Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item
Resource Identifier:
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9994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text



PAGE 2, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Confidence expressed over efforts

lm By MARK HUMES

THE chairman and chief operating
officer of Bahamas Petroleum Com-
pany (BPC) Limited, Mr, Alan Burns
and Paul Crevello, yesterday expressed :
confidence in their efforts to mine for '
oil in Bahamian waters, despite the
failings of their predecessors. .

“The world is full of experiences
where one company decides there is
no oil and gas and the other decides.
there is and it turns out great,” said Mr

Colours Loy

Oscars. 4

commercial break on Thursday.

Burns. “Twice in my career that has
happened.”

He went on to highlight his compa-
ny’s past success at discovering oil
deposits in previously explored Mau-
ritania and Uganda. east

“We have pioneer oil exportatio
in Mauritania where no-one thought
there was any oil or gas, and compa-
nies had left. And we found oil and
gas on our first well, and that has now

gone into production,” noted Mr

Burns.
ek eanS

eet:

@ THE Bahamian Junkanoo group Colours are in Hollywood for the
They appeared live and fully-costumed on KTLA television in each

In Uganda, a country which had
been explored unsuccessfully since
1938, Mr Burns said his company was
successful in its efforts to discover oil.

“It’s one of these things where no-

one is perfect in their judgment,” the °
chairman and CEO said in response to ©

questions about the potential of find-
ing oil in Bahamian waters.

“It is very much an art form, as well
as a business, so you need very highly
competent people to work on these,”
Mr Burns continued. —

Studios in Los Angeles.

Victoria Sarne, public relations spokesperson for the group, said:
“Colours Entertainment, led by Chris Justilien, along with 18 per-
formers, was invited to perform at a pre-Oscar party at The Jim Henson

é

‘We have assembled what we think
are the world’s best scientists to work
here on these particular kind of rocks
and we are pretty certain of success.

“We examine these matters global-
ly, and research the world constantly
to look for gas, and the Bahamas is
quite an obvious place because they
are adjacent to other gas provinces
like Florida and Cuba.” -

He said the Bahamas had the thick-
est “spot” of limestone in the world,
which may be a good indication that it






to mine for oil in Bahamian waters

is a good place to look for oil.

Putting the matter in perspective,
however, Mr Crevello said that the
company still has a deal of prelimi-
nary work to complete before it can
get to the stage where it is drilling for
oil.

“We are using satellite techniques,
as well as shipboard techniques, for
now to: gather additional data that will
help us with searching beneath the
surface of the earth and to look at the
geometry of the layers below the
Bahamas,” said Mr Crevello.

“Any drawing aspects wouldn’t
occur until at least four years down
the road,” he said. “So there won’t be
any type of platform or rigs of any

' sort.”

If their venture is successful, both
men foresee great economic benefits
for the Bahamas.

“One oilfield discovery would have
a large economic impact on the
Bahamas,” said Mr Burns.

Giving a rough estimate, the CEO
said: “You would be looking at rev-
enues grossing upward of a billion a
year.”

But noting that all of the figures are
solely conjectures, Mr Burns pointed
out that, out of the potential $1 bil-
lion, royalties for the government and
country could be in excess of $100 mil-
lion a year. ;

“The whole idea is to bring what-
ever we can bring to the Bahamian
community,” said Mr Crevello. “You
can imagine the revenue that can go
toward improving all of the social facil-
ities, such as hospitals, university and
schools.”

Mr Burns and Mr Crevello met the
press after they were granted five
licences to continue their research for
sizable oil deposits within Bahamian
waters.

The agreements signed on Thurs-
day between Island Offshore Petrole-
um Limited and Bahamas Offshore
Limited, two subsidiaries of the hold-
ing company BPC Limited, and the
Bahamas Government will allow for
the companies to explore areas along
the Great Isaacs Bank of Grand

<4
Fie ee

&

%,

“Everyone is very excited and thrilled to be able to strut their stuff as

At a pre-Oscar party they performed for a group of stars, including cite
cultural entertainers andSbe the best ambassadors for tle Bahamas

. Halle Berry, Forrest Whitaker, Herbie Hancock, Janet Jackson, Jennifer Bahama, the south west of Andros,

and the northern waters off Cuba for



Log ige




EVERY MO
GETS YOU



‘ Hudson, Quincey Jones and others.



that they can be, in a city where entertainment is the major industry.”



traces of hydrocarbons.

| Cancer Centre unveils most
‘(| ‘state of the art’ treatment

planning system in the world



B By NATARIO McKENZIE which allows you to determine “Right now we can give the *-1
——_____-__~ where the cancer is and how to same therapy that you would get »"
BAHAMIAN cancer victims. get the radiation to the tumour in the United States. Having ther- ~“
can now get local access to the and not to the normal tissues apy at home is very important.
most “state of the art”. cancer around it. The CMS planning sys- Most patients can go home every ~
treatment planning system in the tem will now allow us todo that day,” Dr Porter said. A
world as executives at the Cancer in the most sophisticated way “We are proud that we make '
Centre yesterday introduced’the anywhere in the world,” Dr _ our technology and the high qual- ©
computerised medical system Porter said. ity of service we provide avail- +»
CMS Xio. . The new system, he said, costs able to all in the Bahamas. Via’.
The new system, according to in excess of $150,000 in terms of our partnered care model we are ~ S
Dr Arthur Porter, managing putting it together but noted that able to take care of those per- _
director of The Cancer Centre, there were other costs involved, sons who are insured and those *
provides for distribution of radi- such as the training of staff on that are not insured. : a
ation treatment specifically to the _ the use of the very sophisticated “The technology is available °°
tumour and not the normal tis- system. to all and we hope that we canbe ~~
sues around it . wae the beacon for the Caribbean and °°
“We are introducing some- the rest of the developing world .,
thing which I think is going to be Sop histicated with respect to being able to pro- |.
extremely important to the i vide high-tech services, hopeful- | ,
Bahamas, its citizens and most We now have the most Jy for the betterment of the pop- *
importantly patients with cancer. SOPhisticated radiation therapy yJation,” said Dr Conville
“The Cancer Centre, which is and cancer centre in the Brown, CEO of the Cancer Cen- >;
already on the cutting edge of Caribbean and we believe that tre, a4
7 cancer therapy in terms of equip- “© have to extend the technolo- “We are able to accommodate >»,
ment and staffing, has just intro- $!€8 we have here to our neigh- jj patients via our partnered care .. ,
duced to the Bahamas and to the 0Uting Caribbean countries. As model and what that means is
Caribbean anew comprehensive W¢ do that we need to know that that we divide the entire popula- *.,
treatment planning system called have the right partners to tion into three groups. n
the CMS Xio planning system MOVE this process forward. “There are persons who will 4°
‘ which takes us to the first league Computerised Medical Sys- choose to be insured and they ~.
in terms of cancer centres any- ‘@™S, CMS, is a partner with the can come of their own accord via «
where in the world,” Dr Porter _ Same desire to produce high qual- q private or government system,” .,
said. , ity radio therapy and to make py Brown explained. ae
He noted that, while adminis- this available to the Bahamas and Self-paying patients are accom- «+
tering radiation treatment, it is beyond, Dr Porter said. : modated usually with 25 per cent
very important to know where He said the Cancer Centre, discount, he said. ou
you are putting the radiation. which began treating patients in “Those who are not insured >.1
“For that you need a very 2003, can treat 25 to 30 patients a get the same services and come .‘
sophisticated planning system @Y. via the government system. «.
Those patients are then treated at “u
a 50 per cent discount and thatis |."
our contribution to making sure .~
that everyone has access so no- | '
: it anes one gets denied service,” Dr »'
Open a Scotiabank Home Savings Plan today. You Brown said. ‘v
7 “For the past 30 years CMS
save a little every month for your home purchase has been a leader in the devel-
' ' ' opment of treatment planning.
and we'll top it up with as much as $2,000." sloducts fohfeancet/trecumeute |
and one of our primary objec- |
tives is to always offer the best °
product available to our cus-
tomers which assists in the treat- |
mT ment of cancer to their patients,”
said Adam Akbany, vice- |
dohdfol eto al president of North American!
sales.
Mie ay. B (
Ua aL
’
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’
*Trademarks of The Bank of Nova Scotia. Trademarks used under authorization and control of The Bank of Nova Scotia. :
| t Conditions apply, Subject to credit approval. aly PEST PHL NS my!
, " 4
MLN aay aera





THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007, PAGE 3



° In brief

Boat thefts —
spark call
for action

ll By NATARIO
McKENZIE

A PARADISE ISLAND
resident is calling for action
over a recent spate of boat
thefts.

Michael Ranson, a boat
owner, claims that he fears for
his own personal property in
light of several boat thefts over
the past few months.

“One week ago I went to go
fishing and my next door neigh-
bqur’s boat was tailing off in
the harbour. Someone had
tried to steal it and just left one
line dangling in the harbour,”
Mr Ranson claimed. ~

“J hear there has been a
problem of late over the num-
ber of boats stolen off Paradise
Island. Someone has got to do
something. These boats aren’t
cheap,” he said.

“Just last Friday someone
had tried to steal another
boat,” he claimed.

According to Mr Ranson,
the 32-foot vessel was actually
about to be sold by the owner.
“The boat was selling for
$58,000 and the owner had a
buyer.

“When he went down to
look at the boat it was gone. I
understand there have been
quite a few boats stolen and
there seems to be no attention
given to that fact whatsoever,"
he said.

Mr Ranson fears for his own
property, particularly his 25-
foot Boston Whaler, which he
uses for fishing. —

“It’s a shame when you get
so many thefts and no atten-
tion is given and people have to
fear for their property,” he said.

Police say, however, that
they have no knowledge of any
rash in boat thefts, as nothing
has been reported to them.

Leslie Miller:
citrus canker

| still exists
‘in Abaco

‘MI By ALISON LOWE: ”

Tribune Staff Reporter

TWO years after a ban on the
export of Bahamian citrus
plants and products was
imposed, citrus canker still exists
in Abaco, and a ban is likely to
be in place for years to come,
Minister of Agriculture Leslie
Miller said yesterday.

Furthermore, with no-one
held accountable for the out-
break, and the cost of its con-
tainment, the government
remains out of pocket to the
tune of millions of dollars.

January, 2005, saw the end of
a burgeoning Bahamian indus-
try when then Minister of Agri-
culture, Mr Alfred Gray, issued
an emergency order declaring
Abaco "an area infested with
the canker disease."

Mr Gray put an order in
place to ensure that no plant or
plant material would be moved
from Abaco, lest the virulent
bacterial disease spread to other
parts of the island chain.

This ended the export of
Bahamian citrus products within
the islands and abroad and vast
amounts of public money have
since been spent on uprooting
and destroying the canker-rid-
den plants in the area, MP
Robert Sweeting and Minister
of Agriculture Leslie Miller said
yesterday.

While at the time Mr Gray

~ gafd that he was advised that the

order may need to be in place
for up to two years while’the
eradication process was under-
way, the two-year mark has
passed, and no end to the ban -
and subsequently no revitalisa-
tion of the industry - is in sight.

Fortunately, despite predic-
tions that the ban on citrus
movement would have "an
immediate impact" on the
national economy - with $60
million worth of citrus products
reportedly exported annually
from the country prior to the
outbreak - Mr Sweeting claimed
yesterday that no major impact
was ultimately felt.

‘Union claims Morton Bahamas wing
tactics to intimidate bargaining unit —

BIMAWU issues
press release

@ By MARK HUMES

YESTERDAY, after three
days of industrial action in
Inagua, the Bahamas Industrial

Manufacturers and Allied Work-”
ers Union called on Morton -
Bahamas Limited to cease its .

attempt to create what it claims is
an atmosphere of fear and intim-
idation among employees.

In a press release issued yes-
terday, the Allied Workers Union
(BIMAWU) accused the compa-

ny, once again, of using “union °

busting tactics” to intimidate
members of its bargaining unit.
Addressing a letter to Mr
Vivian Moultrie, manager of
administrative services at Mor-
ton, union secretary-general Jen-
nifer Brown said: “I am in receipt
of a copy of a letter that is being
distributed to members of the

bargaining unit. Please be advised —
_that the union has not taken any

illegal strike action as your letter
states.” She suggested the com-
pany “discontinue the issuance of
such letters.”

This new demand by the secre-
tary-general comes after 90
unionised Morton Salt workers
went on strike as a result of being
subjected to what they consid-

. ered to be discriminatory prac-

tices at the company.

On Thursday, Mr Obie Fergu-
son, counsel for the group, said
they were frustrated after being
told, earlier in the week, that bar-
gaining unit employees would be
subject to having their work week
reduced from five to three days
because of a “crisis” brought on
by heavy rainfall.

Because none of the 94
employees implicated in the
reduction included supervisory
and managerial staff, union chiefs
saw management’s decision as
amounting to nothing more than
intimidation, and they warned
that their strike would continue
until government intervenes.

‘ “We have gone to the govern-
ment before,” said Ms Brown.
However, she pointed out on
Thursday that, “the MP for
the island refuses to get involved

in it.”
Ms Brown’s comments seem to

have sparked a flurry of activity, .

with the opposition member nom-
inated for MICAL, Mr Dion
Foulkes, issuing a statement.
“The salt industry is of major
importance to the economic life
of Inagua and it is in everybody’s
interest that the current
industrial dispute be settled as

soon as possible,” said Mr
Foulkes.
He added: “I call on Prime

Minister Perry Christie and Min-
ister of Labour Vincent Peet to
intervene immediately to help
resolve the outstanding issues.”

In her statements yesterday,
Ms Brown noted that the Minister
of Labour, Mr Vincent Peet,
along with other government offi-
cials, was expected in Inagua “to
try and resolve issues between
the parties.”

Law change over
abandoned vessels
‘may be seen in future

â„¢ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A CHANGE in the law as it relates to
abandoned vessels may be seen in the
future, suggested the port controller yes-
terday as a two-year struggle to have an
abandoned oil drill barge in Abaco moved
nears a close.

The process of attempting to ensure the
removal of the derelict 220-foot boat, the
Louis J Goulet, which ran aground in Feb-
ruary, 2005, has "dragged on and on" said
Capt ‘Anthony Allens.

The Louis J Goulet has been the source of
consternation for Bahamian citizens and
government alike since it was first found
floating in Balamian waters.

Described by locals of both Exuma and
Abaco as "an eyesore", it was determined,
once an owner was identified in Texas, that
it had broken free of its:moorings during
Hurricane Wilma.

After having difficulty getting the owner
to act to secure the boat, it subsequently ran
aground on a reef, and has been lodged 100
yards off Man o’ War Cay since November,
2005.

Difficulties

Yesterday, Capt Allens described the dif-
ficulties his department had in dealing with
the now unsalvageable vessel.

He said that, in accordance with the law
as it stands, his department first sought to
identify the owner before seeking to remove
or sink the vessel.

After an owner was found, The Tribune
reported over a period of months on various
promises made by that person that the ves-
sel would be dealt with.

These included promises that repairs to
the hull would be carried out, and de-water-
ing initiated, to ensure the boat could be
removed.

In November, 2005, the port controller
was assured that the vessel would be taken
to Grand Bahama.

However, none of these assurances were
fulfilled, and 18 months later the port
department has realised that the owner does
not have "good intentions", and has secured
Cabinet agreeinent that they move the ves-
sel and then attempt to recoup the costs
through the courts from the owner.

A suitable company with the necessary
equipment to float the boat has been found
and Capt Allens said yesterday he is hope-
ful that the move to float the vessel will be
made in the next few weeks.

After being floated and moved away from .

the area, the vessel will be sunk in deeper
waters, where it will form an artificial reef,
ae said.

ee ae 7

A prior determination was made that it

was not, in fact, leaking any hazardous sub-

stances, and would not cause a serious envi-
ronmental risk.

Under international law it is the owner's
obligation to have a boat removed, accord-
ing to Capt Allens. °

However, waiting for an owner to be
found and ensuring their responsibilities
are carried out can take too long, as this
case reveals.

"What we are trying'to do now is look at
current legislation to'see how we can make
recommendations in events of things hap-
pening again so we can deal with it more
swiftly," said Capt Allens.

The issue is a time-sensitive one.’

Although the Louis J Goulet is deeply
embedded - though whether on the seabed,
or on the reef is a subject of dispute - if it

were to move, perhaps in a major hurri- .

cane, more serious damage to the reef could
be seen.

Speaking of the need for a change in the
law, Capt Allens explained that a recent
clean-up of Nassau Harbour turned into a
"big headache" for his department - as ful-
filling the obligation of finding the
owners of abandoned vessels was no easy
task.

When The Tribune dontaated
Mr Peet late yesterday evening,
he was in Inagua meeting with

,management and union teams

and said he would issue a state-
ment once he had concluded talks

with the parties involved.

“Unfortunately,” said Mr Fer-
guson, “you can’t negotiate in
good faith anymore. You have to
go on strike before people take
you seriously.”

teen ereceeenecceseneeececessnesscecesccesessacasesecessaccenenes

Brenda V Hauck
dies at age of 72

BRENDA V. Hauck, 72, of Sparta, NJ, formerly of Maplewood,
NJ, Canada and the Bahamas, died peacefully at Compassionate
Care Hospice in Dover, NJ, on February 20.

Mrs Hauck, born in Frome, Somerset, England on March 16,
1934, was married to Hubert G. Hauck, son of Mrs Hedwig Hauck,
at Christ Church Cathedral in Nassau on June 21, 1958.

The late Mr and Mrs Hauck and their son, Hubert, made Nas-
sau their home in 1941 after fleeing the Nazi terror in Germany.
Young Hubert attended Queen’s College. His mother operated the

~ Cumberland House Restaurant for many years and later, in part-

nership with Lorraine Onderdonk,. operated the Buena Vista

Restaurant.

After their 1958 marriage, Hubert and Brenda Hauck often vis-
ited Nassau and in recent years during the winter months have spent

a month or more here.

Brenda Hauck was a resident of the Lake Mohawk section of
Sparta since 1992 where she belonged to the Lake Mohawk Coun-
try Club. Prior to moving to Lake Mohawk she lived in Maplewood
and was an active member of the ladies tennis team of the Maple-

wood Country Club for 25 years.

Mrs Hauck is survived by her husband Hubert Hauck and
children Nigel Hauck and Kate Githens, and grandchildren Travis

. Hauck, Ginger and David Githens. All funeral services were held

privately under the direction of the Goble Funeral Home in Spar-
ta. Instead of flowers friends were asked to make contributions in
her memory to The American Cancer Society, 669 Littleton Rd.,

Parsippany, NJ 07054.






FASHION tycoon Peter
Nygard said yesterday that
Howard K Stern is not the
biological father of Anna
Nicole Smith’s baby daughter
Dannielynn.

The Lyford Cay resident
told Fox TV: “Howard knows
he is not the biological father
and he is piving: with Bahami-
an law.

“There is no question in

POSES TVET a Cc
hot ed fu NR eee

- times and just loved the peo-





@ HOWARD K STERN






anybody’s mind that Howard
is not the father.”

Mr Nygard also revealed
that he introduced Anna
Nicole to the Bahamas. “She
had been over a couple of





ple and felt comfortable here,”
he said.

He felt she would have liked
to have stayed in the Bahamas
because she felt safe here.





anes SSIES

“The Matl«at-Marathon



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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007 THE TRIBUNE .
EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Should a democratic
society be sacrificed





The Tribune Limited —

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1 903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
3 (Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972



Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, CMG, M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 )-352-6608
; Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

jot arta rie De OE ee eee

Propaganda war continues in Cuba

DRESSED in tidy uniforms, Cuban school-
children file solemnly past a forest of flag-
poles into a small meeting room, listening as
a grey-haired matron describes the story
behind Cuba’s newest national monument.

“Our fight is not with the American peo-
ple,” the woman tells them. “It is a fight
against the blockade (embargo) and the poli-
cies of the imperialist government.”

The flagpoles, which stand directly in front
of the U.S. Interests Section building in

~ Havana, were erected last year after Ameri-
can officials unveiled a high-tech twist to the
long propaganda war between the United
States and Cuba: a five-foot tall electronic
sign spelling out news and messages to the
Cuban people.

The sign, which stretches across a bank of
windows along the building’s fifth floor, at the
time outraged Cuban leader Fidel Castro,
who quickly organized a protest of more than
a million people.

As Castro spoke at the rally, the, sign’s red
letters spelled out quotes in Spanish that

Cuban Officials found offensive, including .

one from Abraham Lincoln that said, “No

man is good enough to govern another man

without that other’s consent.”

_ A year later, the battle shows no sign of

1” easing, despite the much-publicized illness

' that has sidelined Castro for the past six
months. Cuban officials plan a ceremony
today to commemorate the one-year anniver-
sary of what has been named the “Hill of the
Flags.”

Jose Carlos, director of the Cuban monu-
ment complex, said 138 flagpoles were erect-
ed to mark the 138 years since Cuba’s inde-
pendence from Spain. Their black flags with
a single white star symbolize the Cubans who
have died at the hands of American aggres-
sion over the years, he said.

“It’s the high technology of their sign
against the human force of dignified Cuban
men and women,” he said.

Carlos insisted the flags were not put up to
block the American sign, although they do
that quite effectively.

American officials say the electronic sign is
not a violation of international law, as the
Cubans claim. At first the sign carried mes-
sages calling for “A free Cuba,” but now the
focus is mainly on news.

“We decided to break the information
blockade,” said Demitra Pappas, deputy pub-
lic affairs officer at the U.S. Interests Sec-

“NOTICE

NOTICE is: hereby given

send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 17th day of February, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box

N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.
Rememibering the late

on his birthday, Februar

Once again the Family would like to thank everyone for their
prayers, floral arrangements, telephone calls and other acts
of kindness. For those who traveled from abroad, your”
presence was indeed a blessing. These gestures hel :
ease the pain of our great loss.

May God continue to bestow his richest blessings

each of you.



Missing you from the Family, especially your brother

Ronaid Seymout Sr.
May Your Soul Rest In Peace.





that JOEL MANIUS OF
PODOLEO ST., P.O. BOX N-7060, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/. naturalization should not be granted, should



tion in Havana. “They don’t get this infor-
mation from anyone. It’s what you’d see if
you logged on to ‘My Yahoo,’ but the Cuban
people can’t do that.”

It is also a counterpoint, Pappas said, to the
Cuban propaganda billboards that dot the
country, some erected near the U.S. building.
The billboards rail against U.S. “imperial-
ism” and “aggression,” with some calling
President Bush a “terrorist.”

Cuba and America severed diplomatic rela-
tions shortly after Castro’s 1959 revolution,
but the countries agreed to open “interests
sections” - diplomatic outposts that serve
essentially as embassies - during the Carter
administration. Cuba runs its office under
the auspices of the Swiss Embassy in Wash-
ington, while the U.S. constructed a building
on Havana’s broad seaside avenue, the Male-
con.

The offices mostly process travel docu-
ments. While U.S. policies effectively block
most Americans from visiting Cuba, thou-
sands of Cuban-Americans visit relatives on
the island each year and a limited number of
Cubans travel to America.

Castro erected an amphitheatre in front
of the American building and turned it into a
protest site during the furor over Elian Gon-
zalez, the Cuban boy who survived a 1999
raft trip to Florida and became the centre of
a tumultuous tug-of-war between Cuba and

‘Cuban exiles in Miami.

Castro continued holding anti-U.S. events
at the amphitheatre following Elian’s return
to Cuba, but the facility also hosts cultural
events and concerts.

Things heated up again in January 2006
when American officials switched on the elec-
tronic sign.

Since the flagpoles went up, passersby can
still glimpse the American sign - which lights
up only at dusk on weekends and a few week-
nights - but only if they come close.

Most Cubans seem to ignore it.

“They can’t even get their grammar cor-
rect,” laughed Jose Antonio Gonzalez, 44, a
painter who was working near the Ameri-
can building one recent morning. “But the
Hill of Flags is of great significance to us. It
represents the martyrs of American terror-
ism.”

(This article was written by Mike Williams
of Cox News Service).













WINDOWS





Serving The Bahamian Community
Since 1978

DON STAINTON
(PROTECTION) LTD.

HILLSIDE PLAZA - THOMPSON BLVD.
PHONE: 322-8160 OR 322-8219

for the immoral few?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

SHOULD a democratic
society be sacrificed for the
immoral few?

These are times of
immorality of the Bahami-
an power that be! As is
stated:- “A society is estab-
lished when a group of
people live together and
have many contacts with
one another, they tend to
think of certain things in
the same way, they have
the same feelings toward
various objects, they have
the same respect for cer-
tain institution and they
develop certain traditional
ways of living and doing

things.”
In the cause of Bahamian
societal events — it

appears that morality,
decency, honesty, integri-
ty, and responsibility, have
collapsed, and we are now
forced to exist in a failed
State.

If some in this arena who

beg to differ - for the love

of God:- “tell me why’

every time we look at the
media we see Mr So- and-
So brought before the
courts for failing to adhere
to the law or ministers of
the government - do as
they please - no matter
how immoral; and don’t
have the decency to resign
for the general welfare and
integrity of our society?”

Why do we have so many
ministers of religion being
caught up in sex scandals -
among other immoralities
and refusing to step aside
for the healing of the
nation? :

Why these sentiments
pass on to the young gen-
eration, and then punished
by those who pass these
sentiments on?

Why should the created

suffer for the creators?
_ Why are there so many
in society prepared to tol-
erate the unscrupulous few
because of politics, religion
or popularity?

Why should one con-
stituency be allowed to
ketp one popular candi-
date in office to the detri-
ment of the society as a
whole?

The whole point of the
power of government
would be lost or reduced

BEAUTY GUARD. .

SLUMS

ANH







1M BSS

letters@tribunemedia.net

to acceptance of actions
that would otherwise shock
the conscience - but
because of who they are -
they’re allowed to contin-
ue!
_ We’re so unscrupulous
that when we go to many
of our family of islands
we're questioned by our
fellow Bahamian - “who’re
you? - where you come
from?” -Knowing quite
well that you’re Bahamian.
But when the foreigners
show up - legal or illegal -
we roll out the red carpet -
but treat Bahamians as
though they belong to
some other planet.
We’re so unscrupulous -
one group of Christians
can’t see eye to eye with
another - even though
we’re brothers and sisters.
Instead of trying to win
souls for Christ - we try to
win members for church —
“incredulous” - leaving the
high ways and by ways to
Satan. And the only mes-
sage some of them are seri-
ous about - “should a man
rob God”? -
Nation?”

Immorality is taking us.

straight to hell. And the
sad part about it - we’re
joyously going with

“Christian

immorality! Not to men-
tion man looking at women
only as a sex object, and
women looking at man
only as a dollars sign.

Women verbally castrat-
ing men, and men beating
women with 2X4”. Young
Bahamians having no
respect for human life -
killing one another -
declaring open season -
shooting each other like
fair game.

Parents all over town
with little children; wreak-
ing havoc on the public -
instead of training them
how to behave in society,
we allow them to rip and
run - making all kinds of
nuisance - without any
restraint.

Boy - “Whose fools we
Bahamians be?”

Will the real-Bahamians
come forth - or all we have
left - are unscrupulous
Bahamians?

Is “unscrupulous” the
definition of Bahamian?

You who beg to differ - I
dare you respond -
(email:randybahamas@yah
oo.com) Please:- for the
love of God - tell me why
should a democratic soci-
ety be sacrificed for the
immoral few?

RANDY
PATRIOTIC.
BAHAMIAN
Nassau,

February 14, 2007.

Re sponding
to article on

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Shane Gibson

IN RESPONSE to John Marquis’ “No hiding place
for shameless Shane,” The Tribune, February 19, 2007.

I don’t expect you to use this letter as “feedback”
seeing that you tend to print only the letters which rave
about your coverage of a particular matter or present
the views of your less articulate opponents, thus justi-
fying your poor opinion of them. Yet, I will give you

my views.

Your article seemed somewhat irrelevant in the wake
of Minister Gibson’s resignation. I do confess, howev-
er, that it provided scintillating details about Anna

’ Nicole’s sex life that, quite frankly, I would have

expected to see in the gossip section of the local
tabloid paper. But what I really took offence to was
your admonition that Bahamians should be concerned
about the repercussions of the whole Shane
Gibson/Anna Nicole affair because “First world
nations will be eager to see if the Bahamas emerges
from this mess...with a sense of property” or “another
squalid little post colonial outpost with a poorly run

”
eee

legal system

Why must Bahamians constantly make decisions
based on the opinions of ‘first world countries’ rather

than its own citizens? Shou

ldn’t we be more concerned

about the message the supposed impropriety would
send to the young people of this country? Your state-
ment also rests on the false assumption that first world
countries are bastions of morality. What country is
sleazier or more corrupt than our ‘first world’ neigh-
bour to the north, home of steroid using athletes (who

continue to play), drug add
retain their crown by enteri

icted beauty queens (who
ng rehab) and skirt-chasing

presidents (who do not resign after lying about having
sexual relations with an intern). Yes, we should be very
concerned about what they think of us. As for your

comment about our questio
parison to our more civilise
say one name - O J Simpson.

nable legal system in com-
d neighbours, I need only

As a writer, I am sure you are very precise with your
choice and use of words. So the use of the words
‘squalid’ and ‘outpost’ to describe one possible view of
the Bahamas was no mistake. So, what puzzles me is
why someone who thinks so highly of ‘first world’
countries and finds this country so reprehensible would
fight tooth and nail for a permit to continue to work
and live here but I guess, that is beside the point.

Don’t get me wrong. I am not writing to defend the

actions of the minister, rig

ht or wrong. I am writing to

defend the dignity of Bahamians, nationwide and inter-
nationally, who do not deserve the oftentimes personal
and condescending manner in which you and this news-
paper in general choose to address local political

issues.

M BAIN
Nassau,
February, 2007.



PAGE 8, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007

Rev C B Moss says he will run as independent:

THE TRIBUNE

if he is not picked for the general election

FROM page one

and myself in the presence of Dr
William Thompson -— the president of
the Baptist Convention.”

Rev Moss’s reference to the promise
further fuels controversy surrounding
the PLP nomination for the con-
stituency.

During the PLP rally in Pinewood
Gardens, supporters of Dr Nottage
came dressed in PLP T-shirts, while
waving placards depicting Dr Nottage
as the party’s candidate for the Bain
and Grant’s Town constituency.

These supporters said that the Not-

tage paraphernalia was handed out to.

them at the local headquarters days
before the rally.

This public declaration by supporters
suggests the nomination has already
been given to Dr Nottage and that this
will be announced when the PLP
reveals its slate of candidates.

Rev Moss has previously denied

» rumours that he was offered a new

minister of religion position — as a sen-
ator — to compensate for not receiv-
ing the PLP nomination for Bain and
Grant’s Town.

He said: “There is no need for me to
agree to a new deal when the old deal
is still in effect. Because a contract is

delayed does not mean it is cancelled.”

Rev Moss appears determined to
hold the PM and Mr Roberts to this
alleged promise.

At a thanksgiving service for Rev
Moss in August, 2002, Mr Roberts said:
“As my days wind down as represen-
tative for the Bain and Grant’s Town
constituency, it is my hope that the
people will welcome Rev C B Moss as
my recommendation to replace me.”

Bradley Roberts won the con-
stituency by more than 1,400 votes in
the 2002 election. However, if Rev
Moss does not receive the PLP nomi-
nation, and he runs as an independent,

may split the PLP vote — giving the
FNM’s youngest candidate, David Jor-
dine, a better chance of winning a seat
that is considered a PLP stronghold.

Rev Moss said he is now waiting and
“relying on the word of the leader of
the PLP and Mr Bradley Roberts.”

An impassioned C B Moss also said
he would not support any other candi-
date the PLP sent into Bain and
Grant’s Town.

Raynard Rigby, PLP chairman; did
not wish to comment on Rev Moss’s
remarks.

@ REV CB MOSS



Miller on govts

FROM page one

However, Mr Miller main-
tained that, over the almost
four years he has been push-
ing the LNG initiative, a
diversification of the
Bahamas’ economy is of
utmost importance to the sus-
tained growth of the country.

“T have been preaching this
now for almost 30 years that
every government, the first
PLP government, the FNM
government, and to a great
extent the present govern-
ment, of which I am a mem-
_ ber, have failed: to diversify
and expand our economic
* base away from tourism;” he
said.

Mr Miller said there need-
ed to be more diversification
if the Bahamas wanted to sus-

tain its economy.

“Tf we are going to sustain
an economy - a growing econ-
omy:- you cannot depend on
tourism. Tourism is a good
industry but it has proven to
be the most fickle industry in
the world. Jamaica and else-
where can give you instances
of this.

“When the crime wave hit

‘Jamaica about 15 years ago,

there was such a rapid decline
in that sector, the sector went
belly up. People stopped
going to Jamaica. Why should
infringe on my family’s right
to go to a country, and take
my wife and children there,
if we can be killed? And if we
don’t be careful, where there
is one or two murders every
week, the same thing is going
to happen to the Bahamas,”
he said.

Bimini ate

“AM AON

JOB FAIR

held on

March Ist and March 2nd 2007,
Place: Culinary and Hospitality Management
Instutitude College of Bahamas in the
deministration room

Time: 9:00am until 2:00pm daily

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES:

Accountant
Reservation Clerk
Special Events Coordinator

Chef

Line Cook »
Waiters / Waitress
Bus Boys
Bartenders
Maintenance

Security ©

Appliciants Should bring resume along with them.

BIS:

Pricing Information As Of:'
2007 |

Securit
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank j
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

tity
Cee
S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low 3

Bahamas Supermarkets

Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

28.00 ABDAB -
Bahamas Supermarkets

S2wk-Low Fund Name

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund

Fidelity Pri

1.329237*
3.0569°**
2.596093**
1.224792****
11.3545*****

2.6662
2.3241
1.1547

Bigx rin SHAR’
§ S2wk-Hi - Highest closing Side In last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's welghted price for dally volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
Oly, $ - Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings



Previous Close Today's Close

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol.
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

FROM page one

not the end at all.

Estranged mother Virgie
Arthur's decision to file an
appeal in Florida yesterday
morning caused a stir,
especially in light of Med-
ical Examiner Dr Joshua
Perper's announcement
that Ms Smith's body was
decomposing rapidly and
needed to be buried soon,

Judge Seidlin ruled on
Wednesday that Ms
Smith's remains be handed
over to five-month-old
Dannielynn's court-
appointed guardian,
Richard Millstein, for bur-
ial,

Mr Millstein stated short-
ly afterwards that the
Bahamas would be Ms
Smith's final resting place.

However, Mrs Arthur's
lawyer announced to the
press that his client "is the

the ensuing three-way race for the seat

Anna Nicole

only person to. handle the
burial. That is the law."

According to reports,
Mrs Arthur touched down
in Nassau yesterday for the
second time since her
daughter's demise,
and is now staying at
Atlantis.

Also yesterday, it was
revealed that the dispute
over the paternity of the
now-deceased former Play-
boy Playmate's daughter
could be. moving to the
Bahamas shortly, after
Florida judge Lawrence
Kora doubted he had juris-
diction over the matter.

"I'm trying to figure out
what jurisdiction there
could possibly be here...I'm
not even sure California's
got jurisdiction," the Hous-
ton Chronicle reported the
judge as saying.

Teachers set to take
strike vote next week

FROM page one

tact the union, but failed to do so.

“That means we are going to take this to the next level,” Ms

Wilson said.

The union official said it will take a few days to contact
all teachers throughout the islands and organise the strike
vote, but emphasised that it isa step the BUT now has to

take.

The union this week filed a trade dispute concerning
outstanding pay and treatment of teachers.

Last Tuesday, hundreds of irate teachers from 52
schools in Nassau invaded the Ministry Education, crying

“We shall overcome.”

It was the culmination of a week of back-and-forth
and frustrated negotiations between the ministry and the

BUT.

Education Minister Alfred Sears had promised to pro-
vide the union with a list detailing which teachers are

owed what money.

‘However, when the list was given to the BUT, it was

discovered to be incomplete.

BUT president Ida Poitier-Turnquest told The Tribune
that list was an old one and unacceptable.

Prior to that, government had promised that all teach-
ers awaiting reassessment and backpay will be paid either

in February or March.

Minister Sears had also promised that “extraordinary
measures” will be taken to expedite the process of deal-
ing with teachers’ pay-related grievances.

=) FIDELITY

Change

“Last Price Weekly Vol.

Last 12 Months Div $



- Trading volume of the prior week



CATER

EPS $

8.8
eae

ae
- =

NAV KEY

*- 16 February 2007
*-31 January 2007
*** . 31\ January 2007

* - 31 January 2007

- 31 January 2007



relevant case law. at
Meanwhile, paternity!
claimant Larry Birkhead:
told the Associated Press”
that he “will go anywhere»
(he has) to" to fight to be*
named father of Dan."
nielynn.

"This child is in the
Bahamas. The jurisdiction
is in the Bahamas," he said.

However, the Houston
Chronicle reported that no
ruling to move the case has
yet been made as Korda
continues to examine the

Sr re
>

FNM chairman : é

FROM page one . Ae

Joo

with the PLP having not yet announced the party’s slate of candi?"
dates for the election. ae

The fact that the Boundaries Commission has not yet submitted"!
a report, and that new voters cards have not yet been issued, indi ,
cates the PLP is attempting to confuse the electorate, according ta;
Mr Bannister.

He thinks these delays are creating confusion that could have
been easily avoided.

Mr Bannister also suggested that this confusion is a deliberate:'
attempt by the PLP to “steal the election.” However, he said that»
despite the PLP’s efforts, the Bahamian people are going to ensure,
that does not happen.

}

Minister on racism:
FROM page one : a is

Hill, feferied to the FNM {MP for Mantes Brent Sas ‘Pat
white Bahamian, as the “heir of the UBP’:;, which:has sparked ,
debate among voters about the use of race in the next general.
election.

“T think we still have racism in the Bahamas,” Mr Miller said, “but,
the racism is in black people, as well as white people. And there-i ASn

nothing worse than a racist black man who believes in his head thats

he is better than you or I, and some of them believe that they are:
white in their minds. (SY

“For example, let’s say a fella’ lives out 02 the Eastern Road and;:
has a million dollar house with a boat. When he has parties you will
see more white people than black. Because he has arrived. So he has
gone into another structure. He has elevated himself above the guy
in Bain Town, Grants Town and McCullough Corner and peor
Road. He has arrived. te

“So he has a new mixture of friends that he is comfortable with.
He has no concern for the brother in the ghetto because he has<
made it. And his view is I guess like Clarence Thomas, if I can make:
it, you can make it. That’s not necessarily so. Some of us need help”.
he said.

Mr Miller said that if persons were truly interested in making | a.
contribution to society, they would reach back into the rural areas
and help out their brother man — black or white. c a

Selection process:.

comed with open arms by par-_

FROM page one

Political pundits have criti-
cised the “sluggishness” of the
PLP in going into the 2007
campaign, and are urging the
party to announce their candi-
dates as soon as possible.

While no official announce-
ments have been made yet,
PLP supporters in some cases
have already been seen wear-
ing T-shirts and holding up
posters of candidates they
believe will run.

There has also been no word
yet if former Immigration Min-
ister Shane Gibson will run for
Golden Gates.

While Mr Gibson was wel-

ty supporters at the PLP’s:
Pinewood rally on Tuesday,;
some observers feel he should
take time off from politics after
the Anna Nicole Smith debare
cle. 7}

It is also claimed that party
financiers said they would not:
support Mr Gibson running for,
the constituency. te

Prime Minister Perry
Christie, in an earlier interview,,
said all party members expect+,
ing to be nominated are:
already on the ground sen
paigning.

Mr Christie said a lot of peo-
ple running in the election are,
incumbents and already known
to the public. thy

NOTICE

LE BOURG INTERNATIONAL LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the dissolution of the
above-named Company commenced on the 20th
day of February, 2007. The Liquidator is John
M. Lawrence of P.O. Box CR-56766, Suite 1000,

Nassau, Bahamas.





THE TRIBUNE . SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007, PAGE 7

ad MO ed
AF Adderley’s Sainta

-

appeals to judges’ tastes

- A. STUDENT of AF



"SE +

BH RUNNER-UP Junior

j Adderley Junior High School Champion Young Chef
+ has been declared the winner Richae Bain, 13, a ninth
of this year’s New Providence grader at SC McPherson

» Junior Champion Young Chef
“ Contest.
‘ Sainta Louisaint of AF

JHS placed second with 370
points in the 2007 New Provy-
idence Junior Champion

4 Adderley won the contest — Young Chef Contest spon-
sponsored by Mahatma Rice sored by Mahatma Rice and
and Robin Hood Flour — by Robin Hood Flour.
» impressing the judges, all pro-
« fessional chefs, and earning
391 points with her ‘roaring ee
“. seafood patty’ and ‘fruity rice Ninek)

~ cheese cake delight.’ PS Ga ECOTETES) ;
She took top honours for
best rice and best flour dishes
., {rom all the judges.
Thirteen-year-old Richae
’,, Bain of SC McPherson JHS
placed second with 370 points
for her ‘conchy rice cakes’ and ~
‘pineapple guava cobbler."
Ashton Fraser of Queen’s
College came third with 357.8
points for her ‘cajun style cray-
fish scallion rice cakes’ and
‘banana and pineapple frit-
* ters’. m@ ABOVE: 2007 New
Judges in the contest were | Providence Junior Champion

Chef Sterling Thompson of Young Chef winner Saintia SPR , .
the Bahamas Hotel Training Louisaint of AF Adderley J ear aN . g L
College and Chef Tracey High. ae eC | ,' _George Street, New Providence ;
Sweeting of the Radisson - The Bahamas
Cable Beach Resort. @ RIGHT: ASHTON Fras- : ws

The contest isa preliminary er of Queen’s College came

to the 15th annual All Island _ third with 357.8 points inthe {| . ;
Champion Young Chef finals 2007 New Providence Junior | 3 wey Due to the Annual General Meeting (A.G.M.)

— scheduled to be held on Champion Young Chef Con- ;
March 14 at Queen’s College test sponsored by Mahatma on Sunday 25th February, 2007 there will be one

WoC ans

L

OS



720

w} S704

+

-. for juniors and on March 15 at Rice and Robin Hood Flour | . : 1 Eucharist Service at 8:00 am.
CR Walker Senior High for through the Ministry of Edu- : CEN 1 ‘
. senior high school students. cation. ; Oe fen ; :
' Over $3,750 in scholarships GBR ros In addition, there will be no evening service, due
; can be won by participants of (Photos by to the Diocesan Lenten Mission at St. John’s
~ the contest. Deanndra Ferguson, CO . : he ane
.. The top two New Provi- PS News/Features) College Auditorium beginning at 7:00 p.m. the
“ dence Juniors ne an to the rt ee guest missioner is the Right Reverend Robert
1 National Junior Champion | ; \ . ha :
n Youtig Chet competition. For i ~~) we A Thompson, Bishop Suffragan of Kingston,
. the sixth year, there will be National Champion Young Jamaica.

a

prizes for junior high national Chefs and runners-up from
Young Chef competitors: $250 the Senior High Schools will
for first, $150 for second, and _ receive $1,750, $900, and $400,
$100 for third. respectively.

WW



FIRST HOLINESS CHURCH OF GOD

BAMBOO TOWN

Church 33rd |
Anniversary Services

Date: Sunday 25th February, 2007@3:30p.m.

