Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )
UF00084249_02844 ( sobekcm )

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Volume: 103 No.95









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#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION ©

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BAHAMAS EDITION

PRICE — 75¢ |

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IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE

Life. Money. Balance both:




( Const f
Pope rcei ite) ele ty) 4









One extra seat
will be created |
ahead of election

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
and KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter



ONE extra seat will be creat-
ed when the Boundaries Com-
mission report is presented
before the House of Assembly
on Monday.

Four constituencies will be
eliminated - Holy Cross, Dela-
porte, Adelaide, and St Mar-
garet’s. Replacing them will be
the new seats of Clifton, Killar-
ney, Sea Breeze, St Anne’s, and
Golden Isles, informed sources
have revealed.

The Family Island con-
stituencies will effectively
remain unchanged.

Delaporte will be divided into
two constituencies ~ Killarney
and Clifton — in order to “save”
the seat of incumbent MP
Neville Wisdom and win the
PLP an additional seat, it was
claimed yesterday.

According to other sources,
the Sports, Youth and Housing
Minister will run for the con-
stituency of Clifton — an area
further, west which includes sev-
eral subdivisions.

Former CDR member Fayne
Thompson is said to be the
front-runner for the con-
stituency of Killarney, which
will include the Cable Beach
area, ,

St Margaret’s will be divided
into two, with a portion going to

Montagu, and some to the new .

constituency of St Anne’s.

Mr Thompson was rumoured
to have been the PLP’s choice
for South Beach, however, it is

claimed that Wallace Rolle has
been given the nomination for
that constituency.

Despite reports that Mr
Thompson has been chosen as
the candidate for Killarney,
there is also speculation that the
people of the area may prefer
Mr Wisdom’s campaign man-
ager Randy Rolle —- a younger

candidate who has been seen ~

knocking on residents’ doors
with Mr Wisdom.

Works Minister Bradley
Roberts, who represented the
government on the Boundaries
Commission, remained tight-
lipped yesterday only saying
that there is “some good news
and some not so good news”,
depending on a person’s point
of view,

“Some people are tied to the
past and they do not want
change, but the movement of
the population dictates that
changes have to be made.

“A lot of work went into this
and the Prime Minister will be
in a position to explain,” he told
The Tribune.

According to informed
sources, the initiative behind
renaming the Holy Cross con-
stituency was, as previously
reported, to force the renomi-
nation for the resulting area for
the incumbent MP Sidney
Stubbs. Mr Stubbs has been at
odds with the Selections Com-

‘mittee, which is reportedly seck-

ing to block him from running
as the PLP candidate for the
area, It is alleged that the new

SEE page 16



















PET LE

[cs s aia et OCCT

el beanie naa

a LEADER o of thie Workers Party Roduey Moncar held a ballot on Bay Street yesterday
to get an idea of where the upcoming general election might be headed.
(Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff)

° The Tribune hit the streets yesterday to feel out the public’s mood as election day
approaches. See SPECIAL REPORT, page seven.

Deputy PM

hits out at

p p : Smith continue to unfold in local
: courts as hearings over the
: guardianship of her daughter
; and the ownership of the Hori-

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

_ DEPUTY Prime Minister Cyn-
thia Pratt said she was insulted :

by the intentional and “nasty”

before the next general election.

During her address on the }
amendments to the Road Act in :
the House of Assembly, Mrs Pratt
launched into an all out attack on }

the daily newspaper.

Mrs Pratt was referring to a }
headline which read, “DPM says :
*, She said that she said } Be none Monbet
that crimes are being committed }
by people that “we know” — }
meaning the general public. An }
apology has since been published :

Police know who commit the
crimes’
by the Guardian,

now is the season of politics,

“embarrass” her,

SEE page 16

Calories .....0.320 :

Total Fate, Og
1310m:

Sodium..



Anna Nicole hearings
take place this week

THE legal wrangles sur-
rounding the late Anna Nicole

zons estate are being heard this
week,
Yesterday, Senior Justice

attempt by The Nassau Guardian Anita Allen met in closed cham-

to demonise her character right : : age
é : the Horizons ownership dispute.

bers with attorneys involved in

Howard K Stern has said that

the million dollar gated man-
sion belonged to Anna Nicole
Smith, South Carolina develop-
er G, Ben Thompson claims he
is the rightful owner of the
estate and did not give the
house to the former late reality
TV star. The hearing over the
ownership dispute was

‘adjourned to Friday at 2.30 pm.

SEE page 15

National Insurance Board
assures public after break-in

Tribune Staff Reporter

THE National Insurance Board confirmed today the break-in at
its Wulff Road complex on March 13, but rushed to assure the
public that there is no need for concern about the confidentiality of

data base.

. : individuals’ personal information stored in the National Insurance
However, Mrs Pratt re.aained }

livid. She said that she knows that i

Yesterday, The Tribune reported that there was a break-in at the

stolen.

Wis tn ! : National Insurance building in which a number of computers were
maintaining that the headline :

error was intentionally done to :

An anonymous source claimed that the computers contained

SEE page 15

CAPS.

9
Dietary Piber...09
Pro

: national insurance numbers, business information and residential

Bahamians working at
Chub Cay claim island
run like ‘slave camp’



ll MARCOS ARMBRISTER

BAHAMIANS working on a
resort project at Chub Cay claim
the island is being run like a
“slave camp” with no regard for
labour laws.

They say the Cuban construc-
tion boss, Mario Espino — who
claims to be a close friend of
Prime Minister Perry Christie —
seems to see himself as a Castro-
style dictator who sacks workers
so often he is known as “The Ter-
minator.”

Irate tradesmen who have been
fired from the project told The
Tribune yesterday of Mr Espino’s
alleged contempt towards his
employees and seething discon-
tent among the workforce.

However, a partner in the firm
has denied the veracity of their
complaints.

One of the men, Marcos Arm-
brister, a 39-year-old father of
four, alleged that employment
practices on the island were in
flagrant defiance of their consti-
tutional rights,

“Mr Espino relies on his high-

SEE page 16

MP calls for
overpasses to
alleviate traffic
problems

@ By BRENT DEAN

OVERPASSES need to be
created in New Providence to aid
in alleviating the traffic problems
on the island, according to Ten-
nyson Wells, the independent MP
for Bamboo Town.

Mr Welis made this declara-
tion yesterday during his contri-
bution to the debate on the act
to amend the Road Traffic Act.

“IT would venture to say, Mr
Speaker, that it doesn’t matter
how long we go, or how much we

put it off, overpasses in New

SEE page 16







AGE 2, THURSDAY, MARCH. 15, 2007

> eae
Anger after Gibson phone expose

THE TRIBUNE



Flurry of calls sparks claim ‘Maybe he was too busy calling Ms Smith to call his own voters’



THE seven phone calls made
in two days by Shane Gibson
to Anna Nicole Smith have
infuriated voters in his Golden
Gates constituency.

For many of them have been
waiting for years for Mr Gib-
son to return their calls on
issues they consider extremely
important.

This was revealed yesterday
by fathers’ rights campaigner
Clever Duncombe, who is chal-
lenging Mr Gibson in the gen-
eral election.

He said many voters are
deeply upset that Mr Gibson,
who was forced to resign his

Cabinet post over the Anna
Nicole issue, appeared to apply
“double standards” in dealing
with rich and poor.

He said scores of voters had
been waiting weeks, months
and sometimes years for Mr
Gibson to return their phone
calls. But he evidently didn’t
consider them important
enough, he added.

Yet, said Mr Duncombe, Mr
Gibson could make seven calls
in two days to Ms Smith, some
of them late at night.

“This Anna Nicole thing con-
tinues to take its toll on Mr Gib-
son,” he added.

LARRY BIRKHEAD will
be declared father of baby Dan-
nielynn and have custody of his
daughter within a month, his
attorney Debra Opri claims.

Paternity tests will take place
and her client will be ruled the

nformation Cards with vital statistics on

“The prime minister needs to
be warned that if he continues
to run this political corpse in
Golden Gates, the whole gov-
ernment will suffer.”

Mr Duncombe said the ex-
minister was now getting so des-
perate that he was staging par-
ties and cook-outs to garner
support.

“This is a last-ditch attempt to
show his party he has support in
the area,” he said. “But the
truth is that his support is dimin-
ishing by the day as more and
more things are revealed about
the Anna Nicole Smith busi-
ness.”

baby’s biological father, Ms
Opri told American television
networks.

Her comments came as the
fight over Anna Nicole
Smith’s daughter Dannielynn
descended into a vicious slang-

Retos will be ne by Magic Photo and

Mr Gibson and the govern-
ment faced more embarrass-
ment this week when Ameri-
can TV networks aired voice-
mail messages left by the then
minister for the cover girl.

In a series of “Shane calling”
messages, Mr Gibson gave times
in a way that suggested he want-
ed to talk to her urgently.

No such urgency was shown
to his own constituents, though
- their messages often fell on
deaf ears, said Mr Duncombe.

“Maybe he was too busy call-
ing Ms Smith to call his own
voters,” he added.

Pleas RaeelEG in Golden

ing match between attorneys.

Ms Opri lambasted fellow
lawyers Ron Rale and James
Neavitt for what she called
“egregious” conduct in trying
to drive a wedge between her
and her client.

And she decried their
attempts to reach a “settle-
ment” with Birkhead by saying:
“The baby is not for sale.”

Ms Opri warned Howard K
Stern to “put up or shut up”
and take the DNA test ordered
by a Californian court, claim-
ing he could no longer hide
behind a “fake” birth certifi-
cate.

“Stern’s feet will be held to

Gates had shown that “things are
not looking good for the minis-
ter”, said Mr Duncombe, who is
running as an independent.

“He is getting weaker, and
weaker and losing support as
more and more revelations are
made about this situation,” -

He said Mr Gibson's sudden
burst of party-giving was a mea-
sure of his desperation.

“However, my campaign will
be different - I’ll be discussing
the issues,” said Mr Duncombe.

“I keep hearing people say
Golden Gates is a stronghold
for Mr Gibson, but I can’t real-
ly see it,” he added.

TODPD PP eR Pann enaeyemenenen aan ey

the fire,” she said, “Within a

hl Istered will b
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his daughter. He is already
preparine a nursery for her.”

e said Stern’s real mission
was to secure rights over Anna
Nicole Smith’s image and like-
ness for years to come.

However; Stern’s Florida
attorney Krista Barth said her
client was looking to resolve the
DNA issue without court inter-
vention,

Meanwhile, another lawyer
warned that the Bahamas could
suffer economic fall-out if local
courts did not resolve the issue















@ LARRY Birkhead with
Anna Nicole Smith

satisfactorily.

Pam Bondi said Americans
could put pressure on the
Bahamas by choosing to vaca-
tion elsewhere unless the pater-
nity issue was decided, '











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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 3





O In brief — Former

Campaigner
calls for
march on
the House

FATHERS’ rights campaign-
ers are expected to join a Rasta-
farian march from Arawak Cay
to the House of Assembly next
week.

Clever Duncombe is encour-
aging all inner city people — and
those who feel they have suf-
fered injustice — to join the
demonstration.

The Rastafarians are calling
on the government to end dis-
crimination against their mem-
bers, and marched on parlia-
ment last week.

Discussion
on Haitian
immigration
at college

THE College of the Bahamas
School of Social Studies has
announced that it will hold a
panel discussion entitled “Per-
spective on the impact of Hait-
ian migration to the Bahamas.”

The discussion will be held
on Wednesday, March 21, at
7pm in the! foyer on the ground
floor of the Portia Smith Stu-
dent Services Centre on Poin-
ciana Drive.

Panélists for the discussion
will $nclude: |<) —

‘@Earl Deveaux, former cab-
inet minister and marketing
director of Lucayan Tropical.

¢ Dr Eyelyn McCollin, .asso-
ciate professor of history at
COB.

e Dr Thaddeus McDonald,
dean of the faculty of social and
educational studies at COB.

e Eliezer Regnier . :
attorney.

e Dr Keith Tinker, director
of the National Museum of the
Bahamas.

Admission is free, however

COB says’it will gladly accept’

donations.

Gang leader
in Haiti is
captured
by police

B& HAITI
Port-au-Prince

HAITIAN police have arrest-
ed a fugitive gang leader who
fled into hiding after UN peace-
keepers launched a crackdown
to seize control of the country’s
largest slum, officials said,
according to Associated Press.

Evens Jeunes, a top gang
leader from the violent Cite
Soleil slum, was captured Tues-
day during a raid in the south-
ern coastal town of Les Cayes,
UN police spokesman Fred
Blaise said. Police arrested 11
other suspects, including a
woman believed to be Jeunes’
wife.

Jeunes, also known as Evens
Tikouto, is wanted for ordering
or carrying out a string of
killings and kidnappings that
engulfed the impoverished
Caribbean nation after a bloody
2004 revolt toppled former pres-
ident Jean-Bertrand Aristide.

, Residents in Les Cayes alert-
ed police after seeing a man
resembling Jeunes, who went
into hiding last month after hun-
dreds of UN troops raided Cite
Soleil, a seaside shantytown of
300,000 people. No weapons
were recovered in the arrest.

“The good news is that peo-
ple are turning in the gang lead-
ers now,” Blaise said.

Jeunes was flown to Port-au-
Prince aboard a UN plane but
will remain in Haitian custody,
Blaise said.

The 8,800-strong UN force
seized control of Cite Soleil for
the first time on February 28
but failed to catch any of the
top gang leaders, several whom
fled into rural areas.

On Monday, UN peacekeep-
ers arrested 31 gang suspects
and freed two kidnapping vic-
tims in Cite Soleil.

ae
EXTERMINATORS.

a PEST PROBLEMS



RG warns Bahamas is

racing toward a ‘failed state’

THE Bahamas is in danger
of becoming a failed state, a
lawyer claimed yesterday.

Chicanery and corruption in
the court system was under-
mining the foundation of soci-
ety, said former registrar gen-
eral Elizabeth Thompson.

“As a practitioner, I am very
disillusioned,” she told The Tri-
bune. “In the current environ-
ment, who has the will to over-
haul the system?”

Her comments came as dis-
quiet deepened over the courts
and people’s inability to get
justice.

She echoed remarks by two-

more lawyers, Maurice Glin-
ton and Damien Gomez, wha
first raised the “failed state”
spectre on radio talk shows.

“Mr Glinton said we are
limping towards a failed state,
Mr Gomez said we are rac-
ing towards it. | feel that rac-
ing towards a failed state is
the right term. It is a sad soci-
ety.”

Lawyers have begun speak-
ing out on the shortcomings of
the courts in the wake of a
series of INSIGHT articles in
The Tribune.

These have focused on
instances of injustice and called

@ ELIZABETH Thompson

for an independent inquiry into
the judicial process.

Last week, the tragic story
of Daniel Williams, a man
still fighting to get justice



Corruption in court system undermining the
foundation of society, says Elizabeth Thompson



after 17 years, touched many
people’s hearts and high-
lighted the inadequacies of
the system.

Injustice

Next Monday, INSIGHT
will again highlight a case of
injustice, with a call for imme-
diate action.

Ms Thompson said: “We
have a corrupt society and I
have four children who are
now asking questions about
what they see going on around
them.

“Unless something is done, I
think we are going to be in seri-
ous trouble. We may have a
mass exodus out of here by
those who can afford to go.

“The court system is the
basis of our lifestyle, but we
are now in a race towards the
breakdown of our institutions.
People are being killed. We are
in a state of mayhem.”

Hotels lose hundreds
after raids by gunman

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

Two hotels — El Greco and
the Towne Hotel - were
robbed of hundreds of dol-
lars in cash early Wednesday
morning by a man who
threatened staff.with a gun.

In both cases, a short, dark,
man wearing a striped shirt
and dark trousers entered the
building under the pretense
‘of being a customer, police
said.

As he approached the
counter, he pulled out a gun
and demanded cash.

He struck first at the
Towne Hotel shortly after
12am on Wednesday morn-
ing, and then later, at around
2am at El Greco on West
Bay street.

Harry Pikramenos, the son
of the owner of El Greco,
said his staff did not suspect
the “clean cut” man, who at
first pretended that he was
looking to rent a room.

He estimated that the rob-
ber — who put a gun to the
head of one of the two hotel
clerks — may have stolen
around $700 from the hotel
cash register.

“He surprised the front
desk clerk. We lock the doors
after 10.30pm,” he said,
adding that the company
were already reviewing their
security practices in light of
the confrontation.




We Won't Undersold!

ie gee ORM LD eMC sd

"He was almost as scared as
the front desk clerk was, but
that's when it's scary — if they're
scared, they'll pull the trigger,"
said Mr Pikramenos, who added
that the whole incident was over
"pretty quickly."

At the Towne Hotel, the man

reportedly also robbed, seyeral :

patrons who were present*at the

time, before escaping on foot.
At El Greco, he robbed an

employee of an undisclosed




































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amount of personal cash and
jewellery before leaving, said

police press liaison officer Wal- -

ter Evans yesterday, although
Mr Pikramenos could not con-

’ firm this.

Last year, another hotel on
the western esplanade — an

extremely popular area at this:

time of year among Spring
Break visitors — was repeatedly
targeted by robbers.










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Last week, Freeport attorney
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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398



Bahamian women remember history

IN LAUNCHING his re-election campaign
in Fox Hill Tuesday night, Foreign Affairs Min-
ister Fred Mitchell gave residents a history les-
son. It was very important for them to know
their history, he said, because if they didn’t, they
put themselves “in danger of repeating it.”

He urged the women of Fox Hill — the vil-
lage settled in the nineteenth century by freed
African slaves — not to be complacent about
their voting rights. He reminded them that they
had only received those rights “within the life-
time of your grandmothers and some of your
teachers here today.”

Since Mr Mitchell wants Bahamians to know
their history, we do not think he should gloss
over the politics, and the part that his party
played during the passing of the Bill that gave
-women the same rights as men to register and
vote at an election. Bahamian women went to
the polls for the first time on Monday, Novem-
ber 27, 1962.

The struggle was long and hard for the small
group of women who spearheaded this fight,
and the handful of men who supported them.

On the verge of victory, Dr Doris Johnson,
who was at university, returned home. In 1958
Dr Johnson joined the Women’s Suffrage Move-
ment, which was headed by Mrs Mary Ingra-
ham. Without question, Dr Johnson was better
educated than the pioneers and as a result felt
that she should lead the movement.

As she manoeuvred her way to the top in her
bid to replace Mrs Ingraham, internal conflict
erupted.

In 1975 a ZNS broadcast, giving credit to Dr
Johnson and the PLP for winning the vote for
women, prompted Mrs Mary Ingraham to write
a letter to The Tribune to set the record straight.

Mrs Ingraham said she sent the women’s
petition for the right to vote, containing 9,500 sig-
natures, to Independent MP Gerald Cash (later
Sir Gerald), which he presented to the House
with notice that it be read at the next meeting.

It was that week, wrote Mrs Ingraham, that
Dr Johnson arrived from university, and was
taken to the women’s meeting where the activ-
ities that were to be held before the petition
was to be presented for first reading were to be
discussed.

“Dr Johnson suggested that we allow her to
address the assembly before the petition was
read,” Mrs Ingraham wrote. “It was a rough
morning in the House. Sir Milo Butler objected
to the motion by Mr Roy Solomon to spend
£9,000 to entertain Prince Philip, therefore, when
it was time for Dr Johnson to make her address,
Mr Roy Solomon objected to the ladies being
allowed to address the Assembly.

“Sir Roland Symonette, then being Premier,
went over to the Magistrate’s Court and got the
Magistrate to vacate the courtroom, and brought

the members of the House over to the Magis-
trate’s court to listen to the address of the ladies.

“Ladies and gentlemen,” continued Mrs
Ingraham in her letter to The Tribune, “this is
the only part that Dr Johnson played in the vote
for women. And when the motion came for the
vote in the House of Assembly not one member
of the PLP government, including the Prime
Minister (Sir Lynden Pindling), voted for the
women to vote. Instead, every member walked
out.

“Therefore,” she asked, “how can Women’s
Week be celebrated by this government (the
PLP)?”

What is interesting is that the women who
went to the polls for the first time in 1962 helped
defeat the PLP. They returned a UBP govern-
ment.

History, Mr Mitchell, can only be appreciat-
ed if the whole story is objectively told — which
it never is when a politician tries to twist it to his
own advantage.

And even more recently, Bahamian women
were short changed by the PLP.

In a rush to complete his election promises,
former prime minister Hubert Ingraham tried to
push through a referendum to grant citizenship
to the foreign spouses of Bahamian women. It
was pointed out that if this amendment were
passed the Bahamas would be in full compli-
ance with the UN Convention for the elimina-
tion of all forms of discrimination against
women.

This amendment was one of five on which
Bahamians were asked to vote. All five amend-
ments passed both House and Senate. However,
when it was put to the people, Prime Minister
Perry Christie changed his mind and led the
fight to defeat the referendum, pleading that
the process was flawed.

Even when the section to which Mr Christie
objected was removed, the amendment still
remained flawed in the eyes of the PLP.

Mr Christie urged Mr Ingraham to cancel
the proposed referendum. “It should be left to
the next government of the Bahamas to do it the
right way,” he said.

As a consequence the referendum, with the
amendment to protect a Bahamian woman’s
family, was defeated.

Since then, Mr Christie has had five full years
“to do it the right way” and remove the dis-
crimination against Bahamian women. Typical of
Mr Christie, that was the last that was heard of
his efforts to put Bahamian women on an equal
footing with their male counterparts.

Yes, Bahamian women, remember your his-
tory.
As Mr Mitchell has said, this memory is
important if you don’t want to run the risk of his-
tory repeating itself.



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Politicians who
value power
over principle

EDITOR, The Tribune

OVER the past several
months, some disgruntled men,
who once wore FNM badges
have “switched” to the PLP.

Since most FNM’s were once
PLP’s there is nothing wrong
with this.

In a democracy, people
should be free to do as they
please within reason.

However, what becomes evi-
dent with most of these persons
— such as Ashley Cargill, Ten-
nyson, Pierre Dupuch, Alger-
non Allen or Wallace Rolle and
others is that they simply could
not have their own way, thus
their departure. Not because of
a worthy cause, just, in my opin-
ion, personal ambitions unful-
filled.

Further we hear of persons
who could not get the FNM

‘nomination to run, now switch-

ing to PLP.
These persons who have no
personal mooring are a clear

The true

EDITOR, The Tribune

THE writer of the article
which claimed, several months
ago, that Bahamians are the sec-
ond happiest people on this
earth — the happiest being the
Danes — must have been work-
ing on outdated statistics; or suf-
fering from the delusion that
prosperity automatically brings
happiness. They could not have
known that prosperity is not
eyen general in The Bahamas.

Some while ago I heard
someone say that you can tell
the quality of a people’s civili-
sation by the way they treat ani-
mals, children, and the elderly.
I believe that even our un-gen-
eral prosperity shows little proof
of our civilisation.

Democracy itself is becoming
a laugh, here. In certain osten-
sibly ‘less’ happy countries, indi-
viduals would risk their lives for
the right to vote. It’s not uncom-






LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net

and present danger to the
growth and well being of our
Bahamas and should be exiled
to the political grave yard.

These types have no political
allegiance, they have no set
principles. Their only ambition
is to get in the house called Par-
liament.

“If you want to see what a man
will do with Power take note to
see what he does to get it.”

Obviously if a man could
fight for a cause “all his life”
and having been denied a posi-
tion, to suddenly be embraced
by the party against which he
fought, shows exactly where his
heart has been all along. He is
not committed to a cause but
selfish ambition gone awry.

There is obviously something
sweet in that place Parliament

mon in this country to gain the
promise of a vote by dispens-
ing T-shirts. Furthermore, many
people act as though freedom
is a right. Because they’re free
they can do whatever - or
notever — they please, in their
own time, and who don’t like it
can lump it! They’re free to
throw garbage around where
they live, into other people’s
yards, the parks, the beaches
and the roads. After all, dispos-
ing of trash is the garbage col-
lector’s job! Democracy with-

out pride and responsibility is like |
ee _ “Allen and ministers of the |
“Gospel who walk.out of their

a laugh.

We're also forgetting our.

cooking culture. When I was
growing up they fed us peas and
rice, with the rice coloured the
greyish-brown of the water in
which the peas had boiled. We
never thought of counting the
number of peas on our plates
because we would have had to
be counting all day. Now it’s



— where men and women will
lower their personal principles
just to get on the inside.

All those who switch just for
convenience sake should be
rejected by sensible voters.

Ever since women were
granted the right to vote I have
cast my ballot according to my
conscience. In the last forty
years | have voted for both
major parties. I cast my ballot in
the interest of my seven chil-
dren. I invite Bahamians to do
the same.

The history of our nation will
be determined by the men and
women who are willing to put
self above personal gain.

Some men will use any name;
raise any flag and engage in any
cause to get in “that house” and
we must deny them their mis-
placed ambition, which in the
end will be better for all.

JUST A READY VOTER
Nassau
March 2007

face of ‘prosperity’

‘rice and peas’ — with the num-
ber of peas being no more than
the fingers on one hand. No
wonder we’re getting fat.
Nowadays the news of the lat-
est murder by stabbing, blud-
geoning, gunshot or whatever
is getting to be considered ‘nor-
mal’; no matter that the blud-
geoning was of a toddler, and
at the other end of the gunshot
a shepherd of God’s flock fell.
We are becoming used to crime.
That, I think, is the greatest
danger. Thank God for persons
like Darold Miller, Dr, David |

fine or not-so-fine churches into
the wilds of our living areas to
show the good news. Thank
you.

TELCINE
TURNER ROLLE
Nassau

March 1 2007

A plea from Ragged Island

EDITOR, The Tribune

Please publish this open letter
to:

Hon Perry G Christie, MP

Prime Minister.

Dear Sir,

I hereby write this letter on
behalf of the Ragged Island
community. Mr Prime Minister


















we are tired of suffering. I often
wonder if we are counted as one
of the islands of the Bahamas.
We need our channel, sir, it is
ridiculous to see how we have
to be transported from out to
sea to the main land via dinghy
boats. God help us if the weath-
er is bad because you would be
soaked from head to toe.

For the pass 25 years we have
been neglected by both govern-
ing parties, it is not just your
government but the previous
government also that have
made the same promises to us
but have not kept them.

We can’t go home cause it’s
a two-day trip by boat and our
island is the only island in the
Bahamas that Bahamasair
does not fly to. It costs too
much to charter a plane so we






Guess wne ()

HAPPY BIRT HDAY

From your sons, Carl&
Dante; nieces, Kai & ©)

are stuck with no airport and
no channel. We need assis-
tance now more than ever, it is
hard on our people because
when there is an emergency
and you need to come to Nas-
sau it cost more than $11,000
to charter a plane.

We have been neglected for
far too long and we are tired
of going unnoticed, stop
neglecting us we are Bahamian
too. We might be few in num-
bers and maybe that is why our
voices are not being heard, but
we need assistance now. This
is the 21st century — treat us
fairly.

AMANDA CURLING

A concerned Ragged Islander
Nassau

February 2007

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 5



© In brief

Man is
charged with
men’s store
break-in

FREEPORT - Jamaal
Williams, a resident of
Freeport, was charged in the
Magistrate’s Court this week
in connection with the week-
end break-in at Esquires
Men’s Store.

Williams, 24, of No 118
Oleander Street, appeared in
Court Two where he was
charged with shopbreaking
with intent to steal and steal-
ing $150 from the establish-
ment on March 10.

He was also charged with
intentionally causing $400
worth of damage to the secu-
rity monitoring device.

Williams pleaded not guilty
to the charges and was
remanded in custody to June
18 for trial.



of things we
think, say or do

1. ls it the TRUTH?

2.Is it FAIR to all
concerned?

3. Will it build
GOODWILL and
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www.rotary.org



Amended driving under the
influence laws are passed

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

PERSONS driving or
attempting to operate a vehicle
under the influence of alcohol

or illegal drugs will be commit-

ting a offence according to the
new amended road traffic laws
passed yesterday in the House
of Assembly, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

With almost 400 traffic fatal-
ities recorded in the Bahamas in
the past seven years, Transport
and Aviation Minister Glenys
Hanna-Martin yesterday in par-
liament moved to have new leg-
islation enacted with the aim of
improving road traffic laws in
accordance with the country’s
needs.

Giving her contribution to the
second reading of the Act to
Amend the Road Traffic Act,
Mrs Hanna-Martin said that this
new piece of legislation will
serve to implement the manda-
tory use of seat belts and will
make driving under the influ-
ence of alcohol or illegal drugs
an offence.

She explained that the
amended act will correct flaws
which were part of the legisla-
tion when it was passed in 2002
under the former government.

The amended act, she said,
introduces the use of the
breathalyser test by police, cor-
rects measurement errors which
allow for improper calibration
of urine samples and includes
provisions for the testing blood
samples of persons that are sus-
pected of driving under the
influence.

The minister said that the
implementation of provisions
for both the mandatory use of
seatbelts and the use of the



@ GLENYS Hanna-Martin

breathalyser were suspended in
2002 for a period of six months
for the purpose of educating the
public on the use of such
devices.

“I do not believe this process
was ever begun in earnest,” she
admitted.

Mrs Hanna-Martin said that -

there were some serious con-
cerns expressed by Bahamians
about aspects of the original act,
including the “inordinately
high” fines and the fact that the
taxi cab industry was not con-
sulted about what they termed
the “impractical standards”
which were put into place.

The minister explained that
under the new act, drivers who

BVM hila name



fail to wear seat belts, who do
not secure their children prop-
erly, who drive under the influ-
ence of alcohol or illegal drugs,
will face lower fines and new
penalties such as community
service and licence suspension.

The amendments proposed
in the new legislation are as fol-
lows:

e The criteria for the use of
child restraints in vehicles is
being changed from an age cri-
teria to a weight and height cri-
teria in keeping with the rec-
ommendations of the Ameri-
can Association of Pediatri-
cians.

e The age of children who
will be permitted to sit in the

front seat has been increased

from five years to eight years.

e The existing fines are being
reduced and will be more in line
with the fines in other jurisdic-
tions. Adjudicating magistrates
will also be given discretion in
the levelling of such fines.

e Alternate-penalties are
being introduced including the
imposition of community ser-
vice and the suspension of dri-
ver’s licences.

¢ Exemptions to seatbelt use

\
and child restraint devices have
been extended to golf carts and
taxis, except for front seat pas-
senger.

e Persons who for medical
reasons cannot wear a seatbelt
will also be exempt.

e For the first time ever a pro-
vision has also been added
requiring persons riding in the
back of trucks to be seated on
bed of the truck and not on the
tailgate or the side of the vehi-
cle.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



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PROSPECTUS
. THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS



BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2026 AND 2027
° ISSUE OF B$50,000, 000.00

LOCAL NEWS



PLP accused of trying
to evade real issues

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Progressive Liberal Par-
ty is making a desperate
attempt to “distract the people’s
attention from the real issues”
the FNM claimed.

In a statement posted on the
party’s website yesterday, the
FNM took exception to a polit-
ical radio advertisement aimed
at its leader, Hubert Ingraham.

“A radio advertisement by
the ruling party seeks to blame
FNM Leader Hubert Ingraham
for the misfortune that befell

the late Sir Lynden Pindling
towards the end of his political,

career, just as they are trying to
blame the FNM for the sleaze
they have created for them-
selves today.

“To set the record straight for
young Bahamians who might
not be aware of what happened
back in the 1980s, it was Sir
Lynden himself, not the FNM,
who set up the Commission of
Inquiry that exposed him and
his government in a devastat-
ing report in 1984.

Issued under The Bahamas Registered Stock Act, and poe by Resolutions of the House of
Assembly, 21st June, 2006.

Applications will be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 16th March, 2007 and
will close at 3:00pm on 26th March, 2007. Allocations will commence at 9:30 a.m. on 27th March, 2007 and
will cease at 3:00p.m. on 28th March, 2007.

If the total subscriptions exceed the sum of B$50,000,000.00 (Nominal) partial allotment will be made to
subscribers, and a proportionate refund will be made as soon as possible after allotment. No interest will be
paid on amounts so refunded.

: The date of this Prospectus is 15th March, 2007

The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas invites applications for Bahamas Registered
Stock totalling B$50,000,000.00. The Stock will be available in a range of maturity dates; the earliest being
repayable in 2026 and the latest in 2027. The total amount of Stock offered, the rate of interest and the issue
Price are given below :-

; Issue

Rate Of Interest Amount Price
BS BS

9/32% Above Prime Rate Bahamas Registered Stock 2626 25,000,000.00 100.00

5/16% Above Prime Rate Bahamas Registered Stock 2027 25,000,000.00 100.00



50,000,000.00

The Stock shall be repaid on 28th March, in the year appearing in the name of the Stock.

INTEREST

The Stock will bear interest from 28th March, 2007, at the rate shown against the name of the Stock as the



“That report confirmed what
the international press had been
saying about the Bahamas in
the latter part of Sir Lynden’s
administration including a
description of the Bahamas as a
‘nation for sale’.

“Indeed, the Colombian drug
lords had infiltrated and cor-
rupted the country from top to
bottom and the commission
found that this corruption
reached right into Sir Lynden’s
Cabinet.

“It also found that Sir Lyn-
den himself had spent eight
times his salary and had bank
deposits for which he could not
satisfactorily account. In a
minority report, Bishop Drexel
Gomez concluded that he could
not say that payments made to
Sir Lynden’s bank account were
all non-drug related,” the
release read.

Bishop Gomez is quoted stat-
ing: “Some could have been,
but however that may be, it cer-
tainly cannot be contested that
the prime minister did not exer-
cise sufficient care to preclude
the possibility of drug-related



@ SIR Lynden Pindling

funds reaching his bank account
or being applied for his benefit.”

The Commission of Inquiry
in 1984, the FNM said, painted
a “sorry state of affairs” of
Colombian drug dealers flying
their flag in the Bahamas and
having their own way.

“It was during this period that
gangster executions came to the
Bahamas for the first time and
that the whole structure of our
society was badly damaged, per-
haps irreparably. It was at that
time that Hubert Ingraham and
Perry Christie parted company
with the PLP. And the rest, as
they say, is history.

“Still, FNM Prime Minister

Hubert Ingraham, with great
generosity of spirit, afforded Sir
Lynden every courtesy before
he departed this life, put his face
on our dollar bill and on a
postage stamp, and when he
died gave him a send-off befit-
ting a national hero in recogni-
tion of his earlier services to the
nation,” the statement read.

“But the real issues facing us
today are the long list of sleaze
and scandals,” the party said,
“the unbelievable incompetence
of the PLP government and
their determination to give
away of as much of our land to
foreigners as they can before
leaving office. “

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

BAHAMA

S REGISTERED STOCK 2026 AND 2027

SR NEE EO EUMEK 2020 AND 2027

The Registrar

FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY
APPLICATION No



ALLOTMENT No.



DATE:





c/o The Central Bank of The Bahamas

P. O. Box N-4868
Nassau, Bahamas

Sir:

I/We hereby apply for the following amount of Bahamas Registered Stock:

9/32% Above Prime Rate
5/16% Above Prime Rate

Insert below the amount applied for

in Units of B$100 a

and undertake to accept any less amount which may be allotted to me/us.

VWe enclose B$

In the event of the full amount of Stock(s) apoliea for above is/are not allotted to

Bahamas Registered Stock 2026
Bahamas Registered Stock 7027

in payment for the Stock applied for. ©

BS )
B$ T

percent per annum over the Prime Rate (i.e. the prime commercial interest rate from time to time fixed by the
Clearing banks carrying on business in the Island of New Providence in The Bahamas. If there shall be any
difference between them, then that which is fixed by Royal Bank of Canada). Interest shall be payable half-
yearly commencing on 28th September, 2007 and thereafter on 28th March and 28th September in every year
until the Stock is repaid.

CHARGE UPON CONSOLIDATED FUND



The principal monies and interest represented by the Stock are charged upon and payable out of the
Consolidated Fund and assets of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

SUPPLEMENTARY PROVISIONS

The Stock will be issued by the Registrar (The Central Bank of The Bahamas).
Applications will be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 16th
March, 2007 and will close at 3:00 pm on 26th March, 2007. Allocations will commence
at 9:30 a.m. on 27th March, 2007 and will cease at 3:00p.m. on 28th March, 2007. All
envelopes enclosing applications should be labelled “Application For Bah mas
Government Registered Stocks”.

Issue of Stock

Units "The Stock will be in units of B$100.00.

Applications Applications must be for B$100.00 or a multiple of that sum.

Application Forms Applications for the Stock should be made to the Registrar on the form attached to the
Prospectus and may be obtained from the Registrar offices in Nassau and Freeport, The
Treasury Department (Marlborough Street & Navy Lion Road, Nassau) or any of the
following banks:

Bank of The Bahamas International

First Caribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited

Commonwealth Bank Limited

Royal Bank Of Canada

Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited (formally British American Bank(1993)
Limited)

Citibank, N.A.

Salers eC ae

be

PUBLIC DEBT

Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts as at December 31, 2006 show the Public Debt of The
Bahamas to be B$2,880,739,000.*

GOVERNMENT REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE

The following information is extracted from the unaudited accounts of the Government of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

FY2005/2006p** FY2005/2006p** FY2006/2007p**
BS BS B$
Approved Budget Approved Budget
Revehue 1,221,454,000 1,132,774,000 1,338,971,000
Recurrent Expenditure (excluding
Repayment of Public Debt) 1,149,582,000 1,145,691,000 1,269,560,000
Capital Development
Expenditure (excluding loans
contributions and advances
to public corporations) 123,454,000 132,901,000 , 162,356,000

** Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts.
* — The Public Debt amount is inclusive of The Public Corporations contingent liability which as at
December 31, 2006 totalled B$499,067,000.

me/us, I/we request that the sum ask) to me/us be applied for the following Stock: 4
1
% Bahamas Registered Stock BS
% Bahamas Registered Stock BS :
% Bahamas Registered Stock BS i
% Bahamas Registered Stock BS
% Bahamas Registered Stock BS
% Bahamas Registered Stock BS

PAYMENTS CAN BE MADE VIA RTGS SYSTEM THROUGH ALL COMMERCIAL BANKS
EXCEPT FINCO, BY BANK DRAFTS PAYABLE TO THE CENTRAL BANK OF THE BAHAMAS
AND BY CASH.

1. (One Person)
Ordinary Signature

















’
r
Name in Full (BLOCK LETTERS, state whether Mr., Mrs., or Miss and titles if any.) :
°
x
]
Address (Corporations etc. should give Registered Addresses ) 2
a
P. O. Box

ft
‘
.
»
Telephone Nos._(H) (W) 4
; ; H
‘
2. (Where two or more persons apply as joint subscribers, the additional names and addresses should b
be given below.) :
4
Ordinary Signatures ‘
k
A
Names in Full te ‘
’
’
And/OR ’
:
5

Address As .



Telephone Nos.(H) CW) AS eee

I/We hereby request semi annual interest to be paid to:

Bank Name.



Bank Branch



Account Number



ND a sere neo, a. 0 ae ee



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 7







The electorate
and their views

m@ TAMARA FERGUSON

ACCOMPLISHMENTS
OF THE PLP

Samantha Johnson, a sales
clerk, said that on a scale of 1 to
10, she would rate the govern-
ment’s performance as a “10”.
The Fort Charlotte constituent
said the government has built
homes, fixed roads and estab-
lished parks. “They have also
provided many jobs,” she said.

Baillou Hill constituent Nor-
ma Williams said that the gov-
ernment must consider the
views of the public. "Bahami-
ans need to feel more involved
in what is happening in the
country. The government
should've addressed the issue
of crime. The government
needs to build a strong rela-
tionship with the church and
put God first.”

' She added that the govern-
ment needs to show more con-
cern for poorer communities.

Devardo Roile, a pharmacist,
said that he would grade the
current government as an
“eight”, stating that his repre-
sentative did a good job. “I
must commend the minister for
ensuring that the roads were
improved on Baillou Hill Road
and a new round-about was
installed.”

However sales clerk Saman-
tha Jones of Fort Charlotte said
the government could've done a
much better job and sold too
much land to foreigners. She
said the next government needs
to resolve illegal immigration
and re-examine residency per-
mit approvals.

Elizabeth constituent Ray-
mond Parker said that he is
concerned about the Baha Mar
deal. "I feel that they could've
received more money," he said.

Kara Sawyer of Golden
Gates said she is looking for-
ward to the election because it's
time for a change. However, she
said Shane Gibson did a good
job in the area and as minister
of housing, although he recent-
ly resigned as minister of immi-
gration, which she feels was the
best choice.

Dino Pratt of Farm Road
said the Urban Renewal pro-
ject helped make some signifi-
cant changes in the area. How-
ever, he said that he would like
to see the ideas of the young
taken into account.

Former educator, Theresa
Albury-Johnson said she is
impressed with the National
Health Insurance plan. Howev-
er, the Bain and Grants Town
constituent said the government
has failed to address social issues

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TV 13 SCHEDULE

THURSDAY,
MARCH 15TH

6:30am Community Page 1540AM
11:00 Immediate Response
12:00 ZNS News Update
12:05 Immediate Response
Cont'd
1:00 Legends: Sir. Arthur
Foulkes
1:30 Fast Forward
2:30 — Turning Point
3:00 — Bishop Leroy Emmanuel
3:30 Dr. Jamal Bryant
4:00 The Fun Farm
5:00 ZNS News Update
5:05 Andiamo
5:30 You & Your Money
6:00 This Week In The
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right to



LOCAL NEWS }

AS the general election approaches, Bahamians
state their views on the current administration,
candidates and the future of the country.





SUPER

nursing major Simone Smith
said although the government
had done a good job, her rep-
resentative should have held
meetings to discuss the concerns
of constituents.

Trillo Edgecombe, econom-
ic and finance major from North
Abaco, said that more provi-
sions need to be made for the
youth of Abaco.

He also noted that more and
better police recruits are need-
ed.Mr Edgecombe said he feels
the candidate for his area has
done an outstanding job.

Marketing major Quentin
Bowe, said he does not plan to
vote, because he feels that after
the election, he will no longer
see his candidate. The Fox Hill
constituent also said the park
in his constituency needs to be
safer for children. He expressed
concerns about illegal immigra-
tion and a lack of justice for vic-
tims of crime.

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and fix the education system.
Bain and Grants town con-
stituent Wendel Rolle said his
representative has done a good
job, but stressed the need for
prison reform. Mr Rolle also
expressed concern about the
state of the police force, and
said some Defence Force offi-
cers need to be punished and
taught to uphold standards.
Mount Moriah constituent
Raymond Tucker gave the gov-
ernment a “seven” rating, say-
ing he would like to see a
change in crime and juvenile
delinquency. He also said par-
liamentarians need to be hon-
est, God-fearing individuals.

THE YOUNG VOTERS’
VIEW

Young Bahamians at the Col-
lege of the Bahamas, who say
they plan to have their voices
heard in the upcoming election,
also shared their views.

Banking and finance major
Owenique Gregory said she
feels the FNM candidate for her
area will perform well if given
the chance. The Mount Mori-
ah constituent also said that the
current representative could
have made more improvements
to the area.

Orlando Pinder, a law and
criminal justice major, said
many plans announced by the
government were not carried
out.

Fort Charlotte resident and



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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



World’s largest dolphin facility —

OPEN HOUSE
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FRONT CONDOS

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@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
and ALISON LOWE

THE world's largest man-
made dolphin facility, Atlantis’
Dolphin Cay affords guests the
opportunity to not only inter-
act with marine mammals but
also to learn about the environ-
ment and the importance of
marine conservation.

Dolphin Cay Paradise Island,
which opened on February 26,
is a nearly seven million gallon
state-of-the-art habitat.

This allows each dolphin
250,000 gallons of water — more
than 10 times the amount
required by US regulations,
according to marine specialists
at the Cay.

The 11 acre lagoon contains
three 10 foot-deep coves for
interaction with the mammals.
It houses 20 dolphins in total,
and six are currently pregnant.
Sixteen of the dolphins were
displaced from their previous
home in Gulfport Mississippi,
after being swept to sea during
hurricane Katrina.

“Here at Dolphin Cay we
want it to be a very intimate
experience for guests and for
them to have an up close
experience with the animals,”
said Teri Corbett, vice-presi-
dent of marine mammal oper-
ations on Monday during a
media fun day, where mem-
bers of the press were treated
to a tour of the Dolphin Cay
facility.

Atlantis will soon offer two
dolphin interaction programmes
—a shallow water and a deep
water interaction. Currently,
shallow interactions are avail-
able. These take place in waist-
deep water with one dolphin,
two trainers and seven to 10
guests.

Details of the deep water
interaction are yet to be
unveiled, but are expected to
offer closer contact with the
mammals.

Interactions last 30 minutes.
Ms Corbett said 40 to S50 people
usually interact with the dol-
phins each day, although this is
ultimately dictated by the mood
of the mammals.

Following the interaction,

Atlantic Medical Insurance (AMI), a subsidiary of Colonial Group
International Limited (CGI) headquarters in Bermuda, is seeking a Claims

Processor for our office in Freeport, Bahamas.

CGI, with offices in Bermuda, the Bahamas, the Cayman Islands, and the
British Virgin Islands, offers a complete range of premier financial and in-
surance services to both local and international clients. This is an opportu-
nity to be part of a rapid growing innovative company, focusing on provid-
ing clients with first class service and access to competitive products.

Reporting to the Account Executive/Office Manager as well as the Assistant
Claims Manager, this position.will be responsible for processing medical

claims, including prescription claims.
Applicants should possess the following:

2-5 years experience working in an automated office environment,

preferably with high volume data entry

2-5 years medical claims processing and knowledge of processing both
local and overseas claims (specifically US claims) and an understanding
of various fee schedules applicable to the local marketplace is desirable
A firm understanding of ICD-9 (diagnosis) and CPT coding and medical

terminology is desirable

Superior communication and organizational skills as well as attention to

detail

Ability to work under pressure and mutli-task

Proficiency in MS Word along with superior data entry accuracy

Compensation for the successful candidate will be attractive and linked to
performance. AMI offers an attractive benefits package that includes com-
prehensive medical insurance, contributory pension plan, life and long term

disability coverage.

If you have a keen commitment to quality results and want to contribute
your talents to a dynamic company please submit you application, which
will be treated in the strictest confidence, in writing to:

Atlantic Medical Insurance
P.O.Box SS-5915
Nassau, Bahamas

Closing Date for application is March 28, 2007

guests are encouraged to expe-
rience the Education Centre to
learn more about dolphins and
marine life conservation. “Part
of our goal is to educate people
about the animals, their envi-
ronment, conservation and to
bring them up close so that they
walk away with a true feeling
of the animals,” Ms Corbett
said,

In addition, Atlantis Dolphin
Cay staff will soon begin their
outreach programmes in the
local schools, raising awareness
of dolphins and marine mam-
mals.

Atlantic bottlenose dolphins,
such as the ones h
oused at Dolphin Cay, live nat-
urally in Bahamian waters, said
Ms Corbett.

Behind the scenes at the facil-
ity, things are no less impres-
sive.

The close to seven million
gallons of sea water used in the
habitat is pumped from the sea,
filtered, decontaminated and
then chilled or heated to arrive
at the optimum temperature for
the dolphins.

“We pride ourselves on the
care of the animals and ours is a
state of the art facility,” she
said.

With a brand new laboratory
and hospital, care for Dolphin
Cay’s aquatic residents is only
the beginning. Very soon the
facility will begin accommodat-
ing dolphins or other ocean
mammals that are found sick or
injured along the Bahamian
coastline, as a part of its com-
mitment to marine conserva-
tion.

A quarantine facility forms
part of the compound. “This
facility was designed to start the
first live animals beach strand-
ing network for the Bahamas,”
said Ms Corbett.

“We are going to provide the
infrastructure so that we will set
up a stranding network similar
to what is in the south-east
United States, where people can
call when they see a sick or
injured animal and we can assist
them or give them guidance on
helping them rehabilitate,

release or find. new:-homes for

the animals.”

&



@ THE new stretch of beach to the west of Paradise Island for
use by Atlantis guests



# A VIEW from the top of one of the new slides

Rex Major

& Associates

in coordination
with the
Churches

of Freeport,
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nl

Dr. Leslie Woodside - 242-373-4855 / Leslie Minus - 242-352-4378 / Jeff Hepburn - 242-362-4273





THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS

tops new attractions at Atlantis

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter










% Moments Of Truth

March 2007

If you think Cabbage beach
looks a bit more empty these
days, it's because the visitors
are finding other watery diver-
sions further inland — in the
form of the new 63-acre Aqua-
venture waterpark at Atlantis.

The Tribune was invited to
test the turquoise waters of the
new park on Monday, and can
report that with over 20 million
gallons of water and four exhil-
arating new slides, Atlantis has
truly upped the ante on the
waterpark experience.

The iconic new centrepiece
is the Power Tower, a 120 feet
tall edifice that houses The
Abyss, The Drop, The Falls and
The Surge — all high powered
adrenaline pumping slides that
have proved extremely popular
with guests since the park's Feb-
ruary 26 opening.

Visitors can choose to slide
on their tubes, propelled by
powerful jets of water, or do the
bodyslide in the form of The




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they don't want to get out to

climb the stairs to the top of the
tower, Atlantis has provided WE PUT vr.




@ ATLANTIS guests approach the new facility











something else new and unex- ~ - Accounting

stad rangaice BO AO a
Add to this more rapids, . a

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



reer eR on eo ESS): Siege Ciao eee ea
Donation for Saunders scholarship

‘The Tomlinson
Scholarship

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“s. and family members in memory of Mr Joseph Tomlinson











CAVES VILLAGE

WAHAMAS



TM ASRAL

COLLEGE of the Bahamas
president Janyne Hodder
accepted a substantial dona-
tion from a local to help build
up the Winston Saunders
Scholarship Fund.

The scholarship honours the
late Winston Saunders, play-
wright, cultural icon and long-
time director of the Dundas
Centre for the Performing
Arts — who died unexpectedly
in November 2006.

“A national university has
an obligation to ensure that
contributions to national life
are remembered and celebrat-
ed, said the college in a state-
ment. “The College of the
Bahamas is committed to pre-
serving the memories of the
country’s outstanding men and
women and is doing so ina
variety of ways. One such
method is to fund scholarships
in the names of those persons
the institution honours.”

The donation, in excess of
$11,000, was the direct result
of an exhibition of paintings
by Jerome Miller, which the
artist organised in tribute to
his great friend, Mr Saunders,
and to raise money for the
scholarship fund named for
him.

Auction

Mr Miller’s works were auc-
tioned and proceeds donated
to the scholarship fund. The
artist commented, “This is a
great project to work with and
I hope there will be many
more events to raise funds for
it.”

The scholarship is to be
awarded to a student who will
pursue a COB degree in Eng-
lish, the subject Mr Saunders

taught at St Anne’s School in |

the mid 60s.





i SHOWN (ito r) are: Shawn Sawyer, president and CEO of
Cacique International, who organised the art exhibition; Phyllis
Garraway, whose Yodephy dancers provided entertainment at
the art show; Betty Knowles, administrator of the Dundas Civic
Centre where the exhibition was staged; Dr Gail Saunders,
widow of Winston Saunders; Janyne Hodder, president of the
College of The Bahamas; Lady Pindling; Jerome Miller, the
artist who made the donation; Pauline Glasby, organiser of exhi-
bition.



Tourist office in Atlanta for Black History Month

THE African American
Market of the Bahamas
Tourist Office in Atlanta,
Georgia took part in Home
Depot’s African American
Cultural Heritage Celebration,

‘in observance of the US Black

History Month.

The event takes place each
year for the Home Depot’s
Atlanta-based staff of 5,000
and includes performances,
prizes and a lecture about the
achievements of African
Americans. Each year, the
highlight of the event is a grand
prize trip for a lucky employee.

Over the past few years, the
Bahamas has partnered with
one of four local hotels to
provide the prize.

The winner of this year's
prize won a three day/four
night stay at the Wyndham
Resort Hotel and round trip
tickets for two. The
photograph pictures from left:
actress Jasmine Guy, the
keynote speaker; prize winner
Sandra Owens; Jeannie
Gibson, district manager,
Bahamas Tourist Office;
Gianne Moss, Bahamas
Tourist Office intern.



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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 11



New detox unit to
be commissioned
in Chippingham

THE Bahamas Association
for Social Health has
announced the date for the
grand opening and dedication
of its new detoxification unit —
the Peter N Andrews Commu-
nity Detoxification Unit.

The opening will be held on
Friday, March 16 at the BASH
Exodus Village Facility resi-
dential hall in Chippingham at
2pm.

Peter Andrews, executive
chairman of Bahamas Waste
Management, will be honoured
by BASH in a dedication cere-
mony in recognition of his dis-
tinguished service.

For nearly 15 years, under his
leadership, Bahamas Waste
Management has been a corpo-
rate donor and friend to BASH.

The Peter N Andrews Com
munity Detoxification Unit is
located at BASH Residence
Hall and features safe, com-
fortable, and accessible accom-
modations for up to four clients,
usually at admissions.

The definition of detoxifica-
tion is as follows: “A treatment
for addiction to drugs and alco-
hol intended to rid the body of
the addictive substances, and

the physiological and psycho-
logical readjustment that
accompanies the process.”
Occupying a space of around
160 square feet, the site features
two new wood bunk beds, an



@ PETER Andrews

open chrome closet system, tile
flooring, a brand new céiling
fan, surrounded by soft mint
green walls intended to relax
the body and mind.

Just steps away is Earth Vil-
lage Bahamas, a nature pre-
serve, animal and garden
ecosystem designed to compli-
ment therapy and healing.

BASH aims to provide 24/7
drug treatment and rehabilita-
tion for adult men ages 18 and

up. The organisation has a total
of 32 beds for clients.

BASH is a non-governmental
organisation with an emphasis,
on the development of civil soci-
ety.

A clinical psychologists and
medical attendant, along with
key workers who specialise in
addiction studies provide ser-
vices to the client, including par-
tial medical care and progress
monitoring.





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©2007 CreativeRelations net

_ INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS TO PURCHASE (WITH TELEPHONE
CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS) TO CHERRY MISSICK, THE PLAZA, MACKEY STREET,
OR CALL 242-502-6221 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION. * WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO
REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS.



Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear from people who are
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you are raising funds for a good cause,
campaigning for improvements in the area or
have won an award.

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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

Investment hocus pocus: the PM’s

sleight of hand with the economy

Moxie is entertain-
ing but it is not real.

The key to magic is sleight-of-
hand or misdirection. In
essence, magic is deception.

Prime Minister Perry
Christie’s sometimes $15 billion,
other times $18 billion and yet
other times $20 billion in invest-
ment in The Bahamas is pretty
much a magic trick. It is the
kindof hocus pocus that can be
entertaining but simply is not
real. It is not real in its present
tense or its future tense.

Available
on the
pot

Prices includes: Licensing, Inspection. Plates, Mats

According to the Central
Bank’s Quarterly Statistical
Review, dated February, 2007,
between 2002 and 2006 inward
foreign direct investment in The
Bahamas totalled a little more
than $1.6 billion, of which less
than $1 billion was equity
investment.

Readers can verify the figures
for themselves at www.central-
bankbahamas.com in the statis-
tics section. The sum of $1.6 bil-
lion is a far cry from $15 billion
or $18 billion or $20 billion.
Much of the $1 billion in equity

investment came from Kerzn-
er International’s Phase III, a
project scheduled long before
Mr Christie came to office.

Notwithstanding the fact that
the Central Bank of The
Bahamas only records some
$1.6 billion in investment over
the last five years, Mr Christie
and his crew continue to speak
as if billions and billions of dol-
lars in investments have come
into The Bahamas under their
tenure.

This is nothing more than
hocus pocus. It is a myth, a

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sleight-of-hand, misdirection.
Even when you view the gov-
ernment’s investment promo-
tion website one observes artis-
tic renderings of these proposed
investments as if they were actu-
ally taking place. Once again,
this is hocus pocus, a magician’s
trick.

A government should
not mislead the pub-

lic. It should not mislead the
international community. A
government should be upfront.
Our nation is not a comedy and
our leaders should not be magi-
cians. Entertainment should be
left for entertainers. Leaders
must speak to the facts and act
with truth.

The fact is that Mr Christie
and his crew have approved a
number of investment proposals
by international persons. Few
of those investments are now
in the ground or going in the
ground; that is why the Central
Bank’s investment figures do
not reflect the mega numbers
that the government puts out.

What is the total value of
those investments according to
the standard means of measur-
ing investment proposals? We
don’t know. Mr Christie has put
out huge numbers that really
one has no means of verifying.
It might be easier to analyse the
proposed investments if the
government was upfront with
disclosing all of the details; how-
ever, no such thing is the case.

Not only are the full details of
heads of agreements signed not
available to the public, some of
those agreements have secret
clauses.

It seems that the only real
interest that the government has
is in putting out a big number in

ORR

we wet

VAL ence ©)



LA
hopes of impressing the public.
Is it working? We will have to
see. This much is true, people
may be impressed with a magi-
cian but they will not count on
him to pay their bills.

N G

THE THINGS YOU
CAN’T SEE

I is surprising that Mr
Christie and his adminis-
tration is placing so much
emphasis on foreign investment



Our nation is
not a comedy
and our leaders
should not be
magicians. —
Entertainment
should be left
for entertainers.
Leaders must
speak to the
facts and act
with truth.



in their bid to win re-election
given their claim while in oppo-
sition that the economy wasn’t
everything and that the Ingra-
ham administration had placed
too much emphasis on foreign
investment.

Now they. gladly compare...

their record of putting foreign=

awd, oS » i Sr) Gy, Ae
Apr it a tee” Wie










ee

THE TRIBUNE

ers ahead of Bahamians with
that of others. “Ingraham only
approved a mere $4 billion in
foreign investment in ten years
compared to our $20 billion in
five,” they say.

Minister Gibson noted that
her government has sold more
land to foreigners in their five
years than the Ingraham admin-
istration did, yet Ingraham was
accused of selling the country
out. I guess the young man was
right who said, “I guess Christie
sellin’ da country more out! “
What a difference a day makes!

What is not surprising about
Mr Christie’s $20 billion invest~
ment boast is the fact that it has
no real evidence to support it.
Go to all those islands, cays,
nooks and crannies where these
investments are supposed to be
happening and see how many
of them have visible and tangi-
ble displays of these so-called
anchor projects; not many will
and those that do were likely
created before this current goy-
ernment.

Again, however, it is not sur-
prising that PM Christie brags
about this illusory $20 billion
investment windfall. Remem-
ber, one of those investors said:
“What is most beautiful are the
things you can’t see”.

If this is so, it only makes

sense for Mr Christie to contin-
ue boasting about $20 billion in
investments that we can’t see
because this is the most beauti-
ful thing. If this $20 billion ever
actually materialises, it will not
be as beautiful as it is now that
we cannot see it. Confusing?
Perhaps! But that is magic for
ya!

THOUGHT FOR
THE WEEK

66 he magician and
the politician have

much in common: they both
have to draw our attention away
from what they are really
doing.” —- Ben Okri

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 13
poy VR ae



Claim that Larry Cartwright partially
financed by PLP in last general election

Potential candidate for P

Long Island Anthony
Knowles speaks out

m@ By BRENT DEAN

LARRY CART-
WRIGHT was partially
financed by the PLP in the
last general election
according to Anthony
Knowles, a potential can-
didate for the Long Island
constituency in the upcom-
ing election.

Mr Knowles made these
statements yesterday in a
press release, in which he
sought to clarify issues sur-
rounding his potential can-
didacy.

“It is true that I have
been considering the pos-
sibility of running as an
independent candidate for
the Long Island and
Ragged Island constituen-
cy. What is absolutely not
true is that my campaign
would be financed by the
PLP, as was that of the cur-
rent MP back in 2002. As
a Bahamian I have the
right to run as does any
other Bahamian.

“Tf I do run, I can assure
the people of Long Island
and Ragged Island that I
will bring a true vision of
hope and prosperity. They
will not be subiect to false
promises, like those made
by the current MP back in
2002,” he said.

Mr Knowles also listed
promises he claims were
made by Mr Cartwright in
2002, such as cable TV
throughout Long Island;
potable water to all; an
ocean-front road through-

’ out Long Island; the arrival
of cruise ships; more jobs
for the constituency.

He challenged the elec-
torate to see how many of
these developments have
actually occurred during
Mr Cartwright’s tenure as
representative.

Despite his possible inde-
pendent candidacy, Mr
Knowles also stated that
his FNM credentials are
established.

“There is no doubt that
anyone who knows me,
knows that my Free
National Movement cre-
dentials are unshakable,
unlike the current MP.
Whatever I do now or in



an energetic T€a!
If we've piqued your interest, Let’s Talk!



the future will be in the
best interest of all con-
stituents, FNM or other-
wise,” he said.

Mr Knowles’ potential
candidacy would create a
three-way race in Long
Island between FNMs — Mr
James Miller officially
declared his candidacy for
the constituency yesterday
to The Tribune.

Due to the historical
antagonism between the
PLP and Long Islanders, it



“If I do run, I
can assure the
people of Long
Island and
Ragged Island
that I will
bring a true
vision of hope
and prosperity.
They will not
be subject to
false promises,
like those
made by the
current MP
back in 2002.”



Anthony Knowles,
potential candidate
for the Long Island

constituency

is unlikely that the party
will officially nominate a
candidate for the con-
stituency, especially in the
face of in-fighting between
three FNMs for the seat.
Rather, it is more likely
that the PLP will either
stand by and watch the
fight between the FNMs,
or, the PLP may attempt to
secretly support one of the
independent candidates.



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THE TRIBUNE ze
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yeas

demographics .

@ FLORIDA
Miami Beach

CRUISE lines must target
new customers by including spe-
cific groups such as minorities,
children and Generation X in
marketing efforts as they try to
cater ‘to the broadest base of
travellers, industry executives
said Tuesday, according to
Associated Press.

Executives of six cruise lines
discussed topics important to
the industry in front of a stand-

ing-room only collection of rep- _

resentatives from ports; ‘ship-
yards, suppliers, travel’ agents
and cruise lines at the annual
Seatrade Cruise Shipping Con-
vention.

Richard Fain, chairman and
CEO of Royal Caribbean Cruis-
es, said meeting the changing
demographics of a cruise indus-
try that’s getting younger and
more diverse is one of its main
challenges.

Citing an industry statistic
that shows only about 17 per
cent of Americans have taken a
cruise vacation, Fain said direct-
ly marketing to groups such as
blacks, Hispanics, the physical-
ly disabled and multi-genera-
tion travellers — also known as
families with children — would
add to cruise vacation demand.

“Children were (once) seen
as entities that distracted from
the enjoyment of the bulk of
our guests... Today we devote
whole sections of the ships to
meet their needs,” he said.

Bob Dickinson, president and
CEO of Carnival Cruise Lines,
stressed the need to appeal to
younger travellers. Statistics
show that Generation X, from
the late 20s in age to the early
40s, is the group that reports it is
most interested in taking a cruise
vacation, said Daniel Hanrahan,
chairman of the Cruise Lines
International Association’s mar-
keting committee. .

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 15



ational

Insurance
FROM page one

information of a “large number”
of Bahamians.

The source further alleged that
senior management within the
department terminated the contract
of a private security company about
two to three weeks ago, in a cost
cutting effort, leaving the building
vulnerable,

Additionally, the source alleged
that the building alarm did not
work, nor did the security cameras,
leaving few clues as to who the cul-
prits are.

According to NIB Director
Lennox McCartney, a number of
personal computers were stolen
from the Claims Department of the
Wulff Road Local Office.

He said, though, the stolen PC’s,
once removed as they were from
the Board’s network, will not per-
mit access to National Insurance's
data base.

This is because NIB’s data is
stored in central computers and the
theft of individual PC’s would not
compromise any information the
Board holds.

Mr McCartney explained; “We
are part of an intricate network.
Persons will not be able to use the
computers to connect to the
National Insurance system, as it is
configured in such a way that access
can only be gained through autho-
rised user [D’s and passwords
assigned by us,”

He said the thieves simply got
away with stand alone personal
computers.

The Director said that each of
the Board's computers has an
account that can be disabled.

He explained that this and other
state-of-the-art security measures
and practices have been put in place
over the years to safeguard against
breaches, because NIB has always
been cognizant of the need to
secure customer information,

He declined to make specific
comments about the investigations
into the break-in, explaining that
NIB, as a matter of policy, does not
comment about its security systems,

He did say, however, that all
security recordings have been
turned over to the police to assist in
their investigations.

Mr McCartney said that even as
NIB takes measures to reduce its
administrative cost, nothing would
be done to compromise the confi-
dentiality and security of the infor-
mation with which the Board has
been entrusted,

TCA ATT es

ith

iG aataee to As)

LOCAL NEWS

Deputy Prime Minister
FROM page one

“Mr Speaker, I have come to this place and I have done the
best that I can and I continue to serve the Bahamian people
the best way I know. And, Mr Speaker, if [cannot build, | will
not destroy. If I cannot encourage, | will not discourage, If]
cannot enhance the lives of people, I will not try to destroy
them.

“That is my philosophy, Mr Speaker, that’s the way I live,
that’s the way I have always been. Whether you are for me or
against me. I speak evil of no man, Mr Speaker. I try to
encourage people. But I know this is the season and you have
some dirty, nasty people out there trying their best to discour-
age and to tear down and to rip up.

“But, Mr Speaker, I just want to say one thing, in your quest
to destroy me, look out you don’t kill yourself,” she warned.

Mrs Pratt said she trusts in God; a God who brought her
into parliament, and who will ultimately decide when she
leaves,

“So, Mr Speaker, I want the Guardian to know that I take
exception to it, it’s an insult to me. And certainly I appreciate
Mr (Charles) Carter calling me and apologising. Thank you
very much, sir, for that.

“But at the same time I want to say to reporters, please
quote me for what I say, Don’t lic on me, It is so wrong, so
wrong, and I will just leave it at that,” she said.

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Attorneys are being tightlipped on
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courts.

Also on Friday, a continuation of
a hearing over who will ultimately
retain custody of Anna Nicole
Smith’s five-month-old daughter
Dannielynn is scheduled before Jus-
tice Stephen Isaacs. Smith's mother
Vergie Arthur is trying to get
guardianship from Howard K.
Stern, who is listed as the father on
the child’s birth certificate.

Arthur claims she could provide a
more stable home for the infant,
who could stand to inherit a for-
tune, Los Angeles based photogra-
pher Larry Birkhead an ex-
boyfriend of the late Anna Nicole
Smith is also a part of the guardian-
ship dispute, The court is expected
to give further directions on the

matter when the hearing resumes
on Friday,

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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



ee ee ee
MP calls for overpasses

FROM page one

level connections to do as he pleas-
es,” Mr Armbrister alleged.

The alleged “slave camp” condi-

tions at Chub Cay came to light
after three more workers — Ter-
rold Rolle, 24, William McQueen,
25, and Michael Forbes, 28 — were
dismissed.
» They allege that MGM Con-
struction Services, Mr Espino’s
company, fires workers for being
sick, leaving the island for a break
or failing to attend meetings called
in the employees’ own time.

They also claim they are made to
work 60 hours before being allowed
to claim overtime pay, in what they
described as a breach of labour law.

Mr Armbrister said he was fired
for “standing up for my rights”,
claiming he was unwilling to work
seven days a week. He claimed he is
still owed nearly $3,000 by the firm
in unpaid wages.

The workers also alleged that pay
cheques “bounced like basketballs”
and National Insurance contribu-
tions were not paid on their behalf.

Mr Armbrister said: “Mario
seems to think he’s a Castro-style
dictator, but his behaviour can’t be
tolerated. It is unconstitutional.”

The workers, all skilled sheetrock
tradesmen, said they had been
promised by David Cooper, site

Chub Cay

superintendent for Moss Construc-
tion, the main contractors, that their
grievances would be addressed.

But nothing was done about Mr
Espino’s attitude, “All the workers
there feel as we do,” said Mr Arm-
brister, “but they don’t want to
leave until they get paid.”

The men said Mr Espino insisted
they should not leave the cay
“unless your mother dies, or you’re
fired.”

Mr Armbrister said: “He claims
to be a peroonal friend of Perry
Christie.

“He did some work at Christie's
house. Because of this, he seems to
feel he can get away with
anything.”

He added: “We want the govern-
ment to resolve this problem. He
should not be allowed to come here
and take advantage of our rights.
What is the government doing?

“We are fugitives in our own
home. I will soon be like the
Haitians who are looking for a bet-
ter life in the United States.

“On Chub Cay you get fired if
you get sick, you get fired if you

et hurt, and you get fired if you
ail to attend a meeting called in
your own time,

“Workers are ordered about in
military style. Mario likes total con-

trol and he treats us with con-
tempt.”

A message left with Mr Espino
was not returned, however Mr
Steve Greenslade, a partner with
MGM construction, denied the
men's accusations.

"Most of (what they said) was
complete lies," he said. "The men in
question were never forced to work
more than the appropriate hours a
week indicated in the labour laws,
Secondly, the persons who were ter-
mninated, the record reflects most
of them left of their own accord. If
they were terminated, whatever
time they worked, they got paid."

He added that he would "go fur-
ther" to say that his "fellow associ-
ate" who he would not name, but
did not deny to be Mr Espino, was
particularly benevolent to employ-
ees, paying them out of his own
pocket prior to the time their pay
cheques were due if they said they
needed their funds early.

"My associate, his first reaction if
you have a problem is, ‘yeah, I'll
take care of that problem'," he said.

He stated that any demands
made of the men were in their con-
tract, and in accordance with labour
laws, .

The issue is now being mediated
at the Labour Board and the com-
pany is "pulling records" to prove
that the men's claims are incorrect,
said Mr Greenslade.

FROM page one

Providence will have to come. That is the
only solution,” he said.

Mr Wells said that overpasses would be
most useful if placed at the major round-
abouts in New Providence, such as the round-
about that intersects Baillou Hill Road and
the Tonique Williams-Darling highway.

This is very necessary and the government
should “bite the bullet” now, Mr Wells added,
as the economy is growing — with more cars
being purchased — leading to even more traf-
fic on New Providence.

The land that is necessary to aid this effort,
should be purchased by the government, Mr
Wells said. However, he said that the gov-
ernment must compensate the land owners
for the land that is acquired.

“There are thousands, millions of dollars
out there that are owed to the public by this
government, the previous government, and
the government before that, acquiring peo-

»ple’s land ~ for years and years, Title good,

and they wouldn’t pay you. You know, it’s
wrong, in my opinion, for the government to
allow itself to get caught up in the situation
where the public has to take them to court and
ask the judge to tell the government that they
have to pay,” he said.

The Bamboo Town MP also suggested that
speed bumps should be placed in residential
communities,

“All over this island people are crying out



for speed bumps, because they are concerned
for the safety of their children, who are play-
ing on the streets,”

In these residential areas, Mr Wells argued
that speed bumps should be placed every 500
to 800 feet, to increase neighbourhood safety.

Mr Wells also made a request to Works
Minister Bradley Roberts to at least extend
the four lanes on Baillou Hill Road to -
Carmichael Road. Currently, the four lanes
merge to two lanes just beyond the hill, which
creates significant traffic when motorists
attempt to merge.

Mr Roberts said he has discussed the mat-
ter with the special projects officer for the
road improvement programme, and he com-
mitted to carry out the necessary provisions to
ensure that the four lanes are extended.

Constituencies
FROM page one

constituency will be represented by lawyer
Hope Strachan for the PLP.

Although the report of the Boundaries
Commission has been completed and been
given to Governor General Arthur Hanna
for approval, the public will not officially
know of its contents until Prime Minister .
Perry Christie presents the report to par-
liament next week.



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CATHERINE STREET Vv J v $22,271
CCTV SYSTEM WATER & SEWERAGE CORP. PHASE! o di v Vv J $70,681
CONVERSION OF TRAINING CENTER TO LAB Vv $41,906
EASTERN DISTRICT MAINS RENEWAL o V m $11,800,000
EMERGENCY FOX HILL WWYP v J J $408,560
FLAMINGO GARDENS SEWAGE PLANT af J =
FOX HILL ROAD MAINS RENEWAL Vv d rile
GLADSTONE RO. WWTP af v v i
GLADSTONE ROAD SEWER FORCE MAIN " v Vv ? 900,000
GLADSTONE ROAD WWTP PHASE ! iv Vv w $2,120,882
GLADSTONE TRANSMISSION MAINS vf ¢ Vv ¢ $700,000
IMPROVEMENT WORKS AT WSC HEADQUARTERS Vv v Vv $02,151
INSTALLATION OF 15K DIESEL TANK 7 7 v Vv $75,018
MAJOR ROAD, YELLOW ELDER GONS, Vv Vv $21,001
MALCOLM PARK DISPOSAL WELL Vv Vv v $109,802
MARSHALL RD. PHASE 1&tt V Vv Vv Vv $76,074
NEWBOLD STREET Vv Vv Vv Vv Ted
HON EASTERN DISTRICTS MAINS RENEWAL J v $121,908
PILOT PROJECT FOR PHASING OUT BRACKISH WATER SYSTEM y Zz Vv Vv v TBD
PINEWOOD GARDENS SEWAGE PLANT Vv ¢ v $329,312
PUMP CONTROL & SURGE f V Vv Vv $35,192
RENOVATION TO ENGINEERING TECHNICAL SUPPORT AREAS =v y s Vv Vv $89,405
ROOF REFURBISHMENT BLOCK "B" MAIN OFFICE Vv to V v F $438,804
SHIRLEY STREET MAINS RENEWAL af J $50,686
- SKYLINE LAKES SUBDIVISION LIFT STATION INSTALLATION sy ¢ Vv $99,827
ST. ALBANS DRIVE FORCE V v V v ¥ $97,578
SUMMERSET HOUSE LOWER WEST WING o r ” J v $411,721
TELEMENTRY - MAIN PUMP 7 v V Y $91,085
WINDSOR FIELD OFFICE BLDG. REFURBISHMENT Vv v Vv ¥ d $900,004
WINDSOR STATION GENERATOR Vv Vv sae. t77
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WSC HEADOFFICE - SANITARY FACILITIES Vv J v manent



THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 17









ley SS

Shandong ! Acrobatics Troupe
erform in the Bahamas







@ BAHAMIAN and Chinese cultural stakeholders pose with members of the Shandong Acrobat-
ic Troupe, as they get ready to leave The Bahamas, on March 12, 2007. The Bahamas was the first stop
on the award-winning troupe's "Friendship Tour" and they performed three times over the weekend.
(ABOVE - BIS photo: Derek Smith, BELOW - photos by Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

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PAGE 18, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007 THE TRIBUNE



@ MINISTER of Foreign Affairs and the Public Service Fred
Mitchell (right) and Director of Public Works Ms. Melanie Roach
listen, as Ambassador of the People's Republic of China Li Yuan-
ming show them prints of various Chinese cities and landmarks dur-
. ing the reception for the of Shandong Acrobatic Troupe presen-

tation; on March 10, 2007, at the Kendal G. L. Isaacs Gymnasium.
“ The es is the first stop on the award-winning troupe's
"Friendship Tour" and they performed three times, over the week-
end. *

(BIS photo: Derek Smith)

veuwee ee a

[ew eee

we & Saas



a MINISTER of Foreign Affairs sad the Public Service Fred Mitchell (right) speaks, as Awibassadne of the People’ s Republic of Chi-
na Li Yuanming looks on, during the reception for the of Shandong Acrobatic Troupe peers on March 10, 2007, at the Kendal
G. L. Isaacs Gymnasium.



(BIS photo: Derek Smith)































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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 19





@ BAHAMIAN and Chi-
nese Government officials
and cultural stakeholders
pose with members of the
Shandong Acrobatic Troupe
presentation, on March 10,
2007, at the Kendal G. L.
Isaacs Gymnasium.

The Bahamas is the first
stop on the award-winning
troupe's "Friendship Tour"
and they performed three
times, over the weekend.

(BIS photo: Derek Smith)

Bush to Congress:
Immigration reform
is key to better
relations with

Latin America

@ MERIDA, Mexico

PRESIDENT Bush, seeking
to rebuild ties with Mexico,
pledged Wednesday to intensi-
fy efforts to overhaul U.S. immi-
gration laws and crack down on
illegal drug trafficking, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

Bush said that he senses there

. has been a change of attitudes
..in Congress about updating
- immigration laws, from skepti-
cism last year to recognition
now that changes are in U.S.
7> interests.
“T will work with Congress,
’ ,members of both political par-
ties, to pass immigration law
that will enable us to respect
the rule of law — and at the
same time, respect humanity,”
Bush said in a news conference
with Mexican President Felipe
Calderon.
_ Bush, facing a huge fight
.‘ within his own party for his
>. immigration plan, called it an
‘-important but sensitive
issue.

“T say important because a
_._»good migration law will help
.>.-both economies and will help

the security of both countries,”
Bush said. “If people can come
into our country, for example,
on a temporary basis to work,
doing jobs Americans aren’t
doing, they won’t have to sneak
across the border.”

For the seventh straight day
on his Latin American trip,
Bush shrugged off a question
about his nemesis, leftist
Venezuelan President Hugo
Chavez. Bush would not even
use his name.









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THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 21



PN merle

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@ PUBLISHED poet Mr.
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on March 7, 2007.

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SEMnEN,








POET and performance artist
Ms. Rolinda Pierre sharing one
of her humourous poems during
the latest session of "Express
Yourself," on March 7, 2007. The
event, held at "Da IslandClub" in
the Nassau Beach Hotel, is an
open mic forum for poets, musi-
cians and performance artists to
share their work. The next ses-
sion will take place Wednesday,
March 14, 2007, at 8 p.m.

(Photos: Eric Rose)




@ POET Ms. Shamija Mon-
cur reads one of her pieces
during the latest session of
"Express Yourself," on March
7, 2007.



Five tourists
kidnapped in
Ethiopia to
be reunited
with family

@ ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia

FIVE Europeans freed by
kidnappers said Wednesday
they were treated well and
expressed gratitude to the
governments of Eritrea and
Ethiopia that led to their
release, according to Associat-
ed Press.

However, in a statement
issued by the British Foreign
Office in London, the five
diplomats and relatives said
they were worried about the
eight Ethiopians who were
abducted with the group and
who are still missing.

“We are very worried that
the Ethiopians who were
accompanying us are all still
being held. We would not
want anything to be said that
might inadvertently jeopardize
their safe release. Our fore-
most concern is that they
should be released as soon as
possible,” the statement said.

The five said they spoke to
their families and were look-
ing forward to seeing them
again but they needed time to
take stock of what happened.
They appealed to the media
for privacy.

“We were treated well by
our captors — physically we
are all in good condition but
obviously very tired,” the
statement said.

Fears were growing for the
eight Ethiopians who were
kidnapped with the group and
who are still missing. The
Ethiopian government called
for their immediate release.

The Europeans were held
captive for 13 days after being
kidnapped while on a sightsee-
ing tour near the disputed bor-
der with Eritrea. They were
released Tuesday and taken to
the British Embassy in
Asmara, the Eritrean capital,
where they were fed and given
medical checkups.

A British Foreign Office
Official, who spoke on condi-
tion of anonymity in line with
ministry policy, said they were _
to leave Asmara shortly.

