Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )
UF00084249_02835 ( sobekcm )

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Full Text






Volume: 103 No.86



‘=. SUN, CLOUDS
ws. AND BREEZE

|
1
|

Lawsuit to have ‘no
impact’ on South
Teel Mets a mere 1

Maa SUS Le

Siow Alliance
planning to ask
Privy Council to
prevent any __
discrimination

@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

HOMOSEXUALS aim to
take their concerns to the Privy
Council if they.don’t-receive
justice from thé local courts,
says gay rights activist Erin
Greene.
| In an exclusive interview with
The Tribune, Ms. Greene said
that the Rainbow Alliance of
the Bahamas (RAB) — the
local gay rights group — is
changing its campaign strategy
in the light of a recent UK leg-
islation that prohibits discrimi-
nation against homosexuals.

“With the recent events in
England with the passing of the
Equality Act 2006 we are cer-
tain that in due time Bahamian
law will be created and/or mod-
ified to ensure that homosexuals
can participate in the develop-
ment of their country as
equals,” Ms Greene said.

The Equality Act was tabled
in the British House of Com-
mons in January, and the act is
due to come into effect in Eng-
land, Wales and Scotland in
April.

The act outlaws discrimina-
tion in-the provision of goods,
facilities and services on the
basis of sexual orientation.

Prime Minister Tony Blair
has already come under heavy
criticism from various religious
groups, particularly Catholics,

who are asking for an exemp-
tion to the law, that would con-
tinue to allow church run adop-
tion agencies to prohibit adop-
tions to homosexuals.
Adoption agencies had
warned they would close rather
than place children with gay
couples, saying that went
against their beliefs.
However, the British gov-
ernment has said there will be
no exemption from anti-dis-
crimination laws for Catholics
or any other adoption agencies.
“There is no place in our
society for discrimination.

- That’s why I support the right of

gay couples to apply to adopt

like any other couple.
“And that way there can be

no exemptions for faith-based

adoption agencies offering pub- _

lic funded services from regu-
lations that prevent discrimina-
tion,” Prime Minister Blair said.
He added: “It’s a difficult sit-
uation, but I think we have
found the right balance and a
sensible compromise.”
_ The Catholic Church in Eng-
land and Wales said it was
“deeply disappointed” that no
exemption had been offered.
Ms Greene told The Tribune
that the Equality Act had

changed the strategy of the gay —

rights campaign in the

Bahamas.

SEE page 14

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yn The Tribune

Che Miami Herald





BAHAMAS EDITION



MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

THO ae

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mee ial: and the Caribbean







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PRICE — 75¢







Man suffers
— serious:

injuries in ©
dog attack

@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

A MAN was left in serious

“condition in the hospital after
-- a “vicious” dog attack over the

weekend, according to police
reports.

The police said that on Sat-
urday night a 23-year-old man

‘from the Carmichael Road area

was attacked by. dogs while

walking.

“Tt is reported that the man -

- was rescued from the dogs by a

“neighbour who came to his



@ GOVERNOR General Arthur Hanna and Dame Marguerite Pindling look te see what prizes’
they could win on Saturdyy at the Red Cross Fair, in the grounds of Government House

(Photo:Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

nuvceccccccccccccaceccucthuccsncdseccececceseuseeccssceusessncsesccaseceseecsuceduaneaesteceesacesesecencensnceasecacsscuasecssscavancouesecsuseaenseneesncessenssancessunssnsaueneaueneusuccuscaccssranssaeuacseussaascuausauesuaugeuauccacsccsacccseceusnasenaesasensaracseene se

THE PLP i ‘is “desperately —
attempting to resurrect the
bogeyman of the old UBP”
which has been long dead and
buried, the opposition FNM
said in its weekly commentary
yesterday.

The opposition said that this
was the same strategy the gov-

erning party used when it came

to office in 1992.
“They used the same tired old
propagance It did not work

then and it will not work now.
It’s a tired old myth, and the

‘Bahamian people are aware

that 10 years of FNM gover-
nance gave the lie to that line.
The UBP did not come back
then and it will not come back
now,” the party said.

The opposition said that it
proved while in office that it is

‘far more progressive than the

PLP which is progressive in
name only. :

“During the course of the
campaign the Bahamian people
will see clearly the difference
between them and us when it
comes to being progressive,”
said the party.

The opposition claimed that
one of the fundamental issues
that separates the FNM from
the PLP is the issue of democ-
ratic governance.

“Before the PLP came to
power in 1967 it promised, if

assistance on hearing loud
screams.

During the rescue, the neigh-
bour was also bitten and taken
to hospital for treatment.

However, the police said that

the man, who was initially. |

attacked, is in serious condition
at the hospital.

SEE page 14.

PLP ‘trying to resurrect UBP bogeyman’

elected, to introduce elective
and representative local gov-
ernment for the Family Islands.
In 1968 Minister of Out Island
Affairs Warren Levarity caused
to be drafted and circulated a
White Paper on Local Govern-
ment in the first step towards
fulfilment of that important
fomise. But that was as far as it
got,” the party said.

SEE page 14

necccccadececctccenevivesvesacccuseccdnecconccbsnegessecsesecouagayetenvacacncsaccqdsnnbageucuenesssavasecuebasectucctsccecqaaeneugeccaeesscacsccanscceuseacubaqcagencsaqnconcncncaavacnecsnascansendesecancccucencacenanacgunascusnaccuaaccanavauccnccaneusenelepenesegesecaeeges

’Brilanders sceptical

over ‘Master Plan’

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

THE first draft of the Har-
bour Island Master Develop-
ment Plan was met with scep-
ticism by island residents,
who felt that while it did con-
tain some good ideas, they
had not been consulted sig-
nificantly.

The master plan — a joint
venture between the architec-
tural firms of Bruce LaFleur
and Associates of Nassau, and
Kiser, Straw and Kolodner of

of Harbour Island.

A first draft was presented }
by Malcolm Martini, from the :
Ministry of Energy and the ;
Environment, and Jim Straw, a :
town planner at Kiser, Straw }
and Kolodner, himself a winter ;
resident of Harbour Island for :
: dollars in revenues.

more than 10 years.

According to Mr Straw, the :
plan is “just the beginning of :
: Business, where an industry
i; insider claimed that lack of

SEE page 14

Docks condition has no

impact on cruise ships

i Ml By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Philadelphia, was commissioned :
by the Prime Minister to }
address the future development :
: Prince.George’s Wharf has not

Tribune Business Reporter
THE condition of bollards at

negatively impacted the num-
ber of cruise ships arriving in
Nassau, the Port Controller told
The Tribune, refuting claims
that any deterioration in the
dock’s condition meant this
nation had lost thousands of

Captain Anthony Allens said
the recent article in Tribune

space at Prince George’s Wharf
and the dock’s deterioration
meant that at least five ships
had to be turned away per
week, was inaccurate.

Mr Allens said that while it
was true that cruise ships have
had to be turned away, it is
because the increasing size of
the ships - and the fact they all
request the most popular days -
Tuesdays, Fridays Saturdays
and Sundays - makes it physi-
cally impossible to accommo:
date them.

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(



‘starring with Eartha Kitt in the

’ the bodybuilding titles of Mr

PAGE 2, MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE




Bodybuilder Steve
arroll dies at 65

ANTHONY (Tony) Carrol,
world famous bodybuilder,
actor and perennial winner in
the individual Junkanoo cate-
gorys died late Friday at the
Princess Margaret Hospital
after a short illness. -

He was 65 years old.

Fans of the He-Man franchise
would remember his perfor-
mance as Beastman in the 1987
live action He-Man film "Mas-
ters of the Universe", but most
remember him for his fantastic
solo performances each year at
Junkanoo.

His career took off after.co-

Broadway play, "Timbuktu", in
the early 70s.

For several years after he
appeared on such television
shows as Buck Rogers, SOAP,
Kojak, Today's FBI, Alice and
Bloopers and Practical Jokes.

He costarred in six feature
films, starred in seven theatrical
productions both on and off
Broadway.

At different times he has held

America, Mr World and Mr >
Universe.

@ TONY Carroll



|g today &
nassau
freeport t 248








































rari Na ES)

the Government House grounds



@ GOVERNOR

General Arthur

Hanna hugs two

i TONY little girls
_ Carroll shown yesterday as
in full i Dame Marguerite
Beastman ; Pindling looks on
costume going: while they toured
over his part: ea _ the stalls
in the i (Photo:Felipé
Masters of the : ; Major/Tribune

Universe i. staff)

“movie.

a ais & Bowdlery
She have to Say?

© 2007 ADWORKS

ae. Sjakcnaaeoin











Red Cross Fair at Government House

@ THE Governor General Arthur Hanna tours the stalls on Saturday at the Red Cross Fair held at

ie apy

& AFTER getting his face painted this child enjoys a nice cold drink at the Red Cross fair

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THE TRIBUNE



e In brief

Entertainment
series Is
‘introduced at
Pelican Bay

PELICAN Bay at Lucaya
introduced a new entertainment
series for resort guests and
Grand Bahama residents over
the weekend.

In the next two months, Peli-
can Bay will offer art exhibi-
tions and musical performances
poolside at the resort.

The series will feature com-
plimentary performances with
choirs, steel drum performers,
violinists, rake ’n scrape bands,
and exhibitions featuring the
work of the island’s leading
artists. The shows and exhibi-
tions will take place on Friday
and Saturday nights, March 2
through April 28.

The series, started Friday
night with a performance from
the Bishop Michael Eldon High
School senior choir and dance
group.

On Saturday, Ophie and the
Boys performed Rake ’n Scrape
music.

“Pelican Bay at Lucaya is

committed to offering its guests -

experiences that they otherwise
would not have been able to
embrace while visiting Grand
Bahama Island,” said Terria
Grant, front office manager,
Pelican Bay. “This past week-
end’s experiences mark only the
beginning of our creating a myr-
iad of indigenous experiences
for our guests.”

No bank
privatisation
planned in
Venezuela

@ VENEZUELA
Caracas

FINANCE Minister Rodrigo
Cabezas said ere that the



stances, accor ae to Associated
Press.

But he added that President
Hugo Chavez would use powers
granted to him by congress to
issue a decree to strengthen the
role of financial intermediation
of private banks.

“Tt is not planned in the short
term, medium term, or long
term that the Bolivarian social-
ist revolution-would nationalise

banks of private financial insti-

tutions. Except in an unusual
circumstance that comes to con-
spire against the revolution,”
he said in a Televen television
interview.

He also said Venezuela could
maintain itself for 18 months
even if its biggest buyer of. oil,
the United States, suspended
purchases.

“If the North Americans
decide some day to ask us to
stop selling them oil ... don’t
have any doubt that our oil will
be sold somewhere on the plan-
et,” he said.

He said India is one possible
market and agreements are
already in the works to supply
China. “Toward the end of the
decade, it is likely that we will
be selling a million barrels dai-
ly of oil.”

He said there are no plans to
eliminate controls on the
exchange of foreign currency,
in place since 2003, despite com-
plaints from sectors, including
carmakers, that the controls
make it difficult to obtain US
dollars to import goods.

He defended government
plans to seize businesses found
hoarding food or speculating
with prices as the country faces
food shortages and the govern-
ment seeks to ensure items are
sold at set prices.

“Nobody likes using force,”
he said.

m@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE FNM believes there
should be limited hiring in the
public service until temporary
and contractual government
workers are regularised.

The declaration was made
by Bain and Grants Town can-
didate Dayid Jordine yester-
day.

Mr Jordine said there is an
urgent need to regularize these
persons in the system in an
effort to afford some sort of
comfort and job security.

In the past, he said, one of
the “political tools” vigorously
used by the PLP was to employ
large numbers of people near
an election in temporary gov-
ernment jobs in an attempt to
secure votes from persons, who
are easily enticed with the
prospect of obtaining a gov-

LOCAL NEWS

Party looks at public service



ernment job.

“Though the government
has a social responsibility to
provide employment for all its
people who are willing, and
capable of working, the social
responsibility should be more
geared towards providing
secure and stable employment
and entrepreneurial opportu-
nities,” Mr Jordine said.

Mr Jordine claimed that

since the PLP’s convention in :

2005, the government has
made announcements of lift-
ing the moratorium on gov-
ernment hiring to accommo-
date some 1200 or more per-

“sons.

“Tam further concerned

that many persons are work-
ing as temps or weekly in the
public service and they do
not have much to look for-
ward to in terms of financial
security if for-any reason they
are terminated, hospitalized,
incapacitated, or have
reached the age of retire-
ment,” he said.
- Mr Jordine said that he is
also concerned with weekly
workers in the public service
who are not considered suit-
able candidates for loans in
banks, which he claims is con-
tributing to the lack of self-suf-
ficiency in our communities.
Mr Jordine said his goal is

to focus on the issue of |

Zhivargo Laing opens campaign
headquarters with announcement

HUNDREDS turned out in
support of Marco City candi-
date Zhivargo Laing as he offi-
cially opened his campaign
headquarters, and outlined
numerous programmes he and
the FNM will implement to
facilitate tangible and positive
change in the lives of Marco
City residents.

Mr Laing said that the open-
ing of the headquarters was a
defining moment in his cam-
paign to give that area “better
representation in the House of

Assembly and a better gov-'

ernment for our country.”

’ “From within this headquar-
ters we are strategising not
merely to win an election but
to lift the quality of life of you,
the residents of Marco City,
Grand Bahama and the

Bahamas,” the FNM hopeful

said.
“Living in Marco City, trav-
elling throughout the con-



& ZHIVARGO ) Laing

stituency and speaking with
many of you in your homes,
the issues that concern us are
clear. These include, among

~ other things: joblessness; stag-

nant wages and household

income; illegal immigration;
high cost of living; and over-
crowded high school. .
“These are real and chal-
lenging issues that we will have
to face together. We can
address many of them. It has
not been done over the last five
years; they will be addressed
over the next five years with
me as your representative and
the FNM as your government,”

the former Cabinet Minister -

said.

He told those gathered at
the event that he did not come
empty handed and had “real
plans and programmes” for
making life in Marco City bet-
ter. These include: Freedom of
Information Act; amend Local
Government Act to give fur-
ther powers to Local Govern-
ment and an MP Reporting to
the People Act requiring MPs
to give a comprehensive annu-
al report of their duties.

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Mar. 10







MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007, PAGE 3

employment in Bain and Grants

Town. ;
“Providing assistance in find-

ing employment where it is

needed, securing employment,
and the financial position of all,
in particular the young Bahami-
ans in our constituency,” Mi
Jordine explained.

Mr Jordine said he wished the










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prime minister and the minis-
ter of public service to bring
swift relief to Bain and Grant’s
Town through the provision of
true job creation and security.

He also implored the govern- 5
ment to stop the “nonsense” of ;
using temporary government
jobs as a political tool for elec-
tion votes.

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Cabezas said such moves are
not a sign the government is
seeking to wipe out private busi-
nesses.

“The Bolivarian revolution
does not deny private property”
but owners needs are subordi-
nate to society’s best interests,
he said.

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR:

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon. J LL, D., D. Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

aoe DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

Election talk needs to be moderated

RECENTLY the first caller to The Tribune
to tip our reporters off to a murder in the
Johnson Road area, blamed the incident on
politics. He claimed that all the racial talk by
certain politicians and a particular talk show
host was inflaming the people and creating
discord in the Johnson Road area.

Residents, of which he was one, were not
only upset, but they were afraid for their safe-
ty. He did not understand how race had a
place in Bahamian politics, especially as unity
among citizens was needed to tackle so much
that was wrong in the country today — par-
ticularly crime, the reason for his call.

We don’t know if the growing racial tension
had any part in this particular murder — from
the police report we think not — but still the
caller’s fears are not misplaced.

We had several telephone calls from
Bahamians, both black and white, after Prime
Minister Christie’s interview on a local radio
talk show on February 18. They were all upset
— some were angry, some nervous for their
safety, others considered his emotive words
irresponsible.

Said one concerned citizen: “We know that
Mr Christie is a passionate speaker, we know
he is emotive, but he should be careful of the
words he uses, words that silly people can
take out of context with unpleasant conse-
quences. What I would like to know is: When
does passion become incitement?” He felt
that Mr Christie had crossed the line:

And what were the words that bothered
this Bahamian? He was very concerned about
Mr Christie referring to sinister “forces in this
country” that were pushing Opposition Leader
Hubert Ingraham back into politics. In the
course of the political campaign Mr Christie
promised to name them. The next day a gov-
ernment talk show host had latched onto Mr
Christie’s sinister “forces” and turned them
into “traitors”.

The talk show hosts tone and words over
the government radio station further inflamed
the situation, and, as one Bahamian said, if a
“traitor” is fingered he is no longer safe in
his own country. And who will be blamed for
fingering him?

The Bahamian who talked with us was also
concerned that Mr Christie had declared war
on the community with the words: “We’re
going to put faces on this, because this is a
fight for the future of this country. It is not
going to be an easy fight and as a result of
what I have seen I will spare no effort to turn
the streets into what I call a basket of infor-
mation.” He called it a “basket of informa-
tion.” By day’s end the feeble-minded had

Technical
Scholarships
available

twisted it into a basket of something more
evil, which we shall leave to the imagination of
our readers.

And so where is this taking the country?
Instead of fighting crime, some were con-
tributing to the problem by declaring war on
persons who dared to have an opposing polit-
ical opinion. Do these statements threaten

‘ democracy?. Of course, they do.

Also of concern was Mr Christie’s descrip-
tion of Mr Ingraham as the type of person
who would “take your guts out and then come
to your funeral and cry.’

. Most of our readers would have read of
the fate of St Thomas 4 Becket, Archbishop
of Canterbury. According to history his mur-
der was the result of words uttered in, pas-

. sion.

King Henry II of England and Becket were
close friends, but the day came when king and
prelate fell out because of a difference of opin-
ion. In short the king wanted complete control
over Church and State. Becket drew the line
when it came to the Church. Tension grew
between the two men. One day in the heat of
passion the king angrily uttered words to the
effect: “Will no one rid me of this turbulent
priest?”

Four knights, who heard this outburst,
interpreted them as the king’s command, and
rode post haste to Canterbury. There they
murdered the “turbulent priest” inside his
cathedral as cathedral monks chanted ves-
pers.

Most historians agree that King Henry,
despite his harsh words, did not intend for
Becket to be murdered.

That bloody incident took place in the
twelfth century. Today harsh words are as
potent as they were then and can have the
same unintended results. As the good book
says: “There is no new thing under the sun.’

The Bahamas’ election campaign has start-
ed off badly and if tensions are racheted up
any higher by too many passiofrate words, it
will end badly.

Politicians on both sides would do well to
heed the words of Bahamas Christian Council

. President William Thompson who advised

them to lay the issues before the people
instead of trying to diminish the character of
their opponents in order to win votes.

“As we head into the months of cam-
paigning remember who we are — we are one
nation. If we destroy it in our campaign trail
we will have nothing to govern. So let us be
very careful,” the president warned.

_ It is now time for passion to be moderated
and good sense to prevail.





THE TRIBUNE



A need to
address our
education

EDITOR, The Tribune

THE contract for construc-
tion of a Junior High School in
Freeport’s Heritage subdivision
has finally ‘been signed, I
believe. Construction of the
school will soon start, I hope.
The first block is yet to be laid
though, mind you.

I opted to forego attending
Fidelity’s grand opening of their
new Freeport office in order to
watch the ground breaking/con-
tract signing for the school on
TV-13. I ended up not watching
all that much. Retrospectively, I
think my decision-making may
have been flawed.

The expression “all things are
created twice” by Stephen Coy-
ey, one of my favourite authors,
has likely been used by me ona
previous occasion. I doubt,
however, that Mr Covey con-
ceived of a gestation period
anywhere near as long as is
being experienced with Her-

itage Junior High when he said °

what he did.

My understanding is that con-
struction of the school was to
have commenced in 2002, to
cater to a growing Freeport
school population and, at the
same time, separate younger,
more impressionable minds
from students with more world-
ly outlooks ‘and attitudes.

I suppose ‘construction was
not proceeded with because
“someone” dithered. Yet, “no
one” intervened. Nevertheless I
haven’t heard of “anyone” step-



iO aMb Sl

letters@tribunemedia.net






ping up to the plate and saying,
mea culpa, I am to blame. Per-
haps “everyone” feels the con-
tract signing will now have a
mantra-like effect on the com-
munity.

As a consequence of the
apparent vacillation, Jack Hay-
ward High is now colossally
overcrowded. This situation
will, no doubt, exacerbate fur-
ther this coming September.

Constructed, I understand, to
house 800 students the school
has currently home to 1700. St
George’s High, designed to

‘cater to a similar number. as

Jack Hayward, presently has an
enrolment of 1300.

Given the extent of over-
crowding persisting at Jack
Hayward and St Georges, Her-
itage Junior High will likely
already be overcrowded by the
time its doors open.

More than five years have
passed since a new school was
built on Grand Bahama. I have
heard it said that more than five
years have passed since a new
school was built anywhere in
the Bahamas.

“A mind is a terrible thing to
waste”, is a commonly used
expression, seemingly of
unknown origin. The serious
overcrowding at Freeport’s two
Government high schools may

well be contributing to the
minds of this nation’s “darlings”
being wasted to a degree.

Late last year (2006) Britain’s
Prime Minister, Tony Blair, not-
ed “Education is the most pre-
cious gift a society can bestow
on its children”. Is overcrowd-
ing depriving our children of
such a precious gift? Is it, per-
haps, contributing to the under
achievement of our youth,
including that BGCSE “D”
average which has evoked much
discussion?

Some years ago, Professor
Kader Asmi,.Education Minis-
ter of South Africa at the time,
noted “Education is not just a
fundamental right; there is
irrefutable evidence that it cre-
ates the opportunity for sus-
tainable livelihoods.” Are we

‘depriving our youth of the

opportunity to foster sustain-
able livelihoods because of pre-_
vailing overcrowded classroom
conditions?

Last month, as a contribution
to Black History month, War-
ren Washington noted.“educa-
tion is still the (great) equalis-
er”. Failing to provide our
youth with an appropriate
learning environment is tanta-
mount to failing to not giving
them due access to a proper
sharing in the country’s eco-
nomic pie.

Our youth deserve better,

MICHAEL R MOSS
Freeport, Bahamas
March 2007

Jet-ski rentals and drug offers.

EDITOR, The Tribune

MY Spring Break visitors
from Canada spent Tuesday,
February 7th, on the beach at
Paradise Island, the same day
that the 21-years-old tourist is
reported to have died after a
jet-ski related incident. Upon
their return back to our resi-

‘dence, shaking their heads they

told us of how the jet ski oper-
ators were soliciting sales of jet
ski rides beginning at $90. They
told us they could not afford
the exorbitant price and kept
shaking their heads, curious to
see if the operator would reduce
the cost. Much to their amaze-

ment, the operator then offered |

them marijuana joints, pressing
them repeatedly asking, “You
like smoke?”

I believe I am correct in
understanding that these oper-
ators act independently of
Atlantis and RIU, and that

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ignores requests and warnings
to protect tourists from some
unscrupulous operators. How
can any responsible Govern-
ment allow this situation to
continue? How many chil-
dren, teenagers, young and
older adults are going to be
allowed to repeatedly fall into
the hands of these operators
who are pushing drugs to
underage or drunk tourists?
How is it that we are allow-
ing these same unscrupulous
operators to be handing out
joints to tourists before they
rent these jet skis? Who is to
say that this same young man
might not have accepted a
token smoke or perhaps
worse, a snort which, com-
bined with a strenuous swim,
led to his death?

It is a shame that there are
always a few individuals who
ruin business for others, and

that our Government continues
to be held ransom to “voters”.
Wake up Bahamians, if there
are operators out there who do
not practise “gouging” of
tourists, rentals of jet skis to
those who are inebriated and
offers of drugs to entice tourists
to ride these powerful
machines, come forward and
take control of this volatile sit-
uation and be leaders in your
industry.

Many of us watch in horror
and disgust at how our wonder-
ful country is progressing rapid-
ly downhill and wonder how
long it will take the tourists to
wake up and realise that The
Bahamas is not really interested
in their welfare and promoting a
safe, affordable and pleasent
destination. ‘

S A FARRINGTON
Nassau
March 2 2007

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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007, PAGE 5

Pe EE ea

The legacy of Anna Nicole Smith

VEN those of us who

have been dismayed at
the nature of the attention that
the Anna Nicole Smith affair
has brought to the country must
concede that it has a certain
bright side.

There have, of course, been
all sorts of unkind innuendoes
about the Bahamas among the
more sensationalist and unpro-
fessional American journalists,
interested in investigating every
salacious angle of the affair.
There has also probably been
some degree of annoyance
among those American visitors
who have been coming or resid-
ing here for years that the
wrong kind of compatriot may
soon be joining them here in
uncomfortable numbers, on the
Anna Nicole trail.

But overall, it is difficult not
to conclude that the whole trag-
ic affair has not been, on bal-
ance, a boon to The Bahamas.

If we are to believe press
reports, a number of new rev-
enue streams have already
opened in the wake of the
affair. It seems, for instance,
that taxi drivers and tour oper-
ators will be hosting costly pil-
grimages to the Eastern Road
for many years to come, as nos-
talgic Americans indulge a
curiosity about ‘the Anna
Nicole house”.

As for the owners of Lake-
view cemetery and perhaps

even Mt Horeb Baptist Church

PERSPECTIVES



ANDREW ALLEN

impact, there are good reasons
to believe that, unlike the last
time our country figured this
prominently in the US media, it
will emerge this time with its
reputation intact, or possibly
even enhanced.

irstly, despite the obvi-

ous questions that must
be asked about the circum-
stances that prompted it, the
most potentially damaging
aspect of this affair (the rela-
tionship between the starlet and
the man who approved her res-
idency status) has ended in a
ministerial resignation. —

Importantly, as was clear for
the world to see, the pressure
that forced Shane Gibson’s tele-
vised departure emanated
entirely from within the
Bahamas, beginning with intense
opposition scrutiny of the matter
and culminating in a major jour-
nalistic scoop by The Tribune, a
Bahamian newspaper.

The importance of these facts
and what they say for the state
of Bahamian society can hardly
be overstated. It all offers a
healthy comparison with the
‘way the matter has played out
in Ms. Smith’s country of ori-



For the image of the country,
Shane Gibson’s resignation was,
whatever the truth behind the
accusations, as positive an
outcome as could have been
hoped for under the

circumstances.

I I ETE TS

in Sandyport, they are likely to

seé an increased interest in their _

services among Americans.
But more importantly than
the immediate economic

gin.

.As.is now clear, Ms. Smith
lived a life that constituted a
trail of ‘incidents’. A whiff of
scandal seems to hang around

Â¥

many of the people with whom
she came to interact, be they

against all of the scrutiny
focused upon it. While some
‘news personalities’ made early,
predictably disparaging insinu-
ations, it has now become clear
to a USA-wide audience that
Bahamian justice is far from a
circus affair.

The somberness of court pro-



There are good reasons to
believe that, unlike the last time
our country figured this
prominently in the US media,
it will emerge this time with its:
reputation intact, or possibly

even enhanced.



doctors, lawyers or other pro-
fessionals. That the only poten-
tially scandalous association
involving a Bahamian has
resulted in a forced resignation
tells the world that Bahamian
society is not as tolerant of even
the appearance of scandal as it
once was.

As for Mr Gibson himself,
here is a very young politician
who has built a solid core of
support within his party. He
could well have a place in some
future government when all this
blows over. But for the image of
the country, his resignation was,
whatever the truth behind the

accusations, as positive an out- °

come as could have been hoped
for under the circumstances.

s for the Bahamas’
legal institutions and
its lawyers, these have been
articulately represented by
those of my colleagues who
have appeared in US. news
shows. One recalls with partic-
ular satisfaction a stern-faced
Wayne Munroe reprimanding
Sean Hannity (a rightwing bul-
ly who hosts a shallow show on
Fox) for sensationalism. ,
While proceedings are appar-
ently far from concluded, the
country’s legal system itself has
also come off respectably



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cedure here as compared with
Florida seems stark after view-
ing televised footage of the lat-
ter. Bahamian justice may be‘a
little slow and deliberate, but it
is clear that, as the proceedings
here get underway, there will
be no cameras, no loose report-
ing (on account of contempt
rules) and no courtroom audi-
tioning by judges for TV shows.

Early in the affair, a legal
‘expert’ on Court Television
described the Bahamian legal
system as ‘primitive’ for not
regarding physical paternity as
the conclusive factor in deter-
mining paternal rights. Three
weeks and six potential fathers
later (many with nakedly mate-
rialistic motivations), it is
becoming clear to many Amer-
ican viewers that fatherhood is
about more than sperm dona-
tion and that a jurisdiction that
regards fatherhood as a more
robust legal construct than mere
physical paternity is actually
more sophisticated in its
approach, not less.

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c



PAGE 6, MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

PM: ‘substat

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter




before government.
Despite concerns expressed
by the opposition party about

FREEPORT — Expressing
the depressed state of the Grand

strong optimism for the future
of Grand Bahama, Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie announced
that new “substantial develop-

TV 13 SCHEDULE

MONDAY,
MARCH 5TH

6:30amBahamas @ Sunrise - Live
11:00 Immediate Response .
12:00 ZNS News Update (Live)
12:05 Immediate Response
1:00 Legends: Jimmy Nixon

said that the island is beginning
to show signs of vitality.

Speaking at the opening of
the Fidelity Financial Centre in
Freeport on Thursday, the
prime minister said the compa-
ny’s expansion here is an indi-
cation that there is confidence
in the economy of Freeport and
Grand Bahama.






















there was gloom, now there is
energy and the elections are

ThePublic Service
Gospel Grooves

Royal Oasis resort because of
the sensitive nature of the nego-
tiations to sell the hotel.

10:00 Caribbean Newsline
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
{2m/n Immediate Response



ments” for the island are now’:

Bahama economy, Mr Christie”)

He said: “You are going to.
find there is energy here. Before’

1:30 One Cubed coming up now.

2:00 Caribbean Passport “But, I indicated that any®:
2:30 Turning Point government of the Bahamas
3:00 Ami Rushes will have to now ensure that it
3:30 Bishop Neil Ellis gets on top of Grand Bahama
4:00 The Fun Farm because it is going to move very
5:00 ZNS News Update quickly in the coming months
5:05 A Service of Thanksgiving: with huge developments going

on at the same time, and there-
fore more people will be ~ End, and its.extensive market-

6:25 Life Line ‘employed, and more will have
6:30 News Night 13 - Freeport to come into Grand Bahama to
7:00 Bahamas Tonight secure employment that will be
8:00 You & Your Money available here.”
8:30 _ Island Life Destinations Mr Christie indicated that he ,
9:00 Human Mind could not to speak about the’

The Harcourt, Development ©





1:30am Community Pg. 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
right to make last minute
programme changes!

Group is in negotiations to pur
chase the closed resort proper:
ty after an initial investment
group failed to complete the
purchase deal for $40 million.






















CABLE BAHAMA
APPOINTS EDRIS

TO OPERATIONS f
(GRAND BAHAMA |

advanced broadband networks, tod.

and Bimini.

"Edris has been a key part of our su

Nassau and obtained a Bachelor of
Business

Toastmasters programs where she

Toastmasters group. She is an avid
and has participated in bowling



Cable Bahamas Ltd, which operates one of the most

appointment of Edris Wilson to Operations Manager,
Northern Bahamas. Ms. Wilson will have primary
responsibility for the daily manag
company's operations on Grand Bahar



thrilled to appoint her to this important }
Tony Butler, President/COO of Cable Bahamas Ltd.

Ms. Wilson was educated at St. Anne s High School,
Administration from Acadia University,
Wolfville, Nova Scotia, Canada in 1991 and a MBA from
the University of Miami Executive program in 2000.

Ms. Wilson is a product of the Junior

President of the Action for Achievement Club 1095



Providence and Grand Bahama. Congrats Edris!

The closure of the property
has resulted in the loss of 1,200
jobs, and 30 per cent of the
island’s room inventory since
the hurricanes of 2004.

Mr Christie said: “The Grand

‘Bahama Port Authority could
tell you of the significant, if not,
substantial developments that
have crossed their desk enroute
:to the government of the
Bahamas, and the people of
Grand Bahama will hear about
“them inshort order.
“So, really in essence the
.doom and gloom that was the
order of day down here about
othe ‘future of Grand Bahama
«should be dispelled, that there is
every reason to look around
and see that there is an out-
standing future for the island of

Grand Bahama.”

_-Mr Christie also reminded
“residents)of current major
~ developments taking:place on
the island, including Ginn
_ Development’s $4.7 billion
mixed resort project at West

ing of the Bahamas.

The prime minister added
_ that the expansion of the con-
port, and the upcoming
ening of Associated Grocers,
id. the recent opening of a
ireless plant in Freeport, will
create an additional 700 jobs in
the Grand Bahama economy.
Mr Christie said the services
provided by Fidelity will be in
gteat demand as major devel-
opments and jobs come on
stream.
‘Fidelity Financial Centre in













nnounced the

ment of the
1a, The Abacos




segs and we were
position,” said

Science degree in



Achievement and
held the post of

fling enthusiast,
leagues in New

mG Penns gules 2



THE TRIBUNE





HM PERRY Christie greets staff at Fidelity

Freeport has combined its retail
banking divisions and merchant

bank operations at its new

premises on Poinciana and East
Mall Drives.

Serena Williams, director of
marketing and public relations
for Fidelity Group of Compa-
nies, said the Freeport opening
is the second of six planned for
the Bahamas.

. financial institution in the

Bahamas to offer both personal
and investment banking prod-
ucts and services in One conve-
nient location.

To mark the official opening,
Fidelity is giving a special pro-
motional opportunity to people
opening accounts through April 6.

Persons opening a CD with
$1,000 will get a 1 percent bonus
interest rate for the life of the

CD. Those opening loan, sav-
ings, checking or investment
accounts will be entered to win
weekly cash of $100, and a
grand prize jackpot of $1,000 at
the end of the promotion. -
Fidelity, which initially
opened in the Bahamas in 1978,
has also opened similar financial
institutions in the Cayman
Islands and the Turks and
Caicos Islands since 1980.

. consequences.

Ms Williams said it is the only

Lecture on future of education

MEMBERS of the Coalition for
Education Reform, comprising rep-
resentatives of major business and
labour organisations, will make pre-
sentations on the 22-page report
entitled, “Bahamian Youth: The
Untapped Resource”.

The report focuses on *he unac-
ceptable level of achievement
among school leavers and con-
cludes that failure to address the
education crisis will produce grave



However, the report said that
there was eause for optimism: while
the solution is complex, it is possi-
ble:to begin to address the issues.

For further information, contact
The Research Unit at telephone
326-4501/2. The lecture is open to
the public and free of charge.



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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007, PAGE 7





In brief

US territory
in contempt
over prison

violations

@ PUERTO RICO
San Juan

A FEDERAL judge has
threatened sanctions after find-
ing the US Virgin Islands gov-
ernment in contempt of court
for the fourth time in 12 years
for failing to improve care for
mentally ill prisoners awaiting
trial, according to Associated
Press.

US District Judge Stanley
Brotman, in a ruling dated
Thursday, warned he would
impose daily fines against the
US Caribbean territory in two
months unless it upgrades treat-
ment of mentally ill inmates at

' two jails. The Bureau of Cor-
rections must also allow a new
inspection of an annex where
the inmates are housed.

The order stems from a class
action lawsuit filed in 1993 by
the American Civil Liberties
Union against the three-island
chain’s government for what it
said were abuses in the Central
Justice Complex and CJC
Annex in St Thomas. Charges
ranged from poor sanitary con-

ditions to abuse of mentally ill’

inmates.

The court declined to impose
sanctions for the last three con-
tempt orders with the expecta-
tion that “hazardous condi-
tions” would be fixed, according
to Brotman.

A spokesman for the territo-
ry’s new governor referred calls
for comment to Acting Attor-
ney General Vincent Frazer.
Frazer, who was nominated by
Governor John deJongh Jr after
he took office about two
months ago, could not be
reached for comment.

While acknowledging that
deJongh’s administration was
young, Brotman said they will
still be obligated to meet all of
the commitments made by pre-
decessors over the past 12 years
and “must suffer the conse-

quences of the government’s

past failures.”
. A correctional medicine
expert has toured the St
Thomas facilities at least twice
over the past two years and
found the Bureau of Correc-
tions has consistently failed to
provide adequate mental health
services to ill inmates as man-
dated by previous court orders.
The expert, forensic psychi-
atrist Jeffrey Metzner, report-
ed the annex did not have prop-
er mental health policies in
place and the designated unit
for ill prisoners was “danger-
ously understaffed and over-
crowded."

Venezuelan
communists
resist single
socialist party

@ VENEZUELA
Rio Chico

IT shares the Marxist ideals

espoused by President Hugo
Chavez, but Venezuela’s Com-

munist Party is resisting his call

to fold dozens of allied political
organisations into a single party,
according to Associated Press.

At a meeting Sunday to
' decide their political fate, many
communists said they fully sup-
port Chavez but aren’t ready to
relinquish their 76-year history
as an independent party.

“The Communist Party is not
dissolving. That’s for sure,
although the decision isn’t offi-
cial yet,” said Nestor Ramos, a
25-year-old who traveled 14
hours by bus to join party
activists and leaders in the
closed-door meeting at a sea-
side retreat just east of Cara-
cas. j

Chavez has already disband-
ed his own party, the Fifth
Republic Movement, to make
way for the United Socialist
Party of Venezuela, which is
_ intended to replace a long list of

pro-Chavez parties. While most
parties have swiftly agreed, the
Communist Party and a second
pro-Chavez party, Podemos,
have been holdouts.

The Communist Party’s red
flag, bearing a hammer and
sickle, flew outside an auditori-

. um Sunday while nearly 1,000
attendees began the day’s meet-
ing singing folk songs by artists
including Cuba’s_ Silvio
Rodriguez.

Some wore T-shirts embla-
zoned with pro-Chavez slogans,
and party members stressed they
wholeheartedly back Chavez.
But an attachment to the par-
ty’s traditions and ideology has
made the idea of giving it up
hard to swallow for many.



Bahamas visitor looks back

on his James Bond legacy

@ By ANASTACIA MOREE
Tribune Feature Reporter

MANY Bahamians may be
familiar with the James Bond
franchise, especially as signifi-
cant parts of the latest edition,
Casino Royale, were filmed in
Nassau. What many may not
know, however, is that several
other James Bond films were
also shot, not only in New
Providence; but also in the
Family Islands.

Taking advantage of the
country’s spectacular ocean
views, Thunderball, the sixth
movie in the franchise, star-
ring Sean Connery, filmed
many of its underwater scenes
in Staniel Cay, Exuma.

Something else that
Bahamians may not know is
that the grotto in the film was
discovered by one Paul Wag-
ner in 1959. Celebrating his
40th wedding anniversary in
the Bahamas, Mr Wagner,
who is staying at Atlantis, said
that he found the grotto while
on a fishing trip on the Island
of Exuma in Staniel Cay.

The alert 70 year old said
that while travelling on Staniel
Cay with his brother and a few
friends, he noticed a rock pile
in the harbour, and felt he had
to explore it.

"We chartered a sailboat out
of Nassau, sailed to the Exu-
mas and worked our way
down to Staniel Cay," said Mr
Wagner.

According to Mr Wagner at
that time there were only two

persons living on Staniel Cay,
an old man in his late fifties,
and a young woman who he
thinks was the man's wife.

While in the harbour Mr
Wagner said he noticed an odd
pile of rocks.

"After noticing the pile, an
hour later we started to swim

-back to the boat when I

noticed an opening between
two large rocks. Immediately I
swam towards it. After turn-
ing to the left, then to the
right there was this bright light
that shone brightly from with-
in that lit up the cave. It was
the most beautiful thing that I
have ever seen in my life. This
cove was gorgeous and unbe-
lievable," he said.

Mr Wagner said that after
dinner that night he told the
owner of the restaurant and
motel about his discovery and
to his surprise the owner did
not even know about the grot-
to.

"I was surprised that the
owner of the restaurant did
not even know about this
place, how could he not know
about this beautiful place that
existed on this island,” he won-
dered.

Mr Wagner said that
although the owner had no
knowledge about this discov-
ery, a native had told him that
something had to have been
down there because a young
goat had fallen into the hole.

Mr Wagner said the owner
had asked him for advice as to
what he could do to attract

@ PAUL Wagner

people to Staniel Cay. "Are you
kidding me? You have a gold
mine here! " Mr Wagner told
him.

Mr Wagner said that after
seeing the movie previews he
noticed that the cave he had dis-
covered was a scene in the
James Bond movie.

At the time of his discovery,



(Photo: Davinia Whitlock-Bullard)

Mr Wagner said he was 27 years
old, now 43 years later the dis-
covery is still clear in his mind.

"T still remember as if it was,
just yesterday,” Mr Wagner

said.

Mr Wagner, who is visiting
the Bahamas for the fourth
time, said he's a part of Bahami-
an history. He plans another

visit.

"T will be coming back to the
Bahamas again. | think that this
place is one of the most beauti-
ful places in the world.” .

After spending two weeks in
the Bahamas the seventy year
old, with his wife Mildred, is
leaving to return to their home-
town in Kingsville, Maryland.

ow details announced

SATURD

Neg

March 10th
ANTIQUE AUTO CLUB OF THE BAHAMAS

celebrating our 20th. Anniversary



@ MEMBERS of the Antique Auto Club's show committee
busy planning details for the upcoming show on March 10 are
(I-r) Roland Ferguson, Murray Forde, Peter Armstrong,
president and chairman, and Michael Ford.

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

ipods iTunes

anniversary

cy we 3 EJ E 4

Share your news

‘| The Tribune wants to hear

(Photo: Jim LaRoda).

iPhones













iMacs

MEMBERS of the Antique
Auto Club of the Bahamas,
started in 1987 by six men, are
busy planning the Club's 20th
anniversary with an antique car
show and steak-out to be held
at Arawak Cay (the fish fry
area) on March 10 between
noon and 5 pm.

‘The club now has a mem-
bership of 52, but the organisers
are looking for owners of vehi-
cles 15 years and older, who
may not be members of the
club to participate by displaying
their vehicles and competing in
the judging for the trophies that
will be awarded in various class-
es

The Club has adopted a local
definition of antique as being
"a vehicle 20, at least, years
old". This year, however, a sep-

NASSAU REPAIR SHOP

\

arate class of "Almost
Antique" is being added for
vehicles between 15 and 20
years old. gama

Murray Forde, chairman of
last year's 2006 Show, explained
that "last-year a few owners of
very nice cars that were over 15
years old came to the show, but
unfortunately we did not have a
class for them to compete.

“We know,” he said, “that
there are a number of nice vehi-
cles between the ages of 15 and
20 years old on the island —
and in the Family Islands — so
I suggested we introduce this
extra class to encourage those
owners to come out. After all,
they will be antiques before
long.

"We will also have a few oth-
er surprises," added Peter Arm-

strong, president and chairman
of the 20th anniversary show,
"including various raffle prizes
and one that you will have to
be there to find out about. We
are hoping to make this a mem-
orable event to celebrate our
20th anniversary".

The show raises funds. for
charity through sponsorships
and the sale of steak and chick-
en dinners. Tickets, still at the
low cost of $10, are available
from any Club member. The
ticket includes a stub that enti-
tles every purchaser to cast a
vote for their favourite car, from
which the People's Choice
awards are decided. This year
the beneficiary of the funds will
be "Every Child Counts", a
school for children with special
needs in Abaco.



iBooks

Mac OSX



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COMPUTERS LIMITED



RT RIL eB eust bay street 322.2115 f 322.2355 POnO noc



PAGE 8, MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





.

Resident claims victimisation by
officials in Ministry of Housing

@ By BRENT DEAN

A RESIDENT of Pride
Estates alleges that she is being
victimised by senior officials in
the Ministry of Housing.

Faye McKenzie of Pride
Estates came to The Tribune in
January to speak publicly on
the poor workmanship that left
her house uninhabitable.

When The Tribune first visit-
ed her home, the defects were
obvious and numerous. Wall
tiles were uneven, the wood
used in the home seemed old
and putty was used to cover
cracks and defects all over the
house. However, these defects,
though numerous, were small
by comparison to the effects of
a flood that raged through her
home.

The flood occurred when the
water was turned on in the area.
Mrs McKenzie thinks that the
water pipes in her home were
never sealed. Other homes built
by the same contractor, suffered
the same fate.

Mrs McKenzie had to hire a
new contractor to tear down the
sheet rock walls of her home,
as mould infestation resulted
from the flood. She also had to
remove the wooden cabinets
from her kitchen and pull up all
of her floor titles because they
had been destroyed by the
flood.

After The Tribune article, the
Ministry began to cooperate
with Mrs McKenzie, in order to
address the mess that resulted
from the poor workmanship of
the contractor that it had hired
to build her home, and the inad-
equate inspection effort by the
ministry, which passed this
home at every stage of its con-
struction. ;

Around this time, Minister

FAL

| The Tribune

com-

Wisdom invited all
plainants in government subdi-
visions to bring their housing
problems to him, so that he
could have them resolved.

Mrs McKenzie went to Mr
Wisdom, and according to her,
he said that she should bring
the estimates for repairs to’him,
and he would authorise the
funds.

The ministry initially for-
warded more than $10,000, in
numerous cheques, to start
repairs on the house.

However, Mrs McKenzie dis-
covered additional defects in
the home. The sewer exhaust
pipes, that were to have extend-
ed through the roof to the out-
side, were only extended into
the ceiling’'— meaning that the
foul odour would have filled the
home;.a broken toilet was
installed in the home; electrical
wiring needed to be changed;
and no telephone or cable wires
were ever installed in the home
— just to mention some of what
she has now uncovered.

These defects, and other
effects of the flood — and the
general poor workmanship —






meant that additional funds
were needed so that Mrs
McKenzie and her family could
finally move in to their home.

Nearly $23,000 more would
be needed to finish the repairs,
Mrs McKenzie said.

Mrs McKenzie said her prob-
lems with receiving these addi-
tional funds started when she
bypassed Housing’s Permanent
Secretary Leila Greene, and
again took her frustrations to
Mr Wisdom.

Mrs McKenzie said the min-
ister informed her that he had
already signed off on the
cheques, and it was now up to
Mrs Greene to complete the
process so thai they could be
released.

Mrs McKenzie said that she
again went to Mrs Greene, who
told her that she was unaware
of any cheques for her.

When asked about the funds
for Mrs McKenzie, Mrs Greene
told The Tribune that she could
not make any comments, as she
was not aware of any funds in
this matter.

This run-around so upset Mrs
McKenzie that she took her



pointment

Mr. William B. Sands, Jr., President & CEO of Commonwealth
Bank is pleased to announce the following appointment:



Mrs. Daria J. Bain

Branch Manager, Plaza Branch

Effective January 1st, 2007

Mrs. Bain has over 25 years experience in Banking,

the last 19 with Commonwealth Bank. Her most

recent position was as Sr. Assistant Manager, Credit

Inspection. She has attended several courses and

seminars in management and leadership including the

University of North

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a Masters Degree in Business Administration, both of

which she graduated Magna Cum Laude from Nova

Southeastern University.



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concerns to the Prime
Minister’s office.

According to Mrs
McKenzie, Prime Minis-
ter Christie apologised
for what had happened
to her and assured her
that he would assist.

Mr Wisdom _ then
assured her that she
would receive the funds.

Mrs McKenzie said
that Mr Wisdom signed
off for her to receive the
new cheques, and she
gave them a week to
have them ready. How-
ever, to date, she and her
family are still unable to
get the funds needed to
complete their home and
live a peaceful life.

Mrs Greene, who,
according to Mr Wisdom
was to have the funds,
claimed she is unaware
of the matter.

Senior aides to the
Prime Minister urged
Mrs McKenzie not to go
to the press, as, they said,
this matter could be
resolved without further
embarrassment to the ministry
and the government.

Authority

Sources claim that Mr Wis-
dom has no authority over
senior bureaucrats in the Min-
istry of Housing. Although he
makes requests, and holds the
title of Minister, according to
the sources, it is the civil ser-
vants who run the show.

Currently, there is a police
investigation into the workings
of the Ministry of Housing,
Also, homeowners in various
government subdivisions have



M NEVILLE Wisdom has urged residents with
complaints to bring them to him

complained to numerous media
outlets — both print and broad-
cast — about the inadequate
inspection process at the min-
istry, which allows homes to be
passed at every stage with glar-
ing defects.

‘Numerous homeowners have
also complained about the high
rates of mortgage that are
charged by the Mortgage Cor-
poration for homes that are
obviously: worth a fraction of
what is being charged.

Mrs McKenzie’s mortgage is
$875 a month over a period of
26 years. This amounts to near-
ly $275,000 for a modest: sized
home, on a five thousand
square foot lot. Mrs McKenzie

suspects that these
homes cost no more that
$108,000 to erect. This
raises the question as to
why some government
“low-cost” houses, cost
so much. /

The stress over this
ordeal has started to

health. She is constantly
anxious and has not
been able to spend
enough time with her
daughter, because she is
back and forth seeking
justice from a less than
concerned ministry.

She is also forced to
continue to pay rent,
although she should
have been in her home
months ago. The min-
istry paid one month of
her rent, and, it was
claimed, agreed to pay
her rental fees until her
home was completed.
However, to date no
additional cheques have
been forwarded.

Mrs McKenzie
declared that she will not
stop until she receives the funds
she requires for her home.

Nor is she afraid of the con-
sequences of challenging the

‘powerful. For her, her cause is

not political, but merely a mat-
ter of fairness.

She said that the ministry
offered her a new home. How-

ever, she said she does not trust |

the “dangers” that may lie
beyond other walls. This suspi-
cion appears justified based on
the number of complaints that
have been made about the qual-
ity of work in various govern-
ment subdivisions.

Up to press time, Mr Wisdom
was unavailable for comment.

Two men are sought in

connection with murder







‘ML RICARDO Edgecombe

POLICE are searching for
two young men in connection
with murder charges.

Twenty-nine-year-old Ricardo
Edgecombe, also known as “Peb-

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Marvin Sears of Cordeaux
Avenue are wanted by the CDU.

These men are said to be
armed and dangerous.

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mean
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“Sy

THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007, PAGE 9



Veco omer |
Bahamians have

their say on Anna
Nicole Smith

By Tamara Ferguson

ALREADY a hot topic inter-
nationally, the Anna Nicole
Smith affair is expected to con-
tinue to hold the headlines with
the paternity of her five-month-
old daughter the next issue to
be settled following her burial
Friday in a local cemetery.

Since the death of her son,
Daniel, in September last year,
the paternity battle and then
her tragic death, the Anna
Nicole Smith saga continues
with the question still to be set-
tled as to who gets baby Dan-
nielynn and who owns the East-
ern Road home, “Horizons”, in
which she lived until her death.

Yesterday, in an interview
with The Tribune, some
Bahamians shared their views
on the new controversies sur-
rounding the former Trimispa
spokeswoman’s death.

THE BURIAL

Former Playboy Playmate,
Anna Nicole Smith was found
dead in a hotel room in Florida
last month.

Her death was an interna-
tional shock as her son Daniel
had just died five months earli-
er at her bedside in Doctor’s
Hospital, Nassau. An inquest
into his death is pending.

There has been much contro-
versy following the late celebri-
ty’s death, as both her mother
and lawyer-companion battled
in court over the custody of her
remains and her final resting
place.

Dennis Whylly, a carpenter,
agreed that Ms. Smith should
be buried in The Bahamas next
to her son.

“IT think it is what Anna
Nicole would’ve wanted. It
angers me to. see the way
they’re fighting over her body,”
he said.

Lisa Russell, an education
major, said, “I understand that
Anna Nicole’s mother wants to
bury her daughter with the rest
of her relatives, but she also
needs to consider her daugh-
ter’s wishes.”

Virgie Arthur, Anna Nicole’s
estranged mother and Howard
K Stern, Ms. Smith’s lawyer-
companion, and one of the men
claiming that he is the father of
her baby girl, battled in court
for custody of Ms. Smith’s
remains.

A judge ordered that a court-
appointed guardian of Ms.
Smith’s baby be awarded cus-
tody of the remains.

Although it was confirmed
that Ms Smith would be buried
in Lakeview cemetery in the
Bahamas, her mother, Virgie
Arthur, fought to the very
morning of the funeral to stop
the burial. As a result funeral
services were delayed by 45
minutes. Crowds waiting out-
side booed Mrs Arthur when
she arrived at the church.

Keisha Sanders, a teacher,
said that Ms Smith’s mother is
continuing to appeal the ruling
for her daughter’s remains
because she feels that if she
wins this case, she will stand a
better chance of winning the
battle for the baby.

On the other hand, Ken
Bullard, a computer engineer,
said that Mrs Arthur has a right
to fight for her daughter,
although some may say that she
: is being selfish.

“She wants to start a compe-
tition with Mr Stern,” Ms
Sanders said.

Steven Rolle, a jitney driver,
said that if Ms Smith is buried
here, the Bahamas would be
further promoted through
advertising.

“It is also best that Ms Smith
be reunited with her son,” he
said.

THE BABY

Dannielynn Hope, daughter
of the late celebrity, continues
to be at the heart of a major
controversy battle regarding her
paternity and the possible for-
tune that she is expected to
inherit from her mother’s estate.

Larry Birkhead, a photogra-
pher and former boyfriend of
the late celebrity, Howard K.
Stern and Virgie Arthur are all
fighting fer custody of the baby.

Alex Pinder, a sales clerk said



ANNA Nicole Smith
(Photo: AP archive)

side,” Mrs. Pinder said.

Law and Criminal Justice
major, Monica Lewis, said that
in her opinion Ms Smith’s moth-
er is primarily interested in
financial gain.

“She and Anna Nicole were
never really close,” Ms Lewis
said.

On the other hand, Brandon
Cooper, an electrician, said that
the baby should be raised by
her grandmother, Mrs Arthur.

“My grandmother led me ina
positive direction. After all of
this controversy is over, that
baby is going to need some pos-
itive direction,” he said.

According to Stephanie
Miller, a teacher, the most
important issue concerning the
baby is that she is well taken
care of emotionally, not just
financially. ;

“However, whoever is proven
to be the father must realize
that money is not the main issue
here, but the well being of the
child,” she said.

Marilyn Sturrup, a medical
assistant said that Larry Birk-
head. seems to have positive
interests, rather than financial

ain.

“Mr Birkhead, although not
given a chance, seems as if he is
willing to do the right thing,”
Ms Sturrup said.

Dino Pratt, a bank teller, said
that a paternity test should’ve
been taken a long time ago
before the issue got out of hand.

“T hate to see the innocent
baby in the middle of all of
this,” he said.

HORIZONS

At the time of her death, Ms
Smith was also fighting a court
battle with Ben Thompson to
claim the million dollar home
on the Eastern Road in New
Providence.

The legal battle continues and
the home has become a popular
site for many tourists, who visit
the house, taking photos.
Reports also state that tour
guides and taxi drivers have
made profits from showing off
the house. ,

Vera Rolle, an insurance
agent said that it is amazing how
much money taxi drivers and
tour guides are making over
Horizons.

“This house has been an issue
for far too long,” she said.

Charles Thompson, a restau-
rant manager, said that if Ms
Smith claimed to own the home,
her lawyers need to provide the
evidence.

Defence Force Officer Mar-
garet Smith said she is con-
cerned as to why Anna Nicole
didn’t resolve this controversy
with Ben Thompson by provid-
ing evidence that she was the
rightful owner of the house.

“Everyone knows that you
cannot rely on someone’s words
when it comes to a million dol-
lar home like Horizons. What
was she thinking?” Mrs Smith
asked.

THE MEDIA COVERAGE

The Anna Nicole Smith saga
has caught the attention of both
the local and international
media.



close embrace, the internation-
al media further developed a
thirst for coverage in the
Bahamas.

For the last two weeks, the
Bahamas could be seen on
MSNBC, FOX News and CNN.

During the hearing on Mon-
day in the Supreme Court on
Bank Lane, countless media
groups were present and set up
camp to capture the media fren-
zy.

Kelly Smith, a nursing major,
said that the international cov-
erage has been positive for the
country.

“However, I am questioning
whether the Bahamian media
would’ve been afforded this
kind of coverage if this issue
was taking place in the US.”

Photographer Kevin Rolle,
said that during the hearing in
the Supreme Court on Monday,
it was unbelievable the way
reporters and photographers
were eager to catch a glimpse of
Larry Birkhead and Virgie
Arthur.

“T feel that some of the
reporters were in some way,
very unprofessional,” she said.

On the other hand, Tanya
Lockhart, a waitress, said that
the media coverage has
increased tourist arrivals to the
country as many tourists want
to get involved and be a part of
the excitement.



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PAGE 10, MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





IN order to “advance a more
permanent peace process” and
to prevent their rearmament,
José Miguel Insulza, Secretary
General of the Organisation of
American States, has called on
the Colombian government to
strengthen its programmes to
reintegrate demobilised mem-
bers of the United Self-defence
Forces of Colombia into soci-
ety.

In the process he thanked the
Bahamas and other countries
for its contributions that showed
“the breadth of support” for
OAS efforts in Colombia and
provided the backing to move
the process forward.

{

Funeral held for Dr George White



agency.

(AML/CFT).

‘Compliance.





Required Skills:

qualifications:

communication skills

is offered.



Regional Manager
Human Resources
Caribbean Banking
Royal Bank of Canada

RANE eyecare Rue tlt

RBC Royal Bank of Canada
is presently considering applications for

Compliance Manager -
Bahamas

As Compliance Manager, you will be responsible for the
overall administration of the Bahamas Compliance
Department. Your responsibilities will include the following:

¢ Implementing consistent and integrated Anti-Money
Laundering and Counter Financing of Terrorism
(AML/CFT) and Compliance Management policies and
processes to ensure consistent compliance by all staff
with the local laws of jurisdiction.

© All Legal, Regulatory and Policy Compliance ensuring
overall Regulatory Compliance.

© Serving as Compliance Officer/Money Laundering Report
Officer (MLRO) - determining appropriate instances for
filing suspicious/unusual transaction reports to relevant

e Serving as a Liaison Officer with all Regulators including

- but not limited to The Central Bank of the Bahamas, The
Financial Intelligence Unit, Internal Audit etc. Monitoring
all regulatory requests and requirements and tracking
Internal Audit issues relative to AML and Compliance.

® Serving as a Liaison Officer with any External Legal
Counsel and, monitoring all litigation involving the bank.
Preparing regular reports as to the status of any litigation.

© Providing advice to designated Compliance Officers in
branches/units and ensuring that each adheres to and
implements compliance policies and procedures.

e Staff training, awareness on the prevention of money
laundering, fraud and Counter Financing of Terrorism

¢ Ensuring that policies and procedures in respect of Privacy
and Confidentiality are understood and implemented.

® Keeping abreast of all new legislation and policy
developments within the jurisdiction which affect

As Compliance Manager, you have previous experience in
a compliance role with a sound knowledge of effective
management practices. Along with having a strong sense |
of responsibility you are extremely self-motivated, have a
strong work ethic and promote the overall development
of employees. You are a team player, able to collaborate
with all your partners and committed to relationship
building. You have demonstrated results on the execution
of aggressive action plans. You are proactive.

The successful candidate should possess the following
© Well developed organizational, interpersonal and

e Proven leadership, analytical and decision making skills
© The ability to achieve results and build relationships

e Bachelors Degree in law, finance, banking or related field
¢ At least 3-5 years relevant experience

© Microsoft Office skills (Word, Excel, Power Point, Outlook)
A competitive compensation package (base salary & bonus)
commensurate with relevant experience and qualifications

Please apply by March 9, 2007 to:

Bahamas Regional Office
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, N.P, Bahamas

Via fax: (242)328-7145
Via email: bahcayjp@rbc.com

According to the OAS web-
site, in presenting to the Per-
manent Council the eighth
quarterly report of the OAS
Mission to Support the Peace
Process in Colombia (MAPP,

by its Spanish acronym), the.

Secretary General stressed the
importance of the demobiliza-
tion and reintegration of the
United Self-defence Forces of
Colombia (AUC) as an essen-
tial component of the peace
process. He reaffirmed that the
OAS remains committed to
building on this effort and to
supporting the people and insti-
tutions of Colombia in any
peace initiatives they are willing

































































to move forward. The process
that demobilized 31,689 former
combatants ended a few months
ago, Insulza noted.

The Secretary General high-
lighted OAS efforts in the veri-
fication and demobilization
process and the dismantling of
the illegal combatants’ military
structure, noting that through
the MAPP “we have verified
that armed structures that have
not been demobilized still
remain, and even though these
are numerically fewer, they are
a cause for concern, both for
the Colombian government and

- for the OAS.” He added that it
‘ is not possible to guarantee 100



per cent demobilization. He
said this process has given rise
to two phenomena: “First, that
there are people who refuse to
be included in the demobiliza-
tion process; and second, the
appearance of new ‘emerging
bands’ of groups that, having
been demobilized, tend to take
up arms again.”

Insulza also underscored the
efforts underway to try to estab-
lish peace talks between the
Colombian government and the
National Liberation Army
(ELN), and lamented the
breakdown of negotiations with
the Colombian Armed Forces
(FARC) in terms of actions

A FUNERAL filled with |

musical renditions and tributes

was the final send-off for Dr ;
George White at the weekend
at St Matthew's Anglican ;
Church, where he was later laid:
to rest in the church's,ceme- .:

tery.

those Bahamians that came
back home after studying med-
icine and helped began the

. track of nation-building.

Dr White was the first ;
Bahamian to be appointed as :
senior medical officer at
Princess Margaret Hospital.
Also, when television was
being envisioned for the
colony, Dr White served as

chairman of the Broadcasting

Corporation of the Bahamas.
Special tributes were

brought by friends Thomas
Robinson and Anthony

White. Rector of St
Matthew's Parish Rev James
Moultrie delivered the eulugy.

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conducive to a humanitarian
agreement.

The decision to destroy all
the weapons handed over dur-
ing the demobilization of the
AUC represents an important
step, said the Secretary Gener-
al, who reaffirmed OAS tech-
nical and financial support in
this effort as well as in the full
verification of the process. He
backed the government’s deci-
sion to neutralize instances of
rearmament that have been ver-
ified, especially in the depart-
ments of Cérdoba, Caqueta,
Casanare and the Alta Guajira
zone.

The Secretary General

Ree Oa leo. ere ae
ahamas thanked for role in OAS

expressed his appreciation for
contributions received from
The Bahamas, Brazil, Cana-
da, Chile, Spain, the United
Sates, Holland, Ireland, Mex-
ico, Norway, Sweden, Thai-
land and Korea, which he said
show “the breadth of support”
for OAS efforts in Colombia
and provided the backing to
move the process forward.
Insulza also recognized the
“confidence and deference”
demonstrated by the Colom-
bian government in granting
the OAS Mission to Support
the Peace Process a three-year
extension to continue its
efforts.

Motivational speaker
developing new
- programme for
primary children

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE

FOR Spence Finlayson, Pres-
ident and CEO of The Phoenix
Institute, motivational speaking
is a calling that has allowed him
to help others realise their true
potential.

‘Mr Finlayson has been
involved in motivational speak-
ing for nearly 20 years, starting
in 1988 after leaving his job as
an advertising sales consultant
for BaTelCo. After travelling
the Caribbean for the past sev-
eral years as a motivational
speaker, Mr Finlayson has
returned home to continue his
calling. According to Mr Fin-
layson, the younger brother of
Alphaeus “Hawk” Finlayson,
since being back home for over

a year, local response has been -

overwhelming.

Mr Finlayson currently does
motivational speaking, in house
training for several local com-
panies and government, agen-
cies. m3 :

"My passion is really just
speaking to groups and individ-
uals and helping them realise
true greatness in life and I
always let people know that it is
not where you start off in life,
but it is where you end up and
your past does not equal your
future. Your past is just that,
your past," Mr Finlayson said
while speaking with The Tri-
bune on Friday.

Mr Finlayson said that since
1993, he had been based in the
Cayman Islands as a motiva-
tional speaker.

“I was working for BaTelCo
in Florida selling yellow pages
advertising and I met some peo-
ple-who thought I had an abili-
ty to be a motivational speaker.
I did a few programmes with
them in the US and learned the
business from them and that’s
how it all started,” he explained.

“In 1988 I came home and

oo \

did the first public session at
the old Ambassador Beach
Hotel. I have conducted pro-
grammes from St. Croix in the
US Virgin Islands straight on
down to Aruba,” he said.

“The response was phenom-
enal and for the fist time they
saw a Caribbean person doing
motivational speaking. Prior to
that it would have been persons
from the US and Canada,” he
said. Mr Finlayson said that he
travelled from his base in the
Cayman Islands _ to St. Croix,
St. Kitts, St. Vincent and the
Grenadines, St. Lucia, Antigua
and Barbuda, Aruba and
Jamaica among others. Mr Fin-
layson said that while traversing
these islands his company was
named “Motivation Interna-
tional.”

“The reason for the name
change,” he said, “is that I have
expanded the things that I do.
Rather than just motivational
speaking and training it’s
become a full institute where I
conduct in-house training. I
have always been fascinated
with mythology and the phoenix
bird is the inspiration for my
institute. What it represents is
rebirth a metamorphosis and a
positive change.”

Mr Finlayson said he is cur-
rently developing a programme
for primary school students to
help develop other speakers.
even if they do not want to be
motivational speakers, but to
help them realise their full.
potential in life.

“The joy that I get is when
people stop me on the street to
this day and they quote verba-
tim something I said back in
1988 and:1989 and that impress-
es,” he said. Mr Finlayson said
he also about to release a new
recording soon and a second
book entitled, “Phoenix Ris-
ing,” due for release by the end
of the year.

.

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THE TRIBUNE








ir Albert [. Miller :
Chairman and President
FOCOL HOLDINGS LTD.

UNAUDITED FINANCIAL REPORT AS AT OCTOBER 31, 2006

MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007, PAGE 11.



le Gn

9) 4 e) Sal ea ENDED ere 31, 2006 iis Une

their continued confidence in our company. We look forward to continued succes

hah c

UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET AT OCTOBER 31, 2006












34-Oct-06
ASSETS (Unaudited)
CURRENT ASSETS:
Cash ‘ $ 9,371,608
Accounts receivable, net 18,595,989
Inventories 16,627,127
Investments ‘ 424,500
Prepaid expenses and sundry assets 572,723
Total current assets 42,591,947
NON-CURRENT ASSETS:
* - Property, plant and equipment, nel 45,842,894 |
Intangible assets , 11,547,936
57,390,830
$99,982,777
$ 5,697,089

24,496,346

‘ Total current Hlabilities
NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES:
Long-term debt
Total liabiities
SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY:
Share capital
Preference shares
. Contributed capital
x : Revaluation surplus
Total shareholders’ equity 52,227,303
TOTAL $90,982,777

UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME
THREE MONTHS ENDED OCTOBER 31, 2006



34-Oct-08

REVENUES : ‘ $ 73,390,201

COST OF SALES (63,493,960)

Gross profit 9,896,241

: Qtherincome 1,989

Marketing, administrative and general expenses (6,662,032)

Depreciation (527,371)

‘Finance costs (379,805)

< : Other expenses. SS (8,000)
AEE 5 : : NET INCOME 3,320,922
ee Net income available to common shareholders $ 3,320,922

: sateen

BASIC EARNINGS PER SHARE : $ 0.39

* (SSR RT

DILUTED EARNINGS PER SHARE $ 0.39



UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY '
THREE MONTHS ENDED OCTORER 31, 2008

31-Jul-06
(Audited)

$ 10,348,408
27,097,480
21,375,976

432,500

2,134,622
61,388,966

42,336,214

7,365,419

"49,701,633

$ 111,090,599

$ 3,546,854
44,542,077
2,242,460
50,334,391

20,566,903

49,620,633

$ 111,090,599

31-Oct-05

$ 24,799,004

(21,356,745)

3,442,259
38,339
(1,419,288)
(178,690)

1,884,622

$1,884,622 ©



Share Preference Contbuied Revaluation Retained
Laphel -__ Shoreg_ __ Capital _Suphs__ _Eemings _ Too
Beren of hy 31,208 SUBTS $+ $ BSENRTS $ 1ASi S00 $12208201 $20,278,181

* 1,884,622 1,884,622
‘Common share dividends: $0.1) per share x {939,103} __ (80,103)

Balance at October 31, 2005 : 4,431,839 $13.151720_ $21,221,710
~ Balance at July 31. 2008 senate $ 207.900 $27,965,178 $ 1405,488 $.20,866.999. $49.6200%3
tgouance of common shares - hee : 227,085
Net inooms 320922 3320822

‘Common share dividends: $0.11 per share = (44,337) (41,337)
Balence at October 31, 2006 $85:576 $ mie erry $ ae $22,986,578 $52,227 303

UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS
THREE MONTHS ENDED OCTOBER 31, 2006

34-Oct-06
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:
Net income $ 3,320,922
er enhed for: :
: $27,371
resseat toss (gain) on marketable securities 8,000
-_. Income from operations before working capital changes * 3,856,293
Decrease (increase) in accounts receivable, net 11,501,474
Decrease (Increase) in prepaid expanses and deposits 4,561,899
Decrease in inventories 4,748,849
Dacrease in accounts payable and accrued expenses (20,045,731)
_ Net cash from operating activities 4,822,784
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:
Purchase of property, plant and equipment % (4,034,051)
Goodwill on acquisition (4,382,517)
Net cash used in investing activities: (8,216,568)
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES: ;
issuance of shares 227,085
Dividends paid (941,337)
Proceeds from tong term debt ‘ 4,617,004
Repayment of long-term debt (438,000)
Net cash from (used) in financing activities 3,466,752
NET (DECREASE) INCREASE IN CASH (3,427,035)
CASH, BEGINNING OF PERIOD 6,801,554
CASH, END OF PERIOD $ 3,874,519
Cash $ 9,971,608
Bank overdrafts (5,697,089)
§.3874519

Sun Oil Limited

A Shall License



H-Oete5

$ 1,884,622

176,890
(17,000)

2,044,312
(1,866,444)
(233,051)

2,423,812

(1,471,209)
4,097,420



(184,278)
(181,278)

250,000
(939,103)



(689,703)
227,039

3,456,571

$.__ 3,683,610

$ 3,683,610



Son 3853810,

NET INCOME









































Notes to the unaudited condensed consolidated
Three months ended October 31, 2006

1. Basis of preparation

The condensed financial statements have been pi
Accounting Standard (IAS) 34, Interim Financii

2. Significant accounting policies

‘The condensed financial statements have been
except for the revaluation of certain properties and

The accounting policies adopted are consistent wi
Company's annual financial statements for the year

3. Segment information

The following is an analysis of the revenue and re
segment, the Company’s primary basis of segmentati

THREE MONTHS ENDED OCTOBER 31, 2008:
REVENUE: LSE
External safes $ 7,931,730.

intersegment sales :

RESULT:
Segment result.
Unallocated operating expenses

Income from operations
Interest Income
Other expense
Unailocated other income
Unallocated other expenses

NET INCOME

REVENUE:
External sales
intersegment sales

RESULT:
Segment result
Unallocated operating expenses
Income from operations
Interest income
Unallocated other income

4. Results for the period

Starting in late summer and continuing through w
for the first quarter reflect the beginning of that

§. Earnings per share
The calculation of the basic earnings per share at

attributable to ordinary shareholders of $3,320, 922 (2005:
following data:

Profit attributable to ordinary shareholders













Weighted average number of ordinary shares : Saas < 8,557,617 . 8,537,287
Basic earnings per share g
Weighted average number of onnary













50,000 (2005: 400,000) potential ative ‘hates

‘ Seo ey Seer 28)

Diluted earings per share $a 922



WG

6. Dividends



During the interim peri
shareholders.
\



7. Property, plant and equipment and goodwill

During the period, through the acquisition of GAL Terminals Limited, the Company added $6.7
million on new property, plant, equipment and goodwill in eaien Wooing existing
facilities. : : ‘

SH
s



8. Borrowings



During the period, the Company issued $3 million i in bonds o $1, 000 each. The issue was made
in pursuance of a resolution passed on August 9, 2006. The bonds bear interest at a fixed rate of
8% per annum payable quarterly on 31" March, 30 June, 3 30" Segteaiter and 31* December
The bonds mature in ten years,

9, Share capital

Share capital as at October 31, 2006 amounted to $85,576 (2005;
8,557,617 (2005: 8,537,287) common shares. During the period!
common shares.

10. Related party transactions
During the period, related party transactions included insurance premiums

$221,437), armoured car service fees of $8,260 (2005: $0), fuel sales of $1
short-term benefits of $232,499 (2005: $132,500) paid to key employees.



11. Acquisition of subsidiary SS

During the period, the Company completed the acquisition of GAL T. erminls Limited and the '
Grand Bahamian assets of Chevron Bahamas Limited. =

The acquisition was financed in part from proceeds of a $3 million pes bond i ie in :
addition to a non-interest bearing long-term note for $1, ol 7,004 and the balance in cash and ;
stock, : : :

The transaction was accounted for using the acquisition method of accounting. Goodwill arising:
from the acquisition amounted to $4,182,517 and property, plant and equipment was valued at
$2,561,340,





{



”AGE 12, MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

ynated Sanders
tise business con-
topuer Caribbean

4
a UlYANA has
” become the first Eng-
vcuking country to host a
mil meeting of the Rio
up made up of 21 Latin
and Caribbean

SER.

