Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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Fo eg ee ae eS le ee Oe

PAGE 12, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007 THE TRIBUNE.





@ PRIME MINISTER Perry Christie and Miniser of Tourism Obie Wilchcombe are all smiles at

the PLP Pinewood Park rally on Tuesday night.



5

(Photos: Franklyn G Ferguson)




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MINISTER of ic isheries Leslie Mi §
DEPUTY Prime Minister Cynthia Pratt greets supporters. Cicer is ER of Agriculture and Fisheries Leslie Miller surrounded by *.





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li GOLDEN GATES MP Shane Gibson, Deputy Prime Minis-
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THE TRIBUNE



0 In brief

Gunmen rob
motorist of
car and
jewellery

TWO armed gunmen robbed
a Pinewood Gardens man of his
vehicle, cash and jewellery
Tuesday night.

According to police reports,
the man had just arrived home
at around 9pm when he was
accosted by two gunmen, who
then robbed him. One of the
gunmen fled the scene in the
man’s green Ford Explorer, reg-
istration 100225, and the other
followed in a trail bike. Police
are investigating the incident.

Pair rob
laundromat
of money at
gunpoint

A LAUNDROMAT was
robbed on Tuesday night by
armed gunmen.

According to police reports,
the robbery took place around
10pm at Super Wash Gibbs
Corner.

Two gunmen reportedly
entered the establishment and
robbed it of $600 cash before
fleeing on foot. The matter is
under police investigation.

Peacekeepers
seize house
of Haitian
gang leader

Bt HAITI
Port-au-Prince

UN peacekeepers seized a
house belonging to one of Haiti’s
most wanted gang leaders but
failed to catch him during a raid
that also led to the arrest of 17
suspected gang members, offi-
cials said Wednesday, according
to Associated Press.

Blue-hélmeted troops
stormed the house of Amaral
Duclona on Tuesday in the

- Port-au-Prince slum of Cite
Soleil, but the targeted man
slipped out pefore troops could
catch him, said Col Alphonso
Henrique Pedrosa, a Brazilian
military spokesman. It was not
clear if those arrested belonged
to Duclona’s gang.

Duclona is suspected in a
wave of kidnappings but has
denied criminal ties. He is the
second gang leader this month
to flee from the 8,800-strong
UN force, which arrived in 2004
after a violent uprising toppled
former president Jean-Bertrand
Aristide.

The raid was part of a new
UN offensive to drive gangs out
of the Caribbean nation’s slums.
Earlier this month, UN troops
stormed Cite Soleil and chased
out another gang leader known
as Evens, who is also in hiding.

On Wednesday, UN troops
gave journalists a tour of
Duclona’s vanilla-colored
house, a well-secured, two-bed-
room property. The home
included an entertainment cen-
ter and tiled patio with a foun-
tain — a sharp contrast to the
rows of tin shacks and crum-
bling brick hovels that populate
the fetid seaside slum.

“It’s hard to believe there |

could be a house like this in the
middle of all this poverty,”
Pedrosa said, adding that the
UN mission had yet to decide
what to do with the house...

Outside, about 200 slum
dwellers staged a protest call-
ing for the withdrawal of U.N.
peacekeepers. Many said
Duclona, believed to be in his
early 30s, provided them with
food and security and were wor-
ried how they would survive
without him.

“If Amaral isn’t here, who
will replace him?” the protest-
ers chanted as they marched
past Brazilian troops in armored
vehicles.

“T’ve known Amaral for 20
years and he never hurt any of
us, he only. helped us,” said one
woman, Sianie Dieu.

UN troops handed out rice and
water to children on Wednesday,
and Pedrosa said soldiers would
remain in the area.

share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Call us
on 322-1986 and share
your story.



LOCAL NEWS

Campaigner: PLP

‘must lose ‘political 7,

corpse of Gibson’

THE PLP was warned last
night that “dragging the polit-
ical corpse of Shane Gibson”
into its election campaign
would contaminate its bid to
retain power.

The party had shown its
shameless side by treating the’
disgraced former immigration
minister like a returning:war
hero, said fathers’ rights cham- -
pion Clever Duncombe.

“PLPs are lifting this man
as though he has just come
back from doing battle. I find
this very disturbing - what does
it mean for our country?”

Mr Duncombe, who is set
to challenge Mr Gibson in the
Golden Gates constituency,
said: “If they continue to drag
this political corpse into their
campaign, he will eventually
contaminate it if he has not
already done so, and everyone
will suffer from Shane Gib-
son.”

Mr Duncombe’s remarks
came as the public continued
to air its views on the Anna
Nicole Smith controversy and
the minister’s resignation last
Sunday.

The independent candidate
also attacked Prime Minister
Perry Christie, saying: “He is
supposed to be about stan-
dards but he is trying to main-
tain that Shane Gibson has
been victimised.”

Mr Duncombe added: “Mr
Gibson knew exactly what he
was doing. I don’t know what
it takes for politicians to be
reprimanded and ultimately
punished.

“If the PLP wants to hail
this man as a hero, then so be
it but I don’t know what this
man is doing in the House. He
should resign from there, too.”

Mr Gibson, he claimed, was





if SHANE Gibson

saying that everyone was lying
but him. But no-one believed
his story.

“It baffles me to see the
prime minister promoting this
man as a hero,” he said. He
wondered what Mr Christie’s
“so-called code of ethics”
meant.

“This man (Gibson) has tak-
en our country to the pits,” he
added, “If they go ahead and
re-elect Shane Gibson, then
this country-will eventually pay
the penalty.”

Mr Duncombe said the peo-
ple of Golden Gates were
drifting away from the ex-min-
ister, as was,shown when he
made an unsuccessful attempt
to stage a demonstration
against The Tribune and its
managing editor, ‘John Mar-

He said Mr Gibson was
unable to enlist the required
level of support and called the
whole thing off.

“I am very saddened and
disappointed by this whole
thing. The prime minister is
trying to force him upon the
people. This is no example for
the criminal on the street.”

Mr Duncombe said the gov-
ernment’s treatment of scan-
dal-hit politicians had a “direct
correlation” with crime figures
in the Bahamas.

Mr Christie, he said, was set-
ting a “dangerous precedent
in parading around with the
disgraced and embattled

_ Shane Gibson.”

He added: “This is the worst
scandal to rock our country in
modern times.. He (Mr
Christie) is more concerned
with saving the PLP than sav-
ing our country.”

But Mr Duncombe said Mr
Gibson’s standing in Golden
Gates was best illustrated by
the poor showing at his mini-
rally at Sunshine Park on Sat-
urday.

“There were about 90 peo-
ple there, of whom about 60
were children. There were
about 30 voting adults. The
longer they keep parading him
around as a hero just returning
from war, the more disgusted
and fed up people will
become.”

Many people had expressed
disgust that their own children
had borne the full brunt of the
law while the prime minister
was displaying two sets of stan-
dards, he said.

“We need to borrow a page
from the first world’s book
when it comes to dealing with
corrupt and scandalous politi-
cians,” he added.

Anna Nicole’s mother says she

is afraid for her g

ANNA Nicole Smith’s
mother testified yesterday that
she is afraid for the safety of
her granddaughter Dannielynn
as long as she remains in the
custody of Howard K Stern.

As the court hearing to
determine who gets custody of
the former Playboy playmate’s
remains continued yesterday
in Fort Lauderdale, Virgie
Arthur told the judge that she
wants her grandson Daniel
exhumed and moved from the
Bahamas to Texas.

Ms Arthur said she believed
that any mother would want
to be buried with her children.

She added that her 20-year-

Id grandson Daniel, who died
in the Bahamas last Septem-
ber, would be accommodated
too.

“I’m going to go get his body
and bring him back home (to
Texas)”, she said.

The mother of the deceased
celebrity is contesting the

A
vi VÂ¥

request of Howard K Stern to
have Ms Smith buried at
Lakeview Cemetery in Nassau
next to Daniel.

However, Ms Avxthur
acknowledged that in the last
conversation she had with her
daughter about burial plans,
Ms Smith expressed the wish
to be buried in California.

She testified that this con-
versation took place more than
10 years ago, and that her
daughter said she wanted to
be interred near her idol Mar-
ilyn Monroe.

“Wherever the stars are
buried, that’s where she want-
ed to be buried,” she said.

Ms Arthur further told the
court that if she could have
done anything differently she
would have “kidnapped” her
daughter and removed her
from the influence of Mr Stern.

“TI knew she would be next.
My grandson did not overdose.
Howard was there when he

ran

ddaughter

died, and Howard was there
when my daughter died. And
he has my granddaughter now
and it is not even his child. I’m
afraid for her life as well,” she
said while crying on the stand.
Earlier during her testimo-
ny, Mr Stern rose angrily from
his seat, but Circuit Judge Lar-
ry Seidlin stopped him before
he could complete a sentence.
“You have no podium here,
Mr Stern, appreciate you being
here, though,” the judge told
him. :
Ms Arthur took her time in
answering whether she had
benefited financially in any
way from her daughter’s death,

‘ but repeatedly stated that Mr

Stern had.

After being informed that
the embalmed body of Ms
Smith is decomposing quicker
than anticipated, Judge Seidlin
said that battle for the celebri-
ty’s body will wrap up this
week.

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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007
a

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,



(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972

Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352 .



George Bush and Al Qaeda

RECENT DESCRIPTIONS by intelligence
officials of Al Qaeda’s renewed control of ter-
rorist networks and training camps in the tribal
areas of Pakistan contrast with previous admin-
istration depictions of isolated leaders reduced
to acting as little more than a source of ideo-
logical inspiration. The new picture seems to
belie the triumphalist tone of President Bush,
who said a few days before last November’s
congressional elections: “Absolutely, we're win-
ning. Al Qaeda is on the run.”

Which is it, then, a hounded, faltering Al
Qaeda or an enemy that has regrouped and
become a greater threat than ever? The answer
is crucial not only for national security but for
. America’s open society.

An obvious part of the answer is that Bush
has played politics with the Al Qaeda threat.
When it suits his needs, he inflates the stateless
band of Osama bin Laden and his deputy
Ayman al-Zawahiri into an existential threat. At
other times, Bush boasts about routing bin
Laden, passing over in silence his administra-
tion’s failure to send enough US forces to cap-
ture the fugitive Saudi in the caves of Tora
Bora five years ago.

An accurate assessment of the threat from Al
Qaeda depends less on classified intelligence
than on a sense of proportion. There is no rea-
son to doubt reports from European and Pak-
istani intelligence agencies that, from their hide-
outs in Pakistan, Al Qaeda’s leaders have spon-
sored terrorist attacks that killed people and

attacks that were foiled beforehand. It is also
clear that extremist groups in Iraq and North
Africa have openly sworn fealty to bin Laden
and named themselves as regional branches of
Al Qaeda.

Nevertheless, bin Laden and Zawahiri are
confronting a real-world version of the principle
that every action induces a reaction. Even with
their safe haven in Pakistan, they no longer
enjoy the freedom of action they had under the
Taliban in Afghanistan before Sept. 11. When
the former leader of Al Qaeda in Iraq, Abu
Musab al-Zarqawi, sent suicide bombers to
blow themselves up in Amman, Jordan, in
November 2005, murdering Muslim men,
women, and children who could not possibly
be defined as enemies of the faithful, the
nihilism of that act turned millions of people in
the Muslim world against Al Qaeda.

Al Qaeda has little chance of toppling any
government in the Muslim world. It presents
instead a threat of episodic terrorism, and it
has provoked the security services of many
countries to cooperate against that threat. That
cooperation should be intensified and expand-
ed, but the threat from Al Qaeda does not jus-
tify Bush’s curtailing of Americans’ civil rights
or the government’s invading of their privacy. It

_should never have been used to justify a resort

to torture.

These are abuses of power harmful to Amer-
ica’s true interests, and they derive from a dis-
torted representation of Al Qaeda.

- Calamity in Jet Blue

JET BLUE CEO David Neeleman apolo-
gized profusely for his airline’s system melt-
down last week, telling customers whose flights
were cancelled or who were stranded on run-
ways for as much as 10 hours that he was “mor-
tified and humiliated,” and pledging to give
refunds, train more staff, and improve commu-
nications to avoid such a trauma in the future. It
was ritualized corporate groveling at its most
dramatic; all that was left, it seemed, was for
Neeleman to announce he was checking into
rehab.

But JetBlue is just the latest airline to hold
passengers hostage for hours without adequate
supplies or information when congestion or,
more often, adverse weather conditions over-
whelm their operations.

In December, American Airlines kept pas-
sengers locked inside planes for nine hours with-
out food or functioning toilets, waiting for
storms to clear over Dallas. Last summer a
United Airlines flight sat on the ground in Penn-
sylvania for eight hours, until the airline finally
agreed to bus passengers to New York. The
voluntary “customer service plans” adopted by



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the airlines clearly have not been good enough
to prevent such fiascoes. It’s time for congres-
sional action to enforce a passenger bill of rights.

California Democrat Mike Thompson, who
had constituents stranded on American in
December, is drafting such legislation to be
filed in the House next week. Among other
things, it would require airlines to return pas-
sengers to the airport terminal after three hours
on a runway, and to provide food, clean water,
proper ventilation and sanitary facilities dur-
ing delays of any length. It would require airlines
to provide frequent updates to passengers on a
delay’s cause and status.

In the mi$ts of memory, air travel was an
exciting, glamorous occasion one wouldn’t
dream of showing up for dressed in sweats.
Now, during bad weather delays, airports are
wore like bus depots, with passengers and
exploded luggage sprawled about and tempers
flaring. Thompson’s bill won’t return air trav-
ellers to the days when stewardesses wore white
gloves, but it would bring some measure of fair-
ness to what has become a necessity of modern
life.










EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

THE TRIBUNE




Give injured
workers
their rights

EDITOR, The Tribune.

WE HAVE in this country
many persons who have been
injured on the job. This again
has come to light from the
injury of a worker employed at
a power company. Companies
pass the compensation to
National Insurance as: C17 -
Convention concerning Work-
men’s Compensation for Acci-
dents and C19 - Convention
concerning Equality of Treat-
ment for National and Foreign
Workers as regards Workmen’s
Compensation for Accidents
have not been put in place by
the country.

These persons suffer both
bodily and financial injury. They
get no help to bring their lives
back to the original position pri-
or to the injury. This needs to
be addressed and changes put
in. The attached gives an insight
into what we as a country have
signed, but have not put in
place.

The Bahamas is one of the
174 members who are a part of
the ILO. List of Ratifications
of International Labour Con-
ventions - Bahamas Member
since 1976 - 33 conventions rat-
ified (30 in force). The main
function of the ILO is to estab-
lish standards of working con-
ditions for men and women
throughout the world. The
International Labour Organi-
sation (ILO) headquartered in
Geneva, Switzerland is a tri-
partite agency within the Unit-
ed Nations (UN).

The issue is:

If an employee is injured on
the job, who pays the
salary/wages?

The following Conventions
show that an injured person is
to be’cémpensated. The prob-
lem is that the Government has
not complied with the require-
ments. In not complying, the
Labour Department does not
follow up on the injuries. The
injured person suffers as the
companies have the view that
National Insurance is to cover.
National Insurance cannot cov-
er the wage on the injured. The
injured persons work for the
companies and they need to
cover the wage difference.

C17 - Convention concerning
Workmen’s Compensation for
Accidents (Note: Date of com-
ing into force: 01:04:1927).

Article 1 - Each Member of
the International Labour
Organisation which ratifies this
Convention undertakes to
ensure that workmen who suf-
fer personal injury. due to an
industrial accident, or their
dependents, shall be compen-








DAMP

letters@tribunemedia.net

sated on terms at least equal to
those provided by this Conven-
tion.

Article 6 - In case of incapac-
ity, compensation shall be paid
not later than as from the fifth
day after the accident, whether
it be payable by the employer,
the accident insurance institu-
tion, or the sickness insurance
institution concerned.

C19 - Convention concerning
Equality of Treatment for
National and Foreign Workers
as regards Workmen’s Com-
pensation for Accidents

Article 3 - The Members
which ratify this Convention
and which do not already pos-
sess a system, whether by insur-
ance or otherwise, of work-
men’s compensation for indus-
trial accidents agree to institute
such a system within a period
of three years from the date of
their ratification.

C 121 - Convention concern-
ing Benefits in the Case of
Employment Injury (Note:
Date of coming into force:
28:07:1967.)

Article 6 - The contingencies
covered shall include the fol-
lowing where due to an employ-
ment injury: (b) incapacity for
work resulting from such a con-
dition and involving suspension
of earnings, as defined by
national legislation;

(c) total loss of earning capac-
ity or partial loss thereof in
excess of a prescribed degree,
likely to be permanent, or cor-
responding loss of faculty;

Article 9 -1. Each Member
shall secure to the persons pro-

Reputation matter

EDITOR, The Tribune.

tected, subject to prescribed
conditions, the provision of the
following benefits:

(b) cash benefits in respect of
the contingencies specified in
Article 6, clauses (b), (c)

2. Eligibility for benefits may

not be made subject to the

length of employment, to the
duration of insurance or to the
payment of contributions: Pro-
vided that a period of exposure
may be prescribed for occupa-
tional diseases.

Article 10 - 2. The benefits
provided in accordance with
paragraph 1 of this Article shall
be afforded, using all suitable
means, with a view to main-
taining, restoring or, where this
is not possible, improving the
health of the injured person and
his ability to work and to attend
to his personal needs

Schedule II. Pericdical pay-
ments to standard beneficiaries.

Category

1. Temporary or initial inca-
pacity for work.

Standard beneficiary — Man
with wife and two children.

Percentage - 60.

The Convention states that
60 per cent is to be covered by
using all suitable means. Nation-
al Insurance now covers 40 per

cent. The company needs to put ©

in place what is required.
The persons injured on the
jobs need help.

We must put in place this .

requirement.
Not putting in the required

- changes as per the Conventions

hurts not just the injured, but
the whole country.

SIGMUND J WILLIS
_ Freeport, .
‘“Grand Bahama, |” *
*'Bébruary13, 2007-9 2

ANNA NICOLE Smith is not the first to bring notoriety to
our little country, nor will she be the last.

Whether the notoriety is good or bad, it is global, and bound
to have consequences for the reputation of our country in the

international arena.

It draws attention to, and raises questions about, the stan-
dards of our government and the political parties running it. In
this case the Anna Nicole publicity shows the world that govern-
ment ministers do not impartially apply the rules, and that spe-
cial services are available for “special friends”.

One way to counteract some of the negative publicity would
be for the Prime Minister to tell the world he has Minister Shane
Gibson's resignation on his desk.

It is the proper thing to do. Pity is was not done weeks ago.

THE NASSAU INSTITUTE
Nassau,
February 15, 2007.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 5



@ In brief

Highgrove |
sinkers get |
ready for |
concert 2

THE Highgrove Singers are
eagerly warming up their
vocal chords as they prepare
for the third annual “Let
Freedom Reign” concert.

The event will be held on
Sunday, February 25 at
7.30pm.

It is free to the public and
will be held at New Destiny
Baptist Cathedral on Blue
Hill road.

This year’s event consists
of a fusion of dramatic read-
ings, poetry, song and dance.

According to organisers:
“The performance will show
the important role sacred
music. and dance has played
‘in black history and how its
‘reflective power continues to

affect us today.”

_ Noting that this year com-
memorates the 200th year of
the abolition of the trans-
Atlantic slave trade, the High-
grove Singers have combined,
with other musicians such as:
Sonovia Pierre, Nikita
Thompson-Wells, Allison
Mason-Rolle, and_ the
Bahamas National Children’s
Choir to make this event a
memorable one.

Highgrove is comprised of
talented singers who have
studied and trained at.various
renowned musical institutions.

Dexter Fernander, the
choir director, said that he
wanted to bring back the time
when concerts were free and
audiences could enjoy good
singing.

The concert will showcase
the MCD Singers, an ensem-
ble making their mark in the
‘genre of Negro spirituals, as
well as choreographed works
of Andrew Campbell, a three
time National Arts Festival
winner.



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THURSDAY,

FEBRUARY 22ND
6:30am Community Page 1540AM
11:00 — Immediate Response

12:00. ZNS News Update,

12:05’. Immediate Response Cont'd
1:00 Legends: Beverley Wallace





























Whitfield

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NOTE: ZNS-TV 13-reserves the
right to make last minute
programme changes!






PLP chairman:

struggle of blacks

is far from over

lm By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

ACCORDING to PLP chair-
man Raynard Rigby, the “strug-
gle” of Black-Bahamians has
not ended — despite the gains
won by Majority Rule in 1967.

Mr Rigby was responding to
claims by the FNM that the PLP
is using the “race card” to
muster up support for the
upcoming general election.

He denied the allegations and
suggested that persons like
FNM deputy leader Brent
Symonette should not “run
away” from the history of the
Bahamas.

Yesterday, Mr Symonette
told The Tribune there was no
question in his mind that the
Progressive Liberal Party is
playing the race card, with its
constant references to the Unit-
ed Bahamian Party (UBP).

At the PLP rally on Tuesday
night, Foreign Affairs Minister
Fred Mitchell alleged that FNM
leader Hubert Ingraham will
turn over the government to
‘the UBP heir’, Brent Symon-
ette, if Mr Ingraham is returned
to government. ©

And Prime Minister Christie

said Mr Ingraham was brought
out of retirement by “hidden
forces” who cannot let the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party and the
progressive forces control the
Bahamas. L

But according to Mr Symon-
ette: “The Bahamas of 2007 has
developed way beyond the
question of the race card that
the PLP is trying to use in a very
low-down way to hold on to
power.”

He claimed the PLP is using
the race card because it is in a
“desperate” state of affairs as
the general election approaches.

Mr Symonette also said there
are some white Bahamians who
are “very offended”. by the
PLP’s race card strategy. .

But PLP chairman Raynard
Rigby said the history of the
Bahamas cannot be re-written.

“Whether Brent Symonette
wants to accept it or whether
he wants to run away from it is
his business, but the history of

-our country cannot change.

“At a time, there was a
minority government who con-
trolled the economy and the
politics of the Bahamas and
that’s why we had January 10
1967, and that’s the importance

Ministry of Tourism
considers Indian travel

A DAUNTING travel visa
process looms as the main bar-
rier preventing the Bahamas
from tapping into a lucrative
segment of affluent Indian trav-
ellers, top Ministry of Tourism
officials say.

‘A team from the Ministry of
Tourism visited India from Feb-
ruary 3 to 10 to ascertain the
potential for the travel of Indi-
ans to the Bahamas.

Director general Vernice
Walkine, deputy director gen-
eral Ellison “Tommy” Thomp-
son, and director of Europe and
Asia Karen Seymour met with
tour operators, airlines, media,
and film representatives in Del-
hi and Mumbai..

While the team received
“promising” and “encouraging”
information during their busi-
ness meetings, it was apparent
that the Bahamas’ travel visa
process was a significant barrier
in developing travel business
from India, which has a popu-
lation of more than one billion.

“Notwithstanding the fact that
India is a long way, geographi-
cally, from the Bahamas, the
Indians and this particular afflu-
ent population in India tend to
travel fairly spontaneously,” Ms
Walkine said. “They have the
funds and the adventuresome
spirit to decide they want to go
abroad for a week, next week.
So, having to wait several weeks
for a visa application to be
processed was one of the con-
cerns that everybody expressed.”

Visa applications for travel to
the Bahamas are processed by
the British High Commission.
At the moment, it takes more
than four weeks to be processed.

Ms Walkine said that the cur-
rent time of processing is con-
sidered too long by Indians.
Destinations such as Australia

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and New Zealand have been
able to process visa applications
within days.

The Indian travel business
community also identified a lack
of acceptable vegetarian and
Indian cuisine as another barri-
er to travel to the Bahamas,
Indian travellers, particularly
more traditional Indians,
require true vegetarian diets.
The Indian vegetarian strictly
adheres to the diet, Bahamian
officials were advised.

Mr Thompson said it was
encouraging that Indian travel
professionals were not concerned
about the cost of a Bahamas
vacation for Indian travellers.

He added that language also
did not appear to be a signifi-
cant barrier since many afflu-
-ent Indians speak English. He
said there also appeared to be
great potential for weddings and
honeymoon business.

The Ministry of Tourism is
also hoping to arrange location
visits for members of India’s
film industry since filmmakers
are known as trend setters for
travellers in India.

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of majority rule,” Mr Rigby
said. '

Asked if he believed black
Bahamians still face pre-1967
obstacles, Mr Rigby said the
majority of Bahamians want to
ensure that they have a slice of
the “economic pie.”

“We have political indepen-
dence, but now the question is
one of economic empowerment
for the masses,” he said.

According to Mr Rigby, the
issue is not one of black and
white, but instead economic
empowerment for all Bahami-
ans.

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THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 6, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007













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Application close Feb. 28th, 2007



















= FIDELITY

"Time After Time ;



m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

ACCORDING to a report
presented to government last
year, public transportation —
and in particular, public trans-
portation that services schools —
is a crucial factor in solving Nas-
sau's dire traffic situation.

It was noted that with school
out for the week, it is impossible
for any driver not notice the
alleviation of the congestion
problem in New Providence.

The 2006 report noted that
60 per cent of all school chil-
dren on the island, including 90
per cent of all primary school
children, are currently driven
to school individually in private
vehicles.

With this in mind, The Tri-
bune sought answers to the
question of when the long-tout-
ed unified bus system — the
answer proposed by govern-
ment and independent consul-
tants to New Providence's con-
gestion problem — will see the
light of day.

Yesterday however, neither
Minister of Transport Glenys
Hanna-Martin nor road traffic
controller Jack Thompson were
willing to put a definite time-
line on when a unified bus sys-
tem will be implemented in
New Providence.










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While both agreed that the
radical change is required if
congestion and road safety are
to be improved to any signifi-
cant degree, they said the com-
plexity of the issue has made
the process of bringing about
that change lengthy.

Mrs Hanna-Martin empha-
sised that the issue is primarily
in Mr Thompson’s hands and
that any move towards passing
the legislation in parliament —
the first and most crucial step
towards radically changing the
current public transportation
system — depends on how soon
Mr Thompson and his team

-



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\

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een eMC SRS] tay ead
Malt at Marathon Tel: 394-5180



complete their work with the
documents.

_ "It's taken longer than I
would've hoped. It's something
that I wish we could've fixed
over night in a shorter period
of time but I can say that I feel
that it really sort of became
fueled in the last few months,"
said Mrs Hanna-Martin.

"I would hope and pray that
within 12 real months we will
have a public transportation sys-
tem in this country that is dif-
ferent to what we have now,"
she added.

Meanwhile, Jack Thompson,
road traffic controller, said that
his team is "working overtime"
to "fine tune" the draft legisla-
tion to enable the system to be
put into place, while the busi-
ness plan should be completed
"very soon."

He originally told The Tri-
bune in October that "fine tun-
ing" was taking place, and said
at that time that "giant steps
towards completion" were
being made.

Asked yesterday when he felt
the legislation may go before
parliament, Mr Thompson said
that in a week he may be "ina
better position to answer that."

The industry as it exists today,
many claim, is not only unsuit-
able to offer a real alternative to
travel in private vehicles — but is




We stock a wide selection

With still no sign of the public
transort plan intended to solve
the congestion in the capital,
how close is a solution?



problem in Nassau

also plagued with lawlessness
and a disregard for safety. In
March of last year, bus unifica-
tion was brought to the fore-

front of the public's attention

when a primary school student,
Faith Mackey, was hit and killed
by a jitney.

On January 17, 2007, an
alleged hit-and-run accident
involving a jitney driver again
raised the question of a need
for greater regulation.

However, with around 500
individual franchise owners
operating various buses around
New Providence, the current
"system" did not develop
overnight — but is the result of
years of disorganisation on the
part of numerous governments,
the minister pointed out.

Both Mr Thompson and Mrs
Hanna-Martin said that they are
confident that stakeholders in
the industry will accept the
forthcoming plan when it is
completed. —

"Tf they feel that they accept
that the system is not accept-
able to the public in this coun-
try...I think that's a compelling
driving force to the way that
they adapt to what is happen-
ing," said Mrs Hanna-Martin.

However, she added that bus
operators "main concern will
be that they get a fair economic
stake in what happens,"

Despite not being able to
offer a time frame for the over-
haul, Mrs Hanna Martin said
that she is absolutely committed
to seeing the unified bus sys-
tem. come to fruition.

"T think it impacts the quality
of life we enjoy, it's not a simple
matter but its an important mat-
ter," she said, adding that on
her ministry's part "there is a
commitment to pursue the mat-
ter and hopefully in the shortest
possible time."

"A proper transportation :ys-
tem cannot be achieved unver
the current system and I thin.
the facts every day show that,”
she said.

The government first
announced in 2005 that a "pre-
ferred model" for the unifica-
tion of the public bus system
had been put together.

A report released by the Min-
istry of Transport an Aviation
on January 12 of last year said
the "time is opportune to carry
out appropriate reform of the
industry in a decisive and sys-
tematic manner" as the present
bus system's weaknesses are
destructive to the future devel-
opment of public transporta-
tion. ,

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THE TRIBUNE

mele. \ Ba IE)

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 7





@ RICARDO Whylly.

Attacks on Ingraham continue
with speech by Ricardo Whylly

THE PLP offensive against
former Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham continued yesterday
with an attack by Senator Ricar-
do Whylly against the FNM
leader.

Using his contribution for the
Prime Minister’s Pension Bill
as a platform, Mr Whylly
accused Mr Ingraham of ‘dou-
ble-dipping’, referring to the
fact the he is paid a government
salary as an MP as well as a
pension as a former prime min-
ister.

Mr Whylly said: “He insisted
that the late Sir Lynden resign
from the other place before he
could receive his pension. Now,
he is receiving his pension and
continues to sit in the other
place. Madam, I am sure that

Senator accuses former PM of ‘double-dipping’



you and everyone would agree
with me that two plus two is
equal to four just as three plus
one is equal to four. Mr Ingra-
ham, however, does not agree.
He believes that he could re-
write common sense, logic, law
and intelligence.”

Mr Ingraham has said repeat-
edly that both salaries have
been forwarded to him despite
his efforts to prevent this, He
added however that the salary

he has received as an MP has .

been set aside for return to the
government.
Mr Whylly also questioned

Mr Ingraham’s trustworthiness,
saying: “The greatest display of
trust ever pronounced in the
Bahamas was when the
Bahamian citizens said that they
did not trust former Prime Min-
ister Ingraham to amend the
constitution... Mr Ingraham
who was leaving after the ref-
erendum to attend a CARI-
COM meeting stated that he
was ashamed of the Bahamian
people.

“I ask colleagues opposite
whether or not they can indi-
cate to the Bahamas whether
or not Mr Ingraham is still

ashamed of Bahamians and
their right to make decisions
they consider to be in their best
interest.”

The senator also added his
name to the list of those voicing
their support for former .Cabi-
net minister Shane Gibson,:-who
resigned on Sunday night over

his relationship with deceased.

celebrity Anna Nicole Smith.
He said: “In the case of Anna
Nicole Smith, former Minister
Gibson approved an application
for permanent residence after
due legal diligence was done by
a law firm that is reputedly of

the top in the country. This law
firm indicated that Ms Smith
met the legal requirements for
permanent residency. Conse-
quently, approval was given.”

And he echoed the comments
on Tuesday of Prime Minister
Perry Christie, who tried to
deflect attention away from Mr
Gibson’s actions. The senator
said: “Individuals known to be
undesirable in several countries,
and in several cases with inter-
national adverse notoriety, were
given permanent residency
under the Ingraham adminis-
tration in record time.”

Homeschooling seminar gives |
alternatives for education

HOMESCHOOLING. is
emerging as a viable and sus-
tainable alternative to tradi-
tional Bahamian education,
concerned parents and home-
schooling pioneers said ahead
of a homeschooling seminar this
weekend.

Kingdom Life Church on
Chesapeake Road has sched-

‘uled a series of seminars for

February 23 to 25. The series
begins with “Why homeschool?
Informing families about the
homeschool alternative.”

The seminar is being pre-
sented against a backdrop of
promising homeschooling
results out of the United States.
According to the findings of the
Rudner Study, the average
homeschooled eighth grade stu-
dent performs four grade lev-
els above the national average.

‘ One in four homeschool! stu-

happiness is in

your C

dents (24.5 per cent) are
enrolled one or more grades
above age level. Statistics from
the United States also show that
students who have been home-
schooled their entire lives have
the highest scholastic achieve-
ment.

Furthermore, in every sub-
ject and at every grade level of
the Iowa Test of Basic Skills
(ITBS) and the Measures of
Academic Progress (MAP) bat-

teries, homeschooled students -

scored significantly higher than
their counterparts in public and
private schools.

Pastor Cedric Moss and his
wife Alexine, who have home-
schooled three children for the
past 11 years, will assist in lead-
ing the seminars. The Mosses
are gréat advocates of home-
schooling for families within the
proper circumstances.

The eldest child of Pastor and
Mrs Moss made history last year
by becoming the first fully home-
schooled Bahamian to sit the
Bahamas Junior Certificate
examinations. Her sitting of the
examinations resulted in seven
passes — four As, two Bs anda C.

Although the academic
accomplishments have been
excellent, the Moss family
points to “more substantial”
benefits of homeschooling.
Those benefits include the fos-
tering of a special relationship
between parents and children,
and the avoiding of the many

social ills to which many

Bahamian students are exposed
in today’s schools.
Homeschooling also allows
parents to better shape the char-
acter of children, the Mosses
said.
Kingdom Life Church has

hoices

Let the baristas at your favourite Starbucks store
show you how to customize a beverage and make it your drink.

also enlisted the help of a US
couple who have been home-
schooling for more than 20
years. Brent and Jenny Detwiler
of North Carolina will share
their experiences in home-
schooling. The Detwilers have
four children and two grand-
children.

Sessions for the seminar
include “Why homeschool?
Biblical and practical reasons,”
“Why homeschool?”: lessons
from my life’s book,” and a pan-
el discussion with Cedric and
Alexine Moss and Brent and
Jenny Detwiler.

The seminar is free and per-. _

sons wishing to attend can reg-
ister online at www.kingdom-
life.org.

All homeschooling sessions
will be held on Friday, February
23 beginning at 7.30pm at King-
dom Life Church.





@ CEDRIC Moss

AA a
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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007

Christie’s econo



I: IS clear that Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie and his
crew have put outa propaganda
sheet touting what they regard
as their economic accomplish-
ments.

This propaganda sheet was
taken up by two very eloquent
young people on Jeff Lloyd’s
Real Talk radio show as well as
by the editorial section of one
of the country’s newspapers on
Wednesday, February 21, 2007.
The problem is that the sheet
put out is filled with fiction, as
we shall point out the following
paragraphs.

STRAIGHT UP TALK

ZJHIVARGO

When Mr Christie came to
office in 2002 the unemployment
rate was only 9.1 per cent. It
increased in 2003 to 10.8 per
cent and stayed at around that
same level until 2005.

It was only in 2006 that there
was a somewhat curious
sharp decrease in the unem-
ployment rate to 7.4 per cent,
according to preliminary esti-

LAING

THE GROWTH OF THE
COUNTRY’S GDP

The Christie administration’s

- fiction sheet says that the nation-

al economy shrank in 2001 by
1.5 per cent and .5 per cent in
2002. This is simply not the
whole story.

What the fiction sheet will not
say is that 2001 was the year in

mi



out that the highest growth rate
experienced during the Ingra-
ham administration was 6.8 per
cent. That growth rate has not
been equalled since.

The Christie administration’s
fiction sheet also suggested that
there was a turnaround in the
economy by the current govern-
ment to a high of six per cent in
five years. That is untrue.

In real terms, the Bahamian
economy has never exceeded 45
per cent under the Christie
administration and, in fact, the
government has played games
with the numbers by using

- growth rates that do not account
for inflation to make its num-

GOVERNMENT REVENUE
TOPS $1 BILLION

The Christie administration’s
propaganda sheet boasts that
government revenue topped $1
billion for the first time in 2005.
So what?

Any previous administration
could have taxed the nation
more heavily and brought rev-
enue to $1 billion. Certainly, nat-
ural inertia would have brought
us eventually to that point. After
all, in 2001, revenue was already
$986 million, just $14 million shy
of $1 billion.

In any event, what is special
about the $1 billion dollar mark?

THE TRIBUNE





c fiction sheet

utter nonsense and entirely
untrue.

First of all, the paper
approvals that the PLP touts are
just that, paper approvals. They
are not real. In fact, that “$20
billion” approved investment fig-
ure is simply bogus.

Pe
a

The way these figures are cal- |

culated is unreliable and not in
keeping with the way these fig-
ures are professionally calculat-
ed.

The fact is that, according to
Central Bank Reports, a little

more than-$1 billion in FDI ~j

flowed into The Bahamas over
the last five years, almost half
of which represented land sales.

THE UNEMPLOYMENT mates by the Department of Sta- which the terrorist attacks took _ bers look better. What matters most is what is _ Other than Kerzner Interna- ,\1,,
RATE tistics. place in the USA and which being done with taxpayers’ mon- tional’s third phase of Atlantis, ,, ;,,
It is mere speculation to sug- affected the global economy. TOURISM ARRIVALS AND ey, whether it is $1 million or $1 which came under the Ingraham ...,,,

The Christie administration’s The US economy experienced EXPENDITURE billion. administration, no meaningful

fiction sheet says that unem-
ployment was reduced from 10.2
per cent when the PLP came to
office to seven per cent in 2006.
This is not true.





gest that we are probably arriv-
ing at full employment when
Grand Bahama’s economic
plight remains dire and its unem-
ployment rate hardly improving.

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd

Montrose Avenue >







decline from the 9/11 attacks
combined with a recession that
began in March of that same
year.

The economic fallout from
both lasted for at least three
ears. When Mr Christie came

growth for the Bahamian econ-
omy of some 2.5 per cent to
three per cent. That is to say,
before Mr Christie hit a lick, the
international community had

to office, the IMF had projected.

The fiction sheet touts an
increase in tourist arrivals to five
million and visitor expenditure
in excess of $2 billion. What the
sheet will not say is that visitor
arrivals have been breaking mil-
lion-increment marks for the
past 40 years and the same is
true of expenditure breaking the
billion-dollar-increment mark.

Also, the fiction sheet will not
point out that not one new hotel

Within the last five years no
new school was built; no new
clinic; no new court or any other
important public structure.
Teachers, prison officers,
Defence Force officers, the
police, nurses.and others com-
plain about their working con-
ditions.

If $1 billion in revenue is
something to boast about, why
are these hard-working people
not being paid? If $1 billion in

investment has taken place in

The Bahamas over the last five ,

years.

It is simply untrue for anyone,
including any editorial piece, to
say that “foreign investment has
grown by proverbial leaps and
bounds.”

Let those who say so provide 4

some objective proof of this,

either from the Central Bank or .. ..

the Department of Statistics.
Announcements of invest-



: or resort was built under the revenue is so special, why are ments that have not yet taken : ras
Phone:322-1722 ® Fax: 326-7452 pape ett robust-erowtD Christie administration or new we running such high deficits place have certainly grown but te%
: : The Christie administration’s cruise line introduced. In fact, and increasing the national not foreign investments in the __
- pit fiction sheet says that the at least one major hotel has debt? That boast is simply laugh- ground. Indeed, the PM was \
Bahamian economy did not closed in Grand Bahama. If this able. untruthful to say that the IMF \
grow by more than 4.5 per cent is true, what accounts for the predicted unprecedented growth
in the entire 10 years that the tourism increases? GFS DEFICITS for The Bahamas.
Ingraham administration was in The tourism increases hadless— The IMF said no such thing
office. That is clearly untrue. to do with the Christie adminis- The Christie administration’s and the prime minister cannot |
In fact, an appendix to Deputy tration than with the more fiction sheet boasts that the fiscal provide proof of any such state- \
Prime Minister Cynthia Pratt’s robust US economy as well as discipline of the PLP govern- ment. He and Minister Vincent
budget communication in 2005, the multi-billion dollar renewal ment resulted in the GFS deficit Peet are now on record as »
when she assumed the prime of the tourism plant between _ being 2.4 per cent in 2006 and spreading untruths about inter- |
minister’s responsibilities, points 1992 and 2002. the containing of inflation with- national financial institutions’ “4
in 1.74 per cent. predictions about the Bahami- oogn
What the sheet will not point an economy. The IMF and the <7."
out is that from 1992 to 1996, “IDB only report what we report vee
Na hie bY) ld the Ingraham administration ran about projected investments. orig!
WE PUT A GES deficits below one per cent é ~~
and from 1997 to 2000, the FNM THE FAMILY ISLANDS
NEW BAI sii 0 3 -Be tan low GFS deficits of below BENEFITING 7











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1.6 per cent, 1.4 per cent, 0.3 per
cent, 0.3 per cent. :
The PLP has never matched

take credit for this because The
Bahamas really imports its infla-
tion. :

CONSTRUCTION

The Christie administration’s
fiction sheet touts that 826 build-
ing permits were issued during
the first five months of 2006
totalling some $313.4 million
compared to just 680 approvals
for all of 2001.

What the fiction sheet will not
note is that in the FNM’s tenure

the highest number of building .

permits in the history of The
Bahamas were issued in the
amount of 2,773 permits in 1999,
valued at $646.5 million.

That construction record has
not been equalled since.

FOREIGN INVESTMENT

The fiction sheet touts invest-
ments of some $13.6 billion in
various stages of development
with $3 billion in FDI. This is












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available

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Here again the fiction sheet

reaches new heights. Go to these «

Propagandists can try their ,

best to create fantasies and illu-
sions of life. The truth stub-
bornly looks them in the face
and says, you are shameless.

This is what is now happen-
ing in our nation; the PLP is try-
ing to convince Bahamians that
what they are experiencing is not
real. They want Bahamians to
live in a dreamland of accom-
plishments that they have simply
not made.

Never mind their magic tricks;
Bahamians know the truth and it
is that truth that now has Mr
Christie asking the dead to pray
for him, taking off gloves he nev-
er wore, and getting ready to
walk where he should have been
running. ;

THOUGHT FOR
THE WEEK

Those complicit in a lie are
liars too.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS



Missing woman is
found in South
American prison

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - A woman
who was initially reported miss-

ing by family members in.

Grand Bahama has turned up
alive — in a South American
prison after she was caught
with illegal drugs in that coun-
try.

Melicia Ewing of Pinedale,
Eight Mile Rock, was arrested
in Georgetown, Guyana, for
possession of a substantial
amount of the cocaine.

Ewing was arraigned in the
Georgetown Magistrate’s
Court, where she pleaded guilty
to trafficking illegal narcotics

on February 6, 2007.

She was sentenced to four
years imprisonment and hard
labour. She was additionally
fined $10,000, or in default of
payment an additional one year
in prison.

A local pastor told The Tri-
bune that Ewing’s family mem-

bers were concerned about -

whereabouts, and had report-
ed her missing to the police in
Grand Bahama.

Supt Basil Rahming, assistant
press liaison officer, confirmed
the circumstances surrounding
Ewing’s arrest and incarcera-
tion in Guyana.

Mr Rahming reported that
Ewing was undergoing pre-

flight processing at the security
checkpoint at the Cheddi Jagan
International Airport in
Georgetown on February 3.

Before she boarded
Caribbean Airways Flight 484
to Miami, Florida, a security
officer examined Ewing’s hand-
bag and discovered a plastic
package that contained one kilo
of cocaine, and a small package
containing 586 grams of
cocaine.

She was arrested by airport
police and taken into custody
at the Georgetown Police
Headquarters.

After serving her sentence in
Guyana, Ms Ewing will be
deported back to the Bahamas.

MP steers students to tourism



@ PARLIAMENTARY secretary at the Ministry of Tourism John Carey visited Jordan Prince

William High School to talk with seniors about the opportunities that exists for them in the field of
tourism. Carey focused on giving the students an overview of the tourism andustry and encouraged =
them to consider pursuing a career in Tourism.

BAHAMAS

“LIMITED

mMF!rs

RETAIL TECHNICAL SUPPORT SPECIALIST

Bahamas Supermarkets Limited operates a leading supermarket chain in The
Bahamas. As a market leader, the Company prides itself on delivering premier
service through its City Market supermarkets, having a strong commitment to
its customers, associates and community.

Aa opportunity for a Retail Technical Support Specialist to join this market

leader has arisen.

Reporting directly to the IT Manager, the IT Retail Technical Support Specialist’s
role is to ensure proper computer operations so that end users (Retail and Support
Office) can accomplish business tasks.

Key responsibilities and selection criteria include:

Field incoming help requests ihioushout support office and retail locations
via both telephone and e-mail.
Prioritize, document and pro-actively resolve support office and retail

help requests.

'

Install Point of Sale hardware and configure systems and applications
as directed by IT operations.
Ensure network connectivity to retail network equipment and perform
preventative maintenance.
Support development and implementation of networking projects and
new technology installations.
Troubleshoot technical problems in retail locations as directed by IT’

operations.

Must be willing to travel to remote offices and retail locations when
required and work shifts.
College diploma or university degree in the field of computer science

or 2 years equivalent work experience specifically in the technology/help

desk field.

Knowledge of computer hardware and network design including printers,
routers, wireless devices, switches and workstations.

Excellent working knowledge of PC Hardware, Ethernet network
topology, TCP/IP, Windows XP/2003 and MS Office 2003 products.

If you have what it takes to succeed in this challenging role, forward your
resume and cover letter to:

Human Resources

Bahamas Supermarkets Limited

East-West Highway
P. O. Box N 3738
Nassau, Bahamas

Or e-mail to

humanresources@bahamassupermarkets.com

No telephone inquiries please



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THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 10, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007








SOLDIER ROAD








394-6312

8am-8pm
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The successful candidate should possess the following
qualifications:

¢ ACIB OR ABIFS Diploma or degree in Banking

. (or a related field)

e At least 5 or more years banking experience.
Previous experience in portfolio and liability
administration would be an asset.

¢ Negotiating/Selling skills

e Strong leadership, coaching, relationship building,
problem solving and confidentiality skills

e Ability to manage multiple priorities

® Ability to make sound credit analysis

e Microsoft Office skills (Word, Excel, Power Point)
















Responsibilities include:

e Contributing to meeting team sales plans by
acquiring and growing profitable client relationships

© Providing customized solutions and financial advice
designed to satisfy the client’s long-term goals on
obtaining a mortgage

* Seeking out new clients by developing relationships
within the community and local centres of influence

e Enhancing the experience of existing clients by
providing accessibility and one-on-one advice and
valuable information on the intricacies of having
a mortgage y >: .

e Successfully anchoring clients with the appropriate
delivery channel within RBC Financial Group

A competitive compensation package (base salary
& bonus) commensurate with relevant experience
and qualifications.













Please apply before March 2, 2007 to:
Regional Manager

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Royal Bank of Canada

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P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, N.P, Bahamas

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Via email: bahcayjp@rbc.com

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cover essemneeeresiveten HARRAG, WAM AM A £m




@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

BAHAMIAN hotels are
reporting good occupancy rates
as the flexibility period for the

Western Hemisphere Travel |

Initiative’s (WHTI) enforce-
ment, which requires Ameri-
cans to have passports to return
to their homeland from a visit to
the Bahamas, draws to an end.

Russell Miller, president of
the Bahamas Hotel Association
(BHA), said that while all the
figures are not*in, Bahamian
hotels are enjoying good occu-
pancy levels.

He said the BHA was await-
ing the results of a members
survey to determine just how
the numbers compare to last
year. The association, eager to
avoid a massive fallout from
the WHTI, has been closely
monitoring call centres and
reservations desks to see if the
passport requirements have
negatively affected occupan-

cy.

In addition, BHA members
have implemented a passport
reimbursement programme
where they refund their guests
the cost of a new US passport in
the hope this will encourage
persons to visit.



»

©2007 CreativeRelations.net

393-4813

— Lowe’ has all the romance you need for

ends February 28th, Ns

Selected

ae off Trimmers

*Good while supplies last

Harbour Bay Shopping Centre

Bahamas Hotel Association look at effects

ahamas hotel occupancy goo





of enforcement of passports for Americans





@ RUSSELL Miller

However, Mr Miller said
the BHA can only judge the
impact of the WHTI based on
the numbers of persons who
express interest in the pass-
port reimbursement or call


















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into the call centre.

Otherwise, they have no way
of knowing the persons in the
US who simply decide not to
visit and never make the calls.

Mr Miller pointed out that
there may be other factors at
play affecting occupancy.

Temperature

He acknowledged that at the
beginning of the year, tempera-
tures in the northern US were
unseasonably warm, which may
have deterred persons from
travel. Now, the severe cold
weather which has hit the
region, and was responsible for
massive travel delays, should
work in the Bahamas’ favor by
encouraging persons to flock to
warmer climates.

However, Mr Miller added
that the delays in air travel also
may have helped to deter peo-
ple from attempting to travel.

“So this is a situation difficult
to gauge, but we are optimistic
and continue to monitor it,” he
said.

Mr Miller pointed out that

Atlantis had seen very good

Defence Force craft sink
after years of service

A Defence Force vessel has
sunk at its moorings at Coral
Harbour.

The Port Nelson, a 108-foot
patrol craft designed for work
in shallow water,.was being
“cannibalised” to keep its sister
vessel Yellow Elder in opera-
tion, according to inside
sources.

“The vessel had been decay-
ing for years,” a source. said,
“but in its day it was regarded as
one of the best vessels on the
fleet.”



/

tine, crystal, chocolates, candles & gifts galore!

occupancy levels, particularly
over the President’s Day holi-
day weekend.

He added that in several cas-
es at ticket counters in the US,
there was some confusion
regarding whether persons trav-
elling needed to have their pass-
ports to board. Mr Miller said
the BHA and the Ministry of
Tourism had to get involved
and help resolve the issue.

Although the WHTI require-
ment took effect last month, the
US government has allowed for
a flexible implementation of the
law, which means that per$ons
could still travel without a pass-
port - and airlines will nof:be
penalised if they board those
persons - for 30 days after the
initiative came into being on
January 23, 2007. ,

Regional data implies thatthe
requirement is hurtge
Caribbean destinations, h
some reports indicating that air
atrivals are down or flat, while
cruise arrivals - which are not
yet subjected to the WHT1 - are
up. It also suggests that, air
arrivals from other markets
such as Canada, the UK and
Europe are increasing. iJ

9

“Ag
5,

"ty S2

avo
ris
vt
ity
The Port Nelson sank in spite
of maintenance. work. by
mechanics. “It should have beep
in dry dock,” said the source.
“But it has been standing jn
water for years.” ay.
Sub-Lieutenant Sonya Miller,
PR officer for the Defence
Force, would not speak, to
whether the ship had been “can-
nibalised”. “4
She would only say that,the
ship was in an “decommissioned
state” and had not been used

for a few years. Pio







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£



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 11

JHE TRIBUNE









i _ LOCAL NEWS |



Kae

por



The Tribune
takes a look at
Tuesday night’s
political rallies



"KN

ol ly

iG.

S16 *

1m By BRENT DEAN

JOR

wYHE PLP rally in the
Pinewood constituency in effect
marked the official beginning
of the party’s 2007 election cam-
paign.

“Fittingly, the party sought to
bégin the campaign in a con-
stituency where the party won
every polling division, and ulti-
mately claimed the seat by over
1,000 votes in the last general
election.
2The rally brought out PLP
‘Supporters from all over the
‘Bahamas. Passionate PLP’s
from Grand Bahama and

‘Andros mixed with those from -

Yamacraw and Grant's Town
46‘hear the message of their par-
ty which had been up to that
‘point, hesitant to unleash the
full force of their campaign.
Former minister of immigra
tfén, Shane Gibson, weighed
RPSpificantly on the minds of
“‘'sfahy of the supporters. Many
of them shared the views of
Foreign Minister. Fred Mitchell.

~

F

~,

Ta a

mâ„¢ By PAUL TURNQUEST
; Tribune Staff Reporter
% FOLLOWING a night when
o political parties held mas-
dive rallies simultaneously, the
prs thought that burned in curi-
gus minds was which event
drew the largest crowd.
&. =
¢ Tribune correspondents at
both rallies, after collecting
3umerous police estimates, nar-
lowed the range of crowd num-
wers to an unofficial 5,000 for
the PLP, and around 7,000 for
e FNM.
Both FNM and PLP support-
‘rs labelled their respective
rowds as being into the “tens
of thousands” and displayed
their discontent at being
Aunderestimated”.
& While many PLP supporters
would argue the disparity in
filumbers, a general observation
the venues could bring some
ylarity to the discussion.
“ The Pinewood Park is small-
than that of R M Bailey, and
was not entirely filled accord-
ing to all accounts.
iS This however could not be
said of the venue of the FNM
tally.
¢ Cars lined Independence Dri-
we and Prince Charles Drive,

a -*: PPP Fee

ee

@nd the Robinson and.
larathon Roads, to reach the
ark on Tuesday night.

# Cars filled the parking lot of
lomon’s wholesalers, the Mall
t Marathon, Galleria Cinemas,
ind the grass parking area
ground the theatre and the park
itself.
'»Rersons seeking to avoid the
crowd opted to stay in their
cars — resulting in an undeter-
mined number of attendees
that could not be readily count-
ed: (With these persons fac-
tored in, the conservative 7,000
figure could jump even high-
.er.);Whether the same was true
at the PLP rally could not be
verified.

At R M Bailey, where there
was standing room only, per-
sons stood along the road lis-
tening to FNM commentators





Rallies mark the
eginning of 2007
election campaign

suggesting that Mr Gibson’s

public ordeal was the work of

the media.

However, a few supporters
were willing to admit that Mr
Gibson exercised poor judg-
ment regarding his relationship
with the late Anna Nicole
Smith.

The beginning of the rally
season also ushers in the begin-
ning of the numbers game sur-
rounding these public displays
of support. Displays that on the
one hand, reveal what momen-
tum:the party possesses, and on
the other, reveal to the public
the depth of the party coffers.

For the PLP rally, numerical

estimates of the crowd ranged

from the implausible (30,000)
to the uncharitable (3,000), with
many guesses in between.
When asked, one party offi
cial casually looked around and
stated, “there must be ove:
10,000 people here. orm ,
However most estimates sug,
gested that the PLP had a
crowd near 3000 at the rath



C

‘The mystery o
really atten

and discussing the pitfalls, short-
comings, and merits of the gov-
erning PLP party.

Some attendees who spoke
with The Tribune said it should
also be kept in mind that R M
Bailey Park, although touted as
“PNM country” ts a central
location for the Kennedy,







though a spatial description of
their support may be more use-
ful for those that were not there.

The PLP was not able to fully
fill the Pinewood Park, which is
in an area that can be regarded
as a PLP stronghold, based on
the results of the last election —
whereas the FNM was able to
fill a larger venue, the R M Bai-
ley park, on much shorter notice.

Ultimately, it is far too early
to place excessive importance
on the respective turn-outs,
commentators say.

However, FNM_ leader
Hubert Ingraham’s snap deci-
sion to counter the PLP’s rally
effort with one of his own, on
the same night, brought a new
and heightened significance to
the crowds last ‘Tuesday night.

If it is correct that Mr Ingra-
ham was able to bring out more
supporters, ina bigger venue,
on the spur of the moment, then
the unpression could be created

dhat he has as much. or possibly
even more support or momen

tum. than the PLP at this stave

x

of the campaign.

The true significance of win-
ning the turn-out race at rallies

especially when your oppo-
nent has one at the same time —
is in how the public regard your
level of support in the days that
follow, one political observer

@ THE PLP rally in Pinewood park

noted.

Public perception becomes
even more significant in the face
of what appears to be a close
election, with voter turn-out

that will probably be less than .
‘during the last election. :
Commentators said the PLP

numbers — how many
ed Tuesday night's ra

Marathon, and Holy Cross con-
stituencies — three seats that are
now under the representation
of the PLP.

Kennedy was won by the
incumbent Kenyatta Gibson by
almost a 1.000 voter differen-
tial over the FNM candidate
during the 2002 general elec-

Tel: 341-2024

tion. Holy Cross was won by
the embattled Sidney Stubbs by
only a few hundred votes. and
Marathon by Ron Pinder by a
very small margin.

To many observers, the dif-
ference in crowd turnout is an
indicator — whether favourable
or not — that could give a valu-

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able insight into the disposition
of the Bahamian electorate.

This information, one said,
is invaluable for a party if it
wishes to know how to “adjust,
trim, or tweak” its campaign
to garner more public displays
of support within the coming
months.










amuse

if

Jj
y
q
Ui

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a landslide victory in 2002. It is
still early in the campaign — but
not too Jong before Bahamians
will again decide who they want
to lead them.

lies?

On the other hand, some
commentators believe just as
strongly that paying too much
attention to the question of
rally turnout can be mislead-
ing, and that Bahamian elec-
tions are really decided in the
last few days before the polls
close.






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Phone: 393-1488 |



THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 13





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TRE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 15
a LOCAL NEWS ,

Farquharson urges police
reserves to

M

r"s

COMMISSIONER of
Palice Paul Farquharson
has challenged members of
the Royal Bahamas Police
Fource’s reserves to play
greater roles in their indi-
vidual communities.

sCommissioner Farquhar-
son said this can be done
thtough the formation of
youth clubs, crime watch-
es and other activity groups
which will “exemplify the
kind of leadership skills”
that exists within the mem-
bership of the reserves.

‘The commissioner said
the police reserves, which
will celebrate 42 years as a
separate branch in August,
have become an integral
part of the force, augment-
ing, the regular compliment
of officers.

He said reserves have
shared, and in many cases,
taken on responsibilities
that would normally be
performed by enlisted
members of the Force.

‘These duties include, but
ar€ not limited to, police
patrols, assisting with the
processing of traffic
offences, assisting with
eniergency situations and
providing security at
logal events and crime
scenes.

-he.reserves are also
expected to play a key role
during the upcoming gen-
eral elections as their
duties will be expanded to
include manning police sta-
tions while the regular offi-
cérs are assigned to polic-
ing the elections.

“The way forward
démands wide-ranging
planning in order for goals

objectives to be

id
MS atniéved. ” the commis-

i

Forty-two year anniversary
as a separate branch —

sioner said. “Volunteering
your services demonstrates

that you believe in the.

vision where communities
are safe, police officers
offer professional service
and where men, women
and children can play their
rightful roles in a peaceful

society.”
He said the police
reserves must play a

greater role in the devel-
opment of their communi-
ties by “exemplifying lead-
ership” in those areas. He
said there are many chal-
lenges facing communities

because of a lack of lead--

ership.

The commissioner
encouraged the reserves to
take up the challenge to
provide leadership espe-
cially to young men who
may need “some direction
in terms of character build-
ing”

“The young men in this
country, we see them
everyday, parading down

in front of the courts in.

chains. Well, if you lock all
of the young men up, who
are we going to have left?,”
Commissioner Farquharson
asked.

“We will have the women
left, who are very capable,
but if the young males in
your communities are
yearning for leadership in
terms of character build-
ing, let us try and form
youth clubs, form crime
watches wherever we are,
to make sure that we can

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“This country is too
small for these young men
to be on a road of destruc-
tion among us. We have to
help them. Those who have

-to be. locked up, must be

locked up by all means, but

play greater role

those we can help, let us
try to help.

“T believe that some
intervention and leadership
can play a great role in
regards to this particular
problem within our com-
munities,”
Farquharson said.

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THE TRIBUNE ~ THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 19
; NASSAU LIFE th Ses et

Colinalmperial awards for staff.

i fee es A Le B@ STUDENTS

; Ve i -and teachers
from Deep
Creek Middle
School in
Eleuthera
paid a cour-
tesy call on
Deputy to the
Governor
GeneralSir
Clement Ma
nard at Gov-
ernment
House on
Friday

(Photo:

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Are. ae SNe Sir Clement











@ EDDISON Brice, a 42 year veteran of the insurance industry was named Colinalmperial’s 2006
Agent of the Year in the Executive Category (agents with more than 10 years in sales at Colinalm-
perial) at the company’s recent sales awards luncheon. Mr Brice was also named the winner of the
Elite Category of MDRT qualifiers for the highest sales and a persistency rate of over 95 per cent.
Pictured above, Mr Brice (centre) receives his awards from Montgomery Braithwaite, president of
Colinalmperial (left) and Ednol Farquharson, board director with responsibility for sales.

A ah

@ ANDRE Wilmott of the Colinalmperial's North West Branch was named Seasoned Agent of
the Year 2006. This award recognises the top selling agent in the Seasoned category — those who
‘ have been with Colinalmperial from 24 months to 10 years. Pictured above from left.to right:
. Montgomery Braithwaite; Mr Wilmott; Ednol Farquharson.

tere

Syry aban a






HIN the Genesis category (those agents with less than 24 months experience with CIIL) Barry
Bascom of the northeast branch walked away with top honours. Pictured above from left to right:
Montgomery Braithwaite, president of Colinalmperial; Mr Bascom; Ednol Farquharson.

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PAGE 20, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Map of
Proposed National
Park Areas






1,
Graham's Harbour
& Gays







Bay

TS



2. Dive Sites

After full consultation with the people of San Salvador, the
Bahamas National Trust has submitted a proposal for a
national park on that island to the Office of the Prime Minister.
The proposal targets the conservation and management of
important wetland, marine and terrestrial habitats. Five areas
have been recommended to protect important marine nursery
areas, some of the most dramatic dive sites in the world,
habitat for endangered species of iguanas, and the highest
diversity of nesting seabirds in the Bahamian archipelago.
Before any decisions are made on zoning or management of
the proposed areas, the BNT will undertake further consulation
with the communities involved. A copy of the proposal is
available online at www.bahamasnationaltrust.org.

Support for the development of the proposal was provided by
the Jerry Taylor and Nancy Bryant Foundation.

Map Courtesy of The BNGIS - Project 1999

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Russian rights

groups to boycott
Chechen conference

gm MOSCOW

LEADING Russian rights.
activists said Wednesday they
would boycott a human rights

- conference scheduled to be held

in the Chechen capital Grozny
next week, saying attending
would give legitimacy to the
region’s Kremlin-backed gov-
ernment, according to Associ-
ated Press.

A letter signed by Lyudmila
Alexeyeva, Lev Ponomaryov
and other prominent Russian
defenders said they made the
decision because the conference
was to be hosted, in part, by act-
ing Chechen President Ramzan
Kadyrov, whose paramilitary
militias are suspected of
involvement in widespread civil-
ian abductions, possible torture
and other human rights abuses.

The conference, they said, was
aimed at “using the authority of
many rights defenders, the rights
movement and the idea of
human rights in Russia and the
international arena to strengthen
the legitimacy of the Chechen
Republic’s illegitimate regime.”

The activists said Chechnya’s
only legitimately elected presi-
dent was Aslan Maskhadov,
who was killed in 2005.

Ponomaryov told The Asso-
ciated Press said the letter was
signed by only five activists, but
said they spoke on behalf of
many more organisations.

“We do not want to take part
in the conference because oth-
erwise it would have been legit-
imization of Kadyrov’s totali-
tarian regime,” he told AP. “We
wish he could offer some
actions, real actions in respecting
human rights, not just words.
We do not want his declarations,
but we would like to see effec-
tive routine cooperation. How-
ever, instead we see abductions,
tortures and other violations.”

Allison Gill, Moscow direc-
tor for the US-based group
Human Rights Watch, said

| StH AN









Name:

Address:

NUAL

REGISTRATION FEE: $12

Date of Birth: [ori] es





ert i

@ RAMZAN Kadyrov recently named as





|



acting president of the

war-battered republic of Chechnya by President Vladimir Putin
speaks in Grozny on Tuesday. In the background is a portrait of

Vladimir Putin.

many of the invitees to the con-
ference were given very short
notice. She said many groups,
Russian and international, were
looking to seriously discuss
human rights in Chechnya with
the authorities, but under the
right circumstances.

The conference appears to be
part of the Kremlin effort to
show that the situation in
Chechnya has improved after
more than a dozen years of



- Race starts at 7a.m. at the Western Esplanade to Goodman's Bay & back
Late registration starts at 6:00 a.m. Registration Fee: $12 (Indudes race T-shirt and other gifts and surprises)





Applications can be picked up at all Subway® Restaurants in New Providence

Early registration & applications can be dropped off at Subway® restaurant in the Harbour Bay Shopping Centre from February 14 - 23.
All Proceeds will be donated to The Bahamas Heart Association and The Strider Track Club. Trophies and prizes will be awards for different categories.

For More Information, Call 327-0806 or 394-6715 —



Age (on race day):



Sex: M F..

(AP Photo/Musa Sadulayev)

,

fighting between separatist
rebels and federal and regional
authorities.

Last week, President
Vladimir Putin dismissed Alu
Alkhanov as president of the
war-battered republic, naming
Kadyrov as acting president.
The region’s parliament is wide-
ly expected to confirm him as
president, despite government
intentions to. put forward two
competing candidates.











E-mail:






T-shirt Size (circle one)












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J assume all risks associated with The Subway® Fun Run/Walk including, but not limited to, falls, contact with other participants, the effect of
the weather, including extreme heat, extreme cold, and/or humidity, traffic and the conditions of the road, all such risks being known and
appreciated by me, Having read this waiver and knowing these facts and in consideration of accepting my application, |, for myself and anyone

& entitled to act on my behalf, waive and release Subway® and all sponsors, their representatives and successors from all claims
and liabilities of any kind arising out of my participation in the Subway® Fun Run/Walk even though that liability may arise
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non-refundable.| am also aware that the course will open to traffic and that headphone, jogging strollers, bikes;in line skaters
and similar items and animals accompanying entrants are not permitted on the course,



Masters
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THE TRIBUNE

| HURSDAY, FEBRUARY Zz, Zuu/, FAUE 21





INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Industry leaders endorse fight



against gas-caused climate change

m@ NEW YORK

THE leaders of several
worldwide corporations —
including General Electric,
Volvo and Air France — called
Tuesday for prompt, decisive
action on climate change cre-
ated by the emission of green-
house gases and carbon diox-

ide, according to Associated
Press.
Nearly 100 companies fol-

lowed a meeting at Columbia °

University by endorsing a for-
mal statement to fight for clean
energy and against climate
change caused by people and
businesses. The companies are
members of the Global

Roundtable on Climate
Change, formed in 2004 to
explore issues critical to shap-
ing public and industry policy
on climate change.

"This is an issue that requires
action now but will not be
solved immediately," said Jef-
frey Sachs, director of the
Earth Institute at Columbia

Experts say climate change could threaten
~ quality of Italy’s famed Tuscan wines

ROME

IMAGINE a world where Scandinavia produces
wines to rival Italy's fabled Chianti region.

It could come to just that by the end of the cen-
tury, experts in Italy warn, if global warming con-
tinues unchecked, according to Associated Press.

A study by Florence University linking the effects
of rain and temperature to wine production found
that increasingly high temperatures and intense
rains are likely to threaten the quality of Tuscan
wines. Italy's farmers association warned the culti-
vation of olive trees, which grow in a mild climate,
has almost reached the Alps.

"This rise in temperatures will continue in the
next years, and they will be too high and unfavorable
for the quality of wine," because they cause the
grapes to over-ripen, said Simone Orlandini, an
agronomist at Florence University and co-author
of the study.

“Even if temperatures go up three or four degrees
Celsius (seven or eight degrees Fahrenheit) it will be
a big problem," he said in a telephone interview. "It
will be warmer and rains will be more concentrated
in fewer events, thus damaging the earth, which will
not be able to absorb," all the water.

The study, which was published in the wine mag-
azine VQ, compares quality checks on some of
Italy's most famous wines — Brunello di Montalcino,
Vino Nobile di Montepulciano, Chianti Classico,
Barolo, Barbaresco and Amarone - to the weather
conditions of the past three or four decades.

The research shows.that while warmer tempera-
tures favor wine quality, the rain that comes with
them is often bad news.

The dangers stemming from climate change have
drawn increasing attention. ,

The world's leading climate scientists warned dur-
ing a gathering in Paris earlier this month that glob-
al warming is so severe it will "continue for cen-



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turies," leading to a far different planet in 100 years.

A report by the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on
Climate Change states that if nothing is done to
change current emissions patterns of greenhouse
gases, global temperature could increase as much as
11 degrees by 2100. If greenhouse gas emissions get
under control _ something scientists say they hope
can be achieved _ the best estimate is about a three-
degree increase.

Wine makers in Tuscany are downplaying the
risk.

"I don't foresee harmful effects within the next 20
years," said Filippo Mazzei, whose wine company

_ located 10 miles north of Siena produces 700,000 bot-

tles a year, mostly of Chianti Classico. "We are in an
area with a temperate climate, and I do not think it

faces an immediate risk. I am not saying it is -

unfounded, but a range of 100 years is not very sig-
nificant," he said.

On Tuesday, European Union nations announced
an ambitious target to cut their greenhouse gas
emissions to 20 percent below 1990 levels by the
year 2020, in one of the boldest moves yet to contain
global warming.

-Orlandini said that a rise in temperatures would
geographically push wine production to the north,
allowing regions like Scandinavia to join the indus-
try.

Coldiretti, a farm lobby, said measures should be
taken to tackle the threats.

"In Italy, there's a significant shift in traditional
agricultural areas for olive trees which almost
reached the Alps," it said in a statement. "These
processes represent a new challenge for the farming
industry," which should increase investment and
infrastructure.

Coldiretti said seasonal shifts, fewer but intense
rainstorms and the reduction of water reserves could
also increase the risk of desertification in certain
areas.



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University, which created the
Global Roundtable.

The statement by the inter-
national business community
seeks to lay out a framework
for global action to mitigate
the impact of human-made cli-
mate change without adverse-
ly affecting energy and eco-
nomic growth, according to
Sachs, who also spoke at the
United Nations on Friday. The
business leaders hoped that a
permanent plan could be in
place by 2012.

"Climate change is an urgent
problem that requires global
action ... in a time frame that
minimizes the risk of serious
human impact on the Earth's
natural systems," the joint
statement said.

The modern age is powered
largely by fossil fuels coal, oil
and gas. The fossil fuel era has
been a period of unprecedent-
ed economic advances, the
statement noted.

"Yet we now understand
that fossil fuels — as they are
currently used — increase the
amount of carbon dioxide in
the atmosphere, which along
with the release of other green-
house gases warms the planet
and leads to other impacts on
global climate change," it stat-
ed.

The document calls on gov-
ernments to set scientifically
informed targets for reduced
global emissions and concen-
trations of carbon dioxide and
greenhouse gases and to take
immediate action in pursuit of

those targets.
The business community

wants a framework because it ©

provides predictability. It said
that generally politicians lag
behind the business sector in
addressing the need to reduce
human-made climate change.
Alain Belda, chairman and
CEO of Alcoa, the world's
leading producer of aluminum,
said addressing climate change
involves "risks and costs." -
"But much greater is the risk

_ Of failing to act," he said.
\

Mandatory

The potential recommenda-
tions must be mandatory, and
the costs of de-carbonization
or change over to low carbon
are smaller than, people fear,
said Sachs.

He said it cannot be success-
ful without the participation of
countries such as China, India,
Australia and the United
States.

China will soon replace the
United States as the largest
emitter of greenhouse gases
and carbon dioxide, he said.

Tomas Ericson, president of

Volvo Group, North America, .

said that the environment has
become one of the, priorities
of the vehicle manufacturer,
along with safety and quality.
"We feel we are part of the
problem, and we feel we need
to be part of the solution,"
Ericson said at the meeting.
Robert Edgar, of the Nation-
al Council of Churches, a

member of the Roundtable
group, said everyone has the
responsibility to be a steward
of earth by limiting future
impacts on global warming and
preserving nature's resources.

"We feel this is a moral
issue," Edgar said.

On Jan. 22 in Washington,
D.C., chief executives of 10
major corporations urged U.S.
Congress to require limits on
greenhouse gases this year,
contending voluntary efforts
to combat climate change are -
inadequate.

In his State of the Union
address, President George W.
Bush said that climate change
needs to be addressed, but he
has opposed any mandatory’
emission caps, arguing that
industry through development

_ Of new technologies can deal

with the issue.

In a January letter to Bush,
the executives and leaders of
four major environmental
organizations said mandatory
emissions caps are needed to
reduce the flow of carbon diox-
ide and other heat-trapping
gases into the atmosphere.

China announced this month
it will spend more money to
research global warming, but
it said it lacks the money and »
technology to significantly
reduce greenhouse gas emis-
sions.

On Monday, the country's
environmental watchdog said it
had failed to reach any of its
pollution control goals for
2006.

YOUR CONNECTION*TO THE WORLD

VACANCY NOTICE

Ba WSS SRE Us
UA s hepa ii aL

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited invites applications
from suitably qualified individuals for the position of SENIOR
ASSOCIATE/Facilities, Electrical, Plumbing, AC and Security in our
Contract Services Department.

REPORTING RELATIONSHIP:
This position will report to the Manager, Contract Services.

GENERAL RESPONSIBILITY:

1. Responsible for providing administrative and technical support for
electrical, plumbing, air conditioning and security.

2. Responsible for providing administrative and technical support of
efforts needed in maintenance/construction of the exchange and
network facilities by contractors and to support activities necessary

to ensure that contractors observe indust

requirements, and security regulations.
Responsible for the administrative and technical support of the network
planning, engineering, design and maintenance of electrical support

systems, equipment, and corporate security.

ry standards, specification

4. Responsible for the coordination and administration of contracts,
and to ensure that the facilities are safe and kept in repair order.

ROLES & RESPONSIBILITY:
Coordinates, administers and provide technical support in the following

areas:

All Electrical System Maintenance
Building Electrical Renovations

AC Systems Maintenance
Plumbing Design & Maintenance
Security System Planning & Design
Contractor Management

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS

1. A Bachelor’s degree in Engineering or Facilities Management or

equivalent work experience.
2. Excellent written and oral presentation skills required.
3. Excellent leadership skills.

All applications are to be received at BTC’s Head Office, 21 John F. Kennedy
Drive, no later than Wednesday March 7, 2007 and addressed as follows:

VICE PRESIDENT

HUMAN RESOURCES, TRAINING & SAFETY
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

RE: SENIOR ASSOCIATE/CONTRACT SERVICES







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THE TRIBUNE

, INTERNATIONAL NEWS

@ THIS photo supplied by the International Fund For Animal Welfare shows lions in cages at a bree



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 23






ding facility in the Orange free

State province, South Africa in 2005 during part of an IFAW investigation into the captive breeding of the animals for canned hunts. South
Africa's environment minister announces new laws, Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2007, to clamp down on the hunting of captive lions amid warn- -
ings from predator breeders that they may have to euthanize hundreds of the mighty beasts.

(AP Photo/IFAW)

Government finalises new

.

laws on big-game hunting

m@ CAPE TOWN,
South Africa

SOUTH AFRICA'S envi-
ronment minister on Tuesday
announced a long-awaited clam-
pdown on big-game hunting,
declaring he was sickened by
wealthy tourists shooting tame
lions from the back of a truck
and felling rhinos with a bow
and arrow, according to Associ-
ated Press.

Shrugging off threats of legal
action by the hunting industry,
Marthinus Van Schalkwyk said
that the new law would ban
"canned" hunting of big preda-
tors and rhinos in small enclo-
sures which offered the animals
no means of escape.

Lions bred in captivity would
have to be released into the

RRRWWE

open for at least two years —
rather than the six months pro-
posed in draft regulations —
before they could be hunted to
allow them to develop self-
defense instincts, he said.

"Hunting should be about a
fair chase ... testing the wits of a
hunter against that of the ani-
mal," he told a press conference
on Table Mountain. "Over the
years that got eroded and now
we are trying to re-establish that
principle."

South Africa is famous as
home to the Big Five — lion,
leopard, rhinoceros, elephant
and buffalo. Its flagship Kruger
National Park attracts hundreds
of thousands of visitors every
year. Some 9,000 privately

owned game farms and other.

government-run reserves also





—— 2
Se \

offer visitors a taste of the wild.

But it has also become a
choice destination for wealthy
gun-toting tourists willing to pay
more than US$20,000 to take

home a prized "trophy" in the

form of a lion or rhino's head.
The new law, which comes
into force June 1, bans the hunt-
ing of animals which have been
tranquilized. It outlaws bows
and arrows for big predators
and thick skinned animals like
rhinos — one of the practices sin-
gled out by Van Schalkwyk as
particularly shocking. And it
bans the use of vehicles to chase
the animal until it is too tired
and terrified to flee for its life.
"To see people who are half
drunk on the back of a bakkie
(truck) hunting lions which are
in fact tame animals is quite

:

S
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abhorrent," Van Schalkwyk —
himself an avid ‘hunter — told
The Associated Press.