Michael Moore, the head of
the British Council’s Ethiopia
office and the husband of one
of the kidnapped tourists, said
Wednesday he spoke briefly
with his wife by phone.

“She sounded well and
healthy. | am feeling very
relieved and grateful for all
the work that has been done
so far,” Moore told The Asso-
ciated Press in Addis Ababa.
He said they did not discuss
details of her ordeal.



PAGE 22, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Blair discusses power-sharing
deadline with N Ireland rivals —

@ LONDON

BRITISH Prime Minister
Tony Blair and Northern Ire-
land’s hard-line Protestant
leader, Ian Paisley, discussed
his price Wednesday for sharing

power with the Catholics of
Sinn Fein by Blair’s March 26
deadline, according to Associ-
ated {ress.

Blair held his first face-to-face
meetings with Democratic
Unionist leader Paisley and

Sinn Fein chief Gerry. Adams
since their parties triumphed
last week in Northern Ireland
Assembly elections — and gave
them both veto power over
reviving a Catholic-Protestant
administration.



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just bring in 2 complete Huggies”
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receipt dated after March 10, 2007
to the d’Albenas Agency in
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Paisley, who represents most
of the province’s British Protes-
tant majority, and Adams met
separately in a House of Com-
mons conference room with
Blair as well as his treasury chief
and likely successor, Gordon
Brown.

Paisley has refused to com-
mit to Blair’s deadline, citing
Sinn Fein’s continued ambigui-
ty on whether it will cooperate
fully with the police in Northern
Ireland. In recent weeks Sinn
Fein leaders have called on
Catholics to help police solve
certain crimes, but suggested
they will not help stop attacks
by Irish Republican Army dis-
sidents opposed to the peace
process.

Democratic Unionist deputy
leader Peter Robinson, who
also took part in the talks,
stressed afterward that his par-
ty would not move unless Sinn
Fein demonstrated fulsome sup-
port for law and order.

“Mr. Adams knows the
requirements. He knows what
has to be done, and he knows
he is not yet doing them,”
Robinson said in an interview.

But Adams said the British
government accepted that Sinn
Fein had done enough to merit
a share of power. Adams said
he, Blair and Brown all sensed a
breakthrough with Paisley was
imminent.

“I do think that this British
government ... they can smell
it, that this could be the real
breakthrough after all the con-
flict, after all the false dawns,”
Adams said.

Both the Democratic Union-
ists and Sinn Fein do agree on
the other key condition for
cooperation — getting more
money from Britain, which
already heavily subsidises gov-
ernment services and employ-
ment in Northern Ireland. —

Paisley is seeking a reported
£1 billion in extra funds for any
incoming power-sharing admin-
istration to spend. Both Adams
and Paisley say they would use

Ages 6 - 14





i SINN Feinn leader Gerry Adams speaking to the media out-
side the Palace of Westminster in London yesterday

(AP Photo/ Alastair Grant)

extra money to reverse a new
household water tax due to be
‘imposed starting next month
across Northern Ireland.

“We certainly want to see the
British government pick up the
tab for the failure to invest in
water services and the infra-
structure. That’s what I was
negotiating for,” said Adams,
who remains committed to oust-
ing the British government from
Northern Ireland.

Paisley did not speak to
reporters after his meetings.

Earlier, in a House of Com-
mons debate, Paisley said a

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power-sharing administration
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He said there was no point
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engine".

Britain has already commit-
ted to the idea of providing a
“peace dividend” of extra mon-
ey if a Democratic Unionist-
Sinn Fein administration takes
root. Brown has planned a for-
mal meeting with several North-
ern Ireland leaders next week to

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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 23

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

P.O. BOX N-7509
TELEPHONE: 302-1000





BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
TENDER FOR GENERAL INSURANCE , TENDER FOR GENERAL INSURANCE
ALL RISKS (BUILDINGS & CONTENTS, PLANT, MACHINERY & MARINE INSURANCE
EQUIPMENT INCLUDING SUB-STATION SITES
TENDER NO. 597 106 TENDER NO. 600/06
The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the The Babeme a eeision Sear insmanoet me dexeribed atove, bidces toe ts

provision of general insurances as described above.
Bidders are required to collect packages from

Bidders are required to collect packages from Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at the Administration Office,
at the Administration Office, Blue Hill and Tucker Road.
Blue Hill and Tucker Road.
Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 30 March 2007 by 3:00 p.m.
and addressed as follows:
Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 30 March 2007 by 3:00 p.m. =
and addressed as follows: The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
The General Manager — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Bahamas Electricity Corporation Nassau, Bahamas
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads :
Nassau, Bahamas Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
ion: .D
axsientiow: Wary. Delmer Seymour Marked: Tender No. 600/06
Marked: Tender No. 597/06 “GENERAL INSURANCE - MARINE INSURANCE”
“GENERAL INSURANCE — BUILDINGS, PLANT & MACHINERY” The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION —-—s BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
‘TENDER FOR GENERAL INSURANCE | TENDER FOR GENERAL INSURANCE
PUBLIC & EMPLOYERS’ LIABILITY, PERSONAL ACCIDENT, PROFESSIONAL INDEMNITY (DIRECTORS & OFFICERS)
PRIVATE CAR & COMMERCIAL VEHICLES
TENDER NO. 598/06 TENDER NO-otive
, oo, _ . The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the
The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the provision of general insurances as described above.

provision of general insurances as described above.
Bidders are required to collect packages from

Bidders are required to collect packages from Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at the Administration Office,
at the Administration Office, Blue Hill and Tucker Road.
Blue Hill and Tucker Road.
. Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 36 March 2007 by 3:00 p.m.
Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 30 March 2007 by 3:00 p.m. and addressed as follows:
and addressed as follows:
The General Manager
The General Manager _ Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Bahamas Electricity Corporation Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads Nassau, Bahamas

Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Marked: Tender No. 601/06

Marked: Tender No. 598/06
“GENERAL INSURANCE - PROFESSIONAL INDEMNITY
“GENERAL INSURANCE — PUBLIC & EMPLOYERS’ DIRECTORS & OFFICERS”
LIABILITY AND MOTOR VEHICLES”
. The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.
The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders. 7 eh : 7

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
TENDER FOR GENERAL INSURANCE _ TENDER FOR GENERAL INSURANCE
MONEY & FIDELITY ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT & MOBILE RADIOS
TENDER NO. 599/06 . TENDER NO. 602/06

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the

provision of general insurances as described above. The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the

provision of general insurances as described above.

Bidders are required to collect packages from

Mrs. Delmeta Seymour Bidders are required to collect packages from

Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

at the Administration Office. as :
. , at the Administration Office,
Blue Hill and Tucker Road. Blue Hill and Tucker Road.
t -deli C : . :
Tenders tne 200 Handed ees On or bern ae exch 2007 by 3:00 p.m. Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 30 March 2007 by 3:00 p.m.
and addressed as follows: and addressed as follows:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation Bekeren Feoticity Comnoration
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas a caaiaay

Nassau, Bahamas

ttention: . i
Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 599/06 Marked: Tender No. 602/06

“ RAI URA _ ITY”
eal NS CE MONEY & YUE “GENERAL INSURANCE — ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT & MOBILE RADIOS”

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders. . : .
P gh P J ¥ The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.





PAGE 24, THURSDAY, MARCH 14, 2007

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SECTION

business@tribunemedia.net



THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

A Wiles Bit oyitiC eee

BUSINE

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street







°





Money Safe.
Money Fast.

at

Bank of The Baharnas

INTERNATIONAL

Online at



Bahamas leads US real estate downturn

world on Internet
penetration rate

l@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas has the high-
est rate of broadband Internet
penetration in the world per 100
people, Cable Bahamas chair-
man said yesterday, a rate that
is some 65 per cent higher than
the leader in an Organisation
for Economic Co-Operation
and Development (OECD) sur-
vey of the world’s wealthiest
nations. /

Brendan Paddick, who is also
president of Cable Bahamas’
largest shareholder, Columbus
Communications, said the orig-
inal “commitment” by his pre-
decessors - Philip Keeping and
his group - to spend $20 million
on building a cable television
network in the Bahamas had
“mushroomed into” a $180 mil-
lion investment by year-end
2006.

Referring to the OECD study
on broadband Internet pene-

Cable chief says
nation 65% better
than OECD leader,

his company having

dramaticlly reduced

Internet connectivity
costs

tration rates per 100 people, Mr
Paddick told Bahamian busi-
ness executives attending the
Canada-Bahamas Business
Council’s launch that the
reseasrch found Denmark was
the leader with a 29 people per
100 access rate.

Denmark was closely fol-
lowed by the Netherlands, with

SEE page 11B

Tremblay pleads guilty
to laundering $220,000

THE. former, head of a
~ Bahamas-based financial ser-
vices provider was yesterday
sentenced to four years in
prison by a US judge after
pleading guilty to laundering
$220,000 in alleged drug traf-
ficking proceeds in a Drug
Enforcement Agency (DEA)
sting operation.

Martin Tremblay, 44, the
president and managing. direc-
tor of Nassau-based Dominion
Investments, was sentenced by
US District Judge John Keenan.
The judge said Tremblay would
be credited with the 14 months
he has already spent in prison,
and the sentence was two years
less than the term called for
under federal sentencing guide-
lines.

"I'm sorry," Mr Tremblay
said in the Manhattan court-
room just before he was sen-
tenced. "I apologise to my fam-
ily and the court. I just ask for
forgiveness."

Mr Tremblay’s agreement to
plea guilty saw the US authori-
ties drop more serious charges
that he laundered $1 billion in
drug and other illegal monies
via his firm's bank accounts.

He pleaded guilty to one

US judge sentences him
to four years in prison

count of money laundering
resulting from a sting operation
mounted by undercover US
Drug Enforcement Adminis-
tration (DEA) agents and other
federal agencies.

Mr Tremblay had previously
pleaded guilty to allegations
that on March 19, 2005, he met
with the undercover DEA
agents in Manhattan to discuss
laundering funds derived from
fictitious drug sales.

At the meeting, he was
alleged to have agreed to laun-
der the proceeds from the drug
operation run by the DEA

' agents.

On May 3, 2005, and again
on October 5 and October 26,
2005, following instructions
from Mr Tremblay, a total of
$220,000 was allegedly wire
transferred to Dominion Invest-
ments-related accounts in con-
nection with the March 19,
2005, agreement.

SEE page 10B

Abaco Markets sells
Turks store in $2.7m deal

ABACO Markets last night ,

announced another step
towards the completion of its
divestment programme had
been concluded with the sale of
its Turks & Caicos-based Cost
Right store for $2.7 million, a
deal that will bring it close to
“completely eliminating” its
bank debt.

The purchaser is Entervant
Holdings (TCI) Ltd, a Turks &
Caicos company, which will pay
Abaco Markets $2.5 million
upfront in cash, with the
remaining $200,000 payable
over a three-year period.

The purchase price will be
paid in US dollars, and used to
repay the BISX-listed retailer’s
US dollar debts, in addition to
financing the refurbishment of
its Cedar Street store and inven-
tory needed for Cost Right
Freeport’s relocation.

The latest development fol-
lows on closely from Abaco
Markets’ decision to dispose of
its minority $2.5 million invest-
ment in BSL Holdings, the buy-
out group that acquired the
majority 78 per cent stake in
Bahamas Supermarkets from
Winn-Dixie last year.

Gavin Watchorn, Abaco

Sale and BSL Holdings
disposal to ‘completely
eliminate’ bank debt

Markets’ president, said on the
Turks & Caicos sale in a state-
ment: “This agreement is anoth-
er important step in our core

‘market strategy to fully realise

our turnaround.

“The proceeds from both this
transaction and the sale of the
group’s BSL investment,
expected at the end of this
month, will completely elimi-
nate the bank debt that has sig-
nificantly impacted our results
in recent years.

“This allows us to reallocate
key resources, both in terms of
capital and personnel, to our
core markets.”

Abaco Markets had recently
improved cash flow and
reduced its Royal Bank of
Canada debt to just $3.4 mil-
lion through the $4.2 million
sale of its former Solomon's
SuperCentre property in
Freeport.

The Cedar Street property's

SEE page 9B

may harm resort projects

Realtors fear pre-sales may be hit, while some say they have no incentive
to market properties as developers cut commissions by five per cent

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

ahamian realtors

yesterday expressed

concern that the

slowing US econo-
my and stock market uneasi-
ness might negatively impact
demand for high-priced second
homes in the Bahamas, some-
thing that could have a knock-
on effect on tourism-related for-
eign direct investment projects
depending on land and proper-
ty pre-sales to finance their
developments.

Mike Lightbourn, head of
Coldwell Banker Lightbourn
Realty, told The Tribune that
while he remained optimistic,

the potential slowing of the US
economy - with concerns being
expressed over the state of its
housing and mortgage market
- had “got” to have an impact
on demand for Bahamian real
estate by high net worth indi-
viduals over time.

“Obviously, there aren’t as
many high-end buyers out there
as there were a year ago, and I
just don’t want these projects
to get started and then be left
dead in the water, which is what
might happen to some of them,”
Mr Lightbourn told The Tri-
bune.

Most foreign investment pro-
jects currently underway or
being planned in the Bahamas
are for mixed-use resorts, which
often involve a small, boutique
hotel that is accompanied by

other residential options, such
as condos, fractional ownership,
timeshares and dockominiums.

To minimise their risk and
financial exposure, many for-
eign investors and developers
have moved away from the cap-
ital-intensive, older model of
constructing a hotel for tran-
sient visitors in favour of devel-
opments that involve some form
of visitor ownership.

From land, lot and real estate
pre-sales to this wealthly client
base, the developers generate
the capital and cash flow
required to finance their pro-
jects. Yet a downturn in the US
economy, especially if it impacts
real estate or people with assets
heavily linked to stock market
performance, could reduce the
demand for Bahanfian real

estate, hurting sales at invest-
ment projects and impacting
their financing plans.

Another Bahamian realtor,
who requested anonymity, said
the US real estate market was
down slightly, something that
could very well have impact the
market in the Bahamas.

“Tt may be a little too early to
tell just what type of impact this
could have,” he said.

Another problem US devel-
opers in the Bahamas could face
is a lack of support from
Bahamian realtors to market
their investments.

“A large problem is that
some US developers are trying
to shut out the Bahamian real-

SEE page 8B

EU deal to cost Bahamas $5-$10m in taxes, not $14m

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor

THE Bahamas is likely
to lose between $5 mil-
lion to $10 million in per
annum tax revenues,
“rather than the $14 mil-
lion originally thought”,
as a result of deciding to
negotiate the Economic
Partnership Agreement
(EPA) through CARI-
FORUM, the minister of
foreign affairs said yesterday.

Fred Mitchell told members of the
‘Bahamian business community, who were
attending the launch of the Canada-
Bahamas Business Council, that all region-
al trade agreements the Bahamas was par-
ty to - the EPA, the Caribbean Basin Ini-





@ MITCHELL

(WTO) rules.

“All of these [agreements] are presently
in danger of running afoul of WTO rules,”
Mr Mitchell said........

“On all fronts, the countries of this region
are facing changes in the terms of trade,
changing to a reciprocal regime, not a one-
way preferential regime. :

“The Bahamas will have to grapple with

tiative (CBI) with the US, and Caribcan .
with Canada - were under pressure because
they violated World Trade Organisation

Minister says nation will ‘have to take the hard decisions’ on all
trade agreements, with US deal also threatened in WTO
— * ‘Resentment’ among Bahamians as lack
of skills causes ‘oppotunities to pass by’

these issues and take the hard decisions on
the way forward on integration with the
world economy.” ;

The minister of foreign affairs said the

Cabinet had given approval to the creation
of a Department of Foreign Trade, which
would help the Government to negotiate
the multitude of trade arrangements it was
now faced with. Staff recruitment for the

SEE page 7B





PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007









MARK A TURNQUEST /

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10:00 am— 10:30am | Entrepreneurship: The pros and pitfalls of business Philip Simon
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10:30 am ~ 11:00 am

The Marketing Plan: How to evaluate and take Khaalis Rolle

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The role of the Accountant and the importance of Craig Gomez
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11:00 am - 11:30 am
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THE TRIBUNE

Bahamas urged to
free-up telecoms

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

able Bahamas’ chair-

( man yesterday urged
the Bahamas to learn

from the likes of Jamaica and

-Trinidad and liberalise its

telecommunications industry,
as this nation has “probably
the most closed market in the
region”.

Brendan Paddick, who is
also president of Columbus
Communications, the largest
shareholder in BISX-listed
Cable Bahamas with a 30 per
cent stake, said Jamaica and
Trinidad were among the
world’s most liberalised tele-
coms markets, competition
delivering better prices, more
choice and service quality to
consumers in those nations.

He added that in Trinidad, a
nation where Columbus Com-
munications also operates, reg-
ulators there did not issue
licences telling operators what
they could or could not do, but
instead allowed them to offer
any telecoms service to any
customer in that nation.

As a result, Trinidad had
one of the highest cellular
phone penetration rates in the
world.

Mr Paddick said: “It’s hope-
fully something ‘that will come]
through to the Bahamas some

day. The Bahamas is probably

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
eat eS



Â¥

Model

Cable chair says nation has
“probably the most closed market in
the region’; should follow Jamaica
and Trinidad’s lead

the most closed market in the
region.”

This is an environment com-
pletely at odds with the
Bahamas’ image as a major
tourism and international
financial services industry, and
a country hoping to establish
itself as an e-commerce base.

Yet while it has been talk-
ing liberalisation on one side,
to preserve the Bahamas
Telecommunications Compa-
ny’s (BTC) value for possible
privatisation, the Government
has minimised and restricted
the competition offered by oth-
er private providers such as
Systems Resource Group
(SRG).

BTC retains a monopoly in
cellular provision, while Cable
Bahamas enjoys a similar situ-
ation - for the moment - in
cable television. “We'd give it
up tomorrow for that kind of
model,” Mr Paddick said of
Cable’s cable TV monopoly,
to some chuckles in the audi-
ence at the launch of the Cana-
da-Bahamas Business Council.
“It’s an open invitation.”

Mr Paddick said Columbus
Communications’ philosophy
was that those who worked for
its companies needed to live
in the countries the operations
were based in.

Cf 1100 employees across
the Caribbean, only 36 were
on work permits, he said, with
Cable Bahamas only having 11
work permits out of some 300

staff.

Mr Paddick said that one
issue he felt was holding devel-
opment in the Bahamas back
was that this nation appeared
to be afraid of taking risk and
facing failure, attempting to
get everything right before
something was launched.

“One of the things I can see
holding the Bahamas back is
that you want to get everything
perfect, when perfect’s not
there,” Mr Paddick said. If it
was not right when launched,
there was always room to take
decisions that would get it
right.

Columbus Communications’
strategy for the wider
Caribbean, Mr Paddick said,
was to build on the successful
model it had established in the
Bahamas, targeting high-
growth opportunities in Eng-
lish-speaking nations where it
could exploit the “triple-play”
of voice, cable and Internet
services.

Its systems were designed to
cover entire countries, and par-
ticipating in telecoms liberali-
sation and offering a viable
alternative to incumbents were
also on the agenda.

Columbus Communications,
which was formed in autumn
2004, has some $850 million in
assets and planning “a very
aggressive capital expenditure”
that will see it spend $600 mil-
lion on a network roll-out
between 2005-2008, “a good —
piece of which’is in the -
Bahamas”.

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THE MARKETS

STOCKS, MUTUAL FUNDS, 5-6B

DOW 30 12,133.40 +57.44 AA
S&P 5CO 1,387.17 +9.22 AX
NASDAQ 2,371.74 421.17 Aw
10-YR NOTE 454 +05 A
CRUDE OIL 58.16 +23 AR

Stocks
bounce
back
despite
concerns

BY TIM PARADIS
Associated Press

NEW YORK — Wall Street
gyrated and then steadied itself
Wednesday, closing with a
respectable advance although
the Dow Jones industrials fell as
much as 136 points and briefly
dropped below the 12,000 mark
before recovering.

Stocks bounced back and
forth a day after concerns about
faltering subprime mortgage
lenders sparked a broad selloff.
H&R Block had added to Wall
Street’s uneasiness by announc-
ing after the closing bell Tues-
day its fiscal third-quarter
losses would rise because of a
$29 million writedown at its
mortgage arm.

The anxiety over mortgage
lenders, particularly the sub-
prime lenders that make loans
to people with poor credit,
pushed the Dow down by more
than 240 points Tuesday, its
second-biggest drop in nearly
four years, Such concerns jos-
tled stocks for much of
Wednesday’s session.

“I think the market got below
12,000 and buyers came in,” said
Todd Leone, managing director
of equity trading at Cowen &
Co.

The Dow rose 57.44, or 0.48
percent, to 12,133.40. ;

The Dow first climbed above
the 12,000 level on Oct. 18, after
a meandering, 7 1/2 year jour-
ney from the 11,000 mark. Dur-
ing that time, Wall Street dealt
with the dot-com bust, reces-
sion and the aftermath of the
2001 terror attacks. Tuesday’s
drop echoed a 416-point drop in
the Dow.seen two weeks ago
that began in part after a nearly.
9 percent drop in stocks in
Shanghai and amid concerns
about subprime mortgages.

Broader stock indicators also
rose Wednesday. The Standard
& Poor’s 500 index advanced
9.22, or 0.67 percent, to 1,387.17,
and the Nasdaq composite
index rose 21.17, or 0.90 percent,
to 2,371.74.

Bonds fell as stocks bandied
about; the yield on the bench-
mark 10-year Treasury note
rose to 4.52 percent from 4.50
percent late Tuesday. Gold
prices fell.

Light sweet crude settled up
23 cents at $58.16 per barrel on
the New York Mercantile
Exchange.

“I think people right now
don’t know what to make of this
market,” said Larry Peruzzi,
senior equity trader at The Bos-
ton Company Asset Manage-
ment. “You look like a hero
right now if you bought when
the Dow was down 120 points
and if you sold you look like a
goat.”

Wall Street’s turbulence
came as stocks in Europe closed
sharply lower, apparently see-
ing little room for optimism
U.S. markets would rebound.
Britain’s FTSE 100 fell 2.61 per-
cent, Germany’s DAX index lost
2.66 percent, and France’s
CAC-40 fell 2.52 percent.
Japan’s Nikkei stock average
closed down 2.92 percent, while
Hong Kong’s Hang Sang index
fell 2.57 percent and the some-
times volatile Shanghai Com-
posite Index fell 1.97 percent.

The dollar, which was mixed
against other major currencies,
rose against the yen. Some
observers have fingered the
ascendent yen with contribut-
ing to the volatility seen in
recent weeks on Wall Street.

RE

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ECONOMY

THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

3B

POSS NA AMAA A ARE UM AR UALS SSCA SAAALCQSAS LSS OMA BML! SEE IAL OME DOMME: AE iOS AOR AE USSGLEESESNCA Nib EGOS SOMBRE

Trade deficit hits record high

@ Marking the fifth straight year
the trade deficit set a record, the
account jumped to $856.7 billion.

BY MARTIN CRUTSINGER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The deficit in
the broadest measure of trade hit an
all-time high in 2006 and for the first
time the United States even ran a def-
icit on investment income.

The Commerce Department
reported that the imbalance in the
current account jumped by 8.2 per-



BETTER SALES: Worldwide, General Motors said it cut structural costs by $6.8 billion last year due
mainly to buyouts and early retirement offers accepted by more than 34,000 hourly workers.
Above, the company sign hangs in front of a storage lot filled with 2007 cars and trucks ata

cent to $856.7 billion, representing a
record 6.5 percent of the total econ-
omy. It marked the fifth straight year
the current account deficit set a
record.

Investment flows turned negative
by $7.3 billion from’a surplus of $11.3
billion in 2005. It was the first time
investment income has been negative
on records going back to 1929, That
means foreigners earned more on
their U.S. holdings than Americans
earned on their overseas invest-
ments.

AUTOMOTIVE



' Chevrolet dealership in Lone Tree, Colo.

It’s good



a 4th-quarter profit

@ General Motors reported net income of

$950 million in the fourth quarter. The firm made
its second quarterly profit in two years, on
increased auto sales and reduced labor costs.

BY TOM-KRISHER
Assbciated Press

DETROIT — General Motors accomplished some-
thing in the fourth quarter of 2006 that domestic auto-
makers have been unable to do for some time: it

reported a profit.

Now comes the hard part — repeating that success.
The company’s chief financial officer stopped short of
promising it this year, but he did pledge continued
improvement over last year’s numbers.

For the quarter, the world’s biggest automaker on
Wednesday reported net income of $950 million due to
the benefits of cost cuts, higher automotive revenues
and a gain on the sale of its finance division. It was a
turnaround from a $6.6 billion loss in the same period a

year ago.

GM, which is undergoing a massive overhaul that
includes shedding thousands of jobs and closing plants
to become more competitive with Asian automakers | |
such as Toyota Motor, wound up with a loss of $2 bil-
lion for all of 2006 compared with a restated loss of

$10.4 billion in 2005.

Chief Financial Officer Fritz Henderson said despite
the fourth-quarter profit, no one at GM is declaring
victory over the company’s financial woes.

He would say only that he expects GM’s year-over-
year performance to improve in 2007, and he would

slo we

not predict whether the company would continue to be

profitable through the year.

“The objective is to build a successful and profitable
enterprise going forward,” he told reporters Wednes-
day after the earnings report was released.

The positive fourth-quarter results included

*TURN TO GM

COMPUTER MAKER

quarter.

new for GM:

While the U.S. has run deficits in
its trade in goods every year since
1976, until last year it had still been
able to record a surplus in invest-
ments.

Analysts said that figure turned
negative because of the large amount
of U.S. assets that have been trans-

ferred to foreign hands over the past .

three decades to pay for the imported
cars, clothing and electronic goods
American consumers love to buy.
The Bush administration contends
the large foreign holdings of U.S.

DAVID ZALUBOWSKI/AP



CARLOS OSORIO/AP

APPEAL: Detailer Michael Dean shines up a tire
on a Chevrolet truck on display at General
Motors World Headquarters at the Renaissance
Center in Detroit. The company said it made
$228 million selling cars and trucks for the



assets are a sign of strength. But
many economists worry that foreign-
ers might suddenly decide they want
to hold less in U.S. stocks, bonds and
other assets.

A rapid withdrawal could cause
the value of the dollar against other
currencies, as well as U.S. stock
prices, to plunge while pushing inter-
est rates higher. If the disruption
were serious enough, it could push
the country into a recession.

* TURN TO DEFICIT

INVESTMENTS

Mutual
funds may
sidestep
some
fallout

@ Experts say diversified mutual
funds should offer investors some
protection from trouble among
subprime lenders.

BY TIM PARADIS
Associated Press

NEW YORK — Investors fishing
mutual fund statements from the
mailbox might take a look at their
neighbors’ homes and wonder
whether any will cost them money.

Mounting difficulties among lend-
ers that originate mortgages for peo-
ple with poor credit have drawn con-
cern on Wall Street and provided
fodder for alarming headlines about
mortgage defaults. But many mutual
funds might have shied from invest-
ing in the lenders because small mar-
ket capitalizations can make it diffi-
cult for a mutual fund to park a
decent amount of money in such

. companies. Plus, most mutual funds

rely on diversity to help reduce risks
from such blowups.

If companies such as New Century
Financial and Accredited Home
Lenders Holding were to go under
because of a rise in mortgage
defaults, questions will inevitably
arise about the financial fallout.
Experts say properly diversified
mutual funds should offer some pro-
tection from trouble among so-called
subprime lenders.

“Diversity is what saves you from
an event like this,” said Jeff Tjorne-
hoj, a senior analyst at Lipper, which
tracks mutual funds. He noted it is
too soon to tell whether some funds
might have dropped their invest-
ments in the space before the stocks
began to fall sharply in recent weeks.

“Some of the worst offenders
among subprime lenders were gener-
ally not considered sizable holdings,”
he said.

Harry Clark, president of Clark
Capital Management in Philadelphia,
said many funds would have already
avoided subprime lenders.

“A lot of funds have pieces of
them,” he said, “but I don’t think a lot
of funds have big chunks of them
because they’re pretty risky to start
with.”

Tjornehoj contends most mutual
fund investors shouldn’t worry
unless they were in a specific sector
fund, such as the Fidelity Select
Home Finance Fund, which is down

*TURN TO MUTUALS

Case dismissed against former HP chairwoman

@ Former Hewlett-Packard
Chairwoman Patricia Dunn, fired
after disclosure of boardroom
spying, had charges related to
the scandal dismissed by a
California judge.

BY JORDAN ROBERTSON
Associated Press
SAN JOSE, Calif. — A judge
dropped all charges against former
Hewlett-Packard board Chairwoman
Patricia Dunn, who was accused of
fraud in the boardroom spying
scheme that rocked one of Silicon
Valley’s most respected companies.
Three other defendants in the case
also will avoid jail time after their
lawyers entered no contest pleas



Wednesday to misdemeanor charges
of fraudulent wire communications
in Santa Clara Superior Court.
Judge Ray E. Cunning-
ham did not immediately
accept the pleas by former
HP ethics chief Kevin Hun-
saker, and private investiga- [e¥,
tors Ronald DeLia and'‘Mat- |
thew DePante, and said the
charges against them will
also be dropped in Septem- |
ber after they complete 96
hours of community service
and make restitution.
‘State prosecutors
announced earlier Wednesday that
Dunn and the three other defendants
had agreed to plead guilty to reduced

DUNN



charges and that Dunn would be
spared community service because of
her health. She revealed last year that
she was being treated for
advanced ovarian cancer.

But the office of Attorney
General Jerry Brown later
said that release was incor-
rect. Lawyers for Dunn and
the other defendants said
deal with the state called for
Dunn’s case to be dismissed.

“This is a vindication of
Patty Dunn in every sense of
the word,” said her lawyer,
James Brosnahan. “It shows
what she’s maintained throughout:
that she’s innocent of these charges.”

_ The four were initially charged in

TRS RAPIELT SETS UOTE AS

October with four felony counts: use
of false or fraudulent pretenses to
obtain confidential information from
a public utility; unauthorized access
to computer data; identity theft; and
conspiracy to commit each of those
crimes.

Each of those charges carried a
fine of up to $10,000 and three years
in prison.

While the deal with state prosecu-
tors allows all four defendants to
escape jail time, federal prosecutors
have said their investigation of the
HP leaks probe is ongoing.

“The guilty pleas offered today
will not prevent federal prosecutors

* TURN TO HP

BEE LIE Te

«

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fi
= 6 oS



SS IE

4B | THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

TECHNOLOGY

__ INTERNATIONAL EDITION

MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

Trade fair still draws crowd, but rivalry strong

BY PETER ZSCHUNKE
Associated Press

HANOVER, Germany —
Hundreds of thousands of
high-tech professionals are
streaming to the annual CeBIT
show this week, but the
world’s biggest information
technology trade fair is not the
draw it used to be.

Some of the industry’s big-
gest names — Apple, Hewlett-
Packard and Cisco Systems —
have all withdrawn from
CeBIT, and this year’s event is
going on without Motorola,
Nokia, Seiko Epson, Symantec
and China’s Lenovo.

Since 2001, when 850,000
visitors crowded the halls to
get a first glance at upcomil
technologies, the number co.
visitors has decreased almost
by half. Six years ago more
than 8,100 exhibitors came;
this year there will be 6,059
companies from 77 countries
on hand, 195 of them from the
United States.

GM
reports
higher
earnings

°GM

$770 million in special items
attributed mainly to the sale
of a 51 percent stake in GM’s
financial arm, General Motors
Acceptance, to an investment
group led by Cerberus Capital
Management.

But GM said it would have
made $180 million in the quar-
ter without the GMAC pro-
ceeds and other items.

Henderson said GM’s auto-
motive operations performed
better than expected for the

-quarter with increased reve-

nue in North America due to

higher transaction prices and. |
higher sales volumes and rev-"

enues overseas.

Worldwide, the company
said it made $228 million sell-
ing cars and trucks for the

‘quarter and $422 million for

the calendar year.

Its North American auto-
motive operations lost $14
million for the quarter and
$779 million for the year, but
the annual figures were $5 bil-
lion better than the previous
year, Henderson said.

The company also cut
structural costs by $6.8 billion
last year due mainly to buy-
outs and early retirement
offers accepted by more than
34,000 hourly workers.

It expects to reap the
results of $9 billion in cost
cuts this year.

But GM still is losing
money in North America and
has $47.4 billion in employee
healthcare and other long-
term liabilities, as well as
other challenges that will
have to be addressed in con-
tract talks this year with the
United Auto Workers, Hen-
derson said.

He would not answer ques-
tions about what GM would
seek in the bargaining.

INVESTMENTS

“It is not the number of
halls which is relevant to us
but the number of solutions
presented here,” said Ernst
Raue, a manager with
Deutsche Messe, which is
organizing the event that for-
mally opens its doors today.

After all, he said, the prod-
ucts designed and manufac-
tured by technology compa-
nies have become smaller —
but that is not the reason for
CeBIT’s decline. Instead, the
trade fair has outgrown itself,
he said. Ten years ago, it was
possible to get a general idea
of all IT trends at the show,
whether they were chip-mak-
ing advances or the latest in

~~ ‘cations. :

OTHEn. «..- ITS

But CeBIT is now in com-
petition with other, more spe-
cific marquee events such as
the annual International Con-
sumer Electronics Show in Las
Vegas and the 3GSM wireless

industry trade fair, held last
month in Barcelona, Spain.
In Germany, the annual



FABIAN BIMMER/AP
A SNEAK PEAK: Employees walk by the IBM booth at the
CeBIT fair on Wednesday in Hanover, Germany. The
biggest fair of its kind will open to the public today.

Internationale Funkausstel-
lung in Berlin is a competitor,
and the Games Convention in

EEL?

ULES



JUSTIN SULLIVAN/AFP-GETTY IMAGES

AT ALOSS: General Motors is losing money in North America and has $47.4 billion in
employee healthcare and other long-term liabilities. Above, new Chevrolet trucks are
displayed at the F.H. Dailey dealership in San Leandro, Calif.

GM also said it had a year-
end cash balance of $26.4 bil-
lion.

“We still expect to have
negative cash flow in 2007,”
Henderson said.

GM’s fourth-quarter profit
amounted to $1.68 per share
with special items, and 32
cents per share without them.
Without the GMAC sale pro-
ceeds, GM fell short of Wall
Street expectations for the
quarter.

A dozen analysts surveyed
by Thomson Financial pre-
dicted earnings of $1.19 per
share, excluding special
items.

NUMBERS FALL SHORT

For the year, GM’s loss
amounted to $3.50 per share
including special items and
$3.88 per share without them.
Excluding special items, GM

also fell short of Wall Street
expectations for the year.

Ten analysts polled by
Thomson Financial predicted
a profit of $4.39 per share
excluding the special items.

GWM’s financial results were
delayed by accounting trou-
bles and last year’s sale of the
GMAC stake.

Overall, its revenue for the
quarter declined to $51.2 bil-
lion from $51.7 billion in the
last quarter of 2005.

GMAC REVENUE

GM attributed the decline
to the exclusion of GMAC
revenue starting Dec. 1.

The company also took a
$284 million loss from GMAC
to its bottom line in the fourth
quarter due mainly to prob-
lems with GMAC’s residential
mortgage division.

Also Wednesday, GM said

that as part of the GMAC sale,
it will pay $1 billion to GMAC
by the end of the month to
bring up its equity to where it
was on Nov. 30 when the deal
closed. The payment is neces-
sary because of deterioration
in GMAC’s residential mort-
gage results due in large part
to subprime loans, and earn-
ings restatements by GMAC,
GM said.

GM also said it would
restate its net earnings from
the first three quarters of
2006 back through calendar
year 2002 due to the account-
ing problems.

The changes ranged from
an 8.7 percent decrease in
2003 to a 10.2 percent increase
in 2002. GM shares fell 26
cents to close at $30.25 on the
New York Stock Exchange.

They have traded in a 52-
week range of $19 to $37.24.

Mutual funds may sidestep some fallout

*MUTUALS

about 5.7 percent so far this
year.

“It’s extremely sector spe-
cific. It’s almost like you’re
overweighting in subsectors,”
Tjornehoj said. “If you are
that invested into a sector you
darn well better keep your
eye on the ball at all times.”

Andrew Gunter, an analyst
at investment research pro-
vider at Morningstar, notes
some funds might suffer tem-
porary hits because some
investors have rushed to sell
stocks of a wide range of lend-
ers and even of homebuilders.

“It might be a case of
throwing out the baby with
the bath water. Their worries
about subprime lenders might
have been overblown.”

Guater noted, for example,
that the FBR Small Cap Finan-
cial Fund is a good fund that

has struggled within its spe-
cialty financial category this
year. However, he encourages
investors to take a longer-
term view.

“He focuses on regional
lenders,” Gunter said of port-
folio manager David Ellison.
“He pays attention to how
risky or nonrisky an institu-
tion’s loans are. He takes care
not get burned by something
like a New Century Finan-
cial.”

So far this year, the fund is
down 6.88 percent, though its
three-year annualized return
is 3.87 percent and its five-
year annualized return is 12.91
percent.

“This is the kind of thing
that happens with an indus-
try-specific fund. It can be
subject to the whim of what’s
out there. It can get clobbered
because it’s not diversified,”
Gunter said.

He noted that even some
large-capitalization funds
could face “a lot” of exposure
to larger financials whose
shares might fall as investors
face jitters over the lending
industry in general.

Tjornehoj noted that funds
that hold big lenders like
HSBC Holdings PLC could
suffer. Europe’s largest bank
and a large presence in the

U.S. mortgage market last -

month alarmed investors with
the disclosure it will need
about $10.6 billion to cover
soured loans. Tjornehoj noted
that the Fidelity China Region
Fund last year held about an 11
stake in HSBC, which has long
had a presence in Asia.

The fund is down about 2
percent for the year but up
16.2 percent on a three-year
annualized basis and 14.4 per-
cent on a five-year annualized
basis.

_ business

Some funds have concen-
trations in companies that
only draw a small part of their
from subprime
loans. For example, several
Weitz Partners funds ended
2006 with stakes of more than
5 percent in Countrywide
Financial Corp., whose stock
is down about 17 percent for
the year,.even though sub-
prime loans don’t make up the
biggest part of its business.

Several of the Weitz Part-
ners funds are down more
than 1] percent for the year.

“I don’t think we’re going
to have a lot of handwriting
among investors over the sub-
prime lenders,” Tjornehoj
said. “It’s just not an area of
the economy that’s going to
blow up in terms that we
might describe as Enron-like.
The worst offenders will not
be missed and the big banks
are not set to fail.”



Leipzig has been successful
since its inception in 2002.

CeBIT still blends a bit of
everything, from consumer
products to the latest in back-
end servers, said Willi Ber-
chtold, the president of Bit-
kom, Germany’s IT associa-
tion.

“Nowhere else can innova-
tions be seen in such diver-
sity,” he said. “Converging
technologies require a large
platform and this platform def-
initely exists only in one place
in the world: here in Hanover.”

Some of the key items on
display this year focus on geo-

graphical information systems, .

or GIS, the European counter-
part to the more common, and
U.S.-operated global position-
ing system for satellite naviga-
tion.

RUSSIAN INFLUENCE

Russia is also a major topic
and CeBIT has made it the
fair’s partner country.

ECONOMY

Since 2000, the volume of
Russian software exports has
increased by more than six.
times to $1.8 billion in 2006,
Russian Information Technol-
ogy Minister Leonid Reiman
said in a statement.

About 150 Russian exhibi-
tors are showing off their
products and skills at CeBIT,
despite the country’s reputa-
tion as a haven for hackers.

CeBIT organizers have
moved to keep the event rele-
vant and plan to shorten it
from seven days to six starting
next year. It will also focus
more on the professional seg-
ment, or businesses, instead of
catering to hobbyists and the
merely interested, Raue said.

And while some of the
industry’s top players are
gone, others still view CeBIT
as a “good barometer for the
economic situation and the
general feeling on the market,”
said Volker Smid, European
chief of software firm Novell.

Trade deficit reaches
a record high in 2006

° DEFICIT

“The hope is that the tran-
sition to a lower current
account deficit goes
smoothly, but the danger is
that people stop loaning us
money before they start buy-
ing our goods,” said David
Wyss, chief economist at
Standard & Poor’s in New
York. The current-account is
the broadest measure of trade
because it covers not only
trade in goods and services
but also investment flows
between countries. It also
represents the amount of U.S.
assets that have been trans-
ferred into foreign hands to
cover the gap between Ameri-
can exports and imports.

Democrats say the current
account deficit illustrates that
America’s ‘control ‘over its
economic destiny is being

‘transferred to countries like

China and Japan that hold siz-
able amounts of U.S. govern-
ment bonds and other assets.

“Our economic security
should not be in the hands of
China or Saudi Arabia or any
other entity because this
administration can’t control
government spending and
because they haven’t effec-
tively negotiated trade deals
around the world,” said Sen.
Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., a
leading critic of President
Bush’s trade policies.

The new report indicated
the current account deficit for
the final three months of this

COMPUTER MAKER

year did show improvement,
dropping by 14.6 percent to
$195.8 billion after hitting a
record of $229.4 billion in the
third quarter. The improve-
ment reflected a big drop in
oil prices from their record
highs this summer.

Despite five straight years
of the current account deficit
hitting new records, econo-
mists said there were signs
the imbalance may narrow a
bit this year. Economist Nigel
Gault with Global Insight pre-
dicted the 2007 current
account deficit would shrink
slightly to $807 billion, the
first decline since 2001.

A deficit of $856.7 billion in
2006 meant the U.S. was
transferring more than $2 bil-
lion daily to foreigners last
year to finance the trade gap.

For all of 2006, the United
States hada goods deficit of
$836 billion, a surplus in ser-
vices of $70.7 billion and a
deficit in investment flows of
$7.3 billion. In addition, the
government paid out $84.1 bil-
lion in a category known as
unilateral transfers, which
covers foreign aid.

The report also showed
that foreign direct investment
to buy or expand companies
in the United States jumped
67 percent to $183.6 billion
last year, the highest level in
six years. This increase came
in spite of the controversy
over efforts by Dubai Ports
World to take over operations
at several U.S. ports.

Charges are dropped
against ex-HP exec

*HP

from filing criminal charges
against Hunsaker, DeLia or
DePante — if they so choose,”
the attorney general’s office
said in its statement.

Dunn, Hunsaker, DeLia
and Depante did not attend
Wednesday’s hearing.

A fifth defendant, private
investigator Bryan Wagner,
was also charged by the state
in October. But the state’s
case against him was dropped
after Wagner pleaded guilty
to the same charges in federal
court and agreed to testify for
the prosecution.

No other federal charges
have been filed in connection
with HP’s effort to spy on its
own board members.

The boardroom scandal
shook Hewlett-Packard, with
Dunn stepping down as chair-
woman and several other top
executives resigning over

their roles in the subterfuge.

HP’s investigation, which
took place in 2005 and 2006,
erupted into a national scan-
dal after HP disclosed that the
detectives it hired had
obtained the private phone
records of directors, employ-
ees and journalists in an effort
to ferret out the source of
media leaks.

Using a shady tactic known
as “pretexting,” the detectives
obtained the Social Security
numbers of their targets and
fooled telephone companies
into divulging their detailed
call logs.

Shares of the region’s old-
est and biggest technology
company were unscathed by
the scandal, as the stock price
steadily rose through much of
last year.

HP’s stock was up 15 cents,
to $39.70, in afternoon trading
Wednesday on the New York
Stock Exchange.

LATE TRADING _





4pm. 6:35 p.m. Late 4 pay 6:35 p.m. Late
Stock Thr, lose close Chg. volume | Stock Tkr. close close_—Chg._-volume
Domtarg — UFS 9.50 9.50 ‘ 92931 Annaly NLY 13.80 1380 * 20114
CaremkRx CMX 61.08 61.08 * 72290 Weyerh wy 78.83 7883 ° 18605
Altria MO 83.90 84.00 +.10 67408 BrcdeCm BRCD 9.80 9.82 +.02 17494
Nasdl00Tr QQQQ 42.99 42.99 * 44918 | FordM F 751 752 +01 16626
SPOR SPY 139.28 139.28 * 32145 | ishemMkt EM = 110.37. 110.37 * 15209

OilSVHT OlH 139.26 139.37. +.11 30276
SP Engy XLE 57.20 57.20 . 27358
WalMart WMT 45.73 45.73 5 26163
Qwesttm Q 8.57 8.57 : 22990
ClearChan CCU 35.02 35.02 = 21985
DollarG 0G 21.01 21.01 : 20902
Hallibtnss = HAL 31.83 31.83 : 20794
Alcatelluc = ALU 11.93 11.62 “31 20420

RetailHT RTH 99.10 99.00 10 15000
Tyson TSN 18.00 18.00 ° 14664
iSHR2K nya IWM 77.25 75.65 “1.60 13513
Microsoft MSFT 27.40 27.40 a 13429
Motorola MOT 18.40 18.44 +.04 13055
Starbucks — SBUX 29.32 29.32 . 12298
OnSmend ONNN — 10.04 10.04 ‘ 10174





"For up-to-date stock quotes, go to www.MiamiHerald.com and click on Business



THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 5B

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

MUST SELL. eer

MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES
| ELEUTHERA - LOT NO. 14B & 7B, PALMETTO POINT

All that piece parcel or lot of land and improvement comprising of 20,355 sq. ft. being Lot #14B and 7B and situated in the Palmetto
Point District of the Island of Eleuthera, Northward of the public road which runs from the Palmetto Point settlement to Savannah
Sound in the coastal area northward of Ingraham’s Pond, and which said piece, parcel or Lot of land and improvements forms a
portion of several parcels of land containing 2.947 acres or thereabouts and which also includes Lot No. 7B. This site encompasses a
2-storey structure comprising 3-bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathorooms, front room, dining room, dining room, family room, utility room, pantry,
kitchen, stairwell, basement, 2-car garage and attic office. The entire house is equipped with central air-conditioning. The upper floor
to the porch area has been converted into a storage and an area for the irrigation system and equipment. There is a pool area at the
rear of this building approximately 537.14 sq. ft. with the garage area approximately 777 sq. ft. This area is complete with all utilities

j and services available.
Appraisal: $513,959.00












LOT NO. 1490 GOLDEN GATES SECTION 2

All that lot of land having an area of 6,000 sq. ft. being lot no. 1490 of the subdivision known and designated as Golden Gates, the —
\ said subdivision situated in the southwestern district of New Providence, bahamas. This property is comprised.of ‘a 25 yer old single:

| family residence consisting of approximately 2,480 sq. ft. of enclosed living space with three bedrooms, three bathrooms, living,
dining rooms and kitchen. The land is on a grade and level, however the site appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the posibility
| of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods of the year. The grounds are fairly kept, ith improvements including driveway, walkway -
and low shrubs. Yard is enclosed on one side wth a 5 foot chain linked fencing and a low cement block wall to the front..

Appraisal: $162,400.00

Traveling west on Carmichael Road turn left then right onto the service road opposite Bahamas Faith Ministries Complex, then first left
again after passing clico and pre-school. The subject house is the 6th house left painted green trimmed white.



LOT NO. 4 GAMBLE HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION

ee| Alll that lot of land having an area of 5,000 sq. ft. being

«| Lot No. 4 of the subdivision known and designated as
Gamble Heights, the said subdivision situated in the
southern district of New Providence Bahamas. Located
on the subject property is a single storey duplex apartment
building containing one 2, and one 1-bedroom apartment
each unit consisting of 1-bath, closets, dining rooms and
kitchen. This building is approximately 2 years old with
an enclosed living space of approximately 1,213 sq. ft.
| the land is one a grade and level; however the site appears
to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility of

LOT NO. 1, BLOCK NO. 45,
ELEUTHERA ISLAND SHORES

All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of 9,644
sq. ft. being lot #1 in block 45, Section “E” in the
subdivision called and known as Eleuthera Island Shores
Subdivision, situated in the vicinity of Hatchet Bay Harbour,
on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahams. This site encompasses
a two storey building which is approximately 14 yrs old

and is abandoned. There is a wooden landing
approximately 7’-4” wide by 20’-0” on the upper level, approximately 1,610 sq. ft. of enclosed living



space, with 3-bedrooms, 2-bathrooms, front room, dining room, den, kitchen, and utility room. The flooding during annual heavy rainy periods of the year.
wooden porch on the upper level is approximately 148sq. ft. There is also a water cistern under the :
dining room floor area. Alll utilities and services available. Appraisal: $143,217.60
Traveling south on Blue Hill Road take the first corner left after passing aed yh Faith United ark Church
teal: and Primary School. This corner is slant and just opposite St Vincent Road, then take second left (paved
Appraisal: $1 51,007.00 road) go all the way to the end around the curve then make a left then first right up the gravel road, all the

. way over the hill. The subject duplex is the 3rd building on the right hand side painted light yellow trimmed
This property is situated in Eleuthera Island Shores. white with high steps in front.



MURPHY TOWN (ABACO)

Lot #60 with a structure, lot size 60 x 115 ft., 6,900 sq. ft., 10
ft., above sea level but below road level and would flood in a
severe hurricane the duplex has dimensions of 60 ft by 30 ft
partly of wood and partly of cement blocks with one section
virtually finished and occupied with blocks up to window level
and floor ready to be poured. The roof is asphalt shingles, the.

DUNDAS TOWN (ABACO)

3 two bed, 1 bath fourplex 9,000 sq. ft., lot no. 18b with an
area for a small shop. Age 12 years the land is a portion of
one of the Dundas Town Crown Allotment parcels stretching
from Forest Drive to Front Street, being just under a quarter

acre in size and on the lowside. A concrete block structure, and | de D ’
with asphalt shingle roof and L-shape in design with a total interior walls and ceiling are of 1x6 pine and the floor of ceramic

length of 70x26 ft, plus 50 x 22 ft., 2,920 sq. ft., the interior tiles. The finished work is average/below, 2 bedrooms, one

walls are concrete blocks, ceiling is sheet rock and the floors a bath, living/dining. The occupied portion of the structure is
of vinyl tiles. not complete. Age: 10 years old.

Appraisal: $265,225.00 Appraisal: $75,660.00





MURPHY TOWN ABACO

Alll that parcel of land having an approximate area of 9,000 sq ft, located on the above mentioned lot is a single family wooden structure, 25ft by 40 ft” —
with asphalt shingled roof. This house is approximately 15 yr old and comprising of 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, living/dining area and kitchen. This house

is in need of some serious repairs. The future life of this house depends on the repairs that will be carried out. Without repairs itis not more than about 5 .~
years. If upgrading and maintenance is carried out it could be longer the land rises above road level, to a height in excess of approximately 15ft above .
sea level, with no likelihood of flooding in a hurricane. ws

Appraisal: $30,000.00 .

This house is located off the main Murphy Town Road about 150 ft to the Northeast of the corner and is painted blue trimmed white. —





LOT NO. 6 BLOCK 13 WOODLAND WAY, WINTON HEIGHTS (NASSAU)

All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of 14,897 sq. ft. being lot 6, block 13, in the Subdivision known as Winton Heights, this property is comprised of a 26 year old
11/2 storey single family resident consisting of approximately 2,567 sq. ft. of enclosed living space with 3 bed rooms, 2 baths, upstairs and downstairs consisting of a foyer,
guest bedroom and bath, laundry room, kitchen, powder room, sunken living area, tv room and dining area. Climate control is provided by wall air conditioning units throughout
the house quality of construction and maintenance is fair as a good amount of remedial work is needed on the roof and plumbing system. The effective age of the building is
} seven years the property is rectangular in shape on flat terrain, and on a level grade slightly elevated above the road to disallow flooding during annual heavy rainy periods. The
| grounds improvements include a concrete wall with two double gates at the front with chain-link fencing otherwise, open patios at the front and back, and a 20,000 gal rainwater
cistern under the front patio overall, the grounds are attractive and well kept.

Appraisal: $385,369.75

Traveling east on Prince Charles Drive go pass Winton Super Value, then second left to T Junction, turn right at T junction and the subject property is the third house right painted
yellow trimmed white.



VACANT PROPERTIES



LOT NO. 10B, PALMETTO POINT
All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land containing 9,000 sq. ft., and being Lot No. 10B situated North of Ingraham’s Pond and Eastwardly of North Palmetto Point, on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas, and is bounded and abutting as follows:- on the north by Lot No. 3B and running thereon for a distance of (90) ft; on the East by Lot No. 11B and running thereon for a distance of (100) ft, on the south by a 20’ wide
road reservation and running thereon (90) ft on the west by Lot No. 9B running thereon for a distance of (100) Ft, the said Lot is overgrown with shrubs and is in close proximity of a white sandy beach. This neighborhood is zoned
residential development and is quiet and peaceful with a topography of approximately 50ft and because of this there is no danger of flooding. The area is approximately 80% developed with all utilities and services available.

APPRAISAL: $72,000.00



MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA

All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land containing 44,714 sq. ft., and designated “E” which forms a portion of land known as “Mutton Fish Point” situated about two miles northwestward of the settlement of Gregory Town on the
island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and is bounded and abutting as follows:- Northwardly by the land now or formerly the property of Coridon Limited, and running thereon for a distance
of 393.13 hundredth ft.; outwardly by a 30’ wide road reservation and running thereon for a distance of 402.57 hundredth ft; eastwardly by the main Queen's Highway and running thereon for a distance of 109.73 hundredth ft;
westwardly by land now or formerly the property of Caridon Limited and running thereon for a distance of 110.75 hundredth ft. this property having an area of approximately 44,714 sq. ft. this neighbourhood is zoned commercial/residential
development and is quiet, peaceful and has a topography of approximately 2 ft. with all utilities and servic~s available.

APPRAISAL: $51,421.00



MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA
All that piece, parcel or tract of land containing 1 acre situated about two miles northwestward of the settlement of Gregory Town on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and is bounded
and abutting as follows:- Northwestwardly by the main Queens Highway and is running thereon for a distance of 125.462 feet northwestwardly by the land now of formerly the property of Coridon Limited, and running thereon for a
distance of 390.274 hundredth ft.; southwestwardly by a 30’ wide road reservation and running thereon for a distance of 128.128 hundredth ft; southeastwardly by the land now or formerly the property of the Venor and running
thereon for a distance of 322.955 hundredth ft. This property having an area of approximately 44,847.76 sq. ft. This neighbourhood is zoned commercial development and is quiet and peaceful with a topography of approximately 2

ft. with all utilities and services available.
APPRAISAL: $51,421.00

This lot is vacant land and is located in the area known as “Mutton Fish Point”



MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA

All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land and improvements containing approximately 44,587 sq. ft. and designated “F” which forms a portion of land known as “Mutton Fish Point” situated about two miles northwestward of the
settlement of Gregory Town on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and bounded and abutting as follows:- Northwardly by the land now or formerly the property of Coridon Limited,
and running thereon for a distance of 383.56 hundredth ft; southwardly by land now of formerly the property of Caridon Limited and running thereon for a distance of 393-19 hundredth ft. eastwardly by the main Queen’s Highway
and running thereon for a distance of 113.40 hundredth ft. westwardly by land now or formerly the property of Coridon Limited and running thereon for a distance of 113.40 hundredth ft. this neighbourhood is zoned commercial/residential
development and is quiet, peaceful and has a topography of approximately 2 ft. with all utilities and services available.

APPRAISAL: $51,276.00

\

- For Pend of sale Pye] ey mE Led Pentel

Philip White @ 502-3077 email philip.white@scotiabank.com or Harry Collie @ 502-3034 © email harry.collie@scotiabank.com * Fax 356-3851



To view properties go to: www.stopnshopbahamas.com - Click on “Real IC) Mall” - Click on doorway “Enter Online Store”

\



PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





NOTICE OF VACANCY

PUBLIC LIBRARIAN

Educational Requirement










Masters degree in Library Science or Library and Information
Science from an accredited college or university





Experience

Five years of experience in Library administration, including
three years of administration and supervisory responsibility.





Functions



The successful candidate will be required to manage and direct
the operations and activities of a public library; develop and
administer library goals, objectives and procedures; monitor
and review new library acquisitions and select and acquire
new librarian materials.







Please submit resume and supporting documentation (o:





P.O. Box F-42666
or
Fax No. 351-6422
Freeport, Grand Bahama






On or before March 23rd, 2007






COMPUTERS LIMITED
Setting the Standard”

sere) oie) gFeU ety to join our Know How Teamâ„¢
as PRODUCT LINE MANAGER for

Canada-Bahamas group
can ‘benefit everyone’ on
merchandise imports

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

A GROUP formed to
enhance trade and investment
links between Canada and the
Bahamas has “the opportunity
to benefit everyone” by help-
ing lo increase the former’s
share of merchandise imports
to this nation above the exist-
ing 2.5-3 per cent, Canada’s
senior trade commissioner said

yesterday.

Russell Merifield, speaking
at the launch of the Canada-
Bahamas Business Council,
told Bahamian business exec-

utives that Canada’s share of

Bahamian merchandise
imports had not improved
since 191, when the then-
Bahamas governor visited his
country to promote trade,
tourism and investment oppor-
tunities in the Bahamas.



M&E Limited



As a privately-owned, mid-sized Bahamian
Company and the authorized Caterpillar dealer
in the Bahamas, we are seeking a Financial
Rental Coordinator. The candidate should
have a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting.

He/She should be knowledgeable in the field’

of Marine Engineering and Inventory Control.
The candidate should be able to develop
inventory systems for rental equipment, be
able to implement a system for service
inventory for rental machines, create a

Back then, Canada’s share
of the Bahamian merchandise
imports market was 2 per cent,
with the US enjoying an 80 per
cent-plus share, and Mr Meri-
field said this had not changed
much.

“T think there is an oppor-
tunity to benefit everyone by
improving this aspect of our
commercial relationship,” Mr
Merifield said.

“What we’re doing is trying
to find new ways to build rela-
tionships.”

The Bahamas has attracted
many Canadian investors, such
as Royal Bank of Canada, Sco-
tiabank, FirstCaribbean Inter-
national Bank (Bahamas), the
YVRAS firm that will take
over management and rede-
velopment of Lynden Pindling
International Airport, the own-
ers of Cable Bahamas and the
Canadian pension fund that
still owns a stake in the British
Colonial Hilton.

Mr Merifield said these and
others were ready to “continue
to build the Bahamas”,
although the investment
approvals and permitting
processes needed to be “quick-
er and simpler”.

Tanya Wright, the Bahamas
Chamer of Commerce’s presi-
dent, said the organisation had
discussed with the Canadian
High Commission, which has
its regional head office in
Jamaica, ways in which the dia-
logue between them on
increasing two-way trade and
investment opportunities “pro-
duces something meaningful;
that there’s a productive end”.

Mrs Wright said the’ Cham-
ber had developed a similar
relationship to the, Canada-
Bahamas Business. Council
with India, and was working
on another with China.

“We are poised to ensure
that every business oppoortu-
nity out there, we will seek
them out and bring them to
you,” Mrs Wright said. “The
partnership could not have
been better made.”

She added that the link-up
with the Canadian High Com-
mission showed “the value of
maintaining the kind of busi-
ness environment that stimu-
lates” interest in the Bahamas
from foreign investors who
could provide spin-off oppor-
tunities for Bahamian busi-

“nesses.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JEANNIE BELIAS OF
FINLAYSON STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
, from the 15th day of March, 2007 to the Minister responsible

maintenance program for company’s rental
fleet, and monitor inventory system levels
among technicians. The candidate should also
have some knowledge about purchasing parts,
inventory, and motors, and be able to
coordinate the delivery of these parts, motors

KONICA MINOLTA

We are looking for a dedicated and enthusiastic
individual committed to the strategic development
of the KONICA MINOLTA brand in The Bahamas.

_ The ideal candidate will be a team player,
goal oriented, professional, with at least 5 years
relevant experience in the field of copier products
and a proven success record in sales. Excellent
communication skills and proficiency in the use of
comp ters are essential.

A gener us remuneration and benefits package is

: offered to the



and equipment.
professional who thrives on the challenge of
developing outstanding custéher relations and
service excellence.

Having both academic and practical
background in the field of Accounting/Inventory
Control is an asset.

Send complete resume with education and work
experience to M & E Limited, P. O. Box N-3238,
Nassau Bahamas, Attention: Human Resources
Department, or email me@me-l|td.com.

Only persons being interviewed for this position
will be contacted.



The Wasp Nest Boutique
and Fab Finds Gift Shop
mo Asolo) Cay Shopping Center
Tel: 362-6983

idewalk Sale

10:00am - 6:00pm
SELECTED ITEMS WILL BE $5.00 TO $30.00

This person should be_a.ff. .

fo Nationality and Gtizenstip, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

Bahamas.

BUSINESS FOR SALE

Well established Fashion Retail
Business. Well known and.

. respected worldwide Franchise,

20 years at same prime locatiox

Email: b.inquiries@gmail.com

Trading Futures, Options, Equities and Forex?
direct access trading with state of the art front ends to
all exchanges highly competitive rates outstanding
services full 24/7 it support talk to a Nassau based AP
of the leading brokerage house with more than 50

billion in assets!

Please call for a further information,
demonstration and consultation
324-2295 or email: ctaw@coralwave.com

Director International
Client Services



Small Nassau based financial services company requires
self motivated and dynamic individual to lead its initiative
to promote tax and risk management structures for
successful small to medium sized businesses engaged in
ecommerce and international commerce with the specific
objective of exploiting synergies with captive insurance.

The successful applicant will have skills and experience

in the following areas:

1) payment platforms for businesses engaged in
ecommerce and international trading

2) risk management for the ownership of intellectual
property and for internet based operations

3) tax planning for ecommerce business and international
trading companies



90-75%:

HUGE SAVINGS ON DESIGNER CLOTHING
& ACCESSORIES FOR LADIES!
CHILDRENS CLOTHING AND TOYS
HOUSEHOLD ITEMS & MORE!

4) knowledge of taxation and organization of captive
insurance companies

A relevant tertiary degree and professional qualification
is required along with a minimum of 10 years experience
in this area.

Applications to the Chief Operating Officer, P.O. Box
SS-5382, Nassau, Bahamas.





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 7B



EU deal to cost

ahamas $5-$10m
in taxes, not $14m

FROM page 1B

unit was due to begin shortly.
Provisions were also being
made in the forthcoming 2007-
2008 Budget to establish a
Bahamas Embassy in Brussels,
which would deal with both the

EU and the WTO “should we,

proceed with accession to [full
membership] in the WTO”.

Mr Mitchell pointed out that
the CBI had already expired,
and although the US was a
seeking a WTO waiver to
extend this in the face of oppo-
sition from Paraguay and oth-
ers, if granted this would only
extend the agreement until
December 31, 2008.

The EPA is the replacement
for the Cotonou Agreement
that the EU previously held
with the Bahamas and other 76
countries in the African,
Caribbean and Pacific (ACP)
group. *

Both it and the CBI are
under pressure because they are
considered discriminatory under
WTO tules, since they provide
the Bahamas and Caribbean
region with trade benefits and
preferences that others do not
get. This violates Most
Favoured Nation (MEN) prin-
ciples, which require countries
to treat others equally when it
comes to trade and not dis-
criminate.

In addition, the EPA will also
involve reciprocity, as Mr
Mitchell said, meaning that the
Bahamas will have to offer to
EU producers and exporters the
same benefits and terms of
trade that Europe offers
Bahamas-based exporters.

This means the one-way pref-
erential regime is over, requir-
ing the Bahamas to remove
import and stamp duties on EU
goods that are imported into
this nation, hence the tax rev-
enue loss.

But what Mr Mitchell did not
say is that the Bahamian tax
structure will be impacted far
more heavily if this nation is
forced to negotiate a replace-
ment for the CBI with the US
that is based on reciprocity.

More than 80 per cent of this



¢ Thursday February 1, 2007

!
“Eaporvering Baharmtans *
COB ~ Lecture Theatre
Presenter - Mr. Gleon Ferguson

» Thursday February 8, 2007

BT V.L - Old Trail Road
Presenter» Mr Daniel Thompson

» Thursday February 15, 2007
Busmess Finance and Venture Capital
COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenter - Mr. Jerome Gomez



Doing Business via the Internet

Possibilities of Pitfalls

Thursday March 15, 2007
at 7:00 p.m.

The College Of The Bahamas

(Bahamas Tourism Training Center)

‘Husiness Planning, Forecasting s Marketing

nation’s imports come from the
US, and Customs revenue
annually accounts for about 60
per cent of the Government’s
taxes. Reciprocity will require
the Bahamas to remove import
tariffs on most goods, driving
tax reform in this nation.

In the EPA, the Bahamas has
effectively decided to trade-off
what it believes is a minor loss
of tax revenues in favour of pro-
tecting duty-free market access
to the EU for its exporters,
namely Bacardi’s rum, the
seafoods industry, and
Freeport-based Polymers Inter-
national.

The loss of such duty-free
market access, Mr Mitchell said,
would be “significant”, as
shown by “careful analysis”.

He added that one attractive
feature of the talks between the
EU and the Bahamas on the
EPA was that the agreement
included a development com-
ponent, focusing on issues such
as education and training.

Mr Mitchell indicated that
this was especially important,
given that the size and scale of
foreign direct investment pro-
jects taking place in the
Bahamas was placing heavy
demands on the Bahamian
workforce. |

Yet there were not enough
workers with the required skills
to meet this demand, the minis-
ter added, forcing employers to
hire expatriate workers, some-

thing that was causing resent-

ment among Bahamians.
“There is a lbour shortage

because of the lack of trained

workers,” Mr Mitchell said.

“There is some resentment

developing in the population,
because they see opportunities
abounding, but these opportu-
nities are passing them by.”

The EPA , he added, would
deal with the terms of invest-
ment in all parties, so that
developers would know what
the rules were, in addition to
setting out the terms of trade
in goods and services.

Trade, Mr Mitchell said,
would be a major “focus” for
the Bahamian government,
especially over the next five
years, with this nation “still
grappling with how to integrate
our economy with the rest of
the world”.

“The entire CARICOM
region, of which we are part, is
still struggling to come to terms
with the requirements of reci-
procity in trade,” Mr Mitchell
said, noting that the EU Trade
Commissioner, Peter Mandel-
son, had expressed hopes of
reaching a trade agreement with
CARIFORUM by July 2007.

He indicated that the
Bahamas was most concerned
with ensuring Bacardi’s run
products retained duty-free
access to European markets.

A briefing prepared for the
Cabinet's sub-committee on
trade by the Ministry of For-
eign Affairs, which has respon-
sibility for international trade,
previously warned that the
Bahamas would lose “its
favourable $20 million trade
balance" with the EU if it failed
to sign the EPA, while hun-
dreds of jobs would be jeopar-
dised if Bacardi and Polymers
International shut their respec-
tive operations due to their

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WILSAID AUGUSTIN, OF
TREASURE CAY, ABACO, BAHAMAS is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The

Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 8th day of March,
2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and

Citizenship, P.O.Box N-

BAIC

In Conjunction With

Will Host

siness Empowerment

Presenter Mr. Dudrick Edwards

Assistant Professor
School of Business, The College of The Bahamas



(Lecture Theatre)

§
{
t
i

7147,

Nassau, Bahamas.



The College of The Bahamas

To sensitize Bahamians of
the business opportunities
available to them now, and
to encourage them to

exploit such opportunities,
thereby empowering them

to become self employed.

February |-April 5, 2007
(See Schedule Below)
1-00 p.m, Lecture/ Presentation |

Interactive Panel Discussion
followed by Entrepreneur
Testimonials and Q&A session. |

- The College of The Bahamas |
(Bahaovas Tvarism Yrainiog Coste)
(Lectore Theatre}

Change your buying habits, “BUY to SELL’,

FREE of charge |

Schedule of Weekly Seminars

« Thursday February 22, 2007,
‘Book-Keeping - Accounting for the Business
COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenter - Mr. Christopher Stuart

Thursday March 1, 2007

Business Opportunities in The Bahamas
COB - Lecture Theatre

Presenter - Mr. Benjamin Bailey
Thursday March 8, 2007

‘Forging a New Vision for the Bahamian {nvestor
COB - Lecture Theatre

become self employed and create wealth.

» Thursday March 15, 2007
Doing Business via the Intemet - Possrbulities
priffalls COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenter - Mr. Dudrick Edwards

« Thursday March 22, 2007
fap oS Export, Customs, Concessions
COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenter - Bahamas Customs Representative

« Thursday March 29, 2007
Book Keeping + Accounting for the Business
COB - Lecture Theatre

Presenter - Mr. Christopher Stuart

Presenters » Mr. Donald Demeritte
Mr. Paul Major

« Thursday April 5, 2007

Government Regulations and Business License
COB - Lecture Theatre

Presenter - Registrar Representative

CONTACT: Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation (BAIC) at 322-3740 or 325-1912

Mr. Lester Stuart / Mr. Le-Var Miller



exports becoming uncompeti-
tive.

The Government document
detailed that the Bahamas
exported some $66.315 million
worth of goods to the EU in
2004, importing about $43 mil-
lion for a favourable $20 mil-
lion trade balance. But for Bac-
ardi, loss of duty-free access
would see tariffs imposed on its
rum equivalent to $5 per gal-
lon.

The Ministry of Foreign
Affairs document said: "An
additional cost of $5 per gallon
would make the Bahamian-pro-
duced rum uncompetitive, and
would likely cause Bacardi to
shift its production to either
Puerto Rico or Mexico, where
the MEN tariffs are not applic-
able.

Just over $35 million worth
of sea food products were
exported to the EU from the
Bahamas in 2004, and loss of
duty-free access would lead to a
12.5 per cent tariff being
imposed. The Ministry of For-
eign Affairs briefing note said
this would raise the price of
Bahamian lobster by $2-$2.50
per pound, making it uncom-
petitive.

The loss to the Bahamas
would be the value of the lob-
ster exported, and the income
loss of the Bahamian fishermen
who catch the lobster, as well
as $649,259 in royalties.

:

SSS



3 IMMEDIATE POSITIONS

“Showroom Sales Associate”

Highly self-motivated person with sharp,
dynamic personality

Strong interpersonal skills
Fulltime and able to work weekends

Computer literate

The ideal candidates possessing knowledge in
either furniture sales, fabric sales, plumbing
hardware or tile is preferable.

Salary commensurate with experience. _
Please fax resume to: Showroom Sales
RAPS) |





MAINTENANCE/HANDYMAN
WANTED

A leading retail company has an immediate opening
for a Maintenance/Handyman














BASIC REQUIREMENTS

1. Should’ have a basic working knowledge electrical,
plumbing and general carpentry repairs.

. Must have a clean current Police Record

. Must be a self-starter with drive and determination

. Must be able to work with minimum supervision.

. Previous experience not required but would be an
asset.

nABWN



Persons meeting the above requirements should submit
their Resumes via fax to the address below.

The positions offer career opportunities with excellent
salary and benefits package.

THE OPERATIONS MANAGER
Fax: 328-5902



PREMIER TRAVEL

M5Y Colling Avenue *~ P.C.Box N-G696 * Messou. Be homes

328-8264 / S28-G257

OE aS

MAINTENANCE SUPERVISOR

The incumbent will have overall responsibility for the efficient operation

and maintenance of equipment and machinery, with a keen focus on detail
in keeping with international standards. He/she will also be customer oriented
with a track record of mastery in mechanical areas. Specifically he/she will
be required to:

> Ensure the effective and efficient performance of the maintenance
function for the following assets:
Building and the environment
Packaging lines and blow molding operations
Utilities supplies: Electrical distribution, high and low pressure
air, refrigeration and RO water systems

Manage the workshop and the execution of planned and preventative
maintenance program
Diagnose equipment malfunction and remove, install or effect repairs

as necessary

Evaluate the maintenance performance in his/her area of responsibility,
compile reports and effectively use performance data

Maintain technical integrity of plant to attain production targets and
keep abreast with latest technological advancements

Ideal candidate would have strong Electrical & Mechanical Engineering
experience, demonstrate a proficiency to trouble shoot and repair common
electrical problems and have the ability to work independently.

Please send resume to:

Human Resources Manager
P.O. BOX N-3207

DA 16436

NASSAU, BAHAMAS





PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

THE TRIBUNE

ee re
US real estate downturn
may harm resort projects



































Assistant Manager

Position Available Immediately
At

Domino’s Pizza

Qualifications:

¢ You should have a High School Diploma
Past managerial experience

Certificate in Management 1s a plus
Must be available for day and night shifts,
including weekends
You should demonstrate strong communication,
leadership, motivational and people management
skills

You should have a valid driver’s license
You must have a GREAT attitude towards
customer service!

Basic responsibility to include:
Maintain product, service and image standard
To assist in supervision of all phases of
production.

To maintain a high level of efficiency &
productivity in all areas of store operation

Please send résumé on or before
October 2, 2006

Attention: Human Resource Department
P.O. Box SS-6704

Nassau, Bahamas

Or Fax 356-7855



GOVERNMENT NOTICE

PUBLIC WORKS ACT (CHAPTER 26)

NAMING OF THE MAIN
ROADWAY ON RUSSELL ISLAND TO

THE VIVIAN PINDER DRIVE

Pursuant to Section 3 of the Public Works
Act, Notice is hereby given that the Minister
responsible for Public | Works _ intends
to name the main roadway at Russell
Island as the VIVIAN PINDER DRIVE.

Any person objecting to proposed naming of the
said roadway may give Notice, in writing, of
the objecting and reason therefor to the Minister
within one month of the date of publication of the
Notice, by letter addressed. to.

Ag. Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Works & Utilities
P.O. Box N-8156
Nassau, The Bahamas

Signed:
Maxwell Poitier

Acting Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Works & Utilities



Bis

Pricing Information As Of:
sday, 14 March 2007
ee 2 BISX LISTED & TRADED SECUR 1
BIS ALL SHARE INDEX: CLO:
52wk-Low Security
0.54 Abaco Markets
10.40 Bahamas Property Fund
6.90 Bank of Bahamas
0.70 Benchmark
1.26 Bahamas Waste
1.12 Fidelity Bank
9.00 Cable Bahamas
1.64 Colina Holdings
9.38 Commonwealth Bank
4.22 Consolidated Water BDRs
2.40 Doctor's Hospital
5.54 Famguard
10.70 Finco
10.90 - FirstCaribbean
10.00 Focol
0.50 Freeport Concrete
7.10 ICD Utilities
J.S. Johnson
Premier Real Estate

S2wk-Hi
1.85
12.05
8.60
0.85
2.19
1.49
10.33
2.20
14.15
6.26
2.88
6.21
12.45
14.70
17.06

0.75
11.25
8.60
0.85
2.19
1.26
10.33
2.10
14.15
5.18
2.46
5.94
12.45
14.70
17.06
0.50

8.52
10.00

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

52wk-Low

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

41.00
14.60

Fund Name
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund

1.331212"
3.0988***
2.625419°**
1.224635****

1.2909
2.6662
2.3312
1.1592
10.0000
BISX ALL SHARC INCEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 oks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in 52w

MARKET TERMS

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted pri r daily volume

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 / FIDELITY 242-366-77

FROM page 1B

tors. Some of them want to cut
down commissions by as much
as 5 per cent - from to 6 per
cent to 1 per cent. I think the

‘OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE :

4,468 of miter space

developers underestimate the
power of local realtors,” the
realtor said.

They indicated that if some
commissions were dropped and
others aren’t, then it does not
encourage them to market cer-
tain properties, simply because

it is less profitable to them.

Another realtor, who also
wished not to be named, noted
that whatever happens in the
US will naturally have an
impact on what happens in the
Bahamas.

“We have not seen a decline.
Our demand is still very high
for second homes and invest-
ments, but of course that would
depend on the extent the US
has problems, because if the US
economy gets really bad than
we may see some effects here,”
they said.

“(However], you have to
remember that the persons who
are interested in purchasing and
developing properties as invest-
ments and second homes are

the economy may not have that
big of an effect on them.”

Philip Williams, a real estate
agent with HG Christie, noted
that while many of the foreign
developers in the Bahamas are
US companies, and the Bahami-
an economy is closely tied to
the US, persons from all over
the world, particularly Europe
and Asia, purchase property in
the Bahamas. .

In fact, he said that as the US
economy declines, the econo-’
my here should get better as
Americans seek to diversify
their assets by moving into oth-
er jurisdictions.

“Real estate here is still rela-
tively cheaper than it is in the
United States” Mr Williams

Previous Close Today's Close

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

downtown for lease.

Adequate parking and
infrastructure in place.

Please call 326-520

et

The Ministry of Works & Utilities

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

PUBLIC WORKS ACT (CHAPTER 26)

- . ABACO HIGHWAY

lO THE CAPTAIN ERNEST ALEXANDER
D HWAY

Pursuant to Section 3 of the Public Works
Act, Notice is hereby given that the Minister
responsible for Public Works.intends to. rename
the forty-six mile stretch of GREAT ABACO
HIGHWAY, which extends from the traffic
circle east of the Marsh Harbour southwards to
the Sandy Point Settlement, to the CAPTAIN
EARNEST ALEXANDER DEAN HIGHWAY.

Any person objecting to proposed renaming of
the said roadway may give Notice, in writing, of
the objecting and reason therefor to the Minister
within one month of the date of publication of the
Notice, by letter addressed to.

Ag. Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Works & Utilities -
P.O. Box N-8156
Nassau, Bahamas

Signed:

Maxwell Poitier
Acting Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Works & Utilities

Change
0.75
11.25
8.60
0.85
2.19
1.26
10.33
2.10
14.15
5.13
2.46
5.94
12.45
14.70
17.06
0.50
7.24
9.05

a.125
0.640
0.000

0.000
1.320
0.000

Yield %

NAV KEY.
* . 2 March 2007
** - 8 February 2007

* 31 January 2007
**** . 28 February 2007

- 8 February 2007

394-2503



eee nee ee ee ee ee

28g eee yee ye

amas

Soo ao

o

Z
:
a
-
f
-
{
-
cl
‘

o
o



wealthy, and so the effects of said.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DOROTHY SEJOUR OF LEWIS
YARD, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and

that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
8th day of March, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.









FOR SALE

TWO (2) PIPER AZTECS - 5 Seater Aircrafts

* Owner asking $220,000 (ONO) for hoth Aircrafts as is.
The Aircrafts can be viewed at
Executive Flight Support, Nassau Bahamas



For further information or inspection call (242) 377-1256.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)

NEW CAPITAL MANAGEMENT
VENTURES LIMITED

LIQUIDATOR’S NOTICE

PURSUANT TO SECTION 137 (6) OF THE
INTERANTIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES, ACT

We, Sovereign Directors Limited , Liquidator of NEW

CAPITAL MANAGEMENT VENTURES LIMITED, hereby
certify that the winding-up and dissolution has been completed
in accordance with the Articles of Dissolution and the company

has been struck off the Registers of Companies.

Dated the 9th day of March, A.D. 2007.

For and on-behalf of
Sovereign Directors Limited
Liquidator

Bela ae
52,

For an expanding Freeport Auto Dealership.

Successful applicant must have a thorough
understanding of computerized inventory
systems and must be willing to supervise
and train others. Knowledge of Japanese
and Korean parts is a must along with
proven dealership experience.

Attractive and competitive remuneration
package available to successful applicant.

