Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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A

PAGE 2, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





The Prime Minister brought
_ troubles down on himself |

T is not unusual in politics to

see a government in a state of
meltdown. When it happens, all the
usual clichés and adages come to
mind: when it rains it pours; those
whom the gods would destroy they
first make mad; troubles come not in
singles but in battalions. —

In the United States the adminis-
tration of a previously cocky George
Bush is facing a sea of troubles and in
Britain the shine has worn off the
leadership of Prime Minister Tony
Blair.

In some people, as Oliver Wendell
Holmes put it, “Trouble creates a
capacity to handle it.” Others just go
to pieces and blame everybody in
sight for their misery,

It is true that in the political arena
as it is in life that good people often
suffer from the schemes, snares and -
slanders of opponents. It is also true

- that many political troubles are self-

inflicted, but that does not stop the
victims of self-mutilation from blam-
ing others.

In Shakespeare’s play, Julius Cae-
sar, Cassius addresses Brutus solicit-
ing his support to stop Caesar and
his dictatorial designs on Rome. Says
Cassius: “ ...Men are at some time
masters of their fates: The fault, dear
Brutus, is not in our stars, but in our-
selves, that we are underlings.”

It is true that Cassius was soliciting
the conflicted Brutus to cause the ulti-
mate trouble for Caesar - putting an
end to his life. But the point still holds:
most of our troubles in life come as a
result of our own fault.

hat is certainly the case with

Prime Minister Christie as his

beleaguered government falls apart. It

is all of their own making and that is

clear to the whole country, including
PLP supporters.

But that does not stop Mr Christie

from flailing about hysterically, con-

juring up conspiracies, threatening his
opponents and blaming everyone but
his colleagues and himself for their
troubles. ae ake Mi Rie Setqenieda
From. the very beginning of his
administration, Mr Christie seemed,
to have adopted the attitude that if he
left everything alone then everything
would sort itself out, that if he allowed
his ministers and other colleagues to
do as they liked, they would gra-.
ciously respond by doing the right





things.

The case of the Korean fishing
boats was an early indication of how
things would fall apart. A fleet of fish-
ing boats invaded the Bahamas to
catch fish for export, presumably to
Korea. Included in the fleet was a

‘mother ship with processing equip-

ment, and they were all crewed by
Koreans.

There were so many things wrong
with this scheme that it is difficult to
understand who could have conceived
it and how it got so far. The Bahami-
ans responsible - even those who were
nota part of the administration -

should have known that such a thing ..

could not, would not, be allowed.
More so, members of the govern-

ment ministers and backbenchers —

and all the civil servants involved

should have known better. But work

permits were obtained for the Kore-
ans and the boats were allowed into
the country. Obviously someone high
up knew about it.

It was only when the plot was dis-



Among Mr Christie’s colleagues when
the PLP came to office were some peo-
ple with the same corrupt and vindic-
tive inclinations of the old PLP and
some who never really understood
how our system of government is sup-

posed to operate.



ALL YOUR DEC

s On The Island”



Donald's



Up to this day Mr Christie has not
given the Bahamian people satisfacto-
ry answers to the many questions
which remain outstanding with
regard to the Korean fishing boats
scandal. And that has been the hall-
mark of his administration.



covered and the Opposition and oth-
ers started to protest that the boats
left the country, or were otherwise
disposed of, and the Korean crew
also left.

ut up to this day Mr Christie

has not given the Bahamian
people satisfactory answers to the
many questions which remain out-
standing with regard to this scandal.
And that has been the hallmark of
his administration.

Other scandals and crises followed
in much the same pattern and with
much the same result, including the
Junkanoo bleachers, the fight in the

When he should
have spoken out,
he was silent;
when he should
have acted, he
was paralysed;
and when he
should have



revealed, he

covered up.



Cabinet Room and the Anna Nicole
Smith affair, to name a few.

Among Mr Christie’s colleagues
when the PLP came to office were
some people with the same corrupt
and vindictive inclinations of the old
PLP and some who never really
understood how our system of gov-
ernment is supposed to operate.

But there had never been any hint
of corruption about Mr Christie and
certainly he was well-educated in the
ways of our parliamentary democracy
and cabinet government.

_ He was familiar with all the princi--
ples and conventions of the system

and he enjoyed the goodwill of the
people, including many in the oppo-
sition. So the country looked to him to
regulate the deviant and educate the
ignorant.

Mr Christie was able to articulate,
sometimes eloquently, all these things.
Yet he failed; and that failure was
neither due to his political opponents
nor to a hostile media nor even so

MONDAY - THURSDA'
FRIDAY - SATURD

BILLY’S DREAM
STILL ALIVE

Furnitu
And Appliance Cent

much to his wayward colleagues.
When he should have spoken out,
he was silent; when he should have

acted, he was paralysed; and when he’
should have revealed, he covered up. |

It was due to something lacking in
him: either the will or the strength or
the courage to do what he should
have done. That is why we are wit-
nessing this meltdown - like an ice
sculpture in the noonday sun.

* Ok O*

ADVICE FOR RADIO

eaders of this column may

recall that a few months
back I was the victim of a chronic
radio talk show caller and serial slan-
derer. Last week he was at it again
with other people as his intended vic-
tims. :

As the election season heats up,
this individual and others like him
will no doubt be quite busy.

So this is a bit of advice for the pro-
prietors and hosts of radio talk shows
who have a responsibility to protect
the public from slander and indecent
comment on the airwaves.

They cannot expect members of the
public who are attacked by slanderers
to be satisfied with just an apology,
and they leave themselves open to
costly legal remedy.

Talk show hosts and the proprietors

have the same responsibility to guard.

against slander as the editors and pub-
lishers of the print media have to
guard against libel. They know exact-
ly who the serial slanderers are and
the public knows as well.

The hosts should cut them off to
avoid this high risk and the propri-
etors should make sure that mecha-
nisms are in place to protect the pub-
lic.

‘That is not too difficult to do, and it
is better that the proprietors should
do it before people start making
demands on their legislators. It would
be a pity if this wonderful venue for
democratic debate should have to be
restricted because of the nastiness of
a few.

As for the serial slanderers them-
selves, they may feel that because of
their circumstances they are immune
from legal action for redress by their
victims. They are wrong.

sirarthurfoulkes@hotmail.com
www.bahamapundit.typepad.com

Share
your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.







In brief

Cuba trains
Panamanians
in medical
hypnosis

m@ HAVANA



CUBA, whose doctors have
experimented with dozens of
alternative treatments, is train-
ing Panamanian therapists in
the medical use of hypnosis, the
government news agency AIN
reported Monday, according to
Associated Press.

The agency said that 80 Pana-
manians graduated from cours-
es held in the Central Ameri-
can country under a program
with Cuba’s Higher Institute of
Medical Sciences, based in the
eastern city of Santiago. :

Cuba’s best-known
researcher in the field, Alberto
Cobian, has said that hypnosis
can be useful in treating stress,
bronchial asthma, sexual dys-
function and some types of skin
diseases, as well as offering
some anesthetic effects, the
agency reported.

An economic collapse in the
early 1990s created dire short-
ages of many conventional med-
icines in Cuba, prompting wide-
spread research into and use of
alternative treatments such as
herbal medicines and acupunc-
ture.

Cuba also has used its exten-
sive medical system as a bridge
of cooperation with other coun-
tries, offering training and send-
ing tens of thousands of its own

doctors abroad on medical mis-

sions.

Government
in Cuba to
open offices
for longer

@ HAVANA

CUBAN officials are tackling
problems such as child care,

poor lighting and insufficient

transportation for workers so
they can keep some government
offices open later, the Commu-
nist labour newspaper report-

ed Monday, according to Asso- ~~~

ciated Press.

The goal is to have offices
open at times when people can
use them before or after their
own eight-hour workdays, tak-
ing advantage of an expanding
economy. .

Trabajadores, published by
Cuba’s Communist Party labor
federation, reported that some
notaries and civil registries in
Havana are already working

until 8pm and officials hope to .

expand hours at least some days
of the week at child care cen-
tres, primary schools, hair
dressers and workshops.

The effort is linked to a gov-
ernment campaign for greater
discipline among workers, with
a crackdown on absenteeism,
overlong lunch breaks, sloppy
work and theft.

Officials were working to.

overcome problems such as
insufficient lighting and trans-
portation at night while supply-
ing meals and child care at dif-
ferent times for workers, Tra-
bajadores reported.

The communist government
has been gradually expanding
services as its economy recovers
from the shortages of the early
1990s, caused by the loss of
Soviet bloc aid and trade that
were once crucial.

RARE Re
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control



Uy rae Cy
Py EeALY]



~

pees

$s
vy
wy
ve

rin
wv



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007, PAGE 3



Woman charged
with ‘intentional
libel’ in connection
with publishing of
Internet images

A WOMAN was
arraigned in Magistrate’s
Court yesterday charged
with “intentional libel” in
connection with the pub-
lishing of images of
another woman on the
Internet.

Rochelle Dean, 25, of
Forbes Street appeared in
court six on Parliament
Street to answer the
charge.

It was alleged that
sometime between Tues-
day, October 17 and
Monday, October 23,
while at New Providence,
Dean intentionally and
unlawfully published
images of a woman via e-
mail without her consent,
to defame and cause
damage to the woman’s
character.

Dean pleaded not
guilty to the charge and
was granted bail in the
sum of $7,000.

The case was
adjourned to May 14.

e A man was sen-
tenced to life in prison
yesterday for the murder
of two Austrian tourists
at a Bimini resort in July
2005.

Frederick Cardinal
Francis, 24, appeared in
Supreme Court yesterday
before Justice Stephen
Isaacs for a sentencing
hearing.

He was represented by
attorney Carlson Shur-
land. Prosecuting was
director of public prose-
cutions Bernard Turner.

In August 2006, a
Freeport jury found Fran-
cis guilty of the murders
of the Austrian visitors.

Francis had been
charged back in July 2005
with the murders of
Bernhard von Bolzano
and Barbara Frelln von
Perfall.

The bodies of 35-year-
old Bolzano and Perfall,
32, were discovered in
their room at the
Anchorage Blue Water
Resort and Marina at
Alice Town Bimini on
Saturday July 23, 2005.

They were expected to
leave the island the day
they were found. A maid
- reportedly discovered the
bodies when she went to
clean the room.

Bolzano was said to
have been face down on
the floor, bound and
gagged, with a shotgun
wound in his back.

Perfall was found on
one of two beds with a
gun shot wound in the
stomach and a wound in
her head. Francis was
also sentenced yesterday
to 14 years in prison for
the rape of Baroness Per-
fall.

Police seize
drugs worth
almost $im

GRAND Bahama Police
seized 70 pounds of cocaine
worth almost $1 million and
arrested 10 persons, including
a Haitian boat captain and
nine crew members on board a
freighter at Luoayan Harbour
on Saturday.

_ Superintendent of Police
Basil Rahming said the 140-
foot freighter vessel docked at
Bradford Marine Shipyard
around at 9pm on Friday.

He said a team of drug inter-
diction officers proceeded to
Bradford Marine around 8am
the next day and boarded the
vessel, the ‘MV Caribbean
Dolphin,’ as it was suspected
that illegal drug trafficking was
taking place onboard.

During a search of the ves-
sel, officers discovered and
seized 30 taped packages con-
taining a substance they sus-
pected of being cocaine.

As a result, the captain, a
Haitian national who lives in
Miami, Florida and crew,
which consisted of eight men
and one woman, were arrested
and taken into custody.

The 10 suspects and the
drugs, which have an estimated
street value of $900,000 were
flown to New Providence
aboard an OP-BAT helicopter.

SHANE GIBSON’S resigna-
tion was hailed as The Tribune’s
“Watergate” yesterday as the
Anna Nicole Smith affair con-
tinued to rock the Bahamas.

Attorney Fred Smith said the
newspaper’s tenacity helped to
keep politicians and govern-
ment officials accountable.
“And it helps to develop the
democracy that we all aspire to
here,” he added.

Mr Gibson stepped down as
immigration minister on Sun-
day almost a week after The
Tribune published photographs
of him and Anna Nicole in close
embrace in her bedroom at her
Eastern Road home.

The pictures caused a furore
and The Tribune’s front page
was reproduced on leading TV
stations and in major newspa-
pers all over the world.

Mr Smith said: “Newspapers
such as The Tribune are the
fourth estate. Unless it is a ques-
tion of national security, noth-
ing should be kept from the
public.”

Mr Smith’s comments came
as the public responded to Mr
Gibson’s resignation, which was
announced in spite of his claims
that he had done nothing
wrong.

He said he was going for the
sake of his family, but would
seek vindication.

But Mr Smith said: “I consid-



B@ ATTORNEY Fred Smith

er this The Tribune’s Watergate
story.”

He was referring to The
Washington Post’s expose of
the Watergate scandal in 1973
when President Richard Nixon
was forced to resign.

Earlier, Mr Smith said politics
was all about: perception.
“Whether Mr Gibson did or did
not do anything wrong, he was
perceived to have acted improp-
erly.

“I congratulate him for his
resignation. This is an opportu-
nity for the Bahamas to recon-
sider the Immigration Act, to
reform and depoliticise our

fered “terrible” exposure over
Anna Nicole Smith, and had
rekindled the kind of interna-
tional publicity that suggested
it was a nation for sale.

Attorney: Gibson resignation
is [he Tribune's ‘Watergate’

“We need to clean up our act.
That is what the world is tellin
us.” .
He said The Tribune had
to be congratulated for dogged-





@ SHANE GIBSON

immigration laws and take them
out of the hands of politicians.”

He was referring to Mr Gib-
son’s controversial decision to
fast-track Ms Smith’s residen-
cy permit last summer with the
comment: “I would have done it
in a day if I could.”

Mr Smith said: “We should
have an independent immigra-
tion board that is not subject to
political manipulation and cor-
ruption.”

For decades, he added, the
UBP and PLP had used immi-
gration as a tool of oppression
against foreigners and Bahami-
ans.

He said the Bahamas had suf-

Tennyson Wells: Gibson did ‘honourable thing’

@ By BRENT DEAN

FORMER attorney general
Tennyson Wells said that Shane
Gibson did “the honourable
thing” in resigning as a member
of the Cabinet on Sunday.

In an interview with The Tri-
bune, Mr Wells stated that he
does think that Mr Gibson made
some errors in judgement
regarding to the Anna Nicole
Smith scandal. .

However, Mr Wells said he
believes Mr Gibson’s actions
probably did not amount to offi-
cial wrongdoing.

Mr Wells further asserted that
the national political process
would be improved if represen-
tatives of all political parties

would step down in the face of major scan-

dals.

He said: “If all of political parties would do
that with their people, we would have a much
better system. The country would be much
better off. And, when Hubert Ingraham

decides that that is what he will

of the fellas he is now running — who have
been compromised in office — then we could all

talk.”
During the FNM’s 10 years in

allegations were made against members such as
Tommy Turnquest and Dion Foulkes, but
these men did not step down. Current deputy



aN

@ FORMER Attorney
General Tennyson Wells

parties in his

leader of the FNM Brent
Symonette did resign from the
Airport Authority in the face of
allegations that he directed con-
tracts to companies he held an
ownership stake in.

Mr Wells also stated that he
is very confident about his
chances of retain the Bamboo
Town seat. In the last election,
Mr Wells was not opposed by

“the PLP and won the seat by

more than 1,000 votes.

When asked if he thought the
governing party will oppose him
in the election, Mr Wells stated
that the PLP are campaigning in
the constituency, however, he
has heard that internal polls done
by the PLP indicate that he can-
not be beaten by either of the
constituency.

In such situations, parties often divert their

resources to

do with some

sition, Huber

more competitive seats in what

may be a close election.

Despite being an independent, Mr Wells and
the retiring member for the St Margaret con-
stituency Pierre Dupuch have been allies of
the PLP in criticising the leader of the oppo-

t Ingraham.

Mr Wells further stated that he would not

office, public
Yet, he did

publicly endorse either party in the election.

assert that he regards Mr Christie

as a better choice for the position of prime
minister, compared to Mr Ingraham.

— Call for Shane
Gibson to resign
from parliament

A CALL went out yesterday
for Shane Gibson to resign from
parliament altogether and nev-
er again seek to represent the
Bahamas.

In the wake of Mr Gibson’s
resignation from the Cabinet
on Sunday, the Bahamas
Democratic Movement con-
gratulated Prime Minister
Christie for “finally having the
courage” to take control of his
government.

However, the party said it is
“sadly disappointed” that Mr
Christie allowed the country's
name to be “maligned, scan-
dalised and dragged through the
mud internationally” for a full
week before taking action.

“It is not acceptable for a
government minister to contin-
ue to arrogantly deflect respon-
sibility for his personal actions.
For Shane Gibson to say he is
resigning only because his rep-
utation and his family’s reputa-
tion have been scarred deeply is
a slap in the face to every
decent, right-thinking Bahami-
an citizen,” said the party in a
statement yesterday.

It said Mr Gibson seems to

have forgotten that the bad
press the Bahamas received in
the wake of Anna Nicole
Smith’s death was attributed to
him as a public official and not
as a private citizen.

“We do believe that Mr Gib-
son may have caused some scar-
ring to his family’s reputation
due to his inappropriate behav-
ior with Anna Nicole Smith, but
(this) should have been sec-
ondary as a cause for his resig-
nation. Thus, we firmly believe
that his resignation should be
due primarily to the Bahamian
people since his poor judgment
has potentially caused irrepara-
ble damage to the reputation of
our country,” the BDM said.

The party noted that Mr Gib-
son still fails to admit that his
relationship with Anna Nicole
Smith constituted an error in
judgment and an “obvious con-
flict of interest”.

“Moreover, in the wake of
this tragedy he continues to
boast about his past achieve-
ments while failing to admit to
his present circumstances. We
would like to remind Mr Gib-
son, your past achievements are

not on trial here, it is your
recent inappropriate behavior
with Ms Anna Nicole Smith and
the apparent nepotism and con-
flict of interest that resulted
from your former position as
minister of immigration,” the
BDM said.

“It is clear that this man does
not get it. He has brought
shame and disgrace to us as
people but he only seems to
think about his personal life
when all of his blatant errors in
this matter have taken place in
the public sphere and in his
public capacity,” it said. “There-
fore, not only should Mr Gibson
resign as a cabinet minister, he
should also resign from the hon-
ourable House of Assembly and
never again seek to represent
this country in any capacity.”

RMD aa cers
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

i ane TEC ae
eh



Mr Smith said this had been a
salutary lesson for the Bahamas.

Edition featuring photos
being auctioned on eBay

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

ly exposing “this sordid situa-
tion”.

EDITIONS of The Tribune which feature the now infamous photos
of former Immigration Minister Shane Gibson and controversial US
celebrity Anna Nicole Smith are being auctioned off on eBay as a part
of pop culture history.

Private sellers who were able to obtain a copy of the newspaper’s
February 12 edition — which sold out just a few hours after being on the
street — have put the paper up for bid for over 200 million shoppers
worldwide.

The edition is described on the popular online auction website as the
paper that “sent shockwaves through the entertainment world.”

“This issue of the paper marks a key point in the Anna Nicole
Smith story and will be a valuable collector's item and a piece of
entertainment history for years to come,” the seller states on eBay.

Although the newspaper is well read, the seller notes in his article
description, that the country has a small population and the print run
of this newspaper is correspondingly very low.

“Few copies will make their way to the entertainment memorabilia
marketplace,” the seller states. ;

The edition of the paper being auctioned features six colour photos
of the former immigration minister and Ms Smith in various stages of
embrace. ma

Some of the photos were reportedly taken inside the former Playboy
cover girl’s bedroom in the Eastern Road home ‘Horizons’ on the
occasion of her 39th birthday.

One photo shows Mr Gibson and Ms Smith relaxing by the pool
together, while another shows the former minister visiting the celebri-
ty in hospital after she had given birth to her daughter Dannielynn.

The February 12 edition of The Tribune was so hotly sought after
that, according to reports, some people were re-selling their copies for
$20 a piece in Nassau later that very day.

The paper was displayed on all the major international television net-
works and set off a storm of controversy about the appropriateness of
Mr Gibson’s friendship with Ms Smith.

The pictures were also re-printed in black and white the following day
in response to numerous requests from Tribune readers who failed to
get their hands on a copy of the February 12 paper.

Some observers are claiming’ that the photos were responsible for set-
ting in motion the chain of events that led to Mr Gibson’s resigning
from Cabinet on Sunday night.

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Telephone: (242) 362-6656, Fax: (242) 326-9953
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com



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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007 THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO. THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI |
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

The future as"
a welfare state

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972

Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

Shane Gibson makes right decision.

IN THEORY the Bahamas has a Westmin-
ster system of government.

We say it is “in theory” only because when
crunch time comes government members who
fall from grace, don’t seem to know what course
of action is expected of them. \

“In Westminster systems of parliamentary
democracy, the term ‘responsible government’
describes a system of executive government
accountability, first to the parliament and ulti-
mately to the people. This system of account-
ability is meant to ensure that the government
acts in ways that are approved by the people.”

This is a succinct description of what kind of
government the Bahamas is supposed to have —
a government in which parliamentarians are
not only accountable to the électorate for the
laws they make and their performance in rep-
resenting the concerns of their constituents, but
also for the standards they set in their public
behaviour. .

On Sunday night Labour and Immigration
Minister Shane Gibson announced his resigna-
tion from Cabinet because of a scandal that
had spun out of control, but which could have
been contained if what he did Sunday night
had been done a week earlier.

Obviously Mr Gibson did not understand
the rules of the Westminster system, nor his
own government’s Code of Ethics, because, in
trying to lessen the scandal that had engulfed
him as a result of fast-tracking Anna Nicole
Smith’s residency permit, he made the situa-
tion worse by extending their friendship to
include his family.

With his wife sitting by his side in a TV pro-
gramme in which he intended to vindicate him-
self by shifting blame to The Tribune, he made
matters worse.

He said that the inappropriate photographs of
himself in the arms of the playgirl were posed
and that the Smiths and Gibsons were just one
big family.

“Anna Nicole was my friend as much as
Jackie’s friend and my mother’s and my kids,”
he told a television audience.

In fact his mother was the baby-sitter for
Anna’s five-month-old daughter, Dannielyn;
his wife was’ Anna’s spiritual counsellor; his
father captained her newly-purchased boat back
to Nassau, and the person the foreign media
kept referring to as the “nurse” who was with
Anna in her last hours, turned out to be his
father’s female companion. It was questionable
as to whether the lady was a nurse, especially as
she had to send for the bodyguard to give CPR
to Anna’s limp body. It was, you could say —
still all in the family.

But by dragging in his family and the services
they performed for the celebrity playgirl, Mr
Gibson forgot the Code of Ethics, which says:
“Ministers must avoid using their ministerial

status or influence for the enrichment of them-
selves or their families.”
Mr Christie criticised those who, he claimed,

had included the Gibson family in the scandal, .

forgetting that it was Mr Gibson himself who
had introduced them and made them an issue.

Mr Gibson also said it was The Tribune that
had harped on the inappropriateness of a gov-
ernment minister’s unseemly poses with an out-
of-control centre-fold cover girl. Again those
who blame The Tribune must remember that
Anna Nicole was not our friend, we did not
process her residency permit in record time,
nor did we pose for suggestive photographs
with her.

It was Mr Gibson himself who had made his
close friendship with her an issue when the
question came up as to why her residency per-
mit had been “fast tracked.”

The photographs went to the heart of this
issue and showed just how close that friend-
ship was.

Despite their unseemly nature, we published
the photographs because the Bahamian peo-
ple had a right to know just where a friendship
was leading one of their ministers.

And then there was the gift of the Rolex
watch. Mr Gibson said there was no gift. There
are others who would swear that there was and
that the Rolex cost in the region of $14,000.
We were not there and so we don’t know, just as
we were not in Anna Nichole’s bedroom when
Mr Gibson is alleged to have received, on behalf
of the Bahamas Treasury, the $10,000 cheque
for her residency permit delivered by a lawyer
from Callenders law firm — another denial by
Mr Gibson. Really, it is just a matter of who you
believe.

But if this gift is true, then Mr Gibson has
once again to be reminded of the Code of
Ethics. Says the code: “Ministers should not
accept gifts that might be perceived to create an
obligation to the donor.”

In regretting Mr Gibson’s departure, Mr
Christie said:

“T want to say that a man has acted improp-
erly, a man has acted incorrectly, a man has
acted in a way that his colossal error of judg-
ment raises suspicions or whatever it is, but I
want to do it mindful of the fact that I don’t
have to take his head off his body to kill him
politically and I don’t have to kill his wife and
his children in doing so. That is not the Bahamas
I want to live in.”

In the end Mr Gibson made the right deci-

sion. If he had better understood the principles

of the government system of which he was a
part, he would have made his decision sooner,
and saved himself, his family, his political party
and this country much embarrassment.
However, in the end he landed right side up.

- For this he must be congratulated.



BAHAMAS SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS

NOTICE
www.bahamasengineers.org

THE BAHAMAS SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS
CORDIALLY INVITES YOU TO ATTEND

THE MONTHLY LUNCHEON
ON

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2007

TOPIC:

“BEC: MEETING THE BAHAMIAN
CHALLENGE IN BOTH GROWTH AND

COMPLEXITY”

GUEST SPEAKER:

Mr. Kevin Basden

General Manager

EDITOR, The Tribune.

SINCE August 2006 The
National Coalition for Health
Care Reform (Coalition) has
been attempting to obtain
meaningful data from the
Bahamas government on their
proposed National Health
Insurance scheme (NHI) to
offer constructive criticism.

When the government
started to "feel the heat" of
the public debate, Dr. BJ Not-
tage, Senator and Minister of
Health, invited the Coalition
to take the debate out of the
public domain and he would
share the information being
sought. As it turns out Dr.
Nottage effectively silenced
the Coalition and to date has
not provided the promised
information.

Bear in mind that Dr. Not-
tage and his staff at the Min-
istry of Health have been
meeting with groups all across
the country to offer a public
relations programme on how
great the NHI scheme will be,
without providing substantive

‘ data on how the plan is struc-

tured, how they arrived at
their numbers or how it will
be sustained.

They commonly refer to
this PR road show as "con-
sultation".

The Coalition agreed to the
government's “code of
silence" based on the promise
from the Minister that the
information they requested
would be provided to them.

It is dispiriting to note that
the Minister is unwilling or
unable to provide substantive
information to the Coalition
and health care professionals.

What has been provided is
a an indignant and offensive
letter frdm the Minister of
Health that still does not pro-
vide the information but chas-
tises ni¢mbers of the Coali-
tion for exercising their Con-
stitutional right to free speech.

Accompanying the Nottage
tirade of January 26, 2007 is a
copy of a letter to Dr. Robin
Roberts, Chairman of the
Coalition, dated November
14, 2006 that lists some 29
questions and comments for
the Coalition to answer but
no responses to the Coali-
tion’s questions. Quite a con-
tradiction to what many on
the Coalition envisioned. In
addition, none of the Coali-
tion members contacted have
seen this letter before Tues-
day, February 6, 2007. This is
curious indeed.

One thing that is patently
clear is that the Minister of
Health and the Government

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LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net





suffer from what Thomas
Sowell calls The Vision of the
Anointed.

Dr. Sowell of the Hoover
Institute writes:

“In the anointed we find a
whole class of supposedly
‘thinking-people’ who do
remarkably little thinking
about substance and a great
deal of verbal expression. In
order that this relatively small
group of people can believe
themselves wiser and nobler
than the common herd, we
have adopted policies which
impose heavy costs on mil-
lions of other human beings,
not only in taxes but also in
lost jobs, social disintegration,
and a loss of personal safety.
Seldom have so few cost so
much to so many.”

This will undoubtedly be
the case with the NHI scheme
as the evidence from many
other countries indicates.

The obvious deceit being
wielded by Dr. Nottage is
instructive. The Ministry of
Health team go to the press
with the most inconsequen-
tial points they wish to raise

‘about their NHI scheme, yet

the Coalition or its members
are expected to refrain from
using the media to inform
their membership and the

. general public of its views.

How immature of a gov-
ernment that boasts of taking
politics to a new level in The
Bahamas. Particularly a gov-
ernment that in opposition
said it would:

“ lead by example. The

’ Government ...will conduct

itself according to a rigid,

uncompromising code of com-' ©

plete honesty, integrity and
transparency."

So much for honesty,
integrity and transparency.

The future as a welfare
state

If there is one overriding
concern it is the role of the
government in our health care
system. While most people
accept the fact that there are
indigent people that need a
handout for health care, I dis-
agree entirely with the man-
date that the minority of
Bahamians who object to
their involvement must be
subjugated to the will of the
majority in this case.

In fact, I can't think of
many areas where the will of
the majority should be forced
on the minority unless some-
one has committed a crime
against another person or
their property.

' When a government
assumes responsibility for the
behaviour and actions of the
majority of a population it

interpersonal skills

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effectively deprives them of
their self respect and in the
end, their liberty.

Government administered
and controlled health care ser- -
vices is state welfare and that ~
sets up a dependency culture
that, with time will result in
their inability to carry the
growing debt load.

It is important to under-
stand that government can
give us absolutely nothing
without taking something
from us first! Not to mention
the service we currently get
from government. Giving
them a bigger role in health
care is precarious, if not dan-
gerous. :

Harvard Professor Charles
Fried points to the Quebec
government’s impositions in
his recent book titled Mod-
ern Liberty by forcing dis-
senters to participate in their
health scheme. He equates
this to when the Romans
forced Christians to obey their
laws and also "burn a pinch
of incense before the statues
of their gods".

And Dr. Nottage, Senator
and Minister of Health, and
his fellow scheme designers
will do no less than to use the
coercive power of govern-
ment to force every Bahamian
to participate in the NHI. The
finest hour for democracy in
The Bahamas, wouldn't you
say?

Robert Higgs in his great
treatise Against Leviathan
puts it very well when writing
about the welfare state:

“To continue the road we
American's (insert Bahami-
ans here) have travelled for
the past century is ultimately
to deliver ourselves com-
pletely into the hands of an
unlimited government. It will’
not matter if the democratic *
processes lead us to that des-.
tination. As noted previous-
ly, the making of the welfare
state has been from the very
beginning a matter of politi-
cians' corrupt vote buying and
patronage dispensing -
democracy in action: "And
one sad servitude alike
denotes: The slave that
labours and the slave that
votes. We can have a free
society or a welfare state. We
cannot have both.”

It is obvious the PLP
believe otherwise. Unfortu-
nately the leaders of the gov-
ernment will be off enjoying
their pensions from Bahamian
taxpayers while the next gen-
eration will be trying to "fix"
NHI. Not unlike the taxpay-
ers in Canada and the UK are
doing today.

I for one would caution
against putting too much faith
in the vision of the anointed.

RICK LOWE
Nassau,
February, 2007.














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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007, PAGE 5





Hign winds
cause power
loss on Grand
Bahama

FREEPORT - Around
16,000 Grand Bahamians
were without power on Sun-
day afternoon when a ground
wire came loose as a result
of high winds.

Grand Bahama Power
Company executive Tony
Lopez reported that some-
time around 2pm the compa-
ny was forced to shut down
transmission, affecting
Freeport proper into East
Grand Bahama. Ni

He explained that the loose
ground wire started to make
contact with the 69KV trans-
mission lines and crews were
dispatched to correct the
problem.

Mr Lopez said that about
two thirds of their customers
were affected, excluding
those in West End, Pinder’s
Point and Eight Mile Rock.

He said power was
restored within two hours.

Hign winds
cause power
loss on Grand
Bahama

@ HAITI
Port-au-Prince

THE United Nations said
Monday it has captured a
Haitian gang leader wanted
in the killing of family mem-
bers of two cohorts who had
agreed to join a disarmament
programme, according to
Associated Press.

On a routine patrol Sun-
_ day night, peacekeepers
arrested Johnny Pierre Louis
in the seaside slum of Cite
Soleil, the UN mission said
in a statement.

Louis, also known as Ti
Bazil, will be turned over to
Haitian national police, U.N.
spokeswoman Sophie
Boutaud de la Combe said.

The arrest came 10 days.
after hundreds of UN troops
raided Cite Soleil to dislodge
armed gangs, which are

blamed for a string of kid-"':
nappings and killings in:the ‘?:
Haitian.capital of Port-au-. 3%

Prince. At least one gang 3
member was killed and four
wounded.

The UN said Louis took
orders from another Cite
Soleil gang leader known as
Evens, who went into hiding
after the raid.

Among other crimes, Louis

is wanted in connection with
the killings of two gang mem-
bers who volunteered for a
UN-backed programme
aimed at disarming hundreds |
of gunmen in exchange for
economic aid and job train-
ing.
More than 100 gang mem-
bers have joined the pro-
gramme since it-Jaunched late
last year. At least two were
later found dead in what UN
officials have described as
reprisal killings for co-oper-
ating with peacekeepers, who
arrived in July 2004 to restore
order after a bloody uprising
toppled former president
Jean-Bertrand Aristide.

tate
EUS

AI eqmaninlas
Pr sers ea Ly,



TV 18 SCHEDULE

TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 20TH

6:00 Community “page 1540am
11:00 Immediate Response

noon ZNS News Upaate .

12:05 Immediate Response (Cont'd)
1:00 Legends: Muriel Eneas

1:30 . Ethnic Health America

2:00 Island Life Destinations
Turning Point

3:00 Durone Hepburn ‘
3:30 Ernest Leonard

The Fun Farm

5:00 ZNS News Update





























5:05 Andiamo

5:30 Challenged

6:00 Bahamas Business Outlook:
Predictions 2007

6:15 Seven Seas Informcial

6:30 News Night 13

7:00 The Bahamas Tonight

8:00 Urban Renewal Project:
Building Lives, Building
Communities

8:30 Island Lifestyles

9:00 Hugh Campbell Courtside

Express .
9:15 — Gillette World Sports
9:30 Anchor Projects
10:00 Caribbean Newsline
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
12:30 Community Page 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
‘right to make last minute .
programme changes!



m@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

IN an exclusive interview
last month, Immigration Direc-
tor Vernon Burrows guaran-
teed that properly documented

citizenship applications could —

be completed within six
months. .

However, The Tribune con-
tinues to receive reports from
young Haitian-Bahamians,
claiming they are made to wait
“forever” for feedback from the
Department of Immigration.

Even though the Bahamas
Constitution entitles any indi-
vidual born in the Bahamas to
foreign parents after July 9,
1973, to apply for citizenship
when they reach 18, young
Haitian-Bahamians __ like
Stephanie Francique claim they
are denied this legal entitle-
ment.

Twenty-year-old Stephanie
Francique said she applied to
the Department of Immigration
for citizenship almost two years
ago, but had not yet received
it.

Ms Francique said she was

in brie’ Haitian-Bahami

called into the department last
week, where she was told that
her application could not be
processed because her parents’
birth certificates were missing.

Interview

But she feels the certificates
were misplaced, because she
had to attend an interview at
the department in May, 2006,
and the certificates were in her
file.

“I had already been on my
interview, so how could my par-
ents’ birth certificates not be in
the file unless they misplaced
them,” Ms Francique asked.

She described the citizenship
process as “ridiculous” because
she said applicants are not told
how long the process would
take or when they would be
called in for interview.

“It took a whole year for
them to call me back for an
interview,” she said.

Ms Francique said she had
friends who felt so “hopeless”
that they had resorted to giv-
ing employees money “under

the table” for their applications .

to be processed faster.

“I think that’s ridiculous,
because at the end of the day
they are receiving a government
salary, so they should not try to
take advantage of us,” Ms Fran-
cique said.

According to her, there are
many Haitian-Bahamians
between 23 and 26 who had not
received their citizenship yet.

She claimed that many per-
sons only get their citizenship
before a-general election,
because politicians are interest-
ed in gathering votes.

However, last month Mr
Burrows said that cases like Ms
Francique are only “isolated” -
and that the real problem rested
with applicants not having the
required documents.

“Trust me, as soon as all the
documents are in, and we have
interviewed them, the process
is very swift,” Mr Burrows said.

But, according to Stephanie
Francique, her application’s
completion date had been
extended because of a lack of
efficiency at the Department of
Immigration.

ans challenge.





@ STEPHANIE Francique, pictured with her child, complains
that she applied for citizenship two years ago but has yet to

receive an answer



Union boss threatens Deputy Prime Minister
over punishments given to prison officers

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

PRESIDENT of the Nation:
al Congress of Trade Unions
John Pinder said yesterday that
the umbrella organisation will
“put the heat” on Deputy Prime
Minister Cynthia Pratt if she
does not decide to review the
punishments levied upon prison
officers who failed to show for
work last week.

Mr Pinder said that Mrs Pratt
had committed herself at a
meeting last Thursday to a
review of the punishments,
which, he said yesterday, were
“punching (officers) three times
for the same offence”.

It was, anticipated that a
response would be made public
yesterday, however up to press
time neither Mr Pinder nor The

Tribune had been informed of
Mrs Pratt's decision.

Coming out of last Thurs-
day's meeting, Mr Pinder said
he felt that the DPM was
favourably disposed to their
suggestion that she be more
lenient on the officers, who had
participated in what she termed
a “wildcat" strike over a period
of three days.

The officers complained of

undelivered promotions, miss-
ing backpay, a lack of protec-

tive gear, and poor living con-

ditions at the prison.

Mrs Pratt stated last Wednes-
day that each officer would
have to pay a monetary.fine, as
well as suffer a reduction of
three days of leave and be
required to make "a sincere and
appropriate public apology" to
herself and superintendent of

prisons Dr Elliston Rahming
for their actions.

Last Monday, Dr Rahming
narrowly escaped a one-week jail
sentence and fine of $1,500 for
failing to inform Appeals Court
President Dame Joan Sawyer
that there was industrial action
underway at Fox Hill Prison.

Mr Pinder said that he
accepted that three days leave
may be docked from the men,
but did not agree with the other
punishments.

On Thursday, he described
the government's decision to
punish the participating officers
as “intimidation, victimisation
and union-busting tactics”.

He further alleged that the
strike was not in fact illegal
because all the staff taking part
— amounting to 75 per cent of
the total number of officers

scheduled to work — produced a
sick slip on the days they were
not present.

However, Mrs Pratt rebutted
this claim.

“It's illegal. He knows that.
Any formal sick-out is consid-
ered industrial action. We've
had 70 people sick out at the
same time — come on!" she
exclaimed.

Under their rules of engage-

ment, industrial action by mem- .

bers of the disciplinary forces,
including prison officers, is con-
sidered illegal.

Prison officers claimed prior
to the action that they felt the
government was taking advan-

tage of the unique situation they’

are in to avoid addressing their
concerns.

However, Mrs Pratt said yes-
terday that of 45 concerns raised

in a December 14 meeting
between the Prison Staff Offi-
cers Association and govern-
ment, 37 have now been
addressed to the satisfaction of
the association.

She said that she had been
shocked by the prison officer's
action as her ministry has an.
"open door policy" towards
officers and the union.

She added that miscommuni-
cation between the government
and the NCTU meant that the
union was not initially aware of
the industrial agreement
between the government and
the prison officers dating back
to December 14.

Mr Pinder said on Thursday
that the union will carry out an
island-wide demonstration if
further punitive action is taken

- against the officers.



@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

TEACHERS will "sit and
wait" for the rest of the week to
see how the Ministry of Labour
handles a trade dispute filed by
the Bahamas Union of Teachers
on Friday, a union official said
yesterday.

Although she could not con-
firm definitively that no indus-
trial action will take place,
union president Ida Poitier-
Turnquest said that her mem-
bers will probably wait until the
Minister of Labour determines
the merit or otherwise of their
‘dispute before raising their voic-
es publicly again.

The filing of the dispute came
at the end of a week of numer-
ous face-offs between Ministry
of Education officials and teach-
ers.

Last Tuesday, hundreds of
aggrieved teachers from 52 New
Providence schools invaded the
Ministry, crying "We shall over-
come!".

Many are personally effect-
ed by the pay delays and mis-
takes made by the ministry,
while others were marching in
solidarity with union members
who shared stories of hardship
that morning at a BUT meet-
ing in New Providence.

On Monday, a list that union
officials requested detailing
which teachers are owed what
money, and when they will be
paid, arrived incomplete.

"It was an old list and it was
unacceptable," said Mrs Poitier-
Turnquest yesterday. "It stated
that persons 'should' be placed
on the pay sheet and ‘should’
does not give us a guarantee."

Previously, the ministry said
that all of the teachers await-
ing reassessment and backpay
will be paid in either February
or March.

Minister of Education Alfred
Sears said two weeks ago that
he was instructing his ministry
to take "extraordinary mea-
sures" to expedite the process of
dealing with the teachers’ pay-
related grievances.

However, Mrs Poitier-Turn-

quest has indicated that the .

pace is not fast enough, and yes-



HIDA Poitier-Turnquest

terday, reiterated that officials
are disturbed that no detailed

schedule had been provided for —

the awaited payments.

"When you look at reassess-
ments, that's backpay, and there
was no listing sent to us stating
that, yes, they will be paid, they
will be paid so much in Febru-
ary, they will be paid so much in
March, so much in April —
there's nothing like that."

The union will now await a
response for the next seven days
from the office of the minister
of labour as to whether their
case has merit. Union officials
said they did not think the res-
ignation of the Minister of
Labour Shane Gibson yester-
day would affect this process.

A strike vote will be taken at
the end of that period if a satis-
factory resolution is not
reached.

Up to 800 teachers nation-
wide could be involved in that
action, secretary-general Belin-
da Wilson said last week.

"Whatever response is nec-
essary in terms of a dispute
being filed, I'm sure that the
officers responsible are present-
ly dealing with the issue," said
education permanent-secretary
Cresswell Sturrup, when asked
to comment on the matter yes-
terday.

Mr Sears is currently "off the
island", he added.

Distributed by
Lowe’s Wholesale « Soldier Road * 393-7111 ¢ Fax: 393-0440

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A.

PAGE 6, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



‘Good Samaritan’ receives Lady
Sassoon Golden heart Award

DESCRIBED as an ambas-
sador for her country and a
woman with a heart of gold,
Frances Ledee became the
recipient of the Lady Sassoon
Golden Heart Award at the
43rd annual Heart Ball on Sat-
urday night.

During an evening filled with
excitement, the Sir Victor Sas-
soon (Bahamas) Heart Foun-
dation was proud to present the
coveted award to Mrs Ledee.

Presenting the award on
behalf of the Foundation was
RE Barnes.

“Frances Ledee is an example
of a person with a true golden
heart. She sees beyond what is
normally expected of someone
to provide the love and support
for many of the aged in our
community,” said Mr Barnes.

Mrs Ledee’s story is one
which reflects the selflessness
of a Good Samaritan. Mrs
Ledee’s entire life has been one
of service to her country.

A retired professional social
worker, planner an administra-
tor, Mrs Ledee acquired train-
ing in behavioural sciences
abroad.

However, during the time,
the pubic service was unable to
accommodate persons in the

' social work profession, which

resulted in Mrs Ledee taking a
position with the Bahamas
Branch of the British Red Cross
as an assistant welfare officer.
With specific duties for the

Out Islands of the Bahamas,
Mrs Ledee engaged in the
development of Red Cross
groups and Junior Links, and
also undertook investigations,
analysis and the preparation of
reports on specific human
needs.

Describing her initial experi-
ences as “rugged and raw, but
exciting escapades,” Frances
Ledee says she never dreamed
of stopping. Instead, she
immersed herself totally in the
cause.

Transfer

In 1964 the Bahamas govern-
ment assumed ministerial gov-
ernance and Frances Ledee was
transferred to the very first Min-

. istry of Welfare, then under the

leadership of the late Eugene
Dupuch.

At the Ministry, Mrs Ledee
served in the capacity of a child
welfare officer and in Septem-
ber of that year she became the
first Bahamian professional
social worker to be engaged by
the Bahamas government.

Although she became heavily
involved in her new duties,
Frances Ledee says she never
severed her ties with the
Bahamas Red Cross Society.

Tn fact, she was instrumental in
bringing the society to national
status in the mid-70s, and today
remains an active member.

Mrs Ledee served as presi-
dent of the Red Cross Society in
1981 for a period of five years
and was awarded the highest
local honour of lifetime mem-
ber.

In her capacity as a child wel-
fare officer, Frances Ledee,
with the assistance of others
and in co-operation with the
late June Dolly-Besson from
the University of the West
Indies Mona Campus, estab-
lished the Social Work Pro-
gramme at the College of the
Bahamas in 1978.

Mrs Ledee served as a lec-
turer on a part-time basis for
the programme for several
years and. also served on the
Social Work Council.

When the National Insurance
Scheme was introduced,
Frances Ledee was automati-
cally selected to assist because
of her ability, proven track
record, and commitment to her
country.

Mrs Ledee assisted with the
development and implementa-
tion of the scheme. In 1977 she
was transferred to the newly-
formed quasi-government cor-
poration, from which she
retired.

Mrs Ledee is presently the
president of the Persis Rodgers
Home For the Aged and is also
a founding member.

At the home, Mrs Ledee
oversees the administrative
work and continues to be



@ RE Barnes presents the award to Frances Ledee

adamant in her commitment to
assisting her fellow Bahamians.

She has implemented a self-
imposed mandate to turn the
home around, and says she is
proud to embrace such a chal-
lenge with open arms.

“We slaved over 30 years ago

to establish this home, the first
of its kind in the Bahamas. |
cannot and will not sit back and
watch it diminish. There is a
great need for its existence,
even more so today than tn the
past,” says Mrs Ledee.

Since Mrs Ledee became

president of the Persis Rodgers
Home For the Aged, she has
worked without receiving a
salary.

In 2006, the home received a
facelift because of Frances
Ledee’s efforts in obtaining
community sponsors.

FNM’s St Thomas More candidate claims
‘continuous neglect’

elderly have suffered

ELDERLY members of the
St Thomas More constituency
have suffered in the face of

“continuous neglect” according
to the FNM candidate for the
area.

Reece Chipman issued a
statement yesterday acknowl-
edging the huge role that senior

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E-mail: tonysan@coralwave.com

citizens play in Bahamian soci-
ety.

“They, taught us the rights
and wrongs, the,ups and downs
and the,in and outs. They teach
us about their past experiences
so we would learn from them
to chart our future ahead of us,”
he said.

“After fully analysing the sta-
tistics and reviewing my walk-
about survey, I have noticed
that the elderly individuals are
shown no concern nor attention
until it is election time and as
soon as the elections are over,
they are placed back into hyber-
nation by the ones appointed
to represent them,” he said.

Mr Chipman said that, most
importantly, the promised “help

and hope” of Urban Renewal,
which was expected to improve
the lives of all including the
elderly in the urban areas, has
proven unsuccessful.

He said Urban Renewal has
had an “ineffective impact and a
non-progressive outlook on
what constitutes a community”.

“In St Thomas Moore alone,
based on the last statistics,
more than 20 per cent of its
registered votes were over the
age 65. In light of this | would
have expected that they. the
elderly in the area would be
better represented. Mr Chip-
man said.

“It appears as if they are
hurled out of their homes on
election day to cast their most

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favourable vote and thereafter
left to fend for themselves.”

Mr Chipman noted that in St
Thomas More:

_ © There has been an increase

in the elderly population

e A high percentage of elder-
ly persons live alone

¢ Many of them stay indoors
and are not socially integrated

“We are very proud of our
record with the elderly with
regards to increasing pensions
and creating incentives to make
everyday living simpler and
more convenient for the elder-
lv.” he said of the FNM.
“Social and community inte-
gration is a key part of urban
dev elopment, let’s not forget
it.”



Father doubts
Guantamo
captive will
be sent home

Mm AUSTRALIA
Canberra

THE father of the only Aus-
tralian held at a US prison camp
in Cuba said Monday he is
unconvinced by assurances that
his son will be able to serve any
sentence for terrorism offences
in Australia, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

The Australian government
announced in May last year it
had signed an agreement with
the United States that would
allow alleged Taliban fighter
David Hicks, 31, to apply for a
transfer to an Australian prison
if he were convicted at Guan-
tanamo Bay of terrorism offens-
es.

Such a transfer would need
the approval of both the Aus-
tralian and US governments,
and Hicks would have to serve
the full duration of the sentence
handed down by a US military
commission,

*The Australian government
said long ago that David would
be able to serve any sentence
in Australia, but I've never seen
anything in writing,” Terry
Hicks said. “I think they just
want to sound like they're look-
ing out for David’s interests to
get them past the next election.”

‘Terry Hicks said he doubted
whether either government
would risk sending his son back
to Australia where the top legal
body, Law Council of Australia,
has condemned the military
commission system as unfair.

ae





FAUE 6, ILUEOQVAY, FEBRUARY 2U, ZUU/




City Markets donation helps school for the blind:

STUDENTS from the Sal-
vation Army School for the
Blind Band have wowed audi-
ences across the Bahamas.

Now they have even more
to sing about, thanks to a gen-
erous donation from long-time
supporter City Market.

a NELSON Moss on the drums

The gift, substantial enough
to cover the cost of new
instruments, was made this
week at the Erin H Gilmour
School for the Blind on Mack-
ey Street. °

On hand were Bahamas
Supermarkets Limited CFAO

and senior vice-president for
finance, Bryan Knowles (play-
ing the saw) and Harbour Bay
City Market manager Nelson
Moss (on the goatskin drum).

Getting down with the band
was easy; saying thank you to
Bahamas Supermarkets in

three languages — English,’

Spanish and Chinese — was
tougher, but outstanding stu-
dent’ Rickia Arnette impressed
benefactors with her skills.
Like other students, Rickia
works on talking computers.
Books and maps are in

@ BRYAN Knowles on the saw

Braille. She’s so fast that a
sighted person can barely
keep up.
Mr Knowles said: “The Sal-
vation Army does an incredi-
ble job, feeding the hungry,
helping the troubled, visiting
shut-ins and the elderly, pro-

THE TRIBUNE





ov

oP,

ta)
viding spiritual and emotio#al
support for hundreds evéry
week. In times of disaster,
they are a pillar of strength
with shelters, food and the
potential to make the differ-
ence between life and death
or safety and danger.” +.

Police chief says winning the fight against

domestic violence will take a joint effort :

WINNING the fight against
domestic violence will take a
collaborative effort, according
to Assistant Superintendent of
Police Elaine Sands.

She said law enforcement
agencies, governmental and
non-governmental agencies,
communities and individuals
must come together to face this
ongoing struggle.

ASP Sands, officer-in-charge
of the Community Relations
Section, says the Royal
Bahamas Police Force will con-
\ tinue to play a major role in the
~- reduction of domestic violence
by continuing its education and
awareness campaign through-

out the Bahamas.

The Community Relations
Section recently teamed up with
a number of government and
non-governmental agencies to
host a four-day law enforce-
ment anti-violence exhibit at
the Royal Bahamas Police
Training College on Thompson
Boulevard..-

Representatives from the
police, Defence Force, Depart-
ment of Social Services,
Crimestoppers Bahamas, the
Crisis Centre, the National
Drug Council, the National
Child Protection Council,
Urban Renewal, the Roman
Catholic Archdiocese, Bahamas

Assistant superindentent says communities, individuals | *2
and non-governmental organisations must tackle problem:



Customs, the Office of the
Attorney General, the AIDS
Secretariat, Rotary Interna-
tional, Department of Immi-
gration and the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce partici-
pated in the event.

ASP Sands said the Anti-Vio-
lence Exhibit afforded persons
in the community the opportu-

With origins in The Bahamas since 1978 and in the Cayman Islands
and the Turks and Caicos Islands since 1980, Fidelity is a financial
services group offering a comprehensive range of insurance
services, domestic and international banking, estate planning, pen-
sion services and corporate finance as well as other financial prod-
ucts and services. Fidelity is now inviting applications in Cayman
for a:

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVE — INSURANCE

Reporting directly to the Vice President & Regional Marketing Man-
ager, the successful candidate will have the following minimum
requirements:-

* Business or Finance related Bachelor’s Degree Qualification

* Professional Insurance Qualification, i.e. FCIl, ACII or CPCU
* Ten years commercial insurance experience.

* Proven track record in new business development

+ Self motivated in addition to being a good team player

* Excellent organizational and strong analytical skills

* Must be proficient with Excell, Powerpoint and Mircosoft Word
* Ability to relocate and reside in the Cayman Islands

* Ability to prepare & deliver high level presentations

* Knowledge of the local insurance market would be an advantage

wu
a>
=
=
Z)
=
LL
=
_
— |
1*)
ra
ae
—
=
ee
—
a.
Lo]

The successful applicant will primarily be responsible for new busi-
ness development as well as maintaining & developing existing
client & carrier relationships across a broad range of products &
services.

An attractive compensation package, including a comprehensive
range of employee benefits and relocation is being offered.

Salary range Cl $65,000 - $100,000
Deadline for resumes is the 16th March 2007:

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SteppingStones Recruitment
P.O. Box 10091
Grand Cayman KY1-1001
Tel (345) 946 7837
Fax (345) 946 7836
Email jobs@steppingstonescayman.com

Ss

BUSINESS DEVEL



nity to “come forward and see
the resources that are available
to them.”

“When one policing division
can have more than 600 com-
plaints of domestic disputes, you
know it is a serious problem in
our country and we really need
to work together towards min-

sdimising what-we-are iseeing ‘as;



she 'said,.,
~~ Conflicts *

“There will be conflicts with-
in relationships, but how those
conflicts are managed and
resolved is important and this
is what we are trying to get out
to members of the general pub-
lic. We want to focus on edu-
cating people as to how they
can prevent the escalation of
violence within the homes, rela-
tionships and communities.”

ASP Sands says the Domestic
Violence Hotline recently estab-
lished by the police through the
Community Relations Section,
is an attempt to provide both
potential victims and perpetra-
tors of abuse with a lifeline
before those conflicts escalate
into violence. -

The toll-free number — 323-
0884 — will not replace the exist-
ing Emergency 919 number, but



relates to injuries,”



is intended to give police an
opportunity to intervene in
potentially violent situations
before they occur.

“The hotline was not only
established for the victims but
also for perpetrators who have a
very bad temper and who feel
the need or desire to cause

harm:to: their-mates we want'
them to.call‘in sa ithat.they.can:

get help,” ASP Sands said..;;,, :

: She-said police officials-have
found that “power and control”
are two of the major reasons
abusers inflict harm on their vic-
tims.

ASP Sands said domestic vio-
lence and abuse are not just lim-
ited to physical harm, howev-
er, but could also take the form
of emotional, verbal or finan-
cial abuse.

“We have found that most of
the perpetrators want to be in
total control of the victim. They
want to know the victims every
movement; they want to be the
one to deal with the finances:
and they use violence and ver-
bal abuse to degrade the victim
so that they (the victim). don’t
even have the desire to make a
change or do something that
could help the victim take con-
trol of their day-to-day activi-
ties,” ASP Sands said. .

“Domestic violence can come

ointment _

or
cet

‘THI
ay

nwt
jae

in many shapes and forms and:
SO we want to get the word out,
on those many aspects, so that,
people will be able to recognise,
them and seek help if necessary.’
She said domestic violence in
homes can have serious conse;
quences on children — “wheng
parents are fighting; when sib-¢
lings are fighting.” *».~ Si

of
: Younger children witnessigig} _

these acts,.said ASP: Sands
often come to assume that t ist
type of behavior is the norm>
particularly “when they have
no one else to compare against,
his or her parents, or their rela-«
tives behavior with whom they‘
are living.” ‘
“That behavior becomes nor-?
mal to them and violence wit-}
nessed is violence experienced.
by these children and this is why §
we have so many children today»
who are violent in the schools:or*
violent in the communitigs,
because in a lot of cases it is ‘
learned behavior. It’s what they §
see in the home and so“it,y
becomes a normal reaction? ¢
ASP Sands said. m ;
“They then go out into the y
public, someone says what they {
consider to be the inappropriate
thing to them, and they solye
those conflicts with violence
because that is the only thiig®
they know.”








COMMONWEALTH

q

BANK



Mr. William B. Sands, Jr., President & CEO of Commonwealth
Bank is pleased to announce the following appointment:

Demetri Bowe



they have two sons.

“Leader in Personal Banking Services” | WWww.combanklitd.com



Sr. Assistant Branch Manager,
Golden Gates Branch

Effective January 1st, 2007

Mr. Bowe has over 21 years experience with
Commonwealth Bank and has held a variety of
management positions, the latest being Sr. Assistant
Manager, Plaza Branch. He has attended several
courses and seminars in management and leadership
including the University of North Carolina New
Managers Program. He is married to Genevieve and


























1 *
- /

| THE TRIBUNE

ula trains

e

‘Panamanians

‘a

in medical
‘iypnosis

SWhavana

46 4 6 6 4

“CUBA, whose doctors
have experimented with
dozens of alternative
“treatments, is training
Panamanian therapists in
the medical use of hypno-
“sis, the government news
-agency AIN reported
Monday, according to
Associated Press.

‘The agency said that 80
Pgnamanians graduated
frem courses held in the
Central American coun-

, try under a program with
| Cuba's Higher Institute

| of.Medical Sciences,
based in the eastern city
of Santiago.

: ‘Cuba's best-known
researcher in the field,
Alberto Cobian, has said
that hypnosis can be use-
ful in treating stress,

dysfunction and some
types of skin diseases, as
well as offering some.
anesthetic effects, the
agency reported.

An economic collapse
in the early 1990s created
dire shortages of many

conventional medicines in

Cuba, prompting wide-
spread research into and
use of alternative treat-
ments such as herbal
medicines and acupunc-
ture.

Cuba also has used its
extensive medical system

with other countries,
offering training and
sending tens of thousands
of its own doctors abroad
on: medical missions.

from people who are
Ymaking news in their

bronchial asthma, sexual | -

as a bridge of cooperation

‘The Tribune wants to hear

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007, PAGE 9

Ingraham responds to
‘Shane Gibson resignation

FROM page one

Nicole scandal.

He said: “I understand Mr
Christie’s reluctance to act
and his defensiveness in this
matter because he became a
part of this gross error by
allowing Mr Gibson to con-

‘vince him and his colleagues
to approve of the residence.

permit when he, above all
others, should have said no.”

Mr Ingraham also hit out
at Mr Christie for attempt-
ing to equate two of his for-
mer ministers - Tommy
Turnquest and Dion Foulkes
— with Mr Gibson, though the
prime minister did not explic-
itly name. either man in his
public comments on Sunday.

"Last evening in a radio |

interview the prime minister
sought further to excuse the
inexcusable by attempting
once again to defend bad
behaviour by attacking oth-

- ers.

“What is most offensive
was his attempt to equate the
actions of two dedicated
FNM political servants of the
people — Tommy Turnquest
and Dion Foulkes — to the
behaviour of his disgraced
Cabinet minister, Shane Gib-
son.

“It is laughable to even
mention the three men in the

‘same sentence, but that is.

what the prime minister

- sought to do,” Mr Ingraham

said.
He then sought to clarify

~ the public record as it per-

tains to Mr: Turnquest and
Mr Foulkes.

According to Mr Ingra- .
ham, Tommy Turnquest was .

involved in no wrong-doing
regarding the air-condition-
ing: contract: awarded: while
he was at: the Ministry of
Tourism.

‘Mr Ingraham also’ stated
that Mr Turnquest. was the
one who paid for the political
function hosted at his house
by the contractor, rather than
the contractor.

Mr Ingraham also com-
mented on Dion Foulkes’
role in granting contracts in
the summer of 2001. He said
Mr Foulkes was concerned
that school repairs would not
be completed in time for the
re-opening of school.

multiple investigations have

not found any wrong-doing-
in relation to this process.

Mr Ingraham ended his *
remarks by criticising the

PM’s many public assertions
that God is somehow respon-
sible for his current political
position.

“The prime minister is
confused. He has confused



his personal political ambi-
tions with the will of the

- Bahamian people and, worse °

still, with the design of God.

“He claims i in public that
‘God brought us (he and the
PLP government) into this

country to do. right and no’

weapon formed against us
(the PLP government led by
Perry Christie) will prosper.’

The prime minister is delud-

ed, Mr Ingraham said.

““Mr Christie is a learned’
“man. He must know that he
“is not a divine-right king. He
-must know that we are a .
democracy and that ina

democracy a government is

answerable to the people.
“No political party has a

divine right to form a gov-



ernment. Ina democracy the
Tight to lead a government is

given to a political party by
the people, who express their
will freely in an election,” Mr

“Ingraham said.

Mr. Ingraham also
announced that the FNM will
have a mass rally tonight —
at the same time as the
PLP.

@ PRIME Minister Perry Christie speaks to Sean m MeWeeney on GEM’s 108: 9’s tall iow “Tell It like It Is”.

(Photo: Peter Ramsay)

FNM eager h hits back
at PM’s ‘forces’ claim

FROM page one

puppet. He would bite his tongue out

wish the Free National Movement to

of his head before he would say those
words.

“T am my own man and I’ve always
been my own man, and I am a strong
man, not.a weak man,” Mr Ingraham
said.

Mr Ingraham said the forces that

win the next general election are nor-
mal citizens of the Bahamas.

“All I know is the Bahamian peo-
ple, the same people who voted him in
office, and those same forces that put
him there, are the same forces that
will take him out,” Mr Ingraham said.

neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
| for improvements in the
area or have won an

J award.

Hf so, call us on 302-1986
and share your story.

Therefore, Mr Foulkes
separated some major con-
tracts into multiple parts,

'. enabling multiple contractors
to complete the work.
_ According to Mr Ingra-
ham, this resulted in the
timely opening of schools and

ing out of his head in many respects
and claimed the prime minister would
not dare refer to him as a puppet.
* “T have no idea ‘what he is talking
about.

“He knows that he cannot call mea.



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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20: 2007

TUESDAY EVENING

: Great Romances
WPBT ofthe 2th Cen-
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Bring your children to the
McHappy Hour at McDonald's in
Oakes Field every Thursday
3 from 3:30pm to 4:300m during the
‘month of February 2007.

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun. .

THE TRIBUNE











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PAGE 12, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007



INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Veggie oil
fuels Florida
man's car

§ WEST PALM BEACH, Fla.

PRESIDENT George Bush
says Americans are addicted to
oil.

George Kinney has a cure.

For the last six months, the 65-
year-old Royal Palm Beach
retiree hasn't spent a nickel for
fuel. He drives right by gas sta-
tions, with a big fat smirk on his
face, according to Associated

~ Press.

Best of all, he's getting 32 miles
per gallon.

How does he do it?

By transforming his $1,900 1984
Mercedes 300D into a greasemo-
bile. Instead of diesel, Kinney's
Benz runs on used vegetable oil,
which he gets free of charge from
a pizza joint and a diner. ~

"I'm proud as the devil of it,"
says Kinney. "Why more people
aren't doing this, I don't know."

The idea of running diesel
engines on vegetable oil is hardly
a revelation. The first known use
was at the 1900 World's Fair when
pure peanut oil powered an
engine built by the Otto company.
But with petroleum so cheap and
plentiful, who needed peanut oil?

Even after the energy crisis of
the 1970s, when cars lined up for
miles to get a few dollars' worth of
gas, the development of alterna-
tive sources of fuel moved along
at a drip.

But now, with oil prices roller-
coastering to record highs, oil-rich
regimes fueling terrorism and
threatening national security, and
worries about global warming,
alternative sources of energy are
in vogue. Singer Willie Nelson has
converted his tour bus to run on
soy-based diesel.

But French fries?

Why not, says Charles Ander-
son. On September 10, 2001, he
opened Golden Fuel Systems in
Springfield, Mo. Since then, he's
sold 4,500 conversion kits - includ-
ing one to Kinney - that trans-
form diesel engines into vegetable
oil-burning machines.

When you think about it, veg-
etable oil is an untapped natural
resource, especially when you con-
sider how many French fries and
other fried foods Americans con-
sume.

The result of all that frying is
waste oil. Many restaurants must
pay a fee to have it hauled away,
and frequently, it winds up in
landfills.

But what if it could be saved
and used to run cars?
~ The process of converting dirty
waste oil to clean oil is simple.
Kinney picks up used oil from the
pizza joint and diner and stores it
in a 55-gallon plastic barrel in his
garage. He uses a regular kitchen
colander to remove the big bits
of food, then sticks an electric
heater prong into the barrel to
make it more viscous. He pours
the heated oil through a small
sock filter and a 5-micron filter
into another 55-gallon barrel. He
transfers the clean oil to standard
plastic gasoline containers, which
he uses to fill his tank.

.. "It takes me 15 minutes on a
Saturday to filter it," he says. "It's
cleaner than diesel fuel."

Unfortunately, it works only
with diesel engines. With a sepa-
rate diesel tank in his car, Kinney
still has the option of using diesel
to power his car.

Getting an engine to run the
fuel involves buying and installing
a conversion kit. -

At $650 for a small car, and
$2,500 for semi-trucks and RVs,
the kits aren't exactly cheap.
Installation can add $1,500 to the
total cost.

Peanuts, says Anderson.

Most people get their money
back in fuel savings within six
months to a year, he says.

"I've already made my money
back," says Kinney, who has
racked up more than 100,000
miles on his gas-guzzling Ford
Excursion SUV in the last two
years. "I don't know why we're
so dependent on the Middle East
for oil when we've got this type of
technology available."

Anderson figures he has saved
$25,000 over the last two years by
converting his SUV to run on veg-
etable oil.

In the U.S., some 10,000 vehi-
cles have abandoned petroleum-
based fuel for vegetable oil.
Anderson has opened an office
in Japan, where 200 to 300 vehi-
cles have been transformed by his
company. He's also working with
Japanese municipalities and
schools to convert their fleets.

But only some diesel engines
can be converted. His Web site,
http://www.goldenfuelsystems.co
m, lists the vehicles and answers
questions about the process.

"I'm under no illusions that
straight vegetable oil is going to be
the savior of the world," Ander-
son says. "On the national scale,
we're not even a drop in the buck-
et. But we've got to start some-
where."

As if to underline his point, his
Web site flashes a headline across
the top of the page: "Be a True
Patriot. End Your Dependence
on Foreign Oil Today."

@ SAN FRANCISCO

THE world's largest gen-
eral scientific society joined
the concern. over global cli-
mate change, calling it a
“growing threat to society",
according to Associated
Press

It is the first consensus
statement of the board of
the American Association
for the Advancement of Sci-
ence on climate change. It
comes just weeks after the
International Panel on Cli-
mate Change issued its most
recent report on human-
induced warming...

"The evidence is clear:

global climate change caused —

by human activities is occur-
ring now and is a growing
threat to society," the
AAAS said: at its annual

meeting Sunday. ©);

wen

"Scientists are observing |

the rapid melting of glaciers,
destabilization’ of major. ice
sheets, rising sea levels, shifts
in species ranges and
increased frequency of
weather extremes," said
John P. Holdren, director of
the Woods Hole Research
Center and AAAS presi-
dent.

Concern focuses on car-
bon dioxide and other gases
produced by burning fossil
fuels and other processes. As
these gases accumulate in
the atmosphere they trap
heat from the sun, much like
a greenhouse, warming the
climate.

"The longer we wait to
tackle climate change, the
harder and more expensive
the task will be," the group
said.

Holdren noted that some
of the most dramatic
changes are occurring in the
far North where warming
has occurred more rapidly
than in other areas. Retreat-
ing sea ice and rising sea lev-
el are driving some natives
from their villages, the group
said.

On Feb. 2 the Intergov-
ernmental Panel in Climate
Change reported that global
warming is so severe that it
will "continue for centuries,"

ae

Haiti gets in the
Carnival spirit

A GROUP of women dressed as butterflies and a man with his face
painted participate in a parade during the traditional Carnival in Port-
au-Prince, Sunday, Feb. 18, 2007.

leading to a far different
planet in 100 years.

The panel, established by
the United Nations, con-
cluded that global warming
is "very likely" caused by
man, meaning more than 90
percent certain.

If nothing is done to
change current emissions
patterns of greenhouse gas-
es, global temperature could
increase as much as 11
degrees Fahrenheit by 2100,
the report said.

AAAS was founded in

1848. It reports that it serves

262 affiliated societies and
academies of science, reach-
ing 10 million individuals.

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THE TRIBUNE

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ON THE SPOT FINANCING WITH
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BUN SRT Nel LS Py







The Miami Herald











WALL STREET

Takeove

@ Even though the number of
acquisitions isn’t growing as in
2006, the amount of money for
these deals is growing and may
pass the $4 trillion record set last
year.

BY JOE BEL BRUNO
Associated Press

NEW YORK — The rumors about
a potential takeover of aluminum
producer Alcoa this past week cre-
ated an enthusiastic buzz on Wall
Street that acquisitions this year will
smash the $4 trillion record set in
2006.

Seconds
ticking |
away for
watches —

i Many people today do not rely
- ona watch to tell time, but they
get the time from a cellphone, a
computer or some other kind of
electronic device.

BY MARTHA IRVINE
Associated Press

CHICAGO — Allison Elliott occa-
sionally wears the delicate gold
windup watch that belonged to her
grandmother. But it’s really just for
show. :

Elliott, who’s 27, is much more
likely to get the time from the clock
in her car, the one on her cable TV
box or cellphone or from the bottom
‘right-hand of her computer at the
University of Kentucky, where she
works. | .

Paul Dryden is much the same.
“To be honest, I can’t remember the
last time I wore a watch — I’m guess-
ing early in high school,” says the 21-
year-old senior at Connecticut Col-
lege. The busy student’s cellphone.
often doubles as an alarm clock
because “it goes everywhere I go.”

In other words, the way we track
time is changing with the times.

Market researchers say more peo-
ple are carrying electronic devices
that also tell time, whether a phone,
an iPod or a BlackBerry. They’re also
finding that young people, in particu-
lar, are more interested in spending
their money on other kinds of acces-
sories, such as shoes and hand bags.

In a survey last fall, investment
bank Piper Jaffray & Co. found that
nearly two-thirds of teens never wear
a watch — and only about one in 10
wears one every day.

Experian Simmons Research also
discovered that, while Americans
spent more than $5.9 billion on
watches in 2006, that figure was
down 17 percent when compared
with five years earlier.

In response, some watchmakers
have begun to add more functions to
their time pieces, with models that
have everything from heart rate mon-
itors to GPS trackers.

Luxury watches, such as Rolex,

remain popular. But even then, the ~

watch is often more about fashion
than function, says Max Kilger of
Experian Simmons. pt

*TURN TO WATCHES
MINIMUM WAGE

Rural poor

Seven weeks into 2007, the
amount of money for takeovers bro-
kered by investment banks and pri-
vate equity firms is trending above
last year. In the United States, market
researcher Dealogic said volume has
soared 86 percent to $228.6 billion
from last year, while global volume
rose 36 percent to $477.4 billion.

The statistics indicate that while
the dollar amounts of these deals are
growing, the number of them isn’t.
There have been 519 deals in the
United States so far this year, down
38 percent from 2006, while global
transactions declined 25 percent to





GOLD

driven by the Internet.

veiled by greasy smoke.

All around them are newly dug
pits, felled trees and growing mis-
ery.

This is Eldorado do Juma, Bra-
zil’s newest boom town. Since
December, thousands of fortune
seekers have rushed here hoping to
strike gold in the jungle state of
Amazonas.

__ Drawn to this grim scene by a
local math teacher’s Internet
descriptions of miners scooping up
thousands of dollars in gold, some-
where between 3,000 and 10,000
people have cut down huge trees,
diverted streams and dug ever-
deeper wildcat mines, in an area






GOLD AND GRIME: Anderson Luiz, 13,
Since December, when a local ma
thousands of fortune seekers have rushed-to-the region.

rs off to a good

2,392. }

Analysts believe this shows a shift
in M&A trends. Wall Street might see
the number of deals edge lower. But,
those still in the mix will fetch
increasingly higher takeover bids,
such as a potential Alcoa deal that
would easily top $30 billion.

“How big can it go? That’s not the
focus,” said Gregg Slager, a senior
partner with accounting firm Ernst &
Young’s private equity practice.
“This is still all about value creation
regardless of the size. The economy
is strong, capital is readily available,
and this creates opportunity.”

BRAZIL

- n

Lp



p

ELDORADO DO JUMA, Brazil — It’s a gold rush in the jungle,

Speeding past unbroken walls of foliage, a motorboat packed with
gritty prospectors veers toward the shore of the Juma river. Rising up
along the steep, muddy banks, a city of black plastic lean-tos appears

that only months ago was pristine
rain forest.

This El Dorado is nothing like
the Amazon’s long sought-after
mythical city of gold.

Hundreds of mud-covered men
with picks and shovels hack away
daily at the brown, red.and gray
earth, marking their tiny plots with
tree branches and string. Others
feed dirt into rough-hewed wooden
troughs, washing off lighter sedi-
ment. What’s left is jiggered in
metal pans.

_ At day’s end, the luckiest ones
weigh out tiny chunks and flakes of
actual gold, tucking them away in’

an sonnei

looking forward to

proposed minimum wage boost

Mi Nationwide, an estimated ©
13 million workers would be
affected as the bill to raise the
minimum hourly wage to $7.25
moves a step closer to passage.

BY BRUCE SMITH
Associated Press

CHERAW, | S.C. Louise
McQueen has scrimped all her life,
working two jobs while raising two
daughters alone and now earning
$5.47 an hour as a cook in a small res-
taurant. So it’s a comfort to her in this
rural corner of South Carolina that
Congress this week moved closer to



4

raising the minimum hourly wage to

_ $7.25 over the next two years.

“J can get by, but this is going to
help me a lot,” said McQueen, 54,
who has taken one vacation in her life
and who considers her sole luxury to
be watching television.

More than 10 percent of hourly
workers in South Carolina, Louisiana
and Mississippi would see wage
increases if the federal proposal goes
through — the highest such percent-
ages in the nation, according to the
Washington-based Economic Policy
Institute. In South Carolina, that
translates to 179,000 people.

The House and Senate have
approved bills raising the hourly min-
imum wage from $5.15 to $7.25 over
two years. The Senate bill paired the
wage hike with tax breaks for small
businesses. The House, initially
reluctant to add similar tax cuts,
passed a smaller tax package on Fri-
day. House and Senate negotiators
will have to work out the differences.

Economists say many of the low-
wage workers expected to see their
pay increase right away live in rural
areas like Cheraw, where unemploy-

* TURN TO-HOURLY WAGE

pans for gold at the wildcat mine in Eldorado do Juma, Brazil.
th teacher posted descriptions of the mine on the Internet, -

SH STIRS |
~~ HOPES, FEARS _

BRAZIL'S NEWEST BOOMTOWN BRINGS
QUICK RICHES ALONG WITH CRIME,
HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS

BY MICHAEL ASTOR
Associated Press

While it might be about value cre-

‘ation, the competition among private
‘ equity firms and investment banks is

increasing. Big deals such as the bid-
ding war between Vornado Realty
Trust and Blackstone Group over
real estate investment trust Equity
Office Properties are escalating deal
volume. .

In fact, it has become an intense
Wall Street mating dance. In trying to
gauge one of his suitor’s interest,
Equity Office Properties founder
Samuel Zell sent an e-mail to Vor-
nado Chairman Steven Roth that read
“Roses are red, violets are blue; I hear

VICTOR R. CAIVANO/AP



small plastic bottles until they can
sell it for 40 reais agram, or about |
$19, in the town of Apui, 50 miles
north.

Those who support the miners
make more reliable money — cook-
ing, cleaning or carrying supplies
for about 2 grams of gold a day,
about six times the minimum wage “|
in a part of Brazil where few are
lucky to earn it. :

Not since the early 1980s, when



tens of thousands of Brazilians —
transformed a mountain known as |
Serra Pelada into a gargantuan hole |
in the jungle floor, has the Amazon |
seen a gold rush of these propor-
tions.

“This is even better than Serra |
Pelada. I’ve been mining all around |
the Amazon since 1978 and this is |
the best I’ve ever seen,” said Joao |
Leandro de Azedo, 70, overlooking |
his stake from a hammock. \

Serra Pelada was Brazil’s most |
lucrative and notorious “garimpo,” |
or wildcat mine, attracting a vast
army of prospectors and producing
thousands of pounds of gold before
going. bust in the early 1990s.

It became a glaring symbol of

*TURN TO AMAZON





start in 2007

a rumor, is it true?” :

The e-mail, obtained by The New
York Times, sought to determine if
Roth might be interested in raising
his bid to trump buyout giant Black-
stone’s offer of $48.50 per share. Roth
responded: “Roses are red, violets are
blue. I love you Sam, our bid is 52.”
And the deal was secured to buy the
largest U.S. commercial real estate
company. :

If anything, the wooing that goes
on in these big deals shows the will-
ingness to raise the stakes. The

*TURN TO TAKEOVERS

WORKPLACE

Take steps
to avoid
sparring

with a

contender

@ Getting a new job at anew
company is great, but if you don’t
learn how to supervise the
internal runner-up to your job,
you may run into problems.

BY JOANN S. LUBLIN
The Wall Street Journal

The good news: You have
accepted a terrific job offer at a new
company. The potential bad news:
You must supervise the internal
runner-up for your spot.

Amid a buoyant job market, the
problem appears to be spreading.
“Anyone who comes into a moder-
ately senior position will probably

“encounter resistance and possibly

resentment from the passed-over
insider,” says Richard Guha, a part-
ner for a small brand consultancy in
San Marino, Calif., who has run into
the dicey dilemma twice. “A lot of
people don’t recognize it until it’s too
late,” he notes.

How can you make sure the loser
doesn’t hijack your authority, give
you wrong information or otherwise
derail your effectiveness as an out-
side hire? _

To avoid being sabotaged, you ~
should come well informed about
your selection. “Find out all you can
about what was behind your being
brought on board over the inside
contender,” says Sheryl Spanier, a
leadership consultant in New York.
Ask your boss why that individual
was not chosen for the job and how
to best use his or her talents, she sug-

gests. 4 ‘
It’s equally important to discover
whether upper management

appeased the defeated employee with
a raise. The gesture may make that
person “feel newly empowered and
less willing to cooperate,” says Vince
Thompson, an Internet business
advisor and former AOL executive.
After an energy company wooed
Guha to lead a key division, the
industry novice belatedly learned he
had been chosen over a staffer who
was a long-time friend of the founder
and board chairman. The vanquished
official soon complained to the chair-
man that Guha would wreck the

* TURN TO SUPERVISING

WORKING HARD:
Kirby Platt, a
19-year-old .
technical
college
student,
juggles tuition
and rent while
working her
part-time job
for $6.50 an
hour in North
Charleston,
S.C.

MARY ANN CHASTAIN/AP




\



cqnnmunannaneennnanasnanneans ies Qaatehs HAN RAANARRSSRARARGESRAANRNAANNEAAARENAARES GANNON

Che Miami Herald |



REED SAXON/AP

EMBRACEABLE TWO: Charles Howell
Ill and his caddie Jimmy Johnson
embrace after Howell sank the,
winning putt on the third playoff
hole to win the Nissan Open.

Prayer pays off
for winner of
Nissan Open

BY DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press .

LOS ANGELES — Charles Howell
III remembers the first time he —

_ stepped inside Tiger Woods’ house.
There was a TV in the living room,
and a mantle above the fireplace with
four silver trophies from the Masters,
U.S. Open, British Open and PGA
Championship.

Howell only had a trophy from the
Michelob Championship, a tourna-
ment that now exists on the LPGA
Tour. :

“He probably wondered what was
wrong with me because I just sat
there bit a mesmerized,” Howell said.
“Here you have it. You've got all four
majors sitting right there.”

While the Nissan Open won't be
mistaken for a claret jug, it felt like a
major to Howell.

After going 4'2 years and 127 starts
onthe PGA Tour without winning, -
Howell ended his drought with a play-
off victory Sunday at Riviera that was
surprising on two fronts — the late
fade by Phil Mickelson, and the clutch
putts made by Howell.

-° Mickelson was headed for his sec-

ond victory in as many weeks when
he carried a two-shot lead into the
back nine. Then came a 2-foot par
putt that rimmed out and a 4-foot
birdie putt that stayed right of the
cup. Needing a par on the 18th hole to
win, he came up short of the green, hit
a pedestrian chip and missed an 18-
foot to fall into a playoff.

“I felt like I had the tournament in
my grasp and let it go,” said Mickel-
son, who shot 68. ~

Howell closed with a 6-under 65,
shooting a 32 on the back nine to keep
Mickelson honest. And while he
didn’t do anything spectacular in the
three playoff holes, Howell was never
more clutch in making pars.

On the 18th, he chipped weakly
from behind the 18th green and curled
in a 6-footer for par to extend the
playoff. On the 10th, where he lost a
playoff to Mike Weir four years ago,
Howell was headed fc~ a bogey until a
pitch with perfect pace from 80 feet

that stopped 3 feet away for another

par.

He ended it on the par-3 14th.

Both players came up short with a
7-iron as the air lost some of its
warmth in the fading light. Mickelson
chose to putt, but the ball took a high
hop when it left his blade and came up
10 feet short. Howell, facing the kind
of chip that failed him in Honolulu
last month, hit a solid one that trick-
led 3 feet by the hole.

- Even then, he didn’t think his long
day was over. ‘

_ “It’s Phil Mickelson hitting a par
putt,” Howell reasoned. “I’m giving
him the putt. When he missed it, my
heart jumped because it was a shock
that the guy had actually missed that
putt: I just said a prayer and said,
’God, if this is the time, then let’s
knock this in.’

“And fortunately,” he said, “it
was.”

Howell and Mickelson finished at
268.

Ernie Els (67), Jim Furyk (67) and
Robert Allenby (68) tied for third,
three shots out of the playoff. Els and
Allenby both had chances to catch
Mickelson along the back nine of a
mostly sunny afternoon, but the Big
Easy was tripped up by three bogeys,
while Allenby fell back with a three-
putt from 60 feet on the fringe at the
15th.

It was a blown opportunity for
Mickelson, playing Riviera for the
first time since 2001, although it prob-
ably won’t cost him too much
momentum as he slowly makes his
way to the Masters.

He worked hard after the U.S.
Open debacle to improve his driving,
and while he missed the 18th fairway

* TURN TO FERGUSON





BY BERNIE WILSON
Associated Press

SAN DIEGO — Norv Turner
got his third shot at an NFL head
coaching job when he was hired
Monday by the San Diego Char-
gers, a week after the surprise fir-
ing of Marty Schottenheimer.

The hiring came less than 24
hours after the Chargers wrapped
up their interviews. The Chargers
also hired Ted Cottrell as defen-
sive coordinator.

Turner, the San Francisco 49ers’
offensive coordinator, was the only
one of the six candidates who’s
been an NFL head coach, and the
only one from the offensive side of
the ball.

He inherits a team that was an
NFL-best 14-2 last season but
melted down in its playoff opener,
a stunning 24-21 loss to the New



TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007



PRO FOOTBALL | SAN DIEGO CHARGERS

AFC West champs turn to Turner

Last Monday, the Chargers
again surprised the NFL when
president Dean Spanos fired Schot-
tenheimer, citing a “dysfunctional
situation’’
between the
coach and gen-
eral manager
AJ. Smith.

Turner had
trouble winning
in the regular
season, going
58-82-1 in head
coaching stints
with Washington and Qakland.
Schottenheimer had trouble win-



TURNER

ning in the postseason, going 5-13 .

overall and 0-2 with the Chargers.

Turner was San Diego’s offen-
sive coordinator in 2001, when
LaDainian Tomlinson was a rookie
and Smith was the assistant to the
late John Butler.

The Chargers still use the same
offense Turner installed.

“This isn’t a team where you’re
rebuilding,” Turner said. “We
should start fast. We should be
good early and we should be good
late. Not having to go through the
normal things you have to go
through when you make a coach-
ing change is going to help the
players more than anyone.”

Turner was fired by the Raiders
in 2005 after going 9-23 in two sea-
sons. San Francisco’s Mike Nolan
quickly hired Turner to take over
the NFL’s 32nd-ranked offense.
Turner got remarkable progress
from quarterback Alex Smith and
an improved offensive line. He
helped Frank Gore become the
NFC’s leading rusher in a breakout
season. .

Turner will be able to help with
the continued development of



INTERNATIONAL EDITION





quarterback Philip Rivers, who
was voted to the Pro Bowl but saw
his play tail off down the stretch.
Tomlinson was the league’s MVP
after setting NFL records with 31
touchdowns and 186 points.

Turner might be viewed by
some as a safe pick, but Spanos
said the Chargers were swayed by
his experience as a head coach and
the continuity he can bring.

“You can say whatever you
want to say,” Spanos said. “If we
hadn’t made a change and we lost,
we made the wrong decision. If we
do make the change and we lose,
we made the wrong decision. So
the net result of all this is, there’s
only one thing we have to do this
year, and that’s get back in the
playoffs. Just get to the postseason
and win the first game, is our goal.
And then I think we’re off to a
good start.”

England Patriots.





HOCKEY | NEW YORK ISLANDERS 6, PITTSBURGH 5

A rare pointless outing

Sillinger’s last-minute goal for Islanders ends Penguins’ unbeaten streak

BY IRA PODELL
Associated Press

UNIONDALE, N.Y. — Suddenly, the Pitts-
burgh Penguins’ standard of success has risen
as quickly as their place in the Eastern Confer-
ence standings.

Just 26.8 seconds away from another produc-
tive outing, Pittsburgh allowed Mike Sillinger’s
winning goal that gave the New York Islanders
a 6-5 comeback victory and snapped the Pen-
guins’ point streak at 16 games Monday.

Pittsburgh, riding a 14-0-2 surge that vaulted
the Penguins from also-ran to Atlantic Division-
contenders, got three goals from Ryan Malone,
two from Mark Recchi and four assists from
NHL scoring leader Sidney Crosby, but couldn’t
survive shaky goaltending by Marc-Andre
Fleury.

He will have to be better if the Penguins
hope to reach the playoffs for the first time
since 2001. :

' Sillinger took a pass from Andy Hilbert in
the high slot and got off a shot that hit under
Fleury’s glove and carried in for his 20th goal.

“When you outscore a team like this, you’re
doing something right,” Sillinger said.

“When you score five goals on the road,
you've got to win those games,” Penguins coach
Michel Therrien said.

Chris Simon scored twice, Viktor Kozlov,

Jason Blake and Miroslav Satan added goals,
and Marc-Andre Bergeron had two assists in his
Islanders debut one day after being acquired
from Edmonton.

Pittsburgh, which led 3-1 and 5-4, hadn’t lost
in regulation since Jan. 10 at Florida. It was the
Penguins’ longest streak since an 18-game run in
1993 that included a league-record 17 consecu-
tive victories.

Malone scored in the opening minute of all
three periods, but the Penguins continued a
recent pattern of blown leads and had a six-
game winning streak broken.

Crosby is first in the league with 95 points,
despite only one goal in ll games.

Malone gave Pittsburgh a 5-4 lead at 48 sec-
onds of the third, putting in his rebound after a
shot from Crosby bounced to him. He has 12
goals this season, six against the Islanders in the
first two hat tricks of his career.

Simon broke out of a 26-game scoring
drought, netting his second of the game and
seventh overall 1:11 later.

Recchi notched his 21st goal, one day after



ED BETZ/AP

STICK TO IT: New York Islanders’ Mike Sillinger, left, faces off with Pittsburgh Penguins’
Sidney Crosby in the second period of their game on Monday in Uniondale, N.Y.

reaching 20 for the Sth time in 18 seasons. The
power-play tally gave Pittsburgh a 2-1 lead with
49 seconds left in the first period.

The Penguins needed only 49 more at the
start of the second to grab a two-goal advan-
tage. After a lengthy video review, Malone was
credited with his second of the game and fifth
against New York this season.

Their joy was short-lived as the Islanders
tied it with goals by Simon and Blake 15 seconds
apart. Simon made it 3-2 at 2:03, then, during a
delayed-penalty call, Blake tied his career high
with No. 28.

€

-It marked the fourth time in six games that
the Penguins blew an advantage of at least two
goals, but they had all won the others.

Satan gave New York its first lead at 8:05
when he put in a juicy rebound after a hard
drive by Kozlov during 4-on-4 play.

Recchi struck again 16 seconds into a 5-on-3
advantage, making it 4-4 with 1:59 remaining in
the middle frame.

Kozlov’s power-play goal 14:49 into the game
tied it at 1 and was New York’s second with a
man advantage in 22 chances over eight games.

e MORE NHL NEWS

SPORTS SHOWCASE | RICHARD PITINO

His own man, but young coach embraces father

BY ALAN ROBINSON
Associated Press

PITTSBURGH — The last name alone is
enough to stamp Duquesne University’s youn-
gest assistant as an on-the-rise college basket-
ball coach.

Pitino.

Yes, Richard Pitino is Louisville coach Rick
Pitino’s son and is proud of it, though he prefers
the more formal Richard. He wants his own
identity, and ironically, a tragedy in the early
morning hours of Sept. 17 might have helped
him achieve that.

After five Duquesne players were shot, four
of them only weeks after arriving on campus,
other players frantically called Pitino for advice
and support. The difficult, demanding and
ongoing ordeal has helped the 24-year-old
Pitino understand that college coaching
involves more than Xs and Os, text messaging

recruits and watching game tape.

It was a lesson in growing up fast than noth-
ing in his life could have prepared him for, not
even the experience of losing two uncles sev-
eral months apart in 2001 — one in the Sept. ll
terrorist attacks.

“It’s like coach [Ron] Everhart told me, ‘You
came here last spring as a second-year assistant,
and now you're a 10-year veteran,” Pitino said.
“For me it’s been a learning experience in how
to handle things. Every tragedy is different and
you've got to handle it differently with each kid
and with each person.”

Duquesne (10-14) has rebounded admirably
from the terrible incident, winning far more
games than expected with a nearly new roster
and upsetting Boston College, Xavier, Dayton
and Saint Louis.

*TURN TO SHOWCASE



KEITH SRAKOCIC/AP

LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON: Duquesne
University’s youngest assistant coach,
Richard Pitino, center, watches his father,
Louisville basketball coach Rick Pitino, at
work against host Pittsburgh on Feb. 12.



____MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

SOCCER | AUTO RACING | TENNIS | ETC.

4B | TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20,2007 INTERNATIONAL EDITION





SOCCEER | EXTRA TIME

new twist to sport’s violence



BY CHRIS LEHOURITES some time in court. In 2003, he Newcastle players Lee Bowyer death at the FA Cup semifinal 2
Associated Press was charged with three racism and Kieron Dyer exchanged match against Nottingham :
LONDON — Liverpool offenses after a night out in punches on the field during a Forest at Hillsborough Sta- u

striker Craig Bellamy added a
new twist to the problem of
soccer violence last week
when he attacked a teammate.

Yes, a teammate.

The Wales forward alleg-
edly hit John Arne Riise in the
legs with a golf club while Liv-
erpool was in Portugal at a
training camp preparing for a
Champions League match
against defending champion
FC Barcelona. s

Bellamy now faces a fine of
$155,000 and an uncertain
future with the 18-time English
league champions.

If teammates whacking
each other with golf clubs
after a night out isn’t absurd
enough, consider the reason

Cardiff, Wales. He admitted to

using threatening, abusive or |

insulting words or behavior
and was fined $1,252.

_ The charge of “racially
aggravated” abuse was
dropped. —

Late last year, Bellamy was
cleared of assaulting two
women in a nightclub.

But Bellamy can’t be sin-
gled out as the team’s lone
troublemaker in Portugal.
Other Liverpool players,
including Jerzy Dudek, Jer-
maine Pennant and Robbie
Fowler, were also said to have
been drunk and acting up.

There have been worse
crimes committed by profes-
sional athletes, however, and

game in 2005.

Bowyer was later sus-
pended for seven games and
Dyer banned for three. The
team also fined Bowyer.

Gillett and Hicks are no
strangers to pugnacious play-
ers — both own NHL hockey
teams. But spending $430.8
million for a group of players
who hate each other isn’t
something they’re likely to tol-
erate.

And they shouldn’t,
because soccer — and Liver-
pool — has had an ugly
enough past when it comes to
violence. ;

At the 1985 European Cup
final at the Heysel stadium in
Brussels, 39 people were killed

dium.

Hooliganism in soccer
hasn’t been confined to just
Liverpool, of course.

On Feb. 2, 38-year-old
policeman Filippo Raciti was
killed by rioting fans after
Catania played Palermo in the
Italian league. That incident
led to the suspension of league
play for a week and security
measures that have forced
some teams to play in empty
stadiums until standards are
met. ,

There have been other soc- |
cer riots and fighting all over.

the world, but it’s still worry-
ing to read about a profes-
sional soccer player hitting
another — especially in the



STEPHEN DOWELL/ORLANDO SENTINEL/MCT

ESCAPE HATCH: Clint Bowyer climbs out of his burning
race car after a crash on the final lap of the Daytona
500 on Sunday in Daytona Beach, Fla.

Circuit writes its own
‘Ricky Bobby’ ending

for the fight — they were argu- plenty of unruly behavior has when Liverpool fans charged _ legs. BY JIM LITKE ae
ing about a karaoke competi- come from overly aggressive their Juventus counterparts Luckily for Riise, he was | Associated Press ye
tion. sportsmen over the years. and a stadium wall collapsed. not injured. If only the same | The first 150 laps of the

Karaoke! Teammates have fought Four years later, 96 Liver- could be said for the image of Daytona 500 was like watch- :

The news of the fracas defi-
nitely wasn’t music to the ears

of George Gillett Jr. and Tom waiting for parking spots to

Hicks, Liverpool’s new Ameri- open up. is

can owners. Then the sun went down, nee
The pair supposedly heard a full moon popped up and

about the fight in Portugal and everybody started behaving

ordered Liverpool manager like the Wolfman — sud- ;

Rafa Benitez to issue a state- denly in a hurry and only too ‘ ee

ment saying that players who eager to mix it up. GARY GREEN/ORLANDO SENTINEL/MCT

misbehaved would be pun- The last 50 laps featured THE VICTOR: Kevin Harvick

ished.
“We will take disciplinary







before in the English league.

pool fans were crushed to

Liverpool and soccer.





ing drivers circle the lot at
the grocery store politely

five wrecks, all involving
multiple cars, and small won-



celebrates his victory.

action and fine any of them der. There was no room. utation smudged with oil
who are found to have With three dozen circuits even less.
breached club rules during our left, the top 20 were sepa- The funny thing is that
stay in Portugal,” Benitez said rated by a second. With six hijinks have been on the way A
in Sunday’s statement. laps to go, the field was as out the last half-dozen or so .
Bellamy, who has a history tightly packed as it was atthe years, as NASCAR embarked -
of losing his temper, looks to start. on an NFL-style expansion yy
be the first casualty of the dic- At the finish, as car parts, _ plan, growing more homoge- oe
tum — something not exactly smoke and sparks flew neous than homespun, more
alien to him. through the airbehindthem choreographed than chaotic a
When he played for New- | like the climactic chase scene _in the bargain. ; 2"
castle in 2004, Bellamy threw from “The Road Warrior,” But this race was a throw- ;
a chair at assistant manager F Kevin Harvick and Mark back in the best sense of the aoe
John Carver. He was then a oe, | Martin were racing side by word, at least once the sun x
heavily fined for calling man- OWEN HUMPHREYS/AP | side at around 200 mph sepa- went down and the cars LF
ager Graeme Souness a liar in CONFRONTATIONAL: Newcastle United’s Steven Taylor, center, is held back by | rated by the length of a car found their griponthe _.
2005. ~~ -goalkeepér Steve Harper as he is confronted by Liverpool's Craig Béllamy'during their | hood. Seconds later, provid- ancient concrete oval. Driv- Tail
Bellamy has also spent '’Prerfiier League match at St James’ Park in Newcastle, England, on Saturday. 9° | | ing a perfect exclamation” ers banged into the walls, off. atl
; a uibasdl eve BR Boh Say MANS coe herve Ss | point, Clint Bowyer skidded each other and the crazier it af
| across the line with his car got, the more chances they ou
TENNIS | upside down — and on fire. took. we
\ The guys calling the race “Wildest thing I’ve been a
e . ; 9 e | on Fox, with decades of part of,” Harvick said after {
Federer ties Connors’ ranking record Seite. SEeD5Sarr 2
between them, scoured their victory at .020 seconds, “ina at
| collective memory banks to long time.” :

. | come up with an ending Martin, the sentimental Sh
Associated Press final last year. beat American qualifier Jesse Croatia’s Roko Karanusic | nearly this wild. favorite, wes trying to win is
Roger Federer tied The 25-year-old Federer Witten 1-6, 6-3, 7-6 (7-3) Mon-__ 6-4, 7-6 (7-2). | One referenced “Joey Chi- _ his first Daytona title in 23 ,

Jimmy Connors’ record of has dominated tennis for the day in the first round in Mem- e Dubai Open: Eleni | twood,” the daredevil who tries.
160 consecutive weeks as the _ past three seasons, but is still _ phis, Tenn. Daniilidou of Greece upset | performed death-defying “We were inches or feet
top-ranked player in men’s trying to win a Grand Slam On the women’s side, inthe seventh-seeded LiNaofChina | auto stunts beginninginthe | or whatever. We were short. 7
tennis Monday. title on clay. Cellular South Cup, unseeded while No. 6 Patty Schnyder — 1940s, and whose best work —_ It was so close,” he said -
The 10-time Grand Slam “That’s the only way can American Bethanie Mattek of Switzerland defeated Italy's | _ is still available on you- finally, “but it was second.” ;
champion has held the No.1 make this season a better one defeated two-time champion Francesca Schiavone inthe | tube.com. Another nomi- It’s small consolation, but Fer
ATP Tour than last year,” Federer has Lisa Raymond 6-2,7-Sinthe first round in Dubai, United | nated the 1979 Daytona 500, _ it was as good and honorable FNS
ranking said. “Otherwise it won't be first round, and No. 5 seed Arab Emirates, on Monday. | when Cale Yarborough and a second-place finish as
since Feb. 2, possible.” Nicole Pratt beat Lilia Oster- The 42nd-ranked Daniili- | Donnie Allisonlockedupin there's been in NASCAR.
2004. The Last season, only Nadal and Ioh 6-3, 6-0 to advance to the dou needed more than three =a final-lap battle, spun into Even so, Martin could have “ete!
Swiss star is Andy Murray managed to round of 16. hours to oust Li 7-6 (7-5), 7-6 | the infield, started throwing whined about the lack of a oot
assured of beat Federer, who finished the e ABN AMRI: In Rotter- (7-3). | insults and then punches as caution flag seconds from the
breaking the season with 12 titles and 16 dam, Netherlands, top-seeded Schnyder, the only left- | Allison’s brother, Bobby, end. As he battled Harvick to
record next finals appearances in his 17 Nikolay Davydenko cruised hander in the tournament, | pulled over and joined the the line, the final, seven-car i
week. tournaments. He earned $8.34 into the second round witha struggled in the opening set | fray. The fight garnered so crash was exploding just a “aes
FEDERER Connors million and also won the sea- 6-3, 6-4 victory over Germa- _ but prevailed 6-7 (5-7), 6-3, 6-3. | muchattention that anation _ few hundred yards behind Me
. was No. 1 son-ending Masters Cup. ny’s Michael Berrer on Mon- Maria Kirilenko of Russia | watching the first-ever live them. Had the yellow flag ue
from July 1974 to August 1977. Connors won eight Grand _ day. also advanced to the second broadcast of. 500-mile race been dropped, the field sf

He is now coaching one of

Federer’s biggest rivals, Andy lasted more than 20 years. involving a seeded player Monica Niculescu of Roma- making up a half-lap deficit Martin would have won. =
Roddick. Although he also only failed to Monday, Novak Djokovic of nia 6-3, 6-0. | and sneaking across the fin- —_ Instead, the green flag flew. a
Federer, who has won six of winthe French Open, Connors Serbia beat French qualitier Alicia Molik of Australia ish line. “I was ahead of it all,” t

the last seven Grand Slam
titles, hasn’t played since beat-

Slam titles in his career, which

did win the 1976 U.S. Open on
clay.

In the only other match

Florent Serra 7-6 (8-6), 6-4.
Djokovic will meet another

round after beating wild-card

beat Anna-Lena Groenefeld
of Germany 6-3, 6-4 while

barely noticed Richard Petty

Grand as that race was,
driver-turned-broadcaster

would have been frozen and

Martin conceded, “It was
pretty decent where I was

ing Fernando Gonzalez in The American is the only qualifier, Andrei Pavel of Japan’s Ai Sugiyama defeated Darrell Waltrip came up with _ sitting.” on

the Australian Open final on man to win the U.S. Openon Romania, in the next round. Tunisian Selima Sfar 6-4, 5-7, | aneven better one. And because Martin was a saa

Jan. 28. He returns to action alll three surfaces — grass, clay Pavel beat Daniele Bracialli 6-3. “This finish,” he said, standup guy, France, Harvick 5

next week at the Dubai Open. and hardcourt. of Italy 6-1, 6-1. Defending champion and __ recalling last year’s and all the rest of the “
Federer has 8,120 points in The ATP rankings began on In other first-round second-ranked Justine Henin | NASCAR-inspired hit com- employees in his traveling

the year-based rankings. Aug. 23, 1973. matches, Belgium’s Olivier had a bye in the first round. edy, “It’s ‘Ricky Bobby.’ It circus are sitting pretty.

Rafael Nadal, the man who Rochus rallied to beat Janko The tournament, which couldn’t have been any bet- —- Since the Daytona 500 is

beat Federer at the French TOURNAMENTS Tipsarevic of Serbia 4-6, 6-2, runs until Saturday, also fea- ter.” NASCAR's biggest event, the

Open last year, is second with e Regions Morgan Kee- 6-4. Dutch wild card Robin tures third-ranked Amelie Nor better-timed. season effectively starts with gn

4,705 points. Nadal also beat gan Championships: No. 6 Haase recorded his first ATP Mauresmo, Svetlana Kuz- Think back to the events its Super Bowl and builds ;

Federer in the Dubai Open

Coughlin,

ica’s Big Three, and the addi- _just bought back into. fe
tional responsibilities all that A few years back, France '
Associated Press , topping second-place finisher In the men’s 200 breast- lege 55 miles northeast of money rolling in would place _ was asked whether all the

Natalie Coughlin and
Michael Phelps dominated
the Missouri Grand Prix again
on Sunday night in Columbia,
Mo., each winning a pair of
races in the final major com-
petition before next month’s
world championships in Aus-
tralia.

Coughlin set an American
pool record in the 200-meter
freestyle with a time of 1 min-
ute, 58 seconds. Fellow 2004
Olympian Katie Hoff finished
second.

Coughlin added a win in the
50 freestyle, finishing in 25.22,

seed Jurgen Melzer rallied to

tournament victory by beating

SPORTS ROUNDUP

Phelps dominate swim meet

Amanda Weir by a half-sec-
ond. Coughlin also won the
100 freestyle Saturday.

Like Coughlin, Phelps won
both races he entered Sunday,
the 200 freestyle and the 400
individual medley.

On Saturday, Phelps broke
his own world record in the
200 butterfly. Sunday, he had
to come from behind in the
medley race, overtaking sec-
ond-place finisher Ous Mel-
louli in the final 25 meters. He
finished in 4:11.3.

Phelps also won the 200
freestyle in 1:46.47.

stroke, Eric Shanteau upset
Longhorn Aquatics teammate
and world-record holder
Brendan Hansen. Shanteau
finished the race in 2:13.03 sec-
onds.

SWIMMER DIES

Kenyon College swimmer
Caleb Gottinger, 19, of Mil-
waukee, died Sunday after he
fell in a dormitory bathroom
and struck his head, school
officials said Monday.

He apparently fainted Sat-
urday morning and tests at a
medical center near the col-

netsova and Martina Hingis.

Columbus, Ohio, determined
he suffered a fractured skull
and a hemorrhage, college
spokesman Shawn Presley
said.

Gottinger was declared
brain dead Sunday morning
after being transferred to
Columbus’ Riverside Method-
ist Hospital.

JOCKEY TRAMPLED

Puerto Rican jockey
Manuel Caraballo has died
after being trampled during a
race, authorities in the U.S.
Virgin Islands said Monday.

|

of last week, when NASCAR
czar Brian France gave his
upbeat state-of-the-sport
address. He boasted about
new T'V partners, new spon-
sors, anew carmaker coming
on-board to challenge Amer-

on the people who make the
sport go.

Then an hour or so later,
his handlers announced four
teams caught cheating would
lose their crew chiefs for
Sunday’s race. A fifth team,
headed by owner-driver
Michael Waltrip, was busted
the following day. That may
have been the most embar-
rassing development of all,
since he was fronting for
new series-entrant Toyota, a
manufacturer that knew little
about NASCAR's notorious
past and liked seeing its rep-

momentum from there. Now
there’s a great race, a little
controversy and enough
highlights to fill up a week’s
worth of the nightly pro-
grams that ESPN has trotted
out to promote the sport it

changes he embarked on,
from increased corporate
involvement to a crackdown
on the drivers’ conduct, lan-
guage and under-the-hood
shenanigans wasn’t driving
his core audience away. He
replied that coming up with
magical moments wouldn’t
be tough so long as men and
machines remained a volatile
mix.
“Racing has always had
them. The trick now,” he
said, “is to keep them coming
on a bigger stage.”

So far, so good.





AT WUD ess

EASTERN CONFERENCE







SOUTHEAST WL Pct. GB 10 Str. Home Away _ Conf
Washington 29 21 580 - 5:5 W-1 19-7 10-14 20-10
Orlando 27 26 © «©.509 31% 4-6 W-1 18-10 9-16 15-17
Miami 26 26 500 44 7-3 W-2 15-10 11-16 13-15
Atlanta 20 31 1392 9% 5-5 L-l 9-15 11-16 12-20
Charlotte 19 33 .365 11 4-6 W-1 11-15 8-18 13-20
"ATLANTIC == WL Pet. -GB_L10_ Str. Home Away Conf
Toronto 29 24 ~««.547 - 82 W-2 19-7 10-17 20-10
New Jersey 25 29 463 4% 4-6 L-2 14-13. 11-16 19-14
New York 23 30 «434-655 L-L:13-13 10-17 13-18
Philadelphia 17 36 .321 12 46 L-3 9-15 8-21 12-18
Boston 13 38 255 15 1:9 W-1 521 817 9-24
CENTRAL WL Pet. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Detroit 32 19 627 - 82 L-L 17-10 15-9 22-10
_ + Cleveland 30 22 577 2% 64 L-1 20-7 10-15 18-14
‘ Indiana 28 24 538 4% 6-4 W-2 17-10 11-14 19-13
Chicago 29 25 537 4% 4-6 L2 20-7 9-18 20-10
Milwaukee 19 34 .358 14 2-8 L-4 1-11 8-23 9-21
WESTERN CONFERENCE.
SOUTHWEST wil Pct. _ GB i L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Dallas 44.9 830 - 91 W-9 24-3 20-6 30-6
San Antonio 35 18 .660 9 5-5 W-2 -16-8 19-10 21-11
Houston 33 19 .63510% 7-3 L-1 19-7 14-12 19-17
New Orleans 25 28 .472 19 7-3 W-l 17-11 8-17 15-19
Memphis 14 40 .25930% 3-7 L-1 11-17 3-23 8-25
NORTHWEST WL Pct. GB L10 ‘Str. Home Away Conf
Utah 7-3 W-6 21-6, 14-11 20-10
Denver 4-6 L-1 14-14 12-11) 11-17
Minnesota 5-5 W-2 16-9 9-18 15-19
Portland 4-6 L-2 12-14 10-18 13-17
Seattle 4-6 W-2 14-13 6-19 9-20
PACIFIC = OW }_L10Str, Home Away Conf
Phoenix ‘ 5-5 L-3 20-6 19-7 19-10
L.A. Lakers 30 23 566 9% 3-7 L4 19-7 11-16 17-10
LA. Clippers 25 27 .481 14 46 L-2 17-8 819 14-17
Golden State 25 29 463 15 46.W-1 19-9 6-20 13-17
Sacramento 22 29 «.43116% 5-5 L-3. 15-12 7-17 12-21
RESULTS AND SCHEDULES
Monday’s results Tonight’s games Sunday’s results
NO GAMES SCHEDULED ‘Min. at Was., 7 All-Star Game
N.O. at Cha., 7 West 153, East 132
Orl. at N.Y., 7:30
Det. at Mil., 8
Den. at S.A., 8
Atl. at Chi., 8:30
Bos. at Sac., 10
Utah at Por., 10
Mem. at Sea., 10
Pho. at L.A.C., 10:30





WNBA

Atlanta committee
searching for team

BY CHARLES ODUM
Associated Press

An Atlanta organizing committee is trying to
bring a WNBA team to Atlanta for the 2008 season,
Atlanta City Council president Lisa Borders said
Monday.

Borders said she is part of an eight-member com-
mittee interested in bringing women’s professional
baéketball back to Atlanta for the first time in 10 _
years. The Atlanta Glory was a member of the ©
American Basketball League, which folded on Dec.
28, 1998.

The WNBA, which had 16 teams in 2002, is down
to 13 teams in 2007. The Charlotte franchise was dis-

_ banded following the 2006 season, leaving the
-’ Jeague without a team in the Southeast.

The WNBA also has had teams in Cleveland,
Miami and Portland fold since 2002. A Chicago
team was added for the 2006 season.

“J think we recognize the value that the leagu



._ would bring to our city,” Borders said.

“We are starting to talk with folks who would be
potential owners. Our goal at the exploratory level
is to have a team in place for the 2008 season.”

WNBA president Donna Orender on Monday
called Atlanta “a terrific destination for the
WNBA.”

PRO B

League heads back to

BY BRIAN MAHONEY
Associated Press

LAS VEGAS — Time for Allen Iverson,
Pat Riley, Steve Nash and the rest of the NBA
to get back to work. .

Jason Kidd, too, though even he wasn’t
sure how much longer he’ll be doing it in
New Jersey. ;

The show is over in Las Vegas, where the
NBA capped its weekend of All-Star festivi-
ties with the West’s victory over the East on
Sunday night.

Now it’s time to get serious again.

“Being in Vegas, it’s a great placé to be, a
great place to chill,” Minnesota’s Kevin Gar-
nett said. “But it’s out with the fantasy and
back to reality.”

That means trade talk for some teams,
playoff pushes for. others. It all gets started
tonight when play resumes with 10 games.
Riley returns to Miami’s bench the following
night, and the next big event on the league’s
calendar comes quickly after that.

The trade deadline is Thursday, with Pau
Gasol and Kidd among the big names who
will wait to see if they have a new destina-
tion. Gasol has asked out of Memphis and the
Grizzlies are trying to accommodate him,
while Kidd, who missed the All-Star game
because of a back injury, acknowledged dur-
ing the break that teams have asked about
getting him out of New Jersey.

In the East, landing one proven star could
be all a team needs to seize control in a medi-
ocre conference. Teams in the West could be

» looking to deal for a better chance to com-

pete with powerful Dallas and Phoenix.

Denver hoped it had done that when it
acquired Iverson from Philadelphia in
December to pair with Carmelo Anthony, but
the results haven’t been there yet, mostly
because the duo hasn’t been on the court
enough. Anthony was serving his 15-game
suspension when Iverson was acquired, and
Iverson missed eight of the last nine games
because of a sprained ankle.

So despite having two of the NBA’s top
five scorers, Denver is only seventh in the
West, two games ahead of the ninth-place
Clippers. But Anthony thinks the Nuggets are
ready to make their move.

“Now that this is over with, I can focus on
my season, the rest of the season,” Anthony
said after the All-Star game. “A.I. told me
today he’d be ready to play [tonight], so that
was a good sign.

“We need some wins. This first half of the.

season was rocky for us. Hopefully we can
put that behind us and get better.” x

Nash joined Iverson on the West bench
because of a shoulder injury that forced him
to miss the last four games, though hopes to
return tonight. The Suns couldn’t keep up
their sizzling pace without their two-time
MVP, losing three times to fall 442 games
behind Dallas for the league’s best record.

The Heat already know their big piece is
ready. .

Riley is set to take the coaching reins back
from Ron Rothstein when Miami visits Hous-
ton on Wednesday night. He returns to a
team that looks much different from the one
he left on Jan. 3 to have knee and hip surgery.

Shaquille O’Neal has since come back and
the Heat have won seven of their last eight
games, rebounding from a horrendous start
and moving into eighth place in the Eastern











}

L | HOCKEY

NBA | SECOND-HALF PREVIEW





work

C.W. GRIFFIN/MIAMI HERALD/MCT
TALKIN’ AND WALKIN’: Miami head coach Pat Riley, above, speaks at a press

conference prior to the Heat’s game against the Portland Trail Blazers in Miami on
Feb. 13. Denver Nuggets guard Allen Iverson, below left, walks gingerly back onto

the court after rolling his injured ankle on a play in overtime against the New
Orleans Hornets on Feb. 7. The New Jersey Nets’ Jason Kidd, below right, speaks ©



at a news conference during NBA All-Star festivities in Las Vegas on Friday.

DAVIDZALUBOWSKI/AP

Conference. The defending NBA champions
are only four games behind Washington in
the Southeast Division.

“We wanted at the beginning of the year
to come out of the blocks strong but it wasn’t
scripted that way,” Dwyane Wade said. “So
we have to take what we have and go into the
second half of the season, and hopefully



MARK HUMPHREY/AP



KEVORKDJANSEZIAN/AP

Jason Williams gets back healthy and we
have all our guns and we have our coach back
and just try to defend our title. It’s going to
be very tough and whatever happens, we can
say we all did it together.”

The Heat still have plenty of time to move
up in the East, where Detroit has looked like
the class of the conference since signing
Chris Webber. Even teams such as Atlanta
and New York, both coming off dismal sea-
sons and well below .500 in this one, still
have playoff hopes heading into the final two
months.

The West has four teams right behind
Garnett’s Timberwolves for the final playoff
spot, but it’s hard to imagine any of the teams
at the bottom doing any damage in the play-
offs since they’d have to face the Mavs or
Suns right away.

But teams like Utah and Houston could be
dangerous second-round foes, especially if
injured All-Stars Carlos Boozer and Yao
Ming make successful comebacks.

That can wait. There’s enough to keep the
NBA busy Thursday — trades during the day
and an NBA finals rematch in Dallas that
night. :

“Obviously we have a lot of work to do,”
the Mavs’ Dirk Nowitzki said. “We have a big
game on Thursday, so it should be fun.”

Kotalik hurt the knee collid-
ing with Boston defenseman
Andrew Ference five minutes
into the second period in Buf-
falo’s 4-3 shootout loss to the
Bruins on Saturday.

Kotalik’s name is added to a
growing list of banged-up
Sabres. Buffalo is now down
six regulars after Maxim Afi-
nogenov, the team’s second-
leading scorer, broke his left
hand and Jiri Novotny twisted
his left ankle in a 2-1 overtime
win over Edmonton on Thurs-
day. Afinogenov is expected to
miss a minimum of six weeks,
while Novotny will be out
indefinitely.

Buffalo has already lost for-
ward Paul Gaustad (torn ten-
don) for the season, and
defenseman Jaroslav Spacek
(broken left hand) will be out
for about a month. Center Tim
Connolly has yet to play this
year after sustaining a concus-
sion in last season’s playoffs.

Kotalik has 14 goals and 36
points in 59 games this season



also scored for the Canucks,
who have won four straight
games to move two points
ahead of Calgary atop the

Andrew Brunette scored
twice, Brad Richardson added
a short-handed goal and Ian
Laperriere also scored for the

e Sabres: Buttalo forward
Ales Kotalik will miss the next
4-6 weeks because of a right

after setting career highs in
goals (25) and points (62) last
year.

To replace Kotalik, Buffalo
recalled Michael Ryan from
AHL Rochester.

e Oilers: Edmonton
placed forward Fernando Pis-
ani on injured reserve Monday
while he recovers from a con-
cussion.

The Oilers recalled
defenseman Tom Gilbert and
winger Jean-Francois Jacques
from Wilkes-Barre/Scranton
of the AHL.

NTA NHL
¢ “
eee eee Hartnell’s rapid-fire goals lead Predators
SOUTHEAST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV p
TampaBay 33 24 2 1 69191 183 16-13-0-0 17-11-2-1
Atlanta 30 22 6 3 69185 194 14-9-3-2 16-13-3-1 Associated Press
Carolina 30 24 3 4 67185 192 15-11-1-3 15-13-2-1
Florida 23 26 5 6 57170 195 16-10-2-1 7-16-3-5 NASHVILLE, Tenn. —
-“ Washington 23 27 2 7 55177 206 14-12-1-3 9-15-1-4 Scott Hartnell scored two
ate goals in 23 seconds and Nash-
ar ee . oT as \ ; ee aos : mci leer) ville went back on top of the
ew Jersey 7 -6-0 -11-0- ic
Pittsburgh 32:18 «4 «5S «73 208 187 18-B-2-2 14-10-2-3 baal Conference by beat
NY. Islanders 29 23 4 4 66177 170 15-10-3-1 14-13-1-3 ing Phoenix 4-1 on Monday.
N.Y. Rangers 29 25 3 2 63175 170 12-13-3-0 17-12-0-2 The Predators, who
> Philadelphia 16 35 3 5 40 154 221 5-17-3-4 11-18-0-1 snapped a two-game losing
NORTHEAST WL OL SLPTS GF GA Home away _ pw | Streak, leapfrogged idle
Buffalo OE 2) B21) 168 DOTA 19811 12812 | Detroit into first place in the
Ottawa 3422, «2 «1 71200 157 18-11-1-1 16-11-1-0 —15-9-0-1 Central Division and the West.
Montreal 30 25 1 5 66173 181 17-12-0-3 13-13-1-2 — 10-8-0-4 They did it despite not getting
Toronto 29 22 3 5 66191 192 12-12-2-3 17-10-1-2 —10-8-2-2 :
Boston 28 26 1 3 60167 212 16-12-0-2 12-14-1-1 11-12-0-1 any points from new forward
Peter Forsberg for the second
straight game since he joined
. WESTERN CONFERENCE Nashville.
CENTRAL _W__L OL SLPTS GF GA HOME _ AWAY DIV ee ela Aye
Nashville 40 18 2 1 83206 152 22-5-2-1 18-13-0-0 17-5+1-0 Jes eu ee otg eg secre oe
Detroit ie 3 3 82 188 148 «21342 17-1321 12-411 | Nashville, tied with Buffalo for
- Louis 25 26 5 4 59155 181 14-15-2-1 11-11-3-3 10-12-2-2 the overall lead in the NHL
icago 22 28 2 7 53147 179 11-13-1-3 11-15-1-4 10-12-1-0 ‘ ‘
Columbus 23 31 2 3 51146 182 14-14-1-2 9-17-1-1 —7-13-0-2 with 83 points. : .
Oleg Saprykin spoiled ; 5‘ ‘ :
NORTHWEST W LOL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY piv Tomas Vokoun’s shutout bid HE PLAYS DEFENSE, TOO: Nashville right wing Scott Hartnell
Vancouver’ 34-2113 72 187 150 19-9-1-1. 15-12-0-2 13-11-01 | by scoring Phoenix’s lone goal slides on the ice to block a shot by Phoenix defenseman
Calne 7 0 : : a 188 158 Haw ia 12-6-1-2 with 2:46 left. Nick Boynton, right, in the third period on Monday. The
innesota 9 171 156 20-5- 12-18-0- 9-6-1-2 : : , : : : ad
Edmonton oe 26 32 «GL 160 171 (WeLi-1-l 10-15-2-1 9-12-1-0 Vokoun finished with 22 Coyotes’ Mathias Tjarnqvist watches the action in front
Colorado 28 27 2 2 60190 187 16-13-1-2 12-14-1-0 —10-9-1-0 saves. of Predators goalie Tomas Vokoun. Hartnell scored two
Curtis Joseph made 3l ina i -
paciric WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME _ AWAY DIV igetie ees P goals in 23 seconds as the hosts won 4-1.
Anaheim 35 16 2 7 79193 155 18-5-1-5 17-11-1-2 15-5-0-2 e Bruins 6, Flyers 3: In had won three of four.
San Jose 36 22 0 1 73178 150 18-11-0-1 18-11-0-0 12-11-0-1 ladelphi : .
Dallas et 0 2 2 ise 142 19-901 161201 17-600 | Philadelphia, Petr Tenkrat Boston’s Tim Thomas
Phoenix 25 32 2 1 53 160 207 13-13-2-0. 12-19-0-1 — 7-13-2-1 scored twice during a wild made 30 saves in earning his
‘Los Angeles 20 31 5 5 50170 211 11-12-44 9-19-1-1 7-14-0-3 second period and helped Bos- fourth win in five games.
Note: Two points for a win, one point for a tie and overtime loss ton beat Philadelphia. Northwest Division.
Marco Sturm, P.J. Axelsson, LATE SUNDAY
RESULTS AND SCHEDULES Brandon Bochenski, and Marc e Canucks 5, Avalanche
Savard also scored for the Bru- 4: Henrik Sedin scored the tie-
Monday’s results Tonight’ ” é : : 3 ‘
aes sae Se Golghe s games Sunday's sroutls ins, who have won four of five. breaking goal 1:31 into the third
fers 6, urgh 5 + Florida at T.B., 7:30 Dallas 5, San Jose 2 : ‘
Nashville 4, Phoenix 1 Phil. at Buffalo 7 Pittsburgh 3, Washington 2 Jeff Carter, Kyle Calder, period, Brendan Morrison Avalanche.
joston 6, Philadelphia janta ai ina, 7 N.Y. R 2, Chi 1 1 ‘ $65
plana at Solas) RLY. Rangers 2, Chicago and Scottie Upshall, playing added his second of the game ELSEWHERE
Edmonton at Ottawa, 730, Montreal 3, Columbus 2 es his first game in Philadelphia 2:20 later, and host Vancouver
a * i ‘ : 7
Rangers at NJ. 730 {25 Angee couads | since being acquired Thursday beat Colorado.
teat! an Se in the deal that sent captain Matt Cooke matched a
Calgary at Colorado, 9 Peter Forsberg to Nashville, career high with a goal and
Vane.-at:Ananetm 10 scored for the Flyers. They two assists, and Daniel Sedin knee injury.



6.B | | TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007

Associated Press

MANHATTAN, Kan. —
Freshman reserve Sherron
Collins scored 20 points and
led a key second-half run, and
No. 6 Kansas beat Kansas State
71-62 Monday night to extend
its winning streak in Manhat-
tan to 24 games.

Mario Chalmers added 17
points, Darrell Arthur had 13
points and 12 rebounds, and
Brandon Rush finished with 11
points for Kansas (24-4, ll-2
Big 12), which has never lost in
Bramlage Coliseum ‘since it
opened for the 1988-89 season.
The Jayhawks’ last loss in
Manhattan was a 58-57 defeat
on Jan. 29, 1983, in Ahearn
Fieldhouse.

@ No. 10 Pittsburgh 71,
Seton Hall 68: Levance Fields
scored seven of his 15 points in
the final 24 minutes to help
short-handed Pittsburgh hold
off Seton Hall in East Ruther-
ford, NJ.

Levon Kendall had 14

Wisconsin leaps over Ohio State |

BY RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press

Get ready for another 1 vs. 2
showdown in the Big Ten —
this time on the hardwood.

Wisconsin was the new No. -

lin The Associated Press Top
25 poll on Monday and Big

Ten rival Ohio State was not

far behind at No. 2.
The Badgers (26-2, 12-1), on
top of the poll for the first time

in school history, play the |

Buckeyes (24-3, 12-1) in
Columbus on Sunday — just a
bit more than three months
after Ohio State and Michigan
played a much-hyped 1 vs. 2
football game at Ohio Stadium.

Florida’s 83-70 loss at Van-
derbilt on Saturday snapped
the Gators’ 17-game winning
streak and dropped them from
the top spot in the media poll
for the second time this sea-
son.

Wisconsin, which was No. 3
last week, leapfrogged second-
ranked Ohio State to become
the fourth No. 1 team this sea-
son, and 52nd different school
to hold the top spot in the his-
tory of the AP poll.

For the Badgers and coach
Bo Ryan, there’s not much
time to celebrate their new
lofty status, not with a game at
Michigan State on Tuesday.

So Ryan held his own 60-
second celebration at home,
with a big foam “We’re No. I”
finger he took from his kids, a
party favor and a handful of
paper torn into confetti.

“J ran around with the foam
finger, blowing the horn and
throwing the confetti for
about a minute,” Ryan said

WOMEN’S TOP 25 POLL

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

COLLEGE BASKETBA

MONDAY’S GAMES

Freshman leads
No. 6 Kansas

points and eight rebounds and
Sam Young added 1 points for
the Panthers (24-4, 11-2 Big
East).

The victory was the 100th
for Pittsburgh coach Jamie
Dixon (100-26), who reached
the milestone faster than any
other coach in the school’s his-
tory.

e No. 15 Butler 68, Wis.-
Green Bay 58: A.J. Graves
scored 20 points and Brandon
Crone added 17 for the visiting
Bulldogs (25-4, 12-2 Horizon
League).

e No. 16 Marquette 80,
Villanova 67: In Milwaukee,
freshman Lazar Hayward
scored a career-high 18 points
to lead Marquette.

WOMEN’S GAME

e No. 2 Tennessee 56,
No. 7 LSU 51: In Baton Rouge,
La., Candace Parker had 27
points and 13 rebounds to help
the Volunteers hold off Louisi-
ana State.





BILL KOSTROUN/AP

A SLAPDASH PLAY: Seton Hall’s Paul Gause, right, slaps the
ball away from Pittsburgh’s Ronald Ramon during first-
half action on Monday night in East Rutherford, N.J. The
10th-ranked Panthers edged the host Pirates 71-68.



MEN’S TOP 25 POLL

with a laugh. “Then I went
back into my office and
watched the DVD of a very
good Iowa team losing by 30
to Michigan State.”

The Badgers received 35
first-place votes and 1,747
points. Ohio State got 31 first-
place votes and 1,728 points.
No. 3 Florida received four
first-place votes and No. 4
UCLA got two.

“I’m really happy for the

‘players and the university,”
--Ryan’said. “It says something
syabout:the work that’s been put

in, not just this year but over
the years. That’s the reward.

“It does make a great state-
ment for the program.”

For the Big Ten, it’s the sec-
ond time the league best
known for its football has had
the top two teams in the AP
basketball poll. Michigan was
No. 1 and Indiana No. 2 on
Nov. 30, 1992.

The last time the same con-
ference had Nos. 1 and 2 was
last season, when the Big East
had Connecticut at No. 1 and
Villanova No. 2 in the second-
to-last poll.

The last 1 vs. 2 game was
also last season. No. 1 Duke
defeated No. 2 Texas 97-66 at
the Meadowlands in New Jer-
sey on Dec. 10, 2005.

The Blue Devils returned to
the rankings at No. 18 after a
one-week absence. A four-
game losing streak ended an
ll-year run in the Top 25 for
Duke. The Blue Devils were
ranked in 200 straight polls,
the second-longest streak
ever.

But last week Duke beat

Boston College on the road
and Georgia Tech at home and
the voters rewarded the Blue
Devils.

The bottom of the rankings
received a major shake-up as
teams ranked 18-25 last week
went 3-13.

Vanderbilt, Texas, Louis-
ville, BYU and Virginia also
moved into the Top 25. For
Louisville, which beat two
ranked teams — Pittsburgh
and Marquette — on the road,
and BYU, it’s the first time this
season they’ve been ranked.
The Cougars haven't been in
the Top 25 since March 1993.

Dropping out were Okla-
homa State, Kentucky, Boston
College, Indiana and Southern
California.

Duke’s Atlantic Coast Con-
ference rival and Tobacco
Road neighbor, North Caro-
lina, slipped a spot to No. 5
after a 1-1 week. Kansas
jumped three spots to No. 6.

Memphis, Texas A&M,
Washington State and Pitts-
burgh rounded out the top 10.

The Badgers and Buckeyes
will not only be playing for the
No. 1 ranking Sunday, but also
for the inside track to a Big
Ten regular-season title.

Alando Tucker, who has
seven consecutive 20-point
games and is a leading candi-
date for national player of the
year, and the Badgers defeated
Ohio State 72-69 last month in
Madison.

“If there is a player who
was ever responsible for his
team being ranked No. 1, it’s
Alando Tucker,” Ryan said. “If
there is an MVP, it’s him.”

The Badgers started the
season ranked ninth, dipped to
12th and have been on the rise
ever since. An experienced
team that starts three seniors
and two juniors, Wisconsin
has already set a school record
for victories in a season.

“It’s not a bunch of McDon-
ald’s All-Americans and five-
star recruits,” Ryan said. “It’s a
bunch of guys, who paid their
dues.”

The:Buckeyes have been in
the top 10 all season thanks to
one ofthe best. freshmen
classes inthe country.

Seven-footer Greg Oden
leads the team in scoring (15.5)
and rebounding (9.5) and is
shooting 61 percent from the
field with 71 blocked shots in
20 games. Fellow freshmen
Mike Conley Jr. (10.1) and Dae-
quan Cook (11.9) combine to
average 22 points per game.

No. ll Nevada leads the sec-
ond 10 in the Top 25, followed
by Georgetown and No. 13
Southern Illinois, which has its

‘highest ranking ever. The

Salukis reached No. 15 in
March 2004.

Air Force is 14th and Butler,
which lost to Southern Illinois
on Saturday; dropped two
spots to No. 15.

No. 16 Marquette has lost
three straight games and
slipped four spots.

No. 17 Vanderbilt, Duke,
Texas and Louisville round
out the top 20.

BYU, West Virginia, Ore-
gon, which fell eight spots to
No. 23 after losing twice last
week, Virginia and Alabama
are the final five.

‘Tennessee moves up to the No. 2 slot

BY CHUCK SCHOFFNER
For The Associated Press

No. 1 Duke has some new
company at the top of the AP
women’s basketball poll.

Tennessee moved into the
No. 2 spot to replace North
Carolina, which was upset by
North Carolina State last
week. The Tar Heels, who had
been second all season,
slipped to fourth, while Con-
necticut climbed two spots to
third.

Ohio State dropped from
fourth to fifth after a home
loss to Michigan State on Sun-
day ended its 17-game winning
streak. In the only other
change among the top 10, No. 8
Stanford traded places with
No. 9 George Washington.

Wisconsin-Green Bay was
the lone newcomer, returning
at No. 24 after a one-week
absence. California dropped
out.

Duke (28-0) led the poll for
the sixth consecutive week
and was a unanimous pick for
the second straight week,

receiving all 50 first-place
votes from a national media
panel.

The Blue Devils beat Bos-
ton College and No. 6 Mary-
land — their second victory of
the season over the defending
national champs — to remain
the nation’s only unbeaten
team and clinch the Atlantic
Coast Conference regular-sea-
son championship.

Duke has one’more chal-
lenging game to finish the reg-
ular season, at home Sunday
against North Carolina. The
Blue Devils beat the Tar Heels
64-53 in Chapel Hill:‘on Feb. 8.

Tennessee (24-2) took a
seven-game winning streak
into Monday night’s visit to
No. 7 LSU. The Lady Vols’
losses were to North Carolina
and Duke.

Connecticut (24-2) has won
10 straight since-a Jan. 15 loss
at North Carolina and has
clinched at least a tie for the
Big East regular-season cham-
pionship. Once a constant con-
tender for No. 1, the Huskies’

No. 3 ranking ‘iis their highest
since they were third the week
of March 8, 2004.

North Carolina (26-2)
started the week. with a victory
at Florida State, then lost to
North Carolina State 72-65 in
the first game on the newly
dedicated “Kay Yow Court” in
Reynolds Coliseum, named in
honor of the Wolfpack’s Hall
of Fame coach.

The Tar Heels bounced
back to rout Miami 93-70 on
Sunday. They play at Wake
Forest on Thursday before
heading up the road to meet
Duke.

Ohio State (24-2) routed
Wisconsin before falling to
Michigan State, its first loss in
31 games against Big Ten
opponents.

Maryland remained sixth
and LSU held at No. 7. Stan-
ford, George Washington and
Arizona State completed the
top 10.

No. 11 Georgia and No. 12
Vanderbilt stayed the same,
while the next three teams all

moved up one spot — Okla-
homa, Baylor and Purdue.
Texas A&M, upset at Iowa
State last week, slipped three
places to 16th and was fol-
lowed by Middle Tennessee,
Bowling Green, Marquette and
Michigan State.

Rutgers, James Madison,
Louisville, Wisconsin-Green
Bay and Nebraska held the
final five places.

Wisconsin-Green Bay had
been ranked for two weeks,
then dropped out a week ago
even though it didn’t lose. The
Phoenix (21-3) have won 18 in
a row.

California (20-7), which
had been 22nd, split on a road
trip, losing to Oregon 62-42
and beating Oregon State 67-61
in two overtimes. The Bears
had been ranked all season,
climbing as high as 15th in
mid-December.

Michigan State made the
biggest jump in the poll, clim-
bing from 24th to 20th.
Nebraska had the biggest
drop, falling six places to 25th.

LL











FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

Young
assistant
coach is
on the
rise

* SHOWCASE

“I think he’s done remark-
ably well, and I am quite
proud of him,” said Rick
Pitino, who recently visited
with his son when Louisville
played at Pitt. “Some of the
teams they beat, with all
their players sitting out, I
couldn’t believe that.”

Duquesne’s turnaround
may accelerate Pitino’s
already fast-moving career,
one he hopes will someday
find him running his own
major college program. It is
a job he plans to earn not by
his last name, but how he
performs on his own.

“If you look ahead, you’re
not doing your job here,” he
said. “But I definitely want
to be a head coach, and I
think I will be, but I don’t
know when.” +

Still, Pitino said there is
much more to learn before
that day arrives.

He is only now learning
how to recruit — an impor-
tant aspect of the game. He
didn’t see much of that
growing up with his father
coaching Kentucky and the
Boston Celtics.

He is also learning how to
deal with players whose per-
formances may be affected
by simple matters such as
girlfriend problems and
classroom worries.

Pitino may be a famous
name in the sport, but Rich-
ard has not leaned on his
father to help him get jobs.
His first,'as an assistant
under .Mike Hart at St.
Andrew’s School in Barring-
ton, R.I., came when he was
a freshman at Providence —
only a year after he ended
his own high school career.

As a junior and senior at
Providence, he broke down
film, compiled statistics and
helped with practice under
Providence coach Tim
Welsh, essentially perform-
ing a graduate assistant’s job
as an undergraduate.

“J jumped on that right
away because it sped up the
process,” said Pitino, who



KEITH SRAKOCIC/AP

STAYING FOCUSED:
Duquesne assistant
coach Richard Pitino
says: ‘If you look ahead
[for a head-coaching
position], you’re not
doing your job here.’

has always wanted to coach
but was never pushed to do
so by his father.

That led to his first post-
college job as an administra-
tive assistant at the College
of Charleston. He got his
first full-time job at North-
eastern under Everhart in
October, 2005. He accompa-
nied Everhart to Duquesne
six months later.

Not that any of this was a
surprise to his father, who in
2001 asked a then-18-year-
old Richard to accompany
him to Louisville when he
negotiated taking the job
there.

“All four years of his col-
lege life, he gave up socializ- _
ing to work for nothing,”
Rick Pitino said. “He did it a
lot differently than the rest
of us. We had a social life in
college, he didn’t. He has a
very strong work ethic anda
lot of humility.”

Everhart saw the same
traits in Pitino: a hardwork-
ing young man trying to
make his own way in the
sport, rather than latching
onto the job he probably
could have had on his
father’s staff.

“It doesn’t matter that his
last name is Pitino,” Ever-
hart said. “It could be Smith
or Jones and he’d still be a
great coach.”

Despite maintaining his
career independence, Rich-
ard Pitino talks with his
father at least once a day and
often more. The main topic
of discussion, besides fam-
ily, is obvious.

“We talk basketball — it’s
what we love,” Pitino said.
“What else are we going to
talk about? It’s natural. I’m
very influenced by him. I
truly believe he’s one of best
coaches out there, and I’m
not ashamed to tell anyone
about it. I think the guy’s a
Hall of Famer, and I love
him. I’m proud to be his
son.”





FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

Clutch putts, a big
chip and key pars

* FERGUSON

to the left on both tee shots,
they were not too far from
where he was aiming, and
both times he had ample
opportunity to get to the
green. His 8-iron from 204
yards in regulation came up
short. In the playoff, he was
on the opposite side of the
green, and nearly holed a
putt from 60 feet.

“I had control of the tour-
nament,” Mickelson said. “I
just needed to par the last
hole. If I birdied 16 and make
that 4-footer, I’m probably
going to do it. If I don’t miss
that par putt on 13, a good
chance J do it. So I’ll look
back and say there were a lot
of opportunities that I let
slide.

“But on the good note, it’s
better to get those out of the
way early.”

Howell couldn’t wait
another day.

He was labeled a future
star when he won the NCAA
title at Oklahoma State in
2000, captured his first PGA
Tour event two years later
at Kingsmill and made the
Presidents Cup team the fol-
lowing year.

But something always
kept him from winning.
There were nine runner-up
finishes since his only tro-
phy, including two of them
this year. His poor chip on
the 18th hole in Honolulu
cost him a chance, and he
was beaten by Woods down

the coast at Torrey Pines
three weeks ago.

Howell was reminded of
his shortcomings at every
turn in the playoff, but he
erased those memories by
making the clutch putts, the
big chip and the key pars.

When he tapped in the
3-footer to win, he closed his
eyes and tilted his head to
the skies, hugging caddie
Jimmie Johnson. His voice
cracked when asked to go
over his emotions, and when
he mentioned the support he
got from his father, along
with swing coach David.
Leadbetter and his staff.

“They never thought any-
thing I was doing wasn’t
eventually going to pay off,”
Howell said. “It was never a
point where we thought,
‘This is no good, you've lost
it,’ or anything like that. This
game can beat you up pretty
good, and you see a lot of
guys who never recover. I’ve
got great people around me
to help get me out of that.”

Now he back book a trip
home to Augusta, Ga.

Howell’s first goal at the
start of the year was to get
into the top 50 in the world
ranking by the end of March
to qualify for the Masters.
Having ended last year at
No. 82, his victory moved
him up to No. 16, essentially
securing a tee time at his
favorite course.

He also hoisted another
trophy, which was more
important.

1 LEYS PE IM TI TT OS Ns NA LE ON LEN SAN TN ES TT NS ON I

he



THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com

retnneemeutnareanretets topes

BASEBALL

GOLD GLOVE TEAM

___INTERNATIONAL EDITION _

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007 | '7B.





Fans will get to pick all-time defensive squad

BY R.B. FALLSTROM
Associated Press

ST. LOUIS — Brooks Robinson
has made just one concession to age.
At the Orioles’ fantasy camps these
days, he plays first base so he doesn’t
have to bounce any throws across the
diamond.

During his playing days, the
Human Vacuum Cleaner captured 16
consecutive American League Gold
Glove awards from 1960-75. His 16 is
tied for the most Gold Gloves with
pitchers Jim Kaat and Greg Maddux
since the Rawlings-sponsored award
debuted 50 years ago.

Is Robinson the best third base- .

man ever? Now fans will decide by
voting on the all-time Gold Glove
team. ;

The ballot will be unveiled at
Times Square in New York this
morning. Three members of the orig-
inal Gold Glove team — Willie Mays,
Frank Malzone and Minnie Minoso

— are scheduled to attend and cast ©

the first votes.
St. Louis Cardinals manager Tony
La Russa was among the dozens of



JULIE JACOBSON/AP

GLOVE MAN: Yankees shortstop
Derek Jeter has won three Gold
Gloves so far during his career.

baseball luminaries, including Sparky
Anderson, Dusty Baker, Tommy
Lasorda, Bob Costas and Hall of
Fame broadcasters Vin Scully and

BASEBALL NOTEBOOK

Cubs’ Zambrano
expects to avoid
arbitration today



Ernie Harwell, who chose the 50
players most worthy of consideration
as the best at their position.

“Nowadays defense is not as glam-
orous as walk-off home runs or big
strikeouts,” La Russa said. “But I
think the most consistent way to
have a chance to win is to pitch and
defend.”

Robinson, 70, said it’s about time
that defense gets the spotlight.

“It’s great to see defense get a little
bit of attention because too often it
gets overlooked,” Robinson said. “I
negotiated 23 one-year contracts, and
not once do I remember the general
manager taking note of any of the
plays I made or factoring that in at
all.”

From more than 250 players who
have won a Gold Glove, the panel
identified 18 outfielders, six players
at each infield position, five catchers
and three pitchers.

Hall of Fame shortstop Ozzie
Smith, who captured 13 Gold Gloves,
is on the ballot, along with Yankees
star Derek Jeter, who has won three
so far. Hall of Fame catcher Johnny

INSIDE THE GAME | NEW YORK YANKEES ~~ >

_ Bench captured 10 Gold Gloves; cur-

rent star Ivan Rodriguez of the
Tigers has 12.

Hall of Fame outfielders like Mays
and Roberto Clemente, who won 12

Gold Gloves in a 13-year period, will -

be challenged by active players Ken
Griffey Jr., Torii Hunter and Jim
Edmonds. Griffey had a clean sweep
in the 90s, getting all 10 of his Gold
Gloves in that decade.

“There’s nothing better than a
good baseball debate,” Smith said.

Kaat, who won 16 consecutive
Gold Gloves from 1962-77, believes
his reputation was enhanced when he

returned to the mound three days.

after getting teeth knocked out by a
comebacker and cleanly fielded
another hard shot right back at him.

Maddux, who won 13 of his in suc-
cession from 1990-2002, joked he
keeps them in his “dig-me room” at
his home.

“There are a lot of guys that are
good fielding pitchers so it’s nice to
win,” Maddux said. “I do work on my
fielding. I’ work on it this month and
I'll work on it during the season, too.”

At third base, Robinson has com-
petition from Mike Schmidt (10) and
Scott Rolen, who already has seven.

“I’ve talked to La Russa and Jim
Fregosi, who managed him in Phila-

-delphia;,-afid this guy is the real deal,”

Robinson said of Rolen. “He can do
everything.”

One obvious omission is Barry
Bonds, who has eight Gold Gloves.
But his defense declined precipi-
tously around.the time he started his
run at the home run record.

Rawlings president and CEO Rob-
ert Parish said a 50th anniversary
team has been in the works since he
joined the company 3'/ years ago.

Fans can vote online at www.Raw
lingsGoldGlove.com, as well as at
thousands of sporting goods retailers,
by mobile device and text messaging,
or by mail through June 19.

The company also will begin
awarding Gold Gloves to college,
high school and even youth league
players this year.

“Defense is a really important
aspect of the game,” Parish said. “It’s
time it gets the attention it deserves.”



From Miami Herald Wire Services
MESA, Ariz. — Chicago
Cubs starting pitcher Carlos
Zambrano said he expects
to sign a
one-year
contract
before

scheduled

arbitration

ee pets | hearing.

oe “I think
Es it’s 85 to 90

PSs percent that

ZAMBRANO. .. .



i. 2... to. arbitra-
tion,” ‘Zambrano said .on,
Monday. ‘

Zambrano caused a stir
last week when he told
WGN-TV he would leave as
a free agent if he did not have
a multiyear contract by
Opening Day, but backed off
that request.

He earned $6.5 million last
season when he was 16-7
with a 3.41 ERA and 210
strikeouts, then asked for
$15.5 million in arbitration.
The Cubs countered at
$11,025,000,’ which is more
than any player has been
awarded.

Zambrano has said he is

seeking a salary similar to
that of Barry Zito, who
signed a seven-year, $126
million contract with San
Francisco. A multiyear deal
with the Cubs would likely
be in the five-year range, but
Zambrano said that “can
wait.”
“I have six more weeks to
think about it,” Zambrano
said. “They have six more
weeks, also.”

The last Cubs player to go
to arbitration was Mark
Grace in 1993, when the gen-
eral. manager was Larry
Himes, and neither side
wants that streak to end.

e Elsewhere: Right-
hander Kerry Wood threw
25 pitches off the mound in
Mesa, Ariz., and will likely
get in two or three more ses-
sions before facing hitters.
Wood is a few days behind
schedule because he slipped
and landed on his. stomach
and chest while getting out
of a hot tub at home last
week,

AROUND THE MAJORS

e Yankees: Bernie Wil-
liams was nowhere to be

seen in Tampa, Fla., and Yan- .

kees general manager Brian
‘Cashman doesn’t think that
will change.

“It appears he made his
decision. That’s all I can take
from it,” Cashman said. “I’m
assuming at this stage that
he’s not coming.”

Yankees position players
took physicals Monday, a day
ahead of their first workout.
Manager Joe Torre, fighting
a cold, went home before the
end of Monday’s workout
and didn’t speak with report-

today’s.

we don’t go»...
.Manny Ramirez mystery
«surfaced... Monday.. when

ers. Torre had planned to call
Williams again Sunday, and
Cashman said he didn’t hear
that a conversation took
place. :

Catcher Jorge Posada
has called Williams several
times — he placed another
call Sunday — but hasn’t
reached Williams.

Torre said Sunday that
Williams was hurt the Yan-
kees didn’t offer him a guar-
anteed spot on their regular-
season roster.

e Red Sox: The latest

teammate Julian Tavarez
said his close friend would
arrive late at spring training
in Fort Myers, Fla., and Bos-

ton manager Terry Fran- |

cona said that may not be
true. 2

Tavarez said the left
fielder would report March ],
as he did last year when he
received permission from the
Red Sox to show up late. The
first workout of spring train-
ing for position players is set
for Thursday. The official
reporting date under the col-
lective bargaining agreement
is Feb. 27.

e Blue Jays: The club
and manager John Gibbons
have agreed to a one-year,

$650;000 contract extension, .

a team official said.

Gibbons led the Blue Jays
to an 87-75 record and a sec-
ond-place finish in the Amer-
ican League East last season
— the first time they finished
higher than third since win-
ning the World Series in
1993,

The team official spoke on
condition of anonymity
because the deal hasn’t been
announced yet. Gibbons will
make $500,000 this year, one
of the lowest salaries for a

‘manager in the majors. The

extension covers the 2008
season.

e@ Rangers: Closer Eric
Gagne threw off a mound
for the first time at spring
training in Surprise, Ariz.,
completing a 37-pitch session
with no complications.
Gagne, who had as many sur-
geries (two) as relief appear-
ances last season, said he will
do some light throwing today
before returning to the
mound Wednesday or
Thursday.

e Padres; |. Khalil
Greene’s left middle finger
is still sore, six months after
he injured it. The shortstop
insists it’s not an issue.

Greene checked into camp in ©

Peoria, Ariz., two days ahead
of the reporting date for
position players,

e Mets: Veteran catcher
Sandy Alomar Jr. agreed to
a minor-league contract with
the club. The 40-year-old is
expected to report today to
spring training in Port St.
Lucie, Fla.





MARK J. TERRILL/AP

OH, HOW TIMES HAVE CHANGED: Alex Rodriguez, left, said of his relationship with Yankees teammate Derek Jeter, right:
‘People start assuming that things are a lot worse than what they are, which they’re not. But they’re obviously not
as great as they used to be. We were like blood brothers,’ said Rodriguez... . ‘| just want to let the truth be known.’

A-Rod and Jeter growing apart?

BY RONALD BLUM
Associated Press

TAMPA, Fla. -- Yes, it’s
true, admitted Alex Rodriguez,
his relationship with Derek
Jeter is not what it once was.

Surrounded by reporters
and cameras as he sat in the
first-base dugout Monday at
Legends Field, A-Rod played
true confessions, acknowledg-
ing they no longer have sleep-
overs and don’t go out
together all the time anymore.

“People start assuming that

‘things are a lot worse than

what they are, which they’re
not. But, they’re obviously not
as great as they used to be. We
were like blood brothers,”
Rodriguez said. “You don’t
have to go to dinner with a guy
four, five times a week to do
what you're duing. It’s actually
much better than all you guys
expect, but I just want to let
the truth be known.”

On the first day of his

- fourth season with the Yan-

kees, he did three rounds of
interviews ~- English-lan-
guage television, Spanish-lan-
guage television and print
reporters. He talked about his
poor postseason (“I stunk”),
his pride at being the highest-
paid player in U.S. team sports
(“It’s pretty cool’) and his
refusal to rule out exercising
the opt-out provision in his
contract after this season (“I
understand my options”).

RUNNING SOAP OPERA

A-Rod and Jeter were bud-
dy-buddy back in the 1990s,

when Rodriguez was a young:

star shortstop in Seattle and
Jeter emerged as a force that
helped the New York Yankees
capture four World Series
titles in five years. But A-Rod
dissed Jeter in a 2001 Esquire

article, saying “Jeter’s been
blessed with great talent
around him” and “he’s never
had to lead.”

“You go into New York,
you wanna stop Bernie [Wil-
liams] and [Paul] O’Neill,”
A-Rod was quoted as saying.
“You never say, ‘Don’t let
Derek beat you.’ He’s never
your concern.”

Since Rodriguez was
acquired by the Yankees in
2004, their relationship has
been analyzed and dissected, a
soap-opera sidebar to New
York’s repeated postseason
failures,

Until now, A-Rod had
denied their relationship had
changed. Sitting in jeans and a
black sweat jacket, Rodriguez
said it was “important” that
people heard the truth directly
from him.

RELATIONSHIP CHANGES

“Let’s make a contract,”
Rodriguez said after the first
Jeter question. “You don’t ask
me about Derek anymore, and
I promise I’ll stop lying to all
you guys.” ;

“The reality is there’s been
a change in the relationship
over 14 years and, hopefully,
we can just put it behind us,”
he went on. “You go from
sleeping over at somebody’s

‘house five days a week, and

now you don’t sleep over. It’s
just not that big of a deal.”
Jeter had left the clubhouse
by the time reporters were
allowed back in. His agent,
Casey Close, said later that
Jeter didn’t want to comment.
Most of the Yankees have
long concluded the relation-
ship between their captain and
Rodriguez is a non-issue.
“They’re probably not as
tight as they used to be, but it’s

not a situation’ where they
don’t look at each other and
don’t say, ‘Hi.’ They’re team-
mates and they’re still
friends,” Jason Giambi said.
“I suspect it’s nowhere near
as bad as the general percep-
tion is,” general manager Brian

_ Cashman added.

During the offseason, for-
mer Yankee -Darryl Straw-
berry said Jeter needs to
“embrace” Rodriguez, A-Rod
said he didn’t feel Jeter needed
to support him more.

ON THE SAME PAGE?

“Y’m a big boy. I’m 31 years
old now, so I should be able to
help myself out there,” he said.
“I care about what he thinks
about me on the field. I think
it’s important for us to be on
the right page. And we are.
We're here to win a champion-
ship together.”

While Rodriguez captured
the American League MVP
award for the second time in
2005, he was booed. for
stretches at Yankee Stadium
last season, when he made 24
errors, Some thought that if
Jeter spoke out on A-Rod’s
behalf, fans would go easier on
him. “Derek can’t stop the fans
from booing. They boo all of
us,” catcher Jorge Posada said.

And then came another
abysmal postseason for Rodri-
guez. He’s 4-for-41 (.098) with-
out an RBI in his past 12 play-
off games dating to 2004. He
got just one hit in last year’s
playoff loss to Detroit.

“T stunk, And when you
stink, sometimes, you have to
call it,” he said. “I went l-for-14
last year with an error and
that’s pretty lousy.”

As the Yankees were elimi-
nated in Game 4, he was
dropped to eighth in the bat-

ting order for the first time in
a decade. “It was very disap-
pointing,” he said. “Yes, I was
embarrassed.”

Rodriguez is entering the
seventh season of his 10-year,
$252 million contract, a deal he
signed with the Texas Rang-
ers. He can terminate the
agreement after the season,
forfeit the $72 million owed in
the final three years and
become a free agent. He also

could pressure New York for —

an extension. .

WILL A-ROD STAY?

He said he wants to remain
a Yankee, but wouldn’t prom-
ise that he will. Like closer
Mariano Rivera, he is thinking
ahead to the new ballpark
scheduled to open in 2009.

“My goal is to go in with
Derek and Mo and open the
new stadium. I’m saying it
pretty clear, fellas,” he said.

Steve Swindal, the Yankees’
general partner, saw it the
same way.

“I would love to see him
end his career here. He’s great.
He’s the real deal,” was his
reaction.

Rodriguez knows his con-
tract has made him a target,
adding to his burden. Still, he
doesn’t mind.

“I love being the highest-
paid player in the game. It’s
pretty cool. I like making that
money. You get crushed, but
you know what? It’s pretty
cool. I enjoy it,” he said. “I was
poor and broke when I grew
up. I didn’t have that type of
money to help out children.
Now I get a chance to help out
children. Whatever you say is
important. People listen to
you. That’s pretty cool.
Nobody used to listen to me
before.”

FEA SAE DE cE ES LY I TN a

sean

sa







THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007, PAGE 7



Armed 2
robber shot |
and killed |
by police |

FREEPORT - An armed
robbery suspect was shot and
killed by police after report-
edly robbing an establish-
ment and attacking officers
with a cutlass.

The incident took place
over the weekend in the
Yoeman’s Woods area.

The identity of the
deceased man, who is
believed to be 30-years-old,

has not yet been released by

police.

Superintendent Basil Rah-
ming said the incident
occurred sometime around
12.55pm on Saturday when
a man armed with a cutlass
robbed the convenient store
at Cora’s Place Shopping
Plaza on Sergeant Major
Road.

An employee of the store
telephoned police and
reported that the suspect had
taken the cash register and
was walking north on
Sergeant Major Road.

Mr Rahming said several
police units were dispatched
to the scene to investigate.

When the first unit arrived,
the officer said he spotted a
man dressed in blue jeans, a
multi-coloured jacket and a

_ camouflage cap. The man

was also wearing black
gloves on his hands and
armed with a cutlass, they
reported.

The officer, who was dri-
ving a Scene of Crime van,
pulled up alongside the man
and ordered him to drop the
weapon. _

He reported that the sus-
pect broke out driver’s win-
dow with the cutlass and also
shattered the passenger-side
window.

Fearing for his life, the
officer drove off in the van.
Shortly afterwards, two oth-
er police units arrived.

The officers confronted
the suspect, who allegedly
charged one officer with the
cutlass.

Mr Rahming said the offi-
cer ran to avoid being
chopped, but lost his balance
and fell to the ground.

He said the suspect was
about to attack the officer
when two other officers shot
him in the torso.

Paramedics were sum-
moned to the scene, where
they examined the suspect
and pronounced him dead.

Mr Rahming reported that
a significant amount of mon-
ey believed to be the prop-
erty of Cora’s Convenience

- Store was retrieved from the

man’s pocket.
Investigations are continu-
ing into the matter.

New York
could get
first Haitian

counciilor

@ NEW YORK

THE City Council could
make history Tuesday by
gaining its first Pakistani or
Haitian member, according
to Associated Press.

But a former UN ambas-
sador for St Vincent ‘and the
Grenadines also.is among the
10 hopefuls for the Brook-
lyn seat, some of whom trace
their heritage to Panama,
Costa Rica and Jamaica.

More than one-third of
New York City residents are
foreign-born.

The council seat represents
an area with a large immi-
grant population, especially
from the Caribbean.

The candidates would like

. to succeed Democrat Yvette

Clarke, who in turn succeed-
ed her mother, Una Clarke,
who was the first Caribbean-
born council member.

Among the competitors to
join the 51-member council is
Joel Toney, who served as
United Nations ambassador
for his home nation, St Vin-
cent and the Grenadines, an
island chain of about 118,000
people.

Physician Mathieu Eugene

would be the council’s first

Haitian member if elected.
And Mohammad Razvi
would be the first Pakistani
member. He is executive
director at the Council of
Peoples Organizations, a
nonprofit he founded to
advocate for South Asians.
One of his strengths, he
said, is working with the dis-
trict’s multitude of cultures.

PM: I wish I’'d done more
during my time in office

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

PRIME Minister Perry
Christie said that his one major
disappointment has been that
he was unable to achieve more
during his term in office.

Reflecting on his past five
years as leader of country, Mr
Christie said that although he
is immensely pleased with the
unprecedented level of invest-
ment his government was able
to attract to the country, he
wishes his vision for the
Bahamas could have been ful-
filled more expediently.

“I’m disappointed in the
slowness of the realisation of
the PLP’s vision for the country.
The major disappointment |
have is that I could have done
more,” he told talk show host
Sean McWeeny on GEMS
“Tell it like it is” over the week-
end.

However, Mr Christie point-
ed out that there is only so
much one person can do in a
day and that some things take
time.

“T wanted to have a new
straw market two years ago, we
now signed the contract (on Fri-

Christie touts investment in country but admits
disappointment in ‘realisation of the PLP’s vision’



day). I wanted to have the Roy-
al Oasis opened a year ago, six
months ago, and we’re just now
moving towards a final resolu-
tion of that. Things have to take
time and sometimes in the lives
of politicians, the time is judged
by five years,” he said.

Echoing recent comments by
Normon Solomon and citing
Chinese philosophy, the prime
minister said. that statesmen
“must not look at the execution
of their work in a five year peri-
od, they must look at it for a
generation.”

During the current political
season, Mr Christie said, the
PLP government is coming to
the people on the basis of their
record — a record which he said
shows achievements that have
touched all islands and every
Bahamian positively.

The PLP’s single greatest
achievement, Mr Christie said,
was bringing over $18 billion of

Haitian carnival
anthems target
UN peacekeepers

@ HAITI
Port-au-Prince

SONGS lampooning politi-
cians have always been a fix-
ture of Haiti’s carnival, but this
year, musicians have a new
favorite target: UN peacekeep-
ers, according to Associated
Press.

The airwaves have been filled
with satirical songs about the
UN force, known by its French
acronym MINUSTAH, which
has been trying to restore order
to Haiti since the 2004 rebel-
lion that toppled President
Jean-Bertrand Aristide.

“MINUSTAH, you're really
just a tourista. You’re holding
back my country,” the group
Vwadezil sings in one popular
song. “You're just lounging
around so why don’t you get ...
out.”

The songs, known as
“meringues,” add a political
dimension to the three-day car-
nival celebrations. The rum-

fueled festivities bring even:

more chaos to the bustling
streets of downtown Port-au-
Prince, with tens of thousands
of people dancing to live bands
on floats.

Haiti’s government spent $2

million on this year’s carnival,

hoping to lure tourists, espe-
cially Haitians living in the Unit-
ed States.

The former French colony,
plagued since independence
with political upheaval and dire

poverty, has a long history of |

skewering public institutions
during carnival.
UN troops are only the lat-

i. est addition to a rhetorical

menu that typically includes
crooked government officials,
outgunned police and kidnap-
pers who prey on the popula-
tion of eight million.

The peacekeepers have
recently become more aggres-
sive in battling the gangs
blamed for rampant kidnap-
pings. On Sunday, they cap-
tured a gang leader known as
Ti Bazil in the Cite Soleil slum.

But many Haitians feel that
the force, which combines sol-
diers and police from more than
a dozen countries, has been too
slow in stemming violence.

“MINUSTAH, you’ve invad-
ed our country, you must make
things better,” the popular
group T-Vice warns in one of
its meringues.

Other meringues accuse UN

bureaucrats of spending more:

time dining in posh restaurants
and sunning themselves on the
beach than working to solve the
poor country’s troubles.

“Since the UN is now a part
of our society, | touch upon it in
my music,” the band Vwadezil’s
lead singer, Fresh La, said in an
interview. “They’re taking a
long time to bring peace to the
country, and that’s keeping us
from moving forward.”

@ A MAN disguised with
death references sings

as he participates a
traditional Carnival parade in
Port-au-Prince yesterday.
Songs lampooning

politicians have always _

been a fixture of Haiti's
carnival, but this year,
musicians have a new

keepers.

(Photo: AP/
Ariana Cubillos)

The UN mission takes the
jabs in stride.

“T think it’s part of the Hait-
ian tradition of carnival to make
fun of things, even serious
things,” said Edmond Mulet,
the special UN representative
to Haiti. “It’s a way of convey-
ing some sentiments which are
genuine and I don’t blame for
them that. On the contrary, I
think they should be wel-
comed.”

Some singers have caused
problems for the UN, howev-
er.

At last year’s carnival, the
group Demele performed a pro-
fanity-laced song that accused
peacekeepers of stealing goats
belonging to peasants. Despite
denials by the UN mission, the
accusation spread through the
streets and became a common
chant during anti-UN street
protests.

“That song caused a lot of
issues between MINUSTAH
and the population,” said that
group’s frontman, also known
as Demele. He alleged that the
offending lyric got him uninvit-
ed from this year’s carnival line-
up.

UN officials and carnival
organizers denied censoring any
artists.

“Musicians have the right to
write any song they like,” said
Yanick Louis, a member of the
carnival’s artistic committee.

And despite the harsh tone
of some songs, other artists said
they mean no offence.

“I ridicule the UN in the spir-
it of carnival, which is about
having fun and letting go,”
Vwadezil’s Fresh La said.

Share
VOU
nevis

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
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for improvements in the
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award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.












' second term, he is not compla-

ee



capital investment into the
country, “which will lay the
basis for a new Bahamas for
Bahamians.”

AS concerns the upcoming
general election, the prime min-
ister said he believes that the
outcome will depend entirely
on the disposition of the
Bahamian people.

“Tam very hopeful and opti-
mistic that they will see the
record that I speak of and they
will know the country I that I
have tried to introduce,” he
said.

Mr Christie said although he
is very confident that the PLP
will win the government for a


























cent.

The prime minister said that
“every degree of preparation
and energy will be brought to
bear” on his party’s campaign in
the coming weeks.














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THE TRIBUNE

Your look

fife

at what’s going on in your community



Cast of Pinocchio.
prepare for debut

|

THE cast of Pinocchio LIVE
is getting ready for their first
Bahamian performance next
week.

Organisers promise the show
will be full of “thrills, music,
adventure, laughter and sur-
prise, surprise, surprise.”

Coming from the touring
company of the American Fam-
ily Theatre in Philadelphia, the

experienced cast of multi-tal- :

ented performers are eager to
meet Bahamian youngsters
when Bahamas OnStage
YouTheatre presents Eiocsbio
on Monday.

Rotary donates $18, 000 |
to Scout Association |

“We have been asked repeat-
edly by persons booking if this
is a real Broadway-style show,”
said Kathy Ingraham, CEO and
producer of Bahamas OnStage
‘YouTheaitre. “I want to assure
everyone that we have part-
nered with the American Fam-
ily Theatre and we are offering
an amasing experience for the
performance. The lighting is
going to be first class, the music
will be first class, the sets, the
costumes and of course our per-
formers. The cast is profession-
ally trained i in music, dance and
acting and has worked all dver

the United States. We made
sure the sure is going to be
above and beyond public expec
tations.”

Leading the versatile cast is
Paul Pakler who takes on the
role of the title character. Hav-
ing recently appeared as Puck in
A Midsummer Night's Dream
off Broadway, he has worked
in California, Pittsburgh, and
Chicago.

His favorite roles include Ray
in Some Voices (for which he
received the OC Weekly Award
for Best Actor in 2005), White
Steve in Gompers, Skeets Miller

H RECEIVING a eau for $18, 000 a are s Leweliva Bae conn chief commissioner; Ralph



{

THE East Nassau Rotary
Club is contributing $18,000; to
the Scout Association. Some, of
those funds will help to send a
Bahamian team to the 100th
anniversary world scout jal
boree in Chelmsford, England
this summer.

Some 40,000 scouts, leaders,
and staff from more than 100
countries will meet for 12 days
on the historic 574-acre High-
lands Estate. From July 27 to
August 8 they will share adven-
ture, friendship and personal
development, while celebrating
the dawn of a new century | of
Scouting.

As this is the centennial year
of the founding of.the Scouting .
movement, the jamboree theme
will be “One world, one
promise”. Sir Robert Baden-
Powell, who founded the Scout-
ing programme, also pioneered
the first jamboree in London i in
1920.

On August 1, scouts at th
jamboree and around the world

-will take part in a special event

called Scouting's Sunrise. Both
scouts and former scouts will
gather together to renew their
promise and commemorate
what Scouting has accom-,
plished.
The day will also celebrate’
the Gifts for Peace pro-|
gramme by exhibiting reports |
and presentations on social |

projects at a local and nation- |

al level. The Gifts for Peace
Project is an effort by scouts to
strengthen family life by find-
ing solutions to social prob-
lems and providing communi-
ty service.

"The Bahamas Scout Asso-
ciation will focus oyr collective
energy On this project," a
spokesmen said. "Both our
leaders and our youth will apply
the principals of the Scout
Method — learning by doing.
Young people not only have a
role to play in addressing social
needs, they may have solutions
to some of those problems.

From March to August this
year, scouts throughout the

country will identify specific

needs in their areas, formulate

Bohomos
International
Film Festival

Forskin, president of the Rotary Club of East Nassau; John Phillpot, president of the Scout Associ-
= and Donny Tomlinson, vice president of the Bahamas Scout Association.

(Photo by Letisha Henderson)

solutions, implement action

’ plans and report on the results,

Rawson Square

Frise osha he 2008 BFF Meni ad and Osa

AVIVA EEL DEUE ATED GE EHUD INYO DPNT ADAP UNTO UP CUE COUR UN SPAN ET AMEN LELO ODE UD UN TOP LRVE SEE IUE EEE HUA IT GRIT ACUTE ( Ege

“There's limited seating available please come early or bing your personal

fad out chains





TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007, PAGE 11

@ MICHAEL Contini is playing toymaker Gepetto

in Floyd Collins, Gary in Give a »

Boy a Gun, and Dopey in Dis-
ney's Snow White: An Enchant-
ing Musical. Pakler is a graduate
of Point Park University with a
BFA in Theatre.

American Musical and Dra-
matic Academy graduate Jarvis
Manning, Jr. plays the fun-lov-

- ing troublemaker Candlwyk. No

stranger to theatre, he has
starred in a number of plays
including The Color Purple in
which he took on the role of
Harpo.

Playing toy maker Gepetto —

is Michael Contini who studied
at Shakespeare’s Globe The-

-atre. With a BFA in Musical

Theatre from Syracuse Univer-
sity, Contini has held the title
role in Macbeth and starred as
Puck in A Midsummer’s Night
Dream.

A performer s since age two,

Yvette Newsome is a native:

New Yorker who has appeared
in several films and as a voice

over for Nickelodeon. She will”
' formance will take place that _
evening. The show runs yntil »

be playing the role of the mag-
ical Blue Fairy who brings the
wooden puppet to life.



Leah Goblirsch, who will act
the part of Gina in the produc-
tion, is also a graduate of the
American Musical and Dra-

works include The Music Mar,
Joseph and the Amasing Tech-
nicolor Dreamcoat and Hello
Dolly!

t=

. matic Academy. Her theatrical |

Pinocchio debuts at the

National Centre for Perform- ‘ .

ing Arts this Monday February *
19. A one night only family per- «

Medneeay, Eevmaty 21.



_ Swimming club visits Governor General

i THE Sea:
Bees Swimming
Club held its
annual awards
ceremony at
Government
House on ,
Sunday. Deputy
to the governor
general Sir
Clement

centre, presented

the awards and
is pictured with
swimmers and.
coaches. ;

=e

(Photo: ‘

BIS/Tim Aylen) ‘4





ee ee ee ee ee Oe ae ee







TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764





FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010

business@tribunemedia.net

Miami Harald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street





Investor
develo

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

major invest-
ment project
proposed for
Grand
Bahama is
stating that the Government



has allowed it “to be the mas-: .

ter developer of the entire east
end of the island........ an area
exceeding 100 square miles”,
with a development slated to
include a 400-room hotel, casi-
no, convention centre and $28
million marina.

Beka Development LLC,
the project developer, submit-

Project for Grand Bahama proposes 400-room hotel, casino, convention




centre and $28 million marina in eastern part of island, with. Foxwoods
and Omni ined up as operating and equity partners

ted its proposal to the Gov-

ernment in December through
its wholly-owned. subsidiary,

Bahamas Golden Beach Ltd.»
. The project includes a tie-up
with Omni Hotels as the hotel’

operator, and Foxwoods
Development Company as the
casino operator.

The details were =,comtained

Rite

te

'

ina doriheat posted on the
Internet by Infinity Partners,
the company that appears to
have been contracted by Beka
Development to handle the
project’s real estate sales. The
document disappeared from
the Internet last night, likely
as a result of The Tribune’s
investigations.

Ki Eby
4
oath

The document said the Gov-

ernment “has committed a
contingent master casino
licence for the remainder of

the island” to the developers of

the eastern Grand Bahama
project.

’ In addition, the Infinity Part-
ners posting said that Beka was
seeking a Heads of Agreement

that provided it with the same
level of incentives as Kerzner
International had obtained for
its Phase III project, Baha Mar
was seeking for its $2.4 billion
Cable Beach redevelopment;

‘and Ginn Clubs & Resorts was

receiving for its $4.9 billion
West End investment.

Beka was also said to be

seeking “right to full access use
of the existing harbour”, and
an “option to purchase the

lease of the entire harbour ~

when the existing lease
expires”.
The harbour referred to is

SEE page 7B



Film Studios to require $200m terminal fees -
$70-$90m investment

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Eaitor

THE group
moving to
acquire the §
rights | to
develop the
Grand
Bahama-
based
Bahamas Film
Studios said
yesterday the
investment
required':to.
complete the project is likely to
be in the range of $80-$90 mil-
lion, as opposed to the $70 mil-
lion originally envisaged, with
the full build-out of the project
likely to take five to 10 years.

Owen Bethel, president of
the Nassau-based financial ser-

@ BETHEL

trite



Pen Sethe,

Project likely to require
five-10 year build-out,
as buying group moves

--to-close-deal and get:

government approval

vices provider, the Montaque
Group, who structured the
group that acquired the devel-
opment rights, said its “priority”
was to complete the Bahamas
Film Studios’ sound stage and
return its water tank to full
operational status.

Mr Bethel said that getting
the film components of the

SEE page 8B

being negotiated in
Sry contract talks

m By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



toe faded sy

’ "THE Government aud Van-.

VRE “Airport Services
YVRAS) are now down to the
iret details over the’ 10-year

management contract for Sir.’

Lynden Pindling International
Airport, the structure of pay-
ments and fees for construction
of the new $200 million terminal
being among the outstanding
issues. |: )

The final handover of the air-
port by the Airport Authority
to the Nassau Airport Devel-
opment Company (NADC), a

_ subsidiary of the former that

will be managed by YVRAS,
has been delayed not for polit:
i be Wh

ur in %

Wott pa

cial reasons, as some have
alleged, but because the Gov-

ernment wants to ensure it gets.

the. right deal first time, and
maximises the benefits for the
Bahamas. .

Highly-placed sources have
told The Tribune that among
the key issues still being worked
on, which has led to proposals
and counter-proposals being
passed back and forth between
YVRAS and the Government’s
negotiating team, is how much
to pay the Canadian operators
for managing construction of
the new $200 million airport ter-
minal.

SEE page 5B

jaye

"46.40%

Pegasus chief: ©
‘We're debt free’

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter



FREEPORT — Pegasus
Wireless’s president and chief
executive, Jasper Knabb, said
the wireless company is debt-
free with a value of more than
$100 million, and is trading well
on the US over-the-counter
market. j

“We are profitable, and we
are trading well, and I am very.
optimistic that our sharehold-
ers will be pleased with our
numbers. I couldn’t be happi-
er,” Mr Knabb told The Tri-
bune last week. .

Mr Knabb is planning to
open a 20,000 square foot wire-
less manufacturing facility in
Freeport on February 22. He
expects to employ about 280

persons at the plant on West
Settler’s Way.

The newly-licensed wireless
technology supplier is also

negotiating for another site that —

will allow it to construct a

400,000 square foot plant, in

addition to its current plant. -
Mr Knabb, who had initially
announced in November that
he planned to invest $25 mil-
lion on the project in Freeport,
said Pegasus is financing the
project itself without any assis-
tance from financial institutions.
“In building this facility here
(in Freeport), it’s been an entire
cash transaction. We have not
gone to the bank and borrowed
money. We have built it from
within and that is how strong

SEE page 5B















IN yesterday’s lead story
in Tribune Business, head-
lined Bahamas finally
‘open’ for e-commerce busi-
ness, it was reported that the
appointment of the Data
Protection Commissioner
would enable the Bahamas
to implement the three e-

‘commerce related Acts
passed in 2003.
This is incorrect, in that

Clarification



puter Misuse Act and the |
Electronic Communications -
and Transactions Act - were
implemented that same year, |
2003.

It is only the Data Protec- °
tion Act that has not been
implemented, due to the
wait for the Data Protection
Commissioner’s appoint-
ment.

7, ww







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mented shortly.

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ENM leader responds to

Shane Gibson resignation |

@ By BRENT DEAN
PRIME Minister Perry

- Christie was labelled “con-

fused” and “unable to lead the
country” yesterday by oppo-
sition leader Hubert Ingra-
ham.

His remarks came in
response to the resignation of
Shane Gibson, whose involve-
ment with Anna Nicole Smith
was only addressed by Mr
Christie after pressure from
the public and from within the
PLP, he said.

Mr Ingraham also refuted
allegations made against two
FNM candidates - Tommy
Turnquest and Dion Foulkes —
during a press conference yes-

- terday at FNM headquarters.

Cabinet
shuffle

PRIME Minister Perry
Christie was up to press time
deciding who would take
over the portfolio of former
Minister of Labour and
Immigration Shane Gibson.

Many speculated that the
Cabinet shuffle would not
be a significant one as the
general election is only
months away.

Mr Gibson resigned on
Sunday over the Anna
Nicole scandal, bowing to
political pressure while at
the same time vehemently
denying he had done any-
’ thing wrong.

The former prime minister
claimed that Mr Christie
finally acted only due to over-
whelming public condemna-
tion, along with serious inter-
nal dissatisfaction emerging
within the PLP.

The scandal, Mr Ingraham
added, had done much dam-
age to the reputation of the
country.

He admonished both Mr
Gibson and: Mr-Ghristie-for
not accepting responsibility
for what had transpired.

Mr Ingraham stated: “Prime
Minister Perry Christie has at
long last accepted the resig-
nation of his Minister of Immi-
gration and Labour, Shane
Gibson, after a protracted
scandal arising out of the
granting of a permanent resi-
dence permit to Anna Nicole
Smith.

“It is a scandal that has
done much damage to the
country and has been a big
embarrassment to the PLP
government.

“What is quite astonishing,
however, is the failure of both
the prime minister and Mr
Gibson to acknowledge any
wrong-doing. Instead they
attempted to put the blame
for this sordid affair on the

press and on their political -

opponents. I remind Mr
Christie that the press does

not make the news, they sim- °

ply report it.”

Mr Ingraham’s comments
placed partial responsibility
on Mr Christie for the Anna

SEE page nine

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The Miami Herald

The Tribune





BAHAMAS EDITION

ESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007

1



a OPPOSITION leader Hubert iigebhians speaks to the press, ania

(Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune sta)

EE a ee






















Shooting
victim is ninth
homicide
of the year

i By PAUL G
TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter ;

ties has become. the ninth
homicide victim of the year
in the Bahamas.

Police’ press officer,
Inspector Walter Evans, said
‘Maurice Horton, of Key
West Street, was shot in the
head around 6am yesterday.

Mr Evans said police had

in the Poinciana area of ©

6am. '
It was reported that Hor- ~.
ton was followed by several —
persons until he got to
Watlings Street, near the
Red Door Package store.

“Tt was at this point,” Mr -.
Evans said, “that he was
shot in the head while in the
yard of that store.”

_i Mr Horton was tracked to
“fthe southern section of the

: yard and was found in a
“lifeless state”, he said.

Mr Evans said police had
several persons assisting
them in the investigation.

“We are uncertain as to
the motives, and are right
now hoping that persons can
assist us,” he said.

e In other crime news,
operation Quiet Storm net-
ted three warrants of arrest
and 22 traffic citations. Also,
officers from the Mobile
Division issued one warrant
of arrest and 43 traffic cita-
tions over the weekend.

FNM leader hits back at PM’s ‘forces’ claim

@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter



FNM leader Hubert Ingraham said the

‘prime minister was talking “out of his

head” when he said there were forces in

the country pushing the opposittion.

leader to return to politics.

During an interview on GEM’s 105.9’s
talk show “Tell It like It Is”, Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie said Mr Ingraham
was brought out of retirement by forces
“who cannot let the Progressive Liberal
Party and the progressive forces’ con-
trol the Bahamas.

“People know who the forces are and
we are going to give faces to these forces
Tuesday night (during the PLP rally).
We're going to put faces on this fight for
the future of the country.

“Tt is not going to be an easy fight and,

‘as a result of what I have seen, I will

spare no effort to turn the streets into
what I call a basket of information,” Mr
Christie said.

However, Mr Christie stopped short of
calling Mr Ingraham a puppet.

“I have too much respect for him as a
former prime minister of the country to
call him a puppet. I know him personally,

I know he has had a hard life and I know
he has travelled hard but he has a killer
instinct that goes too far,” the prime min-
ister said.

Mr Christie said that Mr Ingraham’s .
philosophy drives him to believe that
“whatever is needful is lawful.”

However, Mr. Ingraham told reporters
yesterday that he would be delighted if
the prime minister was to identify these
forces, bécause he would not support --
them.

He said the prime minister was talk-

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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





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having modern pension legis-
lation on the books to govern
and regulate private pension
schemes. In this regard, we are
totally ‘out of kilter’ with the
rest of the region, and modern
and progressive societies.

In 2004, the UK passed a
new Pensions Act, which
among other things created a
new regulatory body called
‘The Pensions Regulator,
which started business on April
6, 2005.

The UK Act has the follow-
ing broad objectives:

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tem that provides decency for
all, which encourages and
rewards savings, and! is finan-
cially sustainable.” And: “To
provide everyone with the
opportunity to build an ade-
quate retirement income, and
be affordable, fair and simple
to understand.”

The seventh Actuarial
Report of the Bahamas’
National Insurance Fund,
which was released on Febru-
ary 2003, revealed significant
challenges ahead for the
National Insurance Fund if
major changes were not made
to its structure. This in|turn led
to the appointment of.a Social
Security Reform Commission
to study the implications‘of the
actuarial report, and make rec-
ommendations regarding the
Fund’s sustainability. The
Commission, through its chair-
man, has called for pension leg-
islation among its various rec-
ommendations.

The most recent study con-
ducted by the Central Bank
suggests that private pension
funds in the Bahamas are fast
approaching the $1 billion
mark in terms of assets. Look-
ing at this another way, the size
of these private pension funds
represents almost 20 per cent
of GDP. When you add the
value of the National Insurance
Fund, which has slightly over
$1 billion in assets, these two

- sources of long-term pension

savings now soar to 40 per cent
of GDP. What is most incredi-
ble is that while industry par-
ticipants have called on suc-

cessive governments to imple-
ment pension legislation, noth-
ing seems to have been done.

We have a great social time-
bomb in the making, growing
daily, while our policymakers
seem to lack the resolve to
address it. The reality is that
less than 25 per cent of our
workforce is covered by any
pension scheme whatsoever,
while the Social Security
Reform Commission clearly
recognises the shortfall in the
design of National Insurance
as it relates to retirement
income.

Commission

The NIB Commission states:
“The Social Security Reform
Commission recognises that the
National Insurance Retirement
pension was not designed to
provide sufficient income in old
age for all retirees. And
although many workers are
members of employer pension
plans and/or have their own
personal savings, a great num-
ber of Bahamians retire with-
out a secure income.”

The above statement is in
stark contrast to the percep-
tion of the average man on the
street; who believes the Nation-

al Insurance Fund will provide --

for their full pension needs.
How are future retirees
going to be provided for? Do
we just ignore the situation and
face the consequences later on
somebody else’s watch, or do
we plan for the inevitable?
We need to bear in mind that
our population demographics
are highly skewed. Currently,
we have about 60 per cent of
our population under the age
of 35. Given the current birth
trends among our legal popu-
lation, who are having fewer

- children and therefore fewer

long-term contributors to

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nas must
catch up on

National Insurance, in another.
30-40 years we will have a
large, retired population trying
to survive on insufficient retire-
ment incomes. Currently, our
annual national budgets are

‘ perennially challenged. What

should we do? The answer is
certainly not ‘nothing’.

One option under consider-
ation by the Commission is the
introduction of mandatory pen-
sions, which they see working
as follows: “Through legisla-
tion, require all employers in
the Bahamas to establish a pen-

’ sion plan for employees that

provide certain basic minimum
benefits, contributions and oth-
er requirements. These contri-
butions and pension payments
will complement NIB’s pension
to meet the overall income
objective. Where an employer
already has a pension plan
whose terms are more gener-
ous than the minimum stan-
dard, the employer may choose
to continue that plan.”
Australia and Switzerland
are examples of developed
countries that have successful-
ly implemented mandatory °
pension laws, while Bermuda
and the Cayman Islands are
regional examples.
Further, Jamaica, Barbados
and Trinidad have.recently

i passed new pension legislation,.

or are in the advanced stage of
doing so.

The intention of pension leg-
islation is not only to regulate
pension funds but to encour-
age employers/employees to
work together to provide a
social safety net for the long-
term benefit of workers, while
relieving central government
of this sole burden. Progressive
governments have understood
this and are doing it.

As we are now Officially in
the ‘silly season’, I anxiously
await the distribution of the
manifestos of the major politi-
cal parties to examine their
views on this most vital sub-

"ject.

Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a
Chartered Financial Analyst,
is vice-president - pensions,

. Colonial Pensions Services

(Bahamas), a wholly-owned
subsidiary: of Colonial Group
International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance and
is a major shareholder of Secu-
rity & General Insurance Com-
pany in the Bahamas.

The views expressed are
those of the author and do not
necessarily represent those of
Colonial Group International
or any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct any questions or com-

_ ments to rlgibson@atlantic-

house.com.bs

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award,

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



4B | MONDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2007 INTERNATIONAL EDITION =

“See
*

WALL STREET

* TAKEOVERS

exception so far this year has
been Nasdaq Stock Market’s
unwillingness to raise its offer
price for the London Stock
Market; the takeover attempt.
collapsed earlier this month.
One thing is for certain,
that U.S. companies are’ sit-
ting on record cash stockpiles
— at last count $605 billion
racked up by members of the.
Standard & Poor’s 500 index
— that can be used to: expand

WORKPLACE ._-

e

Avoid

battles

with |

* SUPERVISING:

enterprise. “He thought he

had the right answers, and I
was the wrong answer,” Guha
says. He believes the bad”
mouthing hurt his effective- .
ness. If a prior relationship...
allows a spurned contender to:

circumvent you, try to “get .
your boss’ help in making ~

sure that the employee is sent
back to you,” Spanier says. In
Guha’s case, the chairman
refused to curb his chum’s
misbehavior. : x

So, a month after he
arrived, Guha took ‘matters

into his own hands. He solic- -
ited business insights from.”

the disgruntled official over
dinner once a week.’ The man
stopped whining to the chair-
man, his ‘cooperation
improved. and the division
flourished. Their weekly or
monthly meals lasted a year.
Guha now wishes he had
inaugurated the dinners right
away.

DEFUSE THE TENSION
An immediate, frank chat .

Mergers may pass

through mergers and acquisi-
tions. “This amount of money
is looking to be deployed, that
has really made a difference
in tactics and in attitude,” said
Bob Profusek, co-head of
global M&A for law firm
Jones Day. “‘There’s this huge
amount of money that needs
to be invested.”

‘That only means good
things for investors, where
the-sky’s-the-limit offers can
‘send share prices flying high.

For example, rumors this









3

“friends. In discussing the
associate’s definition of per-
sonal success, stress that you
value his abilities but you are
the boss, recommends Barb
Bridendolph, president of
Crenshaw Associates, a New

York career-advisory bou-

tique. “Otherwise, you set.

false expectations that this
role can be shared.”
~ During her initial nine
“weeks with a Pennsylvania
’ management-consulting firm,
a senior vice president lacked
time for a heart-to-heart chat
with Paul Forti, a middle man-
ager and psychologist
rebuffed for her job. Being
ignored by the new boss exac-
erbated his pain at being
passed over, he recalls.
Forti deliberately kept his

" distance, never volunteering

“{nfofmation. When consulting

with the passed-over prospect < clients inquired about the

about his disappointment and’
career goals can also defuse

the sticky situation. Act
empathetic without, naively |
assuming you will become.

BRAZIL

executive, he curtly replied:
“She is senior to me. She is
obviously competent.” But he
told work buddies that he
doubted she was the right

* AMAZON EP OS : eries, equipment shops and

social injustice and lawless-
-ness after photographer
Sebastiao Salgado immortal-

- ized its human anthills in.

stark black and white, captur-"
ing the desperation of -the®:
nearly naked miners carrying.
huge sacks of mud from what
seemed like the depths of hell.
Years later, that area in neigh- .
boring Para state remains a
scarred wasteland, and Brazi
ian authorities fear Eldorado
do Juma will turn into soimie-
thing similar.

But Azedo, like many of the
miners, is determined to make
his fortune here now.

Azedo said’ he panned
about half a pound of gold in a
single day last week and:a
total of about 4:4 pounds,
worth about 40,000 reais :
($19,000) since ‘he arrived 17::
days ago. ashe Ne hi

Even after paying 50 per: -
cent to the man who staked
out his plot and eight percent .
more to Ze Capeta, or “Joe the

Devil,”. a local boss who.
claims to own the entire gar-
impo, Azedo stands to clear a
tidy sum.

Most are not so lucky Se
already, too many people are -

chasing too little gold.

Estimates of the number of «-

prospectors, prostitutes and
merchants in this jungle slum,
where the smell of burning
meat and timber mingles with
the pungent odor of an open
sewer, varies wildly. But there
is not enough space for all the
miners at the eight main dig-
ging sites.

RAPID DEVELOPMENT

Price gouging and malaria |“
- DOING WHAT THEY CAN: To crack down. on shootings and

are rampant in the makeshift.’
city, which already has bars, i






“: jewelry stores, most of them

constructed out of tree
branches and tarps, strapped
together with vines and bark.

A 16-room brothel being con-: .

structed promises cushioned

platforms and pumped-in

river water.
. The federal police arrived

- Jast month, cracking down on

- shootings but making it still
harder to get rich quick.
“Luckily, we caught it right

cern for everyone from the
President of the Republic to
the state’s governor and the
mayor that this doesn’t
become another. Serra
Pelada,” said Walter Arcov-
erde, enforcemént director
for the National Department

~ of Mineral Production.

»° Officers with automatic
“weapons impose a nightly

» curfew, while government

geologists try to determine
the extent of the gold. Envi-
ronmental regulators are here

at the beginning. It is a'con-,

week .that Anheuser-Busch:

might be taken over caused its
shares to hit a 52-week high.
Speculation that Alcoa might
be on the block helped send
the entire Dow Jones indus-
trial average higher on hope
that acquisition activity will
remain on a breakneck pace.
It also means Wall Street
investment banks could be set
up for another record-break-

ing year of profits. Investors |
- have cheered results from the
top five U.S _ securities firms

pick. “I didn’t want her to suc-
ceed,” says Forti, now a maD-
agement psychologist in Mor-
ristown, NJ. “That really hurt
us both.” He found himself
testy with private-practice
patients, while the senior vice
president “was always a little
on edge.”

A fall on the ice broke the
ice. Forti saw his supervisor
tumble as she emerged from
her car one snowy morning.
He rushed outside to help.
“I'd really like to get to know
you,” the grateful executive
said. They ate lunch together
that day for the first time. She

explained how much she

respected him. and promised
they would operate as equals,
according to Forti. Afterward,
“we worked well together,”
he says.
OPPONENT TURNED ALLY
Things improved partly.
because the senior vice presi-
dent offered Forti first crack

at plum client assignments
and touted his expertise when

Internet lures thous ands to

too, trying to keep miners
from using heavy equipment
or mercury, a toxic chemical
that joins tiny gold particles
together but can ruin rivers.

How long the government
can keep a lid on things is an
open question. Already, small
rivers of mud gush from
streambeds at night, suggest-
ing that heavy-duty water jets
are already being used ille-
gally, despite promises to wait
for permits..; 90 8.0.

The land‘reform agency
says the land actually belongs

to the federal government, .

but now that the miners are
here, there is talk of compro-
mise — authorities say they

will. permit pressure hoses, -

rock crushers and other
machinery if miners police
themselves and stick to an
environmental protection
plan.

The man who claims to
own the whole area says he is
working on exactly that.

“This place has a great

VICTOR R. CAIVANO/AP

slow down environmental damage, military police patrol
the wildcat mine in Eldorado do Juma, Brazil.

restaurants, barbershops, bak-

and sent their shares to new
highs. Morgan Stanley, Mer-
rill Lynch & Co., Lehman
Brothers, Bear Stearns and
Goldman Sachs might all see
appreciation in their shares as
they garner more investment
banking business. set
This isn’t lost on smaller
firms. JMP, a boutique invest-
ment banking firm and asset
manager based in San Fran-
cisco, has filed to raise some
$100 million in an initial pub-
lic offering on the New York.

ILLUSTRATION BY RIC THORNTON/MCT
they made new business
pitches. Finding attractive
opportunities for a rejected
but well respected insider to
shine is a good idea, career
coaches advise.

.. The approach transformed
one newcomer’s possible
opponent into an ally. A for-
mer international director of
a Los Angeles skin-care man-
ufacturer says the company
hired her for the new post
rather than elevate its experi-
enced head of international
marketing. Aware of her
young colleague’s talents, the
recruit agreed to make the
lieutenant responsible for all

_of Europe.

The new executive also
persuaded her boss to send
workers, customers and sup-
pliers a
plans to ‘expand the market-
er’s duties. As a result, the ex-
international director notes,
“I had somebody 100 percent
dedicated to being successful
rather than trying to find a
way to sabotage me.”

mine ©

future. There are other miner-
als here besides gold. We
have to get organized to
exploit it,” said Jose Ferreira
da Silva Filho, better known
by his more sinister nick-
name, Ze Capeta.

Stock Exchange. The firm,
founded in 1999 by executives
from the old Montgomery
Securities that was later
bought by Bank of America,
last year posted a profit of
almost $2.4 million on reve-
nue of $63.6 million.

JMP joins others that have
scrambled to go public in the
past year to take advantage of
robust M&A activity. Last
year several boutique firms
decided to go public to take
advantage of the escalating

MINIMUM WAGE

_MiamiHerald.com_| THE MIAMI HERALD

eter eee ete tttCnttt tte Cette ttt

¢4 trillion record in 2006

capital markets environment.
Shareholders that got in on
their IPOs are now sitting on
some pretty big returns.

Keefe, Bruyette & Woods
Inc. has seen its shares
advance 18 percent since it
became a public company in
November. Cowen Group,
founded in 1918 and most
recently a division of French
bank Societe Generale, has
realized a 35 percent jump in
its shares since going public
in July.

Wage increase
would aid poor

*HOURLY WAGE

ment is high and there is less
competition for labor.

Some businesses, such as
restaurants, may lose money
from such an_ increase
because their workers would
have to be paid more. Others,
such as tobacco companies
and dollar stores, would likely
see more profits, according to
Merrill Lynch. ;

From the 1960s through the
1980s, manufacturing plants
flocked to rural South Caro-
lina for cheap labor and lower
overhead costs, only to leave
after they discovered they
could do even better over-
seas. At the same time, the
state’s textile base also
headed offshore, leaving a
string of shuttered plants and
mills dotting the rural land-
scape.

McQueen worked at a
small sewing plant in Cheraw
before it closed its doors in
the early 1990s. As far as she
is concerned, it’s high time
Congress paid attention to the
rural poor. “They forgot
about us,” she said.

’ Nationwide, an estimate
13 million workers would be

ter describing.the~affected,,.either..directly,.or

indirectly. The policy insti-
tute estimates that many
workers already making the
new federal minimum could
expect pay hikes after lower-
wage earners start making
more.

Down the road: from
Cheraw, a poster at the Com-
munity Development Corp. of

- Marlboro County gives mute

testimony to how long it’s
been since the minimum wage
was raised. It notes the wage
will be increased to $5.15 an
hour on Sept. I, 1997.

The Rev. Charles Malloy,

TECHNOLOGY

‘in rural areas

who runs the Bennettsville-
based agency that helps peo-
ple find affordable housing,
said the wage hasn’t kept up
with rising housing and utility
costs over the past decade. He
and other advocates said peo-'
ple still will need help even if
it goes up. :

Some 160 miles away, out-
side Charleston, Kirby Platt
juggles tuition and rent while

working a part-time job for.

$6.50 an hour to help pay her
way through technical col-
lege. She’s also hoping for the.
federal pay bump. “Of course
it would be helpful, going to
school and supporting
Inyself,” said Platt, 19.

It still takes on average $11
an hour to afford a two-bed-
room apartment with utilities
in South Carolina, said Sue
Berkowitz, director of the
South Carolina Appleseed
Legal Justice Center, which
provides legal services to the
poor. “Raising the minimum
wage to $7.25 is still asking a
lot of people to live mod-
estly,” she said.

South Carolina tourism
officials and advocates for the
poor say a ripple effect of ris-
ing pay from a minimum wage

increase,would especially-be =«w

felt among those who work in
the state’s $16 billion tourism
industry and other areas
where employers already pay
close to the proposed increase
because they have trouble
finding workers.

Louisiana’s healthcare
industry is another good
example. Officials say a
worker shortage caused by
Hurricane Katrina drove up

hospital wages in the ‘south- ..

ern part of the state, and they
fear the effects of a federal
wage hike on overall health-
care costs.

ning 2c ain. Watches losing -
race on time

ers talk of threats and intimi-
dation that, ensures they

-cough up Ze Capeta’s 8 per-
cent cut. Ze Capeta denies he
is making a killing or intimi-
dating anyone and says he has
more than his share of head-
aches and unseen costs.

So far, the federal govern-
ment and most. miners seem
content to leave him in
charge, if only to provide
some order.

In Apui, 10 gold-buying
shops have opened in the past
few weeks. Gilmar Predebon
manages one, buying and
melting about 4.4 pounds a
day into gold ingots.

He figures the mines gen-
erate between 13 and 15.5
pounds a day overall — “It’s a

good amount of gold but
nowhere near as much as
you'd expect, considering all
the talk.” ;

Apui Mayor’ Antonio
Roque Longo thinks his city
of 20,000 would be better off
without the mine: “Sure, it’s
been good for the merchants,
but we have major health
problems. Before the garimpo,
we had malaria mostly under
control here; now it’s a huge
problem again.”

‘Others say the garimpo has
improved things.

- “This was a door God
opened for Apuf. Today the
city has grown fivefold and
people are flooding in from
every corner of the country,”
said Antonio Carlos Santos,
48, who quit his policeman
job to work the mines.

*WATCHES

“It really is an anchor point
— and that’s the end of it,”
says Kilger, the research
firm’s chief behavioral scien-
‘tist. “A cellphone is one step
up from that; it begins to help
you manage your time. Anda
BlackBerry is one level up
‘from that.”
Some have found the trend
convenient, if a little stressful.
“Tt don’t check my watch
anymore. My watch checks
me,” says Sean MacPhedran, a
27-year-old from Ottawa,
Ontario, who works in adver-
tising. He’s referring to the
beeps and vibrations his
BlackBerry makes to remind
him of his obligations.
“On the one .hand, I’ve
become a slave to its beeps,”
-he says. “But on the other
hand, it automates a lot of
things that I would have to do
manually otherwise, like try
to remember when I’m sup-
- posed to go learn how to cha-
cha or call a client.”
MacPhedran does wear a
watch when he wants to look
“put together.” But it’s
become so much more an
accessory than a necessity
that he’s developed a habit of
taking it off unconsciously
and leaving it places.
“When I was little, I took
off my socks because they

were constraining,” he says.
“I think I take my watch off
for the same reason.”

Before she joined the ranks
of telecommuters and
stopped wearing a watch, 35-

year-old working mom Jean- _

nine Fallon Anckaitis also
thought of her watch as “a
handcuff” that 'she’d immedi-
ately remove when returning
home.

“Even if I went out to din-
ner straight from work, I’d
dump the watch into my
purse to free my wrist,” says
Anckaitis, who lives in
Swarthmore, Pa., and now
works from home for an
online auto site. “Taking off
the watch symbolized being
done with the pressure-filled
commitments of the day, and
settling into a pace where the
time matters far less.”

Indeed, the watch is a sym-
bol of stress for many people.
But it’s not really time itself
that’s the problem, says histo-
rian James Hoopes.

“It’s that we live in an
increasingly synchronized
world,” says Hoopes, a pro-
fessor in the division of his-
tory and society at Babson
College in Massachusetts.

“You don’t really relieve
all the stress unless you get
out of the world where time
synchronization is so impor-
tant.”

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007, PAGE 5B



I

Data Protection chief —
to take office April 2 ©

- g By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

. George Rodgers will offi-
Bes begin his work as the
Data Protection Commis-

sioner on April 2, 2007, when legisla-
tion contained in the Data Protection
and Privacy of Persons Act is enacted.
The former Bahamas Development
Bank managing director told The Tri-
bune yesterday that until then, he is
-_familarising himself with the various
.’. aspects the new post will entail,
"including going on several fact-finding



PEGASUS, from 1B ee

missions to other jurisdictions.

Mr Rodgers said that once he offi-
cially begins, things will'start very
slowly. .

“We're not going to initiate any-
thing. It will really be up to the public
to come forward and raise their con-
cerns,” he explained.

Mr Rodgers expected there would
be a surge of complaints during the
initial period of his posting. All com-
plaints will be thoroughly investigat-
ed, he said.

Mr Rodgers’ appointment was vital
for the implementation of the Data

4

Protection Act, and James Smith,
minister of state for finance, said of
Mr Rodgers’ appointment: “I think
it sends a signal to both the domestic
and international economy that the
Bahamas has modern e-commerce

legislation and the basis on which they

can look to the Bahamas as a base
for e-commerce activities.

Mr Rodgers added that the Euro-
pean Council authority looks at the
Bahama closely.

“ Now we can become a trusted
enclave, as we have passed the test
for protecting information, and data is

able to flow with the data protection
laws on the books,” he said.

Many in the business community
have long considered the Bahamas
to be a natural location for an e-com-
merce hub, given its tax structure,
proximity to the US in the east coast
time zone, established infrastructure
and communications, and the exis-
tence of the Hawksbill Creek agree-
ment - viewed as an excellent trans-
shipment/distrubution hub for ship-
ping orders placed via internet.

In yesterday’s lead story in Tribune
Business, headlined Bahamas finally

$200m terminal fees er in airport talks.

‘open’ for e-commerce business, it
was reported that the appointment
of the Data Protection Commissioner
would enable the Bahamas to imple-
ment the three e-commerce related
Acts passed in 2003.

This is incorrect, in that two of the
Acts - the Computer Misuse Act and
the Electronic Communications and
Transactions Act -'were implemented
that same year, 2003.

It is only the Data Protection Act
that has not been implemented, due
to the wait for the Data Protection
Commissioner’s appointment.

our company is,” he said.

“T don’t take a salary, and I have
done everything to allow this com-
pany to succeed, so the company
itself is very strong.”

It had been claimed “that there
was growing concern by the Grand
-. Bahama Port Authority over the
(company’s) questionable finan-
cial situation, as evidenced by its
performance on the US stock
exchange”.

Mr Knabb explained that the
stock price did not determine
_. whether his company stayed open

’ or not. He added that Pegasus was

a public company that had been
trading for a number of years since
it opened in 1993. He said the com-
pany traded at a relatively stable
price as far as stock exchange stan-
dards go for the first year-and-a-
half.
_ The company, according to Mr
Knabb, was also accepted to the
NASDAQ global markets, which
is the premier stock exchange.

“Once we were accepted to that
platform it opened the stock to a
mechanism called naked shorting.
It gives a person the ability to sell
a share of stock that he doesn’t
actually own,”- Mr Knabb







Authority.

computer skills are essential.






Responsibilities Duties

business objectives.

to:-

resources transactions and services, t

explained.

“Shorting was designed to allow
someone to say: ‘Okay, the com-
pany, their numbers are falling off.
They are declining in value. | am
going to bet that that company
keeps going down in value and I
am going to sell a share, or short a
share, and then when it hits where
I think it is the bottom, I will then
buy that share back and I get to
keep the difference in the money.
So I sold a stock that I didn’t own
and buy it back for $1 to cover
back the loan. Basically, I borrow
the stock to do that then I make
$10 per share’.

“That’s what happened to our
company. We went in as a very
strong stock, very stable with no
ups and downs, and we went from
zero short position to nine million
shares. So, we had what is called an
artificial short, or naked short, and
this was very well documented by
Forbes Magazine.

“We went to NASDAQ and all
the US government agencies and
we said ‘Help, our investors are
getting destroyed’, and then the
negative publicity started,” he said.

Mr Knabb added that when peo-

ple buy and sell stocks in the US, :

Public Hospitals Authority
Advertisement

Manager III (Human Resources)
Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre

_ Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the post
of Human Resources Manager III, Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre, Public Hospitals

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:-

Bachelors Degree in Business Administration. Management, or equivalent qualification (a
Masters degree would be an advantage); and at least three (3) years post qualification
experience in human resource management. Excellent oral written communication skills and

The Human Resources Manager III is a part of the Human Resources Team at Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre, and shares responsibility for the day-to-day administration of human

o ensure that the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre human
resources policies and procedures, transactions and services are aligned with Authority’s

f- Within this context, the Human Resources Manager III will be responsible for, but not limited

that money doesn’t come to the
company, unless the company rais-
es money from the public in an
initial public offering.

He said Pegasus had never done
an initial public offering. “We
haven’t done one because we don’t
need the public’s money. We are
trading, we are a public company
and we are responsible. We report
all of our financials, and we have
never been attacked on the finan-
cial strength of the company,” Mr
Knabb said. “If you look at the
attacks, it is because of my stock
price. And, right now, the value
of the company is at $100 million.
So you have to look at all the facts
as to what is happening.”

Mr Knabb said they may elect to
take the company private and buy
out the public shareholders.

‘We have that choice. We might
elect to change stock exchanges,
but in the end the company is
fine,” he added.

“It is trading well, trading
healthy, and our annual filing will
be coming out on time. So,
although there is all this happening
on the public side of the company,
it is different than the actual com-
pany itself.”

1 paper

gre haan 4




sof









FROM page 1B

Also being discussed is the method of
payment for this, and how to hold YVRAS
accountable, ensuring that it carries out
what it promises to do. As a result, there are
likely to be a number of financial incen-
tives and timelines likely to be built into
the final contract. : fe

The 10-year management contract is
essentially the privatisation of Sir Lynden
Pindling International Airport, placing it
in the hands of a private company and draw-
ing on the expertise of the Canadian com-
pany for its management and development.

Sources have told The Tribune that a
number of lease agreements, contracts and
other agreements are being drafted, and
that the stroke suffered in late 2006 by
Joseph Reckley, the Airport Authority’s
acting general manager, did delay the
process due to his central role as the Gov-
ernment said. So

“The Government wants to get it right
first time,” The Tribune was told. “It'll prob-

_ably be the most important infrastructure
investment this country has ever seen.”

Getting Sir Lynden Pindling Internation-

al Airport up to scratch so that it comple-

















ments the five-star Bahamian tourism prod-
uct has been a key priority for the Govern-
ment, especially as it provides the first and
last experiences and impressions for visi-
tors coming to this country.

Through the partnership between the
Nassau Airport Development Company
(NADC) and YVARS, the airport is expect-
ed to be transformed into a “premier world
class facility” within the next four years.

After the ten-year management contract
expires, NADC — with an independent
board of directors, comprised of stakehold-
ers in the tourism industry — will continue to
be responsible for airport operations.

During phase one of the transformation
of Sir Lynden Pindling International Airport
— scheduled to be completed within 24
months — the physical and sanitary condi-
tions of the facility will be improved, the
congestion associated with US pre-clear-
ance will be alleviated, adequate check-in
spaces for additional air traffic will be cre-
ated, and increased group travel and the
streamlining of security checks will be facil-
itated.

In phase two — anticipated to take some
48 months — design and construction of new
and/or upgraded terminal facilities and relat-
ed airport infrastructure will take place.

eaten Karan

‘s seh

Mato TRL be

C errr ‘





PRIMARY DUTIES:

Sbarro the Italian Pizzeria is looking for a self motivated, responsible and mature individual to spear-
head the position of Marketing/Advertising & Public Relations. The candidate will have to perform the
following duties:

¢ Assist the Managing Director lay out and compile company data, events and happenings in

a quarterly newsletter and website.

¢ Assist the Managing Director to update the website on a as needed bases.
@ Assist the Managing Director with the writing, recording and placing radio and newspaper

advertisements.

Assist the Managing Director compile new information and alter existing information for

menus & menu boards.

¢ Represent the company in public relations matters and document the same.
¢ Assist Managing Director in all other matters pertaining to Marketing/Advertising and Public

Relations.

SECONDARY DUTIES:

¢ Assist the Managing Director in accomplishing his daily tasks, e.g. handling and screening
calls, tabulating sales and payroll data, taking dictation and writing correspondence, etc.

Assist the Office Administrator with in-coming calls, posting sales, payroll data, compiling
and updating employee files, etc.

¢ Assist Office Administrator in compiling data for Director's and General Manager's meet-
ings.

¢ Working side by side with Office Administrator to fill in when necessary.

1. Processing recommendations for:





















¢ Probationary appointments
¢ Confirmations in substantive posts

¢ Promotions and reclassification

* Benefits under the Authority’s policies

° Benefits under the law, eg. Employment Act and National Insurance Act
¢ Employee transfers and secondment

¢ Employee grievances

* Disciplinary actions and penalties

¢ Involuntary and voluntary terminations

SKILLS & APTITUDE:

The successful candidate must have excellent writing and speaking abilities.
Must be an assertive and socially pleasant person.

Must have excellent organizational abilities

Must be able to work independently of all others

Must be able and willing to work in a close office and multi cultural environment.

2. Liaising with the Payrolls Unit with matters relating to salaries adjustments and
financial clearances.

os © &@©.06U ]HmhlU OH

3. Managing the performances appraisal process for staff within assigned areas of responsibili-
ties, ensuring that evaluations are ongoing and appraisal forms are prepared, distributed and

reviewed, WORK EXPERIENCE & EDUCATION:

This position requires a person who has a sound background in writing and general communication
mediums. They must have excellent command of both written and spoken English and the comprehen-
sion skills to organize and communicate information in a clear and concise manner. The candidate must
have a solid secondary education and at least four years experience or a Bachelor's Degree and at
least two years experience in the field of Marketing/Advertising & Public Relations.




Opportunities will also be given for involvement in human resources strategic functions such
as policies, developing an annual human resources plan, staff training and development, qual-
ity improvement initiatives To facilitate the Manager’s professional development and career
advancement within Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre.

Letters of application, resume, documentary evidence of qualifications and three (3) references
should be submitted through the head of your department, no later than 28th February, 2007, to
the Director Human Resources (Acting), Public Hospitals Authority P.O. Box N-8200, or Ist

" Floor Corporate Office, Dockendale House, West Bay Street.

Salary is competitive. Bonuses are available and based purely on performance. Medical Health
coverage is also available.

: ye) PR esl Uly lee Le) SORE MEIIEERCO mea} 356 0333~ Attention Managing Director



PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007

Satellite radio rivals XM and.

_ Sirius agree to merge, but |
regulatory hurdles remain

_ THE TRIBUNE





16

wecten
eae

°
°

f

[Suen ewer

By SETH SUTEL
* AP Business Writer

* NEW YORK (AP) — XM

INSIGHT

mma

metal late Mal- Waly oH
Ce Ele Lal
on Mondays



Satellite Radio Holdings Inc.
and Sirius Satellite Radio Inc.
have agreed to merge, the two
companies said yesterday.

The deal would consolidate
the only two companies in the
emerging business of subscrip-
tion-only satellite radio, and is
sure to face tough scrutiny
from federal regulators.
Investors and. analysts have
been speculating about a deal
for months.

The two companies said in
a statement that Mel Kar-
mazin, the CEO of Sirius,
would become chief executive
of the new company while
Gary Parsons, the chairman of
XM, would remain in that role.
XM’s CEO Hugh Panero will
remain to oversee closing the

of the deal, they said.

The deal would face signifi-
cant regulatory hurdles in
Washington, including a Fed-
eral Communications Com-
mission rule that clearly states
that one satellite radio
provider cannot buy the other
one. However, that rule could
be waived.

A combination would also
have to meet antitrust approval
from the Department of Jus-
tice. The companies are
expected to argue that they
compete not only with each
other but also with a growing
base of digital audio sources
such as iPods, mobile phones,
and non-satellite digital radio.

XM and Sirius have both
posted significant financial

losses as they built up their
programming lineups and
recruited subscribers. Both
stocks declined more than 40
per cent last year on concerns
about their continued growth
in subscribers and softness in
the retail market, but investors
have held out hopes that a
merger could bring costs down
significantly.

Shareholders

Shareholders of XM and Sir-
ius would each own approxi-
mately 50 per cent of the com-
bined company. XM share-
holders would receive 4.6
shares of Sirius stock for each
share of XM they own.

That would value XM shares

at $17.02 each, based on Fri-
day’s closing prices, represent-
ing a premium of 22 per cent
from XM’s closing value of
$13.98 Friday. Markets were

- closed Monday for the Presi-

dents’ Day holiday.

The companies didn’t say
what the new company would
be called, though they
described it as a merger of
equals. The new company’s
board will have 12 members,
including Parséns, Karmazin,
four independent directors
named by each company, and
one representative each from
General Motors Corp. and
Honda Motor Co.

News of a possible merger
was reported earlier Monday
by the New York Post.

On Friday, a Bear Stearns °
analyst said in a research note,
that a merger would have a
good chance of overcoming:
regulatory obstacles.

Other analysts remain less
sure. Sanford C. Bernstein ana-)
lyst Craig Moffett said he gives |
the deal a “50-50” chance of
passing regulatory muster. .

Moffett said the deal could, '

have a particularly tough time... *: -

getting through the FCC, and...
is likely to opposed by the
National Association of Broad-~
casters, a lobbying group that
includes radio broadcasters.
Moffett said it was “anyone’s
guess” as to whether the FCC
would change its rule barring a
consolidation of the two satel- .
lite radio companies.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

Legal Notice

NOTICE

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that YVONNE ST. FLEUR
ALCENOR OF KEY WEST STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any.person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 20th day of February, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NYSA COMPANY LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of NYSA COMPANY LIMITED has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

REEDSPORT CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 15th day of February 2007. The Liquidator is

. Legal Notice
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

LONGACRE ASSETS LTD.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

ARGOSA CORP. INC. Giquidatsne

CLigndator) Notice is hereby given that in accordance with

Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of LONGACRE ASSETS LTD. has °
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has beenissued |.
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

Legal Notice

NOTICE

LERIDA S.A.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies py
Act 2000, the dissolution of LERIDA S.A. has been Tans 7
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and NOTICE

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register. ~

_ ENTERPRISE VENTURES LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

RAPPID EXPRESS LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of RAPPID EXPRESS LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



(a) ENTERPRISE VENTURES LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the

ARGOSA CORP. INC. International Business Companies Act 2000. ;
(Liquidator) .

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)
(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced

on the 16th February, 2007 when the Articles of .
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the *
Registrar General.

c FA LL

| Ss

Pricing Information As Of:
, 19 February 2007

Zlib

The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse Trust
of Geneva, Rue de Lausanne 17 bis, 1211 Geneva 70.

< © ews

Change Vol. EPS $ Div $
0.000 N/M
0.400 6.5
0.260 10.2 eet eae wn ee ee Ny
Ooeos a3 Credit Suisse Trust Limited
0.050 7.4 Liquidator

0.240 14.0 - .

NOTICE

0.045 38.9
OF

Previous Close Today's Close Dated this 20th day of February, A.D. 2007
Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs |
Doctor's Hospital

Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

‘10.00
eps earserpeatermses
S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low
12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0. old



0.000 8.3
0.240 10.3
0.570 15.7
0.500 15.9
0.510 11.3
0.000 N/M
0.100 13.6
0.560 15.4
2.795 aaa 9
oo

Div $




wana a






PATARA LIMITED



14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.35 RND Hold

eee eons,



Pursuant to Part IX, Section 137 (6) of the
(International Business Companies Act, 2000), we
hereby submit that winding-up and dissolution of
the Company has been completed on the 16th day of
March, 2007.




1.2736
2.6662

1.328271*
3.0569***
2.596093**
1.224792****

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund







dends di
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity,
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas ~tock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-HI - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
§ S2wk-Low - Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change In closing price from day to day
Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings




* .9 February 2007
** 31 January 2007
ve" - 31 January 2007

eee" - 31 January 2007

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

Se MIAN NTA PORTOLA TOE




- 31 January 2007



Z



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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007, PAGE 7B





PTO om ERIC

Roo Wome Ore

FROM page 1B

e

thought to be the Burmah Oil
harbour, which is leased from
the Government. In addition,
Beka is also seeking permis-
sion to re-open an airport to
facilitate the arrival of provate
and charter flights, likely to be
a reference to the airstrip at
the former US Air Force Mis-
sile Base, part of the Bahamas
Film Studios development.

The document said that with
the general election scheduled
for early May, the Government
“would like to complete all the
approvals and make a formal
announcement at least 30 days
in advance”.

It added: “The Government
has allowed Bahamas Golden
Beach to be the master devel-
oper of the entire east end of

the island. This includes an.

area exceeding 100 square
miles.

“The Government is willing
to sell in the future to Bahamas
Golden Beach Ltd substan-
tially all of its east Crown Land
at the same price per acre as
the initial site.”

The Infinity Partners post-
ing said one condition that
Beka had to fulfil to obtain the
master casino licence was a
“willingness to purchase gov-
ernment Crown Land at the
Golden Beach site for a mini-
mum of $5 million ($2,800 per
acre)”.

Checks by Tribune Business
confirmed the details in the
~ document were authentic, with
- several sources describing
Beka’s interest as “serious”. It
is likely to have been posted
by Infinity Partners as an
update to its real estate client
base, hoping to generate inter-
-est in land and real estate sales
uieastemn Crand Bahama.

However, infinity Partners
my wou have jumpes the
eats the project has 3 aot

been approved by the Gov-
ernment. Its publication may
well cause problems for both
Beka, its partners and the Gov-
ernment due to its premature
nature, as no agreement has
been set in stone.

The ‘document's revelations
aie likely to revive concerns
that the pace of development
and foreign direct investment
into the Bahamas is currently
too fast, outpacing the capaci-
ty of this nation’s public ser-
vice, workforce and infra-
structure to control and sup-
port the number of projects
either uinderway or in the
pipeline.

The details on Crown Land
are also likely to fuel concerns
that too much Bahamian land
is being conveyed to foreign




Derry On Apc mini enh
located Shirley & Church ieee ast Bana i

developers, and raises ques-
tions about how Bahamians
can prepare to participate and
capture the benefits from such
projects without knowing
about them.

Vincent Peet, minister of
financial services and invest-
ments, yesterday confirmed to
Tribune Business: “There is
very strong interest in the
development of eastern Grand
Bahama.”

However, he added that any
investment project was “in the
early stages” of talks with the
Government. Mr Peet, who
was out of office, said he was
unable to confirm any details
because he did not have the
information to hand.

The other conditions that
Beka has to fulfil to obtain this
master casino licence, the doc-
ument said, include complet-
ing a definitive agreement with
Foxwoods Development Com-
pany, and “Foxwood’s willing-
ness to manage for Harcourt
Developments the existing
shut down Royal Oasis casi-
no”.

Interest

Harcourt’s interest in the
still-closed Royal Oasis has
been revived, after rival bid-
der World Investments Hold-
ings failed to complete its $40
million purchase of the resort
from Lehman Brothers’ pri-
vate equity arm.

Harcourt Developments is
understood to have met with
both the Government, in the
shape of Prime Minister Perry
Christie, and the Grand
Bahama Port Authority over
the Royal Oasis, although it is
unclear how much progress has
been made.

The document on the Beka
project added that “Beka has
discussed with Harcourt

involvement in the Royal !
Oasis, and Harcourt develop- {

ing a section of the east end

property.”
Prime Minister Perry
Christie, in one of his last

updates to the House of
Assembly on the Royal Oasis,
said the Government had
encouraged investors looking
at eastern Grand Bahama to
also assess the resort. Govern-
ment officials and ministers
have also touted a major
investment project for eastern
Grand Bahama.

‘The document said Beka
and Foxwoods Development
Company had already signed a
Letter of Intent over the casi-
no, agreeing fee structures and
the latter’s “equity participa-
tion”. Beka had also supplied
Foxwoods with branding, oper-
ating and management agree-

ments.

On the hotel front, Beka
“has a confirming letter from
Omni Hotels to jointly own a
400-room Omni Hotel and
convention centre. Omni is
prepared to invest $20 million-
plus into the project”.

“A leading South Florida
marina developer, who is
financially backed by Dillon
Read, has offered to purchase
the marina site for $28 million
and invest an additional $80
million,” the document said.

“Beka has a pre-sale site of
20 acres to a group from the
Florida Panhandle to.develop
500 condo units.”

Infinity Partners will man-
age the residential lot sales,
investing $10 million in equity,
the document said. The com-
pany claimed to have commit-
ments for more than 75 lot pur-
chases worth more than $40
million, and commitments to
build 40 homes in the first year.
Beka had a further 50 lot pur-
chase commitments.

A former Jack Nicklaus
designer had agreed to design
a links golf course, while nego-
tiations were underway with
Greg Normam Golf for a
course designed to PGA spec-
ifications.

Beka was also said to have
discussed with Matrix, a utility
equipment supplier, over a
50/50 joint venture on provid-
ing utilities for the project.

Meanwhile, Beka had devel-
oped a relationship with Kings
Creek Development to con-
struct timeshare units, the for-
mer investing the land and
receiving $1,000 per week of
sales generated. Kings Creek,
which has a Virginia timeshare
development, has links with
Ken Farino, who was trying to
develop the Marriott Discov-
ery Bay project, and is now

understood to be acting asa

lovai adviser to Beka

‘Beka ts said to have received
commitments for 200 condo
hotel units, having been
involved in discussions on this
with hedge funds and institu-
tional investors. It was said to

have “made significant
progress” on real estate pre-
sales.

“Condo hotel pre-sales rev-
enue based upon Beka’s cur-
rent position exceeds $220 mil-
lion,” the document said. “Res-
idential lot pre-sales revenue
based upon Beka’s current

. position exceeds $60 million.”

Beka was target marketing
a 52,000-strong high-end golf
group and 100,000 doctors
group, while Foxwoods had 3.2
million casino members.

Other potential relationships
involved a_ tie-up with
NASCAR over a NASCAR-

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branded resort, and Margari-
taville - for a Margaritaville
Hotel and Casino, even an
entire Margaritaville town.
Illich Holdings, which has
invested in the Detroit Red
Wings ice hockey team, was
said to be interested in sub-
licensing the casino.
Financing for the project was

coming from UBS, which had.

committed a $550 million, six-
year loan to fund land acquisi-

tions, infrastructure build, and

the Foxwoods Hotel and Casi-
no. UBS had also committed
to a $140 million construction
loan.

Scotiabank was the lead
bank in a syndicate, involving
Royal Bank of Canada:and
FirstCaribbean International
Bank, for a $100 million loan
to finance the Omni Hotel.

Royal Bank, meanwhile, was
in discussions with Beka over a
$100 million mortgage line, and
had shown interest in supply-
ing a $40 million loan for con-
struction of a retail complex
based upon anchor tenant leas-
es. The bank had even offered
to bring a major grocery chain
to the Bahamas.

EDAW, the Government’s
master planner, is the planner
for this project. East Bay
Group is doing the environ-
mental impact assessment
(EIA).

Beka is also seeking from
the Government the right to
control roads plans in eastern

Grand Bahama and re-direct *

existing roads; construct all
utilities; import fuel; build a
concrete and asphalt plant;
build an International School,
offshore medical centre; estab-
lish a mortgage company; and
manage a clerk’s office to
record deed transfers.

It also wants to “prohibit
others from accessing any
canals or harbours within five
miles of our site”.













PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, MICHELLE
DONNA MARIE DEAN of the Western District of the
Island of New Providence intend to change my name
to MICHELLE DONNA MARIE MITCHEL. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box SS-792, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANDREW MARC OF
PINEDALE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 20th day of February, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.









OFFICE ASSISTANT

To assist in General Office Work, Duties include, but not limited to:










- receptionist
- filing, typing correpondence

- banking & postal duties

- accounting; knowledge of Quickbooks a plus.

- computer skills

Ideal candidate will be honest, personable, respopaible, and punctual, and self
motivated.

Salary commensurate with experience. 2 9




Send resume to: Office Position, P.O. Box CB-13835, Nassau, Bahamas

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, BRANDON JULIAN
of Stapledon Gardens, PO. BOX CB-12714,Nassau,
Bahamas, intend to change my name to BRANDON
JULIAN OLOUMOU. If there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box SS-
792, Nassau, Bahamas: no later.than thirty (30) cays after
the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE is hereby given that IOULIA OMPOUCHOVA (also
known as ELENA KALIS) OF SUGAR ROCK, GREAT
HARBOUR CAY, BERRY ISLANDS is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for’
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 20th day of February, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas, -c.sasssems :












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PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



En eee cece eee ea ee
Film Studios to require $70-$90m investment

FROM page 1B

development up and running
was critical in the short-term.
He explained: “We are aware
there are two, possibly three,

productions that are interested
[in using the Film Studios] and
have been green-lit to move for-
ward, specifically the use of the
tank”. ,

Mr Bethel said: “From the
film production side, it’s cer-

tainly a one to two-year build
out for the completion of every
thing film production-related”
that was envisaged by the orig-
inal developers when they

signed their Heads of Agree- |

ment with the Government in

Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited, a subsidiary of Citigroup, a leading financial
institution with a presence in over 100 countries and over 100 million
customers worldwide, is seeking candidates for the position of Technology
Controls Officer in our Technology Department.

Role Responsibilities

- Manage the Change Management Process throughout the entire lifecycle
and keep associated records updated.

Review database security audit logs, access logs, incident reports and
on-line reports using various database security tools such as SEMS
and APP Detective.

Monitor software and hardware patching and licensing to maintain
compliance with Citigroup and Industry Standards.

Assist in the preparation and tracking of information for internal and
external Information Security audits in accordance with generally
accepted IS audit standards and controls.

Assist in the execution of technical Risk and Compliance Self Assessment
(RCSA) and participate in the identification, recording, monitoring
and reporting of corrective action plans.

Provide backup for the Information Security Administrator and Business
Information Security Officer.

Knowledge/Skills Required

Bachelors of Arts/Science in Information Technology or equivalent

experience

2-4 years related experience; experience with Information Security

audits or Compliance-related positions an asset.

Strong oral and written communication skills

Excellent time management, organization and administrative skills
Solid knowledge of Oracle and SQL

Experience with Change Management systems

Proficient in MS Office Suite, LAN/WAN environment

Interested Bahamian candidate should forward a copy of their resume by
February 23, 2007 to: Human Resources, Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited, P.O.
Box N-1576, Nassau, Bahamas OR Fax: (242) 302-8779 OR Email:
janice.gibson @citigroup.com

(Standing next to Mrs. Charlene Storr is Mr. Bruno Roberts a Director of
The Private Trust Corporation Limited)

The Private Trust Corporation Limited is pleased to announce the appointment of
Mrs. Charlene Wells-Storr to the Board of Directors of the Company effective 5th

February 2007 .

Mrs. Storr is a Certified Public Accountant who started her professional career with
‘the international accounting firm of Deloitte & Touche, during which time she was
seconded for a year and a half to the firm’s Jersey, Channel Island office. She
joined The Private Trust Corporation Limited in September 2003 as Client’
Relationship Team Manager and was subsequently promoted to the position of
Manager — Client Relationship Department.

Mrs. Storr has been recognized by the Bahamas Financial Services Board for »
professional excellence in the financial services and trust administration industry.
She holds an advanced proficiency certificate in Spanish and has conducted seminars
on corporate services and trust administration policies to native Spanish speakers.

She currently serves as a Director on the Boards of The Bahamas Financial Services
Board and The Bahamas Development Bank. She brings a wealth of knowledge
and experience to the Board of The Private Trust Corporation.

She is married to Mr. Merrit A. Storr.

The Private Trust Corporation Limited is an independent, licensed Bahamian trust company, securities broker dealer and
investment fund administrator providing to international corporate and private clients personalized, professional and
comprehensive financially engineered solutions including:

* Asset protection, discretionary and purpose trusts
* Company incorporation and management

¢ Establishment and administration of foundations
¢ Investment fund administration and accounting

¢ Estate planning and executorships
¢ Insurance structures

* Corporate finance and strategic planning



2002.

The new owners anticipated
completing the sound stage in
the first year, and Mr Bethel

added: “The rest of the project:

is more likely a five to 10-year
build-out.”

He and his group had given
undertakings to the Govern-
ment that they would “complete
all facets of the project accord-
ing to the Heads of Agreement,
and that includes the resort, res-
idences and theme park con-
cept”.

“The original Heads of
Agreement called for some-
where in the range of an injec-
tion of $70 million in capital
into the project,” Mr Bethel
said.

“From a first look, we are
convinced the investment will
be much more than that, «given
what we have to do and what’s
essential to make the project
work. The investment is going
into the range of $80-$90 mil-
lion, and that will obviously be
phased in over the period of the
project.”

Mr Bethel told The Tribune
that the definitive agreement
for the sale of the Bahamas
Film Studios was “still being
negotiated, and subject to

approval by the Government”.

He and his group have sub-
mitted the relevant proposals
and documents to the Govern-
ment, but the anticipated com-
pletion date for the purchase,
February 28, 2007, was likely to
be “extended given the need for
government review and
approval”.

Mr Bethel and his group are
understood to have paid $14
million to acquire the rights to
develop the Bahamas Film Stu-
dios from Gold Rock Creek
Enterprises and its ultimate
Bermuda-based parent, Ashby
Corporation.

Companies

Ross Fuller, chairman of both
companies, it is understood, will
use part of the purchase price to
pay off Gold Rock’s liabilities,
including a $10 million loan
from FirstCaribbean Interna-
tional Bank for the water tank
construction, and a further $1
million in debts.

Mr Fuller took over the pro-
ject after two of its three origi-
nal founding partners, Hans
Schutte and Michael Collyer,
passed away. The surviving

partner is Paul Quigley, who is .

Legal Notice

NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) LECLE LIMITED is in dissolution under the provisions of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on February 19, 2007
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by Registrar

General.

(c) The liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace

West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 19th day of March, 2007 to send their names and
addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the
company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of
any distribution made before such debts are proved.

February 19, 2007

LAKEISHA COLLIE

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY



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no longer associated with the
Bahamas Film Studios.

This will leave him with a net
$3-$4 million from the deal, but
Mr Bethel yesterday declined
to comment on any of the trans-

_action’s financial details.

However, he said: “We need
to recognise that some of the
requirements of the original
Heads of Agreement were not
met in the first instance, and we
have undertaken to remedy this
and the associated timelines
also.

“We have undertaken to
work with the BEST Commis-
sion on remedial action [on
environmental concerns raised
over the Film Studios], which
was apparently promised by the
previous developers to be done,
but it seems nothing has been
implemented. We are prepared
to bring in the proper technical ©
team to see what work needs
to be done and move forward
with it.

“We have undertaken to doa
thorough study and survey of
the land, which had been one
of the requirements of the
Heads of Agreement. That was
not done or completed. We are
gearing to do that, so we can
present to government a full
land-use study and proposals.”

Mr Bethel said his investor .°.

group, which is largely Euro-
pean based, was recruiting the
marketing and management
teams it had identified to run
the Bahamas Film Studios.
“We are recruiting a market-
ing team that has significant

inroads into producers and °.

directors, and can sell them the
story,” Mr Bethel said.

The members of his investor
group had backgrounds in film
finance, oil and gas, and oil and
gas construction, Mr Bethel
said, adding that they were all
pre-existing clients of Montaque
and approached him about the
potential investment opportu-
nity.

Mr Bethel had worked exten-
sively in the fledgling film indus-
try in the Bahamas, trying to
develop it domestically, explor-
ing film financing from the
Bahamas, and providing Trea-
sury and payroll functions to
production companies filming
here, including Disney’s Pirates
of the Caribbean IJ and III.

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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007

SECTION



Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com




Lions 15-9

didn’t stop the Masters
League in continuing
with their regular sea-
son action, completing
two games on Saturday.

The two games came
ahead of the league’s
playoff series, which is
expected to start on
March 10th.

Getting things started
was the Joshua Knights,
destroying the DHL
Lions 15-5.

The Knights, who
‘rode the arm’ of Rudy
Gardiner, held the
Lions’ to three shut out
innings, while they
exploded in the third
inning.

Things were pretty
evenly matched in the
two innings with the
Knights taking a one
run lead over the Lions
in the second inning.

But the Knights went
to work in the third
inning, turning in eight
runs to the Lions’ two.

The team was led by
Lester Dean, Abe John-
son and Sunny Haven,
all scoring two.

For the Lions, Larry ©
Forbes lad one run** ~~"
with pitcher Mike
Isaacs connecting with
the ball on two occa-
sions.

Having already
secured their place in
the playoffs is the Pan-
thers, clinging onto the
fourth spot.

It was a tough second
match for the Panthers
pulling off a close win
over the Dog House
Rangers.

The Panthers won the
game 13-11, the win-
ning pitcher was Robert
Gilbert with John
Woodside taking the



_ loss.

pu cite




NAA
Sheniqua
stars at

track meet

@ THE first annual Dian-
na Lynn Thompson Road
Runners track meet, held
over the weekend, saw the
return of some the coun-
try’s premier athletes, all
hoping to fight their way
back to the top of the
charts.

Sealing her return with a
win in the sprint events was
Sheniqua Ferguson. This
was the first set of individ-
ual events for the Auburn
University bound sprinter.

¢ SEE PAGE TWO







SERA AANA PT REA NNR

The Joshua | a : nu
ccc GHS weave their magic
the DHL Ul

m BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON

Sports Reporter

THE Hugh Campbell Invi-
tational has arrived and the
GHS Magics pulled out all the
tricks to start their tournament
on a high.

The Magics had their wands
handy and with just one twirl,
Galilee College was in the los-
ing bracket. The Magics, who
had a big fourth quarter,
pulled off the first game with a
49-43 victory.

The Magics’ show started
from the tip, with an explo-

sive offensive opening. As a .

team, they outscored Galilee
7-3 — a score posted just min-
utes from the opening start.

Galilee, who were depend-
ing on Ashton Neely to score,
got off to a slow start, the
team managed to throw up
five clean shots, only three fell.
All other scores were made
from the free throw line.

Even though the Magics’
were able to disrupt Galilee’s
offensive flow, head coach
Samuel Symonette was still
disappointed with their play
in the first half.

According to Symonette,
the Magics allowed Galilee to
creep their way back into the
game after successful shut outs
in the first quarter.

Symonette said: “The guys
played with a little more heart
than they usually do through
the regular season. They came

out, they listened and tried to |

execute down the stretch and
it worked out for us.”

But Symonette will have to
take his crew back to the
drawing board before their
next game.

Even though the team
bagged a win, Symonette
believes that perfect execu-
tion on both ends of the court
will be the only way his team
will prevail.

The Magics, who are play-
ing out of Pool I in the tour-
nament, are scheduled to play
St John’s College today at
7pm.

According to Symonette,
this will be a big challenge for
his team, but the yesterday’s
win will give the boys enough
confidence.

He said: “I am sure this is
going to be a big challenge for
the team but we will have to
come out and meet the chal-
lenge and come out and play
extra hard.

“T believe the guys can do it,
they will just have to come
out, buckle down, they will
need to stay focused and exe-
cute on every opportunity.

“It is a tough pool but we
are going to do our best. We
need to react to the ball a little
bit faster, stay focused through
the game. Defensively after
they score they tend to trot
back when we need to get
back on defence.”

The Magics blew an eight
point half time lead, trailing
Galilee by three points by the
end of third quarter.

But Magics’ Kenzitte
Munnings would turn up the
heat in the fourth.

Munnings scored eight of
his 10 points in the closing
minutes. Helping the Magics’
cause was William Dean with
eight points and six rebounds.

Symonette added: “The
guys got tired, some of them
missed a lot of practices. Lack
of conditioning takes a toll on
them as they play the game.”

Leading the way for Galilee
was Cordero Sturrup with 14
points and 11 rebounds.

=>

i GHS prove to be too much for Galilee dowr

mM





1 the stretch in the Hugh Campbell opening game.
(Photo: Tim Cla

IAMI HERALD

SPORTS INSIDE

m SOFTBALL
By KELSIE
JOHNSON
Sports Reporter
THE weekend rain



GHS won 49-43.

rke/Tribune staff)







PAGE 8E, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007 TRIBUNE SPORTS

wraex GHS edge past Galilee in|

of 80 million

co” Hugh

mâ„¢ SOCCER agen
LONDON m,;

Associated Press

PREMIER League
champion Chelsea post-
ed losses of 80.2 million
pounds (US$155.9 mil-
lion) in the last financial.
year, a cut of 60 million
pounds (US$116.6m) on
the debt recorded the
previous tax period

The loss, announced
by the club Monday, is
the lowest loss since
Russian oil billionaire
Roman Abramovich
took over the club in
2003. The Blues have
won the last two league
championships and are
in second place this sea-
son behind Manchester
United.

Also Monday,
Chelsea announced it
was freezing Premier
League ticket prices for
all non-corporate buy-
ers, including season
and matchday tickets
for members, youth and
senior citizens. .

Chief executive Peter ©
Kenyon said the club
was also planning to
reduce ticket prices for
Champions League and
domestic cup matches.

"We understand that
our ticket prices are at
the higher end and we
are sensitive to the eco-
nomic demands on our
supporters," Kenyon
said.

Chelsea said its finan-
cial results for the year
ending June 2006 also
included increases in
turnover, merchandising
and soccer activities.

The most significant
rise was in merchandis-
ing, which increased
from 7.7 million pounds
(US$14.9 million) to

-11.1 million pounds

(US$21.5 million).

Turnover increased by
2.3 percent to 150 mil-
lion pounds (US$291.6
million), and soccer
activities increased by
6.3 percent to 130.4 mil-
lion (US$253.5 million).

"These figures
demonstrate that the
business is moving in
the right direction with
increases and growth in
all the major income
streams," Kenyon said.

Chelsea began a 100-
million-pound |
(US$194.4 million), 10-
year deal with German
sporting manufacturer
Adidas this season.

Last financial year,
Chelsea paid English
firm Umbro 25 million
pounds (US$48.6 mil-
lion) to end its:sponsor-
ship deal and spent 22.8
million pounds
(US$44.3 million) ter-
minating the coniracts
of strikers Adrian Mutu
and Juan Sebastian
Veron.

"Last year we took
some painful decisions
in order to help us
achieve our long term i i
business aims," Kenyon: as ‘ oe Foe " Ce Ss
said. i ; “ uae oe a stan ae —

"This year's figures
prove that was the cor-
rect decision.

“With increasing
sponsorship income,
television revenue, and
ongoing success on the
field, those positive
trends are projected to
continue."

Chelsea aims to break
even by the 2009-10 sea-
son. Until then, it's rely-
ing on the financial
backing of Abramovich,
who has put nearly 500
million pounds
(US$972.3 million) into
the club.

‘Last financial year,
Chelsea spent more
than 100 million pounds
(US$194.4 million) on
new players, most
notably Andriy
Shevchenko. Shaun
Wright-Phillips, Michael
Essien and John Obi
Mikel also joined the
club — all for more than
16 million pounds
(US$31.1 million).

ee ee

e us Loe ew A a : : \ . : ‘ Rei
@ ACTION from the GHS Magics’ game ag (Photos: Tim





PAGE 2E, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007




Roger Federer fies —
Connors’ record for
consecutive weeks
as top-ranked player

@ TENNIS ;
LONDON i
Associated Press

ROGER FEDERER tied
Jimmy Connors’ record of 160
consecutive weeks as the top-
ranked player in men’s tennis
Monday.

The 10-time Grand Slam
champion has held the No. 1
ATP Tour ranking since Feb.
2, 2004. The Swiss star is
assured of breaking the record
next week.

“Breaking records and
doing something that hasn’t
been done for a long time, it’s
really nice,” Federer said
recently.

Connors was No. 1 from
’ July 1974 to August 1977. He
is now coaching one of Feder-
er’s biggest rivals, Andy Rod-
dick. :

Federer, who has won six of
the last seven Grand Slam
titles, hasn’t played since beat-
ing Fernando Gonzalez in the
Australian Open final on Jan.
28. He returns to action next
week at the Dubai Open.

Federer has 8,120 points in
the year-based rankings.
Rafael Nadal, the man who
beat Federer at the French
Open last year, is second with
4,705 points. Nadal also beat
Federer in the Dubai Open i
final last year. i

The 25-year-old Federer
has dominated tennis for the
past three seasons, but is still
trying to win a Grand Slam
title on clay.

“That’s the only way I can -
make this season a better one
than last year,” Federer has
said. “Otherwise it won’t be
possible.”

Last season, only Nadal and
Andy Murray managed to
beat Federer, who finished the : *
season with 12 titles and 16 }
finals appearances in his 17
tournaments. He earned $8.34
million and also won the sea-
son-ending Masters Cup.

Federer couldn’t be
reached for comment Mon- i
day, but his mother was happy }
to hear that her son reached :
yet another milestone.

“Of course I’m proud. It’s





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VICTORY: S



heniqua Ferg

(FILE Photo)

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS

Sheniqua
hits form in
sprint events

MTRACK AND FIELD.
By KELSIE JOHNSON

Sports. Reporter

TRACK and field is in full
swing on the local scene and
junior athletes are using the
weekend meets to improve
their form.

The first annual Dianna

Lynn Thompson Road Run-.

ners track meet, held over the
weekend, saw the return of
some the country’s premier

athletes, all hoping to fight .

their way back to the top of
the charts.

Sealing her return with a
win in the sprint events was
Sheniqua Ferguson. This was
the first set of individual
events for the Auburn Uni-
versity bound sprinter. -

In the 100m she clocked
12.11 seconds for the win over
teammates Krystal Bodie’s
12.27 seconds and Tia Rolle
in third in 12.32 seconds. ,

The 200m Ferguson record-
ed 24.37 seconds to edge out
Tamara Rigby who finished
up in 25.01 seconds and Jesha
White in 25.37 seconds.

Printassia Johnson is show-
ing great form, leading the
sprint events in the under 17
girls division.

Johnson, who has already
dipped under the entry stan-
dards in the 100m for the
Carifta Games, returned to
the track this week to capture
the century in a time of 12.47
seconds and the 200m in 24.90
seconds.

.Fifiishing second in the
100m "was V’Alonne Robin-

Dianna Lynn Thompson
Road Runners meet



son in 12.49 seconds followed
by Ashlee Dorsett in 12.67
seconds and Carlene Johnson
in 12.73 seconds.

In the 200m Carlene John-
son would follow Printassia
Johnson in 25.30 seconds with
Robinson coming in third in
25.60 seconds.

Daejha Moss continues on
her winning streak in the girls
under 9 division, showing that
she is indeed a prospect for
the future.

For the fourth consecutive
week, Moss walked away the
victor in the 100m, taking the
event in a time of 15.70 sec-
onds. She was followed by
Dejanique Lightbourne in

15.80 seconds and Charlissa

Ferguson in 16.30 seconds.

Lightbourne would claim
the 200m with a best of 34.50
seconds, Charisma Taylor was
second in 35.10 seconds with
Danielle Shaw. third in 35.60
seconds.

The yard dash in the under
11 girls division belonged to
Asia Butler, who finished up
in 14.20 seconds, Jeorgette
Williams came in second place
in 14.50 seconds followed
closely by Kennedy Carbin in
14.60 seconds.

It would be a twist in posi-
tions for the trio in the 200m
with Carbin leading the way.

She would take the event in

a time of 30.98 seconds, Butler
secured the second spot in
31.20 seconds while Williams
settled for third in a time of
31.50 seconds.

Things in the under 13 divi-
sion heated up with Khadjia
Fraser’s winning streak com-
ing to an end.

Breaking the streak was
Kendace Hart, capturing the
100m in 13.30 seconds, leav-
ing Fraser to settle for second
in 13.60 seconds. Rounding
out the third spot was Makeya
White in 13.70 seconds.

The battle, between D’An-
gelo Mackey and D’Vaughn
Laing, for the sprinting crown
in the under 9 boys division
continued on this weekend.

Mackey would get the bet-
ter of Laing in the 100m, tak-
ing the event in a time of 15.00
seconds, Laing clocked 15.20
seconds for second and Mari-
ano Kelly 15.50 seconds for
the third spot.

The 200m would see Laing
record 32.50 seconds for the
200m crown, Mackey second
in 33.00 seconds and Brason
Rolle third in 33.30 seconds.

On the field Trae Carey
landed his way to the top of
the boys under 13 long jump
with a best leap of 4.41m. He
was followed by Oral Rolle
with 4.22m and Rubin Elme
of Bahamas Elite with 4.16m.

First Baptist crush
Faith United ©

m BASKETBALL

AFTER losing a close encounter with the
defending champions St. Paul's Fox Hill last

week, First Baptist men came back Saturday

and they took their frustration out on Faith
United.

In one of the marquee games at the Charles
W. Saunders High School, Jean Street, First
Baptist clobbered Faith United 66-17 to high-
light a day of blowouts and close finishes as the
Baptist Sports Council's 2007 Rev. Tyrone
Knowles Basketball Classic rolled into high
gear.

¢ Here's a summary of all of the games
played:

First Baptist 66, Faith United 17: Gamalian
Rose led a balanced scoring attack, with 15
points, Eddy Miller and Cruz Simmons both
had nine and Eugene Bain and Tamico Moxey
chipped in with eight a-piece as First Baptist
pulled even at 1-1.

Ronald Napolean had eight and Dario Dean
five in the loss as Faith United dropped their
season opener.

Church of the Nazarene 47, Lord's House of
Faith 44: Evins Milfrid and Vardo Gray both
scored 16 points to lead Christ Church of the
Nazarene as they won in their debut in the
men's division.

Carvin Cummings scored a game high 19 in
the loss. Pastor Arthur Duncombe added eight.

Temple Fellowship 56, Golden Gates 49:
Edison Burrows canned a game high 23 points
and Ishban Lynes and Sidney Cunningham
both contributed four as Temple Fellowship
pulled even at 1-1.

Jaroy Cooper had 15 and Kyle Rodgers nine
as Golden Gates suffered their season opening
loss.

Bahamas Harvest 43, Macedonia 35: Irnara
Thompson scored 13, Travis Forbes had eight
and Shawn Smith six as Bahamas Harvest won
their men's season opener.

Rohn Johnson scored a game high 15,
Anthony Porter had eight and Tim Clarke six
as Macedonia loss their second straight game.

New St. Paul's 64, New Bethlehem 29: Dar-
ren Darville pumped in a game high 19, includ-
ing three 3-pointers, Ricardo Smith had 11,
including two 3-pointers, George Simpson had
nine, McClain Higgs added seven and Robert
Colebrooke Jr. chipped in with six as the New
St. Paul's Bias Street pulled evenatl-l.

Therell Duncombe had 18 and Kendrick
Wilson, Gerrad Darville and Donovan Bullard
all scored four as New Bethlehem dropped to
1-1,

First Baptist 66, Faith United 17: Golden
Gates 47, New Bethlehem 30: Claude Lesbott

scored 10, Bradley Cash and Brandon Brown
both had eight and Rocco Fernander added
six as Golden Gates won their second straight
19-and-under game.

Philip Jackson and Kentino Ferguson scored
eight each in New Bethlehem's season opener.

St. Paul's FH 31, Golden Gates No.1 19:
Kendal Simmons came up with 12, Patrick
Brice had seven and Jarvis Delancy helped out
with five as St. Paul's Fox Hill won their 15-
and-under opener.

Kendrick Moss had six, Ravon Armbrister
five and Dearran Rolle and David Kemp both
added four.

Everlasting Life Ministries 42, St. Paul's FH
39: Deangelo Williamson hit 14 points, Jyde
Rolle 10, Trevone Grant six and Daniel Cadet
five as Everlasting Life Ministries wo. their
pulled even at 1-1 in the 19-and-under divi-
sion.

Bryan Delancy scored 12, Kendal Simmons
had nine and Kendal Simmons eight in St
Paul’s season opening loss.

First Baptist 33, Faith United 31: Donero
Balfour scored nine points to lead First Baptist
as they nipped Faith United's team one for
their season opening victory.

Jermaine Mackey and Kenton Gibson led
the way for Faith United.

Faith. United 52, Ebenezer 35: Galen Gray
scored a game high 21 points and Theo Woods
had 16 as Faith United won their 19-and-under
season opener. .

Leroy Wells scored 11 as Ebenezer suffered
their second straight loss.

Golden Gates 24, Ebenezer 8: Daveran Boo-
tle had six points and Delano Miller added
five as Golden Gates No.II won their 15-and-
under season opener.

Lewis Colebrooke scored four in Ebenez-
er's season opener loss.

¢ Here's the fixture of games on tap for Sat-
urday:

Court One - 10 a.m. Ebenezer vs Macedonia
(15); 11 a.m. Macedonia vs Kemp Road Min-
istries (19); Noon Evangelistic Center vs Mace-
donia (M); 1 p.m. Christ Church of the
Nazarene vs New Covenant (19); 2 p.m. New
Bethlehem vs Bahamas Harvest (M) and 3
p.m. Kemp Road Ministries vs Faith United
(M).

Court Two - 10 a.m. Transfiguration vs Mt.
Tabor (15); 11 a.m. Ebenezer vs New Bethle-
hem (19); Noon Christ Church of the Nazarene
vs Calvary Bible (M); 1 p.m. Golden Gates
No.II vs New Covenant (15); 2 p.m.

Temple Fellowship vs St. Paul's FH (M); 3
p.m. Lord's House of Faith vs St. Paul's Bias
Street (M).



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A

PAGE 2, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





The Prime Minister brought
_ troubles down on himself |

T is not unusual in politics to

see a government in a state of
meltdown. When it happens, all the
usual clichés and adages come to
mind: when it rains it pours; those
whom the gods would destroy they
first make mad; troubles come not in
singles but in battalions. —

In the United States the adminis-
tration of a previously cocky George
Bush is facing a sea of troubles and in
Britain the shine has worn off the
leadership of Prime Minister Tony
Blair.

In some people, as Oliver Wendell
Holmes put it, “Trouble creates a
capacity to handle it.” Others just go
to pieces and blame everybody in
sight for their misery,

It is true that in the political arena
as it is in life that good people often
suffer from the schemes, snares and -
slanders of opponents. It is also true

- that many political troubles are self-

inflicted, but that does not stop the
victims of self-mutilation from blam-
ing others.

In Shakespeare’s play, Julius Cae-
sar, Cassius addresses Brutus solicit-
ing his support to stop Caesar and
his dictatorial designs on Rome. Says
Cassius: “ ...Men are at some time
masters of their fates: The fault, dear
Brutus, is not in our stars, but in our-
selves, that we are underlings.”

It is true that Cassius was soliciting
the conflicted Brutus to cause the ulti-
mate trouble for Caesar - putting an
end to his life. But the point still holds:
most of our troubles in life come as a
result of our own fault.

hat is certainly the case with

Prime Minister Christie as his

beleaguered government falls apart. It

is all of their own making and that is

clear to the whole country, including
PLP supporters.

But that does not stop Mr Christie

from flailing about hysterically, con-

juring up conspiracies, threatening his
opponents and blaming everyone but
his colleagues and himself for their
troubles. ae ake Mi Rie Setqenieda
From. the very beginning of his
administration, Mr Christie seemed,
to have adopted the attitude that if he
left everything alone then everything
would sort itself out, that if he allowed
his ministers and other colleagues to
do as they liked, they would gra-.
ciously respond by doing the right





things.

The case of the Korean fishing
boats was an early indication of how
things would fall apart. A fleet of fish-
ing boats invaded the Bahamas to
catch fish for export, presumably to
Korea. Included in the fleet was a

‘mother ship with processing equip-

ment, and they were all crewed by
Koreans.

There were so many things wrong
with this scheme that it is difficult to
understand who could have conceived
it and how it got so far. The Bahami-
ans responsible - even those who were
nota part of the administration -

should have known that such a thing ..

could not, would not, be allowed.
More so, members of the govern-

ment ministers and backbenchers —

and all the civil servants involved

should have known better. But work

permits were obtained for the Kore-
ans and the boats were allowed into
the country. Obviously someone high
up knew about it.

It was only when the plot was dis-



Among Mr Christie’s colleagues when
the PLP came to office were some peo-
ple with the same corrupt and vindic-
tive inclinations of the old PLP and
some who never really understood
how our system of government is sup-

posed to operate.



ALL YOUR DEC

s On The Island”



Donald's



Up to this day Mr Christie has not
given the Bahamian people satisfacto-
ry answers to the many questions
which remain outstanding with
regard to the Korean fishing boats
scandal. And that has been the hall-
mark of his administration.



covered and the Opposition and oth-
ers started to protest that the boats
left the country, or were otherwise
disposed of, and the Korean crew
also left.

ut up to this day Mr Christie

has not given the Bahamian
people satisfactory answers to the
many questions which remain out-
standing with regard to this scandal.
And that has been the hallmark of
his administration.

Other scandals and crises followed
in much the same pattern and with
much the same result, including the
Junkanoo bleachers, the fight in the

When he should
have spoken out,
he was silent;
when he should
have acted, he
was paralysed;
and when he
should have



revealed, he

covered up.



Cabinet Room and the Anna Nicole
Smith affair, to name a few.

Among Mr Christie’s colleagues
when the PLP came to office were
some people with the same corrupt
and vindictive inclinations of the old
PLP and some who never really
understood how our system of gov-
ernment is supposed to operate.

But there had never been any hint
of corruption about Mr Christie and
certainly he was well-educated in the
ways of our parliamentary democracy
and cabinet government.

_ He was familiar with all the princi--
ples and conventions of the system

and he enjoyed the goodwill of the
people, including many in the oppo-
sition. So the country looked to him to
regulate the deviant and educate the
ignorant.

Mr Christie was able to articulate,
sometimes eloquently, all these things.
Yet he failed; and that failure was
neither due to his political opponents
nor to a hostile media nor even so

MONDAY - THURSDA'
FRIDAY - SATURD

BILLY’S DREAM
STILL ALIVE

Furnitu
And Appliance Cent

much to his wayward colleagues.
When he should have spoken out,
he was silent; when he should have

acted, he was paralysed; and when he’
should have revealed, he covered up. |

It was due to something lacking in
him: either the will or the strength or
the courage to do what he should
have done. That is why we are wit-
nessing this meltdown - like an ice
sculpture in the noonday sun.

* Ok O*

ADVICE FOR RADIO

eaders of this column may

recall that a few months
back I was the victim of a chronic
radio talk show caller and serial slan-
derer. Last week he was at it again
with other people as his intended vic-
tims. :

As the election season heats up,
this individual and others like him
will no doubt be quite busy.

So this is a bit of advice for the pro-
prietors and hosts of radio talk shows
who have a responsibility to protect
the public from slander and indecent
comment on the airwaves.

They cannot expect members of the
public who are attacked by slanderers
to be satisfied with just an apology,
and they leave themselves open to
costly legal remedy.

Talk show hosts and the proprietors

have the same responsibility to guard.

against slander as the editors and pub-
lishers of the print media have to
guard against libel. They know exact-
ly who the serial slanderers are and
the public knows as well.

The hosts should cut them off to
avoid this high risk and the propri-
etors should make sure that mecha-
nisms are in place to protect the pub-
lic.

‘That is not too difficult to do, and it
is better that the proprietors should
do it before people start making
demands on their legislators. It would
be a pity if this wonderful venue for
democratic debate should have to be
restricted because of the nastiness of
a few.

As for the serial slanderers them-
selves, they may feel that because of
their circumstances they are immune
from legal action for redress by their
victims. They are wrong.

sirarthurfoulkes@hotmail.com
www.bahamapundit.typepad.com

Share
your
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award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.







In brief

Cuba trains
Panamanians
in medical
hypnosis

m@ HAVANA



CUBA, whose doctors have
experimented with dozens of
alternative treatments, is train-
ing Panamanian therapists in
the medical use of hypnosis, the
government news agency AIN
reported Monday, according to
Associated Press.

The agency said that 80 Pana-
manians graduated from cours-
es held in the Central Ameri-
can country under a program
with Cuba’s Higher Institute of
Medical Sciences, based in the
eastern city of Santiago. :

Cuba’s best-known
researcher in the field, Alberto
Cobian, has said that hypnosis
can be useful in treating stress,
bronchial asthma, sexual dys-
function and some types of skin
diseases, as well as offering
some anesthetic effects, the
agency reported.

An economic collapse in the
early 1990s created dire short-
ages of many conventional med-
icines in Cuba, prompting wide-
spread research into and use of
alternative treatments such as
herbal medicines and acupunc-
ture.

Cuba also has used its exten-
sive medical system as a bridge
of cooperation with other coun-
tries, offering training and send-
ing tens of thousands of its own

doctors abroad on medical mis-

sions.

Government
in Cuba to
open offices
for longer

@ HAVANA

CUBAN officials are tackling
problems such as child care,

poor lighting and insufficient

transportation for workers so
they can keep some government
offices open later, the Commu-
nist labour newspaper report-

ed Monday, according to Asso- ~~~

ciated Press.

The goal is to have offices
open at times when people can
use them before or after their
own eight-hour workdays, tak-
ing advantage of an expanding
economy. .

Trabajadores, published by
Cuba’s Communist Party labor
federation, reported that some
notaries and civil registries in
Havana are already working

until 8pm and officials hope to .

expand hours at least some days
of the week at child care cen-
tres, primary schools, hair
dressers and workshops.

The effort is linked to a gov-
ernment campaign for greater
discipline among workers, with
a crackdown on absenteeism,
overlong lunch breaks, sloppy
work and theft.

Officials were working to.

overcome problems such as
insufficient lighting and trans-
portation at night while supply-
ing meals and child care at dif-
ferent times for workers, Tra-
bajadores reported.

The communist government
has been gradually expanding
services as its economy recovers
from the shortages of the early
1990s, caused by the loss of
Soviet bloc aid and trade that
were once crucial.

RARE Re
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control



Uy rae Cy
Py EeALY]



~

pees

$s
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wy
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rin
wv
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007, PAGE 3



Woman charged
with ‘intentional
libel’ in connection
with publishing of
Internet images

A WOMAN was
arraigned in Magistrate’s
Court yesterday charged
with “intentional libel” in
connection with the pub-
lishing of images of
another woman on the
Internet.

Rochelle Dean, 25, of
Forbes Street appeared in
court six on Parliament
Street to answer the
charge.

It was alleged that
sometime between Tues-
day, October 17 and
Monday, October 23,
while at New Providence,
Dean intentionally and
unlawfully published
images of a woman via e-
mail without her consent,
to defame and cause
damage to the woman’s
character.

Dean pleaded not
guilty to the charge and
was granted bail in the
sum of $7,000.

The case was
adjourned to May 14.

e A man was sen-
tenced to life in prison
yesterday for the murder
of two Austrian tourists
at a Bimini resort in July
2005.

Frederick Cardinal
Francis, 24, appeared in
Supreme Court yesterday
before Justice Stephen
Isaacs for a sentencing
hearing.

He was represented by
attorney Carlson Shur-
land. Prosecuting was
director of public prose-
cutions Bernard Turner.

In August 2006, a
Freeport jury found Fran-
cis guilty of the murders
of the Austrian visitors.

Francis had been
charged back in July 2005
with the murders of
Bernhard von Bolzano
and Barbara Frelln von
Perfall.

The bodies of 35-year-
old Bolzano and Perfall,
32, were discovered in
their room at the
Anchorage Blue Water
Resort and Marina at
Alice Town Bimini on
Saturday July 23, 2005.

They were expected to
leave the island the day
they were found. A maid
- reportedly discovered the
bodies when she went to
clean the room.

Bolzano was said to
have been face down on
the floor, bound and
gagged, with a shotgun
wound in his back.

Perfall was found on
one of two beds with a
gun shot wound in the
stomach and a wound in
her head. Francis was
also sentenced yesterday
to 14 years in prison for
the rape of Baroness Per-
fall.

Police seize
drugs worth
almost $im

GRAND Bahama Police
seized 70 pounds of cocaine
worth almost $1 million and
arrested 10 persons, including
a Haitian boat captain and
nine crew members on board a
freighter at Luoayan Harbour
on Saturday.

_ Superintendent of Police
Basil Rahming said the 140-
foot freighter vessel docked at
Bradford Marine Shipyard
around at 9pm on Friday.

He said a team of drug inter-
diction officers proceeded to
Bradford Marine around 8am
the next day and boarded the
vessel, the ‘MV Caribbean
Dolphin,’ as it was suspected
that illegal drug trafficking was
taking place onboard.

During a search of the ves-
sel, officers discovered and
seized 30 taped packages con-
taining a substance they sus-
pected of being cocaine.

As a result, the captain, a
Haitian national who lives in
Miami, Florida and crew,
which consisted of eight men
and one woman, were arrested
and taken into custody.

The 10 suspects and the
drugs, which have an estimated
street value of $900,000 were
flown to New Providence
aboard an OP-BAT helicopter.

SHANE GIBSON’S resigna-
tion was hailed as The Tribune’s
“Watergate” yesterday as the
Anna Nicole Smith affair con-
tinued to rock the Bahamas.

Attorney Fred Smith said the
newspaper’s tenacity helped to
keep politicians and govern-
ment officials accountable.
“And it helps to develop the
democracy that we all aspire to
here,” he added.

Mr Gibson stepped down as
immigration minister on Sun-
day almost a week after The
Tribune published photographs
of him and Anna Nicole in close
embrace in her bedroom at her
Eastern Road home.

The pictures caused a furore
and The Tribune’s front page
was reproduced on leading TV
stations and in major newspa-
pers all over the world.

Mr Smith said: “Newspapers
such as The Tribune are the
fourth estate. Unless it is a ques-
tion of national security, noth-
ing should be kept from the
public.”

Mr Smith’s comments came
as the public responded to Mr
Gibson’s resignation, which was
announced in spite of his claims
that he had done nothing
wrong.

He said he was going for the
sake of his family, but would
seek vindication.

But Mr Smith said: “I consid-



B@ ATTORNEY Fred Smith

er this The Tribune’s Watergate
story.”

He was referring to The
Washington Post’s expose of
the Watergate scandal in 1973
when President Richard Nixon
was forced to resign.

Earlier, Mr Smith said politics
was all about: perception.
“Whether Mr Gibson did or did
not do anything wrong, he was
perceived to have acted improp-
erly.

“I congratulate him for his
resignation. This is an opportu-
nity for the Bahamas to recon-
sider the Immigration Act, to
reform and depoliticise our

fered “terrible” exposure over
Anna Nicole Smith, and had
rekindled the kind of interna-
tional publicity that suggested
it was a nation for sale.

Attorney: Gibson resignation
is [he Tribune's ‘Watergate’

“We need to clean up our act.
That is what the world is tellin
us.” .
He said The Tribune had
to be congratulated for dogged-





@ SHANE GIBSON

immigration laws and take them
out of the hands of politicians.”

He was referring to Mr Gib-
son’s controversial decision to
fast-track Ms Smith’s residen-
cy permit last summer with the
comment: “I would have done it
in a day if I could.”

Mr Smith said: “We should
have an independent immigra-
tion board that is not subject to
political manipulation and cor-
ruption.”

For decades, he added, the
UBP and PLP had used immi-
gration as a tool of oppression
against foreigners and Bahami-
ans.

He said the Bahamas had suf-

Tennyson Wells: Gibson did ‘honourable thing’

@ By BRENT DEAN

FORMER attorney general
Tennyson Wells said that Shane
Gibson did “the honourable
thing” in resigning as a member
of the Cabinet on Sunday.

In an interview with The Tri-
bune, Mr Wells stated that he
does think that Mr Gibson made
some errors in judgement
regarding to the Anna Nicole
Smith scandal. .

However, Mr Wells said he
believes Mr Gibson’s actions
probably did not amount to offi-
cial wrongdoing.

Mr Wells further asserted that
the national political process
would be improved if represen-
tatives of all political parties

would step down in the face of major scan-

dals.

He said: “If all of political parties would do
that with their people, we would have a much
better system. The country would be much
better off. And, when Hubert Ingraham

decides that that is what he will

of the fellas he is now running — who have
been compromised in office — then we could all

talk.”
During the FNM’s 10 years in

allegations were made against members such as
Tommy Turnquest and Dion Foulkes, but
these men did not step down. Current deputy



aN

@ FORMER Attorney
General Tennyson Wells

parties in his

leader of the FNM Brent
Symonette did resign from the
Airport Authority in the face of
allegations that he directed con-
tracts to companies he held an
ownership stake in.

Mr Wells also stated that he
is very confident about his
chances of retain the Bamboo
Town seat. In the last election,
Mr Wells was not opposed by

“the PLP and won the seat by

more than 1,000 votes.

When asked if he thought the
governing party will oppose him
in the election, Mr Wells stated
that the PLP are campaigning in
the constituency, however, he
has heard that internal polls done
by the PLP indicate that he can-
not be beaten by either of the
constituency.

In such situations, parties often divert their

resources to

do with some

sition, Huber

more competitive seats in what

may be a close election.

Despite being an independent, Mr Wells and
the retiring member for the St Margaret con-
stituency Pierre Dupuch have been allies of
the PLP in criticising the leader of the oppo-

t Ingraham.

Mr Wells further stated that he would not

office, public
Yet, he did

publicly endorse either party in the election.

assert that he regards Mr Christie

as a better choice for the position of prime
minister, compared to Mr Ingraham.

— Call for Shane
Gibson to resign
from parliament

A CALL went out yesterday
for Shane Gibson to resign from
parliament altogether and nev-
er again seek to represent the
Bahamas.

In the wake of Mr Gibson’s
resignation from the Cabinet
on Sunday, the Bahamas
Democratic Movement con-
gratulated Prime Minister
Christie for “finally having the
courage” to take control of his
government.

However, the party said it is
“sadly disappointed” that Mr
Christie allowed the country's
name to be “maligned, scan-
dalised and dragged through the
mud internationally” for a full
week before taking action.

“It is not acceptable for a
government minister to contin-
ue to arrogantly deflect respon-
sibility for his personal actions.
For Shane Gibson to say he is
resigning only because his rep-
utation and his family’s reputa-
tion have been scarred deeply is
a slap in the face to every
decent, right-thinking Bahami-
an citizen,” said the party in a
statement yesterday.

It said Mr Gibson seems to

have forgotten that the bad
press the Bahamas received in
the wake of Anna Nicole
Smith’s death was attributed to
him as a public official and not
as a private citizen.

“We do believe that Mr Gib-
son may have caused some scar-
ring to his family’s reputation
due to his inappropriate behav-
ior with Anna Nicole Smith, but
(this) should have been sec-
ondary as a cause for his resig-
nation. Thus, we firmly believe
that his resignation should be
due primarily to the Bahamian
people since his poor judgment
has potentially caused irrepara-
ble damage to the reputation of
our country,” the BDM said.

The party noted that Mr Gib-
son still fails to admit that his
relationship with Anna Nicole
Smith constituted an error in
judgment and an “obvious con-
flict of interest”.

“Moreover, in the wake of
this tragedy he continues to
boast about his past achieve-
ments while failing to admit to
his present circumstances. We
would like to remind Mr Gib-
son, your past achievements are

not on trial here, it is your
recent inappropriate behavior
with Ms Anna Nicole Smith and
the apparent nepotism and con-
flict of interest that resulted
from your former position as
minister of immigration,” the
BDM said.

“It is clear that this man does
not get it. He has brought
shame and disgrace to us as
people but he only seems to
think about his personal life
when all of his blatant errors in
this matter have taken place in
the public sphere and in his
public capacity,” it said. “There-
fore, not only should Mr Gibson
resign as a cabinet minister, he
should also resign from the hon-
ourable House of Assembly and
never again seek to represent
this country in any capacity.”

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Mr Smith said this had been a
salutary lesson for the Bahamas.

Edition featuring photos
being auctioned on eBay

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

ly exposing “this sordid situa-
tion”.

EDITIONS of The Tribune which feature the now infamous photos
of former Immigration Minister Shane Gibson and controversial US
celebrity Anna Nicole Smith are being auctioned off on eBay as a part
of pop culture history.

Private sellers who were able to obtain a copy of the newspaper’s
February 12 edition — which sold out just a few hours after being on the
street — have put the paper up for bid for over 200 million shoppers
worldwide.

The edition is described on the popular online auction website as the
paper that “sent shockwaves through the entertainment world.”

“This issue of the paper marks a key point in the Anna Nicole
Smith story and will be a valuable collector's item and a piece of
entertainment history for years to come,” the seller states on eBay.

Although the newspaper is well read, the seller notes in his article
description, that the country has a small population and the print run
of this newspaper is correspondingly very low.

“Few copies will make their way to the entertainment memorabilia
marketplace,” the seller states. ;

The edition of the paper being auctioned features six colour photos
of the former immigration minister and Ms Smith in various stages of
embrace. ma

Some of the photos were reportedly taken inside the former Playboy
cover girl’s bedroom in the Eastern Road home ‘Horizons’ on the
occasion of her 39th birthday.

One photo shows Mr Gibson and Ms Smith relaxing by the pool
together, while another shows the former minister visiting the celebri-
ty in hospital after she had given birth to her daughter Dannielynn.

The February 12 edition of The Tribune was so hotly sought after
that, according to reports, some people were re-selling their copies for
$20 a piece in Nassau later that very day.

The paper was displayed on all the major international television net-
works and set off a storm of controversy about the appropriateness of
Mr Gibson’s friendship with Ms Smith.

The pictures were also re-printed in black and white the following day
in response to numerous requests from Tribune readers who failed to
get their hands on a copy of the February 12 paper.

Some observers are claiming’ that the photos were responsible for set-
ting in motion the chain of events that led to Mr Gibson’s resigning
from Cabinet on Sunday night.

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007 THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO. THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI |
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

The future as"
a welfare state

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972

Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

Shane Gibson makes right decision.

IN THEORY the Bahamas has a Westmin-
ster system of government.

We say it is “in theory” only because when
crunch time comes government members who
fall from grace, don’t seem to know what course
of action is expected of them. \

“In Westminster systems of parliamentary
democracy, the term ‘responsible government’
describes a system of executive government
accountability, first to the parliament and ulti-
mately to the people. This system of account-
ability is meant to ensure that the government
acts in ways that are approved by the people.”

This is a succinct description of what kind of
government the Bahamas is supposed to have —
a government in which parliamentarians are
not only accountable to the électorate for the
laws they make and their performance in rep-
resenting the concerns of their constituents, but
also for the standards they set in their public
behaviour. .

On Sunday night Labour and Immigration
Minister Shane Gibson announced his resigna-
tion from Cabinet because of a scandal that
had spun out of control, but which could have
been contained if what he did Sunday night
had been done a week earlier.

Obviously Mr Gibson did not understand
the rules of the Westminster system, nor his
own government’s Code of Ethics, because, in
trying to lessen the scandal that had engulfed
him as a result of fast-tracking Anna Nicole
Smith’s residency permit, he made the situa-
tion worse by extending their friendship to
include his family.

With his wife sitting by his side in a TV pro-
gramme in which he intended to vindicate him-
self by shifting blame to The Tribune, he made
matters worse.

He said that the inappropriate photographs of
himself in the arms of the playgirl were posed
and that the Smiths and Gibsons were just one
big family.

“Anna Nicole was my friend as much as
Jackie’s friend and my mother’s and my kids,”
he told a television audience.

In fact his mother was the baby-sitter for
Anna’s five-month-old daughter, Dannielyn;
his wife was’ Anna’s spiritual counsellor; his
father captained her newly-purchased boat back
to Nassau, and the person the foreign media
kept referring to as the “nurse” who was with
Anna in her last hours, turned out to be his
father’s female companion. It was questionable
as to whether the lady was a nurse, especially as
she had to send for the bodyguard to give CPR
to Anna’s limp body. It was, you could say —
still all in the family.

But by dragging in his family and the services
they performed for the celebrity playgirl, Mr
Gibson forgot the Code of Ethics, which says:
“Ministers must avoid using their ministerial

status or influence for the enrichment of them-
selves or their families.”
Mr Christie criticised those who, he claimed,

had included the Gibson family in the scandal, .

forgetting that it was Mr Gibson himself who
had introduced them and made them an issue.

Mr Gibson also said it was The Tribune that
had harped on the inappropriateness of a gov-
ernment minister’s unseemly poses with an out-
of-control centre-fold cover girl. Again those
who blame The Tribune must remember that
Anna Nicole was not our friend, we did not
process her residency permit in record time,
nor did we pose for suggestive photographs
with her.

It was Mr Gibson himself who had made his
close friendship with her an issue when the
question came up as to why her residency per-
mit had been “fast tracked.”

The photographs went to the heart of this
issue and showed just how close that friend-
ship was.

Despite their unseemly nature, we published
the photographs because the Bahamian peo-
ple had a right to know just where a friendship
was leading one of their ministers.

And then there was the gift of the Rolex
watch. Mr Gibson said there was no gift. There
are others who would swear that there was and
that the Rolex cost in the region of $14,000.
We were not there and so we don’t know, just as
we were not in Anna Nichole’s bedroom when
Mr Gibson is alleged to have received, on behalf
of the Bahamas Treasury, the $10,000 cheque
for her residency permit delivered by a lawyer
from Callenders law firm — another denial by
Mr Gibson. Really, it is just a matter of who you
believe.

But if this gift is true, then Mr Gibson has
once again to be reminded of the Code of
Ethics. Says the code: “Ministers should not
accept gifts that might be perceived to create an
obligation to the donor.”

In regretting Mr Gibson’s departure, Mr
Christie said:

“T want to say that a man has acted improp-
erly, a man has acted incorrectly, a man has
acted in a way that his colossal error of judg-
ment raises suspicions or whatever it is, but I
want to do it mindful of the fact that I don’t
have to take his head off his body to kill him
politically and I don’t have to kill his wife and
his children in doing so. That is not the Bahamas
I want to live in.”

In the end Mr Gibson made the right deci-

sion. If he had better understood the principles

of the government system of which he was a
part, he would have made his decision sooner,
and saved himself, his family, his political party
and this country much embarrassment.
However, in the end he landed right side up.

- For this he must be congratulated.



BAHAMAS SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS

NOTICE
www.bahamasengineers.org

THE BAHAMAS SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS
CORDIALLY INVITES YOU TO ATTEND

THE MONTHLY LUNCHEON
ON

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2007

TOPIC:

“BEC: MEETING THE BAHAMIAN
CHALLENGE IN BOTH GROWTH AND

COMPLEXITY”

GUEST SPEAKER:

Mr. Kevin Basden

General Manager

EDITOR, The Tribune.

SINCE August 2006 The
National Coalition for Health
Care Reform (Coalition) has
been attempting to obtain
meaningful data from the
Bahamas government on their
proposed National Health
Insurance scheme (NHI) to
offer constructive criticism.

When the government
started to "feel the heat" of
the public debate, Dr. BJ Not-
tage, Senator and Minister of
Health, invited the Coalition
to take the debate out of the
public domain and he would
share the information being
sought. As it turns out Dr.
Nottage effectively silenced
the Coalition and to date has
not provided the promised
information.

Bear in mind that Dr. Not-
tage and his staff at the Min-
istry of Health have been
meeting with groups all across
the country to offer a public
relations programme on how
great the NHI scheme will be,
without providing substantive

‘ data on how the plan is struc-

tured, how they arrived at
their numbers or how it will
be sustained.

They commonly refer to
this PR road show as "con-
sultation".

The Coalition agreed to the
government's “code of
silence" based on the promise
from the Minister that the
information they requested
would be provided to them.

It is dispiriting to note that
the Minister is unwilling or
unable to provide substantive
information to the Coalition
and health care professionals.

What has been provided is
a an indignant and offensive
letter frdm the Minister of
Health that still does not pro-
vide the information but chas-
tises ni¢mbers of the Coali-
tion for exercising their Con-
stitutional right to free speech.

Accompanying the Nottage
tirade of January 26, 2007 is a
copy of a letter to Dr. Robin
Roberts, Chairman of the
Coalition, dated November
14, 2006 that lists some 29
questions and comments for
the Coalition to answer but
no responses to the Coali-
tion’s questions. Quite a con-
tradiction to what many on
the Coalition envisioned. In
addition, none of the Coali-
tion members contacted have
seen this letter before Tues-
day, February 6, 2007. This is
curious indeed.

One thing that is patently
clear is that the Minister of
Health and the Government

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LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net





suffer from what Thomas
Sowell calls The Vision of the
Anointed.

Dr. Sowell of the Hoover
Institute writes:

“In the anointed we find a
whole class of supposedly
‘thinking-people’ who do
remarkably little thinking
about substance and a great
deal of verbal expression. In
order that this relatively small
group of people can believe
themselves wiser and nobler
than the common herd, we
have adopted policies which
impose heavy costs on mil-
lions of other human beings,
not only in taxes but also in
lost jobs, social disintegration,
and a loss of personal safety.
Seldom have so few cost so
much to so many.”

This will undoubtedly be
the case with the NHI scheme
as the evidence from many
other countries indicates.

The obvious deceit being
wielded by Dr. Nottage is
instructive. The Ministry of
Health team go to the press
with the most inconsequen-
tial points they wish to raise

‘about their NHI scheme, yet

the Coalition or its members
are expected to refrain from
using the media to inform
their membership and the

. general public of its views.

How immature of a gov-
ernment that boasts of taking
politics to a new level in The
Bahamas. Particularly a gov-
ernment that in opposition
said it would:

“ lead by example. The

’ Government ...will conduct

itself according to a rigid,

uncompromising code of com-' ©

plete honesty, integrity and
transparency."

So much for honesty,
integrity and transparency.

The future as a welfare
state

If there is one overriding
concern it is the role of the
government in our health care
system. While most people
accept the fact that there are
indigent people that need a
handout for health care, I dis-
agree entirely with the man-
date that the minority of
Bahamians who object to
their involvement must be
subjugated to the will of the
majority in this case.

In fact, I can't think of
many areas where the will of
the majority should be forced
on the minority unless some-
one has committed a crime
against another person or
their property.

' When a government
assumes responsibility for the
behaviour and actions of the
majority of a population it

interpersonal skills

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effectively deprives them of
their self respect and in the
end, their liberty.

Government administered
and controlled health care ser- -
vices is state welfare and that ~
sets up a dependency culture
that, with time will result in
their inability to carry the
growing debt load.

It is important to under-
stand that government can
give us absolutely nothing
without taking something
from us first! Not to mention
the service we currently get
from government. Giving
them a bigger role in health
care is precarious, if not dan-
gerous. :

Harvard Professor Charles
Fried points to the Quebec
government’s impositions in
his recent book titled Mod-
ern Liberty by forcing dis-
senters to participate in their
health scheme. He equates
this to when the Romans
forced Christians to obey their
laws and also "burn a pinch
of incense before the statues
of their gods".

And Dr. Nottage, Senator
and Minister of Health, and
his fellow scheme designers
will do no less than to use the
coercive power of govern-
ment to force every Bahamian
to participate in the NHI. The
finest hour for democracy in
The Bahamas, wouldn't you
say?

Robert Higgs in his great
treatise Against Leviathan
puts it very well when writing
about the welfare state:

“To continue the road we
American's (insert Bahami-
ans here) have travelled for
the past century is ultimately
to deliver ourselves com-
pletely into the hands of an
unlimited government. It will’
not matter if the democratic *
processes lead us to that des-.
tination. As noted previous-
ly, the making of the welfare
state has been from the very
beginning a matter of politi-
cians' corrupt vote buying and
patronage dispensing -
democracy in action: "And
one sad servitude alike
denotes: The slave that
labours and the slave that
votes. We can have a free
society or a welfare state. We
cannot have both.”

It is obvious the PLP
believe otherwise. Unfortu-
nately the leaders of the gov-
ernment will be off enjoying
their pensions from Bahamian
taxpayers while the next gen-
eration will be trying to "fix"
NHI. Not unlike the taxpay-
ers in Canada and the UK are
doing today.

I for one would caution
against putting too much faith
in the vision of the anointed.

RICK LOWE
Nassau,
February, 2007.














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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007, PAGE 5





Hign winds
cause power
loss on Grand
Bahama

FREEPORT - Around
16,000 Grand Bahamians
were without power on Sun-
day afternoon when a ground
wire came loose as a result
of high winds.

Grand Bahama Power
Company executive Tony
Lopez reported that some-
time around 2pm the compa-
ny was forced to shut down
transmission, affecting
Freeport proper into East
Grand Bahama. Ni

He explained that the loose
ground wire started to make
contact with the 69KV trans-
mission lines and crews were
dispatched to correct the
problem.

Mr Lopez said that about
two thirds of their customers
were affected, excluding
those in West End, Pinder’s
Point and Eight Mile Rock.

He said power was
restored within two hours.

Hign winds
cause power
loss on Grand
Bahama

@ HAITI
Port-au-Prince

THE United Nations said
Monday it has captured a
Haitian gang leader wanted
in the killing of family mem-
bers of two cohorts who had
agreed to join a disarmament
programme, according to
Associated Press.

On a routine patrol Sun-
_ day night, peacekeepers
arrested Johnny Pierre Louis
in the seaside slum of Cite
Soleil, the UN mission said
in a statement.

Louis, also known as Ti
Bazil, will be turned over to
Haitian national police, U.N.
spokeswoman Sophie
Boutaud de la Combe said.

The arrest came 10 days.
after hundreds of UN troops
raided Cite Soleil to dislodge
armed gangs, which are

blamed for a string of kid-"':
nappings and killings in:the ‘?:
Haitian.capital of Port-au-. 3%

Prince. At least one gang 3
member was killed and four
wounded.

The UN said Louis took
orders from another Cite
Soleil gang leader known as
Evens, who went into hiding
after the raid.

Among other crimes, Louis

is wanted in connection with
the killings of two gang mem-
bers who volunteered for a
UN-backed programme
aimed at disarming hundreds |
of gunmen in exchange for
economic aid and job train-
ing.
More than 100 gang mem-
bers have joined the pro-
gramme since it-Jaunched late
last year. At least two were
later found dead in what UN
officials have described as
reprisal killings for co-oper-
ating with peacekeepers, who
arrived in July 2004 to restore
order after a bloody uprising
toppled former president
Jean-Bertrand Aristide.

tate
EUS

AI eqmaninlas
Pr sers ea Ly,



TV 18 SCHEDULE

TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 20TH

6:00 Community “page 1540am
11:00 Immediate Response

noon ZNS News Upaate .

12:05 Immediate Response (Cont'd)
1:00 Legends: Muriel Eneas

1:30 . Ethnic Health America

2:00 Island Life Destinations
Turning Point

3:00 Durone Hepburn ‘
3:30 Ernest Leonard

The Fun Farm

5:00 ZNS News Update





























5:05 Andiamo

5:30 Challenged

6:00 Bahamas Business Outlook:
Predictions 2007

6:15 Seven Seas Informcial

6:30 News Night 13

7:00 The Bahamas Tonight

8:00 Urban Renewal Project:
Building Lives, Building
Communities

8:30 Island Lifestyles

9:00 Hugh Campbell Courtside

Express .
9:15 — Gillette World Sports
9:30 Anchor Projects
10:00 Caribbean Newsline
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
12:30 Community Page 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
‘right to make last minute .
programme changes!



m@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

IN an exclusive interview
last month, Immigration Direc-
tor Vernon Burrows guaran-
teed that properly documented

citizenship applications could —

be completed within six
months. .

However, The Tribune con-
tinues to receive reports from
young Haitian-Bahamians,
claiming they are made to wait
“forever” for feedback from the
Department of Immigration.

Even though the Bahamas
Constitution entitles any indi-
vidual born in the Bahamas to
foreign parents after July 9,
1973, to apply for citizenship
when they reach 18, young
Haitian-Bahamians __ like
Stephanie Francique claim they
are denied this legal entitle-
ment.

Twenty-year-old Stephanie
Francique said she applied to
the Department of Immigration
for citizenship almost two years
ago, but had not yet received
it.

Ms Francique said she was

in brie’ Haitian-Bahami

called into the department last
week, where she was told that
her application could not be
processed because her parents’
birth certificates were missing.

Interview

But she feels the certificates
were misplaced, because she
had to attend an interview at
the department in May, 2006,
and the certificates were in her
file.

“I had already been on my
interview, so how could my par-
ents’ birth certificates not be in
the file unless they misplaced
them,” Ms Francique asked.

She described the citizenship
process as “ridiculous” because
she said applicants are not told
how long the process would
take or when they would be
called in for interview.

“It took a whole year for
them to call me back for an
interview,” she said.

Ms Francique said she had
friends who felt so “hopeless”
that they had resorted to giv-
ing employees money “under

the table” for their applications .

to be processed faster.

“I think that’s ridiculous,
because at the end of the day
they are receiving a government
salary, so they should not try to
take advantage of us,” Ms Fran-
cique said.

According to her, there are
many Haitian-Bahamians
between 23 and 26 who had not
received their citizenship yet.

She claimed that many per-
sons only get their citizenship
before a-general election,
because politicians are interest-
ed in gathering votes.

However, last month Mr
Burrows said that cases like Ms
Francique are only “isolated” -
and that the real problem rested
with applicants not having the
required documents.

“Trust me, as soon as all the
documents are in, and we have
interviewed them, the process
is very swift,” Mr Burrows said.

But, according to Stephanie
Francique, her application’s
completion date had been
extended because of a lack of
efficiency at the Department of
Immigration.

ans challenge.





@ STEPHANIE Francique, pictured with her child, complains
that she applied for citizenship two years ago but has yet to

receive an answer



Union boss threatens Deputy Prime Minister
over punishments given to prison officers

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

PRESIDENT of the Nation:
al Congress of Trade Unions
John Pinder said yesterday that
the umbrella organisation will
“put the heat” on Deputy Prime
Minister Cynthia Pratt if she
does not decide to review the
punishments levied upon prison
officers who failed to show for
work last week.

Mr Pinder said that Mrs Pratt
had committed herself at a
meeting last Thursday to a
review of the punishments,
which, he said yesterday, were
“punching (officers) three times
for the same offence”.

It was, anticipated that a
response would be made public
yesterday, however up to press
time neither Mr Pinder nor The

Tribune had been informed of
Mrs Pratt's decision.

Coming out of last Thurs-
day's meeting, Mr Pinder said
he felt that the DPM was
favourably disposed to their
suggestion that she be more
lenient on the officers, who had
participated in what she termed
a “wildcat" strike over a period
of three days.

The officers complained of

undelivered promotions, miss-
ing backpay, a lack of protec-

tive gear, and poor living con-

ditions at the prison.

Mrs Pratt stated last Wednes-
day that each officer would
have to pay a monetary.fine, as
well as suffer a reduction of
three days of leave and be
required to make "a sincere and
appropriate public apology" to
herself and superintendent of

prisons Dr Elliston Rahming
for their actions.

Last Monday, Dr Rahming
narrowly escaped a one-week jail
sentence and fine of $1,500 for
failing to inform Appeals Court
President Dame Joan Sawyer
that there was industrial action
underway at Fox Hill Prison.

Mr Pinder said that he
accepted that three days leave
may be docked from the men,
but did not agree with the other
punishments.

On Thursday, he described
the government's decision to
punish the participating officers
as “intimidation, victimisation
and union-busting tactics”.

He further alleged that the
strike was not in fact illegal
because all the staff taking part
— amounting to 75 per cent of
the total number of officers

scheduled to work — produced a
sick slip on the days they were
not present.

However, Mrs Pratt rebutted
this claim.

“It's illegal. He knows that.
Any formal sick-out is consid-
ered industrial action. We've
had 70 people sick out at the
same time — come on!" she
exclaimed.

Under their rules of engage-

ment, industrial action by mem- .

bers of the disciplinary forces,
including prison officers, is con-
sidered illegal.

Prison officers claimed prior
to the action that they felt the
government was taking advan-

tage of the unique situation they’

are in to avoid addressing their
concerns.

However, Mrs Pratt said yes-
terday that of 45 concerns raised

in a December 14 meeting
between the Prison Staff Offi-
cers Association and govern-
ment, 37 have now been
addressed to the satisfaction of
the association.

She said that she had been
shocked by the prison officer's
action as her ministry has an.
"open door policy" towards
officers and the union.

She added that miscommuni-
cation between the government
and the NCTU meant that the
union was not initially aware of
the industrial agreement
between the government and
the prison officers dating back
to December 14.

Mr Pinder said on Thursday
that the union will carry out an
island-wide demonstration if
further punitive action is taken

- against the officers.



@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

TEACHERS will "sit and
wait" for the rest of the week to
see how the Ministry of Labour
handles a trade dispute filed by
the Bahamas Union of Teachers
on Friday, a union official said
yesterday.

Although she could not con-
firm definitively that no indus-
trial action will take place,
union president Ida Poitier-
Turnquest said that her mem-
bers will probably wait until the
Minister of Labour determines
the merit or otherwise of their
‘dispute before raising their voic-
es publicly again.

The filing of the dispute came
at the end of a week of numer-
ous face-offs between Ministry
of Education officials and teach-
ers.

Last Tuesday, hundreds of
aggrieved teachers from 52 New
Providence schools invaded the
Ministry, crying "We shall over-
come!".

Many are personally effect-
ed by the pay delays and mis-
takes made by the ministry,
while others were marching in
solidarity with union members
who shared stories of hardship
that morning at a BUT meet-
ing in New Providence.

On Monday, a list that union
officials requested detailing
which teachers are owed what
money, and when they will be
paid, arrived incomplete.

"It was an old list and it was
unacceptable," said Mrs Poitier-
Turnquest yesterday. "It stated
that persons 'should' be placed
on the pay sheet and ‘should’
does not give us a guarantee."

Previously, the ministry said
that all of the teachers await-
ing reassessment and backpay
will be paid in either February
or March.

Minister of Education Alfred
Sears said two weeks ago that
he was instructing his ministry
to take "extraordinary mea-
sures" to expedite the process of
dealing with the teachers’ pay-
related grievances.

However, Mrs Poitier-Turn-

quest has indicated that the .

pace is not fast enough, and yes-



HIDA Poitier-Turnquest

terday, reiterated that officials
are disturbed that no detailed

schedule had been provided for —

the awaited payments.

"When you look at reassess-
ments, that's backpay, and there
was no listing sent to us stating
that, yes, they will be paid, they
will be paid so much in Febru-
ary, they will be paid so much in
March, so much in April —
there's nothing like that."

The union will now await a
response for the next seven days
from the office of the minister
of labour as to whether their
case has merit. Union officials
said they did not think the res-
ignation of the Minister of
Labour Shane Gibson yester-
day would affect this process.

A strike vote will be taken at
the end of that period if a satis-
factory resolution is not
reached.

Up to 800 teachers nation-
wide could be involved in that
action, secretary-general Belin-
da Wilson said last week.

"Whatever response is nec-
essary in terms of a dispute
being filed, I'm sure that the
officers responsible are present-
ly dealing with the issue," said
education permanent-secretary
Cresswell Sturrup, when asked
to comment on the matter yes-
terday.

Mr Sears is currently "off the
island", he added.

Distributed by
Lowe’s Wholesale « Soldier Road * 393-7111 ¢ Fax: 393-0440

Ve eee


A.

PAGE 6, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



‘Good Samaritan’ receives Lady
Sassoon Golden heart Award

DESCRIBED as an ambas-
sador for her country and a
woman with a heart of gold,
Frances Ledee became the
recipient of the Lady Sassoon
Golden Heart Award at the
43rd annual Heart Ball on Sat-
urday night.

During an evening filled with
excitement, the Sir Victor Sas-
soon (Bahamas) Heart Foun-
dation was proud to present the
coveted award to Mrs Ledee.

Presenting the award on
behalf of the Foundation was
RE Barnes.

“Frances Ledee is an example
of a person with a true golden
heart. She sees beyond what is
normally expected of someone
to provide the love and support
for many of the aged in our
community,” said Mr Barnes.

Mrs Ledee’s story is one
which reflects the selflessness
of a Good Samaritan. Mrs
Ledee’s entire life has been one
of service to her country.

A retired professional social
worker, planner an administra-
tor, Mrs Ledee acquired train-
ing in behavioural sciences
abroad.

However, during the time,
the pubic service was unable to
accommodate persons in the

' social work profession, which

resulted in Mrs Ledee taking a
position with the Bahamas
Branch of the British Red Cross
as an assistant welfare officer.
With specific duties for the

Out Islands of the Bahamas,
Mrs Ledee engaged in the
development of Red Cross
groups and Junior Links, and
also undertook investigations,
analysis and the preparation of
reports on specific human
needs.

Describing her initial experi-
ences as “rugged and raw, but
exciting escapades,” Frances
Ledee says she never dreamed
of stopping. Instead, she
immersed herself totally in the
cause.

Transfer

In 1964 the Bahamas govern-
ment assumed ministerial gov-
ernance and Frances Ledee was
transferred to the very first Min-

. istry of Welfare, then under the

leadership of the late Eugene
Dupuch.

At the Ministry, Mrs Ledee
served in the capacity of a child
welfare officer and in Septem-
ber of that year she became the
first Bahamian professional
social worker to be engaged by
the Bahamas government.

Although she became heavily
involved in her new duties,
Frances Ledee says she never
severed her ties with the
Bahamas Red Cross Society.

Tn fact, she was instrumental in
bringing the society to national
status in the mid-70s, and today
remains an active member.

Mrs Ledee served as presi-
dent of the Red Cross Society in
1981 for a period of five years
and was awarded the highest
local honour of lifetime mem-
ber.

In her capacity as a child wel-
fare officer, Frances Ledee,
with the assistance of others
and in co-operation with the
late June Dolly-Besson from
the University of the West
Indies Mona Campus, estab-
lished the Social Work Pro-
gramme at the College of the
Bahamas in 1978.

Mrs Ledee served as a lec-
turer on a part-time basis for
the programme for several
years and. also served on the
Social Work Council.

When the National Insurance
Scheme was introduced,
Frances Ledee was automati-
cally selected to assist because
of her ability, proven track
record, and commitment to her
country.

Mrs Ledee assisted with the
development and implementa-
tion of the scheme. In 1977 she
was transferred to the newly-
formed quasi-government cor-
poration, from which she
retired.

Mrs Ledee is presently the
president of the Persis Rodgers
Home For the Aged and is also
a founding member.

At the home, Mrs Ledee
oversees the administrative
work and continues to be



@ RE Barnes presents the award to Frances Ledee

adamant in her commitment to
assisting her fellow Bahamians.

She has implemented a self-
imposed mandate to turn the
home around, and says she is
proud to embrace such a chal-
lenge with open arms.

“We slaved over 30 years ago

to establish this home, the first
of its kind in the Bahamas. |
cannot and will not sit back and
watch it diminish. There is a
great need for its existence,
even more so today than tn the
past,” says Mrs Ledee.

Since Mrs Ledee became

president of the Persis Rodgers
Home For the Aged, she has
worked without receiving a
salary.

In 2006, the home received a
facelift because of Frances
Ledee’s efforts in obtaining
community sponsors.

FNM’s St Thomas More candidate claims
‘continuous neglect’

elderly have suffered

ELDERLY members of the
St Thomas More constituency
have suffered in the face of

“continuous neglect” according
to the FNM candidate for the
area.

Reece Chipman issued a
statement yesterday acknowl-
edging the huge role that senior

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February 28, 2007 to:

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E-mail: tonysan@coralwave.com

citizens play in Bahamian soci-
ety.

“They, taught us the rights
and wrongs, the,ups and downs
and the,in and outs. They teach
us about their past experiences
so we would learn from them
to chart our future ahead of us,”
he said.

“After fully analysing the sta-
tistics and reviewing my walk-
about survey, I have noticed
that the elderly individuals are
shown no concern nor attention
until it is election time and as
soon as the elections are over,
they are placed back into hyber-
nation by the ones appointed
to represent them,” he said.

Mr Chipman said that, most
importantly, the promised “help

and hope” of Urban Renewal,
which was expected to improve
the lives of all including the
elderly in the urban areas, has
proven unsuccessful.

He said Urban Renewal has
had an “ineffective impact and a
non-progressive outlook on
what constitutes a community”.

“In St Thomas Moore alone,
based on the last statistics,
more than 20 per cent of its
registered votes were over the
age 65. In light of this | would
have expected that they. the
elderly in the area would be
better represented. Mr Chip-
man said.

“It appears as if they are
hurled out of their homes on
election day to cast their most

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favourable vote and thereafter
left to fend for themselves.”

Mr Chipman noted that in St
Thomas More:

_ © There has been an increase

in the elderly population

e A high percentage of elder-
ly persons live alone

¢ Many of them stay indoors
and are not socially integrated

“We are very proud of our
record with the elderly with
regards to increasing pensions
and creating incentives to make
everyday living simpler and
more convenient for the elder-
lv.” he said of the FNM.
“Social and community inte-
gration is a key part of urban
dev elopment, let’s not forget
it.”



Father doubts
Guantamo
captive will
be sent home

Mm AUSTRALIA
Canberra

THE father of the only Aus-
tralian held at a US prison camp
in Cuba said Monday he is
unconvinced by assurances that
his son will be able to serve any
sentence for terrorism offences
in Australia, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

The Australian government
announced in May last year it
had signed an agreement with
the United States that would
allow alleged Taliban fighter
David Hicks, 31, to apply for a
transfer to an Australian prison
if he were convicted at Guan-
tanamo Bay of terrorism offens-
es.

Such a transfer would need
the approval of both the Aus-
tralian and US governments,
and Hicks would have to serve
the full duration of the sentence
handed down by a US military
commission,

*The Australian government
said long ago that David would
be able to serve any sentence
in Australia, but I've never seen
anything in writing,” Terry
Hicks said. “I think they just
want to sound like they're look-
ing out for David’s interests to
get them past the next election.”

‘Terry Hicks said he doubted
whether either government
would risk sending his son back
to Australia where the top legal
body, Law Council of Australia,
has condemned the military
commission system as unfair.

ae


FAUE 6, ILUEOQVAY, FEBRUARY 2U, ZUU/




City Markets donation helps school for the blind:

STUDENTS from the Sal-
vation Army School for the
Blind Band have wowed audi-
ences across the Bahamas.

Now they have even more
to sing about, thanks to a gen-
erous donation from long-time
supporter City Market.

a NELSON Moss on the drums

The gift, substantial enough
to cover the cost of new
instruments, was made this
week at the Erin H Gilmour
School for the Blind on Mack-
ey Street. °

On hand were Bahamas
Supermarkets Limited CFAO

and senior vice-president for
finance, Bryan Knowles (play-
ing the saw) and Harbour Bay
City Market manager Nelson
Moss (on the goatskin drum).

Getting down with the band
was easy; saying thank you to
Bahamas Supermarkets in

three languages — English,’

Spanish and Chinese — was
tougher, but outstanding stu-
dent’ Rickia Arnette impressed
benefactors with her skills.
Like other students, Rickia
works on talking computers.
Books and maps are in

@ BRYAN Knowles on the saw

Braille. She’s so fast that a
sighted person can barely
keep up.
Mr Knowles said: “The Sal-
vation Army does an incredi-
ble job, feeding the hungry,
helping the troubled, visiting
shut-ins and the elderly, pro-

THE TRIBUNE





ov

oP,

ta)
viding spiritual and emotio#al
support for hundreds evéry
week. In times of disaster,
they are a pillar of strength
with shelters, food and the
potential to make the differ-
ence between life and death
or safety and danger.” +.

Police chief says winning the fight against

domestic violence will take a joint effort :

WINNING the fight against
domestic violence will take a
collaborative effort, according
to Assistant Superintendent of
Police Elaine Sands.

She said law enforcement
agencies, governmental and
non-governmental agencies,
communities and individuals
must come together to face this
ongoing struggle.

ASP Sands, officer-in-charge
of the Community Relations
Section, says the Royal
Bahamas Police Force will con-
\ tinue to play a major role in the
~- reduction of domestic violence
by continuing its education and
awareness campaign through-

out the Bahamas.

The Community Relations
Section recently teamed up with
a number of government and
non-governmental agencies to
host a four-day law enforce-
ment anti-violence exhibit at
the Royal Bahamas Police
Training College on Thompson
Boulevard..-

Representatives from the
police, Defence Force, Depart-
ment of Social Services,
Crimestoppers Bahamas, the
Crisis Centre, the National
Drug Council, the National
Child Protection Council,
Urban Renewal, the Roman
Catholic Archdiocese, Bahamas

Assistant superindentent says communities, individuals | *2
and non-governmental organisations must tackle problem:



Customs, the Office of the
Attorney General, the AIDS
Secretariat, Rotary Interna-
tional, Department of Immi-
gration and the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce partici-
pated in the event.

ASP Sands said the Anti-Vio-
lence Exhibit afforded persons
in the community the opportu-

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and the Turks and Caicos Islands since 1980, Fidelity is a financial
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The successful applicant will primarily be responsible for new busi-
ness development as well as maintaining & developing existing
client & carrier relationships across a broad range of products &
services.

An attractive compensation package, including a comprehensive
range of employee benefits and relocation is being offered.

Salary range Cl $65,000 - $100,000
Deadline for resumes is the 16th March 2007:

Business Development Executive
SteppingStones Recruitment
P.O. Box 10091
Grand Cayman KY1-1001
Tel (345) 946 7837
Fax (345) 946 7836
Email jobs@steppingstonescayman.com

Ss

BUSINESS DEVEL



nity to “come forward and see
the resources that are available
to them.”

“When one policing division
can have more than 600 com-
plaints of domestic disputes, you
know it is a serious problem in
our country and we really need
to work together towards min-

sdimising what-we-are iseeing ‘as;



she 'said,.,
~~ Conflicts *

“There will be conflicts with-
in relationships, but how those
conflicts are managed and
resolved is important and this
is what we are trying to get out
to members of the general pub-
lic. We want to focus on edu-
cating people as to how they
can prevent the escalation of
violence within the homes, rela-
tionships and communities.”

ASP Sands says the Domestic
Violence Hotline recently estab-
lished by the police through the
Community Relations Section,
is an attempt to provide both
potential victims and perpetra-
tors of abuse with a lifeline
before those conflicts escalate
into violence. -

The toll-free number — 323-
0884 — will not replace the exist-
ing Emergency 919 number, but



relates to injuries,”



is intended to give police an
opportunity to intervene in
potentially violent situations
before they occur.

“The hotline was not only
established for the victims but
also for perpetrators who have a
very bad temper and who feel
the need or desire to cause

harm:to: their-mates we want'
them to.call‘in sa ithat.they.can:

get help,” ASP Sands said..;;,, :

: She-said police officials-have
found that “power and control”
are two of the major reasons
abusers inflict harm on their vic-
tims.

ASP Sands said domestic vio-
lence and abuse are not just lim-
ited to physical harm, howev-
er, but could also take the form
of emotional, verbal or finan-
cial abuse.

“We have found that most of
the perpetrators want to be in
total control of the victim. They
want to know the victims every
movement; they want to be the
one to deal with the finances:
and they use violence and ver-
bal abuse to degrade the victim
so that they (the victim). don’t
even have the desire to make a
change or do something that
could help the victim take con-
trol of their day-to-day activi-
ties,” ASP Sands said. .

“Domestic violence can come

ointment _

or
cet

‘THI
ay

nwt
jae

in many shapes and forms and:
SO we want to get the word out,
on those many aspects, so that,
people will be able to recognise,
them and seek help if necessary.’
She said domestic violence in
homes can have serious conse;
quences on children — “wheng
parents are fighting; when sib-¢
lings are fighting.” *».~ Si

of
: Younger children witnessigig} _

these acts,.said ASP: Sands
often come to assume that t ist
type of behavior is the norm>
particularly “when they have
no one else to compare against,
his or her parents, or their rela-«
tives behavior with whom they‘
are living.” ‘
“That behavior becomes nor-?
mal to them and violence wit-}
nessed is violence experienced.
by these children and this is why §
we have so many children today»
who are violent in the schools:or*
violent in the communitigs,
because in a lot of cases it is ‘
learned behavior. It’s what they §
see in the home and so“it,y
becomes a normal reaction? ¢
ASP Sands said. m ;
“They then go out into the y
public, someone says what they {
consider to be the inappropriate
thing to them, and they solye
those conflicts with violence
because that is the only thiig®
they know.”








COMMONWEALTH

q

BANK



Mr. William B. Sands, Jr., President & CEO of Commonwealth
Bank is pleased to announce the following appointment:

Demetri Bowe



they have two sons.

“Leader in Personal Banking Services” | WWww.combanklitd.com



Sr. Assistant Branch Manager,
Golden Gates Branch

Effective January 1st, 2007

Mr. Bowe has over 21 years experience with
Commonwealth Bank and has held a variety of
management positions, the latest being Sr. Assistant
Manager, Plaza Branch. He has attended several
courses and seminars in management and leadership
including the University of North Carolina New
Managers Program. He is married to Genevieve and























1 *
- /

| THE TRIBUNE

ula trains

e

‘Panamanians

‘a

in medical
‘iypnosis

SWhavana

46 4 6 6 4

“CUBA, whose doctors
have experimented with
dozens of alternative
“treatments, is training
Panamanian therapists in
the medical use of hypno-
“sis, the government news
-agency AIN reported
Monday, according to
Associated Press.

‘The agency said that 80
Pgnamanians graduated
frem courses held in the
Central American coun-

, try under a program with
| Cuba's Higher Institute

| of.Medical Sciences,
based in the eastern city
of Santiago.

: ‘Cuba's best-known
researcher in the field,
Alberto Cobian, has said
that hypnosis can be use-
ful in treating stress,

dysfunction and some
types of skin diseases, as
well as offering some.
anesthetic effects, the
agency reported.

An economic collapse
in the early 1990s created
dire shortages of many

conventional medicines in

Cuba, prompting wide-
spread research into and
use of alternative treat-
ments such as herbal
medicines and acupunc-
ture.

Cuba also has used its
extensive medical system

with other countries,
offering training and
sending tens of thousands
of its own doctors abroad
on: medical missions.

from people who are
Ymaking news in their

bronchial asthma, sexual | -

as a bridge of cooperation

‘The Tribune wants to hear

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007, PAGE 9

Ingraham responds to
‘Shane Gibson resignation

FROM page one

Nicole scandal.

He said: “I understand Mr
Christie’s reluctance to act
and his defensiveness in this
matter because he became a
part of this gross error by
allowing Mr Gibson to con-

‘vince him and his colleagues
to approve of the residence.

permit when he, above all
others, should have said no.”

Mr Ingraham also hit out
at Mr Christie for attempt-
ing to equate two of his for-
mer ministers - Tommy
Turnquest and Dion Foulkes
— with Mr Gibson, though the
prime minister did not explic-
itly name. either man in his
public comments on Sunday.

"Last evening in a radio |

interview the prime minister
sought further to excuse the
inexcusable by attempting
once again to defend bad
behaviour by attacking oth-

- ers.

“What is most offensive
was his attempt to equate the
actions of two dedicated
FNM political servants of the
people — Tommy Turnquest
and Dion Foulkes — to the
behaviour of his disgraced
Cabinet minister, Shane Gib-
son.

“It is laughable to even
mention the three men in the

‘same sentence, but that is.

what the prime minister

- sought to do,” Mr Ingraham

said.
He then sought to clarify

~ the public record as it per-

tains to Mr: Turnquest and
Mr Foulkes.

According to Mr Ingra- .
ham, Tommy Turnquest was .

involved in no wrong-doing
regarding the air-condition-
ing: contract: awarded: while
he was at: the Ministry of
Tourism.

‘Mr Ingraham also’ stated
that Mr Turnquest. was the
one who paid for the political
function hosted at his house
by the contractor, rather than
the contractor.

Mr Ingraham also com-
mented on Dion Foulkes’
role in granting contracts in
the summer of 2001. He said
Mr Foulkes was concerned
that school repairs would not
be completed in time for the
re-opening of school.

multiple investigations have

not found any wrong-doing-
in relation to this process.

Mr Ingraham ended his *
remarks by criticising the

PM’s many public assertions
that God is somehow respon-
sible for his current political
position.

“The prime minister is
confused. He has confused



his personal political ambi-
tions with the will of the

- Bahamian people and, worse °

still, with the design of God.

“He claims i in public that
‘God brought us (he and the
PLP government) into this

country to do. right and no’

weapon formed against us
(the PLP government led by
Perry Christie) will prosper.’

The prime minister is delud-

ed, Mr Ingraham said.

““Mr Christie is a learned’
“man. He must know that he
“is not a divine-right king. He
-must know that we are a .
democracy and that ina

democracy a government is

answerable to the people.
“No political party has a

divine right to form a gov-



ernment. Ina democracy the
Tight to lead a government is

given to a political party by
the people, who express their
will freely in an election,” Mr

“Ingraham said.

Mr. Ingraham also
announced that the FNM will
have a mass rally tonight —
at the same time as the
PLP.

@ PRIME Minister Perry Christie speaks to Sean m MeWeeney on GEM’s 108: 9’s tall iow “Tell It like It Is”.

(Photo: Peter Ramsay)

FNM eager h hits back
at PM’s ‘forces’ claim

FROM page one

puppet. He would bite his tongue out

wish the Free National Movement to

of his head before he would say those
words.

“T am my own man and I’ve always
been my own man, and I am a strong
man, not.a weak man,” Mr Ingraham
said.

Mr Ingraham said the forces that

win the next general election are nor-
mal citizens of the Bahamas.

“All I know is the Bahamian peo-
ple, the same people who voted him in
office, and those same forces that put
him there, are the same forces that
will take him out,” Mr Ingraham said.

neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
| for improvements in the
area or have won an

J award.

Hf so, call us on 302-1986
and share your story.

Therefore, Mr Foulkes
separated some major con-
tracts into multiple parts,

'. enabling multiple contractors
to complete the work.
_ According to Mr Ingra-
ham, this resulted in the
timely opening of schools and

ing out of his head in many respects
and claimed the prime minister would
not dare refer to him as a puppet.
* “T have no idea ‘what he is talking
about.

“He knows that he cannot call mea.



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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20: 2007

TUESDAY EVENING

: Great Romances
WPBT ofthe 2th Cen-
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Bahamian Puppet and
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Bring your children to the
McHappy Hour at McDonald's in
Oakes Field every Thursday
3 from 3:30pm to 4:300m during the
‘month of February 2007.

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun. .

THE TRIBUNE











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PAGE 12, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007



INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Veggie oil
fuels Florida
man's car

§ WEST PALM BEACH, Fla.

PRESIDENT George Bush
says Americans are addicted to
oil.

George Kinney has a cure.

For the last six months, the 65-
year-old Royal Palm Beach
retiree hasn't spent a nickel for
fuel. He drives right by gas sta-
tions, with a big fat smirk on his
face, according to Associated

~ Press.

Best of all, he's getting 32 miles
per gallon.

How does he do it?

By transforming his $1,900 1984
Mercedes 300D into a greasemo-
bile. Instead of diesel, Kinney's
Benz runs on used vegetable oil,
which he gets free of charge from
a pizza joint and a diner. ~

"I'm proud as the devil of it,"
says Kinney. "Why more people
aren't doing this, I don't know."

The idea of running diesel
engines on vegetable oil is hardly
a revelation. The first known use
was at the 1900 World's Fair when
pure peanut oil powered an
engine built by the Otto company.
But with petroleum so cheap and
plentiful, who needed peanut oil?

Even after the energy crisis of
the 1970s, when cars lined up for
miles to get a few dollars' worth of
gas, the development of alterna-
tive sources of fuel moved along
at a drip.

But now, with oil prices roller-
coastering to record highs, oil-rich
regimes fueling terrorism and
threatening national security, and
worries about global warming,
alternative sources of energy are
in vogue. Singer Willie Nelson has
converted his tour bus to run on
soy-based diesel.

But French fries?

Why not, says Charles Ander-
son. On September 10, 2001, he
opened Golden Fuel Systems in
Springfield, Mo. Since then, he's
sold 4,500 conversion kits - includ-
ing one to Kinney - that trans-
form diesel engines into vegetable
oil-burning machines.

When you think about it, veg-
etable oil is an untapped natural
resource, especially when you con-
sider how many French fries and
other fried foods Americans con-
sume.

The result of all that frying is
waste oil. Many restaurants must
pay a fee to have it hauled away,
and frequently, it winds up in
landfills.

But what if it could be saved
and used to run cars?
~ The process of converting dirty
waste oil to clean oil is simple.
Kinney picks up used oil from the
pizza joint and diner and stores it
in a 55-gallon plastic barrel in his
garage. He uses a regular kitchen
colander to remove the big bits
of food, then sticks an electric
heater prong into the barrel to
make it more viscous. He pours
the heated oil through a small
sock filter and a 5-micron filter
into another 55-gallon barrel. He
transfers the clean oil to standard
plastic gasoline containers, which
he uses to fill his tank.

.. "It takes me 15 minutes on a
Saturday to filter it," he says. "It's
cleaner than diesel fuel."

Unfortunately, it works only
with diesel engines. With a sepa-
rate diesel tank in his car, Kinney
still has the option of using diesel
to power his car.

Getting an engine to run the
fuel involves buying and installing
a conversion kit. -

At $650 for a small car, and
$2,500 for semi-trucks and RVs,
the kits aren't exactly cheap.
Installation can add $1,500 to the
total cost.

Peanuts, says Anderson.

Most people get their money
back in fuel savings within six
months to a year, he says.

"I've already made my money
back," says Kinney, who has
racked up more than 100,000
miles on his gas-guzzling Ford
Excursion SUV in the last two
years. "I don't know why we're
so dependent on the Middle East
for oil when we've got this type of
technology available."

Anderson figures he has saved
$25,000 over the last two years by
converting his SUV to run on veg-
etable oil.

In the U.S., some 10,000 vehi-
cles have abandoned petroleum-
based fuel for vegetable oil.
Anderson has opened an office
in Japan, where 200 to 300 vehi-
cles have been transformed by his
company. He's also working with
Japanese municipalities and
schools to convert their fleets.

But only some diesel engines
can be converted. His Web site,
http://www.goldenfuelsystems.co
m, lists the vehicles and answers
questions about the process.

"I'm under no illusions that
straight vegetable oil is going to be
the savior of the world," Ander-
son says. "On the national scale,
we're not even a drop in the buck-
et. But we've got to start some-
where."

As if to underline his point, his
Web site flashes a headline across
the top of the page: "Be a True
Patriot. End Your Dependence
on Foreign Oil Today."

@ SAN FRANCISCO

THE world's largest gen-
eral scientific society joined
the concern. over global cli-
mate change, calling it a
“growing threat to society",
according to Associated
Press

It is the first consensus
statement of the board of
the American Association
for the Advancement of Sci-
ence on climate change. It
comes just weeks after the
International Panel on Cli-
mate Change issued its most
recent report on human-
induced warming...

"The evidence is clear:

global climate change caused —

by human activities is occur-
ring now and is a growing
threat to society," the
AAAS said: at its annual

meeting Sunday. ©);

wen

"Scientists are observing |

the rapid melting of glaciers,
destabilization’ of major. ice
sheets, rising sea levels, shifts
in species ranges and
increased frequency of
weather extremes," said
John P. Holdren, director of
the Woods Hole Research
Center and AAAS presi-
dent.

Concern focuses on car-
bon dioxide and other gases
produced by burning fossil
fuels and other processes. As
these gases accumulate in
the atmosphere they trap
heat from the sun, much like
a greenhouse, warming the
climate.

"The longer we wait to
tackle climate change, the
harder and more expensive
the task will be," the group
said.

Holdren noted that some
of the most dramatic
changes are occurring in the
far North where warming
has occurred more rapidly
than in other areas. Retreat-
ing sea ice and rising sea lev-
el are driving some natives
from their villages, the group
said.

On Feb. 2 the Intergov-
ernmental Panel in Climate
Change reported that global
warming is so severe that it
will "continue for centuries,"

ae

Haiti gets in the
Carnival spirit

A GROUP of women dressed as butterflies and a man with his face
painted participate in a parade during the traditional Carnival in Port-
au-Prince, Sunday, Feb. 18, 2007.

leading to a far different
planet in 100 years.

The panel, established by
the United Nations, con-
cluded that global warming
is "very likely" caused by
man, meaning more than 90
percent certain.

If nothing is done to
change current emissions
patterns of greenhouse gas-
es, global temperature could
increase as much as 11
degrees Fahrenheit by 2100,
the report said.

AAAS was founded in

1848. It reports that it serves

262 affiliated societies and
academies of science, reach-
ing 10 million individuals.

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WALL STREET

Takeove

@ Even though the number of
acquisitions isn’t growing as in
2006, the amount of money for
these deals is growing and may
pass the $4 trillion record set last
year.

BY JOE BEL BRUNO
Associated Press

NEW YORK — The rumors about
a potential takeover of aluminum
producer Alcoa this past week cre-
ated an enthusiastic buzz on Wall
Street that acquisitions this year will
smash the $4 trillion record set in
2006.

Seconds
ticking |
away for
watches —

i Many people today do not rely
- ona watch to tell time, but they
get the time from a cellphone, a
computer or some other kind of
electronic device.

BY MARTHA IRVINE
Associated Press

CHICAGO — Allison Elliott occa-
sionally wears the delicate gold
windup watch that belonged to her
grandmother. But it’s really just for
show. :

Elliott, who’s 27, is much more
likely to get the time from the clock
in her car, the one on her cable TV
box or cellphone or from the bottom
‘right-hand of her computer at the
University of Kentucky, where she
works. | .

Paul Dryden is much the same.
“To be honest, I can’t remember the
last time I wore a watch — I’m guess-
ing early in high school,” says the 21-
year-old senior at Connecticut Col-
lege. The busy student’s cellphone.
often doubles as an alarm clock
because “it goes everywhere I go.”

In other words, the way we track
time is changing with the times.

Market researchers say more peo-
ple are carrying electronic devices
that also tell time, whether a phone,
an iPod or a BlackBerry. They’re also
finding that young people, in particu-
lar, are more interested in spending
their money on other kinds of acces-
sories, such as shoes and hand bags.

In a survey last fall, investment
bank Piper Jaffray & Co. found that
nearly two-thirds of teens never wear
a watch — and only about one in 10
wears one every day.

Experian Simmons Research also
discovered that, while Americans
spent more than $5.9 billion on
watches in 2006, that figure was
down 17 percent when compared
with five years earlier.

In response, some watchmakers
have begun to add more functions to
their time pieces, with models that
have everything from heart rate mon-
itors to GPS trackers.

Luxury watches, such as Rolex,

remain popular. But even then, the ~

watch is often more about fashion
than function, says Max Kilger of
Experian Simmons. pt

*TURN TO WATCHES
MINIMUM WAGE

Rural poor

Seven weeks into 2007, the
amount of money for takeovers bro-
kered by investment banks and pri-
vate equity firms is trending above
last year. In the United States, market
researcher Dealogic said volume has
soared 86 percent to $228.6 billion
from last year, while global volume
rose 36 percent to $477.4 billion.

The statistics indicate that while
the dollar amounts of these deals are
growing, the number of them isn’t.
There have been 519 deals in the
United States so far this year, down
38 percent from 2006, while global
transactions declined 25 percent to





GOLD

driven by the Internet.

veiled by greasy smoke.

All around them are newly dug
pits, felled trees and growing mis-
ery.

This is Eldorado do Juma, Bra-
zil’s newest boom town. Since
December, thousands of fortune
seekers have rushed here hoping to
strike gold in the jungle state of
Amazonas.

__ Drawn to this grim scene by a
local math teacher’s Internet
descriptions of miners scooping up
thousands of dollars in gold, some-
where between 3,000 and 10,000
people have cut down huge trees,
diverted streams and dug ever-
deeper wildcat mines, in an area






GOLD AND GRIME: Anderson Luiz, 13,
Since December, when a local ma
thousands of fortune seekers have rushed-to-the region.

rs off to a good

2,392. }

Analysts believe this shows a shift
in M&A trends. Wall Street might see
the number of deals edge lower. But,
those still in the mix will fetch
increasingly higher takeover bids,
such as a potential Alcoa deal that
would easily top $30 billion.

“How big can it go? That’s not the
focus,” said Gregg Slager, a senior
partner with accounting firm Ernst &
Young’s private equity practice.
“This is still all about value creation
regardless of the size. The economy
is strong, capital is readily available,
and this creates opportunity.”

BRAZIL

- n

Lp



p

ELDORADO DO JUMA, Brazil — It’s a gold rush in the jungle,

Speeding past unbroken walls of foliage, a motorboat packed with
gritty prospectors veers toward the shore of the Juma river. Rising up
along the steep, muddy banks, a city of black plastic lean-tos appears

that only months ago was pristine
rain forest.

This El Dorado is nothing like
the Amazon’s long sought-after
mythical city of gold.

Hundreds of mud-covered men
with picks and shovels hack away
daily at the brown, red.and gray
earth, marking their tiny plots with
tree branches and string. Others
feed dirt into rough-hewed wooden
troughs, washing off lighter sedi-
ment. What’s left is jiggered in
metal pans.

_ At day’s end, the luckiest ones
weigh out tiny chunks and flakes of
actual gold, tucking them away in’

an sonnei

looking forward to

proposed minimum wage boost

Mi Nationwide, an estimated ©
13 million workers would be
affected as the bill to raise the
minimum hourly wage to $7.25
moves a step closer to passage.

BY BRUCE SMITH
Associated Press

CHERAW, | S.C. Louise
McQueen has scrimped all her life,
working two jobs while raising two
daughters alone and now earning
$5.47 an hour as a cook in a small res-
taurant. So it’s a comfort to her in this
rural corner of South Carolina that
Congress this week moved closer to



4

raising the minimum hourly wage to

_ $7.25 over the next two years.

“J can get by, but this is going to
help me a lot,” said McQueen, 54,
who has taken one vacation in her life
and who considers her sole luxury to
be watching television.

More than 10 percent of hourly
workers in South Carolina, Louisiana
and Mississippi would see wage
increases if the federal proposal goes
through — the highest such percent-
ages in the nation, according to the
Washington-based Economic Policy
Institute. In South Carolina, that
translates to 179,000 people.

The House and Senate have
approved bills raising the hourly min-
imum wage from $5.15 to $7.25 over
two years. The Senate bill paired the
wage hike with tax breaks for small
businesses. The House, initially
reluctant to add similar tax cuts,
passed a smaller tax package on Fri-
day. House and Senate negotiators
will have to work out the differences.

Economists say many of the low-
wage workers expected to see their
pay increase right away live in rural
areas like Cheraw, where unemploy-

* TURN TO-HOURLY WAGE

pans for gold at the wildcat mine in Eldorado do Juma, Brazil.
th teacher posted descriptions of the mine on the Internet, -

SH STIRS |
~~ HOPES, FEARS _

BRAZIL'S NEWEST BOOMTOWN BRINGS
QUICK RICHES ALONG WITH CRIME,
HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS

BY MICHAEL ASTOR
Associated Press

While it might be about value cre-

‘ation, the competition among private
‘ equity firms and investment banks is

increasing. Big deals such as the bid-
ding war between Vornado Realty
Trust and Blackstone Group over
real estate investment trust Equity
Office Properties are escalating deal
volume. .

In fact, it has become an intense
Wall Street mating dance. In trying to
gauge one of his suitor’s interest,
Equity Office Properties founder
Samuel Zell sent an e-mail to Vor-
nado Chairman Steven Roth that read
“Roses are red, violets are blue; I hear

VICTOR R. CAIVANO/AP



small plastic bottles until they can
sell it for 40 reais agram, or about |
$19, in the town of Apui, 50 miles
north.

Those who support the miners
make more reliable money — cook-
ing, cleaning or carrying supplies
for about 2 grams of gold a day,
about six times the minimum wage “|
in a part of Brazil where few are
lucky to earn it. :

Not since the early 1980s, when



tens of thousands of Brazilians —
transformed a mountain known as |
Serra Pelada into a gargantuan hole |
in the jungle floor, has the Amazon |
seen a gold rush of these propor-
tions.

“This is even better than Serra |
Pelada. I’ve been mining all around |
the Amazon since 1978 and this is |
the best I’ve ever seen,” said Joao |
Leandro de Azedo, 70, overlooking |
his stake from a hammock. \

Serra Pelada was Brazil’s most |
lucrative and notorious “garimpo,” |
or wildcat mine, attracting a vast
army of prospectors and producing
thousands of pounds of gold before
going. bust in the early 1990s.

It became a glaring symbol of

*TURN TO AMAZON





start in 2007

a rumor, is it true?” :

The e-mail, obtained by The New
York Times, sought to determine if
Roth might be interested in raising
his bid to trump buyout giant Black-
stone’s offer of $48.50 per share. Roth
responded: “Roses are red, violets are
blue. I love you Sam, our bid is 52.”
And the deal was secured to buy the
largest U.S. commercial real estate
company. :

If anything, the wooing that goes
on in these big deals shows the will-
ingness to raise the stakes. The

*TURN TO TAKEOVERS

WORKPLACE

Take steps
to avoid
sparring

with a

contender

@ Getting a new job at anew
company is great, but if you don’t
learn how to supervise the
internal runner-up to your job,
you may run into problems.

BY JOANN S. LUBLIN
The Wall Street Journal

The good news: You have
accepted a terrific job offer at a new
company. The potential bad news:
You must supervise the internal
runner-up for your spot.

Amid a buoyant job market, the
problem appears to be spreading.
“Anyone who comes into a moder-
ately senior position will probably

“encounter resistance and possibly

resentment from the passed-over
insider,” says Richard Guha, a part-
ner for a small brand consultancy in
San Marino, Calif., who has run into
the dicey dilemma twice. “A lot of
people don’t recognize it until it’s too
late,” he notes.

How can you make sure the loser
doesn’t hijack your authority, give
you wrong information or otherwise
derail your effectiveness as an out-
side hire? _

To avoid being sabotaged, you ~
should come well informed about
your selection. “Find out all you can
about what was behind your being
brought on board over the inside
contender,” says Sheryl Spanier, a
leadership consultant in New York.
Ask your boss why that individual
was not chosen for the job and how
to best use his or her talents, she sug-

gests. 4 ‘
It’s equally important to discover
whether upper management

appeased the defeated employee with
a raise. The gesture may make that
person “feel newly empowered and
less willing to cooperate,” says Vince
Thompson, an Internet business
advisor and former AOL executive.
After an energy company wooed
Guha to lead a key division, the
industry novice belatedly learned he
had been chosen over a staffer who
was a long-time friend of the founder
and board chairman. The vanquished
official soon complained to the chair-
man that Guha would wreck the

* TURN TO SUPERVISING

WORKING HARD:
Kirby Platt, a
19-year-old .
technical
college
student,
juggles tuition
and rent while
working her
part-time job
for $6.50 an
hour in North
Charleston,
S.C.

MARY ANN CHASTAIN/AP




\
cqnnmunannaneennnanasnanneans ies Qaatehs HAN RAANARRSSRARARGESRAANRNAANNEAAARENAARES GANNON

Che Miami Herald |



REED SAXON/AP

EMBRACEABLE TWO: Charles Howell
Ill and his caddie Jimmy Johnson
embrace after Howell sank the,
winning putt on the third playoff
hole to win the Nissan Open.

Prayer pays off
for winner of
Nissan Open

BY DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press .

LOS ANGELES — Charles Howell
III remembers the first time he —

_ stepped inside Tiger Woods’ house.
There was a TV in the living room,
and a mantle above the fireplace with
four silver trophies from the Masters,
U.S. Open, British Open and PGA
Championship.

Howell only had a trophy from the
Michelob Championship, a tourna-
ment that now exists on the LPGA
Tour. :

“He probably wondered what was
wrong with me because I just sat
there bit a mesmerized,” Howell said.
“Here you have it. You've got all four
majors sitting right there.”

While the Nissan Open won't be
mistaken for a claret jug, it felt like a
major to Howell.

After going 4'2 years and 127 starts
onthe PGA Tour without winning, -
Howell ended his drought with a play-
off victory Sunday at Riviera that was
surprising on two fronts — the late
fade by Phil Mickelson, and the clutch
putts made by Howell.

-° Mickelson was headed for his sec-

ond victory in as many weeks when
he carried a two-shot lead into the
back nine. Then came a 2-foot par
putt that rimmed out and a 4-foot
birdie putt that stayed right of the
cup. Needing a par on the 18th hole to
win, he came up short of the green, hit
a pedestrian chip and missed an 18-
foot to fall into a playoff.

“I felt like I had the tournament in
my grasp and let it go,” said Mickel-
son, who shot 68. ~

Howell closed with a 6-under 65,
shooting a 32 on the back nine to keep
Mickelson honest. And while he
didn’t do anything spectacular in the
three playoff holes, Howell was never
more clutch in making pars.

On the 18th, he chipped weakly
from behind the 18th green and curled
in a 6-footer for par to extend the
playoff. On the 10th, where he lost a
playoff to Mike Weir four years ago,
Howell was headed fc~ a bogey until a
pitch with perfect pace from 80 feet

that stopped 3 feet away for another

par.

He ended it on the par-3 14th.

Both players came up short with a
7-iron as the air lost some of its
warmth in the fading light. Mickelson
chose to putt, but the ball took a high
hop when it left his blade and came up
10 feet short. Howell, facing the kind
of chip that failed him in Honolulu
last month, hit a solid one that trick-
led 3 feet by the hole.

- Even then, he didn’t think his long
day was over. ‘

_ “It’s Phil Mickelson hitting a par
putt,” Howell reasoned. “I’m giving
him the putt. When he missed it, my
heart jumped because it was a shock
that the guy had actually missed that
putt: I just said a prayer and said,
’God, if this is the time, then let’s
knock this in.’

“And fortunately,” he said, “it
was.”

Howell and Mickelson finished at
268.

Ernie Els (67), Jim Furyk (67) and
Robert Allenby (68) tied for third,
three shots out of the playoff. Els and
Allenby both had chances to catch
Mickelson along the back nine of a
mostly sunny afternoon, but the Big
Easy was tripped up by three bogeys,
while Allenby fell back with a three-
putt from 60 feet on the fringe at the
15th.

It was a blown opportunity for
Mickelson, playing Riviera for the
first time since 2001, although it prob-
ably won’t cost him too much
momentum as he slowly makes his
way to the Masters.

He worked hard after the U.S.
Open debacle to improve his driving,
and while he missed the 18th fairway

* TURN TO FERGUSON





BY BERNIE WILSON
Associated Press

SAN DIEGO — Norv Turner
got his third shot at an NFL head
coaching job when he was hired
Monday by the San Diego Char-
gers, a week after the surprise fir-
ing of Marty Schottenheimer.

The hiring came less than 24
hours after the Chargers wrapped
up their interviews. The Chargers
also hired Ted Cottrell as defen-
sive coordinator.

Turner, the San Francisco 49ers’
offensive coordinator, was the only
one of the six candidates who’s
been an NFL head coach, and the
only one from the offensive side of
the ball.

He inherits a team that was an
NFL-best 14-2 last season but
melted down in its playoff opener,
a stunning 24-21 loss to the New



TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007



PRO FOOTBALL | SAN DIEGO CHARGERS

AFC West champs turn to Turner

Last Monday, the Chargers
again surprised the NFL when
president Dean Spanos fired Schot-
tenheimer, citing a “dysfunctional
situation’’
between the
coach and gen-
eral manager
AJ. Smith.

Turner had
trouble winning
in the regular
season, going
58-82-1 in head
coaching stints
with Washington and Qakland.
Schottenheimer had trouble win-



TURNER

ning in the postseason, going 5-13 .

overall and 0-2 with the Chargers.

Turner was San Diego’s offen-
sive coordinator in 2001, when
LaDainian Tomlinson was a rookie
and Smith was the assistant to the
late John Butler.

The Chargers still use the same
offense Turner installed.

“This isn’t a team where you’re
rebuilding,” Turner said. “We
should start fast. We should be
good early and we should be good
late. Not having to go through the
normal things you have to go
through when you make a coach-
ing change is going to help the
players more than anyone.”

Turner was fired by the Raiders
in 2005 after going 9-23 in two sea-
sons. San Francisco’s Mike Nolan
quickly hired Turner to take over
the NFL’s 32nd-ranked offense.
Turner got remarkable progress
from quarterback Alex Smith and
an improved offensive line. He
helped Frank Gore become the
NFC’s leading rusher in a breakout
season. .

Turner will be able to help with
the continued development of



INTERNATIONAL EDITION





quarterback Philip Rivers, who
was voted to the Pro Bowl but saw
his play tail off down the stretch.
Tomlinson was the league’s MVP
after setting NFL records with 31
touchdowns and 186 points.

Turner might be viewed by
some as a safe pick, but Spanos
said the Chargers were swayed by
his experience as a head coach and
the continuity he can bring.

“You can say whatever you
want to say,” Spanos said. “If we
hadn’t made a change and we lost,
we made the wrong decision. If we
do make the change and we lose,
we made the wrong decision. So
the net result of all this is, there’s
only one thing we have to do this
year, and that’s get back in the
playoffs. Just get to the postseason
and win the first game, is our goal.
And then I think we’re off to a
good start.”

England Patriots.





HOCKEY | NEW YORK ISLANDERS 6, PITTSBURGH 5

A rare pointless outing

Sillinger’s last-minute goal for Islanders ends Penguins’ unbeaten streak

BY IRA PODELL
Associated Press

UNIONDALE, N.Y. — Suddenly, the Pitts-
burgh Penguins’ standard of success has risen
as quickly as their place in the Eastern Confer-
ence standings.

Just 26.8 seconds away from another produc-
tive outing, Pittsburgh allowed Mike Sillinger’s
winning goal that gave the New York Islanders
a 6-5 comeback victory and snapped the Pen-
guins’ point streak at 16 games Monday.

Pittsburgh, riding a 14-0-2 surge that vaulted
the Penguins from also-ran to Atlantic Division-
contenders, got three goals from Ryan Malone,
two from Mark Recchi and four assists from
NHL scoring leader Sidney Crosby, but couldn’t
survive shaky goaltending by Marc-Andre
Fleury.

He will have to be better if the Penguins
hope to reach the playoffs for the first time
since 2001. :

' Sillinger took a pass from Andy Hilbert in
the high slot and got off a shot that hit under
Fleury’s glove and carried in for his 20th goal.

“When you outscore a team like this, you’re
doing something right,” Sillinger said.

“When you score five goals on the road,
you've got to win those games,” Penguins coach
Michel Therrien said.

Chris Simon scored twice, Viktor Kozlov,

Jason Blake and Miroslav Satan added goals,
and Marc-Andre Bergeron had two assists in his
Islanders debut one day after being acquired
from Edmonton.

Pittsburgh, which led 3-1 and 5-4, hadn’t lost
in regulation since Jan. 10 at Florida. It was the
Penguins’ longest streak since an 18-game run in
1993 that included a league-record 17 consecu-
tive victories.

Malone scored in the opening minute of all
three periods, but the Penguins continued a
recent pattern of blown leads and had a six-
game winning streak broken.

Crosby is first in the league with 95 points,
despite only one goal in ll games.

Malone gave Pittsburgh a 5-4 lead at 48 sec-
onds of the third, putting in his rebound after a
shot from Crosby bounced to him. He has 12
goals this season, six against the Islanders in the
first two hat tricks of his career.

Simon broke out of a 26-game scoring
drought, netting his second of the game and
seventh overall 1:11 later.

Recchi notched his 21st goal, one day after



ED BETZ/AP

STICK TO IT: New York Islanders’ Mike Sillinger, left, faces off with Pittsburgh Penguins’
Sidney Crosby in the second period of their game on Monday in Uniondale, N.Y.

reaching 20 for the Sth time in 18 seasons. The
power-play tally gave Pittsburgh a 2-1 lead with
49 seconds left in the first period.

The Penguins needed only 49 more at the
start of the second to grab a two-goal advan-
tage. After a lengthy video review, Malone was
credited with his second of the game and fifth
against New York this season.

Their joy was short-lived as the Islanders
tied it with goals by Simon and Blake 15 seconds
apart. Simon made it 3-2 at 2:03, then, during a
delayed-penalty call, Blake tied his career high
with No. 28.

€

-It marked the fourth time in six games that
the Penguins blew an advantage of at least two
goals, but they had all won the others.

Satan gave New York its first lead at 8:05
when he put in a juicy rebound after a hard
drive by Kozlov during 4-on-4 play.

Recchi struck again 16 seconds into a 5-on-3
advantage, making it 4-4 with 1:59 remaining in
the middle frame.

Kozlov’s power-play goal 14:49 into the game
tied it at 1 and was New York’s second with a
man advantage in 22 chances over eight games.

e MORE NHL NEWS

SPORTS SHOWCASE | RICHARD PITINO

His own man, but young coach embraces father

BY ALAN ROBINSON
Associated Press

PITTSBURGH — The last name alone is
enough to stamp Duquesne University’s youn-
gest assistant as an on-the-rise college basket-
ball coach.

Pitino.

Yes, Richard Pitino is Louisville coach Rick
Pitino’s son and is proud of it, though he prefers
the more formal Richard. He wants his own
identity, and ironically, a tragedy in the early
morning hours of Sept. 17 might have helped
him achieve that.

After five Duquesne players were shot, four
of them only weeks after arriving on campus,
other players frantically called Pitino for advice
and support. The difficult, demanding and
ongoing ordeal has helped the 24-year-old
Pitino understand that college coaching
involves more than Xs and Os, text messaging

recruits and watching game tape.

It was a lesson in growing up fast than noth-
ing in his life could have prepared him for, not
even the experience of losing two uncles sev-
eral months apart in 2001 — one in the Sept. ll
terrorist attacks.

“It’s like coach [Ron] Everhart told me, ‘You
came here last spring as a second-year assistant,
and now you're a 10-year veteran,” Pitino said.
“For me it’s been a learning experience in how
to handle things. Every tragedy is different and
you've got to handle it differently with each kid
and with each person.”

Duquesne (10-14) has rebounded admirably
from the terrible incident, winning far more
games than expected with a nearly new roster
and upsetting Boston College, Xavier, Dayton
and Saint Louis.

*TURN TO SHOWCASE



KEITH SRAKOCIC/AP

LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON: Duquesne
University’s youngest assistant coach,
Richard Pitino, center, watches his father,
Louisville basketball coach Rick Pitino, at
work against host Pittsburgh on Feb. 12.
____MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

SOCCER | AUTO RACING | TENNIS | ETC.

4B | TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20,2007 INTERNATIONAL EDITION





SOCCEER | EXTRA TIME

new twist to sport’s violence



BY CHRIS LEHOURITES some time in court. In 2003, he Newcastle players Lee Bowyer death at the FA Cup semifinal 2
Associated Press was charged with three racism and Kieron Dyer exchanged match against Nottingham :
LONDON — Liverpool offenses after a night out in punches on the field during a Forest at Hillsborough Sta- u

striker Craig Bellamy added a
new twist to the problem of
soccer violence last week
when he attacked a teammate.

Yes, a teammate.

The Wales forward alleg-
edly hit John Arne Riise in the
legs with a golf club while Liv-
erpool was in Portugal at a
training camp preparing for a
Champions League match
against defending champion
FC Barcelona. s

Bellamy now faces a fine of
$155,000 and an uncertain
future with the 18-time English
league champions.

If teammates whacking
each other with golf clubs
after a night out isn’t absurd
enough, consider the reason

Cardiff, Wales. He admitted to

using threatening, abusive or |

insulting words or behavior
and was fined $1,252.

_ The charge of “racially
aggravated” abuse was
dropped. —

Late last year, Bellamy was
cleared of assaulting two
women in a nightclub.

But Bellamy can’t be sin-
gled out as the team’s lone
troublemaker in Portugal.
Other Liverpool players,
including Jerzy Dudek, Jer-
maine Pennant and Robbie
Fowler, were also said to have
been drunk and acting up.

There have been worse
crimes committed by profes-
sional athletes, however, and

game in 2005.

Bowyer was later sus-
pended for seven games and
Dyer banned for three. The
team also fined Bowyer.

Gillett and Hicks are no
strangers to pugnacious play-
ers — both own NHL hockey
teams. But spending $430.8
million for a group of players
who hate each other isn’t
something they’re likely to tol-
erate.

And they shouldn’t,
because soccer — and Liver-
pool — has had an ugly
enough past when it comes to
violence. ;

At the 1985 European Cup
final at the Heysel stadium in
Brussels, 39 people were killed

dium.

Hooliganism in soccer
hasn’t been confined to just
Liverpool, of course.

On Feb. 2, 38-year-old
policeman Filippo Raciti was
killed by rioting fans after
Catania played Palermo in the
Italian league. That incident
led to the suspension of league
play for a week and security
measures that have forced
some teams to play in empty
stadiums until standards are
met. ,

There have been other soc- |
cer riots and fighting all over.

the world, but it’s still worry-
ing to read about a profes-
sional soccer player hitting
another — especially in the



STEPHEN DOWELL/ORLANDO SENTINEL/MCT

ESCAPE HATCH: Clint Bowyer climbs out of his burning
race car after a crash on the final lap of the Daytona
500 on Sunday in Daytona Beach, Fla.

Circuit writes its own
‘Ricky Bobby’ ending

for the fight — they were argu- plenty of unruly behavior has when Liverpool fans charged _ legs. BY JIM LITKE ae
ing about a karaoke competi- come from overly aggressive their Juventus counterparts Luckily for Riise, he was | Associated Press ye
tion. sportsmen over the years. and a stadium wall collapsed. not injured. If only the same | The first 150 laps of the

Karaoke! Teammates have fought Four years later, 96 Liver- could be said for the image of Daytona 500 was like watch- :

The news of the fracas defi-
nitely wasn’t music to the ears

of George Gillett Jr. and Tom waiting for parking spots to

Hicks, Liverpool’s new Ameri- open up. is

can owners. Then the sun went down, nee
The pair supposedly heard a full moon popped up and

about the fight in Portugal and everybody started behaving

ordered Liverpool manager like the Wolfman — sud- ;

Rafa Benitez to issue a state- denly in a hurry and only too ‘ ee

ment saying that players who eager to mix it up. GARY GREEN/ORLANDO SENTINEL/MCT

misbehaved would be pun- The last 50 laps featured THE VICTOR: Kevin Harvick

ished.
“We will take disciplinary







before in the English league.

pool fans were crushed to

Liverpool and soccer.





ing drivers circle the lot at
the grocery store politely

five wrecks, all involving
multiple cars, and small won-



celebrates his victory.

action and fine any of them der. There was no room. utation smudged with oil
who are found to have With three dozen circuits even less.
breached club rules during our left, the top 20 were sepa- The funny thing is that
stay in Portugal,” Benitez said rated by a second. With six hijinks have been on the way A
in Sunday’s statement. laps to go, the field was as out the last half-dozen or so .
Bellamy, who has a history tightly packed as it was atthe years, as NASCAR embarked -
of losing his temper, looks to start. on an NFL-style expansion yy
be the first casualty of the dic- At the finish, as car parts, _ plan, growing more homoge- oe
tum — something not exactly smoke and sparks flew neous than homespun, more
alien to him. through the airbehindthem choreographed than chaotic a
When he played for New- | like the climactic chase scene _in the bargain. ; 2"
castle in 2004, Bellamy threw from “The Road Warrior,” But this race was a throw- ;
a chair at assistant manager F Kevin Harvick and Mark back in the best sense of the aoe
John Carver. He was then a oe, | Martin were racing side by word, at least once the sun x
heavily fined for calling man- OWEN HUMPHREYS/AP | side at around 200 mph sepa- went down and the cars LF
ager Graeme Souness a liar in CONFRONTATIONAL: Newcastle United’s Steven Taylor, center, is held back by | rated by the length of a car found their griponthe _.
2005. ~~ -goalkeepér Steve Harper as he is confronted by Liverpool's Craig Béllamy'during their | hood. Seconds later, provid- ancient concrete oval. Driv- Tail
Bellamy has also spent '’Prerfiier League match at St James’ Park in Newcastle, England, on Saturday. 9° | | ing a perfect exclamation” ers banged into the walls, off. atl
; a uibasdl eve BR Boh Say MANS coe herve Ss | point, Clint Bowyer skidded each other and the crazier it af
| across the line with his car got, the more chances they ou
TENNIS | upside down — and on fire. took. we
\ The guys calling the race “Wildest thing I’ve been a
e . ; 9 e | on Fox, with decades of part of,” Harvick said after {
Federer ties Connors’ ranking record Seite. SEeD5Sarr 2
between them, scoured their victory at .020 seconds, “ina at
| collective memory banks to long time.” :

. | come up with an ending Martin, the sentimental Sh
Associated Press final last year. beat American qualifier Jesse Croatia’s Roko Karanusic | nearly this wild. favorite, wes trying to win is
Roger Federer tied The 25-year-old Federer Witten 1-6, 6-3, 7-6 (7-3) Mon-__ 6-4, 7-6 (7-2). | One referenced “Joey Chi- _ his first Daytona title in 23 ,

Jimmy Connors’ record of has dominated tennis for the day in the first round in Mem- e Dubai Open: Eleni | twood,” the daredevil who tries.
160 consecutive weeks as the _ past three seasons, but is still _ phis, Tenn. Daniilidou of Greece upset | performed death-defying “We were inches or feet
top-ranked player in men’s trying to win a Grand Slam On the women’s side, inthe seventh-seeded LiNaofChina | auto stunts beginninginthe | or whatever. We were short. 7
tennis Monday. title on clay. Cellular South Cup, unseeded while No. 6 Patty Schnyder — 1940s, and whose best work —_ It was so close,” he said -
The 10-time Grand Slam “That’s the only way can American Bethanie Mattek of Switzerland defeated Italy's | _ is still available on you- finally, “but it was second.” ;
champion has held the No.1 make this season a better one defeated two-time champion Francesca Schiavone inthe | tube.com. Another nomi- It’s small consolation, but Fer
ATP Tour than last year,” Federer has Lisa Raymond 6-2,7-Sinthe first round in Dubai, United | nated the 1979 Daytona 500, _ it was as good and honorable FNS
ranking said. “Otherwise it won't be first round, and No. 5 seed Arab Emirates, on Monday. | when Cale Yarborough and a second-place finish as
since Feb. 2, possible.” Nicole Pratt beat Lilia Oster- The 42nd-ranked Daniili- | Donnie Allisonlockedupin there's been in NASCAR.
2004. The Last season, only Nadal and Ioh 6-3, 6-0 to advance to the dou needed more than three =a final-lap battle, spun into Even so, Martin could have “ete!
Swiss star is Andy Murray managed to round of 16. hours to oust Li 7-6 (7-5), 7-6 | the infield, started throwing whined about the lack of a oot
assured of beat Federer, who finished the e ABN AMRI: In Rotter- (7-3). | insults and then punches as caution flag seconds from the
breaking the season with 12 titles and 16 dam, Netherlands, top-seeded Schnyder, the only left- | Allison’s brother, Bobby, end. As he battled Harvick to
record next finals appearances in his 17 Nikolay Davydenko cruised hander in the tournament, | pulled over and joined the the line, the final, seven-car i
week. tournaments. He earned $8.34 into the second round witha struggled in the opening set | fray. The fight garnered so crash was exploding just a “aes
FEDERER Connors million and also won the sea- 6-3, 6-4 victory over Germa- _ but prevailed 6-7 (5-7), 6-3, 6-3. | muchattention that anation _ few hundred yards behind Me
. was No. 1 son-ending Masters Cup. ny’s Michael Berrer on Mon- Maria Kirilenko of Russia | watching the first-ever live them. Had the yellow flag ue
from July 1974 to August 1977. Connors won eight Grand _ day. also advanced to the second broadcast of. 500-mile race been dropped, the field sf

He is now coaching one of

Federer’s biggest rivals, Andy lasted more than 20 years. involving a seeded player Monica Niculescu of Roma- making up a half-lap deficit Martin would have won. =
Roddick. Although he also only failed to Monday, Novak Djokovic of nia 6-3, 6-0. | and sneaking across the fin- —_ Instead, the green flag flew. a
Federer, who has won six of winthe French Open, Connors Serbia beat French qualitier Alicia Molik of Australia ish line. “I was ahead of it all,” t

the last seven Grand Slam
titles, hasn’t played since beat-

Slam titles in his career, which

did win the 1976 U.S. Open on
clay.

In the only other match

Florent Serra 7-6 (8-6), 6-4.
Djokovic will meet another

round after beating wild-card

beat Anna-Lena Groenefeld
of Germany 6-3, 6-4 while

barely noticed Richard Petty

Grand as that race was,
driver-turned-broadcaster

would have been frozen and

Martin conceded, “It was
pretty decent where I was

ing Fernando Gonzalez in The American is the only qualifier, Andrei Pavel of Japan’s Ai Sugiyama defeated Darrell Waltrip came up with _ sitting.” on

the Australian Open final on man to win the U.S. Openon Romania, in the next round. Tunisian Selima Sfar 6-4, 5-7, | aneven better one. And because Martin was a saa

Jan. 28. He returns to action alll three surfaces — grass, clay Pavel beat Daniele Bracialli 6-3. “This finish,” he said, standup guy, France, Harvick 5

next week at the Dubai Open. and hardcourt. of Italy 6-1, 6-1. Defending champion and __ recalling last year’s and all the rest of the “
Federer has 8,120 points in The ATP rankings began on In other first-round second-ranked Justine Henin | NASCAR-inspired hit com- employees in his traveling

the year-based rankings. Aug. 23, 1973. matches, Belgium’s Olivier had a bye in the first round. edy, “It’s ‘Ricky Bobby.’ It circus are sitting pretty.

Rafael Nadal, the man who Rochus rallied to beat Janko The tournament, which couldn’t have been any bet- —- Since the Daytona 500 is

beat Federer at the French TOURNAMENTS Tipsarevic of Serbia 4-6, 6-2, runs until Saturday, also fea- ter.” NASCAR's biggest event, the

Open last year, is second with e Regions Morgan Kee- 6-4. Dutch wild card Robin tures third-ranked Amelie Nor better-timed. season effectively starts with gn

4,705 points. Nadal also beat gan Championships: No. 6 Haase recorded his first ATP Mauresmo, Svetlana Kuz- Think back to the events its Super Bowl and builds ;

Federer in the Dubai Open

Coughlin,

ica’s Big Three, and the addi- _just bought back into. fe
tional responsibilities all that A few years back, France '
Associated Press , topping second-place finisher In the men’s 200 breast- lege 55 miles northeast of money rolling in would place _ was asked whether all the

Natalie Coughlin and
Michael Phelps dominated
the Missouri Grand Prix again
on Sunday night in Columbia,
Mo., each winning a pair of
races in the final major com-
petition before next month’s
world championships in Aus-
tralia.

Coughlin set an American
pool record in the 200-meter
freestyle with a time of 1 min-
ute, 58 seconds. Fellow 2004
Olympian Katie Hoff finished
second.

Coughlin added a win in the
50 freestyle, finishing in 25.22,

seed Jurgen Melzer rallied to

tournament victory by beating

SPORTS ROUNDUP

Phelps dominate swim meet

Amanda Weir by a half-sec-
ond. Coughlin also won the
100 freestyle Saturday.

Like Coughlin, Phelps won
both races he entered Sunday,
the 200 freestyle and the 400
individual medley.

On Saturday, Phelps broke
his own world record in the
200 butterfly. Sunday, he had
to come from behind in the
medley race, overtaking sec-
ond-place finisher Ous Mel-
louli in the final 25 meters. He
finished in 4:11.3.

Phelps also won the 200
freestyle in 1:46.47.

stroke, Eric Shanteau upset
Longhorn Aquatics teammate
and world-record holder
Brendan Hansen. Shanteau
finished the race in 2:13.03 sec-
onds.

SWIMMER DIES

Kenyon College swimmer
Caleb Gottinger, 19, of Mil-
waukee, died Sunday after he
fell in a dormitory bathroom
and struck his head, school
officials said Monday.

He apparently fainted Sat-
urday morning and tests at a
medical center near the col-

netsova and Martina Hingis.

Columbus, Ohio, determined
he suffered a fractured skull
and a hemorrhage, college
spokesman Shawn Presley
said.

Gottinger was declared
brain dead Sunday morning
after being transferred to
Columbus’ Riverside Method-
ist Hospital.

JOCKEY TRAMPLED

Puerto Rican jockey
Manuel Caraballo has died
after being trampled during a
race, authorities in the U.S.
Virgin Islands said Monday.

|

of last week, when NASCAR
czar Brian France gave his
upbeat state-of-the-sport
address. He boasted about
new T'V partners, new spon-
sors, anew carmaker coming
on-board to challenge Amer-

on the people who make the
sport go.

Then an hour or so later,
his handlers announced four
teams caught cheating would
lose their crew chiefs for
Sunday’s race. A fifth team,
headed by owner-driver
Michael Waltrip, was busted
the following day. That may
have been the most embar-
rassing development of all,
since he was fronting for
new series-entrant Toyota, a
manufacturer that knew little
about NASCAR's notorious
past and liked seeing its rep-

momentum from there. Now
there’s a great race, a little
controversy and enough
highlights to fill up a week’s
worth of the nightly pro-
grams that ESPN has trotted
out to promote the sport it

changes he embarked on,
from increased corporate
involvement to a crackdown
on the drivers’ conduct, lan-
guage and under-the-hood
shenanigans wasn’t driving
his core audience away. He
replied that coming up with
magical moments wouldn’t
be tough so long as men and
machines remained a volatile
mix.
“Racing has always had
them. The trick now,” he
said, “is to keep them coming
on a bigger stage.”

So far, so good.


AT WUD ess

EASTERN CONFERENCE







SOUTHEAST WL Pct. GB 10 Str. Home Away _ Conf
Washington 29 21 580 - 5:5 W-1 19-7 10-14 20-10
Orlando 27 26 © «©.509 31% 4-6 W-1 18-10 9-16 15-17
Miami 26 26 500 44 7-3 W-2 15-10 11-16 13-15
Atlanta 20 31 1392 9% 5-5 L-l 9-15 11-16 12-20
Charlotte 19 33 .365 11 4-6 W-1 11-15 8-18 13-20
"ATLANTIC == WL Pet. -GB_L10_ Str. Home Away Conf
Toronto 29 24 ~««.547 - 82 W-2 19-7 10-17 20-10
New Jersey 25 29 463 4% 4-6 L-2 14-13. 11-16 19-14
New York 23 30 «434-655 L-L:13-13 10-17 13-18
Philadelphia 17 36 .321 12 46 L-3 9-15 8-21 12-18
Boston 13 38 255 15 1:9 W-1 521 817 9-24
CENTRAL WL Pet. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Detroit 32 19 627 - 82 L-L 17-10 15-9 22-10
_ + Cleveland 30 22 577 2% 64 L-1 20-7 10-15 18-14
‘ Indiana 28 24 538 4% 6-4 W-2 17-10 11-14 19-13
Chicago 29 25 537 4% 4-6 L2 20-7 9-18 20-10
Milwaukee 19 34 .358 14 2-8 L-4 1-11 8-23 9-21
WESTERN CONFERENCE.
SOUTHWEST wil Pct. _ GB i L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Dallas 44.9 830 - 91 W-9 24-3 20-6 30-6
San Antonio 35 18 .660 9 5-5 W-2 -16-8 19-10 21-11
Houston 33 19 .63510% 7-3 L-1 19-7 14-12 19-17
New Orleans 25 28 .472 19 7-3 W-l 17-11 8-17 15-19
Memphis 14 40 .25930% 3-7 L-1 11-17 3-23 8-25
NORTHWEST WL Pct. GB L10 ‘Str. Home Away Conf
Utah 7-3 W-6 21-6, 14-11 20-10
Denver 4-6 L-1 14-14 12-11) 11-17
Minnesota 5-5 W-2 16-9 9-18 15-19
Portland 4-6 L-2 12-14 10-18 13-17
Seattle 4-6 W-2 14-13 6-19 9-20
PACIFIC = OW }_L10Str, Home Away Conf
Phoenix ‘ 5-5 L-3 20-6 19-7 19-10
L.A. Lakers 30 23 566 9% 3-7 L4 19-7 11-16 17-10
LA. Clippers 25 27 .481 14 46 L-2 17-8 819 14-17
Golden State 25 29 463 15 46.W-1 19-9 6-20 13-17
Sacramento 22 29 «.43116% 5-5 L-3. 15-12 7-17 12-21
RESULTS AND SCHEDULES
Monday’s results Tonight’s games Sunday’s results
NO GAMES SCHEDULED ‘Min. at Was., 7 All-Star Game
N.O. at Cha., 7 West 153, East 132
Orl. at N.Y., 7:30
Det. at Mil., 8
Den. at S.A., 8
Atl. at Chi., 8:30
Bos. at Sac., 10
Utah at Por., 10
Mem. at Sea., 10
Pho. at L.A.C., 10:30





WNBA

Atlanta committee
searching for team

BY CHARLES ODUM
Associated Press

An Atlanta organizing committee is trying to
bring a WNBA team to Atlanta for the 2008 season,
Atlanta City Council president Lisa Borders said
Monday.

Borders said she is part of an eight-member com-
mittee interested in bringing women’s professional
baéketball back to Atlanta for the first time in 10 _
years. The Atlanta Glory was a member of the ©
American Basketball League, which folded on Dec.
28, 1998.

The WNBA, which had 16 teams in 2002, is down
to 13 teams in 2007. The Charlotte franchise was dis-

_ banded following the 2006 season, leaving the
-’ Jeague without a team in the Southeast.

The WNBA also has had teams in Cleveland,
Miami and Portland fold since 2002. A Chicago
team was added for the 2006 season.

“J think we recognize the value that the leagu



._ would bring to our city,” Borders said.

“We are starting to talk with folks who would be
potential owners. Our goal at the exploratory level
is to have a team in place for the 2008 season.”

WNBA president Donna Orender on Monday
called Atlanta “a terrific destination for the
WNBA.”

PRO B

League heads back to

BY BRIAN MAHONEY
Associated Press

LAS VEGAS — Time for Allen Iverson,
Pat Riley, Steve Nash and the rest of the NBA
to get back to work. .

Jason Kidd, too, though even he wasn’t
sure how much longer he’ll be doing it in
New Jersey. ;

The show is over in Las Vegas, where the
NBA capped its weekend of All-Star festivi-
ties with the West’s victory over the East on
Sunday night.

Now it’s time to get serious again.

“Being in Vegas, it’s a great placé to be, a
great place to chill,” Minnesota’s Kevin Gar-
nett said. “But it’s out with the fantasy and
back to reality.”

That means trade talk for some teams,
playoff pushes for. others. It all gets started
tonight when play resumes with 10 games.
Riley returns to Miami’s bench the following
night, and the next big event on the league’s
calendar comes quickly after that.

The trade deadline is Thursday, with Pau
Gasol and Kidd among the big names who
will wait to see if they have a new destina-
tion. Gasol has asked out of Memphis and the
Grizzlies are trying to accommodate him,
while Kidd, who missed the All-Star game
because of a back injury, acknowledged dur-
ing the break that teams have asked about
getting him out of New Jersey.

In the East, landing one proven star could
be all a team needs to seize control in a medi-
ocre conference. Teams in the West could be

» looking to deal for a better chance to com-

pete with powerful Dallas and Phoenix.

Denver hoped it had done that when it
acquired Iverson from Philadelphia in
December to pair with Carmelo Anthony, but
the results haven’t been there yet, mostly
because the duo hasn’t been on the court
enough. Anthony was serving his 15-game
suspension when Iverson was acquired, and
Iverson missed eight of the last nine games
because of a sprained ankle.

So despite having two of the NBA’s top
five scorers, Denver is only seventh in the
West, two games ahead of the ninth-place
Clippers. But Anthony thinks the Nuggets are
ready to make their move.

“Now that this is over with, I can focus on
my season, the rest of the season,” Anthony
said after the All-Star game. “A.I. told me
today he’d be ready to play [tonight], so that
was a good sign.

“We need some wins. This first half of the.

season was rocky for us. Hopefully we can
put that behind us and get better.” x

Nash joined Iverson on the West bench
because of a shoulder injury that forced him
to miss the last four games, though hopes to
return tonight. The Suns couldn’t keep up
their sizzling pace without their two-time
MVP, losing three times to fall 442 games
behind Dallas for the league’s best record.

The Heat already know their big piece is
ready. .

Riley is set to take the coaching reins back
from Ron Rothstein when Miami visits Hous-
ton on Wednesday night. He returns to a
team that looks much different from the one
he left on Jan. 3 to have knee and hip surgery.

Shaquille O’Neal has since come back and
the Heat have won seven of their last eight
games, rebounding from a horrendous start
and moving into eighth place in the Eastern











}

L | HOCKEY

NBA | SECOND-HALF PREVIEW





work

C.W. GRIFFIN/MIAMI HERALD/MCT
TALKIN’ AND WALKIN’: Miami head coach Pat Riley, above, speaks at a press

conference prior to the Heat’s game against the Portland Trail Blazers in Miami on
Feb. 13. Denver Nuggets guard Allen Iverson, below left, walks gingerly back onto

the court after rolling his injured ankle on a play in overtime against the New
Orleans Hornets on Feb. 7. The New Jersey Nets’ Jason Kidd, below right, speaks ©



at a news conference during NBA All-Star festivities in Las Vegas on Friday.

DAVIDZALUBOWSKI/AP

Conference. The defending NBA champions
are only four games behind Washington in
the Southeast Division.

“We wanted at the beginning of the year
to come out of the blocks strong but it wasn’t
scripted that way,” Dwyane Wade said. “So
we have to take what we have and go into the
second half of the season, and hopefully



MARK HUMPHREY/AP



KEVORKDJANSEZIAN/AP

Jason Williams gets back healthy and we
have all our guns and we have our coach back
and just try to defend our title. It’s going to
be very tough and whatever happens, we can
say we all did it together.”

The Heat still have plenty of time to move
up in the East, where Detroit has looked like
the class of the conference since signing
Chris Webber. Even teams such as Atlanta
and New York, both coming off dismal sea-
sons and well below .500 in this one, still
have playoff hopes heading into the final two
months.

The West has four teams right behind
Garnett’s Timberwolves for the final playoff
spot, but it’s hard to imagine any of the teams
at the bottom doing any damage in the play-
offs since they’d have to face the Mavs or
Suns right away.

But teams like Utah and Houston could be
dangerous second-round foes, especially if
injured All-Stars Carlos Boozer and Yao
Ming make successful comebacks.

That can wait. There’s enough to keep the
NBA busy Thursday — trades during the day
and an NBA finals rematch in Dallas that
night. :

“Obviously we have a lot of work to do,”
the Mavs’ Dirk Nowitzki said. “We have a big
game on Thursday, so it should be fun.”

Kotalik hurt the knee collid-
ing with Boston defenseman
Andrew Ference five minutes
into the second period in Buf-
falo’s 4-3 shootout loss to the
Bruins on Saturday.

Kotalik’s name is added to a
growing list of banged-up
Sabres. Buffalo is now down
six regulars after Maxim Afi-
nogenov, the team’s second-
leading scorer, broke his left
hand and Jiri Novotny twisted
his left ankle in a 2-1 overtime
win over Edmonton on Thurs-
day. Afinogenov is expected to
miss a minimum of six weeks,
while Novotny will be out
indefinitely.

Buffalo has already lost for-
ward Paul Gaustad (torn ten-
don) for the season, and
defenseman Jaroslav Spacek
(broken left hand) will be out
for about a month. Center Tim
Connolly has yet to play this
year after sustaining a concus-
sion in last season’s playoffs.

Kotalik has 14 goals and 36
points in 59 games this season



also scored for the Canucks,
who have won four straight
games to move two points
ahead of Calgary atop the

Andrew Brunette scored
twice, Brad Richardson added
a short-handed goal and Ian
Laperriere also scored for the

e Sabres: Buttalo forward
Ales Kotalik will miss the next
4-6 weeks because of a right

after setting career highs in
goals (25) and points (62) last
year.

To replace Kotalik, Buffalo
recalled Michael Ryan from
AHL Rochester.

e Oilers: Edmonton
placed forward Fernando Pis-
ani on injured reserve Monday
while he recovers from a con-
cussion.

The Oilers recalled
defenseman Tom Gilbert and
winger Jean-Francois Jacques
from Wilkes-Barre/Scranton
of the AHL.

NTA NHL
¢ “
eee eee Hartnell’s rapid-fire goals lead Predators
SOUTHEAST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV p
TampaBay 33 24 2 1 69191 183 16-13-0-0 17-11-2-1
Atlanta 30 22 6 3 69185 194 14-9-3-2 16-13-3-1 Associated Press
Carolina 30 24 3 4 67185 192 15-11-1-3 15-13-2-1
Florida 23 26 5 6 57170 195 16-10-2-1 7-16-3-5 NASHVILLE, Tenn. —
-“ Washington 23 27 2 7 55177 206 14-12-1-3 9-15-1-4 Scott Hartnell scored two
ate goals in 23 seconds and Nash-
ar ee . oT as \ ; ee aos : mci leer) ville went back on top of the
ew Jersey 7 -6-0 -11-0- ic
Pittsburgh 32:18 «4 «5S «73 208 187 18-B-2-2 14-10-2-3 baal Conference by beat
NY. Islanders 29 23 4 4 66177 170 15-10-3-1 14-13-1-3 ing Phoenix 4-1 on Monday.
N.Y. Rangers 29 25 3 2 63175 170 12-13-3-0 17-12-0-2 The Predators, who
> Philadelphia 16 35 3 5 40 154 221 5-17-3-4 11-18-0-1 snapped a two-game losing
NORTHEAST WL OL SLPTS GF GA Home away _ pw | Streak, leapfrogged idle
Buffalo OE 2) B21) 168 DOTA 19811 12812 | Detroit into first place in the
Ottawa 3422, «2 «1 71200 157 18-11-1-1 16-11-1-0 —15-9-0-1 Central Division and the West.
Montreal 30 25 1 5 66173 181 17-12-0-3 13-13-1-2 — 10-8-0-4 They did it despite not getting
Toronto 29 22 3 5 66191 192 12-12-2-3 17-10-1-2 —10-8-2-2 :
Boston 28 26 1 3 60167 212 16-12-0-2 12-14-1-1 11-12-0-1 any points from new forward
Peter Forsberg for the second
straight game since he joined
. WESTERN CONFERENCE Nashville.
CENTRAL _W__L OL SLPTS GF GA HOME _ AWAY DIV ee ela Aye
Nashville 40 18 2 1 83206 152 22-5-2-1 18-13-0-0 17-5+1-0 Jes eu ee otg eg secre oe
Detroit ie 3 3 82 188 148 «21342 17-1321 12-411 | Nashville, tied with Buffalo for
- Louis 25 26 5 4 59155 181 14-15-2-1 11-11-3-3 10-12-2-2 the overall lead in the NHL
icago 22 28 2 7 53147 179 11-13-1-3 11-15-1-4 10-12-1-0 ‘ ‘
Columbus 23 31 2 3 51146 182 14-14-1-2 9-17-1-1 —7-13-0-2 with 83 points. : .
Oleg Saprykin spoiled ; 5‘ ‘ :
NORTHWEST W LOL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY piv Tomas Vokoun’s shutout bid HE PLAYS DEFENSE, TOO: Nashville right wing Scott Hartnell
Vancouver’ 34-2113 72 187 150 19-9-1-1. 15-12-0-2 13-11-01 | by scoring Phoenix’s lone goal slides on the ice to block a shot by Phoenix defenseman
Calne 7 0 : : a 188 158 Haw ia 12-6-1-2 with 2:46 left. Nick Boynton, right, in the third period on Monday. The
innesota 9 171 156 20-5- 12-18-0- 9-6-1-2 : : , : : : ad
Edmonton oe 26 32 «GL 160 171 (WeLi-1-l 10-15-2-1 9-12-1-0 Vokoun finished with 22 Coyotes’ Mathias Tjarnqvist watches the action in front
Colorado 28 27 2 2 60190 187 16-13-1-2 12-14-1-0 —10-9-1-0 saves. of Predators goalie Tomas Vokoun. Hartnell scored two
Curtis Joseph made 3l ina i -
paciric WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME _ AWAY DIV igetie ees P goals in 23 seconds as the hosts won 4-1.
Anaheim 35 16 2 7 79193 155 18-5-1-5 17-11-1-2 15-5-0-2 e Bruins 6, Flyers 3: In had won three of four.
San Jose 36 22 0 1 73178 150 18-11-0-1 18-11-0-0 12-11-0-1 ladelphi : .
Dallas et 0 2 2 ise 142 19-901 161201 17-600 | Philadelphia, Petr Tenkrat Boston’s Tim Thomas
Phoenix 25 32 2 1 53 160 207 13-13-2-0. 12-19-0-1 — 7-13-2-1 scored twice during a wild made 30 saves in earning his
‘Los Angeles 20 31 5 5 50170 211 11-12-44 9-19-1-1 7-14-0-3 second period and helped Bos- fourth win in five games.
Note: Two points for a win, one point for a tie and overtime loss ton beat Philadelphia. Northwest Division.
Marco Sturm, P.J. Axelsson, LATE SUNDAY
RESULTS AND SCHEDULES Brandon Bochenski, and Marc e Canucks 5, Avalanche
Savard also scored for the Bru- 4: Henrik Sedin scored the tie-
Monday’s results Tonight’ ” é : : 3 ‘
aes sae Se Golghe s games Sunday's sroutls ins, who have won four of five. breaking goal 1:31 into the third
fers 6, urgh 5 + Florida at T.B., 7:30 Dallas 5, San Jose 2 : ‘
Nashville 4, Phoenix 1 Phil. at Buffalo 7 Pittsburgh 3, Washington 2 Jeff Carter, Kyle Calder, period, Brendan Morrison Avalanche.
joston 6, Philadelphia janta ai ina, 7 N.Y. R 2, Chi 1 1 ‘ $65
plana at Solas) RLY. Rangers 2, Chicago and Scottie Upshall, playing added his second of the game ELSEWHERE
Edmonton at Ottawa, 730, Montreal 3, Columbus 2 es his first game in Philadelphia 2:20 later, and host Vancouver
a * i ‘ : 7
Rangers at NJ. 730 {25 Angee couads | since being acquired Thursday beat Colorado.
teat! an Se in the deal that sent captain Matt Cooke matched a
Calgary at Colorado, 9 Peter Forsberg to Nashville, career high with a goal and
Vane.-at:Ananetm 10 scored for the Flyers. They two assists, and Daniel Sedin knee injury.
6.B | | TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007

Associated Press

MANHATTAN, Kan. —
Freshman reserve Sherron
Collins scored 20 points and
led a key second-half run, and
No. 6 Kansas beat Kansas State
71-62 Monday night to extend
its winning streak in Manhat-
tan to 24 games.

Mario Chalmers added 17
points, Darrell Arthur had 13
points and 12 rebounds, and
Brandon Rush finished with 11
points for Kansas (24-4, ll-2
Big 12), which has never lost in
Bramlage Coliseum ‘since it
opened for the 1988-89 season.
The Jayhawks’ last loss in
Manhattan was a 58-57 defeat
on Jan. 29, 1983, in Ahearn
Fieldhouse.

@ No. 10 Pittsburgh 71,
Seton Hall 68: Levance Fields
scored seven of his 15 points in
the final 24 minutes to help
short-handed Pittsburgh hold
off Seton Hall in East Ruther-
ford, NJ.

Levon Kendall had 14

Wisconsin leaps over Ohio State |

BY RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press

Get ready for another 1 vs. 2
showdown in the Big Ten —
this time on the hardwood.

Wisconsin was the new No. -

lin The Associated Press Top
25 poll on Monday and Big

Ten rival Ohio State was not

far behind at No. 2.
The Badgers (26-2, 12-1), on
top of the poll for the first time

in school history, play the |

Buckeyes (24-3, 12-1) in
Columbus on Sunday — just a
bit more than three months
after Ohio State and Michigan
played a much-hyped 1 vs. 2
football game at Ohio Stadium.

Florida’s 83-70 loss at Van-
derbilt on Saturday snapped
the Gators’ 17-game winning
streak and dropped them from
the top spot in the media poll
for the second time this sea-
son.

Wisconsin, which was No. 3
last week, leapfrogged second-
ranked Ohio State to become
the fourth No. 1 team this sea-
son, and 52nd different school
to hold the top spot in the his-
tory of the AP poll.

For the Badgers and coach
Bo Ryan, there’s not much
time to celebrate their new
lofty status, not with a game at
Michigan State on Tuesday.

So Ryan held his own 60-
second celebration at home,
with a big foam “We’re No. I”
finger he took from his kids, a
party favor and a handful of
paper torn into confetti.

“J ran around with the foam
finger, blowing the horn and
throwing the confetti for
about a minute,” Ryan said

WOMEN’S TOP 25 POLL

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

COLLEGE BASKETBA

MONDAY’S GAMES

Freshman leads
No. 6 Kansas

points and eight rebounds and
Sam Young added 1 points for
the Panthers (24-4, 11-2 Big
East).

The victory was the 100th
for Pittsburgh coach Jamie
Dixon (100-26), who reached
the milestone faster than any
other coach in the school’s his-
tory.

e No. 15 Butler 68, Wis.-
Green Bay 58: A.J. Graves
scored 20 points and Brandon
Crone added 17 for the visiting
Bulldogs (25-4, 12-2 Horizon
League).

e No. 16 Marquette 80,
Villanova 67: In Milwaukee,
freshman Lazar Hayward
scored a career-high 18 points
to lead Marquette.

WOMEN’S GAME

e No. 2 Tennessee 56,
No. 7 LSU 51: In Baton Rouge,
La., Candace Parker had 27
points and 13 rebounds to help
the Volunteers hold off Louisi-
ana State.





BILL KOSTROUN/AP

A SLAPDASH PLAY: Seton Hall’s Paul Gause, right, slaps the
ball away from Pittsburgh’s Ronald Ramon during first-
half action on Monday night in East Rutherford, N.J. The
10th-ranked Panthers edged the host Pirates 71-68.



MEN’S TOP 25 POLL

with a laugh. “Then I went
back into my office and
watched the DVD of a very
good Iowa team losing by 30
to Michigan State.”

The Badgers received 35
first-place votes and 1,747
points. Ohio State got 31 first-
place votes and 1,728 points.
No. 3 Florida received four
first-place votes and No. 4
UCLA got two.

“I’m really happy for the

‘players and the university,”
--Ryan’said. “It says something
syabout:the work that’s been put

in, not just this year but over
the years. That’s the reward.

“It does make a great state-
ment for the program.”

For the Big Ten, it’s the sec-
ond time the league best
known for its football has had
the top two teams in the AP
basketball poll. Michigan was
No. 1 and Indiana No. 2 on
Nov. 30, 1992.

The last time the same con-
ference had Nos. 1 and 2 was
last season, when the Big East
had Connecticut at No. 1 and
Villanova No. 2 in the second-
to-last poll.

The last 1 vs. 2 game was
also last season. No. 1 Duke
defeated No. 2 Texas 97-66 at
the Meadowlands in New Jer-
sey on Dec. 10, 2005.

The Blue Devils returned to
the rankings at No. 18 after a
one-week absence. A four-
game losing streak ended an
ll-year run in the Top 25 for
Duke. The Blue Devils were
ranked in 200 straight polls,
the second-longest streak
ever.

But last week Duke beat

Boston College on the road
and Georgia Tech at home and
the voters rewarded the Blue
Devils.

The bottom of the rankings
received a major shake-up as
teams ranked 18-25 last week
went 3-13.

Vanderbilt, Texas, Louis-
ville, BYU and Virginia also
moved into the Top 25. For
Louisville, which beat two
ranked teams — Pittsburgh
and Marquette — on the road,
and BYU, it’s the first time this
season they’ve been ranked.
The Cougars haven't been in
the Top 25 since March 1993.

Dropping out were Okla-
homa State, Kentucky, Boston
College, Indiana and Southern
California.

Duke’s Atlantic Coast Con-
ference rival and Tobacco
Road neighbor, North Caro-
lina, slipped a spot to No. 5
after a 1-1 week. Kansas
jumped three spots to No. 6.

Memphis, Texas A&M,
Washington State and Pitts-
burgh rounded out the top 10.

The Badgers and Buckeyes
will not only be playing for the
No. 1 ranking Sunday, but also
for the inside track to a Big
Ten regular-season title.

Alando Tucker, who has
seven consecutive 20-point
games and is a leading candi-
date for national player of the
year, and the Badgers defeated
Ohio State 72-69 last month in
Madison.

“If there is a player who
was ever responsible for his
team being ranked No. 1, it’s
Alando Tucker,” Ryan said. “If
there is an MVP, it’s him.”

The Badgers started the
season ranked ninth, dipped to
12th and have been on the rise
ever since. An experienced
team that starts three seniors
and two juniors, Wisconsin
has already set a school record
for victories in a season.

“It’s not a bunch of McDon-
ald’s All-Americans and five-
star recruits,” Ryan said. “It’s a
bunch of guys, who paid their
dues.”

The:Buckeyes have been in
the top 10 all season thanks to
one ofthe best. freshmen
classes inthe country.

Seven-footer Greg Oden
leads the team in scoring (15.5)
and rebounding (9.5) and is
shooting 61 percent from the
field with 71 blocked shots in
20 games. Fellow freshmen
Mike Conley Jr. (10.1) and Dae-
quan Cook (11.9) combine to
average 22 points per game.

No. ll Nevada leads the sec-
ond 10 in the Top 25, followed
by Georgetown and No. 13
Southern Illinois, which has its

‘highest ranking ever. The

Salukis reached No. 15 in
March 2004.

Air Force is 14th and Butler,
which lost to Southern Illinois
on Saturday; dropped two
spots to No. 15.

No. 16 Marquette has lost
three straight games and
slipped four spots.

No. 17 Vanderbilt, Duke,
Texas and Louisville round
out the top 20.

BYU, West Virginia, Ore-
gon, which fell eight spots to
No. 23 after losing twice last
week, Virginia and Alabama
are the final five.

‘Tennessee moves up to the No. 2 slot

BY CHUCK SCHOFFNER
For The Associated Press

No. 1 Duke has some new
company at the top of the AP
women’s basketball poll.

Tennessee moved into the
No. 2 spot to replace North
Carolina, which was upset by
North Carolina State last
week. The Tar Heels, who had
been second all season,
slipped to fourth, while Con-
necticut climbed two spots to
third.

Ohio State dropped from
fourth to fifth after a home
loss to Michigan State on Sun-
day ended its 17-game winning
streak. In the only other
change among the top 10, No. 8
Stanford traded places with
No. 9 George Washington.

Wisconsin-Green Bay was
the lone newcomer, returning
at No. 24 after a one-week
absence. California dropped
out.

Duke (28-0) led the poll for
the sixth consecutive week
and was a unanimous pick for
the second straight week,

receiving all 50 first-place
votes from a national media
panel.

The Blue Devils beat Bos-
ton College and No. 6 Mary-
land — their second victory of
the season over the defending
national champs — to remain
the nation’s only unbeaten
team and clinch the Atlantic
Coast Conference regular-sea-
son championship.

Duke has one’more chal-
lenging game to finish the reg-
ular season, at home Sunday
against North Carolina. The
Blue Devils beat the Tar Heels
64-53 in Chapel Hill:‘on Feb. 8.

Tennessee (24-2) took a
seven-game winning streak
into Monday night’s visit to
No. 7 LSU. The Lady Vols’
losses were to North Carolina
and Duke.

Connecticut (24-2) has won
10 straight since-a Jan. 15 loss
at North Carolina and has
clinched at least a tie for the
Big East regular-season cham-
pionship. Once a constant con-
tender for No. 1, the Huskies’

No. 3 ranking ‘iis their highest
since they were third the week
of March 8, 2004.

North Carolina (26-2)
started the week. with a victory
at Florida State, then lost to
North Carolina State 72-65 in
the first game on the newly
dedicated “Kay Yow Court” in
Reynolds Coliseum, named in
honor of the Wolfpack’s Hall
of Fame coach.

The Tar Heels bounced
back to rout Miami 93-70 on
Sunday. They play at Wake
Forest on Thursday before
heading up the road to meet
Duke.

Ohio State (24-2) routed
Wisconsin before falling to
Michigan State, its first loss in
31 games against Big Ten
opponents.

Maryland remained sixth
and LSU held at No. 7. Stan-
ford, George Washington and
Arizona State completed the
top 10.

No. 11 Georgia and No. 12
Vanderbilt stayed the same,
while the next three teams all

moved up one spot — Okla-
homa, Baylor and Purdue.
Texas A&M, upset at Iowa
State last week, slipped three
places to 16th and was fol-
lowed by Middle Tennessee,
Bowling Green, Marquette and
Michigan State.

Rutgers, James Madison,
Louisville, Wisconsin-Green
Bay and Nebraska held the
final five places.

Wisconsin-Green Bay had
been ranked for two weeks,
then dropped out a week ago
even though it didn’t lose. The
Phoenix (21-3) have won 18 in
a row.

California (20-7), which
had been 22nd, split on a road
trip, losing to Oregon 62-42
and beating Oregon State 67-61
in two overtimes. The Bears
had been ranked all season,
climbing as high as 15th in
mid-December.

Michigan State made the
biggest jump in the poll, clim-
bing from 24th to 20th.
Nebraska had the biggest
drop, falling six places to 25th.

LL











FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

Young
assistant
coach is
on the
rise

* SHOWCASE

“I think he’s done remark-
ably well, and I am quite
proud of him,” said Rick
Pitino, who recently visited
with his son when Louisville
played at Pitt. “Some of the
teams they beat, with all
their players sitting out, I
couldn’t believe that.”

Duquesne’s turnaround
may accelerate Pitino’s
already fast-moving career,
one he hopes will someday
find him running his own
major college program. It is
a job he plans to earn not by
his last name, but how he
performs on his own.

“If you look ahead, you’re
not doing your job here,” he
said. “But I definitely want
to be a head coach, and I
think I will be, but I don’t
know when.” +

Still, Pitino said there is
much more to learn before
that day arrives.

He is only now learning
how to recruit — an impor-
tant aspect of the game. He
didn’t see much of that
growing up with his father
coaching Kentucky and the
Boston Celtics.

He is also learning how to
deal with players whose per-
formances may be affected
by simple matters such as
girlfriend problems and
classroom worries.

Pitino may be a famous
name in the sport, but Rich-
ard has not leaned on his
father to help him get jobs.
His first,'as an assistant
under .Mike Hart at St.
Andrew’s School in Barring-
ton, R.I., came when he was
a freshman at Providence —
only a year after he ended
his own high school career.

As a junior and senior at
Providence, he broke down
film, compiled statistics and
helped with practice under
Providence coach Tim
Welsh, essentially perform-
ing a graduate assistant’s job
as an undergraduate.

“J jumped on that right
away because it sped up the
process,” said Pitino, who



KEITH SRAKOCIC/AP

STAYING FOCUSED:
Duquesne assistant
coach Richard Pitino
says: ‘If you look ahead
[for a head-coaching
position], you’re not
doing your job here.’

has always wanted to coach
but was never pushed to do
so by his father.

That led to his first post-
college job as an administra-
tive assistant at the College
of Charleston. He got his
first full-time job at North-
eastern under Everhart in
October, 2005. He accompa-
nied Everhart to Duquesne
six months later.

Not that any of this was a
surprise to his father, who in
2001 asked a then-18-year-
old Richard to accompany
him to Louisville when he
negotiated taking the job
there.

“All four years of his col-
lege life, he gave up socializ- _
ing to work for nothing,”
Rick Pitino said. “He did it a
lot differently than the rest
of us. We had a social life in
college, he didn’t. He has a
very strong work ethic anda
lot of humility.”

Everhart saw the same
traits in Pitino: a hardwork-
ing young man trying to
make his own way in the
sport, rather than latching
onto the job he probably
could have had on his
father’s staff.

“It doesn’t matter that his
last name is Pitino,” Ever-
hart said. “It could be Smith
or Jones and he’d still be a
great coach.”

Despite maintaining his
career independence, Rich-
ard Pitino talks with his
father at least once a day and
often more. The main topic
of discussion, besides fam-
ily, is obvious.

“We talk basketball — it’s
what we love,” Pitino said.
“What else are we going to
talk about? It’s natural. I’m
very influenced by him. I
truly believe he’s one of best
coaches out there, and I’m
not ashamed to tell anyone
about it. I think the guy’s a
Hall of Famer, and I love
him. I’m proud to be his
son.”





FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

Clutch putts, a big
chip and key pars

* FERGUSON

to the left on both tee shots,
they were not too far from
where he was aiming, and
both times he had ample
opportunity to get to the
green. His 8-iron from 204
yards in regulation came up
short. In the playoff, he was
on the opposite side of the
green, and nearly holed a
putt from 60 feet.

“I had control of the tour-
nament,” Mickelson said. “I
just needed to par the last
hole. If I birdied 16 and make
that 4-footer, I’m probably
going to do it. If I don’t miss
that par putt on 13, a good
chance J do it. So I’ll look
back and say there were a lot
of opportunities that I let
slide.

“But on the good note, it’s
better to get those out of the
way early.”

Howell couldn’t wait
another day.

He was labeled a future
star when he won the NCAA
title at Oklahoma State in
2000, captured his first PGA
Tour event two years later
at Kingsmill and made the
Presidents Cup team the fol-
lowing year.

But something always
kept him from winning.
There were nine runner-up
finishes since his only tro-
phy, including two of them
this year. His poor chip on
the 18th hole in Honolulu
cost him a chance, and he
was beaten by Woods down

the coast at Torrey Pines
three weeks ago.

Howell was reminded of
his shortcomings at every
turn in the playoff, but he
erased those memories by
making the clutch putts, the
big chip and the key pars.

When he tapped in the
3-footer to win, he closed his
eyes and tilted his head to
the skies, hugging caddie
Jimmie Johnson. His voice
cracked when asked to go
over his emotions, and when
he mentioned the support he
got from his father, along
with swing coach David.
Leadbetter and his staff.

“They never thought any-
thing I was doing wasn’t
eventually going to pay off,”
Howell said. “It was never a
point where we thought,
‘This is no good, you've lost
it,’ or anything like that. This
game can beat you up pretty
good, and you see a lot of
guys who never recover. I’ve
got great people around me
to help get me out of that.”

Now he back book a trip
home to Augusta, Ga.

Howell’s first goal at the
start of the year was to get
into the top 50 in the world
ranking by the end of March
to qualify for the Masters.
Having ended last year at
No. 82, his victory moved
him up to No. 16, essentially
securing a tee time at his
favorite course.

He also hoisted another
trophy, which was more
important.

1 LEYS PE IM TI TT OS Ns NA LE ON LEN SAN TN ES TT NS ON I

he
THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com

retnneemeutnareanretets topes

BASEBALL

GOLD GLOVE TEAM

___INTERNATIONAL EDITION _

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007 | '7B.





Fans will get to pick all-time defensive squad

BY R.B. FALLSTROM
Associated Press

ST. LOUIS — Brooks Robinson
has made just one concession to age.
At the Orioles’ fantasy camps these
days, he plays first base so he doesn’t
have to bounce any throws across the
diamond.

During his playing days, the
Human Vacuum Cleaner captured 16
consecutive American League Gold
Glove awards from 1960-75. His 16 is
tied for the most Gold Gloves with
pitchers Jim Kaat and Greg Maddux
since the Rawlings-sponsored award
debuted 50 years ago.

Is Robinson the best third base- .

man ever? Now fans will decide by
voting on the all-time Gold Glove
team. ;

The ballot will be unveiled at
Times Square in New York this
morning. Three members of the orig-
inal Gold Glove team — Willie Mays,
Frank Malzone and Minnie Minoso

— are scheduled to attend and cast ©

the first votes.
St. Louis Cardinals manager Tony
La Russa was among the dozens of



JULIE JACOBSON/AP

GLOVE MAN: Yankees shortstop
Derek Jeter has won three Gold
Gloves so far during his career.

baseball luminaries, including Sparky
Anderson, Dusty Baker, Tommy
Lasorda, Bob Costas and Hall of
Fame broadcasters Vin Scully and

BASEBALL NOTEBOOK

Cubs’ Zambrano
expects to avoid
arbitration today



Ernie Harwell, who chose the 50
players most worthy of consideration
as the best at their position.

“Nowadays defense is not as glam-
orous as walk-off home runs or big
strikeouts,” La Russa said. “But I
think the most consistent way to
have a chance to win is to pitch and
defend.”

Robinson, 70, said it’s about time
that defense gets the spotlight.

“It’s great to see defense get a little
bit of attention because too often it
gets overlooked,” Robinson said. “I
negotiated 23 one-year contracts, and
not once do I remember the general
manager taking note of any of the
plays I made or factoring that in at
all.”

From more than 250 players who
have won a Gold Glove, the panel
identified 18 outfielders, six players
at each infield position, five catchers
and three pitchers.

Hall of Fame shortstop Ozzie
Smith, who captured 13 Gold Gloves,
is on the ballot, along with Yankees
star Derek Jeter, who has won three
so far. Hall of Fame catcher Johnny

INSIDE THE GAME | NEW YORK YANKEES ~~ >

_ Bench captured 10 Gold Gloves; cur-

rent star Ivan Rodriguez of the
Tigers has 12.

Hall of Fame outfielders like Mays
and Roberto Clemente, who won 12

Gold Gloves in a 13-year period, will -

be challenged by active players Ken
Griffey Jr., Torii Hunter and Jim
Edmonds. Griffey had a clean sweep
in the 90s, getting all 10 of his Gold
Gloves in that decade.

“There’s nothing better than a
good baseball debate,” Smith said.

Kaat, who won 16 consecutive
Gold Gloves from 1962-77, believes
his reputation was enhanced when he

returned to the mound three days.

after getting teeth knocked out by a
comebacker and cleanly fielded
another hard shot right back at him.

Maddux, who won 13 of his in suc-
cession from 1990-2002, joked he
keeps them in his “dig-me room” at
his home.

“There are a lot of guys that are
good fielding pitchers so it’s nice to
win,” Maddux said. “I do work on my
fielding. I’ work on it this month and
I'll work on it during the season, too.”

At third base, Robinson has com-
petition from Mike Schmidt (10) and
Scott Rolen, who already has seven.

“I’ve talked to La Russa and Jim
Fregosi, who managed him in Phila-

-delphia;,-afid this guy is the real deal,”

Robinson said of Rolen. “He can do
everything.”

One obvious omission is Barry
Bonds, who has eight Gold Gloves.
But his defense declined precipi-
tously around.the time he started his
run at the home run record.

Rawlings president and CEO Rob-
ert Parish said a 50th anniversary
team has been in the works since he
joined the company 3'/ years ago.

Fans can vote online at www.Raw
lingsGoldGlove.com, as well as at
thousands of sporting goods retailers,
by mobile device and text messaging,
or by mail through June 19.

The company also will begin
awarding Gold Gloves to college,
high school and even youth league
players this year.

“Defense is a really important
aspect of the game,” Parish said. “It’s
time it gets the attention it deserves.”



From Miami Herald Wire Services
MESA, Ariz. — Chicago
Cubs starting pitcher Carlos
Zambrano said he expects
to sign a
one-year
contract
before

scheduled

arbitration

ee pets | hearing.

oe “I think
Es it’s 85 to 90

PSs percent that

ZAMBRANO. .. .



i. 2... to. arbitra-
tion,” ‘Zambrano said .on,
Monday. ‘

Zambrano caused a stir
last week when he told
WGN-TV he would leave as
a free agent if he did not have
a multiyear contract by
Opening Day, but backed off
that request.

He earned $6.5 million last
season when he was 16-7
with a 3.41 ERA and 210
strikeouts, then asked for
$15.5 million in arbitration.
The Cubs countered at
$11,025,000,’ which is more
than any player has been
awarded.

Zambrano has said he is

seeking a salary similar to
that of Barry Zito, who
signed a seven-year, $126
million contract with San
Francisco. A multiyear deal
with the Cubs would likely
be in the five-year range, but
Zambrano said that “can
wait.”
“I have six more weeks to
think about it,” Zambrano
said. “They have six more
weeks, also.”

The last Cubs player to go
to arbitration was Mark
Grace in 1993, when the gen-
eral. manager was Larry
Himes, and neither side
wants that streak to end.

e Elsewhere: Right-
hander Kerry Wood threw
25 pitches off the mound in
Mesa, Ariz., and will likely
get in two or three more ses-
sions before facing hitters.
Wood is a few days behind
schedule because he slipped
and landed on his. stomach
and chest while getting out
of a hot tub at home last
week,

AROUND THE MAJORS

e Yankees: Bernie Wil-
liams was nowhere to be

seen in Tampa, Fla., and Yan- .

kees general manager Brian
‘Cashman doesn’t think that
will change.

“It appears he made his
decision. That’s all I can take
from it,” Cashman said. “I’m
assuming at this stage that
he’s not coming.”

Yankees position players
took physicals Monday, a day
ahead of their first workout.
Manager Joe Torre, fighting
a cold, went home before the
end of Monday’s workout
and didn’t speak with report-

today’s.

we don’t go»...
.Manny Ramirez mystery
«surfaced... Monday.. when

ers. Torre had planned to call
Williams again Sunday, and
Cashman said he didn’t hear
that a conversation took
place. :

Catcher Jorge Posada
has called Williams several
times — he placed another
call Sunday — but hasn’t
reached Williams.

Torre said Sunday that
Williams was hurt the Yan-
kees didn’t offer him a guar-
anteed spot on their regular-
season roster.

e Red Sox: The latest

teammate Julian Tavarez
said his close friend would
arrive late at spring training
in Fort Myers, Fla., and Bos-

ton manager Terry Fran- |

cona said that may not be
true. 2

Tavarez said the left
fielder would report March ],
as he did last year when he
received permission from the
Red Sox to show up late. The
first workout of spring train-
ing for position players is set
for Thursday. The official
reporting date under the col-
lective bargaining agreement
is Feb. 27.

e Blue Jays: The club
and manager John Gibbons
have agreed to a one-year,

$650;000 contract extension, .

a team official said.

Gibbons led the Blue Jays
to an 87-75 record and a sec-
ond-place finish in the Amer-
ican League East last season
— the first time they finished
higher than third since win-
ning the World Series in
1993,

The team official spoke on
condition of anonymity
because the deal hasn’t been
announced yet. Gibbons will
make $500,000 this year, one
of the lowest salaries for a

‘manager in the majors. The

extension covers the 2008
season.

e@ Rangers: Closer Eric
Gagne threw off a mound
for the first time at spring
training in Surprise, Ariz.,
completing a 37-pitch session
with no complications.
Gagne, who had as many sur-
geries (two) as relief appear-
ances last season, said he will
do some light throwing today
before returning to the
mound Wednesday or
Thursday.

e Padres; |. Khalil
Greene’s left middle finger
is still sore, six months after
he injured it. The shortstop
insists it’s not an issue.

Greene checked into camp in ©

Peoria, Ariz., two days ahead
of the reporting date for
position players,

e Mets: Veteran catcher
Sandy Alomar Jr. agreed to
a minor-league contract with
the club. The 40-year-old is
expected to report today to
spring training in Port St.
Lucie, Fla.





MARK J. TERRILL/AP

OH, HOW TIMES HAVE CHANGED: Alex Rodriguez, left, said of his relationship with Yankees teammate Derek Jeter, right:
‘People start assuming that things are a lot worse than what they are, which they’re not. But they’re obviously not
as great as they used to be. We were like blood brothers,’ said Rodriguez... . ‘| just want to let the truth be known.’

A-Rod and Jeter growing apart?

BY RONALD BLUM
Associated Press

TAMPA, Fla. -- Yes, it’s
true, admitted Alex Rodriguez,
his relationship with Derek
Jeter is not what it once was.

Surrounded by reporters
and cameras as he sat in the
first-base dugout Monday at
Legends Field, A-Rod played
true confessions, acknowledg-
ing they no longer have sleep-
overs and don’t go out
together all the time anymore.

“People start assuming that

‘things are a lot worse than

what they are, which they’re
not. But, they’re obviously not
as great as they used to be. We
were like blood brothers,”
Rodriguez said. “You don’t
have to go to dinner with a guy
four, five times a week to do
what you're duing. It’s actually
much better than all you guys
expect, but I just want to let
the truth be known.”

On the first day of his

- fourth season with the Yan-

kees, he did three rounds of
interviews ~- English-lan-
guage television, Spanish-lan-
guage television and print
reporters. He talked about his
poor postseason (“I stunk”),
his pride at being the highest-
paid player in U.S. team sports
(“It’s pretty cool’) and his
refusal to rule out exercising
the opt-out provision in his
contract after this season (“I
understand my options”).

RUNNING SOAP OPERA

A-Rod and Jeter were bud-
dy-buddy back in the 1990s,

when Rodriguez was a young:

star shortstop in Seattle and
Jeter emerged as a force that
helped the New York Yankees
capture four World Series
titles in five years. But A-Rod
dissed Jeter in a 2001 Esquire

article, saying “Jeter’s been
blessed with great talent
around him” and “he’s never
had to lead.”

“You go into New York,
you wanna stop Bernie [Wil-
liams] and [Paul] O’Neill,”
A-Rod was quoted as saying.
“You never say, ‘Don’t let
Derek beat you.’ He’s never
your concern.”

Since Rodriguez was
acquired by the Yankees in
2004, their relationship has
been analyzed and dissected, a
soap-opera sidebar to New
York’s repeated postseason
failures,

Until now, A-Rod had
denied their relationship had
changed. Sitting in jeans and a
black sweat jacket, Rodriguez
said it was “important” that
people heard the truth directly
from him.

RELATIONSHIP CHANGES

“Let’s make a contract,”
Rodriguez said after the first
Jeter question. “You don’t ask
me about Derek anymore, and
I promise I’ll stop lying to all
you guys.” ;

“The reality is there’s been
a change in the relationship
over 14 years and, hopefully,
we can just put it behind us,”
he went on. “You go from
sleeping over at somebody’s

‘house five days a week, and

now you don’t sleep over. It’s
just not that big of a deal.”
Jeter had left the clubhouse
by the time reporters were
allowed back in. His agent,
Casey Close, said later that
Jeter didn’t want to comment.
Most of the Yankees have
long concluded the relation-
ship between their captain and
Rodriguez is a non-issue.
“They’re probably not as
tight as they used to be, but it’s

not a situation’ where they
don’t look at each other and
don’t say, ‘Hi.’ They’re team-
mates and they’re still
friends,” Jason Giambi said.
“I suspect it’s nowhere near
as bad as the general percep-
tion is,” general manager Brian

_ Cashman added.

During the offseason, for-
mer Yankee -Darryl Straw-
berry said Jeter needs to
“embrace” Rodriguez, A-Rod
said he didn’t feel Jeter needed
to support him more.

ON THE SAME PAGE?

“Y’m a big boy. I’m 31 years
old now, so I should be able to
help myself out there,” he said.
“I care about what he thinks
about me on the field. I think
it’s important for us to be on
the right page. And we are.
We're here to win a champion-
ship together.”

While Rodriguez captured
the American League MVP
award for the second time in
2005, he was booed. for
stretches at Yankee Stadium
last season, when he made 24
errors, Some thought that if
Jeter spoke out on A-Rod’s
behalf, fans would go easier on
him. “Derek can’t stop the fans
from booing. They boo all of
us,” catcher Jorge Posada said.

And then came another
abysmal postseason for Rodri-
guez. He’s 4-for-41 (.098) with-
out an RBI in his past 12 play-
off games dating to 2004. He
got just one hit in last year’s
playoff loss to Detroit.

“T stunk, And when you
stink, sometimes, you have to
call it,” he said. “I went l-for-14
last year with an error and
that’s pretty lousy.”

As the Yankees were elimi-
nated in Game 4, he was
dropped to eighth in the bat-

ting order for the first time in
a decade. “It was very disap-
pointing,” he said. “Yes, I was
embarrassed.”

Rodriguez is entering the
seventh season of his 10-year,
$252 million contract, a deal he
signed with the Texas Rang-
ers. He can terminate the
agreement after the season,
forfeit the $72 million owed in
the final three years and
become a free agent. He also

could pressure New York for —

an extension. .

WILL A-ROD STAY?

He said he wants to remain
a Yankee, but wouldn’t prom-
ise that he will. Like closer
Mariano Rivera, he is thinking
ahead to the new ballpark
scheduled to open in 2009.

“My goal is to go in with
Derek and Mo and open the
new stadium. I’m saying it
pretty clear, fellas,” he said.

Steve Swindal, the Yankees’
general partner, saw it the
same way.

“I would love to see him
end his career here. He’s great.
He’s the real deal,” was his
reaction.

Rodriguez knows his con-
tract has made him a target,
adding to his burden. Still, he
doesn’t mind.

“I love being the highest-
paid player in the game. It’s
pretty cool. I like making that
money. You get crushed, but
you know what? It’s pretty
cool. I enjoy it,” he said. “I was
poor and broke when I grew
up. I didn’t have that type of
money to help out children.
Now I get a chance to help out
children. Whatever you say is
important. People listen to
you. That’s pretty cool.
Nobody used to listen to me
before.”

FEA SAE DE cE ES LY I TN a

sean

sa




THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007, PAGE 7



Armed 2
robber shot |
and killed |
by police |

FREEPORT - An armed
robbery suspect was shot and
killed by police after report-
edly robbing an establish-
ment and attacking officers
with a cutlass.

The incident took place
over the weekend in the
Yoeman’s Woods area.

The identity of the
deceased man, who is
believed to be 30-years-old,

has not yet been released by

police.

Superintendent Basil Rah-
ming said the incident
occurred sometime around
12.55pm on Saturday when
a man armed with a cutlass
robbed the convenient store
at Cora’s Place Shopping
Plaza on Sergeant Major
Road.

An employee of the store
telephoned police and
reported that the suspect had
taken the cash register and
was walking north on
Sergeant Major Road.

Mr Rahming said several
police units were dispatched
to the scene to investigate.

When the first unit arrived,
the officer said he spotted a
man dressed in blue jeans, a
multi-coloured jacket and a

_ camouflage cap. The man

was also wearing black
gloves on his hands and
armed with a cutlass, they
reported.

The officer, who was dri-
ving a Scene of Crime van,
pulled up alongside the man
and ordered him to drop the
weapon. _

He reported that the sus-
pect broke out driver’s win-
dow with the cutlass and also
shattered the passenger-side
window.

Fearing for his life, the
officer drove off in the van.
Shortly afterwards, two oth-
er police units arrived.

The officers confronted
the suspect, who allegedly
charged one officer with the
cutlass.

Mr Rahming said the offi-
cer ran to avoid being
chopped, but lost his balance
and fell to the ground.

He said the suspect was
about to attack the officer
when two other officers shot
him in the torso.

Paramedics were sum-
moned to the scene, where
they examined the suspect
and pronounced him dead.

Mr Rahming reported that
a significant amount of mon-
ey believed to be the prop-
erty of Cora’s Convenience

- Store was retrieved from the

man’s pocket.
Investigations are continu-
ing into the matter.

New York
could get
first Haitian

counciilor

@ NEW YORK

THE City Council could
make history Tuesday by
gaining its first Pakistani or
Haitian member, according
to Associated Press.

But a former UN ambas-
sador for St Vincent ‘and the
Grenadines also.is among the
10 hopefuls for the Brook-
lyn seat, some of whom trace
their heritage to Panama,
Costa Rica and Jamaica.

More than one-third of
New York City residents are
foreign-born.

The council seat represents
an area with a large immi-
grant population, especially
from the Caribbean.

The candidates would like

. to succeed Democrat Yvette

Clarke, who in turn succeed-
ed her mother, Una Clarke,
who was the first Caribbean-
born council member.

Among the competitors to
join the 51-member council is
Joel Toney, who served as
United Nations ambassador
for his home nation, St Vin-
cent and the Grenadines, an
island chain of about 118,000
people.

Physician Mathieu Eugene

would be the council’s first

Haitian member if elected.
And Mohammad Razvi
would be the first Pakistani
member. He is executive
director at the Council of
Peoples Organizations, a
nonprofit he founded to
advocate for South Asians.
One of his strengths, he
said, is working with the dis-
trict’s multitude of cultures.

PM: I wish I’'d done more
during my time in office

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

PRIME Minister Perry
Christie said that his one major
disappointment has been that
he was unable to achieve more
during his term in office.

Reflecting on his past five
years as leader of country, Mr
Christie said that although he
is immensely pleased with the
unprecedented level of invest-
ment his government was able
to attract to the country, he
wishes his vision for the
Bahamas could have been ful-
filled more expediently.

“I’m disappointed in the
slowness of the realisation of
the PLP’s vision for the country.
The major disappointment |
have is that I could have done
more,” he told talk show host
Sean McWeeny on GEMS
“Tell it like it is” over the week-
end.

However, Mr Christie point-
ed out that there is only so
much one person can do in a
day and that some things take
time.

“T wanted to have a new
straw market two years ago, we
now signed the contract (on Fri-

Christie touts investment in country but admits
disappointment in ‘realisation of the PLP’s vision’



day). I wanted to have the Roy-
al Oasis opened a year ago, six
months ago, and we’re just now
moving towards a final resolu-
tion of that. Things have to take
time and sometimes in the lives
of politicians, the time is judged
by five years,” he said.

Echoing recent comments by
Normon Solomon and citing
Chinese philosophy, the prime
minister said. that statesmen
“must not look at the execution
of their work in a five year peri-
od, they must look at it for a
generation.”

During the current political
season, Mr Christie said, the
PLP government is coming to
the people on the basis of their
record — a record which he said
shows achievements that have
touched all islands and every
Bahamian positively.

The PLP’s single greatest
achievement, Mr Christie said,
was bringing over $18 billion of

Haitian carnival
anthems target
UN peacekeepers

@ HAITI
Port-au-Prince

SONGS lampooning politi-
cians have always been a fix-
ture of Haiti’s carnival, but this
year, musicians have a new
favorite target: UN peacekeep-
ers, according to Associated
Press.

The airwaves have been filled
with satirical songs about the
UN force, known by its French
acronym MINUSTAH, which
has been trying to restore order
to Haiti since the 2004 rebel-
lion that toppled President
Jean-Bertrand Aristide.

“MINUSTAH, you're really
just a tourista. You’re holding
back my country,” the group
Vwadezil sings in one popular
song. “You're just lounging
around so why don’t you get ...
out.”

The songs, known as
“meringues,” add a political
dimension to the three-day car-
nival celebrations. The rum-

fueled festivities bring even:

more chaos to the bustling
streets of downtown Port-au-
Prince, with tens of thousands
of people dancing to live bands
on floats.

Haiti’s government spent $2

million on this year’s carnival,

hoping to lure tourists, espe-
cially Haitians living in the Unit-
ed States.

The former French colony,
plagued since independence
with political upheaval and dire

poverty, has a long history of |

skewering public institutions
during carnival.
UN troops are only the lat-

i. est addition to a rhetorical

menu that typically includes
crooked government officials,
outgunned police and kidnap-
pers who prey on the popula-
tion of eight million.

The peacekeepers have
recently become more aggres-
sive in battling the gangs
blamed for rampant kidnap-
pings. On Sunday, they cap-
tured a gang leader known as
Ti Bazil in the Cite Soleil slum.

But many Haitians feel that
the force, which combines sol-
diers and police from more than
a dozen countries, has been too
slow in stemming violence.

“MINUSTAH, you’ve invad-
ed our country, you must make
things better,” the popular
group T-Vice warns in one of
its meringues.

Other meringues accuse UN

bureaucrats of spending more:

time dining in posh restaurants
and sunning themselves on the
beach than working to solve the
poor country’s troubles.

“Since the UN is now a part
of our society, | touch upon it in
my music,” the band Vwadezil’s
lead singer, Fresh La, said in an
interview. “They’re taking a
long time to bring peace to the
country, and that’s keeping us
from moving forward.”

@ A MAN disguised with
death references sings

as he participates a
traditional Carnival parade in
Port-au-Prince yesterday.
Songs lampooning

politicians have always _

been a fixture of Haiti's
carnival, but this year,
musicians have a new

keepers.

(Photo: AP/
Ariana Cubillos)

The UN mission takes the
jabs in stride.

“T think it’s part of the Hait-
ian tradition of carnival to make
fun of things, even serious
things,” said Edmond Mulet,
the special UN representative
to Haiti. “It’s a way of convey-
ing some sentiments which are
genuine and I don’t blame for
them that. On the contrary, I
think they should be wel-
comed.”

Some singers have caused
problems for the UN, howev-
er.

At last year’s carnival, the
group Demele performed a pro-
fanity-laced song that accused
peacekeepers of stealing goats
belonging to peasants. Despite
denials by the UN mission, the
accusation spread through the
streets and became a common
chant during anti-UN street
protests.

“That song caused a lot of
issues between MINUSTAH
and the population,” said that
group’s frontman, also known
as Demele. He alleged that the
offending lyric got him uninvit-
ed from this year’s carnival line-
up.

UN officials and carnival
organizers denied censoring any
artists.

“Musicians have the right to
write any song they like,” said
Yanick Louis, a member of the
carnival’s artistic committee.

And despite the harsh tone
of some songs, other artists said
they mean no offence.

“I ridicule the UN in the spir-
it of carnival, which is about
having fun and letting go,”
Vwadezil’s Fresh La said.

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' second term, he is not compla-

ee



capital investment into the
country, “which will lay the
basis for a new Bahamas for
Bahamians.”

AS concerns the upcoming
general election, the prime min-
ister said he believes that the
outcome will depend entirely
on the disposition of the
Bahamian people.

“Tam very hopeful and opti-
mistic that they will see the
record that I speak of and they
will know the country I that I
have tried to introduce,” he
said.

Mr Christie said although he
is very confident that the PLP
will win the government for a


























cent.

The prime minister said that
“every degree of preparation
and energy will be brought to
bear” on his party’s campaign in
the coming weeks.














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THE TRIBUNE

Your look

fife

at what’s going on in your community



Cast of Pinocchio.
prepare for debut

|

THE cast of Pinocchio LIVE
is getting ready for their first
Bahamian performance next
week.

Organisers promise the show
will be full of “thrills, music,
adventure, laughter and sur-
prise, surprise, surprise.”

Coming from the touring
company of the American Fam-
ily Theatre in Philadelphia, the

experienced cast of multi-tal- :

ented performers are eager to
meet Bahamian youngsters
when Bahamas OnStage
YouTheatre presents Eiocsbio
on Monday.

Rotary donates $18, 000 |
to Scout Association |

“We have been asked repeat-
edly by persons booking if this
is a real Broadway-style show,”
said Kathy Ingraham, CEO and
producer of Bahamas OnStage
‘YouTheaitre. “I want to assure
everyone that we have part-
nered with the American Fam-
ily Theatre and we are offering
an amasing experience for the
performance. The lighting is
going to be first class, the music
will be first class, the sets, the
costumes and of course our per-
formers. The cast is profession-
ally trained i in music, dance and
acting and has worked all dver

the United States. We made
sure the sure is going to be
above and beyond public expec
tations.”

Leading the versatile cast is
Paul Pakler who takes on the
role of the title character. Hav-
ing recently appeared as Puck in
A Midsummer Night's Dream
off Broadway, he has worked
in California, Pittsburgh, and
Chicago.

His favorite roles include Ray
in Some Voices (for which he
received the OC Weekly Award
for Best Actor in 2005), White
Steve in Gompers, Skeets Miller

H RECEIVING a eau for $18, 000 a are s Leweliva Bae conn chief commissioner; Ralph



{

THE East Nassau Rotary
Club is contributing $18,000; to
the Scout Association. Some, of
those funds will help to send a
Bahamian team to the 100th
anniversary world scout jal
boree in Chelmsford, England
this summer.

Some 40,000 scouts, leaders,
and staff from more than 100
countries will meet for 12 days
on the historic 574-acre High-
lands Estate. From July 27 to
August 8 they will share adven-
ture, friendship and personal
development, while celebrating
the dawn of a new century | of
Scouting.

As this is the centennial year
of the founding of.the Scouting .
movement, the jamboree theme
will be “One world, one
promise”. Sir Robert Baden-
Powell, who founded the Scout-
ing programme, also pioneered
the first jamboree in London i in
1920.

On August 1, scouts at th
jamboree and around the world

-will take part in a special event

called Scouting's Sunrise. Both
scouts and former scouts will
gather together to renew their
promise and commemorate
what Scouting has accom-,
plished.
The day will also celebrate’
the Gifts for Peace pro-|
gramme by exhibiting reports |
and presentations on social |

projects at a local and nation- |

al level. The Gifts for Peace
Project is an effort by scouts to
strengthen family life by find-
ing solutions to social prob-
lems and providing communi-
ty service.

"The Bahamas Scout Asso-
ciation will focus oyr collective
energy On this project," a
spokesmen said. "Both our
leaders and our youth will apply
the principals of the Scout
Method — learning by doing.
Young people not only have a
role to play in addressing social
needs, they may have solutions
to some of those problems.

From March to August this
year, scouts throughout the

country will identify specific

needs in their areas, formulate

Bohomos
International
Film Festival

Forskin, president of the Rotary Club of East Nassau; John Phillpot, president of the Scout Associ-
= and Donny Tomlinson, vice president of the Bahamas Scout Association.

(Photo by Letisha Henderson)

solutions, implement action

’ plans and report on the results,

Rawson Square

Frise osha he 2008 BFF Meni ad and Osa

AVIVA EEL DEUE ATED GE EHUD INYO DPNT ADAP UNTO UP CUE COUR UN SPAN ET AMEN LELO ODE UD UN TOP LRVE SEE IUE EEE HUA IT GRIT ACUTE ( Ege

“There's limited seating available please come early or bing your personal

fad out chains





TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007, PAGE 11

@ MICHAEL Contini is playing toymaker Gepetto

in Floyd Collins, Gary in Give a »

Boy a Gun, and Dopey in Dis-
ney's Snow White: An Enchant-
ing Musical. Pakler is a graduate
of Point Park University with a
BFA in Theatre.

American Musical and Dra-
matic Academy graduate Jarvis
Manning, Jr. plays the fun-lov-

- ing troublemaker Candlwyk. No

stranger to theatre, he has
starred in a number of plays
including The Color Purple in
which he took on the role of
Harpo.

Playing toy maker Gepetto —

is Michael Contini who studied
at Shakespeare’s Globe The-

-atre. With a BFA in Musical

Theatre from Syracuse Univer-
sity, Contini has held the title
role in Macbeth and starred as
Puck in A Midsummer’s Night
Dream.

A performer s since age two,

Yvette Newsome is a native:

New Yorker who has appeared
in several films and as a voice

over for Nickelodeon. She will”
' formance will take place that _
evening. The show runs yntil »

be playing the role of the mag-
ical Blue Fairy who brings the
wooden puppet to life.



Leah Goblirsch, who will act
the part of Gina in the produc-
tion, is also a graduate of the
American Musical and Dra-

works include The Music Mar,
Joseph and the Amasing Tech-
nicolor Dreamcoat and Hello
Dolly!

t=

. matic Academy. Her theatrical |

Pinocchio debuts at the

National Centre for Perform- ‘ .

ing Arts this Monday February *
19. A one night only family per- «

Medneeay, Eevmaty 21.



_ Swimming club visits Governor General

i THE Sea:
Bees Swimming
Club held its
annual awards
ceremony at
Government
House on ,
Sunday. Deputy
to the governor
general Sir
Clement

centre, presented

the awards and
is pictured with
swimmers and.
coaches. ;

=e

(Photo: ‘

BIS/Tim Aylen) ‘4


ee ee ee ee ee Oe ae ee







TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764





FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010

business@tribunemedia.net

Miami Harald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street





Investor
develo

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

major invest-
ment project
proposed for
Grand
Bahama is
stating that the Government



has allowed it “to be the mas-: .

ter developer of the entire east
end of the island........ an area
exceeding 100 square miles”,
with a development slated to
include a 400-room hotel, casi-
no, convention centre and $28
million marina.

Beka Development LLC,
the project developer, submit-

Project for Grand Bahama proposes 400-room hotel, casino, convention




centre and $28 million marina in eastern part of island, with. Foxwoods
and Omni ined up as operating and equity partners

ted its proposal to the Gov-

ernment in December through
its wholly-owned. subsidiary,

Bahamas Golden Beach Ltd.»
. The project includes a tie-up
with Omni Hotels as the hotel’

operator, and Foxwoods
Development Company as the
casino operator.

The details were =,comtained

Rite

te

'

ina doriheat posted on the
Internet by Infinity Partners,
the company that appears to
have been contracted by Beka
Development to handle the
project’s real estate sales. The
document disappeared from
the Internet last night, likely
as a result of The Tribune’s
investigations.

Ki Eby
4
oath

The document said the Gov-

ernment “has committed a
contingent master casino
licence for the remainder of

the island” to the developers of

the eastern Grand Bahama
project.

’ In addition, the Infinity Part-
ners posting said that Beka was
seeking a Heads of Agreement

that provided it with the same
level of incentives as Kerzner
International had obtained for
its Phase III project, Baha Mar
was seeking for its $2.4 billion
Cable Beach redevelopment;

‘and Ginn Clubs & Resorts was

receiving for its $4.9 billion
West End investment.

Beka was also said to be

seeking “right to full access use
of the existing harbour”, and
an “option to purchase the

lease of the entire harbour ~

when the existing lease
expires”.
The harbour referred to is

SEE page 7B



Film Studios to require $200m terminal fees -
$70-$90m investment

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Eaitor

THE group
moving to
acquire the §
rights | to
develop the
Grand
Bahama-
based
Bahamas Film
Studios said
yesterday the
investment
required':to.
complete the project is likely to
be in the range of $80-$90 mil-
lion, as opposed to the $70 mil-
lion originally envisaged, with
the full build-out of the project
likely to take five to 10 years.

Owen Bethel, president of
the Nassau-based financial ser-

@ BETHEL

trite



Pen Sethe,

Project likely to require
five-10 year build-out,
as buying group moves

--to-close-deal and get:

government approval

vices provider, the Montaque
Group, who structured the
group that acquired the devel-
opment rights, said its “priority”
was to complete the Bahamas
Film Studios’ sound stage and
return its water tank to full
operational status.

Mr Bethel said that getting
the film components of the

SEE page 8B

being negotiated in
Sry contract talks

m By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



toe faded sy

’ "THE Government aud Van-.

VRE “Airport Services
YVRAS) are now down to the
iret details over the’ 10-year

management contract for Sir.’

Lynden Pindling International
Airport, the structure of pay-
ments and fees for construction
of the new $200 million terminal
being among the outstanding
issues. |: )

The final handover of the air-
port by the Airport Authority
to the Nassau Airport Devel-
opment Company (NADC), a

_ subsidiary of the former that

will be managed by YVRAS,
has been delayed not for polit:
i be Wh

ur in %

Wott pa

cial reasons, as some have
alleged, but because the Gov-

ernment wants to ensure it gets.

the. right deal first time, and
maximises the benefits for the
Bahamas. .

Highly-placed sources have
told The Tribune that among
the key issues still being worked
on, which has led to proposals
and counter-proposals being
passed back and forth between
YVRAS and the Government’s
negotiating team, is how much
to pay the Canadian operators
for managing construction of
the new $200 million airport ter-
minal.

SEE page 5B

jaye

"46.40%

Pegasus chief: ©
‘We're debt free’

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter



FREEPORT — Pegasus
Wireless’s president and chief
executive, Jasper Knabb, said
the wireless company is debt-
free with a value of more than
$100 million, and is trading well
on the US over-the-counter
market. j

“We are profitable, and we
are trading well, and I am very.
optimistic that our sharehold-
ers will be pleased with our
numbers. I couldn’t be happi-
er,” Mr Knabb told The Tri-
bune last week. .

Mr Knabb is planning to
open a 20,000 square foot wire-
less manufacturing facility in
Freeport on February 22. He
expects to employ about 280

persons at the plant on West
Settler’s Way.

The newly-licensed wireless
technology supplier is also

negotiating for another site that —

will allow it to construct a

400,000 square foot plant, in

addition to its current plant. -
Mr Knabb, who had initially
announced in November that
he planned to invest $25 mil-
lion on the project in Freeport,
said Pegasus is financing the
project itself without any assis-
tance from financial institutions.
“In building this facility here
(in Freeport), it’s been an entire
cash transaction. We have not
gone to the bank and borrowed
money. We have built it from
within and that is how strong

SEE page 5B















IN yesterday’s lead story
in Tribune Business, head-
lined Bahamas finally
‘open’ for e-commerce busi-
ness, it was reported that the
appointment of the Data
Protection Commissioner
would enable the Bahamas
to implement the three e-

‘commerce related Acts
passed in 2003.
This is incorrect, in that

Clarification



puter Misuse Act and the |
Electronic Communications -
and Transactions Act - were
implemented that same year, |
2003.

It is only the Data Protec- °
tion Act that has not been
implemented, due to the
wait for the Data Protection
Commissioner’s appoint-
ment.

7, ww







That Act will be imple-
mented shortly.

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ENM leader responds to

Shane Gibson resignation |

@ By BRENT DEAN
PRIME Minister Perry

- Christie was labelled “con-

fused” and “unable to lead the
country” yesterday by oppo-
sition leader Hubert Ingra-
ham.

His remarks came in
response to the resignation of
Shane Gibson, whose involve-
ment with Anna Nicole Smith
was only addressed by Mr
Christie after pressure from
the public and from within the
PLP, he said.

Mr Ingraham also refuted
allegations made against two
FNM candidates - Tommy
Turnquest and Dion Foulkes —
during a press conference yes-

- terday at FNM headquarters.

Cabinet
shuffle

PRIME Minister Perry
Christie was up to press time
deciding who would take
over the portfolio of former
Minister of Labour and
Immigration Shane Gibson.

Many speculated that the
Cabinet shuffle would not
be a significant one as the
general election is only
months away.

Mr Gibson resigned on
Sunday over the Anna
Nicole scandal, bowing to
political pressure while at
the same time vehemently
denying he had done any-
’ thing wrong.

The former prime minister
claimed that Mr Christie
finally acted only due to over-
whelming public condemna-
tion, along with serious inter-
nal dissatisfaction emerging
within the PLP.

The scandal, Mr Ingraham
added, had done much dam-
age to the reputation of the
country.

He admonished both Mr
Gibson and: Mr-Ghristie-for
not accepting responsibility
for what had transpired.

Mr Ingraham stated: “Prime
Minister Perry Christie has at
long last accepted the resig-
nation of his Minister of Immi-
gration and Labour, Shane
Gibson, after a protracted
scandal arising out of the
granting of a permanent resi-
dence permit to Anna Nicole
Smith.

“It is a scandal that has
done much damage to the
country and has been a big
embarrassment to the PLP
government.

“What is quite astonishing,
however, is the failure of both
the prime minister and Mr
Gibson to acknowledge any
wrong-doing. Instead they
attempted to put the blame
for this sordid affair on the

press and on their political -

opponents. I remind Mr
Christie that the press does

not make the news, they sim- °

ply report it.”

Mr Ingraham’s comments
placed partial responsibility
on Mr Christie for the Anna

SEE page nine

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ia Pa !

| AN | {
ae Baa Bel

The Miami Herald

The Tribune





BAHAMAS EDITION

ESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007

1



a OPPOSITION leader Hubert iigebhians speaks to the press, ania

(Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune sta)

EE a ee






















Shooting
victim is ninth
homicide
of the year

i By PAUL G
TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter ;

ties has become. the ninth
homicide victim of the year
in the Bahamas.

Police’ press officer,
Inspector Walter Evans, said
‘Maurice Horton, of Key
West Street, was shot in the
head around 6am yesterday.

Mr Evans said police had

in the Poinciana area of ©

6am. '
It was reported that Hor- ~.
ton was followed by several —
persons until he got to
Watlings Street, near the
Red Door Package store.

“Tt was at this point,” Mr -.
Evans said, “that he was
shot in the head while in the
yard of that store.”

_i Mr Horton was tracked to
“fthe southern section of the

: yard and was found in a
“lifeless state”, he said.

Mr Evans said police had
several persons assisting
them in the investigation.

“We are uncertain as to
the motives, and are right
now hoping that persons can
assist us,” he said.

e In other crime news,
operation Quiet Storm net-
ted three warrants of arrest
and 22 traffic citations. Also,
officers from the Mobile
Division issued one warrant
of arrest and 43 traffic cita-
tions over the weekend.

FNM leader hits back at PM’s ‘forces’ claim

@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter



FNM leader Hubert Ingraham said the

‘prime minister was talking “out of his

head” when he said there were forces in

the country pushing the opposittion.

leader to return to politics.

During an interview on GEM’s 105.9’s
talk show “Tell It like It Is”, Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie said Mr Ingraham
was brought out of retirement by forces
“who cannot let the Progressive Liberal
Party and the progressive forces’ con-
trol the Bahamas.

“People know who the forces are and
we are going to give faces to these forces
Tuesday night (during the PLP rally).
We're going to put faces on this fight for
the future of the country.

“Tt is not going to be an easy fight and,

‘as a result of what I have seen, I will

spare no effort to turn the streets into
what I call a basket of information,” Mr
Christie said.

However, Mr Christie stopped short of
calling Mr Ingraham a puppet.

“I have too much respect for him as a
former prime minister of the country to
call him a puppet. I know him personally,

I know he has had a hard life and I know
he has travelled hard but he has a killer
instinct that goes too far,” the prime min-
ister said.

Mr Christie said that Mr Ingraham’s .
philosophy drives him to believe that
“whatever is needful is lawful.”

However, Mr. Ingraham told reporters
yesterday that he would be delighted if
the prime minister was to identify these
forces, bécause he would not support --
them.

He said the prime minister was talk-

SEE page nine

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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





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Baha







“On pensions, our aim is a sys-
tem that provides decency for
all, which encourages and
rewards savings, and! is finan-
cially sustainable.” And: “To
provide everyone with the
opportunity to build an ade-
quate retirement income, and
be affordable, fair and simple
to understand.”

The seventh Actuarial
Report of the Bahamas’
National Insurance Fund,
which was released on Febru-
ary 2003, revealed significant
challenges ahead for the
National Insurance Fund if
major changes were not made
to its structure. This in|turn led
to the appointment of.a Social
Security Reform Commission
to study the implications‘of the
actuarial report, and make rec-
ommendations regarding the
Fund’s sustainability. The
Commission, through its chair-
man, has called for pension leg-
islation among its various rec-
ommendations.

The most recent study con-
ducted by the Central Bank
suggests that private pension
funds in the Bahamas are fast
approaching the $1 billion
mark in terms of assets. Look-
ing at this another way, the size
of these private pension funds
represents almost 20 per cent
of GDP. When you add the
value of the National Insurance
Fund, which has slightly over
$1 billion in assets, these two

- sources of long-term pension

savings now soar to 40 per cent
of GDP. What is most incredi-
ble is that while industry par-
ticipants have called on suc-

cessive governments to imple-
ment pension legislation, noth-
ing seems to have been done.

We have a great social time-
bomb in the making, growing
daily, while our policymakers
seem to lack the resolve to
address it. The reality is that
less than 25 per cent of our
workforce is covered by any
pension scheme whatsoever,
while the Social Security
Reform Commission clearly
recognises the shortfall in the
design of National Insurance
as it relates to retirement
income.

Commission

The NIB Commission states:
“The Social Security Reform
Commission recognises that the
National Insurance Retirement
pension was not designed to
provide sufficient income in old
age for all retirees. And
although many workers are
members of employer pension
plans and/or have their own
personal savings, a great num-
ber of Bahamians retire with-
out a secure income.”

The above statement is in
stark contrast to the percep-
tion of the average man on the
street; who believes the Nation-

al Insurance Fund will provide --

for their full pension needs.
How are future retirees
going to be provided for? Do
we just ignore the situation and
face the consequences later on
somebody else’s watch, or do
we plan for the inevitable?
We need to bear in mind that
our population demographics
are highly skewed. Currently,
we have about 60 per cent of
our population under the age
of 35. Given the current birth
trends among our legal popu-
lation, who are having fewer

- children and therefore fewer

long-term contributors to

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Degree in Actuarial ee, or related

field

2 or more SOA actuarial exams

(or equivalent)»

Pensions or social security experience
Proficiency in use of MS-Excel &

Word

Send resume to:
or fax to (242) 364-2470





nas must
catch up on

National Insurance, in another.
30-40 years we will have a
large, retired population trying
to survive on insufficient retire-
ment incomes. Currently, our
annual national budgets are

‘ perennially challenged. What

should we do? The answer is
certainly not ‘nothing’.

One option under consider-
ation by the Commission is the
introduction of mandatory pen-
sions, which they see working
as follows: “Through legisla-
tion, require all employers in
the Bahamas to establish a pen-

’ sion plan for employees that

provide certain basic minimum
benefits, contributions and oth-
er requirements. These contri-
butions and pension payments
will complement NIB’s pension
to meet the overall income
objective. Where an employer
already has a pension plan
whose terms are more gener-
ous than the minimum stan-
dard, the employer may choose
to continue that plan.”
Australia and Switzerland
are examples of developed
countries that have successful-
ly implemented mandatory °
pension laws, while Bermuda
and the Cayman Islands are
regional examples.
Further, Jamaica, Barbados
and Trinidad have.recently

i passed new pension legislation,.

or are in the advanced stage of
doing so.

The intention of pension leg-
islation is not only to regulate
pension funds but to encour-
age employers/employees to
work together to provide a
social safety net for the long-
term benefit of workers, while
relieving central government
of this sole burden. Progressive
governments have understood
this and are doing it.

As we are now Officially in
the ‘silly season’, I anxiously
await the distribution of the
manifestos of the major politi-
cal parties to examine their
views on this most vital sub-

"ject.

Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a
Chartered Financial Analyst,
is vice-president - pensions,

. Colonial Pensions Services

(Bahamas), a wholly-owned
subsidiary: of Colonial Group
International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance and
is a major shareholder of Secu-
rity & General Insurance Com-
pany in the Bahamas.

The views expressed are
those of the author and do not
necessarily represent those of
Colonial Group International
or any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct any questions or com-

_ ments to rlgibson@atlantic-

house.com.bs

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award,

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.
4B | MONDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2007 INTERNATIONAL EDITION =

“See
*

WALL STREET

* TAKEOVERS

exception so far this year has
been Nasdaq Stock Market’s
unwillingness to raise its offer
price for the London Stock
Market; the takeover attempt.
collapsed earlier this month.
One thing is for certain,
that U.S. companies are’ sit-
ting on record cash stockpiles
— at last count $605 billion
racked up by members of the.
Standard & Poor’s 500 index
— that can be used to: expand

WORKPLACE ._-

e

Avoid

battles

with |

* SUPERVISING:

enterprise. “He thought he

had the right answers, and I
was the wrong answer,” Guha
says. He believes the bad”
mouthing hurt his effective- .
ness. If a prior relationship...
allows a spurned contender to:

circumvent you, try to “get .
your boss’ help in making ~

sure that the employee is sent
back to you,” Spanier says. In
Guha’s case, the chairman
refused to curb his chum’s
misbehavior. : x

So, a month after he
arrived, Guha took ‘matters

into his own hands. He solic- -
ited business insights from.”

the disgruntled official over
dinner once a week.’ The man
stopped whining to the chair-
man, his ‘cooperation
improved. and the division
flourished. Their weekly or
monthly meals lasted a year.
Guha now wishes he had
inaugurated the dinners right
away.

DEFUSE THE TENSION
An immediate, frank chat .

Mergers may pass

through mergers and acquisi-
tions. “This amount of money
is looking to be deployed, that
has really made a difference
in tactics and in attitude,” said
Bob Profusek, co-head of
global M&A for law firm
Jones Day. “‘There’s this huge
amount of money that needs
to be invested.”

‘That only means good
things for investors, where
the-sky’s-the-limit offers can
‘send share prices flying high.

For example, rumors this









3

“friends. In discussing the
associate’s definition of per-
sonal success, stress that you
value his abilities but you are
the boss, recommends Barb
Bridendolph, president of
Crenshaw Associates, a New

York career-advisory bou-

tique. “Otherwise, you set.

false expectations that this
role can be shared.”
~ During her initial nine
“weeks with a Pennsylvania
’ management-consulting firm,
a senior vice president lacked
time for a heart-to-heart chat
with Paul Forti, a middle man-
ager and psychologist
rebuffed for her job. Being
ignored by the new boss exac-
erbated his pain at being
passed over, he recalls.
Forti deliberately kept his

" distance, never volunteering

“{nfofmation. When consulting

with the passed-over prospect < clients inquired about the

about his disappointment and’
career goals can also defuse

the sticky situation. Act
empathetic without, naively |
assuming you will become.

BRAZIL

executive, he curtly replied:
“She is senior to me. She is
obviously competent.” But he
told work buddies that he
doubted she was the right

* AMAZON EP OS : eries, equipment shops and

social injustice and lawless-
-ness after photographer
Sebastiao Salgado immortal-

- ized its human anthills in.

stark black and white, captur-"
ing the desperation of -the®:
nearly naked miners carrying.
huge sacks of mud from what
seemed like the depths of hell.
Years later, that area in neigh- .
boring Para state remains a
scarred wasteland, and Brazi
ian authorities fear Eldorado
do Juma will turn into soimie-
thing similar.

But Azedo, like many of the
miners, is determined to make
his fortune here now.

Azedo said’ he panned
about half a pound of gold in a
single day last week and:a
total of about 4:4 pounds,
worth about 40,000 reais :
($19,000) since ‘he arrived 17::
days ago. ashe Ne hi

Even after paying 50 per: -
cent to the man who staked
out his plot and eight percent .
more to Ze Capeta, or “Joe the

Devil,”. a local boss who.
claims to own the entire gar-
impo, Azedo stands to clear a
tidy sum.

Most are not so lucky Se
already, too many people are -

chasing too little gold.

Estimates of the number of «-

prospectors, prostitutes and
merchants in this jungle slum,
where the smell of burning
meat and timber mingles with
the pungent odor of an open
sewer, varies wildly. But there
is not enough space for all the
miners at the eight main dig-
ging sites.

RAPID DEVELOPMENT

Price gouging and malaria |“
- DOING WHAT THEY CAN: To crack down. on shootings and

are rampant in the makeshift.’
city, which already has bars, i






“: jewelry stores, most of them

constructed out of tree
branches and tarps, strapped
together with vines and bark.

A 16-room brothel being con-: .

structed promises cushioned

platforms and pumped-in

river water.
. The federal police arrived

- Jast month, cracking down on

- shootings but making it still
harder to get rich quick.
“Luckily, we caught it right

cern for everyone from the
President of the Republic to
the state’s governor and the
mayor that this doesn’t
become another. Serra
Pelada,” said Walter Arcov-
erde, enforcemént director
for the National Department

~ of Mineral Production.

»° Officers with automatic
“weapons impose a nightly

» curfew, while government

geologists try to determine
the extent of the gold. Envi-
ronmental regulators are here

at the beginning. It is a'con-,

week .that Anheuser-Busch:

might be taken over caused its
shares to hit a 52-week high.
Speculation that Alcoa might
be on the block helped send
the entire Dow Jones indus-
trial average higher on hope
that acquisition activity will
remain on a breakneck pace.
It also means Wall Street
investment banks could be set
up for another record-break-

ing year of profits. Investors |
- have cheered results from the
top five U.S _ securities firms

pick. “I didn’t want her to suc-
ceed,” says Forti, now a maD-
agement psychologist in Mor-
ristown, NJ. “That really hurt
us both.” He found himself
testy with private-practice
patients, while the senior vice
president “was always a little
on edge.”

A fall on the ice broke the
ice. Forti saw his supervisor
tumble as she emerged from
her car one snowy morning.
He rushed outside to help.
“I'd really like to get to know
you,” the grateful executive
said. They ate lunch together
that day for the first time. She

explained how much she

respected him. and promised
they would operate as equals,
according to Forti. Afterward,
“we worked well together,”
he says.
OPPONENT TURNED ALLY
Things improved partly.
because the senior vice presi-
dent offered Forti first crack

at plum client assignments
and touted his expertise when

Internet lures thous ands to

too, trying to keep miners
from using heavy equipment
or mercury, a toxic chemical
that joins tiny gold particles
together but can ruin rivers.

How long the government
can keep a lid on things is an
open question. Already, small
rivers of mud gush from
streambeds at night, suggest-
ing that heavy-duty water jets
are already being used ille-
gally, despite promises to wait
for permits..; 90 8.0.

The land‘reform agency
says the land actually belongs

to the federal government, .

but now that the miners are
here, there is talk of compro-
mise — authorities say they

will. permit pressure hoses, -

rock crushers and other
machinery if miners police
themselves and stick to an
environmental protection
plan.

The man who claims to
own the whole area says he is
working on exactly that.

“This place has a great

VICTOR R. CAIVANO/AP

slow down environmental damage, military police patrol
the wildcat mine in Eldorado do Juma, Brazil.

restaurants, barbershops, bak-

and sent their shares to new
highs. Morgan Stanley, Mer-
rill Lynch & Co., Lehman
Brothers, Bear Stearns and
Goldman Sachs might all see
appreciation in their shares as
they garner more investment
banking business. set
This isn’t lost on smaller
firms. JMP, a boutique invest-
ment banking firm and asset
manager based in San Fran-
cisco, has filed to raise some
$100 million in an initial pub-
lic offering on the New York.

ILLUSTRATION BY RIC THORNTON/MCT
they made new business
pitches. Finding attractive
opportunities for a rejected
but well respected insider to
shine is a good idea, career
coaches advise.

.. The approach transformed
one newcomer’s possible
opponent into an ally. A for-
mer international director of
a Los Angeles skin-care man-
ufacturer says the company
hired her for the new post
rather than elevate its experi-
enced head of international
marketing. Aware of her
young colleague’s talents, the
recruit agreed to make the
lieutenant responsible for all

_of Europe.

The new executive also
persuaded her boss to send
workers, customers and sup-
pliers a
plans to ‘expand the market-
er’s duties. As a result, the ex-
international director notes,
“I had somebody 100 percent
dedicated to being successful
rather than trying to find a
way to sabotage me.”

mine ©

future. There are other miner-
als here besides gold. We
have to get organized to
exploit it,” said Jose Ferreira
da Silva Filho, better known
by his more sinister nick-
name, Ze Capeta.

Stock Exchange. The firm,
founded in 1999 by executives
from the old Montgomery
Securities that was later
bought by Bank of America,
last year posted a profit of
almost $2.4 million on reve-
nue of $63.6 million.

JMP joins others that have
scrambled to go public in the
past year to take advantage of
robust M&A activity. Last
year several boutique firms
decided to go public to take
advantage of the escalating

MINIMUM WAGE

_MiamiHerald.com_| THE MIAMI HERALD

eter eee ete tttCnttt tte Cette ttt

¢4 trillion record in 2006

capital markets environment.
Shareholders that got in on
their IPOs are now sitting on
some pretty big returns.

Keefe, Bruyette & Woods
Inc. has seen its shares
advance 18 percent since it
became a public company in
November. Cowen Group,
founded in 1918 and most
recently a division of French
bank Societe Generale, has
realized a 35 percent jump in
its shares since going public
in July.

Wage increase
would aid poor

*HOURLY WAGE

ment is high and there is less
competition for labor.

Some businesses, such as
restaurants, may lose money
from such an_ increase
because their workers would
have to be paid more. Others,
such as tobacco companies
and dollar stores, would likely
see more profits, according to
Merrill Lynch. ;

From the 1960s through the
1980s, manufacturing plants
flocked to rural South Caro-
lina for cheap labor and lower
overhead costs, only to leave
after they discovered they
could do even better over-
seas. At the same time, the
state’s textile base also
headed offshore, leaving a
string of shuttered plants and
mills dotting the rural land-
scape.

McQueen worked at a
small sewing plant in Cheraw
before it closed its doors in
the early 1990s. As far as she
is concerned, it’s high time
Congress paid attention to the
rural poor. “They forgot
about us,” she said.

’ Nationwide, an estimate
13 million workers would be

ter describing.the~affected,,.either..directly,.or

indirectly. The policy insti-
tute estimates that many
workers already making the
new federal minimum could
expect pay hikes after lower-
wage earners start making
more.

Down the road: from
Cheraw, a poster at the Com-
munity Development Corp. of

- Marlboro County gives mute

testimony to how long it’s
been since the minimum wage
was raised. It notes the wage
will be increased to $5.15 an
hour on Sept. I, 1997.

The Rev. Charles Malloy,

TECHNOLOGY

‘in rural areas

who runs the Bennettsville-
based agency that helps peo-
ple find affordable housing,
said the wage hasn’t kept up
with rising housing and utility
costs over the past decade. He
and other advocates said peo-'
ple still will need help even if
it goes up. :

Some 160 miles away, out-
side Charleston, Kirby Platt
juggles tuition and rent while

working a part-time job for.

$6.50 an hour to help pay her
way through technical col-
lege. She’s also hoping for the.
federal pay bump. “Of course
it would be helpful, going to
school and supporting
Inyself,” said Platt, 19.

It still takes on average $11
an hour to afford a two-bed-
room apartment with utilities
in South Carolina, said Sue
Berkowitz, director of the
South Carolina Appleseed
Legal Justice Center, which
provides legal services to the
poor. “Raising the minimum
wage to $7.25 is still asking a
lot of people to live mod-
estly,” she said.

South Carolina tourism
officials and advocates for the
poor say a ripple effect of ris-
ing pay from a minimum wage

increase,would especially-be =«w

felt among those who work in
the state’s $16 billion tourism
industry and other areas
where employers already pay
close to the proposed increase
because they have trouble
finding workers.

Louisiana’s healthcare
industry is another good
example. Officials say a
worker shortage caused by
Hurricane Katrina drove up

hospital wages in the ‘south- ..

ern part of the state, and they
fear the effects of a federal
wage hike on overall health-
care costs.

ning 2c ain. Watches losing -
race on time

ers talk of threats and intimi-
dation that, ensures they

-cough up Ze Capeta’s 8 per-
cent cut. Ze Capeta denies he
is making a killing or intimi-
dating anyone and says he has
more than his share of head-
aches and unseen costs.

So far, the federal govern-
ment and most. miners seem
content to leave him in
charge, if only to provide
some order.

In Apui, 10 gold-buying
shops have opened in the past
few weeks. Gilmar Predebon
manages one, buying and
melting about 4.4 pounds a
day into gold ingots.

He figures the mines gen-
erate between 13 and 15.5
pounds a day overall — “It’s a

good amount of gold but
nowhere near as much as
you'd expect, considering all
the talk.” ;

Apui Mayor’ Antonio
Roque Longo thinks his city
of 20,000 would be better off
without the mine: “Sure, it’s
been good for the merchants,
but we have major health
problems. Before the garimpo,
we had malaria mostly under
control here; now it’s a huge
problem again.”

‘Others say the garimpo has
improved things.

- “This was a door God
opened for Apuf. Today the
city has grown fivefold and
people are flooding in from
every corner of the country,”
said Antonio Carlos Santos,
48, who quit his policeman
job to work the mines.

*WATCHES

“It really is an anchor point
— and that’s the end of it,”
says Kilger, the research
firm’s chief behavioral scien-
‘tist. “A cellphone is one step
up from that; it begins to help
you manage your time. Anda
BlackBerry is one level up
‘from that.”
Some have found the trend
convenient, if a little stressful.
“Tt don’t check my watch
anymore. My watch checks
me,” says Sean MacPhedran, a
27-year-old from Ottawa,
Ontario, who works in adver-
tising. He’s referring to the
beeps and vibrations his
BlackBerry makes to remind
him of his obligations.
“On the one .hand, I’ve
become a slave to its beeps,”
-he says. “But on the other
hand, it automates a lot of
things that I would have to do
manually otherwise, like try
to remember when I’m sup-
- posed to go learn how to cha-
cha or call a client.”
MacPhedran does wear a
watch when he wants to look
“put together.” But it’s
become so much more an
accessory than a necessity
that he’s developed a habit of
taking it off unconsciously
and leaving it places.
“When I was little, I took
off my socks because they

were constraining,” he says.
“I think I take my watch off
for the same reason.”

Before she joined the ranks
of telecommuters and
stopped wearing a watch, 35-

year-old working mom Jean- _

nine Fallon Anckaitis also
thought of her watch as “a
handcuff” that 'she’d immedi-
ately remove when returning
home.

“Even if I went out to din-
ner straight from work, I’d
dump the watch into my
purse to free my wrist,” says
Anckaitis, who lives in
Swarthmore, Pa., and now
works from home for an
online auto site. “Taking off
the watch symbolized being
done with the pressure-filled
commitments of the day, and
settling into a pace where the
time matters far less.”

Indeed, the watch is a sym-
bol of stress for many people.
But it’s not really time itself
that’s the problem, says histo-
rian James Hoopes.

“It’s that we live in an
increasingly synchronized
world,” says Hoopes, a pro-
fessor in the division of his-
tory and society at Babson
College in Massachusetts.

“You don’t really relieve
all the stress unless you get
out of the world where time
synchronization is so impor-
tant.”

eRagy

“ “e2% o's nO. & ad Bs —_- =.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007, PAGE 5B



I

Data Protection chief —
to take office April 2 ©

- g By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

. George Rodgers will offi-
Bes begin his work as the
Data Protection Commis-

sioner on April 2, 2007, when legisla-
tion contained in the Data Protection
and Privacy of Persons Act is enacted.
The former Bahamas Development
Bank managing director told The Tri-
bune yesterday that until then, he is
-_familarising himself with the various
.’. aspects the new post will entail,
"including going on several fact-finding



PEGASUS, from 1B ee

missions to other jurisdictions.

Mr Rodgers said that once he offi-
cially begins, things will'start very
slowly. .

“We're not going to initiate any-
thing. It will really be up to the public
to come forward and raise their con-
cerns,” he explained.

Mr Rodgers expected there would
be a surge of complaints during the
initial period of his posting. All com-
plaints will be thoroughly investigat-
ed, he said.

Mr Rodgers’ appointment was vital
for the implementation of the Data

4

Protection Act, and James Smith,
minister of state for finance, said of
Mr Rodgers’ appointment: “I think
it sends a signal to both the domestic
and international economy that the
Bahamas has modern e-commerce

legislation and the basis on which they

can look to the Bahamas as a base
for e-commerce activities.

Mr Rodgers added that the Euro-
pean Council authority looks at the
Bahama closely.

“ Now we can become a trusted
enclave, as we have passed the test
for protecting information, and data is

able to flow with the data protection
laws on the books,” he said.

Many in the business community
have long considered the Bahamas
to be a natural location for an e-com-
merce hub, given its tax structure,
proximity to the US in the east coast
time zone, established infrastructure
and communications, and the exis-
tence of the Hawksbill Creek agree-
ment - viewed as an excellent trans-
shipment/distrubution hub for ship-
ping orders placed via internet.

In yesterday’s lead story in Tribune
Business, headlined Bahamas finally

$200m terminal fees er in airport talks.

‘open’ for e-commerce business, it
was reported that the appointment
of the Data Protection Commissioner
would enable the Bahamas to imple-
ment the three e-commerce related
Acts passed in 2003.

This is incorrect, in that two of the
Acts - the Computer Misuse Act and
the Electronic Communications and
Transactions Act -'were implemented
that same year, 2003.

It is only the Data Protection Act
that has not been implemented, due
to the wait for the Data Protection
Commissioner’s appointment.

our company is,” he said.

“T don’t take a salary, and I have
done everything to allow this com-
pany to succeed, so the company
itself is very strong.”

It had been claimed “that there
was growing concern by the Grand
-. Bahama Port Authority over the
(company’s) questionable finan-
cial situation, as evidenced by its
performance on the US stock
exchange”.

Mr Knabb explained that the
stock price did not determine
_. whether his company stayed open

’ or not. He added that Pegasus was

a public company that had been
trading for a number of years since
it opened in 1993. He said the com-
pany traded at a relatively stable
price as far as stock exchange stan-
dards go for the first year-and-a-
half.
_ The company, according to Mr
Knabb, was also accepted to the
NASDAQ global markets, which
is the premier stock exchange.

“Once we were accepted to that
platform it opened the stock to a
mechanism called naked shorting.
It gives a person the ability to sell
a share of stock that he doesn’t
actually own,”- Mr Knabb







Authority.

computer skills are essential.






Responsibilities Duties

business objectives.

to:-

resources transactions and services, t

explained.

“Shorting was designed to allow
someone to say: ‘Okay, the com-
pany, their numbers are falling off.
They are declining in value. | am
going to bet that that company
keeps going down in value and I
am going to sell a share, or short a
share, and then when it hits where
I think it is the bottom, I will then
buy that share back and I get to
keep the difference in the money.
So I sold a stock that I didn’t own
and buy it back for $1 to cover
back the loan. Basically, I borrow
the stock to do that then I make
$10 per share’.

“That’s what happened to our
company. We went in as a very
strong stock, very stable with no
ups and downs, and we went from
zero short position to nine million
shares. So, we had what is called an
artificial short, or naked short, and
this was very well documented by
Forbes Magazine.

“We went to NASDAQ and all
the US government agencies and
we said ‘Help, our investors are
getting destroyed’, and then the
negative publicity started,” he said.

Mr Knabb added that when peo-

ple buy and sell stocks in the US, :

Public Hospitals Authority
Advertisement

Manager III (Human Resources)
Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre

_ Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the post
of Human Resources Manager III, Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre, Public Hospitals

Applicants must possess the following qualifications:-

Bachelors Degree in Business Administration. Management, or equivalent qualification (a
Masters degree would be an advantage); and at least three (3) years post qualification
experience in human resource management. Excellent oral written communication skills and

The Human Resources Manager III is a part of the Human Resources Team at Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre, and shares responsibility for the day-to-day administration of human

o ensure that the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre human
resources policies and procedures, transactions and services are aligned with Authority’s

f- Within this context, the Human Resources Manager III will be responsible for, but not limited

that money doesn’t come to the
company, unless the company rais-
es money from the public in an
initial public offering.

He said Pegasus had never done
an initial public offering. “We
haven’t done one because we don’t
need the public’s money. We are
trading, we are a public company
and we are responsible. We report
all of our financials, and we have
never been attacked on the finan-
cial strength of the company,” Mr
Knabb said. “If you look at the
attacks, it is because of my stock
price. And, right now, the value
of the company is at $100 million.
So you have to look at all the facts
as to what is happening.”

Mr Knabb said they may elect to
take the company private and buy
out the public shareholders.

‘We have that choice. We might
elect to change stock exchanges,
but in the end the company is
fine,” he added.

“It is trading well, trading
healthy, and our annual filing will
be coming out on time. So,
although there is all this happening
on the public side of the company,
it is different than the actual com-
pany itself.”

1 paper

gre haan 4




sof









FROM page 1B

Also being discussed is the method of
payment for this, and how to hold YVRAS
accountable, ensuring that it carries out
what it promises to do. As a result, there are
likely to be a number of financial incen-
tives and timelines likely to be built into
the final contract. : fe

The 10-year management contract is
essentially the privatisation of Sir Lynden
Pindling International Airport, placing it
in the hands of a private company and draw-
ing on the expertise of the Canadian com-
pany for its management and development.

Sources have told The Tribune that a
number of lease agreements, contracts and
other agreements are being drafted, and
that the stroke suffered in late 2006 by
Joseph Reckley, the Airport Authority’s
acting general manager, did delay the
process due to his central role as the Gov-
ernment said. So

“The Government wants to get it right
first time,” The Tribune was told. “It'll prob-

_ably be the most important infrastructure
investment this country has ever seen.”

Getting Sir Lynden Pindling Internation-

al Airport up to scratch so that it comple-

















ments the five-star Bahamian tourism prod-
uct has been a key priority for the Govern-
ment, especially as it provides the first and
last experiences and impressions for visi-
tors coming to this country.

Through the partnership between the
Nassau Airport Development Company
(NADC) and YVARS, the airport is expect-
ed to be transformed into a “premier world
class facility” within the next four years.

After the ten-year management contract
expires, NADC — with an independent
board of directors, comprised of stakehold-
ers in the tourism industry — will continue to
be responsible for airport operations.

During phase one of the transformation
of Sir Lynden Pindling International Airport
— scheduled to be completed within 24
months — the physical and sanitary condi-
tions of the facility will be improved, the
congestion associated with US pre-clear-
ance will be alleviated, adequate check-in
spaces for additional air traffic will be cre-
ated, and increased group travel and the
streamlining of security checks will be facil-
itated.

In phase two — anticipated to take some
48 months — design and construction of new
and/or upgraded terminal facilities and relat-
ed airport infrastructure will take place.

eaten Karan

‘s seh

Mato TRL be

C errr ‘





PRIMARY DUTIES:

Sbarro the Italian Pizzeria is looking for a self motivated, responsible and mature individual to spear-
head the position of Marketing/Advertising & Public Relations. The candidate will have to perform the
following duties:

¢ Assist the Managing Director lay out and compile company data, events and happenings in

a quarterly newsletter and website.

¢ Assist the Managing Director to update the website on a as needed bases.
@ Assist the Managing Director with the writing, recording and placing radio and newspaper

advertisements.

Assist the Managing Director compile new information and alter existing information for

menus & menu boards.

¢ Represent the company in public relations matters and document the same.
¢ Assist Managing Director in all other matters pertaining to Marketing/Advertising and Public

Relations.

SECONDARY DUTIES:

¢ Assist the Managing Director in accomplishing his daily tasks, e.g. handling and screening
calls, tabulating sales and payroll data, taking dictation and writing correspondence, etc.

Assist the Office Administrator with in-coming calls, posting sales, payroll data, compiling
and updating employee files, etc.

¢ Assist Office Administrator in compiling data for Director's and General Manager's meet-
ings.

¢ Working side by side with Office Administrator to fill in when necessary.

1. Processing recommendations for:





















¢ Probationary appointments
¢ Confirmations in substantive posts

¢ Promotions and reclassification

* Benefits under the Authority’s policies

° Benefits under the law, eg. Employment Act and National Insurance Act
¢ Employee transfers and secondment

¢ Employee grievances

* Disciplinary actions and penalties

¢ Involuntary and voluntary terminations

SKILLS & APTITUDE:

The successful candidate must have excellent writing and speaking abilities.
Must be an assertive and socially pleasant person.

Must have excellent organizational abilities

Must be able to work independently of all others

Must be able and willing to work in a close office and multi cultural environment.

2. Liaising with the Payrolls Unit with matters relating to salaries adjustments and
financial clearances.

os © &@©.06U ]HmhlU OH

3. Managing the performances appraisal process for staff within assigned areas of responsibili-
ties, ensuring that evaluations are ongoing and appraisal forms are prepared, distributed and

reviewed, WORK EXPERIENCE & EDUCATION:

This position requires a person who has a sound background in writing and general communication
mediums. They must have excellent command of both written and spoken English and the comprehen-
sion skills to organize and communicate information in a clear and concise manner. The candidate must
have a solid secondary education and at least four years experience or a Bachelor's Degree and at
least two years experience in the field of Marketing/Advertising & Public Relations.




Opportunities will also be given for involvement in human resources strategic functions such
as policies, developing an annual human resources plan, staff training and development, qual-
ity improvement initiatives To facilitate the Manager’s professional development and career
advancement within Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre.

Letters of application, resume, documentary evidence of qualifications and three (3) references
should be submitted through the head of your department, no later than 28th February, 2007, to
the Director Human Resources (Acting), Public Hospitals Authority P.O. Box N-8200, or Ist

" Floor Corporate Office, Dockendale House, West Bay Street.

Salary is competitive. Bonuses are available and based purely on performance. Medical Health
coverage is also available.

: ye) PR esl Uly lee Le) SORE MEIIEERCO mea} 356 0333~ Attention Managing Director
PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007

Satellite radio rivals XM and.

_ Sirius agree to merge, but |
regulatory hurdles remain

_ THE TRIBUNE





16

wecten
eae

°
°

f

[Suen ewer

By SETH SUTEL
* AP Business Writer

* NEW YORK (AP) — XM

INSIGHT

mma

metal late Mal- Waly oH
Ce Ele Lal
on Mondays



Satellite Radio Holdings Inc.
and Sirius Satellite Radio Inc.
have agreed to merge, the two
companies said yesterday.

The deal would consolidate
the only two companies in the
emerging business of subscrip-
tion-only satellite radio, and is
sure to face tough scrutiny
from federal regulators.
Investors and. analysts have
been speculating about a deal
for months.

The two companies said in
a statement that Mel Kar-
mazin, the CEO of Sirius,
would become chief executive
of the new company while
Gary Parsons, the chairman of
XM, would remain in that role.
XM’s CEO Hugh Panero will
remain to oversee closing the

of the deal, they said.

The deal would face signifi-
cant regulatory hurdles in
Washington, including a Fed-
eral Communications Com-
mission rule that clearly states
that one satellite radio
provider cannot buy the other
one. However, that rule could
be waived.

A combination would also
have to meet antitrust approval
from the Department of Jus-
tice. The companies are
expected to argue that they
compete not only with each
other but also with a growing
base of digital audio sources
such as iPods, mobile phones,
and non-satellite digital radio.

XM and Sirius have both
posted significant financial

losses as they built up their
programming lineups and
recruited subscribers. Both
stocks declined more than 40
per cent last year on concerns
about their continued growth
in subscribers and softness in
the retail market, but investors
have held out hopes that a
merger could bring costs down
significantly.

Shareholders

Shareholders of XM and Sir-
ius would each own approxi-
mately 50 per cent of the com-
bined company. XM share-
holders would receive 4.6
shares of Sirius stock for each
share of XM they own.

That would value XM shares

at $17.02 each, based on Fri-
day’s closing prices, represent-
ing a premium of 22 per cent
from XM’s closing value of
$13.98 Friday. Markets were

- closed Monday for the Presi-

dents’ Day holiday.

The companies didn’t say
what the new company would
be called, though they
described it as a merger of
equals. The new company’s
board will have 12 members,
including Parséns, Karmazin,
four independent directors
named by each company, and
one representative each from
General Motors Corp. and
Honda Motor Co.

News of a possible merger
was reported earlier Monday
by the New York Post.

On Friday, a Bear Stearns °
analyst said in a research note,
that a merger would have a
good chance of overcoming:
regulatory obstacles.

Other analysts remain less
sure. Sanford C. Bernstein ana-)
lyst Craig Moffett said he gives |
the deal a “50-50” chance of
passing regulatory muster. .

Moffett said the deal could, '

have a particularly tough time... *: -

getting through the FCC, and...
is likely to opposed by the
National Association of Broad-~
casters, a lobbying group that
includes radio broadcasters.
Moffett said it was “anyone’s
guess” as to whether the FCC
would change its rule barring a
consolidation of the two satel- .
lite radio companies.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

Legal Notice

NOTICE

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that YVONNE ST. FLEUR
ALCENOR OF KEY WEST STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any.person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 20th day of February, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NYSA COMPANY LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of NYSA COMPANY LIMITED has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

REEDSPORT CORP.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 15th day of February 2007. The Liquidator is

. Legal Notice
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

LONGACRE ASSETS LTD.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

ARGOSA CORP. INC. Giquidatsne

CLigndator) Notice is hereby given that in accordance with

Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of LONGACRE ASSETS LTD. has °
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has beenissued |.
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

Legal Notice

NOTICE

LERIDA S.A.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies py
Act 2000, the dissolution of LERIDA S.A. has been Tans 7
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and NOTICE

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register. ~

_ ENTERPRISE VENTURES LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

RAPPID EXPRESS LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of RAPPID EXPRESS LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



(a) ENTERPRISE VENTURES LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the

ARGOSA CORP. INC. International Business Companies Act 2000. ;
(Liquidator) .

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)
(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced

on the 16th February, 2007 when the Articles of .
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the *
Registrar General.

c FA LL

| Ss

Pricing Information As Of:
, 19 February 2007

Zlib

The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse Trust
of Geneva, Rue de Lausanne 17 bis, 1211 Geneva 70.

< © ews

Change Vol. EPS $ Div $
0.000 N/M
0.400 6.5
0.260 10.2 eet eae wn ee ee Ny
Ooeos a3 Credit Suisse Trust Limited
0.050 7.4 Liquidator

0.240 14.0 - .

NOTICE

0.045 38.9
OF

Previous Close Today's Close Dated this 20th day of February, A.D. 2007
Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs |
Doctor's Hospital

Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

‘10.00
eps earserpeatermses
S2wk-Hi S2wk-Low
12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0. old



0.000 8.3
0.240 10.3
0.570 15.7
0.500 15.9
0.510 11.3
0.000 N/M
0.100 13.6
0.560 15.4
2.795 aaa 9
oo

Div $




wana a






PATARA LIMITED



14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
0.35 RND Hold

eee eons,



Pursuant to Part IX, Section 137 (6) of the
(International Business Companies Act, 2000), we
hereby submit that winding-up and dissolution of
the Company has been completed on the 16th day of
March, 2007.




1.2736
2.6662

1.328271*
3.0569***
2.596093**
1.224792****

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund







dends di
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity,
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas ~tock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-HI - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
§ S2wk-Low - Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change In closing price from day to day
Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings




* .9 February 2007
** 31 January 2007
ve" - 31 January 2007

eee" - 31 January 2007

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

Se MIAN NTA PORTOLA TOE




- 31 January 2007



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ERNMENT TET OT

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a a
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007, PAGE 7B





PTO om ERIC

Roo Wome Ore

FROM page 1B

e

thought to be the Burmah Oil
harbour, which is leased from
the Government. In addition,
Beka is also seeking permis-
sion to re-open an airport to
facilitate the arrival of provate
and charter flights, likely to be
a reference to the airstrip at
the former US Air Force Mis-
sile Base, part of the Bahamas
Film Studios development.

The document said that with
the general election scheduled
for early May, the Government
“would like to complete all the
approvals and make a formal
announcement at least 30 days
in advance”.

It added: “The Government
has allowed Bahamas Golden
Beach to be the master devel-
oper of the entire east end of

the island. This includes an.

area exceeding 100 square
miles.

“The Government is willing
to sell in the future to Bahamas
Golden Beach Ltd substan-
tially all of its east Crown Land
at the same price per acre as
the initial site.”

The Infinity Partners post-
ing said one condition that
Beka had to fulfil to obtain the
master casino licence was a
“willingness to purchase gov-
ernment Crown Land at the
Golden Beach site for a mini-
mum of $5 million ($2,800 per
acre)”.

Checks by Tribune Business
confirmed the details in the
~ document were authentic, with
- several sources describing
Beka’s interest as “serious”. It
is likely to have been posted
by Infinity Partners as an
update to its real estate client
base, hoping to generate inter-
-est in land and real estate sales
uieastemn Crand Bahama.

However, infinity Partners
my wou have jumpes the
eats the project has 3 aot

been approved by the Gov-
ernment. Its publication may
well cause problems for both
Beka, its partners and the Gov-
ernment due to its premature
nature, as no agreement has
been set in stone.

The ‘document's revelations
aie likely to revive concerns
that the pace of development
and foreign direct investment
into the Bahamas is currently
too fast, outpacing the capaci-
ty of this nation’s public ser-
vice, workforce and infra-
structure to control and sup-
port the number of projects
either uinderway or in the
pipeline.

The details on Crown Land
are also likely to fuel concerns
that too much Bahamian land
is being conveyed to foreign




Derry On Apc mini enh
located Shirley & Church ieee ast Bana i

developers, and raises ques-
tions about how Bahamians
can prepare to participate and
capture the benefits from such
projects without knowing
about them.

Vincent Peet, minister of
financial services and invest-
ments, yesterday confirmed to
Tribune Business: “There is
very strong interest in the
development of eastern Grand
Bahama.”

However, he added that any
investment project was “in the
early stages” of talks with the
Government. Mr Peet, who
was out of office, said he was
unable to confirm any details
because he did not have the
information to hand.

The other conditions that
Beka has to fulfil to obtain this
master casino licence, the doc-
ument said, include complet-
ing a definitive agreement with
Foxwoods Development Com-
pany, and “Foxwood’s willing-
ness to manage for Harcourt
Developments the existing
shut down Royal Oasis casi-
no”.

Interest

Harcourt’s interest in the
still-closed Royal Oasis has
been revived, after rival bid-
der World Investments Hold-
ings failed to complete its $40
million purchase of the resort
from Lehman Brothers’ pri-
vate equity arm.

Harcourt Developments is
understood to have met with
both the Government, in the
shape of Prime Minister Perry
Christie, and the Grand
Bahama Port Authority over
the Royal Oasis, although it is
unclear how much progress has
been made.

The document on the Beka
project added that “Beka has
discussed with Harcourt

involvement in the Royal !
Oasis, and Harcourt develop- {

ing a section of the east end

property.”
Prime Minister Perry
Christie, in one of his last

updates to the House of
Assembly on the Royal Oasis,
said the Government had
encouraged investors looking
at eastern Grand Bahama to
also assess the resort. Govern-
ment officials and ministers
have also touted a major
investment project for eastern
Grand Bahama.

‘The document said Beka
and Foxwoods Development
Company had already signed a
Letter of Intent over the casi-
no, agreeing fee structures and
the latter’s “equity participa-
tion”. Beka had also supplied
Foxwoods with branding, oper-
ating and management agree-

ments.

On the hotel front, Beka
“has a confirming letter from
Omni Hotels to jointly own a
400-room Omni Hotel and
convention centre. Omni is
prepared to invest $20 million-
plus into the project”.

“A leading South Florida
marina developer, who is
financially backed by Dillon
Read, has offered to purchase
the marina site for $28 million
and invest an additional $80
million,” the document said.

“Beka has a pre-sale site of
20 acres to a group from the
Florida Panhandle to.develop
500 condo units.”

Infinity Partners will man-
age the residential lot sales,
investing $10 million in equity,
the document said. The com-
pany claimed to have commit-
ments for more than 75 lot pur-
chases worth more than $40
million, and commitments to
build 40 homes in the first year.
Beka had a further 50 lot pur-
chase commitments.

A former Jack Nicklaus
designer had agreed to design
a links golf course, while nego-
tiations were underway with
Greg Normam Golf for a
course designed to PGA spec-
ifications.

Beka was also said to have
discussed with Matrix, a utility
equipment supplier, over a
50/50 joint venture on provid-
ing utilities for the project.

Meanwhile, Beka had devel-
oped a relationship with Kings
Creek Development to con-
struct timeshare units, the for-
mer investing the land and
receiving $1,000 per week of
sales generated. Kings Creek,
which has a Virginia timeshare
development, has links with
Ken Farino, who was trying to
develop the Marriott Discov-
ery Bay project, and is now

understood to be acting asa

lovai adviser to Beka

‘Beka ts said to have received
commitments for 200 condo
hotel units, having been
involved in discussions on this
with hedge funds and institu-
tional investors. It was said to

have “made significant
progress” on real estate pre-
sales.

“Condo hotel pre-sales rev-
enue based upon Beka’s cur-
rent position exceeds $220 mil-
lion,” the document said. “Res-
idential lot pre-sales revenue
based upon Beka’s current

. position exceeds $60 million.”

Beka was target marketing
a 52,000-strong high-end golf
group and 100,000 doctors
group, while Foxwoods had 3.2
million casino members.

Other potential relationships
involved a_ tie-up with
NASCAR over a NASCAR-

COME Peart: -

we ;

seas hl lal ibe bus routes, lots of parking. |

aly sq ft - Yee] ee ae ar sq idee sce §] Ra et oe
; (4) 1500 sq ft - Office Spaces CRORE Cit eli a
Ss) psn ahhh Md ACE ; SEs eel AVAL CET rat Le

CONTACT

MON BOO RT. * 9AM-5PM
A

341-7184 | alter Gime



branded resort, and Margari-
taville - for a Margaritaville
Hotel and Casino, even an
entire Margaritaville town.
Illich Holdings, which has
invested in the Detroit Red
Wings ice hockey team, was
said to be interested in sub-
licensing the casino.
Financing for the project was

coming from UBS, which had.

committed a $550 million, six-
year loan to fund land acquisi-

tions, infrastructure build, and

the Foxwoods Hotel and Casi-
no. UBS had also committed
to a $140 million construction
loan.

Scotiabank was the lead
bank in a syndicate, involving
Royal Bank of Canada:and
FirstCaribbean International
Bank, for a $100 million loan
to finance the Omni Hotel.

Royal Bank, meanwhile, was
in discussions with Beka over a
$100 million mortgage line, and
had shown interest in supply-
ing a $40 million loan for con-
struction of a retail complex
based upon anchor tenant leas-
es. The bank had even offered
to bring a major grocery chain
to the Bahamas.

EDAW, the Government’s
master planner, is the planner
for this project. East Bay
Group is doing the environ-
mental impact assessment
(EIA).

Beka is also seeking from
the Government the right to
control roads plans in eastern

Grand Bahama and re-direct *

existing roads; construct all
utilities; import fuel; build a
concrete and asphalt plant;
build an International School,
offshore medical centre; estab-
lish a mortgage company; and
manage a clerk’s office to
record deed transfers.

It also wants to “prohibit
others from accessing any
canals or harbours within five
miles of our site”.













PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, MICHELLE
DONNA MARIE DEAN of the Western District of the
Island of New Providence intend to change my name
to MICHELLE DONNA MARIE MITCHEL. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box SS-792, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANDREW MARC OF
PINEDALE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 20th day of February, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.









OFFICE ASSISTANT

To assist in General Office Work, Duties include, but not limited to:










- receptionist
- filing, typing correpondence

- banking & postal duties

- accounting; knowledge of Quickbooks a plus.

- computer skills

Ideal candidate will be honest, personable, respopaible, and punctual, and self
motivated.

Salary commensurate with experience. 2 9




Send resume to: Office Position, P.O. Box CB-13835, Nassau, Bahamas

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, BRANDON JULIAN
of Stapledon Gardens, PO. BOX CB-12714,Nassau,
Bahamas, intend to change my name to BRANDON
JULIAN OLOUMOU. If there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box SS-
792, Nassau, Bahamas: no later.than thirty (30) cays after
the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE is hereby given that IOULIA OMPOUCHOVA (also
known as ELENA KALIS) OF SUGAR ROCK, GREAT
HARBOUR CAY, BERRY ISLANDS is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for’
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 20th day of February, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO. Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas, -c.sasssems :












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PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



En eee cece eee ea ee
Film Studios to require $70-$90m investment

FROM page 1B

development up and running
was critical in the short-term.
He explained: “We are aware
there are two, possibly three,

productions that are interested
[in using the Film Studios] and
have been green-lit to move for-
ward, specifically the use of the
tank”. ,

Mr Bethel said: “From the
film production side, it’s cer-

tainly a one to two-year build
out for the completion of every
thing film production-related”
that was envisaged by the orig-
inal developers when they

signed their Heads of Agree- |

ment with the Government in

Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited, a subsidiary of Citigroup, a leading financial
institution with a presence in over 100 countries and over 100 million
customers worldwide, is seeking candidates for the position of Technology
Controls Officer in our Technology Department.

Role Responsibilities

- Manage the Change Management Process throughout the entire lifecycle
and keep associated records updated.

Review database security audit logs, access logs, incident reports and
on-line reports using various database security tools such as SEMS
and APP Detective.

Monitor software and hardware patching and licensing to maintain
compliance with Citigroup and Industry Standards.

Assist in the preparation and tracking of information for internal and
external Information Security audits in accordance with generally
accepted IS audit standards and controls.

Assist in the execution of technical Risk and Compliance Self Assessment
(RCSA) and participate in the identification, recording, monitoring
and reporting of corrective action plans.

Provide backup for the Information Security Administrator and Business
Information Security Officer.

Knowledge/Skills Required

Bachelors of Arts/Science in Information Technology or equivalent

experience

2-4 years related experience; experience with Information Security

audits or Compliance-related positions an asset.

Strong oral and written communication skills

Excellent time management, organization and administrative skills
Solid knowledge of Oracle and SQL

Experience with Change Management systems

Proficient in MS Office Suite, LAN/WAN environment

Interested Bahamian candidate should forward a copy of their resume by
February 23, 2007 to: Human Resources, Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited, P.O.
Box N-1576, Nassau, Bahamas OR Fax: (242) 302-8779 OR Email:
janice.gibson @citigroup.com

(Standing next to Mrs. Charlene Storr is Mr. Bruno Roberts a Director of
The Private Trust Corporation Limited)

The Private Trust Corporation Limited is pleased to announce the appointment of
Mrs. Charlene Wells-Storr to the Board of Directors of the Company effective 5th

February 2007 .

Mrs. Storr is a Certified Public Accountant who started her professional career with
‘the international accounting firm of Deloitte & Touche, during which time she was
seconded for a year and a half to the firm’s Jersey, Channel Island office. She
joined The Private Trust Corporation Limited in September 2003 as Client’
Relationship Team Manager and was subsequently promoted to the position of
Manager — Client Relationship Department.

Mrs. Storr has been recognized by the Bahamas Financial Services Board for »
professional excellence in the financial services and trust administration industry.
She holds an advanced proficiency certificate in Spanish and has conducted seminars
on corporate services and trust administration policies to native Spanish speakers.

She currently serves as a Director on the Boards of The Bahamas Financial Services
Board and The Bahamas Development Bank. She brings a wealth of knowledge
and experience to the Board of The Private Trust Corporation.

She is married to Mr. Merrit A. Storr.

The Private Trust Corporation Limited is an independent, licensed Bahamian trust company, securities broker dealer and
investment fund administrator providing to international corporate and private clients personalized, professional and
comprehensive financially engineered solutions including:

* Asset protection, discretionary and purpose trusts
* Company incorporation and management

¢ Establishment and administration of foundations
¢ Investment fund administration and accounting

¢ Estate planning and executorships
¢ Insurance structures

* Corporate finance and strategic planning



2002.

The new owners anticipated
completing the sound stage in
the first year, and Mr Bethel

added: “The rest of the project:

is more likely a five to 10-year
build-out.”

He and his group had given
undertakings to the Govern-
ment that they would “complete
all facets of the project accord-
ing to the Heads of Agreement,
and that includes the resort, res-
idences and theme park con-
cept”.

“The original Heads of
Agreement called for some-
where in the range of an injec-
tion of $70 million in capital
into the project,” Mr Bethel
said.

“From a first look, we are
convinced the investment will
be much more than that, «given
what we have to do and what’s
essential to make the project
work. The investment is going
into the range of $80-$90 mil-
lion, and that will obviously be
phased in over the period of the
project.”

Mr Bethel told The Tribune
that the definitive agreement
for the sale of the Bahamas
Film Studios was “still being
negotiated, and subject to

approval by the Government”.

He and his group have sub-
mitted the relevant proposals
and documents to the Govern-
ment, but the anticipated com-
pletion date for the purchase,
February 28, 2007, was likely to
be “extended given the need for
government review and
approval”.

Mr Bethel and his group are
understood to have paid $14
million to acquire the rights to
develop the Bahamas Film Stu-
dios from Gold Rock Creek
Enterprises and its ultimate
Bermuda-based parent, Ashby
Corporation.

Companies

Ross Fuller, chairman of both
companies, it is understood, will
use part of the purchase price to
pay off Gold Rock’s liabilities,
including a $10 million loan
from FirstCaribbean Interna-
tional Bank for the water tank
construction, and a further $1
million in debts.

Mr Fuller took over the pro-
ject after two of its three origi-
nal founding partners, Hans
Schutte and Michael Collyer,
passed away. The surviving

partner is Paul Quigley, who is .

Legal Notice

NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) LECLE LIMITED is in dissolution under the provisions of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on February 19, 2007
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by Registrar

General.

(c) The liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace

West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 19th day of March, 2007 to send their names and
addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the
company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of
any distribution made before such debts are proved.

February 19, 2007

LAKEISHA COLLIE

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY



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no longer associated with the
Bahamas Film Studios.

This will leave him with a net
$3-$4 million from the deal, but
Mr Bethel yesterday declined
to comment on any of the trans-

_action’s financial details.

However, he said: “We need
to recognise that some of the
requirements of the original
Heads of Agreement were not
met in the first instance, and we
have undertaken to remedy this
and the associated timelines
also.

“We have undertaken to
work with the BEST Commis-
sion on remedial action [on
environmental concerns raised
over the Film Studios], which
was apparently promised by the
previous developers to be done,
but it seems nothing has been
implemented. We are prepared
to bring in the proper technical ©
team to see what work needs
to be done and move forward
with it.

“We have undertaken to doa
thorough study and survey of
the land, which had been one
of the requirements of the
Heads of Agreement. That was
not done or completed. We are
gearing to do that, so we can
present to government a full
land-use study and proposals.”

Mr Bethel said his investor .°.

group, which is largely Euro-
pean based, was recruiting the
marketing and management
teams it had identified to run
the Bahamas Film Studios.
“We are recruiting a market-
ing team that has significant

inroads into producers and °.

directors, and can sell them the
story,” Mr Bethel said.

The members of his investor
group had backgrounds in film
finance, oil and gas, and oil and
gas construction, Mr Bethel
said, adding that they were all
pre-existing clients of Montaque
and approached him about the
potential investment opportu-
nity.

Mr Bethel had worked exten-
sively in the fledgling film indus-
try in the Bahamas, trying to
develop it domestically, explor-
ing film financing from the
Bahamas, and providing Trea-
sury and payroll functions to
production companies filming
here, including Disney’s Pirates
of the Caribbean IJ and III.

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Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com




Lions 15-9

didn’t stop the Masters
League in continuing
with their regular sea-
son action, completing
two games on Saturday.

The two games came
ahead of the league’s
playoff series, which is
expected to start on
March 10th.

Getting things started
was the Joshua Knights,
destroying the DHL
Lions 15-5.

The Knights, who
‘rode the arm’ of Rudy
Gardiner, held the
Lions’ to three shut out
innings, while they
exploded in the third
inning.

Things were pretty
evenly matched in the
two innings with the
Knights taking a one
run lead over the Lions
in the second inning.

But the Knights went
to work in the third
inning, turning in eight
runs to the Lions’ two.

The team was led by
Lester Dean, Abe John-
son and Sunny Haven,
all scoring two.

For the Lions, Larry ©
Forbes lad one run** ~~"
with pitcher Mike
Isaacs connecting with
the ball on two occa-
sions.

Having already
secured their place in
the playoffs is the Pan-
thers, clinging onto the
fourth spot.

It was a tough second
match for the Panthers
pulling off a close win
over the Dog House
Rangers.

The Panthers won the
game 13-11, the win-
ning pitcher was Robert
Gilbert with John
Woodside taking the



_ loss.

pu cite




NAA
Sheniqua
stars at

track meet

@ THE first annual Dian-
na Lynn Thompson Road
Runners track meet, held
over the weekend, saw the
return of some the coun-
try’s premier athletes, all
hoping to fight their way
back to the top of the
charts.

Sealing her return with a
win in the sprint events was
Sheniqua Ferguson. This
was the first set of individ-
ual events for the Auburn
University bound sprinter.

¢ SEE PAGE TWO







SERA AANA PT REA NNR

The Joshua | a : nu
ccc GHS weave their magic
the DHL Ul

m BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON

Sports Reporter

THE Hugh Campbell Invi-
tational has arrived and the
GHS Magics pulled out all the
tricks to start their tournament
on a high.

The Magics had their wands
handy and with just one twirl,
Galilee College was in the los-
ing bracket. The Magics, who
had a big fourth quarter,
pulled off the first game with a
49-43 victory.

The Magics’ show started
from the tip, with an explo-

sive offensive opening. As a .

team, they outscored Galilee
7-3 — a score posted just min-
utes from the opening start.

Galilee, who were depend-
ing on Ashton Neely to score,
got off to a slow start, the
team managed to throw up
five clean shots, only three fell.
All other scores were made
from the free throw line.

Even though the Magics’
were able to disrupt Galilee’s
offensive flow, head coach
Samuel Symonette was still
disappointed with their play
in the first half.

According to Symonette,
the Magics allowed Galilee to
creep their way back into the
game after successful shut outs
in the first quarter.

Symonette said: “The guys
played with a little more heart
than they usually do through
the regular season. They came

out, they listened and tried to |

execute down the stretch and
it worked out for us.”

But Symonette will have to
take his crew back to the
drawing board before their
next game.

Even though the team
bagged a win, Symonette
believes that perfect execu-
tion on both ends of the court
will be the only way his team
will prevail.

The Magics, who are play-
ing out of Pool I in the tour-
nament, are scheduled to play
St John’s College today at
7pm.

According to Symonette,
this will be a big challenge for
his team, but the yesterday’s
win will give the boys enough
confidence.

He said: “I am sure this is
going to be a big challenge for
the team but we will have to
come out and meet the chal-
lenge and come out and play
extra hard.

“T believe the guys can do it,
they will just have to come
out, buckle down, they will
need to stay focused and exe-
cute on every opportunity.

“It is a tough pool but we
are going to do our best. We
need to react to the ball a little
bit faster, stay focused through
the game. Defensively after
they score they tend to trot
back when we need to get
back on defence.”

The Magics blew an eight
point half time lead, trailing
Galilee by three points by the
end of third quarter.

But Magics’ Kenzitte
Munnings would turn up the
heat in the fourth.

Munnings scored eight of
his 10 points in the closing
minutes. Helping the Magics’
cause was William Dean with
eight points and six rebounds.

Symonette added: “The
guys got tired, some of them
missed a lot of practices. Lack
of conditioning takes a toll on
them as they play the game.”

Leading the way for Galilee
was Cordero Sturrup with 14
points and 11 rebounds.

=>

i GHS prove to be too much for Galilee dowr

mM





1 the stretch in the Hugh Campbell opening game.
(Photo: Tim Cla

IAMI HERALD

SPORTS INSIDE

m SOFTBALL
By KELSIE
JOHNSON
Sports Reporter
THE weekend rain



GHS won 49-43.

rke/Tribune staff)




PAGE 8E, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007 TRIBUNE SPORTS

wraex GHS edge past Galilee in|

of 80 million

co” Hugh

mâ„¢ SOCCER agen
LONDON m,;

Associated Press

PREMIER League
champion Chelsea post-
ed losses of 80.2 million
pounds (US$155.9 mil-
lion) in the last financial.
year, a cut of 60 million
pounds (US$116.6m) on
the debt recorded the
previous tax period

The loss, announced
by the club Monday, is
the lowest loss since
Russian oil billionaire
Roman Abramovich
took over the club in
2003. The Blues have
won the last two league
championships and are
in second place this sea-
son behind Manchester
United.

Also Monday,
Chelsea announced it
was freezing Premier
League ticket prices for
all non-corporate buy-
ers, including season
and matchday tickets
for members, youth and
senior citizens. .

Chief executive Peter ©
Kenyon said the club
was also planning to
reduce ticket prices for
Champions League and
domestic cup matches.

"We understand that
our ticket prices are at
the higher end and we
are sensitive to the eco-
nomic demands on our
supporters," Kenyon
said.

Chelsea said its finan-
cial results for the year
ending June 2006 also
included increases in
turnover, merchandising
and soccer activities.

The most significant
rise was in merchandis-
ing, which increased
from 7.7 million pounds
(US$14.9 million) to

-11.1 million pounds

(US$21.5 million).

Turnover increased by
2.3 percent to 150 mil-
lion pounds (US$291.6
million), and soccer
activities increased by
6.3 percent to 130.4 mil-
lion (US$253.5 million).

"These figures
demonstrate that the
business is moving in
the right direction with
increases and growth in
all the major income
streams," Kenyon said.

Chelsea began a 100-
million-pound |
(US$194.4 million), 10-
year deal with German
sporting manufacturer
Adidas this season.

Last financial year,
Chelsea paid English
firm Umbro 25 million
pounds (US$48.6 mil-
lion) to end its:sponsor-
ship deal and spent 22.8
million pounds
(US$44.3 million) ter-
minating the coniracts
of strikers Adrian Mutu
and Juan Sebastian
Veron.

"Last year we took
some painful decisions
in order to help us
achieve our long term i i
business aims," Kenyon: as ‘ oe Foe " Ce Ss
said. i ; “ uae oe a stan ae —

"This year's figures
prove that was the cor-
rect decision.

“With increasing
sponsorship income,
television revenue, and
ongoing success on the
field, those positive
trends are projected to
continue."

Chelsea aims to break
even by the 2009-10 sea-
son. Until then, it's rely-
ing on the financial
backing of Abramovich,
who has put nearly 500
million pounds
(US$972.3 million) into
the club.

‘Last financial year,
Chelsea spent more
than 100 million pounds
(US$194.4 million) on
new players, most
notably Andriy
Shevchenko. Shaun
Wright-Phillips, Michael
Essien and John Obi
Mikel also joined the
club — all for more than
16 million pounds
(US$31.1 million).

ee ee

e us Loe ew A a : : \ . : ‘ Rei
@ ACTION from the GHS Magics’ game ag (Photos: Tim


PAGE 2E, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2007




Roger Federer fies —
Connors’ record for
consecutive weeks
as top-ranked player

@ TENNIS ;
LONDON i
Associated Press

ROGER FEDERER tied
Jimmy Connors’ record of 160
consecutive weeks as the top-
ranked player in men’s tennis
Monday.

The 10-time Grand Slam
champion has held the No. 1
ATP Tour ranking since Feb.
2, 2004. The Swiss star is
assured of breaking the record
next week.

“Breaking records and
doing something that hasn’t
been done for a long time, it’s
really nice,” Federer said
recently.

Connors was No. 1 from
’ July 1974 to August 1977. He
is now coaching one of Feder-
er’s biggest rivals, Andy Rod-
dick. :

Federer, who has won six of
the last seven Grand Slam
titles, hasn’t played since beat-
ing Fernando Gonzalez in the
Australian Open final on Jan.
28. He returns to action next
week at the Dubai Open.

Federer has 8,120 points in
the year-based rankings.
Rafael Nadal, the man who
beat Federer at the French
Open last year, is second with
4,705 points. Nadal also beat
Federer in the Dubai Open i
final last year. i

The 25-year-old Federer
has dominated tennis for the
past three seasons, but is still
trying to win a Grand Slam
title on clay.

“That’s the only way I can -
make this season a better one
than last year,” Federer has
said. “Otherwise it won’t be
possible.”

Last season, only Nadal and
Andy Murray managed to
beat Federer, who finished the : *
season with 12 titles and 16 }
finals appearances in his 17
tournaments. He earned $8.34
million and also won the sea-
son-ending Masters Cup.

Federer couldn’t be
reached for comment Mon- i
day, but his mother was happy }
to hear that her son reached :
yet another milestone.

“Of course I’m proud. It’s





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heniqua Ferg

(FILE Photo)

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS

Sheniqua
hits form in
sprint events

MTRACK AND FIELD.
By KELSIE JOHNSON

Sports. Reporter

TRACK and field is in full
swing on the local scene and
junior athletes are using the
weekend meets to improve
their form.

The first annual Dianna

Lynn Thompson Road Run-.

ners track meet, held over the
weekend, saw the return of
some the country’s premier

athletes, all hoping to fight .

their way back to the top of
the charts.

Sealing her return with a
win in the sprint events was
Sheniqua Ferguson. This was
the first set of individual
events for the Auburn Uni-
versity bound sprinter. -

In the 100m she clocked
12.11 seconds for the win over
teammates Krystal Bodie’s
12.27 seconds and Tia Rolle
in third in 12.32 seconds. ,

The 200m Ferguson record-
ed 24.37 seconds to edge out
Tamara Rigby who finished
up in 25.01 seconds and Jesha
White in 25.37 seconds.

Printassia Johnson is show-
ing great form, leading the
sprint events in the under 17
girls division.

Johnson, who has already
dipped under the entry stan-
dards in the 100m for the
Carifta Games, returned to
the track this week to capture
the century in a time of 12.47
seconds and the 200m in 24.90
seconds.

.Fifiishing second in the
100m "was V’Alonne Robin-

Dianna Lynn Thompson
Road Runners meet



son in 12.49 seconds followed
by Ashlee Dorsett in 12.67
seconds and Carlene Johnson
in 12.73 seconds.

In the 200m Carlene John-
son would follow Printassia
Johnson in 25.30 seconds with
Robinson coming in third in
25.60 seconds.

Daejha Moss continues on
her winning streak in the girls
under 9 division, showing that
she is indeed a prospect for
the future.

For the fourth consecutive
week, Moss walked away the
victor in the 100m, taking the
event in a time of 15.70 sec-
onds. She was followed by
Dejanique Lightbourne in

15.80 seconds and Charlissa

Ferguson in 16.30 seconds.

Lightbourne would claim
the 200m with a best of 34.50
seconds, Charisma Taylor was
second in 35.10 seconds with
Danielle Shaw. third in 35.60
seconds.

The yard dash in the under
11 girls division belonged to
Asia Butler, who finished up
in 14.20 seconds, Jeorgette
Williams came in second place
in 14.50 seconds followed
closely by Kennedy Carbin in
14.60 seconds.

It would be a twist in posi-
tions for the trio in the 200m
with Carbin leading the way.

She would take the event in

a time of 30.98 seconds, Butler
secured the second spot in
31.20 seconds while Williams
settled for third in a time of
31.50 seconds.

Things in the under 13 divi-
sion heated up with Khadjia
Fraser’s winning streak com-
ing to an end.

Breaking the streak was
Kendace Hart, capturing the
100m in 13.30 seconds, leav-
ing Fraser to settle for second
in 13.60 seconds. Rounding
out the third spot was Makeya
White in 13.70 seconds.

The battle, between D’An-
gelo Mackey and D’Vaughn
Laing, for the sprinting crown
in the under 9 boys division
continued on this weekend.

Mackey would get the bet-
ter of Laing in the 100m, tak-
ing the event in a time of 15.00
seconds, Laing clocked 15.20
seconds for second and Mari-
ano Kelly 15.50 seconds for
the third spot.

The 200m would see Laing
record 32.50 seconds for the
200m crown, Mackey second
in 33.00 seconds and Brason
Rolle third in 33.30 seconds.

On the field Trae Carey
landed his way to the top of
the boys under 13 long jump
with a best leap of 4.41m. He
was followed by Oral Rolle
with 4.22m and Rubin Elme
of Bahamas Elite with 4.16m.

First Baptist crush
Faith United ©

m BASKETBALL

AFTER losing a close encounter with the
defending champions St. Paul's Fox Hill last

week, First Baptist men came back Saturday

and they took their frustration out on Faith
United.

In one of the marquee games at the Charles
W. Saunders High School, Jean Street, First
Baptist clobbered Faith United 66-17 to high-
light a day of blowouts and close finishes as the
Baptist Sports Council's 2007 Rev. Tyrone
Knowles Basketball Classic rolled into high
gear.

¢ Here's a summary of all of the games
played:

First Baptist 66, Faith United 17: Gamalian
Rose led a balanced scoring attack, with 15
points, Eddy Miller and Cruz Simmons both
had nine and Eugene Bain and Tamico Moxey
chipped in with eight a-piece as First Baptist
pulled even at 1-1.

Ronald Napolean had eight and Dario Dean
five in the loss as Faith United dropped their
season opener.

Church of the Nazarene 47, Lord's House of
Faith 44: Evins Milfrid and Vardo Gray both
scored 16 points to lead Christ Church of the
Nazarene as they won in their debut in the
men's division.

Carvin Cummings scored a game high 19 in
the loss. Pastor Arthur Duncombe added eight.

Temple Fellowship 56, Golden Gates 49:
Edison Burrows canned a game high 23 points
and Ishban Lynes and Sidney Cunningham
both contributed four as Temple Fellowship
pulled even at 1-1.

Jaroy Cooper had 15 and Kyle Rodgers nine
as Golden Gates suffered their season opening
loss.

Bahamas Harvest 43, Macedonia 35: Irnara
Thompson scored 13, Travis Forbes had eight
and Shawn Smith six as Bahamas Harvest won
their men's season opener.

Rohn Johnson scored a game high 15,
Anthony Porter had eight and Tim Clarke six
as Macedonia loss their second straight game.

New St. Paul's 64, New Bethlehem 29: Dar-
ren Darville pumped in a game high 19, includ-
ing three 3-pointers, Ricardo Smith had 11,
including two 3-pointers, George Simpson had
nine, McClain Higgs added seven and Robert
Colebrooke Jr. chipped in with six as the New
St. Paul's Bias Street pulled evenatl-l.

Therell Duncombe had 18 and Kendrick
Wilson, Gerrad Darville and Donovan Bullard
all scored four as New Bethlehem dropped to
1-1,

First Baptist 66, Faith United 17: Golden
Gates 47, New Bethlehem 30: Claude Lesbott

scored 10, Bradley Cash and Brandon Brown
both had eight and Rocco Fernander added
six as Golden Gates won their second straight
19-and-under game.

Philip Jackson and Kentino Ferguson scored
eight each in New Bethlehem's season opener.

St. Paul's FH 31, Golden Gates No.1 19:
Kendal Simmons came up with 12, Patrick
Brice had seven and Jarvis Delancy helped out
with five as St. Paul's Fox Hill won their 15-
and-under opener.

Kendrick Moss had six, Ravon Armbrister
five and Dearran Rolle and David Kemp both
added four.

Everlasting Life Ministries 42, St. Paul's FH
39: Deangelo Williamson hit 14 points, Jyde
Rolle 10, Trevone Grant six and Daniel Cadet
five as Everlasting Life Ministries wo. their
pulled even at 1-1 in the 19-and-under divi-
sion.

Bryan Delancy scored 12, Kendal Simmons
had nine and Kendal Simmons eight in St
Paul’s season opening loss.

First Baptist 33, Faith United 31: Donero
Balfour scored nine points to lead First Baptist
as they nipped Faith United's team one for
their season opening victory.

Jermaine Mackey and Kenton Gibson led
the way for Faith United.

Faith. United 52, Ebenezer 35: Galen Gray
scored a game high 21 points and Theo Woods
had 16 as Faith United won their 19-and-under
season opener. .

Leroy Wells scored 11 as Ebenezer suffered
their second straight loss.

Golden Gates 24, Ebenezer 8: Daveran Boo-
tle had six points and Delano Miller added
five as Golden Gates No.II won their 15-and-
under season opener.

Lewis Colebrooke scored four in Ebenez-
er's season opener loss.

¢ Here's the fixture of games on tap for Sat-
urday:

Court One - 10 a.m. Ebenezer vs Macedonia
(15); 11 a.m. Macedonia vs Kemp Road Min-
istries (19); Noon Evangelistic Center vs Mace-
donia (M); 1 p.m. Christ Church of the
Nazarene vs New Covenant (19); 2 p.m. New
Bethlehem vs Bahamas Harvest (M) and 3
p.m. Kemp Road Ministries vs Faith United
(M).

Court Two - 10 a.m. Transfiguration vs Mt.
Tabor (15); 11 a.m. Ebenezer vs New Bethle-
hem (19); Noon Christ Church of the Nazarene
vs Calvary Bible (M); 1 p.m. Golden Gates
No.II vs New Covenant (15); 2 p.m.

Temple Fellowship vs St. Paul's FH (M); 3
p.m. Lord's House of Faith vs St. Paul's Bias
Street (M).