But conservationists said the
law would be difficult to enforce
and did not go far enough as it
stopped short of an outright ban
on the intensive breeding of
lions, leopards and other preda-
tors.

"The big thing for South
Africa would be to stand up and,
say ‘we are conservation leaders
and this industry is immoral and
unethical and we are not going
to allow it,'" said Louise Jou-
bert of the San Wildlife Trust,
which campaigned for tougher
regulations.

She said it made little differ-
ence whether a lion was freed
for six months or two years
before being hunted because
once it had got used to being
reared and fed by people, it was
hard to break that trust.

Joubert said there should be
an outright ban on intensive
breeding projects, which often
remove cubs from the mother at
birth so the lioness mates more
quickly, and often cull female
cubs as mak lions fetch a high-
er trophy price.

"We have asked for an out-
right ban. If it means that four
to five thousand lions have to be
euthanized it would be a tragic
day but it is the only way for
this country to get a grip, so be
it" she said.

The South African Predator
Breeders' Association, which
was set up last year to lobby
against the regulations, has
warned that breeders may be
forced to put down the estimat-
ed 3-5,000 lions they have
reared if they are unable to
offer.them to foreign hunters
and can no longer afford to feed
them.

Earlier this year, it threatened
legal action against the govern-
ment to claim for compensa-
tion. ‘Association officials did
not return phone calls asking
for comment Tuesday.

However, the Professional
Hunters' Association of South
Africa, whose members accom-
pany foreign clients, said it wel-
comed the new regulations as

_ achance to clean up the image

of the South African hunting
industry by clamping down on
lion breeders who account for
only about 3 percent of game
farms.

"A small sector has given the
whole industry a bad name,"
said Stewart Dorrington, presi-
dent of the hunting body.

An 6-7,000 foreign tourists
visit South Africa each year on
hunting safaris, each spending
roughly US$18,000, Dorrington

said. About 55 percent of

hunters are from North Ameri-
ca and the rest from Europe
and other countries.

Van Schalkwyk said the reg-
ulations marked the start of a
"clean-up of the hunting indus-
try" and would in due course
be extended to other animals
like antelope species.

Hunting is an integral part of
South African life because of
its cultural traditions and impor-
tance to the economy.

"We gave our firm intention
more than two years ago to deal
with the issue," he said. "Many
of the lion breeders thought
they were empty threats and did
not take it seriously. This is a
practice that cannot be defend-
ed in any way," he said.



THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 25 —



THURSDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 22, 2007

7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30
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cel ON PLLA ALA OLED AL A

‘FORMER astronaut and senator John Glenn,
the 45th anniversary of the space flight that made him t

. Feb. 20, 2007, in Columbus, Ohio. i

'

eenges



85, speaks at a museum exhibition marking
he first American to orbit Earth Tuesday,

(AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato)



- Denmark is set to

~ withdraw its Iraq

contingen

@ COPENHAGEN,
: Denmark

DENMARK’S prime min-
ister said Wednesday that his
country will withdraw its 460-
member contingent from
southern Iraq by August and
transfer security responsibil-
ities to Iraqi forces, according
to Associated Press.

Prime Minister Anders
Fogh Rasmussen said the
decision had been made in
conjunction with the Iraqi
government and Britain,
under whose command the
Danish forces are serving
near Basra.

Fogh Rasmussen said Den-
mark would replace the
troops with surveillance heli-



copters and_ civilian
advisers to help the Iraqi gov-
ernment’s reconstruction
efforts.

“The Danish battalion will
be brought home by
August,” Fogh Rasmussen
told reporters in Copen-
hagen. “We expect that the
Iraqis during 2007 will take
over security in southern
Iraq.”

Training

Denmark would also boost
training of Iraqi soldiers and
increase support to Iraqi
refugees in nearby countries,
the prime minister said.

He added that the govern-

by August

ment was planning to
increase its presence in
Afghanistan, saying Den-
mark will deploy “more
troops if there’s a need for
it,”

Fogh Rasmussen had earli-
er said he hoped Denmark
would be able to start scal-
ing back its Iraq troops this
year, without setting a pre-
cise timetable.

The Danish announcement
Wednesday came as British
Prime Minister Tony Blair
said his country would with-
draw about 1,600 troops in
coming months if local forces
can secure the southern part
of the country.

Six Danish soldiers have
been killed in Iraq.

pace station getting
shortchanged, US ©

astronaut says —
on the anniversary -

of his historic orbit

m@ COLUMBUS, Ohio

THE United States is not
getting its money's worth out
of the international space
station, John Glenn said on
the 45th anniversary of the
day he became the first
American to orbit the Earth,
according to Associated
Press.

_Diverting money from the
orbiting research outpost to
President George W. Bush's
goal of sending astronauts
back to the moon and even-
tually on to Mars is prevent-

~ ing some scientific experi-

ments on the space station,
Glenn told an audience of
about 300 high school stu-
dents and space enthusiasts
at the COSI Columbus sci-
ence center on Tuesday.
"To not utilize that station

a cE st ean

Rs

oT Le

Royce!
Beery Ue ttn

Rt VIG SA

eee THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 27
INTERNATIONAL NEWS 2

the way I think it ought to
be utilized is just wrong,"
said Glenn, 85, also a former
USS. senator.

Capsule

Glenn made three trips
around the planet inside his
Friendship 7 capsule on Feb.
20, 1962, making him a

‘national hero and proving

that the nascent NASA
space program was competi-
tive with the Soviet Union,
which had accomplished a
manned orbital flight a year
earlier.

In 1998, Glenn, then 77,
flew on the shuttle Discov-

ery and became the oldest ©

person ever in space.
He said he supports the
president's moon and Mars

‘goals but not at the expense

awe
aur

3?

of the space station, which is-
only two-thirds complete. —"
NASA and its internation=
al partners, including Cana-
da, Japan and Russia, hope
to finish the space station in
2010, but no decision has’
been made to extend its —
operation past 2016. oe
Glenn, a Democrat who
represented Ohio from 1975
to 1999, said the station
should not be abandoned, _
especially after costing tax- ©’
payers billions of dollars
(euros).
"We will not even begin to
realize its potential," he said.
A White House.
spokesman said Tuesday
night that officials were not _
prepared to comment. Mes-=
sages were left after business—.
hours at NASA headquar-=
ters. :

:

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__ PAGE 28, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007. fauhas Lane Ss i a “ rd igi! THE TRIBUNE .

'ebniety is National Heart Month
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FAMILY ESSAY CONTEST

Child’s Name:_ See ne Ene

Age: As re bs sa el ‘Date of birth:..

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Address: aR eta ge sie el ee eel SS eee P.O. Box:. obey oS Be seer hd

Parent’s name: BD MES FG i ah Ade he eutcullieideatuaa ter uae Se RECs Snr Ne aa . Bee Nester kaise ee

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Telephone contact: (H)

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an

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com













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@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE



_ Bahamian duo
to lead Tigers
at weekent

@ TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Sports Reporter

CONSISTENCY will be the
key for Donald Thomas and
Shamar Sands this weekend, as

they ‘soak up’ their final day of

rest.

The Bahamian duo are
expected to lead the Auburn
Tigers’ men’s squad into the
Southeastern. Conference’
(SEC) championships, set to
' start on Friday at the Nutter
Field House in Lexington, Ken-
tucky.

The only pressure both Sands
and Thomas will have on them
is securing one of the three top
conference honours. Both ath-
letes have already achieved the
NCAA in their respective
events.

Sands, who specialises in the
100 metre hurdles, has a sea-
son’s best time of 7.70 seconds.

While Thomas has cleared -

2.30m.

According to'their coach and
fellow countryman Henry
Rolle, the duos task ahead of
them this weekend is not stren-
uous if they are able to pull off
the same performances they did
during the regular season. —

Rolle said: “Currently we will 4

only have Donald and Shamar,
they are the only two Bahami-
ans here that are currently still
eligible for the team. Consis-
tency will help both athletes
prevail this weekend.
“Shamar was down for the
last week or so with a sinus
_ infection. That kind of ham-
~pered him a bit and played a
part in his performances and
there is a bad bug of the flu
going around.

Rested

“When you add all of this in I
really can’t say how he (Sands)
will hold up this weekend, but
he did tell me that he is feeling
a lot better and that he is well
rested. So it is just a matter of
how he holds up during the con-
ference championships.

“Now on the other hand

Donald seems to be doing pret-'

ty well. It.is just a matter of him
being consistent. I don’t'see the
reason why both of them can’t
be conference championships,
even though it is going to be a
little tougher for Shamar.”

Sands is holding onto the
number two spot in the hurdles,
but he is tied with John
Yarbough.

But Rolle isn’t. worried to
much about Yarbough, switch-
ing his, focus on South Caroli-
na’s Jason Richardson and
Thomas Hilliard.

RoWe added: “Shamar will
have his work cut out for him
this weekend. He has two other
big hurdlers in the conference,
both of them coming in from

SEE page two



Bimini win Fal
Island thriller

@ BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON

Sports Reporter

THINGS are starting to
heat up in the 25th annual
Hugh Campbell Invitational
Tournament, now that the
Island teams have been
added to the blend.

Although the action in
yesterday’s first session was a
little slow, organisers used it
to introduce the Family
Islands, and giving them a
means of getting their
feet wet before it gets







Fuel

INVITATIONAL

DenRA yh Re

more intense.

The first Family Island
teams battle, played between
Old Bight and Bimini, went
down to the wire with Bimini

. pulling off the nail biting vic-

tory 33-32.

Bimini, who struggled from
the free throw line, made a
push for the lead in the clos-

ing minutes of the first quar-
ter. Rallying the troops back
into the game was Christo-
pher Munnings.

Although he missed two
free throws, Munnings net-
ted three first quarter points.

But his charge wasn’t
enough to contain the Old
Bight squad.

The team had a triple

threat coming from Theo

Armbrister, Paul Rolle and
Sheldon Rolle. \
The trio were on fire and

their dominance prevailed. -

Bimini were on a 4-2 run



when Paul. Rolle sealed an
10-foot jumper. The jumper

‘was ghe spark the Bimini

team needed as they ended
the quarter with a three point
lead.

The nightmare from the

’ free throw line continued for

Bimini in the second quar-
ter, the team added 10 more-

missed shots to their already

six misses from the first quar-
ter. :

But things were about to
change in the third quarter
for Bimini. The baseline lay-
up gave them a one point

wae to poe TNC
in action against the Dol-
phins yesterday.
(Photo: Felipé Majors
CRUNCH oe



lead — the team also
outscored the Old Bight
squad 9-5.

The Old Bight squad
weren’t about to take the fall
in the third quarter laying
down.

Taking over the fourth
quarter were Theo Armbris-
_ ter and Aldino Russell. The
duo scored 12 of the team’s
14 point to seal the game.

Armbrister ended the
game as.the team’s top scor-
er with 11 points, chipping in
was Russell with seven
points.

Jaguars
live up to
ite hype

@ BASKETBALL _
By KELSIE JOHNSON

Sports Reporter

THE St George’s Jaguars
showed why they are being
referred to as the number one
team coming in from

reeport, Grand Bahama,
yesterday.

Although their opening
game was viewed as an easy
one, against SC Bootle Dol-
phins, their message was
strong.

The Jaguars destroyed the
Dolphins, capturing their first



_ win 54-28.

The game was turned into a
dunk fest, with the Jaguars’
big men easily rising above
the rim.

Hoping to lead their team.
all the way into the champi-
onships will be Crishad
Thompson and Cordero
Rolle.

In yesterday’s game Rolle
walked away with the top
score honours, netting 12
points while Thompson sealed
10 points. -

On the Dolphins’ end
Rashad Moxey led all scores
with 11 points and Francis
Delva scored five points.

The Jaguars will now play
the winner of the Turks and
Caicos and Alpha and Omega
game which was scheduled for

| . yesterday’s second session.



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PAGE 2E, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS _



Lack of facilities on
the Family Islands

Hee you been to
any of the Family

Islands lately and viewed their
sporting facilities?

In most cases, there are big
problems. Seeing is believing
and, after visiting Acklins and
Crooked Island on Monday
and Tuesday, I'm concerned
that they are both in dire need
of a major overhaul.

As a member of the Min-

istry of Youth, Sports and
Housing's National Sports
Advisory team, I had the
opportunity to travel with
chairman Alpheus 'Hawk'
Finlayson to the less densely
populated islands and there
were virtually no sporting

. activities taking place there

because of.a lack of the prop-
er facilities.

I won't preempt what Fin-
layson has to say in his report.

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games, these islands have
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it's difficult because the major-

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ity of them are working during
the day.

What makes it even more
difficult is the fact that no
courts or other sporting facil-
ities are centrally located
within a particular settlement.
They are on the primary or
high school premises, which
are placed between one or two
settlements for obvious trans-
portation reasons.

So in a lot of cases, the raw
talent that is still lingering on
the islands, is not properly
developed.

In fact, they are still wait-

ing to be discovered.

While on both islands, we
didn't get to see any of the
promising young athletes who
are based in the high school
system. But teachers and
members of the community
have vouched for their athlet-
ic abilities.

I think more effort must be
made by, firstly, the Ministry
of Youth, Sports and Hous-
ing and the Ministry of Works,
to get into the islands and pro-
vide the basic facilities such
as the basketball and volley-
ball courts and the track and
field and softball fields on
these islands.

Secondly, I think it's also
important that the national
federations and associations
do a little more than just wait
for the talent to come to them
during their national events.
Rather, they should take it
upon themselves to get into
the islands and start provid-
ing coaching and official clin-
ics for those persons who are
interested in the various
sports.

Then thirdly, I think the
various associations in New
Providence, which have the
resources, should look at trav-
eling'to-some of these islands
to assist in their growth and
development by hosting some
exhibition games.

On both islands visited, I've
seen the passion from the per-
sons we've been in contact
with, for sustainable sporting
activities. But they can't do it
without the facilities being
upgraded.

At night, there's virtually
nothing to do.

The Bahamas Games, when
started in 1989, was intended
to be find talent in the islands
and bring them to the fore-
front at the national level to
compete in some wholesome
activities as the nation bridged
the tremendous gap between
the islands.

But after hosting it in 1991,
1995, 1998 and 2001, we have
not had another.

Every year it's been post-
poned.

Last year, when it was set

to return, Minister of Youth, .

Sports and Housing Neville
Wisdom, declared that instead
of the games, the government
would concentrate on devel-

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STUBBS



oping facilities on the islands.

Today, the Family Islanders
are still waiting to see some
work carried out.

Even with the election fever
in the air, the Family Islanders
say they thought that some
work would be sent their way.

The Family Islanders are
crying out for help and what-
ever it takes, we need to assist
them.

Otherwise, we will contin-
ue to see an influx of the raw
talent coming to New Provi-
dence and getting lost in the
shuffle because they haven't
been or won't bedeveloped at
home.

Bahamian duo
to lead Tiger's
at weekend

FROM page one

South Carolina. ;

“But I tell all of the athletes
that our biggest thing is to get
to the NCAA championships,
we really believe that we have
a shot of winning the men’s
title there as well. Both of
them (Sands and Thomas) are
automatic qualifiers for the
NCAA, maintaining the A_
standard — Donald and
Shamar are currently tied for
second in the country in their
respective events.”

Although Thomas is still
going through the adjustment
phase in the high jump, Rolle
believes that he is still capable
of putting on a good show.

Thomas, who made head-
lines after competing in his
tennis shoes and finishing
fourth in the World Indoor
championships, is still having a
hard time adjusting to ‘high
jump spikes.’

According to Rolle, Thomas
is receiving the support he
needs from both the coaching
staff and his teammate.

Rolle said: “Academically,
Donald is a stable guy, you
know he is working on getting
his masters. The biggest thing
with him is he is still learning
the high jump event. He is still
new to the event being a bas-
ketball player.

“Jerry is taking it very easy
on him, the technical part he is
coming along slowly so he
can understand what he is
doing.

“One of the things with him
what we have done is his
jumping in the spikes. You
know he had started out with
the shoes\and then we moved
him to the pole vault spikes
now we moved him to the
spikes in the heels. We tried
out some other brands with
him, even though we are a
Nike brand school, but we
have to do the best thing for
the athlete.

“We tried couple brands so
we are going to see how it
goes this weekend. It has been
a learning experience for him
with the spikes but he is get-
ting the hang of it.”

Thomas and Sands aren't
the only Bahamians compet-
ing at the weekend meet. Also
appearing are Andretti Bain,
Aymara Albury and Tia
Thompson.





}
}
;
;
i
i
i

Defending champ
Haas breezes
through opener;
Williams ativances

M@ TENNIS
MEMPHIS, Tenn.
Associated Press

DEFENDING champion
Tommy Haas defeated Vince
Spadea 6-4, 6-1 Tuesday night
in the Regions Morgan Kee-
gan Championships, and
Venus Williams advanced
with her second win follow-—
ing a four-month layoff.

Spadea beat Haas in the
quarterfinals of the Delray
Beach tournament earlier this
month, but lost his serve in
the opening game of the sec-
ond set, one of three breaks
for Haas in the set, including
the final game..

Both recorded six aces, but
three of Haas’ came in the
fourth game of the second set,
and Spadea didn’t win a game
the rest of the way in the 56-
minute match.

In the women’s Cellular
South Cup, Williams contin-
ued her comeback from a
sprained wrist with a 6-4, 6-4
victory over Caroline Wozni-
acki of Denmark.

“I think this match was def-
initely better,” Williams said
after her second win in the |
tournament. “I definitely had
a jot of good streaks of play.”

Both players had trouble
holding serve in the first set,
leading to five service breaks.
Williams got the final break to
take the first set.

Williams seemed in control
in the second set, overpower-

' ing the 16-year-old and serv-

ing with a 4-0 lead. But as she
did in her opening win Mon-
day, she lost focus and let
Wozniacki back into the
match to tie it at 4-4.

“T think I had a loose point
and I started making some
more errors,” Williams said.
“She did a good job of get-
ting the ball back and taking
advantage of the errors.”

After Wozniacki pulled
even, Williams held serve, and
broke Wozniacki to move
into the quarterfinals. apts

Williams is playing in her

first tournament since Octo-
ber. She said her wrist didn’t
bother her Tuesday and sta-
mina was not an. issue after
playing consecutive days.
’ Earlier, fourth-seeded
American Mardy Fish con-
tinued a successful start to the
season with a 6-3, 6-2 victory
over unseeded German Bjorn
Phau.

The 25-year-old made an
impressive comeback to the
tour last year after undergoing
a pair of wrist operations in
2005 and plummeting to
342nd in the ATP rankings.
He kept the momentum going
this year by advancing to the
semifinals at Auckland and
the last eight at both the Aus-
tralian Open and last week in
San Jose.

Fish is now ranked 25th in
the world — just eight places
shy of his career-best rank-
ing. He earned a second-
round match with fast-rising
Argentine teenager Juan
Martin Del Potro, who domi-
nated former top-20 player
Feliciano Lopez 6-1, 6-2.

Haas said he arrived early
at the tournament to avoid
the jet lag returning from the
Australian Open the German
said he suffered before Delray
Beach. Tuesday night’s victo-
ry over the American gave
him a good start to his title
defense.

“The first set was,pretty
tight until I broke him,” said
Haas, who also won the tour-
nament in 1999. “I felt that
was a good game that I played
when I served for the first set.
I felt pretty comfortable and
loose. I managed to break
him right away (in the second
set) and get off to a good
start. After the second break,
he kind of didn’t believe it
anymore.”

“I just got down and break,
and he served well,” Spadea
said. “I didn’t play well off
my serve. I don’t know what
happened. I’m dazed and con-
fused right now.”

In other women’s action,
top-seeded Shahar Peer of
Israel rolled to a 6-4, 6-3 first-
round victory over Emma
Laine of Finland.

Fourth-seeded Samantha
Stosur of Australia beat
unseeded Aleksandra Wozni-
ak of Canada 6-2, 7-5 to
advance to a second-round
meeting with Camille Pin of
France. Pin defeated Uzbek-
istan’s Varvara Lepchenko 7-
5, 6-1.

Also advancing to the
round of 16 in the CSC were
Milagros Sequera and Jarmi-
la Gajdosova.









, “AN MY OPINION
GREG COTE

_ gcote@MiamiHerald.com :

Anti-hero Bonds
is playing a game
of criminal pursuit

-y-y he biggest story in baseball
began unfolding in Scottsdale,
Ariz., on Tuesday, coming back
like a dormant disease as malignant
Barry Bonds returned to begin his run
at sports’ ultimate record. The mark
— Hank.Aaron’s 755 career home runs
— doesn’t seem like something being
“chased.” It feels more like the objec
of a criminal assault. KS
Bonds passed Babe Ruth last sea-
- son, and it was like a burglar in the

a portrait of George

| Washington. By late
summer, Bonds fig-
ures to vault Aaron
and officially place

’ America’s most
famous, revered

i a sporting oo in
-. dirty hands.

oe ac ' , Bonds will ascend

as a hero in San Francisco but will be

a villain to most of the rest of the

_ country: Darth Batter,

And everything about it stinks.
A BURDEN OF SHAME
What should be a good, nourishing
thing for baseball, a grand achieve- —
ment worthy of celebration or at least
respect, instead is a looming embar-

~ rassment. Bond’s milestone is the

- sport’s millstone. Heavy. A burden.

-” Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig
already has worked to distance him-
self by saying he might not attend the
record-breaking game. It is hard to



imagine Selig’s delicate spot, but start...

by imagining that you are the head of
your Kiwanis Club and must intro-
duce your group’s new Man of the
Year, OJ. Simpson.

For Bonds, too, what should be a
fulfilling, dream season will only
aggravate the shame on his name as
fans in visiting ballparks boo or turn
their backs on him. Every step closer
to the record he now trails by only
21 homers will increase chatter and
debate about steroids and amphet-

White House passing

BY MICHAEL MAROT
Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS — _ Rich
McKay likes what he sees among
today’s NFL rookies.’

Sure, they are bigger, faster,
stronger — even brasher. But they
also are better-prepared to make
a quick impact on the field.

Once considered a league
dominated by veterans, the
NFL has gradually been
transformed by increasing-
ly-talented rookie classes
into a league that is more
affected by today’s young players.

“For a scout, mini-camp used to
be the worst three days of the
year,” said McKay, the general
manager of the Atlanta Falcons.

“You'd show up after spending
all this time working on the draft,
and a guy would come in out of



“PRO FOOTBALL | NFL COMBINE

Rookie revolution feeds success

shape or struggle to pick up a
scheme, But you don’t really see
that any more.”

McKay is among the dozens of

NEL front-office officials, coaches §f

and scouts that will spend the next
five days in Indianapolis grading
this year’s college prospects at the
league’s annual scouting combine.
About 330 players are ready
to take the field today.

Over the past five years,
McKay says, he has consis-
tently seen rookies arrive at
training camp with more
knowledge, in better shape and
more prepared to make the transi-
tion to the NFL.

The results have been just as
dramatic. In 2004, Pittsburgh Steel-
ers rookie quarterback Ben Roeth-
lisberger went from the Mid-
American Conference to within

'



DOUG BENC/GETTY IMAGES

INSTANT IMPACT: Reggie Bush
helped turn the Saints around.

one victory of the Super Bowl.
Then he won it the next season.
The 2006 class even outdid
Roethlisberger. Quarterbacks
Vince Young of the Tennessee
Titans and Jay Cutler of the Den-
ver Broncos almost led their teams



INTERNATIONAL EDITION

to the playoffs. The New Orleans

Saints’ dynamic duo of running

back Reggie Bush and receiver
Marques Colston helped the team
reach its first NFC Championship
Game. Kick returner Devin Hester
helped get the Chicago Bears to
their first Super Bowl in two dec-
ades, and running back Joseph
Addai played a key role in the Indi-
anapolis Colts’ championship.

It might go down as one of the
NEL’s best rookie classes ever.

Matching that productivity will
prove difficult in 2007, but the —
trend is expected to continue.

“T know that the coaching at the
college level is getting better every
year,” Baltimore Ravens general
manager Ozzie Newsome said. “A
lot of the guys that have coached at
our level are going back to college,
and I think that’s helping them.”



COLLEGE BASKETBALL | NO. 2 OHIO STATE 68, PENN STATE 60

es dodge scare

1 aie.

Buckey

a Tein



ee,

Narrow victory
keeps Ohio State
in the driver’s seat

BY RUSTY MILLER
Associated Press
COLUMBUS, Ohio — Ohio State keeps win-
ning; Barely. © jas) =
Jamar Butler scored 18 points, and Greg Oden
had 17-points and 14 rebounds, helping the No. 2
Buckeyes beat Penn State for the second time in
eight days, 68-60 on Wednesday night.
Daequan Cook added 12 points and Ron
Lewis had Il for the Buckeyes (25-3, 13-1), who
hold a one-game edge withtwo
games left in the Big Ten race.
The victory set the stage for a

No. 1 vs. No. 2 showdown Sunday
when top-ranked Wisconsin, still
smarting from Tuesday night’s
64-55 loss at Michigan State,
comes to town. The winner is
assured of at least a share of the
Big Ten championship.

amines and asterisks.

The words hero and halo do no
apply here. :

Neither should Bonds be held up as
anybody’s martyr, as an innocent vic-
tim. Too much is known. The picture
is of a man who cheated, and who is



cheating some more by robbing his
sport of the ability to properly marka
historic event, and cheating himself of
the honor that might have been his.

It stretches credulity to call Bonds’
steroids use a suspicion, branding the
claimant as naive. Juries might con-

-_vict on circumstantial evidence if it is
overwhelming, and so might the pub-
lic jury that shapes Bonds’ legacy.

_ Bonds and the word steroids are
together in dreaded matrimony now.

THE NIGHTMARE CONTINUES

- *1 et them investigate,” Bonds told
the slew of gathered media Tuesday
as the Giants opened spring training

‘jin Scottsdale. “Let ’em. They’ve been
doing it this long.”

That was Bonds’ version of forth-
rightness. On the specifics of steroids
and amphetamine use, he offered no
substantive comment.

At least he did not say, “I hate gay
people.” Give him that much.

Long after Daisuke Matsuzaka
Mania and the soap of A-Rod’s rela-

‘tionship with Derek Jeter have sub-
sided from national headlines to paro-
chial fascinations of the Red
Sox-Yankees Axis, Bonds’ dubious
pursuit of Aaron will remain contro-
versial and polarizing and revolting.

- Bonds might be the greatest ball-
player ever. But there must be an
asterisk by his name. He put it there.
And now he is denigrating hallowed
ground by stealing Aaron’s record.

It was not such a big deal in 1985,
when Kareem Abdul-Jabbar passed

Wilt Chamberlain as the NBA’s career —

lead in points.

Or in 1994, when Wayne Gretzky
topped Gordie Howe im career goals.

Nor will it be a huge story outside
of Green Bay and Miami when Brett
Favre surpasses Dan Marino’s career
record for touchdown passes.

Home runs, though? Ruth and
Aaron? This is baseball, the sport
where history and statistics are vital.
This is our national pastime, still, in
some deep-seated way that is embed-
ded in our psyche.

That Barry Bonds will soon own
baseball’s most prized posséssion is
about a tape-measure shot beyond
unfortunate.

This is blasphemy happening.

ARMS RACE: Greg Oden of Ohio State grabs a rebound away from Penn State’s Geary
Claxton during the second half Wednesday night. Oden had 17 poi



LAY LaPRETE/AP

nts and 14 rebounds.

GOLF | ACCENTURE MATCH PLAY CHAMPIONSHIP

Ohio State has won 12 games
in a row overall, 24 in a row at home and 11 ina
row in the Big Ten. The conference winning
streak is the second-longest in school history,
eclipsed only by the 27 in a row by the Jerry
Lucas and John Havlicek teams of 1960-62.

Geary Claxton scored 15 points, David Jack-
son had 14 and Danny Morrissey ll for the Nit-
tany Lions (10-16, 1-12), who have lost their past
12 games. They also are 0-9 on the road and have
lost 44 of their past 47 Big Ten road games.

Yet, for some reason, they seem to be at their
best against the Buckeyes.

A week earlier, Penn State trailed by 21 points
at the half and by as many as 24 in second half,
but the Nittany Lions outscored Ohio State 19-4
down the stretch before falling 64-62.

The Buckeyes trailed by eight points in the
first half Wednesday and again early in the seg-
ond before they started clicking on offense.

Oden left the game for a while, grimacing
while holding his surgically-repaired left hand,
but he returned and played down the stretch.

@ MORE GAMES



Woods, Mickelson win; Ames turns tables

BY DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

MARANA, Ariz. — Tiger
Woods got the first match out of
the way Wednesday, although this
time he had to work for it.

One year after he set a tourna-
ment record with a 9-and-8 victory
in the opening round, Woods
relied on a big par save early and
nearly aced the Mth hole to put
away Ryder Cup teammate J.J.
Henry 3 and 2 in the Accenture
Match Play Championship.

For the second year in a row,
the shortest day belonged to Ste-
phen Ames — with a nice twist.

Ames was on the losing end of
that record rout by Woods at La
Costa but experienced the flip side
of this fickle tournament by mak-
ing seven birdies in JJ holes to bury
Robert Karlsson of Sweden 8 and 7.

Fourth-seeded Phil Mickelson
got a minor scare, trailing fellow



MATT YORK/AP

WHO'S GOT NEXT? Tiger Woods.

lefty Richard Green of Australia
and not taking the lead until the
14th hole. Mickelson won l-up
when Green missed a 20-foot
birdie putt on the 18th hole.

Jim Furyk, the No. 2 seed, also
trailed at the turn until making
three consecutive birdies and beat-
ing Brett Quigley 2 and 1.

Shaun Micheel, who ended
Woods’ worldwide winning streak



in September by beating him in the
first round of the World Match
Play Championship, was up.to his
old tricks. Micheel knocked out
one of the top seeds — Adam Scott,
at No. 3 — in 21 holes. Scott made a
birdie on the 18th to force extra
holes, then three-putted on No. 3,

missing a 5-foot par putt.

Woods said that only his score

made it look like an easy day.
' “Tt was actually a pretty tight
match,” Woods said. “J.J. hit a lot of
beautiful putts in the middle part
of the round and even on the back
nine, and those putts just didn’t go
in. Had they gone in, it might have
been a different story.”

Woods advanced to face Tim
Clark of South Africa, a 3-and-2
winner over Robert Allenby.

Some think this might be the
toughest hurdle in Woods’ unlikely
quest to win ll consecutive PGA
Tour events, the record Byron Nel-



ANDY LYONS/GETTY IMAGES

‘BUNKER BLAST: Phil Mickelson.

son set over five months in 1945.
But on a warm day of swirling
winds in the high desert, on a
course with tight pins, he did him-
self a favor by not getting behind.
Woods was 2-up until the 14th,
when his 8-iron approach shot
spun back to within a foot of the
cup for an easy birdie putt. From
there, it was a just matter of when
Henry would run out of holes.



~~

Sf






THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007

SECTION




~ The Tribune



e Money Safe.
Money Fast. »




a

| [@ Back of The Bahamas

LINTERNATIONAL @













at i Sse pour Fin
Bde ema ee pedan we OD



businestribunemedianet Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street.

Government harbour lease



frustrates firm’s expansion

>
‘

@ By NEIL HARTNELL ©

Tribune Business Editor

major Grand
Bahama-based
company yes-
terday told
The Tribune
its expansion plans have been
frustrated because the Gov-

’ ernment has not entered talks

on extending the lease for the
harbour it uses, and expressed
concerns that that facility
might now be used instead for
a major tourism-related pro-
ject.

Jaime Vargas, South Riding —

_ Point Holdings vice-president
of operations, said the compa-
ny was “very worried” over
future use of the harbour it
currently leases from the Gov-
ernment when that agreement
expires,

This was because a major
investment project proposed

Grand Bahama

t
1}
\

firm very worried’ over likelihood harbour

being eyed for mega tourism project, cutting them out

for east Grand Bahama by
Beka Development LLC,
revealed by The Tribune on
Tuesday, said it was seeking as
part of a Heads of Agreement
with the Government the
“tight to full access use of the
existing harbour”, and an
“option to purchase the lease
of the entire harbour when the
existing lease expires”.

Both Mr Vargas and other
business community contacts
on Grand Bahama have iden-
tified the “harbour” referred
to in the Beka document as
likely being the one currently
used by South Riding Point

Coalition lawyers
study government

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government has

issued a statement to the.

National Coalition for Health-
care Reform clarifying Clause
14 of the National Health
Insurance Act, The Tribune
was told yesterday, which the

Coalition’s attorneys are now.

reviewing to see if it matches
their interpretation, |
.Winston Rolle, a former
Chamber of Commerce presi-
dent and Coalition consultant,

. confirmed Dr Bernard Not-

Cg

Well-known investor —
in $4bn Rum Cay deal

tage, minister of health and
national insurance, had sent a
letter clarifying Clause 14’s
interpretation from the Goy-
ernment’s perspective.

He added: “We’re actually
getting a clear interpretation
from our legal mindset who
assisted us with the first part
of it.” Among the attorneys
the Coalition is thought to
have engaged is Katina Mosko.

Clause 14 is the: part in the
legislation that has caused most
concern, which the business
community felt left a lot of
unanswered questions and was
unnecessary, as it deals with
material already covered in the
labour laws, (/

Some felt its inclusion was
an attempt to cover anything in
relation to trade union or

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A “$4 billion, six-star resort”
project planned for Rum Cay
has among its investors a con-
troversial former US politician
who has already caused dis-
quiet among the island’s resi-
dents through his involvement
in land deals where the title
has been queried,

A release issued yesterday

_ by Island Village Resorts, the

developer behind the proposed
Rum Cay Island Club Resort
Marina and Spa, said: “The
Billy Davis family of Atlanta,
Georgia, joins Fredric Rern-

‘ NHI clarification

. industrial contract negotia- -

tions, but these were cavered
under the labour laws,

Clause 14 (1) of the NHI Act
says that despite. any agree-
ment a Bahamian employer
may have in place regarding
the provision of group health
insurance for his workers with
a trade union representing
them, or in their contracts of
employment, "every employ-
er is entitled to modify.,., the
rate of contributions payable"

_under this scheme, to elimi-

nate any duplication and
"overlap" of benefits with the

‘proposed NHI scheme,

Apart from the fact that this
seems to allow employers to
arbitrarily tear up any con-
tracts and agreements made
over the provision of private
health insurance for their staff,
the following clause, 14 (2), of
the Bill.stipulates that "no
employer shall make any mod-

ification [to their private group ‘
coverage] without obtaining

the prior written approval of

‘the Minister",

To obtain this approval, all
relevant information and mate-

rials, including a copy of the.

group health plan, has to be
sent to the Minister,

Businesses fear Clause 14 —

SEE page 8B

stein as co-investor in the
development,”

- Mr, Davis’s name is well-
known to Rum Cay’s 90 resi-
dents, as he and his Newport

‘Harbour company have been

among several foreign real
estate developers to alight on
the island, where they have
been claiming land ownership
based on title derived from
landholdings originally pos-
sessed by the estate of the late
Effie Knowles,

She was a Floridian attorney
of Bahamian descent, and Mr

SEE page 6B

Holdings.

“We didn’t know anything
about it and were very sur-
prised,” Mr Vargas said of the
Beka project and its plans for
the ‘harbour, South Riding
Point Holdings’ lease on the
harbour expires on December
31, 2019, giving it just under
13 more years there,

“We would like to extend
our lease,” Mr Vargas said, “It
runs out on December 31,
2019, and we have tried to
engage in negotiations with the
Government for a lease exten-
sion in order to start expan-
sion projects, so we can have a

Marinas ‘accept’ move to

return on investment for a
longer period of time than the
13 years we have left,

“For whatever reason, the
Government has not shown an
interest in these negotiations.”

Mr Vargas added of the
Beka project revelations: “We
didn’t know anything about it,
We were suprised. We would

like to extend our lease, so the .

option.they want to take over
our lease after it expires is very
worrying,

“IT don’t know what else to
say at this point, I just hope to
be part of it, and that they con-
sider keeping us on as part of

the equation.”

South Riding Point Holdings
is the Bahamian subsidiary of
World Point Terminals, a
Canadian public company list-
ed on the Toronto Stock
Exchange.

It owns and operates the oil
terminal at High Rock in east-
ern Grand Bahama, which has

the capacity to hold 5,3 million -

barrels of crude oil, It holds
crude oil deliveries to the US,
and act as a ‘break bulk’ facil-
ity for transhipment opera-
tions,
The South Riding Point
Holdings terminal has a 4,000

foot offshore island that can

handle the world’s largest oil
tankers, due to a water depth
of 105 feet.

The company, though, saw

its revenues fall by $764,000 in
the 2006 first half compared to
last year, due to "considerably
slower" marine —
activity around the island,

The revenue decrease for
the period to June 30, 2006,
was partly explained by tough
2005 comparatives,

During the 2005 first half,

SEE page 11B

WBy NEILHARTNELL
_ Tribune Business Editor

MARINA owners and operators have
accepted that the Bahamas should move to
“a revenue-based” method for levying tax-
es on the industry, The Tribune was told
yesterday, much as the Government does
with the hotel industry,

Malcolm Martini, the Government's
chief planning consultant in the Ministry of
Energy and the Environment, said a full
week of consultations on the proposed
draft policy to regulate the expanding

marina industry in the Bahamas had pro-
vided “really good feedback”,

: Some 150 people, split evenly between .

the general public and marina owners and
operators, attended the consultations,
which were held on. five separate islands,

Mr Martini said that in response to the
views and feedback submitted, the Gov-
ernment team responsible for overseeing
the marina policy had in some areas made
refinements to the original draft, and in
others made more wide-sweeping changes,

“People by and large accepted the reg-
imen we proposed” for controlling and

AUER ky

_ revenue based taxation |

regulating environmental issues raised by
marina development, Mr Martini said,
although concerns were raised about fol-
lowing Florida’s regulations too closely.

He acknowledged that Florida’s geog-
raphy was different to the Bahamas, the
seabed being mostly sand as opposed to
the coral found in this nation,

On the Government’s revenue-raising
proposals, Mr Martini said: “There were
concerns about the charges, as one might

SEE page 9B |

DUTY: eS
2 OY PERNA

ye eye AO 0

Corenlaelele
Inasnap!

t

Give us 3 days!









THE MARKETS |
STOCKS, MUTUAL FUNDS, 5-68

DOW 30 12,786.64 +19.07 AX
S&P 500 1,459.68 +414 AR
NASDAQ 2,513.04 +16.73 AK
10-YR NOTE 468 -01W
CRUDE OIL 58.07 -132 W

Stocks —
advance
as oil
drops

_ BY MADLEN READ
. Associated Press
~NEW YORK — Wall Street

managed a moderate advance in
an uneven session Tuesday
after a drop in oil prices and
encouraging comments from a
Federal Reserve official allowed
investors to shrug off disap-
pointment over Home Depot's |
declining sales. The retailer’s —
drop suggested that consumers’
appetite for home improvement

~ goods is still dwindling due to
the sluggish housing market. —
Despite this, the Dow Jones
industrials set another closing —
high.

Comments from outgoing
.Fed Governor Susan Bies, who
said slumping demand for hous-
ing may have bottomed out,
alleviated some concerns about
the downturn dragging down
the rest of the economy. Her —
remarks echoed those of Fed
Chairman Ben Bernanke, who
last week predicted the econ-
omy will keep: growing ata
modest pace. :

“The overall trend of the
market is basically positive,”
said Brian Gendreau, invest-
ment strategist for ING Invest-
ment Management, pointing to
Bernanke’s recent forecast of
moderating growth and cooling
inflation. “That’s a great envi- -
ronment for equities. Unless
you have some specifically
nasty news, there’s no reason.
why the trend shouldn’t be ©
upward.”

Falling oil prices, which tum-
bled $1.32 to $58.07 a barrel on
the New York Mercantile
Exchange on forecasts of
warmer weather, also lent some
support to stocks, as did a pro-
posed merger between XM Sat- _
ellite Radio and Sirius Satellite —
Radio. ee

"The Dow rose 19.07, or 0.15
percent, to 12,786.64, after fall-
ing more than 60 points earlier.
Tuesday’s climb brought the
index to its 3lst record close
since early October, and its big-
gest five-day rally since mid-
November. The Dow also
reached a new trading high of
12,795.93, just short of 12,800. |

Markets were closed Mon- :
day for Presidents Day. a

Broader stock indicators also _
turned higher. The Standard & |
Poor’s 500 index rose 4.14, or
0.28 percent, to 1,459.68, and the
Nasdaq composite index
climbed 16.73, or 0.67 percent, to
2,513.04. ae '

Bond prices rose slightly, |
with the yield on the bench-
mark 10-year Treasury note at
4.68 percent, down from 4.69
percent late Friday. Bies’ com-
ments helped support Trea-
surys, which added some fuel to
the stock market’s advance.

The decline in crude prices
gave some investors reason to
buy back into the market, as
lower fuel costs curb consumer
prices — which could help
boost discretionary spending,
and reduce the chance of an
interest rate hike.

Advancing issues outnum-
bered decliners by about 5 to 3
on the New York Stock
Exchange, where consolidated

‘ volume came to 2.39 billion
shares, compared to 2.38 billion
shares traded on Friday.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies rose 7.96, or
0.97 percent, to 826.11.

Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei
stock average fell 0.01 percent. -

. Britain’s FTSE 100 fell 0.50 per- ’

‘ cent, Germany’s DAX index fell
0.06 percent, and France’s
CAC-40 fell 0.46 percent.

unc mgt ny nan RTD
ERNE NILE EEN





PHILIP MORRIS

Court tosses $79.5M tobacco verdict

@ The U.S. Supreme Court
tightened the constitutional
limits on punitive damages,
setting aside a $79°5 million
award in a smoker case against
Altria Group’s Philip Morris unit.

BY MARK SHERMAN
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Supreme
Court threw out a $79.5 million award
that a jury had ordered a cigarette
maker to pay to a smoker’s widow, a
ruling that could bode well for other
businesses seeking stricter limits on

Lepeeennnnmnreseerenyeinnnihteiein rein qrman arene ntattnneeeet



But the world’s largest retailer
still faces the challenge of reinvigo-
rating sales at its U.S. stores amid
fierce competition, analysts said.

' “They’re getting some traction,
but they’ve still got a lot of work to
do,” said Stephanie Hoff, senior
retail analyst at Edward Jones.

While profits and total sales
were up around 10 percent each,
Hoff noted that sales at stores open
at least one year, a key measure of
retail performance, only grew 13



“TECHNOLOGY

HP profit ris

@ Hewlett-Packard’s first-quarter
profit jumped 26 percent as the
company benefited from higher
sales of laptop computers,
printers and printing supplies.

BY CONNIE GUGLIELMO
Bloomberg News

Hewlett-Packard, the world’s larg-
est personal-computer maker, said
first-quarter profit rose 26 percent
after the company won consumer
sales away from Dell.

Net income increased to $1.55 bil-
lion, or 55 cents a share, from $1.23
billion, or 42 cents, a year earlier,
Palo Alto, Calif.-based Hewlett-
Packard said Tuesday. Sales in the
quarter ended Jan. 31 rose 1] percent
to $25.1 billion. Excluding some costs,
profit was 65 cents, beating the 63
cents expected on average by ana-
lysts.

Chief Executive Officer Mark
Hurd nabbed the PC market lead
from Dell for the second straight
quarter by offering low-priced note-
book computers and selling them
with help from retail partners. PC
shipments jumped 24 percent last
quarter while Dell’s dropped 8.4 per-
cent, according to researcher IDC.

| BULLISH: A shopper at a Wal-Mart in North Fayet
' reported fourth-quarter profit growth of 9.8 per

“STRATEGIC SUCCESS

WAL-MART SAYS U.S. STORES, COST CUTTING
| HELP BOOST 4Q RESULTS BY 9.8 PERCENT




big-dollar verdicts.

The 5-4 decision Tuesday was a
victory for Altria Group’s Philip Mor-
ris USA, which contested an Oregon
Supreme Court decision upholding
the jury’s verdict.

Yet.the decision did not address a
key argument made by Philip Morris
and its supporters across a wide
range of businesses — that the size of
the award was unconstitutionally
large. They had hoped the court
would limit the amount that can be
awarded in punitive damage cases.

Instead, Justice Stephen Breyer

wrote in his majority opinion that the
award to Mayola Williams could not
stand because a jury may punish a
defendant only for the harm done to
the person who is suing, not to others
whose cases were not before it.

“To permit punishment for injur-
ing a nonparty victim would add a
near standardless dimension to the
punitive damages question,” Breyer
said.

The company had argued that the
jury was encouraged to punish Philip
Morris for health problems suffered
by every Oregonian who smoked its



RETAIL

vio

BY MARCUS KABEL
Associated Press -

Wal-Mart reported on Tuesday a better-than-expected 9.8 percent
increase in fourth-quarter profits, helped by new strategy and
- cost-control measures at its flagship U.S. stores division.

percent in the fourth quarter after
annual rates well over 5 percent
early this decade.

Wal-Mart forecast same-store
sales growth between 1 and 3 per-
cent in the current quarter.

“Those numbers will have to get
stronger and be at the 3 percent end
of the [forecast] range for investors
to be willing to pay a higher pre-
mium for the stock,” Hoff said.

Wal-Mart said profit for the
period ending Jan. 31 was $3.94 bil-

Hewlett-Packard’s shares declined
to $42.88 in, trading after the

‘ announcement. They rose 36 cents to

$43.13 at 4 p.m. in New York Stock
Exchange composite trading. The
stock is trading at their highest level

' in six years.

Hurd has exceeded analysts’ profit
expectations in every quarter since
taking over in April 2005. Hewlett-
Packard in November forecast profit,
excluding some items, of 60 cents to
62 cents a share on sales of $24.1 bil-
lion to $24.3 billion.

Profit this quarter, excluding some
costs, will be 63 cents to 64 cents a
share on sales of $24.5 billion. Ana-
lysts were anticipating profit of 64
cents, the average of 22 estimates
compiled by Bloomberg, on sales of
$24.1 billion.

Hurd, 50, continued to reap the
benefits of job cuts and office clo-
sures during the first quarter. He has
used the cost savings to undercut
rivals including Round Rock, Texas-
based Dell on price while preserving
profit margins. He is also capitalizing
on customer dissatisfaction with
Dell, which alienated the U.S. con-
sumers driving PC market growth
with poor customer service.

cn ent

GENE J. PUSKA/AP

te, Pa., loads her purchases. On Tuesday, Wal-Mart
cent to beat analysts’ estimates.

lion, or 95 cents per share, up from
$3.59 billion, or 87 cents, from one
year prior. Even without a $98 mil-
lion tax benefit worth 2 cents per
share, Wal-Mart’s earnings beat the
90 cents per share forecast by ana-
lysts surveyed by Thomson Finan-
cial.

The company had fourth-quar-
ter sales of $98.09 billion, up 10.9
percent from a year before but
below the $99.95 billion forecast by
analysts. :

Wal-Mart said it expects per-
share earnings of between 68 cents
and 71 cents in the first quarter and
between $3.15 and $3.23 for the fis-
cal year 2008. Analysts surveyed by
Thomson Financial were forecast-



ing 68 cents for the first quarter and
$3.19 for the year ahead.

Chief Executive Lee Scott sin-
gled out Eduardo Castro-Wright,

* TURN TO RETAIL

cigarettes.
Chief Justice John Roberts and

-Justices Samuel Alito, Anthony Ken-

nedy and David Souter, joined with
Breyer.

Dissenting were Justices Ruth
Bader Ginsburg, Antonin Scalia, John
Paul Stevens and Clarence Thomas.
Ginsburg said Tuesday’s ruling made
punitive damages law even more

confusing.

Jesse Williams died of lung cancer
in 1997 at the age of 67. He had

*TURN TO PHILIP MORRIS

AIRLINES

JetBlue
vows to
win back |
passengers

i JetBlue Airways introduced a
customer bill of rights that
promises vouchers to fliers who
experience delays, hoping the
move wins back passengers after
an operational meltdown
damaged its brand.

BY ADAM GOLDMAN

Associated Press :

NEW YORK — JetBlue CEO
David Neeleman said on Tuesday the

- airline will implement a customer bill
__of rights to prevent a repeat of last

week’s storm-related disruptions that
kept passengers stuck aboard planes,
some for up to 10 hours.

Neeleman described the crisis as
“4 huge bump in the road” but said
JetBlue would move past it. He said
he had no intention of resigning in
the wake of the worst corporate mess
in the airline’s 7-year history. Jet-
Blue’s shares fell 66 cents, or 4.87
percent, to close at $12.90 on the
Nasdaq Stock Market Tuesday.

' «1 think P’m uniquely qualified to
deal with these issues,” Neeleman
said.

JetBlue said the first step in getting —

people to fly on the airline again was
its introduction of a new customer
bill of rights. :

Under the bill, if JetBlue cancels a

. flight within 12 hours of its departure

because of problems within its con-
trol, customers can ask for a full
refund, a credit or a voucher. If the
airline delays a flight in a situation
within its control, passengers would
receive vouchers ranging from $25 to
the full amount of a round-trip ticket,
depending on the length of the delay.

Compensation also would be
made if a plane lands but can’t taxi to
its gate within 30 minutes. And ifa
plane’s departure is delayed for more
than three hours, passengers will be
eligible for vouchers of at least $100

* TURN TO JET BLUE

es 26% after PC victory over Dell

PAUL SAKUMA/AP

STIFF COMPETITOR: Hewlett Packard printers are on display at a Best
Buy store in Mountain View, Calif. HP’s first-quarter profit jumped
26 percent as the company cut into Dell's sales of laptop

computers.

o*

eo nlee eee



THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 5B

Oe,



@ JETBLUE airplanes are seen at JFK airport

JetBlue: No impact

(AP Photo: Rick Maiman)

on the Bahamas

m@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

JETBLUE’S air service to
the Bahamas should not be
impacted in any way by the
recent problems caused when
the low-cost carrier had to
ground passengers for up to 10
hours during massive snow
storms in the northeastern US.

The inability of hundreds of
planes to receive take-off clear-
ance meant thousands of pas-
sengers had to sit on runways
for lengthy periods of time,
and caused the airline to have
spend millions of dollars pro-
viding compensation to pas-
sengers.

The Tribune contacted the
Jet Blue office at the Sir Lyn-

den Pindling International Air-
port, but was told that all

media inquires had to be made
to the company’s corporate
offices.

Bryan Baldwin, manager of
corporate communications at
the Jet Blue office in New
York, the company is deter-
mined not to let the incident
affect its future performance.

“We didn’t really have any
major affects in the Bahamas.
We had some minor cancella-
tions, but that area was not
that impacted,” he said.

Mr Baldwin added that Jet
Blue was sure there would be
no economic fallout as a result
of the situation.

“We are dedicated to the
cities and hubs that we provide
service to, and are determined
to not let them be adversely
affected,” he said.

In an effort to reaffirm its

commitment to customers, the .

company has issued a Jetblue

Customer Bill of Rights, which
ensures that customers will be
notified in the event there are

delays, cancellations or diver-

sions, and their causes.

According to the policy, cus-
tomers who have their flight
cancelled by the airline have
the option to receive a full
refund or accommodation on a
future Jet Blue flight at no
additional charge.

Customers whose departure
or arrival is delayed are enti-
tled to a voucher for future
travel, the amount dependent
on the amount of time of the
delay, which is not to exceed
five hours. Customers experi-
encing a delay of more than
three hours will receive a
voucher for the same amount
they paid for their ticket.

Customers denied involun-

tarily boarding shall: receive ‘

$1,000. mil

T

FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

for

Home Finance Specialist

( pualiticanons: :

BAHAMAS TECHNICAL VOCATIONAL INSTITUTE

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons as |
faculty members at the Bahamas Technical & Vocational
Institute for the Fall Semester 2007.

Positions are available in the following disciplines:-

(1) Masonry

(2) Plumbing

(3) Tile Laying

(4) Electrical

(5) Air conditioning & Refrigeration

The successful candidate will be required to teach during
day or evening hours, must be very knowledgeable in their
prospective discipline area, be able to communicate well
with students and maintain a good rapport in the classroom.

The applicants must possess certification and qualifications

in the various disciplines and at least 10 years experience in
the industry. A Teaching Certificate or a minimum of three
years teaching experience.

Applications forms can be obtained from the Bahamas
Technical & Vocational Insitute, Old Trail Road and should
be returned complete with copies of qualifications to the
Human Resouces Department, Bahamas ‘Technical &
Vocational Institute at P.O. Box N-4934,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than March 5th, 2007.



« Experience in Sales & Lending and in depth up-to-date
knowledge of Mortgage and loans and an understanding of
local economies, client needs, condition of client’s business
/ industry / market.

Knowledge of and/or experience in credit assessment, credit -
policies and procedures with emphasis on mortgage
underwriting as well as risk awareness in order to assess
lending risk.
Knowledge of the principles and techniques of selling to
prospects for new business and close sales. x
Self-motivated and able to work with minimal supervision. “OF
Actual @ .
%,

The world’s smallest
glucose meter

ACIB or equivalent qualification in relevant discipline (not Shee
mandatory >

m World’s smallest sample size
(0.3 yL, about the size of a pinhead).

WS Re

General Requirements/Responsibilities:
. Fast 7 second average test time.
= To be the primary point of contact for customers wishing to
obtain a FirstCaribbean Mortgage.
= To generate incremental mortgage business for FirstCaribbean,
primarily through business development and direct selling
efforts.
To provide a high level of customer service to external referral
sources and potential home purchasers.
To develop appropriate external sales contacts with land
developers/ Real Estate Agents/Brokers etc. to ensure that
opportunities for developing profitable customer relationships
are realized in order to increase FirstCaribbean’s share of the
mortgage market.
Responsible for the management of a portfolio of approximately
200 — 300 clients.
Ensure credit quality i.e. delinquency and NPNA levels are
maintained within acceptable standards

Test yourself on different, less painful areas, such as
the palm of your hand, forearms, thighs, or calves.

4 alarms to remind patients when it’s time to test.

Ask for it at your favorite drug store.

GLUCOSE TESTING

10AM — 1PM
These dates and locations:

Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter
via email by March 2, 2007 to:
deangelia.deleveaux@FirstCaribbeanBank.com

Monday, Feb 12
Prescription Centre
Rosetta St.

Tuesday, Feb. 27
Centerville Pharmacy
Collins Ave.

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for their interest,
however only those under consideration will be contacted.



Distributed by Lowe's Wholesale . Tel: 393-7111 . Fax: 393-0440









Se




PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007

NGOS SINE OSS ASUS



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

IAPETUS HOLDING LTD..

VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000
IAPETUS HOLDING LTD. has been completed, a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company |
has therefore been struck off the Register of Companies.

The Date of the Completion of dissolution was 30th January

2007.

me

EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY

«

Computer Company needs Company/Network
Repair Technician



Applicant should have:-

- Knowledge of Microsoft Windows desktop and
‘Operating Systems





THE TRIBUNE



Well-known investor

FROM page 1B

Davis has argued that he

obtained the title to land on

Rum Cay completely legiti-
mately through the title chain
derived from her estate.
Others, though, are scepti-
cal of the title chain derived

from her estate, and have ques- .

tioned whether the land being
acquired and then sold on by
Mr Davis and other develop-
ers, largely to potential foreign
second home buyers, has clean
title.

Attorneys such as Craig But-
ler, grandson of famed Rum
Cay native, Sir Milo Butler,

have argued that Mr Davis and .

other foreign developers are
simply engaged in land specu-
lation, flipping lots to other
buyers.

However, Todd Davis, a
spokesman for Island Village
Resorts and Mr Bernstein, yes-
terday told The Tribune that
the 2,520 acres earmarked for
the Rum Cay Island Club



NOTICE

Resort Marina and Spa was.

not derived from a title chain

involving the late Effie,

Knowles’ estate. s
“The land was totally sepa-
rate” from that, he added,
implying that the development
had good title to its land.
Island Village Resorts said
in a statement that it was plan-
ning a 4,000-unit, six-star resort
with hotel residences; a 400-
slip ‘Blue Flag’ Super Mega-
Yacht Marina, with slips up to
500 feet, and waterways run-
ning throughout most of the
property with water taxis.

Amenities

Other planned amenities
include a 27-hole golf course; a
swim with the Dolphins facili-
ty at the Dolphin Hotel; a spa
and tennis facilities, a
Caribbean-inspired casino, a
Straw Market and a retail vil-
lage.

The project designer is Taft

Bradshaw, of Bradshaw &’

Associates, and Mr Bernstein









- Be familiar with PC Hardware and Software repair

- Be able to work with minimal supervision

- Be trainable on specific industry based software
applications

Please send resumes via email to
nassautechjob@ yahoo.com

MINISTRY OF ENERGY & THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL
HEALTH SERVICES | ae

As part of the activities of the inner-city
100 day. challenge project, “Keeping
the Inner-City Clean, Green & Pristine”
refuse and bulk waste (old _ stoves,
refrigerators, beds, mattresses and other
discarded articles) will be collected
from premises in the area bounded by
meeting street in the north, Blue Hill Road
in the East, Meadow Street in the South and
Nassau Street in the West and all side
Streets; Augusta Street, West Street,
Hospital Lane and Rupert Dean Lane
During the Period February 12th-March
12th, 2007



Pricing Information As Of:
2

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

P

ier Real Estate
a



12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
dings
Le

28.00 ABDAB
14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets

1.328271*
3.0569***
2.596093**
1.224792****
id 11.3545****

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina)MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund

tts
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec ‘ .
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day’s weighted price for dally volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change In closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the fast 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings






NOTICE is hereby given that EVELYNE SENATUS OF
PALM BEACH STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 15th day of February, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Job Opportunity

ce
An established Bahamian business
is seeking a secretary.

Applicant must possess the following
key competencies:

@ Motivated self-starter

@ Excellent communication skills
@ Good telephone etiquette
@ Typing & word processing skills

@ Ability to work with minimal
supervision

@ Literate in all MS Office programs -
Excel in particular

@ Knowledge of the Adobe suite of
programs a plus

Please TiC MC acy a eed

Nassau, Bahamas
Re: Secretary TB-0207



Daily Vol. EPS $

Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS S$

Last 12 Months Div $



: SS
closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. Januan: 1, 1994 = 100

*~9 February 2007
**- 31 January 2007
*** ~ 31 January 2007

**** - 31 January 2007



Sa

was said to be in discussions

with Bahamian contractors.

over the project’s construction.

Little is known about Mr
Bernstein, although a Google
search indicated that he and
his company, Island Develop-
ers, are a Florida-based outfit
involved in real estate devel-
opment, such as condos.and
hotels.

“Our company will employ
and train over 5;000 new
employees at the resort. The
southern Bahamas will come
to Rum Cay Island for employ-
ment. We are creating a
relaxed Island lifestyle with Six
Star Service and a most mem-
orable experience,” Mr Bern-
stein said.

Many people are likely to
question whether such a grand
project is feasible for Rum
Cay, given its small population
size, absence of infrastructure
and the presence already of
the Montana Holdings project
as the Government’s.‘anchor’.

“Even Nassau on New Prov-



and Citizenship,

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GUIRLANDE POLYNICE OF,

P.O. BOX 433, MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 22nd day of
February, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

in $4bn Rum Cay deal

idence Island, with 80 square -

miles, is only slightly twice the
size of Rum Cay Island at 30
square miles,” Mr Bernstein
said. .
““Our company staff an
engineers have spent the better
part of two years asking those
same questions, and we have
found that unlike most of the
cays in the Bahamas, Rum Cay
Island is really a small island
and will support several large
communities. Even in the

1800s ,the island’s history

shows that Rum Cay island
was the home of over 5,000
people without our modern
technology and was only sec-
ond to Nassau for the economy
of the Bahamas.

“We are developing a real
Bahamian Island with Bahami-
an architecture. With our Eco-
friendly and green develop-
ment plans, we will be able to
keep the Bahamian atmos-
phere and water clean and
beautiful throughout the
island.”













Legal Notice

NOTICE

RIBBON FALLS INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of RIBBON FALLS INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator) —









January 22, 2007.

Geraldine I Guest

Liquidator

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

MIDTOWN PROPERTIES LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section138 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
the dissolution of MIDTOWN PROPERTIES LIMITED
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the company has therefore been struck off the

Registrar. The date of completion of the dissolution was





Actuarial Analyst



Actuarial consulting firm seeks independent
thinkers with problem solving skills to join

its team.

Qualifications Required

O Degree in Actuarial Science or related
field

O 2 or more SOA actuarial exams
(or equivalent)

O Pensions or social security experience

O Proficiency in use of MS-Excel &
Word

Send resume to: ho

iZONOW(@ Orarwave¢

or fax to (242) 364-2470

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ww ee - =

“8 oe a

OMAP TUNED

<& es 6 @4L? TEU F

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Tete nea Ts

yO ae eee



THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 7B



‘INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

| ' | i LL Matsa)

_MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES

DUNDAS TOWN CROWN ALLOTMENT,
DUNDAS TOWN ABACO

All that parcel of land having an area of 14,400 sq. ft. being a portion of the Dundas Town Crown allotment this land is rectangular in shape with
dimensions of 80 ft by 180. Located on the above mentioned lot is a concrete block structure with dimensions of 27 x40. This house is an approximate
| 30 year old single family, residence comprising of 3-bedrooms, 1-bathroom, living/dining area and kitchen. This house is in fairly good condition for its

age with a projected future life of about 25 to 30 more years. The land rises above road level, to a height in excess of approximately 15ft above sea
level, with no likelihood of flooding in an hurricane. The grounds are sparsely landscaped.

Appraisal: $90,000.00





This house is located in Dundas Town Abaco which is adjacent to Marsh Harbour and is painted white trimmed teal green.

KENNEDY SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)

Lot no. 21 all utilities available 10 year old single story house, 3 bedroom 2 bathroom, living room, dining area, family room, kitchen, study, laundry
and an entry porch.

Appraisal: $188,406.00

Heading west along Soldier Road take main entrance to Kennedy Subdivision on the left, then take the 1st corner on the left then 1st right, house
is second on your right with garage. : og

CROWN ALLOTMENT NO. 77 MURPHY TOWN, ABACO

All that lot of land having an area of 6,790 sq. ft. being Crown allotment No. 77, of Murphy Town, Abaco Bahamas. Located on the subject property is a single storey single family concerete
building. This house is less than 5 year old and is in good condition with approximately 1,750 sq. ft of living space and contains 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, living room, dining, kitchen, laundry
and utility spaces. There is no significant improvements or deterioration evident. The property is very well drained and not susceptible to flooding. Landscaping efforts are still in remedial stages.
All major public and private utilities are situate within 100 ft of the subject site. Property bounderies are clearly delineated.

Appraisal: $167,580.00



The subject property is situate off the front street, Murphy Town, Abaco and is painted light yellow trimmed dark yellow.

st er ts ee
INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY - MUST SELL
Lot NO.83, Lower Bogue ELEUTHERA

Alll that piece parcel or lot of land being No. 83 on a plan on record in the department of Lands and Survey as plan no. 763 and comprising 21,674 sq. ft.
this site encompasses a 2 year old single storey home consisting of 2-bedrooms; 1 bathroom, living/dining room in one, and kitchen with a total living area
of 1,452 sq. ft. There is also a unit to this structure to be used as a bakery which could bring in an average of approximately $600 to $800 per month. There
is also 2 covered porch areas to the front of this building, with an area of 90.4 sq. ft. (one at the front entrance and one at the entrance to the bakery) this
home is in very good condition and appears to have been built in accordance with the plans and specifications as approved, and at a standard that was
acceptable to the Ministry of Public Works. The land is flat and properly landscaped.

Appraisal: $177,412.00

This property is situated on the Western side of the main Eleuthera Highway and approximately 1,200 ft Northerly from four-for-nothing Road in the Settlement of Lower Bogue.



LOT.NOQ..24, FRELIA SUBDIVISION

4 All that lot of land having an area of 6;724: sq: ft. belt t-No: 24 of the-subdivision known and designated as Frelia Subdivision, the said subdivision
situated in the Southwestern District of New Providence ahamas. This property is comprised of a 4 year old single storey residence consisting of approximately.
1,223 sq. ft of enclosed living space, with 3 bedrooms; 2 bathrooms, living/dining rooms, kitchen and utility room. The land is flat and slightly below the -
level of the roadway, but was brought up to road level by land fill to disallow the possibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods of the year. The
grounds are fairly kept, with minimal landscaping in place. The yard is open at the front and enclosed on its sides and back with 7ft chain linked fencing.

Remedial work required to the house includes repair of cracks in the partitions belts and columns.

ruse oan eee



Appraisal: $161,000.00



Travel south on Sir Milo Butler Highway until you get to Fire Trail Road. Turn left onto Fire Trail Road, go all the way to the last bend right, take first left then
first right the subject house is the 5th house right painted white trimmed yellow.







LOT 194 BOYD SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)

All that lot of land having an area of 6,400 sq. ft. being lot no 194 of the subdivision known as Boyd Subdivision, situated in the central district of New
Providence this property is comprised of a 35 year old single family, single story residence encompassing approximately 1,278 sq. ft. of enclosed living
area and inclusive of separate living and dining rooms, and an average size kitchen, three bedrooms, two bathrooms and an entry porch, of approximately
88 sq. ft. ventilation is by 2 wall unit air conditioners. The property is at grade and level with good drainage, landscaping is minimal, consisting of lawns
and shrubs in the front, the subject is enclosed with stone walls mounted with wrought iron and chain link fencing and a wrought iron gate in front there is
a 208 sq. ft. cement driveway leading to a single covered carport of 250 sq. ft. the subject site also has a concrete block storage shed measuring of
approximately 143 sq. ft.

Appraisal: $133,570.00

Traveling west on Boyd Road, turn left onto Foster Street, continue on Foster Street to the 4th corner right, (Roland Ave.) the subject property is the Sth
property on the.left side painted orange with red/white trim.



(Lot No. 62, Lower Bogue) ELEUTHERA

All that piece parcel or lot of land and improvements, in the settlement of Lower Bogue, North Eleuthera, being No. 62, comprising of about 34,210
sq. ft., this site encompasses a 12 year old single storney home comprising of 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, front room, dining, breakfast room, kitchen
and laundry room, with a total living area of approximately 2,342.06. Property also includes a double car garage, and front entrance with a total sq. ft.
of approximately 655.75. This home is approximately 85% completed. The property is well landscaped with crab grass, fiascos and some fruit trees.

Appraisal: $235,638.00





This property is situated on the western side of Eleuthera Highway in the settlement of Lower Bogue.

LOT NO. 370 GRENADA CLOSE GOLDEN GATES #2 (Nassau)

All that lot of land having an area of 5,500 sq. ft., being lot 370 Grenada Close of the subdivision known and designated as Golden Gates No. 2,
situated in the Southwestern district of New Providence Bahamas. This property is comprised of 25 years old single family residence consisting of
approximately 1,234 sq. ft., of enclosed living space with 3 bedrooms, two bathrooms, living/dining room, and kitchen. The Land is on a grade and
level and appear to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods. The grounds are fairly kept, with
improvements including driveway, walkway and low shrubs. Yard is enclosed with chain linked fencing to the sides and rear.

Appraisal: $149,405.60
Traveling south along Blue Hill Road, turn right at the Farmers Market just after passing the Golden Gates Shopping Center, take 1st corner left,

Windward Isles Way, then take 3rd corner right, St Thomas Road, then first left, grenada Crest, drive around the bend then 1st left again the subject
property is the 2nd property left house #4 painted peach trimmed black.

VACANT PROPERTIES

RAINBOW SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 3 BLOCK 27 (ELEUTHERA)

All that vacant lot of land having an area of approximately 14,052.59 sq. ft. being lot no. 3, block 27, of Rainbow Subdivision with residential zoning. This property is bounded
about 103.44 ft north by Queens Highway, and 137.02 ft. east and about 99.94 ft south of Rainbow Hill Circul 139.91 ft west, all utilities and services available.

Appraisal: $37,440.00









fe ee a

NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS (ELEUTHERA)

’

Lot #20 approximately 11,200 sq. ft., and bounded on North by Early Settler Drive and South by Deal Investment Ltd., this is a single family zoning and _50 ft., above sea level.
This site encompasses a foundation with plumbing and roughing inplace and well compacked quarry fill. The concrete floor has not been poured as yet. The foundation is 2,511
sq. ft. Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles east wardly of the Bluff Settlement. The said lot is vacant and a hill over looking the Atlantic Ocean. Appraisal: $41,275.00

i
ZA



; ieee ee For conditions of sale and other information contact CRN:
: Philip White @ 502-3077 email philip. white@scotiabank.com or Harry Collie @ 502-3034 ¢ email harry.collie@scotiabank.com e Fax 356-3851





| ; \\



PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007

THE TRIBUNE











"SOUS CHEFS.






Private club is seeking experienced full-time sous
chefs with a minimum of eight (8) years experience
in the culinary field. All Standard diplomas from the
Nassau Hotel Training College are demanded. The
applicants must have extensive knowledge in
management skills and excellent levels of cooking skills.








Interested persons should fax resumes to #362-6245
to the attention of:




THE DIRECTOR OF CUISINE
LYFORD CAY CLUB
Lyford Cay Drive
Nassau, Bahamas




FROM page 1B





POUCEEEEE G GE Ot GE AE Ge a nnn ann nn at on a 0 OO)



The Ansbacher Group, specialists in private banking, fiduciary services and wealth management,
has an opening in The Bahamas for a

SECURITIES ADMINISTRATOR/OFFICER

Primary Responsibilities:

'

= ‘To safeguard and accurately maintain records of all securities held

. ‘Proper execution and settlement of trades and/or any other securities transactions

= © To ensure all Securities transactions are accurately processed in the proper accounting period
= + Liaise between custodians and administrators to ensure client records are updated

= °To carry out all duties’as they relate to the proper administration of securities

= » Assist with the preparation of all securities related documentation

= * To accurately post all stock orders, non-cash transactions and dividends

= * Toupdate the trade log on a daily basis, to validate, post and settle trades

= * To assist with daily call-over routine

Secondary Responsibilities: =
* To carry out such duties as may be required from time to time =
* To serve as a back-up verifier of swifts =
* To assist with departmental cross training, pension payments and sales ledger when necessary =

=

Requirements:.

* Bachelors’ Degree in Banking/Accounting/Economics/Management with at least one year
experience in an offshore environment; or

* Relevant associate Degree with three years experience as a Junior Banking of Securities Officer

* Securities certification such as Series 7 or C.S.C.

* Highly proficient in Microsoft Office

* Ability to multi-task

Please send all resumes to the attention of.

. Human Resource Manager
= Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited
= P.O. Box N-7768
iS Nassau, Bahamas
a tye Fax: 325-0524
: E-mail: hrmanager@ansbacher.bs .
7

Deadline for all applications is March 2, 2007 e

eo eee ner ie Wwe at ti





MBA and MSc (Finance
Soe) Maio Assela
Betcrom eseatie (0),

Melee Melo UL
Sle ayo,

resource
development
interndtional

RDI USA .
801 N. Fairfax Street
| Suite 20]
Alexandria, VA 22314 USA

Tel: 1-703-549-5424

SO aOR RIE





could even be interpreted as
preventing companies from
dropping private group health
insurance for their employees
once NHI comes in.

The Tribune understands
that the Government clarifica-
tion said Clause 14 was
designed to protect both
employer and employee,
ensuring that the combination
of benefits available between
the NHI scheme and any sup-
plemental private insurance
package left no one - employer
or worker - in a worse off posi-
tion once the government
scheme came into being.

An employer is prevented
from arbitrarily tearing up an






- receptionist
- filing, typing correpondence
- banking & postal duties

- computer skills

motivated.
Salary commensurate with experience.







{80)



OFFICE ASSISTANT

To assist in General Office Work, Duties include, but not limited to:

- accounting; knowledge of Quickbooks a plus.

Ideal candidate will be honest, personable, responsible, and punctual, and self

Send resume to: Office Position, RO. Box CB-13835, Nassau, Bahamas

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |,
DONNA MARIE DEAN of the Western District of the
Island of New Providence intend to change my name to
MICHELLE DONNA MARIE MITCHELL. [f there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box SS-792, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
days after the date of publication of this notice. '

existing private group health
insurance package once NHI
comes into being, according to
the Government, eliminating
the possibility that workers
might be in a less well-off posi-
tion just covered by NHI.

Employers

In return, employers are not
bound by industrial agree-
ments or trade unions from
adjusting those group health
plans to meet the costs of NHI
contributions and eliminating
double payments. Ministeriai
approval, the Government is
saying, is needed to ensure this
equilibrium is maintained.
















MICHELLE














Coalition lawyers
study government
NHI clarification

Mr Rolle yesterday said the
Coalition was reviewing a let-
ter sent by Dr Nottage, and its
contents would influence its
plans as it moved forward in
relation to the NHI scheme.

The Coalition was preparing
“a well-documented plan” that
it would execute shortly,
releasing information such as
the Segal survey showing the
likely impact NHI’s introduc-
tion would have on the
Bahamian economy, business-
es, salaries and employees.

More information from the
Coalition’s petition is also like-
ly to be released, but it has still
to receive any of the economic
and actuarial studies it has
requested from government.

Correction

WO To ecm een tte
Me Tera ares
Data Protector Commis- -
sioner, The Tribune incor-
rectly referred to Mr
George E. Rodgers as E.
George Rodgers. We apol-
ogise for the error.












Public Hospitals Authority we

Advertisement

Manager III (Human Resources)
Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the post
of Human Resources Manager Ill, Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre, Public Hospitals

Authority.

Applicants must possess the following qualifications: -

Bachelors Degree in Business Administration. Management, or equivalent qualification (a
Masters degree would be an advantage); and at least three (3) years post qualification
experience in human resource management. Excellent oral written communication skills and

computer skills are essential.

Responsibilities Duties

The Human Resources Manager III is a part of the Human Resources Team at Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre, and shares responsibility for the day-to-day administration of human
resources transactions and services; to ensure that the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre human

resources policies and procedures, tran

business objectives.

sactions and services are aligned with Authority’s

Within this context, the Human Resources Manager III will be responsible for, but not limited

to:-

1. Processing recommendations for:

* Probationary appointments

* Confirmations in substantive posts

* Promotions and reclassification

* Benefits under the Authority’s policies
* Benefits under the law, eg. Employment Act and National Insurance Act
¢ Employee transfers and secondment

¢ Employee grievances

* Disciplinary actions and penalties

Involuntary and voluntary terminations

2. Liaising with the Payrolls Unit with matters relating to salaries adjustments and

financial clearances.

3. Managing the performances appraisal process for staff within assigned areas of responsibili-
ties, ensuring that evaluations are ongoing and appraisal forms are prepared, distributed and

reviewed.

Opportunities will also be given for involvement in human resources strategic functions such
as policies, developing an annual human resources plan, staff training and development, qual-
ity improvement initiatives To facilitate the Manager’s professional development and career

advancement within Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre.

Letters of application, resume, documentary evidence of qualifications and three (3) references
should be submitted through the head of your department, no later than 28th February, 2007, to
the Director Human Resources (Acting), Public Hospitals Authority P.O. Box N-8200, or Ist

Floor Corporate Office, Dockendale House, West Bay Street.

ALT ET ae TE Ee PTT



=" THE TRIBUNE
sm

~: FROM page 1B
s

expect, but in the end people
accepted the move towards a
revenue-based charge like the
hotels, rather than a fixed
charge.”