Pre rie ay

in idshion to the Guyanese

‘ent Bharrat Jagdeo, sev-
‘Toads of Government













Behav? E (ish





REPORTI





be









t
! i
t






ELE eae NR SE Se

poeta Ces s

Eis

———
ae

PTE

SI

ICSE

ARS




LFS




=r. OMAR ASSOCIATE/CONTRACT SERVICES

Chine a. yerreen erar aar meer eR ROR

" Rathiub Liners are.designed to fit over worn-out bathtubs
cs ta cover existing bath walls; In simulated Tile and Marble
wer Base Liners to go over existing Shower bases
* Cultured Marble Vanity Tops and Sinks-
* Great Shower Door selection
* Quality Faucets, All-Wood Vanities

TE Ete at



i Monday - Friday, 9:00am - 5:00pm
mont Saturday - 14:00am - 4:00pm

of the Rio Group were in
Guyana for the meeting held
on the weekend of March 2nd

- and 3rd.

While a larger turn out of
Heads of Government would
have made the meeting more
meaningful, some very irnpor-
tant ones showed up. includ-
ing Mexico’s Felipe de Jesus
Calderon Hinojosa, Brazil’s
Luis Ignacio Lula de Silva,
Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez and

‘Chile’s Michelle Bachelet.

Guyana is the current offi-
cial representative in the Rio
Group of the Caribbean Com-







|AHAMAS




(ACT SERVICES DEPARTMENT

sanamas Telecommunications Company Limited invites applications
suitably qualified individuals for the position of SENIOR.
CIATE/Facilities, Electrical, Plumbing, AC and Security in our
ict Services Department.

iG RELATIONSHIP:
ition will report to the Manager, Contract Services.
ob SAL RESPONSIBILITY:

ill Electrical System Maintenance

Suliding Electrical Renovations

AC Systems Maintenance

Plumbing Design & Maintenance
eourity System Planning & Design

Contractor Management

“i REQUIREMENTS

». Bachelor’s degree in Engineering or Facilities Management or
“uivalent work experience.
cellent written and oral presentation skills required.
ellent leadership skills. .

ications are to be received at BTC’s Head Office, 21 John F. Kennedy
i¢ later than Wednesday March 7, 2007 and addressed as follows:

VICE PRESIDENT

HUMAN RESOURCES, TRAINING & SAFETY
iE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD

‘NASSAU, BAHAMAS

ATT



WORLD VIE

munity and Common Market
(CARICOM) countries, but
Belize is also a member of the
group, and the Guyanese Pres-
ident invited Trinidad and
Tobago’s Prime Minister
Patrick Manning to participate
in the informal sessions of the
summit.

With attendance too by the

Dominican Republic (DR)
President Leonel Antonio Fer-
nandez Reyna, there were sev-
eral interests represented at the
meeting.

The DR and CARICOM
countries are together present-
ly negotiating with the Euro-
pean Union (EU) for an Eco-
nomic Partnership Agreement
which will determine the aid,
trade and investment relation-
ship between these two groups
for some time to come.

Similarly the. DR and Cen-
tral American countries repre-
sented at the summit are party
to a Free Trade. Agreement
with the United States, and five
of the Latin American coun-
tries are deepening their own
trading arrangements under the
umbrella of Mercosur.

Then there is the Bolivarian
Alternative for the Americas
(ALBA) being promoted by
the Venezuelan President as a

regional integration strategy

for Latin America, as well as
a possible alternative to the US
notion of a Free Trade Area
of the Americas (FTAA).

And, in the midst of all this,
are the, albeit stalled, but
nonetheless overarching nego-





mesponsible for providing administrative and technical support for
ioctrical, plumbing, air conditioning and security.

' Responsible for providing administrative and technical support of
=orts needed in maintenance/construction of the exchange and
| network facilities by contractors and to support activities necessary
io. ensure that contractors observe industry standards, specification
equirernents, and security regulations.
»sponsible for the administrative and technical support of the network
planning, engineering, design and maintenance of electrical support
systems, equipment, and corporate security.
‘esponsible for the coordination and administration of contracts,
and to ensure that the facilities are safe and kept in repair order.

3P ONSIBILITY:
oc yates, administers and provide technical support in the following







@ SIR Ronald Sanders

tiations in the World Trade
Organisation (WTO) for new



It is to be hoped
that arising from
this meeting, the
Rio group will take
on the role of
promoting Latin
American and
Caribbean
economic
integration through
institutions such as
the Inter-American
Bank.



arrangements that would gov-
ern world trade rules.

Doxessions about
trade were not

expected to feature ‘highly on *relationship/. ‘Ir turn, ‘they ‘wil?

the agenda of the meeting, and’: need an‘enabling-environment ~:

while the Declaration of



da

Turkeyen, the end of Confer-
ence communiqué, will
undoubtedly try to reflect a
consensus position of the Rio
Group, with all the different
and, in some cases, divergent
interests involved, whatever
they say on trade is unlikely to
advance the international agen-



The great value of
this summit is that
it provided an
opportunity for a
small but important
number of Heads of
Government... to
talk informally and
to exchange ideas
about how the
relationship
‘between Latin
American and.
Caribbean countries
could be deepened
in their joint
interest.



The great value of this sum-
mit is that it provided an
opportunity for a small but
important number of Heads of
Government from _ the
Caribbean and Latin America
to talk informally and to
exchange ideas about how the
relationship between Latin
American and Caribbean coun-
tries could be deepened in their
joint interest.
Meeting at the political lev-
el is a necessary first step for
creating the framework for an
economic relationship that
could benefit the people of
Latin America and the
Caribbean, through trade and
investment. But, at the practi-
cal level it is the business com-
munities in each of these coun-
tries that could give flesh to the
bones of-such an economic

a

2

which must include the éstab- °



THE TRIBUNE



lishment of direct transporta-
tion arrangements, access to
financing, and a facility for
English, Spanish and Por-
tuguese.

he Rio Group is pri-

marily an organ of
political consultation; it does
not have a mandate to institute
arrangements for economic
integration, and a summit
meeting of only eight Heads of
Government, however influ-
ential they may be, would be
reluctant to do so.

Further, the Group does not
have a permanent secretariat
and its work between meetings
is carried out by the country to
which the Chairmanship falls.

However, there are other
organisations to which mem-
bers of the Rio Group belong
who have the capacity to initi-
ate arrangements for structured
economic relations between
Latin American and Caribbean

countries. CARICOM and the , -

Central American Free Trade
Agreement (CAFTA) coun-
tries, and CARICOM and
Mercosur could formally pur-
sue discussions that might have
arisen from informal consulta-
tions between the Heads of
Government.

It is to be hoped that arising
from this meeting, the Rio
group will take on the role of
promoting Latin American and
Caribbean economic integra-
tion through institutions such
as the Inter-American Bank.

In any event, Guyana did
well to carry the work of the
Rio Group during its period of
Chairmanship. It has also done
well to host the Summit, and, in
doing so, to act as a bridge
between Latin America and
the Caribbean.

A Conference of Latin
American countries in English-
speaking Guyana as the repre-
sentative of CARICOM, has
immense symbolic value. It
demonstrates that the divide
between the two sub-regions,
which are a consequence of

/ colonial history.and ‘imperial
“interests in the past, can be
‘overcome.



THE TRIBUNE




ALL RISKS (BUILDINGS & CONTENTS, PLANT, MACHINERY
& EQUIPMENT INCLUDING SUB-STATION SITES

TENDER NO. 597/06

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the
provision of general insurances as described above.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office,
‘Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting:-

* Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 30 March 2006 by 3:00 p.m.
and addressed as follows:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation"
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 597/06
“GENERAL INSURANCE — BUILDINGS, PLANT & MACHINERY”

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.





- "TENDER FORGENERALINSURANCE
& EMPLOYERS’ LIABILITY, PERSONAL ACCIDENT, 62!>°
PRIVATE CAR & COMMERCIAL VEHICLES — 35

> PUBLIC

ij

TENDER NO. 598/06

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the
provision of general insurances as described above.
" Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting:-

Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 30 March 2006 by 3:00 p.m.
and addressed as follows:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hili & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 598/06

“GENERAL INSURANCE — PUBLIC & EMPLOYERS’
LIABILITY AND MOTOR VEHICLES”

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.



NDER FOR GENERAL INSURANCE
MONEY & FIDELITY

TENDER NO. 599/06

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the
_ provision of general insurances as described above.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting:-

Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 30 March 2006 by 3:00 p.m.
and addressed as follows:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 599/06
“GENERAL INSURANCE — MONEY & FIDELITY”

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.





NONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007, PAGE 13



TENDER FOR GENERAL INSURANCE
MARINE INSURANCE

- | ‘TENDER NO. 600/06

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the
provision of general insurances as described above.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting:- :

Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas -
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852

‘ Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 30 March 2006 by 3:00 p.m.
and addressed as follows: ,
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads.
Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour:

Marked: Tender No. 600/06
“GENERAL INSURANCE ~ MARINE INSURANCE”



The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.





“ AS SW







‘TENDER FOR GENERAL INSURANCE
PROFESSIONAL INDEMNITY (DIRECTORS & OFFICERS)

TENDER NO. 610/06

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the
provision of general insurances as described above. -

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting:-

Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
: Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 30 March 2006 by 3:00 p.m.
- and addressed as follows:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 601/06

“GENERAL INSURANCE - PROFESSIONAL INDEMNIT
DIRECTORS & OFFICERS”

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.






ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT & MOBILE RADIOS

TENDER NO. 602/06

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligibl bidde rsfor the
provision of general insurances as described above RE

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting:-

Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

_ Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 30 March 2006 by 3:00 p.m.
and addressed as follows:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 602/06
“GENERAL INSURANCE — ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT & MOBILE RADIOS”

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.








LOM page one

city teas’, and focuses on sev-
©) major areas of concern
is lity. infrastructure, devel-
oiscut, housing affordability
{ v‘hamians, traffic planning
J parbases,
straw said Harbour
current infrastructure
eyond capacity, and there-

SAGE 14, MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

fore unable to serve the needs
of residents.

A major area which needs to
be addressed was the public
dock, which currently was over-
whelmed by passenger and
commercial traffic sharing the
same space.

Mr Straw said that a more
practical approach would be to

create separate areas where










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1999 Ford E150 Van
1989 Ford F150
1998 Dodge Stratus
1998 Dodge Intrepid
1997 GMC Safari
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2001 Dodge Intrepid
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1993 GMC Jimmy

r further information, |
ase contact our customer



LOCAL NEWS

passengers could disembark
from water taxis and Bahamas
Ferries’ Bo Hengy, then walk
on a separate pedestrian walk-
way to a welcome centre to
enhance their arrival experi-
ence.

There would also need to be
better management of com-
mercial traffic and removal of
non-essential traffic from the
dock area. The ideal decision,
Mr Straw said, would be to
remove the commercial dock
altogether to a new area, per-
haps by the power point.

Mr Straw said traffic was-a
major problem, noting that on
the island there were 2,200
vehicles. Considering that there
were 475 local households and

225 winter residences, that
worked out to be an average
of three vehicles per house-
hold.

He said a plan needed to be
in place to either limit the vehi-
cles that can come on to Har-
bour Island, or the times they
can be on the road, and the traf-
fic flow itself needed to be
addressed. This would reduce
congestion and improve safety.
In addition, proper signals need-
ed to be in place around the
island.

Mr Straw said one suggestion
could be to develop a schedule
of freight boats that limits load-
ing and unloading.

Addressing the island’s devel-
opment, Mr Straw said they rec-

rilanders sceptical over ‘Master Plan’

ommended two tourist zones -
one in the area near the Pink
Sands and Coral Sands hotels,
and the other near the Valen-
tines and Ramora Bay proper-
ties. Tourist-related develop-
ment in these areas would be
encouraged, Mr _ Straw
explained...

The island could also benefit
from continuing education pro-
grammes and cultural events,
with the proposal being made
to build a dual facility on the
existing school grounds.

Mr Straw and Mr Martini
both emphasised that these
were just initial plans and would
be added to as feedback came
in. <

The next steps towards the

THE TRIBUNE.



we

implementation of the Master
Plan were to have an acceler-
ated and coordinated review
and approval process, prelimi-
nary commitments for key ele-.
ments of the plan.

Mr Straw said the idea of
affordable housing options must
be pursued. This could include
land development, land trades,,
land purchase or the use of ;
commonage property.

He added that it should also’
include the enforcement of,
environmental health laws.
regarding garbage, steps to ini- |
tiate public-private partnerships,
creation of the Harbour Island,
Foundation and a visit by the.
Prime Minister and his Cabinet,
to the island.

Docks condition has no

FROM page one

Those days are popular
because Nassau’s close proxim-
ity to Florida make them an ide-
al stop at the beginning or end
of cruise itineraries.

Mr Allens said that to accom-
modate demand, the Govern-
ment was discussing ways to
offer incentives to the cruise
ships that arrive on less popular
days.

He added that the Ministry

of Works had recently approved
a bid for repairs to the bollards,
and explained that repairs to
Prince George’s Wharf dock
had been underway for quite
some time.

Tribune Business previously
reported on a proposed plan to
turn Arawak Cay into addi-
tional docking space that would
have allowed for at least an
additional three more ships to
dock in Nassau per day.

However, Captain Allens

said this was not a feasible
option at present. He added
that at present, the turning
basin in Nassau Harbour can
accommodate even the largest
ships, although perhaps they
need to approach the basin
from different ways.

Captain Allens said there are
several challenges in widening
the basin, expanding the dock
and creating more space for.
cruise ships.

He explained that many

impact on cruise ships

cruise lines are reluctant to”
reveal their future ship con-,
struction plans, which makes it:
difficult to make changes to the
Prince George’s Wharf dock, as’
there is no indication of how
large boats would be.

Captain Allens said dredging
would have to be done, and that’
more ships would mean that
more staff would have to be’
hired to process them. This, he.
said, was a very expensive
undertaking.

PLP ‘trying to resurrect UBP bogeyman’

FROM page one

Mr Levarity left the PLP
as one of the Dissident
Eight and nothing more was
done to advance local gov-
ernment during the 25 years
of the old PLP’s administra-
tion.

It was left to the FNM
under the leadership of

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, the party said, to

introduce representative and |

elective local government
for the first time thus giving
residents of the Family
Islands more control over
their lives and local affairs.

“That was a major step
forward in developing our
democracy and the people

of the Family Islands cherish
their local government. On
the other hand, the PLP
administration under Perry
Christie has been uncom-
fortable with elected local
government; indeed during
five years in office they have
acted to roll it back,” the
FNM said.

The opposition Sania

that the matter of succession
in the FNM has always been
and will always be by estab-
lished democratic process. ©

“When the time comes for
a change of leadership in the
FNM, whether the party is
in government or not, it will
be decided by democratic
process, not by automatic
succession,” the party said.

Gay activist’s legal threat -

FROM page one

“Considering that the
Bahamas is based on the com-

~mon law tradition, our strategy

has basically changed, because if
we cannot rely on parliament
to create legislation that will
protect and equalize homosex-
uals in the Bahamas, then the
only alternative is to take our
concerns to the highest court,
which is the Privy Council,” Ms
Greene explained. |

Ms Greene said RAB would,
if need be, take matters involv-



ing job discrimination, medical
treatment discrimination, and
adoption issues involving homo-
sexuals before the UK hig
court,

Asked what issues the gay
community wished the govern-
ment to address in this election
year, Ms Green said she wanted
the government to promote a
culture of honesty, integrity and
respect for diversity.

She also said the gay com-
munity needed a government
that was serious about consti-
tutional reform.

ST ANDREW’S SCHOOL

Invites you to join us for

WINE & CHEESE

anda

SILENT AUCTION

Hosted by

e St Andrew’s Alumni and Friends Associatio
(STAAFA)

Thursday

March 8, 2007
at

The Nassau Yacht Club
East Bay Street
7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Hors d’oeuvres
Wine selections by Bristol Cellars

Tickets $30

Vailable in the school’s office from
Margo Albury, from Committee members:

anne Treco (457-1692), lrene Cathopoulis (325-4944)
irstie Smollett (324-7737), Dana Thompson (565-8418)

or at the door

‘Man suffers serious
injuries in dog attack

FROM page one

The Police Canine Unit had
to be called in to collect the
attacking: dogs — two pitbulls
and a Doberman Pincher.

The police also reported that

. two men were arrested over the

weekend for gun possession.

The men were driving a black
Nissan vehicle when they were
pulled over and searched.

During the search, the police
found a .380 hand gun with one
live round of ammunition.

Both men, who are in their
twenties, were arrested and are
now in police custody.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their -
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

aint

Prince eee Drive e ro 324-5476





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007, PAGE 15



LOCAL NEWS



Bush seeks ethanol alliance with Brazil,
the world’s renewable energy leader

@ By ALAN CLENDENNING
AP Business Writer

SAO PAULO, Brazil (AP)
-— Just an hour’s drive outside
this traffic-choked metropolis
where President Bush kicks off
a Latin American tour Thurs-
day, sugar cane fields stretch
for hundreds of miles, providing
the ethanol that fuels eight out
of every 10 new Brazilian cars.

In only a few years, Brazil has

‘ turned itself into the planet’s

undisputed renewable energy
leader, and the highlight of
Bush’s visit is expected to be a
new ethanol “alliance” he will
forge with Brazilian President
Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva,

The deal is still being negoti-
ated, but the two leaders are
expected to sign an accord Fri-
day to develop standards to
help turn ethanol into an inter-
nationally traded commodity,
and to promote sugar cane-
based ethanol production in
Central America and the
Caribbean to meet rising inter-
national demand.

Across Latin America’s
largest nation, Brazilian media
are billing the Bush-Silva meet-
ing as a bid to create a new two-
nation “OPEC of Ethanol,”
despite efforts by Brazilian and
American officials to downplay
the label amid concerns that

whatever emerges would be.

viewed as a price-fixing cartel.

Meanwhile, political and:

energy analysts warn that any
agreements reached between
Brazil and the United States are
unlikely to have short-term
effects. And the deal itself could
end up largely symbolic because
of reluctance by Washington to
address a key point of friction:
A 53 cent-per-gallon US tariff
on Brazilian ethanol imports.
“For the Brazilians, the tariff
has utmost priority,” said
Cristoph Berg, an ethanol ana-
lyst with Germany’s F.O. Licht,
a commodities research firm.

. “They will agree with develop-

cave ve 8 ew aes

avYow © ew re eek

sore ram

mee x

<< sen ne 2 ae

THEMES.

GUEST SPEAKERS:

BISHOP RANDALL E. HOWARD
*General Overseer (Worldwide)

BISHOP DR. BRICE H. THOMPSON
General Presbyter (Caribbean & Atlantic Ocean Islands)

ing biofuel economies around
the world, but the first thing
they will say is "We want to do
away with that tariff.”

No one is expecting Bush to
give ground on the tariff. The
politically sensitive issue essen-
tially subsidizes American corn
growers who are rapidly ramp-
ing up ethanol production amid
Washington’s encouragement
of renewable biofuels to ease
U.S. dependence on imported
petroleum.

But the visit will help Bush
and Silva join forces to promote
the politically popular issue of
renewable energy simply by
gathering in a place where
ethanol is king.

At every gas station in this
city of 18 million, drivers can
fill up with gasoline or ethanol.
Ethanol came courtesy of a
1970s decision by Brazil’s for-
mer military dictators to subsi-
dize production and require dis-
tribution at the pumps.

A 1980s Brazilian fad with
cars that ran only on ethanol
petered out when oil prices fell
in the early 1990s. But the fuel
came back into vogue in 2003
when automakers started rolling
out cars “flex-fuel” cars that run
on gasoline, ethanol or any
combination of the two.

With international oil prices
reaching record highs, Brazil-
ian drivers turned to the cars;
most choose ethanol, because
it costs about half the price of
gas.

The ethanol industry is now
making profits like never before
amid heavy foreign investment.
Just last week, Brazil’s state-
run oil firm, Japan’s Mitsui &
Co. and a Brazilian construc-
tion firm signed a memorandum
of interest to study the con-
struction of a pipeline in Brazil
that would be used to help
export ethanol to Japan.

Brazil is the world’s top
exporter, though U.S. ethanol
production still surpasses Brazil.
But Brazil has an edge over the

18, 2007 ‘ East Street

broadcast Service.

BISHOP DAVID H. BRYAN

Global Outreach Director
BISHOP CLAYTON N. MARTIN

will be delivered by.

National Overseer (Jamaica, Cayman Islands, Guyana &

French Guiana)

MINISTER MORAIS L. CASSELL
Regional Youth Director (Northeast U.S.A. Region & Bermuda)

Ministering in anointed song and performance will he the

Convention Choir and |

Choir, the Ba



if Mood

eae)

& A MAN walks with his bicycle through sugar cane fields in Piracicaba, Brazil. In the background are ethanol-filled tanks (inset).

United States for future pro-
duction because ethanol can be
produced more cheaply with
sugar cane than the corn used
by U.S. farmers to make
ethanol.

And increased use of corn for
ethanol is prompting interna-
tional corn price increases,
prompting Silva to tell reporters
last week he would tell Bush,
“Why make ethanol out of
corn? Why don’t we feed the
corn to the chickens.”

Bush has set a goal of 35 bil-
lion gallons a year of ethanol
and other alternative fuels, such
as soybean-based biodiesel, by

Power Possessed People

ACTS 1:8

‘Monday, March 12th, 2007
National Overseer, Bishop Dr. Elgarnet B. Rahming will deliver his.
Annual Address LIVE VIA RADIO BAHAMAS

Sunday, March 18th, 2007
Annual Baptismal Procession will leave the Tabernacle for the
Western Esplanade followed by the live ZNS Radio and TV 13 evening

Final Message on Convention Theme:
Power Possessed People.

2017 — a fivefold increase over
current requirements.

But production of ethanol
from U.S. corn is expected to
fall far short of meeting such an
increase, and experts doubt
even land-rich Brazil would be
able to fill the gap along with
help from Central America and
the Caribbean. So Bush envi-
sions a major speedup of
research into production of
“cellulosic” ethanol made from
wood chips, switchgrass and
other feedstocks.

Ethanol proponents hope
Bush and Silva will nonetheless
come up with a framework to

- sharply boost ethanol produc-

tion in the nations between
Brazil and the United States,
encouraging more foreign
investment.And coming up with
technical standards to define
quality levels for ethanol is key
to turn it into a commodity that
could be traded like oil. “I think
its Brazilian know how and
American know how, there’s a
lot of cross fertilization that can
take place,” said Brian Dean,
executive director of the Inter-
american Ethanol Commission.

The commission counts
among its directors Florida
Gov. Jeb Bush, the president’s

(AP Photo: Victor R Caivano)

brother, as well as former
Brazilian agriculture minister
Roberto Rodrigues and Luiz
Moreno, president of the Inter-
American Development Bank.

Increasing ethanol produc-
tion in the region is also expect-
ed to be a major topic in
Guatemala later this month
when the bank holds its annual
meeting, Latin America’s top
yearly economic gathering. “We
see a marketplace in ethanol
that can create an enormous
amount of economic growth
and prosperity in the US and
the rest of the world,” Dean
said.

Atlantis invites you to join

our dynamic

FOOD & BEVERAGE TEAM

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and explore a world of fantastic opportunities

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PARADISE ISLAND»





THE TRIBUNE |

Ritetys CF Tent He
my mee

a
tll







MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

SECTION —

business@tribunemedia.net

|

The Tribune











|
i,

Lawsuit to have ‘no impact’

t

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

fresh lawsuit.
filed against the
South Ocean
Golf & Beach .
Resort and its
Canadian pension fund: owner
will not interfere with the prop-
erty’s sale, The Tribune was
told, with a new majority
investor hoping to reach a
Heads of Agreement with the
Government for the hotel’s $1
billion redevelopment later this
month.

Case Financial has taken legal
action in the California courts



against the resort’s holding —

" ew bid for Royal

on South Ocean resort sale

Investor hoping for March Heads on $ibn redevelopment,
as the former potential buyer files a fresh action

company, the Bahamian-regis-
tered South Ocean Develop-
ment Company, and the Cana-
dian Commercial Workers
Industry Pension Plan
(CCWIPP), alleging that a fraud
was committed against it after it
settled previous litigation over
an attempt it made to purchase
the Bahamian hotel.

Also named as a defendant

Oasis unveiled

Q By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ANOTHER potential pur-
‘chaser for the stricken Royal
Oasis Resort in Grand Bahama
has gone public, saying it has

. . “the financial backing in place

= and are now ready to close” on
the deal with the hotel’s de fac-
to owner, Lehman Brothers’
private equity arm.

William Gtaulich III,
described in a press release as a
“veteran hotelier”, has teamed
up with Bahamian architect,
Lawrence Chisholm, of
Lawrence Chisholm & Associ-

ates, to mount a bid for the

Royal Oasis, although it is -

unclear whether they are close
to concluding a deal with
Lehman Brothers.

The statement said that Mr
Graulich owned a firm called
Hotel Acquisition Corporation,

_ a hotel development and man-
‘agement company set up in

1994, and that he was a “partner
of” Hotel Acquisition Corpo-
ration (Bahamas), a Bahamian-
registered entity that has likely
been set up as an acquisition

SEE page 12B

Rum Cay Resort’s
‘huge step forward’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE $600- $700 million Rum
Cay Resort Marina has taken

“a huge step forward” after
receiving all the necessary gov-
ernment approvals and permits
to extend the runways at the
island’s existing airstrip and
construct an expanded airport
terminal that will be the third
largest in the Bahamas.

Tim Perkins, director of con-
struction for the resort devel-
opers, Montana Holdings, said
all required permits and

ty

60 per cent of units in
one complex reserved

approvals from the Ministry of
Transport & Aviation had been
received, enabling the develop-
ers to proceed with the runway
extensions.and expanding the
airport terminal to 5,500 square

_ feet.

“We're very, very pleased,”
Mr Perkins said of the Port Nel-

SEE page 13B

Show ‘same zeal’ for
Bahamian investors

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government must
approach proposals from young
Bahamians with the “same
zeal” it shows foreign direct
investment projects, a Bahami-
an entrepreneur told The Tri-
bune,’as their future as major
economic stakeholders in the
country “depends on it”.

Khaalis Rolle, the principal



owner of Nassau Water Ferries,
which has been seeking gov-

. ernment approval for-a pro-

posed 16-acre beach and island
getaway on the western end of
Paradise Island, said that
whichever party formed the
hext administration, it needed
to cut through public sector
bureaucracy that cost young

SEE page 13B

in the latest lawsuit is Allen &
Company, a Florida firm that
is acting: as a broker for
CCWIPP in finding a buyer for
the South Ocean property.
Case Financial is alleging that
all three entities “made fraudu-
lent misrepresentations” to
induce it to settle previous liti-
gation it filed against them in
the US District. Court for the

southern district of Florida on -

November 9, 2005, claiming that
facts were concealed from it
that would have influenced the

‘decision to settle. .

Chiefly, Case Financial is
alleging that the South Ocean
Golf & Beach Resort had been
sold to-Roger Stein and his
investment group prior to it
agreeing to settle the lawsuit at

the end of March 2006.

Case Financial is claiming
that prior to the agreement
being ‘signed, it was told that it
would still have an opportunity
to purchase the South Ocean
resort following settlement, and
the property’s continuing avail-
ability was what influenced it
to sign.

But a spokesman for South

Ocean and the other defendants
described the Case Financial
lawsuit as “without merit”, say-
ing it would be “vigorously
defended”.

The spokesman said: “Case
did commence an action against
CCWIPP and all the other com-

SEE page 11B

Furious Brilanders seek meeting with minister

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

and CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

THE Harbour Island Town Council and

Harbour Island master plan proves divisive, as islanders

concerns.

claim no consultation and concerns ignored

Although supposed to be overseen by a

angry Briland residents are seeking a meet-

ing with Dr. Marcus Bethel, minister of ener-.

gy and the environment, over the contro-
versial Land Use ‘Master Plan’ for the

island, sources have told The Tribune, argu- |

ing that they .were.not _properly.consulted

The controversy has arisen because the
plan was part-funded by the Save Harbour
Island Association (SHIA), a group com-
posed largely of foreign, second-home win-

_ ter residents, who are oppesed: to any. more

development on the island.

“representative” steering committee of Bri-
landers, and part-produced by Nassau-based
architects, Bruce LaFleur & Associates, the

- SEE page 10B.



and that it does not reflect their needs and

_She has yet to learn her ABC's but that doesn’t matter. When it’s time for her to go to college, she
won't have to worry about whether we can afford it or not. With a plan from Colinalmperial, we
know that we can give her the education she needs to succeed. Harvard, Oxford, University of

The Bahamas? The choice will be hers..

-but a college education is definitely in her future!

*Colinalmperial.

Insurance Lid.

Confidence for Life





PAGE 2B, MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

ee

THE TRIBUNE



@ By Fidelity Capital advanced, two declined and four
Markets remained unchanged.

/ Volume leader for the week

t was an active trading week was Fidelity Bank (Bahamas)

[: the Bahamian market, (BAB), with 51,000 shares chang-
with in excess of 102,000 ing hands and accounting for 49.7

shares changing hands. The mar- _ per cent of the total shares trad-
ket saw 11 out of its 19 listed ed. .
stocks trade, of which five The big advancer for the week

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act
(No. 45 of 2000)

VENADO CORP.
Registration Number 41,862B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
132 (2) of the International Business Companies Act
(No. 45 of 2000) VENADO CORP. is in Dissolution.

Any person having any claim against VENADO CORP.
is required on or before the 30th of March, 2007 to
send their name, address and particulars of the debt or
claim to the liquidator of the company, or in default
thereof they may have excluded from the benefit of
any distribution made before such claim is approved.

GSO Corporate Services Ltd., of 303 Shirley Street,
Nassau, The Bahamas is the Liquidator of VENADO
CORP)" %



was Colina Holdings (Bahamas)
(CHL), up $0.03 or 5 per cent to
end the week at $2.10. Also
advancing was Bank of the
Bahamas (BOB), up $0.39 or 4.81
per cent to close at a new 52-week
high of $8.50.

On the down side, Abaco Mar-
kets (AML), lost $0.01 or 1.32
per cent to close at $0.75.

The FINDEX gained 4.04
points for the week, to close at
782.63.

COMPANY NEWS

FOCOL Holdings (FCL) -

For the 2007 first quarter, FCL
posted net income of $3.3 million
or $0.39 per share versus $1.9 mil-
lion or $0.22 per share in the 2006
first quarter.

It should be noted here that
the 2007 first quarter includes
Shell's operating results, which
will explain some of the large dif-



FOREX Rates
















Commodities

Crude Oil
Gold



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TEL ORNS OF oer

Oar iS ev 139

E-Malkse ulhseasbahar

“PAE RL ET

ioimall.com:

v



International Markets

International Stock Market Indexes:

ferentes with the comparative

period.

Revenues were $73.3 million,
up from $24.8 million in 2006,
while the cost of sales was $63.5
million versus $21.4 million last
year. Gross profit for the .2007
first quarter was $9.9 million com-
pared to $3.4 million the previ-
ous year.

FCL's operating expenses for
the 2007 first quarter skyrocketed
from just $1.6 million the previous
year to $6.6 million in the 2007
first quarter. Marketing, admin-
istrative and general expenses
accounted for $5.6 million of
operating expenses. Total assets
declined by $11 million or 10 per
cent to total $99.9 million as at
October 31, 2006.

In related news, FCL manage-
ment disclosed that during the
2007 first quarter, it completed
the purchase of GAL Terminals



Weekly % Change
1.1772
1.9433
1.3191









Weekly % Change



$61.52
$644.70

0.98
-6.09



Weekly % Change






12,114.10
1,387.17
2,368.00
17,217.93

-4.22



and the Grand Bahama assets of
Chevron Bahamas Ltd. The
acquisition was financed in part

by a $3 million mortgage-backed
bond issue and a non-interest
long-term note of $1.6 million.

The Bahamian cae Market

FINDEX 435.63 YTD 1.321%








BISX
SYMBOL

CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
PRICE CHANGE


























/ $0.75 $-0.01 14250 22.95%
BAB _ $1.25 oe 51000 0.00%
BBL. $0.83 $0.03 2500 9.21%
BOB $8.50 $0.39 2700 5.85%
BPF $11.25 $- 625 -0.44%
BSL $14.60 $- 0 0.00%
BWL $1.95 $ 100 11.43%
CAB $10.03 $-0.05 1400 0.30%
CBL $13.89 $0.15 4050 11.03%
CHL $1.69 ‘ 45 -23.18%
CIB $14.60 $- 0. | 3.18%
CWCB_ $5.34 $0.13 0. | 2.50%
DHS $2.44 $- ¥ 7770 -2.40%
“FAM. $5.85 $0.15 <4. 7700 1.04%
FCC $0.50 $- 0 -9.09%
FCL ». :+-$16.71 $2, eae 33.15%
FIN _—_ $12.30 $- 0 2.33%
ATED: $7.25 $- 0 1.40%
IST yy.» $9.05 $- 0 5.23%
PRE $10.00... $- 0 0.00%

DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:

e FIN has declared dividends of $0.13 per share, payable on
March 9, 2007, to all shareholders of record date March 2,
2007. ©




e ICD has declared dividends of $0.10 per share, payable on
March 30, 2007, to all shareholders of ee date March 12,
2007.




e CBL has declared an extraordinary dividend of $0.12 per
share, payable on April 30, 2007, to all shareholders of record
date April 13,2007.





e FINCO will hold its Annual General Mesting on March
15, 2007, at 6.30pm at SuperClubs Breezes, West Bay Street,
Cable Beach, Nassau, Bahamas.




Joint scholarship effort
honours late Pat Bain

SIX Bahamians will be the
recipients of an annual scholar-
ship to attend the College of
the Bahamas Culinary and Hos-
pitality Management Institute
(CHMI), thanks to the estab-
lishment of an industry-union
partnership which has created
the Patrick Bain BHA-BHEA-
BHC&AWU Hotel Industry
Partners Scholarship Fund.

Jointly funded by the.

Bahamas Hotel Association
(BHA), the Bahamas Hotel
Employers Association
(BHEA) and the Bahamas
Hotel, Catering and Allied
Workers Union (BHC&AWU),

lam - 3pm

‘Miller Rd.(tacardi Road).

THE SER

HACIA ARR,

LWAITS YOU





@ SEALING THE DEAL; Industry partners sign an agreement
committing their annual financial support towards the newly estab-
lished Patrick S.G. Bain BHA-BHEA-BHC&AWU Hotel Indus-
try Partners Scholarship Fund. From L to R: Roy Colebrook,
president, Bahamas Hotel Catering & Allied Workers Union; J.
Barrie Farrington, president, Bahamas Hotel Employers Associa-
tion; and Russell Miller, president, Bahamas Hotel Association.



the scholarships will support
individuals seeking to pursue
advanced studies in hospitality
and culinary-related areas.

The scholarships are being
offered in the name of the
respective organisations and in
tribute to the late union leader
Pat Bain, in recognition of his
commitment to education and
building business-labour part-
nerships.

“Pat Bain was personally
involved in helping us to estab-
lish the criteria for a union-

_industry partnership scholarship

programme well in advance of
his unfortunate passing,”
according to BHEA president,
J. Barrie Farrington. “He held a
deep belief in the power of col-
laboration by the unions and
the private sector in helping to
build a better nation. We
believe it only appropriate that
this fund be named in his hon-
our.”

Commenting on behalf of the
Bahamas Hotel, Catering &
Allied Workers Union, presi-
dent Roy A. Colebrook said:
“On behalf of the union, we
believe it is essential that we
invest in our future, particular-
ly in the youth and those who
are new to the industry, so that
Bahamians can realise the full
potential and rewards which our
industry offers. This is also
another way to honour one of
our fallen brothers, Pat Bain,
who dedicated much of his life
to serving our union, our indus-
try and our nation”.

Russell Miller, president of
the Bahamas Hotel Association,
added: “BHA is pleased to be
part of this programme. Our
support -is made possible
through the generosity of our
hotel and allied members, and
their support for our fundraising
activities for education and

training programmes.

“This adds to three scholar-
ships already awarded to aspir-
ing tourism professionals
through other BHA supported
activities. We believe the fund
to be an excellent example to
our nation as to how we can
support the: development of our
people by leveraging the
resources of various stakehold-
ers, and we plan to build on this
effort.”

Speaking on behalf of the
College, Dr Lincoln Marshall,
executive director for the Culi-
nary Hospitality and Manage-
ment Institute (CHMI), said:
“CHM is very pleased that the
industry partners have estab-
lished a scholarship fund in Pat
Bain’s name, which is tenable
at our institution. Pat was
always a supporter of educa-
tion, and we feel that this schol-
arship speaks well of him and
his efforts on behalf of the hos-
pitality industry”.

The partnership organisations
pledge an annual contribution
of $25,000 in support of up to
six annual scholarships of $4,000
each. The three organisations
have established a selection
committee comprised of repre-
sentation from each of the
organisations, in addition to two
educators. The application
process is open until March 30,
and awards will be announced
by June 30. Individuals wish-
ing to apply should contact
Bridget Murray, Workforce
Development Manager for the
Bahamas Hotel Association, at
322-8381; Lashan Smith for the
Bahamas Hotel Employers
Association at 322-8381; or
Denise Colebrook for the
Bahamas Hotel, Catering and
Allied Workers Union at 323-
5933 for eligibility criteria and
an application form.





PAY SCALES

SCRE RAR PAR SERENE

Che Bliami Z Herald





Websites show how much vou should b he paid

ff When asking a boss for a raise,
most employees have little data
to support their argument, but
that is changing with websites
such as salary.com and
payscale.com

BY DAMON DARLIN
New York Times News Service
If information is power, then most
employees who enter salary negotia-
tions are holding pea shooters while
the boss is encased in a Kevlar vest.
Unless someone left a spreadsheet
of the company’s salaries on the

rural-to-urban transformation.

Three decades ago, this area was

mostly dirt roads and rice paddies.
Farmers eked a living from the fer-
tile crescent of land at the end of
the Pearl River and gazed longingly
across a barbed wire border at
Hong Kong, then a British colony.
' Today, Shenzhen is one of Chi-
na’s largest cities, with a popula-
tion pushing 18 million and a land-
scape of skyscrapers, luxury
apartments and shopping malls.

Hundreds of square miles of
fields have been drained and cov-
ered with factories that churn out a
significant portion of the world’s
products, from computers to cloth-



AUTOMOBILES

ing and eye The ee has pets

copier (funny how often that does
happen), most employees have pre-
cious little ammunition going into a
meeting to talk about their pay.

A few websites try to level the
playing field by providing more
detailed information about salaries.
Salary.com began revealing the
results of salary surveys on its site in
1999. PayScale.com is now challeng-
ing it by gathering information
directly from the people who search
for data. (A third site, Payscroll.com,
is testing a method of trolling job list-
ings for salary information. It will be

ECONOMIC GROWTH

Tye ay
TU iaple SS
Zo ae .



RIDING THE GROWTH: A cyclist passes by a Wal-Mart Supercenter in Shenzhen, China. The city has
averaged an annual economic growth rate of 28 percent since 1980 - the fastest i in China.

CHINA’ S eric.

~SHENZHEN, ONE OF CHINA’S FASTEST GROWING
CITIES, GRAPPLES WITH MASSIVE POLLUTION
AND LABOR DISPUTES

BY CRAIG SIMONS
Cox News Service



SHENZHEN, China — Nowhere else is the country’s breathtaking
economic growth on display as vividly as in this south China
metropolis. It even has a name: “Shenzhen speed,” a remarkable

an annual economic growth of 28
percent since 1980 — the fastest in
China.

But Shenzhen speed also repre-
sents China’s dilemma. The fast
profits have come with problems.

On many days, the air is thick
with smog. The number of cars has
nearly doubled since 2003, and
streets lock into snarls of exasper-
ated motorists. Violent crime and
the incidents of HIV/AIDS have
surged.

Experts see the city as a test case
for whether China will be able to
solve problems ranging from mas-
sive pollution to growing labor dis-
putes.

opened to the public this month or
next.)

New Internet technologies are
providing information that has never
been available to the average person
and transforming the way they sell
homes or buy airline tickets. It could
have the same impact on the 47 mil-
lion people who look for new jobs
each month and the countless others
who think they are underpaid at the
ones they have.

Jessica Morrison, who wrote
advertising copy for Drugstore.com
in Seattle, was one of those. After five

DENNIS OWEN/BLOOMBERG NEWS

At a park in the city center, 55-year-
old Peng Li remembered that when
she moved to the city in 1987, “it
was always clear.”

“But now... Well now you can
see what’s happened,” she said,
sweeping a hand across the pol-
luted gray skyline.

Other residents complain that
lack of social welfare has created a
society where poorer citizens are
left out.

Some 13 million migrant labor-
ers work in Shenzhen’s factories
and produce almost all of the city’s
wealth, but they have almost no
access to public services, including | |
reduced-cost healthcare and
schooling, said Liu Kaiming, direc-
tor of Shenzhen’s Institute of Con-
temporary Observation.

“The system has created a huge
group of people who are treated as
second-class citizens,” he said.

In 1980, China’s paramount
leader Deng Xiaoping declared
Shenzhen a special economic zone,
one of four cities allowed to carry
out communist China’s first capi-
talist reforms.





° TURN TO CHINA

Domestic, foreign firms eye Chrysler

In the topsy-turvy automobile
industry, anything is possible,
including the takeover of
Chrysler by GM or a Chinese firm.

BY WARREN BROWN
Washington Post Service

SANTA BARBARA, Calif. — One
can see Detroit more clearly on a
sunny day in California, where
Detroit and its products mostly
remain an afterthought.

This is import territory where
Aston Martin, Audi, BMW, Ferrari,
Honda, Hyundai, Kia, Lamborghini,
Land Rover, Maserati, Mercedes-
Benz and Volkswagen rule the road.

It is not so much that Californians
hate Detroit metal. They just don’t
think about it. Thus, to them, specula-
tion that a struggling Chrysler Group



will be bought in whole or in part by
Chery Automobile of Wuhu, China,
or by some other foreign car manu-
facturer makes perfect sense.

On the other hand, suggestions
that Chrysler will be consumed by
General Motors, a Detroit company
that finally is getting its act together
after years of financial losses and
product disasters, make no sense at
all in California, where marrying up

‘and marrying right are essential to

professional and political success.
Why would Detroit marry Detroit?
What’s the upside of that? How will it
improve the fortunes of the newly
wedded corporate couple in Califor-
nia, where import vehicles account
for nearly 75 percent of the market?
Some GM insiders agree, albeit
not with the same amount of passion

and ridicule one hears here in cock-
tail chatter about a potential GM-
Chrysler hookup.

The inside line at GM says the cor-

' poration frequently holds talks with a

number of rival car companies,
including its chief domestic competi-
tor, Ford, and other foreign manufac-
turers such as DaimlerChrysler,
which owns the Chrysler Group; and
with BMW, Toyota and Honda.

GM insiders point out that their
company has a long history of such
conversations, some of which, such
as the most recent discussions with
DaimlerChrysler and BMW, have
resulted in technology development
coalitions, like the dual-mode gas-
electric hybrid system that soon will

* TURN TO CHRYSLER



years at the company and several
promotions, her title was associate
editor even though she had the same
duties as a copywriter, a loftier title.
She also suspected that at $42,000 a
year, she was paid a lot less than
someone else with her duties.

She checked PayScale, and its free
report that compares her pay with
others holding a similar job title said
that someone with her experience
should be making $50,000 to $60,000.
Then she went to see her manager.

“I was a little nervous going in, but
I had done my research,” Morrison,

FEDERAL COURT

27, said. She got the title she wanted
and a raise to within the pay range
she suggested. “If I had gone in with-
out the information, the conversation
would have been, ‘I feel like I am not
making enough money,’ ” Morrison
said.

More extensive salary surveys are
done for corporations, but a regular
employee could not hope to buy the
information from any of the other
major compensation companies like
Hay or Mercer. “We wouldn’t give it

° TURN TO SALARY

Tax case could

& A three-year statue of
limitations is running out for any
investor who wants to claim a
refund on overpaid taxes on 2003
insurance company distributions.

BY CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — An ad hoc
group of accountants and lawyers
may be close to winning a federal
court battle that could help millions
of investors claim billions of dollars

_ in overpaid federal taxes the past 15

years.

Led by Charles D. Ulrich, a retired
accountant in Baxter, Minn., the
group charges the Internal Revenue
Service overtaxed stock and cash
these investors received from mutual
life insurance companies when they
reorganized into publicly traded cor-
porations.

A trial is scheduled to start June 18
in the Court of Federal Claims. But
the clock is ticking for anyone who
seeks to claim a refund on overpaid
taxes on insurance company distribu-

_ tions in 2003 because of a three-year

statute of limitations to claim
refunds.

“This is an incredibly important
case,” says Robert Willens, a long-

BALANCING ACT.

lead to big refunds

time tax analyst at Lehman Brothers, ©
who believes the odds favor Ulrich’s
group in federal court.

Taxpayers can file a claim before
the case is decided, which several tax
experts say the IRS likely will lose
based on a procedural ruling by the
same court last November that in
essence said the IRS’ logic in this case
wasn’t valid. An IRS spokesman said
the agency doesn’t comment on
pending litigation.

Mutual insurance companies are
owned by their policyholders, and
companies distribute shares and cash
or both’in exchange for policyhold-
ers’ ownership interests when they

‘ incorporate into public companies

with shares stock
exchanges.

It’s called demutualization and
more than 30 companies took the
plunge in recent years, most in the
late 1990s and early this decade. Two
of the biggest demutualizations
involved Prudential Financial and
MetLife, which each had over 11 mil-
lion policyholders. MetLife distrib-
uted ei $7 billion worth of stock.
Prudential distributed $12.5 billion in
stock.

traded on

*TURN TO TAXES .

Sick? Prove it!

§& Many employers are pushing
for the right to call doctors to
confirm employee illnesses ,

BY CINDY KRISCHER GOODMAN
cgoodman@MiamiHerald.com

The doctor’s noie that used to get
you an excused absence from school
could soon morph
into a workplace
battle. Many
employers want the
right to call your
doctor after he
writes that note to
determine just how
sick you are.

Do you have
debilitating migraines or just
repeated late-night hangovers?
Employers say the federal law that
lets workers take up to 12 weeks of
unpaid time off without losing their
jobs needs more clarity.

A major point of contention is not
the provision that many of us
working parents use to take time off
after childbirth or Peer but



inp KRISCHER
GOODMAN
x . cgoodman@

~MiamiHerald. com :









rather a medical leave problem that
employers and their attorneys say
has grown out of control.

HR professionals like Karen
Ansell of The Cornerstone Group in
Miami, fla., say there’s confusion
over what rises to the level of
“serious health condition” covered
by the act and the use of
unscheduled intermittent leave or
sporadic absences.

Some employers say workers use
minor ailments such as sinus
problems as a reason to seek benefits
under the Family and Medical Leave
Act and they bring vague doctors’
notes as proof of a sporadic need to
miss work.

“Employers need more tools
when they see certain patterns and
suspect something is going on,” said
Michael P. Aitken, director of
governmental affairs for the Society
for Human Resource Management.

On Dec. 1, the Labor Department
opened the floodgates for the public

*TURN TO BALANCING ACT



Chrysler Group.



DAVID ZALUBOWSKI/AP

UP IN THE AIR: It’s anybody’s guess as to who is planning to buy





4B |

ECONOMIC GROWTH

_ INTERNATIONAL EDITION

City’s fast growth

incurring bumps

°CHINA

Changes followed rapidly
as companies began to pay for
work done rather than for
time worked and, for the first
time, to link salaries with per-
formance, both of which
“vastly increased productiv-
ity,” said Yang Yaolin, direc-
tor of the city’s history
museum.

An indication of Shenzhen
speed is on display at the
museum. An exhibition pre-
serves a typical home from
the early 1980s that today is
considered a relic. A poster of
Mao Zedong hangs ona wall,
a sewing machine sits beside a
manual typewriter, and a hot
plate rests on a counter next

-to a flimsy bed.

Looking at the room, 73-
year-old Wu Yanda, a retired
factory manager who now
lives in a “European-style
villa,” recalled that when he
moved to Shenzhen in 1987,
such lodgings were ‘quite
luxurious.”

BALANCING ACT

Rules for
medical
leave
need —
clarifying

*BALANCING ACT

to comment on what’s work-
ing and what’s not with
FMLA, the 12-year-old law
that made America’s work-

places more family-friendly. °

More than 15,000 individuals
and organizations responded.

“A dozen years is a good
time when we should look at
regulations again to make
sure they are up to date,” Vic-
toria Lipnick, U.S. assistant
secretary of labor for employ-
ment standards told me. Lip-
nick says she has heard
employer criticism about the
medical leave part and that’s
one reason for collecting pub-
lic comments. “We want to
know how much of a problem
it is.”

Meanwhile, workers’
groups are preparing for a
fight to protect their rights.
under the FMLA. Since any

part of the law could be.

rewritten, they are making
their voices heard, too. ‘

We all know that family-
friendly policies are good for
employees and their busi-
nesses. They typically make
workers more loyal.

As of late 2006, more than
50 million Americans had
taken job-protected unpaid
leave to care for a new baby, a
seriously ill family member or
to recover from their own
serious health problem. Only
employers with 50 or more

AUTOMOBILES

“Today, it’s ancient his-
tory,” he said. “Most people
have a lot more.”

But not everyone is bask-
ing in the new prosperity.

The combination of low
pay, grueling work and dis-
crimination has led to
increasing labor unrest.

Shenzhen accounted for 15
percent of China’s court-adju-
dicated labor disputes last
year and the number of
migrant workers seeking jobs
in the city has fallen in recent
years as they chose to look
elsewhere, said Liu.

The change has forced
companies to raise salaries by
as much as 20 percent, a shift
that could lead factories to
relocate, he said, adding that
“if the situation doesn’t
improve, companies will not
be able to find enough work-
ers and the economy will have
to slow down.”

With urban ills growing
across China, cities are
looking at Shenzhen for les-
sons on how to deal with the

i

workers must comply with
FMLA. I am one who is grate-
ful to have used FMLA three
times to avoid the pull
between work and family
each time a new baby came.

Remember, this is not a
way to play hooky on your
employer’s dime. The only
thing you are guaranteed is
job protection, not paid leave.

What’s at risk for you, the
employee, should changes
occur? You might be forced to
give up the ability to stretch a
12-week leave should you or a
family member get sick. Now,
employees can take leave in
shorter intervals, such as 15
minutes or one hour.

Some employers want to

problems and avert an eco-
nomic slowdown.

“Because development has
been the most rapid in Shen-
zhen, the problems are the
most extreme here,” said
Huang Donghe, editor of the
Shenzhen Youth Magazine.
“But every Chinese city faces
the same problems.”

City government plans to
tackle the problems include
attracting better-paying high-
tech manufacturers while
forcing heavily polluting
firms to clean up or move fur-
ther inland and improving
access to health care and edu-
cation for migrant workers,
said Yang Lixun, a Shenzhen-
based government sociolo-
gist.

Last year the government
set up a fund to compensate
workers left unpaid when
companies close. The city
also has announced plans to
greatly expand the city’s sub-
way system by 2010, build
more parks and increase recy-
cling programs.



y

MCT/MIAMI HERALD ILLUSTRATION

make workers take time off in
half-day increments. That
could prevent you, the
employee, from coming in an
hour late for a prenatal doctor
visit or lunchtime kidney dial-
ysis. And they are asking for a
hard look at redefining seri-
ous health conditions to cover
problems where the employee
is. unable to work for five or
more business days.

Debra Ness, director of the
National Partnership for
Women & Families, calls any
changes ‘‘alarming.”’ She
wants a comprehensive study
to prove problems exist with
medical leave. “Research
would show the law is work-
ing well,” Ness said.

Firms eyeing Chrysler

° CHRYSLER

be brought to market by GM,
BMW and Chrysler.

The likelihood of a recov-
ering GM taking on the many
problems of a financially way-
ward Chrysler Group “just
doesn’t make much sense” at
this time, one top GM official
said.

But nowadays in the topsy-
turvy automobile industry,
anything is possible, including
the takeover of Chrysler by
people who historically have
had little to do with the busi-
ness of building and selling
cars and trucks.

For example, Ed Lapham, a
knowledgeable and well-re-
spected columnist for the
Detroit-based Automotive
News, speculates that well-fi-
nanced venture capitalists

could put their considerable
sums together to buy out
Chrysler.

Why not? It could be a way
to turn a quick profit. Venture
capitalists are not as inter-
ested in running companies as
they are in aggrandizing over-
all corporate value and selling
off the parts to the highest
bidders. They have no fear of
doing business with the Chi-
nese, or anyone else, as long
as the potential buyers can
show them the money.

Chery Automobile, a Chi-
nese-government-backed
business with ambitions of
rapid growth and global
expansion, especially into the
lucrative North American
market, has the money.

That is why Chery has
agreed to help Chrysler
develop its next generation of

small, fuel-efficient automo-
biles. Chery isn’t acting out of
altruism or love for Chrysler.
The Chinese company is
smart.

It has studied how its cor-
porate Asian siblings entered
the U.S. market — initially by
strengthening their visibility
on the West Coast, where
regional buyers are least
resistant to import newcom-
ers and are very supportive of
Asian brands.

The Chinese know that
what doesn’t sell here as a
Chrysler product could very
well sell as an identifiable
Asian model — as long as the
quality and price are right.

With Chrysler struggling
and desperately in need of
help, it all comes down to a
matter of timing — and Chery
picking the market.



MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD









TONY YU/BLOOMBERG NEWS

SHOPPING: Homebuyers examine a model of the Top King Hill residential project in
Shenzhen, one of China’s largest cities with a population pushing 18 million and a
landscape of skyscrapers, luxury apartments and shopping malls.

“In the 1980s and ’90s,
Shenzhen developed by
attracting low-value manufac-
turing that stressed high con-
sumption and allowed high
levels of pollution,” Yang
said.

FEDERAL COURT

There is little evidence that
the initiatives are working so
far, Liu said. He noted that
workers continue to have
very little access to public
services and pollution and
traffic seems to have gotten

worse in recent months.

“In China the most impor-
tant thing is not to listen to
what government officials say
but to see if they actually do
anything,” he said. ‘So far,
they haven’t done much.”

Investors look to gain
from insurance tax case

* TAXES

Other insurers that demu-
tualized include Principal
Financial, which had a!most
1 million policyholders when
it reorganized in 2001, and
John Hancock Financial Ser-
vices, which had 3 million
policyholders. John Hancock
was later purchased by Cana-
da’s Manulife Financial.

The IRS, citing: administra-
tive rulings from the 1970s,
said policyholders did not pay
for the cash and stock and
owed taxes on the amount
they received from the demu-
tualizations. The IRS argued
that policyholders had no rea-
sonable expectation their
ownership interest would
ever have value, that it could
not be traded like a stock, and
policyholders could not antic-
ipate if or when a demutuali-
zation might occur.

Ulrich, who began study-
ing the issue in 2001, argues

PAY SCALES

that demutualization distribu-
tions should be treated as a
return of the premiums poli-
cyholders paid for their own-
ership interests. Under differ-
ent regulations that govern
such distributions, no taxes
were owed, he said.

“The government is failing
to follow its own code and
regulations,” Ulrich said.

Other tax and insurance

experts agree with: much*of’

Ulrich’s analysis.

In most stock sales, tax is
only owed on the sharehold-
ers’ gain — the difference
between the price initially
paid for the shares, known as
the “cost basis,” and the price
received when they are sold.

| “Certainly, it’s very harsh
to say that you have no cost
basis,” said Brendan Bridge-
land, policy director for the
Center for Insurance
Research in Cambridge, Mass.

The legal battle started in
2004, when Ulrich prepared

an amended tax return for a
client who had received stock
from a demutualization that
was subsequently sold for
$31,579. Ulrich requested a
refund of $5,725 in taxes paid
on the sale. The claim was
denied.

Burgess J.W. Raby, a law-
yer based in Tempe, Ariz.,
challenged the IRS’ denial in
the Court of Federal Claims.

‘sLast November, the court

rejected the IRS’ argument
that its'tax treatment is a mat-
ter of ‘settled. law and said
administrative rulings from
the 1970s were not relevant.

Anyone who might be .
affected in these cases should
file a claim for a refund
because even if it is rejected,
the claim extends the dead-
line for a potential refund by
two years, Ulrich said.

But “if people sit and wait
to see how this is going to
turn out, they’re going to lose
out,” Ulrich said.

Websites arm employees

° SALARY

to you,” said Iain Fitzpatrick,
general manager of the
reward information service
division of Hay. The compen-
sation companies do not want
their information being used
against bosses negotiating sal-
aries.

“The last thing we want is
for a client to say, ‘We just
had a conversation with an
employee who was quoting
Hay data,’” Fitzpatrick said.

Unlike Salary.com, which
obtains its information from a
variety of surveys of corpo-
rate human resource depart-
ments, PayScale collects the
information directly from
people seeking the data.

If you want PayScale’s sal-
ary information, first you will
have to tell them what you
make. A basic report is free,
but the company charges $20
for a more detailed analysis.

SEARCH ENGINE

PayScale, which supplies
its data to job listing sites like
CareerBuilder.com, Jobs-
ter.com and Simply-
Hired.com, says it uses search
engine technology and a
rules-based algorithm to
match requests for data in a
database of 5.5 million pro-
files. ,
Executives at Salary.com,
which provides its data to job
boards at America Online,
Yahoo, HotJobs.com and
Monster.com, take issue with
the new approach. Their sur-
vey found 96 percent of
human resources depart-

ments do not trust user-re-
ported data. William Cole-
man, senior vice president for
compensation at Salary.com,
said, “People get information
wrong.”

He said they often did not
understand what benefits or

bonuses they were getting, so_

he considered any self-report-
ing to be suspect.

ACCURACY

But Joe Giordano, the
founder, chairman and also
vice president for product
development at PayScale, said
its information was accurate.

“People come onto PayS-
cale with no incentive to lie
because they want high-qual-
ity information,” he said.

The company checks the
information for inconsisten-
cies, tossing out extremes. It
said that about 50 percent of
submissions were not
included, but that it got
enough, about 300,000 a
month, that no single filing
could influence the overall
result. ’

“We collect more in one
day than some companies col-
lect in a year,” said Michael
Metzger, the chief executive.

It takes about six minutes
to fill in its questionnaire.

PayScale asks for your title,.

the number of years in the
field and your city.

It then asks you to better
define your job.
_ If you said software pro-
grammer, it wants to know
what kind of programmer and
what programming languages
you know.

with salary information

People in professions with
a profusion of titles are asked
more questions.

Finally, it asks you ques-
tions about your employer,
your education, and, of
course, your salary and bene-
fits. «3

Then it computes the
results and displays them ona
graph so you can see the
range.

A senior software engineer
in Silicon Valley with 20 years
of experience makes $88,531
to $106,364.

A benefits claims examiner

‘in Indianapolis, who has been

on the job for a decade, makes
$41,122 to $54,821.

LITTLE DIFFERENCE

Although Salary.com
argues that its paid results are
more accurate, its free Salary
Wizard tool yields results that
can barely differ: for example,
a range of $84,289 to $107,711
for the programmer and
$40,091 to $52,942 for the
examiner.

PayScale, which gets about
a third of the traffic that Sala-
ry.com does, says it has infor-
mation on jobs not usually
found in corporate salary sur-
veys like pornographic film
actor (average salary:
$63,275), rabbi (average sal-
ary: $98,610) and crossing
guard (average hourly wage:
$9.21), but so far no chick sex-
ers, mimes or bloggers are in
its roster.

“We don’t get many boiler
makers, but we get the jobs
that are out there in volume,”
Giordano said.





THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007, PAGE 5B

Attention:



Nova Southeastern University’s
i. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship
is now accepting applications for Fall Term 2007 enrollment
~ at its main campus in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

Bahamian students interested in pursuing a business education in the United
kates are encouraged to attend one of the following Mntarintion Sessions:

Tuesday, March 13 or Thursday, March 15
6:00 p.m.
British Colonial Hilton Hotel, Nassau

The following topics will be discussed at the Information Sessions:
Nova Southeastern University Athletic Programs
Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship Tuition and Fees

: | Financial Aid and Scholarships
Graduation Requirements

Business Careers and Job Opportunities

Admission Requirements

Business Degree Majors and Minors
Student Housing and Residential Life
Clubs and Campus Activities

The Information Sessions are open to the public. |

RSVP is required. |
Call: (242) 364-6766, ext.0 = Email: nsu-bahamas@nsu.nova. athe

Applications will be available and accepted at both sessions.
The $50 application fee will be waived for those who apply between March 12 and 17.

Nova Southeastern University is the sixth largest private, not-for-profit HS
university in the United States. NSU is accredited. by the Commission NY ae
=a

on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. The

Huizenga School is home to the largest M.B.A. program in Florida, and . 7 SOT rGE ASTERN
offers bachelor’s degrees in management, business administration, : UNIVERSITY





finance, accounting and sport and recreation management. The

Huizenga School is accredited by IACBE and is a member of AACSB.

H. i. Wayne Huizenga School of
Business and Entrepreneurship



specialist, and doctoral degrees.

Nova Southeastern University admits students of any race, color, sexual orientation, and national or ethnic origin. Nova Southeastern University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of
the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033- 4097, Telephone number: 404-679-4501) to award associate's, bachelor’s, master’s, educational

02-178-07PGA



PAGE 6B, MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007




Visit their web
site at:
www.swiftyears.com






lrish & British
Pub Beer on
sale, as well
as Kalik |







DRESS CODE:
Green &
White




Saturday, March 10â„¢ from 7 - 10 at Choices Courtyard
on the COB Campus - off Thompson Boulevard




ADMISSION: General: $25 (includes 1 BEER)
Students: $10 (includes 1 SODA)









FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL: 302-4587 or 4584
THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND EXTENSION SERVICES
PRESENTS

A One Day Workshop
Superior Customer Service

This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the
fundamentals of superior customer service. It focuses on customer value,

retention and relationship building and employee motivation.








Topics to be covered:

The Customer Service Environment
Understanding the Customer
Communication and Customer Service
Handling Complaints and the Difficult Customer
Creating Your Customer Service Strategy for Loyal Customers
The Face of the Future

Thursday, 29 March 2007
9:30am — 4:00pm
TBA

$170.00 Full payment is required at time of registration.
CASH, CREDIT CARD OR BANK CERTIFIED CHEQUE ACCEPTED

Application Fee:$40.00 (one time payment)






Date:
Time:
Venue:





Tuition:




Certification: | A Continuing Education Certificate on successful completion.
Enquiries: Contact the co-ordinator at Tel. (242) 302-5201 / 302-5205 or 302-5202 or
email: nlacroix@cob.edu.bs

All fees included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time payment)
CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials.






~ PRESIDENT’S SCHOLARS
PROGRAMME



The College of The Bahamas is now accepting applications for its prestigious and
valuable President’s Scholars Programme (PSP), a scholarship and leadership programme
for high-achieving, highly-motivated, service-oriented students who will be pursuing
a FIRST-TIME bachelor degree at COB, beginning in Fall 2007.

Applications are welcome from all High School Seniors who possess:

° Cumulative GPA of 3.5

° SAT scores of 1200 on the two-part (math and critical reading) 1800 three-
part (math, reading and writing) OR

° Seven (7) BGCSE’s (minimum of 5 A’s in core subjects)

° Proven leadership skills |

Benefits

ye Scholarship Award of $24,000.00 ($6,000.00 per year for 4 years)

° ns Leadership Training with opportunities for international

ravel.

Applications and brochures can be downloaded from

Hand deliver applications to The College of The Bahamas, Office of Student Leadership,
Â¥ Room A 85, Administration Block, Oakes Field Campus, Nassau, The Bahamas OR
mail to P. O. Box N-4912, Nassau, Bahamas.

Deadline Friday, March 31, 2007

For further information, telephone the Director at (242) 302-4559




(UWI) |
LL.B. PROGRAMME (FULL-TIME) |
AT THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

The normal entry requirements for the UWI LL.B. DEGREE are
based on the following basic UWI Matriculation standards:

(a) Five subjects, at least two of which must be at Advanced (A) Level
and the remainder at CXC (Caribbean Examinations Council) general
or BGCSE (Bahamas General Certificate of Secondary Education) or
the equivalent; OR

(b) ASSOCIATE OR BACHELOR degree with a CUMULATIVE
GPA OF 2.5 OR HIGHER. Note: Space in the programme is limited
and competition is high. Therefore, above average 'A' Level grades
and high averages (AT LEAST 3.0) in undergraduate degrees are
required for an applicant to stand a reasonable chance of gaining
admission. .

The College of The Bahamas will consider a limited number of
applications from persons who do not satisfy Matriculation standards
as identified above but who have equivalent academic qualifications.
In particular, MATURE APPLICANTS OVER 30 WHO PROVIDE
EVIDENCE OF ACADEMIC AND PROFESSIONAL
ACHIEVEMENT CAN BE CONSIDERED. This is an opportunity
for persons who have already been associated with the practice of law
in some way to read for a law degree. A resume must be submitted
with the COB and UWI applications.

All applicants are required to sit a Proficiency Exam, at a date to
announced, by end of June 2007. ,

Interested persons must complete a College of The Bahamas and
University of the West Indies Application for Admission Form available
from the Office of Admissions, 2nd Floor, Portia Smith Building,
Poinciana Drive, The College of The Bahamas. _

Kindly»submit by March 30, 2007 completed applications, original
certificates (which will be returned to the applicant), copies of original
certificates, transcripts (sent directly from universities or colleges
previously attended) to the Director of Admissions at COB, and proof
of payment of the $40.00 application fee (paid at the BUSINESS
OFFICE AT COB).

Calling all
~ COB alumni

Get in on the excitement of building
the University of The Bahamas!

SSNS WN

Whether you graduated from The

College with the Class of 77 or just last

year, we want to hear from you to

e Keep you up to date on news of the
University of The Bahamas
Network you with other alumni in
your field
Invite you to-a reception to meet the
President

e Brag about your achievements

e Ask your advice.

So COB Alumni, let’s reconnect.

Call Alumni and Development today
302-4355 or 6

oremail —

alumnil(dcob.edu.bs
head(dcob.edu.bs



THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS



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THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS




THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMES 2007

What is your goal?

Y/Y PROMOTION

Y QUALITY SERVICE

Y SALARY INCREASE

Y NEW CAREER

Y CAREER ENHANCEMENT
We can provide you with superior education and training to
help you accomplish your goal.

Tel: 242-328-0093 or 242-328-1936
Call today!







For your convenience, the majority of classes are
held on Saturdays, 8am - 12noon.

Are you preparing for a promotion, career change or career enhancement? The Professional Development Department
can help you achieve your career goals! We offer a wide array of courses and programmes leading to certificate, certification
and licensure. You can become the pacesetter for performance excellence in your organization. The College of The Bahamas partners
with leading international institutions offering many of the top internationally recognized professional certifications and designations.
You can continue to improve your professional development credentials at The College of The Bahamas. How successful do you
want to be? It’s largely up to you and CEES is here to help you climb.

Choose the courses or programme to help you accomplish your career
goals...

e Certified Professional Managers Programme

Certificate Programme For The Office Assistant

A+ Computer Technician Certification

Certified Computer Operator- Microsoft Office Specialist: Word, Excel, Access, Outlook, PowerPoint)
Certificate In Law- Paralegal

Certified Public Accountant (Becker Conviser CPA Review)
Certificate in Human Resource Managers Programme
Certificate Programme In Supervisory Management
Journeyman Plumbing License

Master Plumbing License

Certified Project Manager

Accounting For Non-Financial Managers

Ethics and Professional Responsibility

Legal Writing & Research

Writing & Research

Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet

No entrance exams. Tuition may be paid per term or in full. International
/ programmes available.

CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL MANAGERS PROGRAMME

This programme is administered in conjunction with The Institute of Certified Professional Management
at James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Virginia. The CM Programme provides Supervisors, Managers,
H and Team Leaders with the fundamental knowledge needed for today’s management challenges. A
comprehensive instructional scheme gives you the competence you need to meet high standards of
performance.

TERM 1
TPM 900 Personal Skills- $500
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350

TERM 3 .
TPM 902 Interpersonal Skills- $600
CPS 901 Accounts- $300

PREREQUISITE: 3 or more years as a Trainer, Supervisor or Manager with an AA Degree or a B. A. Degree from an
accredited or recognized college/university; COMP956 Intro. To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200

Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS

CERTIFICATION IN PROJECT MANAGEMENT

PROJ901 Master Project Management- $800

This course focuses on strengthening skills previously developed. The core competencies of project management are
addressed, and the following topics are discussed at the advanced level: leadership, project performance management,
project plan development, and people-based project management, project quality, scope, time, cost, human resources, ©
communications, risk, procurement, and integration management. é

Prerequisite: A Bachelors Degree in any discipline from an accredited or recognized college/ university or a minimum
of 4 years experience as a Project Management Apprentice; Curriculum vitae, a Professional Development Seminar:
ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250

Begins: Per demand Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am - 1pm Duration: 10 Weeks

@ Please note that Material Fee, External Registration and Examination Fees are not included in the cost of tuition.

- CERTIFICATE PROGRAMME FOR THE OFFICE ASSISTANT

With the advent of the high-tech office, the Clerks’/Office Assistants’ (O/A) role has evolved as one of the most important
support factors in the operational management process. In an effort to equip the support level staff to function efficiently
in the work environment, CEES is pleased to offer a proficiency programme in basic office skills. The O/A outline maps
closely with the International Association of Administrative Professionals (AAP) programme content.

TERM1 TERM 2

CPS 903 Office Technology- $500 CPS 911 Recards Management- $200

CPS 910 Managing Physical Resources- $300 CPS 909 Business Communication- $300
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250

TERM 2

TPM 901 Administrative Skills- $700

ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210

TERM 3
CPS 901 Accounts- $300
CPS 906 Human Resources- $300; WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350

PREREQUISITE: 3 yrs. work experience or an AA Degree in any discipline from an accredited or recognized
college/university with 0 work experience; COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200
Begins: Spring Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12 N; Weekdays: 6pm - 8:50pm Duration:3 TERMS

CERTIFICATE IN LAW

This programme is offered in conjunction with The Institute of Legal Executives (ILEX), Bedford, England.
ILEX qualification routes are vocationally relevant and designed to build and test legal knowledge and understanding at
the paralegal level. Designed to facilitate the training and educational needs of Legal Secretaries, Legal Clerks, Legal
Office Managers, Law Enforcement Officers, Special Assistants to Lawyers, Justices of The Peace, and all persons
interested in acquiring an impressive array of legal office skills, the Certificate in Law qualification is specifically relevant
to The Bahamas legal system. Courses include:

TERM 1

WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills -§350
LWRE900 Legal Writing & Research - $350 LAW 901 General Legal Principles-$600.00

LAW 900 The Legal Environment -$600.00 CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
TERM 3 Choose ONE from among the following Option/Concentration Courses

WE. Option Courses are subject to change)

LAW 903 Company Law- $600
LAW 905 Employment Law- $600

TERM 2
ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250

LAW 906 Law of Mortgages- $600

LAW 947 Law Office Management- $600
LAW 907 Nature and Role of Criminal Law- $600 LAW 936 Law of the Sea- $600
PREREQUISITE: AA Degree and 3 years work experience;
COMP956 Intro. To Computers, Windows & The Internet- $200
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am- 12:15pm — Duration: 3 TERMS

A+ COMPUTER TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATION

This programme of study is designed to equip students with the skills necessary to successfully sit the international A+
Microsoft Certification Examination. Techniques to identify and rectify mechanical problems related to the personal
computer are explored. It is a hands-on learning experience with lab exercises that help the student to apply theory to
practice.

TERM 1: COMP 954 Software- $510 TERM 2: COMP 955 Hardware- $510
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200
Begins: Per Demand Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 2 TERMS

CERTIFIED COMPUTER OPERATOR (Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS)

This course of study is designed to train students how to master Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Access,
Microsoft Outlook, and PowerPoint. To help the student to develop navigation and design skills, the instructor provides
easy to understand notes and conducts live demonstrations on how to manipulate the entire MS Office Suite. Upon
successful completion of the external international examinations, the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) Certification is
awarded. The programme comprises five Modules and two companion courses:

TERM 1 TERM 2
COMP 506 Microsoft Office Specialist ETHC900 Ethics & Profes. Responsibility- $250 (Optional)
Microsoft Word, Microsoft Access CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210

Microsoft Excel, Microsoft PowerPoint TERM 3
Microsoft Outlook TOMP 906 Microsoft Office Specialist
WRS 906 Writing and Research Skills- $350 (Optional). CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210

NOTE: COMP906 is offered in Spring, Summer and Fall terms. Students are.free to select the term of study.
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200
Begins: Spring and Fall _ Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm

THE BECKER CPA REVIEW

The College of The Bahamas is pleased to offer the New CPA Computer Based Test (CBT). Besides the obvious transition
from a pencil-and-paper exam to a computer-based test, the revised CPA Exam will also contain a new content focus -
broadening the scope of audit and attest areas and incorporating the assessment of critical skills, such as research and
communication. The new exam also has increased emphasis on general business knowledge and information technology.
Students may sit the final exams under the United States CPA Board for which they have qualified.

