Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item
Resource Identifier:
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9994850 ( OCLC )

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PAGE 2, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007



Union exec claims Our Lucaya
refusing to engage in relations |

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT —- A Bahamas
Hotel Catering and Allied
Workers Union executive
claims that management at Our
Lucaya Resort refuses to
engage in proper industrial rela-
tions with local union execu-
tives.

‘Lionel Morley, BHCAWU’s

second vice-president, said that

labour matters relating to hotel
workers at the resort are being
sent.“over their heads” to the
union’s office in New Provi-
dence.

Mr Morley expressed his dis-
appointment and grave concern
over the situation during a press
conference at Workers House
on Wednesday.

He believes that manage-

ment’s continued failure to
communicate with local union
executives is “a slap in the face”
to them.

“That is not in the spirit of
good faith, and is a slap in the
face of executives based on the
collective bargaining agreement

between the union and man- -

agement.”

Since winning the union’s
election in May, Mr Morley said
even though the newly-elected
officers have extended the ‘olive
branch’ to management they
continue to face ongoing com-
munication challenges.

“The reality is that...we still
have some internal problems
since the election, and Our
Lucaya believe they can dis-
seminate information to certain
persons in Nassau.

“We have three duly elected

Pe ie ee oe Oe Me er ee ee ee

officers here in Freeport and
this is not fair; it is not right
because the people have placed
great trust us.”

Mr Morley stressed that exec-
utives in Freeport should also
receive communication regard-
ing matters relating to its mem-
bers in Freeport. ;

“T want to say that if Our
Lucaya is going to remain on
the island of Grand Bahama,

and Lionel Morley and his col-

leagues are going to remain to
here, there must be a better
mode of operation and com-
munication.

“There must a clear under-
standing and constant engaging
with respect to dialogue and
consultation,” he advised.

Mr Morley said the union is
working to resolve a number of

- trade disputes filed against man-

agement. :

Although union executives
have been able to bring resolu-
tion to some matters, he said

‘many are still outstanding.

“We have matters which are
still sitting in some desk moving
very slowly with no real desire
to be resolved.

“We believe that Our Lucaya
is insensitive to the plight of the
workers, or they believe that
employees’ matters can be put
on the back burner.”

Mr Morley said the union
is also Very concerned about
the reduced work days of
employees who work only
three and four days during
peak season.

He said the hours are not
consistent with the seven-and-a-
half hours workday, after the
hotel has reached 55 per cent

occupancy. He also said that
persons are not being placed on
the schedule during slow period
‘discriminately.

“We have exercised great
restraints to allow the resort to
gain a proper footing during
these depressed economic times
in Grand Bahama.

“We wish to foster a rela-
tionship that is conducive to
the betterment of the industry
and our members, but they
seem very irresponsive to the
plight of our members,” Mr
Morley said.

“We have co-operated in the
spirit of the agreement, but we
cannot allow management to
violate our agreement blatantly.
All we are saying is for them to
sit down with us so we can
resolve many of the small prob-
lems,” he said. .

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Crew of Dominican
vessel are accused
of fishing in |
Bahamian waters




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_ MIMAGES like this one, showing.a.stray. dog that frequents the. Arawak Cay area, are a

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testament to the fact that stray dogs pose a significant health risk. But not only are these
animals a hazard to humans, they are also suffering themselves












Cell us today & we will pul you

nassau
freeport t 2

(Photo: Tim Clarke)

RSTO

Bm By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

A DOMINICAN vessel was
apprehended off Ragged Island
on Wednesday under charges

i” of poaching in Bahamian waters

by the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force (RBDF).

The 70 foot vessel was in tow
to New Providence yesterday
and is expected to arrive at Pot-
ter’s Cay sometime this morn-

: . ing. However a second Domini-
can vessel which was appre- |

hended in the area escaped.
According to a release from
the Defence Force, 10 persons
were apprehended on board the
craft, along with an “undeter-
mined amount” of fishery prod-

~ She was OVERWHE LMED by all

the risks involved with.

starting her own business.

a Business Combined Policy









mnity & Burgl
loes she. i

»valStar
surance

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. ©2007 ADWORKS

ucts. ‘

Minister of Marine Resources
Leslie Miller said that the inter-
ception was done by the “Gua-
nahani”, a fishing vessel his min-
istry had recently donated to
the RBDF.

“This is yet another gross vio-
lation of the fishing laws of the
Bahamas,” Mr Miller said.

He congratulated the RBDF
for apprehending the two ves-
sels, and commented that it was
“a pity” that one of the vessels
got away.

Mr Miller said that his min-
istry will be initiating a new pro-

gramme between themselves, — :

the Ministry of National Secu-
rity and the RBDF to place
Defence Force officers on
major fishing vessels “from now
on”. He also said that his min-
istry will be handing over two
smaller boats to assist them in
apprehending poachers in
Bahamian waters.

“We just have to continue to’
be more vigilant, but everybody
has to play their part. In fact
we might go even further next
year and have some of the fish-
ermen become un-paid officers
or guardians so they themselves
would be in a position to,appre-
hend. Because this is a serious
problem we have to deal with,”
he said.

The vessel and its goods are
expected to confiscated and
handed over to the Ministry of
Finance. Officers are expected
to be posted at the dock to
secure the vessel, as the theft
of goods and equipment from
such boats have been a matter
of some concern.



from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

SS

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

THE TRIBUNE



15-year-old
dies after
bike collides
with truck

THE Bahamas recorded

r
’
“

A

“,

»
Â¥.

a

‘ee

oO,

its fifth traffic fatality of the ..’
year on Wednesday when a °.

15-year-old boy died in hos- ..

pital following a collision near

East Avenue and Carmichael -

Road.

Police have identified the ~

victim as Bernard Rolle, 15, .“

of McKinney Avenue. He
was reportedly riding an unli- ~'

censed blue and white dirt

bumper trail motorbike,
heading north on East.

Avenue around 4pm, when

he collided with a green 1985,
Mack truck travelling west on ..

Carmichael Road.

The truck is owned by >
Aquapure water company. «

The driver received no seri- '

ous injuries but the young

boy was taken to hospital :

where he died. Police are
investigating.

US commerce
secretary sees
no change on
Cuban policy

lj WASHINGTON

| US Commerce Secretary ‘
said
Wednesday it would be a ”

Carlos Gutierrez
“sreat disservice” for the
Cuban people if the United
States eased economic and
political ties with the island

in the post-Fidel Castro era, 2

according to Associated press.

“Cuba is at a critical point +

in its history,” Gutierrez said.
“The country is poised for

change. The policy of the :

Bush administration has been
to help the Cuban people
achieve their ‘freedom
through democratic change.”

Gutierrez serves as co- .

chairman of an official com-
mission which made recom-
mendations for Cuba policy

after Castro passes from the. 4;

scene.-He spoke to the Coun- ©

cil of the Americas, a pro-
business group.

Gutierrez’s speech was .

devoted mostly to the plight
of the Cuban people under
the system Castro created 48

years ago. He omitted any ~~

reference to Castro’s broth- '

er Raul, who has served as
acting president since the 80-
year old leader fell ill last
July.

In an interview with The :

Associated Press, Gutierrez
said, “Now isn’t the time to

ease the restrictions” on US :,.

ties with Cuba.

But there has been growing
interest in a reassessment of
policy toward Cuba follow-
ing Castro’s illness and the
emergence of the emergence
of a Democratic-controlled
Congress. The centerpiece of

: US. policy is the 45-year-old
i US. trade embargo.













a et LE FO EL a re



THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007, PAGE 3





In brief —

Guana Cay
campaigners
says concerns
are bypassed

THE Save Guana Cay Asso-
ciation is continuing its fight
against the Baker’s Bay devel-
opers, claiming that the con-
cerns of residents are being
bypassed by local government.

The association is opposing
building applications and per-
mits which they claim have been
awarded to the developers for
projects “each ranging from
$600,000 to $1.6 million for
buildings at Great Guana Cay.”

In a letter to the Hope Town
District Council, the association
said: “Despite our many
requests to central government,
to the Attorney General and to
the administrator, no-one has
seen fit to provide the citizens of
Great Guana Cay with copies
of either the applications or the
permits issued.”

The association said if it con-
firms that these new building per-
mits have been granted it “will
take appropriate action to seek
to quash those decisions.”

“We therefore take this
opportunity to ask you to please
provide us with copies of any
applications and/or permits that
have previously been made of
which your council or the
administrator is aware, either
to the central government and
its agencies and/or to the dis-
trict council and/or such as may
have been issued by the admin-
istrator to the council,” the asso-
ciation said in its letter to Hope
Town District Council.

The Save Guana Cay Asso-
ciation also announced that it
will soon challenge the legali-
ty of the proceedings approved
by the district council, alleg-
ing that some of its members
were appointed and not elect-
ed to office.

“Local government is all
about local rights and taking
into account the views and
allowing those who are most
closely affected by the proposed
developments to be consuited
and to have their views prop-
erly considered.

“The district council is statu-

torily supposed to be represen-
tative of the citizens, residents
and landowners of the district,”
the letter said.

The Save Guana Cay Associ-
ation reiterated that they are
opposed to the scale, scope and
extent of the proposed devel-
opment.

“As you are aware, our
clients complained of the exten-
sive environmental, social and
cultural damage as well as the
destruction of their traditional
way of life,” the association said.

Two men are
charged after
huge seizure ©
of marijuana

TWO men were arraigned

-in magistrate’s court yesterday

charged in connection with the

seizure of over $600,000 worth

of marijuana on Andros earlier
this week.

Ron Alfred Thurston, 34, and
Christopher Remourn Ebanks,
alias Christopher Outten, 34,
both of New Providence, were
arraigned before magistrate
Carolita Bethel at Court Eight,
Bank Lane, on several drug
charges, including conspiracy to
possess marijuana and impor-
tation of marijuana.

The men are represented by
attorney Michael Kemp. Both
pleaded not guilty to the drug
charges. Ebanks also pleaded
not guilty to the charge of deceit
of a public officer.

According to a court docket,
on Monday, February 19, 2007,
he deceived a police officer by
claiming that his name was
Christopher Outten, knowing
that was false information.

According to the prosecution,
the men are accused of posses-
siing 630,000 pounds of mari-
juana with an estimated street
value of $630,000.

Both were remanded to
prison and will return to court
on March.2, when a bail hearing
is scheduled to take place.

According to reports, around
1pm on Monday, DEU, Coast
Guard and DEA officers, while
on routine patrol, discovered a
white, red, and gold Aztec air-
craft on a dirt road in North
Andros.

Officers seized 16 crocus
sacks, one duffle bag, and one
plastic bag of marijuana.

aan
Bee)

ee EU ae
» PHONE: 322-2157



Stubbs defends constituency
record after attack by Bethel

@ By BRENT DEAN

SUGGESTING that Carl
Bethel is grasping at straws,
Sidney Stubbs, MP for Holy
Cross, refuted claims that he
did not have a constituency
office for two years, and
defended his record as a rep-
resentative of the area.

Mr Bethel alleged that Mr
Stubbs had not had an office
for nearly two years when he
spoke at the FNM rally at R
M Bailey park.

This raised the question as

to what was done with the
$18,000 that is allocated annu-
ally to all MPs for such an
office.

Mr Stubbs said his office
was only closed for a few
months during his term in
office because he was forced
-to change office locations.

“Our office was closed for a
few months while we were
looking for a new office. We
have a new office on Joe Far-
rington Road opposite Texa-
co service station painted in
the PLP colours,” Mr Stubbs

stated.

Mr Bethel also criticised Mr
Stubbs and the government for
not having created an adequate
‘number of public spaces in new
residential communities in
Holy Cross.

Mr Stubbs said a new park
was created in Hope Gardens
and that he has also created a
self-help entrepreneurial pro-
gramme, where young people
in Holy Cross have the con-
tracts to clean these parks.

According to Mr Stubbs,
fuhds for this programme come

Anna Nicole’s daughter
still to remain on island

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE

THE injunction blocking
the removal of the five-month-
old daughter of deceased real-
ity TV star Anna Nicole Smith
from the Bahamas is still in
effect after attorneys repre-
senting all parties in the
guardianship dispute appeared
in Supreme Court yesterday.

Last week, Smith’s mother
Virgie Arthur received an
injunction blocking the
removal of her granddaughter
Dannielynn from _ the
Bahamas. Arthur wants to be
named the legal guardian of
the child.

The injunction now contin-
ues until Monday, when all
parties are expected to return
to court.

Attorneys exited to a swarm
of international media after
two hours in closed court.
Some US media agencies had
been camped out just a few
feet away from the Supreme
Court complex since early
Thursday.

Attorney Jamal Davis, rep-
resenting Smith’s mother Vir-
gie Arthur, spoke with the Tri-
bune after the closed court ses-
sion yesterday.

“Today we made submis-
sions to try and get the
guardianship issue determined.
“Prior to those submission
there was an application to
decide whether the procedure
is the most conducive proce-
dure to the continuance of the
application for guardianship.
There was an application for
the paternity issue between
Larry Birkhead and Howard
Stern,” Mr Davis said. “So the
application now is to really to
have all of these actions com-
bined into one. So it has to be
determined now whether the
application launched on behalf
of Ms Arthur is the most con-
ducive to have all of these
actions disposed of at one time

‘and that is where we are at

now,” Mr Davis said.
Attorney Wayne Munroe,
who is representing Howard
Stern, Smith’s companion, was
tight-lipped on the court’s pro-
ceedings. “I cannot tell you
what was discussed apart from



@ JAMAL Davis, one of the attorneys of Virgie Arthur,
answers questions after the court hearing concerning

Dannielynn’s guardianship





@ THE international and local press flood the steps of the
Supreme Court during the hearing ,

the fact that there were pro-
cedural discussions and that
the injunction continues until
Monday,” Mr Munroe said
outside court yesterday.

A decision has not yet been
made on who gets custody of
the five-month-old girl.

Three men claim to have

. fathered the baby girl, who

could potentially inherit a mul-
ti-million dollar fortune. Since
the death in 1995 of her 90-
year-old husband, Texas oil
tycoon Howard Marshall,
Smith had been waging a court
battle over his estate.

Smith gave birth to her
daughter on September 7,

(Photos: Ana Bianca Marin)

three days before her 20-year-
old son Daniel died while vis-
iting her in a Nassau hospital.
A birth certificate lists Stern
as the girl's father but Smith's
former boyfriend Larry Birk-
head has gone to court in
Florida in pursuit of DNA
testing to prove he is the
father. Prince Frederic von
Anhalt, the husband of the

-actress Zsa Zsa Gabor, has

said he had a decade-long
affair with Smith and will file
his own paternity challenge.
Smith, 39, died at a South
Florida hospital after being
discovered unconscious in her
hotel room.

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In regard to Lynden Pin-
dling Estates and Kool Acres,
where Mr Bethel criticised the
government for not having cre-
ated public parks, Mr Stubbs

said he is working with the gov-.

ernment to locate green spaces
for these communities.

Mr Stubbs also took credit
for having paved roads in resi-
dential communities such as
Kool Acres, while criticising



the FNM for having left parts
of these roads in poor condi-
tion during their administra-
tion.

Mr Stubbs did not comment
on whether or not he will again
receive the nomination for
Holy Cross.

. Rumours have emerged
suggesting that Mr Stubbs may
not be nominated as a result
of the controversies that sur-
rounded him as chairman of
BAIC, along with his much
publicised bankruptcy trial.



HM WAYNE Munroe, the attorney for Howard K Stern, leaves
the Supreme Court amidst a sea of press

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007

oat >

ee ee eS ee ee ee

se Bigs a ee ee ee

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO.THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE












































































































































































The Tribune Limited |

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI

Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398



Bahamians want to move on

WE WERE in the US this week and so
missed both political rallies and all the brouha-
ha resulting from them.

Although we have much catching up to do,
we were quickly brought up to date by a bag-
gage handler on arriving at the airport yesterday
and callers on a talk-show that we listened to on
the drive to town from the airport.

Apparently we were the first customer that
the young baggage handler had had for the day.
A look around the Customs area did not show
promise of him having another customer from
that flight, and so he was happy to walk our
luggage from the arrival lounge to the car park.
Asked where we had parked our car we
described the area as down the pedestrian path
that rain or shine always has a large puddle of
water in the middle. That seemed to press a
sensitive button.

“Oh, Lord,” he said looking skyward, “we
can’t wait to get Hubert back! You watch the
first thing he’s going to do is get this airport
straight.”

We don’t think he knew who we were as he
tried to put us in the political picture. He said
that all the government party wanted to talk
was race. “But, I thought that was all behind
us,” he said. “We have no time for that. I don’t
know where they are, but we have moved on.
We want to work together. We want to be one
people.”

It has always struck us as strange that come
election time, the PLP has had to — in one way
or another — insert the race card to create divi-
sion and envy among a people who otherwise
live in harmony.

Years ago ZNS-TV was rushed into exis-
tence to arouse racial animosity by the showing
of “Roots”. The film was so effective that it
took Bahamians’ minds off the issues of the
day and the failings of the PLP and turned them
to root among their own past to dredge up old
wounds and suspicions. Each succeeding elec-
tion Roots was dragged from the closet until
people objected.

The late Sir Lynden Pindling was a master of
divide and rule — and he certainly kept this
nation divided. However, the tactic reveals the
inferiority complexes under which many of our
leaders still labour. They are complexes that
they want to play on to control the Bahamian
people.

But as the years roll by, their game is losing
its appeal. Young people today don’t know
much about Sir Lynden — one young person
had a vague idea that at some stage in our his;
tory, he was a prime minister. Nor did he know

the background of Independence. And what .

was even more interesting, he was not the least
bit interested in learning anything about either.
He had moved on. He was reaching to the

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future, looking straight ahead, not back over
his shoulder. As one young man once said to us:
“Give me a clipped version — I have no time for
more.”

The PLP were often out of step with Bahami- .

ans. We remember when PLP politicians were
still talking about JP Sands and his segregated

grocery store on Bay Street to Bahamians who

had no idea who JP Sands was.

As the young baggage handler said: “We
have moved on, we want to live as one people
— we want Hubert!” .

When we got to our car we switched on the
radio and listened to the end of a lively talk
show with a caller claiming that Mr Ingraham
had committed treason. From what the next
caller said in reply we got the impression that
Mr Ingraham had been accused of treason
because he had offered for a third term as prime
minister. The second caller had to remind the
first that this was nothing unusual in the
Caribbean. He recalled that Michael Manley
had come back to lead Jamaica after being
defeated and out of office for several years,
and Sir John Compton, the father of St Lucia’s
Independence, was called out of retirement at
the age of 81 to again lead that country to vic-
tory in the December elections. Sir John had
led St Lucia for 29 years.

Another caller to the show felt that race had
been blown out of all proportion. He pointed
out that the rich white man did far more for
the poor black man, than the rich black man did
for his own people.

Another commented on the prime minis-
ter’s praise of former housing minister Shane
Gibson for the number of low cost houses built
during his administration. The caller said he
was not interested in the numbers, he was inter-
ested in. the quality of the work — and accord-
ing to owners’ complaints, Mr Gibson had pro-
duced numbers, but not quality.

He was annoyed that the Prime Minister
was still praising Mr Gibson. When a minister
does wrong, the Prime Minister should admit
the wrong, and move on, said the caller.

And, according to PLP chairman Raynard
Rigby, the PLP is “fighting a campaign on phi-
losophy, not race.”

If it’s philosophy they’re fighting then they
have lost most of the people who won’t wait

around to hear even a “clipped version.”

Many Bahamians are tired of the clap-trap.
For them, Hubert Ingraham is not the issue,
but crime is, so is the proliferation of drugs,
over-crowded schools, and sub-standard health
care. There is unrest among certain areas of
the civil service over unresolved matters of pay.

Today Bahamians want to feel safe in their
homes, in their jobs, in the future — they have
no time for a debate on PLP philosophy.


















Gibson has no
one to blame
~ but himself

EDITOR, The Tribune.

“WHATEVER may have
been his lapses in personal
judgment, whatever may have
been his indiscretions or errors
of judgment, I accept his word
when he says he had no sexu-
al affair or no sexual miscon-
‘duct with Anna Nicole Smith.
I accept that. I accept that
because his wife, Jackie, who
is a minister of religion in Mt
Tabor Church and formerly
in the Church of God of
Prophecy, I know to be a
woman of God and I knew
based on what she has said she
was as much a friend of Anna
Nicole Smith as her husband.”

The prime minister said, “I
am satisfied that Shane Gib-
son is fully aware of how he
must go about making this
fight to remove this stain that
they have purposefully put on
shim. I know and I believe that
he is aware that he must do
the right thing.”

Those are the words of an
obviously confused Prime
Minister. Well for starters
Shane’s resignation is the right
thing to do. Period. Mr Shane
Gibson has nobody to blame
but himself. He has brought
this on himself. To make a
conspiracy of this matter and
to suggest that he was set up is
to really try to cloud and mud-
dy the issue.

The issue is really as clear as
plastic!

Did the minister act inap-
propriately by befriending
Anna Nicole to the point that
he can be caught dead or alive
in the bedroom of a morally
challenged celebrity like
Nicole? One must remember
that Nicole’s reputation pre-
ceded her. Want for a better
word she was in fact a sleaze
queen. In fact one would think
that a religious man like Shane
would not put this woman on
a pedestal or role model for
anyone let alone put himself in
the midst of such an unholy
mess. Shane’s arrogance was
such that even after the per-
manent residence scandal,
which in my opinion was bad
in and of itself, Shane never-
theless continued a very close
friendship with Anna! It
would have been a very simple
matter for Shane to take note
of the fact that Anna’s resi-
dency permit was indeed a hot
potato and with allegations to

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Phone: 323-6452 * 393-5798

Fax: 326-4488/394-4819

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(BAAM)
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will sponsor It’s first seminar on
on Sunday 25" February 2007
2pm to Spm
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Presenter: Mr. Brian Blackburn — Research Biochemist.

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LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net

_ the effect that the minister had

fast tracked the permit of
Anna and may have acted
inappropriately by accepting
the cheque payable to the
Treasury for the permit at
Anna’s residence.

The irony of those photos
of Shane on the bed with
Anna, fully clothed by the
way, lends credence to Tracey
Ferguson, a lawyer in the firm
of Calendars’ allegation that
the minister received the per-
manent residence cheque at
Anna’s residence — which the
minister has denied — and
possibly in her bedroom! And
with all of this accusation,
Shane never once thought
about himself, as a minister of
cabinet and that, like the wife
of Caesar, he should be above
reproach.

In fact Shane showed just
what he thought of his cabi-

net position and the Bahami-
an people when asked if he
ever thought that his relation-
ship was inappropriate with
Anna. He said she was a
friend! In other words his
friendship with a woman by
his own admission he met late
last year was more compelling
than his obligation to. the
Bahamian people. What gross
disrespect to his Prime Min-
ister and to the Bahamian
people!

So Christie and his sympa-
thisers can try to cloud the
issue with conspiracy theories
and the likes, but the truth of
the matter is that former Min-
ster Shane Gibson showed
gross disrespect for the posi-
tion he once held and brought
international shame and
embarrassment to the
Bahamas, his colleagues and
family. The blame should go
no further than at his
doorstep!

STEPHEN ROLLE
Nassau,
February 19, 2007.

The design of the
new Straw Market

EDITOR, The Tribune.

BEING well informed in the construction industry I’m surprised
by Minister Roberts’ statement that the cost of the proposed straw
market was way off the Richter scale by comparison to the cost sug-
gested by the quantity surveyor. At a $13 million estimate the

ft.

building being approximately 160,000 sq ft would give $81.25 per sq

Now if Minister Roberts and if his quantity surveyor have been
involved in construction for any duration of time in the Bahamas or
the Caribbean a construction cost of $81.25 per sq ft would be
unbelievable. In fact a cost of $81.25 per sq ft in North America '
would be unbelievable. The design of the New Straw Market is first

convoluted to say the least.

There are a variety of different mediums in its construction,
structural steel, reinforced concrete and precast, making this a
logistical nightmare just trying to find space to store these materi- |
als which only added more cost to this project. There was a base-
ment in the original design that’s been removed.

A ridiculous concept with the ocean only a few feet away and
even more ridiculous was the fact that the transformers and gen-
erator were housed in the basement. And what’s that crazy tower
all about. Actually I feel that the whole design is poor. This build-
ing should have been a four or five storey building with the vendor’s °
being on the ground and first floors and paid parking on the upper ;

floors.

This would give some revenue to help pay for the building. Stop
all parking on Bay Street. Make an area for bus stopping further off
Bay Street than existing and enforce that. Let’s get real, Minister
Roberts, and redesign this building and at least make it functional. ,

INFORMED
Nassau,
February, 2007.

Technical
Scholarships
available

¢

$7,500 Lyford Cay Foundation
Technical Training Awards

Train for careers in

Agriculture/agribusiness
ir conditioning/refrigeration
Auto, marine & aviation
mechanics
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Diesel technology &
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Machine shop/welding
Computer service technology
Hospitality & tourism
Technical instruction &
education
Health care, medical
technology & more

Apply today
Applicants must be
Bahamian with high school diploma
Plan to pursue a vocation valuable to The Bahamas
Pledge to return to The Bahamas upon graduation
Other qualifications may apply

Applications available from The Manager's Office, BTVI,
or write to Technical Training Scholarships,
Lyford Cay Foundation, P.O. Box N 7776, Nassau.
or online at www.lyfordcayfoundation.com

_ DEADLINE TO SUBMIT COMPLETED APPLICATION MAY 1, 2007



SS



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007, PAGE 5





Daylight
saving time
policy to
change

IN March this year, the
Bahamas will adopt a new
policy on daylight saving
time.

It will begin at 2am on the
second Sunday in March,
2007, instead of the first Sun-
day in April, and will contin-
ue until 2am on the first Sun-
day in November, 2007,
instead of the last Sunday in
October.

Consequently, daylight sav-
ing time will be observed
from Sunday, March 11, to
Sunday, November 4, 2007.

The Bahamas joins Aus-
tralia, Canada and the United
States in adopting the new
system.

Dominican
Republic
economy
grows 10.7%

@ DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
Santo Domingo

THE Dominican Repub-
lic’s economy in 2006 experi-
enced its highest growth in
almost two decades, the Cen-
tral Bank said Monday,
according to Associated Press.

Gross domestic product
grew 10.7 per cent as infla-

tion fell to 5 percent, marking 3

a continued recovery from a

2003 banking crisis that i

wiped out much of the coun-
try’s economy.

Construction, communica-
tions and the financial sector
grew the most over the year,
each registering more than
20 per cent growth.

The country’s free-trade
zones, facing increased com-
petition for the US market,
declined 8.3 per cent.
Nonetheless, more than
61,000 jobs were created and
unemployment dropped to
16 per cent.

Overall, it was the best per-
formance since 1987, the
bank said. ee

Share
your
neuvws

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Call us

} on 322-1986 and share
your story.

Se) ee ee Rs (a
_ Fertilizer, Fungicide, -
Pest Control
Tropical CEL

822-2157

GRR ees

FRIDAY,
FEBRUARY 23RD

11:00 Immediate Response
Noon ZNS News Update
12:05 Immediate Response





















Cont'd

1:00. Legends: James Catalyn

2:00 One Cubed

2:30 Turning Point

3:00 Fellowship Of Christians
& Jews

3:30 Ed Young

4:00 The Fun Farm

5:00 ZNS News Update

5:05 The Envy Life

5:30 World Stage Bahamas:
Duke E. Strachan

6:00 Caribbean Passport

6:30 News Night 13

7:00 - The Bahamas Tonight

8:00 55 Degrees North

9:00 Hugh Campbell Courtside
Express

9:15 Gillette World Sports




3 D' Funk Studio

10:00 Caribbean Newsline

} 10:30 News Night 13

11:00. The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30 Community Page 1540 am

SATURDAY,

FEBRUARY 24TH
6:30am Community Page 1540AM

| 9:30














9:00 Bahamas @ Sunrise
10:00 Int'l Fit Dance

10:30 Dennis The Menace
11:00 Carmen San Diego
11:30 Little Robots

noon Underdog




NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
right to make last minute
programme changes!








m@ By BRENT DEAN

THE use of race in the PLP’s

campaign has sparked much

public debate and outrage.
Elements in the party appear

determined to scare voters into

thinking that the FNM is.set to.

re-enslave the black majority
by handing over the govern-
ment to ‘hidden forces’ — an

: allusion to white Bahamians.

Some commentators suggest
that the playing of the so-called
‘race card’ is a sign of despera-
tion by the PLP in what now
appears to be a close election.

Consequently, The Tribune
spoke to several young white
Bahamians to get their impres-
sions on the PLP’s strategy of
resurrecting race as a campaign
issue in the upcoming election.

James stated that the attempt
to link modern white Bahami-
ans with the actions of the old
white Bahamian oligarchy many
decades ago is irresponsible and
unfortunate.

He stated: “I just think that it
is very old. That’s the first thing
that I think about. It’s tired,
played out and has been done
too many times. It’s 2007 and
far too long past the UBP days
to continue to talk about this.
Race is an old tired theme.”

James has become accus-

tomed to the PLP raising this
theme around election time. As
a younger person, he recalled
being offended by the deroga-
tory references that emerged
about white Bahamians, via
PLP rhetoric.

However, as an adult, he said
that he ignores this type of dis-
course.

For James, it is “laughable”
for a Bahamian political party
to engage in racial politics at
this stage of the country’s
development.

Another commentator, Scott,
argued that the PLP’s use of
race is a desperate ploy to take
attention away from the party’s
inadequacies. He stated:

“I think it reeks of despera-
tion. To go to an issue like that
is clearly a tactic to divert atten-
tion from the real issues they
cannot answer for.”

Scott, too, is not offended by
this political rhetoric, as he
thinks the party does not even
believe the anti-white messages
it sometimes proclaims. Rather,
he suggested that the party may
be attempting to use the strong
emotions associated with race
to rally certain sectors of the
electorate.

Scott suggested that the
progress made in this country
surrounding race relations and

Are voters bored
of the ‘race card’
being employed?

economic development, in com-
parison to our regional partners,
should be the focus of political
parties, instead of the demoni-
sation of any particular racial
group.

He said: “I think that we are
probably the luckiest place in
the Caribbean in terms of race
relations. It really is not the
issue here that it is for other
countries like Jamaica.”

Laura, too, agreed that no
party should use race as a mere
political tool to rally public sup-

ort.

She stated that “at this point
and time it is probably inap-
propriate and un-called for.”

Acknowledging that some
Bahamians — both black and
white — still hold racial bias,
Laura argued that discussions
about race should be undertak-
en responsibly, rather than
through fear inspiring rally talk,
which ultimately reinforces
racism.

Allan said the current gov-
ernment is misunderstanding
the mindset of Bahamians if
they assume that race is a still
major election issue in the
Bahamas.

He said: “Elections are about
issues. In 1967 the issue was
race, and it was settled. In 1973
everybody became Bahamian —



@ FRED Mitchell on Tuesday night referred to Brent



Symonette as the ‘heir of the U“3P’ — sparking debate on the
use of race as an issue in the neat election

blacks and whites — and Inde-
pendence happened. In the year
2007, it would be a real sad state
of affairs if the current govern-
ment thinks race is the issue
again.”

Allan assumes that the PLP is
using race to rally core party
supporters. Yet he wonders
whether or not this tactic will
backfire on the party.

If the PLP makes race the
main, or a main, issue in the
remainder of their campaign, it

will ultimately fall on the
Bahamian people to make a
decision on this campaign strat- |
egy through the ballot box.

At this stage of national devel-
opment, when various sectors of
the Bahamian society have, for
the most part, moved on from
the politics of 1967, it would
appear that ‘race card’ should
be dealt with great caution.

e SEE next Monday’s
INSIGHT for more views on
the race issue.

Homeowner complains that government
house still not fixed after five months

@ By. BRENT DEAN

ANOTHER frustrated resi-
dent of Excellence Estates, a
new government housing sub-
division, has come to The Tri-

_bune to publicly speak about

the deficiencies in his home.

The resident, who we will
refer to as “Mr Jones”, has had
to endure a new home with
cracked walls, an incomplete
porch with exposed steel and
now parts of the roof boxing
are coming away from the wall
of his house since September.

Mr Jones said he sent a letter
to the Ministry of Housing a
few months ago and is yet to
receive any response to his
grievances.

The home-owner questioned
the inspection process at the
ministry that allows homes to
be passed as satisfactory, at
various stages of the inspec-
tion process, despite obvious
flaws.

He said the Department of
Housing must reform its prac-
tices to give homeowners val-
ue for money.

Mr Jones said contractors are
not being adequately held
accountable by the Ministry of
Housing for their work and he
challenged the ministry to
improve its practices.





interpersonal skills

public speaking skills

would be an asset.



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Sandals seeks to identify a results-oriented and strategic thinker,
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He said: “They need to step
in and deal with these people
because at the end of the day it
is making the government and
ministry look bad. Someone

needs to be accountable fof the’

government’s money.” ‘~

Minister of Housing ie
Wisdom recently stated that
homeowners should bring their
grievances to him so he can help
in having them resolved.

This declaration, however, is
not an overwhelming vote of
confidence in the Ministry of
Housing’s bureaucracy. The
many levels of management
should be able to resolve these
matters, said Mr Jones.

He felt there is obviously
some deficiency within the min-

istry if it is necessary for the ©

minister to have to intervene in
disputes.

He argued that if the minister
has to step in and mediate dis-

putes, then it would be reason- -

able to suggest that the senior
civil servants in the ministry are
performing their jobs inade-
quately and may need to be
removed.

Residents of Excellence
Estates have made numerous
public complaints regarding the
state of their homes over that
last few months.

Homeowners complained






























about the quality of paint
used in the homes, cracks in
tiles and walls along with
chronic problems with doors
being very difficult to close -
suggesting they may have

Colors:

Brown
Black

been improperly installed.
One homeowner even
alleged police harassment after
going public with her story last
month.
Mr Jones said homeowners

Rosetta St.

of Excellence Estates are deter-
mined to have these grievances
resolved in a timely fashion, and _.
they plan to have a neighbour-
hood meeting to plan their next
course of action.





A

Children’s foundation expands
into sewing classes and tutoring |

| Helping hand for orphans and homeless

“y

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ok oe ee

4 .© Fe

oF 2 2.4%, GD

ade ie

THE Children’s Paradise
Foundation, which offers
orphan and homeless children



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CPA or equivalent;

of the Bahamas vacations
throughout the year, has
expanded its programmes to

















a
aut oD
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the position of Financial Controller.

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cover letter and resume to the following address or via e-mail no later than
February 28, 2007 to:

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P.O. Box CB-13931
Nassau, the Bahamas
E-mail: tonysan@coralwave.com



include sewing classes and an
“Education Circle.”

The sewing classes are
offered to several young women
who live in the Elizabeth
Estates Home For Children, as
well as the Ranfurly Homes.
Sewing rooms have been estab-
lished by the Children’s Par-
adise: Foundation and are
equipped with new sewing
machines and the necessary

~ equipment. The Foundation has

also hired sewing teacher San-
dra Meadows to share her
expertise with the girls.

“I am very honoured to teach
these young ladies the skill of
sewing,” said Ms Meadows, who
also owns the design and tailor
shop Sandra’s Closet in Kool
Acres. “I see myself in their
eyes. I got pregnant as a teenag-
er and never thought I could be
anybody. Through hard work I
became skilled and I now have
a business. They are learning
real life skills something they
can always use in their lives and
I am happy to do it.”

Twice a week the girls in the
programme meet and sew all
under the watchful eye of Ms
Meadows:

“I love the classes and I am
already using my skills in my
life,” said one student. I am
making curtains for this class-
room and I have sewn skirts for
friends, clothes for myself and
hemmed pants for others. I now
have something in my life that I
can do and use for work and I
thank God.”

When the young ladies grad-
uate, they will each receive a
new sewing machine courtesy

of the Children - Paradise Foun-

dation. Plans are also being
made to include young men to
teach them sewing and uphol-
stery.

An ‘Education Circle’ was
also created to provide home-










points of sewing

work assistance and tutoring
by local school teachers for
children without parents or
stable homes.

“These programmes are
making a bid difference in the
lives of these children and I
am so grateful for the gener-
ous donations the Foundation
has received,” said Dorothy
Propach, who founded the
Children’s Paradise Founda-
tion in 2004. “The friends,
family and business associates
of Mr Peter Kugler have made
a significant contribution. He
supported our programmes so
generously and now the dona-
tions made in his name, has
made it ‘possible for the Foun-
dation to offer the sewing
classes, the “Education Cir-
cle” and to continue to offer
our children great vacations.”

To date children from the
Ranfurly Home, the Chil-
dren’s Emergency Hostel,

B TEACHER Sandra Meadows shows her students the finer

@ LEARNING to measure the proper width for a hem.



Nazareth Centre, the Eliza-
beth Estates Children’s Home
and the Bilney Home for Chil-
dren have enjoyed adventur-
ous, educational and fun-filled
trips to the Adventure Learn-
ing Centre, picnics to Cabbage
Beach, and swim lessons at the
Flamingo Swim Club. The
children have also been spon-
sored by Dolphin Encounters
to interact with the dolphins
and to participate in educa-
tional programmes. Scott
Saunders and Pierre Monnard
have also sponsored day trips
to Rose Island.

“Providing children without
parents or homes with learn-
ing opportunities and vaca-
tions is so important,”
Dorothy adds. “We are going
to continue to offer them
meaningful experiences. These
children deserve to have the
opportunity to learn, be sup-
ported and to have fun.”

Twill turn their mourning to joy, will

comfort them, and make them rejoice. —

rather than sorrow”

&

Those left to mourn are, husband, Dr. John A. |

Jeremiah 31 B |

Johnson: daughters, Dr. Lisa Johnson Bazin,
Chistin Peterson, Dr. Bridgette Johnson and
Jahan Johnson; grandsons, Gabriel Bazin and
Keithroy Peterson, Jr; Son-in-law, Dr. Hanz

Bazin and Keithroy Peterson Sr, and a host of

relatives and friends.



THE TRIBUNE



In brie

McCartney

leave crime
post to run

for House

@ BRANVILLE McCartney

ATTORNEY Branville
McCartney resigned this week
as chairman of the Chamber of
Commerce Crime Prevention
Committee to pursue political
interests.

In a small ceremony in the
Village Road headquarters of
Halsbury Chambers, McCart-
ney turned over his responsibil-
ities to Dionisio D’ Aguilar, first
vice president of the Chamber.
Mr D’ Aguilar had served on the
committee with Mr McCartney.

McCartney is seeking a seat
in the House of Assembly, rep-
resenting the Bamboo Town
constituency. os

On Wednesday, chamber .

president Tanya Wright told the
board of directors that McCart-
ney’s leadership had paved the
way for the Chamber to serve as
an important link between busi-
ness and law enforcement.

“In any society, under any cir-
cumstances, the pursuit of busi-
ness is dependent on a feeling of
security,” Mrs Wright said.
“Economic expansion can only
take place in an environment
where people believe their
investment is safe. And noth-
ing has the power to.stymie eco-

'. nomic growth faster than a per-

vasive fear of lawlessness or
crime. :

Earlier, Police Commissioner
Paul Farquharson credited
McCartney with engaging the
business community in the fight
against crime. “Bran has made a
real diiference in the fight
against crime. I am sorry to lose
him in his capacity as the com-
mittee chairman but I wish hia
success in his endeavours. He's
one of a kind,” he said.

Case of dead
robbery
suspect to go
to cornoner

FREEPORT - The shooting
death of an armed robbery sus-
pect by officers on Grand
Bahama will be forwarded to
the Coroner after police inves-
tigations are completed, a senior
police official reported on
Wednesday.

Gregory Henry Lundy, 30, of

* Yeoman Wood, was shot dead

over the weekend during a con-
frontation with officers follow-
ing an armed robbery on
Sergeant Major Road.

Chief Superintendent Basil
Rahming, press liaison officer,
said the case file in connection
with the incident will be for-
warded to Her Majesty’s Coro-

ner once their investigations *

have been concluded.

According to reports, officers
were told that a man armed
with a cutlass had robbed the
convenience store at Cora’s
Place Plaza on Sergeant Major
Road around Ipm on Saturday.

The first police unit arrived
within three minutes and
observed the suspect walking
north on Sergeant Major Road.
The officer ordered the armed
suspect, who was wearing blue
jeans, a multi-coloured jacket, a
camouflage cap and black
gloves, to drop his weapon.

It is alleged that the suspect
broke the driver’s window with
the cutlass and also shattered
the passenger side window and
put the officer in fear for his
life. Shortly afterwards, when
two units arrived to assist, the
suspect allegedly charged one
of the officers with the cutlass.
The officer ran to avoid being
injured, but lost his balance and
fell to the ground.

It is alleged that the suspect
was about to attack the officer
when the officers shot him. The
man was pronounced dead on
the scene by paramedics.

eS TIT RR A OP a A LT

ee ke ee ee



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007, PAGE /

THE TRIBUNE

oO In brief

Dominican
Republic free
trade zones
‘in danger’

@ DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
Santo Domingo



THE Dominican Repub- :
lic’s free-trade zones, which
produce 80 per cent of the ;
country’s exports, are in dan- i
ger of failing if a US trade }

agreement is not implement-

ed soon, an industry group
said Wednesday, according to :

Associated Press.
The Dominican Associa-

tion of Free-Trade Zones said :
that competition from Asia :
and high fuel prices will lead ;
to bankruptcies and wide- :
spread layoffs if the agree- i
ment, which has been delayed :
for more than a year, is not :

put in force.

About 580 companies have
factories in the Caribbear

country’s free-trade zones,

where manufacturers enjoy

investment incentives on the

condition that all goods pro-

duced are sold overseas.

But business in the zones }
declined 8.3 per cent in 2006, ;
. due mostly to losses in the |
textile sector, the Central ;

Bank reported this week.

That comes on the heels of

an association report that the

zones have lost 40,000 jobs —

some 20 per cent —in the past ;

three years. ©

Antigua to

Review

MAK

QS



lm By JASON DONALD

THE Bahamas International
Film Festival (BIFF) continues
its Monthly Film Series this Sat-
urday with the screening of Half
Nelson in Rawson Square at
7.30pm.

Starring Ryan Gosling in an
Oscar-nominated role, Half
Nelson is the story of high
school teacher Dan (Gosling), a
troubled man struggling with
drug addiction and loneliness.

While in the classroom, Dan
finds some consolation for his
empty life, but his spiralling use
of narcotics threatens his career,
as well as the bond he has
developed with young student
Drey (Shareeka Epps) - a bond
which may just lead him to the
redemption he craves.

Any concerns that Half Nel-
son is yet another clichéd
teacher/student inspirational
drama are quickly dispelled —
Dan begins the movie with the
respect of the students and his
time in the classroom is when
he is at his most content.

The real drama happens on-

Film Series screening this year

the fringes of the school, as Dan
stumbles through a private life
that only Drey is aware of,
There are. no grandstanding
speeches, no preachy messsage
as such, just-intense, low-key

drama with strong perfor-

mances.

Gosling and Epps are sensa-
tional in their roles - their awk-
ward friendship is brilliantly

realised without ever resorting
to sentimentality. Gosling
effortlessly swings between affa-
ble and intense and Epps dis-
plays an understanding of the
material beyond her years.

I can’t recommend Half Nel-
son enough - it may have skipped
under the radar last year but this
is an uncompromising, intelligent
drama. Don’t miss it.





@ DAN Dunne, played by actor Ryan Gosling, is an
idealistic inner-city junior high school teacher who
spends his time outside school on the edge of
consciousness

(Photo: AP /ThinkFilm)

et es
eA Moa

JOB FAIR

held on

March Ist and March 2nd 2007,
Place: Bahamas Hotel Training Colleg
Time: 9:00am until 2:00pm daily

EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES:

Accountant

help betting
company to
collect debt

- passport rules
for children

@ ANTIGUA
St John’s

ANTIGUAN financial reg-
ulators will help online gam- :
bling company BetOnSports :
PLC collect its debts to pay :
bettors and employees, the :
Caribbean nation’s govern- ;
ment has announced, accord- }

ing to Associated Press.

Antigua’s Financial Ser-
vices Regulatory Commission :
will manage funds collected :

from the struggling British- ;

based gambling company’s

debtors since BetOnSports
has been unable to repay its :
customers due to cash-flow

problems, the statement said.

Clive Archer, BetOnSports
director, said the company :
has been hampered by the
“slow return of funds owed }
to us and we hope that this :

process will give debtors the

reassurance they need to ;

swiftly pay.” :

The British company said |
in August that it planned to :
stop operating in Costa Rica ;
and Antigua —from where it :
accepted wagers from tens of :
thousands of customers in the :
US -— following a US federal :
court order for the company :
to stop taking bets from the :
country and return deposits :

paid by American bettors.

CHILDREN will be exempt
from new rules that will require
travelers to show passports
when entering the US at land
or sea borders, the Bush admin-
istration announced on Thurs-
day.

The new passport require-
ments will take effect as soon
as January 2008. In a change
from earlier plans, children aged
15 or younger with parental
consent will be allowed to cross
the borders at land and sea
entry points with certified
copies of their birth certificates
rather than passports.

Children aged 16 through 18
traveling with school, religious,
cultural or athletic groups and
under adult supervision will also
be allowed to travel with only
their birth certificates.

Homeland Security Secretary
Michael Chertoff was expected
to discuss the relaxation in rules
at a speech in Detroit on Thurs-
day afternoon. The department
described the details in a written
statement.

Beginning last January 23,
nearly all air travelers entering
the US who are citizens of
Canada, Mexico, Bermuda or
the Caribbean — as well as
returning American citizens —
have been required to display

passports. Children entering the
United States by air will still be
required to show passports.
Homeland Security
spokesman Russ Knocke said
the easing of rules for children
entering by land or sea was in

part the result of talks between,

the department and Canadians
and interested state officials.
Canada and US border states
have been concerned that the
passport requirements would
hurt legitimate travel and com-
merce.

When the new requirements
for travellers crossing land and
sea borders take effect, it will
bring residents of western hemi-
sphere nations under the same
rules as travelers from the rest
of the world.

The rules were mandated by
Congress in 2004 as a response
to the terrorist attacks of Sep-
tember 11, 2001, and the rec-
ommendations by the Septem-
ber 11 commission that border
security be tightened.

Last October, Congress
passed an amendment spon-
sored by Senators Patrick
Leahy, D-Vt., and Ted Stevens,
R-Alaska, that would postpone
the day the land and sea rules
take effect for as long as 17
months, till June 2009, if certain

conditions have not been met.
One of those conditions was
to develop an alternative pro-
cedure for groups of children
travelling across the border
under adult supervision and
with parental consent.
Chertoff will meet with local
officials in Detroit before trav-
eling to Ottawa, Canada, for
meetings Friday with his Mexi-
can and Canadian counterparts.

Reservation Clerk .
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TVs ae

Company

A private bank, creat
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majority of its investment operations.
rivate bank is licensed with The Central Bank of

outsourcing of the

in Lyford Cay, this p
the Bahamas and the
manages more than $1 billion in assets.

ed to manage the assets of private trusts and
an Investment Manager to oversee the

Located

Cayman Island Monetary Authority. It
The majority of the assets

will be managed by external investment advisors in accordance

with a carefully developed investment competition plan approved
by its Board of Directors.

Responsibilities -—

Reporting directly to the Chief Executive Officer of the Bank, as well
as to the Board's Finance Committee, the Investment Manager will
administer the selection of external managers who follow an
investment strategy that has been mandated by the Bank's founder
and Finance Committee. The successful candidate will also
internally manage a fixed income pool of funds. Using the services
of investment consultants and under the guidance of the Investment
- Committee, the Investment manager will recommend allocations '
to fund managers worldwide. Investment results will be monitored
closely and the managers must. perform competitively. The
successful candidate must have the ability to create and build an
infrastructure to monitor risk, Measure performance, and contro!
the flow of funds moving in and out of the bank to managers
worldwide. He/she will manage the relationships with outside
vendors, including custodians and trading relationships.

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GEOFFREY

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007, PAGE 9



TEM nme ce
nd this outdated racial propaganda







VACANCY FOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT MECHANICS

_ Qualifications & Experience

¢ Minimum five (5) years in Heavy Equipment Mechanics
¢ Knowledge of diesel and gasoline engines ~

¢ Knowledge of hydraulic systems

* Good understanding of 24 V Electrical Systems

¢ Experience in wire rope rigging would be a plus

¢ Welding experience also would be a plus

Duties & Responsibilities

¢ Perform repairs and preventive maintenance on various heavy
equipment.

Required Qualities

¢ Good physical condition

¢ Able to withstand constant exposure to the weather conditions
¢ Must be willing to work shift schedules

¢ Must be willing to work at heights







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ypsepesses
lee

Company offers good benefits and salary is commensurate with ex-
_ perience and qualifications. Interested persons are invited to submit a
resume’ by February 28, 2007 to the following person:



Ramon Taylor
‘Tropical Shipping Limited —
John Alfred Dock
East Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone: (242) 322-1012






















@ By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

AS THE general elec-
tion ‘approaches,

both major political parties
have turned the heat up, firing
shots across the other’s bow.



The resignation of former |

Immigration Minister Shane
Gibson last Sunday led Prime

: Minister Perry Christie to for-

mally announce that the elec-
tion battle was on and that the
“sloves were off”.

At the PLP’s rally on Tues-
day, Mr Christie hit below the
belt, comparing the granting of
permanent residency to the late
Anna Nicole Smith under his
administration to the FNM’s
fast-tracking of permanent res-
idency- status to three men who
had an unappealing familiarity
with law enforcement.

According to Mr Christie,

no matter what could be said:

about Anna Nicole, nothing
she ever did in life could have
been worse than a man who
for years was sexually assault-
ing little boys before being wel-
comed into the Bahamas by the

' FNM.

Although the PLP has a
point, sadly the PM appears to
have sought to justify Shane
Gibson’s misjudgment by jux-
taposing it to the FNM’s trans-
gression in granting permanent
residency status to three men
with questionable pasts.

And so, the dirty politics
and mudslinging began! It
appears that Dr William
Thompson’s admonition to
conduct a clean election cam-
paign has fallen on deaf ears.
On this night, the issues were
forgotten and the tit-for-tat
began.

This past Tuesday, the
“new” PLP also sought to play
the race card, with unques-
tionable references and over-
tures being made towards the
FNM’s deputy leader Brent
Symonette.

Throughout the evening,
there were constant references
to the United Bahamian Party
(UBP), as the “new” PLP was
once again seeking to use the
race card to win support and
trump up old feelings of racial
insecurity.

YOUNG MaAn’s VIEW

Ac Baie Ko

While the Lynden Pindling-
led PLP liberated the country
from minority rule and empow-
ered the black majority,
Bahamian politics became
polarised on colour as Sir Lyn-

den and others appealed to .

blacks by instigating acrimony
through the use of racist mate-
rial.
Although the “old” PLP
promoted national identity and
upward mobility for blacks,
sadly they were also skilful in
their use of the race card, sow-
ing seeds of division and
heightening tensions over race
(eg showing Roots), which has
produced much of the racially
motivated propaganda plagu-
ing Bahamian society today.

IE 2005, the “new” PLP
explicitly used racist lingo
at their national convention,
with several speakers making
references to the Bahamas
“going back there” if the FNM
team of Hubert Ingraham and
Brent Symonette were elected.

Again this week, instead of
campaigning on the issues, the
“new” PLP sought to use scare-
mongering tactics to rouse the
fears of Bahamians about a
return to minority rule.

Fred Mitchell, who appears
to be racially insecure, kicked
the rally off with allegations
that Hubert Ingraham would
turn over the government to
“the UBP heir”, Brent Symon-
ette, if the FNM wins the next
election. And so, the sleaze and
nastiness began.

Mr Mitchell’s comments
were eerily similar to the racist

- overtures of Minister for Local

Government and Consumer
Affairs Alfred Gray, who, in a
racially charged convention
speech, said: ‘

“Fellow delegates, could you
imagine, God forbid, that they
should win, and something
were to happen to Hubbigitty,
that we would be back in the
hands of the UBP? Please

Gl BS Gen

don’t let me imagine that.”

If there is a credible reason
why Mr Symonette should not
run or be in a leadership posi-
tion, it would not be because
of race, but because of his pri-
or misjudgments in his capaci-
ty as a Cabinet minister when it
appeared that he awarded a
contract to a company in which
he had interests, and had to
subsequently resign.

Further, on Tuesday, Mr

' Christie also appeared to play

the race card, claiming that Mr
Ingraham was lured out of
retirement by “hidden forces”
that were attempting to recap-
ture the Bahamas for selfish
gain.

He claimed they wanted to
“prostitute” the nation and
stated that they could not “let
the Progressive Liberal Party
and the progressive forces”
control the Bahamas.

Shame on Mr Christie!

. While I never expected this

from him, I am mindful that
he, like Fred Mitchell, were
protégés of Sir Lynden.

Mr Christie and others
should know that the Bahamas
has progressed beyond the days
where racial scaremongering
and the showing of the movie
“Roots” on ZNS would incite
the black majority to vote PLP.

These days, the younger and
better educated voter will vote
to secure the future of our
country and for the party that
shows the vision needed to
advance Bahamians, create
jobs, fight crime, curtail illegal
immigration and stabilise and
uplift our economy.

It is a disgrace that the
“new” PLP would again seek
to exclude white Bahamians
and sow seeds of discontent
among the populace. It is high
time that Mr Christie and his
gang promote racial harmony
in the Bahamas, instead of
spewing racist propaganda and
deepening racial prejudices in a
society that is still recovering.

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4)
aN

Creative forces get ready

to celebrate Heritage Day

6 In brief

7

a ee Em

alt

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=

Ses ae we Ooo ee Se eS a

> passengers, is in stable con-

Sun West End Police are contin-
~ 54uing investigations into the

*o £!Police revealed that Smith
4 was driving a 1995 Toyota

ce west along Queen’s
‘ehway in Deadman’s Reef

Ta OE PF LE ate ee GBI ZN a! 6 PO A RR Tn

THE TRIBUNE

1

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007, PAGE 11



Police say
speed was
cause of
accident |

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama police believe speed
may have contributed to a
traffic accident in Deadman’s
Reef, where a vehicle occu-
pied by three young men
overturned several times in
bushes on Queen’s Highway.

Two of the three occupants
have been admitted for treat-
ment - one in stable, and the
other in serious condition -
at Rand Memorial Hospital.

Navado Smith, 22, of Jones
Town, Eight Mile Rock, the
driver, is detained in inten-
sive care. Adrian Laing, 16,
of Jones Town, one of two

@ By STEPHANIE DOWNS

TOTALLY absorbed, Teleri
Jones places one more shell on
an 8ft by 4ft painted panel and .
completes the form of what
resembles a dragonfly. ©

When asked what it is, she
replies: “It’s what your ins,
nation makes it.”

The young Welsh artist is one _
of many volunteers on Elbow
Cay who are working to make »
Heritage Days 2007 on March 2-
3 a special landmark in the small
island’s already rich history.

In a nearby room of The
Wyannie Malone Historical
Museum in the centre of Hope

» Town, where Teleri is working
with long-time Canadian visi-
tors to the Abacos, Colin Ray
and wife Helen, are assembling
a diorama portraying sponge
fishing in the Bahamas.

Made to the scale of three
eighths of an inch to the foot,
Colin has carved a replica of a
60-foot schooner hull out of
white pine. “It’s a simple rig,”
he said.

Meticulously executed, the
vessel, with its clay figures and
drying sponges, depicts a lost
era.

Tony Bennett, the museum’s '
curator and manager, looks on

"as the piece is carefully centred
on a glass sand-filled base.

“They drove three large box-
es from Canada to West Palm
Beach and then Faron Sawyer
of Cherokee Air flew it over to
Marsh Harbour,” he said.

The museum is abuzz with
activity. A video of Bahamian

_ history focusing on the colonis-
ing of the Abaco cays by Loy-
alists in the late eighteenth cen-
tury. plays in the background.

Meanwhile, on the third floor
of the well-stocked building,
Tony’s wife Elaine is busily
making costumes for what will
be a re-enactment in period cos-
tume of the1785 landing by the
Loyalists.

Here on March 2 actual
descendants of the early settlers,

dition. = |
The second passenger,
Lavardo Williams, 18, of
io Jones Town, was treated for
t©His injuries and later dis-
3 @harged.
Supt Basil Rahming said

i TELERI Jones at work

eight of whom are children, will
arrive in small boats at the land-
ing site in the heart of the set-
tlement where a small plaque
was erected on its 200th
anniversary in 1985. —

Some of the costumes are
ready and have been fitted.
Bobbi, wife of town patriarch
Vernon Malone, says that her
husband “looks quite dapper in
his knickerbockers and ruffle-
bordered shirt.”

Elaine has her work cut out
for her with 49 schoolchildren to
outfit as well as making 17 spe-
cial costumes.

Just a stone’s throw from the
museum to the north children
from Hope Town School have
gathered at the landing site and
are rehearsing their Loyalist
songs.

Bonnie, daughter of Vernon
and Bobbi Malone, directs the
scene with Grade Four teacher
Nancy Burnett. Headmistress
Candace Key looks on and
proudly remarks on the “sweet-
ness” of their voices.

At school the children are
learning the arts and crafts of
the period, such as quilting,
weaving, palm thatching and
knitting as well as the tradi-
tional plaiting of the maypole.

On a more sombre note

»:ageident, which occurred
siatound 8.30pm on Monday.

when he lost control near
Seaward Development.
ai gi he vehicle overturned six
36 tiitves in bushes before crash-
244} into a tree. Police are urg-
ath motorists to slow down
fi drive with extreme care.

Vftom aaale who are
making news in their
Weighbourhoods. Call us
“on 322-1986 and share
your story.



The Bahamas Union of Teachers
Celebrating 60 years 1947 - 2007
“Six Decades Strong...And Growing”’

3 Presents
_A Collection of Paintings of Bahamian
| Art Educators

KALEIDOSCOPE

March 9 - 31, 2007 3
At The Central Bank Art Gallery
Official Opening March 9 -6:30p.m.

Art Educators:

Moya Strachan- C. I. Gibson Senior High School
Kevin Rolle - C.W. Saunders

Mervin Wilson- C.R. Walker Senior High School
_ Loraine Chichester - Queens College
Neil Cleare- Doris Johnson Senior High School
Lendrix Ross- Doris Johnson Senior High School
Timothy Nottage - D.W. Davis Junior High School
| Dana Burrows - D.W. Davis Junior High School
|Mary Deveaux - L.N. Coakley High School - Exuma






Wendy Cartwright - Guest Artist
Duolton Evans - Guest Artist
Damaso Gray - Student C.O.B.

‘Ihe ye



there will be a dedication ser-
vice by Rev Carla Culmer of
the newly-built Seamen’s
Memorial erected on a dune
overlooking Elbow Reef.

This commemorates those
who perished on the “Athol
Queen”, which was torpedoed
by an Italian submarine during
World War 11.

Friday evening will feature
the “Heritage Buffet Dinner”

and auction at 7pm at Hope’

Town Harbour Lodge. Tickets

for this must be bought a week —

in advance.

Saturday’s events include a
boat parade, tours of the muse-
um, a cooking display using an
eighteenth century oven and the
“Beautiful Knees Contest”,
devised a few years ago in the
living room of legendary ex-
pilot Leonard Thompson of
Marsh Harbour. Loyalist
descendant Patrick Bethel of
Cherokee Sound is the reign-
ing champion.

. Most of those involved 'in the

Heritage Day preparations,
such as Tony and Elaine Ben-
nett, are not Wyannie Malone
descendants but long-time resi-
dents of the cay.

What those early settlers flee-
ing persecution must have felt
as they disembarked on to the














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deserted cay is hard to imagine
but their courage and fortitude
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¢ On March 2 Froggie’s Out
Island Adventures are offering
a special ferry service leaving
Marsh Harbour at 6pm and

returning from Hope Town at
10pm.

The number of Hope Town
Harbour Lodge is 366-0095 and
the website for more informa-
tion on Heritage Days 2007 is
www.hopetownmuseum.com

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PAGE 12, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007 THE TRIBUNE.







| FRIDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 23, 2007

7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

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THE TRIBUNE

Tl oh Or

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007, PAGE 15



Award-winning c

hildren’s

author fully booked at Atlantis

. SQUEALS of laughter
filled the Atlantis Theatre as
youngsters from Atlantis Kids
Club and students from St
John’s College, Queen’s Col-
lege and St Andrews School
listened in fascination as
award-winning children’s
book author and illustrator.
Peter McCartney recently
read copies of his books.

McCartney also showed the
youngsters a short animation
based on his book, ‘Hondo |
and Fabian,’ a fun-filled story
based on the adventures of
his dog, Hondo and cat, Fabi-
an. McCartney also demon- .
strated how he begins his sto-
ries from the draft version to
the final copy. At the end of
the presentation the students
were allowed to ask ques-
tions, take photos and partici-
pate in a spécial book signing.

“Tt was a fabulous trip and

‘it was my pleasure to be

here...,” said McCartney just
moments after the book sign-
ing, whichjhe referred to as
“the icing‘on the cake,” of his
visit, the first to Atlantis and
The Bahamas.

The award winning author
who was accompanied by his
wife, Yunhee, daughter Suki,
nine, and son Henry, four,
who are also featured as char-
acters in a number of his
books, noted that he got to
experience,more than a regu-
lar tourist would have, in that
he was able to be engaged
with the community and
interact with local school chil-
dren. “I got a sense of what it
is like to live in the Bahamas
as well,” commented McCart-
ney.
While at Atlantis, McCart-
ney also conducted research:
for his new book about a
young boy’s shark adventure.
He visited Atlantis’ marine
habitat where he was able to
observe several species of
sharks. He also met with
Atlantis’ Glen Kelly, Director
of Planning and Development
for the Marine and Water
Park Operations.

“T picked up a lot of infor-
mation just by walking
around the aquariums, so
when I go back and I draw
sharks out of my head, I will
have more of a sense of their
shape ...,” said McCartney.
“You have to be there to see
them. Its one thing to see:it
on an image, even on a
movie, its different than when
you are right there looking at
them.”

McCartney alsohelda_ °
‘Meet the Author’ session in
the Atlantis Library, where
guests of the resort had an
opportunity to interact with
him, purchase copies of his
books and have them auto-
graphed.

Rosemarie Johnson-Clarke,
Regional Advisor for the
Caribbean North Chapter of
the Society of Children’s
Book Writers and Illustrators
(SCBWI) noted that the
event was the association’s
“first really big author event,”
aside from working with
Bahamian children’s authors
like Alice Bain, author of
‘Ninety Nine Potcakes’ and
author, Christine Aylen who
wrote a Bahamian counting
book. Johnson-Clarke
thanked Atlantis for hosting
McCartney’s presentation.

In 2003 McCartney won a
Caldecott honour for ‘Hondo
and Fabian,’ from the Ameri-
can Library Association,
(ALA). The Caldecott Medal
is awarded annually to the
artist of the most distin-
guished American picture
book for children. ‘Hondo
and Fabian,’ was also award-
ed Best Illustrated Book of
the Year from the New York
Times.

His other books include
‘Night Driving,’ ‘Little Bunny
on the Move,’ and ‘Moon
Plane’ (2006). ‘Moon Plane’
was included in a year-end
picture book review in The
New Yorker, December 12,
2006. In addition, Amazon .
listed it as one of the top 10
Picture Books of 2006

McCartney is also a teacher
at the School of Visual Arts in
New York City. He has
worked with students on
short-term projects, such as
writing and illustrating their
own books.


















at cam
ox

Take an
Additional

@ AWARD-WINNING children’s book, author and illus-
trator Peter McCartney is pictured telling scores of young chil-
dren in the Atlantis Theatre about his up coming book about a
young boy’s shark adventure.

(Photo: Joshua Yentis/Blue Wave Imaging)

e Wall Units * Lamps ¢ Tables ete.

Bi YOUNG students
of St Andrew’s School.
are all smiles during a | *
special book signing by
award-winning children’s
book, author and illus-
trator Peter McCartney
pictured at center with
his daughter Suki at his ©
right in the Atlantis The-;
atre.