SO re oe

Monday - Wednesday
26th through 28th February, 2007
‘TIME: 7:30 p.m.
PARTY THEMES | PLACE: First Holiness Church of God —
Carnival Fiesta * Pirates of Paradise First Holiness Way, Bamboo Town
Pretty as a Princess ¥ Beach Bonanza Blast | ;
Underwater Adventure




ess HOST PASTOR: Bishop Edward Missick JP

2





Price: $35 per child
*Lunch inclusive

w= Ee ene aeae Ee TT BeBe wwe we Te we

PARTY THEMES
Karaoke Superstar ¥ DOR Bash i
Gamers Delight * Organized Chaos vf my
Entertainment: X-Box 360, P53, Apostle Randy Moss Rev. Dr.LeRodney Roll
Nintendo Wii, Game Cube, Internet Access, Movies, Sunday 25th @ 3:30p.m. Monday 26th

DDR Mats, Glow Lights, Your Personal 0.J.,
Music and Dancing.

cs e@ een se st eee ren cee we wee

Price: $40 per child
*Lunch inclusive

and then select a party theme!









Party add-ons for an additional fee: Cakes, Party Bags, Color Tees, Wax Hand...
Build A Bear and an Earth & Fire Pottery Studio experience.







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Tuesday 27th . Wednesday 28th






booking is required!
irthday Party, Ne

THEME: “THE CHURCH STILL STANDING STRONG”





VY

THE TRIBUNE



Contest to
commemorate

25th anniversary

of Bahamas in OAS

THE Ministries of For-
eign Affairs and Educa-
tign have launched a
country-wide contest for
students to commemorate
the 25th anniversary of the
Bahamas’ membership in ©
the Organisation of Amer-
ican States (OAS).

tudents are asked to
enter into a competition,
which will celebrate the
B&Ahamas’ beneficial rela-
tionship with the OAS —a
hemispheric organisation
that promotes social and
eepnomic development in
Litin America and the
C#ribbean through a
range of cooperation
activities and dialogue.

Over the years the
Bahamas has benefited .
significantly from this
partnership in areas such
as.education, tourism, sus-
tainable development, the
environment, culture,
women, the anti-drug
effort, terrorism and law
enforcement.

To commemorate this
special anniversary, the
OAS Bahamas Office, in
conjunction with the Min-
istry of Foreign Affairs
and the Ministry of Edu-
cation, Science and Tech-
nology, is sponsoring

‘
essay, poster and mathe-
matics competitions, .
which are open to all stu-
dents at primary, junior
high and senior high
school levels.

‘The theme selected for
the essay and poster com-

-pétitions is:

““People and Countries
Working Together to Cre-
ate a Better World”

Works submitted should
reflect the partnership
between the Bahamas and
thg OAS over the past 25

ears.

Guidelines for the essay
competition are as follows:

Primary (grades 4-6):
Students should write at
least two well developed
pafagraphs (200' words).

“Junior High (grades: 7-
9): Students should write
atdeast- four well devel-
oped paragraphs (at least
400 words)

Senior High (grades 10-
12): Students should write
aiv‘essay of at least 600
words.

a,

Guidelines for the
p@ster competition are as
follows:

Students may use a vari-
ety of materials to express
the theme, including pen-
cil; charcoal, paint, fabric .
and objects from the nat-
ural environment.

¢Primary (grades 4-6):
Poster size of at least
12”x14”

Junior High (grades 7-
9): Poster size of at least
15”x25”

~Senior High (grades 10-
12): Poster size of at least
15025”

“Guidelines for the math-
ematics competition as are
follows:

‘The mathematics com-
pétition is open to stu-




“Ministry of Education

launches new institute

mâ„¢ By BAHAMAS
INFORMATION
SERVICES

_ THE Ministry of Educa-
tion has moved one step
closer to ensuring that
school administrators are
properly equipped to teach
the nation’s children with
the launch of the Institute
for Educational Leadership.

Veronica Owens, Parlia-
mentary Secretary in the
Ministry of Education told
administrators at the College
of the Bahamas’ Choices







LOCAL NEWS

Aims to improve ‘capabilities
of school leadership’



Restaurant Tuesday that the
Ministry aimed to improve
the “capabilities of school
leadership” as a new thrust
in education.

Hundreds of school
administrators will be
encouraged to complete the
training programme, Ms
Owens said. -

In his message to the



administrators, Ministry of

Education, Science and
Technology Alfred Sears
said that school administra-
tors have the “awesome
responsibility of empower-
ing teachers and other

school personnel to deliver:

quality service to primary
and secondary schools.”
“Through the effective

Atay Aton ARC cra



‘MI MRS Melanie Symonettte, a PBX op
commended for outstanding customer service. .
The club has a ‘Lightning Strikes’ programme which recognises employees for their out- &
standing attempts to engage members, guests and colleagues in an effort to provide flawless
service.
Mrs Symonette, an employee since May, 2006, proved her worth when she tracked down a
friend - who was in Spanish Wells - for a caller from Canada.
This simple act resulted in recognition for both Mrs Symonette and The Abaco Club.
Melanie received an awards certificate from Mr Freddie Munnings IJ, human resources direc-
tor at the club, managed by Ritz-Carlton." : fe AR ‘ ;

~ TrimSpa participants
gather in the Bahamas

TRIMSPA Participants,
inspired by the company’s for-
mer spokesperson Anna Nicole
Smith, have gathered in the
Bahamas to select new faces to
represent the weight loss pro-

amme. ,

This week 50 finalists of a
year-long weight loss challenge
came together at the Breezes
resort for the final weight loss
reveal, after which new
spokespersons for TrimSpa will
be chosen.

One winner of the grand
champion title, Cassie Tebo,
who went from 195 pounds to
157 pounds, said that the
deceased Ms Smith was “a
huge inspiration to me and ~







thousands of people.”

“She represented strength
and beauty and marched to the
beat of her own drum - even if
it wasn’t popular. I respected

@ ANNA NICOLE SMITH
was the former spokesperson

of the company.
(AP Photo)

_go a long way in enhancing .

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007, PAGE 9

leadership of school admin-
istrators and the quality
delivery of instruction, stu-
dents are placed on a firm
foundation and given the
sound preparation they will
require to lead productive
lives while allowing for their
special gifts and talents.

“Such training would
enable administrators to
manage schools in New
Providence and the Family
Islands more effectively. In
addition to equipping our
administrators with a broad
range of education and man-
agement skills, the Institute
will offer certification, re-
certification and advanced
graduate Certificate and
Diploma programmes.”

Ms Owens, in her address,
embraced the philosophy
behind the Institute. She
said that it was the achieve-
ment of another promise in
the Progressive Liberal Par-
ty’s “Our Plan”, on improv-
ing the quality of the deliv-
ery of education throughout
the Bahamas. -

She said that reform of the
education system was need-
ed and the PLP has
embraced the challenge
without flinching. School
administrators, she said,
“will have to be more imag-
inative in their thinking,” if
progress is to be realised in
educating the nation’s youth.

She predicted that “the
(institute) will be “a pre-req-
uisite to promotion” in the
teaching profession.

Ms Jayne Hodder, presi-
dent of the College of the
Bahamas, also welcomed the
training that is available to
administrators through the
Institute. She said it would

“the quality of education in

the Bahamas.





m@ VERONICA OWENS,
Parliamentary Secretary in
the Ministry of Education

‘In her message, Ms Hod-
der stated that the College
continues to undertake myr-
iad, significant initiatives
such as this, not in isolation
but in collaboration with
other entities with a view to
both institutional and
national growth, all parties
possessing converged man-
dates and goals.

“The College is therefore
very pleased to partner.with
the Ministry of Education,
Science and Technology
this year in the establish-
ment of an Institute for Edu-
cation Leadership that will
not only serve persons at the
helm of educational institu-
tions, but will also, by exten-
sion, serve our leaders

of tomorrow,” Ms Hodder
“Said. sre

tf =



2 ee

wing “4 ‘e*e"s

dénts within the various
categories who have a3.0
GPA or a grade point i
average of B. Interested :
students must complete

thé attached registration
form.

This competition will be
conducted in two (2) phas-
es:

«Phase 1 — all entrants

will sit a written examina-

tion, March 16, 2007

1 These examinations will

Ye administered through-. .
-qut the country, venues, tom:

be announced at a later

ate.

\ Phase 2 — The top 10

ftudents within each cate-

gory of the written exami-
“ation will then proceed

an oral competition to

her,” Ms Tebo said.

This week’s event following the year-long challenge was con-
sidered to have officially marked the “passing of the torch that
Anna lit more than 3 years ago.” ,

The former Playboy playmate became the company’s
spokesperson in October 2003 and reportedly lost 69 lbs by
using the dietary supplement.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LUCKNER SIMON OF
i INEDALE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the

Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight

days from the 17th day of February, 2007 to the Minister








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applyingtothe Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
fos. registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the

17TH day of FEBRAURY, 2007 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.
























THE TRIBUNE



TWELFTH grade stu-
_ dents at Government High

School were told that no
matter where they are
employed, good manners,
a positive attitude and
respect for others is a must.

Addressing the students
were managers and super-
visors of Sandals Royal
Bahamian Spa Resort and
offshore island, the
school’s adopted hotel.

In a two-day seminar for
seniors organised by the
school’s guidance depart-
ment, Sandals representa-
tives spoke to the students

about the various career —

possibilities available with-
in a hotel’s various depart-
ments.

Entertainment supervisor
Dianne Gibson advised the
group that they are to
make sure that their hearts
are in whatever they decide
to do.

Experiences

Sharing her personal
experiences of growing up
in Minnesota and wanting
to be a diver, she said there
is no limit in achieving

one’s goals with determi-

nation.

“My willingness to learn
new things and explore the
world has afforded me the
opportunity to live in eight
different countries includ-
ing Mexico, Jamaica and
San Salvador,” Ms Gibson
said.

Carla Lewis, Food and
Beverage supervisor,
showed the class the prop-
er way to set a table for
dinner and remove a plate
from the table.

Ms Lewis who is respon-
sible for training new
employees told the stu-
dents that one. of the first

lessons was greeting guests.

“We have a chance to
create a lasting experience
and we use every opportu-
nity to exceed the expecta-
tions of our guests,” she
said.

While there were a num-
ber of students interested
in being chefs, executive

Cuba declines to renew credentials

sous chef Seanette Brice
noted that there are many
areas of the kitchen
that does not involve cook-
ing.

Among them she listed
stewarding, pantry, pastry
shop, butcher shop, garde
manger and food runner.

“No matter where you
work, it is important to be
professional and courteous.

“Whether you realise it
or not someone is watch-
ing you and they will be
either impressed or disap-
pointed. Now is the time to
develop a positive attitude
that will be your founda-
tion for a lasting career,”
she said.



@ EXECUTIVE Sous
Chef Seanette Brice
(right) and Massage Ther-
apist, Donnella Davis
(above) are pictured talk-
ing with students.

for three Havana correspondenits

m HAVANA



CUBAN press authorities have told the Havana correspon-
dents for the Chicago Tribune, the BBC and a major Mexican
newspaper that they can no longer report from the island,

according to Associated Press.

The Chicago Tribune said correspondent Gary Marx, based in
the country since 2002, was told Wednesday that his stories were

too negative. His press credentials were not renewed during an
annual process, and he and his family were given 90 days to
leave Cuba, the newspaper said.

The Mexican newspaper El Universal said Cesar Gonzalez
Calero, its Havana reporter since 2003, was told this week his
credentials would not be renewed. Authorities told him his
reporting was "not the most convenient for the Cuban govern-
ment," the reporter said, adding he would be allowed to remain
in Cuba as the husband of a Spanish journalist. * f

The British Broadcasting Corp. was "talking to the authorities
jn Havana about the status of its Cuba correspondent after his
accreditation was withdrawn," spokeswoman Karen-Rosine said
Friday in a statement from London. Without naming correspon-
dent Stephen Gibbs, Rosine said he "remains in Cuba, pending —
the outcome of these discussions."

Jose Luis Ponce, director of Cuba's {International Press Cen-
ter, said Friday that the government would have no immediate
comment on the correspondents' status.

Havana in recent years has grown increasingly sensitive about
how the international media portrays the communist-run nation.

It is especially touchy about reports distributed in the United
States and their possible impact on U.S. public opinion amid
efforts by Washington to tighten more than four decades of trav-
el and trade restrictions. And officials have been enraged by
speculation in the foreign press about the health of Fidel Castro,
who temporarily ceded power to his brother Raul after undergo-
ing intestinal surgery in July. :

The government — like many around the world — has long used
the annual reaccreditation process to review the work of interna-
tional journalists.

The latest regulations for foreign correspondents, released in
December, state that Cuba can suspend accreditation when jour-
nalists undertake activities it considers inappropriate or display
"a lack of journalistic ethics and/or objectivity in their dispatch-
es."

The Chicago Tribune said Cuban officials weren't closing their
office and told Marx they would accept an application from
another correspondent. George de Lama, managing editor-news
for the Tribune, said the paper was "disappointed and con-
cerned" by the action.

"Gary Marx is an accomplished, veteran journalist who has
consistently given our readers accurate, incisive and insightful
coverage from Cuba, working under sometimes difficult condi-

tions," de Lama said. "We remain committed to coverage of
Cuba and its people, and we are assessing our options of how to
proceed." .

El Universal Vice President Roberto Rock called Havana's
move a "technical expulsion" of its reporter and said the news-
paper would file an official protest.

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd

P

Montrose Avenues.

hone:322-1722 + Fax: 326-7452

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007, PAGE 11



TEACHING VACANCY

The Anglican Central Authority invites
applications from qualified Teachers for
positions available at St. John’s College, St. Amnne’s
School, Bishop Michael Eldon School, Freeport, and
St. Andrew’s School, Exuma.

















PRIMARY TEACHERS
LIBRARIAN
SCIENCE
ENGLISH LANGUAGE
SPANISH
GUIDANCE COUNSELLORS ~~~
SPECIAL EDUCATION
MATHEMATICS
HOME ECONOMICS
RELIGIOUS STUDIES
PHYSICS/MATHEMATICS
MUSIC
BUSINESS STUDIES
ART
PHYSICAL EDUCATION








Only qualified Teachers, with Bachelor or Master
Degrees from an accredited University or College and .
Teaching Certificate need apply.

For further details and application forms, please
contact the Anglican Central Education
Authority on Sands Road at telephone
(242) 322-3015/6/7.








Letters of application and/or completed application
forms with copies of required documents must be sent
by Friday, March 9th, 2007 to the Anglican Education

Department addressed to:-

The Director of Education
Anglican Central Education Authority
P.O. Box N-656
Nassau, Bahamas





SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: pore i tamz com

ater ste naman seaae seen

Other
Hugh
Campbell
results

BASKETBALL



HERE’S a look at the
late results posted for the
25th Hugh Campbell
Basketball Classic on
Thursday at the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium:

Kingways Academy
def. Nassau.Christian
Academy; Mangrove Cay
def. Harbour Island;
Bimini def. North
Andros 26-13; SC Bootle
def. Turks and Caicos 39-
34; South'Ahdros def.
‘Preston Albury 39-19; CI
Gibson defsSt. John’s 52-
44; Eight Mile Rock def.
CR Walker, 48-43 and CC
Sweeting def. Dame
Doris Johnson 53-44.

e Here’s a summary of

‘the three late games

played:

Rattlers 52, Giants 44:
Danny McKenzie’s game
high 20, Robson Men-
non’s 10, David Taylor’s
eight and Jermaine Stor-
r’s five were enough for
the defending champions
CI Gibson to secure their
win.

/ Denzel Barr had 17,
Ricardo Moultrie 10- and
Shanairj Wallace eight in
the loss for St. John’s, the
runners-up in the BAISS

; championship.

Bluejays 48, Knights
43; Hurbert Williams and
Nathaniel Cooper both
scored 10 ) points, Mark

“Henfield had eight and

Kiplin Fowler seven as
Eight Mile Rock polished
off the CR Walker.

Nashad Butler scored
13, while Batchlette
LaFleur, Tayano Jones
and Renaldo Baillou all
scored seven for the
Knights. . |

Cobras 13, Mystic Mar-
pumped fey game high
24, Cruz Sihon had 11,
Dwight Rolle seven,
Kevin Burrows six and
Wayde Higgs five in the
win for CC Sweeting.

Jonathan Pinder scored
12, Theo Lynes had eight,
Lesley St. Fleur seven —
and Patrick Brice six in
the loss for Dame Doris
Johnson.

Obadele
Thompson
to marry
Marion Jones

OLYMPIC BRONZE
MEDALLIST
OBADELE THOMP-
SON is sprinting up the
altar today, with Olympic
gold medallist Marion
Jones, according to Jones'
website.

And the finish line for
the sprinting sweethearts
is a small church in North
Carolina. |

What's more, according
to her website, Jones, one



i ] 5 secs in the
100-metre dash and 21.62
in the 200, is "expecting".

Her website also states
that the ceremony will be
private and just family and
close friends will be in
attendance.

It's the first time down
the aisle for Thompson
and the second for Jones,
both of whom were stars
at the Sydney Olympics in
2000



Thompson, who turns 31
next month, broke new
ground for Barbados when
he won the country's first
medal, a bronze in the
100-metre dash in Sydney.

supe



§ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS

“Senior Sports Reporter __
'FARRINTINO Wallace dart-

‘ed inside, was fouled, hit two

free throws and then he canned
a jumper in the winding seconds
lifting last year’s runners-up Sir
Jack Hayward Wildcats to a 38-
33 decision over the Grand
Bahama champions Tabernacle
Falcons.

It was day five of the week-
long senior boys basketball dou-
ble elimination tournament and
coach Emmit Higgins said the
victory for his Wildcats was a
huge one.

“We. knew going into this

i _ game, had we won, it would

have made the road a little eas-
ier, Had we lost'it, we would
have had a lot more games to
play,” Higgins said.
‘““Coming out of Grand
Bahama after the Christmas
brea the guys lost focus, but



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS



INVITATIONAL
SEI

we knew that coming here we
are a good team and that is
what good teams do.”

In what turned out to be the
marquee Grand Bahama
matchup, Wallaced scored his
only four points in the fourth
quarter to finish with a side high
10 to lead the Wildcats as they
stayed undefeated in the tour-
nament.

His twin brother, Anton Wal-
lace ended up with nine, the
same as Leon Cooper. Edison
Davis helped out with five.

Sir Jack Hayward, who are
looking to return to the final to
avenge their loss to the CI Gib-
son Rattlers last year, led from
start to finish as they opened a
9-5 lead and never looked back.

They extended their lead to
19-13 at the half and 28-22 at
the end of the third.

Dereck Gaitor scored a game
high 13. Ross Roberts, Jared
Cartwright and Raymond Higgs
all scored four in the loss.

Falcons’ coach Norris Bain
said they deserved to lose the
game.

Frustrated

“We missed too many free
throws, we didn’t play with

much passion in the first two

minutes of the game as we got
out-hussled and we gave up
easy transition,” said Bain, who

admitted that he was ‘frustrat- -

ed with his team’s performance.

“But I thought we were more
aggressive in the second half.
We just dug a hole for our-
selves, but they are kids and I
still believe in them. So we will



‘huge’ victory
r the Wildcats

and try to stay focused.”

With the win, the Wildcats
set up another big match-up
when they face the BAISS
champions Jordan Prince
William Falcons for the pool VI
title today.

The Falcons exploded past
the CV Bethel Stingrays 62-41
in what turned out be the mar-

quee showdown between the
. New Providence teams left in

the tournament.

@ Falcons 62, Stingrays 41:

The BAISS champions got a -

balanced scoring attack, led by
Rashad Williams’ game high 21
to remain undefeated.

Williams came up with eight
and his backcourt team-mate
Ollen Smith added six of his 10
in the fourth quarter as they
extended their 41-35 margin in
the win.

D’Andre Reid also scored 10,
while Donnanthon Moss had
eight.and Demitri Swain came

@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE



up with seven.

Jordan Prince William’s
coach Godfrey McQuay said it
was good to get back to the lev-
el that they played when they
won the BAISS title over the
St. John’s Giants.

“We were letting teams take
leads and we had to come back,
but now it’s giving me hopes
that we can only get better,” he
stated.

“We played good offensively
and defensively.

“We knew we had to play a
good rough game against a
good rough team and we stuck
with the basics to set us up for a
chance to play for the pool
championship on Saturday.”

McQuay said they didn’t get
to play Sir Jack Hayward when
they participated in the Catholic
High Christmas Tournament in
December, but they lost to
Tabernacle, who they could
possibly play on Sunday in the
pool final. ‘

- just take it one game at a time

Three Grand Bahama
Sides hit top form

@ CATHOLIC HIGH CRUSADERS take the ball to the basket against Bishop
Michael Eldon Warriors yesterday.



(Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff)

er

‘ B BASKETBALL

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter



AS THE 25th Hugh Campbell Basket-
ball Classic heads into “Super Saturday”
today, the Sunland Lutheran, Catholic
High Crusaders and the St. George’s
Jaguars are all still in the hunt for the title.

The three Grand Bahama teams came
up With big victories yesterday at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

Sunland Lutheran routed Old Bight 65-
28; Catholic High held off Bishop Michael
Eldon Warriors 36-34 and St. George’s
roared past the Alpha/Omega Owls 87-68.

¢ Here’s a summary of how their match-
ups materialized: .

@ Sunland Lutheran 65, Old Bight 28:
Glenjlian Gaitor and Tamaris King both
scored 15, Don Toote had 12, Travis Hall
eight and Livington Cornish seven as the
Grand Bahama High School runners-up
won this one rather easily.

Sunland Lutheran took a commanding
15-7 advantage after the first quarter and
extended it to 30-18 at the half. But it was
the third quarter when they broke loose
with a 12-1 spurt for a 42-19 margin.

Coach Marvin Johnson said it wasn’t a
good performance, but he will take the
victory anyway. :

“T wasn’t pleased because it seemed as if
our players only showed up. They didn’t
play the way they are capable of playing,”
he insisted.

“I guess because they were playing a
team of that level, their defence and every-

thing else dropped. But I told them that we-

have to send a message and we had to do it
by playing well. They didn’ t do it. We just
played well enough to win.’

‘Johnson, however, said the test will
come on Super Saturday.

“They say if you last through Saturday,
you could be playing on Monday,” he
quipped.

Old Bight, who will now have to play
to stay alive, got 10 from Theo Armbrister.
LeChristo Lesbott has five and Paul Rolle

and Sheldon Rolle both added four.

Coach Anthony Anderson said the lack
of competition in Cat Island really made
the difference for his Old Bight team.

“Coming to a tournament like this, we
didn’t have the opportunity to play that
much, so we have to challenge ourselves,”
he said. “When we play the big teams, we
are intimidated.”

Anderson said it showed as his big men
never really got into the game and as a
result, Grand Bahame got away on the fast
break when his Old Bight squad missed
their jumpers.

@ Crusaders 36, Warriors 34: Catholic
High are probably still than] ng Dajhon
Wildgoose, who missed his two free throws
and a lay-up attempt on an offensive
rebound that could have either tied the
game or given Bishop Michael Eldon the
victory.

The Crusaders managed to hold on to
the win as Lynden Davis scored 12,
Johnathon Russell nine and David Nes-
bitt six as they remained undefeated.

Former national team player Scott

Forbes, who coached Catholic High, said .°.

they didn’t play the way they should have
down the stretch.

“T have a bunch of young kids and they
faltered under the pressure,” he admitted.
“But wé Still managed to Come out on top.” ©

Forbes, a former standout in the tour-
nament, said he’s not putting any high
expectations on his team.

He just wants them to play the way they
were taught.

Bishop Michael Eldon got a game high
14 from. Oral Jones, six from Cameron
Rolle and five from Wildgoose.

Coach Terry Wildgoose said if they had
played basketball for the first three quar-
ters, the game would not have been close.

“I keep trying to tell these guys that
when you have to fight in the last five min-
utes, you really didn’t do any work in the
game,” he stated. “So I don’t evaluate the
last five minutes.”

As the tournament starts to wind down,
Wildgoose said his young and inexperi- ~
enced squad will go out and play 100 per
cent the rest of the way to stay in the tour-
nament.

i Jaguars 87, Owls 68: Tavad Russell
and Antonio Moore combined for 10
points in the third quarter as St. George’s
broke away from a 42-40 half-time lead
for a 67-53 advantage at the end of the
third.

Moore and Cordero Rolle both scored
16, while Russell had eight, Matthew Coop-
er seven, Wilfred Zonicle six and Tyrone
Rolle five in the win for the Jaguars.

“Anytime you get young men like these,

you have to allow them to get focused,”

said St. George’s coach Darryl Sears. “As

coaches, we have to take responsibility
when we win and we have to take it when
we are doing well.

“They just don’t have the.depth, so we

decided to wear them down with our press

because we knew that we had the fresher
legs.”

It won't get any easier for the Jaguars as
they have to prepare for the undefeated
CC Sweeting Cobras, who he feels will be
the team to beat in pool IT.

The Owls, on the other hand, have to
bounce back from their first loss.

Shameka Green and Antonio Ferguson
shared game high honours with 23 apiece
and Stanley Missick had 17.

Clayton ‘Smiley’ Miller, who started
coaching the team five weeks ago, said the
lack of depth really affected them, espe-
cially after his point guard, Jackson Walk-
er, went down with an injury in their first
game.

“We only have eight players, so I’m real-
ly proud of them,” Miller said. “We just
have to go back to the game plan, which is

to press and move the ball.”





BASEBALL
COMMENTARY



Mets giving

the old-timers.

_a spring fli Ing
. BY BILL MADDEN
~~ New York Daily News g
Jy ORT ST. LUCIE, Fla. — In the
P Latin Quarter of the Tradition
_ Field clubhouse — where
- Moises Alou, 40, found himself
_ lockered directly across from pinch-
hitters Julio Franco and Ruben Sierra

(combined official age: 89) —it was -

_ Inevitable that the prevailing conver-

sation this week would be about
nutrition, fitness and survival.

_ Alou, of course, is being counted
A on to proade a substantial chunk of

. offense from the
sixth slot in the New
York Mets batting
order, despite a
recent history of
injuries that limited
him to 123 and 98

in the past two sea-

_ sons. But in addition
Ss to being asked to

defy his: age, Alou also is expected to

fill the leadership void from his left-

eld predecessor, Cliff Floyd.

‘I’m going to really miss Cliff,”

David Wright said. “But after having


















_~ same veteran leadership qualities —
< and, from that respect, I think it’s

_ going to be a seamless transition.”
_ EXCITED TO BE HERE
“Everybody knows I chose to be
here,” Alou said. “This is very excit-
ing to be able, at the age of 40, to be
‘put in a position to play fora champ-
ionship team. It’s the first time in
16 years I showed up on time for my
‘physical — that’s how excited I am.”
_ Presumably, the physical didn’t
reveal any lingering residue of the
ankle and back injuries that felled
Alou for more than a third of last sea-
son with the San Francisco Giants.
_. Alou considered retirement until his
__ dad, Giants manager Felipe Alou, per-

suaded him to keep playing.
. _. “Basically, he said I was his best

“hitter, and I needed to keep playing,”

_ Alou said, “And I did hit over .300, to

_ keep my lifetime average over 300.



e _By coming here, I’m risking throwing

_ all that away, but that’s how confident

-. Tam about having a great year...
_. “Thaven'’t lost a bit off my bat
speed, and I’m a smarter hitter now.”

After listening to Franco, 48,
expound on his diet regimen, Alou
smiled. The injuries aside, he had no
_ explanation for his longevity. ‘

‘T really don’t do anything special,”

‘he said. “And I don’t take care of my
body like Julio, although I do drink ©
light beer.”

KNOWING THEIR ROLES

_ In Franco’s case, he knows how to
_ pace himself. It’s not all diet and exer-
cise, he said — it’s understanding his
* body and keeping both his role and
~ the long season in Perspective.
“Every year, my goal is to leave
s Spring: training injury-free,” he said. “I
know I’m not going to play a lot, but -
Ihave to be mentally prepared to hit
in late-inning pressure situations.”
Sierra, 41, has become a kind of
_ “have bat, will travel” j journeyman
- since resurrecting, his career in the
Mexican League six years ago, but he
__is here merely as a favor to his agent
_ from Omar Minaya. The Mets general
_ manager, who also has brought in
40-year-old catcher Sandy Alomar Jr.
(presumably as a favor to Sandy Sr.,
the Mets’ first-base coach), appears to
be making a hobby of collecting relics

games, respectively, .

- dinner with Mo, I can see he’s got the ©



this spring — although, as Carlos Del- —

gado, two lockers down from Alou,
said: “It can only help having all these
veteran guys who have been there
around the young kids on this team.”

“T’ve got to be ready for any situa- _

_ tion here,” Sierra said, “I know my
role. It’s been like that for me for the
last seven years.

“I get my inspiration from Julio.
We were together in Texas from _
1989-92, and he was like my teacher.
He always knew how to hit in tough

situations, and I just watched him.”
Nevertheless, Sierra has to know
his chances of making this team are
about 100-1. Too many things would
have to happen. So he can at least be
content with trading old war stories
while hoping to impress another club
off the limited at-bats he is given.
And if nothing else, Sierra figures
to leave Florida feeling younger again.

c

Woods

BY DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press °

MARANA, Ariz. — Tiger
Woods’ winning streak is over, no
matter what tour he is playing.

In a shocking end Friday to a
PGA Tour streak that began in
July, Woods failed to notice a ball
mark in the line of a 4-foot birdie
putt that would have won his third-
round match on the first extra hole
against Nick O’Hern at the Accen-
ture Match Play Championship.

Woods missed the putt, then
lost in 20 holes when O’Hern saved
par with a 12-foot putt. That fin-
ished off Woods, and the second-
longest streak in Tour history.

“I was so enthralled with the
line, I didn’t see the ball mark,”
Woods said. “I knew if I hit it left-
center, the match would be over.
It’s my fault for not paying atten-
tion to detail.”

It is rare that Woods makes
such a gaffe or misses such a short
putt with so much riding on the
outcome. One hole earlier, he had

PRO BASKETBALL | CHICAGO 105, WASHINGTON 90

GOLF | ACCENT URE MATCH PLAY CHAMPIONSHIP



INTERNATIONAL EDITION





no match for O’Hern



ROSS FRANKLIN/AP

WHAT A BLAST: Nick O’Hern,
above, has now beaten Tiger
Woods twice in match play.

hit a sand wedge to 5 feet and made
the birdie putt to extend the match,
completing a rally in which he was
four holes behind after seven holes
and still trailed by three with eight
holes left.

O’Hern became the first player
to beat Woods twice in profes-
sional match play. The Australian
lefty also beat Woods in the sec-
ond round at La Costa in 2005.

Byron Nelson’s record of 11 con-

“secutive tour victories in 1945

again looks as untouchable as ever.

Woods had won seven tourna-
ments in a row, although the purity
of the streak was in. question
because he had failed to win four

times during ‘that streak while |

competing on other tours.

“Tiger being Tiger, he birdied -

the 18th,” O’Hern said Friday. “I
thought it was ‘Game Over.’
“Then he gave me a break.”
O’Hern advanced to play Hen-
rik Stenson, who defeated Aaron
Baddeley 4 and 3 in the shortest
match of the third round. Stenson
(No. 9) is the top seed still alive.
The lone American remaining is
Chad Campbell, who advanced
beat David Toms. Campbell will
play Stephen Ames, who was a
3-and-1 winner over Stewart Cink.
In other matches on Friday:
® Paul Casey beat Shaun

Micheel2-up. Casey also beat the:

former PGA champion in the final
of the HSBC World Match Play
Championship in September.

e Geoff Ogilvy, the defending
champion here, won his ninth con-



MATT YORK/AP

NOT HIS DAY: Woods missed
some crucial putts, including
this for birdie on hole No. 6.

secutive match, defeating Niclas’
Fasth of Sweden 2 and 1.

e Justin Rose built a big lead
and beat his good friend Charles
Howell III, winning 3 and 2.

e Trevor Immelman never
trailed in an otherwise-close match
against Ian Poulter, with Immel-
man winning it 2 and 1.

e@ MORE GOLF



— Bulls batter Wizards

SOLO MISSION: Wizards guard Gilbert Arenas, center, goes up for a layup between Bulls
defenders Ben Wallace, left, and Malik Allen. Arenas had 36 points ina losing cause.

Associated Press

BOSTON — Corey Dillon, who
is 14th on the NFL’s career rushing
list, is likely to be playing for
a team other than the New England
Patriots next season.

Dillon's agent, Steve Feldman,
said Friday that his client will ask
the Patriots for his release
and that the team is likely to
grant that request by March
2, the start of free agency.

Dillon, who is 32, had told
The Boston Globe that he
would probably retire, but Feld-
man, although acknowledging that
retirement is a possibility, said that
scenario is unlikely.

“Corey does not have to play,
but he still figures he’s got a couple
of years left as a premier per-



sa
LENG

eesnnarat



Deng scores Oo:

tying career high,
and Chicago rolls

. BY RICK GANO

Associated Press

‘CHICAGO — Luol Deng tied a career high
with 32 points Friday night, and Kirk Hinrich
added 20 points and 12 assists, helping the Chi-
cago Bulls.beat the Washington Wizards 105-90
for their third victory in a row
since the All-Star break.

Gilbert Arenas scored 36
points for the Wizards — and,

during one second-half stretch,
he had 18 consecutive Washing-
ton points. Arenas’ three-point
play pulled the Wizards within

NAM Y. HUH/AP

four points in the final quarter,
but then the Bulls took off.

Thabo Sefolosha got free for a
layup, Deng scored on a jumper, and Hinrich
made a steal and a layup in a quick 9-0 run that
put the Bulls ahead 90-77. Moments later, Hin-
rich came up with a loose ball and fed an alley-
oop to Deng for a dunk, clinching the victory.

Bulls guard Chris Duhon was ejected from
the game with 2:13 left in the third quarter after
getting two technical fouls.

Duhon knocked the: ball away from Arenas
and then went to the floor for the ball as Arenas
fell over him in the scramble. When Duhon was
called for a foul on the play, he got up in disbe-
lief and went toward official Pat Fraher to argue.
Fraher then called Duhon for two technical
fouls and ejected him, leading to four free
throws by Arenas that cut the lead to 68-65.

The Bulls, with back-to-back victories over
two of the teams ahead of them in the Eastern
Conference — the Cleveland Cavaliers and the
Wizards — now face the Pistons on Sunday in
Ben Wallace’s return to Detroit.

Wallace finished the game with 12 rebounds
and five blocks, and Deng had ll rebounds. Ben
Gordon chipped in 18 points, and the Bulls had
just five turnovers in the entire game.



PRO POOL eaee | NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS

Dillon wants to cut loose from the Patriots

former, and the Patriots have been
kind enough to understand that,”
Feldman said.

Dillon will not re- sign with the
Patriots, Feldman said.

Dillon is the top active runner in
the NFL, with 11,241 career yards in
seven seasons with the Cincinnati
Bengals and three with the
Patriots. He still has three
years remaining on his con-
tract and was scheduled to
count $4.4 million against
the salary cap in 2007.

In 2004, his first year with the
Patriots after being acquired from
the Bengals for a second-round
draft pick, Dillon ran for a fran-
chise record 1,635 yards and helped
the team beat the Philadelphia
Eagles 24-21 in the Super Bowl.



STEPHEN DUNN/GETTY IMAGES.

BREAKING AWAY: Corey Dillon.

Dillon’s production dropped off
in the next two seasons. He rushed
for 733 yards in 2005 while battling
a high ankle sprain. Dillon ran for
812 yards last season, when he split
backfield duties with rookie run-

ning back Laurence Maroney.

Feldman said Dillon, though
healthy, knows that Maroney is the
team’s future.

“It’s that if Corey were to stay,
his carries would be limited, and
Corey feels he has more to give,”
Feldman said.

In three years with the Patriots,
Dillon ran for 3,180 yards and
scored 39 touchdowns in 43 games.
After not playing in a single playoff,
game in seven seasons in Cincin-
nati, he played in eight in the three
seasons with the Patriots.

“I gave them what they wanted.
I didn’t come in and steal money,”
Dillon told the Globe.

“I felt like the money they spent
was well-earned.”

e NFL REPORT





TRIBUNE SPORTS | | SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007, PAGE 7B



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HIGH TIF
65F

SUNNY AND

LOW



Volume: 103 No.79

Rev C B Moss

says he will run
as independent if

not picked for

general election

@ By BRENT DEAN

A WELL-KNOWN pastor is
threatening to revolt against the
PLP if the party doesn’t pick
him to run in the general elec-
tion.

The Rev C B Moss — one of
the most prominent churchmen
associated with the governing
party — said he will run as an
independent if need be.

His threat came after he said
Health Minister Dr Bernard
Nottage, the man being con-
sidred as PLP candidate in Bain
and Grants Town, has little sup-
port in the area.

Rev Moss said Dr Bernard
Nottage “does not have great
support” in the constituency,
and that he would run as an
independent against him if he
did not receive the PLP nomi-
nation. _

The popular pastor, who is
heavily involved in community
work in Bain Town, issued his
threat during an interview with

. Steve McKinney on the ZNS
radio talk show, Immediate.

Response.

Rev Moss declared he will be
a candidate in the next general
election, even if it means he is

the context of a promise that
Rev Moss alleges was made to
him by the prime minister and
Bradley Roberts, current MP
for the constituency.

According to Rev Moss, he:

was promised the PLP nomina-
tion after Bradley Roberts
retired.

He said: “Prior to the 2002
election an accommodation was
arrived at between the leader-
ship of the PLP and myself.

“That accommodation was

.that if I were to step aside after

the consolidation of the Grant’s
Town and Bain’s Town con-
stituencies, and allow Mr
Bradley Roberts to run, that in
two and a half years, Bradley
Roberts would retire, and I
would be offered the opportu-
nity to represent the party in a
by-election.

“Two and a half years came
and passed and Mr Roberts said
that the PM asked him to stay
on for the duration of the five-
year term.

“The understanding was that
at the end of the five-year term
I would be nominated for the
next general election. Now this
agreement was made with Mr
Christie, Mr Bradley Roberts



Dominica

.

150 tA Cen

The Tribune

#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION
—- She Miami Herald |

BAHAMAS EDITION







Anna Nicole’s

mother appeals
decision on
Bahamas burial

ml By ALISON LOWE

Tribune Staff Reporter |
LESS than a day after melo-

dramatic Circuit Judge Larry
Seidlin ruled that Anna Nicole
Smith would be buried along-
side her son in the Bahamas,
her mother appealed the deci-
sion - meaning that the cover
gitl’s body may now remain in

Florida until Monday at least. ~
_-In what.has become.a trend

with anything Anna Nicole-
related, what initially appeared
to be the end of one drama was

SEE page eight

Miller: successive
govts have failed

to diversify the

economic base

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE government of the old
PLP, the FNM, and the new
PLP under Prime Minister Per-
ry Christie have failed to diver-
sify the economic base of the
Bahamas, Minister of Agricul-
ture and Marine Resources
Leslie‘Miller said yesterday.

Mr Miller, a guest on the
Darold Miller Show, fielded a
number of questions from
callers on liquefied natural gas
(LNG), a proposal that has gar-
nered much criticism for the

not a PLP. .
His comments come within SEE page eight government from local envi-
ronmentalists.
tig Se i 3 c : “se R SEE page eight
FNM chairman accuses the g A 70-FOOT Dominican fishing vessel was seized by the Defence Force yesterday ee
; and its 12-member crew was arrested for allegedly poaching off Ragged Island. The ves- Minister says
9 ovt of br e akin 9 pr omis es sel allegedly contained a large amount of crawfish, scalefish, grouper, conch and crab legs. i S h
Pictured above is the vessel being cleared of its stock in Nassau. cism
aI (Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff) racis as
mByBRENTDEAN | : : evolved to form
THE government was yesterday accused of breaking promises 1 ; 4 of economic
even to its own party members. PLP candidate i Teachers set i $4m of susperied discrimi na tion’
The charge came from FNM chairman Desmond Bannister, 1 i Pies Ca i
who argued that the Bahamian people couldn’t trust the PLP. selection process : to take strike i cocaine seize ESN
His remarks came in response to the Rev CB Moss’s claim that ¢ comi to an end’ } i in a container @ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
he would contest Bain and Grant’s Town as an independent if the ng 0 i k : : Tribune Staff Reporter
PLP did not keep its promise to nominate him as a candidate. THE process of the PLP's vote next wee m By DENISE MAYCOCK

Rev Moss made this statement yesterday during an interview with
Steve McKinney on the ZNS radio talk show, Immediate Response.

Mr Bannister, FNM candidate for Carmichael, said the probable
denial of a constituency nomination to Rev Moss “is another exam-
ple of the PLP breaking promises that they make.”

According to Mr Bannister, this treatment of one of the party’s
own, drew the PLP’s credibility into question.

He further suggested that a lack of trustworthiness is endemic to

the PLP in general.

The FNM chairman said he is very confident regarding the
chances of David Jordine — the FNM’s youngest candidate - to win
the seat, whether there is a head-to-head contest between him
and the PLP, or a three-way contest including the Rev Moss.

He said: “We have a dynamic young candidate who is off in
that constituency. He has been working extremely hard, he has iden-
tified with the young people and we believe that he is going to be

successful in the election.”

Mr Bannister also commented on the government’s delay in
announcing the final report of the Boundaries Commission, along

SEE page eight



candidate selection is “rapidly : m By KARIN HERIG

coming to an end,” party chair- ; Tribune Staff Reporter

man Raynard Rigby said yes- }

terday.

Mr Rigby could not give an : :
exact Se fe the ; strike vote next week which :

announcement of ratified can- :

didates, but said it would be
idates, but said 1t would be : to 800 teachers.

Secretary general of the } covery was made around

made soon.

“The process is coming to a }

rapid end, but there has been } Bahamas Teachers Union

no full ratification,” he said.

nominations are made.

SEE page eight

(BUT) Belinda Wilson said yes-

The announcement of caridi- ; terday that governmen! had

dates, when it comes, is expect- failed to meet with the. teach-
ed to cause upset in the party, as i about the trade dispute filed ;
several incumbent MPs are | ©atlier this week.
expected to be snubbed when } :

i had until Spm yesterday to con-

By law, she said, government

SEE page eight

Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT - Bahamian and

? US law enforcement authori-

: : ties on Grand Bahama seized
TEACHERS are taking a ; $4 million of suspected cocaine

i : ., ; in acontainer at Freeport Con-
p. may result in a country wide : tainer Port yesterday after-
industrial action involving UP } joon

According to reports, the dis-

i 2.30pm by officers of the Drug
: Enforcement Unit, US DEA
i agents, Bahamas Customs, and
} security personnel at the port.

A senior police officer said

i the illegal drugs - about 132

3

i kilograms of suspected cocaine

— were found in a container

? from Europe

Police are continuing investi-

i? gations.

“LEADING NEWSPAPER |

RACISM is still alive in the
Bahamas today but not in the
simple terms of “white against
black” — it has evolved to a
form of economic discrimina-

‘tion among those who have, and

those who have not, Blue Hills
MP Leslie Miller said yester-

day.
Mr Miller, Minister of Agri-
culture and Marine Resources,

was speaking on the Darold

Miller radio show and respond-
ing to criticism that his party,
the PLP, were playing “the race
card” in the lead-up to the gen-
eral election. me
Fred Mitchell, MP for, Fox

SEE page eight



MUA 7

ee ee

ae







THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007, PAGE 5



© In brief

Police issue
rape warning
after incident
on Collins
Avenue

POLICE have issued
a new rape warning
after a man jumped
into the back of a wom-
an’s car in Collins
Avenue and threatened
her.