CPA 900 Financial Reporting- $650 CPA 901 Accounting & Reporting/Regulation- $520
CPA 902 Law/Business Law- $465 CPA 903 Auditing/Auditing and Attestation- $465
Prerequisite: A BA Degree from an accredited or recognized college/university in any discipline with at least 21
credit hours in accounting.
Begins: Spring and Fall

Duration: 3 TERMS

Day/Time: Sat. 8:30am - 5:30pm Duration: 12 Weeks

MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2007, PAGE 7B

Me ere EE



CERTIFICATION IN HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
This nine months programme is designed for those individuals seeking professional development and aspiring to rise through
the ranks in the HR field. The programme offers six core courses, two prerequisites, and one compulsory professional
development seminar. :

TERM 1 TERM 2

WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350

HRM 900 Intro To HRM Environment- $200 HRM 902 H/R Development & Training-$200

HRM 901 Securing Human Resources- $200 HRM 903 Rewards Compensation and Benefits-$300
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210

TERM 3 ,

ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250

HRM 904 Labour Management Relations- $300

HRM 905 Protecting and Evaluating Human Resources- $300

PREREQUISITE: A BA Degree in any discipline from an accredited or recognized college/university or a minimum of 5 years

ds a manager, supervisor or trainer, WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills, ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility,

and COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200 :

Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMME IN SUPERVISORY MANAGEMENT

Supervisors with cutting edge skills know how to accomplish difficult tasks, solve complicated problems and master challenges
in decision making. This programme is aimed at supervisors and middle managers who wish to update their supervisory
skills, or persons who have been promoted and wish to gain additional insight into the world of supervisory management.
This programme entails essential training for persons wishing to become an associate manager.

TERM 1 TERM 2

TPM 900 Personal Skills- $500 SUPV 500 Supervisory Management (SUPV 1)- $500
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250

CPS 901 Accounts- $300 CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210

TERM 3
TPM 902 Interpersonal Skills- $600

PREREQUISITE: 3 or more years experience as a Supervisor/Manager or Trainer and an AA Degree in any discipline from
a recognized or accredited institution; COMP956 Intro. To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12pm Duration: 3 TERMS ,

CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL SECRETARY REVIEW PROGRAMME

The Certified Professional Secretary (CPS) Review, offered in conjunction with The International Association of Administrative
Professionals (IAAP) is a 9-month course of study designed to prepare administrative professionals and clerical assistants
to write the CPS international exam.
TERM 1

CPS 903 Office Technology- $500
CPS 910 Managing Physical Resources- $300

TERM 2

CPS 911 Records Management- $200

CPS 909 Business Communication- $300

CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210

OPTION COURSES
TPS 901 Accounts- $300 ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250
CPS 906 Human Resources- $300 WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350

PREREQUISITE: 4 yrs. Work experience or a BA Degree in any discipline from an accredited or recognized college/university
with 0 work experience; COMP956 introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200
Begins: Spring Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12 N; Weekdays: 6pm - 8:50pm Duration: 3 TERMS

JOURNEYMAN PLUMBING LICENSE

The Journeyman Plumbing course is designed to assist students preparing to write the Journeyman Plumbing Examination.
Topics include: interpretation of codes, disposal and drainage systems, storm drainage disposal systems, installation of
sanitary fixtures, basic drawings to scale, water supply and distribution, use of materials and tools, repairs and maintenance.
The examination is offered in conjunction with The Ministry of Public Works. At the end of the course, candidates are required

to take one (1) Professional Development Seminar.
TERM 1 TERM 2 (Optional)
upervisory Management- $500
(SUPV900 is available for Plant/Plumbing Supervisors)

JPLM900 Journeyman Plumbing- $800
ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250

CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
PREREQUISITE: Students should have working knowledge and skills in the following areas: interpretation of codes, disposal
and drainage systems, storm drainage disposal systems, installation of sanitary fixtures, basic drawings to scale, water supply
and distribution, use of materials and tools, repairs and maintenance.
Begins: Spring, Summer or Fall Day/Time: Tuesdays 6pm - 9pm Duration: 2 TERMS

MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING FOR NON-FINANCIAL MANAGERS.

This course is designed to strengthen the candidates’ understanding of managerial accounting. Managerial accounting
concepts, principles and functions are the main topics covered. The ability to prepare and accurately read a financial
statement/spreadsheet is an essential skill for all professionals and paraprofessionals; CPS901 covers in a very student
friendly way, easy to understand examples that aid the students’ learning experience. This course also helps to prepare
candidates to write external examinations.

CPS 901 Accounts- $300
PREREQUISITE: None

BEGINS: Per demand Day/Time: Sat/Thurs/Tue. 8am-12:15pm OR-6pm-9pm Duration: 10 Weeks
ETHICS AND PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY

This course examines guidelines for the professional behavior of members of any organisation. A select group of codes of
ethics and ethics cases will be explored to support a theoretical and practical discourse on why the application of ethics
and professional responsibility is important in all aspects of society. °

ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200
Begins: Per demand Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12noon OR Thurs/Tue- 6pm - 9pm _ Duration: 8 Weeks

WRITING & RESEARCH SKILLS

This course is designed to provide mature students with reading, writing, research and critical thinking skills to prepare
them for entry into CEES’ professional development programmes. WRS 900 is also structured to provide certification candidates
with the skills necessary to successfully write position and research papers.

WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills - $350
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200
Begins: Per demand Day/Time: Sat.- 8am-12noon’ or Thursday/Tue- 6pm - 9pm Duration: 8 Weeks

LWRE900 LEGAL WRITING & RESEARCH

Students will learn writing and research techniques for use in case briefs, legal memoranda, motions and reports. Primary
and secondary source materials will be discussed, and a concise approach to legal research will be presented. American
Psychological Association (APA) and Modern Language Association (MLA) Citation formats will also be covered.

TERM 3

LWRE900 Legal Writing & Research- $350
PREREQUISITE: COMP955 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200
Begins: Spring, Summer & Fall Day/Time: Sat.- 8am-12noon Duration: 8 Weeks

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS, WINDOWS & THE INTERNET

This workshop provides a broad foundation for students so that they will have a greater awareness and confidence using
personal computers. Students will gain practical information and skills, such as what a computer is, how to manage personal
files and folders that they create.

COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200
PREREQUISITE: None

Begins: Summer, Spring & Fall Day/Time: Sat.- 8am-12noon Duration: 3 Weeks .
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT & RECERTIFICATION SEMINAR

This compulsory Seminar addresses important issues that are vital to the adult students’ learning experience and is designed
to serve both as a capstone for professional development programmes and as a continuing education activity. It provides
opportunities for additional education points for programme entry, course/ programme completion, as well as recertification.
The Seminar offers two break-out sessions, serving two distinct groups: Part 1- Professional peronen candidates: Five
Seminar contact hours plus 3 hours programme closure activity; Part 2- Recertification candidates: Five Seminar contact
hours plus an additional 3 lecture hours of prescribed guided independent study from any professional development course.

CPMP3903 Professional Development Seminar - $210
Begins: Spring Day: Mainly on Saturdays and per demand

IMPORTANT INFORMATION
ESSENTIAL COMPUTER KNOWLEDGE

Effective Summer 2005, basic computer and Internet skills will be required of all students. Assessment for exemption from
COMP956 introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet will be done via proof of a certificate from an authorized
provider or by taking a prescribed computer skills test to verify competency in Windows and Computers. Students failing
the competency test will be required to take the Introduction to The Internet, Windows and Computers. This Workshop is a
prerequisite for all programmes or single courses.

EXTERNAL EXAMINATIONS
Please note that fees for external examinations and external registration are not included in the cost of tuition. Be sure to
contact your Advisor on examination dates, venue, costs and related details.

ADVISEMENT & REGISTRATION SESSIONS

Please bring the following items with you to the advisement/registration session:

Duration: 8 hours

1. The first four pages of your Passport. In the case of new Passports, the last page should be copied.
2. Copies of your certificates/licensures and college/university transcripts

3. Where applicable, letters of recommendation, job description, special awards, etc.

Please Note:

e Noentrance examination is required for enrollment in professional development courses/programmes.

© Tuition is charged per term; i.e. you will be billed only for courses offered in the current term.

¢ Non-Bahamians add $50 to each course/workshop/seminar

° At the first class session, ALL students must submit to the Programme Coordinator one copy each of his/her stamped receipts
representing payment for tuition and fees for the current term.

APPLICANTS FOR INTERNATIONAL CERTIFICATION COURSES AND PROGRAMMES
All students applying for International Certification Courses and Programmes that are offered in conjunction with foreign institutions are
required to contact the CEES Office for information on external application and examination fees.



FEES

1. COB Registration. $40.00 (one-time fee)
2. Insurance... $25.00 (valid for 1 year)
3. ID Card........ ....$25.00 (one time fee)





4. Technology $100 #
5, Professional Development Se' .. $210 (one time fee)
GiBOOKSiivsaeresctec cetesescatedahes ecesuilassnugsstsatartigeebbees Please contact COB Bookstore for prices.
7. External Application/Examination Fees.............. Each student is required to contact the CEES

Office for information on External Application/Examination Fees.

Secure Your Seat By Enrolling Today!
Classes for Spring begin March 10. The deadline for registration is March 15,2007
Call (242) 328-0093/(242) 328-1936. Make the call today! or visit us on Moss Road in Oakes Field.
Fees May Be Paid By Cash, Credit Card, or Bank Certified Cheque To: The College of The Bahamas, Business Office
Cees Reserves The Right To Change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule And Course Materials.



PAGE 8B, MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

Bahamas must
highlight TIEA to
counter Obama





an

a



â„¢@ MICHAEL PATON

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited

INVITATION FOR EMPLOYMENT

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers of the
Royal Island resort and residential project, an ultra-luxury
resort and private club residential community with private
residences and club, 200 slip marina and boutique hotel and
spa, and a golf course just off North Eleuthera invites suit-
ably qualified individuals to apply for the following position
with the company:

MAINTENANCE MANAGER -

¢ Must have sound mechanical qualifications, experience
and skills with all types of vehicles, boats & water toys.

* Responsible for the maintenance, upkeep and repair of the
following inventory:

Boat/ Water fleet
° 44’ Morgan
¢ 38’ Jupiter
¢ 26’ Dusky
e 15’ Boston Whaler
e 18’ Flats Boat
e Yamaha Jet Skis

Land Fleet
¢ 6 Polaris Ranger 2x4’s ~
¢ Golf Carts
¢ Some Construction machinery

* Knowledge and experience with electrical, plumbing and
building repairs and maintenance also essential, either in 4
or 5 star resort, or on private property.

° Responsible for upkeep of tool/maintenance shed with
particular strength in inventory and stock control and
general order.

¢ Must ensure that all maintenance tools are operated safely
and only by staff qualified to use them.

¢ Must have excellent organizational and skills, an eye for
detail.

Interested persons should submit their resumes with cover,
letter to:
The H.R. Director
GCM
P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas
Fax to: (242) 356-4125

Or Email to: info@ gomezcorp.com

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for
their interest, however only those under consideration will
be contacted..



BIs

Pricing Information As Of:

Previous Close Today's Close

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
“Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

P. ier Real E:

5S2wk-Low
12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Bahamas should
"emphasise that it
entered into a Tax
Information Exchange Agree-
ment (TIEA) with Washington
to combat tax evasion by US
citizens, and that it should pur-
sue this method to clamp down
on the offences cited as the spur
for a Bill backed by Democrat-
ic presidential candidate,
Barack Obama, a leading attor-
ney said yesterday. :
Michael Paton, a partner and
head of Lennox Paton’s finan-

cial services practice, and a for-
mer Bahamas Financial Services
Board (BFSB) chairman, said
this nation should stick to its
position on the TIEA and its
willingness to co-operate with
US law enforcement and tax
authorities should the Obama

_ Bill gain transaction in the US

Senate.

The Bahamas was among 34
jurisdictions targeted by the Bill,
called the Stop Tax Haven
Abuse Act, introduced by Mr
Obama and leading members
from both parties on the US
Senate’s Permanent Subcom-

- mittee on Investigations, Norm

SG Hambros, part of SG Private Banking is a private bank
providing a comprehensive wealth management service with
offices in the UK, Jersey, Guernsey, Gibraltar and

The Bahamas.

SG Hambros is currently looking to recruit a Head of IT &
Telephony. Your primary role will be to:

@ harmonise IT platforms with the
rest of the SG Hambros Group

review the IT operations with a
view to ensuring best practice
is adopted and employed and
to review periodically, in line
with Group directives

supervise the local IT team

ensure that short term solutions
are consistent with the longer ~
term plan or payback within a
short time scale

change management relating
to the local IT function

apply security best practices as
defined by the IT security policy

Candidates should ideally hold
IT Certifications or equivalent,
and have at least 10 to 15 years
experience in all aspects of
information systems.

SG Harbros Bank & Trust @ehamas} Limited is

The candidate should also have
good technical knowledge to
include AS400, Network, UNIX,
IP, WEB and good understanding
of Banking and Trust environment.
Fluency in French would be an
asset,

The position offers an attractive
salary and benefits package.

Appiigations should be submitted
to the following address, fo arrive
on or before 26 February 2007.

Manager, Human Resources
SG Hambros Bank & Trust
(Bahamas) Limited

PO Box N7789

Nassau

Bahamas

www.sghambros.com

fioensed under the Banks & Trust Companies Requiatlan Act.

Pee JANET se1n) CET

Change Daily Vol. EPS $

Weekly Vol.



ANG
Id

Coleman and Carl Levin.

It is designed to clamp down
on “offshore tax abuses” that
the trio claims are costing the
US government and taxpayers
$100 billion annually.

Mr Paton said yesterday:
“From the Bahamas perspec-
tive, our position should be that
we entered into a TIEA with
the US and we’re prepared to
live up to that agreement. If
they have evidence that a US
person is evading taxes, they
can use that agreement to get
the information they’re seek-
ing.
“We’re not here to facilitate
US tax evasion, and we’ve
signed that agreement with
you.”

Mr Paton pointed out that
Bills such as this one often
“died” in the Senate, but the
‘Bahamas might want to watch it
carefully, as it could gain “trac-
tion” through Mr Obama being
a candidate for the 2008 presi-
dential race.

As a result, the Bahamas
might have a dilemma as to
whether to lobby over the Bill
now, or wait and see whether
it caught on in the US Senate.

The Obama Bill said that
among the criteria that the US
Treasury would use to decide
if it would require US-based
financial institutions to imple-
ment measures against foreign
jurisdictions was whether there
was a TIEA in place and if it



"BUSINESS FOR SALE

Well established Fashion Retail

was effective.

Mr Paton said the Obama
Bill was attempting to ensure
total disclosure and trans-
parency from all bank accounts
and corporate vehicles in which
US citizens had a beneficial
ownership interest, but added
that the correct approach was
for the US authorities to
enforce the law at their end.

“From the Bahamas perspec-
tive, we co-operate with the US
and have shown that. It’s. like
using a nuclear bomb when oth-
er resources are available,” Mr
Paton said.

He added that arbitrarily
putting the Bahamas and 33
other nations on a ‘bank secre-
cy jurisdiction’ list “smacks of”
the list used by the Organisa-
tion for Economic Co-Opera-
tion and Development (OECD)
in its ‘harmful tax practices’
campaign, a move Mr Paton
branded as “not responsible”.

He said the US would have to
put most of its 50 states on that
list, too, describing the Obama
Bill as “quite extreme and
potentially running the risk of
shutting off US institutions from
receiving a lot of capital”.

If the Bill was ever passed
into US law, Mr Paton said a
lot of financial institutions and
clients were likely to believe it
was not worth trying to open
bank accounts in the US, and
would switch their business to
Europe.

Business. Well known and
respected worldwide Franchise.
20 years at same prime location.

Email: b.inquiries@gmail.com



3 IMMEDIATE POSITIONS

“Showroom Sales Associate”

Highly self-motivated person with sharp,

dynamic personality

Strong interpersonal skills
Fulltime and able to work weekends

Computer literate

The ideal candidates possessing knowledge in
either furniture:sales, fabric sales, plumbing
hardware or tile 1s preferable.

Salary commensurate with experience.

Please fax resume to:

Showroom Sales

PBI

WEES



CABINET OFFICE.
DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME 2007

28.00 ABDAB
14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets









.35 RND Ho
%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name
1.3303 1.2766 Colina Money Market Fund 1.330313"
3.0569 2.6662 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.0569***
2.5961 2.3241 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.596093**
1.2248 1.1547 Colina Bond Fund 1.224792****
41 1.3545 10.000Q Fidelity Prime Income Fund 11.3545





/BISX ALL SHARE IN :
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Â¥ 52wk-Low - Lowast closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity *~ 23 February 2007
} Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Pride - Cast traded over-the-counter price

W Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol Trading volume of the prior week *- 31 January 2007
i Change ~ Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV § - Dividends per share pald in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX< - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

*** - 31 January 2007

*** 31 January 2007



“7764, FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION CAL

oi erste



In March of this year, The Bahamas will adopt a
new policy on Daylight Saving Time. As a result,
Daylight Saving Time will commence at 2am on
the second Sunday in March 2007 instead of the
first Sunday in April and will continue until 2:00am
on the first Sunday in November 2007 instead of
the last Sunday in October. Consequently, Daylight
Saving Time will be observed during the period
Sunday, | 1th March to Sunday, 4th November, 2007.

The Bahamas joins countries such as Australia,
Canada and the United States in adopting this new
system.



a tye}

“s THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007, PAGE 9B







YOUR CONNECTIONWTO THE WORLD




























‘

*

"i

: k Knowles, “rc Product | -

p 2 cs held at Uriah McPh © Ms. Jewel Dean; Ministry of

; Q

: eres oe Miss bahamas Samantha. Carter, s ee ine aes a ae io
5 Hn Arthur Maurice and Linejuicar Griffard accepting certificates for being the Most Conference a at Uriah McPhee o :
6 Improved Student at Stephen Dillet analy. = oe October 25, 2006.

G

program also exists in 3 High Schools in Freeport, Grand a national honor, : a
Bahama; 3 schools i in Exuma and 3 schools in Andros. Although the program is in it’s embryonic stage, testi--
This program while. sponsored by BTC is endorsed by monies received so far from participating schools, teachers
The Bahama’ Ministry of Education and using the concept _ and students validates the timeliness of the program.

nd | that it takes a village to raise a child and the secret Pp pro- The program is e0-ordinated by aes Haare of cL :
* Awards eebonaen was 5 birthed Oct 2 25, 2006 S me: gram, seeks to motivate and encourage students to prod cepts,
Know That You Can! oo good grades and build teacher’s morale by rewarding the Associates of Market
The program now exists in New Providence in 23 Private most improved student from Primary and High | shools at

Primary Schools; 20 Private High Schools; 12 Government _ the end of each semester. At the end of the school year the
High Scho { rnin most improved student, parent, teacher and school receives








4












IE













schools.

ER ELC ECR ESS CT

© BTC Student Spotlight ‘After School. Program ‘held at renity ot to R) Surre ‘e
Christian see (R) ek aaa Cheryl Jordan. ‘both students of St. ‘Andews School,

Se SEITE EE BI PEO ST OO RE SE






° (L to R) Nikkita Lockhart Id Grade 9 St de S @ (L to R) Carlos Sannie 10 years old Gra 6 Student © (L to R) Elvinette Williams 10 years old Grade 6 Student
and Ricardo Moultrie 17 y rs old Grade 12 Student of St. and Latequa Poiter 10 years old Grade 6 Student of St. and Carlon Johnson 11 years old Grade 6 Student of St.
John's College. Thomas Moore. John’s College.

ape) Seat Sanat Ss al epi pS res ran. ear









> (L to R) Mawquella Dean Grade 2 Student and Ramon

© (L to R) Principal Mrs. Johnson, Kameron Rolle 13 years
Coakley Grade 6 Student attending Woodcock Primary.

, and Bria Smith il ars ( 6 Student of Trinity old Grade 6 Student and Bree Hanna 8 years old Grade 3
Christian School. — Student of Uriah McPhee.





PAGE 10B, MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



4
*

Furious Brilanders seek meeting with minister.

FROM page 1B

‘Master Plan’ was also devel-
oped by Philadelphia-based
Kiser, Straw & Kolodner. That
{irm’s principal, Jim Straw, is a
member of the SHIA group.
As a result, this has led to
claims that the ‘Master Plan’
was impacted by alleged con-
ilicts of interest, and that it was

Legal Notice

NOTICE

XILCART FIELDING HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that above-named Company is in
dissolution, which commenced on the 26th day of
January 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O.
Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

bound to reflect the interests of
Mr Straw and the SHIA; given
that the latter was part-funding
it.

This was denied last week by
Mr Straw during the Harbour
Island Town Meeting when the
plan was formally presented to
Brilanders for the first time,
arguing that the SHIA only

_ funded the “non-controversial”

aspects of the plan.






NOTICE is herehy

Va) af t






























areas.

















Interested persons should submit their resumes

with cover letter to:

< The H.R. Director
GCM
P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas

Fax to: (242) 356-4125
Or Email to: info@ gomezcorp.com

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all
applicants for their interest, however only those
under consideration will be contacted.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)
ADALAR ENTERPRISES LIMTED
IBC No. 133836B
in Voluntary Liquidation

etven thet fn accordance with Section 131

Any person having a Claim against the above-named Company
is required on or before the 6th March 2007 to Send their name,
address and particulars of their debt or claim to the Liquidator of

the Company, or in defauit thereof they may be excluded from the
benefit of any distribution made before such claim is approved.

Mrs Rosana Hollins of Suite 2B, Mansion House, 143 Main Street,
Gibraltar is the Liquidator of Adalar Enterprises Limited.

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited
INVITATION FOR EMPLOYMENT

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers
of the Royal Island resort and residential project,
an ultra-luxury resort and private club residential
community with private residences and club, 200
slip marina and boutique hotel and spa, and a golf
course just off North Eleuthera invites suitably
qualified individuals to apply for the following
position with the company:

HEAD CHEF

Duties and Responsibilities

° Coordinate and manage multiple food venues.
° Coordinate and manage all food preparation

° Budgeting and purchasing of food supplies.
¢ Planning of meals for all food venues.

° Qualifications: Must have 5 star experience ei-
ther in a resturant private residence or yacht. Must
have an “attention to detail” work ethic. Willing
to take directions from management and maintain
a hands on approach. Experience in a “Chef’s
table”, “Disgustation” or “tasting menu” style of
dining. The ideal candidate will have to reside on
Eleuthera or its surrounding area.

"2000,

panies Act N





The SHIA is also opposed to
the 30-slip marina and 40-unit
condo expansion planned by the
Romora Bay Club-Hotel, a pro-
ject that has been backed by a
350-signature petition signed by
Harbour Island residents. As a
result, this issue and the Master
Plan are having a divisive effect
on different Briland stakehold-
ers.

Sources have told The Tri-
bune that over a three-year
period, the Romora Bay expan-
sion would generate about an
extra $9 million in government
tax revenues, and some $27 mil-
lion in on and off-property addi-
tional guest spending. Many
persons also felt that there
would be a great employment
effect both from direct and indi-
rect opportunites.

Together with the marina, the
condo units are understood to
be a $17 million construction
project. Romora Bay, which
currently has 22 rooms split
between one 15-room building
that Bonachella owns and two
others on a ground lease that it
manages, would see its staff
numbers grow from about 35 at

present to 125 if the expansion
projects go ahead.

Romora Bay is understood
to feel that the new marina will
create its own demand, and will
have no negative visual impact
on the harbour, particularly as it
is less dense and on a smaller
scale than the Valentine’s prop-
erty.

In its application, it was
understood that Romora had
met all of the Bahamas Envi-
ronmental, Science and Tech-
nology (BEST) commission
requirements for safe environ-
mental construction, and would
create its own infrastructure,
including sewerage system, gen-
erator and water supply.

Romora Bay’s current own- '

ers, an investor consortium
called Bonachella Investments,
acquired the niche, boutique
property in November 2004,
and won the Harbour Island
Council’s formal approval for
the project. However, the

approvals have since been

rescinded.
But Mr Straw said at the
Town Meeting: ““I do not think

‘that a decision on Romora has

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)

FALCONCLIFF CORPORATION
LIQUIDATOR’S NOTICEE

_ PURSUANT TO SECTION 137 (6) OF
THE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

I, Aimilios Vrachipedis Liquidator of Falconcliff Corporation,
hereby that the winding up and dissolution has been completed in
accordance with the Articles of Dissolution and the company has
been struck of the Registers of Companies. ‘

Dated 1st day of March, A.D. 2006

anything to do with other pro-
jects on the island. It just hap-
pens to be one that is in the
decision-making mode right
now, so it is one that we were
asked to take a look at as part
of our presentation,” he added.

Mr Straw stressed that the
Master Plan’s recommenda-
tions, and those related to

Romora Bay, were completely i

objective.
Yet perhaps acknowledging
Brilanders’ concerns that the

local’economy is not earning’

much from the second homes
rental market, winter residents
on Harbour Island have
expressed a willingness to start
a foundation or fund that would
provide financial support for
the island’s development.

Mr Straw, a winter resident

for more than 10 yearss, told -

islanders that the winter and
second home residents are
excited about forming a public-
private partnership for the
improvement of the island.

Mr Straw acknowledged con-
cerns that Harbour Islanders
were receiving very little - if any
- economic benefit from second
homeowners.

In many cases, Harbour
Islanders claim, second home
owners only occupy their homes
for a few weeks or months of
the year. During the rést of the
time, they rent their properties






rN RN creak nL nie as paps eae ie A a |
Se ES

Reception, Secretarial, Light Accounting and

Customer Service. Located at the.
Airport Industrial Park. Transportation a must.

Good English verbal and writing skills also a must.

Apply by faxing resume to 377-1 778°

out for thousands of dollars,
the benefits of which locals
don’t see.

‘Mr Straw noted that there
were more than 100 Harbour
Island homes that are placed
for rent at some point during
the year. He said that if only
$10 per night in the rent col-
lected was given to Bahamians,
it would translate into thou-
sands of dollars which could be
used to enhance the island.

Many residents on the island
told The Tribune that the eco-:
nomic contribution to the island,
by winter residents was very.
low.

“They come here, and most
of the time they bring in all of
their supplies by boat, so they
don’t have to shop in local
stores. Also, they bring their
staff such as housekeepers with
them as well, so they are not
employing locals,” one resident
said. There were also allega-
tions that some homeowners
were unwillingly to adequately
pay Bahamian workers.

The master plan was meet
with scepticism by Brilanders,
who felt that it was being
“rammed down their throats”.

They claimed that the plan
was conceived with no consul-
tation, particularly because the
winter residents had paid
$75,000 towards the $150,000
cost of the plan.

VACANCY

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)

ARRAN LIMITED
IBC No. 13 698 B

In Voluntary Liquidation

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section 131 (2)
(a) of the International Business Companies Act (No. 46 of 2000),
ARRAN LIMITED is in Dissolution.

Any person having a Claim against the ARRAN LIMITED is
required on or before the 5th day of April, 2007 to send their name,
address and particulars of the debt of claim to the Liquidator of

the Company, or in default thereof they may be excluded from the
benefit of any distribution made before such claim is approved.

Tereq Al-Mudhaf, of Flat 701, Creekside Residence, Port Saeed,
Dubai, United Arab Emirates, is the Liquidator of ARRAN
LIMITED.



Ocean Club Estates
For Sale By Owner

_ Golf Course Lot (No. 25) Available on
Pre-Construction Basis

Professional project management team
standing by for immediate construction

Choice of floor plans allow for personal taste
and style to dictate design

Installment payment option available during
construction phases

For a prospectus and further information,

Please call-(954)-495-4837



Purina cd ee

An established Law firm. is seeking suitable applicants
for the position of Legal Secretary. The following |
qualifications and attributes are necessary ren

Associate Degree in Secretarial Science or
equivalent

A minimum of 3 years working experience in the
specified position t

Excellent use of the English language

Strong secretarial and administrative backerdand:
Good communication and people skills
Proficient in Microsoft Word and Excel

Experience working in a law firm’s Corporate or
Commercial department would be an asset., The
successful candidate must be able to multi-task and work
in a demanding environment.

Qualified persons may apply to the Human Resources
Manager before March 16, 2007.

- Apply to DA 17068
c/o The Tribune, P.O. Box N3207
Nassau, The Bahamas

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited

INVITATION FOR EMPLOYMENT

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers of the
Royal Island resort and residential project, an ultra-luxury
resort and private club residential community with private
residences and club, 200 slip marina and boutique hotel and
spa, and a golf course just off North Eleuthera invites suit-
ably qualified individuals to apply for the following position
with the company:

e Housekeepers

¢ Maids

e Laundry workers

e Waiters

¢ Beach activity coordinators
¢ Cooks

¢ Deck Hands

¢ Groundskeepers

Over 15 positions are to be filled. All persons required
successful applicants to reside on North nEteuers or
vicinity.

Interested persons should submit their resumes with cover
letter to: ;

The ae Director
GCM
P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas
Fax to: (242) 356-4125
Or Email to: info@ gomezcorp.com

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all
applicants for their interest, however only those under
consideration will be contacted.





THE TRIBUNE



FROM page 1B

t

panies in the California courts,
because that’s where it’s from.
The case is without any merit.
It’s a strike out. It will be dis-
missed.

“It doesn’t in any way
attempt to interfere with our
attempt to sell it [South Ocean]
to the New South Ocean Devel-
opment Company. We have it
under contract and they’re
preparing their Heads of Agree-
ment.

“It’s completely without mer-
it, but the lawsuit was careful
not to go after any of that [the
sales agreement]. It’ll be vigor-
ously defended. There’ll be no
interference with our sale or
ability to build the hotel there as
we plan to do.”

The spokesman added that
Case Financial’s lawsuit had not
attached any lien to the resort
or the land it stood on.

Meanwhile, Mr Stein told
The Tribune that “things are
progressing great” as the New
South Ocean Development
Company moves towards reach-
mg a Heads of Agreement with
the Government for the prop-
erty’s redevelopment, which
aims to transform southwestern
New Providence into a third
entertainment centre alongside
Paradise Island and Cable
Beach.
| “We’re anticipating complet-
ing with the Government; I
think March is the month,” Mr
Stein said. “We have all the
studies —traffic, economic
impact statement, environmen-
tal study Phase I and Phase II,
market feasibility, marina.
‘We're about to meet with the
BEST Commission pretty
‘soon.’
® He added: “We're in negoti-
‘ation with a couple of brand [to
«operate the hotels]. There area
‘couple on the five-star side
&

&

For the stories
behind the
news, read
Insight on

mi folate Fe Vie




pe Roo Heo EEK ERR OEEE



* Thursday Pebruary 1, 2007
“Empowering Bahamians “
COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenter - Mr. Glenn Ferguson

* Thursday February 8, 2007



B.T.V J. - Old Trail Road
Presenter - Mr. Daniel Thompson

» Thursday February 15, 2007
Business Tinance and Venture Capital

COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenter - Mr. Jerome Gamez





Presenters. Mr. Donald ee |

Consultant, Domestic Investment Board 7

Mr. Paul Major

Advisor, Domestic
Forging a
For the Bahamian Investor |*

. Improving regulatory environment

(Bahamas Tourism Training Center)

'f |Date: Thursday March 8, 2007 |
] "at 7:00 p.m. 7
| — 8
| Venue. ‘The College Of The Bahamas





+ Thursday February 22, 2007

Business Planning, Forecasting & Marketing

we're in negotiations with, and
are 60 days away [from an
announcement] on that.

A partner in the Trump Fort
Lauderdale resort, with a long
background in real estate, Mr

Stein said the redevelopment -

was still “roughly a $1 billion
project”, and an international
tennis star had shown interest in
running a tennis school and
training facility at South Ocean,
which would involve a 1,000
seat theatre.

Mr Stein is understood to
have been talking to Hard Rock
on a contract to manage/oper-

ate the four-star hotel and casi-
no component of the project,
but he again declined to com-
ment on this.

He did, though, say that the
South Ocean golf course should
be re-opened “somewhere
towards the end of 2007, as
that’s when it will be in peak
condition”.

Mr Stein had previously told
The Tribune that the first phase
of South Ocean’s redevelop-
ment would involve getting it
up to a minimum of 500 resi-
dential units, enabling the prop-

erty’s Casino licence to kick-in.



EXCITING CAREER
OPPORTUNITY

Wanted to supervise the Bahamas operation

for this dynamic

Must have:

UK Tour Operator.

Â¥ 5 Years experience in tourism

v 3 Years managerial/supervisory experience

Y Excellent skills in Microsoft Office

Â¥ Tour Operator Management Skills/Experience

~Y Own car essential

Bahamian Resident status preferred
Y Flexibility to travel unexpectedly
Passion for Customer Service

Y Initiative, enthusiasm and drive

The position will involve:

° Maintaining the strong customer service,
commercial and branding standards of the
operator on a daily basis and ensuring that strict

targets are met.

¢ Competitive salary on offer.

Please send your CV
(including last salary package) to :

vholsrecruitmentbah@hotmail.com

or Fax 001

246 2286927

By 31st MAR 07

Only successful applicants will receive response.



BAIC

in Conjunction With

The College of The Bahamas

Will Host

state’



‘The



vestment Board

ww

w Vision

(Cecture Th weatte) 10.

FREE of charge |

Schedule of Weekly Seminars

Ii

Books Keeping - Accounting for the Business
COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenter - Mr: Christopher Stuart

e Tharsday March 1, 2007
Business Opportunities in The Bahamas
COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenter - Mr. Benjamin Bailey

Thursday March 8, 2007
Forging a New Vision For the Bahamian Investor
COB - Lecture Theatre

Presenters - Mr. Donald Demeritte
Mr. Paul Major

I a a ee
CONTACT; Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation (BAIC) at 322-3740 or 325-1912
Mr. Lester Stuart / Mr, Le-Var Miller

‘Ten reasons why Bahamians should investi in

. Government Promotig Bahamian Economic

. Natural Market to supply good and services

. Greater access to business advice and train-

. Greater access to capital”
. Quick tunaround on funding requirements

. Hany opportunities for Bakamians to partner






» Thursday March 15, 2007
Doing Business via the Internet - Possibilities
Pitfalls COB ~ Lecturé Theatre
Presenter - Mr. Dudrick Edwards

« Thursday March 22, 2007
COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenter + Bahamas Customs Representative

» Thursday March 29, 2001
Book Keeping - Accounting for the Busines
COB - Lecture Theatre

+ Thursday Apsil 5, 2007








DeBahota tater aretha estat ata tts tete thats tetatae

Bahamas now.

Booming Economy

Empowerment i

through anchor properties

Many indastries reserved for Bahamians only

ing

with foreign investors

Opportunities for public/private partnerships;

:



=

Import Export, Customs, Concessions

Presenter - Mr, Christopher Stuart



Government Regulations and Business License
COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenter - Registrar Representative










erate se?

Other plans include a mega-
yacht marina, convention cen-

tre, Greg Norman-designed golf -

course, health and fitness cen-
tre, retail, restaurants and enter-
tainment.

In its original lawsuit against

MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007, PAGE 11B

CCWIPP and South Ocean, the
company claimed it and a part-
ner, L&M Specialities, signed a
Letter of Intent to acquire the
resort for $25 million in a mixed
cash and equity deal.

It alleged that the Letter of



Intent gave it an exclusive peri-
od to conduct due diligence and
conclude the resort’s purchase,
but claimed this exclusive peri-
od was breached when other
investor groups were brought
into look at South Ocean.

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & Co.























COUNSEL & ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW * NOTARIES PUBLIC

1S pleased to announce that
Willie A. M. Moss
has joined The Firm as of
March 1, 2007
as a Partner
in our Freeport Office.

Freeport Chambers

The First Commercial Centre
3rd Floor, Suite 9
P.O. Box 42533
Freeport, Grand Bahama,
Bahamas
Tel: (242) 351-7474
Fax: (242) 351-7752

Nassau Chambers

Sassoon House
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue
P.O. Box N-272
Nassau, New Providence,
Bahamas
Tel: (242) 322-4130
Fax: (242) 328-1069





Design/Build Teams are invited to submit proposals to construct a
new bridge carrying the Grand Bahama Highway over the Lucayan
Waterway near Freeport, on the island of Grand Bahama.



PRE-QUALIFICATION FOR
BRIDGE DESIGN/BUILD CONTRACT

SCOPE OF WORK: The project limits will consist of approximately one
half (1/2) mile of roadway, a bridge over the Lucayan Waterway
Canal and the extension of the existing seawall bulkheads along
both sides of the canal. The intent is for the bridge to span across the
Lucayan Waterway with no piers or marine fenders in the Lucayan
Waterway. This bridge is intended to be the initial two (2) lanes of a
future (4) lane facility with a carrier space for utilities and at least one
sidewalk with pedestrian vehicle divider/barrier wall. No sidewalk
facility is anticipated with the bridge in this agreement, only with the
future four lane facility. The work also includes the reconstruction of
the approach roadway eastbound and westbound to the bridge to
provide for one lane in each direction at the bridge and connection
to the four (4) lane divided rane Bahama Highway beyond the
project limits.

Interested Design/Build Teams must submit information on their tech-
nical and financial competence for qualification, no later than
Friday, March 16, 2007 to:



Mr. Dudley Francis

Project Manager

THE GRAND BAHAMA PORT AUTHORITY, LIMITED
Southern Ridge Building

P.O. Box F-42666

Freeport, Grand Bahama Island

Tel: (242) 352-6611 Ext. 2085

Fax: (242) 351-8473

E-mail: dfrancis@gbpa.com





—





PAGE 12B, MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

cc a a ae eee ee eee ee

New bid for Royal Oasis unveiled.

FROM page 1B

vehicle for the Royal Oasis deal.

Mr Graulich and Mr
Chisholm said they met with Sir
Baltron Bethel, deputy chair-
man and managing director of
the Hotel Corporation of the
Bahamas, to introduce their
group and attempt top acquire
the Royal Oasis, which has been
closed since Hurricane Frances
struck Grand Bahama in early



September 2004, putting 1200
employees out of work.

Mr Graulich said in a state-
ment that they planned “a
major renovation and rebrand-
ing” for the Royal Oasis,
adding: “We have the financial
backing in place and are now
ready to close with Lehman
Brothers. We are currently
working with a world-class casi-
no operator to manage the casi-
no portion of the resort.”

Mr Chisholm added: “The
planned enhancements will

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the

following:

“ALL THAT” piece suite or lot of land being Lot of Land
being Lot ‘B’ Unison West Subdivision, situated in the South
Western District on the island of New Providence one of the
islands of the Commonwealth,of the Bahamas. Situated
thereon is a Single Family Residence, consisting of 2

Bedrooms 2 Bathrooms.

Property Size: 5,202 sq. ft.

Building Size : 904 sq. ft.
This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained
in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF

BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writtingin a sealed

enevelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections
Centre, P.O. N-7549, Nassau Bahamas and marked “Tender
2333”. All offers must be received by the close of business

4:00 p.m.,

Friday 16th March, 2007.

Legal Notice
NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF SERGIO DANGUILLECOURT
Late of Miami - Dade Country, Florida, USA

‘NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claim or
demand against the above Estate are required to send the same
duly certified in writing to the undersigned on or before the 5th
day of June 2007 after which date the Executor will proceed to
distribute the assets having regard only to the claims of which

he shall then have notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that all persons indebted to the
said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or before

the date hereinbefore mentioned.

ALEXIOU, KNOWLES & CO.
P.O. Box N-4805
St. Andrew’s Court, Frederick St. Steps
Nassau, Bahamas ,
Attorneys for the Executor - Barry Brant .



Legal Notice

NOTICE

TARSKI LIMITED

(in Voluntary Liquidation)

| Notice is hereby given that above-named Company is In
dissolution, which commenced on the 7th day of
February 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O.

Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



make the Royal Oasis the ulti-
mate luxury hotel destination,
attracting the attention of both
business and leisure guests,

which will be of enormous ben- .
efit to the local Freeport econ-

omy.”

It is unclear whether this bid
is the reconstituted World
Investments Holdings offer,
since Mr Chisholm was the
Bahamian partner for that
group’s failed $40 million
attempt to acquire the Royal
Oasis, or if Mr Graulich and his
team are a completely new

- group he has linked up with. Mr
Graulich could not be contact- —

ed, despite attempts to reach
him through the PR agency
which sent out the statement on
his behalf. a
Still, the announcement is

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likely to be greeted with cau-
tion by most residents and busi-
nesses on Grand Bahama, since
there have been so many opti-
mistic pronouncements — chiefly
by the Government — that a
solution to the Royal Oasis sit-
uation is at hand, then nothing
happens.

- One source, when contacted
by The Tribune about the
announcement, said it was like-
ly to “muddy the waters”, given
that Harcourt Developments,
the Irish property developer, is
considered to be the company
the Government wants to
acquire the Royal Oasis.

Such a situation occurred pre-
viously, when both the Gov-
ernment and Grand Bahama
Port Authority (GBPA) were
doing everything they could to
make the Harcourt offer to suc-
ceed, only for World Invest-
ments Holdings to enter the
process late in the game and
make a $40 million offer to
Lehman Brothers — a sum clos-
er to its asking price — at a New
York auction. Mr Chisholm was
thought to be the group’s link to
the Hotel Corporation then.

As a result, Lehman Brothers
went with the World Invest-
ments Holdings offer, extend-
ing the Royal Oasis agony for
many more months, as that
group was unable to raise the
financing necessary to close the
deal. Even Prime Minister Per-
ry Christie said the Government
had doubts about World Invest-
ments Holdings ability to raise
the financing and attract a
world-class casino operator.

Obie Wilchcombe, minister

of tourism, last week told The .

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WALLY DORMEUS OF
BALFOUR AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 26TH day of FEBRUARY, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,

Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FEDNA PETIT-BEAU OF

SPANISH WELLS,

ELEUTHERA,

BAHAMAS _ is

applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and

Citizenship,

fer registration/naturalization as a citizen

Tribune that Harcourt Devel-
opments was the front-runner
for the Royal Oasis purchase,
and that he understood the deal
was “moving ahead”.

He added that he thought
World Investments Holdings’
successor had “slipped to num-
ber two”, although they were
still “at the table”.

Harcourt already has a sub-
stantial presence in Grand
Bahama through its Suffolk
Court and Bahamia projects,
and has extensive experience in
hotel and real estate develop-
ment in the Caribbean and
across the globe.

Yet it is unclear whether Har-
court will be able to reach a
deal, given that Lehman Broth-
ers’ private equity arm, which

owns the Royal Oasis by virtue |

of the mortgage it holds on the
property after Driftwood

(Freeport) defaulted on its loan -

repayments, still holds the
trump card.

Harcourt Developments pre-
viously felt the resort was worth
$25-$30 million at most, far
short of Lehman Brothers’ ask-
ing price. The Royal Oasis’ val-
ue is likely to have depreciated
further since that offer has
made, due to the continued
decline in the state of the resort
properties. In.some parts, it is
stripped down to the bare brick.

The key will be whether the
price offered by Harcourt — or
any other buyer — meets
Lehman Brothers’ valuation,
since the private equity fund
will be looking to maximize the
proceeds to recover the $70 mil-
lion+ it pumped into the Royal
Oasis. It funded the $27 million
acquisition, and put in $45 mil-
lion to upgrade the resort, hop-
ing to turn round its perfor-
mance and flip it to another
buyer for a profit.

Lehman Brothers will already
have recouped some of the
money, though by collecting on
the insurance proceed relating
to the 2004 hurricane claim.

It is thought that an invest-

\










PUBLIC NOTICE |
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that by Deed Poll dated 27th day of February, A.D., 2007
now for recording at the Registrar General’s Department, that KENNARD CEDRIKO
ROLLE-WHYMS of No. 91 Jumbay Street, Pinewood Gardens, New Providence,

The Bahamas, formally and absolutely renounced and abandoned the surname of -, >



ROLLE and has assumed and adopted and intends on all occasions to use and~
subscribe the surname of ROLLE-WHYMS instead of the surname ROLLE so as to 3
be at all times called, known, and described by the name of KENNARD CEDRIKO '”

THE TRIBUNE

ment of $200 million will be
needed to restore the Royal
Oasis to a position where it wiil
be able to establish a profitable,
long-term niche in the market,
complete with world class casi-
no and hotel operating brands.

Due to the Convention Tax
break that US citizens attending
meetings, conferences and con-
ventions in the Bahamas now
receive, the Royal Oasis has
potential as a convention hotel,
complete with casino and os
facilities. my

Foxwoods, which is involved
with a potential tourism deve
opment in eastern Gran’
Bahama, is among the casino
brands that have looked at the
Royal Oasis, their local ‘point
man’ being Ken Farino, who is
involved with both the Taino
Beach Resort and had attempt-
ed to start the Marriott project
at Discovery Bay.

Among the issues that any
Royal Oasis buyer will have to
resolve in talks with Lehman
Brothers will be who settles the
resort’s liabilities, which
amounted to $22-plus million
as at January 2005. The majori-
ty of these were casino taxes,
but other creditors were the
National Insurance Board,
some $4.1 million for the hotel
pension funds, Grand Bahama
Power Company and other
Grand Bahama-based suppli-
ers. And that was before the
Government paid out some $8
million in redundancy pay to
the Royal Oasis workers. |

Then there is a resolution of
the timeshare issue, with the
owners of timeshare at the Roy-
al Oasis needing to be settled
with and paid off. 4 0 fer

The Royal Oasis, set on. a
425-acre site, has 392 guest
rooms, 417 condo suites, nine
restaurants and lounges; a
30,000 square foot casino, water
park, two swimming pools, 12
tennis courts, two golf courses, °
eight villas and 40,000 square
foot of convention and meeting
space.






of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 5th day of
March, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is -hereby given that ERIC JOSPEH OF
CHIPPINGHAM, ALBURY STREET, P.O. BOX N-849,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 5th day of
March, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

SALESPERSONS NEEDED

Tropical Companies are in search of highly motivated sales persons
and stock room helpers for a number of vacancies. If you love
working with tourist or have at least one year’s experience in retail
sales, are computer literate and have a good work ethic

Call Ph: 326 7791 between 9-3pm
-M-F deadline Mar 15th









International Offshore Bank is seeking an
OPERATIONS ASSISTANT.

Familiar with general office duties, loan
documentation, filing. Applicant must be fluent
in SPANISH, written and spoken.

Proven knowledge of MS Office products. -

Please submit your resume to
HR Manager
P.O. Box CB 11903
Nassau,NP.



ROLLE-WHYMS exclusively.





NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following: ~
“ALL THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot of Land
being Lot #21, Block ‘C’ Garden Hills Subdivision #2 situated
in the Southern District on the Island of New Providence one
of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated
thereon is a Triplex Townhouse unit, consisting of 1- 4Bedrooms,
2 Bathrooms, and 2 -2 Bedrooms 1-Bathroom.

Property Size: 8,807 sq. ft.

Building Size : 4,151 sq. ft.
This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in
a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writtingin a sealed enevelope, ;
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O.
N-7549, Nassau Bahamas and marked “Tender 3276”. All offers
must be received by the close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday

16th March, 2007.



NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:
“ALL THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot of Land
being Condo Unit #1, Seabeach Subdivison situated in the
Western District on the island of New Providence one of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Condo
Unit consisting of 4 Bedrooms, 3 1/2 Bathrooms.

- 4,800 sq. ft.

Building Size

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in
a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED. :

All offers should be forwarded in writtingin a sealed enevelope, *
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre,
P.O. N-7549, Nassau Bahamas and marked “Tender 8477".
All offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 p.m.,
Friday 16th March, 2007.








THE TRIBUNE

mee Se)

MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007, PAGE 13B



BA cuts Bahamas travel agent commissions to 1%

BRITISH Airways has announced that
it,aill reduce its standard travel agent
¢ommission on tickets sold in the
Bahamas from 6 per cent to just 1 per
cent, a move that is unlikely to please
many travel agents.

jit is not known how many Bahamas-
Based travel agents will be impacted by
this, and how significant the cut in rey-
efiues will be, but say that a British Air-
ways ticket costs around $1,000 for a

return flight to London, the most popular
destination from the Bahamas.

This cut would, based on that price,
cut commission income for Bahamas-
based travel agents from $60 per ticket to
just $10 per ticket, a quite substantial
drop, giving travel agents an incentive
to stop selling BA tickets.

The move also impacts the Cayman
Islands and Turks and Caicos Islands, as
well as the Bahamas. BA did not specify

the reasons behind the cut, although trav-
el agents now face increasing competition
from Internet-based sales channels.

“This change reflects market condi-
tions, such as the introduction of travel
agency feces as well as the need to appro-
priately manage our costs,” said Dr Oliv-
er King, British Airways’ senior vice-
president, Latin America and the
Caribbean.

“British Airways already charges a ser-

vice fee of $25 to those customers who
choose to book directly through our call
centres. “The services offered by travel
agents will always be driven by customer
needs, and agents are free to charge their
own service fees in addition to the ticket
price. British Airways will continue to
develop and enhance products and ser-
vices that travel agents can effectively
sell.

“We are constantly reviewing overall

business practices, and will continue to
transform our business to remain com-
petitive, and to deliver outstanding ser-
vice to our customers across the
Caribbean. “We strongly believe that
agencies across the Caribbean remain an
important and integral distribution part-
ner for British Airways.”

British Airways serves Nassau directly
from London Heathrow, five times a
week.

Show ‘same zeal’ for Bahamian investors



(FROM page 1B

Bahamian investors time and
money.

“TY think the same zeal the
Government has approached
foreign direct investment with,
tHey need to approach local
investors with,” Mr Rolle said.
“The Government is gung-ho
on! announcing $1 billion invest-
ments, but it has to show the
sfme level of excitement when
young Bahamians want to do
fhe same thing, otherwise
‘tHey’re failing their mandate.”
‘Describing young Bahamian
Hivestors as the “under-used
ingredient” in the Governmen-
t’s economic strategy, Mr Rolle
‘said the Government needed to
do much more “to encourage
Yecal Bahamian investors, par-
ticularly non-traditional ones,
to get involved in these large
‘projects”.

“By non-traditional, Mr Rolle
isteferring to new, up-and-com-
‘fig Bahamian entrepreneurs,
rather than well-established
’ tones who are already wealthy
‘and have a proven track record
-6f success. Going beyond this
‘group, the argument goes, will
‘broaden Bahamian ownership
‘of the economy, embracing a
‘Younger generation.
°:*The Government has lauded
athe fact during its tenure,
Bahamian companies and
investor groups have acquired

Shell (Bahamas), Bahamas
Supermarkets, Caribbean Bot-
tling Company (Bahamas) and
British American Insurance
Company (Bahamas).

The former two deals were
completed by already well-
established Bahamian compa-
nies and investors, Freeport Oil
Company (FOCOL) and BSL
Holdings (a group featuring the
hotel pension funds, Craig
Symonette and Franklyn But-
ler). Both the Bahamas Super-
markets and Caribbean Bottling
deals involved the participation
of two major Barbadian con-
glomerates, leaving only the
British American deal, led by
the company’s president and
chief executive, Chester Coop-
er, and attorney John Wilson,
as the one truly featuring ‘new’
Bahamian entrepreneurs.

Mr Rolle said a key question
facing the Government was:
“How do you develop new,
young talent who are hungry,
have access to resources and the
technical know-how, and have
the desire to do things in the
economy?........... They need to
have success stories in that
area.”

The. Government has
attempted to facilitate invest-
ment by Bahamians through the
creation of the Domestic Invest-
ment Board within the Ministry
of Financial Services and Invest-
ments, plus the Bahamas Entre-

preneurial Venture Fund Ltd
(known more commonly as the
Government-sponsored venture
capital fund).

The Board is an attempt to
cut through the bureaucracy
facing Bahamian investors in
their efforts to obtain all the
required government permits
and approvals, while the fund
seeks to assist entrepreneurs in
obtaining start-up financing,
either through taking equity or
debt positions.

Yet Mr Rolle said the
approvals process facing many
Bahamians was still taking too
long. “They're discouraged sim-
ply because the process is taking
too long, and the longer they
take, the more it costs and the
incentive becomes less and
less,” he explained.

‘The bureaucratic maze is so

_ huge, and sometimes individual

agencies don’t understand
where they are and where they
should be in the process.

“Long-term we want. to be
able to participate at a high lev-
el in this economy, and don’t
want to be locked out because
all the goods properties and
good opportunities have gone
to foreign investors.

“This is something the Gov-
ernment has to focus on,” Mr
Rolle said. “Our future depends
on it. Our future as major stake-
holders in the economy depends
on it. Not everyone is destined

Rum Cay Resort's ‘huge step forward’

FROM page 1B

WAT AT AT AAT ee

son Airport approvals. “It’s a
big step forward, as the port of
‘entries, whether by sea or air,

‘yare critical for the overall pro-
ject.

: “It gives Montana the oppor-
‘tunity to bring in G-4 [Gulf-
stream] jets from the US. We’ve

(very pleased with the timing in

‘regard to the overall design of

\ the project.”

| . Mr Perkins added: “This will

smake it the third largest airport

‘ terminal in the Bahamas. We've

; Drought in airport consultants

«Wilbur Smith & Associates,

i ‘from the US. They’ve designed
“all phases of the runway — the

. aprons, security area, fire.”

» + The runway and terminal
* construction will take place in
‘ three phases, and the latter will

A « have specific areas for Customs,

‘ * Immigration and the police. The

5 ; terminal’s second floor will also

: feature a restaurant and wi-fi

‘ Internet access,

‘ 1 Mr Perkins told The Tribune
ia some 90 people were cur-

‘rently working on Montana’s
870- acre resort project, adding:

' ‘We've got as many people

>from Rum Cay as we can
employ.”

« _, He said “good progress” had
: ‘ been made on the marina con-
; struction, and the developers
it had also finished the sales cen-
i tre office at Cotton Field Point.
*Fhis had been constructed by

Kirkland Knowles, also the
wisland’ s chief councilor, while
} the landscaping had been per-
» formed by Montana Landscap-
ing, headed by Montana’s land-
scaping manager, Archie
Cartwright.

Mr Perkins said site clearance
for the marina, and planning
and clearance for the resort’s
toads and utilities, was being
conducted at present. Montana
oc uee had also appointed
, Cole Martinez Curtis & Asso-
, ciates as its interior designers,
working on interior designs for
the marina village condos, bars
and restaurants.
| Mr Perkins explained that
Cole Martinez Curtis & Asso-
¢iates would work in tandem
with the resort’s operating part-
her, Rock Resorts.

, The project’s first phase

includes an 80-slip Blue Flag

inarina, marina village, 100 con-

(lo units, and 80 multi-room cot-
tages. Deposits have been

placed on 60 per cent of the

units offered in the Port Santa

Maria component of Phase I,

and a new offering of marina

buites have been added to the

See 8 eB ac we

ae ak ae ere rere oe

oe we oe eee ee

product mix, furnished to Rock
Resorts’ standards.

The Ministry of Finance has
approved the assignment of
Customs and Immigration offi-
cers to the Rum Cay airport,
which will be redeveloped by
Montana Holdings’ subsidiary,
Montana Aviation, and
FirstAIR Group.

In a second phase of airport
development, Montana Avia-
tion is looking at constructing
a 9,000 square foot hangar. It
is also seeking a franchise agree-

ment with the Government to
establish a Fixed Base Opera-
tion (FBO) at the airport, pro-
viding services such as air char-
ter services, on-site aircraft
maintenance, fuel sales and avi-
ation ground support services.

Mr Perkins thanked the Min-
istry of Financial Services and
Investments, the Ministry of
Transport & Aviation, and the
Department of Civil Aviation
for their assistance in obtaining
approvals for the first phase of
the airport’s extension.

COURT ORDERED SALE
ACTION 1701/08

Judgment creditor
Premier Importers Ltd.

Judgment debtor
Christopher A. Moss
T/AM.O.S.0. Construction

2001 Ford F150

ACh Cah Pick a rs

Vehicle may he viewed at Premier importers, St. Alban’s Drive
7:30 to 4:30 Monday to Friday
Contact: 322-8396 ext 232

to be an employee.

“Young Bahamians need
access, particularly to Crown
Land. There is also no reason
Bahamians should not have
equitable access, and equitable
access without the bureaucracy
associated with it. There is no
legitimate reason for an indi-

Bahamian company, aiming to
provide the adventure-based
excursions and attractions the
cruise industry has been
demanding, through its planned
Paradise Island destination and
an affiliate, Bahamas Undersea
Adventure.

favourable feedback from gov-
ernment ministers and officials,
and a recommendation from the
Domestic Investment Board
that it be approved. The Nas-
sau Water Ferries proposal is
now awaiting final approvals
and sign-off by Prime Minister
ae Christie.

_and he and his partners were

The project has received
vidual to wait for months, some-
times years, to get word or
approval on a project — whether
it will fly.”

Mr Rolle was speaking after
Tennyson Wells, the indepen-
dent MP for Bamboo Town,
revealed his proposal for a
resort and tourism development
on Long Island, saying Bahami-
ans could also do what the I-
Group is doing in Mayaguana.

The J-Group project is a
50/50 joint venture between the
Boston-based developer and the
Government, operating through
the Hotel Corporation of the
Bahamas, with the latter’s equi-
ty coming from the almost
10,000 acres of Crown Land it is
providing for the $1.8 billion
project.

Mr Wells said that if Crown
Land was available for Bahami-
ans, they could do the same,

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SUZANNA ANTOINE OF
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 5th day of
March, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that NICOLE TELUS OF
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 5th day of
March, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

willing to pay $2,000 per acres
for up to 2,000-3,000 acres of
Crown Land for their Long
Island project.

Mr Rolle’s Nassau Water
Ferries is a 100 per cent owned



innovative Offshore.Bank is presently leoking for a:

Noy ase ant ig , a ‘
waa) GOompliance Officer
The successful applicant must:

a Have several years of experience as compliance officer in private banking.
m Have knowledge of Bahamian and international compliance requirements.

s Be computer literate with communication skills.

We require knowledge and experience with:

a Planning, organizing the compliance function for a bank.

a Developing and maintaining adequate policies and procedures.
a Reviewing and managing the documentation of client files. .

a Liaising with regulators and compliance officer of the Group. .
Motivated team player with pleasant personality.

Must be able to work independently with minimal supervision.

Private Bankin
3 Ability ta conduct the monitoring of clients credit risk and/or law degree is an asset.

OYSTER Funds
We offer:

FEN crite ta) ‘a A salary which is commensurate with the job, a pension plan and medical insurance.

Please send yar resume and ene {7} letter of reference ta:
ation Betsy Marris ihetsy. mornis@syzbank.carn}
Parke West Gay Strees & Blake Road

Sitde-Swigedanw
LIVE & WORK

IN PARADISE
every day of the year

POI Ace EL eC



4
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Caribbean and Florida. We sell great names like Tiffany & Co., Omega, Rado, Baume & Mercier, Raymond
Weil, Movado, Roberto Coin, Aaron Basha, John Hardy and more.

If you want a career with prospects and have what it takes to sell fine jewelry, watches and gifts from a
prestigious retailer we have immediate openings for the following positions:

Store Manager — St. Kitts
Assistant Store Manager — Nassau or Grand Turk

Major Responsibilities Include: You will manage all phases of store operations to achieve sales and profitability
goals by providing the highest level of customer satisfaction. Successful recruiting, supervising, training,
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for to:

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Assistant Store Manager position in Nassau:
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Fax: (561) 241-9815 Attn: William Carey

Assistant Store Manager position in Grand Turk
E-Mail: nmartin@littleswitzerland.com
Fax: (561) 241-9815 Attn: Nikki Martin





Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday 940am. 24 od7am. 0.1
din lay? TT. . . ttt .
Tene ge edgy sg pm. 26 3:41pm. 0.1
High . ssseesssacseees O° F/32° C 10:13 03 4:14 02
ee ursd: 3am, 2. W4am. 0.

Low . vonsune 73° 23°C THMFBMAY os 3g Ald pm. 0.2
Normal high seessseessseees 18° F/26° G
Normal low sessessesereesees BO? F/18° C
ee I Last year’s high . sesestessecrsessees 82” F/28° C
High: 70° F/21°C Z zs Last year’s low ecsessssseessenseeesssee OO” F/19° 6

Low:50° Zz : LLL : Z Precipitation Sunrise......6:29a.m. Moonrise .... 7:51 p.m.
GIL E AS Of 1 p.m. YeStEPGAY veccssssssssssseseneens 0.00" ‘Sunset. ..... 6:14 p.m. Moonset ..... 7:18 a.m.

g Vea t0 date cccccccossescocrsssrvssisisatnersversinesneons £00.

“High: 70° F/21°C Normal year to date vss OT” Hew First Full

Low: 59° F/15° € :
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j g | LEE : : AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007 3 5 5 he
jj “a i = 3 g ELEUTHERA os =e me sk : ee ° : : = Glunies Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
/ ZB @ Z U High: 76 F/24°C ; at BE.) Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm ienfitentite
Z ; C f é £410 : Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Mengualit





SS













ep | NEQUAT













Tuesday WINDS = WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
High Low W WASSAU Today: N at 7-14 Knots 3-5 Feet 6-7 Miles 78° F
NNE at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 7-8 Miles 78° F
ORT Today: N at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-6 Miles 78° F

N at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 6-7 Miles 76° F
























: — : . , Today: NW at 12-25 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-6 Miles 78° F
Breezy with times of Sunny and breezy. Partly sunny. Chance for a couple Some sun. The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Tuesda’ WNW at 10-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-6 Miles 78° F
clouds and sun. of showers. greater the need for eye and skin'protection.
High: 75° High: 78° High: 80° High: 82°
75° Low: 63° Low: 64° Low: 68° iat a






PYAR ID













AccuWeather RealFeel : 3 4 Ovaa Ei amacrllaaal
owe Ee) Ce | [| 74°-62°F | 76°-65° F 2 : :
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is-an-index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, Spadina, ofeaipiton pressure, and Today 8:37 a.m. 28 2:24 a.m.
; elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the tow for the day. 8:51pm. 2.7 2:38pm. 0.0







3:01am, 0.

Tuesday 05pm. 27 3:09pm. 0.0


















































50/10 ATR r







88/31 74/23 po
7B/25 42/5
76/24 55/12 s







_ SAN SALVADOR
— High: 80°F/27°C
’ Low: 69° F/21°C

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's

highs and tonights's lows.





Tae Aas

ee insurance





Tuesday
High Low W





B8/31 71/21 po.





24/28 69/20 p

5/1
2 14-10 s





RAGGED JSLAND
High: 83° F/28°C
Low:68°F/20°C





pe 20/6 12/-11 pc





uffa : 2 9g GLEE TAGBE Louisville
Charleston, SC 62/16, 36/2 s 66/18 44/6 s Memphis
49-7 pe 36/2 24/-4 sf Miami
35/1 18/-7 sn 23/-5 20/-6 pc Minneapolis 24/-4
68/20 40/4 s 63/17 46/7 s- shville. 57/3
62/16 32/0 s 59/15 32/0 s New Orleans 63/17
i 35/1 14/10 ‘sn 25/-3 17/-8 pe — 4G)
Honolulu 80/26 67/19 s 81/27 68/20 pc

== 68/20 42/5 $s 70/21 S2/11- ss



GREAT INAGUA
High: 88° F/31°G












San Francisco



ee as






71/21
Tampa 265 sg o7aaee sari
Tucson 79/26 47/8 pe 82/27 50/10 pe
Washington, DC 53/11 29/-1 s 41/5 28/-2 $s

35/1 s







Winnipeg 18/-7 12-11 sf

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh -showers, t-thunder-

storms, rrain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-preci , Tr-trace








Houston-











MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

E & PO RT

Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

eR AA a





osition at track meet

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

ANDRETTI Bain took
advantage of a Last Chance
Meet to solidify his entry in the
NCAA Division One Indoor
Track and Field Championships
in both the 400 metres and the
Oral Roberts University’s 4 x
400 metre relay.

Having done a provisional
time of 46.92 seconds for Oral
Roberts University on Febru-
ary 10, Bain jumped from num-
ber 23 to a two-way tie for ninth
place with a time of 46.43 as he
won at Iowa State University
over the weekend.

“It felt good. It was the race
I’ve been waiting to put togeth-
er all year,” Bain said. “The last
two times I had a good track to
run on, I messed up. Either it
was my first 200, I wasn’t
aggressive enough, or in the last
200, I got boxed in.

“Finally, yesterday (Satur-
day), I just put everything
together, so it felt very good.”

Back for another trip to the
NCAA Division One Champi-
onships, scheduled for March
9-10 in Fayetteville, Arkansas,
Bain is hoping to improve on
his ninth place finish.in last
year’s NCAA’s.

“This year I’ve set my goals,
not just on becoming All-Amer-
ican, which is top eight, to hope-
fully placing in the top three.
That.is what I’m aiming for
right now,” Bain said.

Bain also helped Oral
Roberts to'a second place finish
in the 4 x 4 relay as he anchored
the golden Eagles in a time of
3:07.47 that pushed them in the
top ten to also secure their sport
in the NCAA’s. Iowa State won
the race in 3:07.39.

Prior to this weekend, Bain
earned three Mid-Conference
Athlete of the Week honors
and eventually carted off the
Athlete of the Month for Feb-
ruary.

His second Athlete of the
Week honours came after he
won the 400 in a time of 47.10,
finishing a full second ahead of
American No 1-ranked 400m
runner Wallace Spearmon. Bain
also won-the 200m in a Mid-
Conference best time of 21.97
and he anchored the Golden
Eagles to a best time of 3:14.75
in the 4 x 4 relay.

@ ANDRETTI Bain

“That was our first head-to-
head match-up after running
against each other in the relay,”
Bain said. “He specialises in the
200m, but he also runs a good
400m, so beating a quality guy
like that was a real good confi-
dence booster.”

As he look ahead to the
NCAA’s, Bain said if he can get
a top-three finish and help the
Golden Eagles’ 4 x 4 team
clinch an All-American honour,
he will be quite satisfied with
his trip to Fayetteville.

Bain is expected to join a
number of Bahamians, who



have also qualified to compete
in the NCAA’s Championships.

Auburn University’s senior
Donald Thomas is in second
place in the men’s high jump
with a best leap of 2.30 metres
with Auburn’s Shamar Sands in
the 60m hurdles.

On the ladies’ side, South Illi-
nois’ sophomore Bianca Stuart
is sitting in fifth place in the
long jump with a best mark of
6.31 metres.

And the University of Alaba-
ma’s Aymara Albury is in
eighth place in the shot put with
a best of 16.63 metres.







Freeport team beat Buccaneers
by six points in close game _



@ RAY Simpson of the Buccaneers tries to evade the Freeport players on Saturday. The
Buccaneers lost to Freeport 23-29

Knowles and Nestor confident of success

@ MARK Knowles and Daniel Nestor



@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

ALTHOUGH they have fall-
en short once again of winning
their first ATP Tennis Tourna-
ment, Mark Knowles is conti-
dent that he and Daniel Nestor
will have a stroke of success
very soon.

Back in the United States
after being eliminated in the
semi-final of the Dubai Tennis
Championships, Knowles and
Nestor are now preparing to
defend their title at the ATP
Masters Series in Indian Wells,
California next week.

“It didn’t end the way we
would have liked in Dubai,”
said Knowles, relfecting on their
heartbreaking 10-8 loss in the
tie breaker to Nenad Zimonjic
and Fabrice Santoro. “So it was
a little bit disappointing.”

Trailing the dynamic Ameri-
can twin brothers Bob and
Mike Bryan by just 36 points in
the the Stanford ATP Doubles
Race, Knowles and Nestor are
taking a couple of days off to
recuperate with their families
before they hit the road on

~ Tuesday for Palm Srings and

the Pacific Life Open.

“We have two big tourna-
ments out there on the schedule
in the next couple of weeks, so
we’re hoping that we can final-
ly win a tournament,” said
Knowles, who revealed that
they will be ‘in Miami, Florida
for the Sony Ericsson Open,
starting on March 19.

. Having played and lost in the
final of Sydney and Marseilles
and the semis of the Australian
Open, Doha and Dubai,
Knowles and Nestor said they
are knocking on the door of
their first championship feat this
year.

“The goal is to win every
tournament every week, but
sometimes it doesn’t work on
the schedule like you want,” he
insisted. “So we're disappointed
that we didn’t win in Dubai.

“But we’re ranked second in
the world right now and we've
played a lot of matches over
there, so we put ourselves in a
good position to win.”

Not counting out the fact that
they’ve already played two
months and have yet to win a

tournament, Knowles said it is

. still early and there are a lot more

tournaments out there to win.

“So we will just focus on this
tournament next week. We
know we are playing well.
Sometimes you just don’t win
the close ones,” he said. “But
we have put ourselves in posi-
tion, so we just have to continue
to work hard and the success
will come.”

While they are eagerly look-
ing forward to coming back to
Miami where the Bahamian
people will have the best oppor-
tunity to watch them play,
Knowles said their first goal is
to defend their title in Palm
Springs.

“We didn’t do so well in Mia-
mi last year, so it would be a
good chance to do well this
year,” he said. “It’s close to
home and there’s normally a lot
of Bahamians, who are there
for the event. So it’s always nice
to have some people from home
cheering us on.”

Both players are reporting
good health, so they are confi-
dent that their breakthrough
will come shortly.



PAGE 2E, MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS



| SPORTS | :



phomores Stubbs and Strachan

line up for clash at championships _

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

ALFREEPHA Stubbs and
Grand Bahamian Bianca Stra-
chan traded places with each
other as they hooked up a
showdown for Essex Commu-
nity College at the National
Junior College Athletic Asso-
ciation’s Indoor Champi-
onships.

The sophomores met in the
600m at the Texas Tech Uni-
versity in Lubbock, Texas over
the weekend, with Stubbs com-
ing through the tape in second
place in 1:36.01, improving on
her preliminary time of 1:38.26.

Strachan ended up in sixth in
1:37.33. She ran 1:38.14 for sec-



ond in heat four and fourth
overall, just ahead of Stubbs,
was won her heat, but was fifth
overall.

The final was won by Jodian
Richards, a freshman from New
Mexico Junior College in
135.3153

In the 800m, Strachan came

out on top, although she did not
defend her title with a third-
place finish in 2:22.65, just
ahead of Stubbs, who came
‘fourth in 2:23.10.

The two were matched
against each other in the first
heat of the preliminaries, with
Strachan coming in second in
2:27.05 and Stubbs was third in
2:27.50.

Essex’s sophomore Celia

Whyte won the final in 2:20.54.

With Stubbs on the lead-off
and Strachan on anchor, Essex
took the 4 x 800m relay in
9:54.37 and they got fourth in
the distance medley with Stra-
chan on pop-off and Stubbs on
third.

A number of other Bahami-
ans participated in the meet for
Essex, Iowa Central Commu-
nity College, Southwest Christ-
ian, Hinds Community College
and South Plains.

Deandrea Laing

Another Essex sophomore
Deandrea Laing clocked 57.87
seconds for sixth place in the
women’s 400 metres at the
Texas Tech University in Lub-
bock, Texas.



The event was won by
Trudeane Clarke, a freshman
from New Mexico Junior Col-
lege in 57.26. Southwest Christ-
ian freshman Crystal Roscoe
was second in 56.90 and Essex’s
freshman Melony McKay was
third in 57.79.

In the preliminaries, Laing
was fourth in section two in
57.87. Her heat was won by
Clarke in 57.26.

Andrea Moss

Grand Bahamian freshman
Andrea Moss competed for
Iowa Central Community Col-
lege in the Indoor Pentathlon
where she was fifth overall with
a total of 3,004 points. Asiya
Iskakova of South Plains won
the title with 3562.

Moss was ninth in the 60 hur-
dles in 9.76; tied with three oth-
ers in the high jump with 5-3;
third in the shot put with a
heave of 31ft 8.75in; second in
the long jump with 18ft Sin and
14th in the 800m in 3:07.12.

Ryan Penn

On the men’s side, Ryan
Penn, a freshman for Southwest
Christian, was tied with two oth-
ers for ninth in the 55 in 6.42.
He won his heat in 6.42.

Penn also competed in the
200m where he was 10th in
21.77. He was third in heat two
in 21.77.

Jamal Moss

Competing for Hinds Com-
munity College, freshman Jamal
Moss was eighth in the final of

the 400m in 48.94. He was sec-
ond in his heat in 48.61 for fifth
overall.

Moss also ran the second leg
on Hinds College’s 4 x 4 relay
team that got fourth in Section
4 in 3:18.74, They ended up in
sixth place.

Jamaal Butler

Also in-the two-lap race,

. Jamaal Butler, representing

South Plains, was tenth overall
in 49.21 after he came in sec-
ond in heat two in the prelimi-
naries.

Butler also ran on the second
leg of South Plains’ 4 x 4 relay

team that won section 4 in:

3:12.97 for second overall]
behind Butler Community Col-
lege, the. winner in 3:12.79.



More action from the rugby game between Freeport and the Buccaneers

Concern over changes Lord’

at Olympic Association.

ff By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

INCUMBENT officers of
the Bahamas Olympic Associ-
ation said they are concerned
about the new twist that pres-
ident Arlington Butler wants
introduced to the election of
officers on March 15 at the
Nassau Yacht Club.

Referring to the purposed
changes that Butler intends to
have initiated during the elec-
tions — to take place as the -
annual general meeting

I ter a break to

financial report —

secrciary general Larry ‘Doc’

Davis satd the changes are

unconstitutional and will not
be accepted.

Butler, at a press conference
last Monday, said that they
voted out of order in 2002 and
they are making the necessary
corrections to ensure that they
are compliant with the
Olympic Charter, as was laid
down in 2000 by the Interna-
tional Olympic Committee.

The charter calls for the
executive board to be made up
of more members of the affili-
ated associations and federa-
rembers

of the BOA, only
thrice cxccutives are currently
affiliated with any association
or federation. They are vice-
president Sir Durward
Knowles in sailing, vice-presi-
dent Wellington Miller in box-
ing and assistant treasurer
Dianne Miller in softball.
“T think all we are saying is



sthan the non



what the Sanstitintiol says and
we're going by the constitu-
tion,” Davis said. “It’s not a
debatable issue. It’s, here is
what the constitution says and
here’s what we’re going to do.”