The percentages applied to
revenue charges levied on
marinas still had to be worked

-'- out, Mr Martini cautioned, as
--" the figures still needed to be
“'"'’ assessed properly.
cw “J thought we got a lot of
“<' really good feedback, and we’ll
- have to see what it means,” Mr
2"t Martini said.
is’ He added that the Govern-
“+” ment’s planners had “started
‘« + with draft a and ended up with
~"."" draft e”, and were now in the
-““ process of trying to prepare a
“« final document.
~ That report would then have
_. to be submitted to the Cabi-
“4 net, and Mr Martini said it was
2"» likely more consultation would
4? take place after that. He added
°“!° that his impression was that
“&° this current round of consul-
*« tation had gone well, whereas
criticism had been voiced of
other processes in the past.
The initial draft document
said the Bahamas was earning
a “very small portion of the
* potential” economic benefits
this nation’s expanding marina
+ and boating industry could
generate, with the sector cur-
rently generating $25 million
* in revenues per annum.
The draft policy document
- warned that the Bahamas’
‘ attraction for boaters, due to

SD esol
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feet
eu HEM we

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aie ey 4
aa “ a”

square miles of ocean, coupled
with the lack of space for new
_. marinas in Florida, had created
“es. “significant opportunities” that
“should not be missed”.
~ Boating generated some
$25.559 million in revenues for
the Bahamas annually, the
Ministry of Tourism, had cal-
culated, based on 38,875 visitor
~ room nights.
The earnings were broken
-.* down into:
* Room revenues - $5.818
million





te ye Boe
96 a

i ae & %



SS O88 oe LE Pe kG

ee:

Fe?

FO. FLL

FOR OAR EE ALLIS EHS RNAS 8 OO ETE era

a2 SHY CAD RA A ee ees aS

es @ a a7.>:

its 2,000 cays and 100,000 '

* Fuel - $6.206 million

* Meals and entertainment
- $9.929 million

* Dockage - $1.862 million

* Fees - $1.745 million

In addition, the boating and
marina industry had generated
$271,000 in revenues for the
Government during the first
10 months of 2006.

In assessing the tax revenues
derived from the marina and
boating industry, the draft pol-
icy document said the
Bahamas levied an annual
charge of $6.15 and $1.95 per
linear foot of dock space for
commercial and private slips
respectively in Family Island
marinas. For New Providence,
the figures were slightly higher,
standing at $6.32 and $2 for
commercial and private dock
space respectively.

But while collection rates for
these charges on New Provi-
dence were high, they were
lower for Family Island mari-
nas. For the first 10 months in
2006, the Port Controller’s
Office had collected $156,000
in charges from New Provi-
dence, but just $115,000 from
the Family Islands.

“Apparently very little” rev-
enues for business licence fees
were collected from marinas,
while there were no charges
for the use of seabed Crown
Land. The seabed was often
leased by the marina develop-
ers.

“There are no mooring or
anchoring charges other than
the $300 cruising permit and
the annual mooring charge of






PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, JULIO TYLER
SEBASTIAN PIERRE-LOUIS of the Island of New
Providence intend to change my
TYLER SEBASTIAN BROWN.
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box SS-792, Nassau, Bahamas.no later than thirty
(80) days after the date of Publication, of this notice...

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 9B

OTST Stats

$30 for private moorings and
$100 for commercial moorings
in the Family Islands, and $50
and $200 respectively in New
Providence,” the draft policy
document said.

To ensure the Bahamas
maximised tax revenues from
the marina and boating indus-
tries, the policy document sug-
gested that seabed land should
be leased, not sold, with the
leases based on appraised val-
ues and renewable indefinitely.
However, there would be five-
year rental reviews.

The more radical suggestion
is to collect real property taxes
on seabed land, and on the val-
ue of improvements made to
marina property over the
seabed.

The policy document sug-
gested that the annual mooring
charge be continued, with the
addition of a $1 per foot, per
night, mooring charge that
would not apply to Bahamian
residents or people mooring
one boat near their own prop-
erty.

The current charges of $1.95
and $2 per foot of dock space

. could be “waived for private

own-use holdings provided a
lease is being paid on the sea
bed”.

The document suggested
that commercial marinas
should pay the higher of the
$6.13 or $6.32 per foot of dock
space on the Family Islands
and New Providence respec-
tively, or 6 per cent of revenues
for the seabed lease, bringing
the Bahamas into line with the
taxes levied by Florida.






name to JULIO
If there are any





The BNT welcomes
you to an early
morning tour of the
Maillis Residence on
Adelaide Road.

Saturday, |
F ebruary 24 at 8: 30am

Hundreds of wild ducks and other wildlife live comfortably
amongst humans and domestic animals, fruit trees grow among
native species, making the Maillis residence a fine example of
living within the environment without making a major impact.
The Maillis property stretches from Adelaide Road to the sea,
consisting of wetlands, native coppice and pines, open areas
and the seashore.

The Maillis property is located one mile west of Adelaide Village
on the Adelaide Road, turn south into the gate at the green
fence. Drive slowly down the road inside the gate and park on
the grassy slope near the beach, past all the houses. If you
bring children, please keep them under control.

BNT Members and non-members are welcome, but we do
encourage participants to join.

For more information call the BNT at 393-1317
or e-mail: bnt@bahamasnationaltrust.org

March’s nature walk will be on Saturday 24th March, 8.30 am
at West Bay (Jaws Beach), Clifton.

Wear
comfortable
shoes for
walking and if
interested in
birding bring
binoculars





SEND RESUMES 10: ev ORO Teen fax to: 356 0333- AMSG Managing Director



Marinas ‘accept’ move to revenue based taxation

Give the Gift OF Travel with our new

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ea fics for details:
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for redemption towards airfare, car & hotel,
CRUISES, VIP Services, etc. Card can not be
redeemed for cash.

Give as a Gift for birthdays, anniversaries, etc.

Set up your own Gift Account with our new
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occasion, instead of presents you'll never use ...
have your friends & family come into Premier |
Travel and put money on your Travel Gift Card! |

#57 Coffins dvenvie® P.O. Bas N-9676* ‘Race Bahamas
eae i HIE EY





Sbarro the Italian Pizzeria is looking for a self motivated, responsible and mature individual to spear-
head the position of Marketing/Advertising & Public Relations. The candidate will have to perform the
following duties:

PRIMARY DUTIES:

¢ Assist the Managing Director lay out and compile company data, events and happenings in
a quarterly newsletter and website.
Assist the Managing Director to update the website on a as needed bases. i
Assist the Managing Director with the writing, recording and placing radio and newspaper |}
advertisements.
¢ Assist the Managing Director compile new information and alter existing information for
menus & menu boards.
Represent the company in public relations matters. and document the same.
Assist Managing Director in all other matters pertaining to Marketing/Advertising and Public
Relations. ;

SECONDARY DUTIES:

¢ Assist the Managing Director in accomplishing his daily tasks, e.g. handling and screening
calls, tabulating sales and payroll data, taking dictation and writing correspondence, etc.

Assist the Office Administrator with in-coming calls, posting sales, payroll data, compiling
and updating employee files, etc.

¢ Assist Office Administrator in compiling data for Director's and General Manager's meet-
ings.

@ Working side by side with Office Administrator to fill in when necessary.

SKILLS & APTITUDE:

The successful candidate must have excellent writing and speaking abilities:
Must be an assertive and socially pleasant person.

Must have excellent organizational abilities

Must be able to work independently of all others

Must be able and willing to work in a close office and multi cultural environment.

WORK EXPERIENCE & EDUCATION:

eet ¢ @ @

This position requires a person who has a sound background in writing and general communication
mediums. They must have excellent command of both written and spoken English and the comprehen-
sion skills to organize and communicate information in a clear and concise manner. The candidate must |f
have a solid secondary education and at least four years experience or a Bachelor's Degree and at

least two years experience in the field of Marketing/Advertising & Public Relations.

Salary is competitive. Bonuses are available and based purely on performance, Medical Health
coverage is also available.



\\



PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007



TSN si ee ity ) abe
A reminder for firms on Data Protection Act

Oceanrtin Gahamas Ltd.

Retirement Rd., P.O. Box SS-19003, Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 394 6874, Fax: (242) 394 6873

Ocean Air Bahamas Ltd.
T/A Bahamas Freight Forwarders
In affiliation with IBC Airways, OceanAir Bahamas Ltd., is pleased to

announce it’s new Cargo Air Service:



¢ Daily Scheduled Flights from Miami International Airport
* Fully Bonded Facilities with US Customs on site

¢ Connected from all Major US cities

e Large or Small Shipments-we can handle it

¢ Full Charters

° Shipment of Perishable Goods
Nassau Address:

US address: Lynden Pindling Int’! Airport
5600 NW 36th Street Customs Bonded Warehouse Bldg.
Miami, FL 33166 Office #47. .

Tel. 888-742-5422
Fax. 305-639-6478
Contact: Jose Olivera 305-871-9100

Tel. 242-394-6874/5
Fax 242-377-1798
Contact: J. Darville or D. Skolnick

OceanAir Bahamas...The Proven Quality you expect in lfandling your Cargo!



ANY




LEVITICUS “UNCLE LOU” ADDER

FUN RUN/WALK
ON

- SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2007
AT ,



THE 3rd ANNUAL
EY

PRIN



Starting from St. Augustine’s College (Pool) (Route - west on Bernard
Road, north of Village Road to Montague Beach making a full circle then
return south on Village Road, east on Bernard Road to SAC Pool)

ENTRY FEE WITH T-SHIRT:
$15.00 Adults ¢ $5.00 Students

UNDER 12, 13-20; 21-30, 31-40, 41-50 AND OVER 50
Trophies will be given to the Ist and 2nd place finishers of each category.

FOR REGISTRATION FORMS AND PAYMENTS
PLEASE CONTACT
Jobina Bain (SAC) 324-1511
Geno Nairn 397-2230
Yvette Barr 502-5783
















VACANCY FOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT MECHANICS




Qualifications & Experience

° Minimum five (5) years in Heavy Equipment Mechanics
¢ Knowledge of diesel and gasoline engines

¢ Knowledge of hydraulic systems

* Good understanding of 24 V Electrical Systems

¢ Experience in wire rope rigging would be a plus

¢ Welding experience also would be a plus







¢ Perform repairs and preventive maintenance on various heavy
equipment.





¢ Good physical condition
e Able to withstand constant exposure to the weather conditions
¢ Must be willing to work shift schedules

¢ Must be willing to work at heights





Company offers good benefits and salary is commensurate with ex-
perience and qualifications. Interested persons are invited to submit a
resume’ by February 28, 2007 to the following person:





Ramon Taylor
Tropical Shipping Limited
John Alfred Dock
East Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas ©
Phon

PSE:

















FROM page 2B

the security or maintenance of
good order in a prison or
detention centre.

However, the right of access
does not apply to legislation
for the protection of individu-
als against financial loss arising
from dishonesty or malprac-

‘ tice; legal professional privi-

lege; matters relating to the
protection of the international
relations of the country; and
statistical, research, or back-
up data.

Section 10 of the Data Pro-
tection Act provides an indi-
vidual with the right of rectifi-
cation or erasure for personal
data that is inaccurate.

An individual is also afford-
ed the right to prohibit the pro-
cessing of personal data for the
purposes of direct marketing,
under Section 11 of the Data
Protection Act.

The data controller has a
statutory duty of care to the
data subject, imposed upon
him by Section 12 of the Data
Protection Act. The data sub-
ject may bring a lawsuit against
the data controller for breach
of this statutory duty of care,
where applicable.

Notwithstanding the fact
that the Data Protection Act
provides protection for the dis-
closure of personal data gen-
erally, under Section 13 of the

Act, such protection may be
overridden in the following cir-
cumstances:

* In the interest of national
security as determined by the
Commissioner of Police or the
Commodore of the Defence
Force.

* For the purposes of crimi-
nal investigations, prosecutions
and the collection of taxes,
duties and similar levies

* The protection of interna-
tional relations of the country.

* To prevent injury, damage
or loss to person or property;

* Any disclosure required by
enactment of law or the
enforcement of a court order.

* Any disclosure required
for the purpose of obtaining
legal advice or required as part
of legal proceedings.

* Any disclosure made to
the data subject concerned, or
to a person acting on his
behalf.

* Any disclosure made at the
request or consent of the data
subject, or a person acting on
his behalf.

Based on the foregoing legal

THE TRIBUNE

considerations and in light of

y
*

¢
a
¢
*
e+
*

oe »

the preventative and protec- '

tive nature of the Act, busi-
nesses, particularly those who

may have limited knowledge ‘ -'

or resources with regard to

information technology and e- +

commerce, would do well to
provide adequate training,
internal controls and monitor-

ing to ensure full and proper “|

compliance with this e-com-
merce legislation, the minimi-

sation and elimination of abuse ‘

and misuse of customer infor-
mation, and the protection of
its customers’ right to privacy.

© 2007. Tyrone L. E.

Fitzgerald. All rights reserved. \

NB: The information con-
tained in this article does not
constitute nor is it a substitute
for legal advice. Persons read-
ing this article and/or column,

generally, are encouraged to ~~”

seek the relevant legal advice
and assistance regarding issues
that may affect them and may
relate to the information pre-
sented.

Tyrone L. E. Fitzgerald is an
attorney in the Chambers of
Fitzgerald & Fitzgerald.
Should you have any com-

ments or enquiries, you may |

contact Mr Fitzgerald at Suite

212, Lagoon Court Building, '
Olde Towne Mall at Sandy- ~

port, West Bay St, or at 327-
3347 (telephone)

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY —

Awell established Pharmaceutical Company is seekingto hire the

following individual:~



ACCOUNTS CLERK >

Experience Skills:

- Amininium of three G) years experience in the field.
- Excellent organizational and interpersonal skills

- Excellent communication skills

+ Excellent command of English Language
- Proficiency in Microsoft Work and Excel.

ow” Ability to work with minimal supervision

All interested persons should mail their resume to:

Chief Financial Officer

Commonwealth Drugs & Medical Supplies Co. Ltd

PO.Box N-1145
Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: (242) 323-2871

Email: ksherman@commonwealthdrgs.com

Only applicants who meet the requirements will be contacted.






oy, y QW

AG

upscale mini mall, offices BU Le
ey & Church Streets near, Paradise Island
long bus routes, lots of parking. |

rt 3 854 sq ft- Beauty RP easel
ihe Office Spaces ec Co Pre a a
ALL ed ACR bedroom 2 2 bath apartments






Le

MOND

‘Ba4i-7

CONTACT




AY-FRIDAY ° 9AM-5PM
fé 3225-0450
AS4 ater 6pm




























eRe we

‘ne @' >

a

as e+ he %



THE TRIBUNE



FROM page 1B

South Riding Point had bene-
fited from a one-off $1.1 mil-
lion gain from insurance recoy-
eries relating to the 2004 hur-
ricane season, and the sale of
product inventory.
Meanwhile, Ken Russell, the
FNM MP for High Rock, said
he would raise the Beka

‘Development project and the °

Government’s plans for Crown
Land in eastern Grand
Bahama with Prime Minister
Perry Christie next week dur-
ing Opposition Day in the
House of Assembly.

The Government has been
silent on the project since The
Tribune’s article on Tuesday,
but has not denied the details
in the document that were
reported by this newspaper, .

“I will question the Prime .

Minister on it next week,” Mr
Russell said. “I will raise the
question on the House floor
so that the whole Bahamas
can know what the Govern-
ment intends to do with east-
ern Grand Bahama, and what
people in eastern Grand
Bahama feel about it,

“I will try to find out from
the Prime Minister why they’re
doing this with the land in east-

ern Grand Bahama, when the
residents have not been sorted
out, Many people in eastern
Grand Bahama are young and
need property,”

Mr Russell, whose High
Rock constituency is in east-
ern Grand Bahama, said the
reaction from people living in
the area to news of the pro-
posed project was that they
“are ready to get up in arms
and demonstrate over it, as
they believe the Government
should not be selling the
Crown Land in eastern Grand
Bahama”.

Added

He added that many resi-
dents had’paid for Crown
Land in the area, but no sur-
veys had been done or deeds
received, and “now they’re
reading in the newspapers that
the Government wants to give
them [the developers] all the
Crown Land”

“We have to have some land
set aside for our people, We
should not be causing our peo-
ple to pay $500,000 for Jand;
they should be getting it at
$2,500 [per acre]”,

Mr Russell added of South
Riding Point Holdings: “I think
they’re very concerned,

BUSINESS

‘Government harbour lease frustrates firm’s expansion

because the Government
seems to be cancelling their
agreement now for the future,

“That means the Govern-
ment has, in effect, terminated
the lease. It’s just a matter of
time before it’s finalised.”

Beka Development LLC
submitted its proposal to the
Government in December
through its Evel ye sub-
sidiary, Bahamas Golden
Beach Ltd, The project
includes a tie-up with Omni
Hotels as the hotel operator,
and Foxwoods Development
Company as the casino opera-
tor,

A document posted on the
Internet by its real estate part-
ners, Inifinity Partners, said the
Government “has committed
a contingent master casino
licence for the remainder of
the island” to the developers of
the eastern Grand Bahama
project.

In addition, the Infinity Part-
ners posting said that Beka was
seeking a Heads of Agreement
that provided it with the same
level of incentives as Kerzner
International had obtained for
its Phase III project; Baha Mar
was seeking for its $2.4 billion
Cable Beach redevelopment;
and Ginn Clubs & Resorts was
receiving for its $4.9 billion
West End investment.



The document said that with
the general election scheduled
for early May, the Government
“would like to complete all the
approvals and make a formal
announcement at least 30 days
in advance”,

Government

It added: “The Government
has allowed Bahamas Golden
Beach to be the master devel-
oper of the entire east end of
the island, This includes an
area exceeding 100 square
miles,

“The Government is willing
to sell in the future to Bahamas
Golden Beach Ltd substan-
tially all of its east Crown Land
at the same price per acre as
the initial site,”

The Infinity Partners post-
ing said one condition that
Beka had to fulfil to obtain the
master casino licence was a
“willingness to purchase gov-

ernment Crown Land at the .

Golden Beach site for a mini-
mum of $5 million ($2,800 per
acre)",

It is unclear, though,
whether Beka will receive what
it is seeking and, indeed,
whether the company’s interest
is serious and an agreement
can be concluded with the
Government,

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that HENRY TILME OF

MAGARETA ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and

that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
| and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
| days from the 15th day of February, 2007 to the Minister
+ responsible for Nationality and Cilizenenin P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

i

POSITION AVAILABLE
ze Auto Parts Store seeks receptionist/sales clerk must be
2 , Sat i) work on weekends. Applicant must be able

‘work on Or initiative, iy ons) STURT TLC a sonal
skills. .

ore eat MET ey p P.O. Box

RO , Box E
Nawal, Rahamas':
PH: SCHEELE (4387)

DELL LCD Monitor 15°$224 Wireless Keyboard
| DELL LCD Monitor 17° $290

dducetional faunales

Belkin Wirless
Software for Kids ,

Router

PRICEWAERHOUSE(COPERS
161100 OP AVAILABL aXe
ASSOCIATES -

EricewatertionseCocpers has vacancies for staff accountants to
pursue a programme of training culminating in a professional
y accountancy qualification. Prospective candidates should have a
graduate or undergraduate degree in accounting with a cumulative
“@ grade point average that exemplifies your success as an achiever and
f leader.

4 Applications are being accepted for the 2007 Programme.

i Expectant May/June 2007 graduates are also encouraged to
} apply.

Successful candidates will undergo a period of rigorous training,

both academically and on the job, with the objective of developing

professional skills. Much of the on-the-job experience will. entail

auditing the financial statements of entities in the financial services

Industries such as banks, trust companies, investment funds and

insurance companies. The positions offer excellent salaries and
f promotional opportunities, and benefits ‘include medical
f insurance and provident fund, Also, as a team member of
j PricewaterhouseCoopers there are opportunities to work in another
; country where PricewaterhouseCoopers has an office,

q Please submit your application, with a current curriculum vitae and
a'copy of your most recent transcript, before 31 March 2007 to:

Human Resources Partner
* PricewaterhouseCoopers
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, The Bahamas



aU Nt FOR SALE

aT Ae aTeiee Fashion Retail
_ Business. Well known and
respected worldwide Franchise.
20 years at same prime location.

Email: b.inquiries@gmail.com



3 We, ls omne Ue dened ;

a » Retention Pond

* Jogging Tralls & Playground
ae Court
bos & rom

Tel: 325-6447/9 or 325-6456

UBS

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd. a leading international Trust Company is
seeking to employ,

MIS Specialist & Team Leader

Duties to include:
Guide development of system to provide consistent and coherent
management information
Enhance and redesign the existing database and workflow
models to meet the business requirements
Develop and implement solutions in MS Access
Support and testing of the developed system and rapidly provide
solutions to any defects that are detected
Take ownership and responsibility for the analysis and design
phases of one or more of the project deliveries - producing
results within the agreed timeframes
Collaborate on project to build an intranet site to support
business processes
Maintain interface to our international internal partners in
Switzerland and the rest of the world
Lead MIS team.
Provide initial training and second level support to users

This position is open to candidates with the following minimum
requirements:

Proven experience in the following key areas;
Training
Relational database modelling \
Database modelling using MS Access and understanding of user
interface design
Database reengineering and reverse engineering
Process modelling
Software development lifecycles
Knowledge of VB, ODBC, SQL, WIP (Vignette V/5 e-Business
Platform using Oracle 8.1.7 as the data repository)
Business analyst
Team Leader
Trust operations

In addition, the successful candidate should:
e® Have strong analytical skills
e Be fluent in English and German

Bahamian Nationals need only apply to;
hrbahamas@ubs.com

or

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources

P,O, Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 11B



Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods, Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award,

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story,

To conduct daily analysis of water facility |

Call 326-8585 for appointment
Serious inquires only

Se a

erty

% A it A Mh

JOB FAIR

held on

March Ist and March 2nd 2007,
Place: Bahamas Hotel Training College
Time: 9:00am until 2:00pm daily

EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES:

Accountant
. Reservation Clerk
Special Events Coordinator
Line Cook
Waiters / Waitress
Bus Boys
Bartenders
Maintenance
Security

TEACHING VACANCY

The Anglican Central Authority invites
applications from qualified Teachers for
positions available at St, John’s College, St. Anne’s
School, Bishop Michael Eldon School, Freeport, and
St. Andrew's School, Exuma,

PRIMARY TEACHERS
LIBRARIAN
SCIENCE
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PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Only qualified Teachers, with Bachelor or Master
Degrees from an accredited University or College and
Teaching Certificate need apply.

For further details and application forms, please
contact the Anglican Central Education
Authority on Sands Road at telephone
(242) 322-3015/6/7,

Letters of application and/or completed application
forms with copies of required documents must be sent
by Friday, March 9th, 2007 to the Anglican Education

Department addressed to: -

The Director of Education
Anglican Central Education Authority
P.O, Box N-656
Nassau, Bahamas





















~

— o....... : : THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY FEBRUARY 22ND, 2067)







































































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; | i N at 6-42 Knots
| : ; NW at 7-14 Knots
| / N at 8-16 Knots
: i! , ; : . WNW at 7-14 Knots
: _ Plenty of sunshine. Sunny to partly ; | Rather cloudy. The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the NNW at 8-16 Knots
i i cloudy and breezy. / greater the need for eye and - protection.
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5 elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold 2 person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. i W52p.m 29 52ipm 03
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Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday’ © Saturday 1255am. 27 72am. O02 ej
Temperature, 1:20pm. 21 7:20pm. 00 Sef
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Low: 63° F/17°C 3 is
AccuWeather.com «
All forecasts and maps provided by
= AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.
ed
Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today's merits
highs and tonights's lows. 14/-10
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Volume: 103 No.77

GAH Ca ema Uy Ut

PLP ‘playing race card

RRITQ —s Um tovin’ it.

79F
65F

MOSTLY
oe SUNNY



FNM deputy leader
Brent Symonette
hits out over
references to UBP

@ By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE PLP is playing the “race
card” to black Bahamians
because they want to spread dis-
content among the people,
FNM deputy leader Brent
Symonette said yesterday.»

In an exclusive interview with
The Tribune, the MP for Mon-
tagu said there was no question
in his mind that the PLP is play-
ing the race card, with its con-
stant references to the United
Bahamian Party (UBP).

However, he said, the PLP’s
strategy: will fail because most
Bahamians have moved beyond
the question of race. ;

This is not the first time the
government has been accused
of using race to win support
from voters.

At the PLP national conven-
tion in November, 2005, several
references were made to the
Bahamas “going back there” if
the FNM leadership team of
Hubert Ingraham and Brent
Symonette were to be elected.

And, while not referred to by
name, Mr Symonette is gener-
ally considered to be the target
of these comments as he is the
son of former UBP premier Sir
Roland Symonette, and brother
of Speaker of the House, the
late Bobby Symonette.

During: his convention

. speech, Minister of Agriculture

and Fisheries’ Alfred Gray said:
“Fellow delegates, could you
imagine, God forbid, that they





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should win, and something were
to happen to Hubbigity, that we
would be back in the hands of
the UBP? Please don’t let me
imagine that.”

In addition, at the PLP rally
this week, Foreign Affairs Min-
ister Fred Mitchell alleged that
FNM leader Hubert Ingraham
would turn over the govern-
ment to ‘the UBP heir’, Brent
Symonette, if Mr Ingraham is
returned to government.

And Prime Minister Christie
said Mr Ingraham was brought
out of retirement by forces
“who cannot let the Progressive
Liberal Party and the progres-

sive forces,” control the

Bahamas.

However, according to Mr
Symonette: “The Bahamas of
2007 has developed way beyond
the question of the race card
that the PLP is trying to use ina
very low-down way to hold on
to power.”

Mr Symonette said that Mr

Mitchell’s attack on him showed
that he is a “desperate man”
who would do anything to win
his seat.

“T’ve said on numerous occa-
sions that I have no intention
whatsoever to take over or oust
Mr Hubert Ingraham. Hubert
Ingraham is my leader, he is the
FNM leader, he is Tommy
Turnquest’s leader and I sup-
port him 100 per cent,”
explained Mr Symonette.

He said ‘there are some white
Bahamians who are’ “very

SEE page 14




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= /n Lhe Tribune

Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION



bee RESTS

HURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007
” ‘ a ‘it
HET ete ht

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Religion section



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PRICE — 75¢

INSIDE TODAY

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i?



@ RICHARD ROBELLO, one of the finalists of a Trimspa contest, came all the way from Hawaii this week to put flow-
ers at the gates of Horizons. Mr Robello had lost 40 pounds and was eager to meet with “the person who inspired him to

do so.” Anna Nicole Smith, the spokesperson for Trimspa, died earlier this month.
(Photo: Ana Bianca Marin)



PM: Ingraham not

the only person to |

advise Deputy PM

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter

FORMER Prime Minister :
Hubert Ingraham should not :
flatter himself into thinking that :
he was the only person invited to }
advise Cynthia Pratt during :
Prime Minister Perry Christie’s ;

illness, the country’s leader said

~ yesterday.
Mr Christie, who was respond-_
ing to remarks by the FNM }

ham had showed just how
incredibly “naive and arrogant” ;

he is.

that I invited to be of assistance

to Cynthia ‘Mother’ Pratt when :

she served as acting prime min- }
: I By KARIN HERIG

Tribune Staff Reporter

A MONTH after the US’s new passport rule
came into effect there still has been no notification
by authorities about the end of the flexible imple-

ister,” Mr Christie said.

“There were no less than two }
dozen other persons in our com- }
munity of whom I made the :
same ' request, including retired }
politicians on both sides of the :
political divide, business leaders :
and, of course, spiritual figures. ;

SEE page 14



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Total Fat.........6.0g



“Surely Mr Ingraham does not
think that he was the only person:

Authorities yet to give notification on passport rule

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Attorney General:
rally was mainly
a family reunion

: By KARIN HERIG

Tribune Staff Reporter

SEE page 14

mentation.

Observers are now saying that no news on the

“Mr Ingraham, therefore, } Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative (WHTI)

should. not flatter himself into :

“is good news.”

: The US Embassy stated yesterday that Customs
: and Board Protection previously indicated to all

Carbs........479
Dietary Fiber...4g
PrOteIM eoseresereer B4G

iti

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Morton Salt
workers go
on strike

RESPONDING to criti- | @ By ALISON LOWE

: cism that the PLP engaged : |
in name-calling rather than ;
speaking to the country’s pri- :

bistne ation ontohcineres : Wellington Francis told reporters
continue to be her party’s }
: focus, but that the event in :
leader at a mass rally on R M } Pinewood Park was mainly a }
Bailey Park, said that Mr Ingra- “family reunion,” i

- The aim of the rally, she :

management.

SEE page 14

Bomb scare
Closes COB

THE College of the Bahamas

: was closed yesterday as a bomb
? scare caused school officials to
:, evacuate the premises.
Tribune Staff Reporter :
: around 3.50pm they were told that
EIGHTY to 90 Morton Salt :
;. ; Workers went on strike yester-
mary concerns at Tuesday's : gay morning in Inagua after :
: Tally, Attorney General : being subject to what they felt:
i Allyson Maynard-Gibson i
i said that those issues will

Security officials said that

there was an individual walking
around the campus with
explosives, targeting two lectur-
ers.

COB’s Director of Security

: that the appropriate agencies were

: ii i lled to the scene
Mr Obie Ferguson, legal ; immediately ca = a
; counsel for the group, said they : ee BS ere
; were frustrated after being told i § :

in an early morning meeting i firmed that no explosive devices

: were found and that classes were
‘ } now back in session.

However, school officials con-

airlines that they will provide “ample notice before

moving to more rigorous enforcement of the new
» documentation requirements.”
“That notification has not yet been given.”
When the airlines receive that notification, it is
expected that a 30-day period will be given until

the WHTI is strictly enforced.

US Ambassador John Rood and Tourism Min-
ister Obie Wilchcombe earlier this month held a

joint press conference emphasising that the WHTI



SEE page 14








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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, FEBRUAN)

SSS LE Ld HU





.



PRG Sa ata aw

Mackey St. 393-5684 | Thompson Blvd 328-1164 |

Town, over Rev CB Moss (right)
m@ By BRENT DEAN

DR Bernard Nottage will be
the PLP candidate for the Bain
and Grant’s Town constituen-
cy according to his supporters —
who waved placards and wore t-
shirts bearing his image at the
PLP rally on Tuesday.

Dr Nottage’s supporters
claim he and not Rev C B Moss
will be representing the party
for the constituency in the
upcoming general election.

The supporters stated that the
shits and posters they wore, dis-
playing him as the PLP candi-
date for Bain and Grant’s
Town, were printed and dis-
tributed to constituents only

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Center Tel: ¥93-3882 © Mall at Marathon
& Marathon Mall 394-5180



| Nottage rumoured |

as PLP candidate |
to replace Robetts |

ies

8 BERNARD Nottage (left) has been touted as the next candidate for Bain and Grant’s

within the last few days.

Commentators suggest that
the public display at the PLP
rally in the Pinewood con-
stituency indicates that Dr
Nottage has received the par-
ty nomination, and all that he
awaits. is the official
announcement of this fact
from the PM when he decides
to formally announce his slate
of candidates.

The decision to give Dr
Nottage this nomination may
finally end the hopes of Rev
CB Moss to represent the
constituency under the PLP
banner.

Rev Moss had expected to
receive the PLP’s nomination
for the area after the current
representative, Bradley
Roberts announced that he
would step down halfway
through the PLP’s current
term in office.

At a thanksgiving service
for Rev Moss in August 2002,
Mr Roberts told those attend-

Are We

r R )
\ a io

Center Tel:

RadioShack
Harbour Bay Shoppi
93-3682 ©



ing: “As my days wind down
as representative for the Bain
and Grant’s Town con-
stituencies, it is my hope that
the people will welcome Rev
CB Moss as my recommen-
dation to replace me.”

However, Mr Roberts sub-
sequently decided to continue
on in office for the full length
of the PLP’s mandate. He
stated that the PM requested
him to continue to serve on as
a minister, because he was
too valuable for the govern-
ment to lose.

In response to Mr Roberts’ .

decision to continue on as a
member of parliament, Rev
Moss recently stated:

“There is no need for me
to agree to a new deal when
the old deal is still in effect.
Because a contract is delayed
does not mean it is can-
celled.”

Rev Moss was unavailable
for comment up to press time
yesterday. ;

& Marathon Mall









only used in American Eng-
; lish. ;

AN ao
ae



THE TRIBUNE



In brief

Boat crew
charged with
smuggling
cocaine

A HAITIAN-AMERI-

CAN boat captain and nine
other Haitian crewmembers

have been charged in connec-

tion with the discovery of
almost $1 million worth of

illegal drugs at Lucayan Har-

bour.

Arraigned were captain
Ray Francis, 47, of Miami
Gardens, Florida, along with
Edmond Cylien, 46, Juan
Mendoza, 40, Wislet Cadet,
31, Harold Jean, 43, Telina
Excellent, 47, Eddie

Matthew, 43, Vilmar Zila, 66,

Jacques Cothiere, 35, and

Jean Lubin, 57, all of Haiti.

It is alleged that the group

of the Haitians were found in
possession of 30kg of cocaine

— with an estimated street

value of $900,000 — onboard a

freighter that was docked at
Lucayan Harbour.

The accused Haitian
nationals pleaded not guilty
to the charges of possession
of dangerous drugs with
intent to supply, conspiracy
to possess dangerous drugs
and conspiracy to import
dangerous drugs.

Magistrate Carolita Bethel

remanded the group to cus-
tody at Her Majesty’s Fox
Hill Prison until February 27
when they will return to
court for a bail hearing. The
10 defendants were not rep-
resented by legal counsel.

Paedophile,
not pedophile

SOME readers complained

yesterday that the word ‘pae-
: dophile’ in our Page One

: headline was misspelt. Not

: SO

Paedophile is the correct

English spelling of the word
: meaning ‘child molester’.

The spelling ‘pedophile’ is











NY

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us ik



East St. North
Tel: 356-2217
Mall at Marathon
394-5180



ED:





TRIBUNE SPOt

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6B _| THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007 _



From Miami Herald Wire Services

Liverpool came from
behind to win 2-1 at defending
champion Barcelona on
Wednesday while runaway
Italian leader Inter Milan was
held to a 2-2 draw by another
Spanish club, Valencia, in the
European Champions League.

Jose Mourinho’s Chelsea
team held his former club, FC
Porto, to a 1-1 draw, and Lyon
— on course for a sixth con-
secutive French league title —
was held to a 0-0 tie at AS
Roma.

In a matchup of the past
two winners of European soc-
cer’s most prestigious compe-
tition, Craig Bellamy scored
one goal and set up the second
for John Arne Riise at Barce-
lona’s Camp Nou after Deco
had given the home team a
14th-minute lead.

The goals for Bellamy and
Riise came less than a week
after reports that the Welsh

‘striker hit the Norwegian

defender on the legs with a

golf club after a drinking binge
at a Portuguese hotel.

Barcelona went ahead after
some trademark footwork by
Ronaldinho released Gian-
luca Zambrotta down the
left. The Italian raced past a
defender and crossed from the
left for Deco to arrive
unmarked and head inside the
far post.

Bellamy equalized two min-
utes before halftime when Liv-
erpool earned a free kick and
the Welsh striker eluded his
markers to head Steve Fin-
nan’s cross goalwar: ial
keeper Victor Valdes didn't
stop it until it had crossed the
line, then fumbled it away: and
Dirk Kuyt drilled the loose
ball into the net with the offi-
cials already signalling a goal
for Bellamy’s effort.

Bellamy celebrated his goal

with an imaginary golf swing. *
Kuyt missed a close-ranget

header in the 68th after Valdes
was penalized for handling

SPORTS ROUNDUP



INTERNATIONAL EDITION



SOCCER

Liverpool outlasts Barcelona

MUTSU KAWAMORI/AP
WAY TO GO, MAN: Liverpool’s
Craig Bellamy, right, gets a
hand from teammate Dirk
Kuyt after Bellamy’s goal.

what the referee ruled as a
backpass.

At the other end, Liverpool
goalkeeper Pepe Reina
blocked a shot from Javier
Saviola and Steve Finnan
deflected Lionel Messi’s
follow-up over the bar.

Liverpool moved ahead in
the 74th when Valdes blocked
a close-range shot from Kuyt
and, as the rebound dropped
loose, Bellamy played a side-
ways pass to Riise, who ham-
mered it into the roof of the
net with his weaker right foot.

Mourinho returned to the
club he guided to the Champi-
ons League title two seasons
ago. He also led the Portu-
guese side to the UEFA Cup
and two d tic league titles.

Raul Meireles volleyed

Porto ahead in the 12th minute -

while Chelsea captain John
Terry was off the field getting
treatment for a calf-muscle
injury. Terry will miss the
League Cup final against Arse-
nal. The center back, who

“reé¢ently returned from a long
“spell out after back surgery
followed by the calf-muscle.

problem, lasted only U1 min-

Peyton takes
a cut to save
Colts money

From Miami Herald Wire Services

Peyton Manning has
'-agreed to restructure his con-
tract with the Indianapolis
Colts to save the team nearly
$8 million in salary-cap space.

The Super Bowl MVP was
to receive a $10 million roster
bonus during the offseason but
by converting the money into
a regular signing bonus, the
Colts can prorate that amount
over the remaining four years
of his deal. That saves India-
napolis space under the cap,
which is $109 million.

The restructuring was dis-
closed to The Associated
Press on Wednesday by a per-
son familiar with the negotia-
tions who spoke on condition
of anonymity because the deal
had not yet been signed.

Colts spokesman Craig
Kelley said the team had no
comment.

Manning signed a $98 mil-
lion contract in March 2004,
the season after he shared the
league’s MVP award with
Steve McNair. He followed
that with a record-setting 2004
season in which he threw 49
touchdown passes and earned
his second consecutive league
MVP award.

In 2005, Manning guided
the Colts to a 13-0 record and
the AFC’s No. 1 seed before
losing in the divisional round
of the playoffs to eventual
Super Bowl champion Pitts-
burgh.

But this season, Manning
showed more patience in
throwing short and relying on
his ground game, using that
combination to bring the Colts
their first Super Bowl title
since moving to Indianapolis



in 1984.

e@ Elsewhere: Colts run-
ning back Dominic Rhodes’
initial court appearance on a
drunken driving charge was
postponed to Monday after
prosecutors did not receive
paperwork from the arresting
officer.

e Around the league:
Wide receiver Jerry Porter is
ready for a new start with the
Oakland Raiders. Aiter a diffi-
cult 2006 season when he
clashed with coach Art Shell
and rarely got on the field,
Porter announced he is chang-
ing his uniform number from
84 to 81 in order to put last
season behind him and get off
on the right foot with new
coach Lane Kiffin. .. . Defen-
sive tackle Vonnie Holliday
signed a four-year, $20 million
contract to stay with the
Miami Dolphins. The deal
includes a signing bonus of
nearly $7 million. ... Buffalo
Bills cornerback Terrence
McGee filed a lawsuit Tues-
day accusing his former finan-
cial adviser of funneling more
than $1 million into unautho-
rized investments... . Cincin-
nati Bengals linebacker Odell
Thurman pleaded no contest
to driving drunk last Septem-
ber and said he was undergo-
ing treatment for alcohol
abuse. ... The New York Jets
released veteran running back
Kevan Barlow after the least-
productive season of Barlow’s
career. He ran for a career-low
370 yards — third on the team
— and averaged just 2.8 yards
per carry. Also, the Jets
released offensive lineman
Trey Teague, re-signed cor-
nerback Hank Poteat, and

utes against Porto before dam-

aging ankle ligaments.
Andriy Shevchenko

equalized four minutes later

when he took a pass from.

Arjen Robben and raced
clear of the Porto defense to
score.

Inter led twice at home
before Valencia rallied. Este-
ban Cambiasso scored in the
29th minute, but David Villa
equalized in the 64th. Brazilian
Maicon restored the lead in
the 76th, but David Silva
earned a valuable draw with a
second equalizer with three
minutes remaining.

Lyon’s Brazilian midfielder
Juninho hit the post off a
deflected shot in the eighth
minute in Rome and English
referee Mike Riley handed out
11 yellow cards, eight of them
to AS Roma.

The second legs are sched-
uled in two weeks.

ELSEWHERE

e France: UEFA opened
an investigation into the trou-
ble on and off the field during
Lille’s Champions League loss
to Manchester United.

Man United fans said they
were crushed against high
fences at Tuesday’s game, and
manager Alex Ferguson was
furious that Lille’s coaching
staff waved players off the
field after Ryan Giggs scored
in the 1-0 victory.

“UEFA has officially
opened an investigation into
events at the UEFA Champi-
ons League first knockout
round first-leg match,” UEFA
said.

UEFA will look at whether
Lille breached safety and secu-
rity instructions, and alleged
improper conduct of both sets
of fans. The matter will be dis-
cussed at the UEFA Control
and Disciplinary Body’s next
meeting on March 22.

UEFA, led by former
France great Michel Platini,
has shown a hard line on secu-

“SOCCER RIF PRO FOOTBALL zi ETC.

__MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD



rity and safety issues. The gov-
erning body of European soc-
cer recently threw Feyenoord
out of the UEFA Cup for
crowd disturbances.

UEFA also said it would
review Giggs’ 83rd-minute
goal, which was taken before
the referee whistled play to
restart and led to the near
walk-off.'Fans threw objects
onto the field after Giggs’ goal.

The match was played at

‘tthe Stade Felix-Bollaert in

Lens — one of the stadiums
used for the 1998 World Cup
— because Lille’s stadium
doesn’t meet UEFA standards.
' @ England: David Beck-
ham’s recent performances
for Real Madrid have
improved his chances of a
recall to the England team.
The former captain was
dropped by England coach

Steve McClaren after last:

year’s World Cup. However,
he has played well since being
recalled to the Madrid team
and set up all three goals in
Tuesday’s 3-2 Champions
League victory over Bayern
Munich.

e Spain: Real Madrid will
reportedly protest to UEFA
over two insulting gestures

made by Bayern Munich mid- .

fielder Mark van Bommel
after he scored in the teams’
Champions League game.

Madrid will send a report to
the European body’s disciplin-
ary committee today, accord-
ing to sports daily Marca,
which added that the Spanish
club considered Tuesday’s
actions “an intolerable provo-
cation.”

Van Bommel, a former
player with Madrid’s archrival

FC Barcelona, volleyed Bay-

ern’s late second goal in a 3-2
defeat at Madrid’s Santiago
Bernabeu Stadium. The 29-
year-old apologized, but said
he had been insulted by a
Madrid player about his Bar-
celona connections. He didn’t
name the player.



CHRIS O'MEARA/AP

PASSING THE BUCKS: Colts quarterback Peyton Manning
will save the team almost $8 million in salary-cap space.

signed safety Raymond Ven-
trone to a reserve-future con-
tract. Meanwhile, Jets coach
Eric Mangini finalized his
staff for next season, with for-
mer New England receivers
coach Brian Daboll and for-
mer Miami defensive-line
coach Dan Quinn among the
additions. Daboll joins the Jets
as their quarterbacks coach
after seven seasons with the
Patriots. Quinn spent the past
two years coaching the Dol-
phins defensive line and will
serve in the same capacity for
the Jets. The Jets also hired
Mike Macintyre as their sec-
ondary coach, Sal Alosi as
their strength and condition-
ing coach, and Jerome Hen-
derson as assistant secondary
coach. Former North
Dakota State assistant Todd
Wash was hired as defensive-
quality-control coach for the
Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

ETC.

e College football: South
Carolina quarterback recruit
Stephen Garcia was sus-
pended indefinitely from par-
ticipating in team activities
less than a week after he was
arrested and charged with
drunkenness.

e Tennis: France’s Julien

Benneteau advanced to the

second round of the Regions.

Morgan Keegan Champion-
ships in Memphis, Tenn.,
along with American teenager
Sam Querrey. The seventh-
seeded Benneteau, who upset
Andy Roddick in last year’s
ATP Tour event, defeated
South Korea’s Hyung-Taik
Lee 7-5, 6-3. Benneteau was a
qualifier last year when he
eliminated Roddick in the
quarterfinals. Querrey had 17
aces in his 6-3, 6-2 victory over
Croatia’s Ivo Karlovic.

Radek Stepanek beat fellow
Czech Jan Hernych 6-2, 7-5 to
open the defense of his ABN
Amro title in Rotterdam,
Netherlands. Nicolas
Devilder upset second-
seeded Juan Carlos Ferrero
1-6, 7-6 (7-2), 6-0 in the Copa
Telmex round-robin event in
Buenos Aires, Argentina. ...
Defending champion Justine
Henin-Hardenne survived a
major scare from 16-year-old
qualifier Tamira Paszek
before advancing to the Dubai
Women’s Open quarterfinals
with a 4-6, 7-5, 6-1 victory. ...
No. 4 seed Emilie Loit beat
two-time champion Paola
Suarez 6-4, 4-6, 6-3 in the sec-
ond round of the Copa Colsan-
itas in Bogota, Colombia.



PEOPLE IN SPORTS





AP PHOTO/KYODO NEWS

~ OVERLOOKING THE CITY

Japan’s Daito Takahashi soars amid the backdrop of
Sapporo, Japan, in Tuesday’s practice session for the
Nordic World Ski Championships, which begin today.

Soccer’s higher calling

Italian soccer has not been a pious spectacle of late, with
riots and scandals marring a game that is practically a religion

there.

Sports officials now hope clergymen from 50 nations can
bring back faith to soccer as they take to the field for the first
time in a tournament for priests and seminarians that will

begin Saturday.

Catholic institutes have entered 16 teams in the Clericus
Cup, fielding 311 athletes from countries including the United
States, Brazil, Papua New Guinea and Rwanda.

“Tt’s an intelligent initiative which helps give a positive

‘ image to sport and especially to soccer,” Italian Olympic

Committee president Gianni Petrucci said at a presentation

of the event.

Even as Italy’s national team was making its successful run
for the World Cup last summer, club soccer at home was rav-; |
aged by a match-fixing scandal that. led to sanctions against

several top teams.

Earlier this month, rioting at a game in Sicily caused the

death of a policeman.

The matches will last one hour and rules will differ from
professional club soccer. Teams will be allowed one timeout,
and the referee will brandish a blue card, which will send off
errant players for a five-minute suspension.

“I expect [the tournament] to create a friendly relationship
among the players and the teams,” said the Rev. Emil Martin
of Cameroon, who plays with the tear: of the Pontifical
Urban College. “I hope each one can learn to win but also to
lose, because not everybody knows how to lose.”

He’s too slap-happy

A University of Southern
California hockey goalie put
ona show at North Logan,
Utah, but it had nothing to
do with stopping shots.

Mickey Meyer rode his ©

stick like a horse, dropped
his bulky pants, mooned the
crowd and slapped his but-
tocks during a game against
Brigham Young University,
police said. He was ejected
and ticketed for lewdness, a
misdemeanor, after an offi-
cer who was working secu-
rity at the rink said he wit-
nessed the scene Saturday.
“I had my fill of these
refs,” Meyer said on an
Internet broadcast of the

game, according to The Her-
ald-Journal of Logan (Utah).

Meyer, a junior from
Clinton, N.Y., was “riding
his hockey stick like a horse
and slapping his butt,”
North Park, Utah, officer
Mike Stauffer said ina
report.

‘?'m 52 years old. | started
coaching when [I was] 21. It’s the
first time in the history of my
coaching career I’ve gotten a
technical foul sitting on the

bench.’

- JOHN BRADY, Louisiana State coach, after
béing assessed a technical foul for arguing a

Father knew best

Baseball Hall of Famer
Willie Mays was in New
York’s Times Square on
Tuesday to help unveil the
ballot for Rawling’s all-time
Gold Glove team, celebrat-
ing the award’s 50th anni-

. versary.

“My father told me when
I was young, ‘If you can play
defense and you can run the
bases, you’ll have a job in
baseball for the rest of your
life.’ And he was right,” said
Mays, 75, who wore a gray
suit and black San Francisco
Giants hat, which he tipped
twice to the applauding
crowd.

Mays was joined at the
ceremony by two other
members of the original
Gold Glove team from 1957:
former Chicago White Sox
outfielder Minnie Minoso
and former Boston Red Sox
third baseman Frank Mal-
zone. They all wore gold
ties.



five-second call during a 70-63 loss Tuesday

night at Kentucky.

“FLASHBACK





On this day in history:



1969 — Barbara Jo Rubin becomes the first female
jockey to win a race at an American thoroughbred track
when she rides Cohesian to a neck victory over Reely Beeg
in the ninth race at Charles Town in West Virginia.

1980 — The U.S. Olympic hockey team stuns the Soviet
Union with a 4-3 victory in the medal round of the Winter
Olympics in Lake Placid, N.Y. Captain Mike Eruzione scores
the deciding goal midway through the final period.





THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com







Note: Two points for a win, one point for a tie and overtime loss

EASTERN CONFERENCE |
|
i





RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Wednesday’s results

S.J. 3, Washington 2 (SO)
Detroit 4, Chicago 2

Tonight’s games

Pittsburgh at Florida, 7:30
Ottawa at Buffalo, 7
Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 7
Edmonton at Columbus, 7
Philadelphia at Carolina, 7
New Jersey at Rangers, 7
Toronto at Islanders, 7:30
Montreal at Nashville, 8
San Jose at Chicago, 8:30
Calgary at Phoenix, 9
Minnesota at Colorado, 9
Vancouver at L.A., 10:30 p.m.

Tuesday’s results

Tampa Bay 3, Florida 2 (SO)
Buffalo 6, Philadelphia 3
Atlanta 3, Carolina 1

Boston 3, Toronto 0

Ottawa 4, Edmonton 3 (SO)
Montreal 5, Washington 3
New Jersey 2, N.Y. Rangers 1
Minnesota 2, Dallas 1 (SO)
St. Louis 5, Columbus 4 (SO)

Vancouver 3, Anaheim 2 (OT)

NHL LEADERS "



|
;
i
t
t
|
:
Colorado 4, Calgary 3 :
|
|
|
}

Sharks top

Pavel Datsyuk and Kris Draper also
scored for the Red Wings. Dominik Hasek
made 26 saves.

Radim Vrbata and Bryan Smolinski
scored for Chicago, and Nikolai Khabibu-
lin stopped 31 shots.

ELSEWHERE

e Rangers: The team placed veteran
forward Brendan Shanahan on injured
reserve and recalled forward Brad Isbis-
ter from Hartford of the American
Hockey League.

Shanahan has missed two games since
suffering a concussion last Saturday after
colliding with Philadelphia Flyers for-
ward Mike Knuble.



HOCKEY

Caps in shootout

Flyers general manager Paul Holmgren
said Knuble is out of any type of activity
for a week to 10 days and will then start
his conditioning. Trainer Jim McCrossin
said on Tuesday that he hoped Knuble
could return within a month after the sur-
gery and not miss the remainder of the
season.

Knuble has 22 goals and 43 points in 52
games.

e Hurricanes: Left wing Erik Cole is
expected to miss at least two weeks with a
hip injury. The team announced on its
website Wednesday that Cole could miss
up to four weeks after tearing a muscle
near his hip.

Hurricanes general manager Jim Ruth-





in time, are really high. So that’s what
we're trying to decide — do we add a
player? Do we decide to call somebody
up?”

Cole has 25 goals and 26 assists in 57
games this season. He did not play in the
3-1 loss to the Thrashers. He missed the
Toronto loss on Jan. 30 with a hip pointer,
then missed three more after aggravating
it in an on-ice collision on Feb. 8 against
Boston.

The loss to Atlanta dropped the
defending Stanley Cup champions to
eighth in the Eastern Conference, one
point ahead of the New York Islanders
and Toronto.

SOUTHEAST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV
TampaBay 34 24 2 1 71.194 185° 17-13-00 17-11-2-1 0 14-7-1-0 |
Atlanta 31 22 6 3 71188 195 14-9-3-2 17-13-3-1 13-4-4-1 | = 43 .
Carolina 30 25 3 4 67186 195 15-12-1-3 15-13-2-1 13-7-0-2. ,- From Miami Herald Wire Services
Florida 23 26 5 7 S8172 198 16-10-2-1 7-16-3-6 G6-11-2-1 | = avaleki and
Washington 23 28 2 8 56182 214 14-12-1-4 9-16-1-4 © 8-L1-1-2 | WASHINGTON — Joe P
Jonathan Cheechoo scored in the shoot-
ATLANTIC WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV | out to lift the San Jose Sharks to a 3-2 vic-
New Jersey. 37 17. 0 6 80162 141 22-6-0-4 15-11-0-2 17-5-0-1 | tory over the Washington Capitals on
Pittsburgh 32 18 4 5 73 208 187 Rea? ee r ae | Wednesday night.
NY. Islanders 29 23 4 4 66177 170 15-10-3- -13-1- 9-2-0 : ees
NY. Rangers. 29 26 3 2 63176 172 12-13-3-0 17-13-0-2 9-11-0-1 Patrick Rismiller and Matthew Carle
Philadelphia 16 36 3 5 40 157 227 5-17-3-4 11-19-0-1 4-14-1-4 scored in regulation and Evgeni Nabokov
| stopped 24 shots as San Jose ended a
a a re oe ie three-game losing streak and beat Wash-
Buffalo 40 ; -T-1- -8-1- -8-1- : . :
Ottawa 35 22 2 1 73204 160 191111 1611-0 159-01 | ington for the 10th eta an ;
Montreal 31 25 1 5 68178 184 18-12-0-3 13-13-1-2 10-8-0-4 | Shaone Morrisonn and Brian Sutherby
Toronto 29 23 3 5 66191 195 12-13-2-3 17-10-1-2 — 10-9-2-2 scored for the Capitals, who have not
Boston 29 26 1 3 62170 212 16-12-0-2 13-14-1-1 12-12-0-1 beaten the Sharks since Feb. 20, 1999.
| Washington has dropped five in a row
WESTERN CONFERENCE , overall, : ;
i Matt Pettinger scored in the shootout
CENTRAL =W_L OL SLPTS GF GA = = HOME = AWAY DIV for Washington, but Nabokov denied
ei eat a arate I Spee Teta he 13411 | Alex Ovechkin on a stick save in front and
ashville -5-2- -13-0- 5-1 ; : ;
St. Louis 26 26 5 4 61160 185 15-15-21 1-11-33 1-12-22 | Alexander Semin on a move to the right
Chicago 22 29 2 7 53149 183 11-13-1-3 11-16-1-4 10-13-10 | post. Cheechoo then ended the shootout
Columbus 23 31 2 4 52150 187 14-14-1-2 9-17-1-2 7-13-0-3 \ with a backhander past Brent Johnson at
NORTHWEST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY __pw | the left Post
_ Vancouver 35 21 1 3 74 160 152 | RED WINGS 4, BLACKHAWKS 2 / GEORGE BRIDGES/MCT
Minnesota 33 23. 1 4 71173 157 | : . : ‘
Calgary 31 21 3 5 70191 162 | DETROIT — Henrik Zetterberg BRING IT ON: Sharks goalie Evgeni Nabokov stops a shot by Capitals phenom
Colorado 29 27 2° 2 62194 190 | scored the tiebreaking goal with 6:22 left Alex Ovechkin during Wednesday night’s shootout, which San Jose won.
Aaa ee pee | to lead the Red Wings to the victory over :
PACIFIC WL OL SLPTS GF GA’ | | the Blackhawks. Knuble was injured Saturday when he NHL’s trade deadline is Feb. 27.
Anaheim 35 «16 3 «7 80195 158 5 Detroit got its 13th consecutive home collided with New York Rangers veteran “We're trying to decide as we speak,”
“I Jose 2 i ; i i icy a eat | victory, moving within one of the fran- forward Brendan Shanahan. Shanahan Rutherford said. “We were trying to adda
allas -9-0- : . ; : ‘ :
Phoenix 25 32 2 1 53160 207 13-13-2-0 | chise record set in 1964-65. suffered a concussion and went on player anyway with some experience. But
Los Angeles 20 31 5 5 50170 211 11-12-4-4 | Zetterberg added an empty-netter, and injured reserve. the prices for these players, at this point
\

ee The 38-year-old leads the Rangers with erford, who is attending the NHL general LATE TUESDAY

SCORING GOALIES | 28 goals this season. He also has 26 managers’ meeting in Naples, Fla., said he e Avalanche 4, Flames 3: Paul
Player, team Gp GA Pts Player, team Gp MIN GAAVG assists. didn’t know how Cole was injured. Stastny had two goals and an assist, and
eee, Oe sec aL es See Isbister has 27 points in 42 games with According to newspaper reports Wednes- Peter Budaj stopped 33 shots to lead host
St. Louis, TB 61 36 44 80 Brodeur, NJ 58 3507 121 2.07 | the Wolf Pack and Albany River Rats this day, the left winger was hurt during war- Colorado. ‘
ee rae 2 a z s! oT we i‘ 0 pe — | season. mups before Tuesday’s loss to Atlanta. __ e Canucks 3, Ducks 2 (OT): Dany
Thorton, SI 59 15 60° 75. - Backstrom, Min 24) 1307... 49 225 e Flyers: Forward Mike Knuble had Rutherford said the Hurricanes are Sabourin stopped 38 shots for his first
Briere, Buf _,, 80 27 47 74 Mason, Nas 34 197376231 = two plates inserted in his face during sur- considering their options in replacing NHL victory and Daniel Sedin scored ona
Heatley, Ott S28. =. 60 33° 40°73 «Turco, Dats S** ‘51° 2807 109.233 | Geary to fix his broken right cheekbone and _ Cole, either by making a trade or recallin; ower play 2:19 into overtime to lift-visit-
5 gery y s 6 P play
elanne,Ana... ....-... 61 36 36 72, ,Luongo,Van .. © 56 3272. 128235 ft : oT: £ ;
Ovechkin, Was” 6034 38 72 Vokoun, Nas’ S*«éS 182 © 66235 | Yight orbital bone. M ing Vancouver. --

a player from Albany of the AHL. The.

BASEBALL |. SPRING TRAINING REPORT

Vizquel wants extension from Giants

From Miami Herald Wire Services

Omar Vizquel would pre-
fer to know where he will play
next season, and announced
upon his arrival at spring
training in Scottsdale, Ariz.,
that he hopes the San Fran-
cisco Giants will consider a
contract extension.

Vizquel would like to set up
an informal meeting this
spring, though Giants general
manager Brian Sabean isn’t
ready to commit to such dis-
cussions with the ll-time Gold
Glove shortstop.

“We can just sit and talk,”
Vizquel said on Wednesday
before taking the field at
Scottsdale Stadium. “If he
can’t accommodate that, it’s
fine. It’s not an obligation.
They would probably listen to

_ what I have to say — I hope so.
It could be just an introduc-
tion.”

Sabean certainly knows
Vizquel’s value, yet also has to
think about the club’s long-
term future at the position and
what Vizquel might command
financially. Vizquel plans to
play through the 2009 season
and catch Venezuelan coun-
tryman and Hall of Famer Luis
Aparicio in a few statistical
categories for shortstops along
the way.

“It’s possible,” Sabean said
about having a meeting. “But
how probable that is, I have no
idea right now.”

The Giants’ top prospect at
shortstop is Emmanuel Bur-
ris, a switch-hitter selected
33rd overall in last year’s draft
as compensation for losing
lefty reliever Scott Eyre in
free agency.

Vizquel, who will turn 40 in
April, enters his 19th major-
league season still making the
same leaping catches of line
drives and artistic, athletic
stops to turn double plays that
have defined his career and
made him one of the best
defensive shortstops in the
game. His 11 Gold Gloves are
second all-time at his position
to Ozzie Smith’s 13.

Vizquel played in 153 games
last season and batted .295
with four home runs, 10 tri-
ples, 22 doubles and 58 RBIs.
His four errors were his few-
est since committing three for
Cleveland in 2000. And in the
past two seasons, only third
baseman Pedro Feliz has
played in more games for the
Giants. .

The San Francisco front
office might consider giving
Vizquel a one-year deal for
2008 with an option for ’09.

ELSEWHERE

e Padres: Second base-
man Todd Walker won his
arbitration case, getting a raise
from $2.5 million to $3.95 mil-
lion.

The Padres offered $2.75

million to Walker, who joined
the club in a trade with the
Chicago Cubs on July 31.

“You don’t want to go
through something like that,”
Walker said. “It was painful. It
worked out and we feel very
lucky.”

Walker said he accepted
arbitration for the first time in
his career because he wanted
to stay with the Padres, the
two-time defending National
League West champions who
lost each time in the opening
round of the playoffs to the St.
Louis Cardinals. He said he
settled on his asking price so
the Padres would have a
tougher time trading him.

“It’s all business and not
personal,” said Walker, who
added that general manager
Kevin Towers “handled it
with class. That’s all you can
ask for. I want to be a part of
this club.”

Walker originally .came
over to play third base, making
22 starts there. He also made
13 starts at second base.

Marcus Giles, signed in
December, is the projected
starter at second base. Last
year’s starter, Josh Barfield,
was traded to Cleveland in
October.

Walker hit .282 with three



ERIC RISBERG/AP

HEY, CAN WE MEET? Giants shortstop Omar Vizquel talks with general manager Brian
Sabean during Wednesday’s workout. Vizquel wants to set up a longer meeting
with Sabean to discuss a contract extension. ‘We can just sit and talk,’ Vizquel said.

homers and 13 RBIs with the
Padres. Overall last season, he
hit .278 with nine homers and
53 RBIs.

e Red Sox: Manny Rami-
rez, who received permission
from the Red Sox to report
late to spring training in Fort
Myers, Fla., for family reasons,
was scheduled to attend a car
auction in Atlantic City on Sat-
urday, according to the pro-
moter of the auction.

It wasn’t immediately clear
if the team was aware of Rami-
rez’s scheduled appearance at
the Atlantic City Classic Cars
Auction. Boston’s first full-
squad workout is today. Under
the collective bargaining
agreement, the deadline for
players to report to spring
training is next Tuesday.

Earlier Wednesday, Boston
general manager Theo
Epstein said Ramirez has an
excused absence and will

report on March 1 for the sec-
ond consecutive year. On
Monday, pitcher Julian
Tavarez, Ramirez’s close
friend, said the slugger’s
mother recently had surgery
and Ramirez was with her in
Florida. ... J.D. Drew has no
complaints about Boston add-
ing conditions to his contract
to protect the team in case he
re-injures his shoulder. The
club’s new right fielder is con-
fident the Red Sox have noth-
ing to worry about.

Drew showed up at spring
training on Wednesday with a
five-year, $70 million deal,
saying he’s as healthy as he’s
ever been in his career and
he’s sure his right shoulder
will hold up throughout the
duration of his contract.

Drew reached a prelimi-
nary agreement with Boston
on Dec. 5 after opting out of
the last three years of his five-

year, $55 million contract with
the Los Angeles Dodgers. On
Jan. 26, the Red Sox finally
announced the deal after lan-
guage was inserted allowing
them to get out of the guaran-
teed money for 2010 and 2011 if
he re-injures his shoulder. He
had surgery on the shoulder in
September 2005.

e Orioles: Pitcher Kris
Benson is trying to avoid sur-
gery on his injured right shoul-
der with aggressive rehabilita-
tion. Following the advice of
two of the three medical
experts he consulted, Benson
will start a program geared
toward easing the pain froma
torn rotator cuff. If successful,
it would allow him to pitch
this season.

Benson boarded a flight
Wednesday morning for Fort
Lauderdale, where the pro-
gram will take place.

e Braves: Mike Hampton

was on the mound Wednesday
in Kissimmee, Fla., though he’s
still far from a sure thing for
the Braves. .

Seventeen months after
reconstructive surgery on his
left elbow, Hampton threw
batting practice during the
first full-squad workout of
spring training. But he stuck
mostly with his fastball, mix-.
ing in a couple of changeups
before calling it a day.

“Nice and easy,” said
Hampton, who estimated he
was throwing at about 75 per-
cent. “I didn’t want to push it.
Now, we'll see how it feels
tomorrow.”

e Nationals: Closer Chad.
Cordero won his arbitration
case, getting a raise to $4.15
million from $525,000.

The Nationals argued for a
$3.65 million salary for the
right-hander, who was 7-4
with a 3.19 ERA and 29 saves
last season. Cordero led the
majors with a franchise-record
47 saves in 2005 for Washing-
ton.

e Blue Jays: Tomo Ohka
arrived at the Blue Jays’ train-
ing camp in Dunedin, Fla., five
days after the voluntary
reporting date, due to visa
problems.

Ohka agreed last month to a
one-year, $1.5 million contract
after going 4-5 with a 4.82 ERA
in 18 starts for the Milwaukee
Brewers last year.

“Y'm a bit sleepy. Right now
it’s 2 a.m. in Japan. The trip
was 15 hours,” Ohka said.

The deal reunited Ohka
with Brad Arnsberg, his for-
mer pitching coach with the
Montreal Expos. Ohka threw a
bullpen session soon after
arriving.

e White Sox: Accused of
shooting a Dominican farmer
in October, shortstop Juan
Uribe has received permission
from a judge to attend spring
training in Tucson, Ariz.

e Phillies: Lefty Matt
Smith and outfielder Shane
Victorino agreed to terms on
contracts for this season.

LAREN LL LANE TT ON EE FN a Ne a ONIN EE NT NN NN ON



THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com __



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Rematch gives two teams plenty

BY iSRAEL GUTIERREZ
igutierrez@MiamiHerald.com

It has been eight months since
Dwyane Wade grabbed that rebound,
looked at the clock and launched the
basketball into the air at American
Airlines Center to kick off the biggest
celebration in Miami Heat history. -

The Heat returns to Dallas tonight
for the first time since claiming its
NBA title on June 20, 2006, in Game 6

- against the Mavericks. And although

this matchup doesn’t quite have an
NBA Finals feel, there is plenty of |
reason to await the second and final
regular-season meeting between the
Heat and the Mavs.

penerenirnenennereninnmnneucneerenennntiinanatind taint NANA TL A aneranncarentn

Stretch drive

The Heat has the ingredients for a repeat title performance, but will the pieces fall into place?

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still manag
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season, an



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JARED LAZARUS/MIAMI HERALD © shooting a

2. Jason Williams has to return to health

An abdominal injury can be ;
tricky, so the Heat might want to ..
be extra careful with Williams, .
right. Despite.a sore knee that; 2;
hobbled him for the early portion
of the season, Williams provides
much-needed tempo for the team
_and sports a 3.7-to-1 assist-to-
turnover ratio, including a
career-best 1.38 turnovers a

game. He also is shooting 94
percent from the foul line.

3. Defense must remain consistent
For most of the season, the Heat’s
build a healthy amount of victories in

struggles. For the season, the Heat is

1. Shaquille O’Neal must
show flashes of dominance

Last season, which was his
statistical worst, O'Neal, left,

rebounds and shot 60 percent
from the field. In 13 games this

averaging 10.9 shots, 4.3 free
throws, 5.8 rebounds and

been dictated by its offensive success. If the Heat is going to

defense has to remain consistent regardless of any offensive

field-goal percentage, compared with last season’s .440.



RO BASKETBALL | MIA



IHEA

___ INTERNATIONAL EDITION _ _ THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007 | '9B



INSIDE THE GAME | MIAMI AT DALLAS

Since the two teams’ first regular-
season game, on Jan. 21, Wade, Mavs
owner Mark Cuban and Dirk Now-
itzki have renewed a public exchange
of words that brought another ele~
ment to the budding rivalry.

Before the season, Nowitzki said
the Mavericks had handed the Heat
the title. Wade and his teammates
took offense to the suggestion that
they didn’t earn the title, and Wade
took his hardest shot at Nowitzki on
Feb. 8, when he questioned Nowitz-
ki’s leadership. |

“Dirk says they gave us the cham-
pionship last year, but he’s the reason
they lost the championship —



ed 13.6 shots, 8.0
attempts, 9.2

ailing O’Neal is

career-low 52 percent.

Ls




ee el
CHARLES TRAINOR/MIAMI HERALD

defensive success has
the final 30 games, the

giving up a .452







March is the key

Call it the Heat’s moving month, as in moving up the
standings. In March, the Heat has a home-friendly schedule
that includes 10 of its 15 games at home and features a

| six-game homestand to begin the month.
|
|
L

Miami’s March opponents feature a combined 319-308



NUCCIO DINUZZO/MCT

combined 128-135 (.487).

The Heat’s combined record against its March opponents

is 8-11, including O-3 against the Bulls.

The toughest.game is probably March 23 at Indiana,
where the Heat blew a 20-point lead earlier this season.

record at the
break (.509
winning
percentage),
and the five
road games
come against
the Hawks,
Timberwolves,
Nets, Pacers
and Raptors,
who area



THREE THINGS TH

1. Dwyane Wade can’t get hurt:

The Heat as won one game this season without its
leading scorer (28.8 points), distributor (7.8 assists) and:
thief (2.09 steals). Any extended periods without him would
\ require too much of an adjustment to generate victories. .

because he wasn’t the leader that he’s
supposed to be in the closing
moments,” Wade said.

Cuban responded with a spiteful
entry on his blog, takings shots at
Wade that included: “What you
know about Dirk’s leadership skills is
non-existent. You don’t have a clue.
Your ability to evaluate leadership
skills ... well, you obviously have an
overinflated value of your own.”

Heat coach Pat Riley was taking

his leave of absence when the latest :

exchange occurred. But Riley said
Wednesday that the reaction from
the Mavericks was “typical,” and
similar to how he felt when Riley’s



2. Antoine Walker can’t
struggle for long stretches



AT CAN’T HAPPEN

ae ar panne




CARL JUSTE AMI HERALD STAFF

Los Angeles Lakers lost the NBA
Finals to the Boston Celtics in 1984.
“I think what was said by them last
year was probably a genuine feel,”
Riley said. “I remember when we

choked away [a title] to the Boston —

Celtics back in 1984. We felt we did,
we gave it away, in a seven-game
series. We always felt we should’ve
won that year, and we voiced it.
“We came back and won it the
next year. I’m sure they’re just voic-
ing the fact that they feel like they
should’ve won. that’s it, Just let it go.”
As for Cuban’s blog entry on
Wade, Riley didn’t offer much.
“Those are the things you have to



2. Comeback ability



THREE SIGNS OF PROGRESS ©



RICARDO LOPEZ/M 1AM! HERALD STAFF

The trademark of last season’s team was its ability to
come back from large deficits, no.matter. what point of the
game. This season, that has been accomplished only a few
times. If the Heat can show that resiliency more often, it will
prove that the team is capable of another title run.

3, Free-throw parade

Last season, the Heat averaged 28.2 free-throw attempts
agame. This season, despite the complaints that Wade is’
getting favorable calls, the team is shooting just 24.9 free
throws a game. The goal since Shaquille O'Neal, below,
joined the team in 2004 was to attempt 30 free throws
agame, so.25 is not anough.



to think about

deal with,” he said. “I don’t have a
blog. I don’t even think about having
a blog. Thank God I don’t have one.”

Since Cuban’s blog, however,
there hasn’t been much discussion on
the subject, other than Nowitzki
wondering why Wade was so ‘sensi-
tive to the Mavs’ comments. —

On Wednesday, Nowitzki said
tonight’s game is big, but he offered
no bulletin-board material.

“It’s a big game,” Nowitzki said.
“We're not going to lie about it, the
way the Finals went. Very disap-
pointing loss to Miami. Before the
season started, you-knew when those
two games were coming up.”




























1. Lower scoring
average for Wade

As the season
progresses and the games
~ get bigger, teams will force
the ball out of Dwyane
Wade's hands more often
- especially at crucial
moments. So if Wade’s
teammates can lessen his
load by scoring more, it will
4 . make teams hesitant to pay
that much attention to
Wade.




GETTY IMAGES

3. Gary Payton can't play .
more than half a game

Payton, right, averaged 22 minutes in
the Finals last season, coming up with
big plays when necessary. He can
provide that again. But if he’s on the
court for too long, teams will gang up
on Wade, leaving Payton outside the
three-point line, from where he has shot
27.7 percent in his time with the Heat.

- SCHEDULE BREAKDOWN —

GASTON DE CARDENAS/EL N

cenuesyece th tt tt ACARD NCCC NCCC CC NIT LA A A

Walker, left, is going to play
significant minutes, and he will need to
be a threat. If he struggles, it affects his
confidence, his teammates’ confidence
in him and allows the opposition to pay
more attention to Shaquille O’Neal and
Wade without penalty.









Streak-ability

The Heat’s best
chance at a lengthy
winning streak is from
March 5-21, with nine
seemingly winnable
games (Atlanta twice,
Chicago, Minnesota,
Washington, Utah, New
Jersey, Sacramento and




and 26), a team that the
Heat is 8-1 against since
Shaquille O'Neal, left,
rejoined the team (the
ers: one loss came without
UEVOHERALD Shaq in the lineup).. percentage.







Heat Wizard-ry

The Heat can guarantee itself a
top-four seed by winning its division
(and probably a top-three seed,
unless the Raptors stay hot atop the
Atlantic). Miami entered the All-Star
break four games behind the
Southeast-leading Wizards, with three
games remaining against them, which
should bode well for the Heat. Wade

Orlando). has never lost to the Wizards - Miami
is 16-1 against Washington since
ae Wade, left; entered the league, with
Hawk-ing . a>, the loss coming this season without
Miami has three ALDIAZ/MIAMIHERALD = Wade in the lineup.
games in March against
the Hawks (March 5, 21 Down the home stretch

If the Heat needs‘one final push to improve its playoff
standings, the final seven games of the regular season come
against the Celtics, Bobcats, Wizards, Pacers and Magic -
five teams that feature a combined .450 winning

- ISRAEL GUTIERREZ





\



4 AR ert re © RBar ign

:
y





‘+ FS 8 VO mm wk em rt - -.s.7 =

PAGE 2, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007 . ~ THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

We the family of the late Irvin
Newell King Sr. Would like to express
heartfelt thanks and gratitude to family,



si ior



and loss we have inet
Our loving memories of you still g00 on
You are in our thoughts at each

friends and acquaintances who so graciously
surrounded us with love, prayers words of

\
af
s
{
a



day’s dawn. OE | comfort, visits and calls.
We miss you and love’ you... ef
AES a .
always and forever Sorrow Ey | kf | Special thanks to Bishop — Gilbert

Thompson, Archdeacon I. Ranfurly Brown,
Reverend Fathers R. Burrows, J Moultrie.
J. Mycklewhye, Angela Palacious and
Deacon. BJ. Smith, Mr. Preston
Ferguson, The Music Ministry of St. Agnes,
Ushers, PHA/PHM Family, Credit Suisse
International, Credit Swiss Financial,
Dollar Rent-A-Car, St. Matthews, St.
Agnes and Mt. Moriah, Bethel Brothers for an

a host of other relatives an friends, | excellent job.
including Bonds Electric Motors

wndtimis | |The King, Family

You will forever be in our hearts!



Sleep on James and take your rest, ‘
We love you but Jesus loves you best) 7



HO las niece, nept ews, and





7 PAGE 4, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Butler's Hureral Homes & Crematoriwm

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS




















MRS. SYBIL








— Harry Bain Assisted by Fr.
Goodridge. Interment will follow. in the Grand Bahama
Memorial Park.








Grandchildren; Reginald Jr., Regina, Eric, Regjee’ and
Devannia Dean, Rickell and Ricka Lightbourn, Dion
McKinney and’ Brandon McCartney; One (1) Brother;
Joseph Sweeting; Father-in-law; Bishop Herman E. Dean;







in-law; Florence Dean; Seven (7) Sisters-in-law; Ruby
Dean, Gloria Sweeting, Audrey Rolle, Eloise Pratt, Irene





in-law; Bishop Noward E. C. Dean; Eight (8) Nieces;













and friends too numerous to mention.






| ELIZABETH DEAN, 68

| of #9 Sutton Road, Freeport, |
| Grand Bahamas will be held on :
| Saturday, February 24", 2007 at |
#1 11:00 a.m. at Pro Cathedral of |
| Christ the King Anglican Church, }
East Atlantic Drive, Pioneers : | —
Way. Officiating will be Canon :



Left to cherish her precious memories are her Seven (7) 2 od .
Children; Reginald Dean, Judith Lightbourn, Andrew, | Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

Denise, Bridget, Erica and Demarco Dean; Nine (9) | He js survived by his wife: Joyce “Rose” Daley-Wells; One

: (1) Son: Marco Wells; Two (2) Daughters: Gabrielle Wells
: and Reiko Major; adopted Children: Heather and Wayne.
: Cole, Suzette and Oral Campbell, Wayne Wagstaff, Giovanni
? Kienz and Kiki Lopez; Three (3) Grandchildren; Trevor
One (1) Son-in-law; Ricafdo Lightbourn; One (1) Daughter- :
? Grandchildren: Stephan White, Devaughn Cole, Kimberly -
: and Kristal Campbell; Four (4) Brothers: Harold, Raymond,
Beneby, Lula Thompson and Anna Dean; One (1) Brother- :

Maxine Allen, Suzette Avena Tamara Sweeting, Princess :
O’Brien, Sheena Rolle, Tiffany Thompson, Rose:ta Beneby, :
Estherlena Jones and Arlene Campbell; Thirteen (13) :
Nephews; Alan and Jayson Sweeting, Michael and Ernest
Cartwright, Kevan, Korey and Kendrick Dean, Preston Jr.,
Kenneth, Nathaniel and Dwayne Pratt, Leonard and David
Beneby; Fourteen (14) Grandnieces; Linder Bandelier, :
Larona Heild, Deidree Rolle, Danielle Sweeting, Alexis |
Avena, Alina and Alea Sweeting, Brianna, Ashlee and Kayla
Pratt, Angelina and Christina Jones, Sarah Campbell and |
Natasha Beneby; Eleven (11) Grandnephews; Alex Avena, |
Cameron Johnson, Joshua, Justin and Deon Sweeting, Spencer :
and Wesley Pratt, Christopher and Nathaniel Jones, Adrian |
and Roosevelt Allen; One (1) Aunt; Gracey Adderley; One a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday from

(1) Uncle; Kirkwood Sweeting and a host of other relatives 10:00 sera suULSeRRCe Le.