Please apply in writing to:
PARTS
P.O. Box F-41060

Freeport, Grand Bahama





THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 9B





Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps













Abaco Markets sells Turks store

years", eliminating $250,000 in monthly —_ Right Freeport format. |



FROM page 1B debt payments to Royal Bank. That store is currently located on Milton you are raising funds for a
Street, and Abaco Markets plans to relo- ood cause, campaignin
Square cate it to its former Solomon's Super- a a ee = he.
sale to Menas Enterprises - a company Centre site in summer 2007. The property P ean an
The Tribune understands is headed by The 55,000 square foot Cedar Street has been empty since the roof was badly ated i a
farmer and businessman, Menas property sale was a sale and leaseback damaged by Hurricane Frances in Sep- award.

If so, call us on 322-1986

Verdoulis - reduced the company's debt — agreement, as Abaco Markets had secured _ tember 2004, with Solomon's SuperCentre
and share your story.

to its "lowest level in more than five a 10-year lease on the site for its Cost now based at Queen's Highway.





‘WHAT SHOULD BE DONE TO PROVIDE BETTER




HEALTH CARE COVERAGE FOR ALL BAHAMIANS

Part three of the series highlights If we then assume that
the third principle tn our

our goal is quality health
care for all, then we

documented Statement of Purpose. pF maintain that we must

cast aside partisan and other special interests

“True and Meaningful and create an atmosphere where all Bahamian
Consultation and Consensus: “ stakeholders can collectively access the same

Reform dictates that the principal

information, the same studies, the same analy-
sis and work through the key issues, chal-
lenges and opportunities to come to a consen-

stakeholders must be equitable sus as to the best way forward for improving
partners in the articulation, the delivery of health care throughout the

development and execution for

country.

improvements to the health care Please visit our website at

system;

http://www.bahamashealthcarereform.org
for the complete text inclusive of our suggested
alternative approach for a Universal Health Care

National Coalition for System
Health Care Reform Better HealthCare for All

Email: coalition@bahamashealthcarereform.org / Web: www.bahamashealthcarereform.org

RMF Investment Management — Nassau Branch

RME, part of the Man Investments division of Man Group plc, a leading global
provider of alternative investment products, has an opening in The Bahamas for a

Manager, Secondary Market Activity

The primary responsibility of the successful candidate will be to assist with the
establishment and administration of a trading platform quoting and trading in a
large range of hedge fund products promoted and managed by RMF and/or Man
Investments. This is a challenging opportunity for a candidate with ambition to join
a market leading organization and help create a servicing unit for Man’s activities
around the globe. In particular the successful candidate will:

1. Manage the creation of a dealing facility that aims ultimately to provide 24
hour service to an existing global client base.

2. Design and operate an administrative system that ensures that all
transactions are properly documented and accurately processed on a timely
basis and recorded in securities management systems both in the Bahamas
and in Switzerland, the RMF headquarters.
Organise the establishment and operation of electronic links to settlement
agents and custodians which ensure the effective settlement of transactions
in hedge fund products.

In addition, the role will incorporate other duties relating to the Investment

Management functions performed by RMF including acting as back-up to existing
staff in the management and processing of investments in hedge funds.

Requirements

The successful candidate will:

Have a bachelor degree, probably in Banking. Finance or Accounting.
Have at least three years experience in financial services and a detailed
knowledge of alternative investments.
Have the communication skills and ability to deal with persons from a
broad range of backgrounds and cultures. Experience in this area, whilst not
essential, will be a key advantage.
Be highly proficient in information technology and aware of the advantages
that IT can bring to a project of this sort.
Have excellent time management and organizational skills.

Have the ability to analyse business issues and develop effective solutions
to challenges.
Be prepared to travel when necessary and will probably have some foreign
language skills.
Enjoy working in a small office of a large multi-national group of
companies.

Candidates with Bahamian status should send a copy of their resume to arrive

by 23rd March, 2007 to Bob Hudson, Chief Executive Officer, RMF Investment
Management — Nassau Branch, P. O. Box EE 17758, Nassau, Bahamas or e-mail
bhudson'‘@maninvestments.com.



THE BAHAMAS INSTITUTE
OF CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS

“Accuracy, Integrity and Fairness”
Website: www.bica.bs

CONTINUING EDUCATION SEMINAR:
LEADERSHIP & REGULATORY TRAINING FOR MANAGERS

Date: March 22"4 2007
Place: British Colonial Hilton Hotel, The Governor’s Ballroom
Time: 9:00 am - 4:00 pm

Pre-register: Telephone 326-6619
Cost per day: Members $100 Non-members $125
Lunch & Parking Included. No Billings.

CPE hours: 7(BICA members - 40 hours required over a 2 year period)
Topics & Speakers Include:

° Effective Leadership Skills & Managing People
Work/Life Balance Issues
Ms. Debbie Bartlett — President, CEO Network & Partner,
Gems Radio Station

The Blueprint for a Successful Woman Executive

The importance of maintaining strong corporate ethical standards
Ms. Minna Israel — Managing Director, Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd.
& Chairman, Clearing Banks Association

Steps to Plan and Manage a Successful Audit Engagement
A technical perspective
Ms. Tiffany Norris Pilcher, CPA — Senior Manager, Ernst & Young

Detecting & Reporting Suspicious Transactions
A case study approach for financial institutions
Financial Intelligence Unit

Risk Based Supervision
Impact on Anti-Money Laundering Procedures
Mr. Stephen Thompson — Compliance Commission

Induction Ceremony for New Members & Licensees of BICA





PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

THE TRIBUNE !



To ativertise in The Tribune - the #1 newspaper Tremblay pleads

eC ES ae rae OT

FROM page 1B

POSITION VACANCY
MANUFACTURING PLANT OPERATIONS MANAGER

But in the plea agreement,
Mr Tremblay only admitted to
the $20,000 he received at the
New York meeting, his lawyers

Pepsi Cola Bahamas, an affiliate of Pepsi Americas, Inc., is searching for a arguing that he was unaware
p a Baha : p > 8 that the remaining $200,000 was

qualified individual to manage its manufacturing operations. This includes feancievecd- te Bahianias based
Production, Quality Control, Maintenance, Warehouse, Fleet, and Logistics. (5 accounts.

direct reports, 30+ indirect reports). The Tremblay episode has
been damaging to the Bahamas'
financial services industry's rep-
utation, something which the
Bahamas Financial Services

Qualified candidates must posses the following:

Education:
° Minimum Bachelor’s degree in business, operations or related field

Experience:
° Prior leadership, supervisor and coaching experience required. Operations
and distribution experience preferred

Personal:
Results oriented
Strong leadership
Team builder / Team player
Ability to coach and develop people
Excellent interpersonal skills
Process oriented
Problem solver
Ability to multi task

A competitive salary and benefits package will be offered to the successful
candidate. If you are a strong leader/manager capable of multi tasking and are
interested in being part of a dynamic, growing international company, please
mail or email resume to:

Human Resources Manager
Pepsi Cola Bahamas Bottling Co., Ltd.
P. O. Box N-3004
Prince Charles Drive
» Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 364-2123
e-mail: rhonda.rolle@pepsibahamas.com



expenses excluding amortisation and depreciation expenses increased by 83% to CHF 352.6
EPG International million, compared to CHF 192.8 million for 2005. EFG International’s cost-income ratio stood
at 55.6 % for the current period, down 1.4 percentage points from the 57.0% reported for the

: EFG International Increases 2006 Net Profit by 90% to CHF 230.0 Million financial year 2005.
Net Profit Attributable to Ordinary Shareholders of CHF 204.0 Million, up 144%



EFG International’s consolidated balance sheet as of December 31, 2006 increased by 47% to
CHF 15.9 billion, compared to CHF 10.8 billion as of December 31, 2005. At the end of the
fiscal year 2006, consolidated shareholders’ equity stood at CHF 2.3 billion.

Zurich, February 28, 2007 — EFG International continued to show strong earnings growth,
increasing its net profit for 2006 to CHF 230.0 million, up 90% compared to net profit of
CHF 120.9 million for 2005. Total Clients’ Assets under Management Including
announced acquisitions were CHF 73.6 billion, up 56% from CHF 47.3 billion at the end
of 2005. EFG International made greater than anticipated progress during the first full All above-mentioned figures are unaudited.

financial year after the IPO in October 2005 and based on this adjusts its 2007 and 2008

CRO and AUM targets upwards. : Rudy van den Steen, Chief Financial Officer of EFG International, said: “2006 saw a near

: doubling of EFG International's business both in terms of operating income and net profit, in
Financial highlights for 2006, compared to 2005, include: line with growth in clients’ assets under management which tripled in the last two years driven

Client Relationship Officers (CROs): 398 up 49% both by organic and acquisition growth. In addition, our balance sheet increased sizeably by

CROs incl. announced acquisitions: 405 up 51%
AUM incl. announced acquisitions: CHF 73.6 billion up 56% net profit attributable to ordinary shareholders, in line with the dividend policy for 2006

almost 50% in 2006. The Board of Directors will recommend a dividend payment of 21.6% of

Clients’ Assets under Management (AUM): CHF 69.8 billion up 48% announced during the time of the IPO. The dividend will leave EFG International with
Operating Income: CHF 634.4 million up 87% sufficient Tier 1 Capital to continue both its organic and acquisition driven growth strategy
Cost-Income Ratio: 55.6 % vs 57.0% while honouring commitments made at the time of the IPO.”

Net Profit: CHF 230.0 million up 90%

Net Profit Attributable to Ordinary Shareholders: CHF 204.0 million up 144% Dividend Proposal
During the fiscal year of 2006 and in carly January 2007, EFG International has announced the

acquisitions of the following companies: The Board of Directors of EFG International will propose a cash dividend of CHF 0.30 per

ordinary share for the financial year 2006 at the Annual General Meeting on April 27, 2007, in
» C.M. Advisors Limited (CMA), Bermuda Announced and closed Feb 06

Banque Monégasque de Gestion (BMG), Monaco Announced May 06, closed Oct 06

line with the dividend policy for the financial year 2006 communicated at the time of the Initial

Public Offering in October 2005.
Harris Allday, Birmingham, England Announced July 06, closed Aug 06
Quesada Kapitalférvaltning, Stockholm, Sweden — Announced Dec 06, not yet closed Review of Business Expansion
PRS Group, Cayman/Miami Announ. Jan 8, 07, not yet closed

; : ; . Duri first half of 2006, EFG Int i i
Lawrence D. Howell, Chief Executive Officer of EFG International, said: “During the first full pene ae ena nternational opened banks in Luxembourg and the

financial year after our IPO in October 2005, EFG International continued to grow as Bahamas, a bank branch in Dubai, offices in Jakarta, Caracas and Bogota and a trust company

anticipated. This growth supports the positive outlook enunciated at the time of the IPO and in Hong Kong. In the second half of the year, EFG International continued to increase its
reaffirmed today.” i geographical presence by opening offices in Mexico-City, Quito, Panama-City, Cayman,
Bahrain, Athens, Bangkok and Manila.
Financial Results for 2006
Since the beginning of 2006, EFG International announced the acquisition of five businesses:
During 2006, the number of Client Relationship Officers (CROs) increased by 51% from 268
to 405, including the announced acquisitions of Quesada Kapital férvaltning and PRS Group (7 In February 2006, EFG International enhanced its hedge funds capabilities with the
CROs). acquisition of Bermuda based C, M. Advisors Limited (CMA). The acquisition closed in
February 2006 and added CHF 2.1 billion in AUM.
Consolidated Clients’ Assets under Management (AUM) increased 56% from CHF 47.3 billion In May 2006, EFG International announced the acquisition of Banque Monégasque de
at the end of 2005 to CHF 73.6 billion, including the announced acquisitions of Quesada Gestion, increasing its private banking presence in Monaco. The acquisition closed end of

Kapital férvaltning and PRS Group (AUM of CHF 3.8 billion). Excluding these two announced October 2006 adding 6 CROs and CHF 1.3 billion in AUM

acquisitions as well as shares of EFG International which do not form part of the current 28.1% . : Pa
. In July 2006, EFG International reached an agreement to acquire Birmingham-based
free-float of EFG International shares at the SWX Swiss Exchange, AUM amounted to CHF

ivate client stock ending i i < isiti
65.2 billion at the end of December, 2006. private client stockbroker Harris Allday, extending its reach in the UK. The acquisition of

Harris Allday closed in August 2006, adding 27 CROs and CHF 4.5 billion in AUM.
Consolidated financial results for the full-ycar of 2006 reflect the full impact of the five In December 2006, EFG International announced the acquisition of Quesada
acquisitions EFG International closed in 2005. The financial results of the Bahamas-based Kapitalférvaltning, a Stockholm-based wealth management company focused on High
private banking business acquired from Banco Sabadell and of C. M. Advisors Limited Net Worth Individuals. Quesada Kapitalfdrvaltning will add 2 CROs and CHF 0.8 billion
(CMA), Bermuda, were consolidated from February 2006 onwards. The financial results from in AUM. The closing of the acquisition is expected during the first quarter of 2007.
Harris Allday were consolidated from August 2006 onwards, while financial results from In January 2007, EFG International reached an agreement to acquire Cayman/Miami-based
Banque Monégasque de Gestion were consolidated from November 2006 onwards. PRS Group specialized in investment services to Ultra High Net Worth Individuals. PRS
Group will add 5 CROs and CHF 3.0 billion m AUM. The closing of the transaction is
[:FG International’s consolidated net profit for the financial year 2006 amounted to CHF 230.0 expected during the first quarter of 2007.
million, up 90% compared to CHF 120.9 million for 2005. Consolidated net profit attributable
to ordinary sharcholders increased by 144% from CHF 83.7 million for 2005 to CHF 204.0 EFG International continues to evaluate multiple acquisition opportunities in Switzerland,

area eae : :
inillion for 2066, onshore continental Europe, the UK and the Americas.

EFG International's consolidated operating income rose by 87% from CHF 338.4 million to

CHF 634.4 million, reflecting healthy growth in all of EFG International’s markets and

activities as well as the contribution of the newly acquired businesses. Consolidated operating

TRAINED AUTOMOTIVE. | acitxposed” to any risk.
TECHNICIAN sion in their 2005 financial state,”

experience. References as proof of good work
relationships must be supplied.

Apply in person or in writing to:
Manager ati
QUALITY AUTO SALES
(FREEPORT) LTD.
Queens Highway
P.O. Box F-42405
Freeport, Grand Bahama





2

ouilt to laundering
$220,000

Board (BFSB), the Govern- _ for the southern district of New
ment and entire sector have York.
worked at assiduously. They The institution's records were |
have been promoting this seized for examination by the. ,
nation as a blue-chip brandand ‘Financial Intelligence Unit ”
financial centre that is well-reg- | (FIU), Royal Bahamas Police
ulated and co-operative, yet still Force and Securities Commis- _
maintains client confidentiali- sion of the Bahamas. BDO ‘;
ty. Mann Judd accountant Clifford. 7
Dominion Investments was Culmer was appointed as liq- _
placed into voluntary liquida- _uidator, assisted by the law firm
tion immediately after charges of Lennox Paton. 7
were filed against Mr Tremblay The Securities Commission ~
in January 2006, in the US court was Dominion Investments’. ,
chief regulator, as it was an_-
investment services provider, |
brokerage and financial services’ |

SITUATION VACANT. |. percent bencticuy ovned by.

Mr Tremblay.
Ferrier Lullin Bank & Trust

OG?
qt

ments as a result of Mr Trem- -;

experienced in American, Japanese blay having: been employed as

its managing director from |?

and Korean vehicles needed March 4, 2005, until his arrest.

The US indictment had ini- °
tially alleged that among the

Applicants must be familiar with automotive qionies launiered iniouch.
computer analysis systems and preference will Dominion Investments and ||

related bank accounts in the .

be given to applicant with proven dealership | Bahamas, Canada, Texas and

‘elsewhere - between 1998 to ~.
December 2005 - were the pro- *,

ceeds from securities frauds, tax .;
evasion schemes, and cocaine, a
marijuana, and date rape drug -
sales.

For the stories
behind the news,

read Insight
on Mondays



Outlook and Update on Strategic Goals

EFG International reconfirms that it is on track to meet or excced its previously announced
medium-term targets. Based on greater than anticipated progress made during 2006, EFG
International adjusts its 2007 and 2008 CRO and AUM targets upwards. "

The updated 2007 and 2008 strategic goals are:



2006 2007 goal 2008 goal
| CROs 398 / 405 ° Previously announced: Previously announced: .
500-525 650-675 ma



New: New: a
540 675 ae
| CHF 65.2 bn/ Previously announced: Previously announced:
CHF 69.0 bn“ | CHF 87-93 bn CHF 115-125 bn



yh aay

New: New:
CHF 93-99 bn CHF 121-131 bn











(1) Including announced acquisitions.
(2) Excl. shares of EFG Intemational, which do not form part of the current 28.1% free-float at SWX Swiss

Exchange.

For a full overview of EFG International’s 2006 results and its strategic goals, please refer to
the company presentation available on www.efginternational.com (Investor Relations /

Investor Presentations).

EFG International’s 2006 Annual Report including audited consolidated financial 7
statements for 2006 will be made available on-line on www.efginternational.com on
April 4, 2007.

Investor Relations
+41 44 212 7377 vet

investorrelations@efginternational.com

Media Relations
+41 44 212 7387

mediarelations@cfgintemational.com

About EFG International
EFG International is a global private banking group offering private banking and assct .
management services, headquartered in Zurich. EFG International's group of private banking
businesses currently operate in 44 locations in 30 countrics employing | ,477 staff. EFG “
International's registered shares (EFGN) are listed on the SWX Swiss Exchange. EFG ‘«
International is a member of the EFG Group headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, which is

the third-largest banking group in Switzerland by Tier-| Capital.

Disclaimer
This press release has been prepared by EFG International solely for use by you for general information only and 2
does not contain and is not to be taken as containing any securities advice, recommendation, offer or invitation to “,
subscribe for or purchase any securities regarding EFG International.
Uhis press release contains specific forward-looking statements, e.g. statements, which include terms, like ‘
“believe”, "assume", "expect" or similar expressions. Such forward-looking statements are subject to known and
unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, which may result in a substantial divergence between the actual “
results, the financial situation, and/or the development or performance of the company and those explicitly or .
implicitly presumed in these statements. These factors include (1) gencral market, macro-economic, governmental
and regulatory trends, (2) movements in securities markets, exchange rates and interest rates, (3) competitive
pressures, (4) our ability to continue to recruit CROs, (5) our ability to implement our acquisition strategy, (6) our
ability to manage our economic growth and (7) other risks and uncertainties inherent in our business. EFG ‘
International is not under any obligation to (and expressly disclaims any such obligation to) update or alter its .”
2

forward-looking statements whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise



THE TRIBUNE.

THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 11B :



Bahamas leads
Internet penetration rate |

FROM page 1B

a 28.8 per 100 access rate, fol-
lowed by Iceland with 27, and
Canada and the US trailing a
little with 22 and 19 respective-
ly.

For the Bahamas, Mr Pad-
dick said Cable Bahamas’ had
an estimated 37,000 Coralwave
Internet subscribers, while the
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company (BTC) had 11,000
subscribers to its DSL service.

Based on there being three
persons per household in the
Bahamas, Mr Paddick said this
meant that the 48,000 total sub-
scribers translated into 144,000
Bahamian residents having
broadband Internet access.

With between 300,000 to

allowed Bahamian businesses
to be global players with the
ability to reach markets
beyond” this nation’s relatively
small population.

Mr Paddick said Mr Keeping,
original owner of Columbus
Communications, which still has
a 30 per cent stake in BISX-list-
ed Cable Bahamas, had com-
mitted that within four years of
obtaining the cable TV contract
in 2004, some 90: per cent of
Bahamian homes would be able
to access the service.

The Cable Bahamas chair-
man said the company had
grown from having 15,000 sub-
scribers in 1995 to 74,000 sub-
scribers today, out of an esti-
mated 100,000 households in

Cable Bahamas had 36,000
Internet subscribers at year-end
2006, and last year had spent $6
million upgrading its cable TV
service from analog to two-way
digital. Mr Paddick said the
company now had “28,000 set
top boxes deployed” for its
Oceans Digital TV service.

He added that Cable
Bahamas’s 2400 shareholders
had “been rewarded rather
handsomely” by their invest-
ment in the company, which
had floated at $1 per share in
1998, and was now worth some
$10.33. Some $2 per share had
also been paid out in dividends.

Cable Bahamas’ network, Mr
Paddick said, passed through 95
per cent of all homes in the
Bahamas, and some 3,300 busi-

nesses relied on the company
to provide them with Internet
connectivity and links to the
outside world that enabled
them to conduct business.

Mr Paddick said Cable
Bahamas’ investment in
Caribbean Crossings as a broad-

band Internet wholesale sup-
plier had enabled it to provide
Internet services on its own,
controlled terms.

Cable Bahamas was looking
at introducing three, six and
nine megabyte Internet speed
this month, ensuring that

the world on

sae

se
Ce
if.

Bahamians were “positioned on *
the right side of the digital,
divide”. é
Columbus Communications, “
Mr Paddick added, aimed to’
“become the premier telecom-
munications provider in the

Caribbean region”.

the Bahamas.

320,000 persons living in the
Bahamas, Mr Paddick said this
translated into a 48.1 persons »
per 100 having Internet broad-
band access, a higher rate than
anywhere else in the world -
some 65.8 per cent higher than
that for Denmark.

“The Bahamas now boasts
one of the most advanced net-
work architectures in the
world,” Mr Paddick said. “The
Bahamas is now far more com-
petitive in regard to high speed
Internet and Internet connec-
tivity rates.” .

He explained that in 2001,
just after Cable Bahamas
entered the market as an Inter-
net Service Provider (ISP) and
completed the fibre optic
telecommunications ring link-
ing Nassau, Grand Bahama,
Abaco and Eleuthera to Florida
through its Caribbean Cross-
ings subsidiary, it cost $48,000
per month to acquire 1.5
megabytes of bandwidth space
between Nassau and Florida.

After Cable Bahamas came
into the market, that price came
down by 50 per cent to $24,000
per month, and now that same
circuit can be bought for $8,000
to $10,000 per month.

“We didn’t steal a single cus-
tomer; we filled.a market need,”
Mr Paddick added. “This really’.

Insurance Brokers & Benefit Consultants Lid.

LAMPKIN & COMPANY
Insurance Brokers & Benefit Consultants Ltd.

AUTO
SERVICE VACANCY

Freeport automobile dealership is looking for
an energetic person to fill the position of

WILL BE CLOSED
on Thursday, March 15th and
Friday, March 16th
for Staff Training and Fun Day. |

Our office will re-open on
Monday, March 19th. —

We apologize for any inconvenience caused.
eA
12 Montrose Ave. P.O. Box EE 15280

Phone: (242) 325-0850 Fax: (242) 326-8024
E-Mail: info@lampkinco.com

SERVICE WRITER/

ADVISOR

in our Service Department. Prospective
applicants should possess similar work
experience with some training in customer
management relations. Intermediate
computer skills are a must.



Please apply in writing to:
Service Advisor
P.O. Box F-41060
Freeport, Grand Bahama



Pata P aaa, ofa Peewee oa,”
Pata aeaearee nee
ee



NAD has been incorporated to manage, operate, develop and maintain the i
Lynden Pindling International Airport. Our corporate vision is to operate we
airports that are safe, friendly, clean, efficient and profitable, with a local sense ere
of place. oi

Do you want to join our team? aie



Manager, Parking and Ground Transportation rod
Reporting to the Vice President, Commercial Development, the Manager Parking #5
and Ground Transportation is responsible for formulating and implementing =
policies, procedures, systems and controls required to optimize the car parking 4%
and ground transportation operations. This will maximize non-aeronautical ae
revenues and provide world-class parking facilities and ground transportation
services. Post secondary education in business, commerce or marketing and at 355 -
least 5 years related experience preferred; experience in parking and/or ground
transportation would be a definite asset. Peis

The following positions are currently available:












Manager, Retail Services

Reporting to the Vice President, Commercial Development, the Manager Retail
services is responsible for creating and implementing a strategy for the overall
food & beverage and retail operations at Lynden Pindling International Airport
in order to provide world class offerings to our customers, while maximizing
non-aeronautical revenues. Post secondary education in business, commerce or
marketing and at least 5 years related experience preferred; experience in the
food & beverage or retail industry would be a definite asset. §

» Marketing Analyst as
Reporting to the Vice President, Marketing, this position is responsible for 8%
comprehensive aviation and tourism market research, analysis of competition #5
in passenger and cargo, assessing tourism activities and trends, developing 33
proposals, supporting analyses for new services and participating in the 4355 -
development and execution of aviation and airport marketing, communications #
and public relations policies. Post secondary education in #3:
Marketing/Communications or a related field with at least 5 years experience
is preferred; experience in the airline business would be a definite asset. 78

Commercial Business Analyst

Reporting to the Manager, Retail Services, this position is responsible for doing
analytical work related to food & beverage and retail services at the airport.
Must be proficient in gathering data and statistical analysis and have strong
analytical, math and communication skills. Minimum High School Diploma and
5 years experience preferred. Recent experience in retail, food & beverage or
shopping mall management or marketing would be a definite asset.

Executive Assistants and Administrative Assistants — Several Positions
Available

These positions are responsible for providing administrative and execurive
support to various executives and senior managers. Responsibilities will include,

Supervisor Purchasing or
Reporting to the Vice President, Finance and CFO, this position is responsible 335
for overall management of the purchasing function including Requests for i:

but not be limited to calendar management, general administrative duties, Proposals, awarding contracts and managing the corporate inventory and stores 352
in close cooperation with the Airport’s operating departments. Post secondary 33

development of PowerPoint presentations, and creative documents, organizing

meetings, conferences and other activities, taking meeting minutes and organizing education in business or commerce and at least 5 years experience in a similar os |
travel. High School Diploma and 5 years experience is required position is preferred a
Corporate Financial Analyst Please send your resumé to: Bs
Reporting to the Vice President, Finance and CFO, this position will be primarily aie
responsible for the development of business cases and financial analysis to Manager, People ae
support commercial, investment and financing decisions, as well as assisting Nassau Airport Development Company mat
with corporate reporting to lenders, airlines, government and other stakeholders. P.O. Box AP-59229 aie
A post secondary education in business or commerce is required and a professional Lynden Pindling International Airport Be
designation in finance or accounting or MBA, combined with at least 5 years Nassau. Bahamas et
experience in a similar position is preferred.

:
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SISO SE SESE pee ee ee ee ca aaa Pa eae eae ae ad ede e naa ee ae ea ea eae nee Cette Te Te Tere Ee



PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007



CAREER OPPORTUNITY

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

for

Key Activities and Deliverables:

Treasurer — Bahamas and Cayman Operating Companies
Treasury Sales & Trading (TST)

The Treasurer is a senior member of the TST leadership team that provide
best-in-class Balance sheet management, TST control and TST dealing support for
the FirstCaribbean Group. A key focus for TST is to enhance Group interest income
and develop / market TST products to the countries’ largest and most discerning
clients. Countries include: Bahamas, Turks and Caicos, Cayman, British Virgin
Islands, St. Maarten, and Curacao.

Successfully manage and extract maximum value from business projects and process
improvement initiatives designed to strengthen the operational infrastructure of
FirstCaribbean TST

THE TRIBUNE

$14m Film Studios
deal deadline today

\

he extended deadline
for Bahamas FilmIn-
vest, the group put
together by Bahamian banker
Owen Bethel, to complete its
$14 million purchase of the
Bahamas Film Studios is due
to expire today, sources told
The Tribune yesterday.

It is uncertain whether the
closing deadline, which has
been extended from February
28, 2007, will be met. Mr Bethel
and The Tribune missed each

other with
telephone
calls made
yesterday.
Mr Bethel
had previous-
ly told The
Tribune that
the definitive §
agreement —
for the sale of
the Bahamas
Film Studios
was "still being negotiated, and

@ BETHEL



subject to approval by the Gov-
ernment".

He and his group had sub-
mitted the relevant proposals
and documents to the Govern-
ment, but the anticipated com-
pletion date for the purchase,
February 28, 2007, was likely
to be “extended given the need
for government review and
approval".

Mr Bethel and his group are
understood to have paid $14
million to acquire the rights to

develop the Bahamas Film Stu-
dios from Gold Rock Creek
Enterprises and its ultimate
Bermuda-based parent, Ashby
Corporation.

Ross Fuller, chairman of
both companies, it is under-
stood, will use part of the pur-
chase price to pay off Gold
Rock's liabilities, including a
$10 million loan from First-
Caribbean International Bank
for the water tank construction,
and a further $1 million in
debts.

Mr Fuller took over.the pro-_
ject after two of its three origi-
nal founding partners, Hans
Schutte and Michael Collyer,
passed away. The surviving
partner is Paul Quigley, who is
no longer associated with the
Bahamas Film Studios.

This will leave Mr Fuller with
a net $3-$4 million from the
deal, but unconfirmed reports
reaching The Tribune suggest
other potential buyers may
have been lined up if Mr
Bethel’s group fails to complete
the purchase.

Mr Bethel, president of the
Nassau-based financial services
provider, the Montaque
Group, previously sai4 an
investment of $80-$90 million
was needed to develop the
Bahamas Film Studios to its
full build-out as envisaged by
the original business plan.

The project could provide
between 700-1200 jobs once

. film and TV productions begin
“to use the facility.

Build and improve the organizational structures and delivery platforms that support
the FirstCaribbean TST model and product lines

Manage to successful completion, business projects and process improvement
initiatives, designed to strengthen the operational infrastructure of FirstCaribbean
CST.

Develop effective partnerships with all functional groups including Marketing,
Finance. Human Resources and Operations & Technology that directly benefit TST
activities, customers and day-to day operations.

=F =
e

NOW HIRING

Key result areas include: balance sheet & liquidity management, product
sales/marketing function, product structured support, governance and market
risk

NOW HIRING BAKERS

Qualifications/Experience:

world | Do you want to make some extra Cash?
$200 - $300 per week

Come Deliver for Domino’s Pizza

* 3 years of specific management experience in a TST environment

° Association of Corporate Treasurers (ACT) or equivalent qualification
preferred

* Understanding of the local Bahamas markets, competition, geographic, macro
economic and global factors impacting TST activities

¢ Seasoned director with a solid track record of success managing and growing ° 18yrs. or older
TST / Treasury Products business in international financial institutions ° Have a Drivers License & good Driving recor

° Solid operational experience in both a sales and a trading environment ¢ Have your own Vehicle

¢ Great Customer Service Attitude

e Graduate status with minimum of 7 years experience in the business/financial Are you retired or work night Shift only?
If you are:-

Remuneration: '
Then “s wants YOU!!
the p »niority (FC Level 9 - the Bank
Benefits eee
e Good Health Insurance Plan
e Pension

tee pe) Me oe . . .
¢ Benefits- includes a car allowance, variable incentive pay (bonus) and preferred
loan rates

Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter via email by

March 23, 2007 to: Come into Abaco Markets Limited
Town Center Mall Office

And fill out an application Today.

Ph. 325-2122 Fax 356-7855.

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for their interest,
however only those under consideration will be contacted.



Lo en a ee ee me oe Nm pan pam Scaawmene bwin nee en i





26th International All Breed Dog

Show & Obedience Trials
Saturday, March 17, 2007

(Note: Except a Aer time, times are Fra)





OBEDIENCE JUDGING SCHEDULE om nee
8:30 Open 3 Carol Mett THE LYFORD CAY FOUNDATION
oe oe ; a rt ~ = (INCCONJUNCTION WITH)
: ovice ose Doan
945, 4. Open a. ‘Herald Doar THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY |
10:15 5 Beginner 4 Jon Mett
10:45 6 Rally Novice 3/4 Carol Mett
7 Rally Advance Jon Mett
8 Rally Excellent Carol Mett
# BREED JUDGING SCHEDULE
9:45 9 Veterans 1 Sonny Tougas
ee STEN] 000 11 eShowmanshp (12-tryrs) 2 Larry Kerluk ,
ae r. Showmanship yrs arry Kereluke
* 10:15 12 Jr. Showmanship (7-11 yrs) 1 Sonny Tougas ALL BAHAMAS MERIT SCHOLARSHIP 2007
: BOTANICAL 10:30 13 Toys-Group5 2 Larry Kereluke
‘ ates 10:30 14 Non-Sporting — Group 6 1 Sonny Tougas . Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the All Bahamas Merit Scholarship.
11:00 15 Sporting — Group 1 1 Sonny Tougas The scholarship will be given for 4 (four) years tenable at accredited universities or colleges in the
Gar mie m 11:00 16 Hounds — Group 2 2 Larry Kereluke Caribbean, United States of America, United Kingdom or Canada, commencing August 2007.
Magi ia ® 11:15 17 Terriers - Group 4 2 Larry Kereluke ; ;
: starting 11:15 18 — Miscellaneous — Group 8 1 Sonny Tougas
ne 11:30 19 Working — Group 3 1 Sonny Tougas Applicants must:
: eh eV me 11:45 20 Herding — Group 7 2 Larry Kereluke PP ‘
12:15 21 LOCAL BEST IN SHOW 1 Sonny Tougas ° iti i
39 BEST IN SHOW 1 Larry Kereluke Be a citizen of The Bahamas who has been educated in The Bahamian

Secondary School system;
Be between the ages of 16 and 19 years and should have completed
secondary school in the year of application or not later than one year after

Lunch Break

1:30. 23 Special Class (Spayed & Neutered)

















. ss 1 eae ae (A) Pirebreeds 2 Larry Kereluke ;
: ETC Drink. 8) Crossbreeds 1 Sonny Tougas graduation;
ane C) Potcakes 2 Larry Kereluke Be unmarried and childless;
Overall Winner 1 Sonny Tougas Possess at least a 3.0 GPA or equivalent:
Have at least seven 's wi ini A’s and two (2
TENE VET 8, 2007 - ven (7) BGCSE’s with a minimum of four (4) (2)
~~ (Note: Except-for starting time, times are approximate) B's;
Time Class# Class Ring# Judge Have a minimum SAT score of 1150;
ose OBEDIENCE Bae SCHEDULE Show integrity of character and respect for others;
: if ae ca ; sovies ; ee Prove participation in beneficial community activities
; orme — ee ; ue ye rie Mett
: :30 ally Novice on Mett
Whole ; Rally Advance Carol Mett VALUE OF AWARD
4 eee i Les Rally Excellent Jon Mett ; ok ,
: Family! ieee Bae ue JUDGING SCHEDULE fail a 4 The award will include tuition fees, room and board, one round trip ticket, clothing
Same Jr. Showmanship yrs arry Kereluke ;
10:00 : Jt Showmanship (12-17 yrs) 1 Sonny Tougas and a personal and book allowance. The total award is not to exceed $35,000.00
: ! 10:15 9 Jr. Showmanship (7-11 yrs) 2 Larry Kereluke per annum.
et 10:30 10 Toys - Group 5 1 Sonny Tougas
ROU et Cutcnse eco a Sree Gon 5 ; oe ne Further details and application forms may be obtained from the Scholarship and
ee junior MERC CCA 11:00 13 Hounds — Group 2 1 Sonny Tougas Education Loan Division of The Ministry of Education, Science & Technology or
ph 4 11:15 14 Terriers — Group 4 1 Sonny Tougas from the Ministry of Education, Science & Technology's website at
Pa EC 14:15 15 Miscellaneous — Group 8 2 Larry Kereluke :
11:30 16 Working - Group 3 2 Larry Kereluke | www.bahamaseducation.com
11:45 17 Herding — Group 7 1 Sonny Tougas |
12:15 18 LOCAL BEST IN SHOW 1 Larry Kereluke Completed application forms should be returned to reach The Scholarship
19 BEST IN SHOW 1 Sonny Tougas and Education Loan Division, Ministry of Education, Science & Technology
Lunch Break P. O. Box N-3913, No later than Monday, April 30, 2007.
1:30 20 Special Class (Spayed & Neutered)
: oteeelie : ee
rossbreeds arry Kereluke Sere . : 7 7
C) Potcakes 1 Sonny Tougas Application forms received after this date will not be considered.
srall Winner 2 Ly Rereluke







7 oer ry

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

| THURSDAY EVENING

'@ WPBT
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8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00

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wy %%; ALIEN NATION: BODY | 4 BILLY MADISON (1995, Comedy) Adam Sandler,
ND SOUL (1995, Science Fiction) |Darren McGavin. A hotel magnate’s adult son goes
Gary Graham. 0 back to grade school. ‘PG-13' (CC)



* & RUNNING SCARED ah
Paul Walker. A gun winds up in the
wrong hands. (1 'R’ (CC)



6:15) * & x HARRY POTTER AND THE GOBLET |x x» THE X-FILES (1998, Science
F FIRE (2005) Daniel Radcliffe. Voldemort lays a trap|derson, Martin Landau. FBI agents
for Harry at the Triwizard Tournament. ‘PG-13' of aliens. ‘PG-13' (CC)



Fiction) David Duchovny, Gillian An-
ulder and Scully probe the existence;









io * %%% THE USUAL SUS- — |(:45) SHO Me
ECTS (1995, Suspense) Stephen
Baldwin. iTV. 1 'R’ (CC) Die Tryin’,’” turns to rap music for salvation. ‘R’





afterlife. ‘PG-13' (CC)

* * GET RICH OR DIE TRYIN’ (2005, Crime Drama) Curtis “50 Cent”
low “Get Rich or| Jackson, Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje, Walter Alza. iTV. A drug dealer

* WHAT DREAMS MAY COME (1998, Fantasy) Robin Williams, Cuba] * % + TOMORROW NEVER DIES (1997, Action)
Gooding Jr, Annabella Sciorra. A man tries to reunite with his wife in the |Pierce Brosnan. James Bond tries to short-circuita |
communications tycoon. o PG-13 (CC) ens |







THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 13B

let Charlie the
Bahamian Puppet and lay
his sidekick Derek put

some smiles on your
kids’s faces.

Bring your children to the
McHappy Hour at McDonald’s in
~ Palmdale every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
month of March 2007.

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.



i'm lovin’ it

Git Certificates

Movie
make great gifts!





PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

anne eee ee ee eee ee ee ee
| | COMICS PAGE - rs

LOOK,
HONEYBUNCH, ROY'6
RIGHT--- MAYBE
YOU SHOULD...

IT'6 MY PARTY!

7” I'M GOING
TO THE COURTHOUSE
WITH YOU, REG!

THE BUILDING YOU'RE

INQUIRING ABOUT WAS

DECLARED A LANDMARK

SEVENTY YEARS AGO/
i

i

PINKHAM
RYDER “

THIS #@!* CAMPAIGN.

MARVIN






AST, BY WAVEREAL FREES D1 HHcett

it © 07 WIL IK. (HC,

TIGER

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EXTRA-LARGE PIZZA WITH
PEPPERONI ANO CHEESE

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THIS COAT




























€51GHI¢ HAVING
TO STARE AT
THESE TWO WALLS
IS BORING!

| { 00 you
4 DELIVER?






\S IT MAKING
You SWEAT?

| | CRYPTIC PUZZLE |







ACROSS: 1, Flood 6, Ditch 9, Pacific
10, Poppy 11, V-O-ce 12, C-anon 13,
Mission 15, Pea 17, Once 18, Act-or-
s 19, Dense 20, Tar-tar 22, Ince 24,
Hen 25, De-note-s 26, Tibe+ 27,
Dixie 28, P-i-ste 29, Platoon 30, Class
31, Pekes

DOWN: 2, Look-in 3, Op.-pose 4, Da-:
y 5, Diva-n 6, Div-orc-e 7, Ic-on 8,
Cocker 12, Cover (di-vorce) 13, Mo-N-
th 14, Scorn 15, Point 16, Ashes 18,
Asset (rev.) 19, Daniels 21, Aerial 22.
!-O-dine 23, Centre 25, Death 26, Tips
28, Pop

OVDOSZHHODO

7) i
Rh ACROSS DOWN
| FR | 8 Say excttedty“A lapsed ther (7) 1 Anunidentified substance in the
a 9 eau other scrambled egg (6)
s away 2 Giving no hints fe stupid (8)
B 13 Only a pupil at a time (5) 3 Definitely lke drawers you can pull
4 14 oe out easily (4,5,2)
: we're escaping
Uo 15 For food, comes from a ravaged : ae me
oe planet in which there's nothing
NI Tathee haven 21) peter pate arena ems
E | ___ temiade ot murat (7)
ome 17 Tum the radio on to get music (5) 6 Join the ranks, sweetie, and be
1 18 ven going back to hug her, he fost ' ee are
surage (5) drawing, 1
T 20 Lots of names of banks (5) ‘Ws clear (4) :
: 22 It's nottumed on only by what maybe | i: reanrediedaaet
a depressed (6) squashing a the
We 23 Heavens, take home an tangerines (7)
(Oo. Ice cream! (6) 12 Proprietary. That's very clear (6)
ae 28 Ree bane 19 Findto be in need of
eo permanently refurbighinn (9-4
| 27. The surviving childis 21 Tarai cd Gl
| supported by (6,2) thorougnay (0)
, | 30. Then, hatt cut, do very well (6) - 24 Does it ensure one
Ni | 31. Cautioned after the fight, going back eats senaibly? (6.5)
a home (6) 26 Not charging for accompanying the
4 aeuete ts bride to the aktar? (6,4)
© | 35 Loaded, hada large port! (5) aes Pied tee Coats, hese
o "i tell 29 Any silly gid entering in 4
36 He'll tel you furthermore it's
N venomous (5) Mot pique (7)
. | 37. Showusthe claim about Ris tase (7) | 30 Asoinducedto set ina
E | 39 Themarkonthe outside, Spanish city (6)
41 Greeting with an expression of : Ne aa
surprise 3 up giving a wave (6)
42 T Ticcaa site al akg Se 34 Decree the fellow should be given
in your placel (5) time (7)
43 Place to get, on entering, dominion - 38 Quick to bring pressure to bear on
over material desires? (9) the figurehead (6)
44 Rushed, lost one's temper (7) 40 Try-and get a nip (4)
~ YESTERDAY'S CRYPTIC SOLUTIONS

YESTERDAY'S EASY SOLUTIONS

ACROSS: 1, Panto 6, Handy 9,
Abettor 10, Forte 11, Stink 12, Claps
13, Alcohol 15, Emu 17, Soho 18,
Ocelot 19, Revue 20, Demcan 22,
Acne 24, Eve 25, Chatter 26, Stitt 27,
‘Weal 28, Beats 29, Tenuous 30,
Ashes 31, Steer

DOWN: 2, Apoto 3, Tattoo 4, OBE 5,
Still G, Hospice 7, Arts 8, Dynamo 12,
Coven 13, Aside 14, Chime 15, Elect
16, Utter 18, Ought 19, Rattles 21,
Syadas 22, Attest 23, Nestle 25,
Cloul 26, Sate 28, Bus







No. BUT MY
CANVY BA IS
MELTING











WHERE HE HANGS) HE'S
DEAD/



PERHAPS I(T
WOULD CHEER
THE PLACE UP
\F THUNG A
FEW PICTURES






COLOMICS, CoH [popSEQN SR

(©2007 by King Feanses Syndicate, Inc. Wortd npran reaarved.

eo

Cree
TH Ninth

ce
= cS}




South dealer.
Neither side vulnerable.
NORTH
398
Â¥AQ 10
852
$9743
WEST
463
Â¥J762
#QJ104
AIS

EAST
@A4
VK954
0973
#10862
SOUTH
#KQ10752
Â¥83
@AK6
#KQ
The bidding:
South West
1¢ Pass
44
Opening lead — queen of diamonds.
If you toss a coin in the air, it is
even money it will come down
heads. If you toss two coins, how-
ever, it is 3-to-1 that they will not
both come down heads. With three
coins the odds become 7-to-1.
Although it is not essential for a
competent bridge player to be able to
compute various _ probabilities
exactly, it is nevertheless helpful in
many hands to be generally familiar
with the principles of chance. Bridge
is, after all, a game of probabilities,
and the player who consistently
adheres to the percentages will come

North East
2%. Pass





THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS -

MOM, CAN T HAVE SOME
MONEY SO HOBRES AND
I CAN (TO A MONE?

T REAUN THINK THERE
ARE MORE CONSTRUCTIVE
WAYS YOU COULD SPEND
YOUR AFTERNOON, CALNIN.

Bridge Is a Game of Probabilities

TARGET |





out best in the long run.

Consider this deal where South
was in four spades. He won the dia-
mond lead and led a spade to the
jack, losing to the ace. East returned
a diamond to declarer’s king. After
drawing another round of trumps,
South led a heart to the queen, losing
to the king. He then lost a diamond
and a club to go down one.

Declarer erred by staking the out-
come strictly on a simple heart
finesse. In effect, he gave himself
only a 50 percent chance to make the
contract, since it was even money
whether East or West had the king of
hearts.

But he would have had a 3-to-1
chance in his favor if he had taken
the, queen-of-hearts finesse at trick
two, instead of later on. If it won, 10
tricks would have been assured.

Suppose, however, the queen lost
to the king, as in the actual deal.
South could then win. the diamond
return, lead another heart to dummy
and finesse the ten. If West held the
jack, the finesse would succeed, and
South could then dispose of his dia-
mond loser on the ace of hearts to
make the contract.

By this method of play, declarer
gets two chances to get home safely
instead of just one. He combines two
even-money shots, which, as in the
case of the coins, make him a 3-to-1
favorite.

The

Target

uses

words in

the main

body of

Chambers pe

21st o Be

Century Body

Dictionary § 8 e 8

(1999 zZ 4888

edition) E 2s Es >

Po

HOW many words of four a i 8 g 5
letters or more can you make 3 o8§8o =
from the letters shown here? y Bosse
In making a word, each letter > Seng a
may be used once only. Each 4 %S8ee2
must contain the centre letter e 3 as 25
and there must be at least one Boy RO
nine-letter word. No plurals 9 38 gHe <
TODAY'S TARGET 2 adda
Good 14; very good 21;

excellent 27 (or more). Solution

tomorrow.














EASY PUZZLE

























aay

wor

grammar

Study of
words and
re aX =) a UY Ta)

Ey AVE Yet








e
@2¢.9 >?

>

THURSDAY,
MARCH 15

ARIES — March 21/April 205:
You’re not concerned with other
people’s opinions this week, Ariés:
You are feeling quite confident and
loving every minute of it. Consult

aE OT TPLRW

4
#4

m7

te

with friends for weekend plans.
TAURUS - April 21/May 21.‘
It seems that romance is key for this,
week, Taurus. You are wef,
equipped to handle any situation
that comes your way — so make the:
most of chances for passion. Liby;

could be,a love match. rg

GEMINI - May 22/June 21°:
Stop your excessive worrying
Gemini, things will turn out just fine®,
Capricorn is’a key player in surpris*,
ing events .on Thursday. Expect an!
outcome you never expected. »,!
CANCER - June 22/July 22"
Now is the time to take chances and,
step out into the public spotlight,
Cancer. Make the most of your conff-«
dence to pursue a new love interest»
Don’t look too far for that someone. 2
LEO - July 23/August 23. =“
This week’s struggles won’t go away.;
with a quick fix. You must pull out the

big guns and spend some time and con-

sideration on this difficulty. Look to,
Pisces to lend a hand. v4

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22. ©”
The more you learn, the more you: ©
are anxious to use your knowl-,
edge, Virgo. All matters concern?»
ing technology are child’s play
this week. Others need your help. «*

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23

You provide the missing link in ans

important work project, Libra.*,
Tuesday will prove to be your most: «
productive day of the week. Use it as.¢
your power day and all others wilf »
look toward you as adeader. e

SCORPIO -— Oct 24/Nov 22 ~.

You’re the master of your domain;

Scorpio and you feel great. An easy «
work week leaves you plenty of time !
to sit back and enjoy the scenery. A*,
natural loner, enjoy it alone. af
SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21

You are not in the mood for commo-,,*
tion this week, Sagittarius, so stays”
away from those who are loud and»”
overbearing. Spend some serene /
moments with your mate. wy
CAPRICORN — Dec 22/Jan 20°;
Let work associates get a peak at what
makes you tick, Capricorn, and you'll “s
seem less mysterious to them. A testy.
boss contronts your work ethic. Be,»
patient and the situation will blow over, *,

*
AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 = ‘»*
You've bitten off more than you can’s
chew this week, Aquarius, but there’s
no backing out now. Best to call in’
the reserves, namely a few trusty
friends who can lend a hand.

PISCES — Feb 19/March 20 +
When a close friend pushes your lim- *
its, it’s best to stand by your princi-
ples and not go along with this per- 7
son’s plan. Trouble is not what you #,

«
se@eeaniu © OY

tale, tall, toll, toil, TAIL



need right now. re

CHESS by Leonard Barden 2

Rogelio Antonio v Dao Thein

Hai, Malaysian Open 2005. With 2

China and India aiming to _*

become chess superpowers and “?

smaller Far East nations o

benefiting from the increased v

ACROSS DOWN tournament activity, Asia is : ¢
8 ek 0s (7) a 1 oe aon the growth area for ea
chess. The game was given oa

: Hand aba 5) 3 ete oe) official status in last year's Asian “
15 Underwater oxide (8,3) Games in Qatar, it is believed é
missile (7) p. eneemmetery (27) that Beijing will allow it as a 2

16 Libyan capital (7) 6 Sroden ti) demonstration sport at the 2008 »
He acer eye (5) 7 Fevar (4) Olympic Games, while Qatar 0
20 Dark period (5) 10 Absolutely correct plans to bid for the 2016 just two turns to induce his 0%
22 Landa a 4-2) Olympics and has said that chess vietnamese opponent to resign. Ve
house (6) a Sherer dance 6 will be part of the package. In what happened? ; /

ae Sov aniuesn 19 Contort the face by today’s position White is “
27 More than a few (7° 21 Large ape (7) attacking, and though Black 7
30 Credit (6) oa eae aath 3,4) seems to have a solid defensive °4
31 Shooting star (6) 26 Rastafarian | formation it took the Philippines of
32 Staff of life (5) hairstyle (1 o master Antonio (White, to play) ‘

35 Endure (6) 28 Takk LEONARD BARDEN é
36 Unify (5) times (8) if
37 sh (7) 29 age ( SST A
39 Foreboding evil (7) 30 eet if
41 Fool (5 32 Propel 26) a
42 Estimate (5) 33 Elgar 6 * . »,!
43 Insect type 34 photo (3,4) Chess solution 8317: 1 Qxg/7+! Kxg7 2 Nd5! Resigns. It <
44 Cafeteria (7 38 Irregular (6) exd5 (else White regains the queen with a bishop “ F
AO Press Comte ahead) 3 NF5++ Kg8 4 Nh6 mate. £
Mensa quiz: Sport. The words are Tasty, Topaz, Trout, *,
Three and Tatty. "a
One possible word ladder solution is: MANE, male, le 4

?



THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 15B —

The Tribune’s & Kelly’s

EASTER

Coloring Contest
FIRST PRIZE = 3 SECONDPRIZE ___ THIRD PRIZE

Tea NS). ¢ 9 1) Ps 20S) Ci) CURT
In Each Age Group wee InEachAgeGroup In Each Age Group














m CONTEST RULES

1 Children ages 4-5, 6-8, and 9-10. Staff members and relatives of The Tribune and Kelly’s are not eligible to enter.

2 Coloring may be done with crayons. Adults or an older child may assist the child in filling out the entry form, BUT NOT IN COLORING THE ENTRY.

3 Enter as many times as you wish. All entries must be in The Tribune by 5 pm on Friday March 30, 2007. Winners will be contacted April 3 and winners
published Thursday, April 5, 2007.

4 There will be one first-prize winner, one second-prize winner and one third-prize winner in each age group.

5 All entries become the property of The Tribune and may be used for any purpose including, but not limited to, publication in a future issue.
NO PHOTOCOPIES. USE NEWSPAPER AD ONLY

Child’s Name: | Parent/Guardian Signature

Address: Tel: (hm) (cell) Age:



| *Toys | é Eag Colouring Kits _ | ae A
* Stuffed Bunnies * Reading Books f# \ aia:
* Easter Candies » Beach Toys h BASKETS

| TDi
© Gift Items = Vac



¢ Decorations —« Baskets Soe K, I. House

© Party Goods —* Stickers Che ay Home
7° Silk Flowers and much more! =a Tek. {242} 3934000 + Fen (242} 3984096





PAGE 16B THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY MARCH 15TH, 2007

THE WEATHER REPORT Exe (FNSURANG MANAGEVENT



Arty a eee Pi: mes

Friday WINDS _ WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
High Low W NASSAU Today: E at 8-16 Knots ~ 2-4 Feet - 77° F







































F/C F/C Friday: ESE at 6-12 Knots 1-2 Feet 6-7 Miles TE

130. 74/23. FREEPORT Today: E at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-7 Miles 76° F

MODERATE «38 pe Friday: SE at 6-12 Knots 1-2 Feet 5-7 Miles 76° F

1/-6 pc ABACO Today: E at 8-16 Knots 3-5 Feet 6-7 Miles 16°F

Intervals of clouds Partly cloudy. Partial sunshine. Mostly cloudy, a t- Mostly cloudy, a Partly sunny and The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the 46/7 pe Friday: SE at 6-12 Knots 1-3 Feet 5-7 Miles 76° F
and sunshine. storm possible. - shower possible. windy. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Ze i





High: 80° High: 80° High: 76° High: 76°
High: 80° Low: 70° Low: 70° Low: 68° Low: 66° Low: 66°

VHA teatro






itv ES aa




/i pe «50/10 =~ 33/0 pe
“51/10 t a 93/11 ae










The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature? is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, oe precipitation, pressure, and Today 5:21 a.m. 26 11:38 a.m. 02
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures sli we high and mn low for the ay 5:39p.m. 2.4 11:48p.m. 0.0

Givam. 28 1229 pm.00
a
A. osm, 26

turday “09am. 2.9 12:45am. -0.2
seTEay ppm. . 29: bpm. 2







Statistics are for Nassau through 2 p.m. yesterday
Temperature





HD ne TEESE Sunday 7SBam. 30 Taam DF.
Normal high ........-... 79° F/26° C eae ee eee





























Normal low ...... . 65° F/18° C sae - : : a 25/-3. pe
Last year’s high . 84° F/29° C YT PVM 29 72/22 pe
Last year’s low . 72° F/22° C : : - 83/28 70/21 ee
EZ g Precipitation Sunrise.....:7:20a.m. Moonrise. .... 4:53 a.m.
JZ S As Of 2 p.m. yesterday v.eccusssscsssseecssseee-s 0.00" ‘Sunset....... 7:19 p.m. Moonset .... . 3:50 p.m.
FR Year to date ............. . 8.96” New First Full Dublin:
High: 79° F/26° C Normal year to date . 4.28” & a“ pen
Low: 61° F/16°C ere :
AccuWeather.com:
All forecasts and maps provided by s a se ne ea .
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007 Mar.18 Mar. 25 2 r. 10 (0 pe
ELEUTHERA es 6/24 7021 po
76124 _SS/ 12 pe Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
J precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Jerusalem Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Menge
Johannesburg
KEY WEST CAT ISLAND
Te Oe

° Monterrey

SALVADOR
:81°F/27°C
265° F/A8°C

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today
highs and tonights's lows.

Ss




U.S. Cines




Today Friday Today Friday Today Friday
High Low W High Low Ww High Low W High Low Ww High Low W High ~=Low W
Fc FC F/C F/C : Fe = sF/C F/C F/C Fe F/C











Albuquerque 73/22 48/8 s 74/23 45/7 pe Indianapolis ==» 52/01 8440 or 48/7 277-2 Philadelphia’ «67/19 --37/2 t ce ie

Anchorage 14/-10 2/-16 s 20/-6 6/-14 s Jacksonville 77/25 60/15 t 77/25 5412 t Phoenix 92/33 62/16 s 94/34 64/17 s 1 can trust.

Atlanta - ~ 73/22 56/13 t 62/16 40/4 Fr Kansas City 50/10 32/0 pe 50/10 31/0 pc Pittsburgh 54/12 32/0 r 39/8 26/-3 sn RAGGED ISLAND

Atlantic City 62/16 42/5 t 43/6 30/-1 r Las Vegas 85/29 57/13 s 87/30 58/14 s Portland, OR 58/14 40/4 s 64/17 44/6 pc High: 81° F/27°C

Baltimore 71/21 40/4 t 4677 32/00 r Little Rock -_74/23« «47/8 cc 62/16 39/3 pe Raleigh-Durham 80/26 47/8 c 59/15 34/1 © Low:65°F/18°C

Boston 54/12 30/-1 + 30/-1 30/-1 sn Los Angeles 73/22 56/13 pe 82/27 5713 s St. Louis 54/12 36/2 sh 49/9 35/1 / .

Buffalo 44/6 25/-3 & 33/0 24/-4 c Louisville «62/16 «40/4 r = 552/11 33/0 oc Salt Lake City 62/16 38/3 s 66/18 42/5 s- GREAT INAGUA ANAGEMENT
Charleston, SC 78/25 60/15 c 69/20 47/8 t Memphis 72/22 48/8 t 59/15 39/3 pc San Antonio 83/28 60/15 pc 74/23 52/11 pe Migh 82 Fc RANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Chicago — 42/5 30/-1 © 38/3 25/-3 ¢ Miami — 80/26 69/20 t 84/28 70/21 t San Diego =—»«66/18 56/13 pe —- 74/23 «56/13 s

Cleveland 46/7 30/-1 + 33/0 26/-3 c¢ Minneapolis 38/3 24/-4 pc 39/3 23/-5 pe San Francisco 70/21 49/9 pce 69/20 49/9 s

Dallas 78/25 49/9 pe 65/18 43/6 c Nashville: 66/18 45/7 t 54/12. 34/1 ¢ Seattle — $010 40/4 pe 55/12 44/6 46 ee on
Denver 54/12 30/-1 pe 62/16 36/2 pc New Orleans 77/25 60/15 t 71/21 50/10 pe Tallahassee 71/21 59/15 t 75/23 51/10 t : ee RO Taam

Detroit 45/7 28/-2 pc 39/3 26/-3 c — New York 63/17 39/3 t- 40/4 31/0 © Tampa ~——« 80/26 «65/18 t 79/26 62/16 t— Winnipeg 8/-13 pc 22/-5 13/-10 ¢

Honolulu 79/26 67/19 sh 81/27 69/20 s Oklahoma City 68/20 ae 64/17 39/3 pc Tucson 89/31 53/11 s 90/32 56/13 s ‘ és = ft : -

Hols 82/27 59/15 pc 72/22 49/9 pc Orlando 80/26 nat Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder



eieols 62/16) t-. Washington,DC 70/21 42/5 t 44/6 33/0 ane storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, I-ice, . Prep precipitation, Tr-trace -







«

THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

The Tribune



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS



@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE



top Bahamas soccer pole

@ By DENEZ JONES
Tribune Sports Reporter



THERE’S a new soccer-sher-
iff in town who hails from the
land of “the beautiful game” —
Brazil. The Bahamas Football
Association (BFA), after having
such great success in 2006,
decided that they warited to
focus more on the development
of national teams. So, they
sought the services of Neider
Dos Santos last month, who
officially became a member of
the BFA at the beginning of
March. ;

“It’s my first time in
Bahamas, but I have some
experience in the Caribbean,
working in the Cayman Islands,
and I worked for three years in
Guyana. So, I have some kind
of knowledge about Caribbean

- football and all the situations

they face,” Dos Santos told The
Tribune yesterday.

The Brazilian replaces for-
mer BFA technical director and
national senior men’s head
coach Gary White. The British






Tevet

of 168 junior athletes named to |

Neider Dos Santos
replaces Gary White

ex-pat had spent seven years in
the Bahamas, and was heavily

- involved in the establishment

of all of the youth development
programmes. White is credited
for helping the men’s side
improve its world rankings by
moving up 55 places, as well as
leading the men to the furthest
they’ve ever been in interna-
tional competition.

Asked what’ll be first on his
agenda, Dos Santos replied:

“First of all, there are limita-
tions here - like the amount of
people. The population of the
Bahamas is not great, it’s not
very big in numbers, so this is
the first problem.” Dos Santos
said that he has already begun
to familiarise himself with the
youth programmes and the local
leagues, and says he hopes to

presentation this weekend.

Lucas



rf



be able to improve on what’s
been established.

“T see some good things, like
great emphasis being put on
youth, and this is the way to
move forward. Of course this is
huge work, it’s not easy, but we
need to emphasise the training
part of it. We cannot succeed
having a national team training
once a week - this is completely
impossible. So, the first thing
for me is to plan for the com-
petitions coming, and then they
way that we train will change -
but my first goal is to improve
the performance of the nation-

bol, along with coaching in oth-
er parts of South America.
Included in his extensive coach-
ing background are stints in
China and in Africa, with his
most recent appointment as
head coach of the Simba Sports
Club in Tanzania, Africa last
year.

In a statement, BFA presi-
dent Anton Sealy pointed out
that: “Neider has quite a bit of
experience in coaching at the
highest level, and we needed to
get somebody who could
advance the development of our
teams in competition. Of
course, added to his experience
is the fact that he is familiar with
the region, having worked in
the Cayman Islands and
Guyana. So, we felt that this
experience would have made
him better suited to our needs
as well as our conditions.”





al team.”

Coaching in his homeland in
Brazil, Dos Santos served in
various capacities with profes-
sional clubs like Botafogo, Vas-
co da Gama and Mesquita Fute-

@ NEIDER DOS SANTOS
(right) replaces Gary White as
the BFA’s technical director







BAAA set for the first
‘All Bahamian’ awards

lm By DENEZ JONES



MUCH like the ‘All-American’ sys-
tem for recognising outstanding perfor-
mances by athletes in the United States,
the Bahamas Association of Athletic
Associations (BAAA) has established
an ‘All-Bahamian’ awards presentation,
which will be hosted for the first time
this coming weekend.

“T think this is a big morale-booster for
one,” said BAAA public relations direc-
tor Kermit Taylor.

“When you look at athletes who have
gone, for example in 2006, to CARIFTA
in Guadeloupe, to Trinidad & Tobago
for the Jr. CAC’s, then on to Beijing,
China for Jr. World’s. To know that they
would’ve gone on and represented the
country, and at the end of the year the
BAAA’s, and the country is now say-
ing thank you for a job well done.”

Some 168 junior athletes have been

of St. Augustine’s standouts Nathan
Arnett and Gerard Brown, as well as

Queen’s College junior girls sprint sen-
sations Printassia Johnson and Sparkyl
Cash. There were also a number of ath-
letes out of Grand Bahama selected to
the All Bahamian Team, with nine selec-
tions coming out of the Golden Eagles
Track & Field Club and nine from
Freeport Anglican High.

According to long time BAAA coun-
cil member Harrison Petty, the idea to
establish the All-Bahamian Award came
from fellow BAAA executive member
Dr. Dwight Marshall. “Dwight said look,
they have All-Americans in the US -
let’s have an All-Bahamian Team.” Pet-
ty added, “Speaking to past presidents,
they all said ‘wow, we had that idea’.
No one did it, but now it’s done.”

To drive home the significance of hav-
ing such an awards system for recognis-
ing outstanding junior athletes, the
BAAA’s is hosting the event at Gov-
ernment House this coming Friday at

Eleuthera, Elgin Johnson, who was not
selected to the All-Bahamian Team,




impressively cleared 6-feet, 5-inches to
win the high jump at the Eleuthera Dis-
trict High School Sports Track & Field
Championship last week. That mark also
set a new meet record, which Johnson
had previously set,at 6-feet, 3-inches.

Family Island athletes and sporting
associations have been claiming neglect
by the governing federations in New
Providence for years.

The Tribune asked BAAA’s vice-pres-
ident Curt Hollingsworth how they
intend to improve in this area.

He replied, “The attitude of the mem-
bers that you’re now dealing with, along
with the enthusiasm of folks that are
responsible for a specific programme,
and with the support that we have - I
think we can look forward to some
things being moved in the right direc-
tion. I don’t want to reflect on the past,
because I wasn’t a part of the past. I
don’t think members who may have



the BAAA Alll- :
and Kiel rer named to the BAAA All-Bahamian 7pm. been a part of the past want to reflect on
host an ‘All Bahamian’ awards Track & Field team, including the likes One senior high school athlete from the past - only for determining how fur-

ther we have to go to get to where we
want to go.”

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PAGE 2E, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS



mA significant night for the
Bahamas Olympic Association

Sharapova
loses at Indian
Wells event

@ TENNIS
fNDIAN WELLS, Calif.
Associated Press

DEFENDING champion
Maria Sharapova was knocked
out of the Pacific Life Open
on Tuesday with a 4-6, 7-5, 6-1

loss to Vera Zvonareva that

will cost her the No. 1 ranking.

Andy Roddick, the lone
American left in the tourna-
ment, advanced to the quar-
terfinals with a 7-6 (3), 6-3 vic-
tory over Richard Gasquet of
France. Roddick’s game was
particularly sharp in the sec-
ond set, with his serves,
groundstrokes and volleys all
clicking.

Roddick finished the match
with a 133 mph serve down
the center stripe for his 15th
ace.

Sharapova was beaten in
the fourth round and needed
to reach the Indian Wells
semifinals to remain No. 1.
She will be supplanted by Jus-
tine Henin when the rankings
are released Monday. Henin,
who is not at this tournament,
won two recent events in the
Middle East.

The 19-year-old Sharapova
was playing her first event
since withdrawing from her
semifinal at Tokyo last month
with a strained left hamstring.

She struggled in a match
between Russians. The 22-
year-old Zvonareva, ranked
No. 20, won for third time in
seven matches against Shara-
pova.

Sharapova had 13 double-
faults and 47 unforced errors.
She was up 5-3 in the second
set and serving for the match
when Zvonareva suddenly
took control, winning eight
consecutive g games and 10 of
the final 11. !

Frequently looking off-bal-
ancé while serving, Sharapova
bounced her second serve into
the net on one of her two dou-
ble-faults in losing the sixth
game of the third set.

The men’s side of the tour-
nament lost its No. 1 player
Sunday when Guillermo
Canas upset Roger Federer 7-
5, 6-2 to end the Swiss star’s
41-match winning streak.



Civic Si Sedan

ONIGHT will be a

very significant one
for the Bahamas Olympic
Association.

That’s because at the annu-
al general meeting at the
Yacht Club, a new slate of
officers is expected to be vot-
ed in.

New, because according to
incumbent president Arling-
ton Butler, the Olympic Char-
ter of the International
Olympic Committee calls for
the majority of the officers to
come from the membership.

That means that between
the 11 affiliated associations
and federations, at least six of
them will be sitting on the
executive board that currently
comprises of 11 officers.

Whether or not that stands
up is a different story because
the incumbent executive offi-
cers, the majority of whom are
opposing Butler, are claiming
that they are sticking by their
constitution, which does not
specify the exact amount of
non-members that can be
elected.

In addition to the changes
of the executive board, But-
ler himself will have his hands
full as he will be opposed for
the first time — it’s coming
from within his own ranks.

One of his vice presidents,
the Rev. Enoch Backford, has
indicated that he will chal-
lenge Butler for the top post.

All indications are that
Backford has been able to
secure the backing of the
majority of the executive
board members and there are
some federation and associa-
tion members that have joined
forces.

Butler, however, has report-
edly secured the support of a
number of executives from the
associations and federations.

STUBBS



peat 2s!

While it will be good to see
some of them emerge on the
executive board of the high-
est sporting body in the coun-

- try, the question is will they

continue to function in their
capabilities at the association
and federation levels?

All of the outgoing execu-
tives were or still are actively
involved in their respective
associations and federations
that got them on the board in
the first place.

But over the years as they
devoted more and more time
to the higher body, some
eventually relinquished their
positions or were not voted
back in.

Does it matter who is elect-
ed? Maybe not.

What should matter is the
fact that more emphasis
should be placed on getting
more sporting associations and



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federations competing on the
international scene.

There’s no reason why we
can’t have teams competing
at the Central American and
Caribbean Games and Pan
American Games in basket-
ball, volleyball, softball and
baseball.

Those sports have been on
the borderline for a number

of years. Now it’s time for
them to get their break-
through.

There should be greater

participation for these sports,
which means that more
emphasis must be placed on
getting the teams together in
time so that they can go
through their respective qual-
ifying tournaments.

We have too much talent
both here and. throughout the
United States and Europe
nowadays for us not to be able
to field teams that can com-
pete just like athletics, swim-
ming, boxing and tennis do at
the bigger games.

The executive board, how-
ever it is made up, will have a
lot of work ahead of them.

Cricket World ort action

a AUSTR ALIA'S Glenn McGrath, left, taking the wicket of Scotland's Gavin Hamil-
ton, right, caught behind for 3 runs in their Cricket World Cup match at Warner Park at
Basseterre, St. Kitts, Wednesday, March 14, 2007. Australia made 334 in their innings and

won the match.



sports’

@ BASKETBALL
CARIBS/TRUCKERS ©
TAKE UPPERHAND

The pennant winning College of the Bahamas
Lady Caribs and the defending champion Johnson
Lady Truckers are now one game away from
clashing in the final of the New Providence Wom-
en's Basketball Association.

The Lady Caribs didn't have to work up a
sweat for their win as the Sunshine Auto Lady
Cheetahs failed to show up on time on Tuesday

night at the DW Davis Gym for game one of

their best-of-three playoff series.

The Truckers, on the other hand, pulled off a
91-80 victory over the Cleaning Centre Lady
Angels in their series opener.

Shantell Rolle scored a game high 33 points
with 14 rebounds and five assists; Glenda Gilcud
had 29 points and seven rebounds and Janice
Williams added 18 points with 10 rebounds.

For the Lady Angels, Suzette McKenzie scored
28 points with 12 rebounds; Sharell Cash had 13
points and eight rebounds; Keisha Richardson
added 13 points with eight rebounds; Kecia Smith
and Kezzie Gray both scored 12 points.



making news in their neighbourhoods.

won an award.

brief

Share your news _

The Tribune wants to hear from people who are

Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause,
campaigning for improvements in the area or have

If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

(AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)





Game two in both series will be played tonight,
starting at 7 p.m. If necessary, game three will be
on Saturday. If both series are completed tonight,
the best-of-five championship series will then
start on Saturday.

@ BASKETBALL
NPBA POST SEASON

The New Providence Basketball Association,
which opened its playoff series last night at the CI
Gibson Gym, will continue the post season on Fri-
day night at the gym with a double header, start-
ing at 7 p.m.

@ BASKETBALL
BSC ACTION

The Baptist Sports Council will be back in
action tonight at the Baillou Hills Sporting Com-
plex with four men's games on tap, starting at 7
p.m. On court one, its St. Paul's Fox Hill taking on
Kemp Road Ministries, followed by Golden Gates
vs Mt. Tabor. On court two, it's Evangelistic Cen-
tre vs Church of the Nazarene, followed by
Bahamas Harvest vs Calvary Bible.








ae

we





IN MY OPINION

GREG COTE

gcote@MiamiHerald.com



March Madness
isn’t about games
— it’s about fans

ou have cannonballed into an
Y office pool and are a master of
bracketology.

You delight friends with a spot-on,
shouting Dick Vitale impression.

You are aware that Winthrop is not
an English butler, but a team.

And you can speed-spell “Krzy-
zewski” on demand.

Today’s 16-game launch of the
NCAA Tournament trails the birth of
your first child among your most
anticipated, cherished days, but it
beats the birth of your second child.

If any of this sounds like you, it’s
official: You are one of them.

You are what makes this three-
week festival — March Madness, The
Big Dance — the phenomenon it is.

And it isn’t the tournament itself,
the games or results. :

It is the way the event is embraced
by enthralled, enamored and enrap-
tured fans.

A SPECTACULAR SHOW

There is nothing like it in Ameri-
can sports. Hard-core NASCAR fans
might come close. Golf fans seem to
hold some of the same reverent feel-
ings about their hallowed Mecca,
Augusta National, and the Masters.

But it can’t match how college bas-
ketball fans feel about this. From
Selection Sunday to the Sweet Sixteen
to the Final Four, this rivets interest
rivaled only by Super Bowl Week.

Long before March Madness
became so overstuffed that it spilled
into April, I have been intrigued and
at odds. Not with the event — college
basketball is great — but with the reli-

- gious zeal of its idolaters.

Fans don’t enjoy March Madness.
They worship it. And if you do any-
thing less, they regard youi as if you
were Madalyn Murray O’Hair at the
gates of the Vatican.

Ihave mocked Big Dancer friends
of mine for their obsession with the
almighty pools and brackets, and I
have been looked at like a heretic. It’s ,
like mocking someone who sees the
outline of Jesus in a piece of toast.

Go ahead and make fun. They are
the ones who see Jesus, not you!

As someone who prefers the NBA
game and the best-of-seven playoff
format for its growing, changing
drama and story lines, I can appreci-
ate why some might prefer the March
Madness format. But those folks are
loath to even consider the opposite.
It’s sort of snooty, in a way.

NOTHING’S PERFECT

Hoops fans drifting into their
three-week nirvana don’t want to hear
it, but the NCAA Tournament isn’t
perfect, and it can be improved.

A few thoughts... ‘

@ 1. Fewer teams. Do we really
need a play-in game and 16th seeds?
Should such reward attach to being
the 64th-best team (maybe) in the
country? If you haven’t spent a single
week in the season’s Top 25, chances
are you don’t deserve to be Big Danc-
ing With the Stars. Haive the field.
Thirty-two teams means a more qual-
ity-laden tournament, and it cuts to
the chase quicker.

@ 2. Get the best teams. Some of
these automatic bis from lesser con-
ferences need to go. The NCAA field
should be the best in the nation
straight through, but it isn’t now. Who
thinks Niagara and Miami of Ohio are
better than Syracuse and Florida
State? Hands, please. Even Dickie V
admits that a half-dozen teams in the
NIT could make a run at the Sweet
Sixteen. Contrarily, USA Today odds-
maker Danny Sheridan puts 16 teams,
a quarter of the field, at 1 million-to-1
odds or longer. Which brings us to...

e 3. The Cinderella Myth. Huge,
stunning upsets rarely happen. A
No. 1 regional seed has never lost in
the first round. You get a true Cinder-
ella — Gonzaga, once; George Mason
last year — maybe once a decade.
They will make a charming run, but
hardly ever do they cut down the nets.

Anything can happen, but what
usually does is what’s expected. Big
teams win. If you gave me the top four
seeds and you took the other 60
teams, I’d feel good.

The sameness of the field also dis-
courages true Cinderellas. Fifty-seven
of 64 teams have been in the tourna-
ment in the 2000s, most of them in the
past year.

Anyway, I’d love to keep making
the tournament better, but I gotta run.

My money is on Belmont to win it,
and that game is about to start.

3E



PRO BASKETBALL | HOUSTON 109, LOS ANGELES 105

Rockets hang tough, beat Clippers

BY CHRIS DUNCAN
Associated Press

HOUSTON — Luther Head hit
a 3-pointer with 12.2 seconds left to
play, and Yao Ming then deflected
a pass and created a game-sealing
steal, as the Houston Rockets
defeated the Los Angeles Clippers
109-105 on Wednesday night.

The Rockets nearly
collapsed late after
building a 17-point lead 4
in the first half.

Elton Brand scored a A
season-high 37 points
for Los Angeles and drove in for a
dunk with 1:01 left that put the
Clippers up 105-104.

Yao was whistled for an offen-
sive foul barreling down the lane,
but Brand missed an outside shot
to give Houston another chance.

March Madness
brings fireworks
and thrills, A to Z

BY MANNY NAVARRO
mnavarro@MiamiHerald.com

As the men’s NCAA Tourna-
ment tips off today, all eyes will be
on the the defending champions,
the Florida Gators.

Joakim Noah, Tito Horford and
the top-seeded Gators will be try-
ing to become the first team to
repeat as champions since Duke
did it last, in 1991-92.

Florida should be the story for
the next three weeks, but here’s a
little alphabet soup on the rest of
the Big Dance:

is for Advertising: The
A NCAA is going to beat you
down with books, pro-
moting their student-athletes.
Keep the remote handy and your
fingers loose. Flipping is inevitable.
= created by basketball
nerds to predict how the
tournament field would look
before the official field came out.
Silly, yes, but now you know.
( heim is not in the tourna-
ment. Neither is Jim Cal-
houn. But the rest of the familiar
faces are: Mike Krzyzewski, Bobby
Knight, Roy Williams and Rick
Pitino. Now, meet Texas A&M’s
Billy Gillespie, Georgetown’s John
Thompson III and Southern Illi-

nois’s Chris Lowery. They could
make some big splashes here.

is for Bracketology, a word

is for Coaches: Jim Boe-

is for Duke: Speaking of

Krzyzewski, did you have

trouble finding Duke on
your bracket this year? The Blue
Devils, normally a top-three seed,
are sixth out West and in serious
danger of seeing their streak of

BY COLIN FLY
Associated Press A
MILWAUKEE — Terry Stotts
was fired Wednesday as the head
coach of the Milwaukee Bucks,
who are struggling this season
after injuries to key players.
Bucks assistant Larry Krystko-
wiak was promoted to
replace Stotts. Krystkowiak
agreed to a multiyear con-
tract and will be introduced
at a news conference today.
“Terry has done the best
he could in a difficult situation,
especially with all of our injuries,”
Bucks general manager Larry Har-
ris said.
“I felt it was in the best interest
of our organization to make the
decision now and move forward,





Tracy McGrady, who led the
Rockets with 21 points, drew the
defense to him and found Head
wide open in the corner for the go-
ahead 3-pointer. Head came into
the game shooting 44 percent from
3-point range in the fourth quarter.

After a timeout, Brand tried to
find Corey Maggette cutting to the
basket, but Yao batted
the ball to Rafer Alston,
who raced down the
floor and was fouled
with 5.9 seconds
remaining. Alston then
hit both free throws and finished
the game with 20 points.

Chuck Hayes added 16 points
for the Rockets, and Brand also had
10 rebounds to get his 29th double-
double of the season.

Chris Kaman added 16 points for



PAT SULLIVAN/AP

WE HAVE LIFTOFF: Rockets star
Tracy McGrady had 21 points
in Wednesday night’s victory.

the Clippers, who have lost five in
a row and six of their past seven.
The Clippers missed 10 of their

COLLEGE BASKETBALL | NCAA TOURNAMENT

T’S TIME T0 D

JONATHAN DANIEL/GETTY IMAGES

Greg Oden of Ohio State

nine consecutive Sweet 16 appear-
ances end. Don’t expect Coach K’s
young squad to go far: Virginia
Commonwealth, seeded llth, could

send Duke home tonight.
= ketball experts are picking
Florida, Kansas and Ohio
State to make it to the Final Four.
= Durant of Texas, Ohio
State’s Greg Oden and
North Carolina’s Brandan Wright

are more than capable of leading
a team to the national title.

is for the Elite. Most bas-

is for Freshmen: Kevin





ROB CARR/AP

Joakim Noah of Florida
is for Georgetown: The
Hoyas are back in conten-

G tion. Jeff Green and Roy
Hibbert should take the Hoyas at

least to the Elite Eight, where a
potential matchup with North Car-

olina or Texas looms. 8
fe looking for someone to
sink a magical buzzer-
beater to pull off an upset, look no
further than Michigan State’s Drew
Neitzel, Old Dominion’s Drew
Williamson, Davidson’s Stephen
Curry, Virginia Commonwealth’s
Eric Maynor and Oral Roberts’

is for Heroes. If you’re

PRO BASKETBALL | MILWAUKEE BUCKS

Stotts gets the boot as coach of the Bucks

rather than wait until the end
of the regular season.”