(Photo:
Joshua Yentis/
Blue Wave Imaging)

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Caribbean’s third-
largest food market

FROM page 1B

Abaco Markets’ battle to return
to profitability, said the compa-
ny appeared to be struggling to
make its two formats work. It
was now focusing on its core
operations in New Providence
and Grand Bahama, targeting
shrink, loss and damage in
stores, and eyeing a strategic
alliance as a result of its 10 per
cent stake in BSL Holdings, the
company that acquired the
majority 78 per cent stake in
Bahamas Supermarkets last
year. -

“The Bahamas food retail
sector has been saturated for
some time now, and no new
supermarkets have been built,”
the CRNM report said.

“Rather, the two traditional
supermarket chains [Bahamas

‘- Supermarkets and Super Val-

-‘ue] have been increasing sales

by restructuring their store port-
folios through refurbishing,
rebuilding and relocating of
stores.”

The Bahamian supermarket
industry may in time again show
the need for this nation to
implement some form of com-
petition or antitrust legislation
and policies, especially if
Bahamas Supermarkets and
Abaco Markets pursue a tie-up,

. which the latter’s 10 per cent

stake in BSL Holdings would
appear to indicate is the long-
‘term game plan.

Any merger would, at current
sales levels, give the combined
entity just below a 50 per cent
share of the Bahamian food
sales market at around $240
million, and leave it the domi-
nant player on Grand Bahama
and in an duopoly on New
Providence with Super Value.

However, the size of its mar-
ket dominance by sales would

BUSINESS FOR SALE

Ae ence cel
Business. Well known and

respected worldwide Teele tee
20 years at same prime location.

Email: b.inquiries@gmail.com











Nassau, Bahamas.













a UBS





























seeking to employ,

Duties to include:

management information

business processes

e Lead MIS team.

requirements:
e = Training

interface design

e
e Process modelling
e
e

e Business analyst
e Team Leader
Trust operations

‘ hrbahamas@ubs.com
or
UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas



NOTICE

| NOTICE is hereby given that
P.O. BOX CB-12627, EXUMA, BAHAMAS is applying to |
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization:should not be: granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
‘days from the,16th day of January, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, MARC MEYE of the of #14
ALBACORE DRIVE, P.O. BOX GT-2554, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA, intend to change my name to MARK DORESTIN.
If there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, P.O.Box SS-792, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.



UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd. a leading international Trust Company is

MIS Specialist & Team Leader

e Guide development of system to provide consistent and coherent

e Enhance and redesign the existing database and workflow
models to meet the business requirements

e Develop and implement solutions in MS Access

e Support and testing of the developed system and rapidly provide
solutions to any defects that are detected

e Take ownership and responsibility for the analysis and design
phases of one or more of the project deliveries — producing
results within the agreed timeframes

e Collaborate on project to build an intranet site to support

e Maintain interface to our international internal partners in
Switzerland and the rest of the world

e Provide initial training and second level support to users
This position is open to candidates with the following minimum

Proven experience in the following key areas:

e Relational database modelling
* Database modelling using MS Access and understanding of user

Database reengineering and reverse engineering
Software development lifecycles

Knowledge of VB, ODBC, SQL, WIP (Vignette V/5 e-Business
Platform using Oracle 8.1.7 as the data repository)

In addition, the successful candidate should:
e Have strong analytical skills
e Be fluent in English and German

Bahamian Nationals need only apply to:





MAR-KELLON GILVERT OF



be below the 70 per cent share
of the Bahamian life insurance
market now enjoyed by Coli-
nalmperial Insurance following
its controversial acquisition of
Imperial Life.

The CRNM report said the
sales areas in Bahamas Super-
market stores ranged in size
from 5,000 to 40,000 square feet,
stocking between 15,000 to
25,000 stock keeping units
(SKUs), of which 85 per cent
were food.

Yet only 5 per cent of its
products were Bahamian-pro-
duced, some 95 per cent of pro-
duce ‘being manufactured or
sourced from either the
Caribbean (45 per cent) or out-
side the region (50 per cent).

THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007, PAGE 5B

The Bahamas:

Fast food supply escapes



Bahamas based producers

FROM page 1B

ment for KFC volumes,” the
report read. “In addition, KFC
requires a chicken ‘cut in nine’,
which is normally different from
the ‘cut in eight’ required by
supermarkets. This requires
investment in two sets of auto-
mated equipment.”

The CRNM report’s findings
again illustrate the dilemma fac-
ing the Bahamas when it comes
to its fledgling and underdevel-
oped agricultural industry: does
it employ protectionist mea-
sures to safeguard local pro-
ducers and allow them to
become strong enough to stand
on their own and compete, or
does it follow the law of com-
parative advantage, specialise
in what it is good at and focus
on consumer benefits, refusing
to tolerate inefficient domestic
producers?

The CRNM report found that

the Bahamas, despite having a
relatively small population com-
pared to other Caribbean
nations, was the second largest
‘quick service restaurant’ mar-
ket in the region, with the sector
in this nation generating $200
million per annum in sales. This
was only exceeded by Jamaica’s
$325 million.

The ‘quick service’ restaurant
industry in the Bahamas
employed 3,425 persons, and
there were some 235 such
restaurants in this nation.




The CRNM report also found
that the Bahamas had the high-
est number of full-service
restaurants in hotels of any
Caribbean nation, standing at
252 - a reflection, no doubt, of
the five-star tourist model it has
followed, attracting top-tier
hotel brands and the restaurants
to match guest demands.

The Bahamas was also home
to 100 independent full-service
restaurants and 15 commercial
caterers, with some 602 food
service firms in total.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
: (No. 46 of 2000)

NEW CAPITAL MANAGEMENT
VENTURES LIMITED
_ IBC No. 111394 B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby givn that in accordance with Section 131(2) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 46 of 2000), NEW
CAPITAL MANAGEMENT VENTURES LIMITED, is in

Dissolution.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby~ given that ROSE REGIS OF
FAITH AVENUE, CARMICHEAL ROAD SOUTH, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 16th day of
February, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.






























CILIFEGUARDS@
NEEDED

Applicants must be certified by the Royal Life
Saving Society and possess first aid and CPR
training. Candidates should also be swimmers.
Successful applicants will be able to give swim
and dive lessons but cannot do such lessons
during regular workigg shifts. It is imperative that
applicants be personable, well-groomed, flexible
individuals available to work shifts as needed.




Interested persons should fax resumes with
copies of certificates and telephone contacts to:

The Director, Human Resources
Lyford Cay Members Club
Lyford Cay
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: #362-6245

NOTICE TO SHAREHOLDERS




The Board of Directors of Finance
Corporation of Bahamas Limited hereby
notifies all of its Shareholders that the
Bank’s actual net profit, based on
unaudited results for the quarter ended
31st January, 2007 was $5,244,041. As
a result, an interim dividend of thirteen
cents (13 cents) per Ordinary Share will
be paid on 9th March 2007, to all
shareholders of record as of 2nd March
2007.




The Bank’s total assets stood at
$660,801,940 for the quarter ended 31st
January 2007.




KEVA L. BAIN
CORPORATE SECRETARY

Dated this 23rd February, 2007

The date of commencement of dissolution was 19th day of January
2007.

SOVEREIGN DIRECTORS LIMITED, of 2nd floor, Ansbacher
House, Shirley & East Street North, PO. Box N-4244, Nassau,

Bahamas is the Liquidator of NEW CAPITAL MANAGMENT
VENTURES LIMITED.

For and on-behalf of
Sovereign Directors Limited

Liquidator

JEWELLERY SALES ASSOCIATES



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Anglican

Bene

_ TEACHING VACANCY

The Anglican Central Authority invites
applications from qualified Teachers for
positions available at St. John’s College, St. Anne’s
School, Bishop Michael Eldon School, Freeport, and
: St. Andrew’s School, Exuma.

PRIMARY TEACHERS
LIBRARIAN
SCIENCE
ENGLISH LANGUAGE
SPANISH
GUIDANCE COUNSELLORS
SPECIAL EDUCATION
MATHEMATICS
HOME ECONOMICS
RELIGIOUS STUDIES
PHYSICS/MATHEMATICS
MUSIC
BUSINESS STUDIES
ART |
PHYSICAL EDUCATION








Only qualified Teachers, with Bachelor or Master
Degrees from an accredited University or College and
Teaching Certificate need apply.

For further details and application forms, please
contact the Anglican Central’ Education
Authority on Sands Road at telephone
(242) 322-3015/6/7.






Letters of application and/or completed application
forms with copies of required documents must be sent
by Friday, March 9th, 2007 to the Anglican Education
Department addressed to:-






The Director of Education

Anglican Central Education Authority
P.O. Box N-656

Nassau, Bahamas





“+

PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



ESSE
Development model branded ‘fool’s paradise’

FROM page 1B

protects its environmental
resources, but this is*a classic
case of the sorts of develop-
ments that have been allowed to
cause untold damage in the
past, and should no longer be
permitted.”

Dr Goreau warned that cli-
mate change would exacerbate
the environmental damage from
poorly thought-out and regu-
iated development, adding:
“Much stronger environmental

laws and oversight are urgently
needed, because the Bahamas
has permitted developments
whose environmental costs have
neither been recognised nor
compensated for, and the accel-
erating pressures of global cli-
mate change make continuation
of such policies a fool’s paradise
of profiting today and ignoring
all the consequences that will
strike tomorrow.”

Dr Goreau added: “It is
astonishing that the Bahamas
is one of the few countries in

_ the world with no real laws to

- NOTICE

-- CRESTFAIR LIMITED
(In Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby given that the Creditors of the
above-named Company are required on or before —
the 23rd. March, 2007, to send their names and
addresses, with particulars of their debts or claims,
and the names and addresses of their Attorneys (if
any), to Messers Robert H. Kelly and Charles G. J.
King, Joint Liquidators of the said Company, c/o FT
Consultants Ltd. , P.O. Box N-3932, Nassau, Bahamas.

Dated this 22nd February, 2007

Robert H. Kelly
Charles G. J. King
~ Joint Liquidators

UBS

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. is one of the leading Wealth Managers in
the Caribbean. We look after wealthy private clients by
providing them with comprehensive, value-enhancing services,
In order to strengthen our team we look for an additional

Client Advisor Brazil

In this challenging position you will be responsible for the
following tasks (traveling required):

« Advisory of existing clients

® Acquisition of high net worth individuals
« Presentation and implementation of investment solutions
in the client's mother tongue

We are searching for a personality with solid experience in
wealth management, specialized in the fields of customer
telations, investment advice and portfolio management.
Excellent sales and advisory skills as well as solid knowledge of
investment products are key requirements. A proven track
record with a leading global financial institution as well as
fluency in English and Portuguese is essential.

Written applications should be addressed to: .

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O, Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas



protect the environment, espe-
cially the coral reefs and man-
groves that are so crucial to it.

“For years long-term divers
in the Bahamas have been
telling me how fast the reefs are
disappearing. In fact, the dam-
age is now so extensive that
even saving and strictly pro-
tecting all remaining habitat in
good condition will not be
enough.

“Large-scale restoration of
damaged coral reefs and man-
groves will be needed if the
country is to maintain its shore
protection from rising sea levels,

its fisheries and its ecotourism.

value. A long-term sustainable
environmental policy that is
enforced is the badly-needed
first step.”

Dr Goreau further warned
that the Bahamas was “racing
down the same unsustainable
track which has destroyed the
reefs of Florida”. He added:
“Tragically, the Florida devel-
opers and sewage injectors are
now bringing their methods to
the Bahamas, which is even

‘ more vulnerable. South Florid-

ians have a whole continent
they can move to when the ris-
ing seas drown south Florida,
but Bahamians do not have this
option and must protect what
they have.”

The Bahamas, Dr Goreau_

warned, was the most vulnera-
ble country in the Atlantic to
global warming and global sea
level rise.

Meanwhile, the Save Guana

POSITION AVAILABLE

Auto Parts Store seeks receptionist/sales clerk must be
willing to work on weekends. Applicant must be able
to work on own initiative, possess strong interpersonal
Sa

Please apply in writing to the manager, P.O. Box
N-10744, Nassau, Bahamas. Deadline for application is
March Sth, 2007.

EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY |

Computer Company needs Company/Network

»

Applicant should have:-

Repair Technician

- Knowledge of Microsoft Windows desktop and

Operating Systems

- Be familiar with PC Hardware and Software repair
- Be able to work with minimal supervision
- Be trainable on specific industry based software

applications

Please send resumes via email to
nassautechjob@ yahoo.com



JEWELLERY STORE MANAGERS

Discover a rewarding and
challenging career catering to the
country’s visitors in the exciting
retail jewelry business!!!

Do You Have What it Takes?

ARE YOU...
Confident? * A Leader? * Self Motivated?
¢ Professional? ¢ Mature (25 yrs or older)? * Dedicated?
' If the answer isYES then take the next step
FAX RESUME TO 326-2824

SALARY OPPORTUNITY COMMENSURATE WITH EXPERIENCE & QUALIFICATION

Cay Reef Association is oppos-
ing applications. by Baker’s Bay
to the Hope Town District
Council, seeking six permits for
projects ranging form $600,000
to $1.6 million for buildings at
Great Guana Cay. These appli-
cations were heard last night.
The Association’s attorney,
Fred Smith, said in a letter to
the Council: “Our clients have
vigorously complained that

throughout this process they -

haye not been provided with an
opportunity for proper consul-
tation and participation as
stakeholders in the decision-
making process of any central
and/or local government per-
son or agency having responsi-
bility for consideration of appli-
cations.

“Central to our clients’ com-

plaints is the fact that our clients’
consider that it is the local gov-.

ernment’s authority, specifical-
ly the district council, which has
the duty and responsibility
under the Local Government
Act to consider the many dif-
ferent applications which will
need to be made under the

’ Local Government Act. Appar-

ently, many applications have: '

somehow been made directly
to central government agencies
in Nassau thus bypassing the
local district council. cs

“In addition, apparently sin
between the recent elections ‘of
new members to the district
council, the administrator to the
Council apparently issued cer-
tain permits.”





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JAMES BAROCHIN OF
EAST STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister. responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, . for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration? ,
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written }
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight ,
days from the 16th day of February, 2007 to the Minister °
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,

Nassau, Bahamas.














- receptionist
- filing, typing correpondence
- banking & postal duties

- computer skills

motivated.

OFFICE ASSISTANT

To assist in General Office Work, Duties include, but not limited to: '

- accounting; knowledge-of Quickbooks a plus. - ER »
Ideal candidate will be honest, personable, responsible, and punctual, and self
Salary commensurate with experience.

Send resume to: Office Position, RO. Box CB-13835, Nassau, Bahamas



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FINLY TURNIER OF MARSH .”
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister
responsible for. Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/* |
naturalization as acitizen of The Bahamas, andthatanyperson’
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should: '
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 23RD day of,
February, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality,
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

-
.



’

NOTICE is hereby given that EARL RICARDO CHUNO OF
WINTON MEADOWS, . P.O.. BOX N-9810, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for

Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization.
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who

knows any reason why registration/ ‘naturalization should

not be granted, should send a written and signed statement: 4:
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 16th day of; 4:
February, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality’
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE isherebygiventhat KEVINJEROMEWOODSIDE OF.: | «.
GARDEN HILLS, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to’ |:
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for. } *
registrationmaturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and: ,
that any person who knows any reason why registration‘ -
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written: | ;
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days . f '
from the 23RD day of February, 2007 to the Minister} :
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, |
Nassau, Bahamas.

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
‘Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

0.000
0.100
0.560 :
eceserememame 202 0.795 7.9 95%
eee \
IV

Weekly Vol. ield



52wk-Low Last Price












12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 1.766 1.365 8.8 9.35%
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 0.000 0.640 NM 7.85%}
0.021 0.000 26.2



CESSES

EARS SEARS
2.220 0.000 19.4

28.00 ABDAB




















14.00 Bahamas. Supermarkets 1.770 1.320 8.3 9.04%
070 0.000 J N/M ” 0.00% 4
$ piss s SRS SRNR S SS S S SS :
Anite CS
S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name NA _V YTD% Yield % ‘
1.3292 1.2756 Colina Money Market Fund 1.329237* ‘
3.0569 2.6662 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.0569*** ‘
}2.5961 2.3241 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.596093”**
: 41.2248 1.1547 Colina Bond Fund 1.224792**** RAKSEGQ__EV|E AS S .
- 11.3545 10,0000 _ Fidelity Prime Income Fund 11,3545*%""* Alfani ay 66
Ms ne ECE VAVVQNVwG§ Multifunction Color Printer $166
et LL ultifunction Color Printer, $1¢



Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Baharr.18 Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
H Previous Close - Previous day’s weighted price for dally volume
|) Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume
H Change - Change In closing price from day to day

Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12. month eamings

*- 16 February 2007

D ELLLCD Monitor 15” $224
DELL LCD Monitor 17” $290

*** 31 January 2007 \ ‘ X

“* 31 January 2007

see" . 31 January 2007



- 31 January 2007

COee ene eae we est 4%,

Ses ce yt mb




RECIRIR





—* THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

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I/VE GOT GROCERIES.

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GOOD
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ERIC STOPPED BY THE
STUDIO. HE SEEMED SO






SO I INVITED HIM OVER...



THEY'RE GONNA TRY
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. 2007 by King Festures Gyraficets, Inc. World rights veserved.

CRYPTIC PUZZLE

ACROSS ;
Supported the right in it, having
drifted (7)

Identify those you're addressing
when you're being abusive (4,5)
Said something to conceal the
features would be useful (5)
duncture at which you aim at (5)
Meant | got off to an early start in
entertainment (7)

Attack you get terribly

upset over (3,4)

Making holes, lets out (5)
Happen to be among our:
numbers (5)

A small box contains the material (5)

Cook with a little brandy to
give it a lift (6)
That's not fairl (6)

Associate with, when you join up (7)

Leave the brush behind! (7)

On retum, does some gumshoeing in

the woods (6)
Changes toa victory sign (6)

It provides grass for all the horses (5)
Though out of condition, having fun

Playing with it (3)

Calm, nevertheless (5)

It's an imbroglio and we ratumed”
wortied (2,1,4)

Book from a distance (7)
Alonging to start the holiday (5)
All goods manufactured for the
mountains (5)

Anticipate and get the woodend
everything (9)

Appalled to be back at the home with

lunatics (7)
YESTERDAY'S CRYPTIC SOLUTIONS

ACROSS: 1, Stud-s 6, Staff 9, El
Greco 10, Da-is-y 11, Rum-BA 12,
Sitar 13, Pen-gui-n. 15, Seb , 17, Iron
18, Ce-rise 19, Sloes 20, Tr-eat-y 22,
Star 24, Sad 25, Fil-Ch.-ed 26, Spell
' 27, Strap 28, Te-p-ld 29, Left arm 30,
Or-der 31, Y-ells
DOWN: 2, Teaser 3, Design 4, Sly
5, B-ruin 6, Scrapes 7, Tou-R 8, Fab-
Les 12, Silly 13, Pict-s 14, Noted 15,

SI-X-th 16, Be-ar-d 18, Cacil . 19, °

Stopper 21, A-after 22, Scheme 23,
Aarial 25, Flute 26, Sale 28, Try

x

DOWN

1 Achannel with no water in it,

* you say (6)

At the end, nips back in a state of
panic (8)

Not disclosing that you're
reserving (7,4)

‘ Is able to, having seen olf the
Chinese (9)
Translating, himself, to a foreign
language (7)

With him, it’s over in a flash! (4,6)
Anoodle suitable for vegetarians (4)
Either gives the OK to or
skips over (6) ty

See what I'm saying? (3-4)
Ajolly “You, there, painting the
interior!" (6) ;
Our going into where the lion Is
requires boldness (7)

Went up In the air when

one copied (4,3)

Gats flaming or has a slight tiff
about (4,5,2)

It's not a novice and It's

not running (3-7)

Very well, then, improve on it,
chum! (9)

The sick are in the best possible
quarters (7)

Rush to get a'small order from the
Indian takeaway? (6)

Glaring at the show of patriotism,
deliver a diatribe (8)

Anumber admitted to have been
drinkers (6)

Says one tends to push oneself
forwards? (7)
Someone who looks after his
money? (6)
Drink for a bash (4)

YESTERDAY'S EASY SOLUTIONS

ACROSS

8 Large ape (7)

9 — Furniture itam (9)

13 | In front (5)

14 * Tolerate (5)
Oblivious (7)
Antagonistic (7)
Very tall person (5)
Player's first game (5)
Firearm (5)

Fritters away (6)
Shirt part ©
Deep purplish red (7)
Truthfulness (7)
Metallic element (6)
Smaii basket
for fruit (6)
Heals (5)
Soup server (5)

’ Capture (5)
Souvenir (7)
Not very (4,3)
Royal (5)
Sum (5)
Polite (9)
First course of
a meal (7)

B38 £¢ 8 8B 8 BR Bs

Lu
=
N
=
a]
>
n
x |
Wu

ACROSS: 1, Harsh 6, Hangs 9,
Handbag 10, Stead 11, Rummy 12,
Halve 13, Cordial 16, Fit 17, Ores
18, Astute 19, Least 20, Raises 22,
Herd 24, Act 25, Derides 26, Cumin
27, Groom 28, Shout 29, Reshape
30, Ashes 31, Armed
DOWN: 2, Author 3, Shards 4, Had
5, [deal 6, Harvest 7, Ague 8, Gambit
12, Hades 13, Cobra 14, Remit 15,
Fumed 16, Tends 18, Aspen 19,
‘Legumes 21, Acoms 22, Higher 23, ©
Resume 25, Dishy 26, Core: 28, Spa





COMICS PAGE








North dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.
NORTH
@A54
VA
#1093
#3109765
WEST EAST
#10972 @#KQI83
¥11054 ¥82 :
48 #KIJ765
AK 42 &Q
SOUTH .
46
Â¥KQ9763
@AQ42
83
The bidding:
North East South West —
1+ 1% 29% 34
Pass 4% 5¢ Pass
Pass Dble :

Opening lead — king of clubs.
Odd things happen, even m
national championships. For exam-
ple, take this deal played in the Van-
derbilt Teams. The four players at the
table were all well-known Life Mas-
ters. The bidding was not letter-

perfect, but it often isn’t under the °

stress of competition. ;
North was a player who seldom
passed when it was his tum to bid,
and he elected to open one club.
East-West were no shrinking violets

either, and they quickly reached four,

TARGET _



HOW many words of
four letters or more
can you make from the
letters shown here? In
making a word, each
letter may be used once
only. Each must contain
the centre letter and
there must be at least
one nine-letter word. No
plurals or verb forms
ending in “s”, no words
with initial capitals and

no words with a hyphen or apostrophe permitted.
The first word of a phrase is permitted (e.g. inkjet in

inkjet printer).
TODAY'S TARGET :

Good 30; very good 45; excellent 60 (or more).

Solution tomorrow.

WN
1 Hangs in the air (6)
Trachea (8)

Happ

betatos of (7,4)
Sets free (9)
Subtracts (7)

Tel ;
song (384)

ng (7)
Annoy continually (6)
Support, reinforce (7)
Lacking firmness (7)
Consider calmly (11)
Simple (10)
Yellow-flowered

energetic (2,3,2)
Stockings (6)
Burial ground (8)
Reels (6)
— Nahr (7
romatic
Midday dee

SSSess B SBRNSEES~

*MAYBE IF YOU PLAY WITH JUST OWE HANR
IT WOULP ONLY SOUND HALF AS BAP.”

Famous Hand



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007, PAGE 7B







BEACH.

spades (which probably would have

gone down one). South was now
faced with a difficult problem. After
great thought, he bid five diamonds
— which East, of course, doubled —
and everyone passed.

West led the king of clubs and
continued with the ace, East discard-
ing a heart: West then shifted to a
spade. Declarer took dummy’s ace
and returned the ten of diamonds,
covered by the king and ace. He then
crossed to the ace of hearts and led
the nine of diamonds, covered by
East’s jack and South’s queen.

Six tricks had been played, and
South had won four of them. At this
point, East turned to declarer,
showed him his ‘cards and said mat-
ter-of-factly, “I think the rest are
mine.”

And so they were. East had the 7-
6-5 of diamonds and K-Q-J-3 of
spades. Whatever declarer led next,
East would win the trick with a
trump and cash the 7-6 of diamonds
and four spades to defeat the contract
seven tricks — 2,000 points!

Of course, South could have saved
a bushel of points had he not per-
sisted with trump leads. Instead, he
should have tried to score his low
trumps and save what he could from
the wreck. If he had, though, this col-

umn featuring, {a :2,000-point penalty,

would never have been written...
tt res

er breath

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loathe loth
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broth brothel
halter hare h

hear heart h
hotel hotter

earth halbert hale: hale’
arlot- hart hate hater
lath lathe Jather loath

abhor bath bathe bath
oath other rehab that th
throb throe torah troth

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION
BETROTH.

yellow cheese



Harry Pillsbury v Emanuel Lasker,
St Petersburg 1895-6. Lasker was
world champion for 27 years, yet
his reign could have been much
shorter but for events at St
Petersburg. A few months earlier
_the then unknown Pillsbury had
won Hastings ahead ofthe —
European elite ted by Lasker. Both
were invited to Russia to compete
against former world champion
Wilhelm Steinitz and national icon
Mikhail Tchigorin in probably the —
ever jar.
Pillsbury and Lasker battled for
early lead until, some researchers
claim, the American visited the .
city’s red-light district and
contracted syphilis. His form

THE GIANT SLIMY OCTOPUS
OOZES ACROSS THE

WITH A SUCKER-QVERED
TENTACLE, HE GRABS AN || SOMETHING, CALVIN?
a |

WIS HIDEOUS PRESENCE

TERRORIZES THE SLEEPY

WATERFRONT COMMUNITY
2















FRIDAY,
FEBRUARY 23
ARIES -— Mar 21/Apr 20
Efforts to impress other people could
have disconcerting results. :Don’t
expect favors from others now. A

relationship with a member of the
opposite sex could become serious.

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21
Watch your temper this week. You may
end up driving someone away with one
of your sudden emotional outbursts.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21
This is not a very good week to pur-
chase secondhand items.-They could
be of poor value. If you are looking
to make a purchase, shop around for
a few weeks, then decide.

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22
You will have an especially easy time
with teamwork and shared projects. A
lot will be accomplished.

LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23

This will prove to be an exceptionally
talkative week...even for you! It’s an
ideal time for exchanging views, mak-
ing deals and having heart-to-heart
conversations with those you love.
VIRGO — Aug 24/Sept 22

You may have recently been involved
in some activity that you don’t want to

‘become public knowledge. But your
‘J /secrecy maybe noted by those’ close

to you and lead to difficult questions.

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23

This week could easily start with
some family arguments connected
with leisure activities. Try to be
more decisive when it comes to
making plans with friends.

SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22
You'll have to try to be less straight-
forward than usual. There is a prob-
lem — something to do with a close
friend — and you could be involved.
It’s a situation that doesn’t call for
Straight talk, so try to keep your
opinions to yourself.

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
Recent disagreements with family
members should be resolved. You
will find that tensions. at home have
been alleviated.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
Make sure social activities. don’t
conflict with your rigorous work
schedule. If you neglect your respon-

| sibilities, you could find yourself in

a bad situation next week.

AQUARIUS -— Jan 21/Feb 18
You may not have as much energy as
you think, so slow down your pace.
Steer clear of conversations about
politics or religion with family mem-
bers who have opposing views.

PISCES — Feb 19/Mar 20
Because Pisces tend to feel sorry for
themselves, they are often held back
from the good things in life. You
can’t improve your life if you're
always drowning in sorrows. Many
good things could happen this week,
but you won’t be able to experience
them if you’re home sulking.





10 years later he died, still only 34,
from the long-term effects of his
illness. Here Lasker (Black, to move)
has boldly sacrificed two rooks for a
bishop to open up the white king.
How did the world champion force

suddenty dropped, he finished the —_ victory?

event a distant third to Lasker, and

LEONARD BARDEN

a

CHESS

SCLUTIONS



“AYE QP GEN p +90

SOOM E 150 HEN Z +E90T “908 VORNIOS Ssay)







. Spo 6

SS See : Zi | LS ace

[NSPE MINE




es

THE



(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

NMIARINE FORECAST

WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY _ WATER TEMPS.
N at 7-14 Knots 1-2 Feet 6-7 Miles 77° F
ENE at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 6-7 Miles 77°F
N at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 6-7 Miles 76° F
ENE at 10-20 Knots 6-7 Miles
N at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 6-7 Miles 76° F
ENE at 8-16 Knots i
















Clear; breezy late. Breezy with plenty of Partly sunny. Rather cloudy. Mostly cloudy with a The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the

sunshine. : few showers. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
















ine High: 77° High: 79° High: 81° High: 79°
Low: 65° Low: 67° Low: 69° : Low: 59° Topay’s U.S. FORECAST
Meee RealFeel AAA rea AccuWeather RealFeel YAH Yl Uta ater: Yaa er 5





High Ht.(ft.) Low Ht.(ft.
T 12:17 p.m. 2.2 6:17am. 0.0
Mn 6:17 p.m, -0.1
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7:20 p.m. 0.0

da 8:34am. 0.3
Sunday 30pm. 2.0 8:28pm. 0.1

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The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature? is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, srecigtiiion, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

| ae | Ls
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Temperature


















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; health cee , oes : 3:40 p.m. 20 9:37 p.m. 0.1 si a7 92 58/1
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Last year’s high . 82° F/28° C
Last year’s low . 70° F/21° C
Precipitation ;
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2 Z Z a Year to date ............4. i hA2” First
High:76°F/24° : gee Normal year to date .. wee O12”
AccuWeather.com
— All forecasts and maps provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and Cod ==

precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. aaa
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. en
: Stationary Menge

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Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.





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Tel (242) 332-2862 | Tek: (242) 336-2304



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Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-patty cloudy, ¢-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-



“81/27 68/20 oe
7523 6317 c 75/23 5613 t

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Tucson 59/15 35/1 “sh 60/15 36/2 s

Houston Washington,DC 45/7 25/-3 s 47/8 32/0 - s. é



t35 storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rcp precipitation, Tr-trace





-- BASKETBALL

ae

i Re

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007

SECTION

|
|
Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

. sebone

MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

can

]

ren a







' BM MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE



Ferguson
leads the
Stingrays
to win over
Warriors

By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports
orter



STERMAN Ferguson
took CV Bethel down
the stretch and guided
the Stingrays to a 58-49
victory over the Faith

_ Temple Warriors yester-

day.

The Stingrays, who
won their second
straight game in the
25th Hugh Campbell
Basketball Classic at. the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasi-
um, got a game high 25
points from Ferguson.

He pumped in six of
CV Bethel’s final eight .
points as they pulled
away from a 51-47
advantage in the final

_.two minutes to seal the

win.

“T had to pull the
team together, keep the
team togéther and play
ball, That was how we
won,” Ferguson said.

“We just wanted to

make sure that we’re
still in the tournament.”
Ferguson said their
goal is to get to the final
for the first time and
eventually win the title
that has eluded them.
While Ferguson had
the hot hands, Raymond
Minus added 17 and
Romell Johnson chipped
in with 10. ag
CV Bethel trailed 18-
20 after the first quarter
and 31-30 at the half.
But they went on to
take a 42-39 lead after
the third quarter.
Wilfred Culmer led
Faith Temple with 18,
Neketo Ferguson had 17
and Rashad McPhee six
in the loss.
Warriors’ coach Gary
Hanna said: “Down the

stretch we lost our com-

posure, we lost focus
and the team fell apart.
We just have to regroup
and improve on our
guard play.”

Despite the loss, Han- a

na said he’s-not con-
vinced that they are
done yet. He still feels
he has the “two best big

. men in the tournament”

_ in Culmer and Fergu-
’ son.

Also staying alive was
the Dame Doris John-
son Mystic Marlins.
They knocked off Telios
42-37 as Rarsenio

‘ Dorsette scored 12; Les-

‘~. ley St. Fleur seven and

Jerome Wright four in
the win.

Walter Charlton
canned a game high
20 in the loss, while
Eric Stuart and
Theodore McHardy
scored five ‘and four
respectively.

The Mystic Marlins,
who led fust 11-10 after
the first quarter, opened
a 26-19 margin at the

, half.

But they only led 34-

_ 32 at the end of the

third before they held.
off Telios in the fourth.



THE Grand Bahama Tabernacle Fal-

cons, Eight Mile Rock Bluejays, Alpha .

Omega’ and Sunland Lutheran were
among the winners on Wednesday night
on day three of the Hugh Campbell Bas-
ketball Classic.

The Grand Bahama teams made their
debut on day three of the 25th version of
the week-long double elimination tour-
nament for senior boys high school
teams.

The Falcons routed the South Andros

Cheetahs 65-20; the Bluejays pounded °

the Mt. Carmel Cavaliers 59-49 and
Alpha/Omega won over visiting Turks

il! RM BAILEY’S Vincent Strachan goes up hard for the lay up.



(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

een ere emer

TATIONAL





INV I

@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

AFTER losing by one point in their opening game, the
RM Bailey Pacers stayed alive in the 25th Hugh Camp-
bell Basketball Classic with an 11-point victory.

During day four of the senior boys double elimination
tournament yesterday at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasi-
um, the Pacers posted a 66-54 decision over the Church
of God Flames.

The Flames, one of the first year teams in the tourna-
ment, were the first team to:be ousted on the court after
they were blown out by the CR Walker Knights on day
two,

The first team, sent packing, however, was the Aquinas
College Aces, They failed to show up for their second
straight game, losing to Galilee by default yesterday.

Coach Stephen Strachan said his Pacers finally played
like they are capable of playing.

“We knew that we were on the brink of elimination
and so I told my guys we just have to come out and play
basketball and leave everything on the court,” Strachan
stressed,

“For six minutes a quarter, leave everything on the
court, So they went out and executed and we came out
with the victory.”

The Pacers, however, didn’t turn things around until
the second quarter when Brian Delancy completed a
three-point play to push their lead to 18-15 before they
extended it to 26-20 at the half.

RM Bailey never looked back as they coasted to a 45-
38 lead at the end of the third.

Church of God never threatened in the fourth as they
lost two of their big men, Adrian Gustave and
DeCardroy Burrows in the first minute of the fourth.

The Pacers were able to out-run the Flames through-
out the period to stay in control.

“We started out slow, but once we get the jitters out,
we can play basketball with anyone in this country,”
Strachan stated. . 4

Delancy finished with a game high 28 points, including
11 in the third, to pace the Pacers. Vincent Strachan
had 21 and Clint Higgs chipped in with five.

Bernard Bonamy scored 22, Travis Flowers.14 and

» Neko Barr and'Stanford Rolle both contributed five ih -

the loss.

For the Flames, coach Rodney Curry said it was just an
opportunity for his players to get their feet wet in the
tournament as they made their debut,

“We have a lot of ten, eleven and ninth graders, so a lot
of them will be back next year,” Curry stressed. “We
started out a little late, but we hope to be back next
year,”

Curry said they got away from their game plan, which
was to take the ball inside because they had the bigger
line-up. He said when they lost their two big mento
foul trouble, it didn’t help them in their comeback.

But he vowed that they will learn from this year’s
experience and hopefully be back better next year.

and Caicos 62-48,
¢ Here’s a summary of the games
played:

_ @ Falcons 65; Cheetahs 20: Raymond
Higgs led Tabernacle Academy with a
game high 17 points, Leo Gideon had
12, Dereck Gaitor 11, Colyn Grant eight
and Stephen Burrows chipped in with
six.

Travis Sands scored 10 in the loss.

@ Bluejays 59, Cavaliers 49: Kiplin
Fowler scored 18, Reginald Carey had
13, Nathaniel Cooper 12 and Hubert

Williams 10 to pace the Eight Mile Rock
to their opening victory.
Taquil Ferrier had a game high 22,

‘Travis Stuart 13 and Rashad. Ferguson

eight in the loss.

@ Alpha/Omega 62, Turks and Cacaos
48; Antonio Ferguson scored 22 points,
Shameka Green had 12 and Jackson
Walker 10 in the win as Alpha/Omega
greeted Turks and Cacaos in the tour-
nament,

Hilarian Taylor scored 18, Javon Ful-
ford had 10 and Delroy Saunders six in
the loss.

Sunland Lutheran, the other Grand
Bahama team, blew out North Andros
67-19,

e Also Wednesday night, the St. John’s
Giants knocked off the Government
High Magics 59-49,

' @ Giants 52, Magics 48: Denzel
Barr scored a game high 21 points, Ricar-
do Moultrie had 15 and Shanairz
Wallace added 10 in the win for St.
John’s.

Kenson Doke and Trizille Darville
both had eight points.



Pmilovin' it®



:



4
4

acer ea Fane
to Keep hopes alive



PAGE 2C, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Henin, Mauresmo
reach Dubai semis,
but Hingis loses

@ TENNIS
DUBAI,
United Arab Emirates
Associated Press

DEFENDING champion
Justine Henin led the top
three seeds into the semifinals
of the Dubai Open on Thurs-
day.

Henin routed Eleni Daniili-
dou 6-0, 6-2 and will meet
third-seeded Svetlana —
Kuznetsova, who defeated
Patty Schnyder 6-3, 6-4.

Second-seed Amelie Mau-
resmo topped Daniela Hantu-
chova 6-3, 3-6, 6-4, and Marina
Hingis, the 2001 champion,
lost 7-6 (3), 6-2 to Jelena
Jankovic after a quick turn-
around.

Henin is 12-1 against
Kuznetsova, with wins in the
2004 Dubai final and 2006
semifinal. Mauresmo leads
Jankovic 4-1 overall, but the
Serb won their previous outing
last month in Sydney.

Henin, playing her second
tournament of the year, was
pleased with her form after a
three-set scare on Wednesday
against 16-year-old Tamira
Paszek.

“It’s definitely the best I
have played this year,” Henin
said. “I really needed a match
like yesterday’s. Today, I was
very aggressive, very positive.”

Mauresmo said she lost her
concentration against Hantu-
chova in the second set and
was grateful for a courtside
visit from coach Loic
Courteau to shake her up.

“T really felt I was in control
of the match in the first set,”
said Mauresmo, the 2005
champ. “But then I told Loic
at the end of the second set
how asleep I was. I wasn’t
doing anything in the second
set, but I was able to get my
rhythm going bit by bit in the
third set.”

Hingis finished an earlier
three-set match at 1:30 a.m.
and didn’t hit the bed until 4
a.m.

She was annoyed at the
scheduling.

“They should have put at
least one match yesterday in
the outside court,” Hingis said.
“T should not have bothered
going back to hotel last night.”

The Swiss player led 4-2 in
the first set, but Jankovic dom-
inated thereafter.



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event sponsors;

Family Islands hear Neville ©

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

NATIONAL Sports Advisory
chairman Alpheus 'Hawk'
Finalyson was more than pleased
with the response he got from the
residences in Acklins and Crooked
Island.

Finlayson was on those two
islands on Monday and Tuesday
where he shared the vision of the
Minister of Youth, Sports and
Housing Neville Wisdom for an
improvement in the sporting facil-
ities there.

While the emphasis in the Fam-
ily Islands for the past decade was
on the Bahamas Games, Finlayson
told the residences in two sepa-
rate meetings that Wisdom is seek-
ing to ensure that the islands are
better prepared by improving their
facilities,

During both meetings, Fin-
layson touched on facilities, tal-
ent, organisation, coaching and
funding, He also indicated that he
will do his best to provide a coach-
ing clinic for the core sports for
the two islands combined.

"T feel very encouraged by what
has happened these last two days,"
said Finlayson, who made the trip
on the heels of his first Family
Island visit to Abaco last week-
end. Based on his assessment,
Finalyson said he's encouraged by
persons in those areas and it all
goes well for what he sees in terms
of the development on the islands.

"This is just a continuation of
the plans that we have for making
an impact throughout the nation,"

_ he stressed.

"In Abaco last weekend, I had
an. opportunity to go Moores
Island where they have more peo-
ple than any of these islands.

"But if you just look at the num-
bers alone, these people here in
the southern islands need just as
much attention as Grand Bahama
or any other island. So I was hap-
py that the recommendation that
moneys should go to Family Island
sports development is a timely
one."

Both Acklins and Crooked
Island are lacking in adequate
sporting facilities, lighting fixtures,
sports equipment and most impor-



Race starts at 7a.m. at the Western Esplanade to Goodmans Bay & back
Late registration starts at 6:00 a.m. Registration Fee: $12 (Includes race T-shirt and other gifts and surprises)

Early registration & applications can be dropped off at Subway® restaurant in the Harbour Bay Shopping Centre from February 14-23,
All Proceeds will be donated to The Bahamas Heart Association and The Strider Track Club. Trophles and prizes will be awards for different categories.

_ For More Information, Call 327-0806 or 394-6715



Age (on race day):





[tnder20 | Femate_|



| Masters
Over 50



__ PARENTS SIGNATURE (Mander 18) ne ete bliin

Ny

Sex: M F

Telephone:







| Under 40_|_Female_|



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J assume all risks assoclated with The Subway® Fun Run/Walk including, but not limited to, falls, contact with other participants, the effect of
the weather, Including extreme heat, extreme cold, and/or humidity, traffic and the conditlons of the road, all such risks being known and
appreclated by me, Having read this waiver and knowing these facts and in consideration of accepting my application, |, for myself and anyone
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and similar items and animals accompanying entrants are not permitted on the course,

m
Fem

|? Masters:
‘1 Over 60

tantly, trained physical education
teachers and the lack of organised
sporting activities.

Andrew Dean, principal of the
Acklins High School, said in order
to better promote or organise
sports on their islands, he firmly
believes that the sporting facilities
have to be upgraded.

"We need some facilities cen-
trally located on the island, but
the most important thing we need
right now jis a bus," he pointed
out. "The closest athlete to the
school is some 20-40 miles from
the school and it's difficult to pick
them up and drop them off so that
they can train."

Portia Cox, who fills in as a
physical education instructor at
the school, said the lack of equip-

Applications can be picked up at all Subway® Restaurants in Ne Providence Fe












Date:

Date;



ment has been a hindrance to the’

growth and development of the
athletes,

"We just had our school sports
and basically all of the athletes
were using the same equipment,"
she stated, referring to the javelin
as an example. "It's just a matter
of the athletes using the correct
equipment."

Stephen Sands, a member of
the MICA Sports council, said he's
more optimistic that sports will
start to re-develop on Acklins
because he knows that their cry
will be heard in New Providence,

"I'd like to see a priority made
in such a way that moneys can
now be disbursed to the sports
councils so they can try to make
sure that these athletes get the
training and nutrition that they
need to be better athletes," he
charged. "Don't forget, a lot of
our*best athletes came from the
Family Islands.”

On Crooked Island, the enthu-
siasm level was much higher. After

@ NATIONAL Sports Advisory chairman Alpheus 'Hawk' Finlayson meets with sports personnel in Acklins.

a highly spirited meeting, persons
were more energised, but they say
they are still waiting for the help to
come their way. —

"I'm very enthused about what
I heard," said Darrel Moss. "We
are really looking for some things
to happen for Crooked Island
now."

Former softball player Celes-
tine Bonaby, now a nursing officer
on the island, said she's looking
for the proper basketball and soft-
ball fields to be drawn out so that
they can start working on their
teams.

"I'm disappointed in what's
happening here right now," she
said. "I want the people to come
and help us to push sports because

we have a lot of talent here and we _
know that a lot of them can-get

athletic schalarships." :

David Cunningham, the Depu
Chief Councillor for Crooked
Island, said the meeting was very
beneficial because they covered a
lot of areas,

@ A BASKETBALL court on Crooked Island. David Cunningham, the Deputy Chief Councillor

Wisdom’s sporting vision —













_"L hope that this information
get to the ears of those persons
who can make a difference," he
insisted.

"T just feel that it's good for the
exposure that we are getting and I
hope that something good come
out of it."

Annafaye Ferguson-Knowles,
the chairman of the MICA Sports
Council, best summed it up by say-
ing that the meeting was fruitful
because a number of persons came
out and expressed their desire to
work as one for the betterment of
the island.

"Once the sporting facilities are
there and the coaching clinics are
held, I think the people will be
motivated to ensure that the sport-
ing activities are held," she
claimed.

“*:Finlayson assured the resi-

dences that he will do his best to
pass'on their concerns and he will
work diligently to ensuring that
the improvements are made in a
timely fashion.



for Crooked Island, said the meeting held on the island was very beneficial because they covered a lot

of areas.



@ BASKETBALL

HUGH CAMPBELL CORRECTION

sports in brief —



the ball bounced through."

Yuma improved to 14-8, but Scorpions' man-



IT WAS incorrectly stated in Thursday’s Tri-
bune Sports headline story that “Bimini win
Family Island thriller.” The story also stated
that Bimini won the game in a nail-biter, 33-32,
over New Bight, Cat Island.

In fact, it was the other way around. New
Bight-won the game 33-32.

The Tribune apologises for the error.

@ BASEBALL
BURROWS JR. SHINES IN ARIZONA

GREG Burrows Jr. paid off big dividends for
the Yumia Scorpions last’ Friday as the Ari-
zona Winger League came to a close.

Burrows, who was hitless at 0-4 at that point,
came up with a game ending RBI-single down
the left-field line in the bottom of the ninth
inning that propelled the Scorpions to a 7-6
victory over the Canada Miners as 3,000 fans
cheered from the sidelines.

"It was an overall team effort coming back
from 5-1," Burrows reflected.

"It was just the luck of the draw. I'm sure
anyone else would have done it, but it was my
turn to hit and I just took a good swing at it and

ager Mike Marshall said their success was due
in part to Burrows' game-winning heroics.

"He's from the Bahamas and it's all about
the visa," Marshall said, who earlier watched as
Yuma front office extended Burrows' contract
through the summer.

"Visas are very difficult to get in the United
States the last few years, so I am hoping some-
how some way, we can keep him because not
only is he a great ball player, but he's a great
individual."

Burrows was named MVP because of his
performance.

m@ DEBORAH DEAN'S FUNERAL SERVICE

THE funeral service for the late Deborah
Dean, 50, will be held on Saturday at 10 a.m. on
Chapel on the Hill, Tonique Williams-Darling
Highway. Interment will follow in Woodlawn
Memorial Gardens, Soldier Road.

Dean was the mother of Golden Girl Chan-
dra Sturrup. Dean was an active mother, who
supported the Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations in many ways and she trav-
eled with the national team to the majority of
the big international meets around the world,



~SPORTSWEEKEND_





Ene Poa Tack
finally run out
_ Sor the Heat?

he Miami Heat has gotten an
unusual amount of goodluckin
the past few years. Abelow-
~ average Heat player named Anthonys
Carter forgot to exercise a clause in -

- his exorbitant contract,somehow __

clearing the cluttered path for Sha- -

~ quille O’Neal to thunder into town. _

the Heat fell a spot in a draft by acci- _

_ dentally winning the lastgameofa _
~ last-place season — and the tumble a
allowed tt the Heat to settle forsome

~ . anonymous kid ©
-mamedDwyaneé

Wade. The king’s. ON

_ treasurechestis

~ always filled with a lot .

of good. fortune. .

Butnow?

The broke and | <

‘weary king is limping, \

-crownheavyand >
a askew, The Heat is suddenly the _

_ unluckiest team in the NBA, unable t

_ keep anything from its players toits

head coach to its place in the stand-

_ ings healthy. Heat fans attending the a

next home game should byes of |

locusts and killer bees. :

~ DROPPING LIKE FLIES” ST
: It isn’t merely that Miami’s players CO
keep collapsing, Wade with a dislo-
cated shoulder most recently, It is
_ that Miami’s best players keep Setting:
hurt, and at different times. So this _
~ herky-jerky season keeps sputtering
and stalling without any consistency
_ except bad luck. TheHeathashada
winning record only once in 54 games a
—a long time ago, when it was 3-2.
_. Next up: Expect forward Udonis
- Haslem to be mauled by a bear, Jason
__ Kapono to be attacked by an octopus
and center Alonzo Mourning to miss
four to six weeks after being hitinthe
head by a safe that falls from the sky. -
That’s a joke, but this isn’t: Wayne . -
Simien has missed this entire season
while fighting salmonella. .
So the Heat leads Oe league in
being poisoned. | .
It is hard to overcome the loss of -
one star player in this league, never _
_ mind three. The Phoenix Suns Pees
~ crushed everyone, then began losing -
- by double digits the moment Steve
Nash missed a few games. The Heat,
meanwhile, has lost significant time’
from Shaq, Jason Williams and now
-Wade. Gary Payton has missed a o
string of games for the first time inhis _
entire 16-year career, and two others ae
players (Antoine WalkerandJames
S Posey) were suspended for being fat.
_ Itisanamazingthing whenoneofthe _
- healthiest guys on your rosteristhe
one taking hundreds of pills for his _
borrowed kidney (Mourning).
Crazier still: The Detroit Pistons,
the Heat’s chief rival in the Eastern
Conference, never have anybody
_ injured. In the past three seasons, for
’ example, Tayshaun Prince hasn’t
missed a single game. The Heathas:
had more injuries in the last couple of ©
months than the Pistons have hadin
the past three years combined.

ALLISNOTLOST...RIGHT?
_ It is surprising that, upon Wade’s
injury, Riley didn’t simply raise his
arm in “Check, please” style and take.
another sabbatical. Awfully strange,



MORE
INSIDE: 10B















sate aaneintaanannannnaAAhhinAniAnANRAAMMARARASAMARASIHAMNROMARAMAAANAARANRARANAURANAH

PRO BASKETBALL | DENNIS JOHNSON: 1954 - 2007



INTERNATIONAL EDITION





Former NBA All- Star dies at 52

BY JIM VERTUNO
Associated Press

AUSTIN, Texas — Dennis John-
son, the star NBA guard who was
part of three championships and
teamed with Larry Bird on one of
the great postseason plays, died
Thursday, collapsing after
his developmental team’s
practice. He was 52.

Johnson, coach of the
Austin Toros, was uncon-
scious: and in cardiac
arrest when paramedics
arrived at Austin Conven-
tion Center, said Warren
Hassinger, spokesman for
Austin-Travis County
Emergency Medical Services.

Paramedics tried to resuscitate
Johnson for 23 minutes before he
was taken to a hospital and pro-
nounced dead, Hassinger said.
Mayra Freeman, a spokeswoman
for the medical examiner’s office,
said there will be an autopsy.

The Toros postponed home
games today and Saturday, the
NBA Development League said.

“He was one of the most under-



. DENNIS JOHNSON

rated players i in n the history of the
game, in my opinion, and one of
the greatest Celtic acquisitions of
all time,” said former Celtics team-
mate Danny Ainge, now the team’s
executive director of basketball
operations. “D.J. was a free spirit
and a fun personality who
loved. to laugh and play
the game. .

“We had spoken at
length just the other night
about basketball and his
excitement about coach-
ing the Austin Toros. “

Toros spokeswoman
Perri Travillion said she
was talking with Johnson
outside the building when he col-
lapsed. Johnson had been joking
about getting a parking ticket.

“We were laughing,” Travillion
said. “He just collapsed.”

Travillion said she called 911,

and that Johnson never regained
consciousness. She said Johnson
did not appear to have overexerted
himself at Toros practice and that
he had not complained of any dis-
comfort before he collapsed.



MARK LENNIHAN/AP FILE
GUARD DUTY: Dennis Johnson,
driving on Magic Johnson in
1986, helped win three titles.

Johnson, a five-time All-Star and

-one of the top defensive guards in

NBA history, was part of the last
Celtics dynasty. He spent 14 sea-
sons in the league and retired after

the 1989-90 season. Johnson played
on title teams with the Celtics in
1984 and 1986 and with the Seattle
SuperSonics in 1979, when he was
voted MVP of the NBA Finals.

“Whether he was leading his
teams to NBA championships or
teaching young men the meaning
of professionalism, Dennis John-
son’s contributions to the game
went far beyond the basketball
court,” NBA Commissioner David
Stern said. “Dennis was a man of
extraordinary character, with a tre-
mendous passion for the game.”

Johnson was a favorite team-
mate of Bird’s, and the two were
part of one of the most memorable
plays in Celtics history.

During the fifth game of the 1987
Eastern Conference finals against
the Detroit Pistons, Bird stole Isiah
Thomas’ inbounds pass under Bos-
ton’s basket and fed Johnson, who
drove in for the winning layup.

The Celtics won the series in
seven. games but lost to the Los
Angeles Lakers in the NBA ‘Finals.

* TURN TO DENNIS JOHNSON



PRO BASKETBALL | CHICAGO 84, CLEVELAND 78

_ Strong in the clutch



Bulls step it up
down the stretch,
hold off Cavaliers

BY TOM WITHERS
Associated Press

CLEVELAND — Luol Deng scored 18 points,
and Ben Wallace had 19 rebounds, a season-high
seven blocks and two huge free throws in the
final minutes, leading the Chicago Bulls to an
84-78 victory qver the Cleveland
Cavaliers on Thursday night.

Wallace added 14 points as the
Bulls snapped a six-game losing
streak in Cleveland and
improved to 8-2 in the Central
Division race. :

Ben Gordon scored 16 Bolits
and Kirk Hinrich had 11 for the
Bulls, who overcame foul trouble
and put the Cavaliers away with
a 14-5 burst in the fourth quarter.

LeBron James scored 29 points and Larry
Hughes had 20 for Cleveland, but the Cavaliers,



- the NBA’s worst free-throw-shooting team,

were just 8-of-16 from the line. Chicago, mean-
while, was 12-of-12 from the line.

After a fadeaway jumper by Deng in the lane
gave the Bulls a 78-73 lead, Wallace, a 41 percent
free-throw shooter, stepped up to the line and
swished his only two attempts of the game.

Deng scored again to make it 82-73 before
James hit a 3-pointer and scored on a follow to
pull the Cavaliers within 82-78. However, Gor-
don made two more free throws with 13.7 sec-

_ onds left to seal the victory.

The Cavaliers played their fourth game with-
out starting center Zydrunas Ilgauskas, who is
attending to family health matters. Cleveland
also was missing guard Sasha Pavlovic (flu) and
guard Damon Jones (strep throat).

Andres Nocioni returned to the Bulls lineup

TONY DEJAK/AP

. . after missing seven games with plantar fasciitis.
THE RUSH IS ON: Luo! Deng of the Bulls drives against Cavaliers defender Daniel Gibson

_ that injury. Wade is as reckless with
He scored five points in 15 minutes.

_ his body as any player in the NBA, but
- he dislocated his shoulder simply by
_ reaching his arm out on defense? It —
looked harmless until he started winc-
_ ing and screaming. One of the tough-
__ est players in sports needed a wheel-
chair to the locker roomanda
‘stretcher to the ambulance because of
__ the pain. For a shoulder. How’s that —
for a snapshot of the Heat’s season? —
The Heat rides on Wade’s shoul- _
ders, too, and the timing of this is ter-
rible. Miami’s coughing engine was on
the cusp of humming right for the first
time this season. But all is not lost, no
matter how hopeless it might seem.
The Heat would be done if it
played in the Western Conference.
But O’Neal and friends, even though
they are capable of putting up a few
stinker 60-point games without
Wade, are still good enough to sal-
vage this season in the godforsaken
’ Eastern Conference. O’Neal makes his
sidekicks great, no matter who they
are, and someone will step up. The
Heat, if Wade can return soon, would
be the most formidable low seed in
the history of the NBA playoffs.
That is, if Shaq can avoid being
trampled by a runaway herd of buf-
falo outside his mansion.

in the fourth quarter, when the Bulls used a 14-5 run to pull away and win by six points.

GOLF | ACCENTURE MATCH PLAY CHAMPIONSHIP

e@ NBA REPORT

~ Woods wins easily; Mickelson, Furyk, Singh out

BY DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

MARANA, Ariz. — One by one,
the biggest names headed for the
airport Thursday, until Tiger
Woods was the only player among
the top eight seeds remaining in
the hunt at the Accenture Match
Play Championship.

Phil Mickelson had designs on a
comeback until Justin Rose scram-
bled backward out of the desert
and made a 30-foot par putt to
halve the 15th hole, leaving Lefty
looking like a batter frozen by a 3-2
curve that dropped over the plate.

Jim Furyk backed off a 7-foot
birdie putt three times and still
went wide left on it, losing on the
19th hole to Chad Campbell.

Vijay Singh
celebrated his
44th birthday
with birdies on
his last two
holes to extend
his match, then
missed a 6-foot
birdie putt on
the 19th hole



JEFF GROSS/GETTY

and lost to Ste-
TIGER WOODS phen Ames.
Woods had

an easy time against Tim Clark.
And, suddenly, his path to an
eighth consecutive PGA Tour vic-
tory looks a whole lot easier.
“T played better than I did yes-
terday, which is great,” Woods said
after making birdie on half his



PAUL CONNORS/AP

DOWN AND OUT: Phil Mickelson.

holes in a 5-and-4 victory over
Clark. “Do a little bit of practice
this afternoon and solidify some
things, and tomorrow, hopefully,
I can play even better.”

But Woods, a two-time winner
of this fickle event, knows not to

look too far
ahead. Next up
is Nick O’Hern,
a short-but-
straight-hitting
Australian who
beat Woods in
the second
round two
years ago at La
Costa. Still in
Woods’ side of
the bracket is.
Henrik Stenson, who won in Dubai
earlier this month when Woods
finished two shots behind. Another
winner was Trevor Immelman, the
last player to win a PGA Tour



ROSS FRANKLIN/AP

JIM FURYK

* TURN TO GOLF







ey



(OL IY OG IG GLY AI A AI SY I I I MN



PAGE 8, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007 THE TRIBUNE





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“My work at The Tribune is rewarding

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and challenging. I enjoy contributing
to the look of our newspaper while
meeting the needs of our advertisers.
| am proud to work here. The
Tribune is my newspaper.”

ESTHER BARRY

PRODUCTION MANAGER
THE TRIBUNE

The Tribune
My Voice. My Vlowspaper!

REEMA TR SOIT



era ame ren tes ee







gl A LN Es ET LT YO ELC CLC Le



/ ,orizons
/ | FROM page one

ing to determine who gets cus-
tody of the remains of the con-
troversial US celebrity.

‘He took the stand and pre-
sénted the judge with a video of
Ms Smith taken when she was
eight months pregnant and living
at ‘Horizons’.

‘When asked how he had
obtained the video, Mr Shelley

did not answer directly but told:

the court that Ms Smith had
instructed him and Mr Thomp-
son to secure her belongings —
including the computer she had at
the house — if anything should
happen to her and Mr Stern was
not around.

Mr Shelley told the Associat-
ed Press earlier this week that
sdid he entered the property a
day after Smith’s death to
“Secure” it after he heard that
someone had been removing
items.

Rum Cay

‘FROM page one

Rum Cay had stopped, but
stressed that the stoppage was
only temporary. :

‘Mr Peet said work on the pro-
ject had stopped to allow the
Bahamas Environment, Science

and Technology (BEST) Com- |

mission to inspect the company’s
plans for a bigger marina than
the Heads of Agreement provides
for. ;

\The minister said Montana
Holdings’ proposal was being
reviewed in the light of govern-
ment’s new marina policy, which
was drafted last year.

‘Mr Peet said he expects the

matter to be worked out by next
week.

Registration
FROM page one

arly election up until then.

‘Mr Bethel said he believes
there is even sufficient time for
the number of registrations to
reach the projected 165,000.

Following the announcement
by Prime Minister Perry Christie
that the current register would
close in mid-March, registration
picked up considerably, Mr
Bethel explained.

Before the announcement, he
said, around 200 people registered
daily, now his department is see-
ing between 500 and 600 new reg-
istrations each day. bree

“We went up to about 400, 500

a day. On the last couple of days
we were definitely over 500, yes-
terday we were over 600. We’re
averaging between 500-600 a day
and it can go up more,” he said.

Mr Bethel said he expects even
more people to come out to reg-
ister as the political season heats
up and more rallies like the two
major ones which took place on
Tuesday are held.

“It’s coming gradually. It’s
much better than it was,” he said.

In December last year officials
expressed concern at the lack of
veter registrations. At that time
only a little over 100,000 people
had registered — with elections
only a few months away.

The slow registration impeded
the work of the boundaries com-
mission which reportedly was not
able to make any definitive deci-
sions on how some constituencies
will be drawn up.

Announcing the closing of the
register earlier this month, the
prime minister said that this was a
matter of “first importance”, urg-

ing all Bahamians citizens who -

had not yet done so to register
“as soon as possible.”

t









FROM page one

along the Great Isaacs Bank of
Grand Bahama, the south west of
Andros, and the northern area of
Cuba for traces of hydrocarbons -
which are used by petroleum geol-
ogists to assess the potential of
commercial deposits of oil in the
region.

Minister of Energy.and the
Environment Dr Marcus Bethel
told the press yesterday that inital
seismic data suggests that the
Bahamas has the necessary ingre-
dients to generate and trap com-
mercial deposits of petroleum.

“Techincal officers of the Min-

istry of Energy and the Environ- ©

ment, the BEST Commission, the
Ministry of Foreign ‘Affairs, the
Department of Lands and Surveys,
and the Office of the Attorney
General have reviewed the licence
documents to ensure that they are




Licences

in compliance with the require-
ments of our laws and policies.

“The licences are for three years
with a right to renewal if the terms
and conditions therein are met. If
hydrocarbons are discovered in
commercial quantities, the licences
will be converted to leases upon
the requests of the companies,” he
said. -

The companies’ licences have
been granted under the Petrole-
um Exploration Act of 1978.

The application has been

approved by the Bahamas Cabi-

net, the minister, and is now only
awaiting the signature of the Gov-
ernor General Arthur Hanna.

The financial benefit for the
Bahamas will be accrued through
rent for the licence areas, in addi-
ton to the application fee of
$100,000 per licence.

Baha Mar is accused
of ‘union-busting’

FROM page one

time employees, who receive better benefits.

Under the plan, all full-time employees up to director level work-
ing in the Bahamas and Florida have been offered a one-time, com-
pletely voluntary opportunity to end their employment with Cable

Beach Resorts and receive an a

ttractive compensation package

based on their positions and length of employment. Employees
have been given a six-week window to consider it.

In addition, the developer said those who participate in the plan
and can prove that they have enhanced their skills through contin-
uing education or specialised training after leaving Cable Beach
resorts, will receive first interview consideration when hiring begins

for Baha Mar in 2010.

Baha Mar CEO Don Robinson told Tribune Business: “As we start
mobilising for the project some of the rooms will come down, so the
workforce has to come down with that.”

Baha Mar also claimed the plan complies with all labour laws

and union guidelines.

However, BHMA president Obie Ferguson said Baha Mar has
“disregarded the requirements of the Industrial Relations Act and

their industrial agreement.”

According to him: “The agreement that BHMA has with Baha
Mar requires them to send the union a written notice of any proposed
changes that they wish to make to the industrial agreement, and up
to this date that has not been done.”

Mr Ferguson said that proposals directed to BHMA members,
without prior union consultation, were in contravention of the indus-
trial agreement between BHMA and Baha Mar.

He said Baha Mar executives and a union official had conducted
a “preliminary” meeting on the plan, but that no terms were ratified

by the union.

Asked why he believed Baha Mar had introduced the plan, Mr
Ferguson said the Cable Beach developer aims to reduce employee

benefits.

“Our industrial agreement says that if you’ve been working there
for 10 years or more you are entitled to five weeks vacation, but the
new employees that will be hired will come in under a different

arrangement,” he said.

_ Mr Ferguson said Baha Mar is attempting to “clean house” by get-
ting rid of employees who receive five weeks vacation.
The union president said he would be meeting with his members

next month to discuss the issue.

Baha Mar’s retirement and voluntary separation plan applies to _
employees of Radisson Cable Beach Resort, the Nassau Beach
Hotel, Wyndham Nassau Resort and Crystal Palace Casino.

FROM page one

tion in November, 2005, several
references were made to the
Bahamas “going back there” if
the FNM leadership team of
Hubert Ingraham and Brent
Symonette were to be elected.