: Viewing will be held at the Church on Friday from 12noon
: until 4:00 p.m. and on Saturday from 9:00 a.m. until. Service

time.

MR. WILLARD
McDONALD WELLS, 72

of Hillside Park and formerly of
Gray’s, Long Island will be held
on Saturday, February 24th 2007
at. 11:00 a.m..at Central Baptist
Church, Jean Street & Gleniston
Gardens. Officiating will be Pastor
Alfred N. Brown assisted by other

_ ministers. Interment will follow in

Knowles, Alex Wells and Tyrique Dorsett; Four Adopted

Vincent and Howard “Donnie” Wells; One (1) Sister: Ruth

: Knowles; Two (2) Brothers-in-law: Chester Knowles Sr.

and James “Jimmy” Wells; Six (6) Sisters-in-law: Marian,
Angela, Ruth, Brenda and Julia Wells ana Constance
“Blossom” Johnson; Two (2) Aunts: Verna Knowles and
Edna Wells; One (1) Uncle: Leon Knowles; Numerous
Nieces and Nephews and a host of other relatives and
friends including: Pastor Alfred N. Brown and the members
of Central Baptist Church, the entire Long Island community,
the staff of Commonwealth Bank Star Plaza, the staff of
Royal Bank Prince Charles Branch, Hillside Park community,
the Hummingbirds Association and others too numerous to
mention.

Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers’ Funeral Homes
& Crematorium, Ernest & York Streets on Friday from 10:00



The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, Febru 22 2007 °PG5



Tt v was love, not the nails’

‘lI By PASTOR MATTHEW
ALLEN

John 3:16: For God so
loved the world, that he gave
his only begotten Son, that
whosoever believeth in him
should not perish, but have
everlasting life.

for mankind that held

the Son on the cross
and not the nails that were
driven into His hands and
feet. Despite your position or
situation in life, God’s love
will always be extended
towards you.

It’s through erroneous
teachings, religion and tradi-
tion, that most believers with-
in the body of Christ are liv-
ing far beneath their God
ordained privileges. Yeshuwa
Messiah, Jesus the Christ,
said in John 10:10. “I am
come that they might have
life, and that they might have
it more abundantly”.

The word abundantly in
the Greek is: Perissos, per-is-
sos'; which has several mean-
ings: superabundant in quan-
tity, superior in quality,
advantage, very highly, and
beyond measure.

As a child of God, He
wants you to live the high life,

[ was the Father’s love

a life beyond measure, a
superior quality life; to have
superabundance in quantity,
to always have the victories
advantage over the enemy
and this world system.

In order for this to happen
in the life of a believer he/she
would have to come out of
ignorance, religion and tradi-
tion and receive the rightly
divided word of God, other-
wise many will continue to
perish for generations to
come. Remember Hosea 4:6,
“My people are destroyed for
lack of knowledge: because
thou hast rejected knowl-
edge, I will also reject thee,
that thou shalt be no priest to
me: seeing thou hast forgot-
ten the law of thy God, I will
also forget thy children.”

It’s absolutely impossible
for a child of God who is dis-
cipline to walk in the knowl-
edge of God not to live the
abundant life. If going to
Calvary was only about the
crucifixion, Yeshuwa Messiah
would have easily come down
from the cross. But He sub-
mitted Himself to the
Father’s will, and love, by
remaining on the cross in
order that mankind could be
restored, reunited, reconciled
back to the Father’s love.

It’s only when believers



@ PASTOR ALLEN

don’t know of God’s love that
they make such. silly, dumb
religious statement like “I’m
just an old sinner, saved by
grace.” As spiritual as this
and other statements like, “If
you make one step, God will
make two” might sound, God
gets no glory or honour in
hearing such foolishness.
Listen! Once you’ve
accepted Yeshuwa Messiah,
Jesus the Christ, as your
Saviour and Lord, you’re
now the righteousness of
God in Christ Jesus. Yes, you
were a sinner, and it was by

His grace that you’ve been
saved, delivered from the
bondage of sin and death.
Therefore don’t allow reli-
gious, deep, spooky, sound
good sayings to proceed from
your mouth any longer.

Now, as a- believer, there
are times when you might sin
but being the Father that He
is, in knowing this; He. ec
you;

e I John 1:9: If we confess
our sins, he is faithful and just
to forgive us our sins, and to
cleanse us from all unright-
eousness.

e :10. If we say that we have
not sinned, we make him.a
liar, and his word is not in us.

If you’re living in sin ,or
may have back slide don’t
allow religion and hypocriti-
cal religious people to hinder
you from pursuing after a
genuine relationship with
God. Here’s what Jesus says
about the sinner man or
woman: Luke 15:7 “I say
unto you, that likewise joy
shall be in heaven over one
sinner that repenteth, more
than over ninety and nine just
persons, which need no
repentance.”

The Father wants you to
live the abundant life that
He’s sent through His Son.
The only way this abundant

life can be genuinely experi-
enced is for His word to have
free course in.your life. Have
you gotten to that place in
your life as yet, where you
know that there’s got to be
more to the word of God
than what you’re experienc-
ing?

The very same love that
kept Him on the cross has
been made available to you;
it’s just a matter of you now

' walking in that love. In so

.

doing, you will begin to expe-
rience the FOG (Favor of
God) where there is nothing
broken, nothing lacking and
nothing missing.

It was His love for you; Not
the nails in His hands that
kept Him on the cross.

¢ Join Pastor Brendalee
and I, along with the family
of Kingdom Minded
Fellowship Center Int'l,
every Sunday Mornings @
10:30am and Thursday
nights @ 7:30pm at the
Bishop Michael Eldon High
School auditorium for a
non-religious, non-tradi-
tional powerful time in the
word of God.

For questions or comments
contact us via E-mail:pas-
tormallen@yahoo.com or
Phone 351-7368 or 441-
2021.

Uzbek authorities arrest Protestant
pastor on illegal proselytizing charges

TASHKENT, Uzbekistan (AP) —
Uzbek authorities-have arrested a

Pentecostal Christian pastor on

charges of illegal proselytizing and
running an unregistered religious

organization.
The State Religious Affairs

Committee for the predominantly

Muslim state said Tuesday that

Dmitry Shestakov led an under-
ground Charismatic Pentecostal
church in the eastern city of Andijan

and was converting Muslims to
Christianity.
The committee called him an

impostor claiming he was not affiliat-.

The Norway-based
religious freedoms
group Forum 18 said that
Shestakov faced up to”

20 years in jail for inciting
religious hatred, insulting
IS FrrnerrCele nisin Loy TAT NT
banned literature.



ture.

tent.

ed with the officially registered Full
Gospel Pentecostal Church.

The Norway-based religious free-_
doms group Forum 18 said that
Shestakov faced up to 20 years in jail
for inciting religious hatred, insulting
Islam and distributing banned litera-

The group said police had raided
Shestakov’s church and house, seizing
books and tapes with religious con-

In recent months, Uzbek authori-
ties have closed or fined several
Western-funded aid groups and
churches for alleged attempts to con-

vert Uzbeks to “a religion of a
Protestant character.”

The Russian Orthodox Church that
caters to a significant Russian-speak-
ing minority in the country enjoys
official recognition in Uzbekistan.
However, many small Protestant

groups that mushroomed in

Uzbekistan after the 1991 Soviet col-
lapse have faced increasing official
pressure.

President Islam Karimov’s govern-

ment also harshly persecutes peaceful
Muslims practicing outside state-
sanctioned mosques, branding them
radicals. ,



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES





THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 7



Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026





FUNERAL SERVICES FOR



FLORINE JUANITA
BAKER, 81

































Infantview Road.











om ce

by her parents
















Ida Payne, Michael, Yvena and Matthew Brown, Mr. and Mrs.










Her close survivor is a brother |
: Cyril Baker, She was predeceased
Herbert and Maria Baker; brothers and sisters, |
Herbert, Norman, Mary, Gorman, Iris and Teresa Bernadette. |

Other survivors are sisters-in-law, Majorie and Ironaca Baker; |
nieces and nephews, Herbert, Sylvia, Deborah, Stephen, Sabrina, |
Denice, Norma, Gregory, Theresa, Kim, Norman, Cyril, Christine,
Michael, Teresita, Bernand, Dwight, Sylvan, Jefferey Baker and }
their families, Jerome Smith, Rashida, Mohammed and Hanifah |
Baker; godchildren, Bernard and Clavert Bostwick and Keith :
Thompson; relatives and friends, Umenia Adderley, Ruth Russell
and family, George and Dorothy Huyler, Telcine Albury, Maxine :
Archer, Brenda Ferguson, Franklyn and Sharon Wilson and their :
families, Delores Glover and the entire O'Brien family of Florida, |
Johnnymae and Nurse Thelma Thurston, Leonease Lightbourne, |
Ena Williams, Wendell, Edward, Thomas and Larry Thurston,
John Thurston Jr., Sir Clement and Lady Maynard, Euda Stubbs,
Poitier family, Christine and Frank Smith, Patricia Coakley, |
James Smith, Edris and Lee Sparrow, Terry Duncombe and Jim, |
Jerry Elps, Stephanie Phillips, Violet Cummings, Patsy Nicholls, |.
Eunice Boyce, Telzena Coakley, Sheila Tracey, Dr. Joanne Butler,
| Forbes, Smith, Lockhart, Gibson, Edwards, Ingraham, Reid,



John Duncombe, Marjorie Davis, Sonia Cox, George Thurston, |
Newton McDonald and family, Carmetta Strachan and family, |.
Mary Armbrister, Patricia Collie, the Gibson family (formerly :
of Cockburn Street) Monsignor Wallace A. Harris and parishioners |
of St. Charles Borromco's Church, the Johnson and Coakley -
families of Lewis Street, Monsignor Preston Moss, Fr. Martin |
Gomez, Deacon Gregory Taylor, The Benedictine Sisters, St.
Joseph's Senior Choir, St. Joseph's Faith Community, Joan |
Demeritte, Priscilla Dean, Bishop Ross Davis and Mrs. Davis, |
Dolly Foster, George Curtis, Marilyn Gardiner, Clarita Saunders, |

. Basil and Eric Wright, Juanita Symonette, Dressler, Carla,
Michael, Craig and Andrea, the Jordan family of Florida, Cardinal
Cook Health Care Centre and a host of other relatives and friends.

of New York and formerly of ; Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians,

My, Baker's Close will be held on |

| Saturday at 11:00 a.m. at St. |
Joseph's Roman Catholic Church, |
f Boyd Road. Fr. Martin Gomes |
! and Deacon GregoryTaylor will |
officiate. Interment will be made |
Win the Catholic Cemetery, |

#44 Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and
on Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

MICHAEL ANDREW
GARDINER, 45

of #32 Nassau Street will be held
on Saturday at 11:00 a.m. at St..
Mary's Anglican Church, Virginia ~
Street. Canon Warren Rolle
assisted by Fr. Theodore Hunt
will officiate. Interment will be
made in St. Mary's Cemetery,
Virginia Street.

Left to mourn Michael's passing
are his parents, Edward E. Gardiner and Inez Gardiner Dorestant;
sister, Michelle Dorestant; brothers, Eugene Gardiner, Anthony
Hanna and Sam McKinney; uncles, George W. W. Gardiner and
Peter Bowe; aunts, Hazel Sturrup, Marilyn Gardiner and Mildred
Bowe; nieces, Lauryn Gardiner, Antonia Hanna, Courtney
Watkins and Katrina Lathan; nephews, Justin Gardiner, Jason
Hanna, Charles "CJ" Watkins, Adrian Lathan and Arian Ingraham;
grand niece, Ania Pintard; sisters-in-law, Donna Gardiner, Anna
Hanna and Kathleen Lathan; brothers-in-law, Kendal Neely and
Jeffrey Watkins; godmother, Maria McKenzie; godfathers,
Wildred Knowles and Sidney Moncur; relatives and friends,
including the following families, Rolle, Bowe, Sturrup, Bain,
Cooper, Strachan, McKenzie, Wells, Bethel, Collie, Wring,

Parker, Rutherford, Curry, Rahming, Bodie, Poitier, Archer,
Johnson, Sherman, Roberts, Brice, Love, Romer, Mr. and Mrs. |
Dwight Fernander, Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Thompson, Dean's
Lane family, St. Mary's family, St. Cecilia family and numerous
others.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians
#44 Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and
on Saturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES . THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 9

Yager fimeral Home (&° Crematoriam

Queen’s Highway:
PO. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 © Paging: 352-6222 #1724
Fax: 351-3301

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR -












BRO

. zs
Ca
Se B
fy, 9,
RTC

ORTICN



Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

A MASS
OF REMEMBRANCE






























RUEBEL
LUNDY, 49

of #145 Avocado Close, Pioneer's f
Loop, Freeport and formerly of f
Calabash Bay, Andros, will be held
on Saturday, February 24, 2007 a
2:00 p.m. at St. John's Native}
Baptist Church, Coral Road
Freeport. Officiating will b
Bishop Neville Campbell
Intermnent will be made in The
Grand Bahama Memorial Park
Frobisher Drive.









Left to cherish his memory are his ;
loving wife Pamela Lundy; two daughters, Melissa and Maudtasma Ciji
Lundy; one son Reland Lundy; three grandchildren, Calsey Bannister
Jr., Chrishon and Cortez Rolle; two stepchildren, Marvin Brown and
Charles Bootle Jr.; four brothers, Brad, Vincent, Hubert and Hartley
Lundy; three sisters, Velma, Carolyn and Joan Lundy; one adopted
brother Linkey Wilmott; three adopted sisters, Mary Smith of West
Palm Beach, Vernenchia Butler and Antionette Fernander; two aunts
Ophelia Humes and Gaynell Blatch of Hollywood Florida; three brothers-
in-law, Frederick and William Scott and Glen Gibson; three sisters-in-
law, Miriam, Coretta and Eleanor Scott; 56 nieces and nephews including
Michelle, Seneka, Seneca, Sharlene, J asmine, Rosanna, Cara, Nathalia,
Monisa, Lamont,Sean, Brenth, Tiffany, Monique, Brittney, Ebony, Don,
Bradleon, Keith, Rocco; grandnieces and nephews including Jade and
Mekhi, and a host of other relatives and friends including, Dr. Leon
Lundy of Washington, Martin Lundy, Judy Miller; also the following
and their families Philip Lundy, Nancy Stuart, M. Lundy, Veronica
Lundy, the entire Lundy family, Jeanetta Moss, Ethlyn Cox, Naomi
McPhee, Hilda Miller, Alphonso Rolle, Violet Cleare, Jane Bodie,
Francis Whylly, Perlee Minnis and Rev. Alonzo Hinsey; also Rev.
Michael, Rev. Leon, Henery, Joel, Freddie, Max and Mark Hinsey and
Shirley Hinsey; the families of Maude Demeritte and Leslie Duncombe,
Stacey Rolle, Bonnie Knowles, Dean Coakley, Rolle, Edgecombe,
Rahming, McKenzie, Keith Knowles, Delerese McIntosh, Lucille Hanna,
Eleanore Pratt, Flo and Pandora, Jennifer Mackey, Anita Missick. Shirley
Pinder, the entire Taxi Union, Arianne Thompson; Nick, Nigel Kendall,
Dewitte Edgecombe, Pauline Davis, Hilton, Solo, Dellamae Griffin,
Donna Playdell and Theresa; the families of Verushka Missick and Sybil
McPhee; Valderine Higgs, Gus and Virginia Parks, Yolanda Newbold,
Theresa and Jan Riley, Sidney McIntosh; the families of Lynden Missick,
Mary Hepburn, Pastor Vanda Capron, Mary Bowe, Ivarene, Minister
Charles Knowles, the Butlers, Henfields and Arthurs, Stacey Roberts
and Calsey Bannister Sr.

-IVY:S: |
GRANT-KESSLER
will be held on

Saturday February 24th, 2007
at 9:00am
















Sacred Heart

Roman Catholic Church, |
Shirley Street,

Nassau, Bahamas.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Grand Bahama Taxi
Union Hall, Airport Road on Friday from1:00 p.m. until 5:00 p.m. and
on Saturday at the church from 12:30 p.m. until service time.

Funeral arrangements are being handled by Yager Funeral Home and
Crematorium Limited, Queen's Highway, Freeport.



PAGE 10, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007







- ROSITA
THERVIL, 66

of Marsh Harbour Abaco and
formerly of Haiti will be held

Marsh. Harbour Abaco at
11:00 a.m. Officiating will
_ | be Father. Rodger Madrazo
assisted by other ministers
of the gospel. Interment will
follow in Marsh Harbour Public Cemetery.

Left to cherisli fond memory are her 5-sons, Rosner,
Nixton,; Max, Luc and Alin Thervil; 1-daughter, Linda

Mackey Street ¢ P.O. Box N-4404

Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: 242-341-6451 ¢ Nights 242-322-3242
24 Hour Cell: 242-427-5414













on Saturday at St. Francis:
Desales Catholic Church,

Thervil; 4-brothers, Anouse, George, Jean-Ronal and —

Fidner Louis; 3-sisters, Gerta Astrid, Maryange and
Mimose Louis; 13-grand-children, Mike, Rahem, Britney,
Shaquille, Nic, Alicia, Antoinia, Luc Jr., Shanti, Diesha
and Shuna, Aleah and Lamont Thervil; 5-nephews, John,
Jean Claude, Joseph, Sonn and Wister Thervil; 3-nieces,
Franc, Carmen and Carlene Timothee; 2-brothers-in-Iaw,

Roland and Mac Antoine Thervil; 3-sisters-in-Iaw, Alzine,

Genene and Bernadette; numerous aunts, uncles, cousins
and other relatives and friends including, Ellen Petit,
Gerta Aristil, Yvonne Victor, Chantel Smith, Manera
Rolle, Pattie Albury, Antoinette Box, Wilfort Matayer
and family, Claude, Mitchell and family, Margo Dolmond,
Mariloude Altidor and family, Clomene Jonnassaint and
family, Fred Louis and family, Faniel Doetuer, Jeffrey
Victor and family, Souviner Laurent and family, Laticia
Jonnassaint, Antoinette Fredrick, Lienel Thervil, Willie
Baptist and family, Rosemary Paul and family, Anose
Jean-Pierre, Andy Telci, Vegella Louis, Elease Dawkins,

- Louisane St. Fleur, The Pigeon Peas family and the entire
community of Marsh Harbour Abaco.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respect at
Evergreen Mortuary, Mackey Street on Thursday at 1:00

p.m. until 5:00 p.m. and again on Friday at the church in |

Marsh Henour: from 4: 00 p.t m. -untib service time.

CLL nine 2 ADO TAIRA EES TA A TARP



held at Calvary Bible |

| -6106, Nassau; Bahamas.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Pinder's Funeral Home

“Service Beyond Measure”

PALMDALE AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
PHONE: 322-4570/ 393-1351 * CELL: 357-3617

RANNIE PINDER President

FUNERAL SERVICE |

RICHARD
GHYNARD
MALONE

of Murphyville, will be



Church Collins Ave. on |
Friday February 23rd, {i
2007 at 3:00pm. Pastor §
Allan R. Lee, Thomas
Albury and Frederick
“Arnette officiating.



He was predeceased by his father, Richard
Malone; survived by his mother, Alice Movena
Malone; two sisters, Carolyn Movena Gronlund
and Linda Maria Clarke; one brother, William
Danny Malone; one sister-in-law, Susan Malone;
three nieces, Lisa, Brianna and Brinette; one
nephew, Brian II; two aunts, Clarice Baldwain
and Josephine Weatherford; and many other
relatives and great friends especially Tr Nassau
Glass Family.

" God takes the loved ones from our he ves but
never from our hearts".

Friends may pay their last respects at : inder's
Funeral Home Palmdale Ave., Palmdale on
Thursday February 22nd, 2007 from 5:00pm
until 7:00pm.

In Lieu of flowers donations may be made to
the Christian Counselling Center P.O. Box SS















G12 © Thursday, February 22, 2007

PG 12 ¢ Thursday, February 22,2007 FREON.

SEATTLE: (AP) —
Complaints of religious
discrimination at jobs and
schools in Washington
state are at their highest in
the past 15 years, with
confrontations ranging
from when and where
people pray, how they
dress or what hours they
work.

According to filings
with the U.S. Equal
Employment Opportunity
Commission, complaints
in the state rose 60 per-
cent between 2002 and
2006, compared to a
nationwide. 30 percent
increase during the same
period.

“We’re seeing an
increase in religious
charges involving all dif-
ferent faiths — across the
board,” said Kathryn

' Olson, supervisory trial
attorney with the EEOC
in Seattle.

Employers

Employers are prohibit-
ed from discriminating
against individuals
because of their religion
in hiring, firing and other
terms of employment
under the Civil Rights Act
of 1964. The law applies to
- employers. with 15 or
' more employees,’ includ-
-ing-state and local govern-

“federal government. °”

" Aation. have: helpe

: afthough many

complaints

“around the Christian faith.
. “4 4“Christians are being

treated as second-class cit-- .

_ izens in schools, city coun-
: ‘cil and on the streets,”
said Greg Scott, a
spokesman for _ the
Alliance Defense Fund,
which represents plaintiffs

2 Teena ite ood at
“22 jinereasingly diverse popu-.
Anion have helped act
workplace ‘tensions, But. - 'c nday: worship. “He exem-
“plifies the kind of love and
‘empathy I envision. Christ to.



“> ‘egmie from Muslims, data,
: ‘show a growing ‘conflict .

The Tribune

Defrocked pastor’s church supportive,
hopes to change rules on gay clergy

m@ By GIOVANNA
DELL’ORTO
_Associated Press Writer

ATLANTA (AP) — It was
a typical Sunday scene and, in
its own way, a small act of
defiance.

Members of St John’s
Lutheran Church last week-
end filed by their pastor, hug-
ging him and exchanging
jokes. Gleeful children
rushed past toward a treats-
laden table.

Many in the 350-member
Atlanta congregation say
they don’t plan to let the Rev
Bradley Schmeling leave the
pulpit on August 15, as
ordered last week by an
Evangelical Lutheran Church
in America disciplinary com-
mittee because he is in a gay
relationship.

Defying the order could
end Atlanta’s oldest Lutheran
church affiliation with the
ELCA, cutting off the small
church and its members from
the large denomination’s
resources, including commu-
nity service programs, hymn
books and access to synod
officials for guidance on legal,
financial and spiritual mat-
ters.

St John’s members hope it
doesn’t come to that. They
want the denomination to
change its rules about sexual-

sly active gay clergy at its bien-

nial churchwide assembly
‘August 6-12 in Chicago, just

"> ments,-as well as employ-. days before Schmeling is set
© Rent agencies, " labor tbe femoved from.the cler-
_) erggatzations.- “and. she: See ,



. -¢We are: not can activist
church, ‘eventhough we can
:* stand’ for -issues: of “justice,”
“said Charles Fox, who occa

~ sionally ‘assists Schmeling at .

have had.”.

The committee, which basi-

cally served as the jury in a
closed-door trial, found
Schineling guilty of breaking
the denomination’s rules for
having a same-sex relation-
ship. However, the commit-
tee also called those rules “at
least bad policy,” and recom-

@ THE Rey Bradley Schmeling, pastor of St John’s Lutheran
Church in Atlanta, poses inside the church

sider at its biennal meeting.

St John’s — a congregation
that gathers in a 1914 Tudor-
style manor in one of
Atlanta’s historic, mansion-
lined neighbourhoods — now
finds itself in the middle of a
campaign to allow sexually
active gays to be pastors in
the largest Lutheran denomi-
nation in the US

“It hasn’t been a problem
to explain Brad or his rela-

tionship to our children as

much as what the church.
_swarits to do,” said Fox, a mar- -

ried: father of a 10-year-old’
‘- boy”. and an eight-year-old

‘The ELCA, which has 4.9. -

‘million members, allows

openty gay clergy, but only if.
they are celibate. Still; many’:

Lutheran churches support
ordaining partnered gays and

perform same-sex blessing
ceremonies despite the poli-.
cy. The same debate over .

how biblical verses on. gay
relationships should be inter-
preted is tearing at many
mainline Protestant groups.
Schmeling told both his
bishop and congregation

1 _ meeting in 2005, a proposal to



(AP Photo: Gene Blythe)

in 2000; at the time he was
not in a relationship. Last
year, when Schmeling told
Bishop Ronald Warren of the
Southeastern Synod that he
had found a lifelong partner,
Warren asked the 44-year-old
pastor to resign. Schmeling
refused and Warren started
disciplinary proceedings.
Much like a trial, a closed-
door disciplinary hearing
committee of 12 ELCA mem-

bers, both lay and clergy,
heard. evidence for nearly’
week in January. Seven of
them felt ‘the-rule.as'stated “tHe Digges! ns! Bee
“y oice>. bi 3 ‘to just be St John's, and then,

left them no ‘choice: but to ~- at | John's, and ther
the ELCA decides what’ it

defrock Schmeling. “But: the.
committee also wrote that, if ~
‘not bound by_ the church's. «
rules, they - “would find

almost. ‘ananimously »“that
Pastor Schmeling. :is . not
—@agaged in conduct that ‘is
“incompatible with. the: minis-
terial office” and would order |

nodiscipline.

. Further, the committee
suggested the ELCA remove
its rule and reinstate gay cler-

gy who were removed or

resigned because they were in
a same-sex “lifelong partner-
= ”

allow synods to decide if they
would accept a pastor in a
same-sex relationship failed
after getting nearly half the
1,000 votes, short of the
required two-thirds majority.

St. John’s members and gay
rights groups

the final push for change.
“We could have dodged the
bullet for St. John’s and Brad,
but the gun would have
remained loaded for every
other gay and lesbian pastor
in a committed relationship,
and there’s lots of them,” said
Emily Eastwood, who assist-
ed in Schmeling’s defense and
heads Lutherans Concerned,

a national group that fights -

for full inclusion of gays in
the church and is drafting a
policy change to propose dur-

“ing the upcoming biennial

meeting.

The largest ELCA synod in
the U.S., which includes
Minneapolis and has more
than 225,000 baptized mem-
bers, already supports sexual-
ly active gay clergy. Its mem-
bers voted for the national
resolution in 2005.

“What we like to believe is
that it’s up to us to find ways
to utilize the gifts of all peo-
ple,” Bishop Craig E.
Johnson said.

Laura Crawley, the presi-
dent of St. John’s 10-member

‘council, said the council ulti-
mately will have to decide _.
‘whether to defy the orderor be
not, but support is.strong for -
the pastor. . SEE EC

hope .
_ Schmeling’s case will provide

“The biggest thing is for us

: wants to be,” church: member oe BS
John :Ballew ‘said after. —
~ Sunday's services 2. 0

*Schmeling has until the sec- =)
‘ond week. of March to decide> >
if he wants to appeal the com-

mittee’s. decision. However,

he’s optimistic that he will
still be leading the church on
August 15, which also would
be his seventh anniversary at
St. John’s. Until then, he
doesn’t plan any particular
activism. “The best thing I
can do for this issue is to be
the best pastor I can be in this





“With long life will I satis-
fy him and show him my sal-

vation.”
— Psalm 91:16

IN celebration of nearly
100 years of life Brother
Simeon Knowles, born
February 2, 1910, was joined
by his wife Ellen and
extended family for the
presentation of a special
plaque by the pastors of the
Church of God of Prophecy
East Street Sanctuary in
honour of his 97th birthday.

During the recent service,
Mr Knowles, who’s presence
was celebrated by the entire
East Street congregation,
also received a floral and
fruit arrangement.

PG 14 ¢ Thursday, February 22, 2007 RELIGION The Tribune



Brother Simeon Knowles receives
plaque in honour of 97th birthday

@ (TOP) — Pictured
from left are Associate
Pastor Kendal. Simmons,
Austin Knowles (son), Ellen
and Simeon. Knowles,
Bishop Franklin Ferguson,
senior pastor, and Associate
Pastor Woodley Thompson.

@ (LEFT) — In celebra-
tion of his 97th birthday,
Brother Simeon Knowles,
his wife Ellen, their chil- .
dren, grandchildren and
extended family, wor-
shipped at the Church of
God of Prophecy East
Street Sanctuary recently.

(Photos: Fareno
Ferguson)



PAGE 16, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007

Clarke's Duneral
Slime

244 Market Street ¢ P.O. Box EE-16634
Fel: 322-2070 or 322-2072

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

__ ROSLYN
ESTELLE STORR

also known as
Need te rac or "MS. FRANCIS"
39

of Wulff Road and formerly of

Blanket Sound Andros will be held

on Saturday, February 24th, 2007 }*

at 11:00 a.m. at Judaea Baptist

Church, Tonique Williams-Darling

Highway. Officiating will be Rev. | ,:

Marina P. Sands; assisted by other |/?

ministers. Interment will follow

in the Woodlawn Gardens Cemetery, Soldier Road.

Precious Memeroies will forever linger in the heart of her (7)
Daughters: Naomi Seymour, Virginia Francis Lightbourne, Delores
A. Francis Williams, Louise Francis Russell, Ann Maude Francis,
Mother Leanna Minnis, Dorothy Moss; (4) Sons: Prince "Dopy",
William "Willie Mays’. Tyrone & Jerome Francis; (36) Grandchildren:
Vernique Stubbs. Steven. Annette. Dion & Carol Seymour. Tyrone.
Zhivargo, Margo & Fabian Laing, Phillippa, Philip, Portia, Kizzy
& Carlton Newton, Charmaine, Vanessa, Adrian, IIsa. Gena, Sevon,
Shavet & Charan, Willvesia, Willam, Madina, Nakisha, Racquel,
Ashley & Shantel Francis, Ramond, Morrell & Anastascia Ramsey,
Charles Jr. & Naveia Russell. Cormell & Mia Williams: (18) Great-
Grandchildren: Wilmore Dames III, Bianca Seymore. Queswell &
Ashley Ferguson, Ridge, Marvin, Lacy, Phillippa, Joshua, Zhivargo
Jr.. Fabiar Jr. Algernon, Gianna, Ty rone, Denier, Chandonnae,
Renaldo, Adrian Ir: (1) Great greatgrand: Willon Dames: A host
of other relatives & friends including: Rhoda Williams & Family,
Monica Flowers, Dean Family, Tezell Humes & Family, Pastor
Marina Sands & Roberts Family, Pastor Minerva Pratt & Family,
Geneva & Prince Mackey & Family, Jonathan Sam Rolle & Family,
Theleta Strachan & Family, Keva Johnson & Family, William &

Margurette Simmons & Family; Creig Flowers & Family, Sonny |

Russell & Family, L. Edger & Calvin Moxey & Family, Queswell
Sr. & Family, Joey Demeritte, Sharlene Newbold & Family, Apostle
David Butler & Family World Outreach Church, Officers & Members
of Judaea Baptist Church, Vestry & People Of Christ the King
Freeport, St. Anges.& St Barnabas, Nassau Bahamas: The School
of Business-College of The Bahamas, Doctors & Nurses of Accident
& Emergency, Ambulance Department & Female Surgical & Medical

_ Ward# I & Chief Security Officer Storr & Staff:

Viewing will be held at Clarke's Funeral Hionic #244 Market Street :

on Friday, February 22nd from 10:00am to 6:00pm and on Saturday,

February 24th from 10:00am at the church until service time. |



DOS wwe tres

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

WIL,

EAT SUN qg SE MORTUARY
Gy —_S—_

“A New . Conmmtnent To Service
FUNERAL SERVICE FOR —

~ JACQUES
LOUIS, 50

of Bain’s Town and
formerly of Gonaive,
Haiti, will be held on
Saturday at 2:00 p.m. at
Bethesda Faith
Ministries International,
Independence Shopping
/ Centre, Independence
Drive. Rev. Idez. E.



3

Laroda and Minister Alexander Laroda Sr.,

assisted by Rev. Lide Knowles will officiate
and interment will be made in Southern
Cemetery, Cowpen and Spikenard Roads.

He is survived by one son, Robed Louis; four
daughters, Dania, Daneka, Gertride and Shelda

Louis; his special friend, Gertha Louis and a

host of other family members including Yolande
Cerafin, Ninin, Annie and Geurda Dolce, Jackie
and Jacklyn Louis, Verlanda James, Franc Dolce,

! Marvin Drake, Anna, Victor and Ann-marie;

two grandsons, Dieuden and Jaylin Winters.

Friend may pay their last respects at East Sunrise
Mortuary, Rosetta Street, Palmdale from 10:00
a.m..to 5:00 p.m. on Friday and again on
Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to noon and at the
church from 1:00 p.m. on n Saturday until service
time. .

EAST FATT MORTUARY.

“A New Commitment To a

Poy Rosetta Street, P.O.Box C.B. Peat if SSI
Nassau}. Bahamas

: Tel: (242) 323-EAST — (242) 326-4209 Fax: Ko

rede Emergency Service.
Berit #; 357-9151 * Beeper: 380-1450 or i-[0 ba BA



Weta excde W OreVvid S Yitttst doa Puc ACOA YLovEL

CP EE REMI ENN EDO OS ORAL TT OS OOM AAT Ow M8 ARTUR, Ow Oe RR Oe © © MARR UN UW oO eee! Oe wH se

5
q

{



Ss ee Russell & family, Rev. Hilbert Flowers & family, Rev Lavardo |
-_. .f. Duncanson & family, Rey. Pennerman & family, Ms.. Jane:
‘| Taylor &'family, Mr. & Mrs. Winston Bonaby &.Family, Mr

: ma . Rev. Barbara Rahming & family, ‘Ms. Louise Wallace, Rev.”.|
2 T Dereck Sweeting & family, Archdeacon James Palacious & |
| Rev. Angela Palacious, Mrs. ‘Cynthia Hall, Mr. & Mrs, Brad -

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES : | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 17

y Restoiees Memorial Movuary
, and Cremaloium Limiled





FREEPORT
‘41A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas ’ Robinson end Soldier Reeds Neck. NLP, Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312 P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 37341 115 / (242) 373-1471 Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 373-3005 Pager: (242) 340-8043 ¢ Fax: (242) 340-8034



|e Pea |

| | Viewing will be held in the “Serenity” Suite at Restview
YVETTE SHERICE _ | Memorial Mortuary & Crematorium Ltd., Robinson and
RR : Soldier Roads on Friday from 10:00 a. m. until 6:00 p. m. and -
BURROWS, 41 - i then again at the church on Saturday from 8:30 a. m. until
i Service time.







of Bethel Terrace, Carmichael Road, }
wil} be held on Saturday, February :
24, 2007 at 10:00 a. m. at New |
Lively Hope Baptist Church, Jerome : [{.
| Avenue and Cheasepeak Road. : B
9) Officiating will be Rev. Dr. Sheldon : |
_/ Higgs, Rev. Hilbert Flowers, and : | *
other Ministers of the Gospel. :

| Interment will follow in Woodlawn Gardens.






MARGARET ANN
CHIPMAN-SEARS, 51

‘| of Gambier Village, will be held on
-] Saturday, February 24! 2007 at
11:00 a. m. at Greater Bethel
Cathedral, Faith United Way, Baillou -
Hill Road. Officiating will be District












Left to revere her memory are her Son: Shaquille, Mother: :
Willamae Burrows, Brothers: Dennis and Colin, Sisters: :
Peggy, Melissa and Kennise, Nieces: Lashan and Jenae, Elder George Duncombe. Interment
Nephew: Winston, Brother-in-law: Winston Bonaby Jr., : : : will follow in Lakeview Memorial
| Sister-in-law: Jenny Burrows, Uncles: Teddy and Kelly ; Gardens, John F. Kennedy Drive.
Burrows, Grandaunts: Virgina Curry and Mrs. Lovely Evans, ;
Godmother: Gloria Campbell, Cousins: Dianne, Sidney, : She is survived by her Husband: Sidney Sears, Sons: Trevor
Leslie, Nicole Sweeting, Karen, Keith, Melonie & Judy Taylor, | Bethel and Cresswell Dawkins, Daughters: Sandralee Edgar,
Shaunna, Biancia, Tamara and Carl Minis Jr., Sean Bethel, : Shakira McKinney, Ingrid Sears, and Synovia Sears Huyler,
Lenora Mackey, Jackie, Stephanie Curry, Dillon Burrows, Mr. | Sister: Shirley Chipman-Holmes, Brother: Etienne Chipman,
& Mrs. Henry Taylor & family, Ms. Eulease Butler, Mrs. Elma | Grand Children: Diojenez Thurston, Cianna Edgar, Dinae
Knowles & family, Mr. & Mrs. Theophilus Taylor, Ms. Patsy | and Trenia Bethel, Terry and Peja McKinney, Jaquan, Jayden
and Sandra Knowles, Rev. Clarence Knowles, Ms. Linda Rolle ; Huyler, and Kamani Rolle, Aunts and Uncles: Judy Thompson,
& family, Mr. & Mrs. Hubert & Hazel Chipman, Dr. Rhonda | wilfred Thompson, Eugene Brown and Agnes Bowe, Nieces
Chipman-Johnson, Mr. Nathaniel Cooper & family, Other | and Nephews: Jujeda Chipman, Latonia Burrows, Shonell
Relatives and Friends: Mrs. & Mrs. Joseph Sweeting, James ; Mackey, Gregory Pratt, Daniel Sears, Lornex Mackey, Carlos,
Se tae: Mrs. Vernecha Johnson and family, Mrs. Betty Bethel | Julius, Ron, Stephen, Leander Chipman, Sons-in-law: Mark
amily, Rev. Dr. Sheldon Higgs & family, Rev. Garland }) Edgar, Anson McKinney and Jason Huyler, Daughter-in-law:
|. Denice Bethel, Sisters-inlaw: Gwendolyn Brennen, Doreen
Ts Mr. Chipman, and Janet Lightboume,.Brothers-in-law: Philip |
(| & Mrs. Rene Joseph & family, Mr, & Mrs. Jerrard Nottage, - ioe ee Lany, wees Pa ioe. a Tyrone Sears, q-



























me Rahming, Mr. & Mrs. Oswald Moore, Mrs. Thez Paul, Ms. Lucy | Church, ‘Sandra Knowles and Family,. and: Daphne Evans. if

| Sands, Nis. Iona Sands, Sharon, Mildred, Mrs. Susat Deveaux. {° ‘
& family, Ms. Charmine Rodgers, Valarie, Hughie, Ricardo, Viewing will be held in the Celestial” Suite at Restv lew

| ‘Nina & Eddie Burrows, Mrs. Terry Stewart, Dr. Friday, Sister s Memor. ial. Mortuary & Cr emator "ium Ltd., Robinson and :
Ella Anderson and the Staff of Princes Margaret Hospital | Soldier Roads ic Friday from . 0: is m. eae & OOP mt. mnt
Accident and Emergency, Nassau Village Urban Renewal, New then again Gf INE CHATCH OF SGLEreay from a. m. unti
Lively Hope Baptist Church family & Living Waters Ministry. service time.














_ and Friends including: Cpl. 618 Ivan Deveaux, Floyd Rolle, |
-and the entire Community of Gambier Village, Little Jerusalem. Bese:



PAGE 18, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007



FREEPORT
‘41A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
‘ Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 ¢ Fax: (242) 373-3005

MEMORIAL S



HUBERT BERNARD
MORRISON, 76

of Pigeon Plum Street, |
Pinewood Gardens, will be :



held on Sunday, February :
25th 2007 at 1:00 p. m. at Real :
i Harvest Seventh-Day :
Y Adventist Church, Pinewood :
, Gardens. Officiating will be :
Pastor Wilfred T. Adderley, assisted by Elder M. :
Williams and Deacon A. Collie. Cremation will |
follow. |



-Hubert Morrison is survived by his Wife of twenty- :
three years: Earthmae Sweeting Morrison, One Son: |
Hubert Morrison Jr, Two Daughters: Florenda :
Morrison Gibson of Freeport and Amanda Morrison :
of Miami, Fl, Three Brothers: Allington Morrison, :
Cardinal Green of Inagua, and Busta Morley of New :
Jersey, Four Sisters: Maria Cox, Paula Bell, Rosemary |
Williams Dos Santos of England and Francis Rolle ;
of Freeport, Father-in- law: James Smith of Stuart :
Manner, Exuma, Mother —in-law: Lolean Smith of |
Stuart Manner, Exuma, One Daughter-in-law: |
Sheniqua Johnson-Morrison, Ten Brothers—in—law: |
Erie Cox, Cliffton Rolle of Grand Bahama, Matias |
Dos Santos of England, John Saunders of Treasure |
Cay, Abaco, Orset Symonette, Samuel Whymns, :
Preston Johnson of the C. I. D., Franklyn Neely, Anton |
Adderley of Long Island and Roy Bain, Ten Sisters- :
in-law: Pearlie Green of Inagua, Glendina Sweeting, |



4, | Symonette, Sabrina Johnson, Francita Sweeting, Gretel |
= | Morrison, Constable 225 Marsha Francis Neely, and |

Patricia Cartwright, One Grandson: Demontre |
_ | Morrison, Two Hundred Twenty Nieces and |
-| Nephews, and a host of other Relatives and Friends |

vay BRR wm A 1â„¢ Pee ey wy * ce om mB 4 SE gwe Ob. steak ts z $
AE VAR ECS BS ARSE EY Bek Cit 8 oF Ree Stes SAE ST RARE FAP MP TR

and Cromalouum

Dr. Ismae Whymns, Eurica Adderley, Janny §

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES |

Pronelod

NASSAU ‘ ;
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 ¢ Fax: (242) 340-8034

. Box CB-12072



ERVICE FOR

including: Mr. Cornelius Burrows, Mr. Williams

Cash of Lowes Pharmacy, Joe Johnson, Nicholas

: Bartlette, Curtis at Port New Providence, Joe and Leze
| Bullard of Mangrove Cay, Andros, Francita Nairn
: j,Elethel Moxey, Sharline Munroe, and James Mackey.

| Special thanks go out to the Staff at P. M. H. Male
? Medical Il and A & E and the Staff at the South
: Beach Clinic for their support.

There will be no public viewing.





DEATH NOTICE

MISS FLORENCE
‘CURRY

of Roker’s Point, Exuma, passed
away on 13th February, 2007.









Florence was the 6th of nine
children born to Mr Matthew
Curry II and Mrs Ida Jane Curry,
. . McPhee. Florence’s parents
cas : and six of her siblings: Ira, Edgar, —
Harry and Zacchaeus Curry, Isabel Curry-Armbrister and Stella
Curry-Sands predeceased her. Frederick Curry and Eric Curry
are the remaining two survivors of the nine children, whose
children, grandchildren and great grandchildren are the primary
survivors.





















Other survivors include Aunt Rose McPhee, Mrs Ira O. Curry,
Mrs Jewel Bowe-Curry; Cousin Jane Curry and Jacinta White,
nee Demeritte, Evalina Lloyd, Saveletha and Georgianna Rolle,
Dorcas Shuttleworth, Eleanor Curry-Ferguson, Valarie Toni
_ of Exuma, Sidney Curry and Allan McPhee.













PG 20 ° Thursday, February 22, 2007



Joseph: Interpreter of Dreams
Text: Genesis Chapter Genesis 37:4-20: 41:1-46:






Joseph’s Story began prior to his birth; when his
deceitful grandfather deceived his deceitful father,
forcing him to marry his daughter Leah, whom Jacob
did not love. He loved Rachael instead, and openly
displayed this special love towards her, and her
children. This obviously created tension between the
wives and their children who competed for his love,
and favour. It was further exasperated, when Jacob
presented Joseph with a special robe. The brothers
saw that their father loved him more; therefore, they
hated him, and could not speak peaceably to him.









Pastor Ben Bailey
The Prophetic Voice
P. O. Box N-9518
Nassau, Bahamas










The final straw that broke the proverbial camel’s back;
came when Joseph dreamed a dream, and told it to his brothers. ‘““We were
binding sheaves in the field, my sheaf arose and stood upright, and your sheaves
bowed down to my sheaf. His brothers said shall you indeed reign over us?”
They hated him still more for his dreams. The lad was young and naive, and
told a second dream, “Behold, the sun and the moon and the eleven stars bowed
down to me.” His brothers became jealous of him. One day his father sent him
on an errand to his brothers; “When they saw him afar off, they conspired to
kill him. They said to one another, let us kill him, and see what will become
of his dreams.” Eventually, he is sold as a slave in Egypt, where he realizes
the full potential of his gift, as it relates to dreams, and their interpretation.













“Pharaoh had a dream; in it, he stood by the river [Nile]. Suddenly, out of the
river came seven cows, fine looking and fat; and they fed in the meadow. Then,
seven other cows came out of the fiver, ugly and gaunt, and stood by the other
cows. The ugly and gaunt cows ate up the seven fine looking and fat cows.
Pharaoh awoke. He slept. and dreamed a second time; and suddenly seven
heads of grain came up on one stalk, plump and good. Then, seven thin heads,
blighted by the east wind, sprang up. The seven thin heads devoured the seven
plump and full heads. Pharaoh awoke, his spirit was troubled, he called for
‘the magicians of Egypt, and its wise men. Pharaoh told them his dreams, but
no one could interpret them.













The Chief Butler told Pharaoh about a young Hebrew named Joseph; who
interpreted the dreams of both him and the Baker; and disclosed the dreams
accurately came to pass. Pharaoh called Joseph, who shaved, and changed his
clothing. Pharaoh told Joseph, I had a dream, and no one can interpret it. I
heard that you can understand a dream, to interpret it.” Joseph explained that
interpretations did not result from the power of man’s intellect, “God will give
Pharaoh an Answer of Peace.”






Joseph told Pharaoh, the dreams are one; God has shown Pharaoh what He is
about to do: The'seven good cows; and the seven good heads are seven years;
the dreams are one. The seven thin and ugly cows; and the seven empty heads
are seven years of famine. Indeed seven years of great plenty will come
throughout Egypt; then seven years of famine will arise, and deplete the land
of Egypt. The plenty will not be remembered because of the famine following,
for it will be very severe. The dream was repeated to Pharaoh twice because
the thing is established by God, and God will shortly bring it to pass.








Joseph proceeded to give Pharaoh godly advice: Select a discerning and wise
man, and set him over the land of Egypt: Let him appoint officers, to collect
one-fifth [twenty percent] of the produce of the land of Egypt in the seven
plentiful years. Let them gather all the food, and store up grain under the
authority of Pharaoh, and keep the food. Then reserve that food in the cities
anne the seven years of famine; that the land may not perish during the
amine.






Pharaoh said to his servants, can we find anyone like this, in whom the Spirit
of God resides? Pharaoh set Joseph over all the land of Egypt; took his signet
ring, and put it on Joseph’s hand; clothed him in garments of fine linen, and
put a gold chain around his neck. Pharaoh called Joseph Zaphnath-Paaneah.
Archaeologists have discovered that the signet ring signified the role of vizier,
who bore the title, ‘Seal bearer of the King of Lower Egypt,’ whilst the chain
signified ‘Control over the food supply.’ The name Zaphnath-Paaneah means,
‘Revealer of secrets.’








Moral: Pharaoh had a dream that no wise man could interpret. Joseph endured
-a series of painful preparations; and allowed God to release his full potential,
to decipher Pharaoh’s dreams at the appropriate time.

gee





RELIGION |

The Tribune:

‘Let God be seen
and glorified |
in our lives’

lm By CANON NEIL ROACH

Read Psalm:

“Proclaim the greatness of the Lord
our God and fall down before his foot-
stool; for he is the Holy one of God.”

— V5

proclamation is a public
announcement or a call to
pay attention. In other

words it is a call to announce the good
news of the Kingdom of God, to evan-
gelize. The good news is that Jesus
was crucified; he died and rose
according to the Scripture. We are to
receive him with faith and repen-
tance.

It is often said that the best sermon
one can preach is one’s own life. The
best method of proclaiming the good
news is our own life. We are to tell
others of God’s majesty, “the Lord is
king’. V1. Tell others of his goodness,
his grace, and his glory.

“Proclaim the goodness of the Lord
our God and fall down before his
footstool; He is the Holy One.” To fall
down before his footstool is to wor-
ship him. It is fall down or to prostate
oneself out of respect. It also means
to serve God in heart and by life.
Jesus tells the devil in Luke 4:8 “It is
written worship the Lord your God,
and only serve him.”

We should follow the example of
Mary, the sister of Lazarus. Every
time we see her she is at Jesus’ feet.
When Jesus visited the home in
Bethany, Mary sat at the feet of Jesus,
Luke 10:39. At the death of Lazarus
Jesus arrived late, and when Mary
heard that he had come she ran and

threw herself at Jesus’ feet. John-

11:32. Jesus is the ideal priest, and
more than a priest, for worship
belongs to him. “For he is the Holy
One of Israel.”

“Holy is He.” Holiness sums up all
of God’s moral perfection.. On that
basis everyone should worship him. In
Leviticus 19:2, God summons Moses
and told him “Speak to the entire
assembly of Israel and say to them: Be
Holy because I, the Lord your God,
am Holy”. God’s holiness is seen in
his moral perfection and his faithful
commitment to good and his judg-
“ment on those who sin.

rycrolâ„¢ tau



@ CANON NEIL ROACH

“The Lord Almighty will be exalted
by justice, and the Holy God will
show himself holy by his righteous-

-ness.” Isaiah. 5:16. God’s proclama-

tion to Israel was to get them to wor-
ship him because of His Holiness. The
ministry of Jesus is the same. The
story of the woman at the well illus-
trates this when he told her “God is a
Spirit: and they that worship Him
must worship Him in spirit and in
truth.”

Jesus’ proclamation is directed to a
single end: to draw our hearts in wor-
ship of the living God. We are to pro-
claim him by our worship.

We are called to holiness.. We have
been set apart by God's action in
Christ to be his own personal posses-
sions. We are daily to live out that
moral holiness and active love that is
so beautiful in God’s own character.
This is what we are called to proclaim.

Our proclamation is to let God be
seen and glorified in our lives.

Prayer: Grant O Lord, that I be
changed into your likeness from glory
to glory.

Promise: To worship God, for the

Lord our God is the Holy One.

t















PAGE 22, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007



FREEPORT
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 © Fax: (242) 373-3005



amd! Csommatoriam Gianilad

THE TRIBUNE DEITUARIES:



NASSA'
Robinson and —_ Roads, Nese N.P., Bahamas
O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 ° Fax: (242) 340-8034

: FUNERAL SERVICES FOR



CHARLES CARDINAL
PORTER, 35 _

OF #97 B GORDON AVENUE,









} WILL BE HELD ON SATURDAY,










FOLLOW AT THE GRAND BAHAMA MEMORIAL PARK,
FROBISHER DRIVE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA.

Left to cherish his memories are his Father: Charles Alfred Porter;

1 Son: Charles Porter Jr.; Grandmother: Mrs. Minerva Cooper;
1 Sister: Mrs. Donell Knowles; 4 Brothers: Kevin Lockhart,

Colebrooke; 8 Aunts: Mrs. Delores Bain, Mrs. Melba Styles, Mrs.

Ferguson, Nicole St. McCary and Mrs. Jennifer Lockhart; 5 Uncles:

Tatianna Lockhart, Chellesa Knowles, Shakeitha, Lakeisha,

Henfield, Michael and Dominic Knowles and Kevin Lockhart Jr.;

Cousins: Carlyse Bourne, Adina Bourne, Lisa Okoh- Brown,
Mercury McBride, Renaldo Davis, Natasha Bain, Michael, Randy,
Grace and Edison Davis, Dellarese Poitier, Joan Davis-Rolle,
Antoinette Thompson, Jocelyn Davis-Forbes, Michael Cooper
and Julien Miles, Todd and Tanya Smith, Christine, Hope Styles,
Philisa, Aretha, Tamara, Henria and Mia Cooper, Erica Glinton,

and A Host of Other Relatives and Special Friends including:
the Colebrooke family, Rollins, Gwendolyn and Phillise, Vincent







OF RESTVIEW MEMORIAL

FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA 3

FEBRUARY 24th, 2007 AT 1:00 :
P.M. AT FREEPORT GOSPEL :
CHAPEL, SANDERLING CIRCLE :
& KITE ST., FREEPORT, GRAND :
BAHAMA. OFFICIATING WILL :
BE PASTOR HARTLEY :
THOMPSON (SENIOR PASTOR). INTERMENT WILL :



VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE “SERENITY SUITE” 2
MORTUARY AND :

| CREMATORIUM LIMITED, 11-A EAST CORAL ROAD,
| FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA ON FRIDAY FROM 10: 00

A.M TO 6:00 P.M AND ON SATURDAY AT THE CHURCH
: FROM 11:30 A.M. UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

ALPHEAUS.
“Cheese” —
GRAY, 44 —

OF #120 PIONEERS LOOP,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
WILL BE HELD ON SATURDAY,
FEBRUARY 24, 2007, AT 11:00 A.M
AT “THE CHAPEL” OF
BS RESTVIEW MEMORIAL
MORTUARY & CREMATORIUM
Ltd., EAST CORAL ROAD,

3 FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA.OFFICIATING WILL BE

Keith Henfield, Teon Forbes and Javon Jones; Fiancée: Shantel 3 FOE Cr REA TON POLO

; Left to cherish his memories are his Mother: Ruby Deveaux-
Lana Cooper, Mrs. Alfreda Cooper, Mrs. Ena Cooper, Mrs. Sylvia : Clarke; Father: Daniel T. Clarke; Daughter: Alpheia LeKeisha
Calvin, Carney, Philip and Eric Cooper and Golston Bain; 3 Great Gray,.6 Sisters: Comine; Enderlyn, Blossom Betty, Rochelle and
grand aunts: Mrs. Prescola Lockhart, Mrs. Naomi Lockhart and | \iother-in-law: Helen Harris Newbold; 4 Brothers-in-law:

| Mrs. Emma Cooper; 1 Great Grand Uncle: Capt. Victor Lockhart; : Tyrone, Charles, Sylvan and Lawrence; 1 Sister-in-law: Hope

2 Sisters-in-law: Paula Henfield and Lisa Lockhart; 1 Brother- : Gray; 1 Aunt Magnolia Deveaux; 1 Uncle: Herman Deveaux of

in-law: Elvis Knowles; 8 Nieces: Vernecia, Kera, Keva, and Fort Lauderdale; 10 Nieces: Portia, Latoya, Terez,: Glendnia,
: ..” } Diane, April, Kendra, Lakell and Danae; 15 Nephews: Kevin,
Makaylah and Kieanna Henfield; 5 Nephews: Keithan and Keilo | Mark, Vaughn, Marvin, Tavarus, James, Eddie, Johnny, Deon,
Sherrad, Kevin KP, Ramon, De’ Andre, Wesley Jr., Danard and |
: A Host Of Other Relatives and Friends including; Shoes, Aloe,

: Picket and George.

Marsha; 2 Brothers: Willis Gray Jr. and Wesley Munroe Sr.; —

? VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE “PERPETUAL SUITE”
: OF RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND
Dellarese, Jason and Jamie Cooper, Sammie and Chineme Swann CREMATORIUM LIMITED, I1-A EAST CORAL ROAD,

: FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA ON FRIDAY FROM 12:00
? NOON TO 5:00 P.M, AND AT THE CHAPEL ON SATURDAY

Colebrooke, Monique and Whitney Bain, Sharon, Ali and Shaquille FROM 2 30 UNIT See ee

Pinder, Mazie, Rowland and Navado Stuart, Debbie and Perry |
Charlton and the Freeport Gospel Chapel family. |










THE- TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Demeritte’s

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 23

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

BUN aa ers al eel

DEACON PHILLIP
BERRYMORE BERNARD
SWANN, 77

a resident of Highbury Park and formerly
of Freeport, Grand Bahama, will be held
at Zion Baptist Church, East & Shirley
Streets, on Saturday at 10:00 a.m.
Officiating will be Rev. T.G. Morrison,

assisted by Bishop J.M. Swann, Rev..
Michael Pinder and associate ministers

and deacons. Interment follows. in
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

Left to mourn the passing of this giant of a man, are his wife of 53 years, i
Myrtle Irene (nee Howell); children, Maxine, Phillip Jr., Jacqueline, and :
Madge Swann, Barbara Ferguson, Brenda Jenoure, Paula Smith and Dale

Neely-Swann; sisters, Leo Palmer, Cecelia Handfield, Theresa Henfield,

Kathleen Grant, and Jane Swann; brothers, Bishop Joseph, George and
Clifford Swann; sisters-in-law, Rosalind, Lorraine, Herma, Bathsheba, }
and Deborah Swann and Ellen Howell; brother-in-law, Willis Henfield ;
Sr.; adopted children, Ivy Hall, Claire Pinder and Shadrack Johnson; two }
daughters-i in-law, Heather Swann and Tonya Neely-Swann; two sons-in-: }

law, David Ferguson and Dwight Smith; 17 grand children, Laverne
Horton, Darius Ferguson, Dameeka Roberts, Marissa Haven, Royce
Jenoure, Joshua Swann, Dominic and Danielle. Smith, Degregory (Stephen) |:

Cox, Jovann Burrows, Shaunte Forrestant, Tonico Neely, Samantha,
Avardo, Scott, Marlin and Dion Williams; 1 aunt, Kathleen Phillips;
grandsons-in-Iaw, Craig Horton and Alexis Roberts; ‘great grand-children,

Ashley Mackey, Keishon Fegruson, Craig Jr., Chauncey and Cameron
Horton, Mchale Haven, Samia Rolle, Carrington Hylton, AJ and Avard ;
Williams; nieces including, Elainé Cartwright, Vera Bailey, Bathsheba : |

- Cleare, Lera Smith, Rosetta Robinson, Jessica Reymer, Francine Virgil,

Cassandra Swann, Louise Williams, Zennith Palmer, Edith Humphrey,
Kaye Stubbs, Myrtis Roberts, Cecelia Forbes, Deloris Grant-Francis,

Vanice Delancey, Girlie and Linda Rigby, Pearline Forbes, Minid Gardiner,

Leo Palmer, Emily Swann, Cecelia Butler and Janet Hall; Beverly Howell-
i Mrs. Paula Adderley of Nassau, Bahamas; three brothers, Eric Rolle of

Williams and Temera Howell-Robinson; Pamela and Dorothy Handfield;

nephews including, Bishop Ghaly, Joseph Jr., Michael, George, Rufus. :
~ and Melvin Swann; Wendal, Willet, Brian and Oliver Swann; Cleophas
i Alphanso Adderly, Leslie Dean and Cephas Dean of Nassau, Bahamas;
i three sisters-in-law, Deidra Rolle of West Palm Beach, Florida, Stacy

Jr. and Douglas Swann; Alvin, Edwin, David, Douglas, Philip E.M. (Dr.),
Samuel and Nathan Swann; Samuel and George Ebenezer Swann; Maxwell,

Howard, Lincoln and Kenneth Grant; Norman Lightbourne, Rev. |
MacPherson (Mack) Duncanson, Bishop Enos Gardiner; Calvert, Kenneth
: Nassau, Bahamas; five aunts, Mrs. Iris Bonamy, Ms. Dorothy Rolle, and
~ Keith, Howard, Conrad, Randy and Edgar Howell; his care-taker: Val ;
Francois; Other relatives and friends including, Lorraine Moss, Alfred :
Phillips, Arthur Phillips, (the rest of Lorraine sisters), Cecila Harris, and }
family, Rey. Wellington, Pinder and family, Rev. Michael Pinder and }
family. Rev. Haywood Cooper and family, the entire congregation of ;
Upper Zion Baptist Church, Pinder's Point, Grand Bahama, Rev. and Mrs.
T.G. Morrison and the entire congregation of Zion Baptist Church East }
: and friends.

and Benton Henfield; Thomas Lightbourne; Chris and Franklyn Rigby,

and Shirley Street, Bishop and Mrs. Samuel Greene and the entire
congregation of Zion Yamacraw Baptist Church, Charles and Louise Hall,

Calvin Morley and, family, Wealthy Hall, Minister Sherlyn Hall and }
family, Minister Ena Pintard and family, Tonki Hall, George and Gershum
Swann, Elaine Swann, Ms. Nicki Ellis, Mr. Gaitor, (Alfred.) Ms. Edith :
Forbes, staff and tenants of Cove House Condominiums Freeport Grand.



: Bahama, Mrs. Leoni Grant and Friends from Smith's Point Grand Bahama,
: Mr. and Mrs. Drexel Wallace and family, Henry, Gordon, Wellington,
? Delroy Derrick and Albert Williams of Provodenciales, Rev. Father Dr.
? Roland Hamilton, Terrell and Pammy Taylor, Mr. and Mrs. Reaves Bartlett,
} Alfred Johnson, Rupert Jenoure, Evelyn Ferguson and family, Mispah
i Bosfield and family, Tom and Sheila Knebel and family of South Dakota,
i The Highbury Park community, Mr. Levon Moxey, Dewitt and Pam
i Duncanson, Keturah Ferguson, Department of the Auditor General, Royal
: Bank of Canada, PMH Lab, the Kerzner families of Atlantis, the Cove ©
: and the One & Only Ocean Club, Bahamas Bakery, Nortel, Ft. Lauderdale

Office, Dr. Turnquest and the Oncology Department of the P.M.H. The.

Hall, Grant, Howell, Rigby, Phillips, Outten and Hamilton families, other |

: family and friends in Freeport, Nassau, USA and Turks & Caicos too —
: numerous to mention. lf we have omitted anyone's name, please be assured

; that it was not intentional and we ask your forgiveness at this time.
: Donations can be made to the Cancer Society in memory of Phillip Swann.

Friends may pay their last respect at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market

! Street from 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Friday and on Sse at the church

from 9:00 a.m. until service time...

_ ANTHONY HARRIS
: "JOKER " ‘
ROLLE, 33

\\| a resident of Hynes Alley, will be held
=| at New Testament Baptist Church,
‘Dolphin Drive, on Saturday at 11:00 a.m.
| Officiating will be Dr. Dave Adams.
Interment follows in Southern Cemetery,
Cowpen and Spikenard Roads.

| Anthony is survived by, his mother, Mrs.
Thelma Rolle; four sisters, Ms. Shirley
Rolle Port St. Lucie, Florida, Ms. Vangie
Rolle, of Miami, Florida, Mrs. Linda Albury of Hollywood, Florida, and

West Palm Beach, Florida, Philip Rolle and Kenneth Rolle of Nassau,
Bahamas; four brothers-in-law, Nelson Albury of Hollywood, Florida,

Rolle and Yvonne Fowler-Rolle of New Providence; three uncles, Martin .
Munroe of Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera, James Munroe, and Simeon Rolle of

Mrs. Olga Munroe of Nassau, Bahamas, Merlyn Munroe and Thelma
Rolle of Tar pum Bay, Eleuthera, and Mrs. Evelyn Rolle of Cat Island;
nine nieces, Angela Kemp, Andrea Gerring; Symeka Lee, Mavis Carte,
Deandrea, Felicia, Philippa, Anastasia Rolle, and Alicia Adderley; eleven
nephews, Quincy Dean, Robert Rolle, Johnathan Dean, Tommy
Lightbourne, Sean Kemp, Raoul Philips, Demetrius, KenVaughn Rolle,
Kenu Adderley, Philip Rolle Jr. and Kody Rolle, a host of other relatives

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market
Street, from 1:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m. on Friday and on Saturday at the church

from 10:00 a.m.-until service time.
: May His Soul Rest In Peace.









PAGE 24, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007

Demeritte’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR



SHANEKA SHAVONNE
McKENZIE, 20

Road.

Left to cherish her memory are her parents, Lynette Ambrister and
Gregory Adderley; step father, Zehaniah Armbrister; step mother, Andrea }
Adderley; adopted parents, Livingston and Yvonne Cooper; grand
parents, Dorothy Ferguson and Dudley and Genesta Adderley; great :
grand mother: Rose Knowles; 12 sisters, Roshanda, Tishara, Shandica,
Latovia, Lakeisha, Genesta, Ashley, Lashonda, Khadeishia, Deandra, :
Shaquille and Shaquae; 4 brothers, Kenton, Don, Gerez and Lanando; :
2 nieces, Rishanti Black and Lavetra; 2 step sisters, Farrah and April; :
2 step brothers, Jamaal and Ron; aunts and uncles including, Joseph }
and Karen Adderley, Crpl 394 Dawson and Evangelyn Smith, Dara :
Clarke, Vaccaro Clarke, Terrance Smith, Avernell, Yvette, Trestina, }
Doreen, Marsha, Sherry, Brenda, Debra, Barbara, Dephla, Dudley, Felix,
Sammy, Troy, Henry, Lee, Whitney, Tyrone and Don, grand aunts and :
uncles including, Ann and Andy Ferguson, Shedrick and Jacqueline :
McPhee, Terrance and Eulamae Smith, Dan and Rosemary McKenzie, }
Rudolph and Clyde Ferguson and Felton Rolle; numerous cousins ;
including, Jolando, Jorann, Joseph, K'Shonique, Antonia, Anthony,
Andira, Shequelle, Shadrack and Clyde Jr.; other relatives and friends ;
including, Pastor Roslyn Astwood and the St. Stephens Full Gospel :
Baptist Church family, Yvonne Butler Sands, Anita Collie and family, :
Lisa Rolle and family, Patsy, Hester Dawkins and family, Elder-Gloria :
Flowers and family, Elder Barbara Cooper, Sheila Bain and family, staff :
of Children's Ward, PMH, Carol Pinder and family, Feron Albury, :

Alexander, Devin Francis, Milton, Mike, Karen and Crystallaire Campbell : Adrian, Franshon, Felicia, Lunnise, Sherice, Shakiesha, Krishna, Shakara,

and Margaret Major.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market
Street, from 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Friday and on Saturday at the :

church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

EUSTACE
a: | JONES, 65

a resident of Fox Hill Road and formerly of Stanyard Creek, Andros 4
will be held at Whosoever Will Church of God, Nassau Village East, :
on Saturday at 10:00 a.m. Officiating will be Bishop Burton Johnson,
assisted by Rev. Dereck Bastian and Rev. Delvin Duncombe. Interment
follows in Southern Cemetery, Cowpen and Spikenard Road. ;



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Left to cherish his memory are his 1 daughter, Shirley Astwood; 1 sister,

Cynthia Oliver; 1 uncle, Ellis Whyms; 4 aunts, Gladys Johnson, Marcella

Saunders, Rebecca Walkins and Naomi Whyms.

; : Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market
aresident of Marshall Road, will be held :

at Fellowship Missionary Baptist Church,
Pinewood Gardens, on Saturday at 11:00 :
a.m. Officiating will be Pastor Roslyn :
| L. Astwood, assisted by Pastor Michael :
| Ferguson and other ministers. Interment :
follows in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier ; §

Street, from 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Friday and on Saturday at the
church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.

ZHIVAGO MURRAY, 19

a resident of Peter Street West, will be
held at St. Barnabas Anglican Church,
Wulff and Baillou Hill Roads, on Saturday
at 2:00 p.m. Officiating will be Canon
| Basil Tynes. Interment follows in
| Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.
Survived by, parents, Nicola Sands-
Stubbrshland Murray; step-fathe,r Mark
Stubbs, Spouse "Chip" Akila Colebrook; %
grand-father, George Murray, Eldridge
Sands; grand-mother, Thelma Murray,
Ermite Ferguson-Rattigan; step-grand Father Charles Stubbs Sr.; sisters,
Dimargo Stubbs Ashanti Latesa, Tiffany Murray; brothers, Ashland Jr., .
Teran, Theron; uncles, George Jr., Trevor, Stephen, Shawn, Kevin,
Kenny, Georgie Murray, Glen Sands, Linrick Sands, Charles Stubbs Jr.,
Kevin Knowles, Max Severe, Shawn Stevens, Craig Davis, Steven
Sands; aunts, Georgina Thompson, Sharon Francis, Christine Murray,
Denise Gibson, Georgette Murphy, Tanya Sands, Terry Ferguson,
Brunbell Ferguson, Natasha Ferguson, Maria Ferguson, Dernitria Sands-
Severe; grand uncles, James Murray, Anthony McKinney, William
Hepburn, Joseph Ferguson, Jeffery Saunders, grand aunts, Lynn Lewis,
Ivy Murray, Willamae Hepburn, Marion McDonald, Dorothy Ferguson,
Maria Ferguson, Emmerline Burnside; great grand father, Austin Murray;
great grand aunts, Elizanne Ferguson of Forest Exuma, Rev. Shirley
Evans; great grand uncle, Nathaniel Ferguson of Forest Exuma, cousins,
Chenaralrevia, Dewitte, Deway, Dewaugn, Deandlo, Deasha, Demond,

Makeisha, Shakera, Austin, Shawn Jr., Cosantino, Shon Braee, Reshawn,
Trayvon, Kevin Jr., Tascia, KK, Lenny, Brittany, Candice, Kendaro,
Kenwayn, Kendaro, Angelo, Laamar, Cody Renaldo, Latisa, Linzey,
Anika, Ednel, Laterro, Christazia, Pamela, Kera, Rekisha, Ashanton,

Spentisha, Shadia, Tashania, Tanique, Tawana, Kristen, Christopher,

Tisean, Steven Jr., Shavante, Ruel, Macquel, Kenrick, Mario, Tash,
Tanag, Brittany, Carl, Shavon, Alecia, Lyric, Lindea, Philease, Nathan,
Shante, Briel, Brinique, Brinel, Edeana, Erica, Winsor, Edwin, Eddie,
Lisa, Christlyn, Dandra, Mandy, Vardo, Sammy, Don; his loving
godmother, "Honey" Paulette Hepburn; godfathers, Bursil Daxon,
Lawrence Farrington; adopted grandmother, Euna Evans; godsisters,
India and Tatum Hepburn.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market
Street from p.m. on Friday and on Saturday from 9-12:00 noon and at
the church from 1:00 p.m, until service time.





at

PAGE 26, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007

Rock of Ages Funeral Chapel

Wulff Road & Pinedale
- Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 ¢ Fax: 328-8852

Waly a) Waa ce eed.

PASTOR PETUEL
PIERRE, 34



a resident of Kennedy
Subdivision and formerly of
Gonaives, Hiti, will be held
at Gospel Assembly Church
of Jesus Christ, Minnie Street
& Balfour Ave. on Sunday,
February 25th, 2007 at
2:30pm. Officiating will be
Pastor C. St. Louis, assisted
ep by other ministers of the
gospel. Interment will follow at Southern Cemetery,
Spikenard & Cowpen Roads.



He is survived by his wife, Angemona Pierre; father,
Aveny Pierre; mother, Cadocia Phillip; one son, James

- Pierre; nine sisters, Angelaire, Lanouse, Elucienne,

Yllande, Rosline, Naderge, Avrinna, Altide and
Modeline Pierre; fifteen brothers, Alcemy, Evens,
Pierrelus, Cerest, Heugekne, Ydroge, Thomas, Yquens,
Piekkelius, Francky, Heugerne, Jaennsen, Jenda,
Dieuna and Sainnatis Pierre, James Dort, Angeline
Fabien; father-in-law, Dejeala Pierre; mothers-in-law,
Paulette Fleurmond, Derzelie Ynnocent and Thyborle
Demonsterne; sisters-in-law, Solanise, Manex and

~ Wissselande Pierre, Quilande and Fleurmond; brothers-

in-law, Alverson Fabien, Joel Dort, Luckman Bathelmy,
‘Jeanbe, Manex and Frinal Pierre; cousins, Raymond,

Raketth, Ricot and Walner Pierre, Claudy and Kazzo |

Innoncent; uncles, Estelus, Thomas and Pierretilus
Pierre, Mathely, Odyllond and Eludieu Philippe; aunts,
Norette, Micheline, Adeline, Annette, Junior and

- Tourtout Pierre; and a host of other relatives and
friends including, Maccene Osias, Eslane Bodrien, }

Antoinnette Francois, Philippe Robes, Borgella
Barthelus, Pastor Diene Mertius, Othanis Francois,
Occean Innocent, Patrick, Nesly and Rocheny Pierre.

Friends may pay their last respects at Rock of Ages |

Funeral Chapel on Wulff Road and Pinedale on
Saturday from 10am to Spm and on Sunday at the
church from 1:30pm until funeral time.



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Publish your

CARD OF T
or

IN LOVING MEMORY





in The Tribune’





RELIGION

ce AL

@ SHOWN are members of the St Matthew's Anglican Church family



St Matthew’s Anglican Church:
205 years of faithful ministry

he family of St Matthew’s Anglican Church
community today announced plans to cele-
brate the 205th Anniversary of the church’s
faithful ministry to the community and the country.

The cornerstone of the edifice known as St
Matthew’s Church was laid in 1800 and according to
historic records, the building was erected without
steel reinforcements. This explains the enormous
pillars and the anusually thick walls. The building
has stood the test of time.

The opening service was conducted by the first
Rector, Reverend Henry Groombridge on J uly 18,
~ 1802.

Several important events are planned to com-
memorate that momentous occasion in the life of St
Matthew’s. They will all culminate with the dedica-
tion and homecoming in July 2008.

‘The Great Fair’ scheduled for Saturday, June 23
will kick off the events for this celebration. The
Great Fair promises to be an event to remember as
the islands of the Bahamas will be represented at
the fair with their native dishes. The Great Fair will
culminate in a cultural evening with the leading
Junkanoo groups of the country gathering on
Dowdeswell Street near the fair grounds and
parade onto the eastern parade. Marching bands of
the community will also descend on the Eastern

Â¥

The cornerstone of the
edifice known as St Matthew’s
Church was laid in 1800 and
according to historic records,

the building was erected
without steel reinforcements.
This explains the enormous
pillars and the unusually
thick walls. The building
has stood the test of time.

Parade at the fair grounds adding to an afternoon
of musical fun and entertainment on this spectacu-
lar Saturday in June. ,

Beginning in July the parish will host a distin-
guished lecture series, and an invitation has been
extended to Reverend Dr John Holder, Bishop of
Barbados, to be the first lecturer in the series. And
throughout the 205th year former Rectors of St
Matthew's will be invited to- participate in the
series.

The 205th anniversary year will conclude with a
gala honours banquet. :

Many prominent citizens and priests have served
the Anglican community and the country through
St Matthew’s and quite a number of them will par-
ticipate in the events planned to commemorate this
important anniversary year.

A special press conference will be held in May to

“Jaunch the 205th anniversary celebrations, and at

that time further details of activities will be provid-

‘ed.

© Members of the St Matthew's family as well as
the general public can help to prepare for the cele-
brations, please contact Churches’ office or the
Rector, Reverend Dr James Moultrie, assistant
priest, Father Don Haynes or members of the vestry.



Anglican
- Mission





@ THE Reverend Robert McLean Thompson, Suffragan Bishop of Kingston, Jamaica

nder the theme
“Mission and
Ministry”, the

annual Anglican Diocesan
Lenten Mission will run
from Sunday, February 25 to
Friday, March 2, at St John’s
College auditorium,
Stapledon Gardens. The
service will begin nightly at
7pm with Praise and
Worship.

The preacher for this
year’s mission will be the
Reverend Robert McLean
Thompson, Suffragan

Bishop of Kingston, .

Jamaica. Bishop Thompson
was educated at Jamaica
College, — the United
Theological College of the

West Indies, McGill ~

University, and Episcopal
Divinity School, Cambridge.