The news came as a surprise to
the Bucks players.

“This is the first I heard about it.
We had practice, and Terry ran
practice,” said Lynn Greer, a free
agent acquired in the offseason. “I
had a great time playing
under him. He knew his X’s
and O’s. He had a tough time
with the injuries, but I
haven’t got a bad thing to
say about him.”

The Bucks have dealt with a
spate of injuries, including the loss
of top scorer Michael Redd for 20
games as the team went 3-17 with-
out him. Milwaukee is 23-41, in last
place in the NBA’s Central Divi-
sion.



GARY DINEEN/NBA-GETTY IMAGES

TAKING THE FALL: Terry Stotts.

The Bucks were expected to be
much improved with Redd’s
return, but they might have hit
their lowest point Monday night
after losing by 15 points at home to
the Toronto Raptors.

Andrew Bogut, the top pick in

first 11 shots and trailed 25-9 eight
minutes into the game. The Rock-
ets hit 9 of their first 11 shots.

Hayes, Houston’s power for-
ward, had 10 points in the first
quarter, reaching double digits for
the fourth time in five games.

The Clippers regrouped and
shot much better in the second

. quarter, hitting 11 of 20 shots. Cut-

tino Mobley had eight points in the
quarter to lead the comeback, and
Brand hit two free throws to cut
the deficit to 57-52 by halftime.
Alston and McGrady opened
the third quarter with 3-pointers to
stretch the lead to ll. Both teams
played a sloppy quarter from there,
with wild passes and missed shots.
The Rockets headed into the
final quarter with an 87-76 lead.
e NBAREPORT *

f





RONALD MARTINEZ/GETTY IMAGES

Rock. Chalk. ... Jayhawk!

Caleb Green. They all have done
that with regularity.

A&M-Corpus Christi, who

are making their tournament
debut against Alando Tucker and
No. 2 Wisconsin in the Midwest.
The Isles didn’t even have a team
until the school picked up basket-
ball in 1999. But don’t take the Isles
lightly: A&¢M-CC has a 7-foot cen-
ter in Chris Daniels, and the team
has the nation’s second-best field-
goal percentage, behind Florida.

( is for the Islanders of Texas

*TURN TO NCAA TOURNAMENT _

the 2005 NBA Draft, made an
obscene gesture toward the fans as
he left the court after being ejected
for committing a flagrant foul
against Toronto’s Chris Bosh in the
final minute. The league fined
Bogut $25,000 earlier Wednesday.

Stotts was hired as the team’s
ninth coach in June 2005 after
Terry Porter was let go. Stotts was
a favorite of owner Herb Kohl,
who got to know the 13-year NBA
veteran coach while Stotts was an
assistant under George Karl.

Stotts and Harris made good on
their promise to return to the play-
offs in 2005-06, but the Bucks
stumbled badly down the stretch,
finishing 40-42 and, seeded eighth
in the playoffs, losing in five games
to the Detroit Pistons.



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THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 5E





SPORTS

Top two are set to
contest the Masters

)| Softball League final

&@ SOFTBALL

THE final of the Masters
Softball League will come
down to a battle of the top
iwo teams in the league this
vear.

Defending champions
Joshua Knights will take on
runners-up William Construc-
tion Jets in the best-of-five
series that will get started on
Saturday at the Archdeacon
William Thompson Softball
Park at the Southern Recre-
ation Grounds.

‘Both teams advanced to the
final by sweeping past their
respective opponents in two
straight games in their best-
of-three playoff series over the
weekend.

The Knights polished off the
DHL Lions, winning their
series 23-8 in game one on
Saturday and 24-2 in game
two in season finale on Sun-
day.

The Jets roared past the Bat
Miller Panthers with a 43-7
blowout in game one on Sat-
urday and 23-8 in the clincher
on Sunday.

e Here's a summary of how
they both advanced in their
series:

M@ Knights 24, Lions 2
James Clarke went 3-for-4
with six RBIs and three runs
scored; Lorenzo 'Doni' Lock-
hart was 2-for-5 with three
RBIs and three runs scored
and Anthony Robinson was
2-for-3 with three RBIs and a
run scored for Joshua.

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RBIs and five runs:

Greg Thompson picked up
(he win on the mound over
Mike Isaacs.

Larry Forbes was 2-for-?
with an RBI to lead DHL.

@ Jets 23, Panthers 8: Lec
Rahming went 3-for-4 with
five RBIs and two runs scored;
Anthony 'Boots' Weech was
3-for-5 with four RBIs and a
run) Danny Stubbs was 2-for-
5 with four RBIs and three
runs: Gary ‘Super! Johnson 3-
for-5 with an RBI and two
runs: Jeff Cooper 2-for-3 with
two RBIs and three runs and
Stan Smith 2-for-3 with an
RBI and three runs for
William Construction.

Bertie Murray got the win
on the mound and Foster
Dorsette was tagged with the
loss.

Dorsette also helped his
own cause by going 2-for-4
with two. RBIs and a run
scored. Will Basden was 2-for-
4 with two runs and Vianny
Jacques was 2-for-2.

Bf Jets 43, Panthers 7: Roger
Demeritte went 7-for-8 with
five RBIs and séven runs
scored to lead Williams Con-
struction in the win.

Clifford Jones was 4-for-6
with five RBIs and five runs;
Anthony 'Hotdog' Pearce was
3-for-6 with seven RBIs and
three runs; Anthony ‘Boots’
Weech 5-for-7 with three
Gary
‘Super’ Johnson 3-for-4 with
five RBIs and five runs and
Lee Rahming 5-for-6 with two
RBIs and five runs.

blush,

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Mike Dillette was the win-
ning pitcher. Robert Gilbert
suffered the loss.

Will Bastian was 3-for-3
with two RBIs; Kirk Knowles
1-for-3 with two RBIs and a
run and Anthony Richardson
2-for-4 with an RBI and run
scored for the Panthers.

@ Knights 23, Lions 8: Son-
ny ‘Jiggy’ Haven enjoyed a 6-
for-3 day with five RBIs and
three runs scored; Max Mon-
cur was 3-for-5 with two RBIs
and three runs and Sammy
Adderley went 3-for-5 with
two RBIs and three runs to
lead Joshua.

Paul Moss was credited with
the win on the mound and
Mike Isaacs picked up the
loss.

Richard 'Dick' Brown went
4-for-5 with two RBIs and
three runs in a losing effort.

° Here's how they will play
the championship series this
weekend:

@ Saturday's schedule

1 p.m. Joshua Knights vs
Williams Construction Jets,
game one.

3:30 p.m. Williams Con-
structions Jets vs Joshua
Knights, game two.

@ Sunday's schedule

1:30 p.m. Joshua Knights vs
Williams Construction Jets,
game three.

3:30 p.m. Williams Con-
struction Jets vs Joshua
Knights, game four, if neces-
sary.

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Ph: 393-4440 or 393-4448





6E| THURSDAY, MARCH 15,2007 |

From Miami Herald Wire Services

Bayer Leverkusen and Wer-
der Bremen both advanced
into the quarterfinals of the
UEFA Cup on Wednesday,
giving Germany two clubs in
the final eight.

Leverkusen, the 2002 Euro-
pean Champions League
runner-up, reached its first
UEFA quarterfinal in 12 years
with a 3-0 victory over
France’s Lens, overcoming a
2-1 loss in the first leg. Bremen
beat Spain’s Celta Vigo 2-0 for
a 3-0 aggregate victory.

Tottenham Hotspur over-
came an early own-goal with
two by Bulgarian striker Dimi-
tar Berbatov for a 3-2 victory
over Braga and a place in the
quarterfinals on 6-4 aggregate.

Osasuna carried Spain’s
honor, beating Glasgow Rang-
ers 1-0 for a 2-1 overall score
and its first-ever European
quarterfinal.

Defending champion
Sevilla faces Shakhtar Donetsk
today in Ukraine after a 2-2
draw in Spain.

Bayer Leverkusen got goals
from Andriy Voronin in the
first half and Sergej Bar-
barez and Juan in the second
to advance on 4-2 aggregate.

Voronin pounced on a half
clearance and sent a right-foot
volley inside the left post from
the edge of the area in the
36th.

Babarez made it 2-0 in the
55th, finishing with a tap-in
after Voronin’s powerful
header bounce ced off th
70th off a corner, heading in
unchallenged from close
range.

For Bremen, 18-year-old
substitute Kevin Schindler —
playing in his first game for.
the German powerhouse —
provided the cross that Hugo
Almeida headed into the net; _
in the 48th. Almeida had-alse:;:

. scored'the only goal in Vigo. ¢¢:;

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

SOCCER | TENNIS 1 ETC.

SOCCER

Leverkusen, Bremen prevail |

MARCUS BRANDT/AFP-GETTY IMAGES

VICTORY IS OURS: Werder
Bremen players celebrate
during their victory over
Celta Vigo on Wednesday.

doubled the lead after winning
possession at midfield and
driving solo to beat Esteban
in the 6lst minute.

In Spain, Achille Webo’s

‘7lst-minute goal gave Osasuna

the victory over Rangers. The
drive from the Cameroon
striker bounced off diving
Rangers goalkeeper Allan
McGregor before going into
the net.

The home side carried the
play in the first half, although
it was unable to create any
clear opportunities. Osasuna
hed a stre- salty claim

48th min-
ute aiter the dau hit leftback
lan Murray on the arm.

Three minutes after
Webo’s goal, Rangers mid-
fielder Charles Adam nar-
rowly missed with a 74th-min-
ute drive from near the
halfway line, sending the ball
just over the Osasuna cross-
qbar.

Jesus Perera had a-strike,,;,to make up, two, goals.against

for Vigo disallowed because of
offside, before Clemens Fritz

- SPORTS ROUNDUP

Murray

Newcastle after a 4-2 defeat in
England. Paris Saint-Germain

beats

Davydenko at
Indian Wells

From Miami Herald Wire Services

Andy Murray added to his
- strong start this season with a
7-6 (7-3), 6-4 victory over
Nikolay Davydenko in
Wednesday’s fourth round of
the Pacific Life Open in Indian
Wells, Calif.

Murray has won 18 of 21
matches in 2007, including
successfully defending his title
at San Jose.

On another day of tempera-
tures above 90 degrees at
Indian Wells, the 14th-seeded
Murray had 10 aces, with his
serve topping out at 136 mph,
against his fourth-ranked foe
from Russia.

“I served great,” said Mur-
ray, 19, of Scottland. “I think it
was about playing the big
points better than the guy
who’s No. 4 in the world.

“It’s about me playing a
really good match and manag-
ing to come through.”

Murray is continuing his
steady climb up the rankings,
jumping from No. 514 in 2004
to 65th in 2005 to 17th last sea-
son. His victory over Davy-
denko was his second in four
meetings, the first coming in
the semifinals at Doha in Janu-

David Ferrer of Spain
defeated countryman Carlos
Moya 1-6, 6-2, 6-3 in another
fourth-round match.

Li Na of China downed
Vera Zvonareva 6-4, 7-5 to
move iato the women’s semifi-
nals.

ETC.

e NFL: The Cleveland
Browns signed offensive line-
man Seth McKinney to a one-
year deal. They also termi-

nated fullback Terrelle
Smith’s contract before he
was due a roster bonus at the
end of the week. ... The Ari-
zona Cardinals re-signed line-

_backer Monty Beisel to a two-

year contract. Beisel played in
eight games for Arizona last
season, including two starts.
.. Defensive end Kenny
Peterson re-signed with the
Denver Broncos late ‘'uesday.
e College football: Ten-
nessee starting quarterback
Erik Ainge will have surgery
next week on his right knee: to
repair or remove torn carti-
lage, team officials announced.
Ainge is sidelined for spring
practice, which began Feb. 22
and ends March 31. ... South
Carolina recruit Stephen
Garcia hopes to enter a coun-
seling and community service
program, put his two arrests
behind him and rejoin the
Gamecocks in the summer.
Garcia, a highly touted quar-
terback who graduated high
school early to get a jump on
coach Steve Spurrier’s
offense, applied to a pre-trial
intervention program
Wednesday rather than face
prosecution on two misde-
meanor charges. Garcia was
arrested on Feb. 17 on charges
of drunkenness and failure to
stop for a police officer during
an incident outside a club....
Michigan running back Mike
Hart will miss spring practice
because of a medical proce-
dure and wide receiver
Adrian Arrington is out for
unspecified reasons. Coach
Lloyd Carr said Hart, who fin-
ished fifth in the Heisman
Trophy voting, had “a minor
arthroscopic procedure.”



Today, Ag Albanigat needs .

goes to Benfica with a 2-1 ead:
Espanyol and Maccabi Haifa
are goalless going into today’s
decider.

ELSEWHERE

e FIFA rankings: Argen-
tina claimed the top spot in the
FIFA rankings for the first
time since they began in 1993,
displacing World Cup cham-
pion Italy.

The United States dropped
two places to No. 30, nine
behind Mexico, the top-ranked
team from the North and Cen-
tral American and Caribbean
region. Italy fell to second, one
spot ahead of Brazil, which
had been No. 1 for 55 consecu-
tive months before the Azzurri
took over in February.

Argentina’s move to the top
was boosted by its 1-0 exhibi-
tion victory last month over
World Cup runner-up France,
which remained in fourth. Les
Bleus were followed by Ger-
many, England and the Neth-
erlands, Portugal, the Czech
Republic and Spain.

e Champions League:
Valencia defender David
Navarro was suspended for
seven months for his part ina
brawl at the end of the team’s
Champions League match
against Inter Milan. Five other
players were suspended by
UEFA, while each team was
fined $204,000.

As the final whistle blew at
the game in Valencia on
March 6, Inter midfielder
Nicolas Burdisso attacked
defer sr Carlos Marchena,
sparking the brawl.

e England: Chelsea beat
Manchester City 1-0 to close
within six points of English

_ Premier League leader Man-

chester United.

Frank Lampard converted
a penalty in the 28th minute
for his 20th goal of the season
after winger Salomon Kalou
was fouled by defender Micah
Richards. Chelsea controlled
possession for the remainder
of the game to send Manches-

~ @ Steroids probe: The
Albany, N.Y., district attorney

conducting a nationwide drag-

net into the illicit sale of ste-
roids and human growth hor-
mone will forward the names
of athletes linked to the
inquiry to pro sports leagues.

“We're going to be sending
information to vet those
names, see if they are who
they say they are,’ Albany
County District Attorney
David Soares said.

Aibany authorities declined
to disclose on Wednesday
how many athletes have come
up in the probe and which
sports leagues will get letters.

e Boxing: The condition
of five-time world champion
Johnny Tapia was upgraded
to fair Wednesday as he
begins to recover from an
apparent cocaine overdose.
Teresa Tapia, the boxer’s
wife and manager, said her
husband has been improving
but he’s “not out of the woods
yet.” He’s being treated in the
intensive-care unit at Presby-
terian Hospital in Albuquer-
que, New Mexico.

e Iditarod: When it

ter City to its fifth consecutive
defeat.

In the only other Premier
League game Wednesday,
Arsenal beat Aston Villa 1-0 on
a goal by Vassiriki Diaby in
the 10th minute to move past
Liverpool into third place.

Manchester United leads
the standings with 72 points,
while Chelsea improved to 66.
Arsenal has 55 points, two
more than Liverpool.

e Germany: Police raided
the homes of 24 soccer fans
from two Munich clubs who
allegedly crossed the border to
fight with Austrian supporters.

Police in Munich said
Wednesday that 170 officers
searched the homes of fans of
the two Munich clubs, Bun-
desliga champion Bayern
Munich and second-division
1860 Munich.

German authorities are
investigating the fight that
took place near Kufstein on
Sunday and may raise charges
of breach of peace and causing
grievous bodily harm: Aus-
trian police said they would

not start an investigation until

the Germans complete theirs.

According to German
police reports, the Munich
fans met with an Austrian
group for a prearranged fight.
Police presence at soccer
games has led hooligan groups
to fight at isolated locations,
police said.

e Italy: AC Milan
defender Alessandro Nesta
is hoping to return from a
four-month shoulder. injury
layoff on Sunday against Ata-
lanta.

Nesta underwent surgery
on Dec. 4, but his injury goes
back to last season. He spent
much of the past four months
doing physical rehab in Miami.

e Algarve Cup: The
United States won the Algarve
Cup for the fifth time, beating

Denmark 2-0 in, the final on,:

geals by Kristine Lilly and
Carli Lloyd in Vila Real De
Santo Antonio, Portugal.



MATTHEW STOCKMAN/GETTY IMAGES
RIGHT BACK AT YOU: Andy Murray of Scotland delivers a
backhand during his straight-set victory over Russia’s
Nikolay Davydenko at the Pacific Life Open in California.

comes to a tough fight, win-
ning the longest sled dog race
in the world was no match for
what it took Lance Mackey to
beat cancer.

Mackey captured the Idi-
tarod Trail Sled Dog Race late
Tuesday in Nome, Alaska, and
did something no other
musher has done — get back-
to-back victories in the 1,100-
mile Iditarod Trail Sled Dog
Race and the 1,000-mile
Yukon Quest International
Sled Dog Race.

In 2001, he was diagnosed
with neck cancer and under-
went surgery and radiation.

e Cricket: Ricky Pont-
ing’s 113 and-—-Glenn
McGrath’s three wickets
helped Australia beat Scotland
by 203 runs in Basseterre, St.
Kitts, for the second-biggest-
victory margin in World Cup
history.

Playing in their fourth
World Cup, the two players
starred as Australia opened
Group A with a victory that
has only been bettered by its
own 256-run margin over
Namibia at Potchefstroom,
South Africa, in 2003.

|





MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

"PEOPLE IN SPORTS _



GEORGIOS KEFALAS/AP PHOTO/KEYSTONE

EYE ON THE TARGET

Japan’s Eriko Hirose returns a shuttlecock to Judith
Meulendijks of the Netherlands at the Badminton
Swiss Open on Wednesday in Basel, Switzerland.

Sabathia sees race ‘crisis’

C.C. Sabathia looks around Cleveland’s clubhouse and
notices something is missing.

“There aren’t very many African-American players, and
it’s not just in here, it’s everywhere,” Sabathia said Wednes-
day between morning workouts in Winter Haven, Fla. “It’s
not just a problem — it’s a crisis.”

Sabathia, the only black player on the Indians’ 25-man rOs-
ter last season, believes baseball could be doing more to pro-
mote its game to inner-city youths who are gravitating
toward basketball and other sports.

“I go back home to Vallejo,” Sabathia said of his offseason
time in California, “and the kids say, ‘What’s baseball?’ It’s not
just an issue for my hometown, it’s an issue for the whole
country. I think Major League Baseball should do something
about it. I don’t know exactly what they could be doing, but I
know it’s not enough.”

According to a 2005 report by the University of Central
Florida Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport, 8.5 percent
of major-leaguers were black — the lowest percentage since
the report was initiated in the mid-1980s.

Sabathia is trying to do his part to make a difference and

~ raise baseball’s profile: He spotisors thé North Vallejo Little
League, providing equipmént aiid sérving as a role model for

175 children from-his hometown who he hopes will See where
baseball can take them.

“I want to show them,” he said. “I came from there. These
are the fields I played on. There is a way out, and it could be
baseball.” ;

| Hilton’s return

Former boxing champion

Elderly scorer

Age is only a number to

Anaheim Ducks forward | Dave Hilton Jr., who was
Teemu Selanne, the oldest | released in June after spend-
player in NHL history to | ing five years in jail for sex-
have back-to-back 40-goal ual assault against minors, is
seasons. returning to the ring.
“Ym very proud that I Hilton, 43, will face
can do those kinds of things | Adam Green, 26, of Cha-
at a little older age,” said | teauguay, Quebec, on May 1
Selanne, 36. at the Maurice Richard
“When you find the pas- Arena in Montreal.

Hilton’s last appearance
in the ring was Dec. 15, 2000,
when he defeated Dingaan
Thobela for the World Box-
ing Council super-middle-
weight title.

In March 2001, Hilton
was sentenced to seven
years in prison for sexual
assault against two under-
age girls. His daughters later
revealed they were the vic-
tims. He served two-thirds

sion back, and you get the
enjoyment back, and you’re
healthy, you feel like you're, |
like, 20 or whatever, physi-
cally, it doesn’t matter how
old you are.”

After thinking his career
might be over during the
lockout because of a serious
knee injury, Selanne, known
as the Finnish Flash, fol-
lowed up a 40-goal, 90-
point season in 2005-06

with 41 goals and 81 points | of his sentence. He must live
in 70 games this season. | ina halfway house until
“Maybe the injury was | 2009 but can leave during

the day to train.

Hilton must first pass
medical examinations
before he can regain his
license from the Quebec
boxing commission.

good for me,” he said. “You
_know, I just was reborn
again, and I really enjoyed
the time when I can play
healthy and pain-free and
everything.”

‘I stopped counting goals a little
while ago. When you’re 36, you
look at the wins.’

- MATS SUNDIN, Toronto Maple Leafs
center, who got his 388th career goal - one
short of the franchise record - in a 3-2 victory
over the Tampa Bay Lightning on Tuesday.



FLASHBACK

On this day in history:

1869 — The Cincinnati Red Stockings, the first profes-
sional baseball team, are organized by George Ellard and
Harry Wright.

1985 — Larry Holmes scores a 10th-round knockout of
David Bey in Las Vegas to retain the world heavyweight
boxing title.

2001 — The NCAA men’s basketball tournament opens
with a series of close calls and upsets, with 15th-seeded
Hampton beating second-seeded Iowa State 58-57 in the big-
gest surprise of the day.

2004 — In hockey, Alexander Mogilny has three assists
in the Toronto Maple Leafs’ 6-5 overtime victory over the
Buffalo Sabres. Mogilny becomes the second Russian player
to reach the NHL’s 1,000-point plateau.



THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com

From Miami Herald Wire Services

Los Angeles Angels outfielder
Gary Matthews Jr. ended more than
two weeks of silence on Wednesday
in Tempe, Ariz., after being linked to
a steroids investigation, denying for
the first time that he took human
growth hormone.

Matthews, 32, allegedly was sent
HGH in 2004 from a pharmacy that’s
part of a widespread steroid investi-
gation. Angels owner Arte Moreno
and Commissioner Bud Selig had
been pushing Matthews to address
the issue, and he finally did 16 days
after the first stories came out.

“T have never taken HGH — dur-
ing the 2004 season or any other
time,” Matthews said in a statement.
“Nobody has accused me of doing so,
and no law enforcement authority
has said I am a target of any investi-
gation for doing so.”

Angels general manager Bill Sto-
neman said he was glad Matthews
finally addressed the issue and that
he denied using HGH.

“We're finding out at the same
time you are,” Stoneman said. “We’re
happy to find out that he’s saying that
he never used HGH. We’re an. organi-
zation that feels there isn’t a place in
our game for any of these illegal sub-
stances. He’s denying he ever used
something he was linked to.”

Manager Mike Scioscia said he
senses that Matthews was relieved
after issuing the statement through
the team Wednesday morning. Mat-
thews then went out and homered in
the Angels’ 4-3 spring training vic-
tory over the San Francisco Giants.

HGH was not banned by: baseball
for players with major-league con-
tracts until 2005. This investigation
appears to be targeting the suppliers
of the substances, not those who
might have received anything from
the suppliers.

Stoneman said the team had no.
plans to discipline Matthews. He said
it was up to the commissioner’s
office to determine whether Mat-
thews violated baseball’s drug policy.

Selig said it would be inappropri-
ate to comment while his office is
investigating the case.

Matthews explained the delay in
his denial by saying he and his repre-
sentatives needed to determine how
he got linked to the story.

The Times Union of Albany, N.Y.,

BASEBALL ] HOCKEY

BASEBALL | SPRING TRAINING

Matthews denies ever taking HGH



CHRIS CARLSON/AP

BACK TO BASEBALL: Angels outfielder Gary Matthews Jr. watches his home run on Wednesday against the
Giants in Tempe, Ariz. Earlier in the day, Matthews Jr. denied that he took any human growth hormone.

__INTERNATIONAL EDITION

_ THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007 | 7E

rado 6-2 in Surprise, Ariz.

Greinke entered the game with a
7.20 ERA in his first two appearances,
and another mediocre’ outing might
have put him far behind Brian Ban-
nister and Joakim Soria for the fifth
slot in the rotation, which is up for
grabs.

e Padres: Jake Peavy felt a lit-
tle weak, and that helped him turn in
his best outing of the spring. The
Padres’ ace gave up one run and two
hits in five innings in San Diego’s 9-5,
10-inning loss to the Texas Rangers
in Peoria, Ariz.

Peavy struck out six and walked
one, lowering his spring-training
ERA from 11.57 to 6.52. ;

e Cardinals: Anthony Reyes
was just as stingy as he was in the
World Series opener. The St. Louis
right-hander gave up one hit in 414

‘shutout innings, lowering the rota-
tion’s ERA to a microscopic 0.88, in a
2-2, 10-inning tie with the Washing-
ton Nationals in Jupiter, Fla. .

Center fielder Jim Edmonds and
right fielder Juan Encarnacion are
likely to be on the disabled list when
the Cardinals begin defense of their
World Series title. Edmonds is com-
ing off foot and shoulder surgery, and
the Cardinals had said earlier that he
might not be ready for the April 1
opener against the New York Mets.
Encarnacion is recovering from an
operation on his left wrist.

e Dodgers: The club released
third baseman Fernando Tatis —
three days after he failed to report to
its minor-league camp. The Dodgers

NHL STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE

reported Matthews was listed as a
customer of Applied Pharmacy Ser-
vices in Mobile, Ala., which is under
investigation for allegedly being part
of a national steroids distribution
network.

ELSEWHERE

e Yankees: Manager Joe Torre
hasn’t spoken with Alex Rodriguez
about the opt-out clause in the New
York third baseman’s contract:

Rodriguez, a two-time American
League MVP, is entering the seventh
season of his 10-year, $252 million
contract, a deal he signed with the
Texas Rangers.

He can opt out of the agreement
after the season and become a free
agent.

“I hope he doesn’t add that to



everything he has to deal with at this
point in time. It’s tough enough play-
ing this game without looking for the
finish line too soon,” Torre said
before Wednesday night’s game
against Minnesota in Tampa, Fla.
Rodriguez told reporters Tuesday
night that he wanted to “100 percent
stay in New York. Period.” In an
interview earlier Tuesday on WFAN
radio’s Mike and the Mad Dog pro-
gram, Rodriguez indicated the fans
reaction this season could be a deter-
mining factor....The Yankees reas-
signed ‘top pitching prospect Phil
Hughes ic their minor-league camp.
“You can/6fily benefit from this expe-
rience,” the right-hander said. “I got a
lot of good things out of it.” Hughes
is slated to start the season at Tri-
ple-A Scranton. ... Torre said right

fielder Bobby Abreu (strained right
oblique) could take batting practice
in the cage this weekend.

e Rangers: Shortstop Michael
Young had minor surgery to fix a cut
on his left ear when he was hit by a
pitch on the helmet, and the All-Star
didn’t travel to Wednesday’s spring
training. game in Peoria, Ariz.

Young was plunked Tuesday by
Gavin Floyd of the Chicago White
Sox. The wound was stitched, then
Young had cosmetic surgery at a hos-
pital to repair the cut, Rangers
spokesman Gregg Elkin said.

e Royals: Zack Greinke needed
a good outing to stay in the mix for a
spot in Kansas City’s rotation, and he
delivered at the right time. Greinke
struck out six in four scoreless
innings to help the Royals beat Colo-

HOCKEY

reassigned Tatis on Sunday in the
team’s first round of roster cuts.

The Dodgers also announced that
right-hander Chad Billingsley, 22, a
candidate for the fifth starter’s spot,
will instead be used as a middle
reliever to begin the season.

e Orioles: Second baseman
Brian Roberts agreed to a two-year,
$14.3 million contract extension
through 2009.

e Rose makes admission:
Career hits leader Pete Rose said he
bet on the Cincinnati Reds “every
night” when he managed the club, a
much wider admission than previ-

“-ously acknowledged.

“I bet on my team every night. I
didn’t bet on my team four nights a
week,” Rose told ESPN Radio on
Wednesday.

Red wings sweep Predators







From Miami Herald Wire Services

DETROIT — Jiri Hudler scored twice
and the Detroit Red Wings beat Nashville
4-2 on Wednesday night, passing the
Predators for first place in the NHL and

Hudler scored the go-ahead goal early
in the third period after making it 2-all
with 3:37 left in the second.

The Red Wings beat Nashville on
back-to-back nights, giving them one
more point in the division and a league-

|
t
SOUTHEAST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV
(3) Atlanta 37 24 7 3 84219 218 19-10-4-2 18-14-3-1 16-6-5-1
(6) Tampa Bay 39 28 3 1 82223 219 18-14-1-0 21-14-2-1 16-8-1-0
(8) Carolina 35 28 3 5 78206 212 18-13-1-3 17-15-2-2 16-8-0-2
Florida 29 28 6 7 71202 220 20-10-3-1 9-18-3-6 9-13-2-1
Washington 24 34 2 10 60203 251 14-15-1-6 10-19-1-4 8-13-1-4
ATLANTIC WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY ____ DIV
(2) New Jersey 42 20 1 7 92186 170 22-9-0-5 20-11-1-2 20-6-1-1 h ‘al Divisi
(4) Pittsburgh 39 21 4 6 88240 217 21-9-2-3 18-12-2-3 19-7-1-2 the Central Division.
(7) N.Y. Islanders 34 25 5 5 78207.195 19-11-4-1 15-14-1-4 12-10-2-1
N.Y. Rangers 34 28 4 4 76200 193 16-15-3-2 18-13-1-2 11-11-1-3
Philadelphia 19 40 5 6 49185 262 7-19-3-4 12-21-2-2 5-14-2-5
NORTHEAST * W L OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV |
(1) Buffalo 44.19 2 4 94260 205 23-10-1-2 21-9-1-2 16-9-1-2
(5) Ottawa 40 23 3 4 87241 193 22-11-1-2 18-12-2-2 17-9-1-2
Toronto 34 27 3 6 77219 227 15-15-2-3 19-12-1-3 11-13-2-2 high 99.
Montreal 35 30 1 5 76208 223 20-12-0-3 15-18-1-2 ‘11-10-0-4 :
Boston 33 31 2 3 71198 241 17-15-1-2 16-16-1-1 13-12-0-1

WESTERN CONFERENCE

AWAY





CENTRAL WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME — __DIV
(1) Detroit 45 17 5 4 99227 177 26-4-2-3 19-13-3-1 18-4-2-1
(4) Nashville 46 20 2 4 98246 190 25-6-2-2 21-14-0-2 20-7-1-1
St. Louis 29 29 5 6 69183 212 17-17-2-1 12-12-3-5 11-13-2-2
Columbus 27 35 2 5 61169 212. 15-16-1-3 12-19-1-2 7-14-0-4
Chicago 26 34 2 7 61173 217 14-16-1-3 12-18-1-4 11-15-1-0
NORTHWEST —=W__L OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV
(3) Vancouver 41 23 3 3 88188 176 22-9-2-1 19-14-1-2 14-11-1-1
(6) Minnesota 40 24 1 6 87203 176 23-6-1-3 17-18-0-3 14-6-1-4
(8) Calgary 37 23 5 5 84227 192 28-6-1-1 9-17-4-4 14-8-1-2
Colorado 35 29 3 3 76228 218 19-14-1-2 16-15-2-1 12-10-2-0
Edmonton 30 34 3 3 66177 210 18-15-1-1 12-19-2-2 9-15-1-0
PACIFIC — WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV
(2) Anaheim 42 17 4 7 95224 178 24-5-2-5 18-12-2-2 18-6-1-2
(5) Dallas 41 23 1 4 87 183 166 23-10-0-2 18-13-1-2 19-7-0-0
(7) San Jose 42 25 1 2 87211 172° 20-12-1-2 22-13-0-0 13-13-0-1
Phoenix 28 38 2 1 59186 235 15-16-2-0 13-22-0-1 7-14-2-1
Los Angeles < 23 34 8 5 59197 242 14-14-4-4 9-20-4-1 8-14-1-3

Note: Two points for a win, one point for a shootout loss or overtime loss

RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Wednesday’s results

Detroit 4, Nashville 2
Pittsburgh 3, New Jersey 0
Colorado 3, Calgary 2
Columbus at Anaheim, late

Tonight’s games

Buffalo at Florida, 7:30
Washington at Boston, 7
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7
New Jersey at Carolina, 7:30

N.Y. Islanders at Ottawa, 7:30

Calgary at Dallas, 8:30
Minnesota at Edmonton, 9
San Jose at Phoenix, 10
St. Louis at Vancouver, 10

Chicago at Los Angeles, 10:30

Tuesday’s results

Carolina 3, Florida 1

Ottawa 3, N.Y. Rangers 2
Pittsburgh 5, Buffalo 4 (SO)

Montre:

5, N.Y. Islanders 3

Toronto 3, Tampa Bay 2
Detroit 5, ‘Nashville 2

Dallas 3, Philadelphia 2
Minnesota 3, Vancouver 2 (OT)
San Jose 7, Chicago 1

NHL LEADERS



Both teams competed with playoff-like
intensity and that led to plenty of check-
ing, shoving, swinging gloves and trash
talk.

Nashville went ahead on goals by Alex-
ander Radulov in the first and Jason
Arnott in the second, but the Red Wings
responded each time.

Nicklas Lidstrom made it 1-all early in
the second and Hudler scored off a
rebound late in the period.

On the go-ahead goal, Hudler charged
to the net and beat Chris Mason on his
short side with a shot from the bottom of
the right circle off Robert Lang’s pass.

Nashville had a power play with 6:17
left, but didn’t get off a shot. Shortly after
Mason went off for an extra skater, Kirk
Maltby scored an empty-net goal.

Dominik Hasek made 27 saves, helping
Detroit improve to 5-1-] against the Preda-
tors. Their last meeting of the regular sea-
son is March 29 in Nashville.

PENGUINS 3, DEVILS O

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Jocelyn
‘Thibault stopped 25 shots for his first
shutout in more than three years, and the
Penguins completed a two-night sweep of
the top two teams in the Eastern Confer-
ence.

Jarkko Ruutu scored a fluky game-win-
ner off a Devils’ stick and set up an insur-
ance tally by Erik Christensen as the Pen-
guins won their third in a row and won
for the fifth time in six games (5-0-1). Jor-
dan Staal also scored.

One night after a 5-4, shootout victory
over Buffalo, Pittsburgh pulled to within
four points of the first-place Devils (92
points) in the Atlantic Division. Both
teams have 10 games left in the regular

Martin Brodeur made 19 saves for New

Through Tuesday |
SCORING GOALIES
Player, team GP G A Pts _ Player, team GP MIN GAAVG
Crosby, Pit 66 29 74 103 Smith, Dal 19 1002 35 2.10
Lecavalier, TB 71 46 48 94 ~~ Hasek, Det 48 2852 101 2.12
St. Louis, TB 71 39 53 92 Brodeur, NJ 66 4002 143 2.14
Heatley, Ott 70 42 48 90 Backstrom, Min 32 1741 64 2.21
Hossa, Atl 71 40 50 90 ~— Gigu, Ana 50 2881 106 2.21
Thornton, SJ 70 17 72 89 Nabokov, SJ 40 2213 83 2.25
Savard, Bos 69 21 67 88 Turco, Dal 57 3177 = 120 2.27 season.
Ovechkin, Was 70 41 42 83 Luongo, Van 65 3828 150 2.35
Briere, Buf 68 29 54 83 Mason, Nas 37 2156 85 2.37
Selanne, Ana 70 41 40 = 81 Toskala, SJ 35 1983 81 2.45

Jersey, which had a two-game winning



DAVID GURALNICK/DETROIT NEWS

TRY AGAIN: Red Wings Boakenicr Dominik Hasek makes one of his 27 saves,
denying Jerred Smithson of the Predators in Wednesday night’s 4-2 victory.

streak snapped and missed a chance to tie
Buffalo for first overall in the East. The
Sabres have a game in hand.

ELSEWHERE

e Rangers: The club is running out of
games and healthy players in its push for
the playoffs. Add Karel Rachunek to the
list of injured regulars.

The veteran defenseman will be out
three-to-four weeks after an MRI taken
Wednesday revealed a sprained medial
collateral ligament in his right knee.
Rachunek was injured in the first period
of the Rangers’ 3-2 loss to Ottawa on

Tuesday night when he collided knee-to-

knee with Senators center Jason Spezza.

That left the Rangers with only five
defensemen, and Ottawa took advantage
by scoring all three goals after he left the
game.

Rachunek joins fellow defenseman
Fedor Tyutin and forward Marcel Hossa,
who also sustained MCL injuries in the
past two weeks.

The Rangers recalled defenseman
David Liffiton from Hartford of the AHL
on Wednesday.

e Predators: Forward Martin Erat
will miss up to four weeks with a sprained
right knee, after colliding with teammate

Jason Arnott. Erat and Arnott slammed
into each other in the third period of
Tuesday night’s 5-2 loss to Detroit and
had to be helped from the ice.

e Islanders: Goalie Rick DiPietro has
a stiff neck and is a gametime decision for
New York’s contest in Ottawa tonight.

e Capitals: Goalie Olaf Kolzig is
expected to start tonight against the Bos-
ton Bruins, his first appearance since
missing a month with a knee injury.
Backup goalie Frederic Cassivi was
assigned Wednesday to Hershey of the
AHL.

e Flyers: The last-place Flyers gave
general manager Paul Holmgren a two-
year extension through the 2008-09 sea-
son, giving him more time to make Phila-
delphia a Stanley Cup contender seen

LATE TUESDAY

e Wild 3, Canucks 2 (OT): Defense-
man Brent Burns scored in overtime for
the second consecutive game, getting a
goal with 35.8 seconds left to lead visiting
Minnesota.

e@ Sharks 7, Blackhawks 1: Bill Gue-
rin scored his first three goals for host San
Jose, and Evgeni Nabokov fell 32 minutes
short of posting his fourth shutout in five
games.



8E | THURSDAY, MARCH 15,2007 _ INTERNATIONAL EDITION MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

COLLEGE BASKETBALL | NCAA TOURNAMENTS

MIDWEST | EAST
FIRSTROUND {| SECOND ROUND REGIONALS SECOND ROUND | FIRST ROUND
March 15-16 March 17-18 March 22-23 March 24-25 March 24-25 March 22-23 March 17-18 March 15-16

1 Florida Fri. 9:40 p.m. Thur. 9:40p.m. N.Carolina 1














































































































































16 Jackson St. Soetal 9 Eastem Ky. 16
8 Arizona Fri. 7:20 p.m. Division Men s Bracket Thur. 7:20p.m. Marquette 8
9 All game times are EDT 9
5 Butler Thur. 2:40 p.m. Fri. 9:45 p.m. Southem(al 5
12 Old Dominion 12
4 Maryland Thur.12:20p.m. Buffalo, N.Y. Fri. 7:25 p.m. Texas 4
13 Davidson SEMIFINALS SEMIFINALS New Mexico St. 13
6 NotreDame Fri. 2:35 p.m. St. Louis East Rutherford, N.J. Thur. 4:55 p.m. Vanderbilt 6
11 Winthrop G. Washington 11
3 Oregon Fri.4:50 p.m. Spokane, Wash. Sacramento Thur, 2:40 p.m. Washington St. 3
14 Miami (Ohio) 14
7 UNLV Fri. 12:25 p.m. Thur. 12:25 p.m. Boston College 7
10 Georgia Tech Texas Tech 10
2 Wisconsin — Fri. 2:45 p.m. Chicago Winston-Salem, N.C. Thuy. 2:45 p.m. Georgetown 2
15 Tex ARM CC Belmont 15
WEST | : SOUTH
REGIONALS TEENIE
March 15-16 - March 17-18 March 22-23 March 24-25 March 24-25 March 22-23 March 17-18 March 15-16
1 Kansas Fri. 7:10 p.m. Thur. 7:10p.m. —OhioSt. 1
16 C.Conn. St. 16
8 Kentucky Fri.9:30 p.m, Lexington, KY thyr.9:30p.m. BYU 8
9 Villanova . : 9
5 Virginia Tech Fri. 7:10 p.m. Fri. 235p.m. Tennessee 5
12 Illinois 12
4 Southern Il. ri 9:30 p.m. ae = Columbus, Ohio fi a5pm. Virginia 4
13 Holy Cross _ : ‘ 13
San Jose, Calif. Atlanta San Antonio
6 Duke Thur. 7:10 p.m. April 2 Thur. 12:40 p.m. Louisville 6
nN Vu : 1
3 Pittsburgh Thur. 9:30 p.m. Thur. 3p.m. TexasA&M 3
v4 gt 4
7 Indiana ‘Thur. 9:45 p.m. Niagara 77, Florida A&M 69 Nevada 7
10 Gonzaga Dayton, Ohio, March 13 10
2 UCLA — Thur. 7:25p.m. Fri. 12:30 p.m. Memphis 2
North Texas 15

15 Weber St.










North Carolina 30-3)
Prarie View (19-13)

Pittsburgh

B California (23-8)
Noire Dame (19-11)

{
}
|
Texas ASM (24-6 |
vasARM (4-6) Dallas Fresno _

Women’s Division I

Bae || GC —
Championship New Mexico) iD
Ws-Geenday@es)

cata iO
Raleigh, N.C
N.C. State (23-9) ;
is (24-7) 73

















Robert Morris

lowa State (25-8) con ee
: i West Virginia (20-10)
Austin

rae : . | |. Final Four
ie ee | r same aprt

: oe










i

i

LSU (26-7) *
| ille 21-1) |
| ee cee
i
i
|
i













Stanford (28-4) a
Idaho State (17-13) 15

| (o> aan

ST Championship | | ;
Co Tues., Apr. 3 :
| [Michigan t.G-8)



ennessee (28-3)
Drake (14-18)









| Middle Tenn. (29-3)
¢ Es Gonzaga (24-9)

|

East Lansing, Mich. .

5
3
£
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: Dayton Greensboro; Brham Young 59)

Austin

| Angeles
rs | CO =
| | All times EDT | Arzonastate@a-s) BD
| | | B

.
East Lansing, Mich.
)











(| Harvard (5-12)







THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com INTERNATIONAL EDITION __ THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007 | 9E

BASKETBALL

PRO BASKETBALL

| NBA STANDINGS



tia | ‘EASTERN CONFERENCE
| SOUTHEAST _W_L Pct. GB L110 Str. Home Away Conf
| (4) Washington 3528 556 - 46. W-1 24-9 11-19 23-16
| (6) Miami 3429 540 1 82 W-7 22-10 12-19 19-16
| (8) Orlando 30 36 455 6% 3-7 Wl 20-13 10-23 17-22
Atlanta 26 40 .394 10% 46 Ll 14-18 12-22 14-25
Charlotte 2441 369 12 2-8 W-2 15-17 9-24 15-21
lA aol oe le ga ATLANTIC Wk Pet GB 110 Str. Home Away Cont
INDIANAPOLIS — Gilbert Arenas scored (5) Toronto 36 29 554 - 6-4 W-4 23-9 13-20 24-14
28 of his 35 points in the second half Wednes- (7) New Jersey 30 % 462 6 5-5 W-2 17-15 13-20 21-16
i i Wizards New Yor! 453 6% 5-5 L-1 17-14 12-21 18-22
aay A ect ios : — teak to Philadelphia 25 40 385 11 7-3 L-2 16-16 9-24 15-22
earn . ie oe ae one | Boston 19 45 .297 16% 6-4 Wel 9-23 10-22 12-26
games wl a 7 victory.
Antawn Jamison added 27 points and NE a ae ee eee.
i i | etro x - 7 “3 19- -
eight oe the bibeeulni ides honey : | @) Cleveland 40 25 615 1% 82 W-1 25-8 15-17 23-16
their previous three games by a combined six (3) Chicago 39 28 582 3% 7-3 W-4 25-8 14-20 28-13 |
points. The only negative for Washington | Indiana 29 35 453 12 0-10 L-11 18-14 11-21 20-17
Milwaukee 2341 .359 18 4-6 L-2 1415 9-26 11-28

was that forward Caron Butler left the game
early in the second quarter with stiffness in
his left knee and did not return.

WESTERN CONFERENCE

Jermaine O’Neal started after missing | SOUTHWEST WL Pct. GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf
three games with a sprained left knee. He (1) x-Dallas «52 10 B39. =«LsCL-L «30-3 22-7 33-7
had 24 points and seven rebounds. (3) San Antonio 4618 .719 7 10-0 W-13 22-8 24-10 28-11

(5) Houston 40 25 .615 13% 5-5 Wei 23-10 17-15 21-19

Danny Granger scored 19 points for the



New Orleans 28 36 .438 «25 3-7 L-6 19-13 9-23 16-23

Pacers, and Troy Murphy added 17. Memphis 16 50 .242 38 2-8 L-2 11-22 5-28 9-29
CAVALIERS 118, GRIZZLIES 96 NORTHWEST = WoL Pct, GB LI0 Str. Home Away Conf
MEMPHIS, Tenn. — LeBron James recov- | (4) Utah 43 21 672 - 7-3 L-2 25-7 18-14 25-12

? os ‘ | (7) Denver 3131 .500 11 5-5 We-2 17-17 14-14 15-22

-ered from a back injury to score 29 points, | Minnesota 28 35 444 14% 3-7 Wel 19-13 9-22 16-22
leading seven Cavaliers in double figures as Portland 26 37 .413 16% 4-6 L-1 15-17 11-20 16-22
the Cavs won their seventh game in a row. Seattle 2539 391 18 4-6 L-4 18-14 7-25 12-23
Rudy Gay led Memphis with 24 points, PACIFIC _ _W_L Pct. GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf
and Pau Gasol had 23 points and 10 rebounds. | (2) x-Phoenix 49 14.778 - 9-1 W-5 26-6 23-8 24-10

33 31 .516 16% 3-7 L-6 20-11 13-20 19-15

WW, ree ne.

RAPTORS 104, KNICKS 94

TORONTO. — Chris Bosh scored 22
points, T.J. Ford matched a career high with



DARRON CUMMINGS/AP

(6) L.A. Lakers
(8) Golden State
L.A. Clippers
Sacramento
x-clinched playoff spot

30 36 .455 20%
29 35 453 20%
28 36 .438 21%

4-6 We-1 23-10 7-26 17-20
4-6 L-5 21-12 8-23 16-23
5-5 L-4 18-14 10-22 14-23

sists, and t tors strengthens their
a in Poe ee ea SEE YOU LATER, PAL... Wizards guard Gilbert Arenas drives past Pacers defender RESULTS AND SCHEDULES
Jorge Garbajosa had a career-high 20 Darrell Armstrong in the first half. Arenas poured in 35 points in a 112-96 victory. saipetngt at Tomes 5 eet agra lbp
points for Toronto, and fellow rookie Andrea | Tor. 104, N.Y, 94 S.A, at Mil,, 8 Atl, 104, Phi 92
Bargnani added 18. BOBCATS 111, KINGS 108 to be a dirty player. That’s just ridiculous. Cae LAL, at Den., 10:30 Cle, wee
Stephon Marbury led the Knicks (29-35) CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Sean May had 20 I’m not a dirty player. Never have been, Cha, 111, Sac, 108 NJ, 112, N.O, 108
with 31 points and nine assists. points and 12 rebounds, and hit the go-ahead _ never will be.” ee ete os ot ee
3-pointer with 16 seconds left. e Bobcats: Brevin Knight said a referee ape fre i Padi cee

BULLS 88, 76ERS 87

PHILADELPHIA — Kirk Hinrich made
the go-ahead jumper with 26.7 seconds left,
Luol Deng scored 20 points, and the Bulls
won their fourth in a row.



COLLEGE BASKETBALL | NIT GAMES

Syracuse beats |

May, who had been 0-of-6 on 3s in his
two-year career, hit both of his 3-point
attempts. Matt Carroll added 22 points and
Raymond Felton scored 16 points, including
two free throws with 9 seconds left to put

“It’s insulting,” Bryant said. “I don’t need

bumped into him in a game on Saturday, and
he plans to appeal a $25,000 fine he received
in connection with the incident.

Knight received a technical foul from ref-
eree Joe DeRosa in a game against the Griz-

FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

Det. at Por., late



South Alabama;
Clemson wins

From Miami Herald Wire Services

Eric Devendorf scored a
career-high 34 points, and
Demetris Nichols added 15,
helping host Syracuse rally for
a 79-73 victory over South Ala-
bama on Wednesday night in
the National Invitation Tour-
nament,

The Orange (23-10), trailing
59-50 with 11:23 left to play,
scored 18 consecutive points
to go up 68-59 with 4:59 to
play. Daon Merritt broke the
run with a free throw at the
4:03 mark. The Jaguars went
without a field goal for more
than 9 minutes until Ernest
Little scored with a dunk with
2:10 left to play. i

Nichols, the Big East’s lead-
ing scorer, gave Syracuse the
lead for good on a 3-pointer
from the top of the key with
8:05 left.

Syracuse will play either
San Diego State or Missouri
State on Monday night. Those
teams played late Wednesday.

Demetric Bennett led South
Alabama (20-12) with 23
points, going 7-for-11 from
3-point range. Little finished
with 17 points and 18
rebounds, but the Jaguars took
their fifth loss in a row.

South Alabama led 39-38 at
halftime on a 35-footer Bennett
banked in at the buzzer.

e@ Clemson 64, East Ten-
nessee State 57: K.C. Rivers
finished with 17 points and 14
rebounds, and Trevor Booker
had 11 points and 11 boards,
leading the Tigers (22-10) at
home.

Clemson will play host to

Mississippi in a second-round
matchup on Monday night.

Courtney Pigram, the
Atlantic Sun Conference’s
Player of the Year, led ETSU
(24-10) with 25 points.

® Kansas State 59, Ver-
mont 57: David Hoskins
drove for the go-ahead bucket
with 33 seconds left, capping a
second-half comeback that
carried the host Wildcats,

Vermont led 51-39 with
about 10:30 left after trailing
by as many as eight in the first
half. But the Catamounts
missed eight shots and had
three turnovers in the final
5:09, allowing Kansas State to
go on a 9-0 run,

Cartier Martin scored 19
points for Kansas State (23-11),
and Hoskins added 13.

Martin Klimes led Vermont
(25-8) with 16 points,

e Mississippi 73, Appa-
lachian State 59: Todd Aber-
nethy scored 18 points, and the
host Rebels held the Moun-
taineers scoreless for nearly 6
minutes in the second half to
pull away for the victory.

Clarence Sanders’ steal and
layup with 10:15 remaining
began a 19-2 run that put the
Rebels ahead to stay.

Fourth-seeded Mississippi
(21-12), which won its first
postseason game since reach-
ing the round of 16 in the 2001
NCAA tournament, got 14
points and eight rebounds
from Dwayne Curtis and 13
points and 11 rebounds from
Kenny Williams. Sanders
scored 11 points.

D.J. Thompson scored 17



KEVIN RIVOLI/AP
COMING AT YOU: Syracuse’s
Eric Devendorf drives
against South Alabama’s
Stephen Cowherd, right.



points and Donte Minter
added 14 for Appalachian State
(25-8).

e Georgia 88, Fresno
State 78: Levi Stukes contrib-
uted to a deluge of 3-pointers,
finishing with a season-high 30
points as the Bulldogs won on
their home court.

The two teams combined to
hit 31 of 62 shots from beyond
the three-point arc.

Stukes was 8-for-9 on 3s
and Takais Brown added 21
points for Georgia (19-13),
which will play the winner of
Austin Peay-Air Force.

Hector Hernandez and
Dominic McGuire had 21
points apiece for Fresno State
(22-10).

LATE TUESDAY

e Massachusetts 89,
Alabama 87 (OT): Chris
Lowe’s pull-up jumper with 1.6
seconds left in overtime lifted
the host Minutemen (24-8)
over the Crimson Tide (20-12)
in the first round.

e Marist 67, Oklahoma
State 64: Will Whittington
scored 31 points, and the Red
Foxes (25-8) upset the host
Cowboys (22-13) for their first
victory ever in a national post-
season tournament.

*NCAA TOURNAMENT

is for the Jayhawks of

Kansas. Since Roy

Williams bolted for
North Carolina, Bill Self’s
squad has gone into the tour-
nament as No. 3 and No. 4
seeds. They also have gone
home after just one day both
times. Brandon Rush, Mario
Chalmers and Julian Wright
are among five returning
starters who probably won't
get a real challenge until
a possible showdown with

UCLA in the West.
K which could end up
being coached by
Tubby Smith for the last time
if it loses this weekend.
Smith, who led the Wildcats
to a title in his first season,
has been under the gun with
the Wildcats’ recent strug-
gles. Villanova star Scottie
Reynolds, the Big East Fresh-
man of the Year, could be the
guy that ends Tubby’s stay.
l had more of it last
week than Miami of
Ohio, which went into its
conference tournament asa
No. 4 seed and lucked out
when guard Doug Penno hit
a three-pointer at the buzzer
to get the team into the
Dance. But Miami doesn’t
figure to have much luck Fri-
day against Pac-10 champion
Oregon, which averages 25
three-point attempts a game.
George Mason’s

i l run to the Final

Four-last year was unprece-
dented for an Ith seed. This
year, the mid-major confer-
ences landed seven at-large
bids —- none better than

fourth-seeded Southern IIli-

is for Kentucky,

is for Luck. Nobody

is for Mid-Majors.

nois. Fifth-seeded Butler
won the preseason NIT, and
seventh-seeded Nevada, a
team that was upset in its
conference playoffs, is 28-4,
But none of those three fig-
ures to get past the Sweet 16.

is for Nicknames.
N And this year there

was a tie at the top
between the Eagles and

Wildcats, who have five rep-
resentatives each, Boston
College and Winthrop are
just the regular kind, Mar-
quette and Oral Roberts are
Golden Eagles, and Niagara
has the Purple Eagles. The
Wildcats are from Kentucky,
Arizona, Weber State, David-
son and Villanova.

which are not in

O favor of Jackson

State, Eastern Kentucky,

Niagara or Central Connecti-

cut State, all 16th seeds here.

No 16th seed has ever won

a tournament game.

ES ons, Arkansas (1994),
Maryland (2002),

UNLV (1990) and Indiana

(1987) have all been to the

mountaintop before. But

only Maryland might have
what it takes this year.

is for the Odds,
is for past champi-

is for quick exits:
Albany, Holy Cross,
Pennsylvania and

North Texas, to name a few.
is for the Rattlers of
Florida A&M, the

ie losers of the play-in

game. Hey, at least they can
call themselves No. 65.
S athletes: Maryland
guard D,J. Straw-

berry (father Darryl was a

is for Sons of famous

NSW. 00) Oe ;

Hinrich finished with 14 points, and Ben Charlotte ahead by 3. zlies, but he said DeRosa made the contact. | Through Tuesday
Wallace had 10 points and 11 rebounds. The Kevin Martin scored 26 points for the “For him to initiate some type of contact SCORING REBOUNDING
Bulls outrebounded the Sixers 45-30. Kings, but failed to hit the rim on adespera- and then call a tech on me was wrong,” GFGFTPTSAVG GOFF DEF TOT AVG
Andre Iguodala made all 10 free throws and tion 3-point attempt at the buzzer. Ron Art- Knight said, - . Anthony, Den. 46 512 325 1373 29.8 Garnett, Minn. 62 156 623 779 12.6
scored 19 points for the Sixers. Willie Green est added 21 points, but was called for a e Hornets: Chris Paul has been diag- Bryant, LAL 59 564 4911720 29.2 Chandler, NOK. 62 271 502 773 12.5
had 16 points, and Samuel Dalembert added charge with 10 seconds left and the Kings nosed with a stress fracture in his left foot Wade, Mia, 46 445 413 1324 288 Howard, Orl, 65 225 558. 783 12.0
15, but the Sixers saw their slim playoffhopes trailing by one. Sacramento committed 18 but is not expected to miss any playing time. Arenas, Wash, 62 552 507 1782 28.7 Okafor, Char. 56 228 429 657 11.7
continue to dim. turnovers and lost its fourth straight game. Paul had complained of soreness in his left oe oo hae i ise ni ia 2 2 a
c 09, HAWKS 88 foot after the Hornets’ loss Tuesday night to | eda Mi, 44 a 209 1194 27.1 Jefferson, Bos. $6 196 426 622 11.
MAGIC 101, JAZZ 90 ETC? 102) ; the Nets. Paul played 38 minutes in the game, Allen, Sea, ‘53 494 268 1417 26.7 Lee, N.Y. 55 191 398 589 10.7
ORLANDO, Fla. — Dwight Howard had 31 BOSTON — Al Jefferson had 23 points, finishing with 25 points and 12 assists. | Nowitzki, Dall, 61 527 4161527 25,0 Duncan, S.A. 64 174.509 683 10,7
points and 15 rebounds, and the Magic ended and Paul Pierce added 17, leading the Celtics. | J. Johnson, Atl, 57 536 235 1426 25.0 Wallace, Chi, 63 245 418 663 10.5
a three-game losing streak. Josh Smith led the Hawks with 19 points. LATE TUESDAY |
; - 8 : ; 04 ASSISTS ° FIELD GOALS
Howard also won the battle-of the boards @ Pistons 101, SuperSonics 97: Chris | - G AST AVG FG FGA PCT
against Carlos Boozer, who is right behind ELSEWHERE Webber scored 24 points, Tayshaun Prince Nash. Phow: 57 661 11.6 Chandler, NOK. 340 382 .628
the Magic star in the league rebounding sta- e@ Lakers: Kobe Bryant says he canhan- added 18, and Detroit held off host Seattle. Williams, Utah 61 559 9.2 Biedrins, GS, 294 483 .609
tistics. Both are among the NBA’s top four — __ dle just about any kind of criticism. But call- e Nuggets 107, Trail Blazers 99: Allen |_ Kidd, NJ. 63 566 9.0 Lee, NY. 237 391 .606
Howard third: with 12 per game; Boozer tied: ing: him:a dirty player: crosses-thedine:: Iaexson had 31 points, and Carmelo Anthony jell NOkese AT ALS. Bas for fourth with Charlotte’s Emeka Okafor Two suspensions and a similar flagrant- added 29 points, as Denver won at home. | Davis, = 47 396 8.4 Curry, NY. MAT 770 581
averaging 117. foul incident in a span of five weeks have e Nets 112, Hornets 108: Vince Carter | Miller, Phil. BE EI ORES
: : ; : : ; | Wade, Mia, 46 362 7.9 — Boozer, Utah ATT BAT 563
Boozer had seven rebounds to go with 29 sparked conversation on whether Bryant’s hit the go-ahead free throws with 21 seconds | org Tor, 57 441 7.7 Patterson, Mil 369 666 654
points, while Mehmet Okur had 21 points and intensity has crossed the line. left, Richard Jefferson scored 26 points, and | _ ittups, pet. 54 402 7.4 Bogut, Mil, 335 609 .550
12 rebounds. New Jersey won in Oklahoma City. | Iverson, Den. 46 329 7.2. Okafor, Char. 345 637 .542





The Madness begins now

major-league outfielder),
Davidson guard Stephen
Curry (Dale was an NBA
player) and Ohio State’s
Mike Cowley Jr., whose
father won gold in the triple

jump at the Olympics.
arounds, which Vir-

T ginia Tech, Texas

Tech, Washington State,
Oregon and Eastern Ken-
tucky all enjoyed after dread-
ful seasons in 2006.
U year for the past
six, there has been
one in a 5-12 matchup.
V you're looking for a
sixth seed to reach
the Sweet 16, the Commo-
dores have the experience.
VW streak, The team
with the longest

coming in is Memphis, with
22 games in a row.

is for Terrific Turn-

is Upsets. Every

is for Vanderbilt. If

is for winning

is for Xavier. The
Musketeers could
surprise Memphis
in the second round — if
they get there, of course.
Y of Georgia Tech. If
it’s a No. 10 seed you
are looking for to record a
few upsets, watch the Jack-
ets. Tech has two top fresh-
men: Javaris Crittenton and
Thaddeus Young.
Z past few seasons,
10-seeds who aver-
age more than 75 points per
game and win by an average
margin of more than 7 points

are 16-7 in opening-round
games. So watch Gonzaga.

is for Yellow Jackets

is for the Zags. In the





PAGE 10E, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007



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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

LAKEVIEW MEMORIAL
GARDENS & MAUSOLEUM



CON nny W7 gm” A} ZARA 498
® ld -a) ye y iad Nah . > BT r ‘onPn pwaavathen B/B mwa? 7
“ror inose Y ou Care ADOUT IVIOST



LAKEVIEW MEMORIAL

Gardens & Mausoleum







JFK Drive, Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 323-7244 ¢ Fax: (242) 323-7329
Email: lakeviewmemorialgardens @ coralwave.com










THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

| KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED |

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas



MRS.
FLORENCE
L. KEY

of Blair Estates, Nassau, The }
Bahamas will be held at
Shirley Heights Gospel
Chapel, Mount Royal
Avenue, Nassau on
Thursday, 15th March, 2007
at 3:00 p.m.

Pastor Tommy Albury, Dr. |
Sam Mikhael and Brother
Alec Pinder will officiate and
interment will follow in
Woodlawn Gardens
ij Cemetery, Soldier Road,
# Nassau.

Mrs.Key was pre-deceased by her parents, Capt. K. i Rogers
§ and Mrs. Sybil L. Rogers and is survived by her husband, Albert
B. Key, Jr.; two sons, Kevin Key and Christopher Key; one
daughter-in- law, Frances Key; one granddaughter, Tiffany Brianna

d Mary Key; two brothers, Merrill Rogers and Albert Rogers; her |

| step-mother, Ethel Rogers; her father-in-law, Berlin Key, Sr;
sisters-in-law, Karen Rogers, Rosemary Rogers, Dagney Drudge,
Marguerite King, Cheryl Key, Kathy Key, Kimberley Johnson
| and Sandra Grammatico; brothers-in-law, Harlin Johnson and
| Patrick Grammatico; newpews, Jeffrey, Daren, Nicholas and
Jason Rogers, Stephan Johnson and Marcus Grammatico; a great

nephew, Drew Rogers; neices, Celia Rogers, Chantelle and Monique
Wszolek and Jennifer Knowles;aunts, Movina Malone, Elaine |
Malone and Merle Rogers; cousins, Margaret Rose Kanitsch, Joan |

Carey, Raymond Rogers, Andrew Rogers, Carolyn, Linda and
Danny Malone, Lisa Roberts, Dorothy Albury and Laura Lowe;
special long time friends, Jack and Evelyn Sweeting, Gary and
| Sheena Lowe, Craig Pinder, Donald and Barbara Maura, John and
Barbara Symonette; brothers and sisters in Christ at Shirley Heights
| Gospel Chapel, at Calvary Bible Church and throughout the
Universe. All those Churches and members and friends who
| prayed for her during her illness; all doctors and nurses who cared
for her, especially Dr. Ada Thompson, Dr. Duvaughn Curling and
Dr. Theodore Turnquest; and other relatives and friends in Nassau
and thorughout The Bahamas and in the United States.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to the Cancer Society |

| of The Bahamas. P.O.Box S.S.6539, Nassau or Proud Paws,

P.O.Box S.S. 6159, Nassau in Memory of MRS. FLORENCE L. |

| KEY.

Arrangements by Kemp’s Funeral Home Limited, 22 Palmdale
-}- Avenue, Nassau, The- Bahamas. Sie r ead ate leon

Ee,







TRA SI IE I I

~ condolences aoe prayers, '
and floral contributions on the passing of our fami y head,
Matriarch Adelaide Fredrica Butler-Jones. :

praises to Go

the Lord. .We say well done mama for you ha’ g
good fight, finished your course and kept the faith.
Henceforth there is laid up for you a crown of righteousness, .
which the Lord the ne tioous pee shall Bie. to you at
that day.

As we face these difficult ae ahead without your p

your children, grandchildren, great grandchil

great grandchildren will cherish the wonderful memories -
in our hearts that we have shared with you not only today
but in the days and years ahead.

So. unt we see you face to face mama, we rely on your
yesterday’ s influence, t *s memories and tomorrow’s
reunion as we walk through this time and God comfort us
with his peace, surround t us with his love and encourage —
us with his presence. Rest in peace mama......Rest in peace. _

Although words cannot begin to describe our thanks, we
thank God for so many persons who cared and showed
love. Once again special thanks to one and all and may
the blessings of God be with all of us.

From the family of:







- eh ey,
* +
Lo ee OM + eR SAA TS CE gd Oh eh DD

PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

RUSSELL & PINDER’S FUNERAL HOME

Eight Mile Rock, Grand Bahama



eee Bo

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES



Telephone: (242) 348-2340/348-2131/352-9398/353-7250

LIONEL
SMITH, 73









of Eight Mile Rock, Grand
Bahama, will be held on
b. | Saturday, March 17, 2007
at 1:00p.m. at the Pro
Cathedral Christ the King,
Freeport. Officiating will
be Rev. Fr. Rudolph
Cooper, assisted by Rev. Fr. Stephen Grant. Interment
will follow in St. Stephen's Anglican Church
Cemetery, Eight Mile Rock.

Left to cherish his memory is his loving wife
Merlene; children, Lionel Jr., Julie Woods, Wendal
Smith, Patra Stuart, Vernae Grant, Vandyke, Philip,
Elvis and Oliver Hepburn; four brothers, Lloyd,
Walter, Cardinal (Cardy) and Louie Smith, two

sisters, Ena Kelly and Ermabelle Forbes; one aunt, -

Irene Parker-Rolle; three sons-in-law, Kem Stuart,
Howard Grant, Kingsley Woods; six daughters-in-
law, Clarice and Monique Smith, Susan, Mechelle,
Dioni and Susan Hepburn; sisters-in-law, Whitlean,
Pamala, Maureen and Patsina Smith, Rachelle
Edwards, Melvese Headley; brothers-in-law,
Alverston Edwards and Fendrick Hendley; 33
grandchildren, 12 great grand, numerous nieces,
nephews and a host of other relatives and friends.

Family will receive friends at Russell's and Pinder's
Funeral Home, Eight Mile Rock on Friday, March
16, 2007 from 1:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday
March 17, 2007 from 12:00 noon to service time.



P.O. Box F-40557 - Freeport, Grand Bahamas

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR







VIVIAN INITHA
HARVEY, 69





| formerly of Turks Island
| and a resident of Pinedale,
| Grand Bahama, will be
eld on Saturday, March
7, at 1:00 p.m. at Bethel's
)/ Baptist Church, Pinedale,
Grand Bahama. Officiating
will be Rev. F. Dennis Missick, assisted by Rev.
Rodney Forbes. Interment will follow in Harbour
West Cemetery.





She is survived by one son Calvin Jolly; one daughter
Sheneka Harvey; five grandchildren, Larry Jr.,
Anthonek, Deajanea, Dixon and Calvinae Jolly;
three brothers, Robert, Thomas and Albert Forbes
of New Providence; four sisters, Gloria Forbes,
Mary Lattice, Almatha Clarke of New Providence
and Victoria Pratt of Turks and Caicos Islands; seven
sisters-in-law, Marina, Pauline and Caroline Forbes,
Lillith Harvey, Geneva Rigby of Miami, Florida,
Carry Forbes and Elmina Gibson of Turks Island;
four brothers-in-law, Cyril, Benjamin and Norward
Harvey and Otis Lattice; four godchildren, Beverley
Cooper, Christian Grant, Mary Brown and Sherman
Hendfield, 19 nieces, 31 nephews, numerous
grandnieces and nephews and a host of other relatives
and friends.

Family will receive friends at Russell's and Pinder's
Funeral Home on Friday, March 16, 2007 from 1:00
p.m. to6:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday,
March 17, 2007 from 12:00 noon to service time.

DaAYVUP das ar?












The Tribune

RELIGION |

sla an

Thursday, March 15, 2007 °PG5



‘Real Men’s Ministry’ to begin
mentorship programme

@ By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer

eal Men. That may be what
Re Bahamas is lacking

when we read headlines of
males fighting over frivolous matters,
wrecking havoc in their family life by
raining down abuse and violence on
their loved ones, engaging in promis-
cuous lifestyles, pedaling drugs in
local communities - ultimately
destroying their lives and the lives of
others.

No doubt facing an identity crisis
of sorts, it is not a stretch to say that
many young Bahamian men don’t
know how to be real men - responsi-
ble, with a strong moral compass,
and the drive to succeed in life. And
with boys as young as high school
age falling to a host of vices, from
violent school yard brawls, disre-
specting teachers, and marijuana
usage, all would agree that an exam-
ple needs to be set.

Answering that call are the men of
Bahamas Faith Ministries
International who have made it their
mandate this year to reach out to
young boys within their church and
the wider community. Though there
has always been a men’s ministry at
the church, it was not until 10 years
ago that they revamped their efforts
and became, the “Real Men’s
Ministry”, a name which hints to the
almost ignored fact that there are
men, then there are rea/ men.

Beginning next month, this min-
istry will begin a mentorship pro-
gramme with at-risk boys at the S$ C
McPherson Junior High School. For
one hour each week, for the remain-
der of the school year, the men will
meet with the group of young stu-
dents and create a forum that will
hopefully effect change in their lives.

Kersch Darville, vice president of
Real Men’s Ministry, said that
although the group does not have a
concrete step-by-step course of
action just yet, the mentorship pro-
gramme will mirror one that they are
developing for young men in their
church. That programme will also get
started next month. And both pro-
grammes will involve discussions
about anger management, becoming
a man, and Bible studies, just to
highlight some aspects.

, Speaking about the programme for

a a a a RR ?

BFMI men reaching out to
at-risk high school boys

at-risk boys at S C McPherson, Mr
Darville said that the objective is to
change their mindset.

“We want the students to begin to
think that they will not always be
boys. One day they will be men and
we want their mindset now to shift to
being more responsible. We want
them to focus on their purpose and
think about what they want to get
out of life, then help them learn to
channel their thoughts to developing
their gifts and talents. And if they
haven't identified those gifts yet, we
want to help them channel how to
identify them. And of course, we will
be letting them know that Christ is
the example,” he added.

Mr Darville believes that much of
the anti-social behaviour we see
exhibited by young men in this socie-
ty is the result of them not having a
plan for their lives.

Anyone

“They haven’t had anyone take
interest in their lives. The truth is, no
matter what mother tries to do, boys
are validated by their fathers or
some man. So men need to teach
men. That’s the reason why a lot of
boys get involved with gangs,
because they get that validation in
that group. When they do something
wrong, they are seen as cool,” Mr
Darville continued.

In these mentorship sessions, Mr
Darville said, the Real Men’s
Ministry hopes to show the students
a more fruitful way to approach the
rest of their lives: “We want to show
them that if they have a plan for
their lives and pursue that plan, then
their lives will turn out this way. But
if they have no plan or direction,
then life will turn out that way.”

For several years, officials at S C
McPherson have been identifying at-
risk boys in their school and creating
a forum for them where collectively

they discuss issues important to
them, and receive counseling to help
them to find solutions.

The boys in this at-risk group are
those who have exhibited a pattern
of disciplinary problems.

“The at-risk boys are those who
are likely to fall through the cracks if
they do not get intervention. They
may be challenged in some way with
managing their anger, challenged in
terms of truancy, challenged in terms
of how to respect others and other’s
property - various challenges they do
not seem to be able to get a grip on
their own,” Anna Heastie, in charge
of the Guidance and Counselling
Department at S C McPherson, told
Tribune Religion.

There are currently 25 boys in the
at-risk group. At the end of each
term, guidance counselors evaluate
all of the boys to determine whether
they will have to stay in the group, or
are fit to go. Surprisingly, there are
also some young men who, though
no longer required to meet with the
group, choose to continue to meet in
the group sessions.

“They see the benefits and they
enjoy some of the assistance that
they are getting. They are also intro-
duced to a lot of other role models
other than teachers, so a lot of them
have built bonds and have even actu-
ally joined churches and youth
groups - organisations that they
would not ordinarily be exposed to,”
Ms Heastie said.

The Real Men’s Ministry became a
part of this mentorship programme
after they responded to the school’s
request for assistance. And Ms
Heastie believes that it is a perfect
partnership to have men - real men -
mentor these boys. “We know that
the only person who can tell a male
how to be a male is a male.

“J don’t want people to believe
that adolescent development is so
different now from the way it was



when these men were growing up.
How that boy’s body is changing, the
feelings, the emotions and how to
deal with it, are still the same. So
these men should be able to relate to
the. boys and the boys should be able
to relate to them.”

To signify his partnership with the
school, Dr Kendal Major, president
of the Real Men’s Ministry, was on
hand at an assembly at S C
McPherson earlier this week to pres-
ent a banner for the school’s Praise
and Worship Day, which is today.
The banner, which hangs on the
archway to the school reads, “There’s
no God like Jehovah. He knows my
Name”.

Worship

Praise and Worship Day is an ini-
tiative that was started many years
ago to bring the “gospel alive” in the
school. The first half of the school
day will be dedicated to students
hearing messages from various
speakers and engaging in praise and
worship sessions.

According to Ms Heastie, when
Bahamians tune into local radio and
talk shows, there are many negative
comments about our young people.
Yet, there are not many person who
are willing to be a part of the solu-
tion. “Sometimes you invite commu-
nity partners in for a careers day for
example, but they would assume the
position of being to busy.

“But I would like to say that they
might feel like the careers day or
these seminars are affecting their
bottom line, but these programmes
are helping to build a life,” Ms
Heastie said. “And that’s really the
only bottom line that matters
because it will affect the nation for
the future, for your children and
your children’s children because you
never know who these young people
are going to become.”



PG 6 °@ Thursday, March 15, 2007

RELIGION

The Tribune

Churches are empty in the heart
of Rome, as people in suburbs
worship in garages and stores

@ By MARIA SANMINIATELL!
Associated Press Writer

ROME (AP) — The faithful lowered their heads
in prayer as the priest celebrated Mass. The only
peculiarity about the act of worship was its setting:
A garage-like space inside an apartment building,
with an altar made of bamboo.

It was supposed to be temporary, but the Rev.
Arnaldo D’Innocenzo’s makeshift church in this
desolate, working class community on Rome’s west-
ern outskirts has been serving local parishioners for
more than 30 years.

About 12 miles east, in the historic center of
Rome, tourists mill about the 400-year-old Baroque
Church of St. Ignatius Loyola, admiring the trompe
Voeil frescos on the ceiling and the relics of saints.

But regular worshippers there are few and far
between.

It’s a situation that has been confounding the
Diocese of Rome, the very heart of the Roman
Catholic world: The magnificent churches of the
city center serve more as museums than houses of
prayer, while many among the burgeoning throngs
of the faithful in the scrappy outskirts of town are
forced to worship in garages, former grocery stores,
or prefab buildings.

One reason is that there is a higher concentration
of regular churchgoers among the poor Italians and
eastern European immigrants living in the suburbs
than among the more affluent Romans in the heart
of the city. Much of the center also has been taken
over by commercial spaces and government build-
ings — resulting in lower population density.

For the Rev. Ferruccio Romanin, rector of St.
Ignatius Loyola, the problems are compounded by
intense competition for worshippers: There are at
least 10 other churches within a short walk from
where he preaches. And in Rome’s center, there are
more than 200 churches that are an important part
of the country’s artistic heritage.

“The problem in Rome is the high concentration
of churches. But you can’t ship them out, they’re
historical.” Romanin said. “There’s no solid group
(of worshippers) here. They change. They'll come
and say, “Oh, what a nice sermon,’ and then they
leave and I never see them again.”

Meanwhile. the Diocese of Rome is struggling to
provide for the spiritual needs of the rapidly grow-
ing neighborhoods on the outskirts of Rome.

Bishop Ernesto Mandara. who is in charge of
building new churches within the diocese, says huge
amounts of church funds go into the upkeep of the
glorious churches of the city center at the expense
of the suburban parishes. He said priests who have
been waiting for a church for years often lobby him
for a new building.

% O69 .



@ VISITORS look up at the ceiling of St Ignatius
Loyola Church, in central Rome. The magnificent
churches of the city center serve more as museums
than houses of prayer, while many among the bur-
geoning throngs of the faithful in the scrappy out-
skirts of town are forced to worship in garages, for-
mer grocery stores, or prefab buildings.

(AP Photo: Pier Paolo Cito)

“Sometimes I live as if I were surrounded by
creditors — I have to hide from parish priests, some
of whom live in dire situations,” Mandara said.

At his parish of San Patrizio a Colle della
Mentuccia, D’Innocenzo described the frustration
he has lived through waiting for a church.

“ve been here 33 years,” he said. “lve become
an old man.”

He said generations of children have been bap-
tized and received their first Communion in his
ramshackle church, but nobody wants to get mar-
ried there. “They all looked for a more beautiful
church,” he said.

In downtown Rome. such artistic landmarks as
Santa Maria del Popolo e San Luigi dei Francesi are
mostly empty and their religious purpose has been
reduced mainly to hearing confessions — often
from tourists.

“At the root of the problem is how to keep up
these structures that from a‘pastoral point of view

are not needed, but that are artistic treasures,”
Mandara said. “The problem of the new churches in
Rome is an absurd problem.”

Mandara said there are 19 existing parishes that
still do not have churches, and finding the money to
do so can be a struggle. The average cost of build-
ing a parish church is between $4.62 million and
$5.28 million, with half the funding coming from tax
payments to the church, and the other half coming
from the diocese.

Raising money can be a challenge in working
class neighborhoods.

“Getting economic help from the new neighbor-
hoods is difficult, but not for lack of generosity,”
Mandara said. “Often, it’s young couples with a
mortgage. I can’t ask people with mortgages to give
me money.”

Complicating matters is the fact that some neigh-
borhoods sprang up without planning in the 1960s
when the poor in southern Italy began migrating
north. As a consequence, many do not include zon-
ing for a place of worship, which means added years
of bureaucracy, Mandara said.

In Rome’s heavily immigrant Montespaccato
neighborhood, a parish serving about 10,000 people
was established in 2000 and it is not close to getting.
a church.

About 500 faithful who attend Mass gather in
what was probably supposed to be a grocery store.
A purple neon sign over the door identifies it as a
church and inside, electric stoves keep people
wari. Catechism lessons are held in a musty under-
ground garage.

“For one hour it doesn’t harm anyone, but for
anything more than that it becomes a health issue,”
said the Rev. Danilo Bissacco, who heads the
parish.

Mandara’s cause got a boost during the Catholic
Church’s 2000 Jubilee year, when 50 new churches
were planned for the city as part of initiatives to
mark Vatican celebrations.

That’s how D’Innocenzo finally got his church.
He will inaugurate it on March 18.

“It took the Jubilee of 2000, when the city agreed
to transform farm land into areas zoned for con-
struction.” D’Innocenzo said. “And that’s when we
bought it.”

His flock has grown over the last 30 years. The
audience for his very first Mass in the parish of San
Patrizio a Colle della Mentuccia consisted of “four
adults who had come to take a look and five chil-
dren.”