And while not referred to by
name, Mr Symonette is generally
considered to be the target of
these comments, as he is the son
of former UBP premier Sir Rolan
Symonette, and brother of Speak-
er of the House, the late Bobby
Symonette.

In addition, at the PLP rally on
Tuesday, Foreign Affairs Minister
Fred Mitchell alleged that FNM
leader Hubert Ingraham will turn
over the government to ‘the UBP
heir’, Brent Symonette, if Mr
Ingraham is returned to govern-
ment.

However, PLP chairman Ray-
nard Rigby said Mr Symonette
was the one who brought up the
race issue, not the PLP.

The PLP press release says:
“This is the same Brent Symon-

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs announces that application for the captioned
fellowship at the Graduate and Undergraduate levels are now being accepted in
the following fields of study related to the OAS priority development areas:
1 Social Development and the creation of productive employment, Education,
Economic diversification and integration, trade liberalization and market access,
Scientific development and exchange & transfer of Technology, Strengthening
of democratic institutions, Sustainable development of tourism, Sustainable

development and environment, Culture.

Candidates are required to be citizens or permanent residents in OAS member
states with a minimum GPA of 3.00

Applications can be obtained from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, East Hill
Street or by downloading and electronically completing the OAS form 98 on
www.oas.org. All applications are to be submitted in triplicate to the attention
of the National Liaison Officer. The deadline for receipt of application forms in
1 the Ministry is February 28th 2007

Additional information can be obtained by contacting the Technical Assistance
Cooperation Division of the Ministry at telephone number 322-7624/5, or by
email to technicalassistance@mfabahamas.org

Rigby on PLP

ette who himself doubted his own
ability to be prime minister
because of the colour of his skin.
The PLP believes in the suprema-
cy of the content of one’s charac-
ter over the colour of one’s skin.
This has always been our belief.
And this belief has been put into
full practice by this PLP govern-
ment during our first term by
ensuring that all Bahamians par-
ticipate, and are engaged, in mat-
ters of national importance.”

Mr Rigby also denied the PLP
was guilty of playing the race card
at its convention in 2005.

The release reads: “It was the
FNM who, when they had their
convention, started speaking
about ‘salt and pepper’ in describ-

~ ing Brent Symonette and Hubert

Ingraham, not the PLP. It was
Hubert Ingraham who raised the
issue of race when he accused
Prime Minister Perry Christie of
not appointing a white man to his
Cabinet.



















LOCAL NEWS |






“Petroleum exploration and pro-
duction is capital intensive,” Dr
Bethel said, “so this activity’ will
not generate significant employ-
ment opportunities. However, roy-
alties will be paid to the Bahamas
government if hydrocarbons are
discovered, based on the volume of
production.

“For example, if the company
discovers petroleum in commer-
cial quantities and produces up to
75,000 barrels of oil per day, a 12.5
per cent royalty will be paid into
the treasury. Royalties payable will
increase with an increase in pro-

duction, such that on production in ,

excess of 350,000 barrels of oil per
day, 25 per cent royalty will be
paid,” he said.

Also, if natural gas is discovered,
a 12.5 per cent royalty will be
payable to the Bahamas govern-
ment, Dr Bethel said.

Besides the finaicial benefits, the
minister explained that there will

Anna Nicole

to be buried

in Bahamas
FROM page one

Judge Seidlin initially
announced that he would find
a remedy for the situation by
today, but he surprised all
parties involved when he
made his decision yesterday
afternoon.

If his ruling is upheld, the:
Bahamas can expect a media
circus to once again descend
on Lakeview Cemetery when
Ms Smith is buried in the
coming days.

Mr Stern — long-time

lawyer and companion of the

former TrimSpa spokes-
woman - testified on
Tuesday that Ms Smith want-
ed to be buried next to her
son. :

He said that she was “very
firm, very firm, that the
Bahamas was her home.”

Mr Stern was hunched over
a table with his hands folded
as he awaited Judge Seidlin’s.
ruling.

He appeared relieved and
wiped tears away after the
ruling was announced, while
Ms Arthur sat crying in the
courtroom.

Judge Seidlin said that he,
too, had suffered through this
case and that he felt sympa-
thy for all the parties, but
that it was important for, Ms
Smith to be united with her .
beloved son in death.

“The PLP is fighting a cam-
paign on philosophy, not race.
The FNM can talk all they want
about race. The PLP is not inter-
ested in race.” .

Mr Rigby said the FNM had
two questions to answer.

“What Brent Symonette and
the FNM must answer is: are they
the inheritors of the UBP and its
philosophy of exclusion? And
does Mr Ingraham deny that he
said that he intends to remain — if
elected — for 18 months and then
turn the party over to Brent
Symonette, who is his deputy
leader?

“Those are the issues.”

Mr Rigby described the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party as a party
of “inclusion”, with a “big and
inviting tent.”

be an increase of knowledge of the
petroleuem potential of the
Bahamas as a result of the explo-
ration activities.

“The terms of the licence man- |

date the companies to provide to
the minister within four months of
each year of the term of the
licence, the results of all geological,
seismic, and the other related
investigations and interpretations









Jamaica.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007, PAGE 13

CHRIST CHURCH CATHEDRAL

George Street, New Providence
The Bahamas

Due to the Annual General Meeting (A.G.M.)
on Sunday 25th February, 2007 there will be one
Eucharist Service at 8:00 am.

In addition, there will be no evening service, due
to the Diocesan Lenten Mission at St. John’s
College Auditorium beginning at 7:00 p.m. the
guest missioner is the Right Reverend Robert
Thompson, Bishop Suffragan of Kingston,



of works done.

“These will assist our under-
standing of our subsurface and will
be of interest to the College of the
Bahamas. The government of the
Bahamas welcomes this opportu-
nity, which can lead to an expan-
sion of our economic base, and
welcome such activities that will
be conducted in an environmen-

_ tally sustainable manner,” he said.




Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd
De Cie Noe
Phone:322-1722 ¢ Fax: a7 Ey |



322-1722

“EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

Awell established Pharmaceutical Company is seekingto hire the

.following, individual:-

: Reel U Wesel a1

Experience Skills:

+ Aminimum of three G) years



experience in the field.

- Excellent organizational and interpersonal skills
- Excellent communication skills

- Excellent command of English Language
- Proficiency in Microsoft Work and Excel.

Ae.

- Ability to work with minimal supervision

All interested persons should mail their resume to:

Chief Financial Officer

Commonwealth Drugs & Medical Supplies Co. Ltd

P.O.Box N-1145 -
Nassau, Bahamas 4

NT
Fax: (242) 323-2871

\
meds
A







Email: ksherman@commonwealthdmgs.com

Only applicants who meet the requirements will be contacted.

REE RN TT EN RL



4B | FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23,2007 __ INTERNATIONAL EDITION _



From Miami Herald Wire Services

Sevilla kept its UEFA Cup
title defense on track while
2005 champion, CSKA Mos-
cow was eliminated and Ajax’s
poor European season finally
ended on Thursday.

Sevilla had. a comfortable
3-0 aggregate victory over
Steaua Bucharest to reach the
final 16. Striker Aleksandr
Kerzhakov scored the only
goal of the second leg when he

headed past goalkeeper Cor- |

nel Cernea in first-half injury

time off a cross from Andreas’

Hinkel.
The match marked a disap-

pointing return for Steaua to ©
Sevilla’s Ramon Sanchez .

Pizjuan stadium, where it
lifted the European Cup in
1986 by beating FC Barcelona
on penalties.

Three other Spanish clubs
also made the fourth round —
Osasuna, Celta Vigo and
Espanyol.

CSKA Moscow lost 1-0 to
Maccabi Haifa to exit by the
same aggregate score, and

while Ajax beat Werder Bre-'

e

SOCCER

Sevilla advances in UEFA

JOSE MANUEL VIDAL/EPA
AN ALL-OUT RACE: Sevilla’s
Andreas Hinkel, left, fights
for possession with Ovidiu
from Steaua Bucharest

men 3-1, it couldn’t overcome
its 3-0 first-leg loss.
AZ Alkmaar, Bayer Lever-

SPORTS ROUNDUP

Trouble dogs
Pacman Jones
in Las Vegas

From Miami Herald Wire Services
More than $81,000 in cash

belonging to Tennessee Titans

cornerback Adam “Pacman”

Jones was seized by police, _

who say the money sparked a
weekend melee and a triple
shooting at a Las Vegas strip
club. -

Jones was showering more
than 40 strippers onstage early
Monday with cash “intended
as a visual effect,”:a search
warrant said. But a scuffle
broke out when the Houston
promoter
who. hired
the strippers
told them to
pick up the
money.

The pro-
moter, iden-
tified as
e Chris
Mitchell,
and a male
associate
took a plastic trash bag con-
taining Jones’ money and
walked out the front door, the
warrant says. Police recovered
the money and two watches
inside a safe at Mitchell’s hotel
room Monday.

Jones’ lawyer, Worrick
Robinson, has said his client
did not know anyone involved
in the shooting and was inter-
viewed by authorities as a wit-
ness, not as a suspect. Police
have not said Jones is a person
of interest in the case. Robin-
son could not be reached for
comment Thursday.



JONES

The incident occurred just

hours after the NBA All-Star
Game in Las Vegas, which
attracted celebrities from
music, sports and entertain-
ment.

Jones has faced criminal

charges three times — all -

involving nightclubs in Ten-
nessee — since the Titans
made the cornerback the sixth
overall pick in the 2005 draft.

Mitchell “admits that he
took the money in the bag
belonging to Jones because he
thought it was for the danc-
ers,” the warrant says. After
Mitchell left Minxx Gentle-

men’s Club & Lounge, “a_

melee broke out,” the warrant
says.

Later, a woman identified
as a member of Jones’ group
fought with one of the strip-
pers and security tried to
break up the fight, it says.
Jones told the guards to back
off and reached behind his
back “as if he were retrieving a
weapon there.”

Jones’ entourage was
moved outside, but the woman
continued to fight, according

_ to the warrant filed Wednes-

day in Clark County District in
Las Vegas.

The woman hit a guard in
the head with a champagne

‘bottle and “began biting and

screaming” when other guards

tried to restrain her, the war-

rant says. Minutes later, a valet
told police he heard shots
fired near the front entrance
and saw a black man with corn
rows in his hair pointing a
black semi-automatic hand-
gun, it says. The man then fled.
» The shots hit a female cus-
tomer and two guards, one
who is in critical condition at a
Las Vegas hospital. Aaron
Cudworth, the guard hit with
the champagne bottle, and the
woman were treated and
released. Police © have
described the suspected
shooter as last seen wearing a
black shirt and blue jeans.

e Elsewhere: The Jack-
sonville Jaguars have settled
on a starting quarterback for
next season. Coach Jack Del
Rio said that Byron Leftwich
will return to his starting role,
ending months of speculation
about what the Jaguars would
do at the quarterback position.
... Lovie Smith’s negotiations
for a new contract are at a
stalemate, according to his
agent, who created a stir by
saying the coach who led the
Chicago Bears to the Super
Bowl could become a free

-agent after the 2007 season....

Kellen Winslow has to make
another comeback. The Cleve-
land Browns’ talented tight
end underwent microfracture
surgery on his right knee last
month, a more extensive pro-
cedure than was initially
revealed and one that will
require a longer recovery....
The Baltimore Ravens decided
against designating Pro Bowl

linebacker Adalius Thomas —

as their franchise player, a
move that will enable the sev-
en-year veteran to become an
unrestricted free agent. Also,
the Ravens disclosed that the
contract extension signed by
head coach Brian Billick last
month was for four years,
through the 2010 season. ...
The Oakland Raiders cut ties
with Aaron Brooks, declining

to pick up the option on the’

quarterback’s contract afte:
one difficult season. ... The
New Orleans Saints desig

nated defensive end Charles’

Grant as their franchise
player, preverting the five-
year veteran from becoming
an unrestricted free agent...
The Seattle Seahawks desig
nated clutch kicker Josh
Brown as their franchise



kusen, Newcastle, Benfica,
Shakhtar Donetsk, Rangers,
Paris Saint-Germain, Lens and
Braga also advanced. But no
Italian teams qualified after
Parma and Livorno lost.

Leonardo, Klaas-Jan
Huntelaar and Ryan Babel
scored for Ajax in Amsterdam,
but it wasn’t enough to stop
the German club from advanc-
ing. ‘

The loss was the culmina-
tion of a poor European cam-
paign for Ajax, which failed to
qualify for the Champions
League group stage.

Ajax won the last of its four
European Cup titles in 1995, It
also captured the 1992 UEFA
Cup.

Ajax’s elimination leaves
AZ Alkmaar as the only Dutch
club in the final 16 — Feyen-
oord was kicked out of the
competition for crowd vio-
lence, which advanced its
scheduled opponent Totten-
ham.

AZ rallied to draw 2-2 with
Turkish club Fenerbahce for a
5-5 aggregate, and advanced

on away goals. Maarten Mar-
tens and Barry Opdam
scored in the second half to
counter first-half Fenerbahce
goals from Tumer Metin and
Alex.

ELSEWHERE

e Italy: Juventus signed
Czech Republic defender
Zdenek Grygera from Ajax
to a five-year contract, starting
next season.

The 26-year-old will trans-
fer to Juventus when his cur-
rent contract expires in June,
the Italian team said. Juventus
did not disclose financial
details of the deal. ... The
four-month ban on fans
attending games at Catania’s
stadium was upheld after a
police officer was killed dur-
ing rioting this month.

e France: Lille’s directors
blamed Manchester United for
the crowd trouble at their
Champions League match on

Tuesday, saying the English © |

team’s early distribution of
tickets led to a high number of
counterfeits being made.





SS SS

JEFF GROSS/GETTY IMAGES

RUNNING FROM TROUBLE: The lawyer for Adam “Pacman”
Jones said this week tnat his client did not know anyone
involved in Monday’s shooting and was interviewed by
authorities as a witness to the crime, not as a suspect.

player. ... The Detroit Lions
put the franchise tag on defen-
sive tackle Cory Redding,
team president Matt Millen
said late Wednesday. ... The

Dallas Cowboys hired Wade

Wilson to coach quarterbacks
and Bruce Read to run spe-
cial teams on Wade Phillips’
staff.... Veteran safety Troy
Vincent was cut by the Wash-
ington Redskins, saving the

team about $1.3 million in sala- °

ry-cap space.
ETC.

e Tennis: After years of
holding out against equal prize
money, Wimbledon yielded to
public pressure and agreed to
pay female players as much as
male players at the world’s
most prestigious tennis tour-
nament. The All England Club
fell in line with other Grand
Slam events and offered equal
pay through all rounds at this
year’s tournament. ... Defend-
ing champion Tommy Haas
edged Amer Delic in two tie-
breakers in the Regions Mor-
gan Keegan Championships
while women’s titleholder
Sofia Arvidsson lost her
quarterfinal in Memphis,
Tenn. Haas scraped by Delic
7-6 (7-2), 7-6 (7-5) in a second-

round match, without any

break points. In the women’s
Cellular South Cup, the
unseeded Arvidsson was
knocked out in 40 minutes by
Meilen Tu of the United
States 6-0, 6-2... . Juan Car-
los Ferrero deteated Lukas
Dlouhy 6-3, 6-3 but missed the
quarterfinals of the Copa Tel-

mex in Buenos Aires, Argen- _

tina. Ferrero finished second
in his round-robin group to
Nicolas Devilder, who beat
the Spaniard on Wednesday
and will advance to his first
ATP quarterfinals. ... Nikolay
Davydenko advanced to the
quarterfinals of the ABN
Amro in Rotterdam Nether-
lands, despite an ankte injury,
beating Marc Gicquel of

France 6-3, 6-3.... Defending
champion Justine Henin
advanced to the semifinals of
the Dubai Open, routing Eleni
Daniilidou 6-0, 6-2.
Lourdes Dominguez Lino of
Spain and Flavia Pennetta of
Italy reached the quarterfinals
and are on course to meet ina
third consecutive Copa Col-
sanitas final in Bogota, Colom-
bia.

e Golf: Fred Funk shot an
8-under 62 to take a two-
stroke lead after the first
round of the Mayakoba Golf
Classic, the first PGA Tour
event in Mexico. Cameron
Beckman was two shots
behind at 64 along with
George McNeill, John Mer-
rick and Boo Weekley in
Playa Del Carmen.’... Rookie
Angela Park shot a 6-under
66 in windy conditions to take
the early lead in the first round
of the LPGA Tour’s Fields
Open in Kapolei, Hawaii.
Meaghan Francella survived
a triple bogey to open with a
68, and South Korea’s Jeong
Jang and Jee Young Lee
shot 69s. Defending champion
Meena Lee opened with a 71,
leaving her tied with last sea-
son’s LPGA Player of the Year
Lorena Ochoa of Mexico....
Nationwide Tour player Ryan
Howison shot a 7-under 65 to
take a one-stroke lead after the
first round of the New Zealand
PGA in Christchurch.

e College football: Boise
State coach Chris Petersen
received a new five-year, $4.25
million deal that still lags
behind coaches at other major
colleges, but athletic director
Gene Bleymaier called it ‘a
reward for a phenomenal sea-
son.”

e Boxing: Former WBO
heavyweight champion
Tommy Morrison stopped
John Castle in the second
round in Chester, W.Va., in his
return to the ring ll years after
testing positive for the virus
that causes AIDS.



SOCCER | PRO FOOTBALL | ETC.





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____MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD




ZBIGNIEW BZDAK/CHICAGO TRIBUNE/AP

ONE BIG FACEOFF |

Oscar De La Hoya, left, and Floyd Mayweather trade
words during a news conference in Chicago on
Thursday to promote their World Boxing Council
junior-middleweight title fight on May 5 in Las Vegas.

Chief's reign comes to end

The student who had just performed Chief Illiniwek’s last
dance stood in a tunnel just off the basketball court, still in
costume and grimacing to fight back tears.

After 20 years of pressure from activists who found the
University of Illinois mascot offensive, the school did away
with Illiniwek and his antics. Dan Maloney, a graduate stu-
dent who portrays the controversial American Indian mascot,
performed for the final time in front of students and fans at a
men’s basketball game Wednesday night.

“If this is the last time — and I stress if,” Maloney said, “I
couldn’t think of a better way for it to end.”

The school’s decision led the NCAA to lift sanctions that
had barred Illinois from hosting postseason sports since 2005.
The NCAA had deemed Illiniwek — portrayed since 1926 by
students who cavorted at home football and basketball games
in buckskin regalia — an offensive use of American Indian

imagery.

But in the eyes of orange-clad students who waited outside

Assembly Hall in chilly weather for hours ahead of the game, a ;

‘the decision robbed the school of a piece of its history. | ¥

Gridiron goodwill
The latest phase of an
effort to help needy ex-NFL

players has brought in
$50,000 from the public
through an auction and
donations, bringing the total
raised to about $200,000,
organizers said. i
And the Gridiron Greats
Assistance Fund said’
Wednesday that three other |
individuals, who wish to i
remain anonymous, have

pledged another $200,000
for the cause. '

The fund waslaunched
by Jerry Kramer, the star
right guard of the Green Bay |
Packers four decades ago
under Vince Lombardi.

Kramer started the effort |
by auctioning off areplicaof |
his Super Bowl I ring last |
spring, raising more than
$22,000 to help supplement
pension and disability bene-
fits for other former players.

“Tam so encouraged by
the public support and the
support of other NFL play-
ers that I can see we have a
real opportunity to help
some of the guys who really
need it,” Kramer said.

einer ogatantaaior stool sachplocaerinenanitge

‘It means he is very old.’

- DANIEL ALFREDSSON, Senators right
wing, on Ottawa’s Bryan Murray, right, who
earned his 600th career coaching victory
with the Senators’ 4-3 shootout triumph
over Edmonton on Tuesday night.

Fuzzy situation

Pro golfer Fuzzy Zoeller
is suing to track downthe _
author who posted what he
describes as a defamatory
paragraph about him on the
Internet reference site Wiki-
pedia. Zoeller’s attorney,
Scott D. Sheftall, said he
filed the lawsuit against a
Miami firm last week
because the law won't allow
him to sue St. Petersburg,
Fla.-based Wikipedia. The
suit alleges someone used a
computer at Josef Silny &
Associates, a Miami educa-
tion consulting firm, to add
the information to Zoeller’s
Wikipedia profile.

Wikipedia, which
describes itself as “the free
encyclopedia that anyone .
can edit,” leaves it to a vast
user community to catch
factual errors.

The paragraph in ques-
tion has been removed, but
the information has been
picked up by other websites.
The lawsuit said it alleged
Zoeller abused drugs, alco-
hol and his family with no
evidence to back up the
statements.

On this day in history:

1938 — In boxing, Joe Louis knocks out Nathan Mann
in the third round to defend his world heavyweight title at
Madison Square Garden in New York.

1960 — Carol Heiss captures the first gold medal for the
United States in the Winter Olympics at Squaw Valley, win-

ning the figure skating event.

1985 — In college basketball, Indiana coach Bob Knight
is ejected 5 minutes into the Hoosiers’ 72-63 loss to Purdue
when he throws a chair across the court. Knight, after two
fouls called on his team, is hit with his first technical. While
Purdue is shooting the technical, Knight picks up a chair
trom the bench area and throws it across the court, earning

his second technical.

2002 — The Americans end nearly a half-century of
Olympic frustration for the U.S. men’s bobsled team, driving
to the silver and bronze medals in the four-man race.





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| “RIDAY, FEBRUARY 23,2007 INTERNATIONAL EDITION

PRO FOOTBALL



INSIDE THE GAME | NFL COMBINE

Dolphins might
be drafting help
at quarterback

§ In what is viewed by many experts as a thin quarterback field, Notre
Dame star Brady Quinn could drop to the Miami Dolphins in the NFL
Draft - but Quinn’s stock would have to plummet for that to happen.

BY JEFF DARLINGTON
jdarlington@MiamiHerald.com

INDIANAPOLIS — A herd of
young quarterbacks will shuffle
through RCA Dome today at the
scouting combine, each player show-
ing off a different set of skills while
scouts, coaches and general manag-
ers dissect their every move.

Surely, there’s a star in there
somewhere, right?

“Quarterbacks come from every-
where,” said Detroit Lions offensive

‘coordinator Mike Martz, one of the

league’s most respected offensive
minds and quarterback gurus. “All
shapes, sizes and backgrounds.”

If that’s the case, then someone
apparently forgot to invite the Miami
Dolphins to this part of the party for
the past two decades. Or perhaps
they just aren’t looking very hard.

After all, for a team that has strug-
gled to get cozy with a quarterback
since Dan Marino’s retirement,
Miami certainly hasn’t looked to the
draft for any help. The Dolphins have
used only three picks in the past
16 years on quarterbacks.

None of those quarterbacks was
selected before the sixth round —
and none succeeded in the NFL. Alas,
there might finally be reason for
hope. Consider the comments made
by Dolphins general manager Randy
‘Mueller in October 2005.

“I subscribe to the [former Pack-
ers general manager] Ron Wolf
method that you ought to draft one
every year if you can,” Mueller said.

“They are always valuable. You
can’t have enough of them.”

Although all three of the Dolphins’
current quarterbacks were acquired
through trades (not the draft) during
Mueller’s two-year tenure, that could
change with the philosophy of the
new coaching staff.

A CHANGING TREND?

Cam Cameron is an offensive-
minded coach — and one of the best
developers of quarterbacks currently
in the league. Former coach Nick
Saban, quite simply, wasn’t. With
Mueller given more control (as well
as Camerpn’s offensive emphasis), it
could be enough to sway the
mind-set toward drafting quarter-
backs for the first time in years.

“If you can get a quarterback, and
he looks halfway decent and he can
be developed, you’ve got a chance to
have a pretty good player,” said Gil
Brandt, the longtime vice president
of player personnel for the Dallas



Quality Products, Knock But Prices

Cowboys. “Quarterback is a develop-
ment player.”

‘ Brandt and Wolf, who have two of
the best track records for drafting
players in NFL history, each made a
habit out of constantly picking quar-
terbacks.

Between 1983 and 2000, Wolt’s
teams drafted a quarterback during
every draft except two. That’s 18
quarterbacks. In.1964, when teams

had 20 picks each, Brandt used four |

selections on quarterbacks.

The third one picked? Future Mall
of Famer Roger Staubach.

“It’s different today because you

only have seven picks, and you can .

only have 85 guys in camp,” Brandt
said. “But you still need to draft them
to find them.”

But some also would argue that
you need to find him before you draft
him. Simply choosing a quarterback
for the sake of adding depth isn’t
always the best route, either.

“T think you make a mistake if you
go into any draft believing you have
to take a specific player at a posi-
tion,” Houston Texans general man-
ager Rick Smith said.

Such a notion brings up a natural
question when it comes to this year’s
draft: Will the Dolphins have a shot
at drafting a quarterback who is even
worthy of development? Despite an
average class, the possibility cer-
tainly exists.

There has been chatter through-
out Indianapolis that Notre Dame
quarterback Brady Quinn — who
once. appeared destined to be the
No. 1 overall pick — could slide sev-

‘eral spots before the draft. ;

Should he fall as hard as Cardinals
quarterback Matt Leinart did a year
ago (he was drafted llth), the Dol-
phins could scoop up Quinn with the
ninth pick — surely an exciting pros-
pect considering Leinart’s successful
rookie season.

AN AVERAGE QGB CLASS

Beyond Quinn and LSU’s JaMar-
cus Russell, however, some analysts
don’t believe the field is very deep.

“I think it’s a pretty average quar-
terback class,” said Mike Mayock, an
analyst for NFL.com.

“I think you’ve got two first-round
picks. Over the last six years, they’ve
averaged three in the first round.”

Mayock said Michigan State’s
Drew Stanton, Stanford’s Trent
Edwards and Houston’s Kevin Kolb
could be options for teams in the sec-
ond round, and it still is debatable

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MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

MATTHEW STOCKMAN/GETTY IMAGES

TRACKING MR. QUINN: Notre Dame quarterback Brady Quinn, who orice appeared destined to be the No. 1
overall pick in the draft, could slide. If he falls. far enough, the Dolphins could get him with the ninth pick.

how late Florida’s Chris Leak and
Ohio State’s Troy Smith will get
selected. "

Wherever any of the 22 quarter-
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ing,” said Jason Garrett, who served
as Saban’s quarterbacks coach before
becoming the Cowboys’ offensive
coordinator. ;

“Different people have ditferent
philosophies, but everyone wants
depth at all positions.”

MIAMI DOLPHINS

Culpepper
will be fine,
Garrett says

BY JEFF DARLINGTON
jdarlington@MiamiHerald.com

Former Miami Dolphins
quarterbacks coach Jason Gar-
rett might have decided to
leave South Florida for the
Dallas Cowboys — but it cer-
tainly had nothing to do with
the constant issues at quarter-
back in Miami last season.

Instead, Garrett said Thurs-
day that he remains confident

.Daunte Culpepper will get
back to his old self, able to per-
form more like a Pro Bowl
quarterback than the injured
former star he was last season.

“I’m very confident,” said
Garrett, who recently
accepted a job as the Cow-
boys’ offensive coordinator.
“He’s a guy that has had a lot
of success in this league. He
has great football character,
_and all of the people that had
him before said that.

“T know he’s working hard
to get back physically to
where he has been.”

Garrett said Culpepper first
must regain his mobility.

“The hard thing was, he ,
really wasn’t himself,” Garrett
said. “A big part of what he
does is moving around and
playing.”
CE





& crore



INTERNATIONAL EDITION |

BASKETBALL | GOLF

LATE WEDNESDAY | HOUSTON 112, MIAMI 102

MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD



Loss of Wade compounds Heat’s defeat

BY ISRAEL GUTIERREZ
igutierrez@MiamiHerald.com

HOUSTON — With one swift
swipe of Dwyane Wade’s left arm,
Pat Riley’s return to the Miami Heat
bench became a devastating ordeal.

Wade left Wednesday night’s

game against the Houston Rockets
wincing in severe pain in a wheel-
chair, his left arm propped up.

The Heat lost the game 112-102, but
the team has probably lost a whole
lot more with Wade sustaining a dis-
located left shoulder. That could
require surgery, ending Wade’s sea-
son. Even without surgery, he could
be out for about six weeks.

With about 10 minutes remaining
in the fourth quarter of a game the
Heat had trailed for almost the entire
way, Wade reached in on a driving

Shane Battier with his left hand.
Battier’s momentum forced
Wade’s left arm back, and Wade
immediately grabbed the arm and
walked to the bench hunched over.
Wade had bruised his left shoulder
during the Heat’s home victory
against the Portland Trail Blazers on
Feb. 13, the Heat’s last game before
the All-Star break, and he had told
teammates privately that it was both-
ering him Wednesday. It is unclear,
however, whether that made Wade
more vulnerable to a dislocation.

After Heat trainer Ron Culp
tended to Wade on the bench for sev-
eral minutes, a Rockets employee
emerged from one of the tunnels





Wade studying options.
for repairing his shoulder



PAT SULLIVAN/AP
IT’S JUST BAD LUCK: Dwyane Wade
was injured after he reached out
while defending Shane Battier.

with a wheelchair for Wade, who
needed help even getting into the

chair. Wade was in so much pain |

while on the bench that he was
forced to tears.

It was a gruesome ending to what
already had been a difficult experi-
ence for the Heat and Riley, who
returned to the bench after taking a
medical leave of absence and missing
22 games himself.

“Obviously, we’re disappointed

. BY MICHAEL WALLACE

mwallace@MiamiHerald.com

Heat guard Dwyane ‘Wade .

is back in Miami considering
his options for repairing the
dislocated left shoulder he
sustained late in Wednesday
night’s loss in Houston.

Among those options are
immediate surgery, which
would end Wade’s season, or a
six-week rehabilitation period
and a possible return in time

-for the playoffs.

Wade flew back to Miami
Thursday on a private plane
accompanied by Heat trainer
Ron Culp. He was examined
by Heat physician Dr. Harlan
Selesnick and underwent a
magnetic resonance imaging
test at Doctors Hospital in
Coral Gables. Initial tests
taken in Houston and Thurs-
day’s MRI revealed a disloca-
tion, team officials confirmed.

Wade returned to the hos-

’ pital Thursday afternoon and
met with team doctors to
examine the test results. Wade
left the. hospital without
speaking to reporters gathered
across the street.

Wade probably will seek a
second apinion to be safe, and
he plans to consult his family
as well as Heat coach Pat Riley
before announcing his deci-

_ sion.

“We leave it up to the ace!
tors to explain everything to
him,” Riley said before Thurs-
day’s game in Dallas. “We
always left it open to our play-
ers to get a second opinion if
they choose. When it comes
right down to it, the player
always weighs all the options
and makes the decision.”

Riley said he had not spo-
ken to Wade on Thursday.

“I wrote him a letter today, .

Fed Ex-ed it, because his mail-



month.

“box was loaded on his phone,”
Riley said. “It’s right to his
house.”

In a Miami radio interview
Thursday, Heat general man-
ager Randy Pfund said it could
take days before Wade and the
team decide which course to
take.

“It’s a significant injury,
and we’re obviously looking at
some time where, with any of
the options provided, we will
be playing without him,”
Pfund said.

Even if Wade is able to
return before the end of the
season on April 18, he still
would probably need offsea-
son surgery, which would
jeopardize his summer com-
mitment to help the USS.
national team qualify for the
2008 Olympics.

A dislocated shoulder can
be extremely painful and can
sideline a player for weeks. or

At the top of the humerus
— the bone that runs from
elbow to shoulder — is a
round bone called the humeral
head. It fits into the glenoid

about the loss but more disappointed
about Dwyane,” Riley said. “We’re
really concerned about him. The ini-
tial word is that it’s dislocated. We'll
have to find out more.’

CLOSING THE GAP

With Wade in the game, the Heat

was still behind for most of the way
by double digits. Wade scored 13 of
his 27 points in the third quarter to
help the Heat temporarily close the
gap to seven points, but the quarter
ended in demoralizing fashion.

After Chuck Hayes split two free
throws, Wade missed a 19-foot
jumper with 3.9 seconds remaining.

That left just enough time for
Bonzi Wells to snatch the rebound,
dribble and lauuch a 65-foot heave
(he was inside nis own three-point
line when it was released) that went
through as the buzzer sounded. It
extended the Rockets’ lead to 89-75
entering the final quarter.

The Heat made a quick recovery,
scoring the first five points of the
fourth to again close its deficit to
nine points. But it was soon after that
an apparently: simple defensive
sequence turned devastating.

“Not again,” Mourning said when
asked his reaction to Wade’s injury.
“We just now got everybody
together, and this happens again. I
don’t know what it is. Obviously,
injuries are a part of this game, but it

‘seems like this year we’ve been

behind the eight ball when it comes





| | FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

ry Bird: Johnson
was fone of the best’

PAT SULLIVAN/AP
STAGGERED BY PAIN: With Heat coach Pat Riley looking on
in dismay, trainer Ron Culp leads Dwyane Wade off the
court after he was injured Wednesday night in Houston.

BILL BAPTIST/GETTY IMAGES

DEVASTATING LOSS: Wade, wincing _

in severe pain, exited with his left
arm propped up on a wheelchair.

to injuries.”

Heat players tried to shake off
Wade’s injury and attempt a late
comeback. Shaquille O’Neal, who fin-
ished with 20 points while making 9
of 15 shots, was aggressive after
Wade went out, scoring eight points
in the final quarter. But the Heat still
fell short, and now the team has lost
its leading scorer.

“We just have to keep fighting
parece it,” O'Neal said. “We’ve been

Lar

*DENNIS JOHNSON

club.”



ment.”

| ish and Bill Walton.



“Dennis was a great

_ Player, one of the best team-

mates I ever had, and a won-

derful person,” said Bird,
now president of the Indiana _,

through a lot this season. Everybody
has to step their game up. We can’t
get back into a hole like we did right
before the All-Star break.

“[’'m getting my legs back, and:

oach is calling my play.”

- PAST INJURIES
In his first season with Miami, .

Eddie Jones missed 15 games after.

dislocating his left shoulder on
March 7, 2001. Jones said he had to
strengthen his shoulder before

returning, and he had offseason sur- *.

gery to repair the joint.
Jones said that when he. initially

returned in April 2001, he still |

thought his shoulder was weak. .
“Hopefully, his is not that bad,”
Jones said.

Riley didn’t look like he was inany
mood to make motivational speeches ,

after Wednesday night’s game, but he -
might have to do some of his best ,

coaching to keep the Heat in shape

for its final 29-game playoff push.
“We just have to stay the course,”

said Riley, whose team is 26-27 and

position in the Eastern Conference.
“If we can get Shaquille to play like

4

>

he played tonight, real aggressive, C

_this is the way it may have to turn

out. I don’t know.
“We have had a lot of adversity

this year. Things haven’t gone right .- i
from the get-go. You just have to stay -. —

the course. You don’t know how this
whole thing is going to play out.

for delivering in big games.
“T hate to lose,” he once

comes, but I still hate it.

That’s the way I am.”
Johnson averaged 14.1

points and 5.0 assists per

Pacers. “My thoughts and
condolences are. with his _
family at this difficult time.”
Bill Laimbeer, the center
on that 1987 Pistons team,
remembered Johnson as a —
“great player on a great ball-

- “He played with passion
and grit,” Laimbeer said. “It
was fun to play games like
that. You always enjoyed it.
It made for not only great
games but great entertain-

In the 1984 Finals, John-
son guarded Magic Johnson
effectively in the last four
games. In 1985, he hit a last-
second jumper against the
Lakers that won the fourth
game. In 1986, Johnson was
part of a team that featured
four Hall of Famers — Bird,
Kevin McHale, Robert Par-

“He was truly one of the
good guys to play in the
NBA, and he was a great
teammate who was fun to be
around,” McHale said.

Johnson had a reputation

he retired, he was the llth. ;
player. in NBA history: to *
total 15,000 points and 5,000 :

Johnson made one all-

“aoe .

said. “I accept it when it,

{

game for his career. When’.

assists. 07

NBA first team and one sec- +

ond team. Six times he made , ;

including five consecutive .,
seasons (1979-83). '
“As far as a person, he

the All-Defensive first team, ., ;

Sikma said. “He wouldn’t let ,.

strongly about something,
but with our team that was a -
good thing.”

_ Johnson was born Sept.
18, 1954, in Compton, Calif. ..:

by the Sonics in 1976. John-

things pass. He would cause -.
some friction if he felt

He played at Pepperdine: -
University and was drafted ,.

son was traded to the Phoe- ,-

nix Suns in 1980 and then to
the Celtics in 1983.

Johnson is survived by his
wife, Donna; his sons,,-

mas.

Dwayne and Daniel]; and his | ..

daughter, Denise.

o.-

sitting in the eighth and final playoff .

socket in the scapula, or shoul-
der blade, like a ball-and-
socket trailer hitch.

A ring of cartilage called
the labrum holds the head in
the socket. In a dislocation, the
head is pulled out of the
socket, creating great pain that
is partly relieved only when it
is pushed back in.

Typically,: the accident
strips at least part of the
labrum off the front of the
socket. When this happens in
Wade's age and weight group,
can heal on its own within four
to six weeks..In some cas-
es,though, it must be reat-
tached to the socket with
arthroscopic surgery and dis-

\

solvable staples, requiring
three to six months to heal.

A dislocation also can tear
ligaments or tendons.

Wade already had missed
seven games this season with
injuries. He missed four with a
sprained right wrist and three
after having wisdom teeth
extracted. ,

.“T definitely understand he
probably wants to tough it out

and come back as soon as pos- .

sible,” Heat forward Udonis
Haslem said. “But just like the
situation with Coach Riley,
sometimes health is more
important, and you need to
take time off. It’s a situation
where you need to think about

what’s best for him.”

Wade’s shoulder is the lat-
est in a line of devastating
injuries for the Heat. Shaquille
O’Neal has missed 39 games
with knee and calf injuries.
Jason Williams has missed 20
games with knee, ankle and
abdominal injuries. Wayne
Simien has missed most of the

season with a salmonella .

infection.
Riley had just returned

Wednesday after missing 22 «

games for knee- and hip-
replacement surgeries.

Miami Herald writers Israel
Gutierrez and Fred Tasker con-
tributed to this cee

FROM THE SPORTS FRONT



. RODOLFO GONZALEA/AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN

ALWAYS A LEADER: Dennis Johnson’s legacy ended as
the coach of the Austin Toros, a developmental team.

Big names sent packing, and that clears the path for Woods

*GOLF

event that Woods played — the
Western Open last July.

And as well as Woods has played
for two rounds — he is one of five
players who has never trailed in a
match this week — there is'‘always
the next match.

“I’ve never played a match play
event where all six rounds I’ve
played great golf,” Woods said.

_“You’re going to have one or two
rounds where you’re not going to
play well. You’ve just got to get

through those matches. Sometimes
you do, sometimes you don’t.”
Mickelson didn’t.

His West Coast Swing ended in a_

3-and-1 loss to that featured a dra-

matic shift in momentum. Rose was |

1-up when he pulled his tee shot into
the desert brush and had no choice
but to pitch out backward, then had
to hit his third shot to the green
before Mickelson hit his second.

When Mickelson two-putted for par,

he figured it would be all square.
But Rose’s putt dropped on the
final turn, and everything changed.

“It looked like all I had to do was
make par, and the match would be
even,” Mickelson said.

“That hurt the most.”

Mickelson’s plan was to hit first
on the par-3 16th to the middle of the
green, away from what he called a
“carnival” pin cut atop a slope that
fed off the green in two directions.
Rose did the honors, and Mickelson
felt that he-had to go after the flag.
His 9-iron shot was about 10 feet
long, enough to tumble off the green.

Mickelson’s difficult chip hit the
hole but trickled off the front of the

green. His 25-foot par putt caught
the lip but stayed out. And when
Mickelson failed to birdie the par-5
17th, he conceded the match.

It was the first time in five years
he failed to get to the third round.

Why not play it safe on the 16th
and take his chances after that?

“The 17th was a hole we both
would probably birdie,” Mickelson
said. “And I didn’t want to leave it
up to 18.”

Instead he was leaving, with
Furyk, Singh, Retief Goosen and
Luke Donald not far behind.

Goosen rallied from three holes ,

down against Niclas Fasth, but the

*

Swede birdied the 17th and held on °

for a l-up victory. Donald might have
been the most surprising loss, as he

was 3-up until Aaron Baddeley won -

four of the last six holes, and only
twice with birdie putts.
Campbell came up big on the 18th

hole again. In the opening round, he .-
holed a 25-foot birdie putt to put ©. |.

away Angel Cabrera. This time, he .
made birdie from 18 feet to force -,
extra holes, and then he beat Furyk A

with a two-putt birdie.



was a great competitor,” for- ,- -_-~
mer Scenics teammate Jack...

.



THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com





BASKETBALL

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

int TERNATIONAL EDITION...

__ FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007 | 7B



Duke holds off Clemson; Memphis rolls:

From Miami Herald Wire Services

CLEMSON, S.C. — Jon Scheyer
scored 18 points to help No. 18 Duke
capture its 2lst game in a row over
Clemson 71-66 on Thursday night —
without any late help with the game
‘clock.

When these teams met last month
at Cameron Indoor Stadium, the Blue
Devils’ 68-66 victory was helped
when officials incorrectly added time
at the end — the extra seconds more
than enough for David McClure’s

. winning layup.
* This time, Duke (21-7, 8-6 Atlantic
Coast Conference) opened a 21-point

halftime lead and hung on as Clem- Be

son (19-8, 5-8) came within 69-64 in
the final minute.
Scheyer, though, hit two foul shott

.”. with 5.7 seconds left to put the game

away.

DeMarcus Nelson had 16 points.

and Greg Paulus added 14 for the
Blue Devils, who have won three in a
row since a four-game losing streak.

Cliff Hammonds and Vernon
Hamilton had 14 points each for
Clemson, which has lost eight of 10
games since starting the season 17-0.

The sold-out crowd at Littlejohn
Coliseum hadn’t forgotten the clock

problems of last month, Several stu- -

dents wore large clocks around their
necks — ala rap personality Flavor
Flav.

Duke appeared to make the clock
issue moot, outscoring the Tigers
29-8 over the final 12 minutes of the
first half to take a large lead into the
locker room.

Nelson had all 11 of his first-half
points during Duke’s large run. His
foul shot started the Sore and a pat



TED RICHARDSON /AP

HE’S AT ANOTHER LEVEL: Duke forward Josh McRoberts finishes off an
alley-oop dunk off a pass from Greg Paulus in Thursday night’s win.

the Blue Devils ahead for good, 14-13.
By the time Nelson drove in for a
layup with 1:26 left before the half,
Duke was up 36-17.

The Tigers missed 13 consecutive
shots during the run and finished the
half with only six field goals.

As cold as Clemson was in the first
half, it came out hot after the break.
The Tigers made 10 of their first 14
field-goal attempts — led by Hamil-
ton’s 10 points — and they sliced the
lead to 47-42 with 10:14 to go.

Scheyer’s 3-pointer finished an 8-2
run by Duke that rebuilt ine lead to
59-47,

Clemson, though, made one final
run with K.C. Rivers’ 3-pointer cut-

ting it to 69-64 with six seconds left.
That’s when Scheyer finished things
off with his foul shots. He was a per-
fect 5-of-5 at the foul line.

AROUND THE TOP 25

e No. 7 Memphis 99, Rice 63:

Willie Kemp scored 20 points to help
host Memphis beat Rice and clinch
its second consecutive Conference
USA title.

The victory extended Memphis’
winning streak to 16, longest in the

nation. Memphis (24-3, 13-0 C-USA) ~

also has won 28 in a row at home.
Memphis, which started the game

0-for-7 from 3-point range, ended up

shooting 47 percent from outside the

PRO BASKETBALL

Wizards win a wild

From Miami Herald Wire Services

WASHINGTON — Gilbert Arenas-scored
30 of his 43 points in the first half Thursday
night. Then the Washington Wizards blew a

17-point fourth-quarter lead but survived a

video review at the buzzer to beat the Sacra-
mento Kings 109-106.

With 0.7 seconds remaining, John Salm-
ons took a long inbounds pass and made a
turnaround jump shot at the 3-point arc, Offi-
cials initially ruled it a good 2-point basket,
but replay showed it to be a 3-pointer,
released just after the clock hit 0.0.

Caron Butler and DeShawn Stevenson
made key defensive plays in the final 30 sec-
onds to give the Wizards the victory. Butler
stripped Mike Bibby, who was having a hot
fourth quarter, and Stevenson forced Salm-
ons into a traveling call.

But Arenas made only one of two free
throws with 0.7 remaining, giving the Kings a
final chance to tie.

: Arenas finished with an extremely-active
line in the box score: 12-for-22 from the field,
_: 3-for-8 from 3-point range, 16-for-17 from the
free-throw line, seven rebounds, seven
assists, three steals and nine of the Wizards’
season-high 23 turnovers.
. .’ Arenas had a relatively-quiet second half,
but Butler scored 19 of his 25 points after the
‘break. Stevenson finished with 21 points for
the Wizards, who won their third game in a
row and improved to 4-4 since Antawn Jami-
son was sidelined with a knee injury.

The tag team of Arenas and Butler out-
scored Ron Artest and Bibby in high-spirited
‘. game that combined streaky shooting with
47 combined turnovers. Artest had 2] of his

32 points by halftime, and 22 of Bibby’ s 30

came after the break.

KIDD STAYS PUT

; Amid concerns about his health, point
-’ guard Jason Kidd remained with the New
': Jersey Nets as the NBA trade deadline
passed Thursday. The team confirmed
reports that Kidd has a cracked rib in addi-
tion to the back injury that forced him to
miss two games and the NBA All-Star Game.

Nets coach Lawrence Frank defended the
team’s decision not to publicize the rib
injury, saying it didn’t force Kidd to miss any
games and was discovered only when Kidd’s
back was being examined.

“The implication was that it was being
concealed, which would be a falsehood,”
Frank said. “We’re not going to disclose
every nick, bruise or bump that’s not pre-
venting a guy from playing.”

Kidd had been the subject of trade specu-
lation that had intensified as Thursday’s
deadline drew near. Reports had him head-
ing to any of several teams, with the Los
Angeles Lakers considered the clear favorite.

The Nets also entertained offers for guard
Vince Carter, who can opt out of his contract
after the season. But no offers came close to
getting the Nets to move either player,
according to team president Rod Thorn.

In trades completed Thursday:

e The Portland Trail Blazers dealt guard
Juan Dixon to the Toronto Raptors for guard
Fred Jones and future considerations.

e Dallas Mavericks guard Anthony John-
son was sent to Atlanta for the Hawks’ sec-
ond-round pick in the 2007 NBA Draft.



one

arc, Kemp converted four of his six
attempts from 3-point territory.

It was the third consecutive loss
for the Owls (13-13, 7-6).

e Loyola of Chicago 75, No. 15
Butler 71: Blake Schilb scored 28
points, Tracy Robinson hit five free
throws in the final 36 seconds and
visiting Loyola of Chicago held off
Butler for its first victory over a
ranked opponent in 21 years.

It also gave the streaking Ram-
blers (20-9, 10-5 Horizon League)
their seventh consecutive victory,
their longest streak since 1992, and
assured league-leader Wright State
the top seed in the conference tour-
nament next week. Butler (24-5, 12-3)
can still tie Wright State for the regu-
lar-season title with a victory over
Detroit on Saturday but would get
the second seed because of a tie-
breaker.

ELSEWHERE

e Pittsburgh: Center Aaron
Gray still isn’t practicing because of a
sprained left ankle, and coach Jamie
Dixon said it is unlikely he will play
in Saturday’s key Big East game at
Georgetown,

“He shot some free throws but, if I
had to guess, he won't be able to go,”
Dixon said following the team’s prac-
tice on Thursday. “From what I saw,
he won't be going on Saturday.” -

No. 10 Pitt and No. 12 Georgetown
are tied for first place with 11-2 Big
East records,

e North Carolina State:
Wolfpack coach Sidney Lowe was
released from a hospital on Thurs-
day, a day after leaving the game
against No. 5 North Carolina with

SOUTHEAST —

Washington
Orlando
Miami
Atlanta
Charlotte

ATANTC

Toronto

New Jersey
New York
Philadelphia
Boston -- ’

CENTRAL

Detroit
Cleveland
Chicago
Indiana
Milwaukee

Dallas

San Antonio
Houston

New Orleans"
Memphis

Utah
Denver
Minnesota
Portland
Seattle

Chi. 84, Cle, 78
Was. 109, Sac, 106
Sac, at Wash,, late

NORTHWEST _

PACIFIC.

dehydration anid flulike symptoms.

Lowe coached the first half of
Wednesday night’s game, but didn’t
come out for the second half. The
Tar Heels broke open a one-point
game and won 83-64,

Lowe and the team were already
scheduled to have the day off Thurs-
day; N.C, State spokeswoman Anna-
belle Myers said. He will rejoin the
team today and accompany players .
to Saturday’s game at Florida State,
she said.

e New Mexico: Coach Ritchie
McKay will be fired at the end of the
season, the school said.

McKay, who has three years
remaining on his contract, and his
assistants will continue coaching the
Lobos until then. New Mexico has
three regular-season games remain-
ing, starting Saturday at Utah, fol-

lowed by the Mountain West tourna-

ment.

New Mexico is 15-13 this season
and 4-9 in the conference. McKay has
a record of 82-65 in five seasons,
including an 8-41 mark on the road.

LATE WEDNESDAY

e No. 21 BYU 76, Colorado
State 67: Keena Young scored 16 of
his 24 points in the second half and
host Brigham Young won its eighth
in a row.

The Cougars never trailed in their
first game as a ranked team in nearly
14 years. BYU (21-6, 11-2) remained
alone in first place in the Mountain
West Conference with three games
left.

Jason Smith led Colorado State
(15-11, 5-9) with 20 points and ll

. rebounds,

“31
27
26
a1
21

29

| 25

24
18
13

a

34
32
31
29
19

“44
37
34
26
14

Ww.

35.
26
25
24
21

41
30
26
25
23

SCORING
___G FG_FT PTS AVG



a

Ww.

NBA STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE

‘L_ Pct. GB 10 Str. Home Away Conf

21.596 - 64 W-3 21-7 10-14 20-10
28 «491 5% 4-6 L-2 18-10 9-18 15-19
27, «491 5% «7-3-1 15-10 11-17 13-15
33. 389 11 4-6 L-2. 9-16 12-17 12-21
33. 389 «11 5-5 W-3) 12-15 9-18 13-20

L Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away — Conf

25. 537 - «7-3 ~ 30.455 4% 3-7 L-3 14-14 11-16 19-14
31.436 5% 5-5 L-l 14-13 10-18 14-19
36 333 11) «5-5 Wel 10-15 8-21 13-18

40.245 15% 19° L-2 5-21 819 9-24
Lh ' Pct, GB “L110 Str, Home Away Conf

19.642. - 91 W-2 1810 16-9 24-10
23. «582, 3) 6-4 —L-L- 20-8 «12-15 19-15
25 «554 4% 5-5 W-2 21-7 10-18 22-10
24 «547 5 6-4 (W-3 18-10 11-14 20-13

36 345 «16 «1-9 L6G 11-12 8-24 = 9-23

WESTERN CONFERENCE

SOUTHWEST _

L_ Pct, GB 110 Str. Home Away . _Conf
“9 “830 - “O-1 “W-9 24-3 20-6 30-6
18 673 8 6-4 W-4 17-8 20-10 22-11
19 642 10 7-3 W-1 20-7, 14-12 19-17
29. .A73,--19 7-3: Wel 17-11 9-18 15-19
42 .25031% 2-8 L-3 11-17 3-25 8-27

L_ Pct. GB L10_ Str. Home Away Conf

21-6 14-12 20-11

18 660. - 7-3 Ll

26 500 8% 46 L-2 14-14 12-12 11-18
29 463 10% 3-7 L-2 1610 919 15-19
32 429.12 5-5 W-2 13-14 11-18 15-17
32.396 14 4-6 W-3 15-13 6-19 10-20
at_.Pet. GB 10 Str. Home Away Conf
13.759 - 5-5 W-2 21-6 20-7 20-10
25 54511% 3-7 L-6 19-9 1-16 17-11
29 473 15% 5:5 W-2 20-9 6-20 14-17

L-4. 17-10 8-19 14-18
L-1 16-12) 7-18 12-21

29. 463 16 3-7
30 .43417% 6-4

RESULTS AND SCHEDULES
~ Thursday’s results

Tonight’s games Wednesday’s results
Det. at Orl., 7 Hou. 112, Miami 102
Ind, at Tor., 7 Ind. 136, Mil. 129 (20T)
Phil, at Cha., 7 S.A. 103, Atl. 96

Hou. at Atl., 7:30 Cle, 86, Tor. 85

Mil. at N.Y., 7:30 Phi. 104, N.Y. 84

Sac. at NJ, iis Det. 110, Orl. 88

Wash, at Chin N.O. 111, NJ. 107

Phx at Minn., Cha. 100, Min. 95

Sea. at N.O., '; Pho, 118, Bos. 108

Por. 112, LA.L. 108
G.S, 118, Mem, 115 (OT)

Mem. at Port., 10
Utah at Den., ‘10:30
Bos. at Lakers, 10: a0

NBA LEADERS

Through Wednesday

REBOUNDING
GOFF DEF TOT AVG

A MAN ON A MISSION: Gilbert Arenas of the Wizards leaves Kings defender Sharif
Abdur-Rahim behind i in a game in which he scored 43 points - 30 in the first half.

e The Utah Jazz got forward Alan Hen-
derson from the Philadelphia 76ers for the
‘right to trade second-round picks in the 2007
draft and undisclosed cash considerations.

LATE WEDNESDAY

o Trail Blazers 112, Lakers 108: Jarrett
Jack scored 30 points, and the Blazers beat
the host Lakers, giving Los Angeles its sixth
loss in a row and Phil Jackson the longest los-
ing streak of his coaching career.

Kobe Bryant, coming off his MVP perfor-
mance in the All-Star Game, scored nine of
his 25 points in the final 3:51, but it wasn’t
enough to bring the Lakers back from a nine-
point deficit the Trail Blazers built while he
getting a breather.

Jackson’s teams had lost as many as five
consecutive games only two other times in
Jhis 16 seasons as a head coach. He has won
nine NBA championship rings, including
three with the Lakers.

Zach Randolph added 22 points and had
nine rebounds for Portland. Reserve LaMar-

cus Aldridge had 18 points, and Brandon Roy |
had 16 points and seven assists.

e Warriors 118, Grizzlies 115 (OT):
Monta Ellis scored nine of his 22 points in a
frantic overtime, and Golden State survived
Mike Miller’s franchise-record 45-point per-
formance and won at home.

Miller hit three of his club-record nine

3-pointers in overtime to cap a spectacular
shooting display, but Ellis kept the Warriors
close until Al Harrington made the go-ahead
jumper with 1:02 to play.

Sarunas Jasikevicius then hit two late free
throws, and Miller finally lost his stroke in
the final minute as Golden State snapped a
five-game losing streak to the Western Con-
ference’s worst team.

Jason Richardson scored 19 points in his
return from a 22-game absence with a broken
hand, playing 37 minutes but making just
eight of his 22 shots.

e Suhs 118, Celtics 108: Leandro Bar-
bosa scored 14 of his 26 points in the fourth
Seen eee ee as host Phoenix beat Boston.

-{
Phoenix.
LA. Lakers
~ Golden State
L.A. Clippers
Sacramento



Anthony, Del Den. 37 419 263 1121 30.3 Garnett, Minn, 53 138 528 666 12.6
Arenas, Wash, 51 469 397 1480 29.0 Chandler, NOk, .53 220 433 653 12.3
Wade, Mia. 46 445 413 1324 28.8 Howard, Orl. 55 182 479 661 12.0
Bryant, LAL 51 483 413 1465 28.7 Boozer, Utah 45 142 389 531 11.8
: pean Pen. 36 341 298 1013 bee paaloe, cn : a BH oH us
HARAZ GHANBARI/AP Redd, M 35 322 252. 969 27 lefferson, Bos.
Vs Allen, Sea. 43 404 225 1161 27.0 Lee, N.Y. 54 188 392 580 10.7
James, Clev. 52 495 319 1373 26.4 Duncan, S.A. 55 159 424 583 10.6
O'Neal, Ind, 47 114 373 487 10.4
FIELD GOALS
FG FGA PCT Sonn
Biedrins, GS. 251 410 .612 AST AVG
Lee, N.Y, 234 383 .611 ash, Phoe. a 567 118
Howard, Orl. 357 596 .599 Wilms, Utah 52 478 9.2
Stoudemire, Phoe. 391 659 593 Kidd, N. 53 468 8.8
Curry, N.Y, 398 675 .590 Paul, Nok. 38 329 87
Boozer, Utah 410 721 569 Davis, G.S. 43 372) 8&7
Bogut, Mil. 286 520 .550 Miller, Phil. 52 423, 8.1
Brand, LAC 423-775 546 Wade, Mia 46 362 «(7.9
Okafor, Char. 335 618 542 ‘Ford, Tor. 47 366 «7.8
Patterson, Mil. 313 580 .540 Billups, Det. 45 3397.5

NBA AWARDS |

PLAYER OF THE MONTH

November

Eastern Conference: Dwight How-
ard, Orlando Magic

Western Conference: Yao Ming,
Houston Rockets

December

Eastern Conference; Gilbert Arenas,
Washington Wizards

Western Conference: Kobe Bryant,
Los Angeles Lakers

“pnuary

Eastern Conterence: Chris Bosh, To-
ronto Raptors

Western Conference: Steve Nash,
Phoenix Suns

ROOKIE OF THE MONTH

November

Eastern Conference: Adam Morri-

son, Charlotte Bobcats

Western Conference: Rudy Gay,

Memphis Grizzlles

December

Eastern Conference: Jorge Garba-

Josa, Toronto Raptors

Western Conference: Randy Foye,

Minnesota Timberwolves

January

Eastern Conference: Andrea Barg-

nani, Toronto Raptors

: Brandon Roye,

Portland Trail Blazers



pee eas

‘oe 0

PAGE 8C, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Mii ine a

Ponting OK,
others mosily
on mend for
defenting
champions

@ CRICKET
SYDNEY, Australia
Associated Press

AUSTRALIAN
cricket captain Ricky
Ponting, rested from a
three-match series loss
to New Zealand, said
Thursday his back
problem has eased
-ahead of his team's
-defense of the World
‘Cup starting next
month,

* Ponting received
‘three cortisone injec-
‘tions in his back 10 days
‘ago to reduce inflam-
‘mation caused by bone
‘spurs on his spine.

» “My back's fine,"
Ponting said Thursday.
:"(Doctors) said on the
‘day that I had the injec-
‘tions it would be three —
to four days of not
doing much before the
injection settles down.

"It's been about a
-week and the last few
‘nights I've slept a lot
‘better and felt a lot bet-
‘ter in the morning.
Hopefully when I get to
the West Indies I'll be
pain free and ready to

Oo. " 4

Of the five Aus-
tralians struggling with
injuries three weeks
away from the World
Cup, Ponting and fel-
low batsman Michael
Clarke (hip injury) are
the two players of least
concern.

Opener Matthew
Hayden has been given
two to three weeks to
recover from the frac-
tured toe he suffered
while scoring an Aus-
tralian record 181 not
out against New
Zealand on Tuesday.

Allrounder Andrew
Symonds (biceps)
remains in doubt for
the Caribbean, but
believes he is making
good progress from
shoulder surgery.

Fast bowler Brett Lee
is the biggest concern,
with Cricket Australia
delaying a second
round of scans on his
injured ankle until
Tuesday — the day
before the team flies
out for the West Indies.
_ The paceman admit-
ted he was only a 50-50
chance of playing in the
World Cup last week
after being sent home
from the New Zealand
tour when he damaged
ankle ligaments during
training.

With Mike Hussey
replacing Ponting in
New Zealand, and Aus-
tralia being swept in the
Chappell-Hadlee series
3-0, Ponting said he
received some interest-
ing correspondence
from the replacement
skipper.

"I got some pretty
funny text messages
from him after every
one of the games - 'how
are you, are you on the
next flight over,' ‘you
can have your job back,
I don't want it any
more,'" Ponting joked.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award. _

If so, call us on 322-1986
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White Tigers roar past
St Anne’s Bluewaves

m@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports

Reporter .

i

KING’S Court were just-(-1-

a little too much for the

St. Anne’s Bluewaves to |
handle as the White

Tigers pulled off a rout to
stay alive in the 25th

Hugh Campbell Basket--
ball Classic yesterday. ~.°

oming off an opening .*.’

loss to the CC Sweeting
Cobras on day two of the
senior boys double elimi-
nation tournament at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasi-
um, the White Tigers
made this one look so
easy - winning 67-42
Torrino Clarke was a
tower of strength as he
powered his way inside for
a game high 17 points,
playing strong on both
ends of the court.
Edmundo Curtis added ©
13, while Michael Carey
had six and Danero Bal-
four and Kyheil Roberts
both had five in the win. ©
After their five-point
loss to the Cobras, the
White Tigers ensured that
they were not going home
just yet with their second |
straight loss. z

Blowout

However, they sent the
Bluewaves packing after
they failed to rebound
from their 73-33 blowout.
against the Dame Doris
Johnson Mystic Marlins
on opening day.

‘King’s Court coach
Geno Bullard said it was
good to still be alive in
the tournament.

“The first we game, we.
got off to a bad start, but
as the game progressed,
we were able to deal with
some issues that we had,”
he charged.

“In this game today, it
was much better, but I
think once we get into a

' defensive mood, we will -

be able to play at the high -
standard that we are capa~_

ble of playing.” eres

Bullard said he has a
very young team and as
soon as they can work out
their kinks, they will be
ready to play up to their
standard.

“As the tournament _
progresses and we contin-
ue winning, we will be

‘right there,” Bullard stat-

ed. “I think they are try-
ing to get through the
pressure of playing in a

tournament of this magni-

tude.”
For the Bluewaves, Ter-
rance Knowles led the
way with 13, Marquis
Williams had 10,
Lawrence Rolle eight and

Travis Parks six. es *

’

Coach

St. Anne’s coach Curt
Hollinsworth said after
falling behind 9-2 in the

first quarter and 32-18 at ~

the half, they managed to
play better in the second
half.

“This is a challenge for
us this year because I’m
trying to get them to play
a different style of basket-
ball,” Hollingsworth '
reflected. “Coming into
the game today, I felt we ©
had a chance.

“But in order to instill «
some discipline in the
plaayers, I decided to
start some seventh and
eighth graders and tenth
graders to let them know
that I have to build for the
future if I’m going to
coach.”

Hollingsworth said he
sees the future as a bright.
one for the Bluewaves.

@ KINGS Court’s
Danero Balfour lays the

_ ball up against St Annes.

(Photo:Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)

Â¥

u



PEELE ee







h

BAHAMAS EDITION

m Lhe Tribune

i'm lovin’ it. |
|



¢ Miami Herald





Volume: 103 No.78

Se Nae





third-largest food market

SEE FRONT PAGE OF BUSINESS SECTION

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007



CHILDREN’S AUTHOR AT ATLANTIS





PRICE — 75¢

PACERS KEEP HOPES Al



Bahamas burial for Anna Nicole

Custody of her |
remains given to
baby’s guardian

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

RULING in the Anna Nicole
Smith case, Judge Larry Seidlin
yesterday expressed his wish for
the controversial celebrity to be
buried alongside her son Daniel
inthe Bahamas.

Crying as he announced his

decision, the Fort Lauderdale Cir-:

cuit Judge awarded Richard Mil-
stein - the guardian of five-
month-old Dannielynn - custody
of Ms Smith’s remains.

Mr Milstein promptly
announced that he is making
plans to have Ms Smith interred
in Nassau, where her 20-
year-old son Daniel
was buried at Lakeview Ceme-
tery after he died last September.

All parties - Ms Smith’s moth-
er Virgie Arthur, and both men

who are claiming paternity of
baby Dannielynn, Howard K
Stern and Larry Birkhead -
seemed to agree with the deci-
sion.

However, just an hour after
Judge Seidlin announced his deci-
sion, US media reported that the
former Playboy Playmate’s moth-
er Ms Arthur appealed the rul-
ing.

The estranged mother of the’

cover girl wants her daughter
buried in her native Texas.

At press time last night, a spe-
cial appeal hearing was reported-
ly scheduled to take place today.

The court had heard from var-
ious witnesses over the past three
days, including Ms Smith’s ex-
husband, Billy Smith, via tele-
phone.

SEE page 13

Anna Nicole asked G Ben Thompson
‘to remove items from Horizons’

ANNA Nicole Smith asked South Carolina developer G Ben
Thompson to remove her personal effects from the Eastern Road
home ‘Horizons’, it emerged in Florida court yesterday.

The disclosure came as Bahamian police continued to investigate an
alleged break-in at the $900,000 property.

Ms Smith’s companion Howard K Stern filed a burglary report
claiming that the celebrity’s personal effects, including a computer
hard drive, home videos and other items, had been stolen from the East-
ern Road home the couple had shared in recent months. |

Ford Shelley — son-in-law of Mr Thompson, who claims he is the
rightful owner of Horizons — yesterday testified that Ms Smith had told
him and his father-in-law to claim her personal possessions from the

house in the event of her death.

Mr Shelley was one of many witnesses called to testify in the hear-

SEE page 13

Wha ac eG hy

Tih ll :
Dae

tok cuit ee

ae a
ee atl
Gooner aba il

| Mlami-Freeport-Nassat





7

One-man protest against The Tribune

BOUT THE STOLEN

Wo tas Bee
MORK PE RMT

NER ST TR Ren w/a oe
= oR THe Pas? 7 Yénes
PEP DUT OU mie ee 777° S





“WHY RE You Recklessy TRIMS BO™

We En TEryarenae.

aie) t
7 g

l CELI MOSS stages a one-man protest against The Tribune and its managing editor
John Marquis outside of the newspaper’s office yesterday. Mr Moss took his stand in the wake
of Shane Gibson’s resignation from the Cabinet following the paper’s publication of pho-

tographs of the MP with the late US celebrity Anna Ni

Baha Mar is

accused of

‘inion-busting’

By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY

Tribune Staff Reporter

voluntary separation programme
to its employees without union
consultation.

BHMA president Obie Fergu-

son said Baha Mar did not consult

the union before the plan was
unveiled, and he claims the plan
was created to get rid of long-

SEE page 13

Voter registration

now over 120,000 |

mi By KARIN HERIG

Tribune Staff Reporter _

: VOTER registration has final- ;
: ly picked up and is now over }
120,000, rising steadily with each :
: passing day, Commissioner of the ;

THE Bahamas Hotel Manage- }
rial Association is accusing Baha }
Mar of union-busting for intro- ;
ducing an carly retirement and }

Parliamentary Registration
Department Errol Bethel said
yesterday.

SEE page 13

cole Smith.
(Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff)

Licences granted

for oil exploration
companies to work

in Bahamian waters

li By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

TWO oil exploration companies
: were granted five licences yester-
; day at the Ministry of Energy and
: the Environment to continue their
i ” Speaking with The Tribune, Mr} research for-sizable oil deposits
: Bethel said he expects the num- ;
: ber of voter registrations to “eas- }
} ily” reach 150,000 by March 12, :
: when the register closes. ;
This would exceed the number ; 1 0
: of voter registrations in 2002, ; licences they were seeking.
: when 144,758 people registered ;
: to vote ~ the highest number for |

within Bahamian waters.
Island Offshore Petroleum Lim-
ited was granted their one licence,

: and the Bahamas Offshore Lim-

ited was granted four of the five

These agreements will allow for
the companies to explore areas

SEE page 13

PLP ‘open
to black -
and white
Bahamians’

@ By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY

Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Progressive Liberal Party
is open to black and white
Bahamians, according to party
chairman Raynard Rigby. —

Mr Rigby’s statement is in
response to the FNM’s allegation

~ that the PLP is playing the race

card to gather support from black
Bahamian voters.

Yesterday, FNM deputy leader
Brent Symonette accused the
PLP of manipulating the race

issue, with its constant references _

to the United Bahamian Party
(UBP).

Mr Symonette said the PLP’s
strategy will fail because most
Bahamians have moved beyond
the question of race.

‘The Tribune also reported that
this is not the first time the gov-
ernment has been accused of

playing the race card.

At the PLP national conven-

SEE page 13

All on-site
workers at
Rum Cay
back to work

DEVELOPERS behind the
multi-million dollar Rum Cay
Resort Marina project yesterday
said all workers on-site were back
to work, following a temporary

stoppage as they awaited further .

approvals and an amended Heads
of Agreement from the Govern-
ment.

Tim Perkins, Montana Hold-
ings’ director of construction, said
last night: “It seems like we’re
making progress. We're working
as a team with the Government,
and everybody's back to work.
We're awaiting further progress
from our negotiations with the
Government over the next few
weeks.”

Vincent Peet, minister of finan-
cial services and investments, said
earlier this week that Montana
Holdings had asked the Govern-
ment for an amendment to the
Heads of Agreement for the $700

~ million Rum Cay Resort and

Marina.
The minister said work on

SEE page 13

WILSONART

RING WILSONART ADHESIVES

~ LAMINATE FOR COUNTERTOPS & CABINETS

PLUS CABINET KNOBS, HINGES & PULLS!









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CHIEF REPORTER

THE TRIBUNE

¢

Miy Lose. Ply Flewyoapgent"

call our
502-2359

To report the news,
News Tips Line at



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Throughout cae
comm

PAGE 16, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007 ut | THE TRIBUNE.



ahi
Hl Ha

ce to
responsibility for alll mattors relating to Eaviron

Andy ‘has'been employed with Bacardi & Company Limited for Seventeen years, 2
Technician, Research Engineer and ANP. Adm tion. Hie wteo ‘serves on
Commitice,

Previously, Ant watiied at the Departement of
Environmental Ti


















numerous job-selated cowses and seminars, both locally and in
Bacardi managers from around the world, to attend Darden
University of Virginia.

Andy isa Past President ofithe: company’s ‘Top ee
Nassau A.M. His hobbies include art, reading and karate.
Carla Lewis, and is the proud tah f vee chen, Dakeds, Avery & Holey.






t



avitiorn og) Divtlll q ihe
mre Winer ma ton ite he













Clinton: also plays a. lending role: an, Quality mem:
Representative for the intemnationallly entified Gees Management

: in Bacardi’s “extracunricullan” Ii ihe The as served cm warts:
of Taesnasters Organization, eating vavos Mendes and






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communication awards



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2a. eee ene a pre nn rm

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sans eek tee nme NN



“24 & © 2

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' officer at the Freeport Container Port,




FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007.

SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net



The EET

BUSINESS

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, analysis, Wall Street _








| The Bahamas:



third-largest food market —

Food retailers enjoy $530m in sales annually, with top five chains enjoying 63% market share;
nation the only one in region not to apply: national treatment to food retail Seep

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he “saturated” Bahami-
an food retailing industry
generates about $530 mil-
lion in sales per annum,
and together with the

$200 million in sales produced by the.

fast-food restaurant sector gives this
nation a 13 per cent share of the total

-°. Caribbean consumer market for food.

The findings were contained ina
report produced by the food and agri-
culture distribution services industries
in the Caribbean for the Caribbean
Regional Negotiating Machinery
(CRNM), which said that the five
largest food chains in the Bahamas -
Bahamas Supermarkets, Super Value,
Abaco Markets, John Chea & Sons
and Budget Food Stores - collectively
enjoyed a 63 per cent share of that
$530 million market.

Bahamas Supermarkets had the

- Business Centre |
oe eyes Sea / Air Park
‘ on Grand noha THE Bahamas is pursuing

* “unsustainable”

i By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
~-Fribune-Business Reporter 0. -

A GROUP of Bahamians is seeking,

highest sales volume i any supermar-
ket chain in the Bahamas, with about
$140 million, followed by Super Value
with $95 million and Abaco Markets at
$85 million.

The CRNM report pointed out,
though, that despite the fact that Winn-
Dixie until last year held the majority
78 per cent stake in Bahamas Super-
markets, this nation was one of the few
in the Caribbean that restricted for-
eign ownership and involvement in its
supermarket industry.

This meant that the Bahamas did
not apply National Treatment policies,
as stipulated in any rules-based trading
system such as the World Trade
Organisation (WTO), to the food
retailing industry, and the CRNM

report said it restricted the opening
hours for foreign firms in contrast to
Bahamian-owned competitors.

“In the area of franchising, the.

Bahamas has an extensive licensing
regime, favours joint ventures in fran-
chising and allows local individuals and
operators to launch objections to
prospective new market entrants,” the

‘report said. “Other countries in the

region, as a general rule, apply such
regulations as they have i in a non- ~dis-
criminatory manner.’

The CRNM report said the apmit
nance of the major food store chains
was emphasised by the fact that:spe-
cialist food retailers and fresh produce
markets “are not very significant in
the Bahamas” apart from fish, as 80

> per cent of this was picchbeea by con- .
sumerts at fish landings.

. Specialist retailers had between 5-
15 per cent of all fruit and vegetable,

' chicken, pork and bakery products con-

sumed in the Bahamas, the report said.

The CRNM document estimated
that in addition to the major food
chains, there were 50 neighbourhood
counter shops, 200 ‘mom and pop’
stores, and the gas stations offering
convenience foods and groceries in the

‘ Bahamas..

“While the middle to upper income
consumers shop mainly in supermar-
kets, smaller self-service food stores,
2,000-7,00 square feet in size with.two
to three check-outs, operating with
family labour and low overheads, pro-

vide basic staples and a limited line of
frozen meats and convenience foods
to lower to middle-income neighbour-
hoods,” the report said.

On the supermarket side, Bahamas

Supermarkets’ 12 stores were said to”
_ range in size from 15,000-35,000 square
feet, with Super Value’s formats rang- —

ing from 25,000-30,000 square feet
across 10 stores.
Abaco Markets’ formats - Solomon’ s

SuperCentre and Cost Right - ranged _

in size from 10,000 to 50,000 square
feet for the former, and up to 120,000
square feet for the latter.

However, the CRNM report, noting

SEE page 5B

Development model branded ‘fool’s paradise’

to establish a warehousing and pro- —7ea

curement operation at Grand
Bahama’s Sea/Air Business Park,
called GBI Business Centre, the
Grand. Bahama Business Outlook
Conference was told yesterday.
Raymond Jones, chief operating

said the GBI Business Centre was
looking to construct four to five ware-
houses, totalling 200,000 square feet,
on land specially set aside for the pro-
ject.

SEE page 2B



= WILCHCOMBE

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

economic
growth and “an outdated mod-
el of development that enriches
|, large foreign investors with no
* ¢eal long- term: concern ae
the future of the Bahamas”,
environmental expert aa
warned.

Thomas Goreau, president of
the Global Coral Reef Alliance,
in a February 10, 2007, paper
written after he surveyed the
coral reefs and mangroves at
Guana Cay, urged the Govern-
ment “to promptly enact and

enforce environmental laws to .

protect the nation’s natural
resources”.

Although his assessment was
done on behalf of the Save
Guana Cay Reef Association,

ees.

which is attempting to stop the
$175 million Baker’s Bay Golf
& Ocean Club project, Dr
Goreau said he was not paid
and gave his time voluntarily.
Calling for the Baker’s Bay
development, being led by San

_ Francisco-based Discovery
Land Company, to “be stopped

immediately”, Dr Goreau said
developments like it and oth-
ers in locations such as Bimini

had the potential to create

“severe long-term costs to the

- Bahamian environment and

people”. He based his thoughts
on a series of dives at coral reefs
near the Baker’s Bay develop-
ment on February 9, 2007. ~
His conclusions will auto-
matically be opposed by Dis-
covery Land Company, which
has repeatedly said the golf
course would be designed so
that any fertilizer and nutrient

cAR KERR

run-off would be directed back

into the island, rather than

towards the sea and the coral -

reefs.

The company will also mount |

a defence of its environmental
track record, notably the clean-

up efforts at the former Disney .
“site-and the removal of all
native vegetation, trees and

species out of the path of roads
and infrastructure development.
Many investors coming into

’ the Bahamas repeatedly insist

they will do nothing to harm
the environment that first

attracted them to these shores, .

and Discovery Land Company
will also point to the more than
100 jobs its project has created -
albeit mostly on mainland Aba-
co, as opposed to Guana Cay,
which has fullemployment. —

But Dr Goreau added of the

development plan the Govern-

ment was following, with its
emphasis on a so-called ‘anchor
property’ for every island: “It
is typical of an outdated model

of development that enriches —

foreign investors with no real
long-term concerns about the
future of the Bahamas, and will

- provide mainly low-paying jobs:

for Haitian immigrants.

. “In sharp contrast, Guana |

Cay is a model for small-scale,
locally-owned tourism, which

creates a completely different -

ambience that more tourists
prefer, causes far less environ-
mental damage, and in the long
run is more economically bene-
ficial to the Bahamian econo-
MY...

“The Bahamas needs sound
economic development that

SEE page 6B

Fast food supply escapes

Bahamas based producers

~~ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas’ import duty
policy, coupled with the inabil-
ity of domestic producers to
meet fast-food restaurant
demands for quality specialised
product and supply volume,
have. virtually eliminated
Bahamian farmers from‘the
chicken-leg quarters supply
chain, a study has revealed.

The report, which assessed
the food and agriculture distri-
bution services industries in the
Caribbean for the Caribbean
Regional Negotiating Machin-
ery (CRNM), showed how the

,", Bahamas’ import duties and
“-"- agricultural policy choices

impacted the supply chain

- choices made by fast-food

restaurants in this nation.
Focusing on chicken leg quar-

“ters, the CRNM study showed

that in Jamaica and Barbados,
which imposed tariffs of 260 per

-cent‘and 184 per cent respec-

tively on imports of this prod-
uct, domestic producers enjoyed
a.75 per cent and 80 per cent
market share respectively.
And when it came to supply-

., ing fast food chains such as

KFC and Burger King with
chicken leg quarters, in both
those countries domestic pro-
ducers enjoyed a, 100 per cent
share of the supply chain.

The same was true for

,/ Guyana and ‘Belize, which
‘ impose 100 per cent tariffs on

chicken leg quarter imports, but
in contrast, the Bahamas
imposed only a 35 per cent tar-
iff, giving local producers just a
50 per cent market share. More
importantly, domestic produc-

Fast food industry
a $200m revenue
generator

ers were shut out of the mar-

ket for supplying KFC and .-

Bamboo Shack.

' The report found: “The .

Bahamas is a higher cost pro-
ducer and has moderate tariffs,

which make imported leg quar- ©

ters approximately equal in
price to the local product.
“Local [fast-food] chains in
Nassau, such as Bamboo Shack,
used to purchase local chicken
before the poultry operation in

New Providence [Gladstone ’

Farms] was closed.

“However, the international
[fast food] chains such as KFC
report that local production is
not large enough or efficient
enough to deliver the require-
ment of specialised parts. KFC
continues to purchase local
product in Freeport where there
is still a local supply.”

The report for the CRNM
said all fast food chains had spe-
cific broilers to fit their cook-
ing equipment, “and for KFC
only 25-30 per cent of all bird
slaughters.in a plant can ever
meet this criteria”.

It pointed out that this
requirement caused difficulties
for Bahamian producers when it
came to supplying KFC with
chicken leg quarters.

“This requires that total local
production be large enough to
meet the productivity require-

SEE page 5B

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ee eS Tee eee ee ae gi ae My

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

TJX reports more stolen
ata, still posts sales growth

BY MARK JEWELL
AssociatedPress.” coy
BOSTON — A computer...
security breach by a‘hacker
who stole TJX Cos? customer *
data was broader than initially
feared, and started 10 months
earlier than first thought, the
company said Wednesday.
But the parent of discount
retail chains including T-J.







* and ran into last month. On
Wi ednesday, the company said





jts ongoing investigation
‘revealed the breach started
nearly a year earlier, in July
2005.

Also, TJX said Wednesday

“that credit and debit card data

had been accessed involving
transactions at U.S. and Puerto
- Rican stores from January

Maxx and Marshalls also**.2003 through June 2004, and

reported 5 percent sales
growth during its fiscal fourth’
quarter, which ended just 10:
days after the breach was dis-
closed Jan. 17. . ee ai
Company executives said,
they saw no evidence of any.
exodus of customers’ from:
TJX’s more than 2,400. stores. x
after the data theft. Industry: °
analysts agreed. . -
“To the degree that that
may possibly have occurred, itâ„¢ :
certainly hasn’t shown up in
the numbers,” said Donald-
Trott of Jefferies & Co.
TJX initially believed. the .
intrusion began in LNGY 2006



SANE A |



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discussion

7 Res
Sieh
t bl d



workers —

: BALSNCING ACE, FROM 1B

%



Cheskin‘ ‘says. For somes sian 4
ing assistance for personal ©

problems makes’ more senst
than disciplining or firing é
someone for messing up..
Cheskin, of Hogan & Hart
son, then advises a frank con- 4









wdrivers’

credit card-only transactions
at’Ganadian stores during that
period. The company had ini-

® tially been less certain, saying
‘Fast: month that information
ani “may have been accessed.”

MORE CASES

“TJX also found more cases
niwhich the hacker accessed
license numbers
“together with names and

‘addresses. TJX said it would:

~ notify affected customers.
Also, TJX found evidence

Nes of an intrusion into a system
that processes transactions in
‘Britain and Ireland from T.K.

Maxx stores. So far, there’s no
evidence of any theft of cus-

‘tomer data from T.K. Maxx

stores, TJX said.

More than 50 computer
security experts are working
with TJX in its investigation,
CEO Carol Meyrowitz said.

CANNOT ESTIMATE LOSS

The company said it’s too
early to estimate its losses
from the breach, which
prompted banks nationwide to
reissue debit and credit cards
to guard against further fraud.
TJX also faces lawsuits from

consumers and financial insti- |

tutions, and dozens of states
have expressed interest in
joining a civil investigation
into TJX’s security led by Mas-
sachusetts Attorney General
Martha Coakley.

But in response to a ques-
tion about customer traffic,
Meyrowitz said TJX enjoyed
consistent sales gains through-
out January — including after
the breach was disclosed Jan.

17. Fourth-quarter sales at
stores open at least a year rose
5 percent over the previous
year, and January sales were
particularly strong in the
Northeast, Meyrowitz said.

That’s a region where Mas-
sachusetts-based TJX has
endured media coverage of
the breach, and the most likely
place where customers might
have been expected to shop
elsewhere, said Patrick
McKeever, an analyst with
Avondale Partners.

“So far, it doesn’t seem like
the systems breach is having a
material effect on sales,”
McKeever said.

TJX’s forecasts of first-
quarter and full-year earnings,
however, fell just shy of Wall
Street’s expectations. Inves-
tors sent the Framingham-
based company’s shares down
44 cents, or 15 percent, to
$28.18 on the New York Stock
Exchange.

TJX also reported a 29 per-
cent decline in fourth-quarter





PHILIP ANDREWS/AFP- GETTY IMAGES

DID ANYONE KNOW? What if a co- SAGE had sensed astronaut Lisa Marie Nowak’s

distress and taken action?

versation: Let the employee *”

know his performance: :
dropped and ask what you can
do to help. If he doesn’t vol-;
unteer information, back off...
Employers often. disagree
about what symptoms war-
rant manager intervention.
With some issues — alcohol,
drug abuse or gambling — it’s
obvious that an employee
should be steered toward
Employer Assistance Pro-
grams. With other personal |
problems, it’s a tougher «
Some managers want to:
know whether it’s a tempo-'
rary situation or a longer term..
problem. Then they must”
choose how deeply to get
involved. One human











resources manager says to
approach these conversations
with caution.

“It could backfire,” says
Debbie Winkles, president of

“‘Miami’s Society of Human

Resource Management and a

vice president of HR at Com-

mercial Bank of Florida.
Winkles notes the increase
of employment litigation and

. says she has learned that
crossing the line is a tough

call.‘“You want to be nice and

‘do the right thing, but as the
‘employer, you have to look

out for the company, too.”
-« Winkles recently took a
backdoor approach. When

‘she learned that grief was

affecting one employee’s
work, she handed out infor-
mation about the bank’s
Employee Assistance Pro-
gram to all employees.

Alicia Cervera, president
of Miami’s Related Cervera
Realty Services, prefers a
more direct approach, taking
her employees aside and
inviting them to talk.

“It’s more important to get
involved than not, if you are
doing it for the right reason,”
Cervera says.

Although the employees
may initially react poorly, in
the long term they understand
her good intentions, she says.
She has offered employees

time off, referals to profes-
sionals, even pairing them
with co-workers who have
had similar problems.

For her, follow-through is

. crucial. “If you engage them

in conversation, you do some-
thing about it. You don’t just
abandon the person.”

Flynn believes companies
have the responsibility to
train all workers to recognize

aberrant behavior and refer it _

up the chain of command. In
NASA’s case, a co-worker
may have sensed Nowak spi-
raling out of control.

Says Flynn: “There are
times when you just have to.
use your best judgment.”

Lenders tout changes to aid borrowers

" *PAYDAY, FROM 1B



four extra months | to pay off
loans.

Other changes. inchide
$10 million national ad cam-
paign warning that payday”.
loans are not a long-term:
financial solution and a ban’
on ads that promote payday
advances for “frivolous pur-
poses” like vacations.

Consumer watchdog
remained skeptical. . ‘.

“This does not. solve the

est rate payday lending that:
traps borrowers and leads to’

ECONOMY ~~ _—_..










Cen est borrowing,” said Jean
“Ann Fox, consumer protec-

tion director for the Con-

sumer Federation of America.

4 Fox said the extended pay-
ment plan does not lower the
cost, of loans or make loan

repayment any more afford-

able: She accused the industry
of trying to shift attention

away from the high loan rates

to distract lawmakers from

enacting meaningful reform.

~ ONE STEP AHEAD
problem of triple-digit inter="7*~

‘The industry is trying to
stay one step ahead of those
who want to restrict payday

lending practices. At least 12
states prohibit triple-digit
rates on payday loans, a cap
that effectively bans payday
lending, according to the Con-
sumer Federation of America.
Dozens of other states are
also considering legislation to
crack down on payday lend-
ers.

Last year, Congress
imposed a 36 percent annual
percentage rate cap on pay-
day loans to military service
members after reports
showed thousands of troops
in debt to payday lenders,
many of which are clustered

outside bases.

Anderson, who is president
of QC Holdings, an Overland
Park, Kan., payday lender,
said only a small percentage
of customers have trouble
repaying loans.

REPEAT BORROWERS

’ The nonprofit Center for
Responsible Lending esti-

mates more than 90 percent

of payday loans go to repeat
borrowers. Customers are
drawn to the lenders because,
unlike banks and credit
unions, they don’t run credit
checks.

Medical ear food push consumer prices up

*ECONOMY, FROM 1B

0.8 percent, the biggest |
increase in more than 15

years, reflecting higher costs ””
‘possible interest rate hikes
“because of inflation.

for prescription drugs: and
doctor services, which were:
risiag in January at the fastest
clip in 25 years.

Airline tickets jumped by
2.1 percent, the biggest gain
since November 2004. pt

The cost of tobacco prod-
ucts rose by 3.1 percent, the’
largest increase in 4'4 years:

ve








ye The report on consumer
‘prices came a week after Fed-

‘eral.Reserve Chairman Ben
“Bernanke had relieved fears

in financial markets about





‘Délivering the Fed’s latest

;@conomic forecast to Con-

gress, Bernanke had signaled
growing confidence that infla-
‘tion: was heading lower

“although he said the Fed was
till “worried about some -



unexpected development that

could push prices higher.

For all of 2006, consumer
prices had risen by 2.5 per-
cent, the smallest increase in
three years, helped by big
declines in energy costs in the
second half of the year after a
sharp run-up in energy costs
through last summer.

For January, gasoline pump
prices fell by 3 percent, leav-
ing them 2.7 percent lower

than they were a year ago and

32 percent lower than their
peak in July of last year.

‘Natural gas and fuel oil
costs were also down last
month, giving a boost to con-
sumers during the winter
heating season.

But the cost of electricity
was up 2 percent, on a season-
ally adjusted basis from the
price in December.

The 0.3 percent rise in
inflation excluding food and
energy was the biggest
increase in this category since
a similar 0.3 percent rise in
June of last year.



__MiamiHerald.com |THE MIAMI HERALD

ELISE AMENDOLA/AP

LOYAL CUSTOMERS: A shopper leaves a T.J, Maxx store in
Framingham, Mass. Despite a hacker stealing customer
data, T.J. Maxx’s parent company, TJX Co., posted :
particularly strong January sales in the Northeast.

earnings compared with its
strong performance in the
same quarter a year earlier.
The latest quarter’s profit
was $205.5 million, or 44 cents
per share, compared with
$288.7 million, or 60 cents per
share, a year ago, when net
income rose 75 percent.

The data theft costs

ASIA

equaled about $5 million for
the quarter, including
expenses to investigate and
contain an intrusion the com-
pany says it learned about. in
mid-December. TJX waited a
month to disclose the breach,
saying the delay allowed it to
work with security experts to
contain the problem.

Japan’s central

* JAPAN, FROM 1B

Japan’s economy grew at a
stronger-than-expected
annual pace of 4.8 percent in
the fourth quarter — the fast-
est rate in nearly three years.

But the government also
left its monthly appraisal of
the economy unchanged in its
February report, released

Monday, warning about weak 3

consumption.’

Determined to escape dec-
ade-long stagnation, the Bank
of Japan kept rates at virtually
zero since March 2001. The
raise to 0.25 percent from
zero in July last year was the
first hike in six years.

The Bank of Japan said
Wednesday that gradual
growth will likely continue
amid healthy production,
income and company invest-
ments, and worries were
diminishing about the future
of the American and other
overseas economies.

It also said a dip in con-
sumer spending last summer
was temporary, and spending
may be on a rebound.

For the first time, the Bank
of Japan gave the names of the
officials who had voted in
favor or opposed the rate
hike, and showed how the
decision had been split among
the governor and deputy gov-
ernors.

‘SEND A MESSAGE’

Before, the governor and
deputies had always voted
together on rate raises, said
Barclays Capital sttatceist
Masuhisa Kobayashi.

“The Bank of Japan was
able to send a message about
a new, more transparent Bank
of Japan,” Kobayashi said.

Worries had been growing
that prices could fall in com-
ing months, reflecting the
decline in once-soaring oil
prices. Japan has been
plagued for years by the dan-
ger of deflation, the down-
ward spiraling of prices that
brings down wages and dead-
ens growth.

Although.consumer prices
have been inching up in
recent months, top govern-
ment officials had warned
that deflation remains a threat |
and urged the bank to hold off
on raising rates so as not. to
quash the recovery.

Japan’ s, core consumer
price index, which excludes
food, rose 0.1 percent in
December from the: same
month the previous year, in
its seventh straight monthly

bank raises rate

Barclays Capital
strategist Masuhisa
Kobayashi said the
rate hike was part of
an effort to
‘normalize’ interest
rates in Japan.

‘rise, but the increase was less
‘than the 0.2 percent gain in

November.

Bank of Japan Gov. Toshih-
iko Fukui said interest rates
remain considerably low,
given Japan’s solid pace of
growth.

ADJUST GRADUALLY

“We plan to adjust interest
rate levels gradually based on
movements in the economy
and prices,’’ Fukui told
reporters, adding that keeping
an excessively easy monetary
policy could harm the market
and economy.

In a monthly report, the
Bank of Japan kept its assess-
ment of the economy.
unchanged as moderately
expanding — the same word-
ing it used the previous
month — noting that con-
sumer spending remains solid
and prices will be stable in the
long run.

The bank also left its
monthly purchase of Japanese
government bonds at 1.2 tril-
lion yen ($10 billion). It prom-
ised to carefully weigh eco-
nomic activity and price
moves in adjusting interest
rates.

Kobayashi said the rate
hike was part of an effort to
“normalize” interest rates in
Japan, which had been unusu-
ally low for years.

“This was a good chance to
raise interest rates,” he said.
“That’s difficult to do, if the
economy is sluggish.”

CAVED TO PRESSURES

When the Bank of Japan
decided to hold rates steady
earlier this year, perception
became widespread that the
central bank had caved into
political pressures, although
both sides have always said
the central bank is indepen-
dent.

Top ruling party officials
had given harsh warnings
against an overly hasty rate
hike ahead of the BOJ meeting
in January. This time, politi-
cians’ comments had been
muted.



4pm. 6:35 p.m. Late



Stock Tkr. close ~— close. = Chg. -—-volume | Stock a, ‘his SSE ge
WalMart WMT 49.97 50.00 +03 59011 Qwesttm Q 8.32 836 +04 © 15331
CocaCl KO 47.57 45,57 -2.00 46879 AmStand = ASD 55.09 55.09 . 14379
GenElec GE 35.91 35.92 +01 45923 BkofAm BAC 53,91 §3.71 -.20 13909
WholeFd = WFML 45.70 48,05 #2.35 31764 Qualcom QCOM 4205 4205 = * 13631
TimeWam TWX 21,65 21.6302, 30738 | Valueclick VCLK 26.47 29.70 $3.23. 11417
Nasdl00Tr §=QQQQ 45.19 45.25 +06 28832 SPDR SPY 145.98 145.94 04 9936
SprintNex = S 18.97 18.88 +09 28325 AmintGp If AIG 69.69 69,69 . 9153
Netflix NFLX 23,39 23.39 00 28166 nap : ?

. | AnalogDev ADI =, 33.32 3493 41.61 8963
CBS B CBS 31,70 31,70 24545 8908
Windstrm WIN 15.13 15.13 * 21700 | IShR2K nya WM 8210 807-03
Weyerh wy 83.57 83.57 ¢ 19706 NewellRub NWL = 31.83 31.83 8826
Merck MRK 43.95 43,955 * 18560 ITC Hold wT 44.03 “403 * 8645
Limited LTD 29.47 2947——* 17292 XcelEngy —-XEL 24.30 2430—=—* 8002

Res Macey ae ae ab Pe OR Meh Sse ny ee Be ee ae
For up-to-date stock quotes, go to www.MiamiHerald.com and click on Business

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er

AGE 2B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007




OFFICE ASSISTANT NEEDED

| To assist in General Office Work. Duties include,
i but not limited to, Receptionist, Filing, Typing,
| Banking and Postal Duties. Will also be required
F to perform some Accounting and Payroll
| Functions. Excellent Computer Skills Necessary.









‘|fl Ideal candidate will be honest, responsible,
| punctual and self-motivated.

Salary commensurate with experience.
FAX 326-2824.

HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER

Job Opportunity —
An established Bahamian business |
eT CT ie secretary.

Applicant must possess the following
key competencies:

@ Motivated self-starter

S Excellent communication skills
@ Good telephone etiquette
° Typing '& word processing skills

© Ability. to work with minimal
supervision

@ Literate in all MS Office programs -
Excel in particular

@ Knowledge of the Adobe suite of ©
programs a plus

Please send your reply by post to:

P. O. Box SS-6136
Nassau, Bahamas
Re: Secretary TB-0207

P
BUSINESS | :

THE TRIBUNE



Private insurers will not»

oversee NHI administration

m By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter



he National Health Insurance plan

(NHI) will be administered by the

National Insurance Board (NIB) and

not by private insurers, although the Govern-

ment is expected to consult the industry on
potential partnerships.

Dr Stanley Lalta, the National Health Insur-

ance implementation project manager, told ,

The Tribune that the collection and manage-
ment of NHI contributions would be done
through the NIB in conjunction with the coun-
try’s employers, who would be responsible
for ensuring the mandatory payments were
met. :

Private insurance companies would not be

given contracts to administer the NHI scheme, »

although the Government was examining
potential partnerships and resource sharing

to enhance the quality of care patients receive.

Dr Lalta said one such area was that of
case managers for persons who need extend-
ed care.

“When we spoke with one of the private .

insurers, they told us that they have what they
call case managers, who follow patients
throughout the system to make sure they are

getting appropriate care,” he said.

“That is an area that we can tap into, and so
there are things we are looking at now that can
relate to the private sector in terms of differ-
ent aspects of care.”

Private life and health insurers are still
awaiting the final NHI plan costs before they
can determine their fees and benefits plans
for private coverage they might offer to sup-
plement the Government scheme.

One insurance agent attending a sympo-
sium given by Lampkin & Company said
once that happens, they would be in a position
to “sit down with our clients because we offer
different plans to them, and really we cannot
price or present to them without knowing or
having the finalised plan”.

Another person pointed out that the
Bahamas Association of Life and Health

Insurers (BALHI ) was now defunct, so there -

was no association to speak on behalf of the

insurers, leaving them without a voice.

Etoile Pinder, a health financing specialist
with the NHI project team, said all the costings
were still being worked on.

She said the programme was projected to
cost around $235 million each year, although
because it was based on a fixed percentage of
income, it could increase just by nature of
inflation or the.state of the Bahamian econo-

my.
“She also pointed out that the figure was

. based not on 100 per cent compliance, but on

contributions resulting from 25 per cent com-
pliance by self-employed persons and 85 per
cent of the working population.

Ms Pinder said the NHI team was working
to establish a “minimum standard of care”
which can be provided at the level of contri-
butions.

However, she pointed out that in the cost-
ing there has to be a levei of reality, as not
every service can be offered. As an example,
she said that they are looking at the use of
generic medicine, which would be cheaper to
provide. ;



Business Centre eyes Sea/Air Park on Grand Bahama

FROM page 1B

He was speaking after Obie
Wilchcombe, minister of
tourism, said there needed to be
better co-ordination between
Grand Bahama’s economic
stakeholders on marketing the
benefits of Freeport and the
Hawksbill-Creek Agreement to

| outside investors.

The minister said that two
nights ago, he spoke to a dia-
mond manufacturer who had
123 stores across the globe, who
had not heard about Freeport
or the Agreement, and the ben-
efits they could have as a site for
her products to be prepared. Not
identifying the person or the
firm, Mr Wilchcombe said “she”
was due to visit Grand Bahama
next week.

Mr Wilchcombe said a senior
official or minister needed to be

_appointed to co-ordinate Grand

Bahama’s economic growth, and
suggested that a Grand Bahama
Economic Summit - involving
the likes of the Government,
Grand Bahama Port Authority,
Hutchison Whampoa and Grand
Bahama Chamber of Commerce

FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK
CAREER OPPORTUNITY

for |

Home Finance Specialist

Qualifications:

= Experience in Sales & Lending and in depth up-to-date

_knowledge of Mortgage and loans and an understanding of
local economies, client needs, condition of client’s business

/ industry / market.

Knowledge of and/or experience in credit assessment, credit
policies and procedures with emphasis on mortgage
underwriting as well as risk awareness in order to assess

lending risk.

Knowledge of the principles and techniques of selling to
prospects for new business and close sales. .

Self-motivated and able to work with minimal supervision.
ACIB or equivalent qualification in relevant discipline (not ,

“mandatory

General Requirements/Responsibilities:

"To be the primary point of contact for customers wishing to

obtain a FirstCaribbean Mortgage.

= To generate incremental mortgage business for FirstCaribbean,
primarily through business development and direct selling

efforts.

To provide a high level of customer service to external referral

sources and potential home purchasers.

To develop appropriate external sales contacts with land
developers/ Real Estate Agents/Brokers etc. to ensure that
opportunities for developing profitable customer relationships
are realized in order to increase FirstCaribbean’s share of the

mortgage market.

Responsible for the management of a portfolio of approximately

200 — 300 clients.

Ensure credit quality i.e. delinquency and NPNA levels are

‘maintained within acceptable standards

Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter

via email by March 2, 2007 to:

deangelia.deleveaux@FirstCaribbeanBank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for their interest,
however only those under consideration will be contacted.



- be called to chart the way for-
ward.

Within a decade, Grand
Bahama could become the high-
est economic earner in the
nation, Mr Wilchombe added.

He said that last year, the sus-
tained growth in the economy,
combined with the relatively low
interest rate environment stim-
ulated heightened demand for
credit.

Total Bahamian dollar domes-
tic credit surged by an estimated
12.1 per cent, or some $657 mil-
lion in 2006, compared to an
expansion of 13.2 per cent or
$541.2 million in 2005. The rapid
rise reflected heightened growth
in credit in the personal sector,
which strengthened by 15.8 per
cent or $552.9 million, compared
to the 14.3 per cent or $440.3
million recorded in 2005.

Foreign reserves declined by
$79 million last year, following a
contraction of $89 million in
2005. However, over the first
month of 2007, foreign reserves
have increased and, by the end
of last month, stood at $511 mil-
lion -anse of 12.1 per cent.

Mr Wilchombe said this
growth in foreign reserves was
expected to continue through-

out the rest of the year.

He added that the Bahamas
and its tourism product had
fared well against “all manner
of international and other
shocks”, and the bizarre events
surrounding the death of Holly-
wood playmate Anna Nicole
Smith. :

“Similarly, the unfortunate
turbulent relationship with the
owners of the Grand Bahama
Port Authority, fortunately, has
not dissuaded potential investors
or the local investors from plac-
ing money in the ground,” the
minister said.

Mr Wilchombe said he had
hoped the two families would
amicably resolve the conflict in
the way that the late Edward St
George would have - through
dialogue and compromise.

“ Both families have worked
too hard for too long to allow
the wonderful story of sagacity,
respect and trust to be thrashed
and destroyed,” he added.

That notwithstanding, Mr Wil-
chombe said: “The future beck-
ons us to recognise and accept
that Grand Bahama holds the
key to the further expansion and
diversity of the Bahamian econ-
omy. In fact, I contend that the

Neen nee een SS

JOB OPPORTUNITY

Established Company seeking to employ a

CERTIFIED CHEMIST

To conduct daily analysis of water facility
Call 326-8585 for appointment
Serious inquires only ~

Requirements:

* Ability to multi-task

‘



* To safeguard and accurately maintain records of all securitie
* Proper execution and settlement of trades and/or any other s
* To ensure all Securities transactions are accurately processed in the proper accounting period
* Liaise between custodians and administrators to
* To carry out all duties as they relate to the proper administration of securities
* Assist with the preparation of all securities related documentation

* To accurately post all stock orders, non-cash transactions and dividends

* To update the trade log on a daily basis, to validate, post and settle trades

-© To assist with daily call-over routine



an

The Ansbacher Group, specialists in private banking, fiduciary services and wealth management,
has an opening in The Bahamas for a

SECURITIES ADMINISTRATOR/OFFICER

Primary Responsibilities:

Secondary Responsibilities:
* To carry out such duties as may be required from time to time
* To serve as a back-up verifier of swifts
* To assist with departmental cross training, pensi

* Bachelors’ Degree in Banking/Accounting/Economics/Management with at least one year
experience in an offshore environment; or

+ Relevant associate Degree with three years ex

¢ Securities certification such as Series 7 or C.S.C.

* Highly proficient in Microsoft Office

Please send all resumes to the attention of.

Human Resource Manager

Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited

P.O. Box N-7768
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 325-0524

E-mail: hrmanager@ansbacher.bs

Deadline for all applications is March 2, 2007

sheld ‘
ecurities transactions

ensure client records are updated

on payments and sales ledger when necessary

perience as a Junior Banking of Securities Officer

diversity is already here.”

Mr Wilchombe said the
Freeport Container Port was
being expanded and will employ

_ an additional 300 Bahamians this

year.

He added that the Govern-
ment and Grand Bahama Port
Authority had approved the
opening of a bio-chemical plant
at the former Franklyn Chemi-
cals facility, and hinted there
couldbe a relaunch of the BOR-
CO plant in the near future.

Mr Wilchombe said Ginn
Clubs & Resorts had spent $40
million in marketing its West
End development, while Jasper
Knabb, president and chief exec-
utive of Pegasus Wireless, which
was officially opened yesterday
by the Prime Minister, had spent
$5 million in the Grand Bahama
economy over the past two
months.

He said the Government has
approved a purchaser of the
Royal Oasis, likely to be Har-
court Developments although
he did not reveal the name, and
the group is currently in New
York for meetings with Lehman
Brothers’ private equity arm.
~ “We know the group will
bring the brand, the experience
and the commitment to Freeport
and Grand Bahama,” the minis-
ter said. ;

He noted that the Govern-
ment and Isle of Capri, the casi-

no operators at Sheraton/West-

ern Resort had now concluded
“a series cf progressive discus-

- sions”, although he did not say

what the outcome was.

According to Mr Wilchcombe,
tourism arrivals to Grand
Bahama look to be substantially
higher than 2006, with more than
352 groups already booking
meetings and events on the
island this year. Cruise arrivals
are expected to be up as well.

With all this economic activity,
Mr Wilchombe reminded Grand
Bahamians that they must be
prepared to take advantage of
every opportunity afforded
them.

TU Oe OR On Te Oe Pe oe a ee

Tun 00 08 08 88 28 0 eo 2 02 88 08 88 00



BUSINESS&SPORTS [}

Che Miami Herald





THE MARKETS

ASIA | . )
STOCKS, EA ale FUNDS, 5-6B
Dow 30 12,738.41 -48.23 V 5 a a
“NASDAQ es — 2siea2 +538 AL 4 eine |
“10-YR NOTE co 4.69 — +01 A 8 Saying that it expects that - percent on Wednesday, judging that “The bank thinks that even if The dollar, which had slipped on
ye ‘CRUDE Ol 60.07. ¥1.22 A gradual growth will likely price stability and consumer spend-__ prices drop, that won’t cripple eco-. Japanese media reports of an immi-







threat of inflation. —







the Dow Jones industrials fell. .

y

latest readings leaving some

week Wall Street rallied after
Federal. Reserve Chairman Ben

ing sustainable growth. _
~The Labor Department's



index rose 0.2 percent in Janu-
ary came as a surprise to Wall

0.1 percent increase.
The inflation news ‘and Fed

report from Hewlett-Packard
that dampened sentiment on
_ Wall Street.





the economy can continue to do

well as it has without interest

rates being under some upward

_ pressure, and if interest rates do

_ stay where they are or in fact go

down it’s probably because the,

_ economy will slow down,” said

_ Denis Amato, chief investment
officer at Ancora Advisors.

. The Dow. Jones industrial

__ average fell 48.23, or 0.38 per- :

: oe to 12,738.41.
‘Broader ‘stock indicators

were narrowly mixed. The a
_ Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell

_ 2.05, or 0.14 percent, to 1,457.63,
oS and the Nasdaq composite
_ index rose 5.38, or 0.21 percent,
_. to its highest level in six years at
2,518.42. The Previous high was
2,514.22.

- Bonds fell following the

. inflation data; the yield on the
_ benchmark 10-year Treasury

e note rose to 4.70 percent from —

_ 4.68 percent late Tuesday. The
_ dollar was mostly lower against
_ other major currencies, though
_ it rose against the yen after the

_ Bank of Japan increased interest

rates. Gold prices rose sharply, ©

__ rising to a level not seen since
_ July, as oil prices increased.

_ Light, sweet crude settled up |

_, $1.22 at $60.07 per barrel on the
_ New York Mercantile Exchange
after a number of refinery shut-

_ ‘downs raised concerns about

_ supply and. as_ tensions
_ increased over Iran’s uranium
enrichment plans.

_. Energy and materials stocks
_ showed widespread gains as
_ commodity prices rose. Cono-
_ coPhillips rose 71 cents to
- $66.29, while AK Steel Holding
_ finished up 27 cents at $22.92.
_ Incorporate news, Hewlett-
_ Packard fell $2.03, or 4.7 per-
-- cent, to $41.10 after the printer
_ and computer maker saw inven-
_ tories increase during its fiscal
_ first quarter. Sales and profits
_ topped Wall Street’s forecasts.
- Declining issues outnum-
_, bered advancers about 6-to-5 on
"the New York Stock Exchange,
where consolidated volume
came to 2.57 billion shares, com-
pared with 2.39 billion Tuesday.
The Russell 2000 index rose
122, or 0.15 percent, to 827.33,
Britain’s FTSE 100 closed
down 0.86 percent, Germany’s
DAX index fell 0.59 percent,
and France’s CAC-40 was down
0.33 percent. ©



continue amid healthy
production, the Bank of Japan
raised its benchmark rate by a
quarter point.

BY YURI KAGEYAMA
Associated Press

TOKYO — Encouraged by signs

of robust economic growth, Japan’s |

central bank raised its benchmark
interest rate by a quarter point to 0.5

ing would withstand slightly tighter
credit. ;

The Bank of Japan’s decision,
which came at the end of a two-day
monetary policy board meeting, high-
lights confidence in the continuing
moderate recovery in the world’s
second-largest economy. The vote
among the nine-member board was
8-1 in favor of the hike, the bank said
in a statement.

nomic growth, and conditions were
ripe for a rate hike,” said Takeo Oku-
hara, bond strategist at Daiwa Insti-
tute of Research in Tokyo. “The bank
made the right choice.”

On the Tokyo stock market, the
benchmark Nikkei index rebounded
temporarily, as relief set in that the
next rate hike will not come for a
while — but it finished down 0.14
percent.





























NEW YORK - —_ Stocks fin-
hed mixed: Wednesday after
msumer prices showed a larg-
-than-expected increase in —
January and minutes from the |
Federal Reserve’s last meeting _
showed the central bank consid- —
red but decided against taking
more dovish tone on the. .

asdaq Foe idee .
a six-year high, while —



Inflation again commanded :
rall Street’s attention, with the
investors unnerved. Only last —

ernanke told Congress that _
inflation appeared to be moder- =
ating as the economy was show:

report that the consumer price -
Street, which had expected an -

comments followed a profit _

“We find it hard to see How.



PRESSING VINYL PRODUCES GROOVY INCOME



MARK HUMPHREY/AP

Seth Sequa operates a record press at the United Record Pressing company in Nashville, Tenn.
Many record collectors, DJs and music junkies still consider vinyl to be the gold standard of
recorded music. That appeal has helped United Record Pressing, which cranks out 20,000 to
40,000 records a day, become: one of the largest = and last - vinyl record manufacturers im thes:

.. country. Story, 3B

‘ECONOMY

Medical care, food push

consumer prices higher

i U.S. consumer prices rose
more than forecast in January,
giving credence to Federal
Reserve Chairman Ben S.
Bernanke’s message that
inflation remains the central
bank’s primary concern.

BY MARTIN CRUTSINGER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Inflation at
the consumer level rose by a larger-
than-expected amount in January
as falling energy prices only par-
tially offset big increases in the cost
of medical care, food and airline
tickets.

The Labor Department reported
Wednesday that prices rose by 0.2
percent in January. That was down
from a 0.4 percent rise in Decem-
ber, but it was higher than the 0.1
percent increase that ‘Wall Street
had been expecting.

Core inflation, which excludes
volatile energy and food compo-
nents, also was up more than ana-

lysts had been expecting, rising by .

0.3 percent. It was the largest one-
month gain in seven months.

In other economic news, a key
gauge of future economic activity
rose a tiny 0.1 percent in January,
held back by the ailing housing and
auto markets.

The increase in the Conference
Board’s Index of Leading Economic

BALANCING ACT

Should we get involved with co-workers’ problems?

hat do you do when you
W notice your co-worker is
regularly bolting to the

ladies room to dab tears? What if
your reliable sales associate suddenly
is coming to work with bags under
his eyes?

We all know people who have
faced the stress of a divorce, a diffi-
cult teen or an ill family member —
and shown signs of their troubled
personal lives at work. But as a boss
or co-worker, how do you respond?

Until recently, the experts would
tell you to stay out of employees’ per-
sonal lives. But there’s a growing



MARK LENNIHAN/AP

FOOD PRICES CLIMB: Food prices increased 0.7 percent, the biggest
rise since the spring of 2005, as the cost of dairy products, fruits
and vegetables all showed big gains. Above, New Yorkers shop
for fruit at a produce stand on Wednesday.

Indicators followed a much larger
0.6 percent December increase and
was lower than the 0.2 percent
advance that analysts were expect-
ing.

While energy prices dropped by
1.5 percent, food prices were up 0.7

army of employers and co-workers
who believe they should get involved.

“Sometimes as a boss, you have a
social responsibility
to cross that fine
line,” says Carol
Flynn of Miami’s HR
Solutions.

Just look at the
bizarre case of Lisa
Marie Nowak, the
astronaut charged
with the attempted
murder of a romantic
rival. Nowak had allegedly been
stalking her rival for two months.



CINDY KRISCHER
GOODMAN.

cgoodman@
MiamiHerald.com

percent, the biggest rise since the
spring of 2005, as the cost of dairy
products, fruits and vegetables all
showed big gains.

The cost of medical care shot up

* TURN TO ECONOMY, 4B

When NASA learned of Nowak’s
arrest, they put her on a 30-day leave
and relieved her from mission duties.
Agency spokesman John Ira Petty at
the Johnson Space Center in Houston
said he was concerned about the peo-
ple involved and their families. But,
he added, “We try not to concern
ourselves with our employees’ per-
sonal lives.”

The public outcry: Why not?

“With the hours people are put-
ting in, telecommuting and virtual
offices, work does bleed into per-
sonal lives,” Flynn says. “Our private
lives just aren’t as, private anymo.e.”









-

nent rate raise, also rebounded after
the move, trading at 120.44 yen, as
another rate hike is unlikely for
months,

Views had been split over what
the bank would do amid mixed sig-
nals from recent economic indica-
tors. f

Last week, the government said

* TURN TO JAPAN, 4B

Payday
lenders
tout |
changes

i Consumers are usually offered
quick cash advances that would
have to be repaid once they got
their next paycheck by certain
lenders. But now those lenders
are offering to give customers
more time to repay the loan with
no financial penalty.

BY SAM HANANEL

’ Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Under pres-
sure from lawmakers and consumer
groups, the payday lending industry
on Wednesday announced changes
to educate borrowers and help cus-

‘=tomers who have trouble: making ~

payments on short-term loans.
Consumer advocates called the
move a public relations gimmick
aimed at discouraging state legisla-
tures and Congress from limiting the
annual interest rates on payday loans,

’ which can exceed 400 percent.

_ cycle of

Payday lenders offer quick cash
advances —
for a fee —
that custom-
ers must
repay once
they receive
their next
paycheck.
Borrowers
who cannot
repay the
loan by the
next payday
often “roll
the
loan repeat-
edly, leading
to more
charges that
can quickly
add up and
lead to a

debt.

““We’ve
heard the
concerns raised about our industry
by policy makers and customers and‘
by. responsible consumer groups,”
said Darrin Andersen, president of
the Community Financial Services
Association of America, a trade asso-
ciation that represents about half the
payday lending stores.

The biggest change would give
customers more time to pay back a
loan with no financial penalty. This
“extended payment plan” would be
available at least once a year and pro-
vide borrowers between two and



* TURN TO PAYDAY, 4B

The risk is real. Laws such as the
American Disability Act, the Family
Medical Leave Act and the Health
Insurance Portability and Account-
ability Act protect workers’ privacy
and prevent retaliation. An employer
could be sued for learning informa-
tion about an employee and then fir-
ing that worker.

But even as Miami employment
attorney Mark Cheskin advises his
clients not to prod, he says some
employers are pushing back. They
feel they owe it to good employees,

*TURN TO BALANCING ACT, 4B





PAGE 10, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007

&









BEREESE 2S MONDAY
@ HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public of its
meeting times and places: New Providence Community
Centre: Mondays - 6pm to. 7pm. The Kirk: Mondays -
7:30pm to 8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support group
meets the first Monday of each month at 6:30pm at New
Providence Community Centre, Blake Road. Dinner is
provided and free blood sugar, blood pressure and cho-
lesterol testing is available. For more info call 702.4646 or
327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third Monday
of every month ‘at 6pm. @ Doctors Hospital conference
room.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial
Hilton Monday's at 7pm © Club 612315 meets Monday
6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach ¢ Club
3596 meets at the British Colonia! Hilton Mondays at
7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC)
meets every third Monday of the month in the Board
Room of the British Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.

TUESDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public of its
meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta
Street: Tuesday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at 5:30pm on
the second Tuesday of each month at their Headquarters
at East Terrace, Centreville. Call 323.4482 for more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held 6:30pm
Tuesdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes location (off
Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval is required. Call

364.8423 to register for more info.



@ CIVIC CLUBS

day at 7:30pm at the Holy Cross Community Centre;
Highbury Park.

The Luncheon Pilot Club of Nassau meets every third
Tuesday at SuperClubs Breezes, Cable Beach at 12:30pm.
We invite all community minded persons to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7:30pm @ CC
Sweeting Senior School's Dining Room, College Avenue
off Moss Road. ¢ Club Cousteau 7343 meets Tuesdays at
7:30pm in the Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh Creek, Central
Andros ¢ Club 7178 meets each Tuesday at 6pm at the
Cancer Society of the Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centre-
ville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Eta Psi Omega chapter
meets every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ the Eleuthera
Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach «
Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second Tuesday,
6:30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office, 4th floor meeting
room ¢ Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first
Tuesday, 6:30pm at the British Colonial Hilton. Please call
502.4842/377.4589 for more info.

The Downtown Pilot Club of Nassau meets every third
Tuesday of the month at 6pm at the J P Whitney Building,
First Terrace, Collins Avenue.

The Bahamian Forum will hold its next meeting Tuesday,
February 27 at 5:45pm at the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel. Distinguished attorney Brian Moree, senior part-
ner of McKinney, Bancroft and Hughes, and Chairman of
the Bahamas Financial Forum, will examine legal aspects
and implications raised by Anna Nicole’s celebrated res-
idency in the Bahamas in "The Anna Nicole Saga: Lessons
Learned and Challenges Raised for the Bahamas". Dr
David Allen will moderate the discussion which is open to

‘the public.

’ WEDNESDAY

B PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar every
Wednesday Spm-8pm. Free appetizers and numerous
drink specials. .

@ HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public of its

“meeting times and places: New Providence Community

Centre: Wednesday - 7pm to 8pm. The Nassau Group:
Rosetta Street, Wednesday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm. ;

FREE Health and Wellness Lectures are held the first
Wednesday of every month at 6:30pm at New Providence
Community Center Blake Road. For more information
call 327.1660 or 327.2878, FREE Blood Pressure, Blood
Sugar and Cholesterol Screening.

thtintnsemist srs nase anenteneactanpnacnttecniae is raseentnsoneannecensesassnsenes

"The brewery of The Bahamas"

“SAMS ASCO INA NER eee etn rere reno ements neem NNER





SS

the me Rae



“featuring

& lrtetiwds

- Special guest appearences by:

Simeon Outten

Live Recording & Concert!

Elder Vanderson A. Barnett:

Pastor Arthur Duncombe






Sunday March 4", 2007

@ Living Waters Auditorium at 7pm

Ticket Lacations:



The Cancer Society of the Bahamas Support Group meets
every Wednesday from 5:30pm to 7pm at Cancer Head-
quarters, two doors south of ZNS. Cancer patients, sur- -

.. vivors, their family members and friends are invited yaw



senorassontan

eae ee trend. PHONG SEF 4482
The Kiwanis Club of New Providétice meets Wery Tues."



isi

end ‘ nil
@ CIVIC CLUBS
The Rotary Club of SouthEast Nassau meets every
Wednesday from 1pm - 2pm at East Villa Restaurant,
East Bay Street. Always an interesting speaker and great
fellowship. If you would like to attend our meetings
please send an e-mail to bruno.pletscher@gottardo.com or
kathyvsmith@hotmail:com.

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta Sigma
Theta Sorority Incorporated meets 6:30pm every third
Wednesday at the Bahamias National Pride Building.

International Training in Communication, Essence Club
#3173 holds it’s bi-monthly meetings on the 1st and 3rd
Wednesday of each month at Doctor's Hospital Confer-
ence Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets the sec-
ond and fourth Wednesday of the month, 8pm @ St
Augustine's Monastery.

The Kiwanis Club of Cable Beach invites the public to its
regular weekly meeting held every Wednesday at 7:30pm
at the British Colonial Hilton. Kiwanis is a worldwide
service organisation dedicated to changing the world One
Child, One Community at a times"

School and Community Nature Walk and Petting Zoo -
Free Every Wednesday from !Oam to 2:30pm at Earth
Village Ranch, St Albans Drive and Columbus Avenue
(Chippingham). Call (242) 356.2274 now to make reser-
vations. Open to all ages and groups Monday-Sunday
from 9am to 6pm. Inquire about additional activities and
programmes. _

TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday on the 4th floor of
the Ministry of Health, Meeting Street, at
6pm. :

THURSDAY



@ ENTERTAINMENT

Shadowhand Entertainment presents an all Bahamian
Talent Explosion this and every Thursday night at the
Patio Bar & Grill on Carmichael Road.. This event fea-
tures upcoming Bahamian artist who are ready to show-
case their original material to the world. There will also be
a freestyle competition every week which is open to the
public at large. Doors open at 8:30pm. Ladies free until
11pm ; Gentlemen - small door charge. See u there.

@ HEALTH

Free public health lectures featuring distinguished physi-
cians are held at Doctors Hospital every third Thursday
of the month at 6pm in the Doctors Hospital Confer-
ence Room. Free screenings between Spm & 6pm. For
more information call 302.4603.

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public its







\.
Bible BOoRSGift Shop

meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta

Street: Thursday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. The-

Kirk: Thursdays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held 6:30pm
Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes location (off
Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval is required. Call
364.8423 to register for more info. :

REACH - Resources & Education for Autism and Relat-
ed Challenges meets from 7pm - 9pm the second Thurs-
day of each month in the cafeteria of the BEC building,
Blue Hill Road.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise has a breakfast meet-
ing every Thursday moming at 7am at the British Colonial
Hilton Hotel (Fellowship begins at 6:45am).

The Kiwanis Club of Over-the-Hill meets every Thursday
at 8pm at the Holy Cross Activity Centre, Soldier Road.
Guests are welcome.

Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first, second and
third Thursday at the Ministry of Health & Environment
building on Meeting Street commencing at 7:30pm. Every-
one is welcome to attend « TM Club 1600 meets Thursday,
8:30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes.

International Association of Administrative Profession-
als, Bahamas Chapter meets the third Thursday of every
month @ SuperClubs Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.

The recently established National Insurance Board
Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets every fourth Thurs-
day in the month, in the National Insurance Board's
(NIB) training room, Wulf Road office complex, at 6pm.
All retirees are welcome.

The Rotary Club of West Nassau holds its weekly meet-
ing, every Thursday at Choices Restaurant on the campus
of the College of the Bahamas. Fellowship starts at
12:30pm, with the meeting held from 1pm to 2pm.

‘ s

@ CONCERT ‘
Chariots of Fire Album release concert: Come see and
hear the best in gospel music, with performances by Selec-
tor, Manifest, Counsellor, Mr Lynx, Christian Massive
and internationally acclaimed recording artist Landlord
and many more, February 23 @ 7:30pm at Workers
House, Tonique Williams Darling Highway. Box Offices
@ the Juke Box, Oasis Music Centre, and Faith Life
Book Store. Fore More information call 544.8078 or
455.3067 ;

FRIDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public of its
meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta
Street: Friday 6pm to 7pm & 8:30pm to 9:30pm. Sacred
Heart Church: Friday 6pm to 7pm. New Providence Com-
munity Centre: Friday 7pm to 8pm.

Mm CIVIC CLUBS |
TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas Baptist
Community College Rm A19, Jean St.








THE TRIBUNI

|

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Friday of |
each month, 7:30pm at the Emmaus Centreat'St |
Augustine’s Monastery. For more info call 325.1947 after

4pm. ‘ 5 |

AMISTAD is a club which promotes the Spanish‘lan-
guage and culture in the community, Residents of the
Bahamas who speak Spanish or are learning Spanish ‘are
invited to attend meetings on the third Friday of the |
month during the academic year at 7pm in room 13 of

COB's Tourism Training Centre.

a‘
8
qs #

SATURDAY



M EVENTS f =
i)

The Pinewood Gardens Outreach Association is having its
[st annual Pinewood Fest, March 3 @ 7am - midnight at
Pinewood Gardens Park. Included in the days actiyities
are a breakfast and a Fun\Run and Walk @ 7am. Come
out and bring the entire family... Join the domino teams
and basketball tournaments, and many other games.
Bring your kids to the toddlers town and let them expe-
rience bouncing castles and carnival rides, games, face
painting, complimentary lunch from 1-2ipm. There willbe |
performances by Ancient Man, Lassie:Doh Boys, and |
internationally acclaimed recording artist Landlord and
many more. Come and see the Junkanoo Rush Out by the
Pinewood Gardens Crusaders Junkanoo Group. For mére
information call 392.1618 or 565-8870 5

@ HEALTH |
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public ofits
meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta
Street: Saturday mornings -1Oam to 11am. | :
Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third Satur-
day, 2:30pm (except August and December) @ the Nuts-
ing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street. oe ar |
Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes are offered
every third Saturday of the month from 9am-1pm. Contact
a Doctors Hospital Community Training Representative
at 302.4732 for more information and learn to save.@ life
today. 2
#
The Eugene Dupuch Law School Students’ Association |
presents - Race Judicata - A Fun Run/Power Walk, Sat- |
urday, March 3 at 6:30am. Tke race commences atthe
Culinary and Hospitality Institute, College offthe |
Bahamas, Thompson Boulevard. There will be tropfiies
and.medals, prizes and surprises. For route, details "and
tules, please see forms available at: the Eugene Dupuch
Law School Library, the Eugene Dupuch Law Schdol
Administrative Office, the Law Library, UWI, Collegé of
the Bahamas campus. Or call: 326.8507/8, 326.8867, or
Fax: 326.8504 or go to www.edls.edu.bs. It’s fun/.t’s
healthy — See you there!!! x

ty
@ CIVIC CLUBS ay
JAR CYCLING: The Owners of JAR Cycling arc pleased
to offer a cycling clinic for juniors between'10 and 17. The |
free clinic will be held every Saturday in an effort'to
encourage kids to cycle. Parents interested in Tegistefing |
their children should contact organisersyat |
jarcycling@gmail.com. »

#
Toastmasters Club 7178 10th Anniversary Banquet: Sat-
urday, March 17 at the British Colonial Hilton at 7pm. The
Club will honor it’s 10 past presidents in grand style. ‘For
tickets e-mail: prezsj@tc7178.org: A special invitation-is
extended to persons who were a part of or visited the club
during its earlier years. Come out to see old friends afid
toastmasters. The public is invited and guests are always
welcomed. .

om
ad






SUNDAY |
@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS "hy
& RESTAURANTS *
Traveller's Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street, features sBe-
ef
s

‘
i
4

cial entertainment - Gernie, Tabitha and the Caribbean
Express - very Sunday from 6:30pm to 9:30pm,

h
m HEALTH y
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public of its
meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta
Street: Sunday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. *y

@ RELIGIOUS SERVICES

7.

“
x, ,

+

>
The Bahamas Metaphysical Society Inc - A spiritital
teaching society leading you to greater peace of mind,
health, prosperity and happiness - holds Higher Con-
sciousness Services every Sunday at 10am and weekly |.
Meditation services every Wednesday at 7pm at Bowe'’s *
Cove off Bernard Road. Interested persons are welcqme ;
to attend. For more information contact by e-mail @ bath-

metsol@hotmail.com or call 393.0279, De)
"e
*

sseneneneaesenenseaenasssanensseanseaesesesesensseeassssesesseceesssaesesessescsearseseel he

*
*

Send all your civic and social events (attach picture$ ¢f
possible) to The Tribune via fax: 328.2398 or e-mail:
ybdeleveaux@tribunemedia.net - Out there in the subject
line. *

WORNAANAAAAATDHVY

{



Full Text




Sera aw

PAGE 2, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007



Union exec claims Our Lucaya
refusing to engage in relations |

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT —- A Bahamas
Hotel Catering and Allied
Workers Union executive
claims that management at Our
Lucaya Resort refuses to
engage in proper industrial rela-
tions with local union execu-
tives.

‘Lionel Morley, BHCAWU’s

second vice-president, said that

labour matters relating to hotel
workers at the resort are being
sent.“over their heads” to the
union’s office in New Provi-
dence.

Mr Morley expressed his dis-
appointment and grave concern
over the situation during a press
conference at Workers House
on Wednesday.

He believes that manage-

ment’s continued failure to
communicate with local union
executives is “a slap in the face”
to them.

“That is not in the spirit of
good faith, and is a slap in the
face of executives based on the
collective bargaining agreement

between the union and man- -

agement.”

Since winning the union’s
election in May, Mr Morley said
even though the newly-elected
officers have extended the ‘olive
branch’ to management they
continue to face ongoing com-
munication challenges.

“The reality is that...we still
have some internal problems
since the election, and Our
Lucaya believe they can dis-
seminate information to certain
persons in Nassau.

“We have three duly elected

Pe ie ee oe Oe Me er ee ee ee

officers here in Freeport and
this is not fair; it is not right
because the people have placed
great trust us.”

Mr Morley stressed that exec-
utives in Freeport should also
receive communication regard-
ing matters relating to its mem-
bers in Freeport. ;

“T want to say that if Our
Lucaya is going to remain on
the island of Grand Bahama,

and Lionel Morley and his col-

leagues are going to remain to
here, there must be a better
mode of operation and com-
munication.

“There must a clear under-
standing and constant engaging
with respect to dialogue and
consultation,” he advised.

Mr Morley said the union is
working to resolve a number of

- trade disputes filed against man-

agement. :

Although union executives
have been able to bring resolu-
tion to some matters, he said

‘many are still outstanding.

“We have matters which are
still sitting in some desk moving
very slowly with no real desire
to be resolved.

“We believe that Our Lucaya
is insensitive to the plight of the
workers, or they believe that
employees’ matters can be put
on the back burner.”

Mr Morley said the union
is also Very concerned about
the reduced work days of
employees who work only
three and four days during
peak season.

He said the hours are not
consistent with the seven-and-a-
half hours workday, after the
hotel has reached 55 per cent

occupancy. He also said that
persons are not being placed on
the schedule during slow period
‘discriminately.

“We have exercised great
restraints to allow the resort to
gain a proper footing during
these depressed economic times
in Grand Bahama.

“We wish to foster a rela-
tionship that is conducive to
the betterment of the industry
and our members, but they
seem very irresponsive to the
plight of our members,” Mr
Morley said.

“We have co-operated in the
spirit of the agreement, but we
cannot allow management to
violate our agreement blatantly.
All we are saying is for them to
sit down with us so we can
resolve many of the small prob-
lems,” he said. .

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Crew of Dominican
vessel are accused
of fishing in |
Bahamian waters




aye)

_ MIMAGES like this one, showing.a.stray. dog that frequents the. Arawak Cay area, are a

Dee) the potca



ia

A Peet

9) Ser es



testament to the fact that stray dogs pose a significant health risk. But not only are these
animals a hazard to humans, they are also suffering themselves












Cell us today & we will pul you

nassau
freeport t 2

(Photo: Tim Clarke)

RSTO

Bm By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

A DOMINICAN vessel was
apprehended off Ragged Island
on Wednesday under charges

i” of poaching in Bahamian waters

by the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force (RBDF).

The 70 foot vessel was in tow
to New Providence yesterday
and is expected to arrive at Pot-
ter’s Cay sometime this morn-

: . ing. However a second Domini-
can vessel which was appre- |

hended in the area escaped.
According to a release from
the Defence Force, 10 persons
were apprehended on board the
craft, along with an “undeter-
mined amount” of fishery prod-

~ She was OVERWHE LMED by all

the risks involved with.

starting her own business.

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ucts. ‘

Minister of Marine Resources
Leslie Miller said that the inter-
ception was done by the “Gua-
nahani”, a fishing vessel his min-
istry had recently donated to
the RBDF.

“This is yet another gross vio-
lation of the fishing laws of the
Bahamas,” Mr Miller said.

He congratulated the RBDF
for apprehending the two ves-
sels, and commented that it was
“a pity” that one of the vessels
got away.

Mr Miller said that his min-
istry will be initiating a new pro-

gramme between themselves, — :

the Ministry of National Secu-
rity and the RBDF to place
Defence Force officers on
major fishing vessels “from now
on”. He also said that his min-
istry will be handing over two
smaller boats to assist them in
apprehending poachers in
Bahamian waters.

“We just have to continue to’
be more vigilant, but everybody
has to play their part. In fact
we might go even further next
year and have some of the fish-
ermen become un-paid officers
or guardians so they themselves
would be in a position to,appre-
hend. Because this is a serious
problem we have to deal with,”
he said.

The vessel and its goods are
expected to confiscated and
handed over to the Ministry of
Finance. Officers are expected
to be posted at the dock to
secure the vessel, as the theft
of goods and equipment from
such boats have been a matter
of some concern.



from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

SS

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

THE TRIBUNE



15-year-old
dies after
bike collides
with truck

THE Bahamas recorded

r
’
“

A

“,

»
Â¥.

a

‘ee

oO,

its fifth traffic fatality of the ..’
year on Wednesday when a °.

15-year-old boy died in hos- ..

pital following a collision near

East Avenue and Carmichael -

Road.

Police have identified the ~

victim as Bernard Rolle, 15, .“

of McKinney Avenue. He
was reportedly riding an unli- ~'

censed blue and white dirt

bumper trail motorbike,
heading north on East.

Avenue around 4pm, when

he collided with a green 1985,
Mack truck travelling west on ..

Carmichael Road.

The truck is owned by >
Aquapure water company. «

The driver received no seri- '

ous injuries but the young

boy was taken to hospital :

where he died. Police are
investigating.

US commerce
secretary sees
no change on
Cuban policy

lj WASHINGTON

| US Commerce Secretary ‘
said
Wednesday it would be a ”

Carlos Gutierrez
“sreat disservice” for the
Cuban people if the United
States eased economic and
political ties with the island

in the post-Fidel Castro era, 2

according to Associated press.

“Cuba is at a critical point +

in its history,” Gutierrez said.
“The country is poised for

change. The policy of the :

Bush administration has been
to help the Cuban people
achieve their ‘freedom
through democratic change.”

Gutierrez serves as co- .

chairman of an official com-
mission which made recom-
mendations for Cuba policy

after Castro passes from the. 4;

scene.-He spoke to the Coun- ©

cil of the Americas, a pro-
business group.

Gutierrez’s speech was .

devoted mostly to the plight
of the Cuban people under
the system Castro created 48

years ago. He omitted any ~~

reference to Castro’s broth- '

er Raul, who has served as
acting president since the 80-
year old leader fell ill last
July.

In an interview with The :

Associated Press, Gutierrez
said, “Now isn’t the time to

ease the restrictions” on US :,.

ties with Cuba.

But there has been growing
interest in a reassessment of
policy toward Cuba follow-
ing Castro’s illness and the
emergence of the emergence
of a Democratic-controlled
Congress. The centerpiece of

: US. policy is the 45-year-old
i US. trade embargo.













a et LE FO EL a re
THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007, PAGE 3





In brief —

Guana Cay
campaigners
says concerns
are bypassed

THE Save Guana Cay Asso-
ciation is continuing its fight
against the Baker’s Bay devel-
opers, claiming that the con-
cerns of residents are being
bypassed by local government.

The association is opposing
building applications and per-
mits which they claim have been
awarded to the developers for
projects “each ranging from
$600,000 to $1.6 million for
buildings at Great Guana Cay.”

In a letter to the Hope Town
District Council, the association
said: “Despite our many
requests to central government,
to the Attorney General and to
the administrator, no-one has
seen fit to provide the citizens of
Great Guana Cay with copies
of either the applications or the
permits issued.”

The association said if it con-
firms that these new building per-
mits have been granted it “will
take appropriate action to seek
to quash those decisions.”

“We therefore take this
opportunity to ask you to please
provide us with copies of any
applications and/or permits that
have previously been made of
which your council or the
administrator is aware, either
to the central government and
its agencies and/or to the dis-
trict council and/or such as may
have been issued by the admin-
istrator to the council,” the asso-
ciation said in its letter to Hope
Town District Council.

The Save Guana Cay Asso-
ciation also announced that it
will soon challenge the legali-
ty of the proceedings approved
by the district council, alleg-
ing that some of its members
were appointed and not elect-
ed to office.

“Local government is all
about local rights and taking
into account the views and
allowing those who are most
closely affected by the proposed
developments to be consuited
and to have their views prop-
erly considered.

“The district council is statu-

torily supposed to be represen-
tative of the citizens, residents
and landowners of the district,”
the letter said.

The Save Guana Cay Associ-
ation reiterated that they are
opposed to the scale, scope and
extent of the proposed devel-
opment.

“As you are aware, our
clients complained of the exten-
sive environmental, social and
cultural damage as well as the
destruction of their traditional
way of life,” the association said.

Two men are
charged after
huge seizure ©
of marijuana

TWO men were arraigned

-in magistrate’s court yesterday

charged in connection with the

seizure of over $600,000 worth

of marijuana on Andros earlier
this week.

Ron Alfred Thurston, 34, and
Christopher Remourn Ebanks,
alias Christopher Outten, 34,
both of New Providence, were
arraigned before magistrate
Carolita Bethel at Court Eight,
Bank Lane, on several drug
charges, including conspiracy to
possess marijuana and impor-
tation of marijuana.

The men are represented by
attorney Michael Kemp. Both
pleaded not guilty to the drug
charges. Ebanks also pleaded
not guilty to the charge of deceit
of a public officer.

According to a court docket,
on Monday, February 19, 2007,
he deceived a police officer by
claiming that his name was
Christopher Outten, knowing
that was false information.

According to the prosecution,
the men are accused of posses-
siing 630,000 pounds of mari-
juana with an estimated street
value of $630,000.

Both were remanded to
prison and will return to court
on March.2, when a bail hearing
is scheduled to take place.

According to reports, around
1pm on Monday, DEU, Coast
Guard and DEA officers, while
on routine patrol, discovered a
white, red, and gold Aztec air-
craft on a dirt road in North
Andros.

Officers seized 16 crocus
sacks, one duffle bag, and one
plastic bag of marijuana.

aan
Bee)

ee EU ae
» PHONE: 322-2157



Stubbs defends constituency
record after attack by Bethel

@ By BRENT DEAN

SUGGESTING that Carl
Bethel is grasping at straws,
Sidney Stubbs, MP for Holy
Cross, refuted claims that he
did not have a constituency
office for two years, and
defended his record as a rep-
resentative of the area.

Mr Bethel alleged that Mr
Stubbs had not had an office
for nearly two years when he
spoke at the FNM rally at R
M Bailey park.

This raised the question as

to what was done with the
$18,000 that is allocated annu-
ally to all MPs for such an
office.

Mr Stubbs said his office
was only closed for a few
months during his term in
office because he was forced
-to change office locations.

“Our office was closed for a
few months while we were
looking for a new office. We
have a new office on Joe Far-
rington Road opposite Texa-
co service station painted in
the PLP colours,” Mr Stubbs

stated.

Mr Bethel also criticised Mr
Stubbs and the government for
not having created an adequate
‘number of public spaces in new
residential communities in
Holy Cross.

Mr Stubbs said a new park
was created in Hope Gardens
and that he has also created a
self-help entrepreneurial pro-
gramme, where young people
in Holy Cross have the con-
tracts to clean these parks.

According to Mr Stubbs,
fuhds for this programme come

Anna Nicole’s daughter
still to remain on island

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE

THE injunction blocking
the removal of the five-month-
old daughter of deceased real-
ity TV star Anna Nicole Smith
from the Bahamas is still in
effect after attorneys repre-
senting all parties in the
guardianship dispute appeared
in Supreme Court yesterday.

Last week, Smith’s mother
Virgie Arthur received an
injunction blocking the
removal of her granddaughter
Dannielynn from _ the
Bahamas. Arthur wants to be
named the legal guardian of
the child.

The injunction now contin-
ues until Monday, when all
parties are expected to return
to court.

Attorneys exited to a swarm
of international media after
two hours in closed court.
Some US media agencies had
been camped out just a few
feet away from the Supreme
Court complex since early
Thursday.

Attorney Jamal Davis, rep-
resenting Smith’s mother Vir-
gie Arthur, spoke with the Tri-
bune after the closed court ses-
sion yesterday.

“Today we made submis-
sions to try and get the
guardianship issue determined.
“Prior to those submission
there was an application to
decide whether the procedure
is the most conducive proce-
dure to the continuance of the
application for guardianship.
There was an application for
the paternity issue between
Larry Birkhead and Howard
Stern,” Mr Davis said. “So the
application now is to really to
have all of these actions com-
bined into one. So it has to be
determined now whether the
application launched on behalf
of Ms Arthur is the most con-
ducive to have all of these
actions disposed of at one time

‘and that is where we are at

now,” Mr Davis said.
Attorney Wayne Munroe,
who is representing Howard
Stern, Smith’s companion, was
tight-lipped on the court’s pro-
ceedings. “I cannot tell you
what was discussed apart from



@ JAMAL Davis, one of the attorneys of Virgie Arthur,
answers questions after the court hearing concerning

Dannielynn’s guardianship





@ THE international and local press flood the steps of the
Supreme Court during the hearing ,

the fact that there were pro-
cedural discussions and that
the injunction continues until
Monday,” Mr Munroe said
outside court yesterday.

A decision has not yet been
made on who gets custody of
the five-month-old girl.

Three men claim to have

. fathered the baby girl, who

could potentially inherit a mul-
ti-million dollar fortune. Since
the death in 1995 of her 90-
year-old husband, Texas oil
tycoon Howard Marshall,
Smith had been waging a court
battle over his estate.

Smith gave birth to her
daughter on September 7,

(Photos: Ana Bianca Marin)

three days before her 20-year-
old son Daniel died while vis-
iting her in a Nassau hospital.
A birth certificate lists Stern
as the girl's father but Smith's
former boyfriend Larry Birk-
head has gone to court in
Florida in pursuit of DNA
testing to prove he is the
father. Prince Frederic von
Anhalt, the husband of the

-actress Zsa Zsa Gabor, has

said he had a decade-long
affair with Smith and will file
his own paternity challenge.
Smith, 39, died at a South
Florida hospital after being
discovered unconscious in her
hotel room.

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In regard to Lynden Pin-
dling Estates and Kool Acres,
where Mr Bethel criticised the
government for not having cre-
ated public parks, Mr Stubbs

said he is working with the gov-.

ernment to locate green spaces
for these communities.

Mr Stubbs also took credit
for having paved roads in resi-
dential communities such as
Kool Acres, while criticising



the FNM for having left parts
of these roads in poor condi-
tion during their administra-
tion.

Mr Stubbs did not comment
on whether or not he will again
receive the nomination for
Holy Cross.

. Rumours have emerged
suggesting that Mr Stubbs may
not be nominated as a result
of the controversies that sur-
rounded him as chairman of
BAIC, along with his much
publicised bankruptcy trial.



HM WAYNE Munroe, the attorney for Howard K Stern, leaves
the Supreme Court amidst a sea of press

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007

oat >

ee ee eS ee ee ee

se Bigs a ee ee ee

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO.THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE












































































































































































The Tribune Limited |

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI

Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398



Bahamians want to move on

WE WERE in the US this week and so
missed both political rallies and all the brouha-
ha resulting from them.

Although we have much catching up to do,
we were quickly brought up to date by a bag-
gage handler on arriving at the airport yesterday
and callers on a talk-show that we listened to on
the drive to town from the airport.

Apparently we were the first customer that
the young baggage handler had had for the day.
A look around the Customs area did not show
promise of him having another customer from
that flight, and so he was happy to walk our
luggage from the arrival lounge to the car park.
Asked where we had parked our car we
described the area as down the pedestrian path
that rain or shine always has a large puddle of
water in the middle. That seemed to press a
sensitive button.

“Oh, Lord,” he said looking skyward, “we
can’t wait to get Hubert back! You watch the
first thing he’s going to do is get this airport
straight.”

We don’t think he knew who we were as he
tried to put us in the political picture. He said
that all the government party wanted to talk
was race. “But, I thought that was all behind
us,” he said. “We have no time for that. I don’t
know where they are, but we have moved on.
We want to work together. We want to be one
people.”

It has always struck us as strange that come
election time, the PLP has had to — in one way
or another — insert the race card to create divi-
sion and envy among a people who otherwise
live in harmony.

Years ago ZNS-TV was rushed into exis-
tence to arouse racial animosity by the showing
of “Roots”. The film was so effective that it
took Bahamians’ minds off the issues of the
day and the failings of the PLP and turned them
to root among their own past to dredge up old
wounds and suspicions. Each succeeding elec-
tion Roots was dragged from the closet until
people objected.

The late Sir Lynden Pindling was a master of
divide and rule — and he certainly kept this
nation divided. However, the tactic reveals the
inferiority complexes under which many of our
leaders still labour. They are complexes that
they want to play on to control the Bahamian
people.

But as the years roll by, their game is losing
its appeal. Young people today don’t know
much about Sir Lynden — one young person
had a vague idea that at some stage in our his;
tory, he was a prime minister. Nor did he know

the background of Independence. And what .

was even more interesting, he was not the least
bit interested in learning anything about either.
He had moved on. He was reaching to the

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future, looking straight ahead, not back over
his shoulder. As one young man once said to us:
“Give me a clipped version — I have no time for
more.”

The PLP were often out of step with Bahami- .

ans. We remember when PLP politicians were
still talking about JP Sands and his segregated

grocery store on Bay Street to Bahamians who

had no idea who JP Sands was.

As the young baggage handler said: “We
have moved on, we want to live as one people
— we want Hubert!” .

When we got to our car we switched on the
radio and listened to the end of a lively talk
show with a caller claiming that Mr Ingraham
had committed treason. From what the next
caller said in reply we got the impression that
Mr Ingraham had been accused of treason
because he had offered for a third term as prime
minister. The second caller had to remind the
first that this was nothing unusual in the
Caribbean. He recalled that Michael Manley
had come back to lead Jamaica after being
defeated and out of office for several years,
and Sir John Compton, the father of St Lucia’s
Independence, was called out of retirement at
the age of 81 to again lead that country to vic-
tory in the December elections. Sir John had
led St Lucia for 29 years.

Another caller to the show felt that race had
been blown out of all proportion. He pointed
out that the rich white man did far more for
the poor black man, than the rich black man did
for his own people.

Another commented on the prime minis-
ter’s praise of former housing minister Shane
Gibson for the number of low cost houses built
during his administration. The caller said he
was not interested in the numbers, he was inter-
ested in. the quality of the work — and accord-
ing to owners’ complaints, Mr Gibson had pro-
duced numbers, but not quality.

He was annoyed that the Prime Minister
was still praising Mr Gibson. When a minister
does wrong, the Prime Minister should admit
the wrong, and move on, said the caller.

And, according to PLP chairman Raynard
Rigby, the PLP is “fighting a campaign on phi-
losophy, not race.”

If it’s philosophy they’re fighting then they
have lost most of the people who won’t wait

around to hear even a “clipped version.”

Many Bahamians are tired of the clap-trap.
For them, Hubert Ingraham is not the issue,
but crime is, so is the proliferation of drugs,
over-crowded schools, and sub-standard health
care. There is unrest among certain areas of
the civil service over unresolved matters of pay.

Today Bahamians want to feel safe in their
homes, in their jobs, in the future — they have
no time for a debate on PLP philosophy.


















Gibson has no
one to blame
~ but himself

EDITOR, The Tribune.

“WHATEVER may have
been his lapses in personal
judgment, whatever may have
been his indiscretions or errors
of judgment, I accept his word
when he says he had no sexu-
al affair or no sexual miscon-
‘duct with Anna Nicole Smith.
I accept that. I accept that
because his wife, Jackie, who
is a minister of religion in Mt
Tabor Church and formerly
in the Church of God of
Prophecy, I know to be a
woman of God and I knew
based on what she has said she
was as much a friend of Anna
Nicole Smith as her husband.”

The prime minister said, “I
am satisfied that Shane Gib-
son is fully aware of how he
must go about making this
fight to remove this stain that
they have purposefully put on
shim. I know and I believe that
he is aware that he must do
the right thing.”

Those are the words of an
obviously confused Prime
Minister. Well for starters
Shane’s resignation is the right
thing to do. Period. Mr Shane
Gibson has nobody to blame
but himself. He has brought
this on himself. To make a
conspiracy of this matter and
to suggest that he was set up is
to really try to cloud and mud-
dy the issue.

The issue is really as clear as
plastic!

Did the minister act inap-
propriately by befriending
Anna Nicole to the point that
he can be caught dead or alive
in the bedroom of a morally
challenged celebrity like
Nicole? One must remember
that Nicole’s reputation pre-
ceded her. Want for a better
word she was in fact a sleaze
queen. In fact one would think
that a religious man like Shane
would not put this woman on
a pedestal or role model for
anyone let alone put himself in
the midst of such an unholy
mess. Shane’s arrogance was
such that even after the per-
manent residence scandal,
which in my opinion was bad
in and of itself, Shane never-
theless continued a very close
friendship with Anna! It
would have been a very simple
matter for Shane to take note
of the fact that Anna’s resi-
dency permit was indeed a hot
potato and with allegations to

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LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net

_ the effect that the minister had

fast tracked the permit of
Anna and may have acted
inappropriately by accepting
the cheque payable to the
Treasury for the permit at
Anna’s residence.

The irony of those photos
of Shane on the bed with
Anna, fully clothed by the
way, lends credence to Tracey
Ferguson, a lawyer in the firm
of Calendars’ allegation that
the minister received the per-
manent residence cheque at
Anna’s residence — which the
minister has denied — and
possibly in her bedroom! And
with all of this accusation,
Shane never once thought
about himself, as a minister of
cabinet and that, like the wife
of Caesar, he should be above
reproach.

In fact Shane showed just
what he thought of his cabi-

net position and the Bahami-
an people when asked if he
ever thought that his relation-
ship was inappropriate with
Anna. He said she was a
friend! In other words his
friendship with a woman by
his own admission he met late
last year was more compelling
than his obligation to. the
Bahamian people. What gross
disrespect to his Prime Min-
ister and to the Bahamian
people!

So Christie and his sympa-
thisers can try to cloud the
issue with conspiracy theories
and the likes, but the truth of
the matter is that former Min-
ster Shane Gibson showed
gross disrespect for the posi-
tion he once held and brought
international shame and
embarrassment to the
Bahamas, his colleagues and
family. The blame should go
no further than at his
doorstep!

STEPHEN ROLLE
Nassau,
February 19, 2007.

The design of the
new Straw Market

EDITOR, The Tribune.

BEING well informed in the construction industry I’m surprised
by Minister Roberts’ statement that the cost of the proposed straw
market was way off the Richter scale by comparison to the cost sug-
gested by the quantity surveyor. At a $13 million estimate the

ft.

building being approximately 160,000 sq ft would give $81.25 per sq

Now if Minister Roberts and if his quantity surveyor have been
involved in construction for any duration of time in the Bahamas or
the Caribbean a construction cost of $81.25 per sq ft would be
unbelievable. In fact a cost of $81.25 per sq ft in North America '
would be unbelievable. The design of the New Straw Market is first

convoluted to say the least.

There are a variety of different mediums in its construction,
structural steel, reinforced concrete and precast, making this a
logistical nightmare just trying to find space to store these materi- |
als which only added more cost to this project. There was a base-
ment in the original design that’s been removed.

A ridiculous concept with the ocean only a few feet away and
even more ridiculous was the fact that the transformers and gen-
erator were housed in the basement. And what’s that crazy tower
all about. Actually I feel that the whole design is poor. This build-
ing should have been a four or five storey building with the vendor’s °
being on the ground and first floors and paid parking on the upper ;

floors.

This would give some revenue to help pay for the building. Stop
all parking on Bay Street. Make an area for bus stopping further off
Bay Street than existing and enforce that. Let’s get real, Minister
Roberts, and redesign this building and at least make it functional. ,

INFORMED
Nassau,
February, 2007.

Technical
Scholarships
available

¢

$7,500 Lyford Cay Foundation
Technical Training Awards

Train for careers in

Agriculture/agribusiness
ir conditioning/refrigeration
Auto, marine & aviation
mechanics
Construction & related trades
Diesel technology &
mechanics
Heavy equipment operation
Machine shop/welding
Computer service technology
Hospitality & tourism
Technical instruction &
education
Health care, medical
technology & more

Apply today
Applicants must be
Bahamian with high school diploma
Plan to pursue a vocation valuable to The Bahamas
Pledge to return to The Bahamas upon graduation
Other qualifications may apply

Applications available from The Manager's Office, BTVI,
or write to Technical Training Scholarships,
Lyford Cay Foundation, P.O. Box N 7776, Nassau.
or online at www.lyfordcayfoundation.com

_ DEADLINE TO SUBMIT COMPLETED APPLICATION MAY 1, 2007



SS
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007, PAGE 5





Daylight
saving time
policy to
change

IN March this year, the
Bahamas will adopt a new
policy on daylight saving
time.

It will begin at 2am on the
second Sunday in March,
2007, instead of the first Sun-
day in April, and will contin-
ue until 2am on the first Sun-
day in November, 2007,
instead of the last Sunday in
October.

Consequently, daylight sav-
ing time will be observed
from Sunday, March 11, to
Sunday, November 4, 2007.

The Bahamas joins Aus-
tralia, Canada and the United
States in adopting the new
system.

Dominican
Republic
economy
grows 10.7%

@ DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
Santo Domingo

THE Dominican Repub-
lic’s economy in 2006 experi-
enced its highest growth in
almost two decades, the Cen-
tral Bank said Monday,
according to Associated Press.

Gross domestic product
grew 10.7 per cent as infla-

tion fell to 5 percent, marking 3

a continued recovery from a

2003 banking crisis that i

wiped out much of the coun-
try’s economy.

Construction, communica-
tions and the financial sector
grew the most over the year,
each registering more than
20 per cent growth.

The country’s free-trade
zones, facing increased com-
petition for the US market,
declined 8.3 per cent.
Nonetheless, more than
61,000 jobs were created and
unemployment dropped to
16 per cent.

Overall, it was the best per-
formance since 1987, the
bank said. ee

Share
your
neuvws

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Call us

} on 322-1986 and share
your story.

Se) ee ee Rs (a
_ Fertilizer, Fungicide, -
Pest Control
Tropical CEL

822-2157

GRR ees

FRIDAY,
FEBRUARY 23RD

11:00 Immediate Response
Noon ZNS News Update
12:05 Immediate Response





















Cont'd

1:00. Legends: James Catalyn

2:00 One Cubed

2:30 Turning Point

3:00 Fellowship Of Christians
& Jews

3:30 Ed Young

4:00 The Fun Farm

5:00 ZNS News Update

5:05 The Envy Life

5:30 World Stage Bahamas:
Duke E. Strachan

6:00 Caribbean Passport

6:30 News Night 13

7:00 - The Bahamas Tonight

8:00 55 Degrees North

9:00 Hugh Campbell Courtside
Express

9:15 Gillette World Sports




3 D' Funk Studio

10:00 Caribbean Newsline

} 10:30 News Night 13

11:00. The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30 Community Page 1540 am

SATURDAY,

FEBRUARY 24TH
6:30am Community Page 1540AM

| 9:30














9:00 Bahamas @ Sunrise
10:00 Int'l Fit Dance

10:30 Dennis The Menace
11:00 Carmen San Diego
11:30 Little Robots

noon Underdog




NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
right to make last minute
programme changes!








m@ By BRENT DEAN

THE use of race in the PLP’s

campaign has sparked much

public debate and outrage.
Elements in the party appear

determined to scare voters into

thinking that the FNM is.set to.

re-enslave the black majority
by handing over the govern-
ment to ‘hidden forces’ — an

: allusion to white Bahamians.

Some commentators suggest
that the playing of the so-called
‘race card’ is a sign of despera-
tion by the PLP in what now
appears to be a close election.

Consequently, The Tribune
spoke to several young white
Bahamians to get their impres-
sions on the PLP’s strategy of
resurrecting race as a campaign
issue in the upcoming election.

James stated that the attempt
to link modern white Bahami-
ans with the actions of the old
white Bahamian oligarchy many
decades ago is irresponsible and
unfortunate.

He stated: “I just think that it
is very old. That’s the first thing
that I think about. It’s tired,
played out and has been done
too many times. It’s 2007 and
far too long past the UBP days
to continue to talk about this.
Race is an old tired theme.”

James has become accus-

tomed to the PLP raising this
theme around election time. As
a younger person, he recalled
being offended by the deroga-
tory references that emerged
about white Bahamians, via
PLP rhetoric.

However, as an adult, he said
that he ignores this type of dis-
course.

For James, it is “laughable”
for a Bahamian political party
to engage in racial politics at
this stage of the country’s
development.

Another commentator, Scott,
argued that the PLP’s use of
race is a desperate ploy to take
attention away from the party’s
inadequacies. He stated:

“I think it reeks of despera-
tion. To go to an issue like that
is clearly a tactic to divert atten-
tion from the real issues they
cannot answer for.”

Scott, too, is not offended by
this political rhetoric, as he
thinks the party does not even
believe the anti-white messages
it sometimes proclaims. Rather,
he suggested that the party may
be attempting to use the strong
emotions associated with race
to rally certain sectors of the
electorate.

Scott suggested that the
progress made in this country
surrounding race relations and

Are voters bored
of the ‘race card’
being employed?

economic development, in com-
parison to our regional partners,
should be the focus of political
parties, instead of the demoni-
sation of any particular racial
group.

He said: “I think that we are
probably the luckiest place in
the Caribbean in terms of race
relations. It really is not the
issue here that it is for other
countries like Jamaica.”

Laura, too, agreed that no
party should use race as a mere
political tool to rally public sup-

ort.

She stated that “at this point
and time it is probably inap-
propriate and un-called for.”

Acknowledging that some
Bahamians — both black and
white — still hold racial bias,
Laura argued that discussions
about race should be undertak-
en responsibly, rather than
through fear inspiring rally talk,
which ultimately reinforces
racism.

Allan said the current gov-
ernment is misunderstanding
the mindset of Bahamians if
they assume that race is a still
major election issue in the
Bahamas.

He said: “Elections are about
issues. In 1967 the issue was
race, and it was settled. In 1973
everybody became Bahamian —



@ FRED Mitchell on Tuesday night referred to Brent



Symonette as the ‘heir of the U“3P’ — sparking debate on the
use of race as an issue in the neat election

blacks and whites — and Inde-
pendence happened. In the year
2007, it would be a real sad state
of affairs if the current govern-
ment thinks race is the issue
again.”

Allan assumes that the PLP is
using race to rally core party
supporters. Yet he wonders
whether or not this tactic will
backfire on the party.

If the PLP makes race the
main, or a main, issue in the
remainder of their campaign, it

will ultimately fall on the
Bahamian people to make a
decision on this campaign strat- |
egy through the ballot box.

At this stage of national devel-
opment, when various sectors of
the Bahamian society have, for
the most part, moved on from
the politics of 1967, it would
appear that ‘race card’ should
be dealt with great caution.

e SEE next Monday’s
INSIGHT for more views on
the race issue.

Homeowner complains that government
house still not fixed after five months

@ By. BRENT DEAN

ANOTHER frustrated resi-
dent of Excellence Estates, a
new government housing sub-
division, has come to The Tri-

_bune to publicly speak about

the deficiencies in his home.

The resident, who we will
refer to as “Mr Jones”, has had
to endure a new home with
cracked walls, an incomplete
porch with exposed steel and
now parts of the roof boxing
are coming away from the wall
of his house since September.

Mr Jones said he sent a letter
to the Ministry of Housing a
few months ago and is yet to
receive any response to his
grievances.

The home-owner questioned
the inspection process at the
ministry that allows homes to
be passed as satisfactory, at
various stages of the inspec-
tion process, despite obvious
flaws.

He said the Department of
Housing must reform its prac-
tices to give homeowners val-
ue for money.

Mr Jones said contractors are
not being adequately held
accountable by the Ministry of
Housing for their work and he
challenged the ministry to
improve its practices.





interpersonal skills

public speaking skills

would be an asset.



Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort
@ Offshore Island.

Invites applications for the position of:

REVENUE MANAGER

Sandals seeks to identify a results-oriented and strategic thinker,
who is passionate about the travel industry to join its management
team as Revenue Manager.
| development and manage implementation of initiatives to attain
annual and strategic sales and revenue goals.

The incumbent must direct

The applicant should have the following minimum requirements:

Minimum 5 years of Leadership experience in a Sales

environment in the Travel Industry.

* — Two of those years in the position of Revenue Manager

¢ — Proven ability to design and oversee all marketing, advertising
and sales promotional activities :

¢ Must have strong analytical skills as well as excellent

° Must have excellent communication skills and effective

* Ability to conceptualize and demonstrate a high degree of
original creative thinking with no reliance on precedent

¢ — Identify business opportunities and generate new business
through various activities.

¢ Proficiency in use of Computer Software applications:
Microsoft Word, Excel, Power Point and Publisher

¢ — Ability to work collaboratively with colleagues and staff to
create a results-driven, team oriented environment.

° Self motivated, methodical, analytical and creative individual.

¢ Previous experience in E.P. Hotels or Cruise Ship experience

Applications should be email to: cmajor@srb.sandals.com
Application close Feb. 28th, 2007

He said: “They need to step
in and deal with these people
because at the end of the day it
is making the government and
ministry look bad. Someone

needs to be accountable fof the’

government’s money.” ‘~

Minister of Housing ie
Wisdom recently stated that
homeowners should bring their
grievances to him so he can help
in having them resolved.

This declaration, however, is
not an overwhelming vote of
confidence in the Ministry of
Housing’s bureaucracy. The
many levels of management
should be able to resolve these
matters, said Mr Jones.

He felt there is obviously
some deficiency within the min-

istry if it is necessary for the ©

minister to have to intervene in
disputes.

He argued that if the minister
has to step in and mediate dis-

putes, then it would be reason- -

able to suggest that the senior
civil servants in the ministry are
performing their jobs inade-
quately and may need to be
removed.

Residents of Excellence
Estates have made numerous
public complaints regarding the
state of their homes over that
last few months.

Homeowners complained






























about the quality of paint
used in the homes, cracks in
tiles and walls along with
chronic problems with doors
being very difficult to close -
suggesting they may have

Colors:

Brown
Black

been improperly installed.
One homeowner even
alleged police harassment after
going public with her story last
month.
Mr Jones said homeowners

Rosetta St.

of Excellence Estates are deter-
mined to have these grievances
resolved in a timely fashion, and _.
they plan to have a neighbour-
hood meeting to plan their next
course of action.


A

Children’s foundation expands
into sewing classes and tutoring |

| Helping hand for orphans and homeless

“y

ee

ok oe ee

4 .© Fe

oF 2 2.4%, GD

ade ie

THE Children’s Paradise
Foundation, which offers
orphan and homeless children



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CPA or equivalent;

of the Bahamas vacations
throughout the year, has
expanded its programmes to

















a
aut oD
H )
SG i
Sq es :
x

LIMITED



| VACANCY FOR FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

A general insurance agency seeks to employ a suitably qualified professional for
the position of Financial Controller.

QUALIFICATIONS & EXPERIENCE:

Minimum of five (5) years in a similar position;

Good computer skills, particularly related to Excel and accounting software;
Knowledge of the relevant industry’s regulations and laws;
Knowledge and ability to apply generally accepted accounting and auditing

standards.

DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES:

Prepare financial and operational budgets;

Prepare monthly financial statements in accordance with International

Standards;

Manage the input of accounting transactions and reconciliation processes;
Document and implement proper policies and procedures for the

accounting and internal control functions;

Liaise with and provide assistance to the Company's internal and external

auditors;

Manage the collections of the Company’s accounts receivable;
Manage and develop the Company's IT systems and resources;
Investigate, collect and analyze data, evaluate information and systems,

and draw logical conclusions.

REQUIRED QUALITIES:
Highest level of integrity, objectivity and confidentiality in the execution of

duties;

Ability to meet deadlines under pressure,

Skill in negotiating issues and resolving problems;

Strong report writing skills;

Considerable skill in effective verbal communications, including active
listening skills and skill in making presentations to the President,

Executive Committee and Board of Directors.

The Company offers good benefits and salary is commensurate with
experience and qualifications. Interested persons are invited to submit a
cover letter and resume to the following address or via e-mail no later than
February 28, 2007 to:

The President
P.O. Box CB-13931
Nassau, the Bahamas
E-mail: tonysan@coralwave.com



include sewing classes and an
“Education Circle.”

The sewing classes are
offered to several young women
who live in the Elizabeth
Estates Home For Children, as
well as the Ranfurly Homes.
Sewing rooms have been estab-
lished by the Children’s Par-
adise: Foundation and are
equipped with new sewing
machines and the necessary

~ equipment. The Foundation has

also hired sewing teacher San-
dra Meadows to share her
expertise with the girls.

“I am very honoured to teach
these young ladies the skill of
sewing,” said Ms Meadows, who
also owns the design and tailor
shop Sandra’s Closet in Kool
Acres. “I see myself in their
eyes. I got pregnant as a teenag-
er and never thought I could be
anybody. Through hard work I
became skilled and I now have
a business. They are learning
real life skills something they
can always use in their lives and
I am happy to do it.”

Twice a week the girls in the
programme meet and sew all
under the watchful eye of Ms
Meadows:

“I love the classes and I am
already using my skills in my
life,” said one student. I am
making curtains for this class-
room and I have sewn skirts for
friends, clothes for myself and
hemmed pants for others. I now
have something in my life that I
can do and use for work and I
thank God.”

When the young ladies grad-
uate, they will each receive a
new sewing machine courtesy

of the Children - Paradise Foun-

dation. Plans are also being
made to include young men to
teach them sewing and uphol-
stery.

An ‘Education Circle’ was
also created to provide home-










points of sewing

work assistance and tutoring
by local school teachers for
children without parents or
stable homes.

“These programmes are
making a bid difference in the
lives of these children and I
am so grateful for the gener-
ous donations the Foundation
has received,” said Dorothy
Propach, who founded the
Children’s Paradise Founda-
tion in 2004. “The friends,
family and business associates
of Mr Peter Kugler have made
a significant contribution. He
supported our programmes so
generously and now the dona-
tions made in his name, has
made it ‘possible for the Foun-
dation to offer the sewing
classes, the “Education Cir-
cle” and to continue to offer
our children great vacations.”

To date children from the
Ranfurly Home, the Chil-
dren’s Emergency Hostel,

B TEACHER Sandra Meadows shows her students the finer

@ LEARNING to measure the proper width for a hem.



Nazareth Centre, the Eliza-
beth Estates Children’s Home
and the Bilney Home for Chil-
dren have enjoyed adventur-
ous, educational and fun-filled
trips to the Adventure Learn-
ing Centre, picnics to Cabbage
Beach, and swim lessons at the
Flamingo Swim Club. The
children have also been spon-
sored by Dolphin Encounters
to interact with the dolphins
and to participate in educa-
tional programmes. Scott
Saunders and Pierre Monnard
have also sponsored day trips
to Rose Island.

“Providing children without
parents or homes with learn-
ing opportunities and vaca-
tions is so important,”
Dorothy adds. “We are going
to continue to offer them
meaningful experiences. These
children deserve to have the
opportunity to learn, be sup-
ported and to have fun.”

Twill turn their mourning to joy, will

comfort them, and make them rejoice. —

rather than sorrow”

&

Those left to mourn are, husband, Dr. John A. |

Jeremiah 31 B |

Johnson: daughters, Dr. Lisa Johnson Bazin,
Chistin Peterson, Dr. Bridgette Johnson and
Jahan Johnson; grandsons, Gabriel Bazin and
Keithroy Peterson, Jr; Son-in-law, Dr. Hanz

Bazin and Keithroy Peterson Sr, and a host of

relatives and friends.



THE TRIBUNE



In brie

McCartney

leave crime
post to run

for House

@ BRANVILLE McCartney

ATTORNEY Branville
McCartney resigned this week
as chairman of the Chamber of
Commerce Crime Prevention
Committee to pursue political
interests.

In a small ceremony in the
Village Road headquarters of
Halsbury Chambers, McCart-
ney turned over his responsibil-
ities to Dionisio D’ Aguilar, first
vice president of the Chamber.
Mr D’ Aguilar had served on the
committee with Mr McCartney.

McCartney is seeking a seat
in the House of Assembly, rep-
resenting the Bamboo Town
constituency. os

On Wednesday, chamber .

president Tanya Wright told the
board of directors that McCart-
ney’s leadership had paved the
way for the Chamber to serve as
an important link between busi-
ness and law enforcement.

“In any society, under any cir-
cumstances, the pursuit of busi-
ness is dependent on a feeling of
security,” Mrs Wright said.
“Economic expansion can only
take place in an environment
where people believe their
investment is safe. And noth-
ing has the power to.stymie eco-

'. nomic growth faster than a per-

vasive fear of lawlessness or
crime. :

Earlier, Police Commissioner
Paul Farquharson credited
McCartney with engaging the
business community in the fight
against crime. “Bran has made a
real diiference in the fight
against crime. I am sorry to lose
him in his capacity as the com-
mittee chairman but I wish hia
success in his endeavours. He's
one of a kind,” he said.

Case of dead
robbery
suspect to go
to cornoner

FREEPORT - The shooting
death of an armed robbery sus-
pect by officers on Grand
Bahama will be forwarded to
the Coroner after police inves-
tigations are completed, a senior
police official reported on
Wednesday.

Gregory Henry Lundy, 30, of

* Yeoman Wood, was shot dead

over the weekend during a con-
frontation with officers follow-
ing an armed robbery on
Sergeant Major Road.

Chief Superintendent Basil
Rahming, press liaison officer,
said the case file in connection
with the incident will be for-
warded to Her Majesty’s Coro-

ner once their investigations *

have been concluded.

According to reports, officers
were told that a man armed
with a cutlass had robbed the
convenience store at Cora’s
Place Plaza on Sergeant Major
Road around Ipm on Saturday.

The first police unit arrived
within three minutes and
observed the suspect walking
north on Sergeant Major Road.
The officer ordered the armed
suspect, who was wearing blue
jeans, a multi-coloured jacket, a
camouflage cap and black
gloves, to drop his weapon.

It is alleged that the suspect
broke the driver’s window with
the cutlass and also shattered
the passenger side window and
put the officer in fear for his
life. Shortly afterwards, when
two units arrived to assist, the
suspect allegedly charged one
of the officers with the cutlass.
The officer ran to avoid being
injured, but lost his balance and
fell to the ground.

It is alleged that the suspect
was about to attack the officer
when the officers shot him. The
man was pronounced dead on
the scene by paramedics.

eS TIT RR A OP a A LT

ee ke ee ee
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007, PAGE /

THE TRIBUNE

oO In brief

Dominican
Republic free
trade zones
‘in danger’

@ DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
Santo Domingo



THE Dominican Repub- :
lic’s free-trade zones, which
produce 80 per cent of the ;
country’s exports, are in dan- i
ger of failing if a US trade }

agreement is not implement-

ed soon, an industry group
said Wednesday, according to :

Associated Press.
The Dominican Associa-

tion of Free-Trade Zones said :
that competition from Asia :
and high fuel prices will lead ;
to bankruptcies and wide- :
spread layoffs if the agree- i
ment, which has been delayed :
for more than a year, is not :

put in force.

About 580 companies have
factories in the Caribbear

country’s free-trade zones,

where manufacturers enjoy

investment incentives on the

condition that all goods pro-

duced are sold overseas.

But business in the zones }
declined 8.3 per cent in 2006, ;
. due mostly to losses in the |
textile sector, the Central ;

Bank reported this week.

That comes on the heels of

an association report that the

zones have lost 40,000 jobs —

some 20 per cent —in the past ;

three years. ©

Antigua to

Review

MAK

QS



lm By JASON DONALD

THE Bahamas International
Film Festival (BIFF) continues
its Monthly Film Series this Sat-
urday with the screening of Half
Nelson in Rawson Square at
7.30pm.

Starring Ryan Gosling in an
Oscar-nominated role, Half
Nelson is the story of high
school teacher Dan (Gosling), a
troubled man struggling with
drug addiction and loneliness.

While in the classroom, Dan
finds some consolation for his
empty life, but his spiralling use
of narcotics threatens his career,
as well as the bond he has
developed with young student
Drey (Shareeka Epps) - a bond
which may just lead him to the
redemption he craves.

Any concerns that Half Nel-
son is yet another clichéd
teacher/student inspirational
drama are quickly dispelled —
Dan begins the movie with the
respect of the students and his
time in the classroom is when
he is at his most content.

The real drama happens on-

Film Series screening this year

the fringes of the school, as Dan
stumbles through a private life
that only Drey is aware of,
There are. no grandstanding
speeches, no preachy messsage
as such, just-intense, low-key

drama with strong perfor-

mances.

Gosling and Epps are sensa-
tional in their roles - their awk-
ward friendship is brilliantly

realised without ever resorting
to sentimentality. Gosling
effortlessly swings between affa-
ble and intense and Epps dis-
plays an understanding of the
material beyond her years.

I can’t recommend Half Nel-
son enough - it may have skipped
under the radar last year but this
is an uncompromising, intelligent
drama. Don’t miss it.





@ DAN Dunne, played by actor Ryan Gosling, is an
idealistic inner-city junior high school teacher who
spends his time outside school on the edge of
consciousness

(Photo: AP /ThinkFilm)

et es
eA Moa

JOB FAIR

held on

March Ist and March 2nd 2007,
Place: Bahamas Hotel Training Colleg
Time: 9:00am until 2:00pm daily

EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES:

Accountant

help betting
company to
collect debt

- passport rules
for children

@ ANTIGUA
St John’s

ANTIGUAN financial reg-
ulators will help online gam- :
bling company BetOnSports :
PLC collect its debts to pay :
bettors and employees, the :
Caribbean nation’s govern- ;
ment has announced, accord- }

ing to Associated Press.

Antigua’s Financial Ser-
vices Regulatory Commission :
will manage funds collected :

from the struggling British- ;

based gambling company’s

debtors since BetOnSports
has been unable to repay its :
customers due to cash-flow

problems, the statement said.

Clive Archer, BetOnSports
director, said the company :
has been hampered by the
“slow return of funds owed }
to us and we hope that this :

process will give debtors the

reassurance they need to ;

swiftly pay.” :

The British company said |
in August that it planned to :
stop operating in Costa Rica ;
and Antigua —from where it :
accepted wagers from tens of :
thousands of customers in the :
US -— following a US federal :
court order for the company :
to stop taking bets from the :
country and return deposits :

paid by American bettors.

CHILDREN will be exempt
from new rules that will require
travelers to show passports
when entering the US at land
or sea borders, the Bush admin-
istration announced on Thurs-
day.

The new passport require-
ments will take effect as soon
as January 2008. In a change
from earlier plans, children aged
15 or younger with parental
consent will be allowed to cross
the borders at land and sea
entry points with certified
copies of their birth certificates
rather than passports.

Children aged 16 through 18
traveling with school, religious,
cultural or athletic groups and
under adult supervision will also
be allowed to travel with only
their birth certificates.

Homeland Security Secretary
Michael Chertoff was expected
to discuss the relaxation in rules
at a speech in Detroit on Thurs-
day afternoon. The department
described the details in a written
statement.

Beginning last January 23,
nearly all air travelers entering
the US who are citizens of
Canada, Mexico, Bermuda or
the Caribbean — as well as
returning American citizens —
have been required to display

passports. Children entering the
United States by air will still be
required to show passports.
Homeland Security
spokesman Russ Knocke said
the easing of rules for children
entering by land or sea was in

part the result of talks between,

the department and Canadians
and interested state officials.
Canada and US border states
have been concerned that the
passport requirements would
hurt legitimate travel and com-
merce.

When the new requirements
for travellers crossing land and
sea borders take effect, it will
bring residents of western hemi-
sphere nations under the same
rules as travelers from the rest
of the world.

The rules were mandated by
Congress in 2004 as a response
to the terrorist attacks of Sep-
tember 11, 2001, and the rec-
ommendations by the Septem-
ber 11 commission that border
security be tightened.

Last October, Congress
passed an amendment spon-
sored by Senators Patrick
Leahy, D-Vt., and Ted Stevens,
R-Alaska, that would postpone
the day the land and sea rules
take effect for as long as 17
months, till June 2009, if certain

conditions have not been met.
One of those conditions was
to develop an alternative pro-
cedure for groups of children
travelling across the border
under adult supervision and
with parental consent.
Chertoff will meet with local
officials in Detroit before trav-
eling to Ottawa, Canada, for
meetings Friday with his Mexi-
can and Canadian counterparts.

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ed to manage the assets of private trusts and
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with a carefully developed investment competition plan approved
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Responsibilities -—

Reporting directly to the Chief Executive Officer of the Bank, as well
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administer the selection of external managers who follow an
investment strategy that has been mandated by the Bank's founder
and Finance Committee. The successful candidate will also
internally manage a fixed income pool of funds. Using the services
of investment consultants and under the guidance of the Investment
- Committee, the Investment manager will recommend allocations '
to fund managers worldwide. Investment results will be monitored
closely and the managers must. perform competitively. The
successful candidate must have the ability to create and build an
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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007, PAGE 9



TEM nme ce
nd this outdated racial propaganda







VACANCY FOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT MECHANICS

_ Qualifications & Experience

¢ Minimum five (5) years in Heavy Equipment Mechanics
¢ Knowledge of diesel and gasoline engines ~

¢ Knowledge of hydraulic systems

* Good understanding of 24 V Electrical Systems

¢ Experience in wire rope rigging would be a plus

¢ Welding experience also would be a plus

Duties & Responsibilities

¢ Perform repairs and preventive maintenance on various heavy
equipment.

Required Qualities

¢ Good physical condition

¢ Able to withstand constant exposure to the weather conditions
¢ Must be willing to work shift schedules

¢ Must be willing to work at heights







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ypsepesses
lee

Company offers good benefits and salary is commensurate with ex-
_ perience and qualifications. Interested persons are invited to submit a
resume’ by February 28, 2007 to the following person:



Ramon Taylor
‘Tropical Shipping Limited —
John Alfred Dock
East Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Phone: (242) 322-1012






















@ By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

AS THE general elec-
tion ‘approaches,

both major political parties
have turned the heat up, firing
shots across the other’s bow.



The resignation of former |

Immigration Minister Shane
Gibson last Sunday led Prime

: Minister Perry Christie to for-

mally announce that the elec-
tion battle was on and that the
“sloves were off”.

At the PLP’s rally on Tues-
day, Mr Christie hit below the
belt, comparing the granting of
permanent residency to the late
Anna Nicole Smith under his
administration to the FNM’s
fast-tracking of permanent res-
idency- status to three men who
had an unappealing familiarity
with law enforcement.

According to Mr Christie,

no matter what could be said:

about Anna Nicole, nothing
she ever did in life could have
been worse than a man who
for years was sexually assault-
ing little boys before being wel-
comed into the Bahamas by the

' FNM.

Although the PLP has a
point, sadly the PM appears to
have sought to justify Shane
Gibson’s misjudgment by jux-
taposing it to the FNM’s trans-
gression in granting permanent
residency status to three men
with questionable pasts.

And so, the dirty politics
and mudslinging began! It
appears that Dr William
Thompson’s admonition to
conduct a clean election cam-
paign has fallen on deaf ears.
On this night, the issues were
forgotten and the tit-for-tat
began.

This past Tuesday, the
“new” PLP also sought to play
the race card, with unques-
tionable references and over-
tures being made towards the
FNM’s deputy leader Brent
Symonette.

Throughout the evening,
there were constant references
to the United Bahamian Party
(UBP), as the “new” PLP was
once again seeking to use the
race card to win support and
trump up old feelings of racial
insecurity.

YOUNG MaAn’s VIEW

Ac Baie Ko

While the Lynden Pindling-
led PLP liberated the country
from minority rule and empow-
ered the black majority,
Bahamian politics became
polarised on colour as Sir Lyn-

den and others appealed to .

blacks by instigating acrimony
through the use of racist mate-
rial.
Although the “old” PLP
promoted national identity and
upward mobility for blacks,
sadly they were also skilful in
their use of the race card, sow-
ing seeds of division and
heightening tensions over race
(eg showing Roots), which has
produced much of the racially
motivated propaganda plagu-
ing Bahamian society today.

IE 2005, the “new” PLP
explicitly used racist lingo
at their national convention,
with several speakers making
references to the Bahamas
“going back there” if the FNM
team of Hubert Ingraham and
Brent Symonette were elected.

Again this week, instead of
campaigning on the issues, the
“new” PLP sought to use scare-
mongering tactics to rouse the
fears of Bahamians about a
return to minority rule.

Fred Mitchell, who appears
to be racially insecure, kicked
the rally off with allegations
that Hubert Ingraham would
turn over the government to
“the UBP heir”, Brent Symon-
ette, if the FNM wins the next
election. And so, the sleaze and
nastiness began.

Mr Mitchell’s comments
were eerily similar to the racist

- overtures of Minister for Local

Government and Consumer
Affairs Alfred Gray, who, in a
racially charged convention
speech, said: ‘

“Fellow delegates, could you
imagine, God forbid, that they
should win, and something
were to happen to Hubbigitty,
that we would be back in the
hands of the UBP? Please

Gl BS Gen

don’t let me imagine that.”

If there is a credible reason
why Mr Symonette should not
run or be in a leadership posi-
tion, it would not be because
of race, but because of his pri-
or misjudgments in his capaci-
ty as a Cabinet minister when it
appeared that he awarded a
contract to a company in which
he had interests, and had to
subsequently resign.

Further, on Tuesday, Mr

' Christie also appeared to play

the race card, claiming that Mr
Ingraham was lured out of
retirement by “hidden forces”
that were attempting to recap-
ture the Bahamas for selfish
gain.

He claimed they wanted to
“prostitute” the nation and
stated that they could not “let
the Progressive Liberal Party
and the progressive forces”
control the Bahamas.

Shame on Mr Christie!

. While I never expected this

from him, I am mindful that
he, like Fred Mitchell, were
protégés of Sir Lynden.

Mr Christie and others
should know that the Bahamas
has progressed beyond the days
where racial scaremongering
and the showing of the movie
“Roots” on ZNS would incite
the black majority to vote PLP.

These days, the younger and
better educated voter will vote
to secure the future of our
country and for the party that
shows the vision needed to
advance Bahamians, create
jobs, fight crime, curtail illegal
immigration and stabilise and
uplift our economy.

It is a disgrace that the
“new” PLP would again seek
to exclude white Bahamians
and sow seeds of discontent
among the populace. It is high
time that Mr Christie and his
gang promote racial harmony
in the Bahamas, instead of
spewing racist propaganda and
deepening racial prejudices in a
society that is still recovering.

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to celebrate Heritage Day

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Sun West End Police are contin-
~ 54uing investigations into the

*o £!Police revealed that Smith
4 was driving a 1995 Toyota

ce west along Queen’s
‘ehway in Deadman’s Reef

Ta OE PF LE ate ee GBI ZN a! 6 PO A RR Tn

THE TRIBUNE

1

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007, PAGE 11



Police say
speed was
cause of
accident |

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama police believe speed
may have contributed to a
traffic accident in Deadman’s
Reef, where a vehicle occu-
pied by three young men
overturned several times in
bushes on Queen’s Highway.

Two of the three occupants
have been admitted for treat-
ment - one in stable, and the
other in serious condition -
at Rand Memorial Hospital.

Navado Smith, 22, of Jones
Town, Eight Mile Rock, the
driver, is detained in inten-
sive care. Adrian Laing, 16,
of Jones Town, one of two

@ By STEPHANIE DOWNS

TOTALLY absorbed, Teleri
Jones places one more shell on
an 8ft by 4ft painted panel and .
completes the form of what
resembles a dragonfly. ©

When asked what it is, she
replies: “It’s what your ins,
nation makes it.”

The young Welsh artist is one _
of many volunteers on Elbow
Cay who are working to make »
Heritage Days 2007 on March 2-
3 a special landmark in the small
island’s already rich history.

In a nearby room of The
Wyannie Malone Historical
Museum in the centre of Hope

» Town, where Teleri is working
with long-time Canadian visi-
tors to the Abacos, Colin Ray
and wife Helen, are assembling
a diorama portraying sponge
fishing in the Bahamas.

Made to the scale of three
eighths of an inch to the foot,
Colin has carved a replica of a
60-foot schooner hull out of
white pine. “It’s a simple rig,”
he said.

Meticulously executed, the
vessel, with its clay figures and
drying sponges, depicts a lost
era.

Tony Bennett, the museum’s '
curator and manager, looks on

"as the piece is carefully centred
on a glass sand-filled base.

“They drove three large box-
es from Canada to West Palm
Beach and then Faron Sawyer
of Cherokee Air flew it over to
Marsh Harbour,” he said.

The museum is abuzz with
activity. A video of Bahamian

_ history focusing on the colonis-
ing of the Abaco cays by Loy-
alists in the late eighteenth cen-
tury. plays in the background.

Meanwhile, on the third floor
of the well-stocked building,
Tony’s wife Elaine is busily
making costumes for what will
be a re-enactment in period cos-
tume of the1785 landing by the
Loyalists.

Here on March 2 actual
descendants of the early settlers,

dition. = |
The second passenger,
Lavardo Williams, 18, of
io Jones Town, was treated for
t©His injuries and later dis-
3 @harged.
Supt Basil Rahming said

i TELERI Jones at work

eight of whom are children, will
arrive in small boats at the land-
ing site in the heart of the set-
tlement where a small plaque
was erected on its 200th
anniversary in 1985. —

Some of the costumes are
ready and have been fitted.
Bobbi, wife of town patriarch
Vernon Malone, says that her
husband “looks quite dapper in
his knickerbockers and ruffle-
bordered shirt.”

Elaine has her work cut out
for her with 49 schoolchildren to
outfit as well as making 17 spe-
cial costumes.

Just a stone’s throw from the
museum to the north children
from Hope Town School have
gathered at the landing site and
are rehearsing their Loyalist
songs.

Bonnie, daughter of Vernon
and Bobbi Malone, directs the
scene with Grade Four teacher
Nancy Burnett. Headmistress
Candace Key looks on and
proudly remarks on the “sweet-
ness” of their voices.

At school the children are
learning the arts and crafts of
the period, such as quilting,
weaving, palm thatching and
knitting as well as the tradi-
tional plaiting of the maypole.

On a more sombre note

»:ageident, which occurred
siatound 8.30pm on Monday.

when he lost control near
Seaward Development.
ai gi he vehicle overturned six
36 tiitves in bushes before crash-
244} into a tree. Police are urg-
ath motorists to slow down
fi drive with extreme care.

Vftom aaale who are
making news in their
Weighbourhoods. Call us
“on 322-1986 and share
your story.



The Bahamas Union of Teachers
Celebrating 60 years 1947 - 2007
“Six Decades Strong...And Growing”’

3 Presents
_A Collection of Paintings of Bahamian
| Art Educators

KALEIDOSCOPE

March 9 - 31, 2007 3
At The Central Bank Art Gallery
Official Opening March 9 -6:30p.m.

Art Educators:

Moya Strachan- C. I. Gibson Senior High School
Kevin Rolle - C.W. Saunders

Mervin Wilson- C.R. Walker Senior High School
_ Loraine Chichester - Queens College
Neil Cleare- Doris Johnson Senior High School
Lendrix Ross- Doris Johnson Senior High School
Timothy Nottage - D.W. Davis Junior High School
| Dana Burrows - D.W. Davis Junior High School
|Mary Deveaux - L.N. Coakley High School - Exuma






Wendy Cartwright - Guest Artist
Duolton Evans - Guest Artist
Damaso Gray - Student C.O.B.

‘Ihe ye



there will be a dedication ser-
vice by Rev Carla Culmer of
the newly-built Seamen’s
Memorial erected on a dune
overlooking Elbow Reef.

This commemorates those
who perished on the “Athol
Queen”, which was torpedoed
by an Italian submarine during
World War 11.

Friday evening will feature
the “Heritage Buffet Dinner”

and auction at 7pm at Hope’

Town Harbour Lodge. Tickets

for this must be bought a week —

in advance.

Saturday’s events include a
boat parade, tours of the muse-
um, a cooking display using an
eighteenth century oven and the
“Beautiful Knees Contest”,
devised a few years ago in the
living room of legendary ex-
pilot Leonard Thompson of
Marsh Harbour. Loyalist
descendant Patrick Bethel of
Cherokee Sound is the reign-
ing champion.

. Most of those involved 'in the

Heritage Day preparations,
such as Tony and Elaine Ben-
nett, are not Wyannie Malone
descendants but long-time resi-
dents of the cay.

What those early settlers flee-
ing persecution must have felt
as they disembarked on to the














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deserted cay is hard to imagine
but their courage and fortitude
is to be admired.

¢ On March 2 Froggie’s Out
Island Adventures are offering
a special ferry service leaving
Marsh Harbour at 6pm and

returning from Hope Town at
10pm.

The number of Hope Town
Harbour Lodge is 366-0095 and
the website for more informa-
tion on Heritage Days 2007 is
www.hopetownmuseum.com

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PAGE 12, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007 THE TRIBUNE.







| FRIDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 23, 2007

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THE TRIBUNE

Tl oh Or

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007, PAGE 15



Award-winning c

hildren’s

author fully booked at Atlantis

. SQUEALS of laughter
filled the Atlantis Theatre as
youngsters from Atlantis Kids
Club and students from St
John’s College, Queen’s Col-
lege and St Andrews School
listened in fascination as
award-winning children’s
book author and illustrator.
Peter McCartney recently
read copies of his books.

McCartney also showed the
youngsters a short animation
based on his book, ‘Hondo |
and Fabian,’ a fun-filled story
based on the adventures of
his dog, Hondo and cat, Fabi-
an. McCartney also demon- .
strated how he begins his sto-
ries from the draft version to
the final copy. At the end of
the presentation the students
were allowed to ask ques-
tions, take photos and partici-
pate in a spécial book signing.

“Tt was a fabulous trip and

‘it was my pleasure to be

here...,” said McCartney just
moments after the book sign-
ing, whichjhe referred to as
“the icing‘on the cake,” of his
visit, the first to Atlantis and
The Bahamas.

The award winning author
who was accompanied by his
wife, Yunhee, daughter Suki,
nine, and son Henry, four,
who are also featured as char-
acters in a number of his
books, noted that he got to
experience,more than a regu-
lar tourist would have, in that
he was able to be engaged
with the community and
interact with local school chil-
dren. “I got a sense of what it
is like to live in the Bahamas
as well,” commented McCart-
ney.
While at Atlantis, McCart-
ney also conducted research:
for his new book about a
young boy’s shark adventure.
He visited Atlantis’ marine
habitat where he was able to
observe several species of
sharks. He also met with
Atlantis’ Glen Kelly, Director
of Planning and Development
for the Marine and Water
Park Operations.

“T picked up a lot of infor-
mation just by walking
around the aquariums, so
when I go back and I draw
sharks out of my head, I will
have more of a sense of their
shape ...,” said McCartney.
“You have to be there to see
them. Its one thing to see:it
on an image, even on a
movie, its different than when
you are right there looking at
them.”

McCartney alsohelda_ °
‘Meet the Author’ session in
the Atlantis Library, where
guests of the resort had an
opportunity to interact with
him, purchase copies of his
books and have them auto-
graphed.

Rosemarie Johnson-Clarke,
Regional Advisor for the
Caribbean North Chapter of
the Society of Children’s
Book Writers and Illustrators
(SCBWI) noted that the
event was the association’s
“first really big author event,”
aside from working with
Bahamian children’s authors
like Alice Bain, author of
‘Ninety Nine Potcakes’ and
author, Christine Aylen who
wrote a Bahamian counting
book. Johnson-Clarke
thanked Atlantis for hosting
McCartney’s presentation.

In 2003 McCartney won a
Caldecott honour for ‘Hondo
and Fabian,’ from the Ameri-
can Library Association,
(ALA). The Caldecott Medal
is awarded annually to the
artist of the most distin-
guished American picture
book for children. ‘Hondo
and Fabian,’ was also award-
ed Best Illustrated Book of
the Year from the New York
Times.

His other books include
‘Night Driving,’ ‘Little Bunny
on the Move,’ and ‘Moon
Plane’ (2006). ‘Moon Plane’
was included in a year-end
picture book review in The
New Yorker, December 12,
2006. In addition, Amazon .
listed it as one of the top 10
Picture Books of 2006

McCartney is also a teacher
at the School of Visual Arts in
New York City. He has
worked with students on
short-term projects, such as
writing and illustrating their
own books.


















at cam
ox

Take an
Additional

@ AWARD-WINNING children’s book, author and illus-
trator Peter McCartney is pictured telling scores of young chil-
dren in the Atlantis Theatre about his up coming book about a
young boy’s shark adventure.

(Photo: Joshua Yentis/Blue Wave Imaging)

e Wall Units * Lamps ¢ Tables ete.

Bi YOUNG students
of St Andrew’s School.
are all smiles during a | *
special book signing by
award-winning children’s
book, author and illus-
trator Peter McCartney
pictured at center with
his daughter Suki at his ©
right in the Atlantis The-;
atre.

(Photo:
Joshua Yentis/
Blue Wave Imaging)

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Caribbean’s third-
largest food market

FROM page 1B

Abaco Markets’ battle to return
to profitability, said the compa-
ny appeared to be struggling to
make its two formats work. It
was now focusing on its core
operations in New Providence
and Grand Bahama, targeting
shrink, loss and damage in
stores, and eyeing a strategic
alliance as a result of its 10 per
cent stake in BSL Holdings, the
company that acquired the
majority 78 per cent stake in
Bahamas Supermarkets last
year. -

“The Bahamas food retail
sector has been saturated for
some time now, and no new
supermarkets have been built,”
the CRNM report said.

“Rather, the two traditional
supermarket chains [Bahamas

‘- Supermarkets and Super Val-

-‘ue] have been increasing sales

by restructuring their store port-
folios through refurbishing,
rebuilding and relocating of
stores.”

The Bahamian supermarket
industry may in time again show
the need for this nation to
implement some form of com-
petition or antitrust legislation
and policies, especially if
Bahamas Supermarkets and
Abaco Markets pursue a tie-up,

. which the latter’s 10 per cent

stake in BSL Holdings would
appear to indicate is the long-
‘term game plan.

Any merger would, at current
sales levels, give the combined
entity just below a 50 per cent
share of the Bahamian food
sales market at around $240
million, and leave it the domi-
nant player on Grand Bahama
and in an duopoly on New
Providence with Super Value.

However, the size of its mar-
ket dominance by sales would

BUSINESS FOR SALE

Ae ence cel
Business. Well known and

respected worldwide Teele tee
20 years at same prime location.

Email: b.inquiries@gmail.com











Nassau, Bahamas.













a UBS





























seeking to employ,

Duties to include:

management information

business processes

e Lead MIS team.

requirements:
e = Training

interface design

e
e Process modelling
e
e

e Business analyst
e Team Leader
Trust operations

‘ hrbahamas@ubs.com
or
UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas



NOTICE

| NOTICE is hereby given that
P.O. BOX CB-12627, EXUMA, BAHAMAS is applying to |
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization:should not be: granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
‘days from the,16th day of January, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, MARC MEYE of the of #14
ALBACORE DRIVE, P.O. BOX GT-2554, FREEPORT, GRAND
BAHAMA, intend to change my name to MARK DORESTIN.
If there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport
Officer, P.O.Box SS-792, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.



UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd. a leading international Trust Company is

MIS Specialist & Team Leader

e Guide development of system to provide consistent and coherent

e Enhance and redesign the existing database and workflow
models to meet the business requirements

e Develop and implement solutions in MS Access

e Support and testing of the developed system and rapidly provide
solutions to any defects that are detected

e Take ownership and responsibility for the analysis and design
phases of one or more of the project deliveries — producing
results within the agreed timeframes

e Collaborate on project to build an intranet site to support

e Maintain interface to our international internal partners in
Switzerland and the rest of the world

e Provide initial training and second level support to users
This position is open to candidates with the following minimum

Proven experience in the following key areas:

e Relational database modelling
* Database modelling using MS Access and understanding of user

Database reengineering and reverse engineering
Software development lifecycles

Knowledge of VB, ODBC, SQL, WIP (Vignette V/5 e-Business
Platform using Oracle 8.1.7 as the data repository)

In addition, the successful candidate should:
e Have strong analytical skills
e Be fluent in English and German

Bahamian Nationals need only apply to:





MAR-KELLON GILVERT OF



be below the 70 per cent share
of the Bahamian life insurance
market now enjoyed by Coli-
nalmperial Insurance following
its controversial acquisition of
Imperial Life.

The CRNM report said the
sales areas in Bahamas Super-
market stores ranged in size
from 5,000 to 40,000 square feet,
stocking between 15,000 to
25,000 stock keeping units
(SKUs), of which 85 per cent
were food.

Yet only 5 per cent of its
products were Bahamian-pro-
duced, some 95 per cent of pro-
duce ‘being manufactured or
sourced from either the
Caribbean (45 per cent) or out-
side the region (50 per cent).

THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007, PAGE 5B

The Bahamas:

Fast food supply escapes



Bahamas based producers

FROM page 1B

ment for KFC volumes,” the
report read. “In addition, KFC
requires a chicken ‘cut in nine’,
which is normally different from
the ‘cut in eight’ required by
supermarkets. This requires
investment in two sets of auto-
mated equipment.”

The CRNM report’s findings
again illustrate the dilemma fac-
ing the Bahamas when it comes
to its fledgling and underdevel-
oped agricultural industry: does
it employ protectionist mea-
sures to safeguard local pro-
ducers and allow them to
become strong enough to stand
on their own and compete, or
does it follow the law of com-
parative advantage, specialise
in what it is good at and focus
on consumer benefits, refusing
to tolerate inefficient domestic
producers?

The CRNM report found that

the Bahamas, despite having a
relatively small population com-
pared to other Caribbean
nations, was the second largest
‘quick service restaurant’ mar-
ket in the region, with the sector
in this nation generating $200
million per annum in sales. This
was only exceeded by Jamaica’s
$325 million.

The ‘quick service’ restaurant
industry in the Bahamas
employed 3,425 persons, and
there were some 235 such
restaurants in this nation.




The CRNM report also found
that the Bahamas had the high-
est number of full-service
restaurants in hotels of any
Caribbean nation, standing at
252 - a reflection, no doubt, of
the five-star tourist model it has
followed, attracting top-tier
hotel brands and the restaurants
to match guest demands.

The Bahamas was also home
to 100 independent full-service
restaurants and 15 commercial
caterers, with some 602 food
service firms in total.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
: (No. 46 of 2000)

NEW CAPITAL MANAGEMENT
VENTURES LIMITED
_ IBC No. 111394 B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby givn that in accordance with Section 131(2) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 46 of 2000), NEW
CAPITAL MANAGEMENT VENTURES LIMITED, is in

Dissolution.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby~ given that ROSE REGIS OF
FAITH AVENUE, CARMICHEAL ROAD SOUTH, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 16th day of
February, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.






























CILIFEGUARDS@
NEEDED

Applicants must be certified by the Royal Life
Saving Society and possess first aid and CPR
training. Candidates should also be swimmers.
Successful applicants will be able to give swim
and dive lessons but cannot do such lessons
during regular workigg shifts. It is imperative that
applicants be personable, well-groomed, flexible
individuals available to work shifts as needed.




Interested persons should fax resumes with
copies of certificates and telephone contacts to:

The Director, Human Resources
Lyford Cay Members Club
Lyford Cay
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: #362-6245

NOTICE TO SHAREHOLDERS




The Board of Directors of Finance
Corporation of Bahamas Limited hereby
notifies all of its Shareholders that the
Bank’s actual net profit, based on
unaudited results for the quarter ended
31st January, 2007 was $5,244,041. As
a result, an interim dividend of thirteen
cents (13 cents) per Ordinary Share will
be paid on 9th March 2007, to all
shareholders of record as of 2nd March
2007.




The Bank’s total assets stood at
$660,801,940 for the quarter ended 31st
January 2007.




KEVA L. BAIN
CORPORATE SECRETARY

Dated this 23rd February, 2007

The date of commencement of dissolution was 19th day of January
2007.

SOVEREIGN DIRECTORS LIMITED, of 2nd floor, Ansbacher
House, Shirley & East Street North, PO. Box N-4244, Nassau,

Bahamas is the Liquidator of NEW CAPITAL MANAGMENT
VENTURES LIMITED.

For and on-behalf of
Sovereign Directors Limited

Liquidator

JEWELLERY SALES ASSOCIATES



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Anglican

Bene

_ TEACHING VACANCY

The Anglican Central Authority invites
applications from qualified Teachers for
positions available at St. John’s College, St. Anne’s
School, Bishop Michael Eldon School, Freeport, and
: St. Andrew’s School, Exuma.

PRIMARY TEACHERS
LIBRARIAN
SCIENCE
ENGLISH LANGUAGE
SPANISH
GUIDANCE COUNSELLORS
SPECIAL EDUCATION
MATHEMATICS
HOME ECONOMICS
RELIGIOUS STUDIES
PHYSICS/MATHEMATICS
MUSIC
BUSINESS STUDIES
ART |
PHYSICAL EDUCATION








Only qualified Teachers, with Bachelor or Master
Degrees from an accredited University or College and
Teaching Certificate need apply.

For further details and application forms, please
contact the Anglican Central’ Education
Authority on Sands Road at telephone
(242) 322-3015/6/7.






Letters of application and/or completed application
forms with copies of required documents must be sent
by Friday, March 9th, 2007 to the Anglican Education
Department addressed to:-






The Director of Education

Anglican Central Education Authority
P.O. Box N-656

Nassau, Bahamas


“+

PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



ESSE
Development model branded ‘fool’s paradise’

FROM page 1B

protects its environmental
resources, but this is*a classic
case of the sorts of develop-
ments that have been allowed to
cause untold damage in the
past, and should no longer be
permitted.”

Dr Goreau warned that cli-
mate change would exacerbate
the environmental damage from
poorly thought-out and regu-
iated development, adding:
“Much stronger environmental

laws and oversight are urgently
needed, because the Bahamas
has permitted developments
whose environmental costs have
neither been recognised nor
compensated for, and the accel-
erating pressures of global cli-
mate change make continuation
of such policies a fool’s paradise
of profiting today and ignoring
all the consequences that will
strike tomorrow.”

Dr Goreau added: “It is
astonishing that the Bahamas
is one of the few countries in

_ the world with no real laws to

- NOTICE

-- CRESTFAIR LIMITED
(In Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby given that the Creditors of the
above-named Company are required on or before —
the 23rd. March, 2007, to send their names and
addresses, with particulars of their debts or claims,
and the names and addresses of their Attorneys (if
any), to Messers Robert H. Kelly and Charles G. J.
King, Joint Liquidators of the said Company, c/o FT
Consultants Ltd. , P.O. Box N-3932, Nassau, Bahamas.

Dated this 22nd February, 2007

Robert H. Kelly
Charles G. J. King
~ Joint Liquidators

UBS

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. is one of the leading Wealth Managers in
the Caribbean. We look after wealthy private clients by
providing them with comprehensive, value-enhancing services,
In order to strengthen our team we look for an additional

Client Advisor Brazil

In this challenging position you will be responsible for the
following tasks (traveling required):

« Advisory of existing clients

® Acquisition of high net worth individuals
« Presentation and implementation of investment solutions
in the client's mother tongue

We are searching for a personality with solid experience in
wealth management, specialized in the fields of customer
telations, investment advice and portfolio management.
Excellent sales and advisory skills as well as solid knowledge of
investment products are key requirements. A proven track
record with a leading global financial institution as well as
fluency in English and Portuguese is essential.

Written applications should be addressed to: .

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O, Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas



protect the environment, espe-
cially the coral reefs and man-
groves that are so crucial to it.

“For years long-term divers
in the Bahamas have been
telling me how fast the reefs are
disappearing. In fact, the dam-
age is now so extensive that
even saving and strictly pro-
tecting all remaining habitat in
good condition will not be
enough.

“Large-scale restoration of
damaged coral reefs and man-
groves will be needed if the
country is to maintain its shore
protection from rising sea levels,

its fisheries and its ecotourism.

value. A long-term sustainable
environmental policy that is
enforced is the badly-needed
first step.”

Dr Goreau further warned
that the Bahamas was “racing
down the same unsustainable
track which has destroyed the
reefs of Florida”. He added:
“Tragically, the Florida devel-
opers and sewage injectors are
now bringing their methods to
the Bahamas, which is even

‘ more vulnerable. South Florid-

ians have a whole continent
they can move to when the ris-
ing seas drown south Florida,
but Bahamians do not have this
option and must protect what
they have.”

The Bahamas, Dr Goreau_

warned, was the most vulnera-
ble country in the Atlantic to
global warming and global sea
level rise.

Meanwhile, the Save Guana

POSITION AVAILABLE

Auto Parts Store seeks receptionist/sales clerk must be
willing to work on weekends. Applicant must be able
to work on own initiative, possess strong interpersonal
Sa

Please apply in writing to the manager, P.O. Box
N-10744, Nassau, Bahamas. Deadline for application is
March Sth, 2007.

EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY |

Computer Company needs Company/Network

»

Applicant should have:-

Repair Technician

- Knowledge of Microsoft Windows desktop and

Operating Systems

- Be familiar with PC Hardware and Software repair
- Be able to work with minimal supervision
- Be trainable on specific industry based software

applications

Please send resumes via email to
nassautechjob@ yahoo.com



JEWELLERY STORE MANAGERS

Discover a rewarding and
challenging career catering to the
country’s visitors in the exciting
retail jewelry business!!!

Do You Have What it Takes?

ARE YOU...
Confident? * A Leader? * Self Motivated?
¢ Professional? ¢ Mature (25 yrs or older)? * Dedicated?
' If the answer isYES then take the next step
FAX RESUME TO 326-2824

SALARY OPPORTUNITY COMMENSURATE WITH EXPERIENCE & QUALIFICATION

Cay Reef Association is oppos-
ing applications. by Baker’s Bay
to the Hope Town District
Council, seeking six permits for
projects ranging form $600,000
to $1.6 million for buildings at
Great Guana Cay. These appli-
cations were heard last night.
The Association’s attorney,
Fred Smith, said in a letter to
the Council: “Our clients have
vigorously complained that

throughout this process they -

haye not been provided with an
opportunity for proper consul-
tation and participation as
stakeholders in the decision-
making process of any central
and/or local government per-
son or agency having responsi-
bility for consideration of appli-
cations.

“Central to our clients’ com-

plaints is the fact that our clients’
consider that it is the local gov-.

ernment’s authority, specifical-
ly the district council, which has
the duty and responsibility
under the Local Government
Act to consider the many dif-
ferent applications which will
need to be made under the

’ Local Government Act. Appar-

ently, many applications have: '

somehow been made directly
to central government agencies
in Nassau thus bypassing the
local district council. cs

“In addition, apparently sin
between the recent elections ‘of
new members to the district
council, the administrator to the
Council apparently issued cer-
tain permits.”





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JAMES BAROCHIN OF
EAST STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister. responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, . for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration? ,
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written }
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight ,
days from the 16th day of February, 2007 to the Minister °
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,

Nassau, Bahamas.














- receptionist
- filing, typing correpondence
- banking & postal duties

- computer skills

motivated.

OFFICE ASSISTANT

To assist in General Office Work, Duties include, but not limited to: '

- accounting; knowledge-of Quickbooks a plus. - ER »
Ideal candidate will be honest, personable, responsible, and punctual, and self
Salary commensurate with experience.

Send resume to: Office Position, RO. Box CB-13835, Nassau, Bahamas



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FINLY TURNIER OF MARSH .”
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister
responsible for. Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/* |
naturalization as acitizen of The Bahamas, andthatanyperson’
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should: '
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 23RD day of,
February, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality,
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

-
.



’

NOTICE is hereby given that EARL RICARDO CHUNO OF
WINTON MEADOWS, . P.O.. BOX N-9810, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for

Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization.
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who

knows any reason why registration/ ‘naturalization should

not be granted, should send a written and signed statement: 4:
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 16th day of; 4:
February, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality’
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE isherebygiventhat KEVINJEROMEWOODSIDE OF.: | «.
GARDEN HILLS, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to’ |:
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for. } *
registrationmaturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and: ,
that any person who knows any reason why registration‘ -
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written: | ;
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days . f '
from the 23RD day of February, 2007 to the Minister} :
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, |
Nassau, Bahamas.

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
‘Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

0.000
0.100
0.560 :
eceserememame 202 0.795 7.9 95%
eee \
IV

Weekly Vol. ield



52wk-Low Last Price












12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets 1.766 1.365 8.8 9.35%
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 0.000 0.640 NM 7.85%}
0.021 0.000 26.2



CESSES

EARS SEARS
2.220 0.000 19.4

28.00 ABDAB




















14.00 Bahamas. Supermarkets 1.770 1.320 8.3 9.04%
070 0.000 J N/M ” 0.00% 4
$ piss s SRS SRNR S SS S S SS :
Anite CS
S2wk-Hi 52wk-Low Fund Name NA _V YTD% Yield % ‘
1.3292 1.2756 Colina Money Market Fund 1.329237* ‘
3.0569 2.6662 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.0569*** ‘
}2.5961 2.3241 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.596093”**
: 41.2248 1.1547 Colina Bond Fund 1.224792**** RAKSEGQ__EV|E AS S .
- 11.3545 10,0000 _ Fidelity Prime Income Fund 11,3545*%""* Alfani ay 66
Ms ne ECE VAVVQNVwG§ Multifunction Color Printer $166
et LL ultifunction Color Printer, $1¢



Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Baharr.18 Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
H Previous Close - Previous day’s weighted price for dally volume
|) Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume
H Change - Change In closing price from day to day

Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12. month eamings

*- 16 February 2007

D ELLLCD Monitor 15” $224
DELL LCD Monitor 17” $290

*** 31 January 2007 \ ‘ X

“* 31 January 2007

see" . 31 January 2007



- 31 January 2007

COee ene eae we est 4%,

Ses ce yt mb




RECIRIR


—* THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

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SO I INVITED HIM OVER...



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. 2007 by King Festures Gyraficets, Inc. World rights veserved.

CRYPTIC PUZZLE

ACROSS ;
Supported the right in it, having
drifted (7)

Identify those you're addressing
when you're being abusive (4,5)
Said something to conceal the
features would be useful (5)
duncture at which you aim at (5)
Meant | got off to an early start in
entertainment (7)

Attack you get terribly

upset over (3,4)

Making holes, lets out (5)
Happen to be among our:
numbers (5)

A small box contains the material (5)

Cook with a little brandy to
give it a lift (6)
That's not fairl (6)

Associate with, when you join up (7)

Leave the brush behind! (7)

On retum, does some gumshoeing in

the woods (6)
Changes toa victory sign (6)

It provides grass for all the horses (5)
Though out of condition, having fun

Playing with it (3)

Calm, nevertheless (5)

It's an imbroglio and we ratumed”
wortied (2,1,4)

Book from a distance (7)
Alonging to start the holiday (5)
All goods manufactured for the
mountains (5)

Anticipate and get the woodend
everything (9)

Appalled to be back at the home with

lunatics (7)
YESTERDAY'S CRYPTIC SOLUTIONS

ACROSS: 1, Stud-s 6, Staff 9, El
Greco 10, Da-is-y 11, Rum-BA 12,
Sitar 13, Pen-gui-n. 15, Seb , 17, Iron
18, Ce-rise 19, Sloes 20, Tr-eat-y 22,
Star 24, Sad 25, Fil-Ch.-ed 26, Spell
' 27, Strap 28, Te-p-ld 29, Left arm 30,
Or-der 31, Y-ells
DOWN: 2, Teaser 3, Design 4, Sly
5, B-ruin 6, Scrapes 7, Tou-R 8, Fab-
Les 12, Silly 13, Pict-s 14, Noted 15,

SI-X-th 16, Be-ar-d 18, Cacil . 19, °

Stopper 21, A-after 22, Scheme 23,
Aarial 25, Flute 26, Sale 28, Try

x

DOWN

1 Achannel with no water in it,

* you say (6)

At the end, nips back in a state of
panic (8)

Not disclosing that you're
reserving (7,4)

‘ Is able to, having seen olf the
Chinese (9)
Translating, himself, to a foreign
language (7)

With him, it’s over in a flash! (4,6)
Anoodle suitable for vegetarians (4)
Either gives the OK to or
skips over (6) ty

See what I'm saying? (3-4)
Ajolly “You, there, painting the
interior!" (6) ;
Our going into where the lion Is
requires boldness (7)

Went up In the air when

one copied (4,3)

Gats flaming or has a slight tiff
about (4,5,2)

It's not a novice and It's

not running (3-7)

Very well, then, improve on it,
chum! (9)

The sick are in the best possible
quarters (7)

Rush to get a'small order from the
Indian takeaway? (6)

Glaring at the show of patriotism,
deliver a diatribe (8)

Anumber admitted to have been
drinkers (6)

Says one tends to push oneself
forwards? (7)
Someone who looks after his
money? (6)
Drink for a bash (4)

YESTERDAY'S EASY SOLUTIONS

ACROSS

8 Large ape (7)

9 — Furniture itam (9)

13 | In front (5)

14 * Tolerate (5)
Oblivious (7)
Antagonistic (7)
Very tall person (5)
Player's first game (5)
Firearm (5)

Fritters away (6)
Shirt part ©
Deep purplish red (7)
Truthfulness (7)
Metallic element (6)
Smaii basket
for fruit (6)
Heals (5)
Soup server (5)

’ Capture (5)
Souvenir (7)
Not very (4,3)
Royal (5)
Sum (5)
Polite (9)
First course of
a meal (7)

B38 £¢ 8 8B 8 BR Bs

Lu
=
N
=
a]
>
n
x |
Wu

ACROSS: 1, Harsh 6, Hangs 9,
Handbag 10, Stead 11, Rummy 12,
Halve 13, Cordial 16, Fit 17, Ores
18, Astute 19, Least 20, Raises 22,
Herd 24, Act 25, Derides 26, Cumin
27, Groom 28, Shout 29, Reshape
30, Ashes 31, Armed
DOWN: 2, Author 3, Shards 4, Had
5, [deal 6, Harvest 7, Ague 8, Gambit
12, Hades 13, Cobra 14, Remit 15,
Fumed 16, Tends 18, Aspen 19,
‘Legumes 21, Acoms 22, Higher 23, ©
Resume 25, Dishy 26, Core: 28, Spa





COMICS PAGE








North dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.
NORTH
@A54
VA
#1093
#3109765
WEST EAST
#10972 @#KQI83
¥11054 ¥82 :
48 #KIJ765
AK 42 &Q
SOUTH .
46
Â¥KQ9763
@AQ42
83
The bidding:
North East South West —
1+ 1% 29% 34
Pass 4% 5¢ Pass
Pass Dble :

Opening lead — king of clubs.
Odd things happen, even m
national championships. For exam-
ple, take this deal played in the Van-
derbilt Teams. The four players at the
table were all well-known Life Mas-
ters. The bidding was not letter-

perfect, but it often isn’t under the °

stress of competition. ;
North was a player who seldom
passed when it was his tum to bid,
and he elected to open one club.
East-West were no shrinking violets

either, and they quickly reached four,

TARGET _



HOW many words of
four letters or more
can you make from the
letters shown here? In
making a word, each
letter may be used once
only. Each must contain
the centre letter and
there must be at least
one nine-letter word. No
plurals or verb forms
ending in “s”, no words
with initial capitals and

no words with a hyphen or apostrophe permitted.
The first word of a phrase is permitted (e.g. inkjet in

inkjet printer).
TODAY'S TARGET :

Good 30; very good 45; excellent 60 (or more).

Solution tomorrow.

WN
1 Hangs in the air (6)
Trachea (8)

Happ

betatos of (7,4)
Sets free (9)
Subtracts (7)

Tel ;
song (384)

ng (7)
Annoy continually (6)
Support, reinforce (7)
Lacking firmness (7)
Consider calmly (11)
Simple (10)
Yellow-flowered

energetic (2,3,2)
Stockings (6)
Burial ground (8)
Reels (6)
— Nahr (7
romatic
Midday dee

SSSess B SBRNSEES~

*MAYBE IF YOU PLAY WITH JUST OWE HANR
IT WOULP ONLY SOUND HALF AS BAP.”

Famous Hand



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007, PAGE 7B







BEACH.

spades (which probably would have

gone down one). South was now
faced with a difficult problem. After
great thought, he bid five diamonds
— which East, of course, doubled —
and everyone passed.

West led the king of clubs and
continued with the ace, East discard-
ing a heart: West then shifted to a
spade. Declarer took dummy’s ace
and returned the ten of diamonds,
covered by the king and ace. He then
crossed to the ace of hearts and led
the nine of diamonds, covered by
East’s jack and South’s queen.

Six tricks had been played, and
South had won four of them. At this
point, East turned to declarer,
showed him his ‘cards and said mat-
ter-of-factly, “I think the rest are
mine.”

And so they were. East had the 7-
6-5 of diamonds and K-Q-J-3 of
spades. Whatever declarer led next,
East would win the trick with a
trump and cash the 7-6 of diamonds
and four spades to defeat the contract
seven tricks — 2,000 points!

Of course, South could have saved
a bushel of points had he not per-
sisted with trump leads. Instead, he
should have tried to score his low
trumps and save what he could from
the wreck. If he had, though, this col-

umn featuring, {a :2,000-point penalty,

would never have been written...
tt res

er breath

»
83
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vu
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£
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=
3
Ye

er berth betroth
loathe loth
eta thole threat throat

AL blah blather both both

broth brothel
halter hare h

hear heart h
hotel hotter

earth halbert hale: hale’
arlot- hart hate hater
lath lathe Jather loath

abhor bath bathe bath
oath other rehab that th
throb throe torah troth

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION
BETROTH.

yellow cheese



Harry Pillsbury v Emanuel Lasker,
St Petersburg 1895-6. Lasker was
world champion for 27 years, yet
his reign could have been much
shorter but for events at St
Petersburg. A few months earlier
_the then unknown Pillsbury had
won Hastings ahead ofthe —
European elite ted by Lasker. Both
were invited to Russia to compete
against former world champion
Wilhelm Steinitz and national icon
Mikhail Tchigorin in probably the —
ever jar.
Pillsbury and Lasker battled for
early lead until, some researchers
claim, the American visited the .
city’s red-light district and
contracted syphilis. His form

THE GIANT SLIMY OCTOPUS
OOZES ACROSS THE

WITH A SUCKER-QVERED
TENTACLE, HE GRABS AN || SOMETHING, CALVIN?
a |

WIS HIDEOUS PRESENCE

TERRORIZES THE SLEEPY

WATERFRONT COMMUNITY
2















FRIDAY,
FEBRUARY 23
ARIES -— Mar 21/Apr 20
Efforts to impress other people could
have disconcerting results. :Don’t
expect favors from others now. A

relationship with a member of the
opposite sex could become serious.

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21
Watch your temper this week. You may
end up driving someone away with one
of your sudden emotional outbursts.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21
This is not a very good week to pur-
chase secondhand items.-They could
be of poor value. If you are looking
to make a purchase, shop around for
a few weeks, then decide.

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22
You will have an especially easy time
with teamwork and shared projects. A
lot will be accomplished.

LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23

This will prove to be an exceptionally
talkative week...even for you! It’s an
ideal time for exchanging views, mak-
ing deals and having heart-to-heart
conversations with those you love.
VIRGO — Aug 24/Sept 22

You may have recently been involved
in some activity that you don’t want to

‘become public knowledge. But your
‘J /secrecy maybe noted by those’ close

to you and lead to difficult questions.

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23

This week could easily start with
some family arguments connected
with leisure activities. Try to be
more decisive when it comes to
making plans with friends.

SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22
You'll have to try to be less straight-
forward than usual. There is a prob-
lem — something to do with a close
friend — and you could be involved.
It’s a situation that doesn’t call for
Straight talk, so try to keep your
opinions to yourself.

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
Recent disagreements with family
members should be resolved. You
will find that tensions. at home have
been alleviated.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
Make sure social activities. don’t
conflict with your rigorous work
schedule. If you neglect your respon-

| sibilities, you could find yourself in

a bad situation next week.

AQUARIUS -— Jan 21/Feb 18
You may not have as much energy as
you think, so slow down your pace.
Steer clear of conversations about
politics or religion with family mem-
bers who have opposing views.

PISCES — Feb 19/Mar 20
Because Pisces tend to feel sorry for
themselves, they are often held back
from the good things in life. You
can’t improve your life if you're
always drowning in sorrows. Many
good things could happen this week,
but you won’t be able to experience
them if you’re home sulking.





10 years later he died, still only 34,
from the long-term effects of his
illness. Here Lasker (Black, to move)
has boldly sacrificed two rooks for a
bishop to open up the white king.
How did the world champion force

suddenty dropped, he finished the —_ victory?

event a distant third to Lasker, and

LEONARD BARDEN

a

CHESS

SCLUTIONS



“AYE QP GEN p +90

SOOM E 150 HEN Z +E90T “908 VORNIOS Ssay)




. Spo 6

SS See : Zi | LS ace

[NSPE MINE




es

THE



(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

NMIARINE FORECAST

WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY _ WATER TEMPS.
N at 7-14 Knots 1-2 Feet 6-7 Miles 77° F
ENE at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 6-7 Miles 77°F
N at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 6-7 Miles 76° F
ENE at 10-20 Knots 6-7 Miles
N at 8-16 Knots 2-4 Feet 6-7 Miles 76° F
ENE at 8-16 Knots i
















Clear; breezy late. Breezy with plenty of Partly sunny. Rather cloudy. Mostly cloudy with a The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the

sunshine. : few showers. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
















ine High: 77° High: 79° High: 81° High: 79°
Low: 65° Low: 67° Low: 69° : Low: 59° Topay’s U.S. FORECAST
Meee RealFeel AAA rea AccuWeather RealFeel YAH Yl Uta ater: Yaa er 5





High Ht.(ft.) Low Ht.(ft.
T 12:17 p.m. 2.2 6:17am. 0.0
Mn 6:17 p.m, -0.1
:23 a.m.
7:20 p.m. 0.0

da 8:34am. 0.3
Sunday 30pm. 2.0 8:28pm. 0.1

pos oir: 3S a Li 72 Fe LE Te)

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature? is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, srecigtiiion, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

| ae | Ls
, " Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday
Temperature


















HIN. micnctacinrennnininns BE" FPQB® Ca ne “72s
; health cee , oes : 3:40 p.m. 20 9:37 p.m. 0.1 si a7 92 58/1
Normal low .... .. 64° F/18° C Calg 339 ome

10 sn a anes aea0 6 c





Last year’s high . 82° F/28° C
Last year’s low . 70° F/21° C
Precipitation ;
s ; : As Of 1 p.m. yesterday ......sseecsessseceseseseeeee 0.00"
2 Z Z a Year to date ............4. i hA2” First
High:76°F/24° : gee Normal year to date .. wee O12”
AccuWeather.com
— All forecasts and maps provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and Cod ==

precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. aaa
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. en
: Stationary Menge

“
ur
s!

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.





U.S. Cines







RAGGED ISLAND Low7t°F o¢





4205 23/-5 s Las » Vegas pala ae sh 59/15 °c
eae. taetes Lowe 66* BC
San 24 4 pe Los. Angeles tgs
ee GREATINAGUA
anit High: 82° F/28° C C RANCE BROKERS & AGENTS



- , p Minneapolis _
722 584 ¢ TOR «47 t
Sort 2a Oe 39/3 21/-6 sn

Eleuthera =] = Exumg
Tel (242) 332-2862 | Tek: (242) 336-2304



Winnipeg 23/-5 12/11 sn- 23/5 14/-11 sn
Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-patty cloudy, ¢-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-



“81/27 68/20 oe
7523 6317 c 75/23 5613 t

Honolulu 81/27 68/20 s



Tucson 59/15 35/1 “sh 60/15 36/2 s

Houston Washington,DC 45/7 25/-3 s 47/8 32/0 - s. é



t35 storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rcp precipitation, Tr-trace


-- BASKETBALL

ae

i Re

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007

SECTION

|
|
Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

. sebone

MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

can

]

ren a







' BM MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE



Ferguson
leads the
Stingrays
to win over
Warriors

By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports
orter



STERMAN Ferguson
took CV Bethel down
the stretch and guided
the Stingrays to a 58-49
victory over the Faith

_ Temple Warriors yester-

day.

The Stingrays, who
won their second
straight game in the
25th Hugh Campbell
Basketball Classic at. the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasi-
um, got a game high 25
points from Ferguson.

He pumped in six of
CV Bethel’s final eight .
points as they pulled
away from a 51-47
advantage in the final

_.two minutes to seal the

win.

“T had to pull the
team together, keep the
team togéther and play
ball, That was how we
won,” Ferguson said.

“We just wanted to

make sure that we’re
still in the tournament.”
Ferguson said their
goal is to get to the final
for the first time and
eventually win the title
that has eluded them.
While Ferguson had
the hot hands, Raymond
Minus added 17 and
Romell Johnson chipped
in with 10. ag
CV Bethel trailed 18-
20 after the first quarter
and 31-30 at the half.
But they went on to
take a 42-39 lead after
the third quarter.
Wilfred Culmer led
Faith Temple with 18,
Neketo Ferguson had 17
and Rashad McPhee six
in the loss.
Warriors’ coach Gary
Hanna said: “Down the

stretch we lost our com-

posure, we lost focus
and the team fell apart.
We just have to regroup
and improve on our
guard play.”

Despite the loss, Han- a

na said he’s-not con-
vinced that they are
done yet. He still feels
he has the “two best big

. men in the tournament”

_ in Culmer and Fergu-
’ son.

Also staying alive was
the Dame Doris John-
son Mystic Marlins.
They knocked off Telios
42-37 as Rarsenio

‘ Dorsette scored 12; Les-

‘~. ley St. Fleur seven and

Jerome Wright four in
the win.

Walter Charlton
canned a game high
20 in the loss, while
Eric Stuart and
Theodore McHardy
scored five ‘and four
respectively.

The Mystic Marlins,
who led fust 11-10 after
the first quarter, opened
a 26-19 margin at the

, half.

But they only led 34-

_ 32 at the end of the

third before they held.
off Telios in the fourth.



THE Grand Bahama Tabernacle Fal-

cons, Eight Mile Rock Bluejays, Alpha .

Omega’ and Sunland Lutheran were
among the winners on Wednesday night
on day three of the Hugh Campbell Bas-
ketball Classic.

The Grand Bahama teams made their
debut on day three of the 25th version of
the week-long double elimination tour-
nament for senior boys high school
teams.

The Falcons routed the South Andros

Cheetahs 65-20; the Bluejays pounded °

the Mt. Carmel Cavaliers 59-49 and
Alpha/Omega won over visiting Turks

il! RM BAILEY’S Vincent Strachan goes up hard for the lay up.



(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

een ere emer

TATIONAL





INV I

@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

AFTER losing by one point in their opening game, the
RM Bailey Pacers stayed alive in the 25th Hugh Camp-
bell Basketball Classic with an 11-point victory.

During day four of the senior boys double elimination
tournament yesterday at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasi-
um, the Pacers posted a 66-54 decision over the Church
of God Flames.

The Flames, one of the first year teams in the tourna-
ment, were the first team to:be ousted on the court after
they were blown out by the CR Walker Knights on day
two,

The first team, sent packing, however, was the Aquinas
College Aces, They failed to show up for their second
straight game, losing to Galilee by default yesterday.

Coach Stephen Strachan said his Pacers finally played
like they are capable of playing.

“We knew that we were on the brink of elimination
and so I told my guys we just have to come out and play
basketball and leave everything on the court,” Strachan
stressed,

“For six minutes a quarter, leave everything on the
court, So they went out and executed and we came out
with the victory.”

The Pacers, however, didn’t turn things around until
the second quarter when Brian Delancy completed a
three-point play to push their lead to 18-15 before they
extended it to 26-20 at the half.

RM Bailey never looked back as they coasted to a 45-
38 lead at the end of the third.

Church of God never threatened in the fourth as they
lost two of their big men, Adrian Gustave and
DeCardroy Burrows in the first minute of the fourth.

The Pacers were able to out-run the Flames through-
out the period to stay in control.

“We started out slow, but once we get the jitters out,
we can play basketball with anyone in this country,”
Strachan stated. . 4

Delancy finished with a game high 28 points, including
11 in the third, to pace the Pacers. Vincent Strachan
had 21 and Clint Higgs chipped in with five.

Bernard Bonamy scored 22, Travis Flowers.14 and

» Neko Barr and'Stanford Rolle both contributed five ih -

the loss.

For the Flames, coach Rodney Curry said it was just an
opportunity for his players to get their feet wet in the
tournament as they made their debut,

“We have a lot of ten, eleven and ninth graders, so a lot
of them will be back next year,” Curry stressed. “We
started out a little late, but we hope to be back next
year,”

Curry said they got away from their game plan, which
was to take the ball inside because they had the bigger
line-up. He said when they lost their two big mento
foul trouble, it didn’t help them in their comeback.

But he vowed that they will learn from this year’s
experience and hopefully be back better next year.

and Caicos 62-48,
¢ Here’s a summary of the games
played:

_ @ Falcons 65; Cheetahs 20: Raymond
Higgs led Tabernacle Academy with a
game high 17 points, Leo Gideon had
12, Dereck Gaitor 11, Colyn Grant eight
and Stephen Burrows chipped in with
six.

Travis Sands scored 10 in the loss.

@ Bluejays 59, Cavaliers 49: Kiplin
Fowler scored 18, Reginald Carey had
13, Nathaniel Cooper 12 and Hubert

Williams 10 to pace the Eight Mile Rock
to their opening victory.
Taquil Ferrier had a game high 22,

‘Travis Stuart 13 and Rashad. Ferguson

eight in the loss.

@ Alpha/Omega 62, Turks and Cacaos
48; Antonio Ferguson scored 22 points,
Shameka Green had 12 and Jackson
Walker 10 in the win as Alpha/Omega
greeted Turks and Cacaos in the tour-
nament,

Hilarian Taylor scored 18, Javon Ful-
ford had 10 and Delroy Saunders six in
the loss.

Sunland Lutheran, the other Grand
Bahama team, blew out North Andros
67-19,

e Also Wednesday night, the St. John’s
Giants knocked off the Government
High Magics 59-49,

' @ Giants 52, Magics 48: Denzel
Barr scored a game high 21 points, Ricar-
do Moultrie had 15 and Shanairz
Wallace added 10 in the win for St.
John’s.

Kenson Doke and Trizille Darville
both had eight points.



Pmilovin' it®



:



4
4

acer ea Fane
to Keep hopes alive
PAGE 2C, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Henin, Mauresmo
reach Dubai semis,
but Hingis loses

@ TENNIS
DUBAI,
United Arab Emirates
Associated Press

DEFENDING champion
Justine Henin led the top
three seeds into the semifinals
of the Dubai Open on Thurs-
day.

Henin routed Eleni Daniili-
dou 6-0, 6-2 and will meet
third-seeded Svetlana —
Kuznetsova, who defeated
Patty Schnyder 6-3, 6-4.

Second-seed Amelie Mau-
resmo topped Daniela Hantu-
chova 6-3, 3-6, 6-4, and Marina
Hingis, the 2001 champion,
lost 7-6 (3), 6-2 to Jelena
Jankovic after a quick turn-
around.

Henin is 12-1 against
Kuznetsova, with wins in the
2004 Dubai final and 2006
semifinal. Mauresmo leads
Jankovic 4-1 overall, but the
Serb won their previous outing
last month in Sydney.

Henin, playing her second
tournament of the year, was
pleased with her form after a
three-set scare on Wednesday
against 16-year-old Tamira
Paszek.

“It’s definitely the best I
have played this year,” Henin
said. “I really needed a match
like yesterday’s. Today, I was
very aggressive, very positive.”

Mauresmo said she lost her
concentration against Hantu-
chova in the second set and
was grateful for a courtside
visit from coach Loic
Courteau to shake her up.

“T really felt I was in control
of the match in the first set,”
said Mauresmo, the 2005
champ. “But then I told Loic
at the end of the second set
how asleep I was. I wasn’t
doing anything in the second
set, but I was able to get my
rhythm going bit by bit in the
third set.”

Hingis finished an earlier
three-set match at 1:30 a.m.
and didn’t hit the bed until 4
a.m.

She was annoyed at the
scheduling.

“They should have put at
least one match yesterday in
the outside court,” Hingis said.
“T should not have bothered
going back to hotel last night.”

The Swiss player led 4-2 in
the first set, but Jankovic dom-
inated thereafter.



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event sponsors;

Family Islands hear Neville ©

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

NATIONAL Sports Advisory
chairman Alpheus 'Hawk'
Finalyson was more than pleased
with the response he got from the
residences in Acklins and Crooked
Island.

Finlayson was on those two
islands on Monday and Tuesday
where he shared the vision of the
Minister of Youth, Sports and
Housing Neville Wisdom for an
improvement in the sporting facil-
ities there.

While the emphasis in the Fam-
ily Islands for the past decade was
on the Bahamas Games, Finlayson
told the residences in two sepa-
rate meetings that Wisdom is seek-
ing to ensure that the islands are
better prepared by improving their
facilities,

During both meetings, Fin-
layson touched on facilities, tal-
ent, organisation, coaching and
funding, He also indicated that he
will do his best to provide a coach-
ing clinic for the core sports for
the two islands combined.

"T feel very encouraged by what
has happened these last two days,"
said Finlayson, who made the trip
on the heels of his first Family
Island visit to Abaco last week-
end. Based on his assessment,
Finalyson said he's encouraged by
persons in those areas and it all
goes well for what he sees in terms
of the development on the islands.

"This is just a continuation of
the plans that we have for making
an impact throughout the nation,"

_ he stressed.

"In Abaco last weekend, I had
an. opportunity to go Moores
Island where they have more peo-
ple than any of these islands.

"But if you just look at the num-
bers alone, these people here in
the southern islands need just as
much attention as Grand Bahama
or any other island. So I was hap-
py that the recommendation that
moneys should go to Family Island
sports development is a timely
one."

Both Acklins and Crooked
Island are lacking in adequate
sporting facilities, lighting fixtures,
sports equipment and most impor-



Race starts at 7a.m. at the Western Esplanade to Goodmans Bay & back
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All Proceeds will be donated to The Bahamas Heart Association and The Strider Track Club. Trophles and prizes will be awards for different categories.

_ For More Information, Call 327-0806 or 394-6715



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__ PARENTS SIGNATURE (Mander 18) ne ete bliin

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tantly, trained physical education
teachers and the lack of organised
sporting activities.

Andrew Dean, principal of the
Acklins High School, said in order
to better promote or organise
sports on their islands, he firmly
believes that the sporting facilities
have to be upgraded.

"We need some facilities cen-
trally located on the island, but
the most important thing we need
right now jis a bus," he pointed
out. "The closest athlete to the
school is some 20-40 miles from
the school and it's difficult to pick
them up and drop them off so that
they can train."

Portia Cox, who fills in as a
physical education instructor at
the school, said the lack of equip-

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Date:

Date;



ment has been a hindrance to the’

growth and development of the
athletes,

"We just had our school sports
and basically all of the athletes
were using the same equipment,"
she stated, referring to the javelin
as an example. "It's just a matter
of the athletes using the correct
equipment."

Stephen Sands, a member of
the MICA Sports council, said he's
more optimistic that sports will
start to re-develop on Acklins
because he knows that their cry
will be heard in New Providence,

"I'd like to see a priority made
in such a way that moneys can
now be disbursed to the sports
councils so they can try to make
sure that these athletes get the
training and nutrition that they
need to be better athletes," he
charged. "Don't forget, a lot of
our*best athletes came from the
Family Islands.”

On Crooked Island, the enthu-
siasm level was much higher. After

@ NATIONAL Sports Advisory chairman Alpheus 'Hawk' Finlayson meets with sports personnel in Acklins.

a highly spirited meeting, persons
were more energised, but they say
they are still waiting for the help to
come their way. —

"I'm very enthused about what
I heard," said Darrel Moss. "We
are really looking for some things
to happen for Crooked Island
now."

Former softball player Celes-
tine Bonaby, now a nursing officer
on the island, said she's looking
for the proper basketball and soft-
ball fields to be drawn out so that
they can start working on their
teams.

"I'm disappointed in what's
happening here right now," she
said. "I want the people to come
and help us to push sports because

we have a lot of talent here and we _
know that a lot of them can-get

athletic schalarships." :

David Cunningham, the Depu
Chief Councillor for Crooked
Island, said the meeting was very
beneficial because they covered a
lot of areas,

@ A BASKETBALL court on Crooked Island. David Cunningham, the Deputy Chief Councillor

Wisdom’s sporting vision —













_"L hope that this information
get to the ears of those persons
who can make a difference," he
insisted.

"T just feel that it's good for the
exposure that we are getting and I
hope that something good come
out of it."

Annafaye Ferguson-Knowles,
the chairman of the MICA Sports
Council, best summed it up by say-
ing that the meeting was fruitful
because a number of persons came
out and expressed their desire to
work as one for the betterment of
the island.

"Once the sporting facilities are
there and the coaching clinics are
held, I think the people will be
motivated to ensure that the sport-
ing activities are held," she
claimed.

“*:Finlayson assured the resi-

dences that he will do his best to
pass'on their concerns and he will
work diligently to ensuring that
the improvements are made in a
timely fashion.



for Crooked Island, said the meeting held on the island was very beneficial because they covered a lot

of areas.



@ BASKETBALL

HUGH CAMPBELL CORRECTION

sports in brief —



the ball bounced through."

Yuma improved to 14-8, but Scorpions' man-



IT WAS incorrectly stated in Thursday’s Tri-
bune Sports headline story that “Bimini win
Family Island thriller.” The story also stated
that Bimini won the game in a nail-biter, 33-32,
over New Bight, Cat Island.

In fact, it was the other way around. New
Bight-won the game 33-32.

The Tribune apologises for the error.

@ BASEBALL
BURROWS JR. SHINES IN ARIZONA

GREG Burrows Jr. paid off big dividends for
the Yumia Scorpions last’ Friday as the Ari-
zona Winger League came to a close.

Burrows, who was hitless at 0-4 at that point,
came up with a game ending RBI-single down
the left-field line in the bottom of the ninth
inning that propelled the Scorpions to a 7-6
victory over the Canada Miners as 3,000 fans
cheered from the sidelines.

"It was an overall team effort coming back
from 5-1," Burrows reflected.

"It was just the luck of the draw. I'm sure
anyone else would have done it, but it was my
turn to hit and I just took a good swing at it and

ager Mike Marshall said their success was due
in part to Burrows' game-winning heroics.

"He's from the Bahamas and it's all about
the visa," Marshall said, who earlier watched as
Yuma front office extended Burrows' contract
through the summer.

"Visas are very difficult to get in the United
States the last few years, so I am hoping some-
how some way, we can keep him because not
only is he a great ball player, but he's a great
individual."

Burrows was named MVP because of his
performance.

m@ DEBORAH DEAN'S FUNERAL SERVICE

THE funeral service for the late Deborah
Dean, 50, will be held on Saturday at 10 a.m. on
Chapel on the Hill, Tonique Williams-Darling
Highway. Interment will follow in Woodlawn
Memorial Gardens, Soldier Road.

Dean was the mother of Golden Girl Chan-
dra Sturrup. Dean was an active mother, who
supported the Bahamas Association of Ath-
letic Associations in many ways and she trav-
eled with the national team to the majority of
the big international meets around the world,
~SPORTSWEEKEND_





Ene Poa Tack
finally run out
_ Sor the Heat?

he Miami Heat has gotten an
unusual amount of goodluckin
the past few years. Abelow-
~ average Heat player named Anthonys
Carter forgot to exercise a clause in -

- his exorbitant contract,somehow __

clearing the cluttered path for Sha- -

~ quille O’Neal to thunder into town. _

the Heat fell a spot in a draft by acci- _

_ dentally winning the lastgameofa _
~ last-place season — and the tumble a
allowed tt the Heat to settle forsome

~ . anonymous kid ©
-mamedDwyaneé

Wade. The king’s. ON

_ treasurechestis

~ always filled with a lot .

of good. fortune. .

Butnow?

The broke and | <

‘weary king is limping, \

-crownheavyand >
a askew, The Heat is suddenly the _

_ unluckiest team in the NBA, unable t

_ keep anything from its players toits

head coach to its place in the stand-

_ ings healthy. Heat fans attending the a

next home game should byes of |

locusts and killer bees. :

~ DROPPING LIKE FLIES” ST
: It isn’t merely that Miami’s players CO
keep collapsing, Wade with a dislo-
cated shoulder most recently, It is
_ that Miami’s best players keep Setting:
hurt, and at different times. So this _
~ herky-jerky season keeps sputtering
and stalling without any consistency
_ except bad luck. TheHeathashada
winning record only once in 54 games a
—a long time ago, when it was 3-2.
_. Next up: Expect forward Udonis
- Haslem to be mauled by a bear, Jason
__ Kapono to be attacked by an octopus
and center Alonzo Mourning to miss
four to six weeks after being hitinthe
head by a safe that falls from the sky. -
That’s a joke, but this isn’t: Wayne . -
Simien has missed this entire season
while fighting salmonella. .
So the Heat leads Oe league in
being poisoned. | .
It is hard to overcome the loss of -
one star player in this league, never _
_ mind three. The Phoenix Suns Pees
~ crushed everyone, then began losing -
- by double digits the moment Steve
Nash missed a few games. The Heat,
meanwhile, has lost significant time’
from Shaq, Jason Williams and now
-Wade. Gary Payton has missed a o
string of games for the first time inhis _
entire 16-year career, and two others ae
players (Antoine WalkerandJames
S Posey) were suspended for being fat.
_ Itisanamazingthing whenoneofthe _
- healthiest guys on your rosteristhe
one taking hundreds of pills for his _
borrowed kidney (Mourning).
Crazier still: The Detroit Pistons,
the Heat’s chief rival in the Eastern
Conference, never have anybody
_ injured. In the past three seasons, for
’ example, Tayshaun Prince hasn’t
missed a single game. The Heathas:
had more injuries in the last couple of ©
months than the Pistons have hadin
the past three years combined.

ALLISNOTLOST...RIGHT?
_ It is surprising that, upon Wade’s
injury, Riley didn’t simply raise his
arm in “Check, please” style and take.
another sabbatical. Awfully strange,



MORE
INSIDE: 10B















sate aaneintaanannannnaAAhhinAniAnANRAAMMARARASAMARASIHAMNROMARAMAAANAARANRARANAURANAH

PRO BASKETBALL | DENNIS JOHNSON: 1954 - 2007



INTERNATIONAL EDITION





Former NBA All- Star dies at 52

BY JIM VERTUNO
Associated Press

AUSTIN, Texas — Dennis John-
son, the star NBA guard who was
part of three championships and
teamed with Larry Bird on one of
the great postseason plays, died
Thursday, collapsing after
his developmental team’s
practice. He was 52.

Johnson, coach of the
Austin Toros, was uncon-
scious: and in cardiac
arrest when paramedics
arrived at Austin Conven-
tion Center, said Warren
Hassinger, spokesman for
Austin-Travis County
Emergency Medical Services.

Paramedics tried to resuscitate
Johnson for 23 minutes before he
was taken to a hospital and pro-
nounced dead, Hassinger said.
Mayra Freeman, a spokeswoman
for the medical examiner’s office,
said there will be an autopsy.

The Toros postponed home
games today and Saturday, the
NBA Development League said.

“He was one of the most under-



. DENNIS JOHNSON

rated players i in n the history of the
game, in my opinion, and one of
the greatest Celtic acquisitions of
all time,” said former Celtics team-
mate Danny Ainge, now the team’s
executive director of basketball
operations. “D.J. was a free spirit
and a fun personality who
loved. to laugh and play
the game. .

“We had spoken at
length just the other night
about basketball and his
excitement about coach-
ing the Austin Toros. “

Toros spokeswoman
Perri Travillion said she
was talking with Johnson
outside the building when he col-
lapsed. Johnson had been joking
about getting a parking ticket.

“We were laughing,” Travillion
said. “He just collapsed.”

Travillion said she called 911,

and that Johnson never regained
consciousness. She said Johnson
did not appear to have overexerted
himself at Toros practice and that
he had not complained of any dis-
comfort before he collapsed.



MARK LENNIHAN/AP FILE
GUARD DUTY: Dennis Johnson,
driving on Magic Johnson in
1986, helped win three titles.

Johnson, a five-time All-Star and

-one of the top defensive guards in

NBA history, was part of the last
Celtics dynasty. He spent 14 sea-
sons in the league and retired after

the 1989-90 season. Johnson played
on title teams with the Celtics in
1984 and 1986 and with the Seattle
SuperSonics in 1979, when he was
voted MVP of the NBA Finals.

“Whether he was leading his
teams to NBA championships or
teaching young men the meaning
of professionalism, Dennis John-
son’s contributions to the game
went far beyond the basketball
court,” NBA Commissioner David
Stern said. “Dennis was a man of
extraordinary character, with a tre-
mendous passion for the game.”

Johnson was a favorite team-
mate of Bird’s, and the two were
part of one of the most memorable
plays in Celtics history.

During the fifth game of the 1987
Eastern Conference finals against
the Detroit Pistons, Bird stole Isiah
Thomas’ inbounds pass under Bos-
ton’s basket and fed Johnson, who
drove in for the winning layup.

The Celtics won the series in
seven. games but lost to the Los
Angeles Lakers in the NBA ‘Finals.

* TURN TO DENNIS JOHNSON



PRO BASKETBALL | CHICAGO 84, CLEVELAND 78

_ Strong in the clutch



Bulls step it up
down the stretch,
hold off Cavaliers

BY TOM WITHERS
Associated Press

CLEVELAND — Luol Deng scored 18 points,
and Ben Wallace had 19 rebounds, a season-high
seven blocks and two huge free throws in the
final minutes, leading the Chicago Bulls to an
84-78 victory qver the Cleveland
Cavaliers on Thursday night.

Wallace added 14 points as the
Bulls snapped a six-game losing
streak in Cleveland and
improved to 8-2 in the Central
Division race. :

Ben Gordon scored 16 Bolits
and Kirk Hinrich had 11 for the
Bulls, who overcame foul trouble
and put the Cavaliers away with
a 14-5 burst in the fourth quarter.

LeBron James scored 29 points and Larry
Hughes had 20 for Cleveland, but the Cavaliers,



- the NBA’s worst free-throw-shooting team,

were just 8-of-16 from the line. Chicago, mean-
while, was 12-of-12 from the line.

After a fadeaway jumper by Deng in the lane
gave the Bulls a 78-73 lead, Wallace, a 41 percent
free-throw shooter, stepped up to the line and
swished his only two attempts of the game.

Deng scored again to make it 82-73 before
James hit a 3-pointer and scored on a follow to
pull the Cavaliers within 82-78. However, Gor-
don made two more free throws with 13.7 sec-

_ onds left to seal the victory.

The Cavaliers played their fourth game with-
out starting center Zydrunas Ilgauskas, who is
attending to family health matters. Cleveland
also was missing guard Sasha Pavlovic (flu) and
guard Damon Jones (strep throat).

Andres Nocioni returned to the Bulls lineup

TONY DEJAK/AP

. . after missing seven games with plantar fasciitis.
THE RUSH IS ON: Luo! Deng of the Bulls drives against Cavaliers defender Daniel Gibson

_ that injury. Wade is as reckless with
He scored five points in 15 minutes.

_ his body as any player in the NBA, but
- he dislocated his shoulder simply by
_ reaching his arm out on defense? It —
looked harmless until he started winc-
_ ing and screaming. One of the tough-
__ est players in sports needed a wheel-
chair to the locker roomanda
‘stretcher to the ambulance because of
__ the pain. For a shoulder. How’s that —
for a snapshot of the Heat’s season? —
The Heat rides on Wade’s shoul- _
ders, too, and the timing of this is ter-
rible. Miami’s coughing engine was on
the cusp of humming right for the first
time this season. But all is not lost, no
matter how hopeless it might seem.
The Heat would be done if it
played in the Western Conference.
But O’Neal and friends, even though
they are capable of putting up a few
stinker 60-point games without
Wade, are still good enough to sal-
vage this season in the godforsaken
’ Eastern Conference. O’Neal makes his
sidekicks great, no matter who they
are, and someone will step up. The
Heat, if Wade can return soon, would
be the most formidable low seed in
the history of the NBA playoffs.
That is, if Shaq can avoid being
trampled by a runaway herd of buf-
falo outside his mansion.

in the fourth quarter, when the Bulls used a 14-5 run to pull away and win by six points.

GOLF | ACCENTURE MATCH PLAY CHAMPIONSHIP

e@ NBA REPORT

~ Woods wins easily; Mickelson, Furyk, Singh out

BY DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

MARANA, Ariz. — One by one,
the biggest names headed for the
airport Thursday, until Tiger
Woods was the only player among
the top eight seeds remaining in
the hunt at the Accenture Match
Play Championship.

Phil Mickelson had designs on a
comeback until Justin Rose scram-
bled backward out of the desert
and made a 30-foot par putt to
halve the 15th hole, leaving Lefty
looking like a batter frozen by a 3-2
curve that dropped over the plate.

Jim Furyk backed off a 7-foot
birdie putt three times and still
went wide left on it, losing on the
19th hole to Chad Campbell.

Vijay Singh
celebrated his
44th birthday
with birdies on
his last two
holes to extend
his match, then
missed a 6-foot
birdie putt on
the 19th hole



JEFF GROSS/GETTY

and lost to Ste-
TIGER WOODS phen Ames.
Woods had

an easy time against Tim Clark.
And, suddenly, his path to an
eighth consecutive PGA Tour vic-
tory looks a whole lot easier.
“T played better than I did yes-
terday, which is great,” Woods said
after making birdie on half his



PAUL CONNORS/AP

DOWN AND OUT: Phil Mickelson.

holes in a 5-and-4 victory over
Clark. “Do a little bit of practice
this afternoon and solidify some
things, and tomorrow, hopefully,
I can play even better.”

But Woods, a two-time winner
of this fickle event, knows not to

look too far
ahead. Next up
is Nick O’Hern,
a short-but-
straight-hitting
Australian who
beat Woods in
the second
round two
years ago at La
Costa. Still in
Woods’ side of
the bracket is.
Henrik Stenson, who won in Dubai
earlier this month when Woods
finished two shots behind. Another
winner was Trevor Immelman, the
last player to win a PGA Tour



ROSS FRANKLIN/AP

JIM FURYK

* TURN TO GOLF




ey



(OL IY OG IG GLY AI A AI SY I I I MN



PAGE 8, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007 THE TRIBUNE





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“My work at The Tribune is rewarding

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and challenging. I enjoy contributing
to the look of our newspaper while
meeting the needs of our advertisers.
| am proud to work here. The
Tribune is my newspaper.”

ESTHER BARRY

PRODUCTION MANAGER
THE TRIBUNE

The Tribune
My Voice. My Vlowspaper!

REEMA TR SOIT



era ame ren tes ee




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/ ,orizons
/ | FROM page one

ing to determine who gets cus-
tody of the remains of the con-
troversial US celebrity.

‘He took the stand and pre-
sénted the judge with a video of
Ms Smith taken when she was
eight months pregnant and living
at ‘Horizons’.

‘When asked how he had
obtained the video, Mr Shelley

did not answer directly but told:

the court that Ms Smith had
instructed him and Mr Thomp-
son to secure her belongings —
including the computer she had at
the house — if anything should
happen to her and Mr Stern was
not around.

Mr Shelley told the Associat-
ed Press earlier this week that
sdid he entered the property a
day after Smith’s death to
“Secure” it after he heard that
someone had been removing
items.

Rum Cay

‘FROM page one

Rum Cay had stopped, but
stressed that the stoppage was
only temporary. :

‘Mr Peet said work on the pro-
ject had stopped to allow the
Bahamas Environment, Science

and Technology (BEST) Com- |

mission to inspect the company’s
plans for a bigger marina than
the Heads of Agreement provides
for. ;

\The minister said Montana
Holdings’ proposal was being
reviewed in the light of govern-
ment’s new marina policy, which
was drafted last year.

‘Mr Peet said he expects the

matter to be worked out by next
week.

Registration
FROM page one

arly election up until then.

‘Mr Bethel said he believes
there is even sufficient time for
the number of registrations to
reach the projected 165,000.

Following the announcement
by Prime Minister Perry Christie
that the current register would
close in mid-March, registration
picked up considerably, Mr
Bethel explained.

Before the announcement, he
said, around 200 people registered
daily, now his department is see-
ing between 500 and 600 new reg-
istrations each day. bree

“We went up to about 400, 500

a day. On the last couple of days
we were definitely over 500, yes-
terday we were over 600. We’re
averaging between 500-600 a day
and it can go up more,” he said.

Mr Bethel said he expects even
more people to come out to reg-
ister as the political season heats
up and more rallies like the two
major ones which took place on
Tuesday are held.

“It’s coming gradually. It’s
much better than it was,” he said.

In December last year officials
expressed concern at the lack of
veter registrations. At that time
only a little over 100,000 people
had registered — with elections
only a few months away.

The slow registration impeded
the work of the boundaries com-
mission which reportedly was not
able to make any definitive deci-
sions on how some constituencies
will be drawn up.

Announcing the closing of the
register earlier this month, the
prime minister said that this was a
matter of “first importance”, urg-

ing all Bahamians citizens who -

had not yet done so to register
“as soon as possible.”

t









FROM page one

along the Great Isaacs Bank of
Grand Bahama, the south west of
Andros, and the northern area of
Cuba for traces of hydrocarbons -
which are used by petroleum geol-
ogists to assess the potential of
commercial deposits of oil in the
region.

Minister of Energy.and the
Environment Dr Marcus Bethel
told the press yesterday that inital
seismic data suggests that the
Bahamas has the necessary ingre-
dients to generate and trap com-
mercial deposits of petroleum.

“Techincal officers of the Min-

istry of Energy and the Environ- ©

ment, the BEST Commission, the
Ministry of Foreign ‘Affairs, the
Department of Lands and Surveys,
and the Office of the Attorney
General have reviewed the licence
documents to ensure that they are




Licences

in compliance with the require-
ments of our laws and policies.

“The licences are for three years
with a right to renewal if the terms
and conditions therein are met. If
hydrocarbons are discovered in
commercial quantities, the licences
will be converted to leases upon
the requests of the companies,” he
said. -

The companies’ licences have
been granted under the Petrole-
um Exploration Act of 1978.

The application has been

approved by the Bahamas Cabi-

net, the minister, and is now only
awaiting the signature of the Gov-
ernor General Arthur Hanna.

The financial benefit for the
Bahamas will be accrued through
rent for the licence areas, in addi-
ton to the application fee of
$100,000 per licence.

Baha Mar is accused
of ‘union-busting’

FROM page one

time employees, who receive better benefits.

Under the plan, all full-time employees up to director level work-
ing in the Bahamas and Florida have been offered a one-time, com-
pletely voluntary opportunity to end their employment with Cable

Beach Resorts and receive an a

ttractive compensation package

based on their positions and length of employment. Employees
have been given a six-week window to consider it.

In addition, the developer said those who participate in the plan
and can prove that they have enhanced their skills through contin-
uing education or specialised training after leaving Cable Beach
resorts, will receive first interview consideration when hiring begins

for Baha Mar in 2010.

Baha Mar CEO Don Robinson told Tribune Business: “As we start
mobilising for the project some of the rooms will come down, so the
workforce has to come down with that.”

Baha Mar also claimed the plan complies with all labour laws

and union guidelines.

However, BHMA president Obie Ferguson said Baha Mar has
“disregarded the requirements of the Industrial Relations Act and

their industrial agreement.”

According to him: “The agreement that BHMA has with Baha
Mar requires them to send the union a written notice of any proposed
changes that they wish to make to the industrial agreement, and up
to this date that has not been done.”

Mr Ferguson said that proposals directed to BHMA members,
without prior union consultation, were in contravention of the indus-
trial agreement between BHMA and Baha Mar.

He said Baha Mar executives and a union official had conducted
a “preliminary” meeting on the plan, but that no terms were ratified

by the union.

Asked why he believed Baha Mar had introduced the plan, Mr
Ferguson said the Cable Beach developer aims to reduce employee

benefits.

“Our industrial agreement says that if you’ve been working there
for 10 years or more you are entitled to five weeks vacation, but the
new employees that will be hired will come in under a different

arrangement,” he said.

_ Mr Ferguson said Baha Mar is attempting to “clean house” by get-
ting rid of employees who receive five weeks vacation.
The union president said he would be meeting with his members

next month to discuss the issue.

Baha Mar’s retirement and voluntary separation plan applies to _
employees of Radisson Cable Beach Resort, the Nassau Beach
Hotel, Wyndham Nassau Resort and Crystal Palace Casino.

FROM page one

tion in November, 2005, several
references were made to the
Bahamas “going back there” if
the FNM leadership team of
Hubert Ingraham and Brent
Symonette were to be elected.

And while not referred to by
name, Mr Symonette is generally
considered to be the target of
these comments, as he is the son
of former UBP premier Sir Rolan
Symonette, and brother of Speak-
er of the House, the late Bobby
Symonette.

In addition, at the PLP rally on
Tuesday, Foreign Affairs Minister
Fred Mitchell alleged that FNM
leader Hubert Ingraham will turn
over the government to ‘the UBP
heir’, Brent Symonette, if Mr
Ingraham is returned to govern-
ment.

However, PLP chairman Ray-
nard Rigby said Mr Symonette
was the one who brought up the
race issue, not the PLP.

The PLP press release says:
“This is the same Brent Symon-

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs announces that application for the captioned
fellowship at the Graduate and Undergraduate levels are now being accepted in
the following fields of study related to the OAS priority development areas:
1 Social Development and the creation of productive employment, Education,
Economic diversification and integration, trade liberalization and market access,
Scientific development and exchange & transfer of Technology, Strengthening
of democratic institutions, Sustainable development of tourism, Sustainable

development and environment, Culture.

Candidates are required to be citizens or permanent residents in OAS member
states with a minimum GPA of 3.00

Applications can be obtained from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, East Hill
Street or by downloading and electronically completing the OAS form 98 on
www.oas.org. All applications are to be submitted in triplicate to the attention
of the National Liaison Officer. The deadline for receipt of application forms in
1 the Ministry is February 28th 2007

Additional information can be obtained by contacting the Technical Assistance
Cooperation Division of the Ministry at telephone number 322-7624/5, or by
email to technicalassistance@mfabahamas.org

Rigby on PLP

ette who himself doubted his own
ability to be prime minister
because of the colour of his skin.
The PLP believes in the suprema-
cy of the content of one’s charac-
ter over the colour of one’s skin.
This has always been our belief.
And this belief has been put into
full practice by this PLP govern-
ment during our first term by
ensuring that all Bahamians par-
ticipate, and are engaged, in mat-
ters of national importance.”

Mr Rigby also denied the PLP
was guilty of playing the race card
at its convention in 2005.

The release reads: “It was the
FNM who, when they had their
convention, started speaking
about ‘salt and pepper’ in describ-

~ ing Brent Symonette and Hubert

Ingraham, not the PLP. It was
Hubert Ingraham who raised the
issue of race when he accused
Prime Minister Perry Christie of
not appointing a white man to his
Cabinet.



















LOCAL NEWS |






“Petroleum exploration and pro-
duction is capital intensive,” Dr
Bethel said, “so this activity’ will
not generate significant employ-
ment opportunities. However, roy-
alties will be paid to the Bahamas
government if hydrocarbons are
discovered, based on the volume of
production.

“For example, if the company
discovers petroleum in commer-
cial quantities and produces up to
75,000 barrels of oil per day, a 12.5
per cent royalty will be paid into
the treasury. Royalties payable will
increase with an increase in pro-

duction, such that on production in ,

excess of 350,000 barrels of oil per
day, 25 per cent royalty will be
paid,” he said.

Also, if natural gas is discovered,
a 12.5 per cent royalty will be
payable to the Bahamas govern-
ment, Dr Bethel said.

Besides the finaicial benefits, the
minister explained that there will

Anna Nicole

to be buried

in Bahamas
FROM page one

Judge Seidlin initially
announced that he would find
a remedy for the situation by
today, but he surprised all
parties involved when he
made his decision yesterday
afternoon.

If his ruling is upheld, the:
Bahamas can expect a media
circus to once again descend
on Lakeview Cemetery when
Ms Smith is buried in the
coming days.

Mr Stern — long-time

lawyer and companion of the

former TrimSpa spokes-
woman - testified on
Tuesday that Ms Smith want-
ed to be buried next to her
son. :

He said that she was “very
firm, very firm, that the
Bahamas was her home.”

Mr Stern was hunched over
a table with his hands folded
as he awaited Judge Seidlin’s.
ruling.

He appeared relieved and
wiped tears away after the
ruling was announced, while
Ms Arthur sat crying in the
courtroom.

Judge Seidlin said that he,
too, had suffered through this
case and that he felt sympa-
thy for all the parties, but
that it was important for, Ms
Smith to be united with her .
beloved son in death.

“The PLP is fighting a cam-
paign on philosophy, not race.
The FNM can talk all they want
about race. The PLP is not inter-
ested in race.” .

Mr Rigby said the FNM had
two questions to answer.

“What Brent Symonette and
the FNM must answer is: are they
the inheritors of the UBP and its
philosophy of exclusion? And
does Mr Ingraham deny that he
said that he intends to remain — if
elected — for 18 months and then
turn the party over to Brent
Symonette, who is his deputy
leader?

“Those are the issues.”

Mr Rigby described the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party as a party
of “inclusion”, with a “big and
inviting tent.”

be an increase of knowledge of the
petroleuem potential of the
Bahamas as a result of the explo-
ration activities.

“The terms of the licence man- |

date the companies to provide to
the minister within four months of
each year of the term of the
licence, the results of all geological,
seismic, and the other related
investigations and interpretations









Jamaica.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007, PAGE 13

CHRIST CHURCH CATHEDRAL

George Street, New Providence
The Bahamas

Due to the Annual General Meeting (A.G.M.)
on Sunday 25th February, 2007 there will be one
Eucharist Service at 8:00 am.

In addition, there will be no evening service, due
to the Diocesan Lenten Mission at St. John’s
College Auditorium beginning at 7:00 p.m. the
guest missioner is the Right Reverend Robert
Thompson, Bishop Suffragan of Kingston,



of works done.

“These will assist our under-
standing of our subsurface and will
be of interest to the College of the
Bahamas. The government of the
Bahamas welcomes this opportu-
nity, which can lead to an expan-
sion of our economic base, and
welcome such activities that will
be conducted in an environmen-

_ tally sustainable manner,” he said.




Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd
De Cie Noe
Phone:322-1722 ¢ Fax: a7 Ey |



322-1722

“EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

Awell established Pharmaceutical Company is seekingto hire the

.following, individual:-

: Reel U Wesel a1

Experience Skills:

+ Aminimum of three G) years



experience in the field.

- Excellent organizational and interpersonal skills
- Excellent communication skills

- Excellent command of English Language
- Proficiency in Microsoft Work and Excel.

Ae.

- Ability to work with minimal supervision

All interested persons should mail their resume to:

Chief Financial Officer

Commonwealth Drugs & Medical Supplies Co. Ltd

P.O.Box N-1145 -
Nassau, Bahamas 4

NT
Fax: (242) 323-2871

\
meds
A







Email: ksherman@commonwealthdmgs.com

Only applicants who meet the requirements will be contacted.

REE RN TT EN RL
4B | FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23,2007 __ INTERNATIONAL EDITION _



From Miami Herald Wire Services

Sevilla kept its UEFA Cup
title defense on track while
2005 champion, CSKA Mos-
cow was eliminated and Ajax’s
poor European season finally
ended on Thursday.

Sevilla had. a comfortable
3-0 aggregate victory over
Steaua Bucharest to reach the
final 16. Striker Aleksandr
Kerzhakov scored the only
goal of the second leg when he

headed past goalkeeper Cor- |

nel Cernea in first-half injury

time off a cross from Andreas’

Hinkel.
The match marked a disap-

pointing return for Steaua to ©
Sevilla’s Ramon Sanchez .

Pizjuan stadium, where it
lifted the European Cup in
1986 by beating FC Barcelona
on penalties.

Three other Spanish clubs
also made the fourth round —
Osasuna, Celta Vigo and
Espanyol.

CSKA Moscow lost 1-0 to
Maccabi Haifa to exit by the
same aggregate score, and

while Ajax beat Werder Bre-'

e

SOCCER

Sevilla advances in UEFA

JOSE MANUEL VIDAL/EPA
AN ALL-OUT RACE: Sevilla’s
Andreas Hinkel, left, fights
for possession with Ovidiu
from Steaua Bucharest

men 3-1, it couldn’t overcome
its 3-0 first-leg loss.
AZ Alkmaar, Bayer Lever-

SPORTS ROUNDUP

Trouble dogs
Pacman Jones
in Las Vegas

From Miami Herald Wire Services
More than $81,000 in cash

belonging to Tennessee Titans

cornerback Adam “Pacman”

Jones was seized by police, _

who say the money sparked a
weekend melee and a triple
shooting at a Las Vegas strip
club. -

Jones was showering more
than 40 strippers onstage early
Monday with cash “intended
as a visual effect,”:a search
warrant said. But a scuffle
broke out when the Houston
promoter
who. hired
the strippers
told them to
pick up the
money.

The pro-
moter, iden-
tified as
e Chris
Mitchell,
and a male
associate
took a plastic trash bag con-
taining Jones’ money and
walked out the front door, the
warrant says. Police recovered
the money and two watches
inside a safe at Mitchell’s hotel
room Monday.

Jones’ lawyer, Worrick
Robinson, has said his client
did not know anyone involved
in the shooting and was inter-
viewed by authorities as a wit-
ness, not as a suspect. Police
have not said Jones is a person
of interest in the case. Robin-
son could not be reached for
comment Thursday.



JONES

The incident occurred just

hours after the NBA All-Star
Game in Las Vegas, which
attracted celebrities from
music, sports and entertain-
ment.

Jones has faced criminal

charges three times — all -

involving nightclubs in Ten-
nessee — since the Titans
made the cornerback the sixth
overall pick in the 2005 draft.

Mitchell “admits that he
took the money in the bag
belonging to Jones because he
thought it was for the danc-
ers,” the warrant says. After
Mitchell left Minxx Gentle-

men’s Club & Lounge, “a_

melee broke out,” the warrant
says.

Later, a woman identified
as a member of Jones’ group
fought with one of the strip-
pers and security tried to
break up the fight, it says.
Jones told the guards to back
off and reached behind his
back “as if he were retrieving a
weapon there.”

Jones’ entourage was
moved outside, but the woman
continued to fight, according

_ to the warrant filed Wednes-

day in Clark County District in
Las Vegas.

The woman hit a guard in
the head with a champagne

‘bottle and “began biting and

screaming” when other guards

tried to restrain her, the war-

rant says. Minutes later, a valet
told police he heard shots
fired near the front entrance
and saw a black man with corn
rows in his hair pointing a
black semi-automatic hand-
gun, it says. The man then fled.
» The shots hit a female cus-
tomer and two guards, one
who is in critical condition at a
Las Vegas hospital. Aaron
Cudworth, the guard hit with
the champagne bottle, and the
woman were treated and
released. Police © have
described the suspected
shooter as last seen wearing a
black shirt and blue jeans.

e Elsewhere: The Jack-
sonville Jaguars have settled
on a starting quarterback for
next season. Coach Jack Del
Rio said that Byron Leftwich
will return to his starting role,
ending months of speculation
about what the Jaguars would
do at the quarterback position.
... Lovie Smith’s negotiations
for a new contract are at a
stalemate, according to his
agent, who created a stir by
saying the coach who led the
Chicago Bears to the Super
Bowl could become a free

-agent after the 2007 season....

Kellen Winslow has to make
another comeback. The Cleve-
land Browns’ talented tight
end underwent microfracture
surgery on his right knee last
month, a more extensive pro-
cedure than was initially
revealed and one that will
require a longer recovery....
The Baltimore Ravens decided
against designating Pro Bowl

linebacker Adalius Thomas —

as their franchise player, a
move that will enable the sev-
en-year veteran to become an
unrestricted free agent. Also,
the Ravens disclosed that the
contract extension signed by
head coach Brian Billick last
month was for four years,
through the 2010 season. ...
The Oakland Raiders cut ties
with Aaron Brooks, declining

to pick up the option on the’

quarterback’s contract afte:
one difficult season. ... The
New Orleans Saints desig

nated defensive end Charles’

Grant as their franchise
player, preverting the five-
year veteran from becoming
an unrestricted free agent...
The Seattle Seahawks desig
nated clutch kicker Josh
Brown as their franchise



kusen, Newcastle, Benfica,
Shakhtar Donetsk, Rangers,
Paris Saint-Germain, Lens and
Braga also advanced. But no
Italian teams qualified after
Parma and Livorno lost.

Leonardo, Klaas-Jan
Huntelaar and Ryan Babel
scored for Ajax in Amsterdam,
but it wasn’t enough to stop
the German club from advanc-
ing. ‘

The loss was the culmina-
tion of a poor European cam-
paign for Ajax, which failed to
qualify for the Champions
League group stage.

Ajax won the last of its four
European Cup titles in 1995, It
also captured the 1992 UEFA
Cup.

Ajax’s elimination leaves
AZ Alkmaar as the only Dutch
club in the final 16 — Feyen-
oord was kicked out of the
competition for crowd vio-
lence, which advanced its
scheduled opponent Totten-
ham.

AZ rallied to draw 2-2 with
Turkish club Fenerbahce for a
5-5 aggregate, and advanced

on away goals. Maarten Mar-
tens and Barry Opdam
scored in the second half to
counter first-half Fenerbahce
goals from Tumer Metin and
Alex.

ELSEWHERE

e Italy: Juventus signed
Czech Republic defender
Zdenek Grygera from Ajax
to a five-year contract, starting
next season.

The 26-year-old will trans-
fer to Juventus when his cur-
rent contract expires in June,
the Italian team said. Juventus
did not disclose financial
details of the deal. ... The
four-month ban on fans
attending games at Catania’s
stadium was upheld after a
police officer was killed dur-
ing rioting this month.

e France: Lille’s directors
blamed Manchester United for
the crowd trouble at their
Champions League match on

Tuesday, saying the English © |

team’s early distribution of
tickets led to a high number of
counterfeits being made.





SS SS

JEFF GROSS/GETTY IMAGES

RUNNING FROM TROUBLE: The lawyer for Adam “Pacman”
Jones said this week tnat his client did not know anyone
involved in Monday’s shooting and was interviewed by
authorities as a witness to the crime, not as a suspect.

player. ... The Detroit Lions
put the franchise tag on defen-
sive tackle Cory Redding,
team president Matt Millen
said late Wednesday. ... The

Dallas Cowboys hired Wade

Wilson to coach quarterbacks
and Bruce Read to run spe-
cial teams on Wade Phillips’
staff.... Veteran safety Troy
Vincent was cut by the Wash-
ington Redskins, saving the

team about $1.3 million in sala- °

ry-cap space.
ETC.

e Tennis: After years of
holding out against equal prize
money, Wimbledon yielded to
public pressure and agreed to
pay female players as much as
male players at the world’s
most prestigious tennis tour-
nament. The All England Club
fell in line with other Grand
Slam events and offered equal
pay through all rounds at this
year’s tournament. ... Defend-
ing champion Tommy Haas
edged Amer Delic in two tie-
breakers in the Regions Mor-
gan Keegan Championships
while women’s titleholder
Sofia Arvidsson lost her
quarterfinal in Memphis,
Tenn. Haas scraped by Delic
7-6 (7-2), 7-6 (7-5) in a second-

round match, without any

break points. In the women’s
Cellular South Cup, the
unseeded Arvidsson was
knocked out in 40 minutes by
Meilen Tu of the United
States 6-0, 6-2... . Juan Car-
los Ferrero deteated Lukas
Dlouhy 6-3, 6-3 but missed the
quarterfinals of the Copa Tel-

mex in Buenos Aires, Argen- _

tina. Ferrero finished second
in his round-robin group to
Nicolas Devilder, who beat
the Spaniard on Wednesday
and will advance to his first
ATP quarterfinals. ... Nikolay
Davydenko advanced to the
quarterfinals of the ABN
Amro in Rotterdam Nether-
lands, despite an ankte injury,
beating Marc Gicquel of

France 6-3, 6-3.... Defending
champion Justine Henin
advanced to the semifinals of
the Dubai Open, routing Eleni
Daniilidou 6-0, 6-2.
Lourdes Dominguez Lino of
Spain and Flavia Pennetta of
Italy reached the quarterfinals
and are on course to meet ina
third consecutive Copa Col-
sanitas final in Bogota, Colom-
bia.

e Golf: Fred Funk shot an
8-under 62 to take a two-
stroke lead after the first
round of the Mayakoba Golf
Classic, the first PGA Tour
event in Mexico. Cameron
Beckman was two shots
behind at 64 along with
George McNeill, John Mer-
rick and Boo Weekley in
Playa Del Carmen.’... Rookie
Angela Park shot a 6-under
66 in windy conditions to take
the early lead in the first round
of the LPGA Tour’s Fields
Open in Kapolei, Hawaii.
Meaghan Francella survived
a triple bogey to open with a
68, and South Korea’s Jeong
Jang and Jee Young Lee
shot 69s. Defending champion
Meena Lee opened with a 71,
leaving her tied with last sea-
son’s LPGA Player of the Year
Lorena Ochoa of Mexico....
Nationwide Tour player Ryan
Howison shot a 7-under 65 to
take a one-stroke lead after the
first round of the New Zealand
PGA in Christchurch.

e College football: Boise
State coach Chris Petersen
received a new five-year, $4.25
million deal that still lags
behind coaches at other major
colleges, but athletic director
Gene Bleymaier called it ‘a
reward for a phenomenal sea-
son.”

e Boxing: Former WBO
heavyweight champion
Tommy Morrison stopped
John Castle in the second
round in Chester, W.Va., in his
return to the ring ll years after
testing positive for the virus
that causes AIDS.



SOCCER | PRO FOOTBALL | ETC.





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____MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD




ZBIGNIEW BZDAK/CHICAGO TRIBUNE/AP

ONE BIG FACEOFF |

Oscar De La Hoya, left, and Floyd Mayweather trade
words during a news conference in Chicago on
Thursday to promote their World Boxing Council
junior-middleweight title fight on May 5 in Las Vegas.

Chief's reign comes to end

The student who had just performed Chief Illiniwek’s last
dance stood in a tunnel just off the basketball court, still in
costume and grimacing to fight back tears.

After 20 years of pressure from activists who found the
University of Illinois mascot offensive, the school did away
with Illiniwek and his antics. Dan Maloney, a graduate stu-
dent who portrays the controversial American Indian mascot,
performed for the final time in front of students and fans at a
men’s basketball game Wednesday night.

“If this is the last time — and I stress if,” Maloney said, “I
couldn’t think of a better way for it to end.”

The school’s decision led the NCAA to lift sanctions that
had barred Illinois from hosting postseason sports since 2005.
The NCAA had deemed Illiniwek — portrayed since 1926 by
students who cavorted at home football and basketball games
in buckskin regalia — an offensive use of American Indian

imagery.

But in the eyes of orange-clad students who waited outside

Assembly Hall in chilly weather for hours ahead of the game, a ;

‘the decision robbed the school of a piece of its history. | ¥

Gridiron goodwill
The latest phase of an
effort to help needy ex-NFL

players has brought in
$50,000 from the public
through an auction and
donations, bringing the total
raised to about $200,000,
organizers said. i
And the Gridiron Greats
Assistance Fund said’
Wednesday that three other |
individuals, who wish to i
remain anonymous, have

pledged another $200,000
for the cause. '

The fund waslaunched
by Jerry Kramer, the star
right guard of the Green Bay |
Packers four decades ago
under Vince Lombardi.

Kramer started the effort |
by auctioning off areplicaof |
his Super Bowl I ring last |
spring, raising more than
$22,000 to help supplement
pension and disability bene-
fits for other former players.

“Tam so encouraged by
the public support and the
support of other NFL play-
ers that I can see we have a
real opportunity to help
some of the guys who really
need it,” Kramer said.

einer ogatantaaior stool sachplocaerinenanitge

‘It means he is very old.’

- DANIEL ALFREDSSON, Senators right
wing, on Ottawa’s Bryan Murray, right, who
earned his 600th career coaching victory
with the Senators’ 4-3 shootout triumph
over Edmonton on Tuesday night.

Fuzzy situation

Pro golfer Fuzzy Zoeller
is suing to track downthe _
author who posted what he
describes as a defamatory
paragraph about him on the
Internet reference site Wiki-
pedia. Zoeller’s attorney,
Scott D. Sheftall, said he
filed the lawsuit against a
Miami firm last week
because the law won't allow
him to sue St. Petersburg,
Fla.-based Wikipedia. The
suit alleges someone used a
computer at Josef Silny &
Associates, a Miami educa-
tion consulting firm, to add
the information to Zoeller’s
Wikipedia profile.

Wikipedia, which
describes itself as “the free
encyclopedia that anyone .
can edit,” leaves it to a vast
user community to catch
factual errors.

The paragraph in ques-
tion has been removed, but
the information has been
picked up by other websites.
The lawsuit said it alleged
Zoeller abused drugs, alco-
hol and his family with no
evidence to back up the
statements.

On this day in history:

1938 — In boxing, Joe Louis knocks out Nathan Mann
in the third round to defend his world heavyweight title at
Madison Square Garden in New York.

1960 — Carol Heiss captures the first gold medal for the
United States in the Winter Olympics at Squaw Valley, win-

ning the figure skating event.

1985 — In college basketball, Indiana coach Bob Knight
is ejected 5 minutes into the Hoosiers’ 72-63 loss to Purdue
when he throws a chair across the court. Knight, after two
fouls called on his team, is hit with his first technical. While
Purdue is shooting the technical, Knight picks up a chair
trom the bench area and throws it across the court, earning

his second technical.

2002 — The Americans end nearly a half-century of
Olympic frustration for the U.S. men’s bobsled team, driving
to the silver and bronze medals in the four-man race.





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| “RIDAY, FEBRUARY 23,2007 INTERNATIONAL EDITION

PRO FOOTBALL



INSIDE THE GAME | NFL COMBINE

Dolphins might
be drafting help
at quarterback

§ In what is viewed by many experts as a thin quarterback field, Notre
Dame star Brady Quinn could drop to the Miami Dolphins in the NFL
Draft - but Quinn’s stock would have to plummet for that to happen.

BY JEFF DARLINGTON
jdarlington@MiamiHerald.com

INDIANAPOLIS — A herd of
young quarterbacks will shuffle
through RCA Dome today at the
scouting combine, each player show-
ing off a different set of skills while
scouts, coaches and general manag-
ers dissect their every move.

Surely, there’s a star in there
somewhere, right?

“Quarterbacks come from every-
where,” said Detroit Lions offensive

‘coordinator Mike Martz, one of the

league’s most respected offensive
minds and quarterback gurus. “All
shapes, sizes and backgrounds.”

If that’s the case, then someone
apparently forgot to invite the Miami
Dolphins to this part of the party for
the past two decades. Or perhaps
they just aren’t looking very hard.

After all, for a team that has strug-
gled to get cozy with a quarterback
since Dan Marino’s retirement,
Miami certainly hasn’t looked to the
draft for any help. The Dolphins have
used only three picks in the past
16 years on quarterbacks.

None of those quarterbacks was
selected before the sixth round —
and none succeeded in the NFL. Alas,
there might finally be reason for
hope. Consider the comments made
by Dolphins general manager Randy
‘Mueller in October 2005.

“I subscribe to the [former Pack-
ers general manager] Ron Wolf
method that you ought to draft one
every year if you can,” Mueller said.

“They are always valuable. You
can’t have enough of them.”

Although all three of the Dolphins’
current quarterbacks were acquired
through trades (not the draft) during
Mueller’s two-year tenure, that could
change with the philosophy of the
new coaching staff.

A CHANGING TREND?

Cam Cameron is an offensive-
minded coach — and one of the best
developers of quarterbacks currently
in the league. Former coach Nick
Saban, quite simply, wasn’t. With
Mueller given more control (as well
as Camerpn’s offensive emphasis), it
could be enough to sway the
mind-set toward drafting quarter-
backs for the first time in years.

“If you can get a quarterback, and
he looks halfway decent and he can
be developed, you’ve got a chance to
have a pretty good player,” said Gil
Brandt, the longtime vice president
of player personnel for the Dallas



Quality Products, Knock But Prices

Cowboys. “Quarterback is a develop-
ment player.”

‘ Brandt and Wolf, who have two of
the best track records for drafting
players in NFL history, each made a
habit out of constantly picking quar-
terbacks.

Between 1983 and 2000, Wolt’s
teams drafted a quarterback during
every draft except two. That’s 18
quarterbacks. In.1964, when teams

had 20 picks each, Brandt used four |

selections on quarterbacks.

The third one picked? Future Mall
of Famer Roger Staubach.

“It’s different today because you

only have seven picks, and you can .

only have 85 guys in camp,” Brandt
said. “But you still need to draft them
to find them.”

But some also would argue that
you need to find him before you draft
him. Simply choosing a quarterback
for the sake of adding depth isn’t
always the best route, either.

“T think you make a mistake if you
go into any draft believing you have
to take a specific player at a posi-
tion,” Houston Texans general man-
ager Rick Smith said.

Such a notion brings up a natural
question when it comes to this year’s
draft: Will the Dolphins have a shot
at drafting a quarterback who is even
worthy of development? Despite an
average class, the possibility cer-
tainly exists.

There has been chatter through-
out Indianapolis that Notre Dame
quarterback Brady Quinn — who
once. appeared destined to be the
No. 1 overall pick — could slide sev-

‘eral spots before the draft. ;

Should he fall as hard as Cardinals
quarterback Matt Leinart did a year
ago (he was drafted llth), the Dol-
phins could scoop up Quinn with the
ninth pick — surely an exciting pros-
pect considering Leinart’s successful
rookie season.

AN AVERAGE QGB CLASS

Beyond Quinn and LSU’s JaMar-
cus Russell, however, some analysts
don’t believe the field is very deep.

“I think it’s a pretty average quar-
terback class,” said Mike Mayock, an
analyst for NFL.com.

“I think you’ve got two first-round
picks. Over the last six years, they’ve
averaged three in the first round.”

Mayock said Michigan State’s
Drew Stanton, Stanford’s Trent
Edwards and Houston’s Kevin Kolb
could be options for teams in the sec-
ond round, and it still is debatable

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MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

MATTHEW STOCKMAN/GETTY IMAGES

TRACKING MR. QUINN: Notre Dame quarterback Brady Quinn, who orice appeared destined to be the No. 1
overall pick in the draft, could slide. If he falls. far enough, the Dolphins could get him with the ninth pick.

how late Florida’s Chris Leak and
Ohio State’s Troy Smith will get
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ing,” said Jason Garrett, who served
as Saban’s quarterbacks coach before
becoming the Cowboys’ offensive
coordinator. ;

“Different people have ditferent
philosophies, but everyone wants
depth at all positions.”

MIAMI DOLPHINS

Culpepper
will be fine,
Garrett says

BY JEFF DARLINGTON
jdarlington@MiamiHerald.com

Former Miami Dolphins
quarterbacks coach Jason Gar-
rett might have decided to
leave South Florida for the
Dallas Cowboys — but it cer-
tainly had nothing to do with
the constant issues at quarter-
back in Miami last season.

Instead, Garrett said Thurs-
day that he remains confident

.Daunte Culpepper will get
back to his old self, able to per-
form more like a Pro Bowl
quarterback than the injured
former star he was last season.

“I’m very confident,” said
Garrett, who recently
accepted a job as the Cow-
boys’ offensive coordinator.
“He’s a guy that has had a lot
of success in this league. He
has great football character,
_and all of the people that had
him before said that.

“T know he’s working hard
to get back physically to
where he has been.”

Garrett said Culpepper first
must regain his mobility.

“The hard thing was, he ,
really wasn’t himself,” Garrett
said. “A big part of what he
does is moving around and
playing.”
CE


& crore



INTERNATIONAL EDITION |

BASKETBALL | GOLF

LATE WEDNESDAY | HOUSTON 112, MIAMI 102

MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD



Loss of Wade compounds Heat’s defeat

BY ISRAEL GUTIERREZ
igutierrez@MiamiHerald.com

HOUSTON — With one swift
swipe of Dwyane Wade’s left arm,
Pat Riley’s return to the Miami Heat
bench became a devastating ordeal.

Wade left Wednesday night’s

game against the Houston Rockets
wincing in severe pain in a wheel-
chair, his left arm propped up.

The Heat lost the game 112-102, but
the team has probably lost a whole
lot more with Wade sustaining a dis-
located left shoulder. That could
require surgery, ending Wade’s sea-
son. Even without surgery, he could
be out for about six weeks.

With about 10 minutes remaining
in the fourth quarter of a game the
Heat had trailed for almost the entire
way, Wade reached in on a driving

Shane Battier with his left hand.
Battier’s momentum forced
Wade’s left arm back, and Wade
immediately grabbed the arm and
walked to the bench hunched over.
Wade had bruised his left shoulder
during the Heat’s home victory
against the Portland Trail Blazers on
Feb. 13, the Heat’s last game before
the All-Star break, and he had told
teammates privately that it was both-
ering him Wednesday. It is unclear,
however, whether that made Wade
more vulnerable to a dislocation.

After Heat trainer Ron Culp
tended to Wade on the bench for sev-
eral minutes, a Rockets employee
emerged from one of the tunnels





Wade studying options.
for repairing his shoulder



PAT SULLIVAN/AP
IT’S JUST BAD LUCK: Dwyane Wade
was injured after he reached out
while defending Shane Battier.

with a wheelchair for Wade, who
needed help even getting into the

chair. Wade was in so much pain |

while on the bench that he was
forced to tears.

It was a gruesome ending to what
already had been a difficult experi-
ence for the Heat and Riley, who
returned to the bench after taking a
medical leave of absence and missing
22 games himself.

“Obviously, we’re disappointed

. BY MICHAEL WALLACE

mwallace@MiamiHerald.com

Heat guard Dwyane ‘Wade .

is back in Miami considering
his options for repairing the
dislocated left shoulder he
sustained late in Wednesday
night’s loss in Houston.

Among those options are
immediate surgery, which
would end Wade’s season, or a
six-week rehabilitation period
and a possible return in time

-for the playoffs.

Wade flew back to Miami
Thursday on a private plane
accompanied by Heat trainer
Ron Culp. He was examined
by Heat physician Dr. Harlan
Selesnick and underwent a
magnetic resonance imaging
test at Doctors Hospital in
Coral Gables. Initial tests
taken in Houston and Thurs-
day’s MRI revealed a disloca-
tion, team officials confirmed.

Wade returned to the hos-

’ pital Thursday afternoon and
met with team doctors to
examine the test results. Wade
left the. hospital without
speaking to reporters gathered
across the street.

Wade probably will seek a
second apinion to be safe, and
he plans to consult his family
as well as Heat coach Pat Riley
before announcing his deci-

_ sion.

“We leave it up to the ace!
tors to explain everything to
him,” Riley said before Thurs-
day’s game in Dallas. “We
always left it open to our play-
ers to get a second opinion if
they choose. When it comes
right down to it, the player
always weighs all the options
and makes the decision.”

Riley said he had not spo-
ken to Wade on Thursday.

“I wrote him a letter today, .

Fed Ex-ed it, because his mail-



month.

“box was loaded on his phone,”
Riley said. “It’s right to his
house.”

In a Miami radio interview
Thursday, Heat general man-
ager Randy Pfund said it could
take days before Wade and the
team decide which course to
take.

“It’s a significant injury,
and we’re obviously looking at
some time where, with any of
the options provided, we will
be playing without him,”
Pfund said.

Even if Wade is able to
return before the end of the
season on April 18, he still
would probably need offsea-
son surgery, which would
jeopardize his summer com-
mitment to help the USS.
national team qualify for the
2008 Olympics.

A dislocated shoulder can
be extremely painful and can
sideline a player for weeks. or

At the top of the humerus
— the bone that runs from
elbow to shoulder — is a
round bone called the humeral
head. It fits into the glenoid

about the loss but more disappointed
about Dwyane,” Riley said. “We’re
really concerned about him. The ini-
tial word is that it’s dislocated. We'll
have to find out more.’

CLOSING THE GAP

With Wade in the game, the Heat

was still behind for most of the way
by double digits. Wade scored 13 of
his 27 points in the third quarter to
help the Heat temporarily close the
gap to seven points, but the quarter
ended in demoralizing fashion.

After Chuck Hayes split two free
throws, Wade missed a 19-foot
jumper with 3.9 seconds remaining.

That left just enough time for
Bonzi Wells to snatch the rebound,
dribble and lauuch a 65-foot heave
(he was inside nis own three-point
line when it was released) that went
through as the buzzer sounded. It
extended the Rockets’ lead to 89-75
entering the final quarter.

The Heat made a quick recovery,
scoring the first five points of the
fourth to again close its deficit to
nine points. But it was soon after that
an apparently: simple defensive
sequence turned devastating.

“Not again,” Mourning said when
asked his reaction to Wade’s injury.
“We just now got everybody
together, and this happens again. I
don’t know what it is. Obviously,
injuries are a part of this game, but it

‘seems like this year we’ve been

behind the eight ball when it comes





| | FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

ry Bird: Johnson
was fone of the best’

PAT SULLIVAN/AP
STAGGERED BY PAIN: With Heat coach Pat Riley looking on
in dismay, trainer Ron Culp leads Dwyane Wade off the
court after he was injured Wednesday night in Houston.

BILL BAPTIST/GETTY IMAGES

DEVASTATING LOSS: Wade, wincing _

in severe pain, exited with his left
arm propped up on a wheelchair.

to injuries.”

Heat players tried to shake off
Wade’s injury and attempt a late
comeback. Shaquille O’Neal, who fin-
ished with 20 points while making 9
of 15 shots, was aggressive after
Wade went out, scoring eight points
in the final quarter. But the Heat still
fell short, and now the team has lost
its leading scorer.

“We just have to keep fighting
parece it,” O'Neal said. “We’ve been

Lar

*DENNIS JOHNSON

club.”



ment.”

| ish and Bill Walton.



“Dennis was a great

_ Player, one of the best team-

mates I ever had, and a won-

derful person,” said Bird,
now president of the Indiana _,

through a lot this season. Everybody
has to step their game up. We can’t
get back into a hole like we did right
before the All-Star break.

“[’'m getting my legs back, and:

oach is calling my play.”

- PAST INJURIES
In his first season with Miami, .

Eddie Jones missed 15 games after.

dislocating his left shoulder on
March 7, 2001. Jones said he had to
strengthen his shoulder before

returning, and he had offseason sur- *.

gery to repair the joint.
Jones said that when he. initially

returned in April 2001, he still |

thought his shoulder was weak. .
“Hopefully, his is not that bad,”
Jones said.

Riley didn’t look like he was inany
mood to make motivational speeches ,

after Wednesday night’s game, but he -
might have to do some of his best ,

coaching to keep the Heat in shape

for its final 29-game playoff push.
“We just have to stay the course,”

said Riley, whose team is 26-27 and

position in the Eastern Conference.
“If we can get Shaquille to play like

4

>

he played tonight, real aggressive, C

_this is the way it may have to turn

out. I don’t know.
“We have had a lot of adversity

this year. Things haven’t gone right .- i
from the get-go. You just have to stay -. —

the course. You don’t know how this
whole thing is going to play out.

for delivering in big games.
“T hate to lose,” he once

comes, but I still hate it.

That’s the way I am.”
Johnson averaged 14.1

points and 5.0 assists per

Pacers. “My thoughts and
condolences are. with his _
family at this difficult time.”
Bill Laimbeer, the center
on that 1987 Pistons team,
remembered Johnson as a —
“great player on a great ball-

- “He played with passion
and grit,” Laimbeer said. “It
was fun to play games like
that. You always enjoyed it.
It made for not only great
games but great entertain-

In the 1984 Finals, John-
son guarded Magic Johnson
effectively in the last four
games. In 1985, he hit a last-
second jumper against the
Lakers that won the fourth
game. In 1986, Johnson was
part of a team that featured
four Hall of Famers — Bird,
Kevin McHale, Robert Par-

“He was truly one of the
good guys to play in the
NBA, and he was a great
teammate who was fun to be
around,” McHale said.

Johnson had a reputation

he retired, he was the llth. ;
player. in NBA history: to *
total 15,000 points and 5,000 :

Johnson made one all-

“aoe .

said. “I accept it when it,

{

game for his career. When’.

assists. 07

NBA first team and one sec- +

ond team. Six times he made , ;

including five consecutive .,
seasons (1979-83). '
“As far as a person, he

the All-Defensive first team, ., ;

Sikma said. “He wouldn’t let ,.

strongly about something,
but with our team that was a -
good thing.”

_ Johnson was born Sept.
18, 1954, in Compton, Calif. ..:

by the Sonics in 1976. John-

things pass. He would cause -.
some friction if he felt

He played at Pepperdine: -
University and was drafted ,.

son was traded to the Phoe- ,-

nix Suns in 1980 and then to
the Celtics in 1983.

Johnson is survived by his
wife, Donna; his sons,,-

mas.

Dwayne and Daniel]; and his | ..

daughter, Denise.

o.-

sitting in the eighth and final playoff .

socket in the scapula, or shoul-
der blade, like a ball-and-
socket trailer hitch.

A ring of cartilage called
the labrum holds the head in
the socket. In a dislocation, the
head is pulled out of the
socket, creating great pain that
is partly relieved only when it
is pushed back in.

Typically,: the accident
strips at least part of the
labrum off the front of the
socket. When this happens in
Wade's age and weight group,
can heal on its own within four
to six weeks..In some cas-
es,though, it must be reat-
tached to the socket with
arthroscopic surgery and dis-

\

solvable staples, requiring
three to six months to heal.

A dislocation also can tear
ligaments or tendons.

Wade already had missed
seven games this season with
injuries. He missed four with a
sprained right wrist and three
after having wisdom teeth
extracted. ,

.“T definitely understand he
probably wants to tough it out

and come back as soon as pos- .

sible,” Heat forward Udonis
Haslem said. “But just like the
situation with Coach Riley,
sometimes health is more
important, and you need to
take time off. It’s a situation
where you need to think about

what’s best for him.”

Wade’s shoulder is the lat-
est in a line of devastating
injuries for the Heat. Shaquille
O’Neal has missed 39 games
with knee and calf injuries.
Jason Williams has missed 20
games with knee, ankle and
abdominal injuries. Wayne
Simien has missed most of the

season with a salmonella .

infection.
Riley had just returned

Wednesday after missing 22 «

games for knee- and hip-
replacement surgeries.

Miami Herald writers Israel
Gutierrez and Fred Tasker con-
tributed to this cee

FROM THE SPORTS FRONT



. RODOLFO GONZALEA/AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN

ALWAYS A LEADER: Dennis Johnson’s legacy ended as
the coach of the Austin Toros, a developmental team.

Big names sent packing, and that clears the path for Woods

*GOLF

event that Woods played — the
Western Open last July.

And as well as Woods has played
for two rounds — he is one of five
players who has never trailed in a
match this week — there is'‘always
the next match.

“I’ve never played a match play
event where all six rounds I’ve
played great golf,” Woods said.

_“You’re going to have one or two
rounds where you’re not going to
play well. You’ve just got to get

through those matches. Sometimes
you do, sometimes you don’t.”
Mickelson didn’t.

His West Coast Swing ended in a_

3-and-1 loss to that featured a dra-

matic shift in momentum. Rose was |

1-up when he pulled his tee shot into
the desert brush and had no choice
but to pitch out backward, then had
to hit his third shot to the green
before Mickelson hit his second.

When Mickelson two-putted for par,

he figured it would be all square.
But Rose’s putt dropped on the
final turn, and everything changed.

“It looked like all I had to do was
make par, and the match would be
even,” Mickelson said.

“That hurt the most.”

Mickelson’s plan was to hit first
on the par-3 16th to the middle of the
green, away from what he called a
“carnival” pin cut atop a slope that
fed off the green in two directions.
Rose did the honors, and Mickelson
felt that he-had to go after the flag.
His 9-iron shot was about 10 feet
long, enough to tumble off the green.

Mickelson’s difficult chip hit the
hole but trickled off the front of the

green. His 25-foot par putt caught
the lip but stayed out. And when
Mickelson failed to birdie the par-5
17th, he conceded the match.

It was the first time in five years
he failed to get to the third round.

Why not play it safe on the 16th
and take his chances after that?

“The 17th was a hole we both
would probably birdie,” Mickelson
said. “And I didn’t want to leave it
up to 18.”

Instead he was leaving, with
Furyk, Singh, Retief Goosen and
Luke Donald not far behind.

Goosen rallied from three holes ,

down against Niclas Fasth, but the

*

Swede birdied the 17th and held on °

for a l-up victory. Donald might have
been the most surprising loss, as he

was 3-up until Aaron Baddeley won -

four of the last six holes, and only
twice with birdie putts.
Campbell came up big on the 18th

hole again. In the opening round, he .-
holed a 25-foot birdie putt to put ©. |.

away Angel Cabrera. This time, he .
made birdie from 18 feet to force -,
extra holes, and then he beat Furyk A

with a two-putt birdie.



was a great competitor,” for- ,- -_-~
mer Scenics teammate Jack...

.
THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com





BASKETBALL

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

int TERNATIONAL EDITION...

__ FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007 | 7B



Duke holds off Clemson; Memphis rolls:

From Miami Herald Wire Services

CLEMSON, S.C. — Jon Scheyer
scored 18 points to help No. 18 Duke
capture its 2lst game in a row over
Clemson 71-66 on Thursday night —
without any late help with the game
‘clock.

When these teams met last month
at Cameron Indoor Stadium, the Blue
Devils’ 68-66 victory was helped
when officials incorrectly added time
at the end — the extra seconds more
than enough for David McClure’s

. winning layup.
* This time, Duke (21-7, 8-6 Atlantic
Coast Conference) opened a 21-point

halftime lead and hung on as Clem- Be

son (19-8, 5-8) came within 69-64 in
the final minute.
Scheyer, though, hit two foul shott

.”. with 5.7 seconds left to put the game

away.

DeMarcus Nelson had 16 points.

and Greg Paulus added 14 for the
Blue Devils, who have won three in a
row since a four-game losing streak.

Cliff Hammonds and Vernon
Hamilton had 14 points each for
Clemson, which has lost eight of 10
games since starting the season 17-0.

The sold-out crowd at Littlejohn
Coliseum hadn’t forgotten the clock

problems of last month, Several stu- -

dents wore large clocks around their
necks — ala rap personality Flavor
Flav.

Duke appeared to make the clock
issue moot, outscoring the Tigers
29-8 over the final 12 minutes of the
first half to take a large lead into the
locker room.

Nelson had all 11 of his first-half
points during Duke’s large run. His
foul shot started the Sore and a pat



TED RICHARDSON /AP

HE’S AT ANOTHER LEVEL: Duke forward Josh McRoberts finishes off an
alley-oop dunk off a pass from Greg Paulus in Thursday night’s win.

the Blue Devils ahead for good, 14-13.
By the time Nelson drove in for a
layup with 1:26 left before the half,
Duke was up 36-17.

The Tigers missed 13 consecutive
shots during the run and finished the
half with only six field goals.

As cold as Clemson was in the first
half, it came out hot after the break.
The Tigers made 10 of their first 14
field-goal attempts — led by Hamil-
ton’s 10 points — and they sliced the
lead to 47-42 with 10:14 to go.

Scheyer’s 3-pointer finished an 8-2
run by Duke that rebuilt ine lead to
59-47,

Clemson, though, made one final
run with K.C. Rivers’ 3-pointer cut-

ting it to 69-64 with six seconds left.
That’s when Scheyer finished things
off with his foul shots. He was a per-
fect 5-of-5 at the foul line.

AROUND THE TOP 25

e No. 7 Memphis 99, Rice 63:

Willie Kemp scored 20 points to help
host Memphis beat Rice and clinch
its second consecutive Conference
USA title.

The victory extended Memphis’
winning streak to 16, longest in the

nation. Memphis (24-3, 13-0 C-USA) ~

also has won 28 in a row at home.
Memphis, which started the game

0-for-7 from 3-point range, ended up

shooting 47 percent from outside the

PRO BASKETBALL

Wizards win a wild

From Miami Herald Wire Services

WASHINGTON — Gilbert Arenas-scored
30 of his 43 points in the first half Thursday
night. Then the Washington Wizards blew a

17-point fourth-quarter lead but survived a

video review at the buzzer to beat the Sacra-
mento Kings 109-106.

With 0.7 seconds remaining, John Salm-
ons took a long inbounds pass and made a
turnaround jump shot at the 3-point arc, Offi-
cials initially ruled it a good 2-point basket,
but replay showed it to be a 3-pointer,
released just after the clock hit 0.0.

Caron Butler and DeShawn Stevenson
made key defensive plays in the final 30 sec-
onds to give the Wizards the victory. Butler
stripped Mike Bibby, who was having a hot
fourth quarter, and Stevenson forced Salm-
ons into a traveling call.

But Arenas made only one of two free
throws with 0.7 remaining, giving the Kings a
final chance to tie.

: Arenas finished with an extremely-active
line in the box score: 12-for-22 from the field,
_: 3-for-8 from 3-point range, 16-for-17 from the
free-throw line, seven rebounds, seven
assists, three steals and nine of the Wizards’
season-high 23 turnovers.
. .’ Arenas had a relatively-quiet second half,
but Butler scored 19 of his 25 points after the
‘break. Stevenson finished with 21 points for
the Wizards, who won their third game in a
row and improved to 4-4 since Antawn Jami-
son was sidelined with a knee injury.

The tag team of Arenas and Butler out-
scored Ron Artest and Bibby in high-spirited
‘. game that combined streaky shooting with
47 combined turnovers. Artest had 2] of his

32 points by halftime, and 22 of Bibby’ s 30

came after the break.

KIDD STAYS PUT

; Amid concerns about his health, point
-’ guard Jason Kidd remained with the New
': Jersey Nets as the NBA trade deadline
passed Thursday. The team confirmed
reports that Kidd has a cracked rib in addi-
tion to the back injury that forced him to
miss two games and the NBA All-Star Game.

Nets coach Lawrence Frank defended the
team’s decision not to publicize the rib
injury, saying it didn’t force Kidd to miss any
games and was discovered only when Kidd’s
back was being examined.

“The implication was that it was being
concealed, which would be a falsehood,”
Frank said. “We’re not going to disclose
every nick, bruise or bump that’s not pre-
venting a guy from playing.”

Kidd had been the subject of trade specu-
lation that had intensified as Thursday’s
deadline drew near. Reports had him head-
ing to any of several teams, with the Los
Angeles Lakers considered the clear favorite.

The Nets also entertained offers for guard
Vince Carter, who can opt out of his contract
after the season. But no offers came close to
getting the Nets to move either player,
according to team president Rod Thorn.

In trades completed Thursday:

e The Portland Trail Blazers dealt guard
Juan Dixon to the Toronto Raptors for guard
Fred Jones and future considerations.

e Dallas Mavericks guard Anthony John-
son was sent to Atlanta for the Hawks’ sec-
ond-round pick in the 2007 NBA Draft.



one

arc, Kemp converted four of his six
attempts from 3-point territory.

It was the third consecutive loss
for the Owls (13-13, 7-6).

e Loyola of Chicago 75, No. 15
Butler 71: Blake Schilb scored 28
points, Tracy Robinson hit five free
throws in the final 36 seconds and
visiting Loyola of Chicago held off
Butler for its first victory over a
ranked opponent in 21 years.

It also gave the streaking Ram-
blers (20-9, 10-5 Horizon League)
their seventh consecutive victory,
their longest streak since 1992, and
assured league-leader Wright State
the top seed in the conference tour-
nament next week. Butler (24-5, 12-3)
can still tie Wright State for the regu-
lar-season title with a victory over
Detroit on Saturday but would get
the second seed because of a tie-
breaker.

ELSEWHERE

e Pittsburgh: Center Aaron
Gray still isn’t practicing because of a
sprained left ankle, and coach Jamie
Dixon said it is unlikely he will play
in Saturday’s key Big East game at
Georgetown,

“He shot some free throws but, if I
had to guess, he won't be able to go,”
Dixon said following the team’s prac-
tice on Thursday. “From what I saw,
he won't be going on Saturday.” -

No. 10 Pitt and No. 12 Georgetown
are tied for first place with 11-2 Big
East records,

e North Carolina State:
Wolfpack coach Sidney Lowe was
released from a hospital on Thurs-
day, a day after leaving the game
against No. 5 North Carolina with

SOUTHEAST —

Washington
Orlando
Miami
Atlanta
Charlotte

ATANTC

Toronto

New Jersey
New York
Philadelphia
Boston -- ’

CENTRAL

Detroit
Cleveland
Chicago
Indiana
Milwaukee

Dallas

San Antonio
Houston

New Orleans"
Memphis

Utah
Denver
Minnesota
Portland
Seattle

Chi. 84, Cle, 78
Was. 109, Sac, 106
Sac, at Wash,, late

NORTHWEST _

PACIFIC.

dehydration anid flulike symptoms.

Lowe coached the first half of
Wednesday night’s game, but didn’t
come out for the second half. The
Tar Heels broke open a one-point
game and won 83-64,

Lowe and the team were already
scheduled to have the day off Thurs-
day; N.C, State spokeswoman Anna-
belle Myers said. He will rejoin the
team today and accompany players .
to Saturday’s game at Florida State,
she said.

e New Mexico: Coach Ritchie
McKay will be fired at the end of the
season, the school said.

McKay, who has three years
remaining on his contract, and his
assistants will continue coaching the
Lobos until then. New Mexico has
three regular-season games remain-
ing, starting Saturday at Utah, fol-

lowed by the Mountain West tourna-

ment.

New Mexico is 15-13 this season
and 4-9 in the conference. McKay has
a record of 82-65 in five seasons,
including an 8-41 mark on the road.

LATE WEDNESDAY

e No. 21 BYU 76, Colorado
State 67: Keena Young scored 16 of
his 24 points in the second half and
host Brigham Young won its eighth
in a row.

The Cougars never trailed in their
first game as a ranked team in nearly
14 years. BYU (21-6, 11-2) remained
alone in first place in the Mountain
West Conference with three games
left.

Jason Smith led Colorado State
(15-11, 5-9) with 20 points and ll

. rebounds,

“31
27
26
a1
21

29

| 25

24
18
13

a

34
32
31
29
19

“44
37
34
26
14

Ww.

35.
26
25
24
21

41
30
26
25
23

SCORING
___G FG_FT PTS AVG



a

Ww.

NBA STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE

‘L_ Pct. GB 10 Str. Home Away Conf

21.596 - 64 W-3 21-7 10-14 20-10
28 «491 5% 4-6 L-2 18-10 9-18 15-19
27, «491 5% «7-3-1 15-10 11-17 13-15
33. 389 11 4-6 L-2. 9-16 12-17 12-21
33. 389 «11 5-5 W-3) 12-15 9-18 13-20

L Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away — Conf

25. 537 - «7-3 ~ 30.455 4% 3-7 L-3 14-14 11-16 19-14
31.436 5% 5-5 L-l 14-13 10-18 14-19
36 333 11) «5-5 Wel 10-15 8-21 13-18

40.245 15% 19° L-2 5-21 819 9-24
Lh ' Pct, GB “L110 Str, Home Away Conf

19.642. - 91 W-2 1810 16-9 24-10
23. «582, 3) 6-4 —L-L- 20-8 «12-15 19-15
25 «554 4% 5-5 W-2 21-7 10-18 22-10
24 «547 5 6-4 (W-3 18-10 11-14 20-13

36 345 «16 «1-9 L6G 11-12 8-24 = 9-23

WESTERN CONFERENCE

SOUTHWEST _

L_ Pct, GB 110 Str. Home Away . _Conf
“9 “830 - “O-1 “W-9 24-3 20-6 30-6
18 673 8 6-4 W-4 17-8 20-10 22-11
19 642 10 7-3 W-1 20-7, 14-12 19-17
29. .A73,--19 7-3: Wel 17-11 9-18 15-19
42 .25031% 2-8 L-3 11-17 3-25 8-27

L_ Pct. GB L10_ Str. Home Away Conf

21-6 14-12 20-11

18 660. - 7-3 Ll

26 500 8% 46 L-2 14-14 12-12 11-18
29 463 10% 3-7 L-2 1610 919 15-19
32 429.12 5-5 W-2 13-14 11-18 15-17
32.396 14 4-6 W-3 15-13 6-19 10-20
at_.Pet. GB 10 Str. Home Away Conf
13.759 - 5-5 W-2 21-6 20-7 20-10
25 54511% 3-7 L-6 19-9 1-16 17-11
29 473 15% 5:5 W-2 20-9 6-20 14-17

L-4. 17-10 8-19 14-18
L-1 16-12) 7-18 12-21

29. 463 16 3-7
30 .43417% 6-4

RESULTS AND SCHEDULES
~ Thursday’s results

Tonight’s games Wednesday’s results
Det. at Orl., 7 Hou. 112, Miami 102
Ind, at Tor., 7 Ind. 136, Mil. 129 (20T)
Phil, at Cha., 7 S.A. 103, Atl. 96

Hou. at Atl., 7:30 Cle, 86, Tor. 85

Mil. at N.Y., 7:30 Phi. 104, N.Y. 84

Sac. at NJ, iis Det. 110, Orl. 88

Wash, at Chin N.O. 111, NJ. 107

Phx at Minn., Cha. 100, Min. 95

Sea. at N.O., '; Pho, 118, Bos. 108

Por. 112, LA.L. 108
G.S, 118, Mem, 115 (OT)

Mem. at Port., 10
Utah at Den., ‘10:30
Bos. at Lakers, 10: a0

NBA LEADERS

Through Wednesday

REBOUNDING
GOFF DEF TOT AVG

A MAN ON A MISSION: Gilbert Arenas of the Wizards leaves Kings defender Sharif
Abdur-Rahim behind i in a game in which he scored 43 points - 30 in the first half.

e The Utah Jazz got forward Alan Hen-
derson from the Philadelphia 76ers for the
‘right to trade second-round picks in the 2007
draft and undisclosed cash considerations.

LATE WEDNESDAY

o Trail Blazers 112, Lakers 108: Jarrett
Jack scored 30 points, and the Blazers beat
the host Lakers, giving Los Angeles its sixth
loss in a row and Phil Jackson the longest los-
ing streak of his coaching career.

Kobe Bryant, coming off his MVP perfor-
mance in the All-Star Game, scored nine of
his 25 points in the final 3:51, but it wasn’t
enough to bring the Lakers back from a nine-
point deficit the Trail Blazers built while he
getting a breather.

Jackson’s teams had lost as many as five
consecutive games only two other times in
Jhis 16 seasons as a head coach. He has won
nine NBA championship rings, including
three with the Lakers.

Zach Randolph added 22 points and had
nine rebounds for Portland. Reserve LaMar-

cus Aldridge had 18 points, and Brandon Roy |
had 16 points and seven assists.

e Warriors 118, Grizzlies 115 (OT):
Monta Ellis scored nine of his 22 points in a
frantic overtime, and Golden State survived
Mike Miller’s franchise-record 45-point per-
formance and won at home.

Miller hit three of his club-record nine

3-pointers in overtime to cap a spectacular
shooting display, but Ellis kept the Warriors
close until Al Harrington made the go-ahead
jumper with 1:02 to play.

Sarunas Jasikevicius then hit two late free
throws, and Miller finally lost his stroke in
the final minute as Golden State snapped a
five-game losing streak to the Western Con-
ference’s worst team.

Jason Richardson scored 19 points in his
return from a 22-game absence with a broken
hand, playing 37 minutes but making just
eight of his 22 shots.

e Suhs 118, Celtics 108: Leandro Bar-
bosa scored 14 of his 26 points in the fourth
Seen eee ee as host Phoenix beat Boston.

-{
Phoenix.
LA. Lakers
~ Golden State
L.A. Clippers
Sacramento



Anthony, Del Den. 37 419 263 1121 30.3 Garnett, Minn, 53 138 528 666 12.6
Arenas, Wash, 51 469 397 1480 29.0 Chandler, NOk, .53 220 433 653 12.3
Wade, Mia. 46 445 413 1324 28.8 Howard, Orl. 55 182 479 661 12.0
Bryant, LAL 51 483 413 1465 28.7 Boozer, Utah 45 142 389 531 11.8
: pean Pen. 36 341 298 1013 bee paaloe, cn : a BH oH us
HARAZ GHANBARI/AP Redd, M 35 322 252. 969 27 lefferson, Bos.
Vs Allen, Sea. 43 404 225 1161 27.0 Lee, N.Y. 54 188 392 580 10.7
James, Clev. 52 495 319 1373 26.4 Duncan, S.A. 55 159 424 583 10.6
O'Neal, Ind, 47 114 373 487 10.4
FIELD GOALS
FG FGA PCT Sonn
Biedrins, GS. 251 410 .612 AST AVG
Lee, N.Y, 234 383 .611 ash, Phoe. a 567 118
Howard, Orl. 357 596 .599 Wilms, Utah 52 478 9.2
Stoudemire, Phoe. 391 659 593 Kidd, N. 53 468 8.8
Curry, N.Y, 398 675 .590 Paul, Nok. 38 329 87
Boozer, Utah 410 721 569 Davis, G.S. 43 372) 8&7
Bogut, Mil. 286 520 .550 Miller, Phil. 52 423, 8.1
Brand, LAC 423-775 546 Wade, Mia 46 362 «(7.9
Okafor, Char. 335 618 542 ‘Ford, Tor. 47 366 «7.8
Patterson, Mil. 313 580 .540 Billups, Det. 45 3397.5

NBA AWARDS |

PLAYER OF THE MONTH

November

Eastern Conference: Dwight How-
ard, Orlando Magic

Western Conference: Yao Ming,
Houston Rockets

December

Eastern Conference; Gilbert Arenas,
Washington Wizards

Western Conference: Kobe Bryant,
Los Angeles Lakers

“pnuary

Eastern Conterence: Chris Bosh, To-
ronto Raptors

Western Conference: Steve Nash,
Phoenix Suns

ROOKIE OF THE MONTH

November

Eastern Conference: Adam Morri-

son, Charlotte Bobcats

Western Conference: Rudy Gay,

Memphis Grizzlles

December

Eastern Conference: Jorge Garba-

Josa, Toronto Raptors

Western Conference: Randy Foye,

Minnesota Timberwolves

January

Eastern Conference: Andrea Barg-

nani, Toronto Raptors

: Brandon Roye,

Portland Trail Blazers
pee eas

‘oe 0

PAGE 8C, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Mii ine a

Ponting OK,
others mosily
on mend for
defenting
champions

@ CRICKET
SYDNEY, Australia
Associated Press

AUSTRALIAN
cricket captain Ricky
Ponting, rested from a
three-match series loss
to New Zealand, said
Thursday his back
problem has eased
-ahead of his team's
-defense of the World
‘Cup starting next
month,

* Ponting received
‘three cortisone injec-
‘tions in his back 10 days
‘ago to reduce inflam-
‘mation caused by bone
‘spurs on his spine.

» “My back's fine,"
Ponting said Thursday.
:"(Doctors) said on the
‘day that I had the injec-
‘tions it would be three —
to four days of not
doing much before the
injection settles down.

"It's been about a
-week and the last few
‘nights I've slept a lot
‘better and felt a lot bet-
‘ter in the morning.
Hopefully when I get to
the West Indies I'll be
pain free and ready to

Oo. " 4

Of the five Aus-
tralians struggling with
injuries three weeks
away from the World
Cup, Ponting and fel-
low batsman Michael
Clarke (hip injury) are
the two players of least
concern.

Opener Matthew
Hayden has been given
two to three weeks to
recover from the frac-
tured toe he suffered
while scoring an Aus-
tralian record 181 not
out against New
Zealand on Tuesday.

Allrounder Andrew
Symonds (biceps)
remains in doubt for
the Caribbean, but
believes he is making
good progress from
shoulder surgery.

Fast bowler Brett Lee
is the biggest concern,
with Cricket Australia
delaying a second
round of scans on his
injured ankle until
Tuesday — the day
before the team flies
out for the West Indies.
_ The paceman admit-
ted he was only a 50-50
chance of playing in the
World Cup last week
after being sent home
from the New Zealand
tour when he damaged
ankle ligaments during
training.

With Mike Hussey
replacing Ponting in
New Zealand, and Aus-
tralia being swept in the
Chappell-Hadlee series
3-0, Ponting said he
received some interest-
ing correspondence
from the replacement
skipper.

"I got some pretty
funny text messages
from him after every
one of the games - 'how
are you, are you on the
next flight over,' ‘you
can have your job back,
I don't want it any
more,'" Ponting joked.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award. _

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

aceccsccccescccccccccccescssccsscscccascsncecessecsccencecovescenccceccscsccscsccccscescroceensesesesssscensssesssesenecesoecceseaseesesesenessseccscesenessesesesecsccsscsecscencoes: .
a cccccccecessocsccccsccossccossncsccsesscccoctccnccnsacscsscacsscsccescescccnescccepeccescscoccnccncccsccnsecceccccensssesenccncnssconsrecsscenssoscsenccsscescesescesocscsennsceccnssoscuccssscn snes ereccssoesesosensesscensoscesssoscesessesesessscessssosessssoneesseese nee:

:
:
3
:







White Tigers roar past
St Anne’s Bluewaves

m@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports

Reporter .

i

KING’S Court were just-(-1-

a little too much for the

St. Anne’s Bluewaves to |
handle as the White

Tigers pulled off a rout to
stay alive in the 25th

Hugh Campbell Basket--
ball Classic yesterday. ~.°

oming off an opening .*.’

loss to the CC Sweeting
Cobras on day two of the
senior boys double elimi-
nation tournament at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasi-
um, the White Tigers
made this one look so
easy - winning 67-42
Torrino Clarke was a
tower of strength as he
powered his way inside for
a game high 17 points,
playing strong on both
ends of the court.
Edmundo Curtis added ©
13, while Michael Carey
had six and Danero Bal-
four and Kyheil Roberts
both had five in the win. ©
After their five-point
loss to the Cobras, the
White Tigers ensured that
they were not going home
just yet with their second |
straight loss. z

Blowout

However, they sent the
Bluewaves packing after
they failed to rebound
from their 73-33 blowout.
against the Dame Doris
Johnson Mystic Marlins
on opening day.

‘King’s Court coach
Geno Bullard said it was
good to still be alive in
the tournament.

“The first we game, we.
got off to a bad start, but
as the game progressed,
we were able to deal with
some issues that we had,”
he charged.

“In this game today, it
was much better, but I
think once we get into a

' defensive mood, we will -

be able to play at the high -
standard that we are capa~_

ble of playing.” eres

Bullard said he has a
very young team and as
soon as they can work out
their kinks, they will be
ready to play up to their
standard.

“As the tournament _
progresses and we contin-
ue winning, we will be

‘right there,” Bullard stat-

ed. “I think they are try-
ing to get through the
pressure of playing in a

tournament of this magni-

tude.”
For the Bluewaves, Ter-
rance Knowles led the
way with 13, Marquis
Williams had 10,
Lawrence Rolle eight and

Travis Parks six. es *

’

Coach

St. Anne’s coach Curt
Hollinsworth said after
falling behind 9-2 in the

first quarter and 32-18 at ~

the half, they managed to
play better in the second
half.

“This is a challenge for
us this year because I’m
trying to get them to play
a different style of basket-
ball,” Hollingsworth '
reflected. “Coming into
the game today, I felt we ©
had a chance.

“But in order to instill «
some discipline in the
plaayers, I decided to
start some seventh and
eighth graders and tenth
graders to let them know
that I have to build for the
future if I’m going to
coach.”

Hollingsworth said he
sees the future as a bright.
one for the Bluewaves.

@ KINGS Court’s
Danero Balfour lays the

_ ball up against St Annes.

(Photo:Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)

Â¥

u
PEELE ee







h

BAHAMAS EDITION

m Lhe Tribune

i'm lovin’ it. |
|



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Volume: 103 No.78

Se Nae





third-largest food market

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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007



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PRICE — 75¢

PACERS KEEP HOPES Al



Bahamas burial for Anna Nicole

Custody of her |
remains given to
baby’s guardian

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

RULING in the Anna Nicole
Smith case, Judge Larry Seidlin
yesterday expressed his wish for
the controversial celebrity to be
buried alongside her son Daniel
inthe Bahamas.

Crying as he announced his

decision, the Fort Lauderdale Cir-:

cuit Judge awarded Richard Mil-
stein - the guardian of five-
month-old Dannielynn - custody
of Ms Smith’s remains.

Mr Milstein promptly
announced that he is making
plans to have Ms Smith interred
in Nassau, where her 20-
year-old son Daniel
was buried at Lakeview Ceme-
tery after he died last September.

All parties - Ms Smith’s moth-
er Virgie Arthur, and both men

who are claiming paternity of
baby Dannielynn, Howard K
Stern and Larry Birkhead -
seemed to agree with the deci-
sion.

However, just an hour after
Judge Seidlin announced his deci-
sion, US media reported that the
former Playboy Playmate’s moth-
er Ms Arthur appealed the rul-
ing.

The estranged mother of the’

cover girl wants her daughter
buried in her native Texas.

At press time last night, a spe-
cial appeal hearing was reported-
ly scheduled to take place today.

The court had heard from var-
ious witnesses over the past three
days, including Ms Smith’s ex-
husband, Billy Smith, via tele-
phone.

SEE page 13

Anna Nicole asked G Ben Thompson
‘to remove items from Horizons’

ANNA Nicole Smith asked South Carolina developer G Ben
Thompson to remove her personal effects from the Eastern Road
home ‘Horizons’, it emerged in Florida court yesterday.

The disclosure came as Bahamian police continued to investigate an
alleged break-in at the $900,000 property.

Ms Smith’s companion Howard K Stern filed a burglary report
claiming that the celebrity’s personal effects, including a computer
hard drive, home videos and other items, had been stolen from the East-
ern Road home the couple had shared in recent months. |

Ford Shelley — son-in-law of Mr Thompson, who claims he is the
rightful owner of Horizons — yesterday testified that Ms Smith had told
him and his father-in-law to claim her personal possessions from the

house in the event of her death.

Mr Shelley was one of many witnesses called to testify in the hear-

SEE page 13

Wha ac eG hy

Tih ll :
Dae

tok cuit ee

ae a
ee atl
Gooner aba il

| Mlami-Freeport-Nassat





7

One-man protest against The Tribune

BOUT THE STOLEN

Wo tas Bee
MORK PE RMT

NER ST TR Ren w/a oe
= oR THe Pas? 7 Yénes
PEP DUT OU mie ee 777° S





“WHY RE You Recklessy TRIMS BO™

We En TEryarenae.

aie) t
7 g

l CELI MOSS stages a one-man protest against The Tribune and its managing editor
John Marquis outside of the newspaper’s office yesterday. Mr Moss took his stand in the wake
of Shane Gibson’s resignation from the Cabinet following the paper’s publication of pho-

tographs of the MP with the late US celebrity Anna Ni

Baha Mar is

accused of

‘inion-busting’

By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY

Tribune Staff Reporter

voluntary separation programme
to its employees without union
consultation.

BHMA president Obie Fergu-

son said Baha Mar did not consult

the union before the plan was
unveiled, and he claims the plan
was created to get rid of long-

SEE page 13

Voter registration

now over 120,000 |

mi By KARIN HERIG

Tribune Staff Reporter _

: VOTER registration has final- ;
: ly picked up and is now over }
120,000, rising steadily with each :
: passing day, Commissioner of the ;

THE Bahamas Hotel Manage- }
rial Association is accusing Baha }
Mar of union-busting for intro- ;
ducing an carly retirement and }

Parliamentary Registration
Department Errol Bethel said
yesterday.

SEE page 13

cole Smith.
(Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff)

Licences granted

for oil exploration
companies to work

in Bahamian waters

li By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

TWO oil exploration companies
: were granted five licences yester-
; day at the Ministry of Energy and
: the Environment to continue their
i ” Speaking with The Tribune, Mr} research for-sizable oil deposits
: Bethel said he expects the num- ;
: ber of voter registrations to “eas- }
} ily” reach 150,000 by March 12, :
: when the register closes. ;
This would exceed the number ; 1 0
: of voter registrations in 2002, ; licences they were seeking.
: when 144,758 people registered ;
: to vote ~ the highest number for |

within Bahamian waters.
Island Offshore Petroleum Lim-
ited was granted their one licence,

: and the Bahamas Offshore Lim-

ited was granted four of the five

These agreements will allow for
the companies to explore areas

SEE page 13

PLP ‘open
to black -
and white
Bahamians’

@ By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY

Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Progressive Liberal Party
is open to black and white
Bahamians, according to party
chairman Raynard Rigby. —

Mr Rigby’s statement is in
response to the FNM’s allegation

~ that the PLP is playing the race

card to gather support from black
Bahamian voters.

Yesterday, FNM deputy leader
Brent Symonette accused the
PLP of manipulating the race

issue, with its constant references _

to the United Bahamian Party
(UBP).

Mr Symonette said the PLP’s
strategy will fail because most
Bahamians have moved beyond
the question of race.

‘The Tribune also reported that
this is not the first time the gov-
ernment has been accused of

playing the race card.

At the PLP national conven-

SEE page 13

All on-site
workers at
Rum Cay
back to work

DEVELOPERS behind the
multi-million dollar Rum Cay
Resort Marina project yesterday
said all workers on-site were back
to work, following a temporary

stoppage as they awaited further .

approvals and an amended Heads
of Agreement from the Govern-
ment.

Tim Perkins, Montana Hold-
ings’ director of construction, said
last night: “It seems like we’re
making progress. We're working
as a team with the Government,
and everybody's back to work.
We're awaiting further progress
from our negotiations with the
Government over the next few
weeks.”

Vincent Peet, minister of finan-
cial services and investments, said
earlier this week that Montana
Holdings had asked the Govern-
ment for an amendment to the
Heads of Agreement for the $700

~ million Rum Cay Resort and

Marina.
The minister said work on

SEE page 13

WILSONART

RING WILSONART ADHESIVES

~ LAMINATE FOR COUNTERTOPS & CABINETS

PLUS CABINET KNOBS, HINGES & PULLS!






THE TRIBUN




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call our
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PAGE 16, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007 ut | THE TRIBUNE.



ahi
Hl Ha

ce to
responsibility for alll mattors relating to Eaviron

Andy ‘has'been employed with Bacardi & Company Limited for Seventeen years, 2
Technician, Research Engineer and ANP. Adm tion. Hie wteo ‘serves on
Commitice,

Previously, Ant watiied at the Departement of
Environmental Ti


















numerous job-selated cowses and seminars, both locally and in
Bacardi managers from around the world, to attend Darden
University of Virginia.

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Nassau A.M. His hobbies include art, reading and karate.
Carla Lewis, and is the proud tah f vee chen, Dakeds, Avery & Holey.






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Representative for the intemnationallly entified Gees Management

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of Taesnasters Organization, eating vavos Mendes and






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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007.

SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net



The EET

BUSINESS

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, analysis, Wall Street _








| The Bahamas:



third-largest food market —

Food retailers enjoy $530m in sales annually, with top five chains enjoying 63% market share;
nation the only one in region not to apply: national treatment to food retail Seep

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he “saturated” Bahami-
an food retailing industry
generates about $530 mil-
lion in sales per annum,
and together with the

$200 million in sales produced by the.

fast-food restaurant sector gives this
nation a 13 per cent share of the total

-°. Caribbean consumer market for food.

The findings were contained ina
report produced by the food and agri-
culture distribution services industries
in the Caribbean for the Caribbean
Regional Negotiating Machinery
(CRNM), which said that the five
largest food chains in the Bahamas -
Bahamas Supermarkets, Super Value,
Abaco Markets, John Chea & Sons
and Budget Food Stores - collectively
enjoyed a 63 per cent share of that
$530 million market.

Bahamas Supermarkets had the

- Business Centre |
oe eyes Sea / Air Park
‘ on Grand noha THE Bahamas is pursuing

* “unsustainable”

i By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
~-Fribune-Business Reporter 0. -

A GROUP of Bahamians is seeking,

highest sales volume i any supermar-
ket chain in the Bahamas, with about
$140 million, followed by Super Value
with $95 million and Abaco Markets at
$85 million.

The CRNM report pointed out,
though, that despite the fact that Winn-
Dixie until last year held the majority
78 per cent stake in Bahamas Super-
markets, this nation was one of the few
in the Caribbean that restricted for-
eign ownership and involvement in its
supermarket industry.

This meant that the Bahamas did
not apply National Treatment policies,
as stipulated in any rules-based trading
system such as the World Trade
Organisation (WTO), to the food
retailing industry, and the CRNM

report said it restricted the opening
hours for foreign firms in contrast to
Bahamian-owned competitors.

“In the area of franchising, the.

Bahamas has an extensive licensing
regime, favours joint ventures in fran-
chising and allows local individuals and
operators to launch objections to
prospective new market entrants,” the

‘report said. “Other countries in the

region, as a general rule, apply such
regulations as they have i in a non- ~dis-
criminatory manner.’

The CRNM report said the apmit
nance of the major food store chains
was emphasised by the fact that:spe-
cialist food retailers and fresh produce
markets “are not very significant in
the Bahamas” apart from fish, as 80

> per cent of this was picchbeea by con- .
sumerts at fish landings.

. Specialist retailers had between 5-
15 per cent of all fruit and vegetable,

' chicken, pork and bakery products con-

sumed in the Bahamas, the report said.

The CRNM document estimated
that in addition to the major food
chains, there were 50 neighbourhood
counter shops, 200 ‘mom and pop’
stores, and the gas stations offering
convenience foods and groceries in the

‘ Bahamas..

“While the middle to upper income
consumers shop mainly in supermar-
kets, smaller self-service food stores,
2,000-7,00 square feet in size with.two
to three check-outs, operating with
family labour and low overheads, pro-

vide basic staples and a limited line of
frozen meats and convenience foods
to lower to middle-income neighbour-
hoods,” the report said.

On the supermarket side, Bahamas

Supermarkets’ 12 stores were said to”
_ range in size from 15,000-35,000 square
feet, with Super Value’s formats rang- —

ing from 25,000-30,000 square feet
across 10 stores.
Abaco Markets’ formats - Solomon’ s

SuperCentre and Cost Right - ranged _

in size from 10,000 to 50,000 square
feet for the former, and up to 120,000
square feet for the latter.

However, the CRNM report, noting

SEE page 5B

Development model branded ‘fool’s paradise’

to establish a warehousing and pro- —7ea

curement operation at Grand
Bahama’s Sea/Air Business Park,
called GBI Business Centre, the
Grand. Bahama Business Outlook
Conference was told yesterday.
Raymond Jones, chief operating

said the GBI Business Centre was
looking to construct four to five ware-
houses, totalling 200,000 square feet,
on land specially set aside for the pro-
ject.

SEE page 2B



= WILCHCOMBE

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

economic
growth and “an outdated mod-
el of development that enriches
|, large foreign investors with no
* ¢eal long- term: concern ae
the future of the Bahamas”,
environmental expert aa
warned.

Thomas Goreau, president of
the Global Coral Reef Alliance,
in a February 10, 2007, paper
written after he surveyed the
coral reefs and mangroves at
Guana Cay, urged the Govern-
ment “to promptly enact and

enforce environmental laws to .

protect the nation’s natural
resources”.

Although his assessment was
done on behalf of the Save
Guana Cay Reef Association,

ees.

which is attempting to stop the
$175 million Baker’s Bay Golf
& Ocean Club project, Dr
Goreau said he was not paid
and gave his time voluntarily.
Calling for the Baker’s Bay
development, being led by San

_ Francisco-based Discovery
Land Company, to “be stopped

immediately”, Dr Goreau said
developments like it and oth-
ers in locations such as Bimini

had the potential to create

“severe long-term costs to the

- Bahamian environment and

people”. He based his thoughts
on a series of dives at coral reefs
near the Baker’s Bay develop-
ment on February 9, 2007. ~
His conclusions will auto-
matically be opposed by Dis-
covery Land Company, which
has repeatedly said the golf
course would be designed so
that any fertilizer and nutrient

cAR KERR

run-off would be directed back

into the island, rather than

towards the sea and the coral -

reefs.

The company will also mount |

a defence of its environmental
track record, notably the clean-

up efforts at the former Disney .
“site-and the removal of all
native vegetation, trees and

species out of the path of roads
and infrastructure development.
Many investors coming into

’ the Bahamas repeatedly insist

they will do nothing to harm
the environment that first

attracted them to these shores, .

and Discovery Land Company
will also point to the more than
100 jobs its project has created -
albeit mostly on mainland Aba-
co, as opposed to Guana Cay,
which has fullemployment. —

But Dr Goreau added of the

development plan the Govern-

ment was following, with its
emphasis on a so-called ‘anchor
property’ for every island: “It
is typical of an outdated model

of development that enriches —

foreign investors with no real
long-term concerns about the
future of the Bahamas, and will

- provide mainly low-paying jobs:

for Haitian immigrants.

. “In sharp contrast, Guana |

Cay is a model for small-scale,
locally-owned tourism, which

creates a completely different -

ambience that more tourists
prefer, causes far less environ-
mental damage, and in the long
run is more economically bene-
ficial to the Bahamian econo-
MY...

“The Bahamas needs sound
economic development that

SEE page 6B

Fast food supply escapes

Bahamas based producers

~~ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas’ import duty
policy, coupled with the inabil-
ity of domestic producers to
meet fast-food restaurant
demands for quality specialised
product and supply volume,
have. virtually eliminated
Bahamian farmers from‘the
chicken-leg quarters supply
chain, a study has revealed.

The report, which assessed
the food and agriculture distri-
bution services industries in the
Caribbean for the Caribbean
Regional Negotiating Machin-
ery (CRNM), showed how the

,", Bahamas’ import duties and
“-"- agricultural policy choices

impacted the supply chain

- choices made by fast-food

restaurants in this nation.
Focusing on chicken leg quar-

“ters, the CRNM study showed

that in Jamaica and Barbados,
which imposed tariffs of 260 per

-cent‘and 184 per cent respec-

tively on imports of this prod-
uct, domestic producers enjoyed
a.75 per cent and 80 per cent
market share respectively.
And when it came to supply-

., ing fast food chains such as

KFC and Burger King with
chicken leg quarters, in both
those countries domestic pro-
ducers enjoyed a, 100 per cent
share of the supply chain.

The same was true for

,/ Guyana and ‘Belize, which
‘ impose 100 per cent tariffs on

chicken leg quarter imports, but
in contrast, the Bahamas
imposed only a 35 per cent tar-
iff, giving local producers just a
50 per cent market share. More
importantly, domestic produc-

Fast food industry
a $200m revenue
generator

ers were shut out of the mar-

ket for supplying KFC and .-

Bamboo Shack.

' The report found: “The .

Bahamas is a higher cost pro-
ducer and has moderate tariffs,

which make imported leg quar- ©

ters approximately equal in
price to the local product.
“Local [fast-food] chains in
Nassau, such as Bamboo Shack,
used to purchase local chicken
before the poultry operation in

New Providence [Gladstone ’

Farms] was closed.

“However, the international
[fast food] chains such as KFC
report that local production is
not large enough or efficient
enough to deliver the require-
ment of specialised parts. KFC
continues to purchase local
product in Freeport where there
is still a local supply.”

The report for the CRNM
said all fast food chains had spe-
cific broilers to fit their cook-
ing equipment, “and for KFC
only 25-30 per cent of all bird
slaughters.in a plant can ever
meet this criteria”.

It pointed out that this
requirement caused difficulties
for Bahamian producers when it
came to supplying KFC with
chicken leg quarters.

“This requires that total local
production be large enough to
meet the productivity require-

SEE page 5B

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ee eS Tee eee ee ae gi ae My

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

TJX reports more stolen
ata, still posts sales growth

BY MARK JEWELL
AssociatedPress.” coy
BOSTON — A computer...
security breach by a‘hacker
who stole TJX Cos? customer *
data was broader than initially
feared, and started 10 months
earlier than first thought, the
company said Wednesday.
But the parent of discount
retail chains including T-J.







* and ran into last month. On
Wi ednesday, the company said





jts ongoing investigation
‘revealed the breach started
nearly a year earlier, in July
2005.

Also, TJX said Wednesday

“that credit and debit card data

had been accessed involving
transactions at U.S. and Puerto
- Rican stores from January

Maxx and Marshalls also**.2003 through June 2004, and

reported 5 percent sales
growth during its fiscal fourth’
quarter, which ended just 10:
days after the breach was dis-
closed Jan. 17. . ee ai
Company executives said,
they saw no evidence of any.
exodus of customers’ from:
TJX’s more than 2,400. stores. x
after the data theft. Industry: °
analysts agreed. . -
“To the degree that that
may possibly have occurred, itâ„¢ :
certainly hasn’t shown up in
the numbers,” said Donald-
Trott of Jefferies & Co.
TJX initially believed. the .
intrusion began in LNGY 2006



SANE A |



he oo

discussion

7 Res
Sieh
t bl d



workers —

: BALSNCING ACE, FROM 1B

%



Cheskin‘ ‘says. For somes sian 4
ing assistance for personal ©

problems makes’ more senst
than disciplining or firing é
someone for messing up..
Cheskin, of Hogan & Hart
son, then advises a frank con- 4









wdrivers’

credit card-only transactions
at’Ganadian stores during that
period. The company had ini-

® tially been less certain, saying
‘Fast: month that information
ani “may have been accessed.”

MORE CASES

“TJX also found more cases
niwhich the hacker accessed
license numbers
“together with names and

‘addresses. TJX said it would:

~ notify affected customers.
Also, TJX found evidence

Nes of an intrusion into a system
that processes transactions in
‘Britain and Ireland from T.K.

Maxx stores. So far, there’s no
evidence of any theft of cus-

‘tomer data from T.K. Maxx

stores, TJX said.

More than 50 computer
security experts are working
with TJX in its investigation,
CEO Carol Meyrowitz said.

CANNOT ESTIMATE LOSS

The company said it’s too
early to estimate its losses
from the breach, which
prompted banks nationwide to
reissue debit and credit cards
to guard against further fraud.
TJX also faces lawsuits from

consumers and financial insti- |

tutions, and dozens of states
have expressed interest in
joining a civil investigation
into TJX’s security led by Mas-
sachusetts Attorney General
Martha Coakley.

But in response to a ques-
tion about customer traffic,
Meyrowitz said TJX enjoyed
consistent sales gains through-
out January — including after
the breach was disclosed Jan.

17. Fourth-quarter sales at
stores open at least a year rose
5 percent over the previous
year, and January sales were
particularly strong in the
Northeast, Meyrowitz said.

That’s a region where Mas-
sachusetts-based TJX has
endured media coverage of
the breach, and the most likely
place where customers might
have been expected to shop
elsewhere, said Patrick
McKeever, an analyst with
Avondale Partners.

“So far, it doesn’t seem like
the systems breach is having a
material effect on sales,”
McKeever said.

TJX’s forecasts of first-
quarter and full-year earnings,
however, fell just shy of Wall
Street’s expectations. Inves-
tors sent the Framingham-
based company’s shares down
44 cents, or 15 percent, to
$28.18 on the New York Stock
Exchange.

TJX also reported a 29 per-
cent decline in fourth-quarter





PHILIP ANDREWS/AFP- GETTY IMAGES

DID ANYONE KNOW? What if a co- SAGE had sensed astronaut Lisa Marie Nowak’s

distress and taken action?

versation: Let the employee *”

know his performance: :
dropped and ask what you can
do to help. If he doesn’t vol-;
unteer information, back off...
Employers often. disagree
about what symptoms war-
rant manager intervention.
With some issues — alcohol,
drug abuse or gambling — it’s
obvious that an employee
should be steered toward
Employer Assistance Pro-
grams. With other personal |
problems, it’s a tougher «
Some managers want to:
know whether it’s a tempo-'
rary situation or a longer term..
problem. Then they must”
choose how deeply to get
involved. One human











resources manager says to
approach these conversations
with caution.

“It could backfire,” says
Debbie Winkles, president of

“‘Miami’s Society of Human

Resource Management and a

vice president of HR at Com-

mercial Bank of Florida.
Winkles notes the increase
of employment litigation and

. says she has learned that
crossing the line is a tough

call.‘“You want to be nice and

‘do the right thing, but as the
‘employer, you have to look

out for the company, too.”
-« Winkles recently took a
backdoor approach. When

‘she learned that grief was

affecting one employee’s
work, she handed out infor-
mation about the bank’s
Employee Assistance Pro-
gram to all employees.

Alicia Cervera, president
of Miami’s Related Cervera
Realty Services, prefers a
more direct approach, taking
her employees aside and
inviting them to talk.

“It’s more important to get
involved than not, if you are
doing it for the right reason,”
Cervera says.

Although the employees
may initially react poorly, in
the long term they understand
her good intentions, she says.
She has offered employees

time off, referals to profes-
sionals, even pairing them
with co-workers who have
had similar problems.

For her, follow-through is

. crucial. “If you engage them

in conversation, you do some-
thing about it. You don’t just
abandon the person.”

Flynn believes companies
have the responsibility to
train all workers to recognize

aberrant behavior and refer it _

up the chain of command. In
NASA’s case, a co-worker
may have sensed Nowak spi-
raling out of control.

Says Flynn: “There are
times when you just have to.
use your best judgment.”

Lenders tout changes to aid borrowers

" *PAYDAY, FROM 1B



four extra months | to pay off
loans.

Other changes. inchide
$10 million national ad cam-
paign warning that payday”.
loans are not a long-term:
financial solution and a ban’
on ads that promote payday
advances for “frivolous pur-
poses” like vacations.

Consumer watchdog
remained skeptical. . ‘.

“This does not. solve the

est rate payday lending that:
traps borrowers and leads to’

ECONOMY ~~ _—_..










Cen est borrowing,” said Jean
“Ann Fox, consumer protec-

tion director for the Con-

sumer Federation of America.

4 Fox said the extended pay-
ment plan does not lower the
cost, of loans or make loan

repayment any more afford-

able: She accused the industry
of trying to shift attention

away from the high loan rates

to distract lawmakers from

enacting meaningful reform.

~ ONE STEP AHEAD
problem of triple-digit inter="7*~

‘The industry is trying to
stay one step ahead of those
who want to restrict payday

lending practices. At least 12
states prohibit triple-digit
rates on payday loans, a cap
that effectively bans payday
lending, according to the Con-
sumer Federation of America.
Dozens of other states are
also considering legislation to
crack down on payday lend-
ers.

Last year, Congress
imposed a 36 percent annual
percentage rate cap on pay-
day loans to military service
members after reports
showed thousands of troops
in debt to payday lenders,
many of which are clustered

outside bases.

Anderson, who is president
of QC Holdings, an Overland
Park, Kan., payday lender,
said only a small percentage
of customers have trouble
repaying loans.

REPEAT BORROWERS

’ The nonprofit Center for
Responsible Lending esti-

mates more than 90 percent

of payday loans go to repeat
borrowers. Customers are
drawn to the lenders because,
unlike banks and credit
unions, they don’t run credit
checks.

Medical ear food push consumer prices up

*ECONOMY, FROM 1B

0.8 percent, the biggest |
increase in more than 15

years, reflecting higher costs ””
‘possible interest rate hikes
“because of inflation.

for prescription drugs: and
doctor services, which were:
risiag in January at the fastest
clip in 25 years.

Airline tickets jumped by
2.1 percent, the biggest gain
since November 2004. pt

The cost of tobacco prod-
ucts rose by 3.1 percent, the’
largest increase in 4'4 years:

ve








ye The report on consumer
‘prices came a week after Fed-

‘eral.Reserve Chairman Ben
“Bernanke had relieved fears

in financial markets about





‘Délivering the Fed’s latest

;@conomic forecast to Con-

gress, Bernanke had signaled
growing confidence that infla-
‘tion: was heading lower

“although he said the Fed was
till “worried about some -



unexpected development that

could push prices higher.

For all of 2006, consumer
prices had risen by 2.5 per-
cent, the smallest increase in
three years, helped by big
declines in energy costs in the
second half of the year after a
sharp run-up in energy costs
through last summer.

For January, gasoline pump
prices fell by 3 percent, leav-
ing them 2.7 percent lower

than they were a year ago and

32 percent lower than their
peak in July of last year.

‘Natural gas and fuel oil
costs were also down last
month, giving a boost to con-
sumers during the winter
heating season.

But the cost of electricity
was up 2 percent, on a season-
ally adjusted basis from the
price in December.

The 0.3 percent rise in
inflation excluding food and
energy was the biggest
increase in this category since
a similar 0.3 percent rise in
June of last year.



__MiamiHerald.com |THE MIAMI HERALD

ELISE AMENDOLA/AP

LOYAL CUSTOMERS: A shopper leaves a T.J, Maxx store in
Framingham, Mass. Despite a hacker stealing customer
data, T.J. Maxx’s parent company, TJX Co., posted :
particularly strong January sales in the Northeast.

earnings compared with its
strong performance in the
same quarter a year earlier.
The latest quarter’s profit
was $205.5 million, or 44 cents
per share, compared with
$288.7 million, or 60 cents per
share, a year ago, when net
income rose 75 percent.

The data theft costs

ASIA

equaled about $5 million for
the quarter, including
expenses to investigate and
contain an intrusion the com-
pany says it learned about. in
mid-December. TJX waited a
month to disclose the breach,
saying the delay allowed it to
work with security experts to
contain the problem.

Japan’s central

* JAPAN, FROM 1B

Japan’s economy grew at a
stronger-than-expected
annual pace of 4.8 percent in
the fourth quarter — the fast-
est rate in nearly three years.

But the government also
left its monthly appraisal of
the economy unchanged in its
February report, released

Monday, warning about weak 3

consumption.’

Determined to escape dec-
ade-long stagnation, the Bank
of Japan kept rates at virtually
zero since March 2001. The
raise to 0.25 percent from
zero in July last year was the
first hike in six years.

The Bank of Japan said
Wednesday that gradual
growth will likely continue
amid healthy production,
income and company invest-
ments, and worries were
diminishing about the future
of the American and other
overseas economies.

It also said a dip in con-
sumer spending last summer
was temporary, and spending
may be on a rebound.

For the first time, the Bank
of Japan gave the names of the
officials who had voted in
favor or opposed the rate
hike, and showed how the
decision had been split among
the governor and deputy gov-
ernors.

‘SEND A MESSAGE’

Before, the governor and
deputies had always voted
together on rate raises, said
Barclays Capital sttatceist
Masuhisa Kobayashi.

“The Bank of Japan was
able to send a message about
a new, more transparent Bank
of Japan,” Kobayashi said.

Worries had been growing
that prices could fall in com-
ing months, reflecting the
decline in once-soaring oil
prices. Japan has been
plagued for years by the dan-
ger of deflation, the down-
ward spiraling of prices that
brings down wages and dead-
ens growth.

Although.consumer prices
have been inching up in
recent months, top govern-
ment officials had warned
that deflation remains a threat |
and urged the bank to hold off
on raising rates so as not. to
quash the recovery.

Japan’ s, core consumer
price index, which excludes
food, rose 0.1 percent in
December from the: same
month the previous year, in
its seventh straight monthly

bank raises rate

Barclays Capital
strategist Masuhisa
Kobayashi said the
rate hike was part of
an effort to
‘normalize’ interest
rates in Japan.

‘rise, but the increase was less
‘than the 0.2 percent gain in

November.

Bank of Japan Gov. Toshih-
iko Fukui said interest rates
remain considerably low,
given Japan’s solid pace of
growth.

ADJUST GRADUALLY

“We plan to adjust interest
rate levels gradually based on
movements in the economy
and prices,’’ Fukui told
reporters, adding that keeping
an excessively easy monetary
policy could harm the market
and economy.

In a monthly report, the
Bank of Japan kept its assess-
ment of the economy.
unchanged as moderately
expanding — the same word-
ing it used the previous
month — noting that con-
sumer spending remains solid
and prices will be stable in the
long run.

The bank also left its
monthly purchase of Japanese
government bonds at 1.2 tril-
lion yen ($10 billion). It prom-
ised to carefully weigh eco-
nomic activity and price
moves in adjusting interest
rates.

Kobayashi said the rate
hike was part of an effort to
“normalize” interest rates in
Japan, which had been unusu-
ally low for years.

“This was a good chance to
raise interest rates,” he said.
“That’s difficult to do, if the
economy is sluggish.”

CAVED TO PRESSURES

When the Bank of Japan
decided to hold rates steady
earlier this year, perception
became widespread that the
central bank had caved into
political pressures, although
both sides have always said
the central bank is indepen-
dent.

Top ruling party officials
had given harsh warnings
against an overly hasty rate
hike ahead of the BOJ meeting
in January. This time, politi-
cians’ comments had been
muted.



4pm. 6:35 p.m. Late



Stock Tkr. close ~— close. = Chg. -—-volume | Stock a, ‘his SSE ge
WalMart WMT 49.97 50.00 +03 59011 Qwesttm Q 8.32 836 +04 © 15331
CocaCl KO 47.57 45,57 -2.00 46879 AmStand = ASD 55.09 55.09 . 14379
GenElec GE 35.91 35.92 +01 45923 BkofAm BAC 53,91 §3.71 -.20 13909
WholeFd = WFML 45.70 48,05 #2.35 31764 Qualcom QCOM 4205 4205 = * 13631
TimeWam TWX 21,65 21.6302, 30738 | Valueclick VCLK 26.47 29.70 $3.23. 11417
Nasdl00Tr §=QQQQ 45.19 45.25 +06 28832 SPDR SPY 145.98 145.94 04 9936
SprintNex = S 18.97 18.88 +09 28325 AmintGp If AIG 69.69 69,69 . 9153
Netflix NFLX 23,39 23.39 00 28166 nap : ?

. | AnalogDev ADI =, 33.32 3493 41.61 8963
CBS B CBS 31,70 31,70 24545 8908
Windstrm WIN 15.13 15.13 * 21700 | IShR2K nya WM 8210 807-03
Weyerh wy 83.57 83.57 ¢ 19706 NewellRub NWL = 31.83 31.83 8826
Merck MRK 43.95 43,955 * 18560 ITC Hold wT 44.03 “403 * 8645
Limited LTD 29.47 2947——* 17292 XcelEngy —-XEL 24.30 2430—=—* 8002

Res Macey ae ae ab Pe OR Meh Sse ny ee Be ee ae
For up-to-date stock quotes, go to www.MiamiHerald.com and click on Business

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AGE 2B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007




OFFICE ASSISTANT NEEDED

| To assist in General Office Work. Duties include,
i but not limited to, Receptionist, Filing, Typing,
| Banking and Postal Duties. Will also be required
F to perform some Accounting and Payroll
| Functions. Excellent Computer Skills Necessary.









‘|fl Ideal candidate will be honest, responsible,
| punctual and self-motivated.

Salary commensurate with experience.
FAX 326-2824.

HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER

Job Opportunity —
An established Bahamian business |
eT CT ie secretary.

Applicant must possess the following
key competencies:

@ Motivated self-starter

S Excellent communication skills
@ Good telephone etiquette
° Typing '& word processing skills

© Ability. to work with minimal
supervision

@ Literate in all MS Office programs -
Excel in particular

@ Knowledge of the Adobe suite of ©
programs a plus

Please send your reply by post to:

P. O. Box SS-6136
Nassau, Bahamas
Re: Secretary TB-0207

P
BUSINESS | :

THE TRIBUNE



Private insurers will not»

oversee NHI administration

m By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter



he National Health Insurance plan

(NHI) will be administered by the

National Insurance Board (NIB) and

not by private insurers, although the Govern-

ment is expected to consult the industry on
potential partnerships.

Dr Stanley Lalta, the National Health Insur-

ance implementation project manager, told ,

The Tribune that the collection and manage-
ment of NHI contributions would be done
through the NIB in conjunction with the coun-
try’s employers, who would be responsible
for ensuring the mandatory payments were
met. :

Private insurance companies would not be

given contracts to administer the NHI scheme, »

although the Government was examining
potential partnerships and resource sharing

to enhance the quality of care patients receive.

Dr Lalta said one such area was that of
case managers for persons who need extend-
ed care.

“When we spoke with one of the private .

insurers, they told us that they have what they
call case managers, who follow patients
throughout the system to make sure they are

getting appropriate care,” he said.

“That is an area that we can tap into, and so
there are things we are looking at now that can
relate to the private sector in terms of differ-
ent aspects of care.”

Private life and health insurers are still
awaiting the final NHI plan costs before they
can determine their fees and benefits plans
for private coverage they might offer to sup-
plement the Government scheme.

One insurance agent attending a sympo-
sium given by Lampkin & Company said
once that happens, they would be in a position
to “sit down with our clients because we offer
different plans to them, and really we cannot
price or present to them without knowing or
having the finalised plan”.

Another person pointed out that the
Bahamas Association of Life and Health

Insurers (BALHI ) was now defunct, so there -

was no association to speak on behalf of the

insurers, leaving them without a voice.

Etoile Pinder, a health financing specialist
with the NHI project team, said all the costings
were still being worked on.

She said the programme was projected to
cost around $235 million each year, although
because it was based on a fixed percentage of
income, it could increase just by nature of
inflation or the.state of the Bahamian econo-

my.
“She also pointed out that the figure was

. based not on 100 per cent compliance, but on

contributions resulting from 25 per cent com-
pliance by self-employed persons and 85 per
cent of the working population.

Ms Pinder said the NHI team was working
to establish a “minimum standard of care”
which can be provided at the level of contri-
butions.

However, she pointed out that in the cost-
ing there has to be a levei of reality, as not
every service can be offered. As an example,
she said that they are looking at the use of
generic medicine, which would be cheaper to
provide. ;



Business Centre eyes Sea/Air Park on Grand Bahama

FROM page 1B

He was speaking after Obie
Wilchcombe, minister of
tourism, said there needed to be
better co-ordination between
Grand Bahama’s economic
stakeholders on marketing the
benefits of Freeport and the
Hawksbill-Creek Agreement to

| outside investors.

The minister said that two
nights ago, he spoke to a dia-
mond manufacturer who had
123 stores across the globe, who
had not heard about Freeport
or the Agreement, and the ben-
efits they could have as a site for
her products to be prepared. Not
identifying the person or the
firm, Mr Wilchcombe said “she”
was due to visit Grand Bahama
next week.

Mr Wilchcombe said a senior
official or minister needed to be

_appointed to co-ordinate Grand

Bahama’s economic growth, and
suggested that a Grand Bahama
Economic Summit - involving
the likes of the Government,
Grand Bahama Port Authority,
Hutchison Whampoa and Grand
Bahama Chamber of Commerce

FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK
CAREER OPPORTUNITY

for |

Home Finance Specialist

Qualifications:

= Experience in Sales & Lending and in depth up-to-date

_knowledge of Mortgage and loans and an understanding of
local economies, client needs, condition of client’s business

/ industry / market.

Knowledge of and/or experience in credit assessment, credit
policies and procedures with emphasis on mortgage
underwriting as well as risk awareness in order to assess

lending risk.

Knowledge of the principles and techniques of selling to
prospects for new business and close sales. .

Self-motivated and able to work with minimal supervision.
ACIB or equivalent qualification in relevant discipline (not ,

“mandatory

General Requirements/Responsibilities:

"To be the primary point of contact for customers wishing to

obtain a FirstCaribbean Mortgage.

= To generate incremental mortgage business for FirstCaribbean,
primarily through business development and direct selling

efforts.

To provide a high level of customer service to external referral

sources and potential home purchasers.

To develop appropriate external sales contacts with land
developers/ Real Estate Agents/Brokers etc. to ensure that
opportunities for developing profitable customer relationships
are realized in order to increase FirstCaribbean’s share of the

mortgage market.

Responsible for the management of a portfolio of approximately

200 — 300 clients.

Ensure credit quality i.e. delinquency and NPNA levels are

‘maintained within acceptable standards

Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter

via email by March 2, 2007 to:

deangelia.deleveaux@FirstCaribbeanBank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for their interest,
however only those under consideration will be contacted.



- be called to chart the way for-
ward.

Within a decade, Grand
Bahama could become the high-
est economic earner in the
nation, Mr Wilchombe added.

He said that last year, the sus-
tained growth in the economy,
combined with the relatively low
interest rate environment stim-
ulated heightened demand for
credit.

Total Bahamian dollar domes-
tic credit surged by an estimated
12.1 per cent, or some $657 mil-
lion in 2006, compared to an
expansion of 13.2 per cent or
$541.2 million in 2005. The rapid
rise reflected heightened growth
in credit in the personal sector,
which strengthened by 15.8 per
cent or $552.9 million, compared
to the 14.3 per cent or $440.3
million recorded in 2005.

Foreign reserves declined by
$79 million last year, following a
contraction of $89 million in
2005. However, over the first
month of 2007, foreign reserves
have increased and, by the end
of last month, stood at $511 mil-
lion -anse of 12.1 per cent.

Mr Wilchombe said this
growth in foreign reserves was
expected to continue through-

out the rest of the year.

He added that the Bahamas
and its tourism product had
fared well against “all manner
of international and other
shocks”, and the bizarre events
surrounding the death of Holly-
wood playmate Anna Nicole
Smith. :

“Similarly, the unfortunate
turbulent relationship with the
owners of the Grand Bahama
Port Authority, fortunately, has
not dissuaded potential investors
or the local investors from plac-
ing money in the ground,” the
minister said.

Mr Wilchombe said he had
hoped the two families would
amicably resolve the conflict in
the way that the late Edward St
George would have - through
dialogue and compromise.

“ Both families have worked
too hard for too long to allow
the wonderful story of sagacity,
respect and trust to be thrashed
and destroyed,” he added.

That notwithstanding, Mr Wil-
chombe said: “The future beck-
ons us to recognise and accept
that Grand Bahama holds the
key to the further expansion and
diversity of the Bahamian econ-
omy. In fact, I contend that the

Neen nee een SS

JOB OPPORTUNITY

Established Company seeking to employ a

CERTIFIED CHEMIST

To conduct daily analysis of water facility
Call 326-8585 for appointment
Serious inquires only ~

Requirements:

* Ability to multi-task

‘



* To safeguard and accurately maintain records of all securitie
* Proper execution and settlement of trades and/or any other s
* To ensure all Securities transactions are accurately processed in the proper accounting period
* Liaise between custodians and administrators to
* To carry out all duties as they relate to the proper administration of securities
* Assist with the preparation of all securities related documentation

* To accurately post all stock orders, non-cash transactions and dividends

* To update the trade log on a daily basis, to validate, post and settle trades

-© To assist with daily call-over routine



an

The Ansbacher Group, specialists in private banking, fiduciary services and wealth management,
has an opening in The Bahamas for a

SECURITIES ADMINISTRATOR/OFFICER

Primary Responsibilities:

Secondary Responsibilities:
* To carry out such duties as may be required from time to time
* To serve as a back-up verifier of swifts
* To assist with departmental cross training, pensi

* Bachelors’ Degree in Banking/Accounting/Economics/Management with at least one year
experience in an offshore environment; or

+ Relevant associate Degree with three years ex

¢ Securities certification such as Series 7 or C.S.C.

* Highly proficient in Microsoft Office

Please send all resumes to the attention of.

Human Resource Manager

Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited

P.O. Box N-7768
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 325-0524

E-mail: hrmanager@ansbacher.bs

Deadline for all applications is March 2, 2007

sheld ‘
ecurities transactions

ensure client records are updated

on payments and sales ledger when necessary

perience as a Junior Banking of Securities Officer

diversity is already here.”

Mr Wilchombe said the
Freeport Container Port was
being expanded and will employ

_ an additional 300 Bahamians this

year.

He added that the Govern-
ment and Grand Bahama Port
Authority had approved the
opening of a bio-chemical plant
at the former Franklyn Chemi-
cals facility, and hinted there
couldbe a relaunch of the BOR-
CO plant in the near future.

Mr Wilchombe said Ginn
Clubs & Resorts had spent $40
million in marketing its West
End development, while Jasper
Knabb, president and chief exec-
utive of Pegasus Wireless, which
was officially opened yesterday
by the Prime Minister, had spent
$5 million in the Grand Bahama
economy over the past two
months.

He said the Government has
approved a purchaser of the
Royal Oasis, likely to be Har-
court Developments although
he did not reveal the name, and
the group is currently in New
York for meetings with Lehman
Brothers’ private equity arm.
~ “We know the group will
bring the brand, the experience
and the commitment to Freeport
and Grand Bahama,” the minis-
ter said. ;

He noted that the Govern-
ment and Isle of Capri, the casi-

no operators at Sheraton/West-

ern Resort had now concluded
“a series cf progressive discus-

- sions”, although he did not say

what the outcome was.

According to Mr Wilchcombe,
tourism arrivals to Grand
Bahama look to be substantially
higher than 2006, with more than
352 groups already booking
meetings and events on the
island this year. Cruise arrivals
are expected to be up as well.

With all this economic activity,
Mr Wilchombe reminded Grand
Bahamians that they must be
prepared to take advantage of
every opportunity afforded
them.

TU Oe OR On Te Oe Pe oe a ee

Tun 00 08 08 88 28 0 eo 2 02 88 08 88 00
BUSINESS&SPORTS [}

Che Miami Herald





THE MARKETS

ASIA | . )
STOCKS, EA ale FUNDS, 5-6B
Dow 30 12,738.41 -48.23 V 5 a a
“NASDAQ es — 2siea2 +538 AL 4 eine |
“10-YR NOTE co 4.69 — +01 A 8 Saying that it expects that - percent on Wednesday, judging that “The bank thinks that even if The dollar, which had slipped on
ye ‘CRUDE Ol 60.07. ¥1.22 A gradual growth will likely price stability and consumer spend-__ prices drop, that won’t cripple eco-. Japanese media reports of an immi-







threat of inflation. —







the Dow Jones industrials fell. .

y

latest readings leaving some

week Wall Street rallied after
Federal. Reserve Chairman Ben

ing sustainable growth. _
~The Labor Department's



index rose 0.2 percent in Janu-
ary came as a surprise to Wall

0.1 percent increase.
The inflation news ‘and Fed

report from Hewlett-Packard
that dampened sentiment on
_ Wall Street.





the economy can continue to do

well as it has without interest

rates being under some upward

_ pressure, and if interest rates do

_ stay where they are or in fact go

down it’s probably because the,

_ economy will slow down,” said

_ Denis Amato, chief investment
officer at Ancora Advisors.

. The Dow. Jones industrial

__ average fell 48.23, or 0.38 per- :

: oe to 12,738.41.
‘Broader ‘stock indicators

were narrowly mixed. The a
_ Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell

_ 2.05, or 0.14 percent, to 1,457.63,
oS and the Nasdaq composite
_ index rose 5.38, or 0.21 percent,
_. to its highest level in six years at
2,518.42. The Previous high was
2,514.22.

- Bonds fell following the

. inflation data; the yield on the
_ benchmark 10-year Treasury

e note rose to 4.70 percent from —

_ 4.68 percent late Tuesday. The
_ dollar was mostly lower against
_ other major currencies, though
_ it rose against the yen after the

_ Bank of Japan increased interest

rates. Gold prices rose sharply, ©

__ rising to a level not seen since
_ July, as oil prices increased.

_ Light, sweet crude settled up |

_, $1.22 at $60.07 per barrel on the
_ New York Mercantile Exchange
after a number of refinery shut-

_ ‘downs raised concerns about

_ supply and. as_ tensions
_ increased over Iran’s uranium
enrichment plans.

_. Energy and materials stocks
_ showed widespread gains as
_ commodity prices rose. Cono-
_ coPhillips rose 71 cents to
- $66.29, while AK Steel Holding
_ finished up 27 cents at $22.92.
_ Incorporate news, Hewlett-
_ Packard fell $2.03, or 4.7 per-
-- cent, to $41.10 after the printer
_ and computer maker saw inven-
_ tories increase during its fiscal
_ first quarter. Sales and profits
_ topped Wall Street’s forecasts.
- Declining issues outnum-
_, bered advancers about 6-to-5 on
"the New York Stock Exchange,
where consolidated volume
came to 2.57 billion shares, com-
pared with 2.39 billion Tuesday.
The Russell 2000 index rose
122, or 0.15 percent, to 827.33,
Britain’s FTSE 100 closed
down 0.86 percent, Germany’s
DAX index fell 0.59 percent,
and France’s CAC-40 was down
0.33 percent. ©



continue amid healthy
production, the Bank of Japan
raised its benchmark rate by a
quarter point.

BY YURI KAGEYAMA
Associated Press

TOKYO — Encouraged by signs

of robust economic growth, Japan’s |

central bank raised its benchmark
interest rate by a quarter point to 0.5

ing would withstand slightly tighter
credit. ;

The Bank of Japan’s decision,
which came at the end of a two-day
monetary policy board meeting, high-
lights confidence in the continuing
moderate recovery in the world’s
second-largest economy. The vote
among the nine-member board was
8-1 in favor of the hike, the bank said
in a statement.

nomic growth, and conditions were
ripe for a rate hike,” said Takeo Oku-
hara, bond strategist at Daiwa Insti-
tute of Research in Tokyo. “The bank
made the right choice.”

On the Tokyo stock market, the
benchmark Nikkei index rebounded
temporarily, as relief set in that the
next rate hike will not come for a
while — but it finished down 0.14
percent.





























NEW YORK - —_ Stocks fin-
hed mixed: Wednesday after
msumer prices showed a larg-
-than-expected increase in —
January and minutes from the |
Federal Reserve’s last meeting _
showed the central bank consid- —
red but decided against taking
more dovish tone on the. .

asdaq Foe idee .
a six-year high, while —



Inflation again commanded :
rall Street’s attention, with the
investors unnerved. Only last —

ernanke told Congress that _
inflation appeared to be moder- =
ating as the economy was show:

report that the consumer price -
Street, which had expected an -

comments followed a profit _

“We find it hard to see How.



PRESSING VINYL PRODUCES GROOVY INCOME



MARK HUMPHREY/AP

Seth Sequa operates a record press at the United Record Pressing company in Nashville, Tenn.
Many record collectors, DJs and music junkies still consider vinyl to be the gold standard of
recorded music. That appeal has helped United Record Pressing, which cranks out 20,000 to
40,000 records a day, become: one of the largest = and last - vinyl record manufacturers im thes:

.. country. Story, 3B

‘ECONOMY

Medical care, food push

consumer prices higher

i U.S. consumer prices rose
more than forecast in January,
giving credence to Federal
Reserve Chairman Ben S.
Bernanke’s message that
inflation remains the central
bank’s primary concern.

BY MARTIN CRUTSINGER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Inflation at
the consumer level rose by a larger-
than-expected amount in January
as falling energy prices only par-
tially offset big increases in the cost
of medical care, food and airline
tickets.

The Labor Department reported
Wednesday that prices rose by 0.2
percent in January. That was down
from a 0.4 percent rise in Decem-
ber, but it was higher than the 0.1
percent increase that ‘Wall Street
had been expecting.

Core inflation, which excludes
volatile energy and food compo-
nents, also was up more than ana-

lysts had been expecting, rising by .

0.3 percent. It was the largest one-
month gain in seven months.

In other economic news, a key
gauge of future economic activity
rose a tiny 0.1 percent in January,
held back by the ailing housing and
auto markets.

The increase in the Conference
Board’s Index of Leading Economic

BALANCING ACT

Should we get involved with co-workers’ problems?

hat do you do when you
W notice your co-worker is
regularly bolting to the

ladies room to dab tears? What if
your reliable sales associate suddenly
is coming to work with bags under
his eyes?

We all know people who have
faced the stress of a divorce, a diffi-
cult teen or an ill family member —
and shown signs of their troubled
personal lives at work. But as a boss
or co-worker, how do you respond?

Until recently, the experts would
tell you to stay out of employees’ per-
sonal lives. But there’s a growing



MARK LENNIHAN/AP

FOOD PRICES CLIMB: Food prices increased 0.7 percent, the biggest
rise since the spring of 2005, as the cost of dairy products, fruits
and vegetables all showed big gains. Above, New Yorkers shop
for fruit at a produce stand on Wednesday.

Indicators followed a much larger
0.6 percent December increase and
was lower than the 0.2 percent
advance that analysts were expect-
ing.

While energy prices dropped by
1.5 percent, food prices were up 0.7

army of employers and co-workers
who believe they should get involved.

“Sometimes as a boss, you have a
social responsibility
to cross that fine
line,” says Carol
Flynn of Miami’s HR
Solutions.

Just look at the
bizarre case of Lisa
Marie Nowak, the
astronaut charged
with the attempted
murder of a romantic
rival. Nowak had allegedly been
stalking her rival for two months.



CINDY KRISCHER
GOODMAN.

cgoodman@
MiamiHerald.com

percent, the biggest rise since the
spring of 2005, as the cost of dairy
products, fruits and vegetables all
showed big gains.

The cost of medical care shot up

* TURN TO ECONOMY, 4B

When NASA learned of Nowak’s
arrest, they put her on a 30-day leave
and relieved her from mission duties.
Agency spokesman John Ira Petty at
the Johnson Space Center in Houston
said he was concerned about the peo-
ple involved and their families. But,
he added, “We try not to concern
ourselves with our employees’ per-
sonal lives.”

The public outcry: Why not?

“With the hours people are put-
ting in, telecommuting and virtual
offices, work does bleed into per-
sonal lives,” Flynn says. “Our private
lives just aren’t as, private anymo.e.”









-

nent rate raise, also rebounded after
the move, trading at 120.44 yen, as
another rate hike is unlikely for
months,

Views had been split over what
the bank would do amid mixed sig-
nals from recent economic indica-
tors. f

Last week, the government said

* TURN TO JAPAN, 4B

Payday
lenders
tout |
changes

i Consumers are usually offered
quick cash advances that would
have to be repaid once they got
their next paycheck by certain
lenders. But now those lenders
are offering to give customers
more time to repay the loan with
no financial penalty.

BY SAM HANANEL

’ Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Under pres-
sure from lawmakers and consumer
groups, the payday lending industry
on Wednesday announced changes
to educate borrowers and help cus-

‘=tomers who have trouble: making ~

payments on short-term loans.
Consumer advocates called the
move a public relations gimmick
aimed at discouraging state legisla-
tures and Congress from limiting the
annual interest rates on payday loans,

’ which can exceed 400 percent.

_ cycle of

Payday lenders offer quick cash
advances —
for a fee —
that custom-
ers must
repay once
they receive
their next
paycheck.
Borrowers
who cannot
repay the
loan by the
next payday
often “roll
the
loan repeat-
edly, leading
to more
charges that
can quickly
add up and
lead to a

debt.

““We’ve
heard the
concerns raised about our industry
by policy makers and customers and‘
by. responsible consumer groups,”
said Darrin Andersen, president of
the Community Financial Services
Association of America, a trade asso-
ciation that represents about half the
payday lending stores.

The biggest change would give
customers more time to pay back a
loan with no financial penalty. This
“extended payment plan” would be
available at least once a year and pro-
vide borrowers between two and



* TURN TO PAYDAY, 4B

The risk is real. Laws such as the
American Disability Act, the Family
Medical Leave Act and the Health
Insurance Portability and Account-
ability Act protect workers’ privacy
and prevent retaliation. An employer
could be sued for learning informa-
tion about an employee and then fir-
ing that worker.

But even as Miami employment
attorney Mark Cheskin advises his
clients not to prod, he says some
employers are pushing back. They
feel they owe it to good employees,

*TURN TO BALANCING ACT, 4B


PAGE 10, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2007

&









BEREESE 2S MONDAY
@ HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public of its
meeting times and places: New Providence Community
Centre: Mondays - 6pm to. 7pm. The Kirk: Mondays -
7:30pm to 8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support group
meets the first Monday of each month at 6:30pm at New
Providence Community Centre, Blake Road. Dinner is
provided and free blood sugar, blood pressure and cho-
lesterol testing is available. For more info call 702.4646 or
327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third Monday
of every month ‘at 6pm. @ Doctors Hospital conference
room.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial
Hilton Monday's at 7pm © Club 612315 meets Monday
6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach ¢ Club
3596 meets at the British Colonia! Hilton Mondays at
7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC)
meets every third Monday of the month in the Board
Room of the British Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.

TUESDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public of its
meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta
Street: Tuesday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at 5:30pm on
the second Tuesday of each month at their Headquarters
at East Terrace, Centreville. Call 323.4482 for more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held 6:30pm
Tuesdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes location (off
Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval is required. Call

364.8423 to register for more info.



@ CIVIC CLUBS

day at 7:30pm at the Holy Cross Community Centre;
Highbury Park.

The Luncheon Pilot Club of Nassau meets every third
Tuesday at SuperClubs Breezes, Cable Beach at 12:30pm.
We invite all community minded persons to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7:30pm @ CC
Sweeting Senior School's Dining Room, College Avenue
off Moss Road. ¢ Club Cousteau 7343 meets Tuesdays at
7:30pm in the Chickcharney Hotel, Fresh Creek, Central
Andros ¢ Club 7178 meets each Tuesday at 6pm at the
Cancer Society of the Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centre-
ville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Eta Psi Omega chapter
meets every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ the Eleuthera
Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach «
Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets every second Tuesday,
6:30pm @ Atlantic House, IBM Office, 4th floor meeting
room ¢ Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity meets every first
Tuesday, 6:30pm at the British Colonial Hilton. Please call
502.4842/377.4589 for more info.

The Downtown Pilot Club of Nassau meets every third
Tuesday of the month at 6pm at the J P Whitney Building,
First Terrace, Collins Avenue.

The Bahamian Forum will hold its next meeting Tuesday,
February 27 at 5:45pm at the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel. Distinguished attorney Brian Moree, senior part-
ner of McKinney, Bancroft and Hughes, and Chairman of
the Bahamas Financial Forum, will examine legal aspects
and implications raised by Anna Nicole’s celebrated res-
idency in the Bahamas in "The Anna Nicole Saga: Lessons
Learned and Challenges Raised for the Bahamas". Dr
David Allen will moderate the discussion which is open to

‘the public.

’ WEDNESDAY

B PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar every
Wednesday Spm-8pm. Free appetizers and numerous
drink specials. .

@ HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public of its

“meeting times and places: New Providence Community

Centre: Wednesday - 7pm to 8pm. The Nassau Group:
Rosetta Street, Wednesday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm. ;

FREE Health and Wellness Lectures are held the first
Wednesday of every month at 6:30pm at New Providence
Community Center Blake Road. For more information
call 327.1660 or 327.2878, FREE Blood Pressure, Blood
Sugar and Cholesterol Screening.

thtintnsemist srs nase anenteneactanpnacnttecniae is raseentnsoneannecensesassnsenes

"The brewery of The Bahamas"

“SAMS ASCO INA NER eee etn rere reno ements neem NNER





SS

the me Rae



“featuring

& lrtetiwds

- Special guest appearences by:

Simeon Outten

Live Recording & Concert!

Elder Vanderson A. Barnett:

Pastor Arthur Duncombe






Sunday March 4", 2007

@ Living Waters Auditorium at 7pm

Ticket Lacations:



The Cancer Society of the Bahamas Support Group meets
every Wednesday from 5:30pm to 7pm at Cancer Head-
quarters, two doors south of ZNS. Cancer patients, sur- -

.. vivors, their family members and friends are invited yaw



senorassontan

eae ee trend. PHONG SEF 4482
The Kiwanis Club of New Providétice meets Wery Tues."



isi

end ‘ nil
@ CIVIC CLUBS
The Rotary Club of SouthEast Nassau meets every
Wednesday from 1pm - 2pm at East Villa Restaurant,
East Bay Street. Always an interesting speaker and great
fellowship. If you would like to attend our meetings
please send an e-mail to bruno.pletscher@gottardo.com or
kathyvsmith@hotmail:com.

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta Sigma
Theta Sorority Incorporated meets 6:30pm every third
Wednesday at the Bahamias National Pride Building.

International Training in Communication, Essence Club
#3173 holds it’s bi-monthly meetings on the 1st and 3rd
Wednesday of each month at Doctor's Hospital Confer-
ence Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets the sec-
ond and fourth Wednesday of the month, 8pm @ St
Augustine's Monastery.

The Kiwanis Club of Cable Beach invites the public to its
regular weekly meeting held every Wednesday at 7:30pm
at the British Colonial Hilton. Kiwanis is a worldwide
service organisation dedicated to changing the world One
Child, One Community at a times"

School and Community Nature Walk and Petting Zoo -
Free Every Wednesday from !Oam to 2:30pm at Earth
Village Ranch, St Albans Drive and Columbus Avenue
(Chippingham). Call (242) 356.2274 now to make reser-
vations. Open to all ages and groups Monday-Sunday
from 9am to 6pm. Inquire about additional activities and
programmes. _

TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday on the 4th floor of
the Ministry of Health, Meeting Street, at
6pm. :

THURSDAY



@ ENTERTAINMENT

Shadowhand Entertainment presents an all Bahamian
Talent Explosion this and every Thursday night at the
Patio Bar & Grill on Carmichael Road.. This event fea-
tures upcoming Bahamian artist who are ready to show-
case their original material to the world. There will also be
a freestyle competition every week which is open to the
public at large. Doors open at 8:30pm. Ladies free until
11pm ; Gentlemen - small door charge. See u there.

@ HEALTH

Free public health lectures featuring distinguished physi-
cians are held at Doctors Hospital every third Thursday
of the month at 6pm in the Doctors Hospital Confer-
ence Room. Free screenings between Spm & 6pm. For
more information call 302.4603.

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public its







\.
Bible BOoRSGift Shop

meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta

Street: Thursday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. The-

Kirk: Thursdays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held 6:30pm
Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes location (off
Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval is required. Call
364.8423 to register for more info. :

REACH - Resources & Education for Autism and Relat-
ed Challenges meets from 7pm - 9pm the second Thurs-
day of each month in the cafeteria of the BEC building,
Blue Hill Road.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise has a breakfast meet-
ing every Thursday moming at 7am at the British Colonial
Hilton Hotel (Fellowship begins at 6:45am).

The Kiwanis Club of Over-the-Hill meets every Thursday
at 8pm at the Holy Cross Activity Centre, Soldier Road.
Guests are welcome.

Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first, second and
third Thursday at the Ministry of Health & Environment
building on Meeting Street commencing at 7:30pm. Every-
one is welcome to attend « TM Club 1600 meets Thursday,
8:30pm @ SuperClubs Breezes.

International Association of Administrative Profession-
als, Bahamas Chapter meets the third Thursday of every
month @ SuperClubs Breezes, Cable Beach, 6pm.

The recently established National Insurance Board
Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets every fourth Thurs-
day in the month, in the National Insurance Board's
(NIB) training room, Wulf Road office complex, at 6pm.
All retirees are welcome.

The Rotary Club of West Nassau holds its weekly meet-
ing, every Thursday at Choices Restaurant on the campus
of the College of the Bahamas. Fellowship starts at
12:30pm, with the meeting held from 1pm to 2pm.

‘ s

@ CONCERT ‘
Chariots of Fire Album release concert: Come see and
hear the best in gospel music, with performances by Selec-
tor, Manifest, Counsellor, Mr Lynx, Christian Massive
and internationally acclaimed recording artist Landlord
and many more, February 23 @ 7:30pm at Workers
House, Tonique Williams Darling Highway. Box Offices
@ the Juke Box, Oasis Music Centre, and Faith Life
Book Store. Fore More information call 544.8078 or
455.3067 ;

FRIDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public of its
meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta
Street: Friday 6pm to 7pm & 8:30pm to 9:30pm. Sacred
Heart Church: Friday 6pm to 7pm. New Providence Com-
munity Centre: Friday 7pm to 8pm.

Mm CIVIC CLUBS |
TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas Baptist
Community College Rm A19, Jean St.








THE TRIBUNI

|

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Friday of |
each month, 7:30pm at the Emmaus Centreat'St |
Augustine’s Monastery. For more info call 325.1947 after

4pm. ‘ 5 |

AMISTAD is a club which promotes the Spanish‘lan-
guage and culture in the community, Residents of the
Bahamas who speak Spanish or are learning Spanish ‘are
invited to attend meetings on the third Friday of the |
month during the academic year at 7pm in room 13 of

COB's Tourism Training Centre.

a‘
8
qs #

SATURDAY



M EVENTS f =
i)

The Pinewood Gardens Outreach Association is having its
[st annual Pinewood Fest, March 3 @ 7am - midnight at
Pinewood Gardens Park. Included in the days actiyities
are a breakfast and a Fun\Run and Walk @ 7am. Come
out and bring the entire family... Join the domino teams
and basketball tournaments, and many other games.
Bring your kids to the toddlers town and let them expe-
rience bouncing castles and carnival rides, games, face
painting, complimentary lunch from 1-2ipm. There willbe |
performances by Ancient Man, Lassie:Doh Boys, and |
internationally acclaimed recording artist Landlord and
many more. Come and see the Junkanoo Rush Out by the
Pinewood Gardens Crusaders Junkanoo Group. For mére
information call 392.1618 or 565-8870 5

@ HEALTH |
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public ofits
meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta
Street: Saturday mornings -1Oam to 11am. | :
Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third Satur-
day, 2:30pm (except August and December) @ the Nuts-
ing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street. oe ar |
Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes are offered
every third Saturday of the month from 9am-1pm. Contact
a Doctors Hospital Community Training Representative
at 302.4732 for more information and learn to save.@ life
today. 2
#
The Eugene Dupuch Law School Students’ Association |
presents - Race Judicata - A Fun Run/Power Walk, Sat- |
urday, March 3 at 6:30am. Tke race commences atthe
Culinary and Hospitality Institute, College offthe |
Bahamas, Thompson Boulevard. There will be tropfiies
and.medals, prizes and surprises. For route, details "and
tules, please see forms available at: the Eugene Dupuch
Law School Library, the Eugene Dupuch Law Schdol
Administrative Office, the Law Library, UWI, Collegé of
the Bahamas campus. Or call: 326.8507/8, 326.8867, or
Fax: 326.8504 or go to www.edls.edu.bs. It’s fun/.t’s
healthy — See you there!!! x

ty
@ CIVIC CLUBS ay
JAR CYCLING: The Owners of JAR Cycling arc pleased
to offer a cycling clinic for juniors between'10 and 17. The |
free clinic will be held every Saturday in an effort'to
encourage kids to cycle. Parents interested in Tegistefing |
their children should contact organisersyat |
jarcycling@gmail.com. »

#
Toastmasters Club 7178 10th Anniversary Banquet: Sat-
urday, March 17 at the British Colonial Hilton at 7pm. The
Club will honor it’s 10 past presidents in grand style. ‘For
tickets e-mail: prezsj@tc7178.org: A special invitation-is
extended to persons who were a part of or visited the club
during its earlier years. Come out to see old friends afid
toastmasters. The public is invited and guests are always
welcomed. .

om
ad






SUNDAY |
@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS "hy
& RESTAURANTS *
Traveller's Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street, features sBe-
ef
s

‘
i
4

cial entertainment - Gernie, Tabitha and the Caribbean
Express - very Sunday from 6:30pm to 9:30pm,

h
m HEALTH y
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public of its
meeting times and places: The Nassau Group, Rosetta
Street: Sunday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm. *y

@ RELIGIOUS SERVICES

7.

“
x, ,

+

>
The Bahamas Metaphysical Society Inc - A spiritital
teaching society leading you to greater peace of mind,
health, prosperity and happiness - holds Higher Con-
sciousness Services every Sunday at 10am and weekly |.
Meditation services every Wednesday at 7pm at Bowe'’s *
Cove off Bernard Road. Interested persons are welcqme ;
to attend. For more information contact by e-mail @ bath-

metsol@hotmail.com or call 393.0279, De)
"e
*

sseneneneaesenenseaenasssanensseanseaesesesesensseeassssesesseceesssaesesessescsearseseel he

*
*

Send all your civic and social events (attach picture$ ¢f
possible) to The Tribune via fax: 328.2398 or e-mail:
ybdeleveaux@tribunemedia.net - Out there in the subject
line. *

WORNAANAAAAATDHVY

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