The incident hap-
pened near the Wulff
Road junction at about
2.30pm last Sunday.
The car’s windows were
down and doors
unlocked at the time.

“If a driver behind
her had not seen the
situation and inter-
vened anything could
have happened,” a
source told The Tri-
bune.

“The police told the
victim that this was a
regular occurrence in
that area.”

Police have issued
several tips, particular-
ly for women, in an
effort to reduce the
incidents of sexual
assault and rape.

According to police
press liaison officer
Walter Evans, women

es should:

e Always be vigilant
of one’s surroundings.

e Dress appropriate-
ly so as not to expose
themselves to the crimi-
nal element.

e Avoid walking
alone in dim-lit areas at
night and travel ina
group.

e Avoid taking
shortcuts while travel-
ling in areas not
exposed or illuminated
at night.














Fertilizer, Fungicide,
AO TID
Tropical aE

5a At)

TV 13 SCHEDULE

SATURDAY
FEBRUARY 24TH

12:30 Bullwinke & Friends

1:00. Mat.:.“Kid With the 200 1.Q.”

3:00 Salute To Legends
Basketball Game

6:30 Sports Lifestyle

7:00 The Bahamas Tonight

7:30 Native Show

8:00 Tropical Beat

9:00 | Hugh Campbell Courtside
Express

9:15 Movie: “Scandalous Me:
The Jacqueline Susan
Story”

11:00 The Bahamas Tonight

11:30 Hustle

12:30 Comm. Pg. 1540AM






















SUNDAY
FEBRUARY 25TH |

6:30am Community Pg. 1540AM

8:30 — Let's Talk Church

9:00 E.M.P:A.C.T.

9:30 The Voice That Makes

; The Difference

Effective Living

This Is The Life

BTC Thanksgiving Service

Faith United Missionary

Baptist Church

1:00 — Gillette World Sports

1:30 Calvary Deliverance

2:00 Ernest Angley Ministries

3:00 CeCe Winans

3:25 Mt. Tabor Full Gospel
Baptist Church - 20th
Anniversary Service

6:00 Temple Fellowship
Ministries International

6:30 The Bible Study Hour

7:00 The Bahamas Tonight

7:30 — St. John’s Jubilee Cathedral

8:00 Living Abundantly

9:00 Movie: “My Breast’

10:30 Turning Point

11:00 Bahamas Tonight

11:30 New Dimension

12:m/n Community Pg. 1540AM



10:00
10:30
11:00

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
right to make last minute
programme changes!

FOR 3 IN { LAWN SERVICE |

Couple claim they are being

‘blocked’ by Bahamian courts,

take case to Privy Council

A COUPLE who have
been fighting for justice for
five years are taking their
case directly to the Privy
Council, claiming they are
being “blocked” by the
Bahamian courts. .

Greg and Tanya Cash say
they are forced to “seek jus-
tice in a foreign country”
because of repeated
attempts by court staff to
impede their progress.

“If we were not caught up
in it we would not have sus-
pected it,” Mrs Cash told
The Tribune yesterday:
“This is a corrupt little coun-
try.”

Mr and Mrs Cash now
have two actions underway

-as a result of their five-year
fight with the Baptist edu-.

cational establishment
sparked by the alleged unfair
dismissal of Mr Cash from
Jordan Prince William High
School in 2002.

One is due for trial in
May, but an action against
the president of the Court
of Appeal is being blocked
at every turn, they claimed
yesterday. ;

Mrs Cash said: “If we were
not involved in it, we would
not really know about it, but
we can’t allow this to go on.
The next generation will
have to face this kind of
thing unless we do some-
thing about it now.”

The couple’s outburst
came after the court registry
allegedly refused to accept



“If we were not involved in it,
we would not really know
about it, but we can’t allow this
to go on. The next generation
will have to face this kind of |
thing unless we do something

about it now.”

RS

documents relating to their
action against Dame Joan
Sawyer.

“A lady at the registry

actually told us ‘This is not
going anywhere’ when we
tried to file the documents,”
said Mrs Cash. _
- “When I asked. her to
explain, she said ‘No judge
will hear this matter’. Before
that, documents filed by our
attorney, Mr Maurice Glin-
ton, were ‘lost’ by the reg-
istry.

“But as soon as we went
in to file our new. papers,
they had ‘found’ them. They
told us they were not going
to give us a case number and
added that it was going
nowhere.”

Mrs Cash added: “We now
have to go to a foreign land
to get justice. We have to go
to the Privy Council because
the appeal court refused to

Tanya Cash

hear us.”

She and her husband are
to seek special leave to go
before the London judges
after claiming they had been
“blocked at every turn” in

their efforts to get justice in

their own country.

Mr Cash said: “It really
puts us in the position where
we see that the political and
religioius influence in our
country is terrible.”

Last summer, Mr Glinton
wrote to the Supreme Court

registry seeking a hearing of |

a constitutional action
brought by Mr and Mrs Cash
relating to their ongoing bat-
tle with the Baptists.

His letter referred to “the
sad history of our efforts to
progress the litigation along
to trial.”

It added: “Every request
for trial fixtures and all
attempts to move the hear-

ENM candidate claims PLP

ist

sovt politics discouraging

the youth from voting ©

THE politics of the PLP
government are discouraging
the youth from voting, accord-
ing to the FNM’s Pineridge
candidate Kwasi Thompson.

Mr Thompson, in a press
statement, said he wants to
remind Prime Minister Perry
Christie and his Cabinet that
the youth of this country are
watching.

“They are wise enough to
see through the personal
attacks. They will judge his
party on all the scandalous
behaviour and empty unful-

‘filled promises,” he said.

Mr Thompson said he has
reviewed reports of state-
ments made by Mr Christie
and his Cabinet ministers and
has come to the conclusion
that they are responsible for
youth not involving them-
selves in the political process
more.

“There are those young

people who believe that gov- .

ernment officials are only
interested in attacking one
another rather than providing
better service for the people.

This view discourages them .

from taking part in the politi-
cal process,” he said.

The FNM candidate said
that young Bahamians expect
a sitting government to cam-
paign on its record.

“They expect that if you are
the party of choice that you
will convince them that you
have done better for the coun-
try.

“Unfortunately, the prime

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from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.














@ PINERIDGE candidate
Kwasi Thompson

minister cannot say that his
government has a record that '
they can campaign on. There
is no comparison between the

, accomplishments of the FNM

and the failures of the PLP,”
he said. 4

Mr Thompson said it was
an insult to young people,
especially those of Grand
Bahama, “to watch this gov-
ernment launch personal
attacks while our youth are
forgotten.

“Our young people have
been doing what they were
told to do and have been
obtaining a good education



OPEN HOUSE
LUXURY OCEAN

and developing themselves.
However, in Grand Bahama
there are few job opportuni-
ties available,” he said.

Instead of personal attacks,
Mr Thompson said, the PLP
should state why they failed
to keep their promises about
roads and infrastructure for
the people in Pineridge,
specifically in Lucayan Ridge
and Hudson Estates.

“And while the cries of our
special children at the Beacon
School for a shelter workshop
go unheard, the PLP govern-
ment continues its smear cam-
paign.

“The Free National Move-
ment can be proud of its
record\and especially proud
of its record with young peo-
ple,” he said.

Mr Thompson said that, due
to the former FNM govern-
ment’s support of the educa-
tion system, the young people
of this country can access
more information than any

‘generation before them.

“They do not want, nor will
they allow, this election to
be about attacking personali-
ties. i

“They will recognise that
the FNM under Mr Ingra-
ham’s leadership is a party
that cares for them, that is
interested in them, a party that
gives them opportunities. Our
young people can see that this
country under an FNM gov-
ernment led by Mr Ingraham
did more for them than any
other government,” he said.

FRONT CONDOS

Private Marina

CO Meee ny AY ATI

The Porches @ Coral Harbor

Saturday & Sunday 10 am-4 pm

’ Free Food and Drinks

-For More Information Call: 424-8366
; ' By Appointment Only



ing of applications pending
in these cases appear to have
gone ignored regardless.”
Mr Glinton referred to
cases “which cry out for judi-

cial attention going back to-

the year 2000.”

The attorney said it was
the-duty of the registrar and
chief justice to ensure cases
were discharged impartially
and indiscriminately “with
strength and independence
of judgment.”

Mr Glinton added that no
litigant should have to com-
plain of “offical inattentive-
ness and obstruction of jus-
tice” by being denied access
to the court and not have a
complaint acted upon. He
said various complaints
about “administrative inat-
tention” had gone ignored.

“This, in our view, sadly

reflects not only possible
administrative incompetence
but also obstruction of the
administration of justice

' which, were it not.attribut- 4

able to them, would warrant
at the very least an investi-
gation by the office bearers
themselves.”

Ironically, Dame Joan her-
self referred to “lost” cases
in a speech a few weeks ago
and questioned the quality
of justice in the Bahamas.

Now Mr and Mrs Cash are
set to test that quality in the
ultimate appeal court. “This
country is in a terrible state,”
said Mrs Cash, “but we will
not give up.”

_ Eight illegal
_ immigrants
taken into
custody

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - Police
have taken eight illegal
immigrants into cus-

- tody after they were
‘discovered at a condo-
minium complex near

Xanadu Beach.

Chief Supt Basil
Rahming reported that
at 8.45pm on Tuesday
police received infor-
mation that led them to
St Tropez Condomini-
ums, where they dis-
covered eight male
immigrants hiding in a

‘second-storey apart-
ment. .

Mr Rahming said the
group consisted of sev-
en Jamaicans and one
American. They were:
Jamaicans Damien
Andrew Watson, 26, of
Kingston; Lenworth
Thomas, 39, of St
Catherine; Jeffrey
Morris Walters, 46, of
Kingston; Carlton
Anderson, 37, of
Kingston; Lincoln
Clive Dawkins, 36, of
St Catherine; Robert

: Paul Barrett, 29, of
: Kingston; and Paul

Nobell, 34, of Spanish

Town, and American

James Harris, 36, of

Pennsylvania.

The men were turned

over to Bahamas Immi-

gration.

ST. AUGUSTINE’S
COLLEGE

Is accepting applications for the
2007-2008 ACADEMIC YEAR

Three persons to teach Mathematics to all levels.

Experience

in preparing

students for external

examinations (BJC, BGCSE & SAT) is a requirement.

Two persons to teach English Language/Literature to
all grade levels. Experience in teaching candidates for
external examinations is necessary

OnepersontoteachSocialStudiesandHistoryfrom grades
eight to twelve. Expereince in preparing for external
examinations is a requirement

One person to teach General Science and Chemistry to
all grade levels. The applicant must have experience in
preparing students for external examinations.

SPANISH

One person to teach Spanish to grades seven through ten.

One person to teach French to grades all grade

levels. Experience in

preparing students _ for

external examinations (BGCSE) is a requirement.

One person to teach

Computer Keyboarding,

Basic Personal Computer Applications and Computer
Science to grades seven through twelve. The applicant
must be proficient in Microsoft Word, Excel, Access

and Powerpoint.

One person to teach Physical Education to all grade
levels. The applicant must be available to coach varsity

teams in the core sports.

All applicants must hold a degree from an accredited
University anda Teacher’s Certificate or must have some ~
teaching experience. Two letters of reference, copies of
all degrees and certificate, proof of teaching experience
and two passport size photos should be submitted. A
commitment to the values of Catholic, Benedictine:
education is expected of our teachers. Only those

persons

who have no difficulty with Roman

Catholic beliefs and teaching need apply. Please submit
applications and required documents to:

THE PRINCIPAL
ST. AUGUSTINE’S COLLEGE
P.O.BOX N-3940
NASSAU, BAHAMAS





Nish,

PAGE 10, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, cuur





MONDAY

@ HEALTH Nee,

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public of its
meeting times and places: New Providence Community
Centre: Mondays - 6pm to 7pm. The Kirk: Mondays -
7:30pm to 8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support group
meets the first Monday of each month at 6:30pm at New
Providence Community Centre, Blake Road. Dinner is
provided and free blood sugar, blood pressure and cho-
lesterol testing is available. For more info call 702.4646 or
327.2878 ;

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third Monday
of every month at 6pm @ Doctors Hospital conference
room.

CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial
Hilton Monday's at 7pm ¢ Club 612315 meets Monday
6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach ¢ Club
3596 meets at the British Colonial Hilton Mondays at
7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC)
meets every third Monday of the month in the Board
Room of the British Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.



TUESDAY

HB HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public of its
. meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta

Street: Tuesday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at 5:30pm on
the second Tuesday of each month at their Headquarters
at East Terrace, Centreville. Call 323.4482 for more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held 6:30pm
Tuesdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes location (off
Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval is required. Call
364.8423 to register for more info.

i CIVIC CLUBS

The Kiwanis Club of New Providence meets every Tues-
day at 7:30pm at the Holy Cross Community Centre;
Highbury Park.

The Luncheon Pilot Club of Nassau meets every third
Tuesday at SuperClubs Breezes, Cable Beach at 12:30pm.
We invite all community minded persons to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7:30pm @ C C
Sweeting Senior School's Dining Room, College Avenue
off Moss Road. * Club Cousteau 7343 meets Tuesdays at
7:30pm in the Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh Creek, Central
Andros ¢ Club 7178 meets each Tuesday at 6pm at the
Cancer Society of the Bahamas, 3rd: Terrace, Centre-
ville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Eta Psi Omega chapter
meets every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ the Eleuthera
Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach
Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second Tuesday,
6:30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office, 4th floor meeting
room * Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first
Tuesday, 6:30pm at the British Colonial Hilton. Please call
502.4842/377.4589 for more info. /

The Downtown Pilot.Club of Nassau meets every third
Tuesday of the month at 6pm at the J P Whitney Building,
First Terrace, Collins Avenue. ;

The Bahamian Forum will hold its next meeting Tuesday,
February 27 at 5:45pm at the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel. Distinguished attorney Brian Moree, senior part-
ner of McKinney, Bancroft and Hughes, and Chairman of
the Bahamas Financial Forum, will examine legal aspects
and implications raised by Anna Nicole’s celebrated res-
idency in the Bahamas in "The Anna Nicole Saga: Lessons
Learned and Challenges’ Raised for the Bahamas". Dr
David Allen will moderate the discussion which.is open to
the public.

WEDNESDAY



@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar every
Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free appetizers and numerous
drink specials.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public of its
meeting times and places: New Providence Community
Centre: Wednesday - 7pm to 8pm. The Nassau Group:
Rosetta Street, Wednesday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm.

FREE Health and Wellness Lectures are held the first
Wednesday of every month at 6:30pm at New Providence
Community Center Blake Road. For more information
call 327.1660 or 327.2878. FREE Blood Pressure, Blood
Sugar and Cholesterol Screening.







A RO U

IHE | HIBUNE

NDB NASSAU





“featuring

& rtctids

Special guest appearences by:

Simeon Outten

Efder Vanderson A. Barnett °

Pastor Arthur Duncombe &
Prophet Lawrence Rolle ° Chosen ..



Live Recording & Concert!

Sunday March 4", 2007

@ Living Waters Auditorium at 7pm



BUGKS

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas Support Group meets
every Wednesday from 5:30pm to 7pm at Cancer Head-
quarters, two doors south of ZNS. Cancer patients, sur-

- vivors, their family members and friends are invited to

attend. Phone 323.4482

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of SouthEast Nassau meets every
Wednesday from 1pm - 2pm at East Villa Restaurant,
East Bay Street. Always an interesting speaker and great
fellowship. If you would like to attend our meetings
please send an e-mail to bruno.pletscher@gottardo.com or
kathyvsmith@hotmail.com.

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta Sigma
Theta Sorority Incorporated meets 6:30pm every third
Wednesday at the Bahamas National Pride Building.

International Training in Communication, Essence Club
#3173 holds it’s bi-monthly meetings on the 1st and 3rd
Wednesday of each month at Doctor's Hospital Confer-
ence Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets the sec-
ond and fourth Wednesday of the month, 8pm @ St
Augustine's Monastery.

The Kiwanis Club of Cable Beach invites the public to its
regular weekly meeting held every Wednesday at 7:30pm
at the British Colonial Hilton. Kiwanis is a. worldwide
service organisation dedicated to changing the world One
Child, One Community at a time."

School and Community Nature Walk and Petting Zoo -
Free Every Wednesday from lOam to 2:30pm at Earth
Village Ranch, St Albans Drive and Columbus Avenue
(Chippingham). Call (242) 356.2274 now to make reser-

‘ vations. Open to all ages and groups Monday-Sunday
_ from 9am to 6pm. Inquire about additional activities and

programmes.

TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday on the 4th floor.of
the Ministry of Health, Meeting Street, at

- 6pm. ;

THURSDAY

@ ENTERTAINMENT

Shadowhand Entertainment presents an all Bahamian
Talent Explosion this and every Thursday night at the
Patio Bar & Grill on Carmichael Road. This event fea-
tures upcoming Bahamian artist who are ready to show-
case their original material to the world. There will also be
a freestyle competition every week which is open to the
public at large. Doors open at 8:30pm. Ladies free until
11pm - Gentlemen - small door charge. See u there.

@ HEALTH

Free public health lectures featuring distinguished physi-
cians are held at Doctors Hospital every third Thursday
of the month at 6pm in the Doctors Hospital Confer-
ence Room. Free screenings between Spm & 6pm. For
more information call 302.4603.

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public its





Ticket Locations:
nak . Bible BOORS&-Gift Shop

meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta
Street: Thursday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. The
Kirk! Thursdays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held 6:30pm
Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes location (off
Prince Charles. Dr). Doctor approval is required. Call
364.8423 to register for more info.

REACH - Resources & Education for Autism and Relat-
ed Challenges meets from 7pm - 9pm the second Thurs-
day of each month in the cafeteria of the BEC building,
Blue Hill Road.

Mm CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise has a breakfast meet-
ing every Thursday morning at 7am at the British Colonial
Hilton Hotel (Fellowship begins at 6:45am).

The Kiwanis Club of Over-the-Hill meets every Thursday
at 8pm at the Holy Cross Activity Centre, Soldier Road.
Guests are welcome.

Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first, second and
third Thursday at the Ministry of Health & Environment
building on Meeting Street commencing at 7:30pm. Every-
one is welcome to attend ¢ TM Club 1600 meets Thursday,
8:30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes.

International Association of Administrative Profession-
als, Bahamas Chapter meets the third Thursday of every
month @ SuperClubs Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.

The recently established National Insurance Board
Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets every fourth Thurs-
day in the month, in the National Insurance Board's
(NIB) training room, Wulf Road office complex, at 6pm.
All retirees are welcome. '

The Rotary Club of West Nassau holds its weekly meet-
ing, every Thursday at Choices Restaurant on the campus
of the College of the Bahamas. Fellowship starts at
12:30pm, with the-meeting held from 1pm to 2pm.





FRIDAY

CONCERT

Chariots of Fire Album release concert: Come see and
hear the best in gospel music, with performances by Selec-
tor, Manifest, Counsellor, Mr Lynx, Christian Massive
and internationally acclaimed recording artist Landlord
and many more, February 23 @ 7:30pm at Workers
House, Tonique Williams Darling Highway. Box Offices
@ the Juke Box, Oasis Music Centre, and Faith Life
Book Store. Fore More information call 544.8078 or
455.3067

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public of its
meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta
Street: Friday 6pm to 7pm & 8:30pm to 9:30pm. Sacred
Heart Church: Friday 6pm to 7pm. New Providence Com-
munity Centre: Friday 7pm to 8pm.

@ CIVIC CLUBS
TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas Baptist
Community College Rm A19, Jean St.





SSHHLHWGHNGWWOGHNHHNN HNN HAAN AA

PHOTOS WELCOME




Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Friday of
each month, 7:30pm at the Emmaus Centre at St

‘ Augustine’s Monastery. For more info call 325.1947 after

4pm.

AMISTAD is a club which promotes the Spanish lan-
guage and culture in the community. Residents of the
Bahamas who speak Spanish or are learning Spanish are
invited to attend meetings on the third Friday of the
month during the academic year at 7pm in room 13 of
COB's Tourism Training Centre.

SATURDAY



@ EVENTS

The Pinewood Gardens Outreach Association is having its
1st annual Pinewood Fest, March 3 @ 7am - midnight at
Pinewood Gardens Park. Included in the days activities
are a breakfast and a Fun\Run and Walk @ 7am. Come
out and bring the entire family... Join the domino teams
and basketball tournaments, and many other games.
Bring your kids to the toddlers town and let them expe-
rience bouncing castles and carnival rides, games, face
painting, complimentary lunch from 1-2 pm. There will be
performances by Ancient Man, Lassie Doh Boys, and
internationally acclaimed recording artist Landlord and
many more. Come and see the Junkanoo Rush Out by the

Pinewood Gardens Crusaders Junkanoo Group. For more

information call 392.1618 or 565-8870

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public of its
meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta
Street: Saturday mornings - 1Oam to 11am.

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third Satur-
day, 2:30pm (except August and December) @ the Nurs-
ing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street. ~

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes are offered
every third Saturday of the month from 9am-1pm. Contact
a Doctors Hospital Community Training Representative
at 302.4732 for miore information and learn to.save a life
today. P79» .

The Eugene Dupuch Law School Students’ Association
presents - Race Judicata - A Fun Run/Power Walk, Sat-
urday, March 3 at 6:30am. The race commences at the
Culinary and Hospitality Institute, College of the
Bahamas, Thompson Boulevard. There will be trophies
and medals, prizes and surprises. For route, details and
tules, please see forms available at: the Eugene Dupuch
Law School Library, the Eugene Dupuch Law School
Administrative Office, the Law xibrary, UWI, College of
the Bahamas campus. Or call: 326.8507/8, 326.8867 or
Fax: 326.8504 or go to www.edls.edu.bs. It’s fun, it’s
healthy — See you there!!!

Mm CIVIC CLUBS
JAR CYCLING: The Owners of JAR Cycling arc pleased
to offer a cycling clinic for juniors between 10 and 17. The
free clinic will be held every Saturday in an effort to
encourage kids to cycle. Parents interested in registering
their children should contact organisers at
jarcycling@gmail.com. 2

Toastmasters Club 7178 10th Anniversary Banquet: Sat-
urday, March 17 at the British Colonial Hilton at 7pm. The
Club will honor it’s 10 past presidents in grand style. For
tickets e-mail: prezsj@tc7178.org. A special invitation is
extended to persons who were a part of or visited the club
during its earlier years. Come out to see old friends and
toastmasters. The public is invited and guests are always
welcomed.

BC SUNDAY \\\S
@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

Traveller's Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street, features spe-
cial entertainment - Gernie, Tabitha and the Caribbean
Express - very Sunday from 6:30pm to 9:30pm.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public of its
meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta
Street: Sunday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

@ RELIGIOUS SERVICES

The Bahamas Metaphysical Society Inc - A spiritual
teaching society leading you to greater peace of mind,
health, prosperity and happiness - holds Higher Con-
sciousness Services every Sunday at 10am and weekly
Meditation services every Wednesday at 7pm at Bowe’s
Cove off Bernard Road. Interested persons are welcome
to attend. For more information contact by e-mail @ bah-
metsol@hotmail.com or call 393.0279.

Send all your civic and social events (attach pictures if |
possible) to The Tribune via fax: 328.2398 or e-mail:
ybdeleveaux@tribunemedia.net - Out there in the subject
line.



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4

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;

PAGE 12, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007 | THE TRIBUNE









1. Sen Dr Bernard Not-
tage, Minister of Health,
National Insurance and
Public Information and
PLP candidate for the Bain
and Grants Town con-
stituency, and his wife, Mrs
Portia Nottage, co-chair-
person of the Lady Sas-
soon Golden Heart Award
43rd Annual Ball on Satur-
day, February 17, in the |
Crown Ballroom, Atlantis
Resort,-Paradise Island.

“2. Mr Marvin Bethel,
managing director of JS
Johnson Insurance Compa-
ny, is flanked by his wife,
Zelia, and daughter, Erin.

3. Li Yuan Ming, Ambas-
sador of the People’s
Republic of China; Mrs
Loretta Thomas; Madam
Li Yuan Ming, wearing a
“Qipao”, a Chinese tradi-
tional cloth for ladies; and
Dr Carlos O Thomas, pae-
diatrician and neonatolo-
gist. ;

--4, Chartered accountant
Paul Andy Gomez of
Grant Thornton, flanked
by his wife, Cheryl (left)
and Dr Madeline Sawyer.

~'5, Mrs Theresa Burrow,
deputy chairman of the

- Bahamas Telecommunica-

tions Company (BTC) and
Mr Leon Williams, presi-
dent and chief executive
officer of BTC.

«6. Mr J Barrie Farring-
ton, senior vice-president
of administration of Kerzn-
er International, flanked
by his wife, artist Susan
Farrington (left) and Mrs
Sarah Markantonis, wife of
John Markantonis, presi-
dent and managing direc-
tor of Kerzner (Bahamas)
International Limited.

7.The Rt Rev Laish |
Boyd, co-adjutor Bishop of
the Anglican Diocese of
The Bahamas, including
the Turks and Caicos
Islands and his banker
wife, Joann.

8, Prime Minister Perry
Christie with his wife
Bernadette.

>.9. Mr Basil Dean, senior
vice-president of security
at Kerzner International
and a former Assistant
Commissioner of Police,
and his wife, Mrs Norma
Edgecombe-Dean, a
teacher at Sandilands Pri-
mary School.

‘ 10. Entrepreneur and

former banker Ella Davis,
owner of B-Ella Design, a
jewellery company, and

wife of Dr Anthony Davis. -

_°11. Mr Henry Saunders,
owner of Saunders Truck-
ing and More 94 FM Radio
Station, and his wife
Shirley.

+ 12. Mrs Linda Gibson,
president of Atlantic Med-
ical Insurance Company,

~ and husband Joe Gibson of

Tarm Corporation, a con-
sultancy firm, located in
Cable Beach.

ae





















































































photos by Franklyn G Ferguson

lt

he Annual Heart Ball

AS
Ss
be

4

For further information on THE SCENE Pictures please contact

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‘eniempaiatimphacss



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WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU = Today: ENE at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 6-7 Miles 77° F
ESE at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 6-7 Miles
E at 10-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 6-7 Miles sb 10°F

MODERATE | HIGH














: sees SE at 10-20 Knots 6-7 Miles
, 16/-8°S ABACO ‘Today: ENE at 8-16 Knots 3-6 Feet 6-7 Miles 76°F
Mostly sunny and Breezy early; mainly Partly sunny. - Rather cloudy. ° Variable clouds, Chance of a shower The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Sunda SE at 10-20 Knots 3-5 Feet - 6-7 Miles
breezy. clear. showers around. in the morning. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
High: 80° High: 82° _ High: 79° High: 79°
4 : Low: 69° Low: 69° Low: 69° Low: 70°










AccuWeather RealFeel. PY rma

UT EE uaa dat PH tage lig EVAH Wr marl aa VATA EE TY ate ad










79°F 84°-72° F 86°-74° F 86°-70° F 82°-66° F
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 12:55am. 2. 7 7:23 a.m. 0. 2
g elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 1:20p.m. 2.1 7:20p.m. 0.0 35 i 1 Zn
Sunday 209am. 26 8:34am. 0.3 “S211 pei




2:30 p.m. 2.0 8:28p.m. 0.1
Monday . 3:18am. 26 9:42am. 0.3

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Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. vesoriay



















ABACO Temperature —ts—“‘“(‘(C(S:S:*C*C*C*CSS 3:40p.m. 2.0 9:37p.m. 0.1
High: 76° F/24°C the 3 3 . eee Tuesday 4:29am. 26 10:43am. 0.2
Low:62°F/17°C Normal high ese 78° F/25° C ASS Dare lan 139 Peat 04 >
E LZ Normal |OW .......c.ccssccessessesersessessseeseese 04° F/18° C
__ WEST PALM BEACH | nt 7 SUN AND WVIOON
_ __High:78°F/26°C Last year’s OW o.....sesssesccseccseesseesssesee OO” F/18° C
Low:60°F/A6°C — Precipitation - Sunrise......6:38 a.m. Moonrise. ... 11:30 a.m.
60° FA Precipitation 0
g As Of 1 p.m. yesterday ....sesssssssssscscssseee. 0.00" Sunset...... . 6:09 p.m. res oe 12:52 a.m.
Year to: Wate cssccicicecisccrsesescosssoodesscssssociveasessies Eel 2 Full
High: 76° F/24°C Normal year to date .......eessessesssessessesseseee Gol p ;
Low: 59° F/15°C B
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f. ; RA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007 Mar. Mar. 18
c — 3 High: Fronts
FA8°C Zz NASSAU s bd tell Shown are noon positions of weather systems and Cold-w=w—w F
_ Hligh:77°F/26°C” - Low: 65° F/18°C

precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm MenMtls
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary 2



least.

AUTO INSURANCE —



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Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

« SANSALVADOR = =—————C—sis 2. TREATED
r High: 79° F/26° C * aoubeke :
Low: 66° F/19°C



High: 80° F/27°C.






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MAYAGUANA
High: 83° F/28° C

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Today Sunday s Today Sunday LE
High Low W High Low Ww High Low W High Low WwW

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$381 69/20 |





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: RAGGED ISLAND
High: 82° F/28° C
Low: 64°F/18°C



13-40 6/- as pe 54/12



Jacksonvi le Ss



72/22

las Vegas



60/15



GREAT INAGUA
High: 82° F/28° C

Low: 70° F/21°G RS NCE BROKERS & AGENTS.

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B JUNIOR All-Star
Coaches Sharelle Cash and
Anastacia Moultrie.

Programme
seeks female
players for
the future

m BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
. Senior Sports
Reporter



EVERY Saturday
morning inside the DW
Davis Gymnasium, coach-
es Sharelle Cash and
Anastacia Moultrie can be
seen grooming some of the
future female.basketball .
players. - :

They're responsible for
the Junior Programme,
‘which is preparing a team
to represent the Bahamas
at an international tourna-
‘ment this summer.

The Bahamas Basket-
ball Federation is expected
to send a team off to com-
pete in the Dominican
Republic either in July or
August. The dates and
venue have not yet been

confirmed.
According to Cash, who

coaches the Temple Chris-
tian Suns in the BAISS
and the Junior All-Stars in
the NPWBA, the practices
are paying off as they're
seeing more and more
girls starting to come out,
not just for the national
team, but in a bid to help
with their own personal
development.

"It's a good thing that
the junior national team is
supposed to travel because
we want to see the num-
bers increase so that we
can really select the best
team," Cash stressed.

While she and Moultrie
are directly responsible for
the practices, Jeannie
Minus has been coming
out and assisting as well.
They are also hoping for
national team coach Felix
'Fly' Musgrove to attend.

From the practice ses- .
sions, Cash said they are
hoping to select three dif-
ferent teams, comprising
of the 21-and-under, 19-
and-under and 17-and-
under.

"There's always room
for improvement and
room for more players to
come out," Cash insisted.

- Moultrie, a physical edu-
cation teacher and coach
at St. Augustine's College,
said that while they are
looking at developing their
skills, they are also trying
to find ways of helping the
players to attain athletic
scholarships to play col-
lege basketball in the
United States.

"We want them to go off
ro school, get that educa-
tion and further them-
selves," she insisted.

The Saturday pro-
gramme runs from 10 a.m.
til noon.

»school









PAGE 2B, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007





@ FISHING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

WHILE Crooked Island is
basking in the success of
Elton ‘Bonefish Shaky’
McKinney on the national
level, another islander is
preparing to bring some
more international acclaim
to the island.

Robert 'Robbie' Gibson,
who has been doing deep sea
fishing and dive charters on
Crooked Island for the past
20 years, will be traveling to
the Keys in Florida next
week to compete with Carter
Andrews at the Mad Fin, a
popular catch and release
tournament.

Impressing

Andrews is the manager
of the Crooked Island Lodge
at Pittstown Point where
Gibson and McKinney,
along with the other fishing
guides, have been impress-
ing the visitors to the island.

Gibson, who has been fea-
tured on a number ef ESPN
shows, said he's excited
about going to the champi-
onship.

"We really want to bring
the big cheque back home

to Crooked Island," he stat-
ed. "Me and Carter have
done well in other tourna-
ments we've competed in, so
we really want to win this
one."

Andrews, who has been in
the Bahamas since 1996,
competed for Team USA in
the Flag Fish Championships

in Australia in 2002 and, last -

year, he competed for Team
USA. in the Off Shore
Championships in Portugal
where they got a bronze
medal.

Gibson, on the other hand,
is a native of Crooked
Island. ©

He has achieved a number
of successes and as you look
on the wall inside the
Crooked Island Lodge, you
can't help but notice it
because the pictures are
there to prove it.

"I started using the spin-
ning rod, but I just recently
started using the fly rod,"
Gibson stated. "I kind of
gradually move into it, but
I haven't had any regrets
yet."

At age 47, Gibson said
Andrews has played a piv-
otal role in his development
since he came to the island.

"We learn some things
together. He learned some
things from me and Tlearned



some things from him," he

charged.

"He knows a lot of people
all over the world, so I get to
know them too."

Having originally started
out as fishing partners, Gib-
son said he hopes that this
trip will help to propel their
relationship to an even high-
er level.

- Success

In the meantime, Gibson
said he's proud to know that
McKinney, another of his
compatriots, has attained the
success he did last year as
the Cacique Award winner.

"He has done well. He
deserves to win," Gibson
stressed. "But look out for
me and Carter. Watch us on
TV. We hope to be holding
up the big cheque and bring-
ing the title back to Crooked
Island.

"Then we will really have
to have a massive celebra-
tion in the streets."

@ ROBBIE Gibson and
Carter Andrews form a for-
midable team that will rep-

resent Crooked Island and
the Bahamas in another
international tournament
this year.

@ FISHING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

MEET Elton McKinney.

He's the Cacique Awards
2006 winner for Sports,
Leisure and Events. He won
the prestigious national award
over two other finalists -
Hezron Moxey of New Provi-
dence and Theophilus 'Tom-
my' Rolle of South Andros.

"Bonefish Shaky," as he's
affectionately called, is a
native of Landrail Point,
Crooked Island. Today, he
makes a living as a tour guide,
but his passion is in bonefish-
ing, a sport he's been doing
for consistently for the past 12
years.

"Tt was really exciting," said

‘McKinney, about his latest:
achievement. "I kind of had a’

feeling that I was going to win
it after I was nominated and
they told me that I must be
there."

Looking back at his success,
McKinney said it was the fact
that he was featured in a num-
ber of magazines, on ESPN
several times and the letters
he received from repeat cus-
tomers that really made him
stood out.

"Some years ago, I thought
it was the most foolish thing
I've ever seen, but after get-
ting involved, there's nothing
that I like more than bone-
fishing," he insisted.

"Being in it, I haven't
regretted it one day because
it's really paying off."

McKinney, who clinched a
second and third place finish
in the Bahamas National
Bonefish Championships in
Andros and Abaco respec-
tively, actually got started in
commercial fishing.

But after he was introduced
to the fly rods, he took his ini-
tial course and the rest was
history.

"I started spending 50-60
dollars a day getting the expe-
rience," he said. "I watched
the customers with what they

TRIBUNE SPORTS

are doing and I just picked up
onit.” .

Today, McKinney has been
considered the best in the
business in Crooked Island,
but he's hoping that winning
the award will give him the
nod as one of th best in the
Bahamas.

After enjoying himself at
the after party at the end of
the Cacique Awards ceremo-
ny, McKinney returned to
Crooked Island where he was
scheduled to be treated.to a
motorcade.

That has not yet mater-
alised, but McKinney, who
spots a sign on the front of his
pickup truck that reads: "Nice
and Easy," said he's just going
to wait for the accolades to
come. Ee

He's also looking for the
posters that were displayed in
Nassau to be plastered
through Crooked Island. But
if that doesn't happen, McK-
inney said he will continue to
do what he's been doing.

At age 42 with a wife and
four children, McKinney said
the journey has just begun.

Carter Andrews, the man-
ager of the Crooked Island
Lodge where McKinney is
employed as one of the seven
fishing guides, said there's no
doubt that McKinney ranks
right up there with the best.

He said he can speak from.
experience because they have
enjoyed some success togeth-
er on the international scene,
having competed in the Keys
off Florida several times. |

Andrews said McKinney's
performance speaks for itself.

"T think it's tremendous that
he's been able to promote
bonefishing in the Bahamas,
particularly in Crooked Island
and I think he will continue
to do so," he projected.

"The rest of the guides have
come along and they have all.
gained the skills, but Elton has
been there as a mentor to
them because he's been doing
it for so long and at such a
high level."

B CARTER ANDREWS of the Crooked Island Lodge congrat-
ulates Elton 'Bonefish Shaky' McKinney, the 2006 Cacique
Award winner for Sports, Lesiure and Eveats.





THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com _





From Miami Herald Wire Services

The way Ohio State coach
Thad Matta sees it, a fresh-
man-laden team is much-
improved by February.

Matta will be banking on
that Sunday when the Buck-
eyes take on Wisconsin in the
first No. 1 vs. No. 2 matchup
between Big Ten teams.

The Buckeyes, who have
four freshmen among their top
eight players, lost 72-69 on Jan.
9 in Madison, Wis. The first-
year players, including 7-foot
center Greg Oden and point
guard Mike Conley Jr., have
been quick studies since then.

“They’ve obviously gotten
more experience under their
belt. They’ve grown up a little
bit,” Matta said. “They have
played seven Big Ten road
games now. We've taken them

_to the No. 3 [Florida], No. 4
[North Carolina] and No. 5
[Wisconsin] teams in the
country on their home floors,
so J think it’s just a maturity
thing that guys have a better
understanding of what college
basketball is all about.”

The Buckeyes (25-3, 13-1)
hold a one-game edge in the
conference with two games
left, closing the regular season
at Michigan on March 3.
Should they beat Wisconsin,
the Buckeyes clinch their sec-
ond outright Big Ten crown in
a row. The Badgers (26-3, 12-2)
are coming off a loss at Michi-
gan State on Tuesday night,
and they would like nothing

—?

BASKETBALL







COLLEGE BROKETPALS

Buckeyes, Badgers brace for showdown



JONATHAN DANIEL/GETTY IMAGES

BATTLING FOR THE BIG TEN TITLE: Alando Tucker, left, and
Wisconsin play Greg Oden and Ohio State on Sunday.

better than to disappoint an
expected overflow crowd in
Columbus, Ohio.

ecaeee State got the

best of us in the last 3, 4 min-
utes,”
Ryan said. “We needed to do
some things that we didn’t

PRO BASKETBALL

Wisconsin coach Bo .

Suns tame th

From Miami Herald Wire Services

MINNEAPOLIS — Shawn Marion scored
27 points, Leandro Barbosa added 24,.and
Amare Stoudemire had 23, leading the Phoe-
nix Suns-to a 116-104 victory over:the’ Mage
sota Timberwolves on Friday-night.: yi

Steve Nash added nine points andl 15
assists in his third game back after missing
four starts with an injured right shoulder.

Kevin Garnett, who had a season-high 44
points the last time the teams met, led Min-
nesota with 28 points and tied a season-high
with 19 rebounds. -

Randy Foye had 14 points and Ricky Davis
12 for the Timberwolves, who have lost three
consecutive games.

KNICKS 95, BUCKS 93.

NEW YORK — Channing Frye made two

free throws after a video review put 0.8 sec-
onds back on the clock, winning a nail-biter
for the Knicks.
’ The Knicks overcame 23 turnovers and a
quiet night from Eddy Curry, their leading
scorer, by capitalizing on a second chance
after they séemed headed for overtime.

Stephon Marbury and Jamal Crawford
each scored 22 points for the Knicks, and
Curry had 10 points and 11 rebounds.

Mo Williams had 28 points and 10 assists
in another good game against the Knicks, and
Andrew Bogut finished with 19 points.

NETS 109, KINGS 96

EAST RUTHERFORD, NJ: — Jason Kidd
got his 84th career triple-double, and the
Nets ended a three-game losing streak.

Kidd had 22 points, 13 rebounds and 10
assists despite playing with a cracked rib that
the Nets revealed on Thursday. It was Kidd’s
ninth triple-double of the season, tying his
personal high, and his sixth against the Kings.

' Vince Carter led the Nets with 26 points.
He also had 11 rebounds.

Both Kidd and Carter were the subjects of
trade rumors, but they did not pan out at
Thursday’s deadline.

PISTONS 94, MAGIC 89

ORLANDO, Fla. — Chauncey Billups
scored 28 points for the Pistons, and Richard
Hamilton added 22 of his own.

It was the second time in three nights that
the Pistons beat the Magic, after a 110-88 vic-
tory on Wednesday. This time Orlando had a
chance, but the Magic didn’t score a field
goal for the first 10:30 of the final period,
squandering a 71-67 lead.

Dwight Howard had 20 points and 13
rebounds for the Magic. Hedo Turkoglu
scored 20 points, and Hill had 15.

Rasheed Wallace had 14 points and 10
rebounds for Detroit.

BOBCATS 102, 76ERS 87

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Adam Morrison,
Matt Carroll and Gerald Wallace each scored
19 points, and the Bobcats, minus their ill
coach, tied a team record with their fourth
victory in a row.

The third-year Bobcats, ahs won four
consecutive games to end last season, were
never threatened by the 76ers despite coach
Bernie Bickerstaff leaving the bench late in
the first quarter with flu-like symptoms.

Emeka Okafor added 16 points and pulled

accomplish, but that’s going to
happen sometimes. So you’ve
just got to get ready for the
next one.”

Ohio State hasn’t been
dominating teams yet has
rolled to 12 victories in a row.
The Buckeyes have had two
close calls against Big Ten cel-
lar-dweller Penn State, and
they have won five other con-
ference games by less than
10 points each.

In the first meeting with the
Badgers, the Buckeyes had
matchup problems with

Alando Tucker. That has been |

a common theme for teams
trying to contain the favorite
for Big Ten Player of the Year.

Marcus Landry and Brian
Butch held their own inside
against Oden and Michael
Flowers, and Kammron Taylor
provided strong transition and
defensive play.

Ryan isn’t concerned about
how his team will respond to
the upset at Michigan State.
He is confident that the Bad-
gers will follow Tucker.

“Alando Tucker really
leads for us,” Ryan. said.
“There’s leading by example,
and then there’s Alando
Tucker.

“He’s in another realm.”

FRIDAY’S GAMES

e Dartmouth 53, Prince-
ton 43: John Ball and Leon
Pattman scored 14 points
apiece as host Dartmouth
(9-15, 4-7 Ivy League) com-

e Wolves

__ INTERNATIONAL EDITION



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007 | 4B.



pleted its first two-game sea-

son sweep of Princeton (11-13,

2-8) since the 1945-46 season.

e Penn 83, Harvard 67:
Mark Zoller scored 21 points,
and Ibrahim Jaaber added 19
points, leading the Quakers
(18-8, 9-1 Ivy League) over the
host Crimson (10-15, 3-8).

ELSEWHERE

e Illinois: Sophomore
guard Jamar Smith pleaded
not guilty Friday to drunken

driving and leaving the scene’

of an accident.

Smith, 19, faces a maximum
of 12 years in prison and a
$25,000 fine if convicted of the
felony charges. His pretrial
hearing is April 5.

Smith was driving in snowy
conditions on Feb. 12 when the
car struck a tree. Authorities
say Smith and his passenger,
teammate Brian Carlwell, had
been drinking tequila and beer
before the crash. Smith, too
young to drink legally, had a
blood-alcohol level after the
crash that was more than
twice the legal limit, prosecu-
tors say.

Smith said he thought that
Carlwell, also 19, had been
killed in the crash. Authorities
contend that Smith left the
scene and drove the damaged
car back to his apartment.
Bystanders saw Carlwell
unconscious inside the car and
called police. Carlwell was
hospitalized for several days
yath a severe concussion.

Smith has agreed to sit out
the rest of the season.

LATE THURSDAY

e No. 4 UCLA 885, Cali-
fornia 75: Josh Shipp scored
22 points, and Lorenzo Mata
added 14, leading a second-half
comeback that extended the
Bruins’ home winning streak

_to 19 games.

UCLA (24-3, 13-2 Pac-10)
completed a season sweep of
the Golden Bears (14-13, 6-9),
who had won their two previ-
ous games at Pauley Pavilion.

Freshman Ryan Anderson
led the Bears with 21 points,
and Omar Wilkes was among
three players with 10 each.

e No. 23 Oregon 64, No.
9 Washington State 59:
Freshman Tajuan Porter
scored 21 points, and Aaron
Brooks made a layup with
12.9 seconds left to seal Ore-

‘ gon’s home victory.

The Ducks (21-7, 9-7
Pac-10) had lost three games in
a row and six of eight. The vic-
tory marked the third time
Oregon has defeated a top-10
team this season.

Washington State (22-5,
11-4) had won five in a row
since a 77-74 overtime loss to
Oregon in Pullman, Wash.

e No. 11 Nevada 84,
Idaho 68: Nick Fazekas
scored 21 points and grabbed _
14 rebounds to help the Wolf
Pack (25-2, 12-1 Western Ath-
letic Conference) beat the host
Vandals (3-24, 1-13).



HEY LPL Les)

Washington 31 22
Orlando 27 29
Miami 26 28
Atlanta 22 33

Charlotte 22 33
ATLANTIC we
Toronto 30 25

New Jersey 26 30
New York 25 31
Philadelphia 18 37
Boston AB 40.
CENTRAL WL
Detroit ‘35 19
Cleveland 32 23
Chicago 32 25
Indiana 29 25

Milwaukee 19 37

’ SOUTHWEST WL

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf

585 -

5-5 L-1 21-7 10-15 20-11

482 5Â¥2
481 5%
400 10
400 .10

Pct. GB

545 -
464 4%
446 56
327 12
.245. 16
Pct. GB
648 -
582 3%
561 4%
537 6
339 17

down 16 rebounds for the Bobcats.

Kyle Korver scored 10 of his 21 points in
the fourth quarter for the Sixers, and Andre
Miller added 15 points.

RAPTORS 110, PACERS 88

TORONTO — Chris Bosh had 23 points
and 12 rebounds, leading the Raptors.

Jorge Garbajosa added 16 points for the
Raptors, who have won nine of their last 10 at
home. Toronto rebounded from a disap-
pointing loss to Cleveland on Wednesday.

Jamaal Tinsley had 19 points for the Pac-
ers, who fell a half-game behind the Raptors
in the East. Darrell Armstrong made a 59-
foot-heave at the buzzer at halftime for the
Pacers’ only highlight.

' HORNETS 98, SUPERSONICS 97

NEW ORLEANS — David West had
23 points and 11 rebounds, and the Hornets
moved into the eighth playoff spot in the
Western Conference.

Tyson Chandler added 15 points and
19 rebounds for New Orleans (27-29), which
moved ahead of the idle Golden State War-
riors (26-29) by a half-game for the last play-
off spot in the West.

Allen finished with 32 points for the
SuperSonics, whose recent winning streak



TOM OLMSCHEID/AP

THE PLAYMAKER: Suns point guard Steve Nash blows past Timberwolves forward
Kevin Garnett. Nash had 15 assists to lead Phoenix to a 116-104 victory on Friday.

ended at three games. Rashard Lewis had 18
points and 12 rebounds for the Sonics, and
Earl Watson scored 18 points.

HAWKS 105, ROCKETS 99

ATLANTA — Joe Johnson scored 31
points, and Atlanta overcame a 37-point
effort by Tracy McGrady to beat Houston.

Josh Smith and Marvin Williams each had

20 points for the Hawks, who hit seven free .

throws over the final 75 seconds of the game
to seal the victory.

The Hawks had suffered four home losses
in a row before continuing their history of
home success against the Rockets. Houston
has lost 20 of its past 27 games in Atlanta,
including three in a row.

LATE THURSDAY

e Mavericks 112, Heat 100: Dirk Now-
itzki had 31 points and 11 rebounds and the

- host Mavs took advantage of Dwyane

Wade's absence and won their 10th in a row.
Miami was playing in Dallas for the first
time since winning the NBA title in Game 6
of the NBA Finals last June. Wade, who aver-
aged nearly 35 points per game in that series
and was the Finals MVP, is considering sea-
son-ending surgery after dislocating his left
shoulder Wednesday in a loss in Houston.



Mem. at Port., late
Utah at Den., late

"Bos. at Lakers, late

18-11 9-18 15-20
15-10 11-18 13-15
10-16 12-17 12-21
13-15 9-18 14-20

3-7 3
7-3) -L-2
5-5 W-1
5-5 W-4

15-14 11-16 19-14

4-6 L-1 10-15 8-22 13-19
19° L-2 5-21 8-19 9-24
L10° Str. Home Away Conf
9-1° W-3 ‘ 18-10"
6-4 Ll 20-8 12-15. 19-15
55 W-3 22-7 10-18 23-10
6-4 L-L 18-10 11-15 20-14
1-9 L-7 11-12 8-25 9-24

WESTERN CONFERENCE —

Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf:

Dallas 45. 9. 833 - (10-0 W-lC _ 25-3 20-6 30-6
San Antonio 37 18 673 8% 6-4 W-4 17-8 20-10 22-11
Houston 34 20 .630 11. 6-4 L-1 20-7 14-13 19-17
New Orleans 27 29 .482 19 7-3 W-2 18-11 9-18 16-19
Memphis 14 42.250 32 2-8 L-3 11-17 3-25 8-27
NORTHWEST W. L_ Pct. GB L110 Str. Home Away Con Conf
Utah 35 18 660 - 7-3 L-l 21-6 14-12 20-11
Denver 26 26 «500 8% 4-6 L-2 14-14 12-12 11-18
Minnesota 25 30 .455 11 3-7 L-3 16-11 9-19 15-20
Portland 24 32 .42912% 5-5 W-2 13-14 11-18 15-17
Seattle 21. 33) «.389:14% 46 L-1 15-13 6-20 10-21
PACIFIC W L_ Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Phoenix 42.13 .764 - 6-4 W-3 21-6 21-7. 21-10
LA. Lakers 30 25 545 12 3-7 L-6 19-9 11-16 17-11
Golden State 26 29 .473 16 5-5 W-2 20-9 6-20 14-17
LA. Clippers 25 29 .46316% 3-7 L-4 17-10 8-19 14-18
Sacramento 23 31 = .426:18% 5-5 L-2 16-12 7-19 12-21
RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Friday’s results Tonight’s games Thursday’s results .
Det. 94, Orl. 89 GS. at Clippers, 3:30 Dal. 112, Miami 100

~ Tor. 110, Ind. 88 Tor. at Cha., 7 Chi. 84, Cle. 78
Cha. 102, Phi. 87 Sea. at S.A., 8 Was. 109, Sac. 106
Atl. 105, Hou. 99 Phi. at Mil., 8:30
N.Y. 95, Mil. 93 Bos. at Utah, 9
NJ. 109, Sac. 96 Den. at Dal., 9
Chi. 105, Was. 90 ;
Pho. 116, Min. 104
N.O. 98, Sea. 97

NBA LEADERS

Through Thursday

SCORING
G FG FT PTSAVG

REBOUNDING
G OFF DEF TOT AVG

Anthony, Den. 37 419 263 1121 30.3 Garnett, Minn. 53 138 528 666 12.6
Arenas, Wash. 52 481 413 1523 29.3. Chandler, NOk. 53 220 433 653 12.3
Wade, Mia. 46 445 413 1324 288 Howard, Ori. 55 182 479 661 12.0
Bryant, LAL 51 483 413 1465 28.7 Boozer, Utah 45 142 389 531 11.8
Iverson, Den. 36 341 2981013 281 Okafor, Char. 54 221 408 629 11.6
Redd, Mil. 35 322 252 969 27.7 Jefferson, Bos. 46 160 340 500 10.9
Allen, Sea. + 43 404 225 1161 27.0 Lee, N.Y. 54 188 392 580 10.7
James, Clev. 53 508 321 1402 26.5 Duncan, S.A. 55 159 424 583 10.6
Nowitzki, Dall. 53 461 371 1344 25.4 Wallace, Chi. 53 211 345 556 10.5
Carter, N.J. 55 488 297 1379 25.1 — O'Neal, Ind. 47 114 373 487 10.4
FIELD GOALS ASSISTS
GGA PCT G___AST_AVG
Biedrins, G.S. 251 410 .612 Nash, Phoe. 48 567 11.8
Lee, N.Y. 234 383 611 Williams, Utah 52 478 9.2
Howard, Orl. 357 596 .599 ~— Kidd, NJ. 53 468 88
Stoudemire, Phoe. 391 659 .593 Paul, NOk. 38 329. 8.7
Curry, N.Y. 398 675 .590 Davis, G.S. 43 372) 87
Boozer, Utah 410 721 569 Miller, Phil. 52 423, 8.1
Bogut, Mil. 286 520 .550 Wade, Mia. 46 362. 7.9
Brand, LAC 423 775 546 ‘Ford, Tor. 47 366 (7.8
Okafor, Char. 335 618 .542 Billups, Det. 45 339 7.5
Patterson, Mil. 313 580 540 — Felton, Char. 51 3847.5

NBA AWARDS a

PLAYER OF THE MONTH

November
Eastern Conference: Dwight How-
ard, Orlando Magic
Western Conference: Yao Ming,
Houston Rockets

ROOKIE OF THE MONTH
November

Eastern Conference: Adam Morti- _

son, Charlotte Bobcats
Western Conference: Rudy Gay,
Memphis Grizzlies

December ‘December
Eastern Conference: Gilbert Arenas, Eastern Conference: Jorge Garba-
Washington Wizards josa, Toronto Raptors

Western Conference: Kobe Bryant,
Los Angeles Lakers

January
Eastern Conference: Chris Bosh, To-
ronto Raptors
Western Conference: Steve Nash,
Phoenix Suns

Western Conference: Randy Foye,
Minnesota Timberwolves

January
Eastern Conference: Andrea Barg-

nani, Toronto Raptors
Westem Comberence Brandon Roye,
Portland Trail Blazers

20-8 10-17 21-11:
-, 15-13 10-18. 15-19...

17-9° 25-10°



THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com

repairer entrar

PRO FOOTBAL

INTERNATIONAL EDITION _ SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007 | 5B



Dolphins going after McIntosh |

BY JEFF DARLINGTON
jdarlington@MiamiHerald.com

INDIANAPOLIS — The
Dolphins appear ready to
begin addressing one of their

Most pressing offseason con-
cerns, as they have initiated
contact with left tackle Dam-
lon Mcintosh about a poten-
tial return next season.

‘With a thin group of tackles
in the free agent market — as
well as a mediocre draft class
at the position — the Dolphins
could instead look to maintain
cohesiveness by bringing back
the seven-year veteran to once
again compete with L.J. Shel-
ton for the starting job.

“We’ve been in contact
with [the Dolphins],” Brett

’ Tessler, MclIntosh’s agent,
said Friday at the scouting
combine. “I’m hoping things
will pick up in the next week,
and hopefully we’ll be able to
get something done. But if not,
we'll find out what’s available
in free agency.”

McIntosh, an unrestricted
free agent, returned to the
Dolphins after the team ini-
tially terminated his contract
last season. An increased sal-
ary cap paved the way for his

NFL NOTES

Tomlinson’s
family suffers
a double loss

~ From Miami Herald Wire Services

The father of NFL MVP
LaDainian Tomlinson was
killed Friday in Waco,
Texas, when the pickup in
which he was a passenger
blew a tire and then flipped
on a highway.

Oliver Tomlinson, 71,
was killed at about 1:30 p.m.
CST in the rollover acci-
dent, said Charlie Morgan,
a Texas Department of
Public Safety representa-
tive. Morgan also said
LaDainian Tomlinson, who
grew up in Waco, had been
notified.

The driver, Ronald C. ,
McClain, was believed to
be LaDainian’s brother. He
was rushed by ambulance
to Hillcrest Baptist Medical
Center, where he later died.

Witnesses said that a tire
on the 1969 Chevrolet truck
blew, causing the truck to
swerve right, briefly going
off the road. McClain
reportedly overcorrected,
causing the vehicle to then
swerve to the left and
careen off the road.

The vehicle then flipped,
landing on a gravel mound.

McClain and Oliver
Tomlinson were ejected
from the vehicle. Morgan
said they did not appear to
be wearing seat belts.

Jewel Tomlinson, Oli-
ver’s wife and LaDainian’s
stepmother, said her hus-
band and McClain had been
returning to Waco after a
trip to the family home in
Tomlinson Hill, Texas.

ELSEWHERE

e Giants: Tiki Barber
said last week that Tom
Coughlin helped push him
into retirement and a new
gig with NBC. On Friday,
Coughlin pushed back.

“[That] bothered me,”
Coughlin said. “... I think
to give the illusion that I
had something to do with
his retirement .— I don’t
quite follow it.”

e Browns: The team
won a coin flip with the
Buccaneers and will pick
third overall in April at the









NFL Draft.

The teams had 4-12
records last season, and
their opponents had the
same winning percentage,
making the coin toss neces-
sary.

e Raiders: The team
signed defensive tackle
Terdell Sands and line-
backer Robert Thomas.

Sands got a four-year,
$17 million contract that
includes a $4 million sign-
ing bonus. Thomas agreed
to a three-year, $6 million
deal with a $1.5 million sign-
ing bonus.



return, but he was only given a
one-year deal at the league

A return next season would
certainly garner a much larger
contract — and it would keep
alive the competition between
he and Shelton for the starting
job. Shelton shifted to right
guard last season, but the
move was made solely
because of injuries.

During the move, however,
McIntosh showed clear
improvement, having arguably
the best season of his career. It
was still believed the Dolphins
would attempt to upgrade the
position, a notion that is still
alive if a deal isn’t worked out.

UNEXPECTED VISITOR

While chatting in general
manager Randy Mueller’s
office during the week of the
Super Bowl, Mueller and Cam
Cameron received an unex-
pected — and enlightening —
visitor.

Indianapolis Colts general
manager Bill Polian visited as
his team prepared for the
Super Bowl at the Dolphins
facility. Polian, one of the
league’s most respected GMs,

THIS IS THE WAY IT IS: ‘I don’t think there’s
caller,’ Cam Cameron, the Dolphins’ ne

INSIDE THE GAME | DOLPH

MIAMI DOLPHINS | NOTEBOOK



MICHAEL CONROY/AP

LOSING POINTS: Notre Dame quarterback Brady Quinn
does not know why his stock is falling around the NFL.

ended up meeting with Cam-
eron and Mueller for “an hour
or two.”

“It was awesome, a great
resource,” Mueller said. “I’ve
been in the league 22 years
and still, the week of the Super
Bowl, to have what ended up
being the Super Bowl GM
come in and spend an hour or
two with Cam and I in my
office was a great resource.

“We asked a lot of ques-

S’ NEW HEAD COACH

tions, we picked Bill’s brain
and he was kind enough to
share a lot of insights with us. I
think that helped Cam and I
grow as a unit as well because
it’s a two-man job along with
all of our staff.”

RUNNING-BACK HELP?

Although Cameron had no
updates about the potential

return of running back Ricky —

Williams, he did say the team

IN

RR



would approach free agency
and the draft without compen-
sating for him. Reason being,
Cameron said the team would
make decisions based on who
is on the roster and Williams
has not been reinstated.
“When [players] are out
there practicing with us and
eligible to practice, then we're
going to focus on those guys,”
Cameron said. “I think that
serves our team the best.”

WAIT AND SEE

As quarterback Cleo
Lemon waits to see how the
Dolphins will tender him as a
restricted free agent next

_ week, quarterback Joey Har-

rington’s future with the team
also could be in question.
Then again, Cameron said,
that’s no different than any
other player.

“{Harrington’s] status is
just like anyone else,” Cam-
eron said. “It’s the same as
Cleo’s. Of course, Cleo’s a
restricted free agent so the
specific status is a ittle differ-
ent. We’ve talked on the
phone and his status is no dif-
ferent than anybody else’s.”

However, since the Dol-



MICHAEL CONROY/AP

any magic in naming an offensive coordinator if the guy is not the play
W.coach, said about any perceived need to hire an offensive coordinator.

Cameron is clear on offense

Mi Dolphins coach Cam
Cameron said he is
confident he can be the
head coach and the
offensive coordinator.

BY JEFF DARLINGTON
jdarlington@MiamiHerald.com
INDIANAPOLIS — The
answer comes quick. Not like
many of the other ones, those
touchy topics ranging from a
questionable quarterback to
the return of a running back.
Instead, when Dolphins
coach Cam Camerecn spoke
Friday about his ability to run
an offense — while also coach-
ing an entire team — all of his
previous hesitations, cautions

-or cliches immediately faded.

Does Cameron really think
he’s capable of serving as
Miami’s coach and offensive
coordinator at the same time,
something that isn’t done by
any other coach in the NFL?
You bet.

“I think without question,”
Cameron said Friday.

As some continue to won-
der when Cameron will finally
add an offensive coordinator,
he gave reason to believe the
person might already be on his
staff. And his name is Cam
Cameron.

“I don’t think there’s any
magic in naming an offensive
coordinator if the guy is not

people thi

the play ¢aller,” said Cameron,
who became known as one of
the league’s most innovative
offensive minds during his
time in San Diego. “I’m going
to call the plays with the help
of the offensive [staff], just
like I’ve always done.” -

That’s not to say Cameron
absolutely won’t hire an offen-
sive coordinator — he just
doesn’t feel any pressure to do
so. And considering the cur-
rent experience on his staff,
from Hudson Houck to Mike
Mularkey, it. wouldn’t be
entirely implausible.

Nonetheless, it would cer-
tainly be different. Currently,
10 head coaches in the NFL
call their own offensive plays,
but all 10 also have offensive
coordinators. Many of those
coordinators also serve as a
position coach, but that
wouldn’t be the case in Miami,
since Cameron has hired assis-
tants for each position.

Most recently, Cameron
hired Terry Shea as the quar-
terbacks coach, quelling
rumors the offensive coordi-
nator would also tutor the
quarterbacks.

“We wanted to hire a quar-
terbacks coach, and we’ve
done that,” Cameron said. “I
don’t want to get in a hurry of
hiring someone just because
nk you need to have

nl



a offensive coordinator title.”

Of course, there are still
options available. Broncos
running backs coach Bobby
Turner has interviewed for the
position, and Cameron has not
taken his name out of the hunt.

It also seemed possible the
Dolphins would make a hard
run at Clarence Shelmon, who
was promoted to the Chargers
offensive coordinator after
Cameron departed. But new
Chargers coach Norv Turner
retained Shelmon.

So for now, the actual
offensive coordinator
“vacancy” will remain unfilled
— unless Cameron decides
he’s cozy keeping the spot
warm himself. Should he
decide to run the offense him-
self, relying on assistants to
aid him, there are two poten-
tial downsides.

First, he could begin run-
ning himself too thin — but
other NFL coaches said that’s
not a huge concern with the
right staff around him.

“You're team might look at
you as being one-handed,”
said Chiefs coach Herm
Edwards, still noting that it has
worked for many coaches. “All
of a sudden, you stay on one
side of the ball because your
emphasis is on one side of the
ball. But players realize some-
times coaches do that.”

Cameron said it would still
be important to avoid such
dilemmas of alienating the
defensive side of the ball. Even
though Dom Capers is capable
of handling full defensive
responsibilities, Cameron said
he still plans to have some
focus on defense,

“I think the key is making
sure your defense is squared
away first because I’m still
accountable to the defense,”
Cameron said. “And in no way
am I just going to be over here
coaching the offense and then
not being involved in the
defense.”

Make no mistake, either:
Just because Cameron js
offense-minded, general man-
ager Randy Mueller said, Cam-
eron isn’t dumb about defense.

“He knows how to attack
[defenses], therefore he knows
how to go after defensive play-
ers weaknesses,” Mueller said.

But whether Cameron
decides to hire an offensive
coordinator or whether he
simply relies on his assistants
to collectively help out, it
remains clear which voice the
quarterback will hear when
the play comes in.

“It’s ultimately going to
come out of my mouth to the
quarterback,” Cameron said.
“But I'll get great input from
our entire staff.’



phins could save nearly
$2 million by waiving Harring-
ton, he remains one of several
veterans in jeopardy of being
released. Harrington and Cam-
eron have yet to meet in per-
son because Harrington is pre-
paring for his wedding.

A BIG PUZZLE

Long considered one of the ©

top picks in the NFL Draft,
Notre Dame quarterback
Brady Quinn remains a bit
puzzled why league chatter
has suggested his stock is slip-
ping. Could Quinn really fall
all the way to the Dolphins
with the No. 9 pick? He cer-
tainly doesn’t think so.

“It’s kind of hard for a guy
to slip when we haven’t done
anything,” Quinn said. “I
didn’t play a game for the past
couple of months. It’s funny to
kind of sit back and hear some
of that and you're thinking,
‘Did somebody see me in the
weight room miss a rep? I’m
kind of confused.’ ”

Quinn said he still believes
he’s the most experienced
quarterback in the draft, and
he is still hopeful he will be the
Raiders’ No. 1 overall pick.



DOLPHINS -
TICKETS

Team

prices

BY JEFF DARLINGTON
jdarlington@MiamiHerald.com
_.. Although the Miami Dol-
phins made efforts to main-
tain the same ticket prices
_-forone third of the stadi-
um’s seats, most fans will
endure another hit to their
wallets if they plan to
attend next season’s home
games, :
As a result of continued

cap, the team raised prices
to keep local revenues in
line with the NFL’s system,
team president Bryan
Wiedmeier said Friday.

Season tickets for lower-
level seats will run between
$77 and $98 per game.
Many upper-level seats also
will exceed the $70 mark.

However, the Dolphins
also created four tiers of
pricing in an effort to pro-
vide more options for fans
wishing to attend games.
Rather than seven price cat-
egories, the team will now
offer 11 options, the cheap-
est of which can be pur-
chased in the economy sec-
tion (highest section in the
end zone) for $39.

The increase in prices
might come as a surprise to
some, especially since the
Dolphins have not yet
improved the product of
football being played. How-
ever, Wiedmeier said, the
team decided years ago to
implement an objective sys-
tem that causes ticket
prices to follow the league’s
cap increases.

The team’s success or
failure does not affect deci-
sions in ticket pricing.

“That’s why we made
the decision a number of
years ago to mirror the
[NFL] system,” Wiedmeier
said. “And the system is, the
cap increases every year.
You basically have to grow
your local revenues to stay
competitive.

“The more you don’t, -

you fall further and further
behind.”

Wiedmeier said she
understands the hikes can
be frustrating, but he said
the team is making efforts
to make sure the public can
still afford certain tickets.

“What we want to do
organizationally is make
sure we can have a wide
variety so you don’t price
people out,” he said. «

The Dolphins’ prices still
fall in the bottom quartile
among other NFL teams,
Wiedmeier said.



raising —

hikes in the league’s salary ©



TRIBUNE SPORTS



PAGE 6B, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007



COMICS PAGE.




JUDGE PARKER

























UH-OH ; HERE COMES MOE,









YOU! REALLY YES, X'OIB THE =| THEY DIDN'T PLACE...
WORKED WITH RESEARCH,FOR | BUT THEY WERE

THE INDIAN THEIR DIET EXTREMELY HEALTHY!
OLYMPIC \ . REGIMEN!

WRESTLING : ee










OUR TEAM AT
STATE NEEDS HELP

WITH NUTRITIONL
YOU INTERESGTEDZ














I KNOW, BUT...| AND HE LOOKED
HE AGKED IF LSO...WISTFUL.

WHAT POSSESSED YOU
TO INVITE ERIC MILLS FoR
THANKSGIVING DINNER?!
WE PLANNED TO EAT OUTS!



WE WERE
HAVING
TURKEY. ««







“I WISH MARGARET WOULD STOP CALLIN’ To
TELL ME SHE'S NOT SPEAKIN’ To ME.”










Bi

Now You See It...



COFF, COEFF... )
EXCUSE ME... /

GREAT IDEA, PUTTING CAR HORNS
ON THESE SHOPPING CARTS

SS pa peur














MARVIN





PROTECTION PROGRAM






y ACROSS



1 3



Saw pies distributed on the 1st of



CRYPTIC PUZZLE



I'M BEGINNING To | I'VENOTICED SHE [ SUSPECT MOM ISIN | "NEVER LEAVES | DISGUISING
THE WITNESS THE HOUSE HER LOOKS



OOF ty ast Aanenten Dynationte, ime. Warkd rights reserved.

DOWN

1

She's not exactly lucid (5)










. Opening lead — queen of diamonds.


















Oo cam (th. (oH |PAHEAI IL



EAST . South goes up with the ace, leads
#1064 the heart nine to the ten and muffs
VA52. dummy’s last diamond with his last
5 09743 trump, the king. A spade is then led
3 &I72 ‘to the jack and the J-8 of trumps are
SOUTH cashed, drawing East’s last two
@#KQ95 trumps as declarer discards the Q-9
VÂ¥KQ94 of clubs! :

#8 At this point, South’s last three
AQ95 cards are all spades, and he simply
The bidding: cashes them to make the slam. The
South West North East potential club loser, more imaginary

l& Pass 1¢ Pass than real, turns out to be a mirage.
14 Pass 39 Pass The method of play utilized here
3¢ Pass . -44@ Pass; is called a dummy reversal. Instead
4NT Pass 59 Pass of trumping his losers in dummy,
6% which is what declarer usually does,

South must go down one in six
hearts, since the club finesse on
which the slam appears to depend is
destined to fail. But appearances can
sometimes be deceiving. With cor-
rect play, the contract can be made
wi



South dealer. with the ace and cashes the king, dis-
Both sides vulnerable: carding a club. He then mffs a dia-
NORTH mond with the queen of hearts and

@AJ3
Â¥3J1087
AK 62
$64

returns the heart four to dummy’s
seven, Let’s assume East takes the
ace (whether he wins or not doesn’t
matter) and returns a club.

he reverses the procedure and trumps
dummy’s losers in his hand. In effect,
dummy becomes declarer and
declarer becomes dummy.

In this deal specifically, South
plays the hand as though he is
declarer with the North cards at six
hearts and East’s opening lead is a
diamond. The fact that he is physi-
thout doing anything particularly — cally seated South rather than North

=o ae P ‘ should not deter him from adopting
Declarer wins the diamond lead ~ what is clearly the best line of play.

Vie) =a oe

HOW many words of four letters or more can make
from the letters shown here? In making a sori cach letter
a be used once only. Each must contain the centre letter
.and there must be at ieast one nine-letter word. No plurals
oc verb forms ending in “s", no words with initial capitals
and no words with a hyphen or apostrophe permitted.

The Arst word of a phrase is permitted (e.g. inkjet in inkjet
printer).

TODAY'S TARGET :
Good 38; very good 57: excellent 75 (or more). Solution Monday.

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION

erosion inert inner insert Inter intern intro iron °
TRONSTONE nitre nosier ores orient orison osier rein
rent resin resit rest rinse riot rise risen rite rites roost
root rose rosin rote senior senor serotonin sinner
sinter sire siren snootier snore snort sooner sootier
sore sort sortie stern stir stonier store tenor tern tier
lire toner tore torn torsion torso trio

At first glance, it might seem that
































SATURDAY,
FEBRUARY 24
ARIES — Mar 21/Apr-20

. and you’ ll experience a new Vitality.
TAURUS — Apr 21/May 21

heels, know what you’re getting into.
GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21

way it should be, you may decide.
CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22

Don’t take this out on loved ones.
LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23

certain friends rather boring.

VIRGO - Aug
You may not be happy with your cur-
tion, you'll find that you really don’t
have it so bad after all.

LIBRA - Sept 23(Oct 23

This should be a calm, easy week
with no shocks or surprises to upset
things. Try to keep a fair balance
between work and play.

SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22
You will find yourself being pulled
in many different directions at work.
You're persistence is admirable, but
you must delegate some of your
responsibilities so you don’t get
completely overworked.
SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
This is going to be one of those weeks
where everything seems to keep you
waiting. You also will have difficulty

doing any clear-cut planning. Don’t.
Jet your frustrations get to,you; life ~

should get easier by week’s

CAPRICORN -— Dec 22/Jan 20
Something that happens this week
will be very important to you. Be
ready for opportunities, This is a

good time for buying and/or selling. ,

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
Don’t waste your energies on ven-









This would be an excellent. time to
take a trip or even a weekend get-
away. Your health should improve,

This should be a very amusing but:
unproductive week for you. You will
find yourself spending more time social-
izing and less time working. That’s the :

Use your imagination if you are
unsure of your next move. A change
of scenery could be stimulating as
you are likely to find the company of ;

You may be about to start a sudden and
deep relationship with a Scorpio of the ‘
Opposite sex. This could be a happy
affair, but, before you fall head-over-

6
ee
t
'

People won’t be easy’ to please, so .
don’t bother trying too hard. Mundane
issues will surround you, and you will
find yourself getting bored and cranky.

Ba sar sae * aa bebe tale den phys igi ee












December (5) 2 To make the bed up with lace can be tures that could prove worthless.
8 Made to play quietly (5) a failure (7) Pes fea te] You may be feeling a little sad about
10° It goes round or back to 4 Asoft service but with speed (4) a friend moving away. Meditation
the right (6) 5 Apoem in red, maybe, is not what it bee eles should help you relieve the blues.
11 Bronco buster’s horse (3) used to be (6) ’ P ISCES i Feb 19/Mar 20
12 London Town in the current 6 One generously shoving a letter in i | ' | Spencing ee ae reads is the ,
orn tear eT Se ot aa ea
iti clear, | 7 Australian resembling Teddy (5) ei a y.
13 What it is to find the motorway 9 o if involved in arguments of any
possibly? (7) 9 High spot in hetorc (8) Fe as | se kind — especially those at work.
15 They go with guys (5) 12 A lively movement (7)
18 Pass an officer on the left (3) 14 Nicotine extract conducive | ‘ a
19 A broken romance (6) to sleep (3) | |
21 How Ted Ear 16 Joins for golf? (5) ;
changed (7) 17 Chuck's little goose has bt] wie Simon Williams v David Howell, '
22° The charm of lake and river? (4) no energy! (5) Hilsmark Kingfisher v Guildford-
23 Comprehensive 19 Les is upset about Vera Pee ADC, UK 4NCL league 2006. Iwo ‘
‘personal cover (4) being in a group (7) mr be . of England's best young talents
24 Stops and stares bemusedly around 20 Barbara accepts a novice talks too ; i met, and Howell (Black, to
move) has a fine position with
the air terminal (7) freely (5) Yookand
26 Little restaurant with that Gallic fee! 21 Come up for a pay increase (5) ee capeting thant aor N i.
about it (6) : 23 | It prevents a drunken sot very aL ee 1 Lure (5) positions like this, spars look '
29 In Australia, a little quietly getting some beer (7) 8 Wa a sy 2 Comfort (7) to recognise attack pattems cht i
bounder (3) 24 Painter who might start getting out ai 10 Mature (5) . 4 Attentive (4) known from previous games. cies ES ‘
"31 Cold steel, possibly? (5) ‘ ofline? (6) _I 11. Tin (3) : oe a So Howell analysed Rh2, | fe (aks :
32 Once princely title (7) 25 Incash, it's not enough N a hee (5) fay 7 Started (5) metennn ve White Pa ] ey | Pw Py ‘
reement . 'e Sm L amet '
ot ele aes awe) 2 18 Classification (5) 9 Sprinted (3) Another typical idea Is Rh1 + so —
upset? (5) F 27 The epic poem one mislaid? (5) = 18 Be indebted to (3) 12 Crept (7) m that if Kxh1 Qh3+ (the g pawn : ,
35 Just what you'd expect from dad - 28 Bells across the meadow? (5) 19 Place of worship (6) ‘14 Female sheep is pin ; :
ed aa seb te chane Bk 7 2) 21 Old cinema (7) 16 African country (6) ae oe Kg! Qxg2 mate. This ice defences and led to
higntt (3) ae ne oiaD Olan pereanel ty < 22. Character (4) 17 Feeling (5) re because White's queen Cs smate, For full solution credit,
36. A bent straw and all? (5) nominally (5) Lu 23 Fewer (4) 19 Meaningful (7) guards h3, while 1... Bh2+ is you also : Sto find ‘s best \
37 Plead to go by bike? (5) Sort of tennis suitable for card 24 Master (7) 20. Spoilt children (5) met simply by Kf1. The non- Counter and its vee ;
38 Keats composed playersi (4) 26 Detected (6) 21° Drift (5) sactifidal Qg4 Is good, but J
29 Age (3) 23 Tolerant (7) Howell instead found a forcing ’
one for a bet (5) 33 Tricked by some shady dealer (3) Sonate 24 Term of office (6) tactic which demolished the LEONARD BARDEN ;
wae Le a eee ee sa 25. Garden
> F 32 Cargo (7)
Friday's cryptic solutions Friday's easy solutions ; implement (3)
ACROSS: 8, SL-R-ayed 9, Call names 13, Aval(a vel) 14, | ACROSS: 8, Gorila 9, Sideboard 12, Ahead 14, Abide 15, Ba biliary Tenate, 27 Wireless (5)
Foint 15, Matine-e(arty) 16, Set up-on 17, Rents 18, O-C-_ | Unaware 16, Hostile 17, Giant 18, Debut 20, File 22, 85." Organ of hearng 28 Log (5)
27, Pia 90 Spoor (wy iV Aes 9 Fenise Ue | ent Se oe anasto, Not, 36. Sf 30 Scrap (6) )
+ p Vn . , UNI ) ‘i if y
it 36, Still 37, In a st-ew 39, Reserve 41, A-lich 42, None too 41, Regal 42, Total 44, Courteous 44 : sof Rage (5) Ran away (4) Chess solution 8296: 1..Bxg2i and if 2 Kxg2 Qg4+ 3



32
Down 1 fobs lar agit) 2 Tel 3, Keo ba eee eae
:1, raight) 2, in 3, Keeping back 4,
HeLa Ser to Sn nn Cs
, He-art-y 19, C-our-age 21, Took otf 24, | Di 19, Bolster’21, Flaccld 24 al
Seth 026, Non saa 26, Cop rally 29, Bullets 30, | 26, ry 28, Buttercup 29,,On the go 30, ‘
- 32, 33, D-owned 34, Asserts 38, Tender pons Cemetery 33, 34, Scooter 38, Nutmeg

Kfl Rhl mate. So White tried 2 Rxe5 Qg4l 3 Qg3 BI! 4 ;
Qxg4 Rh mate. ‘ ‘
Mensa quiz: 17.30 or 5.30pm. ‘
One possible word ladder sohution is: JEST, pest,

post, pose, poke, wobe, JOKE



arter.

DOWN: 1, Hovers 2, Windpipe 3, Pleased with 4, Liberates

ao ee 10, Rasher 11,
Pester




San









PAGE 6, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Prime Minister urges confidence
in the future in Grand Bahama

@ PRIME MINISTER Perry Christie is pictured here with Pegasus CEO Mr. Jasper Knabb during his company's grand opening at



Freeport on Thursday evening. Left to right participating in the ceremonial ribbon cutting are: Obie Wilchcombe, Minister of Tourism;
Vincent Peet, Minister of Financial Services and Labour; Prime Minister Christie; Mrs: Knabb and Mr. Knabb.
(BIS Photo by Vandyke Hepburn)

LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Grounded In The Past & Geared To the Future

Worship Time: lam & 7pm

Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer Time: 6:30pm

Place: The Madeira Shopping. |
Center

Pastor Knowles can be heard
each Sunday morning on

‘Joy: LOE9:at-8:30a:m Mer Dr. Franklin’ Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND
Pastor: Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles
P.O. Box EE-16807

Telephone number 325-5712
Email-lynnk@batelnet.bs



THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
sina P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
ywmmme Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-8135

WN CHURCH SERVICES
WME SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 200
FIRST SUNDAY INLENT

a AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road

11:00AM Rev. Mark Carey/HC
| ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,
: Prince Charles Drive :
11:00AM Rev.Dr. Laverne Lockhart

COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Bernard Road
11:00AM Pastor Sharon Loyley/HC

CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Zion Boulevard
10:00AM Mr. Sidney Pinder

7:00AM Cell Group #1

EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,
East Shirley Street

11:00AM Pastor Martin Loyley
7:00PM Mr. Allison Underwood

GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH,
Queen’s College Campus
9:30AM Rev. James Neilly/HC

ST. MICHAEL’S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill
Avenue

8:00AM Connections - Rev. Phillip Stubbs
9:30AM Rev. Philip Stubbs/HC ;

‘ ra it TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
AsJ{ 11:00AM Rev. William Higgs
Rev. William H

IETS eee LTE LTA UAaRAN ERLE DITEO ER

RADIO PROGRAMMES
RENEWAL’ on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1

|
Your Host: Rev. William R. Higgs
‘METHODIST MOMENTS’ on each weekday at 6:55a.m.
Your Host: Rev. William R. Higgs







































YOUTH AND YOUNG ADULTS LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE
will be held on March 2-4, 2007 at Westley Methodist Church, Tarpum Bay, South
Eleuthera.




The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 25TH, 2007

7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Tezel Anderson
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Bro. Andre Bethel
7:00 p.m. Rev. Ernest Miller/Board of Men & Women’s Ministry



Ore CDN er MY eM LM i 1

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ° Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 25TH, 2007

11:30 a.m. Service Speaker:Pastor Michael Johnson



Topic: The Marriage Relationship Between Christ & The Church
6:30 p.m. U.M.D. Rally at Englerston Gospel Chapel
- Cordeaux Avenue West
Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. ¢ Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m. —

« Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. ¢ Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
\ ~ .¢ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesda
* Sisters’









ys) SN
Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)



ULI SSNS RN EAVWQ MGB MW sAsB$PQqo
NES S|
\

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_

- so LDIER
Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL
Preachering 11am & 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:
Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2
Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

Pastor:H. Mills

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
Pastor: H. Mills © Phone: 393-0563 ¢ Box N-3622



QE HH




S

' (a, Brenig
mwhere|peopleldiscovenGod||

WORSHIP AND. LL TES de
UNDAY SERVICES

ming Worship Service... 8.30. am.
_ Sunday School for allages... 9.45a.m. —
~. Adult Education vc. vas 945 am,
_ Worship Service wc. an 11.00 am,
__ Evening Worship Service ...
- . Summer ,.7,00 p.m.
Winter... 6.30 p.m.



RADIO MINISTRY :
Sundays at 8:30 a.m, - ZNS | - TEMPLE TIME
2 Visit Our Premise Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

-~EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God

}

| PA VOMOR CME enti

Tel: 322-8304, Fax; 322-4793, P.O, Box: N-1566

EE ICUEC GUase MUL SLSHICaul a

FEISS SSS SS



















'





DRAWING attention to mil-
lions of dollars being spent on
construction in Grand Bahama,
Prime Minister Perry Christie has
again stressed the need for people
there to be confident of their
future.

Mr Christie was in Grand

Bahama for Pegasus. Wireless
Corporation’s grand opening.

The multi-million dollars high-
tech facility on West Settlers Way
and Oak Street employs 90
Bahamians. Over the next few
months it is expected to bring
staff up to near 300 people.

A NASDAQ trading compa-

ny, Pegasus offers a line of indoor

and outdoor products that
enhance the wireless networking
experience.

The company recently
launched a new wireless video-
streaming technology, CYNAL-
NX, which earned the coveted
Technical Excellence Award
from PC Magazine this year. It
is also planning to relocate its US-
based corporate offices to Grand
Bahama.

Donate

Pegasus chief executive Mr
Jasper Knabb, confirming his
company’s commitment to Grand
Bahama and the Bahamas, said
it will donate two labs to Hugh
Campbell Primary School and
Freeport Anglican High School
as well as ten yearly scholarships
to the College of The Bahamas.

Addressing a large audience at
Thursday’s opening, Mr Christie
said he had always told people of
Grand Bahama that “you must
be confident of your future. I
have never hesitated to look you
in your eyes with the greatest

‘optimism about your future.

“T have even told you that you
have allowed your psyche to be
defined by the Royal Oasis and
that is a fatal, fatal experience in
your lives. You must avoid that
because in the past year on this
island, over $180 million of con-
struction value was approved,”
he said, indicating that things
were happening on the island.

“That means that companies
like Associated Grocers, or by
the local name International Dis-
tributors, with their business or
their construction about 40 per

cent complete, is that much near-

- er to hiring 200 additional

Bahamians here in Grand
Bahama.”
Mr Christie said the container
port, with 700-plus employees, is
showing confidence in the econ-
omy of Grand Bahama and is
about to expand and hire an addi-

tional 400 people.

He added: “I am coming back
soon with good news, because we
are. going to remove that burden
off your psyche.” ;

Focusing on Pegasus’s opera-
tion, Mr Christie said the compa-’ -
ny’s CEO Mr Jasper Knabb was
determined to make it happen,
so much so that he did not take
time out to seek any concessions
from the government.

Speaking to Pegasus staff, most
dressed in khaki pants and blue
golf shirts bearing the company’s
logo, Mr Christie said the future
was all about young people.

“The same kind of energy and
enthusiasm that you have brought
to bear today must be the
energy and enthusiasm that
you must bring into your work-
place. °

“The training that will take
place or that is taking place in
this building must be training that
you absorb so that the intention
and objective of the company can
be achieved,” he said.

Mr Christie said last year the
company’s CEO indicated he
would give everything to make it
work and could transfer his oper-
ations out of Taiwan and China to
Grand Bahama.

“He spoke of employing hun-
dreds of Grand Bahamians. I sup-
pose if I was being loose with my
language, which I will be now, I
can say so said, so done,” he said.

Claiming his government had

‘brought in more than $18 billion

in investment, Mr Christie said
the intention was not limited to
giving safe haven to investors, but
enabling young Bahamians to get
jobs and other Bahamians to
become self-employed business
people.

He noted that Mr Knabb, in
the process of reaching the point;
of opening, had spent over $5 mil-
lion directly in the local econo-
my. :

He encouraged Bahamians to
dream on and to let no-one “kill
your dream.”




*

THE BAHAMAS, TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS
CONFERENCE
OF THE METHODIST CHURCH IN THE
CARIBBEAN AND THE AMERICAS ~
L’EGLISE METHODISTE DANS LA CARAIBE

ET LES AMERIQUES

NASSAU CIRCUIT OF CHURCHES tes<
108 Montrose Avenue y

P.O. Box EE-16379, Nassau, Bahamas; Telephone: 325-6432; Fax:

328-2784; rhodesmethod@batelnet.bs _, :

METHODISM: RAISED UP IN THE PROVIDENCE OF

GOD, TO REFORM THE NATION, BUT ESPECIALLY

THE CHURCH AND TO SPREAD SCRIPTURAL

HOLINESS THROUGHOUT THE LAND (Father John
» Wesley) '

“Celebrating 223 years of continuous Methodist witness
for Christ in The Bahamas”

THE SIXTH LORD’S DAY BEFORE THE
RESURRECTION/JUSTICE AWARENESS LORD’S DAY,
FEBRUARY 25, 2007 :

COLLECT:

Almighty God, whose Son Jesus Christ fasted forty days in
the wilderness, and was tempted as we are, yet without sin:
give us grace to discipline ourselves in obedience to your
Spirit; and, as you know our weakness, so may we know your
power to save; through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord.

WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malcolm Rd East)
7:00 a.m. Rev. Emily A. Demeritte (Holy Communion)
11:00am; Rev. Edward J. Sykes

RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (108
Montrose Ave. near Wulff Rd)

7:00 a.m. Rev. Leonard G. Roberts (Holy Communion)
10:00 a.m. Bishop Raymond R. Neilly
11:00 a.m. Bishop Raymond R. Neilly
Circuit Service for MCCA Men’s Lord’s Day



sas

= See

6:30 p.m.

COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH
(Rose Street, Fox Hill)

11:00 a.m. . Sis. Patrice Strachan

PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plaza)
11:00 a.m. Bro. Arthur Chase

HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHODIST
CHURCH (28 Crawford St, Oakes Field)

7:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes
10:00 a.m. Sis. Katie Carter

GOOD SHEPHERD METHODIST CHURCH
8:00 a.m. Bishop Raymond R. Neilly (Holy Communion)

CROIX-DES-MISSIONS ALDERSGATE (Quackoo Street)
5:30 p.m. Fridays — Children’s Club
9:00 a.m. Sunday = Youth Encuentro 2006

METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo St) -Thrift Shop
and other Ministries

JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE (28 Crawford
St., Oakes Field) Reception to Primary

PEACE AND JUSTICE CAMPAIGN 2007: — All Methodists
of the Conference are urged to pray and to fast for Justice to
prevail in. the Methodist Cases. The fast begins weekly after
the evening meal on Thursday and ends at noon on Friday.
This we proclaim unswervingly: “My God and My Right.”

RADIO PROGRAMS

“Vision” - On the Lord’s Day, ZNS 1 at 9 p.m.; “Great Hymns
of Inspiration” - On the Lord’s Day, Radio 810 at 5:30 p.m.;
“Family Vibes” ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.; “To God be the
Glory” ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:45 p.m.





Full Text



PAGE 2, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Confidence expressed over efforts

lm By MARK HUMES

THE chairman and chief operating
officer of Bahamas Petroleum Com-
pany (BPC) Limited, Mr, Alan Burns
and Paul Crevello, yesterday expressed :
confidence in their efforts to mine for '
oil in Bahamian waters, despite the
failings of their predecessors. .

“The world is full of experiences
where one company decides there is
no oil and gas and the other decides.
there is and it turns out great,” said Mr

Colours Loy

Oscars. 4

commercial break on Thursday.

Burns. “Twice in my career that has
happened.”

He went on to highlight his compa-
ny’s past success at discovering oil
deposits in previously explored Mau-
ritania and Uganda. east

“We have pioneer oil exportatio
in Mauritania where no-one thought
there was any oil or gas, and compa-
nies had left. And we found oil and
gas on our first well, and that has now

gone into production,” noted Mr

Burns.
ek eanS

eet:

@ THE Bahamian Junkanoo group Colours are in Hollywood for the
They appeared live and fully-costumed on KTLA television in each

In Uganda, a country which had
been explored unsuccessfully since
1938, Mr Burns said his company was
successful in its efforts to discover oil.

“It’s one of these things where no-

one is perfect in their judgment,” the °
chairman and CEO said in response to ©

questions about the potential of find-
ing oil in Bahamian waters.

“It is very much an art form, as well
as a business, so you need very highly
competent people to work on these,”
Mr Burns continued. —

Studios in Los Angeles.

Victoria Sarne, public relations spokesperson for the group, said:
“Colours Entertainment, led by Chris Justilien, along with 18 per-
formers, was invited to perform at a pre-Oscar party at The Jim Henson

é

‘We have assembled what we think
are the world’s best scientists to work
here on these particular kind of rocks
and we are pretty certain of success.

“We examine these matters global-
ly, and research the world constantly
to look for gas, and the Bahamas is
quite an obvious place because they
are adjacent to other gas provinces
like Florida and Cuba.” -

He said the Bahamas had the thick-
est “spot” of limestone in the world,
which may be a good indication that it






to mine for oil in Bahamian waters

is a good place to look for oil.

Putting the matter in perspective,
however, Mr Crevello said that the
company still has a deal of prelimi-
nary work to complete before it can
get to the stage where it is drilling for
oil.

“We are using satellite techniques,
as well as shipboard techniques, for
now to: gather additional data that will
help us with searching beneath the
surface of the earth and to look at the
geometry of the layers below the
Bahamas,” said Mr Crevello.

“Any drawing aspects wouldn’t
occur until at least four years down
the road,” he said. “So there won’t be
any type of platform or rigs of any

' sort.”

If their venture is successful, both
men foresee great economic benefits
for the Bahamas.

“One oilfield discovery would have
a large economic impact on the
Bahamas,” said Mr Burns.

Giving a rough estimate, the CEO
said: “You would be looking at rev-
enues grossing upward of a billion a
year.”

But noting that all of the figures are
solely conjectures, Mr Burns pointed
out that, out of the potential $1 bil-
lion, royalties for the government and
country could be in excess of $100 mil-
lion a year. ;

“The whole idea is to bring what-
ever we can bring to the Bahamian
community,” said Mr Crevello. “You
can imagine the revenue that can go
toward improving all of the social facil-
ities, such as hospitals, university and
schools.”

Mr Burns and Mr Crevello met the
press after they were granted five
licences to continue their research for
sizable oil deposits within Bahamian
waters.

The agreements signed on Thurs-
day between Island Offshore Petrole-
um Limited and Bahamas Offshore
Limited, two subsidiaries of the hold-
ing company BPC Limited, and the
Bahamas Government will allow for
the companies to explore areas along
the Great Isaacs Bank of Grand

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&

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“Everyone is very excited and thrilled to be able to strut their stuff as

At a pre-Oscar party they performed for a group of stars, including cite
cultural entertainers andSbe the best ambassadors for tle Bahamas

. Halle Berry, Forrest Whitaker, Herbie Hancock, Janet Jackson, Jennifer Bahama, the south west of Andros,

and the northern waters off Cuba for



Log ige




EVERY MO
GETS YOU



‘ Hudson, Quincey Jones and others.



that they can be, in a city where entertainment is the major industry.”



traces of hydrocarbons.

| Cancer Centre unveils most
‘(| ‘state of the art’ treatment

planning system in the world



B By NATARIO McKENZIE which allows you to determine “Right now we can give the *-1
——_____-__~ where the cancer is and how to same therapy that you would get »"
BAHAMIAN cancer victims. get the radiation to the tumour in the United States. Having ther- ~“
can now get local access to the and not to the normal tissues apy at home is very important.
most “state of the art”. cancer around it. The CMS planning sys- Most patients can go home every ~
treatment planning system in the tem will now allow us todo that day,” Dr Porter said. A
world as executives at the Cancer in the most sophisticated way “We are proud that we make '
Centre yesterday introduced’the anywhere in the world,” Dr _ our technology and the high qual- ©
computerised medical system Porter said. ity of service we provide avail- +»
CMS Xio. . The new system, he said, costs able to all in the Bahamas. Via’.
The new system, according to in excess of $150,000 in terms of our partnered care model we are ~ S
Dr Arthur Porter, managing putting it together but noted that able to take care of those per- _
director of The Cancer Centre, there were other costs involved, sons who are insured and those *
provides for distribution of radi- such as the training of staff on that are not insured. : a
ation treatment specifically to the _ the use of the very sophisticated “The technology is available °°
tumour and not the normal tis- system. to all and we hope that we canbe ~~
sues around it . wae the beacon for the Caribbean and °°
“We are introducing some- the rest of the developing world .,
thing which I think is going to be Sop histicated with respect to being able to pro- |.
extremely important to the i vide high-tech services, hopeful- | ,
Bahamas, its citizens and most We now have the most Jy for the betterment of the pop- *
importantly patients with cancer. SOPhisticated radiation therapy yJation,” said Dr Conville
“The Cancer Centre, which is and cancer centre in the Brown, CEO of the Cancer Cen- >;
already on the cutting edge of Caribbean and we believe that tre, a4
7 cancer therapy in terms of equip- “© have to extend the technolo- “We are able to accommodate >»,
ment and staffing, has just intro- $!€8 we have here to our neigh- jj patients via our partnered care .. ,
duced to the Bahamas and to the 0Uting Caribbean countries. As model and what that means is
Caribbean anew comprehensive W¢ do that we need to know that that we divide the entire popula- *.,
treatment planning system called have the right partners to tion into three groups. n
the CMS Xio planning system MOVE this process forward. “There are persons who will 4°
‘ which takes us to the first league Computerised Medical Sys- choose to be insured and they ~.
in terms of cancer centres any- ‘@™S, CMS, is a partner with the can come of their own accord via «
where in the world,” Dr Porter _ Same desire to produce high qual- q private or government system,” .,
said. , ity radio therapy and to make py Brown explained. ae
He noted that, while adminis- this available to the Bahamas and Self-paying patients are accom- «+
tering radiation treatment, it is beyond, Dr Porter said. : modated usually with 25 per cent
very important to know where He said the Cancer Centre, discount, he said. ou
you are putting the radiation. which began treating patients in “Those who are not insured >.1
“For that you need a very 2003, can treat 25 to 30 patients a get the same services and come .‘
sophisticated planning system @Y. via the government system. «.
Those patients are then treated at “u
a 50 per cent discount and thatis |."
our contribution to making sure .~
that everyone has access so no- | '
: it anes one gets denied service,” Dr »'
Open a Scotiabank Home Savings Plan today. You Brown said. ‘v
7 “For the past 30 years CMS
save a little every month for your home purchase has been a leader in the devel-
' ' ' opment of treatment planning.
and we'll top it up with as much as $2,000." sloducts fohfeancet/trecumeute |
and one of our primary objec- |
tives is to always offer the best °
product available to our cus-
tomers which assists in the treat- |
mT ment of cancer to their patients,”
said Adam Akbany, vice- |
dohdfol eto al president of North American!
sales.
Mie ay. B (
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’
*Trademarks of The Bank of Nova Scotia. Trademarks used under authorization and control of The Bank of Nova Scotia. :
| t Conditions apply, Subject to credit approval. aly PEST PHL NS my!
, " 4
MLN aay aera


THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007, PAGE 3



° In brief

Boat thefts —
spark call
for action

ll By NATARIO
McKENZIE

A PARADISE ISLAND
resident is calling for action
over a recent spate of boat
thefts.

Michael Ranson, a boat
owner, claims that he fears for
his own personal property in
light of several boat thefts over
the past few months.

“One week ago I went to go
fishing and my next door neigh-
bqur’s boat was tailing off in
the harbour. Someone had
tried to steal it and just left one
line dangling in the harbour,”
Mr Ranson claimed. ~

“J hear there has been a
problem of late over the num-
ber of boats stolen off Paradise
Island. Someone has got to do
something. These boats aren’t
cheap,” he said.

“Just last Friday someone
had tried to steal another
boat,” he claimed.

According to Mr Ranson,
the 32-foot vessel was actually
about to be sold by the owner.
“The boat was selling for
$58,000 and the owner had a
buyer.

“When he went down to
look at the boat it was gone. I
understand there have been
quite a few boats stolen and
there seems to be no attention
given to that fact whatsoever,"
he said.

Mr Ranson fears for his own
property, particularly his 25-
foot Boston Whaler, which he
uses for fishing. —

“It’s a shame when you get
so many thefts and no atten-
tion is given and people have to
fear for their property,” he said.

Police say, however, that
they have no knowledge of any
rash in boat thefts, as nothing
has been reported to them.

Leslie Miller:
citrus canker

| still exists
‘in Abaco

‘MI By ALISON LOWE: ”

Tribune Staff Reporter

TWO years after a ban on the
export of Bahamian citrus
plants and products was
imposed, citrus canker still exists
in Abaco, and a ban is likely to
be in place for years to come,
Minister of Agriculture Leslie
Miller said yesterday.

Furthermore, with no-one
held accountable for the out-
break, and the cost of its con-
tainment, the government
remains out of pocket to the
tune of millions of dollars.

January, 2005, saw the end of
a burgeoning Bahamian indus-
try when then Minister of Agri-
culture, Mr Alfred Gray, issued
an emergency order declaring
Abaco "an area infested with
the canker disease."

Mr Gray put an order in
place to ensure that no plant or
plant material would be moved
from Abaco, lest the virulent
bacterial disease spread to other
parts of the island chain.

This ended the export of
Bahamian citrus products within
the islands and abroad and vast
amounts of public money have
since been spent on uprooting
and destroying the canker-rid-
den plants in the area, MP
Robert Sweeting and Minister
of Agriculture Leslie Miller said
yesterday.

While at the time Mr Gray

~ gafd that he was advised that the

order may need to be in place
for up to two years while’the
eradication process was under-
way, the two-year mark has
passed, and no end to the ban -
and subsequently no revitalisa-
tion of the industry - is in sight.

Fortunately, despite predic-
tions that the ban on citrus
movement would have "an
immediate impact" on the
national economy - with $60
million worth of citrus products
reportedly exported annually
from the country prior to the
outbreak - Mr Sweeting claimed
yesterday that no major impact
was ultimately felt.

‘Union claims Morton Bahamas wing
tactics to intimidate bargaining unit —

BIMAWU issues
press release

@ By MARK HUMES

YESTERDAY, after three
days of industrial action in
Inagua, the Bahamas Industrial

Manufacturers and Allied Work-”
ers Union called on Morton -
Bahamas Limited to cease its .

attempt to create what it claims is
an atmosphere of fear and intim-
idation among employees.

In a press release issued yes-
terday, the Allied Workers Union
(BIMAWU) accused the compa-

ny, once again, of using “union °

busting tactics” to intimidate
members of its bargaining unit.
Addressing a letter to Mr
Vivian Moultrie, manager of
administrative services at Mor-
ton, union secretary-general Jen-
nifer Brown said: “I am in receipt
of a copy of a letter that is being
distributed to members of the

bargaining unit. Please be advised —
_that the union has not taken any

illegal strike action as your letter
states.” She suggested the com-
pany “discontinue the issuance of
such letters.”

This new demand by the secre-
tary-general comes after 90
unionised Morton Salt workers
went on strike as a result of being
subjected to what they consid-

. ered to be discriminatory prac-

tices at the company.

On Thursday, Mr Obie Fergu-
son, counsel for the group, said
they were frustrated after being
told, earlier in the week, that bar-
gaining unit employees would be
subject to having their work week
reduced from five to three days
because of a “crisis” brought on
by heavy rainfall.

Because none of the 94
employees implicated in the
reduction included supervisory
and managerial staff, union chiefs
saw management’s decision as
amounting to nothing more than
intimidation, and they warned
that their strike would continue
until government intervenes.

‘ “We have gone to the govern-
ment before,” said Ms Brown.
However, she pointed out on
Thursday that, “the MP for
the island refuses to get involved

in it.”
Ms Brown’s comments seem to

have sparked a flurry of activity, .

with the opposition member nom-
inated for MICAL, Mr Dion
Foulkes, issuing a statement.
“The salt industry is of major
importance to the economic life
of Inagua and it is in everybody’s
interest that the current
industrial dispute be settled as

soon as possible,” said Mr
Foulkes.
He added: “I call on Prime

Minister Perry Christie and Min-
ister of Labour Vincent Peet to
intervene immediately to help
resolve the outstanding issues.”

In her statements yesterday,
Ms Brown noted that the Minister
of Labour, Mr Vincent Peet,
along with other government offi-
cials, was expected in Inagua “to
try and resolve issues between
the parties.”

Law change over
abandoned vessels
‘may be seen in future

â„¢ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A CHANGE in the law as it relates to
abandoned vessels may be seen in the
future, suggested the port controller yes-
terday as a two-year struggle to have an
abandoned oil drill barge in Abaco moved
nears a close.

The process of attempting to ensure the
removal of the derelict 220-foot boat, the
Louis J Goulet, which ran aground in Feb-
ruary, 2005, has "dragged on and on" said
Capt ‘Anthony Allens.

The Louis J Goulet has been the source of
consternation for Bahamian citizens and
government alike since it was first found
floating in Balamian waters.

Described by locals of both Exuma and
Abaco as "an eyesore", it was determined,
once an owner was identified in Texas, that
it had broken free of its:moorings during
Hurricane Wilma.

After having difficulty getting the owner
to act to secure the boat, it subsequently ran
aground on a reef, and has been lodged 100
yards off Man o’ War Cay since November,
2005.

Difficulties

Yesterday, Capt Allens described the dif-
ficulties his department had in dealing with
the now unsalvageable vessel.

He said that, in accordance with the law
as it stands, his department first sought to
identify the owner before seeking to remove
or sink the vessel.

After an owner was found, The Tribune
reported over a period of months on various
promises made by that person that the ves-
sel would be dealt with.

These included promises that repairs to
the hull would be carried out, and de-water-
ing initiated, to ensure the boat could be
removed.

In November, 2005, the port controller
was assured that the vessel would be taken
to Grand Bahama.

However, none of these assurances were
fulfilled, and 18 months later the port
department has realised that the owner does
not have "good intentions", and has secured
Cabinet agreeinent that they move the ves-
sel and then attempt to recoup the costs
through the courts from the owner.

A suitable company with the necessary
equipment to float the boat has been found
and Capt Allens said yesterday he is hope-
ful that the move to float the vessel will be
made in the next few weeks.

After being floated and moved away from .

the area, the vessel will be sunk in deeper
waters, where it will form an artificial reef,
ae said.

ee ae 7

A prior determination was made that it

was not, in fact, leaking any hazardous sub-

stances, and would not cause a serious envi-
ronmental risk.

Under international law it is the owner's
obligation to have a boat removed, accord-
ing to Capt Allens. °

However, waiting for an owner to be
found and ensuring their responsibilities
are carried out can take too long, as this
case reveals.

"What we are trying'to do now is look at
current legislation to'see how we can make
recommendations in events of things hap-
pening again so we can deal with it more
swiftly," said Capt Allens.

The issue is a time-sensitive one.’

Although the Louis J Goulet is deeply
embedded - though whether on the seabed,
or on the reef is a subject of dispute - if it

were to move, perhaps in a major hurri- .

cane, more serious damage to the reef could
be seen.

Speaking of the need for a change in the
law, Capt Allens explained that a recent
clean-up of Nassau Harbour turned into a
"big headache" for his department - as ful-
filling the obligation of finding the
owners of abandoned vessels was no easy
task.

When The Tribune dontaated
Mr Peet late yesterday evening,
he was in Inagua meeting with

,management and union teams

and said he would issue a state-
ment once he had concluded talks

with the parties involved.

“Unfortunately,” said Mr Fer-
guson, “you can’t negotiate in
good faith anymore. You have to
go on strike before people take
you seriously.”

teen ereceeenecceseneeececessnesscecesccesessacasesecessaccenenes

Brenda V Hauck
dies at age of 72

BRENDA V. Hauck, 72, of Sparta, NJ, formerly of Maplewood,
NJ, Canada and the Bahamas, died peacefully at Compassionate
Care Hospice in Dover, NJ, on February 20.

Mrs Hauck, born in Frome, Somerset, England on March 16,
1934, was married to Hubert G. Hauck, son of Mrs Hedwig Hauck,
at Christ Church Cathedral in Nassau on June 21, 1958.

The late Mr and Mrs Hauck and their son, Hubert, made Nas-
sau their home in 1941 after fleeing the Nazi terror in Germany.
Young Hubert attended Queen’s College. His mother operated the

~ Cumberland House Restaurant for many years and later, in part-

nership with Lorraine Onderdonk,. operated the Buena Vista

Restaurant.

After their 1958 marriage, Hubert and Brenda Hauck often vis-
ited Nassau and in recent years during the winter months have spent

a month or more here.

Brenda Hauck was a resident of the Lake Mohawk section of
Sparta since 1992 where she belonged to the Lake Mohawk Coun-
try Club. Prior to moving to Lake Mohawk she lived in Maplewood
and was an active member of the ladies tennis team of the Maple-

wood Country Club for 25 years.

Mrs Hauck is survived by her husband Hubert Hauck and
children Nigel Hauck and Kate Githens, and grandchildren Travis

. Hauck, Ginger and David Githens. All funeral services were held

privately under the direction of the Goble Funeral Home in Spar-
ta. Instead of flowers friends were asked to make contributions in
her memory to The American Cancer Society, 669 Littleton Rd.,

Parsippany, NJ 07054.






FASHION tycoon Peter
Nygard said yesterday that
Howard K Stern is not the
biological father of Anna
Nicole Smith’s baby daughter
Dannielynn.

The Lyford Cay resident
told Fox TV: “Howard knows
he is not the biological father
and he is piving: with Bahami-
an law.

“There is no question in

POSES TVET a Cc
hot ed fu NR eee

- times and just loved the peo-





@ HOWARD K STERN






anybody’s mind that Howard
is not the father.”

Mr Nygard also revealed
that he introduced Anna
Nicole to the Bahamas. “She
had been over a couple of





ple and felt comfortable here,”
he said.

He felt she would have liked
to have stayed in the Bahamas
because she felt safe here.





anes SSIES

“The Matl«at-Marathon



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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007 THE TRIBUNE .
EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Should a democratic
society be sacrificed





The Tribune Limited —

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1 903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
3 (Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972



Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, CMG, M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 )-352-6608
; Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

jot arta rie De OE ee eee

Propaganda war continues in Cuba

DRESSED in tidy uniforms, Cuban school-
children file solemnly past a forest of flag-
poles into a small meeting room, listening as
a grey-haired matron describes the story
behind Cuba’s newest national monument.

“Our fight is not with the American peo-
ple,” the woman tells them. “It is a fight
against the blockade (embargo) and the poli-
cies of the imperialist government.”

The flagpoles, which stand directly in front
of the U.S. Interests Section building in

~ Havana, were erected last year after Ameri-
can officials unveiled a high-tech twist to the
long propaganda war between the United
States and Cuba: a five-foot tall electronic
sign spelling out news and messages to the
Cuban people.

The sign, which stretches across a bank of
windows along the building’s fifth floor, at the
time outraged Cuban leader Fidel Castro,
who quickly organized a protest of more than
a million people.

As Castro spoke at the rally, the, sign’s red
letters spelled out quotes in Spanish that

Cuban Officials found offensive, including .

one from Abraham Lincoln that said, “No

man is good enough to govern another man

without that other’s consent.”

_ A year later, the battle shows no sign of

1” easing, despite the much-publicized illness

' that has sidelined Castro for the past six
months. Cuban officials plan a ceremony
today to commemorate the one-year anniver-
sary of what has been named the “Hill of the
Flags.”

Jose Carlos, director of the Cuban monu-
ment complex, said 138 flagpoles were erect-
ed to mark the 138 years since Cuba’s inde-
pendence from Spain. Their black flags with
a single white star symbolize the Cubans who
have died at the hands of American aggres-
sion over the years, he said.

“It’s the high technology of their sign
against the human force of dignified Cuban
men and women,” he said.

Carlos insisted the flags were not put up to
block the American sign, although they do
that quite effectively.

American officials say the electronic sign is
not a violation of international law, as the
Cubans claim. At first the sign carried mes-
sages calling for “A free Cuba,” but now the
focus is mainly on news.

“We decided to break the information
blockade,” said Demitra Pappas, deputy pub-
lic affairs officer at the U.S. Interests Sec-

“NOTICE

NOTICE is: hereby given

send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 17th day of February, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box

N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.
Rememibering the late

on his birthday, Februar

Once again the Family would like to thank everyone for their
prayers, floral arrangements, telephone calls and other acts
of kindness. For those who traveled from abroad, your”
presence was indeed a blessing. These gestures hel :
ease the pain of our great loss.

May God continue to bestow his richest blessings

each of you.



Missing you from the Family, especially your brother

Ronaid Seymout Sr.
May Your Soul Rest In Peace.





that JOEL MANIUS OF
PODOLEO ST., P.O. BOX N-7060, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/. naturalization should not be granted, should



tion in Havana. “They don’t get this infor-
mation from anyone. It’s what you’d see if
you logged on to ‘My Yahoo,’ but the Cuban
people can’t do that.”

It is also a counterpoint, Pappas said, to the
Cuban propaganda billboards that dot the
country, some erected near the U.S. building.
The billboards rail against U.S. “imperial-
ism” and “aggression,” with some calling
President Bush a “terrorist.”

Cuba and America severed diplomatic rela-
tions shortly after Castro’s 1959 revolution,
but the countries agreed to open “interests
sections” - diplomatic outposts that serve
essentially as embassies - during the Carter
administration. Cuba runs its office under
the auspices of the Swiss Embassy in Wash-
ington, while the U.S. constructed a building
on Havana’s broad seaside avenue, the Male-
con.

The offices mostly process travel docu-
ments. While U.S. policies effectively block
most Americans from visiting Cuba, thou-
sands of Cuban-Americans visit relatives on
the island each year and a limited number of
Cubans travel to America.

Castro erected an amphitheatre in front
of the American building and turned it into a
protest site during the furor over Elian Gon-
zalez, the Cuban boy who survived a 1999
raft trip to Florida and became the centre of
a tumultuous tug-of-war between Cuba and

‘Cuban exiles in Miami.

Castro continued holding anti-U.S. events
at the amphitheatre following Elian’s return
to Cuba, but the facility also hosts cultural
events and concerts.

Things heated up again in January 2006
when American officials switched on the elec-
tronic sign.

Since the flagpoles went up, passersby can
still glimpse the American sign - which lights
up only at dusk on weekends and a few week-
nights - but only if they come close.

Most Cubans seem to ignore it.

“They can’t even get their grammar cor-
rect,” laughed Jose Antonio Gonzalez, 44, a
painter who was working near the Ameri-
can building one recent morning. “But the
Hill of Flags is of great significance to us. It
represents the martyrs of American terror-
ism.”

(This article was written by Mike Williams
of Cox News Service).













WINDOWS





Serving The Bahamian Community
Since 1978

DON STAINTON
(PROTECTION) LTD.

HILLSIDE PLAZA - THOMPSON BLVD.
PHONE: 322-8160 OR 322-8219

for the immoral few?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

SHOULD a democratic
society be sacrificed for the
immoral few?

These are times of
immorality of the Bahami-
an power that be! As is
stated:- “A society is estab-
lished when a group of
people live together and
have many contacts with
one another, they tend to
think of certain things in
the same way, they have
the same feelings toward
various objects, they have
the same respect for cer-
tain institution and they
develop certain traditional
ways of living and doing

things.”
In the cause of Bahamian
societal events — it

appears that morality,
decency, honesty, integri-
ty, and responsibility, have
collapsed, and we are now
forced to exist in a failed
State.

If some in this arena who

beg to differ - for the love

of God:- “tell me why’

every time we look at the
media we see Mr So- and-
So brought before the
courts for failing to adhere
to the law or ministers of
the government - do as
they please - no matter
how immoral; and don’t
have the decency to resign
for the general welfare and
integrity of our society?”

Why do we have so many
ministers of religion being
caught up in sex scandals -
among other immoralities
and refusing to step aside
for the healing of the
nation? :

Why these sentiments
pass on to the young gen-
eration, and then punished
by those who pass these
sentiments on?

Why should the created

suffer for the creators?
_ Why are there so many
in society prepared to tol-
erate the unscrupulous few
because of politics, religion
or popularity?

Why should one con-
stituency be allowed to
ketp one popular candi-
date in office to the detri-
ment of the society as a
whole?

The whole point of the
power of government
would be lost or reduced

BEAUTY GUARD. .

SLUMS

ANH







1M BSS

letters@tribunemedia.net

to acceptance of actions
that would otherwise shock
the conscience - but
because of who they are -
they’re allowed to contin-
ue!
_ We’re so unscrupulous
that when we go to many
of our family of islands
we're questioned by our
fellow Bahamian - “who’re
you? - where you come
from?” -Knowing quite
well that you’re Bahamian.
But when the foreigners
show up - legal or illegal -
we roll out the red carpet -
but treat Bahamians as
though they belong to
some other planet.
We’re so unscrupulous -
one group of Christians
can’t see eye to eye with
another - even though
we’re brothers and sisters.
Instead of trying to win
souls for Christ - we try to
win members for church —
“incredulous” - leaving the
high ways and by ways to
Satan. And the only mes-
sage some of them are seri-
ous about - “should a man
rob God”? -
Nation?”

Immorality is taking us.

straight to hell. And the
sad part about it - we’re
joyously going with

“Christian

immorality! Not to men-
tion man looking at women
only as a sex object, and
women looking at man
only as a dollars sign.

Women verbally castrat-
ing men, and men beating
women with 2X4”. Young
Bahamians having no
respect for human life -
killing one another -
declaring open season -
shooting each other like
fair game.

Parents all over town
with little children; wreak-
ing havoc on the public -
instead of training them
how to behave in society,
we allow them to rip and
run - making all kinds of
nuisance - without any
restraint.

Boy - “Whose fools we
Bahamians be?”

Will the real-Bahamians
come forth - or all we have
left - are unscrupulous
Bahamians?

Is “unscrupulous” the
definition of Bahamian?

You who beg to differ - I
dare you respond -
(email:randybahamas@yah
oo.com) Please:- for the
love of God - tell me why
should a democratic soci-
ety be sacrificed for the
immoral few?

RANDY
PATRIOTIC.
BAHAMIAN
Nassau,

February 14, 2007.

Re sponding
to article on

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Shane Gibson

IN RESPONSE to John Marquis’ “No hiding place
for shameless Shane,” The Tribune, February 19, 2007.

I don’t expect you to use this letter as “feedback”
seeing that you tend to print only the letters which rave
about your coverage of a particular matter or present
the views of your less articulate opponents, thus justi-
fying your poor opinion of them. Yet, I will give you

my views.

Your article seemed somewhat irrelevant in the wake
of Minister Gibson’s resignation. I do confess, howev-
er, that it provided scintillating details about Anna

’ Nicole’s sex life that, quite frankly, I would have

expected to see in the gossip section of the local
tabloid paper. But what I really took offence to was
your admonition that Bahamians should be concerned
about the repercussions of the whole Shane
Gibson/Anna Nicole affair because “First world
nations will be eager to see if the Bahamas emerges
from this mess...with a sense of property” or “another
squalid little post colonial outpost with a poorly run

”
eee

legal system

Why must Bahamians constantly make decisions
based on the opinions of ‘first world countries’ rather

than its own citizens? Shou

ldn’t we be more concerned

about the message the supposed impropriety would
send to the young people of this country? Your state-
ment also rests on the false assumption that first world
countries are bastions of morality. What country is
sleazier or more corrupt than our ‘first world’ neigh-
bour to the north, home of steroid using athletes (who

continue to play), drug add
retain their crown by enteri

icted beauty queens (who
ng rehab) and skirt-chasing

presidents (who do not resign after lying about having
sexual relations with an intern). Yes, we should be very
concerned about what they think of us. As for your

comment about our questio
parison to our more civilise
say one name - O J Simpson.

nable legal system in com-
d neighbours, I need only

As a writer, I am sure you are very precise with your
choice and use of words. So the use of the words
‘squalid’ and ‘outpost’ to describe one possible view of
the Bahamas was no mistake. So, what puzzles me is
why someone who thinks so highly of ‘first world’
countries and finds this country so reprehensible would
fight tooth and nail for a permit to continue to work
and live here but I guess, that is beside the point.

Don’t get me wrong. I am not writing to defend the

actions of the minister, rig

ht or wrong. I am writing to

defend the dignity of Bahamians, nationwide and inter-
nationally, who do not deserve the oftentimes personal
and condescending manner in which you and this news-
paper in general choose to address local political

issues.

M BAIN
Nassau,
February, 2007.
PAGE 8, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007

Rev C B Moss says he will run as independent:

THE TRIBUNE

if he is not picked for the general election

FROM page one

and myself in the presence of Dr
William Thompson -— the president of
the Baptist Convention.”

Rev Moss’s reference to the promise
further fuels controversy surrounding
the PLP nomination for the con-
stituency.

During the PLP rally in Pinewood
Gardens, supporters of Dr Nottage
came dressed in PLP T-shirts, while
waving placards depicting Dr Nottage
as the party’s candidate for the Bain
and Grant’s Town constituency.

These supporters said that the Not-

tage paraphernalia was handed out to.

them at the local headquarters days
before the rally.

This public declaration by supporters
suggests the nomination has already
been given to Dr Nottage and that this
will be announced when the PLP
reveals its slate of candidates.

Rev Moss has previously denied

» rumours that he was offered a new

minister of religion position — as a sen-
ator — to compensate for not receiv-
ing the PLP nomination for Bain and
Grant’s Town.

He said: “There is no need for me to
agree to a new deal when the old deal
is still in effect. Because a contract is

delayed does not mean it is cancelled.”

Rev Moss appears determined to
hold the PM and Mr Roberts to this
alleged promise.

At a thanksgiving service for Rev
Moss in August, 2002, Mr Roberts said:
“As my days wind down as represen-
tative for the Bain and Grant’s Town
constituency, it is my hope that the
people will welcome Rev C B Moss as
my recommendation to replace me.”

Bradley Roberts won the con-
stituency by more than 1,400 votes in
the 2002 election. However, if Rev
Moss does not receive the PLP nomi-
nation, and he runs as an independent,

may split the PLP vote — giving the
FNM’s youngest candidate, David Jor-
dine, a better chance of winning a seat
that is considered a PLP stronghold.

Rev Moss said he is now waiting and
“relying on the word of the leader of
the PLP and Mr Bradley Roberts.”

An impassioned C B Moss also said
he would not support any other candi-
date the PLP sent into Bain and
Grant’s Town.

Raynard Rigby, PLP chairman; did
not wish to comment on Rev Moss’s
remarks.

@ REV CB MOSS



Miller on govts

FROM page one

However, Mr Miller main-
tained that, over the almost
four years he has been push-
ing the LNG initiative, a
diversification of the
Bahamas’ economy is of
utmost importance to the sus-
tained growth of the country.

“T have been preaching this
now for almost 30 years that
every government, the first
PLP government, the FNM
government, and to a great
extent the present govern-
ment, of which I am a mem-
_ ber, have failed: to diversify
and expand our economic
* base away from tourism;” he
said.

Mr Miller said there need-
ed to be more diversification
if the Bahamas wanted to sus-

tain its economy.

“Tf we are going to sustain
an economy - a growing econ-
omy:- you cannot depend on
tourism. Tourism is a good
industry but it has proven to
be the most fickle industry in
the world. Jamaica and else-
where can give you instances
of this.

“When the crime wave hit

‘Jamaica about 15 years ago,

there was such a rapid decline
in that sector, the sector went
belly up. People stopped
going to Jamaica. Why should
infringe on my family’s right
to go to a country, and take
my wife and children there,
if we can be killed? And if we
don’t be careful, where there
is one or two murders every
week, the same thing is going
to happen to the Bahamas,”
he said.

Bimini ate

“AM AON

JOB FAIR

held on

March Ist and March 2nd 2007,
Place: Culinary and Hospitality Management
Instutitude College of Bahamas in the
deministration room

Time: 9:00am until 2:00pm daily

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES:

Accountant
Reservation Clerk
Special Events Coordinator

Chef

Line Cook »
Waiters / Waitress
Bus Boys
Bartenders
Maintenance

Security ©

Appliciants Should bring resume along with them.

BIS:

Pricing Information As Of:'
2007 |

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tity
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S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low 3

Bahamas Supermarkets

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28.00 ABDAB -
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Colina Money Market Fund
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Fidelity Pri

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§ S2wk-Hi - Highest closing Side In last 52 weeks
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FROM page one

not the end at all.

Estranged mother Virgie
Arthur's decision to file an
appeal in Florida yesterday
morning caused a stir,
especially in light of Med-
ical Examiner Dr Joshua
Perper's announcement
that Ms Smith's body was
decomposing rapidly and
needed to be buried soon,

Judge Seidlin ruled on
Wednesday that Ms
Smith's remains be handed
over to five-month-old
Dannielynn's court-
appointed guardian,
Richard Millstein, for bur-
ial,

Mr Millstein stated short-
ly afterwards that the
Bahamas would be Ms
Smith's final resting place.

However, Mrs Arthur's
lawyer announced to the
press that his client "is the

the ensuing three-way race for the seat

Anna Nicole

only person to. handle the
burial. That is the law."

According to reports,
Mrs Arthur touched down
in Nassau yesterday for the
second time since her
daughter's demise,
and is now staying at
Atlantis.

Also yesterday, it was
revealed that the dispute
over the paternity of the
now-deceased former Play-
boy Playmate's daughter
could be. moving to the
Bahamas shortly, after
Florida judge Lawrence
Kora doubted he had juris-
diction over the matter.

"I'm trying to figure out
what jurisdiction there
could possibly be here...I'm
not even sure California's
got jurisdiction," the Hous-
ton Chronicle reported the
judge as saying.

Teachers set to take
strike vote next week

FROM page one

tact the union, but failed to do so.

“That means we are going to take this to the next level,” Ms

Wilson said.

The union official said it will take a few days to contact
all teachers throughout the islands and organise the strike
vote, but emphasised that it isa step the BUT now has to

take.

The union this week filed a trade dispute concerning
outstanding pay and treatment of teachers.

Last Tuesday, hundreds of irate teachers from 52
schools in Nassau invaded the Ministry Education, crying

“We shall overcome.”

It was the culmination of a week of back-and-forth
and frustrated negotiations between the ministry and the

BUT.

Education Minister Alfred Sears had promised to pro-
vide the union with a list detailing which teachers are

owed what money.

‘However, when the list was given to the BUT, it was

discovered to be incomplete.

BUT president Ida Poitier-Turnquest told The Tribune
that list was an old one and unacceptable.

Prior to that, government had promised that all teach-
ers awaiting reassessment and backpay will be paid either

in February or March.

Minister Sears had also promised that “extraordinary
measures” will be taken to expedite the process of deal-
ing with teachers’ pay-related grievances.

=) FIDELITY

Change

“Last Price Weekly Vol.

Last 12 Months Div $



- Trading volume of the prior week



CATER

EPS $

8.8
eae

ae
- =

NAV KEY

*- 16 February 2007
*-31 January 2007
*** . 31\ January 2007

* - 31 January 2007

- 31 January 2007



relevant case law. at
Meanwhile, paternity!
claimant Larry Birkhead:
told the Associated Press”
that he “will go anywhere»
(he has) to" to fight to be*
named father of Dan."
nielynn.

"This child is in the
Bahamas. The jurisdiction
is in the Bahamas," he said.

However, the Houston
Chronicle reported that no
ruling to move the case has
yet been made as Korda
continues to examine the

Sr re
>

FNM chairman : é

FROM page one . Ae

Joo

with the PLP having not yet announced the party’s slate of candi?"
dates for the election. ae

The fact that the Boundaries Commission has not yet submitted"!
a report, and that new voters cards have not yet been issued, indi ,
cates the PLP is attempting to confuse the electorate, according ta;
Mr Bannister.

He thinks these delays are creating confusion that could have
been easily avoided.

Mr Bannister also suggested that this confusion is a deliberate:'
attempt by the PLP to “steal the election.” However, he said that»
despite the PLP’s efforts, the Bahamian people are going to ensure,
that does not happen.

}

Minister on racism:
FROM page one : a is

Hill, feferied to the FNM {MP for Mantes Brent Sas ‘Pat
white Bahamian, as the “heir of the UBP’:;, which:has sparked ,
debate among voters about the use of race in the next general.
election.

“T think we still have racism in the Bahamas,” Mr Miller said, “but,
the racism is in black people, as well as white people. And there-i ASn

nothing worse than a racist black man who believes in his head thats

he is better than you or I, and some of them believe that they are:
white in their minds. (SY

“For example, let’s say a fella’ lives out 02 the Eastern Road and;:
has a million dollar house with a boat. When he has parties you will
see more white people than black. Because he has arrived. So he has
gone into another structure. He has elevated himself above the guy
in Bain Town, Grants Town and McCullough Corner and peor
Road. He has arrived. te

“So he has a new mixture of friends that he is comfortable with.
He has no concern for the brother in the ghetto because he has<
made it. And his view is I guess like Clarence Thomas, if I can make:
it, you can make it. That’s not necessarily so. Some of us need help”.
he said.

Mr Miller said that if persons were truly interested in making | a.
contribution to society, they would reach back into the rural areas
and help out their brother man — black or white. c a

Selection process:.

comed with open arms by par-_

FROM page one

Political pundits have criti-
cised the “sluggishness” of the
PLP in going into the 2007
campaign, and are urging the
party to announce their candi-
dates as soon as possible.

While no official announce-
ments have been made yet,
PLP supporters in some cases
have already been seen wear-
ing T-shirts and holding up
posters of candidates they
believe will run.

There has also been no word
yet if former Immigration Min-
ister Shane Gibson will run for
Golden Gates.

While Mr Gibson was wel-

ty supporters at the PLP’s:
Pinewood rally on Tuesday,;
some observers feel he should
take time off from politics after
the Anna Nicole Smith debare
cle. 7}

It is also claimed that party
financiers said they would not:
support Mr Gibson running for,
the constituency. te

Prime Minister Perry
Christie, in an earlier interview,,
said all party members expect+,
ing to be nominated are:
already on the ground sen
paigning.

Mr Christie said a lot of peo-
ple running in the election are,
incumbents and already known
to the public. thy

NOTICE

LE BOURG INTERNATIONAL LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the dissolution of the
above-named Company commenced on the 20th
day of February, 2007. The Liquidator is John
M. Lawrence of P.O. Box CR-56766, Suite 1000,

Nassau, Bahamas.


THE TRIBUNE . SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007, PAGE 7

ad MO ed
AF Adderley’s Sainta

-

appeals to judges’ tastes

- A. STUDENT of AF



"SE +

BH RUNNER-UP Junior

j Adderley Junior High School Champion Young Chef
+ has been declared the winner Richae Bain, 13, a ninth
of this year’s New Providence grader at SC McPherson

» Junior Champion Young Chef
“ Contest.
‘ Sainta Louisaint of AF

JHS placed second with 370
points in the 2007 New Provy-
idence Junior Champion

4 Adderley won the contest — Young Chef Contest spon-
sponsored by Mahatma Rice sored by Mahatma Rice and
and Robin Hood Flour — by Robin Hood Flour.
» impressing the judges, all pro-
« fessional chefs, and earning
391 points with her ‘roaring ee
“. seafood patty’ and ‘fruity rice Ninek)

~ cheese cake delight.’ PS Ga ECOTETES) ;
She took top honours for
best rice and best flour dishes
., {rom all the judges.
Thirteen-year-old Richae
’,, Bain of SC McPherson JHS
placed second with 370 points
for her ‘conchy rice cakes’ and ~
‘pineapple guava cobbler."
Ashton Fraser of Queen’s
College came third with 357.8
points for her ‘cajun style cray-
fish scallion rice cakes’ and
‘banana and pineapple frit-
* ters’. m@ ABOVE: 2007 New
Judges in the contest were | Providence Junior Champion

Chef Sterling Thompson of Young Chef winner Saintia SPR , .
the Bahamas Hotel Training Louisaint of AF Adderley J ear aN . g L
College and Chef Tracey High. ae eC | ,' _George Street, New Providence ;
Sweeting of the Radisson - The Bahamas
Cable Beach Resort. @ RIGHT: ASHTON Fras- : ws

The contest isa preliminary er of Queen’s College came

to the 15th annual All Island _ third with 357.8 points inthe {| . ;
Champion Young Chef finals 2007 New Providence Junior | 3 wey Due to the Annual General Meeting (A.G.M.)

— scheduled to be held on Champion Young Chef Con- ;
March 14 at Queen’s College test sponsored by Mahatma on Sunday 25th February, 2007 there will be one

WoC ans

L

OS



720

w} S704

+

-. for juniors and on March 15 at Rice and Robin Hood Flour | . : 1 Eucharist Service at 8:00 am.
CR Walker Senior High for through the Ministry of Edu- : CEN 1 ‘
. senior high school students. cation. ; Oe fen ; :
' Over $3,750 in scholarships GBR ros In addition, there will be no evening service, due
; can be won by participants of (Photos by to the Diocesan Lenten Mission at St. John’s
~ the contest. Deanndra Ferguson, CO . : he ane
.. The top two New Provi- PS News/Features) College Auditorium beginning at 7:00 p.m. the
“ dence Juniors ne an to the rt ee guest missioner is the Right Reverend Robert
1 National Junior Champion | ; \ . ha :
n Youtig Chet competition. For i ~~) we A Thompson, Bishop Suffragan of Kingston,
. the sixth year, there will be National Champion Young Jamaica.

a

prizes for junior high national Chefs and runners-up from
Young Chef competitors: $250 the Senior High Schools will
for first, $150 for second, and _ receive $1,750, $900, and $400,
$100 for third. respectively.

WW



FIRST HOLINESS CHURCH OF GOD

BAMBOO TOWN

Church 33rd |
Anniversary Services

Date: Sunday 25th February, 2007@3:30p.m.

SO re oe

Monday - Wednesday
26th through 28th February, 2007
‘TIME: 7:30 p.m.
PARTY THEMES | PLACE: First Holiness Church of God —
Carnival Fiesta * Pirates of Paradise First Holiness Way, Bamboo Town
Pretty as a Princess ¥ Beach Bonanza Blast | ;
Underwater Adventure




ess HOST PASTOR: Bishop Edward Missick JP

2





Price: $35 per child
*Lunch inclusive

w= Ee ene aeae Ee TT BeBe wwe we Te we

PARTY THEMES
Karaoke Superstar ¥ DOR Bash i
Gamers Delight * Organized Chaos vf my
Entertainment: X-Box 360, P53, Apostle Randy Moss Rev. Dr.LeRodney Roll
Nintendo Wii, Game Cube, Internet Access, Movies, Sunday 25th @ 3:30p.m. Monday 26th

DDR Mats, Glow Lights, Your Personal 0.J.,
Music and Dancing.

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*Lunch inclusive

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Party add-ons for an additional fee: Cakes, Party Bags, Color Tees, Wax Hand...
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Tuesday 27th . Wednesday 28th






booking is required!
irthday Party, Ne

THEME: “THE CHURCH STILL STANDING STRONG”


VY

THE TRIBUNE



Contest to
commemorate

25th anniversary

of Bahamas in OAS

THE Ministries of For-
eign Affairs and Educa-
tign have launched a
country-wide contest for
students to commemorate
the 25th anniversary of the
Bahamas’ membership in ©
the Organisation of Amer-
ican States (OAS).

tudents are asked to
enter into a competition,
which will celebrate the
B&Ahamas’ beneficial rela-
tionship with the OAS —a
hemispheric organisation
that promotes social and
eepnomic development in
Litin America and the
C#ribbean through a
range of cooperation
activities and dialogue.

Over the years the
Bahamas has benefited .
significantly from this
partnership in areas such
as.education, tourism, sus-
tainable development, the
environment, culture,
women, the anti-drug
effort, terrorism and law
enforcement.

To commemorate this
special anniversary, the
OAS Bahamas Office, in
conjunction with the Min-
istry of Foreign Affairs
and the Ministry of Edu-
cation, Science and Tech-
nology, is sponsoring

‘
essay, poster and mathe-
matics competitions, .
which are open to all stu-
dents at primary, junior
high and senior high
school levels.

‘The theme selected for
the essay and poster com-

-pétitions is:

““People and Countries
Working Together to Cre-
ate a Better World”

Works submitted should
reflect the partnership
between the Bahamas and
thg OAS over the past 25

ears.

Guidelines for the essay
competition are as follows:

Primary (grades 4-6):
Students should write at
least two well developed
pafagraphs (200' words).

“Junior High (grades: 7-
9): Students should write
atdeast- four well devel-
oped paragraphs (at least
400 words)

Senior High (grades 10-
12): Students should write
aiv‘essay of at least 600
words.

a,

Guidelines for the
p@ster competition are as
follows:

Students may use a vari-
ety of materials to express
the theme, including pen-
cil; charcoal, paint, fabric .
and objects from the nat-
ural environment.

¢Primary (grades 4-6):
Poster size of at least
12”x14”

Junior High (grades 7-
9): Poster size of at least
15”x25”

~Senior High (grades 10-
12): Poster size of at least
15025”

“Guidelines for the math-
ematics competition as are
follows:

‘The mathematics com-
pétition is open to stu-




“Ministry of Education

launches new institute

mâ„¢ By BAHAMAS
INFORMATION
SERVICES

_ THE Ministry of Educa-
tion has moved one step
closer to ensuring that
school administrators are
properly equipped to teach
the nation’s children with
the launch of the Institute
for Educational Leadership.

Veronica Owens, Parlia-
mentary Secretary in the
Ministry of Education told
administrators at the College
of the Bahamas’ Choices







LOCAL NEWS

Aims to improve ‘capabilities
of school leadership’



Restaurant Tuesday that the
Ministry aimed to improve
the “capabilities of school
leadership” as a new thrust
in education.

Hundreds of school
administrators will be
encouraged to complete the
training programme, Ms
Owens said. -

In his message to the



administrators, Ministry of

Education, Science and
Technology Alfred Sears
said that school administra-
tors have the “awesome
responsibility of empower-
ing teachers and other

school personnel to deliver:

quality service to primary
and secondary schools.”
“Through the effective

Atay Aton ARC cra



‘MI MRS Melanie Symonettte, a PBX op
commended for outstanding customer service. .
The club has a ‘Lightning Strikes’ programme which recognises employees for their out- &
standing attempts to engage members, guests and colleagues in an effort to provide flawless
service.
Mrs Symonette, an employee since May, 2006, proved her worth when she tracked down a
friend - who was in Spanish Wells - for a caller from Canada.
This simple act resulted in recognition for both Mrs Symonette and The Abaco Club.
Melanie received an awards certificate from Mr Freddie Munnings IJ, human resources direc-
tor at the club, managed by Ritz-Carlton." : fe AR ‘ ;

~ TrimSpa participants
gather in the Bahamas

TRIMSPA Participants,
inspired by the company’s for-
mer spokesperson Anna Nicole
Smith, have gathered in the
Bahamas to select new faces to
represent the weight loss pro-

amme. ,

This week 50 finalists of a
year-long weight loss challenge
came together at the Breezes
resort for the final weight loss
reveal, after which new
spokespersons for TrimSpa will
be chosen.

One winner of the grand
champion title, Cassie Tebo,
who went from 195 pounds to
157 pounds, said that the
deceased Ms Smith was “a
huge inspiration to me and ~







thousands of people.”

“She represented strength
and beauty and marched to the
beat of her own drum - even if
it wasn’t popular. I respected

@ ANNA NICOLE SMITH
was the former spokesperson

of the company.
(AP Photo)

_go a long way in enhancing .

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007, PAGE 9

leadership of school admin-
istrators and the quality
delivery of instruction, stu-
dents are placed on a firm
foundation and given the
sound preparation they will
require to lead productive
lives while allowing for their
special gifts and talents.

“Such training would
enable administrators to
manage schools in New
Providence and the Family
Islands more effectively. In
addition to equipping our
administrators with a broad
range of education and man-
agement skills, the Institute
will offer certification, re-
certification and advanced
graduate Certificate and
Diploma programmes.”

Ms Owens, in her address,
embraced the philosophy
behind the Institute. She
said that it was the achieve-
ment of another promise in
the Progressive Liberal Par-
ty’s “Our Plan”, on improv-
ing the quality of the deliv-
ery of education throughout
the Bahamas. -

She said that reform of the
education system was need-
ed and the PLP has
embraced the challenge
without flinching. School
administrators, she said,
“will have to be more imag-
inative in their thinking,” if
progress is to be realised in
educating the nation’s youth.

She predicted that “the
(institute) will be “a pre-req-
uisite to promotion” in the
teaching profession.

Ms Jayne Hodder, presi-
dent of the College of the
Bahamas, also welcomed the
training that is available to
administrators through the
Institute. She said it would

“the quality of education in

the Bahamas.





m@ VERONICA OWENS,
Parliamentary Secretary in
the Ministry of Education

‘In her message, Ms Hod-
der stated that the College
continues to undertake myr-
iad, significant initiatives
such as this, not in isolation
but in collaboration with
other entities with a view to
both institutional and
national growth, all parties
possessing converged man-
dates and goals.

“The College is therefore
very pleased to partner.with
the Ministry of Education,
Science and Technology
this year in the establish-
ment of an Institute for Edu-
cation Leadership that will
not only serve persons at the
helm of educational institu-
tions, but will also, by exten-
sion, serve our leaders

of tomorrow,” Ms Hodder
“Said. sre

tf =



2 ee

wing “4 ‘e*e"s

dénts within the various
categories who have a3.0
GPA or a grade point i
average of B. Interested :
students must complete

thé attached registration
form.

This competition will be
conducted in two (2) phas-
es:

«Phase 1 — all entrants

will sit a written examina-

tion, March 16, 2007

1 These examinations will

Ye administered through-. .
-qut the country, venues, tom:

be announced at a later

ate.

\ Phase 2 — The top 10

ftudents within each cate-

gory of the written exami-
“ation will then proceed

an oral competition to

her,” Ms Tebo said.

This week’s event following the year-long challenge was con-
sidered to have officially marked the “passing of the torch that
Anna lit more than 3 years ago.” ,

The former Playboy playmate became the company’s
spokesperson in October 2003 and reportedly lost 69 lbs by
using the dietary supplement.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LUCKNER SIMON OF
i INEDALE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the

Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight

days from the 17th day of February, 2007 to the Minister








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applyingtothe Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
fos. registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the

17TH day of FEBRAURY, 2007 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.





















THE TRIBUNE



TWELFTH grade stu-
_ dents at Government High

School were told that no
matter where they are
employed, good manners,
a positive attitude and
respect for others is a must.

Addressing the students
were managers and super-
visors of Sandals Royal
Bahamian Spa Resort and
offshore island, the
school’s adopted hotel.

In a two-day seminar for
seniors organised by the
school’s guidance depart-
ment, Sandals representa-
tives spoke to the students

about the various career —

possibilities available with-
in a hotel’s various depart-
ments.

Entertainment supervisor
Dianne Gibson advised the
group that they are to
make sure that their hearts
are in whatever they decide
to do.

Experiences

Sharing her personal
experiences of growing up
in Minnesota and wanting
to be a diver, she said there
is no limit in achieving

one’s goals with determi-

nation.

“My willingness to learn
new things and explore the
world has afforded me the
opportunity to live in eight
different countries includ-
ing Mexico, Jamaica and
San Salvador,” Ms Gibson
said.

Carla Lewis, Food and
Beverage supervisor,
showed the class the prop-
er way to set a table for
dinner and remove a plate
from the table.

Ms Lewis who is respon-
sible for training new
employees told the stu-
dents that one. of the first

lessons was greeting guests.

“We have a chance to
create a lasting experience
and we use every opportu-
nity to exceed the expecta-
tions of our guests,” she
said.

While there were a num-
ber of students interested
in being chefs, executive

Cuba declines to renew credentials

sous chef Seanette Brice
noted that there are many
areas of the kitchen
that does not involve cook-
ing.

Among them she listed
stewarding, pantry, pastry
shop, butcher shop, garde
manger and food runner.

“No matter where you
work, it is important to be
professional and courteous.

“Whether you realise it
or not someone is watch-
ing you and they will be
either impressed or disap-
pointed. Now is the time to
develop a positive attitude
that will be your founda-
tion for a lasting career,”
she said.



@ EXECUTIVE Sous
Chef Seanette Brice
(right) and Massage Ther-
apist, Donnella Davis
(above) are pictured talk-
ing with students.

for three Havana correspondenits

m HAVANA



CUBAN press authorities have told the Havana correspon-
dents for the Chicago Tribune, the BBC and a major Mexican
newspaper that they can no longer report from the island,

according to Associated Press.

The Chicago Tribune said correspondent Gary Marx, based in
the country since 2002, was told Wednesday that his stories were

too negative. His press credentials were not renewed during an
annual process, and he and his family were given 90 days to
leave Cuba, the newspaper said.

The Mexican newspaper El Universal said Cesar Gonzalez
Calero, its Havana reporter since 2003, was told this week his
credentials would not be renewed. Authorities told him his
reporting was "not the most convenient for the Cuban govern-
ment," the reporter said, adding he would be allowed to remain
in Cuba as the husband of a Spanish journalist. * f

The British Broadcasting Corp. was "talking to the authorities
jn Havana about the status of its Cuba correspondent after his
accreditation was withdrawn," spokeswoman Karen-Rosine said
Friday in a statement from London. Without naming correspon-
dent Stephen Gibbs, Rosine said he "remains in Cuba, pending —
the outcome of these discussions."

Jose Luis Ponce, director of Cuba's {International Press Cen-
ter, said Friday that the government would have no immediate
comment on the correspondents' status.

Havana in recent years has grown increasingly sensitive about
how the international media portrays the communist-run nation.

It is especially touchy about reports distributed in the United
States and their possible impact on U.S. public opinion amid
efforts by Washington to tighten more than four decades of trav-
el and trade restrictions. And officials have been enraged by
speculation in the foreign press about the health of Fidel Castro,
who temporarily ceded power to his brother Raul after undergo-
ing intestinal surgery in July. :

The government — like many around the world — has long used
the annual reaccreditation process to review the work of interna-
tional journalists.

The latest regulations for foreign correspondents, released in
December, state that Cuba can suspend accreditation when jour-
nalists undertake activities it considers inappropriate or display
"a lack of journalistic ethics and/or objectivity in their dispatch-
es."

The Chicago Tribune said Cuban officials weren't closing their
office and told Marx they would accept an application from
another correspondent. George de Lama, managing editor-news
for the Tribune, said the paper was "disappointed and con-
cerned" by the action.

"Gary Marx is an accomplished, veteran journalist who has
consistently given our readers accurate, incisive and insightful
coverage from Cuba, working under sometimes difficult condi-

tions," de Lama said. "We remain committed to coverage of
Cuba and its people, and we are assessing our options of how to
proceed." .

El Universal Vice President Roberto Rock called Havana's
move a "technical expulsion" of its reporter and said the news-
paper would file an official protest.

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd

P

Montrose Avenues.

hone:322-1722 + Fax: 326-7452

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007, PAGE 11



TEACHING VACANCY

The Anglican Central Authority invites
applications from qualified Teachers for
positions available at St. John’s College, St. Amnne’s
School, Bishop Michael Eldon School, Freeport, and
St. Andrew’s School, Exuma.

















PRIMARY TEACHERS
LIBRARIAN
SCIENCE
ENGLISH LANGUAGE
SPANISH
GUIDANCE COUNSELLORS ~~~
SPECIAL EDUCATION
MATHEMATICS
HOME ECONOMICS
RELIGIOUS STUDIES
PHYSICS/MATHEMATICS
MUSIC
BUSINESS STUDIES
ART
PHYSICAL EDUCATION








Only qualified Teachers, with Bachelor or Master
Degrees from an accredited University or College and .
Teaching Certificate need apply.

For further details and application forms, please
contact the Anglican Central Education
Authority on Sands Road at telephone
(242) 322-3015/6/7.








Letters of application and/or completed application
forms with copies of required documents must be sent
by Friday, March 9th, 2007 to the Anglican Education

Department addressed to:-

The Director of Education
Anglican Central Education Authority
P.O. Box N-656
Nassau, Bahamas


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: pore i tamz com

ater ste naman seaae seen

Other
Hugh
Campbell
results

BASKETBALL



HERE’S a look at the
late results posted for the
25th Hugh Campbell
Basketball Classic on
Thursday at the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium:

Kingways Academy
def. Nassau.Christian
Academy; Mangrove Cay
def. Harbour Island;
Bimini def. North
Andros 26-13; SC Bootle
def. Turks and Caicos 39-
34; South'Ahdros def.
‘Preston Albury 39-19; CI
Gibson defsSt. John’s 52-
44; Eight Mile Rock def.
CR Walker, 48-43 and CC
Sweeting def. Dame
Doris Johnson 53-44.

e Here’s a summary of

‘the three late games

played:

Rattlers 52, Giants 44:
Danny McKenzie’s game
high 20, Robson Men-
non’s 10, David Taylor’s
eight and Jermaine Stor-
r’s five were enough for
the defending champions
CI Gibson to secure their
win.

/ Denzel Barr had 17,
Ricardo Moultrie 10- and
Shanairj Wallace eight in
the loss for St. John’s, the
runners-up in the BAISS

; championship.

Bluejays 48, Knights
43; Hurbert Williams and
Nathaniel Cooper both
scored 10 ) points, Mark

“Henfield had eight and

Kiplin Fowler seven as
Eight Mile Rock polished
off the CR Walker.

Nashad Butler scored
13, while Batchlette
LaFleur, Tayano Jones
and Renaldo Baillou all
scored seven for the
Knights. . |

Cobras 13, Mystic Mar-
pumped fey game high
24, Cruz Sihon had 11,
Dwight Rolle seven,
Kevin Burrows six and
Wayde Higgs five in the
win for CC Sweeting.

Jonathan Pinder scored
12, Theo Lynes had eight,
Lesley St. Fleur seven —
and Patrick Brice six in
the loss for Dame Doris
Johnson.

Obadele
Thompson
to marry
Marion Jones

OLYMPIC BRONZE
MEDALLIST
OBADELE THOMP-
SON is sprinting up the
altar today, with Olympic
gold medallist Marion
Jones, according to Jones'
website.

And the finish line for
the sprinting sweethearts
is a small church in North
Carolina. |

What's more, according
to her website, Jones, one



i ] 5 secs in the
100-metre dash and 21.62
in the 200, is "expecting".

Her website also states
that the ceremony will be
private and just family and
close friends will be in
attendance.

It's the first time down
the aisle for Thompson
and the second for Jones,
both of whom were stars
at the Sydney Olympics in
2000



Thompson, who turns 31
next month, broke new
ground for Barbados when
he won the country's first
medal, a bronze in the
100-metre dash in Sydney.

supe



§ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS

“Senior Sports Reporter __
'FARRINTINO Wallace dart-

‘ed inside, was fouled, hit two

free throws and then he canned
a jumper in the winding seconds
lifting last year’s runners-up Sir
Jack Hayward Wildcats to a 38-
33 decision over the Grand
Bahama champions Tabernacle
Falcons.

It was day five of the week-
long senior boys basketball dou-
ble elimination tournament and
coach Emmit Higgins said the
victory for his Wildcats was a
huge one.

“We. knew going into this

i _ game, had we won, it would

have made the road a little eas-
ier, Had we lost'it, we would
have had a lot more games to
play,” Higgins said.
‘““Coming out of Grand
Bahama after the Christmas
brea the guys lost focus, but



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS



INVITATIONAL
SEI

we knew that coming here we
are a good team and that is
what good teams do.”

In what turned out to be the
marquee Grand Bahama
matchup, Wallaced scored his
only four points in the fourth
quarter to finish with a side high
10 to lead the Wildcats as they
stayed undefeated in the tour-
nament.

His twin brother, Anton Wal-
lace ended up with nine, the
same as Leon Cooper. Edison
Davis helped out with five.

Sir Jack Hayward, who are
looking to return to the final to
avenge their loss to the CI Gib-
son Rattlers last year, led from
start to finish as they opened a
9-5 lead and never looked back.

They extended their lead to
19-13 at the half and 28-22 at
the end of the third.

Dereck Gaitor scored a game
high 13. Ross Roberts, Jared
Cartwright and Raymond Higgs
all scored four in the loss.

Falcons’ coach Norris Bain
said they deserved to lose the
game.

Frustrated

“We missed too many free
throws, we didn’t play with

much passion in the first two

minutes of the game as we got
out-hussled and we gave up
easy transition,” said Bain, who

admitted that he was ‘frustrat- -

ed with his team’s performance.

“But I thought we were more
aggressive in the second half.
We just dug a hole for our-
selves, but they are kids and I
still believe in them. So we will



‘huge’ victory
r the Wildcats

and try to stay focused.”

With the win, the Wildcats
set up another big match-up
when they face the BAISS
champions Jordan Prince
William Falcons for the pool VI
title today.

The Falcons exploded past
the CV Bethel Stingrays 62-41
in what turned out be the mar-

quee showdown between the
. New Providence teams left in

the tournament.

@ Falcons 62, Stingrays 41:

The BAISS champions got a -

balanced scoring attack, led by
Rashad Williams’ game high 21
to remain undefeated.

Williams came up with eight
and his backcourt team-mate
Ollen Smith added six of his 10
in the fourth quarter as they
extended their 41-35 margin in
the win.

D’Andre Reid also scored 10,
while Donnanthon Moss had
eight.and Demitri Swain came

@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE



up with seven.

Jordan Prince William’s
coach Godfrey McQuay said it
was good to get back to the lev-
el that they played when they
won the BAISS title over the
St. John’s Giants.

“We were letting teams take
leads and we had to come back,
but now it’s giving me hopes
that we can only get better,” he
stated.

“We played good offensively
and defensively.

“We knew we had to play a
good rough game against a
good rough team and we stuck
with the basics to set us up for a
chance to play for the pool
championship on Saturday.”

McQuay said they didn’t get
to play Sir Jack Hayward when
they participated in the Catholic
High Christmas Tournament in
December, but they lost to
Tabernacle, who they could
possibly play on Sunday in the
pool final. ‘

- just take it one game at a time

Three Grand Bahama
Sides hit top form

@ CATHOLIC HIGH CRUSADERS take the ball to the basket against Bishop
Michael Eldon Warriors yesterday.



(Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff)

er

‘ B BASKETBALL

By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter



AS THE 25th Hugh Campbell Basket-
ball Classic heads into “Super Saturday”
today, the Sunland Lutheran, Catholic
High Crusaders and the St. George’s
Jaguars are all still in the hunt for the title.

The three Grand Bahama teams came
up With big victories yesterday at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

Sunland Lutheran routed Old Bight 65-
28; Catholic High held off Bishop Michael
Eldon Warriors 36-34 and St. George’s
roared past the Alpha/Omega Owls 87-68.

¢ Here’s a summary of how their match-
ups materialized: .

@ Sunland Lutheran 65, Old Bight 28:
Glenjlian Gaitor and Tamaris King both
scored 15, Don Toote had 12, Travis Hall
eight and Livington Cornish seven as the
Grand Bahama High School runners-up
won this one rather easily.

Sunland Lutheran took a commanding
15-7 advantage after the first quarter and
extended it to 30-18 at the half. But it was
the third quarter when they broke loose
with a 12-1 spurt for a 42-19 margin.

Coach Marvin Johnson said it wasn’t a
good performance, but he will take the
victory anyway. :

“T wasn’t pleased because it seemed as if
our players only showed up. They didn’t
play the way they are capable of playing,”
he insisted.

“I guess because they were playing a
team of that level, their defence and every-

thing else dropped. But I told them that we-

have to send a message and we had to do it
by playing well. They didn’ t do it. We just
played well enough to win.’

‘Johnson, however, said the test will
come on Super Saturday.

“They say if you last through Saturday,
you could be playing on Monday,” he
quipped.

Old Bight, who will now have to play
to stay alive, got 10 from Theo Armbrister.
LeChristo Lesbott has five and Paul Rolle

and Sheldon Rolle both added four.

Coach Anthony Anderson said the lack
of competition in Cat Island really made
the difference for his Old Bight team.

“Coming to a tournament like this, we
didn’t have the opportunity to play that
much, so we have to challenge ourselves,”
he said. “When we play the big teams, we
are intimidated.”

Anderson said it showed as his big men
never really got into the game and as a
result, Grand Bahame got away on the fast
break when his Old Bight squad missed
their jumpers.

@ Crusaders 36, Warriors 34: Catholic
High are probably still than] ng Dajhon
Wildgoose, who missed his two free throws
and a lay-up attempt on an offensive
rebound that could have either tied the
game or given Bishop Michael Eldon the
victory.

The Crusaders managed to hold on to
the win as Lynden Davis scored 12,
Johnathon Russell nine and David Nes-
bitt six as they remained undefeated.

Former national team player Scott

Forbes, who coached Catholic High, said .°.

they didn’t play the way they should have
down the stretch.

“T have a bunch of young kids and they
faltered under the pressure,” he admitted.
“But wé Still managed to Come out on top.” ©

Forbes, a former standout in the tour-
nament, said he’s not putting any high
expectations on his team.

He just wants them to play the way they
were taught.

Bishop Michael Eldon got a game high
14 from. Oral Jones, six from Cameron
Rolle and five from Wildgoose.

Coach Terry Wildgoose said if they had
played basketball for the first three quar-
ters, the game would not have been close.

“I keep trying to tell these guys that
when you have to fight in the last five min-
utes, you really didn’t do any work in the
game,” he stated. “So I don’t evaluate the
last five minutes.”

As the tournament starts to wind down,
Wildgoose said his young and inexperi- ~
enced squad will go out and play 100 per
cent the rest of the way to stay in the tour-
nament.

i Jaguars 87, Owls 68: Tavad Russell
and Antonio Moore combined for 10
points in the third quarter as St. George’s
broke away from a 42-40 half-time lead
for a 67-53 advantage at the end of the
third.

Moore and Cordero Rolle both scored
16, while Russell had eight, Matthew Coop-
er seven, Wilfred Zonicle six and Tyrone
Rolle five in the win for the Jaguars.

“Anytime you get young men like these,

you have to allow them to get focused,”

said St. George’s coach Darryl Sears. “As

coaches, we have to take responsibility
when we win and we have to take it when
we are doing well.

“They just don’t have the.depth, so we

decided to wear them down with our press

because we knew that we had the fresher
legs.”

It won't get any easier for the Jaguars as
they have to prepare for the undefeated
CC Sweeting Cobras, who he feels will be
the team to beat in pool IT.

The Owls, on the other hand, have to
bounce back from their first loss.

Shameka Green and Antonio Ferguson
shared game high honours with 23 apiece
and Stanley Missick had 17.

Clayton ‘Smiley’ Miller, who started
coaching the team five weeks ago, said the
lack of depth really affected them, espe-
cially after his point guard, Jackson Walk-
er, went down with an injury in their first
game.

“We only have eight players, so I’m real-
ly proud of them,” Miller said. “We just
have to go back to the game plan, which is

to press and move the ball.”


BASEBALL
COMMENTARY



Mets giving

the old-timers.

_a spring fli Ing
. BY BILL MADDEN
~~ New York Daily News g
Jy ORT ST. LUCIE, Fla. — In the
P Latin Quarter of the Tradition
_ Field clubhouse — where
- Moises Alou, 40, found himself
_ lockered directly across from pinch-
hitters Julio Franco and Ruben Sierra

(combined official age: 89) —it was -

_ Inevitable that the prevailing conver-

sation this week would be about
nutrition, fitness and survival.

_ Alou, of course, is being counted
A on to proade a substantial chunk of

. offense from the
sixth slot in the New
York Mets batting
order, despite a
recent history of
injuries that limited
him to 123 and 98

in the past two sea-

_ sons. But in addition
Ss to being asked to

defy his: age, Alou also is expected to

fill the leadership void from his left-

eld predecessor, Cliff Floyd.

‘I’m going to really miss Cliff,”

David Wright said. “But after having


















_~ same veteran leadership qualities —
< and, from that respect, I think it’s

_ going to be a seamless transition.”
_ EXCITED TO BE HERE
“Everybody knows I chose to be
here,” Alou said. “This is very excit-
ing to be able, at the age of 40, to be
‘put in a position to play fora champ-
ionship team. It’s the first time in
16 years I showed up on time for my
‘physical — that’s how excited I am.”
_ Presumably, the physical didn’t
reveal any lingering residue of the
ankle and back injuries that felled
Alou for more than a third of last sea-
son with the San Francisco Giants.
_. Alou considered retirement until his
__ dad, Giants manager Felipe Alou, per-

suaded him to keep playing.
. _. “Basically, he said I was his best

“hitter, and I needed to keep playing,”

_ Alou said, “And I did hit over .300, to

_ keep my lifetime average over 300.



e _By coming here, I’m risking throwing

_ all that away, but that’s how confident

-. Tam about having a great year...
_. “Thaven'’t lost a bit off my bat
speed, and I’m a smarter hitter now.”

After listening to Franco, 48,
expound on his diet regimen, Alou
smiled. The injuries aside, he had no
_ explanation for his longevity. ‘

‘T really don’t do anything special,”

‘he said. “And I don’t take care of my
body like Julio, although I do drink ©
light beer.”

KNOWING THEIR ROLES

_ In Franco’s case, he knows how to
_ pace himself. It’s not all diet and exer-
cise, he said — it’s understanding his
* body and keeping both his role and
~ the long season in Perspective.
“Every year, my goal is to leave
s Spring: training injury-free,” he said. “I
know I’m not going to play a lot, but -
Ihave to be mentally prepared to hit
in late-inning pressure situations.”
Sierra, 41, has become a kind of
_ “have bat, will travel” j journeyman
- since resurrecting, his career in the
Mexican League six years ago, but he
__is here merely as a favor to his agent
_ from Omar Minaya. The Mets general
_ manager, who also has brought in
40-year-old catcher Sandy Alomar Jr.
(presumably as a favor to Sandy Sr.,
the Mets’ first-base coach), appears to
be making a hobby of collecting relics

games, respectively, .

- dinner with Mo, I can see he’s got the ©



this spring — although, as Carlos Del- —

gado, two lockers down from Alou,
said: “It can only help having all these
veteran guys who have been there
around the young kids on this team.”

“T’ve got to be ready for any situa- _

_ tion here,” Sierra said, “I know my
role. It’s been like that for me for the
last seven years.

“I get my inspiration from Julio.
We were together in Texas from _
1989-92, and he was like my teacher.
He always knew how to hit in tough

situations, and I just watched him.”
Nevertheless, Sierra has to know
his chances of making this team are
about 100-1. Too many things would
have to happen. So he can at least be
content with trading old war stories
while hoping to impress another club
off the limited at-bats he is given.
And if nothing else, Sierra figures
to leave Florida feeling younger again.

c

Woods

BY DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press °

MARANA, Ariz. — Tiger
Woods’ winning streak is over, no
matter what tour he is playing.

In a shocking end Friday to a
PGA Tour streak that began in
July, Woods failed to notice a ball
mark in the line of a 4-foot birdie
putt that would have won his third-
round match on the first extra hole
against Nick O’Hern at the Accen-
ture Match Play Championship.

Woods missed the putt, then
lost in 20 holes when O’Hern saved
par with a 12-foot putt. That fin-
ished off Woods, and the second-
longest streak in Tour history.

“I was so enthralled with the
line, I didn’t see the ball mark,”
Woods said. “I knew if I hit it left-
center, the match would be over.
It’s my fault for not paying atten-
tion to detail.”

It is rare that Woods makes
such a gaffe or misses such a short
putt with so much riding on the
outcome. One hole earlier, he had

PRO BASKETBALL | CHICAGO 105, WASHINGTON 90

GOLF | ACCENT URE MATCH PLAY CHAMPIONSHIP



INTERNATIONAL EDITION





no match for O’Hern



ROSS FRANKLIN/AP

WHAT A BLAST: Nick O’Hern,
above, has now beaten Tiger
Woods twice in match play.

hit a sand wedge to 5 feet and made
the birdie putt to extend the match,
completing a rally in which he was
four holes behind after seven holes
and still trailed by three with eight
holes left.

O’Hern became the first player
to beat Woods twice in profes-
sional match play. The Australian
lefty also beat Woods in the sec-
ond round at La Costa in 2005.

Byron Nelson’s record of 11 con-

“secutive tour victories in 1945

again looks as untouchable as ever.

Woods had won seven tourna-
ments in a row, although the purity
of the streak was in. question
because he had failed to win four

times during ‘that streak while |

competing on other tours.

“Tiger being Tiger, he birdied -

the 18th,” O’Hern said Friday. “I
thought it was ‘Game Over.’
“Then he gave me a break.”
O’Hern advanced to play Hen-
rik Stenson, who defeated Aaron
Baddeley 4 and 3 in the shortest
match of the third round. Stenson
(No. 9) is the top seed still alive.
The lone American remaining is
Chad Campbell, who advanced
beat David Toms. Campbell will
play Stephen Ames, who was a
3-and-1 winner over Stewart Cink.
In other matches on Friday:
® Paul Casey beat Shaun

Micheel2-up. Casey also beat the:

former PGA champion in the final
of the HSBC World Match Play
Championship in September.

e Geoff Ogilvy, the defending
champion here, won his ninth con-



MATT YORK/AP

NOT HIS DAY: Woods missed
some crucial putts, including
this for birdie on hole No. 6.

secutive match, defeating Niclas’
Fasth of Sweden 2 and 1.

e Justin Rose built a big lead
and beat his good friend Charles
Howell III, winning 3 and 2.

e Trevor Immelman never
trailed in an otherwise-close match
against Ian Poulter, with Immel-
man winning it 2 and 1.

e@ MORE GOLF



— Bulls batter Wizards

SOLO MISSION: Wizards guard Gilbert Arenas, center, goes up for a layup between Bulls
defenders Ben Wallace, left, and Malik Allen. Arenas had 36 points ina losing cause.

Associated Press

BOSTON — Corey Dillon, who
is 14th on the NFL’s career rushing
list, is likely to be playing for
a team other than the New England
Patriots next season.

Dillon's agent, Steve Feldman,
said Friday that his client will ask
the Patriots for his release
and that the team is likely to
grant that request by March
2, the start of free agency.

Dillon, who is 32, had told
The Boston Globe that he
would probably retire, but Feld-
man, although acknowledging that
retirement is a possibility, said that
scenario is unlikely.

“Corey does not have to play,
but he still figures he’s got a couple
of years left as a premier per-



sa
LENG

eesnnarat



Deng scores Oo:

tying career high,
and Chicago rolls

. BY RICK GANO

Associated Press

‘CHICAGO — Luol Deng tied a career high
with 32 points Friday night, and Kirk Hinrich
added 20 points and 12 assists, helping the Chi-
cago Bulls.beat the Washington Wizards 105-90
for their third victory in a row
since the All-Star break.

Gilbert Arenas scored 36
points for the Wizards — and,

during one second-half stretch,
he had 18 consecutive Washing-
ton points. Arenas’ three-point
play pulled the Wizards within

NAM Y. HUH/AP

four points in the final quarter,
but then the Bulls took off.

Thabo Sefolosha got free for a
layup, Deng scored on a jumper, and Hinrich
made a steal and a layup in a quick 9-0 run that
put the Bulls ahead 90-77. Moments later, Hin-
rich came up with a loose ball and fed an alley-
oop to Deng for a dunk, clinching the victory.

Bulls guard Chris Duhon was ejected from
the game with 2:13 left in the third quarter after
getting two technical fouls.

Duhon knocked the: ball away from Arenas
and then went to the floor for the ball as Arenas
fell over him in the scramble. When Duhon was
called for a foul on the play, he got up in disbe-
lief and went toward official Pat Fraher to argue.
Fraher then called Duhon for two technical
fouls and ejected him, leading to four free
throws by Arenas that cut the lead to 68-65.

The Bulls, with back-to-back victories over
two of the teams ahead of them in the Eastern
Conference — the Cleveland Cavaliers and the
Wizards — now face the Pistons on Sunday in
Ben Wallace’s return to Detroit.

Wallace finished the game with 12 rebounds
and five blocks, and Deng had ll rebounds. Ben
Gordon chipped in 18 points, and the Bulls had
just five turnovers in the entire game.



PRO POOL eaee | NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS

Dillon wants to cut loose from the Patriots

former, and the Patriots have been
kind enough to understand that,”
Feldman said.

Dillon will not re- sign with the
Patriots, Feldman said.

Dillon is the top active runner in
the NFL, with 11,241 career yards in
seven seasons with the Cincinnati
Bengals and three with the
Patriots. He still has three
years remaining on his con-
tract and was scheduled to
count $4.4 million against
the salary cap in 2007.

In 2004, his first year with the
Patriots after being acquired from
the Bengals for a second-round
draft pick, Dillon ran for a fran-
chise record 1,635 yards and helped
the team beat the Philadelphia
Eagles 24-21 in the Super Bowl.



STEPHEN DUNN/GETTY IMAGES.

BREAKING AWAY: Corey Dillon.

Dillon’s production dropped off
in the next two seasons. He rushed
for 733 yards in 2005 while battling
a high ankle sprain. Dillon ran for
812 yards last season, when he split
backfield duties with rookie run-

ning back Laurence Maroney.

Feldman said Dillon, though
healthy, knows that Maroney is the
team’s future.

“It’s that if Corey were to stay,
his carries would be limited, and
Corey feels he has more to give,”
Feldman said.

In three years with the Patriots,
Dillon ran for 3,180 yards and
scored 39 touchdowns in 43 games.
After not playing in a single playoff,
game in seven seasons in Cincin-
nati, he played in eight in the three
seasons with the Patriots.

“I gave them what they wanted.
I didn’t come in and steal money,”
Dillon told the Globe.

“I felt like the money they spent
was well-earned.”

e NFL REPORT


TRIBUNE SPORTS | | SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007, PAGE 7B



SUNDAY EVENING "FEBRUARY 25, 2007

8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30) |:

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Volume: 103 No.79

Rev C B Moss

says he will run
as independent if

not picked for

general election

@ By BRENT DEAN

A WELL-KNOWN pastor is
threatening to revolt against the
PLP if the party doesn’t pick
him to run in the general elec-
tion.

The Rev C B Moss — one of
the most prominent churchmen
associated with the governing
party — said he will run as an
independent if need be.

His threat came after he said
Health Minister Dr Bernard
Nottage, the man being con-
sidred as PLP candidate in Bain
and Grants Town, has little sup-
port in the area.

Rev Moss said Dr Bernard
Nottage “does not have great
support” in the constituency,
and that he would run as an
independent against him if he
did not receive the PLP nomi-
nation. _

The popular pastor, who is
heavily involved in community
work in Bain Town, issued his
threat during an interview with

. Steve McKinney on the ZNS
radio talk show, Immediate.

Response.

Rev Moss declared he will be
a candidate in the next general
election, even if it means he is

the context of a promise that
Rev Moss alleges was made to
him by the prime minister and
Bradley Roberts, current MP
for the constituency.

According to Rev Moss, he:

was promised the PLP nomina-
tion after Bradley Roberts
retired.

He said: “Prior to the 2002
election an accommodation was
arrived at between the leader-
ship of the PLP and myself.

“That accommodation was

.that if I were to step aside after

the consolidation of the Grant’s
Town and Bain’s Town con-
stituencies, and allow Mr
Bradley Roberts to run, that in
two and a half years, Bradley
Roberts would retire, and I
would be offered the opportu-
nity to represent the party in a
by-election.

“Two and a half years came
and passed and Mr Roberts said
that the PM asked him to stay
on for the duration of the five-
year term.

“The understanding was that
at the end of the five-year term
I would be nominated for the
next general election. Now this
agreement was made with Mr
Christie, Mr Bradley Roberts



Dominica

.

150 tA Cen

The Tribune

#1 PAPER IN CIRCULATION
—- She Miami Herald |

BAHAMAS EDITION







Anna Nicole’s

mother appeals
decision on
Bahamas burial

ml By ALISON LOWE

Tribune Staff Reporter |
LESS than a day after melo-

dramatic Circuit Judge Larry
Seidlin ruled that Anna Nicole
Smith would be buried along-
side her son in the Bahamas,
her mother appealed the deci-
sion - meaning that the cover
gitl’s body may now remain in

Florida until Monday at least. ~
_-In what.has become.a trend

with anything Anna Nicole-
related, what initially appeared
to be the end of one drama was

SEE page eight

Miller: successive
govts have failed

to diversify the

economic base

m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE government of the old
PLP, the FNM, and the new
PLP under Prime Minister Per-
ry Christie have failed to diver-
sify the economic base of the
Bahamas, Minister of Agricul-
ture and Marine Resources
Leslie‘Miller said yesterday.

Mr Miller, a guest on the
Darold Miller Show, fielded a
number of questions from
callers on liquefied natural gas
(LNG), a proposal that has gar-
nered much criticism for the

not a PLP. .
His comments come within SEE page eight government from local envi-
ronmentalists.
tig Se i 3 c : “se R SEE page eight
FNM chairman accuses the g A 70-FOOT Dominican fishing vessel was seized by the Defence Force yesterday ee
; and its 12-member crew was arrested for allegedly poaching off Ragged Island. The ves- Minister says
9 ovt of br e akin 9 pr omis es sel allegedly contained a large amount of crawfish, scalefish, grouper, conch and crab legs. i S h
Pictured above is the vessel being cleared of its stock in Nassau. cism
aI (Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff) racis as
mByBRENTDEAN | : : evolved to form
THE government was yesterday accused of breaking promises 1 ; 4 of economic
even to its own party members. PLP candidate i Teachers set i $4m of susperied discrimi na tion’
The charge came from FNM chairman Desmond Bannister, 1 i Pies Ca i
who argued that the Bahamian people couldn’t trust the PLP. selection process : to take strike i cocaine seize ESN
His remarks came in response to the Rev CB Moss’s claim that ¢ comi to an end’ } i in a container @ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
he would contest Bain and Grant’s Town as an independent if the ng 0 i k : : Tribune Staff Reporter
PLP did not keep its promise to nominate him as a candidate. THE process of the PLP's vote next wee m By DENISE MAYCOCK

Rev Moss made this statement yesterday during an interview with
Steve McKinney on the ZNS radio talk show, Immediate Response.

Mr Bannister, FNM candidate for Carmichael, said the probable
denial of a constituency nomination to Rev Moss “is another exam-
ple of the PLP breaking promises that they make.”

According to Mr Bannister, this treatment of one of the party’s
own, drew the PLP’s credibility into question.

He further suggested that a lack of trustworthiness is endemic to

the PLP in general.

The FNM chairman said he is very confident regarding the
chances of David Jordine — the FNM’s youngest candidate - to win
the seat, whether there is a head-to-head contest between him
and the PLP, or a three-way contest including the Rev Moss.

He said: “We have a dynamic young candidate who is off in
that constituency. He has been working extremely hard, he has iden-
tified with the young people and we believe that he is going to be

successful in the election.”

Mr Bannister also commented on the government’s delay in
announcing the final report of the Boundaries Commission, along

SEE page eight



candidate selection is “rapidly : m By KARIN HERIG

coming to an end,” party chair- ; Tribune Staff Reporter

man Raynard Rigby said yes- }

terday.

Mr Rigby could not give an : :
exact Se fe the ; strike vote next week which :

announcement of ratified can- :

didates, but said it would be
idates, but said 1t would be : to 800 teachers.

Secretary general of the } covery was made around

made soon.

“The process is coming to a }

rapid end, but there has been } Bahamas Teachers Union

no full ratification,” he said.

nominations are made.

SEE page eight

(BUT) Belinda Wilson said yes-

The announcement of caridi- ; terday that governmen! had

dates, when it comes, is expect- failed to meet with the. teach-
ed to cause upset in the party, as i about the trade dispute filed ;
several incumbent MPs are | ©atlier this week.
expected to be snubbed when } :

i had until Spm yesterday to con-

By law, she said, government

SEE page eight

Tribune Freeport Reporter
FREEPORT - Bahamian and

? US law enforcement authori-

: : ties on Grand Bahama seized
TEACHERS are taking a ; $4 million of suspected cocaine

i : ., ; in acontainer at Freeport Con-
p. may result in a country wide : tainer Port yesterday after-
industrial action involving UP } joon

According to reports, the dis-

i 2.30pm by officers of the Drug
: Enforcement Unit, US DEA
i agents, Bahamas Customs, and
} security personnel at the port.

A senior police officer said

i the illegal drugs - about 132

3

i kilograms of suspected cocaine

— were found in a container

? from Europe

Police are continuing investi-

i? gations.

“LEADING NEWSPAPER |

RACISM is still alive in the
Bahamas today but not in the
simple terms of “white against
black” — it has evolved to a
form of economic discrimina-

‘tion among those who have, and

those who have not, Blue Hills
MP Leslie Miller said yester-

day.
Mr Miller, Minister of Agri-
culture and Marine Resources,

was speaking on the Darold

Miller radio show and respond-
ing to criticism that his party,
the PLP, were playing “the race
card” in the lead-up to the gen-
eral election. me
Fred Mitchell, MP for, Fox

SEE page eight



MUA 7

ee ee

ae




THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007, PAGE 5



© In brief

Police issue
rape warning
after incident
on Collins
Avenue

POLICE have issued
a new rape warning
after a man jumped
into the back of a wom-
an’s car in Collins
Avenue and threatened
her.

The incident hap-
pened near the Wulff
Road junction at about
2.30pm last Sunday.
The car’s windows were
down and doors
unlocked at the time.

“If a driver behind
her had not seen the
situation and inter-
vened anything could
have happened,” a
source told The Tri-
bune.

“The police told the
victim that this was a
regular occurrence in
that area.”

Police have issued
several tips, particular-
ly for women, in an
effort to reduce the
incidents of sexual
assault and rape.

According to police
press liaison officer
Walter Evans, women

es should:

e Always be vigilant
of one’s surroundings.

e Dress appropriate-
ly so as not to expose
themselves to the crimi-
nal element.

e Avoid walking
alone in dim-lit areas at
night and travel ina
group.

e Avoid taking
shortcuts while travel-
ling in areas not
exposed or illuminated
at night.














Fertilizer, Fungicide,
AO TID
Tropical aE

5a At)

TV 13 SCHEDULE

SATURDAY
FEBRUARY 24TH

12:30 Bullwinke & Friends

1:00. Mat.:.“Kid With the 200 1.Q.”

3:00 Salute To Legends
Basketball Game

6:30 Sports Lifestyle

7:00 The Bahamas Tonight

7:30 Native Show

8:00 Tropical Beat

9:00 | Hugh Campbell Courtside
Express

9:15 Movie: “Scandalous Me:
The Jacqueline Susan
Story”

11:00 The Bahamas Tonight

11:30 Hustle

12:30 Comm. Pg. 1540AM






















SUNDAY
FEBRUARY 25TH |

6:30am Community Pg. 1540AM

8:30 — Let's Talk Church

9:00 E.M.P:A.C.T.

9:30 The Voice That Makes

; The Difference

Effective Living

This Is The Life

BTC Thanksgiving Service

Faith United Missionary

Baptist Church

1:00 — Gillette World Sports

1:30 Calvary Deliverance

2:00 Ernest Angley Ministries

3:00 CeCe Winans

3:25 Mt. Tabor Full Gospel
Baptist Church - 20th
Anniversary Service

6:00 Temple Fellowship
Ministries International

6:30 The Bible Study Hour

7:00 The Bahamas Tonight

7:30 — St. John’s Jubilee Cathedral

8:00 Living Abundantly

9:00 Movie: “My Breast’

10:30 Turning Point

11:00 Bahamas Tonight

11:30 New Dimension

12:m/n Community Pg. 1540AM



10:00
10:30
11:00

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
right to make last minute
programme changes!

FOR 3 IN { LAWN SERVICE |

Couple claim they are being

‘blocked’ by Bahamian courts,

take case to Privy Council

A COUPLE who have
been fighting for justice for
five years are taking their
case directly to the Privy
Council, claiming they are
being “blocked” by the
Bahamian courts. .

Greg and Tanya Cash say
they are forced to “seek jus-
tice in a foreign country”
because of repeated
attempts by court staff to
impede their progress.

“If we were not caught up
in it we would not have sus-
pected it,” Mrs Cash told
The Tribune yesterday:
“This is a corrupt little coun-
try.”

Mr and Mrs Cash now
have two actions underway

-as a result of their five-year
fight with the Baptist edu-.

cational establishment
sparked by the alleged unfair
dismissal of Mr Cash from
Jordan Prince William High
School in 2002.

One is due for trial in
May, but an action against
the president of the Court
of Appeal is being blocked
at every turn, they claimed
yesterday. ;

Mrs Cash said: “If we were
not involved in it, we would
not really know about it, but
we can’t allow this to go on.
The next generation will
have to face this kind of
thing unless we do some-
thing about it now.”

The couple’s outburst
came after the court registry
allegedly refused to accept



“If we were not involved in it,
we would not really know
about it, but we can’t allow this
to go on. The next generation
will have to face this kind of |
thing unless we do something

about it now.”

RS

documents relating to their
action against Dame Joan
Sawyer.

“A lady at the registry

actually told us ‘This is not
going anywhere’ when we
tried to file the documents,”
said Mrs Cash. _
- “When I asked. her to
explain, she said ‘No judge
will hear this matter’. Before
that, documents filed by our
attorney, Mr Maurice Glin-
ton, were ‘lost’ by the reg-
istry.

“But as soon as we went
in to file our new. papers,
they had ‘found’ them. They
told us they were not going
to give us a case number and
added that it was going
nowhere.”

Mrs Cash added: “We now
have to go to a foreign land
to get justice. We have to go
to the Privy Council because
the appeal court refused to

Tanya Cash

hear us.”

She and her husband are
to seek special leave to go
before the London judges
after claiming they had been
“blocked at every turn” in

their efforts to get justice in

their own country.

Mr Cash said: “It really
puts us in the position where
we see that the political and
religioius influence in our
country is terrible.”

Last summer, Mr Glinton
wrote to the Supreme Court

registry seeking a hearing of |

a constitutional action
brought by Mr and Mrs Cash
relating to their ongoing bat-
tle with the Baptists.

His letter referred to “the
sad history of our efforts to
progress the litigation along
to trial.”

It added: “Every request
for trial fixtures and all
attempts to move the hear-

ENM candidate claims PLP

ist

sovt politics discouraging

the youth from voting ©

THE politics of the PLP
government are discouraging
the youth from voting, accord-
ing to the FNM’s Pineridge
candidate Kwasi Thompson.

Mr Thompson, in a press
statement, said he wants to
remind Prime Minister Perry
Christie and his Cabinet that
the youth of this country are
watching.

“They are wise enough to
see through the personal
attacks. They will judge his
party on all the scandalous
behaviour and empty unful-

‘filled promises,” he said.

Mr Thompson said he has
reviewed reports of state-
ments made by Mr Christie
and his Cabinet ministers and
has come to the conclusion
that they are responsible for
youth not involving them-
selves in the political process
more.

“There are those young

people who believe that gov- .

ernment officials are only
interested in attacking one
another rather than providing
better service for the people.

This view discourages them .

from taking part in the politi-
cal process,” he said.

The FNM candidate said
that young Bahamians expect
a sitting government to cam-
paign on its record.

“They expect that if you are
the party of choice that you
will convince them that you
have done better for the coun-
try.

“Unfortunately, the prime

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.














@ PINERIDGE candidate
Kwasi Thompson

minister cannot say that his
government has a record that '
they can campaign on. There
is no comparison between the

, accomplishments of the FNM

and the failures of the PLP,”
he said. 4

Mr Thompson said it was
an insult to young people,
especially those of Grand
Bahama, “to watch this gov-
ernment launch personal
attacks while our youth are
forgotten.

“Our young people have
been doing what they were
told to do and have been
obtaining a good education



OPEN HOUSE
LUXURY OCEAN

and developing themselves.
However, in Grand Bahama
there are few job opportuni-
ties available,” he said.

Instead of personal attacks,
Mr Thompson said, the PLP
should state why they failed
to keep their promises about
roads and infrastructure for
the people in Pineridge,
specifically in Lucayan Ridge
and Hudson Estates.

“And while the cries of our
special children at the Beacon
School for a shelter workshop
go unheard, the PLP govern-
ment continues its smear cam-
paign.

“The Free National Move-
ment can be proud of its
record\and especially proud
of its record with young peo-
ple,” he said.

Mr Thompson said that, due
to the former FNM govern-
ment’s support of the educa-
tion system, the young people
of this country can access
more information than any

‘generation before them.

“They do not want, nor will
they allow, this election to
be about attacking personali-
ties. i

“They will recognise that
the FNM under Mr Ingra-
ham’s leadership is a party
that cares for them, that is
interested in them, a party that
gives them opportunities. Our
young people can see that this
country under an FNM gov-
ernment led by Mr Ingraham
did more for them than any
other government,” he said.

FRONT CONDOS

Private Marina

CO Meee ny AY ATI

The Porches @ Coral Harbor

Saturday & Sunday 10 am-4 pm

’ Free Food and Drinks

-For More Information Call: 424-8366
; ' By Appointment Only



ing of applications pending
in these cases appear to have
gone ignored regardless.”
Mr Glinton referred to
cases “which cry out for judi-

cial attention going back to-

the year 2000.”

The attorney said it was
the-duty of the registrar and
chief justice to ensure cases
were discharged impartially
and indiscriminately “with
strength and independence
of judgment.”

Mr Glinton added that no
litigant should have to com-
plain of “offical inattentive-
ness and obstruction of jus-
tice” by being denied access
to the court and not have a
complaint acted upon. He
said various complaints
about “administrative inat-
tention” had gone ignored.

“This, in our view, sadly

reflects not only possible
administrative incompetence
but also obstruction of the
administration of justice

' which, were it not.attribut- 4

able to them, would warrant
at the very least an investi-
gation by the office bearers
themselves.”

Ironically, Dame Joan her-
self referred to “lost” cases
in a speech a few weeks ago
and questioned the quality
of justice in the Bahamas.

Now Mr and Mrs Cash are
set to test that quality in the
ultimate appeal court. “This
country is in a terrible state,”
said Mrs Cash, “but we will
not give up.”

_ Eight illegal
_ immigrants
taken into
custody

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - Police
have taken eight illegal
immigrants into cus-

- tody after they were
‘discovered at a condo-
minium complex near

Xanadu Beach.

Chief Supt Basil
Rahming reported that
at 8.45pm on Tuesday
police received infor-
mation that led them to
St Tropez Condomini-
ums, where they dis-
covered eight male
immigrants hiding in a

‘second-storey apart-
ment. .

Mr Rahming said the
group consisted of sev-
en Jamaicans and one
American. They were:
Jamaicans Damien
Andrew Watson, 26, of
Kingston; Lenworth
Thomas, 39, of St
Catherine; Jeffrey
Morris Walters, 46, of
Kingston; Carlton
Anderson, 37, of
Kingston; Lincoln
Clive Dawkins, 36, of
St Catherine; Robert

: Paul Barrett, 29, of
: Kingston; and Paul

Nobell, 34, of Spanish

Town, and American

James Harris, 36, of

Pennsylvania.

The men were turned

over to Bahamas Immi-

gration.

ST. AUGUSTINE’S
COLLEGE

Is accepting applications for the
2007-2008 ACADEMIC YEAR

Three persons to teach Mathematics to all levels.

Experience

in preparing

students for external

examinations (BJC, BGCSE & SAT) is a requirement.

Two persons to teach English Language/Literature to
all grade levels. Experience in teaching candidates for
external examinations is necessary

OnepersontoteachSocialStudiesandHistoryfrom grades
eight to twelve. Expereince in preparing for external
examinations is a requirement

One person to teach General Science and Chemistry to
all grade levels. The applicant must have experience in
preparing students for external examinations.

SPANISH

One person to teach Spanish to grades seven through ten.

One person to teach French to grades all grade

levels. Experience in

preparing students _ for

external examinations (BGCSE) is a requirement.

One person to teach

Computer Keyboarding,

Basic Personal Computer Applications and Computer
Science to grades seven through twelve. The applicant
must be proficient in Microsoft Word, Excel, Access

and Powerpoint.

One person to teach Physical Education to all grade
levels. The applicant must be available to coach varsity

teams in the core sports.

All applicants must hold a degree from an accredited
University anda Teacher’s Certificate or must have some ~
teaching experience. Two letters of reference, copies of
all degrees and certificate, proof of teaching experience
and two passport size photos should be submitted. A
commitment to the values of Catholic, Benedictine:
education is expected of our teachers. Only those

persons

who have no difficulty with Roman

Catholic beliefs and teaching need apply. Please submit
applications and required documents to:

THE PRINCIPAL
ST. AUGUSTINE’S COLLEGE
P.O.BOX N-3940
NASSAU, BAHAMAS


Nish,

PAGE 10, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, cuur





MONDAY

@ HEALTH Nee,

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public of its
meeting times and places: New Providence Community
Centre: Mondays - 6pm to 7pm. The Kirk: Mondays -
7:30pm to 8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support group
meets the first Monday of each month at 6:30pm at New
Providence Community Centre, Blake Road. Dinner is
provided and free blood sugar, blood pressure and cho-
lesterol testing is available. For more info call 702.4646 or
327.2878 ;

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third Monday
of every month at 6pm @ Doctors Hospital conference
room.

CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial
Hilton Monday's at 7pm ¢ Club 612315 meets Monday
6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach ¢ Club
3596 meets at the British Colonial Hilton Mondays at
7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC)
meets every third Monday of the month in the Board
Room of the British Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.



TUESDAY

HB HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public of its
. meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta

Street: Tuesday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at 5:30pm on
the second Tuesday of each month at their Headquarters
at East Terrace, Centreville. Call 323.4482 for more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held 6:30pm
Tuesdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes location (off
Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval is required. Call
364.8423 to register for more info.

i CIVIC CLUBS

The Kiwanis Club of New Providence meets every Tues-
day at 7:30pm at the Holy Cross Community Centre;
Highbury Park.

The Luncheon Pilot Club of Nassau meets every third
Tuesday at SuperClubs Breezes, Cable Beach at 12:30pm.
We invite all community minded persons to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7:30pm @ C C
Sweeting Senior School's Dining Room, College Avenue
off Moss Road. * Club Cousteau 7343 meets Tuesdays at
7:30pm in the Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh Creek, Central
Andros ¢ Club 7178 meets each Tuesday at 6pm at the
Cancer Society of the Bahamas, 3rd: Terrace, Centre-
ville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Eta Psi Omega chapter
meets every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ the Eleuthera
Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach
Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second Tuesday,
6:30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office, 4th floor meeting
room * Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first
Tuesday, 6:30pm at the British Colonial Hilton. Please call
502.4842/377.4589 for more info. /

The Downtown Pilot.Club of Nassau meets every third
Tuesday of the month at 6pm at the J P Whitney Building,
First Terrace, Collins Avenue. ;

The Bahamian Forum will hold its next meeting Tuesday,
February 27 at 5:45pm at the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel. Distinguished attorney Brian Moree, senior part-
ner of McKinney, Bancroft and Hughes, and Chairman of
the Bahamas Financial Forum, will examine legal aspects
and implications raised by Anna Nicole’s celebrated res-
idency in the Bahamas in "The Anna Nicole Saga: Lessons
Learned and Challenges’ Raised for the Bahamas". Dr
David Allen will moderate the discussion which.is open to
the public.

WEDNESDAY



@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar every
Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free appetizers and numerous
drink specials.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public of its
meeting times and places: New Providence Community
Centre: Wednesday - 7pm to 8pm. The Nassau Group:
Rosetta Street, Wednesday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm.

FREE Health and Wellness Lectures are held the first
Wednesday of every month at 6:30pm at New Providence
Community Center Blake Road. For more information
call 327.1660 or 327.2878. FREE Blood Pressure, Blood
Sugar and Cholesterol Screening.







A RO U

IHE | HIBUNE

NDB NASSAU





“featuring

& rtctids

Special guest appearences by:

Simeon Outten

Efder Vanderson A. Barnett °

Pastor Arthur Duncombe &
Prophet Lawrence Rolle ° Chosen ..



Live Recording & Concert!

Sunday March 4", 2007

@ Living Waters Auditorium at 7pm



BUGKS

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas Support Group meets
every Wednesday from 5:30pm to 7pm at Cancer Head-
quarters, two doors south of ZNS. Cancer patients, sur-

- vivors, their family members and friends are invited to

attend. Phone 323.4482

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of SouthEast Nassau meets every
Wednesday from 1pm - 2pm at East Villa Restaurant,
East Bay Street. Always an interesting speaker and great
fellowship. If you would like to attend our meetings
please send an e-mail to bruno.pletscher@gottardo.com or
kathyvsmith@hotmail.com.

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta Sigma
Theta Sorority Incorporated meets 6:30pm every third
Wednesday at the Bahamas National Pride Building.

International Training in Communication, Essence Club
#3173 holds it’s bi-monthly meetings on the 1st and 3rd
Wednesday of each month at Doctor's Hospital Confer-
ence Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets the sec-
ond and fourth Wednesday of the month, 8pm @ St
Augustine's Monastery.

The Kiwanis Club of Cable Beach invites the public to its
regular weekly meeting held every Wednesday at 7:30pm
at the British Colonial Hilton. Kiwanis is a. worldwide
service organisation dedicated to changing the world One
Child, One Community at a time."

School and Community Nature Walk and Petting Zoo -
Free Every Wednesday from lOam to 2:30pm at Earth
Village Ranch, St Albans Drive and Columbus Avenue
(Chippingham). Call (242) 356.2274 now to make reser-

‘ vations. Open to all ages and groups Monday-Sunday
_ from 9am to 6pm. Inquire about additional activities and

programmes.

TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday on the 4th floor.of
the Ministry of Health, Meeting Street, at

- 6pm. ;

THURSDAY

@ ENTERTAINMENT

Shadowhand Entertainment presents an all Bahamian
Talent Explosion this and every Thursday night at the
Patio Bar & Grill on Carmichael Road. This event fea-
tures upcoming Bahamian artist who are ready to show-
case their original material to the world. There will also be
a freestyle competition every week which is open to the
public at large. Doors open at 8:30pm. Ladies free until
11pm - Gentlemen - small door charge. See u there.

@ HEALTH

Free public health lectures featuring distinguished physi-
cians are held at Doctors Hospital every third Thursday
of the month at 6pm in the Doctors Hospital Confer-
ence Room. Free screenings between Spm & 6pm. For
more information call 302.4603.

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public its





Ticket Locations:
nak . Bible BOORS&-Gift Shop

meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta
Street: Thursday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. The
Kirk! Thursdays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held 6:30pm
Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes location (off
Prince Charles. Dr). Doctor approval is required. Call
364.8423 to register for more info.

REACH - Resources & Education for Autism and Relat-
ed Challenges meets from 7pm - 9pm the second Thurs-
day of each month in the cafeteria of the BEC building,
Blue Hill Road.

Mm CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise has a breakfast meet-
ing every Thursday morning at 7am at the British Colonial
Hilton Hotel (Fellowship begins at 6:45am).

The Kiwanis Club of Over-the-Hill meets every Thursday
at 8pm at the Holy Cross Activity Centre, Soldier Road.
Guests are welcome.

Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first, second and
third Thursday at the Ministry of Health & Environment
building on Meeting Street commencing at 7:30pm. Every-
one is welcome to attend ¢ TM Club 1600 meets Thursday,
8:30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes.

International Association of Administrative Profession-
als, Bahamas Chapter meets the third Thursday of every
month @ SuperClubs Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.

The recently established National Insurance Board
Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets every fourth Thurs-
day in the month, in the National Insurance Board's
(NIB) training room, Wulf Road office complex, at 6pm.
All retirees are welcome. '

The Rotary Club of West Nassau holds its weekly meet-
ing, every Thursday at Choices Restaurant on the campus
of the College of the Bahamas. Fellowship starts at
12:30pm, with the-meeting held from 1pm to 2pm.





FRIDAY

CONCERT

Chariots of Fire Album release concert: Come see and
hear the best in gospel music, with performances by Selec-
tor, Manifest, Counsellor, Mr Lynx, Christian Massive
and internationally acclaimed recording artist Landlord
and many more, February 23 @ 7:30pm at Workers
House, Tonique Williams Darling Highway. Box Offices
@ the Juke Box, Oasis Music Centre, and Faith Life
Book Store. Fore More information call 544.8078 or
455.3067

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public of its
meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta
Street: Friday 6pm to 7pm & 8:30pm to 9:30pm. Sacred
Heart Church: Friday 6pm to 7pm. New Providence Com-
munity Centre: Friday 7pm to 8pm.

@ CIVIC CLUBS
TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas Baptist
Community College Rm A19, Jean St.





SSHHLHWGHNGWWOGHNHHNN HNN HAAN AA

PHOTOS WELCOME




Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Friday of
each month, 7:30pm at the Emmaus Centre at St

‘ Augustine’s Monastery. For more info call 325.1947 after

4pm.

AMISTAD is a club which promotes the Spanish lan-
guage and culture in the community. Residents of the
Bahamas who speak Spanish or are learning Spanish are
invited to attend meetings on the third Friday of the
month during the academic year at 7pm in room 13 of
COB's Tourism Training Centre.

SATURDAY



@ EVENTS

The Pinewood Gardens Outreach Association is having its
1st annual Pinewood Fest, March 3 @ 7am - midnight at
Pinewood Gardens Park. Included in the days activities
are a breakfast and a Fun\Run and Walk @ 7am. Come
out and bring the entire family... Join the domino teams
and basketball tournaments, and many other games.
Bring your kids to the toddlers town and let them expe-
rience bouncing castles and carnival rides, games, face
painting, complimentary lunch from 1-2 pm. There will be
performances by Ancient Man, Lassie Doh Boys, and
internationally acclaimed recording artist Landlord and
many more. Come and see the Junkanoo Rush Out by the

Pinewood Gardens Crusaders Junkanoo Group. For more

information call 392.1618 or 565-8870

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public of its
meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta
Street: Saturday mornings - 1Oam to 11am.

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third Satur-
day, 2:30pm (except August and December) @ the Nurs-
ing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street. ~

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes are offered
every third Saturday of the month from 9am-1pm. Contact
a Doctors Hospital Community Training Representative
at 302.4732 for miore information and learn to.save a life
today. P79» .

The Eugene Dupuch Law School Students’ Association
presents - Race Judicata - A Fun Run/Power Walk, Sat-
urday, March 3 at 6:30am. The race commences at the
Culinary and Hospitality Institute, College of the
Bahamas, Thompson Boulevard. There will be trophies
and medals, prizes and surprises. For route, details and
tules, please see forms available at: the Eugene Dupuch
Law School Library, the Eugene Dupuch Law School
Administrative Office, the Law xibrary, UWI, College of
the Bahamas campus. Or call: 326.8507/8, 326.8867 or
Fax: 326.8504 or go to www.edls.edu.bs. It’s fun, it’s
healthy — See you there!!!

Mm CIVIC CLUBS
JAR CYCLING: The Owners of JAR Cycling arc pleased
to offer a cycling clinic for juniors between 10 and 17. The
free clinic will be held every Saturday in an effort to
encourage kids to cycle. Parents interested in registering
their children should contact organisers at
jarcycling@gmail.com. 2

Toastmasters Club 7178 10th Anniversary Banquet: Sat-
urday, March 17 at the British Colonial Hilton at 7pm. The
Club will honor it’s 10 past presidents in grand style. For
tickets e-mail: prezsj@tc7178.org. A special invitation is
extended to persons who were a part of or visited the club
during its earlier years. Come out to see old friends and
toastmasters. The public is invited and guests are always
welcomed.

BC SUNDAY \\\S
@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

Traveller's Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street, features spe-
cial entertainment - Gernie, Tabitha and the Caribbean
Express - very Sunday from 6:30pm to 9:30pm.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public of its
meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta
Street: Sunday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

@ RELIGIOUS SERVICES

The Bahamas Metaphysical Society Inc - A spiritual
teaching society leading you to greater peace of mind,
health, prosperity and happiness - holds Higher Con-
sciousness Services every Sunday at 10am and weekly
Meditation services every Wednesday at 7pm at Bowe’s
Cove off Bernard Road. Interested persons are welcome
to attend. For more information contact by e-mail @ bah-
metsol@hotmail.com or call 393.0279.

Send all your civic and social events (attach pictures if |
possible) to The Tribune via fax: 328.2398 or e-mail:
ybdeleveaux@tribunemedia.net - Out there in the subject
line.



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PAGE 12, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007 | THE TRIBUNE









1. Sen Dr Bernard Not-
tage, Minister of Health,
National Insurance and
Public Information and
PLP candidate for the Bain
and Grants Town con-
stituency, and his wife, Mrs
Portia Nottage, co-chair-
person of the Lady Sas-
soon Golden Heart Award
43rd Annual Ball on Satur-
day, February 17, in the |
Crown Ballroom, Atlantis
Resort,-Paradise Island.

“2. Mr Marvin Bethel,
managing director of JS
Johnson Insurance Compa-
ny, is flanked by his wife,
Zelia, and daughter, Erin.

3. Li Yuan Ming, Ambas-
sador of the People’s
Republic of China; Mrs
Loretta Thomas; Madam
Li Yuan Ming, wearing a
“Qipao”, a Chinese tradi-
tional cloth for ladies; and
Dr Carlos O Thomas, pae-
diatrician and neonatolo-
gist. ;

--4, Chartered accountant
Paul Andy Gomez of
Grant Thornton, flanked
by his wife, Cheryl (left)
and Dr Madeline Sawyer.

~'5, Mrs Theresa Burrow,
deputy chairman of the

- Bahamas Telecommunica-

tions Company (BTC) and
Mr Leon Williams, presi-
dent and chief executive
officer of BTC.

«6. Mr J Barrie Farring-
ton, senior vice-president
of administration of Kerzn-
er International, flanked
by his wife, artist Susan
Farrington (left) and Mrs
Sarah Markantonis, wife of
John Markantonis, presi-
dent and managing direc-
tor of Kerzner (Bahamas)
International Limited.

7.The Rt Rev Laish |
Boyd, co-adjutor Bishop of
the Anglican Diocese of
The Bahamas, including
the Turks and Caicos
Islands and his banker
wife, Joann.

8, Prime Minister Perry
Christie with his wife
Bernadette.

>.9. Mr Basil Dean, senior
vice-president of security
at Kerzner International
and a former Assistant
Commissioner of Police,
and his wife, Mrs Norma
Edgecombe-Dean, a
teacher at Sandilands Pri-
mary School.

‘ 10. Entrepreneur and

former banker Ella Davis,
owner of B-Ella Design, a
jewellery company, and

wife of Dr Anthony Davis. -

_°11. Mr Henry Saunders,
owner of Saunders Truck-
ing and More 94 FM Radio
Station, and his wife
Shirley.

+ 12. Mrs Linda Gibson,
president of Atlantic Med-
ical Insurance Company,

~ and husband Joe Gibson of

Tarm Corporation, a con-
sultancy firm, located in
Cable Beach.

ae





















































































photos by Franklyn G Ferguson

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Tucson 60/15 36/2 s 68/20 41/5 s

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| __ Washington, DC 45/7 28/-2 s 36/2 35/1 i storms, t-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prep-precipitation, Tr-trace







B JUNIOR All-Star
Coaches Sharelle Cash and
Anastacia Moultrie.

Programme
seeks female
players for
the future

m BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
. Senior Sports
Reporter



EVERY Saturday
morning inside the DW
Davis Gymnasium, coach-
es Sharelle Cash and
Anastacia Moultrie can be
seen grooming some of the
future female.basketball .
players. - :

They're responsible for
the Junior Programme,
‘which is preparing a team
to represent the Bahamas
at an international tourna-
‘ment this summer.

The Bahamas Basket-
ball Federation is expected
to send a team off to com-
pete in the Dominican
Republic either in July or
August. The dates and
venue have not yet been

confirmed.
According to Cash, who

coaches the Temple Chris-
tian Suns in the BAISS
and the Junior All-Stars in
the NPWBA, the practices
are paying off as they're
seeing more and more
girls starting to come out,
not just for the national
team, but in a bid to help
with their own personal
development.

"It's a good thing that
the junior national team is
supposed to travel because
we want to see the num-
bers increase so that we
can really select the best
team," Cash stressed.

While she and Moultrie
are directly responsible for
the practices, Jeannie
Minus has been coming
out and assisting as well.
They are also hoping for
national team coach Felix
'Fly' Musgrove to attend.

From the practice ses- .
sions, Cash said they are
hoping to select three dif-
ferent teams, comprising
of the 21-and-under, 19-
and-under and 17-and-
under.

"There's always room
for improvement and
room for more players to
come out," Cash insisted.

- Moultrie, a physical edu-
cation teacher and coach
at St. Augustine's College,
said that while they are
looking at developing their
skills, they are also trying
to find ways of helping the
players to attain athletic
scholarships to play col-
lege basketball in the
United States.

"We want them to go off
ro school, get that educa-
tion and further them-
selves," she insisted.

The Saturday pro-
gramme runs from 10 a.m.
til noon.

»school









PAGE 2B, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007





@ FISHING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

WHILE Crooked Island is
basking in the success of
Elton ‘Bonefish Shaky’
McKinney on the national
level, another islander is
preparing to bring some
more international acclaim
to the island.

Robert 'Robbie' Gibson,
who has been doing deep sea
fishing and dive charters on
Crooked Island for the past
20 years, will be traveling to
the Keys in Florida next
week to compete with Carter
Andrews at the Mad Fin, a
popular catch and release
tournament.

Impressing

Andrews is the manager
of the Crooked Island Lodge
at Pittstown Point where
Gibson and McKinney,
along with the other fishing
guides, have been impress-
ing the visitors to the island.

Gibson, who has been fea-
tured on a number ef ESPN
shows, said he's excited
about going to the champi-
onship.

"We really want to bring
the big cheque back home

to Crooked Island," he stat-
ed. "Me and Carter have
done well in other tourna-
ments we've competed in, so
we really want to win this
one."

Andrews, who has been in
the Bahamas since 1996,
competed for Team USA in
the Flag Fish Championships

in Australia in 2002 and, last -

year, he competed for Team
USA. in the Off Shore
Championships in Portugal
where they got a bronze
medal.

Gibson, on the other hand,
is a native of Crooked
Island. ©

He has achieved a number
of successes and as you look
on the wall inside the
Crooked Island Lodge, you
can't help but notice it
because the pictures are
there to prove it.

"I started using the spin-
ning rod, but I just recently
started using the fly rod,"
Gibson stated. "I kind of
gradually move into it, but
I haven't had any regrets
yet."

At age 47, Gibson said
Andrews has played a piv-
otal role in his development
since he came to the island.

"We learn some things
together. He learned some
things from me and Tlearned



some things from him," he

charged.

"He knows a lot of people
all over the world, so I get to
know them too."

Having originally started
out as fishing partners, Gib-
son said he hopes that this
trip will help to propel their
relationship to an even high-
er level.

- Success

In the meantime, Gibson
said he's proud to know that
McKinney, another of his
compatriots, has attained the
success he did last year as
the Cacique Award winner.

"He has done well. He
deserves to win," Gibson
stressed. "But look out for
me and Carter. Watch us on
TV. We hope to be holding
up the big cheque and bring-
ing the title back to Crooked
Island.

"Then we will really have
to have a massive celebra-
tion in the streets."

@ ROBBIE Gibson and
Carter Andrews form a for-
midable team that will rep-

resent Crooked Island and
the Bahamas in another
international tournament
this year.

@ FISHING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

MEET Elton McKinney.

He's the Cacique Awards
2006 winner for Sports,
Leisure and Events. He won
the prestigious national award
over two other finalists -
Hezron Moxey of New Provi-
dence and Theophilus 'Tom-
my' Rolle of South Andros.

"Bonefish Shaky," as he's
affectionately called, is a
native of Landrail Point,
Crooked Island. Today, he
makes a living as a tour guide,
but his passion is in bonefish-
ing, a sport he's been doing
for consistently for the past 12
years.

"Tt was really exciting," said

‘McKinney, about his latest:
achievement. "I kind of had a’

feeling that I was going to win
it after I was nominated and
they told me that I must be
there."

Looking back at his success,
McKinney said it was the fact
that he was featured in a num-
ber of magazines, on ESPN
several times and the letters
he received from repeat cus-
tomers that really made him
stood out.

"Some years ago, I thought
it was the most foolish thing
I've ever seen, but after get-
ting involved, there's nothing
that I like more than bone-
fishing," he insisted.

"Being in it, I haven't
regretted it one day because
it's really paying off."

McKinney, who clinched a
second and third place finish
in the Bahamas National
Bonefish Championships in
Andros and Abaco respec-
tively, actually got started in
commercial fishing.

But after he was introduced
to the fly rods, he took his ini-
tial course and the rest was
history.

"I started spending 50-60
dollars a day getting the expe-
rience," he said. "I watched
the customers with what they

TRIBUNE SPORTS

are doing and I just picked up
onit.” .

Today, McKinney has been
considered the best in the
business in Crooked Island,
but he's hoping that winning
the award will give him the
nod as one of th best in the
Bahamas.

After enjoying himself at
the after party at the end of
the Cacique Awards ceremo-
ny, McKinney returned to
Crooked Island where he was
scheduled to be treated.to a
motorcade.

That has not yet mater-
alised, but McKinney, who
spots a sign on the front of his
pickup truck that reads: "Nice
and Easy," said he's just going
to wait for the accolades to
come. Ee

He's also looking for the
posters that were displayed in
Nassau to be plastered
through Crooked Island. But
if that doesn't happen, McK-
inney said he will continue to
do what he's been doing.

At age 42 with a wife and
four children, McKinney said
the journey has just begun.

Carter Andrews, the man-
ager of the Crooked Island
Lodge where McKinney is
employed as one of the seven
fishing guides, said there's no
doubt that McKinney ranks
right up there with the best.

He said he can speak from.
experience because they have
enjoyed some success togeth-
er on the international scene,
having competed in the Keys
off Florida several times. |

Andrews said McKinney's
performance speaks for itself.

"T think it's tremendous that
he's been able to promote
bonefishing in the Bahamas,
particularly in Crooked Island
and I think he will continue
to do so," he projected.

"The rest of the guides have
come along and they have all.
gained the skills, but Elton has
been there as a mentor to
them because he's been doing
it for so long and at such a
high level."

B CARTER ANDREWS of the Crooked Island Lodge congrat-
ulates Elton 'Bonefish Shaky' McKinney, the 2006 Cacique
Award winner for Sports, Lesiure and Eveats.


THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com _





From Miami Herald Wire Services

The way Ohio State coach
Thad Matta sees it, a fresh-
man-laden team is much-
improved by February.

Matta will be banking on
that Sunday when the Buck-
eyes take on Wisconsin in the
first No. 1 vs. No. 2 matchup
between Big Ten teams.

The Buckeyes, who have
four freshmen among their top
eight players, lost 72-69 on Jan.
9 in Madison, Wis. The first-
year players, including 7-foot
center Greg Oden and point
guard Mike Conley Jr., have
been quick studies since then.

“They’ve obviously gotten
more experience under their
belt. They’ve grown up a little
bit,” Matta said. “They have
played seven Big Ten road
games now. We've taken them

_to the No. 3 [Florida], No. 4
[North Carolina] and No. 5
[Wisconsin] teams in the
country on their home floors,
so J think it’s just a maturity
thing that guys have a better
understanding of what college
basketball is all about.”

The Buckeyes (25-3, 13-1)
hold a one-game edge in the
conference with two games
left, closing the regular season
at Michigan on March 3.
Should they beat Wisconsin,
the Buckeyes clinch their sec-
ond outright Big Ten crown in
a row. The Badgers (26-3, 12-2)
are coming off a loss at Michi-
gan State on Tuesday night,
and they would like nothing

—?

BASKETBALL







COLLEGE BROKETPALS

Buckeyes, Badgers brace for showdown



JONATHAN DANIEL/GETTY IMAGES

BATTLING FOR THE BIG TEN TITLE: Alando Tucker, left, and
Wisconsin play Greg Oden and Ohio State on Sunday.

better than to disappoint an
expected overflow crowd in
Columbus, Ohio.

ecaeee State got the

best of us in the last 3, 4 min-
utes,”
Ryan said. “We needed to do
some things that we didn’t

PRO BASKETBALL

Wisconsin coach Bo .

Suns tame th

From Miami Herald Wire Services

MINNEAPOLIS — Shawn Marion scored
27 points, Leandro Barbosa added 24,.and
Amare Stoudemire had 23, leading the Phoe-
nix Suns-to a 116-104 victory over:the’ Mage
sota Timberwolves on Friday-night.: yi

Steve Nash added nine points andl 15
assists in his third game back after missing
four starts with an injured right shoulder.

Kevin Garnett, who had a season-high 44
points the last time the teams met, led Min-
nesota with 28 points and tied a season-high
with 19 rebounds. -

Randy Foye had 14 points and Ricky Davis
12 for the Timberwolves, who have lost three
consecutive games.

KNICKS 95, BUCKS 93.

NEW YORK — Channing Frye made two

free throws after a video review put 0.8 sec-
onds back on the clock, winning a nail-biter
for the Knicks.
’ The Knicks overcame 23 turnovers and a
quiet night from Eddy Curry, their leading
scorer, by capitalizing on a second chance
after they séemed headed for overtime.

Stephon Marbury and Jamal Crawford
each scored 22 points for the Knicks, and
Curry had 10 points and 11 rebounds.

Mo Williams had 28 points and 10 assists
in another good game against the Knicks, and
Andrew Bogut finished with 19 points.

NETS 109, KINGS 96

EAST RUTHERFORD, NJ: — Jason Kidd
got his 84th career triple-double, and the
Nets ended a three-game losing streak.

Kidd had 22 points, 13 rebounds and 10
assists despite playing with a cracked rib that
the Nets revealed on Thursday. It was Kidd’s
ninth triple-double of the season, tying his
personal high, and his sixth against the Kings.

' Vince Carter led the Nets with 26 points.
He also had 11 rebounds.

Both Kidd and Carter were the subjects of
trade rumors, but they did not pan out at
Thursday’s deadline.

PISTONS 94, MAGIC 89

ORLANDO, Fla. — Chauncey Billups
scored 28 points for the Pistons, and Richard
Hamilton added 22 of his own.

It was the second time in three nights that
the Pistons beat the Magic, after a 110-88 vic-
tory on Wednesday. This time Orlando had a
chance, but the Magic didn’t score a field
goal for the first 10:30 of the final period,
squandering a 71-67 lead.

Dwight Howard had 20 points and 13
rebounds for the Magic. Hedo Turkoglu
scored 20 points, and Hill had 15.

Rasheed Wallace had 14 points and 10
rebounds for Detroit.

BOBCATS 102, 76ERS 87

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Adam Morrison,
Matt Carroll and Gerald Wallace each scored
19 points, and the Bobcats, minus their ill
coach, tied a team record with their fourth
victory in a row.

The third-year Bobcats, ahs won four
consecutive games to end last season, were
never threatened by the 76ers despite coach
Bernie Bickerstaff leaving the bench late in
the first quarter with flu-like symptoms.

Emeka Okafor added 16 points and pulled

accomplish, but that’s going to
happen sometimes. So you’ve
just got to get ready for the
next one.”

Ohio State hasn’t been
dominating teams yet has
rolled to 12 victories in a row.
The Buckeyes have had two
close calls against Big Ten cel-
lar-dweller Penn State, and
they have won five other con-
ference games by less than
10 points each.

In the first meeting with the
Badgers, the Buckeyes had
matchup problems with

Alando Tucker. That has been |

a common theme for teams
trying to contain the favorite
for Big Ten Player of the Year.

Marcus Landry and Brian
Butch held their own inside
against Oden and Michael
Flowers, and Kammron Taylor
provided strong transition and
defensive play.

Ryan isn’t concerned about
how his team will respond to
the upset at Michigan State.
He is confident that the Bad-
gers will follow Tucker.

“Alando Tucker really
leads for us,” Ryan. said.
“There’s leading by example,
and then there’s Alando
Tucker.

“He’s in another realm.”

FRIDAY’S GAMES

e Dartmouth 53, Prince-
ton 43: John Ball and Leon
Pattman scored 14 points
apiece as host Dartmouth
(9-15, 4-7 Ivy League) com-

e Wolves

__ INTERNATIONAL EDITION



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007 | 4B.



pleted its first two-game sea-

son sweep of Princeton (11-13,

2-8) since the 1945-46 season.

e Penn 83, Harvard 67:
Mark Zoller scored 21 points,
and Ibrahim Jaaber added 19
points, leading the Quakers
(18-8, 9-1 Ivy League) over the
host Crimson (10-15, 3-8).

ELSEWHERE

e Illinois: Sophomore
guard Jamar Smith pleaded
not guilty Friday to drunken

driving and leaving the scene’

of an accident.

Smith, 19, faces a maximum
of 12 years in prison and a
$25,000 fine if convicted of the
felony charges. His pretrial
hearing is April 5.

Smith was driving in snowy
conditions on Feb. 12 when the
car struck a tree. Authorities
say Smith and his passenger,
teammate Brian Carlwell, had
been drinking tequila and beer
before the crash. Smith, too
young to drink legally, had a
blood-alcohol level after the
crash that was more than
twice the legal limit, prosecu-
tors say.

Smith said he thought that
Carlwell, also 19, had been
killed in the crash. Authorities
contend that Smith left the
scene and drove the damaged
car back to his apartment.
Bystanders saw Carlwell
unconscious inside the car and
called police. Carlwell was
hospitalized for several days
yath a severe concussion.

Smith has agreed to sit out
the rest of the season.

LATE THURSDAY

e No. 4 UCLA 885, Cali-
fornia 75: Josh Shipp scored
22 points, and Lorenzo Mata
added 14, leading a second-half
comeback that extended the
Bruins’ home winning streak

_to 19 games.

UCLA (24-3, 13-2 Pac-10)
completed a season sweep of
the Golden Bears (14-13, 6-9),
who had won their two previ-
ous games at Pauley Pavilion.

Freshman Ryan Anderson
led the Bears with 21 points,
and Omar Wilkes was among
three players with 10 each.

e No. 23 Oregon 64, No.
9 Washington State 59:
Freshman Tajuan Porter
scored 21 points, and Aaron
Brooks made a layup with
12.9 seconds left to seal Ore-

‘ gon’s home victory.

The Ducks (21-7, 9-7
Pac-10) had lost three games in
a row and six of eight. The vic-
tory marked the third time
Oregon has defeated a top-10
team this season.

Washington State (22-5,
11-4) had won five in a row
since a 77-74 overtime loss to
Oregon in Pullman, Wash.

e No. 11 Nevada 84,
Idaho 68: Nick Fazekas
scored 21 points and grabbed _
14 rebounds to help the Wolf
Pack (25-2, 12-1 Western Ath-
letic Conference) beat the host
Vandals (3-24, 1-13).



HEY LPL Les)

Washington 31 22
Orlando 27 29
Miami 26 28
Atlanta 22 33

Charlotte 22 33
ATLANTIC we
Toronto 30 25

New Jersey 26 30
New York 25 31
Philadelphia 18 37
Boston AB 40.
CENTRAL WL
Detroit ‘35 19
Cleveland 32 23
Chicago 32 25
Indiana 29 25

Milwaukee 19 37

’ SOUTHWEST WL

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf

585 -

5-5 L-1 21-7 10-15 20-11

482 5Â¥2
481 5%
400 10
400 .10

Pct. GB

545 -
464 4%
446 56
327 12
.245. 16
Pct. GB
648 -
582 3%
561 4%
537 6
339 17

down 16 rebounds for the Bobcats.

Kyle Korver scored 10 of his 21 points in
the fourth quarter for the Sixers, and Andre
Miller added 15 points.

RAPTORS 110, PACERS 88

TORONTO — Chris Bosh had 23 points
and 12 rebounds, leading the Raptors.

Jorge Garbajosa added 16 points for the
Raptors, who have won nine of their last 10 at
home. Toronto rebounded from a disap-
pointing loss to Cleveland on Wednesday.

Jamaal Tinsley had 19 points for the Pac-
ers, who fell a half-game behind the Raptors
in the East. Darrell Armstrong made a 59-
foot-heave at the buzzer at halftime for the
Pacers’ only highlight.

' HORNETS 98, SUPERSONICS 97

NEW ORLEANS — David West had
23 points and 11 rebounds, and the Hornets
moved into the eighth playoff spot in the
Western Conference.

Tyson Chandler added 15 points and
19 rebounds for New Orleans (27-29), which
moved ahead of the idle Golden State War-
riors (26-29) by a half-game for the last play-
off spot in the West.

Allen finished with 32 points for the
SuperSonics, whose recent winning streak



TOM OLMSCHEID/AP

THE PLAYMAKER: Suns point guard Steve Nash blows past Timberwolves forward
Kevin Garnett. Nash had 15 assists to lead Phoenix to a 116-104 victory on Friday.

ended at three games. Rashard Lewis had 18
points and 12 rebounds for the Sonics, and
Earl Watson scored 18 points.

HAWKS 105, ROCKETS 99

ATLANTA — Joe Johnson scored 31
points, and Atlanta overcame a 37-point
effort by Tracy McGrady to beat Houston.

Josh Smith and Marvin Williams each had

20 points for the Hawks, who hit seven free .

throws over the final 75 seconds of the game
to seal the victory.

The Hawks had suffered four home losses
in a row before continuing their history of
home success against the Rockets. Houston
has lost 20 of its past 27 games in Atlanta,
including three in a row.

LATE THURSDAY

e Mavericks 112, Heat 100: Dirk Now-
itzki had 31 points and 11 rebounds and the

- host Mavs took advantage of Dwyane

Wade's absence and won their 10th in a row.
Miami was playing in Dallas for the first
time since winning the NBA title in Game 6
of the NBA Finals last June. Wade, who aver-
aged nearly 35 points per game in that series
and was the Finals MVP, is considering sea-
son-ending surgery after dislocating his left
shoulder Wednesday in a loss in Houston.



Mem. at Port., late
Utah at Den., late

"Bos. at Lakers, late

18-11 9-18 15-20
15-10 11-18 13-15
10-16 12-17 12-21
13-15 9-18 14-20

3-7 3
7-3) -L-2
5-5 W-1
5-5 W-4

15-14 11-16 19-14

4-6 L-1 10-15 8-22 13-19
19° L-2 5-21 8-19 9-24
L10° Str. Home Away Conf
9-1° W-3 ‘ 18-10"
6-4 Ll 20-8 12-15. 19-15
55 W-3 22-7 10-18 23-10
6-4 L-L 18-10 11-15 20-14
1-9 L-7 11-12 8-25 9-24

WESTERN CONFERENCE —

Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf:

Dallas 45. 9. 833 - (10-0 W-lC _ 25-3 20-6 30-6
San Antonio 37 18 673 8% 6-4 W-4 17-8 20-10 22-11
Houston 34 20 .630 11. 6-4 L-1 20-7 14-13 19-17
New Orleans 27 29 .482 19 7-3 W-2 18-11 9-18 16-19
Memphis 14 42.250 32 2-8 L-3 11-17 3-25 8-27
NORTHWEST W. L_ Pct. GB L110 Str. Home Away Con Conf
Utah 35 18 660 - 7-3 L-l 21-6 14-12 20-11
Denver 26 26 «500 8% 4-6 L-2 14-14 12-12 11-18
Minnesota 25 30 .455 11 3-7 L-3 16-11 9-19 15-20
Portland 24 32 .42912% 5-5 W-2 13-14 11-18 15-17
Seattle 21. 33) «.389:14% 46 L-1 15-13 6-20 10-21
PACIFIC W L_ Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Phoenix 42.13 .764 - 6-4 W-3 21-6 21-7. 21-10
LA. Lakers 30 25 545 12 3-7 L-6 19-9 11-16 17-11
Golden State 26 29 .473 16 5-5 W-2 20-9 6-20 14-17
LA. Clippers 25 29 .46316% 3-7 L-4 17-10 8-19 14-18
Sacramento 23 31 = .426:18% 5-5 L-2 16-12 7-19 12-21
RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Friday’s results Tonight’s games Thursday’s results .
Det. 94, Orl. 89 GS. at Clippers, 3:30 Dal. 112, Miami 100

~ Tor. 110, Ind. 88 Tor. at Cha., 7 Chi. 84, Cle. 78
Cha. 102, Phi. 87 Sea. at S.A., 8 Was. 109, Sac. 106
Atl. 105, Hou. 99 Phi. at Mil., 8:30
N.Y. 95, Mil. 93 Bos. at Utah, 9
NJ. 109, Sac. 96 Den. at Dal., 9
Chi. 105, Was. 90 ;
Pho. 116, Min. 104
N.O. 98, Sea. 97

NBA LEADERS

Through Thursday

SCORING
G FG FT PTSAVG

REBOUNDING
G OFF DEF TOT AVG

Anthony, Den. 37 419 263 1121 30.3 Garnett, Minn. 53 138 528 666 12.6
Arenas, Wash. 52 481 413 1523 29.3. Chandler, NOk. 53 220 433 653 12.3
Wade, Mia. 46 445 413 1324 288 Howard, Ori. 55 182 479 661 12.0
Bryant, LAL 51 483 413 1465 28.7 Boozer, Utah 45 142 389 531 11.8
Iverson, Den. 36 341 2981013 281 Okafor, Char. 54 221 408 629 11.6
Redd, Mil. 35 322 252 969 27.7 Jefferson, Bos. 46 160 340 500 10.9
Allen, Sea. + 43 404 225 1161 27.0 Lee, N.Y. 54 188 392 580 10.7
James, Clev. 53 508 321 1402 26.5 Duncan, S.A. 55 159 424 583 10.6
Nowitzki, Dall. 53 461 371 1344 25.4 Wallace, Chi. 53 211 345 556 10.5
Carter, N.J. 55 488 297 1379 25.1 — O'Neal, Ind. 47 114 373 487 10.4
FIELD GOALS ASSISTS
GGA PCT G___AST_AVG
Biedrins, G.S. 251 410 .612 Nash, Phoe. 48 567 11.8
Lee, N.Y. 234 383 611 Williams, Utah 52 478 9.2
Howard, Orl. 357 596 .599 ~— Kidd, NJ. 53 468 88
Stoudemire, Phoe. 391 659 .593 Paul, NOk. 38 329. 8.7
Curry, N.Y. 398 675 .590 Davis, G.S. 43 372) 87
Boozer, Utah 410 721 569 Miller, Phil. 52 423, 8.1
Bogut, Mil. 286 520 .550 Wade, Mia. 46 362. 7.9
Brand, LAC 423 775 546 ‘Ford, Tor. 47 366 (7.8
Okafor, Char. 335 618 .542 Billups, Det. 45 339 7.5
Patterson, Mil. 313 580 540 — Felton, Char. 51 3847.5

NBA AWARDS a

PLAYER OF THE MONTH

November
Eastern Conference: Dwight How-
ard, Orlando Magic
Western Conference: Yao Ming,
Houston Rockets

ROOKIE OF THE MONTH
November

Eastern Conference: Adam Morti- _

son, Charlotte Bobcats
Western Conference: Rudy Gay,
Memphis Grizzlies

December ‘December
Eastern Conference: Gilbert Arenas, Eastern Conference: Jorge Garba-
Washington Wizards josa, Toronto Raptors

Western Conference: Kobe Bryant,
Los Angeles Lakers

January
Eastern Conference: Chris Bosh, To-
ronto Raptors
Western Conference: Steve Nash,
Phoenix Suns

Western Conference: Randy Foye,
Minnesota Timberwolves

January
Eastern Conference: Andrea Barg-

nani, Toronto Raptors
Westem Comberence Brandon Roye,
Portland Trail Blazers

20-8 10-17 21-11:
-, 15-13 10-18. 15-19...

17-9° 25-10°
THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com

repairer entrar

PRO FOOTBAL

INTERNATIONAL EDITION _ SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007 | 5B



Dolphins going after McIntosh |

BY JEFF DARLINGTON
jdarlington@MiamiHerald.com

INDIANAPOLIS — The
Dolphins appear ready to
begin addressing one of their

Most pressing offseason con-
cerns, as they have initiated
contact with left tackle Dam-
lon Mcintosh about a poten-
tial return next season.

‘With a thin group of tackles
in the free agent market — as
well as a mediocre draft class
at the position — the Dolphins
could instead look to maintain
cohesiveness by bringing back
the seven-year veteran to once
again compete with L.J. Shel-
ton for the starting job.

“We’ve been in contact
with [the Dolphins],” Brett

’ Tessler, MclIntosh’s agent,
said Friday at the scouting
combine. “I’m hoping things
will pick up in the next week,
and hopefully we’ll be able to
get something done. But if not,
we'll find out what’s available
in free agency.”

McIntosh, an unrestricted
free agent, returned to the
Dolphins after the team ini-
tially terminated his contract
last season. An increased sal-
ary cap paved the way for his

NFL NOTES

Tomlinson’s
family suffers
a double loss

~ From Miami Herald Wire Services

The father of NFL MVP
LaDainian Tomlinson was
killed Friday in Waco,
Texas, when the pickup in
which he was a passenger
blew a tire and then flipped
on a highway.

Oliver Tomlinson, 71,
was killed at about 1:30 p.m.
CST in the rollover acci-
dent, said Charlie Morgan,
a Texas Department of
Public Safety representa-
tive. Morgan also said
LaDainian Tomlinson, who
grew up in Waco, had been
notified.

The driver, Ronald C. ,
McClain, was believed to
be LaDainian’s brother. He
was rushed by ambulance
to Hillcrest Baptist Medical
Center, where he later died.

Witnesses said that a tire
on the 1969 Chevrolet truck
blew, causing the truck to
swerve right, briefly going
off the road. McClain
reportedly overcorrected,
causing the vehicle to then
swerve to the left and
careen off the road.

The vehicle then flipped,
landing on a gravel mound.

McClain and Oliver
Tomlinson were ejected
from the vehicle. Morgan
said they did not appear to
be wearing seat belts.

Jewel Tomlinson, Oli-
ver’s wife and LaDainian’s
stepmother, said her hus-
band and McClain had been
returning to Waco after a
trip to the family home in
Tomlinson Hill, Texas.

ELSEWHERE

e Giants: Tiki Barber
said last week that Tom
Coughlin helped push him
into retirement and a new
gig with NBC. On Friday,
Coughlin pushed back.

“[That] bothered me,”
Coughlin said. “... I think
to give the illusion that I
had something to do with
his retirement .— I don’t
quite follow it.”

e Browns: The team
won a coin flip with the
Buccaneers and will pick
third overall in April at the









NFL Draft.

The teams had 4-12
records last season, and
their opponents had the
same winning percentage,
making the coin toss neces-
sary.

e Raiders: The team
signed defensive tackle
Terdell Sands and line-
backer Robert Thomas.

Sands got a four-year,
$17 million contract that
includes a $4 million sign-
ing bonus. Thomas agreed
to a three-year, $6 million
deal with a $1.5 million sign-
ing bonus.



return, but he was only given a
one-year deal at the league

A return next season would
certainly garner a much larger
contract — and it would keep
alive the competition between
he and Shelton for the starting
job. Shelton shifted to right
guard last season, but the
move was made solely
because of injuries.

During the move, however,
McIntosh showed clear
improvement, having arguably
the best season of his career. It
was still believed the Dolphins
would attempt to upgrade the
position, a notion that is still
alive if a deal isn’t worked out.

UNEXPECTED VISITOR

While chatting in general
manager Randy Mueller’s
office during the week of the
Super Bowl, Mueller and Cam
Cameron received an unex-
pected — and enlightening —
visitor.

Indianapolis Colts general
manager Bill Polian visited as
his team prepared for the
Super Bowl at the Dolphins
facility. Polian, one of the
league’s most respected GMs,

THIS IS THE WAY IT IS: ‘I don’t think there’s
caller,’ Cam Cameron, the Dolphins’ ne

INSIDE THE GAME | DOLPH

MIAMI DOLPHINS | NOTEBOOK



MICHAEL CONROY/AP

LOSING POINTS: Notre Dame quarterback Brady Quinn
does not know why his stock is falling around the NFL.

ended up meeting with Cam-
eron and Mueller for “an hour
or two.”

“It was awesome, a great
resource,” Mueller said. “I’ve
been in the league 22 years
and still, the week of the Super
Bowl, to have what ended up
being the Super Bowl GM
come in and spend an hour or
two with Cam and I in my
office was a great resource.

“We asked a lot of ques-

S’ NEW HEAD COACH

tions, we picked Bill’s brain
and he was kind enough to
share a lot of insights with us. I
think that helped Cam and I
grow as a unit as well because
it’s a two-man job along with
all of our staff.”

RUNNING-BACK HELP?

Although Cameron had no
updates about the potential

return of running back Ricky —

Williams, he did say the team

IN

RR



would approach free agency
and the draft without compen-
sating for him. Reason being,
Cameron said the team would
make decisions based on who
is on the roster and Williams
has not been reinstated.
“When [players] are out
there practicing with us and
eligible to practice, then we're
going to focus on those guys,”
Cameron said. “I think that
serves our team the best.”

WAIT AND SEE

As quarterback Cleo
Lemon waits to see how the
Dolphins will tender him as a
restricted free agent next

_ week, quarterback Joey Har-

rington’s future with the team
also could be in question.
Then again, Cameron said,
that’s no different than any
other player.

“{Harrington’s] status is
just like anyone else,” Cam-
eron said. “It’s the same as
Cleo’s. Of course, Cleo’s a
restricted free agent so the
specific status is a ittle differ-
ent. We’ve talked on the
phone and his status is no dif-
ferent than anybody else’s.”

However, since the Dol-



MICHAEL CONROY/AP

any magic in naming an offensive coordinator if the guy is not the play
W.coach, said about any perceived need to hire an offensive coordinator.

Cameron is clear on offense

Mi Dolphins coach Cam
Cameron said he is
confident he can be the
head coach and the
offensive coordinator.

BY JEFF DARLINGTON
jdarlington@MiamiHerald.com
INDIANAPOLIS — The
answer comes quick. Not like
many of the other ones, those
touchy topics ranging from a
questionable quarterback to
the return of a running back.
Instead, when Dolphins
coach Cam Camerecn spoke
Friday about his ability to run
an offense — while also coach-
ing an entire team — all of his
previous hesitations, cautions

-or cliches immediately faded.

Does Cameron really think
he’s capable of serving as
Miami’s coach and offensive
coordinator at the same time,
something that isn’t done by
any other coach in the NFL?
You bet.

“I think without question,”
Cameron said Friday.

As some continue to won-
der when Cameron will finally
add an offensive coordinator,
he gave reason to believe the
person might already be on his
staff. And his name is Cam
Cameron.

“I don’t think there’s any
magic in naming an offensive
coordinator if the guy is not

people thi

the play ¢aller,” said Cameron,
who became known as one of
the league’s most innovative
offensive minds during his
time in San Diego. “I’m going
to call the plays with the help
of the offensive [staff], just
like I’ve always done.” -

That’s not to say Cameron
absolutely won’t hire an offen-
sive coordinator — he just
doesn’t feel any pressure to do
so. And considering the cur-
rent experience on his staff,
from Hudson Houck to Mike
Mularkey, it. wouldn’t be
entirely implausible.

Nonetheless, it would cer-
tainly be different. Currently,
10 head coaches in the NFL
call their own offensive plays,
but all 10 also have offensive
coordinators. Many of those
coordinators also serve as a
position coach, but that
wouldn’t be the case in Miami,
since Cameron has hired assis-
tants for each position.

Most recently, Cameron
hired Terry Shea as the quar-
terbacks coach, quelling
rumors the offensive coordi-
nator would also tutor the
quarterbacks.

“We wanted to hire a quar-
terbacks coach, and we’ve
done that,” Cameron said. “I
don’t want to get in a hurry of
hiring someone just because
nk you need to have

nl



a offensive coordinator title.”

Of course, there are still
options available. Broncos
running backs coach Bobby
Turner has interviewed for the
position, and Cameron has not
taken his name out of the hunt.

It also seemed possible the
Dolphins would make a hard
run at Clarence Shelmon, who
was promoted to the Chargers
offensive coordinator after
Cameron departed. But new
Chargers coach Norv Turner
retained Shelmon.

So for now, the actual
offensive coordinator
“vacancy” will remain unfilled
— unless Cameron decides
he’s cozy keeping the spot
warm himself. Should he
decide to run the offense him-
self, relying on assistants to
aid him, there are two poten-
tial downsides.

First, he could begin run-
ning himself too thin — but
other NFL coaches said that’s
not a huge concern with the
right staff around him.

“You're team might look at
you as being one-handed,”
said Chiefs coach Herm
Edwards, still noting that it has
worked for many coaches. “All
of a sudden, you stay on one
side of the ball because your
emphasis is on one side of the
ball. But players realize some-
times coaches do that.”

Cameron said it would still
be important to avoid such
dilemmas of alienating the
defensive side of the ball. Even
though Dom Capers is capable
of handling full defensive
responsibilities, Cameron said
he still plans to have some
focus on defense,

“I think the key is making
sure your defense is squared
away first because I’m still
accountable to the defense,”
Cameron said. “And in no way
am I just going to be over here
coaching the offense and then
not being involved in the
defense.”

Make no mistake, either:
Just because Cameron js
offense-minded, general man-
ager Randy Mueller said, Cam-
eron isn’t dumb about defense.

“He knows how to attack
[defenses], therefore he knows
how to go after defensive play-
ers weaknesses,” Mueller said.

But whether Cameron
decides to hire an offensive
coordinator or whether he
simply relies on his assistants
to collectively help out, it
remains clear which voice the
quarterback will hear when
the play comes in.

“It’s ultimately going to
come out of my mouth to the
quarterback,” Cameron said.
“But I'll get great input from
our entire staff.’



phins could save nearly
$2 million by waiving Harring-
ton, he remains one of several
veterans in jeopardy of being
released. Harrington and Cam-
eron have yet to meet in per-
son because Harrington is pre-
paring for his wedding.

A BIG PUZZLE

Long considered one of the ©

top picks in the NFL Draft,
Notre Dame quarterback
Brady Quinn remains a bit
puzzled why league chatter
has suggested his stock is slip-
ping. Could Quinn really fall
all the way to the Dolphins
with the No. 9 pick? He cer-
tainly doesn’t think so.

“It’s kind of hard for a guy
to slip when we haven’t done
anything,” Quinn said. “I
didn’t play a game for the past
couple of months. It’s funny to
kind of sit back and hear some
of that and you're thinking,
‘Did somebody see me in the
weight room miss a rep? I’m
kind of confused.’ ”

Quinn said he still believes
he’s the most experienced
quarterback in the draft, and
he is still hopeful he will be the
Raiders’ No. 1 overall pick.



DOLPHINS -
TICKETS

Team

prices

BY JEFF DARLINGTON
jdarlington@MiamiHerald.com
_.. Although the Miami Dol-
phins made efforts to main-
tain the same ticket prices
_-forone third of the stadi-
um’s seats, most fans will
endure another hit to their
wallets if they plan to
attend next season’s home
games, :
As a result of continued

cap, the team raised prices
to keep local revenues in
line with the NFL’s system,
team president Bryan
Wiedmeier said Friday.

Season tickets for lower-
level seats will run between
$77 and $98 per game.
Many upper-level seats also
will exceed the $70 mark.

However, the Dolphins
also created four tiers of
pricing in an effort to pro-
vide more options for fans
wishing to attend games.
Rather than seven price cat-
egories, the team will now
offer 11 options, the cheap-
est of which can be pur-
chased in the economy sec-
tion (highest section in the
end zone) for $39.

The increase in prices
might come as a surprise to
some, especially since the
Dolphins have not yet
improved the product of
football being played. How-
ever, Wiedmeier said, the
team decided years ago to
implement an objective sys-
tem that causes ticket
prices to follow the league’s
cap increases.

The team’s success or
failure does not affect deci-
sions in ticket pricing.

“That’s why we made
the decision a number of
years ago to mirror the
[NFL] system,” Wiedmeier
said. “And the system is, the
cap increases every year.
You basically have to grow
your local revenues to stay
competitive.

“The more you don’t, -

you fall further and further
behind.”

Wiedmeier said she
understands the hikes can
be frustrating, but he said
the team is making efforts
to make sure the public can
still afford certain tickets.

“What we want to do
organizationally is make
sure we can have a wide
variety so you don’t price
people out,” he said. «

The Dolphins’ prices still
fall in the bottom quartile
among other NFL teams,
Wiedmeier said.



raising —

hikes in the league’s salary ©
TRIBUNE SPORTS



PAGE 6B, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007



COMICS PAGE.




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EAST . South goes up with the ace, leads
#1064 the heart nine to the ten and muffs
VA52. dummy’s last diamond with his last
5 09743 trump, the king. A spade is then led
3 &I72 ‘to the jack and the J-8 of trumps are
SOUTH cashed, drawing East’s last two
@#KQ95 trumps as declarer discards the Q-9
VÂ¥KQ94 of clubs! :

#8 At this point, South’s last three
AQ95 cards are all spades, and he simply
The bidding: cashes them to make the slam. The
South West North East potential club loser, more imaginary

l& Pass 1¢ Pass than real, turns out to be a mirage.
14 Pass 39 Pass The method of play utilized here
3¢ Pass . -44@ Pass; is called a dummy reversal. Instead
4NT Pass 59 Pass of trumping his losers in dummy,
6% which is what declarer usually does,

South must go down one in six
hearts, since the club finesse on
which the slam appears to depend is
destined to fail. But appearances can
sometimes be deceiving. With cor-
rect play, the contract can be made
wi



South dealer. with the ace and cashes the king, dis-
Both sides vulnerable: carding a club. He then mffs a dia-
NORTH mond with the queen of hearts and

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returns the heart four to dummy’s
seven, Let’s assume East takes the
ace (whether he wins or not doesn’t
matter) and returns a club.

he reverses the procedure and trumps
dummy’s losers in his hand. In effect,
dummy becomes declarer and
declarer becomes dummy.

In this deal specifically, South
plays the hand as though he is
declarer with the North cards at six
hearts and East’s opening lead is a
diamond. The fact that he is physi-
thout doing anything particularly — cally seated South rather than North

=o ae P ‘ should not deter him from adopting
Declarer wins the diamond lead ~ what is clearly the best line of play.

Vie) =a oe

HOW many words of four letters or more can make
from the letters shown here? In making a sori cach letter
a be used once only. Each must contain the centre letter
.and there must be at ieast one nine-letter word. No plurals
oc verb forms ending in “s", no words with initial capitals
and no words with a hyphen or apostrophe permitted.

The Arst word of a phrase is permitted (e.g. inkjet in inkjet
printer).

TODAY'S TARGET :
Good 38; very good 57: excellent 75 (or more). Solution Monday.

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION

erosion inert inner insert Inter intern intro iron °
TRONSTONE nitre nosier ores orient orison osier rein
rent resin resit rest rinse riot rise risen rite rites roost
root rose rosin rote senior senor serotonin sinner
sinter sire siren snootier snore snort sooner sootier
sore sort sortie stern stir stonier store tenor tern tier
lire toner tore torn torsion torso trio

At first glance, it might seem that
































SATURDAY,
FEBRUARY 24
ARIES — Mar 21/Apr-20

. and you’ ll experience a new Vitality.
TAURUS — Apr 21/May 21

heels, know what you’re getting into.
GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21

way it should be, you may decide.
CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22

Don’t take this out on loved ones.
LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23

certain friends rather boring.

VIRGO - Aug
You may not be happy with your cur-
tion, you'll find that you really don’t
have it so bad after all.

LIBRA - Sept 23(Oct 23

This should be a calm, easy week
with no shocks or surprises to upset
things. Try to keep a fair balance
between work and play.

SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22
You will find yourself being pulled
in many different directions at work.
You're persistence is admirable, but
you must delegate some of your
responsibilities so you don’t get
completely overworked.
SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
This is going to be one of those weeks
where everything seems to keep you
waiting. You also will have difficulty

doing any clear-cut planning. Don’t.
Jet your frustrations get to,you; life ~

should get easier by week’s

CAPRICORN -— Dec 22/Jan 20
Something that happens this week
will be very important to you. Be
ready for opportunities, This is a

good time for buying and/or selling. ,

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
Don’t waste your energies on ven-









This would be an excellent. time to
take a trip or even a weekend get-
away. Your health should improve,

This should be a very amusing but:
unproductive week for you. You will
find yourself spending more time social-
izing and less time working. That’s the :

Use your imagination if you are
unsure of your next move. A change
of scenery could be stimulating as
you are likely to find the company of ;

You may be about to start a sudden and
deep relationship with a Scorpio of the ‘
Opposite sex. This could be a happy
affair, but, before you fall head-over-

6
ee
t
'

People won’t be easy’ to please, so .
don’t bother trying too hard. Mundane
issues will surround you, and you will
find yourself getting bored and cranky.

Ba sar sae * aa bebe tale den phys igi ee












December (5) 2 To make the bed up with lace can be tures that could prove worthless.
8 Made to play quietly (5) a failure (7) Pes fea te] You may be feeling a little sad about
10° It goes round or back to 4 Asoft service but with speed (4) a friend moving away. Meditation
the right (6) 5 Apoem in red, maybe, is not what it bee eles should help you relieve the blues.
11 Bronco buster’s horse (3) used to be (6) ’ P ISCES i Feb 19/Mar 20
12 London Town in the current 6 One generously shoving a letter in i | ' | Spencing ee ae reads is the ,
orn tear eT Se ot aa ea
iti clear, | 7 Australian resembling Teddy (5) ei a y.
13 What it is to find the motorway 9 o if involved in arguments of any
possibly? (7) 9 High spot in hetorc (8) Fe as | se kind — especially those at work.
15 They go with guys (5) 12 A lively movement (7)
18 Pass an officer on the left (3) 14 Nicotine extract conducive | ‘ a
19 A broken romance (6) to sleep (3) | |
21 How Ted Ear 16 Joins for golf? (5) ;
changed (7) 17 Chuck's little goose has bt] wie Simon Williams v David Howell, '
22° The charm of lake and river? (4) no energy! (5) Hilsmark Kingfisher v Guildford-
23 Comprehensive 19 Les is upset about Vera Pee ADC, UK 4NCL league 2006. Iwo ‘
‘personal cover (4) being in a group (7) mr be . of England's best young talents
24 Stops and stares bemusedly around 20 Barbara accepts a novice talks too ; i met, and Howell (Black, to
move) has a fine position with
the air terminal (7) freely (5) Yookand
26 Little restaurant with that Gallic fee! 21 Come up for a pay increase (5) ee capeting thant aor N i.
about it (6) : 23 | It prevents a drunken sot very aL ee 1 Lure (5) positions like this, spars look '
29 In Australia, a little quietly getting some beer (7) 8 Wa a sy 2 Comfort (7) to recognise attack pattems cht i
bounder (3) 24 Painter who might start getting out ai 10 Mature (5) . 4 Attentive (4) known from previous games. cies ES ‘
"31 Cold steel, possibly? (5) ‘ ofline? (6) _I 11. Tin (3) : oe a So Howell analysed Rh2, | fe (aks :
32 Once princely title (7) 25 Incash, it's not enough N a hee (5) fay 7 Started (5) metennn ve White Pa ] ey | Pw Py ‘
reement . 'e Sm L amet '
ot ele aes awe) 2 18 Classification (5) 9 Sprinted (3) Another typical idea Is Rh1 + so —
upset? (5) F 27 The epic poem one mislaid? (5) = 18 Be indebted to (3) 12 Crept (7) m that if Kxh1 Qh3+ (the g pawn : ,
35 Just what you'd expect from dad - 28 Bells across the meadow? (5) 19 Place of worship (6) ‘14 Female sheep is pin ; :
ed aa seb te chane Bk 7 2) 21 Old cinema (7) 16 African country (6) ae oe Kg! Qxg2 mate. This ice defences and led to
higntt (3) ae ne oiaD Olan pereanel ty < 22. Character (4) 17 Feeling (5) re because White's queen Cs smate, For full solution credit,
36. A bent straw and all? (5) nominally (5) Lu 23 Fewer (4) 19 Meaningful (7) guards h3, while 1... Bh2+ is you also : Sto find ‘s best \
37 Plead to go by bike? (5) Sort of tennis suitable for card 24 Master (7) 20. Spoilt children (5) met simply by Kf1. The non- Counter and its vee ;
38 Keats composed playersi (4) 26 Detected (6) 21° Drift (5) sactifidal Qg4 Is good, but J
29 Age (3) 23 Tolerant (7) Howell instead found a forcing ’
one for a bet (5) 33 Tricked by some shady dealer (3) Sonate 24 Term of office (6) tactic which demolished the LEONARD BARDEN ;
wae Le a eee ee sa 25. Garden
> F 32 Cargo (7)
Friday's cryptic solutions Friday's easy solutions ; implement (3)
ACROSS: 8, SL-R-ayed 9, Call names 13, Aval(a vel) 14, | ACROSS: 8, Gorila 9, Sideboard 12, Ahead 14, Abide 15, Ba biliary Tenate, 27 Wireless (5)
Foint 15, Matine-e(arty) 16, Set up-on 17, Rents 18, O-C-_ | Unaware 16, Hostile 17, Giant 18, Debut 20, File 22, 85." Organ of hearng 28 Log (5)
27, Pia 90 Spoor (wy iV Aes 9 Fenise Ue | ent Se oe anasto, Not, 36. Sf 30 Scrap (6) )
+ p Vn . , UNI ) ‘i if y
it 36, Still 37, In a st-ew 39, Reserve 41, A-lich 42, None too 41, Regal 42, Total 44, Courteous 44 : sof Rage (5) Ran away (4) Chess solution 8296: 1..Bxg2i and if 2 Kxg2 Qg4+ 3



32
Down 1 fobs lar agit) 2 Tel 3, Keo ba eee eae
:1, raight) 2, in 3, Keeping back 4,
HeLa Ser to Sn nn Cs
, He-art-y 19, C-our-age 21, Took otf 24, | Di 19, Bolster’21, Flaccld 24 al
Seth 026, Non saa 26, Cop rally 29, Bullets 30, | 26, ry 28, Buttercup 29,,On the go 30, ‘
- 32, 33, D-owned 34, Asserts 38, Tender pons Cemetery 33, 34, Scooter 38, Nutmeg

Kfl Rhl mate. So White tried 2 Rxe5 Qg4l 3 Qg3 BI! 4 ;
Qxg4 Rh mate. ‘ ‘
Mensa quiz: 17.30 or 5.30pm. ‘
One possible word ladder sohution is: JEST, pest,

post, pose, poke, wobe, JOKE



arter.

DOWN: 1, Hovers 2, Windpipe 3, Pleased with 4, Liberates

ao ee 10, Rasher 11,
Pester




San






PAGE 6, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Prime Minister urges confidence
in the future in Grand Bahama

@ PRIME MINISTER Perry Christie is pictured here with Pegasus CEO Mr. Jasper Knabb during his company's grand opening at



Freeport on Thursday evening. Left to right participating in the ceremonial ribbon cutting are: Obie Wilchcombe, Minister of Tourism;
Vincent Peet, Minister of Financial Services and Labour; Prime Minister Christie; Mrs: Knabb and Mr. Knabb.
(BIS Photo by Vandyke Hepburn)

LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
Grounded In The Past & Geared To the Future

Worship Time: lam & 7pm

Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer Time: 6:30pm

Place: The Madeira Shopping. |
Center

Pastor Knowles can be heard
each Sunday morning on

‘Joy: LOE9:at-8:30a:m Mer Dr. Franklin’ Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND
Pastor: Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles
P.O. Box EE-16807

Telephone number 325-5712
Email-lynnk@batelnet.bs



THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
sina P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
ywmmme Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-8135

WN CHURCH SERVICES
WME SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 200
FIRST SUNDAY INLENT

a AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road

11:00AM Rev. Mark Carey/HC
| ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,
: Prince Charles Drive :
11:00AM Rev.Dr. Laverne Lockhart

COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Bernard Road
11:00AM Pastor Sharon Loyley/HC

CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Zion Boulevard
10:00AM Mr. Sidney Pinder

7:00AM Cell Group #1

EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,
East Shirley Street

11:00AM Pastor Martin Loyley
7:00PM Mr. Allison Underwood

GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH,
Queen’s College Campus
9:30AM Rev. James Neilly/HC

ST. MICHAEL’S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill
Avenue

8:00AM Connections - Rev. Phillip Stubbs
9:30AM Rev. Philip Stubbs/HC ;

‘ ra it TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
AsJ{ 11:00AM Rev. William Higgs
Rev. William H

IETS eee LTE LTA UAaRAN ERLE DITEO ER

RADIO PROGRAMMES
RENEWAL’ on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1

|
Your Host: Rev. William R. Higgs
‘METHODIST MOMENTS’ on each weekday at 6:55a.m.
Your Host: Rev. William R. Higgs







































YOUTH AND YOUNG ADULTS LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE
will be held on March 2-4, 2007 at Westley Methodist Church, Tarpum Bay, South
Eleuthera.




The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 25TH, 2007

7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Tezel Anderson
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Bro. Andre Bethel
7:00 p.m. Rev. Ernest Miller/Board of Men & Women’s Ministry



Ore CDN er MY eM LM i 1

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ° Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 25TH, 2007

11:30 a.m. Service Speaker:Pastor Michael Johnson



Topic: The Marriage Relationship Between Christ & The Church
6:30 p.m. U.M.D. Rally at Englerston Gospel Chapel
- Cordeaux Avenue West
Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. ¢ Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m. —

« Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. ¢ Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
\ ~ .¢ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesda
* Sisters’









ys) SN
Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)



ULI SSNS RN EAVWQ MGB MW sAsB$PQqo
NES S|
\

es VN & \\ =
_

- so LDIER
Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL
Preachering 11am & 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:
Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2
Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

Pastor:H. Mills

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
Pastor: H. Mills © Phone: 393-0563 ¢ Box N-3622



QE HH




S

' (a, Brenig
mwhere|peopleldiscovenGod||

WORSHIP AND. LL TES de
UNDAY SERVICES

ming Worship Service... 8.30. am.
_ Sunday School for allages... 9.45a.m. —
~. Adult Education vc. vas 945 am,
_ Worship Service wc. an 11.00 am,
__ Evening Worship Service ...
- . Summer ,.7,00 p.m.
Winter... 6.30 p.m.



RADIO MINISTRY :
Sundays at 8:30 a.m, - ZNS | - TEMPLE TIME
2 Visit Our Premise Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

-~EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God

}

| PA VOMOR CME enti

Tel: 322-8304, Fax; 322-4793, P.O, Box: N-1566

EE ICUEC GUase MUL SLSHICaul a

FEISS SSS SS



















'





DRAWING attention to mil-
lions of dollars being spent on
construction in Grand Bahama,
Prime Minister Perry Christie has
again stressed the need for people
there to be confident of their
future.

Mr Christie was in Grand

Bahama for Pegasus. Wireless
Corporation’s grand opening.

The multi-million dollars high-
tech facility on West Settlers Way
and Oak Street employs 90
Bahamians. Over the next few
months it is expected to bring
staff up to near 300 people.

A NASDAQ trading compa-

ny, Pegasus offers a line of indoor

and outdoor products that
enhance the wireless networking
experience.

The company recently
launched a new wireless video-
streaming technology, CYNAL-
NX, which earned the coveted
Technical Excellence Award
from PC Magazine this year. It
is also planning to relocate its US-
based corporate offices to Grand
Bahama.

Donate

Pegasus chief executive Mr
Jasper Knabb, confirming his
company’s commitment to Grand
Bahama and the Bahamas, said
it will donate two labs to Hugh
Campbell Primary School and
Freeport Anglican High School
as well as ten yearly scholarships
to the College of The Bahamas.

Addressing a large audience at
Thursday’s opening, Mr Christie
said he had always told people of
Grand Bahama that “you must
be confident of your future. I
have never hesitated to look you
in your eyes with the greatest

‘optimism about your future.

“T have even told you that you
have allowed your psyche to be
defined by the Royal Oasis and
that is a fatal, fatal experience in
your lives. You must avoid that
because in the past year on this
island, over $180 million of con-
struction value was approved,”
he said, indicating that things
were happening on the island.

“That means that companies
like Associated Grocers, or by
the local name International Dis-
tributors, with their business or
their construction about 40 per

cent complete, is that much near-

- er to hiring 200 additional

Bahamians here in Grand
Bahama.”
Mr Christie said the container
port, with 700-plus employees, is
showing confidence in the econ-
omy of Grand Bahama and is
about to expand and hire an addi-

tional 400 people.

He added: “I am coming back
soon with good news, because we
are. going to remove that burden
off your psyche.” ;

Focusing on Pegasus’s opera-
tion, Mr Christie said the compa-’ -
ny’s CEO Mr Jasper Knabb was
determined to make it happen,
so much so that he did not take
time out to seek any concessions
from the government.

Speaking to Pegasus staff, most
dressed in khaki pants and blue
golf shirts bearing the company’s
logo, Mr Christie said the future
was all about young people.

“The same kind of energy and
enthusiasm that you have brought
to bear today must be the
energy and enthusiasm that
you must bring into your work-
place. °

“The training that will take
place or that is taking place in
this building must be training that
you absorb so that the intention
and objective of the company can
be achieved,” he said.

Mr Christie said last year the
company’s CEO indicated he
would give everything to make it
work and could transfer his oper-
ations out of Taiwan and China to
Grand Bahama.

“He spoke of employing hun-
dreds of Grand Bahamians. I sup-
pose if I was being loose with my
language, which I will be now, I
can say so said, so done,” he said.

Claiming his government had

‘brought in more than $18 billion

in investment, Mr Christie said
the intention was not limited to
giving safe haven to investors, but
enabling young Bahamians to get
jobs and other Bahamians to
become self-employed business
people.

He noted that Mr Knabb, in
the process of reaching the point;
of opening, had spent over $5 mil-
lion directly in the local econo-
my. :

He encouraged Bahamians to
dream on and to let no-one “kill
your dream.”




*

THE BAHAMAS, TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS
CONFERENCE
OF THE METHODIST CHURCH IN THE
CARIBBEAN AND THE AMERICAS ~
L’EGLISE METHODISTE DANS LA CARAIBE

ET LES AMERIQUES

NASSAU CIRCUIT OF CHURCHES tes<
108 Montrose Avenue y

P.O. Box EE-16379, Nassau, Bahamas; Telephone: 325-6432; Fax:

328-2784; rhodesmethod@batelnet.bs _, :

METHODISM: RAISED UP IN THE PROVIDENCE OF

GOD, TO REFORM THE NATION, BUT ESPECIALLY

THE CHURCH AND TO SPREAD SCRIPTURAL

HOLINESS THROUGHOUT THE LAND (Father John
» Wesley) '

“Celebrating 223 years of continuous Methodist witness
for Christ in The Bahamas”

THE SIXTH LORD’S DAY BEFORE THE
RESURRECTION/JUSTICE AWARENESS LORD’S DAY,
FEBRUARY 25, 2007 :

COLLECT:

Almighty God, whose Son Jesus Christ fasted forty days in
the wilderness, and was tempted as we are, yet without sin:
give us grace to discipline ourselves in obedience to your
Spirit; and, as you know our weakness, so may we know your
power to save; through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord.

WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malcolm Rd East)
7:00 a.m. Rev. Emily A. Demeritte (Holy Communion)
11:00am; Rev. Edward J. Sykes

RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (108
Montrose Ave. near Wulff Rd)

7:00 a.m. Rev. Leonard G. Roberts (Holy Communion)
10:00 a.m. Bishop Raymond R. Neilly
11:00 a.m. Bishop Raymond R. Neilly
Circuit Service for MCCA Men’s Lord’s Day



sas

= See

6:30 p.m.

COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH
(Rose Street, Fox Hill)

11:00 a.m. . Sis. Patrice Strachan

PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plaza)
11:00 a.m. Bro. Arthur Chase

HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHODIST
CHURCH (28 Crawford St, Oakes Field)

7:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes
10:00 a.m. Sis. Katie Carter

GOOD SHEPHERD METHODIST CHURCH
8:00 a.m. Bishop Raymond R. Neilly (Holy Communion)

CROIX-DES-MISSIONS ALDERSGATE (Quackoo Street)
5:30 p.m. Fridays — Children’s Club
9:00 a.m. Sunday = Youth Encuentro 2006

METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo St) -Thrift Shop
and other Ministries

JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE (28 Crawford
St., Oakes Field) Reception to Primary

PEACE AND JUSTICE CAMPAIGN 2007: — All Methodists
of the Conference are urged to pray and to fast for Justice to
prevail in. the Methodist Cases. The fast begins weekly after
the evening meal on Thursday and ends at noon on Friday.
This we proclaim unswervingly: “My God and My Right.”

RADIO PROGRAMS

“Vision” - On the Lord’s Day, ZNS 1 at 9 p.m.; “Great Hymns
of Inspiration” - On the Lord’s Day, Radio 810 at 5:30 p.m.;
“Family Vibes” ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.; “To God be the
Glory” ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:45 p.m.





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