The new church is more imposing, with the altar
high above the congregation. It’s undoubtedly a
better facility, but it also has made D'Innocenzo
appreciate some aspects of his cramped quarters.

“I’m sorry to lose this direct rapport,” he said, .



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES



THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 7



Hutler’s Funeral Homes & Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

Mrs. Margaret
Jeanette Pratt, 69



Long Island.

Left to cherish her memories are her Two (2) Adopted Sons;
Kevin Pratt and Falcon Major; Three (3) Sisters; Susanna |

Martinborough, Joanna Allen and Parnell Darville; Two (2)
Brothers; James and Erwin Pratt; One (1) Sister-in-law;

Mavis Pratt; Thirty-three (33) Nephews; Rudolph, Kim, : §
Leo, Edward and Capt. John Pratt, Peter, Glen, Ricardo, Chan, : \
Nigel, Miguel, Levar and Johnny Pratt, Bernard Shephard,
Patrick Hanna, Michael and Nathaniel Rolle, Elgin and Elkanah :
Major, Matthias and Simeon Cartwright, George Knowles, :
Michael Rolle, Bernard, Anthony, Cornelius and Nedley :
Martinborough Jr., Kirk, Matthew, David, Raymond, Robert :
and Aaron Darville; Thirty-five (35) Nieces; Shirley Gomez, :
Jelva and Eugenia Cartwright, Emily Martinborough, Maria :

Margaret Major, Albertha Clincy of North : Tye and Joshua; Two (2) Nieces;

Darville,

Carolina, Felicity Walker, Sister Felicitas Pratt of Boston, :
Massachusetts, Elease Smith, Margaret Knowles, Dulcita |
Ferguson, Francillon and Joanne Martinborough, Jacqueline :
Cooper, Genevieve Colo, Ceola Turnquest, Camelita Treco, |
Paulette Cartwright, Toinett Major, Juliana Bullard, Grace :
Beneby, Pamela Minnis-Smith, Maria and Kendra Rolle, |

Shirley Russell, Linda Sawyer, Paulette and Janet Pratt; Three
(3) Godchildren; Byron Cartwright, Natasha Adderley and

Catholic Church of South Long Island, The Carroll, Darville



: Community of Mortimer’s South Long Island others too
: numerous to mention.

: Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers’ Funeral Homes

. 7 : and Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets on Thursday from

eh ene ry eS : 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. on Friday from 9:00 a.m. until

2007 at 10:00 a.m. at Mt. Camel |

Catholic Church, Hamilton’s, Long | °” Saturday at the church.
Island. Officiating will be Fr. :

@ Patrick Fanning Assisted by :
PS) Deacon Darville. Interment will |
Â¥/ follow in Immaculate Conception |

Church Cemetery, Mortimer’s, |

12noon and from 4: 00 p.m. in Long Island until service time

Mr. Anthony George
Woodside-Smith, 32

of Johnson Road, Fox Hill will be
held on Friday, March 16th, 2007
|] at 11:00 a.m. at Macedonia Baptist
Church, Bernard Road. Officiating
will be Pastor David S. Johnson.
J Interment will follow in
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

Left to treasure his precious
memories are his darling Mother; Selena Woodside-Smith;
Father; Samuel Smith; Two (2) Brothers; Michael and
Andrew; Four (4) Sisters; Grace, Andrea, Joy and Samantha;
Three (3) Brothers-in-law; Geno, Kev and Ian; One (1)
Sister-in-law; Brea; Five (5) Nephews; Shavano, Joe, Mark,
Asia and Selena;
Grandfather; Andre Rocktoe; Adopted Grandmother;
Mildred Maruce; Three (3) Aunts; Molina Rocktoe, Toppie
and Max; Adopted Aunt; Ina Baker; One (1) Uncle; Charles
Rocktoe; Close Family; The Cartwright and Darville families,
Christopher and Louise Humes, Pat and Mommy, Shelly,
Savana, Perry, CJ, Latheis, Carrita, Aneshika, Matthew,

: Trevor and Tony; Close Family Friends; Pastor Samuel
: Johnson and family, Madra, Ashton, Buda, Zelma Minnis
Alinique Rolle and a host of other relatives and friends :
including; The Teachers and Staff of C. H. Reeves Junior |
High School, Uriah McPhee Primary School, St. Ann’s Primary |
School in Rock Sound, Eleuthera, the families of the : to mention.

Resurrection Catholic Church, The Immaculate Conception |

: Arrangements are being conducted by Butlers’ Funeral
and Cartwright families of Rose’s and Berry’s, and the :

and family, Cola Rolle and family, Palmer, Mrs. Daisy, Mrs.
Winnie, Mr. and Mrs. Adam Mackey, Roscoe and Agnes
Ferguson, Ingrid and family and many others too numerous

Homes and Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets.





PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030

Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026



Trevonne Allyassa
McKinney, 22

be held on Saturday at 1:00 p.m. at St.
Francis Xavier Catholic Church, West Hill
®y Street. Fr. Glen C. Nixon, assisted by Fr.
Kendrick J. Forbes and Fr. Elvado R.

View Road.



Trevonne Paula Louise McKinney; parents, Steve and Treva McKinney;
2 brothers, Stephen Esq., Schvonne McKinney; 3 sisters, Okoya, Stefka,
Odia McKinney; grandfather, Philip Collymore; 6 aunts, Sabrina Ingraham,
Davina Brown, Philippa Robinson, Shelly Collymore, Lee Rahming, Sarah
Sands; 7 uncles, William McKinney, Desmond Sands, Theadore Rahming,
Philip Collymore Jr., Walter Robinson, Leslie Ingraham Sr., Gossett Brown,
3 godparents, Sherman Brown, Linda Brown, Virginia Moss; 109 cousins,
Lavell, Lavern, Lavon, Lavado, Lavette, Daryl, William II, Ricardo,
Wilfred, Keskida, Desmond Jr., Celestial, Jewel, Charity, Bridgette, Nicky,
Theadora, Theadore Jr., Torri, Thea, Toya, Leslie Jr., Dionne, Alera, Juffura,
Dwayne, Tiffany, Kimbley, Darcel, Antonio, Portia, Tavaras, Douglas,
Romiko, Doyle III, Clement Jr., Cashera, Chalecia, Sarah, Paul, Teiko,
Zhivago, Ahmad, Ervano, Shavincia, Roberto, Vincent Jr., Sharonn, Rolando,
Rhainne, Nicole, Destiny, Ashley, Marcel Jr., LeShante Isaiah, Brionne,
Leslie II, Eryn, Tonya, Sharon, Doyle Sr., Elizabeth, James, Marcell, Mark,
Nakita, Niki, Tavras Jr., Travis, Savannah, Kendera, Rolando Jr., Romeko
Jr., Kendria, Terron, Tyler, Lexia, Ryan, Felicity, Ferron, Shantz, Danielle,
D' Andrielle, Dimitri, Taryn, Anthony, Cyprianna, Fred, Pam, Tony, Peter,

Russell, Denise and Nicki, Deanne, Cecil, Marva, Gregory, other relatives,

Cynthia Hall and family, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Ellis, Marina Clare and:
family, Anthony Newbold and family, Calsey Johnson and family, Laura : Watkin's family of West Palm Beach, Florida, Alfred Burrows, Richard
Lowe-Wright and family, Vaughn Albury and family, Linda Woodside and =
! Michael McQueen, Andrew Hepburm, Jenny Roberts, Flossiemae Coakley,
: Richard Innocent, Richmond Bostwick, George Deveaux, Maxine Roker,

: the Beckles family, Roosevelt Godet, Paul Christopher Cooper, Rev. Dr.

family, Sabrina Thurston and family, Jerdavinique Moss, Jerdeshia ‘and
Jerkelle Moxey, Vanlock Fowler and family, the Lockhart and family,
Algeron S.P.B. Allen and family, also survived by, The Rt. Hon. Perry G.

Christie and Mrs. Christie, Deputy Prime Minister, Cynthia Pratt, Minister
Alfred Sears, Minister Obadiah Wilchcombe. Sir Arlington and Sheila
Butler, Pastor Timothy Stewart and family; special friends, Shanika, Holly, . |

Shevon, Kera, Shemelle, Dawayna, Sherice Ferguson, Gerrard, Marcian,
Mario, Andy, Staff of Tile Magic, Staff of Adam and Eve, Staff of the
Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas, Staff of Ministry of Education,
Staff of Bahamas Information Services, Staff of Love 97, Staff of Island
FM, Staff of 1240 Community of Fort Charlotte,

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians #44
Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday
from 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. and atthe church from Vt: 30 a.m. until

~ service time.

Kenseth Sat RID WH TS i BoM SEG RG TG WIE IF RPS KABA AANBE KY AMBER RAM Naee:
rs Fa a eee ees OE RTE TERT SRE

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

. A memorial service will be held on Friday 9 pm at St. Francis Xavier
Cane West Hill Street.

of #19 Gibbs Lane, off Nassau Street will

Turnquest will officiate. Interment will be
| made in the Catholic Cemetery, Infant | [

She is survived by | daughter, Nalla |

terme eRMGeue 2 eo A ee

Thomas Alexander
Rahming, 81

of Bernard Road, Fox Hill, will be held on
Saturday at 3:00 p.m. at St.Anselm's
Catholic Church, Bernard Road, Fox Hill.
Monsignor Preston Moss will officiate.
Interment will be made in the church's
cemetery.











Left to cherish precious memory are his
sisters, Mrs. Margaret Demetrius and Mrs.
Alice Woodside; cousin, Miss Miriam

: Roker; brother-in-law, Mr. Kenneth Woodside; nieces, Mrs. Effie Jane
: Sherman Wallis, Mrs. Jaunianne Dorsette, Mrs. Louis Russell, Dr. Christina
: Nwosa, Miss Drescilla Moss, Miss Lucy Woodside, Miss Annie Moss,
: Miss Doris Rahming, Miss Christina Moss, Mrs. Regina Talley, Miss Anne.
: Woodside, Miss Barbara Rahming, Mrs. Wilfred Huie, Mrs. Carolyn
: Kinglock and Paula Lundy; nephews, Mr. Ferdinand Sherman, Mr. Benjamin
: Rahming, Mr. Hosea Moss, Mr. Calvin Moss, Mr. John Rahming, Mr.
! Ricardo Rahming, Mr. Frederick Rahming, Mr. Barry Rahming
: Rahming and Mr.Theodore Rahming; cousins who are the children of his
: late aunt Louise Watkins of Palm Beach, Florida and a host of grandnieces
: and grandnephews; other relatives and friends including , Mr. Watson "LJ"
: ‘Hemmings, Dr. Vincent Nuvoza, Bernard Dorsette, Richard Tally, Vincent
* Russell, Benjamin Demeritte, Nellie Woods, Granville Symonette, Alex
‘? and Stuart, Patricia Jarvis, Lincoln Cox, Hugh Mackey, Barbara Place of
Geanette, Cecil, Earla, Mickey, Karen Jo-ann, Addington, Kim, Ian, Ken,:' | New York, Gladys Cobb of Detroit, Sandra Gardiner of Maryland, Iva
! Thompson of New Bight, Cat Island, Emily Burnside, Louise Pople, Cora

, Mr. Larry

Mackey, Beryl Wright, Sheila Rolle, John Brice, Frank Edgecombe, the

Carey, the Rolle family of Augusta Street, Philip Saunders, Van Benson,

Philip Rahming, Doyle and Deanza Burrows, Sir Clement Maynard, Hon.
Alfred Sears, Attorney Michael Barnett, Mavis Darling Hill and the the

: members of the Parkinson's Foundation, Dr. Fung Chung, Charlotte
: Rahming, Rev. David Johnson, Rev. J. Carl Rahming, Samuel Ferguson,
: Hilton Bowleg and Ethlyn Rolle of Grand Bahama, management, staff and
: family of Coastline Nursing Home, the Rahming and Demeritte families,
-| staff of Tom's Radiator, Monsignor Preston Moss and the family of St.
/ Anselm's Catholic Church, Rev. Dr. Enoch Backford and family of Mt.
/ Carey Union Baptist Church and the entire Fox Hill community. |

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brother's Morticians, #44
: Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and,on Saturday
| from 10:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and at the church from 1:30 P. m. until service
: time.

ee eee ee eee er ee





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026



THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 9



FUNERAL SERVICES FOR





Dr. Trevor Percy
Jupp, 84



Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

Dr. Trevor Percy Jupp
Born: August 2, 1922
Died: March 3, 2007
Age: 84

Forbes and family and Dr. LisaAnne Knowles;

Numerous other relatives and friends including, cousins, Harold :
and Susan Jupp of Switzerland, Peter and Elisabeth Jupp of :
England, Michael and Patricia Bowlingbrook of England and Rita |



. Hocken of Florida; also the following and their families, William
_ and Adella Weeks, Helena and Tony Sterling of England, Violet
' and Eldridge Knowles, Mildred Dian, Dr. Corolyn Hanna, Joan
: Mason, Deborah Armogan, Ruth Fawkes, John Wilkinson,

of #20 Benson Road, Danottage :
Estates and formerly of Hornsey, |

England, U.K., will be held on | Rita Wells, Dennis and Theresa McKenzie, Delores Pratt, Francis

Saturday at 10:00 a.m. at Holy Cross McPhee, Calrid Bain, Cyprianna Burrows, Michael Bain, Dorphany

Anglican Church, Highbury Park. The | Simmons, Nurse Brenda Bain, Ms. Vernie Neely, Sidney and
Most Rev'd Drexel W. Gomez, The |
Right Rev'd Bishop Laish Z. Boyd, |
The Right Rev'd Gilbert A. Thompson, |
Rev'd Canon Neil Roach, Rev'd Beryl Higgs, Rev'd Ethan Ferguson |

and Rev'd Peter Scott will officiate. Interment will be made in | M : :
: Bishop Laish Z. and Mrs. Joanne Boyd, The Right Reverend

_ Gilbert A. and Mrs. Olga Thompson, The Reverend Canon Neil
and Mrs Joan Roach, The Reverends Beryl L. Higgs, The Reverend
_ Ethan Ferguson, Reverend Father Peter Scott, The Reverend Dr.
_ James and Bernadette Moultrie, Pastor Hugh Roach, His Excellency
_ The Honourable Arthur D. Hanna and Mrs. Hanna, Dame
: Marguerite Pindling, Sir Clement and Lady Zoe Maynard, Hon.

Survivors include his wife of 39 years, Hazel Jupp (nee Bain); : Paul and Lillith Adderley, Hon. Marcus Bethel, Hon. Bernard

children, Denise and Kermith Graham, Kenneth Jupp, Lawrence | : Lk :
and Lashan Jupp, Brian Jupp, Ian Jupp, Kamala and Frederick Thé Bahamas Medical Association, George and Anita Bernard,
Gilmore, Colin Jupp and Scott Jupp; grandchildren, Ashley and |
Brittney Graham, Alexander, Alicia and Ibraheim Jupp, Laurence : : . :
Jr. and Lashanti Jupp, Ryan and Brayon Jupp, Hallie Jupp and | family, St. Anne's School family; Omega College family, St.
Luke Gilmore; in-laws, Douglas Towell of Portsmouth, England,
Andrea Archer, Marina and Audley Greaves, Nigel Fox, Edgar :
Wellington Bain, Elizabeth Philipps of Miami, Florida, Melvern :
Roberts, Pastor Barbara and George Rahming, Betty and Bishop :
Walter H. Richardson of Opalocka, Florida, Judith Knowles and :
Keva Bain; nieces and nephews, Keith Towell of Gilford, Engiand, :
Charlotte Cawthom, Kevin and Aidee Archer, Gina and Michael |
Carey and family, Taza Archer, Darren and Jason Greaves, Cherly :
Turner and family, Yvonne and Michael Ashe, Floy.and "Fuzzy" :
Glen and family, Wayne and Shelly Roberts family, Hollis Sand :
Brickell Sherman and family, Tanya, Sherri and Brandon Roberts,
_ Linda and Lawrence Lightboume and family, Stephen, Carol and:
Peter "PJ." Rahming, Clifford "Jimmy" and Denice Forbes, Dobrie :

Roseman Byles, the Brozozog, the Wells, William Weeks III,
Pamela and George Casimir, Antionette Trotman, Anthony Smith,

Patsy Moss, Winifred Major, Helen and Surace Bhagwandin,
Barbara and John Morgan, Mr. and Mrs. L.B. Johnson, Justice
Emmanuel and Emily Osadebay, Dr. Kirk and Rachael Culmer,
Michelle White, Angela Achara, Dorie Jones, Gloria Gomez, The
Most Reverend Drexel W. and Mrs. Gomez, Right Reverend

Nottage and Mavis Adderley; his many medical colleagues from

Mrs. Muriel Eneas, Dr. Keva Bethel, the Danottage Estates |
Neighbourhood Association, members of The Holy Cross Parish

Thomas University, Miami Florida, The Bahamas Branch of the
British Legion, Bethel Baptist Senior Saints, The Dolphin Swim
Club, staff of The Princess Margaret Hospital and his many
patients too numerous to name whom he served unselfishly for -
nearly fifty years.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians,
#44 Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on
Saturday at the church from 9:00.a.m. until service time..







.

PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007 _THE TRIBUNE OB!TUARIES

KRurtiss Memorial Mortuary

Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma - Tel: 345-7020¢ Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325- 6621/322-4969 « 24 Hour Paging Service — 9761

Last Rites Las






ROBERT ROY
ALBURY I, 68

William's Town, Exuma.



| He is survived by his-wife, Venell Albury; sons, George, Robert II, :
Brian and R.R. Isaac; daughters, Kim Carey, Evelyn Glynatsis and :
Tiashia; grandchildren, Andrew, Christopher, -Matthew and Spence :
Carey; Tenille, Robert (Robbie), Kimberly (Kimmie), Joshua, : ©

Jonathan, Joel.and Joanna ‘Albury, Margaret and Nicko Glynatsis;

great grandchildren, Elverton Bain and Keonta Albury; brothers, :
Albert, Berchanal and Arlington Albury; sister, Adina Roberts; uncles, : 4) - . ‘
Earnest and Daniel Duncombe; aunts, Roselyn Pierre, Annemay ; Miller, Deacon Whitney Miller, Bradley and Rodney Miller; three
Duncombe, Evelyn. Missick and Esther Anderson; numerous neices }
and nephews, especially Ernest, Sandra, Stacy, Barbara, Lelia, Bessie, :
Doris, Evelyn, Betty, Shelly, Pratt, Bobby, Freeman, Richard, Jonicka, i
Adina, Jaya and Kendra; daughter-in-law, Vernice Albury; sons-in- }
law, Philip Carey and George Glynatsis; father-in-law, Lorenzo }
Bullard; mother-in-law, Cynthia Bullard; brothers-in-law, Lorenzo i
Bullard, Deintree Williams, Jethro Arthur and Dwayne Deveaux; :
sisters-in-law, Alice Albury, Margie Scott, Ruth Hurlman, Eunice }
Smith, Dominique Arthur, Juliana Bullard, Linda Bullard-Deveaux; :
host of other relatives and friends including Archdeacon Keith :
Cartwright, Rev. Alfred.and Cora McKenzie and family, Pastor :
_ Naphtali and Sarah Cooper and family, the church family of Ebenezer
Baptise, Baratarre, Exuma, the church family of The Lord's House, : : ¢ d Me )
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Kenneth and Essie Sams and family, Alfred : relatives and friends and their families including Rev. Basil Strachan,
Sams and family; Bernie Fry and family, Cherokee Brick and Tile :
Company all of Macon, Georgia, Leroy Weir and family, Spencer : Charles Miller, Vince and Wellington Miller, Eric and Deacon Hillard
and Vern Burrows and family, Craig and Barbara Darville, Douglas :
Minns, Zephaniah Duncombe, Tracey and Ranae Styles, Joshua Sears i J 3 v
and family, Neko Grant and family, Fred Cooper and family, Maurice | Henrietta Rolle, Mervin Rahming, Prince Mackey, Sar’ a Thompson,
Glinton and family, Rudy Gray, Eddison Brice, Paul Moxey and :
family, Dashville Williams, Capt. Raymond Carroll, Cresswell P. :
Morley and family, Anthony-Moss and family, Mario Simms and :
family of Long Island, Attorney Elliott Lockhart, Paul Darville, i
Jeremiah (Jerry) Rolle and family, Nadine Rolle-Sweeting, Marian : : y ;
Bethel, Dora Missick, Thelma Pennerman, Desireen Pennerman, ; family, Safari, John Hutcheson and family, Smiley
Vivian Miller, Thelma Smith, Lisa Pelecanous, Antionette Munnings, }
Abigail Charlow, Deon Britton, Hulland and Adina Darville, Capt. :

Hezron Moxey and family, Anthony, Headly and the Smith's family ; The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary.

from Big Mangrove, the Knowles family from Mangrove Bush, : and Fifth Street on Thursday from12:00 noon until :
Cresswell (Shortie) Johnson and family and the entire communities :

of William's Town, Staniel Cay, Black Point, Farmer's Cay and }

Baratarre Exuma.

The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary, Robinson Road”
: and Fifth Street on Thursday from 12:00 noon until 6:00 p.m. and
} at the church on Friday from 2:00 p.m. until service time on Saturday.

| of George Town, Exuma, will be held :
“| on Saturday at 2:00 p.m.-at St. Andrew's : —
J Anglican Church, George Town, }
Exuma. Officiating will be Archdeacon }
Keith Cartwright, assisted by Fr. Mario : |
8 Conliffe and Rev'd Willish Johnson. : j
Interment in St. Mary's Cemetery, :





LUTHNEY
MILLER, 55

of Sunshine Park and formerly of |
Conch Sound, Andros, will be held on |
| Sunday at 11:00 a.m.-at The New Mt.
(| The New Mt. Pisgah Trinity Baptist
8 Church, Conch Sound, “Andros:
Officiating will be Rev. Basil Strachan,
assisted by other ministers. Interment
‘in The Miller's Private Cemetery, Conch
Sound.

He is survived by his wife, Margaret Miller; four daughters, Edna
Myers, Shonique, Carol and Nolette Miller; four brothers, Emmith

sisters, Deaconess Mabelene Bowleg, Judith Miller and Louise Rivera
of Kendall, Miami, Florida; adopted brother, Lloyd Riley; eight
grandchildren, Dacoda Fernander, Amos Myers, Trevor, Jonique and
Trevon Farquharson; Jemni and Romin Davis and Ricardo Culmer;
uncle, Harold Miller; son-in-law, Leslie Myers; three brothers-in-
law, Charles Bowleg, Jesus Rivera and James Outten; six-sisters-in-
law, Linda, Deloris and Jessica Miller, Shirley Clarke, Betty Outten
and Patricia Ash; 32 nieces and nephews, Marilyn Adderley, Harazona, |
Charlie, Vashenell, Bradley, Joycelyn and Shamardo Bowleg, Sherell
Leadon, Lovan Christie, Perry, Marva, Dave, Alberto, Bruno, Clinton,
Labra, Latora, Laconan, William, Ramon, Brad, Lemont and Kendra
Miller, Janness, Bernadette and Lee Gibson, Claudia and J. J. Rivera,
Dorissa Taylor, Ricardo Scott and Melissa Newbold; host of other
Bernadette and Eleanor Bowleg, Keva Walker, Olive ‘: »wn, Minister
Miller, Alfred Colebrooke, Mitchell Evans, Philip Sands, Beryl Rolle,
Doral, Dereck and Dennis Miller, Mavis Adderley, Ernie Pedican,

? Mildred Miller, Eudie Rolle Jr., and Mae Miller. o Marie and
: Charmaine Sumner, Bernetta James, Dianne Kno!’ —_.ddie Miller
: and family, John Rolle and family, Mt. Pisgah Trini —:ptist Church

family, Rev. E. Brown of New Bethlehem Baptist C' —_, Ivan Gray,
: The Immigration staff, The Potter's Cay Dock Cr. The Outten

-utler, Joshua
Rolle and Rev. Miverva Pratt and families.

»binson Road
‘) p.m. and at
the church in Conch Sound on Friday from 3:00 p.n:. until service |

time on Sunday.



The Tribune

RELIGION

AGS Le be

4 oo
oop ee ee

Thursday, March 15, 2007 ° PG 11



Prayer group brings
Christianity to catwalk

@ By MATT SEDENSKY
Associated Press Writer

MIAMI BEACH, Fla. (AP) — The bodies at this
Saturday night gathering are sculpted, the locks of
hair full and wavy, the faces made for the covers of
magazines.

Such physical perfection is a South Beach staple.
on its sun-kissed shoreline and in its velvet-roped
dance clubs. But these young men and women are
not here to find a weekend hookup or to imbibe a
$15 drink. They’re here for God.

Since its 1984 founding in New York, Models for
Christ has sought to bring faith to fashion — spiri-
tuality to an industry that puts a premium on sex
appeal. The non-denominational organization has
since expanded to 19 other major fashion centers,
including Los Angeles, London, Paris, Milan and
Tokyo — and hundreds participate.

“This work can lead anyone away from the
Lord,” said Jeremiah Johnson, a former model who
heads the group’s Miami Beach chapter. “But it
doesn’t have to.”

About a dozen people — not just models but also
photographers and agents and others in the indus-
try — gather in a circle of maroon chairs in the sim-
ple worship space of Calvary Chapel Miami Beach.
They sing hymns, read from bright blue paperback
Bibles and share their struggles of remaining
Christian in the fashion business.

Most come dressed casually in jeans and T-shirts.
They are as young as 17, and hail from all parts of
the country during the peak season for modeling
work. They bow their heads in prayer.

Many talk about their boundaries — refusing to
do overtly sexual advertisements, or those for alco-
hol and cigarettes. They also talk about resisting a
professional culture they feel often encourages



@ MODEL Sabriane Brandao prays
during a Models for Christ meeting.

(AP Photo: Lynne Sladky)

64 mOet se eee

ee AL ere ee ee ee mo eo er id (eee ote



@ A GROUP of people in the fashion industry pray during a meeting of Models for Christ at the Calvary
Chapel in Miami Beach, Florida. For more than 20 years, Models for Christ has sought to bring faith to
fashion—spirituality and sanctity to an industry driven by sex and selfishness.

rampant partying and sex.

“There’s a lot of pressure to do the alcohol ad or
get in your underwear or do whatever publication
you don’t want to do. But we don’t need to bow
down in order to be blessed in what we do,” said
Roman Watson, a 29-year-old model who has done
work for Ralph Lauren, Nike and Macy’s. “I want
to encourage everyone to be a Christian first and a
model second.”

Watson said models are often afraid to reveal
their moral boundaries on shoots, for fear that it
could end their careers. But he urged those gath-
ered at Models for Christ to follow their hearts and
they would ultimately be rewarded with work.

“We can be fearful of a client ... but we should be
fearful of the King of Kings,” he said. “God is able
to bless you. He’s got more connections than the
entire world.”

Jeff and Laura Calenberg were both models
when they founded Models for Christ with a small
group of participants. Jeff Calenberg said he want-
ed to not only provide a place for Christians in the
industry to gather, but also provide an example for
those not living a necessarily spiritual life.

“The business has a lot of darkness in it.” said
Calenberg, now a fashion photographer. “And as a

yea

(AP Photo: Lynne Sladky)

believer in Christ, we are seeking to maintain the
light within us as well as shine toward others.”

Calenberg said there are countless stories of peo-
ple who have been transformed by the group and
led away from lives of substance abuse and promis-
cuity.

“We’ve seen some people’s lives change totally,”
he said.

At the recent Models for Christ meeting, Heather
Funk, a 34-year-old fashion photographer based in
Miami, told her own story of club-hopping, and
drug and alcohol abuse. She tried to change her life
numerous times — she even remembers showing up
at church on a Sunday morning smelling of vodka.
But she said she was surrounded by others who
made it very easy to slip back into her partying life.

Funk eventually did become a Christian. She
doesn’t credit Models for Christ with her conver-
sion, but she said it has been valuable because it
allows her to gather with others from similar
lifestyles who are trying to follow God.

“The fashion industry. there’s so many extremes

‘init. The models are extremely beautiful, extreme-

ly skinny, make tons of money,” she said. “It may
seem an unlikely place to find God, but really it’s
not.”

TM AOS PN oe eee 6 ee aun aces aoe eeu ek ©



. EEG Be lvt g ey e a

2 Use

+ Vs

“ede ‘



PG 45. e Thursday, March 15, 2007 REI IGION | "The Tribune”

Top Episcopal panel reiterates
church’s welcome of gays

i By The Associated Press



PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A top Episcopal
panel reiterated the church’s welcome of gays and
lesbians, as it began talks on whether the denomi-
nation should meet Anglican demands to roll back

eceptance of same-sex couples.

The executive council, a committee of clergy and
lay people, issued the statement Sunday at the end
of its three-day meeting in Portland. The council
also emphasized that Episcopalians with traditional
views of sexuality have a place in the denomination,
too.

“We wish to reaffirm to our lesbian and gay mem-
bers that they remain a welcome and integral part
of the Episcopal Church,” the council said, then
offered “prayerful concern” for those who consider
gay relationships sinful. “We wish to reaffirm that
they too remain a welcome and integral part of the
Episcopal Church,” the council said.

In 2003, the Episcopal Church, the US wing of
Anglicanism, created an uproar when it consecrat-
ed the first openly gay bishop, V Gene Robinson of
New Hampshire.

Last month, Anglican leaders emerged from a
closed-door meeting in Tanzania with an ultima-
tum: They gave Episcopalians until September 30
to unequivocally pledge not to consecrate another
partnered gay bishop or authorize official prayers
for same-sex couples. If it doesn’t, the church risks
a reduced role in the 77 million-member Anglican
Communion.

The council, which oversees the work of the
denomination’ between its General Conventions
held once every three years, created a working
group to study what role the council should play in
responding to the demands. The House of Bishops
will discuss their response to Anglican leaders at a
meeting later this month. National Council of
Churches releases 2007 yearbook.

oman Catholic



raises $

BOSTON (AP) — The Roman Caiholic Bosion
Archdiocese raised $13.8 million in its latest annual
fund drive. the most since 2002 at the height of the
clergy sex abuse scandal.

Donations to this past year’s appeal rose 15 per
cent over the previous year, a 57 per cent increase

ver 2002, when income dropped to $8.8 million.
archdiocese officials said.

‘The number of donors has also rebounded. in
2000, when $17.2 million was collected, 93.000 peo-

a! Pottesydiovyt, OPE ne PON tH
pou ON, Laat agdie Crop pes to 36.06 In









EPISCOPAL Bishop of New Hamshire V Gene Robinson

ge

pau sore),

2002, then rose this past year to 50,000.

~ Clearly, if you look over the last four campaigns,
ihcre is a strong demonstration of forward move-
ment and a recognition by Catholics of the progress
that’s taking place across the archdiocese,” said
Damien De Vasto, director of the Catholic Appeal.

The fundraising drive was formerly called the
, rpeal, mut was renamed after Cardinal















Bernard Law resigned in 2002 as archbishop of
Boston. Unsealed court files showed Law had
veut gecticed vi ste Ginone parishes wifhnt

(AP Photo)

Boston Archdiocese
4 8m in latest annual fund drive

notifying civil authorities or the public.

Cardinal Sean O’Malley was installed as arch-
bishop in 2003 and quickly settled with hundreds
people who claimed to be abuse victims.

But he too drew protests for a reconfiguration

-plan for the archdiocese that resulted in the closure

of 62 parishes and some Catholic schools.

Money raised by the annual appeal is used to sup-
port archdiocese operations. religious education,
youth ministries. clergy and laity training, spiritual
Proorammes. ancl needy narishes



THE TRIBUNE: OBITUARIES







paae “THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 1

NEWBOLD BROTHERS

CHAPEL

#10 Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street « PO. Box N-3572

ENDERLYN
CHRISTIE, 43

Ministry,

Trevor Stubbs.

She is survived by, five children, Tellareese Johnson, |
Lakeisha, Leonardo, Tamika and Taneisha Christie; two |
brothers, Donald Murphy ad Selvin Christie; one sister, |
Eserin Christie; four grandchildren, Alicia and David -

Nassau, Bahamas ® Tel: (242) 326-5773

-.... FUNERAL SERVICES FOR _

_ Market & East Streets on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00
_ p.m., Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service
: time. .

of Wilson Tract will be held on |
Saturday, March 17th, 2007 at |
11 :00 a.m., at Free In Jesus |
Wulff Road. :
Officiating will be Pastor |
Interment |
follows in Southern Cemetery, |
Cowpen & Spikenard Roads. |

VALERIE
SMITH, 87

© of Fox Hill will be held on
© Saturday, March 17th, 2007, at
2:00 p.m., at St. Paul's Baptist

Hill. Officiating will be Rev.

«| Dr. J. Carl Rahming. Interment

we follows in the Church's
7 Cemetery.



Johnson, Shavanta and Destiny Dean; one niece, Pandora |

Forbes; one nephew, Franklyn Christie; one nephew-in-
Iaw, Vincent Forbes; one grand niece, Shandika Forbes;
numerous relatives including, Clara and Loretta Christie,
Gladys, Genevieve McKenzie, Louise Knowles, Eleanor

| Wilkinson, Bernadette Bain, Gwendolyn Fraser-Collins,

Sheryl Feaster, Butch, Michael, Solomon, Raymond,
Jeffrey and Leonardo Bain, James "Killer" Coakley, Rose,
Prudence, Frankymae, Heatimae, Florence, Alice,
Elizabeth, Hartman Brown, Ephraim Jones, Patrick Wavell,
Perez and Pierre Wess, Rudolph, Kenneth, Pearl, Sylvia
and Gloria Jones-Adderley; other relatives and friends

| including, Kellymae Russell, Jennymae Colebrook-

Caroline, Andrea Gibson, Claradell, Vickie, Viola, Karen
Lindsey, Bricemae, Patrice Dorsett, Clifford Godet, Warren,
Clifford Jr., Rosalie, Roslyn Ferguson, Tiffany, Aniska,

| Joyann, Lewis, Lucille Mitchell, Clara Lundy, Terry, Pastor
| Feast and family, Elmas Gardiner, Olive Murphy, the
Smith family, the Johnson family, the Bodie family, Richard:
| Knowles and family, the Sweeting and McPhee family,
| Verdell, Velma and Lee Livingston.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Newbold
Brothers Chapel, Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Streets off

: She will always be loved and missed by; her only sister,
: Enid Mortimer; two daughters, Gwendolyn Smith Pratt
'and Betty Smith Armbrister; one son-in-law, Cecil
: Armbrister Sr.; ten grandchildren, Randolph Pratt, Daphne, [
‘Rhonda Rolle, Cecil Armbrister Jr., (Nora Orozco
: Armbrister), Sherelle Miller, Sherisse Kelly (Hilton Kelly),
: Marchello Armbrister, Lashawnda Pratt and Nakisha
: Thomas (Robert Thomas Sr.); ten great grandchildren
including, Michaele Miller, Patrick Miller, Imani Valstacia
: Thomas, Robert Thomas Jr., and Ceyanna Valerie
: Armbriser; one nephew, Vincent Mortimer Jr., and a host
: of relatives and close friends including, the late Carolyn
: Demeritte, Barbara Rogers, May Sweeting, Audrey
: Knowles, Margaret Wedderburn, Blanche Timothy, Ruth
: Knowles, Fred Mackey, Nadine Mosley, Dr. J. Carl
: Rahming, St. Paul's Baptist Church family and Ellen |
| Adderley.

x SS

POR
me Reet



Church, Bernard Road, Fox |

' Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Newbold |
| Brothers Chapel, Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street off

: Market and East Streets on Friday trom 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 |
' p.m., Saturday at the church from 1:00 p.m. until service |
: time.



PG 14 © Thursday, March 15, 2007 RELIGION | The Tribune

Focusing an ‘eye’ on











er en oe! : 4
Ls hc bast _. Eaaeeenee Remennrwe





The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, March 15, 2007 ° PG 15

St Michael’s Methodist





@ WITH camera in hand, The Tribune’s senior photographer Felipé Major has vowed to cap-
ture the picturesque hallways of churches in New Providence to the delight of our dedicated
RELIGION section readers. In this week’s collage, he chose to feature St Michael’s Methodist
Church. The church, headed by Rey Philip Stubbs, was established on January 12, 1964.

See page 14







PAGE 16, THURSDAY, MARCH. 15, 2007.



el dos (242) 325 AB Sf 345 A.

STS Me|ReT
airy te

Antoinette Marie
Johnson, 62

a resident of Hill Crest Drive, Seven Hills
Estates will be held at 11:00 a. m. on Saturday
March 17",2007 at the Greater Bethel Cathedral
Located Faith United Way off Baillou Hill
Road South. Interment will follow at the
Lakeview Memorial Gardens and Mausoleums
Cemetery, John F. Kennedy Drive. Officiating
will be Pastor Christopher Minnis assisted by
other Ministers of the Gospel. Services have
been entrusted to Gateway Memorial Funeral
Chapel, #19 Kenwood Street and Mount Royal
A venue.

She is survived by her husband, Felix Johnson; two (2) sons Pastor Barry and
Dwight Johnson; four (4) daughters, Kim Thurston, Minister Alyce Carey, Samantha
Evans and Renee Johnson; five (5) brothers, Dennis, Leonard, Ivan, Leslie and
Bradley Sands; three (3) daughters-in-law, Michelle, Mildred and Monique Johnson;
three (3) sisters-in-law, Janet, Elaine and Annamae Sands; twenty (20) grand-
children, Keva Knowles, PC 512 Trevor Johnson, Candia, Lanna and Desiree

Carey, Alexandria and Byron Thurston, Tre’, Trevel, Arthur Jr., and Atrell Evans, ~

Shaniqua and Ivory Johnson, Dwight Jr., Deondre and Zantavia Johnson, Reychell
and Dante Johnson, Ricara and Ashley Riley; two (2) great-grand children,
Dremecia and Dontez Knowles; one (1) grandson-in-law, Dremeko Knowles; ten
(10) nieces, Evangelist Crystal Ferguson, Cherise Major, Shandles Williams,
Denise Marvalyn, Tina, Camille and Carolyn, Stacy and Anastacia Sands; eighteen
(18) nephews, Leonardo, Quentin and Corp. Aaron Sands, Devaughn Sands,
Raymond, Kirk, Gregory, Kevin, Brian and Stephen Williams, Leslie Jr., Fabian,
Keno, Delano, Dennis Jr., Dwayne and Devin Sands, other relatives and friends
including, Felix and Gloria Johnson, Deacon Enos and Norma Dawkins, Pastor
Arlington and Karen Rahming, Charles and Tavanna Rodgers, Maria McSweeney,
Mary Moxey and family, John Sands and Veronica Rolle, Harold Miller and family,
John Sands and family, Junior Sands and family, Junior Sands and Edward Dames
of Miami Florida, Gwendolyn Albury and family, Catherine Woods and family,
Jack Davis, Management and Staff of Public Market Administration including
Maggie Rolle, Robbie Cambridge, Philip, Staff of Medical Records/Services
Departments, Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre, Alvin Heild Agency, Clico
Bahamas, St. Luke Diagnostic Centre, Communications Branch, Royal Bahamas
Police Force, Ralph Carey and family, Leisure Travel and Tours, John and Carol
Tully, Melonie Jolly, Hubert Wallace, Mannasseh Cartwright and family, Evangelist
Marcia Martin and family, Magnol Walker and family, John Gibson and family,
Godfrey Saunders and family, Eugene Thompson and family, Ivy Smith and family,
Harriet Darling and family, Rufus Kemp and family, Marie Saunders, Hazel Fisher
and family, George Rolle and family, Althea Gibson and family, and the entire
Seven Hills Community, the entire Faith family Church, Hartment and Shirley
Wood. Elma Slade of Miami Florida, New Covenant Baptist Church family.
Sharon Thompson, Essiemae Barr, Yvonne Campbell and family, Angela Knowles
and fumily. Host of other relatives and friends to numerous to mention.

Harewood Sinclair Higgs L.F.D.
President/Managing Director

J mite Oye t 2 iy isc
Satna HHO AMUGIH!

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES -




Sse

| Friends may pay their last respects at the Funeral Home on Friday from 10:00 a.
' m. to 6:00 p. m. and on Saturday from 9:30 a. m. to service time at the church.



Mr. Ricardo "Punks"
Taylor, 39

a resident of Peardale, will be held at The New
Mount Zion Baptist Church, Baillou Hill Road
South, at 11:00 a. m. on Saturday March 17th,
2007. Interment will follow in the Old Trail
Cemetery, Abundant Life Road. Officiating
will be Bro. Alfred Stewart assisted by other
Ministers of the Gospel. Services have been
entrusted to Gateway Memorial Funeral
Chapel, #19 Mount Royal Avenue and .
Kenwood Street.



He is survived His wife Altermese; three (3)
sons, Ricardo, Renaldo and Ricarzio; one (1) daughter, Ricarzia; his mother, Janet
Taylor; his father, Ikel Curtis; four (4) sisters, Enith Ferguson, Lydia Strachan,
‘ Julie Rolle and Paulette Mackey; two (2) brothers, David Mackey and Anthony
Strachan; four (4) aunts, Unamae Lewis, Agnes Grey, Marklyn Williams, Judy
Taylor; five (5) uncles, David, Samuel and Howard Taylor, Simeon and Clauduis
Curtis; sixteen (16) nieces, Rochell, Chantell, Patrice, Shandkea, Patricia, Dercka,
Danisha, Dena, Sharkara, Tenae, Denae, Kendisha, Kendria, Devoyha, Lashai,
Lanisha; Fifteen (15) Nephews Fredricko, Emmerick, Jamael, Keyno, Shavonne,
Jason, Demond, David, Demetrius, Minister Delano Rolle, Mark, Kenvardo,
Tyrieck, Tyrone, Deshaw; three (3) nephews-in-law Harcourt, Quincy and Martin;
nine (9) grand nieces, seven (7) grand nephews; mother-in-law, Dorothy Lewis;
father-in-law, Samuel Lewis; four (4) sisters-in-law, Kantrice, Fantella, Chevette
and Tenair; three (3) brothers-in-law, James, Samuel and Brenard; numerous
cousins including, Robertha, Karenm Kendra, Shalando, Leandra, Rolanda,
Natasha, Cherylenn, Cassandra, Shareece, Davyanette, Tiffany, Lakelsha, Dayvette,
Angelica, Penny and Wendy Antonio, Shervin, Elwood, Jamie, Jerrardo, Navardo,
Ryan, Ronell, Derrick, Renardo, David Jr., Garreth, Gary, Kenrick, Dexter,
Clarence, Derek, Herbrit, Advilda and Marie; two (2) god children, Quedell and
Anterio, a host of relatives and friends including, Martha Dean and family, Ted
Rolle and family, Rosemary Musgrove and family, Clyde Rashard and family,
Carmen Forbes and family, Natile Evans and family, Geoffrey Symonette and
family, Joann Carey, Victoria Farrington and family, Earl Deveaux and family,
Patrick Brown and family, Kathleen Allen and family, Mayfield Young and family,
Rev. Lavenia and Bro. Alfred Stewart and the officers and members of the New
Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church, The Elizabeth Estate, Malclom Lane,
Mackey Street and Peardale Crew, The staff of Esso Village Road and The Burns
House Group family.

Friends may pay their last respects at the Funeral Home on Friday from 10:00 a.
| m. to 6:00 p. m. and on Saturday from {0:00 a. m. to service time at the church.







THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES °"

Ge EE GDSEI NR A IRD PR NGS AI ERD ENN ETP TR PSN ES REET PTR A AE A WS NS AIR MR LN AD RS TY TAO

|
!





Aubery Leon
Greene, 37

a resident of South Beach to be held
on Saturday March 17th, 2007 at All
Saints Anglican Church Jones Height
West 11:30 p.m Officiating will be
Father Sebastian Campbell and
Internment will follow at Lakeview
Memorial Gardens J.F.K. Drive
Services has been entrusted to Gateway Memorial Funeral
Chapel Mt. Royal Avenue and Kenwood Street.

He survived by. his wife, Melvern (Pam) Greene; daughters,
Fontaishia and Fahamisha Greene; mother, Aneli Bowe;
grandmother, Dorothy "Mom" Bowe: brothers, Stephano Greene,
Kareem Gilharry, Jermaine Sands, Warren Stuart, Andre Evans,
Omar Greene, Kevin Greene, Oscar Greene; sisters, Damonai,
Shondel! and Joan Greene; special friend, Brenda Whyley; aunts,
Pauline Edwards, Yvette Goodman, Cherise Archer, Janiece
Henfieid, Joan Butler and Nurse Jaunita Greene, Esther Bowe,
Arlene Simmons, Evel ys Bowe, Miriam Lockhart; uncles, Cecil
Bowe, Dirk Simons, Scan Simmons, Gary Goodman, Judson
Henne, Andrew Edwards: mother-in-law, Lernine Sears;
sisters-in-law, Tamika Greene, Dezaree Sands, Melissa Evans,
Mrs. Debbie Siuart, Juliette Brown, Joann, Charline, and Veunell
Sears, Maralyn Brennen; brother-in-law, Andrew Sears, Charlston
Brown; grand aunts, Willadale Campbell, Ednamae Newton,
Marion Edw ards, Inez Dorstant, Bessie Bowe and Mildred
Bowe; grand uncle, Peter Bowe, P. Anthony White, Philip White,
Paul White: numerous nieces and nephews including, Kareem

arry Jr. Jermaine Sands Jr., Sienna, Anissa and Melyah
Evans, Akeerm, Worren Jr., Thequane, Tatjama and Tabitha



Stuart, Gerrad and Giovano Bethel!, Ryan, Vince and Shanique
Sears, Charlise, Charae and Travis Brown, Azzaleah Higgs,
Wellecta Scott, Asienea, Dashan and Juwan Greene; numerous



Harewood Sinclair Higgs LF.D.
President/Managing Director

eee THURSDAY, MARCH'45 ‘2007;





cousins, Alveron and Coffee Bowe, Craig Bowe, Chrisann
Palmer, Cedric, Clement and Cecily Bowe, Andrew, Jason and
Anaja Edwards, Monet Lockhart, Danielle and Diandra Simmons,
Courtney John and Madison Simmons. Gabrielle, Greer and
Garae Goodman, Cheria, Charae, and Cherelle Archer, and Janae
Henfield, numerous other family and friends including, Andrea
Gray and family, Jennifer Newton and family, Carmen Mac and
family, the late Thelma Smith's family, the late Kenneth White's
family, the late Samuel White's family, the late Caroline Price's
family, Vernita Gardiner, Mr. Finder, Ruth Bowe-Darville,
Elmore Archer, Dorothy Collie, Joan Butler and family, Orty J
Sands, the late Emma Bethel's family, the late Burke Bowe's
family, the late Theus Bain's family, John and Joy Munnings
and family, Pat Rutherford, Barry and Stephanie Lightbourn,
the Late Anita Strachan and family, Louise Riley and family,
Joan Saunders and family, Peggy Wells and family. Blanch
Butler and family, [ris Smith and family. Mrs. Lucille “Wilmott
family, Bowes Plumbing family induding Keith Guru's. William
Scott, Ms. Thompson, Jeffery, Isaac Burnside. George, Densel
Major's family, Sherry Albury's family, Earnest Frazer's fami'y,
Edith Sawyer's family, Troy Parham's family, Went
Albert Rolle, Rev. Shelia Tracey and family, We
Ian and Kim Smith, Tracey Brown, The
Parish family, All Saints Parish fa amit y
Brian and Carolyn, Andre and Phedra & ul
Melrose Knowles and family, The Farringion famiy, Esther
Turnquest and family, Mrs. Monica Chariton family. Majorie
Bain, Chriss Sturrup and family, Kevin Simmons, Julian and
Samantha Carey and the entire Carey family, Tarpuim Bay and
Palmetto Point Eleuthera family, and Many More.

iy Ghinton,
Simmons








Friends may pay their last respect at the funeral home &om |
Â¥ pay I

0:00a.m -6:0Gp.m. and on Saturday &om 9:30am until service

time at the Church



PAGE 7°"

A Te WS. SEL NS AS POA INIT HL ITER ET IASLC EN HOT COE TEL

PE BT NPI RE CPE SST PS IE TU II RE TG LLY PLT PEI IVETE

Pera



PAGE 18, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

i



QRiverside Qruneral Chapel
4 = “Where the river lies still.
24 HOURS A DAY
‘Serving The Bahamas With Pride”
Frank M. Coopsr - Funeral Director
“Professional People Who Care”



Market Street & Bimini Avenue
P.O. Box GT 2305
Nassau, Bahamas
Telephone: (242) 356-3721
Cellular: (242) 395-8931

Cockburn Town
San Salvador, Bahamas
Telephone:
(242) 331-2642



FUNERAL SERVICES FOR |

STANLEY
SAUNDERS, 38

; cemetery.

Left to cherish his memory are his

Cyril, Rashad, Magarith, Danario, Jessie, George, Dameko, Betty,

Johnson. Margaret Taylor, Berthamae Ligihtbourne and family,

Ms. Tavior, Naomi Pinder and family, Mr. Rabming, Mr. Christie, ;
; Smokey, 3uzz, Benjamin, Patty, The Poitier iamily, Nicole Smith, ;

don mca Daumpnna como ae PREECE ERATE A EEN TTT stan

| will be held at Mount Zion Union »
Baptist Church, Gambier Village :
on Saturday 17th March, 2007 at |
2:00 p.m. and officiating will be |
Pastor J. Leslie Rolle and assisted |
by Reverend Hulton Lloyd and |
Reverend R.E. Bridgewater. |
| Interment will follow in the church's



PS NERS ETT FT

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

| Hopkins, Barbara Saunders and family, Neville Seymour and
: family, Sandra and the Sears family, Luther Hanna and family,
: Robert Thurston, Dr. Hubert Minnis, Robert McDonald, Honourable
: Neville Wisdom, Mount Zion, Mount Pleasant Green, Mount
| Horeb Church and the entire Gambier Community Association.

: Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Riverside
_ Funeral Chapel, Market Street and Bimini Avenue on Friday from
: 10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. and at the Church on Saturday at 1:00
| p.m. until service time.

TYRONE SAMUEL
ROLLE, 41

will be held at Voice of the
Watchman, Milton Street of East
Street on Saturday 17th March,
2007 at 10:00 a.m. and
officiating will be Pastor
Livingston Lynes. Interment will
| follow in the Old Trail Cemetery
‘| of Soldier Road.

Memories will forever linger in
the heart of his survivors which

2 include his mother Ivy Rolle Davis; (6) brothers, Lionel Rolle,

/ JR, Norman Rolle, Rodney Butler, Otis Rolle, James Rolle and

wife, Lindamae Saunders; (1) son Durran Saunders; (1) | Philip Rolle; (1) sister, Gloria Rolle; (2) great grand aunt, Bertrice

stepdaughter, Veoshe Thompson; (2) brothers, George and David | Cjarke: (4) sister-in-law, Sheva Rolle, Shanell Roberts, Sherry

McPhee; (3) sisters, Judy Taylor, Rose Francis and Deloris; (3) | Stubbs and Gina Knowles; (1) step sister, Sherry; (17) nieces,

aunts Hilda Farrington of New York, Charlotte McPhee and Theresa | Norma, Shantell, Sherelle, Shanika, Raquel, Sonovia, Narrissa,

Bethel; (1) uncle, Hubert Bethel; mother-in-law, Dernice Miller; Charmaine, Stacey, Jenny, Shonell, Philippa, Princess Rolle,

father-in-law, Ivan Miller; (5) sisters-in-law, Georgette McPhee, © samantha Neely, Naomi Adderley, Vanessa Roberts and Tanya

Renae, Giny, Jenny and Mel; (6) brothers-in-law, Marvin Davis, | qderley; (15) nephews, Kerall, Shervan, Romando, Tionell,

Quinton Hopkins, Darren Strachan, Alfie, Winky and Derek; (21) | Theophilius, Marcus, Shanton, Darren, Shanarie, Geraldo, Stephen,

nephews and nieces, Bronson, Darren, Dwayne, Rudolph, Patrick, _ Norman Jr., Kevin and Marvin Rolle, Antonio Adderley, Terrance
: Neely Jr.; (6) grand nieces, De'Vencia, Shandria, De'Chan, Jadorn,

Sylvia, Hazel, Audrey, Tori, Tobi, Quintenise, Gabriella and Key, - Shanyia, Branika; (6) grand nephews, Adrian Butler, Terry Rolle,

cousins Bernice, Monique, Mary Ellen Valence, Beryl, Annamae, 2 Daryl Riley Jr., Geraldo Rolle, Devante, Andino, cousins Tailboy,

Althia, Sandra, Sherese, Christine, Sheniqua, Anastacia, Helen, | pyejena Musgrove, Estermae Sawye:. Slick Brown, Christian

Leon, Arthur, Prince, Kevin, Robert, Keith, Samuel, Jen, Natasha, Maxcine, Sabrina, Kendal, Wadow, Pinky, Nikka, Anya, Devon,

Melinda, Jestina, Michael, Sara, Eddison, Jefferson, Sally, Mary, | Nikkie and Dwayne; numerous relatives and friends, Minister

Janet, Leonora, Chester, Judy, Hensil, Ricardo, Barbara, Winnie, ' Salael Armbrister, Rayfield, Tracey, Monk, Pinky and family,

Linda Sears, Deborah, Dorris, Ariel, Malvese, Laverne, Christine, _ Preston, Terrance Neely and family, Delancy family, Verlin Knowles

Obediah, Raymond, Stephen, Shem, David, Lillian, other relatives | .44q family, Lucinda Allen and family, Pam and family, John

and friends, James Fernander, William Dean and family, Alrick, Adderley and family, Pedro Bannister and family, Steven and

Mildred Dorsette and family, Shakira McKenzie, Gladstone family and Alice Miller and family, Lisa, Deangelo, Cordell, Face,

Thurston and family, Charlton Tinker and Family, Simon, Mark, | Tyick: Terrance, Tina, Alexis, Coricka and family, Julie Musgrove

James, Danny, Gladstone, Lenora Poitier and family, the Gambier ang family, The Nassau Village Price Street Crew, Rolleville family

Community Association, Ethel Adderley and family, Pastor Rolle | re : | wena ns panes
and family, Sandra Knowles, Deborah and Abagail Fox, Gina and | and Strachan: Alley amily and eee ieee

igue Smith ; ire as Place fami i ; Be i t Ri i
Monique Smith and the entire Rhodas Place family, Kathleen © Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Riverside

- Funeral Chapel, Market Street and Bimini Avenue on Friday from |
10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. and at the Church on Saturday at 9:00 |

oe iy re ; : a.m. until service time.
Sophia and Antonio Mackey, Lithera Roach, Joanna and Mike |

RE RS RN TERN REINO ELE NRT = RT

> wanes



The Tribune



@ By REVEREND
ANGELA BOSFIELD
PALACIOUS

Hospitality, Benedict’s Way of *

le a_ ‘book entitled Radical

Love, the authors:speak about

- Benedictine «spirituality based on St —

Benedict’s Rule, and the-significance

‘that this: love has forall of us, It.is. ;
Christ's love ‘being developed in us |

from day to day.

““As.we come to be with God, listen « ‘
~to God-and desire and begin to obey |.
- God, we-want.to become more like}

God.‘We-want to embody those God- . -

like qualities that »we-attach to the
word “holy”. If we think of “holy” as
connected ‘to “Wholly” then -we are
—seeking an inner unity, integration
and equilibrium that is impossible to
maintain perfectly for more than a

-- few minutes at a time.

Radical Hospitality’ describes this
balance as.a move to be aware of our
need for silence and - solitude. or
“cloister”, for community (which may
be: family. and -very close friends or
- colleagues), and hospitality (which is
love extended to strangers). We grow
in self-love.as we come to know our-
selves «within God’s love for us,
because. we open our hearts to wel-
come and. accept: who we’ really are,
‘entertaining choices that make us
more gracious people.

Our growth in community helps us

. to see ourselves through others’ eyes
‘even. as we open to the “other” in
~ them. We risk being hurt, being chal-
lenged, being changed, and being
. inspired to see God:in them.and in us.
With. hospitality comes the lesson of
opening our hearts to the total
-. stranger, the unknown other, the per-
‘- son quite different to us.

In all of.these relationships, there.

are boundaries, a need for respect and
‘responsibility, and an underlying love

that comes from God to self and to

- others. It isa matter of discovering
and revealing the God within: by
. thinking more of God’s thoughts,
responding ‘with more Christ-like
feelings, and acting out in ways that
bring praise for God.

The God who begins with us
becomes incarnate (living) within us,
and others see a glimpse of God’s
glory in us as we peep at God’s pres-
ence in them. Total strangers may
become soul mates in a second, ignore
us with contempt, or destroy us with
hidden dangers. We need the spirit of

‘Embodying the | %q
presence of God’






@ ANGELA PALACIOUS

“AS we come
to be with God,
listen to God
and desire and
begin to obey
God, we want

to become ©
more like God.”

— Rev A B Palacious 7

discernment to test their spirits. We

need: courage to face the danger we -

may bring to them.

If we keep to ourselves because. we
have been hurt, we will die in isola-
tion on the inside before we are pro-
nounced dead. There is this call on
‘our lives to love and be loved, to
accept and be accepted, to nurture
and be nurtured, to know and be
known. This is why we want to
embody the presence of God as a
healing presence. We want to enable
others to come out of hiding and trust
us to journey with them towards
wholeness.





or frmeral Home (° Crematorium

Queen’s Highway
P.O. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 © Paging: 352-6222 #1724

Fax: 351-3301

Taal
silts eae
DONALD ~
_ADDERLEY, 73



|| Freeport, Grand Bahama and
i formerly of Millers, Long
‘Island will be held 11 00 a.m.
|) Sunday, 18th March, 2007 at

1 Freeport: Seventh-Day
-Adventist Church, Gambier

‘Officiating will be Pastor
Paul Scavella, Pastor Michael
Smith and other Minister of the Gospel. Interment will be
made.in the Grand Bahama Memorial Park, Frobisher Drive.

Cherished memory are held by i wife, Paulette Richardson-

Adderley; son, Kevin Miller Adderley; four daughters, Mable ,

Swaby, Sofia Kavari, Suzanne Nicole Darling and Shawn
Burnette; four stepsons, Dag Spencer Adderley, Charles, Deon
and Omar; four step-daughters, Michelle, Sharill, Christelle

-/-a resident of Pinetree Estate,

“& Beach. Way Drives. |

Thursday, March 15, 2007 © PG 19

















and Charlene Kelly; twenty-five grandchildren and four great |

grandchildren; six brothers, Neville, Alphonso, George,
Reginald, Charles and Kendall Adderley; uncle, Israel
Adderley; three sons-in-law, Edd Kavari, Rae Darling and
Kevin Burnette; father-in-law, Emanuel Rolle; six brothers-
in-law, Leonard Braynen, Larry, Marvin and Gregory
McDonald, Edward:and Nelson Rolle;:nine sisters-in-law,

~Yvonne, Vernetha, Helen and Shavonne Adderley, Linda

Braynen, Adrie Roberts, Aileen McKinney, Sandra Bastian
and Judy Benjamin; nine nephews and thirteen nieces and

numerous other relatives and friends including, Ruben

George Ferguson, Bernard and Kendal Nottage, Ms. Althea

- Knowles, Gloria Johnson, Duchy Glinton, Nemiah Clarke, |

Woods, Ms. Velma Smith, Mr..and Mrs. Louis Thurston, Mr. |

and Mrs. Frankie Sands, Pastor and Sister Michael Smith,
Pastor and Sister Paul Scavella; the Jervis family, the entire
Seventh-Day Adventist Community, the staff of EMS, and
the Princess Margaret Hospital Accident & Emergency
Department and the National Workers Cooperative Credit
Union.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Yager
Funeral Home and Crematorium Ltd, Queen's Highway on
Saturday from 12 noon to 6:00p.m and at the church on
Sunday from 9:30 a.m. until service time.





PG 20 @ Thursday, March 15, 2007



@ POPE Benedict XVI
(AP Photo)

Vatican,
Vietnamese
officials
discussing
diplomatic
relations

HANOI, VIETNAM (AP) — Vatican officials
traveled Monday to Vietnam for meetings with
government leaders on establishing diplomatic
relations. ee

Tensions have existed between the Vietnamese
government and the Roman Catholic Church for
decades, since communist authorities closely
monitor religious groups and insist.on approving
most church appointments. . :

- But relations have begun to thaw recently.

Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung
became the highest-level Vietnamese official to
meet a pontiff when he visited Pope Benedict
XVI January 25 in Rome. Afterward, Vatican
Officials said there had been “concrete progress”
for religious freedom in Vietnam. Vietnamese
officials then said they were working on a
“roadmap” toward normalizing relations with the
Vatican. ;

Vietnam has one of the largest Catholic popula-
tions in Asia, with six million Catholics.

The Vatican has indicated that official ties
between the Holy See and Hanoi could lead to
Catholic assistance in medical care and other
social services for the Vietnamese people.

RELIGION

‘The Bahamas is a God-
ordained strong nation
destined for success’

@ By PASTOR MATTHEW
ALLEN

Proverbs 14:12 There is a way
(or path) which seemeth right
unto a man, but the end thereof
are the ways of death.

(In the Hebrew the word way
is: derek, deh'-rek; which has
several meanings: (1) a road, (2)
a course of life or mode of
action, (3) a conversation, a cus-
tom or culture, (4) a path or high
way.)

John 14:6 Jesus saith unto him,
I am the way (or path), the truth,
and the life: no man cometh unto
the Father, bui by me.

(In the Greek the word way is:
hodos, hod-os'; which has several
meanings: (1) a road, (2) the
route, act or distance, (3) a mode
or means of a journey, (4) a high
way.)

ne would have to be
spiritually blind, dead
or just plain down right

stupid, not to see and know that
we are reaping what we’ve sown.
As a religious Christian nation
we’ve opened our doors, arms
and hearts to the many foreign
gods and cultures of this world.
The Bahamas is a God-
ordained strong nation that’s des-
tined for success. Just as Father
Yahweh led the children of Israel
out of Egypt as He established
and provided for them, so are

His plans for the Bahamas.

Lord

In Exodus 20:3, the Lord gave
Moses a commandment for the
people, “Thou shalt have no
other gods before me.” In our
pursuit for prosperity as a nation
we’ve bent over backwards and
bowed down in worship to the
god of tourism of which some 80
- 90 per cent of our people rely
on for their daily bread.

AS a people, we are very good
when it comes to the quoting of
scriptures, just listen to the radio
talk shows on any given day or
check the print media at times;

this is just one aspect of us hav-
ing a form of Godliness as we
deny His power.

I’ve heard it said time and time
again that “the Bahamas would
be finished if America closes its
tourism doors to us.” What’s so
alarming about this statement is
that it’s not only coming from
those in the tourism field, but
also from some of the religious
leaders. As I sought God in
prayer concerning this, He said
unto me “Don’t be perplexed by
what you're seeing and hearing,
for many of these religious lead-
ers are parading around as if
they know me.”

Leadership

The Governmental leadership
of this country, be that PLP or
FNM, will always face the same
giants because of the foreign
gods and pagan altars that
they’ve allowed to filled the land.

The church, which supposes to
be the most powerful organism
in the land, is powerless against
these gods because of its many
compromising religious leaders.
Listen, and remember this, “The
hardest spirit to drive out is the
one that we’ve invited in.” We
have sold our Godly heritage for
the tourist dollar; as a result
we’ve invited the many spirits of
these foreign gods who used
their financial means to gain and
have free course in this once
God fearing country.

Accompanying these foreign
gods and spirits are many
plagues and curses which have
been unleashed upon the
Bahamas. These spirits operate
in many facets, their sole purpose
is to rule and reign, one of their
methods is to distract the leader-
ship with money and riches while
the spirit of death and destruc-
tion has it’s way among the youth
of the nation.

Stop! Take a good look and
see how many of our young men
and women have died senseless,
tragic deaths in the past 10 - 15
years. The many theologians and

The Tribune

scholars we’ve have throughout
this country love the idea of
being called upon to speak on
and dissect the fruit of the many
problems that are now being har-
vested here in the Bahamas to a
far greater degree.

I am persuaded that one or
two dynamics is at work as it
relates to some these theologians
and scholars of today; who couid
not find a lump of fresh dung in
a perfume store.

1) They’ve spent countless
hours talking and praying their
powerless prayers about the fruit
of the nation’s problems and
could never deal with the root
which produces the fruit. If they
would humble themselves and do
things Yahweh’s way and not
their own way, they would be
able to kill the root, which would
eliminate the fruit.

2) There’s so much division
and compromising among these
religious knuckle heads, that
they are in no position as an
anointed united force to gain the
victory in this spiritual war that’s
unleashed upon the Bahamas.

But thanks be unto our heav-
enly Father who has raised up
young sons and daughters for a
time such as this. These are the
anointed ones who’ve have the
revelation and purpose of unity
embedded in their hearts. For we
understand that it’s in our obedi-
ence to His word and in our
unity where God commands His
blessings upon the land and peo-

ple.

Let’s go to the clear path and
stay in the FOG (Favor of God)

e Join Pastor Brendalee and I
along with the family of Kingdom
Minded Fellowship Center Int'l,
every Sunday Morning @
10:30am and Thursday Nights @
7:30pm at the Bishop Michael
Eldon High School Auditorium,
for more of God’s powerful word.
For questions or comments con-
tact us via E-mail: pastor-
mallen@yahoo.com or
Ph.351.7368 or 441.2021.



The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, March 15, 2007 © PG 21





‘But for the ‘Hide and seek
grace of God’

@ By CLEMENT JOHNSON

here was an old man who main-
tained his subscription to the daily

newspaper even though he had
virtually stopped reading. His neighbour
asked him why he maintained a subscrip-
tion to a newspaper he never read. This
was his reply. "Every morning, before any
other thing, I look up the obituary section
of the newspaper to see if my name is
there. If I don't find my name there, I
kneel down and thank God for the gift of
another day. That is why I subscribe to the
daily newspaper."

Imagine last weeks gospel as giving us a
rare glimpse into the obituary section of a
Jerusalem daily newspaper one day in the
lifetime of Jesus. That particular day, the
story of the dead took up not only the
obituary section but the front page head-
lines as well: "Blood bath in the temple,
Pilate slaughters suspected Galilean terror-
ists", "Tower of Siloam collapses, 18 peo-
ple feared dead."

What was the common reaction of the
religious people of Jerusalem to such news
of human disaster and misfortune? About
the Galileans they probably said, "Serves
them right. Death to the terrorists!" About
those crushed to death they would say,
"Well, that is an act of God. God knows
why those 18 deserve to die at this time, in
this manner." And they would flip the
page for more interesting news, such as the
survivor in the previous day's reality show
of the amphitheatre gladiators. The people
who broke the news to Jesus conveyed it
with the same "serves-them-right" atti-
tude. Jesus could not contain himself in
the face of such ignorance and self-justifi-
cation.

Do you think that because these
Galileans suffered in this way they were
worse sinners than all other Galileans? No,
I tell you; but unless you repent, you will
all perish as they did. Or those eighteen
who were killed when the tower of Siloam
fell on them.- do you think that they were
worse offenders than all the others living
in Jerusalem? No, I tell you; but unless
you repent, you will all perish just as they
did. (Luke 13:2-5)

In the face of a natural disaster or per-
sonal misfortune befalling other people, it
is wrong to suppose that they must have
done something to deserve it which those
who are free from the disaster did not do.
The right disposition is to realise that it
could happen to anybody. and that if it
dogs, pot, Jhappen fou us. at, f this time vit is °

?

: ‘séason for you all. :
Dhaene !fi ‘ t seni hosytibel jis,

because of God's mercy and love and not
because of what we deserve.

The Reverend John Bradford (1510-
1555) was asked what he though of the
criminals who were being led to public
execution, and his reply was: "But for the
grace of God, there goes John Bradford."
We can see the same attitude in our old
man who reads the obituary column every-
day. He knows that but for the grace of
God his name would be there on that

page.

Attitude

The attitude of "but for the grace of
God, there go I" helps us make the best of
the opportunity God gives us in prolonging
our lives from day to day, from week to
week, from year to year. We watch T', lis-
ten to the radio, read the news papers so
we know what is going on in our country,
we hear about the senseless killings, the
labour unrest, the negative campaign, and
the list goes on and on. So like I said last
week we have a lot to thank God for
because we realize that like the barren fig
tree, extra time has been given to us for a
purpose, as a chance to bear fruit.

The misfortunes of the less fortunate are
not an occasion to stand in judgment over
them, but an invitation to humble repen-
tance, knowing tuat "unless you repent,
you will all perish just as they" (verse 5).
Next time we hear about earthquakes and
plane crashes and senseless murders in the
news, let us realise that it could happen to
anybody, and that if we have been spared
such disasters it is so that we might repent
and bear fruit worthy of repentance.

Today, let us thank God for the "garden-
ers" who mediate and intercede for us
before God. We know that Jesus is the
Great Gardener who intercedes and medi-
ates for us. In practice, however, Jesus ful-
fills this role through men and women who
function as members of Christ's body.

The gardeners in our lives, those who
have helped us to move from barrenness
to fruitfulness, include our parents, teach-
ers, pastors, friends, and even our enemies
who have motivated us by their bitter criti-
cism, which more often than not turns out
to be true. We thank God for them, we
thank God for giving us another opportu-
nity this Lent, and we promise to make the
best use of this season of grace to repent
more and to bear more fruit in our lives.

We trust that now that we our half way
through lent it is proving to be a Fue

at nay} PEW,

I
s







Le

nt Jaane

through. No one else knows

@ By CANON NEIL ROACH

Read Psalm 27: 10-18
“Seek my face.” “Your face
will I seek.” v8

ONE of the most popular
games among young children is
the age- -long, game we call ‘hide
and seek.’

We alt have our ‘own private
and individual hells to live

what we must suffer and some-
times it seems that God is play-
ing the game of hide and seek
with us. We cry out in our
anguish when there is nothing
we can do, but the Lord’s
response is, “hide not your face
from me”. We need to seek the
Lord. Even before we cry, God
replies, “Seek my face.” The
Lord makes no distinction, he
addresses all.

We have several examples in
the Bible of people who felt
that God had hidden his face
from them, but when they
looked for him he delivered
them. The Psalmist felt it, as did Elijah.

In I Kings 19:1-4, King Ahab told his wife what Elijah had
done. She became angry because he had not killed Elijah who
had killed her prophets. She planned to have Elijah killed so
the prophet was forced to flee. This ordeal drained him emo-
tionally and spiritually. He felt that God was playing hide and
seek with him, that God had hidden himself. Elyah went to a
cave in the mountain to look for the Lord. He was rewarded
with a small still voice.

Most of the time the challenges we facc are in appearances
only. In II Kings 6:13-17, the word says, “The city was sur-
rounded by a great company of soldiers. Elisha’s servant was
terrified at the sight of the enemy. Elisha prayed that God
would open the eyes of his servant that he may sce. This
meant the eyes of faith. The servant then saw that they were
under the protection of chariots of fire and horses of fire more
numerous than the enemy” (NRSV Harper Study Bible).
When we seek the Lord’s face our spiritual eyes become open.

On Calvary; Jesus felt that God had hidden his face from
him. “When it was noon, darkness came over the whole land,
until three in the afternoon,” Mark 15:35. Jesus suffered a
great deal and cried out, “My God! My God! Why have you
forsaken me?”

He had suffered life experiences of loneliness. neglect,

@ CANON NEIL ROACH

humility, and indifference of others toward him, failure of
friends, hatred of foes, the malice of enemies. God under-
stands our experiences. When it seems that God has hidden
his face from us we must search for him, we need not fear.

God can help us in all that we are going ihrough. In Xomans

Ss: 38, 39, St Paul reminds us, “neither death, nor life, nor
angels, nor rulers, nor anything to come, nor powers, nor
height, nor depth, nor anything else in crcation, wil! separate
us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord.” This is

God’s solemn promise and his word cannot be broken by any-
one or anything. Take God at his word.

Prayer: Hear my voice, O Lord, when | call; have mercy on
me and answer me.
Promise: To seek the Lord always.



FIOR CE oO ELPRO LY CFD TN









PAGE 22, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

f ¢ i, le a ¢ W e fa f
NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072

Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471 Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager? (242) 340-8043 ¢ Fax: (242) 373-3005 Pager: (242) 340-8043 e Fax: (242) 340-8034

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR :

Leroy “Killer Roy” Mortuary & Crematorium Ltd., Robinson and Soldier Roads on Friday
. : from 10:00 a. m. until 6:00 p. m. and then again at the church on
Armbrister, 48 : Saturday from 9:30 a. m. until service time.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES



FREEPORT
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312

of Williams Lane, Kemp Road, will be
held on Saturday, March 17th, 2007 at
11:00 a. m. at New Lively Hope Baptist
Church, Jerome Avenue and
Chesapeake Road. Officiating will be

Associate Ministers. Interment will
follow in Woodlawn Gardens.

Forever touched by his memories are
his Eight Sisters: Diania Sifford,



Patrica Curtis, Margaret Sears, Tanya :

Stubbs, Jenniemae, Joanne and Kaylisa Armbrister, and Paulamae
Mackey, Four Brothers: Michael, Jeffery, Rudc!ph and Gregory
Armbrister, Four Aunts: Miriam Munroe, Helen Armbrister, Dolly

i d Faith Knowles, Th les: F ie A 1 H
Ende ane eal piles 3 ree Uncles. —rodaie-furbnisies, Howard : Daughter: Lovely Thelmaque, Special Friend: Monfort Debreus,

: Four Brothers: Aulain Jean of Miami, Fl., Soule, Luvens, and David
: Jean of Haiti, One Sister: Rosemitha Jean, God Father: Anold Jean
: of Haiti, God Mother: Ritha Jean of Miami, Fl, Cousins: Mitha Jean,
: Jetley St. Aude, Mirleine Pierre, and Sinielia St. Aude, and a_host of
: Relatives and Friends including: the Wilson Family of St. Michael
? Road, Sgt. 1173 Dallas and Mrs. Veronica Wilson, Kirk and Kyle
: Wilson, Eleanor Pintard, Maryann Rolle of Rolleville Exuma, Veronique
: Russell, Lenora Hield, Vernessa and Gretal Stuart, Maxine Armbrister,
? Kim Moss, Kayla Swain of Grand Bahama, Alfred and Cindy Moss of
? New Bight, Cat Island, Exi Prophet, Nazareth, Heidi Cei, her Family
: of New Haitian Mission Baptist Church, Mrs. Rose Roberts, Senelia

Pinder and Oswald Knowles, Forty-one Nieces and Nephews: Keith
Armbrister, Tracey Ann McDonald, Donnell Reckley, Darlene Wallace
and Kendrick Sifford, Trevor and Angelo Armbrister, Samantha
Armbrister, Robert, Pedro, Jason, Patrico and Andy Curtis, Farrah,
Jamal, Terron and April Armbrister, Gail, Hilda and Joel Glinton,
Shantell Seals, Darren Brown, George Curry, Renaldo and Jaleel
Deveaux, Kenya Lightbourn, and Garth Munroe, Lamark Bowleg,
Shakara Gordon, Dion Roker, Randolph and Glenroy Armbrister,
Tanisha, Sam and William Stubbs, Anthony, Olga, Joel, and Melissa
Clarke, Forty Great Grand Nieces and Nephews: Keith Jr., Alexa,
Camille, Kenneth Jr., Dominique Jr., Dhaquar, Kendonisha, Kenton,
Veronique, Kenjel, Leo, Pedro Jr., Pedronique, Anthonia, Jania, Fredrick,
Fredrico, Angelo Jr., Jason Jr., Tamia, Dleon, Trevor Jr., Shandio,
Temia, Tanaje, Delano, Amodo, Anthon, Anthonya, Keishan, Tasha,
Nicole, Aaron, Tanisha, Elja, and Bryant, Four Brothers-in-law:
Daniel Sifford, Jack Curtis, Wilbert Stubbs, and Basil Clarke, Two
Sisters-in-law: Lorna and Lynette Armbrister, Nephews-in-law:
Veron, Kenneth, and Dominique, and a host of other Relatives and
Friends including: Rev. Garland K. Russell, Whitney and Elvyton
Russell, Wilfred and Isaac Hepburn, Patrick, Fred, Bryant, Philip,
Richard. Armbrister, Idamae Duncombe, Evangelist Victoria Flowers,
Esselean Bowe, Jenniemae Higgs, Rhoda Armbrister, Carolyn and
Daphne Francis, Elsa Russell, Marilyn Munroe, Donna Moss, Patrice
Lewis, Denise Armbrister and Family, Judy and Maxine Mackey, Donna
Russell, Marilyn Dean, Irene Ferguson, Annamae Knowles, Emily
Brown, Angela Pinder, Cedric, Henry, Johnny, Philip, Oswald, Howard,
and Elvis Pinder and Families, Rev. Shelton Higgs and Family, the

New Lively Hope Baptist Church, Tony Sweeting, Marlene Stubbs of

Orange Creek, Cat Island, Dana Cartwright, Agnes Scavella, Monique
Cummings, Governor General A. D. Hanna, and the Williams Lane,
Kemp Road Community.

Viewing will be held in the “Serenity” Suite at Restview Memorial

Dr. Shelton A. Higgs, assisted by

Roslaine Jane, 47

of St. Michael Road, and formerly of
Port-au-Prince, Haiti, will be held on
Saturday, March 17th, 2007 at 1:00 p.
m. at New Haitian Mission Baptist
Church, Palm Beach Street. Officiating
will be Rev. Dr. Cherelus Exante,
assisted by Deacon Rony Senat and
other Ministers. Interment will follow
in Southern Cemetery, Cowpen and
Spikenard Roads.



Left to cherish her memories are her

St. Aude, Myleine Pierre, Bishop Samuel and Mrs. Alleyne.

Viewing will be held in the “Celestial” Suite at Restview Memorial

Mortuary & Crematorium Ltd., Robinson and Soldier Roads on Friday
: from 10:00 a. m. until 6:00 p. m. and then again at the church on
: Saturday from 12:00 p. m. until service time.

| DEATH NOTICE

Melissa Turnquest, 80

of Apple Street off Wulff Road and
formerly of Exuma, died at the Princess
Margaret Hospital on Sunday, March
11th, 2007.

Funeral arrangements will be announced
later.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES





Fuuneral Anmnoumcennemtt





sso ae:

———“Fivelyn Nina Roberts
Evelyn Nina Roberts Wells age: 84 of Miami, Florida
formerly of Harbour Island and Nassau N.P. Bahamas,
passed away Sunday March 4th 2007 after a short illness.
Funeral service will be held on March 17th 2007 at First
Baptist Missionary Church, 4600 N.W. 23 Ave. Miami,
Florida at 10 a.m. She is predeceased by her husband and
is survived by a sister Violet Barton; 3 brothers, Evangelist
Tom Roberts Cordell and Winsworth Roberts numerous
nieces and nephews.
























raed Cnamalovionn Lintad!

FREEPORT NASSAU
11-A East Coral Road, P.O. Box F-42312 Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas P.0. Box CB-12072
Tel: (242) 373-1471 Fax: (242) 373-3005 Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Page 340-8043 Pagers: 340-8043 / 340-4424 / 340-8034 « Fac: (242) 340-8034







MONIQUE BAIN, 37

OF #2, KATCH CLOSE, MALIBU
REEF, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA AND FORMERLY OF
NASSAU, BAHAMAS DIED ON
SUNDAY, MARCH 11, 2007.