He served as Curate at the
Church of St Mary the
Virgin, Rector of St Jude’s,
Stony Hill and later St
Andrew Parish Church, Half
Way Tree. He was made a
Canon of the Cathedral in
June 2001, and was elected
as the third Suffragan
Bishop of Kingston at the
Synod of March 2005, and
consecrated and ordained in
May 2005.

Bishop Thompson has
served on several boards and
committees including the
Board of Kingston College
and the Council of the
Institute of Jamaica. He is a
member of the Provincial
Synod of the Church in the
Province of the West Indies
(CPWI) and for seven years
served on the Anglican



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007 | The Tribune _| i

~~ RELIGIO

Sermons, Church Activities, Awards

Diocesan Lenten
kicks off Sunday

ghee
love, not

the nails

See Page

£



Consultative Council which
facilitates cooperative work ©
among the Churches of the
worldwide ~ Anglican
Communion.

As Suffragan Bishop he is
a member of all boards and
committees of the diocese of
Jamaica and the Cayman
Islands. He is married
Charmaine Thompson and
they have two sons, Matthew
and Joseph.

‘During the annual session
of Synod held in October,
2005, the diocese of the
Bahamas and the Turks &

_Gaicos Islands unanimously

adopted a proposal to invite

- the entire-diocese to engage

in an intentional study of
Mission and Ministry, which
will result in a new mission -
statement and a ten-year
plan for the diocese.

Archbishop Gomez has
called on all members of the
diocesan family to become
partners in this new initia-
tive. .

Hundreds of Anglicans
are expected to attend the
week of services in an effort
to get closer to God during
this penitential season. Lent
is a 40-day season of prepa-
ration for Easter, and is used
as a period of spiritual disci-
pline, prayers, extra acts of
worship, and self-denial. -

Lent begins on Ash
Wednesday and ends-on
Holy Saturday, the day --
before Easter. The last week
of Lent is called Holy Week,
beginning with Palm Sunday,
and including Maundy .
Thursday and Good Friday.



PAGE 22, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007 THE TRIB
Fr TRY | ) i

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PAGE 24, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Rice criticises Russian general's

'

'
'

@ BERLIN

SECRETARY of State
Condoleezza Rice on
Wednesday called a Russ-
ian general’s warning that
Poland and the Czech
Republic risk being target-
ed if they host U.S. missile
defense bases “extremely
unfortunate.”

Rice also repeated

‘assurances the system does

not threaten’ Russia,
according to Associated
Press.

Gen. Nikolai Solovtsov,
head of Russia’s strategic
missile forces, said Monday
that Russia might train its
missiles on the two coun-
tries if they accept a U.S.
proposal to base 10 inter-
ceptor missiles in Poland
and a radar in the Czech
Republic.

“JT think that was an
extremely unfortunate
comment,” Rice said at a
news conference in Berlin,
adding that the system did
not threaten Moscow’s
forces “and we have had
the opportunity to explain
that to Russia.”

Threat

‘She said the U.S. has
made clear to Russia that
the system would be to
counter any missile threat
from Iran. The system is
too small to stop Russia’s
large nuclear arsenal, she
said.

“Anyone who knows
anything about this knows
that there is no way that 10
interceptors ... are a threat
to Russia or that they are
somehow going to dimin-
ish Russia’s deterrent of

MU A ILC





@ U.S. SECRETARY of State Condoleezza Rice during a media conference in Berlin on Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2007. Rice on
Wednesday called a Russian general's warning that Poland and the Czech Republic risk being targeted if they host American missile defense

bases "extremely unfortunate."

thousands of warheads,”
Rice said.

“J think everyone under-
stands that with a growing
Iranian missile threat,
which is quite pronounced,
that there need to be ways
to deal with that problem,”
she added.

The missile dispute is
chilling relations between
Moscow and Washington

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in Russia.

Russian Foreign Minister
Sergey Lavrov. said
Moscow sees the establish-
ment of the missile defense
sites.as a signal that the
United States wants to gain
nuclear superiority over

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Russia. He dismissed U.S.
claims that it was to
counter Iranian threats.

Located

“If they talk about

‘potential threats coming

from Iran or North Korea,
missile defense elements
should be located in a dif-
ferent place,” Lavrov said
in an interview. published
Wednesday in the daily
Rossiyskaya Gazeta. “We
can’t help noting that these
facilities would be capable
of intercepting missiles
launched from Russia.”
Lavrov said that having
the ability to shoot down

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Russian missiles could
allow the United States to
consider the possibility of
a nuclear strike on
Russia without fear of
retaliation.

He referred to the 1972
Anti-Ballistic Missile
(ABM) Treaty that Wash-
ington quit in order to
develop missile defenses,
saying that it banned mis-
sile defense systems on the
assumption that the fear of
retaliation would prevent
each nation from launch-
ing a first strike.

“Since protection from
the first strike would be
guaranteed, as American
strategists apparently
expect, another temptation

shone OAOO 280064 © 1800 $09 O21.

remark on missile defence

arises — to be the first to
launch a strike, aware that
a chance has emerged to
go unpunished,” Lavrov
said.

The system consists of
interceptor rockets that
release a small kill vehicle
which maneuvers into the
path of oncoming warheads
and destroys them in a
high-speed collision. Critics
say the system has not
been convincingly shown to
work.

The defensive shield
would protect Europe and
the eastern United States,
complementing bases at
Fort Greely, Alaska, and
at Vandenberg Air Force
Base in California, which
are positioned to guard
from any North Korean
missile launch.

Warned

Russian President
Vladimir Putin warned ear-
lier this month that the
U.S. plan risks provoking

-a new arms race.

Lavrov followed up on
Putin’s warning that Rus-
sia would take counter-
measures in response to

the U.S. missile sites ,

deployment in Europe.

“We will respond, of
course, but without any
hysteria.

“We can’t afford being
entangled in an arms race
once again,” he said.

He said that Russia and
the United States must

negotiate new arms control |

agreements to improve
mutual trust, particularly
as a landmark Soviet-era
nuclear arms reduction
treaty expires in 2009. - .

Russian, officials have
called for negotiations on
a replacement for START
I, signed in 1991 by the
United States and the Sovi-
et Union, which limits the
number of various types of
vehicles and warheads that
can be deployed by either
side.

be

peat o)] MoS ss ’'S : Wh oO | rtoys| Cay |



Soldier Road ¢ 393-7111 © Fax: 393-0440





ee rn, eo er ee





PAGE 14, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007





Passport

FROM page one

— which requires US citizens to ;

obtain a passport for all inter-
national air travel — is in place,
but that it is being implemented
in a flexible manner.

At this time US travellers to
the Caribbean not in passession

of a passport will not be turned :
away, but will be further edu- :



cated on the need for the prop-

er documents.

“The law is in place, it has
been in place since the 23rd (of :

January) and our officials have :

been instructed to implement it :
in a flexible, common sense }
approach,” Ambassador Rood

explained.

He also emphasised that
“notice will be given before the :

flexibility goes away.”

While observers predicted :
that the WHTI would discour- :
age US citizens from travelling :
abroad and lead to the loss of :
hundreds of millions in revenue :
for Caribbean, so far the }
Bahamas has not recorded any }

negative effects.

The US Embassy said that ;

efforts to educate American :
tourists on the need for a pass- }
port have so far proven success- }
ful, and that they were seeing a }
99 per cent compliance with the :

new requirement.

However, a US Congressman
yesterday argued that the WHTI :

should be scrapped altogether.

In a letter to House of Rep- }
resentatives, Congressman Bri- }
an Higgins is calling for the :
funding dedicated to the WHTI :
to be re-directed to Homeland :
Security and Urban Area Secu- }
rity Initiative (UASI) pro-

grammes.

“T urge you to zero out fund-
ing for WHTI so that we can }
implement sound policy based :

on need, and to use that funding :

to offset other homeland secu- }
rity cuts for programmes that :
already make a difference,” :
Congressman Higgins stated in :

his letter.

He said that the new pass- i
port requirement “would deci- :
mate the economic viability and :

cultural and social fabric” of his
district (the 27th District of New ;

York).

travel,” he said.

John

“J fail to see how requiring :
the use of one form of a pass- :
port or PASS card is more }
secure than the documents cur- }
rently required for cross-border :

Eighty to ninety Morton
Salt workers go on strike

FROM page one

that bargaining unit employees
alone would be subject to hav-
ing their work week reduced
from five to three days because
of a "crisis" brought on by
heavy rainfall.

"They're not averse to some
arrangement but the arrange-
ment has to be for all the
employees - if there's a crisis
everybody participates in the
crisis, that's their position,
which I think is a very reason-
able position," said Mr Fergu-
son yesterday.

Ninety-four employees are
implicated in the reduction.

Meanwhile, supervisory and »

managerial staff will, they
claim, suffer no reduction in
houis or salary.

Mr Ferguson agreed with
statements made by secretary-
general of the Bahamas Indus-
trial Manufacturers and Allied
Workers Union (BIMAWU),
Ms Jennifer Brown, that the
decision to have the reduction
only apply to unionised
employees amounts to "union-
busting tactics."

Ms Brown said that employ- .

ees had suggested other ways
for the company to cut costs in
the wake of the rainfall, but
they "are not interested in
that."

The announcement was the
last straw for the group, it was

claimed, who have also been
seeking the renegotiation of an
industrial agreement over a
period of years.

A strike vote was initially
taken over the industrial agree-
ment and and ratified by the
minister of labour two years
ago, said Mr Ferguson, but
union members held back, hop-
ing that they could peacefully
negotiate a new agreement.

Mr Ferguson claimed that
unfortunately "you can't nego-
tiate in good faith anymore" in
the Bahamas. "You have to go
on strike before people take
you seriously."

BIMAWU stated that meet-
ings last week between union
officers and Morton Salt man-

Attorney General on rally

FROM page one

said, was to unite all PLPs as,
well as friends of the party and
celebrate all the accomplish-
ments of the past five years.

“Whenever you have a fami-
ly reunion you do a lot of talk-
ing, but the whole thing about it
is to enjoy yourself,” she
said.

When asked yesterday on the
Darold Miller show on GEMS
if the country’s issues were
being put on the “backbench,”
Mrs Maynard-Gibson said she
had not heard any particular
criticism directed at the nature
of the rally, but emphasised that
the PLP is very much focused
on the issues that concern the Bahamas.

“The PLP is very much focused on the
issues, we will continue to show very clearly
what has been accomplished, what was set
out in Our Plan and what has been accom-
plished (since 2002),” she said.

As one of the main “bombshells” promised
to be dropped at the rally, Prime Minister
Perry Christie on Tuesday night stated that
the FNM had fast-tracked the permanent res-

Laer dk sorters beh 8 ictal Stabe Innis WAR





m@ ATTORNEY-
GENERAL Allyson
Maynard-Gibson

idency of a person who turned }
out.to be a paedophile. i

Mr Christie accused FNM }
leader Hubert Ingraham of ;
being a hypocrite for objecting :
to US celebrity’s Anna Nicole :
Smith’s permanent residency }
status. i

He charged that at the time :
the former government granted :
the man in question permanent :
residency, the individual ;
already had a well-known his- :
tory of sexual assaults against :
young boys. i

Speaking on the GEMS radio }
show yesterday, the Attorney :
General, who was part of the :
line-up of speakers at the rally, :
said that the PLP sent a strong }
message on Tuesday night: “We are not :
afraid.” ;

She said that the “PLP family” came out in :
force at the rally. i

“It was a wonderful family reunion, we :
haven’t been together in that way for quite :
some time,” she said. i

Mrs Maynard-Gibson confirmed that police :
had estimated that some 12,000 to 13,000 :
people had turned out for the rally in:
Pinewood Park. i

TPT ho)

agement in Nassau had been
prematurely ended as the com-
pany "walked out" of talks
before any issues relating to
the agreement were resolved.

It was at this point that -

employees first threatened
industrial action.

However, vice-president and
executive manager of Morton
Salt, Glen Bannister, said the
union, not management, had
been primarily responsible for
the delays that had plagued the
process so far.

In a statement issued at the
beginning of the week, Mr
Bannister said: "The company
continues to diligently encour-
age the union to finalise the
agreement post haste. The

FNM deputy
leader speaks out:

FROM page one

THE TRIBUNE

a
ote

company will spare no effort
in this regard, but will not be
bullied into any positon which
will jeopardise the efficiency
and productivity of its opera-*
tions." 7A
At press time yesterday i
employees and Morton Salt:
management were in talks:«
However, Ms Brown said that ;
no resolution had yet been
reached. ie
The strike will continue until];
government intervenes, she,,
stated. 54
"We have gone to the gov-,,

“ernment before. The MP for

the island refuses to get,
involved in it - somebody has ...
to come in because this com-
pany is not above the law." _,

4

a4

offended” by the PLP’s race card strategy. ;
“A number of people feel that our Bahamas has moved way

beyond what the Old PLP are trying to drag up, to spread discon- .

tent among fellow Bahamians. But if that’s all they have, then ~

they are in a very desperate state,” Mr Symonette said.

FROM page one

thinking that there was anything
special or unique about my invi-
tation to him on this subject.

“If he really thinks otherwise,
all I can say is, poor fellow,” he
said.

Mr Ingraham, however, told
the FNM rally on Tuesday night
that Mr Christie had approached
him to guide Mrs Pratt because
he was “the one person he could
trust”.

“Fair enough,” Mr Ingraham
said, “I didn’t talk it. Now he
says that he can’t trust me. Well,
when it really counted, he did
trust me. You know Mrs Pratt
was complimented for her per-

aan
2

MIG

PM: Ingraham not :
the only person to:
advise Deputy PM

formance as acting prime minis-
ter. lye
“I take no credit. Some in her’,
own party said that her meet-,.
ings were some of the best they ..
have had in office. I take no
credit,” he said. ee

Mr Christie’s illness was the
first time in the history of an,
independent Bahamas that the, °
authority of the prime minister *’
had to be transferred from an ~
incumbent to another due to ill- *
ness.




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THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 17

Cee TTC

Your look at what’s going on in your community —

Junction’s art |









@ HARL Robinson, representative for the United Nations Population Fund, paid a courtesy call

e. : oe. | @ | 3 |
on the Minister of Social Services and Community Development Melanie Griffin on Tuesday at
+ the Ministry of Social Services headquarters. Shown from left are Alan Strachan, under secretary;
tht Barbara Burrows, permanent secretary; Minister Griffin; Mr Robinson; Mellany Zonickle,

director of Social Services; and Phedra Rahming, officer in charge of Bureau of Women's Affairs. ;
thay ia ‘ (Photo: BIS/Tim Aylen) whe









THE Ministry of Tourism, Atlantis and New Providence Community Church (NPCC) hosted a
reception on Thursday to celebrate the grand opening of WELCOME, an art exhibition by
Antonius Roberts and Tyrone Ferguson. Vernice Walkine, Tourism’s Director General; Obie
Wilchcombe; Minister of Tourism; Clint Kemp, pastor of NPCC; and George Markantonis, new
CEO of ‘Atlantis at Kerzner International were among those present at the art exhibition. &

sa isaaatehay Res Seta Bat (Photos: Derek Smith/BIS)

'
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™@ WELCOME exhibits the ingenious work of Bahamian artists . ae ‘el ;
Antonius Roberts and Tyrone Ferguson. This collaboration pa ee ene —
showcases wooden sculptures done by Mr Roberts and Metal _

Bells and Shield done by Mr Ferguson. The art is on display at
the corner of JF Kennedy Drive and Blake Road.

@ KEMP (centre), pastor of NPCC, is pictured with WELCOME creators Antonius R
and Tyrone Ferguson



oberts (left)



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are

_.} making news in their

| neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award,
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

UMASS
i i i

fy



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PAGE 18, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007 — THE TRIBUNE

sau Students shine

zs | |
= in young chef
Your look at what’s going on in your community es f it o









@ CHEF Sterling
Thompson of The
Bahamas Hotel Training
College, one of the judges
for the event, poses with

SAINTIA Louisaint of A F
Adderley Junior High School
won the 2007 New Providence

h

eee Gua Junior Champion Young Chef
Junior Young Chefs, — Contest, sponsored by Mahat-
(from left) Richae Bain, ma Rice and Robin Hood
13, of S C McPherson, Flour. .

She impressed the judges, all
professional chefs, and earned
391 points with her stylish
“Roaring seafood patty” and
“fruity rice cheese cake
delight.”

Saintia took top honours for
best rice and best flour dishes
from all the judges. |

Richae Bain, 13, of SC
McPherson Junior High School
placed second with 370 points
for “Conchy rice cakes” and
“Pineapple guava cobbler.”

Ashton Fraser of Queen’s
College came third with 357.8
points for her “Cajun style cray-
fish scallion rice cakes” and
“Banana and pineapple frit-
ters.”

i The contest, held at Queens

'MSAINTIA Louisaint of A F Adderley Jr High School won the [011¢ge. is a preliminary to oN
2007 New Providence Junior Champion Young Chef contest... ion Youn Chef finale sched:
She advances to the All-Island Champion Young Chef finals to P 8 '

: seer led to be held March 14 at
be held March 14 to 15 when over $3,750 in scholarships willbe Gu corss Colles re anions ie

awarded - March 15 at CR Walker Senior

High School for senior students,
with over $3,750 in scholarships
Bahamas $. vs
Film Festival 7 “©

who placed second with
370 points; 2007.
champion Saintia
Louisaint; Ashton Fraser
of Queen’s College who
came third with 357.8
points.



available.

The top two New Providence
juniors move on to the Nation-
al Junior Champion Young
Chef competition, explained
Sharon Ferguson, Ministry of
Education home economics
officer, who co-ordinates the
event throughout the nation’s
schools.

Junior High Champion
Young Chef Judges were Chef

a entry Sterling Thompson of the
[pm pease onus af aur monty fin sels atRawson Square J Bahamas Hotel Training Col
Â¥ i lege and Chef Tracey Sweeting ~:
of the Radisson Cable Beac
Resort.

Bahamas iterational Fim Festival (BFF) PLM SOGETY ba putes for fener hl Neda
ete BF is lease ty show the GB BFF New Visions Aver andOscar | S2sp ors, Csi competitors:

; ow ms ‘ ei. ‘Nommetad film HALF NELSON e Chaapiear aad runners-up
Flair Mixologist/Bartender — ~nnnnrnnennnornnennnvsnannnannnnnan ete oe at

respectively, revealed Keith
Parker of P S Advertising and

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS
* Experience bottle juggling and show routines

Atla ntis Invites you to join
our Dynamic
FOOD & BEVERAGE TEAM





PR, who has been co-ordinator -
of the event since its inception,
for Asa H Pritchard Co Ltd,
distributor of Mahatma Rice
and Robin Hood Flour in the

_ Bahamas.



If you meet the requirements apply online today at

www.atiantispijobs.com

‘and explore a world of fantastic opportunities

TLANTIS

(PARADISE ISLAND.



@ RUNNER-UP Richae
T’shura Bain, 13, a ninth
grader at S C McPherson,
placed second with 370 points.



Sates

- HERE TODAY. GONE SOCN.





A GO LLL LR GE GEM



















ee ee








7
BUT IF YOU LIKE ERIG WHY \ SA US,

DID YOD PICK A FIGHT WITH
HIM: MARGO® a

HEY, MR. B.!
THEY CLOSED
OUR SCHOOL ON
ACCOUNT OF
THE SNOW

NORTH But this would e ie wrong way "
@KQ8 to play the hand. ar better
v9 2 approach: is to oe a ae FE BR UARY 23
@#AKJ109 from your hand at trick one, allowing .
$84 West's king to hold the trick! A star= oes Sa arate 20 " :
EAST tling play, no doubt, but it has one . O put in extra®
a a7 ron advantage. It virtually | effort to get the results you want's;
VWAKI854 ¥Q1076 assures the contract, and it’s hard to | Your patience will be tested by a co»
#53 @Q87 find a better reason than that. - worker. Try to keep your cool. So,
&AI76 _ €Q 10532 Let’s see what happens after you | TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21 *¢'
: SOUTH discard at trick one. Assume West | Encouraged by what you’ve accom *,
Pe ER ore y @AJ1095432 leads another heart. You ruff, lead a | plished recently, your ambitions wil¥
EEE ee y— to dummy’s eight, cash the A- } be at an all-time high. With yougs
ANY BRINE: Serle #642 K of diamonds, ruff a diamond and } progressive thinking, you. will. bes!
#K9 finish with an overtrick. able to improve on the details of 3
.The bidding: If the diamonds are divided 4-1 | current project. =
West North East South instead of 3-2, you still make the | GEMINI — May 22/Jun 21 &
iv 2¢ 29 4¢ contract. Let’s say West started with | Difficulties at work or home could bey
59 5¢ Q-x-x-x of diamonds, In that case, | smoothed out easily with a bit of com ~








| 5
el Ww






and a pay increase (6)
19 Where fruit’s concerned, loses out

NED'S STILL AT
THE PARTY.--
ANP RAIDU'S

OUTSIDE ON






A ant — ee Eg et








SS

SS





Esse



THE FIRST TIME
WITH GHE'S STOLENA
LUANN? MAN FROM UNDER



MY BOSS DIDN'T
CLOSE THE OFFICE
ANO I HAVE TO
GO TO WORK

well known (5)
Cross this out, roughly, in part (5)




NEW FRIEND!
— REMEMBER
i BOBBY



I HOPE HIS
BOSS NEVER
BECOMES
OUR SCHOOL
PRINCIPAL.





















BUT SHE'S IN
LOVE WITH
“ALANS



©2007 oy Hees hemes Syndicate, ne. Wert rig ranerved.









"T WAS JUST KIPDIN’ Joey. HAM SANDWICHES -
AREN'T REALLY MADE OUT OF HAMSTERS.”




















SS

Keeping an Open Mind

West dealer.
East-West vulnerable.

Opening lead — king of hearts.

You sometimes have to make a
peculiar play to accomplish your
purpose. For a good illustration, con-
sider this deal where you're declarer




queen“ of diamonds and retums a
club, and down the chute you go.

after cashing the A-K of diamonds,
you ruff dummy’s nine, lead a trump
to the queen and ruff dummy’s ten of
diamonds. Next comes a trump to
dummy’s king and a club discard on
the jack of diamonds — making five,



words with initial capitals and no words with a

hyphen or apostrophe

permitted.
e first word of a phrase is permitted (e.g. inet

in inkjet printer).
TODAY'S

TARGET
Good 29; very good 44; excellent 57 (or more).

Solution tomorrow.



ping
rim
m priming

roping rosin sign signor s

s
sprig spring

gin giro grim grin gri inf imposing
imprison Spso fris ifon mini minor iri

moping nisi origin p

§

SEE? RIGHT ABOUT
YESTERDAN YOUR POPULARITY

















PAGE 26, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007 THE TRIBUNE .
‘COMICS PAGE 2

e

“

‘4

*

DAD, YOUR POUS TOOK | YOUR “OVERALL DAD ?

I THINK RAJU WAS IN THE A BIG DINE THIS NEEK. | PERFORMANCE RATING = #
RIGHT PLACE AT THE ae WAS ESPECIALIN. LOW. ‘
RIGHT TIME TONIGHT! \ ; ‘
; *
4,

~,

rae to'e's ‘eet, oa RT ~"

22 oe
as ae

6 e 8 FF?
&se2 kN

Paes 4 8109 te

“aa!

Fate sate oe te Oe ee LS























THURSDAY,

promise On your part. However, a bad’,
attitude could worsen the situation. )
CANCER - Jun 22/Jul22. #
Just when you thought life was bor“

ing, something exciting happens.«




= - ve spades and West leads the akin 3
| ai ing of earls How would you play despite the 4-1 diamond division. aS ye suddenly feel lighthearteds
NON SEQUITUR the hand? Of course, you must be on your | UIT ANsashe x
: If you proceed with the play toes to overcome the natural inclina- | LEO — Jul 23/Aug 23 Ms

along normal lines, you wind up a__ tion to ruff the opening heart lead. | You could find yourself working o

. trick short of your goal, You ruff the . But if a declarer is by nature a cau-. {many projects at the same time. Don’
' : : res Taw_a round ‘of ‘trumps tious player and vey stops to ne bite off more'than You Can chew... 3#,
andgggentually either try:a diamond the-play, especially at trick one, 1® 1 VIRGO — Aug 24/Sept 22. 28°5°
: : ee iced Sea ane anther should concinde' that dt is better.to | y6it workload Sail be target ine
~n diamond. Either way, East scores his lose the first trick than to win it. usual this week. Overworking ma a
i : mht apentant Pte cause stress, so fina we ume to rest
and relax. eA
} LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23.

z This will be an especially satisfying

k week concerning work or business.
X You will accomplish a great cee ad
i ‘ gain the rewards to prove it. It will ,

i BAL foe oe Ss be worth taking the chance on a

ITN © to vied vA, UX, can make from rE a business deal, but get professional

TIGER the letters shown Sup advice before signing any official

here? In making a SESe documents. This weekend will be

HES EATING word, each letter may wee great for social outings of any kind.

LEFTOVERS Foch must contain the Bape | SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22

centre ener cae there g. Saturday will be an ideal day for

must be at least one e. Es light entertainment and company.

: nine-letter word. No g . On Sunday, you could tire yourself

: wh plurals or verb forms 2 out by too much travel. After the

ending in “s”, no . weekend, you’ll be doing some

much-needed financial planning.

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
A friend will come to you for advice.
Take a logical point of view when
speaking to her. ;
CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
You will be faced with an important
decision. It will be best to follow your
instincts. Make sure you make your
feelings known.

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
You will be spending a lot of time



ACROSS DOWN outdoors, enjoying the weather with»
1 Studious exterior of certain males 2 neue puzzle? (6) friends and family; You “will do
teak Kathy, perhaps (5) x 6) Perec ee
9 Reg Cole as an artist (2,5) 4 Like a for’s grisly end? (3) BcuVity Youre saves In,
10 Sheis in time (5) ; 5 _ Bear disaster at Birkenhead: (5) PISCES —- Feb 19/Mar 20
11 Dance with an eccentric bachelor 6 Bad situations bringing superficial You may be feeling a little unhappy ~
(5) . damage about the behavior of a close friend
12 Some artists can make music with ge (7) ti
it) pale muse 7 Travel erratically out to the right (4) Prctercie a or relative. Don’t let this distract you .
. : 8 Tales of a fabulous fellow (6) Caer War Vaal) 2 as there is not much you can do
13 ue Pennsyfvania 42 - Brainless as Billy? (5) ° including lions about it.
15 Little chap in a horse box (3) 13 People who made pictures without and tigers
17 The hard stuff (4) a bit of pleasure (5)
18 In the red, you want a price cut 14 Explosive part detonated, as is



































wa Ne











































(5) i ’
20 Agreement not to fast during an 16 Can ithelp heap one’s chest a bt
: warm in bed? (5)
22 Siw acne oda bader 18 Rhodesian name? (6) ;
24 What a pity Sadie's lst, that is (3) ff #9 One ina hottle of preventive Krishnan Sasikiran v Viad
25 Stolen from the church in a foreign medicine (7) Malakhov, Aeroflot Moscow 2006.
field (7) 21. light behind in support (6) Silas ianibbec te gtandiniastet
26 Magical bit of bowling? (5) 22 Anintriguing thing to do (6) a tough and successful
27 Leather parts remade? (6) 23 It's of signal usefutness in the loff,
28 With some warmth, soft-heartedly say (6) globetrotter who, just one day
tied in a knot (5) ae after earning £10,000 by shared
29 Not the right member to describe Re Ns teuahy end be neneraree ACROSS DOWN first prize at Aeroflot, was sitting
a) im
the bowling (4,3) ( 1 Severe (5) down ound
30° It’s gold ee you can telll (5) 26 Transaction taking place In Greater 6 Suspends (5) : aed 6) at pe ies tee plied
31. Cries of “Sell out!” at the end of the Manchester (4) 9 Portable a ties put eos
day (5) : 28 Ashot at goal, perhaps (3) container (7) 4 Owned (3) tals cae Ot aaee rah 7
‘ii 10 . Place (6) 5 Model (5) Se va ate ;
I 11, Card game (6) 6 Reap (7) pace taal se ‘es
: 12 Bisect (5) ler siege, So r08
13 Friendly (7) 7 Fever (4) Malakhov's choice is between (a) 36
= 15 Suitable (3) 8 «Opening move Bb7 reinforcing the knight but with oe
: CRYPTIC SOLUTIONS > 17 Minerals (4) (6) a passive position and (b) Qd6 .
w 18 Perceptive (6) 12 Hell (5) offering a pawn for counterplay on 4
ACROSS: 4, Relics 7, Unicycle 8, Spad-ES 10, Slain 13, Poo-R 14, Torn 15, Bows 46, Be-G 17, Flo-p 19, To-Ur 21, Head’s-tart 23, Bars 24, Ho.-LD 26, (May) Hem wi 20 Lifts (6) 13 Snake (5) choice, and what happened when aM
27, Co-O-t 29, Eros 32, RA-MP 33, Front 34, Fi-gu-re 35, Geronimo 36, A-ngela 22. Group of cattle 4 Send (5) Malakhov got it ? ‘nue %
DOWN: 1, Burst 2, C-ig-ar 3, C-yan 4, Resow 5, Lear 6, Clever 9, Postal 11, Low - . font 15 Smouldered (6) tet
12, Infer 13, Pop’s-hop 15, Bod 16, But 18, Lascar 20, (postal) Order 21, Ham 25 Mocks (7) 16 Nurses (5) aaeeee errr a
' 22, T-O-T 23, Benig-N 25, Don 28, Omega 30, Robin 31, S-too-| 32, Rude 33, Frog |, 26. Spice (6) 18 Poplar (5) PUZZLE SOLUTIONS &
27 Horse 19 Vegetables (7) “dn sumed ony AySE9 YOM ayIYYA pue +99%q *
» EASY SOLUTIONS sa ae ®) oe - fruits (6) 9 (peaye abueypxe atp LIM BEXg 9 a5]8) Seg +GPXg “
29 Reform (7) (6) : S gmx) +80%0 » SPXO [SPY E 295%) 195xN Z 90 *
ACROSS: 4, Mumble 7, Readable 8, Tirade 10, Sweat 13, Cane 14, Sari 15, Gold 30 Charred 23 Continue (6) (q) quam aureb a4 359q 5} (2) :WoRMOs sayy a
16, Tea 17, Stem 19, Isis 21, Eliminate 23, Seem 24, Cone 26, Gel 27, Beat 29, remains (5) 25 Attractive (5) ne
Eros 32, Seal 33, Slope 34, Report 35, Evenness 36, Strain 31 Weapon- 28 Centre (4) oe
bearing (5) 28 Resort (3) ‘of
DOWN: 1, Cross 2, Caber 3, Want 4, Metal 5, More 6, Ledges 9, Indian 11, War 12, os
Aisle 13, Comical 15, Gem 16, Tie 18, Timber 20, Steel 21, Eel 22, Not 23, os
Select 25, Top 28, Eaten 30, Rower 31,’Sense 32, Soya 33, Song “
: 4
a



*
=



nn cnerree ne menenny nee wiry Raney ey meee A HANES “TERT AC TITESTEAN ATIC ARCUATE ATT HANNE RS AER PREC RRCESIRNT EPSON TA REN OEMS NR RT PORN TT OE TEN

( f







It’s time to

To help with:

PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007

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| THE TRIBUNE



pr \A reminder for firms —

on Data Protection Act

lhe announcement
made this week by
James Smith, minister.
of state for finance, on the
appointment of George E,
Rodgers as Data Protection
Commissioner, precipitates the
implementation of the Data
Protection (Privacy of Person-
al Information) Act 2003. It
was passed by. Parliament in
June 2003 to protect the pri-
vacy of personal information
on individuals, particularly
consumers, in the Bahamas
and internationally. Mr Smith
said: the Data Protection Act

' will be in full force within a

few months, following Mr
Rodgers’ appointment.

The implementation of the :

Data Protection Act will also
reinforce the need for small,
medium and large business
enterprises to be aware of the
legal implications of using and
misusing private information
on former, existing and poten-
tial customers, This is espe-
cially if the information is used
for purposes other than for
which it was originally
obtained by the business,
which is to identify, monitor
and service its clients,

One of the primary objec-
tives of the Data Protection
Act is to ensure that informa-
tion is obtained by fair and
lawful means, and that it is
used in a manner consistent
with that for which it was col-
lected,

Under the provisions of the
Data Protection Act, persons
collecting and using personal
data on individuals are
required to observe and abide
by specific standards of confi-
dentiality in respect of such
data, They are prohibited from)
transferring personal data to.
jurisdictions with less stringent :
data protection legislation:
without the consent of the per-
son from whom the data i is.
obtained! >

Under Section 2 of the Data |
~ Protection Act:

\

4 by Tyrone Fitzgerald



“Data” means information
in a form in which it can be
processed, —

“Personal data” means infor-
mation relating to a living indi-
vidual who can be identified
either from the data or from
the data in conjunction with
other information in the pos-
session or control of.the data
controller,

“Data controller” means a
person. who, either. alone or
with others, determines the
purposes for which -and the
manner in which - any person-
al data are, or are to be,
processed,

“Data processor” means a

. person who processes person-

al data on behalf of a data con-
troller but does not include an
employee of a data controller
who processes such data in the
course of his employment.

“Data subject” means an
individual who is the subject
of personal data,

The Data Protection Act

applies to both the public and
private sectors, and to the
Crown, However, the Act does
not apply to personal data
which is obtained or used for
matters relating to national
security; information that is
required by law to be made
available to the public by the
data controller; and informa-
tion obtained, secured and
used for family, household and
recreational purposes.

Additionally, the Data Pro-
tection Act applies only to data
controllers who are connected
- to the Bahamas as follows:

* The data controller is an
“ordinary resident, a company
incorporated or registered in
the Bahamas, or an individual

\

who maintains an office,
branch, agency or practice in
the Bahamas and processes the
data in connection with the
business establishment.

. * The data controller is not
established in the Bahamas but
uses equipment in this juris-
diction for processing data that
is not restricted to data in tran-
sit. |

i |

In order to protect the pri-
vacy of individuals and achieve
the primary objectives of the
legislation, the data controller
must be satisfied of the fol-
lowing principles in relation to
the collection, quality and use
of personal data:

* The data should be col-
lected and used fairly, and by
lawful means,

* The data should be accu-
rate and kept up to date,

* The data should be kept
for specified purposes.

* The data should be ade-
quate, relevant and not exces-
sive in relation to the purpose
for which it is kept.

..* The data should not be dis-
closed in a manner that is
inconsistent to the purpose for
which it is kept,

* The data should not be
kept for longer than is neces-
sary except where the data is
historical, research or statistical
data; |

* The data should be kept
securely from unauthorised
access, alteration, disclosure,
destruction or accidental loss.

An individual has the right
of access to personal data kept
on him under Section 8 of the
Data Protection Act, except
where the personal data is kept

_ for the purposes of preventing,

detecting or investigating
offences; prosecutions; tax col-
lection or assessment; or if such
personal data is prejudicial to

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4B | WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2007

AIRLINES

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

JetBlue offers “customer bill of rights’

* JET BLUE

and up to the value of the
ticket.

JetBlue also vowed to
deplane passengers if an air-
craft is delayed on the ground
for five hours.

The airline said it was fully
operational on Tuesday after
a sequence of events led to
the cancellation of 1,096
flights, tarnishing the reputa-
tion of a carrier known for its
low fares and customer ser-
vice.

More than 100,000 passen-
gers were affected.

Snow and extreme temper-
atures last week froze equip-
ment and grounded the com-
pany’s planes at JetBlue’s

terminal at John F. Kennedy .

International Airport in New
York, trapping certain passen-
gers inside the plane for as
long as 10 1/2 hours.

JetBlue said it waited too
long to call for help to get pas-
sengers off the planes because

PHILIP MORRIS

it had hoped the weather
would let up and flights could
proceed.

Bad weather delays and
cancellations led to a spike in
customer complaints that
flooded the company reserva-
tions system, and many of
pilots and flight crews ended
up stuck in places other than
where they were needed.

NO SYSTEM IN PLACE
When the weather struck
Feb. 14, JetBlue didn’t have a
system in place to reroute so
many stranded flight crews,

something it said it is working.

to rectify within a few weeks.

“What we did was wrong
and we. didn’t have a plan,”
Neeleman said. He called last
week a “somber” time.

To prevent future break-
downs, Neeleman said JetBlue
will put in place a reserve
force of employees in the
New York area who can aid
the airline in a crisis.

“Had we had that in place

for this event, it would have
been much better,” Neeleman
said.

Neeleman said JetBlue’ s
reservation operations center
in Utah was also over-
whelmed.

“We are addressing that
very aggressively,” he said.

Since those “cascading
events,” Neeleman has been
making the media rounds, try-
ing to convince investors and
customers that the airline will
recover as it struggles to keep
fares down and earn a profit
in the face of mounting costs
related to fuel and other
issues.

“This is a great company,”
he said. “We’ve had seven
years of unbelievable ser-
vice.”

The debacle is sure to hurt
JetBlue’s bottom line. Pruden-
tial analyst Bob McAdoo
wrote in a note to investors
that “revenues and added
expenses will cost the com-
pany about 4 to 6 cents in the

March quarter.”

REFUNDS AND CREDITS

Neeleman said he expects
JetBlue to hand out $26 mil-
lion in refunds and credits
and another $4 million in
incremental expenses such as
paying overtime for crews
and chartering airplanes.

Neeleman said the com-
pany would provide more
details about those costs in a
filing later Tuesday with the
Securities and Exchange
Commission.

It’s not clear if the damage
to JetBlue will hurt its future
prospects.

McAdoo suggested the
effects would be temporary.

“Although the press cover-
age of JetBlue’s problems has
been widespread, the prob-
lems experienced are not
likely to be repeated nor any
negative impact on the com-
pany’s reputation be long last-
ing,” he wrote in a note to
investors.

Verdict thrown out against cigarette firm

* PHILIP MORRIS

smoked two packs a day of
Philip Morris-made Marlbo-
ros for 45 years.

His widow argued that the
jury award was appropriate
because it punished Philip
Morris for a decades-long
“massive market-directed
fraud” that misled people into
thinking cigarettes were not
dangerous or addictive.

She won compensatory
damages of $800,000 and
punitive damages of $79.5 mil-
lion — 97 times the compen-
satory damages — in the

fraud lawsuit she filed against

Philip Morris.

A state court previously
cut the compensatory award
to $500,000, which is unaf-
fected by Tuesday’s ruling.

The case now goes back to
the Oregon high court, which
could order a new trial,
reduce the award or reinstate
its decision.

Punitive damages are
money intended to punish a
defendant for bad behavior
and deter repetition.

Lawyers who defend com-
panies against product-liabil-
ity claims said Tuesday’s rul-
ing would help curtail large
jury awards.



; For Satie Reraeien eee e-mail :



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A jury will have to be told
“that it cannot punish for con-
duct that may be directed to
others. That’s really the cru-
cial part of this decision,” said
Sheila Birnbaum, who won a
punitive damages case in 2003
when the Supreme Court
struck down a $145 million
verdict against State Farm
Mutual Automobile Insurance
Co.

Yet trial lawyers on the
other side of the issue said the
court could have severely
restricted plaintiffs if it had
chosen to spell out how high
punitive damages could go in
relation to actual damages.
Philip Morris argued that
punitive damages should not
exceed 4 times the amount of
actual damages, also known as
compensatory damages.

The court instead stated a
principle that state courts
already adhere to widely and
one that the Oregon Supreme
Court also applied.

“There is almost no court
in this country that has been
applying a standard that you

RETAIL

punish someone for harm
done to others,” said Arthur
Bryant, executive director of
Trial Lawyers for Public Jus-
tice. “I don’t think it’s a set-
back at all.”

Philip Morris vice presi-
dent William Ohlemeyer said
the decision gives the com-
pany “an opportunity to fully
and fairly defend itself in this
and other cases.”

The Chamber of Com-
merce, National Association
of Manufacturers and trade
associations representing car
and drug makers have
weighed in on behalf of
tighter restrictions on damage
awards.

The case also was watched
closely as a test of whether
the new makeup of the

‘‘t0 Sapreme Court would lead to

changes in its prior rulings
limiting punitive damages.

Roberts and Alito, the two
newest members, were in the
majority Tuesday, giving no
hint of a change in the court’s
approach to punitive dam-
ages.

Wal-Mart’s profit
increases by 9.8%

*RETAIL

president of Wal-Mart’s U.S.
stores division, for his initia-
tives in strategy and in cutting
costs for labor and inventory
in Wal-Mart’s largest busi-
ness.

The U.S. stores account for
nearly 70 percent of. total’
group sales, followed by
Wal-Mart International and
Sam’s Club membership
warehouses.

Scott praised the strategy
launched last year by Castro-
Wright, who has returned
Wal-Mart to deep discounts
on items like electronics and
holiday toys after a brief foray
into trendier merchandise.

LOCAL DEMOGRAPHICS

At the same time, Castro-
Wright has started a three-
year effort to tailor stores
more closely to local demo-
graphics.

“I believe in the strategic
plan that is guiding our U.S.
stores,” Scott said in a
recorded conference call for
investors.

Castro-Wright also spear-

headed inventory reduction
and cost cutting last year,
allowing U.S. store operating
profits to grow 11.3 percent in
the fourth quarter, ahead of
sales growth of 6.7 percent.

Those cost controls
include a new scheduling sys-
tem that matches staffing
more closely to peak shop-.
ping hours, a decision to close
layaway departments late last
year and a reduction in the
size of accounting offices at
each store.

CRITICIZING SYSTEM

Critics have charged that
the new scheduling system
cuts hours for individual
workers and requires too
much flexibility from its
employees.

Detractors like WakeUp
Walmart.com maintain that
the company’s decision to
eliminate layaway programs
hurts low-income shoppers
by denying them the chance
to buy an expensive item over
time.

Meanwhile, Wal-Mart ‘is
achieving its goal of growing
inventory at half the rate of
sales.

That has helped return on
investment, a key metric that
drives stock price, which rose
at Wal-Mart’s U.S. stores.

Merrill Lynch analyst Vir-
ginia Genereux said the cost-
cutting measures would con-
tinue to help Wal-Mart’s
results this year.

“If apparel and home
[same- store sales] materially
improve this year, the stock
should respond well,” Gener-
eux said in a research note.

Those two areas are where
Wal-Mart had the most trou-
ble last year, while electron-
ics, food and pharmacy did
well. Charles Holley, execu-
tive vice president of finance
at Wal-Mart Stores, said dur-
ing the conference call that
sales of apparel and home fur-
nishings “continue to be
softer than we would like.”

Still, even some skeptical
investors said they saw signs
of improvement in the U.S.
that complement Wal-Mart’s
growth overseas.

MAYBE SOME MOMENTUM

Fund manager Patricia
Edwards, who has long been
doubtful about Wal-Mart’s
ability to keep up with faster
growing rivals like Target,
said the latest results con-
tained “some signs that they
might be getting it”.

Edwards said the changes
in strategy and costs at
Wal-Mart U.S. may give the
retailer momentum for
growth in the year ahead.

MiamiHerald.com _| THE MIAMI HERALD

BUSINESS BRIEFS





e BANKING





RECORD
PROFIT:
Barclays
profit
before tax
and
exceptional
items rose
35 percent
to arecord
$13.9 billion.
The
company
logo for
Barclays,
left, is seen
at their
Holborn
branch in
London.

Barclays says profit
rises 33% in 2006

From Herald Wire Services
Barclays (BCS) reported on Tuesday that net profit rose
33 percent in 2006, and claimed that the worst was over for its
Barclaycard business, which posted a sharp fall in profit.

‘The company, Britain’s third-largest banking group by
market capitalization, earned $8.92 billion. The bank did not
break out fourth-quarter results.

Profit before tax and exceptional items rose 35 percent to a

record $13.9 billion. Barclaycard pretax profits were down 40
percent to $745 million despite an 8 percent growthin

income.

e HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME DEPOT REPORTS
28% FALL IN 4Q PROFIT

The Home Depot (HD),
the world’s largest home
improvement store chain,
reported a 28 percent drop
in fourth-quarter profit
despite a 4 percent gain in
overall sales. However, sales
at stores open at least a year
fell in'the quarter.’



a slowing home improve-
ment market amid a contin-
ued slump in the housing
sector. The results,
announced before the mar-
ket opened, were in line
with Wall Street expecta-
tions, when expenses
related to severance payouts
to former Chief Executive
Bob Nardelli and four other
executives who left the com-
pany in the final fiscal quar-
ter of 2006 are excluded.

e AIRLINES

US AIRWAYS CEO
JAILED 1 DAY FOR DUI

The chief executive of US
Airways (LCC) will spend
one day in jail for his
drunken driving arrest
shortly after his airline’s
$9.8 billion bid for Delta Air
Lines (DALRQG.PK) was
rejected.

Doug Parker, 45, pleaded
guilty Tuesday morning in
Scottsdale (Ariz.) City
Court to one DUI charge,
according to the court
clerk’s oftice.

e AUTOMOTIVE

NISSAN OFFERING
BUYOUTS IN TENNESSEE

Nissan North America
announced it is offering
buyouts to 6,200 workers at
two manufacturing plants in
Tennessee.

Higher demand for pas-
senger cars, such as the
Altima sedan and Altima
coupe, combined with lower
demand for trucks and sport
utility vehicles results in a
manufacturing mix that is
less labor-intensive to build
and requires fewer assembly
workers, Nissan officials
said in a news release.

The company said it
expects about 300 workers
to accept the voluntary
offers, which include a
$45,000 lump sum payment
plus $500 for each year of
service.



soa 6:35 p.m, Late
Stock Tkr, cl Close Chg. volume

Nasd100Tr QQQQ 44.68 45.04 +36 . 37008
PhelpsDs PD 124.00 124.00 * 28293
FredMac FRE 66.29 66.29 * 25000
Amgen AMGN 66.35 6635 = * 24250
ClearChan CCU 36.43 -3643—* 22315
WalMart WMT 50.26 50.21 ~.05 22219
Crocs CROX 56.00 56.28 +28 20775
HewlettP HPQ 43.13 42.70 +43 20498
FannieM If FNM 59.88 59,88 e 20000
OSI Rest os! 40,51 40.51 : 19688
Level3 WILT 6.55 6.56 +01 18976
SPDR SPY 146.04 = 145.99 -.05

Windstrm = WIN 15.12 15.12 ‘ 16400

Home Depot cited in part::

Impairment charges rose 37 percent to $4.2 billion.

e MEDIA

VIACOM TO LICENSE
TV, MOVIES TO JOOST

Media conglomerate Via-
com (VIA-B) agreed to
license television shows and
movies to Joost, the new
online video distribution
channel launched by the
founders of Kazaa and
Skype. ax

‘” -Under the deal, Viacom’s

‘MTV, Nickelodeon and BET |
television networks and its
Paramount studios will
license shows and movies
for the Joost Internet plat-
form. This comes two weeks
after Viacom pulled Com-
edy Central clips and other
content from Google’s
(GONG) YouTube online
video sharing service, citing
copyright concerns.

Joost, founded by Niklas
Zennstrom and Janus Friis,
is still in testing.

e FRANCE

AIRBUS HEAD CREATING
RESTRUCTURING IDEAS

French Airbus chief
Louis Gallois is drawing up
compromise restructuring
proposals, people familiar
with the discussions said,
after the main German
shareholder blocked a plan

- designed to help the aircraft
maker cope with costly pro-
duction delays and a-weaker
dollar.

Tuesday’s scheduled
launch of the long-awaited
“Power8” strategy was
called off after representa-
tives of DaimlerChrysler
(DCX) refused to endorse
the plan at a Sunday board
meeting of Airbus parent
company EADS.

The defense group said
talks had stalled over where
to build the A350 XWB, a
planned rival to Boeing’s
(BA) 787.

e GERMANY

VOLKSWAGEN: ANNUAL
PROFIT SOARS IN 2006

Volkswagen’s annual
profit more than doubled in
2006, with a gain on the sale
of a car rental business help-
ing offset steep restructur-
ing costs, including thou-
sands of job cuts.

Europe’s biggest auto-
maker said it earned $3.61
billion in 2006.

Sales rose ll percent to
$137.8 billion.

4pm, 6:35 p.m, Late
Stock Tk. ‘dose close Chg. volume
SiriusS SIRI 3.92. 3.90 -.02 16173
CaremkRx CMX 63.43 63.43 * 14253
ApldMatl = AMAT — 18.76 18.77 +01 11713
Citigrp c 54.19 54.22 +03 11256
SP Engy XLE §7.35 $7.39 +04 11154
CSXs CSX . 40.42 40.42 . 11000
OilSvHT OlH 13449 134.50 +01 10069
BkNY BK 43.19 43.19 ‘ 9820,
BkofAm BAC 54.05 54.05 . 8489
NovaStar —NFI 17.56 12.32 -5.24 8301
Microsoft MSFT = 28.83 28.75 — -.08 7500
Fortressn FIG 28.19 28.05 «14 6006

For up-to-date stock quotes, go to www.MiamiHerald.com and click on Business



— ~ age I I I I ee RT eee eek ie ee
Ie ee

|

FSA TRIBUNE SPORTS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 5E






















BAR-S
CHICKEN OR
‘(MEAT

Liverpool win
in Barcelona

LIVERPOOL’S John Arne
Riise scores his team’s second
goal against Barcelona in the
Champions League first knock-
out round, first-leg soccer match
at the Camp Nou Stadium,
Barcelona, Spain, Wednesday
Feb. 21, 2007. Liverpool won 2-
1 to leave Barcelona with a dif-
ficult task in the second leg at
Anfield.

(AP Photo/
Dave Thompson)




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‘SB | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007 INTERNATIONAL EDITION

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

__MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD





Florida rebounds, clinches SEC title

From Miami Herald Wire Services

Al Horford scored 20 points, Chris
Richard added a season-high 14, and
third-ranked Florida rebounded from
its first loss in more than two months
with a 63-49 home victory against
South Carolina on Wednesday night.

The Gators, whose 17-game win-
ning streak was snapped Saturday at
Vanderbilt, clinched the Southeast-
ern Conference’ regular-season
championship and improved to 17-0
on their home court this season.

Florida (25-3, 12-1) endured
another slow start, a problem that has

plagued the defending national ~

champion this season and contrib-
uted to the loss against the Commo-
dores. But the Gators got going mid-
way through the first half and
dominated the Gamecocks (13-13,
3-10) most of the night.

Horford presented the most prob-
lems for South Carolina. The

6-foot-10 center scored on putbacks, .

left-handed layups and spinning
drives in the lane, and he even hit
a few jumpers. Horford helped the
Gators with one of their best defen-
sive efforts, too, finishing with at
least four blocks. :

Joakim Noah had six points and
13 rebounds for Florida, and Corey
Brewer had six points and a career-
high 12 rebounds.

Tre Kelley led the Gamecocks
with 19 points on 8-of-20 shooting.

e No. 5 North Carolina 83,
North Carolina State 64: Brandan
Wright scored 24 points, and the Tar
Heels pulled away and won at home.

Tyler Hansbrough added 20
points for the Tar Heels (24-4, 10-3

Cavs eSca

From Miami Herald Wire Services

TORONTO — LeBron James scored
and Anderson Varejao dunked
teammate Sasha Pavlovic’s missed shot with
16 seconds left, lifting the ‘Cleveland Cava-’
liers to an 86-85 victory over the Toronto

29 points,

Raptors on Wednesday night.

Varejao had 16 points and 15 rebounds for
the Cavaliers, who moved three games ahead
of the Raptors in the Eastern Conference.,

A double-teamed James passed to an open



PHIL SANDLIN/AP

NICE NUMBERS: Al Horford scored
20 points, and the No. 3 Gators
stayed unbeaten (17-0) at home.

Atlantic Coast Conference), who
used a huge second-half run to
avenge an upset loss earlier this
month and move into first place in
the league standings.

A North Carolina roster that went
12 players deep proved too much for
the fatigue-riddled Wolfpack (14-12,
4-9), who have played with a short
bench all season and had five players
log at least 29 minutes.

The Tar Heels’ depth even.

extended to the coaching staffs. N.C.
State played the second half without

coach Sidney Lowe, who had been
suffering from flulike symptoms and
was taken to a hospital at halftime

with dehydration. Assistant Monte | :

owe ran the team in the second half.
Brandon Costner scored 18 points
before fouling out with about 2 min-
utes left for N.C. State.
Engin Atsur had 16 points and

’ _ Gavin Grant 14 for the Wolfpack.

e No. 8 Texas A&M 66, Okla-
homa State 46: Acie Law IV scored
19 points, and freshman Donald Sloan
added 15, as the Aggies handed the
Cowboys their most lopsided home
defeat in nearly three decades.

The Aggies (23-4, 11-2 Big 12) made
their first victory in Gallagher-Iba
Arena a memorable one. They had
the largest margin of victory for a vis-
itor since Texas won 108-87 in Still-
water on Dec. 12, 1977, embarrassing
the Cowboys (19-8, 5-7) on a night
when former head coach Eddie Sut-
ton was honored at halftime.

Oklahoma State’s Mario Boggan
and JamesOn Curry, who combined
to average 38.7 points entering the
game, each had season lows in scor-
ing. Curry had eight points on 3-for-l1
shooting, and Boggan went 3-for-13 to
finish with seven points and 10
rebounds.

Kenny Cooper scored 10 to lead
the Cowboys, who shot 30 percent.

e No. 12 Georgetown 75, Cin-
cinnati 65: Jeff Green scored 21
points and had a tone-setting block to
help the Hoyas extend their winning
streak to 10 games with a victory over
the host Bearcats.

The Hoyas (21-5, 11-2 Big East)
took control with a 13-point run late



PRO BASKETBALL



pe rival Raptors



GERRY BROOME/AP

EXTRA INCENTIVE: Roy Williams
puts a little scare into his Tar
Heels: North Carolina won 83-64.

in the first half, and the league’s
toughest defense held off its worst
team. Cincinnati (10-17, 1-12) has
dropped nine games in a row, its lon-
gest losing streak in 23 years.

e No. 13 S. Illinois 58, Indiana
State 50: Tony Young scored 13 of
his 15 points in the second half to help
the Salukis (24-5, 14-3) beat the host
Sycamores (12-16, 5-12) and win the
Missouri Valley Conference regular-
season title outright.

Jamaal Tatum also scored 15
points for the Salukis , who won their



10th consecutive game.
e Mississippi St. 83, No. 17
Vanderbilt 70: Jamont Gordon

\ recorded his first career triple-

double — and the second in school
history — with 15 points, 12 rebounds
and 10 assists as the host Bulldogs
(16-10, 7-6 SEC) snapped a 13-game
skid against ranked opponents by
beating the Commodores (18-9, 8-5).

e No. 20 Louisville 72, St.
John’s 48: Terrence Williams
scored 16 points to go with four
rebounds and four assists, and the
Cardinals (20-8, 10-4 Big East) rolled
to victory over the visiting Red
Storm (15-13, 6-9).

e Miami 68, No. 24 Virginia
60: Jack McClinton scored 14 points,
including two late 3-pointers, and the
Hurricanes (11-16, 4-9 ACC) pulled

the upset at home.

McClinton’s 3-pointer with 1:06
left put Miami ahead for good, 61-58.
' Asbury, Anthony Harris and
Dwayne Collins each finished with

ll points, and Collins had 12 of his |

14 rebounds in the second half.

Sean Singletary scored 17 points to
lead the Cavaliers (18-8, 9-4 ACC).

e Tennessee 69, No. 25 Ala-
bama 66 (OT): Chris Lofton scored :
20 points, JaJuan Smith added 16, and
the Volunteers (19-9, 7-6 SEC) rallied
to beat the Crimson Tide (19-8, 6-7)
in overtime. |

Tennessee, still hoping to get an
at-large bid to the NCAA tourna-
ment, improved to 15-0 at home.

The Crimson Tide came back
from nine points down in the second
half, but the team struggled with a
season-high 26 turnovers.



EASTERN CONFERENCE

SOUTHEAST WL Pet. GB 110 Str. Home Away _Conf
Washington 30 21 588 - 6-4 W-2 20-7 10-14 20-10
Orlando 27 28 «491 «5 46 L-2 1810 9-18 15-19
Miami 26 27 «491 «57-3 LA 15-10 11-17 13-15
Atlanta 21 33 .38910% 46 L-2 916 12-17 12-21

Pavlovic, whose 3-point attempt hit the rim



before Varejao emphatically dunked it while
falling to the floor for the final points.

TJ. Ford missed badly on a layup for the
Raptors, and Morris Peterson missed a
jumper at the buzzer.

Chris Bosh had 24 points and 10 rebounds
and Andrea Bargnani scored 18 points for the
Raptors, whose eight-game home winning
streak ended.

James went 3-for-10 and had‘10 points at
halftime, but he heated up in the third quar-
ter, scoring 10 points in the first 5 minutes.

SPURS 103, HAWKS 96 ¢

ATLANTA ‘— Manu Ginobili scored a
season-high 40 points — including 24 ina
row for San Antonio in the first half — and
Tim Duncan had 30 points, leading the Spurs.

Entering the game late in the first quarter,
Ginobili missed two of his first four shots
before hitting six in a row from the field and
all seven attempts on free throws. The Spurs
led 39-23 at the end of his flurry, and Ginobili
had 27 points on 9-of-13 shooting at the half.

Joe Johnson scored 30 points for the
Hawks, who have lost two games in a row.

PACERS 136, BUCKS 129 (20T) ;

INDIANAPOLIS — Jermaine O’Neal had
29 points and 15 rebounds to help Indiana
outlast Milwaukee. .

Danny Granger added 26 points, and
reserve Marquis Daniels, charged Wednes-
day for his role in a Feb. 6 bar fight in India-
napolis, had 22 points for the Pacers. Indiana
guard Jamaal Tinsley, also indicted Wednes-
day, finished with 11 points.

Michael Redd had 38 points for Milwau-
kee. Mo Williams added 24 points for the
Bucks, who were down by as many as 18
points in the first half. te

HORNETS 111, NETS 107

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — David West Webber, limited to 22 minutes by a first-
scored a season-high 32 points, and Chris quarter eye injury, went 8-for-10 from the
Paul added 19 points and 1l assists, leading floor, and Hamilton and Chauncey Billups
New Orleans. combined for 35 points on 21 shots.

The Hornets overcame a season-high 46 Dwight Howard had 26 points and 15
points from Vince Carter, who along with rebounds for the Magic.
teammate Jason Kidd has been the subject of
persistent trade rumors as Thursday’s 3 p.m. 76ERS 104, KNICKS 84
EST trade deadline approaches.

Kidd struggled from the field in what
might have been his final game with the Nets,
missing nine of his first 10 shots and finishing Andre Miller scored 19 points, Joe Smith
2-for-14. Two of his misses came on 3-point had 14 and Steven Hunter ll for the Sixers,
attempts in the final minute, with New Jersey who finished 3-4 on their homestand.
trailing 105-101. Eddy Curry scored 22 points and Jamal

Crawford had 14 for the Knicks.
PISTONS 110, MAGIC 88
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. — Chris Webber BOBCATS 100, TIMBERWOLVES 95
and Richard Hamilton each scored 18 points, MINNEAPOLIS — Adam Morrison

and Detroit beat Orlando for its ninth victory scored 26 points — all in the second half —
in the past 10 games. to help Charlotte rally from a 17-point deficit

Pistons in 2003 over Carmelo Anthony, Chris
Bosh and Dwyane Wade, was loudly booed
in his return to the Palace. Milicic was traded
to the Magic last season after averaging
fewer than 2 points per game in two-plus
seasons in Detroit.

PHILADELPHIA — Kyle Korver made six
3-pointers and matched a career high with 31
points, leading Philadelphia.



ADRIAN WYLE/AP

LEAVE ME ALONE: LeBron James of the Cavaliers fights off pressure from Raptors
defenders Anthony Parker, right, and Chris Bosh in the second half Wednesday.

‘Morrison, a rookie forward from Gonzaga,
overcame an 0-for-5 first half, finishing 10-
for-19. He scored 13 consecutive points for
Charlotte late in the fourth quarter.

Matt Carroll added 20 points and Gerald
Wallace had 18 for the Bobcats.

Kevin Garnett had 22 points and ll
rebounds to record his NBA-leading 47th
double-double for the Timberwolves.

LATE TUESDAY

e Suns 115, Clippers 90: Two-time
league MVP Steve Nash had 13 points and 12
assists in his return, and Shawn Marion
scored 31 points, as Phoenix won in Los
Angeles. Nash had missed four’games with
inflammation in his right shoulder.

e Trail Blazers 103, Jazz 100: Brandon:

Roy scored 27 points and Zach Randolph had
20 points and 12 rebounds for host Portland.
Utah had won six in a row.

e Sonics 121, Grizzlies 105: Rashard
Lewis got 21 of his 34 points in the first half,
and host Seattle won its third game in a row.

e Kings 104, Celtics 101: Kevin Martin
scored 22 points and Ron Artest had 18
points for host Sacramento, which sent Bos-
ton to its 19th loss in the past 20 games.



Hou. 112, Miami 102

Miami at Dallas, 9:30

Charlotte 21 33 - .38910%. 5-5 W-3 12-15 9-18 13-20
ATLANTIC W eL. Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away — Conf
Toronto ~ 29 25 537 - 7:3 Ll 198 10-17 20-11
New Jersey 25 30 .455 4% 3-7 1:3 14-14. 11-16 19-14
~ New. York 24 31. .436 5% 55 L-1 14-13 10-18 14-19 =
Philadelphia 18 36. 333. «11 «(5-5 W-1 10-15 8-21 13-18
Boston 13 40> .24515% 1-9 L2 ~§-21 8-19 > 9-24 —
CENTRAL W L_ Pct. GB LIO Str. Home Away Conf
Detroit 34°19 .642 - 91 W-2 18-10 16-9 24-10
Cleveland 32 22 593 2% 7-3 W-2 20-7 12-15 19-14
Indiana 29 24 547 «5 «6-4 W-3 18-10 11-14 20-13
Chicago 30 25 545 5 46 Wel 21-7 9-18 21-10
Milwaukee 19 36 .345 16 19 L-6 11-12 824 9-23
WESTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHWEST WL Pct. GB 10 Str. Home Away Conf
Dallas 44.9 830 - 9&1 W-9 24-3 20-6 = 30-6
San Antonio 37 18 .673 8 6-4 W-4 17-8 20-10 22-11
Houston 34.19 .642.10 7-3 W-1 20-7 14-12 19-17
New Orleans 26 29 .473 19 7-3 W-1 17-11 9-18 15-19
Memphis 14 41 255 31 3-7 L-2 11-17 3-24 = 8-26
NORTHWEST WL Pct. GB L10_ Str. Home Away Conf
Utah 35 18 ..660 - 7-3 L-l 21-6 14-12 20-11
- Denver 26 26 500 8% 4-6 L-2 14-14 12-12 11-18
Minnesota 25 29 .46310% 3-7. L2 16-10 9-19 15-19
Portland 23 32 «418 «13 «46 W-1 13-14 10-18 14-17
Seattle 2 32. 396 14 4-6 W-3 15-13 6-19 10-20
PACIFIC W eL Pet. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Phoenix 41 13.759 - 5-5 W-2 21-6 20-7 20-10
LA. Lakers 30 24 556 11 3-7 LS 19-8 11-16 17-10
Golden State 25 29 .463 16 46° W-1 19-9 6-20 13-17
LA. Clippers 25 29 4.463 «16 3-7 L4 17-10 8-19 14-18
Sacramento 23 29 442 «417 «6-4 Wel 16-12 7-17 12-21
RESULTS AND SCHEDULES
Wednesday’s results Tonight's games Tuesday’s results

Was. 112, Min. 100

Ind. 136, Mil. 129 (207) Chicago at Clev., 7 Cha. 104, NO 100
S.A. 103, Atl. 96 Sac. at Wash., 7 NY 100, Orl. 94
Cle. 86, Tor. 85 Det. 84, Mil. 83
Phi. 104, N.Y. 84 , S.A. 95, Den. 80
Det. 110, Ori. 88 Chi. 106, Atl. 81

N.O. 111, N.J. 107
Cha. 100, Min. 95
Pho. 118, Bos. 108
Mem. at G.S., late
Port. at Lakers, late

Ney NPL ae

Sac. 104, Bos. 101
Por. 103, Utah 100
Sea. 121, Mem. 105
Pho. 115, LA.C. 90

Through Tuesday

SCORING
G FG_FT PTS AVG

Anthony, Den. 37 419 263 1121 30.3

Arenas, Wash. 51 469 397 1480 29.0
Wade, Mia. 45 434 408 1297 28.8
Bryant, LAL 50 475 404 1440 28.8
Iverson, Den. © 36 341 298 1013 28.1
Redd, Mil. 34 309 246 931 27.4
Allen, Sea. 43 404 225 1161 27.0
James, Clev. 51 483 314 1344 26.4
Nowitzki, Dall, 52 450 362 1313 25.3
Johnson, Atl. 49 455 204 1217 24.8
FIELD GOALS

FG FGA PCT
Lee, N.Y. 234 383 .611
Biedrins, G.S. 241 395 .610
Howard, Orl. 346 581 596
Stoudemire, Phoe. 380 642 592
Curry, N.Y. 388 585
Boozer, Utah 410 721 .569
Bogut, Mil. 277 505 .549
Brand, LAC 423 775 546
Okafor, Char. 329 607 .542
Patterson, Mil. 309 572 .540

REBOUNDING
GOFF DEF TOT AVG

Garnett, Minn. 52 136 519 655 12.6
Chandler, NO 52 218 423 641 12.3
Howard, Orl. 54 175 471 646 12.0
Boozer, Utah 45 142 389 531 11.8
Okafor, Char. 53 210 400 610 11.5
Lee, N.Y. 54 188 392 580 10.7
Jefferson, Bos. 45 155 328 483 10.7
Duncan, S.A. 54 156 418 574 10.6
Wallace, Chi, 52 202 335 537 10.3
Marion, Phoe. 53 113 431 544 10.3
ASSISTS

G AST AVG

Nash, Phoe. 47 554 11.8
’ Williams, Utah 52 478 9.2
Kidd, NJ. 52 454 8.7
Davis, G.S. 43 372) (87
Paul, NOk. 37 318 8.6
Miller, Phil. 51 418 8.2
Wade, Mia. 45 353 7.8
Ford, Tor. 46 357 7.8
Billups, Det. 44 332, (7.5
Felton, Char. 50 377, 75

NBA AWARDS



PLAYER OF THE MONTH

November
Eastern Conference: Dwight How-
ard, Orlando Magic .
Western Conference: Yao Ming,
Houston Rockets

December
Eastern Conference: Gilbert Arenas,
Washington Wizards
Western Conference: Kobe Bryant,
Los Angeles Lakers

January.
Eastern Conference: Chris Bosh, To-
ronto Raptors
Western Conference: Steve Nash,
Phoenix Suns

ROOKIE OF THE MONTH >

November

Eastern Conference: Adam Morri-
son, Charlotte Bobcats

Western Conference: Rudy Gay,
Memphis Grizzlies

December
Eastern Conference: Jorge Garba-
josa, Toronto Raptors
Western Conference: Randy Foye,
Minnesota Timberwolves

January
Conference: Andrea Barg-

i, Toronto

nani, Toronto Raptors

Western Conference: Brandon Roye,
Portland Trail Blazers

Darko Milicic, picked No. 2 overall by the _ to beat Minnesota.

4





PAGE 10E, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007 TRIBUNE SP

China, India,
France among
countries

to provide
assistance
for World Cup

m@ CRICKET
SAN JUAN,
Puerto Rico

CHINA, France and
Canada are among
countries to have
helped prepare the
nine Caribbean coun-
tries set to host the
World Cup starting
next month, according
to Associated Press. —

ICC World Cup man-
aging director Chris
Dehring said Wednes-
day that Australia,
India, South Africa and
Britain were also
among the countries to
have helped with issues
including security and
renovation of venues.

Ann Jackson, World
Cup coordinator for
the US Embassy in
Barbados, said the
United States has con-
tributed about US$3
million in specialized
training, including port
security and bomb
detection.

Database

Jackson said the U.S.
has also helped set up a
database that will
check travelers’ names
against criminal watch
lists.

"We anticipate that
this project will be one
of the legacies of the
cricket World Cup,"
she said.

Interpol and the
United States agreed to
provide information to
help Caribbean coun-
tries filter potential
security risks from the
tens of thousands
expected for the March
13-April 28 tourna-
ment. ;

French and British
law enforcement offi-
cials will help with
security during the
event.

Security forces acti-:
vated for the tourna-
ment will include 70
officers from South
Africa trained in bomb
and nuclear materials
detection.

‘Hugh Campbell highlight

M@ ACTION from, yesterday's
Hugh Campbell invitational clash
between St George’s Jaguars and
SC Bootle Dolphins. The Jaguars ©
won the game 54-28, ee

© SEE SPORTS FRONT

(Photos: Felipé Major/
ee

omplete Ba PAAR Oc
oftball Uniforms from

Large selection of Aon i
___ Nike and Mizuno

Easton,

Kan Ces risarT |

Mizuno Equipment at
. Team Discount Prices

Contact Dave Blake

The Sports Center - Harbour Bay

Phone: 394-7663 / Fax: 394-7668
Email: davesportscenter@coralwave.com

RTS

Fad
4
*

*

%
+








THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES ~



MR. JOSEPH ALBERT
PRATT, 69



Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

He is survived by One (1) Brother; Capt. John Pratt; Two
(2) Sisters; Sis. Felicitas Pratt O.S.A and Elease Smith;

Two (2) Brothers-in-law; Richard Smith and Sherwin :

- “Tommy” Burrows; One (1) Sister-in-law; Gloria Pratt;

Sixteen (16) Nephews and Nieces; Theron, Alexander and

_ Christopher Pratt, Sgt. Victor Wells, Sgt. William Deleveaux,
Sherylann and Lynden Deleveaux, Gertrude McKenzie,

Frank Smith MP, Kevin and Raymond Smith, Phyllis |
Meeusen, Denise Vaval, Tameka Forbes, Jermal and Sheena |
- Burrows; Eight (8) Neices and Nephews-in-law; Pauline |
: Tona & Ukul McKenzie, Dec. Ethel & Elder Audley Minus,
Eva, Shelia, Robin & Bridgette, Deborah & Phillip Knowles,
: Barbara, Glen and Kelly; Brothers: Raymond & Annie,
: Cecil & Geneva and Newlon; Sisters: Anniemae & Nathan
Annie and Mavis Pratt and Ethlyn Cartwright; Two (2) :
Uncles; James and Irvin Pratt; Numerous Cousins; Chan
- Pratt, Maria Albury, Thelma Johnson and family, Valerie :
Clark, Leo and Edward Pratt, Margaret Major, Felicity |
-Walker, Carrimae Pratt, Michael and Willard Martinborough ;
and Asst. Commissioner of Police Reginald and Dolly :
Ferguson; Neighbors; Miller, Adderley and Mortimer |
families, Management and Staff of Penn’s Convenience :
: from 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday
Ann Smith, Leroy Johnson, Jeff Hall, Nellie, Louise, Detry, :
Penn and Leroy McPhee, Charlie Brice, John Etienne, Leroy |

Wells, Samantha and Apryl Pratt, Sharlyn Smith, Andre’

Meeusen, Douglas Vaval, Anthony Forbes and Ian :

McKenzie; Eight (8) Aunts; Susana Martinborough,
Johanna Allen, Parnell Darville, Dorris Mortimore, Margaret,

Store, Patricia McPhee, Roscoe Taylor, Christopher Brown,

Rutler’s Funeral Homes & Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

Green be

: Johnson, Galleo Cut Crew-and all of the family and friends
: in the Community of Lyon Road, GardenWell, Graveyard
: Lane and Freetown Lane and a host of other relatives and
: friends.

of Regency Park and formerly of :
) Cabbage Point, Long Island will |
be held on Friday, February 23rd, |
2007 at 10:00 a.m. at St. George’s :
Anglican Church, Montrose ;
Avenue. Officiating will be Rev'd :
Fr. G. Kingsley Knowles Assisted :
| by Rev. Fr. Kirkland Russell and :
Rev. Dr. Roland Hamilton. Interment will follow in |



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 3 —






Arrangements are be conducted by Butlers Funeral
Homes and Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets.

BOAR ROMERO R REDON EAR RCE R OOK BSR HET ER HER SESE ESAS SSE SOBRE SAREE ESAs Ase eRe EEs

CAPTAIN CLIFTON
KING LLOYD, 87

of Griffin Road, Pyfrom’s
| Addition and formerly of

| Barraterre, Exuma will be held
on Saturday, February 24th 2007
7 at. 10:00 a.m. at Kemp Road
}/ Ministries, Kemp Road..
Officiating will be Rev. Dr. Ivan

: KF, Butler Jr. saaiatsd by other ministers. Interment will

follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

He is survived by his wife: Mother Evelyn Lloyd; Children:

Smith, Ocie, Beulah and LaDoris; Sister-in-law: Laura
Taylor; Twenty-nine (29) Grandchildren; Twenty-four
(24) Great-grandchildren; Sixty-two (62) Nieces and
Nephews and a host of other relatives and friends too
numerous to mention.

Viewing will be held at the Chapel of Butlers’ Funeral
Homes & Crematorium, Ernest & York Streets on Friday

from 9:00 a.m. until service time.



1 H Svs Ve ea z 1

PG 6 © Thursday, February 22, 2007. The Tribune

_ By Faith Christian Book Store holds

~

\



first ever book signing and tea party

y Faith Christian Book

B Store held its first ever

book signing and tea
party. The unique two-day event
held at Golden Gates Assembly
Church, recently exposed the
talents of four authors who
wrote very intriguing and inter-
esting books.

Organiser of the event and
CEO of By Faith Patricia
Patton was pleased as this was
her first effort of this nature. “I
am elated to be exposing the tal-
ents of these authors and have
to have their work available at
-my bookstore.” _ or

. Monique Pratt, one of the
authors that presented during
the book signing, wrote a very
compelling book, Empowereé
by Faith. It is a, testimony of
events that happened in her life
and in the lives of a few others
mentioned in the book, in par-
ticular her mother. She is also a
recording artist and plans to

market the book together with
her music. She describes Faith
as “when what is perceived by
the spoken word becomes more
powerful and has more real
meaning than what you see in
the natural world.”

Another author that present-
ed was Tiffany Edgecombe,
whose book, A Time To Heal,
Restoration From The Ravages
of Rape, gives a powerful
account of her ordeal with vio-
lent criminals who tried to take
her life. She gave a synopsis of

-her experiences that left the

audience spellbound.

In an unprecedented move,
Isaiah Nottage wrote a book
that gives what he terms “a fac-
tual account of black Biblical
history”. Mr Nottage said fur-
ther, “There are very few books
that speak to this and I believe
this book is timely,” especially
since February is dubbed as
Black History month. The text

@ SHOWN (from L-R): Isai

Se ew AON AT I SEIN OR ee ee

also explains how Africa got it's
name.

Dr Lucille Richardson, guest
speaker and author, spoke
Saturday night. Her book
Embracing Destiny's
Crossroads was published by
Xulon Press. All the books are
riveting, must reads and gave
Ms Patton much incentive to
make this an annual event. By
Faith Christian Book Store is
located in The EA Pickstock
Plaza on the Independence
Highway.