Davis, whom Butler indicat-
ed had contacted the IOC with
the view of having the Olympic
Charter take effect after the
elections, said the constitution
has not changed, so they are
not concerned about having
the new regulation imple-
mented,
we can do is go by the
consti anon. he said. “We
know that change is inevitable
and when you are in position
for such a long time, when
changes come about, there is a
big break up between people.

“But change is inevitable
and it will accept all of us. But
I see changes continue taking
place. My only desire is that
the changes are for the better
for the Bahamas Olympic
Association.”

With that in mind, Davis
said he intend to seek another
four-year term in office, as are
all of the other executive mem-
bers. :

However, the position which
is drawing most attention is
that of president, where Butler
is being challenged by Rev
Enoch Backford, one of his
current first vice-presidents.

Executives are of the opin-
ion that Butler is pushing for
the changes to the electoral
voting procedure simply
because of the challenge from
Backford.





hicles.com

+1-954-880-0781

=

In a press release following
Butler’s press conference last
week, the BOA said the com-
ments made were not those of
the executive committee of the
BOA, the provisions of the
Olympic Charter or that of the
Constitution of the Bahamas
Olympic Association.

They were, as stated in the
press release, the personal
opinion of Butler.

The BOA’s press release
further stated that the regula-
tions for voting and for nomi-
nations are stipulated in Arti-
cle V2 and VII 1 .(d) of the
Constitution of the BOA:

Article V2 (B) states:

“The General Assembly
shall be comprised of all mem-
bers referred to in Article Hf.

i. Associate Members who
will not have a right to vote:

ii. Up to two (2) delegates
appointed by each member
association/federation. Only
one of the delegates will have a
right to vote.”

Article VIII 1(d) states:

“Nominations tor election
of any office of the BOA may
be submitted by any delegate
or any officer of the BOA, No
nomination shall be accepted
unless it is seconded. Nomina-
tions may be submitted in writ-
ing or orally from the floor.
Nominees shall be past or pre-

‘sent officers of the BOA, or

Florida Stock Reatly for immediate Shinment

past and present officers of a
Members Association/Feder-
ation.”

There are a total of 13 asso-
ciation/federations that make
up the electoral meeting.

a Now - Ask for Ana, Dan, or Humberto

Fax +1

354-880-0785 Email usa@iapanesevehicles.com

AUTON AHL LEA ANAT PT TINT SPD BNR NARS TT






s triumphant again

for basketball classic

LORD'S House of Faith
picked up its second straight
victory and are looking like the
team to beat in the men's vice
president of the Baptist Sports
Council's 2007 Rev Tyrone
Knowles Basketball Classic.

In the marquee game of the
day at the Charles W Saunders
High School, Jean Street, Lord's
House of Faith prevailed with a
48-37 triumph over Calvary
Bible.

Also in the men's division,
Faith United pulled off a 34-30
decision over Golden Gates.

There was one ladies game
played. Golden Gates prevailed
with a 21-19 victory.

In the 19-and-under division,
First Baptist and Macedonia
stayed undefeated as they lead
their respective divisions.

First Baptist knocked off
Everlasting Life ministries 44-
21, while Macedonia won 39-26
over Bethel. In another 19-and-
under division, Golden Gates
won 57-23 over Ebenezer.

And in the 15-and-under divi-
sion, Golden Gates No 1 beat
Faith United no 1 21-19; First
Baptist nipped St Paul's Fox
Hill 22-20 and Transfiguration
stopped Macedonia 32-27.

e Here's a summary of the
games played:

Lord's House of Faith 48,
Calvary Bible 37 (M): Jeffrey
Rolle exploded a game-high 22
points, Pastor Arthur Dun-
combe had seven and Sterling
Greene six for Lord's House of
Faith as they improved to 2-1.

Marvin Nairn had 13, Garvin
Taylor and Horatior 'Yellow'
Poitier both came up with six
in the loss for Calvary Bible,
who dropped to 2-1.

Faith United 34, Golden
Gates 30 (M): D'Angelo Miller
scored eight and Theo Woods
and Gaylen Gray both had six
as Faith United climbed to 2-1
in the men's president division.

Jeroy Cooper had eight and
A Munnings and Keno Sears
both had six in the loss for
Golden Gates, who are 1-1.

v

Golden Gates 21, St, Paul's
Fox Hill 19 (L): Joyce Minus
lid up the nets for a game high
11, Tenaj Cooper had five and
Teniel Poitier four in the win
for Golden Gates in their debut.

Melinda Bastian had 10 and
D'Vonnya Brown added four
in the loss for St Paul's, who are
1-1.

Champions

First Baptist 44, Everlasting
Life Ministries 21 (19): Eugene
Bain and Cruz Simnon, the 1-2
punch for the Hugh Campbell
Basketball champions CC
Sweeting Cobras, connected on
11 and seven respectively and
Kenyair Smith and Delroy
Rolle both chipped in with six
as First Baptist improved to 2-0
in the 19-and-under presiden-
t's division.

Jude Rolle scored a game
high 14 for Everlasting Life
Ministries, who are 1-1.

Macedonia 39, Bethel 26 (19):
Anthony Porter came up with a

game high 13, Divaz Moss had:

10 and Sampson Cleare added
six for Macedonia, who are 2-0
in the 19-and-under vice presi-
dent division.

Aaron Rolle and Kenton
Jackson both had 10 in the loss
for Bethel as they made their
debut.

Golden Gates 57, Ebenezer
23 (19): Rocco Fernander
scored 12, Claude Lesbott had
10 for Golden Gates, who
moved to 2-0 in the 19-and-
under president's division.

Jermaine Deveaux had 11
and Leroy Wells six for Ebenez-
er, who dropped to 1-2.

St Paul's Fox Hill 43, New
Bethlehem 40 (19): Jarvis
Delancy scored a game high 15,
michael Ferguson had eight and
Kendal Simmons had seven for
St. Paul's Fox Hill, now 1-1 in
the 19-and-under president's
division.

Donovan Bullard had eight
and Khambrel Ferguson seven

in the loss for New Bethlehem,
who are 0-3.

First Baptist 22, St. Paul's Fox
Hill 20 (15): Trujillo Darville
scored a game-high 14 and Basil
Deveaux added four for First
Baptist, who 2-0 in the 15-and-
under president's division.

Kendal Simmons had eight,
Jarvis Delancy six and Raynold
Culmer four in the loss for St.
Paul's, who slipped to 1-1.

Golden Gates No 1 21, Faith
United No 1 19 (15): Zan-
vaughn Beckford scored eight
and Dominic Beadle had four
as Golden Gates No 1 improved
to 2-1 in the 15-and-under pres-
ident's division.

Laron Albury had six and
Recardio Ferguson five for
Faith United, who are 0-2.

Transfiguration 32, Macedo-
nia 27: Twin brothers Ramone
and Raymond McFall came up
with 10 and nine points respec-
tively and Riyadh Barr added
seven in the win for Transfigu-
ration, who are 1-2 in-the 15-
and-under vice president's divi-
sion.

Ritchie Malone had seven,
Brent Stubbs Jr six and Jamaal
Clarke five in the loss for Mace-
donia, who are 1-2.

The action will move to the
Balliou Hills courts this week
when the men's division will be
in the spotlight. Here's how
they will play:

Tuesday

Court One: 7pm St Paul's Fox
Hill vs Golden Gates (M) and
8pm Faith United vs Mt. Tabor
(M).

Court Two: 7pm Macedonia
vs St Paul's Bias Street (M) and
8pm Evangelistic Center ys
New Bethlehem (M).

Thursday

Court One: 7pm Mt. Tabor
vs Kemp Road Ministries (M)
and 8pm Golden Gates vs First
Baptist (M)

Court Two: 7pm Calvary
Bible vs New Bethlehem (M)
and 8pm Evangelistic Center vs
Bahamas,Harvest (M).

\





AUTO RACING
NASCAR



LUIS ACOSTA/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

FIRST WIN: Juan Pablo Montoya
celebrates his victory in the
Telcel-Motorola 200 in Mexico
City on Sunday. It was his first as
a NASCAR driver.

Montoya gets
first victory
on the circuit

BY IOAN GRILLO
Associated Press

MEXICO CITY — Juan Pablo
Montoya spun teammate Scott Pruett
to take the lead with eight laps left,
then held off Denny Hamlin to win
the Busch Series race on Sunday for
' his first NASCAR victory.

Montoya, the Colombian star who
jumped from Formula One to
NASCAR late last season, recovered
from a bad pit stop to aggressively
move from 19th to first, taking the
lead when he sent Pruett’s car spin-
ning on the 72nd lap of the Telcel-Mo-
torola 200.

“I’m very sorry about what hap-
pened with Scott,” Montoya said. “I
thought he saw me and when he came
across I had no room to go.”

Montoya said he would personally
apologize to Pruett.

“Of all the people to take out —
your teammate,” Pruett said. “That
was just lowdown, nasty, dirty driv-
ing.”

Hamlin, right behind the two Chip
Ganassi Racing drivers at the time,
said it was a tough call.

“I wouldn’t call it dirty driving, but
it was a bit aggressive,” Hamlin said.
“Juan had the fastest car and he would
have taken the lead sooner or later.
He was overzealous.”

Hamlin, the winner last year, pres-
sured Montoya in the closing laps, but
couldn’t pass on the 2.518-mile Auto-
dromo Hermanos Rodriguez road
course’s s-curves.

Boris Said finished third in the race
that ended with a green-white-
checker finish after a late caution.
Carl Edwards was fourth, and Pruett
finished fifth.

“I’m really glad we won, but really
upset that we took out a teammate,”
said Brad Parrott, Montoya’s crew
chief.

Montoya, who had the dominant
car for the entire race, started in third
but took the lead from Pruett on the
third lap.

Montoya made a green-flag stop on .

the 45th lap, but a fuel malfunction
forced him to return to the pits about
10 laps later. After a caution, he
started 19th and quickly moved his
way back to the front of the field.

“The reason I came to NASCAR is
for the racing, and we showed today it
is a great place for racing,” Montoya
said.

His victory was celebrated with
deafening cheers from the 72,000-
strong Mexican crowd. Montoya
gained a following in Mexico with
Formula N victories back in the 1990s.

The Mexican fans were hungry for
a fellow Latino to win a NASCAR
event in Mexico after two years in
which U.S. drivers took the crown
south of the border.

“It’s huge for the Latin community |

and for everybody who supported
me,” Montoya said. “Every time I’m
out there I want to shine. To be able
to convert this into victory shows
where the Ganassi team is going.
Hopefully we can share a lot more
successes.’

Two Mexican drivers finished in
the top 10.

Jorge Goeters started fourth and
held the lead for three laps before fin-
ishing seventh. It was a personal best
for the Mexico City native who
stunned the field by winning the pole
for the 2005 race.

“I’m very excited,” Goeters said.
“This is the kind of race that every-
body loves. Nobody knows who’s

*TURN TO NASCAR

i
|
|.
|
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MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007



-AdSAAhst ose ee SbABDonees APCOw OES SCURS EDA OLED SABI ISD SERRE ABESSESERSR ME PESOUCEEBOEEOE SEES ODDO SSIES SCEONEESS RECO DESONORL ELE DLCOOIEE

INTERNATIONAL EDITION



COLLEGE BASKETBALL | NO. 8 NORTH CAROLINA 86, NO. 14 DUKE 72

Hansbrough gets double-double, ugly injury

BY JOEDY McCREARY
Associated Press

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — Tyler
Hansbrough had 26 points and 17
rebounds before suffering an ugly
injury in the closing seconds of No.
8 North Carolina’s 86-72 victory
over 14th-ranked Duke on Sunday,
clinching the top seed in the Atlan-
tic Coast Conference tournament.

Senior Reyshawn Terry added
15 points in his final home game for
the Tar Heels (25-6, 11-5), who
swept the regular-season series
with the Blue Devils for the first
time in ll years, avoided their first
three-game slide under Roy Wil-
liams and gave the homespun
coach his 100th victory at his alma
mater.

But perhaps the lasting image of
the latest renewal of college bas-
ketball’s most intense rivalry will
be Hansbrough’s bloodied face. He
leaped for a layup with 14.5 sec-

‘onds left, but after the ball left his
hand he was struck in the face by
Gerald Henderson’s right elbow.

Hansbrough crumpled to the
ground, his nose bleeding pro-
fusely onto the floor and down his
face, and he was restrained from
the Duke players as he was being
escorted to the locker room. The
officials reviewed the play and
ejected Henderson, then said he
would be suspended for one game.

Greg Paulus had 21 points
before fouling out, and Henderson
finished with 16 for the Blue Devils
(22-9, 8-8).

Ty Lawson scored 12 points and
Brandan Wright finished with 10
for the Tar Heels, who took control
early with a hot start before a
fired-up Senior Day crowd, dodged
Duke’s second-half rally and pulled
away late for their fourth win in
their last five meetings with the
Blue Devils.

North Carolina led comfortably
for most of the way before Duke
made things interesting midway
through the second half, closing to
50-48 on Paulus’ baseline jumper
with 12:50 left.

The Blue Devils then forced a
miss and had the ball with a chance
to tie or take the lead, but North
Carolina’s Marcus Ginyard inter-
cepted Paulus’ pass to the interior.

Ginyard then started the fast
break that led to a three-point play

‘by Hansbrough, which started the

game-clinching 18-4 run that ended
when Hansbrough’s free throw
with 5:14 left made it 68-52.

The win, coupled with Virginia
Tech’s loss to Clemson, gave UNC
the top seed and a first-round bye
in this week’s ACC tournament.

DeMarcus Nelson had 14 points,
Jon Scheyer finished with 10 and
Josh McRoberts added 10 rebounds
for Duke.



GERRY BROOME/AP
PUTTING IT UP:‘UNC’s Tyler
Hansbrough, right, shoots
over Duke’s Josh McRobert in
the second half on Sunday.
Hansbrough had 26 points
and 17 rebounds.



COLLEGE BASKETBALL | NO. 5 FLORIDA 85, KENTUCKY 72

usting his .



PHIL SANDLIN/AP

FIERCE GATOR: Florida’s Joakim Noah, left, struggles with Kentucky’s Lukasz Obrzut for possession of the ball in first-half action in
Gainesville, Fla., on Sunday. The Gators defeated Wildcats 85-72 as Noah collected 17 points and 10 rebounds.

Noah scores 17 points and grabs 10 rebounds to lead the Gators

BY MARK LONG
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Joakim
Noah was thumping his. chest,
screaming at the top of lungs and
pumping up teammates with his
hustle and tenacious defense.

Noah was back to his usual self
— and so was Florida.

Noah broke out of a slump with
17 points and 10 rebounds, played
with the kind of passion missing in
recent games and helped the fifth-
ranked Gators rebound from con-
secutive losses and make history
with an 85-72 victory against Ken-
tucky on Sunday.

Florida became the first South-

eastern Conference team to win six
in a row against the Wildcats. Only
Notre Dame has won seven
straight against the storied pro-
gram.

“We’ve come a long way,” said
center Al Horford, who added 14
points and 10 boards. “We're all
about setting records, and that’s
what we did.”

It started with Noah, the
6-foot-10 son of tennis star Yannick
Noah.

Noah — who had his father,
mother, two sisters and brother on
hand for what might have been his
last home game — had scored 18
points the last three games and was

admittedly playing without his

"usual energy.

He had plenty of it against the
“Kitty Cats,” the nickname Noah
playfully gave Kentucky (20-10,
9-7) this week.

“I feel like if you can deal with
all the good that we’ve gone
through, you have to know how to
deal with some bad,” Noah said.

“We knew that it wasn’t the end
of the world, but I feel like to me
it’s like crazy how people can just
be on your side and all of a sudden,
a couple days later, the same peo-
ple ... just trash you. I’ve never
experienced that before. I realize

. now that I can’t let those people

affect who I am,” he added.

The Gators (26-5, 13-3) got
behind early again and were tied at
halftime, but they used a 13-2 run to
open the second half and pulled
away down the stretch to finish the
season unbeaten at home (18-0).

Noah, much like last year’s run
through the NCAA tournament,
was the catalyst. He had aj left-
handed jam in the second-half
spurt, then threw down consecu-
tive dunks that pushed the lead to
62-51 with about 10 minutes to play.
He added seven straight points in
the closing minutes that sealed the
victory.

e MORE COLLEGES

PRO BASKETBALL | PHOENIX 99, LOS ANGELES LAKERS 94

Nash gets 25, Suns stagger to victory fag

BY BOB BAUM
Associated Press

PHOENIX — The Phoenix Suns
usually sprint to victory. With
their “mojo” severely lacking Sun-
day, they staggered to one.

Steve Nash scored 18 of his 23
points in the second half — includ-

. ing two free throws with 5.4 sec-

onds to play — and the Suns held
on to beat the short-handed Los
Angeles Lakers 99-94,

Leandro Barbosa added 20
points and Amare Stoudemire had
17 points and 11 rebounds, but the

Suns barely held off a Lakers team
without Lamar Odom, out indefi-
nitely after tearing his left labrum
on Friday.

Shawn Marion, who had missed
the two previous games with a
bruised right hand, had 13 points
and 12 rebounds before fouling out
with 22.8 seconds to play. Raja Bell
scored 14, including two free
throws that put Phoenix ahead
97-92 with 18.1 seconds to go.

Kobe Bryant scored 18 of his 30
points in the second half — but
shot just ll-of-28 overall — in the

first meeting of the teams since the
season opener. The Lakers won
that one in Los Angeles without
Bryant, and they made it tough on
Phoenix this time, too, even though
they were without Odom as well as
Luke Walton and Vladimir Radma-
novic.

Brian Cook had 22 points —
including 4-of-6 3-pointers — and
14 rebounds for Los Angeles.

It was an often-sloppy contest
that featured 35 turnovers — 19 by
the Lakers and 16 by Phoenix.

e@ MORE NBA

MOVING HE
BALL: Suns’
guard
Steve

Nash
drives past
Lakers’
Shammond
Williams,
rear.



MATTYORK/AP



4B | MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

Associated Press

LONDON — Argentina’s
Carlos Tevez scored his first
goal for West Ham on Sunday
in a 4-3 loss to Tottenham in
the Premier League.

Tevez, who hadn’t scored
in 19 previous appearances,
curled a free kick over the wall
that caught the underside of
the crossbar before the ball
bounced in.

The goal put the Hammers
up 2-0 at home four minutes
before halftime.

He also set up Mark Noble’s
first goal in the 16th minute
and floated a free kick in front
of the goal that Bobby Zamora
headed in to make it 3-2 with
five minutes to go.

Dimitar Berbatov tied the
score with a free kick in the
88th minute, and then Cana-
dian defender Paul Stalteri
scored the winner on a break-
away in the fifth minute of
injury time.

Jermain Defoe scored on a
penalty shot and Teemu Tai-
nio also had a goal for the
Spurs. .

Tottenham moved up two
places to eighth, strengthening
its chances of playing in next
season’s UEFA Cup. West

Ham remains in last place

behind Watford because of
goal differential. Both teams

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

SOCCER

Tottenham spoils Tevez’s
show by beating West Ham

have 20 points after 29 games.
Charlton has four more points,
six behind 17th-place Man-
chester City.

West Ham could have

points deducted if the league.

decides the club broke trans-
fer rules when it signed Tevez
and Javier Mascherano from
the Brazilian club Corinthians.

Also, two penalty kicks by
Benni McCarthy gave Black-
burn a 2-1 victory at Bolton.
On Saturday, Manchester
United won 1-0 at Liverpool to
stay nine points ahead of Chel-
sea, which won 2-0 at Ports-
mouth.

ITALY

MILAN — Christian Rigano
scored on two. headers to
improve Messina’s chances. of
avoiding relegation from Serie
A with a 2-0 victory over 10-
man Palermo.

It was Messina’s second
victory in five months but it
was enough to pull the club
out of the three-club relega-
tion zone.

Palermo, which is winless
in five games, had striker
Andrea Carracciolo sent off in
the 6lst minute for complain-
ing about a tackle.

Messina is 17th with 23
points — one more than Reg-
gina, which tied Parma 2-2.

Also Sunday, Tommaso
Rocchi scored his third goal in
three games to help fourth-
place Lazio beat Sampdoria
1-0; Nicola Pozzi’s 18th-minute
volley gave Empoli a 1-0 win
over Udinese; and Italy striker
Luca Toni scored twice in
three minutes in Fiorentina’s
5-1 rout of Torino.

Inter Milan leads the divi-
sion with 70 points, followed
by AS Roma with 54 and
Palermo with 45. On Saturday,
Inter beat Livorno 2-1 and AS
Roma was held to a 1-1 tie at
last-place Ascoli.

SPAIN

MADRID — Real Madrid
tied Getafe 1-1 and was six
points off the lead in the Span-
ish league.

Daniel Guiza scored in the
38th minute for Getafe. Ruud
van Nistelrooy tied it with a
penalty kick at halftime for
Madrid, which stayed in
fourth place.

David Beckham and Jose
Antonio Reyes of Real Madrid
sustained knee injuries and
will miss Wednesday’s Cham-
pions League game at Bayern
Munich. Reyes was carried off
on a stretcher after a collision
with Getafe goalkeeper
Roberto Abbondanzieri in the

32nd minute.



LEFTERIS PITARAKIS/AP
OVER THE WALL: West Ham striker Carlos Tevez, center, curls a shot over Tottenham
Hot Spurs’ defensive’ wall to score during their Premier League Cup match in London
on Sunday. Despite, the goal, Tottenham won the contest 4-3.

AUTO RACING 5 | GRAND AMERICAN ROLEX SERIES

ee wins in final laps

BY IOAN GRILLO
Associated Press

MEXICO CITY — Alex
Gurney took the lead from
Max Papis with two laps left
and held on to win the 100-lap
Grand American Rolex Sports
Car Series race Saturday at
Autodromo Hermanos Rodri-
guez.

“Tt was amazing,” said Gur-
ney, who teamed with Jon
Fogarty in the No. 99 Pontiac
Riley. “We had five laps to go
and I thought we wouldn't last.

Luckily, we put pressure on
and I closed on him pretty fast.
I couldn’t be happier.”
Fogarty said the close finish
was too much to bare: “T actu-
ally left the pits and went back
to the trailer because I
couldn’t watch. It was great to
see a battle going on. It’s won-
derful racing and awesome we
can put on an event like that.”
Pole-sitter Colin Braun, an
18-year-old from Ovalo, Texas,
led the race for the first 56 laps
in the No. 75 Pontiac Riley.

When he stopped and handed
over to Papis, the car had a 17
second lead.

Papis, the 2004 Daytona
Prototype co-champion,
blamed traffic and himself.

“The problem was that we
hit traffic right at the wrong
time. I saw Alex coming and I
didn’t really have any chance
to do anything so he went by,”
Papis said.

A Pontiac Riley driven by
Max Angelelli and Jan Mag-
nussen finished third.

FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

Montoya gets his first victory

°NASCAR

going to win until the white
flag is coming up. Congratula-
tions to Juan Pablo.”

Adrian Fernandez, Mexi-
co’s best known driver, fin-
ished ninth.

The course features eight
tight turns and was tough for
many Busch Series regulars
used to negotiating oval
tracks.

David Reutiman, who fin-
ished 12th in a Toyota, said he
had never seen turns like
these in his life.

“I definitely learned a lot,”
he said. “We had to run off the

track one time but other than
that we stayed on course, and
they told me if I kept clean I
would come home with a top
153%

Others got in more trouble
and there were a total of eight
cautions, including the Mon-
toya-Pruett bump.

Pruett was involved in
another incident in the 25th
when he passed Venezuela’s
Alex Garcia, leading to a
minor bump that sent Garcia
spinning.

In lap 66, Australian Mar-
cos Ambrose driving a Ford
and J.J. Yeley in his Chevrolet
banged each other near the

front of the pack sending each
other spinning. Yeley’s engine
went after the incident and he
finished 37th, while Ambrose
recovered and finished
eighth.

“I got spun and then he
spun out. But that’s NASCAR.
You’ve got to roll with it,”
Ambrose said.

“I put my head down and
just tried to come back as best
I could,” he added.

Officials said a total of
116,118 came to the track dur-
ing the three days with 72.971
watching Sunday’s race, a
similar attendance to last
year.

SOCCER | AUTO RACING | ETC.

Beckham limped off in the
69th.

Diego Milito’s 16th goal of
the season helped Zaragoza
rally to a 3-2 victory over
lowly Real Sociedad.

Sevilla leads the league
with 50 points while Barcelona
has 49, Valencia 46, Madrid
44, Zaragoza 42 and Atletico
Madrid 40.

GERMANY

BERLIN — Alemannia
Aachen beat Mainz 2-1 to draw
even with its rival in the fight
against relegation from the
Bundesliga.

The end of Mainz’s six-
game unbeaten streak means
the struggle to avoid demotion
is the closest in league history.
The bottom 10 clubs are sepa-
rated by just seven points and
seven teams are within two
points ahead of 16th-place Ein-

‘tracht Frankfurt, which occu-

pies the last demotion place.

Mainz had the league’s best
record since the winter break,
where it started in last place.

Mainz led 1-0 on Moham-
med Zidan’s 14th-minute goal.
Substitute Laurentiu Reghe-
campf then hit free kicks that
led to goals by Jan Schlaudraff
in the 47th and by Vedad Ibi-
sevic two minutes later.

The result left Mainz in 13th
place and Aachen 14th, just
one point above demotion.

Energie Cottbus moved up
to llth with a 3-2 win against
Borussia Dortmund, which fell
to 10th. Both are two points
above demotion.

FRANCE

PARIS — Nantes beat
Sochaux 2-1 to keep alive its
chances of escaping relegation
from the French first division.

Romania’s Claudiu Keresu.

scored the winning goal in the
51st minute, collecting a long
pass and beating goalkeeper
Teddy Richert from close
range.

Dimitri Payet put Nantes
ahead in the 23rd, charging
down the left flank before cut-
ting inside to fire a powerful
shot into the top corner of the
net from the edge of the box.
Brazil’s Alvaro Santos tied it
for Sochaux in the 34th on a
penalty kick after Alioum Sai-
dou had brought down Valter
Birsa.

Nantes is in 19th place with
26 points, while Sochaux
missed an opportunity to
move to third.

TRACK & FIELD

Gevaert

defends
title

Associated Press

BIRMINGHAM, Eng-
land — Kim Gevaert of Bel-
gium successfully defended
her European indoor 60-
meter title on Sunday, with
disgraced Greek sprinter
Katerina Thanou finishing
sixth.

In the men’s final, Brit-

ain’s Jason Gardener ran
the fastest time in Europe

this year — 6.51 seconds — '

to take his fourth straight
European indoor 60-meter
title.

Gevaert won in 7.12 on
the final day of the Euro-
pean Indoor Champion-
ships. Thanou, who posted
7.26, said she had been
tested two days before the
meet but not during the
championships.

Yevgeniya Polyakova of
Russia was second with 7.18
and Daria Onysko of Poland
came third with a personal
best time of 7.20.



MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD





DELIGHTED
AMERICAN: Julia -
Mancuso
celebrates her
third place
finish during
the FIS Skiing -
World Cup
Women’s
Super-G on
Sunday in
Tarvisio,. Italy.

AGENCE )ON/GETTY IMAGES

Mancuso gives US.
a tie at the top

of the World Cup
skiing rankings

Associated Press

TARVISIO, Italy — Julia
Mancuso had two long-term
goals growing up as a skier
-—— winning an Olympic gold
medal and hoisting the over-
all World Cup trophy.

The Californian accom-
plished one at last year’s
Turin Olympics, winning the
giant slalom. And on Sunday,
in this far northeastern cor-
ner of Italy, the second
moved closer to reality.

Mancuso moved atop the
overall World Cup standings
for the first time by finishing
third in a super-giant slalom,
her third straight top-three
result of the weekend. It was
the first time in 24 years that
an American woman had led
the standings at any time
during a season.

“It was always my dream
to win the Olympics. My
other dream was to win the
overall as a kid, maybe that’s

why it’s happening,” she said.

But Mancuso isn’t alone

, atop:the, standings .1 -with six

races remaining’ this’season.
Renate Goetschl won

her record 17th super-G by

more than a second to join

Mancuso in the overall lead. -

She skied the 1.2-mile Pram-
pero course in] minute, 18.66
seconds. Austrian teammate
Nicole Hosp was second,
1.01 behind, and Mancuso
was third, 1.22 back.

Goetschl and Mancuso are
tied with 1,199 points each.
Hosp is third with 1,183.
Another Austrian, Marlies
Schild, finished 12th and
dropped from first to fourth
overall with 1,170.

Goetschl won the overall
title in 2000. Mancuso is
attempting to become the
first American woman to win
since Tamara McKinney in
1983. The closest an Ameri-
can has been to the top since
then was two races into the
1993 season, when Julie Par-
isien was one point behind
leader Pernilla Wiberg of
Sweden.

Goetschl already has
clinched the downhill and
super-G titles, Schild has
locked up the slalom and
super-combi crowns, and
Hosp has a 36-point lead on
Tanja Poutiainen in the
giant slalom standings with
two races remaining.

Bode Miller became the
first American man to win
the overall title in 22 years
when he took the crown in
2005.

Only six races.remain this
season — two technical
events in Zwiesel, Germany,
next weekend and four races
at the World Cup finals in
Lenzerheide, Switzerland,
the following week.

On a spring-like Sunday,
with the temperature hitting
4] degrees, a couple of other
Americans also fared well on
a course set by U.S. speed
coach Alex HoedImoser.
Stacey Cook finished sixth
and Kaylin Richardson was
llth, with both skiers record-
ing the best super-G perfor-
mances of their careers.

e Men’s. slalom: In
Kranjska Gora, Slovenia,
world champion Mario Matt
won his second straight
World Cup slalom on Sun-
day, and Benjamin Raich
finished second to reclaim
the lead in the standings.

Matt, who trailed Raich
after the opening leg by 0.04

‘first,

seconds, raced down the
twisting track in a combined
time of 1 minute, 40.64 sec-
onds. Raich made it an Aus-
trian 1-2 finish, 0.61 behind
Matt. Manfred Moelgg of
Italy was third, 0.96.back.

Bode Miller, who now
has completed two straight
World Cup slaloms after fail-
ing to finish any for more
than a year, was 23rd in
1:43.89. The only other Amer-
ican to finish both legs was
Ted Ligety, who was 25th.

Raich, who won Satur-
day’s giant slalom for the
third straight year, moved
closer to defending his over-
all title by overtaking Aksel
Lund Svindal of Norway at
the top of the standings.
Svindal, who has not finished
better than sixth in a slalom
this season, crashed out on
the first run.

Raich now leads the over-
all standings with 945 points,

while Svindal is second, Alt: canes
868. Didier Cuche of Swit- .
“zerland is third. with: 788.
Miller and Matt are, tied. for. :
fourth with 664.

The victory lifted Matt
atop the slalom standings
with 52C points, 15 ahead of
Raich. Jens Byggmark of
Sweden, who had been lead-
ing the standings, dropped to
third with 445 points.

e Speedskating: In Cal-
gary, Alberta, U.S. speed-
skater Shani Davis broke his
own world record at 1,500
meters Sunday at the World
Cup final.

Davis, a silver medalist at
the 2006 Turin Games, fin-
ished in 1 minute, 42.32 sec-
onds to lower the mark of
1:42.68 he set March 19, 2006,
at Calgary’s Olympic Oval.

He had little to say about
his latest world record: “Talk
is cheap. I just want to
skate.”

Erben Wennemars of
the Netherlands was second
in 1:43.24. Denny Morrison
of Canada, winner of the
1,000 Friday, was third in
1:43.43.

Sven Kramer of the
Netherlands set a world
record in the men’s 5,000
Saturday.

RUNNING

e Los Angeles Mara-
thon: Kenyan Fred Mogaka
outran countryman Moses
Kororia in the last mile Sun-
day to win the race and its
battle-of-the-sexes challenge.

Kororia and another
Kenyan, Christopher
Kipyego, passed eventual
women’s winner Ramilia
Burangolova in the 25th
mile. But Mogaka surged
ahead of all three and
crossed the finish line in 2
hours, 17 minutes, 14 seconds
to give the race a Kenyan
men’s winner for the ninth
consecutive year.

By crossing the finish line
Mogaka earned a
$100,000 bonus as part of
“The Challenge,” which
allows the top women to
start nearly 20 minutes ahead
of the men. The time differ-
ential is chosen by race offi-
cials in hopes of creating a
close finish between the top
man and the top woman.

Mogaka and Burangolova
each received $20,000, plus a
new car. Burangolova’s win-
ning time among the women
was 2:37:54, 49 seconds
behind Mogaka.





ofa Miami

THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com

NBA STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE





__INTERNATIONAL EDITION __ MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007 ||5.B

BASKETBALL

NBA

Arenas’ free throws give Wizards victory

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Gilbert Arenas made
three free throws with one-tenth of a second
remaining to give the Washington Wizards a
wild 107-106 victory over the Golden State
Warriors on Sunday.

With Washington trailing 106-104 with 2.9
seconds to go, Arenas caught an inbounds
pass near the top of the key and drove to the
basket. The horn sounded before Arenas
released a shot, but the officials ruled that
Golden State’s Mickael Pietrus fouled Arenas
with time left on the clock.

Warriors coach Don Nelson was issued a
technical foul for arguing the call, and Are-
nas was awarded a total of three free throws.

With the crowd on its feet, Arenas nailed
the first two free throws before Golden State
called timeout. He then calmly stepped back
to the line and sank the third shot.

Arenas scored a game-high 32 points,
while Jason Richardson led Golden State

e Celtics 124, Timberwolves 117
(2OT): In Boston, Delonte West scored all 31
of his points after halftime, Paul Pierce added
27 points and the Celtics won their fourth
straight game.

Al Jefferson had 20 points and 14
rebounds, and reserve Ryan Gomes added 21

SOUTHEAST WL Pct. GB 10 Str. Home Away Conf |
Washington 33 25 569 - 5-5 W-2 23-8 10-17 21-13 |
29 29° 500 4 «66-4 W-2 17-10 12-19 16-16 |
Orlando 28 33 .459 6% 2-8 L-3 18-12 10-21 16-20 |
Charlotte 22 37) «373: 11% «64-6 «= L-4 13-16 9-21 14-21
Atlanta 22 38 367 12 2-8 L-5 10-18 12-20 12-23 |
ATLANTIC WL _ Pet. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf —
Toroito 32 28 533 - 55 L-2 20-9 12-19 22-13 |
New Jersey 28 32 467 4 5-5 L-2 17-15 11-17 21-16 |
New York 28 33 .459 4% 6-4 W-2 17-13 11-20 17-21 |
Philadelphia 22 38 .367 10 5-5 W-4 14-15 8-23 14-20
Boston 17 42 .28814% 5-5 W-4 7-21 10-21 11-24 |
CENTRAL WL Pet GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf
Detroit 37 20 649 - 82 W-1 19-10 18-10 26-11
Cleveland 34 25 576 4 6-4 W-1 22-8 12-17 20-16 |
Chicago 35 27 565 4% 64 W-3 24-8 11-19 24-12 |
Indiana 29 29° 500 8% 3-7 LS 18-12 11-17 20-14 |
Milwaukee 22 38 «6.367 16% 93-7 Ll 13-13 9-25 11-25 |
WESTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHWEST WL Pet. GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf
Dallas 50 9 847 - 10-0 W-15 29-3 21-6 32-6 |
San Antonio 41 18 695 9 8-2 W-8 20-8 21-10 24-11 |
Houston 36 23 610 14 5-5 L-1 20-10 16-13 20-18 |
New Orleans 28 32 467 22% «5-5 1-2 19-12 9-20 16-20 |
Memphis 15 46 246 36 2-8 L-4 11-20 4-26 9-29 |
NORTHWEST W L Pct. GB LIO Str. Home Away Conf | Wi
Utah 40 19 678 - 82 W-3 22-7 1812 2412 . With 28,
Denver 28 29 491 11 5-5 L-l 15-16 13-13 12-21
Minnesota 26 33 «441 14 3-7 L-3 17-13 9-20 15-22
Portland 25 35 .417 15% 5-5 L-l 14-16 11-19 15-20
Seattle 23 35 «©.397 16% 6-4 W-1 17-13 6-22 12-23
PaciFic = WL Pet. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf |
Phoenix 46 14 767) - «7-3 W-2 23-6 23-8 22-10
L.A. Lakers 33 27 550 13 3-7 L-2 20-10 13-17 19-13 |
LA. Clippers 29 30 .49216% 5-5 W-1 21-10 8-20 16-19 |
Sacramento 27° 32+ ~=.458 18% 9=5-5 ~W-3 17-12 10-20 14-21 |
Golden State 26 35 .42620% 2-8 L-6 20-10 6-25 14-19

RES

Saturday’s results
Bos. 124, Min. 117 (20T)
Was. 107, G.S. 106

Chi. 126, Mil. 121 (OT)
Pho. 99, L.A.L. 94

ULTS AND SCHEDULES

Tonight’s games
Atl. at Miami, 7:30
Mil. at Orl., 7

Hou. at Clev., 7 Cle. 120, Tor. 98

G.S. at Det., 7:30 Det. 92, Mem. 89

Saturday’s results
Bos. 96, NJ 88 (OT)
NY 104, At. 100 (OT)

j

points and 17 boards for Boston, which out-
scored Minnesota 17-10 in the second over-
time to win its second overtime game in two
days. Boston beat New Jersey 96-88 in over-
time Saturday.

Kevin Garnett led Minnesota with 33
points, 13 rebounds and 10 assists.

Utah 108, N.0. 94 Seat LAG” 10:30 Dat 103, Ork 98 e Bulls 126, Bucks 121 (OT): In Milwau-
Char. at Sea., late See, 10 Baro% _ kee, Ben Gordon scored a career-high 48
ne | points to help Chicago withstand Michael

WOMEN’S COLLEGE GAMES |



PABLO MARTINEZ MONSIVAIS/AP

ROAD BLOCK: The Wizards’ Gilbert
Arenas, left, runs into the Warriors’ Al
Harrington in the fourth quarter on
Sunday. No foul was called on the play.

Redd’s 52 points for the Bucks.

Gordon, whose previous high was 41
points on Jan. 2 against Phoenix, sparked a
frantic fourth-quarter rally for the Bulls as
they overcame an 18-point deficit.

Gordon had 20 points in the quarter, and
Luol Deng added 27 points for the Bulls.

Redd’s 52 points is his second-highest
total this season, behind the franchise-record
57 he scored Nov. 10 against Utah, also a loss.

e 76ers 99, Nets 86: In Philadelphia,

Andre Iguodala scored 21 points and Phila-
delphia extended its winning streak to a sea-
son-high four games.

Willie Green and Kyle Korver each scored
20 points for the Sixers, who rallied from a
17-point deficit in the first quarter for their
biggest comeback victory of the season.

e Jazz 108, Hornets 94: In Oklahoma
City, Mehmet Okur scored 28 points, Deron

‘Williams added 20 and the Utah Jazz heated

up in the second half to cruise to victory.

LATE SATURDAY

e Spurs 97, Rockets 74: In Houston,
Tim Duncan scored 26 points and San Anto-
nio beat Houston for its season-high eighth
straight victory.

e Kings 104, Trail Blazers 96: In Port-
land, Ore., Kevin Martin scored 15 of his 33
points in the first quarter and Sacramento
won its third straight.

e Clippers 87, Pacers 64: In Los Ange-
les, Corey Maggette scored 20 points, Elton
Brand added 17 points and 12 rebounds, and
the Clippers recorded their best defensive
game in franchise history.

e Mavericks 103, Magic 98: In Dallas,
Jason Terry had 29 points and 15 assists, and
Dallas established a club record with its 15th
consecutive victory.

ELSEWHERE

Los Angeles Lakers coach Phil Jackson
says he has talked to 41-year-old Scottie Pip-
pen about making a comeback with the team.

“I did get in touch with Scottie,” Jackson
said before the Lakers played the Phoenix
Suns on Sunday, “but it was just preliminary
talk about how he’s doing, where he’s at and
how he feels.”

MEN’S COLLEGE GAMES

North Carolina downs N.C. St.

Associated Press

GREENSBORO, N.C. —
Ivory Latta scored 20 points,
becoming North Carolina’s
career scoring leader, and the
fourth-ranked Tar Heels
ended North Carolina State’s
. emotional run through the
' Atlantic Coast Conference
tournament with a 60-54 win
over the No. 24 Wolfpack in

Sunday’s championship game.

Latta’s driving scoop shot
in the lane with 35 seconds
left gave the Tar Heels a five-
point lead. She then grabbed a
rebound with 13 seconds left
and hit two free throws to put
it away, earning tournament
MVP honors. :

Erlana Larkins added 18
points for North Carolina
(30-3), which earned its third
_ straight ACC title by holding
off the feisty Wolfpack (23-9),
- who had won 11 of 12 games
since coach Kay Yow
returned after breast cancer |
treatments.

* Ashley Key scored 14

points and Shayla Fields
added 12 for N.C. State, which
had its five-game winning
streak snapped. The
Wolfpack got within 55-52 on
Shayla Fields’ 3-pointer with
1:40 left.

Latta grabbed a rebound
with 13 seconds left and hit
two free throws to put it
away.

N.C. State stunned top-
ranked and undefeated Duke
on Saturday to reach its first
- ACC final since 2001.

e No. 13 Vanderbilt 51,
No. 11 LSU 45: In Duluth, Ga.,
Dee Davis scored 19 points,
including a crucial basket
with 23 seconds left, to lead
Vanderbilt past LSU in the
Southeastern Conference
tournament championship.

Third-seeded Vanderbilt
(28-5) won its third SEC tour-
nament championship in six
years.

@ No. 3 Connecticut 74,
South Florida 54: In Hart-
ford, Conn., Charde Houston
scored 19 points, Tina Charles
added 18 and Connecticut
opened its Big East confer-
ence tournament with a quar-
terfinal win over South Flor-
ida.

With losses by No. 1 Duke

and No. 2 Tennessee in their
conference tournaments this
weekend, UConn (28-2) is try-
ing to stake a claim to the
overall No. 1 seed in the
NCAA tournament.
. Jessica Dickson led South
Florida (20-11) with 18 points.
ChiChi Okpaleke and Nalini

. Miller each added 10.

South Florida hit just four
of its first 14 shots, but the
game was tied 10-10 thanks in
part to a technical foul on
UConn coach Geno
Auriemma. But UConn then
went on a 13-0 run capped by



MARCIO JOSE SANCHEZ/AP
TOUGH SHOT: Stanford's
Michelle Harrison, left,
shoots over Southern
Cal’s Jamie Hagiya, center
on Sunday.

a Houston layup that made it
23-10 with less than 9 minutes
to go before intermission.

e No. 18 Rutgers 63,
DePaul 55: In Hartford,
Conn., Matee Ajavon scored
21 points and Rutgers came

back to beat DePaul in a Big -

East tournament quarterfinal.
Essence Carson added 18
for the Scarlet Knights (20-8),
who made their fourth con-
secutive Big East semifinals.

e No. 20 Louisville 68,
West Virginia 56: In Hart-
ford, Conn., Angel McCough-
try scored 26 points and Lou-
isville held West Virginia
without a field goal for over 12
minutes in the first half.

e No. 23 Marquette 61,
Pittsburgh 51: In Hartford,
Conn., Christina Quaye had 18
points to lead Marquette over
Pittsburgh in the Big East
tournament quarterfinals.

Krystal Ellis added 15 and
the Golden Eagles (25-5) went
on a 16-4 run late to break
open a close game. Marquette
has won six of its last seven.

Marcedes Walker led Pitts-

burgh (23-8) with 18 points
and 12 rebounds.
e No. 5 Ohio St. 73, Penn
St. 71, OT: In Indianapolis,
Jessica Davenport scored a
season-high 32 points, includ-
ing all seven of Ohio State’s
points in overtime, to rally the
Buckeyes fifth-seeded Penn
State in a Big Ten tournament
semifinal.

Star Allen added 12 points
and. injured guard Marscilla
Packer provided an inspira-
tional lift with nine points in a
surprise return from a
sprained left ankle.

Three-time regular-season
champion Ohio State (28-2)
will defend last year’s tourna-
ment title Monday night
against Purdue.

Kamela Gissendanner led
Penn State (15-16) with 21
points and Tyra Grant had 17,
but couldn’t get a potentially
tying 15-foot baseline jumper
off before the buzzer at the
end of overtime.

e No. 15 Purdue 64, No.
22 Michigan St. 61: In India-
napolis, Katie Gearlds scored
14 of her 17 points in the sec-
ond half and Purdue rallied to
beat Michigan State in a Big
Ten tournament semifinal.

Erin Lawless had 18 points
and seven rebounds, and
Lindsay Wisdom-Hylton

added 12 points and 14°”
rebounds for the Boilermak-_
ers (27-5), who will go for’,

K-

their sixth tournament title in
the final Monday against the
winner of the late semifinal
between Ohio State and Penn
State.

Victoria Lucas-Perry led
Michigan State (23-8) with 20
points and Allyssa DeHaan
added 16 points, five rebounds
and three blocks.

e No. 7 Stanford 67,
Southern California 52: In
San Jose, Calif., Candice Wig-
gins hit a career-high and
tournament-record eight
3-pointers on the way to 29
points, and Stanford beat
Southern California to reach
the Pac-10 tournament title
game.

e No. 9 Arizona State
60, California 53: In San
Jose, Calif., Kirsten Thomp-
son scored all 14 of her points
in the second half, including
eight straight in crunch time,
to lead Arizona State past Cal-
ifornia and into the Pac-10
tournament title game.

e@ Saint Joseph’s 57, No.
8 George Washington 55:
In Cincinnati, Saint Joseph’s
went to a full-court press in
the closing minutes and
pulled off its biggest upset in
15 years, rallying to beat
George Washington in the
Atlantic 10 tournament semi-
finals.

By overcoming a 13-point
deficit in the final 5. minutes,
Saint Joseph’s (19-12) snapped
the fourth-longest winning
streak in Division I at 19
games and became the first
Al0 team all season to beat
the Colonials.

Saint Joseph’s Whitney
Ffrench scored all of her 14
points in the second half.

Kimberly Beck and Jessica
Adair each scored 15 points
for the Colonials (26-3)

LATE SATURDAY

e No. 13 Vanderbilt 81,
No. 10 Georgia 56: In
Duluth, Ga., Christina Wirth
scored 2] points and Vander-
bilt pulled ahead by 23 points
in the first half in a victory
over Georgia that advanced
the Commodores to the SEC
championship.

e No. 21 Wisconsin-
Green Bay 58, IIlinois-Chi-
cago 45: In Chicago, Nicole
Soulis had 12 points and eight
rebounds to lead Wisconsin-
Green Bay over IJlinois-Chi-
cago.



REPLAY
WATCHING:
Creighton’s
Anthony

Tolliver, center,
and his
teammates
celebrate as ~
they watch the
post-tournament
video after
beating No. 11
Southern

Illinois on
Sunday. ”

OS

TONGANNAM/AP

Winona State extends streak
to 52 consecutive victories

Associated Press

WINONA, Minn.
Winona State tied an NCAA
Division II record by extend-
ing its winning streak to 52
games with an 80-70 victory
over Southwest Minnesota
State in the Northern Sun
Intercollegiate Conference
championship game Sunday.

The Warriors equaled the
record set by Langston Uni-
versity of Oklahoma, which
won 52 straight games with
perfect seasons in 1943-44 and
1944-45 and by winning the
first five games of the 1945-46
season.

Winona State (30-0) has
not lost since Jan. 7, 2006, an
84-79 setback at home to
Bemidji State.

John Smith had 23 points
and 12 rebounds in the victory
over Southwest Minnesota
State (20-10).

The Warriors can break
the Division II record when
they play in the North Central
Regional starting Saturday.

e Creighton 67, No. 11
Southern {Illinois 61: In St.
Louis, Anthony Tolliver had
15 points and 13 rebounds and
Creighton upset the Salukis to
earn their seventh NCAA
tournament appearance in
nine years.

Nate Funk added 19 points
and four assists and Nick Por-
ter had 15 points and six
assists for the second-seeded
Bluejays (22-10), who won the
conference tournament for
the sixth time in nine seasons.

Jamaal Tatum had 21 points
for Southern Illinois (27-6),
which has won the regular-
season title five times in the
last six seasons but has won
only one tournament title dur-
ing that span. The loss ended
a 13-game winning streak for
the Salukis.

e No. 16 Louisville 86,
Seton Hall 71: In Louisville,
Ky., Edgar Sosa scored 18
points to lead five Louisville
players in double figures and
the Cardinals clinched sec-

ond-place in the Big East.

Terrence Williams and
David Padgett scored 15
points apiece, Derrick Carac-
ter added 13 and Jerry Smith
had 10 points for Louisville
(22-8, 12-4), which won its
sixth straight.

Brian Laing scored a

‘career-high 29 points and

Eugene Harvey added 16
points for the Pirates (13-16,
4-12).

e Clemson 75, No. 21
Virginia Tech 74: In Blacks-
burg, Va., K.C. Rivers scored
22 points, including the deci-

sive basket with 18 seconds .

remaining, and the Tigers pre-
vented the Hokies from cap-
turing a share of the Atlantic
Coast Conference’s regular-
season title.

Cliff Hammonds added 17
points for Clemson (21-9, 7-9)
in the ACC regular-season
finale for both teams.

Zabian Dowdell led Vir-
ginia Tech (20-10, 10-6) with
25 points. Jamon Gordon
added 14 points.

LATE SUNDAY

e No. 6 Memphis 64,
SMU 61: In Dallas, Chris
Douglas-Roberts had 19 points
with the key basket late and
Memphis won its 19th straight
game to complete a perfect
record in Conference USA
with a victory at SMU.

The Tigers (27-3, 16-0
C-USA) overcame an early l1-
point deficit to lead at half-
time, but didn’t go ahead for
good until Douglas-Roberts
hit a 3-pointer to make it 59-57
with 3:47 left.

Memphis became the first
C-USA team to get through
league play without a loss
since Cincinnati was the first
to do it in 1999-2000. Big
South champion Winthrop,
which clinched an automatic
NCAA berth Saturday, is the
only other team to get
through conference play
undefeated.

e No. 10 Nevada 69,

New Mexico St. 65: In Reno,
Nev., Marcelus Kemp scored
21 of his 32 points in the sec-
ond half and Nick Fazekas
added 22 points and nine
rebounds to lead Nevada over
New Mexico State.

Kemp was 9-for-17 from
the field and 12-for-13 on free
throws, including four in a
row after a foul and technical
foul gave Nevada a 50-47 lead
midway through the second
half that it didn’t relinquish.

The Wolf Pack (27-3, 14-2
in the Western Athletic Con-
ference) pushed their home
record to 60-6 since the start
of the 2003-04 season while
claiming their fourth straight
WAC regular-season title
with four consecutive seasons
of 25 or more victories.

e No. 20 Marquette 75,
No. 12 Pittsburgh 71: In Mil-
waukee, Wesley Matthews
and David Cubillan scored 20
points each to help Marquette
beat Pittsburgh.

Marquette (23-8, 10-6 Big

East) came into the game
shaky and short-handed, but
looked more athletic and
energetic than Pittsburgh
from the opening tip — until
the Panthers nearly stole the
game with a late rally.
. A win would have given
Pittsburgh (25-6, 12-4 Big
East) a share of the Big East
regular-season title. Earlier in
the day, No. 9 Georgetown
clinched at least a share of the
conference championship
with a 59-46 victory over Con-
necticut.

The Golden Eagles led by
17, but Pittsburgh rallied with
a 15-4 run, cutting the Mar-
quette lead to six, 61-55, on a
3-pointer by Ronald Ramon
with 3:38 remaining.

Pittsburgh’s Sam Young
cut the lead to four with two
free throws, but Marquette
freshman David Cubillan
responded with his fourth
3-pointer of the game to put
the Golden Eagies ahead 64-57
with 1:40 remaining.

SN ELS eA I Ee SE PT I NTS BE ED A TE RE OI NU NR TT TY

eaten



INTERNATIONAL EDITION _MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

NBA EXTRA |

6B | MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

BY ISRAEL GUTIERREZ



HORNETS AT NUGGETS, 9, TUESDAY, NBA TV

The Hornets are fighting through injuries. While they will try to
hold off the Clippers for the eighth seed, the seventh seed is
within reach. The Nuggets hold that spot but aren’t running
“away with it. The Hornets are doing their damage with Chris
Paul and David West, and the Nuggets are still figuring out the
best way to utilize the Carmelo Anthony-Allen Iverson tandem.
Familiarity might give the Hornets the edge. i

RAPTORS AT WIZARDS, 7, TUESDAY, NBA TV

The Wizards are in danger of a free fall in the standings. és
Antawn Jamison is recorvering from a knee injury, Caron
Butler could have lingering back problems and Gilbert
Arenas isn't thrilled with coach Eddie Jordan. The Raptors,
meanwhile, are on the verge of pulling ahead of the
Wizards. This game could determine whether the Raptors
have become an elite Eastern Conference team.

~ WHAT 10

WATCH
THIS WEF

te eee



ALL ACCESS



WHAT IS IT LIKE
TO EXPERIENCE
A CEREMONY IN
YOUR TEAM’S
HONOR AT THE
WHITE HOUSE?

e Shaquille
O'Neal: ‘It’s a very
humbling experi-
ence. I've known



the president for a while now. He’s just a great
guy. Just to see the looks on [Heat players’]

faces is a. beautiful thing.’

e Dwyane Wade: ‘It’s an unbelievable honor.
To be here with this group of guys, knowing
that we did something special last year, to
have a day outside of basketball we can all

enjoy was great.’

FANTASY VS. REALITY



NENE, NUGGETS

e@ Fantasy: After missing last season with a
torn ACL, it took Nene (right) some time get
back to his athletic self. Over the past six
weeks, he has become a steady fantasy
option as he benefits from the attention to
Allen Iverson and Carmelo Anthony. He had
four games of 20 or more points in February.
His rebounding could use a boost, though.
Playing with Marcus Camby doesn't help.

e Reality: While the Nuggets would love to
figure out a way to use Iverson and Anthony
to make their offense unstoppable, the team
will need a post presence. Nene is the big
body Denver needs inside. He is shooting near
52 percent, averaging .double figures and get-
ting to the foul line regularly. He can combine
with Camby to make an intimidating defen-
sive front line, and Nene knows how to run the
floor and finish in transition.

e Winner: Reality.

‘ELEVATED



VINCE CARTER,
NETS
The Nets
star
leads the
league in



scoring since the
break, with two 40-
plus scoring
efforts, and is
shooting better
than 50 percent
from the floor dur-
ing that stretch.
He'll need to con-
tinue that because
Richard Jefferson
still could be a few
weeks away from
returning from
ankle surgery.

‘GROUNDED



DREW GOODEN,
CAVALIERS



‘| three of
“8 their first
five games after
the All-Star break,
and LeBron James’
supporting cast is
getting questioned.
Gooden isn’t help-
ing matters, with
30.6 percent
shooting in those
five games for 4.8
points a game. If he

~ continues to strug--

gle, Donyell Mar-
shall and Anderson
Varejao will have to
come up big.







ll of a sudden, it’s a race.
A Not at the bottom of

each conference’s playoff
standings, but in the Rookie of
the Year standings.

At the start of the season,
Brandon Roy’s injury problems
and a lack of playing time for
Andrea Bargnani and Randy Foye
left Adam Morrison looking like
the default win-
ner of the
award.

After letting
matters shake
out for a few
months, Morri-



-INMY OPINION — son not only has
ISRAEL - legitimate com-
— GUTIERREZ —_— petition but
inatarceoe ;
Miahinersideom ee ae a

a three-man sprint to the finish.

After missing 20 games with a
bad foot, Roy has shown why he
was one of the most coveted
guards in last year’s draft. He is
easily the most polished of the
group, and his ability to either
score or create has made Port-
land a tricky opponent this sea-
son.

__ Roy leads all rookies in scor-
ing and assists and is often the
point man in the Blazers attack,
particularly in late-game situa-
tions.

“Morrison has had some good
games, but for us, Brandon has
been the difference in about 10 to
15 games,” Blazers coach Nate
McMillan said in comparing Roy
to Morrison. “Probably three of
those games.we didn’t win, but
he was able to get us into over-
time with a shot or his play.
There have been a number of
games he has been a difference-
maker. I hope the national media
is paying attention.”

In his two head-to-head meet-
ings with Morrison, Roy out-
played his fellow Rookie of the
Year candidate, following a 15-
point, eight-rebound game on
Feb. 9 with a near triple-double
(14 points, nine assists, eight
rebounds) on Thursday.

Morrison’s shooting percent-
age (.38]) for the season probably
has dropped his standing in the
race, while Roy is getting
endorsements from some of his
distant competition.

“If I had a vote, it would defi-
nitely be Brandon,” fellow rookie
Rudy Gay of the Grizzlies said.
“He has a lot in his game right
now, and he’s going to get so
much better, so much stronger. I
like his in-between game. When
he gets the ball from free-throw
line in, it’s hard to stop him.”

Bargnani, though, is gaining
some momentum on Roy. The
No. 1 pick in last year’s draft
didn’t start getting steady min-
utes until three weeks into the
season, but he has been improv-
ing since.

In February, the 7-foot Rap-
tors reserve averaged 14.3 points
on 51 percent shooting from the
field and 48 percent from three-
point range. The Raptors went
9-3 for the month and vaulted
themselves into a healthy playoff
position.

Rapiors coach Sam Mitchell

GILBERT
ARENAS










AP PHOTOS

CONTENDERS: Battling it out for NBA Rookie of the Year are,
from top, Portland’s Brandon Roy, Toronto’s Andrea
Bargnani and Charlotte's Adam Morrison.

has helped Bargnani get used to
the physical nature of the NBA
game. Earlier this season, Mitch-
ell brought his big men together
during an off day in Denver.

Mitchell placed a basketball
under the basket and lined his big
men up in pairs. Mitchell told
one player to retrieve the ball,
while the other was assigned to
not allow it to happen. It was
supposedly done to test the
toughness of the No. 1 draft pick,
and it turned out to be a two-
hour wrestling match.

If it helps Bargnani’s inside
game match his outside game, he
could be a budding Dirk Now-
itzki.

As for this season, he’lI still
need a late push to make up for
the suddenly narrow gap
between him and Roy.

Bargnani could benefit, how-
ever, from his team’s success.
While team record doesn’t often
affect Rookie of the Year voting,
it has in the past. In the 2002-03
season, many thought the Heat’s
Caron Butler had the best rookie

WHO HAS THE EDGE?



season. But Butler still finished
third, with Amare Stoudemire
winning it over Butler and Yao

_ Ming in large part because he led

his Suns team to the playoffs that
season.

Roy not only plays for a some-
what insignificant. Blazers team,
but he is on the West Coast and
doesn’t get much national air-
time. Bargnani’s Raptors, mean-
while, have been one of the East-
ern Conference’s hottest team
and are becoming a lock for an

~ Atlantic Division title and a top-

four playoff seed.

If Roy really wants to lock up
the award, he could get his team
in serious playoff contention. No
one outside the Northwest has
probably noticed, but the Blazers
are actually within a few games
of the No. 8 seed out West.

“J try not to think about it,”
Roy said of the award. “It could
be a distraction, added pressure I
don’t need right now. The team is
doing good. People are saying,
‘playoffs.’ That’s what I’m trying
to work on.”





EASTERN
_ CONFERENCE



Despite all the talk about
Vince Carter leaving the Nets
after opting out of his con-
tract this offseason, Nets prin-
ciple owner Bruce Ratner said

his top priority would be lock- -

ing up Carter to a long-term
deal. Apparently he learned
after not attempting to re-
sign Kenyon Martin that there
can be a backlash from the
fan base. “The first thing is
intent - the intent is we want
to sign Vince,” Ratner said.
“When | came on | don’t think
| understood it well enough to
have the intent.”... Some
Orlando Magic fan has
launched firebrianhill.com.
Fortunately for his peace of
mind, coach Brian Hill hasn't
seen the website. In fact, he
has never seen any website.
Hill said he’s just starting to
figure out e-mail... . Cavaliers
forward Anderson Varejao
knows Dwyane Wade’s pain.
He dislocated his shoulder
while playing for the Brazilian
national team in 2005. “I’ve
never had anything worse
than that,” Varejao said. “it’s
the worst pain, and Wade’s
was worse than mine because
he had to leave the court [in]
a wheel chair and | walked off
the court. Wade should have
the surgery because it could
keep popping out. He could
play for a month or two and
then it can pop out again.”
Those could be sympathetic
thoughts - or the words of an
opponent who doesn’t want
to see Wade in the playoffs
this year.

WESTERN
CONFERENCE

Rockets coach Jeff Van
Gundy has seen Yao Ming
come back from injury before.
So he recognizes when his
center isn’t ready - despite
the predicted mid-March
return. “What we’ve seen in
the brief things he’s able to do
with us, you get the sense he’s
a lot further away from play-
ing NBA basketball than
maybe the timetables would
suggest,” Van Gunay said.
“He does not look comfort- .
able at all with the brace. He
does not look agile: Last year,
he looked on the cusp of
[returning]. To me, it looks
like we have problems to
solve there to get him back.”
... The Mavericks are pump-
ing Dirk Nowitzki for MVP -
whether he likes it or not. “I’m
not a big fan of that,” Now-
itzki said. “| don’t think you
should push for MVP, espe-
cially with so many games
left. | don’t think there’s an
award for midseason MVP.”

.. Despite being a few games
out of the final playoff spot in
the Western Conference,
Warriors coach Don Nelson
seems to be waving the white
flag. “I definitely feel responsi-
ble,” Nelson said. “I thought |
was going to get this team to
the playoffs, but it doesn’t
seem like I’m going to be able
to do it. | feel like | failed.”

BETTER ARGUMENT FOR THE MOST IMPROVED PLAYER AWARD, DAVID LEE OR KEVIN MARTIN?

Lee is the classic case of a player taking advantage of his first real playing opportunity. Last season, Larry
Brown didn't know what to do with Lee, starting him one day then nailing him to the bench the next. Now
that he is getting regular time - he’s not starting but getting starters’ minutes - Lee is proving his worth. He’s
averaging a double-double and leads the league in field-goal percentage because just about every attempt
is alayup or dunk. The problem with giving him the award is that he hasn't actually improved this much. He
probably could have done this last season if he played 31 minutes a game. He has always been athletic,
worked the boards hard and had a good feel for the game. All he’s doing now is displaying that regularly.

Martin got plenty of opportunities last season. He not only played in 72 games for the Kings, but started
in 41 of them and averaged better than 26 minutes a game. This year he's getting a few more minutes a
game, but it’s what he’s doing with that time that is impressive. In nine more minutes a game, he has nearly
doubled his scoring average from last season, and despite several more shot attempts has improved his
shooting percentage from 48 percent last season to 49.5 percent this season. Martin's rebounds, assists,
steals and three-point percentage are also up from last season. From a third-year player who didn’t play
big-time college basketball at Western Carolina, that’s improvement.

e The edge: |_ee was probably this good last year. Martin is the most improved.

’

H25

Guard

6-7/185

Kay

MARTIN

3p% =FI% ~——OOFF

i le 2 wy
Team G GS MPG FG% = 3p% 0S T% =F SséDEF = RPG Ss APG SPG) BPG. CF PPG Team G GS = MPG FG%



NY 55 R 309 606 = 00085 35 12 107 18 09 Ud lod 2.80 Ie SAG a) Sh %/ 405 M0 8B 8 34

Go online to view our Extras, including Heat beat writer Israel Gutierrez’s weblog and our interactive » free-throw game. A Also watch sh video of the .
festivities vetore the ae NBA champions’ opening game, view photo galleries from last season’s run to the title and download eee






7B | MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

Marquez breaks

BY KEN PETERS
Associated Press

CARSON, Calif. — Chal-
lenger Rafael Marquez broke
Israel Vazquez’s nose with a
hard right in the first round,
then took the WBC super ban-
tamweight crown when Vaz-
quez couldn’t continue after
the seventh.

Although Vazquez had
trouble breathing because of
his swollen nose, he kept
going and caught Marquez
with a left hook that sent him
to the canvas in the third
round of their bout Saturday
night.

“T was only able to breathe
through my mouth and that’s
why I was taking a lot of
shots,” Vazquez said through a
translator. “When I. came back
to my corner the last round, I
couldn’t breathe at all and I
told Freddie (trainer Freddie
Roach), that’s it.”

Marquez didn’t realize he
had broken Vazquez’s nose
and was surprised when the
referee ended the fight. Vaz-
quez immediately came over
to congratulate the new cham-
pion.

“I was surprised when he
stopped it because he had
dropped: me in the (third
round). I thought it was close,”
Marquez said, also speaking
through a translator.

Both fighters said they
would like to have a rematch.

Marquez (37-3, 33 knock-
outs) was ahead on two
judges’ cards through seven

Great

BY RICHARD ROSENBLATT
Associated Press ;

After a great day at the
racetrack, trainers Doug
O’Neill and Todd Pletcher
find themselves with the lead-
ing contenders for the Ken-
tucky Derby just two months
away. ;

On the West Coast, O’Neill
sent out Great Hunter to an
impressive l'4-length victory

-in Saturday’s Robert B. Lewis
‘Stakes at Santa Anita. The
‘colt’s winning 3-year-old
debut moved him atop this
week’s Associated Press’ Run
_. to the Roses Top 10 list.
.'.| Pletcher, meanwhile, had
‘winners galore at Gulfstream
Park in Florida. Scat Daddy’s
nose victory over Stormello in
the Fountain of Youth Stakes
moved the colt to No. 2 on the
weekly list of contenders.

Nobiz Like Shobiz, the No. 1
prospect entering the week-
end, was third in the Fountain
of Youth and dropped to No. 5
this week. Trainer Barclay
Tagg said the colt showed he
still has some growing up to
do.

“He made the race tough on
himself,” Tagg said Sunday.
“He blew the first turn and
then tried to duck in and
slipped back on the other turn.
He lost about a length each
time and he gets beat only half
a length. We have to try to get
him to come out of his shenan-
igans soon.”

Next stop for ‘Nobiz’ is the
Wood Memorial at Aqueduct
on April 7, a final prep before
the May 5 Derby. ‘

So far, Pletcher and O’Neill
have owned the road to the
Derby — Pletcher trains five
of this week’s Top 10 and
O’Neill trains two — with two
more bucking to get in.

Pletcher won five races on
Gulfstream’s card Saturday,
also taking Hutcheson Stakes
with King of the Roxy, who
moves onto the Derby trail at
No. 9.

Looking for his first Derby
' win, Pletcher’s other Top-10
horses are Ravel (No. 6) Cir-
cular Quay (No. 8) and Any
Given Saturday (No. 10).
O’Neill, looking for his first
Derby starter, also trains
Notional (No. 7), and two ris-
ing stars in Liquidity and
Cobalt Blue. He capped his
day by saddling Lava Man to a
second straight victory in the
Santa Anita Handicap.

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

BOXING | HORSE RACING



BOXING | SU



2 BANTAMWEIGHTS

MiamiHerald.com _|_ THE MIAMI HERALD



e7’s nose, takes title

STEPHEN CARR/LONG BEACH PRESS-TELEGRAM/AP



CONNECTING: Rafael Marquez, right, lands a punch to israel Vazquez during the first round of the WBC super
bantamweight bout in Carson Calif., Saturday. Vazquez had to quit after seven rounds because of a broken nose.

rounds, and the third had it
even. Vazquez is 41-4, with 31
knockouts.

“He (Vazquez) told me

right after the first round that
his nose was broken,’ Roach
said. “He wanted to stop a
couple of rounds carlier, but I

told him to suck it up because
I thought Marquez was tiring.

“He went a couple more
rounds and said, ‘I can’t do this

HORSE RACING | RUN TO THE ROSES

unter moves to top of the list

anymore.”

Marquez, from Mexico
City, weighed in at 1212
pounds. Vazquez, who was



MARK AVERY/AP

UNCHALLENGED AT FINISH: Great Hunter, ridden by ¢ orev Nakatani, crosses the finish line well ahead of the pack to win
the $200,000 Robert B. Lewis Stakes at Sarita Anita in Arcadia, Calif., on Saturday.

Merv Griffin owns Cobalt
Blue, and J. Paul Reddam owns
O’Neill’s three other Derby
prospects. -

“We don’t really know
which one is the best one yet,
which is kind of exciting,”
Reddam said.

Two important Derby
preps are set for Saturday —
the Louisiana Derby at the Fair
Grounds and the Gotham
Stakes at Aqueduct. Circular
Quay and Liquidity are set for
the 1 1/16-mile Louisiana
Derby.

New in this week’s Top 10
are Stormello and King of the
Roxy. Stormello, who was sent
cross-country to take on the
top East Coast prospects, was
gallant in defeat and moves in
at No. 4.

Out this week are Drums of
Thunder (sixth in the Fountain
of Youth) and Hard Spun, set
to race next in the Rebel
Stakes at Oaklawn Park on
March 27.

e 1. Great Hunter (Doug
O’Neill, trainer; Corey Naka-
tani, jockey): Stalked leaders

Lewis
Min ehed ;
CiSACG Wh

and won Robert B.
impressively. ..

money in all eight starts. ...
Next start: Blue Grass (April

14).... Odds: 24-1.
@ 2. Scat Daddy (Todd

ory
.



BILL DENVER/EQUI-PHOTO/AP

TAKING THE LEAD: Scat Daddy, far left, with John Velazquez aboard, pulls ahead en
route to victory in the $350,000 Fountain of Youth Stakes on Saturday at Gulfstream
Park in Hallandale Beach, Fla. Nobiz Like Showbiz, center, under Cornelio Velasquez,
was third: and Stormello, right, with Kent Desormeaux aboard, was second.

born in Mexico City and lives
in the Los Angeles suburb of
Huntington Park, weighed
2A.

Victor Burgos, stopped by
IBF champion Vic Darchinyan
in the 12th round of their fly-
weight title bout, was taken to
a hospital for precautionary
tests, ring physician Paul Wal-
lace said.

Wallace said Burgos’ vital
signs were normal, but that
“We didn’t like the way he was
responding.”

The doctor said he grew
concerned when Burgos
slumped on his stool in the
corner after the bout, but that
the fighter was conscious at
the end of the fight and still
conscious when he was taken
to the hospital.

Burgos’ knees were wobbly
and he was reeling around the
ring and couldn’t defend him-
self, so referee John Schorle
stopped the fight at41:27 of the
12th.

Darchinyan ran his record
to 28-0 with his 22nd knock-
out. He dominated the bout
with his powerful left hooks
and uppercuts, losing only one
round on just one of the three
judges’ cards.

Darchinyan rocked Burgos
with a left in the second round,
and Burgos sank to his knees _
but got up at the count of five.

Darchinyan (1112 pounds)
is a native of Armenia who
fights out of Sydney, Australia.
Burgos, from Tijuana, Mexico, ©
is 39-15-3. He weighed 11%.

Pletcher, John Velazquez):
Caught .Stormello in final
stride to win Fountain. of
Youth. ... Next start: Florida
Derby (March 31). ... Odds:
44-1 ;

e 3. Street. Sense (Carl
Nafzger, Calvin Borel): Still
waiting for 3-year-old debut.
... BC Juvenile winner worked
4 furlongs in 47.00 at Palm
Meadows on Sunday, the fast-
est of 25 works at same dis-
tance. ... Next start: Tampa
Bay. Derby (March 17) or

. Rushaway (March 24). ...
Odds: 10-1

e 4. Stormello (Bill Currin,
Kent Desormeaux): Superb
effort fell just short in Foun-
tain of Youth. ... Previous
start was a win in Hollywood
Futurity on Dec. 16.... Next
start: Santa Anita Derby (April
7).... Odds: 40-1.

e 5. Nobiz Like Shobiz
(Barclay Tagg, Cornelio Velas-
quez): Lacked strong kick in
Fountain of Youth, but still
finished a half-length back in
third. ... Won Remsen at 2,
Holy Bull at 3.... Next start:
Wood Memorial (April 7)....
Derby future odds: 8-1.

e 6. Ravel (Pletcher, Gar-
rett Gomez): Sham winner
continues to work well toward
next race.... Next start: Santa
Anita Derby (April 7). ...
Odds: 1-1.

e 7. Notional (O’Neill,
Nakatani): Won San Rafael
and Risen Star this year. ...
O'Neill says colt may be his
most talented 3-year-old....
Next start: Florida Derby
(March 31). ... Odds: 27-1.

e 8. Circular Quay
(Pletcher, Velazquez): Poised
to take huge step forward in
next race... . Son of 1995 derby
winner Thunder Gulch. ...
Next start: Louisiana Derby
(March 10). ... Odds: 12-1.

e 9. King of the Roxy
(Pletcher, Edgar Prado):
Moves onto trail with 24-
length win in 7'-furlong
Hutcheson. ... Ohio-bred was
coming off eighth-place finish
in BC Juvenile on Nov. 4....
Next start: Undecided. ...
Odds: 5-2 (mutuel field).

10. Any Given Saturday
(Pletcher, Velazquez): Sam F.
Davis winner just makes the
cut.... Next start: Tampa Bay
Derby (March 17). ... Odds:
14-1.

e Keep an eye on: Adore
the Gold, Chelokee, Cobalt
Blue, Hard Spun, Liquidity.





PAGE 8E, MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007 TRIBUNE SPORTS

In for the punch

More pictures from the ‘No Mercy’
boxing tournament on Thursday night...