She is survived by her Mother: Anna
Bain; Sons: Craig King, Alexander
Sweeting, Carlos Taylor and Thad Roker:
Daughter: Tanique Roker; Sisters:
Shirley, Barbara and Laverne Bain, Paula
Robinson, Marilyn Poitier, Terry Pratt,
Pamela Williams and Martha Beneby; Brother: Leroy Bain and a Host
of Other Relatives and Friends.

FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT A
LATER DATE.

THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 23



Cdening with
ay Loner
D))
OD) Cone



Emeraly Ridge Mortnacu

& Monument Company Wd.



Mr, Wendell G. Dean TH, 0.8 trusses

Managing Funeral Dircolsr

“Honouring Those wae Lig,

Turquoise Death Notice for

POLICE CORPORAL 253
KENDRICK LEROY
FARQUHARSON SR., 35

OF PALMETTO: POLN FE,
ELEUTHERA AND FORMERLY OF
NASSAU COMPLETED HIS
SERVICE TO GOD AND COUNTRY,
AT THE PRINCESS MARGARET
HOSPITAL ON SATURDAY, MARCH |
10, 2007.

THE RADIANCE OF THIS “TURQUOISE OF A GEM” WILL
ALWAYS GLOW IN THE HEARTS OF HIS: WIFE: MRS.
BRIDGETTE ELEAINE SANDS-FARQUHARSON, THREE
DAUGHTERS: KENDRELL AND KIARA FARQUHARSON, ONE
STEP DAUGHTER: IEASHA PINDER; ONE SON: KENDRICK JR.;
FATHER: ROBERT FARQUHARSON SR.; STEP MOTHER:
ELIZABETH FARQUHARSON; ONE GRAND FATHER: ELDER
KING WILLIAMSON; FIVE BROTHERS: SHANNON
WILLIAMSON OF ATLANTA, GEORGIA, VEREANO CHARLTON,
ROBERT JR., RASHAD AND DENO FARQUHARSON; ELEVEN
SISTERS: SOPHIA ROLLE, CAROL, YVETTE AND MURIEL MOSS,
NOLANDA, LASHANDA, ROLESSA, KERAH, PATRICE, KAYLA
AND WOMAN POLICE CORPORAL 252 TONYA FARQUHARSON;
FOURTEEN UNCLES: PASTORS TREVOR AND ARLINGTON
WILLIAMSON, ANTONE AND PHILIP WILLIAMSON, EDLEY
SARGENT SR.. MILTON HENFIELD, DAVID BULLARD, |
BRINDLEY COOPER, KENDAL, GLEN, EDNOLD, ERROLD AND
ARNOLD FARQUHARSON, DONALD FERGUSON AND KERMIT
WILLIAMS: EIGHTEEN AUNTS: DEACONS RUTHMAE SARGENT
AND BETTYANN FERGUSON AND MINISTER GENEVIEVE
BULLARD, ELOISE THOMPSON, OLGA BETHEL, ENID COOPER,

| PASTORS SHARON AND BETTY WILLIAMSON, CAROLYN AND |
| PRESCOLA WILLIAMSON MABLE, ARLENE, HAZEL, OPAL AND

JULIE FARQUHARSON, DOREEN WILLIAMS. CARLEEN
CLARKE AND ALTHEA FERGUSON; MANY OTHER LOVING
FAMILY AND FRIENDS: GLADSTONE SANDS, SYLVIA DEAL,
ANTHONY, RICARDO OF ELEUTHERA, ERNAL AND JAMIE
MCKENZIE, ARAMINTHA COLLINS OF UPPER BOGUE
ELEUTHERA, KATHERINE WILLIAMSON AND CHRISTINE
ROACHE.



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

PAGE 24, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

4 y
a | Cononivealth Funeral Home,

< Independence Drive » Phone: 341-4055





ACHILLE
JONASSAINT, 46

3 : s of Marsh, Harbour Abaco,

and formerly of Port-De-

7 | ) Paix Haiti will be held on

( | t hii BI) y ; 5 | | | Saturday March 17th, 2007

(a ) i) /e , | 11:00 a.m. at Carmichael

| Evangelical Church

5 Carmichael Road. Pastor

if reserve uu : Wilney Joseph will

| officiate and interment will follow ill the

a Southern Cemetery Cow Pen and Spikenard
CORT ae

‘ Precious memory are held by, his son: Hasthin

. : Jonassaint; 2 daughters, Junie Geffrard and
* Nf) Love Memory ads,



Shirley Jean Baptiste; 4 grand-sons, Nerkino
Geffrard; Rashadson, Wilkenson, and Shelvine
Jean Baptiste; 2 sisters, Quamelitha Jonassaint
and Mme Theofhard Methelus; 7 brothers,
Louis, Antroine, Ausilien, Edra, Edroid,
Dieuceul and Luc Jonassaint; numerous
cousins, other relatives and friends including,
Gecssion and Clomene Jonassaint, Antroinnett

In Memory Of Frederuc Jeffrid and Ivanard Frederuc, Mama



Frederuc, Mary Louis, Asdrid and Bada Louis,
BA Wonderfil Life. - Wilter and Tupa Jonassaint, Wads on Jean
Baptiste, Abner Gapilus, the community of

Sands Bank and Marsh Harbour Abaco and
others too numerous to mention.

And In Syn / thy Relatives and friends may view the remains at

Ge THE CHAPEL OF MEMORIES
For The Sorrow Your Loss INDEPENDENCE DRIVE on Friday from

2:00-7:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday

Has Brought. from 10:00 a.m. to-service time.

ow ee" ee ee P



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 25

Demeritte’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ° P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782



LEROY ROBERT
STUART, 72



Left to cherish his memory are his devoted mother, Deaconess
Evelyn Stuart; children, Charmaine, Samantha and Leroy Jr.; :
grandchildren, Antwane Arnette, Leonardo, Alvinika, Alshanika, |
Alvaneath, Alvin, Alvan, Paul and Samuel Stuart; great |
grandchild, Natanlie; sisters, Ms. Sylvia Neely, Ms. Franes ; Fondest memory of him will forever be cherished by his children,
Stuart, Mrs. Marva Cooper, Mrs. Annamae Thurston of Freeport, :
Grand Bahama, Ms. Anita and Yvonne McKenzie and Mrs. |
Eleanor Wilson; brother, Mr. Tyrone McKenzie; aunt, Ms. Maude
Colebrooke; brother-in-law, Freeman Thurston of Freeport, |
Grand Bahama; numerous nieces, grandnieces, nephews and :
grandnephews including, Julie, Linda and Beverly Neely, :
Bernadette and Jeffrey Colebrooke, Donald Jr., Eugene Sr. and :
Lynete Neely, James and Ann Mackey, Adrian Sr. and Karen
Necly, Chaunccy Thompson, Judson Newton, Veronica : , :
McKenzie, Christopher Pennerman, Charmaine and Leotha : sons-in-law, Jonas Austin, Mario Rolle, Fedner Dorestal and
Colbey, Brent and Keith Deveaux, Trevor Bostwick, Dolce : Marcello Charlow Sr.; several nieces and nephews Including
Pearce, Brandley, Queden, Devon, Sandy and Dalia Stuart, ; Thelma Stubbs, Macilyn Campbell, William McDonald,
Winston and Cheryl Thurston, Michael and Latoya Fountain, :
Priscilla Cox, Lloydra Rolle, Lavon Jr. and Lanisha Sands, | Roberts, Bennett, Michael and Tyrone Roberts, Steve, Marsha,
Jeffame, Javontae, Jeffette, Jesselle and Jaliyah Colebrooke,
Malichand Adderley, Rhodiquez Jr., Rhodrica and Rhodisha | Dwayne, Barbara, Melonie and Michelle, Jerelean, Alice, Tony
Francis, Denise, Yolanda, Desiree, Brian, Katonia, Darrell, :
Latoya, DeVaughn, Alicia, Alexis, Eugeno, Eugene Jr., Symphony, |
Aleska, Adannika, Thomas Jr., |
Timothy, Prescotte, Donald III, Danavio, Terrell, Deja and Sidra :
Neely, Deandra Sturrup, Deangelo Dawkins, Michael Marlon :
Fountain and Jatish Colebrooke; numerous relatives and friends :
including, Ms. Hazel Rolle and her entire family, Fayedora |
Miller, Eva Ferguson, Calvin Spence, Cynthia Stuart, Revis :
Rolle, Mericanna Stuart, Elva Stubbs, the Cartwright family and :
Cartwright Building Supply, the entire Stuart Family Reunion, |
the Stuart, Stubbs, Newbold, Munnings, Poitier, Burrows and :
Dean families of Orange Creek, Cat Island, Angela Hanna,
Evangeline Hanna and children, Andrew Colebrooke, staff of :
the Bahamas Electricity Clifton Pier Crew, Rhoda Munnings, -
Ingrid Adderley, Malichai Adderley, Our Lady's Church family, |
Transfiguration Church family, Joanna Thompson, Sylvia Wallace, :
Ethlyn Rolle, Sheila Moss-Gomez and Rufus Dawkins. :

Evonie, Tamika, Adrian Jr.,

~ FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

: Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,
| Market Street, from 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Friday and on
: Saturday at the church from-10:00 a.m. until service time.

a resident of Palm Beach Street, will be |
held at Transfiguration Baptist Church, :
Market and Vesey Streets, on Saturday :
at 11:00 a.m. Officiating will be Rev. |
‘| Dr. Stephen E. Thompson, assisted by :
Rev. Basil Johnson. Interment follows :
in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road. |



LESLIE WELLINGTON
STUBBS 72

a resident of South Beach Drive, will
| be held at Southland Church of God,

| Soldier Road, on Saturday at 11:00 a.m.
Officiating will be Rev. Charles A.
Sweeting. Intement follows in Lakeview
Memorial Gardens, JFK Drive.

Sandra, Sheva, Carlette, Patricia, Roger, Kenny, Eric and Leslie;
sister, Evelyn Newbold; brothers, Legette Stubbs of Los Angeles
and James Stubbs of New Providence; eight grandchildren,
Marlon Stubbs, Mikandrea Stubbs, Myra Rolle. Leslie, Lavar
and Lauryn Stubbs, Marcia and Marcello Charlow Jr.; two great
grands; four sisters-in-law, Ethreal, Lilly, Judy and Susan Stubbs;
brothers-in-law, Osneb McDonald and McNeil Newbold; four |
daughters-in-law, Camille, Janene, Chifundo and Tahesha; four

Ceaserina McDonald, Jackie Roberts, Karen Feast, Monique
Lamont and Herbert Stubbs, Tony, McNeil Jr., Sylwin, Tyrone,

Hiram Lucine, Herbert and Alfred Johnson, Richenda King,
Cleveland Stubbs, Donella Stubbs, Kirklyn, Trevor and Gary;
many other relatives and friends including, Bishop Tueton
Stubbs, Clonius and Fornswith Stubbs, Maxwell Stubbs, Remelda,
Francetta and Bennett Seymour, Sarah Smith, Doris Collie,
Warren and Carnetta Seymour, Blenton Gibson, Betty Fox, Pearl
Thompson, Esther, Ms. Sylvia, Jim Poitier, William "Bill"
Munnings Sr., Sir Clifford Darling, Romeo Farrington, The
South Beach family, The Taxi Union and The Curry Memorial

Church family.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,
Market Street from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. on Friday and on |
Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.



Cn

PAGE 26, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007 - THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Aemeritie’s Funeral Aome ©

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ° P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782



JACKSON, 30







Cemetery, Infant View Road.

He is survived by one son, Ajaro; one daughter, 2
Felecia; his mother, Princess Porter; father, Derrick |
| Jackson; six brothers, Derrick, Elvado, Germaine, :

| Jameko, Antonio and Jason Jackson; three sisters, _ Will be held at Southern Cemetery, Cowpen and |

Jennie and Shakera Jackson and Shonell Dorsette; | Spikenard Roads, on Thursday at 4:00 p.m.

| one niece, Kaithlyn Jackson; one nephew, Kendal : Officiating will be Rev. Charles A. Sweeting.
| Munroe Jr.; aunts, Jennimae Porter of Hallandale |
Florida, Inspector Althea Porter, Linda Regis, Lucille :
| McIntosh and Izetaa Davis of Jamaica; six uncles, |
| Cheyanne Porter, Paul Tucker, Nathaniel Tucker |
| of Miami Florida, Keith, Israel and Ulet Jackson :
of Jamaica; four grandaunts, Daisy Nottage of |
Andros, Autlees Coleby, Lauriel and Joan Lewis; |
| one grand uncle, Alfred Lewis; one uncle-in-law, |
Gary Regis; one aunt-in-law, Irene Tucker; cousins, |
| Tarra Jackson, Leroy Porter, Mark and Pamela |
Johnson, Tony Davis, Ashlee Coakley, Valencia :
| Moncur, Gary, Georgina and Gehron Regis, Paul, |
| Alonso, Ethan, Nathan and Asia Tucker, Carisma |
| and Jeffery Tucker Nathaniel Nylando and Donald :
Tucker Omar, Porter, Tyrese Mounfremere, Amber |
| Johnson, Tamia Craig, Leroy Hudson, Maquis |
| Porter, Anthonio and Adrian Cash, Antoine Hudson, |
Travis Pierre and Akila Albury; a host of other |
| relatives and friends including, The Taylor family, 2:00 p.m. on Thursday and at the cemetery from
Armbrister family, Basden family, Martin Davis, |
Chandella Stuart and family, Natasha Tucker, :



~ FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

a resident of McCullough :
Corner will be held at St. |
es from 9:00 a.m. until service time
Hill Street, on Saturday at: ~—
10:00 a.m. Officiating will be :
Rev. Glen C. Nixon. Interment follows in St. Francis :



Thompson family, Johnson family, Small family,

WAYDE JERMAINE the McCullough Corner family.

Porter family, the Lewis family, Aretha Cash and

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's
Funeral Home, Market Street, from 10:00 a.m.-
6:00 p.m. on Friday and on Saturday at the church

Graveside Service
for
BABY ANTON A.J. SARGENT

Interment follows.

Left to cherish his memory are his parents, Anton
Sargent and Shenikra Johnson; grand parents,
Cynthia and Anwill Sargent and Kevin Bethel;
aunts, Sherenta, Alphanique Johnson and Samantha
Sargent; uncles, Darren and Teko Johnson, Dwight,
Harry and Jan Sargent; cousins, Darrenique, D'han,
Teka, Shaneya, Tia, Quintel, Iyesha and Sirnita;
godparents, Adrianne Smith, Orita Brown, Joan
Brown, Arlene McAlpine and Mariette Newry;
other relatives and friends including, Calrita,
Sharlene Reed, Rochelle, George Johnson, Zanda,
Lamont, Mikayla, Tanya, Karen, Kandi, Recio and
Sherman.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's
Funeral Home, Market Street, from 10:00 a.m.-

3:00 p.m. until service time.



4,

The Tribune

@ By FATHER JAMES
MOULTRIE

“T must turn aside and look
at this great sight, and see why
the bush is not burning up”

— (Exodus 3:3)

e are all familiar
with the story of
Moses in the 2

burning bush, but what does
it mean for us today? What
comes across in the incident
is God’s concern for His peo-
ple. God had heard the cries
of His people in slavery, and
He sent Moses to liberate
them. Fire is a symbol of
love. God’s love is not dimin-
ished in giving, even as Jesus
died on the cross.

What was it that Moses
saw that made him the right
man to lead his people from
slavery to freedom? The
Bible does not tell us much
about the character of the
youthful Moses. It does not
say whether he was good or
pious. But it does tell us
about three episodes in his

- life prior to the revelation in

the burning bush. He saw an
Egyptian attacking an
Israelite, and he intervened.
He saw an Israelite attacking
an Israelite, and he inter-

RELIGION

Thursday, March 15, 2007 ° PG 27

‘Love in the
burning bush?

vened. He saw Midianite
shepherds preventing Jethro’s
daughters from watering
their flocks, and he inter-
vened.

All these incidents lead to
the same conclusion. They
show us that Moses was the
kind of man who could not
stand idly by when he saw an
injustice or a crime happen-
ing. We can understand then
why God chose him to lead
His people from slavery to
freedom. Private experiences
of God can make people self-
ish. But this did not happen
in the case of Moses. His
experience of God launched
him on a mission to save his
people.

The Lord said to Moses,
“The ground you stand on is
holy”.

All the earth that God
gave to us is holy ground and
deserves to be treated with
respect, but the holiest of
ground is within us. First of
all, the body is holy. Our
body is the work of God, and
that is reason enough for
respecting and caring for it.
He says, “Your body is the
temple of the Lord”.

The mind is holy ground.
Many people fill their minds
with all kinds of trash derived

from TV, radio, newspapers,
etc. We should strive to fol-
low the advice of St Paul:
“Fill your mind with every-
thing that is true, everything
that is noble, everything that
is good and pure, everything
that we love and honour,
everything that can be
thought virtuous and worthy
of praise” (Phillipians 4:8).

But the holiest of all
ground is that of the heart. In
our time there is a huge pre-
occupation with outer clean-
ness. There is a danger of
neglecting inner cleanness, or
cleanness of the heart. It is
from the heart that all our
thoughts, words, and deeds
flow like water from a hidden
spring. If the spring is clean,
then all that flows from it will
be clean. So we must try to
keep the heart clean and
pure. It is especially on this
holy ground that we will see
and meet God. In the words
of Jesus: “Blessed are the
pure in heart: they will see
God”.

Are you living a holy life
on holy ground? Have you
felt the call of God? Are you
ready for Mission and
Ministry? What is God call-
ing you from your “burning
bush to do?”

SABBATICAL, from 28

were free to select the workshop that
would best meet their needs at the
time.

The programme was not all work
and no play. During the course, there
was a 10 days break. We must leave
the residence, so two trips were
planned one to Rome and the other
to Scotland. I chose the latter. All my
life I had wanted to go to Scotland. I
have sung, “On the bonnie, bonnie
banks of Loch Lomond” for years.
Being in Scotland I was able to sing it
while sailing on Loch Lomond. What

aaan

a treat! Scotland was beautiful with
its high and low lands and breathtak-
ing mountains. The Lochs, which I
now know means Lakes, were also
breathtaking with the leaves of the
trees reflecting in them. We lived at a
B&B in Oban, Scotland which over-
looked the Atlantic. It was cool, but
bearable. My most memorable trip
will probably be the one to the Isle of
Iona. This ancient Isle, the home of
an ancient Benedictine Monastery
dating back to the sixth century, was
a trip back in time. We had to take a
Ferry over and that was just like sail-
ing on the Bo’Hengy.

Every Wednesday afternoon and
Saturday all day was free, anda
shopping or sightseeing trip was

planned. Once again participants
were free to go or just stay at the
Hall for a day of reflection or relax-
ation. Many of these trips took us to
parts of England, Scotland and Wales
that we would not have otherwise
been able to afford. We must thank
Mr Mick Sargeant who. arranged
these trips at reasonable and afford-
able prices. His coaches were spa-
cious and comfortable. The field trips
were another aspect of the Course
that was enriching and informative.
North Wales took us to the Irish Sea,
and this was a beautiful sight to
behold. There was a trip to the birth-
place of Shakespeare, Stratford-on-
Avon, and York, which almost caused
me to weep when | entered the



B JAMES MOULTRIE

(FILE photo)

Minster and recalled that that was all
ours — that is the Roman Catholic
church. History always speaks to me
and during this trip I was steeped in
it. I appreciated this experience very
much and will always treasure it.

Most of us arrived at Hawkstone
tired and weary. We were strangers.
However, at the end of the course,
we had bonded and were refreshed,
enriched and ready to be Church
wherever we’d be planted. This expe-
rience was invaluable to me and I
would wholeheartedly recommend it
to anyone. It is very expensive, but so
is England. However, for the knowl-
edge gained and the friendships
forged, it was worth every penny
spent.



PG 28 @ Thursday, March 15, 2007

RELIGION

The Tribune

A sabbatical to remember

(In the first of a two-part series, Sister Annie
Thompson, for eight years Mother Superior of St
Martin’s Benedictine Convent, Nassau Street, shares
her experiences of a sabbatical spent at Hawkstone
Hall, an international retreat centre in England)

@ By SISTER ANNIE THOMPSON

few months ago I was walking in the
Absit Mall and was surprised to see
one of my former students walking the
Mall when she should’ve been in school. After see-
ing the surprised look on my face, she quickly said:
“Sister, I’m on sabbatical.” We laughed and
enjoyed the moment together...

Yes, even the young who are just preparing for
the work force are realising the need for time off
from the everyday humdrum to rest and rejuve-
nate. However, sabbaticals are not new; they have
a long history in biblical times. Every seventh year
in biblical times was declared a sabbatical year
when no cultivation took place and when people
and fields rested.

In today’s world, as a part of the tradition of
Academia, a sabbatical is often granted for the
purpose of renewal, travel and research. It is
believed that a sabbatical can offer the chance to
step out of your work role into personal freedom
and spiritual renewal.

After eight years in the leadership role in my
community I was granted time off for precisely
that: time off for spiritual renewal and personal
freedom. I was tired and weary and a sabbatical
would breath new life into me and rejuvenate my
being. It was time to “burn back” or burn out. The
task now was where to go for this experience.
There are many places, but they don’t come
cheaply. :

Hawkstone Hall

My search led me to many inviting places known
for Sabbaticals, but only one met the yearnings of
my heart and soul at this time, so I settled ona
place called Hawkstone Hall, in England.

Hawkstone Hall was at one time a very gracious
mansion in England used by the aristocratic socie-
ty of that time. In 1926 it was bought by the
Redemptorists Congregation of priests to be used
as a Seminary for the training of young priests.
However, because of its isolation, when the voca-
tion crisis began, it was the wise decision of the
community to transform it into an international
pastoral centre for Retreats, Sabbaticals and
Seminars. With the addition of a modern Chapel,
the Hall is equipped for all of the aforementioned
functions. Because of its age and the inevitable
deterioration that sets in with old buildings, the
Centre was refurbished in 2006, which made it
even more beautiful and comfortable to live in.
There are very spacious grounds with beautifully
manicured English gardens wherever you turn.
The isolation ensured that noise was far away and
you had the space and quiet that is often needed
to reflect.

My main reason for selecting Hawkstone Hall
was the international aspect of the programme. It
has had a tradition of reaching out to the
Universal Church, because its purpose is to serve



@ SISTER ANNIE THOMPSON

(FILE photo)

the needs of the universal Church as centre of
renewal for women and men, lay and religious in
ministry worldwide.

Lecturers

The Course provided a balance of lecture titles,
workshops, daily liturgy, spiritual accompaniment,
personal space and social time in the setting of an
international community. .

The Director of the Programme is Fr Denis
McBride, a scripture scholar, par excellence.
Though small in stature and size, and very unas-
suming, he is a giant of a man, especially when he
presents his lectures or speaks to you on the
Scriptures. His method of re-telling the Parables,
and personalising the old, familiar stories in his
story telling sessions, will keep you spell bound for
hours! His lectures always gave me new insights
into the old familiar parables or scripture passages
that we know so well. In addition, he has written
many books and many of his lectures are on CDs,
so look for them on the market.

Other members of the staff were: Sister Carol
Mouat, OP from South Africa, who is a profes-
sional counselor, spiritual director and a specialist
in complementary therapies of massage and aroma
therapy. Sr Assumpta Hegarty, OSF, a musician
and lecturer, Sr Julian Knowles, FDLC- a special-
ist in reflexology and spiritual direction, Sr Jackie
Smith, SP an artist and musician and spiritual
director. The very capable and beautiful secretary
is Mrs Julia Kerr. The receptionist is Sister
Laurice, a Nazareth House Sister who will keep
you laughing with her many jokes and stories. Fr
Maurice O’Mahony is the Rector and has a very
melodious tenor voice which enables him to lead
the singing for the services. He was also available
for Spiritual Direction.

Participants
I was the first of the 49 participants from 23 dif-

ferent countries to arrive. This pleased me because ,

I was tired enough to sleep for a day and this extra
time would allow that. I found out, however, that
most of the participants came tired from their hec-
tic work schedule. The international aspect was
exciting. There were Ethiopians, Malaysians,
South Africans and Australians among us. They
came from many countries in Africa such as:
Zimbabwe, Tanzania,.the Sudan, Sierra Leone,
Nigeria, Kenya and Eritrea. Others were from, the

e@ USA, Canada, Ireland, Sri Lanka, The Philippines,

Indonesia, Holland, Switzerland, Malta (working
in Cuba) and of course, The Bahamas. It was a
beautiful sight on the last night when all the flags
of the above countries were displayed.

To my great surprise, many of the countries,
especially those in Africa, had not heard of the
Bahamas. This gave me an opportunity to sell the
Bahamas; and to exchange information with the
others. This was the aspect of the programme that
I found most enriching — the exchange of cul-
tures. The other aspect is the fact that although we
are all Roman Catholics, there were variations on
the fheme. This enabled us to discuss and embrace
the differences of to “be Church”.

Being Church means that we must be able and
willing to accept the fact that not everyone experi-
ences God in the same way, but that everyone has
an experience of God. A young woman, Maree
Kenedy says it this way:

The Course “God comes to expression in a mul-
titude of ways, in 4 multitude of cultures.”

The Course

The courses offered at Hawkstone, are designed
in such a way that you may or may not get
involved. One of the characteristics of Hawkstone
Hall is freedom. As a participant, one is free to
take or not take any of the courses. There is
absolutely no pressure on anyone to attend the
lectures. However, because of the quality of the
courses, they are well attended. The lectures are in

the morning of each day, so that there is plenty of ©

time in the afternoon for rest and relaxation.
Workshops are twice a week, and one is once
again free to attend or not attend. The week long
courses included: “Our Story as a Source of
Spirituality” by Fr Nick Haman, MSC, “The spiri-
tuality of Self Esteem”, by Fr Jim McManus CSsR,
three weeks of insightful and inspiring reflections
on the Gospels by Fr McBride, “Christ — an
Unfinished Portrait” by Fr Con Casey, CSsR,
“Managing Trauma and Grief” by Mr Patrick
Strong and “Changing Models of Church” by Fr
Raphael Esteban, a priest of the White Fathers
Society. There were only two lectures each morn-
ing and on Tuesdays and Thursdays a variety of
Workshops were held in the afternoons. They
included such topics as: Coping with Stress, Toga
and Prayer, Transition, Personal Growth through
Creative Arts, The Enneagram, Christian
Meditation and Painting for Pleasure. Participants

SEE page 27

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( Const f
Pope rcei ite) ele ty) 4









One extra seat
will be created |
ahead of election

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
and KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter



ONE extra seat will be creat-
ed when the Boundaries Com-
mission report is presented
before the House of Assembly
on Monday.

Four constituencies will be
eliminated - Holy Cross, Dela-
porte, Adelaide, and St Mar-
garet’s. Replacing them will be
the new seats of Clifton, Killar-
ney, Sea Breeze, St Anne’s, and
Golden Isles, informed sources
have revealed.

The Family Island con-
stituencies will effectively
remain unchanged.

Delaporte will be divided into
two constituencies ~ Killarney
and Clifton — in order to “save”
the seat of incumbent MP
Neville Wisdom and win the
PLP an additional seat, it was
claimed yesterday.

According to other sources,
the Sports, Youth and Housing
Minister will run for the con-
stituency of Clifton — an area
further, west which includes sev-
eral subdivisions.

Former CDR member Fayne
Thompson is said to be the
front-runner for the con-
stituency of Killarney, which
will include the Cable Beach
area, ,

St Margaret’s will be divided
into two, with a portion going to

Montagu, and some to the new .

constituency of St Anne’s.

Mr Thompson was rumoured
to have been the PLP’s choice
for South Beach, however, it is

claimed that Wallace Rolle has
been given the nomination for
that constituency.

Despite reports that Mr
Thompson has been chosen as
the candidate for Killarney,
there is also speculation that the
people of the area may prefer
Mr Wisdom’s campaign man-
ager Randy Rolle —- a younger

candidate who has been seen ~

knocking on residents’ doors
with Mr Wisdom.

Works Minister Bradley
Roberts, who represented the
government on the Boundaries
Commission, remained tight-
lipped yesterday only saying
that there is “some good news
and some not so good news”,
depending on a person’s point
of view,

“Some people are tied to the
past and they do not want
change, but the movement of
the population dictates that
changes have to be made.

“A lot of work went into this
and the Prime Minister will be
in a position to explain,” he told
The Tribune.

According to informed
sources, the initiative behind
renaming the Holy Cross con-
stituency was, as previously
reported, to force the renomi-
nation for the resulting area for
the incumbent MP Sidney
Stubbs. Mr Stubbs has been at
odds with the Selections Com-

‘mittee, which is reportedly seck-

ing to block him from running
as the PLP candidate for the
area, It is alleged that the new

SEE page 16



















PET LE

[cs s aia et OCCT

el beanie naa

a LEADER o of thie Workers Party Roduey Moncar held a ballot on Bay Street yesterday
to get an idea of where the upcoming general election might be headed.
(Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff)

° The Tribune hit the streets yesterday to feel out the public’s mood as election day
approaches. See SPECIAL REPORT, page seven.

Deputy PM

hits out at

p p : Smith continue to unfold in local
: courts as hearings over the
: guardianship of her daughter
; and the ownership of the Hori-

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

_ DEPUTY Prime Minister Cyn-
thia Pratt said she was insulted :

by the intentional and “nasty”

before the next general election.

During her address on the }
amendments to the Road Act in :
the House of Assembly, Mrs Pratt
launched into an all out attack on }

the daily newspaper.

Mrs Pratt was referring to a }
headline which read, “DPM says :
*, She said that she said } Be none Monbet
that crimes are being committed }
by people that “we know” — }
meaning the general public. An }
apology has since been published :

Police know who commit the
crimes’
by the Guardian,

now is the season of politics,

“embarrass” her,

SEE page 16

Calories .....0.320 :

Total Fate, Og
1310m:

Sodium..



Anna Nicole hearings
take place this week

THE legal wrangles sur-
rounding the late Anna Nicole

zons estate are being heard this
week,
Yesterday, Senior Justice

attempt by The Nassau Guardian Anita Allen met in closed cham-

to demonise her character right : : age
é : the Horizons ownership dispute.

bers with attorneys involved in

Howard K Stern has said that

the million dollar gated man-
sion belonged to Anna Nicole
Smith, South Carolina develop-
er G, Ben Thompson claims he
is the rightful owner of the
estate and did not give the
house to the former late reality
TV star. The hearing over the
ownership dispute was

‘adjourned to Friday at 2.30 pm.

SEE page 15

National Insurance Board
assures public after break-in

Tribune Staff Reporter

THE National Insurance Board confirmed today the break-in at
its Wulff Road complex on March 13, but rushed to assure the
public that there is no need for concern about the confidentiality of

data base.

. : individuals’ personal information stored in the National Insurance
However, Mrs Pratt re.aained }

livid. She said that she knows that i

Yesterday, The Tribune reported that there was a break-in at the

stolen.

Wis tn ! : National Insurance building in which a number of computers were
maintaining that the headline :

error was intentionally done to :

An anonymous source claimed that the computers contained

SEE page 15

CAPS.

9
Dietary Piber...09
Pro

: national insurance numbers, business information and residential

Bahamians working at
Chub Cay claim island
run like ‘slave camp’



ll MARCOS ARMBRISTER

BAHAMIANS working on a
resort project at Chub Cay claim
the island is being run like a
“slave camp” with no regard for
labour laws.

They say the Cuban construc-
tion boss, Mario Espino — who
claims to be a close friend of
Prime Minister Perry Christie —
seems to see himself as a Castro-
style dictator who sacks workers
so often he is known as “The Ter-
minator.”

Irate tradesmen who have been
fired from the project told The
Tribune yesterday of Mr Espino’s
alleged contempt towards his
employees and seething discon-
tent among the workforce.

However, a partner in the firm
has denied the veracity of their
complaints.

One of the men, Marcos Arm-
brister, a 39-year-old father of
four, alleged that employment
practices on the island were in
flagrant defiance of their consti-
tutional rights,

“Mr Espino relies on his high-

SEE page 16

MP calls for
overpasses to
alleviate traffic
problems

@ By BRENT DEAN

OVERPASSES need to be
created in New Providence to aid
in alleviating the traffic problems
on the island, according to Ten-
nyson Wells, the independent MP
for Bamboo Town.

Mr Welis made this declara-
tion yesterday during his contri-
bution to the debate on the act
to amend the Road Traffic Act.

“IT would venture to say, Mr
Speaker, that it doesn’t matter
how long we go, or how much we

put it off, overpasses in New

SEE page 16




AGE 2, THURSDAY, MARCH. 15, 2007

> eae
Anger after Gibson phone expose

THE TRIBUNE



Flurry of calls sparks claim ‘Maybe he was too busy calling Ms Smith to call his own voters’



THE seven phone calls made
in two days by Shane Gibson
to Anna Nicole Smith have
infuriated voters in his Golden
Gates constituency.

For many of them have been
waiting for years for Mr Gib-
son to return their calls on
issues they consider extremely
important.

This was revealed yesterday
by fathers’ rights campaigner
Clever Duncombe, who is chal-
lenging Mr Gibson in the gen-
eral election.

He said many voters are
deeply upset that Mr Gibson,
who was forced to resign his

Cabinet post over the Anna
Nicole issue, appeared to apply
“double standards” in dealing
with rich and poor.

He said scores of voters had
been waiting weeks, months
and sometimes years for Mr
Gibson to return their phone
calls. But he evidently didn’t
consider them important
enough, he added.

Yet, said Mr Duncombe, Mr
Gibson could make seven calls
in two days to Ms Smith, some
of them late at night.

“This Anna Nicole thing con-
tinues to take its toll on Mr Gib-
son,” he added.

LARRY BIRKHEAD will
be declared father of baby Dan-
nielynn and have custody of his
daughter within a month, his
attorney Debra Opri claims.

Paternity tests will take place
and her client will be ruled the

nformation Cards with vital statistics on

“The prime minister needs to
be warned that if he continues
to run this political corpse in
Golden Gates, the whole gov-
ernment will suffer.”

Mr Duncombe said the ex-
minister was now getting so des-
perate that he was staging par-
ties and cook-outs to garner
support.

“This is a last-ditch attempt to
show his party he has support in
the area,” he said. “But the
truth is that his support is dimin-
ishing by the day as more and
more things are revealed about
the Anna Nicole Smith busi-
ness.”

baby’s biological father, Ms
Opri told American television
networks.

Her comments came as the
fight over Anna Nicole
Smith’s daughter Dannielynn
descended into a vicious slang-

Retos will be ne by Magic Photo and

Mr Gibson and the govern-
ment faced more embarrass-
ment this week when Ameri-
can TV networks aired voice-
mail messages left by the then
minister for the cover girl.

In a series of “Shane calling”
messages, Mr Gibson gave times
in a way that suggested he want-
ed to talk to her urgently.

No such urgency was shown
to his own constituents, though
- their messages often fell on
deaf ears, said Mr Duncombe.

“Maybe he was too busy call-
ing Ms Smith to call his own
voters,” he added.

Pleas RaeelEG in Golden

ing match between attorneys.

Ms Opri lambasted fellow
lawyers Ron Rale and James
Neavitt for what she called
“egregious” conduct in trying
to drive a wedge between her
and her client.

And she decried their
attempts to reach a “settle-
ment” with Birkhead by saying:
“The baby is not for sale.”

Ms Opri warned Howard K
Stern to “put up or shut up”
and take the DNA test ordered
by a Californian court, claim-
ing he could no longer hide
behind a “fake” birth certifi-
cate.

“Stern’s feet will be held to

Gates had shown that “things are
not looking good for the minis-
ter”, said Mr Duncombe, who is
running as an independent.

“He is getting weaker, and
weaker and losing support as
more and more revelations are
made about this situation,” -

He said Mr Gibson's sudden
burst of party-giving was a mea-
sure of his desperation.

“However, my campaign will
be different - I’ll be discussing
the issues,” said Mr Duncombe.

“I keep hearing people say
Golden Gates is a stronghold
for Mr Gibson, but I can’t real-
ly see it,” he added.

TODPD PP eR Pann enaeyemenenen aan ey

the fire,” she said, “Within a

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his daughter. He is already
preparine a nursery for her.”

e said Stern’s real mission
was to secure rights over Anna
Nicole Smith’s image and like-
ness for years to come.

However; Stern’s Florida
attorney Krista Barth said her
client was looking to resolve the
DNA issue without court inter-
vention,

Meanwhile, another lawyer
warned that the Bahamas could
suffer economic fall-out if local
courts did not resolve the issue















@ LARRY Birkhead with
Anna Nicole Smith

satisfactorily.

Pam Bondi said Americans
could put pressure on the
Bahamas by choosing to vaca-
tion elsewhere unless the pater-
nity issue was decided, '











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Sed
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 3





O In brief — Former

Campaigner
calls for
march on
the House

FATHERS’ rights campaign-
ers are expected to join a Rasta-
farian march from Arawak Cay
to the House of Assembly next
week.

Clever Duncombe is encour-
aging all inner city people — and
those who feel they have suf-
fered injustice — to join the
demonstration.

The Rastafarians are calling
on the government to end dis-
crimination against their mem-
bers, and marched on parlia-
ment last week.

Discussion
on Haitian
immigration
at college

THE College of the Bahamas
School of Social Studies has
announced that it will hold a
panel discussion entitled “Per-
spective on the impact of Hait-
ian migration to the Bahamas.”

The discussion will be held
on Wednesday, March 21, at
7pm in the! foyer on the ground
floor of the Portia Smith Stu-
dent Services Centre on Poin-
ciana Drive.

Panélists for the discussion
will $nclude: |<) —

‘@Earl Deveaux, former cab-
inet minister and marketing
director of Lucayan Tropical.

¢ Dr Eyelyn McCollin, .asso-
ciate professor of history at
COB.

e Dr Thaddeus McDonald,
dean of the faculty of social and
educational studies at COB.

e Eliezer Regnier . :
attorney.

e Dr Keith Tinker, director
of the National Museum of the
Bahamas.

Admission is free, however

COB says’it will gladly accept’

donations.

Gang leader
in Haiti is
captured
by police

B& HAITI
Port-au-Prince

HAITIAN police have arrest-
ed a fugitive gang leader who
fled into hiding after UN peace-
keepers launched a crackdown
to seize control of the country’s
largest slum, officials said,
according to Associated Press.

Evens Jeunes, a top gang
leader from the violent Cite
Soleil slum, was captured Tues-
day during a raid in the south-
ern coastal town of Les Cayes,
UN police spokesman Fred
Blaise said. Police arrested 11
other suspects, including a
woman believed to be Jeunes’
wife.

Jeunes, also known as Evens
Tikouto, is wanted for ordering
or carrying out a string of
killings and kidnappings that
engulfed the impoverished
Caribbean nation after a bloody
2004 revolt toppled former pres-
ident Jean-Bertrand Aristide.

, Residents in Les Cayes alert-
ed police after seeing a man
resembling Jeunes, who went
into hiding last month after hun-
dreds of UN troops raided Cite
Soleil, a seaside shantytown of
300,000 people. No weapons
were recovered in the arrest.

“The good news is that peo-
ple are turning in the gang lead-
ers now,” Blaise said.

Jeunes was flown to Port-au-
Prince aboard a UN plane but
will remain in Haitian custody,
Blaise said.

The 8,800-strong UN force
seized control of Cite Soleil for
the first time on February 28
but failed to catch any of the
top gang leaders, several whom
fled into rural areas.

On Monday, UN peacekeep-
ers arrested 31 gang suspects
and freed two kidnapping vic-
tims in Cite Soleil.

ae
EXTERMINATORS.

a PEST PROBLEMS



RG warns Bahamas is

racing toward a ‘failed state’

THE Bahamas is in danger
of becoming a failed state, a
lawyer claimed yesterday.

Chicanery and corruption in
the court system was under-
mining the foundation of soci-
ety, said former registrar gen-
eral Elizabeth Thompson.

“As a practitioner, I am very
disillusioned,” she told The Tri-
bune. “In the current environ-
ment, who has the will to over-
haul the system?”

Her comments came as dis-
quiet deepened over the courts
and people’s inability to get
justice.

She echoed remarks by two-

more lawyers, Maurice Glin-
ton and Damien Gomez, wha
first raised the “failed state”
spectre on radio talk shows.

“Mr Glinton said we are
limping towards a failed state,
Mr Gomez said we are rac-
ing towards it. | feel that rac-
ing towards a failed state is
the right term. It is a sad soci-
ety.”

Lawyers have begun speak-
ing out on the shortcomings of
the courts in the wake of a
series of INSIGHT articles in
The Tribune.

These have focused on
instances of injustice and called

@ ELIZABETH Thompson

for an independent inquiry into
the judicial process.

Last week, the tragic story
of Daniel Williams, a man
still fighting to get justice



Corruption in court system undermining the
foundation of society, says Elizabeth Thompson



after 17 years, touched many
people’s hearts and high-
lighted the inadequacies of
the system.

Injustice

Next Monday, INSIGHT
will again highlight a case of
injustice, with a call for imme-
diate action.

Ms Thompson said: “We
have a corrupt society and I
have four children who are
now asking questions about
what they see going on around
them.

“Unless something is done, I
think we are going to be in seri-
ous trouble. We may have a
mass exodus out of here by
those who can afford to go.

“The court system is the
basis of our lifestyle, but we
are now in a race towards the
breakdown of our institutions.
People are being killed. We are
in a state of mayhem.”

Hotels lose hundreds
after raids by gunman

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

Two hotels — El Greco and
the Towne Hotel - were
robbed of hundreds of dol-
lars in cash early Wednesday
morning by a man who
threatened staff.with a gun.

In both cases, a short, dark,
man wearing a striped shirt
and dark trousers entered the
building under the pretense
‘of being a customer, police
said.

As he approached the
counter, he pulled out a gun
and demanded cash.

He struck first at the
Towne Hotel shortly after
12am on Wednesday morn-
ing, and then later, at around
2am at El Greco on West
Bay street.

Harry Pikramenos, the son
of the owner of El Greco,
said his staff did not suspect
the “clean cut” man, who at
first pretended that he was
looking to rent a room.

He estimated that the rob-
ber — who put a gun to the
head of one of the two hotel
clerks — may have stolen
around $700 from the hotel
cash register.

“He surprised the front
desk clerk. We lock the doors
after 10.30pm,” he said,
adding that the company
were already reviewing their
security practices in light of
the confrontation.




We Won't Undersold!

ie gee ORM LD eMC sd

"He was almost as scared as
the front desk clerk was, but
that's when it's scary — if they're
scared, they'll pull the trigger,"
said Mr Pikramenos, who added
that the whole incident was over
"pretty quickly."

At the Towne Hotel, the man

reportedly also robbed, seyeral :

patrons who were present*at the

time, before escaping on foot.
At El Greco, he robbed an

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amount of personal cash and
jewellery before leaving, said

police press liaison officer Wal- -

ter Evans yesterday, although
Mr Pikramenos could not con-

’ firm this.

Last year, another hotel on
the western esplanade — an

extremely popular area at this:

time of year among Spring
Break visitors — was repeatedly
targeted by robbers.










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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398



Bahamian women remember history

IN LAUNCHING his re-election campaign
in Fox Hill Tuesday night, Foreign Affairs Min-
ister Fred Mitchell gave residents a history les-
son. It was very important for them to know
their history, he said, because if they didn’t, they
put themselves “in danger of repeating it.”

He urged the women of Fox Hill — the vil-
lage settled in the nineteenth century by freed
African slaves — not to be complacent about
their voting rights. He reminded them that they
had only received those rights “within the life-
time of your grandmothers and some of your
teachers here today.”

Since Mr Mitchell wants Bahamians to know
their history, we do not think he should gloss
over the politics, and the part that his party
played during the passing of the Bill that gave
-women the same rights as men to register and
vote at an election. Bahamian women went to
the polls for the first time on Monday, Novem-
ber 27, 1962.

The struggle was long and hard for the small
group of women who spearheaded this fight,
and the handful of men who supported them.

On the verge of victory, Dr Doris Johnson,
who was at university, returned home. In 1958
Dr Johnson joined the Women’s Suffrage Move-
ment, which was headed by Mrs Mary Ingra-
ham. Without question, Dr Johnson was better
educated than the pioneers and as a result felt
that she should lead the movement.

As she manoeuvred her way to the top in her
bid to replace Mrs Ingraham, internal conflict
erupted.

In 1975 a ZNS broadcast, giving credit to Dr
Johnson and the PLP for winning the vote for
women, prompted Mrs Mary Ingraham to write
a letter to The Tribune to set the record straight.

Mrs Ingraham said she sent the women’s
petition for the right to vote, containing 9,500 sig-
natures, to Independent MP Gerald Cash (later
Sir Gerald), which he presented to the House
with notice that it be read at the next meeting.

It was that week, wrote Mrs Ingraham, that
Dr Johnson arrived from university, and was
taken to the women’s meeting where the activ-
ities that were to be held before the petition
was to be presented for first reading were to be
discussed.

“Dr Johnson suggested that we allow her to
address the assembly before the petition was
read,” Mrs Ingraham wrote. “It was a rough
morning in the House. Sir Milo Butler objected
to the motion by Mr Roy Solomon to spend
£9,000 to entertain Prince Philip, therefore, when
it was time for Dr Johnson to make her address,
Mr Roy Solomon objected to the ladies being
allowed to address the Assembly.

“Sir Roland Symonette, then being Premier,
went over to the Magistrate’s Court and got the
Magistrate to vacate the courtroom, and brought

the members of the House over to the Magis-
trate’s court to listen to the address of the ladies.

“Ladies and gentlemen,” continued Mrs
Ingraham in her letter to The Tribune, “this is
the only part that Dr Johnson played in the vote
for women. And when the motion came for the
vote in the House of Assembly not one member
of the PLP government, including the Prime
Minister (Sir Lynden Pindling), voted for the
women to vote. Instead, every member walked
out.

“Therefore,” she asked, “how can Women’s
Week be celebrated by this government (the
PLP)?”

What is interesting is that the women who
went to the polls for the first time in 1962 helped
defeat the PLP. They returned a UBP govern-
ment.

History, Mr Mitchell, can only be appreciat-
ed if the whole story is objectively told — which
it never is when a politician tries to twist it to his
own advantage.

And even more recently, Bahamian women
were short changed by the PLP.

In a rush to complete his election promises,
former prime minister Hubert Ingraham tried to
push through a referendum to grant citizenship
to the foreign spouses of Bahamian women. It
was pointed out that if this amendment were
passed the Bahamas would be in full compli-
ance with the UN Convention for the elimina-
tion of all forms of discrimination against
women.

This amendment was one of five on which
Bahamians were asked to vote. All five amend-
ments passed both House and Senate. However,
when it was put to the people, Prime Minister
Perry Christie changed his mind and led the
fight to defeat the referendum, pleading that
the process was flawed.

Even when the section to which Mr Christie
objected was removed, the amendment still
remained flawed in the eyes of the PLP.

Mr Christie urged Mr Ingraham to cancel
the proposed referendum. “It should be left to
the next government of the Bahamas to do it the
right way,” he said.

As a consequence the referendum, with the
amendment to protect a Bahamian woman’s
family, was defeated.

Since then, Mr Christie has had five full years
“to do it the right way” and remove the dis-
crimination against Bahamian women. Typical of
Mr Christie, that was the last that was heard of
his efforts to put Bahamian women on an equal
footing with their male counterparts.

Yes, Bahamian women, remember your his-
tory.
As Mr Mitchell has said, this memory is
important if you don’t want to run the risk of his-
tory repeating itself.



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Politicians who
value power
over principle

EDITOR, The Tribune

OVER the past several
months, some disgruntled men,
who once wore FNM badges
have “switched” to the PLP.

Since most FNM’s were once
PLP’s there is nothing wrong
with this.

In a democracy, people
should be free to do as they
please within reason.

However, what becomes evi-
dent with most of these persons
— such as Ashley Cargill, Ten-
nyson, Pierre Dupuch, Alger-
non Allen or Wallace Rolle and
others is that they simply could
not have their own way, thus
their departure. Not because of
a worthy cause, just, in my opin-
ion, personal ambitions unful-
filled.

Further we hear of persons
who could not get the FNM

‘nomination to run, now switch-

ing to PLP.
These persons who have no
personal mooring are a clear

The true

EDITOR, The Tribune

THE writer of the article
which claimed, several months
ago, that Bahamians are the sec-
ond happiest people on this
earth — the happiest being the
Danes — must have been work-
ing on outdated statistics; or suf-
fering from the delusion that
prosperity automatically brings
happiness. They could not have
known that prosperity is not
eyen general in The Bahamas.

Some while ago I heard
someone say that you can tell
the quality of a people’s civili-
sation by the way they treat ani-
mals, children, and the elderly.
I believe that even our un-gen-
eral prosperity shows little proof
of our civilisation.

Democracy itself is becoming
a laugh, here. In certain osten-
sibly ‘less’ happy countries, indi-
viduals would risk their lives for
the right to vote. It’s not uncom-






LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net

and present danger to the
growth and well being of our
Bahamas and should be exiled
to the political grave yard.

These types have no political
allegiance, they have no set
principles. Their only ambition
is to get in the house called Par-
liament.

“If you want to see what a man
will do with Power take note to
see what he does to get it.”

Obviously if a man could
fight for a cause “all his life”
and having been denied a posi-
tion, to suddenly be embraced
by the party against which he
fought, shows exactly where his
heart has been all along. He is
not committed to a cause but
selfish ambition gone awry.

There is obviously something
sweet in that place Parliament

mon in this country to gain the
promise of a vote by dispens-
ing T-shirts. Furthermore, many
people act as though freedom
is a right. Because they’re free
they can do whatever - or
notever — they please, in their
own time, and who don’t like it
can lump it! They’re free to
throw garbage around where
they live, into other people’s
yards, the parks, the beaches
and the roads. After all, dispos-
ing of trash is the garbage col-
lector’s job! Democracy with-

out pride and responsibility is like |
ee _ “Allen and ministers of the |
“Gospel who walk.out of their

a laugh.

We're also forgetting our.

cooking culture. When I was
growing up they fed us peas and
rice, with the rice coloured the
greyish-brown of the water in
which the peas had boiled. We
never thought of counting the
number of peas on our plates
because we would have had to
be counting all day. Now it’s



— where men and women will
lower their personal principles
just to get on the inside.

All those who switch just for
convenience sake should be
rejected by sensible voters.

Ever since women were
granted the right to vote I have
cast my ballot according to my
conscience. In the last forty
years | have voted for both
major parties. I cast my ballot in
the interest of my seven chil-
dren. I invite Bahamians to do
the same.

The history of our nation will
be determined by the men and
women who are willing to put
self above personal gain.

Some men will use any name;
raise any flag and engage in any
cause to get in “that house” and
we must deny them their mis-
placed ambition, which in the
end will be better for all.

JUST A READY VOTER
Nassau
March 2007

face of ‘prosperity’

‘rice and peas’ — with the num-
ber of peas being no more than
the fingers on one hand. No
wonder we’re getting fat.
Nowadays the news of the lat-
est murder by stabbing, blud-
geoning, gunshot or whatever
is getting to be considered ‘nor-
mal’; no matter that the blud-
geoning was of a toddler, and
at the other end of the gunshot
a shepherd of God’s flock fell.
We are becoming used to crime.
That, I think, is the greatest
danger. Thank God for persons
like Darold Miller, Dr, David |

fine or not-so-fine churches into
the wilds of our living areas to
show the good news. Thank
you.

TELCINE
TURNER ROLLE
Nassau

March 1 2007

A plea from Ragged Island

EDITOR, The Tribune

Please publish this open letter
to:

Hon Perry G Christie, MP

Prime Minister.

Dear Sir,

I hereby write this letter on
behalf of the Ragged Island
community. Mr Prime Minister


















we are tired of suffering. I often
wonder if we are counted as one
of the islands of the Bahamas.
We need our channel, sir, it is
ridiculous to see how we have
to be transported from out to
sea to the main land via dinghy
boats. God help us if the weath-
er is bad because you would be
soaked from head to toe.

For the pass 25 years we have
been neglected by both govern-
ing parties, it is not just your
government but the previous
government also that have
made the same promises to us
but have not kept them.

We can’t go home cause it’s
a two-day trip by boat and our
island is the only island in the
Bahamas that Bahamasair
does not fly to. It costs too
much to charter a plane so we






Guess wne ()

HAPPY BIRT HDAY

From your sons, Carl&
Dante; nieces, Kai & ©)

are stuck with no airport and
no channel. We need assis-
tance now more than ever, it is
hard on our people because
when there is an emergency
and you need to come to Nas-
sau it cost more than $11,000
to charter a plane.

We have been neglected for
far too long and we are tired
of going unnoticed, stop
neglecting us we are Bahamian
too. We might be few in num-
bers and maybe that is why our
voices are not being heard, but
we need assistance now. This
is the 21st century — treat us
fairly.

AMANDA CURLING

A concerned Ragged Islander
Nassau

February 2007

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 5



© In brief

Man is
charged with
men’s store
break-in

FREEPORT - Jamaal
Williams, a resident of
Freeport, was charged in the
Magistrate’s Court this week
in connection with the week-
end break-in at Esquires
Men’s Store.

Williams, 24, of No 118
Oleander Street, appeared in
Court Two where he was
charged with shopbreaking
with intent to steal and steal-
ing $150 from the establish-
ment on March 10.

He was also charged with
intentionally causing $400
worth of damage to the secu-
rity monitoring device.

Williams pleaded not guilty
to the charges and was
remanded in custody to June
18 for trial.



of things we
think, say or do

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Amended driving under the
influence laws are passed

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

PERSONS driving or
attempting to operate a vehicle
under the influence of alcohol

or illegal drugs will be commit-

ting a offence according to the
new amended road traffic laws
passed yesterday in the House
of Assembly, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

With almost 400 traffic fatal-
ities recorded in the Bahamas in
the past seven years, Transport
and Aviation Minister Glenys
Hanna-Martin yesterday in par-
liament moved to have new leg-
islation enacted with the aim of
improving road traffic laws in
accordance with the country’s
needs.

Giving her contribution to the
second reading of the Act to
Amend the Road Traffic Act,
Mrs Hanna-Martin said that this
new piece of legislation will
serve to implement the manda-
tory use of seat belts and will
make driving under the influ-
ence of alcohol or illegal drugs
an offence.

She explained that the
amended act will correct flaws
which were part of the legisla-
tion when it was passed in 2002
under the former government.

The amended act, she said,
introduces the use of the
breathalyser test by police, cor-
rects measurement errors which
allow for improper calibration
of urine samples and includes
provisions for the testing blood
samples of persons that are sus-
pected of driving under the
influence.

The minister said that the
implementation of provisions
for both the mandatory use of
seatbelts and the use of the



@ GLENYS Hanna-Martin

breathalyser were suspended in
2002 for a period of six months
for the purpose of educating the
public on the use of such
devices.

“I do not believe this process
was ever begun in earnest,” she
admitted.

Mrs Hanna-Martin said that -

there were some serious con-
cerns expressed by Bahamians
about aspects of the original act,
including the “inordinately
high” fines and the fact that the
taxi cab industry was not con-
sulted about what they termed
the “impractical standards”
which were put into place.

The minister explained that
under the new act, drivers who

BVM hila name



fail to wear seat belts, who do
not secure their children prop-
erly, who drive under the influ-
ence of alcohol or illegal drugs,
will face lower fines and new
penalties such as community
service and licence suspension.

The amendments proposed
in the new legislation are as fol-
lows:

e The criteria for the use of
child restraints in vehicles is
being changed from an age cri-
teria to a weight and height cri-
teria in keeping with the rec-
ommendations of the Ameri-
can Association of Pediatri-
cians.

e The age of children who
will be permitted to sit in the

front seat has been increased

from five years to eight years.

e The existing fines are being
reduced and will be more in line
with the fines in other jurisdic-
tions. Adjudicating magistrates
will also be given discretion in
the levelling of such fines.

e Alternate-penalties are
being introduced including the
imposition of community ser-
vice and the suspension of dri-
ver’s licences.

¢ Exemptions to seatbelt use

\
and child restraint devices have
been extended to golf carts and
taxis, except for front seat pas-
senger.

e Persons who for medical
reasons cannot wear a seatbelt
will also be exempt.

e For the first time ever a pro-
vision has also been added
requiring persons riding in the
back of trucks to be seated on
bed of the truck and not on the
tailgate or the side of the vehi-
cle.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



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PROSPECTUS
. THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS



BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK 2026 AND 2027
° ISSUE OF B$50,000, 000.00

LOCAL NEWS



PLP accused of trying
to evade real issues

@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Progressive Liberal Par-
ty is making a desperate
attempt to “distract the people’s
attention from the real issues”
the FNM claimed.

In a statement posted on the
party’s website yesterday, the
FNM took exception to a polit-
ical radio advertisement aimed
at its leader, Hubert Ingraham.

“A radio advertisement by
the ruling party seeks to blame
FNM Leader Hubert Ingraham
for the misfortune that befell

the late Sir Lynden Pindling
towards the end of his political,

career, just as they are trying to
blame the FNM for the sleaze
they have created for them-
selves today.

“To set the record straight for
young Bahamians who might
not be aware of what happened
back in the 1980s, it was Sir
Lynden himself, not the FNM,
who set up the Commission of
Inquiry that exposed him and
his government in a devastat-
ing report in 1984.

Issued under The Bahamas Registered Stock Act, and poe by Resolutions of the House of
Assembly, 21st June, 2006.

Applications will be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 16th March, 2007 and
will close at 3:00pm on 26th March, 2007. Allocations will commence at 9:30 a.m. on 27th March, 2007 and
will cease at 3:00p.m. on 28th March, 2007.

If the total subscriptions exceed the sum of B$50,000,000.00 (Nominal) partial allotment will be made to
subscribers, and a proportionate refund will be made as soon as possible after allotment. No interest will be
paid on amounts so refunded.

: The date of this Prospectus is 15th March, 2007

The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas invites applications for Bahamas Registered
Stock totalling B$50,000,000.00. The Stock will be available in a range of maturity dates; the earliest being
repayable in 2026 and the latest in 2027. The total amount of Stock offered, the rate of interest and the issue
Price are given below :-

; Issue

Rate Of Interest Amount Price
BS BS

9/32% Above Prime Rate Bahamas Registered Stock 2626 25,000,000.00 100.00

5/16% Above Prime Rate Bahamas Registered Stock 2027 25,000,000.00 100.00



50,000,000.00

The Stock shall be repaid on 28th March, in the year appearing in the name of the Stock.

INTEREST

The Stock will bear interest from 28th March, 2007, at the rate shown against the name of the Stock as the



“That report confirmed what
the international press had been
saying about the Bahamas in
the latter part of Sir Lynden’s
administration including a
description of the Bahamas as a
‘nation for sale’.

“Indeed, the Colombian drug
lords had infiltrated and cor-
rupted the country from top to
bottom and the commission
found that this corruption
reached right into Sir Lynden’s
Cabinet.

“It also found that Sir Lyn-
den himself had spent eight
times his salary and had bank
deposits for which he could not
satisfactorily account. In a
minority report, Bishop Drexel
Gomez concluded that he could
not say that payments made to
Sir Lynden’s bank account were
all non-drug related,” the
release read.

Bishop Gomez is quoted stat-
ing: “Some could have been,
but however that may be, it cer-
tainly cannot be contested that
the prime minister did not exer-
cise sufficient care to preclude
the possibility of drug-related



@ SIR Lynden Pindling

funds reaching his bank account
or being applied for his benefit.”

The Commission of Inquiry
in 1984, the FNM said, painted
a “sorry state of affairs” of
Colombian drug dealers flying
their flag in the Bahamas and
having their own way.

“It was during this period that
gangster executions came to the
Bahamas for the first time and
that the whole structure of our
society was badly damaged, per-
haps irreparably. It was at that
time that Hubert Ingraham and
Perry Christie parted company
with the PLP. And the rest, as
they say, is history.

“Still, FNM Prime Minister

Hubert Ingraham, with great
generosity of spirit, afforded Sir
Lynden every courtesy before
he departed this life, put his face
on our dollar bill and on a
postage stamp, and when he
died gave him a send-off befit-
ting a national hero in recogni-
tion of his earlier services to the
nation,” the statement read.

“But the real issues facing us
today are the long list of sleaze
and scandals,” the party said,
“the unbelievable incompetence
of the PLP government and
their determination to give
away of as much of our land to
foreigners as they can before
leaving office. “

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

BAHAMA

S REGISTERED STOCK 2026 AND 2027

SR NEE EO EUMEK 2020 AND 2027

The Registrar

FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY
APPLICATION No



ALLOTMENT No.



DATE:





c/o The Central Bank of The Bahamas

P. O. Box N-4868
Nassau, Bahamas

Sir:

I/We hereby apply for the following amount of Bahamas Registered Stock:

9/32% Above Prime Rate
5/16% Above Prime Rate

Insert below the amount applied for

in Units of B$100 a

and undertake to accept any less amount which may be allotted to me/us.

VWe enclose B$

In the event of the full amount of Stock(s) apoliea for above is/are not allotted to

Bahamas Registered Stock 2026
Bahamas Registered Stock 7027

in payment for the Stock applied for. ©

BS )
B$ T

percent per annum over the Prime Rate (i.e. the prime commercial interest rate from time to time fixed by the
Clearing banks carrying on business in the Island of New Providence in The Bahamas. If there shall be any
difference between them, then that which is fixed by Royal Bank of Canada). Interest shall be payable half-
yearly commencing on 28th September, 2007 and thereafter on 28th March and 28th September in every year
until the Stock is repaid.

CHARGE UPON CONSOLIDATED FUND



The principal monies and interest represented by the Stock are charged upon and payable out of the
Consolidated Fund and assets of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

SUPPLEMENTARY PROVISIONS

The Stock will be issued by the Registrar (The Central Bank of The Bahamas).
Applications will be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 16th
March, 2007 and will close at 3:00 pm on 26th March, 2007. Allocations will commence
at 9:30 a.m. on 27th March, 2007 and will cease at 3:00p.m. on 28th March, 2007. All
envelopes enclosing applications should be labelled “Application For Bah mas
Government Registered Stocks”.

Issue of Stock

Units "The Stock will be in units of B$100.00.

Applications Applications must be for B$100.00 or a multiple of that sum.

Application Forms Applications for the Stock should be made to the Registrar on the form attached to the
Prospectus and may be obtained from the Registrar offices in Nassau and Freeport, The
Treasury Department (Marlborough Street & Navy Lion Road, Nassau) or any of the
following banks:

Bank of The Bahamas International

First Caribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited

Finance Corporation of Bahamas Limited

Commonwealth Bank Limited

Royal Bank Of Canada

Scotiabank (Bahamas) Limited

Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited (formally British American Bank(1993)
Limited)

Citibank, N.A.

Salers eC ae

be

PUBLIC DEBT

Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts as at December 31, 2006 show the Public Debt of The
Bahamas to be B$2,880,739,000.*

GOVERNMENT REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE

The following information is extracted from the unaudited accounts of the Government of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

FY2005/2006p** FY2005/2006p** FY2006/2007p**
BS BS B$
Approved Budget Approved Budget
Revehue 1,221,454,000 1,132,774,000 1,338,971,000
Recurrent Expenditure (excluding
Repayment of Public Debt) 1,149,582,000 1,145,691,000 1,269,560,000
Capital Development
Expenditure (excluding loans
contributions and advances
to public corporations) 123,454,000 132,901,000 , 162,356,000

** Provisional estimates from the unaudited accounts.
* — The Public Debt amount is inclusive of The Public Corporations contingent liability which as at
December 31, 2006 totalled B$499,067,000.

me/us, I/we request that the sum ask) to me/us be applied for the following Stock: 4
1
% Bahamas Registered Stock BS
% Bahamas Registered Stock BS :
% Bahamas Registered Stock BS i
% Bahamas Registered Stock BS
% Bahamas Registered Stock BS
% Bahamas Registered Stock BS

PAYMENTS CAN BE MADE VIA RTGS SYSTEM THROUGH ALL COMMERCIAL BANKS
EXCEPT FINCO, BY BANK DRAFTS PAYABLE TO THE CENTRAL BANK OF THE BAHAMAS
AND BY CASH.

1. (One Person)
Ordinary Signature

















’
r
Name in Full (BLOCK LETTERS, state whether Mr., Mrs., or Miss and titles if any.) :
°
x
]
Address (Corporations etc. should give Registered Addresses ) 2
a
P. O. Box

ft
‘
.
»
Telephone Nos._(H) (W) 4
; ; H
‘
2. (Where two or more persons apply as joint subscribers, the additional names and addresses should b
be given below.) :
4
Ordinary Signatures ‘
k
A
Names in Full te ‘
’
’
And/OR ’
:
5

Address As .



Telephone Nos.(H) CW) AS eee

I/We hereby request semi annual interest to be paid to:

Bank Name.



Bank Branch



Account Number



ND a sere neo, a. 0 ae ee
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 7







The electorate
and their views

m@ TAMARA FERGUSON

ACCOMPLISHMENTS
OF THE PLP

Samantha Johnson, a sales
clerk, said that on a scale of 1 to
10, she would rate the govern-
ment’s performance as a “10”.
The Fort Charlotte constituent
said the government has built
homes, fixed roads and estab-
lished parks. “They have also
provided many jobs,” she said.

Baillou Hill constituent Nor-
ma Williams said that the gov-
ernment must consider the
views of the public. "Bahami-
ans need to feel more involved
in what is happening in the
country. The government
should've addressed the issue
of crime. The government
needs to build a strong rela-
tionship with the church and
put God first.”

' She added that the govern-
ment needs to show more con-
cern for poorer communities.

Devardo Roile, a pharmacist,
said that he would grade the
current government as an
“eight”, stating that his repre-
sentative did a good job. “I
must commend the minister for
ensuring that the roads were
improved on Baillou Hill Road
and a new round-about was
installed.”

However sales clerk Saman-
tha Jones of Fort Charlotte said
the government could've done a
much better job and sold too
much land to foreigners. She
said the next government needs
to resolve illegal immigration
and re-examine residency per-
mit approvals.

Elizabeth constituent Ray-
mond Parker said that he is
concerned about the Baha Mar
deal. "I feel that they could've
received more money," he said.

Kara Sawyer of Golden
Gates said she is looking for-
ward to the election because it's
time for a change. However, she
said Shane Gibson did a good
job in the area and as minister
of housing, although he recent-
ly resigned as minister of immi-
gration, which she feels was the
best choice.

Dino Pratt of Farm Road
said the Urban Renewal pro-
ject helped make some signifi-
cant changes in the area. How-
ever, he said that he would like
to see the ideas of the young
taken into account.

Former educator, Theresa
Albury-Johnson said she is
impressed with the National
Health Insurance plan. Howev-
er, the Bain and Grants Town
constituent said the government
has failed to address social issues

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THURSDAY,
MARCH 15TH

6:30am Community Page 1540AM
11:00 Immediate Response
12:00 ZNS News Update
12:05 Immediate Response
Cont'd
1:00 Legends: Sir. Arthur
Foulkes
1:30 Fast Forward
2:30 — Turning Point
3:00 — Bishop Leroy Emmanuel
3:30 Dr. Jamal Bryant
4:00 The Fun Farm
5:00 ZNS News Update
5:05 Andiamo
5:30 You & Your Money
6:00 This Week In The
Bahamas
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
8:00 Native Show
8:30 Healthy Lifestyles
9:00 Help Save The Family
Rally
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30am Community Page 1540AM

« NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
right to



LOCAL NEWS }

AS the general election approaches, Bahamians
state their views on the current administration,
candidates and the future of the country.





SUPER

nursing major Simone Smith
said although the government
had done a good job, her rep-
resentative should have held
meetings to discuss the concerns
of constituents.

Trillo Edgecombe, econom-
ic and finance major from North
Abaco, said that more provi-
sions need to be made for the
youth of Abaco.

He also noted that more and
better police recruits are need-
ed.Mr Edgecombe said he feels
the candidate for his area has
done an outstanding job.

Marketing major Quentin
Bowe, said he does not plan to
vote, because he feels that after
the election, he will no longer
see his candidate. The Fox Hill
constituent also said the park
in his constituency needs to be
safer for children. He expressed
concerns about illegal immigra-
tion and a lack of justice for vic-
tims of crime.

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and fix the education system.
Bain and Grants town con-
stituent Wendel Rolle said his
representative has done a good
job, but stressed the need for
prison reform. Mr Rolle also
expressed concern about the
state of the police force, and
said some Defence Force offi-
cers need to be punished and
taught to uphold standards.
Mount Moriah constituent
Raymond Tucker gave the gov-
ernment a “seven” rating, say-
ing he would like to see a
change in crime and juvenile
delinquency. He also said par-
liamentarians need to be hon-
est, God-fearing individuals.

THE YOUNG VOTERS’
VIEW

Young Bahamians at the Col-
lege of the Bahamas, who say
they plan to have their voices
heard in the upcoming election,
also shared their views.

Banking and finance major
Owenique Gregory said she
feels the FNM candidate for her
area will perform well if given
the chance. The Mount Mori-
ah constituent also said that the
current representative could
have made more improvements
to the area.

Orlando Pinder, a law and
criminal justice major, said
many plans announced by the
government were not carried
out.

Fort Charlotte resident and



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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



World’s largest dolphin facility —

OPEN HOUSE
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FRONT CONDOS

Private Marina

1 to 6 bedroom from $349,000 +
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@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
and ALISON LOWE

THE world's largest man-
made dolphin facility, Atlantis’
Dolphin Cay affords guests the
opportunity to not only inter-
act with marine mammals but
also to learn about the environ-
ment and the importance of
marine conservation.

Dolphin Cay Paradise Island,
which opened on February 26,
is a nearly seven million gallon
state-of-the-art habitat.

This allows each dolphin
250,000 gallons of water — more
than 10 times the amount
required by US regulations,
according to marine specialists
at the Cay.

The 11 acre lagoon contains
three 10 foot-deep coves for
interaction with the mammals.
It houses 20 dolphins in total,
and six are currently pregnant.
Sixteen of the dolphins were
displaced from their previous
home in Gulfport Mississippi,
after being swept to sea during
hurricane Katrina.

“Here at Dolphin Cay we
want it to be a very intimate
experience for guests and for
them to have an up close
experience with the animals,”
said Teri Corbett, vice-presi-
dent of marine mammal oper-
ations on Monday during a
media fun day, where mem-
bers of the press were treated
to a tour of the Dolphin Cay
facility.

Atlantis will soon offer two
dolphin interaction programmes
—a shallow water and a deep
water interaction. Currently,
shallow interactions are avail-
able. These take place in waist-
deep water with one dolphin,
two trainers and seven to 10
guests.

Details of the deep water
interaction are yet to be
unveiled, but are expected to
offer closer contact with the
mammals.

Interactions last 30 minutes.
Ms Corbett said 40 to S50 people
usually interact with the dol-
phins each day, although this is
ultimately dictated by the mood
of the mammals.

Following the interaction,

Atlantic Medical Insurance (AMI), a subsidiary of Colonial Group
International Limited (CGI) headquarters in Bermuda, is seeking a Claims

Processor for our office in Freeport, Bahamas.

CGI, with offices in Bermuda, the Bahamas, the Cayman Islands, and the
British Virgin Islands, offers a complete range of premier financial and in-
surance services to both local and international clients. This is an opportu-
nity to be part of a rapid growing innovative company, focusing on provid-
ing clients with first class service and access to competitive products.

Reporting to the Account Executive/Office Manager as well as the Assistant
Claims Manager, this position.will be responsible for processing medical

claims, including prescription claims.
Applicants should possess the following:

2-5 years experience working in an automated office environment,

preferably with high volume data entry

2-5 years medical claims processing and knowledge of processing both
local and overseas claims (specifically US claims) and an understanding
of various fee schedules applicable to the local marketplace is desirable
A firm understanding of ICD-9 (diagnosis) and CPT coding and medical

terminology is desirable

Superior communication and organizational skills as well as attention to

detail

Ability to work under pressure and mutli-task

Proficiency in MS Word along with superior data entry accuracy

Compensation for the successful candidate will be attractive and linked to
performance. AMI offers an attractive benefits package that includes com-
prehensive medical insurance, contributory pension plan, life and long term

disability coverage.

If you have a keen commitment to quality results and want to contribute
your talents to a dynamic company please submit you application, which
will be treated in the strictest confidence, in writing to:

Atlantic Medical Insurance
P.O.Box SS-5915
Nassau, Bahamas

Closing Date for application is March 28, 2007

guests are encouraged to expe-
rience the Education Centre to
learn more about dolphins and
marine life conservation. “Part
of our goal is to educate people
about the animals, their envi-
ronment, conservation and to
bring them up close so that they
walk away with a true feeling
of the animals,” Ms Corbett
said,

In addition, Atlantis Dolphin
Cay staff will soon begin their
outreach programmes in the
local schools, raising awareness
of dolphins and marine mam-
mals.

Atlantic bottlenose dolphins,
such as the ones h
oused at Dolphin Cay, live nat-
urally in Bahamian waters, said
Ms Corbett.

Behind the scenes at the facil-
ity, things are no less impres-
sive.

The close to seven million
gallons of sea water used in the
habitat is pumped from the sea,
filtered, decontaminated and
then chilled or heated to arrive
at the optimum temperature for
the dolphins.

“We pride ourselves on the
care of the animals and ours is a
state of the art facility,” she
said.

With a brand new laboratory
and hospital, care for Dolphin
Cay’s aquatic residents is only
the beginning. Very soon the
facility will begin accommodat-
ing dolphins or other ocean
mammals that are found sick or
injured along the Bahamian
coastline, as a part of its com-
mitment to marine conserva-
tion.

A quarantine facility forms
part of the compound. “This
facility was designed to start the
first live animals beach strand-
ing network for the Bahamas,”
said Ms Corbett.

“We are going to provide the
infrastructure so that we will set
up a stranding network similar
to what is in the south-east
United States, where people can
call when they see a sick or
injured animal and we can assist
them or give them guidance on
helping them rehabilitate,

release or find. new:-homes for

the animals.”

&



@ THE new stretch of beach to the west of Paradise Island for
use by Atlantis guests



# A VIEW from the top of one of the new slides

Rex Major

& Associates

in coordination
with the
Churches

of Freeport,
cordially
invite you

to the

eked

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PU Mme CME iu

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nl

Dr. Leslie Woodside - 242-373-4855 / Leslie Minus - 242-352-4378 / Jeff Hepburn - 242-362-4273


THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS

tops new attractions at Atlantis

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter










% Moments Of Truth

March 2007

If you think Cabbage beach
looks a bit more empty these
days, it's because the visitors
are finding other watery diver-
sions further inland — in the
form of the new 63-acre Aqua-
venture waterpark at Atlantis.

The Tribune was invited to
test the turquoise waters of the
new park on Monday, and can
report that with over 20 million
gallons of water and four exhil-
arating new slides, Atlantis has
truly upped the ante on the
waterpark experience.

The iconic new centrepiece
is the Power Tower, a 120 feet
tall edifice that houses The
Abyss, The Drop, The Falls and
The Surge — all high powered
adrenaline pumping slides that
have proved extremely popular
with guests since the park's Feb-
ruary 26 opening.

Visitors can choose to slide
on their tubes, propelled by
powerful jets of water, or do the
bodyslide in the form of The




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they don't want to get out to

climb the stairs to the top of the
tower, Atlantis has provided WE PUT vr.




@ ATLANTIS guests approach the new facility











something else new and unex- ~ - Accounting

stad rangaice BO AO a
Add to this more rapids, . a

more lazy rivers, and two new OVER YOUR oe

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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



reer eR on eo ESS): Siege Ciao eee ea
Donation for Saunders scholarship

‘The Tomlinson
Scholarship

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= The Tomlinson Scholarship is funded by High Tor Limited
“s. and family members in memory of Mr Joseph Tomlinson











CAVES VILLAGE

WAHAMAS



TM ASRAL

COLLEGE of the Bahamas
president Janyne Hodder
accepted a substantial dona-
tion from a local to help build
up the Winston Saunders
Scholarship Fund.

The scholarship honours the
late Winston Saunders, play-
wright, cultural icon and long-
time director of the Dundas
Centre for the Performing
Arts — who died unexpectedly
in November 2006.

“A national university has
an obligation to ensure that
contributions to national life
are remembered and celebrat-
ed, said the college in a state-
ment. “The College of the
Bahamas is committed to pre-
serving the memories of the
country’s outstanding men and
women and is doing so ina
variety of ways. One such
method is to fund scholarships
in the names of those persons
the institution honours.”

The donation, in excess of
$11,000, was the direct result
of an exhibition of paintings
by Jerome Miller, which the
artist organised in tribute to
his great friend, Mr Saunders,
and to raise money for the
scholarship fund named for
him.

Auction

Mr Miller’s works were auc-
tioned and proceeds donated
to the scholarship fund. The
artist commented, “This is a
great project to work with and
I hope there will be many
more events to raise funds for
it.”

The scholarship is to be
awarded to a student who will
pursue a COB degree in Eng-
lish, the subject Mr Saunders

taught at St Anne’s School in |

the mid 60s.





i SHOWN (ito r) are: Shawn Sawyer, president and CEO of
Cacique International, who organised the art exhibition; Phyllis
Garraway, whose Yodephy dancers provided entertainment at
the art show; Betty Knowles, administrator of the Dundas Civic
Centre where the exhibition was staged; Dr Gail Saunders,
widow of Winston Saunders; Janyne Hodder, president of the
College of The Bahamas; Lady Pindling; Jerome Miller, the
artist who made the donation; Pauline Glasby, organiser of exhi-
bition.



Tourist office in Atlanta for Black History Month

THE African American
Market of the Bahamas
Tourist Office in Atlanta,
Georgia took part in Home
Depot’s African American
Cultural Heritage Celebration,

‘in observance of the US Black

History Month.

The event takes place each
year for the Home Depot’s
Atlanta-based staff of 5,000
and includes performances,
prizes and a lecture about the
achievements of African
Americans. Each year, the
highlight of the event is a grand
prize trip for a lucky employee.

Over the past few years, the
Bahamas has partnered with
one of four local hotels to
provide the prize.

The winner of this year's
prize won a three day/four
night stay at the Wyndham
Resort Hotel and round trip
tickets for two. The
photograph pictures from left:
actress Jasmine Guy, the
keynote speaker; prize winner
Sandra Owens; Jeannie
Gibson, district manager,
Bahamas Tourist Office;
Gianne Moss, Bahamas
Tourist Office intern.



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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 11



New detox unit to
be commissioned
in Chippingham

THE Bahamas Association
for Social Health has
announced the date for the
grand opening and dedication
of its new detoxification unit —
the Peter N Andrews Commu-
nity Detoxification Unit.

The opening will be held on
Friday, March 16 at the BASH
Exodus Village Facility resi-
dential hall in Chippingham at
2pm.

Peter Andrews, executive
chairman of Bahamas Waste
Management, will be honoured
by BASH in a dedication cere-
mony in recognition of his dis-
tinguished service.