@ ANOTHER author that presented
was Tiffany Edgecombe (shown),

whose book, A Time To

Heal,

Restoration From The’ Ravages of
Rape, gives a powerful account of
her ordeal with violent criminals who

tried to take her life.

ah Nottage, Patricia Patton and Monique Pratt

ON ee













NR te





A ee mee tee a et ek ms te ae ae ee

PAGE 8, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007







Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR







RONALD EUGENE
CAREY, 45





























Higgs; in-laws and their spouses, Earl and Lois Bullard, Philip Sr. and Joan
Hilton, Rev. Arthur and Christine Knowles, Sharon Thompson, Paul and

































Those who loved him and mourn his :
passing are, his loving and devoted wife, :
Marsha; his children, Marco, Ronald Jr., and Ronique; his grandchild, Marco i
Jr.; his parents, Eugene and Margaret Carey; his siblings and their spouses,
William Mark, Charlene Carey, Helena and Nat Bain, Kevin and Vonette ;
Carey, Ian and Nadeen Carey and Brian Carey; adopted sisters, Deanna and
her husband Ron Simpson, Lillie-Mae Morley, Juliette Taylor and Elizabeth ;
Hunt; aunts and uncles and their families, Hilda and Bert Carey, Inez Carey, :
Enid and John Carey, Leo and Dorothy Carey, Carolyn and Audley Carey, :

Kenneth Carey, Katrina Knowles, John and Christina Carey, Rosie and Perry | "Cassie" Major; 3 children Chandra and Jessica Sturmp and Trivano

Neilly, Jocelyn Knowles, Wesley Carey, Jackie Carey and Henry Clarke; :

great-aunts and their families, Marget Fisher, Sarah Culmer and Octavia 3 sisters Elder Olga Culmer, Esthermae Dean-Charpentier and Tressa

' Dean of Miami Florida; 5 brothers Reginald Jr., Austin Dean of North

| Mary Knowles, Glen Kriowles, Marilyn Knowles, Ann Rolle, Angie and £ Miami Beach Florida, Donald Dean of Freeport Grand Bahama;Eric, and
» Tim Clarke; nieces and nephews, Brittney, Brendan, lesha, Marcus, Jaden, *
| Malik, Tramaine, Destiny, Jamie, U, Tramesha, Traliyah, Tevin, Talliah, | nephews Remus, Jason and Dustin Culmer, Dwayne and Patrick Thompson,
Santino and Ron Ron, Bruce, Regina, Perry and Melanie Sands. Tony, : Jerome and Patrick Butterfield-Dean, Terrance, Donald Jr., Marlon, DeDe
Christina and Larry Bullard, Philip Jr., Sherwin, Ian and Joann Hilton, and Frankie Dean, Emst Charpentier: 3 aie Brittany ay Destiniy
Régina Ingraham, Natasha Stubbs, Laverne Thompson, Keith, Craig, Heidi, Calmer and Tat ann Thompson: 4 grand-nephews Brandon, Roneko
Troy, Dale, Alex, Rochelle, Glenda and Shakara Knowles; Akera Martin ; Th J ys Viet a cis Remus Jeeand Dresva Calnier 1)
and Nikeisha Rolle, other relatives and friends including, Carolyn Carey, : eee tele, Glenila* Thompson Henbunte 4 Rien A 3 Eugenia
- The Carey, Allen, Knowles, Smith and Culmer families (Bahamas and United : Gera mae : peg ese :
States); Gary Sands, Arthur Styles, Eric Carey, Trevor Rolle, Eddie | ie leraks Oe sa Norra ap ranet Cyne cee Se ee
McSweeney, Leonardo McKinney, Melinda Pelecanos, Beverly, Brenda, | a" yo ee Sfuncles. L ys Me ‘ A J Mai ys
a St a ae ae ee ee . a Aaaeads ae ad i ecdehilaren, Chrolta Taylor and Denigua Sweeting Teo OReE
i stian Centre Florida, Mrs. Vera Carey and family, George and Pearl ; : a : : ’ : :

Edwards and family, Lillis Hunt and family, Franklyn Rolle, Dewitt Carey reves a ee le ° Raleigh ae oe a
and family, Claudia Sands and family, Arnette Palmer, Mark Moultrie, Evan. | @Vans, Calondra Srown, rest Philip, Victoria Mcintosh-Josey an

Rachael Mackey, Tanzania Kelly, Darlene Miller, Dr. Aizik Wolf and Staff |
at Doctor's Hospital, Coral Gables, and Mt. Sinai Medical Centre in Florida, ;

James and Dr. Agreta Carey and Family, Bahamas Conference of the |

Methodist Church, Bishop Kenneth Orr and members of The New Covenant : Embroidery, and Donna and Jeff Turnquest of Miami Florida, family and

Praise and Worship Centre, Management and Staff of B.E.C, John Gomez | friends of Freeport Grand Bahama include Donna and Merville Bradshaw,

and family, James Smith and family, Charles Clarke and family, Lula Burrows ; Marion and Simeon Sweeting, Naomi Simmons, Dianna Allen, Marion

of Abaco, Evan. Shirley Burrows, Delphine Carey, Amos Moss and family, | Sweeting, Joe Thomas, C A Smith, Ellen

Gladstone Meadows and family, Bill Morley and family, Brad Gardiner and |

family, Florence and Queenie Morley and Vernel Hunt, The Sanhedrin ; Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians #44 _

Family, The Entire Community of Tarpum Bay, God-Children: Victoria : Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday







ry the nurses of the Rock Sound Clinic, numerous thes relatives and friends.
| MAY HIS SOUL REST IN PEACE.

of Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera will be held on Friends may pay their last respects at Wesley Methodist Church, Tarpum

Saturday: 11:00.a.m. at Wesley Methodist
Church, Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera. Rev. ;
Diego Flores and Dr. Reginald Eldon ;
assisted by Pastor Remelda Carey and ;
. | Bishop Kenneth Orr will officiate. |

s) Interment will be made in Tarpum Bay |
Public Cemetery, Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera. :

Bay Eleuthera on Friday from 3:00 p.m. until service time on Saturday.

DEBORAH ANITA
DEAN, 50

of #31 Thompson Ave, Stapledon
Gardens will be held on Saturday 10:00
a.m. at Chapel on the Hill, Tonique
Williams-Darling Highway. Dr. Genius
Wells assisted by Min. Nathan Wells and
other Minister of the Gospel will

Woodlawn Memorial Gardens, Soldier
Road.

Survivors include, Mother Cassandra

Philip; 3 grandchildren Shawn Murray Jr., Pharrell and Chavela Philip;

Philip. Dean .of Canada; 5 nieces Patrice Thompson-Sweeting, Patral
Thompson-Murray, Pheromone Thompson, Sisal'and DeShay Dean; 12.

family, Vernay Miller, Vernon Culmer, Linda Evans and family, Peter and
Patricia Curry and Family, Charles Sturrup, The Culmer family, Miss
Kolamae Pedican and Chandra Sturmp Kids Club, Shirley of Ecstasy

BS ne cw Rk Ome OT AE ER Om OP SE aN eS aN WE RY Oe ME Ea Se A eT PO eS OT A wT

officiate. Interment will be made in ©



The Tribune

Transfiguration: Mission and Ministry —

m@ By FATHER JAMES
MOULTRIE

“They came down from the

mountain.”
— (Luke 9:37)

e have heard this
transfiguration
story before, and

even if we have been on the
mountain top ourselves, we
still like to hear about others
having the experience.

But what is more important
is what happens after the
mountain top experience. We
all know that when we go to
the mountain top, we have to
come down. What happens to
Peter, James, and John when
they come down from the
mountain happens to all
Christians.

From the mountain experi-
ence of Jesus being transfig-
ured, the disciples had to go
back to the drudgery of the
human world of pain, disease,
and death. No wonder Peter

PART FOUR



said it was good that they
were on the mountain and
should build three dwelling
places.

When we are in a place of
joy, rarely do we want to
return to the ordinary world.
Yet, Jesus, as the prophets
before Him, always forces
disciples to look at their
world, where the rain of God
falls on the just and- the
unjust. (Matthew 5:45)

Christianity in the 20th cen-
tury has wrestled with two
primary heresies, heresies as
old as the Jesus movement.

¢ One side of the dispute
includes people who retreat-
ed from the world’s problems.
These people focus on their
own spiritual needs while
ignoring the world’s troubles.
Some have often used the
Transfiguration story of the
disciples with Moses, Elijah

RELIGION



@ JAMES MOULTRIE

and Jesus to support a theolo-
gy of retreat.

¢ On the opposite side of
the dispute are those who
observe a_ social Gospel.
Although deeply dedicated
Christians, their focus is to
put the world’s affairs in
order. In the process, they
sometimes neglect their own
spiritual lives. Through the
transfiguration story Luke

Thursday, February 22, 2007 * PG 11

helps us to understand the
vitality of both the personal
and the communal characters
of discipleship.

There must be a balance
between heaven and earth, or
the divine and the human,
which keeps our. lives
between the poies of joy and
service. If we look too much
toward heaven, we may miss
our calling. If we worry too
much about how to live out
the nuts and bolts of Christian
service, we may forget God’s
power that sustains every
benevolent effort. Clearly, we
cannot do God’s work if we
are preoccupied with looking
only to our needs. Likewise if
we do not often look up for
God’s guidance, then we do
not have the strength that
God gives to spread His heal-
ing grace.

The conclusion of the trans-
figuration story is that they
came down from the moun-
tain. God’s work is done in
the valley where the people

“

live, and not on the mountain.
We have all enjoyed “being
on the mountain” spiritually,
especially when we have com-
pleted Discovery or Cursillo.
And like the apostles, we do
not want to come down from
our spiritual high. We feel
energized to save the world!
The call of God on our lives
is that we fulfill the purpose
of the renewal movements of

- our church, and not to remain

on a spiritual high. God
requires us to give our best
effort in His service right
where His people live. That is
what is required of us in our
Mission and Ministry pro-
gramme.

Let it be our resolve to
serve God in the valley and
not remain on the mountain
and there become too far
removed from helping others.
Will you help us in our
Mission and Ministry in this
parish or will you remain
aloof from the work of God in
our faith community?

‘Lent is not about whether there is a political rally or
hot...It's about how we choose to live our lives daily’

@ By CLEMENT JOHNSON

Then, when no one, or they thoug
looking, they would act differently.

ht no one was the beach. .

~ Jesus warned his disciples against such false piety.

Se a ee a

_ WE all know the gospel according to Angelica

Pickles. You do know who Angelica Pickles is, don't
you? If you do not have both small children and
cable you probably have never met her. Angelica
Pickles is a character on the show Rugrats. Rugrats
is about a group of babies. Angelica is the oldest of
the group. She's five. All the others are less than two
and are only able to talk to each other.

Angelica is always. making trouble for the babies
who she repeatedly calls dumb. Angelica makes up
_ Stories to mislead the babies and tricks them into
thinking untrue things simply for her own entertain-
ment. For instance, one time she convinced the
babies that they would all become chickens because
they had come down with the chicken pox.

Angelica is often mean to the babies, but only
when the grown-ups are not looking. When a grown-
up is near she smiles and bats her eyes and tosses her
blond pigtails and talks about how much she loves
playing with the babies. ;

Angelica Pickles would have made a good scribe
in Jesus’ day. I say that because the religious leaders
of Jesus' day seemed to live by the same philosophy
as Angelica Pickles. They thought that the purpose
of their good deeds was to get on the good side of
the grown-ups, They paid alms and prayed and made
‘sacrifices so that others would think good. of them.

90 «igre

D2 OF WAT EU

It reminds me of what we see going on in our
country today. We are all talking about Lent and
what we are going to do for Lent. I laugh when I
hear the politicians talking about what they are
going to do for lent, or how they are not having ral-
lies for Lent. Lent is not about whether there is a
political rally or not. It’s about how we choose to live

our lives daily.
Talking

I was talking with a friend last week and I remind-*

_ ed him that next week was the beginning of Lent on

Ash Wednesday. He asked me if it was a holiday, I

- told him no, so he said, “Well that enn no profit to ——
me if it’s not a holiday”. That is the feeling of most —

Bahamians who do not recognize the significant of —

Lent, and who are living in a pre-dominately _

Protestant country where lent is not honoured.

The other day a friend told me how a Baptist _
Church in San Salvador was having a Lenten tea on
February 25. When asked what a Lenten tea was, the

_ pastor replied he did not know and that it was a sug-

gestion to raise funds. So, Lent, for most of us, seems
to be an excuse to have Lenten teas or a reason for
the price of fish to go up on Fridays especially Good
Friday and for us to travel Easter weekend or go, to,_

~ but in heaven.
The whole point is the motivation for our acts of
-. charity and piety. Do we love the babies just so the
_ grown-ups can say how sweet we are? Or do we love —
-. our neighbour because God told us to? Do we smile

He tells his followers not to call attention to their

_ good deeds. When you give alms don't let your right
hand know what you left hand is doing. When you.

pray don't make a show of it. When you fast do not
make yourself look hungry but hide your hunger.
Finally he says, do not store up treasures on earth

and bat our eyes and say our prayers so that people
reverence for God?

Where are our hearts focused? Here, where things

pass away? Or in heaven, where our treasures are

eternal?

It being Lent today, and in this time we do a lot of

religious things, we pray and fast and read the Bible.
But why?

Jesus warns us about doing things that look reli-
gious. If we do them for show then we are hyp-
ocrites, but if we do them for God we have treasures

‘in heaven, So Jesus advises us to do our deeds in

secret. Then only our father who knows all will see.

And our reward will be from him alane.,... ...

can say "How religious she is!" Or do we do it out of —

The point is: Where are we storing up treasure?



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 13

“MULTIPLICATION” Temple of the Mord Ministries

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The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, February 22, 2007 * PG 15



Annual Ushers Day:
‘Serving in His Presence’

he Church of God of Prophecy East Street Sanctuary

celebrated its 6th Annual Ushers Day on Sunday,

February 4, under the theme “Serving in His
Presence,” Psalm 91.

Honouring those who readily give of their time, efforts and
service to greet and assist the congregation of the righteous,
the Ushers of East Street - led by Rollington Ferguson, coor-
dinator of the Usher Ministry, and chairperson of the Usher
Ministry Eliza Deleveaux - celebrated the day in glorious
style. ;

Breaking the bread of life that Sunday morning was senior
pastor Bishop Franklin Ferguson who. encouraged the con-
gregation to continue to serve in the presence of the Lord. He
told them also to do all that they could for the work of the
Lord while they had the opportunity.

Among those invited to participate in this grand occasion
were Parliamentary Secretary for the Ministry of Immigration
Agatha Marcelle, Parliamentary Secretary for the Ministry of
Education Veronica Owens, FNM Senator Carl Bethel, FNM
candidate for Bamboo Town Branville McCartney and Andil
LaRoda, Public Hospital Authority.

Also on hand for the special service were General Presbyter
of the Church of God of Prophecy for the Caribbean and
Atlantic Ocean Islands Bishop Brice H Thompson, National
Overseer of the COGOP Bishop Elgarnet Rahming, church
elders Bishop Nelson and Sister Maude Ferguson, chairman & COORDINATOR of the East Street Ushers Board Rollington Ferguson is presented with an
of the national usher board for the COGOP (Bahamas) Leroy _ official framed photo of the Usher Ministry in celebration of his long and faithful service.
Maycock, and a representative from the Church of God _ Pictured from left are Kendal Simmons, associate pastor; Bishop Franklin Ferguson, senior pas-
Helena Petty. tor; Usher coordinator Rollington Ferguson and Dr Woodley Thompson, associate pastor.

Reade siege 2

a,






is

@ CHAIRPERSON of the East
Street Ushers Eliza Deleveaux
receives a special plaque in honour
of her faithful service, her continued
-* demonstration of excellence in serv-
= ice and her untiring commitment to

the successful work of the Lord.
| Surrounding Sister Deleveaux from
left are Dr Woodley Thompson,
; associate pastor, Bishop Franklin
Ferguson, senior pastor, and associ-
ate pastor Kendal Simmons.

@ CHAIRPERSON of the East Street Ushers Eliza Deleveaux was presented
with an official framed photograph of the Usher Ministry as a token of appre-
@ HONOURING the senior ushers: Pictured from left are Kendal Simmons, _ ciation from the pastors and members of the East Street Sanctuary. Standing
associate pastor; Ushers Elsie Dean and Emadle Henfield; Bishop Franklin from left are senior pastor Bishop Franklin Ferguson; Dr Woodley Thompson,
Ferguson; Ushers Ellen Johnson and Dedrianna Bain and Dr Woodley associate pastor; Chairperson of the Usher Ministry Eliza Deleveaux, and
Thompson, associate pastor. associate pastor Kendal Simmons.





‘The Tribune

RELIGION

Free BahamaFest
leaders conference

he Bahamas. Christian
Council, the Ministry of
Tourism and various other
Christian leaders, in conjunction with
PraiseFest Ministries, are excited to
present BahamaFest ’07 Leader’s
Conference, Saturday, March 3 at the
Diplomat Centre, Carmichael Road.

This free conference will consist of
two-sessions tentatively scheduled for
1pm-3pm and 4pm-6pm.

According to organisers, a confer-
ence of this type has never taken place
and is truly-a once in a lifetime event.
And it is their desire that every church
of every. denomination on the island
will be represented by multiple people
at this Leader’s Summit.

Among those expected to address
the conference are:

¢ Josh McDowell — Founder of one
of the. largest and most impacting
evangelistic ministries in the world.
Mr McDowell is a: noted author of
more than 100 books and his name is
synonymous with apologetics.

- © Dr Mark Chironna — Founder of a
worldwide ministry that literally
impacts people from all over the



‘Catholic Church
sees most growth

world. Dr Chironna is also a regular
host on TBN, and is the presiding
Bishop of the Legacy Alliance.

¢ Darrel Rundus — Founder and
president of the Great News Network,
which a sister ministry of the Way of
the Master. Mr Rundus features
Evangelistic Boot Camps that teaches
participants how to effectively share
their faith.

e Matthew Dunaway — Founder and
president of PraiseFest Ministries. Mr
Dunaway has a rich theological back-
ground and has founded a ministry
that has iseen more than 4000 deci-
sions for Christ in its first three years
of existence.

Encouraged to attend this event are
all pastors, church staff, ministry lead-
ers, teachers (church & school), gov-
ernment leaders, and media person-
nel. Spouses are also welcome. Music
will be provided by local Bahamian
Groups: Shaback and DJ Counsellor.
Plans and preparations for
BahamaFest ’07 in June will be
announced. There will also be fabu-
lous door prizes including a free cruise
on the 2007 “Cruise with a cause”.

in Africa and Asia

. VATICAN CITY (AP) — The Roman Catholic Church experienced its
greatest growth in Africa and Asia between 2004 and 2005, according to
new statistics released by the Vatican.

In Africa, the Catholic population increased 3.1 percent, while the num-
ber jumped 2.7 percent in Asia from the period, the Catholic News -
Service reported Monday. The rise in the number of Catholics in the
Americas was just 1.2 percent. oe

The trend was similar for priests.

Of the more than 400,000 priests worldwide, Asia saw the greatest
increase, 3.8 percent, followed by Africa at 3.6 percent, while Europe and
the Americas showed a decrease in the number of priests by about half a
percentage point. :

By the end of 2005, Africa and Asia accounted for just over 20 percent
of the world’s priests, compared to 11 percent two decades earlier. Europe
had nearly 49 percent, compared to 58 percent in the same period, while
the numbers for the Americas remained relatively unchanged — about 30
percent. At the end of 2005, the worldwide Catholic population was about
1.1 billion, a't:5 percent'increase from'the previous year, the Vatican said.














c= ee BR Ble:

Thursday, February 22, 2007 PG 19

NESS CHURCH OF G0

Monday - Wednesday
26th through 28th February, 2007 i
TIME: 7:30pm, |
PLACE: First Holiness Church of God
First Holiness Way, Bamboo Town

HOST PASTOR: Bishop Edward Missick JP



&

§

\
SA

Apostle Randy Moss
Sunday 25th @ 3:30 p.m.

Ufiyre



Rev, Gregory Coll
Tuesday 27th

Wednesday 28th
* THEME: “The Church Still Standing Strong”

ee ee ee ee ee ee a a



The Tribune



| RELIGION

‘Journey

Home’

¢ Submitted by Chandrice Ferguson

ome, a simple word that con-
His up so many meanings to
so many people. To some it is
a place of love, peact, tranquillity,
refuge, safety and acceptance, to others
it is a place of challenge, anger, misun-
derstanding and violence and then to
some, home may be a combination of
both extremes.

.As the local Catholic community
gathers for our annual city-wide
Lenten mission from Monday,
February 26 through Friday, March 2,
commencing at 7:30pm nightly, on the
grounds of Loyola Hall, Gladstone
Road, we will seek to define and
understand the ways that Christ is call-
ing us to journey to our true home.

Reconciliation: “Journey Home” is
the theme for this year’s mission. What
do we define as home? Is it a physical
place, like a house or church? Or is it
spiritual in nature - a dwelling in our
hearts and minds? No matter where we
call home, for some the journey is
smooth, while for others the road is
very winding and uneasy.

As we begin our Lenten journey, we
will examine some of the factors that
* slow or impede our “journey home”,
aspects such as divisions-in our fami-

lies,:and ‘or division in our xhearts..

Through presentations by a variéty of
our local clergy, reflection, prayer and
healing, we will seek to understand
how Christ is calling us to trust and fol-
low him. Crucial to this “Journey” is
the need to forgive and or to be forgiv-
en.

e The Sacrament of Reconciliation
will be available each night for anyone
desiring healing and forgiveness in
their lives.

But this is only part of the pro-
gramme. As was a feature last year,
there will also be a special focus on our
young people. They will gather from
Monday through Thursday in a sepa-
rate Youth Mission under the big tent,
in “da yard”, which operates concur-
rently while the Adult Mission unfolds
in Loyola Hall.

The sessions will be conducted by a
very diverse group of experienced and
professional persons from fields such as
education, medicine, health services,
law enforcement and the clergy. The
youth will be challenged through inter-
active and lively discussions. They will
have sessions to help them consider

*how issues such as peer pressure, their

Catholic community
to gather for annual
Lenten mission



m@ ARCHBISHOP PINDER

conduct, conflict resolution, sexual
behaviour and family relationships

_influence how they connect in the

home or with what they may define as
home.
At the end. of the week, it is hoped

~ that .the youth would have a better “|
appreciation for who they are and who ~

God is calling them to be in their
homes, in our society and ultimately in
our world. We also hope that by pro-
viding them with direct access to per-
sons and agencies experienced in assist-
ing young people in different facets of
their lives they would be encouraged to
seek their guidance for any areas of
their life that may be challenged.

An additional feature for this year’s
mission will be a special place specifi-
cally designed for the youngest mem-
bers of our community. Here the chil-
dren between the ages of 3 to 10 years
will be well supervised and entertained
with activities appropriate to their age
group.

On the final night, Friday, March 2,
the entire assembly will gather in a
Eucharistic Celebration led by
Archbishop Patrick C Pinder. This
promises to be a dynamic time of
prayer, reflection, teaching, renewal
and further commissioning as we the
church begin this Lenten season and
continte our Christian journey home.

All are invited and encouraged to
gather with us and “Journey Home”.





Thursday, February 22, 2007 ¢ PG 21






featuring
Elder Vanderson A, Barnett |

& finds
Special quest appearences by:

Simeon Outten
Pastor Arthur Duncombe
Prophet Lawrence Rolle ° Chose

Sunday March 4", 2007

@ Living Waters Auditorium at 7pm





A dmission:
$10 in advance
$15 at the door

Ticket Locations:



MC Ue ene oD eck TON
This recording is Live with a twist, bridging the gap between the traditions of the former

‘worship flavored with the progressive passion of today’s worship experience,






THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 25

a SrRerES
| Bemeritie’s Hunera
- BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782



OLEAN "DEAS"
BURROWS-DORSETT, 80



’ Cherishing precious memory are, son, Wenly Burrows; sister, Luecinda |
Knowles; aunt, Ennal Moss (Florida); brothers-in-law, Samuel Knowles,
Beaufort, Garnet and Arthur Dorsett and Amos Cox of Miami; sisters- }
in-law, Isabel and Adline Burrows, Bloneva Pratt, Gloria, Daisy and :
Alice (Nassau), Idell, and Curlean Dorsett (Cat Island), and Mildred }
Cox (Miami Fla.); numerous nieces, Nurse Kathleen Johnson, Diane :
Eley of Orlando, Lucille Strachan, Marion Morris, Albertha Nairn, |
- Beatrice Dievieull, Paulamae Davis, Cheryl Fountain, Lauramae Innis, :
Agatha, Monique, Shelly and Zenika Burrows, Christine McKenzie, }
Margaret Stubbs, Fredericka Davis of Miami, Adline Burrows, and }
Valarie Knowles; nephews, Samuel Knowles, Cephas, Gary, Dereck, }
Cornelius, William, Whitney, Elijah Burrows, Philip and Livingston :
Knowles, Dave McKenzie, Ray Strachan, Joseph Eley, Carlos Diuvelle, :
Barry Nairn, Danny Innis, Darren Davis, grandnieces, 50 grandnephews, : These memory will forever remain with her four grandchildren, Yvonne
50 great grand nieces and nephews, 30, nieces-in-Iaw, Mavis Forbes, :
Patricia Brown, Marion Pitifier, Myrtis Forbes, Denise Francis, Beverley :
and Karla Pratt, Carolyn and Jacquelyn Dorsett of Nassau, Sharon}
Dames of Miramar Fla, Sonia Solomon of Freeport, Barbara Forbes
of New York, Marzela and Helena Smith, Marjoriana King, Udell }
Cartwright, Darlene Miller, Stephanie, Ingia and Gena Dorsett, } :
Sharmaine Albury, Eleanor Taylor and Judy Dorsett of Freeport, Angela | Norton and Mary Knowles; six grand nephews, Henry, George, Pastor Gene
Rose Rolle of Nassau, Eunice Burrows, Lula and Eve Pinder; nephews-_ }
in-law, Wilfred Thompson, Bradley, Caldwell and Gary Pratt of Nassau, }
Adai, Carvin, Gregory, Shubert, Wellington, Marcian Dorsett of Nassau, }
Vincent and Richard Keliy of Freeport, Vincent and Erecil Dorsett of } : ‘ :
Nassail: Brad Dorsett-of New Bight Caiisland- Edward Rolle (Rev: Rebecca Knowles and family, Glen Adderley and family, Ezekiel Adderley
Archelaus Burrows and Drexel Cartwright of Nassau, a host of family }
and friends including, Brave Davis, Dorothy Gilbert, Philip Davis, :
Member of Parliament for Cat Island, Richard (Paul), Linda, Kadeem, |
Willame Kemp, Shirley Wallace and families, Carolee Thomas and }
family(Florida), Carolyn Major and family, Shirley Rose and family, :
Delores Rolle and family, Aneatha Hart, Sam Hunter, Delano and :
Sharon Hamilton and family, Neil Morris, Dr. Ricky and Kim Davis }
and Families, Dr. Patrick and Susan Cargil, Dr. Patricia Forte, doctors }
and nurses of Accident and Emergency, Trauma Room, Female Medical :
Ward 1 of the Princess Margaret Hospital, and the staff of Smith's Bay :
Clinic, Cat Island, Bishop and Mrs. Delton Fernander and New Destiny :
Church family, Pastor and Mrs. E. D. Clarke and Maranatha Seventh }
Day Adventist Church Family, Bishop and Mrs. Winslow Moss and ;
Highway Church of God Family, New Bight Cat Island, Evangelist }
Bradley Russell and family, Rev Garnet and Letisha King, Rev }
Christopher and Olive King and Family, The Baptist Community, Allan :

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

a resident of New Bight, Cat Island and :
formerly of Old Bight, Cat Island, will :
be held at Highway Church of God, }
New Bight, Cat Island, on Saturday at }
11:00 a.m. Officiating will be Bishop :
Winslow Moss, assisted by Evangelist :
Bradley Russell and other ministers. :
m Interment follows in the Public :
fa Cemetery, New Bight, Cat Island. :

and Margaret Russell and family, The Communities of Old and New

Bight Cat Island, The Moss, Davis, Knowles, Brown, Taylor, Gilbert,
Hunter, Cartwright, Smith, Seymours, Dawkins, Rolle, Hart, Johnson,
Dorsett, Pratt, Burrows families, Carmen Dawkins and family, Eris’
Moncur and family, Sam and Paula Romer and family, and the entire
Cat Island Community.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market
Street, from 12:00-6:00 p.m. on Thursday and on Friday from 9:00
a.m.-12:00 noon and at the church in Cat Island from 6:00 p.m. until
service time on Saturday.

ANNALECIA
"AUNTIE ANNIE"
ROKER, 96

| a resident of River Circle, BelAir and
formerly of Millerton, Long Island, will be
held at Grants Town Seventh-day Adventist
‘ Church, Wellington Street, on Sunday at
1:00 p.m. Officiating will be Pastor H.A.
Roach, assisted by Pastor Barington
{| Brennen, Pastor N.E. Scavella and Elder
*| Dudley Lightbourne. Interment follows in
) Old Trail Cemetery, Abundant Life Road.



Ritchie, Lorraine Deal, Chester Cooper and Daphnie Patterson; three grand
sons-in-law, Ephraim Deal, Daniel Ritchie and Carlton Patterson; one grand
daughter-in-law, Nadene Cooper; eight great grand children, Aaliyah,
Yvoneisha, Kyle and Shaneen Cooper, Dorothea Ritchie, Shekia Sturrup,
Latrell and Enrico Deal; two nieces, Dorothy Cleare and Elsie Thompson;
one nephew, Jeremiah Griffin of West Palm Beach; two grand nieces, Harriet

Cleare, Philip, David, and Walter Cleare of Tampa Florida; one god daughter,
Carrie Raymond; numerous great great grand nieces and nephews, friends
and relatives including, Ethylene Woodside, Edward Knowles, Dudley Cooper
and family, Dudley Lightbourne and family, William Knowles and family,

and family, Melvina Knowles and family, Marjorie Adderley and family,
Garnet Rolle and family, Albert Adderley and family, the Taylor.and Culmer
families, Maxwell Adderley and family, Golda McPhee and family, Leo Rolle
and family, Vernal Rolle and family, Mario Simms and family, Latoya
Deleveaux and family, Coastline Community Care Nursing Home, the entire
Burnt Ground, Millerton and Simms Communities, the New Providence,
Grants Town and Maranatha Churches, Pastors and workers of the Bahamas
Conference of Seventh Day Adventist and a host of other relatives and friends.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market
Street, from 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Saturday and on Sunday at the church
from 12:00 noon until service time.





Full Text


Fo eg ee ae eS le ee Oe

PAGE 12, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007 THE TRIBUNE.





@ PRIME MINISTER Perry Christie and Miniser of Tourism Obie Wilchcombe are all smiles at

the PLP Pinewood Park rally on Tuesday night.



5

(Photos: Franklyn G Ferguson)




S SSS S S SSS

MINISTER of ic isheries Leslie Mi §
DEPUTY Prime Minister Cynthia Pratt greets supporters. Cicer is ER of Agriculture and Fisheries Leslie Miller surrounded by *.





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THE TRIBUNE



0 In brief

Gunmen rob
motorist of
car and
jewellery

TWO armed gunmen robbed
a Pinewood Gardens man of his
vehicle, cash and jewellery
Tuesday night.

According to police reports,
the man had just arrived home
at around 9pm when he was
accosted by two gunmen, who
then robbed him. One of the
gunmen fled the scene in the
man’s green Ford Explorer, reg-
istration 100225, and the other
followed in a trail bike. Police
are investigating the incident.

Pair rob
laundromat
of money at
gunpoint

A LAUNDROMAT was
robbed on Tuesday night by
armed gunmen.

According to police reports,
the robbery took place around
10pm at Super Wash Gibbs
Corner.

Two gunmen reportedly
entered the establishment and
robbed it of $600 cash before
fleeing on foot. The matter is
under police investigation.

Peacekeepers
seize house
of Haitian
gang leader

Bt HAITI
Port-au-Prince

UN peacekeepers seized a
house belonging to one of Haiti’s
most wanted gang leaders but
failed to catch him during a raid
that also led to the arrest of 17
suspected gang members, offi-
cials said Wednesday, according
to Associated Press.

Blue-hélmeted troops
stormed the house of Amaral
Duclona on Tuesday in the

- Port-au-Prince slum of Cite
Soleil, but the targeted man
slipped out pefore troops could
catch him, said Col Alphonso
Henrique Pedrosa, a Brazilian
military spokesman. It was not
clear if those arrested belonged
to Duclona’s gang.

Duclona is suspected in a
wave of kidnappings but has
denied criminal ties. He is the
second gang leader this month
to flee from the 8,800-strong
UN force, which arrived in 2004
after a violent uprising toppled
former president Jean-Bertrand
Aristide.

The raid was part of a new
UN offensive to drive gangs out
of the Caribbean nation’s slums.
Earlier this month, UN troops
stormed Cite Soleil and chased
out another gang leader known
as Evens, who is also in hiding.

On Wednesday, UN troops
gave journalists a tour of
Duclona’s vanilla-colored
house, a well-secured, two-bed-
room property. The home
included an entertainment cen-
ter and tiled patio with a foun-
tain — a sharp contrast to the
rows of tin shacks and crum-
bling brick hovels that populate
the fetid seaside slum.

“It’s hard to believe there |

could be a house like this in the
middle of all this poverty,”
Pedrosa said, adding that the
UN mission had yet to decide
what to do with the house...

Outside, about 200 slum
dwellers staged a protest call-
ing for the withdrawal of U.N.
peacekeepers. Many said
Duclona, believed to be in his
early 30s, provided them with
food and security and were wor-
ried how they would survive
without him.

“If Amaral isn’t here, who
will replace him?” the protest-
ers chanted as they marched
past Brazilian troops in armored
vehicles.

“T’ve known Amaral for 20
years and he never hurt any of
us, he only. helped us,” said one
woman, Sianie Dieu.

UN troops handed out rice and
water to children on Wednesday,
and Pedrosa said soldiers would
remain in the area.

share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Call us
on 322-1986 and share
your story.



LOCAL NEWS

Campaigner: PLP

‘must lose ‘political 7,

corpse of Gibson’

THE PLP was warned last
night that “dragging the polit-
ical corpse of Shane Gibson”
into its election campaign
would contaminate its bid to
retain power.

The party had shown its
shameless side by treating the’
disgraced former immigration
minister like a returning:war
hero, said fathers’ rights cham- -
pion Clever Duncombe.

“PLPs are lifting this man
as though he has just come
back from doing battle. I find
this very disturbing - what does
it mean for our country?”

Mr Duncombe, who is set
to challenge Mr Gibson in the
Golden Gates constituency,
said: “If they continue to drag
this political corpse into their
campaign, he will eventually
contaminate it if he has not
already done so, and everyone
will suffer from Shane Gib-
son.”

Mr Duncombe’s remarks
came as the public continued
to air its views on the Anna
Nicole Smith controversy and
the minister’s resignation last
Sunday.

The independent candidate
also attacked Prime Minister
Perry Christie, saying: “He is
supposed to be about stan-
dards but he is trying to main-
tain that Shane Gibson has
been victimised.”

Mr Duncombe added: “Mr
Gibson knew exactly what he
was doing. I don’t know what
it takes for politicians to be
reprimanded and ultimately
punished.

“If the PLP wants to hail
this man as a hero, then so be
it but I don’t know what this
man is doing in the House. He
should resign from there, too.”

Mr Gibson, he claimed, was





if SHANE Gibson

saying that everyone was lying
but him. But no-one believed
his story.

“It baffles me to see the
prime minister promoting this
man as a hero,” he said. He
wondered what Mr Christie’s
“so-called code of ethics”
meant.

“This man (Gibson) has tak-
en our country to the pits,” he
added, “If they go ahead and
re-elect Shane Gibson, then
this country-will eventually pay
the penalty.”

Mr Duncombe said the peo-
ple of Golden Gates were
drifting away from the ex-min-
ister, as was,shown when he
made an unsuccessful attempt
to stage a demonstration
against The Tribune and its
managing editor, ‘John Mar-

He said Mr Gibson was
unable to enlist the required
level of support and called the
whole thing off.

“I am very saddened and
disappointed by this whole
thing. The prime minister is
trying to force him upon the
people. This is no example for
the criminal on the street.”

Mr Duncombe said the gov-
ernment’s treatment of scan-
dal-hit politicians had a “direct
correlation” with crime figures
in the Bahamas.

Mr Christie, he said, was set-
ting a “dangerous precedent
in parading around with the
disgraced and embattled

_ Shane Gibson.”

He added: “This is the worst
scandal to rock our country in
modern times.. He (Mr
Christie) is more concerned
with saving the PLP than sav-
ing our country.”

But Mr Duncombe said Mr
Gibson’s standing in Golden
Gates was best illustrated by
the poor showing at his mini-
rally at Sunshine Park on Sat-
urday.

“There were about 90 peo-
ple there, of whom about 60
were children. There were
about 30 voting adults. The
longer they keep parading him
around as a hero just returning
from war, the more disgusted
and fed up people will
become.”

Many people had expressed
disgust that their own children
had borne the full brunt of the
law while the prime minister
was displaying two sets of stan-
dards, he said.

“We need to borrow a page
from the first world’s book
when it comes to dealing with
corrupt and scandalous politi-
cians,” he added.

Anna Nicole’s mother says she

is afraid for her g

ANNA Nicole Smith’s
mother testified yesterday that
she is afraid for the safety of
her granddaughter Dannielynn
as long as she remains in the
custody of Howard K Stern.

As the court hearing to
determine who gets custody of
the former Playboy playmate’s
remains continued yesterday
in Fort Lauderdale, Virgie
Arthur told the judge that she
wants her grandson Daniel
exhumed and moved from the
Bahamas to Texas.

Ms Arthur said she believed
that any mother would want
to be buried with her children.

She added that her 20-year-

Id grandson Daniel, who died
in the Bahamas last Septem-
ber, would be accommodated
too.

“I’m going to go get his body
and bring him back home (to
Texas)”, she said.

The mother of the deceased
celebrity is contesting the

A
vi VÂ¥

request of Howard K Stern to
have Ms Smith buried at
Lakeview Cemetery in Nassau
next to Daniel.

However, Ms Avxthur
acknowledged that in the last
conversation she had with her
daughter about burial plans,
Ms Smith expressed the wish
to be buried in California.

She testified that this con-
versation took place more than
10 years ago, and that her
daughter said she wanted to
be interred near her idol Mar-
ilyn Monroe.

“Wherever the stars are
buried, that’s where she want-
ed to be buried,” she said.

Ms Arthur further told the
court that if she could have
done anything differently she
would have “kidnapped” her
daughter and removed her
from the influence of Mr Stern.

“TI knew she would be next.
My grandson did not overdose.
Howard was there when he

ran

ddaughter

died, and Howard was there
when my daughter died. And
he has my granddaughter now
and it is not even his child. I’m
afraid for her life as well,” she
said while crying on the stand.
Earlier during her testimo-
ny, Mr Stern rose angrily from
his seat, but Circuit Judge Lar-
ry Seidlin stopped him before
he could complete a sentence.
“You have no podium here,
Mr Stern, appreciate you being
here, though,” the judge told
him. :
Ms Arthur took her time in
answering whether she had
benefited financially in any
way from her daughter’s death,

‘ but repeatedly stated that Mr

Stern had.

After being informed that
the embalmed body of Ms
Smith is decomposing quicker
than anticipated, Judge Seidlin
said that battle for the celebri-
ty’s body will wrap up this
week.

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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007
a

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,



(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972

Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352 .



George Bush and Al Qaeda

RECENT DESCRIPTIONS by intelligence
officials of Al Qaeda’s renewed control of ter-
rorist networks and training camps in the tribal
areas of Pakistan contrast with previous admin-
istration depictions of isolated leaders reduced
to acting as little more than a source of ideo-
logical inspiration. The new picture seems to
belie the triumphalist tone of President Bush,
who said a few days before last November’s
congressional elections: “Absolutely, we're win-
ning. Al Qaeda is on the run.”

Which is it, then, a hounded, faltering Al
Qaeda or an enemy that has regrouped and
become a greater threat than ever? The answer
is crucial not only for national security but for
. America’s open society.

An obvious part of the answer is that Bush
has played politics with the Al Qaeda threat.
When it suits his needs, he inflates the stateless
band of Osama bin Laden and his deputy
Ayman al-Zawahiri into an existential threat. At
other times, Bush boasts about routing bin
Laden, passing over in silence his administra-
tion’s failure to send enough US forces to cap-
ture the fugitive Saudi in the caves of Tora
Bora five years ago.

An accurate assessment of the threat from Al
Qaeda depends less on classified intelligence
than on a sense of proportion. There is no rea-
son to doubt reports from European and Pak-
istani intelligence agencies that, from their hide-
outs in Pakistan, Al Qaeda’s leaders have spon-
sored terrorist attacks that killed people and

attacks that were foiled beforehand. It is also
clear that extremist groups in Iraq and North
Africa have openly sworn fealty to bin Laden
and named themselves as regional branches of
Al Qaeda.

Nevertheless, bin Laden and Zawahiri are
confronting a real-world version of the principle
that every action induces a reaction. Even with
their safe haven in Pakistan, they no longer
enjoy the freedom of action they had under the
Taliban in Afghanistan before Sept. 11. When
the former leader of Al Qaeda in Iraq, Abu
Musab al-Zarqawi, sent suicide bombers to
blow themselves up in Amman, Jordan, in
November 2005, murdering Muslim men,
women, and children who could not possibly
be defined as enemies of the faithful, the
nihilism of that act turned millions of people in
the Muslim world against Al Qaeda.

Al Qaeda has little chance of toppling any
government in the Muslim world. It presents
instead a threat of episodic terrorism, and it
has provoked the security services of many
countries to cooperate against that threat. That
cooperation should be intensified and expand-
ed, but the threat from Al Qaeda does not jus-
tify Bush’s curtailing of Americans’ civil rights
or the government’s invading of their privacy. It

_should never have been used to justify a resort

to torture.

These are abuses of power harmful to Amer-
ica’s true interests, and they derive from a dis-
torted representation of Al Qaeda.

- Calamity in Jet Blue

JET BLUE CEO David Neeleman apolo-
gized profusely for his airline’s system melt-
down last week, telling customers whose flights
were cancelled or who were stranded on run-
ways for as much as 10 hours that he was “mor-
tified and humiliated,” and pledging to give
refunds, train more staff, and improve commu-
nications to avoid such a trauma in the future. It
was ritualized corporate groveling at its most
dramatic; all that was left, it seemed, was for
Neeleman to announce he was checking into
rehab.

But JetBlue is just the latest airline to hold
passengers hostage for hours without adequate
supplies or information when congestion or,
more often, adverse weather conditions over-
whelm their operations.

In December, American Airlines kept pas-
sengers locked inside planes for nine hours with-
out food or functioning toilets, waiting for
storms to clear over Dallas. Last summer a
United Airlines flight sat on the ground in Penn-
sylvania for eight hours, until the airline finally
agreed to bus passengers to New York. The
voluntary “customer service plans” adopted by



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the airlines clearly have not been good enough
to prevent such fiascoes. It’s time for congres-
sional action to enforce a passenger bill of rights.

California Democrat Mike Thompson, who
had constituents stranded on American in
December, is drafting such legislation to be
filed in the House next week. Among other
things, it would require airlines to return pas-
sengers to the airport terminal after three hours
on a runway, and to provide food, clean water,
proper ventilation and sanitary facilities dur-
ing delays of any length. It would require airlines
to provide frequent updates to passengers on a
delay’s cause and status.

In the mi$ts of memory, air travel was an
exciting, glamorous occasion one wouldn’t
dream of showing up for dressed in sweats.
Now, during bad weather delays, airports are
wore like bus depots, with passengers and
exploded luggage sprawled about and tempers
flaring. Thompson’s bill won’t return air trav-
ellers to the days when stewardesses wore white
gloves, but it would bring some measure of fair-
ness to what has become a necessity of modern
life.










EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

THE TRIBUNE




Give injured
workers
their rights

EDITOR, The Tribune.

WE HAVE in this country
many persons who have been
injured on the job. This again
has come to light from the
injury of a worker employed at
a power company. Companies
pass the compensation to
National Insurance as: C17 -
Convention concerning Work-
men’s Compensation for Acci-
dents and C19 - Convention
concerning Equality of Treat-
ment for National and Foreign
Workers as regards Workmen’s
Compensation for Accidents
have not been put in place by
the country.

These persons suffer both
bodily and financial injury. They
get no help to bring their lives
back to the original position pri-
or to the injury. This needs to
be addressed and changes put
in. The attached gives an insight
into what we as a country have
signed, but have not put in
place.

The Bahamas is one of the
174 members who are a part of
the ILO. List of Ratifications
of International Labour Con-
ventions - Bahamas Member
since 1976 - 33 conventions rat-
ified (30 in force). The main
function of the ILO is to estab-
lish standards of working con-
ditions for men and women
throughout the world. The
International Labour Organi-
sation (ILO) headquartered in
Geneva, Switzerland is a tri-
partite agency within the Unit-
ed Nations (UN).

The issue is:

If an employee is injured on
the job, who pays the
salary/wages?

The following Conventions
show that an injured person is
to be’cémpensated. The prob-
lem is that the Government has
not complied with the require-
ments. In not complying, the
Labour Department does not
follow up on the injuries. The
injured person suffers as the
companies have the view that
National Insurance is to cover.
National Insurance cannot cov-
er the wage on the injured. The
injured persons work for the
companies and they need to
cover the wage difference.

C17 - Convention concerning
Workmen’s Compensation for
Accidents (Note: Date of com-
ing into force: 01:04:1927).

Article 1 - Each Member of
the International Labour
Organisation which ratifies this
Convention undertakes to
ensure that workmen who suf-
fer personal injury. due to an
industrial accident, or their
dependents, shall be compen-








DAMP

letters@tribunemedia.net

sated on terms at least equal to
those provided by this Conven-
tion.

Article 6 - In case of incapac-
ity, compensation shall be paid
not later than as from the fifth
day after the accident, whether
it be payable by the employer,
the accident insurance institu-
tion, or the sickness insurance
institution concerned.

C19 - Convention concerning
Equality of Treatment for
National and Foreign Workers
as regards Workmen’s Com-
pensation for Accidents

Article 3 - The Members
which ratify this Convention
and which do not already pos-
sess a system, whether by insur-
ance or otherwise, of work-
men’s compensation for indus-
trial accidents agree to institute
such a system within a period
of three years from the date of
their ratification.

C 121 - Convention concern-
ing Benefits in the Case of
Employment Injury (Note:
Date of coming into force:
28:07:1967.)

Article 6 - The contingencies
covered shall include the fol-
lowing where due to an employ-
ment injury: (b) incapacity for
work resulting from such a con-
dition and involving suspension
of earnings, as defined by
national legislation;

(c) total loss of earning capac-
ity or partial loss thereof in
excess of a prescribed degree,
likely to be permanent, or cor-
responding loss of faculty;

Article 9 -1. Each Member
shall secure to the persons pro-

Reputation matter

EDITOR, The Tribune.

tected, subject to prescribed
conditions, the provision of the
following benefits:

(b) cash benefits in respect of
the contingencies specified in
Article 6, clauses (b), (c)

2. Eligibility for benefits may

not be made subject to the

length of employment, to the
duration of insurance or to the
payment of contributions: Pro-
vided that a period of exposure
may be prescribed for occupa-
tional diseases.

Article 10 - 2. The benefits
provided in accordance with
paragraph 1 of this Article shall
be afforded, using all suitable
means, with a view to main-
taining, restoring or, where this
is not possible, improving the
health of the injured person and
his ability to work and to attend
to his personal needs

Schedule II. Pericdical pay-
ments to standard beneficiaries.

Category

1. Temporary or initial inca-
pacity for work.

Standard beneficiary — Man
with wife and two children.

Percentage - 60.

The Convention states that
60 per cent is to be covered by
using all suitable means. Nation-
al Insurance now covers 40 per

cent. The company needs to put ©

in place what is required.
The persons injured on the
jobs need help.

We must put in place this .

requirement.
Not putting in the required

- changes as per the Conventions

hurts not just the injured, but
the whole country.

SIGMUND J WILLIS
_ Freeport, .
‘“Grand Bahama, |” *
*'Bébruary13, 2007-9 2

ANNA NICOLE Smith is not the first to bring notoriety to
our little country, nor will she be the last.

Whether the notoriety is good or bad, it is global, and bound
to have consequences for the reputation of our country in the

international arena.

It draws attention to, and raises questions about, the stan-
dards of our government and the political parties running it. In
this case the Anna Nicole publicity shows the world that govern-
ment ministers do not impartially apply the rules, and that spe-
cial services are available for “special friends”.

One way to counteract some of the negative publicity would
be for the Prime Minister to tell the world he has Minister Shane
Gibson's resignation on his desk.

It is the proper thing to do. Pity is was not done weeks ago.

THE NASSAU INSTITUTE
Nassau,
February 15, 2007.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 5



@ In brief

Highgrove |
sinkers get |
ready for |
concert 2

THE Highgrove Singers are
eagerly warming up their
vocal chords as they prepare
for the third annual “Let
Freedom Reign” concert.

The event will be held on
Sunday, February 25 at
7.30pm.

It is free to the public and
will be held at New Destiny
Baptist Cathedral on Blue
Hill road.

This year’s event consists
of a fusion of dramatic read-
ings, poetry, song and dance.

According to organisers:
“The performance will show
the important role sacred
music. and dance has played
‘in black history and how its
‘reflective power continues to

affect us today.”

_ Noting that this year com-
memorates the 200th year of
the abolition of the trans-
Atlantic slave trade, the High-
grove Singers have combined,
with other musicians such as:
Sonovia Pierre, Nikita
Thompson-Wells, Allison
Mason-Rolle, and_ the
Bahamas National Children’s
Choir to make this event a
memorable one.

Highgrove is comprised of
talented singers who have
studied and trained at.various
renowned musical institutions.

Dexter Fernander, the
choir director, said that he
wanted to bring back the time
when concerts were free and
audiences could enjoy good
singing.

The concert will showcase
the MCD Singers, an ensem-
ble making their mark in the
‘genre of Negro spirituals, as
well as choreographed works
of Andrew Campbell, a three
time National Arts Festival
winner.



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THURSDAY,

FEBRUARY 22ND
6:30am Community Page 1540AM
11:00 — Immediate Response

12:00. ZNS News Update,

12:05’. Immediate Response Cont'd
1:00 Legends: Beverley Wallace





























Whitfield

1:30 — Fast Forward

2:30 Turning Point

3:00 — Bishop Leroy Emmanuel

3:30 CeCe Winans

4:00 The Fun Farm

5:00 -ZNS News Update
15:05 Andiamo.

5:30 You & Your Money

6:00 . Island Talks ~

6:30 News Night 13

7:00 The Bahamas Tonight

8:00 Native Show

8:30
9:00

The Family Digest Show
Hugh Campbell Courtside

Express
9:15 Gillette World Sports
9:30 Crouches
10:00 _ Caribbean Newsline
10:30 News Night 13

1 11:00 — The Bahamas Tonight
11:30: Immediate Response

1:30am Community Page 1540AM *

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13-reserves the
right to make last minute
programme changes!






PLP chairman:

struggle of blacks

is far from over

lm By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

ACCORDING to PLP chair-
man Raynard Rigby, the “strug-
gle” of Black-Bahamians has
not ended — despite the gains
won by Majority Rule in 1967.

Mr Rigby was responding to
claims by the FNM that the PLP
is using the “race card” to
muster up support for the
upcoming general election.

He denied the allegations and
suggested that persons like
FNM deputy leader Brent
Symonette should not “run
away” from the history of the
Bahamas.

Yesterday, Mr Symonette
told The Tribune there was no
question in his mind that the
Progressive Liberal Party is
playing the race card, with its
constant references to the Unit-
ed Bahamian Party (UBP).

At the PLP rally on Tuesday
night, Foreign Affairs Minister
Fred Mitchell alleged that FNM
leader Hubert Ingraham will
turn over the government to
‘the UBP heir’, Brent Symon-
ette, if Mr Ingraham is returned
to government. ©

And Prime Minister Christie

said Mr Ingraham was brought
out of retirement by “hidden
forces” who cannot let the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party and the
progressive forces control the
Bahamas. L

But according to Mr Symon-
ette: “The Bahamas of 2007 has
developed way beyond the
question of the race card that
the PLP is trying to use in a very
low-down way to hold on to
power.”

He claimed the PLP is using
the race card because it is in a
“desperate” state of affairs as
the general election approaches.

Mr Symonette also said there
are some white Bahamians who
are “very offended”. by the
PLP’s race card strategy. .

But PLP chairman Raynard
Rigby said the history of the
Bahamas cannot be re-written.

“Whether Brent Symonette
wants to accept it or whether
he wants to run away from it is
his business, but the history of

-our country cannot change.

“At a time, there was a
minority government who con-
trolled the economy and the
politics of the Bahamas and
that’s why we had January 10
1967, and that’s the importance

Ministry of Tourism
considers Indian travel

A DAUNTING travel visa
process looms as the main bar-
rier preventing the Bahamas
from tapping into a lucrative
segment of affluent Indian trav-
ellers, top Ministry of Tourism
officials say.

‘A team from the Ministry of
Tourism visited India from Feb-
ruary 3 to 10 to ascertain the
potential for the travel of Indi-
ans to the Bahamas.

Director general Vernice
Walkine, deputy director gen-
eral Ellison “Tommy” Thomp-
son, and director of Europe and
Asia Karen Seymour met with
tour operators, airlines, media,
and film representatives in Del-
hi and Mumbai..

While the team received
“promising” and “encouraging”
information during their busi-
ness meetings, it was apparent
that the Bahamas’ travel visa
process was a significant barrier
in developing travel business
from India, which has a popu-
lation of more than one billion.

“Notwithstanding the fact that
India is a long way, geographi-
cally, from the Bahamas, the
Indians and this particular afflu-
ent population in India tend to
travel fairly spontaneously,” Ms
Walkine said. “They have the
funds and the adventuresome
spirit to decide they want to go
abroad for a week, next week.
So, having to wait several weeks
for a visa application to be
processed was one of the con-
cerns that everybody expressed.”

Visa applications for travel to
the Bahamas are processed by
the British High Commission.
At the moment, it takes more
than four weeks to be processed.

Ms Walkine said that the cur-
rent time of processing is con-
sidered too long by Indians.
Destinations such as Australia

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and New Zealand have been
able to process visa applications
within days.

The Indian travel business
community also identified a lack
of acceptable vegetarian and
Indian cuisine as another barri-
er to travel to the Bahamas,
Indian travellers, particularly
more traditional Indians,
require true vegetarian diets.
The Indian vegetarian strictly
adheres to the diet, Bahamian
officials were advised.

Mr Thompson said it was
encouraging that Indian travel
professionals were not concerned
about the cost of a Bahamas
vacation for Indian travellers.

He added that language also
did not appear to be a signifi-
cant barrier since many afflu-
-ent Indians speak English. He
said there also appeared to be
great potential for weddings and
honeymoon business.

The Ministry of Tourism is
also hoping to arrange location
visits for members of India’s
film industry since filmmakers
are known as trend setters for
travellers in India.

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of majority rule,” Mr Rigby
said. '

Asked if he believed black
Bahamians still face pre-1967
obstacles, Mr Rigby said the
majority of Bahamians want to
ensure that they have a slice of
the “economic pie.”

“We have political indepen-
dence, but now the question is
one of economic empowerment
for the masses,” he said.

According to Mr Rigby, the
issue is not one of black and
white, but instead economic
empowerment for all Bahami-
ans.

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THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 6, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007













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Applications should be email to: cmajor@srb.sandals.com
Application close Feb. 28th, 2007



















= FIDELITY

"Time After Time ;



m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

ACCORDING to a report
presented to government last
year, public transportation —
and in particular, public trans-
portation that services schools —
is a crucial factor in solving Nas-
sau's dire traffic situation.

It was noted that with school
out for the week, it is impossible
for any driver not notice the
alleviation of the congestion
problem in New Providence.

The 2006 report noted that
60 per cent of all school chil-
dren on the island, including 90
per cent of all primary school
children, are currently driven
to school individually in private
vehicles.

With this in mind, The Tri-
bune sought answers to the
question of when the long-tout-
ed unified bus system — the
answer proposed by govern-
ment and independent consul-
tants to New Providence's con-
gestion problem — will see the
light of day.

Yesterday however, neither
Minister of Transport Glenys
Hanna-Martin nor road traffic
controller Jack Thompson were
willing to put a definite time-
line on when a unified bus sys-
tem will be implemented in
New Providence.










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sa((CHAE D

-ABLEE
- GARD

EAE ET TCT Ta ara

While both agreed that the
radical change is required if
congestion and road safety are
to be improved to any signifi-
cant degree, they said the com-
plexity of the issue has made
the process of bringing about
that change lengthy.

Mrs Hanna-Martin empha-
sised that the issue is primarily
in Mr Thompson’s hands and
that any move towards passing
the legislation in parliament —
the first and most crucial step
towards radically changing the
current public transportation
system — depends on how soon
Mr Thompson and his team

-



K
\

RN








AIRE
a



een eMC SRS] tay ead
Malt at Marathon Tel: 394-5180



complete their work with the
documents.

_ "It's taken longer than I
would've hoped. It's something
that I wish we could've fixed
over night in a shorter period
of time but I can say that I feel
that it really sort of became
fueled in the last few months,"
said Mrs Hanna-Martin.

"I would hope and pray that
within 12 real months we will
have a public transportation sys-
tem in this country that is dif-
ferent to what we have now,"
she added.

Meanwhile, Jack Thompson,
road traffic controller, said that
his team is "working overtime"
to "fine tune" the draft legisla-
tion to enable the system to be
put into place, while the busi-
ness plan should be completed
"very soon."

He originally told The Tri-
bune in October that "fine tun-
ing" was taking place, and said
at that time that "giant steps
towards completion" were
being made.

Asked yesterday when he felt
the legislation may go before
parliament, Mr Thompson said
that in a week he may be "ina
better position to answer that."

The industry as it exists today,
many claim, is not only unsuit-
able to offer a real alternative to
travel in private vehicles — but is




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With still no sign of the public
transort plan intended to solve
the congestion in the capital,
how close is a solution?



problem in Nassau

also plagued with lawlessness
and a disregard for safety. In
March of last year, bus unifica-
tion was brought to the fore-

front of the public's attention

when a primary school student,
Faith Mackey, was hit and killed
by a jitney.

On January 17, 2007, an
alleged hit-and-run accident
involving a jitney driver again
raised the question of a need
for greater regulation.

However, with around 500
individual franchise owners
operating various buses around
New Providence, the current
"system" did not develop
overnight — but is the result of
years of disorganisation on the
part of numerous governments,
the minister pointed out.

Both Mr Thompson and Mrs
Hanna-Martin said that they are
confident that stakeholders in
the industry will accept the
forthcoming plan when it is
completed. —

"Tf they feel that they accept
that the system is not accept-
able to the public in this coun-
try...I think that's a compelling
driving force to the way that
they adapt to what is happen-
ing," said Mrs Hanna-Martin.

However, she added that bus
operators "main concern will
be that they get a fair economic
stake in what happens,"

Despite not being able to
offer a time frame for the over-
haul, Mrs Hanna Martin said
that she is absolutely committed
to seeing the unified bus sys-
tem. come to fruition.

"T think it impacts the quality
of life we enjoy, it's not a simple
matter but its an important mat-
ter," she said, adding that on
her ministry's part "there is a
commitment to pursue the mat-
ter and hopefully in the shortest
possible time."

"A proper transportation :ys-
tem cannot be achieved unver
the current system and I thin.
the facts every day show that,”
she said.

The government first
announced in 2005 that a "pre-
ferred model" for the unifica-
tion of the public bus system
had been put together.

A report released by the Min-
istry of Transport an Aviation
on January 12 of last year said
the "time is opportune to carry
out appropriate reform of the
industry in a decisive and sys-
tematic manner" as the present
bus system's weaknesses are
destructive to the future devel-
opment of public transporta-
tion. ,

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THE TRIBUNE

mele. \ Ba IE)

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 7





@ RICARDO Whylly.

Attacks on Ingraham continue
with speech by Ricardo Whylly

THE PLP offensive against
former Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham continued yesterday
with an attack by Senator Ricar-
do Whylly against the FNM
leader.

Using his contribution for the
Prime Minister’s Pension Bill
as a platform, Mr Whylly
accused Mr Ingraham of ‘dou-
ble-dipping’, referring to the
fact the he is paid a government
salary as an MP as well as a
pension as a former prime min-
ister.

Mr Whylly said: “He insisted
that the late Sir Lynden resign
from the other place before he
could receive his pension. Now,
he is receiving his pension and
continues to sit in the other
place. Madam, I am sure that

Senator accuses former PM of ‘double-dipping’



you and everyone would agree
with me that two plus two is
equal to four just as three plus
one is equal to four. Mr Ingra-
ham, however, does not agree.
He believes that he could re-
write common sense, logic, law
and intelligence.”

Mr Ingraham has said repeat-
edly that both salaries have
been forwarded to him despite
his efforts to prevent this, He
added however that the salary

he has received as an MP has .

been set aside for return to the
government.
Mr Whylly also questioned

Mr Ingraham’s trustworthiness,
saying: “The greatest display of
trust ever pronounced in the
Bahamas was when the
Bahamian citizens said that they
did not trust former Prime Min-
ister Ingraham to amend the
constitution... Mr Ingraham
who was leaving after the ref-
erendum to attend a CARI-
COM meeting stated that he
was ashamed of the Bahamian
people.

“I ask colleagues opposite
whether or not they can indi-
cate to the Bahamas whether
or not Mr Ingraham is still

ashamed of Bahamians and
their right to make decisions
they consider to be in their best
interest.”

The senator also added his
name to the list of those voicing
their support for former .Cabi-
net minister Shane Gibson,:-who
resigned on Sunday night over

his relationship with deceased.

celebrity Anna Nicole Smith.
He said: “In the case of Anna
Nicole Smith, former Minister
Gibson approved an application
for permanent residence after
due legal diligence was done by
a law firm that is reputedly of

the top in the country. This law
firm indicated that Ms Smith
met the legal requirements for
permanent residency. Conse-
quently, approval was given.”

And he echoed the comments
on Tuesday of Prime Minister
Perry Christie, who tried to
deflect attention away from Mr
Gibson’s actions. The senator
said: “Individuals known to be
undesirable in several countries,
and in several cases with inter-
national adverse notoriety, were
given permanent residency
under the Ingraham adminis-
tration in record time.”

Homeschooling seminar gives |
alternatives for education

HOMESCHOOLING. is
emerging as a viable and sus-
tainable alternative to tradi-
tional Bahamian education,
concerned parents and home-
schooling pioneers said ahead
of a homeschooling seminar this
weekend.

Kingdom Life Church on
Chesapeake Road has sched-

‘uled a series of seminars for

February 23 to 25. The series
begins with “Why homeschool?
Informing families about the
homeschool alternative.”

The seminar is being pre-
sented against a backdrop of
promising homeschooling
results out of the United States.
According to the findings of the
Rudner Study, the average
homeschooled eighth grade stu-
dent performs four grade lev-
els above the national average.

‘ One in four homeschool! stu-

happiness is in

your C

dents (24.5 per cent) are
enrolled one or more grades
above age level. Statistics from
the United States also show that
students who have been home-
schooled their entire lives have
the highest scholastic achieve-
ment.

Furthermore, in every sub-
ject and at every grade level of
the Iowa Test of Basic Skills
(ITBS) and the Measures of
Academic Progress (MAP) bat-

teries, homeschooled students -

scored significantly higher than
their counterparts in public and
private schools.

Pastor Cedric Moss and his
wife Alexine, who have home-
schooled three children for the
past 11 years, will assist in lead-
ing the seminars. The Mosses
are gréat advocates of home-
schooling for families within the
proper circumstances.

The eldest child of Pastor and
Mrs Moss made history last year
by becoming the first fully home-
schooled Bahamian to sit the
Bahamas Junior Certificate
examinations. Her sitting of the
examinations resulted in seven
passes — four As, two Bs anda C.

Although the academic
accomplishments have been
excellent, the Moss family
points to “more substantial”
benefits of homeschooling.
Those benefits include the fos-
tering of a special relationship
between parents and children,
and the avoiding of the many

social ills to which many

Bahamian students are exposed
in today’s schools.
Homeschooling also allows
parents to better shape the char-
acter of children, the Mosses
said.
Kingdom Life Church has

hoices

Let the baristas at your favourite Starbucks store
show you how to customize a beverage and make it your drink.

also enlisted the help of a US
couple who have been home-
schooling for more than 20
years. Brent and Jenny Detwiler
of North Carolina will share
their experiences in home-
schooling. The Detwilers have
four children and two grand-
children.

Sessions for the seminar
include “Why homeschool?
Biblical and practical reasons,”
“Why homeschool?”: lessons
from my life’s book,” and a pan-
el discussion with Cedric and
Alexine Moss and Brent and
Jenny Detwiler.

The seminar is free and per-. _

sons wishing to attend can reg-
ister online at www.kingdom-
life.org.

All homeschooling sessions
will be held on Friday, February
23 beginning at 7.30pm at King-
dom Life Church.





@ CEDRIC Moss

AA a
wh tas

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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007

Christie’s econo



I: IS clear that Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie and his
crew have put outa propaganda
sheet touting what they regard
as their economic accomplish-
ments.

This propaganda sheet was
taken up by two very eloquent
young people on Jeff Lloyd’s
Real Talk radio show as well as
by the editorial section of one
of the country’s newspapers on
Wednesday, February 21, 2007.
The problem is that the sheet
put out is filled with fiction, as
we shall point out the following
paragraphs.

STRAIGHT UP TALK

ZJHIVARGO

When Mr Christie came to
office in 2002 the unemployment
rate was only 9.1 per cent. It
increased in 2003 to 10.8 per
cent and stayed at around that
same level until 2005.

It was only in 2006 that there
was a somewhat curious
sharp decrease in the unem-
ployment rate to 7.4 per cent,
according to preliminary esti-

LAING

THE GROWTH OF THE
COUNTRY’S GDP

The Christie administration’s

- fiction sheet says that the nation-

al economy shrank in 2001 by
1.5 per cent and .5 per cent in
2002. This is simply not the
whole story.

What the fiction sheet will not
say is that 2001 was the year in

mi



out that the highest growth rate
experienced during the Ingra-
ham administration was 6.8 per
cent. That growth rate has not
been equalled since.

The Christie administration’s
fiction sheet also suggested that
there was a turnaround in the
economy by the current govern-
ment to a high of six per cent in
five years. That is untrue.

In real terms, the Bahamian
economy has never exceeded 45
per cent under the Christie
administration and, in fact, the
government has played games
with the numbers by using

- growth rates that do not account
for inflation to make its num-

GOVERNMENT REVENUE
TOPS $1 BILLION

The Christie administration’s
propaganda sheet boasts that
government revenue topped $1
billion for the first time in 2005.
So what?

Any previous administration
could have taxed the nation
more heavily and brought rev-
enue to $1 billion. Certainly, nat-
ural inertia would have brought
us eventually to that point. After
all, in 2001, revenue was already
$986 million, just $14 million shy
of $1 billion.

In any event, what is special
about the $1 billion dollar mark?

THE TRIBUNE





c fiction sheet

utter nonsense and entirely
untrue.

First of all, the paper
approvals that the PLP touts are
just that, paper approvals. They
are not real. In fact, that “$20
billion” approved investment fig-
ure is simply bogus.

Pe
a

The way these figures are cal- |

culated is unreliable and not in
keeping with the way these fig-
ures are professionally calculat-
ed.

The fact is that, according to
Central Bank Reports, a little

more than-$1 billion in FDI ~j

flowed into The Bahamas over
the last five years, almost half
of which represented land sales.

THE UNEMPLOYMENT mates by the Department of Sta- which the terrorist attacks took _ bers look better. What matters most is what is _ Other than Kerzner Interna- ,\1,,
RATE tistics. place in the USA and which being done with taxpayers’ mon- tional’s third phase of Atlantis, ,, ;,,
It is mere speculation to sug- affected the global economy. TOURISM ARRIVALS AND ey, whether it is $1 million or $1 which came under the Ingraham ...,,,

The Christie administration’s The US economy experienced EXPENDITURE billion. administration, no meaningful

fiction sheet says that unem-
ployment was reduced from 10.2
per cent when the PLP came to
office to seven per cent in 2006.
This is not true.





gest that we are probably arriv-
ing at full employment when
Grand Bahama’s economic
plight remains dire and its unem-
ployment rate hardly improving.

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd

Montrose Avenue >







decline from the 9/11 attacks
combined with a recession that
began in March of that same
year.

The economic fallout from
both lasted for at least three
ears. When Mr Christie came

growth for the Bahamian econ-
omy of some 2.5 per cent to
three per cent. That is to say,
before Mr Christie hit a lick, the
international community had

to office, the IMF had projected.

The fiction sheet touts an
increase in tourist arrivals to five
million and visitor expenditure
in excess of $2 billion. What the
sheet will not say is that visitor
arrivals have been breaking mil-
lion-increment marks for the
past 40 years and the same is
true of expenditure breaking the
billion-dollar-increment mark.

Also, the fiction sheet will not
point out that not one new hotel

Within the last five years no
new school was built; no new
clinic; no new court or any other
important public structure.
Teachers, prison officers,
Defence Force officers, the
police, nurses.and others com-
plain about their working con-
ditions.

If $1 billion in revenue is
something to boast about, why
are these hard-working people
not being paid? If $1 billion in

investment has taken place in

The Bahamas over the last five ,

years.

It is simply untrue for anyone,
including any editorial piece, to
say that “foreign investment has
grown by proverbial leaps and
bounds.”

Let those who say so provide 4

some objective proof of this,

either from the Central Bank or .. ..

the Department of Statistics.
Announcements of invest-



: or resort was built under the revenue is so special, why are ments that have not yet taken : ras
Phone:322-1722 ® Fax: 326-7452 pape ett robust-erowtD Christie administration or new we running such high deficits place have certainly grown but te%
: : The Christie administration’s cruise line introduced. In fact, and increasing the national not foreign investments in the __
- pit fiction sheet says that the at least one major hotel has debt? That boast is simply laugh- ground. Indeed, the PM was \
Bahamian economy did not closed in Grand Bahama. If this able. untruthful to say that the IMF \
grow by more than 4.5 per cent is true, what accounts for the predicted unprecedented growth
in the entire 10 years that the tourism increases? GFS DEFICITS for The Bahamas.
Ingraham administration was in The tourism increases hadless— The IMF said no such thing
office. That is clearly untrue. to do with the Christie adminis- The Christie administration’s and the prime minister cannot |
In fact, an appendix to Deputy tration than with the more fiction sheet boasts that the fiscal provide proof of any such state- \
Prime Minister Cynthia Pratt’s robust US economy as well as discipline of the PLP govern- ment. He and Minister Vincent
budget communication in 2005, the multi-billion dollar renewal ment resulted in the GFS deficit Peet are now on record as »
when she assumed the prime of the tourism plant between _ being 2.4 per cent in 2006 and spreading untruths about inter- |
minister’s responsibilities, points 1992 and 2002. the containing of inflation with- national financial institutions’ “4
in 1.74 per cent. predictions about the Bahami- oogn
What the sheet will not point an economy. The IMF and the <7."
out is that from 1992 to 1996, “IDB only report what we report vee
Na hie bY) ld the Ingraham administration ran about projected investments. orig!
WE PUT A GES deficits below one per cent é ~~
and from 1997 to 2000, the FNM THE FAMILY ISLANDS
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1.6 per cent, 1.4 per cent, 0.3 per
cent, 0.3 per cent. :
The PLP has never matched

take credit for this because The
Bahamas really imports its infla-
tion. :

CONSTRUCTION

The Christie administration’s
fiction sheet touts that 826 build-
ing permits were issued during
the first five months of 2006
totalling some $313.4 million
compared to just 680 approvals
for all of 2001.

What the fiction sheet will not
note is that in the FNM’s tenure

the highest number of building .

permits in the history of The
Bahamas were issued in the
amount of 2,773 permits in 1999,
valued at $646.5 million.

That construction record has
not been equalled since.

FOREIGN INVESTMENT

The fiction sheet touts invest-
ments of some $13.6 billion in
various stages of development
with $3 billion in FDI. This is












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Here again the fiction sheet

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Propagandists can try their ,

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bornly looks them in the face
and says, you are shameless.

This is what is now happen-
ing in our nation; the PLP is try-
ing to convince Bahamians that
what they are experiencing is not
real. They want Bahamians to
live in a dreamland of accom-
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not made.

Never mind their magic tricks;
Bahamians know the truth and it
is that truth that now has Mr
Christie asking the dead to pray
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er wore, and getting ready to
walk where he should have been
running. ;

THOUGHT FOR
THE WEEK

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS



Missing woman is
found in South
American prison

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - A woman
who was initially reported miss-

ing by family members in.

Grand Bahama has turned up
alive — in a South American
prison after she was caught
with illegal drugs in that coun-
try.

Melicia Ewing of Pinedale,
Eight Mile Rock, was arrested
in Georgetown, Guyana, for
possession of a substantial
amount of the cocaine.

Ewing was arraigned in the
Georgetown Magistrate’s
Court, where she pleaded guilty
to trafficking illegal narcotics

on February 6, 2007.

She was sentenced to four
years imprisonment and hard
labour. She was additionally
fined $10,000, or in default of
payment an additional one year
in prison.

A local pastor told The Tri-
bune that Ewing’s family mem-

bers were concerned about -

whereabouts, and had report-
ed her missing to the police in
Grand Bahama.

Supt Basil Rahming, assistant
press liaison officer, confirmed
the circumstances surrounding
Ewing’s arrest and incarcera-
tion in Guyana.

Mr Rahming reported that
Ewing was undergoing pre-

flight processing at the security
checkpoint at the Cheddi Jagan
International Airport in
Georgetown on February 3.

Before she boarded
Caribbean Airways Flight 484
to Miami, Florida, a security
officer examined Ewing’s hand-
bag and discovered a plastic
package that contained one kilo
of cocaine, and a small package
containing 586 grams of
cocaine.

She was arrested by airport
police and taken into custody
at the Georgetown Police
Headquarters.

After serving her sentence in
Guyana, Ms Ewing will be
deported back to the Bahamas.

MP steers students to tourism



@ PARLIAMENTARY secretary at the Ministry of Tourism John Carey visited Jordan Prince

William High School to talk with seniors about the opportunities that exists for them in the field of
tourism. Carey focused on giving the students an overview of the tourism andustry and encouraged =
them to consider pursuing a career in Tourism.

BAHAMAS

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RETAIL TECHNICAL SUPPORT SPECIALIST

Bahamas Supermarkets Limited operates a leading supermarket chain in The
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its customers, associates and community.

Aa opportunity for a Retail Technical Support Specialist to join this market

leader has arisen.

Reporting directly to the IT Manager, the IT Retail Technical Support Specialist’s
role is to ensure proper computer operations so that end users (Retail and Support
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Key responsibilities and selection criteria include:

Field incoming help requests ihioushout support office and retail locations
via both telephone and e-mail.
Prioritize, document and pro-actively resolve support office and retail

help requests.

'

Install Point of Sale hardware and configure systems and applications
as directed by IT operations.
Ensure network connectivity to retail network equipment and perform
preventative maintenance.
Support development and implementation of networking projects and
new technology installations.
Troubleshoot technical problems in retail locations as directed by IT’

operations.

Must be willing to travel to remote offices and retail locations when
required and work shifts.
College diploma or university degree in the field of computer science

or 2 years equivalent work experience specifically in the technology/help

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Knowledge of computer hardware and network design including printers,
routers, wireless devices, switches and workstations.

Excellent working knowledge of PC Hardware, Ethernet network
topology, TCP/IP, Windows XP/2003 and MS Office 2003 products.

If you have what it takes to succeed in this challenging role, forward your
resume and cover letter to:

Human Resources

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Nassau, Bahamas

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THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 10, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007








SOLDIER ROAD








394-6312

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¢ ACIB OR ABIFS Diploma or degree in Banking

. (or a related field)

e At least 5 or more years banking experience.
Previous experience in portfolio and liability
administration would be an asset.

¢ Negotiating/Selling skills

e Strong leadership, coaching, relationship building,
problem solving and confidentiality skills

e Ability to manage multiple priorities

® Ability to make sound credit analysis

e Microsoft Office skills (Word, Excel, Power Point)
















Responsibilities include:

e Contributing to meeting team sales plans by
acquiring and growing profitable client relationships

© Providing customized solutions and financial advice
designed to satisfy the client’s long-term goals on
obtaining a mortgage

* Seeking out new clients by developing relationships
within the community and local centres of influence

e Enhancing the experience of existing clients by
providing accessibility and one-on-one advice and
valuable information on the intricacies of having
a mortgage y >: .

e Successfully anchoring clients with the appropriate
delivery channel within RBC Financial Group

A competitive compensation package (base salary
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Please apply before March 2, 2007 to:
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Via email: bahcayjp@rbc.com

ks of Royal Bank of Canada

ean te

CAVES VILLAGE

cover essemneeeresiveten HARRAG, WAM AM A £m




@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

BAHAMIAN hotels are
reporting good occupancy rates
as the flexibility period for the

Western Hemisphere Travel |

Initiative’s (WHTI) enforce-
ment, which requires Ameri-
cans to have passports to return
to their homeland from a visit to
the Bahamas, draws to an end.

Russell Miller, president of
the Bahamas Hotel Association
(BHA), said that while all the
figures are not*in, Bahamian
hotels are enjoying good occu-
pancy levels.

He said the BHA was await-
ing the results of a members
survey to determine just how
the numbers compare to last
year. The association, eager to
avoid a massive fallout from
the WHTI, has been closely
monitoring call centres and
reservations desks to see if the
passport requirements have
negatively affected occupan-

cy.

In addition, BHA members
have implemented a passport
reimbursement programme
where they refund their guests
the cost of a new US passport in
the hope this will encourage
persons to visit.



»

©2007 CreativeRelations.net

393-4813

— Lowe’ has all the romance you need for

ends February 28th, Ns

Selected

ae off Trimmers

*Good while supplies last

Harbour Bay Shopping Centre

Bahamas Hotel Association look at effects

ahamas hotel occupancy goo





of enforcement of passports for Americans





@ RUSSELL Miller

However, Mr Miller said
the BHA can only judge the
impact of the WHTI based on
the numbers of persons who
express interest in the pass-
port reimbursement or call


















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into the call centre.

Otherwise, they have no way
of knowing the persons in the
US who simply decide not to
visit and never make the calls.

Mr Miller pointed out that
there may be other factors at
play affecting occupancy.

Temperature

He acknowledged that at the
beginning of the year, tempera-
tures in the northern US were
unseasonably warm, which may
have deterred persons from
travel. Now, the severe cold
weather which has hit the
region, and was responsible for
massive travel delays, should
work in the Bahamas’ favor by
encouraging persons to flock to
warmer climates.

However, Mr Miller added
that the delays in air travel also
may have helped to deter peo-
ple from attempting to travel.

“So this is a situation difficult
to gauge, but we are optimistic
and continue to monitor it,” he
said.

Mr Miller pointed out that

Atlantis had seen very good

Defence Force craft sink
after years of service

A Defence Force vessel has
sunk at its moorings at Coral
Harbour.

The Port Nelson, a 108-foot
patrol craft designed for work
in shallow water,.was being
“cannibalised” to keep its sister
vessel Yellow Elder in opera-
tion, according to inside
sources.

“The vessel had been decay-
ing for years,” a source. said,
“but in its day it was regarded as
one of the best vessels on the
fleet.”



/

tine, crystal, chocolates, candles & gifts galore!

occupancy levels, particularly
over the President’s Day holi-
day weekend.

He added that in several cas-
es at ticket counters in the US,
there was some confusion
regarding whether persons trav-
elling needed to have their pass-
ports to board. Mr Miller said
the BHA and the Ministry of
Tourism had to get involved
and help resolve the issue.

Although the WHTI require-
ment took effect last month, the
US government has allowed for
a flexible implementation of the
law, which means that per$ons
could still travel without a pass-
port - and airlines will nof:be
penalised if they board those
persons - for 30 days after the
initiative came into being on
January 23, 2007. ,

Regional data implies thatthe
requirement is hurtge
Caribbean destinations, h
some reports indicating that air
atrivals are down or flat, while
cruise arrivals - which are not
yet subjected to the WHT1 - are
up. It also suggests that, air
arrivals from other markets
such as Canada, the UK and
Europe are increasing. iJ

9

“Ag
5,

"ty S2

avo
ris
vt
ity
The Port Nelson sank in spite
of maintenance. work. by
mechanics. “It should have beep
in dry dock,” said the source.
“But it has been standing jn
water for years.” ay.
Sub-Lieutenant Sonya Miller,
PR officer for the Defence
Force, would not speak, to
whether the ship had been “can-
nibalised”. “4
She would only say that,the
ship was in an “decommissioned
state” and had not been used

for a few years. Pio







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£
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 11

JHE TRIBUNE









i _ LOCAL NEWS |



Kae

por



The Tribune
takes a look at
Tuesday night’s
political rallies



"KN

ol ly

iG.

S16 *

1m By BRENT DEAN

JOR

wYHE PLP rally in the
Pinewood constituency in effect
marked the official beginning
of the party’s 2007 election cam-
paign.

“Fittingly, the party sought to
bégin the campaign in a con-
stituency where the party won
every polling division, and ulti-
mately claimed the seat by over
1,000 votes in the last general
election.
2The rally brought out PLP
‘Supporters from all over the
‘Bahamas. Passionate PLP’s
from Grand Bahama and

‘Andros mixed with those from -

Yamacraw and Grant's Town
46‘hear the message of their par-
ty which had been up to that
‘point, hesitant to unleash the
full force of their campaign.
Former minister of immigra
tfén, Shane Gibson, weighed
RPSpificantly on the minds of
“‘'sfahy of the supporters. Many
of them shared the views of
Foreign Minister. Fred Mitchell.

~

F

~,

Ta a

mâ„¢ By PAUL TURNQUEST
; Tribune Staff Reporter
% FOLLOWING a night when
o political parties held mas-
dive rallies simultaneously, the
prs thought that burned in curi-
gus minds was which event
drew the largest crowd.
&. =
¢ Tribune correspondents at
both rallies, after collecting
3umerous police estimates, nar-
lowed the range of crowd num-
wers to an unofficial 5,000 for
the PLP, and around 7,000 for
e FNM.
Both FNM and PLP support-
‘rs labelled their respective
rowds as being into the “tens
of thousands” and displayed
their discontent at being
Aunderestimated”.
& While many PLP supporters
would argue the disparity in
filumbers, a general observation
the venues could bring some
ylarity to the discussion.
“ The Pinewood Park is small-
than that of R M Bailey, and
was not entirely filled accord-
ing to all accounts.
iS This however could not be
said of the venue of the FNM
tally.
¢ Cars lined Independence Dri-
we and Prince Charles Drive,

a -*: PPP Fee

ee

@nd the Robinson and.
larathon Roads, to reach the
ark on Tuesday night.

# Cars filled the parking lot of
lomon’s wholesalers, the Mall
t Marathon, Galleria Cinemas,
ind the grass parking area
ground the theatre and the park
itself.
'»Rersons seeking to avoid the
crowd opted to stay in their
cars — resulting in an undeter-
mined number of attendees
that could not be readily count-
ed: (With these persons fac-
tored in, the conservative 7,000
figure could jump even high-
.er.);Whether the same was true
at the PLP rally could not be
verified.

At R M Bailey, where there
was standing room only, per-
sons stood along the road lis-
tening to FNM commentators





Rallies mark the
eginning of 2007
election campaign

suggesting that Mr Gibson’s

public ordeal was the work of

the media.

However, a few supporters
were willing to admit that Mr
Gibson exercised poor judg-
ment regarding his relationship
with the late Anna Nicole
Smith.

The beginning of the rally
season also ushers in the begin-
ning of the numbers game sur-
rounding these public displays
of support. Displays that on the
one hand, reveal what momen-
tum:the party possesses, and on
the other, reveal to the public
the depth of the party coffers.

For the PLP rally, numerical

estimates of the crowd ranged

from the implausible (30,000)
to the uncharitable (3,000), with
many guesses in between.
When asked, one party offi
cial casually looked around and
stated, “there must be ove:
10,000 people here. orm ,
However most estimates sug,
gested that the PLP had a
crowd near 3000 at the rath



C

‘The mystery o
really atten

and discussing the pitfalls, short-
comings, and merits of the gov-
erning PLP party.

Some attendees who spoke
with The Tribune said it should
also be kept in mind that R M
Bailey Park, although touted as
“PNM country” ts a central
location for the Kennedy,







though a spatial description of
their support may be more use-
ful for those that were not there.

The PLP was not able to fully
fill the Pinewood Park, which is
in an area that can be regarded
as a PLP stronghold, based on
the results of the last election —
whereas the FNM was able to
fill a larger venue, the R M Bai-
ley park, on much shorter notice.

Ultimately, it is far too early
to place excessive importance
on the respective turn-outs,
commentators say.

However, FNM_ leader
Hubert Ingraham’s snap deci-
sion to counter the PLP’s rally
effort with one of his own, on
the same night, brought a new
and heightened significance to
the crowds last ‘Tuesday night.

If it is correct that Mr Ingra-
ham was able to bring out more
supporters, ina bigger venue,
on the spur of the moment, then
the unpression could be created

dhat he has as much. or possibly
even more support or momen

tum. than the PLP at this stave

x

of the campaign.

The true significance of win-
ning the turn-out race at rallies

especially when your oppo-
nent has one at the same time —
is in how the public regard your
level of support in the days that
follow, one political observer

@ THE PLP rally in Pinewood park

noted.

Public perception becomes
even more significant in the face
of what appears to be a close
election, with voter turn-out

that will probably be less than .
‘during the last election. :
Commentators said the PLP

numbers — how many
ed Tuesday night's ra

Marathon, and Holy Cross con-
stituencies — three seats that are
now under the representation
of the PLP.

Kennedy was won by the
incumbent Kenyatta Gibson by
almost a 1.000 voter differen-
tial over the FNM candidate
during the 2002 general elec-

Tel: 341-2024

tion. Holy Cross was won by
the embattled Sidney Stubbs by
only a few hundred votes. and
Marathon by Ron Pinder by a
very small margin.

To many observers, the dif-
ference in crowd turnout is an
indicator — whether favourable
or not — that could give a valu-

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This information, one said,
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will have to draw bigger crowds
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a landslide victory in 2002. It is
still early in the campaign — but
not too Jong before Bahamians
will again decide who they want
to lead them.

lies?

On the other hand, some
commentators believe just as
strongly that paying too much
attention to the question of
rally turnout can be mislead-
ing, and that Bahamian elec-
tions are really decided in the
last few days before the polls
close.






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Soldier Road
Phone: 393-1488 |
THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 13





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TRE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 15
a LOCAL NEWS ,

Farquharson urges police
reserves to

M

r"s

COMMISSIONER of
Palice Paul Farquharson
has challenged members of
the Royal Bahamas Police
Fource’s reserves to play
greater roles in their indi-
vidual communities.

sCommissioner Farquhar-
son said this can be done
thtough the formation of
youth clubs, crime watch-
es and other activity groups
which will “exemplify the
kind of leadership skills”
that exists within the mem-
bership of the reserves.

‘The commissioner said
the police reserves, which
will celebrate 42 years as a
separate branch in August,
have become an integral
part of the force, augment-
ing, the regular compliment
of officers.

He said reserves have
shared, and in many cases,
taken on responsibilities
that would normally be
performed by enlisted
members of the Force.

‘These duties include, but
ar€ not limited to, police
patrols, assisting with the
processing of traffic
offences, assisting with
eniergency situations and
providing security at
logal events and crime
scenes.

-he.reserves are also
expected to play a key role
during the upcoming gen-
eral elections as their
duties will be expanded to
include manning police sta-
tions while the regular offi-
cérs are assigned to polic-
ing the elections.

“The way forward
démands wide-ranging
planning in order for goals

objectives to be

id
MS atniéved. ” the commis-

i

Forty-two year anniversary
as a separate branch —

sioner said. “Volunteering
your services demonstrates

that you believe in the.

vision where communities
are safe, police officers
offer professional service
and where men, women
and children can play their
rightful roles in a peaceful

society.”
He said the police
reserves must play a

greater role in the devel-
opment of their communi-
ties by “exemplifying lead-
ership” in those areas. He
said there are many chal-
lenges facing communities

because of a lack of lead--

ership.

The commissioner
encouraged the reserves to
take up the challenge to
provide leadership espe-
cially to young men who
may need “some direction
in terms of character build-
ing”

“The young men in this
country, we see them
everyday, parading down

in front of the courts in.

chains. Well, if you lock all
of the young men up, who
are we going to have left?,”
Commissioner Farquharson
asked.

“We will have the women
left, who are very capable,
but if the young males in
your communities are
yearning for leadership in
terms of character build-
ing, let us try and form
youth clubs, form crime
watches wherever we are,
to make sure that we can

steer some of these young
men and,

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locked up by all means, but

play greater role

those we can help, let us
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“T believe that some
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can play a great role in
regards to this particular
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Farquharson said.

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THE TRIBUNE ~ THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 19
; NASSAU LIFE th Ses et

Colinalmperial awards for staff.

i fee es A Le B@ STUDENTS

; Ve i -and teachers
from Deep
Creek Middle
School in
Eleuthera
paid a cour-
tesy call on
Deputy to the
Governor
GeneralSir
Clement Ma
nard at Gov-
ernment
House on
Friday

(Photo:

BIS/Tim
Aylen)






Are. ae SNe Sir Clement











@ EDDISON Brice, a 42 year veteran of the insurance industry was named Colinalmperial’s 2006
Agent of the Year in the Executive Category (agents with more than 10 years in sales at Colinalm-
perial) at the company’s recent sales awards luncheon. Mr Brice was also named the winner of the
Elite Category of MDRT qualifiers for the highest sales and a persistency rate of over 95 per cent.
Pictured above, Mr Brice (centre) receives his awards from Montgomery Braithwaite, president of
Colinalmperial (left) and Ednol Farquharson, board director with responsibility for sales.

A ah

@ ANDRE Wilmott of the Colinalmperial's North West Branch was named Seasoned Agent of
the Year 2006. This award recognises the top selling agent in the Seasoned category — those who
‘ have been with Colinalmperial from 24 months to 10 years. Pictured above from left.to right:
. Montgomery Braithwaite; Mr Wilmott; Ednol Farquharson.

tere

Syry aban a






HIN the Genesis category (those agents with less than 24 months experience with CIIL) Barry
Bascom of the northeast branch walked away with top honours. Pictured above from left to right:
Montgomery Braithwaite, president of Colinalmperial; Mr Bascom; Ednol Farquharson.

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PAGE 20, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Map of
Proposed National
Park Areas






1,
Graham's Harbour
& Gays







Bay

TS



2. Dive Sites

After full consultation with the people of San Salvador, the
Bahamas National Trust has submitted a proposal for a
national park on that island to the Office of the Prime Minister.
The proposal targets the conservation and management of
important wetland, marine and terrestrial habitats. Five areas
have been recommended to protect important marine nursery
areas, some of the most dramatic dive sites in the world,
habitat for endangered species of iguanas, and the highest
diversity of nesting seabirds in the Bahamian archipelago.
Before any decisions are made on zoning or management of
the proposed areas, the BNT will undertake further consulation
with the communities involved. A copy of the proposal is
available online at www.bahamasnationaltrust.org.

Support for the development of the proposal was provided by
the Jerry Taylor and Nancy Bryant Foundation.

Map Courtesy of The BNGIS - Project 1999

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Russian rights

groups to boycott
Chechen conference

gm MOSCOW

LEADING Russian rights.
activists said Wednesday they
would boycott a human rights

- conference scheduled to be held

in the Chechen capital Grozny
next week, saying attending
would give legitimacy to the
region’s Kremlin-backed gov-
ernment, according to Associ-
ated Press.

A letter signed by Lyudmila
Alexeyeva, Lev Ponomaryov
and other prominent Russian
defenders said they made the
decision because the conference
was to be hosted, in part, by act-
ing Chechen President Ramzan
Kadyrov, whose paramilitary
militias are suspected of
involvement in widespread civil-
ian abductions, possible torture
and other human rights abuses.

The conference, they said, was
aimed at “using the authority of
many rights defenders, the rights
movement and the idea of
human rights in Russia and the
international arena to strengthen
the legitimacy of the Chechen
Republic’s illegitimate regime.”

The activists said Chechnya’s
only legitimately elected presi-
dent was Aslan Maskhadov,
who was killed in 2005.

Ponomaryov told The Asso-
ciated Press said the letter was
signed by only five activists, but
said they spoke on behalf of
many more organisations.

“We do not want to take part
in the conference because oth-
erwise it would have been legit-
imization of Kadyrov’s totali-
tarian regime,” he told AP. “We
wish he could offer some
actions, real actions in respecting
human rights, not just words.
We do not want his declarations,
but we would like to see effec-
tive routine cooperation. How-
ever, instead we see abductions,
tortures and other violations.”

Allison Gill, Moscow direc-
tor for the US-based group
Human Rights Watch, said

| StH AN









Name:

Address:

NUAL

REGISTRATION FEE: $12

Date of Birth: [ori] es





ert i

@ RAMZAN Kadyrov recently named as





|



acting president of the

war-battered republic of Chechnya by President Vladimir Putin
speaks in Grozny on Tuesday. In the background is a portrait of

Vladimir Putin.

many of the invitees to the con-
ference were given very short
notice. She said many groups,
Russian and international, were
looking to seriously discuss
human rights in Chechnya with
the authorities, but under the
right circumstances.

The conference appears to be
part of the Kremlin effort to
show that the situation in
Chechnya has improved after
more than a dozen years of



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(AP Photo/Musa Sadulayev)

,

fighting between separatist
rebels and federal and regional
authorities.

Last week, President
Vladimir Putin dismissed Alu
Alkhanov as president of the
war-battered republic, naming
Kadyrov as acting president.
The region’s parliament is wide-
ly expected to confirm him as
president, despite government
intentions to. put forward two
competing candidates.











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THE TRIBUNE

| HURSDAY, FEBRUARY Zz, Zuu/, FAUE 21





INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Industry leaders endorse fight



against gas-caused climate change

m@ NEW YORK

THE leaders of several
worldwide corporations —
including General Electric,
Volvo and Air France — called
Tuesday for prompt, decisive
action on climate change cre-
ated by the emission of green-
house gases and carbon diox-

ide, according to Associated
Press.
Nearly 100 companies fol-

lowed a meeting at Columbia °

University by endorsing a for-
mal statement to fight for clean
energy and against climate
change caused by people and
businesses. The companies are
members of the Global

Roundtable on Climate
Change, formed in 2004 to
explore issues critical to shap-
ing public and industry policy
on climate change.

"This is an issue that requires
action now but will not be
solved immediately," said Jef-
frey Sachs, director of the
Earth Institute at Columbia

Experts say climate change could threaten
~ quality of Italy’s famed Tuscan wines

ROME

IMAGINE a world where Scandinavia produces
wines to rival Italy's fabled Chianti region.

It could come to just that by the end of the cen-
tury, experts in Italy warn, if global warming con-
tinues unchecked, according to Associated Press.

A study by Florence University linking the effects
of rain and temperature to wine production found
that increasingly high temperatures and intense
rains are likely to threaten the quality of Tuscan
wines. Italy's farmers association warned the culti-
vation of olive trees, which grow in a mild climate,
has almost reached the Alps.

"This rise in temperatures will continue in the
next years, and they will be too high and unfavorable
for the quality of wine," because they cause the
grapes to over-ripen, said Simone Orlandini, an
agronomist at Florence University and co-author
of the study.

“Even if temperatures go up three or four degrees
Celsius (seven or eight degrees Fahrenheit) it will be
a big problem," he said in a telephone interview. "It
will be warmer and rains will be more concentrated
in fewer events, thus damaging the earth, which will
not be able to absorb," all the water.

The study, which was published in the wine mag-
azine VQ, compares quality checks on some of
Italy's most famous wines — Brunello di Montalcino,
Vino Nobile di Montepulciano, Chianti Classico,
Barolo, Barbaresco and Amarone - to the weather
conditions of the past three or four decades.

The research shows.that while warmer tempera-
tures favor wine quality, the rain that comes with
them is often bad news.

The dangers stemming from climate change have
drawn increasing attention. ,

The world's leading climate scientists warned dur-
ing a gathering in Paris earlier this month that glob-
al warming is so severe it will "continue for cen-



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turies," leading to a far different planet in 100 years.

A report by the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on
Climate Change states that if nothing is done to
change current emissions patterns of greenhouse
gases, global temperature could increase as much as
11 degrees by 2100. If greenhouse gas emissions get
under control _ something scientists say they hope
can be achieved _ the best estimate is about a three-
degree increase.

Wine makers in Tuscany are downplaying the
risk.

"I don't foresee harmful effects within the next 20
years," said Filippo Mazzei, whose wine company

_ located 10 miles north of Siena produces 700,000 bot-

tles a year, mostly of Chianti Classico. "We are in an
area with a temperate climate, and I do not think it

faces an immediate risk. I am not saying it is -

unfounded, but a range of 100 years is not very sig-
nificant," he said.

On Tuesday, European Union nations announced
an ambitious target to cut their greenhouse gas
emissions to 20 percent below 1990 levels by the
year 2020, in one of the boldest moves yet to contain
global warming.

-Orlandini said that a rise in temperatures would
geographically push wine production to the north,
allowing regions like Scandinavia to join the indus-
try.

Coldiretti, a farm lobby, said measures should be
taken to tackle the threats.

"In Italy, there's a significant shift in traditional
agricultural areas for olive trees which almost
reached the Alps," it said in a statement. "These
processes represent a new challenge for the farming
industry," which should increase investment and
infrastructure.

Coldiretti said seasonal shifts, fewer but intense
rainstorms and the reduction of water reserves could
also increase the risk of desertification in certain
areas.



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University, which created the
Global Roundtable.

The statement by the inter-
national business community
seeks to lay out a framework
for global action to mitigate
the impact of human-made cli-
mate change without adverse-
ly affecting energy and eco-
nomic growth, according to
Sachs, who also spoke at the
United Nations on Friday. The
business leaders hoped that a
permanent plan could be in
place by 2012.

"Climate change is an urgent
problem that requires global
action ... in a time frame that
minimizes the risk of serious
human impact on the Earth's
natural systems," the joint
statement said.

The modern age is powered
largely by fossil fuels coal, oil
and gas. The fossil fuel era has
been a period of unprecedent-
ed economic advances, the
statement noted.

"Yet we now understand
that fossil fuels — as they are
currently used — increase the
amount of carbon dioxide in
the atmosphere, which along
with the release of other green-
house gases warms the planet
and leads to other impacts on
global climate change," it stat-
ed.

The document calls on gov-
ernments to set scientifically
informed targets for reduced
global emissions and concen-
trations of carbon dioxide and
greenhouse gases and to take
immediate action in pursuit of

those targets.
The business community

wants a framework because it ©

provides predictability. It said
that generally politicians lag
behind the business sector in
addressing the need to reduce
human-made climate change.
Alain Belda, chairman and
CEO of Alcoa, the world's
leading producer of aluminum,
said addressing climate change
involves "risks and costs." -
"But much greater is the risk

_ Of failing to act," he said.
\

Mandatory

The potential recommenda-
tions must be mandatory, and
the costs of de-carbonization
or change over to low carbon
are smaller than, people fear,
said Sachs.

He said it cannot be success-
ful without the participation of
countries such as China, India,
Australia and the United
States.

China will soon replace the
United States as the largest
emitter of greenhouse gases
and carbon dioxide, he said.

Tomas Ericson, president of

Volvo Group, North America, .

said that the environment has
become one of the, priorities
of the vehicle manufacturer,
along with safety and quality.
"We feel we are part of the
problem, and we feel we need
to be part of the solution,"
Ericson said at the meeting.
Robert Edgar, of the Nation-
al Council of Churches, a

member of the Roundtable
group, said everyone has the
responsibility to be a steward
of earth by limiting future
impacts on global warming and
preserving nature's resources.

"We feel this is a moral
issue," Edgar said.

On Jan. 22 in Washington,
D.C., chief executives of 10
major corporations urged U.S.
Congress to require limits on
greenhouse gases this year,
contending voluntary efforts
to combat climate change are -
inadequate.

In his State of the Union
address, President George W.
Bush said that climate change
needs to be addressed, but he
has opposed any mandatory’
emission caps, arguing that
industry through development

_ Of new technologies can deal

with the issue.

In a January letter to Bush,
the executives and leaders of
four major environmental
organizations said mandatory
emissions caps are needed to
reduce the flow of carbon diox-
ide and other heat-trapping
gases into the atmosphere.

China announced this month
it will spend more money to
research global warming, but
it said it lacks the money and »
technology to significantly
reduce greenhouse gas emis-
sions.

On Monday, the country's
environmental watchdog said it
had failed to reach any of its
pollution control goals for
2006.

YOUR CONNECTION*TO THE WORLD

VACANCY NOTICE

Ba WSS SRE Us
UA s hepa ii aL

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Limited invites applications
from suitably qualified individuals for the position of SENIOR
ASSOCIATE/Facilities, Electrical, Plumbing, AC and Security in our
Contract Services Department.

REPORTING RELATIONSHIP:
This position will report to the Manager, Contract Services.

GENERAL RESPONSIBILITY:

1. Responsible for providing administrative and technical support for
electrical, plumbing, air conditioning and security.

2. Responsible for providing administrative and technical support of
efforts needed in maintenance/construction of the exchange and
network facilities by contractors and to support activities necessary

to ensure that contractors observe indust

requirements, and security regulations.
Responsible for the administrative and technical support of the network
planning, engineering, design and maintenance of electrical support

systems, equipment, and corporate security.

ry standards, specification

4. Responsible for the coordination and administration of contracts,
and to ensure that the facilities are safe and kept in repair order.

ROLES & RESPONSIBILITY:
Coordinates, administers and provide technical support in the following

areas:

All Electrical System Maintenance
Building Electrical Renovations

AC Systems Maintenance
Plumbing Design & Maintenance
Security System Planning & Design
Contractor Management

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS

1. A Bachelor’s degree in Engineering or Facilities Management or

equivalent work experience.
2. Excellent written and oral presentation skills required.
3. Excellent leadership skills.

All applications are to be received at BTC’s Head Office, 21 John F. Kennedy
Drive, no later than Wednesday March 7, 2007 and addressed as follows:

VICE PRESIDENT

HUMAN RESOURCES, TRAINING & SAFETY
THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUNICATIONS CO. LTD

NASSAU, BAHAMAS

RE: SENIOR ASSOCIATE/CONTRACT SERVICES




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THE TRIBUNE

, INTERNATIONAL NEWS

@ THIS photo supplied by the International Fund For Animal Welfare shows lions in cages at a bree



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 23






ding facility in the Orange free

State province, South Africa in 2005 during part of an IFAW investigation into the captive breeding of the animals for canned hunts. South
Africa's environment minister announces new laws, Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2007, to clamp down on the hunting of captive lions amid warn- -
ings from predator breeders that they may have to euthanize hundreds of the mighty beasts.

(AP Photo/IFAW)

Government finalises new

.

laws on big-game hunting

m@ CAPE TOWN,
South Africa

SOUTH AFRICA'S envi-
ronment minister on Tuesday
announced a long-awaited clam-
pdown on big-game hunting,
declaring he was sickened by
wealthy tourists shooting tame
lions from the back of a truck
and felling rhinos with a bow
and arrow, according to Associ-
ated Press.

Shrugging off threats of legal
action by the hunting industry,
Marthinus Van Schalkwyk said
that the new law would ban
"canned" hunting of big preda-
tors and rhinos in small enclo-
sures which offered the animals
no means of escape.

Lions bred in captivity would
have to be released into the

RRRWWE

open for at least two years —
rather than the six months pro-
posed in draft regulations —
before they could be hunted to
allow them to develop self-
defense instincts, he said.

"Hunting should be about a
fair chase ... testing the wits of a
hunter against that of the ani-
mal," he told a press conference
on Table Mountain. "Over the
years that got eroded and now
we are trying to re-establish that
principle."

South Africa is famous as
home to the Big Five — lion,
leopard, rhinoceros, elephant
and buffalo. Its flagship Kruger
National Park attracts hundreds
of thousands of visitors every
year. Some 9,000 privately

owned game farms and other.

government-run reserves also





—— 2
Se \

offer visitors a taste of the wild.

But it has also become a
choice destination for wealthy
gun-toting tourists willing to pay
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particularly shocking. And it
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drunk on the back of a bakkie
(truck) hunting lions which are
in fact tame animals is quite

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»

abhorrent," Van Schalkwyk —
himself an avid ‘hunter — told
The Associated Press.

But conservationists said the
law would be difficult to enforce
and did not go far enough as it
stopped short of an outright ban
on the intensive breeding of
lions, leopards and other preda-
tors.

"The big thing for South
Africa would be to stand up and,
say ‘we are conservation leaders
and this industry is immoral and
unethical and we are not going
to allow it,'" said Louise Jou-
bert of the San Wildlife Trust,
which campaigned for tougher
regulations.

She said it made little differ-
ence whether a lion was freed
for six months or two years
before being hunted because
once it had got used to being
reared and fed by people, it was
hard to break that trust.

Joubert said there should be
an outright ban on intensive
breeding projects, which often
remove cubs from the mother at
birth so the lioness mates more
quickly, and often cull female
cubs as mak lions fetch a high-
er trophy price.

"We have asked for an out-
right ban. If it means that four
to five thousand lions have to be
euthanized it would be a tragic
day but it is the only way for
this country to get a grip, so be
it" she said.

The South African Predator
Breeders' Association, which
was set up last year to lobby
against the regulations, has
warned that breeders may be
forced to put down the estimat-
ed 3-5,000 lions they have
reared if they are unable to
offer.them to foreign hunters
and can no longer afford to feed
them.

Earlier this year, it threatened
legal action against the govern-
ment to claim for compensa-
tion. ‘Association officials did
not return phone calls asking
for comment Tuesday.

However, the Professional
Hunters' Association of South
Africa, whose members accom-
pany foreign clients, said it wel-
comed the new regulations as

_ achance to clean up the image

of the South African hunting
industry by clamping down on
lion breeders who account for
only about 3 percent of game
farms.

"A small sector has given the
whole industry a bad name,"
said Stewart Dorrington, presi-
dent of the hunting body.

An 6-7,000 foreign tourists
visit South Africa each year on
hunting safaris, each spending
roughly US$18,000, Dorrington

said. About 55 percent of

hunters are from North Ameri-
ca and the rest from Europe
and other countries.

Van Schalkwyk said the reg-
ulations marked the start of a
"clean-up of the hunting indus-
try" and would in due course
be extended to other animals
like antelope species.

Hunting is an integral part of
South African life because of
its cultural traditions and impor-
tance to the economy.

"We gave our firm intention
more than two years ago to deal
with the issue," he said. "Many
of the lion breeders thought
they were empty threats and did
not take it seriously. This is a
practice that cannot be defend-
ed in any way," he said.
THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 25 —



THURSDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 22, 2007

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cel ON PLLA ALA OLED AL A

‘FORMER astronaut and senator John Glenn,
the 45th anniversary of the space flight that made him t

. Feb. 20, 2007, in Columbus, Ohio. i

'

eenges



85, speaks at a museum exhibition marking
he first American to orbit Earth Tuesday,

(AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato)



- Denmark is set to

~ withdraw its Iraq

contingen

@ COPENHAGEN,
: Denmark

DENMARK’S prime min-
ister said Wednesday that his
country will withdraw its 460-
member contingent from
southern Iraq by August and
transfer security responsibil-
ities to Iraqi forces, according
to Associated Press.

Prime Minister Anders
Fogh Rasmussen said the
decision had been made in
conjunction with the Iraqi
government and Britain,
under whose command the
Danish forces are serving
near Basra.

Fogh Rasmussen said Den-
mark would replace the
troops with surveillance heli-



copters and_ civilian
advisers to help the Iraqi gov-
ernment’s reconstruction
efforts.

“The Danish battalion will
be brought home by
August,” Fogh Rasmussen
told reporters in Copen-
hagen. “We expect that the
Iraqis during 2007 will take
over security in southern
Iraq.”

Training

Denmark would also boost
training of Iraqi soldiers and
increase support to Iraqi
refugees in nearby countries,
the prime minister said.

He added that the govern-

by August

ment was planning to
increase its presence in
Afghanistan, saying Den-
mark will deploy “more
troops if there’s a need for
it,”

Fogh Rasmussen had earli-
er said he hoped Denmark
would be able to start scal-
ing back its Iraq troops this
year, without setting a pre-
cise timetable.

The Danish announcement
Wednesday came as British
Prime Minister Tony Blair
said his country would with-
draw about 1,600 troops in
coming months if local forces
can secure the southern part
of the country.

Six Danish soldiers have
been killed in Iraq.

pace station getting
shortchanged, US ©

astronaut says —
on the anniversary -

of his historic orbit

m@ COLUMBUS, Ohio

THE United States is not
getting its money's worth out
of the international space
station, John Glenn said on
the 45th anniversary of the
day he became the first
American to orbit the Earth,
according to Associated
Press.

_Diverting money from the
orbiting research outpost to
President George W. Bush's
goal of sending astronauts
back to the moon and even-
tually on to Mars is prevent-

~ ing some scientific experi-

ments on the space station,
Glenn told an audience of
about 300 high school stu-
dents and space enthusiasts
at the COSI Columbus sci-
ence center on Tuesday.
"To not utilize that station

a cE st ean

Rs

oT Le

Royce!
Beery Ue ttn

Rt VIG SA

eee THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 27
INTERNATIONAL NEWS 2

the way I think it ought to
be utilized is just wrong,"
said Glenn, 85, also a former
USS. senator.

Capsule

Glenn made three trips
around the planet inside his
Friendship 7 capsule on Feb.
20, 1962, making him a

‘national hero and proving

that the nascent NASA
space program was competi-
tive with the Soviet Union,
which had accomplished a
manned orbital flight a year
earlier.

In 1998, Glenn, then 77,
flew on the shuttle Discov-

ery and became the oldest ©

person ever in space.
He said he supports the
president's moon and Mars

‘goals but not at the expense

awe
aur

3?

of the space station, which is-
only two-thirds complete. —"
NASA and its internation=
al partners, including Cana-
da, Japan and Russia, hope
to finish the space station in
2010, but no decision has’
been made to extend its —
operation past 2016. oe
Glenn, a Democrat who
represented Ohio from 1975
to 1999, said the station
should not be abandoned, _
especially after costing tax- ©’
payers billions of dollars
(euros).
"We will not even begin to
realize its potential," he said.
A White House.
spokesman said Tuesday
night that officials were not _
prepared to comment. Mes-=
sages were left after business—.
hours at NASA headquar-=
ters. :

:

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Pee ee se ok enna DONTE Poa a ola Ua ey OMe Sy :




__ PAGE 28, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007. fauhas Lane Ss i a “ rd igi! THE TRIBUNE .

'ebniety is National Heart Month
» DOCTORS HOSPITAL “Remember Good Health Starts With You.”

ee 3 ee _ + Cardioman




ENTER THE

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do to be heart
_ smart” =



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1. Children ages 8-13 may enter.
Write a letter answering the following question: “What are five things you could do to be heart smart.”

3. The body of the letter may not exceed 150 words: Adults may assist sf the child i in fi illing . out the entry

ee form, but not in writing the letter. : MS NSS

4. Limit one letter per child. All entries must be received by. Doctors Hospital Marketing Department |
before March 31st, 2007. . RUN eae i

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7. Winner must ore toa ae presentation which will be published ir in vthe newspaper. x



ee

FAMILY ESSAY CONTEST

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School:
Address: aR eta ge sie el ee eel SS eee P.O. Box:. obey oS Be seer hd

Parent’s name: BD MES FG i ah Ade he eutcullieideatuaa ter uae Se RECs Snr Ne aa . Bee Nester kaise ee

Parént’s Sighatutes ccc Bertie Sh 8 2 2 OT ie oy

Telephone contact: (H)

abersenssnarssnsnansssnssssessusnsnagecsssnsanssstonangensessscsssesnasanesanetannssneess | teeeaweresseunsssenssnessstesnsceatssaseesessensessesanseassneessassssansssessenascsansansantsnesenesstedsaneutessameessnansnnennessnens

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All entries become property of Doctors Hospital and can be used and reproduced for any purpose without compensation,
an

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com













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@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE



_ Bahamian duo
to lead Tigers
at weekent

@ TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Sports Reporter

CONSISTENCY will be the
key for Donald Thomas and
Shamar Sands this weekend, as

they ‘soak up’ their final day of

rest.

The Bahamian duo are
expected to lead the Auburn
Tigers’ men’s squad into the
Southeastern. Conference’
(SEC) championships, set to
' start on Friday at the Nutter
Field House in Lexington, Ken-
tucky.

The only pressure both Sands
and Thomas will have on them
is securing one of the three top
conference honours. Both ath-
letes have already achieved the
NCAA in their respective
events.

Sands, who specialises in the
100 metre hurdles, has a sea-
son’s best time of 7.70 seconds.

While Thomas has cleared -

2.30m.

According to'their coach and
fellow countryman Henry
Rolle, the duos task ahead of
them this weekend is not stren-
uous if they are able to pull off
the same performances they did
during the regular season. —

Rolle said: “Currently we will 4

only have Donald and Shamar,
they are the only two Bahami-
ans here that are currently still
eligible for the team. Consis-
tency will help both athletes
prevail this weekend.
“Shamar was down for the
last week or so with a sinus
_ infection. That kind of ham-
~pered him a bit and played a
part in his performances and
there is a bad bug of the flu
going around.

Rested

“When you add all of this in I
really can’t say how he (Sands)
will hold up this weekend, but
he did tell me that he is feeling
a lot better and that he is well
rested. So it is just a matter of
how he holds up during the con-
ference championships.

“Now on the other hand

Donald seems to be doing pret-'

ty well. It.is just a matter of him
being consistent. I don’t'see the
reason why both of them can’t
be conference championships,
even though it is going to be a
little tougher for Shamar.”

Sands is holding onto the
number two spot in the hurdles,
but he is tied with John
Yarbough.

But Rolle isn’t. worried to
much about Yarbough, switch-
ing his, focus on South Caroli-
na’s Jason Richardson and
Thomas Hilliard.

RoWe added: “Shamar will
have his work cut out for him
this weekend. He has two other
big hurdlers in the conference,
both of them coming in from

SEE page two



Bimini win Fal
Island thriller

@ BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON

Sports Reporter

THINGS are starting to
heat up in the 25th annual
Hugh Campbell Invitational
Tournament, now that the
Island teams have been
added to the blend.

Although the action in
yesterday’s first session was a
little slow, organisers used it
to introduce the Family
Islands, and giving them a
means of getting their
feet wet before it gets







Fuel

INVITATIONAL

DenRA yh Re

more intense.

The first Family Island
teams battle, played between
Old Bight and Bimini, went
down to the wire with Bimini

. pulling off the nail biting vic-

tory 33-32.

Bimini, who struggled from
the free throw line, made a
push for the lead in the clos-

ing minutes of the first quar-
ter. Rallying the troops back
into the game was Christo-
pher Munnings.

Although he missed two
free throws, Munnings net-
ted three first quarter points.

But his charge wasn’t
enough to contain the Old
Bight squad.

The team had a triple

threat coming from Theo

Armbrister, Paul Rolle and
Sheldon Rolle. \
The trio were on fire and

their dominance prevailed. -

Bimini were on a 4-2 run



when Paul. Rolle sealed an
10-foot jumper. The jumper

‘was ghe spark the Bimini

team needed as they ended
the quarter with a three point
lead.

The nightmare from the

’ free throw line continued for

Bimini in the second quar-
ter, the team added 10 more-

missed shots to their already

six misses from the first quar-
ter. :

But things were about to
change in the third quarter
for Bimini. The baseline lay-
up gave them a one point

wae to poe TNC
in action against the Dol-
phins yesterday.
(Photo: Felipé Majors
CRUNCH oe



lead — the team also
outscored the Old Bight
squad 9-5.

The Old Bight squad
weren’t about to take the fall
in the third quarter laying
down.

Taking over the fourth
quarter were Theo Armbris-
_ ter and Aldino Russell. The
duo scored 12 of the team’s
14 point to seal the game.

Armbrister ended the
game as.the team’s top scor-
er with 11 points, chipping in
was Russell with seven
points.

Jaguars
live up to
ite hype

@ BASKETBALL _
By KELSIE JOHNSON

Sports Reporter

THE St George’s Jaguars
showed why they are being
referred to as the number one
team coming in from

reeport, Grand Bahama,
yesterday.

Although their opening
game was viewed as an easy
one, against SC Bootle Dol-
phins, their message was
strong.

The Jaguars destroyed the
Dolphins, capturing their first



_ win 54-28.

The game was turned into a
dunk fest, with the Jaguars’
big men easily rising above
the rim.

Hoping to lead their team.
all the way into the champi-
onships will be Crishad
Thompson and Cordero
Rolle.

In yesterday’s game Rolle
walked away with the top
score honours, netting 12
points while Thompson sealed
10 points. -

On the Dolphins’ end
Rashad Moxey led all scores
with 11 points and Francis
Delva scored five points.

The Jaguars will now play
the winner of the Turks and
Caicos and Alpha and Omega
game which was scheduled for

| . yesterday’s second session.



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PAGE 2E, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS _



Lack of facilities on
the Family Islands

Hee you been to
any of the Family

Islands lately and viewed their
sporting facilities?

In most cases, there are big
problems. Seeing is believing
and, after visiting Acklins and
Crooked Island on Monday
and Tuesday, I'm concerned
that they are both in dire need
of a major overhaul.

As a member of the Min-

istry of Youth, Sports and
Housing's National Sports
Advisory team, I had the
opportunity to travel with
chairman Alpheus 'Hawk'
Finlayson to the less densely
populated islands and there
were virtually no sporting

. activities taking place there

because of.a lack of the prop-
er facilities.

I won't preempt what Fin-
layson has to say in his report.

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ity of them are working during
the day.

What makes it even more
difficult is the fact that no
courts or other sporting facil-
ities are centrally located
within a particular settlement.
They are on the primary or
high school premises, which
are placed between one or two
settlements for obvious trans-
portation reasons.

So in a lot of cases, the raw
talent that is still lingering on
the islands, is not properly
developed.

In fact, they are still wait-

ing to be discovered.

While on both islands, we
didn't get to see any of the
promising young athletes who
are based in the high school
system. But teachers and
members of the community
have vouched for their athlet-
ic abilities.

I think more effort must be
made by, firstly, the Ministry
of Youth, Sports and Hous-
ing and the Ministry of Works,
to get into the islands and pro-
vide the basic facilities such
as the basketball and volley-
ball courts and the track and
field and softball fields on
these islands.

Secondly, I think it's also
important that the national
federations and associations
do a little more than just wait
for the talent to come to them
during their national events.
Rather, they should take it
upon themselves to get into
the islands and start provid-
ing coaching and official clin-
ics for those persons who are
interested in the various
sports.

Then thirdly, I think the
various associations in New
Providence, which have the
resources, should look at trav-
eling'to-some of these islands
to assist in their growth and
development by hosting some
exhibition games.

On both islands visited, I've
seen the passion from the per-
sons we've been in contact
with, for sustainable sporting
activities. But they can't do it
without the facilities being
upgraded.

At night, there's virtually
nothing to do.

The Bahamas Games, when
started in 1989, was intended
to be find talent in the islands
and bring them to the fore-
front at the national level to
compete in some wholesome
activities as the nation bridged
the tremendous gap between
the islands.

But after hosting it in 1991,
1995, 1998 and 2001, we have
not had another.

Every year it's been post-
poned.

Last year, when it was set

to return, Minister of Youth, .

Sports and Housing Neville
Wisdom, declared that instead
of the games, the government
would concentrate on devel-

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oping facilities on the islands.

Today, the Family Islanders
are still waiting to see some
work carried out.

Even with the election fever
in the air, the Family Islanders
say they thought that some
work would be sent their way.

The Family Islanders are
crying out for help and what-
ever it takes, we need to assist
them.

Otherwise, we will contin-
ue to see an influx of the raw
talent coming to New Provi-
dence and getting lost in the
shuffle because they haven't
been or won't bedeveloped at
home.

Bahamian duo
to lead Tiger's
at weekend

FROM page one

South Carolina. ;

“But I tell all of the athletes
that our biggest thing is to get
to the NCAA championships,
we really believe that we have
a shot of winning the men’s
title there as well. Both of
them (Sands and Thomas) are
automatic qualifiers for the
NCAA, maintaining the A_
standard — Donald and
Shamar are currently tied for
second in the country in their
respective events.”

Although Thomas is still
going through the adjustment
phase in the high jump, Rolle
believes that he is still capable
of putting on a good show.

Thomas, who made head-
lines after competing in his
tennis shoes and finishing
fourth in the World Indoor
championships, is still having a
hard time adjusting to ‘high
jump spikes.’

According to Rolle, Thomas
is receiving the support he
needs from both the coaching
staff and his teammate.

Rolle said: “Academically,
Donald is a stable guy, you
know he is working on getting
his masters. The biggest thing
with him is he is still learning
the high jump event. He is still
new to the event being a bas-
ketball player.

“Jerry is taking it very easy
on him, the technical part he is
coming along slowly so he
can understand what he is
doing.

“One of the things with him
what we have done is his
jumping in the spikes. You
know he had started out with
the shoes\and then we moved
him to the pole vault spikes
now we moved him to the
spikes in the heels. We tried
out some other brands with
him, even though we are a
Nike brand school, but we
have to do the best thing for
the athlete.

“We tried couple brands so
we are going to see how it
goes this weekend. It has been
a learning experience for him
with the spikes but he is get-
ting the hang of it.”

Thomas and Sands aren't
the only Bahamians compet-
ing at the weekend meet. Also
appearing are Andretti Bain,
Aymara Albury and Tia
Thompson.





}
}
;
;
i
i
i

Defending champ
Haas breezes
through opener;
Williams ativances

M@ TENNIS
MEMPHIS, Tenn.
Associated Press

DEFENDING champion
Tommy Haas defeated Vince
Spadea 6-4, 6-1 Tuesday night
in the Regions Morgan Kee-
gan Championships, and
Venus Williams advanced
with her second win follow-—
ing a four-month layoff.

Spadea beat Haas in the
quarterfinals of the Delray
Beach tournament earlier this
month, but lost his serve in
the opening game of the sec-
ond set, one of three breaks
for Haas in the set, including
the final game..

Both recorded six aces, but
three of Haas’ came in the
fourth game of the second set,
and Spadea didn’t win a game
the rest of the way in the 56-
minute match.

In the women’s Cellular
South Cup, Williams contin-
ued her comeback from a
sprained wrist with a 6-4, 6-4
victory over Caroline Wozni-
acki of Denmark.

“I think this match was def-
initely better,” Williams said
after her second win in the |
tournament. “I definitely had
a jot of good streaks of play.”

Both players had trouble
holding serve in the first set,
leading to five service breaks.
Williams got the final break to
take the first set.

Williams seemed in control
in the second set, overpower-

' ing the 16-year-old and serv-

ing with a 4-0 lead. But as she
did in her opening win Mon-
day, she lost focus and let
Wozniacki back into the
match to tie it at 4-4.

“T think I had a loose point
and I started making some
more errors,” Williams said.
“She did a good job of get-
ting the ball back and taking
advantage of the errors.”

After Wozniacki pulled
even, Williams held serve, and
broke Wozniacki to move
into the quarterfinals. apts

Williams is playing in her

first tournament since Octo-
ber. She said her wrist didn’t
bother her Tuesday and sta-
mina was not an. issue after
playing consecutive days.
’ Earlier, fourth-seeded
American Mardy Fish con-
tinued a successful start to the
season with a 6-3, 6-2 victory
over unseeded German Bjorn
Phau.

The 25-year-old made an
impressive comeback to the
tour last year after undergoing
a pair of wrist operations in
2005 and plummeting to
342nd in the ATP rankings.
He kept the momentum going
this year by advancing to the
semifinals at Auckland and
the last eight at both the Aus-
tralian Open and last week in
San Jose.

Fish is now ranked 25th in
the world — just eight places
shy of his career-best rank-
ing. He earned a second-
round match with fast-rising
Argentine teenager Juan
Martin Del Potro, who domi-
nated former top-20 player
Feliciano Lopez 6-1, 6-2.

Haas said he arrived early
at the tournament to avoid
the jet lag returning from the
Australian Open the German
said he suffered before Delray
Beach. Tuesday night’s victo-
ry over the American gave
him a good start to his title
defense.

“The first set was,pretty
tight until I broke him,” said
Haas, who also won the tour-
nament in 1999. “I felt that
was a good game that I played
when I served for the first set.
I felt pretty comfortable and
loose. I managed to break
him right away (in the second
set) and get off to a good
start. After the second break,
he kind of didn’t believe it
anymore.”

“I just got down and break,
and he served well,” Spadea
said. “I didn’t play well off
my serve. I don’t know what
happened. I’m dazed and con-
fused right now.”

In other women’s action,
top-seeded Shahar Peer of
Israel rolled to a 6-4, 6-3 first-
round victory over Emma
Laine of Finland.

Fourth-seeded Samantha
Stosur of Australia beat
unseeded Aleksandra Wozni-
ak of Canada 6-2, 7-5 to
advance to a second-round
meeting with Camille Pin of
France. Pin defeated Uzbek-
istan’s Varvara Lepchenko 7-
5, 6-1.

Also advancing to the
round of 16 in the CSC were
Milagros Sequera and Jarmi-
la Gajdosova.






, “AN MY OPINION
GREG COTE

_ gcote@MiamiHerald.com :

Anti-hero Bonds
is playing a game
of criminal pursuit

-y-y he biggest story in baseball
began unfolding in Scottsdale,
Ariz., on Tuesday, coming back
like a dormant disease as malignant
Barry Bonds returned to begin his run
at sports’ ultimate record. The mark
— Hank.Aaron’s 755 career home runs
— doesn’t seem like something being
“chased.” It feels more like the objec
of a criminal assault. KS
Bonds passed Babe Ruth last sea-
- son, and it was like a burglar in the

a portrait of George

| Washington. By late
summer, Bonds fig-
ures to vault Aaron
and officially place

’ America’s most
famous, revered

i a sporting oo in
-. dirty hands.

oe ac ' , Bonds will ascend

as a hero in San Francisco but will be

a villain to most of the rest of the

_ country: Darth Batter,

And everything about it stinks.
A BURDEN OF SHAME
What should be a good, nourishing
thing for baseball, a grand achieve- —
ment worthy of celebration or at least
respect, instead is a looming embar-

~ rassment. Bond’s milestone is the

- sport’s millstone. Heavy. A burden.

-” Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig
already has worked to distance him-
self by saying he might not attend the
record-breaking game. It is hard to



imagine Selig’s delicate spot, but start...

by imagining that you are the head of
your Kiwanis Club and must intro-
duce your group’s new Man of the
Year, OJ. Simpson.

For Bonds, too, what should be a
fulfilling, dream season will only
aggravate the shame on his name as
fans in visiting ballparks boo or turn
their backs on him. Every step closer
to the record he now trails by only
21 homers will increase chatter and
debate about steroids and amphet-

White House passing

BY MICHAEL MAROT
Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS — _ Rich
McKay likes what he sees among
today’s NFL rookies.’

Sure, they are bigger, faster,
stronger — even brasher. But they
also are better-prepared to make
a quick impact on the field.

Once considered a league
dominated by veterans, the
NFL has gradually been
transformed by increasing-
ly-talented rookie classes
into a league that is more
affected by today’s young players.

“For a scout, mini-camp used to
be the worst three days of the
year,” said McKay, the general
manager of the Atlanta Falcons.

“You'd show up after spending
all this time working on the draft,
and a guy would come in out of



“PRO FOOTBALL | NFL COMBINE

Rookie revolution feeds success

shape or struggle to pick up a
scheme, But you don’t really see
that any more.”

McKay is among the dozens of

NEL front-office officials, coaches §f

and scouts that will spend the next
five days in Indianapolis grading
this year’s college prospects at the
league’s annual scouting combine.
About 330 players are ready
to take the field today.

Over the past five years,
McKay says, he has consis-
tently seen rookies arrive at
training camp with more
knowledge, in better shape and
more prepared to make the transi-
tion to the NFL.

The results have been just as
dramatic. In 2004, Pittsburgh Steel-
ers rookie quarterback Ben Roeth-
lisberger went from the Mid-
American Conference to within

'



DOUG BENC/GETTY IMAGES

INSTANT IMPACT: Reggie Bush
helped turn the Saints around.

one victory of the Super Bowl.
Then he won it the next season.
The 2006 class even outdid
Roethlisberger. Quarterbacks
Vince Young of the Tennessee
Titans and Jay Cutler of the Den-
ver Broncos almost led their teams



INTERNATIONAL EDITION

to the playoffs. The New Orleans

Saints’ dynamic duo of running

back Reggie Bush and receiver
Marques Colston helped the team
reach its first NFC Championship
Game. Kick returner Devin Hester
helped get the Chicago Bears to
their first Super Bowl in two dec-
ades, and running back Joseph
Addai played a key role in the Indi-
anapolis Colts’ championship.

It might go down as one of the
NEL’s best rookie classes ever.

Matching that productivity will
prove difficult in 2007, but the —
trend is expected to continue.

“T know that the coaching at the
college level is getting better every
year,” Baltimore Ravens general
manager Ozzie Newsome said. “A
lot of the guys that have coached at
our level are going back to college,
and I think that’s helping them.”



COLLEGE BASKETBALL | NO. 2 OHIO STATE 68, PENN STATE 60

es dodge scare

1 aie.

Buckey

a Tein



ee,

Narrow victory
keeps Ohio State
in the driver’s seat

BY RUSTY MILLER
Associated Press
COLUMBUS, Ohio — Ohio State keeps win-
ning; Barely. © jas) =
Jamar Butler scored 18 points, and Greg Oden
had 17-points and 14 rebounds, helping the No. 2
Buckeyes beat Penn State for the second time in
eight days, 68-60 on Wednesday night.
Daequan Cook added 12 points and Ron
Lewis had Il for the Buckeyes (25-3, 13-1), who
hold a one-game edge withtwo
games left in the Big Ten race.
The victory set the stage for a

No. 1 vs. No. 2 showdown Sunday
when top-ranked Wisconsin, still
smarting from Tuesday night’s
64-55 loss at Michigan State,
comes to town. The winner is
assured of at least a share of the
Big Ten championship.

amines and asterisks.

The words hero and halo do no
apply here. :

Neither should Bonds be held up as
anybody’s martyr, as an innocent vic-
tim. Too much is known. The picture
is of a man who cheated, and who is



cheating some more by robbing his
sport of the ability to properly marka
historic event, and cheating himself of
the honor that might have been his.

It stretches credulity to call Bonds’
steroids use a suspicion, branding the
claimant as naive. Juries might con-

-_vict on circumstantial evidence if it is
overwhelming, and so might the pub-
lic jury that shapes Bonds’ legacy.

_ Bonds and the word steroids are
together in dreaded matrimony now.

THE NIGHTMARE CONTINUES

- *1 et them investigate,” Bonds told
the slew of gathered media Tuesday
as the Giants opened spring training

‘jin Scottsdale. “Let ’em. They’ve been
doing it this long.”

That was Bonds’ version of forth-
rightness. On the specifics of steroids
and amphetamine use, he offered no
substantive comment.

At least he did not say, “I hate gay
people.” Give him that much.

Long after Daisuke Matsuzaka
Mania and the soap of A-Rod’s rela-

‘tionship with Derek Jeter have sub-
sided from national headlines to paro-
chial fascinations of the Red
Sox-Yankees Axis, Bonds’ dubious
pursuit of Aaron will remain contro-
versial and polarizing and revolting.

- Bonds might be the greatest ball-
player ever. But there must be an
asterisk by his name. He put it there.
And now he is denigrating hallowed
ground by stealing Aaron’s record.

It was not such a big deal in 1985,
when Kareem Abdul-Jabbar passed

Wilt Chamberlain as the NBA’s career —

lead in points.

Or in 1994, when Wayne Gretzky
topped Gordie Howe im career goals.

Nor will it be a huge story outside
of Green Bay and Miami when Brett
Favre surpasses Dan Marino’s career
record for touchdown passes.

Home runs, though? Ruth and
Aaron? This is baseball, the sport
where history and statistics are vital.
This is our national pastime, still, in
some deep-seated way that is embed-
ded in our psyche.

That Barry Bonds will soon own
baseball’s most prized posséssion is
about a tape-measure shot beyond
unfortunate.

This is blasphemy happening.

ARMS RACE: Greg Oden of Ohio State grabs a rebound away from Penn State’s Geary
Claxton during the second half Wednesday night. Oden had 17 poi



LAY LaPRETE/AP

nts and 14 rebounds.

GOLF | ACCENTURE MATCH PLAY CHAMPIONSHIP

Ohio State has won 12 games
in a row overall, 24 in a row at home and 11 ina
row in the Big Ten. The conference winning
streak is the second-longest in school history,
eclipsed only by the 27 in a row by the Jerry
Lucas and John Havlicek teams of 1960-62.

Geary Claxton scored 15 points, David Jack-
son had 14 and Danny Morrissey ll for the Nit-
tany Lions (10-16, 1-12), who have lost their past
12 games. They also are 0-9 on the road and have
lost 44 of their past 47 Big Ten road games.

Yet, for some reason, they seem to be at their
best against the Buckeyes.

A week earlier, Penn State trailed by 21 points
at the half and by as many as 24 in second half,
but the Nittany Lions outscored Ohio State 19-4
down the stretch before falling 64-62.

The Buckeyes trailed by eight points in the
first half Wednesday and again early in the seg-
ond before they started clicking on offense.

Oden left the game for a while, grimacing
while holding his surgically-repaired left hand,
but he returned and played down the stretch.

@ MORE GAMES



Woods, Mickelson win; Ames turns tables

BY DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

MARANA, Ariz. — Tiger
Woods got the first match out of
the way Wednesday, although this
time he had to work for it.

One year after he set a tourna-
ment record with a 9-and-8 victory
in the opening round, Woods
relied on a big par save early and
nearly aced the Mth hole to put
away Ryder Cup teammate J.J.
Henry 3 and 2 in the Accenture
Match Play Championship.

For the second year in a row,
the shortest day belonged to Ste-
phen Ames — with a nice twist.

Ames was on the losing end of
that record rout by Woods at La
Costa but experienced the flip side
of this fickle tournament by mak-
ing seven birdies in JJ holes to bury
Robert Karlsson of Sweden 8 and 7.

Fourth-seeded Phil Mickelson
got a minor scare, trailing fellow



MATT YORK/AP

WHO'S GOT NEXT? Tiger Woods.

lefty Richard Green of Australia
and not taking the lead until the
14th hole. Mickelson won l-up
when Green missed a 20-foot
birdie putt on the 18th hole.

Jim Furyk, the No. 2 seed, also
trailed at the turn until making
three consecutive birdies and beat-
ing Brett Quigley 2 and 1.

Shaun Micheel, who ended
Woods’ worldwide winning streak



in September by beating him in the
first round of the World Match
Play Championship, was up.to his
old tricks. Micheel knocked out
one of the top seeds — Adam Scott,
at No. 3 — in 21 holes. Scott made a
birdie on the 18th to force extra
holes, then three-putted on No. 3,

missing a 5-foot par putt.

Woods said that only his score

made it look like an easy day.
' “Tt was actually a pretty tight
match,” Woods said. “J.J. hit a lot of
beautiful putts in the middle part
of the round and even on the back
nine, and those putts just didn’t go
in. Had they gone in, it might have
been a different story.”

Woods advanced to face Tim
Clark of South Africa, a 3-and-2
winner over Robert Allenby.

Some think this might be the
toughest hurdle in Woods’ unlikely
quest to win ll consecutive PGA
Tour events, the record Byron Nel-



ANDY LYONS/GETTY IMAGES

‘BUNKER BLAST: Phil Mickelson.

son set over five months in 1945.
But on a warm day of swirling
winds in the high desert, on a
course with tight pins, he did him-
self a favor by not getting behind.
Woods was 2-up until the 14th,
when his 8-iron approach shot
spun back to within a foot of the
cup for an easy birdie putt. From
there, it was a just matter of when
Henry would run out of holes.
~~

Sf






THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007

SECTION




~ The Tribune



e Money Safe.
Money Fast. »




a

| [@ Back of The Bahamas

LINTERNATIONAL @













at i Sse pour Fin
Bde ema ee pedan we OD



businestribunemedianet Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street.

Government harbour lease



frustrates firm’s expansion

>
‘

@ By NEIL HARTNELL ©

Tribune Business Editor

major Grand
Bahama-based
company yes-
terday told
The Tribune
its expansion plans have been
frustrated because the Gov-

’ ernment has not entered talks

on extending the lease for the
harbour it uses, and expressed
concerns that that facility
might now be used instead for
a major tourism-related pro-
ject.

Jaime Vargas, South Riding —

_ Point Holdings vice-president
of operations, said the compa-
ny was “very worried” over
future use of the harbour it
currently leases from the Gov-
ernment when that agreement
expires,

This was because a major
investment project proposed

Grand Bahama

t
1}
\

firm very worried’ over likelihood harbour

being eyed for mega tourism project, cutting them out

for east Grand Bahama by
Beka Development LLC,
revealed by The Tribune on
Tuesday, said it was seeking as
part of a Heads of Agreement
with the Government the
“tight to full access use of the
existing harbour”, and an
“option to purchase the lease
of the entire harbour when the
existing lease expires”.

Both Mr Vargas and other
business community contacts
on Grand Bahama have iden-
tified the “harbour” referred
to in the Beka document as
likely being the one currently
used by South Riding Point

Coalition lawyers
study government

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government has

issued a statement to the.

National Coalition for Health-
care Reform clarifying Clause
14 of the National Health
Insurance Act, The Tribune
was told yesterday, which the

Coalition’s attorneys are now.

reviewing to see if it matches
their interpretation, |
.Winston Rolle, a former
Chamber of Commerce presi-
dent and Coalition consultant,

. confirmed Dr Bernard Not-

Cg

Well-known investor —
in $4bn Rum Cay deal

tage, minister of health and
national insurance, had sent a
letter clarifying Clause 14’s
interpretation from the Goy-
ernment’s perspective.

He added: “We’re actually
getting a clear interpretation
from our legal mindset who
assisted us with the first part
of it.” Among the attorneys
the Coalition is thought to
have engaged is Katina Mosko.

Clause 14 is the: part in the
legislation that has caused most
concern, which the business
community felt left a lot of
unanswered questions and was
unnecessary, as it deals with
material already covered in the
labour laws, (/

Some felt its inclusion was
an attempt to cover anything in
relation to trade union or

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A “$4 billion, six-star resort”
project planned for Rum Cay
has among its investors a con-
troversial former US politician
who has already caused dis-
quiet among the island’s resi-
dents through his involvement
in land deals where the title
has been queried,

A release issued yesterday

_ by Island Village Resorts, the

developer behind the proposed
Rum Cay Island Club Resort
Marina and Spa, said: “The
Billy Davis family of Atlanta,
Georgia, joins Fredric Rern-

‘ NHI clarification

. industrial contract negotia- -

tions, but these were cavered
under the labour laws,

Clause 14 (1) of the NHI Act
says that despite. any agree-
ment a Bahamian employer
may have in place regarding
the provision of group health
insurance for his workers with
a trade union representing
them, or in their contracts of
employment, "every employ-
er is entitled to modify.,., the
rate of contributions payable"

_under this scheme, to elimi-

nate any duplication and
"overlap" of benefits with the

‘proposed NHI scheme,

Apart from the fact that this
seems to allow employers to
arbitrarily tear up any con-
tracts and agreements made
over the provision of private
health insurance for their staff,
the following clause, 14 (2), of
the Bill.stipulates that "no
employer shall make any mod-

ification [to their private group ‘
coverage] without obtaining

the prior written approval of

‘the Minister",

To obtain this approval, all
relevant information and mate-

rials, including a copy of the.

group health plan, has to be
sent to the Minister,

Businesses fear Clause 14 —

SEE page 8B

stein as co-investor in the
development,”

- Mr, Davis’s name is well-
known to Rum Cay’s 90 resi-
dents, as he and his Newport

‘Harbour company have been

among several foreign real
estate developers to alight on
the island, where they have
been claiming land ownership
based on title derived from
landholdings originally pos-
sessed by the estate of the late
Effie Knowles,

She was a Floridian attorney
of Bahamian descent, and Mr

SEE page 6B

Holdings.

“We didn’t know anything
about it and were very sur-
prised,” Mr Vargas said of the
Beka project and its plans for
the ‘harbour, South Riding
Point Holdings’ lease on the
harbour expires on December
31, 2019, giving it just under
13 more years there,

“We would like to extend
our lease,” Mr Vargas said, “It
runs out on December 31,
2019, and we have tried to
engage in negotiations with the
Government for a lease exten-
sion in order to start expan-
sion projects, so we can have a

Marinas ‘accept’ move to

return on investment for a
longer period of time than the
13 years we have left,

“For whatever reason, the
Government has not shown an
interest in these negotiations.”

Mr Vargas added of the
Beka project revelations: “We
didn’t know anything about it,
We were suprised. We would

like to extend our lease, so the .

option.they want to take over
our lease after it expires is very
worrying,

“IT don’t know what else to
say at this point, I just hope to
be part of it, and that they con-
sider keeping us on as part of

the equation.”

South Riding Point Holdings
is the Bahamian subsidiary of
World Point Terminals, a
Canadian public company list-
ed on the Toronto Stock
Exchange.

It owns and operates the oil
terminal at High Rock in east-
ern Grand Bahama, which has

the capacity to hold 5,3 million -

barrels of crude oil, It holds
crude oil deliveries to the US,
and act as a ‘break bulk’ facil-
ity for transhipment opera-
tions,
The South Riding Point
Holdings terminal has a 4,000

foot offshore island that can

handle the world’s largest oil
tankers, due to a water depth
of 105 feet.

The company, though, saw

its revenues fall by $764,000 in
the 2006 first half compared to
last year, due to "considerably
slower" marine —
activity around the island,

The revenue decrease for
the period to June 30, 2006,
was partly explained by tough
2005 comparatives,

During the 2005 first half,

SEE page 11B

WBy NEILHARTNELL
_ Tribune Business Editor

MARINA owners and operators have
accepted that the Bahamas should move to
“a revenue-based” method for levying tax-
es on the industry, The Tribune was told
yesterday, much as the Government does
with the hotel industry,

Malcolm Martini, the Government's
chief planning consultant in the Ministry of
Energy and the Environment, said a full
week of consultations on the proposed
draft policy to regulate the expanding

marina industry in the Bahamas had pro-
vided “really good feedback”,

: Some 150 people, split evenly between .

the general public and marina owners and
operators, attended the consultations,
which were held on. five separate islands,

Mr Martini said that in response to the
views and feedback submitted, the Gov-
ernment team responsible for overseeing
the marina policy had in some areas made
refinements to the original draft, and in
others made more wide-sweeping changes,

“People by and large accepted the reg-
imen we proposed” for controlling and

AUER ky

_ revenue based taxation |

regulating environmental issues raised by
marina development, Mr Martini said,
although concerns were raised about fol-
lowing Florida’s regulations too closely.

He acknowledged that Florida’s geog-
raphy was different to the Bahamas, the
seabed being mostly sand as opposed to
the coral found in this nation,

On the Government’s revenue-raising
proposals, Mr Martini said: “There were
concerns about the charges, as one might

SEE page 9B |

DUTY: eS
2 OY PERNA

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Corenlaelele
Inasnap!

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Give us 3 days!






THE MARKETS |
STOCKS, MUTUAL FUNDS, 5-68

DOW 30 12,786.64 +19.07 AX
S&P 500 1,459.68 +414 AR
NASDAQ 2,513.04 +16.73 AK
10-YR NOTE 468 -01W
CRUDE OIL 58.07 -132 W

Stocks —
advance
as oil
drops

_ BY MADLEN READ
. Associated Press
~NEW YORK — Wall Street

managed a moderate advance in
an uneven session Tuesday
after a drop in oil prices and
encouraging comments from a
Federal Reserve official allowed
investors to shrug off disap-
pointment over Home Depot's |
declining sales. The retailer’s —
drop suggested that consumers’
appetite for home improvement

~ goods is still dwindling due to
the sluggish housing market. —
Despite this, the Dow Jones
industrials set another closing —
high.

Comments from outgoing
.Fed Governor Susan Bies, who
said slumping demand for hous-
ing may have bottomed out,
alleviated some concerns about
the downturn dragging down
the rest of the economy. Her —
remarks echoed those of Fed
Chairman Ben Bernanke, who
last week predicted the econ-
omy will keep: growing ata
modest pace. :

“The overall trend of the
market is basically positive,”
said Brian Gendreau, invest-
ment strategist for ING Invest-
ment Management, pointing to
Bernanke’s recent forecast of
moderating growth and cooling
inflation. “That’s a great envi- -
ronment for equities. Unless
you have some specifically
nasty news, there’s no reason.
why the trend shouldn’t be ©
upward.”

Falling oil prices, which tum-
bled $1.32 to $58.07 a barrel on
the New York Mercantile
Exchange on forecasts of
warmer weather, also lent some
support to stocks, as did a pro-
posed merger between XM Sat- _
ellite Radio and Sirius Satellite —
Radio. ee

"The Dow rose 19.07, or 0.15
percent, to 12,786.64, after fall-
ing more than 60 points earlier.
Tuesday’s climb brought the
index to its 3lst record close
since early October, and its big-
gest five-day rally since mid-
November. The Dow also
reached a new trading high of
12,795.93, just short of 12,800. |

Markets were closed Mon- :
day for Presidents Day. a

Broader stock indicators also _
turned higher. The Standard & |
Poor’s 500 index rose 4.14, or
0.28 percent, to 1,459.68, and the
Nasdaq composite index
climbed 16.73, or 0.67 percent, to
2,513.04. ae '

Bond prices rose slightly, |
with the yield on the bench-
mark 10-year Treasury note at
4.68 percent, down from 4.69
percent late Friday. Bies’ com-
ments helped support Trea-
surys, which added some fuel to
the stock market’s advance.

The decline in crude prices
gave some investors reason to
buy back into the market, as
lower fuel costs curb consumer
prices — which could help
boost discretionary spending,
and reduce the chance of an
interest rate hike.

Advancing issues outnum-
bered decliners by about 5 to 3
on the New York Stock
Exchange, where consolidated

‘ volume came to 2.39 billion
shares, compared to 2.38 billion
shares traded on Friday.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies rose 7.96, or
0.97 percent, to 826.11.

Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei
stock average fell 0.01 percent. -

. Britain’s FTSE 100 fell 0.50 per- ’

‘ cent, Germany’s DAX index fell
0.06 percent, and France’s
CAC-40 fell 0.46 percent.

unc mgt ny nan RTD
ERNE NILE EEN





PHILIP MORRIS

Court tosses $79.5M tobacco verdict

@ The U.S. Supreme Court
tightened the constitutional
limits on punitive damages,
setting aside a $79°5 million
award in a smoker case against
Altria Group’s Philip Morris unit.

BY MARK SHERMAN
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Supreme
Court threw out a $79.5 million award
that a jury had ordered a cigarette
maker to pay to a smoker’s widow, a
ruling that could bode well for other
businesses seeking stricter limits on

Lepeeennnnmnreseerenyeinnnihteiein rein qrman arene ntattnneeeet



But the world’s largest retailer
still faces the challenge of reinvigo-
rating sales at its U.S. stores amid
fierce competition, analysts said.

' “They’re getting some traction,
but they’ve still got a lot of work to
do,” said Stephanie Hoff, senior
retail analyst at Edward Jones.

While profits and total sales
were up around 10 percent each,
Hoff noted that sales at stores open
at least one year, a key measure of
retail performance, only grew 13



“TECHNOLOGY

HP profit ris

@ Hewlett-Packard’s first-quarter
profit jumped 26 percent as the
company benefited from higher
sales of laptop computers,
printers and printing supplies.

BY CONNIE GUGLIELMO
Bloomberg News

Hewlett-Packard, the world’s larg-
est personal-computer maker, said
first-quarter profit rose 26 percent
after the company won consumer
sales away from Dell.

Net income increased to $1.55 bil-
lion, or 55 cents a share, from $1.23
billion, or 42 cents, a year earlier,
Palo Alto, Calif.-based Hewlett-
Packard said Tuesday. Sales in the
quarter ended Jan. 31 rose 1] percent
to $25.1 billion. Excluding some costs,
profit was 65 cents, beating the 63
cents expected on average by ana-
lysts.

Chief Executive Officer Mark
Hurd nabbed the PC market lead
from Dell for the second straight
quarter by offering low-priced note-
book computers and selling them
with help from retail partners. PC
shipments jumped 24 percent last
quarter while Dell’s dropped 8.4 per-
cent, according to researcher IDC.

| BULLISH: A shopper at a Wal-Mart in North Fayet
' reported fourth-quarter profit growth of 9.8 per

“STRATEGIC SUCCESS

WAL-MART SAYS U.S. STORES, COST CUTTING
| HELP BOOST 4Q RESULTS BY 9.8 PERCENT




big-dollar verdicts.

The 5-4 decision Tuesday was a
victory for Altria Group’s Philip Mor-
ris USA, which contested an Oregon
Supreme Court decision upholding
the jury’s verdict.

Yet.the decision did not address a
key argument made by Philip Morris
and its supporters across a wide
range of businesses — that the size of
the award was unconstitutionally
large. They had hoped the court
would limit the amount that can be
awarded in punitive damage cases.

Instead, Justice Stephen Breyer

wrote in his majority opinion that the
award to Mayola Williams could not
stand because a jury may punish a
defendant only for the harm done to
the person who is suing, not to others
whose cases were not before it.

“To permit punishment for injur-
ing a nonparty victim would add a
near standardless dimension to the
punitive damages question,” Breyer
said.

The company had argued that the
jury was encouraged to punish Philip
Morris for health problems suffered
by every Oregonian who smoked its



RETAIL

vio

BY MARCUS KABEL
Associated Press -

Wal-Mart reported on Tuesday a better-than-expected 9.8 percent
increase in fourth-quarter profits, helped by new strategy and
- cost-control measures at its flagship U.S. stores division.

percent in the fourth quarter after
annual rates well over 5 percent
early this decade.

Wal-Mart forecast same-store
sales growth between 1 and 3 per-
cent in the current quarter.

“Those numbers will have to get
stronger and be at the 3 percent end
of the [forecast] range for investors
to be willing to pay a higher pre-
mium for the stock,” Hoff said.

Wal-Mart said profit for the
period ending Jan. 31 was $3.94 bil-

Hewlett-Packard’s shares declined
to $42.88 in, trading after the

‘ announcement. They rose 36 cents to

$43.13 at 4 p.m. in New York Stock
Exchange composite trading. The
stock is trading at their highest level

' in six years.

Hurd has exceeded analysts’ profit
expectations in every quarter since
taking over in April 2005. Hewlett-
Packard in November forecast profit,
excluding some items, of 60 cents to
62 cents a share on sales of $24.1 bil-
lion to $24.3 billion.

Profit this quarter, excluding some
costs, will be 63 cents to 64 cents a
share on sales of $24.5 billion. Ana-
lysts were anticipating profit of 64
cents, the average of 22 estimates
compiled by Bloomberg, on sales of
$24.1 billion.

Hurd, 50, continued to reap the
benefits of job cuts and office clo-
sures during the first quarter. He has
used the cost savings to undercut
rivals including Round Rock, Texas-
based Dell on price while preserving
profit margins. He is also capitalizing
on customer dissatisfaction with
Dell, which alienated the U.S. con-
sumers driving PC market growth
with poor customer service.

cn ent

GENE J. PUSKA/AP

te, Pa., loads her purchases. On Tuesday, Wal-Mart
cent to beat analysts’ estimates.

lion, or 95 cents per share, up from
$3.59 billion, or 87 cents, from one
year prior. Even without a $98 mil-
lion tax benefit worth 2 cents per
share, Wal-Mart’s earnings beat the
90 cents per share forecast by ana-
lysts surveyed by Thomson Finan-
cial.

The company had fourth-quar-
ter sales of $98.09 billion, up 10.9
percent from a year before but
below the $99.95 billion forecast by
analysts. :

Wal-Mart said it expects per-
share earnings of between 68 cents
and 71 cents in the first quarter and
between $3.15 and $3.23 for the fis-
cal year 2008. Analysts surveyed by
Thomson Financial were forecast-



ing 68 cents for the first quarter and
$3.19 for the year ahead.

Chief Executive Lee Scott sin-
gled out Eduardo Castro-Wright,

* TURN TO RETAIL

cigarettes.
Chief Justice John Roberts and

-Justices Samuel Alito, Anthony Ken-

nedy and David Souter, joined with
Breyer.

Dissenting were Justices Ruth
Bader Ginsburg, Antonin Scalia, John
Paul Stevens and Clarence Thomas.
Ginsburg said Tuesday’s ruling made
punitive damages law even more

confusing.

Jesse Williams died of lung cancer
in 1997 at the age of 67. He had

*TURN TO PHILIP MORRIS

AIRLINES

JetBlue
vows to
win back |
passengers

i JetBlue Airways introduced a
customer bill of rights that
promises vouchers to fliers who
experience delays, hoping the
move wins back passengers after
an operational meltdown
damaged its brand.

BY ADAM GOLDMAN

Associated Press :

NEW YORK — JetBlue CEO
David Neeleman said on Tuesday the

- airline will implement a customer bill
__of rights to prevent a repeat of last

week’s storm-related disruptions that
kept passengers stuck aboard planes,
some for up to 10 hours.

Neeleman described the crisis as
“4 huge bump in the road” but said
JetBlue would move past it. He said
he had no intention of resigning in
the wake of the worst corporate mess
in the airline’s 7-year history. Jet-
Blue’s shares fell 66 cents, or 4.87
percent, to close at $12.90 on the
Nasdaq Stock Market Tuesday.

' «1 think P’m uniquely qualified to
deal with these issues,” Neeleman
said.

JetBlue said the first step in getting —

people to fly on the airline again was
its introduction of a new customer
bill of rights. :

Under the bill, if JetBlue cancels a

. flight within 12 hours of its departure

because of problems within its con-
trol, customers can ask for a full
refund, a credit or a voucher. If the
airline delays a flight in a situation
within its control, passengers would
receive vouchers ranging from $25 to
the full amount of a round-trip ticket,
depending on the length of the delay.

Compensation also would be
made if a plane lands but can’t taxi to
its gate within 30 minutes. And ifa
plane’s departure is delayed for more
than three hours, passengers will be
eligible for vouchers of at least $100

* TURN TO JET BLUE

es 26% after PC victory over Dell

PAUL SAKUMA/AP

STIFF COMPETITOR: Hewlett Packard printers are on display at a Best
Buy store in Mountain View, Calif. HP’s first-quarter profit jumped
26 percent as the company cut into Dell's sales of laptop

computers.

o*

eo nlee eee
THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 5B

Oe,



@ JETBLUE airplanes are seen at JFK airport

JetBlue: No impact

(AP Photo: Rick Maiman)

on the Bahamas

m@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

JETBLUE’S air service to
the Bahamas should not be
impacted in any way by the
recent problems caused when
the low-cost carrier had to
ground passengers for up to 10
hours during massive snow
storms in the northeastern US.

The inability of hundreds of
planes to receive take-off clear-
ance meant thousands of pas-
sengers had to sit on runways
for lengthy periods of time,
and caused the airline to have
spend millions of dollars pro-
viding compensation to pas-
sengers.

The Tribune contacted the
Jet Blue office at the Sir Lyn-

den Pindling International Air-
port, but was told that all

media inquires had to be made
to the company’s corporate
offices.

Bryan Baldwin, manager of
corporate communications at
the Jet Blue office in New
York, the company is deter-
mined not to let the incident
affect its future performance.

“We didn’t really have any
major affects in the Bahamas.
We had some minor cancella-
tions, but that area was not
that impacted,” he said.

Mr Baldwin added that Jet
Blue was sure there would be
no economic fallout as a result
of the situation.

“We are dedicated to the
cities and hubs that we provide
service to, and are determined
to not let them be adversely
affected,” he said.

In an effort to reaffirm its

commitment to customers, the .

company has issued a Jetblue

Customer Bill of Rights, which
ensures that customers will be
notified in the event there are

delays, cancellations or diver-

sions, and their causes.

According to the policy, cus-
tomers who have their flight
cancelled by the airline have
the option to receive a full
refund or accommodation on a
future Jet Blue flight at no
additional charge.

Customers whose departure
or arrival is delayed are enti-
tled to a voucher for future
travel, the amount dependent
on the amount of time of the
delay, which is not to exceed
five hours. Customers experi-
encing a delay of more than
three hours will receive a
voucher for the same amount
they paid for their ticket.

Customers denied involun-

tarily boarding shall: receive ‘

$1,000. mil

T

FIRSTCARIBBEAN
INTERNATIONAL BANK

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

for

Home Finance Specialist

( pualiticanons: :

BAHAMAS TECHNICAL VOCATIONAL INSTITUTE

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons as |
faculty members at the Bahamas Technical & Vocational
Institute for the Fall Semester 2007.

Positions are available in the following disciplines:-

(1) Masonry

(2) Plumbing

(3) Tile Laying

(4) Electrical

(5) Air conditioning & Refrigeration

The successful candidate will be required to teach during
day or evening hours, must be very knowledgeable in their
prospective discipline area, be able to communicate well
with students and maintain a good rapport in the classroom.

The applicants must possess certification and qualifications

in the various disciplines and at least 10 years experience in
the industry. A Teaching Certificate or a minimum of three
years teaching experience.

Applications forms can be obtained from the Bahamas
Technical & Vocational Insitute, Old Trail Road and should
be returned complete with copies of qualifications to the
Human Resouces Department, Bahamas ‘Technical &
Vocational Institute at P.O. Box N-4934,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than March 5th, 2007.



« Experience in Sales & Lending and in depth up-to-date
knowledge of Mortgage and loans and an understanding of
local economies, client needs, condition of client’s business
/ industry / market.

Knowledge of and/or experience in credit assessment, credit -
policies and procedures with emphasis on mortgage
underwriting as well as risk awareness in order to assess
lending risk.
Knowledge of the principles and techniques of selling to
prospects for new business and close sales. x
Self-motivated and able to work with minimal supervision. “OF
Actual @ .
%,

The world’s smallest
glucose meter

ACIB or equivalent qualification in relevant discipline (not Shee
mandatory >

m World’s smallest sample size
(0.3 yL, about the size of a pinhead).

WS Re

General Requirements/Responsibilities:
. Fast 7 second average test time.
= To be the primary point of contact for customers wishing to
obtain a FirstCaribbean Mortgage.
= To generate incremental mortgage business for FirstCaribbean,
primarily through business development and direct selling
efforts.
To provide a high level of customer service to external referral
sources and potential home purchasers.
To develop appropriate external sales contacts with land
developers/ Real Estate Agents/Brokers etc. to ensure that
opportunities for developing profitable customer relationships
are realized in order to increase FirstCaribbean’s share of the
mortgage market.
Responsible for the management of a portfolio of approximately
200 — 300 clients.
Ensure credit quality i.e. delinquency and NPNA levels are
maintained within acceptable standards

Test yourself on different, less painful areas, such as
the palm of your hand, forearms, thighs, or calves.

4 alarms to remind patients when it’s time to test.

Ask for it at your favorite drug store.

GLUCOSE TESTING

10AM — 1PM
These dates and locations:

Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter
via email by March 2, 2007 to:
deangelia.deleveaux@FirstCaribbeanBank.com

Monday, Feb 12
Prescription Centre
Rosetta St.

Tuesday, Feb. 27
Centerville Pharmacy
Collins Ave.

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for their interest,
however only those under consideration will be contacted.



Distributed by Lowe's Wholesale . Tel: 393-7111 . Fax: 393-0440






Se




PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007

NGOS SINE OSS ASUS



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

IAPETUS HOLDING LTD..

VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000
IAPETUS HOLDING LTD. has been completed, a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company |
has therefore been struck off the Register of Companies.

The Date of the Completion of dissolution was 30th January

2007.

me

EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITY

«

Computer Company needs Company/Network
Repair Technician



Applicant should have:-

- Knowledge of Microsoft Windows desktop and
‘Operating Systems





THE TRIBUNE



Well-known investor

FROM page 1B

Davis has argued that he

obtained the title to land on

Rum Cay completely legiti-
mately through the title chain
derived from her estate.
Others, though, are scepti-
cal of the title chain derived

from her estate, and have ques- .

tioned whether the land being
acquired and then sold on by
Mr Davis and other develop-
ers, largely to potential foreign
second home buyers, has clean
title.

Attorneys such as Craig But-
ler, grandson of famed Rum
Cay native, Sir Milo Butler,

have argued that Mr Davis and .

other foreign developers are
simply engaged in land specu-
lation, flipping lots to other
buyers.

However, Todd Davis, a
spokesman for Island Village
Resorts and Mr Bernstein, yes-
terday told The Tribune that
the 2,520 acres earmarked for
the Rum Cay Island Club



NOTICE

Resort Marina and Spa was.

not derived from a title chain

involving the late Effie,

Knowles’ estate. s
“The land was totally sepa-
rate” from that, he added,
implying that the development
had good title to its land.
Island Village Resorts said
in a statement that it was plan-
ning a 4,000-unit, six-star resort
with hotel residences; a 400-
slip ‘Blue Flag’ Super Mega-
Yacht Marina, with slips up to
500 feet, and waterways run-
ning throughout most of the
property with water taxis.

Amenities

Other planned amenities
include a 27-hole golf course; a
swim with the Dolphins facili-
ty at the Dolphin Hotel; a spa
and tennis facilities, a
Caribbean-inspired casino, a
Straw Market and a retail vil-
lage.

The project designer is Taft

Bradshaw, of Bradshaw &’

Associates, and Mr Bernstein









- Be familiar with PC Hardware and Software repair

- Be able to work with minimal supervision

- Be trainable on specific industry based software
applications

Please send resumes via email to
nassautechjob@ yahoo.com

MINISTRY OF ENERGY & THE ENVIRONMENT
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL
HEALTH SERVICES | ae

As part of the activities of the inner-city
100 day. challenge project, “Keeping
the Inner-City Clean, Green & Pristine”
refuse and bulk waste (old _ stoves,
refrigerators, beds, mattresses and other
discarded articles) will be collected
from premises in the area bounded by
meeting street in the north, Blue Hill Road
in the East, Meadow Street in the South and
Nassau Street in the West and all side
Streets; Augusta Street, West Street,
Hospital Lane and Rupert Dean Lane
During the Period February 12th-March
12th, 2007



Pricing Information As Of:
2

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

P

ier Real Estate
a



12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
dings
Le

28.00 ABDAB
14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets

1.328271*
3.0569***
2.596093**
1.224792****
id 11.3545****

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina)MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund

tts
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec ‘ .
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day’s weighted price for dally volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change In closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the fast 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings






NOTICE is hereby given that EVELYNE SENATUS OF
PALM BEACH STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 15th day of February, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Job Opportunity

ce
An established Bahamian business
is seeking a secretary.

Applicant must possess the following
key competencies:

@ Motivated self-starter

@ Excellent communication skills
@ Good telephone etiquette
@ Typing & word processing skills

@ Ability to work with minimal
supervision

@ Literate in all MS Office programs -
Excel in particular

@ Knowledge of the Adobe suite of
programs a plus

Please TiC MC acy a eed

Nassau, Bahamas
Re: Secretary TB-0207



Daily Vol. EPS $

Last Price Weekly Vol. EPS S$

Last 12 Months Div $



: SS
closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. Januan: 1, 1994 = 100

*~9 February 2007
**- 31 January 2007
*** ~ 31 January 2007

**** - 31 January 2007



Sa

was said to be in discussions

with Bahamian contractors.

over the project’s construction.

Little is known about Mr
Bernstein, although a Google
search indicated that he and
his company, Island Develop-
ers, are a Florida-based outfit
involved in real estate devel-
opment, such as condos.and
hotels.

“Our company will employ
and train over 5;000 new
employees at the resort. The
southern Bahamas will come
to Rum Cay Island for employ-
ment. We are creating a
relaxed Island lifestyle with Six
Star Service and a most mem-
orable experience,” Mr Bern-
stein said.

Many people are likely to
question whether such a grand
project is feasible for Rum
Cay, given its small population
size, absence of infrastructure
and the presence already of
the Montana Holdings project
as the Government’s.‘anchor’.

“Even Nassau on New Prov-



and Citizenship,

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GUIRLANDE POLYNICE OF,

P.O. BOX 433, MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 22nd day of
February, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

in $4bn Rum Cay deal

idence Island, with 80 square -

miles, is only slightly twice the
size of Rum Cay Island at 30
square miles,” Mr Bernstein
said. .
““Our company staff an
engineers have spent the better
part of two years asking those
same questions, and we have
found that unlike most of the
cays in the Bahamas, Rum Cay
Island is really a small island
and will support several large
communities. Even in the

1800s ,the island’s history

shows that Rum Cay island
was the home of over 5,000
people without our modern
technology and was only sec-
ond to Nassau for the economy
of the Bahamas.

“We are developing a real
Bahamian Island with Bahami-
an architecture. With our Eco-
friendly and green develop-
ment plans, we will be able to
keep the Bahamian atmos-
phere and water clean and
beautiful throughout the
island.”













Legal Notice

NOTICE

RIBBON FALLS INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of RIBBON FALLS INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator) —









January 22, 2007.

Geraldine I Guest

Liquidator

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

MIDTOWN PROPERTIES LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section138 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
the dissolution of MIDTOWN PROPERTIES LIMITED
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the company has therefore been struck off the

Registrar. The date of completion of the dissolution was





Actuarial Analyst



Actuarial consulting firm seeks independent
thinkers with problem solving skills to join

its team.

Qualifications Required

O Degree in Actuarial Science or related
field

O 2 or more SOA actuarial exams
(or equivalent)

O Pensions or social security experience

O Proficiency in use of MS-Excel &
Word

Send resume to: ho

iZONOW(@ Orarwave¢

or fax to (242) 364-2470

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ww ee - =

“8 oe a

OMAP TUNED

<& es 6 @4L? TEU F

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Tete nea Ts

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THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 7B



‘INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

| ' | i LL Matsa)

_MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES

DUNDAS TOWN CROWN ALLOTMENT,
DUNDAS TOWN ABACO

All that parcel of land having an area of 14,400 sq. ft. being a portion of the Dundas Town Crown allotment this land is rectangular in shape with
dimensions of 80 ft by 180. Located on the above mentioned lot is a concrete block structure with dimensions of 27 x40. This house is an approximate
| 30 year old single family, residence comprising of 3-bedrooms, 1-bathroom, living/dining area and kitchen. This house is in fairly good condition for its

age with a projected future life of about 25 to 30 more years. The land rises above road level, to a height in excess of approximately 15ft above sea
level, with no likelihood of flooding in an hurricane. The grounds are sparsely landscaped.

Appraisal: $90,000.00





This house is located in Dundas Town Abaco which is adjacent to Marsh Harbour and is painted white trimmed teal green.

KENNEDY SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)

Lot no. 21 all utilities available 10 year old single story house, 3 bedroom 2 bathroom, living room, dining area, family room, kitchen, study, laundry
and an entry porch.

Appraisal: $188,406.00

Heading west along Soldier Road take main entrance to Kennedy Subdivision on the left, then take the 1st corner on the left then 1st right, house
is second on your right with garage. : og

CROWN ALLOTMENT NO. 77 MURPHY TOWN, ABACO

All that lot of land having an area of 6,790 sq. ft. being Crown allotment No. 77, of Murphy Town, Abaco Bahamas. Located on the subject property is a single storey single family concerete
building. This house is less than 5 year old and is in good condition with approximately 1,750 sq. ft of living space and contains 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, living room, dining, kitchen, laundry
and utility spaces. There is no significant improvements or deterioration evident. The property is very well drained and not susceptible to flooding. Landscaping efforts are still in remedial stages.
All major public and private utilities are situate within 100 ft of the subject site. Property bounderies are clearly delineated.

Appraisal: $167,580.00



The subject property is situate off the front street, Murphy Town, Abaco and is painted light yellow trimmed dark yellow.

st er ts ee
INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY - MUST SELL
Lot NO.83, Lower Bogue ELEUTHERA

Alll that piece parcel or lot of land being No. 83 on a plan on record in the department of Lands and Survey as plan no. 763 and comprising 21,674 sq. ft.
this site encompasses a 2 year old single storey home consisting of 2-bedrooms; 1 bathroom, living/dining room in one, and kitchen with a total living area
of 1,452 sq. ft. There is also a unit to this structure to be used as a bakery which could bring in an average of approximately $600 to $800 per month. There
is also 2 covered porch areas to the front of this building, with an area of 90.4 sq. ft. (one at the front entrance and one at the entrance to the bakery) this
home is in very good condition and appears to have been built in accordance with the plans and specifications as approved, and at a standard that was
acceptable to the Ministry of Public Works. The land is flat and properly landscaped.

Appraisal: $177,412.00

This property is situated on the Western side of the main Eleuthera Highway and approximately 1,200 ft Northerly from four-for-nothing Road in the Settlement of Lower Bogue.



LOT.NOQ..24, FRELIA SUBDIVISION

4 All that lot of land having an area of 6;724: sq: ft. belt t-No: 24 of the-subdivision known and designated as Frelia Subdivision, the said subdivision
situated in the Southwestern District of New Providence ahamas. This property is comprised of a 4 year old single storey residence consisting of approximately.
1,223 sq. ft of enclosed living space, with 3 bedrooms; 2 bathrooms, living/dining rooms, kitchen and utility room. The land is flat and slightly below the -
level of the roadway, but was brought up to road level by land fill to disallow the possibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods of the year. The
grounds are fairly kept, with minimal landscaping in place. The yard is open at the front and enclosed on its sides and back with 7ft chain linked fencing.

Remedial work required to the house includes repair of cracks in the partitions belts and columns.

ruse oan eee



Appraisal: $161,000.00



Travel south on Sir Milo Butler Highway until you get to Fire Trail Road. Turn left onto Fire Trail Road, go all the way to the last bend right, take first left then
first right the subject house is the 5th house right painted white trimmed yellow.







LOT 194 BOYD SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)

All that lot of land having an area of 6,400 sq. ft. being lot no 194 of the subdivision known as Boyd Subdivision, situated in the central district of New
Providence this property is comprised of a 35 year old single family, single story residence encompassing approximately 1,278 sq. ft. of enclosed living
area and inclusive of separate living and dining rooms, and an average size kitchen, three bedrooms, two bathrooms and an entry porch, of approximately
88 sq. ft. ventilation is by 2 wall unit air conditioners. The property is at grade and level with good drainage, landscaping is minimal, consisting of lawns
and shrubs in the front, the subject is enclosed with stone walls mounted with wrought iron and chain link fencing and a wrought iron gate in front there is
a 208 sq. ft. cement driveway leading to a single covered carport of 250 sq. ft. the subject site also has a concrete block storage shed measuring of
approximately 143 sq. ft.

Appraisal: $133,570.00

Traveling west on Boyd Road, turn left onto Foster Street, continue on Foster Street to the 4th corner right, (Roland Ave.) the subject property is the Sth
property on the.left side painted orange with red/white trim.



(Lot No. 62, Lower Bogue) ELEUTHERA

All that piece parcel or lot of land and improvements, in the settlement of Lower Bogue, North Eleuthera, being No. 62, comprising of about 34,210
sq. ft., this site encompasses a 12 year old single storney home comprising of 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, front room, dining, breakfast room, kitchen
and laundry room, with a total living area of approximately 2,342.06. Property also includes a double car garage, and front entrance with a total sq. ft.
of approximately 655.75. This home is approximately 85% completed. The property is well landscaped with crab grass, fiascos and some fruit trees.

Appraisal: $235,638.00





This property is situated on the western side of Eleuthera Highway in the settlement of Lower Bogue.

LOT NO. 370 GRENADA CLOSE GOLDEN GATES #2 (Nassau)

All that lot of land having an area of 5,500 sq. ft., being lot 370 Grenada Close of the subdivision known and designated as Golden Gates No. 2,
situated in the Southwestern district of New Providence Bahamas. This property is comprised of 25 years old single family residence consisting of
approximately 1,234 sq. ft., of enclosed living space with 3 bedrooms, two bathrooms, living/dining room, and kitchen. The Land is on a grade and
level and appear to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods. The grounds are fairly kept, with
improvements including driveway, walkway and low shrubs. Yard is enclosed with chain linked fencing to the sides and rear.

Appraisal: $149,405.60
Traveling south along Blue Hill Road, turn right at the Farmers Market just after passing the Golden Gates Shopping Center, take 1st corner left,

Windward Isles Way, then take 3rd corner right, St Thomas Road, then first left, grenada Crest, drive around the bend then 1st left again the subject
property is the 2nd property left house #4 painted peach trimmed black.

VACANT PROPERTIES

RAINBOW SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 3 BLOCK 27 (ELEUTHERA)

All that vacant lot of land having an area of approximately 14,052.59 sq. ft. being lot no. 3, block 27, of Rainbow Subdivision with residential zoning. This property is bounded
about 103.44 ft north by Queens Highway, and 137.02 ft. east and about 99.94 ft south of Rainbow Hill Circul 139.91 ft west, all utilities and services available.

Appraisal: $37,440.00









fe ee a

NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS (ELEUTHERA)

’

Lot #20 approximately 11,200 sq. ft., and bounded on North by Early Settler Drive and South by Deal Investment Ltd., this is a single family zoning and _50 ft., above sea level.
This site encompasses a foundation with plumbing and roughing inplace and well compacked quarry fill. The concrete floor has not been poured as yet. The foundation is 2,511
sq. ft. Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles east wardly of the Bluff Settlement. The said lot is vacant and a hill over looking the Atlantic Ocean. Appraisal: $41,275.00

i
ZA



; ieee ee For conditions of sale and other information contact CRN:
: Philip White @ 502-3077 email philip. white@scotiabank.com or Harry Collie @ 502-3034 ¢ email harry.collie@scotiabank.com e Fax 356-3851





| ; \\
PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007

THE TRIBUNE











"SOUS CHEFS.






Private club is seeking experienced full-time sous
chefs with a minimum of eight (8) years experience
in the culinary field. All Standard diplomas from the
Nassau Hotel Training College are demanded. The
applicants must have extensive knowledge in
management skills and excellent levels of cooking skills.








Interested persons should fax resumes to #362-6245
to the attention of:




THE DIRECTOR OF CUISINE
LYFORD CAY CLUB
Lyford Cay Drive
Nassau, Bahamas




FROM page 1B





POUCEEEEE G GE Ot GE AE Ge a nnn ann nn at on a 0 OO)



The Ansbacher Group, specialists in private banking, fiduciary services and wealth management,
has an opening in The Bahamas for a

SECURITIES ADMINISTRATOR/OFFICER

Primary Responsibilities:

'

= ‘To safeguard and accurately maintain records of all securities held

. ‘Proper execution and settlement of trades and/or any other securities transactions

= © To ensure all Securities transactions are accurately processed in the proper accounting period
= + Liaise between custodians and administrators to ensure client records are updated

= °To carry out all duties’as they relate to the proper administration of securities

= » Assist with the preparation of all securities related documentation

= * To accurately post all stock orders, non-cash transactions and dividends

= * Toupdate the trade log on a daily basis, to validate, post and settle trades

= * To assist with daily call-over routine

Secondary Responsibilities: =
* To carry out such duties as may be required from time to time =
* To serve as a back-up verifier of swifts =
* To assist with departmental cross training, pension payments and sales ledger when necessary =

=

Requirements:.

* Bachelors’ Degree in Banking/Accounting/Economics/Management with at least one year
experience in an offshore environment; or

* Relevant associate Degree with three years experience as a Junior Banking of Securities Officer

* Securities certification such as Series 7 or C.S.C.

* Highly proficient in Microsoft Office

* Ability to multi-task

Please send all resumes to the attention of.

. Human Resource Manager
= Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited
= P.O. Box N-7768
iS Nassau, Bahamas
a tye Fax: 325-0524
: E-mail: hrmanager@ansbacher.bs .
7

Deadline for all applications is March 2, 2007 e

eo eee ner ie Wwe at ti





MBA and MSc (Finance
Soe) Maio Assela
Betcrom eseatie (0),

Melee Melo UL
Sle ayo,

resource
development
interndtional

RDI USA .
801 N. Fairfax Street
| Suite 20]
Alexandria, VA 22314 USA

Tel: 1-703-549-5424

SO aOR RIE





could even be interpreted as
preventing companies from
dropping private group health
insurance for their employees
once NHI comes in.

The Tribune understands
that the Government clarifica-
tion said Clause 14 was
designed to protect both
employer and employee,
ensuring that the combination
of benefits available between
the NHI scheme and any sup-
plemental private insurance
package left no one - employer
or worker - in a worse off posi-
tion once the government
scheme came into being.

An employer is prevented
from arbitrarily tearing up an






- receptionist
- filing, typing correpondence
- banking & postal duties

- computer skills

motivated.
Salary commensurate with experience.







{80)



OFFICE ASSISTANT

To assist in General Office Work, Duties include, but not limited to:

- accounting; knowledge of Quickbooks a plus.

Ideal candidate will be honest, personable, responsible, and punctual, and self

Send resume to: Office Position, RO. Box CB-13835, Nassau, Bahamas

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |,
DONNA MARIE DEAN of the Western District of the
Island of New Providence intend to change my name to
MICHELLE DONNA MARIE MITCHELL. [f there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box SS-792, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
days after the date of publication of this notice. '

existing private group health
insurance package once NHI
comes into being, according to
the Government, eliminating
the possibility that workers
might be in a less well-off posi-
tion just covered by NHI.

Employers

In return, employers are not
bound by industrial agree-
ments or trade unions from
adjusting those group health
plans to meet the costs of NHI
contributions and eliminating
double payments. Ministeriai
approval, the Government is
saying, is needed to ensure this
equilibrium is maintained.
















MICHELLE














Coalition lawyers
study government
NHI clarification

Mr Rolle yesterday said the
Coalition was reviewing a let-
ter sent by Dr Nottage, and its
contents would influence its
plans as it moved forward in
relation to the NHI scheme.

The Coalition was preparing
“a well-documented plan” that
it would execute shortly,
releasing information such as
the Segal survey showing the
likely impact NHI’s introduc-
tion would have on the
Bahamian economy, business-
es, salaries and employees.

More information from the
Coalition’s petition is also like-
ly to be released, but it has still
to receive any of the economic
and actuarial studies it has
requested from government.

Correction

WO To ecm een tte
Me Tera ares
Data Protector Commis- -
sioner, The Tribune incor-
rectly referred to Mr
George E. Rodgers as E.
George Rodgers. We apol-
ogise for the error.












Public Hospitals Authority we

Advertisement

Manager III (Human Resources)
Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the post
of Human Resources Manager Ill, Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre, Public Hospitals

Authority.

Applicants must possess the following qualifications: -

Bachelors Degree in Business Administration. Management, or equivalent qualification (a
Masters degree would be an advantage); and at least three (3) years post qualification
experience in human resource management. Excellent oral written communication skills and

computer skills are essential.

Responsibilities Duties

The Human Resources Manager III is a part of the Human Resources Team at Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre, and shares responsibility for the day-to-day administration of human
resources transactions and services; to ensure that the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre human

resources policies and procedures, tran

business objectives.

sactions and services are aligned with Authority’s

Within this context, the Human Resources Manager III will be responsible for, but not limited

to:-

1. Processing recommendations for:

* Probationary appointments

* Confirmations in substantive posts

* Promotions and reclassification

* Benefits under the Authority’s policies
* Benefits under the law, eg. Employment Act and National Insurance Act
¢ Employee transfers and secondment

¢ Employee grievances

* Disciplinary actions and penalties

Involuntary and voluntary terminations

2. Liaising with the Payrolls Unit with matters relating to salaries adjustments and

financial clearances.

3. Managing the performances appraisal process for staff within assigned areas of responsibili-
ties, ensuring that evaluations are ongoing and appraisal forms are prepared, distributed and

reviewed.

Opportunities will also be given for involvement in human resources strategic functions such
as policies, developing an annual human resources plan, staff training and development, qual-
ity improvement initiatives To facilitate the Manager’s professional development and career

advancement within Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre.

Letters of application, resume, documentary evidence of qualifications and three (3) references
should be submitted through the head of your department, no later than 28th February, 2007, to
the Director Human Resources (Acting), Public Hospitals Authority P.O. Box N-8200, or Ist

Floor Corporate Office, Dockendale House, West Bay Street.

ALT ET ae TE Ee PTT
=" THE TRIBUNE
sm

~: FROM page 1B
s

expect, but in the end people
accepted the move towards a
revenue-based charge like the
hotels, rather than a fixed
charge.”

The percentages applied to
revenue charges levied on
marinas still had to be worked

-'- out, Mr Martini cautioned, as
--" the figures still needed to be
“'"'’ assessed properly.
cw “J thought we got a lot of
“<' really good feedback, and we’ll
- have to see what it means,” Mr
2"t Martini said.
is’ He added that the Govern-
“+” ment’s planners had “started
‘« + with draft a and ended up with
~"."" draft e”, and were now in the
-““ process of trying to prepare a
“« final document.
~ That report would then have
_. to be submitted to the Cabi-
“4 net, and Mr Martini said it was
2"» likely more consultation would
4? take place after that. He added
°“!° that his impression was that
“&° this current round of consul-
*« tation had gone well, whereas
criticism had been voiced of
other processes in the past.
The initial draft document
said the Bahamas was earning
a “very small portion of the
* potential” economic benefits
this nation’s expanding marina
+ and boating industry could
generate, with the sector cur-
rently generating $25 million
* in revenues per annum.
The draft policy document
- warned that the Bahamas’
‘ attraction for boaters, due to

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aa “ a”

square miles of ocean, coupled
with the lack of space for new
_. marinas in Florida, had created
“es. “significant opportunities” that
“should not be missed”.
~ Boating generated some
$25.559 million in revenues for
the Bahamas annually, the
Ministry of Tourism, had cal-
culated, based on 38,875 visitor
~ room nights.
The earnings were broken
-.* down into:
* Room revenues - $5.818
million





te ye Boe
96 a

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SS O88 oe LE Pe kG

ee:

Fe?

FO. FLL

FOR OAR EE ALLIS EHS RNAS 8 OO ETE era

a2 SHY CAD RA A ee ees aS

es @ a a7.>:

its 2,000 cays and 100,000 '

* Fuel - $6.206 million

* Meals and entertainment
- $9.929 million

* Dockage - $1.862 million

* Fees - $1.745 million

In addition, the boating and
marina industry had generated
$271,000 in revenues for the
Government during the first
10 months of 2006.

In assessing the tax revenues
derived from the marina and
boating industry, the draft pol-
icy document said the
Bahamas levied an annual
charge of $6.15 and $1.95 per
linear foot of dock space for
commercial and private slips
respectively in Family Island
marinas. For New Providence,
the figures were slightly higher,
standing at $6.32 and $2 for
commercial and private dock
space respectively.

But while collection rates for
these charges on New Provi-
dence were high, they were
lower for Family Island mari-
nas. For the first 10 months in
2006, the Port Controller’s
Office had collected $156,000
in charges from New Provi-
dence, but just $115,000 from
the Family Islands.

“Apparently very little” rev-
enues for business licence fees
were collected from marinas,
while there were no charges
for the use of seabed Crown
Land. The seabed was often
leased by the marina develop-
ers.

“There are no mooring or
anchoring charges other than
the $300 cruising permit and
the annual mooring charge of






PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, JULIO TYLER
SEBASTIAN PIERRE-LOUIS of the Island of New
Providence intend to change my
TYLER SEBASTIAN BROWN.
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box SS-792, Nassau, Bahamas.no later than thirty
(80) days after the date of Publication, of this notice...

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 9B

OTST Stats

$30 for private moorings and
$100 for commercial moorings
in the Family Islands, and $50
and $200 respectively in New
Providence,” the draft policy
document said.

To ensure the Bahamas
maximised tax revenues from
the marina and boating indus-
tries, the policy document sug-
gested that seabed land should
be leased, not sold, with the
leases based on appraised val-
ues and renewable indefinitely.
However, there would be five-
year rental reviews.

The more radical suggestion
is to collect real property taxes
on seabed land, and on the val-
ue of improvements made to
marina property over the
seabed.

The policy document sug-
gested that the annual mooring
charge be continued, with the
addition of a $1 per foot, per
night, mooring charge that
would not apply to Bahamian
residents or people mooring
one boat near their own prop-
erty.

The current charges of $1.95
and $2 per foot of dock space

. could be “waived for private

own-use holdings provided a
lease is being paid on the sea
bed”.

The document suggested
that commercial marinas
should pay the higher of the
$6.13 or $6.32 per foot of dock
space on the Family Islands
and New Providence respec-
tively, or 6 per cent of revenues
for the seabed lease, bringing
the Bahamas into line with the
taxes levied by Florida.






name to JULIO
If there are any





The BNT welcomes
you to an early
morning tour of the
Maillis Residence on
Adelaide Road.

Saturday, |
F ebruary 24 at 8: 30am

Hundreds of wild ducks and other wildlife live comfortably
amongst humans and domestic animals, fruit trees grow among
native species, making the Maillis residence a fine example of
living within the environment without making a major impact.
The Maillis property stretches from Adelaide Road to the sea,
consisting of wetlands, native coppice and pines, open areas
and the seashore.

The Maillis property is located one mile west of Adelaide Village
on the Adelaide Road, turn south into the gate at the green
fence. Drive slowly down the road inside the gate and park on
the grassy slope near the beach, past all the houses. If you
bring children, please keep them under control.

BNT Members and non-members are welcome, but we do
encourage participants to join.

For more information call the BNT at 393-1317
or e-mail: bnt@bahamasnationaltrust.org

March’s nature walk will be on Saturday 24th March, 8.30 am
at West Bay (Jaws Beach), Clifton.

Wear
comfortable
shoes for
walking and if
interested in
birding bring
binoculars





SEND RESUMES 10: ev ORO Teen fax to: 356 0333- AMSG Managing Director



Marinas ‘accept’ move to revenue based taxation

Give the Gift OF Travel with our new

Travel Gift Card!

ea fics for details:
« Card is refillable! Can be used as a complete
travel card with Premier Travel!

Â¥- Think of it as a Savings Account with us!

Put money on your account as often as you like

for redemption towards airfare, car & hotel,
CRUISES, VIP Services, etc. Card can not be
redeemed for cash.

Give as a Gift for birthdays, anniversaries, etc.

Set up your own Gift Account with our new
Travel Gift Card! If you’re celebrating a special
occasion, instead of presents you'll never use ...
have your friends & family come into Premier |
Travel and put money on your Travel Gift Card! |

#57 Coffins dvenvie® P.O. Bas N-9676* ‘Race Bahamas
eae i HIE EY





Sbarro the Italian Pizzeria is looking for a self motivated, responsible and mature individual to spear-
head the position of Marketing/Advertising & Public Relations. The candidate will have to perform the
following duties:

PRIMARY DUTIES:

¢ Assist the Managing Director lay out and compile company data, events and happenings in
a quarterly newsletter and website.
Assist the Managing Director to update the website on a as needed bases. i
Assist the Managing Director with the writing, recording and placing radio and newspaper |}
advertisements.
¢ Assist the Managing Director compile new information and alter existing information for
menus & menu boards.
Represent the company in public relations matters. and document the same.
Assist Managing Director in all other matters pertaining to Marketing/Advertising and Public
Relations. ;

SECONDARY DUTIES:

¢ Assist the Managing Director in accomplishing his daily tasks, e.g. handling and screening
calls, tabulating sales and payroll data, taking dictation and writing correspondence, etc.

Assist the Office Administrator with in-coming calls, posting sales, payroll data, compiling
and updating employee files, etc.

¢ Assist Office Administrator in compiling data for Director's and General Manager's meet-
ings.

@ Working side by side with Office Administrator to fill in when necessary.

SKILLS & APTITUDE:

The successful candidate must have excellent writing and speaking abilities:
Must be an assertive and socially pleasant person.

Must have excellent organizational abilities

Must be able to work independently of all others

Must be able and willing to work in a close office and multi cultural environment.

WORK EXPERIENCE & EDUCATION:

eet ¢ @ @

This position requires a person who has a sound background in writing and general communication
mediums. They must have excellent command of both written and spoken English and the comprehen-
sion skills to organize and communicate information in a clear and concise manner. The candidate must |f
have a solid secondary education and at least four years experience or a Bachelor's Degree and at

least two years experience in the field of Marketing/Advertising & Public Relations.

Salary is competitive. Bonuses are available and based purely on performance, Medical Health
coverage is also available.



\\
PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007



TSN si ee ity ) abe
A reminder for firms on Data Protection Act

Oceanrtin Gahamas Ltd.

Retirement Rd., P.O. Box SS-19003, Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 394 6874, Fax: (242) 394 6873

Ocean Air Bahamas Ltd.
T/A Bahamas Freight Forwarders
In affiliation with IBC Airways, OceanAir Bahamas Ltd., is pleased to

announce it’s new Cargo Air Service:



¢ Daily Scheduled Flights from Miami International Airport
* Fully Bonded Facilities with US Customs on site

¢ Connected from all Major US cities

e Large or Small Shipments-we can handle it

¢ Full Charters

° Shipment of Perishable Goods
Nassau Address:

US address: Lynden Pindling Int’! Airport
5600 NW 36th Street Customs Bonded Warehouse Bldg.
Miami, FL 33166 Office #47. .

Tel. 888-742-5422
Fax. 305-639-6478
Contact: Jose Olivera 305-871-9100

Tel. 242-394-6874/5
Fax 242-377-1798
Contact: J. Darville or D. Skolnick

OceanAir Bahamas...The Proven Quality you expect in lfandling your Cargo!



ANY




LEVITICUS “UNCLE LOU” ADDER

FUN RUN/WALK
ON

- SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2007
AT ,



THE 3rd ANNUAL
EY

PRIN



Starting from St. Augustine’s College (Pool) (Route - west on Bernard
Road, north of Village Road to Montague Beach making a full circle then
return south on Village Road, east on Bernard Road to SAC Pool)

ENTRY FEE WITH T-SHIRT:
$15.00 Adults ¢ $5.00 Students

UNDER 12, 13-20; 21-30, 31-40, 41-50 AND OVER 50
Trophies will be given to the Ist and 2nd place finishers of each category.

FOR REGISTRATION FORMS AND PAYMENTS
PLEASE CONTACT
Jobina Bain (SAC) 324-1511
Geno Nairn 397-2230
Yvette Barr 502-5783
















VACANCY FOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT MECHANICS




Qualifications & Experience

° Minimum five (5) years in Heavy Equipment Mechanics
¢ Knowledge of diesel and gasoline engines

¢ Knowledge of hydraulic systems

* Good understanding of 24 V Electrical Systems

¢ Experience in wire rope rigging would be a plus

¢ Welding experience also would be a plus







¢ Perform repairs and preventive maintenance on various heavy
equipment.





¢ Good physical condition
e Able to withstand constant exposure to the weather conditions
¢ Must be willing to work shift schedules

¢ Must be willing to work at heights





Company offers good benefits and salary is commensurate with ex-
perience and qualifications. Interested persons are invited to submit a
resume’ by February 28, 2007 to the following person:





Ramon Taylor
Tropical Shipping Limited
John Alfred Dock
East Bay Street
Nassau, Bahamas ©
Phon

PSE:

















FROM page 2B

the security or maintenance of
good order in a prison or
detention centre.

However, the right of access
does not apply to legislation
for the protection of individu-
als against financial loss arising
from dishonesty or malprac-

‘ tice; legal professional privi-

lege; matters relating to the
protection of the international
relations of the country; and
statistical, research, or back-
up data.

Section 10 of the Data Pro-
tection Act provides an indi-
vidual with the right of rectifi-
cation or erasure for personal
data that is inaccurate.

An individual is also afford-
ed the right to prohibit the pro-
cessing of personal data for the
purposes of direct marketing,
under Section 11 of the Data
Protection Act.

The data controller has a
statutory duty of care to the
data subject, imposed upon
him by Section 12 of the Data
Protection Act. The data sub-
ject may bring a lawsuit against
the data controller for breach
of this statutory duty of care,
where applicable.

Notwithstanding the fact
that the Data Protection Act
provides protection for the dis-
closure of personal data gen-
erally, under Section 13 of the

Act, such protection may be
overridden in the following cir-
cumstances:

* In the interest of national
security as determined by the
Commissioner of Police or the
Commodore of the Defence
Force.

* For the purposes of crimi-
nal investigations, prosecutions
and the collection of taxes,
duties and similar levies

* The protection of interna-
tional relations of the country.

* To prevent injury, damage
or loss to person or property;

* Any disclosure required by
enactment of law or the
enforcement of a court order.

* Any disclosure required
for the purpose of obtaining
legal advice or required as part
of legal proceedings.

* Any disclosure made to
the data subject concerned, or
to a person acting on his
behalf.

* Any disclosure made at the
request or consent of the data
subject, or a person acting on
his behalf.

Based on the foregoing legal

THE TRIBUNE

considerations and in light of

y
*

¢
a
¢
*
e+
*

oe »

the preventative and protec- '

tive nature of the Act, busi-
nesses, particularly those who

may have limited knowledge ‘ -'

or resources with regard to

information technology and e- +

commerce, would do well to
provide adequate training,
internal controls and monitor-

ing to ensure full and proper “|

compliance with this e-com-
merce legislation, the minimi-

sation and elimination of abuse ‘

and misuse of customer infor-
mation, and the protection of
its customers’ right to privacy.

© 2007. Tyrone L. E.

Fitzgerald. All rights reserved. \

NB: The information con-
tained in this article does not
constitute nor is it a substitute
for legal advice. Persons read-
ing this article and/or column,

generally, are encouraged to ~~”

seek the relevant legal advice
and assistance regarding issues
that may affect them and may
relate to the information pre-
sented.

Tyrone L. E. Fitzgerald is an
attorney in the Chambers of
Fitzgerald & Fitzgerald.
Should you have any com-

ments or enquiries, you may |

contact Mr Fitzgerald at Suite

212, Lagoon Court Building, '
Olde Towne Mall at Sandy- ~

port, West Bay St, or at 327-
3347 (telephone)

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY —

Awell established Pharmaceutical Company is seekingto hire the

following individual:~



ACCOUNTS CLERK >

Experience Skills:

- Amininium of three G) years experience in the field.
- Excellent organizational and interpersonal skills

- Excellent communication skills

+ Excellent command of English Language
- Proficiency in Microsoft Work and Excel.

ow” Ability to work with minimal supervision

All interested persons should mail their resume to:

Chief Financial Officer

Commonwealth Drugs & Medical Supplies Co. Ltd

PO.Box N-1145
Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: (242) 323-2871

Email: ksherman@commonwealthdrgs.com

Only applicants who meet the requirements will be contacted.






oy, y QW

AG

upscale mini mall, offices BU Le
ey & Church Streets near, Paradise Island
long bus routes, lots of parking. |

rt 3 854 sq ft- Beauty RP easel
ihe Office Spaces ec Co Pre a a
ALL ed ACR bedroom 2 2 bath apartments






Le

MOND

‘Ba4i-7

CONTACT




AY-FRIDAY ° 9AM-5PM
fé 3225-0450
AS4 ater 6pm




























eRe we

‘ne @' >

a

as e+ he %
THE TRIBUNE



FROM page 1B

South Riding Point had bene-
fited from a one-off $1.1 mil-
lion gain from insurance recoy-
eries relating to the 2004 hur-
ricane season, and the sale of
product inventory.
Meanwhile, Ken Russell, the
FNM MP for High Rock, said
he would raise the Beka

‘Development project and the °

Government’s plans for Crown
Land in eastern Grand
Bahama with Prime Minister
Perry Christie next week dur-
ing Opposition Day in the
House of Assembly.

The Government has been
silent on the project since The
Tribune’s article on Tuesday,
but has not denied the details
in the document that were
reported by this newspaper, .

“I will question the Prime .

Minister on it next week,” Mr
Russell said. “I will raise the
question on the House floor
so that the whole Bahamas
can know what the Govern-
ment intends to do with east-
ern Grand Bahama, and what
people in eastern Grand
Bahama feel about it,

“I will try to find out from
the Prime Minister why they’re
doing this with the land in east-

ern Grand Bahama, when the
residents have not been sorted
out, Many people in eastern
Grand Bahama are young and
need property,”

Mr Russell, whose High
Rock constituency is in east-
ern Grand Bahama, said the
reaction from people living in
the area to news of the pro-
posed project was that they
“are ready to get up in arms
and demonstrate over it, as
they believe the Government
should not be selling the
Crown Land in eastern Grand
Bahama”.

Added

He added that many resi-
dents had’paid for Crown
Land in the area, but no sur-
veys had been done or deeds
received, and “now they’re
reading in the newspapers that
the Government wants to give
them [the developers] all the
Crown Land”

“We have to have some land
set aside for our people, We
should not be causing our peo-
ple to pay $500,000 for Jand;
they should be getting it at
$2,500 [per acre]”,

Mr Russell added of South
Riding Point Holdings: “I think
they’re very concerned,

BUSINESS

‘Government harbour lease frustrates firm’s expansion

because the Government
seems to be cancelling their
agreement now for the future,

“That means the Govern-
ment has, in effect, terminated
the lease. It’s just a matter of
time before it’s finalised.”

Beka Development LLC
submitted its proposal to the
Government in December
through its Evel ye sub-
sidiary, Bahamas Golden
Beach Ltd, The project
includes a tie-up with Omni
Hotels as the hotel operator,
and Foxwoods Development
Company as the casino opera-
tor,

A document posted on the
Internet by its real estate part-
ners, Inifinity Partners, said the
Government “has committed
a contingent master casino
licence for the remainder of
the island” to the developers of
the eastern Grand Bahama
project.

In addition, the Infinity Part-
ners posting said that Beka was
seeking a Heads of Agreement
that provided it with the same
level of incentives as Kerzner
International had obtained for
its Phase III project; Baha Mar
was seeking for its $2.4 billion
Cable Beach redevelopment;
and Ginn Clubs & Resorts was
receiving for its $4.9 billion
West End investment.



The document said that with
the general election scheduled
for early May, the Government
“would like to complete all the
approvals and make a formal
announcement at least 30 days
in advance”,

Government

It added: “The Government
has allowed Bahamas Golden
Beach to be the master devel-
oper of the entire east end of
the island, This includes an
area exceeding 100 square
miles,

“The Government is willing
to sell in the future to Bahamas
Golden Beach Ltd substan-
tially all of its east Crown Land
at the same price per acre as
the initial site,”

The Infinity Partners post-
ing said one condition that
Beka had to fulfil to obtain the
master casino licence was a
“willingness to purchase gov-

ernment Crown Land at the .

Golden Beach site for a mini-
mum of $5 million ($2,800 per
acre)",

It is unclear, though,
whether Beka will receive what
it is seeking and, indeed,
whether the company’s interest
is serious and an agreement
can be concluded with the
Government,

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that HENRY TILME OF

MAGARETA ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and

that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
| and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
| days from the 15th day of February, 2007 to the Minister
+ responsible for Nationality and Cilizenenin P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

i

POSITION AVAILABLE
ze Auto Parts Store seeks receptionist/sales clerk must be
2 , Sat i) work on weekends. Applicant must be able

‘work on Or initiative, iy ons) STURT TLC a sonal
skills. .

ore eat MET ey p P.O. Box

RO , Box E
Nawal, Rahamas':
PH: SCHEELE (4387)

DELL LCD Monitor 15°$224 Wireless Keyboard
| DELL LCD Monitor 17° $290

dducetional faunales

Belkin Wirless
Software for Kids ,

Router

PRICEWAERHOUSE(COPERS
161100 OP AVAILABL aXe
ASSOCIATES -

EricewatertionseCocpers has vacancies for staff accountants to
pursue a programme of training culminating in a professional
y accountancy qualification. Prospective candidates should have a
graduate or undergraduate degree in accounting with a cumulative
“@ grade point average that exemplifies your success as an achiever and
f leader.

4 Applications are being accepted for the 2007 Programme.

i Expectant May/June 2007 graduates are also encouraged to
} apply.

Successful candidates will undergo a period of rigorous training,

both academically and on the job, with the objective of developing

professional skills. Much of the on-the-job experience will. entail

auditing the financial statements of entities in the financial services

Industries such as banks, trust companies, investment funds and

insurance companies. The positions offer excellent salaries and
f promotional opportunities, and benefits ‘include medical
f insurance and provident fund, Also, as a team member of
j PricewaterhouseCoopers there are opportunities to work in another
; country where PricewaterhouseCoopers has an office,

q Please submit your application, with a current curriculum vitae and
a'copy of your most recent transcript, before 31 March 2007 to:

Human Resources Partner
* PricewaterhouseCoopers
P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, The Bahamas



aU Nt FOR SALE

aT Ae aTeiee Fashion Retail
_ Business. Well known and
respected worldwide Franchise.
20 years at same prime location.

Email: b.inquiries@gmail.com



3 We, ls omne Ue dened ;

a » Retention Pond

* Jogging Tralls & Playground
ae Court
bos & rom

Tel: 325-6447/9 or 325-6456

UBS

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd. a leading international Trust Company is
seeking to employ,

MIS Specialist & Team Leader

Duties to include:
Guide development of system to provide consistent and coherent
management information
Enhance and redesign the existing database and workflow
models to meet the business requirements
Develop and implement solutions in MS Access
Support and testing of the developed system and rapidly provide
solutions to any defects that are detected
Take ownership and responsibility for the analysis and design
phases of one or more of the project deliveries - producing
results within the agreed timeframes
Collaborate on project to build an intranet site to support
business processes
Maintain interface to our international internal partners in
Switzerland and the rest of the world
Lead MIS team.
Provide initial training and second level support to users

This position is open to candidates with the following minimum
requirements:

Proven experience in the following key areas;
Training
Relational database modelling \
Database modelling using MS Access and understanding of user
interface design
Database reengineering and reverse engineering
Process modelling
Software development lifecycles
Knowledge of VB, ODBC, SQL, WIP (Vignette V/5 e-Business
Platform using Oracle 8.1.7 as the data repository)
Business analyst
Team Leader
Trust operations

In addition, the successful candidate should:
e® Have strong analytical skills
e Be fluent in English and German

Bahamian Nationals need only apply to;
hrbahamas@ubs.com

or

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources

P,O, Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007, PAGE 11B



Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods, Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award,

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story,

To conduct daily analysis of water facility |

Call 326-8585 for appointment
Serious inquires only

Se a

erty

% A it A Mh

JOB FAIR

held on

March Ist and March 2nd 2007,
Place: Bahamas Hotel Training College
Time: 9:00am until 2:00pm daily

EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES:

Accountant
. Reservation Clerk
Special Events Coordinator
Line Cook
Waiters / Waitress
Bus Boys
Bartenders
Maintenance
Security

TEACHING VACANCY

The Anglican Central Authority invites
applications from qualified Teachers for
positions available at St, John’s College, St. Anne’s
School, Bishop Michael Eldon School, Freeport, and
St. Andrew's School, Exuma,

PRIMARY TEACHERS
LIBRARIAN
SCIENCE
ENGLISH LANGUAGE
SPANISH
GUIDANCE COUNSELLORS
SPECIAL EDUCATION
MATHEMATICS
HOME ECONOMICS
RELIGIOUS STUDIES
PHYSICS/MATHEMATICS
MUSIC
BUSINESS STUDIES

ART .
PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Only qualified Teachers, with Bachelor or Master
Degrees from an accredited University or College and
Teaching Certificate need apply.

For further details and application forms, please
contact the Anglican Central Education
Authority on Sands Road at telephone
(242) 322-3015/6/7,

Letters of application and/or completed application
forms with copies of required documents must be sent
by Friday, March 9th, 2007 to the Anglican Education

Department addressed to: -

The Director of Education
Anglican Central Education Authority
P.O, Box N-656
Nassau, Bahamas


















~

— o....... : : THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY FEBRUARY 22ND, 2067)







































































' NW at 5-10 Knots
; | i N at 6-42 Knots
| : ; NW at 7-14 Knots
| / N at 8-16 Knots
: i! , ; : . WNW at 7-14 Knots
: _ Plenty of sunshine. Sunny to partly ; | Rather cloudy. The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the NNW at 8-16 Knots
i i cloudy and breezy. / greater the need for eye and - protection.
i i High: 79° High: 77° : High: 85°
3 o o io i i io Ee, ‘i oy 3 x
Eee Pe Low: 67° fe ee Ties ron Massey BU yaeg ees gh ae 83
EDT TET aa eel | UU | Go OTE | AE ee
[ore Ear DP reer r | “L__ e-6er | Hi f.) Low Ht
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 4:20am. 24 5:47am. -02
5 elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold 2 person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. i W52p.m 29 52ipm 03
POPP | Friday (1217pm. 22 Givam 00
BALE zs — 617 p.m. -0.1 rz
Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday’ © Saturday 1255am. 27 72am. O02 ej
Temperature, 1:20pm. 21 7:20pm. 00 Sef
HEED nee eneene 82" 2B E am. 26 834am. 03 A
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Last year’s OW 2.eeeeccceecseeceeesenecenees 61° F/16° € ae
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As of 1 p.m. yesterday ..........
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High: 76°F/24°C — s NO FTTAT yar 10 Cate -...------eenne y
Low: 63° F/17°C 3 is
AccuWeather.com «
All forecasts and maps provided by
= AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.
ed
Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today's merits
highs and tonights's lows. 14/-10
~~
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49/9




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High: 83° F/28°C



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Volume: 103 No.77

GAH Ca ema Uy Ut

PLP ‘playing race card

RRITQ —s Um tovin’ it.

79F
65F

MOSTLY
oe SUNNY



FNM deputy leader
Brent Symonette
hits out over
references to UBP

@ By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE PLP is playing the “race
card” to black Bahamians
because they want to spread dis-
content among the people,
FNM deputy leader Brent
Symonette said yesterday.»

In an exclusive interview with
The Tribune, the MP for Mon-
tagu said there was no question
in his mind that the PLP is play-
ing the race card, with its con-
stant references to the United
Bahamian Party (UBP).

However, he said, the PLP’s
strategy: will fail because most
Bahamians have moved beyond
the question of race. ;

This is not the first time the
government has been accused
of using race to win support
from voters.

At the PLP national conven-
tion in November, 2005, several
references were made to the
Bahamas “going back there” if
the FNM leadership team of
Hubert Ingraham and Brent
Symonette were to be elected.

And, while not referred to by
name, Mr Symonette is gener-
ally considered to be the target
of these comments as he is the
son of former UBP premier Sir
Roland Symonette, and brother
of Speaker of the House, the
late Bobby Symonette.

During: his convention

. speech, Minister of Agriculture

and Fisheries’ Alfred Gray said:
“Fellow delegates, could you
imagine, God forbid, that they





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should win, and something were
to happen to Hubbigity, that we
would be back in the hands of
the UBP? Please don’t let me
imagine that.”

In addition, at the PLP rally
this week, Foreign Affairs Min-
ister Fred Mitchell alleged that
FNM leader Hubert Ingraham
would turn over the govern-
ment to ‘the UBP heir’, Brent
Symonette, if Mr Ingraham is
returned to government.

And Prime Minister Christie
said Mr Ingraham was brought
out of retirement by forces
“who cannot let the Progressive
Liberal Party and the progres-

sive forces,” control the

Bahamas.

However, according to Mr
Symonette: “The Bahamas of
2007 has developed way beyond
the question of the race card
that the PLP is trying to use ina
very low-down way to hold on
to power.”

Mr Symonette said that Mr

Mitchell’s attack on him showed
that he is a “desperate man”
who would do anything to win
his seat.

“T’ve said on numerous occa-
sions that I have no intention
whatsoever to take over or oust
Mr Hubert Ingraham. Hubert
Ingraham is my leader, he is the
FNM leader, he is Tommy
Turnquest’s leader and I sup-
port him 100 per cent,”
explained Mr Symonette.

He said ‘there are some white
Bahamians who are’ “very

SEE page 14




d i ode

ae Colina General
genet Wiseienice Agirgiy ofan




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= /n Lhe Tribune

Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION



bee RESTS

HURSDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2007
” ‘ a ‘it
HET ete ht

g x ‘|
Religion section



a





PRICE — 75¢

INSIDE TODAY

ad



i?



@ RICHARD ROBELLO, one of the finalists of a Trimspa contest, came all the way from Hawaii this week to put flow-
ers at the gates of Horizons. Mr Robello had lost 40 pounds and was eager to meet with “the person who inspired him to

do so.” Anna Nicole Smith, the spokesperson for Trimspa, died earlier this month.
(Photo: Ana Bianca Marin)



PM: Ingraham not

the only person to |

advise Deputy PM

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter

FORMER Prime Minister :
Hubert Ingraham should not :
flatter himself into thinking that :
he was the only person invited to }
advise Cynthia Pratt during :
Prime Minister Perry Christie’s ;

illness, the country’s leader said

~ yesterday.
Mr Christie, who was respond-_
ing to remarks by the FNM }

ham had showed just how
incredibly “naive and arrogant” ;

he is.

that I invited to be of assistance

to Cynthia ‘Mother’ Pratt when :

she served as acting prime min- }
: I By KARIN HERIG

Tribune Staff Reporter

A MONTH after the US’s new passport rule
came into effect there still has been no notification
by authorities about the end of the flexible imple-

ister,” Mr Christie said.

“There were no less than two }
dozen other persons in our com- }
munity of whom I made the :
same ' request, including retired }
politicians on both sides of the :
political divide, business leaders :
and, of course, spiritual figures. ;

SEE page 14



Calories .........320
Total Fat.........6.0g



“Surely Mr Ingraham does not
think that he was the only person:

Authorities yet to give notification on passport rule

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Attorney General:
rally was mainly
a family reunion

: By KARIN HERIG

Tribune Staff Reporter

SEE page 14

mentation.

Observers are now saying that no news on the

“Mr Ingraham, therefore, } Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative (WHTI)

should. not flatter himself into :

“is good news.”

: The US Embassy stated yesterday that Customs
: and Board Protection previously indicated to all

Carbs........479
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PrOteIM eoseresereer B4G

iti

te



Morton Salt
workers go
on strike

RESPONDING to criti- | @ By ALISON LOWE

: cism that the PLP engaged : |
in name-calling rather than ;
speaking to the country’s pri- :

bistne ation ontohcineres : Wellington Francis told reporters
continue to be her party’s }
: focus, but that the event in :
leader at a mass rally on R M } Pinewood Park was mainly a }
Bailey Park, said that Mr Ingra- “family reunion,” i

- The aim of the rally, she :

management.

SEE page 14

Bomb scare
Closes COB

THE College of the Bahamas

: was closed yesterday as a bomb
? scare caused school officials to
:, evacuate the premises.
Tribune Staff Reporter :
: around 3.50pm they were told that
EIGHTY to 90 Morton Salt :
;. ; Workers went on strike yester-
mary concerns at Tuesday's : gay morning in Inagua after :
: Tally, Attorney General : being subject to what they felt:
i Allyson Maynard-Gibson i
i said that those issues will

Security officials said that

there was an individual walking
around the campus with
explosives, targeting two lectur-
ers.

COB’s Director of Security

: that the appropriate agencies were

: ii i lled to the scene
Mr Obie Ferguson, legal ; immediately ca = a
; counsel for the group, said they : ee BS ere
; were frustrated after being told i § :

in an early morning meeting i firmed that no explosive devices

: were found and that classes were
‘ } now back in session.

However, school officials con-

airlines that they will provide “ample notice before

moving to more rigorous enforcement of the new
» documentation requirements.”
“That notification has not yet been given.”
When the airlines receive that notification, it is
expected that a 30-day period will be given until

the WHTI is strictly enforced.

US Ambassador John Rood and Tourism Min-
ister Obie Wilchcombe earlier this month held a

joint press conference emphasising that the WHTI



SEE page 14








Peek 2 es oe ee
fA AE EL EI INL LISI OILS IEE LIL AE IES A Ew ee ee eee ee ge ee ee ey ee

PAGE 2, THURSDAY, FEBRUAN)

SSS LE Ld HU





.



PRG Sa ata aw

Mackey St. 393-5684 | Thompson Blvd 328-1164 |

Town, over Rev CB Moss (right)
m@ By BRENT DEAN

DR Bernard Nottage will be
the PLP candidate for the Bain
and Grant’s Town constituen-
cy according to his supporters —
who waved placards and wore t-
shirts bearing his image at the
PLP rally on Tuesday.

Dr Nottage’s supporters
claim he and not Rev C B Moss
will be representing the party
for the constituency in the
upcoming general election.

The supporters stated that the
shits and posters they wore, dis-
playing him as the PLP candi-
date for Bain and Grant’s
Town, were printed and dis-
tributed to constituents only

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Tel 356-2917.
Harbour Bay Shoppin el: = hy de
Center Tel: ¥93-3882 © Mall at Marathon
& Marathon Mall 394-5180



| Nottage rumoured |

as PLP candidate |
to replace Robetts |

ies

8 BERNARD Nottage (left) has been touted as the next candidate for Bain and Grant’s

within the last few days.

Commentators suggest that
the public display at the PLP
rally in the Pinewood con-
stituency indicates that Dr
Nottage has received the par-
ty nomination, and all that he
awaits. is the official
announcement of this fact
from the PM when he decides
to formally announce his slate
of candidates.

The decision to give Dr
Nottage this nomination may
finally end the hopes of Rev
CB Moss to represent the
constituency under the PLP
banner.

Rev Moss had expected to
receive the PLP’s nomination
for the area after the current
representative, Bradley
Roberts announced that he
would step down halfway
through the PLP’s current
term in office.

At a thanksgiving service
for Rev Moss in August 2002,
Mr Roberts told those attend-

Are We

r R )
\ a io

Center Tel:

RadioShack
Harbour Bay Shoppi
93-3682 ©



ing: “As my days wind down
as representative for the Bain
and Grant’s Town con-
stituencies, it is my hope that
the people will welcome Rev
CB Moss as my recommen-
dation to replace me.”

However, Mr Roberts sub-
sequently decided to continue
on in office for the full length
of the PLP’s mandate. He
stated that the PM requested
him to continue to serve on as
a minister, because he was
too valuable for the govern-
ment to lose.

In response to Mr Roberts’ .

decision to continue on as a
member of parliament, Rev
Moss recently stated:

“There is no need for me
to agree to a new deal when
the old deal is still in effect.
Because a contract is delayed
does not mean it is can-
celled.”

Rev Moss was unavailable
for comment up to press time
yesterday. ;

& Marathon Mall









only used in American Eng-
; lish. ;

AN ao
ae



THE TRIBUNE



In brief

Boat crew
charged with
smuggling
cocaine

A HAITIAN-AMERI-

CAN boat captain and nine
other Haitian crewmembers

have been charged in connec-

tion with the discovery of
almost $1 million worth of

illegal drugs at Lucayan Har-

bour.

Arraigned were captain
Ray Francis, 47, of Miami
Gardens, Florida, along with
Edmond Cylien, 46, Juan
Mendoza, 40, Wislet Cadet,
31, Harold Jean, 43, Telina
Excellent, 47, Eddie

Matthew, 43, Vilmar Zila, 66,

Jacques Cothiere, 35, and

Jean Lubin, 57, all of Haiti.

It is alleged that the group

of the Haitians were found in
possession of 30kg of cocaine

— with an estimated street

value of $900,000 — onboard a

freighter that was docked at
Lucayan Harbour.

The accused Haitian
nationals pleaded not guilty
to the charges of possession
of dangerous drugs with
intent to supply, conspiracy
to possess dangerous drugs
and conspiracy to import
dangerous drugs.

Magistrate Carolita Bethel

remanded the group to cus-
tody at Her Majesty’s Fox
Hill Prison until February 27
when they will return to
court for a bail hearing. The
10 defendants were not rep-
resented by legal counsel.

Paedophile,
not pedophile

SOME readers complained

yesterday that the word ‘pae-
: dophile’ in our Page One

: headline was misspelt. Not

: SO

Paedophile is the correct

English spelling of the word
: meaning ‘child molester’.

The spelling ‘pedophile’ is











NY

i uy
us ik



East St. North
Tel: 356-2217
Mall at Marathon
394-5180



ED:


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From Miami Herald Wire Services

Liverpool came from
behind to win 2-1 at defending
champion Barcelona on
Wednesday while runaway
Italian leader Inter Milan was
held to a 2-2 draw by another
Spanish club, Valencia, in the
European Champions League.

Jose Mourinho’s Chelsea
team held his former club, FC
Porto, to a 1-1 draw, and Lyon
— on course for a sixth con-
secutive French league title —
was held to a 0-0 tie at AS
Roma.

In a matchup of the past
two winners of European soc-
cer’s most prestigious compe-
tition, Craig Bellamy scored
one goal and set up the second
for John Arne Riise at Barce-
lona’s Camp Nou after Deco
had given the home team a
14th-minute lead.

The goals for Bellamy and
Riise came less than a week
after reports that the Welsh

‘striker hit the Norwegian

defender on the legs with a

golf club after a drinking binge
at a Portuguese hotel.

Barcelona went ahead after
some trademark footwork by
Ronaldinho released Gian-
luca Zambrotta down the
left. The Italian raced past a
defender and crossed from the
left for Deco to arrive
unmarked and head inside the
far post.

Bellamy equalized two min-
utes before halftime when Liv-
erpool earned a free kick and
the Welsh striker eluded his
markers to head Steve Fin-
nan’s cross goalwar: ial
keeper Victor Valdes didn't
stop it until it had crossed the
line, then fumbled it away: and
Dirk Kuyt drilled the loose
ball into the net with the offi-
cials already signalling a goal
for Bellamy’s effort.

Bellamy celebrated his goal

with an imaginary golf swing. *
Kuyt missed a close-ranget

header in the 68th after Valdes
was penalized for handling

SPORTS ROUNDUP



INTERNATIONAL EDITION



SOCCER

Liverpool outlasts Barcelona

MUTSU KAWAMORI/AP
WAY TO GO, MAN: Liverpool’s
Craig Bellamy, right, gets a
hand from teammate Dirk
Kuyt after Bellamy’s goal.

what the referee ruled as a
backpass.

At the other end, Liverpool
goalkeeper Pepe Reina
blocked a shot from Javier
Saviola and Steve Finnan
deflected Lionel Messi’s
follow-up over the bar.

Liverpool moved ahead in
the 74th when Valdes blocked
a close-range shot from Kuyt
and, as the rebound dropped
loose, Bellamy played a side-
ways pass to Riise, who ham-
mered it into the roof of the
net with his weaker right foot.

Mourinho returned to the
club he guided to the Champi-
ons League title two seasons
ago. He also led the Portu-
guese side to the UEFA Cup
and two d tic league titles.

Raul Meireles volleyed

Porto ahead in the 12th minute -

while Chelsea captain John
Terry was off the field getting
treatment for a calf-muscle
injury. Terry will miss the
League Cup final against Arse-
nal. The center back, who

“reé¢ently returned from a long
“spell out after back surgery
followed by the calf-muscle.

problem, lasted only U1 min-

Peyton takes
a cut to save
Colts money

From Miami Herald Wire Services

Peyton Manning has
'-agreed to restructure his con-
tract with the Indianapolis
Colts to save the team nearly
$8 million in salary-cap space.

The Super Bowl MVP was
to receive a $10 million roster
bonus during the offseason but
by converting the money into
a regular signing bonus, the
Colts can prorate that amount
over the remaining four years
of his deal. That saves India-
napolis space under the cap,
which is $109 million.

The restructuring was dis-
closed to The Associated
Press on Wednesday by a per-
son familiar with the negotia-
tions who spoke on condition
of anonymity because the deal
had not yet been signed.

Colts spokesman Craig
Kelley said the team had no
comment.

Manning signed a $98 mil-
lion contract in March 2004,
the season after he shared the
league’s MVP award with
Steve McNair. He followed
that with a record-setting 2004
season in which he threw 49
touchdown passes and earned
his second consecutive league
MVP award.

In 2005, Manning guided
the Colts to a 13-0 record and
the AFC’s No. 1 seed before
losing in the divisional round
of the playoffs to eventual
Super Bowl champion Pitts-
burgh.

But this season, Manning
showed more patience in
throwing short and relying on
his ground game, using that
combination to bring the Colts
their first Super Bowl title
since moving to Indianapolis



in 1984.

e@ Elsewhere: Colts run-
ning back Dominic Rhodes’
initial court appearance on a
drunken driving charge was
postponed to Monday after
prosecutors did not receive
paperwork from the arresting
officer.

e Around the league:
Wide receiver Jerry Porter is
ready for a new start with the
Oakland Raiders. Aiter a diffi-
cult 2006 season when he
clashed with coach Art Shell
and rarely got on the field,
Porter announced he is chang-
ing his uniform number from
84 to 81 in order to put last
season behind him and get off
on the right foot with new
coach Lane Kiffin. .. . Defen-
sive tackle Vonnie Holliday
signed a four-year, $20 million
contract to stay with the
Miami Dolphins. The deal
includes a signing bonus of
nearly $7 million. ... Buffalo
Bills cornerback Terrence
McGee filed a lawsuit Tues-
day accusing his former finan-
cial adviser of funneling more
than $1 million into unautho-
rized investments... . Cincin-
nati Bengals linebacker Odell
Thurman pleaded no contest
to driving drunk last Septem-
ber and said he was undergo-
ing treatment for alcohol
abuse. ... The New York Jets
released veteran running back
Kevan Barlow after the least-
productive season of Barlow’s
career. He ran for a career-low
370 yards — third on the team
— and averaged just 2.8 yards
per carry. Also, the Jets
released offensive lineman
Trey Teague, re-signed cor-
nerback Hank Poteat, and

utes against Porto before dam-

aging ankle ligaments.
Andriy Shevchenko

equalized four minutes later

when he took a pass from.

Arjen Robben and raced
clear of the Porto defense to
score.

Inter led twice at home
before Valencia rallied. Este-
ban Cambiasso scored in the
29th minute, but David Villa
equalized in the 64th. Brazilian
Maicon restored the lead in
the 76th, but David Silva
earned a valuable draw with a
second equalizer with three
minutes remaining.

Lyon’s Brazilian midfielder
Juninho hit the post off a
deflected shot in the eighth
minute in Rome and English
referee Mike Riley handed out
11 yellow cards, eight of them
to AS Roma.

The second legs are sched-
uled in two weeks.

ELSEWHERE

e France: UEFA opened
an investigation into the trou-
ble on and off the field during
Lille’s Champions League loss
to Manchester United.

Man United fans said they
were crushed against high
fences at Tuesday’s game, and
manager Alex Ferguson was
furious that Lille’s coaching
staff waved players off the
field after Ryan Giggs scored
in the 1-0 victory.

“UEFA has officially
opened an investigation into
events at the UEFA Champi-
ons League first knockout
round first-leg match,” UEFA
said.

UEFA will look at whether
Lille breached safety and secu-
rity instructions, and alleged
improper conduct of both sets
of fans. The matter will be dis-
cussed at the UEFA Control
and Disciplinary Body’s next
meeting on March 22.

UEFA, led by former
France great Michel Platini,
has shown a hard line on secu-

“SOCCER RIF PRO FOOTBALL zi ETC.

__MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD



rity and safety issues. The gov-
erning body of European soc-
cer recently threw Feyenoord
out of the UEFA Cup for
crowd disturbances.

UEFA also said it would
review Giggs’ 83rd-minute
goal, which was taken before
the referee whistled play to
restart and led to the near
walk-off.'Fans threw objects
onto the field after Giggs’ goal.

The match was played at

‘tthe Stade Felix-Bollaert in

Lens — one of the stadiums
used for the 1998 World Cup
— because Lille’s stadium
doesn’t meet UEFA standards.
' @ England: David Beck-
ham’s recent performances
for Real Madrid have
improved his chances of a
recall to the England team.
The former captain was
dropped by England coach

Steve McClaren after last:

year’s World Cup. However,
he has played well since being
recalled to the Madrid team
and set up all three goals in
Tuesday’s 3-2 Champions
League victory over Bayern
Munich.

e Spain: Real Madrid will
reportedly protest to UEFA
over two insulting gestures

made by Bayern Munich mid- .

fielder Mark van Bommel
after he scored in the teams’
Champions League game.

Madrid will send a report to
the European body’s disciplin-
ary committee today, accord-
ing to sports daily Marca,
which added that the Spanish
club considered Tuesday’s
actions “an intolerable provo-
cation.”

Van Bommel, a former
player with Madrid’s archrival

FC Barcelona, volleyed Bay-

ern’s late second goal in a 3-2
defeat at Madrid’s Santiago
Bernabeu Stadium. The 29-
year-old apologized, but said
he had been insulted by a
Madrid player about his Bar-
celona connections. He didn’t
name the player.



CHRIS O'MEARA/AP

PASSING THE BUCKS: Colts quarterback Peyton Manning
will save the team almost $8 million in salary-cap space.

signed safety Raymond Ven-
trone to a reserve-future con-
tract. Meanwhile, Jets coach
Eric Mangini finalized his
staff for next season, with for-
mer New England receivers
coach Brian Daboll and for-
mer Miami defensive-line
coach Dan Quinn among the
additions. Daboll joins the Jets
as their quarterbacks coach
after seven seasons with the
Patriots. Quinn spent the past
two years coaching the Dol-
phins defensive line and will
serve in the same capacity for
the Jets. The Jets also hired
Mike Macintyre as their sec-
ondary coach, Sal Alosi as
their strength and condition-
ing coach, and Jerome Hen-
derson as assistant secondary
coach. Former North
Dakota State assistant Todd
Wash was hired as defensive-
quality-control coach for the
Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

ETC.

e College football: South
Carolina quarterback recruit
Stephen Garcia was sus-
pended indefinitely from par-
ticipating in team activities
less than a week after he was
arrested and charged with
drunkenness.

e Tennis: France’s Julien

Benneteau advanced to the

second round of the Regions.

Morgan Keegan Champion-
ships in Memphis, Tenn.,
along with American teenager
Sam Querrey. The seventh-
seeded Benneteau, who upset
Andy Roddick in last year’s
ATP Tour event, defeated
South Korea’s Hyung-Taik
Lee 7-5, 6-3. Benneteau was a
qualifier last year when he
eliminated Roddick in the
quarterfinals. Querrey had 17
aces in his 6-3, 6-2 victory over
Croatia’s Ivo Karlovic.

Radek Stepanek beat fellow
Czech Jan Hernych 6-2, 7-5 to
open the defense of his ABN
Amro title in Rotterdam,
Netherlands. Nicolas
Devilder upset second-
seeded Juan Carlos Ferrero
1-6, 7-6 (7-2), 6-0 in the Copa
Telmex round-robin event in
Buenos Aires, Argentina. ...
Defending champion Justine
Henin-Hardenne survived a
major scare from 16-year-old
qualifier Tamira Paszek
before advancing to the Dubai
Women’s Open quarterfinals
with a 4-6, 7-5, 6-1 victory. ...
No. 4 seed Emilie Loit beat
two-time champion Paola
Suarez 6-4, 4-6, 6-3 in the sec-
ond round of the Copa Colsan-
itas in Bogota, Colombia.



PEOPLE IN SPORTS





AP PHOTO/KYODO NEWS

~ OVERLOOKING THE CITY

Japan’s Daito Takahashi soars amid the backdrop of
Sapporo, Japan, in Tuesday’s practice session for the
Nordic World Ski Championships, which begin today.

Soccer’s higher calling

Italian soccer has not been a pious spectacle of late, with
riots and scandals marring a game that is practically a religion

there.

Sports officials now hope clergymen from 50 nations can
bring back faith to soccer as they take to the field for the first
time in a tournament for priests and seminarians that will

begin Saturday.

Catholic institutes have entered 16 teams in the Clericus
Cup, fielding 311 athletes from countries including the United
States, Brazil, Papua New Guinea and Rwanda.

“Tt’s an intelligent initiative which helps give a positive

‘ image to sport and especially to soccer,” Italian Olympic

Committee president Gianni Petrucci said at a presentation

of the event.

Even as Italy’s national team was making its successful run
for the World Cup last summer, club soccer at home was rav-; |
aged by a match-fixing scandal that. led to sanctions against

several top teams.

Earlier this month, rioting at a game in Sicily caused the

death of a policeman.

The matches will last one hour and rules will differ from
professional club soccer. Teams will be allowed one timeout,
and the referee will brandish a blue card, which will send off
errant players for a five-minute suspension.

“I expect [the tournament] to create a friendly relationship
among the players and the teams,” said the Rev. Emil Martin
of Cameroon, who plays with the tear: of the Pontifical
Urban College. “I hope each one can learn to win but also to
lose, because not everybody knows how to lose.”

He’s too slap-happy

A University of Souther