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Full Text








Volume: 103 No.86



‘=. SUN, CLOUDS
ws. AND BREEZE

|
1
|

Lawsuit to have ‘no
impact’ on South
Teel Mets a mere 1

Maa SUS Le

Siow Alliance
planning to ask
Privy Council to
prevent any __
discrimination

@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

HOMOSEXUALS aim to
take their concerns to the Privy
Council if they.don’t-receive
justice from thé local courts,
says gay rights activist Erin
Greene.
| In an exclusive interview with
The Tribune, Ms. Greene said
that the Rainbow Alliance of
the Bahamas (RAB) — the
local gay rights group — is
changing its campaign strategy
in the light of a recent UK leg-
islation that prohibits discrimi-
nation against homosexuals.

“With the recent events in
England with the passing of the
Equality Act 2006 we are cer-
tain that in due time Bahamian
law will be created and/or mod-
ified to ensure that homosexuals
can participate in the develop-
ment of their country as
equals,” Ms Greene said.

The Equality Act was tabled
in the British House of Com-
mons in January, and the act is
due to come into effect in Eng-
land, Wales and Scotland in
April.

The act outlaws discrimina-
tion in-the provision of goods,
facilities and services on the
basis of sexual orientation.

Prime Minister Tony Blair
has already come under heavy
criticism from various religious
groups, particularly Catholics,

who are asking for an exemp-
tion to the law, that would con-
tinue to allow church run adop-
tion agencies to prohibit adop-
tions to homosexuals.
Adoption agencies had
warned they would close rather
than place children with gay
couples, saying that went
against their beliefs.
However, the British gov-
ernment has said there will be
no exemption from anti-dis-
crimination laws for Catholics
or any other adoption agencies.
“There is no place in our
society for discrimination.

- That’s why I support the right of

gay couples to apply to adopt

like any other couple.
“And that way there can be

no exemptions for faith-based

adoption agencies offering pub- _

lic funded services from regu-
lations that prevent discrimina-
tion,” Prime Minister Blair said.
He added: “It’s a difficult sit-
uation, but I think we have
found the right balance and a
sensible compromise.”
_ The Catholic Church in Eng-
land and Wales said it was
“deeply disappointed” that no
exemption had been offered.
Ms Greene told The Tribune
that the Equality Act had

changed the strategy of the gay —

rights campaign in the

Bahamas.

SEE page 14

AL (oda Y Majesty

Ls ISE
LINE

Hemi ta (Rel aye mars hia

Ral laCeate Mies iese Fer he 1 U0 al

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BAHAMAS EDITION



MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

THO ae

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Man suffers
— serious:

injuries in ©
dog attack

@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

A MAN was left in serious

“condition in the hospital after
-- a “vicious” dog attack over the

weekend, according to police
reports.

The police said that on Sat-
urday night a 23-year-old man

‘from the Carmichael Road area

was attacked by. dogs while

walking.

“Tt is reported that the man -

- was rescued from the dogs by a

“neighbour who came to his



@ GOVERNOR General Arthur Hanna and Dame Marguerite Pindling look te see what prizes’
they could win on Saturdyy at the Red Cross Fair, in the grounds of Government House

(Photo:Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

nuvceccccccccccccaceccucthuccsncdseccececceseuseeccssceusessncsesccaseceseecsuceduaneaesteceesacesesecencensnceasecacsscuasecssscavancouesecsuseaenseneesncessenssancessunssnsaueneaueneusuccuscaccssranssaeuacseussaascuausauesuaugeuauccacsccsacccseceusnasenaesasensaracseene se

THE PLP i ‘is “desperately —
attempting to resurrect the
bogeyman of the old UBP”
which has been long dead and
buried, the opposition FNM
said in its weekly commentary
yesterday.

The opposition said that this
was the same strategy the gov-

erning party used when it came

to office in 1992.
“They used the same tired old
propagance It did not work

then and it will not work now.
It’s a tired old myth, and the

‘Bahamian people are aware

that 10 years of FNM gover-
nance gave the lie to that line.
The UBP did not come back
then and it will not come back
now,” the party said.

The opposition said that it
proved while in office that it is

‘far more progressive than the

PLP which is progressive in
name only. :

“During the course of the
campaign the Bahamian people
will see clearly the difference
between them and us when it
comes to being progressive,”
said the party.

The opposition claimed that
one of the fundamental issues
that separates the FNM from
the PLP is the issue of democ-
ratic governance.

“Before the PLP came to
power in 1967 it promised, if

assistance on hearing loud
screams.

During the rescue, the neigh-
bour was also bitten and taken
to hospital for treatment.

However, the police said that

the man, who was initially. |

attacked, is in serious condition
at the hospital.

SEE page 14.

PLP ‘trying to resurrect UBP bogeyman’

elected, to introduce elective
and representative local gov-
ernment for the Family Islands.
In 1968 Minister of Out Island
Affairs Warren Levarity caused
to be drafted and circulated a
White Paper on Local Govern-
ment in the first step towards
fulfilment of that important
fomise. But that was as far as it
got,” the party said.

SEE page 14

necccccadececctccenevivesvesacccuseccdnecconccbsnegessecsesecouagayetenvacacncsaccqdsnnbageucuenesssavasecuebasectucctsccecqaaeneugeccaeesscacsccanscceuseacubaqcagencsaqnconcncncaavacnecsnascansendesecancccucencacenanacgunascusnaccuaaccanavauccnccaneusenelepenesegesecaeeges

’Brilanders sceptical

over ‘Master Plan’

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

THE first draft of the Har-
bour Island Master Develop-
ment Plan was met with scep-
ticism by island residents,
who felt that while it did con-
tain some good ideas, they
had not been consulted sig-
nificantly.

The master plan — a joint
venture between the architec-
tural firms of Bruce LaFleur
and Associates of Nassau, and
Kiser, Straw and Kolodner of

of Harbour Island.

A first draft was presented }
by Malcolm Martini, from the :
Ministry of Energy and the ;
Environment, and Jim Straw, a :
town planner at Kiser, Straw }
and Kolodner, himself a winter ;
resident of Harbour Island for :
: dollars in revenues.

more than 10 years.

According to Mr Straw, the :
plan is “just the beginning of :
: Business, where an industry
i; insider claimed that lack of

SEE page 14

Docks condition has no

impact on cruise ships

i Ml By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Philadelphia, was commissioned :
by the Prime Minister to }
address the future development :
: Prince.George’s Wharf has not

Tribune Business Reporter
THE condition of bollards at

negatively impacted the num-
ber of cruise ships arriving in
Nassau, the Port Controller told
The Tribune, refuting claims
that any deterioration in the
dock’s condition meant this
nation had lost thousands of

Captain Anthony Allens said
the recent article in Tribune

space at Prince George’s Wharf
and the dock’s deterioration
meant that at least five ships
had to be turned away per
week, was inaccurate.

Mr Allens said that while it
was true that cruise ships have
had to be turned away, it is
because the increasing size of
the ships - and the fact they all
request the most popular days -
Tuesdays, Fridays Saturdays
and Sundays - makes it physi-
cally impossible to accommo:
date them.

SEE sv aerpare 1 14

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(
‘starring with Eartha Kitt in the

’ the bodybuilding titles of Mr

PAGE 2, MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE




Bodybuilder Steve
arroll dies at 65

ANTHONY (Tony) Carrol,
world famous bodybuilder,
actor and perennial winner in
the individual Junkanoo cate-
gorys died late Friday at the
Princess Margaret Hospital
after a short illness. -

He was 65 years old.

Fans of the He-Man franchise
would remember his perfor-
mance as Beastman in the 1987
live action He-Man film "Mas-
ters of the Universe", but most
remember him for his fantastic
solo performances each year at
Junkanoo.

His career took off after.co-

Broadway play, "Timbuktu", in
the early 70s.

For several years after he
appeared on such television
shows as Buck Rogers, SOAP,
Kojak, Today's FBI, Alice and
Bloopers and Practical Jokes.

He costarred in six feature
films, starred in seven theatrical
productions both on and off
Broadway.

At different times he has held

America, Mr World and Mr >
Universe.

@ TONY Carroll



|g today &
nassau
freeport t 248








































rari Na ES)

the Government House grounds



@ GOVERNOR

General Arthur

Hanna hugs two

i TONY little girls
_ Carroll shown yesterday as
in full i Dame Marguerite
Beastman ; Pindling looks on
costume going: while they toured
over his part: ea _ the stalls
in the i (Photo:Felipé
Masters of the : ; Major/Tribune

Universe i. staff)

“movie.

a ais & Bowdlery
She have to Say?

© 2007 ADWORKS

ae. Sjakcnaaeoin











Red Cross Fair at Government House

@ THE Governor General Arthur Hanna tours the stalls on Saturday at the Red Cross Fair held at

ie apy

& AFTER getting his face painted this child enjoys a nice cold drink at the Red Cross fair

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THE TRIBUNE



e In brief

Entertainment
series Is
‘introduced at
Pelican Bay

PELICAN Bay at Lucaya
introduced a new entertainment
series for resort guests and
Grand Bahama residents over
the weekend.

In the next two months, Peli-
can Bay will offer art exhibi-
tions and musical performances
poolside at the resort.

The series will feature com-
plimentary performances with
choirs, steel drum performers,
violinists, rake ’n scrape bands,
and exhibitions featuring the
work of the island’s leading
artists. The shows and exhibi-
tions will take place on Friday
and Saturday nights, March 2
through April 28.

The series, started Friday
night with a performance from
the Bishop Michael Eldon High
School senior choir and dance
group.

On Saturday, Ophie and the
Boys performed Rake ’n Scrape
music.

“Pelican Bay at Lucaya is

committed to offering its guests -

experiences that they otherwise
would not have been able to
embrace while visiting Grand
Bahama Island,” said Terria
Grant, front office manager,
Pelican Bay. “This past week-
end’s experiences mark only the
beginning of our creating a myr-
iad of indigenous experiences
for our guests.”

No bank
privatisation
planned in
Venezuela

@ VENEZUELA
Caracas

FINANCE Minister Rodrigo
Cabezas said ere that the



stances, accor ae to Associated
Press.

But he added that President
Hugo Chavez would use powers
granted to him by congress to
issue a decree to strengthen the
role of financial intermediation
of private banks.

“Tt is not planned in the short
term, medium term, or long
term that the Bolivarian social-
ist revolution-would nationalise

banks of private financial insti-

tutions. Except in an unusual
circumstance that comes to con-
spire against the revolution,”
he said in a Televen television
interview.

He also said Venezuela could
maintain itself for 18 months
even if its biggest buyer of. oil,
the United States, suspended
purchases.

“If the North Americans
decide some day to ask us to
stop selling them oil ... don’t
have any doubt that our oil will
be sold somewhere on the plan-
et,” he said.

He said India is one possible
market and agreements are
already in the works to supply
China. “Toward the end of the
decade, it is likely that we will
be selling a million barrels dai-
ly of oil.”

He said there are no plans to
eliminate controls on the
exchange of foreign currency,
in place since 2003, despite com-
plaints from sectors, including
carmakers, that the controls
make it difficult to obtain US
dollars to import goods.

He defended government
plans to seize businesses found
hoarding food or speculating
with prices as the country faces
food shortages and the govern-
ment seeks to ensure items are
sold at set prices.

“Nobody likes using force,”
he said.

m@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE FNM believes there
should be limited hiring in the
public service until temporary
and contractual government
workers are regularised.

The declaration was made
by Bain and Grants Town can-
didate Dayid Jordine yester-
day.

Mr Jordine said there is an
urgent need to regularize these
persons in the system in an
effort to afford some sort of
comfort and job security.

In the past, he said, one of
the “political tools” vigorously
used by the PLP was to employ
large numbers of people near
an election in temporary gov-
ernment jobs in an attempt to
secure votes from persons, who
are easily enticed with the
prospect of obtaining a gov-

LOCAL NEWS

Party looks at public service



ernment job.

“Though the government
has a social responsibility to
provide employment for all its
people who are willing, and
capable of working, the social
responsibility should be more
geared towards providing
secure and stable employment
and entrepreneurial opportu-
nities,” Mr Jordine said.

Mr Jordine claimed that

since the PLP’s convention in :

2005, the government has
made announcements of lift-
ing the moratorium on gov-
ernment hiring to accommo-
date some 1200 or more per-

“sons.

“Tam further concerned

that many persons are work-
ing as temps or weekly in the
public service and they do
not have much to look for-
ward to in terms of financial
security if for-any reason they
are terminated, hospitalized,
incapacitated, or have
reached the age of retire-
ment,” he said.
- Mr Jordine said that he is
also concerned with weekly
workers in the public service
who are not considered suit-
able candidates for loans in
banks, which he claims is con-
tributing to the lack of self-suf-
ficiency in our communities.
Mr Jordine said his goal is

to focus on the issue of |

Zhivargo Laing opens campaign
headquarters with announcement

HUNDREDS turned out in
support of Marco City candi-
date Zhivargo Laing as he offi-
cially opened his campaign
headquarters, and outlined
numerous programmes he and
the FNM will implement to
facilitate tangible and positive
change in the lives of Marco
City residents.

Mr Laing said that the open-
ing of the headquarters was a
defining moment in his cam-
paign to give that area “better
representation in the House of

Assembly and a better gov-'

ernment for our country.”

’ “From within this headquar-
ters we are strategising not
merely to win an election but
to lift the quality of life of you,
the residents of Marco City,
Grand Bahama and the

Bahamas,” the FNM hopeful

said.
“Living in Marco City, trav-
elling throughout the con-



& ZHIVARGO ) Laing

stituency and speaking with
many of you in your homes,
the issues that concern us are
clear. These include, among

~ other things: joblessness; stag-

nant wages and household

income; illegal immigration;
high cost of living; and over-
crowded high school. .
“These are real and chal-
lenging issues that we will have
to face together. We can
address many of them. It has
not been done over the last five
years; they will be addressed
over the next five years with
me as your representative and
the FNM as your government,”

the former Cabinet Minister -

said.

He told those gathered at
the event that he did not come
empty handed and had “real
plans and programmes” for
making life in Marco City bet-
ter. These include: Freedom of
Information Act; amend Local
Government Act to give fur-
ther powers to Local Govern-
ment and an MP Reporting to
the People Act requiring MPs
to give a comprehensive annu-
al report of their duties.

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MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007, PAGE 3

employment in Bain and Grants

Town. ;
“Providing assistance in find-

ing employment where it is

needed, securing employment,
and the financial position of all,
in particular the young Bahami-
ans in our constituency,” Mi
Jordine explained.

Mr Jordine said he wished the










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prime minister and the minis-
ter of public service to bring
swift relief to Bain and Grant’s
Town through the provision of
true job creation and security.

He also implored the govern- 5
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Cabezas said such moves are
not a sign the government is
seeking to wipe out private busi-
nesses.

“The Bolivarian revolution
does not deny private property”
but owners needs are subordi-
nate to society’s best interests,
he said.

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR:

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon. J LL, D., D. Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

aoe DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

Election talk needs to be moderated

RECENTLY the first caller to The Tribune
to tip our reporters off to a murder in the
Johnson Road area, blamed the incident on
politics. He claimed that all the racial talk by
certain politicians and a particular talk show
host was inflaming the people and creating
discord in the Johnson Road area.

Residents, of which he was one, were not
only upset, but they were afraid for their safe-
ty. He did not understand how race had a
place in Bahamian politics, especially as unity
among citizens was needed to tackle so much
that was wrong in the country today — par-
ticularly crime, the reason for his call.

We don’t know if the growing racial tension
had any part in this particular murder — from
the police report we think not — but still the
caller’s fears are not misplaced.

We had several telephone calls from
Bahamians, both black and white, after Prime
Minister Christie’s interview on a local radio
talk show on February 18. They were all upset
— some were angry, some nervous for their
safety, others considered his emotive words
irresponsible.

Said one concerned citizen: “We know that
Mr Christie is a passionate speaker, we know
he is emotive, but he should be careful of the
words he uses, words that silly people can
take out of context with unpleasant conse-
quences. What I would like to know is: When
does passion become incitement?” He felt
that Mr Christie had crossed the line:

And what were the words that bothered
this Bahamian? He was very concerned about
Mr Christie referring to sinister “forces in this
country” that were pushing Opposition Leader
Hubert Ingraham back into politics. In the
course of the political campaign Mr Christie
promised to name them. The next day a gov-
ernment talk show host had latched onto Mr
Christie’s sinister “forces” and turned them
into “traitors”.

The talk show hosts tone and words over
the government radio station further inflamed
the situation, and, as one Bahamian said, if a
“traitor” is fingered he is no longer safe in
his own country. And who will be blamed for
fingering him?

The Bahamian who talked with us was also
concerned that Mr Christie had declared war
on the community with the words: “We’re
going to put faces on this, because this is a
fight for the future of this country. It is not
going to be an easy fight and as a result of
what I have seen I will spare no effort to turn
the streets into what I call a basket of infor-
mation.” He called it a “basket of informa-
tion.” By day’s end the feeble-minded had

Technical
Scholarships
available

twisted it into a basket of something more
evil, which we shall leave to the imagination of
our readers.

And so where is this taking the country?
Instead of fighting crime, some were con-
tributing to the problem by declaring war on
persons who dared to have an opposing polit-
ical opinion. Do these statements threaten

‘ democracy?. Of course, they do.

Also of concern was Mr Christie’s descrip-
tion of Mr Ingraham as the type of person
who would “take your guts out and then come
to your funeral and cry.’

. Most of our readers would have read of
the fate of St Thomas 4 Becket, Archbishop
of Canterbury. According to history his mur-
der was the result of words uttered in, pas-

. sion.

King Henry II of England and Becket were
close friends, but the day came when king and
prelate fell out because of a difference of opin-
ion. In short the king wanted complete control
over Church and State. Becket drew the line
when it came to the Church. Tension grew
between the two men. One day in the heat of
passion the king angrily uttered words to the
effect: “Will no one rid me of this turbulent
priest?”

Four knights, who heard this outburst,
interpreted them as the king’s command, and
rode post haste to Canterbury. There they
murdered the “turbulent priest” inside his
cathedral as cathedral monks chanted ves-
pers.

Most historians agree that King Henry,
despite his harsh words, did not intend for
Becket to be murdered.

That bloody incident took place in the
twelfth century. Today harsh words are as
potent as they were then and can have the
same unintended results. As the good book
says: “There is no new thing under the sun.’

The Bahamas’ election campaign has start-
ed off badly and if tensions are racheted up
any higher by too many passiofrate words, it
will end badly.

Politicians on both sides would do well to
heed the words of Bahamas Christian Council

. President William Thompson who advised

them to lay the issues before the people
instead of trying to diminish the character of
their opponents in order to win votes.

“As we head into the months of cam-
paigning remember who we are — we are one
nation. If we destroy it in our campaign trail
we will have nothing to govern. So let us be
very careful,” the president warned.

_ It is now time for passion to be moderated
and good sense to prevail.





THE TRIBUNE



A need to
address our
education

EDITOR, The Tribune

THE contract for construc-
tion of a Junior High School in
Freeport’s Heritage subdivision
has finally ‘been signed, I
believe. Construction of the
school will soon start, I hope.
The first block is yet to be laid
though, mind you.

I opted to forego attending
Fidelity’s grand opening of their
new Freeport office in order to
watch the ground breaking/con-
tract signing for the school on
TV-13. I ended up not watching
all that much. Retrospectively, I
think my decision-making may
have been flawed.

The expression “all things are
created twice” by Stephen Coy-
ey, one of my favourite authors,
has likely been used by me ona
previous occasion. I doubt,
however, that Mr Covey con-
ceived of a gestation period
anywhere near as long as is
being experienced with Her-

itage Junior High when he said °

what he did.

My understanding is that con-
struction of the school was to
have commenced in 2002, to
cater to a growing Freeport
school population and, at the
same time, separate younger,
more impressionable minds
from students with more world-
ly outlooks ‘and attitudes.

I suppose ‘construction was
not proceeded with because
“someone” dithered. Yet, “no
one” intervened. Nevertheless I
haven’t heard of “anyone” step-



iO aMb Sl

letters@tribunemedia.net






ping up to the plate and saying,
mea culpa, I am to blame. Per-
haps “everyone” feels the con-
tract signing will now have a
mantra-like effect on the com-
munity.

As a consequence of the
apparent vacillation, Jack Hay-
ward High is now colossally
overcrowded. This situation
will, no doubt, exacerbate fur-
ther this coming September.

Constructed, I understand, to
house 800 students the school
has currently home to 1700. St
George’s High, designed to

‘cater to a similar number. as

Jack Hayward, presently has an
enrolment of 1300.

Given the extent of over-
crowding persisting at Jack
Hayward and St Georges, Her-
itage Junior High will likely
already be overcrowded by the
time its doors open.

More than five years have
passed since a new school was
built on Grand Bahama. I have
heard it said that more than five
years have passed since a new
school was built anywhere in
the Bahamas.

“A mind is a terrible thing to
waste”, is a commonly used
expression, seemingly of
unknown origin. The serious
overcrowding at Freeport’s two
Government high schools may

well be contributing to the
minds of this nation’s “darlings”
being wasted to a degree.

Late last year (2006) Britain’s
Prime Minister, Tony Blair, not-
ed “Education is the most pre-
cious gift a society can bestow
on its children”. Is overcrowd-
ing depriving our children of
such a precious gift? Is it, per-
haps, contributing to the under
achievement of our youth,
including that BGCSE “D”
average which has evoked much
discussion?

Some years ago, Professor
Kader Asmi,.Education Minis-
ter of South Africa at the time,
noted “Education is not just a
fundamental right; there is
irrefutable evidence that it cre-
ates the opportunity for sus-
tainable livelihoods.” Are we

‘depriving our youth of the

opportunity to foster sustain-
able livelihoods because of pre-_
vailing overcrowded classroom
conditions?

Last month, as a contribution
to Black History month, War-
ren Washington noted.“educa-
tion is still the (great) equalis-
er”. Failing to provide our
youth with an appropriate
learning environment is tanta-
mount to failing to not giving
them due access to a proper
sharing in the country’s eco-
nomic pie.

Our youth deserve better,

MICHAEL R MOSS
Freeport, Bahamas
March 2007

Jet-ski rentals and drug offers.

EDITOR, The Tribune

MY Spring Break visitors
from Canada spent Tuesday,
February 7th, on the beach at
Paradise Island, the same day
that the 21-years-old tourist is
reported to have died after a
jet-ski related incident. Upon
their return back to our resi-

‘dence, shaking their heads they

told us of how the jet ski oper-
ators were soliciting sales of jet
ski rides beginning at $90. They
told us they could not afford
the exorbitant price and kept
shaking their heads, curious to
see if the operator would reduce
the cost. Much to their amaze-

ment, the operator then offered |

them marijuana joints, pressing
them repeatedly asking, “You
like smoke?”

I believe I am correct in
understanding that these oper-
ators act independently of
Atlantis and RIU, and that

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our Government repeatedly
ignores requests and warnings
to protect tourists from some
unscrupulous operators. How
can any responsible Govern-
ment allow this situation to
continue? How many chil-
dren, teenagers, young and
older adults are going to be
allowed to repeatedly fall into
the hands of these operators
who are pushing drugs to
underage or drunk tourists?
How is it that we are allow-
ing these same unscrupulous
operators to be handing out
joints to tourists before they
rent these jet skis? Who is to
say that this same young man
might not have accepted a
token smoke or perhaps
worse, a snort which, com-
bined with a strenuous swim,
led to his death?

It is a shame that there are
always a few individuals who
ruin business for others, and

that our Government continues
to be held ransom to “voters”.
Wake up Bahamians, if there
are operators out there who do
not practise “gouging” of
tourists, rentals of jet skis to
those who are inebriated and
offers of drugs to entice tourists
to ride these powerful
machines, come forward and
take control of this volatile sit-
uation and be leaders in your
industry.

Many of us watch in horror
and disgust at how our wonder-
ful country is progressing rapid-
ly downhill and wonder how
long it will take the tourists to
wake up and realise that The
Bahamas is not really interested
in their welfare and promoting a
safe, affordable and pleasent
destination. ‘

S A FARRINGTON
Nassau
March 2 2007

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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007, PAGE 5

Pe EE ea

The legacy of Anna Nicole Smith

VEN those of us who

have been dismayed at
the nature of the attention that
the Anna Nicole Smith affair
has brought to the country must
concede that it has a certain
bright side.

There have, of course, been
all sorts of unkind innuendoes
about the Bahamas among the
more sensationalist and unpro-
fessional American journalists,
interested in investigating every
salacious angle of the affair.
There has also probably been
some degree of annoyance
among those American visitors
who have been coming or resid-
ing here for years that the
wrong kind of compatriot may
soon be joining them here in
uncomfortable numbers, on the
Anna Nicole trail.

But overall, it is difficult not
to conclude that the whole trag-
ic affair has not been, on bal-
ance, a boon to The Bahamas.

If we are to believe press
reports, a number of new rev-
enue streams have already
opened in the wake of the
affair. It seems, for instance,
that taxi drivers and tour oper-
ators will be hosting costly pil-
grimages to the Eastern Road
for many years to come, as nos-
talgic Americans indulge a
curiosity about ‘the Anna
Nicole house”.

As for the owners of Lake-
view cemetery and perhaps

even Mt Horeb Baptist Church

PERSPECTIVES



ANDREW ALLEN

impact, there are good reasons
to believe that, unlike the last
time our country figured this
prominently in the US media, it
will emerge this time with its
reputation intact, or possibly
even enhanced.

irstly, despite the obvi-

ous questions that must
be asked about the circum-
stances that prompted it, the
most potentially damaging
aspect of this affair (the rela-
tionship between the starlet and
the man who approved her res-
idency status) has ended in a
ministerial resignation. —

Importantly, as was clear for
the world to see, the pressure
that forced Shane Gibson’s tele-
vised departure emanated
entirely from within the
Bahamas, beginning with intense
opposition scrutiny of the matter
and culminating in a major jour-
nalistic scoop by The Tribune, a
Bahamian newspaper.

The importance of these facts
and what they say for the state
of Bahamian society can hardly
be overstated. It all offers a
healthy comparison with the
‘way the matter has played out
in Ms. Smith’s country of ori-



For the image of the country,
Shane Gibson’s resignation was,
whatever the truth behind the
accusations, as positive an
outcome as could have been
hoped for under the

circumstances.

I I ETE TS

in Sandyport, they are likely to

seé an increased interest in their _

services among Americans.
But more importantly than
the immediate economic

gin.

.As.is now clear, Ms. Smith
lived a life that constituted a
trail of ‘incidents’. A whiff of
scandal seems to hang around

Â¥

many of the people with whom
she came to interact, be they

against all of the scrutiny
focused upon it. While some
‘news personalities’ made early,
predictably disparaging insinu-
ations, it has now become clear
to a USA-wide audience that
Bahamian justice is far from a
circus affair.

The somberness of court pro-



There are good reasons to
believe that, unlike the last time
our country figured this
prominently in the US media,
it will emerge this time with its:
reputation intact, or possibly

even enhanced.



doctors, lawyers or other pro-
fessionals. That the only poten-
tially scandalous association
involving a Bahamian has
resulted in a forced resignation
tells the world that Bahamian
society is not as tolerant of even
the appearance of scandal as it
once was.

As for Mr Gibson himself,
here is a very young politician
who has built a solid core of
support within his party. He
could well have a place in some
future government when all this
blows over. But for the image of
the country, his resignation was,
whatever the truth behind the

accusations, as positive an out- °

come as could have been hoped
for under the circumstances.

s for the Bahamas’
legal institutions and
its lawyers, these have been
articulately represented by
those of my colleagues who
have appeared in US. news
shows. One recalls with partic-
ular satisfaction a stern-faced
Wayne Munroe reprimanding
Sean Hannity (a rightwing bul-
ly who hosts a shallow show on
Fox) for sensationalism. ,
While proceedings are appar-
ently far from concluded, the
country’s legal system itself has
also come off respectably



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cedure here as compared with
Florida seems stark after view-
ing televised footage of the lat-
ter. Bahamian justice may be‘a
little slow and deliberate, but it
is clear that, as the proceedings
here get underway, there will
be no cameras, no loose report-
ing (on account of contempt
rules) and no courtroom audi-
tioning by judges for TV shows.

Early in the affair, a legal
‘expert’ on Court Television
described the Bahamian legal
system as ‘primitive’ for not
regarding physical paternity as
the conclusive factor in deter-
mining paternal rights. Three
weeks and six potential fathers
later (many with nakedly mate-
rialistic motivations), it is
becoming clear to many Amer-
ican viewers that fatherhood is
about more than sperm dona-
tion and that a jurisdiction that
regards fatherhood as a more
robust legal construct than mere
physical paternity is actually
more sophisticated in its
approach, not less.

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c
PAGE 6, MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

PM: ‘substat

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter




before government.
Despite concerns expressed
by the opposition party about

FREEPORT — Expressing
the depressed state of the Grand

strong optimism for the future
of Grand Bahama, Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie announced
that new “substantial develop-

TV 13 SCHEDULE

MONDAY,
MARCH 5TH

6:30amBahamas @ Sunrise - Live
11:00 Immediate Response .
12:00 ZNS News Update (Live)
12:05 Immediate Response
1:00 Legends: Jimmy Nixon

said that the island is beginning
to show signs of vitality.

Speaking at the opening of
the Fidelity Financial Centre in
Freeport on Thursday, the
prime minister said the compa-
ny’s expansion here is an indi-
cation that there is confidence
in the economy of Freeport and
Grand Bahama.






















there was gloom, now there is
energy and the elections are

ThePublic Service
Gospel Grooves

Royal Oasis resort because of
the sensitive nature of the nego-
tiations to sell the hotel.

10:00 Caribbean Newsline
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
{2m/n Immediate Response



ments” for the island are now’:

Bahama economy, Mr Christie”)

He said: “You are going to.
find there is energy here. Before’

1:30 One Cubed coming up now.

2:00 Caribbean Passport “But, I indicated that any®:
2:30 Turning Point government of the Bahamas
3:00 Ami Rushes will have to now ensure that it
3:30 Bishop Neil Ellis gets on top of Grand Bahama
4:00 The Fun Farm because it is going to move very
5:00 ZNS News Update quickly in the coming months
5:05 A Service of Thanksgiving: with huge developments going

on at the same time, and there-
fore more people will be ~ End, and its.extensive market-

6:25 Life Line ‘employed, and more will have
6:30 News Night 13 - Freeport to come into Grand Bahama to
7:00 Bahamas Tonight secure employment that will be
8:00 You & Your Money available here.”
8:30 _ Island Life Destinations Mr Christie indicated that he ,
9:00 Human Mind could not to speak about the’

The Harcourt, Development ©





1:30am Community Pg. 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
right to make last minute
programme changes!

Group is in negotiations to pur
chase the closed resort proper:
ty after an initial investment
group failed to complete the
purchase deal for $40 million.






















CABLE BAHAMA
APPOINTS EDRIS

TO OPERATIONS f
(GRAND BAHAMA |

advanced broadband networks, tod.

and Bimini.

"Edris has been a key part of our su

Nassau and obtained a Bachelor of
Business

Toastmasters programs where she

Toastmasters group. She is an avid
and has participated in bowling



Cable Bahamas Ltd, which operates one of the most

appointment of Edris Wilson to Operations Manager,
Northern Bahamas. Ms. Wilson will have primary
responsibility for the daily manag
company's operations on Grand Bahar



thrilled to appoint her to this important }
Tony Butler, President/COO of Cable Bahamas Ltd.

Ms. Wilson was educated at St. Anne s High School,
Administration from Acadia University,
Wolfville, Nova Scotia, Canada in 1991 and a MBA from
the University of Miami Executive program in 2000.

Ms. Wilson is a product of the Junior

President of the Action for Achievement Club 1095



Providence and Grand Bahama. Congrats Edris!

The closure of the property
has resulted in the loss of 1,200
jobs, and 30 per cent of the
island’s room inventory since
the hurricanes of 2004.

Mr Christie said: “The Grand

‘Bahama Port Authority could
tell you of the significant, if not,
substantial developments that
have crossed their desk enroute
:to the government of the
Bahamas, and the people of
Grand Bahama will hear about
“them inshort order.
“So, really in essence the
.doom and gloom that was the
order of day down here about
othe ‘future of Grand Bahama
«should be dispelled, that there is
every reason to look around
and see that there is an out-
standing future for the island of

Grand Bahama.”

_-Mr Christie also reminded
“residents)of current major
~ developments taking:place on
the island, including Ginn
_ Development’s $4.7 billion
mixed resort project at West

ing of the Bahamas.

The prime minister added
_ that the expansion of the con-
port, and the upcoming
ening of Associated Grocers,
id. the recent opening of a
ireless plant in Freeport, will
create an additional 700 jobs in
the Grand Bahama economy.
Mr Christie said the services
provided by Fidelity will be in
gteat demand as major devel-
opments and jobs come on
stream.
‘Fidelity Financial Centre in













nnounced the

ment of the
1a, The Abacos




segs and we were
position,” said

Science degree in



Achievement and
held the post of

fling enthusiast,
leagues in New

mG Penns gules 2



THE TRIBUNE





HM PERRY Christie greets staff at Fidelity

Freeport has combined its retail
banking divisions and merchant

bank operations at its new

premises on Poinciana and East
Mall Drives.

Serena Williams, director of
marketing and public relations
for Fidelity Group of Compa-
nies, said the Freeport opening
is the second of six planned for
the Bahamas.

. financial institution in the

Bahamas to offer both personal
and investment banking prod-
ucts and services in One conve-
nient location.

To mark the official opening,
Fidelity is giving a special pro-
motional opportunity to people
opening accounts through April 6.

Persons opening a CD with
$1,000 will get a 1 percent bonus
interest rate for the life of the

CD. Those opening loan, sav-
ings, checking or investment
accounts will be entered to win
weekly cash of $100, and a
grand prize jackpot of $1,000 at
the end of the promotion. -
Fidelity, which initially
opened in the Bahamas in 1978,
has also opened similar financial
institutions in the Cayman
Islands and the Turks and
Caicos Islands since 1980.

. consequences.

Ms Williams said it is the only

Lecture on future of education

MEMBERS of the Coalition for
Education Reform, comprising rep-
resentatives of major business and
labour organisations, will make pre-
sentations on the 22-page report
entitled, “Bahamian Youth: The
Untapped Resource”.

The report focuses on *he unac-
ceptable level of achievement
among school leavers and con-
cludes that failure to address the
education crisis will produce grave



However, the report said that
there was eause for optimism: while
the solution is complex, it is possi-
ble:to begin to address the issues.

For further information, contact
The Research Unit at telephone
326-4501/2. The lecture is open to
the public and free of charge.



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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007, PAGE 7





In brief

US territory
in contempt
over prison

violations

@ PUERTO RICO
San Juan

A FEDERAL judge has
threatened sanctions after find-
ing the US Virgin Islands gov-
ernment in contempt of court
for the fourth time in 12 years
for failing to improve care for
mentally ill prisoners awaiting
trial, according to Associated
Press.

US District Judge Stanley
Brotman, in a ruling dated
Thursday, warned he would
impose daily fines against the
US Caribbean territory in two
months unless it upgrades treat-
ment of mentally ill inmates at

' two jails. The Bureau of Cor-
rections must also allow a new
inspection of an annex where
the inmates are housed.

The order stems from a class
action lawsuit filed in 1993 by
the American Civil Liberties
Union against the three-island
chain’s government for what it
said were abuses in the Central
Justice Complex and CJC
Annex in St Thomas. Charges
ranged from poor sanitary con-

ditions to abuse of mentally ill’

inmates.

The court declined to impose
sanctions for the last three con-
tempt orders with the expecta-
tion that “hazardous condi-
tions” would be fixed, according
to Brotman.

A spokesman for the territo-
ry’s new governor referred calls
for comment to Acting Attor-
ney General Vincent Frazer.
Frazer, who was nominated by
Governor John deJongh Jr after
he took office about two
months ago, could not be
reached for comment.

While acknowledging that
deJongh’s administration was
young, Brotman said they will
still be obligated to meet all of
the commitments made by pre-
decessors over the past 12 years
and “must suffer the conse-

quences of the government’s

past failures.”
. A correctional medicine
expert has toured the St
Thomas facilities at least twice
over the past two years and
found the Bureau of Correc-
tions has consistently failed to
provide adequate mental health
services to ill inmates as man-
dated by previous court orders.
The expert, forensic psychi-
atrist Jeffrey Metzner, report-
ed the annex did not have prop-
er mental health policies in
place and the designated unit
for ill prisoners was “danger-
ously understaffed and over-
crowded."

Venezuelan
communists
resist single
socialist party

@ VENEZUELA
Rio Chico

IT shares the Marxist ideals

espoused by President Hugo
Chavez, but Venezuela’s Com-

munist Party is resisting his call

to fold dozens of allied political
organisations into a single party,
according to Associated Press.

At a meeting Sunday to
' decide their political fate, many
communists said they fully sup-
port Chavez but aren’t ready to
relinquish their 76-year history
as an independent party.

“The Communist Party is not
dissolving. That’s for sure,
although the decision isn’t offi-
cial yet,” said Nestor Ramos, a
25-year-old who traveled 14
hours by bus to join party
activists and leaders in the
closed-door meeting at a sea-
side retreat just east of Cara-
cas. j

Chavez has already disband-
ed his own party, the Fifth
Republic Movement, to make
way for the United Socialist
Party of Venezuela, which is
_ intended to replace a long list of

pro-Chavez parties. While most
parties have swiftly agreed, the
Communist Party and a second
pro-Chavez party, Podemos,
have been holdouts.

The Communist Party’s red
flag, bearing a hammer and
sickle, flew outside an auditori-

. um Sunday while nearly 1,000
attendees began the day’s meet-
ing singing folk songs by artists
including Cuba’s_ Silvio
Rodriguez.

Some wore T-shirts embla-
zoned with pro-Chavez slogans,
and party members stressed they
wholeheartedly back Chavez.
But an attachment to the par-
ty’s traditions and ideology has
made the idea of giving it up
hard to swallow for many.



Bahamas visitor looks back

on his James Bond legacy

@ By ANASTACIA MOREE
Tribune Feature Reporter

MANY Bahamians may be
familiar with the James Bond
franchise, especially as signifi-
cant parts of the latest edition,
Casino Royale, were filmed in
Nassau. What many may not
know, however, is that several
other James Bond films were
also shot, not only in New
Providence; but also in the
Family Islands.

Taking advantage of the
country’s spectacular ocean
views, Thunderball, the sixth
movie in the franchise, star-
ring Sean Connery, filmed
many of its underwater scenes
in Staniel Cay, Exuma.

Something else that
Bahamians may not know is
that the grotto in the film was
discovered by one Paul Wag-
ner in 1959. Celebrating his
40th wedding anniversary in
the Bahamas, Mr Wagner,
who is staying at Atlantis, said
that he found the grotto while
on a fishing trip on the Island
of Exuma in Staniel Cay.

The alert 70 year old said
that while travelling on Staniel
Cay with his brother and a few
friends, he noticed a rock pile
in the harbour, and felt he had
to explore it.

"We chartered a sailboat out
of Nassau, sailed to the Exu-
mas and worked our way
down to Staniel Cay," said Mr
Wagner.

According to Mr Wagner at
that time there were only two

persons living on Staniel Cay,
an old man in his late fifties,
and a young woman who he
thinks was the man's wife.

While in the harbour Mr
Wagner said he noticed an odd
pile of rocks.

"After noticing the pile, an
hour later we started to swim

-back to the boat when I

noticed an opening between
two large rocks. Immediately I
swam towards it. After turn-
ing to the left, then to the
right there was this bright light
that shone brightly from with-
in that lit up the cave. It was
the most beautiful thing that I
have ever seen in my life. This
cove was gorgeous and unbe-
lievable," he said.

Mr Wagner said that after
dinner that night he told the
owner of the restaurant and
motel about his discovery and
to his surprise the owner did
not even know about the grot-
to.

"I was surprised that the
owner of the restaurant did
not even know about this
place, how could he not know
about this beautiful place that
existed on this island,” he won-
dered.

Mr Wagner said that
although the owner had no
knowledge about this discov-
ery, a native had told him that
something had to have been
down there because a young
goat had fallen into the hole.

Mr Wagner said the owner
had asked him for advice as to
what he could do to attract

@ PAUL Wagner

people to Staniel Cay. "Are you
kidding me? You have a gold
mine here! " Mr Wagner told
him.

Mr Wagner said that after
seeing the movie previews he
noticed that the cave he had dis-
covered was a scene in the
James Bond movie.

At the time of his discovery,



(Photo: Davinia Whitlock-Bullard)

Mr Wagner said he was 27 years
old, now 43 years later the dis-
covery is still clear in his mind.

"T still remember as if it was,
just yesterday,” Mr Wagner

said.

Mr Wagner, who is visiting
the Bahamas for the fourth
time, said he's a part of Bahami-
an history. He plans another

visit.

"T will be coming back to the
Bahamas again. | think that this
place is one of the most beauti-
ful places in the world.” .

After spending two weeks in
the Bahamas the seventy year
old, with his wife Mildred, is
leaving to return to their home-
town in Kingsville, Maryland.

ow details announced

SATURD

Neg

March 10th
ANTIQUE AUTO CLUB OF THE BAHAMAS

celebrating our 20th. Anniversary



@ MEMBERS of the Antique Auto Club's show committee
busy planning details for the upcoming show on March 10 are
(I-r) Roland Ferguson, Murray Forde, Peter Armstrong,
president and chairman, and Michael Ford.

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

ipods iTunes

anniversary

cy we 3 EJ E 4

Share your news

‘| The Tribune wants to hear

(Photo: Jim LaRoda).

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MEMBERS of the Antique
Auto Club of the Bahamas,
started in 1987 by six men, are
busy planning the Club's 20th
anniversary with an antique car
show and steak-out to be held
at Arawak Cay (the fish fry
area) on March 10 between
noon and 5 pm.

‘The club now has a mem-
bership of 52, but the organisers
are looking for owners of vehi-
cles 15 years and older, who
may not be members of the
club to participate by displaying
their vehicles and competing in
the judging for the trophies that
will be awarded in various class-
es

The Club has adopted a local
definition of antique as being
"a vehicle 20, at least, years
old". This year, however, a sep-

NASSAU REPAIR SHOP

\

arate class of "Almost
Antique" is being added for
vehicles between 15 and 20
years old. gama

Murray Forde, chairman of
last year's 2006 Show, explained
that "last-year a few owners of
very nice cars that were over 15
years old came to the show, but
unfortunately we did not have a
class for them to compete.

“We know,” he said, “that
there are a number of nice vehi-
cles between the ages of 15 and
20 years old on the island —
and in the Family Islands — so
I suggested we introduce this
extra class to encourage those
owners to come out. After all,
they will be antiques before
long.

"We will also have a few oth-
er surprises," added Peter Arm-

strong, president and chairman
of the 20th anniversary show,
"including various raffle prizes
and one that you will have to
be there to find out about. We
are hoping to make this a mem-
orable event to celebrate our
20th anniversary".

The show raises funds. for
charity through sponsorships
and the sale of steak and chick-
en dinners. Tickets, still at the
low cost of $10, are available
from any Club member. The
ticket includes a stub that enti-
tles every purchaser to cast a
vote for their favourite car, from
which the People's Choice
awards are decided. This year
the beneficiary of the funds will
be "Every Child Counts", a
school for children with special
needs in Abaco.



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PAGE 8, MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





.

Resident claims victimisation by
officials in Ministry of Housing

@ By BRENT DEAN

A RESIDENT of Pride
Estates alleges that she is being
victimised by senior officials in
the Ministry of Housing.

Faye McKenzie of Pride
Estates came to The Tribune in
January to speak publicly on
the poor workmanship that left
her house uninhabitable.

When The Tribune first visit-
ed her home, the defects were
obvious and numerous. Wall
tiles were uneven, the wood
used in the home seemed old
and putty was used to cover
cracks and defects all over the
house. However, these defects,
though numerous, were small
by comparison to the effects of
a flood that raged through her
home.

The flood occurred when the
water was turned on in the area.
Mrs McKenzie thinks that the
water pipes in her home were
never sealed. Other homes built
by the same contractor, suffered
the same fate.

Mrs McKenzie had to hire a
new contractor to tear down the
sheet rock walls of her home,
as mould infestation resulted
from the flood. She also had to
remove the wooden cabinets
from her kitchen and pull up all
of her floor titles because they
had been destroyed by the
flood.

After The Tribune article, the
Ministry began to cooperate
with Mrs McKenzie, in order to
address the mess that resulted
from the poor workmanship of
the contractor that it had hired
to build her home, and the inad-
equate inspection effort by the
ministry, which passed this
home at every stage of its con-
struction. ;

Around this time, Minister

FAL

| The Tribune

com-

Wisdom invited all
plainants in government subdi-
visions to bring their housing
problems to him, so that he
could have them resolved.

Mrs McKenzie went to Mr
Wisdom, and according to her,
he said that she should bring
the estimates for repairs to’him,
and he would authorise the
funds.

The ministry initially for-
warded more than $10,000, in
numerous cheques, to start
repairs on the house.

However, Mrs McKenzie dis-
covered additional defects in
the home. The sewer exhaust
pipes, that were to have extend-
ed through the roof to the out-
side, were only extended into
the ceiling’'— meaning that the
foul odour would have filled the
home;.a broken toilet was
installed in the home; electrical
wiring needed to be changed;
and no telephone or cable wires
were ever installed in the home
— just to mention some of what
she has now uncovered.

These defects, and other
effects of the flood — and the
general poor workmanship —






meant that additional funds
were needed so that Mrs
McKenzie and her family could
finally move in to their home.

Nearly $23,000 more would
be needed to finish the repairs,
Mrs McKenzie said.

Mrs McKenzie said her prob-
lems with receiving these addi-
tional funds started when she
bypassed Housing’s Permanent
Secretary Leila Greene, and
again took her frustrations to
Mr Wisdom.

Mrs McKenzie said the min-
ister informed her that he had
already signed off on the
cheques, and it was now up to
Mrs Greene to complete the
process so thai they could be
released.

Mrs McKenzie said that she
again went to Mrs Greene, who
told her that she was unaware
of any cheques for her.

When asked about the funds
for Mrs McKenzie, Mrs Greene
told The Tribune that she could
not make any comments, as she
was not aware of any funds in
this matter.

This run-around so upset Mrs
McKenzie that she took her



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Bank is pleased to announce the following appointment:



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concerns to the Prime
Minister’s office.

According to Mrs
McKenzie, Prime Minis-
ter Christie apologised
for what had happened
to her and assured her
that he would assist.

Mr Wisdom _ then
assured her that she
would receive the funds.

Mrs McKenzie said
that Mr Wisdom signed
off for her to receive the
new cheques, and she
gave them a week to
have them ready. How-
ever, to date, she and her
family are still unable to
get the funds needed to
complete their home and
live a peaceful life.

Mrs Greene, who,
according to Mr Wisdom
was to have the funds,
claimed she is unaware
of the matter.

Senior aides to the
Prime Minister urged
Mrs McKenzie not to go
to the press, as, they said,
this matter could be
resolved without further
embarrassment to the ministry
and the government.

Authority

Sources claim that Mr Wis-
dom has no authority over
senior bureaucrats in the Min-
istry of Housing. Although he
makes requests, and holds the
title of Minister, according to
the sources, it is the civil ser-
vants who run the show.

Currently, there is a police
investigation into the workings
of the Ministry of Housing,
Also, homeowners in various
government subdivisions have



M NEVILLE Wisdom has urged residents with
complaints to bring them to him

complained to numerous media
outlets — both print and broad-
cast — about the inadequate
inspection process at the min-
istry, which allows homes to be
passed at every stage with glar-
ing defects.

‘Numerous homeowners have
also complained about the high
rates of mortgage that are
charged by the Mortgage Cor-
poration for homes that are
obviously: worth a fraction of
what is being charged.

Mrs McKenzie’s mortgage is
$875 a month over a period of
26 years. This amounts to near-
ly $275,000 for a modest: sized
home, on a five thousand
square foot lot. Mrs McKenzie

suspects that these
homes cost no more that
$108,000 to erect. This
raises the question as to
why some government
“low-cost” houses, cost
so much. /

The stress over this
ordeal has started to

health. She is constantly
anxious and has not
been able to spend
enough time with her
daughter, because she is
back and forth seeking
justice from a less than
concerned ministry.

She is also forced to
continue to pay rent,
although she should
have been in her home
months ago. The min-
istry paid one month of
her rent, and, it was
claimed, agreed to pay
her rental fees until her
home was completed.
However, to date no
additional cheques have
been forwarded.

Mrs McKenzie
declared that she will not
stop until she receives the funds
she requires for her home.

Nor is she afraid of the con-
sequences of challenging the

‘powerful. For her, her cause is

not political, but merely a mat-
ter of fairness.

She said that the ministry
offered her a new home. How-

ever, she said she does not trust |

the “dangers” that may lie
beyond other walls. This suspi-
cion appears justified based on
the number of complaints that
have been made about the qual-
ity of work in various govern-
ment subdivisions.

Up to press time, Mr Wisdom
was unavailable for comment.

Two men are sought in

connection with murder







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POLICE are searching for
two young men in connection
with murder charges.

Twenty-nine-year-old Ricardo
Edgecombe, also known as “Peb-

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007, PAGE 9



Veco omer |
Bahamians have

their say on Anna
Nicole Smith

By Tamara Ferguson

ALREADY a hot topic inter-
nationally, the Anna Nicole
Smith affair is expected to con-
tinue to hold the headlines with
the paternity of her five-month-
old daughter the next issue to
be settled following her burial
Friday in a local cemetery.

Since the death of her son,
Daniel, in September last year,
the paternity battle and then
her tragic death, the Anna
Nicole Smith saga continues
with the question still to be set-
tled as to who gets baby Dan-
nielynn and who owns the East-
ern Road home, “Horizons”, in
which she lived until her death.

Yesterday, in an interview
with The Tribune, some
Bahamians shared their views
on the new controversies sur-
rounding the former Trimispa
spokeswoman’s death.

THE BURIAL

Former Playboy Playmate,
Anna Nicole Smith was found
dead in a hotel room in Florida
last month.

Her death was an interna-
tional shock as her son Daniel
had just died five months earli-
er at her bedside in Doctor’s
Hospital, Nassau. An inquest
into his death is pending.

There has been much contro-
versy following the late celebri-
ty’s death, as both her mother
and lawyer-companion battled
in court over the custody of her
remains and her final resting
place.

Dennis Whylly, a carpenter,
agreed that Ms. Smith should
be buried in The Bahamas next
to her son.

“IT think it is what Anna
Nicole would’ve wanted. It
angers me to. see the way
they’re fighting over her body,”
he said.

Lisa Russell, an education
major, said, “I understand that
Anna Nicole’s mother wants to
bury her daughter with the rest
of her relatives, but she also
needs to consider her daugh-
ter’s wishes.”

Virgie Arthur, Anna Nicole’s
estranged mother and Howard
K Stern, Ms. Smith’s lawyer-
companion, and one of the men
claiming that he is the father of
her baby girl, battled in court
for custody of Ms. Smith’s
remains.

A judge ordered that a court-
appointed guardian of Ms.
Smith’s baby be awarded cus-
tody of the remains.

Although it was confirmed
that Ms Smith would be buried
in Lakeview cemetery in the
Bahamas, her mother, Virgie
Arthur, fought to the very
morning of the funeral to stop
the burial. As a result funeral
services were delayed by 45
minutes. Crowds waiting out-
side booed Mrs Arthur when
she arrived at the church.

Keisha Sanders, a teacher,
said that Ms Smith’s mother is
continuing to appeal the ruling
for her daughter’s remains
because she feels that if she
wins this case, she will stand a
better chance of winning the
battle for the baby.

On the other hand, Ken
Bullard, a computer engineer,
said that Mrs Arthur has a right
to fight for her daughter,
although some may say that she
: is being selfish.

“She wants to start a compe-
tition with Mr Stern,” Ms
Sanders said.

Steven Rolle, a jitney driver,
said that if Ms Smith is buried
here, the Bahamas would be
further promoted through
advertising.

“It is also best that Ms Smith
be reunited with her son,” he
said.

THE BABY

Dannielynn Hope, daughter
of the late celebrity, continues
to be at the heart of a major
controversy battle regarding her
paternity and the possible for-
tune that she is expected to
inherit from her mother’s estate.

Larry Birkhead, a photogra-
pher and former boyfriend of
the late celebrity, Howard K.
Stern and Virgie Arthur are all
fighting fer custody of the baby.

Alex Pinder, a sales clerk said



ANNA Nicole Smith
(Photo: AP archive)

side,” Mrs. Pinder said.

Law and Criminal Justice
major, Monica Lewis, said that
in her opinion Ms Smith’s moth-
er is primarily interested in
financial gain.

“She and Anna Nicole were
never really close,” Ms Lewis
said.

On the other hand, Brandon
Cooper, an electrician, said that
the baby should be raised by
her grandmother, Mrs Arthur.

“My grandmother led me ina
positive direction. After all of
this controversy is over, that
baby is going to need some pos-
itive direction,” he said.

According to Stephanie
Miller, a teacher, the most
important issue concerning the
baby is that she is well taken
care of emotionally, not just
financially. ;

“However, whoever is proven
to be the father must realize
that money is not the main issue
here, but the well being of the
child,” she said.

Marilyn Sturrup, a medical
assistant said that Larry Birk-
head. seems to have positive
interests, rather than financial

ain.

“Mr Birkhead, although not
given a chance, seems as if he is
willing to do the right thing,”
Ms Sturrup said.

Dino Pratt, a bank teller, said
that a paternity test should’ve
been taken a long time ago
before the issue got out of hand.

“T hate to see the innocent
baby in the middle of all of
this,” he said.

HORIZONS

At the time of her death, Ms
Smith was also fighting a court
battle with Ben Thompson to
claim the million dollar home
on the Eastern Road in New
Providence.

The legal battle continues and
the home has become a popular
site for many tourists, who visit
the house, taking photos.
Reports also state that tour
guides and taxi drivers have
made profits from showing off
the house. ,

Vera Rolle, an insurance
agent said that it is amazing how
much money taxi drivers and
tour guides are making over
Horizons.

“This house has been an issue
for far too long,” she said.

Charles Thompson, a restau-
rant manager, said that if Ms
Smith claimed to own the home,
her lawyers need to provide the
evidence.

Defence Force Officer Mar-
garet Smith said she is con-
cerned as to why Anna Nicole
didn’t resolve this controversy
with Ben Thompson by provid-
ing evidence that she was the
rightful owner of the house.

“Everyone knows that you
cannot rely on someone’s words
when it comes to a million dol-
lar home like Horizons. What
was she thinking?” Mrs Smith
asked.

THE MEDIA COVERAGE

The Anna Nicole Smith saga
has caught the attention of both
the local and international
media.



close embrace, the internation-
al media further developed a
thirst for coverage in the
Bahamas.

For the last two weeks, the
Bahamas could be seen on
MSNBC, FOX News and CNN.

During the hearing on Mon-
day in the Supreme Court on
Bank Lane, countless media
groups were present and set up
camp to capture the media fren-
zy.

Kelly Smith, a nursing major,
said that the international cov-
erage has been positive for the
country.

“However, I am questioning
whether the Bahamian media
would’ve been afforded this
kind of coverage if this issue
was taking place in the US.”

Photographer Kevin Rolle,
said that during the hearing in
the Supreme Court on Monday,
it was unbelievable the way
reporters and photographers
were eager to catch a glimpse of
Larry Birkhead and Virgie
Arthur.

“T feel that some of the
reporters were in some way,
very unprofessional,” she said.

On the other hand, Tanya
Lockhart, a waitress, said that
the media coverage has
increased tourist arrivals to the
country as many tourists want
to get involved and be a part of
the excitement.



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PAGE 10, MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





IN order to “advance a more
permanent peace process” and
to prevent their rearmament,
José Miguel Insulza, Secretary
General of the Organisation of
American States, has called on
the Colombian government to
strengthen its programmes to
reintegrate demobilised mem-
bers of the United Self-defence
Forces of Colombia into soci-
ety.

In the process he thanked the
Bahamas and other countries
for its contributions that showed
“the breadth of support” for
OAS efforts in Colombia and
provided the backing to move
the process forward.

{

Funeral held for Dr George White



agency.

(AML/CFT).

‘Compliance.





Required Skills:

qualifications:

communication skills

is offered.



Regional Manager
Human Resources
Caribbean Banking
Royal Bank of Canada

RANE eyecare Rue tlt

RBC Royal Bank of Canada
is presently considering applications for

Compliance Manager -
Bahamas

As Compliance Manager, you will be responsible for the
overall administration of the Bahamas Compliance
Department. Your responsibilities will include the following:

¢ Implementing consistent and integrated Anti-Money
Laundering and Counter Financing of Terrorism
(AML/CFT) and Compliance Management policies and
processes to ensure consistent compliance by all staff
with the local laws of jurisdiction.

© All Legal, Regulatory and Policy Compliance ensuring
overall Regulatory Compliance.

© Serving as Compliance Officer/Money Laundering Report
Officer (MLRO) - determining appropriate instances for
filing suspicious/unusual transaction reports to relevant

e Serving as a Liaison Officer with all Regulators including

- but not limited to The Central Bank of the Bahamas, The
Financial Intelligence Unit, Internal Audit etc. Monitoring
all regulatory requests and requirements and tracking
Internal Audit issues relative to AML and Compliance.

® Serving as a Liaison Officer with any External Legal
Counsel and, monitoring all litigation involving the bank.
Preparing regular reports as to the status of any litigation.

© Providing advice to designated Compliance Officers in
branches/units and ensuring that each adheres to and
implements compliance policies and procedures.

e Staff training, awareness on the prevention of money
laundering, fraud and Counter Financing of Terrorism

¢ Ensuring that policies and procedures in respect of Privacy
and Confidentiality are understood and implemented.

® Keeping abreast of all new legislation and policy
developments within the jurisdiction which affect

As Compliance Manager, you have previous experience in
a compliance role with a sound knowledge of effective
management practices. Along with having a strong sense |
of responsibility you are extremely self-motivated, have a
strong work ethic and promote the overall development
of employees. You are a team player, able to collaborate
with all your partners and committed to relationship
building. You have demonstrated results on the execution
of aggressive action plans. You are proactive.

The successful candidate should possess the following
© Well developed organizational, interpersonal and

e Proven leadership, analytical and decision making skills
© The ability to achieve results and build relationships

e Bachelors Degree in law, finance, banking or related field
¢ At least 3-5 years relevant experience

© Microsoft Office skills (Word, Excel, Power Point, Outlook)
A competitive compensation package (base salary & bonus)
commensurate with relevant experience and qualifications

Please apply by March 9, 2007 to:

Bahamas Regional Office
P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, N.P, Bahamas

Via fax: (242)328-7145
Via email: bahcayjp@rbc.com

According to the OAS web-
site, in presenting to the Per-
manent Council the eighth
quarterly report of the OAS
Mission to Support the Peace
Process in Colombia (MAPP,

by its Spanish acronym), the.

Secretary General stressed the
importance of the demobiliza-
tion and reintegration of the
United Self-defence Forces of
Colombia (AUC) as an essen-
tial component of the peace
process. He reaffirmed that the
OAS remains committed to
building on this effort and to
supporting the people and insti-
tutions of Colombia in any
peace initiatives they are willing

































































to move forward. The process
that demobilized 31,689 former
combatants ended a few months
ago, Insulza noted.

The Secretary General high-
lighted OAS efforts in the veri-
fication and demobilization
process and the dismantling of
the illegal combatants’ military
structure, noting that through
the MAPP “we have verified
that armed structures that have
not been demobilized still
remain, and even though these
are numerically fewer, they are
a cause for concern, both for
the Colombian government and

- for the OAS.” He added that it
‘ is not possible to guarantee 100



per cent demobilization. He
said this process has given rise
to two phenomena: “First, that
there are people who refuse to
be included in the demobiliza-
tion process; and second, the
appearance of new ‘emerging
bands’ of groups that, having
been demobilized, tend to take
up arms again.”

Insulza also underscored the
efforts underway to try to estab-
lish peace talks between the
Colombian government and the
National Liberation Army
(ELN), and lamented the
breakdown of negotiations with
the Colombian Armed Forces
(FARC) in terms of actions

A FUNERAL filled with |

musical renditions and tributes

was the final send-off for Dr ;
George White at the weekend
at St Matthew's Anglican ;
Church, where he was later laid:
to rest in the church's,ceme- .:

tery.

those Bahamians that came
back home after studying med-
icine and helped began the

. track of nation-building.

Dr White was the first ;
Bahamian to be appointed as :
senior medical officer at
Princess Margaret Hospital.
Also, when television was
being envisioned for the
colony, Dr White served as

chairman of the Broadcasting

Corporation of the Bahamas.
Special tributes were

brought by friends Thomas
Robinson and Anthony

White. Rector of St
Matthew's Parish Rev James
Moultrie delivered the eulugy.

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Archbishop Drexel Gomez
hailed Dr White as one of :






conducive to a humanitarian
agreement.

The decision to destroy all
the weapons handed over dur-
ing the demobilization of the
AUC represents an important
step, said the Secretary Gener-
al, who reaffirmed OAS tech-
nical and financial support in
this effort as well as in the full
verification of the process. He
backed the government’s deci-
sion to neutralize instances of
rearmament that have been ver-
ified, especially in the depart-
ments of Cérdoba, Caqueta,
Casanare and the Alta Guajira
zone.

The Secretary General

Ree Oa leo. ere ae
ahamas thanked for role in OAS

expressed his appreciation for
contributions received from
The Bahamas, Brazil, Cana-
da, Chile, Spain, the United
Sates, Holland, Ireland, Mex-
ico, Norway, Sweden, Thai-
land and Korea, which he said
show “the breadth of support”
for OAS efforts in Colombia
and provided the backing to
move the process forward.
Insulza also recognized the
“confidence and deference”
demonstrated by the Colom-
bian government in granting
the OAS Mission to Support
the Peace Process a three-year
extension to continue its
efforts.

Motivational speaker
developing new
- programme for
primary children

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE

FOR Spence Finlayson, Pres-
ident and CEO of The Phoenix
Institute, motivational speaking
is a calling that has allowed him
to help others realise their true
potential.

‘Mr Finlayson has been
involved in motivational speak-
ing for nearly 20 years, starting
in 1988 after leaving his job as
an advertising sales consultant
for BaTelCo. After travelling
the Caribbean for the past sev-
eral years as a motivational
speaker, Mr Finlayson has
returned home to continue his
calling. According to Mr Fin-
layson, the younger brother of
Alphaeus “Hawk” Finlayson,
since being back home for over

a year, local response has been -

overwhelming.

Mr Finlayson currently does
motivational speaking, in house
training for several local com-
panies and government, agen-
cies. m3 :

"My passion is really just
speaking to groups and individ-
uals and helping them realise
true greatness in life and I
always let people know that it is
not where you start off in life,
but it is where you end up and
your past does not equal your
future. Your past is just that,
your past," Mr Finlayson said
while speaking with The Tri-
bune on Friday.

Mr Finlayson said that since
1993, he had been based in the
Cayman Islands as a motiva-
tional speaker.

“I was working for BaTelCo
in Florida selling yellow pages
advertising and I met some peo-
ple-who thought I had an abili-
ty to be a motivational speaker.
I did a few programmes with
them in the US and learned the
business from them and that’s
how it all started,” he explained.

“In 1988 I came home and

oo \

did the first public session at
the old Ambassador Beach
Hotel. I have conducted pro-
grammes from St. Croix in the
US Virgin Islands straight on
down to Aruba,” he said.

“The response was phenom-
enal and for the fist time they
saw a Caribbean person doing
motivational speaking. Prior to
that it would have been persons
from the US and Canada,” he
said. Mr Finlayson said that he
travelled from his base in the
Cayman Islands _ to St. Croix,
St. Kitts, St. Vincent and the
Grenadines, St. Lucia, Antigua
and Barbuda, Aruba and
Jamaica among others. Mr Fin-
layson said that while traversing
these islands his company was
named “Motivation Interna-
tional.”

“The reason for the name
change,” he said, “is that I have
expanded the things that I do.
Rather than just motivational
speaking and training it’s
become a full institute where I
conduct in-house training. I
have always been fascinated
with mythology and the phoenix
bird is the inspiration for my
institute. What it represents is
rebirth a metamorphosis and a
positive change.”

Mr Finlayson said he is cur-
rently developing a programme
for primary school students to
help develop other speakers.
even if they do not want to be
motivational speakers, but to
help them realise their full.
potential in life.

“The joy that I get is when
people stop me on the street to
this day and they quote verba-
tim something I said back in
1988 and:1989 and that impress-
es,” he said. Mr Finlayson said
he also about to release a new
recording soon and a second
book entitled, “Phoenix Ris-
ing,” due for release by the end
of the year.

.

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THE TRIBUNE








ir Albert [. Miller :
Chairman and President
FOCOL HOLDINGS LTD.

UNAUDITED FINANCIAL REPORT AS AT OCTOBER 31, 2006

MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007, PAGE 11.



le Gn

9) 4 e) Sal ea ENDED ere 31, 2006 iis Une

their continued confidence in our company. We look forward to continued succes

hah c

UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET AT OCTOBER 31, 2006












34-Oct-06
ASSETS (Unaudited)
CURRENT ASSETS:
Cash ‘ $ 9,371,608
Accounts receivable, net 18,595,989
Inventories 16,627,127
Investments ‘ 424,500
Prepaid expenses and sundry assets 572,723
Total current assets 42,591,947
NON-CURRENT ASSETS:
* - Property, plant and equipment, nel 45,842,894 |
Intangible assets , 11,547,936
57,390,830
$99,982,777
$ 5,697,089

24,496,346

‘ Total current Hlabilities
NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES:
Long-term debt
Total liabiities
SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY:
Share capital
Preference shares
. Contributed capital
x : Revaluation surplus
Total shareholders’ equity 52,227,303
TOTAL $90,982,777

UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF INCOME
THREE MONTHS ENDED OCTOBER 31, 2006



34-Oct-08

REVENUES : ‘ $ 73,390,201

COST OF SALES (63,493,960)

Gross profit 9,896,241

: Qtherincome 1,989

Marketing, administrative and general expenses (6,662,032)

Depreciation (527,371)

‘Finance costs (379,805)

< : Other expenses. SS (8,000)
AEE 5 : : NET INCOME 3,320,922
ee Net income available to common shareholders $ 3,320,922

: sateen

BASIC EARNINGS PER SHARE : $ 0.39

* (SSR RT

DILUTED EARNINGS PER SHARE $ 0.39



UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY '
THREE MONTHS ENDED OCTORER 31, 2008

31-Jul-06
(Audited)

$ 10,348,408
27,097,480
21,375,976

432,500

2,134,622
61,388,966

42,336,214

7,365,419

"49,701,633

$ 111,090,599

$ 3,546,854
44,542,077
2,242,460
50,334,391

20,566,903

49,620,633

$ 111,090,599

31-Oct-05

$ 24,799,004

(21,356,745)

3,442,259
38,339
(1,419,288)
(178,690)

1,884,622

$1,884,622 ©



Share Preference Contbuied Revaluation Retained
Laphel -__ Shoreg_ __ Capital _Suphs__ _Eemings _ Too
Beren of hy 31,208 SUBTS $+ $ BSENRTS $ 1ASi S00 $12208201 $20,278,181

* 1,884,622 1,884,622
‘Common share dividends: $0.1) per share x {939,103} __ (80,103)

Balance at October 31, 2005 : 4,431,839 $13.151720_ $21,221,710
~ Balance at July 31. 2008 senate $ 207.900 $27,965,178 $ 1405,488 $.20,866.999. $49.6200%3
tgouance of common shares - hee : 227,085
Net inooms 320922 3320822

‘Common share dividends: $0.11 per share = (44,337) (41,337)
Balence at October 31, 2006 $85:576 $ mie erry $ ae $22,986,578 $52,227 303

UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS
THREE MONTHS ENDED OCTOBER 31, 2006

34-Oct-06
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:
Net income $ 3,320,922
er enhed for: :
: $27,371
resseat toss (gain) on marketable securities 8,000
-_. Income from operations before working capital changes * 3,856,293
Decrease (increase) in accounts receivable, net 11,501,474
Decrease (Increase) in prepaid expanses and deposits 4,561,899
Decrease in inventories 4,748,849
Dacrease in accounts payable and accrued expenses (20,045,731)
_ Net cash from operating activities 4,822,784
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:
Purchase of property, plant and equipment % (4,034,051)
Goodwill on acquisition (4,382,517)
Net cash used in investing activities: (8,216,568)
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES: ;
issuance of shares 227,085
Dividends paid (941,337)
Proceeds from tong term debt ‘ 4,617,004
Repayment of long-term debt (438,000)
Net cash from (used) in financing activities 3,466,752
NET (DECREASE) INCREASE IN CASH (3,427,035)
CASH, BEGINNING OF PERIOD 6,801,554
CASH, END OF PERIOD $ 3,874,519
Cash $ 9,971,608
Bank overdrafts (5,697,089)
§.3874519

Sun Oil Limited

A Shall License



H-Oete5

$ 1,884,622

176,890
(17,000)

2,044,312
(1,866,444)
(233,051)

2,423,812

(1,471,209)
4,097,420



(184,278)
(181,278)

250,000
(939,103)



(689,703)
227,039

3,456,571

$.__ 3,683,610

$ 3,683,610



Son 3853810,

NET INCOME









































Notes to the unaudited condensed consolidated
Three months ended October 31, 2006

1. Basis of preparation

The condensed financial statements have been pi
Accounting Standard (IAS) 34, Interim Financii

2. Significant accounting policies

‘The condensed financial statements have been
except for the revaluation of certain properties and

The accounting policies adopted are consistent wi
Company's annual financial statements for the year

3. Segment information

The following is an analysis of the revenue and re
segment, the Company’s primary basis of segmentati

THREE MONTHS ENDED OCTOBER 31, 2008:
REVENUE: LSE
External safes $ 7,931,730.

intersegment sales :

RESULT:
Segment result.
Unallocated operating expenses

Income from operations
Interest Income
Other expense
Unailocated other income
Unallocated other expenses

NET INCOME

REVENUE:
External sales
intersegment sales

RESULT:
Segment result
Unallocated operating expenses
Income from operations
Interest income
Unallocated other income

4. Results for the period

Starting in late summer and continuing through w
for the first quarter reflect the beginning of that

§. Earnings per share
The calculation of the basic earnings per share at

attributable to ordinary shareholders of $3,320, 922 (2005:
following data:

Profit attributable to ordinary shareholders













Weighted average number of ordinary shares : Saas < 8,557,617 . 8,537,287
Basic earnings per share g
Weighted average number of onnary













50,000 (2005: 400,000) potential ative ‘hates

‘ Seo ey Seer 28)

Diluted earings per share $a 922



WG

6. Dividends



During the interim peri
shareholders.
\



7. Property, plant and equipment and goodwill

During the period, through the acquisition of GAL Terminals Limited, the Company added $6.7
million on new property, plant, equipment and goodwill in eaien Wooing existing
facilities. : : ‘

SH
s



8. Borrowings



During the period, the Company issued $3 million i in bonds o $1, 000 each. The issue was made
in pursuance of a resolution passed on August 9, 2006. The bonds bear interest at a fixed rate of
8% per annum payable quarterly on 31" March, 30 June, 3 30" Segteaiter and 31* December
The bonds mature in ten years,

9, Share capital

Share capital as at October 31, 2006 amounted to $85,576 (2005;
8,557,617 (2005: 8,537,287) common shares. During the period!
common shares.

10. Related party transactions
During the period, related party transactions included insurance premiums

$221,437), armoured car service fees of $8,260 (2005: $0), fuel sales of $1
short-term benefits of $232,499 (2005: $132,500) paid to key employees.



11. Acquisition of subsidiary SS

During the period, the Company completed the acquisition of GAL T. erminls Limited and the '
Grand Bahamian assets of Chevron Bahamas Limited. =

The acquisition was financed in part from proceeds of a $3 million pes bond i ie in :
addition to a non-interest bearing long-term note for $1, ol 7,004 and the balance in cash and ;
stock, : : :

The transaction was accounted for using the acquisition method of accounting. Goodwill arising:
from the acquisition amounted to $4,182,517 and property, plant and equipment was valued at
$2,561,340,





{
”AGE 12, MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

ynated Sanders
tise business con-
topuer Caribbean

4
a UlYANA has
” become the first Eng-
vcuking country to host a
mil meeting of the Rio
up made up of 21 Latin
and Caribbean

SER.

Pre rie ay

in idshion to the Guyanese

‘ent Bharrat Jagdeo, sev-
‘Toads of Government













Behav? E (ish





REPORTI





be









t
! i
t






ELE eae NR SE Se

poeta Ces s

Eis

———
ae

PTE

SI

ICSE

ARS




LFS




=r. OMAR ASSOCIATE/CONTRACT SERVICES

Chine a. yerreen erar aar meer eR ROR

" Rathiub Liners are.designed to fit over worn-out bathtubs
cs ta cover existing bath walls; In simulated Tile and Marble
wer Base Liners to go over existing Shower bases
* Cultured Marble Vanity Tops and Sinks-
* Great Shower Door selection
* Quality Faucets, All-Wood Vanities

TE Ete at



i Monday - Friday, 9:00am - 5:00pm
mont Saturday - 14:00am - 4:00pm

of the Rio Group were in
Guyana for the meeting held
on the weekend of March 2nd

- and 3rd.

While a larger turn out of
Heads of Government would
have made the meeting more
meaningful, some very irnpor-
tant ones showed up. includ-
ing Mexico’s Felipe de Jesus
Calderon Hinojosa, Brazil’s
Luis Ignacio Lula de Silva,
Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez and

‘Chile’s Michelle Bachelet.

Guyana is the current offi-
cial representative in the Rio
Group of the Caribbean Com-







|AHAMAS




(ACT SERVICES DEPARTMENT

sanamas Telecommunications Company Limited invites applications
suitably qualified individuals for the position of SENIOR.
CIATE/Facilities, Electrical, Plumbing, AC and Security in our
ict Services Department.

iG RELATIONSHIP:
ition will report to the Manager, Contract Services.
ob SAL RESPONSIBILITY:

ill Electrical System Maintenance

Suliding Electrical Renovations

AC Systems Maintenance

Plumbing Design & Maintenance
eourity System Planning & Design

Contractor Management

“i REQUIREMENTS

». Bachelor’s degree in Engineering or Facilities Management or
“uivalent work experience.
cellent written and oral presentation skills required.
ellent leadership skills. .

ications are to be received at BTC’s Head Office, 21 John F. Kennedy
i¢ later than Wednesday March 7, 2007 and addressed as follows:

VICE PRESIDENT

HUMAN RESOURCES, TRAINING & SAFETY
iE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD

‘NASSAU, BAHAMAS

ATT



WORLD VIE

munity and Common Market
(CARICOM) countries, but
Belize is also a member of the
group, and the Guyanese Pres-
ident invited Trinidad and
Tobago’s Prime Minister
Patrick Manning to participate
in the informal sessions of the
summit.

With attendance too by the

Dominican Republic (DR)
President Leonel Antonio Fer-
nandez Reyna, there were sev-
eral interests represented at the
meeting.

The DR and CARICOM
countries are together present-
ly negotiating with the Euro-
pean Union (EU) for an Eco-
nomic Partnership Agreement
which will determine the aid,
trade and investment relation-
ship between these two groups
for some time to come.

Similarly the. DR and Cen-
tral American countries repre-
sented at the summit are party
to a Free Trade. Agreement
with the United States, and five
of the Latin American coun-
tries are deepening their own
trading arrangements under the
umbrella of Mercosur.

Then there is the Bolivarian
Alternative for the Americas
(ALBA) being promoted by
the Venezuelan President as a

regional integration strategy

for Latin America, as well as
a possible alternative to the US
notion of a Free Trade Area
of the Americas (FTAA).

And, in the midst of all this,
are the, albeit stalled, but
nonetheless overarching nego-





mesponsible for providing administrative and technical support for
ioctrical, plumbing, air conditioning and security.

' Responsible for providing administrative and technical support of
=orts needed in maintenance/construction of the exchange and
| network facilities by contractors and to support activities necessary
io. ensure that contractors observe industry standards, specification
equirernents, and security regulations.
»sponsible for the administrative and technical support of the network
planning, engineering, design and maintenance of electrical support
systems, equipment, and corporate security.
‘esponsible for the coordination and administration of contracts,
and to ensure that the facilities are safe and kept in repair order.

3P ONSIBILITY:
oc yates, administers and provide technical support in the following







@ SIR Ronald Sanders

tiations in the World Trade
Organisation (WTO) for new



It is to be hoped
that arising from
this meeting, the
Rio group will take
on the role of
promoting Latin
American and
Caribbean
economic
integration through
institutions such as
the Inter-American
Bank.



arrangements that would gov-
ern world trade rules.

Doxessions about
trade were not

expected to feature ‘highly on *relationship/. ‘Ir turn, ‘they ‘wil?

the agenda of the meeting, and’: need an‘enabling-environment ~:

while the Declaration of



da

Turkeyen, the end of Confer-
ence communiqué, will
undoubtedly try to reflect a
consensus position of the Rio
Group, with all the different
and, in some cases, divergent
interests involved, whatever
they say on trade is unlikely to
advance the international agen-



The great value of
this summit is that
it provided an
opportunity for a
small but important
number of Heads of
Government... to
talk informally and
to exchange ideas
about how the
relationship
‘between Latin
American and.
Caribbean countries
could be deepened
in their joint
interest.



The great value of this sum-
mit is that it provided an
opportunity for a small but
important number of Heads of
Government from _ the
Caribbean and Latin America
to talk informally and to
exchange ideas about how the
relationship between Latin
American and Caribbean coun-
tries could be deepened in their
joint interest.
Meeting at the political lev-
el is a necessary first step for
creating the framework for an
economic relationship that
could benefit the people of
Latin America and the
Caribbean, through trade and
investment. But, at the practi-
cal level it is the business com-
munities in each of these coun-
tries that could give flesh to the
bones of-such an economic

a

2

which must include the éstab- °



THE TRIBUNE



lishment of direct transporta-
tion arrangements, access to
financing, and a facility for
English, Spanish and Por-
tuguese.

he Rio Group is pri-

marily an organ of
political consultation; it does
not have a mandate to institute
arrangements for economic
integration, and a summit
meeting of only eight Heads of
Government, however influ-
ential they may be, would be
reluctant to do so.

Further, the Group does not
have a permanent secretariat
and its work between meetings
is carried out by the country to
which the Chairmanship falls.

However, there are other
organisations to which mem-
bers of the Rio Group belong
who have the capacity to initi-
ate arrangements for structured
economic relations between
Latin American and Caribbean

countries. CARICOM and the , -

Central American Free Trade
Agreement (CAFTA) coun-
tries, and CARICOM and
Mercosur could formally pur-
sue discussions that might have
arisen from informal consulta-
tions between the Heads of
Government.

It is to be hoped that arising
from this meeting, the Rio
group will take on the role of
promoting Latin American and
Caribbean economic integra-
tion through institutions such
as the Inter-American Bank.

In any event, Guyana did
well to carry the work of the
Rio Group during its period of
Chairmanship. It has also done
well to host the Summit, and, in
doing so, to act as a bridge
between Latin America and
the Caribbean.

A Conference of Latin
American countries in English-
speaking Guyana as the repre-
sentative of CARICOM, has
immense symbolic value. It
demonstrates that the divide
between the two sub-regions,
which are a consequence of

/ colonial history.and ‘imperial
“interests in the past, can be
‘overcome.
THE TRIBUNE




ALL RISKS (BUILDINGS & CONTENTS, PLANT, MACHINERY
& EQUIPMENT INCLUDING SUB-STATION SITES

TENDER NO. 597/06

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the
provision of general insurances as described above.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office,
‘Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting:-

* Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 30 March 2006 by 3:00 p.m.
and addressed as follows:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation"
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 597/06
“GENERAL INSURANCE — BUILDINGS, PLANT & MACHINERY”

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.





- "TENDER FORGENERALINSURANCE
& EMPLOYERS’ LIABILITY, PERSONAL ACCIDENT, 62!>°
PRIVATE CAR & COMMERCIAL VEHICLES — 35

> PUBLIC

ij

TENDER NO. 598/06

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the
provision of general insurances as described above.
" Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting:-

Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 30 March 2006 by 3:00 p.m.
and addressed as follows:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hili & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 598/06

“GENERAL INSURANCE — PUBLIC & EMPLOYERS’
LIABILITY AND MOTOR VEHICLES”

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.



NDER FOR GENERAL INSURANCE
MONEY & FIDELITY

TENDER NO. 599/06

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the
_ provision of general insurances as described above.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting:-

Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 30 March 2006 by 3:00 p.m.
and addressed as follows:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 599/06
“GENERAL INSURANCE — MONEY & FIDELITY”

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.





NONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007, PAGE 13



TENDER FOR GENERAL INSURANCE
MARINE INSURANCE

- | ‘TENDER NO. 600/06

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the
provision of general insurances as described above.

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting:- :

Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas -
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852

‘ Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 30 March 2006 by 3:00 p.m.
and addressed as follows: ,
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads.
Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour:

Marked: Tender No. 600/06
“GENERAL INSURANCE ~ MARINE INSURANCE”



The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.





“ AS SW







‘TENDER FOR GENERAL INSURANCE
PROFESSIONAL INDEMNITY (DIRECTORS & OFFICERS)

TENDER NO. 610/06

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligible bidders for the
provision of general insurances as described above. -

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting:-

Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
: Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 30 March 2006 by 3:00 p.m.
- and addressed as follows:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas
Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 601/06

“GENERAL INSURANCE - PROFESSIONAL INDEMNIT
DIRECTORS & OFFICERS”

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.






ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT & MOBILE RADIOS

TENDER NO. 602/06

The Bahamas Electricity Corporation invites tenders from eligibl bidde rsfor the
provision of general insurances as described above RE

Bidders are required to collect packages from the Administration Office,
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads by contacting:-

Mrs. Delmeta Seymour
Administrative Officer
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads

_ Nassau, Bahamas
Phone No. 302-1158
Fax No. 323-6852

Tenders are to be hand-delivered on or before 30 March 2006 by 3:00 p.m.
and addressed as follows:
The General Manager
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
Blue Hill & Tucker Roads
Nassau, Bahamas

Attention: Mrs. Delmeta Seymour

Marked: Tender No. 602/06
“GENERAL INSURANCE — ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT & MOBILE RADIOS”

The Corporation reserves the right to accept or reject any or all tenders.





LOM page one

city teas’, and focuses on sev-
©) major areas of concern
is lity. infrastructure, devel-
oiscut, housing affordability
{ v‘hamians, traffic planning
J parbases,
straw said Harbour
current infrastructure
eyond capacity, and there-

SAGE 14, MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

fore unable to serve the needs
of residents.

A major area which needs to
be addressed was the public
dock, which currently was over-
whelmed by passenger and
commercial traffic sharing the
same space.

Mr Straw said that a more
practical approach would be to

create separate areas where










20 Smith

>33 Auto

‘arese Williams
| C. Security

| Kir-Jak & CO.

Pre Eminence Auto

| RL & Sons






xert Dieudonne
graham’s IMP

| vWayne Johnson





Jason Satchell



| Rado Ma jor

= lcase be advised that the following vehicles |
/ stored at Betty K. Agencies USA. LLC, 3701
‘|. South River Drive, Miami, F1.33142 will |
-~ sold to cover storage fees at public auction
»ot cleared on or before March 15th, 2007.

bi

eas

=

_ 1997 Ford Escort
1999 Ford E150 Van
1989 Ford F150
1998 Dodge Stratus
1998 Dodge Intrepid
1997 GMC Safari
1997 Honda
1996 Olds Cutlass ff
2002 Ford Escape |
1998 Chevy
1994 Nissan Sentra =
1996 Ford Contour
2001 Dodge Intrepid
1992 Honda Civic

1993 GMC Jimmy

r further information, |
ase contact our customer



LOCAL NEWS

passengers could disembark
from water taxis and Bahamas
Ferries’ Bo Hengy, then walk
on a separate pedestrian walk-
way to a welcome centre to
enhance their arrival experi-
ence.

There would also need to be
better management of com-
mercial traffic and removal of
non-essential traffic from the
dock area. The ideal decision,
Mr Straw said, would be to
remove the commercial dock
altogether to a new area, per-
haps by the power point.

Mr Straw said traffic was-a
major problem, noting that on
the island there were 2,200
vehicles. Considering that there
were 475 local households and

225 winter residences, that
worked out to be an average
of three vehicles per house-
hold.

He said a plan needed to be
in place to either limit the vehi-
cles that can come on to Har-
bour Island, or the times they
can be on the road, and the traf-
fic flow itself needed to be
addressed. This would reduce
congestion and improve safety.
In addition, proper signals need-
ed to be in place around the
island.

Mr Straw said one suggestion
could be to develop a schedule
of freight boats that limits load-
ing and unloading.

Addressing the island’s devel-
opment, Mr Straw said they rec-

rilanders sceptical over ‘Master Plan’

ommended two tourist zones -
one in the area near the Pink
Sands and Coral Sands hotels,
and the other near the Valen-
tines and Ramora Bay proper-
ties. Tourist-related develop-
ment in these areas would be
encouraged, Mr _ Straw
explained...

The island could also benefit
from continuing education pro-
grammes and cultural events,
with the proposal being made
to build a dual facility on the
existing school grounds.

Mr Straw and Mr Martini
both emphasised that these
were just initial plans and would
be added to as feedback came
in. <

The next steps towards the

THE TRIBUNE.



we

implementation of the Master
Plan were to have an acceler-
ated and coordinated review
and approval process, prelimi-
nary commitments for key ele-.
ments of the plan.

Mr Straw said the idea of
affordable housing options must
be pursued. This could include
land development, land trades,,
land purchase or the use of ;
commonage property.

He added that it should also’
include the enforcement of,
environmental health laws.
regarding garbage, steps to ini- |
tiate public-private partnerships,
creation of the Harbour Island,
Foundation and a visit by the.
Prime Minister and his Cabinet,
to the island.

Docks condition has no

FROM page one

Those days are popular
because Nassau’s close proxim-
ity to Florida make them an ide-
al stop at the beginning or end
of cruise itineraries.

Mr Allens said that to accom-
modate demand, the Govern-
ment was discussing ways to
offer incentives to the cruise
ships that arrive on less popular
days.

He added that the Ministry

of Works had recently approved
a bid for repairs to the bollards,
and explained that repairs to
Prince George’s Wharf dock
had been underway for quite
some time.

Tribune Business previously
reported on a proposed plan to
turn Arawak Cay into addi-
tional docking space that would
have allowed for at least an
additional three more ships to
dock in Nassau per day.

However, Captain Allens

said this was not a feasible
option at present. He added
that at present, the turning
basin in Nassau Harbour can
accommodate even the largest
ships, although perhaps they
need to approach the basin
from different ways.

Captain Allens said there are
several challenges in widening
the basin, expanding the dock
and creating more space for.
cruise ships.

He explained that many

impact on cruise ships

cruise lines are reluctant to”
reveal their future ship con-,
struction plans, which makes it:
difficult to make changes to the
Prince George’s Wharf dock, as’
there is no indication of how
large boats would be.

Captain Allens said dredging
would have to be done, and that’
more ships would mean that
more staff would have to be’
hired to process them. This, he.
said, was a very expensive
undertaking.

PLP ‘trying to resurrect UBP bogeyman’

FROM page one

Mr Levarity left the PLP
as one of the Dissident
Eight and nothing more was
done to advance local gov-
ernment during the 25 years
of the old PLP’s administra-
tion.

It was left to the FNM
under the leadership of

Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham, the party said, to

introduce representative and |

elective local government
for the first time thus giving
residents of the Family
Islands more control over
their lives and local affairs.

“That was a major step
forward in developing our
democracy and the people

of the Family Islands cherish
their local government. On
the other hand, the PLP
administration under Perry
Christie has been uncom-
fortable with elected local
government; indeed during
five years in office they have
acted to roll it back,” the
FNM said.

The opposition Sania

that the matter of succession
in the FNM has always been
and will always be by estab-
lished democratic process. ©

“When the time comes for
a change of leadership in the
FNM, whether the party is
in government or not, it will
be decided by democratic
process, not by automatic
succession,” the party said.

Gay activist’s legal threat -

FROM page one

“Considering that the
Bahamas is based on the com-

~mon law tradition, our strategy

has basically changed, because if
we cannot rely on parliament
to create legislation that will
protect and equalize homosex-
uals in the Bahamas, then the
only alternative is to take our
concerns to the highest court,
which is the Privy Council,” Ms
Greene explained. |

Ms Greene said RAB would,
if need be, take matters involv-



ing job discrimination, medical
treatment discrimination, and
adoption issues involving homo-
sexuals before the UK hig
court,

Asked what issues the gay
community wished the govern-
ment to address in this election
year, Ms Green said she wanted
the government to promote a
culture of honesty, integrity and
respect for diversity.

She also said the gay com-
munity needed a government
that was serious about consti-
tutional reform.

ST ANDREW’S SCHOOL

Invites you to join us for

WINE & CHEESE

anda

SILENT AUCTION

Hosted by

e St Andrew’s Alumni and Friends Associatio
(STAAFA)

Thursday

March 8, 2007
at

The Nassau Yacht Club
East Bay Street
7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Hors d’oeuvres
Wine selections by Bristol Cellars

Tickets $30

Vailable in the school’s office from
Margo Albury, from Committee members:

anne Treco (457-1692), lrene Cathopoulis (325-4944)
irstie Smollett (324-7737), Dana Thompson (565-8418)

or at the door

‘Man suffers serious
injuries in dog attack

FROM page one

The Police Canine Unit had
to be called in to collect the
attacking: dogs — two pitbulls
and a Doberman Pincher.

The police also reported that

. two men were arrested over the

weekend for gun possession.

The men were driving a black
Nissan vehicle when they were
pulled over and searched.

During the search, the police
found a .380 hand gun with one
live round of ammunition.

Both men, who are in their
twenties, were arrested and are
now in police custody.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their -
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

aint

Prince eee Drive e ro 324-5476


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007, PAGE 15



LOCAL NEWS



Bush seeks ethanol alliance with Brazil,
the world’s renewable energy leader

@ By ALAN CLENDENNING
AP Business Writer

SAO PAULO, Brazil (AP)
-— Just an hour’s drive outside
this traffic-choked metropolis
where President Bush kicks off
a Latin American tour Thurs-
day, sugar cane fields stretch
for hundreds of miles, providing
the ethanol that fuels eight out
of every 10 new Brazilian cars.

In only a few years, Brazil has

‘ turned itself into the planet’s

undisputed renewable energy
leader, and the highlight of
Bush’s visit is expected to be a
new ethanol “alliance” he will
forge with Brazilian President
Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva,

The deal is still being negoti-
ated, but the two leaders are
expected to sign an accord Fri-
day to develop standards to
help turn ethanol into an inter-
nationally traded commodity,
and to promote sugar cane-
based ethanol production in
Central America and the
Caribbean to meet rising inter-
national demand.

Across Latin America’s
largest nation, Brazilian media
are billing the Bush-Silva meet-
ing as a bid to create a new two-
nation “OPEC of Ethanol,”
despite efforts by Brazilian and
American officials to downplay
the label amid concerns that

whatever emerges would be.

viewed as a price-fixing cartel.

Meanwhile, political and:

energy analysts warn that any
agreements reached between
Brazil and the United States are
unlikely to have short-term
effects. And the deal itself could
end up largely symbolic because
of reluctance by Washington to
address a key point of friction:
A 53 cent-per-gallon US tariff
on Brazilian ethanol imports.
“For the Brazilians, the tariff
has utmost priority,” said
Cristoph Berg, an ethanol ana-
lyst with Germany’s F.O. Licht,
a commodities research firm.

. “They will agree with develop-

cave ve 8 ew aes

avYow © ew re eek

sore ram

mee x

<< sen ne 2 ae

THEMES.

GUEST SPEAKERS:

BISHOP RANDALL E. HOWARD
*General Overseer (Worldwide)

BISHOP DR. BRICE H. THOMPSON
General Presbyter (Caribbean & Atlantic Ocean Islands)

ing biofuel economies around
the world, but the first thing
they will say is "We want to do
away with that tariff.”

No one is expecting Bush to
give ground on the tariff. The
politically sensitive issue essen-
tially subsidizes American corn
growers who are rapidly ramp-
ing up ethanol production amid
Washington’s encouragement
of renewable biofuels to ease
U.S. dependence on imported
petroleum.

But the visit will help Bush
and Silva join forces to promote
the politically popular issue of
renewable energy simply by
gathering in a place where
ethanol is king.

At every gas station in this
city of 18 million, drivers can
fill up with gasoline or ethanol.
Ethanol came courtesy of a
1970s decision by Brazil’s for-
mer military dictators to subsi-
dize production and require dis-
tribution at the pumps.

A 1980s Brazilian fad with
cars that ran only on ethanol
petered out when oil prices fell
in the early 1990s. But the fuel
came back into vogue in 2003
when automakers started rolling
out cars “flex-fuel” cars that run
on gasoline, ethanol or any
combination of the two.

With international oil prices
reaching record highs, Brazil-
ian drivers turned to the cars;
most choose ethanol, because
it costs about half the price of
gas.

The ethanol industry is now
making profits like never before
amid heavy foreign investment.
Just last week, Brazil’s state-
run oil firm, Japan’s Mitsui &
Co. and a Brazilian construc-
tion firm signed a memorandum
of interest to study the con-
struction of a pipeline in Brazil
that would be used to help
export ethanol to Japan.

Brazil is the world’s top
exporter, though U.S. ethanol
production still surpasses Brazil.
But Brazil has an edge over the

18, 2007 ‘ East Street

broadcast Service.

BISHOP DAVID H. BRYAN

Global Outreach Director
BISHOP CLAYTON N. MARTIN

will be delivered by.

National Overseer (Jamaica, Cayman Islands, Guyana &

French Guiana)

MINISTER MORAIS L. CASSELL
Regional Youth Director (Northeast U.S.A. Region & Bermuda)

Ministering in anointed song and performance will he the

Convention Choir and |

Choir, the Ba



if Mood

eae)

& A MAN walks with his bicycle through sugar cane fields in Piracicaba, Brazil. In the background are ethanol-filled tanks (inset).

United States for future pro-
duction because ethanol can be
produced more cheaply with
sugar cane than the corn used
by U.S. farmers to make
ethanol.

And increased use of corn for
ethanol is prompting interna-
tional corn price increases,
prompting Silva to tell reporters
last week he would tell Bush,
“Why make ethanol out of
corn? Why don’t we feed the
corn to the chickens.”

Bush has set a goal of 35 bil-
lion gallons a year of ethanol
and other alternative fuels, such
as soybean-based biodiesel, by

Power Possessed People

ACTS 1:8

‘Monday, March 12th, 2007
National Overseer, Bishop Dr. Elgarnet B. Rahming will deliver his.
Annual Address LIVE VIA RADIO BAHAMAS

Sunday, March 18th, 2007
Annual Baptismal Procession will leave the Tabernacle for the
Western Esplanade followed by the live ZNS Radio and TV 13 evening

Final Message on Convention Theme:
Power Possessed People.

2017 — a fivefold increase over
current requirements.

But production of ethanol
from U.S. corn is expected to
fall far short of meeting such an
increase, and experts doubt
even land-rich Brazil would be
able to fill the gap along with
help from Central America and
the Caribbean. So Bush envi-
sions a major speedup of
research into production of
“cellulosic” ethanol made from
wood chips, switchgrass and
other feedstocks.

Ethanol proponents hope
Bush and Silva will nonetheless
come up with a framework to

- sharply boost ethanol produc-

tion in the nations between
Brazil and the United States,
encouraging more foreign
investment.And coming up with
technical standards to define
quality levels for ethanol is key
to turn it into a commodity that
could be traded like oil. “I think
its Brazilian know how and
American know how, there’s a
lot of cross fertilization that can
take place,” said Brian Dean,
executive director of the Inter-
american Ethanol Commission.

The commission counts
among its directors Florida
Gov. Jeb Bush, the president’s

(AP Photo: Victor R Caivano)

brother, as well as former
Brazilian agriculture minister
Roberto Rodrigues and Luiz
Moreno, president of the Inter-
American Development Bank.

Increasing ethanol produc-
tion in the region is also expect-
ed to be a major topic in
Guatemala later this month
when the bank holds its annual
meeting, Latin America’s top
yearly economic gathering. “We
see a marketplace in ethanol
that can create an enormous
amount of economic growth
and prosperity in the US and
the rest of the world,” Dean
said.

Atlantis invites you to join

our dynamic

FOOD & BEVERAGE TEAM

\

Apply now to be a

Barback, Busser, Bartender
Hostess, Pool Attendant & Butler

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS
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Both males and females are encouraged to apply.

if you meet the requirements apply online today at

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and explore a world of fantastic opportunities

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PARADISE ISLAND»


THE TRIBUNE |

Ritetys CF Tent He
my mee

a
tll




MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

SECTION —

business@tribunemedia.net

|

The Tribune











|
i,

Lawsuit to have ‘no impact’

t

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

fresh lawsuit.
filed against the
South Ocean
Golf & Beach .
Resort and its
Canadian pension fund: owner
will not interfere with the prop-
erty’s sale, The Tribune was
told, with a new majority
investor hoping to reach a
Heads of Agreement with the
Government for the hotel’s $1
billion redevelopment later this
month.

Case Financial has taken legal
action in the California courts



against the resort’s holding —

" ew bid for Royal

on South Ocean resort sale

Investor hoping for March Heads on $ibn redevelopment,
as the former potential buyer files a fresh action

company, the Bahamian-regis-
tered South Ocean Develop-
ment Company, and the Cana-
dian Commercial Workers
Industry Pension Plan
(CCWIPP), alleging that a fraud
was committed against it after it
settled previous litigation over
an attempt it made to purchase
the Bahamian hotel.

Also named as a defendant

Oasis unveiled

Q By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ANOTHER potential pur-
‘chaser for the stricken Royal
Oasis Resort in Grand Bahama
has gone public, saying it has

. . “the financial backing in place

= and are now ready to close” on
the deal with the hotel’s de fac-
to owner, Lehman Brothers’
private equity arm.

William Gtaulich III,
described in a press release as a
“veteran hotelier”, has teamed
up with Bahamian architect,
Lawrence Chisholm, of
Lawrence Chisholm & Associ-

ates, to mount a bid for the

Royal Oasis, although it is -

unclear whether they are close
to concluding a deal with
Lehman Brothers.

The statement said that Mr
Graulich owned a firm called
Hotel Acquisition Corporation,

_ a hotel development and man-
‘agement company set up in

1994, and that he was a “partner
of” Hotel Acquisition Corpo-
ration (Bahamas), a Bahamian-
registered entity that has likely
been set up as an acquisition

SEE page 12B

Rum Cay Resort’s
‘huge step forward’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE $600- $700 million Rum
Cay Resort Marina has taken

“a huge step forward” after
receiving all the necessary gov-
ernment approvals and permits
to extend the runways at the
island’s existing airstrip and
construct an expanded airport
terminal that will be the third
largest in the Bahamas.

Tim Perkins, director of con-
struction for the resort devel-
opers, Montana Holdings, said
all required permits and

ty

60 per cent of units in
one complex reserved

approvals from the Ministry of
Transport & Aviation had been
received, enabling the develop-
ers to proceed with the runway
extensions.and expanding the
airport terminal to 5,500 square

_ feet.

“We're very, very pleased,”
Mr Perkins said of the Port Nel-

SEE page 13B

Show ‘same zeal’ for
Bahamian investors

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government must
approach proposals from young
Bahamians with the “same
zeal” it shows foreign direct
investment projects, a Bahami-
an entrepreneur told The Tri-
bune,’as their future as major
economic stakeholders in the
country “depends on it”.

Khaalis Rolle, the principal



owner of Nassau Water Ferries,
which has been seeking gov-

. ernment approval for-a pro-

posed 16-acre beach and island
getaway on the western end of
Paradise Island, said that
whichever party formed the
hext administration, it needed
to cut through public sector
bureaucracy that cost young

SEE page 13B

in the latest lawsuit is Allen &
Company, a Florida firm that
is acting: as a broker for
CCWIPP in finding a buyer for
the South Ocean property.
Case Financial is alleging that
all three entities “made fraudu-
lent misrepresentations” to
induce it to settle previous liti-
gation it filed against them in
the US District. Court for the

southern district of Florida on -

November 9, 2005, claiming that
facts were concealed from it
that would have influenced the

‘decision to settle. .

Chiefly, Case Financial is
alleging that the South Ocean
Golf & Beach Resort had been
sold to-Roger Stein and his
investment group prior to it
agreeing to settle the lawsuit at

the end of March 2006.

Case Financial is claiming
that prior to the agreement
being ‘signed, it was told that it
would still have an opportunity
to purchase the South Ocean
resort following settlement, and
the property’s continuing avail-
ability was what influenced it
to sign.

But a spokesman for South

Ocean and the other defendants
described the Case Financial
lawsuit as “without merit”, say-
ing it would be “vigorously
defended”.

The spokesman said: “Case
did commence an action against
CCWIPP and all the other com-

SEE page 11B

Furious Brilanders seek meeting with minister

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

and CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

THE Harbour Island Town Council and

Harbour Island master plan proves divisive, as islanders

concerns.

claim no consultation and concerns ignored

Although supposed to be overseen by a

angry Briland residents are seeking a meet-

ing with Dr. Marcus Bethel, minister of ener-.

gy and the environment, over the contro-
versial Land Use ‘Master Plan’ for the

island, sources have told The Tribune, argu- |

ing that they .were.not _properly.consulted

The controversy has arisen because the
plan was part-funded by the Save Harbour
Island Association (SHIA), a group com-
posed largely of foreign, second-home win-

_ ter residents, who are oppesed: to any. more

development on the island.

“representative” steering committee of Bri-
landers, and part-produced by Nassau-based
architects, Bruce LaFleur & Associates, the

- SEE page 10B.



and that it does not reflect their needs and

_She has yet to learn her ABC's but that doesn’t matter. When it’s time for her to go to college, she
won't have to worry about whether we can afford it or not. With a plan from Colinalmperial, we
know that we can give her the education she needs to succeed. Harvard, Oxford, University of

The Bahamas? The choice will be hers..

-but a college education is definitely in her future!

*Colinalmperial.

Insurance Lid.

Confidence for Life


PAGE 2B, MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

ee

THE TRIBUNE



@ By Fidelity Capital advanced, two declined and four
Markets remained unchanged.

/ Volume leader for the week

t was an active trading week was Fidelity Bank (Bahamas)

[: the Bahamian market, (BAB), with 51,000 shares chang-
with in excess of 102,000 ing hands and accounting for 49.7

shares changing hands. The mar- _ per cent of the total shares trad-
ket saw 11 out of its 19 listed ed. .
stocks trade, of which five The big advancer for the week

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act
(No. 45 of 2000)

VENADO CORP.
Registration Number 41,862B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
132 (2) of the International Business Companies Act
(No. 45 of 2000) VENADO CORP. is in Dissolution.

Any person having any claim against VENADO CORP.
is required on or before the 30th of March, 2007 to
send their name, address and particulars of the debt or
claim to the liquidator of the company, or in default
thereof they may have excluded from the benefit of
any distribution made before such claim is approved.

GSO Corporate Services Ltd., of 303 Shirley Street,
Nassau, The Bahamas is the Liquidator of VENADO
CORP)" %



was Colina Holdings (Bahamas)
(CHL), up $0.03 or 5 per cent to
end the week at $2.10. Also
advancing was Bank of the
Bahamas (BOB), up $0.39 or 4.81
per cent to close at a new 52-week
high of $8.50.

On the down side, Abaco Mar-
kets (AML), lost $0.01 or 1.32
per cent to close at $0.75.

The FINDEX gained 4.04
points for the week, to close at
782.63.

COMPANY NEWS

FOCOL Holdings (FCL) -

For the 2007 first quarter, FCL
posted net income of $3.3 million
or $0.39 per share versus $1.9 mil-
lion or $0.22 per share in the 2006
first quarter.

It should be noted here that
the 2007 first quarter includes
Shell's operating results, which
will explain some of the large dif-



FOREX Rates
















Commodities

Crude Oil
Gold



For Sale or Long Term Lease

BRAND NEW CONSTRUCTION
SECURE PROPERTY

Nassau, Bahamas
Over ce. Top iiving Life in the East i Sipseale

SPSL RULE

RMU EHS)

FULLY FURNISH {(Ostional)
Hurricane Proof Windows & Doors

Bed/bath Sq. PL
1,900
acer}
£900

3,000
ac

G45

CONTAGT: COLONY VILLAGE, P, 0. BOX SS-5593, NASSAU BAHAMAS
TEL ORNS OF oer

Oar iS ev 139

E-Malkse ulhseasbahar

“PAE RL ET

ioimall.com:

v



International Markets

International Stock Market Indexes:

ferentes with the comparative

period.

Revenues were $73.3 million,
up from $24.8 million in 2006,
while the cost of sales was $63.5
million versus $21.4 million last
year. Gross profit for the .2007
first quarter was $9.9 million com-
pared to $3.4 million the previ-
ous year.

FCL's operating expenses for
the 2007 first quarter skyrocketed
from just $1.6 million the previous
year to $6.6 million in the 2007
first quarter. Marketing, admin-
istrative and general expenses
accounted for $5.6 million of
operating expenses. Total assets
declined by $11 million or 10 per
cent to total $99.9 million as at
October 31, 2006.

In related news, FCL manage-
ment disclosed that during the
2007 first quarter, it completed
the purchase of GAL Terminals



Weekly % Change
1.1772
1.9433
1.3191









Weekly % Change



$61.52
$644.70

0.98
-6.09



Weekly % Change






12,114.10
1,387.17
2,368.00
17,217.93

-4.22



and the Grand Bahama assets of
Chevron Bahamas Ltd. The
acquisition was financed in part

by a $3 million mortgage-backed
bond issue and a non-interest
long-term note of $1.6 million.

The Bahamian cae Market

FINDEX 435.63 YTD 1.321%








BISX
SYMBOL

CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
PRICE CHANGE


























/ $0.75 $-0.01 14250 22.95%
BAB _ $1.25 oe 51000 0.00%
BBL. $0.83 $0.03 2500 9.21%
BOB $8.50 $0.39 2700 5.85%
BPF $11.25 $- 625 -0.44%
BSL $14.60 $- 0 0.00%
BWL $1.95 $ 100 11.43%
CAB $10.03 $-0.05 1400 0.30%
CBL $13.89 $0.15 4050 11.03%
CHL $1.69 ‘ 45 -23.18%
CIB $14.60 $- 0. | 3.18%
CWCB_ $5.34 $0.13 0. | 2.50%
DHS $2.44 $- ¥ 7770 -2.40%
“FAM. $5.85 $0.15 <4. 7700 1.04%
FCC $0.50 $- 0 -9.09%
FCL ». :+-$16.71 $2, eae 33.15%
FIN _—_ $12.30 $- 0 2.33%
ATED: $7.25 $- 0 1.40%
IST yy.» $9.05 $- 0 5.23%
PRE $10.00... $- 0 0.00%

DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:

e FIN has declared dividends of $0.13 per share, payable on
March 9, 2007, to all shareholders of record date March 2,
2007. ©




e ICD has declared dividends of $0.10 per share, payable on
March 30, 2007, to all shareholders of ee date March 12,
2007.




e CBL has declared an extraordinary dividend of $0.12 per
share, payable on April 30, 2007, to all shareholders of record
date April 13,2007.





e FINCO will hold its Annual General Mesting on March
15, 2007, at 6.30pm at SuperClubs Breezes, West Bay Street,
Cable Beach, Nassau, Bahamas.




Joint scholarship effort
honours late Pat Bain

SIX Bahamians will be the
recipients of an annual scholar-
ship to attend the College of
the Bahamas Culinary and Hos-
pitality Management Institute
(CHMI), thanks to the estab-
lishment of an industry-union
partnership which has created
the Patrick Bain BHA-BHEA-
BHC&AWU Hotel Industry
Partners Scholarship Fund.

Jointly funded by the.

Bahamas Hotel Association
(BHA), the Bahamas Hotel
Employers Association
(BHEA) and the Bahamas
Hotel, Catering and Allied
Workers Union (BHC&AWU),

lam - 3pm

‘Miller Rd.(tacardi Road).

THE SER

HACIA ARR,

LWAITS YOU





@ SEALING THE DEAL; Industry partners sign an agreement
committing their annual financial support towards the newly estab-
lished Patrick S.G. Bain BHA-BHEA-BHC&AWU Hotel Indus-
try Partners Scholarship Fund. From L to R: Roy Colebrook,
president, Bahamas Hotel Catering & Allied Workers Union; J.
Barrie Farrington, president, Bahamas Hotel Employers Associa-
tion; and Russell Miller, president, Bahamas Hotel Association.



the scholarships will support
individuals seeking to pursue
advanced studies in hospitality
and culinary-related areas.

The scholarships are being
offered in the name of the
respective organisations and in
tribute to the late union leader
Pat Bain, in recognition of his
commitment to education and
building business-labour part-
nerships.

“Pat Bain was personally
involved in helping us to estab-
lish the criteria for a union-

_industry partnership scholarship

programme well in advance of
his unfortunate passing,”
according to BHEA president,
J. Barrie Farrington. “He held a
deep belief in the power of col-
laboration by the unions and
the private sector in helping to
build a better nation. We
believe it only appropriate that
this fund be named in his hon-
our.”

Commenting on behalf of the
Bahamas Hotel, Catering &
Allied Workers Union, presi-
dent Roy A. Colebrook said:
“On behalf of the union, we
believe it is essential that we
invest in our future, particular-
ly in the youth and those who
are new to the industry, so that
Bahamians can realise the full
potential and rewards which our
industry offers. This is also
another way to honour one of
our fallen brothers, Pat Bain,
who dedicated much of his life
to serving our union, our indus-
try and our nation”.

Russell Miller, president of
the Bahamas Hotel Association,
added: “BHA is pleased to be
part of this programme. Our
support -is made possible
through the generosity of our
hotel and allied members, and
their support for our fundraising
activities for education and

training programmes.

“This adds to three scholar-
ships already awarded to aspir-
ing tourism professionals
through other BHA supported
activities. We believe the fund
to be an excellent example to
our nation as to how we can
support the: development of our
people by leveraging the
resources of various stakehold-
ers, and we plan to build on this
effort.”

Speaking on behalf of the
College, Dr Lincoln Marshall,
executive director for the Culi-
nary Hospitality and Manage-
ment Institute (CHMI), said:
“CHM is very pleased that the
industry partners have estab-
lished a scholarship fund in Pat
Bain’s name, which is tenable
at our institution. Pat was
always a supporter of educa-
tion, and we feel that this schol-
arship speaks well of him and
his efforts on behalf of the hos-
pitality industry”.

The partnership organisations
pledge an annual contribution
of $25,000 in support of up to
six annual scholarships of $4,000
each. The three organisations
have established a selection
committee comprised of repre-
sentation from each of the
organisations, in addition to two
educators. The application
process is open until March 30,
and awards will be announced
by June 30. Individuals wish-
ing to apply should contact
Bridget Murray, Workforce
Development Manager for the
Bahamas Hotel Association, at
322-8381; Lashan Smith for the
Bahamas Hotel Employers
Association at 322-8381; or
Denise Colebrook for the
Bahamas Hotel, Catering and
Allied Workers Union at 323-
5933 for eligibility criteria and
an application form.


PAY SCALES

SCRE RAR PAR SERENE

Che Bliami Z Herald





Websites show how much vou should b he paid

ff When asking a boss for a raise,
most employees have little data
to support their argument, but
that is changing with websites
such as salary.com and
payscale.com

BY DAMON DARLIN
New York Times News Service
If information is power, then most
employees who enter salary negotia-
tions are holding pea shooters while
the boss is encased in a Kevlar vest.
Unless someone left a spreadsheet
of the company’s salaries on the

rural-to-urban transformation.

Three decades ago, this area was

mostly dirt roads and rice paddies.
Farmers eked a living from the fer-
tile crescent of land at the end of
the Pearl River and gazed longingly
across a barbed wire border at
Hong Kong, then a British colony.
' Today, Shenzhen is one of Chi-
na’s largest cities, with a popula-
tion pushing 18 million and a land-
scape of skyscrapers, luxury
apartments and shopping malls.

Hundreds of square miles of
fields have been drained and cov-
ered with factories that churn out a
significant portion of the world’s
products, from computers to cloth-



AUTOMOBILES

ing and eye The ee has pets

copier (funny how often that does
happen), most employees have pre-
cious little ammunition going into a
meeting to talk about their pay.

A few websites try to level the
playing field by providing more
detailed information about salaries.
Salary.com began revealing the
results of salary surveys on its site in
1999. PayScale.com is now challeng-
ing it by gathering information
directly from the people who search
for data. (A third site, Payscroll.com,
is testing a method of trolling job list-
ings for salary information. It will be

ECONOMIC GROWTH

Tye ay
TU iaple SS
Zo ae .



RIDING THE GROWTH: A cyclist passes by a Wal-Mart Supercenter in Shenzhen, China. The city has
averaged an annual economic growth rate of 28 percent since 1980 - the fastest i in China.

CHINA’ S eric.

~SHENZHEN, ONE OF CHINA’S FASTEST GROWING
CITIES, GRAPPLES WITH MASSIVE POLLUTION
AND LABOR DISPUTES

BY CRAIG SIMONS
Cox News Service



SHENZHEN, China — Nowhere else is the country’s breathtaking
economic growth on display as vividly as in this south China
metropolis. It even has a name: “Shenzhen speed,” a remarkable

an annual economic growth of 28
percent since 1980 — the fastest in
China.

But Shenzhen speed also repre-
sents China’s dilemma. The fast
profits have come with problems.

On many days, the air is thick
with smog. The number of cars has
nearly doubled since 2003, and
streets lock into snarls of exasper-
ated motorists. Violent crime and
the incidents of HIV/AIDS have
surged.

Experts see the city as a test case
for whether China will be able to
solve problems ranging from mas-
sive pollution to growing labor dis-
putes.

opened to the public this month or
next.)

New Internet technologies are
providing information that has never
been available to the average person
and transforming the way they sell
homes or buy airline tickets. It could
have the same impact on the 47 mil-
lion people who look for new jobs
each month and the countless others
who think they are underpaid at the
ones they have.

Jessica Morrison, who wrote
advertising copy for Drugstore.com
in Seattle, was one of those. After five

DENNIS OWEN/BLOOMBERG NEWS

At a park in the city center, 55-year-
old Peng Li remembered that when
she moved to the city in 1987, “it
was always clear.”

“But now... Well now you can
see what’s happened,” she said,
sweeping a hand across the pol-
luted gray skyline.

Other residents complain that
lack of social welfare has created a
society where poorer citizens are
left out.

Some 13 million migrant labor-
ers work in Shenzhen’s factories
and produce almost all of the city’s
wealth, but they have almost no
access to public services, including | |
reduced-cost healthcare and
schooling, said Liu Kaiming, direc-
tor of Shenzhen’s Institute of Con-
temporary Observation.

“The system has created a huge
group of people who are treated as
second-class citizens,” he said.

In 1980, China’s paramount
leader Deng Xiaoping declared
Shenzhen a special economic zone,
one of four cities allowed to carry
out communist China’s first capi-
talist reforms.





° TURN TO CHINA

Domestic, foreign firms eye Chrysler

In the topsy-turvy automobile
industry, anything is possible,
including the takeover of
Chrysler by GM or a Chinese firm.

BY WARREN BROWN
Washington Post Service

SANTA BARBARA, Calif. — One
can see Detroit more clearly on a
sunny day in California, where
Detroit and its products mostly
remain an afterthought.

This is import territory where
Aston Martin, Audi, BMW, Ferrari,
Honda, Hyundai, Kia, Lamborghini,
Land Rover, Maserati, Mercedes-
Benz and Volkswagen rule the road.

It is not so much that Californians
hate Detroit metal. They just don’t
think about it. Thus, to them, specula-
tion that a struggling Chrysler Group



will be bought in whole or in part by
Chery Automobile of Wuhu, China,
or by some other foreign car manu-
facturer makes perfect sense.

On the other hand, suggestions
that Chrysler will be consumed by
General Motors, a Detroit company
that finally is getting its act together
after years of financial losses and
product disasters, make no sense at
all in California, where marrying up

‘and marrying right are essential to

professional and political success.
Why would Detroit marry Detroit?
What’s the upside of that? How will it
improve the fortunes of the newly
wedded corporate couple in Califor-
nia, where import vehicles account
for nearly 75 percent of the market?
Some GM insiders agree, albeit
not with the same amount of passion

and ridicule one hears here in cock-
tail chatter about a potential GM-
Chrysler hookup.

The inside line at GM says the cor-

' poration frequently holds talks with a

number of rival car companies,
including its chief domestic competi-
tor, Ford, and other foreign manufac-
turers such as DaimlerChrysler,
which owns the Chrysler Group; and
with BMW, Toyota and Honda.

GM insiders point out that their
company has a long history of such
conversations, some of which, such
as the most recent discussions with
DaimlerChrysler and BMW, have
resulted in technology development
coalitions, like the dual-mode gas-
electric hybrid system that soon will

* TURN TO CHRYSLER



years at the company and several
promotions, her title was associate
editor even though she had the same
duties as a copywriter, a loftier title.
She also suspected that at $42,000 a
year, she was paid a lot less than
someone else with her duties.

She checked PayScale, and its free
report that compares her pay with
others holding a similar job title said
that someone with her experience
should be making $50,000 to $60,000.
Then she went to see her manager.

“I was a little nervous going in, but
I had done my research,” Morrison,

FEDERAL COURT

27, said. She got the title she wanted
and a raise to within the pay range
she suggested. “If I had gone in with-
out the information, the conversation
would have been, ‘I feel like I am not
making enough money,’ ” Morrison
said.

More extensive salary surveys are
done for corporations, but a regular
employee could not hope to buy the
information from any of the other
major compensation companies like
Hay or Mercer. “We wouldn’t give it

° TURN TO SALARY

Tax case could

& A three-year statue of
limitations is running out for any
investor who wants to claim a
refund on overpaid taxes on 2003
insurance company distributions.

BY CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — An ad hoc
group of accountants and lawyers
may be close to winning a federal
court battle that could help millions
of investors claim billions of dollars

_ in overpaid federal taxes the past 15

years.

Led by Charles D. Ulrich, a retired
accountant in Baxter, Minn., the
group charges the Internal Revenue
Service overtaxed stock and cash
these investors received from mutual
life insurance companies when they
reorganized into publicly traded cor-
porations.

A trial is scheduled to start June 18
in the Court of Federal Claims. But
the clock is ticking for anyone who
seeks to claim a refund on overpaid
taxes on insurance company distribu-

_ tions in 2003 because of a three-year

statute of limitations to claim
refunds.

“This is an incredibly important
case,” says Robert Willens, a long-

BALANCING ACT.

lead to big refunds

time tax analyst at Lehman Brothers, ©
who believes the odds favor Ulrich’s
group in federal court.

Taxpayers can file a claim before
the case is decided, which several tax
experts say the IRS likely will lose
based on a procedural ruling by the
same court last November that in
essence said the IRS’ logic in this case
wasn’t valid. An IRS spokesman said
the agency doesn’t comment on
pending litigation.

Mutual insurance companies are
owned by their policyholders, and
companies distribute shares and cash
or both’in exchange for policyhold-
ers’ ownership interests when they

‘ incorporate into public companies

with shares stock
exchanges.

It’s called demutualization and
more than 30 companies took the
plunge in recent years, most in the
late 1990s and early this decade. Two
of the biggest demutualizations
involved Prudential Financial and
MetLife, which each had over 11 mil-
lion policyholders. MetLife distrib-
uted ei $7 billion worth of stock.
Prudential distributed $12.5 billion in
stock.

traded on

*TURN TO TAXES .

Sick? Prove it!

§& Many employers are pushing
for the right to call doctors to
confirm employee illnesses ,

BY CINDY KRISCHER GOODMAN
cgoodman@MiamiHerald.com

The doctor’s noie that used to get
you an excused absence from school
could soon morph
into a workplace
battle. Many
employers want the
right to call your
doctor after he
writes that note to
determine just how
sick you are.

Do you have
debilitating migraines or just
repeated late-night hangovers?
Employers say the federal law that
lets workers take up to 12 weeks of
unpaid time off without losing their
jobs needs more clarity.

A major point of contention is not
the provision that many of us
working parents use to take time off
after childbirth or Peer but



inp KRISCHER
GOODMAN
x . cgoodman@

~MiamiHerald. com :









rather a medical leave problem that
employers and their attorneys say
has grown out of control.

HR professionals like Karen
Ansell of The Cornerstone Group in
Miami, fla., say there’s confusion
over what rises to the level of
“serious health condition” covered
by the act and the use of
unscheduled intermittent leave or
sporadic absences.

Some employers say workers use
minor ailments such as sinus
problems as a reason to seek benefits
under the Family and Medical Leave
Act and they bring vague doctors’
notes as proof of a sporadic need to
miss work.

“Employers need more tools
when they see certain patterns and
suspect something is going on,” said
Michael P. Aitken, director of
governmental affairs for the Society
for Human Resource Management.

On Dec. 1, the Labor Department
opened the floodgates for the public

*TURN TO BALANCING ACT



Chrysler Group.



DAVID ZALUBOWSKI/AP

UP IN THE AIR: It’s anybody’s guess as to who is planning to buy


4B |

ECONOMIC GROWTH

_ INTERNATIONAL EDITION

City’s fast growth

incurring bumps

°CHINA

Changes followed rapidly
as companies began to pay for
work done rather than for
time worked and, for the first
time, to link salaries with per-
formance, both of which
“vastly increased productiv-
ity,” said Yang Yaolin, direc-
tor of the city’s history
museum.

An indication of Shenzhen
speed is on display at the
museum. An exhibition pre-
serves a typical home from
the early 1980s that today is
considered a relic. A poster of
Mao Zedong hangs ona wall,
a sewing machine sits beside a
manual typewriter, and a hot
plate rests on a counter next

-to a flimsy bed.

Looking at the room, 73-
year-old Wu Yanda, a retired
factory manager who now
lives in a “European-style
villa,” recalled that when he
moved to Shenzhen in 1987,
such lodgings were ‘quite
luxurious.”

BALANCING ACT

Rules for
medical
leave
need —
clarifying

*BALANCING ACT

to comment on what’s work-
ing and what’s not with
FMLA, the 12-year-old law
that made America’s work-

places more family-friendly. °

More than 15,000 individuals
and organizations responded.

“A dozen years is a good
time when we should look at
regulations again to make
sure they are up to date,” Vic-
toria Lipnick, U.S. assistant
secretary of labor for employ-
ment standards told me. Lip-
nick says she has heard
employer criticism about the
medical leave part and that’s
one reason for collecting pub-
lic comments. “We want to
know how much of a problem
it is.”

Meanwhile, workers’
groups are preparing for a
fight to protect their rights.
under the FMLA. Since any

part of the law could be.

rewritten, they are making
their voices heard, too. ‘

We all know that family-
friendly policies are good for
employees and their busi-
nesses. They typically make
workers more loyal.

As of late 2006, more than
50 million Americans had
taken job-protected unpaid
leave to care for a new baby, a
seriously ill family member or
to recover from their own
serious health problem. Only
employers with 50 or more

AUTOMOBILES

“Today, it’s ancient his-
tory,” he said. “Most people
have a lot more.”

But not everyone is bask-
ing in the new prosperity.

The combination of low
pay, grueling work and dis-
crimination has led to
increasing labor unrest.

Shenzhen accounted for 15
percent of China’s court-adju-
dicated labor disputes last
year and the number of
migrant workers seeking jobs
in the city has fallen in recent
years as they chose to look
elsewhere, said Liu.

The change has forced
companies to raise salaries by
as much as 20 percent, a shift
that could lead factories to
relocate, he said, adding that
“if the situation doesn’t
improve, companies will not
be able to find enough work-
ers and the economy will have
to slow down.”

With urban ills growing
across China, cities are
looking at Shenzhen for les-
sons on how to deal with the

i

workers must comply with
FMLA. I am one who is grate-
ful to have used FMLA three
times to avoid the pull
between work and family
each time a new baby came.

Remember, this is not a
way to play hooky on your
employer’s dime. The only
thing you are guaranteed is
job protection, not paid leave.

What’s at risk for you, the
employee, should changes
occur? You might be forced to
give up the ability to stretch a
12-week leave should you or a
family member get sick. Now,
employees can take leave in
shorter intervals, such as 15
minutes or one hour.

Some employers want to

problems and avert an eco-
nomic slowdown.

“Because development has
been the most rapid in Shen-
zhen, the problems are the
most extreme here,” said
Huang Donghe, editor of the
Shenzhen Youth Magazine.
“But every Chinese city faces
the same problems.”

City government plans to
tackle the problems include
attracting better-paying high-
tech manufacturers while
forcing heavily polluting
firms to clean up or move fur-
ther inland and improving
access to health care and edu-
cation for migrant workers,
said Yang Lixun, a Shenzhen-
based government sociolo-
gist.

Last year the government
set up a fund to compensate
workers left unpaid when
companies close. The city
also has announced plans to
greatly expand the city’s sub-
way system by 2010, build
more parks and increase recy-
cling programs.



y

MCT/MIAMI HERALD ILLUSTRATION

make workers take time off in
half-day increments. That
could prevent you, the
employee, from coming in an
hour late for a prenatal doctor
visit or lunchtime kidney dial-
ysis. And they are asking for a
hard look at redefining seri-
ous health conditions to cover
problems where the employee
is. unable to work for five or
more business days.

Debra Ness, director of the
National Partnership for
Women & Families, calls any
changes ‘‘alarming.”’ She
wants a comprehensive study
to prove problems exist with
medical leave. “Research
would show the law is work-
ing well,” Ness said.

Firms eyeing Chrysler

° CHRYSLER

be brought to market by GM,
BMW and Chrysler.

The likelihood of a recov-
ering GM taking on the many
problems of a financially way-
ward Chrysler Group “just
doesn’t make much sense” at
this time, one top GM official
said.

But nowadays in the topsy-
turvy automobile industry,
anything is possible, including
the takeover of Chrysler by
people who historically have
had little to do with the busi-
ness of building and selling
cars and trucks.

For example, Ed Lapham, a
knowledgeable and well-re-
spected columnist for the
Detroit-based Automotive
News, speculates that well-fi-
nanced venture capitalists

could put their considerable
sums together to buy out
Chrysler.

Why not? It could be a way
to turn a quick profit. Venture
capitalists are not as inter-
ested in running companies as
they are in aggrandizing over-
all corporate value and selling
off the parts to the highest
bidders. They have no fear of
doing business with the Chi-
nese, or anyone else, as long
as the potential buyers can
show them the money.

Chery Automobile, a Chi-
nese-government-backed
business with ambitions of
rapid growth and global
expansion, especially into the
lucrative North American
market, has the money.

That is why Chery has
agreed to help Chrysler
develop its next generation of

small, fuel-efficient automo-
biles. Chery isn’t acting out of
altruism or love for Chrysler.
The Chinese company is
smart.

It has studied how its cor-
porate Asian siblings entered
the U.S. market — initially by
strengthening their visibility
on the West Coast, where
regional buyers are least
resistant to import newcom-
ers and are very supportive of
Asian brands.

The Chinese know that
what doesn’t sell here as a
Chrysler product could very
well sell as an identifiable
Asian model — as long as the
quality and price are right.

With Chrysler struggling
and desperately in need of
help, it all comes down to a
matter of timing — and Chery
picking the market.



MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD









TONY YU/BLOOMBERG NEWS

SHOPPING: Homebuyers examine a model of the Top King Hill residential project in
Shenzhen, one of China’s largest cities with a population pushing 18 million and a
landscape of skyscrapers, luxury apartments and shopping malls.

“In the 1980s and ’90s,
Shenzhen developed by
attracting low-value manufac-
turing that stressed high con-
sumption and allowed high
levels of pollution,” Yang
said.

FEDERAL COURT

There is little evidence that
the initiatives are working so
far, Liu said. He noted that
workers continue to have
very little access to public
services and pollution and
traffic seems to have gotten

worse in recent months.

“In China the most impor-
tant thing is not to listen to
what government officials say
but to see if they actually do
anything,” he said. ‘So far,
they haven’t done much.”

Investors look to gain
from insurance tax case

* TAXES

Other insurers that demu-
tualized include Principal
Financial, which had a!most
1 million policyholders when
it reorganized in 2001, and
John Hancock Financial Ser-
vices, which had 3 million
policyholders. John Hancock
was later purchased by Cana-
da’s Manulife Financial.

The IRS, citing: administra-
tive rulings from the 1970s,
said policyholders did not pay
for the cash and stock and
owed taxes on the amount
they received from the demu-
tualizations. The IRS argued
that policyholders had no rea-
sonable expectation their
ownership interest would
ever have value, that it could
not be traded like a stock, and
policyholders could not antic-
ipate if or when a demutuali-
zation might occur.

Ulrich, who began study-
ing the issue in 2001, argues

PAY SCALES

that demutualization distribu-
tions should be treated as a
return of the premiums poli-
cyholders paid for their own-
ership interests. Under differ-
ent regulations that govern
such distributions, no taxes
were owed, he said.

“The government is failing
to follow its own code and
regulations,” Ulrich said.

Other tax and insurance

experts agree with: much*of’

Ulrich’s analysis.

In most stock sales, tax is
only owed on the sharehold-
ers’ gain — the difference
between the price initially
paid for the shares, known as
the “cost basis,” and the price
received when they are sold.

| “Certainly, it’s very harsh
to say that you have no cost
basis,” said Brendan Bridge-
land, policy director for the
Center for Insurance
Research in Cambridge, Mass.

The legal battle started in
2004, when Ulrich prepared

an amended tax return for a
client who had received stock
from a demutualization that
was subsequently sold for
$31,579. Ulrich requested a
refund of $5,725 in taxes paid
on the sale. The claim was
denied.

Burgess J.W. Raby, a law-
yer based in Tempe, Ariz.,
challenged the IRS’ denial in
the Court of Federal Claims.

‘sLast November, the court

rejected the IRS’ argument
that its'tax treatment is a mat-
ter of ‘settled. law and said
administrative rulings from
the 1970s were not relevant.

Anyone who might be .
affected in these cases should
file a claim for a refund
because even if it is rejected,
the claim extends the dead-
line for a potential refund by
two years, Ulrich said.

But “if people sit and wait
to see how this is going to
turn out, they’re going to lose
out,” Ulrich said.

Websites arm employees

° SALARY

to you,” said Iain Fitzpatrick,
general manager of the
reward information service
division of Hay. The compen-
sation companies do not want
their information being used
against bosses negotiating sal-
aries.

“The last thing we want is
for a client to say, ‘We just
had a conversation with an
employee who was quoting
Hay data,’” Fitzpatrick said.

Unlike Salary.com, which
obtains its information from a
variety of surveys of corpo-
rate human resource depart-
ments, PayScale collects the
information directly from
people seeking the data.

If you want PayScale’s sal-
ary information, first you will
have to tell them what you
make. A basic report is free,
but the company charges $20
for a more detailed analysis.

SEARCH ENGINE

PayScale, which supplies
its data to job listing sites like
CareerBuilder.com, Jobs-
ter.com and Simply-
Hired.com, says it uses search
engine technology and a
rules-based algorithm to
match requests for data in a
database of 5.5 million pro-
files. ,
Executives at Salary.com,
which provides its data to job
boards at America Online,
Yahoo, HotJobs.com and
Monster.com, take issue with
the new approach. Their sur-
vey found 96 percent of
human resources depart-

ments do not trust user-re-
ported data. William Cole-
man, senior vice president for
compensation at Salary.com,
said, “People get information
wrong.”

He said they often did not
understand what benefits or

bonuses they were getting, so_

he considered any self-report-
ing to be suspect.

ACCURACY

But Joe Giordano, the
founder, chairman and also
vice president for product
development at PayScale, said
its information was accurate.

“People come onto PayS-
cale with no incentive to lie
because they want high-qual-
ity information,” he said.

The company checks the
information for inconsisten-
cies, tossing out extremes. It
said that about 50 percent of
submissions were not
included, but that it got
enough, about 300,000 a
month, that no single filing
could influence the overall
result. ’

“We collect more in one
day than some companies col-
lect in a year,” said Michael
Metzger, the chief executive.

It takes about six minutes
to fill in its questionnaire.

PayScale asks for your title,.

the number of years in the
field and your city.

It then asks you to better
define your job.
_ If you said software pro-
grammer, it wants to know
what kind of programmer and
what programming languages
you know.

with salary information

People in professions with
a profusion of titles are asked
more questions.

Finally, it asks you ques-
tions about your employer,
your education, and, of
course, your salary and bene-
fits. «3

Then it computes the
results and displays them ona
graph so you can see the
range.

A senior software engineer
in Silicon Valley with 20 years
of experience makes $88,531
to $106,364.

A benefits claims examiner

‘in Indianapolis, who has been

on the job for a decade, makes
$41,122 to $54,821.

LITTLE DIFFERENCE

Although Salary.com
argues that its paid results are
more accurate, its free Salary
Wizard tool yields results that
can barely differ: for example,
a range of $84,289 to $107,711
for the programmer and
$40,091 to $52,942 for the
examiner.

PayScale, which gets about
a third of the traffic that Sala-
ry.com does, says it has infor-
mation on jobs not usually
found in corporate salary sur-
veys like pornographic film
actor (average salary:
$63,275), rabbi (average sal-
ary: $98,610) and crossing
guard (average hourly wage:
$9.21), but so far no chick sex-
ers, mimes or bloggers are in
its roster.

“We don’t get many boiler
makers, but we get the jobs
that are out there in volume,”
Giordano said.


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007, PAGE 5B

Attention:



Nova Southeastern University’s
i. Wayne Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship
is now accepting applications for Fall Term 2007 enrollment
~ at its main campus in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

Bahamian students interested in pursuing a business education in the United
kates are encouraged to attend one of the following Mntarintion Sessions:

Tuesday, March 13 or Thursday, March 15
6:00 p.m.
British Colonial Hilton Hotel, Nassau

The following topics will be discussed at the Information Sessions:
Nova Southeastern University Athletic Programs
Huizenga School of Business and Entrepreneurship Tuition and Fees

: | Financial Aid and Scholarships
Graduation Requirements

Business Careers and Job Opportunities

Admission Requirements

Business Degree Majors and Minors
Student Housing and Residential Life
Clubs and Campus Activities

The Information Sessions are open to the public. |

RSVP is required. |
Call: (242) 364-6766, ext.0 = Email: nsu-bahamas@nsu.nova. athe

Applications will be available and accepted at both sessions.
The $50 application fee will be waived for those who apply between March 12 and 17.

Nova Southeastern University is the sixth largest private, not-for-profit HS
university in the United States. NSU is accredited. by the Commission NY ae
=a

on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. The

Huizenga School is home to the largest M.B.A. program in Florida, and . 7 SOT rGE ASTERN
offers bachelor’s degrees in management, business administration, : UNIVERSITY





finance, accounting and sport and recreation management. The

Huizenga School is accredited by IACBE and is a member of AACSB.

H. i. Wayne Huizenga School of
Business and Entrepreneurship



specialist, and doctoral degrees.

Nova Southeastern University admits students of any race, color, sexual orientation, and national or ethnic origin. Nova Southeastern University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of
the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033- 4097, Telephone number: 404-679-4501) to award associate's, bachelor’s, master’s, educational

02-178-07PGA
PAGE 6B, MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007




Visit their web
site at:
www.swiftyears.com






lrish & British
Pub Beer on
sale, as well
as Kalik |







DRESS CODE:
Green &
White




Saturday, March 10â„¢ from 7 - 10 at Choices Courtyard
on the COB Campus - off Thompson Boulevard




ADMISSION: General: $25 (includes 1 BEER)
Students: $10 (includes 1 SODA)









FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL: 302-4587 or 4584
THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND EXTENSION SERVICES
PRESENTS

A One Day Workshop
Superior Customer Service

This workshop is designed to provide participants with an overview of the
fundamentals of superior customer service. It focuses on customer value,

retention and relationship building and employee motivation.








Topics to be covered:

The Customer Service Environment
Understanding the Customer
Communication and Customer Service
Handling Complaints and the Difficult Customer
Creating Your Customer Service Strategy for Loyal Customers
The Face of the Future

Thursday, 29 March 2007
9:30am — 4:00pm
TBA

$170.00 Full payment is required at time of registration.
CASH, CREDIT CARD OR BANK CERTIFIED CHEQUE ACCEPTED

Application Fee:$40.00 (one time payment)






Date:
Time:
Venue:





Tuition:




Certification: | A Continuing Education Certificate on successful completion.
Enquiries: Contact the co-ordinator at Tel. (242) 302-5201 / 302-5205 or 302-5202 or
email: nlacroix@cob.edu.bs

All fees included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time payment)
CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials.






~ PRESIDENT’S SCHOLARS
PROGRAMME



The College of The Bahamas is now accepting applications for its prestigious and
valuable President’s Scholars Programme (PSP), a scholarship and leadership programme
for high-achieving, highly-motivated, service-oriented students who will be pursuing
a FIRST-TIME bachelor degree at COB, beginning in Fall 2007.

Applications are welcome from all High School Seniors who possess:

° Cumulative GPA of 3.5

° SAT scores of 1200 on the two-part (math and critical reading) 1800 three-
part (math, reading and writing) OR

° Seven (7) BGCSE’s (minimum of 5 A’s in core subjects)

° Proven leadership skills |

Benefits

ye Scholarship Award of $24,000.00 ($6,000.00 per year for 4 years)

° ns Leadership Training with opportunities for international

ravel.

Applications and brochures can be downloaded from

Hand deliver applications to The College of The Bahamas, Office of Student Leadership,
Â¥ Room A 85, Administration Block, Oakes Field Campus, Nassau, The Bahamas OR
mail to P. O. Box N-4912, Nassau, Bahamas.

Deadline Friday, March 31, 2007

For further information, telephone the Director at (242) 302-4559




(UWI) |
LL.B. PROGRAMME (FULL-TIME) |
AT THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

The normal entry requirements for the UWI LL.B. DEGREE are
based on the following basic UWI Matriculation standards:

(a) Five subjects, at least two of which must be at Advanced (A) Level
and the remainder at CXC (Caribbean Examinations Council) general
or BGCSE (Bahamas General Certificate of Secondary Education) or
the equivalent; OR

(b) ASSOCIATE OR BACHELOR degree with a CUMULATIVE
GPA OF 2.5 OR HIGHER. Note: Space in the programme is limited
and competition is high. Therefore, above average 'A' Level grades
and high averages (AT LEAST 3.0) in undergraduate degrees are
required for an applicant to stand a reasonable chance of gaining
admission. .

The College of The Bahamas will consider a limited number of
applications from persons who do not satisfy Matriculation standards
as identified above but who have equivalent academic qualifications.
In particular, MATURE APPLICANTS OVER 30 WHO PROVIDE
EVIDENCE OF ACADEMIC AND PROFESSIONAL
ACHIEVEMENT CAN BE CONSIDERED. This is an opportunity
for persons who have already been associated with the practice of law
in some way to read for a law degree. A resume must be submitted
with the COB and UWI applications.

All applicants are required to sit a Proficiency Exam, at a date to
announced, by end of June 2007. ,

Interested persons must complete a College of The Bahamas and
University of the West Indies Application for Admission Form available
from the Office of Admissions, 2nd Floor, Portia Smith Building,
Poinciana Drive, The College of The Bahamas. _

Kindly»submit by March 30, 2007 completed applications, original
certificates (which will be returned to the applicant), copies of original
certificates, transcripts (sent directly from universities or colleges
previously attended) to the Director of Admissions at COB, and proof
of payment of the $40.00 application fee (paid at the BUSINESS
OFFICE AT COB).

Calling all
~ COB alumni

Get in on the excitement of building
the University of The Bahamas!

SSNS WN

Whether you graduated from The

College with the Class of 77 or just last

year, we want to hear from you to

e Keep you up to date on news of the
University of The Bahamas
Network you with other alumni in
your field
Invite you to-a reception to meet the
President

e Brag about your achievements

e Ask your advice.

So COB Alumni, let’s reconnect.

Call Alumni and Development today
302-4355 or 6

oremail —

alumnil(dcob.edu.bs
head(dcob.edu.bs



THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS



THE UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST INDIES"

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THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS




THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMES 2007

What is your goal?

Y/Y PROMOTION

Y QUALITY SERVICE

Y SALARY INCREASE

Y NEW CAREER

Y CAREER ENHANCEMENT
We can provide you with superior education and training to
help you accomplish your goal.

Tel: 242-328-0093 or 242-328-1936
Call today!







For your convenience, the majority of classes are
held on Saturdays, 8am - 12noon.

Are you preparing for a promotion, career change or career enhancement? The Professional Development Department
can help you achieve your career goals! We offer a wide array of courses and programmes leading to certificate, certification
and licensure. You can become the pacesetter for performance excellence in your organization. The College of The Bahamas partners
with leading international institutions offering many of the top internationally recognized professional certifications and designations.
You can continue to improve your professional development credentials at The College of The Bahamas. How successful do you
want to be? It’s largely up to you and CEES is here to help you climb.

Choose the courses or programme to help you accomplish your career
goals...

e Certified Professional Managers Programme

Certificate Programme For The Office Assistant

A+ Computer Technician Certification

Certified Computer Operator- Microsoft Office Specialist: Word, Excel, Access, Outlook, PowerPoint)
Certificate In Law- Paralegal

Certified Public Accountant (Becker Conviser CPA Review)
Certificate in Human Resource Managers Programme
Certificate Programme In Supervisory Management
Journeyman Plumbing License

Master Plumbing License

Certified Project Manager

Accounting For Non-Financial Managers

Ethics and Professional Responsibility

Legal Writing & Research

Writing & Research

Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet

No entrance exams. Tuition may be paid per term or in full. International
/ programmes available.

CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL MANAGERS PROGRAMME

This programme is administered in conjunction with The Institute of Certified Professional Management
at James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Virginia. The CM Programme provides Supervisors, Managers,
H and Team Leaders with the fundamental knowledge needed for today’s management challenges. A
comprehensive instructional scheme gives you the competence you need to meet high standards of
performance.

TERM 1
TPM 900 Personal Skills- $500
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350

TERM 3 .
TPM 902 Interpersonal Skills- $600
CPS 901 Accounts- $300

PREREQUISITE: 3 or more years as a Trainer, Supervisor or Manager with an AA Degree or a B. A. Degree from an
accredited or recognized college/university; COMP956 Intro. To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200

Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS

CERTIFICATION IN PROJECT MANAGEMENT

PROJ901 Master Project Management- $800

This course focuses on strengthening skills previously developed. The core competencies of project management are
addressed, and the following topics are discussed at the advanced level: leadership, project performance management,
project plan development, and people-based project management, project quality, scope, time, cost, human resources, ©
communications, risk, procurement, and integration management. é

Prerequisite: A Bachelors Degree in any discipline from an accredited or recognized college/ university or a minimum
of 4 years experience as a Project Management Apprentice; Curriculum vitae, a Professional Development Seminar:
ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250

Begins: Per demand Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am - 1pm Duration: 10 Weeks

@ Please note that Material Fee, External Registration and Examination Fees are not included in the cost of tuition.

- CERTIFICATE PROGRAMME FOR THE OFFICE ASSISTANT

With the advent of the high-tech office, the Clerks’/Office Assistants’ (O/A) role has evolved as one of the most important
support factors in the operational management process. In an effort to equip the support level staff to function efficiently
in the work environment, CEES is pleased to offer a proficiency programme in basic office skills. The O/A outline maps
closely with the International Association of Administrative Professionals (AAP) programme content.

TERM1 TERM 2

CPS 903 Office Technology- $500 CPS 911 Recards Management- $200

CPS 910 Managing Physical Resources- $300 CPS 909 Business Communication- $300
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250

TERM 2

TPM 901 Administrative Skills- $700

ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210

TERM 3
CPS 901 Accounts- $300
CPS 906 Human Resources- $300; WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350

PREREQUISITE: 3 yrs. work experience or an AA Degree in any discipline from an accredited or recognized
college/university with 0 work experience; COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200
Begins: Spring Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12 N; Weekdays: 6pm - 8:50pm Duration:3 TERMS

CERTIFICATE IN LAW

This programme is offered in conjunction with The Institute of Legal Executives (ILEX), Bedford, England.
ILEX qualification routes are vocationally relevant and designed to build and test legal knowledge and understanding at
the paralegal level. Designed to facilitate the training and educational needs of Legal Secretaries, Legal Clerks, Legal
Office Managers, Law Enforcement Officers, Special Assistants to Lawyers, Justices of The Peace, and all persons
interested in acquiring an impressive array of legal office skills, the Certificate in Law qualification is specifically relevant
to The Bahamas legal system. Courses include:

TERM 1

WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills -§350
LWRE900 Legal Writing & Research - $350 LAW 901 General Legal Principles-$600.00

LAW 900 The Legal Environment -$600.00 CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
TERM 3 Choose ONE from among the following Option/Concentration Courses

WE. Option Courses are subject to change)

LAW 903 Company Law- $600
LAW 905 Employment Law- $600

TERM 2
ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250

LAW 906 Law of Mortgages- $600

LAW 947 Law Office Management- $600
LAW 907 Nature and Role of Criminal Law- $600 LAW 936 Law of the Sea- $600
PREREQUISITE: AA Degree and 3 years work experience;
COMP956 Intro. To Computers, Windows & The Internet- $200
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am- 12:15pm — Duration: 3 TERMS

A+ COMPUTER TECHNICIAN CERTIFICATION

This programme of study is designed to equip students with the skills necessary to successfully sit the international A+
Microsoft Certification Examination. Techniques to identify and rectify mechanical problems related to the personal
computer are explored. It is a hands-on learning experience with lab exercises that help the student to apply theory to
practice.

TERM 1: COMP 954 Software- $510 TERM 2: COMP 955 Hardware- $510
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200
Begins: Per Demand Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm Duration: 2 TERMS

CERTIFIED COMPUTER OPERATOR (Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS)

This course of study is designed to train students how to master Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Access,
Microsoft Outlook, and PowerPoint. To help the student to develop navigation and design skills, the instructor provides
easy to understand notes and conducts live demonstrations on how to manipulate the entire MS Office Suite. Upon
successful completion of the external international examinations, the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) Certification is
awarded. The programme comprises five Modules and two companion courses:

TERM 1 TERM 2
COMP 506 Microsoft Office Specialist ETHC900 Ethics & Profes. Responsibility- $250 (Optional)
Microsoft Word, Microsoft Access CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210

Microsoft Excel, Microsoft PowerPoint TERM 3
Microsoft Outlook TOMP 906 Microsoft Office Specialist
WRS 906 Writing and Research Skills- $350 (Optional). CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210

NOTE: COMP906 is offered in Spring, Summer and Fall terms. Students are.free to select the term of study.
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200
Begins: Spring and Fall _ Day/Time: Sat. 8:00am-12:15pm

THE BECKER CPA REVIEW

The College of The Bahamas is pleased to offer the New CPA Computer Based Test (CBT). Besides the obvious transition
from a pencil-and-paper exam to a computer-based test, the revised CPA Exam will also contain a new content focus -
broadening the scope of audit and attest areas and incorporating the assessment of critical skills, such as research and
communication. The new exam also has increased emphasis on general business knowledge and information technology.
Students may sit the final exams under the United States CPA Board for which they have qualified.

CPA 900 Financial Reporting- $650 CPA 901 Accounting & Reporting/Regulation- $520
CPA 902 Law/Business Law- $465 CPA 903 Auditing/Auditing and Attestation- $465
Prerequisite: A BA Degree from an accredited or recognized college/university in any discipline with at least 21
credit hours in accounting.
Begins: Spring and Fall

Duration: 3 TERMS

Day/Time: Sat. 8:30am - 5:30pm Duration: 12 Weeks

MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2007, PAGE 7B

Me ere EE



CERTIFICATION IN HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
This nine months programme is designed for those individuals seeking professional development and aspiring to rise through
the ranks in the HR field. The programme offers six core courses, two prerequisites, and one compulsory professional
development seminar. :

TERM 1 TERM 2

WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350

HRM 900 Intro To HRM Environment- $200 HRM 902 H/R Development & Training-$200

HRM 901 Securing Human Resources- $200 HRM 903 Rewards Compensation and Benefits-$300
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350
CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210

TERM 3 ,

ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250

HRM 904 Labour Management Relations- $300

HRM 905 Protecting and Evaluating Human Resources- $300

PREREQUISITE: A BA Degree in any discipline from an accredited or recognized college/university or a minimum of 5 years

ds a manager, supervisor or trainer, WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills, ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility,

and COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200 :

Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12:15pm Duration: 3 TERMS

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMME IN SUPERVISORY MANAGEMENT

Supervisors with cutting edge skills know how to accomplish difficult tasks, solve complicated problems and master challenges
in decision making. This programme is aimed at supervisors and middle managers who wish to update their supervisory
skills, or persons who have been promoted and wish to gain additional insight into the world of supervisory management.
This programme entails essential training for persons wishing to become an associate manager.

TERM 1 TERM 2

TPM 900 Personal Skills- $500 SUPV 500 Supervisory Management (SUPV 1)- $500
WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350 ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250

CPS 901 Accounts- $300 CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210

TERM 3
TPM 902 Interpersonal Skills- $600

PREREQUISITE: 3 or more years experience as a Supervisor/Manager or Trainer and an AA Degree in any discipline from
a recognized or accredited institution; COMP956 Intro. To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200
Begins: Spring and Fall Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12pm Duration: 3 TERMS ,

CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL SECRETARY REVIEW PROGRAMME

The Certified Professional Secretary (CPS) Review, offered in conjunction with The International Association of Administrative
Professionals (IAAP) is a 9-month course of study designed to prepare administrative professionals and clerical assistants
to write the CPS international exam.
TERM 1

CPS 903 Office Technology- $500
CPS 910 Managing Physical Resources- $300

TERM 2

CPS 911 Records Management- $200

CPS 909 Business Communication- $300

CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210

OPTION COURSES
TPS 901 Accounts- $300 ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250
CPS 906 Human Resources- $300 WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills- $350

PREREQUISITE: 4 yrs. Work experience or a BA Degree in any discipline from an accredited or recognized college/university
with 0 work experience; COMP956 introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200
Begins: Spring Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12 N; Weekdays: 6pm - 8:50pm Duration: 3 TERMS

JOURNEYMAN PLUMBING LICENSE

The Journeyman Plumbing course is designed to assist students preparing to write the Journeyman Plumbing Examination.
Topics include: interpretation of codes, disposal and drainage systems, storm drainage disposal systems, installation of
sanitary fixtures, basic drawings to scale, water supply and distribution, use of materials and tools, repairs and maintenance.
The examination is offered in conjunction with The Ministry of Public Works. At the end of the course, candidates are required

to take one (1) Professional Development Seminar.
TERM 1 TERM 2 (Optional)
upervisory Management- $500
(SUPV900 is available for Plant/Plumbing Supervisors)

JPLM900 Journeyman Plumbing- $800
ETHC900 Ethics and Prof. Responsibility- $250

CPM 903 Professional Development Seminar- $210
PREREQUISITE: Students should have working knowledge and skills in the following areas: interpretation of codes, disposal
and drainage systems, storm drainage disposal systems, installation of sanitary fixtures, basic drawings to scale, water supply
and distribution, use of materials and tools, repairs and maintenance.
Begins: Spring, Summer or Fall Day/Time: Tuesdays 6pm - 9pm Duration: 2 TERMS

MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING FOR NON-FINANCIAL MANAGERS.

This course is designed to strengthen the candidates’ understanding of managerial accounting. Managerial accounting
concepts, principles and functions are the main topics covered. The ability to prepare and accurately read a financial
statement/spreadsheet is an essential skill for all professionals and paraprofessionals; CPS901 covers in a very student
friendly way, easy to understand examples that aid the students’ learning experience. This course also helps to prepare
candidates to write external examinations.

CPS 901 Accounts- $300
PREREQUISITE: None

BEGINS: Per demand Day/Time: Sat/Thurs/Tue. 8am-12:15pm OR-6pm-9pm Duration: 10 Weeks
ETHICS AND PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY

This course examines guidelines for the professional behavior of members of any organisation. A select group of codes of
ethics and ethics cases will be explored to support a theoretical and practical discourse on why the application of ethics
and professional responsibility is important in all aspects of society. °

ETHC900 Ethics and Professional Responsibility- $250
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200
Begins: Per demand Day/Time: Sat. 8am-12noon OR Thurs/Tue- 6pm - 9pm _ Duration: 8 Weeks

WRITING & RESEARCH SKILLS

This course is designed to provide mature students with reading, writing, research and critical thinking skills to prepare
them for entry into CEES’ professional development programmes. WRS 900 is also structured to provide certification candidates
with the skills necessary to successfully write position and research papers.

WRS 900 Writing and Research Skills - $350
PREREQUISITE: COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200
Begins: Per demand Day/Time: Sat.- 8am-12noon’ or Thursday/Tue- 6pm - 9pm Duration: 8 Weeks

LWRE900 LEGAL WRITING & RESEARCH

Students will learn writing and research techniques for use in case briefs, legal memoranda, motions and reports. Primary
and secondary source materials will be discussed, and a concise approach to legal research will be presented. American
Psychological Association (APA) and Modern Language Association (MLA) Citation formats will also be covered.

TERM 3

LWRE900 Legal Writing & Research- $350
PREREQUISITE: COMP955 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200
Begins: Spring, Summer & Fall Day/Time: Sat.- 8am-12noon Duration: 8 Weeks

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS, WINDOWS & THE INTERNET

This workshop provides a broad foundation for students so that they will have a greater awareness and confidence using
personal computers. Students will gain practical information and skills, such as what a computer is, how to manage personal
files and folders that they create.

COMP956 Introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet- $200
PREREQUISITE: None

Begins: Summer, Spring & Fall Day/Time: Sat.- 8am-12noon Duration: 3 Weeks .
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT & RECERTIFICATION SEMINAR

This compulsory Seminar addresses important issues that are vital to the adult students’ learning experience and is designed
to serve both as a capstone for professional development programmes and as a continuing education activity. It provides
opportunities for additional education points for programme entry, course/ programme completion, as well as recertification.
The Seminar offers two break-out sessions, serving two distinct groups: Part 1- Professional peronen candidates: Five
Seminar contact hours plus 3 hours programme closure activity; Part 2- Recertification candidates: Five Seminar contact
hours plus an additional 3 lecture hours of prescribed guided independent study from any professional development course.

CPMP3903 Professional Development Seminar - $210
Begins: Spring Day: Mainly on Saturdays and per demand

IMPORTANT INFORMATION
ESSENTIAL COMPUTER KNOWLEDGE

Effective Summer 2005, basic computer and Internet skills will be required of all students. Assessment for exemption from
COMP956 introduction To Computers, Windows and The Internet will be done via proof of a certificate from an authorized
provider or by taking a prescribed computer skills test to verify competency in Windows and Computers. Students failing
the competency test will be required to take the Introduction to The Internet, Windows and Computers. This Workshop is a
prerequisite for all programmes or single courses.

EXTERNAL EXAMINATIONS
Please note that fees for external examinations and external registration are not included in the cost of tuition. Be sure to
contact your Advisor on examination dates, venue, costs and related details.

ADVISEMENT & REGISTRATION SESSIONS

Please bring the following items with you to the advisement/registration session:

Duration: 8 hours

1. The first four pages of your Passport. In the case of new Passports, the last page should be copied.
2. Copies of your certificates/licensures and college/university transcripts

3. Where applicable, letters of recommendation, job description, special awards, etc.

Please Note:

e Noentrance examination is required for enrollment in professional development courses/programmes.

© Tuition is charged per term; i.e. you will be billed only for courses offered in the current term.

¢ Non-Bahamians add $50 to each course/workshop/seminar

° At the first class session, ALL students must submit to the Programme Coordinator one copy each of his/her stamped receipts
representing payment for tuition and fees for the current term.

APPLICANTS FOR INTERNATIONAL CERTIFICATION COURSES AND PROGRAMMES
All students applying for International Certification Courses and Programmes that are offered in conjunction with foreign institutions are
required to contact the CEES Office for information on external application and examination fees.



FEES

1. COB Registration. $40.00 (one-time fee)
2. Insurance... $25.00 (valid for 1 year)
3. ID Card........ ....$25.00 (one time fee)





4. Technology $100 #
5, Professional Development Se' .. $210 (one time fee)
GiBOOKSiivsaeresctec cetesescatedahes ecesuilassnugsstsatartigeebbees Please contact COB Bookstore for prices.
7. External Application/Examination Fees.............. Each student is required to contact the CEES

Office for information on External Application/Examination Fees.

Secure Your Seat By Enrolling Today!
Classes for Spring begin March 10. The deadline for registration is March 15,2007
Call (242) 328-0093/(242) 328-1936. Make the call today! or visit us on Moss Road in Oakes Field.
Fees May Be Paid By Cash, Credit Card, or Bank Certified Cheque To: The College of The Bahamas, Business Office
Cees Reserves The Right To Change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule And Course Materials.
PAGE 8B, MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

Bahamas must
highlight TIEA to
counter Obama





an

a



â„¢@ MICHAEL PATON

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited

INVITATION FOR EMPLOYMENT

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers of the
Royal Island resort and residential project, an ultra-luxury
resort and private club residential community with private
residences and club, 200 slip marina and boutique hotel and
spa, and a golf course just off North Eleuthera invites suit-
ably qualified individuals to apply for the following position
with the company:

MAINTENANCE MANAGER -

¢ Must have sound mechanical qualifications, experience
and skills with all types of vehicles, boats & water toys.

* Responsible for the maintenance, upkeep and repair of the
following inventory:

Boat/ Water fleet
° 44’ Morgan
¢ 38’ Jupiter
¢ 26’ Dusky
e 15’ Boston Whaler
e 18’ Flats Boat
e Yamaha Jet Skis

Land Fleet
¢ 6 Polaris Ranger 2x4’s ~
¢ Golf Carts
¢ Some Construction machinery

* Knowledge and experience with electrical, plumbing and
building repairs and maintenance also essential, either in 4
or 5 star resort, or on private property.

° Responsible for upkeep of tool/maintenance shed with
particular strength in inventory and stock control and
general order.

¢ Must ensure that all maintenance tools are operated safely
and only by staff qualified to use them.

¢ Must have excellent organizational and skills, an eye for
detail.

Interested persons should submit their resumes with cover,
letter to:
The H.R. Director
GCM
P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas
Fax to: (242) 356-4125

Or Email to: info@ gomezcorp.com

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for
their interest, however only those under consideration will
be contacted..



BIs

Pricing Information As Of:

Previous Close Today's Close

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
“Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

P. ier Real E:

5S2wk-Low
12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Bahamas should
"emphasise that it
entered into a Tax
Information Exchange Agree-
ment (TIEA) with Washington
to combat tax evasion by US
citizens, and that it should pur-
sue this method to clamp down
on the offences cited as the spur
for a Bill backed by Democrat-
ic presidential candidate,
Barack Obama, a leading attor-
ney said yesterday. :
Michael Paton, a partner and
head of Lennox Paton’s finan-

cial services practice, and a for-
mer Bahamas Financial Services
Board (BFSB) chairman, said
this nation should stick to its
position on the TIEA and its
willingness to co-operate with
US law enforcement and tax
authorities should the Obama

_ Bill gain transaction in the US

Senate.

The Bahamas was among 34
jurisdictions targeted by the Bill,
called the Stop Tax Haven
Abuse Act, introduced by Mr
Obama and leading members
from both parties on the US
Senate’s Permanent Subcom-

- mittee on Investigations, Norm

SG Hambros, part of SG Private Banking is a private bank
providing a comprehensive wealth management service with
offices in the UK, Jersey, Guernsey, Gibraltar and

The Bahamas.

SG Hambros is currently looking to recruit a Head of IT &
Telephony. Your primary role will be to:

@ harmonise IT platforms with the
rest of the SG Hambros Group

review the IT operations with a
view to ensuring best practice
is adopted and employed and
to review periodically, in line
with Group directives

supervise the local IT team

ensure that short term solutions
are consistent with the longer ~
term plan or payback within a
short time scale

change management relating
to the local IT function

apply security best practices as
defined by the IT security policy

Candidates should ideally hold
IT Certifications or equivalent,
and have at least 10 to 15 years
experience in all aspects of
information systems.

SG Harbros Bank & Trust @ehamas} Limited is

The candidate should also have
good technical knowledge to
include AS400, Network, UNIX,
IP, WEB and good understanding
of Banking and Trust environment.
Fluency in French would be an
asset,

The position offers an attractive
salary and benefits package.

Appiigations should be submitted
to the following address, fo arrive
on or before 26 February 2007.

Manager, Human Resources
SG Hambros Bank & Trust
(Bahamas) Limited

PO Box N7789

Nassau

Bahamas

www.sghambros.com

fioensed under the Banks & Trust Companies Requiatlan Act.

Pee JANET se1n) CET

Change Daily Vol. EPS $

Weekly Vol.



ANG
Id

Coleman and Carl Levin.

It is designed to clamp down
on “offshore tax abuses” that
the trio claims are costing the
US government and taxpayers
$100 billion annually.

Mr Paton said yesterday:
“From the Bahamas perspec-
tive, our position should be that
we entered into a TIEA with
the US and we’re prepared to
live up to that agreement. If
they have evidence that a US
person is evading taxes, they
can use that agreement to get
the information they’re seek-
ing.
“We’re not here to facilitate
US tax evasion, and we’ve
signed that agreement with
you.”

Mr Paton pointed out that
Bills such as this one often
“died” in the Senate, but the
‘Bahamas might want to watch it
carefully, as it could gain “trac-
tion” through Mr Obama being
a candidate for the 2008 presi-
dential race.

As a result, the Bahamas
might have a dilemma as to
whether to lobby over the Bill
now, or wait and see whether
it caught on in the US Senate.

The Obama Bill said that
among the criteria that the US
Treasury would use to decide
if it would require US-based
financial institutions to imple-
ment measures against foreign
jurisdictions was whether there
was a TIEA in place and if it



"BUSINESS FOR SALE

Well established Fashion Retail

was effective.

Mr Paton said the Obama
Bill was attempting to ensure
total disclosure and trans-
parency from all bank accounts
and corporate vehicles in which
US citizens had a beneficial
ownership interest, but added
that the correct approach was
for the US authorities to
enforce the law at their end.

“From the Bahamas perspec-
tive, we co-operate with the US
and have shown that. It’s. like
using a nuclear bomb when oth-
er resources are available,” Mr
Paton said.

He added that arbitrarily
putting the Bahamas and 33
other nations on a ‘bank secre-
cy jurisdiction’ list “smacks of”
the list used by the Organisa-
tion for Economic Co-Opera-
tion and Development (OECD)
in its ‘harmful tax practices’
campaign, a move Mr Paton
branded as “not responsible”.

He said the US would have to
put most of its 50 states on that
list, too, describing the Obama
Bill as “quite extreme and
potentially running the risk of
shutting off US institutions from
receiving a lot of capital”.

If the Bill was ever passed
into US law, Mr Paton said a
lot of financial institutions and
clients were likely to believe it
was not worth trying to open
bank accounts in the US, and
would switch their business to
Europe.

Business. Well known and
respected worldwide Franchise.
20 years at same prime location.

Email: b.inquiries@gmail.com



3 IMMEDIATE POSITIONS

“Showroom Sales Associate”

Highly self-motivated person with sharp,

dynamic personality

Strong interpersonal skills
Fulltime and able to work weekends

Computer literate

The ideal candidates possessing knowledge in
either furniture:sales, fabric sales, plumbing
hardware or tile 1s preferable.

Salary commensurate with experience.

Please fax resume to:

Showroom Sales

PBI

WEES



CABINET OFFICE.
DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME 2007

28.00 ABDAB
14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets









.35 RND Ho
%
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name
1.3303 1.2766 Colina Money Market Fund 1.330313"
3.0569 2.6662 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.0569***
2.5961 2.3241 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.596093**
1.2248 1.1547 Colina Bond Fund 1.224792****
41 1.3545 10.000Q Fidelity Prime Income Fund 11.3545





/BISX ALL SHARE IN :
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Â¥ 52wk-Low - Lowast closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity *~ 23 February 2007
} Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Pride - Cast traded over-the-counter price

W Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol Trading volume of the prior week *- 31 January 2007
i Change ~ Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV § - Dividends per share pald in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX< - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

*** - 31 January 2007

*** 31 January 2007



“7764, FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION CAL

oi erste



In March of this year, The Bahamas will adopt a
new policy on Daylight Saving Time. As a result,
Daylight Saving Time will commence at 2am on
the second Sunday in March 2007 instead of the
first Sunday in April and will continue until 2:00am
on the first Sunday in November 2007 instead of
the last Sunday in October. Consequently, Daylight
Saving Time will be observed during the period
Sunday, | 1th March to Sunday, 4th November, 2007.

The Bahamas joins countries such as Australia,
Canada and the United States in adopting this new
system.
a tye}

“s THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007, PAGE 9B







YOUR CONNECTIONWTO THE WORLD




























‘

*

"i

: k Knowles, “rc Product | -

p 2 cs held at Uriah McPh © Ms. Jewel Dean; Ministry of

; Q

: eres oe Miss bahamas Samantha. Carter, s ee ine aes a ae io
5 Hn Arthur Maurice and Linejuicar Griffard accepting certificates for being the Most Conference a at Uriah McPhee o :
6 Improved Student at Stephen Dillet analy. = oe October 25, 2006.

G

program also exists in 3 High Schools in Freeport, Grand a national honor, : a
Bahama; 3 schools i in Exuma and 3 schools in Andros. Although the program is in it’s embryonic stage, testi--
This program while. sponsored by BTC is endorsed by monies received so far from participating schools, teachers
The Bahama’ Ministry of Education and using the concept _ and students validates the timeliness of the program.

nd | that it takes a village to raise a child and the secret Pp pro- The program is e0-ordinated by aes Haare of cL :
* Awards eebonaen was 5 birthed Oct 2 25, 2006 S me: gram, seeks to motivate and encourage students to prod cepts,
Know That You Can! oo good grades and build teacher’s morale by rewarding the Associates of Market
The program now exists in New Providence in 23 Private most improved student from Primary and High | shools at

Primary Schools; 20 Private High Schools; 12 Government _ the end of each semester. At the end of the school year the
High Scho { rnin most improved student, parent, teacher and school receives








4












IE













schools.

ER ELC ECR ESS CT

© BTC Student Spotlight ‘After School. Program ‘held at renity ot to R) Surre ‘e
Christian see (R) ek aaa Cheryl Jordan. ‘both students of St. ‘Andews School,

Se SEITE EE BI PEO ST OO RE SE






° (L to R) Nikkita Lockhart Id Grade 9 St de S @ (L to R) Carlos Sannie 10 years old Gra 6 Student © (L to R) Elvinette Williams 10 years old Grade 6 Student
and Ricardo Moultrie 17 y rs old Grade 12 Student of St. and Latequa Poiter 10 years old Grade 6 Student of St. and Carlon Johnson 11 years old Grade 6 Student of St.
John's College. Thomas Moore. John’s College.

ape) Seat Sanat Ss al epi pS res ran. ear









> (L to R) Mawquella Dean Grade 2 Student and Ramon

© (L to R) Principal Mrs. Johnson, Kameron Rolle 13 years
Coakley Grade 6 Student attending Woodcock Primary.

, and Bria Smith il ars ( 6 Student of Trinity old Grade 6 Student and Bree Hanna 8 years old Grade 3
Christian School. — Student of Uriah McPhee.


PAGE 10B, MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



4
*

Furious Brilanders seek meeting with minister.

FROM page 1B

‘Master Plan’ was also devel-
oped by Philadelphia-based
Kiser, Straw & Kolodner. That
{irm’s principal, Jim Straw, is a
member of the SHIA group.
As a result, this has led to
claims that the ‘Master Plan’
was impacted by alleged con-
ilicts of interest, and that it was

Legal Notice

NOTICE

XILCART FIELDING HOLDINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that above-named Company is in
dissolution, which commenced on the 26th day of
January 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O.
Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas



ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

bound to reflect the interests of
Mr Straw and the SHIA; given
that the latter was part-funding
it.

This was denied last week by
Mr Straw during the Harbour
Island Town Meeting when the
plan was formally presented to
Brilanders for the first time,
arguing that the SHIA only

_ funded the “non-controversial”

aspects of the plan.






NOTICE is herehy

Va) af t






























areas.

















Interested persons should submit their resumes

with cover letter to:

< The H.R. Director
GCM
P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas

Fax to: (242) 356-4125
Or Email to: info@ gomezcorp.com

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all
applicants for their interest, however only those
under consideration will be contacted.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)
ADALAR ENTERPRISES LIMTED
IBC No. 133836B
in Voluntary Liquidation

etven thet fn accordance with Section 131

Any person having a Claim against the above-named Company
is required on or before the 6th March 2007 to Send their name,
address and particulars of their debt or claim to the Liquidator of

the Company, or in defauit thereof they may be excluded from the
benefit of any distribution made before such claim is approved.

Mrs Rosana Hollins of Suite 2B, Mansion House, 143 Main Street,
Gibraltar is the Liquidator of Adalar Enterprises Limited.

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited
INVITATION FOR EMPLOYMENT

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers
of the Royal Island resort and residential project,
an ultra-luxury resort and private club residential
community with private residences and club, 200
slip marina and boutique hotel and spa, and a golf
course just off North Eleuthera invites suitably
qualified individuals to apply for the following
position with the company:

HEAD CHEF

Duties and Responsibilities

° Coordinate and manage multiple food venues.
° Coordinate and manage all food preparation

° Budgeting and purchasing of food supplies.
¢ Planning of meals for all food venues.

° Qualifications: Must have 5 star experience ei-
ther in a resturant private residence or yacht. Must
have an “attention to detail” work ethic. Willing
to take directions from management and maintain
a hands on approach. Experience in a “Chef’s
table”, “Disgustation” or “tasting menu” style of
dining. The ideal candidate will have to reside on
Eleuthera or its surrounding area.

"2000,

panies Act N





The SHIA is also opposed to
the 30-slip marina and 40-unit
condo expansion planned by the
Romora Bay Club-Hotel, a pro-
ject that has been backed by a
350-signature petition signed by
Harbour Island residents. As a
result, this issue and the Master
Plan are having a divisive effect
on different Briland stakehold-
ers.

Sources have told The Tri-
bune that over a three-year
period, the Romora Bay expan-
sion would generate about an
extra $9 million in government
tax revenues, and some $27 mil-
lion in on and off-property addi-
tional guest spending. Many
persons also felt that there
would be a great employment
effect both from direct and indi-
rect opportunites.

Together with the marina, the
condo units are understood to
be a $17 million construction
project. Romora Bay, which
currently has 22 rooms split
between one 15-room building
that Bonachella owns and two
others on a ground lease that it
manages, would see its staff
numbers grow from about 35 at

present to 125 if the expansion
projects go ahead.

Romora Bay is understood
to feel that the new marina will
create its own demand, and will
have no negative visual impact
on the harbour, particularly as it
is less dense and on a smaller
scale than the Valentine’s prop-
erty.

In its application, it was
understood that Romora had
met all of the Bahamas Envi-
ronmental, Science and Tech-
nology (BEST) commission
requirements for safe environ-
mental construction, and would
create its own infrastructure,
including sewerage system, gen-
erator and water supply.

Romora Bay’s current own- '

ers, an investor consortium
called Bonachella Investments,
acquired the niche, boutique
property in November 2004,
and won the Harbour Island
Council’s formal approval for
the project. However, the

approvals have since been

rescinded.
But Mr Straw said at the
Town Meeting: ““I do not think

‘that a decision on Romora has

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)

FALCONCLIFF CORPORATION
LIQUIDATOR’S NOTICEE

_ PURSUANT TO SECTION 137 (6) OF
THE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

I, Aimilios Vrachipedis Liquidator of Falconcliff Corporation,
hereby that the winding up and dissolution has been completed in
accordance with the Articles of Dissolution and the company has
been struck of the Registers of Companies. ‘

Dated 1st day of March, A.D. 2006

anything to do with other pro-
jects on the island. It just hap-
pens to be one that is in the
decision-making mode right
now, so it is one that we were
asked to take a look at as part
of our presentation,” he added.

Mr Straw stressed that the
Master Plan’s recommenda-
tions, and those related to

Romora Bay, were completely i

objective.
Yet perhaps acknowledging
Brilanders’ concerns that the

local’economy is not earning’

much from the second homes
rental market, winter residents
on Harbour Island have
expressed a willingness to start
a foundation or fund that would
provide financial support for
the island’s development.

Mr Straw, a winter resident

for more than 10 yearss, told -

islanders that the winter and
second home residents are
excited about forming a public-
private partnership for the
improvement of the island.

Mr Straw acknowledged con-
cerns that Harbour Islanders
were receiving very little - if any
- economic benefit from second
homeowners.

In many cases, Harbour
Islanders claim, second home
owners only occupy their homes
for a few weeks or months of
the year. During the rést of the
time, they rent their properties






rN RN creak nL nie as paps eae ie A a |
Se ES

Reception, Secretarial, Light Accounting and

Customer Service. Located at the.
Airport Industrial Park. Transportation a must.

Good English verbal and writing skills also a must.

Apply by faxing resume to 377-1 778°

out for thousands of dollars,
the benefits of which locals
don’t see.

‘Mr Straw noted that there
were more than 100 Harbour
Island homes that are placed
for rent at some point during
the year. He said that if only
$10 per night in the rent col-
lected was given to Bahamians,
it would translate into thou-
sands of dollars which could be
used to enhance the island.

Many residents on the island
told The Tribune that the eco-:
nomic contribution to the island,
by winter residents was very.
low.

“They come here, and most
of the time they bring in all of
their supplies by boat, so they
don’t have to shop in local
stores. Also, they bring their
staff such as housekeepers with
them as well, so they are not
employing locals,” one resident
said. There were also allega-
tions that some homeowners
were unwillingly to adequately
pay Bahamian workers.

The master plan was meet
with scepticism by Brilanders,
who felt that it was being
“rammed down their throats”.

They claimed that the plan
was conceived with no consul-
tation, particularly because the
winter residents had paid
$75,000 towards the $150,000
cost of the plan.

VACANCY

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)

ARRAN LIMITED
IBC No. 13 698 B

In Voluntary Liquidation

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section 131 (2)
(a) of the International Business Companies Act (No. 46 of 2000),
ARRAN LIMITED is in Dissolution.

Any person having a Claim against the ARRAN LIMITED is
required on or before the 5th day of April, 2007 to send their name,
address and particulars of the debt of claim to the Liquidator of

the Company, or in default thereof they may be excluded from the
benefit of any distribution made before such claim is approved.

Tereq Al-Mudhaf, of Flat 701, Creekside Residence, Port Saeed,
Dubai, United Arab Emirates, is the Liquidator of ARRAN
LIMITED.



Ocean Club Estates
For Sale By Owner

_ Golf Course Lot (No. 25) Available on
Pre-Construction Basis

Professional project management team
standing by for immediate construction

Choice of floor plans allow for personal taste
and style to dictate design

Installment payment option available during
construction phases

For a prospectus and further information,

Please call-(954)-495-4837



Purina cd ee

An established Law firm. is seeking suitable applicants
for the position of Legal Secretary. The following |
qualifications and attributes are necessary ren

Associate Degree in Secretarial Science or
equivalent

A minimum of 3 years working experience in the
specified position t

Excellent use of the English language

Strong secretarial and administrative backerdand:
Good communication and people skills
Proficient in Microsoft Word and Excel

Experience working in a law firm’s Corporate or
Commercial department would be an asset., The
successful candidate must be able to multi-task and work
in a demanding environment.

Qualified persons may apply to the Human Resources
Manager before March 16, 2007.

- Apply to DA 17068
c/o The Tribune, P.O. Box N3207
Nassau, The Bahamas

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited

INVITATION FOR EMPLOYMENT

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited, the developers of the
Royal Island resort and residential project, an ultra-luxury
resort and private club residential community with private
residences and club, 200 slip marina and boutique hotel and
spa, and a golf course just off North Eleuthera invites suit-
ably qualified individuals to apply for the following position
with the company:

e Housekeepers

¢ Maids

e Laundry workers

e Waiters

¢ Beach activity coordinators
¢ Cooks

¢ Deck Hands

¢ Groundskeepers

Over 15 positions are to be filled. All persons required
successful applicants to reside on North nEteuers or
vicinity.

Interested persons should submit their resumes with cover
letter to: ;

The ae Director
GCM
P.O.Box N 1991
Nassau Bahamas
Fax to: (242) 356-4125
Or Email to: info@ gomezcorp.com

Royal Island (Bahamas) Limited thanks all
applicants for their interest, however only those under
consideration will be contacted.


THE TRIBUNE



FROM page 1B

t

panies in the California courts,
because that’s where it’s from.
The case is without any merit.
It’s a strike out. It will be dis-
missed.

“It doesn’t in any way
attempt to interfere with our
attempt to sell it [South Ocean]
to the New South Ocean Devel-
opment Company. We have it
under contract and they’re
preparing their Heads of Agree-
ment.

“It’s completely without mer-
it, but the lawsuit was careful
not to go after any of that [the
sales agreement]. It’ll be vigor-
ously defended. There’ll be no
interference with our sale or
ability to build the hotel there as
we plan to do.”

The spokesman added that
Case Financial’s lawsuit had not
attached any lien to the resort
or the land it stood on.

Meanwhile, Mr Stein told
The Tribune that “things are
progressing great” as the New
South Ocean Development
Company moves towards reach-
mg a Heads of Agreement with
the Government for the prop-
erty’s redevelopment, which
aims to transform southwestern
New Providence into a third
entertainment centre alongside
Paradise Island and Cable
Beach.
| “We’re anticipating complet-
ing with the Government; I
think March is the month,” Mr
Stein said. “We have all the
studies —traffic, economic
impact statement, environmen-
tal study Phase I and Phase II,
market feasibility, marina.
‘We're about to meet with the
BEST Commission pretty
‘soon.’
® He added: “We're in negoti-
‘ation with a couple of brand [to
«operate the hotels]. There area
‘couple on the five-star side
&

&

For the stories
behind the
news, read
Insight on

mi folate Fe Vie




pe Roo Heo EEK ERR OEEE



* Thursday Pebruary 1, 2007
“Empowering Bahamians “
COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenter - Mr. Glenn Ferguson

* Thursday February 8, 2007



B.T.V J. - Old Trail Road
Presenter - Mr. Daniel Thompson

» Thursday February 15, 2007
Business Tinance and Venture Capital

COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenter - Mr. Jerome Gamez





Presenters. Mr. Donald ee |

Consultant, Domestic Investment Board 7

Mr. Paul Major

Advisor, Domestic
Forging a
For the Bahamian Investor |*

. Improving regulatory environment

(Bahamas Tourism Training Center)

'f |Date: Thursday March 8, 2007 |
] "at 7:00 p.m. 7
| — 8
| Venue. ‘The College Of The Bahamas





+ Thursday February 22, 2007

Business Planning, Forecasting & Marketing

we're in negotiations with, and
are 60 days away [from an
announcement] on that.

A partner in the Trump Fort
Lauderdale resort, with a long
background in real estate, Mr

Stein said the redevelopment -

was still “roughly a $1 billion
project”, and an international
tennis star had shown interest in
running a tennis school and
training facility at South Ocean,
which would involve a 1,000
seat theatre.

Mr Stein is understood to
have been talking to Hard Rock
on a contract to manage/oper-

ate the four-star hotel and casi-
no component of the project,
but he again declined to com-
ment on this.

He did, though, say that the
South Ocean golf course should
be re-opened “somewhere
towards the end of 2007, as
that’s when it will be in peak
condition”.

Mr Stein had previously told
The Tribune that the first phase
of South Ocean’s redevelop-
ment would involve getting it
up to a minimum of 500 resi-
dential units, enabling the prop-

erty’s Casino licence to kick-in.



EXCITING CAREER
OPPORTUNITY

Wanted to supervise the Bahamas operation

for this dynamic

Must have:

UK Tour Operator.

Â¥ 5 Years experience in tourism

v 3 Years managerial/supervisory experience

Y Excellent skills in Microsoft Office

Â¥ Tour Operator Management Skills/Experience

~Y Own car essential

Bahamian Resident status preferred
Y Flexibility to travel unexpectedly
Passion for Customer Service

Y Initiative, enthusiasm and drive

The position will involve:

° Maintaining the strong customer service,
commercial and branding standards of the
operator on a daily basis and ensuring that strict

targets are met.

¢ Competitive salary on offer.

Please send your CV
(including last salary package) to :

vholsrecruitmentbah@hotmail.com

or Fax 001

246 2286927

By 31st MAR 07

Only successful applicants will receive response.



BAIC

in Conjunction With

The College of The Bahamas

Will Host

state’



‘The



vestment Board

ww

w Vision

(Cecture Th weatte) 10.

FREE of charge |

Schedule of Weekly Seminars

Ii

Books Keeping - Accounting for the Business
COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenter - Mr: Christopher Stuart

e Tharsday March 1, 2007
Business Opportunities in The Bahamas
COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenter - Mr. Benjamin Bailey

Thursday March 8, 2007
Forging a New Vision For the Bahamian Investor
COB - Lecture Theatre

Presenters - Mr. Donald Demeritte
Mr. Paul Major

I a a ee
CONTACT; Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial Corporation (BAIC) at 322-3740 or 325-1912
Mr. Lester Stuart / Mr, Le-Var Miller

‘Ten reasons why Bahamians should investi in

. Government Promotig Bahamian Economic

. Natural Market to supply good and services

. Greater access to business advice and train-

. Greater access to capital”
. Quick tunaround on funding requirements

. Hany opportunities for Bakamians to partner






» Thursday March 15, 2007
Doing Business via the Internet - Possibilities
Pitfalls COB ~ Lecturé Theatre
Presenter - Mr. Dudrick Edwards

« Thursday March 22, 2007
COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenter + Bahamas Customs Representative

» Thursday March 29, 2001
Book Keeping - Accounting for the Busines
COB - Lecture Theatre

+ Thursday Apsil 5, 2007








DeBahota tater aretha estat ata tts tete thats tetatae

Bahamas now.

Booming Economy

Empowerment i

through anchor properties

Many indastries reserved for Bahamians only

ing

with foreign investors

Opportunities for public/private partnerships;

:



=

Import Export, Customs, Concessions

Presenter - Mr, Christopher Stuart



Government Regulations and Business License
COB - Lecture Theatre
Presenter - Registrar Representative










erate se?

Other plans include a mega-
yacht marina, convention cen-

tre, Greg Norman-designed golf -

course, health and fitness cen-
tre, retail, restaurants and enter-
tainment.

In its original lawsuit against

MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007, PAGE 11B

CCWIPP and South Ocean, the
company claimed it and a part-
ner, L&M Specialities, signed a
Letter of Intent to acquire the
resort for $25 million in a mixed
cash and equity deal.

It alleged that the Letter of



Intent gave it an exclusive peri-
od to conduct due diligence and
conclude the resort’s purchase,
but claimed this exclusive peri-
od was breached when other
investor groups were brought
into look at South Ocean.

GRAHAM, THOMPSON & Co.























COUNSEL & ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW * NOTARIES PUBLIC

1S pleased to announce that
Willie A. M. Moss
has joined The Firm as of
March 1, 2007
as a Partner
in our Freeport Office.

Freeport Chambers

The First Commercial Centre
3rd Floor, Suite 9
P.O. Box 42533
Freeport, Grand Bahama,
Bahamas
Tel: (242) 351-7474
Fax: (242) 351-7752

Nassau Chambers

Sassoon House
Shirley Street & Victoria Avenue
P.O. Box N-272
Nassau, New Providence,
Bahamas
Tel: (242) 322-4130
Fax: (242) 328-1069





Design/Build Teams are invited to submit proposals to construct a
new bridge carrying the Grand Bahama Highway over the Lucayan
Waterway near Freeport, on the island of Grand Bahama.



PRE-QUALIFICATION FOR
BRIDGE DESIGN/BUILD CONTRACT

SCOPE OF WORK: The project limits will consist of approximately one
half (1/2) mile of roadway, a bridge over the Lucayan Waterway
Canal and the extension of the existing seawall bulkheads along
both sides of the canal. The intent is for the bridge to span across the
Lucayan Waterway with no piers or marine fenders in the Lucayan
Waterway. This bridge is intended to be the initial two (2) lanes of a
future (4) lane facility with a carrier space for utilities and at least one
sidewalk with pedestrian vehicle divider/barrier wall. No sidewalk
facility is anticipated with the bridge in this agreement, only with the
future four lane facility. The work also includes the reconstruction of
the approach roadway eastbound and westbound to the bridge to
provide for one lane in each direction at the bridge and connection
to the four (4) lane divided rane Bahama Highway beyond the
project limits.

Interested Design/Build Teams must submit information on their tech-
nical and financial competence for qualification, no later than
Friday, March 16, 2007 to:



Mr. Dudley Francis

Project Manager

THE GRAND BAHAMA PORT AUTHORITY, LIMITED
Southern Ridge Building

P.O. Box F-42666

Freeport, Grand Bahama Island

Tel: (242) 352-6611 Ext. 2085

Fax: (242) 351-8473

E-mail: dfrancis@gbpa.com





—


PAGE 12B, MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

cc a a ae eee ee eee ee

New bid for Royal Oasis unveiled.

FROM page 1B

vehicle for the Royal Oasis deal.

Mr Graulich and Mr
Chisholm said they met with Sir
Baltron Bethel, deputy chair-
man and managing director of
the Hotel Corporation of the
Bahamas, to introduce their
group and attempt top acquire
the Royal Oasis, which has been
closed since Hurricane Frances
struck Grand Bahama in early



September 2004, putting 1200
employees out of work.

Mr Graulich said in a state-
ment that they planned “a
major renovation and rebrand-
ing” for the Royal Oasis,
adding: “We have the financial
backing in place and are now
ready to close with Lehman
Brothers. We are currently
working with a world-class casi-
no operator to manage the casi-
no portion of the resort.”

Mr Chisholm added: “The
planned enhancements will

NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the

following:

“ALL THAT” piece suite or lot of land being Lot of Land
being Lot ‘B’ Unison West Subdivision, situated in the South
Western District on the island of New Providence one of the
islands of the Commonwealth,of the Bahamas. Situated
thereon is a Single Family Residence, consisting of 2

Bedrooms 2 Bathrooms.

Property Size: 5,202 sq. ft.

Building Size : 904 sq. ft.
This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained
in a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF

BAHAMAS LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writtingin a sealed

enevelope, addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections
Centre, P.O. N-7549, Nassau Bahamas and marked “Tender
2333”. All offers must be received by the close of business

4:00 p.m.,

Friday 16th March, 2007.

Legal Notice
NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF SERGIO DANGUILLECOURT
Late of Miami - Dade Country, Florida, USA

‘NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claim or
demand against the above Estate are required to send the same
duly certified in writing to the undersigned on or before the 5th
day of June 2007 after which date the Executor will proceed to
distribute the assets having regard only to the claims of which

he shall then have notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that all persons indebted to the
said Estate are requested to make full settlement on or before

the date hereinbefore mentioned.

ALEXIOU, KNOWLES & CO.
P.O. Box N-4805
St. Andrew’s Court, Frederick St. Steps
Nassau, Bahamas ,
Attorneys for the Executor - Barry Brant .



Legal Notice

NOTICE

TARSKI LIMITED

(in Voluntary Liquidation)

| Notice is hereby given that above-named Company is In
dissolution, which commenced on the 7th day of
February 2007. The Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O.

Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



make the Royal Oasis the ulti-
mate luxury hotel destination,
attracting the attention of both
business and leisure guests,

which will be of enormous ben- .
efit to the local Freeport econ-

omy.”

It is unclear whether this bid
is the reconstituted World
Investments Holdings offer,
since Mr Chisholm was the
Bahamian partner for that
group’s failed $40 million
attempt to acquire the Royal
Oasis, or if Mr Graulich and his
team are a completely new

- group he has linked up with. Mr
Graulich could not be contact- —

ed, despite attempts to reach
him through the PR agency
which sent out the statement on
his behalf. a
Still, the announcement is

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likely to be greeted with cau-
tion by most residents and busi-
nesses on Grand Bahama, since
there have been so many opti-
mistic pronouncements — chiefly
by the Government — that a
solution to the Royal Oasis sit-
uation is at hand, then nothing
happens.

- One source, when contacted
by The Tribune about the
announcement, said it was like-
ly to “muddy the waters”, given
that Harcourt Developments,
the Irish property developer, is
considered to be the company
the Government wants to
acquire the Royal Oasis.

Such a situation occurred pre-
viously, when both the Gov-
ernment and Grand Bahama
Port Authority (GBPA) were
doing everything they could to
make the Harcourt offer to suc-
ceed, only for World Invest-
ments Holdings to enter the
process late in the game and
make a $40 million offer to
Lehman Brothers — a sum clos-
er to its asking price — at a New
York auction. Mr Chisholm was
thought to be the group’s link to
the Hotel Corporation then.

As a result, Lehman Brothers
went with the World Invest-
ments Holdings offer, extend-
ing the Royal Oasis agony for
many more months, as that
group was unable to raise the
financing necessary to close the
deal. Even Prime Minister Per-
ry Christie said the Government
had doubts about World Invest-
ments Holdings ability to raise
the financing and attract a
world-class casino operator.

Obie Wilchcombe, minister

of tourism, last week told The .

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WALLY DORMEUS OF
BALFOUR AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 26TH day of FEBRUARY, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,

Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FEDNA PETIT-BEAU OF

SPANISH WELLS,

ELEUTHERA,

BAHAMAS _ is

applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and

Citizenship,

fer registration/naturalization as a citizen

Tribune that Harcourt Devel-
opments was the front-runner
for the Royal Oasis purchase,
and that he understood the deal
was “moving ahead”.

He added that he thought
World Investments Holdings’
successor had “slipped to num-
ber two”, although they were
still “at the table”.

Harcourt already has a sub-
stantial presence in Grand
Bahama through its Suffolk
Court and Bahamia projects,
and has extensive experience in
hotel and real estate develop-
ment in the Caribbean and
across the globe.

Yet it is unclear whether Har-
court will be able to reach a
deal, given that Lehman Broth-
ers’ private equity arm, which

owns the Royal Oasis by virtue |

of the mortgage it holds on the
property after Driftwood

(Freeport) defaulted on its loan -

repayments, still holds the
trump card.

Harcourt Developments pre-
viously felt the resort was worth
$25-$30 million at most, far
short of Lehman Brothers’ ask-
ing price. The Royal Oasis’ val-
ue is likely to have depreciated
further since that offer has
made, due to the continued
decline in the state of the resort
properties. In.some parts, it is
stripped down to the bare brick.

The key will be whether the
price offered by Harcourt — or
any other buyer — meets
Lehman Brothers’ valuation,
since the private equity fund
will be looking to maximize the
proceeds to recover the $70 mil-
lion+ it pumped into the Royal
Oasis. It funded the $27 million
acquisition, and put in $45 mil-
lion to upgrade the resort, hop-
ing to turn round its perfor-
mance and flip it to another
buyer for a profit.

Lehman Brothers will already
have recouped some of the
money, though by collecting on
the insurance proceed relating
to the 2004 hurricane claim.

It is thought that an invest-

\










PUBLIC NOTICE |
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

NOTICE is hereby given that by Deed Poll dated 27th day of February, A.D., 2007
now for recording at the Registrar General’s Department, that KENNARD CEDRIKO
ROLLE-WHYMS of No. 91 Jumbay Street, Pinewood Gardens, New Providence,

The Bahamas, formally and absolutely renounced and abandoned the surname of -, >



ROLLE and has assumed and adopted and intends on all occasions to use and~
subscribe the surname of ROLLE-WHYMS instead of the surname ROLLE so as to 3
be at all times called, known, and described by the name of KENNARD CEDRIKO '”

THE TRIBUNE

ment of $200 million will be
needed to restore the Royal
Oasis to a position where it wiil
be able to establish a profitable,
long-term niche in the market,
complete with world class casi-
no and hotel operating brands.

Due to the Convention Tax
break that US citizens attending
meetings, conferences and con-
ventions in the Bahamas now
receive, the Royal Oasis has
potential as a convention hotel,
complete with casino and os
facilities. my

Foxwoods, which is involved
with a potential tourism deve
opment in eastern Gran’
Bahama, is among the casino
brands that have looked at the
Royal Oasis, their local ‘point
man’ being Ken Farino, who is
involved with both the Taino
Beach Resort and had attempt-
ed to start the Marriott project
at Discovery Bay.

Among the issues that any
Royal Oasis buyer will have to
resolve in talks with Lehman
Brothers will be who settles the
resort’s liabilities, which
amounted to $22-plus million
as at January 2005. The majori-
ty of these were casino taxes,
but other creditors were the
National Insurance Board,
some $4.1 million for the hotel
pension funds, Grand Bahama
Power Company and other
Grand Bahama-based suppli-
ers. And that was before the
Government paid out some $8
million in redundancy pay to
the Royal Oasis workers. |

Then there is a resolution of
the timeshare issue, with the
owners of timeshare at the Roy-
al Oasis needing to be settled
with and paid off. 4 0 fer

The Royal Oasis, set on. a
425-acre site, has 392 guest
rooms, 417 condo suites, nine
restaurants and lounges; a
30,000 square foot casino, water
park, two swimming pools, 12
tennis courts, two golf courses, °
eight villas and 40,000 square
foot of convention and meeting
space.






of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 5th day of
March, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is -hereby given that ERIC JOSPEH OF
CHIPPINGHAM, ALBURY STREET, P.O. BOX N-849,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 5th day of
March, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

SALESPERSONS NEEDED

Tropical Companies are in search of highly motivated sales persons
and stock room helpers for a number of vacancies. If you love
working with tourist or have at least one year’s experience in retail
sales, are computer literate and have a good work ethic

Call Ph: 326 7791 between 9-3pm
-M-F deadline Mar 15th









International Offshore Bank is seeking an
OPERATIONS ASSISTANT.

Familiar with general office duties, loan
documentation, filing. Applicant must be fluent
in SPANISH, written and spoken.

Proven knowledge of MS Office products. -

Please submit your resume to
HR Manager
P.O. Box CB 11903
Nassau,NP.



ROLLE-WHYMS exclusively.





NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following: ~
“ALL THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot of Land
being Lot #21, Block ‘C’ Garden Hills Subdivision #2 situated
in the Southern District on the Island of New Providence one
of the islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated
thereon is a Triplex Townhouse unit, consisting of 1- 4Bedrooms,
2 Bathrooms, and 2 -2 Bedrooms 1-Bathroom.

Property Size: 8,807 sq. ft.

Building Size : 4,151 sq. ft.
This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in
a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED.

All offers should be forwarded in writtingin a sealed enevelope, ;
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre, P.O.
N-7549, Nassau Bahamas and marked “Tender 3276”. All offers
must be received by the close of business 4:00 p.m., Friday

16th March, 2007.



NOTICE
RBC FINCO INVITES TENDERS

RBC FINCO invites tenders for the purchase of the following:
“ALL THAT” piece parcel or lot of land being Lot of Land
being Condo Unit #1, Seabeach Subdivison situated in the
Western District on the island of New Providence one of the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas. Situated thereon is a Condo
Unit consisting of 4 Bedrooms, 3 1/2 Bathrooms.

- 4,800 sq. ft.

Building Size

This property is being sold under Power of Sale contained in
a Mortgage to FINANCE CORPORATION OF BAHAMAS
LIMITED. :

All offers should be forwarded in writtingin a sealed enevelope, *
addressed to the Manager, Royal Bank Collections Centre,
P.O. N-7549, Nassau Bahamas and marked “Tender 8477".
All offers must be received by the close of business 4:00 p.m.,
Friday 16th March, 2007.





THE TRIBUNE

mee Se)

MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007, PAGE 13B



BA cuts Bahamas travel agent commissions to 1%

BRITISH Airways has announced that
it,aill reduce its standard travel agent
¢ommission on tickets sold in the
Bahamas from 6 per cent to just 1 per
cent, a move that is unlikely to please
many travel agents.

jit is not known how many Bahamas-
Based travel agents will be impacted by
this, and how significant the cut in rey-
efiues will be, but say that a British Air-
ways ticket costs around $1,000 for a

return flight to London, the most popular
destination from the Bahamas.

This cut would, based on that price,
cut commission income for Bahamas-
based travel agents from $60 per ticket to
just $10 per ticket, a quite substantial
drop, giving travel agents an incentive
to stop selling BA tickets.

The move also impacts the Cayman
Islands and Turks and Caicos Islands, as
well as the Bahamas. BA did not specify

the reasons behind the cut, although trav-
el agents now face increasing competition
from Internet-based sales channels.

“This change reflects market condi-
tions, such as the introduction of travel
agency feces as well as the need to appro-
priately manage our costs,” said Dr Oliv-
er King, British Airways’ senior vice-
president, Latin America and the
Caribbean.

“British Airways already charges a ser-

vice fee of $25 to those customers who
choose to book directly through our call
centres. “The services offered by travel
agents will always be driven by customer
needs, and agents are free to charge their
own service fees in addition to the ticket
price. British Airways will continue to
develop and enhance products and ser-
vices that travel agents can effectively
sell.

“We are constantly reviewing overall

business practices, and will continue to
transform our business to remain com-
petitive, and to deliver outstanding ser-
vice to our customers across the
Caribbean. “We strongly believe that
agencies across the Caribbean remain an
important and integral distribution part-
ner for British Airways.”

British Airways serves Nassau directly
from London Heathrow, five times a
week.

Show ‘same zeal’ for Bahamian investors



(FROM page 1B

Bahamian investors time and
money.

“TY think the same zeal the
Government has approached
foreign direct investment with,
tHey need to approach local
investors with,” Mr Rolle said.
“The Government is gung-ho
on! announcing $1 billion invest-
ments, but it has to show the
sfme level of excitement when
young Bahamians want to do
fhe same thing, otherwise
‘tHey’re failing their mandate.”
‘Describing young Bahamian
Hivestors as the “under-used
ingredient” in the Governmen-
t’s economic strategy, Mr Rolle
‘said the Government needed to
do much more “to encourage
Yecal Bahamian investors, par-
ticularly non-traditional ones,
to get involved in these large
‘projects”.

“By non-traditional, Mr Rolle
isteferring to new, up-and-com-
‘fig Bahamian entrepreneurs,
rather than well-established
’ tones who are already wealthy
‘and have a proven track record
-6f success. Going beyond this
‘group, the argument goes, will
‘broaden Bahamian ownership
‘of the economy, embracing a
‘Younger generation.
°:*The Government has lauded
athe fact during its tenure,
Bahamian companies and
investor groups have acquired

Shell (Bahamas), Bahamas
Supermarkets, Caribbean Bot-
tling Company (Bahamas) and
British American Insurance
Company (Bahamas).

The former two deals were
completed by already well-
established Bahamian compa-
nies and investors, Freeport Oil
Company (FOCOL) and BSL
Holdings (a group featuring the
hotel pension funds, Craig
Symonette and Franklyn But-
ler). Both the Bahamas Super-
markets and Caribbean Bottling
deals involved the participation
of two major Barbadian con-
glomerates, leaving only the
British American deal, led by
the company’s president and
chief executive, Chester Coop-
er, and attorney John Wilson,
as the one truly featuring ‘new’
Bahamian entrepreneurs.

Mr Rolle said a key question
facing the Government was:
“How do you develop new,
young talent who are hungry,
have access to resources and the
technical know-how, and have
the desire to do things in the
economy?........... They need to
have success stories in that
area.”

The. Government has
attempted to facilitate invest-
ment by Bahamians through the
creation of the Domestic Invest-
ment Board within the Ministry
of Financial Services and Invest-
ments, plus the Bahamas Entre-

preneurial Venture Fund Ltd
(known more commonly as the
Government-sponsored venture
capital fund).

The Board is an attempt to
cut through the bureaucracy
facing Bahamian investors in
their efforts to obtain all the
required government permits
and approvals, while the fund
seeks to assist entrepreneurs in
obtaining start-up financing,
either through taking equity or
debt positions.

Yet Mr Rolle said the
approvals process facing many
Bahamians was still taking too
long. “They're discouraged sim-
ply because the process is taking
too long, and the longer they
take, the more it costs and the
incentive becomes less and
less,” he explained.

‘The bureaucratic maze is so

_ huge, and sometimes individual

agencies don’t understand
where they are and where they
should be in the process.

“Long-term we want. to be
able to participate at a high lev-
el in this economy, and don’t
want to be locked out because
all the goods properties and
good opportunities have gone
to foreign investors.

“This is something the Gov-
ernment has to focus on,” Mr
Rolle said. “Our future depends
on it. Our future as major stake-
holders in the economy depends
on it. Not everyone is destined

Rum Cay Resort's ‘huge step forward’

FROM page 1B

WAT AT AT AAT ee

son Airport approvals. “It’s a
big step forward, as the port of
‘entries, whether by sea or air,

‘yare critical for the overall pro-
ject.

: “It gives Montana the oppor-
‘tunity to bring in G-4 [Gulf-
stream] jets from the US. We’ve

(very pleased with the timing in

‘regard to the overall design of

\ the project.”

| . Mr Perkins added: “This will

smake it the third largest airport

‘ terminal in the Bahamas. We've

; Drought in airport consultants

«Wilbur Smith & Associates,

i ‘from the US. They’ve designed
“all phases of the runway — the

. aprons, security area, fire.”

» + The runway and terminal
* construction will take place in
‘ three phases, and the latter will

A « have specific areas for Customs,

‘ * Immigration and the police. The

5 ; terminal’s second floor will also

: feature a restaurant and wi-fi

‘ Internet access,

‘ 1 Mr Perkins told The Tribune
ia some 90 people were cur-

‘rently working on Montana’s
870- acre resort project, adding:

' ‘We've got as many people

>from Rum Cay as we can
employ.”

« _, He said “good progress” had
: ‘ been made on the marina con-
; struction, and the developers
it had also finished the sales cen-
i tre office at Cotton Field Point.
*Fhis had been constructed by

Kirkland Knowles, also the
wisland’ s chief councilor, while
} the landscaping had been per-
» formed by Montana Landscap-
ing, headed by Montana’s land-
scaping manager, Archie
Cartwright.

Mr Perkins said site clearance
for the marina, and planning
and clearance for the resort’s
toads and utilities, was being
conducted at present. Montana
oc uee had also appointed
, Cole Martinez Curtis & Asso-
, ciates as its interior designers,
working on interior designs for
the marina village condos, bars
and restaurants.
| Mr Perkins explained that
Cole Martinez Curtis & Asso-
¢iates would work in tandem
with the resort’s operating part-
her, Rock Resorts.

, The project’s first phase

includes an 80-slip Blue Flag

inarina, marina village, 100 con-

(lo units, and 80 multi-room cot-
tages. Deposits have been

placed on 60 per cent of the

units offered in the Port Santa

Maria component of Phase I,

and a new offering of marina

buites have been added to the

See 8 eB ac we

ae ak ae ere rere oe

oe we oe eee ee

product mix, furnished to Rock
Resorts’ standards.

The Ministry of Finance has
approved the assignment of
Customs and Immigration offi-
cers to the Rum Cay airport,
which will be redeveloped by
Montana Holdings’ subsidiary,
Montana Aviation, and
FirstAIR Group.

In a second phase of airport
development, Montana Avia-
tion is looking at constructing
a 9,000 square foot hangar. It
is also seeking a franchise agree-

ment with the Government to
establish a Fixed Base Opera-
tion (FBO) at the airport, pro-
viding services such as air char-
ter services, on-site aircraft
maintenance, fuel sales and avi-
ation ground support services.

Mr Perkins thanked the Min-
istry of Financial Services and
Investments, the Ministry of
Transport & Aviation, and the
Department of Civil Aviation
for their assistance in obtaining
approvals for the first phase of
the airport’s extension.

COURT ORDERED SALE
ACTION 1701/08

Judgment creditor
Premier Importers Ltd.

Judgment debtor
Christopher A. Moss
T/AM.O.S.0. Construction

2001 Ford F150

ACh Cah Pick a rs

Vehicle may he viewed at Premier importers, St. Alban’s Drive
7:30 to 4:30 Monday to Friday
Contact: 322-8396 ext 232

to be an employee.

“Young Bahamians need
access, particularly to Crown
Land. There is also no reason
Bahamians should not have
equitable access, and equitable
access without the bureaucracy
associated with it. There is no
legitimate reason for an indi-

Bahamian company, aiming to
provide the adventure-based
excursions and attractions the
cruise industry has been
demanding, through its planned
Paradise Island destination and
an affiliate, Bahamas Undersea
Adventure.

favourable feedback from gov-
ernment ministers and officials,
and a recommendation from the
Domestic Investment Board
that it be approved. The Nas-
sau Water Ferries proposal is
now awaiting final approvals
and sign-off by Prime Minister
ae Christie.

_and he and his partners were

The project has received
vidual to wait for months, some-
times years, to get word or
approval on a project — whether
it will fly.”

Mr Rolle was speaking after
Tennyson Wells, the indepen-
dent MP for Bamboo Town,
revealed his proposal for a
resort and tourism development
on Long Island, saying Bahami-
ans could also do what the I-
Group is doing in Mayaguana.

The J-Group project is a
50/50 joint venture between the
Boston-based developer and the
Government, operating through
the Hotel Corporation of the
Bahamas, with the latter’s equi-
ty coming from the almost
10,000 acres of Crown Land it is
providing for the $1.8 billion
project.

Mr Wells said that if Crown
Land was available for Bahami-
ans, they could do the same,

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SUZANNA ANTOINE OF
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 5th day of
March, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that NICOLE TELUS OF
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 5th day of
March, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

willing to pay $2,000 per acres
for up to 2,000-3,000 acres of
Crown Land for their Long
Island project.

Mr Rolle’s Nassau Water
Ferries is a 100 per cent owned



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Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday 940am. 24 od7am. 0.1
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Tene ge edgy sg pm. 26 3:41pm. 0.1
High . ssseesssacseees O° F/32° C 10:13 03 4:14 02
ee ursd: 3am, 2. W4am. 0.

Low . vonsune 73° 23°C THMFBMAY os 3g Ald pm. 0.2
Normal high seessseessseees 18° F/26° G
Normal low sessessesereesees BO? F/18° C
ee I Last year’s high . sesestessecrsessees 82” F/28° C
High: 70° F/21°C Z zs Last year’s low ecsessssseessenseeesssee OO” F/19° 6

Low:50° Zz : LLL : Z Precipitation Sunrise......6:29a.m. Moonrise .... 7:51 p.m.
GIL E AS Of 1 p.m. YeStEPGAY veccssssssssssseseneens 0.00" ‘Sunset. ..... 6:14 p.m. Moonset ..... 7:18 a.m.

g Vea t0 date cccccccossescocrsssrvssisisatnersversinesneons £00.

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Z ; C f é £410 : Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Mengualit





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ep | NEQUAT













Tuesday WINDS = WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
High Low W WASSAU Today: N at 7-14 Knots 3-5 Feet 6-7 Miles 78° F
NNE at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 7-8 Miles 78° F
ORT Today: N at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-6 Miles 78° F

N at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 6-7 Miles 76° F
























: — : . , Today: NW at 12-25 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-6 Miles 78° F
Breezy with times of Sunny and breezy. Partly sunny. Chance for a couple Some sun. The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Tuesda’ WNW at 10-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-6 Miles 78° F
clouds and sun. of showers. greater the need for eye and skin'protection.
High: 75° High: 78° High: 80° High: 82°
75° Low: 63° Low: 64° Low: 68° iat a






PYAR ID













AccuWeather RealFeel : 3 4 Ovaa Ei amacrllaaal
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The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is-an-index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, Spadina, ofeaipiton pressure, and Today 8:37 a.m. 28 2:24 a.m.
; elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the tow for the day. 8:51pm. 2.7 2:38pm. 0.0







3:01am, 0.

Tuesday 05pm. 27 3:09pm. 0.0


















































50/10 ATR r







88/31 74/23 po
7B/25 42/5
76/24 55/12 s







_ SAN SALVADOR
— High: 80°F/27°C
’ Low: 69° F/21°C

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's

highs and tonights's lows.





Tae Aas

ee insurance





Tuesday
High Low W





B8/31 71/21 po.





24/28 69/20 p

5/1
2 14-10 s





RAGGED JSLAND
High: 83° F/28°C
Low:68°F/20°C





pe 20/6 12/-11 pc





uffa : 2 9g GLEE TAGBE Louisville
Charleston, SC 62/16, 36/2 s 66/18 44/6 s Memphis
49-7 pe 36/2 24/-4 sf Miami
35/1 18/-7 sn 23/-5 20/-6 pc Minneapolis 24/-4
68/20 40/4 s 63/17 46/7 s- shville. 57/3
62/16 32/0 s 59/15 32/0 s New Orleans 63/17
i 35/1 14/10 ‘sn 25/-3 17/-8 pe — 4G)
Honolulu 80/26 67/19 s 81/27 68/20 pc

== 68/20 42/5 $s 70/21 S2/11- ss



GREAT INAGUA
High: 88° F/31°G












San Francisco



ee as






71/21
Tampa 265 sg o7aaee sari
Tucson 79/26 47/8 pe 82/27 50/10 pe
Washington, DC 53/11 29/-1 s 41/5 28/-2 $s

35/1 s







Winnipeg 18/-7 12-11 sf

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh -showers, t-thunder-

storms, rrain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-preci , Tr-trace








Houston-








MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

E & PO RT

Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

eR AA a





osition at track meet

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

ANDRETTI Bain took
advantage of a Last Chance
Meet to solidify his entry in the
NCAA Division One Indoor
Track and Field Championships
in both the 400 metres and the
Oral Roberts University’s 4 x
400 metre relay.

Having done a provisional
time of 46.92 seconds for Oral
Roberts University on Febru-
ary 10, Bain jumped from num-
ber 23 to a two-way tie for ninth
place with a time of 46.43 as he
won at Iowa State University
over the weekend.

“It felt good. It was the race
I’ve been waiting to put togeth-
er all year,” Bain said. “The last
two times I had a good track to
run on, I messed up. Either it
was my first 200, I wasn’t
aggressive enough, or in the last
200, I got boxed in.

“Finally, yesterday (Satur-
day), I just put everything
together, so it felt very good.”

Back for another trip to the
NCAA Division One Champi-
onships, scheduled for March
9-10 in Fayetteville, Arkansas,
Bain is hoping to improve on
his ninth place finish.in last
year’s NCAA’s.

“This year I’ve set my goals,
not just on becoming All-Amer-
ican, which is top eight, to hope-
fully placing in the top three.
That.is what I’m aiming for
right now,” Bain said.

Bain also helped Oral
Roberts to'a second place finish
in the 4 x 4 relay as he anchored
the golden Eagles in a time of
3:07.47 that pushed them in the
top ten to also secure their sport
in the NCAA’s. Iowa State won
the race in 3:07.39.

Prior to this weekend, Bain
earned three Mid-Conference
Athlete of the Week honors
and eventually carted off the
Athlete of the Month for Feb-
ruary.

His second Athlete of the
Week honours came after he
won the 400 in a time of 47.10,
finishing a full second ahead of
American No 1-ranked 400m
runner Wallace Spearmon. Bain
also won-the 200m in a Mid-
Conference best time of 21.97
and he anchored the Golden
Eagles to a best time of 3:14.75
in the 4 x 4 relay.

@ ANDRETTI Bain

“That was our first head-to-
head match-up after running
against each other in the relay,”
Bain said. “He specialises in the
200m, but he also runs a good
400m, so beating a quality guy
like that was a real good confi-
dence booster.”

As he look ahead to the
NCAA’s, Bain said if he can get
a top-three finish and help the
Golden Eagles’ 4 x 4 team
clinch an All-American honour,
he will be quite satisfied with
his trip to Fayetteville.

Bain is expected to join a
number of Bahamians, who



have also qualified to compete
in the NCAA’s Championships.

Auburn University’s senior
Donald Thomas is in second
place in the men’s high jump
with a best leap of 2.30 metres
with Auburn’s Shamar Sands in
the 60m hurdles.

On the ladies’ side, South Illi-
nois’ sophomore Bianca Stuart
is sitting in fifth place in the
long jump with a best mark of
6.31 metres.

And the University of Alaba-
ma’s Aymara Albury is in
eighth place in the shot put with
a best of 16.63 metres.







Freeport team beat Buccaneers
by six points in close game _



@ RAY Simpson of the Buccaneers tries to evade the Freeport players on Saturday. The
Buccaneers lost to Freeport 23-29

Knowles and Nestor confident of success

@ MARK Knowles and Daniel Nestor



@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

ALTHOUGH they have fall-
en short once again of winning
their first ATP Tennis Tourna-
ment, Mark Knowles is conti-
dent that he and Daniel Nestor
will have a stroke of success
very soon.

Back in the United States
after being eliminated in the
semi-final of the Dubai Tennis
Championships, Knowles and
Nestor are now preparing to
defend their title at the ATP
Masters Series in Indian Wells,
California next week.

“It didn’t end the way we
would have liked in Dubai,”
said Knowles, relfecting on their
heartbreaking 10-8 loss in the
tie breaker to Nenad Zimonjic
and Fabrice Santoro. “So it was
a little bit disappointing.”

Trailing the dynamic Ameri-
can twin brothers Bob and
Mike Bryan by just 36 points in
the the Stanford ATP Doubles
Race, Knowles and Nestor are
taking a couple of days off to
recuperate with their families
before they hit the road on

~ Tuesday for Palm Srings and

the Pacific Life Open.

“We have two big tourna-
ments out there on the schedule
in the next couple of weeks, so
we’re hoping that we can final-
ly win a tournament,” said
Knowles, who revealed that
they will be ‘in Miami, Florida
for the Sony Ericsson Open,
starting on March 19.

. Having played and lost in the
final of Sydney and Marseilles
and the semis of the Australian
Open, Doha and Dubai,
Knowles and Nestor said they
are knocking on the door of
their first championship feat this
year.

“The goal is to win every
tournament every week, but
sometimes it doesn’t work on
the schedule like you want,” he
insisted. “So we're disappointed
that we didn’t win in Dubai.

“But we’re ranked second in
the world right now and we've
played a lot of matches over
there, so we put ourselves in a
good position to win.”

Not counting out the fact that
they’ve already played two
months and have yet to win a

tournament, Knowles said it is

. still early and there are a lot more

tournaments out there to win.

“So we will just focus on this
tournament next week. We
know we are playing well.
Sometimes you just don’t win
the close ones,” he said. “But
we have put ourselves in posi-
tion, so we just have to continue
to work hard and the success
will come.”

While they are eagerly look-
ing forward to coming back to
Miami where the Bahamian
people will have the best oppor-
tunity to watch them play,
Knowles said their first goal is
to defend their title in Palm
Springs.

“We didn’t do so well in Mia-
mi last year, so it would be a
good chance to do well this
year,” he said. “It’s close to
home and there’s normally a lot
of Bahamians, who are there
for the event. So it’s always nice
to have some people from home
cheering us on.”

Both players are reporting
good health, so they are confi-
dent that their breakthrough
will come shortly.
PAGE 2E, MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS



| SPORTS | :



phomores Stubbs and Strachan

line up for clash at championships _

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

ALFREEPHA Stubbs and
Grand Bahamian Bianca Stra-
chan traded places with each
other as they hooked up a
showdown for Essex Commu-
nity College at the National
Junior College Athletic Asso-
ciation’s Indoor Champi-
onships.

The sophomores met in the
600m at the Texas Tech Uni-
versity in Lubbock, Texas over
the weekend, with Stubbs com-
ing through the tape in second
place in 1:36.01, improving on
her preliminary time of 1:38.26.

Strachan ended up in sixth in
1:37.33. She ran 1:38.14 for sec-



ond in heat four and fourth
overall, just ahead of Stubbs,
was won her heat, but was fifth
overall.

The final was won by Jodian
Richards, a freshman from New
Mexico Junior College in
135.3153

In the 800m, Strachan came

out on top, although she did not
defend her title with a third-
place finish in 2:22.65, just
ahead of Stubbs, who came
‘fourth in 2:23.10.

The two were matched
against each other in the first
heat of the preliminaries, with
Strachan coming in second in
2:27.05 and Stubbs was third in
2:27.50.

Essex’s sophomore Celia

Whyte won the final in 2:20.54.

With Stubbs on the lead-off
and Strachan on anchor, Essex
took the 4 x 800m relay in
9:54.37 and they got fourth in
the distance medley with Stra-
chan on pop-off and Stubbs on
third.

A number of other Bahami-
ans participated in the meet for
Essex, Iowa Central Commu-
nity College, Southwest Christ-
ian, Hinds Community College
and South Plains.

Deandrea Laing

Another Essex sophomore
Deandrea Laing clocked 57.87
seconds for sixth place in the
women’s 400 metres at the
Texas Tech University in Lub-
bock, Texas.



The event was won by
Trudeane Clarke, a freshman
from New Mexico Junior Col-
lege in 57.26. Southwest Christ-
ian freshman Crystal Roscoe
was second in 56.90 and Essex’s
freshman Melony McKay was
third in 57.79.

In the preliminaries, Laing
was fourth in section two in
57.87. Her heat was won by
Clarke in 57.26.

Andrea Moss

Grand Bahamian freshman
Andrea Moss competed for
Iowa Central Community Col-
lege in the Indoor Pentathlon
where she was fifth overall with
a total of 3,004 points. Asiya
Iskakova of South Plains won
the title with 3562.

Moss was ninth in the 60 hur-
dles in 9.76; tied with three oth-
ers in the high jump with 5-3;
third in the shot put with a
heave of 31ft 8.75in; second in
the long jump with 18ft Sin and
14th in the 800m in 3:07.12.

Ryan Penn

On the men’s side, Ryan
Penn, a freshman for Southwest
Christian, was tied with two oth-
ers for ninth in the 55 in 6.42.
He won his heat in 6.42.

Penn also competed in the
200m where he was 10th in
21.77. He was third in heat two
in 21.77.

Jamal Moss

Competing for Hinds Com-
munity College, freshman Jamal
Moss was eighth in the final of

the 400m in 48.94. He was sec-
ond in his heat in 48.61 for fifth
overall.

Moss also ran the second leg
on Hinds College’s 4 x 4 relay
team that got fourth in Section
4 in 3:18.74, They ended up in
sixth place.

Jamaal Butler

Also in-the two-lap race,

. Jamaal Butler, representing

South Plains, was tenth overall
in 49.21 after he came in sec-
ond in heat two in the prelimi-
naries.

Butler also ran on the second
leg of South Plains’ 4 x 4 relay

team that won section 4 in:

3:12.97 for second overall]
behind Butler Community Col-
lege, the. winner in 3:12.79.



More action from the rugby game between Freeport and the Buccaneers

Concern over changes Lord’

at Olympic Association.

ff By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

INCUMBENT officers of
the Bahamas Olympic Associ-
ation said they are concerned
about the new twist that pres-
ident Arlington Butler wants
introduced to the election of
officers on March 15 at the
Nassau Yacht Club.

Referring to the purposed
changes that Butler intends to
have initiated during the elec-
tions — to take place as the -
annual general meeting

I ter a break to

financial report —

secrciary general Larry ‘Doc’

Davis satd the changes are

unconstitutional and will not
be accepted.

Butler, at a press conference
last Monday, said that they
voted out of order in 2002 and
they are making the necessary
corrections to ensure that they
are compliant with the
Olympic Charter, as was laid
down in 2000 by the Interna-
tional Olympic Committee.

The charter calls for the
executive board to be made up
of more members of the affili-
ated associations and federa-
rembers

of the BOA, only
thrice cxccutives are currently
affiliated with any association
or federation. They are vice-
president Sir Durward
Knowles in sailing, vice-presi-
dent Wellington Miller in box-
ing and assistant treasurer
Dianne Miller in softball.
“T think all we are saying is



sthan the non



what the Sanstitintiol says and
we're going by the constitu-
tion,” Davis said. “It’s not a
debatable issue. It’s, here is
what the constitution says and
here’s what we’re going to do.”

Davis, whom Butler indicat-
ed had contacted the IOC with
the view of having the Olympic
Charter take effect after the
elections, said the constitution
has not changed, so they are
not concerned about having
the new regulation imple-
mented,
we can do is go by the
consti anon. he said. “We
know that change is inevitable
and when you are in position
for such a long time, when
changes come about, there is a
big break up between people.

“But change is inevitable
and it will accept all of us. But
I see changes continue taking
place. My only desire is that
the changes are for the better
for the Bahamas Olympic
Association.”

With that in mind, Davis
said he intend to seek another
four-year term in office, as are
all of the other executive mem-
bers. :

However, the position which
is drawing most attention is
that of president, where Butler
is being challenged by Rev
Enoch Backford, one of his
current first vice-presidents.

Executives are of the opin-
ion that Butler is pushing for
the changes to the electoral
voting procedure simply
because of the challenge from
Backford.





hicles.com

+1-954-880-0781

=

In a press release following
Butler’s press conference last
week, the BOA said the com-
ments made were not those of
the executive committee of the
BOA, the provisions of the
Olympic Charter or that of the
Constitution of the Bahamas
Olympic Association.

They were, as stated in the
press release, the personal
opinion of Butler.

The BOA’s press release
further stated that the regula-
tions for voting and for nomi-
nations are stipulated in Arti-
cle V2 and VII 1 .(d) of the
Constitution of the BOA:

Article V2 (B) states:

“The General Assembly
shall be comprised of all mem-
bers referred to in Article Hf.

i. Associate Members who
will not have a right to vote:

ii. Up to two (2) delegates
appointed by each member
association/federation. Only
one of the delegates will have a
right to vote.”

Article VIII 1(d) states:

“Nominations tor election
of any office of the BOA may
be submitted by any delegate
or any officer of the BOA, No
nomination shall be accepted
unless it is seconded. Nomina-
tions may be submitted in writ-
ing or orally from the floor.
Nominees shall be past or pre-

‘sent officers of the BOA, or

Florida Stock Reatly for immediate Shinment

past and present officers of a
Members Association/Feder-
ation.”

There are a total of 13 asso-
ciation/federations that make
up the electoral meeting.

a Now - Ask for Ana, Dan, or Humberto

Fax +1

354-880-0785 Email usa@iapanesevehicles.com

AUTON AHL LEA ANAT PT TINT SPD BNR NARS TT






s triumphant again

for basketball classic

LORD'S House of Faith
picked up its second straight
victory and are looking like the
team to beat in the men's vice
president of the Baptist Sports
Council's 2007 Rev Tyrone
Knowles Basketball Classic.

In the marquee game of the
day at the Charles W Saunders
High School, Jean Street, Lord's
House of Faith prevailed with a
48-37 triumph over Calvary
Bible.

Also in the men's division,
Faith United pulled off a 34-30
decision over Golden Gates.

There was one ladies game
played. Golden Gates prevailed
with a 21-19 victory.

In the 19-and-under division,
First Baptist and Macedonia
stayed undefeated as they lead
their respective divisions.

First Baptist knocked off
Everlasting Life ministries 44-
21, while Macedonia won 39-26
over Bethel. In another 19-and-
under division, Golden Gates
won 57-23 over Ebenezer.

And in the 15-and-under divi-
sion, Golden Gates No 1 beat
Faith United no 1 21-19; First
Baptist nipped St Paul's Fox
Hill 22-20 and Transfiguration
stopped Macedonia 32-27.

e Here's a summary of the
games played:

Lord's House of Faith 48,
Calvary Bible 37 (M): Jeffrey
Rolle exploded a game-high 22
points, Pastor Arthur Dun-
combe had seven and Sterling
Greene six for Lord's House of
Faith as they improved to 2-1.

Marvin Nairn had 13, Garvin
Taylor and Horatior 'Yellow'
Poitier both came up with six
in the loss for Calvary Bible,
who dropped to 2-1.

Faith United 34, Golden
Gates 30 (M): D'Angelo Miller
scored eight and Theo Woods
and Gaylen Gray both had six
as Faith United climbed to 2-1
in the men's president division.

Jeroy Cooper had eight and
A Munnings and Keno Sears
both had six in the loss for
Golden Gates, who are 1-1.

v

Golden Gates 21, St, Paul's
Fox Hill 19 (L): Joyce Minus
lid up the nets for a game high
11, Tenaj Cooper had five and
Teniel Poitier four in the win
for Golden Gates in their debut.

Melinda Bastian had 10 and
D'Vonnya Brown added four
in the loss for St Paul's, who are
1-1.

Champions

First Baptist 44, Everlasting
Life Ministries 21 (19): Eugene
Bain and Cruz Simnon, the 1-2
punch for the Hugh Campbell
Basketball champions CC
Sweeting Cobras, connected on
11 and seven respectively and
Kenyair Smith and Delroy
Rolle both chipped in with six
as First Baptist improved to 2-0
in the 19-and-under presiden-
t's division.

Jude Rolle scored a game
high 14 for Everlasting Life
Ministries, who are 1-1.

Macedonia 39, Bethel 26 (19):
Anthony Porter came up with a

game high 13, Divaz Moss had:

10 and Sampson Cleare added
six for Macedonia, who are 2-0
in the 19-and-under vice presi-
dent division.

Aaron Rolle and Kenton
Jackson both had 10 in the loss
for Bethel as they made their
debut.

Golden Gates 57, Ebenezer
23 (19): Rocco Fernander
scored 12, Claude Lesbott had
10 for Golden Gates, who
moved to 2-0 in the 19-and-
under president's division.

Jermaine Deveaux had 11
and Leroy Wells six for Ebenez-
er, who dropped to 1-2.

St Paul's Fox Hill 43, New
Bethlehem 40 (19): Jarvis
Delancy scored a game high 15,
michael Ferguson had eight and
Kendal Simmons had seven for
St. Paul's Fox Hill, now 1-1 in
the 19-and-under president's
division.

Donovan Bullard had eight
and Khambrel Ferguson seven

in the loss for New Bethlehem,
who are 0-3.

First Baptist 22, St. Paul's Fox
Hill 20 (15): Trujillo Darville
scored a game-high 14 and Basil
Deveaux added four for First
Baptist, who 2-0 in the 15-and-
under president's division.

Kendal Simmons had eight,
Jarvis Delancy six and Raynold
Culmer four in the loss for St.
Paul's, who slipped to 1-1.

Golden Gates No 1 21, Faith
United No 1 19 (15): Zan-
vaughn Beckford scored eight
and Dominic Beadle had four
as Golden Gates No 1 improved
to 2-1 in the 15-and-under pres-
ident's division.

Laron Albury had six and
Recardio Ferguson five for
Faith United, who are 0-2.

Transfiguration 32, Macedo-
nia 27: Twin brothers Ramone
and Raymond McFall came up
with 10 and nine points respec-
tively and Riyadh Barr added
seven in the win for Transfigu-
ration, who are 1-2 in-the 15-
and-under vice president's divi-
sion.

Ritchie Malone had seven,
Brent Stubbs Jr six and Jamaal
Clarke five in the loss for Mace-
donia, who are 1-2.

The action will move to the
Balliou Hills courts this week
when the men's division will be
in the spotlight. Here's how
they will play:

Tuesday

Court One: 7pm St Paul's Fox
Hill vs Golden Gates (M) and
8pm Faith United vs Mt. Tabor
(M).

Court Two: 7pm Macedonia
vs St Paul's Bias Street (M) and
8pm Evangelistic Center ys
New Bethlehem (M).

Thursday

Court One: 7pm Mt. Tabor
vs Kemp Road Ministries (M)
and 8pm Golden Gates vs First
Baptist (M)

Court Two: 7pm Calvary
Bible vs New Bethlehem (M)
and 8pm Evangelistic Center vs
Bahamas,Harvest (M).

\


AUTO RACING
NASCAR



LUIS ACOSTA/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

FIRST WIN: Juan Pablo Montoya
celebrates his victory in the
Telcel-Motorola 200 in Mexico
City on Sunday. It was his first as
a NASCAR driver.

Montoya gets
first victory
on the circuit

BY IOAN GRILLO
Associated Press

MEXICO CITY — Juan Pablo
Montoya spun teammate Scott Pruett
to take the lead with eight laps left,
then held off Denny Hamlin to win
the Busch Series race on Sunday for
' his first NASCAR victory.

Montoya, the Colombian star who
jumped from Formula One to
NASCAR late last season, recovered
from a bad pit stop to aggressively
move from 19th to first, taking the
lead when he sent Pruett’s car spin-
ning on the 72nd lap of the Telcel-Mo-
torola 200.

“I’m very sorry about what hap-
pened with Scott,” Montoya said. “I
thought he saw me and when he came
across I had no room to go.”

Montoya said he would personally
apologize to Pruett.

“Of all the people to take out —
your teammate,” Pruett said. “That
was just lowdown, nasty, dirty driv-
ing.”

Hamlin, right behind the two Chip
Ganassi Racing drivers at the time,
said it was a tough call.

“I wouldn’t call it dirty driving, but
it was a bit aggressive,” Hamlin said.
“Juan had the fastest car and he would
have taken the lead sooner or later.
He was overzealous.”

Hamlin, the winner last year, pres-
sured Montoya in the closing laps, but
couldn’t pass on the 2.518-mile Auto-
dromo Hermanos Rodriguez road
course’s s-curves.

Boris Said finished third in the race
that ended with a green-white-
checker finish after a late caution.
Carl Edwards was fourth, and Pruett
finished fifth.

“I’m really glad we won, but really
upset that we took out a teammate,”
said Brad Parrott, Montoya’s crew
chief.

Montoya, who had the dominant
car for the entire race, started in third
but took the lead from Pruett on the
third lap.

Montoya made a green-flag stop on .

the 45th lap, but a fuel malfunction
forced him to return to the pits about
10 laps later. After a caution, he
started 19th and quickly moved his
way back to the front of the field.

“The reason I came to NASCAR is
for the racing, and we showed today it
is a great place for racing,” Montoya
said.

His victory was celebrated with
deafening cheers from the 72,000-
strong Mexican crowd. Montoya
gained a following in Mexico with
Formula N victories back in the 1990s.

The Mexican fans were hungry for
a fellow Latino to win a NASCAR
event in Mexico after two years in
which U.S. drivers took the crown
south of the border.

“It’s huge for the Latin community |

and for everybody who supported
me,” Montoya said. “Every time I’m
out there I want to shine. To be able
to convert this into victory shows
where the Ganassi team is going.
Hopefully we can share a lot more
successes.’

Two Mexican drivers finished in
the top 10.

Jorge Goeters started fourth and
held the lead for three laps before fin-
ishing seventh. It was a personal best
for the Mexico City native who
stunned the field by winning the pole
for the 2005 race.

“I’m very excited,” Goeters said.
“This is the kind of race that every-
body loves. Nobody knows who’s

*TURN TO NASCAR

i
|
|.
|
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MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007



-AdSAAhst ose ee SbABDonees APCOw OES SCURS EDA OLED SABI ISD SERRE ABESSESERSR ME PESOUCEEBOEEOE SEES ODDO SSIES SCEONEESS RECO DESONORL ELE DLCOOIEE

INTERNATIONAL EDITION



COLLEGE BASKETBALL | NO. 8 NORTH CAROLINA 86, NO. 14 DUKE 72

Hansbrough gets double-double, ugly injury

BY JOEDY McCREARY
Associated Press

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — Tyler
Hansbrough had 26 points and 17
rebounds before suffering an ugly
injury in the closing seconds of No.
8 North Carolina’s 86-72 victory
over 14th-ranked Duke on Sunday,
clinching the top seed in the Atlan-
tic Coast Conference tournament.

Senior Reyshawn Terry added
15 points in his final home game for
the Tar Heels (25-6, 11-5), who
swept the regular-season series
with the Blue Devils for the first
time in ll years, avoided their first
three-game slide under Roy Wil-
liams and gave the homespun
coach his 100th victory at his alma
mater.

But perhaps the lasting image of
the latest renewal of college bas-
ketball’s most intense rivalry will
be Hansbrough’s bloodied face. He
leaped for a layup with 14.5 sec-

‘onds left, but after the ball left his
hand he was struck in the face by
Gerald Henderson’s right elbow.

Hansbrough crumpled to the
ground, his nose bleeding pro-
fusely onto the floor and down his
face, and he was restrained from
the Duke players as he was being
escorted to the locker room. The
officials reviewed the play and
ejected Henderson, then said he
would be suspended for one game.

Greg Paulus had 21 points
before fouling out, and Henderson
finished with 16 for the Blue Devils
(22-9, 8-8).

Ty Lawson scored 12 points and
Brandan Wright finished with 10
for the Tar Heels, who took control
early with a hot start before a
fired-up Senior Day crowd, dodged
Duke’s second-half rally and pulled
away late for their fourth win in
their last five meetings with the
Blue Devils.

North Carolina led comfortably
for most of the way before Duke
made things interesting midway
through the second half, closing to
50-48 on Paulus’ baseline jumper
with 12:50 left.

The Blue Devils then forced a
miss and had the ball with a chance
to tie or take the lead, but North
Carolina’s Marcus Ginyard inter-
cepted Paulus’ pass to the interior.

Ginyard then started the fast
break that led to a three-point play

‘by Hansbrough, which started the

game-clinching 18-4 run that ended
when Hansbrough’s free throw
with 5:14 left made it 68-52.

The win, coupled with Virginia
Tech’s loss to Clemson, gave UNC
the top seed and a first-round bye
in this week’s ACC tournament.

DeMarcus Nelson had 14 points,
Jon Scheyer finished with 10 and
Josh McRoberts added 10 rebounds
for Duke.



GERRY BROOME/AP
PUTTING IT UP:‘UNC’s Tyler
Hansbrough, right, shoots
over Duke’s Josh McRobert in
the second half on Sunday.
Hansbrough had 26 points
and 17 rebounds.



COLLEGE BASKETBALL | NO. 5 FLORIDA 85, KENTUCKY 72

usting his .



PHIL SANDLIN/AP

FIERCE GATOR: Florida’s Joakim Noah, left, struggles with Kentucky’s Lukasz Obrzut for possession of the ball in first-half action in
Gainesville, Fla., on Sunday. The Gators defeated Wildcats 85-72 as Noah collected 17 points and 10 rebounds.

Noah scores 17 points and grabs 10 rebounds to lead the Gators

BY MARK LONG
Associated Press

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Joakim
Noah was thumping his. chest,
screaming at the top of lungs and
pumping up teammates with his
hustle and tenacious defense.

Noah was back to his usual self
— and so was Florida.

Noah broke out of a slump with
17 points and 10 rebounds, played
with the kind of passion missing in
recent games and helped the fifth-
ranked Gators rebound from con-
secutive losses and make history
with an 85-72 victory against Ken-
tucky on Sunday.

Florida became the first South-

eastern Conference team to win six
in a row against the Wildcats. Only
Notre Dame has won seven
straight against the storied pro-
gram.

“We’ve come a long way,” said
center Al Horford, who added 14
points and 10 boards. “We're all
about setting records, and that’s
what we did.”

It started with Noah, the
6-foot-10 son of tennis star Yannick
Noah.

Noah — who had his father,
mother, two sisters and brother on
hand for what might have been his
last home game — had scored 18
points the last three games and was

admittedly playing without his

"usual energy.

He had plenty of it against the
“Kitty Cats,” the nickname Noah
playfully gave Kentucky (20-10,
9-7) this week.

“I feel like if you can deal with
all the good that we’ve gone
through, you have to know how to
deal with some bad,” Noah said.

“We knew that it wasn’t the end
of the world, but I feel like to me
it’s like crazy how people can just
be on your side and all of a sudden,
a couple days later, the same peo-
ple ... just trash you. I’ve never
experienced that before. I realize

. now that I can’t let those people

affect who I am,” he added.

The Gators (26-5, 13-3) got
behind early again and were tied at
halftime, but they used a 13-2 run to
open the second half and pulled
away down the stretch to finish the
season unbeaten at home (18-0).

Noah, much like last year’s run
through the NCAA tournament,
was the catalyst. He had aj left-
handed jam in the second-half
spurt, then threw down consecu-
tive dunks that pushed the lead to
62-51 with about 10 minutes to play.
He added seven straight points in
the closing minutes that sealed the
victory.

e MORE COLLEGES

PRO BASKETBALL | PHOENIX 99, LOS ANGELES LAKERS 94

Nash gets 25, Suns stagger to victory fag

BY BOB BAUM
Associated Press

PHOENIX — The Phoenix Suns
usually sprint to victory. With
their “mojo” severely lacking Sun-
day, they staggered to one.

Steve Nash scored 18 of his 23
points in the second half — includ-

. ing two free throws with 5.4 sec-

onds to play — and the Suns held
on to beat the short-handed Los
Angeles Lakers 99-94,

Leandro Barbosa added 20
points and Amare Stoudemire had
17 points and 11 rebounds, but the

Suns barely held off a Lakers team
without Lamar Odom, out indefi-
nitely after tearing his left labrum
on Friday.

Shawn Marion, who had missed
the two previous games with a
bruised right hand, had 13 points
and 12 rebounds before fouling out
with 22.8 seconds to play. Raja Bell
scored 14, including two free
throws that put Phoenix ahead
97-92 with 18.1 seconds to go.

Kobe Bryant scored 18 of his 30
points in the second half — but
shot just ll-of-28 overall — in the

first meeting of the teams since the
season opener. The Lakers won
that one in Los Angeles without
Bryant, and they made it tough on
Phoenix this time, too, even though
they were without Odom as well as
Luke Walton and Vladimir Radma-
novic.

Brian Cook had 22 points —
including 4-of-6 3-pointers — and
14 rebounds for Los Angeles.

It was an often-sloppy contest
that featured 35 turnovers — 19 by
the Lakers and 16 by Phoenix.

e@ MORE NBA

MOVING HE
BALL: Suns’
guard
Steve

Nash
drives past
Lakers’
Shammond
Williams,
rear.



MATTYORK/AP
4B | MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

Associated Press

LONDON — Argentina’s
Carlos Tevez scored his first
goal for West Ham on Sunday
in a 4-3 loss to Tottenham in
the Premier League.

Tevez, who hadn’t scored
in 19 previous appearances,
curled a free kick over the wall
that caught the underside of
the crossbar before the ball
bounced in.

The goal put the Hammers
up 2-0 at home four minutes
before halftime.

He also set up Mark Noble’s
first goal in the 16th minute
and floated a free kick in front
of the goal that Bobby Zamora
headed in to make it 3-2 with
five minutes to go.

Dimitar Berbatov tied the
score with a free kick in the
88th minute, and then Cana-
dian defender Paul Stalteri
scored the winner on a break-
away in the fifth minute of
injury time.

Jermain Defoe scored on a
penalty shot and Teemu Tai-
nio also had a goal for the
Spurs. .

Tottenham moved up two
places to eighth, strengthening
its chances of playing in next
season’s UEFA Cup. West

Ham remains in last place

behind Watford because of
goal differential. Both teams

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

SOCCER

Tottenham spoils Tevez’s
show by beating West Ham

have 20 points after 29 games.
Charlton has four more points,
six behind 17th-place Man-
chester City.

West Ham could have

points deducted if the league.

decides the club broke trans-
fer rules when it signed Tevez
and Javier Mascherano from
the Brazilian club Corinthians.

Also, two penalty kicks by
Benni McCarthy gave Black-
burn a 2-1 victory at Bolton.
On Saturday, Manchester
United won 1-0 at Liverpool to
stay nine points ahead of Chel-
sea, which won 2-0 at Ports-
mouth.

ITALY

MILAN — Christian Rigano
scored on two. headers to
improve Messina’s chances. of
avoiding relegation from Serie
A with a 2-0 victory over 10-
man Palermo.

It was Messina’s second
victory in five months but it
was enough to pull the club
out of the three-club relega-
tion zone.

Palermo, which is winless
in five games, had striker
Andrea Carracciolo sent off in
the 6lst minute for complain-
ing about a tackle.

Messina is 17th with 23
points — one more than Reg-
gina, which tied Parma 2-2.

Also Sunday, Tommaso
Rocchi scored his third goal in
three games to help fourth-
place Lazio beat Sampdoria
1-0; Nicola Pozzi’s 18th-minute
volley gave Empoli a 1-0 win
over Udinese; and Italy striker
Luca Toni scored twice in
three minutes in Fiorentina’s
5-1 rout of Torino.

Inter Milan leads the divi-
sion with 70 points, followed
by AS Roma with 54 and
Palermo with 45. On Saturday,
Inter beat Livorno 2-1 and AS
Roma was held to a 1-1 tie at
last-place Ascoli.

SPAIN

MADRID — Real Madrid
tied Getafe 1-1 and was six
points off the lead in the Span-
ish league.

Daniel Guiza scored in the
38th minute for Getafe. Ruud
van Nistelrooy tied it with a
penalty kick at halftime for
Madrid, which stayed in
fourth place.

David Beckham and Jose
Antonio Reyes of Real Madrid
sustained knee injuries and
will miss Wednesday’s Cham-
pions League game at Bayern
Munich. Reyes was carried off
on a stretcher after a collision
with Getafe goalkeeper
Roberto Abbondanzieri in the

32nd minute.



LEFTERIS PITARAKIS/AP
OVER THE WALL: West Ham striker Carlos Tevez, center, curls a shot over Tottenham
Hot Spurs’ defensive’ wall to score during their Premier League Cup match in London
on Sunday. Despite, the goal, Tottenham won the contest 4-3.

AUTO RACING 5 | GRAND AMERICAN ROLEX SERIES

ee wins in final laps

BY IOAN GRILLO
Associated Press

MEXICO CITY — Alex
Gurney took the lead from
Max Papis with two laps left
and held on to win the 100-lap
Grand American Rolex Sports
Car Series race Saturday at
Autodromo Hermanos Rodri-
guez.

“Tt was amazing,” said Gur-
ney, who teamed with Jon
Fogarty in the No. 99 Pontiac
Riley. “We had five laps to go
and I thought we wouldn't last.

Luckily, we put pressure on
and I closed on him pretty fast.
I couldn’t be happier.”
Fogarty said the close finish
was too much to bare: “T actu-
ally left the pits and went back
to the trailer because I
couldn’t watch. It was great to
see a battle going on. It’s won-
derful racing and awesome we
can put on an event like that.”
Pole-sitter Colin Braun, an
18-year-old from Ovalo, Texas,
led the race for the first 56 laps
in the No. 75 Pontiac Riley.

When he stopped and handed
over to Papis, the car had a 17
second lead.

Papis, the 2004 Daytona
Prototype co-champion,
blamed traffic and himself.

“The problem was that we
hit traffic right at the wrong
time. I saw Alex coming and I
didn’t really have any chance
to do anything so he went by,”
Papis said.

A Pontiac Riley driven by
Max Angelelli and Jan Mag-
nussen finished third.

FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

Montoya gets his first victory

°NASCAR

going to win until the white
flag is coming up. Congratula-
tions to Juan Pablo.”

Adrian Fernandez, Mexi-
co’s best known driver, fin-
ished ninth.

The course features eight
tight turns and was tough for
many Busch Series regulars
used to negotiating oval
tracks.

David Reutiman, who fin-
ished 12th in a Toyota, said he
had never seen turns like
these in his life.

“I definitely learned a lot,”
he said. “We had to run off the

track one time but other than
that we stayed on course, and
they told me if I kept clean I
would come home with a top
153%

Others got in more trouble
and there were a total of eight
cautions, including the Mon-
toya-Pruett bump.

Pruett was involved in
another incident in the 25th
when he passed Venezuela’s
Alex Garcia, leading to a
minor bump that sent Garcia
spinning.

In lap 66, Australian Mar-
cos Ambrose driving a Ford
and J.J. Yeley in his Chevrolet
banged each other near the

front of the pack sending each
other spinning. Yeley’s engine
went after the incident and he
finished 37th, while Ambrose
recovered and finished
eighth.

“I got spun and then he
spun out. But that’s NASCAR.
You’ve got to roll with it,”
Ambrose said.

“I put my head down and
just tried to come back as best
I could,” he added.

Officials said a total of
116,118 came to the track dur-
ing the three days with 72.971
watching Sunday’s race, a
similar attendance to last
year.

SOCCER | AUTO RACING | ETC.

Beckham limped off in the
69th.

Diego Milito’s 16th goal of
the season helped Zaragoza
rally to a 3-2 victory over
lowly Real Sociedad.

Sevilla leads the league
with 50 points while Barcelona
has 49, Valencia 46, Madrid
44, Zaragoza 42 and Atletico
Madrid 40.

GERMANY

BERLIN — Alemannia
Aachen beat Mainz 2-1 to draw
even with its rival in the fight
against relegation from the
Bundesliga.

The end of Mainz’s six-
game unbeaten streak means
the struggle to avoid demotion
is the closest in league history.
The bottom 10 clubs are sepa-
rated by just seven points and
seven teams are within two
points ahead of 16th-place Ein-

‘tracht Frankfurt, which occu-

pies the last demotion place.

Mainz had the league’s best
record since the winter break,
where it started in last place.

Mainz led 1-0 on Moham-
med Zidan’s 14th-minute goal.
Substitute Laurentiu Reghe-
campf then hit free kicks that
led to goals by Jan Schlaudraff
in the 47th and by Vedad Ibi-
sevic two minutes later.

The result left Mainz in 13th
place and Aachen 14th, just
one point above demotion.

Energie Cottbus moved up
to llth with a 3-2 win against
Borussia Dortmund, which fell
to 10th. Both are two points
above demotion.

FRANCE

PARIS — Nantes beat
Sochaux 2-1 to keep alive its
chances of escaping relegation
from the French first division.

Romania’s Claudiu Keresu.

scored the winning goal in the
51st minute, collecting a long
pass and beating goalkeeper
Teddy Richert from close
range.

Dimitri Payet put Nantes
ahead in the 23rd, charging
down the left flank before cut-
ting inside to fire a powerful
shot into the top corner of the
net from the edge of the box.
Brazil’s Alvaro Santos tied it
for Sochaux in the 34th on a
penalty kick after Alioum Sai-
dou had brought down Valter
Birsa.

Nantes is in 19th place with
26 points, while Sochaux
missed an opportunity to
move to third.

TRACK & FIELD

Gevaert

defends
title

Associated Press

BIRMINGHAM, Eng-
land — Kim Gevaert of Bel-
gium successfully defended
her European indoor 60-
meter title on Sunday, with
disgraced Greek sprinter
Katerina Thanou finishing
sixth.

In the men’s final, Brit-

ain’s Jason Gardener ran
the fastest time in Europe

this year — 6.51 seconds — '

to take his fourth straight
European indoor 60-meter
title.

Gevaert won in 7.12 on
the final day of the Euro-
pean Indoor Champion-
ships. Thanou, who posted
7.26, said she had been
tested two days before the
meet but not during the
championships.

Yevgeniya Polyakova of
Russia was second with 7.18
and Daria Onysko of Poland
came third with a personal
best time of 7.20.



MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD





DELIGHTED
AMERICAN: Julia -
Mancuso
celebrates her
third place
finish during
the FIS Skiing -
World Cup
Women’s
Super-G on
Sunday in
Tarvisio,. Italy.

AGENCE )ON/GETTY IMAGES

Mancuso gives US.
a tie at the top

of the World Cup
skiing rankings

Associated Press

TARVISIO, Italy — Julia
Mancuso had two long-term
goals growing up as a skier
-—— winning an Olympic gold
medal and hoisting the over-
all World Cup trophy.

The Californian accom-
plished one at last year’s
Turin Olympics, winning the
giant slalom. And on Sunday,
in this far northeastern cor-
ner of Italy, the second
moved closer to reality.

Mancuso moved atop the
overall World Cup standings
for the first time by finishing
third in a super-giant slalom,
her third straight top-three
result of the weekend. It was
the first time in 24 years that
an American woman had led
the standings at any time
during a season.

“It was always my dream
to win the Olympics. My
other dream was to win the
overall as a kid, maybe that’s

why it’s happening,” she said.

But Mancuso isn’t alone

, atop:the, standings .1 -with six

races remaining’ this’season.
Renate Goetschl won

her record 17th super-G by

more than a second to join

Mancuso in the overall lead. -

She skied the 1.2-mile Pram-
pero course in] minute, 18.66
seconds. Austrian teammate
Nicole Hosp was second,
1.01 behind, and Mancuso
was third, 1.22 back.

Goetschl and Mancuso are
tied with 1,199 points each.
Hosp is third with 1,183.
Another Austrian, Marlies
Schild, finished 12th and
dropped from first to fourth
overall with 1,170.

Goetschl won the overall
title in 2000. Mancuso is
attempting to become the
first American woman to win
since Tamara McKinney in
1983. The closest an Ameri-
can has been to the top since
then was two races into the
1993 season, when Julie Par-
isien was one point behind
leader Pernilla Wiberg of
Sweden.

Goetschl already has
clinched the downhill and
super-G titles, Schild has
locked up the slalom and
super-combi crowns, and
Hosp has a 36-point lead on
Tanja Poutiainen in the
giant slalom standings with
two races remaining.

Bode Miller became the
first American man to win
the overall title in 22 years
when he took the crown in
2005.

Only six races.remain this
season — two technical
events in Zwiesel, Germany,
next weekend and four races
at the World Cup finals in
Lenzerheide, Switzerland,
the following week.

On a spring-like Sunday,
with the temperature hitting
4] degrees, a couple of other
Americans also fared well on
a course set by U.S. speed
coach Alex HoedImoser.
Stacey Cook finished sixth
and Kaylin Richardson was
llth, with both skiers record-
ing the best super-G perfor-
mances of their careers.

e Men’s. slalom: In
Kranjska Gora, Slovenia,
world champion Mario Matt
won his second straight
World Cup slalom on Sun-
day, and Benjamin Raich
finished second to reclaim
the lead in the standings.

Matt, who trailed Raich
after the opening leg by 0.04

‘first,

seconds, raced down the
twisting track in a combined
time of 1 minute, 40.64 sec-
onds. Raich made it an Aus-
trian 1-2 finish, 0.61 behind
Matt. Manfred Moelgg of
Italy was third, 0.96.back.

Bode Miller, who now
has completed two straight
World Cup slaloms after fail-
ing to finish any for more
than a year, was 23rd in
1:43.89. The only other Amer-
ican to finish both legs was
Ted Ligety, who was 25th.

Raich, who won Satur-
day’s giant slalom for the
third straight year, moved
closer to defending his over-
all title by overtaking Aksel
Lund Svindal of Norway at
the top of the standings.
Svindal, who has not finished
better than sixth in a slalom
this season, crashed out on
the first run.

Raich now leads the over-
all standings with 945 points,

while Svindal is second, Alt: canes
868. Didier Cuche of Swit- .
“zerland is third. with: 788.
Miller and Matt are, tied. for. :
fourth with 664.

The victory lifted Matt
atop the slalom standings
with 52C points, 15 ahead of
Raich. Jens Byggmark of
Sweden, who had been lead-
ing the standings, dropped to
third with 445 points.

e Speedskating: In Cal-
gary, Alberta, U.S. speed-
skater Shani Davis broke his
own world record at 1,500
meters Sunday at the World
Cup final.

Davis, a silver medalist at
the 2006 Turin Games, fin-
ished in 1 minute, 42.32 sec-
onds to lower the mark of
1:42.68 he set March 19, 2006,
at Calgary’s Olympic Oval.

He had little to say about
his latest world record: “Talk
is cheap. I just want to
skate.”

Erben Wennemars of
the Netherlands was second
in 1:43.24. Denny Morrison
of Canada, winner of the
1,000 Friday, was third in
1:43.43.

Sven Kramer of the
Netherlands set a world
record in the men’s 5,000
Saturday.

RUNNING

e Los Angeles Mara-
thon: Kenyan Fred Mogaka
outran countryman Moses
Kororia in the last mile Sun-
day to win the race and its
battle-of-the-sexes challenge.

Kororia and another
Kenyan, Christopher
Kipyego, passed eventual
women’s winner Ramilia
Burangolova in the 25th
mile. But Mogaka surged
ahead of all three and
crossed the finish line in 2
hours, 17 minutes, 14 seconds
to give the race a Kenyan
men’s winner for the ninth
consecutive year.

By crossing the finish line
Mogaka earned a
$100,000 bonus as part of
“The Challenge,” which
allows the top women to
start nearly 20 minutes ahead
of the men. The time differ-
ential is chosen by race offi-
cials in hopes of creating a
close finish between the top
man and the top woman.

Mogaka and Burangolova
each received $20,000, plus a
new car. Burangolova’s win-
ning time among the women
was 2:37:54, 49 seconds
behind Mogaka.


ofa Miami

THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com

NBA STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE





__INTERNATIONAL EDITION __ MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007 ||5.B

BASKETBALL

NBA

Arenas’ free throws give Wizards victory

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Gilbert Arenas made
three free throws with one-tenth of a second
remaining to give the Washington Wizards a
wild 107-106 victory over the Golden State
Warriors on Sunday.

With Washington trailing 106-104 with 2.9
seconds to go, Arenas caught an inbounds
pass near the top of the key and drove to the
basket. The horn sounded before Arenas
released a shot, but the officials ruled that
Golden State’s Mickael Pietrus fouled Arenas
with time left on the clock.

Warriors coach Don Nelson was issued a
technical foul for arguing the call, and Are-
nas was awarded a total of three free throws.

With the crowd on its feet, Arenas nailed
the first two free throws before Golden State
called timeout. He then calmly stepped back
to the line and sank the third shot.

Arenas scored a game-high 32 points,
while Jason Richardson led Golden State

e Celtics 124, Timberwolves 117
(2OT): In Boston, Delonte West scored all 31
of his points after halftime, Paul Pierce added
27 points and the Celtics won their fourth
straight game.

Al Jefferson had 20 points and 14
rebounds, and reserve Ryan Gomes added 21

SOUTHEAST WL Pct. GB 10 Str. Home Away Conf |
Washington 33 25 569 - 5-5 W-2 23-8 10-17 21-13 |
29 29° 500 4 «66-4 W-2 17-10 12-19 16-16 |
Orlando 28 33 .459 6% 2-8 L-3 18-12 10-21 16-20 |
Charlotte 22 37) «373: 11% «64-6 «= L-4 13-16 9-21 14-21
Atlanta 22 38 367 12 2-8 L-5 10-18 12-20 12-23 |
ATLANTIC WL _ Pet. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf —
Toroito 32 28 533 - 55 L-2 20-9 12-19 22-13 |
New Jersey 28 32 467 4 5-5 L-2 17-15 11-17 21-16 |
New York 28 33 .459 4% 6-4 W-2 17-13 11-20 17-21 |
Philadelphia 22 38 .367 10 5-5 W-4 14-15 8-23 14-20
Boston 17 42 .28814% 5-5 W-4 7-21 10-21 11-24 |
CENTRAL WL Pet GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf
Detroit 37 20 649 - 82 W-1 19-10 18-10 26-11
Cleveland 34 25 576 4 6-4 W-1 22-8 12-17 20-16 |
Chicago 35 27 565 4% 64 W-3 24-8 11-19 24-12 |
Indiana 29 29° 500 8% 3-7 LS 18-12 11-17 20-14 |
Milwaukee 22 38 «6.367 16% 93-7 Ll 13-13 9-25 11-25 |
WESTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHWEST WL Pet. GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf
Dallas 50 9 847 - 10-0 W-15 29-3 21-6 32-6 |
San Antonio 41 18 695 9 8-2 W-8 20-8 21-10 24-11 |
Houston 36 23 610 14 5-5 L-1 20-10 16-13 20-18 |
New Orleans 28 32 467 22% «5-5 1-2 19-12 9-20 16-20 |
Memphis 15 46 246 36 2-8 L-4 11-20 4-26 9-29 |
NORTHWEST W L Pct. GB LIO Str. Home Away Conf | Wi
Utah 40 19 678 - 82 W-3 22-7 1812 2412 . With 28,
Denver 28 29 491 11 5-5 L-l 15-16 13-13 12-21
Minnesota 26 33 «441 14 3-7 L-3 17-13 9-20 15-22
Portland 25 35 .417 15% 5-5 L-l 14-16 11-19 15-20
Seattle 23 35 «©.397 16% 6-4 W-1 17-13 6-22 12-23
PaciFic = WL Pet. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf |
Phoenix 46 14 767) - «7-3 W-2 23-6 23-8 22-10
L.A. Lakers 33 27 550 13 3-7 L-2 20-10 13-17 19-13 |
LA. Clippers 29 30 .49216% 5-5 W-1 21-10 8-20 16-19 |
Sacramento 27° 32+ ~=.458 18% 9=5-5 ~W-3 17-12 10-20 14-21 |
Golden State 26 35 .42620% 2-8 L-6 20-10 6-25 14-19

RES

Saturday’s results
Bos. 124, Min. 117 (20T)
Was. 107, G.S. 106

Chi. 126, Mil. 121 (OT)
Pho. 99, L.A.L. 94

ULTS AND SCHEDULES

Tonight’s games
Atl. at Miami, 7:30
Mil. at Orl., 7

Hou. at Clev., 7 Cle. 120, Tor. 98

G.S. at Det., 7:30 Det. 92, Mem. 89

Saturday’s results
Bos. 96, NJ 88 (OT)
NY 104, At. 100 (OT)

j

points and 17 boards for Boston, which out-
scored Minnesota 17-10 in the second over-
time to win its second overtime game in two
days. Boston beat New Jersey 96-88 in over-
time Saturday.

Kevin Garnett led Minnesota with 33
points, 13 rebounds and 10 assists.

Utah 108, N.0. 94 Seat LAG” 10:30 Dat 103, Ork 98 e Bulls 126, Bucks 121 (OT): In Milwau-
Char. at Sea., late See, 10 Baro% _ kee, Ben Gordon scored a career-high 48
ne | points to help Chicago withstand Michael

WOMEN’S COLLEGE GAMES |



PABLO MARTINEZ MONSIVAIS/AP

ROAD BLOCK: The Wizards’ Gilbert
Arenas, left, runs into the Warriors’ Al
Harrington in the fourth quarter on
Sunday. No foul was called on the play.

Redd’s 52 points for the Bucks.

Gordon, whose previous high was 41
points on Jan. 2 against Phoenix, sparked a
frantic fourth-quarter rally for the Bulls as
they overcame an 18-point deficit.

Gordon had 20 points in the quarter, and
Luol Deng added 27 points for the Bulls.

Redd’s 52 points is his second-highest
total this season, behind the franchise-record
57 he scored Nov. 10 against Utah, also a loss.

e 76ers 99, Nets 86: In Philadelphia,

Andre Iguodala scored 21 points and Phila-
delphia extended its winning streak to a sea-
son-high four games.

Willie Green and Kyle Korver each scored
20 points for the Sixers, who rallied from a
17-point deficit in the first quarter for their
biggest comeback victory of the season.

e Jazz 108, Hornets 94: In Oklahoma
City, Mehmet Okur scored 28 points, Deron

‘Williams added 20 and the Utah Jazz heated

up in the second half to cruise to victory.

LATE SATURDAY

e Spurs 97, Rockets 74: In Houston,
Tim Duncan scored 26 points and San Anto-
nio beat Houston for its season-high eighth
straight victory.

e Kings 104, Trail Blazers 96: In Port-
land, Ore., Kevin Martin scored 15 of his 33
points in the first quarter and Sacramento
won its third straight.

e Clippers 87, Pacers 64: In Los Ange-
les, Corey Maggette scored 20 points, Elton
Brand added 17 points and 12 rebounds, and
the Clippers recorded their best defensive
game in franchise history.

e Mavericks 103, Magic 98: In Dallas,
Jason Terry had 29 points and 15 assists, and
Dallas established a club record with its 15th
consecutive victory.

ELSEWHERE

Los Angeles Lakers coach Phil Jackson
says he has talked to 41-year-old Scottie Pip-
pen about making a comeback with the team.

“I did get in touch with Scottie,” Jackson
said before the Lakers played the Phoenix
Suns on Sunday, “but it was just preliminary
talk about how he’s doing, where he’s at and
how he feels.”

MEN’S COLLEGE GAMES

North Carolina downs N.C. St.

Associated Press

GREENSBORO, N.C. —
Ivory Latta scored 20 points,
becoming North Carolina’s
career scoring leader, and the
fourth-ranked Tar Heels
ended North Carolina State’s
. emotional run through the
' Atlantic Coast Conference
tournament with a 60-54 win
over the No. 24 Wolfpack in

Sunday’s championship game.

Latta’s driving scoop shot
in the lane with 35 seconds
left gave the Tar Heels a five-
point lead. She then grabbed a
rebound with 13 seconds left
and hit two free throws to put
it away, earning tournament
MVP honors. :

Erlana Larkins added 18
points for North Carolina
(30-3), which earned its third
_ straight ACC title by holding
off the feisty Wolfpack (23-9),
- who had won 11 of 12 games
since coach Kay Yow
returned after breast cancer |
treatments.

* Ashley Key scored 14

points and Shayla Fields
added 12 for N.C. State, which
had its five-game winning
streak snapped. The
Wolfpack got within 55-52 on
Shayla Fields’ 3-pointer with
1:40 left.

Latta grabbed a rebound
with 13 seconds left and hit
two free throws to put it
away.

N.C. State stunned top-
ranked and undefeated Duke
on Saturday to reach its first
- ACC final since 2001.

e No. 13 Vanderbilt 51,
No. 11 LSU 45: In Duluth, Ga.,
Dee Davis scored 19 points,
including a crucial basket
with 23 seconds left, to lead
Vanderbilt past LSU in the
Southeastern Conference
tournament championship.

Third-seeded Vanderbilt
(28-5) won its third SEC tour-
nament championship in six
years.

@ No. 3 Connecticut 74,
South Florida 54: In Hart-
ford, Conn., Charde Houston
scored 19 points, Tina Charles
added 18 and Connecticut
opened its Big East confer-
ence tournament with a quar-
terfinal win over South Flor-
ida.

With losses by No. 1 Duke

and No. 2 Tennessee in their
conference tournaments this
weekend, UConn (28-2) is try-
ing to stake a claim to the
overall No. 1 seed in the
NCAA tournament.
. Jessica Dickson led South
Florida (20-11) with 18 points.
ChiChi Okpaleke and Nalini

. Miller each added 10.

South Florida hit just four
of its first 14 shots, but the
game was tied 10-10 thanks in
part to a technical foul on
UConn coach Geno
Auriemma. But UConn then
went on a 13-0 run capped by



MARCIO JOSE SANCHEZ/AP
TOUGH SHOT: Stanford's
Michelle Harrison, left,
shoots over Southern
Cal’s Jamie Hagiya, center
on Sunday.

a Houston layup that made it
23-10 with less than 9 minutes
to go before intermission.

e No. 18 Rutgers 63,
DePaul 55: In Hartford,
Conn., Matee Ajavon scored
21 points and Rutgers came

back to beat DePaul in a Big -

East tournament quarterfinal.
Essence Carson added 18
for the Scarlet Knights (20-8),
who made their fourth con-
secutive Big East semifinals.

e No. 20 Louisville 68,
West Virginia 56: In Hart-
ford, Conn., Angel McCough-
try scored 26 points and Lou-
isville held West Virginia
without a field goal for over 12
minutes in the first half.

e No. 23 Marquette 61,
Pittsburgh 51: In Hartford,
Conn., Christina Quaye had 18
points to lead Marquette over
Pittsburgh in the Big East
tournament quarterfinals.

Krystal Ellis added 15 and
the Golden Eagles (25-5) went
on a 16-4 run late to break
open a close game. Marquette
has won six of its last seven.

Marcedes Walker led Pitts-

burgh (23-8) with 18 points
and 12 rebounds.
e No. 5 Ohio St. 73, Penn
St. 71, OT: In Indianapolis,
Jessica Davenport scored a
season-high 32 points, includ-
ing all seven of Ohio State’s
points in overtime, to rally the
Buckeyes fifth-seeded Penn
State in a Big Ten tournament
semifinal.

Star Allen added 12 points
and. injured guard Marscilla
Packer provided an inspira-
tional lift with nine points in a
surprise return from a
sprained left ankle.

Three-time regular-season
champion Ohio State (28-2)
will defend last year’s tourna-
ment title Monday night
against Purdue.

Kamela Gissendanner led
Penn State (15-16) with 21
points and Tyra Grant had 17,
but couldn’t get a potentially
tying 15-foot baseline jumper
off before the buzzer at the
end of overtime.

e No. 15 Purdue 64, No.
22 Michigan St. 61: In India-
napolis, Katie Gearlds scored
14 of her 17 points in the sec-
ond half and Purdue rallied to
beat Michigan State in a Big
Ten tournament semifinal.

Erin Lawless had 18 points
and seven rebounds, and
Lindsay Wisdom-Hylton

added 12 points and 14°”
rebounds for the Boilermak-_
ers (27-5), who will go for’,

K-

their sixth tournament title in
the final Monday against the
winner of the late semifinal
between Ohio State and Penn
State.

Victoria Lucas-Perry led
Michigan State (23-8) with 20
points and Allyssa DeHaan
added 16 points, five rebounds
and three blocks.

e No. 7 Stanford 67,
Southern California 52: In
San Jose, Calif., Candice Wig-
gins hit a career-high and
tournament-record eight
3-pointers on the way to 29
points, and Stanford beat
Southern California to reach
the Pac-10 tournament title
game.

e No. 9 Arizona State
60, California 53: In San
Jose, Calif., Kirsten Thomp-
son scored all 14 of her points
in the second half, including
eight straight in crunch time,
to lead Arizona State past Cal-
ifornia and into the Pac-10
tournament title game.

e@ Saint Joseph’s 57, No.
8 George Washington 55:
In Cincinnati, Saint Joseph’s
went to a full-court press in
the closing minutes and
pulled off its biggest upset in
15 years, rallying to beat
George Washington in the
Atlantic 10 tournament semi-
finals.

By overcoming a 13-point
deficit in the final 5. minutes,
Saint Joseph’s (19-12) snapped
the fourth-longest winning
streak in Division I at 19
games and became the first
Al0 team all season to beat
the Colonials.

Saint Joseph’s Whitney
Ffrench scored all of her 14
points in the second half.

Kimberly Beck and Jessica
Adair each scored 15 points
for the Colonials (26-3)

LATE SATURDAY

e No. 13 Vanderbilt 81,
No. 10 Georgia 56: In
Duluth, Ga., Christina Wirth
scored 2] points and Vander-
bilt pulled ahead by 23 points
in the first half in a victory
over Georgia that advanced
the Commodores to the SEC
championship.

e No. 21 Wisconsin-
Green Bay 58, IIlinois-Chi-
cago 45: In Chicago, Nicole
Soulis had 12 points and eight
rebounds to lead Wisconsin-
Green Bay over IJlinois-Chi-
cago.



REPLAY
WATCHING:
Creighton’s
Anthony

Tolliver, center,
and his
teammates
celebrate as ~
they watch the
post-tournament
video after
beating No. 11
Southern

Illinois on
Sunday. ”

OS

TONGANNAM/AP

Winona State extends streak
to 52 consecutive victories

Associated Press

WINONA, Minn.
Winona State tied an NCAA
Division II record by extend-
ing its winning streak to 52
games with an 80-70 victory
over Southwest Minnesota
State in the Northern Sun
Intercollegiate Conference
championship game Sunday.

The Warriors equaled the
record set by Langston Uni-
versity of Oklahoma, which
won 52 straight games with
perfect seasons in 1943-44 and
1944-45 and by winning the
first five games of the 1945-46
season.

Winona State (30-0) has
not lost since Jan. 7, 2006, an
84-79 setback at home to
Bemidji State.

John Smith had 23 points
and 12 rebounds in the victory
over Southwest Minnesota
State (20-10).

The Warriors can break
the Division II record when
they play in the North Central
Regional starting Saturday.

e Creighton 67, No. 11
Southern {Illinois 61: In St.
Louis, Anthony Tolliver had
15 points and 13 rebounds and
Creighton upset the Salukis to
earn their seventh NCAA
tournament appearance in
nine years.

Nate Funk added 19 points
and four assists and Nick Por-
ter had 15 points and six
assists for the second-seeded
Bluejays (22-10), who won the
conference tournament for
the sixth time in nine seasons.

Jamaal Tatum had 21 points
for Southern Illinois (27-6),
which has won the regular-
season title five times in the
last six seasons but has won
only one tournament title dur-
ing that span. The loss ended
a 13-game winning streak for
the Salukis.

e No. 16 Louisville 86,
Seton Hall 71: In Louisville,
Ky., Edgar Sosa scored 18
points to lead five Louisville
players in double figures and
the Cardinals clinched sec-

ond-place in the Big East.

Terrence Williams and
David Padgett scored 15
points apiece, Derrick Carac-
ter added 13 and Jerry Smith
had 10 points for Louisville
(22-8, 12-4), which won its
sixth straight.

Brian Laing scored a

‘career-high 29 points and

Eugene Harvey added 16
points for the Pirates (13-16,
4-12).

e Clemson 75, No. 21
Virginia Tech 74: In Blacks-
burg, Va., K.C. Rivers scored
22 points, including the deci-

sive basket with 18 seconds .

remaining, and the Tigers pre-
vented the Hokies from cap-
turing a share of the Atlantic
Coast Conference’s regular-
season title.

Cliff Hammonds added 17
points for Clemson (21-9, 7-9)
in the ACC regular-season
finale for both teams.

Zabian Dowdell led Vir-
ginia Tech (20-10, 10-6) with
25 points. Jamon Gordon
added 14 points.

LATE SUNDAY

e No. 6 Memphis 64,
SMU 61: In Dallas, Chris
Douglas-Roberts had 19 points
with the key basket late and
Memphis won its 19th straight
game to complete a perfect
record in Conference USA
with a victory at SMU.

The Tigers (27-3, 16-0
C-USA) overcame an early l1-
point deficit to lead at half-
time, but didn’t go ahead for
good until Douglas-Roberts
hit a 3-pointer to make it 59-57
with 3:47 left.

Memphis became the first
C-USA team to get through
league play without a loss
since Cincinnati was the first
to do it in 1999-2000. Big
South champion Winthrop,
which clinched an automatic
NCAA berth Saturday, is the
only other team to get
through conference play
undefeated.

e No. 10 Nevada 69,

New Mexico St. 65: In Reno,
Nev., Marcelus Kemp scored
21 of his 32 points in the sec-
ond half and Nick Fazekas
added 22 points and nine
rebounds to lead Nevada over
New Mexico State.

Kemp was 9-for-17 from
the field and 12-for-13 on free
throws, including four in a
row after a foul and technical
foul gave Nevada a 50-47 lead
midway through the second
half that it didn’t relinquish.

The Wolf Pack (27-3, 14-2
in the Western Athletic Con-
ference) pushed their home
record to 60-6 since the start
of the 2003-04 season while
claiming their fourth straight
WAC regular-season title
with four consecutive seasons
of 25 or more victories.

e No. 20 Marquette 75,
No. 12 Pittsburgh 71: In Mil-
waukee, Wesley Matthews
and David Cubillan scored 20
points each to help Marquette
beat Pittsburgh.

Marquette (23-8, 10-6 Big

East) came into the game
shaky and short-handed, but
looked more athletic and
energetic than Pittsburgh
from the opening tip — until
the Panthers nearly stole the
game with a late rally.
. A win would have given
Pittsburgh (25-6, 12-4 Big
East) a share of the Big East
regular-season title. Earlier in
the day, No. 9 Georgetown
clinched at least a share of the
conference championship
with a 59-46 victory over Con-
necticut.

The Golden Eagles led by
17, but Pittsburgh rallied with
a 15-4 run, cutting the Mar-
quette lead to six, 61-55, on a
3-pointer by Ronald Ramon
with 3:38 remaining.

Pittsburgh’s Sam Young
cut the lead to four with two
free throws, but Marquette
freshman David Cubillan
responded with his fourth
3-pointer of the game to put
the Golden Eagies ahead 64-57
with 1:40 remaining.

SN ELS eA I Ee SE PT I NTS BE ED A TE RE OI NU NR TT TY

eaten
INTERNATIONAL EDITION _MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

NBA EXTRA |

6B | MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

BY ISRAEL GUTIERREZ



HORNETS AT NUGGETS, 9, TUESDAY, NBA TV

The Hornets are fighting through injuries. While they will try to
hold off the Clippers for the eighth seed, the seventh seed is
within reach. The Nuggets hold that spot but aren’t running
“away with it. The Hornets are doing their damage with Chris
Paul and David West, and the Nuggets are still figuring out the
best way to utilize the Carmelo Anthony-Allen Iverson tandem.
Familiarity might give the Hornets the edge. i

RAPTORS AT WIZARDS, 7, TUESDAY, NBA TV

The Wizards are in danger of a free fall in the standings. és
Antawn Jamison is recorvering from a knee injury, Caron
Butler could have lingering back problems and Gilbert
Arenas isn't thrilled with coach Eddie Jordan. The Raptors,
meanwhile, are on the verge of pulling ahead of the
Wizards. This game could determine whether the Raptors
have become an elite Eastern Conference team.

~ WHAT 10

WATCH
THIS WEF

te eee



ALL ACCESS



WHAT IS IT LIKE
TO EXPERIENCE
A CEREMONY IN
YOUR TEAM’S
HONOR AT THE
WHITE HOUSE?

e Shaquille
O'Neal: ‘It’s a very
humbling experi-
ence. I've known



the president for a while now. He’s just a great
guy. Just to see the looks on [Heat players’]

faces is a. beautiful thing.’

e Dwyane Wade: ‘It’s an unbelievable honor.
To be here with this group of guys, knowing
that we did something special last year, to
have a day outside of basketball we can all

enjoy was great.’

FANTASY VS. REALITY



NENE, NUGGETS

e@ Fantasy: After missing last season with a
torn ACL, it took Nene (right) some time get
back to his athletic self. Over the past six
weeks, he has become a steady fantasy
option as he benefits from the attention to
Allen Iverson and Carmelo Anthony. He had
four games of 20 or more points in February.
His rebounding could use a boost, though.
Playing with Marcus Camby doesn't help.

e Reality: While the Nuggets would love to
figure out a way to use Iverson and Anthony
to make their offense unstoppable, the team
will need a post presence. Nene is the big
body Denver needs inside. He is shooting near
52 percent, averaging .double figures and get-
ting to the foul line regularly. He can combine
with Camby to make an intimidating defen-
sive front line, and Nene knows how to run the
floor and finish in transition.

e Winner: Reality.

‘ELEVATED



VINCE CARTER,
NETS
The Nets
star
leads the
league in



scoring since the
break, with two 40-
plus scoring
efforts, and is
shooting better
than 50 percent
from the floor dur-
ing that stretch.
He'll need to con-
tinue that because
Richard Jefferson
still could be a few
weeks away from
returning from
ankle surgery.

‘GROUNDED



DREW GOODEN,
CAVALIERS



‘| three of
“8 their first
five games after
the All-Star break,
and LeBron James’
supporting cast is
getting questioned.
Gooden isn’t help-
ing matters, with
30.6 percent
shooting in those
five games for 4.8
points a game. If he

~ continues to strug--

gle, Donyell Mar-
shall and Anderson
Varejao will have to
come up big.







ll of a sudden, it’s a race.
A Not at the bottom of

each conference’s playoff
standings, but in the Rookie of
the Year standings.

At the start of the season,
Brandon Roy’s injury problems
and a lack of playing time for
Andrea Bargnani and Randy Foye
left Adam Morrison looking like
the default win-
ner of the
award.

After letting
matters shake
out for a few
months, Morri-



-INMY OPINION — son not only has
ISRAEL - legitimate com-
— GUTIERREZ —_— petition but
inatarceoe ;
Miahinersideom ee ae a

a three-man sprint to the finish.

After missing 20 games with a
bad foot, Roy has shown why he
was one of the most coveted
guards in last year’s draft. He is
easily the most polished of the
group, and his ability to either
score or create has made Port-
land a tricky opponent this sea-
son.

__ Roy leads all rookies in scor-
ing and assists and is often the
point man in the Blazers attack,
particularly in late-game situa-
tions.

“Morrison has had some good
games, but for us, Brandon has
been the difference in about 10 to
15 games,” Blazers coach Nate
McMillan said in comparing Roy
to Morrison. “Probably three of
those games.we didn’t win, but
he was able to get us into over-
time with a shot or his play.
There have been a number of
games he has been a difference-
maker. I hope the national media
is paying attention.”

In his two head-to-head meet-
ings with Morrison, Roy out-
played his fellow Rookie of the
Year candidate, following a 15-
point, eight-rebound game on
Feb. 9 with a near triple-double
(14 points, nine assists, eight
rebounds) on Thursday.

Morrison’s shooting percent-
age (.38]) for the season probably
has dropped his standing in the
race, while Roy is getting
endorsements from some of his
distant competition.

“If I had a vote, it would defi-
nitely be Brandon,” fellow rookie
Rudy Gay of the Grizzlies said.
“He has a lot in his game right
now, and he’s going to get so
much better, so much stronger. I
like his in-between game. When
he gets the ball from free-throw
line in, it’s hard to stop him.”

Bargnani, though, is gaining
some momentum on Roy. The
No. 1 pick in last year’s draft
didn’t start getting steady min-
utes until three weeks into the
season, but he has been improv-
ing since.

In February, the 7-foot Rap-
tors reserve averaged 14.3 points
on 51 percent shooting from the
field and 48 percent from three-
point range. The Raptors went
9-3 for the month and vaulted
themselves into a healthy playoff
position.

Rapiors coach Sam Mitchell

GILBERT
ARENAS










AP PHOTOS

CONTENDERS: Battling it out for NBA Rookie of the Year are,
from top, Portland’s Brandon Roy, Toronto’s Andrea
Bargnani and Charlotte's Adam Morrison.

has helped Bargnani get used to
the physical nature of the NBA
game. Earlier this season, Mitch-
ell brought his big men together
during an off day in Denver.

Mitchell placed a basketball
under the basket and lined his big
men up in pairs. Mitchell told
one player to retrieve the ball,
while the other was assigned to
not allow it to happen. It was
supposedly done to test the
toughness of the No. 1 draft pick,
and it turned out to be a two-
hour wrestling match.

If it helps Bargnani’s inside
game match his outside game, he
could be a budding Dirk Now-
itzki.

As for this season, he’lI still
need a late push to make up for
the suddenly narrow gap
between him and Roy.

Bargnani could benefit, how-
ever, from his team’s success.
While team record doesn’t often
affect Rookie of the Year voting,
it has in the past. In the 2002-03
season, many thought the Heat’s
Caron Butler had the best rookie

WHO HAS THE EDGE?



season. But Butler still finished
third, with Amare Stoudemire
winning it over Butler and Yao

_ Ming in large part because he led

his Suns team to the playoffs that
season.

Roy not only plays for a some-
what insignificant. Blazers team,
but he is on the West Coast and
doesn’t get much national air-
time. Bargnani’s Raptors, mean-
while, have been one of the East-
ern Conference’s hottest team
and are becoming a lock for an

~ Atlantic Division title and a top-

four playoff seed.

If Roy really wants to lock up
the award, he could get his team
in serious playoff contention. No
one outside the Northwest has
probably noticed, but the Blazers
are actually within a few games
of the No. 8 seed out West.

“J try not to think about it,”
Roy said of the award. “It could
be a distraction, added pressure I
don’t need right now. The team is
doing good. People are saying,
‘playoffs.’ That’s what I’m trying
to work on.”





EASTERN
_ CONFERENCE



Despite all the talk about
Vince Carter leaving the Nets
after opting out of his con-
tract this offseason, Nets prin-
ciple owner Bruce Ratner said

his top priority would be lock- -

ing up Carter to a long-term
deal. Apparently he learned
after not attempting to re-
sign Kenyon Martin that there
can be a backlash from the
fan base. “The first thing is
intent - the intent is we want
to sign Vince,” Ratner said.
“When | came on | don’t think
| understood it well enough to
have the intent.”... Some
Orlando Magic fan has
launched firebrianhill.com.
Fortunately for his peace of
mind, coach Brian Hill hasn't
seen the website. In fact, he
has never seen any website.
Hill said he’s just starting to
figure out e-mail... . Cavaliers
forward Anderson Varejao
knows Dwyane Wade’s pain.
He dislocated his shoulder
while playing for the Brazilian
national team in 2005. “I’ve
never had anything worse
than that,” Varejao said. “it’s
the worst pain, and Wade’s
was worse than mine because
he had to leave the court [in]
a wheel chair and | walked off
the court. Wade should have
the surgery because it could
keep popping out. He could
play for a month or two and
then it can pop out again.”
Those could be sympathetic
thoughts - or the words of an
opponent who doesn’t want
to see Wade in the playoffs
this year.

WESTERN
CONFERENCE

Rockets coach Jeff Van
Gundy has seen Yao Ming
come back from injury before.
So he recognizes when his
center isn’t ready - despite
the predicted mid-March
return. “What we’ve seen in
the brief things he’s able to do
with us, you get the sense he’s
a lot further away from play-
ing NBA basketball than
maybe the timetables would
suggest,” Van Gunay said.
“He does not look comfort- .
able at all with the brace. He
does not look agile: Last year,
he looked on the cusp of
[returning]. To me, it looks
like we have problems to
solve there to get him back.”
... The Mavericks are pump-
ing Dirk Nowitzki for MVP -
whether he likes it or not. “I’m
not a big fan of that,” Now-
itzki said. “| don’t think you
should push for MVP, espe-
cially with so many games
left. | don’t think there’s an
award for midseason MVP.”

.. Despite being a few games
out of the final playoff spot in
the Western Conference,
Warriors coach Don Nelson
seems to be waving the white
flag. “I definitely feel responsi-
ble,” Nelson said. “I thought |
was going to get this team to
the playoffs, but it doesn’t
seem like I’m going to be able
to do it. | feel like | failed.”

BETTER ARGUMENT FOR THE MOST IMPROVED PLAYER AWARD, DAVID LEE OR KEVIN MARTIN?

Lee is the classic case of a player taking advantage of his first real playing opportunity. Last season, Larry
Brown didn't know what to do with Lee, starting him one day then nailing him to the bench the next. Now
that he is getting regular time - he’s not starting but getting starters’ minutes - Lee is proving his worth. He’s
averaging a double-double and leads the league in field-goal percentage because just about every attempt
is alayup or dunk. The problem with giving him the award is that he hasn't actually improved this much. He
probably could have done this last season if he played 31 minutes a game. He has always been athletic,
worked the boards hard and had a good feel for the game. All he’s doing now is displaying that regularly.

Martin got plenty of opportunities last season. He not only played in 72 games for the Kings, but started
in 41 of them and averaged better than 26 minutes a game. This year he's getting a few more minutes a
game, but it’s what he’s doing with that time that is impressive. In nine more minutes a game, he has nearly
doubled his scoring average from last season, and despite several more shot attempts has improved his
shooting percentage from 48 percent last season to 49.5 percent this season. Martin's rebounds, assists,
steals and three-point percentage are also up from last season. From a third-year player who didn’t play
big-time college basketball at Western Carolina, that’s improvement.

e The edge: |_ee was probably this good last year. Martin is the most improved.

’

H25

Guard

6-7/185

Kay

MARTIN

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Team G GS MPG FG% = 3p% 0S T% =F SséDEF = RPG Ss APG SPG) BPG. CF PPG Team G GS = MPG FG%



NY 55 R 309 606 = 00085 35 12 107 18 09 Ud lod 2.80 Ie SAG a) Sh %/ 405 M0 8B 8 34

Go online to view our Extras, including Heat beat writer Israel Gutierrez’s weblog and our interactive » free-throw game. A Also watch sh video of the .
festivities vetore the ae NBA champions’ opening game, view photo galleries from last season’s run to the title and download eee



7B | MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007

Marquez breaks

BY KEN PETERS
Associated Press

CARSON, Calif. — Chal-
lenger Rafael Marquez broke
Israel Vazquez’s nose with a
hard right in the first round,
then took the WBC super ban-
tamweight crown when Vaz-
quez couldn’t continue after
the seventh.

Although Vazquez had
trouble breathing because of
his swollen nose, he kept
going and caught Marquez
with a left hook that sent him
to the canvas in the third
round of their bout Saturday
night.

“T was only able to breathe
through my mouth and that’s
why I was taking a lot of
shots,” Vazquez said through a
translator. “When I. came back
to my corner the last round, I
couldn’t breathe at all and I
told Freddie (trainer Freddie
Roach), that’s it.”

Marquez didn’t realize he
had broken Vazquez’s nose
and was surprised when the
referee ended the fight. Vaz-
quez immediately came over
to congratulate the new cham-
pion.

“I was surprised when he
stopped it because he had
dropped: me in the (third
round). I thought it was close,”
Marquez said, also speaking
through a translator.

Both fighters said they
would like to have a rematch.

Marquez (37-3, 33 knock-
outs) was ahead on two
judges’ cards through seven

Great

BY RICHARD ROSENBLATT
Associated Press ;

After a great day at the
racetrack, trainers Doug
O’Neill and Todd Pletcher
find themselves with the lead-
ing contenders for the Ken-
tucky Derby just two months
away. ;

On the West Coast, O’Neill
sent out Great Hunter to an
impressive l'4-length victory

-in Saturday’s Robert B. Lewis
‘Stakes at Santa Anita. The
‘colt’s winning 3-year-old
debut moved him atop this
week’s Associated Press’ Run
_. to the Roses Top 10 list.
.'.| Pletcher, meanwhile, had
‘winners galore at Gulfstream
Park in Florida. Scat Daddy’s
nose victory over Stormello in
the Fountain of Youth Stakes
moved the colt to No. 2 on the
weekly list of contenders.

Nobiz Like Shobiz, the No. 1
prospect entering the week-
end, was third in the Fountain
of Youth and dropped to No. 5
this week. Trainer Barclay
Tagg said the colt showed he
still has some growing up to
do.

“He made the race tough on
himself,” Tagg said Sunday.
“He blew the first turn and
then tried to duck in and
slipped back on the other turn.
He lost about a length each
time and he gets beat only half
a length. We have to try to get
him to come out of his shenan-
igans soon.”

Next stop for ‘Nobiz’ is the
Wood Memorial at Aqueduct
on April 7, a final prep before
the May 5 Derby. ‘

So far, Pletcher and O’Neill
have owned the road to the
Derby — Pletcher trains five
of this week’s Top 10 and
O’Neill trains two — with two
more bucking to get in.

Pletcher won five races on
Gulfstream’s card Saturday,
also taking Hutcheson Stakes
with King of the Roxy, who
moves onto the Derby trail at
No. 9.

Looking for his first Derby
' win, Pletcher’s other Top-10
horses are Ravel (No. 6) Cir-
cular Quay (No. 8) and Any
Given Saturday (No. 10).
O’Neill, looking for his first
Derby starter, also trains
Notional (No. 7), and two ris-
ing stars in Liquidity and
Cobalt Blue. He capped his
day by saddling Lava Man to a
second straight victory in the
Santa Anita Handicap.

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

BOXING | HORSE RACING



BOXING | SU



2 BANTAMWEIGHTS

MiamiHerald.com _|_ THE MIAMI HERALD



e7’s nose, takes title

STEPHEN CARR/LONG BEACH PRESS-TELEGRAM/AP



CONNECTING: Rafael Marquez, right, lands a punch to israel Vazquez during the first round of the WBC super
bantamweight bout in Carson Calif., Saturday. Vazquez had to quit after seven rounds because of a broken nose.

rounds, and the third had it
even. Vazquez is 41-4, with 31
knockouts.

“He (Vazquez) told me

right after the first round that
his nose was broken,’ Roach
said. “He wanted to stop a
couple of rounds carlier, but I

told him to suck it up because
I thought Marquez was tiring.

“He went a couple more
rounds and said, ‘I can’t do this

HORSE RACING | RUN TO THE ROSES

unter moves to top of the list

anymore.”

Marquez, from Mexico
City, weighed in at 1212
pounds. Vazquez, who was



MARK AVERY/AP

UNCHALLENGED AT FINISH: Great Hunter, ridden by ¢ orev Nakatani, crosses the finish line well ahead of the pack to win
the $200,000 Robert B. Lewis Stakes at Sarita Anita in Arcadia, Calif., on Saturday.

Merv Griffin owns Cobalt
Blue, and J. Paul Reddam owns
O’Neill’s three other Derby
prospects. -

“We don’t really know
which one is the best one yet,
which is kind of exciting,”
Reddam said.

Two important Derby
preps are set for Saturday —
the Louisiana Derby at the Fair
Grounds and the Gotham
Stakes at Aqueduct. Circular
Quay and Liquidity are set for
the 1 1/16-mile Louisiana
Derby.

New in this week’s Top 10
are Stormello and King of the
Roxy. Stormello, who was sent
cross-country to take on the
top East Coast prospects, was
gallant in defeat and moves in
at No. 4.

Out this week are Drums of
Thunder (sixth in the Fountain
of Youth) and Hard Spun, set
to race next in the Rebel
Stakes at Oaklawn Park on
March 27.

e 1. Great Hunter (Doug
O’Neill, trainer; Corey Naka-
tani, jockey): Stalked leaders

Lewis
Min ehed ;
CiSACG Wh

and won Robert B.
impressively. ..

money in all eight starts. ...
Next start: Blue Grass (April

14).... Odds: 24-1.
@ 2. Scat Daddy (Todd

ory
.



BILL DENVER/EQUI-PHOTO/AP

TAKING THE LEAD: Scat Daddy, far left, with John Velazquez aboard, pulls ahead en
route to victory in the $350,000 Fountain of Youth Stakes on Saturday at Gulfstream
Park in Hallandale Beach, Fla. Nobiz Like Showbiz, center, under Cornelio Velasquez,
was third: and Stormello, right, with Kent Desormeaux aboard, was second.

born in Mexico City and lives
in the Los Angeles suburb of
Huntington Park, weighed
2A.

Victor Burgos, stopped by
IBF champion Vic Darchinyan
in the 12th round of their fly-
weight title bout, was taken to
a hospital for precautionary
tests, ring physician Paul Wal-
lace said.

Wallace said Burgos’ vital
signs were normal, but that
“We didn’t like the way he was
responding.”

The doctor said he grew
concerned when Burgos
slumped on his stool in the
corner after the bout, but that
the fighter was conscious at
the end of the fight and still
conscious when he was taken
to the hospital.

Burgos’ knees were wobbly
and he was reeling around the
ring and couldn’t defend him-
self, so referee John Schorle
stopped the fight at41:27 of the
12th.

Darchinyan ran his record
to 28-0 with his 22nd knock-
out. He dominated the bout
with his powerful left hooks
and uppercuts, losing only one
round on just one of the three
judges’ cards.

Darchinyan rocked Burgos
with a left in the second round,
and Burgos sank to his knees _
but got up at the count of five.

Darchinyan (1112 pounds)
is a native of Armenia who
fights out of Sydney, Australia.
Burgos, from Tijuana, Mexico, ©
is 39-15-3. He weighed 11%.

Pletcher, John Velazquez):
Caught .Stormello in final
stride to win Fountain. of
Youth. ... Next start: Florida
Derby (March 31). ... Odds:
44-1 ;

e 3. Street. Sense (Carl
Nafzger, Calvin Borel): Still
waiting for 3-year-old debut.
... BC Juvenile winner worked
4 furlongs in 47.00 at Palm
Meadows on Sunday, the fast-
est of 25 works at same dis-
tance. ... Next start: Tampa
Bay. Derby (March 17) or

. Rushaway (March 24). ...
Odds: 10-1

e 4. Stormello (Bill Currin,
Kent Desormeaux): Superb
effort fell just short in Foun-
tain of Youth. ... Previous
start was a win in Hollywood
Futurity on Dec. 16.... Next
start: Santa Anita Derby (April
7).... Odds: 40-1.

e 5. Nobiz Like Shobiz
(Barclay Tagg, Cornelio Velas-
quez): Lacked strong kick in
Fountain of Youth, but still
finished a half-length back in
third. ... Won Remsen at 2,
Holy Bull at 3.... Next start:
Wood Memorial (April 7)....
Derby future odds: 8-1.

e 6. Ravel (Pletcher, Gar-
rett Gomez): Sham winner
continues to work well toward
next race.... Next start: Santa
Anita Derby (April 7). ...
Odds: 1-1.

e 7. Notional (O’Neill,
Nakatani): Won San Rafael
and Risen Star this year. ...
O'Neill says colt may be his
most talented 3-year-old....
Next start: Florida Derby
(March 31). ... Odds: 27-1.

e 8. Circular Quay
(Pletcher, Velazquez): Poised
to take huge step forward in
next race... . Son of 1995 derby
winner Thunder Gulch. ...
Next start: Louisiana Derby
(March 10). ... Odds: 12-1.

e 9. King of the Roxy
(Pletcher, Edgar Prado):
Moves onto trail with 24-
length win in 7'-furlong
Hutcheson. ... Ohio-bred was
coming off eighth-place finish
in BC Juvenile on Nov. 4....
Next start: Undecided. ...
Odds: 5-2 (mutuel field).

10. Any Given Saturday
(Pletcher, Velazquez): Sam F.
Davis winner just makes the
cut.... Next start: Tampa Bay
Derby (March 17). ... Odds:
14-1.

e Keep an eye on: Adore
the Gold, Chelokee, Cobalt
Blue, Hard Spun, Liquidity.


PAGE 8E, MONDAY, MARCH 5, 2007 TRIBUNE SPORTS

In for the punch

More pictures from the ‘No Mercy’
boxing tournament on Thursday night...














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