For nearly 15 years, under his
leadership, Bahamas Waste
Management has been a corpo-
rate donor and friend to BASH.

The Peter N Andrews Com
munity Detoxification Unit is
located at BASH Residence
Hall and features safe, com-
fortable, and accessible accom-
modations for up to four clients,
usually at admissions.

The definition of detoxifica-
tion is as follows: “A treatment
for addiction to drugs and alco-
hol intended to rid the body of
the addictive substances, and

the physiological and psycho-
logical readjustment that
accompanies the process.”
Occupying a space of around
160 square feet, the site features
two new wood bunk beds, an



@ PETER Andrews

open chrome closet system, tile
flooring, a brand new céiling
fan, surrounded by soft mint
green walls intended to relax
the body and mind.

Just steps away is Earth Vil-
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serve, animal and garden
ecosystem designed to compli-
ment therapy and healing.

BASH aims to provide 24/7
drug treatment and rehabilita-
tion for adult men ages 18 and

up. The organisation has a total
of 32 beds for clients.

BASH is a non-governmental
organisation with an emphasis,
on the development of civil soci-
ety.

A clinical psychologists and
medical attendant, along with
key workers who specialise in
addiction studies provide ser-
vices to the client, including par-
tial medical care and progress
monitoring.





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_ INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS TO PURCHASE (WITH TELEPHONE
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OR CALL 242-502-6221 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION. * WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO
REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS.



Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear from people who are
making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a good cause,
campaigning for improvements in the area or
have won an award.

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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

Investment hocus pocus: the PM’s

sleight of hand with the economy

Moxie is entertain-
ing but it is not real.

The key to magic is sleight-of-
hand or misdirection. In
essence, magic is deception.

Prime Minister Perry
Christie’s sometimes $15 billion,
other times $18 billion and yet
other times $20 billion in invest-
ment in The Bahamas is pretty
much a magic trick. It is the
kindof hocus pocus that can be
entertaining but simply is not
real. It is not real in its present
tense or its future tense.

Available
on the
pot

Prices includes: Licensing, Inspection. Plates, Mats

According to the Central
Bank’s Quarterly Statistical
Review, dated February, 2007,
between 2002 and 2006 inward
foreign direct investment in The
Bahamas totalled a little more
than $1.6 billion, of which less
than $1 billion was equity
investment.

Readers can verify the figures
for themselves at www.central-
bankbahamas.com in the statis-
tics section. The sum of $1.6 bil-
lion is a far cry from $15 billion
or $18 billion or $20 billion.
Much of the $1 billion in equity

investment came from Kerzn-
er International’s Phase III, a
project scheduled long before
Mr Christie came to office.

Notwithstanding the fact that
the Central Bank of The
Bahamas only records some
$1.6 billion in investment over
the last five years, Mr Christie
and his crew continue to speak
as if billions and billions of dol-
lars in investments have come
into The Bahamas under their
tenure.

This is nothing more than
hocus pocus. It is a myth, a

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sleight-of-hand, misdirection.
Even when you view the gov-
ernment’s investment promo-
tion website one observes artis-
tic renderings of these proposed
investments as if they were actu-
ally taking place. Once again,
this is hocus pocus, a magician’s
trick.

A government should
not mislead the pub-

lic. It should not mislead the
international community. A
government should be upfront.
Our nation is not a comedy and
our leaders should not be magi-
cians. Entertainment should be
left for entertainers. Leaders
must speak to the facts and act
with truth.

The fact is that Mr Christie
and his crew have approved a
number of investment proposals
by international persons. Few
of those investments are now
in the ground or going in the
ground; that is why the Central
Bank’s investment figures do
not reflect the mega numbers
that the government puts out.

What is the total value of
those investments according to
the standard means of measur-
ing investment proposals? We
don’t know. Mr Christie has put
out huge numbers that really
one has no means of verifying.
It might be easier to analyse the
proposed investments if the
government was upfront with
disclosing all of the details; how-
ever, no such thing is the case.

Not only are the full details of
heads of agreements signed not
available to the public, some of
those agreements have secret
clauses.

It seems that the only real
interest that the government has
is in putting out a big number in

ORR

we wet

VAL ence ©)



LA
hopes of impressing the public.
Is it working? We will have to
see. This much is true, people
may be impressed with a magi-
cian but they will not count on
him to pay their bills.

N G

THE THINGS YOU
CAN’T SEE

I is surprising that Mr
Christie and his adminis-
tration is placing so much
emphasis on foreign investment



Our nation is
not a comedy
and our leaders
should not be
magicians. —
Entertainment
should be left
for entertainers.
Leaders must
speak to the
facts and act
with truth.



in their bid to win re-election
given their claim while in oppo-
sition that the economy wasn’t
everything and that the Ingra-
ham administration had placed
too much emphasis on foreign
investment.

Now they. gladly compare...

their record of putting foreign=

awd, oS » i Sr) Gy, Ae
Apr it a tee” Wie










ee

THE TRIBUNE

ers ahead of Bahamians with
that of others. “Ingraham only
approved a mere $4 billion in
foreign investment in ten years
compared to our $20 billion in
five,” they say.

Minister Gibson noted that
her government has sold more
land to foreigners in their five
years than the Ingraham admin-
istration did, yet Ingraham was
accused of selling the country
out. I guess the young man was
right who said, “I guess Christie
sellin’ da country more out! “
What a difference a day makes!

What is not surprising about
Mr Christie’s $20 billion invest~
ment boast is the fact that it has
no real evidence to support it.
Go to all those islands, cays,
nooks and crannies where these
investments are supposed to be
happening and see how many
of them have visible and tangi-
ble displays of these so-called
anchor projects; not many will
and those that do were likely
created before this current goy-
ernment.

Again, however, it is not sur-
prising that PM Christie brags
about this illusory $20 billion
investment windfall. Remem-
ber, one of those investors said:
“What is most beautiful are the
things you can’t see”.

If this is so, it only makes

sense for Mr Christie to contin-
ue boasting about $20 billion in
investments that we can’t see
because this is the most beauti-
ful thing. If this $20 billion ever
actually materialises, it will not
be as beautiful as it is now that
we cannot see it. Confusing?
Perhaps! But that is magic for
ya!

THOUGHT FOR
THE WEEK

66 he magician and
the politician have

much in common: they both
have to draw our attention away
from what they are really
doing.” —- Ben Okri

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tA. GU a’ as
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 13
poy VR ae



Claim that Larry Cartwright partially
financed by PLP in last general election

Potential candidate for P

Long Island Anthony
Knowles speaks out

m@ By BRENT DEAN

LARRY CART-
WRIGHT was partially
financed by the PLP in the
last general election
according to Anthony
Knowles, a potential can-
didate for the Long Island
constituency in the upcom-
ing election.

Mr Knowles made these
statements yesterday in a
press release, in which he
sought to clarify issues sur-
rounding his potential can-
didacy.

“It is true that I have
been considering the pos-
sibility of running as an
independent candidate for
the Long Island and
Ragged Island constituen-
cy. What is absolutely not
true is that my campaign
would be financed by the
PLP, as was that of the cur-
rent MP back in 2002. As
a Bahamian I have the
right to run as does any
other Bahamian.

“Tf I do run, I can assure
the people of Long Island
and Ragged Island that I
will bring a true vision of
hope and prosperity. They
will not be subiect to false
promises, like those made
by the current MP back in
2002,” he said.

Mr Knowles also listed
promises he claims were
made by Mr Cartwright in
2002, such as cable TV
throughout Long Island;
potable water to all; an
ocean-front road through-

’ out Long Island; the arrival
of cruise ships; more jobs
for the constituency.

He challenged the elec-
torate to see how many of
these developments have
actually occurred during
Mr Cartwright’s tenure as
representative.

Despite his possible inde-
pendent candidacy, Mr
Knowles also stated that
his FNM credentials are
established.

“There is no doubt that
anyone who knows me,
knows that my Free
National Movement cre-
dentials are unshakable,
unlike the current MP.
Whatever I do now or in



an energetic T€a!
If we've piqued your interest, Let’s Talk!



the future will be in the
best interest of all con-
stituents, FNM or other-
wise,” he said.

Mr Knowles’ potential
candidacy would create a
three-way race in Long
Island between FNMs — Mr
James Miller officially
declared his candidacy for
the constituency yesterday
to The Tribune.

Due to the historical
antagonism between the
PLP and Long Islanders, it



“If I do run, I
can assure the
people of Long
Island and
Ragged Island
that I will
bring a true
vision of hope
and prosperity.
They will not
be subject to
false promises,
like those
made by the
current MP
back in 2002.”



Anthony Knowles,
potential candidate
for the Long Island

constituency

is unlikely that the party
will officially nominate a
candidate for the con-
stituency, especially in the
face of in-fighting between
three FNMs for the seat.
Rather, it is more likely
that the PLP will either
stand by and watch the
fight between the FNMs,
or, the PLP may attempt to
secretly support one of the
independent candidates.



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THE TRIBUNE ze
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CRUISE lines must target
new customers by including spe-
cific groups such as minorities,
children and Generation X in
marketing efforts as they try to
cater ‘to the broadest base of
travellers, industry executives
said Tuesday, according to
Associated Press.

Executives of six cruise lines
discussed topics important to
the industry in front of a stand-

ing-room only collection of rep- _

resentatives from ports; ‘ship-
yards, suppliers, travel’ agents
and cruise lines at the annual
Seatrade Cruise Shipping Con-
vention.

Richard Fain, chairman and
CEO of Royal Caribbean Cruis-
es, said meeting the changing
demographics of a cruise indus-
try that’s getting younger and
more diverse is one of its main
challenges.

Citing an industry statistic
that shows only about 17 per
cent of Americans have taken a
cruise vacation, Fain said direct-
ly marketing to groups such as
blacks, Hispanics, the physical-
ly disabled and multi-genera-
tion travellers — also known as
families with children — would
add to cruise vacation demand.

“Children were (once) seen
as entities that distracted from
the enjoyment of the bulk of
our guests... Today we devote
whole sections of the ships to
meet their needs,” he said.

Bob Dickinson, president and
CEO of Carnival Cruise Lines,
stressed the need to appeal to
younger travellers. Statistics
show that Generation X, from
the late 20s in age to the early
40s, is the group that reports it is
most interested in taking a cruise
vacation, said Daniel Hanrahan,
chairman of the Cruise Lines
International Association’s mar-
keting committee. .

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 15



ational

Insurance
FROM page one

information of a “large number”
of Bahamians.

The source further alleged that
senior management within the
department terminated the contract
of a private security company about
two to three weeks ago, in a cost
cutting effort, leaving the building
vulnerable,

Additionally, the source alleged
that the building alarm did not
work, nor did the security cameras,
leaving few clues as to who the cul-
prits are.

According to NIB Director
Lennox McCartney, a number of
personal computers were stolen
from the Claims Department of the
Wulff Road Local Office.

He said, though, the stolen PC’s,
once removed as they were from
the Board’s network, will not per-
mit access to National Insurance's
data base.

This is because NIB’s data is
stored in central computers and the
theft of individual PC’s would not
compromise any information the
Board holds.

Mr McCartney explained; “We
are part of an intricate network.
Persons will not be able to use the
computers to connect to the
National Insurance system, as it is
configured in such a way that access
can only be gained through autho-
rised user [D’s and passwords
assigned by us,”

He said the thieves simply got
away with stand alone personal
computers.

The Director said that each of
the Board's computers has an
account that can be disabled.

He explained that this and other
state-of-the-art security measures
and practices have been put in place
over the years to safeguard against
breaches, because NIB has always
been cognizant of the need to
secure customer information,

He declined to make specific
comments about the investigations
into the break-in, explaining that
NIB, as a matter of policy, does not
comment about its security systems,

He did say, however, that all
security recordings have been
turned over to the police to assist in
their investigations.

Mr McCartney said that even as
NIB takes measures to reduce its
administrative cost, nothing would
be done to compromise the confi-
dentiality and security of the infor-
mation with which the Board has
been entrusted,

TCA ATT es

ith

iG aataee to As)

LOCAL NEWS

Deputy Prime Minister
FROM page one

“Mr Speaker, I have come to this place and I have done the
best that I can and I continue to serve the Bahamian people
the best way I know. And, Mr Speaker, if [cannot build, | will
not destroy. If I cannot encourage, | will not discourage, If]
cannot enhance the lives of people, I will not try to destroy
them.

“That is my philosophy, Mr Speaker, that’s the way I live,
that’s the way I have always been. Whether you are for me or
against me. I speak evil of no man, Mr Speaker. I try to
encourage people. But I know this is the season and you have
some dirty, nasty people out there trying their best to discour-
age and to tear down and to rip up.

“But, Mr Speaker, I just want to say one thing, in your quest
to destroy me, look out you don’t kill yourself,” she warned.

Mrs Pratt said she trusts in God; a God who brought her
into parliament, and who will ultimately decide when she
leaves,

“So, Mr Speaker, I want the Guardian to know that I take
exception to it, it’s an insult to me. And certainly I appreciate
Mr (Charles) Carter calling me and apologising. Thank you
very much, sir, for that.

“But at the same time I want to say to reporters, please
quote me for what I say, Don’t lic on me, It is so wrong, so
wrong, and I will just leave it at that,” she said.

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Attorneys are being tightlipped on
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Also on Friday, a continuation of
a hearing over who will ultimately
retain custody of Anna Nicole
Smith’s five-month-old daughter
Dannielynn is scheduled before Jus-
tice Stephen Isaacs. Smith's mother
Vergie Arthur is trying to get
guardianship from Howard K.
Stern, who is listed as the father on
the child’s birth certificate.

Arthur claims she could provide a
more stable home for the infant,
who could stand to inherit a for-
tune, Los Angeles based photogra-
pher Larry Birkhead an ex-
boyfriend of the late Anna Nicole
Smith is also a part of the guardian-
ship dispute, The court is expected
to give further directions on the

matter when the hearing resumes
on Friday,

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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



ee ee ee
MP calls for overpasses

FROM page one

level connections to do as he pleas-
es,” Mr Armbrister alleged.

The alleged “slave camp” condi-

tions at Chub Cay came to light
after three more workers — Ter-
rold Rolle, 24, William McQueen,
25, and Michael Forbes, 28 — were
dismissed.
» They allege that MGM Con-
struction Services, Mr Espino’s
company, fires workers for being
sick, leaving the island for a break
or failing to attend meetings called
in the employees’ own time.

They also claim they are made to
work 60 hours before being allowed
to claim overtime pay, in what they
described as a breach of labour law.

Mr Armbrister said he was fired
for “standing up for my rights”,
claiming he was unwilling to work
seven days a week. He claimed he is
still owed nearly $3,000 by the firm
in unpaid wages.

The workers also alleged that pay
cheques “bounced like basketballs”
and National Insurance contribu-
tions were not paid on their behalf.

Mr Armbrister said: “Mario
seems to think he’s a Castro-style
dictator, but his behaviour can’t be
tolerated. It is unconstitutional.”

The workers, all skilled sheetrock
tradesmen, said they had been
promised by David Cooper, site

Chub Cay

superintendent for Moss Construc-
tion, the main contractors, that their
grievances would be addressed.

But nothing was done about Mr
Espino’s attitude, “All the workers
there feel as we do,” said Mr Arm-
brister, “but they don’t want to
leave until they get paid.”

The men said Mr Espino insisted
they should not leave the cay
“unless your mother dies, or you’re
fired.”

Mr Armbrister said: “He claims
to be a peroonal friend of Perry
Christie.

“He did some work at Christie's
house. Because of this, he seems to
feel he can get away with
anything.”

He added: “We want the govern-
ment to resolve this problem. He
should not be allowed to come here
and take advantage of our rights.
What is the government doing?

“We are fugitives in our own
home. I will soon be like the
Haitians who are looking for a bet-
ter life in the United States.

“On Chub Cay you get fired if
you get sick, you get fired if you

et hurt, and you get fired if you
ail to attend a meeting called in
your own time,

“Workers are ordered about in
military style. Mario likes total con-

trol and he treats us with con-
tempt.”

A message left with Mr Espino
was not returned, however Mr
Steve Greenslade, a partner with
MGM construction, denied the
men's accusations.

"Most of (what they said) was
complete lies," he said. "The men in
question were never forced to work
more than the appropriate hours a
week indicated in the labour laws,
Secondly, the persons who were ter-
mninated, the record reflects most
of them left of their own accord. If
they were terminated, whatever
time they worked, they got paid."

He added that he would "go fur-
ther" to say that his "fellow associ-
ate" who he would not name, but
did not deny to be Mr Espino, was
particularly benevolent to employ-
ees, paying them out of his own
pocket prior to the time their pay
cheques were due if they said they
needed their funds early.

"My associate, his first reaction if
you have a problem is, ‘yeah, I'll
take care of that problem'," he said.

He stated that any demands
made of the men were in their con-
tract, and in accordance with labour
laws, .

The issue is now being mediated
at the Labour Board and the com-
pany is "pulling records" to prove
that the men's claims are incorrect,
said Mr Greenslade.

FROM page one

Providence will have to come. That is the
only solution,” he said.

Mr Wells said that overpasses would be
most useful if placed at the major round-
abouts in New Providence, such as the round-
about that intersects Baillou Hill Road and
the Tonique Williams-Darling highway.

This is very necessary and the government
should “bite the bullet” now, Mr Wells added,
as the economy is growing — with more cars
being purchased — leading to even more traf-
fic on New Providence.

The land that is necessary to aid this effort,
should be purchased by the government, Mr
Wells said. However, he said that the gov-
ernment must compensate the land owners
for the land that is acquired.

“There are thousands, millions of dollars
out there that are owed to the public by this
government, the previous government, and
the government before that, acquiring peo-

»ple’s land ~ for years and years, Title good,

and they wouldn’t pay you. You know, it’s
wrong, in my opinion, for the government to
allow itself to get caught up in the situation
where the public has to take them to court and
ask the judge to tell the government that they
have to pay,” he said.

The Bamboo Town MP also suggested that
speed bumps should be placed in residential
communities,

“All over this island people are crying out



for speed bumps, because they are concerned
for the safety of their children, who are play-
ing on the streets,”

In these residential areas, Mr Wells argued
that speed bumps should be placed every 500
to 800 feet, to increase neighbourhood safety.

Mr Wells also made a request to Works
Minister Bradley Roberts to at least extend
the four lanes on Baillou Hill Road to -
Carmichael Road. Currently, the four lanes
merge to two lanes just beyond the hill, which
creates significant traffic when motorists
attempt to merge.

Mr Roberts said he has discussed the mat-
ter with the special projects officer for the
road improvement programme, and he com-
mitted to carry out the necessary provisions to
ensure that the four lanes are extended.

Constituencies
FROM page one

constituency will be represented by lawyer
Hope Strachan for the PLP.

Although the report of the Boundaries
Commission has been completed and been
given to Governor General Arthur Hanna
for approval, the public will not officially
know of its contents until Prime Minister .
Perry Christie presents the report to par-
liament next week.



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oATEM NO, PROJECT | CONCEPTUALIZATION PLANNING PROCUREMENT WORKS IN PROGRESS SUBSTANTIALLY COMPLETE ISLAND TOTAL oe
1 ACCOUNTS RENOVATION ¥ v Vv v v $37,421
2 —_ARAWAK AVE, EMERGENCY MAINS Vv Vv Vv ¥ $48,989
4 BLUE HILL RD. MAINS RENEWAL 8” Vv ¥ $60,968 “s
(8 _BLUEHILL RO WORKS v v> v v $004,005
6 BINLDING # 101 TOOLS/EQUIPMENT CENTER Vv Vv $05,542
7 «BUILDING #8 MODIFICATIONS J v $00,282
8 BURL DING #87 CUSTOMER CALL CENTER/IT BUILDING ADDITION y Vv $350,000
@ BUILDING #87 CASHIERS CAGE v v $20,000
BUILDING #9 REFURBISHMENT Vv v $78,400
BUILDING 8 & 9 ROOF REPAIRS . v. v ¥ $13,135
CAMPERDOWN EXTENSION PHASE | Vv a Vv , J $134,719
CAMPERDOWN WATER MAINS RENEWAL v Vv ¥ $165,830
_ CARMICHAEL VILLAGE SEWER FORCE MAIN Vf Vv Vv v $264,617
CATHERINE STREET Vv J v $22,271
CCTV SYSTEM WATER & SEWERAGE CORP. PHASE! o di v Vv J $70,681
CONVERSION OF TRAINING CENTER TO LAB Vv $41,906
EASTERN DISTRICT MAINS RENEWAL o V m $11,800,000
EMERGENCY FOX HILL WWYP v J J $408,560
FLAMINGO GARDENS SEWAGE PLANT af J =
FOX HILL ROAD MAINS RENEWAL Vv d rile
GLADSTONE RO. WWTP af v v i
GLADSTONE ROAD SEWER FORCE MAIN " v Vv ? 900,000
GLADSTONE ROAD WWTP PHASE ! iv Vv w $2,120,882
GLADSTONE TRANSMISSION MAINS vf ¢ Vv ¢ $700,000
IMPROVEMENT WORKS AT WSC HEADQUARTERS Vv v Vv $02,151
INSTALLATION OF 15K DIESEL TANK 7 7 v Vv $75,018
MAJOR ROAD, YELLOW ELDER GONS, Vv Vv $21,001
MALCOLM PARK DISPOSAL WELL Vv Vv v $109,802
MARSHALL RD. PHASE 1&tt V Vv Vv Vv $76,074
NEWBOLD STREET Vv Vv Vv Vv Ted
HON EASTERN DISTRICTS MAINS RENEWAL J v $121,908
PILOT PROJECT FOR PHASING OUT BRACKISH WATER SYSTEM y Zz Vv Vv v TBD
PINEWOOD GARDENS SEWAGE PLANT Vv ¢ v $329,312
PUMP CONTROL & SURGE f V Vv Vv $35,192
RENOVATION TO ENGINEERING TECHNICAL SUPPORT AREAS =v y s Vv Vv $89,405
ROOF REFURBISHMENT BLOCK "B" MAIN OFFICE Vv to V v F $438,804
SHIRLEY STREET MAINS RENEWAL af J $50,686
- SKYLINE LAKES SUBDIVISION LIFT STATION INSTALLATION sy ¢ Vv $99,827
ST. ALBANS DRIVE FORCE V v V v ¥ $97,578
SUMMERSET HOUSE LOWER WEST WING o r ” J v $411,721
TELEMENTRY - MAIN PUMP 7 v V Y $91,085
WINDSOR FIELD OFFICE BLDG. REFURBISHMENT Vv v Vv ¥ d $900,004
WINDSOR STATION GENERATOR Vv Vv sae. t77
WINTON BOOSTER RELOCATION ¢ Vv ? Vv were
WSC HEADOFFICE - SANITARY FACILITIES Vv J v manent
THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 17









ley SS

Shandong ! Acrobatics Troupe
erform in the Bahamas







@ BAHAMIAN and Chinese cultural stakeholders pose with members of the Shandong Acrobat-
ic Troupe, as they get ready to leave The Bahamas, on March 12, 2007. The Bahamas was the first stop
on the award-winning troupe's "Friendship Tour" and they performed three times over the weekend.
(ABOVE - BIS photo: Derek Smith, BELOW - photos by Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

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PAGE 18, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007 THE TRIBUNE



@ MINISTER of Foreign Affairs and the Public Service Fred
Mitchell (right) and Director of Public Works Ms. Melanie Roach
listen, as Ambassador of the People's Republic of China Li Yuan-
ming show them prints of various Chinese cities and landmarks dur-
. ing the reception for the of Shandong Acrobatic Troupe presen-

tation; on March 10, 2007, at the Kendal G. L. Isaacs Gymnasium.
“ The es is the first stop on the award-winning troupe's
"Friendship Tour" and they performed three times, over the week-
end. *

(BIS photo: Derek Smith)

veuwee ee a

[ew eee

we & Saas



a MINISTER of Foreign Affairs sad the Public Service Fred Mitchell (right) speaks, as Awibassadne of the People’ s Republic of Chi-
na Li Yuanming looks on, during the reception for the of Shandong Acrobatic Troupe peers on March 10, 2007, at the Kendal
G. L. Isaacs Gymnasium.



(BIS photo: Derek Smith)































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a *Straw plaiting/ stripping BoE alte
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ay) o 7 me yy sh . | Maa . ry
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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 19





@ BAHAMIAN and Chi-
nese Government officials
and cultural stakeholders
pose with members of the
Shandong Acrobatic Troupe
presentation, on March 10,
2007, at the Kendal G. L.
Isaacs Gymnasium.

The Bahamas is the first
stop on the award-winning
troupe's "Friendship Tour"
and they performed three
times, over the weekend.

(BIS photo: Derek Smith)

Bush to Congress:
Immigration reform
is key to better
relations with

Latin America

@ MERIDA, Mexico

PRESIDENT Bush, seeking
to rebuild ties with Mexico,
pledged Wednesday to intensi-
fy efforts to overhaul U.S. immi-
gration laws and crack down on
illegal drug trafficking, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

Bush said that he senses there

. has been a change of attitudes
..in Congress about updating
- immigration laws, from skepti-
cism last year to recognition
now that changes are in U.S.
7> interests.
“T will work with Congress,
’ ,members of both political par-
ties, to pass immigration law
that will enable us to respect
the rule of law — and at the
same time, respect humanity,”
Bush said in a news conference
with Mexican President Felipe
Calderon.
_ Bush, facing a huge fight
.‘ within his own party for his
>. immigration plan, called it an
‘-important but sensitive
issue.

“T say important because a
_._»good migration law will help
.>.-both economies and will help

the security of both countries,”
Bush said. “If people can come
into our country, for example,
on a temporary basis to work,
doing jobs Americans aren’t
doing, they won’t have to sneak
across the border.”

For the seventh straight day
on his Latin American trip,
Bush shrugged off a question
about his nemesis, leftist
Venezuelan President Hugo
Chavez. Bush would not even
use his name.









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@ PUBLISHED poet Mr.
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on March 7, 2007.

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SEMnEN,








POET and performance artist
Ms. Rolinda Pierre sharing one
of her humourous poems during
the latest session of "Express
Yourself," on March 7, 2007. The
event, held at "Da IslandClub" in
the Nassau Beach Hotel, is an
open mic forum for poets, musi-
cians and performance artists to
share their work. The next ses-
sion will take place Wednesday,
March 14, 2007, at 8 p.m.

(Photos: Eric Rose)




@ POET Ms. Shamija Mon-
cur reads one of her pieces
during the latest session of
"Express Yourself," on March
7, 2007.



Five tourists
kidnapped in
Ethiopia to
be reunited
with family

@ ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia

FIVE Europeans freed by
kidnappers said Wednesday
they were treated well and
expressed gratitude to the
governments of Eritrea and
Ethiopia that led to their
release, according to Associat-
ed Press.

However, in a statement
issued by the British Foreign
Office in London, the five
diplomats and relatives said
they were worried about the
eight Ethiopians who were
abducted with the group and
who are still missing.

“We are very worried that
the Ethiopians who were
accompanying us are all still
being held. We would not
want anything to be said that
might inadvertently jeopardize
their safe release. Our fore-
most concern is that they
should be released as soon as
possible,” the statement said.

The five said they spoke to
their families and were look-
ing forward to seeing them
again but they needed time to
take stock of what happened.
They appealed to the media
for privacy.

“We were treated well by
our captors — physically we
are all in good condition but
obviously very tired,” the
statement said.

Fears were growing for the
eight Ethiopians who were
kidnapped with the group and
who are still missing. The
Ethiopian government called
for their immediate release.

The Europeans were held
captive for 13 days after being
kidnapped while on a sightsee-
ing tour near the disputed bor-
der with Eritrea. They were
released Tuesday and taken to
the British Embassy in
Asmara, the Eritrean capital,
where they were fed and given
medical checkups.

A British Foreign Office
Official, who spoke on condi-
tion of anonymity in line with
ministry policy, said they were _
to leave Asmara shortly.

Michael Moore, the head of
the British Council’s Ethiopia
office and the husband of one
of the kidnapped tourists, said
Wednesday he spoke briefly
with his wife by phone.

“She sounded well and
healthy. | am feeling very
relieved and grateful for all
the work that has been done
so far,” Moore told The Asso-
ciated Press in Addis Ababa.
He said they did not discuss
details of her ordeal.
PAGE 22, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Blair discusses power-sharing
deadline with N Ireland rivals —

@ LONDON

BRITISH Prime Minister
Tony Blair and Northern Ire-
land’s hard-line Protestant
leader, Ian Paisley, discussed
his price Wednesday for sharing

power with the Catholics of
Sinn Fein by Blair’s March 26
deadline, according to Associ-
ated {ress.

Blair held his first face-to-face
meetings with Democratic
Unionist leader Paisley and

Sinn Fein chief Gerry. Adams
since their parties triumphed
last week in Northern Ireland
Assembly elections — and gave
them both veto power over
reviving a Catholic-Protestant
administration.



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just bring in 2 complete Huggies”
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receipt dated after March 10, 2007
to the d’Albenas Agency in
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Sales & Full Service Department
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Paisley, who represents most
of the province’s British Protes-
tant majority, and Adams met
separately in a House of Com-
mons conference room with
Blair as well as his treasury chief
and likely successor, Gordon
Brown.

Paisley has refused to com-
mit to Blair’s deadline, citing
Sinn Fein’s continued ambigui-
ty on whether it will cooperate
fully with the police in Northern
Ireland. In recent weeks Sinn
Fein leaders have called on
Catholics to help police solve
certain crimes, but suggested
they will not help stop attacks
by Irish Republican Army dis-
sidents opposed to the peace
process.

Democratic Unionist deputy
leader Peter Robinson, who
also took part in the talks,
stressed afterward that his par-
ty would not move unless Sinn
Fein demonstrated fulsome sup-
port for law and order.

“Mr. Adams knows the
requirements. He knows what
has to be done, and he knows
he is not yet doing them,”
Robinson said in an interview.

But Adams said the British
government accepted that Sinn
Fein had done enough to merit
a share of power. Adams said
he, Blair and Brown all sensed a
breakthrough with Paisley was
imminent.

“I do think that this British
government ... they can smell
it, that this could be the real
breakthrough after all the con-
flict, after all the false dawns,”
Adams said.

Both the Democratic Union-
ists and Sinn Fein do agree on
the other key condition for
cooperation — getting more
money from Britain, which
already heavily subsidises gov-
ernment services and employ-
ment in Northern Ireland. —

Paisley is seeking a reported
£1 billion in extra funds for any
incoming power-sharing admin-
istration to spend. Both Adams
and Paisley say they would use

Ages 6 - 14





i SINN Feinn leader Gerry Adams speaking to the media out-
side the Palace of Westminster in London yesterday

(AP Photo/ Alastair Grant)

extra money to reverse a new
household water tax due to be
‘imposed starting next month
across Northern Ireland.

“We certainly want to see the
British government pick up the
tab for the failure to invest in
water services and the infra-
structure. That’s what I was
negotiating for,” said Adams,
who remains committed to oust-
ing the British government from
Northern Ireland.

Paisley did not speak to
reporters after his meetings.

Earlier, in a House of Com-
mons debate, Paisley said a

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power-sharing administration
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Britain has already commit-
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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 23

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

P.O. BOX N-7509
TELEPHONE: 302-1000





BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
TENDER FOR GENERAL INSURANCE , TENDER FOR GENERAL INSURANCE
ALL RISKS (BUILDINGS & CONTENTS, PLANT, MACHINERY & MARINE INSURANCE
EQUIPMENT INCLUDING SUB-STATION SITES
TENDER NO. 597 106 TENDER NO. 600/06
The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the The Babeme a eeision Sear insmanoet me dexeribed atove, bidces toe ts

provision of general insurances as described above.
Bidders are required to collect packages from

Bidders are required to collect packages from Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at the Administration Office,
at the Administration Office, Blue Hill and Tucker Road.
Blue Hill and Tucker Road.
Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 30 March 2007 by 3:00 p.m.
and addressed as follows:
Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 30 March 2007 by 3:00 p.m. =
and addressed as follows: The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
The General Manager — Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Bahamas Electricity Corporation Nassau, Bahamas
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads :
Nassau, Bahamas Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
ion: .D
axsientiow: Wary. Delmer Seymour Marked: Tender No. 600/06
Marked: Tender No. 597/06 “GENERAL INSURANCE - MARINE INSURANCE”
“GENERAL INSURANCE — BUILDINGS, PLANT & MACHINERY” The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION —-—s BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
‘TENDER FOR GENERAL INSURANCE | TENDER FOR GENERAL INSURANCE
PUBLIC & EMPLOYERS’ LIABILITY, PERSONAL ACCIDENT, PROFESSIONAL INDEMNITY (DIRECTORS & OFFICERS)
PRIVATE CAR & COMMERCIAL VEHICLES
TENDER NO. 598/06 TENDER NO-otive
, oo, _ . The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the
The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the provision of general insurances as described above.

provision of general insurances as described above.
Bidders are required to collect packages from

Bidders are required to collect packages from Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Mrs. Delmeta Seymour at the Administration Office,
at the Administration Office, Blue Hill and Tucker Road.
Blue Hill and Tucker Road.
. Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 36 March 2007 by 3:00 p.m.
Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 30 March 2007 by 3:00 p.m. and addressed as follows:
and addressed as follows:
The General Manager
The General Manager _ Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Bahamas Electricity Corporation Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads Nassau, Bahamas

Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Marked: Tender No. 601/06

Marked: Tender No. 598/06
“GENERAL INSURANCE - PROFESSIONAL INDEMNITY
“GENERAL INSURANCE — PUBLIC & EMPLOYERS’ DIRECTORS & OFFICERS”
LIABILITY AND MOTOR VEHICLES”
. The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.
The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders. 7 eh : 7

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
TENDER FOR GENERAL INSURANCE _ TENDER FOR GENERAL INSURANCE
MONEY & FIDELITY ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT & MOBILE RADIOS
TENDER NO. 599/06 . TENDER NO. 602/06

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the

provision of general insurances as described above. The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the

provision of general insurances as described above.

Bidders are required to collect packages from

Mrs. Delmeta Seymour Bidders are required to collect packages from

Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

at the Administration Office. as :
. , at the Administration Office,
Blue Hill and Tucker Road. Blue Hill and Tucker Road.
t -deli C : . :
Tenders tne 200 Handed ees On or bern ae exch 2007 by 3:00 p.m. Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 30 March 2007 by 3:00 p.m.
and addressed as follows: and addressed as follows:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation Bekeren Feoticity Comnoration
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas a caaiaay

Nassau, Bahamas

ttention: . i
Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 599/06 Marked: Tender No. 602/06

“ RAI URA _ ITY”
eal NS CE MONEY & YUE “GENERAL INSURANCE — ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT & MOBILE RADIOS”

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders. . : .
P gh P J ¥ The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.


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business@tribunemedia.net



THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

A Wiles Bit oyitiC eee

BUSINE

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street







°





Money Safe.
Money Fast.

at

Bank of The Baharnas

INTERNATIONAL

Online at



Bahamas leads US real estate downturn

world on Internet
penetration rate

l@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas has the high-
est rate of broadband Internet
penetration in the world per 100
people, Cable Bahamas chair-
man said yesterday, a rate that
is some 65 per cent higher than
the leader in an Organisation
for Economic Co-Operation
and Development (OECD) sur-
vey of the world’s wealthiest
nations. /

Brendan Paddick, who is also
president of Cable Bahamas’
largest shareholder, Columbus
Communications, said the orig-
inal “commitment” by his pre-
decessors - Philip Keeping and
his group - to spend $20 million
on building a cable television
network in the Bahamas had
“mushroomed into” a $180 mil-
lion investment by year-end
2006.

Referring to the OECD study
on broadband Internet pene-

Cable chief says
nation 65% better
than OECD leader,

his company having

dramaticlly reduced

Internet connectivity
costs

tration rates per 100 people, Mr
Paddick told Bahamian busi-
ness executives attending the
Canada-Bahamas Business
Council’s launch that the
reseasrch found Denmark was
the leader with a 29 people per
100 access rate.

Denmark was closely fol-
lowed by the Netherlands, with

SEE page 11B

Tremblay pleads guilty
to laundering $220,000

THE. former, head of a
~ Bahamas-based financial ser-
vices provider was yesterday
sentenced to four years in
prison by a US judge after
pleading guilty to laundering
$220,000 in alleged drug traf-
ficking proceeds in a Drug
Enforcement Agency (DEA)
sting operation.

Martin Tremblay, 44, the
president and managing. direc-
tor of Nassau-based Dominion
Investments, was sentenced by
US District Judge John Keenan.
The judge said Tremblay would
be credited with the 14 months
he has already spent in prison,
and the sentence was two years
less than the term called for
under federal sentencing guide-
lines.

"I'm sorry," Mr Tremblay
said in the Manhattan court-
room just before he was sen-
tenced. "I apologise to my fam-
ily and the court. I just ask for
forgiveness."

Mr Tremblay’s agreement to
plea guilty saw the US authori-
ties drop more serious charges
that he laundered $1 billion in
drug and other illegal monies
via his firm's bank accounts.

He pleaded guilty to one

US judge sentences him
to four years in prison

count of money laundering
resulting from a sting operation
mounted by undercover US
Drug Enforcement Adminis-
tration (DEA) agents and other
federal agencies.

Mr Tremblay had previously
pleaded guilty to allegations
that on March 19, 2005, he met
with the undercover DEA
agents in Manhattan to discuss
laundering funds derived from
fictitious drug sales.

At the meeting, he was
alleged to have agreed to laun-
der the proceeds from the drug
operation run by the DEA

' agents.

On May 3, 2005, and again
on October 5 and October 26,
2005, following instructions
from Mr Tremblay, a total of
$220,000 was allegedly wire
transferred to Dominion Invest-
ments-related accounts in con-
nection with the March 19,
2005, agreement.

SEE page 10B

Abaco Markets sells
Turks store in $2.7m deal

ABACO Markets last night ,

announced another step
towards the completion of its
divestment programme had
been concluded with the sale of
its Turks & Caicos-based Cost
Right store for $2.7 million, a
deal that will bring it close to
“completely eliminating” its
bank debt.

The purchaser is Entervant
Holdings (TCI) Ltd, a Turks &
Caicos company, which will pay
Abaco Markets $2.5 million
upfront in cash, with the
remaining $200,000 payable
over a three-year period.

The purchase price will be
paid in US dollars, and used to
repay the BISX-listed retailer’s
US dollar debts, in addition to
financing the refurbishment of
its Cedar Street store and inven-
tory needed for Cost Right
Freeport’s relocation.

The latest development fol-
lows on closely from Abaco
Markets’ decision to dispose of
its minority $2.5 million invest-
ment in BSL Holdings, the buy-
out group that acquired the
majority 78 per cent stake in
Bahamas Supermarkets from
Winn-Dixie last year.

Gavin Watchorn, Abaco

Sale and BSL Holdings
disposal to ‘completely
eliminate’ bank debt

Markets’ president, said on the
Turks & Caicos sale in a state-
ment: “This agreement is anoth-
er important step in our core

‘market strategy to fully realise

our turnaround.

“The proceeds from both this
transaction and the sale of the
group’s BSL investment,
expected at the end of this
month, will completely elimi-
nate the bank debt that has sig-
nificantly impacted our results
in recent years.

“This allows us to reallocate
key resources, both in terms of
capital and personnel, to our
core markets.”

Abaco Markets had recently
improved cash flow and
reduced its Royal Bank of
Canada debt to just $3.4 mil-
lion through the $4.2 million
sale of its former Solomon's
SuperCentre property in
Freeport.

The Cedar Street property's

SEE page 9B

may harm resort projects

Realtors fear pre-sales may be hit, while some say they have no incentive
to market properties as developers cut commissions by five per cent

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

ahamian realtors

yesterday expressed

concern that the

slowing US econo-
my and stock market uneasi-
ness might negatively impact
demand for high-priced second
homes in the Bahamas, some-
thing that could have a knock-
on effect on tourism-related for-
eign direct investment projects
depending on land and proper-
ty pre-sales to finance their
developments.

Mike Lightbourn, head of
Coldwell Banker Lightbourn
Realty, told The Tribune that
while he remained optimistic,

the potential slowing of the US
economy - with concerns being
expressed over the state of its
housing and mortgage market
- had “got” to have an impact
on demand for Bahamian real
estate by high net worth indi-
viduals over time.

“Obviously, there aren’t as
many high-end buyers out there
as there were a year ago, and I
just don’t want these projects
to get started and then be left
dead in the water, which is what
might happen to some of them,”
Mr Lightbourn told The Tri-
bune.

Most foreign investment pro-
jects currently underway or
being planned in the Bahamas
are for mixed-use resorts, which
often involve a small, boutique
hotel that is accompanied by

other residential options, such
as condos, fractional ownership,
timeshares and dockominiums.

To minimise their risk and
financial exposure, many for-
eign investors and developers
have moved away from the cap-
ital-intensive, older model of
constructing a hotel for tran-
sient visitors in favour of devel-
opments that involve some form
of visitor ownership.

From land, lot and real estate
pre-sales to this wealthly client
base, the developers generate
the capital and cash flow
required to finance their pro-
jects. Yet a downturn in the US
economy, especially if it impacts
real estate or people with assets
heavily linked to stock market
performance, could reduce the
demand for Bahanfian real

estate, hurting sales at invest-
ment projects and impacting
their financing plans.

Another Bahamian realtor,
who requested anonymity, said
the US real estate market was
down slightly, something that
could very well have impact the
market in the Bahamas.

“Tt may be a little too early to
tell just what type of impact this
could have,” he said.

Another problem US devel-
opers in the Bahamas could face
is a lack of support from
Bahamian realtors to market
their investments.

“A large problem is that
some US developers are trying
to shut out the Bahamian real-

SEE page 8B

EU deal to cost Bahamas $5-$10m in taxes, not $14m

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor

THE Bahamas is likely
to lose between $5 mil-
lion to $10 million in per
annum tax revenues,
“rather than the $14 mil-
lion originally thought”,
as a result of deciding to
negotiate the Economic
Partnership Agreement
(EPA) through CARI-
FORUM, the minister of
foreign affairs said yesterday.

Fred Mitchell told members of the
‘Bahamian business community, who were
attending the launch of the Canada-
Bahamas Business Council, that all region-
al trade agreements the Bahamas was par-
ty to - the EPA, the Caribbean Basin Ini-





@ MITCHELL

(WTO) rules.

“All of these [agreements] are presently
in danger of running afoul of WTO rules,”
Mr Mitchell said........

“On all fronts, the countries of this region
are facing changes in the terms of trade,
changing to a reciprocal regime, not a one-
way preferential regime. :

“The Bahamas will have to grapple with

tiative (CBI) with the US, and Caribcan .
with Canada - were under pressure because
they violated World Trade Organisation

Minister says nation will ‘have to take the hard decisions’ on all
trade agreements, with US deal also threatened in WTO
— * ‘Resentment’ among Bahamians as lack
of skills causes ‘oppotunities to pass by’

these issues and take the hard decisions on
the way forward on integration with the
world economy.” ;

The minister of foreign affairs said the

Cabinet had given approval to the creation
of a Department of Foreign Trade, which
would help the Government to negotiate
the multitude of trade arrangements it was
now faced with. Staff recruitment for the

SEE page 7B


PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007









MARK A TURNQUEST /

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THE TRIBUNE

Bahamas urged to
free-up telecoms

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

able Bahamas’ chair-

( man yesterday urged
the Bahamas to learn

from the likes of Jamaica and

-Trinidad and liberalise its

telecommunications industry,
as this nation has “probably
the most closed market in the
region”.

Brendan Paddick, who is
also president of Columbus
Communications, the largest
shareholder in BISX-listed
Cable Bahamas with a 30 per
cent stake, said Jamaica and
Trinidad were among the
world’s most liberalised tele-
coms markets, competition
delivering better prices, more
choice and service quality to
consumers in those nations.

He added that in Trinidad, a
nation where Columbus Com-
munications also operates, reg-
ulators there did not issue
licences telling operators what
they could or could not do, but
instead allowed them to offer
any telecoms service to any
customer in that nation.

As a result, Trinidad had
one of the highest cellular
phone penetration rates in the
world.

Mr Paddick said: “It’s hope-
fully something ‘that will come]
through to the Bahamas some

day. The Bahamas is probably

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
eat eS



Â¥

Model

Cable chair says nation has
“probably the most closed market in
the region’; should follow Jamaica
and Trinidad’s lead

the most closed market in the
region.”

This is an environment com-
pletely at odds with the
Bahamas’ image as a major
tourism and international
financial services industry, and
a country hoping to establish
itself as an e-commerce base.

Yet while it has been talk-
ing liberalisation on one side,
to preserve the Bahamas
Telecommunications Compa-
ny’s (BTC) value for possible
privatisation, the Government
has minimised and restricted
the competition offered by oth-
er private providers such as
Systems Resource Group
(SRG).

BTC retains a monopoly in
cellular provision, while Cable
Bahamas enjoys a similar situ-
ation - for the moment - in
cable television. “We'd give it
up tomorrow for that kind of
model,” Mr Paddick said of
Cable’s cable TV monopoly,
to some chuckles in the audi-
ence at the launch of the Cana-
da-Bahamas Business Council.
“It’s an open invitation.”

Mr Paddick said Columbus
Communications’ philosophy
was that those who worked for
its companies needed to live
in the countries the operations
were based in.

Cf 1100 employees across
the Caribbean, only 36 were
on work permits, he said, with
Cable Bahamas only having 11
work permits out of some 300

staff.

Mr Paddick said that one
issue he felt was holding devel-
opment in the Bahamas back
was that this nation appeared
to be afraid of taking risk and
facing failure, attempting to
get everything right before
something was launched.

“One of the things I can see
holding the Bahamas back is
that you want to get everything
perfect, when perfect’s not
there,” Mr Paddick said. If it
was not right when launched,
there was always room to take
decisions that would get it
right.

Columbus Communications’
strategy for the wider
Caribbean, Mr Paddick said,
was to build on the successful
model it had established in the
Bahamas, targeting high-
growth opportunities in Eng-
lish-speaking nations where it
could exploit the “triple-play”
of voice, cable and Internet
services.

Its systems were designed to
cover entire countries, and par-
ticipating in telecoms liberali-
sation and offering a viable
alternative to incumbents were
also on the agenda.

Columbus Communications,
which was formed in autumn
2004, has some $850 million in
assets and planning “a very
aggressive capital expenditure”
that will see it spend $600 mil-
lion on a network roll-out
between 2005-2008, “a good —
piece of which’is in the -
Bahamas”.

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THE MARKETS

STOCKS, MUTUAL FUNDS, 5-6B

DOW 30 12,133.40 +57.44 AA
S&P 5CO 1,387.17 +9.22 AX
NASDAQ 2,371.74 421.17 Aw
10-YR NOTE 454 +05 A
CRUDE OIL 58.16 +23 AR

Stocks
bounce
back
despite
concerns

BY TIM PARADIS
Associated Press

NEW YORK — Wall Street
gyrated and then steadied itself
Wednesday, closing with a
respectable advance although
the Dow Jones industrials fell as
much as 136 points and briefly
dropped below the 12,000 mark
before recovering.

Stocks bounced back and
forth a day after concerns about
faltering subprime mortgage
lenders sparked a broad selloff.
H&R Block had added to Wall
Street’s uneasiness by announc-
ing after the closing bell Tues-
day its fiscal third-quarter
losses would rise because of a
$29 million writedown at its
mortgage arm.

The anxiety over mortgage
lenders, particularly the sub-
prime lenders that make loans
to people with poor credit,
pushed the Dow down by more
than 240 points Tuesday, its
second-biggest drop in nearly
four years, Such concerns jos-
tled stocks for much of
Wednesday’s session.

“I think the market got below
12,000 and buyers came in,” said
Todd Leone, managing director
of equity trading at Cowen &
Co.

The Dow rose 57.44, or 0.48
percent, to 12,133.40. ;

The Dow first climbed above
the 12,000 level on Oct. 18, after
a meandering, 7 1/2 year jour-
ney from the 11,000 mark. Dur-
ing that time, Wall Street dealt
with the dot-com bust, reces-
sion and the aftermath of the
2001 terror attacks. Tuesday’s
drop echoed a 416-point drop in
the Dow.seen two weeks ago
that began in part after a nearly.
9 percent drop in stocks in
Shanghai and amid concerns
about subprime mortgages.

Broader stock indicators also
rose Wednesday. The Standard
& Poor’s 500 index advanced
9.22, or 0.67 percent, to 1,387.17,
and the Nasdaq composite
index rose 21.17, or 0.90 percent,
to 2,371.74.

Bonds fell as stocks bandied
about; the yield on the bench-
mark 10-year Treasury note
rose to 4.52 percent from 4.50
percent late Tuesday. Gold
prices fell.

Light sweet crude settled up
23 cents at $58.16 per barrel on
the New York Mercantile
Exchange.

“I think people right now
don’t know what to make of this
market,” said Larry Peruzzi,
senior equity trader at The Bos-
ton Company Asset Manage-
ment. “You look like a hero
right now if you bought when
the Dow was down 120 points
and if you sold you look like a
goat.”

Wall Street’s turbulence
came as stocks in Europe closed
sharply lower, apparently see-
ing little room for optimism
U.S. markets would rebound.
Britain’s FTSE 100 fell 2.61 per-
cent, Germany’s DAX index lost
2.66 percent, and France’s
CAC-40 fell 2.52 percent.
Japan’s Nikkei stock average
closed down 2.92 percent, while
Hong Kong’s Hang Sang index
fell 2.57 percent and the some-
times volatile Shanghai Com-
posite Index fell 1.97 percent.

The dollar, which was mixed
against other major currencies,
rose against the yen. Some
observers have fingered the
ascendent yen with contribut-
ing to the volatility seen in
recent weeks on Wall Street.

RE

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ECONOMY

THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

3B

POSS NA AMAA A ARE UM AR UALS SSCA SAAALCQSAS LSS OMA BML! SEE IAL OME DOMME: AE iOS AOR AE USSGLEESESNCA Nib EGOS SOMBRE

Trade deficit hits record high

@ Marking the fifth straight year
the trade deficit set a record, the
account jumped to $856.7 billion.

BY MARTIN CRUTSINGER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The deficit in
the broadest measure of trade hit an
all-time high in 2006 and for the first
time the United States even ran a def-
icit on investment income.

The Commerce Department
reported that the imbalance in the
current account jumped by 8.2 per-



BETTER SALES: Worldwide, General Motors said it cut structural costs by $6.8 billion last year due
mainly to buyouts and early retirement offers accepted by more than 34,000 hourly workers.
Above, the company sign hangs in front of a storage lot filled with 2007 cars and trucks ata

cent to $856.7 billion, representing a
record 6.5 percent of the total econ-
omy. It marked the fifth straight year
the current account deficit set a
record.

Investment flows turned negative
by $7.3 billion from’a surplus of $11.3
billion in 2005. It was the first time
investment income has been negative
on records going back to 1929, That
means foreigners earned more on
their U.S. holdings than Americans
earned on their overseas invest-
ments.

AUTOMOTIVE



' Chevrolet dealership in Lone Tree, Colo.

It’s good



a 4th-quarter profit

@ General Motors reported net income of

$950 million in the fourth quarter. The firm made
its second quarterly profit in two years, on
increased auto sales and reduced labor costs.

BY TOM-KRISHER
Assbciated Press

DETROIT — General Motors accomplished some-
thing in the fourth quarter of 2006 that domestic auto-
makers have been unable to do for some time: it

reported a profit.

Now comes the hard part — repeating that success.
The company’s chief financial officer stopped short of
promising it this year, but he did pledge continued
improvement over last year’s numbers.

For the quarter, the world’s biggest automaker on
Wednesday reported net income of $950 million due to
the benefits of cost cuts, higher automotive revenues
and a gain on the sale of its finance division. It was a
turnaround from a $6.6 billion loss in the same period a

year ago.

GM, which is undergoing a massive overhaul that
includes shedding thousands of jobs and closing plants
to become more competitive with Asian automakers | |
such as Toyota Motor, wound up with a loss of $2 bil-
lion for all of 2006 compared with a restated loss of

$10.4 billion in 2005.

Chief Financial Officer Fritz Henderson said despite
the fourth-quarter profit, no one at GM is declaring
victory over the company’s financial woes.

He would say only that he expects GM’s year-over-
year performance to improve in 2007, and he would

slo we

not predict whether the company would continue to be

profitable through the year.

“The objective is to build a successful and profitable
enterprise going forward,” he told reporters Wednes-
day after the earnings report was released.

The positive fourth-quarter results included

*TURN TO GM

COMPUTER MAKER

quarter.

new for GM:

While the U.S. has run deficits in
its trade in goods every year since
1976, until last year it had still been
able to record a surplus in invest-
ments.

Analysts said that figure turned
negative because of the large amount
of U.S. assets that have been trans-

ferred to foreign hands over the past .

three decades to pay for the imported
cars, clothing and electronic goods
American consumers love to buy.
The Bush administration contends
the large foreign holdings of U.S.

DAVID ZALUBOWSKI/AP



CARLOS OSORIO/AP

APPEAL: Detailer Michael Dean shines up a tire
on a Chevrolet truck on display at General
Motors World Headquarters at the Renaissance
Center in Detroit. The company said it made
$228 million selling cars and trucks for the



assets are a sign of strength. But
many economists worry that foreign-
ers might suddenly decide they want
to hold less in U.S. stocks, bonds and
other assets.

A rapid withdrawal could cause
the value of the dollar against other
currencies, as well as U.S. stock
prices, to plunge while pushing inter-
est rates higher. If the disruption
were serious enough, it could push
the country into a recession.

* TURN TO DEFICIT

INVESTMENTS

Mutual
funds may
sidestep
some
fallout

@ Experts say diversified mutual
funds should offer investors some
protection from trouble among
subprime lenders.

BY TIM PARADIS
Associated Press

NEW YORK — Investors fishing
mutual fund statements from the
mailbox might take a look at their
neighbors’ homes and wonder
whether any will cost them money.

Mounting difficulties among lend-
ers that originate mortgages for peo-
ple with poor credit have drawn con-
cern on Wall Street and provided
fodder for alarming headlines about
mortgage defaults. But many mutual
funds might have shied from invest-
ing in the lenders because small mar-
ket capitalizations can make it diffi-
cult for a mutual fund to park a
decent amount of money in such

. companies. Plus, most mutual funds

rely on diversity to help reduce risks
from such blowups.

If companies such as New Century
Financial and Accredited Home
Lenders Holding were to go under
because of a rise in mortgage
defaults, questions will inevitably
arise about the financial fallout.
Experts say properly diversified
mutual funds should offer some pro-
tection from trouble among so-called
subprime lenders.

“Diversity is what saves you from
an event like this,” said Jeff Tjorne-
hoj, a senior analyst at Lipper, which
tracks mutual funds. He noted it is
too soon to tell whether some funds
might have dropped their invest-
ments in the space before the stocks
began to fall sharply in recent weeks.

“Some of the worst offenders
among subprime lenders were gener-
ally not considered sizable holdings,”
he said.

Harry Clark, president of Clark
Capital Management in Philadelphia,
said many funds would have already
avoided subprime lenders.

“A lot of funds have pieces of
them,” he said, “but I don’t think a lot
of funds have big chunks of them
because they’re pretty risky to start
with.”

Tjornehoj contends most mutual
fund investors shouldn’t worry
unless they were in a specific sector
fund, such as the Fidelity Select
Home Finance Fund, which is down

*TURN TO MUTUALS

Case dismissed against former HP chairwoman

@ Former Hewlett-Packard
Chairwoman Patricia Dunn, fired
after disclosure of boardroom
spying, had charges related to
the scandal dismissed by a
California judge.

BY JORDAN ROBERTSON
Associated Press
SAN JOSE, Calif. — A judge
dropped all charges against former
Hewlett-Packard board Chairwoman
Patricia Dunn, who was accused of
fraud in the boardroom spying
scheme that rocked one of Silicon
Valley’s most respected companies.
Three other defendants in the case
also will avoid jail time after their
lawyers entered no contest pleas



Wednesday to misdemeanor charges
of fraudulent wire communications
in Santa Clara Superior Court.
Judge Ray E. Cunning-
ham did not immediately
accept the pleas by former
HP ethics chief Kevin Hun-
saker, and private investiga- [e¥,
tors Ronald DeLia and'‘Mat- |
thew DePante, and said the
charges against them will
also be dropped in Septem- |
ber after they complete 96
hours of community service
and make restitution.
‘State prosecutors
announced earlier Wednesday that
Dunn and the three other defendants
had agreed to plead guilty to reduced

DUNN



charges and that Dunn would be
spared community service because of
her health. She revealed last year that
she was being treated for
advanced ovarian cancer.

But the office of Attorney
General Jerry Brown later
said that release was incor-
rect. Lawyers for Dunn and
the other defendants said
deal with the state called for
Dunn’s case to be dismissed.

“This is a vindication of
Patty Dunn in every sense of
the word,” said her lawyer,
James Brosnahan. “It shows
what she’s maintained throughout:
that she’s innocent of these charges.”

_ The four were initially charged in

TRS RAPIELT SETS UOTE AS

October with four felony counts: use
of false or fraudulent pretenses to
obtain confidential information from
a public utility; unauthorized access
to computer data; identity theft; and
conspiracy to commit each of those
crimes.

Each of those charges carried a
fine of up to $10,000 and three years
in prison.

While the deal with state prosecu-
tors allows all four defendants to
escape jail time, federal prosecutors
have said their investigation of the
HP leaks probe is ongoing.

“The guilty pleas offered today
will not prevent federal prosecutors

* TURN TO HP

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4B | THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

TECHNOLOGY

__ INTERNATIONAL EDITION

MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

Trade fair still draws crowd, but rivalry strong

BY PETER ZSCHUNKE
Associated Press

HANOVER, Germany —
Hundreds of thousands of
high-tech professionals are
streaming to the annual CeBIT
show this week, but the
world’s biggest information
technology trade fair is not the
draw it used to be.

Some of the industry’s big-
gest names — Apple, Hewlett-
Packard and Cisco Systems —
have all withdrawn from
CeBIT, and this year’s event is
going on without Motorola,
Nokia, Seiko Epson, Symantec
and China’s Lenovo.

Since 2001, when 850,000
visitors crowded the halls to
get a first glance at upcomil
technologies, the number co.
visitors has decreased almost
by half. Six years ago more
than 8,100 exhibitors came;
this year there will be 6,059
companies from 77 countries
on hand, 195 of them from the
United States.

GM
reports
higher
earnings

°GM

$770 million in special items
attributed mainly to the sale
of a 51 percent stake in GM’s
financial arm, General Motors
Acceptance, to an investment
group led by Cerberus Capital
Management.

But GM said it would have
made $180 million in the quar-
ter without the GMAC pro-
ceeds and other items.

Henderson said GM’s auto-
motive operations performed
better than expected for the

-quarter with increased reve-

nue in North America due to

higher transaction prices and. |
higher sales volumes and rev-"

enues overseas.

Worldwide, the company
said it made $228 million sell-
ing cars and trucks for the

‘quarter and $422 million for

the calendar year.

Its North American auto-
motive operations lost $14
million for the quarter and
$779 million for the year, but
the annual figures were $5 bil-
lion better than the previous
year, Henderson said.

The company also cut
structural costs by $6.8 billion
last year due mainly to buy-
outs and early retirement
offers accepted by more than
34,000 hourly workers.

It expects to reap the
results of $9 billion in cost
cuts this year.

But GM still is losing
money in North America and
has $47.4 billion in employee
healthcare and other long-
term liabilities, as well as
other challenges that will
have to be addressed in con-
tract talks this year with the
United Auto Workers, Hen-
derson said.

He would not answer ques-
tions about what GM would
seek in the bargaining.

INVESTMENTS

“It is not the number of
halls which is relevant to us
but the number of solutions
presented here,” said Ernst
Raue, a manager with
Deutsche Messe, which is
organizing the event that for-
mally opens its doors today.

After all, he said, the prod-
ucts designed and manufac-
tured by technology compa-
nies have become smaller —
but that is not the reason for
CeBIT’s decline. Instead, the
trade fair has outgrown itself,
he said. Ten years ago, it was
possible to get a general idea
of all IT trends at the show,
whether they were chip-mak-
ing advances or the latest in

~~ ‘cations. :

OTHEn. «..- ITS

But CeBIT is now in com-
petition with other, more spe-
cific marquee events such as
the annual International Con-
sumer Electronics Show in Las
Vegas and the 3GSM wireless

industry trade fair, held last
month in Barcelona, Spain.
In Germany, the annual



FABIAN BIMMER/AP
A SNEAK PEAK: Employees walk by the IBM booth at the
CeBIT fair on Wednesday in Hanover, Germany. The
biggest fair of its kind will open to the public today.

Internationale Funkausstel-
lung in Berlin is a competitor,
and the Games Convention in

EEL?

ULES



JUSTIN SULLIVAN/AFP-GETTY IMAGES

AT ALOSS: General Motors is losing money in North America and has $47.4 billion in
employee healthcare and other long-term liabilities. Above, new Chevrolet trucks are
displayed at the F.H. Dailey dealership in San Leandro, Calif.

GM also said it had a year-
end cash balance of $26.4 bil-
lion.

“We still expect to have
negative cash flow in 2007,”
Henderson said.

GM’s fourth-quarter profit
amounted to $1.68 per share
with special items, and 32
cents per share without them.
Without the GMAC sale pro-
ceeds, GM fell short of Wall
Street expectations for the
quarter.

A dozen analysts surveyed
by Thomson Financial pre-
dicted earnings of $1.19 per
share, excluding special
items.

NUMBERS FALL SHORT

For the year, GM’s loss
amounted to $3.50 per share
including special items and
$3.88 per share without them.
Excluding special items, GM

also fell short of Wall Street
expectations for the year.

Ten analysts polled by
Thomson Financial predicted
a profit of $4.39 per share
excluding the special items.

GWM’s financial results were
delayed by accounting trou-
bles and last year’s sale of the
GMAC stake.

Overall, its revenue for the
quarter declined to $51.2 bil-
lion from $51.7 billion in the
last quarter of 2005.

GMAC REVENUE

GM attributed the decline
to the exclusion of GMAC
revenue starting Dec. 1.

The company also took a
$284 million loss from GMAC
to its bottom line in the fourth
quarter due mainly to prob-
lems with GMAC’s residential
mortgage division.

Also Wednesday, GM said

that as part of the GMAC sale,
it will pay $1 billion to GMAC
by the end of the month to
bring up its equity to where it
was on Nov. 30 when the deal
closed. The payment is neces-
sary because of deterioration
in GMAC’s residential mort-
gage results due in large part
to subprime loans, and earn-
ings restatements by GMAC,
GM said.

GM also said it would
restate its net earnings from
the first three quarters of
2006 back through calendar
year 2002 due to the account-
ing problems.

The changes ranged from
an 8.7 percent decrease in
2003 to a 10.2 percent increase
in 2002. GM shares fell 26
cents to close at $30.25 on the
New York Stock Exchange.

They have traded in a 52-
week range of $19 to $37.24.

Mutual funds may sidestep some fallout

*MUTUALS

about 5.7 percent so far this
year.

“It’s extremely sector spe-
cific. It’s almost like you’re
overweighting in subsectors,”
Tjornehoj said. “If you are
that invested into a sector you
darn well better keep your
eye on the ball at all times.”

Andrew Gunter, an analyst
at investment research pro-
vider at Morningstar, notes
some funds might suffer tem-
porary hits because some
investors have rushed to sell
stocks of a wide range of lend-
ers and even of homebuilders.

“It might be a case of
throwing out the baby with
the bath water. Their worries
about subprime lenders might
have been overblown.”

Guater noted, for example,
that the FBR Small Cap Finan-
cial Fund is a good fund that

has struggled within its spe-
cialty financial category this
year. However, he encourages
investors to take a longer-
term view.

“He focuses on regional
lenders,” Gunter said of port-
folio manager David Ellison.
“He pays attention to how
risky or nonrisky an institu-
tion’s loans are. He takes care
not get burned by something
like a New Century Finan-
cial.”

So far this year, the fund is
down 6.88 percent, though its
three-year annualized return
is 3.87 percent and its five-
year annualized return is 12.91
percent.

“This is the kind of thing
that happens with an indus-
try-specific fund. It can be
subject to the whim of what’s
out there. It can get clobbered
because it’s not diversified,”
Gunter said.

He noted that even some
large-capitalization funds
could face “a lot” of exposure
to larger financials whose
shares might fall as investors
face jitters over the lending
industry in general.

Tjornehoj noted that funds
that hold big lenders like
HSBC Holdings PLC could
suffer. Europe’s largest bank
and a large presence in the

U.S. mortgage market last -

month alarmed investors with
the disclosure it will need
about $10.6 billion to cover
soured loans. Tjornehoj noted
that the Fidelity China Region
Fund last year held about an 11
stake in HSBC, which has long
had a presence in Asia.

The fund is down about 2
percent for the year but up
16.2 percent on a three-year
annualized basis and 14.4 per-
cent on a five-year annualized
basis.

_ business

Some funds have concen-
trations in companies that
only draw a small part of their
from subprime
loans. For example, several
Weitz Partners funds ended
2006 with stakes of more than
5 percent in Countrywide
Financial Corp., whose stock
is down about 17 percent for
the year,.even though sub-
prime loans don’t make up the
biggest part of its business.

Several of the Weitz Part-
ners funds are down more
than 1] percent for the year.

“I don’t think we’re going
to have a lot of handwriting
among investors over the sub-
prime lenders,” Tjornehoj
said. “It’s just not an area of
the economy that’s going to
blow up in terms that we
might describe as Enron-like.
The worst offenders will not
be missed and the big banks
are not set to fail.”



Leipzig has been successful
since its inception in 2002.

CeBIT still blends a bit of
everything, from consumer
products to the latest in back-
end servers, said Willi Ber-
chtold, the president of Bit-
kom, Germany’s IT associa-
tion.

“Nowhere else can innova-
tions be seen in such diver-
sity,” he said. “Converging
technologies require a large
platform and this platform def-
initely exists only in one place
in the world: here in Hanover.”

Some of the key items on
display this year focus on geo-

graphical information systems, .

or GIS, the European counter-
part to the more common, and
U.S.-operated global position-
ing system for satellite naviga-
tion.

RUSSIAN INFLUENCE

Russia is also a major topic
and CeBIT has made it the
fair’s partner country.

ECONOMY

Since 2000, the volume of
Russian software exports has
increased by more than six.
times to $1.8 billion in 2006,
Russian Information Technol-
ogy Minister Leonid Reiman
said in a statement.

About 150 Russian exhibi-
tors are showing off their
products and skills at CeBIT,
despite the country’s reputa-
tion as a haven for hackers.

CeBIT organizers have
moved to keep the event rele-
vant and plan to shorten it
from seven days to six starting
next year. It will also focus
more on the professional seg-
ment, or businesses, instead of
catering to hobbyists and the
merely interested, Raue said.

And while some of the
industry’s top players are
gone, others still view CeBIT
as a “good barometer for the
economic situation and the
general feeling on the market,”
said Volker Smid, European
chief of software firm Novell.

Trade deficit reaches
a record high in 2006

° DEFICIT

“The hope is that the tran-
sition to a lower current
account deficit goes
smoothly, but the danger is
that people stop loaning us
money before they start buy-
ing our goods,” said David
Wyss, chief economist at
Standard & Poor’s in New
York. The current-account is
the broadest measure of trade
because it covers not only
trade in goods and services
but also investment flows
between countries. It also
represents the amount of U.S.
assets that have been trans-
ferred into foreign hands to
cover the gap between Ameri-
can exports and imports.

Democrats say the current
account deficit illustrates that
America’s ‘control ‘over its
economic destiny is being

‘transferred to countries like

China and Japan that hold siz-
able amounts of U.S. govern-
ment bonds and other assets.

“Our economic security
should not be in the hands of
China or Saudi Arabia or any
other entity because this
administration can’t control
government spending and
because they haven’t effec-
tively negotiated trade deals
around the world,” said Sen.
Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., a
leading critic of President
Bush’s trade policies.

The new report indicated
the current account deficit for
the final three months of this

COMPUTER MAKER

year did show improvement,
dropping by 14.6 percent to
$195.8 billion after hitting a
record of $229.4 billion in the
third quarter. The improve-
ment reflected a big drop in
oil prices from their record
highs this summer.

Despite five straight years
of the current account deficit
hitting new records, econo-
mists said there were signs
the imbalance may narrow a
bit this year. Economist Nigel
Gault with Global Insight pre-
dicted the 2007 current
account deficit would shrink
slightly to $807 billion, the
first decline since 2001.

A deficit of $856.7 billion in
2006 meant the U.S. was
transferring more than $2 bil-
lion daily to foreigners last
year to finance the trade gap.

For all of 2006, the United
States hada goods deficit of
$836 billion, a surplus in ser-
vices of $70.7 billion and a
deficit in investment flows of
$7.3 billion. In addition, the
government paid out $84.1 bil-
lion in a category known as
unilateral transfers, which
covers foreign aid.

The report also showed
that foreign direct investment
to buy or expand companies
in the United States jumped
67 percent to $183.6 billion
last year, the highest level in
six years. This increase came
in spite of the controversy
over efforts by Dubai Ports
World to take over operations
at several U.S. ports.

Charges are dropped
against ex-HP exec

*HP

from filing criminal charges
against Hunsaker, DeLia or
DePante — if they so choose,”
the attorney general’s office
said in its statement.

Dunn, Hunsaker, DeLia
and Depante did not attend
Wednesday’s hearing.

A fifth defendant, private
investigator Bryan Wagner,
was also charged by the state
in October. But the state’s
case against him was dropped
after Wagner pleaded guilty
to the same charges in federal
court and agreed to testify for
the prosecution.

No other federal charges
have been filed in connection
with HP’s effort to spy on its
own board members.

The boardroom scandal
shook Hewlett-Packard, with
Dunn stepping down as chair-
woman and several other top
executives resigning over

their roles in the subterfuge.

HP’s investigation, which
took place in 2005 and 2006,
erupted into a national scan-
dal after HP disclosed that the
detectives it hired had
obtained the private phone
records of directors, employ-
ees and journalists in an effort
to ferret out the source of
media leaks.

Using a shady tactic known
as “pretexting,” the detectives
obtained the Social Security
numbers of their targets and
fooled telephone companies
into divulging their detailed
call logs.

Shares of the region’s old-
est and biggest technology
company were unscathed by
the scandal, as the stock price
steadily rose through much of
last year.

HP’s stock was up 15 cents,
to $39.70, in afternoon trading
Wednesday on the New York
Stock Exchange.

LATE TRADING _





4pm. 6:35 p.m. Late 4 pay 6:35 p.m. Late
Stock Thr, lose close Chg. volume | Stock Tkr. close close_—Chg._-volume
Domtarg — UFS 9.50 9.50 ‘ 92931 Annaly NLY 13.80 1380 * 20114
CaremkRx CMX 61.08 61.08 * 72290 Weyerh wy 78.83 7883 ° 18605
Altria MO 83.90 84.00 +.10 67408 BrcdeCm BRCD 9.80 9.82 +.02 17494
Nasdl00Tr QQQQ 42.99 42.99 * 44918 | FordM F 751 752 +01 16626
SPOR SPY 139.28 139.28 * 32145 | ishemMkt EM = 110.37. 110.37 * 15209

OilSVHT OlH 139.26 139.37. +.11 30276
SP Engy XLE 57.20 57.20 . 27358
WalMart WMT 45.73 45.73 5 26163
Qwesttm Q 8.57 8.57 : 22990
ClearChan CCU 35.02 35.02 = 21985
DollarG 0G 21.01 21.01 : 20902
Hallibtnss = HAL 31.83 31.83 : 20794
Alcatelluc = ALU 11.93 11.62 “31 20420

RetailHT RTH 99.10 99.00 10 15000
Tyson TSN 18.00 18.00 ° 14664
iSHR2K nya IWM 77.25 75.65 “1.60 13513
Microsoft MSFT 27.40 27.40 a 13429
Motorola MOT 18.40 18.44 +.04 13055
Starbucks — SBUX 29.32 29.32 . 12298
OnSmend ONNN — 10.04 10.04 ‘ 10174





"For up-to-date stock quotes, go to www.MiamiHerald.com and click on Business
THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 5B

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

MUST SELL. eer

MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES
| ELEUTHERA - LOT NO. 14B & 7B, PALMETTO POINT

All that piece parcel or lot of land and improvement comprising of 20,355 sq. ft. being Lot #14B and 7B and situated in the Palmetto
Point District of the Island of Eleuthera, Northward of the public road which runs from the Palmetto Point settlement to Savannah
Sound in the coastal area northward of Ingraham’s Pond, and which said piece, parcel or Lot of land and improvements forms a
portion of several parcels of land containing 2.947 acres or thereabouts and which also includes Lot No. 7B. This site encompasses a
2-storey structure comprising 3-bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathorooms, front room, dining room, dining room, family room, utility room, pantry,
kitchen, stairwell, basement, 2-car garage and attic office. The entire house is equipped with central air-conditioning. The upper floor
to the porch area has been converted into a storage and an area for the irrigation system and equipment. There is a pool area at the
rear of this building approximately 537.14 sq. ft. with the garage area approximately 777 sq. ft. This area is complete with all utilities

j and services available.
Appraisal: $513,959.00












LOT NO. 1490 GOLDEN GATES SECTION 2

All that lot of land having an area of 6,000 sq. ft. being lot no. 1490 of the subdivision known and designated as Golden Gates, the —
\ said subdivision situated in the southwestern district of New Providence, bahamas. This property is comprised.of ‘a 25 yer old single:

| family residence consisting of approximately 2,480 sq. ft. of enclosed living space with three bedrooms, three bathrooms, living,
dining rooms and kitchen. The land is on a grade and level, however the site appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the posibility
| of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods of the year. The grounds are fairly kept, ith improvements including driveway, walkway -
and low shrubs. Yard is enclosed on one side wth a 5 foot chain linked fencing and a low cement block wall to the front..

Appraisal: $162,400.00

Traveling west on Carmichael Road turn left then right onto the service road opposite Bahamas Faith Ministries Complex, then first left
again after passing clico and pre-school. The subject house is the 6th house left painted green trimmed white.



LOT NO. 4 GAMBLE HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION

ee| Alll that lot of land having an area of 5,000 sq. ft. being

«| Lot No. 4 of the subdivision known and designated as
Gamble Heights, the said subdivision situated in the
southern district of New Providence Bahamas. Located
on the subject property is a single storey duplex apartment
building containing one 2, and one 1-bedroom apartment
each unit consisting of 1-bath, closets, dining rooms and
kitchen. This building is approximately 2 years old with
an enclosed living space of approximately 1,213 sq. ft.
| the land is one a grade and level; however the site appears
to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility of

LOT NO. 1, BLOCK NO. 45,
ELEUTHERA ISLAND SHORES

All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of 9,644
sq. ft. being lot #1 in block 45, Section “E” in the
subdivision called and known as Eleuthera Island Shores
Subdivision, situated in the vicinity of Hatchet Bay Harbour,
on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahams. This site encompasses
a two storey building which is approximately 14 yrs old

and is abandoned. There is a wooden landing
approximately 7’-4” wide by 20’-0” on the upper level, approximately 1,610 sq. ft. of enclosed living



space, with 3-bedrooms, 2-bathrooms, front room, dining room, den, kitchen, and utility room. The flooding during annual heavy rainy periods of the year.
wooden porch on the upper level is approximately 148sq. ft. There is also a water cistern under the :
dining room floor area. Alll utilities and services available. Appraisal: $143,217.60
Traveling south on Blue Hill Road take the first corner left after passing aed yh Faith United ark Church
teal: and Primary School. This corner is slant and just opposite St Vincent Road, then take second left (paved
Appraisal: $1 51,007.00 road) go all the way to the end around the curve then make a left then first right up the gravel road, all the

. way over the hill. The subject duplex is the 3rd building on the right hand side painted light yellow trimmed
This property is situated in Eleuthera Island Shores. white with high steps in front.



MURPHY TOWN (ABACO)

Lot #60 with a structure, lot size 60 x 115 ft., 6,900 sq. ft., 10
ft., above sea level but below road level and would flood in a
severe hurricane the duplex has dimensions of 60 ft by 30 ft
partly of wood and partly of cement blocks with one section
virtually finished and occupied with blocks up to window level
and floor ready to be poured. The roof is asphalt shingles, the.

DUNDAS TOWN (ABACO)

3 two bed, 1 bath fourplex 9,000 sq. ft., lot no. 18b with an
area for a small shop. Age 12 years the land is a portion of
one of the Dundas Town Crown Allotment parcels stretching
from Forest Drive to Front Street, being just under a quarter

acre in size and on the lowside. A concrete block structure, and | de D ’
with asphalt shingle roof and L-shape in design with a total interior walls and ceiling are of 1x6 pine and the floor of ceramic

length of 70x26 ft, plus 50 x 22 ft., 2,920 sq. ft., the interior tiles. The finished work is average/below, 2 bedrooms, one

walls are concrete blocks, ceiling is sheet rock and the floors a bath, living/dining. The occupied portion of the structure is
of vinyl tiles. not complete. Age: 10 years old.

Appraisal: $265,225.00 Appraisal: $75,660.00





MURPHY TOWN ABACO

Alll that parcel of land having an approximate area of 9,000 sq ft, located on the above mentioned lot is a single family wooden structure, 25ft by 40 ft” —
with asphalt shingled roof. This house is approximately 15 yr old and comprising of 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, living/dining area and kitchen. This house

is in need of some serious repairs. The future life of this house depends on the repairs that will be carried out. Without repairs itis not more than about 5 .~
years. If upgrading and maintenance is carried out it could be longer the land rises above road level, to a height in excess of approximately 15ft above .
sea level, with no likelihood of flooding in a hurricane. ws

Appraisal: $30,000.00 .

This house is located off the main Murphy Town Road about 150 ft to the Northeast of the corner and is painted blue trimmed white. —





LOT NO. 6 BLOCK 13 WOODLAND WAY, WINTON HEIGHTS (NASSAU)

All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of 14,897 sq. ft. being lot 6, block 13, in the Subdivision known as Winton Heights, this property is comprised of a 26 year old
11/2 storey single family resident consisting of approximately 2,567 sq. ft. of enclosed living space with 3 bed rooms, 2 baths, upstairs and downstairs consisting of a foyer,
guest bedroom and bath, laundry room, kitchen, powder room, sunken living area, tv room and dining area. Climate control is provided by wall air conditioning units throughout
the house quality of construction and maintenance is fair as a good amount of remedial work is needed on the roof and plumbing system. The effective age of the building is
} seven years the property is rectangular in shape on flat terrain, and on a level grade slightly elevated above the road to disallow flooding during annual heavy rainy periods. The
| grounds improvements include a concrete wall with two double gates at the front with chain-link fencing otherwise, open patios at the front and back, and a 20,000 gal rainwater
cistern under the front patio overall, the grounds are attractive and well kept.

Appraisal: $385,369.75

Traveling east on Prince Charles Drive go pass Winton Super Value, then second left to T Junction, turn right at T junction and the subject property is the third house right painted
yellow trimmed white.



VACANT PROPERTIES



LOT NO. 10B, PALMETTO POINT
All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land containing 9,000 sq. ft., and being Lot No. 10B situated North of Ingraham’s Pond and Eastwardly of North Palmetto Point, on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas, and is bounded and abutting as follows:- on the north by Lot No. 3B and running thereon for a distance of (90) ft; on the East by Lot No. 11B and running thereon for a distance of (100) ft, on the south by a 20’ wide
road reservation and running thereon (90) ft on the west by Lot No. 9B running thereon for a distance of (100) Ft, the said Lot is overgrown with shrubs and is in close proximity of a white sandy beach. This neighborhood is zoned
residential development and is quiet and peaceful with a topography of approximately 50ft and because of this there is no danger of flooding. The area is approximately 80% developed with all utilities and services available.

APPRAISAL: $72,000.00



MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA

All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land containing 44,714 sq. ft., and designated “E” which forms a portion of land known as “Mutton Fish Point” situated about two miles northwestward of the settlement of Gregory Town on the
island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and is bounded and abutting as follows:- Northwardly by the land now or formerly the property of Coridon Limited, and running thereon for a distance
of 393.13 hundredth ft.; outwardly by a 30’ wide road reservation and running thereon for a distance of 402.57 hundredth ft; eastwardly by the main Queen's Highway and running thereon for a distance of 109.73 hundredth ft;
westwardly by land now or formerly the property of Caridon Limited and running thereon for a distance of 110.75 hundredth ft. this property having an area of approximately 44,714 sq. ft. this neighbourhood is zoned commercial/residential
development and is quiet, peaceful and has a topography of approximately 2 ft. with all utilities and servic~s available.

APPRAISAL: $51,421.00



MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA
All that piece, parcel or tract of land containing 1 acre situated about two miles northwestward of the settlement of Gregory Town on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and is bounded
and abutting as follows:- Northwestwardly by the main Queens Highway and is running thereon for a distance of 125.462 feet northwestwardly by the land now of formerly the property of Coridon Limited, and running thereon for a
distance of 390.274 hundredth ft.; southwestwardly by a 30’ wide road reservation and running thereon for a distance of 128.128 hundredth ft; southeastwardly by the land now or formerly the property of the Venor and running
thereon for a distance of 322.955 hundredth ft. This property having an area of approximately 44,847.76 sq. ft. This neighbourhood is zoned commercial development and is quiet and peaceful with a topography of approximately 2

ft. with all utilities and services available.
APPRAISAL: $51,421.00

This lot is vacant land and is located in the area known as “Mutton Fish Point”



MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA

All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land and improvements containing approximately 44,587 sq. ft. and designated “F” which forms a portion of land known as “Mutton Fish Point” situated about two miles northwestward of the
settlement of Gregory Town on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and bounded and abutting as follows:- Northwardly by the land now or formerly the property of Coridon Limited,
and running thereon for a distance of 383.56 hundredth ft; southwardly by land now of formerly the property of Caridon Limited and running thereon for a distance of 393-19 hundredth ft. eastwardly by the main Queen’s Highway
and running thereon for a distance of 113.40 hundredth ft. westwardly by land now or formerly the property of Coridon Limited and running thereon for a distance of 113.40 hundredth ft. this neighbourhood is zoned commercial/residential
development and is quiet, peaceful and has a topography of approximately 2 ft. with all utilities and services available.

APPRAISAL: $51,276.00

\

- For Pend of sale Pye] ey mE Led Pentel

Philip White @ 502-3077 email philip.white@scotiabank.com or Harry Collie @ 502-3034 © email harry.collie@scotiabank.com * Fax 356-3851



To view properties go to: www.stopnshopbahamas.com - Click on “Real IC) Mall” - Click on doorway “Enter Online Store”

\
PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





NOTICE OF VACANCY

PUBLIC LIBRARIAN

Educational Requirement










Masters degree in Library Science or Library and Information
Science from an accredited college or university





Experience

Five years of experience in Library administration, including
three years of administration and supervisory responsibility.





Functions



The successful candidate will be required to manage and direct
the operations and activities of a public library; develop and
administer library goals, objectives and procedures; monitor
and review new library acquisitions and select and acquire
new librarian materials.







Please submit resume and supporting documentation (o:





P.O. Box F-42666
or
Fax No. 351-6422
Freeport, Grand Bahama






On or before March 23rd, 2007






COMPUTERS LIMITED
Setting the Standard”

sere) oie) gFeU ety to join our Know How Teamâ„¢
as PRODUCT LINE MANAGER for

Canada-Bahamas group
can ‘benefit everyone’ on
merchandise imports

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

A GROUP formed to
enhance trade and investment
links between Canada and the
Bahamas has “the opportunity
to benefit everyone” by help-
ing lo increase the former’s
share of merchandise imports
to this nation above the exist-
ing 2.5-3 per cent, Canada’s
senior trade commissioner said

yesterday.

Russell Merifield, speaking
at the launch of the Canada-
Bahamas Business Council,
told Bahamian business exec-

utives that Canada’s share of

Bahamian merchandise
imports had not improved
since 191, when the then-
Bahamas governor visited his
country to promote trade,
tourism and investment oppor-
tunities in the Bahamas.



M&E Limited



As a privately-owned, mid-sized Bahamian
Company and the authorized Caterpillar dealer
in the Bahamas, we are seeking a Financial
Rental Coordinator. The candidate should
have a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting.

He/She should be knowledgeable in the field’

of Marine Engineering and Inventory Control.
The candidate should be able to develop
inventory systems for rental equipment, be
able to implement a system for service
inventory for rental machines, create a

Back then, Canada’s share
of the Bahamian merchandise
imports market was 2 per cent,
with the US enjoying an 80 per
cent-plus share, and Mr Meri-
field said this had not changed
much.

“T think there is an oppor-
tunity to benefit everyone by
improving this aspect of our
commercial relationship,” Mr
Merifield said.

“What we’re doing is trying
to find new ways to build rela-
tionships.”

The Bahamas has attracted
many Canadian investors, such
as Royal Bank of Canada, Sco-
tiabank, FirstCaribbean Inter-
national Bank (Bahamas), the
YVRAS firm that will take
over management and rede-
velopment of Lynden Pindling
International Airport, the own-
ers of Cable Bahamas and the
Canadian pension fund that
still owns a stake in the British
Colonial Hilton.

Mr Merifield said these and
others were ready to “continue
to build the Bahamas”,
although the investment
approvals and permitting
processes needed to be “quick-
er and simpler”.

Tanya Wright, the Bahamas
Chamer of Commerce’s presi-
dent, said the organisation had
discussed with the Canadian
High Commission, which has
its regional head office in
Jamaica, ways in which the dia-
logue between them on
increasing two-way trade and
investment opportunities “pro-
duces something meaningful;
that there’s a productive end”.

Mrs Wright said the’ Cham-
ber had developed a similar
relationship to the, Canada-
Bahamas Business. Council
with India, and was working
on another with China.

“We are poised to ensure
that every business oppoortu-
nity out there, we will seek
them out and bring them to
you,” Mrs Wright said. “The
partnership could not have
been better made.”

She added that the link-up
with the Canadian High Com-
mission showed “the value of
maintaining the kind of busi-
ness environment that stimu-
lates” interest in the Bahamas
from foreign investors who
could provide spin-off oppor-
tunities for Bahamian busi-

“nesses.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JEANNIE BELIAS OF
FINLAYSON STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
, from the 15th day of March, 2007 to the Minister responsible

maintenance program for company’s rental
fleet, and monitor inventory system levels
among technicians. The candidate should also
have some knowledge about purchasing parts,
inventory, and motors, and be able to
coordinate the delivery of these parts, motors

KONICA MINOLTA

We are looking for a dedicated and enthusiastic
individual committed to the strategic development
of the KONICA MINOLTA brand in The Bahamas.

_ The ideal candidate will be a team player,
goal oriented, professional, with at least 5 years
relevant experience in the field of copier products
and a proven success record in sales. Excellent
communication skills and proficiency in the use of
comp ters are essential.

A gener us remuneration and benefits package is

: offered to the



and equipment.
professional who thrives on the challenge of
developing outstanding custéher relations and
service excellence.

Having both academic and practical
background in the field of Accounting/Inventory
Control is an asset.

Send complete resume with education and work
experience to M & E Limited, P. O. Box N-3238,
Nassau Bahamas, Attention: Human Resources
Department, or email me@me-l|td.com.

Only persons being interviewed for this position
will be contacted.



The Wasp Nest Boutique
and Fab Finds Gift Shop
mo Asolo) Cay Shopping Center
Tel: 362-6983

idewalk Sale

10:00am - 6:00pm
SELECTED ITEMS WILL BE $5.00 TO $30.00

This person should be_a.ff. .

fo Nationality and Gtizenstip, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

Bahamas.

BUSINESS FOR SALE

Well established Fashion Retail
Business. Well known and.

. respected worldwide Franchise,

20 years at same prime locatiox

Email: b.inquiries@gmail.com

Trading Futures, Options, Equities and Forex?
direct access trading with state of the art front ends to
all exchanges highly competitive rates outstanding
services full 24/7 it support talk to a Nassau based AP
of the leading brokerage house with more than 50

billion in assets!

Please call for a further information,
demonstration and consultation
324-2295 or email: ctaw@coralwave.com

Director International
Client Services



Small Nassau based financial services company requires
self motivated and dynamic individual to lead its initiative
to promote tax and risk management structures for
successful small to medium sized businesses engaged in
ecommerce and international commerce with the specific
objective of exploiting synergies with captive insurance.

The successful applicant will have skills and experience

in the following areas:

1) payment platforms for businesses engaged in
ecommerce and international trading

2) risk management for the ownership of intellectual
property and for internet based operations

3) tax planning for ecommerce business and international
trading companies



90-75%:

HUGE SAVINGS ON DESIGNER CLOTHING
& ACCESSORIES FOR LADIES!
CHILDRENS CLOTHING AND TOYS
HOUSEHOLD ITEMS & MORE!

4) knowledge of taxation and organization of captive
insurance companies

A relevant tertiary degree and professional qualification
is required along with a minimum of 10 years experience
in this area.

Applications to the Chief Operating Officer, P.O. Box
SS-5382, Nassau, Bahamas.


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 7B



EU deal to cost

ahamas $5-$10m
in taxes, not $14m

FROM page 1B

unit was due to begin shortly.
Provisions were also being
made in the forthcoming 2007-
2008 Budget to establish a
Bahamas Embassy in Brussels,
which would deal with both the

EU and the WTO “should we,

proceed with accession to [full
membership] in the WTO”.

Mr Mitchell pointed out that
the CBI had already expired,
and although the US was a
seeking a WTO waiver to
extend this in the face of oppo-
sition from Paraguay and oth-
ers, if granted this would only
extend the agreement until
December 31, 2008.

The EPA is the replacement
for the Cotonou Agreement
that the EU previously held
with the Bahamas and other 76
countries in the African,
Caribbean and Pacific (ACP)
group. *

Both it and the CBI are
under pressure because they are
considered discriminatory under
WTO tules, since they provide
the Bahamas and Caribbean
region with trade benefits and
preferences that others do not
get. This violates Most
Favoured Nation (MEN) prin-
ciples, which require countries
to treat others equally when it
comes to trade and not dis-
criminate.

In addition, the EPA will also
involve reciprocity, as Mr
Mitchell said, meaning that the
Bahamas will have to offer to
EU producers and exporters the
same benefits and terms of
trade that Europe offers
Bahamas-based exporters.

This means the one-way pref-
erential regime is over, requir-
ing the Bahamas to remove
import and stamp duties on EU
goods that are imported into
this nation, hence the tax rev-
enue loss.

But what Mr Mitchell did not
say is that the Bahamian tax
structure will be impacted far
more heavily if this nation is
forced to negotiate a replace-
ment for the CBI with the US
that is based on reciprocity.

More than 80 per cent of this



¢ Thursday February 1, 2007

!
“Eaporvering Baharmtans *
COB ~ Lecture Theatre
Presenter - Mr. Gleon Ferguson

» Thursday February 8, 2007

BT V.L - Old Trail Road
Presenter» Mr Daniel Thompson

» Thursday February 15, 2007
Busmess Finance and Venture Capital
COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenter - Mr. Jerome Gomez



Doing Business via the Internet

Possibilities of Pitfalls

Thursday March 15, 2007
at 7:00 p.m.

The College Of The Bahamas

(Bahamas Tourism Training Center)

‘Husiness Planning, Forecasting s Marketing

nation’s imports come from the
US, and Customs revenue
annually accounts for about 60
per cent of the Government’s
taxes. Reciprocity will require
the Bahamas to remove import
tariffs on most goods, driving
tax reform in this nation.

In the EPA, the Bahamas has
effectively decided to trade-off
what it believes is a minor loss
of tax revenues in favour of pro-
tecting duty-free market access
to the EU for its exporters,
namely Bacardi’s rum, the
seafoods industry, and
Freeport-based Polymers Inter-
national.

The loss of such duty-free
market access, Mr Mitchell said,
would be “significant”, as
shown by “careful analysis”.

He added that one attractive
feature of the talks between the
EU and the Bahamas on the
EPA was that the agreement
included a development com-
ponent, focusing on issues such
as education and training.

Mr Mitchell indicated that
this was especially important,
given that the size and scale of
foreign direct investment pro-
jects taking place in the
Bahamas was placing heavy
demands on the Bahamian
workforce. |

Yet there were not enough
workers with the required skills
to meet this demand, the minis-
ter added, forcing employers to
hire expatriate workers, some-

thing that was causing resent-

ment among Bahamians.
“There is a lbour shortage

because of the lack of trained

workers,” Mr Mitchell said.

“There is some resentment

developing in the population,
because they see opportunities
abounding, but these opportu-
nities are passing them by.”

The EPA , he added, would
deal with the terms of invest-
ment in all parties, so that
developers would know what
the rules were, in addition to
setting out the terms of trade
in goods and services.

Trade, Mr Mitchell said,
would be a major “focus” for
the Bahamian government,
especially over the next five
years, with this nation “still
grappling with how to integrate
our economy with the rest of
the world”.

“The entire CARICOM
region, of which we are part, is
still struggling to come to terms
with the requirements of reci-
procity in trade,” Mr Mitchell
said, noting that the EU Trade
Commissioner, Peter Mandel-
son, had expressed hopes of
reaching a trade agreement with
CARIFORUM by July 2007.

He indicated that the
Bahamas was most concerned
with ensuring Bacardi’s run
products retained duty-free
access to European markets.

A briefing prepared for the
Cabinet's sub-committee on
trade by the Ministry of For-
eign Affairs, which has respon-
sibility for international trade,
previously warned that the
Bahamas would lose “its
favourable $20 million trade
balance" with the EU if it failed
to sign the EPA, while hun-
dreds of jobs would be jeopar-
dised if Bacardi and Polymers
International shut their respec-
tive operations due to their

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WILSAID AUGUSTIN, OF
TREASURE CAY, ABACO, BAHAMAS is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The

Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/ naturalization should not be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 8th day of March,
2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and

Citizenship, P.O.Box N-

BAIC

In Conjunction With

Will Host

siness Empowerment

Presenter Mr. Dudrick Edwards

Assistant Professor
School of Business, The College of The Bahamas



(Lecture Theatre)

§
{
t
i

7147,

Nassau, Bahamas.



The College of The Bahamas

To sensitize Bahamians of
the business opportunities
available to them now, and
to encourage them to

exploit such opportunities,
thereby empowering them

to become self employed.

February |-April 5, 2007
(See Schedule Below)
1-00 p.m, Lecture/ Presentation |

Interactive Panel Discussion
followed by Entrepreneur
Testimonials and Q&A session. |

- The College of The Bahamas |
(Bahaovas Tvarism Yrainiog Coste)
(Lectore Theatre}

Change your buying habits, “BUY to SELL’,

FREE of charge |

Schedule of Weekly Seminars

« Thursday February 22, 2007,
‘Book-Keeping - Accounting for the Business
COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenter - Mr. Christopher Stuart

Thursday March 1, 2007

Business Opportunities in The Bahamas
COB - Lecture Theatre

Presenter - Mr. Benjamin Bailey
Thursday March 8, 2007

‘Forging a New Vision for the Bahamian {nvestor
COB - Lecture Theatre

become self employed and create wealth.

» Thursday March 15, 2007
Doing Business via the Intemet - Possrbulities
priffalls COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenter - Mr. Dudrick Edwards

« Thursday March 22, 2007
fap oS Export, Customs, Concessions
COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenter - Bahamas Customs Representative

« Thursday March 29, 2007
Book Keeping + Accounting for the Business
COB - Lecture Theatre

Presenter - Mr. Christopher Stuart

Presenters » Mr. Donald Demeritte
Mr. Paul Major

« Thursday April 5, 2007

Government Regulations and Business License
COB - Lecture Theatre

Presenter - Registrar Representative

CONTACT: Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation (BAIC) at 322-3740 or 325-1912

Mr. Lester Stuart / Mr. Le-Var Miller



exports becoming uncompeti-
tive.

The Government document
detailed that the Bahamas
exported some $66.315 million
worth of goods to the EU in
2004, importing about $43 mil-
lion for a favourable $20 mil-
lion trade balance. But for Bac-
ardi, loss of duty-free access
would see tariffs imposed on its
rum equivalent to $5 per gal-
lon.

The Ministry of Foreign
Affairs document said: "An
additional cost of $5 per gallon
would make the Bahamian-pro-
duced rum uncompetitive, and
would likely cause Bacardi to
shift its production to either
Puerto Rico or Mexico, where
the MEN tariffs are not applic-
able.

Just over $35 million worth
of sea food products were
exported to the EU from the
Bahamas in 2004, and loss of
duty-free access would lead to a
12.5 per cent tariff being
imposed. The Ministry of For-
eign Affairs briefing note said
this would raise the price of
Bahamian lobster by $2-$2.50
per pound, making it uncom-
petitive.

The loss to the Bahamas
would be the value of the lob-
ster exported, and the income
loss of the Bahamian fishermen
who catch the lobster, as well
as $649,259 in royalties.

:

SSS



3 IMMEDIATE POSITIONS

“Showroom Sales Associate”

Highly self-motivated person with sharp,
dynamic personality

Strong interpersonal skills
Fulltime and able to work weekends

Computer literate

The ideal candidates possessing knowledge in
either furniture sales, fabric sales, plumbing
hardware or tile is preferable.

Salary commensurate with experience. _
Please fax resume to: Showroom Sales
RAPS) |





MAINTENANCE/HANDYMAN
WANTED

A leading retail company has an immediate opening
for a Maintenance/Handyman














BASIC REQUIREMENTS

1. Should’ have a basic working knowledge electrical,
plumbing and general carpentry repairs.

. Must have a clean current Police Record

. Must be a self-starter with drive and determination

. Must be able to work with minimum supervision.

. Previous experience not required but would be an
asset.

nABWN



Persons meeting the above requirements should submit
their Resumes via fax to the address below.

The positions offer career opportunities with excellent
salary and benefits package.

THE OPERATIONS MANAGER
Fax: 328-5902



PREMIER TRAVEL

M5Y Colling Avenue *~ P.C.Box N-G696 * Messou. Be homes

328-8264 / S28-G257

OE aS

MAINTENANCE SUPERVISOR

The incumbent will have overall responsibility for the efficient operation

and maintenance of equipment and machinery, with a keen focus on detail
in keeping with international standards. He/she will also be customer oriented
with a track record of mastery in mechanical areas. Specifically he/she will
be required to:

> Ensure the effective and efficient performance of the maintenance
function for the following assets:
Building and the environment
Packaging lines and blow molding operations
Utilities supplies: Electrical distribution, high and low pressure
air, refrigeration and RO water systems

Manage the workshop and the execution of planned and preventative
maintenance program
Diagnose equipment malfunction and remove, install or effect repairs

as necessary

Evaluate the maintenance performance in his/her area of responsibility,
compile reports and effectively use performance data

Maintain technical integrity of plant to attain production targets and
keep abreast with latest technological advancements

Ideal candidate would have strong Electrical & Mechanical Engineering
experience, demonstrate a proficiency to trouble shoot and repair common
electrical problems and have the ability to work independently.

Please send resume to:

Human Resources Manager
P.O. BOX N-3207

DA 16436

NASSAU, BAHAMAS


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

THE TRIBUNE

ee re
US real estate downturn
may harm resort projects



































Assistant Manager

Position Available Immediately
At

Domino’s Pizza

Qualifications:

¢ You should have a High School Diploma
Past managerial experience

Certificate in Management 1s a plus
Must be available for day and night shifts,
including weekends
You should demonstrate strong communication,
leadership, motivational and people management
skills

You should have a valid driver’s license
You must have a GREAT attitude towards
customer service!

Basic responsibility to include:
Maintain product, service and image standard
To assist in supervision of all phases of
production.

To maintain a high level of efficiency &
productivity in all areas of store operation

Please send résumé on or before
October 2, 2006

Attention: Human Resource Department
P.O. Box SS-6704

Nassau, Bahamas

Or Fax 356-7855



GOVERNMENT NOTICE

PUBLIC WORKS ACT (CHAPTER 26)

NAMING OF THE MAIN
ROADWAY ON RUSSELL ISLAND TO

THE VIVIAN PINDER DRIVE

Pursuant to Section 3 of the Public Works
Act, Notice is hereby given that the Minister
responsible for Public | Works _ intends
to name the main roadway at Russell
Island as the VIVIAN PINDER DRIVE.

Any person objecting to proposed naming of the
said roadway may give Notice, in writing, of
the objecting and reason therefor to the Minister
within one month of the date of publication of the
Notice, by letter addressed. to.

Ag. Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Works & Utilities
P.O. Box N-8156
Nassau, The Bahamas

Signed:
Maxwell Poitier

Acting Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Works & Utilities



Bis

Pricing Information As Of:
sday, 14 March 2007
ee 2 BISX LISTED & TRADED SECUR 1
BIS ALL SHARE INDEX: CLO:
52wk-Low Security
0.54 Abaco Markets
10.40 Bahamas Property Fund
6.90 Bank of Bahamas
0.70 Benchmark
1.26 Bahamas Waste
1.12 Fidelity Bank
9.00 Cable Bahamas
1.64 Colina Holdings
9.38 Commonwealth Bank
4.22 Consolidated Water BDRs
2.40 Doctor's Hospital
5.54 Famguard
10.70 Finco
10.90 - FirstCaribbean
10.00 Focol
0.50 Freeport Concrete
7.10 ICD Utilities
J.S. Johnson
Premier Real Estate

S2wk-Hi
1.85
12.05
8.60
0.85
2.19
1.49
10.33
2.20
14.15
6.26
2.88
6.21
12.45
14.70
17.06

0.75
11.25
8.60
0.85
2.19
1.26
10.33
2.10
14.15
5.18
2.46
5.94
12.45
14.70
17.06
0.50

8.52
10.00

Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

52wk-Low

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

41.00
14.60

Fund Name
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund

1.331212"
3.0988***
2.625419°**
1.224635****

1.2909
2.6662
2.3312
1.1592
10.0000
BISX ALL SHARC INCEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 oks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in 52w

MARKET TERMS

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted pri r daily volume

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 / FIDELITY 242-366-77

FROM page 1B

tors. Some of them want to cut
down commissions by as much
as 5 per cent - from to 6 per
cent to 1 per cent. I think the

‘OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE :

4,468 of miter space

developers underestimate the
power of local realtors,” the
realtor said.

They indicated that if some
commissions were dropped and
others aren’t, then it does not
encourage them to market cer-
tain properties, simply because

it is less profitable to them.

Another realtor, who also
wished not to be named, noted
that whatever happens in the
US will naturally have an
impact on what happens in the
Bahamas.

“We have not seen a decline.
Our demand is still very high
for second homes and invest-
ments, but of course that would
depend on the extent the US
has problems, because if the US
economy gets really bad than
we may see some effects here,”
they said.

“(However], you have to
remember that the persons who
are interested in purchasing and
developing properties as invest-
ments and second homes are

the economy may not have that
big of an effect on them.”

Philip Williams, a real estate
agent with HG Christie, noted
that while many of the foreign
developers in the Bahamas are
US companies, and the Bahami-
an economy is closely tied to
the US, persons from all over
the world, particularly Europe
and Asia, purchase property in
the Bahamas. .

In fact, he said that as the US
economy declines, the econo-’
my here should get better as
Americans seek to diversify
their assets by moving into oth-
er jurisdictions.

“Real estate here is still rela-
tively cheaper than it is in the
United States” Mr Williams

Previous Close Today's Close

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

downtown for lease.

Adequate parking and
infrastructure in place.

Please call 326-520

et

The Ministry of Works & Utilities

GOVERNMENT NOTICE

PUBLIC WORKS ACT (CHAPTER 26)

- . ABACO HIGHWAY

lO THE CAPTAIN ERNEST ALEXANDER
D HWAY

Pursuant to Section 3 of the Public Works
Act, Notice is hereby given that the Minister
responsible for Public Works.intends to. rename
the forty-six mile stretch of GREAT ABACO
HIGHWAY, which extends from the traffic
circle east of the Marsh Harbour southwards to
the Sandy Point Settlement, to the CAPTAIN
EARNEST ALEXANDER DEAN HIGHWAY.

Any person objecting to proposed renaming of
the said roadway may give Notice, in writing, of
the objecting and reason therefor to the Minister
within one month of the date of publication of the
Notice, by letter addressed to.

Ag. Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Works & Utilities -
P.O. Box N-8156
Nassau, Bahamas

Signed:

Maxwell Poitier
Acting Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Works & Utilities

Change
0.75
11.25
8.60
0.85
2.19
1.26
10.33
2.10
14.15
5.13
2.46
5.94
12.45
14.70
17.06
0.50
7.24
9.05

a.125
0.640
0.000

0.000
1.320
0.000

Yield %

NAV KEY.
* . 2 March 2007
** - 8 February 2007

* 31 January 2007
**** . 28 February 2007

- 8 February 2007

394-2503



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amas

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wealthy, and so the effects of said.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DOROTHY SEJOUR OF LEWIS
YARD, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and

that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
8th day of March, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.









FOR SALE

TWO (2) PIPER AZTECS - 5 Seater Aircrafts

* Owner asking $220,000 (ONO) for hoth Aircrafts as is.
The Aircrafts can be viewed at
Executive Flight Support, Nassau Bahamas



For further information or inspection call (242) 377-1256.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)

NEW CAPITAL MANAGEMENT
VENTURES LIMITED

LIQUIDATOR’S NOTICE

PURSUANT TO SECTION 137 (6) OF THE
INTERANTIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES, ACT

We, Sovereign Directors Limited , Liquidator of NEW

CAPITAL MANAGEMENT VENTURES LIMITED, hereby
certify that the winding-up and dissolution has been completed
in accordance with the Articles of Dissolution and the company

has been struck off the Registers of Companies.

Dated the 9th day of March, A.D. 2007.

For and on-behalf of
Sovereign Directors Limited
Liquidator

Bela ae
52,

For an expanding Freeport Auto Dealership.

Successful applicant must have a thorough
understanding of computerized inventory
systems and must be willing to supervise
and train others. Knowledge of Japanese
and Korean parts is a must along with
proven dealership experience.

Attractive and competitive remuneration
package available to successful applicant.

Please apply in writing to:
PARTS
P.O. Box F-41060

Freeport, Grand Bahama


THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 9B





Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps













Abaco Markets sells Turks store

years", eliminating $250,000 in monthly —_ Right Freeport format. |



FROM page 1B debt payments to Royal Bank. That store is currently located on Milton you are raising funds for a
Street, and Abaco Markets plans to relo- ood cause, campaignin
Square cate it to its former Solomon's Super- a a ee = he.
sale to Menas Enterprises - a company Centre site in summer 2007. The property P ean an
The Tribune understands is headed by The 55,000 square foot Cedar Street has been empty since the roof was badly ated i a
farmer and businessman, Menas property sale was a sale and leaseback damaged by Hurricane Frances in Sep- award.

If so, call us on 322-1986

Verdoulis - reduced the company's debt — agreement, as Abaco Markets had secured _ tember 2004, with Solomon's SuperCentre
and share your story.

to its "lowest level in more than five a 10-year lease on the site for its Cost now based at Queen's Highway.





‘WHAT SHOULD BE DONE TO PROVIDE BETTER




HEALTH CARE COVERAGE FOR ALL BAHAMIANS

Part three of the series highlights If we then assume that
the third principle tn our

our goal is quality health
care for all, then we

documented Statement of Purpose. pF maintain that we must

cast aside partisan and other special interests

“True and Meaningful and create an atmosphere where all Bahamian
Consultation and Consensus: “ stakeholders can collectively access the same

Reform dictates that the principal

information, the same studies, the same analy-
sis and work through the key issues, chal-
lenges and opportunities to come to a consen-

stakeholders must be equitable sus as to the best way forward for improving
partners in the articulation, the delivery of health care throughout the

development and execution for

country.

improvements to the health care Please visit our website at

system;

http://www.bahamashealthcarereform.org
for the complete text inclusive of our suggested
alternative approach for a Universal Health Care

National Coalition for System
Health Care Reform Better HealthCare for All

Email: coalition@bahamashealthcarereform.org / Web: www.bahamashealthcarereform.org

RMF Investment Management — Nassau Branch

RME, part of the Man Investments division of Man Group plc, a leading global
provider of alternative investment products, has an opening in The Bahamas for a

Manager, Secondary Market Activity

The primary responsibility of the successful candidate will be to assist with the
establishment and administration of a trading platform quoting and trading in a
large range of hedge fund products promoted and managed by RMF and/or Man
Investments. This is a challenging opportunity for a candidate with ambition to join
a market leading organization and help create a servicing unit for Man’s activities
around the globe. In particular the successful candidate will:

1. Manage the creation of a dealing facility that aims ultimately to provide 24
hour service to an existing global client base.

2. Design and operate an administrative system that ensures that all
transactions are properly documented and accurately processed on a timely
basis and recorded in securities management systems both in the Bahamas
and in Switzerland, the RMF headquarters.
Organise the establishment and operation of electronic links to settlement
agents and custodians which ensure the effective settlement of transactions
in hedge fund products.

In addition, the role will incorporate other duties relating to the Investment

Management functions performed by RMF including acting as back-up to existing
staff in the management and processing of investments in hedge funds.

Requirements

The successful candidate will:

Have a bachelor degree, probably in Banking. Finance or Accounting.
Have at least three years experience in financial services and a detailed
knowledge of alternative investments.
Have the communication skills and ability to deal with persons from a
broad range of backgrounds and cultures. Experience in this area, whilst not
essential, will be a key advantage.
Be highly proficient in information technology and aware of the advantages
that IT can bring to a project of this sort.
Have excellent time management and organizational skills.

Have the ability to analyse business issues and develop effective solutions
to challenges.
Be prepared to travel when necessary and will probably have some foreign
language skills.
Enjoy working in a small office of a large multi-national group of
companies.

Candidates with Bahamian status should send a copy of their resume to arrive

by 23rd March, 2007 to Bob Hudson, Chief Executive Officer, RMF Investment
Management — Nassau Branch, P. O. Box EE 17758, Nassau, Bahamas or e-mail
bhudson'‘@maninvestments.com.



THE BAHAMAS INSTITUTE
OF CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS

“Accuracy, Integrity and Fairness”
Website: www.bica.bs

CONTINUING EDUCATION SEMINAR:
LEADERSHIP & REGULATORY TRAINING FOR MANAGERS

Date: March 22"4 2007
Place: British Colonial Hilton Hotel, The Governor’s Ballroom
Time: 9:00 am - 4:00 pm

Pre-register: Telephone 326-6619
Cost per day: Members $100 Non-members $125
Lunch & Parking Included. No Billings.

CPE hours: 7(BICA members - 40 hours required over a 2 year period)
Topics & Speakers Include:

° Effective Leadership Skills & Managing People
Work/Life Balance Issues
Ms. Debbie Bartlett — President, CEO Network & Partner,
Gems Radio Station

The Blueprint for a Successful Woman Executive

The importance of maintaining strong corporate ethical standards
Ms. Minna Israel — Managing Director, Scotiabank (Bahamas) Ltd.
& Chairman, Clearing Banks Association

Steps to Plan and Manage a Successful Audit Engagement
A technical perspective
Ms. Tiffany Norris Pilcher, CPA — Senior Manager, Ernst & Young

Detecting & Reporting Suspicious Transactions
A case study approach for financial institutions
Financial Intelligence Unit

Risk Based Supervision
Impact on Anti-Money Laundering Procedures
Mr. Stephen Thompson — Compliance Commission

Induction Ceremony for New Members & Licensees of BICA


PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

THE TRIBUNE !



To ativertise in The Tribune - the #1 newspaper Tremblay pleads

eC ES ae rae OT

FROM page 1B

POSITION VACANCY
MANUFACTURING PLANT OPERATIONS MANAGER

But in the plea agreement,
Mr Tremblay only admitted to
the $20,000 he received at the
New York meeting, his lawyers

Pepsi Cola Bahamas, an affiliate of Pepsi Americas, Inc., is searching for a arguing that he was unaware
p a Baha : p > 8 that the remaining $200,000 was

qualified individual to manage its manufacturing operations. This includes feancievecd- te Bahianias based
Production, Quality Control, Maintenance, Warehouse, Fleet, and Logistics. (5 accounts.

direct reports, 30+ indirect reports). The Tremblay episode has
been damaging to the Bahamas'
financial services industry's rep-
utation, something which the
Bahamas Financial Services

Qualified candidates must posses the following:

Education:
° Minimum Bachelor’s degree in business, operations or related field

Experience:
° Prior leadership, supervisor and coaching experience required. Operations
and distribution experience preferred

Personal:
Results oriented
Strong leadership
Team builder / Team player
Ability to coach and develop people
Excellent interpersonal skills
Process oriented
Problem solver
Ability to multi task

A competitive salary and benefits package will be offered to the successful
candidate. If you are a strong leader/manager capable of multi tasking and are
interested in being part of a dynamic, growing international company, please
mail or email resume to:

Human Resources Manager
Pepsi Cola Bahamas Bottling Co., Ltd.
P. O. Box N-3004
Prince Charles Drive
» Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 364-2123
e-mail: rhonda.rolle@pepsibahamas.com



expenses excluding amortisation and depreciation expenses increased by 83% to CHF 352.6
EPG International million, compared to CHF 192.8 million for 2005. EFG International’s cost-income ratio stood
at 55.6 % for the current period, down 1.4 percentage points from the 57.0% reported for the

: EFG International Increases 2006 Net Profit by 90% to CHF 230.0 Million financial year 2005.
Net Profit Attributable to Ordinary Shareholders of CHF 204.0 Million, up 144%



EFG International’s consolidated balance sheet as of December 31, 2006 increased by 47% to
CHF 15.9 billion, compared to CHF 10.8 billion as of December 31, 2005. At the end of the
fiscal year 2006, consolidated shareholders’ equity stood at CHF 2.3 billion.

Zurich, February 28, 2007 — EFG International continued to show strong earnings growth,
increasing its net profit for 2006 to CHF 230.0 million, up 90% compared to net profit of
CHF 120.9 million for 2005. Total Clients’ Assets under Management Including
announced acquisitions were CHF 73.6 billion, up 56% from CHF 47.3 billion at the end
of 2005. EFG International made greater than anticipated progress during the first full All above-mentioned figures are unaudited.

financial year after the IPO in October 2005 and based on this adjusts its 2007 and 2008

CRO and AUM targets upwards. : Rudy van den Steen, Chief Financial Officer of EFG International, said: “2006 saw a near

: doubling of EFG International's business both in terms of operating income and net profit, in
Financial highlights for 2006, compared to 2005, include: line with growth in clients’ assets under management which tripled in the last two years driven

Client Relationship Officers (CROs): 398 up 49% both by organic and acquisition growth. In addition, our balance sheet increased sizeably by

CROs incl. announced acquisitions: 405 up 51%
AUM incl. announced acquisitions: CHF 73.6 billion up 56% net profit attributable to ordinary shareholders, in line with the dividend policy for 2006

almost 50% in 2006. The Board of Directors will recommend a dividend payment of 21.6% of

Clients’ Assets under Management (AUM): CHF 69.8 billion up 48% announced during the time of the IPO. The dividend will leave EFG International with
Operating Income: CHF 634.4 million up 87% sufficient Tier 1 Capital to continue both its organic and acquisition driven growth strategy
Cost-Income Ratio: 55.6 % vs 57.0% while honouring commitments made at the time of the IPO.”

Net Profit: CHF 230.0 million up 90%

Net Profit Attributable to Ordinary Shareholders: CHF 204.0 million up 144% Dividend Proposal
During the fiscal year of 2006 and in carly January 2007, EFG International has announced the

acquisitions of the following companies: The Board of Directors of EFG International will propose a cash dividend of CHF 0.30 per

ordinary share for the financial year 2006 at the Annual General Meeting on April 27, 2007, in
» C.M. Advisors Limited (CMA), Bermuda Announced and closed Feb 06

Banque Monégasque de Gestion (BMG), Monaco Announced May 06, closed Oct 06

line with the dividend policy for the financial year 2006 communicated at the time of the Initial

Public Offering in October 2005.
Harris Allday, Birmingham, England Announced July 06, closed Aug 06
Quesada Kapitalférvaltning, Stockholm, Sweden — Announced Dec 06, not yet closed Review of Business Expansion
PRS Group, Cayman/Miami Announ. Jan 8, 07, not yet closed

; : ; . Duri first half of 2006, EFG Int i i
Lawrence D. Howell, Chief Executive Officer of EFG International, said: “During the first full pene ae ena nternational opened banks in Luxembourg and the

financial year after our IPO in October 2005, EFG International continued to grow as Bahamas, a bank branch in Dubai, offices in Jakarta, Caracas and Bogota and a trust company

anticipated. This growth supports the positive outlook enunciated at the time of the IPO and in Hong Kong. In the second half of the year, EFG International continued to increase its
reaffirmed today.” i geographical presence by opening offices in Mexico-City, Quito, Panama-City, Cayman,
Bahrain, Athens, Bangkok and Manila.
Financial Results for 2006
Since the beginning of 2006, EFG International announced the acquisition of five businesses:
During 2006, the number of Client Relationship Officers (CROs) increased by 51% from 268
to 405, including the announced acquisitions of Quesada Kapital férvaltning and PRS Group (7 In February 2006, EFG International enhanced its hedge funds capabilities with the
CROs). acquisition of Bermuda based C, M. Advisors Limited (CMA). The acquisition closed in
February 2006 and added CHF 2.1 billion in AUM.
Consolidated Clients’ Assets under Management (AUM) increased 56% from CHF 47.3 billion In May 2006, EFG International announced the acquisition of Banque Monégasque de
at the end of 2005 to CHF 73.6 billion, including the announced acquisitions of Quesada Gestion, increasing its private banking presence in Monaco. The acquisition closed end of

Kapital férvaltning and PRS Group (AUM of CHF 3.8 billion). Excluding these two announced October 2006 adding 6 CROs and CHF 1.3 billion in AUM

acquisitions as well as shares of EFG International which do not form part of the current 28.1% . : Pa
. In July 2006, EFG International reached an agreement to acquire Birmingham-based
free-float of EFG International shares at the SWX Swiss Exchange, AUM amounted to CHF

ivate client stock ending i i < isiti
65.2 billion at the end of December, 2006. private client stockbroker Harris Allday, extending its reach in the UK. The acquisition of

Harris Allday closed in August 2006, adding 27 CROs and CHF 4.5 billion in AUM.
Consolidated financial results for the full-ycar of 2006 reflect the full impact of the five In December 2006, EFG International announced the acquisition of Quesada
acquisitions EFG International closed in 2005. The financial results of the Bahamas-based Kapitalférvaltning, a Stockholm-based wealth management company focused on High
private banking business acquired from Banco Sabadell and of C. M. Advisors Limited Net Worth Individuals. Quesada Kapitalfdrvaltning will add 2 CROs and CHF 0.8 billion
(CMA), Bermuda, were consolidated from February 2006 onwards. The financial results from in AUM. The closing of the acquisition is expected during the first quarter of 2007.
Harris Allday were consolidated from August 2006 onwards, while financial results from In January 2007, EFG International reached an agreement to acquire Cayman/Miami-based
Banque Monégasque de Gestion were consolidated from November 2006 onwards. PRS Group specialized in investment services to Ultra High Net Worth Individuals. PRS
Group will add 5 CROs and CHF 3.0 billion m AUM. The closing of the transaction is
[:FG International’s consolidated net profit for the financial year 2006 amounted to CHF 230.0 expected during the first quarter of 2007.
million, up 90% compared to CHF 120.9 million for 2005. Consolidated net profit attributable
to ordinary sharcholders increased by 144% from CHF 83.7 million for 2005 to CHF 204.0 EFG International continues to evaluate multiple acquisition opportunities in Switzerland,

area eae : :
inillion for 2066, onshore continental Europe, the UK and the Americas.

EFG International's consolidated operating income rose by 87% from CHF 338.4 million to

CHF 634.4 million, reflecting healthy growth in all of EFG International’s markets and

activities as well as the contribution of the newly acquired businesses. Consolidated operating

TRAINED AUTOMOTIVE. | acitxposed” to any risk.
TECHNICIAN sion in their 2005 financial state,”

experience. References as proof of good work
relationships must be supplied.

Apply in person or in writing to:
Manager ati
QUALITY AUTO SALES
(FREEPORT) LTD.
Queens Highway
P.O. Box F-42405
Freeport, Grand Bahama





2

ouilt to laundering
$220,000

Board (BFSB), the Govern- _ for the southern district of New
ment and entire sector have York.
worked at assiduously. They The institution's records were |
have been promoting this seized for examination by the. ,
nation as a blue-chip brandand ‘Financial Intelligence Unit ”
financial centre that is well-reg- | (FIU), Royal Bahamas Police
ulated and co-operative, yet still Force and Securities Commis- _
maintains client confidentiali- sion of the Bahamas. BDO ‘;
ty. Mann Judd accountant Clifford. 7
Dominion Investments was Culmer was appointed as liq- _
placed into voluntary liquida- _uidator, assisted by the law firm
tion immediately after charges of Lennox Paton. 7
were filed against Mr Tremblay The Securities Commission ~
in January 2006, in the US court was Dominion Investments’. ,
chief regulator, as it was an_-
investment services provider, |
brokerage and financial services’ |

SITUATION VACANT. |. percent bencticuy ovned by.

Mr Tremblay.
Ferrier Lullin Bank & Trust

OG?
qt

ments as a result of Mr Trem- -;

experienced in American, Japanese blay having: been employed as

its managing director from |?

and Korean vehicles needed March 4, 2005, until his arrest.

The US indictment had ini- °
tially alleged that among the

Applicants must be familiar with automotive qionies launiered iniouch.
computer analysis systems and preference will Dominion Investments and ||

related bank accounts in the .

be given to applicant with proven dealership | Bahamas, Canada, Texas and

‘elsewhere - between 1998 to ~.
December 2005 - were the pro- *,

ceeds from securities frauds, tax .;
evasion schemes, and cocaine, a
marijuana, and date rape drug -
sales.

For the stories
behind the news,

read Insight
on Mondays



Outlook and Update on Strategic Goals

EFG International reconfirms that it is on track to meet or excced its previously announced
medium-term targets. Based on greater than anticipated progress made during 2006, EFG
International adjusts its 2007 and 2008 CRO and AUM targets upwards. "

The updated 2007 and 2008 strategic goals are:



2006 2007 goal 2008 goal
| CROs 398 / 405 ° Previously announced: Previously announced: .
500-525 650-675 ma



New: New: a
540 675 ae
| CHF 65.2 bn/ Previously announced: Previously announced:
CHF 69.0 bn“ | CHF 87-93 bn CHF 115-125 bn



yh aay

New: New:
CHF 93-99 bn CHF 121-131 bn











(1) Including announced acquisitions.
(2) Excl. shares of EFG Intemational, which do not form part of the current 28.1% free-float at SWX Swiss

Exchange.

For a full overview of EFG International’s 2006 results and its strategic goals, please refer to
the company presentation available on www.efginternational.com (Investor Relations /

Investor Presentations).

EFG International’s 2006 Annual Report including audited consolidated financial 7
statements for 2006 will be made available on-line on www.efginternational.com on
April 4, 2007.

Investor Relations
+41 44 212 7377 vet

investorrelations@efginternational.com

Media Relations
+41 44 212 7387

mediarelations@cfgintemational.com

About EFG International
EFG International is a global private banking group offering private banking and assct .
management services, headquartered in Zurich. EFG International's group of private banking
businesses currently operate in 44 locations in 30 countrics employing | ,477 staff. EFG “
International's registered shares (EFGN) are listed on the SWX Swiss Exchange. EFG ‘«
International is a member of the EFG Group headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, which is

the third-largest banking group in Switzerland by Tier-| Capital.

Disclaimer
This press release has been prepared by EFG International solely for use by you for general information only and 2
does not contain and is not to be taken as containing any securities advice, recommendation, offer or invitation to “,
subscribe for or purchase any securities regarding EFG International.
Uhis press release contains specific forward-looking statements, e.g. statements, which include terms, like ‘
“believe”, "assume", "expect" or similar expressions. Such forward-looking statements are subject to known and
unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, which may result in a substantial divergence between the actual “
results, the financial situation, and/or the development or performance of the company and those explicitly or .
implicitly presumed in these statements. These factors include (1) gencral market, macro-economic, governmental
and regulatory trends, (2) movements in securities markets, exchange rates and interest rates, (3) competitive
pressures, (4) our ability to continue to recruit CROs, (5) our ability to implement our acquisition strategy, (6) our
ability to manage our economic growth and (7) other risks and uncertainties inherent in our business. EFG ‘
International is not under any obligation to (and expressly disclaims any such obligation to) update or alter its .”
2

forward-looking statements whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise
THE TRIBUNE.

THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 11B :



Bahamas leads
Internet penetration rate |

FROM page 1B

a 28.8 per 100 access rate, fol-
lowed by Iceland with 27, and
Canada and the US trailing a
little with 22 and 19 respective-
ly.

For the Bahamas, Mr Pad-
dick said Cable Bahamas’ had
an estimated 37,000 Coralwave
Internet subscribers, while the
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company (BTC) had 11,000
subscribers to its DSL service.

Based on there being three
persons per household in the
Bahamas, Mr Paddick said this
meant that the 48,000 total sub-
scribers translated into 144,000
Bahamian residents having
broadband Internet access.

With between 300,000 to

allowed Bahamian businesses
to be global players with the
ability to reach markets
beyond” this nation’s relatively
small population.

Mr Paddick said Mr Keeping,
original owner of Columbus
Communications, which still has
a 30 per cent stake in BISX-list-
ed Cable Bahamas, had com-
mitted that within four years of
obtaining the cable TV contract
in 2004, some 90: per cent of
Bahamian homes would be able
to access the service.

The Cable Bahamas chair-
man said the company had
grown from having 15,000 sub-
scribers in 1995 to 74,000 sub-
scribers today, out of an esti-
mated 100,000 households in

Cable Bahamas had 36,000
Internet subscribers at year-end
2006, and last year had spent $6
million upgrading its cable TV
service from analog to two-way
digital. Mr Paddick said the
company now had “28,000 set
top boxes deployed” for its
Oceans Digital TV service.

He added that Cable
Bahamas’s 2400 shareholders
had “been rewarded rather
handsomely” by their invest-
ment in the company, which
had floated at $1 per share in
1998, and was now worth some
$10.33. Some $2 per share had
also been paid out in dividends.

Cable Bahamas’ network, Mr
Paddick said, passed through 95
per cent of all homes in the
Bahamas, and some 3,300 busi-

nesses relied on the company
to provide them with Internet
connectivity and links to the
outside world that enabled
them to conduct business.

Mr Paddick said Cable
Bahamas’ investment in
Caribbean Crossings as a broad-

band Internet wholesale sup-
plier had enabled it to provide
Internet services on its own,
controlled terms.

Cable Bahamas was looking
at introducing three, six and
nine megabyte Internet speed
this month, ensuring that

the world on

sae

se
Ce
if.

Bahamians were “positioned on *
the right side of the digital,
divide”. é
Columbus Communications, “
Mr Paddick added, aimed to’
“become the premier telecom-
munications provider in the

Caribbean region”.

the Bahamas.

320,000 persons living in the
Bahamas, Mr Paddick said this
translated into a 48.1 persons »
per 100 having Internet broad-
band access, a higher rate than
anywhere else in the world -
some 65.8 per cent higher than
that for Denmark.

“The Bahamas now boasts
one of the most advanced net-
work architectures in the
world,” Mr Paddick said. “The
Bahamas is now far more com-
petitive in regard to high speed
Internet and Internet connec-
tivity rates.” .

He explained that in 2001,
just after Cable Bahamas
entered the market as an Inter-
net Service Provider (ISP) and
completed the fibre optic
telecommunications ring link-
ing Nassau, Grand Bahama,
Abaco and Eleuthera to Florida
through its Caribbean Cross-
ings subsidiary, it cost $48,000
per month to acquire 1.5
megabytes of bandwidth space
between Nassau and Florida.

After Cable Bahamas came
into the market, that price came
down by 50 per cent to $24,000
per month, and now that same
circuit can be bought for $8,000
to $10,000 per month.

“We didn’t steal a single cus-
tomer; we filled.a market need,”
Mr Paddick added. “This really’.

Insurance Brokers & Benefit Consultants Lid.

LAMPKIN & COMPANY
Insurance Brokers & Benefit Consultants Ltd.

AUTO
SERVICE VACANCY

Freeport automobile dealership is looking for
an energetic person to fill the position of

WILL BE CLOSED
on Thursday, March 15th and
Friday, March 16th
for Staff Training and Fun Day. |

Our office will re-open on
Monday, March 19th. —

We apologize for any inconvenience caused.
eA
12 Montrose Ave. P.O. Box EE 15280

Phone: (242) 325-0850 Fax: (242) 326-8024
E-Mail: info@lampkinco.com

SERVICE WRITER/

ADVISOR

in our Service Department. Prospective
applicants should possess similar work
experience with some training in customer
management relations. Intermediate
computer skills are a must.



Please apply in writing to:
Service Advisor
P.O. Box F-41060
Freeport, Grand Bahama



Pata P aaa, ofa Peewee oa,”
Pata aeaearee nee
ee



NAD has been incorporated to manage, operate, develop and maintain the i
Lynden Pindling International Airport. Our corporate vision is to operate we
airports that are safe, friendly, clean, efficient and profitable, with a local sense ere
of place. oi

Do you want to join our team? aie



Manager, Parking and Ground Transportation rod
Reporting to the Vice President, Commercial Development, the Manager Parking #5
and Ground Transportation is responsible for formulating and implementing =
policies, procedures, systems and controls required to optimize the car parking 4%
and ground transportation operations. This will maximize non-aeronautical ae
revenues and provide world-class parking facilities and ground transportation
services. Post secondary education in business, commerce or marketing and at 355 -
least 5 years related experience preferred; experience in parking and/or ground
transportation would be a definite asset. Peis

The following positions are currently available:












Manager, Retail Services

Reporting to the Vice President, Commercial Development, the Manager Retail
services is responsible for creating and implementing a strategy for the overall
food & beverage and retail operations at Lynden Pindling International Airport
in order to provide world class offerings to our customers, while maximizing
non-aeronautical revenues. Post secondary education in business, commerce or
marketing and at least 5 years related experience preferred; experience in the
food & beverage or retail industry would be a definite asset. §

» Marketing Analyst as
Reporting to the Vice President, Marketing, this position is responsible for 8%
comprehensive aviation and tourism market research, analysis of competition #5
in passenger and cargo, assessing tourism activities and trends, developing 33
proposals, supporting analyses for new services and participating in the 4355 -
development and execution of aviation and airport marketing, communications #
and public relations policies. Post secondary education in #3:
Marketing/Communications or a related field with at least 5 years experience
is preferred; experience in the airline business would be a definite asset. 78

Commercial Business Analyst

Reporting to the Manager, Retail Services, this position is responsible for doing
analytical work related to food & beverage and retail services at the airport.
Must be proficient in gathering data and statistical analysis and have strong
analytical, math and communication skills. Minimum High School Diploma and
5 years experience preferred. Recent experience in retail, food & beverage or
shopping mall management or marketing would be a definite asset.

Executive Assistants and Administrative Assistants — Several Positions
Available

These positions are responsible for providing administrative and execurive
support to various executives and senior managers. Responsibilities will include,

Supervisor Purchasing or
Reporting to the Vice President, Finance and CFO, this position is responsible 335
for overall management of the purchasing function including Requests for i:

but not be limited to calendar management, general administrative duties, Proposals, awarding contracts and managing the corporate inventory and stores 352
in close cooperation with the Airport’s operating departments. Post secondary 33

development of PowerPoint presentations, and creative documents, organizing

meetings, conferences and other activities, taking meeting minutes and organizing education in business or commerce and at least 5 years experience in a similar os |
travel. High School Diploma and 5 years experience is required position is preferred a
Corporate Financial Analyst Please send your resumé to: Bs
Reporting to the Vice President, Finance and CFO, this position will be primarily aie
responsible for the development of business cases and financial analysis to Manager, People ae
support commercial, investment and financing decisions, as well as assisting Nassau Airport Development Company mat
with corporate reporting to lenders, airlines, government and other stakeholders. P.O. Box AP-59229 aie
A post secondary education in business or commerce is required and a professional Lynden Pindling International Airport Be
designation in finance or accounting or MBA, combined with at least 5 years Nassau. Bahamas et
experience in a similar position is preferred.

:
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SISO SE SESE pee ee ee ee ca aaa Pa eae eae ae ad ede e naa ee ae ea ea eae nee Cette Te Te Tere Ee
PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007



CAREER OPPORTUNITY

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

for

Key Activities and Deliverables:

Treasurer — Bahamas and Cayman Operating Companies
Treasury Sales & Trading (TST)

The Treasurer is a senior member of the TST leadership team that provide
best-in-class Balance sheet management, TST control and TST dealing support for
the FirstCaribbean Group. A key focus for TST is to enhance Group interest income
and develop / market TST products to the countries’ largest and most discerning
clients. Countries include: Bahamas, Turks and Caicos, Cayman, British Virgin
Islands, St. Maarten, and Curacao.

Successfully manage and extract maximum value from business projects and process
improvement initiatives designed to strengthen the operational infrastructure of
FirstCaribbean TST

THE TRIBUNE

$14m Film Studios
deal deadline today

\

he extended deadline
for Bahamas FilmIn-
vest, the group put
together by Bahamian banker
Owen Bethel, to complete its
$14 million purchase of the
Bahamas Film Studios is due
to expire today, sources told
The Tribune yesterday.

It is uncertain whether the
closing deadline, which has
been extended from February
28, 2007, will be met. Mr Bethel
and The Tribune missed each

other with
telephone
calls made
yesterday.
Mr Bethel
had previous-
ly told The
Tribune that
the definitive §
agreement —
for the sale of
the Bahamas
Film Studios
was "still being negotiated, and

@ BETHEL



subject to approval by the Gov-
ernment".

He and his group had sub-
mitted the relevant proposals
and documents to the Govern-
ment, but the anticipated com-
pletion date for the purchase,
February 28, 2007, was likely
to be “extended given the need
for government review and
approval".

Mr Bethel and his group are
understood to have paid $14
million to acquire the rights to

develop the Bahamas Film Stu-
dios from Gold Rock Creek
Enterprises and its ultimate
Bermuda-based parent, Ashby
Corporation.

Ross Fuller, chairman of
both companies, it is under-
stood, will use part of the pur-
chase price to pay off Gold
Rock's liabilities, including a
$10 million loan from First-
Caribbean International Bank
for the water tank construction,
and a further $1 million in
debts.

Mr Fuller took over.the pro-_
ject after two of its three origi-
nal founding partners, Hans
Schutte and Michael Collyer,
passed away. The surviving
partner is Paul Quigley, who is
no longer associated with the
Bahamas Film Studios.

This will leave Mr Fuller with
a net $3-$4 million from the
deal, but unconfirmed reports
reaching The Tribune suggest
other potential buyers may
have been lined up if Mr
Bethel’s group fails to complete
the purchase.

Mr Bethel, president of the
Nassau-based financial services
provider, the Montaque
Group, previously sai4 an
investment of $80-$90 million
was needed to develop the
Bahamas Film Studios to its
full build-out as envisaged by
the original business plan.

The project could provide
between 700-1200 jobs once

. film and TV productions begin
“to use the facility.

Build and improve the organizational structures and delivery platforms that support
the FirstCaribbean TST model and product lines

Manage to successful completion, business projects and process improvement
initiatives, designed to strengthen the operational infrastructure of FirstCaribbean
CST.

Develop effective partnerships with all functional groups including Marketing,
Finance. Human Resources and Operations & Technology that directly benefit TST
activities, customers and day-to day operations.

=F =
e

NOW HIRING

Key result areas include: balance sheet & liquidity management, product
sales/marketing function, product structured support, governance and market
risk

NOW HIRING BAKERS

Qualifications/Experience:

world | Do you want to make some extra Cash?
$200 - $300 per week

Come Deliver for Domino’s Pizza

* 3 years of specific management experience in a TST environment

° Association of Corporate Treasurers (ACT) or equivalent qualification
preferred

* Understanding of the local Bahamas markets, competition, geographic, macro
economic and global factors impacting TST activities

¢ Seasoned director with a solid track record of success managing and growing ° 18yrs. or older
TST / Treasury Products business in international financial institutions ° Have a Drivers License & good Driving recor

° Solid operational experience in both a sales and a trading environment ¢ Have your own Vehicle

¢ Great Customer Service Attitude

e Graduate status with minimum of 7 years experience in the business/financial Are you retired or work night Shift only?
If you are:-

Remuneration: '
Then “s wants YOU!!
the p »niority (FC Level 9 - the Bank
Benefits eee
e Good Health Insurance Plan
e Pension

tee pe) Me oe . . .
¢ Benefits- includes a car allowance, variable incentive pay (bonus) and preferred
loan rates

Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter via email by

March 23, 2007 to: Come into Abaco Markets Limited
Town Center Mall Office

And fill out an application Today.

Ph. 325-2122 Fax 356-7855.

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for their interest,
however only those under consideration will be contacted.



Lo en a ee ee me oe Nm pan pam Scaawmene bwin nee en i





26th International All Breed Dog

Show & Obedience Trials
Saturday, March 17, 2007

(Note: Except a Aer time, times are Fra)





OBEDIENCE JUDGING SCHEDULE om nee
8:30 Open 3 Carol Mett THE LYFORD CAY FOUNDATION
oe oe ; a rt ~ = (INCCONJUNCTION WITH)
: ovice ose Doan
945, 4. Open a. ‘Herald Doar THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY |
10:15 5 Beginner 4 Jon Mett
10:45 6 Rally Novice 3/4 Carol Mett
7 Rally Advance Jon Mett
8 Rally Excellent Carol Mett
# BREED JUDGING SCHEDULE
9:45 9 Veterans 1 Sonny Tougas
ee STEN] 000 11 eShowmanshp (12-tryrs) 2 Larry Kerluk ,
ae r. Showmanship yrs arry Kereluke
* 10:15 12 Jr. Showmanship (7-11 yrs) 1 Sonny Tougas ALL BAHAMAS MERIT SCHOLARSHIP 2007
: BOTANICAL 10:30 13 Toys-Group5 2 Larry Kereluke
‘ ates 10:30 14 Non-Sporting — Group 6 1 Sonny Tougas . Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the All Bahamas Merit Scholarship.
11:00 15 Sporting — Group 1 1 Sonny Tougas The scholarship will be given for 4 (four) years tenable at accredited universities or colleges in the
Gar mie m 11:00 16 Hounds — Group 2 2 Larry Kereluke Caribbean, United States of America, United Kingdom or Canada, commencing August 2007.
Magi ia ® 11:15 17 Terriers - Group 4 2 Larry Kereluke ; ;
: starting 11:15 18 — Miscellaneous — Group 8 1 Sonny Tougas
ne 11:30 19 Working — Group 3 1 Sonny Tougas Applicants must:
: eh eV me 11:45 20 Herding — Group 7 2 Larry Kereluke PP ‘
12:15 21 LOCAL BEST IN SHOW 1 Sonny Tougas ° iti i
39 BEST IN SHOW 1 Larry Kereluke Be a citizen of The Bahamas who has been educated in The Bahamian

Secondary School system;
Be between the ages of 16 and 19 years and should have completed
secondary school in the year of application or not later than one year after

Lunch Break

1:30. 23 Special Class (Spayed & Neutered)

















. ss 1 eae ae (A) Pirebreeds 2 Larry Kereluke ;
: ETC Drink. 8) Crossbreeds 1 Sonny Tougas graduation;
ane C) Potcakes 2 Larry Kereluke Be unmarried and childless;
Overall Winner 1 Sonny Tougas Possess at least a 3.0 GPA or equivalent:
Have at least seven 's wi ini A’s and two (2
TENE VET 8, 2007 - ven (7) BGCSE’s with a minimum of four (4) (2)
~~ (Note: Except-for starting time, times are approximate) B's;
Time Class# Class Ring# Judge Have a minimum SAT score of 1150;
ose OBEDIENCE Bae SCHEDULE Show integrity of character and respect for others;
: if ae ca ; sovies ; ee Prove participation in beneficial community activities
; orme — ee ; ue ye rie Mett
: :30 ally Novice on Mett
Whole ; Rally Advance Carol Mett VALUE OF AWARD
4 eee i Les Rally Excellent Jon Mett ; ok ,
: Family! ieee Bae ue JUDGING SCHEDULE fail a 4 The award will include tuition fees, room and board, one round trip ticket, clothing
Same Jr. Showmanship yrs arry Kereluke ;
10:00 : Jt Showmanship (12-17 yrs) 1 Sonny Tougas and a personal and book allowance. The total award is not to exceed $35,000.00
: ! 10:15 9 Jr. Showmanship (7-11 yrs) 2 Larry Kereluke per annum.
et 10:30 10 Toys - Group 5 1 Sonny Tougas
ROU et Cutcnse eco a Sree Gon 5 ; oe ne Further details and application forms may be obtained from the Scholarship and
ee junior MERC CCA 11:00 13 Hounds — Group 2 1 Sonny Tougas Education Loan Division of The Ministry of Education, Science & Technology or
ph 4 11:15 14 Terriers — Group 4 1 Sonny Tougas from the Ministry of Education, Science & Technology's website at
Pa EC 14:15 15 Miscellaneous — Group 8 2 Larry Kereluke :
11:30 16 Working - Group 3 2 Larry Kereluke | www.bahamaseducation.com
11:45 17 Herding — Group 7 1 Sonny Tougas |
12:15 18 LOCAL BEST IN SHOW 1 Larry Kereluke Completed application forms should be returned to reach The Scholarship
19 BEST IN SHOW 1 Sonny Tougas and Education Loan Division, Ministry of Education, Science & Technology
Lunch Break P. O. Box N-3913, No later than Monday, April 30, 2007.
1:30 20 Special Class (Spayed & Neutered)
: oteeelie : ee
rossbreeds arry Kereluke Sere . : 7 7
C) Potcakes 1 Sonny Tougas Application forms received after this date will not be considered.
srall Winner 2 Ly Rereluke




7 oer ry

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

| THURSDAY EVENING

'@ WPBT
|

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8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00

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(:01) Raines “Pilot” A murdered
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THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 13B

let Charlie the
Bahamian Puppet and lay
his sidekick Derek put

some smiles on your
kids’s faces.

Bring your children to the
McHappy Hour at McDonald’s in
~ Palmdale every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
month of March 2007.

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.



i'm lovin’ it

Git Certificates

Movie
make great gifts!


PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007

anne eee ee ee eee ee ee ee
| | COMICS PAGE - rs

LOOK,
HONEYBUNCH, ROY'6
RIGHT--- MAYBE
YOU SHOULD...

IT'6 MY PARTY!

7” I'M GOING
TO THE COURTHOUSE
WITH YOU, REG!

THE BUILDING YOU'RE

INQUIRING ABOUT WAS

DECLARED A LANDMARK

SEVENTY YEARS AGO/
i

i

PINKHAM
RYDER “

THIS #@!* CAMPAIGN.

MARVIN






AST, BY WAVEREAL FREES D1 HHcett

it © 07 WIL IK. (HC,

TIGER

EXPERIMEN

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!'0 LIKE TO ORDER AN
EXTRA-LARGE PIZZA WITH
PEPPERONI ANO CHEESE

Cal -

THIS COAT




























€51GHI¢ HAVING
TO STARE AT
THESE TWO WALLS
IS BORING!

| { 00 you
4 DELIVER?






\S IT MAKING
You SWEAT?

| | CRYPTIC PUZZLE |







ACROSS: 1, Flood 6, Ditch 9, Pacific
10, Poppy 11, V-O-ce 12, C-anon 13,
Mission 15, Pea 17, Once 18, Act-or-
s 19, Dense 20, Tar-tar 22, Ince 24,
Hen 25, De-note-s 26, Tibe+ 27,
Dixie 28, P-i-ste 29, Platoon 30, Class
31, Pekes

DOWN: 2, Look-in 3, Op.-pose 4, Da-:
y 5, Diva-n 6, Div-orc-e 7, Ic-on 8,
Cocker 12, Cover (di-vorce) 13, Mo-N-
th 14, Scorn 15, Point 16, Ashes 18,
Asset (rev.) 19, Daniels 21, Aerial 22.
!-O-dine 23, Centre 25, Death 26, Tips
28, Pop

OVDOSZHHODO

7) i
Rh ACROSS DOWN
| FR | 8 Say excttedty“A lapsed ther (7) 1 Anunidentified substance in the
a 9 eau other scrambled egg (6)
s away 2 Giving no hints fe stupid (8)
B 13 Only a pupil at a time (5) 3 Definitely lke drawers you can pull
4 14 oe out easily (4,5,2)
: we're escaping
Uo 15 For food, comes from a ravaged : ae me
oe planet in which there's nothing
NI Tathee haven 21) peter pate arena ems
E | ___ temiade ot murat (7)
ome 17 Tum the radio on to get music (5) 6 Join the ranks, sweetie, and be
1 18 ven going back to hug her, he fost ' ee are
surage (5) drawing, 1
T 20 Lots of names of banks (5) ‘Ws clear (4) :
: 22 It's nottumed on only by what maybe | i: reanrediedaaet
a depressed (6) squashing a the
We 23 Heavens, take home an tangerines (7)
(Oo. Ice cream! (6) 12 Proprietary. That's very clear (6)
ae 28 Ree bane 19 Findto be in need of
eo permanently refurbighinn (9-4
| 27. The surviving childis 21 Tarai cd Gl
| supported by (6,2) thorougnay (0)
, | 30. Then, hatt cut, do very well (6) - 24 Does it ensure one
Ni | 31. Cautioned after the fight, going back eats senaibly? (6.5)
a home (6) 26 Not charging for accompanying the
4 aeuete ts bride to the aktar? (6,4)
© | 35 Loaded, hada large port! (5) aes Pied tee Coats, hese
o "i tell 29 Any silly gid entering in 4
36 He'll tel you furthermore it's
N venomous (5) Mot pique (7)
. | 37. Showusthe claim about Ris tase (7) | 30 Asoinducedto set ina
E | 39 Themarkonthe outside, Spanish city (6)
41 Greeting with an expression of : Ne aa
surprise 3 up giving a wave (6)
42 T Ticcaa site al akg Se 34 Decree the fellow should be given
in your placel (5) time (7)
43 Place to get, on entering, dominion - 38 Quick to bring pressure to bear on
over material desires? (9) the figurehead (6)
44 Rushed, lost one's temper (7) 40 Try-and get a nip (4)
~ YESTERDAY'S CRYPTIC SOLUTIONS

YESTERDAY'S EASY SOLUTIONS

ACROSS: 1, Panto 6, Handy 9,
Abettor 10, Forte 11, Stink 12, Claps
13, Alcohol 15, Emu 17, Soho 18,
Ocelot 19, Revue 20, Demcan 22,
Acne 24, Eve 25, Chatter 26, Stitt 27,
‘Weal 28, Beats 29, Tenuous 30,
Ashes 31, Steer

DOWN: 2, Apoto 3, Tattoo 4, OBE 5,
Still G, Hospice 7, Arts 8, Dynamo 12,
Coven 13, Aside 14, Chime 15, Elect
16, Utter 18, Ought 19, Rattles 21,
Syadas 22, Attest 23, Nestle 25,
Cloul 26, Sate 28, Bus







No. BUT MY
CANVY BA IS
MELTING











WHERE HE HANGS) HE'S
DEAD/



PERHAPS I(T
WOULD CHEER
THE PLACE UP
\F THUNG A
FEW PICTURES






COLOMICS, CoH [popSEQN SR

(©2007 by King Feanses Syndicate, Inc. Wortd npran reaarved.

eo

Cree
TH Ninth

ce
= cS}




South dealer.
Neither side vulnerable.
NORTH
398
Â¥AQ 10
852
$9743
WEST
463
Â¥J762
#QJ104
AIS

EAST
@A4
VK954
0973
#10862
SOUTH
#KQ10752
Â¥83
@AK6
#KQ
The bidding:
South West
1¢ Pass
44
Opening lead — queen of diamonds.
If you toss a coin in the air, it is
even money it will come down
heads. If you toss two coins, how-
ever, it is 3-to-1 that they will not
both come down heads. With three
coins the odds become 7-to-1.
Although it is not essential for a
competent bridge player to be able to
compute various _ probabilities
exactly, it is nevertheless helpful in
many hands to be generally familiar
with the principles of chance. Bridge
is, after all, a game of probabilities,
and the player who consistently
adheres to the percentages will come

North East
2%. Pass





THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS -

MOM, CAN T HAVE SOME
MONEY SO HOBRES AND
I CAN (TO A MONE?

T REAUN THINK THERE
ARE MORE CONSTRUCTIVE
WAYS YOU COULD SPEND
YOUR AFTERNOON, CALNIN.

Bridge Is a Game of Probabilities

TARGET |





out best in the long run.

Consider this deal where South
was in four spades. He won the dia-
mond lead and led a spade to the
jack, losing to the ace. East returned
a diamond to declarer’s king. After
drawing another round of trumps,
South led a heart to the queen, losing
to the king. He then lost a diamond
and a club to go down one.

Declarer erred by staking the out-
come strictly on a simple heart
finesse. In effect, he gave himself
only a 50 percent chance to make the
contract, since it was even money
whether East or West had the king of
hearts.

But he would have had a 3-to-1
chance in his favor if he had taken
the, queen-of-hearts finesse at trick
two, instead of later on. If it won, 10
tricks would have been assured.

Suppose, however, the queen lost
to the king, as in the actual deal.
South could then win. the diamond
return, lead another heart to dummy
and finesse the ten. If West held the
jack, the finesse would succeed, and
South could then dispose of his dia-
mond loser on the ace of hearts to
make the contract.

By this method of play, declarer
gets two chances to get home safely
instead of just one. He combines two
even-money shots, which, as in the
case of the coins, make him a 3-to-1
favorite.

The

Target

uses

words in

the main

body of

Chambers pe

21st o Be

Century Body

Dictionary § 8 e 8

(1999 zZ 4888

edition) E 2s Es >

Po

HOW many words of four a i 8 g 5
letters or more can you make 3 o8§8o =
from the letters shown here? y Bosse
In making a word, each letter > Seng a
may be used once only. Each 4 %S8ee2
must contain the centre letter e 3 as 25
and there must be at least one Boy RO
nine-letter word. No plurals 9 38 gHe <
TODAY'S TARGET 2 adda
Good 14; very good 21;

excellent 27 (or more). Solution

tomorrow.














EASY PUZZLE

























aay

wor

grammar

Study of
words and
re aX =) a UY Ta)

Ey AVE Yet








e
@2¢.9 >?

>

THURSDAY,
MARCH 15

ARIES — March 21/April 205:
You’re not concerned with other
people’s opinions this week, Ariés:
You are feeling quite confident and
loving every minute of it. Consult

aE OT TPLRW

4
#4

m7

te

with friends for weekend plans.
TAURUS - April 21/May 21.‘
It seems that romance is key for this,
week, Taurus. You are wef,
equipped to handle any situation
that comes your way — so make the:
most of chances for passion. Liby;

could be,a love match. rg

GEMINI - May 22/June 21°:
Stop your excessive worrying
Gemini, things will turn out just fine®,
Capricorn is’a key player in surpris*,
ing events .on Thursday. Expect an!
outcome you never expected. »,!
CANCER - June 22/July 22"
Now is the time to take chances and,
step out into the public spotlight,
Cancer. Make the most of your conff-«
dence to pursue a new love interest»
Don’t look too far for that someone. 2
LEO - July 23/August 23. =“
This week’s struggles won’t go away.;
with a quick fix. You must pull out the

big guns and spend some time and con-

sideration on this difficulty. Look to,
Pisces to lend a hand. v4

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22. ©”
The more you learn, the more you: ©
are anxious to use your knowl-,
edge, Virgo. All matters concern?»
ing technology are child’s play
this week. Others need your help. «*

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23

You provide the missing link in ans

important work project, Libra.*,
Tuesday will prove to be your most: «
productive day of the week. Use it as.¢
your power day and all others wilf »
look toward you as adeader. e

SCORPIO -— Oct 24/Nov 22 ~.

You’re the master of your domain;

Scorpio and you feel great. An easy «
work week leaves you plenty of time !
to sit back and enjoy the scenery. A*,
natural loner, enjoy it alone. af
SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21

You are not in the mood for commo-,,*
tion this week, Sagittarius, so stays”
away from those who are loud and»”
overbearing. Spend some serene /
moments with your mate. wy
CAPRICORN — Dec 22/Jan 20°;
Let work associates get a peak at what
makes you tick, Capricorn, and you'll “s
seem less mysterious to them. A testy.
boss contronts your work ethic. Be,»
patient and the situation will blow over, *,

*
AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 = ‘»*
You've bitten off more than you can’s
chew this week, Aquarius, but there’s
no backing out now. Best to call in’
the reserves, namely a few trusty
friends who can lend a hand.

PISCES — Feb 19/March 20 +
When a close friend pushes your lim- *
its, it’s best to stand by your princi-
ples and not go along with this per- 7
son’s plan. Trouble is not what you #,

«
se@eeaniu © OY

tale, tall, toll, toil, TAIL



need right now. re

CHESS by Leonard Barden 2

Rogelio Antonio v Dao Thein

Hai, Malaysian Open 2005. With 2

China and India aiming to _*

become chess superpowers and “?

smaller Far East nations o

benefiting from the increased v

ACROSS DOWN tournament activity, Asia is : ¢
8 ek 0s (7) a 1 oe aon the growth area for ea
chess. The game was given oa

: Hand aba 5) 3 ete oe) official status in last year's Asian “
15 Underwater oxide (8,3) Games in Qatar, it is believed é
missile (7) p. eneemmetery (27) that Beijing will allow it as a 2

16 Libyan capital (7) 6 Sroden ti) demonstration sport at the 2008 »
He acer eye (5) 7 Fevar (4) Olympic Games, while Qatar 0
20 Dark period (5) 10 Absolutely correct plans to bid for the 2016 just two turns to induce his 0%
22 Landa a 4-2) Olympics and has said that chess vietnamese opponent to resign. Ve
house (6) a Sherer dance 6 will be part of the package. In what happened? ; /

ae Sov aniuesn 19 Contort the face by today’s position White is “
27 More than a few (7° 21 Large ape (7) attacking, and though Black 7
30 Credit (6) oa eae aath 3,4) seems to have a solid defensive °4
31 Shooting star (6) 26 Rastafarian | formation it took the Philippines of
32 Staff of life (5) hairstyle (1 o master Antonio (White, to play) ‘

35 Endure (6) 28 Takk LEONARD BARDEN é
36 Unify (5) times (8) if
37 sh (7) 29 age ( SST A
39 Foreboding evil (7) 30 eet if
41 Fool (5 32 Propel 26) a
42 Estimate (5) 33 Elgar 6 * . »,!
43 Insect type 34 photo (3,4) Chess solution 8317: 1 Qxg/7+! Kxg7 2 Nd5! Resigns. It <
44 Cafeteria (7 38 Irregular (6) exd5 (else White regains the queen with a bishop “ F
AO Press Comte ahead) 3 NF5++ Kg8 4 Nh6 mate. £
Mensa quiz: Sport. The words are Tasty, Topaz, Trout, *,
Three and Tatty. "a
One possible word ladder solution is: MANE, male, le 4

?
THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2007, PAGE 15B —

The Tribune’s & Kelly’s

EASTER

Coloring Contest
FIRST PRIZE = 3 SECONDPRIZE ___ THIRD PRIZE

Tea NS). ¢ 9 1) Ps 20S) Ci) CURT
In Each Age Group wee InEachAgeGroup In Each Age Group














m CONTEST RULES

1 Children ages 4-5, 6-8, and 9-10. Staff members and relatives of The Tribune and Kelly’s are not eligible to enter.

2 Coloring may be done with crayons. Adults or an older child may assist the child in filling out the entry form, BUT NOT IN COLORING THE ENTRY.

3 Enter as many times as you wish. All entries must be in The Tribune by 5 pm on Friday March 30, 2007. Winners will be contacted April 3 and winners
published Thursday, April 5, 2007.

4 There will be one first-prize winner, one second-prize winner and one third-prize winner in each age group.

5 All entries become the property of The Tribune and may be used for any purpose including, but not limited to, publication in a future issue.
NO PHOTOCOPIES. USE NEWSPAPER AD ONLY

Child’s Name: | Parent/Guardian Signature

Address: Tel: (hm) (cell) Age:



| *Toys | é Eag Colouring Kits _ | ae A
* Stuffed Bunnies * Reading Books f# \ aia:
* Easter Candies » Beach Toys h BASKETS

| TDi
© Gift Items = Vac



¢ Decorations —« Baskets Soe K, I. House

© Party Goods —* Stickers Che ay Home
7° Silk Flowers and much more! =a Tek. {242} 3934000 + Fen (242} 3984096


PAGE 16B THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY MARCH 15TH, 2007

THE WEATHER REPORT Exe (FNSURANG MANAGEVENT



Arty a eee Pi: mes

Friday WINDS _ WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
High Low W NASSAU Today: E at 8-16 Knots ~ 2-4 Feet - 77° F







































F/C F/C Friday: ESE at 6-12 Knots 1-2 Feet 6-7 Miles TE

130. 74/23. FREEPORT Today: E at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-7 Miles 76° F

MODERATE «38 pe Friday: SE at 6-12 Knots 1-2 Feet 5-7 Miles 76° F

1/-6 pc ABACO Today: E at 8-16 Knots 3-5 Feet 6-7 Miles 16°F

Intervals of clouds Partly cloudy. Partial sunshine. Mostly cloudy, a t- Mostly cloudy, a Partly sunny and The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the 46/7 pe Friday: SE at 6-12 Knots 1-3 Feet 5-7 Miles 76° F
and sunshine. storm possible. - shower possible. windy. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Ze i





High: 80° High: 80° High: 76° High: 76°
High: 80° Low: 70° Low: 70° Low: 68° Low: 66° Low: 66°

VHA teatro






itv ES aa




/i pe «50/10 =~ 33/0 pe
“51/10 t a 93/11 ae










The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel