Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
PAGE 2, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Tec RMR BCRUNEWS RRC HPAI VA OATES ae
FNM call for action on constructing new school |

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - The FNM on
Grand Bahama is criticising the
PLP government for its neglect
of overcrowding in the public
education system and its failure
to construct a much needed
junior high school in Freeport.

“For almost five years the
Christie administration has
neglected the education needs
of Grand Bahama,” said the
Free National Movement in a
statement.

“Our children have been
forced to attend severely over-
crowded schools because the
much needed Junior High
School which the FNM left
plans and funding arrangements
in place to construct was
neglected by this uncaring PLP
administration,” it said.

FNM MPs and candidates on
Grand Bahama visited the pro-
posed site for the new junior
high school in the Heritage Sub-
division, where only mounds of
dirt and fill have been piled
along the road side.

St George’s High School,
which was constructed under

the FNM administration and '

was built to accommodate some
900 students, has an enrollment
of almost 1,700 students. Jack
Hayward High, which was also
constructed for 900 students,



a PICTURED (lett to right) are FNM Pineridge « candidate Kwasi Thoinpacik: Marco City candi-
date Zhivargo Laing, MP for Lucaya, Neko Grant, High Rock MP Ken Russell and FNM Eight
MileRock candidate Verna Grant in front of the planned Heritage Junior School site in Grand

Bahama.

currently has an enrollment of

1,500 students.
The FNM claims: “The gov-
ernment of Prime Minister

Christie has made thousands of

Bahamian students and their
educators suffer needlessly
because of their incompetence,
inefficiency and ineffectiveness.

“How much progress have
our children lost because this

uncaring administration could
not follow-through on a plan
left for them to construct the
junior high school? One won-
ders if the overcrowding at
these schools has not con-

tributed to needless social prob-

lems at the schools, including
lower than expected academic
performance, violence among
students, and attacks against

teachers. We know that secu-
rity has been a major concern
over the last several years.”
When the FNM left office in
2002, according to the party,
there were plans drawn for a
junior high school, a site had
been selected for the school, and
there was a $3-million commit-
ment from the Grand Bahama
Port Authority toward financing

the construction of the school.

It was further stated that the
FNM government had made
budgetary provisions for the
financing of the school.

“How uncaring can this gov-
ernment be to have taken
almost five years to build a des-
perately needed school? How
inept can they have been to not
be able to attend to this critical
education need?

The FNM is also demanding
that the government meet the
needs of hundreds of Grand
Bahama teachers who are owed
salaries and other payments.

“Over four hundred teachers
in Grand Bahama found it nec-
essary recently to leave their’
beloved students and the calling
to which they have committed
themselves because the gov-
ernment could not see about
their pay.

The FNM said that both for-
eign and Bahamian teachers
have had to struggle to meet
their obligations while govern-

‘ment ministers collect their full

salaries on time each month.
“Tt is outrageous that the Min-
ister of Education went to the
Parliament and said that these
matters had been resolved. Yet,
these teachers say not so. They
confirm by their industrial action
that it is not so. We cry shame
on this incompetent and inept
administration.”



- Ingraham: education system is in
chaos and the minister incapable

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

THE Ministry of Education

is in a state of disarray and con-
fusion reigns in the country’s
education system, Opposition
leader Hubert Ingraham said

last night at an FNM Rally in
the Golden Gates Constituency.

Mr Ingraham pointed out
that no new schools had been

rn

built in the government’s five
years in office and there had
been a failure by the .govern-
ment to get schools repaired in

”
_ MONT LSU) AVE, Rainy: eee PD ie RPS oe

PRICE INCLUDES: FIRST SERVICE E FREE
LICENSE & INSPECTION

FULL TANK OF GAS :
FULL SET FLOOR MATS

_ PARTS & SERVICE ASSU RED





time for opening or paying new
teachers in a timely fashion.

“At first, the excuse was that
the PLP Minister of Education
was too busy, had too much on
his plate. So during his so-called
Cabinet shuffle, which came
much too late and was not much
of a shuffle anyway, Mr Christie
relieved Minister Alfred Sears
of his responsibility as Attor-
ney General so he could con-
centrate on education.

“And things went from bad
to worse. It wasn’t that the min-
ister had too. much to do; the
problem was, and still is, that
he doesn’t know what to do.
And so our children suffer,” Mr
Ingraham said.

If elected, the opposition
leader said that one of his first
priorities would be to revive the
education system by placing
emphasis on the basics: Litera-
cy, numeracy and oracy in early
education.

He also promised that a gov-
ernment led by him would
meet a great challenge which
will tax the country’s resources,
imagination and commitment,
rescuing those young people
who have already fallen
through the cracks and are
presently unemployed or
unemployable.

“In collaboration with the
churches, youth organisations,
service clubs, civic associations,
the College of The Bahamas
and international agencies, we
will implement programmes to
reach out to these young peo-
ple, to motivate them, to offer
them opportunities for training
so that they can become pro-
ductive citizens.

“We simply cannot afford to

_have large numbers of alienated

young people, especially young
men, sitting on the sidelines
while the country develops and
life passes them by. There

’ would be a high cost in that for

all of us. First, we would have to:
import more and more foreign
workers to do the work that we
should be doing ourselves,” he
said,

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

PEST CONTROL
it aa ya der Lg













In brief

Castro’ Ss son
Says recovery
progress is
‘satisfactory’
a HAVANA



FIDEL Castro’s eldest son
and namesake said Thursday
his father’s comeback from
intestinal surgery has been

“satisfactory” and that he
could eventually recover
completely, Iaccording‘to
Associated Press. i

“As Raul said officials), as
well as other leaders: his state
of health is! progressing i
satisfactory and anainined
manner,” Fidel Castro Diaz
Balart told reporters. \3

Raul Castro, Fidel’s Broth!
er and the 75-year-gl\
defense minister, has beet
acting president since his 80-
year-old sibling stepped aside
more than six months ago to
recover from the surgery. '

“That’s the same percep-
tion that I have,” the 56-year-
old known as “Fidelito” said
on the sidelines of an inter-
national book fair. “We
believe that bit by bit, com-
rade Fidel will achieve total
recovery. That’s the hope of
the Cuban people and the
revolutionaries of the world.”

The bearded revolution-
ary’s brothers Raul and
Ramon, 82, said separately
last week that Castro was
recovering well. Raul added
that his brother was exercis-
ing and frequently using the
telephone.

Cuban officials have denied
US government reports that
Fidel suffered from cancer. A
Spanish newspaper reported
last month that he had diver-
ticular disease, a weakening
of the walls of the colon.

Trial set for
Cuban militant
accused of

lying

@ TEXAS
El Paso Y :

AN anti-Castro Cuban mil
itant accused of lying to
immigration officials in a bid
to become a,US citizen
should stand trial in May, a
federal judge ruled Thursday,
according to Associated Press.

US District Judge Kathleen
Cardone set May 11 for jury
selection in the case against
Luis Posada Carriles, who has
been in US immigration cus-
tody since May 2005 after sur-
facing in Miami. ~

Posada, a former CJA
operative and US Army sol-
dier, is accused of lying about
how he illegally. entered the
United States from Mexico
in 2005 and several other
details in interviews and on
an application to become a
naturalized US citizen.

According to a seven-count
indictment handed down last
month, Posada told investi-
gators he paid a smuggler to
drive him across the border
into South Texas but really
entered the country aboard
a boat with several men he
had denied seeing.

He is also accused of lying
about using an alias.

Posada was arrested ona
charge that he illegally
entered the country. Since
then, an immigration judge
has ruled that he should be
deported, but ordered that he
could not be sent to Cuba,
where he was, born, or
Venezuela, where he is a nat-
uralised citizen.

Governments of both
countries want Posada
deported to Venezuela so he
can stand trial on charges that
he was in Caracas when he
plotted the deadly 1976
bombing of a Cuban jetliner:

Posada has denied any
wrongdoing and has pleaded
not guilty in the federal crim-
inal case.



<¢

5

tw 4

4

a7. FP Owe: [wwe wee se

Oe om ee Oe



THE TRIBUNE





In brief



16-year-old
in hospital
with serious |
head injuries

A 16-YEAR-OLD boy is
in critical condition in the
intensive care unit at Princess
Margaret Hospital after he
received serious head
injuries.

According to, police, the
boy was found lying uncon-
scious on the ground on Tay-
lor Street in the Nassau Vil-
lage area at Spm on Wednes-
day.

He had a wound to his
head when he was discovered
and was taken to hospital.

Investigations are contin-
uing.

Haitian gang
members flee

to Dominican
Republic

w HAITI
Port-au-Prince

AN aggressive new UN
offensive has prompted sev-

eral Haitian gang members.

to flee their slum strongholds
and cross the border into the
Dominican Republic, the top
official of the international
body in Haiti said Thursday,
according to Associated Press.

Edmond Mulet, the United
Nations special envoy to
Haiti, said Dominican
authorities have captured
several of the gang members
crossing into their territory
‘since the UN peacekeepers
launched a series of crack-
downs on gangs in two Port-
au-Prince slums earlier this
month.

“We heard from the
Dominican authorities ... that
they have arrested several
gang members or people try-
ing to flee to the Dominican
Republic,” Mulet told the
Associated Press.

“This is normal, especially
if you are a gang member and
have money, just to leave the
country to go somewhere

here you will not be

nown,” he added.
Officials in the Dominican
Republic — which shares the.
Caribbean island of Hispan-
iola with Haiti — did not
immediately return phone
calls seeking comment.

UN troops and Haitian
police raided the Martissant
slum last weekend and arrest-
ed 31 gang members. On Fri-
day, more than 700 troops
raided another slum, Cite.
Soleil, and killed one sus-
pected gang member and
wounded four others.

In January, UN troops
killed four suspected gang
members in Cite Soleil during
a raid to seize an abandoned
_ schoolhouse that the UN said
had been used to stage
attacks on peacekeepers. A
month earlier, peacekeepers
fought a five-hour gun battle
with gangs during another
raid in Cite Soleil. The UN
said six gang members died,
but slum dwellers claimed 10
died and all were civilians.

Mulet said the 8,800-strong
UN force and Haitian police
would continue going after
gangs in Port-au-Prince but
had no plans to beef up
patrols along the 243-mile
Haitian-Dominican border.

The UN Security Council
on Thursday voted unani-
mously to extend the peace-
keeping mission for eight
months following an agree-

_ment between the United
States and China on the
length of the new mandate.

The blue-helmeted UN
force arrived in July 2004.

“ye 4,
‘The Tribune wants to hear
} from’people who are
making news in, their
J neigh yourhoods. Perhaps
you ate raising funds for a
goodicause, campaigning
for itiprovements in the
area Or have won an
award,

24











@ By BRENT DEAN

A WEEK after Deputy
Prime Minister and Minister of
National Security Cynthia Pratt
said senior police restructuring
would occur, no announcement
has yet been made regarding
the shuffle.

In particular, significant con-
troversy has emerged sur-
rounding the potential transfer

‘of Assistant Commissioner
Reginald Ferguson from his job .

as crime chief to head the police
college.

Many view such a move as a
demotion that may be intended
to force Mr-Ferguson into
retirement.

Mr Ferguson is the brother
of FNM candidate for South
Eleuthera, Johnley Ferguson,
and public accusations have
arisen that his transfer is politi-
cally motivated. :

Other accusations suggest the

‘transfer would make him the

‘scapegoat’ over the arrest of
five Nassau Flight Services bag-
gage handlers in Florida last
year — thus deflecting criticism

ae Meoley.\ Ba | VS

Still no announcement on ©
senior police reshuffling —

from the government.
Mrs Pratt has vehemently
denied accusations that the

impending transfers are either

politically motivated or related
to the NFS controversy.

Mrs. Pratt has also gone on
record as stating that the trans-
fers would be implemented. at

‘ the discretion of the commis-

sioner, and would give senior
officers experience in other
areas of the force.

Mr Ferguson’s transfer has
led many officers to make pub-
lic remarks surrounding the
controversy. Some senior offi-
cers have spoken in support of
Mr Ferguson, indicating that
they do not desire to see him
moved. ,

Other senior offices said Mr
Ferguson has been head of
crime for too long - ten years -
and a change of direction was
now necessary.

Though Mr Ferguson’s
potential move has dominated
discourse surrounding the trans-
fers, the move of Assistant
Commissioner Elliston
Greenslade has also sparked

keen interest.

Mr Greenslade has been
head of the Northern Bahamas
for the last few years and
sources have indicated that his
‘return to Nassau, to potentially
take over Mr Ferguson’s crime

portfolio, indicates that he is

being groomed to succeed Mr
Paul Farquharson as commis-
sioner when Mr Farquharson
leaves office.

Reports have also suggested

that Mr Greenslade may even ,

be about to take over as deputy
commissioner. But for this to
occur, the current deputy John
Rolle would need to retire.

It is unclear if the public con-
troversy created by reports in
The Tribune, and subsequent
discussion on talk radio regard-
ing the transfers, have led the
government to delay or re-eval-
uate the transfers.

Attempts to contact Mrs
Pratt were unsuccessful up to
press time.

i CYNTHIA Pratt

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007, PAGE 3





FNM leader pledges to strengthen police

force and to provide adequate payment

IN response to the country’s
continuing problem with crime,
FNM leader Hubert Ingraham
yesterday promised prospective
voters that his party would
make strengthening the police
force a priority. :

Speaking last night at the
FNM’s rally in the Golden
Gates constituency, Mr Ingra-
ham said that his party is
“acutely aware that the high
incidence of crime, especially
violent crime, is threatening our
society.”

“We are also aware that to
defeat this threat we must

mount a vigorous and multi-

‘
faceted response,” he said.

Mr Ingraham said that it will
be one of the FNM’s first prior-
ities if they win the government
to give police officers the pay

they deserve as well as the.

equipment they need to keep
the: population safe and the
streets crime-free.

In addition to improving the
police force, the FNM leader
told his audience, his party will
also “strengthen, equip and ade-
quately pay the men: ‘and
women of the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force.” ~~

“While we go about our busi-
ness, or while we sleep in our

homes at night, we must know
that they are able to protect us
from drug runners, illegal immi-
grants and those who would
steal our marine resources,” he
said.

Objectives.

Mr Ingraham outlined the -

objectives of the FNM, explain-
ing that his party intends to
strengthen and equip the
Defence Force base at Inagua,
establish a permanent Defence
Force outpost at Farmer’s Cay
in the Exumas, as well as a

Cars wrecked in crash |

EE 3

a

@ A CRASH in front of the Nassau Beach Hotel in Cable Beach left two cars seriously damaged

on Wednesday night- however, there were no injuries



of things we
think, say or do

1.|s it the TRUTH?

2.\s it FAIR to all
concerned?

3. Will it build
GOODWILL and
BETTER
FRIENDSHIPS?

4.Willitbe
BENEFICIAL to
all concerned?

www. rotary.org

















(Photo: Ana Bianca Marin)





satellite presence in the Ragged
Island chain “so as to minimise,
if not eliminate altogether, the
trafficking in human beings
from the south.”
“We believe that with the

right sea and air craft and mod-

ern surveillance equipment we
should be able to stop them
from continuing to cruise
through our islands right into

. Nassau Harbour.

“Tf we can stop them in the
south and process them at
Inagua, that should do two
things. It should discourage
some of them from coming in
the first place, and it will cer-



kssaplie PEF * 3
Sacovs

Ltr TLe
CSI SA. GR





WMO

EFFECTIVE FEBRUARY 09TH, 2007

evi [en | Jom few [5
new | 200 |

15
new | 15 [840 [wa [eto [an | rs |
wew | tad [WA [a0 | tao Tum | rosa
t [sn [2m [an [oto [oa [1050
| sm [325 [Ma
rnewessemen TL tay [880 [NR
srowrmevand TL ty (85 NA
WT sag [3a |_| 620
sarees

_ GALLERIA 6 - JFK DRIVE

QUB E-CARD TQ RESER KET A

DADDY'S LITTLE GIRLS
| DADDY'S LITTLE GIRLS





BRIDGE TO TERABITHIA
MUSIC & LYRICS

WORBIT.
HANNIBAL RISING














ARTHUR AND THE INVISIBLES
DREAMGIRLS

DADDY'S LITTLE GIRLS NEW






BRIDGE TO TERABITHIA NEW

NORBIT T
HANNIBAL RISING .

STOMP THE YARD T

SS RNS ees TS



The Mall-at-Marathon

BOX OFFICE OPENS AT 10:00 AM DAILY

Tee



rat |
cen [a [a8 | WA | [|
sa | | ea
[Pk | |
re [sa [ak | [| |

va 395_ [WA | 600 | 826 [1046

, RS S SEN ETE WON

tainly make it less burdensome
on the Public Treasury to repa-
triate them from Inagua instead
of Nassau,” Mr Ingraham said.

The party leader further said

. the next. FNM government will
undertake a “complete reap-

praisal of public policy as it
relates to the employment of
expatiates in the Bahamas — not
only at the low end but also at
the high end.”

“One of the things we will
immediately address is the pro-
liferation of ghettos by immi-
grants, whether legal or illegal.
We simply cannot allow this to
continue,” he said.












reece NC
















[eff
SiS TMA | gas [025 [108





1h:
a

ae

=>
2










&





ss_|
re
ee |
ea

ital

OB WWW,GALLERIAVINEN OM
[wa | ean | os | 1035







PAGE 4, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007



The Tribune Limited





NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH,

Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.;
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., MS., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

: Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas ~
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

Bahamianisation and discrimination

AT LEAST one Bahamian lawyer considers
“Bahamianisation” a euphemism for institu-
tionalised discrimination. We couldn’t agree
with him more. We also agree that it has out-

lived its usefulness and has for years protected °

and encouraged mediocrity in this country.

Lawyer Fred Smith of Freeport— like many
Bahamians of his age — believes that “Bahami-
anisation” was a creation of the PLP. It was
not. wm
Bahamianisation was first introduced by the
UBP government to protect qualified Bahami-
ans from unfair outside competition. An
employer had to look to our own people first to
fill a vacancy. If that failed he was free to search
beyond our shores.

Bahamianisation took on new meaning when
the Progressive Liberal Party became the gov-
ernment in 1967. It was then that this Bahami-
ans-first policy became a political tool to blud-
geon government’s opponents out of commer-
cial existence. That ig why it has always — and
will always — be considered a PLP creation.

We recall several bank managers complain-
ing that when the bank’s essential work per-
mits were pending, they could be certain that a
government politician would appear and apply
for a bank loan. The bank would send these
applications to head office because it was known
that in the ordinary course of business — such as

credit ratings — these loans would not be -

approved. However, the bank also knew that if
the loan were not approved, neither would be
the work permits. They were also aware that if
the politician did not honour his payments on
the loan, the bank had to remain mute for the
same reason. No matter which way an employ-
er squirmed, Bahamianisation under the PLP,
had him pinned to the wall.

The same thing happened at the hotels when
certain members of the PLP wanted board and
lodging and free entertainment. rae

We recall a certain PLP Immigration Minis-
ter who had the impudence to tell the late Sir
Etienne Dupuch, publisher of this newspaper,
that he was a liar because he failed to retire
from The Tribune on his son-in-law being grant-
ed a work permit — apparently Sir Etienne’s
retirement in this puny man’s mind was condi-
tional on the work permit. Even to this day,
we would like to know who that minister
thought he was.

We could write a book about the abuse and
threats that those who publish this newspaper
had to endure daily under the Pindling reign of
terror. That administration succeeded in turning
this country into a frightened society. But that
cringing fear, that buckled men’s knees, stopped

at The Tribune’s doorstep. We insisted that .

regardless of the threats, the Bahamian people
had a right to know. We stood by our convic-
tions, closed our ears to the abuse and continued
to write and to publish.

And so today when they get out there blus-
tering, and flexing their muscles about what
they are going to make The Tribune do, they are
wasting their breath. The Tribune is going to do
nothing that we do. not consider in the best



. South

SUNDAY SERVICES
7:00am, 9:00am, 11:15am
PASTOR EARLE FRANCIS J.P.,D.D.
Marriage Officer, Counsellor, Intercessor.
- Phone: 323-6452 » 393-5798
Fax: 326-4488/394-4819

ATTENTION ALL RESIDENTS
OF LONG ISLAND

Re-Bath Bahamas will be making
installations in Clarence Town beginning
15 February 2007 for 4 days.

_ To arrange an appointment to receive a
quotation to refurbish your bathroom with

our Re-Bath system.

Contact Michael Duggan at
Phone 242-393-8501 or 242-477-1671



interest of the Bahamian people. We do not
insult the Bahamians by treating them like chil-
dren, whose reading material has to be cen-
sored. They have a right to know what their
elected officials are doing or failing to do so
that they can make informed decisions. The

- ‘Tribune is not here to protect any minister of
any government. Government ministers should
know the rules. They should also know that
when they break those rules and abuse the trust
put in them by the Bahamian people, The Tri-
bune will report them to the people. We are
not here to-put on rose-coloured glasses and
call a thorn a rose when we know that it’s an
undesirable thorn.

“Bahamians should not be automatically enti-
tled to a job because they are Bahamians,” Mr
Smith continued in his commentary on Bahami-
anisation. “Employment in a free, open and
competitive market place is earned on merit.

“Employers should be able to hire competent
employees and not have to settle, in many
instances, for mediocrity and incompetence
because they are forced to hire Bahamians.”

It was this protective policy that shackled
Bahamians in mediocrity and incompetence.
Many felt that they did not have to compete, nor
did they have to qualify. The fact that they were
Bahamian was the only qualification required.
We recall a former PLP gentlemen telling us
many years ago about a disagreement that broke
out among PLPs — we believe it was a branch
election. This gentleman, a man of years and
much experience, told of how an unqualified
upstart pushed his arm out and pointed to the
colour of his skin. The older gentleman’s skin
colour would have been described as “bright”,
the younger man’s was ebony black. They were
both PLPs. But the younger man felt that he had
more rights, not because he was better qualified,
because he certainly was not, but because he
had the darker skin. The darker skin won the
day. The older gentleman came to our offices to

- tell Sir Etienne of his experience, and announce
that he was leaving a party that he had helped
mould — because, of all things, it was racist.

Bahamians will never qualify if they are not
pushed to compete. Today all doors are open to
them. All educational opportunities are avail-
able. Many scholarships are offered for those
who qualify.

For Bahamians with ambition, the sky is the

- limit. For those who do not take advantage of

-the opportunities open to them, they, like the
disappearing dinosaurs, will be left behind. But

this country cannot be held back, and local busi- ~

nesses crippled, because a people are too lazy to
exert themselves.

We agree with Mr Smith that “the Immi-
gration Act, licensing laws, government favours
and political corruption were used as tools of
victimisation against Bahamians who opposed
the PLP.” This has to stop.

We believe that employers should still adver-
tise for Bahamians for positions that are open in
their firms, but that they should be free to select
the best man or woman for the job, regardless of
nationality.













NE TTTOU Sno
“To Obey Is Better Than Sacrifice”



Spy aRe)s i) VM =a maton em 1h

National Art

‘98 HYUNDAI ELANTRA Best offer
~ 499 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
‘00 HYUNDAI GALLOPER
‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE
‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE

Very low mileage, very clean

‘05 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
Only 5,000 miles plus very clean

‘03 SUZUKI BALENO |
‘03 SUZUKI XL-7

7-Passenger, dual A/C & low mileage

‘89 TOYOTA BUS Best offer

QUALIT

#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775 * 325-3079

Visit our showroom at Quallty Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals * Queen's Highway * 352-6122

THE TRIBUNE



Gallery not the
place for these
exhibitions

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I WRITE this criticism
‘with much trepidation. I
have reason to believe that
many agree with me but
prefer not to go public. I
will reluctantly hide behind
a synonym because I don’t
want my telephone ringing
at 3:00 in the morning.

By chance I was recently
drawn into a cordial but
somewhat charged
exchange with a curator of
the National Art Gallery of
the Bahamas. I expressed




LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net

the view that I was very
unhappy with the trend that
I see taking place in the
exhibitions. I went so far as
to say that I do not even
consider as Art displays
(called “installations” )
involving toilets and oil-
cans, lawn mowers, objects
on the floor that have to be
stepped over, or film loops

The achievements of

hard-working students
can be belittled quickly

EDITOR, The Tribune.

AFTER having a good laug

h at the jokes listed in the

letter of Mr Bruce Raine in your column on December

20th, as a teacher and college
realised the unfortunate cons

First. of all, many of the jok
different context, so I do hop

be taken in a light manner.

counsel for many years, I
equence of such a letter.

es I have heard before in a

e that the letter was meant to

However, the danger is that the achievements of so

_many hard-working students in our schools can be belit-

tled so quickly by the stroke of a pen and uninformed

readers.

The old GCS. exams that many of us experienced were
replaced by the BGCSE for valid reasons. mina
However, that is a topic that would take me away: from :

the purpose of my letter.

The BGCSE exam results are used as a yard-stick for
admission to colleges and universities across North Amer-
ica (the UK and Europe require a step further, either A--
levels or the IB) and I have watched many students gain
entrance to top tertiary institutions based on their
BGCSE achievements. In addition, after their first semes-.
ter, I have listened to students report that they felt better
prepared than most of their peers starting off as freshman

in college.

Yes, we have things to fix in our educational system,
most countries do, but please don’t take away the pride,
the satisfaction and the dignity that should be held by the
students who worked very hard to successfully pass these
rigorous exams and course work projects.

JUDY REIACH.
Nassau,
December 20, 2006.

PS: Mr Raine forgot the one where the student was
asked, “What is the national flower of The Bahamas? The
student responded, “Robin Hood”.

auto
sales

LIMITED




Employment Opportunity

projected on a wall depict-
ing a man coughing end-

lessly into his hand.

No doubt these ‘are
intended to make powerful
and valuable social state-
ments, but I feel strongly.
that the NAGB is not the
place to make them. I
believe that most of the
people who contributed
their time: and money
toward the establishment
of a National Art Gallery
never envisioned it to be
used for this purpose.

But to be fair, I was
informed that the curators
of the recent show have
received numerous acco-
lades on the works, which
were first shown in Ger- .
many earlier in 2006. Acco-
lades were received “not

only from Bahamians but

from persons and critics all
over the globe”. Fron.

Still, the curator had to
acknowledge that public
daytime attendance at the
NAGB is disappointing. I
was there myself several
times during 2006, and nev-
er saw a soul. As a busi-
nessman, I winced to think
about the funds being
devoted to air conditioning,
security, cashier, and
administrative staff.

My by-no-means-com-

plete vision for the NAGB

is that it be a traditional art
gallery for things of beauty,
sentiment, culture, tragedy,
style, and historic interest
— in the form of paintings,
water-colours, photographs,

sculpture, carvings, and

pottery. I would much pre-
fer to see paintings of
Junkanoo costumes, rather
than the real thing, for
which there is already a
museum. I am sure my
vision can be improved
upon.

For those who enjoy pon-

. dering Great Truths behind

exhibitions of dead sheep,
embalmed babies, and bas- °
ket balls in fish tanks, there
is always the Tate Modern
in London and the Whitney
in New York.

' Such cities are large
enough to justify them, but
not little Nassau.

ONE MAN’S
OPINION
Nassau,
February 4, 2007.



eo) a Ua lanl
Tellers


















- Enthusiasm

Hours of Work



We are seeking mature candidates
(Age 25 & over) with:

- Excellent Customer Service Skills
- Strong Communication Skills

- Cash Handling Experience

Monday — Thursday 10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Friday 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Interested persons should submit their resumes
in WRITING or EMAIL along with copies of
certificates before February 16th, 2007 to:

Human Resources Department —
RE: Part-time Teller
P.O. Box $S-6263
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 394-0758
Email address: anne.lightbourn@combankitd.com









In brief
Fibre-optic
-cable to run
from Cuba to

Venezuela
B HAVANA

‘A NEW undersea fibre-
optic cable from Cuba to
Venezuela should be finished
within two years, a Venezue-
lan communications official
said Thursday, dramatically
expanding Cuba’s internet
and telephone capacity,
caccording to Associated Press.

‘Julio’ Duran, president of

state-run Telecom Venezuela, *

told Associated Press that the

deal signed in late January
» calls for a line with a capacity

.of 160 gigabytes per second.

That is.well.over 1,000
times the capacity of Cuba’s
current satellite-based inter-
net link, which was listed as

- 65 megabytes per second on
upload and 124 megabytes a
second on download by
‘Cuban Communications Min-
ister Ramiro Valdes.

It will break through what
Cuban officials describe as
choking restrictions imposed
by the US commercial
embargo on Cuba, which
they blame for blocking pos-
sible connections with exist-
ing privately owned fiber-

. optic lines in the region.

“It’s a very important pro-
ject, not only for Venezuela

- and Cuba, it’s for all Latin
.American countries,” Duran
said during an interview at
an informatics convention in
the Cuban capital, Havana.

The project was part of a G

series of agreements signed

‘late last month as Venezue-
la’s socialist President Hugo
Chavez moved toward firmer
political and economic ties
with his Cuban ally.

Duran declined to give a
possible cost for the 964-mile
link, saying it was still under
study. But he said officials
were speaking with compa-

nies from China and Europe

for fiber-optic line or other
assistance.

=». | -He said contracts could be

ari signed: by the end of ‘April
ini sand:the, project itself should

c

ee nm en a nr i RE RET RE UTR TE SR mee

_ebé finished in “léss than :two
years".
_ Interconnect points should
allow other countries in the
Caribbean or Central Amer-
ica to hook up as well.
._ Cuba has one of the
net usage. Officials say that is
because the current band-
width restrictions and US
threats against foreign sup-
pliers of technology to Cuba
force them to give priority to
‘schools, researchers and
essential businesses. Critics
have accused the government
-of restricting internet access
to limit Cubans’ exposure to
criticism or information from
abroad.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

Tropical Exterminators
EAL]

DET
































FRIDAY,
“FEBRUARY 16TH
11:00. Immediate Response
~Noon ZNS News Update
{2:05 Immediate Response

Cont'd
1:00 One Cubed
1:30 Ethnic Health America
2:00 Thousand Dollar Bee
2:30 Aqua Kids
3:00 Fellowship Of Christians
& Jews
3:30 Ed Young
4:00 Little Robots
4:30 Carmen San Diego
5:00 ZNS News Update
5:05 The Fun Farm
6:00 Caribbean Passport
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 The Bahamas Tonight .
8:00 55 Degrees North
9:00 The Envy Life
9:30 3D’ Funk Studio
10:00 Caribbean Newsline
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30 Community Page 1540 am




SATURDAY,
FEBRUARY 17TH
6:30am Community Page 1540AM

9:00 Bahamas @ Sunrise
10:00 Int'l Fit Dance

10:30 Dennis The Menace
11:00 Carmen San Diego
11:30 Little Robots

noon Underdog



. NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
right to make last minute
‘programme. changes!

i 24 His sister Leandra’Esfakis "'

region’s lowest rates of inter-



@ THE Cessna aircraft

\





oS

@ THE landing wheel which broke off during touchdown

THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007, PAGE 5

%





Aircraft crash lands after landing gear collapses

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT -
engine aircraft crash landed at
Grand Bahama International
Airport on Thursday when the
plane’s landing gearing col-

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

RELATIVES and friends of
the deceased Christopher
Esfakis spoke yesterday at an
inquest into his death of how
he died unexpectedly three days
after he was admitted to Doc-
tor's Hospital for burn injuries.

His sister Leandra Esfakis tes-
tified that at the time of his death
his lungs were almost entirely
full of fluid, and he appeared
virtually unrecognisable to those
who knew him best — his body
so swollen that he looked like a
"balloon about to burst."

Yesterday in court number
seven at Victoria Gardens, Lisa
Esfakis, wife of the deceased,
Leandra Esfakis, sister of the
deceased, Diana Esfakis, also
sister of the deceased, and Vin-
cent Pallacious, a friend and

housemate, described the events "
surrounding Mr Esfakis' death -

on Monday, April 22, 2002.

claimed her brother: was

Es neglected by'staff at the private

hospital following an accident.

Lisa Esfakis, his wife, said
that the couple had hosted a
party at their home on Friday,
April 19, 2002. That night, Mr
Esfakis was allegedly drinking

_and, in a series of events, lit his

shirt on fire. Flames engulfed
his upper body, but the fire was
quickly extinguished by his wife.

Lisa Esfakis told the coro-
ner's court that when he was

A single

lapsed on touch down on the
runway.

According to Supt Basil Rah-
ming, three persons onboard a
Cessna, two doctors and the
pilot, were not seriously injured
during the incident, which
occurred around 4.30pm.

Mr Rahming said Peter Sko-

bian, 55, of Fort Lauderdale and
a resident of Island Bay Con-
dominium was piloting Cessna
182 registration N6340S was
arriving from Fort Lauderdale
to Freeport. Doctors Jay Ma
Rolina and Tanacawan Lour-
des were traveling with him.
As the’ aircraft came in on

final approach to runway 024,
the nose gear collapsed on touch
down, resulting in the aircraft
becoming uncontrollable. Mr
Skobian was able to maneuver
the aircraft onto the grass verge,
north of the control town, where

he safely brought it to a stop.

Skobian, an auto-mechanic at

Municipal Motors, sustained
minor injuries to his right leg
and thumb. His two female doc-
tors were unhurt. i

Mr Rahming said the Civil
Aviation Department and the
National Transportation Safe-
ty Aviation board are investi-
gating the accident.

claims patient neglected

Inquest after burn victim dies at Doctors Hospital



first admitted to the hospital he
laughed and joked with nurses,
and the following morning,
appeared cheerful.

Dr James Iferenta — the doc-
tor in charge — informed Mr
Esfakis that he had first, sec-
ond and third degree burns. He
was told that he would require
skin grafts, and may need to be
in the hospital for upto a
month, said his wife.

However, Leandra Esfakis
described how later that after-
noon Christopher's face
appeared "swollen", and Lisa

Esfakis spoke of how he felt he ,
was having difficulty breathing,

as if he were being "strangled."

Relatives said nurses assured
the family that these symptoms
were to be expected.

Lisa Esfakis testified that she
was given the duty of assisting
her husband in urinating into a
"gadget" for the most'of the day
after he expressed a desire not
to have a catheter insérted.

However, on Sunday morn-
ing family members were called
and told that Mr Esfakis had
suffered a "setback".

Leandra Esfakis testified that
she found Christopher had been
moved from his third floor hos-
pital room to the intensive care
unit (ICU): He had become
"swollen to a grotesque figure",
was "completely unrecognis-

able" and appeared to be
unconscious, she said.

Leandra Esfakis said that at
this time she asked for a doctor
but could not find a doctor on
that floor of the hospital.

She added that the nurse at
the nurses station was having a
private telephone conversation
and filling out a passport appli-
cation as she was asking her for
help, completely ignoring Mrs
Esfakis until she "slammed her
hands on the desk and demand-
ed she speak to me".

Mrs Esfakis said that at
11.30am Dr Iferenta appeared
and told the family that Christo-
pher was "seriously ill". Lean-
dra Esfakis claimed that’
Christopher was rarely tended
to throughout Sunday.

On Monday morning Lean-
dra Esfakis stated that Christo-
pher Esfakis's head was wrapped ,
in bandages — his face so
swollen that there was no "trace :
of his facial characteristics."

"His skin was absolutely
turgid," she stated.

She told the court that Dr
Iferenta showed x-rays which evi-
denced that Mr Esfakis' lungs
were filling with fluid. He had
only a small pocket left in one
lung that was not filled with fluid.

‘ It was suggested for a second

- time that Mr Esfakis be

removed to Jackson Memorial |

Union claims Morton Salt
management refusing to
negotiate agreement

@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY.
Tribune Staff Reporter

INDUSTRIAL action is on
the horizon at the Morton Salt
Company on Inagua, as union
officials claim that management
refuses to continue negotiations
on their industrial agreement.

The Bahamas Industrial
Manufacturers and Allied
Workers Union says it has “no
other alternative” than to apply
to the Minister of Labour for a
strike vote against the company.

According to an official press
release, negotiations between
management and union were
planned for December 4-7, but
the managing director of the
company never showed up.

In addition, the release said
that on February 9 union offi-
cers travelled from Inagua to
Nassau for a series of scheduled

‘meetings, but the company

decided to end the negotiations
before any issues were resolved.

The press release reads: “At
the evening session (on Febru-
ary 13) at about 4.30pm the
company decided that they
were no longer going to negoti-
ate and walked out of the meet-
ing.”

The union claims Morton Salt
has had over a year and a half
to consider their position in

respect to the industrial agree-.

ment, but no progress had been
made.

The release adds: “The com-
pany is not trustworthy, and it
appears as if they are trying to
stall as much as possible.”

The union claimed the com-
pany felt as if it was “above the
law” and accused it of having
no regard for its employees, the
union, or the laws of the
Bahamas.

In September, 2006, the

union accused management of
being. anti-union, and
BIMAAWU president Wilfred
Seymour said the union was not
willing to negotiate with Morton
officials or even consider its
counter-proposal for a contract.

Addressing the press during a
news conference at the House
of Labour last year, Mr Sey-
mour said the union submitted
its proposal for a new contract
and requested management’s
counter-proposal from back in
September, 2005.

Noting that the union did not
receive that counter-proposal
until September 7, 2006, he
expressed complete dissatisfac-
tion with its terms.

"I find this document to be
nothing else but a draft when it
comes to union busting," he
said.

Mr Seymour said one of its
provisions stipulated that for




DRYGLEAN

We are the leading garment care organization
and have the following challenging positions
for energetic, dynamic and team oriented individuals.

TEAM LEADERS/SUPERVISORS
Are you fed up with “graveyard” shifts or low pay?
Do you like to smile? Do you have a positive attitude
and work well with others?

If you have answered "YES" to “ALL” of these questions
please fax your resume to 393-8902 or pick-up
an application at the Harbour Bay Shopping Plaza.

NO TELEPHONE CALLS, PLEASE

employees to qualify for a
Christmas -bonus they would
have to process close to two mil-
lion tons of salt.

He described that term as an
attempt to avoid having to pay
the bonus.

However, vice-president and
executive manager of Morton
Salt Glen Bannister said the
union, not management, had
been primarily responsible for
delays that had plagued the
process so far.

Mr Bannister also criticised
what he described as attempts
by union officials to negotiate in
the press.

But, according to the press
release, industrial action is
imminent at Morton Salt.

‘The Tribune tried to contact
the company for comment, but
calls were not returned before
press time.











Hospital by air ambulance.

’. An argument then broke out .

between the family and a doctor
over the chance of Mr Esfakis
surviving the flight, said Lean-
dra Esfakis.

‘It was shortly afterwards
when an air ambulance arrived
that Leandra Esfakis testified
to witnessing a "huge argu-
ment" breaking out between air
ambulance staff and Doctor's
Hospital staff.

She told the court that as she
stood by her brother's hospital
bedside, air ambulance person-

PALMDALE

Qam-6pm
Monday-Saturday

Must be service orientated.
Willing to work long hours.

Should be a self starter.

(French or Italian is a plus)

Must be service orientated.

Willing to work long hours.

Should be a self starter.

and qualifications.



Send resume to: cmajor@sr

. Me TOWN CENTRE MALL
326-5556...
_10am-8pm Monday-Friday



‘Don't migg it!

Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort

Invite application for the mentioned positions:-
FOOD & BEVERAGE MANAGER

Successful applicants should possess the following qualifications:

* University or Collage degree in Hospitality Management with

special emphasis Food & Beverage Management

A minimum of 5 years in a similar position of a luxury hotel/resort

operation with multiple food & beverage outlets.

Good knowledge of the culinary arts and international cuisine.

Knowledgeable on fine wines, being a Sommelier would be a plus.

Experience in food & beverage training.

Must be computer literate in Excel & Word.

Strong corimunication skills oral and written.

Have strong organizational and leadership skills.

Fluently speaks another language besides English

BEVERAGE MANAGER
Successful applicants should possess the following qualifications:
Education from a tertiary level institution
A minimum of 5 years in a similar position of a luxury hotel/resort
operation with multiple food & beverage outlets.
Must be computer literate in Excel & Word.

Strong communication skills oral and written.

Have strong organizational and leadership skills.
Competitive compensation package commensurate with experience

sandals,c

nel on one side of his bed told
doctor's hospital personnel on
the other that "this man is in
no condition to fly‘and will not
make it to the hospital door"
and that they were against mov-
ing him from the hospital.
Doctor's Hospital staff
allegedly tried to convince the
air ambulance staff that his con- .
dition had stabilised and he
could fly. Shortly afterwards she

_ was sent out of the room, she

claimed.
At 7pm, Mr Esfakis was pro-

‘nounced dead. His dead body

leaked fluid from the eyesock-
ets, nostrils and mouth, said
Leandra Esfakis.

The inquest continues today.







356-3205

10am-9pm Saturday



















oy it

wee lig eye csresee cc coke rm te
4 @ Sw

0 a

'

THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 6, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007



@ DONALD Saunders

THE FNM will return “good
leadership and integrity” to
public life when it is returned
to power, a candidate said last
night.

The pledge came when Don-
ald Saunders launched an attack
on Golden Gates MP Shane
Gibson over the Anna Nicole
Smith affair.

Charging that Mr Gibson
should have known better, he
told the FNM rally at Golden
Gates that the minister of immi-
gration should have acted more
responsibly.

Mr Saunders, at 32 one of the
FNM’s youngest candidates,

-criticised Mr Gibson over the

fallout from his relationship
with Ms Smith.




















grades 8 and 9

~ 2007 —

and interviewed.

2621.



+ ag

ORGANIZATION

e Be of the highest academic standing, ”
¢ Be at least 14 years old and not older than 15 years by 31st August

Application forms should be returned to: -

Robert F. Wade
Principal

St Andrew’s School
The International School of The Bahamas
PO Box EE 17340
Nassau, Bahamas



“Regrettably, for the next few
months, Golden Gates is sad-
dled with an MP who is a Cabi-
net member who should have
known. the implications of his
association with someone of the
reputation and notoriety of
Anna Nicole Smith. Her

* lifestyle was never a secret. She

bared it in Playboy Magazine.
She exposed ‘it on reality TV.
He should have known better.

“As a representative of the
people, as a minister of govern-
ment, he ought to have known
better and acted more respon-
sibly,” he stated.

Mr Saunders charged that the
relationship between*Mr Gib-
son and Ms Smith-has brought
international disrepute to the

ANDREY,,
SCHOOL ©

The International School of The Bahamas
FOUNDED L988

~ ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIPS

A limited number of scholarships to attend St Andrew’s School is offered
annually to students attending Ministry of Education secondary schools.

These scholarships cover all tuition and book charges throughout years 10,
11 and 12. Eligible students should meet the following criteria:

e Attendance at a government school for at least two years, including

Applications will require the endorsement of the principal or guidance counsellor
of the student’s school. The students awarded these scholarships will be
expected to follow a full programme of BGCSE and advanced courses leading
to graduation at the end of year 12.

The scholarships will be awarded on a competitive basis and all candidates

will sit the scholarship examinations at 9am on Saturday, 10 March 2007 at
St Andrew’s School. Successful examination candidates will be short-listed

Application forms will be circulated to the Ministry of Education secondary
schools in New Providence and several in the Family Islands or can be
obtained from the administration office of St Andrew's School.

Further details are available from St Andrew’s School, telephone: 1-242-324-

The closing date for applications is Wednesday, 28 February 2007.




maintaining a 3.0 GPA or above

i - Authorized by: oe : =~\ Accredited by:
% » INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE [ggg : 2 COUNCIL OF INFERNA TIONAL S¢ HOOLS
“ z, NEW ENGLAND ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOLS

< ie & COLLEGES













Golden Gates constituency

image of the Bahamas. And he
argued that the Bahamas must
not let its reputation revert to
where it was in the 1980s.

Reputation

“We must not go back to the
compromised image and repu-
tations of Bahamian govern-
ment ministers in the 980s
ministers of government
accused by the international
press of making us a nation for
sale to the highest bidder,
regardless of the business of the
highest bidder. No, not again.
We don’t want to go there
again,” he said.

Mr Saunders further criticised





a SHANE Gibson, the man Don Sau





nders will face in the

the PLP for not building new
schools during their term in
otfice.

“Bahamian parents now live
in a Bahamas where their chil-
dren must study in overcrowded
classrooms, or in makeshift class-
rooms set up in trailers on school
grounds, that sometimes resem-
ble construction sites more than
playgrounds,” he said.

Mr Saunders asserted that, as
the representative under an
FNM government, the planned
high school, which the FNM
had in preparation before they
left office in 2002, would be
built to service the needs of
Golden Gates and the entire
southwest area of New Provi-
dence.. '

$28,344.00



Best
selling

SUV in its
class





SmartChoice







Petition launched to

Gibson challenger: we'll

call for resignation
of Shane Gibson

restore good leadership

m@ By TAMARA FERGUSON

A PETITION calling for

: Shane Gibson to be stripped of

2.3L 4 Cylinder Automatic

se
y &
<

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com ¢

his ministerial portfolio was
launched by the Workers Par-
ty in Rawson Square on
Wednesday.

Two days after photos pub-
lished by the Tribune showed
Immigration Minister Shane
Gibson and late celebrity
Anna Nicole Smith in a close
embrace, members of the par-
ty are calling for the immedi-
ate resignation of the Immi-
gration Minister as a result of
what they claim is a ‘scan-
dalous dealing’ of Mr Gibson
and the government in the
matter of Anna Nicole Smith.

In a petition to Governor
General, Arthur Hanna, the
Workers Party claim that
Prime Minister Perry Christie
has lost control of his interim
government,

“Ministers in the PLP gov-
ernment are doing their own
“thing” without regard for the
law or common decency,” the
petition stated.

“Never in the history of the
Bahamas has there been a per-
manent residence granted with
such fast tracking procedure.
There is corruption within our
government,” party
spokesman Rodney Moncur
said.

According to the petition,

the involvement of the Minis-
ter of Immigration and his
family with the American
celebrity Anna Nicole Smith
smacks of corruption.

Mr Gibson responded to
allegations made against him
concerning photos in the Tri-
bune in an interview with
Jerome Sawyer, director of
Island FM News on Monday.

Mt Gibson said that Ms
Smith was a family friend. He
added that his wife, Jackie
Gibson, a minister in the Full
Gospel Church offered spiri-
tual guidance to Ms Smith, and
his mother was the babysitter
to Ms Smith’s daughter Dan-
nielynn.

The minister also claimed

&

See the full line of your favourite Ford vehicles at

FRIENDLY MOTORS LTD _

THOMPSON BOULEVARD TEL.: 356-7100 ¢ FAX: 328-6094
WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbah

2006 FORD EXPLORER

that the photos published in
the Tribune on Monday were
innocent and that he did noth-
ing wrong.

The Workers Party is claim-
ing that Mr Gibson must stand
condemned for embroiling his
own family in the affair.

Mr Gibson became the
centre of media attention fol-
lowing claims of fast tracking
the permanent residence
application for Anna Nicole
Smith, who was found dead
in a hotel room in Florida a
week ago.

“There are many persons
who apply for permanent res-
idency in the Bahamas, why
was Anna Nicole Smith given
such special consideration,
when others have to wait long
periods of time?” Mr Moncur
said.

Minister Gibson is also fac-
ing pressure from leader of the
opposition, Hubert Ingraham,
who is seeking answers after
reports that the minister
received a Rolex watch from
the celebrity.

Cassius Stuart, leader of the
Bahamas Democratic Move-
ment (BDM), also said that
the Immigration Minister
should resign in an interview in
Rawson Square.

“Government ministers.
need to be held accountable
for their actions,” Mr. Stuart
said.

According to Mr Stuart, Mr
Gibson should also resign
because he is violating Parlia-
ment convention.

“There are many other
Bahamians who need help and

_ special attention,” he said.

Mr Stuart said that Mr Gib-
son needs to face the public
and realise that he has stan-
dards to uphold as a minister.

Representatives from the
various local media houses as
well as international medial
houses, waited at the House
of Assembly anticipating the
arrival of the immigration min-
ister to hear his response.

‘However, the minister was
“unavailable during the first ses-

sion.

$32,400.00

4.0L V6 Automatic

The world’s
most trusted
SUN




amas.com PART OF YOUR LIFE





THE TRIBUNE |




EM
It’s time for Gibson
to be given the boot

QO: Monday, The Tri-
bune’s ultra-explosive

front page photographs of
Immigration Minister Shane
Gibson and the late Anna
Nicole Smith stunned thousands
of Bahamians, leaving many
with wide eyes and dropped
jaws as they stared at pictures
_ showing the minister apparent-
ly canoodling with a woman to
whom he had recently granted
permanent residency status.

It was highly inappropriate
for Mr Gibson to have estab-
lished such an overly friendly

_ relationship with an applicant
to his ministry.

In compliance with Cabinet
procedures, Mr Gibson and Ms
Smith’s relationship should have
been nowhere near what we’ve
now been told.

Last year, it was this same
minister who fast-tracked Anna
Nicole’s permanent residency
permit in 21 work days. He
defended his actions as just a
result of his ministry’s new-
found efficiency.

When criticised, this brash
and boastful minister declared
that he would have granted his
friend her residency status in a
day if he had had his way.
‘Although Mr Gibson’s actions
led to a hailstorm of criticism,
he refused to resign.

Following the death of Anna
Nicole last week, the eyes of the
world again turned to the
Bahamas. i

Then, on Monday, the
Bahamas and the world were
shocked by the publication of
photos showing our government
minister in compromising posi-

‘tions with the former soft-core
porn star.

The Bahamas, once again,
was made to look like a banana
republic and a nation for sale.

Mr Gibson’s relations with
Anna Nicole were scrutinised
across the globe, bringing
shame to many Bahamians. For
this, I say, shame on Shane!

I appears that compas-
sionate Shane Gibson’s

desire to mingle with celebrity
types may result in the probable
demise of what once was a very
promising political career. ,

It is absolutely astonishing
that Mr Gibson would jeopar-
dise his career and go this far,
particularly for a “close friend”
he claimed to have just met in
the late summer of 2006.

It appears that when it came
to Anna Nicole, Mr Gibson was
mesmerised and gave the
impression of a deer caught in
headlights.

On Monday evening, Mr
Gibson and his wife Jacqueline
appeared in an interview on
ZNS TV. During the interview,
Mr Gibson exuded an air of
immodesty, even blaming The

Tribune for the storm he now -

must weather, as if the daily told
him to take the compromising
pictures.

Admittedly, I had anticipated
that Shane Gibson was going on
air to apologise to the Bahamian

‘ people for what appears to be a
breach in Cabinet protocols; and
to announce his resignation.
This was not to be. Under the
Westminster system of govern-
ment, Mr Gibson’s resignation
should have been forthright.

During the interview, the
Bahamas discovered that not
only was Shane Gibson a close
friend of Anna, but that it was a




ms








: _ From his grammys, Catherine M
arents, Amos and Stella; god parents, Dr. P. W. Thompson, Miguel and
| Valaria Obregon; sisters and brothers, uncles and aunts. —



A DaRol AwN

'YouNG MANn’s VIEW
GBS ON



family affair! ©

On the face of it, Mr Gibson
obtained permanent residency
status for Anna at breakneck
speed, his wife led consolation
and prayers, his father travelled
to Florida to pilot Anna’s new
boat to the Bahamas, and his

mother was the pin-up girl’s



I would advise
Prime Minster |
Perry Christie to
follow his own
advice and post
Monday’s
jaw-dropping
photos on his
office wall,
simply to remind
himself of what
his government is
up against and to
wake up to the
embarrassing
reality of being at
the fore ofa
wayward Cabinet.

STE

baby sitter.

Fiction writers couldn’t make
this stuff up! Our minister of
immigration not only appeared
to be tied into an exclusive



How many other
foreigners, who
did not have the
celebrity status or
riches of Ms
Smith, has Shane
Gibson befriended
because they were
in a “strange
land?”

RSS

baby-sittinig service for a per-
manent resident, but for Ms
Smith, he must have seemed to
be a jack of all trades and ser-
vices!

M: Gibson also
claimed that he

befriended. Anna because he
was concerned about people
taking advantage of her, partic-
ularly as she was in a strange
land: What a load of rubbish!

How many other foreigners,
who did not have the celebrity
status or riches of Ms Smith,
has Shane Gibson befriended
because they were in a “strange
land?”

Did. we hire Mr Gibson to
chaperone foreigners that, of
their own will, seek to become
permarient residents in our
country? Mr Gibson’s reason-
ing seems illogical.

vishes as he further his studies and swimming at
Western Kentucky University. _

TRAVANO

cPhee and Cathy Knowles;

It is interesting that Mr Gib-
son declined to provide a
straight answer when asked by

interviewer Jerome Sawyer

whether he and his family had:
offered the same courtesies that
had been bestowed upon Anna
to any other permanent resi-
dency applicant. And, why does
Mr Gibson need to think deeply
on whether or not he has any
regrets? Is the answer no?

I would also like to pose
some outstanding questions to
Mr Gibson: What was in the
box that you were seen holding
in one of the photos? Was casu-
ally sitting on a lounge chair
with Anna, as she downed what
seems to be a beer, a part of
the consoling and ministering
process? Was Anna puckering
her lips, in one of the photos, to
give you a kiss?

W hen the Anna
Nicole controversy

initially began to brew last year,
I originally thought this woman
could not be much of an asset to
our country. To some extent, I
was wrong as her presence here
has led to many troubling reve-
lations about our immigration
department, our court system,
the breakdown of the West-
minster system of government
and, by extension, the inade-
quacies of our current govern-
ment.

As the election approaches,
an old adage is certainly coming
to pass. That is: ‘The higher the
monkey climbs, the more his
tail is exposed’.

Shane Gibson appears to
have acted with total disregard
for decency and Cabinet proto-
cols. o

I would advise Prime Minster
Perry Christie to follow his own
advice and post Monday’s jaw-
dropping photos on his office
wall, simply to remind himself
of what his government is up
against and to wake up to the
embarrassing reality of being at
the fore of a wayward Cabinet.

It is clear that, as is his modus
operandi, Mr Christie is giving
the country the silent treatment
and possibly hoping that every-

thing will eventually just die

down.

If Mr Christie refuses to
request Shane Gibson’s resig-
nation or fire him, he would
then confirm the suspicions of
many - that the PLP has set up a
Third World government that
encourages nepotism, cronyism
and slackness!

It is a shame that to this day,
Mr Gibson has yet to resign.
While I feel it’s still not too late
to do the honourable thing,

* Shane Gibson’s resignation

should have been written and
announced by noon on Mon-
day (the day the photos were
published). For Shane Gibson,
the fat lady has sung!

Mr Christie, the Bahamian
people are demanding that you
act and swiftly kick Mr Gibson
out of your Cabinet. Sir, in the
name of the Bahamian people,
just give Mr Gibson the steel-
tipped end of the boot and save
face!

ajbahama@hotmail.com









to

who graduated
~ from

Western Kentucky
University _
on oe
16th December 2006 |

with a
_Bs in Kinesiology



|

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 20U0/, PAGE /

Don't let your -
DIABETES control you.



Introducing NEW Precision Xtra”

The simple solution for accurate and reliable blood glucose monitoring.

_ Everyday simplicity

I Distinctive oversized numbers and clear backlit display make reading results
effortless in any light. : He

1 Compact and ideally shaped to fit comfortably in the palm of your hand. _

I Three simple-to-use buttons offer the most direct route to optional meter
functions (e.g. stored results) : ah

I Starts automatically —simply insert the strip and add a small droplet of
blood. .

Everyday accuracy and reliability —

i Designed to minimize errors and deliver consistently reliable test results.
Everyday commitment

I. The Precision® Friends for Life Program—a customer care program
dedicated to helping healthcare professionals and people with diabetes.







REE BLOOD GLUCOSE TES
t LOWE’S PHARMACY 10am

“Soldier Road, Feb. 17 | Palmdale, Feb. 2









Precision Xtra”

oe _
DYER eat CLM em RO ERM Lie) RRS L Loam ca 393-7111 « Fax: 393-0440



of the late

SSS SS SASS

REV. DR. CHARLES
CLIFFORD SMITH IT

Former Pastor of Zion Baptist Church
who departed this life eight years ago

OCTOBER 1, 1939 - FEBRUARY 16, 1999

Sweet Hour Of Prayer!
-Sweet Hour Of Prayer!
May I Thy Consolation Share



And From Mt Pisgah’s Lofty Heights
I View My Place And Take My Flight

This Rob Of Flesh I’ll Drop And Rise
To Seize Thee Everlasting Prize
And Shout While Passing Through The Air
Farewell! Farewell! Sweet Hour Of Prayer
auses to remember the Life, Labour and Loving Service of the late Rev. Charles Clifford
Smith II. Who occupied the scared office of Pastor from 1970 - 1999 on this 8th Anniversary
Chis death we extend prayful encouragement to his wife, Sis. Coralee Jacquline Smith, sons:

apewile Charles Clifford Smith III, Rev Joseph, Minister Benjamin, Makarnios and David Smith
along with their spouses and children; brothers, sisters, nieces, nephews, cousins and in-laws.

IN







PAGE 8, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007






MONDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
‘ lic of its meeting times and places: New Providence

Community Centre: Mondays -.6pm to 7pm. The

Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support
group meets the first Monday of each month at
6:30pm at New Providence Community Centre,
Blake Road. Dinner is provided and free blood
sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol testing is
available. For more info call 702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third
Monday of every month at 6pm @ Doctors Hospi-
tal conference room.

@ CIVIC CLUBS
Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colo-
nial Hilton Monday's at 7pm ¢ Club.612315 meets
Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable
Beach ® Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial
Hilton Mondays at 7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the month in
the Board Room of the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel, Bay St. ;

B THEATRE

Bahamas On Stage Youtheatre presents Pinoc-
chio February 19 - 21. The shows will be held at the
National Centre for the Performing Arts. For more
information contact Gloria Darville at 323.5589

TUESDAY



@ HEALTH

- Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: The Nassau
Group, Rosetta Street: Tuesday 6pm to 7pm /
8:30pm to 9:30pm.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at
5:30pm on the second Tuesday of each month at
their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville.
Call 323.4482 for more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes

location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval »

is required. Call 364.8423 to register for more info.

@ CIVIC CLUBS ;

The Kiwanis Club of New Providence meets every
Tuesday at 7:30pm at the Holy Cross Community
Centre; Highbury Park.

The Luncheon Pilot Club of Nassau meets every
third Tuesday at SuperClubs Breezes, Cable Beach
at 12:30pm. We invite all community minded per-
sons to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7:30pm
@ C C Sweeting Senior School's Dining Room,
College Avenue off Moss Road. * Club Cousteau
7343 meets Tuesdays at 7:30pm in the Chickcharney
Hotel, Fresh Creek, Central Andros ¢ Club 7178
meets each Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer Society
of the Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Eta Psi Omega chap-
ter meets every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ the
Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort,
Cable Beach ¢ Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets
every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ Atlantic House,
IBM Office, 4th floor meeting room ¢ Alpha Phi
Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday, 6:30pm
at the British Colonial Hilton. Please call
502.4842/377.4589 for. more info.

The Downtown Pilot Club of Nassau meets every
third Tuesday of the month at 6pm at the J P Whit-
ney Building, First Terrace, Collins Avenue.



WEDNESDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS _.

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports
Bar every Wednesday Spm-8pm. Free appetizers
and numerous drink specials.

@ HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-











NEW EXHIBITION OPENING





lic of its meeting times and places: New Providence
Community Centre: Wednesday -.7pm to 8pm. The
Nassau Group: Rosetta Street, Wednesday 6pm to
7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

FREE Health and Wellness Lectures are held the
first Wednesday of every month at 6:30pm at New
Providence Community Center Blake Road. For
more information call 327.1660 or 327.2878. FREE
Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar and Cholesterol
Screening.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas Support Group
meets every Wednesday from 5:30pm to 7pm at
Cancer Headquarters, two doors south of ZNS.
Cancer patients, survivors, their family members
and friends are invited to attend, Phone 323.4482

m@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of SouthEast Nassau meets every
Wednesday from 1pm — 2pm at East Villa Restau-
rant, East Bay Street. Always an interesting speak-
er and great fellowship. If you would like to attend
our meetings please send an e-mail to bruno.pletsch-
er@gottardo.com or kathyvsmith@hotmail.com.

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta

’ Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated meets 6:30pm

every third Wednesday at the Bahamas National
Pride Building.

International Training in Communication, Essence
Club #3173 holds it’s bi-monthly meetings on the Ist
and 3rd Wednesday of each month at Doctor's
Hospital Conference Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets
the second and fourth Wednesday of the month,

’ 8pm @ St Augustine's Monastery.

The Kiwanis Club of Cable Beach invites the pub-
lic to its regular weekly meeting held every Wednes-
day at 7:30pm at the British Colonial Hilton. Kiwa-
nis is a worldwide service organisation dedicated to
changing the world One Child, One Community at
atime." - ;

School and Community Nature Walk and Petting
Zoo - Free Every Wednesday from 1Oam to 2:30pm

“at Earth Village Ranch, St Albans Drive and

Columbus Avenue (Chippingham). Call (242)
356.2274 now to make reservations. Open to all
ages and groups Monday-Sunday from 9am to 6pm.
Inquire about additional activities and programmes.

_ TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday on the 4th
floor of the Ministry of Health, Meeting Street, at
6pm.

THURSDAY

@ ENTERTAINMENT
Shadowhand Entertainment presents an all Bahami-
an Talent Explosion this and every Thursday night
at the Patio Bar & Grill on Carmichael Road. This
event features upcoming Bahamian artist who are
ready to showcase their original material to the
world. There will also be a freestyle competition
every week which is open to the public at large.
Doors open at 8:30pm. Ladies free until 11pm -
Gentlemen - small door charge. See u there.

@ HEALTH

Free public health lectures featuring distinguished
physicians are held at Doctors Hospital every third
Thursday of the month at 6pm in the Doctors Hos-
pital Conference Room. Free screenings between
5pm & 6pm. For more information call 302.4603. :

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public ‘



Bahamian Art:

Pre-Columbian to the Present

OPENS TO THE PUBLIC: THURSDAY, FEB 22, 2007
This is a survey show on Bahamian Art History. Itis
designed to support the publication of the National

Art Gallery's Educational Pack for teachers scheduled
for release in 2007.

its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Thursday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics Sea-
grapes location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor
approval is required. Call 364.8423 to register for
more info.

REACH - Resources & Education for Autism and
Related Challenges meets from 7pm.- 9pm the
second Thursday of each month in the cafeteria of
the BEC building, Blue Hill Road.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise has a breakfast
meeting every Thursday morning at 7am at the
British Colonial Hilton Hotel (Fellowship begins at
6:45am).

4
The Kiwanis Club of Over-the-Hill meets every
Thursday at 8pm at the Holy Cross Activity Centre,
Soldier Road. Guests are welcome.

Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first, second
and third Thursday at the Ministry of Health &
Environment building on Meeting Street com-
mencing at 7:30pm. Everyone is welcome to attend
¢ TM Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8:30pm @ Super-
Clubs Breezes.

International Association of Administrative Pro-

. fessionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the third Thurs-

day of every month @ SuperClubs Breezes, Cable
Beach, 6pm.

The recently established National Insurance Board
Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets every fourth
Thursday in the month, in the National Insurance
Board's (NIB) training room, Wulf Road office
complex, at 6pm. All retirees are welcome.

The Rotary Club of West Nassau holds its weekly
meeting, every Thursday at Choices Restaurant

- On the campus of the College of the Bahamas. Fel-

lowship starts at 12:30pm, with the meeting held
from 1pm to 2pm.



AK FRIDAY



CONCERT

Chariots of Fire Album release concert: Come see
and hear the best in gospel music, with perfor-
mances by Selector, Manifest, Counsellor, Mr Lynx,
Christian Massive and internationally acclaimed
recording artist Landlord and many more, Febru-
ary 23 @ 7:30pm at Workers House, Tonique
Williams Darling Highway. Box Offices @ the Juke
Box, Oasis Music Centre, and Faith Life Book
Store. Fore More information call 544.8078 or
455.3067

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: The Nassau
Group, Rosetta Street: Friday 6pm to Tpm &
8:30pm to 9:30pm. Sacred Heart Church: Friday
6pm to 7pm. New Providence Community Cen-
tre: Friday 7pm to 8pm.

@ CIVIC CLUBS
TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas Bap-
tist Community College Rm A19, Jean St.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second
Friday of each month, 7:30pm at the Emmaus Cen-
tre at St Augustine’s Monastery. For more info

call 325.1947 after 4pm.

AMISTAD is a club which promotes the Spanish



ceavoonne







"The brewery of The Bahamas"

A ROU

THE TRIBUNE

Nb NASSAU





WELCOME

language and culture in the community. Residents
of the Bahamas who speak Spanish or are learning
Spanish are invited to attend meetings on the third
Friday of the month during the academic year at
7pm in room 13 of COB's Tourism Training Cen-
tre. :



SATURDAY
@ EVENTS

The Pinewood Gardens Outreach Association is
having its 1st annual Pinewood Fest, March 3 @
7am - midnight at Pinewood Gardens Park. Includ-
ed in the days activities are a breakfast and a
Fun\Run and Walk @ 7am. Come out and bring

the entire family... Join the domino teams and bas-
ketball tournaments, and many other games. Bring
your kids to the toddlers town and let them expe-
rience bouncing castles and carnival rides, games,
face painting, complimentary lunch from 1-2 pm.
There will be performances by Ancient Man, Lassie
Doh Boys, and internationally acclaimed recording
artist Landlord and many more. Come and see the
Junkanoo Rush Out by the Pinewood Gardens
Crusaders Junkanoo Group. For more informa-
tion call 392.1618 or 565-8870

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: The Nassau
Group, Rosetta Street: Saturday mornings - 10am
to llam..

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third
Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and December)
@ the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley
Street. |

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes are
offered every third Saturday of the month from
9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Communi-
ty Training Representative at 302.4732 for more
information and learn to save a life today.

@ CIVIC CLUBS :

JAR CYCLING: The Owners of JAR Cycling arc
pleased to offer a cycling clinic for juniors between
10 and 17. The free clinic will be held every Satur-
day in an effort to encourage kids to cycle. Parents
interested in registering their children should con-
tact organisers at jarcycling@gmail.com.

Toastmasters Club 7178 10th Anniversary Ban-
quet: Saturday, March 17 at the British Colonial
Hilton at 7pm. The Club will honor it’s 10 past
presidents in grand style. For tickets e-mail:

prezsj@tc7178.org. A special invitation is extended .

to persons who were a part of or visited the club
during its earlier years. Come out to see old friends

and toastmasters. The public is invited and guests .

are always welcomed.



| SUNDAY
@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

Traveller's Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street, fea-
tures special entertainment - Gernie, Tabitha and
the Caribbean Express - very Sunday from 6:30pm
to 9:30pm.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-’

lic of its meeting times and places: The Nassau
Group, Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm to 7pm /
8:30pm to 9:30pm.

@ RELIGIOUS SERVICES

The Bahamas Metaphysical Society Inc - A spiritual
teaching society leading you to greater peace of
mind, health, prosperity and happiness - holds
Higher Consciousness Services every Sunday at
10am and weekly Meditation services every
Wednesday at 7pm at Bowe’s Cove off Bernard
Road. Interested persons are welcome to attend.
For more information contact by e-mail @ bah-
metsol@hotmail.com or call 393.0279.

Send all your civic and social events (attach pic-
tures if possible) to The Tribune via fax: 328.2398 or
e-mail: ybdeleveaux@tribunemedia.net - Out there in
the subject line.






ae
Nee

t

e028 8 0 SL Pa E FRADE LL Ee LPP AID EDM, CEPI ECAR LLG FPO RES

Wit FIM EE TOE HE af od

oer

=



THE TRIBUNE





FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007, PAGE 9

‘Community organisations collect _

$160,000 from Kerzner at awards

Kerzner International donat-
ed $160,000 to 29 non-profit
organisations during its eighth
annual Community Service
Awards on Tuesday.

. The donation brought Kerzn-

er’s total donations under the. ”

Kerzner Community Service
Awards Programme over the
last eight years to over $1 mil-
lion. ’

The Bahamas Sailing Asso-
ciation (BSA), led by its Presi-
dent Sir Durward Knowles, was
presented with the. ‘Outstand-

. ing Community Service Award’,
- worth $20,000.

The Bahamas Sailing Asso-
ciation is a non-profit organi-
sation which promotes and
encourages amateur sailing in
The Bahamas. It is responsible
for the Bahamas National Sail-
ing School which it founded in
November 2004 for the further
development of the sport of
amateur sailing in The
Bahamas. The sailing school is

currently. working with seven |

public schools in New Provi-

dence including DW Davis, CH

_. Reeves, Yellow Elder and. H O
_ Nash.

Sir ‘Durward, the first

Bahamian Olympic gold medal

_ winner, said‘“To see these chil-

dren on the waterfront sailing |

among each other brings us
tremendous delight. :

“Kerzner has recognised us

and the $20,000 will go a long
way to keep us going. We have
sponsors throughout the busi-
ness sector in The Bahamas, but
without this big donation we
would not be able to carry on.”

Nan Palmer, Kerzner Inter-
national’s chief operating offi-
cer: “We applaud your efforts
and we do so with money, but
we do so in spirit'as well.

Kerzner International’s Com-
munity Service Awards are
divided into eight categories:
Arts and Culture; Education;
Social Community Service;
Senior Citizens; Civic Commu-
nity Service; Youth Related
Services; the special Harborside
at Atlantis presentation award
and Sporting.

Each of the awardees of the
various categories of the awards
scheme were presented with
$5,000. The awardees for the
various categories included.

For Arts & Culture -The
National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas, Bahamas Dance The-
atre, Bahamas National Youth
Choir and the Bahamas Nation-
al Youth Orchestra.

Education - PACE Founda-
tion, Project Read, Stapledon
School and the Hopedale Cen-
tre.

Social Community Service -
The Royal Bahamas Police
Dependants Trust, Physically
Challenged Children’s Com-

@ PICTURED are officials of
The Bahamas Sailing
Association (BSA), this year’s
winners of Kerzner
International’s ‘Outstanding
Community Service Award,”
which has an award prize of
$20,000. Pictured left to right
is Nan Palmer, Kerzner

International’s chief operating _

officer, Jimmy Lowe of the
BSA and Sir Durward
-Knowles, president

of the BSA and Barrie
Farrington, Kerzner
International’s senior
vice-president of
administration.

(Photo: Joshua Yentis)

mittee, Drug Action Service,
Abilities Unlimited, Bahamas
Association for the Physically
Disabled and the Bahamas
Infant Stimulation Programme.

Senior Citizens - Persis
Rodgers Home for the Aged,
Mary Ingraham Intergenera-
tional Care Centre and the
Good Samaritan’s Senior Citi-
zens Home.

Civic Community Service -
The Mission Foundation and

Wild Horses of Abaco Preser- .

vation Society (WHOA).
Youth Related Services - The
Scout Association of the
Bahamas, Bahamas Children’s
Emergency Hostel and The

Art installation opened at

THE Ministry of Tourism,
Kerzner International and the
New Providence Community
Centre officially opened “Wel-
come” on the corner of Blake

Hairs from slain Canadian in

Road and JFK Drive yesterday
evening
This public art installation by

Bahamian artists Antonius

Roberts and Tyrone Ferguson

occupies one of the most visible

- corners in New Providence and

is a popular location for both
locals and visitors alike.
‘Welcome’, say the artists, is

-

Ranfurly Home for Children.
Sports - Bahamas Amateur
Cycling Federation, Bahamas
Junior Golf Association, Road
Runners Track & Field Club
and The Dolphin Swim Club.
Harborside Awards — Annu-
al Commitnient - The Bahamas

“Crisis Center and Special

Olympics.

junction

an attempt to define the
Bahamian connection to our nat-
ural beauty as well as modeling a
healthy and prophetic vision of
what this connection means.

Rico belong to victim, not accused

@ PUERTORICO ||
San Juan |

DNA testing on hairs found
under the fingernails of a Cana-
dian executive slain in Puerto
Rico show they are his own, and

- do not belong toa man charged
in his death, a prosecutor said

Wednesday, according to Asso-

ciated Press.
Two of the hairs belong to
. Adam Anhang, and a third could
not be fully tested because it did
not contain enough genetic mate-
rial, Jimara Gabriel Maisonet
said during a court hearing.
‘Defence lawyers had sought

the DNA testing hoping it would

’, show that ‘someone other than
Jonathan Roman, who has

pleaded nat guilty not to a first-
degree murder charge, was
responsible for the September
2005 stabbing and beating death.
Anhang and his wife, Aurea
Vazquez Rijos, were walking to
their car from her Old San Juan
restaurant when a man with a
knife attacked them. They had
been discussing their divorce.
Vazquez was treated for head
injuries, and police say she has
declined to co-operate with
investigators.
Defence lawyers have said
they want Vazquez’ medical file
to learn what she told medical

personnel about the attack.

On Wednesday, San Juan
Superior Court Judge Isabel
Llompart said she had not given
the file to the defense because
Vazquez had not been properly
notified under US privacy laws.

Maisonet said he believed
that Vazquez was in Italy, but
that it was not possible to con-
firm her whereabouts.

Anhang, 32, moved to Puerto
Rico from Winnipeg in 2004.
He had been a real estate
investor in several hotel pro-
jects in the US Caribbean terri-
tory and chief executive officer
of an internet gambling soft-
ware company.















and Equipment.

YOUR SAE Gere: THE WORLD ~

_'THEBAHAMAS |

TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANY LTD
TENDER FOR NEW VEHICLE & EQUIPMENT.

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to
invite qualified companies to apply for tender for New Vehicle

Interested companies can pick up a specification document from
BTC’s Administration Building John F. Kennedy Drive and The
_ Mall Drive Freeport, Grand Bahama February 5, to February 19,
2007 between the hours of 9:00am to 5:00pm Monday to Friday.

Tender should be sealed in an envelope marked “WEHICLE &
EQUIPMENT TENDER?” and delivered to the attention of: -

Mr. Leon Williams
- President & CEO

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd

P.O. Box N-3048
Nassau, Bahamas

Bids should reach the company’s administration office on John F.
Kennedy Drive by 4:00 p.m. Wednesday, February, 21st, 2007.

Companies submitting bids are invited to attend the bid opening
on Thursday, February 22nd, 2007 at 10:00 A.M. at BTC’s
Perpall Tract location. .

BTC reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.



\

IBO-





Prince Cision Orive
PC. Hox N. BASS
Nesssi, Bararmnas

El NEW LIFE CHRISTIAN CENTER
AN Apostolic Church

You are invited to worship the Lord with.us

“Come Expecting”
Sabbath Worship _

Service: -Saturday 11:00a.m.

Attend and experience the presence of Almighty God

Location:
Second Building
East of Saint Augustine’s College
Entrance on Prince Charles Dive
Telephone: 324-5493
P.O.Box N-8852 :









f





STEAK
CHICKEN BINGO~
TOONEY
BURGERS





BALLOONS
CURRY

PRIZES |
DANCE.







tian





ae





































PAGE 10, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007







STORY SO FAR: The months go by
slowly at the KLA camp, but finally Meli’s
father returns and they pack up what few
belongings they have and head for Uncle
Fadil’s farm. The only reluctant traveler is
Mehmet, who feels he’s old enough to join
the KLA. A

CHAPTER TEN
Life at Uncle Fadil’s

T WAS late when we reached Uncle
Fadil’s, but everyone was up and
waiting except the grandchildren. While
we were on the mountain, our cousin Nex-
ima had come home with her three-year-
old son and twin infants, a boy and a girl.

‘ Her husband was not with them, and no

one spoke of him—which meant to me
that he was not among the disappeared,

~ but more likely KLA. I had come to real-

ize on the mountain that if a man had dis-
appeared, he was talked about and won-
dered about. But if he was KLA, no one
breathed a word.

BNVY

Nexima gave her bed in Granny’s room
to Mama and Papa and brought her chil-
dren into the small parlor to sleep with us
five Lleshi children. We completely cov-
ered the floor. Papa took one look and

laughed. “Pve seen orange sections with

more room to sleep than this,” he said. It

was nice to laugh for a change, and actually,

it was no more crowded than the tent and
a lot warmer. Even though the floor was
hard, there were no rocks poking into your
back. So I was soon sound asleep.

The next morning the household was
stirring by the time the first rooster crowed.
Uncle Fadil and Papa were like generals in
a little army. Everyone except Nexima’s
little ones had orders to carry out. I was in
charge of the water brigade. Uncle Fadil
didn’t have running water in the farm-
house, but why should that bother us? A
backyard pump and a proper outhouse
seemed luxurious after only a stream and
trench latrines at our mountain camp.

The first day as sergeant of the water
detail, I was so excited about my job that I
had the little boys and Vlora help me fill
with water every pot we could lay our
hands on. Aunt Burbuge threw up her
hands in amazement. “Ah, Meli, you are
such a marvelous water carrier, you have

left us nothing to cook in! Oh, well, fill up -

the tub, we'll be bathing babies before the
day is done, I’m sure.”

Papa and Uncle Fadil had brought in
most of the crops while we were waiting on
the mountain—a farmer can’t leave in the
middle of the harvest season—but there
were still potatoes to be dug and wood to
be chopped in preparation for the winter.

‘Between chores, Mehmet and I held
school for Isuf'and Adil. Vlora was always
jumping up and down, demanding atten-
tion, so in the end'we gave up and let her
come as well. The house was too small for

THE TRIBUNE



an indoor school, so we wore our coats
and had our lessons outdoors.

Despite the crowding, I look back on
that time as one of the happiest of my life.
Even Mehmet seemed more content than
he had since the spring-before.

Papa and Uncle Fadil took care to treat
him as one of the men. And when news
from the outside world reached the farm,
Mehmet was told first, even before the
women.

o it was Mehmet who told me that
NATO was threatening to bomb
Serbian military targets, forcing Milosevic
to withdraw thousands of his troops from
IKosovo.
“Now it will be safe for everyone to leave
the mountains,” I said.
“Not everyone will want to,’ said
Mehmet. “We must be prepared. Milosevic

.

- ig a snake. Only a fool would trust him.

We'll be back at war in no time, you'll
see.”

And we were. The KLA may have start-
ed it. They attacked four policemen in
Racak, and the Serbian security forces
retaliated by killing forty-five Albanians,
then, not two weeks later, twenty-four
more. NATO demanded that both sides,
Albanian and Serbian, meet in a peace
conference. But Milosevic refused to
attend. ...

“Didn't I tell you?” Mehmet said. “That
old snake Milosevic wouldn’t come to the
talks. He just sent some flunky. It'll be war
by spring!” He was smiling as he said it.

How could he smile at the thought of
more killing and misery? I felt sick inside.

But Mehmet was right. The peace talks
failed. Once more Serb troops poured over
the border into Kosovo. NATO planes
pounded them from the air, but that didn’t







stop the Serbs on the ground. If the KLA
made a raid and killed one Serb police-
man, several dozen Albanians were sure to
die. The NATO powers threatened and
lectured, but Milosevic paid no heed.

But there on Uncle Fadil’s farm, life

went on as it had for several months. We

had our chores to do. Mehmet and I con-
ducted our little school. The twins grew
fat and funny. We were all well and happy
until the night when I, who was sleeping

close to the front door, heard a quiet rap-

ping. ;

I sat up and listened. Should I answer? I
was the closest, but I guess I am at heart a
coward. |

I decided to go and wake Papa. I made
my way carefully around the sleeping bod-
ies on the floor of the parlor, but before I

- could get to Papa, I met Uncle Fadil as he

stumbled out of his room.

“J think there’s someone at the door,” I
said.

“Yes,” he said, putting a finger to his
lips. “I'll take care of it. Go back to sleep.”

I followed him back into the parlor, both
of us intent on keeping our feet from
touching any of the children.
_ “Go back to sleep, Meli,” Uncle Fadil
repeated in a whisper.

I lay down obediently, but how could j
go back to sleep? Something was up.

(Due to Mid-term Break, the story
resumes February 27, 2007.)

Text copyright

© 2005 by Katherine Paterson
Illustrations copyright

© 2005 by Emily Arnold McCully
Reprinted by permission

of Breakfast Serials, Inc.
www.breakfastserials.com

St AE AI TN TN Wil a A te a





Pe we “THE TRIBUNE



Transport Ministry
holds maritime crisis
management course

@ By LLONELLA GILBERT
Bahamas Information
Services eo _ Be
IN RESPONSE to weaknesses

found during a simulation exer-

cise testing the preparedness of
the country for a disaster, the Min-
istry of Transport and Aviation is
holding a maritime crisis manage-
ment course in collaboration with
the United States Coast Guard.
The week long training is taking
place so that in a real crisis, the
weaknesses would be virtually
non-existent, Transport Minister

Glenys Hanna-Martin said at the

opening of the course Monday,

February 12, 2007.

Instructors from the US Coast

Guard’s International Training

Division from Yorktown, Virginia

will facilitate the course, whose .

participants include a cross-sec-
tion of persons from the Royal
Bahamas Defence and Police
Forces, hospitals, port officials and
the National Emergency Manage-
ment Agency (NEMA).

A majority of the millions of
tourists and tonnes of goods enter
ing the country each year come
through the seaports, noted
Deputy Chief of Missions at the
US Embassy Dr Brent Hart.

“As an island nation with busy
and vitally important freight and
cruise ship ports,” he said, “vigi-
lance and protection of these ports
is particularly important to main.
taining the strength of the Bahami-
an economy.

“The possibility of maritime dlis-

‘aster is too often not at the fore-

front of our thoughts. But with the
growth of global terrorism, our
seaports and borders are increas-
ingly susceptible to attacks and we
must prepare not only for inten-
tional harm but also accidental
harm.”

The course is designed to allow
various stakeholders to be
equipped to protect the economy,
security, people and the environ-
ment of the Bahamas and the US,
he explained.

“While you will be trained in
crisis response, this course will also
offer broader exposure to port
security issues,” Dr Hart said.
“This seminar is the latest exam-
ple, of the many joint activities
carried out by the military, securi-
ty and law enforcement person-
nel of the United States and the
Bahamas:” .

Minister Hanna-Martin said she
was pleased the Bahamas is ‘again
collaborating with the United
States. °?''

“As Dr Hart indicated,” she
said, “there are common interests
and challenges both nations face
and there is an intertwining of
fates by way of trade, tourism and
movement of people that cause us
as a matter of necessity to under-
stand we have a common goal.”

She told participants that when
the training exercise is over they
should be able to protect the inter-

‘ests of the Bahamians and others

persons who are in the country.

Mrs Hanna-Martin also noted
that her Ministry is engaged in an
overview of maritime legislation.

“Our legislation domestically is
fairly outdated and has not been
comprehensively consolidated and
updated for decades.

“There have been some amend-
ments here and there, but a com-
prehensive overview.of Maritime
Legislation is presently being

‘undertaken by my Ministry,” she

said.

“We are hoping everyday that it
will be completed very shortly so
that we can introduce that to Par-
liament.

“We need to put in place mod-
ern standards for the maritime
industry, these things will help with
enforcement, and minimise risk,
particularly as it relates to safe-

ty.”

The Ba

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007, PAGE 11



hamas gets boost

from Superbowl events

SUPERBOWL XLI has
enhanced the Bahamas’ image
following a spectacular slate of
promotions surrounding the
event held in Miami on February
4.

The powerful weekend of pro- -

motions included pitches to tar.
geted segments of Florida resi-
dents and placements of high-

’ profile Bahamas ads in informa-
tion booklets and maps that were

placed in the hands of thousands
of Florida visitors. In addition to
the 2.5 million residents of the
Greater Miami area, the
Bahamas’ tourism team took
pr ime opportunities to market a
vacation expericnee lo the
125.000 visitors that the Greatei
Miami Convention and Visitors
Bureau estimated to enter the
city for Superbowl events.
As a member of the Super

‘bowl Host Committee, the

Bahamas Ministry of Tourism
had the privilege of placing
advertising in the 100,000 Super
bowl host booklets that were dis:
tributed to Miami visitors at atr-
ports, hotels, and other venues
during Superbowl festivities. The
tourism ads were also placed in
250,000 maps that were distrib-
utéd to the thousands of visitors
who rented cars for the occasion.
The Superbowl Host Com-
mittee’s VIP Party drove the
Bahamas experience into the
limelight on February 2. The










@ THE list of Bahamian headliners included junkanoo and special
appearances by Miss Bahamas Universe Samantha Carter

of the 3,400 media covering the
Superbowl.

Committee invited 2,500 local
and visiting VIPs to the event.
In addition, it was open to many

Le
+ Fa







12:00 noon -

*Adults $3. 00

Norma Wilkinson of the

Vl

Bahamas Tourist Office in Plan-
tation, Florida, said the

Bahamas’ participation in the

Superbowl events:is certain to
attract the attention of thousands
of Florida residents and visitors.
She said the Bahamas has
enjoyed a long relationship with
professional sporting teams, and
the involvement with the Super-
bowl Host Committee became
a beneficial extension of those
relationships.

“And it won’t end with the
Superbowl,” Ms Wilkinson said.
“There’s more to come. We have
two Bahamas-theme nights com-
ing up with the Miami Heat.”

During the Bahamas theme
nights, the more than 20,000 fans
each night at the American Air-
lines Arena will be a captive
audience as the Bahamas
tourism team highlights the
many resorts and vacation expe-
riences within The Bahamas.

For the Superbowl events,
Bahamas Out Islands Promotion
Board Director Anthony Stuart,
commended the Ministry of
Tourism for taking advantage of
being a part of the VIP Party at
Carnival Performing Arts Centre

_ on February 2. He said it was an

event that the Out Islands Pro-
motion Board took full advan-

‘tage of also.

Mr'Stuart said the VIP Party
allowed his board to make
potential visitors more familiar

o—

Saturday, February 17”, 2007
11:00 am - until...
Sunday, February 18", 200

until .

with the Family Islands, which
do not have the recognition of
Nassau/Paradise Island and
Grand Bahama.

“Another thing we are trying
to do is attract business,” Mr Stu-
art said. “From this, we can get
group business, We can get some
incentive business. We can get
people even coming to vacation.”

Mr Stuart said those who
attended the party were within
the target visitor group of the
Family Islands.

“We knew with the VIP event,
there would be the CEOs of the
major companies that are spon-
sors.” he said.“We knew there
would be all the major sponsors
would be there. We knew all the
team officials would be
there... This gave us a great
opportunity to showcase the Out
Islands to a group of individuals
who can not only afford our
product, but who are actually
looking for that.”

The Bahamas tourism team
included many prominent
Bahamians and segments of the
Bahamian culture to highlight
during the Superbowl XLI expe-
rience

The list of Bahamian headlin-
ers included junkanoo and spe-
cial appearances by Miss
Bahamas Universe Samantha
Carter, music artist Avvy and
Bahamian NFL players Devard
Darling and Alex Smith.








ak Orthodox Church Grounds - West Street
; Children $1.00

OD, GREEK BEER, OUZO!!
VE BOUZOUKI BAND, Dé
; & MORE...

Dit








When you choose the 2007 Camry
you have the peace of mind that
you're driving a car created to set
a new global standard for safety.
The new Camry offers enhanced
comfort and superior design
amenities, as well as generous
legroom and trunk space. And the
fuel-efficient 4 cylinder, 2400CC
engine gives up to 34 mpg (EPA
highway rating). Available

options- V-6 engine, right or left
hand drive.







Auto Mall, Shirley Street (opp. St Matthew's € “hurch)

Open Mon to Fri Sam - S30pm
Sat 8am - [2noon

Tel; 397-1 700

E-mail: exeomotor@ebatelnet. bs

Parts and service guaraniced

EXECUTIVE
MOTORS LTD

AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER
Available in Grand Bahama at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) * Queens Hwy, 352-8122 * Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2918

All new Toyota vehicles are backed by a 3-year/60,000-mile factory warranty.



Visit our new showroom at the‘AUTO MALL on Shirley Street,
opposite St Matthew's Church and test drive the new Toyota Camry,

a ee en ee ee ee ee eer ee ee eee





PAGE 12,FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007



FRIDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 16, 2007

7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

NETWORK CHANNELS

Issues Round: Washington [McLaughlin — jAre You cme May to Decem- |The Vicar of Di- |Fawlty Towers -
WPBT {table discussion. |Week (N) — [Group iN) (CC) |Served? Again! |ber Surprise for |bley Geraldine _|*Communications
(CC) Zoe. plays Cupid. |Problems”
The Insider (N) Ghost Whisperer ‘The Cradle Will Close to Home ‘Barren’ Awoman |NUMB3RS A mixed-martial-arts
@} WFORIn cc) Rock’ (N) (CC) is charged with killing the surrogate igh dies while training for a
: mother of her baby. i championship match. (N) (CC)
Access Holy. 1 vs, 100 Contestants play for$1 |Las Vegas Sam's long-lost love Law & Order “Melting Pot’ An ac-
WTV4J |wood (N) (CC) {million apa amob that includes fawakes froma 20-year coma; Ed tress is found hanging in her office.
IRS auditors. (N) (CC) wants a new housekeeper. (N) |(N) 1 (CC)
= Deco Drive Nanny 911 “Mills Family” Nanny — | Trading sone Meet Your New |News (CC)
@ WSvN Yvonne helps an Orlando family with| Mommy Rock 'n’ roll singer; unap- ;
a beer-drinking father. (N) 0 preciated housewife. (N)
Jeopardy! “Teen [America’s Funniest Home Videos ‘No Business in Show Business” Per- 20/20 (CC)
WPLG oe (N) an clips from school plays, concerts and other public venues. ! .
i ; CABLE CHANNELS
(:00) CSI: Miami |CSI: Miami The team searches for |CSI: Miami “Shock” A spoiled CSI: Miami “Rampage” The team is
A&E Dead Air’ 1 |the killer of two people on a cruise heiress is found dead. (CC) _- jon the verge of puting away mem-
(CC) ship docked in Miami, (CC) bers of the Mal Noche gang.
Football Focus |BBC News World Business |BBC News Our World Mar- |BBC News Football Focus
BBCI (Latenight). |Report (Latenight). |garet Beckett. _|(Latenight).
Hotwyred (CC) |% x JUICE (1992, Crime Drama) Omar Epps, Tupac Shakur. A ghetto |Comicview (C0)
BET youth Leste his accomplices in a bungled robbery, (CC) :
CBC This Hour Has [Royal Canadian Rick Mercer Re- |CBC Winnipeg Comedy Festival |CBC News: The National (CC)
22 Minutes (CC) |Air Farce (CC) jport (CC) . “Best Medicine’ (N) cc,
:00) On the The Apprentice: Los Angeles 1 |The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CNBC cis [Mr [ee |
CNN (:00) The Situa- |Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) Anderson Cooper 360 (CC)
tion Room







COURT Cops 1 (CC) ‘ Justice |Video Justice |Forensic Files |Forensic Files be “ou “Canyon of Se-
crets
The Suite Life of/Hannah Mon- {Cory in the THE PROUD FAMILY (2005, Fantasy) Voices of Kyla Pratt,.Tommy
DISN Zack & Cody {tana 1 (CC) _|House ‘Napper’s |Davidson, Paula Jai Parker. Animated. A mad scientist unleashes evil
Scouts. 1 (bo) Delight’ clones of a family. 4 (CC)

DIY This Old House [Kitchen Renova-|Kitchen Renova-|Classic Car [Classic Car — |Classic Rides | Classic Rides
A (CC) tions tions Restoration Restoration (N) (N)
Quadriga Journal: Europa Aktuell |Journal: In Journal: Quadriga
pw gma
E! The Daily 10 (N) [American Idol: Girls Rule: The E! |Simon Cowell: The E! True Holly- |The Soup (N) _|Starveillance
: Sa] True Hollywood Story 1 (CC). |wood Story Simon Cowell. (CC) Britney Spears.
ESPN (:00) NBA Basketball 2007 McDonald's All-Star Cel |U.S. Poker Championship From |U.S. Poker Championship From
ebrity Game. From Las Vegas. (Live) (CC) Atlantic City, N.J. (Taped) Atlantic City, N.J. (Taped)

- |Winter X-Games From Aspen, Colo. (Taped) (Part 2 of SportsCenter ~ International Edi- |Boxing Friday Ni
ESPNI (co Boe ee lon Le) Hono vs, Vl







Night Fights. Martin
demir Pereira.

Daily Mass: Our |The World Over Life Is Worth |The Holy Rosary|Defending Life Crash Course in
EWTN [ay Living i hier =e

:00) Cardio |Navy SEALs Training: BUD/s ~ |Navy SEALs Training: BUD/s —|Navy SEALs Training: BUD/s
FIT TV. Se \oate234-Heleek (cc) (Clase 234 (CC "9 Clade 34 lonestett (CC

On the Record With Greta Van

Fox Report-
FOX-NC shepard Smith Susteren (Live) (CC)
Best Damn Top 50 Beatdowns- |Aroundthe |The FSN Final

:00) Women’s College Basketball North Carolina at

FSNFL th Carolina State. ‘Live d Part 2 (Live) Score (Live)
6:30) LPGA Golf SBS Open at Turtle Bay - Second |PGA Golf Nissan Open - Second Round. From Riviera Country Club in
GOLF filtten Oaly nai Li) : Pacic Palisades, Calf. (CC) H

Lingo (CC) _ ‘ia Wants to Be a Millionaire ( Dog Eat Dog © (CC) action
go (CC) 6 10g Eat Dog 11 ( (cc (ce
I

(C
; 00) Attack of {X-Play “College |X-Play Morgan in|Star Trek: The Next Generation “Indianapo- “Indi
GATech [ie brow ty Hood 2k (europe. f20Suddenly Human" 9 (CC) re Cg Iisa tec

The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) |Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC)







/










I've Got a Secre'

oO
B
=
a
2

4



i



‘i

Morris Cerullo |Breakthrough Inspiration To- Life Today (CC) |This Is Your Day |The Go:
INSP [nec fegiaroah faster ren Pee eS
Reba Barbra Wife and |Accordingto {Accordingto [Friends ‘The Everybody Everybody
KTLA _\vean’s new dog Kis “OfMice |Jim ‘Scary lis for|One Where No |Loves Raymond |Loves Raymond
goes missing. Jand Men” (CC) jMovie” (CC) |therapist. {One Proposes’ | "Not So Fast” "PT. &A’ ioc)
Still Standing /Reba Reba takes|Reba ‘Best Lil /FOR MY DAUGHTER'S HONOR (1996, Drama) Gary Cole, Mary Kay
an of the in hurricane sur- |Haunted House Place, Nicholle Tom. A teenager is seduced by her 's most popular
LIFE Man of th in hurri Haunted House |Place, Nicholle Tom. A t is seduced by her school’s most popu
house. © (CC) |vivors. in Texas” (CC) . (CC)

:00) Hardball + |Countdown With Keith Olber- — |MSNBC Investigates Pelican Bay MSNBC Investigates “Lockup: In-
MSNBC cc mann State Prison. " : side Holman” Holman prison.

Jimmy Neutron: [SpongeBob |Full House [Nicktoons TV [Nicktoons TV |Growing Pains |Growing Pains
NICK | enius SquarePants A4(CC) a a :

:00) NUMB3RS Friday Night Lights (CC Las Vegas ‘The Burning Bedouin” |News © (CC)
NTV fae [MSO ae

NCTS Setu NASCAR Racing Craftsman Truck Series -- Chevy Silverado HD 250. From Daytona Inter- | Trackside At...
SPEED (Live) , national Seine, in Daytona Beach, Fla. (ive)

Primary Focus |Behind the The Hal Lindsey |Joel Osteen Dr. Frederick K. |Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN {Scenes (CC) _ |Report (CC) Price (CC) |

body |x & MISS CONGENIALITY (2000, Com ) (PA) Sandra Bullock, |e DOWN TO EARTH (2001 :
Loves Raymond |Michael Caine, Benjamin Bratt. A clumsy FBI agent goes under cover at a en Chris Rock, Regina King,
“Crazy Chin” {beauty pageant. (CC) (DVS) Chazz Palminteri.

Take Home Chef|Wild Weddings A bride needs to go|What Not to Wear ‘KerriA.”A | What Not to Wear An office manag-
TLC “Jen” Roasted to the bathroom; garter games; cer- |county court counselor wears old, jer and mother-of-two needs a more
lobster. emony bloopers. (CC) oversized clothes. (N) (CC) professional wardrobe. (CC)

00) Law & Or- /Law & Order An undercover re- — [NBA Basketball T-Mobile Rookie Challenge & Youth Jam. From the
TNT der “Identity” |porter is murdered while bing to {Thomas & Mack Center in Las Vegas. (Live) (CC)
CC) (DVS) expose a gang of thugs. .

Home for Imagi-/Class of 3000 |MyGym Part- |SquirrelBoy |CampLazio — |Codename: Kids/My Gym Part-
TOON nary Friends [Am | Blue?” ners Monkey : ee Ae ent

Storm Stories Abrams & Bettes It Could Happen |Full Force Na- | Weather: Evening Edition (CC
TWC [iene [mete enor fe 65 seo

:00) Duelo de La Fea Mads Bella Lety es una nifia |Mundo de Fieras (N) Casos de la Vida Real: Edicion
UNIV asiones dulce, romédntica ¢ inteligente, pero Especial Reina Beleza.
apenas atractiva, (N)

=
3
oOo
s
a
F<)

E

‘t



gs
—_=

=]
oO
wn
m
e

=o ge

=>



)
) Law
nt ‘One’
:00) | Love New |The White Rapper Show 1 The White Rapper Show Rappers |Hogan Knows Hogan Knows
VHi omen bean been
vs Guide To Dangerous Escape tothe Best & Worst of |Quest forthe |The Huntley | Fly Fishing
. Outdoors Game (CC) Wild Tred Barta One - Way America.
:00) America’s |VIEW OF TERROR (2003, Suspense) Shannen Doherty, Michel Fran- | WGN News at Nine 1 (CC)
unniest Home |coeur, Jayne Heitmeyer. A mysterious voyeur stalks a young woman.
Videos (CC) |(CC) ‘

Everybod WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) 4 (CC, CWii News at Ten With Kai
WPIX — Love Reon ve } ane Tong, Jim Watins (CC)

Jeopardy! “Teen |Dr. Phil 0 (CC Jeopardy! ‘Teen Frasier Donald Frasier Frasier
WSBK _ _[Toumament’ (N) . ( i Tounament O'Connor quest’ |tries to concoct a
(CC) (CC) stars. © (CC) theme song.

; PREMIUM CHANNELS
i *%% — |%% BIG MOMMA'S HOUSE 2 (2006, Comedy) Martin i Breach: — |Rome “Heroes of the Republic”
HBO-E [ROLL BOUNCE |Lawrence. An FBI agent reprises his disguise, posing |HBO First Look |Vorenus returns to the Collegium.
(2005) ‘PG-13' jas a heavy nanny. (1 'PG-13' (CC) (CC) (CC)

Se *% KING’S RANSOM (2005,
omedy) Anthony Anderson, Jay

(:00) Law & Or- [Law & Order: Special Victims Unit/Monk A millionaire with leprosy Psych “Game, Set ... Muuurder?” A j.
USA der: Criminal In- |A murdered woman's twin may havelhires Monk to recover some papers |tennis star disappears. (N) (CC)
tent “One” (CC) |stolen her identity. (CC) from his estate. (CC)
00
The

=





eae Making] * % %% RETURN OF THE JEDI (1983, Science Fiction) Mark Hamil,
HBO-P f: King Kong [Harrison Ford, Carrie Fisher. Luke Skywalker and his comrades face a fi-
n cc} nal confrontation. 1 ‘PG’ (CC) Mohr. £ ‘PG-13' (CC)

+ % DATE MOVIE (2006, Romance-Comedy) Alyson | # %» ROLL BOUNCE (2005, Comedy-Drama) Bow Wow, Chi McBride,
HBO-W _[Hannigan. A hopeless romantic faces many obstacles |Mike Epps. A roller-skater prepares for a big showdown. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC)
inher courtship. ( ‘PG-13' (CC)


















ee 49 [Big Love ‘Where There’s a Will” | * & * NORTH COUNTRY (2005, Drama) Charlize Theron, Frances Mc-
HBO-S [105 (1980) Jane|Barb is a finalist for Mother of the _|Dormand, Sean Bean. A miner charges her employer with sexual harass-
Fonda. Year. 1 (CC) ment. 1 ‘R’ (CC)
* + BATMAN BEGINS (2005, Action) Christian Bale, Michael Caine, Liam Neeson. % & THE 40-YEAR-OLD VIRGIN
Bruce Wayne becomes Gotham City's Dark Knight. “ 'PG-13' (CC) ae Romance-Comedy) Steve
arall, O'R’ (CC)
lee,
|AMES CAN-
CUN 2 (2006)



band leaves her. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC) n(
* & & COACH CARTER ee Drama) Samuel L. Jackson, Robert —_|(:45) & # IN TOO DEEP (1999, Crime Drama) Omar

Ri'chard, Rob Brown. A high-school basketball coach pushes his team to Epps, LL Cool J, Nia Long. Nn undercover cop starts
excel. MV 'PG-13' (CC) losing his identity. RCC)

pi) % & DIARY OF A MAD BLACK WOMAN (2005) |The L Word “Luck Be a Lady” iM Masters of Horror “Washingtoni-
imberly Elise, iTV. A woman starts over after her hus- ica) enjoys a new romance, ans” fay! Granny's possessions,

(10) ¥ * FIRE DOWN BELOW (1997, Action) Steven] # % % ATL (2006, Comedy-Drama) Tip ‘T.1.” Harris,
eagal, Marg Helgenberger. A lone agent tackles toxic-/Lauren London, Mykelti Williamson. Four Atlanta teens
waste dumping in Kentucky. © ‘R’ (CC) face challenges. \ ‘PG-13' (CC)

TMC

4

Scrubs J.D’s |The Daily Show |The Colbert Re- Chappelle's /Chappelle’s Coney Central |Comedy Central
COM new girlfriend | With Jon Stew- |port Shashi Tha- |Show Eddie Grif- |Show (CC) Presents ‘Tom {Presents Maria
does not laugh. art (CC) roor. (CC) fin. (CC) Papa’ Bamford.
)

00) Walker, _- Walker, Texas Ranger A geneticist | % % * WHEN HARRY MET SALLY (1989, Romance-Comedy) Bil
HALL Pes Ranger is Knapp by Som looking to | Crystal, Meg Ryan, Carrie Fisher. Two romantically bruised New Nits
N (CC) misuse her work. (CC). become close friends.
Buy Me ( (CC) [Million Dollar Listing ‘Hollywood’ {House Hunters |World’s Most — |Relocation, Relocation ‘Victoria
HGTV 1 [ORCC 2ahe aa tn iaratina 1 [Etre Homes Jand Henn” (CC) ohhh
i longhouse:

sak 3 THE TRIBUNE

er Charlie the
Bahamian Puppet and
his sidekick Derek put

some smiles on your

kids’s faces.

Bring your children to the
McHappy Hour at McDonald's in
Oakes Field every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
month of February 2007.

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun. |

i'm lovin’ it

Movie Gift Cert

make great gi





THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007, PAGE 13





INTERNATIONAL NEWS

[share your news| Records show January the hottest
ee, Oy ever, thanks to El Nino and
f=" ee | global warming, scientists say —

\» | from people who are
~° | making news in their
Fs neighbourhoods. Perhaps
|. J you are raising funds for a

If so, call us on 322-1986

ce nmr ee mene

PPO ORE KEES

SS err ee + ea FT LEER NES

and share your story.

wwe

+3. 7 F o Z.
CSS TREES

HTL RAD RHO PISS LS

we

~ 4a ee eS

ae.

ee

=

eae

A Meare FFF 3G >

ee ae

ALRITE Re ICIS Varro a One mi
Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 ¢ Fax: 32

m@ WASHINGTON

IT MAY be cold comfort ,

during a frigid February, but
last. month was by far the
hottest January ever, according

ually warming world, according
to U.S. scientists who reported
the data Thursday. Records on
the planet's temperature have
been kept since 1880.
Spurred on by unusually
warm Siberia, Canada, north-
ern Asia and Europe, the
world's land areas were 3.4
degrees Fahrenheit warmer
than a normal January, accord-
ing to the U.S. National Ch-
matic Data Center in Asheville,
N.C. That didn't just nudge past



the old record set in 2002, but
broke that mark by 0.81

degrees, which meteorologists -

said is a lot, since such records
often are broken by hundredths
of a degree at a time.

scientific services chief, David
Easterling. "I was very sur-
prised."

The scientists went beyond
their normal doublechecking
and took the unusual step of
running computer climate mod-
els "just to make sure that what
we're seeing was real," Easter-
ling said.

It was.

"From one standpoint it is
not unusual to have a new
record because we've become

accustomed to having records
broken," said Jay Lawrimore,
climate monitoring branch
chief. But January, he said, was
a bigger jump than the world
has seen in about 10 years.

surement — was 1.53 degrees
Fahrenheit warmer than nor-
mal, breaking the old record by
more than one-quarter of a
degree.. Ocean temperatures
alone didn't set a record.

In the Northern Hemisphere,
land areas were 4.1 degrees
Fahrenheit warmer than nor-
mal for January, breaking the
‘old record by about three-quar-
tersofadegree. —

But the United States was
about normal. The nation was



Official says US supports international
cooperation on global warming

m@ WASHINGTON



A GROUP of global lawmakers signed a reso-

tion with other countries on combatting global

warming.

"I've detected a really quite remarkable change



lution Thursday calling for a new agreement lim-
iting greenhouse gas emissions by 2009 to succeed
the Kyoto protocol, which is set to expire in 2012,
according to Associated Press.

The resolution reached after a two-day forum
on global warming attended by lawmakers from
about 20 countries, including members of Con-
gress, urged the Group of Eight industrialized
countries to commit to the 2009 deadline when
they next meet in June.

Wednesday, German Chancellor Angela
Merkel, whose country holds the rotating presi-
dencies of the G-8 and the European Union, out-
lined her priorities on global warming when she
addressed the forum by video. Merkel has agreed
to convene an international meeting on climate
change in May to prepare for the G-8 summit in
the north German resort of Heiligendamm June
6-8.

Lawmakers attending the forum held ina US.
Senate building said that after hearing from US.
lawmakers who attended that they sensed a polit-
ical shift in Washington toward greater coopera-

here on climate change," said Elliot Morley, a
British MP who chaired the forum.

A senior State Department official told the

attendees Thursday that the U.S. is committed to
working with other countries on the issue.

"We share with other countries the goals of
reducing greenhouse gas emissions and intro-
ducing new, cleaner technologies," said State
Department Undersecretary Paula J. Dobrian-
sky.

Dobriansky outlined steps taken by the US. in
reducing emissions, but made no mention of the
Kyoto treaty, which the U.S. has refused to
endorse since it was negotiated in 1997.

President George W. Bush has made clear that
his administration will not agree to the kind of
mandatory emission caps required under Kyoto,
because the administration believes the restric-
tions will harm U.S. businesses.

Thirty-fve other industrial nations, who have
endorsed the pact, agreed to cut their global-
warming gases by .S.percent on average below
1990 levels by 2012.



wo fino isesys |



€—
©
=7
=
Wo
©
©
=
(2
(D



0.94 degrees Fahrenheit above
normal for January, ranking
only the 49th warmest since
1895.

The world's temperature
record was driven by northern
latitudes. Siberia was on aver-

ee to Associated Press. "That's pretty unusual for a The temperature of the
r The broken record was fueled record to be broken by that world's land and water com- age 9 degrees Fahrenheit
6-7452 by a waning El Nino anda grad- much," said the data center's bined — the most effective mea- | warmer than normal. Eastern

Europe had temperatures aver-
aging 8 degrees Fahrenheit
above normal.

Canada on average was more
than 5 degrees warmer than
normal.

Larger increases in tempera-
ture farther north, compared to
mid-latitudes, is "sort of the
global warming signal," Easter-
ling said. It is what climate sci-
entists predict happens and will
happen more frequently with
global warming, according to
an authoritative report by hun-
dreds of climate scientists issued
this month. :

Meteorologists aren't blam- .
ing the warmer January on
global warming alone, but they
said the higher temperature was
consistent with climate change.

Easterling said a weakening
El Nino — a warming of the cen-
tral Pacific Ocean that tends to
cause changes in weather across
the globe — was a factor, but not
a big one. But Kevin Trenberth,
director of climate analysis at
the National Center for Atmos-
pheric Research, said El Nino
made big changes worldwide
that added up.

Temperature records break
regularly with global warming.
Trenberth said, but “with a little
bit of El Nino thrown in, you
don't just break records, you
smash records."

As much of the United States
already knows, February does-
n't seem.as unusually warm as
January was.

"Even with global warming,
you're not going to keep that:
cold air bottled up in Alaska
and Canada forever," Easter-
ling said. :




2
WN \

Ly






John S. George
Here to help, every step of fhe wn













WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NW at 10-20 Knots : 2-3 Feet 4-7 Miles 76° F

NW at 6-12 Knots 1-2 Feet 76° F
: NW at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet





WASSAU Today:











5-7 Miles 7o° F





salt


































|
| 4 alate WNW at 6-12 Knots 1-3 Feet 6-7 Miles 15°F
4 i ' } | e niKa 5 WNW at 12-25 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-7 Miles 75° F
Not as warm witha | Ashower possible in © Mostly sunny. | Partly sunny, windy 4 Breezy and cool with Some sun. |. The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the oped Es Saturday: | WNW at 6-12 Knots 2-4 Feet 6-7 Miles 75° F i
shower. } the evening. | ; | and cool. 4 some sun. greater the need for eye and skin protection. =
j j High: 72° High: 72° i High: 72° High: 71°
High: 76° ; Low: 60" 4 Low: 58° Low: 58° 4 Low: 60° i Low: 62° 54

3 a q S.

Lo wed [oF | * (srr) 68°-53° F ‘Teese ) Cerri
60, 15 55/12
12:05am. -02 eee oa







Today 6:36am. 2.9
6:51pm. 2.5 12:50p.m. -0.2

Saturday 723am. 3.0 12:57am. -0.4
7:39p.m. 2.7 1:33 p.m. -0.4

Bam. 30 1:47am. -0.5

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature? is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, = precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect hs ae EH and the low for the day. ~









Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday















Sund 8:
ABACO Temperature 2 8:27 p.m. 2.9 2:16p.m. -0.5
Sepa High esetuusenusnueaeineee BO° F/30° C : : 7
High: 70° F/21°C eee Monday O04am. 29 2:38am. -0.5
io o : Ow ... vesesstssessesssessesseseee LO” F/23° © . : 5
Low: 57° F/14°C Nara Holy ccvansenntonwosancl? BED’ C g14pm. 3.0 2:59pm. “05
Normal low ...... 64° F/18° C


































WEST PALM BEACH Last year's high 76° F/24° C
High: 65° F/18°C Last year’s low ... censenees BT? FAVA? C
Low: 45° F/7°C i Precipitation ae ieabes a a.m. — Bocas S a.m.
eee AS of 1 p.m. yesterday ........ssssssceeeeessessssnenee {aCe unset.......6:04 p.m. Moonset..... 9:15 p.m.
FREEPORT Year to date sceccsescccsssesccsssecsccssseessessseessssseeesss BLO”
oe os High: 68° F/20° C Normal year tO date ....sesssccsserssssssnerseeseenes 2.69” ris all =
Low:55° F/13°C
AccuWeather.com
Be, All forecasts and maps provided by. " : Showers a cases
aE — ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc.©2007 —. ~ Mar. 3 Mar. 11 asa
High:71° F/22°C oa °EDpAe “ [a"4™) Rain
2 see = 3 Front:
Low:52°F/11°C NASSAU. High: . cae : ~— 7 398 f=] Fluries Cold
: High: 76° F23°C : 7/8. 4 x S Shown are noon positions of weather systems and W.
now precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. ArT) elie
{yy Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Memgenfle



Low: 60° F/16°C



85/29 76/24

Cer











| Racal CATISLAND
P Low: 58° F/14°C ot: 76 ee oa sai Se

maicleen oD.





os

63/7 sa







REAT Monterrey 4/1
_ GRE enn F _SAN SALVADOR
High: 77° F/25°C High: 79° F/26°C

Low: 66°F/19°C Low:68°F/20°C










Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ee ee
highs and tonights's lows. High: 75° F/24°C :
Low: 62° F/17°C -
Lo e532 :
High: 80° F, : se ,
toad eI gee so one Low: 69° F/21 :
Today Saturday Today ~ Saturday Today Saturday MAYAGUANA 2 S
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W _ High: 84°F/29°C =
; aes Low: 72° F/22°C 4]





i Fic

| Albuquerque 54/12 32/0 pe
P|

m




Me

Anchorage 30/-1_ 16/-8 Prenat EB. il.
Atlanta

(hs



ye

AM 18-7 8 49/9 RAGGEDISLAND Wah he

ny
































alate City 26-3 19410 po__ 3a 251-3 ¢ 72/22 446 Portl aan art
zi Meal eles a gear ar
9-7 sf 3a _25/-3 c__Los Angeles 34/1 29/-1_ :
of 22-5 16-8 sn Louisville 0/10 26/-3 GREAT INAGUA
Charleston, sc ae 24/-4 s 58/14 37/2 ~ 94° O
Chicago 19-7 19-7 sn 287-2 13-10 ee
Cleveland ——‘16/-8 14/-10_ sf 26-3. 181-7 65/18. 50/10 Low: 72" F226 CE BROKERS & AGENTS
gs 2 SONS 40 s GONE
53/11 22-5 42/5 ee e ee ee Sete = pe Anon | h
7 31/07 ‘18! pe Oklahoma a City Tucson 75/23 45/7 76/24 50/10 bac 24 ere oe Va 3 ) i lager I |
aera ahoma 8 pe . Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, ¢-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder- = Skt. va
6 3 679 425s Orlando Washington, DC 25/-3 18/-7 s 32/0 26/-3 sn ‘storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prep-precipitation, Tr-trace — : a —



ap eins we eee tgp en eS IO STOLL I IN A



ee eee ee



THE MIAMI HERALD



WORLD MARKET PROFILE



Wa







| MiamiHerald.com

INTERNATIONAL EDITION





3B





WHAT THE U.S. MARKETS DID
















































































































































































































U.S. WINNERS AND LOSERS











































































































































































































World Stocks Latin American Stocks NYSE NASDAQ AMEX NYSE NASDAQ — AMEX
Prev. 52wk 52Wk Traded In New York Prev. Prev. Prev.
Today day High _Low_ | CcFemsa .34e 47,600 40.50 39.80 40.25 +.28 Today day Today day ory ‘hay |__Most Active _ Most Active ___ Most Active
arisierdem 50807 50666 509.88 412.87 7 Advanced 759 727 | Advanced 1773-1813 | Advanced 9 OTT Te verge eae ea
het Se ee ha ten Emplca 45,800 46.09 45.42. 45.77 +.13 | pecii ned 367 386 | Declined “148 1181 | Declined 367 386 Name Volume Cis, %Chg | Name Volume Cls. %Chg | Name Volume Cls, %Chg
ek Bt Stl TES SST | csata Ste 500 27.64 2745 2745+ | Uretamed 97 91 | Unchanged 165 169 | Unchanged 37 BS | Ford 53559100 8.51 +06 | NasdlO0TrI20205200 4460 +74 | SPDR 63726000 145.61. +95
New Highs 196 70 | New Highs 176 118 | New Highs 196 70 | AMO 31850500 1495 +435 | HudsCty 64550400 13.90 +21. | iSHRZK nya660720 80.75 +407
Brussels 4547.83 4528.09 4555.08 3445.10 GpgRadio .6le 4,000 11.00 10.89 10.99 +.04
pe RAS Sa ee | OC f 00 10.89 10.99 +.04 | Newlows 18 19 | Newlows 27 39 | Newlows 18 19 | Genflec 31404300 3647 +70. | SunMicro 62967300 640 * | SPEngy 23255500 5843. +01
Caren’ sotesa1 4518081 6201272 2644408 | GPOSImec * 1,067,300 13.20 12.70 13.02 +.23 ee 2,037,061 2,043,602 | Adv. volume 1,739,103 1,182,609] Adv. volume 332,290 277,175 | Pfizer 27884800 26.58 +.19 | ApldMatl 57657700 18.89. +.71 | SemiHTr 16905300 3447 +.75
REE eee a TaN Situs | cideaeite BIW tole AAT wane AOU | 4 Dec le | 3826 612986 Deck. volume 52329 35.230 | Meron 25958600 1256 4.35 | Microsoft $5204300 2940 +29 | ishmMkt 1193200 117.45 +248
eri nak? Onan: aaee0 7 STAL .16e 2,943, 16 29.61 u30.12+. vol (000) 2,711,485 2,635,091 | TE. vol. (000) 2,190,543 1,855,544 | TH, vol. (000) 398,994 323,011 Met zen 19.21 -13 | intel 55010000. 21.14 +27 | OSVHT 11384200 138.64 +.05
FISE 100 S212 ae ae moThag aezougg | TeMexL 73 2,320,700 3089 29.76 30.85+1.05 0 1470 +21 | Cisco 48105700 27.46 +28 | SPFncl . 9716700 37.71 +3
lide hoes he 2 al Pee ga nek i 2a ca ae Most Widely Held U.S. Stocks AT@T Inc 21601400 37.19 * | Oracle 41999600 16.7 +.15 | PrushQQQ n7713400 si ie
er Ee ee eat. Gait F x HASTA | saaa-s chard ane Nani the west shareholders HomeDp 20045000 41.73. -03 | tev 36181600 627, +19 | DUADiam 7309000 1748 +85
CAC-40 5725.84 5682.69 ST11.04 4615.44 Cervecer 1.07e 8,700 31.96 31.35 u31.77+.52 | stock Div. PE Sales High ‘ow Close cha. NokiaCp 19294300 22.96 +.72 | Qualcom 31387400 39.66 +1.59 | iShEAFE 5537400 76.32 +1.02
Kuala Lumpur 1245.64" 1234.31 124883 886.48 | EEIChile —.48e 52,500 43.08 41.49 u42.51+1.26 . Aj
ie a ee oars ATT Inc 142f 20.0 216014 «37.56 37.08 37.19 * Gai G
ae 05.70 1462460 TSS0 INSTE | Ener 20e + 628400 1730 1660 ul7.05+.38 | VerizonCm 1.62 180 115421 3876 38.05 3863 +59 Iners ainers Gainers
Manila 3300.94 3233.91 3281.90 2057.7 | Madeco * 11,900 12.90 12.43 u12.58+.25 | Exxon 1.28 11.0 169454 76.00 74.99 75.60 +.15 | Name Last Chg %Chg | Name Last _Chg %Chg | Name Last Chg %Chg
Aas og a ean ae SocQ&M 2.808 29200 140.49. 13475 u140.25+4.27 GM 1.00 * -y97865 36.70 36.16 36.50 +.16 ae 22.65 +490 +27.6 Corillian 5.00 +1.55 +449] CumbRsg 7.42 +148 +25.0
ia Ts26¢ EQL4S ITERSL OSE | inacone age 2,000 3495 34.30 3475 +50 General Electric 112° 180 314043 3650 35.79 36.47 +.70 Eat Peat bare nena ela +18.0
Sitpore «18221314816 323660 zzan7 | Metrogas * 25,600 S11 485° 496-13 (BM * 120 16.0 56288 99.43 98.25 99.20 +91 | Hangrorth 1134 +103 +100 Cyclacelpf 670 +140 OL ne I a
SaoPaulo 4595.61 45197.45 45382.6 TcmArg * 116,600 22.80 22.42 22.79 +.31 i : gu a ' Rains
say 5561 aT 48 sam su A eee ee aaiacea TrinaSoln 41.22 43.64 497 | SGXPhm 5.22 +107 4258| BSDMed 7.75 +84 +122
Taipei 7809.45 7736.83 7935.54 6257.80 | Aracruz 2.20e 676,200 57.29 55.85 §6.75+1.18 DOW JONES INDUSTRIAL AVERAGE aes an oa aed ace: er A atllekon cis
Toronto 1320446 13171.76 13237.74 10860.72 TelBrasH 2.28r 17,600 29.85 29.10 29.64 +.49 Daily closes for the past year. He eEBES setae teen ee aa
~ Sa Rail persia DaimirC 69.78 +5.33 +83] BCSBBk 17.25 +2.45 +16.6 | EmpireF 2.75 +26 +104
Baie Ba, SR PN SUN TASS bls 1061 +80 +82] SprtHaley 4.60 +65 +165] NevGCas 2.60 +24 +102
hea ama sa aus rae PRECIOUS MET, ‘AL Wednes day eFunds 25.84 +182. +7.6| MartenT 17.63 +2.39 +15.7| Fortuneind 4.24 .
ilan . 00 33057.00 26543.00 S 7
Johannesburg 2631.42 26023.35 | 2602335 18380.06 N.Y. Comex close 12741.86 | Losers Losers Losers
Athens 4699.00 4647.49 4802.53 3379.28 Close Name %Chg
Stockholm 1212.24 1190.10 1206.02 878.16 | Gold Market Price 667.40 ao Name__last_Chy Chg | Name ___tast _Ch eo
Zurich SPI T3IAIT 732391 737158. $573.99 | Silver Market Price 13.933 +0.052 Carterss 21.05 -4.22 -16.7 | Daktrnicss 30.09 8.00 -21.0 Aurora0Gn 2.72 -.58
Bente Spas te eines aa Handy & Harman WattsWir 38.41. -4.94 -11.4| AdeptTch 7.85 -145 16.6 | Friedmind 9.70 -2.02
rae ATT oy ciORICOLS DEAE TA VISOASL Ga CrwfdB 6.05. 59-89 | AdvancPh 2.35 40-145 WellsGard 3.71 ~73
DENG Laon » She ChoiceHtls 37.28 -349 -86 Gullfisland 33.60 -439 -11.6| MetroHith 245-37
a-AEX Index, b-Bel-20, dx-deutscher, Atkien, | silver Market Price Fao E GA WeWatch 49.61 4.07 7.6 RschFrnt, 9.85 -1.25 -113|GSESy 7.22 -58
30-Financial Times, 100-Financial Times, ipc- : CrwfdA 520-36 -6.5| AmRailcar 27.14 -2.86 -9.5] TiensBio 5.23 -.39
d London Aft
im ices pea ected es ie? cc-CAC ondon Afternoon WarnerMus 18.12 -127 -6.5| Channell 3.88. -.39 -91) CdnSEng 2,20 -.14
pera a TT Sed tudo oe Gbse Sha. ScottishRe 4.22 -28 -6.2| Intrgnth = 4.96 458.3] Xethanoln 2.50 -.16
a table, mMIB Telematico, x-holiday. or 4 3 Nordickm 35.44 -2.09 -5.6| EnvoyCm 3.37 -30 -8.2] IderaPhrs 8.70 -.55
‘ EncoreAcq 24.90 -1.39 -5.3| PeopEduc 3.85 -34 81 Iteris 240-14
; Vol. High Low Close Chg. Vol. High Low Close Chg. | _ ____Vol._High Low Close Chg. | _ Vol. High Low’ Close Cig. Vol. High Low Close Chg.
DiKeRity 1085” 46.68 4605 46.15 57 | IShchin2S 1116 106.66 105.07 106.15 +15|Nextwaven 1103 12.07 11.87 12.00 +14) SwstnEngy 1064 SBS TGF SBT +20
: : Dyn 4784.15 TAT 7.70 +21] iShOTr 1126 92.08 90.05 92.02 +1.85 | NikeB 1669 105.78 10495 10538 +18 | SovrgnBep 2181 25.99 25.77 25.87 +.11
. Serie ie Ge re eel Fal Re A tle IY EE Ee RM culimaoe ier be Ge Ga ta
oad 5288. 70 54.23 55:61 +1. n 75 26.16 +.50 | UBS! : +
gett or ore ee en ae $55 ish EAFE 5537 76.40 75.63 7632 +1.02 |Nokiacp 18294 33.00 2250 22.96 +72| SpectBrds 1604 886 B61 8.75 +08] USAirwy 3107 58.18 57.49 57-79 -1.38
cs ns cine en ee RY 2980147 Madd 1470 421 ISROKV nya 1097 8312 8238 82.58 *|NordicAm 1195 37.00 35.22 35.44 -2.09| SprintNex 15655 18.63 18.35 1853 4.17 USEC 1399 14.20 13.66 13.86 -.12
ees Mo a IG) ig AN Talemom Joe Gat ae voltae 8 AS Ue Be eles, UN ee ioe elie, ia) Se SE oe
Vol.__High Low Close Chg. Vol High Low Close _chg. | ertaink Tat eS ISRESt 5126 93408 a1s 222 “8 Nortel irs 6783 36 7394 30s re SeMe. Bie anys star nD 423 utstrem =. 171 om sae 362 401
; ] aaa . ‘ 53 + gt g i i 77 +.04 “19 | UUniao 1199 98.50 95. . .
Brandyw 1963 35.25. 3420 34.40 -52 Sear Eos 1323 +120 TWs 1761 5293 52.02 5277 +82 | NorthropG © 2379 74.96 73.84 74.48 | -.12 Stat ims 284 3e9 Dey i¢| UnionPac 3755 104.70 ions 10448 +158
ABB Ltd TERI Brinker s 2333 35.24 34.85 35.19 *| Ectipsys 1328 2001 1885 19.18 on Mumina 1880 37.35 36.47. 37.22 +.03]|NovaChem 1250 32.71 31.89 32.22 +.39| SP Engy 23255 59.04 5812 5843 +.01| UnionStAn 1192 74 725 «7320 *
9.25 18.65 19.13. +58] BrMySq 4981 27.98 27ST 27.72. +13 : s18 0 | ImunoGn 323. 5.20 4.99 5.12 -.10 | Novartis 1472 59.64 59,03 59.51 +.84 : : 36 | Uni 292 +
ACE Ltd Tet PTL S811 S830 ©4230 | oeonims. 14aast 2455 3371 3450 +98) ccsonint 1498 46.91 46.36 46.75 +39] imunmd 1084 463 447 461 +19] NovaStar 3163 :17.78 16.25 17.38 +1.03 ine amie 3781 3740 377 +38) anita s ta) 2350 ni 22.95 a
ACMMD 40795 7.91 7.93 +02 Bredecm 15186 883 830 8.62 +29 cue 1630 26.25 2340 2584 +182| inaymac 2640 «3795 3651 3788 +83] NvtIWrls 1622 1253 12.20 iow +e cpane See ae a i are a7 | UDO 1365 3386 33.42 - 33.64 eH
"07 16.63 16.99 +.34 | BrooksAuto 1603. 1547 1590 +58 . 17 | informat -«1368.«13,63. 13.32 1357 +23|Novellif ‘6712 7.12 7.01. 7.07 -.02 : “a, | UPS B 32. 7A: ‘
AeScom 1769 65 NY DB 08 |onnswick IMS BY BS BE +2 Eidorcidg 1618 68 00 611 +15) infosyss 1585 5065 $7185 $820 +1.77| Novus ANE The 315 31a) 920 | nee ee ery 2725 +5 | US Banerp Gat 009 3607 3620 08
AFLAC 1994 4802 A764 4790 5.25 | BUNS ASSL AST BSL 65,0205 EDs S219 SHS AB70 SUAB $3 ingerad 208) 42.99 2.6L 12.81 +20 Munoedn eT ee tea) faa | Sames, SAMA 248 2670 2S Typ | uSOlFdn 4829 40155 48.08 4845-91
AKSteel 1650-2177 21.29 2149-16 FBrashero 1217 ASA 4425 455 +5 nomed & OTT L048 00 #01 NutrSys soe Rath GL aes ASHE 32 | rt 2 OO NEE ee ae beiresn rae Gad 6710 BbiT 4124
AMBPr ‘1814. 6538 63.72 63.99 -.88 | CA Inc 2011 26.94 2655 26.84 +04) Emdeon 3999 14.64 14.29 “14.59 +.11 | intgdy 2529 1628 1602 1617 +.07 | Nuvelo PU Re ert ERY Percents Tet reo MLC any pay diae et utah ees aor Loe aLA0
AMR Weld 6538 6372 6399-88) CN, Fag VAS 17-00 1745 +20| EMmersnEls 3623 4595 4439 4580 +144 |inte| 5010 21.30 2094 21.4 +27 | Nv ITS Se rM2| Stoynas, 1386 3886 3898 38.00 -2 ltt —SH05 5193 sat ake #03
AR ae ee ee sete e112 |CBREliss 2610, 3748 36.06 37.34 +134) Emulex 1465 BLA 1766 IRE St) Intent 3593, 154.50 148.25 151.64 +78 503347 3355 45 Statics 108 2139 2065 2105 “A1| ion hess 35) aD SD
Na TE ae eee ey ee CBSB '- 2Br2” 3227 31.95 3189 tai] EnCanm 2962. 4886, ARGS GAT 28 | IntNAP es ” = 365 | 1858. 1845 1893 +38 sroadd 38126665 6597 6637 +53 [trot Sse em 2eek 2603 42
aU opton 2003 1505 14st 1504 +60 | COC 254 088 tase 1085 +23 Encoehcg 1530 2617" 2449 2490 138 | py gio 1898 1845 1883 +38 ocr mest 1365 avo2 4008 4037 +32) SMrdeRt = BB UGG Ro rite, eae er crear
45 43,63 42.85 43.50 +.75 | CH Robins 21 5161 53.12 +1.454 Encysi 733.62 3.63 - ‘ “31! Occipets. 11699 48.46. 46.67 48. tryker = «1741.62.70 61.32 61.82 - 99 34.14.
ee ae en a ng CIGNA ae ae ate) azar 2i¢9| EndoPhrm 1055 3088 2997 2398-47 tnt Coal 36T 506 Ae aty age | Ocwenmn 1248 13.05 1687 eee ae SturmRug 100-1007 9.91 aa 6
Abtlab” 5078 S318. 5267 5270 ~01/CITGD 2330 «GLA 5903. S982 +70 EngyConv 2771 3067 2819 3066 +195] rtp”? 57 grag Seal a7a3 x34 | OfeDpt S568 37.73. 35:19 3621-130] SON eer GAT. 6.37 , 6.40 * | ValeroE, = 8771 56.44 55.40 551 4.14
Abtbrg «1708 316 310315 +02 | CMGI 2330 604t 5003 SPST TTT | EngyPrt 1654 22.66 21.81 2196-96 intpect 1129 43.36 42.63 42.09 +32 | OISVHT. 1138 ire et weed #05 | Suncorg 2357 75.00 7318 ‘7354 -71| ValueClick 1935 26.12 25.72 2583-24
AO ee ee aes aa | CMSENy cys. Lene 1743 “1755 - 17.63 "00 | ENSCO oo 2M S82 ASRS SOS 52 | mba We det i248 1258 220 0lStates 1190 3002 28.01 2912 60 Sunoco. «2679-6214 60.82 61.47 +39] VKSrinc 1197-899 873 881 -.17
Moe eee a70G 2290 22568 eA | CNET. ere ete goa 895 10 Entegrs 2046 111.06 10.66 10.97 +17 | Intersil 3500: 126L--12AS 91253 4-10 | ousands gn 1661" 409 |) 392 4.03. +3 SuniseS Ht 1137 3825 3671 31 +133 varianss 4521. 47-50 4377 47-10 +4.00
Acquicor wt 1604 ‘2 06 SCC + | CSXS 16554 °° 42.53 39.11 42.10 +2.73| Entergy 1079 100.39 99.51 99.95 +.43] intuits 1701 31.54 30.99 31.49 +42 Omnicom 3187 102.65 100.61 102.14 -.42 | Suntech 4538 39.29 37.64 39.05 +1.69| Vasogengh 2531 38 35° 37 +.00
ACUI ee te Fase par | CNS Co pie ONES © 3272 SLM 0.72 ca | LAW 5 ERE = RETR RGR BAD #207 | Uveasv 1682 , 6273 3099 312 Ttz | Omniture n 1184 1464 1384 1431-64] SunTst 1008 85-86 B27 85.79 4.73 | VeraSun nT 1580 15.12 1517-60
fe ae cae, BE AS AS elie EE eee te eS SIS ee a ieee Se ae :
0 365 «(367 90 1476 1489 +. R : 3g | onsmen 03 9.65 9.87 +18] SwiftTm 1086 69 30.81 +. 58 25.56 26.
Adaptec 1601 3.70 3.65 367 “43 | Camecogs, 1422 37-76 3688 37aa 24) Esteeldr = aH ATA AGES ATL 448 lonatron, = 1139 S77 $35 $62 +26) onstreamM 1281 "3.683.433.4613 Sycamore 2223 3087 ee SUE Taal veruacm 1s? 878 3808 5863 459
acoesy 5864 610 ke aa 2 cameron 218 E780 5635 Br 31 Bn rst 492988 am 2a $8 meme |OvN—_6434 24 2455 2480 122 | Symantec 17234 18.37 1786 1833 +42|VertxPh 1316 32.26 31.36 32.07 +.60
olorcp 39666 680 Al "18 3888 39.05 + 04 63:50 63, pnwvSy 11873 9,07 +.34| Synagro 15 5 + sl +,
ea 3153, 689 G68 880 15 | GanNRy gs 1044 A718 4653 46.82 +30) Expedia = 2388 2249 2164 2227 +62] JASolarn 2361 19.60 1800 1862 +1.12 | ontXprs 137 24.90 2408 2472 +04] Synovus wn 3802 320 a 44s VonPnn = ae 138 a8 Ua
Advaita 12123779 3693 37.02 -4g|COMNRSg — 2609 51.89 S071 50.90 -42 Expdintls, 4581 4451 4290 4410 +52 | JOS Unirs 12086 16.09 1565 1599 +37] Oracle 41999 16.94 1668 16.77 +15 | SyntaxBrll_ 3306 B44 B.S 825 -30|Viragenh 4754 16 4 6
AMD ji 318 3683 HG Al Caneticg 1049 1248 12.34 1247 4.08) ExDSerpts 2835 77.06 TEE) 785 +144 | JpMorgch 10734 S155 51.00 51.42 +47 | OraSure 1249816 6.50 8.06 -10| Syntrocp ©1596. 3.55 3.07 3.46 #41 | VirgnMdah 2114 28.41 27.04 27.9
AMD oh eee ee te 23 cap Capone 2663 82.63 81.68 81.87 409] Dorel 1059 7.75 751 7.62. +.08 | Jabill 1495 2664 2613 26.39. +36 | OshkoshT 1341 55.03 53.47 _ 55.03 +1.57 | § 22773458 3425 3434 410 ViroPhrm = 1148 17.62 17.18 at at
AdvancPM ey aus 4260 436A 421 | Capltsroe — 1879 2712. 2654 2675-25 twit 5230 4.72 460 465 +19) Januscap 1971 22.06 21.43 22.03 +45 . mmm | Visha 1203 1438 14, 6
AfcmpSv 2804 5412 5210 5344 +297 | Cost 75299087 dt BrxonMbl 16945. 76.00 74,99 _75.60_+.15 | Jarden 1440 37.90 37.07 37.68 +.88 Vistern a tae oo a +16
Affymetrix 1711. 27.66 27117 2740 +49} Cardnitith 1508 72.77 7207 7245 +21 jyBire —-BISS. 1323 1282 1323 +24 PDLBIO 3848 19.44 1889 19.00 -35| TAMSAn = 1133 32.58 32.00 32.35 +29) vivopart 1899 ear ate
Aruesys, 1843 94S 19.06 1959 +54 | CareerEd 1717 2949 2929 2946 Hl) pyc Ten 1456 65.00 63 ote 7248 6890 6540, 6585 4A7|PECHNG — 4274 4486 42.56 43.05 42.86) TD Ameritr 3432 17.25 16.90 1722 427 | Vodafone 1 “2922 2951 +.
Avent 2882-3340 32.85 32.94 04 CareMKRK 10202 62.31 6097 63.30 +42 eh ASS 748 Jon 1181 © 3428 533.50. 3278 | a6 | COBECD Oi MTT AB T3.; ARDS © AR 09 | TEGO 1122 1697 met 2024 TAG 1883 Lil
Avnicog 3735 40.98 39.93 40.21 -1.01| CarMax 1313. 56.69 55.32 5661 +149 Fakor 1285 59.86 5942 $965 +21 | jovciny” 1543 A758 46.36 47.05 4.95 /PMCSa GHZ 681. 68S GRY AE) THO Shee WaT S28 +198 ee” eo ate Lest 1381 al
farumg 2056. 3883 3.22 3156, 19,4 Cama. 20 4858 4883 245 Palani Tee koe ahs 31.00 220 | ON SMS 12S SS 4i| Pini mes aa an20 ans) an70 88 | ty Peewee Ww
amaiT 2524 56.85 55.61 56.60 +1.06 95° 70, + 7 S781 58. i828 |e a2 .
AlskAr a aoe avers aBats se | carters; 6145 22492053, 21.05, 4.22 Fane eee RE i489 “LITO 406 : Poco a0 3735 3880. 3718 425| Taman a Sao ieee ledge 2ag|Wolcm’s 2218 2875 7222 7331 +111
7 Se Ae ae Se ae ag eee ae a Eileen ao ie OB Hale UR A diets ee a aa ge
Alcatelluc’ 8416.13.30 13.14 13.27 +24 Caterpillar 7428 66.48. 65.17 66.16 +1.43 | Figninfo 2519.47.00 45.35. 46. AT : , : 4270] Taketwo. 3741-206 1921 2097 +161 | Wachovia 5563 58.22 57. :
: ! 75 +153] KLA Tne (| ! 3936 50.81 49.59 50.39 +99] Pacerinth © 1243 -27.46 26.50 27.32 + i : at plo Riar
Alcoa 11830 35.00 3439 3457 -43| Celanese 1505 29.21 28.55 28-73-26) Fifhthind 2155 41.27 40.74 : “73 | TalismE gs 2933 17.40 16.99. 17.02.25) WalMart L747 48.13 47-75 A787 tt
Aligntech 1142-17-42 16.75 16.96» -.03 | CeleraGrp 393 1550 1499 15.00 ~45] Finearif 17194 329A at 4.06 | KCSouthn’? 1499 34.86 3333 3454 +.96|PacSunwr 1146 19.72 19.35 19.44 +11 Target “~~ °3260 62.60 61.90° 62.44 +31|Walgm - 3140 45.20 481 44.93 -.04
NlignTech 1102 1142 1675 1696-03) Cocicg 7B A628 639 408/ erenatas "3984 868 2506 22h $40] Kelogs sal 4876 4806 4863-9 Palmincs 5290 15.65 15.31 15.39 -.06| taser 166 815-780 803 +29 Walterinds 2383 2472 23.90 244-14
AllegTch 2755 101.47 99.26 100.69 +97] Celgenes “3007 S401 5314 53.95 +72) FtMars 1415 $0.26 4832 49.56 +7 | Ki Use 3249 3600 S057 faa/ POUT! 2155 AL A 2A | Totes Lis? moae a sat | Mamemis 2 Pe Tse
Alibata, «2155 «GL 97 6035 61.23 +119) CeliThera 228161157158 01) stSolarn © 5728 M485 40.01 43.7 +37 |KimbCk 1212 6982 Gad 6957 71) Pavchex ze M19} HOH ALT *90/ Tenor, e793) Ls) Lal +20] Mea A a aes 8) al
alidata 2155 SLT 6035 6123-4119 |Comexs 2945 3714 3572 3695 +121 | Fratngy 1369 GAITERS 4372 +844 | Kimo 2063 5260 50.36 5213 +13|PaylShoe 1458 31.74 31.01 31.23 -27} telMext 2320 30.89 29.76 30.85 +1.05 | WREIT 21 4325 42.65. 4280-40
Miemeore 549 3087 2068 3074 e114 | CentenniBk 1066 B69 850 850 +01 rey nee ! 84 +.40|KindredH 1101 32.35 32.14 32.17 -10 |) PeabdyE = A452 4149 40.34 40.68 +13 | Telikinc 1675- 603 567 5.70 -29| WsteMinc 3787 35.51 35.02 35.30 +28
AiedCap 1269 3087 2865 314 +114 Conteront 2247 1824 1800 1817 4.5 "78 1152. 1169 +15] Kineticc 3320 51.59 4875 49.94 -157|Pengrthg 1380 17.24 17.00 17.18 +.25 : ;
Hivee Ge ua ae Le vate HG Be ao ne tole ME ES ha oa calmery te Ge ie bn tlhe it ae GE he al wae, Ge Ae Me he Sa | wane de kn Ser tae
Allstate 3538 «62.15 61.27 61.88 +68 | coma 42 1B.N2 «1B 4.05 Y x 0517 i 12. 31, : :
leat 5M Gis a Ge eles te Hen et ae clemee ee OR le falas’ feo ei ne Hw te reget DB RD US US +21/ Tee iso Mak Aas AT Al Wivatcl 2878 5138 4902 4961 -407
AphaNRS stone 2093 202 2088 427 cera ee tras Tea | forestiad 2410 52.90 S218 52.58 +28 | Kohls 260) BEIT BS AMS ari | Peregrine 3695126 116 119-4) Rnetith 2800 RTE egg +12 Wee beep gas ata? Obes il
Altria se a ee ee) gy | ceradyne 432. 56.67 55.76 56M +74 Fortress 2608 29.47 28.01 29.44 +.54 | Kraft yooe SSL SELL 4d iz Perrveliss 130 3150 3054 aay -a4|Teadyn TRS ea) a0 ver ee Sea) Sead Seal lA
Amazon 671. 4028 30:14 4014 +83 Ceridian 2302 33.93 33.33 33.56 +.19 FredMec 2000 Be ee gees +Lit | Kupke eee EE has ae tent Mat ee 3 WAT +4) Tetum eal 2682 230 4204 Wesrind 1687 6.2 i sas 02
aMorl e857 M867 A779 4850.55 neg ate a 8 SAL DoE ie FregM pV 275 2515 2506 22 +12 — 367 1000 3.6) 395 238) Perio ioe TT S410 Oar «187 i 3322 1680 16.07 1652 +36. vaceae BAGS ae
48.50 47.01 47.94 +1. Bes i 63 +44 Ptrogst : ro 1660 87.04 85. . al
AgagleOs | 4765 31.75 30.88 31.74 +.80 nels re 3.23 3.09 3.18 ~02} Fremont -«-2785«1.79 12.95 1348 +32|LCAVis . 1170 7.54 45.56 47.19 -.26 | Pfizer areas MSS 22 ie tetrats 1580 er foal 85-68 39 | WOigitl If 3007 19.22 1872 19.02 +30
AE 1428 46.32 45.74 45.95 +.17 eran Sh nn a res sa FriedBR te 73 716 724 06] ESILog «11815 9.15. 8.86 9.09 +.23 | PhelpsDs ° 6859. 124.68 oe ne re TevaPhrm 11178 38.00 3706 37.96 +101 | WstiUnn = 3432-2235 21-99 22.32 +.36
ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee eee eee ee eee ge
i Pe aoa Chemtura 2338 1201 1172 1201 +21 69 eerie eet | Rains 21 48.26 4875-47 ore P74 AT-O0 S47.) 4,68 46 91. :
antinity ieee 268 3150 2 +22 chetng Sal M72 W201 421) FuwelF 1370 11.80 10.25 11.30 +78 Cammachce BSTU Gi 3 oA Gelb a) | ens i Lt £174 BRIS ae Wyoribg ES aoe eae Aron ar wan dela» A888 LS eee can
AmerMed 1067. 20.75 20.28 40.62 ~13) Gave” 04 71.78 7219-12 WWSands ‘1673 9390 9210 92.75 +. \ eae i a tal .
amorbio” 248 27 AL te +3 Cc Mies 1600 2 abe a +08) Guarketn 1247 2100 1852 2085 +136 | Lawsnsht 460 Bn Tat Tat orelne Toe ats Suse SOL sal Theos 513317882 On a8 Wnsson ire 3828 a8 245
‘00 3093 3098 +. : 99 m Ol 1789 +15] Learcorp 1345 39.12 38.07 38.32 -.66| Pridelnti 2208 28.00 27.55. 27: Tidwtr x "Ay |Windstrm 47-1500 1487 1499 +.12
Amstand 2594 5439 °5329 5357 -.06| ciiMaMble "2612, 48.00 (45.76.4775 +36) Gulls 3 2470 2401 2466 +25|LegoMason 1265 10508 101.65 10402 +227 | primed THREE eh dees alse aor x32 | Wins 2496 26.90 al
amstand 2504 54 GuowOs: ° 2883 748 “708 “738 +3| carn ‘08 101.65 10402 +227 | Primedia 1551. 2.24200 219 +08) Tifany 1137. 4245 41.56 42.07 +32 | Wath 25.00 «2681
Ameriprise 3192 4003 35) et sling | Chipotle 1087 61.51 59.60 5969-76 | Gap et ee Shis. ias anos [ewan Se ee eT Bre) cae | pagan THis. Sean, BLae 126 $54 |TimeWam 17527 2161 2145.21.48 22] Winn Te20 10433 10249 10336_ 4.93
Ameriprise 03 oT eee ebay ss [Choicehts 1764 3871 3637 37-28 348) Garmins 12964 $9.30 S511 19 saza (tome, ais, 630 ge aT ~02 rushQdgn 7713 $290 $1.25 S142 1.58} TW Tle BS Be ee aLig — Eee
pret eye tion thea val Tete Chordnt If 1402 330 310 330 +10) Gateway ooo de as Sega ve LOL tee? | Lemaak owns sel eae eH ProctGam 5945 ° 65.07 64.62 6488 +.17| TitanMts - 5374 35.95 34.56 35.24 +1.19
Amylin Be toes 21g | ctubbs 1188 52.92 5243 5269 +20) Gemstar 3818 4.23 4.08 A419 +13) LibMintAn 2499 G28 SLES Sb ee | Promesstll visas oven veee iniaaas Lead Tivo lng ay 1397 20 595 S88 i 598 84.1 XM Sita TS 1
aye Ee B28! 472 A190 415 CienaCprs S711. 30.72 29.24 30.07 +1.39 | GenProbe 3053 5129. 4829 43,00 320 LigandPhn 1158 1188 Terie e a ProgCp s 3293 23.52 23.18 23.35 +.10} Todco 1177 33.07 32.38 32.78 +.28 | XOMA 1062 3.16 «3.07 3.11 +01
snacks 4476 4225 4.72 A180 +15) Goueel” ote 505 481 504 +08) Genuah 25D at | een ae Le ee ee ea 14) Protogs, 1637, 7096 69.30 7010 +28 TollBros 2128 32.75 3201 3242 +31/XTOEngy 4719 51.79 5053 S089 +80
rage se Sea anos saaa ear [cueety 3042 DLT 21.03 2122-141 Gencoship 1643 315 3090 31.16 SAL] vel USA Shee Sage aa [pee dee aa ae at 482 TotalSAs” 2464 7039 6965 70.4 +1.66| Yeeingy 1413. 2453 2420 2430 4.09
Analogdev 2539 33.66 3308 3343 +4) Girus Se eee eee eee ee ae eae rat | me PAM tian: Sah ode aa #23 | psc 27827397 7218 7354 +1.52| Transocn 8680 79.00 76.70. 77.08 -.82 | Xerox 79 1804 1767 1793 +25
ance ase 1081 RTT 18 5 | cso Re te Stas Te] Semamet Ue aeaT foal feq) cas [Uneaten oO) Le? 3008 3140 iteH 18593274 31.98 32.34 +.15| TriadH 1949 49.65 4942 49.53 +.05 | Xilinx 6604 2593 2487 2558 +73
Angoams 1421 2523 2483 2515 +73 Citigrp 12439 "54.44 53.74 5418 +.47| GenElec . 31404 .3650 35.79 3647 +.70| Loewss 2109 437 B71 4405 5 Tribune 1144 30.81 30.32 30.72 +.32 | Yahoo 30569 30.86 29.64 30.66 +1.10
anglohms zl 2523 2482 25.15 7 |ctzcomm 1455 1490 1459 1489 +19) GnGrtherp 35326520 6210 G12 +1.74| Laac Il 2156 2131 2137 +10 | QUT MDDS ATO SOF SGT, seal | MUAY Sar Mize ALAR 240.25 41.60 4135 | man Ge A NE es GS aT
Anheuser 2538 5049 50.04 5023 +7 CMS, STR De ae Tea] Gero BSH Sis saz eas |lowess 7868 3363 3317 3344 -a7 [Qiong — 1206 1822 171 1810 +67 TiQuint «1334-498 4.83495 4.05) YumBrds. 1372 60.09 5949 60.03 +27
MMEeT cose TS BR2D'ST.63. SRL 1.23 | CARSON UR SATS, 8 ot | Sa i Ue Bere Oe eat LO a a A sey] Oimodan 1708 1526 1445 1506 +50/ Yeon” = St 32.05 31.84 31.96 +16) ZebraT 3028 38.35 34.56 37.97 +142
Aoatay 1880 3570 3814 3866 +21 | Cory od NGL 3640 3655-705) Gh cha” 1073 2528) 2501 2528 +l nS ee Soor ansz coo | Qlogics 1936 1850 1827 1850 +23| YS" 3802 1880 1847 1862 -14| Zimmer 1462 84.96 83.92 84.62 1.4
aonaly 1620 40k LT BST 32 | coach = aT05 aah 4781 1938 +113 Sere EN TAL. 7298 TAQD +81 Quan Ny aust 2037 2180 #30
toe a ee ae ag [cocace | AMAL 2125 2100 2103 +08) Genta 6330 52.5051. 4.04 | MEMC 4713 54.71 5330 5441 +1.89 | Questsfhif 2124 16.60 15.83 1658 +.74 TORONTO STOCKS
aatiny AeA Te Lie cL CocaC ' 15601 48.56 4173 4788-33) Genworth 1732-36-77 3631 3663 +20|MGIC «2633.67.41. 65.13 66.16 +.92 | Questar == 1141 83.69 81.41 8246 +31
Aesiv 1079. 1469 13468 1450 +80 | COU, . 1 1 "448 417| Gensyme $429 G7BA 6610 67.30 42.10 | MGMMir 4600 74.15 70.17 7038 +14) QksivRes 1089 41.00 3942 40.00 22 Vol. High Low Close Cha. | Vol. High Low Close_Chg.
Anes, Ios A653 GIT aed 27 | COSTES 04 9437 92.30 94.32 41.84] Gaculf Se ot Roos 2008 5g | MIPS Tech 1198 9.72 9.38 9.60 +64 Quiksivr 2261.14.33 1395 14.06 +.15 : 5 ‘
poolosY 19 465) ETT AEM AT lCognosg SSS alg. 4073 AL. MAA) Gacult | 155 2072 1998 2004 SET MRVcm «MIB 439418428 4.05 | Owestom 12292 827 195 1406 +15 1277g044 o1Commurique.s6 80 | 66 +08 2185457 LakeShoreGld2.08 187 2.05 +22
Apple inc 17940 85.64 84.57 85.30 +.60 cotter 2370 1942. 1868 1937 +51|Gerdaus 2437 1872 1827 1850 +33|Macrvsn 2030 27.66 25.82 26.90 +1.48 | RF MicD 9507 803 7.75 792 +21 017983 ATSAutoTIngl2.20, 10.81 1093 -L47 | 2861673 ore tee ya8 dat 1296 488
Applebees 2951 27.13 26.21 26.84 +52 colores i oat ia fe a Glleadsc 4034 71.74 70.51 71.72 41.15 Maia ae Be 70 “71 +06] RTIIntiM 1128 84.03 81.97 82.70 +.82 1999182 Ma aga aaae tie 28| a180169 tern aoe 39.90 4002 “8
pplBio 1281 33.20 32.71 32.83 +.01 . 38-02] GlaxoSKin 3952 58.74 , 57.80 58.37 +1.11 | Malaysa .95 870 8.95 +.35 | RackSys 2155 17.29 16.72 17.06, +.30 | 1688877 Al : 32 6338 - i : OL 5.28 +:
Salers iee Sipe AEN Ure er k ; r06, +. can inc 6475 6332 6338 -.52| 4090226 MiramarMng 537 5.01 5.28 +52
wehed sie? 1908 ea 1889 471 | case to ses aa? 1357-06 |Mamma 2323 5.56 5.10 523-15 | Radian 9225 GA10 6185 6293 +1.05 | 1566630 AlexisNinnUn19.10 1887 19.10 +58 i
mia ome sp «3572.41.25 40,66 40.96 +27| GlobPa ‘ 06 | trarathon 2759-9350 92.01 9280 +. roe o2TIe 2300. " 10 SA | StLASRG Mitac Telecom. 23 Fe ae ea
Aria aa 3 - sae 3.50 +06] Cmtouchh 1198 ° 1.58 142 149° -.04 Glnbaleee A an oa ee “30 Maranon Ae toot 4 ae? oH Be ef RadioShk 1110 23.06 22.72 23.00. +12 1636595 Anatolia) 5.39 5.21 5.25 -.10 | 1712827 NortelNetwork35.66 34.90 35.48 +.09
pria 55 30.75 31.40 +78 | cmepi . 91.82 .09 +05] Rambuslf 4015 22.17 21.83 22.00 +15 (071 AurResources21.21 20.63 .20.88 +.17] 1451494 NovaChem 38.15 8
apantive 1589 2683 2588 2618 07 | SM NI 1069 3414 3369 3388 +.20|Goldritd 32941760 1725 1743 +.17\MarsiM 2336 29.57 29.24 29.38 +04) Raytheon 1899 55.48 54.95 3291676 BCE Inc 31-25 30.62 31.20 +.60 inscoR a ie a
Ale 1589 2663 2585 2618-07 | Cocnceov 1483 42.87 42.13 42.60 42.26] coldcrpg . 1779 29.49 W125 WA} ti | MarvellT sif 13490 1869 1835 1849 +23] RealNwk 3606 10.89 10.39 496-30 | #291678 BCE Ine ara Seed 3658 23 | leecwe Nwae ok 3S -o1
Me SET AGG. CART? NOD 9008 | Cone AN eS Rn mht SRT Fe) Gams "3831 3.92. 3.77 3:92 +.18| Masco 6055 31.74 30.01 31.70 -11|Realogyn 3028 30.00 29.82 N67 32 | 2054423 BemaGldo 684 670 6.77 +.03 SE ee teas apc atl
ArcelorMit 2267 48.38 48.77 482242031 cyRD pts 4168 3087 2870 3055 +78) Goldmans 7682 21910 Mag) ntvag chan | MasseyEn 1323 2415 23.79 2408 +26] RedHat 2697 25.00 24.02 29.85 ~15 | 3750149 BombdrBSV 4.55, 449 453 +04 1553171 PaadinOno 924 907 924 ~Ol
ArchCs | 3440 30.74 79.98 3064 fp [CompCrd 3192 36.09 31.14 35.18 +351 Goodyear 5206 25.00 Mee arte toy | MasterCdn 4724 108.82 104.10 108.02 +333 | RegionsFn 1369 37.49 37.10 37. “04 gGoe Brenwatertesit? 113 175 $2) dass Petocanaaess S15 A882 “88
Fea at oe aera BOBS GO? 67 | Comps ALL? 54.83, 54.02 S419 18 | Google 5547 469.13 459.22 465.93 +6.83 | Mattel 2604 2669 26.18 26.63 +.21 | Reliante MS SEO , TAS | *AU2 | 1546416 Buran © 28 © ae wee ape | uaase Pat fi “a4
ad a Seah et . 33 46, 69 26.18 26.63 +. nn. 1681 16.21 15,91 16.06 +.09 | 1543632 CGIGrpASV 9.60 9.46 9.55 +0 intNrthEgy .07 05.06 ~.04
athst 1382 61.08 $983 6012-67 |Compuwre 2718921 8.97 9.4 +15} GrantPrde 2108 A485 42.88 4446 +17 Maxim if 46743112 3030 3105 473|RschMotn 5994 13822 133.52 137.59 +3.65|2021330 CampbeliRes “17 16 17 “Ot | 1383827 Queenstake 20°20 20 +.01
Arad MBB. SB S20 552 44) [conmara 4368 2602 2579 2545-12) Greywoll 3165609. G58 682 tT McClatchy 283 38.32 37.75 3823 *|RetallHT 2041 104.90 104.05 10466 +.26 | 2087648 CaNathes 6047 E910 S943. mal | 3022020 RloNarcenGld 336 32? oe LOL
Arba inc 2140 1040-1000 1018 +42) Conerant 9123203 1.94 2.02 +.08) Gposimec 1067 13.20 1270" 13.02 +23 McClatchy aes anos NTL 4502 +d2|RiteAld 621315 G07 612 | 1512217 Celesticasv 748 7.32 744 4.10 2367269 RogersCommBs 7.70 36.86, /37.68 +101
Acne 108s 7.68 756 7.63 +17 Conocphil $474 68.10 67.20 67-46 4.19] Ghelewsas 2943 30:16 236) 1302 +23) MoGrwH 1404 68.07 67.31 68,07 +48 | RossStrs 2380 34.7833. Trasteaachariotneso 82) 72 77 +02] A421177, Royal Bnk” S487 SAG S488 220
ATi A Sue A Mae ANAL Pp | Comes 1G, 3589. 3079, SRL pt NG 2.61 3012 GS) ickesson 1416 56.90 56.19 5631 +.10| Rowan 2380 HB BaT 3463 +123 | 1285100 CoalcorpMino 69 6969 Bee et lees Tasioe ct
Arrowel, 1222 3762 3688 3762 +66 | ConstelA 1604 2468 2420 2450 1.43 Mcfesson ite Shar a86T soat 50 | RODSMIA 1683 678 GEL gums 10 |24300ss0Cumberando 877, Bal 868 +179 Saree ShawcommBNyAQO74087 4207 +12
prtfech 2617 2482.05 2.07 08) cir 2811 4433 2.13 A3a6 +96] HAET Pm 110 TAB 129 1343 +06|Mechel 1331 30.90 29.30 30-50 +1.23| Ryerson 1872 31.03 29.30 31.01 4:38 2680540 DenisonMinesi2.42 1195 1217 +22) Sarzarg et rae Rll ald
pve 2225 1979 19.27 1976 +331 CooperCo 1124 46.76 4595 46.14 +.06 Hallibins 14861 30.90 30.27 30.70 +.05|Medimun 4145 31.61 31.18 31.25 -.21 032330 3101 4.96 /4811353 Domtarinc. 9.34 913 932 +19] THARP Mew nestomia ga 1247 1286 tld
AMRoad 215174573944 +02 | Cooperinds S89 93.55 91.75. 93485 +125 HancFab 13° 359 351 352 -03|Medarex if, 1795 - 1399 1373 1391 +.16 TRAITTRAEasternPlat 180° 1.75 1.76 +07 | HER) She ge an? 24
AiheGne 2502 1214 LYS 1204 +20 conan 21788 5.04 5.00 5.0 41.55] Hanesbin 330 2665 2637 2664 432 | MedcoHth 1207 6125 6012 61.18 +1.06/SAFLINKH 3490-1210 +00 AIB7SAD EldoradaGld 719 7.00 712 +17 | Tae Sie rar Beae aETS 84
Atheros 1108 2620 2560 2578 +22) CornPats 1066 3209 32.95 33.00 +.05| Hanover 1330 2865 2637 FG eI Medico L412. 3048 2914 2965 1.01 |/SAPAG 1474 47.85 47.38 47.63 +66 2136068 EnanaCorp 58.12 S669 5725-09} (Oe) Hema Soy eye leat 30
ATMOS 237 S17 585. 559 18) Corning 15438 2243 21.76 22.4 +32] Hansnshif 2617 38.32 37.25 38,02. +.32 | Medicis BL 3806 3736 3749 -61/SBACom 1086 29.40 28.32 2876 +.43 238379 Ea ETN toe 183 1190 4.07 | 5183850 Tomnnese. 10 8 ao 01
furoraoGn 2525 330264 272-58 | Cntwa ae rie Sey, eros 439|HarleyD 1600 69.00 67.97 6891 +1.06|Medtmic 4027 54.67 S419 5458 +.16|SGXPhm 1277 , 5.67 3.50 5.22 41.07) 1asTAI EXmmPRWtA 57 4855 3:03 | 3430400 TwinMiningo (09 109.09 *
Autodeskit 2827 4301 41.25 . 4.68 +1.35 ein Be ne 40.84 42.00 +.52|HarmonyG 1961 13.69 13.35 13.52 +.23)MelcoPBLn 2995 18.44 17.86 18.21 +.57 SLM Cp 3086 4277 4241 4261 +19| 2013928 FirstClgryo 637 6.06 6.32 +05 | 3440876 UEXCorpo 508 485 498 +16
Str saat ee pri Coanail poy yyy Rar aye 52) Mirae 1370 8552. 8516 85.39 +13 |Mellonfne 1798 4591 45.19 4555 +27 SpdrHome 1874 38.47 37.73 38.14. +.35 | 2315878 GabrielReso 50L~ 486 4.88 +.04 | 1825081 UTSEngyCorp4.15 4.07 4.09. -.01
Meee ae a. 1S LL. al teed 14 23.54 24.00 +.43| HarrisCorp 1316 51.02 49.93 50.62 -1.17 | Merck 6100. 44.23 43.90 44.06 +.11 | SPSS 1203 37.28 3370 35.87 43.99 | 1421876 GammonLakeol9.79 18.66 19.70 +1.01 | 2314874 Ur Energyo 4.48 4.10 4.00 +38
janx eee ni wee ARO? 422 oventryH 1105 5492 54.07 54.68. +.60| HartfdFn 1528 97.65 96.75 96.78 -.45| Merriillyn 5413 94.35 92.05 93.80 +1.50 erMicro. «1272-19-21 1893. 1917 #28 | 4507829 Goldcorpinc 34.50 33.37 33.58 +.33 | 2283212 VictoryNklo | 86 78 86 +.03
Ba ate, TREE ea | ee 203 1246 12.00 12.28 04] Hasbro, 1622 29.00 2845 2898 +51|Metlife 3804 65.79 64.25 6534 +49 SIiveHold 4493. «S247 3238 32:39 03 | 2408688 HudBayMnriso22.63 21.69 22.26 +.66 | 1839709 Westictalr, 16.08 15.08 18-50-10
Avnet 1515 7716 2690 27.05 +08 | Credsys 1689 502° 492 493.02) Hawalll TL 2743 2718 2726 . -.01 | Micrel 3804 65.79 O45 Gat 45 | Safeway 3299 3700 3627 3665 +47 | S4L02R lamagiecornla sh 10.07 10.26 +.21 | 3393233 WestshoreRt 04 0304
71 3485 3531. +30 | crocs 1689 Sar Ad AOR 2) MncrPr 1470. 4033. 39683983 46 | Microchp 220 22 | ae ety 65 +47] 320562 InterPipeUn 890 8.67 8.77 -.02 | 2387392 YamanaGldo 16.48 16.21 16.24 +.05
‘Avon 1789 3899 3848 3871 #d1|crecstle | 1543 3844. 34 : rochp =. 2202«-36.40 35.62 36.19 +.69 104 41,64 41,93 +.28 | 1487308 WanhoeMinesl1.95 11.66 11.80 +.06 | 290693
han, Ag tlie BM Ah Sgt He Hg Ae Aig Soltis “ies Re US hi calms toe Wn ae a
xi . 26 +. . ; 88 +. jcroSem 19 17.56 18.02 +. ; } 03 +. VER nto wet Ew UR Owe
AXIS Ca 1216 34.83 34.32 34.73 +.43 parece 1082 a Hy s5.4 61.82 ui HeclaM 2161 A AS AE mM Mirosof 55204 29.69 ue ea et ee 2551 50.13 aid ue ass DIVIDENDS
25 7.42 +1, 28 46.49. 46.92 +.33 | MillPha OL 107 1114 +02 | SanDls 6094 40.95. 39.85 40.80 +:
BETO It 4356 4343-4380 +20 | cummins 1918 146.80 138.58 144.72 46.39) HelmPay s 1462 27.55 2693 2703-27 | Millcomint tear 7875 Tas 7686 4735 | Sanmina 5140 an a “at tl WEDNESDAY DIVIDENDS DECLARED
BRAT Cp 1374 4398 4343 43-80 +20 | Currpnn ° 1253 3.16 82.68 63.10 +41 | Hemisphrx 729240 1.93 2.04 +08) MilsCpIt, 2082, 26.6 26.05 26.35 +11 | Sanofl 3201 43.76 43.49 43.76 +.36 Ceitex Carp Qh 86 aT
Be Aero | 107k 3174. 095 UH $3} | cypsem 2504 1936 Ingo 1927 +42 Herballe | 1570 3873 3185 TE 8 Mindspeed 1448-238 217 227 +07 |Saralee 3704 17.49 17.30 1742 +01 Pe Stk of pay: Citizens Fat Bnep 09 BIS 2822
BHP pillt 4004 4595 45.23 45.60 +58 | UTRK an ae eon gap alo| Hershey. 1584 51.61 50.84 5130 +47| Miramar 1335 4.60 4.25 460 +50) Savlenth 486.1490 14.59 1467 +.05 tod rate record able HNI Corp Q 195 223 Fd
8 sie en 21.33 2675 oo “6 ‘ogen 252 2.48 2.50 +.01 West i Be ee 538 st Minn 1492 3587 35.38 35.69 +.33 mikes Pl a are 24.75 24.76 -.10 IRREGULAR Compx Intl Inc Q 125 3:9 3-26
67 3202 3244 4, 35 2917 29.33 + u 4212.20 1241 + s 33 6415 64.66 +. :
BP PLC 3553 63.06 62.44 62.83 +.02| DJIADiam 7309 127.83 126.70 127.48 +.85 Hewat? 8252 42.99 42.37 42.83 +.24]Monogrm 6240 2.00 1.73 196 Tar | Schwab 8809 18.39. 18.89 1931 a an hal ir Sear Mass ties) Bee aE Gs
BT Gr ae ee ee eres bal 2007 3118 3020 3100 478| tiotten deel eBy eae 08 ye | Mone ibe 218 54.68 5575 41.20] Seopa ke akon 2660 433 ie oat crack ae hain aoc Ne
BT Grp 125.62 6152 6223 +36 |ORHoron, 2981 2853 7744 ZEB +.22/ Hoagie "str BEE Rig Be 1a eet oak alee oe ft | SORT VETS earn ae ee date SI odie x record date unannounced.
BakrHu -4843«72.55 70.84 5.00 +1.70 | DROGOLDH 4490777475. 01) HomeDp 20045. «41.96 41.50 41.73 -.03 voici 2908 g2.94 8129 8236 +111) Semee tes Naas BTA 1938 WES; | Cooper: Inches Xm 228 315 Dentsplay Intl Q ob 32749
SE ee ee ee eee ee ares Gabe gear (ace imeem 4-128 ee ey tse 23 |Motoa 2248 1843 2169 2314 +10 | er ios ae) 888 MAT % 2 for 1 split.
BcoBrades 2249 A148 39.64 416 +1.56 | DTE 1620 4859 48.00 4832 432 | HOmenron 1125 Gee ea a0 | Move Inc 4245 1943 1918 19.21 ~13| SemiHTr 16905 346033933447 475) 6c in EI Paso Corp Q 4 32 2
Ecotec e ae 4 ant DadeBeh 1311’ 43.75 42.03 4225 +011 Honwilintl 44874765 46.20 47/54 44.03 Murpho. i363 sae sns3 shee +53 Sepracor 1953 330 5325 3387 zh for Cee es at ae ee
BkofAm 183 S417 5357 50s 32 DaimirC 4363. 70.60 66.55 69.78 +5.33| HosppT 1519 47.77 47.50 47.69 ~15 | MylanLab 1883 22.49 2187 21.91 =1] | Svemstr 1527 13.40 13.20. 13.32 +04 Son Exchange Natl Beshrs Q 21 315 at
BofA ui ‘05 +32|aktrnicss 10318 | 3045 28.25 30.09 -8.00| Hostrotls 3652 2849 2785 2796 175 cme | StawG 24 3113 3L6l +. INCREASED
sei aISS 4 251 4290 4.42| Daren” 36 4280 1245 1259 -08| Homane uN? 3508 3418 ean ShawGp MOD 22k 3S ae +25 | Brookfld AssetMomnt Q 8 ST S31 Foiwand A COD eS me
Beck bat a8 G02r a3 (Dystar Ide 3st ae aan ei [ely Oe 3508 418 80 21 |NUHidg 1525 74.23 71.06 73.84 43,09 Siemac 160 gta 2¢6 3679 4128 | CSK Corp By kia Sos gayts 3a enn NS RO SS ee
Barter pe Sak On «Ale, OE | Geese 14s wl a 331 +11 |tumoe, "1623 Le? 1143 1147 al |NYSEGDn 4737 “91.00 89.01 89.55.64) SierraHS 1091 40.40 39.75 40.11 +32| piebol : IMS Health Q 03 31 3:29
Beatin 1 OP's Gee ae 7) 10815 11191 49.241 queen —go74 g2as 5988 61.98 +1.97| Naborss 4700 30.23 29.71 29.85 -.01 | SierrPac 1221 18.03 1776 1799 a7 | ema me OE ee Se ed
‘ ; : 81 +5.71 | Dell incif 19041 24.07 23.56 23.90 +.29) Honty “ee 7g | NasdlO0Tr 128209 44.71 44.0: i t "30 +97 | Energy West Inc Mo 215 fend B06 ne OOS 9.223 ee
pear ot Ged RSs eal Bay +06 Dnd 9] Hine «3093 2674 26.14 2655-10 71 4404 4460 4.74] SierraWr 1393 1499 1410 1480 +97 | TOTO) Q. Be
BearngP it 3672855 841 847 M6 |Dndreon 1261480 4078 HuntB 0832674 2614 26 oy |Nastag ©7497 3201 31.36 3160 +50 SigmAls 1829 39.98 39.43 38.74 +81 | HN! Corp O 2195 teas ae eas MES US We OE Tag Os 08 COs SI SIE
HLS Mi ears ab ecg gy ier ec AEM Niort LE eer a ear Naticity 2440 38.35 3814 3828 4.09 Sllcmimg 3510 9.34 9.16 9.27 +08 | Jeffersonville B Midsouth Bancorp = Q 06 3:14 4:2
Beda 296 AOD ALL 4296 4.77 | Dev 1 6844 67.14 67.35. +.26| Hvar 1D se aeay 909 1 | NolVarco 2756 69.40 68.00 6894 -.09] silentab 1823 32.22 ee ae See i 5
Berkleys 1281 34.23 32.82 34.02 +14 ae eel 9k tases 19M 223) Comms, MA LU A aE sas| NatSemi 5097 23.28 2257 2324 +73 |Slenvare 1712-924 87598 +49 MD Te dicistica enh oe saris
Bestuy $143. S072 4981 0.07 “S| DigRver 258 2733 5510 57-00 +1.56 | eet atte Navten MAL 388). 3487 ee a5 | Simone 1900 Leg? ges TS 2 Lsudgennnnae eiearnk 1 LE SO Nee tk Sie ote
Be eee a aay: shan diay | DotA SAE 24.29 23.86 23.92 -.03 Naar ote 21 18s 1278 410 | Smplteh” {rat Meg bet eel 08 Pal CocitCe 7G _A88 08 cat ae PE Me
Biogenide 3599 SSL 49-0 S048 ee eek 1812. 1685 1631 1652 419| lACInter 1828 4015 39.63 3985 +11 | NetLogic 1090 2460. 23.86 24.18 +.05 om otyen ez ket 38 a0? guNTAL abate Ot iy eg
Bova 1808 A2AB 42.20 a0 He intee et SLR aE ee 75 +16) ICICIBR 2185 4367 42.00 43.61 +1.37 | Netflix 5167 23.19 22.20 22.60 -.30| Sixlags 2102 ae aE eta cig | Cooper Indus n x 42-2628 AQ Quest Diagnostics = Q 10 418
Bip UG Me ae fata | Dame, > ay mg 11.38 1185 soo | lease ise 2435 2467 2495 26 Netwide, Se dtar iba 19ys sLig| ening, N08 a2at alae aL “0 | gues Pekan ce Bacaie ts wal cop aise Bae
47 TAL TAL + e 03 3311 34.00 +70] IShBrazil © 7625 49.10 57 +. "O11 1720 +, sti OF ae = WOT RAL foie 226 3 orp 195 22300 34
Bog A AG LE At [Comes 212) 8756 6-70 9681-01) IShHK 1960 ae ae te Ca[aviimee 1808 2587 2500 2878 459 tne SS dead Tear 1208 49 | Nemetinc A ° od 5 pence Chit] ° 315 418 430
04 23.46 23.86 +. 10 26.75 26.90 +. apan 1490 1463 1480 +24|NewellRub 3205 31.73 3014 31.70 41. a 334336 +
Blocks 1482 os pal 658 +04|Domtarg 6812.-««8.01. 7.83 8.01 +18] ISh Kor 2182 50.64 49.87 50.43 +77|NewfldExp 2005 i139 4030 ALTO a i 138 et Catt Sian a ae
Boeing, #482907, 0.27, 02.84 +63 | Dov See ier 5007 S058 417 ishMalasia 5088 10.85 10.72 1075 407|NewmtM 7267 4656 45.78 46.30 +39] SonyCp 1635 52.04 51.40 cee Sha | donee RAINS OBS Se vee Supreme Indus Q 095 227. 35
Borand LMT S13 508 SAL +08 Dowchm $e) Ee Oe SA licieeg aie ait ine eo sal|Newscrs 1M 1497 24 2355 +8) Souinco 18 3670345 ESL + oon Ree b ate! Metionim acti og Ane dh AN
Bost ra 1704 W721 +09 : ‘ 19 + i . 09 +.21 | NewsCp 4190 2497 2469 2479 -.08| SthnCopps 2293 68.34 66.74 68.00 +.75 | Baylake Corp Q 16 3-1 ~—-3+15 Washington RIEstinv AIS 3 :
Duketgys 11380, 20.28 20.03 20:06 -12| iShTalwan 5485 1450 1422 1446 +36|Nexengs 1509 61.44 60.26 6045-09 | Swstin| 6947 16.14 15.76 16.09. +.29 | CNB Frcl PA Q 15 3235 : 0° saison brid a



'

4B

















INT
ERNATIONAL EDITION

M
ARKET REVIEW

a

NAV Chg.

MiamiH

_Aaminiera

erald.com | THE MIAMI HER
ALD




















































































1 ec
UT =
Tk ON
i .__NAV
GlbOppA KGDAX ltr Prem
a KHYAX Saale bt, cs
gd Muni 552 +0 va ee ee
NYIXA en 9.07 oh Ae rh ae
RREEF p aa 10.83 itt EqincB te 14.91 +.08 uly na "el .
The list incl StratincA te 29.44 -20 EqindB p li 2388 421 va vorx si sf han
the roe largest Techa Gu Tica nn HAAT 4.42 aed FVDEX re oe Each econ ‘ene
: ca —— en ATCA 1194 +21 ee oD 1033 +02 eae FSISX ae an Grain asco 2.82 4.23 aor PIFAX NAV Chg. | Fund Tkr.
set value. Tkt i urities D y 5 Scudder 40 +.03 SOBB LEK. tale a “al ae : e
Fund . Tkr is ti ealers. Drei ler CIC: 03) Ome EKIBX 7.04 +.06 iklw FW 5.46 +.68 ne oe ox | oe ih Fs
Zs fs : cr he ae WEX 20.79 GrSt “SGRX 30.26 +. CrpBdA PB 5.85 +.01 jassMutu ig. | Fund
Al NAV ol pw. CX 51.5 PreMtlB t E X 24,59 4.25 elity Selects: oes vain te, aah =
i = Se = cc is : : : ; ee oe Hot et 15.10 +.13 utltya PTYAX He i ee MIEDX 16.79 + Oppenheim Fund
AIMI p LCEAX 14.03 +11 aa WSHBX wy Cha. CorPlsine mens 52.09 +51 wire Ane ae +03 pet THOK ne x ot 7 i al : : is : : 4 : J
BasicBal stments A: el Mutual Fas: 57 +22 | EMMkin Si 12.69. +.05 vergreen C: 4.94 +.10 | Bi Nn — FBIOX a +16 | Smc pGCMAX 40, 5 +02 | JennisonD: 2151 +18 | Ra Sas ia Ba ‘2 =
p BBLAX AD : E CEMX 1 205 | Astallc * Hoke 6.65 +5 nCapA GS: ee me afi is i i, : i :
BasValA 13.54 yprec. CAA mMkGr 2.45 +.05 ICt EA Che FSLBX 51 St SMX 45 rowthC j isin ei a aa g ‘
p GTVLX +09 | Ariel PX 50.6 E TSEMGX 2 05 | Ome CFX 14.65 ‘hem FSC 78.39 41.3: rulnt p GC ea? 120 | Je rc = : = f : SI :
: : ae - ace eee FSCHX 7 32] Gg CIAX 15 5 | Tech 15.46 +19 | Asians X 17.28 ala p QI 74 +10 | PA OEGX 14 | Divi unds: Tk.
p ACDAX +.28 | Arti FX 55.3 Gl SCGEX 33 | E OCX 2465 +24 omequip 150 + ‘oldman S 5.47 +20 C _PTYCX 19] opi &l_ MAC 28 +.19 | QO AX 22.8 TE 9.47 +.0 ividend kr. NAV
ChartA 19.48 isan Funds: 33. +.45 NMA S 38.93 +. vergreen |: 65 +.25 | Cl ip FSDCX 431 ¢ achs B: .20 | Jenni 8.10 China SX 19.40 pptyA QVOI 86 +30 | R PTEPX 07 lend STMOX STIGrAd Chg.
rs fe afc ates 36 | C I; 25| Comp F 20.82. + ‘apGrB p : sonDryden +12 a MCHI 40 +.23 | OF QVOPK 30.8 src p O11 +, Multi-Ca 41.08 -.35 VFSUX s
Const p X 15.85 IbBdS r 14.73 + orBdl D FDCPX 4 37] G p GSCBX Growtl Z&l: Paci FX 25.67 ppenheim a aT 0 i a 2 e
z ae vat sat Sete ESBIX 1 fAar 0.87 +.45 incB p 20.97 +.2 WZ PIFZX 17. ger MAPT 67 +.22 | Ltd er Roch: xAp P 6.74 +.15 SunAmeri 43.91 + im VSMAX 02
5 : = $3 a in| nal E 0.43 +.04 | Elec FSDAX & 45 | Hi GSGBX 21 | Jensen J X 17.48 Mell X 24.26 INYAp L i TF TAEX A erica Ful 33 | TxMCa 34.08
‘S ls i is eae 04 | | EKIZX 04 | Electr 86.98 + i¥IdB p 29.41 +. JENSX 27. +21 jon Funds: 26 +.25 | LNY TNYX 3 nAp P 876 +.0 NwCenA nds: pr VICLX +11
: : = a rt Se + va 9.28 +01 | & FSELX 45 44 p GSHBX 20 | John Hi X 27.60 Em s: ; ct OL 40 +.01 | TF PNAX 1 01 nA p SEGA: TMG 70.05
p AEDAX +.45 | Mid RTKX 2846 +. G SCGDX 37} | ESICX 1 01 | Enray 45.10 + Goldm 8.23 +. lancock A: +19 gMkts MEM RoN TNCX 338 HYA 481 +02) Simp a. ae :
IntGvA 42.92 idCap A 46 +.27 roles 21.00 + ntleqh = 0.65 +.08 | & FSENX 99 an Sachs C: .02 | BondA A IntlFd KX 21 tMuC tO! 3g—* | US THAX 1 oe match 3) is
p AGOV +.60 | Mid RTMX 3 att SCDGX 29 igcpl EKZYX 1 08 | EngSv 49.55. +. CapGrc s C: p JHN M 39 +.26 | RON BN 12 “ eel os s f
= ae a i #21 ales 22.64 +, gcpeEql E 102 +.13 | Fi FSESX 6 10 GSPCX Classi BX 14.87 LoC| PITX 17.4 oNtMuB tORN! 84 +.02 | Vstad PGSIX 1 02 merica Fo +13 | TStkA LX 9,99
AIIEX 02 | SC TOX 2135 + Hi SCHLX 2 18 | Spe VSYX 1838 +. inSv 309 +03 | coldm 20.94 + sicVI p PZFV: .87 +.06 pstk MPL 49. +.19 | RoM BX 12.90 + p P 305 +05 | Felntes el =i a8
se 2 mn ees iVId Tx 6.10 +. pecval 38 +14 | Gi FIDSX 12 03 an Sach: 21 | HSCiA ° X 28.56 MdCy CX 1 uA p RMI 90 +02 | VO VISX 1 5 qc FIN USGI SAX 35.2
p IEGAX +.35 | SC RTSX 18. AZ| SHYTX 1 15 | St ESPIX 28 oldr 2.25 +1.0 CoreFxd S Inst: JHGRX 38! +24 pStk MPM 7 +.10 | Ren UNX 18 yAp P 174 +13 | TOW ee ak 33
LrgCGAt 25.50 ‘apVal A 58 Ct ntTkAMT 2.96 + 1Grol 33 +07 | H FSAGX 00 xd GSFI Lcps X 38.87 M CX 13 tMuA OR 79 +.05 | Putnam ee 2 = ral
LCGAX +30 | Al RTVX 18, \ SCMTX .02 | Excelsi ESGIX 3 07 | Health 3750 +42 | EMME IX 9.86 elp MSBI 87 +.23 ellon Inst 78 +11 | PI INAX 12 Fu 891 +22 | Pi i san a2
MdCpCe 11.89 tlas Funds: 49 +.01 ntl FdS 11.09 +.0 xcelsiol 0.80 +.34 | Hi FSPHX 1 ao) aed GEM 86. +.04 | ROBKA FX 19.33 Intl st Funds: IMCO Admi 87 +.03 | C nds B: 22 | DivFocus Ww VIAX 27 3
'q pGTAG) +11] 6 s: Ti SCINX 01} r Funds: 34 | Home 99,90 +81 | Hivield IX 24.74 FRB .33 +.12 lEqty : Shi min PIMS: apApr t : Ta om a i.
RealEst X 27.29 vtSec gCpvis 64.36 + mgMkt r k \ FSVLX 81 GSH +.38 | SmC AX 38.54 M SDIEX 4 tTmAd 3 C PCABX elEqty! 3.86 +.1 VVWIAX
p IARAX +.19 | Gi ASGMX l t KDCSX 80 rUMEMX nEqp OF 50.72 +53 | tM 1 IX 8.23 PEGA SPV 54 +.10 lergerFd 4.15 +.59 | 1 p PSFAX onvB t 21.93 +18 | T ae 3 an
: : : z is = oA sv ‘53 | HYMuni GHY 23. +.02 | Svin IAX 22.61 Meridi MERFX 15, 59 | TotRtAd 9.95 +.01 | D' PCNBX 18 | Tamarack 19.65 +31 | Wit inmVWENX 25
p GTSAX -.14 | St ASGIX 2 03} L SCQGX 2 16 UMBIX 55, 22 | Wnsur 32.46 +4 MidCay IX 11.55 wAp SOVI 61 +.03 leridian Ful 88-01 thd = PTRAX 1 01 | DvrinBt 1997 +.11| Mi ck Funds: BEd am
: 2 a ee 2 | Sa 5523 4.41 | Mater FSPCX AB pV GSMCX 41. +02 | USGIb IX 19.40 Gi nds: PIMCO I 0.36 +.04 | E PSIBX “1 | Microcpv. } VWNEX 65 38
15 TSAX 28 | M q SLAFX 6 27 nds: 41 | Material 7124 +35 | Sula X 41.06 dr USG 1g) crwth M inst! PIMS: .04 | EuE 9,90 +, pValTMVSX | Wasrltad 65.00 +
: | = - as ne im Me FSDPX 51. a gva GCVIX 15. +33 | John H LX 29.52 Val ERDX 41 AllAsset FLT PEUBX 3 02 | Value X 23.19 +.0 VWNAX A9
a = # tee i amiuee 432 | Value M 69 +17] C PAAIX KBt 0.22 +.41 TVASX 40.5 .02 | Van 63.56 +
ChartB t X 34.77 sset TFS SCI ‘og +01 | FBR Ful sii +50 | MdE SHCX 51 GCIIX +4.07 | Hivldc x i i i, el : = : i :
BCHT! +26 | Gi BARAX Pa MAX 14, 01 nds: gg | MdEasys.F 51.45 +.35 GrnCntBl ia mn a “f é = : : :
ConstB t X 15.20 rowth 62.94 +.44 Opps r SC 419 +.02 Gasutlid Mul SMEX 28.16 +. ICntBlp GCBLX +21 | Joh CX 5.75 T fest Fs: 27, | DevicMk 1399 + | Hlth PGIBX 2 02 | EmMS it: etn VAN
CSTBX +11] P BGRFX 5 Ad | SPS OPX 21.97 +. id r GASFX ultmd Fl 16 +05 | Suides 18.14 +, in Hancock 75 4.01 | lotRetBd Mi i Di rPLMIX 1 IthBt — PI 0.35 4.1 p TEEMX CAIT PX 29.5
EurGrB t 24.91 artners 1.85 +.1 00s Ss ‘97 +24 | mca 20.93 NtG BMPX 48. tone Ful 13 | LSA Cli: T WTRX ivinc 0.67 +.05 | Hiv HSBX 54. .17 | ForEqs aa me ae
: a = WE oo Hd aS sop | NGS F 96 +20 | CPOPG nds: gor J : fotRtBd! 9.74 +.04 | & PDIIX 1 o5 | HivldBt PI 37 +.48 | Thi TFEQX +34 C cAIX 1
HYIdB t X 40.57 mCap 3.77 +2 TmBdS S| 34 +15 FMIF 56.55 N SNGX 39 pGS4 GCOZ LSB; ILAX 15, . MWTIX 04 | EMMkBd 112 +.03 | Intl HBBX 48 | Third ia oe) ee
AHYBX +56 _ BSCFK 2 23) DW: CSTX 991 +. unds: agg | NatResr FN 51-01 | SIEAGS X 16.48 alanc J 29 +14 | Midas Fu 9.74 +04 | Fl PEBIX 1 ‘03 | IntlEqp P 8.20 +.02 |" salting “3 me
AIM Invest 459° Berkshire Fu 4.04 +.04 S Scudd 91 +02 | Focus Pa IARX 28, 4 GGBZX +.13 | LSC ILBX 14.68 ; nds: 04 | FitInc r 1.04 +05 | NwO OVBX 3: pay . Ee i
: i a | . er a 96 +.06 | SrincGs: 17.82 onsrv JIL 68. +49 | Midas Fd Fol PFIIX 10.60 + pBt PN 139 +37 TAVI Di HCOX 3787 +:
DivrsDiv or Cl: Focus : qBOOIL ; FPA Fi X 33.93 Retai PFX 34.9; 4 GGIZX +16 | [SGrwt! CX 13.47 MIDSX rBdUnr PI 60 +01 | OTC OBX 45. RIEstVI aes iY ee
: : 3 a o ee ‘92 17 | STEAGS4 14.90 he JIL 47 +.07 | Monetta 456 +13 | FF FUIX 10.01 +4 Bt PO 85 +44 1 TAREX 36. +.10 | Di DAIX 2 5
Dynm X 14.03 Bernstei 7.99 +1 WS Scud 10 +1.29 | Capit Soft RPX 56.4 GGEZX +.10 | LSMod! GX 15.12 i Funds: 33 FrgnBd PI 01 +.06 | Res He i a Z a
FIDY! +11 in Fds: 14] der Inv: i FPP wr FS 47 +37 | MtEaGs 18.54 Moder JILM 12 +.12 | MidCa Hiv! FORX 10. esrchBt PRI 28 +.06 ‘ap TASC: 61 +29] E VDIGX 2
: ‘ = e : ra ee a CSX 67.6 4 GIEZX 4.21 | Jul X 13.78 ip p MMCEX dP 13 +.01 | Vist FBX 15, Value X, 26.49 nergy 14.95 +
FSTE +.20 SNIDX I BTIEX 1 ic FPN 70 +.20 n FS “G1 +1.07 | Mares 19.59 ius Baer Fu 18 +08) Nona ss : | | a ‘ =; : :
a ka nd ae ntlEgS 63.43 +1.28 | PPAC IX 10.91 Tel PTX 70:7. 4 GMDZX +.23 | Intl nds: a MONTX og | Lowou P 96 +.02 | YovB TBX 10, Tho! X 61.89 Eqinc 6431 +
: , : = ue : 7 1a 9 a : MontagG 13.36 Mod TLOX 9, 4 yBt — PVO 14 +11 mburg Fd: 89 +46] £ VEIPX 18
Sh aa) +05 paMy 14.14 +, Davis Fu 33.26 + Fairhol X 26.74 Tra TCX 51.5 4 GVEZX +.05 | Intl JIEIX 45, gGr | MCGIX +12 | wo Dur PMI 89 +02 | Pu BX 16. Int SC Exple EIPX 26.05 +
. NDPX 01 inds A: 39 me FAI 74 +08) wire FS ‘55 +43 | Harb 19.28 EqA iB. 12. +65 | Morg oe . oe | = = 7
SummitP BCX - 15.24 NYMu 13.96 + NYVen A. NYVT Fed IRX 29.31 Wi RFX 55 jor Funds: +15 | Inte JBIX 44, organ Stanl ‘427 | RealRet_ 93 +.04 | G nds C: Th GCX 27, FLUT X 78.62
: i = a a Ha fess 76 +1.25 | Sond y qAt JET 19 +64 | Divath ley A: Re RAIX 11.03 +. rOppc p PI J jornbur: 94 +29 VFLT +49
AMF Funds: 13.30 +, xMgIntV 13.79 +, Davi 39.55 Amt : Fideli RLX 7.25 HAB Inte AX 15, A DIVA alRtnl =P 03 +.11 | Pu sae ! vs ‘ .
‘ 12 SNIVX 01 is Funds B: +.30 drA FAL idelity S 25. +08 | CAPA OX 11.61 qiitr J 74. +24 | EQWtdA an i ao me = = :
UItShrtMt Intval2 a7 4a7 | NYven8 : CapApA DX 24.96 Eqld partan: plnst HACAX 34. ‘6 sh © = oe zs j : : i
: =e = : 7 = na ee +23 | FocGroA 43.71 TotRt HX 9.9) yrincp Pi y BuildA t TI 27 +31 Ey VHGE +.04
2 E sa : = i i = eae +41 | Kin VX 26.84 : AMOAX +36 PTT 95 +.01 | Pui DVMX Int IBAX 20 Grol X 23.94
3 f 3 hh i ane +.20 kin FSE 60 +40 | intr 63.98 + etics Funds: +10 | Hivida yan +46 |e! RX 10.36 tnam Ful 9,89 +.02 ntValue! Tt 96 +.10 mic VQNPX 36: 4.26
CapAprt s B: Berwyn Fu 961 +65 | NYVenY Y: MktOpA 594 0G | eo MX 40.47 s iASCX | mee ! = a 2 : : ,
ACAP: Fi nds: DNVYX p FMAAX 06 x(nv fFSMK} gig | Scpvilnst 64.48 +. et WWF) iS GvtA 1.80 +.0 TRIII 9.84 lnc : eAt TVA 82 +31 4 VGE +.30
LgCpGBt X 11.43 und BI NYVen C 40.01 MuSech 12.49 - Intliny X 100.75 inst HASCX 94 | IntEmG ys a ne : es nh a - ‘ ‘
: : : = f ie : a a 8 a 21.90 + mGr WWWE 95 +17 | Morgan si 895 +02 | PIMCO 9.18 come P 0.75 +.1 TV 08 +.35 mp VWEH +.16
SmCapGr t X 11.06 come 037-1 Delafield 38.12 S GvtA ine? +02 | OM IK 45.96 g Loevnel 12 | Medic X 5.00 tanley B: 02 Funds A: +.04 | Intl NCYX 17) Thei IFX 41.6 HIthC Xx 6.27
‘ : : : : = ie rai 2) : ‘al MEDR! +06 | EvroB y B: AlAs : Eq Pl 6.81 +.0 hrivent Fds A: 69 +.36 re VGHCX 151.6 +01
Alger Fund: X 6.21 +. jirmMCG p BI 2.50 +.0 Dela 27.03 Federat 7.68 + Fideli X 40.89 r HLEMX tM 1 ss fe : | ‘ : ;
. 05 | Bl p BMCFX 21, “pg | Delaware Inves +16! ated B: “og | Fidelity Spart +.29 | Hartford 45.49. + WWNPX +20 | FocGroB 22.70 + ComRR |AX 12.63 loy 2) ae cos ee s
MidCpGrl s Inst: jackRock A: ‘on +1g | Diver In t A: ALdIBt EqldxA art Adv: lord Fds A: 52 | LSWValE 26.76 +21 | Slbdi AMOBX 26 p PCRAX 63 +.06 | RS YYX 19.56 +: Lgc HYX 5. Intl: SX 11.82
: 2 = i = 3 ae 1 DivB WI +. LwDurA 1379 * Funds: 56 +.22 ycpstk AA 20° xplr VIN 82. +.07
zg c Ss a ne Aust 35,02 +15 | OMA X 51.61 pb ITTAX Laudus 19.94 +15 |!" GLBBX 1 A PTLAX Co Midc LGX 28.7 IntlG EX 22.50
: i s : : : rt "Rt auth Funds: “5 | IntlvalBt I 6.70 +.1 RealRtA 9.89 +, rEQBt GU idCpGr LBM 10 +.21 r VWI 50 +35
SCapVI I; apA pMDi 39 4.14 | bead WS +, aufmB p 549 +0 IntAd 1 EVX 40.48 Di p ITHAX 13 | IntIMstrl Pa VQBX 13. 14] Pp PRTNX 02 | Core PBX 37. Midc GX 16.3 IntlVval GX 24.80
apVip_AMRI BaVIA CPX 27.9 l p DEGIX 03 | Fe p KAUBX 5 09] 5 FSIVX 4.19 | DivGtha ee oo Ss Ae = i : = : i ,
AllianceBel X 19.21 +, p MDBA 95 +1 | LOCPVIA 16.29. +.22 ederated 572 +05 | eee FS 45,96 +.64 | Fl p (HGIX 2 (43 | Intsmcp 21,60 +.27 | SP50 RBX 20.79 +: PTTAX 07 | RSIA SFX 35.1 MuniBd X 16.93 ITIG IX 41.93
: C : : : | ‘le 33 a [SPP 79 +24 | PIMCO Fu 10.36 +.0: ge p RSI 14 +.36 AAMBX 11. gq | Mirage AFG 3 457
. #3 ss oe i596 81 PXHFLAX 10.16 Lazard I 2.23 +27 | SPV IBX 15.2 T nds B: .04 | RSNER FX 16.18 Tocquevi K 1131 Isr CX 9.72
p CABN! GIAIA X 20.17 TP, ELTX 20. “19 Mk AUCX 5.7 : I rFSTVX 40.8 “7g | MidCpA p H 16 JE nstl: 27 lB SVFI 27 +.12 RRB t ; sp RSNR: 8 +.23 queville Fas: et ° se a
BIWIStrA pA X 18.32 +, rt MDLO! ea1 | Pade D 96 +.24 tOppc FMRC 52 +05 First Ar 40.89 +29] 4 FMCX 23 mgMkt! USG BX 16.2 PTTBX RSPart X 32.17 Gold t st Lifec TX 10.74
e ie X16 2 Y MRCX 1 08| oa Fas ¥: 29 | Hartford Fd: J71 +2 LZEMX GvIB_-USG 05+ | PIMCO Fu 10.36 + rt RSPFX 36. +12 Tou ifeCon VSC 74 +.04
aievine pABWAX 13.95 vincly CCGA way] Kusano TD to2 | Federated 239-02 | Cree ; i i >| aa _ : : : : :
ANAGX 7. #10 | HivinvA X 10.70 De MTFX. 1162 -03'| Instl: 02 FFUIX ‘pAppB ; jason: Fd 3 UTL 97 4,02 | AllAsset K sr Ba vl .
= 8 “s +13 | pelawae 62. +.03 Ai Vid Eqicp Fi 10.99 p IHCAX Oppt-Fl Valu BX 15.6. t_ PASCX SmCoGi X 28.99 Fund Ss: Lif SGX 24.5
: = 2 3 a : S ae. +04 | Hartford 35.38 + p LMOFX ep VLU 63 +10 | COMRR 12.53 + iCoGr p RSSG 99 +24) 10 ifeinc 59 +.20
; E i 2 i che 1099 rd Fs C: 38 | Opport 20.80 M BX 14.9 p PCRCX 06 | Raini X 21.82 T RYX 43 Life ASIX 14
: : : =. : oS “ 3 9 LMOFK 20 +28 organ Stan! 197 +.10 | RealRic 13.64 - jer Inv Mgt: +13 | Touchsto A312 447 ifeMod VS .11 +.07
GrowthA X 4.56 p MODLV 12 | lntleast 18.97. +. MidCap 5.94 +.06 Intl 26.96 pc t HCACX Spiny X 20.41 Fo ley D: p PRTCX .01 | SmM gt: M ne Family: i SMGX 2 :
: p AGRF: +.03 | S&P500 X 19.78 Se DEIEX 10 | Fidel FMDCX 06 FAICX +21 | FitRatec 35.55 p UMASX. 41. “£3 | FoeGroD AM Hi TotRtC t 10.66 +. Cap RIM CpGrA , i ae
: : z 2 z z ey nf ns Hoe +.38 | Vallr 41.74 Invi ODX 30. PTICX 07 | S/MC SX 38.84 TEGAX U WESX 14
AHYAX +50 | Black 17.84 DVEBX 2 ly Adv Foc A: bl oe? FISGX +.22 | Hartf 10.16 p LMVIX +50 ald IV 57 +47 | PIMCO 10.36 +, pinst RA\ 27 A ee zs e
, = = - = ee ie Saute +.01 | Leg 74.43 M QDX 13 Funds D: .04 | Re ISX 39.3: A: 22 VUSTX 08
p AWPAX «| GIAIB C: led Trust: | ore FACDX agle: . +.54 | Capa A: 9 Mason I +64 | MorganStan 69 +15 | COmMR ynolds Ful 3 +28 cio i
= is ro nies 3: Fidelit B21 4 GIDIA apApp — HIAC) ValTrF nstl: N ley Ins ; R pPCRD: BIC inds: p IMLAX VMRGX 09
2 ae s : ast ity Adv Foc +.12 SGEN DiscE X 55.11 Ip LMVI tint! t: TRtn X 13.80 hGrp Rl JanGro\ 13.19 Muy 19.58
LgCpGrA 23.02 t MCL 11 +.13 | Dimensi 24.14 Energ Tt Over X 47.02 iscEq HIN +.59 | ValTr FX 80.5 E MSACX p PTTD lo BCGX 3 Wp IDETX +09 VWAHX +18
pAPGAX +.26 | GlbVal OX 17.4 nsional Fads: 44 | ET HAG seasASGO! 02. +33 | Div&G GX 14.42 inst LMN' 5g | EmMkt IM 16.74 +.21 | Pax Worl X 10.36 polyp 118. +.25 | TAID 25.86 * Mulnsl 10.87
2 : “ 2 wal ‘ Be SNX 40.94 SGenci VX 25.78 rHIA +.10 | Leg VX 82.8 c GEMX 21 id: 4.04 | Ri OPPX 1 25 EX C: 6 g VIL) +.01
: = : : ae vol oan ¢ va} a a ig Masol 86 +71 rPIFInst 29.94 +40 | Baa verSo 366. +15 | ASAIM : Mulnt X 12.60
: * cal ae — mana ee X 21.30 drs HIALX 20. +.18 | AgGi n Ptrs A: \ MPFIX 1 “4q | Balanced PAX' B urce A: : od t IMO wit +.02
p ALTHX +02 | BlackRo X 13.86 V DFEVX 33! +27 aT FACTX. 22. +19 hand Funds: 4.33 | Grwthoy ae ie a a ee = : :
: : a aks as tea ee eco nds: ithOpp HAGO +.25 | AD RAX 117, I MSISX 2 03 h PXWe 22. +21 | Di INMUX Gr t IML 52 +.08 id VMLT +.02
: ; = -E : alee cn x 2076 prdp SH 96 +.97 ntlEq 5.50 +29 | Payd GX 13.00 ispEqA 1130 +07 | ASAIS LX 13.1 MuLor X 10.70
TMgBIWI Q 27.98 etl CC LgCol X 22.27 Utilities F X 18.43 GlbTe QX 4.2 ers HADA +.31 | Capl IAPX 15. \ MSIQX 2 ydenfunds: +17 | DI p AQEAX 07 rt IAAI 3 +.09 ong VWLTX +01
pAGIAX 12. +.16 | Bl BBX 9.5 idx DFUSX 11. £30 | alata FAUFX. 20. 437 [eae ST 26. +.05 | Stock X 23.07 apincA SO! 70 +11 ntlEqB p 133 +23 | Mk ss rE Z17 +05 | © LX 13.5 MuS UTX 11.2
USGovtA 12.70 jackRock 50 +03 | IM US X 11.40 Fideli AUFX 20.37 Tec! FQX 47 HSTA +17 | Fav PAX 17 Ltd MIQBX 2 23 | MktRet_ PY Di INDZX ‘o5 | Turner Funds: Mii a a
GovtA p ABUSX + | Intl Instl: Sm DFTSX 27. +.09 | pj ity Advi +13 hinny TI 70. +07 | Mdex X 54.05 alNp SHI 29 +.11 Dur 113. +22 | Pen MRX 11, ivrBd 13.20 +11 | Mid si NL STX 15,
Alliance: 6.16 ntivalr = MAI USLgC X 27.37 Divi sor A: Tect FOX 10.0: HIA +.48 | LOC FVX 16. M MPLOX “57 | PennMtC p R 98 +.08 | 0 INBNX “11 | MidepGth 7 T 57 +.01
: a # a4 ie ou gCpGAp SB 56 +.13 CapGr Mi 10.27 +.01 | Phoeni NPCK 1125 +, vOppA 4.85 +.02| MGFX 30 NY VIUTX. 1185 +
IntValAdv Adv: BaVll MAI 03 +.40 | UStva X 42.75 EqGrA AX 23.79 4 Tech V QX 20.32 {Opp HIAOX +.26 | MoM LGX 24.53 MCG PEGX 29 “01 nixFund 25 +.04 | Eavi WM |S ne a :
ABIYX BalC: BAX 34.4 a OFLVX +33 At EPGAX 5 +36 al TVF " «| MidCa 15.84 + WA pSHMMX 15. +26 rAd pMA 00 +.23 | Bal s A: qVal p 22 +.05 | Sl rowne: PAL NYTX 1
= _ ns alee 25 ie 53.04 +6 For QX 39.31 pp HIMCX .19 | MCay X 15.6 Sr CGX 28. janA PHI Gi IEVAX 1 5 | GlobVal T vl 27 +.02
ianceBern B: .26 | TotR CPX 28.0 Vas DFUVX ' ie Let - FEI gq | Forward Funds: 31 4.54 | TotRetBd tat + a eo: ok 7 : !
BalanB t B: etl BEM 3 +19 | US Micro 20.33 +.15 MdCpA 30.33 + Hoovs ids: HIABX 25 | SocAWA X 21.84 USLC SGX 13.71 pGrA PHI 92. +.09 | Hil INIDX 3268 +. BS Fund ie ve nS
CABB GIbAll CX 9.48 U DFSCX AS Ap FMCDX 25, 2 SCap FFSC Hartford 1134 + p SSIAX 21. +.16 pGrAMSE 76 +.08 | EmMk RX 16.04 ividBd IN 68 +.33 | D: s Cl A: 19] p PMX. 29
EmMObtB X 17.33 loc r MALO +03 | US Small 16.15. +.0 Nwinsgh 3551 4.22 | Fra X 21.50 tford HLS IB : .05 | Legg M 21.26 USR QX 21.5 tA PEMAX 8: +14 | Hivd EAX 2.9! ee = Le
= E co 3 me 22) ante 50 bag | Advisor ; 9 Mason Ptrs +11 eal MSU! 51 +30 | Srinca X 8.94 TEA IN 99 «= | Gi tBNAAX P PCCX 1 :
GrincB p pAGDBX 8.90 | MAFG) 1a | USSmva 22.10 +05 StrlA ror +18 | Ace p Frnk A: sp HAIBX AgGrB B: Muh SX 31.1 ; POI +.05 | Intls HYX 4, lobAllo t ae ca re
CBBD. +.03 | NatM X 20.67 | a DFSVX rh eae FSTAX 1 +18 SEAp AGEF : | Capa 23.25 "Bt SAGBX 10: lenk = MUH' ‘16-16 | MidGi AX 17.89 elVip API 40 +.01 rae ns °
LgCpGrB t X 4.48 un MANLX 10. £2, | lntlsmco 30.84 +. Fidelity Advi X 11.76 +03 | Ballnv ERX 2 apApp p_HIBCX +17 | Alloc7 BX 104.5 Munder LX 87.97 TA PHSKX 17. +.15 | Loc APIAX 10.9) UBS Fu 14.42 +, elValu r 149 +8
APGBX +.03 | S&P50 X 10.56 Gi DFISX 10 Advisor B: “gg | Balliav FR 15 +01 | W&Gr 54.80 OpcBSGRI 52 +.85 Fund: "97 +.86 | MUIFIA X 17.25 pEqp ALI 98 +.13 inds CIC: ll VASVX 86
= ; E i. eae : ce aK 2 ‘0 p HDGBX +.59 | CoreB BX 13.84 Mdc s A: NAM +14 | MC EAX 6 Globall : STAR 22.09 +
p ALCB: +19 | LgCpCi X 17.89 E DGEIX 2d FGIS isAp Fi 67 +59 | TotRet 23.34 ‘oreBdB t TRB 84 +.10 pCGr tMGi MulsS| FX 11.08 CpGrA IN 04 +.05 op BNPC: VGsTX 14
TMgBIWI X 11.02 pCri MALRX +14 | EmgMkt 15.43 +. Fideli X 19.51 Call BDIX 61.7 and Fis. “a ea ee : = - i :
IgBIWI p AGIBX +02 | Bramwell 14.90 Fi DFEMX 2 12] ity Advisor C: 51 +17 | op nsAp FR 7g +44 | Heartland 11.28 + ncial p SBFB) ee ne cals : = : Z : : :
= : i: Se : ci oi 6h Fas: 04 | FVAIB X 16.22 Hlth inds C/I: PHRAX +.01 | Strt VAX 9.3 Int€qt s P: STred 10.57 +
iancel + | Growth : Gi DFIHX 1 Ad C FADC FA FPR 2.69 +.02 | Value valBt — SFVBX 22 +14 thcreC pMFI i. ; 40.04 - trtgcAlA IMR aN ee puck Ee
Si : a . , 1g + | Nivlnsah X 22.92 FedTF TX 11.98 HRTVX HilnB t 15.43 Mi HCX 24. ixFunds B: 22 | RiverSo FX 11.87 LCGEP 20.20 STTsr 10.28 +.
| a: a ae be be +02 | Hend 52.37 SHIBX 7. +12 | Munder Funds 29. +13 | CapGrB : eck Bet A +09 PCLCX 18: +24 y VFISX 02
i " ie +.19 FxIn 37+ | Fidelity Advi 18.60 FIxCpG IX 12.13 lerson Gibl +.06 | LgCpGB 7.07 MC Y: 8B PGTB) DEIt : LCGEqP X 18.55 Straten 10.27
S 1 : i FOX 1 idelity Advisor I: +16 pGrA FKCG) 13. +.02 | Into Fas: t SBLB +.02 pCGrY rM ee EmMkt X 14.67 ID qP—-PCLV: +.18 q VSE +.01
LgCpGrc t 22.65 BL a 26 +04 | OV! or I: FIRLDA X 44.4) ppA p HFO Leg X 22.87 RI TMGOYX 2 mMKtB p PEM +.12 | Loc EBX 13 UMB rag ut or
APGC. +.25 | Bnd UEX 32.8 Int DFIVX 2425 +33 | 2! i) p FAF 44 +.55 | He AX 24.4 g Mason Ptrs a7 +.24 | RIEStEY M 667 +22)? BX 8.71 pEqt AL ar eit ‘ eh :
USGovtC t X 18.97 lywn BRW .89 +.41 ntVa3 25 +33 | VG VIX 24,1 FLTFA RX 10.09 nnessy Fu 46 +.35 | AggG Cc: URYX 2 22 r Funds +.05 EBX 5, Worl fg uf tae
7 ABUCX +.19 | Brid IX 35.5 Gib OFVIX 22 i tht FD 14 4.37 p FR . +|C inds: ggGrc SAG * Mutual Seri 6.36 -12 | Cull A | mie io , al z-
Alli 6.77 Igeway Ful 56 +27 SFxInc DF 83. +3) | EXGE GIX 13.85 Founda ones va 2 ms : : 7 s: : : 2 ;
ianceBern I: * | USCM nds: LCa GBX 10.60 EQPGX 56. +.08 Ip FFALX 14: +.02 | CorV CGX 18.8 eC SHICX 7. +87 | FinSvzZ ClassBa ‘CX 20.67 nape l a 2 = a
: -: a i. = : ore all X 7.07 B TEFAX 2 IA AOBLX +.17 | Roy SCX 21.82 +: ALA investors: Tgth VX 13.42
. ARIIX Brwnsi IX 19.99 TMUS: LX 25.1 EQPIX 31. +.69 AFKRCX +.09 | Focu NX 15.9 ]g Mason Ptrs o7 +01 | Beacnz 8B 3.87 +17 | EaUncA 10.95 ce Funds: a2 +06] Bstne “ = .
Allianz Inst! 19.14 -.0) mci BCS +.08 SV DTM! 9 +30 | Nwins X 31.13 GrvthA a ag Fn tl : : : : : i 2 7
-.07 | Buffal IX 34.91 TMI VX 26.22 gt! FINSX 19. +23 p FKGRX +39 | Heri FX 13.50 gGrolt SAGYX 12 0 co] ee = % a s :
NFIDWI MMS: lo Funds: ar (aunt DIMIX 20. +07 | Fideli INSX 19.16 HYTFA 4371 ritage Fu 50 +.10 | LacrG mk al en et ef =) HH :
es Bala TMMKt IX 20.71 ty Advisor T: +17 p FRHIX +.35 | Gr& nds: pGrl SBLY: .21 +1.01 uropZ MI 10 +.2 IntivalA 11.14 icroCapl R 75 909 mt a - =
Allianz Fu NFIEX 17.72 ncd BUF twVDTMM: +9 | BalancT rT: IncomA ae why : th : - 5 Pioneer i s 3 |
3 : : i EE = he - rat ak nar ay ualfdZ M 6.10 +.27 MdCVA 25.41 +. pptylr RY 19. +.09 hr USE 92 +11 Bal VT! 78 +.12
= , et : a a o ea 2 +0 Ap HRI 33. +.07 | Equi 0: Sha QIFX 23.04 +. Pi p PCGRX 33 | PennMul PNX 1367 +, Holm RX 16.17 TM MFX 20.3
: : : : iE : As ae Mase : resZ_ MUTH 04 +.17 ionFdA 23.85 +. nMul r PENI 67 +.05 esGr ACB 17 +.16 Int TR 38 +.09
SmCpV A 17.55 inds: +21 q DTMEX +.12 | DivGrT 23.55 + TFA p) 12.26 +.0 pHMCAX 97 +.01 | Leg RX 15.77 Navelli X 27.1 p PIODX 19 | Premi INX 11.9 USChi Be ane Us6 =
PCVAX +14 | CapD' 2YGIFxd 15.35 p FOGTX 36 | NY FMISX 1 .02 | SCapA 29.08 9 Mason 7 +13 lier v7 +27 | RIEStA 49.90 + jerl r RYP Coane vn a z. “3
RCMTch t 32.58 y LOMC . DFGFX sea | EMAINT FF 13.65 + InsA p 191 +0 pA pHRSC +.24 | DvS Ptrs 1: Mid : Vi PWREX 50 | Speck RX 18.40 WidP OX 10.5 us VIMSX 26
RAGTX +.06 | Focu X 29.06 OFARIE w4i9* FAEMX .08 | NY FRNYX 1 -03 | Hotchki X 37.54 trl CSGWX Ik idCpG NPI 3 alueA 36.60 - qir RYS! ee Anup ae = ul
Allianz Ful 41.81 s CGM 434] pi DFREX EqGrT 12.40 + TFAp 158 +.0 ichkis & Wi +.05 | Leu WX 18. Ne MOX 32 alueA p _ PIOTX 23 | TotR ee nat on 3 “
: r S et s z rat | ts ete iley: thold Funds: 73 +14 leedham 52 +39 17.19 + etl RYT! 40 Group: 39. 432 | Uovalue V 1888 +.23
TargetB t B: CGMRX 29: +25 fied Inst: 27 | Ealut 53.04 +.64 isDvAp FRI 1.78 +.02 eVall_ HWCL on {com : oe “| 2 AE i : : S
f PTAB: CRM Fu 29.57 - Stkldx 3 G FEIRX 3 64 | SMC DPX 3697 +. LgCpVi X 15.05 Invst LCO ener ; = : : "i : :
Allianz Fu X 20.37 nds: 08 p _ DISFX rOppT 0.69 +2 pGrA FR ‘or +24 | tgcp al HWL aie — = rt 3 z= : 4 : 2 : :
: He es 2g ae ee 1] Strat SGX 4011 + LoCpVIA IX 26.50 leaf 26 +14 72 +22 11.20 +.03 | Di HI Funds S: +.09 tr USC 38-436 | Welt. 2.13 +10
NFIDWVIt vil CRIMX al&inc p _DIVIX ‘or | Hilnadt p FAH 38. +44 tine p_ FRST sIL +49 pHWLAX +.15 | Parti : Foc Inv: H Funds C: .03 | DivBdS : EmgMk\ RX 27.45 Wi WELK 33.06 +.
: PNEC: Calam 31.53 Diversifd 170 #12 | Mide YX 10 USGov X 10.34 MCpVIA 3.3 “7 at : = | 5 E :
Allianz Fu X 17.43 10s Funds: +23 Inv Fas: “1 | Midepr p FM 84 +.02 SovAp FK +.03 | Mi pHWMA’ +.15 | Intl LPFX 36. Genesi BSSX 3 i PYICX DivEgS X 23.24 FStrt AX 20.5 Wi WNDX
: ae 7 = | : aan isn ee MidCpVi X 31.13 Lu 90: 4:34 [en NB 2.33 +32 1131 +. aS RDESX 50, +11 Gr UFSG: 57 435) Wadsll Vv 19.26 +.1
3 : = 3 oS nie wie A Es 42 4.02 | Hi fal HWMIX +.14 | SmC INX 19.61 Gen GNX 34.64 E Adv: 03 | EmerMkts X 50.04 GNMA X 10.66 V. WNFX 35 15
tech p DRBN Gr&incC 19.54 fal&inc 23.19 +. smile X 189 Frank/ X 14.27 jussmnst ae is Sve a s a S E 2 :
Alpine Fu X 25.45 t CVTCX +11 DVEIX 19 pTp FSC bond? Tmp Fm +.08 } IC rGIHSGFX Hf cn = a = = : : :
nds: +29 | Gr&incA 32.40 +, Dodge&Ci 9683 #24 | 2nT TX 23.07 FATE A k Adv: M SmCo eae ise als f ay = al : :
= con 26 | B: OX: BM Fi FSIAX IL, +17 dv FAFIX. 12) Ico ICSCX 39. .02 } LSBo es: Intl r JAX 19.43 Hiv! TRSAX 32 0 | MstrtBdS 78.60 +.9 Gr&inc X 15.82 + VFINX 1
: = : : : mi 2 nn eae nd LSBI NBISX 24! + ig| vide Pi 34 +38 | RMSSX 1 96 USGRX “19 | Balanced 34.28 +1.
IntIRE X 13.22 G p CVGRX 26 | | DODBX ity Freedom: +04 FRIAX +02 | Condisc LSSCV DX 14.51 Manh X 24.94 Val AHIX 7. uantEgs Rt Te a ne a =
EGLRX +13 | GrowthB t C' 55.55 +.6. income 89.46 +.5 FF2000 om: Frank/Tk AX 2,69 onDisc | C" Nec ao a â„¢ ae : Le i : !
a na c ae 63 | | DODIX 55 FFFB emp Fr +.01 | Eql CCCX 13. Strine X 27.41 Partne X 9.66 Pri AVLX 27.73 +. ecS 233 +31 | ne 17.36 + VDMIX 14
AIGYX ag | Growth tC 6.74 +.6 ntistk er +04 | Zot X 12.65 Incom nk B: incl p 63 +.11 C NECZX 15, +.09 NPRTX. 31. +11 ice Funds: 13. +.23 | Sh RESX 60. 31 USAIX 11 | EMkt 13.14 +
Amer Bea 29.85 VGCX 52.48 6415 ODFX 04 FFFC: +.04 NBL p FIC HI IOEIX 1 LSBo X 15,05 SocRe: X 31.92 Bal DrBdS HS i _ < :
~12 | Calvert Gi 2.48 +.5 tock =D 4574 +60 | ee! X 14.94 Income BX 271 theare IC rare oP fet : — Je é 2 e
: = SE a af ated “ys ae AK StrincA X 14.46 Neu X 26.67 BIChi RPBAX 2 pecGrs aes 403 | 10.04 + VEURX +37
: : fF : ae me a an ech ICT AG +11 NEFZX +.08 +26 | BiChio 1.79 +16 | Ru! SPSX 52.69 +. N USIFX .04 | Extend 37.58 +.
Amer Be 2430 +20 | & CFICX \ oc Inv: FFFDX .08 Temp Fro +0] | Materi EX 9 Lord Abb 14.99 Genesi Tr Ci RBCX 3 4 ssell In 9 +33 | Nasda 0 28.17 + VEXMX 56
e 0 gCpGr t 16.85 +.0 SclEq FF2025 X 15.96 + Found p Frnk C: erials ICB en a _ a : 2 4 a2 ; :
es a eS aia 06 | Soc! DIEQX 20. FF FFIWX 13. 12 Alp FFACX : ING Fu MX 1255 4 AMIA p Partner 49.55 + DvSi WCX 2115 + qll REA’ recMM UU 5.63 +.09 joc VFTSX +19
- : Es - : Sa mc ns +.05 LAFFX N NBPTX aq | bvsmGr PRO 15 +12] & SX 34, S& SAGX 2892 +, Growth 9.57 +.
LgCapInst 24.67 Cambi: EX 38. D SEFX 34, i FFFEX 16. 0 t FCISX +.09 | Cor A AllvalA 15.62 jewalt 24.64 DivG SX 14.98 qQi_ oR 14 +.34 P idx 92 +3 VIGRX 08
‘AADEX +31 biar Fu 26 +30 reyfus: 44 +32 2035 e534 | Franky 272 pldrA LEX LOFVX +.10 | Ni NALFX +22 ro PRD 98 +.09 | Intl EDSX 38.77 +: : use 2 |i
SmCpinst 24.56 0 inds: A 32 | FF FFTHX 13 4 Temp M +01 | Hivld XCX 22.5) BalStratA es N ral i. | 3 : : 3 2
: = = mA 653 +14] Bac tl A&B: Ap HY. 52 +21 LABFX 08 | Nj Grou 62 B PREMX 13: +22 NSX 49.00 +: Shi USPRX 2 18 | LTBnd X 10.24
Amer Bea 262 +07 | ° MWX A DRBDX | FFFX 9. eacnA TE : IntVs AX 9. BdDebA rat ih t : : 3 Ryde: : : : ,
‘o7 | Oppinv 20.74 +.1 prec 13.51 +.0 ncome 079 +09 | DSA BIX 17.42 ala p NIV ah ci al : 3 uf = a \
: 3 : = “he mi ‘at «oe AX 21.35 HYMnBd Bl + Nichit) 60.17 +, EmMktS X 33.13 ggStrc p RALCK Fin OU 8.87 +.02 ap VIMSX 20. +.10
AAGP! Capstone: 72 +17 siCS&P .13 +29 idelity I "i ‘6G +03 | EUTOPA 31.76 aA p LETR 35 +.28 | Mi pHYMAX 02 NCLEX , +58 PRMS! +.34 | Bal od . a He ze
SCpPlan X 23.47 G S Di DSPIX 30. 29] A invest: pAp TEM +.29 | ING X 62.97 idCpA 15.98 + 20.20' +. Eqinc X 32.99 StrCp Ri 69 +.10 ae 1 28 4 ce :
2 3 - 4 = on at LE less p LAVLX 02 I 12 PRFDX 30. +33 BLCX 1229 + TE SATX 13.19 +. REIT CX 13.0.
Amer Centu 216 +07 | C2 TROFX D Pe aeace aes DEGX p TFSI +.27 | Intl 5 rp 2 ) : f Rydex H Class: = / :
= : = iE i ne beet SCpB p NAI T LRSCX 13 NTHFX ex PREIX 39. +.20 | Ba R3: -08 | TxES USTEX 1 02 | Smc SIX 28.2
Eqinc p ry Adv: insti ay Intl: .05 | DryMi REVX 10. -26 | AN ‘ASMX 16 18 t TEQIX +.17 | ING pee’ “e sn no = 2 ; : : q
5 3 = aa oe ete LANSX 1 : NTHEX +22 PRESX +31 p RBLOX 12 VAI SSTX 10.60 +. Smic ESX 34.0
Amer 76 +.05 |!" r CIVIX 20.40. Dr50 SPX 31.13 +. AM SGX 1674 +. cA TESIX 26 +.16 | JPM mVI p LAI 153 +0; 788 - Extindx 21.13 +. x Dynami 39 +0 LIC : 60 +.01 pGth VI .06 +11
: Centu os | Investor r 0:40>4.2 OInt PEO! 13 +.20 gr20r F 14 +.12 SharesB a ve : e i = i : |
: : = a Se Se “| Pas FLAp LA 370 +06 | HX FinSves 1724 + nvSP500H ntlEq Cpvl_ VI 31 +10
= 35 | TBE 2 ae ma * a 95 +.24 | TN FIX 473 +4 NOFIX G PRISX 07 | tn RYTPX 3 Md VCIEX 1 STB SVX 177
z ae sn Eng ie gas BlueC LX 20.08 «| Frank/Temp Mtl C: 16 | TRPG! EIX 50.0 YAp W 73. +01 | CE 9.87 NMA 22.15 + vOTCH R 0.13 -.46 Cpldx V 0.71 +.1 nd OV 14 +.02
ee are 3 eae 08 +12 | Piscct Cc: rEql ITC 01 +.42 | Lord NYX 1126 +02 | NOGEX +.04 | G PRGMX 20 | OTC YVNX 16.28 -! SciT MIDX 24 -13 | TotB BISX 9
: : : E = eile Mc: ee IX 61.12 tt B: 6 +02 | HivFxinc 16.62 + rowth =P 9.36 +.03 HRY 28 -.58 iTech VC! 79 +.16 nd = VBR 89 +.02
BEQGX itizens Fu 92 +.20 GNYMX 02 la FICDX 437 | SharesC UT 31.52. +.2 ,M,Q&d: +.72 | Affild B: I NHFIX 14 | Gr& RGFX 3259 +. SaP5 YX 24.4 smC| STX 12.85 Totll MFX 9,9)

: : a ie , vie Hi 8.27 + rain 59 +.38 00C pRYTN 40 +.82 pdx VC +20 ntl Vt 99 +.04
‘E = vn seh 415 | Frank/Te 2666 +16 | IntV pQ NAG! Bd FBX 15. \ NOITX 01 | HithSci RGIX 2: X 49, Stk SLX 18. Tot GTSX 18
FLMuBnd IX 876 Cit! WAIDX 2 UGrinR 18.30 + CapDevO 28.53 + emp Tem 16 | IntVall vee et oe a = = B 3 7 : : :
= : : 2 fee x NG 13. +.83 | Lo NBX B12 +, I T NOINX 01 | HIV HSX 2 19 | MC : Valu TIX 37. V SMX 35.

GNMAI 10.63 Ci AEGX 1 .23 | MdcpVI 16.50 Cplncr 12.91 p TEDMX Re ae, es. “3 . : c S : :
: : : e a : a e ¥. 36 +.28 | Af tt C: ‘ NOIGX Intl RHYX 16 pRYMDX Value Li CULX 9 “ VIVAX 25
Gift X 10.16 Cli WAGEX 2 21 | MunBd 34.26 Chinak 9.03 Gi p TEMFX 45 | NoA\ fildC p LgCapval ee roe =e 3 i e :

= - . & : a ae X 14.05 + joAm p NO) Bai LAFCX 1 S NOLVX 20 | IntDi RPIBX OL | Bi 36 ine Fd: 10 Inst! Fds: AT
GlGold 23.24 Coh CFIMX 93 21 | NY Tax \X 11.89. +. Contra 24.99 +.19 | & p TPINX 16 | IXIS Advi AMX 7.3 DbC’p * BI 5.64 +.10 mCpGr 14.05 + tDis PI 9.56 +.07 Biotech ) ca =
BGEIX 19. +32 jen &S 38 +.74 rt DRNYX 02 a FCNTX 9 +19 | SISCOA X 1101 + Advisoi 32. +.03 | MdC DLAX 8. 10 | 1x NSGRX 11 | Intl ROX 4974 + Mi a e ci
GI Grwth 19.71 \ teers: NYTEr 14.81 CnvSe 66.65 p TEMGX 05 | Hi Cl A: MACVG. «L 13 +0 Expt 13.82. + Gal 74 +63 | 22.56 ‘onv 509 + | DvMiktins! X 21.84
TWGG: +25 | InstlRity DRNIX +.03 | pi FCVSX +60 | Grwtha 953 +, arFocVl NI Lord AB AUMCCX 2 03 | NOTEX 06 | Intl TRIGX 1 Z "ain “- we 3
Growth! X 1.17 | CSRIX SmCStk 17.95 DisEq 26.49 p TEPLX 07] H RSAX 1 2.09. +.12 echnly 10.46 +.0: ae Tat 234 a me : ' S :
wthl TWCG V7 a1g | mtiRitya 62.43. - r_ DISSX +.02 | pi FDEQX +12 | WorldA p 26.30 + aruCVIAN 1.80 +.08 | Af tt ¥: 12] us NTCHX 1 02 | Jay PRITX 17. RYNVX +.08 VLIFX gg | Eurolnst. VE 02 +.18
E E | = ie a = me | te 24] Ls EFOX 1 08 | AfY Govt. Ni 257 +1 pan Pl 31 +.24 orc 32.09 + Inc&Gro nas +11} 2! SIX 37.6
TWH +24 | RityShrs 19.92 + fal DSCVX +09 | Di FDIVX 23 | Frank/Te 19.97 +. CrBdA 5.92 +11 | R LAFYX Ni jOUGX 17 | Lata RUPX 1 RYOCX 35 VALIX Ane Vv 62 +.56
IncGro IX 16.85 5 CSRSX 9} 26 | Dreyfu 26.16 +. DivStkO 38.24 + emp Tm 19 | USDI NEFRX 1 “11 | RschSCy 15.66. +. juveen Cl 9.78 +.0 m — PRLA AT +.10 SEI 12.06 +. NY TE aso +04} o™ IEIX 40.
BIGRX £93 | Spectocs! C 8.64 -.65 | Di is Founders: 20} pi FDESX 45 | Frondv p Adv: DivrA p N 1.32 +.05 | M LRSYX 3 10} Fy A: .03 | MDB X 39.7, folios: 21 ves ee ee
= ie s eK 65 | DiscvF ers: DivGth 16.06 + TFFAX Ix EFSX 2423 +. Funds: 2.08 +.09 LMB p ‘ond ~MDX 73 4.41 | COTEFRA US Gvt 77 +03 | Inf _ WIGIX 30.
nd BEGBX 36, +28 | Columbi 6.30 5 p FOIS! Emr FDGFX 14 | Grthav 14.00 IS Advi 23. +.21 | B wy Hl FLOTX MediaTl BX 10.65 Ei “ae he . =
= i ato e 58 | EqGrthr X 30.38 mrMk 32.36 + TGADX +.16 | USDi isor Cl B: 4 randes! YMuBd 10.16 +, ediaTl PRM 65 +02 | ETMHt 10.31 +. Van Eck 1138 +.04| VIPIX
“yo | Acorn t FRMU +.09 | E FEMKX 19 | Frank/Te 26.33 SDivB ns BIIEX Gi pNHMAX 01 | MidC: TX 45.53 p SIEMX 05 ie a ne
IntlGrot EGX 16.09 LACAX IntlEga X 6.04 q inc 24.83. +. emp Tmi +24 p NESBX MFS Fu 25.31 + wth 2277 +. ‘ap RPM +53 | Ealdxa 17.13 EmgMkA | VINIX 4 06
z ale ae oe as +06 FEQIX 30 | For p Tmp B&C: Ivy Funds: 245 + nds A: 32 p_NRGAX .06 | MC GX 56.2 TROIX +25 pGBFAX 13.8: nsPl 33.27 +1
LgCoVal X 13.03 F t LTFAX 17 | Dreyfi X 17.32 EQli 60.37 +. gnC pp TEFT ° s: .18 | IntlOvA cnn a =e : : e : a : .
ALVIX +21 | FocEaAt 27.83 + yfus Premi +23] E FEQTX 43 | GrwthC Nese is 2 ‘s 4 3 : :
: 2 a : a Se ee nC p TEG +16 t WASCX MITA 16.18 GrwthB er PRWAX 41g | IntMuniA 863 +, Van Kam 16.53 VITBX 4
REAC +05 | Intlvala 22.89 + pct DBO Europ FECAX 17 | GAM TX 25.65 AssetSta 20.10 MITT. +21 p NRGBX NAsi 32.44 \ SEIMX 01 p Funds “ei an
= a : en ae ee CX 20.5 urope + 28.41 + CO Funds: +24 pWASAX +.14'| MIGA X 21.38 LrgCVB 21.87 as PRASX 14 #34 | IntlEGA ros2 +02 | 699° inds A: : ix VITNX 0
TWCl «14 | LSCRValA 25.19 + BdA DS: 59 +.10 FIEUX 40 | GIC nds: CoreEqc 20.45 MIGFX +18 p NNGBX +.22 | New E X 14.49 SEITX 2 Ap ACS =
SGov IX 38.32 NVLEX 31 | Corv! INX 14.3 Export 40.79 +.55 OnAAAG, ‘ac tWTRC +14 | Cap} Ww Nuveen 27.96 ra PRN 4g +.08 | L9CGTOA 15.00 +21 | CTSA x 198 ae
é a ae aa 35. +.06 | Fi FEXPX 55 | GiTe AGCX 5. CoreEqB X 9.68 pp MCOF +15 cic: 4.25 | N Hori EX 46.9 SELCX 21 p ACS 32 +.24 | MidCrl 31.74
SmCpvl X 9.34 M tNMTAX 13 | EmgM VIX 32.89 idel 23.92 + eIAAA GA 59 +.02 qB t WCEBX +10 | EmGA X 16.14 HYMuB riz PRNH! 7 4.27 | LgCvala nig3 +20 | EA nk ar ate :
ASVIX +02 | MarsGrAt 14.89 +. gMktA DRFM 89 +.22 | Fil FFIDX 37. 221 | Math SABIX. 2357 +. GINatRsA ie eu e : e : : fi ce :
: : : | d - me 9 +a Aor +.10 | GITOtA 38.90 Nu X 22.76 PRC +22 | SMCGIA 23.62 Eql X 147. VPK +17
: S : : - : ‘ ee = aS NS ce veen Cl R: 76 +.06 | NIB IX 89 SSCGX aig | EalncAp AC 72. +.18 | REIT! IX 13.05
: : zr = sedi ae sC p IGNCX +31 | GrAlIA X 14.69 InMi fond NITFX 1 +03 | SMCValA 30.86 +10 | ClOFra EIX 9.2 instr VGS 05 +.16
TWSAX +04 | Stetina 15.49 + Ap OR 25 +.03 | F ir FFRHX 241 58 : 01 | JPM 28.60 MAGW +13 un R NI NYBo! 175 wl SESVX 10 np VG 28 +05 | SC! NX 18.66
StrConv 8.57 D COSIX 11 | LtdH DEX 25.6 LMur 993 * &S Inc jorgan A Cl. +.29 | IntNwDA aE om ar es : = ae fy t |
: dE o a tof eth Sg GESLX Gwtha ass: MIDA +14 MBd NU 80 +.03 | PSBal X 11.34 TMLCX 04 p ACG! 69 +.21 | TBI CIX 34
=: tf = i ie ‘ocsdStk 140 + &S PM 11.16 +0 nAdv p VH MCapA X 28.54 HYM VBX 8: TRPB! +03 Fu 1392 +11 |S"! VX 9. st Vv 10 +11
78. +.03 | Columbi 13.72 YdA p DP 39 +.01 1 FTQGX 01 | I GESSX .04 | Inv B WAX 7.58 pA OTCA) +45 junBdNH 97 +.01 | PSGro X 20.58 inds: “1 | Grime AC pat se Ee
: a = ie 7 rest mt axEX 475d +4 ap OGI 58 +.07 | MuBdA X 9,95 Oak MRX 22.78 + Ww TRSG! 17 | EmgMkt Harb) GIX 22 Inst 99 +.04
BTTNX 91, +,05 | Acorn t B: YB p DL 39 +01] Gi FFNOX 3 AY Ti ELFTX AL | InG&l Hany aa : : cafe : : f 2 :
192020 X 91.00 LACB) MAM: TBX 7. NMA 30.4% + iusts 172. +0: SIA ONGIX 14 +07 | MuHiA X 10.44 Pi $ t TRE! +26 | Intistock aH in ma : -
: ce : ae le ro al ELENX 5 02 | MCpV IX 14,83 t_ MMHY: “£92 | PinOkAg_ PO R2010 X 27,74 SSAIX +34 uA p AC 11 +.08 VIVIX 25
Tech 59.23 mbia Class +.16 | MIM AX 11.6 owtine 10.77 +0. GE Inst! Fu 5272 +48 pval p JAMC 18) pes eae a. = ie i: = :
ATCIX 211 +.61 | Acornt Cc: uA PSM 69 +.03 | G FGOVX 1 04 | | nds: 48 | JPM X 26.91 MFFLX 01 itOkKSGWO re al wan a es ie : z :
Ultra 21.80 LIAC Mei IK 15.18 +0 r0Co ata oe ee organ | +14 | ResBdA 1001 org = ie z a : |
‘ ie a oe 8 |e Het 04] GI GIEIX Md nstl: MRBFX +02] 0° alue 01 88. +.59 R2020 12.70 4.19, Gth pVG 53 +.04 pp VPAOX
Util X 27.85 jumbia Cl 03 +.16 | MuBd RX 15.46 rolnc 7131 +6 MOEMMK cn oan ‘a a : fe: : 2 :
BULIX 17: +.29 | Aco jass Z: JA PTE 46 +.10 | GrDi FGRIX 3 64 | G V tGEMVX. lee ct on i: e : . : : : |
= - ae Mi se rDiscv 196 +.2 MO Ti 21.28 +. organ Se 31 +15 | Reina 25,02 E inds I: TRRHX +15 | Hi¥idl 13.32 REStA X15) Eqinc 977
TW +09 | Ac INK 42 ee FDSVX “Sq | CMO Trust I: B16 lect: ee ae atyiner OAKBX rts 2 3 = ia
= 3 i mae eae ighint r 1308 it | ee -S : ond TotRA 20.01 +27| AKBX 26. TRRCX +11 | IntEq! X 10.87 StrG REX 34.47 Growth IX 10.20
; AMVI +.05 | Ac X 28. oA OT 34 +.41 | Inde SPHIX el GMFRX HB BSEX : MSFRX “7 | Global. a +12] s : : = is
: 3 a 1 «| lok eh ndepn 913. +01 | SMO 19.04 SMkNe 9.28 +.0 UtiIA 16.61 Int! AKGX 2 12 TRRIX - +.18 | InEInd! X 17.01 StrM EGX 44, Gri RX 9.88
TWCVX 18: +.04 | AStAl SAX 29.76 +. CnZ_ DRT! 15 +43]! FDFFX 01 Trust Ill: +.24 | Int pHSKSX 16. 03 MMUFX aay | intro 6.33 +.29 R2040 13.60 SIEIX +21 mney & 4a i 3
American 18.02 | GAA 76 +.09 | ET HX 9.83 nProBd 2271 +19 | EMME : neq os +01 | aves rar +14 IMs AKIX 26.2 TRROX +12 | UCPRIVIL 1822 van ae : a
: ey a oe ot 83. +.09 | Int FINPX 1 19 rt GMOE Int SIEX 39, : MEIAX 14 mCp r OAl 3 +32 SciTec 19.36 + CRVAX +24 tgeA VKM 65 +.01 vp 83 +.10
AmcpA A: dz GHOT! 18 +.12 | Kob s: Bd FT 070 +06 | GMOEX 21.35 repGr JP 09 +.54 MFS Fund: a782 +25 | Ck KEX 23 s PRSCX 18 | QuGrStkc eit te ee : a
i : 2 2 mS ee +.33 | MC GSX 23. s B: (5 | Cakmark rOA 90 +.19 htBd 21.82 +. tSTTFX 25.56 13 Kamp Fu 31 +.03 gTG VPLGX : 99 +.16
AMutlA X 20.76 qzt NFE +.05 | Ea GRX 14. mMu Fi a7 +93 | MtlGre 19.12 Val JM 44 +23 | MAITB Sel KMX 47, SI PRWBX 37 | SmCpGrl 2556 +19] 4 inds B: MPT GX i452
‘ | ri ee) 5+ | Intl LIMX 9.94 + q GMIG +.25 | ShtTi SX : MITBX lectr OA 29 +.25 mCpStk 4.69 +. SSCTX “1g | AggGrB p VA : idGr VP 25.28 +23
BalA p X 30.07 SRE oA. +22 | FIR ce Adv: RlEstr Fi ot op | uintevl y ae oi | 2 : ) : E a : :
: “ fe me Pe WREX 1737 +. GMOIX +.43 | USEquit) BSX 9. pB ~MCOBX +17 Mutual 31 423 | mana 35.73 +.16 | 52! p STTAX “yg | CmstB.t AC 16 +21 ictory Funds: 14.82 4.18
BondA p 19.40 SETM +.03 | E ABLX 9, Disc F 37 4.19 | intsm 36.16 quity JU 53 +01 | MGB 14.68 Gwt Adv Il: 5 PRSVX “16 | SandsCpGi 2762 +21) & SWX 19. D 3:
ABND) +12 | IntEqZ X 10.32 aton Vani 88 Intl IGRX 3931 +: ; GMISX +.45 | JP ESX 11. MIGBX +14 hZ Ol pecGr 45 +, rl CISGX 21) ast A B te i.
CapWA X 13.35 4 NIE +02] T ce Cl A: Scpr Fi 31 +52 | Mal pie at malt 2 = : cE = : :
: a i aton ‘ intl ISMX 25. < E GTMI +19 | C Sel Cls: p MFWBX +13 | Lgcez 4.08 +2 pecin 21.09 +, ler Funds: “ts | HarbBt A 12 +06 | YM Blai X 18.08 +.
S : : He ai i 31 +52) sane X 21.32 ‘oreBd Wi MCapB 14.93 M OLCVX 1 25) 7 RPSIX 20 | NAMEqI 3 ' REs CHAX 16. 6 air Fds Inst. 25
p CAB +12 | IntviZ X 19.64 hina 20.71 45,25 | v8 COX 16.9 35 yEq GQET +28] E OBDX OTCBX +12 | MdCrz 1 5.16 +.1 Finc 12.18 + qin SNAEX Bt Al 05 4.07 | (nl inst:
CapWGA X 62.40 EMIE +25 | F p EVCGX 95 | ISB FB “98 +33 | UoCaree Yt ne a ale : . : i = : 2
pcwcl +39 | LCpCrZ X 25.93 loatRt 2440 +1 | 2 NDX 738 +. eEq GMUE! +10 | Hi HLEIX 3 04 | ti MTRBX +09 | SelGrz_ 0 16.80. +.1 KFrH 10.03 +, Fund: 4.99 | SelGrthB rv 3-18 | WM Blai me
EupacA X 43.26 Z — NSEP: +31 | HI EVBLX aay | 2apan 3 "38 +.03 | SMO X 15.31 iVIdBd 3.18 +.2 UtiIB 16.60 TS. BHEX 2 15 | 5 PRFHX 02 | CoreE i vs = ‘ se =
p AEPG) +.43 | LgCapG X 15.16 IthSA 1022 | Jens JPNX 17 ‘ Trust IV: +11 | I OHYFX 26 MMUBX +1 | PS8WwSCvZ 6.18 +.3 xFrSl 12.14 +. ‘oreEq SWA rGwth At ae ly a :
FdlnvA X 48.08 pGr GEGT +12} 1 p ETHSX pnsm AT 4.25 | Core : ntmTFBd gos +01 | ue 17.10 Te OSMVX 4) T PRFSX .03 | DivE NX 19.3 V mee “|e .
i 2 : sel 3 | =f : n 25 ae 413 | Te&Comz 26.56 +. jotindex 5.33 +. ivEqinv SW 34 4.13 fan Kam 7.53 +.4 BIGIX
GovtA p X 41.39 pidxZ NIND +25 | L EVIBX 05 | LePv! FSI 90 +.16 | Ec BFX 10.4 ntlEq! 10.61 +0: MFS Fu X 27.65 Old OBTCX 12] y POMIX 01 | Dive DIX 15.3 p Funds C: oe im
AMUS +34 | LCpviz Xx 28.20 gcpval 659+ | Lala LX. 15.50 + ndt GM 49 +03 |! OIEAX 2 sol nds C: +26 1329 +23 | vane 15.82 +. qSel SWD! 30 4.09 | AggGrct c: & Reed 40
GwthA X 13.34 NVLU: +221 N EHSTX mF 5.50 +.09 | En DFX 10 intrdAme m4 39 ate = : : de f : |
p AGTH 34 +.05 | MarsG X 15.69 atIMun 2189 +18 | beveos LATX’ 47. niMkt GM .67 4.07 | M oan 2 _ : | = = ; :
HI TrA p IX 33.68 rZNGIPX ‘ +13 | TI EANAX 18 oStk FLV ‘QL +73 | Forel AEFX 21.2 eek iy Mr a 3 S SS = i = : ;
s 2 : : ee i . 3 |Mo a 2 MEIC +11 | RealRet 14.18 + Principal 7.93. +.2 r SW ig +03 | Ealnect 19.82 + p_ UNAS $3 +07
x oe Nr le ETTGX ‘o3 | towPr FL 50 4.18 | lntlc FEX 19, unilne Liv -02 | MFS X 27.6 OWRRX 18 Funds: 24) MTA ISX 22, ACERX .13 | Corel X 9.66
S e cE z fe ‘ =e Bah rel 02 Funds I: 61 +.25 | Olstei 12.05 +, 1720301 lIEq SWI 44 +26 | Van Wai 9.16 +. vA UNC! 9.66 +.07
: : £ o 7 sla as FX 19 mCpCor 9.74 +.01 | Rel i in Funds: r00'| nase PMTIX MT EGX 14 goner Ful “06 | NCcpta fi MX 63
: e E te aE 3 a Hua ‘on | Rent = Mi Allcpva Princi 14.01 Gro SWI 34 +11 | Ema nds: pta p UN 32 4.07
: is - alee & gun ee 5 | Janus : 49.46 +.16 | Ya! RSIX 20 Val. OFALX pal Inv: +.10 | 100 HGX 19 mgGro p VWEG Sct ECX 11.55
p AIBAX 13. +11 | MdCpvl X 12.87 Eaton Vi Baz +14] Mid MX U1 MO Tru: 14 +45 : “1g | Valuel 9M 53 +28 | OPpenhel we ma : 2 aE : S :
ICAA p X 13.43 pviZ pNAMA\ +.09 | chit ance CIB: “iq | Midcap FMC 90 +.02 | st VI: 5 | Balanced Ie at nS at rs : : 2 :
AINSK 34. +04 | SmCpC X 15.51 ChinaB t ' MCpvl EF: SX 30.9 mgMkts 1G xd JABAX Funds 95 +.26 | AMTF A: DiscLCl 1X 10.68 Sel * SN 55 +32 | Van CX 9.92 ng UNVGX 67 +11
NEcoA p 3431 pCor2SMCEX +11 EMCGX pvl FSM 98 +.32 | | EMMX Contrari 492 +20) fy te fe es j E 3 :
: : : : f is a BRK 90 | IntlEg AMTR AX 10.3; Divintlt X 16.46 EQS! SWI 54 +32 | As imiral: asatch: 15 +.09
N PerA X 27.61 pIPZ_ NMSC +.04 | Hil EVFLX at | Migsec FM 14 +11] GMIPX 25, 33 | Enterpr ea Se se ‘ _ j :
; = ; : - = “ a 20 | Sa rad 0.79 +26 | CAPA YX 13.2 IntiGth IX 14.33 Pinv S 39 +.07 | Bi VAARX 6 CoreGr
NwWrldA X 32.63 0Z ACRN: +.08 | Hi EVHIX yon | Muniine FH 05. +.03 GCEFX 10 | FedTe 50.35 +, Ss: 2g | CapApA p OPTI 29 +.04 Inst PIT +18 | S& WPIX 22. alAdml 6.33 +.46 | Mi WGROX
: 2 : : cai a i eth Aen “4g | CoreStkB Capl FX 48.0 LgGriN IX 13.22 PSel S 45 +1 VBIAX AG | Mic-C 42.14
SmCpA X 50.03 Bd NSF +17 t EVHY: unr FN. 14 +.03 cGMFIX ‘5g | FlxBnd 7.00 MMPGX pincA p OPI 2 +61 PGLI +.18 | S&l WPPX 2 17 | CAITAdm oe oN a
pSMCWX 41. +.56 | Com: IX 9.76 StrincB X 10.73 NwM JHX 11.5 USCoreEqGMC 25.32. - JAFIX +.02 | IntmincB ae om a ma - : a : = ss
TXEXA X 41.13 stock Pa +.05 t EVSG +01 ktr FN 50 +.02 GMCOQX 04 | Fund 9.42 MMPIX +11 plncA pO 49 +.05 In PLW 10 +.08 | SI ISLCX .18 | CpOpAd! rors cra :
Z ‘ z % : ge = = inka +03 | (ntlB p 968 +04 | OM pOPCHX 9.65 PtrlV IX 14.03 mcpst 11.50 +0 VHCAX 87 01 | Wei EX 38.14 +27
WshA p X 1251 pv DRCVX 2 Lt EMTG: * ill FN 84 +07 yEq’ GQLOX +1 | Fundae ai a ae : : S : =
AWSHX 35, +.02 | Strato VX 214 Eaton X 25.60 NYM MILX 30.1 Gabelli 22.35 + daEq —_JAEIX +35 | Mainst war +20 | DS AX 42.1 PtrLGl | IX 15.73 jotBond S' ae 0 ma VER 2c
American X 35,80 t CPS 14 -.02 Vance Cl C: +21 un FTF .17 +.23 i Funds: 19 | Gl LifeSci 26.41 +. AainStay Funds A: 20 p OPO 19 +.55 in PLGIX +12 | Viewpoi WLBX 08 | EqinAd X 120.79 +, ickory WEHIX
Fund +22 | CG Ca FX 2.45 FloatRt Cc: Nordi MX 12.7 ABC p y cir JAGLX 27 | HiVIdBA s A: Equi CX 48.85 Ptrintl 855 iewpointS 9.84 +.04 nt VEX sh on
AmcpB t nds B: p Mkt Fd : ‘ t ECBLX ic + FNO ATT +,02 p GABCX GlbOpp 20.76 + \dBA MHCAX ityA — OEQA) 85 +31 in —PINIX +.10 | Yid WOBX 1333 +, EuroAd ae new a
AMPB Intl s: NatIMC LX 9.88 ore RX 41.97 Asset x 10,20 +01 | Se JGVAX 13 | Mains' 657 GlobA X 11.35 RealEstl 16.11 Pist S' 33 +12 AAD alr ie
BalB t X 20.04 q TIE t ECHMX +01 FOCP: +89 GABAX 4.01 | Slech r 14.58 + tay Fund +01 p OPPA +13 PIREX +21 | Vid WYPX 9. ExplAd 88.29 + jalue — WVALX 504 4.13
BALBX 19. +15 | LgGrw UX 15.1 TMSG C 11.97 Ovrse CPX 42.64 +.5 Eqlne 49.53 G JAGTX 11 | HYIdBB s B: Glbo X 75.32 SAMBalA 29.06 - Piss]. SW 69 * De “| ne |
BondB t 19.33 TLGI 1 +19 ECMGX +.03 a FOS| +.58 p\ GABEX +.33 | Guin 13.45 +. t MKHC) ppA OPGI +.89 SABPX 19 | Secuti YSX ExtdAd 73.21 fells Fal AG +18
BFAB! +13 | Loval UX 14.4 Empire Bui 12.66 PcBas SF FX 46.30. 4.55 GIOPAAA pG 21.65 M JAGIX .24.| Mai X 6.53 Gold IX 37.14 SAMBalB 15.04 +, rity 969° im VEXA) . : crea ,
CaplBB t X 13.35 TW 8 +.16 pire Builder: +.05 FPBI 4.55 A pGABO qq | McVilnst 38.95 + inStay Fund: +01 p — OPGS +36 SBBPX 09 curity Funds: sok Me cn
a ‘ : : i i re ih alk 41 | ICAP si: GrthA X 30.23 SAMBalC 15.00 + Equity m VEL 16 +.18 loc NVCBX
CpWGrB t X 62.40 y COI 0 +.09 nd EMB Munir FPX +34 MA GABG +29 | MdCpval ies va ig : g | : :
=) se a - Bro A 1X 10.74 Valuet 6 ix 31.51 Dilan, JMCVX .20 | MAP AEX 46. IntBd SX 32.87 SAMGrA 14.92 Selected 6.15 dml VE 60 +.03 | wel NVIN +.09
ErpacB t X 43.03 it Suisse 56 +.25 Gl EN 56 +02 1 FPURX 20. +01 et GAB 51 4.30 | Oe" 24.99 +. 1 MU 13. +.40 Ap OIBAl 87 +.41 p SAGPX +.09 Funds: oe ie = fa
: 8 : : - sn x un Sy VX 18.33 0 JORNX .20 | ICAP: BFX 38.82 +. Inte X 6.00 SAMGrC 17.25. +. Amsh MAAd VI 30 +1.05 s Fargo 30 +44
FdinvB t X 47.51 +, cus p CU rgreen A: +.09 E FRE 5 +13 rtmore Fd #10) reser aa 2 oe Ps 3 u = | i '
51 +.60 | DFi FAX 16 AstAl : Stint\ SX 40.65 Nati s D t JAOSX 15 | S&P! SLX 42 33-1 Intlsi ‘AX 29.1 SAMGrB 16.60 Amst are mn ae me
GrwthB t AFIBX 41.27 ‘A Funds: 99 +.23 Ip EA tintMu FST 5-05 ationwD Mi scvinst me = a - H f : : a:
AGRBX 32. +.35 | Ini s: -23 | Bal AFX 15.0 STBF FX 10.18 Gi UIFX 19. s JAMRX 10 | Mail SPIX 33, 43] LTGVA AX 27,7 StrGA 16.73 Seli SX 47.13 srwAdm eon me ae
: d S" . : lie ee a airs & 59 +.26 p Opa eT +24 p SACAX ‘12 | Seligman G +35] H VIGAX 3 E STCSX 20. 6
= st Ss 2 3 cor ree 30 | Gi rs 26 | LtdTn VX 9,93 WCStEgA 19.16 Cc roup: IthCr 0.88 4.29 nterpr 20.92 +.12
: : i : as e et oe 27.19 + rowth = M mMu OPITX 15. +01 stEqA CMNWX 415 | Comunat SU Hi VGHAX 6 ae SENTX 31.6 12
IFABX +.02 | DW! FOTX 1219 +. HiYid AX 9.3 SmillCpS. X 22.08 M GIXIX Twe JSCVX 08 | Mi PGFX 79, MnstF X 15.92 Purisit 4503 +30 |S MCX 34 ividcp V eee sen a
ICABt 20.68 S Scud 419 +.07 dA EKH 30 +.01 pSr FSLCX 41g | MCoMktd! 11.32 + wenty 26.95 +. janage 716 +5 ‘dA MSI +01 ima Funds: “39 | SrowthA Si JIL +50 YAPA. 232 a ae
AICBX +11 | Bi der Cl A: 07 | Intle AX 3.3 Scpval 19.83 N x GMXIX 15 | y JAVLX 08 | Fi rs Funds: 56 | MnSto/ GX 41.84 TotRet Ss: HYd GRFX. 4 50 | InfProAd es oni oe
NwPersp t 34.13 ala : qa EK 38 t falur FCPV aig | NwBaldst 16.28 + entur 56.30 +. remntBd A pOMS| +34 p PURI BDt SI 61 +.06 viLOK : ie :
NPFB} +23 | Bluchi KTRAX Mu ZAX 10 SEAsia X 14.53 GBXIX AL] Wi JAVTX 62 MBDFX MSSCI OX 15.2 Putni X 23.68 MAMuni HYDX 06 | InsdLTAd qa ae “s
SmCpB t X 32.09 luChipA 10.00 +. inBdA EK 93 +.14 ja FSEA\ ey | S&P5001 10.77 +. rldW 65.50 +, Frmtelbl ee cma ae ra : = a: : - |
s : ; : E = ‘ on o Meee +.05 | S&Md SX 23.15 AAB s A: luni SMATX ITBdAd 12.60 sT Bd X 43.58
39.65 +3 rHIRA KI 21.50 + egA EKO) 54 +02 in FSDIX 4,33 | Gartm 12.43 +. Janus Ad 52.48 +. EssxLCGI 15.09 +. CpVIQVsc .15 +11 alAp PABA) Sentinel G 7.93 +.01 ma ‘ oo va
: s e A a rs oe 10 | F VS Shrst 62 | £ tT MGCAX 3 13 | Strind X 39.25 AAGTA X 12.66 Cc roup: 01 | ITsryAdi 1034 405| oes X 8.51
, z : 2 e = ee | ash mMkEq MEM 0.45 +52 | V p _OPSIX +38 | bwrima PAEAX 14. 407 | Soms.Ap SEN \ ml VFIUX 10. 05 alZ pSSMVX +01
a inn rad 58.45. +75 rReRtr FSR 63. +.03 | IDM pNDMSX 11.35 Jan RTX 31.62 Globalbd EX 24.95 alued p CGR 4.32 +.02 wind p Pl 1459. +.10 | LtlEQA CX 33.89 ntGrAdm VW 14 4.04 UltStiny STADX 32.13 +.09
e = Aes i PO 0a us Aspen | 62 +.33 MGGBX 5 +39] O WX 27.2 Eql DINX 9.98 +. qAp SWRLX +.30 | ITAd IX 78.9 uls STADX 9.1
eee | EVUAX 15. +.08 dd FIBFX + | Gate X 11.16 Balanced stl: IntDurGv M12 +1 ppenheimer .21 +.25 map PEYAX. 18. +02 | SmCOA 216 + dint. VWIU 822-408 Wat rang A -
Le : 14.95 +.10 Trend TRI 10.46 +.04] G way Funds: +.07 | wel ced JABLX 28. ShDurG' MGIDX 10.53 12 | GlobIB t B: EuEq X 1818 +15 | 2°! Ap SAGWX 7.7 .25 | TGrAdm x OT 405 me cag
iE ey = 3 cia ical rGv MGSDX 9 +.03 | IntBd OGLBX 70, FLTXA PEUGX 31.1! 15] g ia SEQUX 70+ | uta VeIDX 972 405 | ol Ils Fargo Admin:
as Ee on = ae hour ogy Bt OIBB 01 +.83 PTFLX “19. +42 | Skvineta 156.87 +1.0 rAd VMU a72 +05 | Dvea! nin:
i a i : Wo wae GSEX 87. MnStFd X 5.98 GeoA an +01 | 9 SKSEX 26. 08} UrGradm! VW UX 10.70 G NVDEX 40.58
: = 2 a coe +05 p PGEO 01 ndSh 93 4.0 dint VW oy | St8al DEX 40.58 +.38
GICIX 21.45 424 BlendA ak +24 Masi ins 24.97 i StrincB t race “a +32 “ee PEQUX ie +12 oer ne aie a Noe a ns +28 este me Bo
D ; | A [ 24 | GlbTotRIA 20.14 ocusp MI 2 Oppenheimer C. .33 +.02 | H p PGRWX “a4 eat | Fund N SI pAdml VIM 29 | an ae
: = le == ope ay IthA p— PHS 20.70 +17 | St PECX 9.52 MorgAdr AX 95.15 +75 | © mn Asset: 3 477
Advantst stocks fro Pca wl acca aunt +19) Gob ODVCX 41.25 HIYA p TX 6131 +55 | 8a imAseoes #1 | AMuHyAdVWALX a ‘ee
Alumina 48.15 m various int ss stCnt p MXXIX 112 +21 Inte p OGLCX 71.2 +55 | Incma PHIGX 824 + lan STFBX p capt VMK a aa rt
| | x aan 5 WACPX .
AsiaSat 23.05 +2.32 | Amari ernational wo NEW = HIG ~ 15.98 +.14| M IC OIBCX 5 +.85 | intle p PINCX 676 ‘| Gwth STF 56.41 +29 imCap r VPMAX 39 Westwood ae
BHP BillLt 22.65 +0.08 Amarin 18 rd stock mark HIGHS BarcBk pr Delhai HS & ieee en nStFdC MIGCX 5.98 +.05 | Int qp POVSX 32, +,03 | Sterling FGX 58.68 +.40 PacfAdml VPA\ ee oe :
CNOOC 45.60 +4,90 BASF te +0.01 | HS ets. AAR Barclay elhaize Fi LOW oe 40.54 +.32 CapO p PNVAX 61 +.38 | SCapV Capital: 40} ReitAdm r oe s a a
: = = = i ee tay Debit Fret a S InvAp —PINV 38.86 +.52 et al SPSCX 15. .| STsyAd VGSLX 120.57 “fb AIAN WEBAX
ChinaMbl 52.12 +0.74 BHPBA a +0.89 Hide 90.28 +0.65 | Smi ABM BlueSq Deltixe SabllE pi sh Tr KVPI X 15.86 +.17 tegic Partn 64 4.04] STB al aan oN
ChinaNet 47.16 +0.57 BHFEIL Ble ae +0.29 ine 80.38 +1.88 Smith&N ABN A\ BiillChina Diageo GnCable iShSP500 KV HB NkeB aionuuee 17 | IntvalA PI ers: dAdml. VBIRX go OTe i :
CityTIcm 49:51 +0.36 BcBilVE an +0.78 {ron Les 45.18 +0.55 Sodexho 62.36 +21 AGCO BikldAs gs Bae con Bas a = 5 = : ss :
GeneticT 348 +0.06 Hate 6223 +036 og 42.19 +0.04 SparkNet Pad ot ASE BShEMA cE ee shi ma oe = = . : oe : :
pete, rae aie ee 2622 +028 imptoh 14.44 40.33 Spirent ei 4020 [ANB ge Seng DepSie: » aoaug are at ise = = | A" = e :
Intrntinits 31:90 Pa Bare8k pt aaa +1.59 Infineon 86.55 +0.86 Statoil 4.96 TOOL AX, Pr CBSB Dist&Srv Gerdau iShSPVal UAN Air ordstim Sal sforce — Vulear ° Ytd, COR Al Bon :
Konami 1021 40.30 | BioProg aot +0.05 inVista 16.18 +0.29 StoraEnso 26.47 aon ae CGI Dollar! GerNew ishMmSC LINTV NoAmEn gn ene ws ed oe 23
MetalSt ee Bit 6176, +00 IntCtHt rs Bb 1028 | ane ies) 0.lt ecenture i Gaon Sx oe ee SE : |
¢ . q 32 : sss iq | AlflMgrs CIGNA jonlleyRR sac Fob er : 7 |
S wie : ; = ae sit 1653 +405 iIMgis CN DuP Goodti ishsPG LatADisc loves mmpraEn WW aC Am FordCr 6 Ytd. Clo: = ON
: ; : 5 : i : : = a i sea Anis. HGbl Du ont Gia yc iSh Ib Lloyd TSI NovoNdk Shinhan Jeyerh mFnGp 7109 6 dCresws 6 se Chg. ae DS
= i i ie 0 FN a 1535 +0. INT NV 35.23 +0.10 AuProd SX s ical Gp my BhMCGIh Lock B NSTI ShipFin WT Dieta 91 10314 B41 992 : r
) 37 Lloyd 38.5 .18 | Techni 4 0.20 | Al CIBC Dune poAS iShLel mM 3 : : | ; |
4 : 3 ig S ie i ; Gp ie 1G InGn — Luxotti OmegaHl SierrPac WTDiefaHi BauschL 7! GMAC 2112 +¥2 | Moran 88 Ytd. Ch =
Nidec 161.65 40.27 Bune! ee 7h +0.30 Me Serono 48.04 +0.66 | TelefEsp 65.35 jad Allete Cap&lnco BynGorp n creeas iShLeCred n Hac ONEO! It Singap WTEurHi f Ya28 7.04 me ‘ an BMS! Cv ae
NippnTT 16.51 +L11 | Cadby bj ory +114 Ned 22.08 +0.16 Telenor 67.40 wae Alliant&g one yo ee or a 8 = - . ; :
| : i ae S as a cng ae HAT BD iShLet-3Â¥ n JacQUIIDY Grentet pel meee n_ | BurN 6.558200 a | Gokims 7.8510 a | OcciP 1010 ats
Novogen 23.39 -0.16 ean ae +0.45 Natori 48,65 +0.49 Ternium 47.70 it Aldlristi ch CarolinaG Fue Sie ene me : 2 5 : = “ 3 3
i: : i S a a ina “ah eel CanSi pp EatnVa HanPtSot , SUSPM n MartMM iC lexho Eqn Be oy -18 1S 30 P
f 31 . s 2.04 nBevC tv nvan H . lat. Masi POS Solerind Writ, REI =
PCCW Ltd 150.76 +0.08 | Conv e0V 2 a 0.01 Woktac a0 O17 Total SA 5 20.40 40.46 | APS CascdeC EDS janesbrd n iShuti jasisa SA CO Sth WT )100.n a nn ma
Pharmax 5.98 +176 Credsuls a +2.26 Norske 2.96 +0.72 Trintech 70,14 ree Anbar Celane p — EAndinB HangrOrth iShMins Mattel PPLCop = S Copp s IntLC n ORE Exe 2
= : i = s a a 2 iy UPM Ky 3.85 + 66 | 4 acF «Ce se Bra Hansot iShM Vv MeAt PallCp wiGas WT IntMC n FO en Fey ( alla
a . ; 951 +0, UtdUti 26 0:30 | AMovill. MOX S asAero n iShMCVal eelt = Pi Steri WT RE ae
i 2 5 | ou im +0.95 | P voNdk St +0.84 tils 16.27 +0.32 | AE Co EmersnE HartidF iShSPUIi MeadW arkwy eris IntsC i GN 913 785
Ri -0.09 jone 87-0, arson 92.70 Van 30.3 32. | AEP rvecer : SnEls n iShSPUiln No sal v . ;
inker 1.80 Delhiai soon Pleif Ny v Mool 0.34 40.14 | A Chspk EmployH HealthNet _‘ShSP Mens = s e : ’ .
Toyota 7388 40.54 DeutTel, 85.86 +0.28 | Pl Vac iH +0.23 eoliaEnv 5.87 +01 mStand Cl ro EEC He a & ee : j : :
; ¢ y : 23 “10 | Ameripri hittend IChile Cancn (ShSPC! lensW ‘oHold paTot n a re
: : : 2 : : : : : e ie a tt Laie inden — End HSET nj isn MetLi PetkEl SubPpne WT LgCl Argent (P jay Yeste foreign ——
: : : : : = : : oe i i ini ca E uS pid HSP% ach ‘Shinds M ife si SunLtFn WM Dvn | Aust (Peso) 322 rday — Toda’ currency ——$——_—
ABBLtd 100.51 foal EON iM 13. +125 Prud UK 4.71 Wolscley 5 19.20 aaa Amotek s oach Enel H atCren ‘ShDUAero n atLifoun tine — SunaF 9 wrens ralia (Dollar) a oat na a
E 0.23 | El AG 12 +0, ublicis 28.48 | AMovilL. 21:8 38 | Apria 5 Comeric Energiz ate sto ts = = : = 3 | 7 ; 3
: F : a : : : = = =. ce ore iat PS USIK Sunt Wirctin calieay 2.6525 sft ah 3.1030 | Lebano veal wot
Adecco 43.50 +0. 9 } Elan 644 +0.15 | Re ISNV 6. 0. SeMeX § 48.35 AntowEl RD pts Enersis Ho no iShKLDSS rant ‘alt x Us TotOvn Britain 4179 6524 3 1.2826 n (Pound) ; esterday 7 oy yesterda
Ahold 16.99 +0.75 | Enel Oa -0.10 Reeds plc iol 0.05 CCFemsa 3698 +127 |au CompssMn Ennis Inc jomoxDov _'ShDJHI Mirant wtA ProcCastpt Te 1Capis WTlntUtn c ‘ain (Pound) ATAG 3770 77 Malaysia (Ringgi es sr 8
AFrance 10.44 +0.45 | Epco is 40.17 Repsol aa +0.16 FEMSA 40.25 ata i ConsGp Enterg Honda ist tn Mirant PrinFnel foletEsp WT Intl ‘anada (Doll fn ca sl a ae
f 5 . : : .28 vn ph y H hBasMt! wiB Te nn chi ar) 9457 2.10 ico (Peso) os mn ms
Aixtron 45.91 0.08 | Euron ante +0.66 mos 3.44 +0.20 Gruma 133.27 +4.38 sl Constollé Enlorgy un jonwilint ISNT MolsCoors ProgrssEn mplein WT Inte ile (Peso) 8584 5097 1080 | N. Ze 7 0915 2887 510.57
Alcatell 531 +0.12 Eurotrust ta +0.98 | STI AG a +0.08 GAerPac n 1372 10.24 | MS stat Copattok! EntorPT ING phot MolsC 1A ProsStico TmpeM) WT Int n | China (Yu 00185 8572 ‘5140 | Ne aland (Dollar) 6 i, ee A
. ‘39 ‘08 | Gl 38 Asse G SHE 2 1.1650 Norw Pa a .
Allianz Ug 13.27 40.22 France te B a 0.07 oreo te +0.66 GpAerCN nv 42.60 +0 a Aut neds Corpb lold = Equifax iShBelg ish ur350. Mone RE fw mn ; : f = : = ,
AltanaAG 20:59 +0.24 | Gall nM 47. 4 +0.27 | Si nofi 9.17 +0.28 GpoASur 24.15 -0.01 | A toDala Cc nee ExcalM ishbvazi cc Ee * : = : : :
ae iE ele ot nebo Shey F ishrrare ishSCV. osalc Hl k Pete laezee ‘000451. BT 542.30 (Rupee) 2 1608 i \
61.50 +0 Gene 88.69 .04 | Sc ) +0.36 | G ba 1092 | Avnet CredSui FPLG ShFranco ON nic = 3 , | : =
.85 aheoekin: 69 +0,59 otPwrn AIT +0.0. 3rpoFin 745 net Suiss Fi D iShtta iShMSCIG lovado A Tox olseley 8 Denm una) 0464 ae oe mst = ,
jaxoSKin Lil Shire 60.59 + 04 | GpoSim on 4031 BASF CrownHold acts IS aly ITT Cops NTTO0C LICp ag Inds WoorlF ark (Krone) 0463 217.50 22 Philpins (Pe a6 3 60.82 6
58.37 +111 SkillSoft 64.31 0.79 | Home: ec 3 +0.31 | Bairn Cummins FMao pM iShNeth \ ‘Comps NtAus 0 =O APM Titfany XTO n Dominicar ay sa iS ha : ! ; :
li | Skyel 31 +165 mexDev 02 +0.2 neo Cl ins Fe iShs Idearc n ust Tit Eng E n Rep (Pes 1749 - : sa i - 2 :
yePh 719 +013 IndBach 63.80 + .23 | BeoSnCH urtdpnn eto ShSpain Indep NatGrid ReinsGp un se oe " rc “ aE :
4.57 ve Metro 28.41 147 | BcSancl OPL Fiat iShSweden | pHid ——-NtPres' Reliant Toro Co x ngy Euro ( ) Wi 0299 ’ 5.7191 ia (Ruble) 3 3M 48.24 i
iE ; is = “i Sh ren resto A n THC (OrOX Euro) 1756 33.45 Saudi A 0381 297 3
assur 4.96 -0.1 BkAm plD TF TxF idINFin is nLV— IntShi NatwHP. itchle g rriCont! Zions Hong K 131 1755 33.40 | Si rab (Riyal) 5 os : :
6.75 ie Bklrel Dail FidNInfo ishMinlG | P Niwt RockT TrinaSoln pia ‘ong (Dollar) JB 1.30 56935 Singapore (D a : i “
08 | a eind DeanFd FlaEstCs iShMinlC IntShip pt HP piB Re on Tu Hungary (F ar) 1280 3376 5.6968 | SI ollar) 68 oles a 1
BRNY fae FEE inp Noh Nanos en utrepar NeW LOWS aoe ,0052 i Tes aon ee is oH isn st
rankRes shsP1s00 J snctl Ne sub — S&PCo UniFitst lors 8 Indnsia ( or om oa : : cs : : :
= = es | ‘i Cats ja (Rupiah) 0227 1,83 ~ 194 10, Korea (Won) 1392 1379 26.14 se
KPN NtwkEq SCANA vont Hino} u srael (Shekel) a mr lo b : : :
Newallftub SGL Cib sSteol AR ptr | Japan (Ve 2367 OOOLL 909 44.039 | 8 (Krona) poInSy RS ae
sT DEUS! Unvsic G Felt en) 236 90.91 90 Switzerind (Franc ee a “ :
JEuStx valeroGP i UDom ptB atte 008279 eel 4.2240 wn enna te = i
Warner Mus enya (Shilling) Lalla hal 120.79 1) 350 | Thailand (8 ; tr : a i
eee ut eee ae 21.18 | Turkey ant) 0299 0302 33.02 L247
inar) O45 i 7085 ey (Ura) 7 tn : ns
3.4584 69.05 7085 | UAE. (DL 102 sen aw 33.12
ons aN iran) ot :
: ri 80 | Uruguay tn wn “
280) | Ven ay (New Peso) 0 ) ns i : i
enue (Bi a na 3
ativan) y ui uk
QOOIEE O00 en zi
D166 2145.92 eu
92 2145.92



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007, PAGE 5B





- Supreme Court

orders Mosaic
omposite Ltd
_ be wound-up

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Fr I “he Supreme Court has
ordered that the key
counterparty for a

Bahamas-domiciled investment
fund, which contained more

than $400 million in investor

- monies that are now missing, be

last year, where they were being
stored and destroyed.

He explained that he had
been contacted in May 2006 by
an anonymous informant, who
claimed that documents related
to the fund were at a private
club in the US state of Min-
nesota. x

The informant alleged that

shield companies a complete
and satisfactory explanation or
reconciliation as to the signifi-
cant shortfall between investor
claims and the value of the iden-
tified assets.”

Another report by Mr Massi,
filed with the Canadian courts,
had revealed how Mr Xan-
thoudakis and Dale Smith, Nor-

rt
fey
|

fd

|
NATIONAL BANK OF CANADA |

Auditors’ —_1o the Shareholders of National Bank of Canada

RGROU * Gee saceiciaredne tenes
ave audited the Consolidated Balance Sheets of National Bank of Canada (the “B:
ank”)
October 31, 2006 and 2005 and the Consolidated Statements of Income, Changes in seaccee:
Equity and Cash Flows for the years then ended, These financial statements are the responsibility of

» the Bank's Management Our respor sibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements

We conducted our audits In accordance with Canadian generally accepted auditing standards Those
Standards require that we plan and perform an audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether the
financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis
evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, An audit also includes
assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by Management, as wel!
evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. " °

», Inouropinion, these consolidated financial statements present fairl i
: , J y, in all material respects, the financial
sain of the Bank as at October 31, 2006 and 2005 and the results of its operations and its cash flows
or the years then ended in accordance with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles.

treme (Lillie J ebetesticd, re eee

Samson Bélair/Deloitte & Touche s.e.n.c.rl.
Chartered Accountants

Montreal, Canada, November 30, 2006

- Consolidated Statement |

of Income :

Year ended October 31
(milltons of dollars) Note 2006 2005
Interest Income
Loans 2,648 2,122
Securities. 960 739
Deposits with flnancjgl instituttons 314 193

3,922 3,054

i a

Interest expense

Deposits 1,877 1,109
Subordinated debentures : 90 100
Other : 663 404

ga





2630613









wound-up. the documents “were being _ shield’s leading executives, had jaime oo ise
Justice Cheryl Albury — stored and/or destroyedonthe claimed they were unable to
ordered on January 24, 2007, premises of a private club in _ identify the beneficial owners Se tee ; as eh
that Mosaic Composite Ltd be Minnesota, US”. of BICE International, a Deposit and payment service charges 208 201
wound-up under the provisions Mr Massi added: “After Bahamian company that was TRE ee tani ots ce =
of the International Business obtaining the requisite search Olympus Univest’s majority Card sarvica revenues os 61 63
Companies Act 2000, with BDO and seizure court orders, we shareholder and put the fund é Pepbiee eo ae : =
Mann Judd accountant Clifford attended at the premises where _into what was initially a volun- ane ee , Care ey
Culmer appointed as one of the these documents were located __ tary liquidation. Foreign exchange revenues 98 76
joint liquidators. and, with the aid of the US mar- The duo also claimed they ee oe ae Eas
His fellow liquidator will be _shalls service, we retrieved 35 were unable to identify the ben- 2
Canadian Raymond Massi of _ boxes of documents.” eficial owners of Mosaic Com- eet es ican 3 4
RSM Richter, with whom he is The receiver said the docu- posite, and neither Norshield ea he Re ee ee ee eS re
also working on the court-super- _ ments were now being reviewed. _nor Cardinal International had peep haar sian ris haat
vised liquidation of Olympus The discovery of Olympus _ been able to supply the liquida- Occupancy 164 160
Univest, the Bahamian-regis- | Univest documents in Minneso- _ tors with a copy of the invest- eae ee ary sity
tered investment fund into ta provided clear evidence ofan ment agreement between Olym- Professional fees 145 136
which the missing monies were attempted cover-up of the pus Univest and Mosaic. Other ei ng BR 5
placed by scandal-plagued mon- _fund’s affairs, and those of Mr Xanthoudakis had also income before Income taxes and now-controlling boterest atc mote ama
ey manager, Norshield Asset Mosaic Composite and Nor- _ failed to provide “information UMCOMme ORS ne ee BR
Management. shield. : and documents” on Cardinal Hon-contvolling interest a ote Os
Mosaic Composite was re- Mr Massi said previously that —International’s activities as the Netincome a ee ee eae es Co ert | 855
domiciled to the US state of John Xanthoudakis, Norshield- Olympus Univest fund’s admin- i nn mn ee TN eee he ee Aaa
Minnesota shortly after Olym- __’s former principal, had written __istrator. Es ais tae ee tek
pus Univest was placed into ini- to investors.in the Bahamian In an implicit criticism of Car- ree ne er ay - fat ee es
tial voluntary liquidation, and _ entities on May 11, 2006. dinal International’s role in the plluted eee ee 165,549 168.964"
its return to this jurisdiction and The liquidator added blunt- —_ affair, Mr Massi previously told Earnings per common share (dollars) 18
. : . . . . : . Basic 5.22 4.98
eventual winding-up was viewed __ly: “Despite its ongoing review _investors that the net asset value Diluted 5.13 4.90
as key to a successful recovery _ of available books and records, | (NAV) calculations for Olym- Dividends per common share (dolla) ee sae MOTE 896 eR
of investor funds. and the numerous requests for pus Univest - for which Cardinal
am In his first report to investors, | documents and information as was responsible for as adminis- Consolidated Balance Sheet mt
before Olympus Univest was © well as examinations under oath, _ trator - resulted in redemption eat '
moved to a court-supervised liqg- the receiver has not received values that were overstated, feeaeas daisy Note 2006 _ sa05
uidation, Mr Culmer noted that from Mr Xanthoudakis or from _ while subscription prices were oe mS Pe je epee nF RE ys oe
Mosaic Composite (MCL) had any other principals of the Nor- _ also overvalued. =. ses a
moved from the Bahamas in Deposits with financlallnstRutions 8061 80,087"
January 2005 to Anguilla, before
eae . : Securitles
domiciling in Minnesota, where Investment account 3 6,814 6,869
it had merged into a US com- ' Trading account fe a teal ee oS sae —--- 218
pany. Sy i eek ace AN, SR reat rag Me eet mere
Mr Culmer said: “It is of sig- Securities purchased under reverse repurchase agreements 0 PR 7023
nificance to the issue of co-oper- ane a.5and6
ation that the liquidator has also Residential mortgage . pe etl
requested that MCL be re-domi- - ee cere a
ciled in the Bahamas, and thus I JEWELLERY SALES ASSOCIATES I a a i a aa 7
far this request has not been I Allowance for credit losses_ -——--- ae
acceded to by the directors of I an ae -
MCL. : I Mus : be... I ae liability under acceptances < as aac,
“It is anticipated that failure H t, Relial) i ee 8 ‘33 355
p I onest, Relial le, Dedicated, \ quip
to accede to his request affects a I Prof 7 IE tic & Goodwill : bie a
major part of the liquidation.” eee nergene I ea 10 5,736 6,685
All investor funds that Nor- | SELF MOTIVATED I ae Te
shield channelled into Olympus | I ——_ eee igre SG, Pi
Univest were invested into | - LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
Mosaic Composite, which in I Excellent S$s Bonus Potential soa ‘ . 11 ai seas
turn placed them into a variety 1 i . Business and government an anars
of investments, including the Deposit-taking institutions 225 oe
. . or ODO”.
BISX-listed real estate invest- ! [JQ YOU HAVE WHAT IT TAKES? i Depo from NBC Ea st tg
ment trust (REIT), Premier | : l es
Real Estate Investment Corpo- | , I Acceptances : ; 3,725 3,242
ration. If the answer IS YES then take the next step. Obligations related to securities sold short 15,621 15,504
: I I Securities sold under repurchase agreements 9,517 12,915
In a report to Canadian FAX RESUME TO 326-2824 Fair value of trading derivative financial instruments 21 1,646 1,846
‘ ba I 8 ¥ 6,058
investors, Mr Massi said docu- I Other liabilities 2 —_ nr Tacs
vest and Mosaic Composite APPLY VE Subordinated debentures 34
were recovered in Minnesota Non-controlling Interest
Shareholders’ equity
fe Preferred shares 16 400 400
Common shares 16 1,566 1,565
buted surpl 23 =
tena cage translation adjustments ‘ ; ay 2 pied
Retained earnings
4,788 4,597
Sa ee a ee ee ; 116,885 107,970
pat Se ss ee ee Se
: : Réal Raymond : Pierre Bowrgie
PEPSI-COLA BAHAMAS BOTTLING COMPANY Peta a
: Consolidated Statement of |
: © as : es ee eh ; ei Changes in Shareholders’ Equity
Applicants are invited from suitably qualified individuals to fill the position Year ended October 31 |
of:
: (millions of dollars) aa Note ___ 2006 2005
Preferred shares at beginning : 400 375
QUALITY CO NTROL TECHNICIAN Issuance of preferred shares, Series 16 . a 200
, Redemption of preferred shares, Series 13, for cancellation __ ee nt oe i eS
Preferred shares at end NO ae 400
The incumbent will: Common shares at begining. , 4,865 1,545
- issuance jon share
' Dividend pe caninas Share Purchase Plan 15 12
Perform standardized qualitative and quantitative tests on beverages, hei eee an os)
in order to ensure compliance with established standards and regulations. ‘pact of shares acquired or sol for tadng purposes —_—______._-______@. __—+-
Analyze test results and compare results with Pepsi-Cola International Peer a ee, ~ eS
Quality Assurance standard tables. Stock option expense 7 12 6
Sample and approve incoming raw material as well as product in process Cevtfbciad spt ated ————_—_—_)—_+3
to ensure that specifications are met. Unrealized foreign currency translation adjustments at beginning (26) (10)
Record and compile test results, prepare graphs, charts and reports Losses on foreign exchange operations with a functional currency
other than the Canadian dollar, netofincometaxes a Ge (66) 6)
Unreallzed foreign currency translation adjusimentsatend 8)
Ideal candidate would at minimum have an Associates Degree in Chemistry. Retained eapnings at beginning eas 2,287
At least three years experience in an analytical or industrial chemistry ae a aiid ; me sa
laboratory, including training in Statistical Quality or Process Control. ee. a a ea
Common shares 1460 (320) (286)
Please send resume to: eee
‘ Human Resources Manager Retained earingaatend 2,893 ios
P.O. Box N-3004 Shareholenrs equity - ie ee 4,708, 4,597.

ments related to Olympus Uni-



Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 364-2123

Telephone calls will not be accepted.































Interested parties may obtain a complete copy of the audited accounts

from National Bank of Canada (International) Ltd., Is¢ Floor

oe Bay Corporate Center, P.O..Box N-3015, Nassau,
ahamas.

IC 404



THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007






St George estate alleges
‘sinister conspiracy’








FROM page 1B Hayward and Mr Babak pre-
pared a further directors’ reso-






































































Premier Real Estate 10.00 0.795 7.9

10.00 10.00 _ Premier Re
wk-Hi wk-LOw y

14.30 12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets :

10.14. * 40.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 8.00 8.25 : 3 Albert told Mr Babak he was in trying to get me to sign this

Leonard did want to have out- with getting four directors to
side counsel’s advice,” Sir sign. Mr Moss was also present
Albert alleged. during my discussions with Sir





Last Price













0.54 0.20 RND Holdings csi 0.45 unable to sign a GBPA Board —_ directors’ resolution.
..... cc . of Directors resolution autho- “When I refused to sign it,
43.00 28.00 ABDAB rising the Island Bay settlement. Mr Moss declared that he

14.60 * 44.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.50 14.00
0.60 = 0.35 RND Holdings .
wk-Hi -Low und Name
1.2736 Colina Money Market Fund 1.328271"
3.0569 . 2.6662 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.0569***
2.5961 2.3241 Colina MSI Preferred Fund . 2.596093**
1.2248 1.1547 Colina Bond Fund 4.224792****
11.3545 | = 10.0000 ‘ a Rrime Income, Fund 11.3545""""*

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 =

He then alleged: “After Lady would resign as counsel to the
Henrietta St George had appar- GBPA. I said to Mr Moss that if
ently received advice not to sign he thought that was what he
the directors resolution, Sir Jack should do, then so be it.”















Last 12 Months


















NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LYDIE REMY OF P.O. BOX





















































MARKET TERMS YIELD - last 42 month dividends divided by NAV KEY.
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity F-44598, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS,
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity * -9 February 2007 IS applying to the Minister responsible for National ity and
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a_ citizen
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week ** 34 January 2007 of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
Change - Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ - Acompany's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today NAV - Net Asset Value *** 34 January 2007 granted, should send a written and signed statement of
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M - Not Meaningful the facts within twenty-eight days from the 9TH day of
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 42 month earnings FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 **** 34 January 2007 FEBRUARY, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality

and Citizenship, P.O.Box .N-71 47, Freeport, Bahamas.

re sere ONE
(L242) 904-2503 .

PUA ssa ales

Well established Fashion Retail
Business. Well known and |

Rrecy rccacee ela NL (accel

20 years at same prime location.

@)

Email: b.inquiries@gmail.com

WANTED

ion f the 1 Ath anniversary a the \ Secretarial Assitant to Managing Director of Corporate Service






Sa Sp . CK Company and Secretary for Partners of Associated Law Firm.
in the Methodist Cases TOA ‘Must have ability to communicate with high net worth clients.




Computer ability essential together with knowledge of
incorporation of Bahamian companies and the preparation of
appropriate Members and Directors Minutes.





he Nassau Circuit of the Bahamas

aicos Islands Conference of the Methodist Church . :




he Caribbean and the Amer

Telephone: 327-3127
Fax: 327-6259





“NOTICE

‘ NOTICE is hereby given that NANNELL LAVELLE EXANTUS
OF RUSSELL TOWN, EIGHT MILE ROCK, P.O. BOX F-42986,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
9TH day of FEBRUARY, 2007 to the Minister responsible for

Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.













Rh emorial Methodist Church
08 Montrose Avenue, Nassau, Bahama
Saturday, February 17, 200

READY FOR MIRACLES!
READY FOR PEACE AND JUSTICE
FOR ALL OF GOD’S CHILDREN! —

PSALM 20:6-9

Se RES ARREST EE

for ad rates

ee

WK <« 9 x
ACO’ | 3.60 | CHG 00.00 / %CHG 00.00 F o 04. lution for the GBPA in which
52wk-Hi — 52wk-Low Security Previous Close Today's Clase__ Change Daily Vol. EPS$ Div$ _ there was only a minimum quo-
1.85 0.54. ~~ Abaco Markets 0.76 0.76 - 0.00 -0.282 0.000 N/M Leonard, its general counsel,in rum of four directors to sign the
12.05 40.40 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.00 1.689 0400 6.5 3.64% October 2006 to reach a settle- resolution. This was produced
8.11 6.90 Bank of Bahamas 8.11 : 8.11 0.00 200 0.796 0.260 10.2 3.21% ment on the Island Bay dispute. to me on October 23, 2006. I
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 * 0.00 0.265 0.020 3.0 2.50% He was allegedly trying to get refused to sign the further res-
1.85 1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.85 1.85 0.00 0.199 0.060 93 3.24%| Mr Leonard to advise and sup- olution.
1.49 1.12 Fidelity Bank 1.27 1.27 0.00 0.170 0.050 7.5 3.94% port a settlement with Island “I was very upset that I was
10.24 9.00 Cable Bahamas 10.24 10.24 0.00 0.715 0.240 14.3 2.34% Bay that would result in the _ being asked to sign this new res-
2.20 1.64 Colina Holdings 2.00 2.00 0.00. 0.078 0.040 25.6 200% GBPA paying $800,000, plus olution since T had received con-
13.34 9.25 Commonwealth Bank 13.34 13.34 0.00 0.998 0.680 13.4 5.10% $120,000 in fees to their attor- _firmation from Christopher Caf-
6.26 4.22 _ Consolidated Water BDRs 5.17 5.19 , 0.02 0.134 0.045 38.6 0.87%] ney, Mr Moss. ferata, a co-Trustee of Lady
2.88 2.40 | Doctor's Hospital 2.44 2.44 0.00 0.295 0.000 83 0.00% “J recall that Mr Carey Henrietta St George’s, that he
6.21 5.54 Famguard 5.70 5.70 0.00 0.552 0.240 10.3 4.21% Leonard was uncomfortable = was now her alternate and Mr
12.30 10.70 Finco 12.30 12.30 0.00 0.779 0.570 15.7 4.65%] and unhappy with the proposed Cafferata had told Mr Leonard
14.60 40.90 _ FirstCaribbean 14.60 14.60 0.00 0.921 0.500 15.9 3.42% settlement amount, although he _ that he would not sign the draft
16.71 10.00 — Focol 16.71 16.71 0.00 1.476 0.510 11.3 3.05% considered that it was perhaps resolution of October 16, '
1.15 0.50 Freeport Concrete 0.50 0.50 0.00 0.434. 0.000 NIM 0.00% advisable for the GBPA to set- 2006......+++
10.20 7.10 ICD Utilities 7.25 7.25 0.00: 0532 0.100 13.6 1.38%) tle to avoid potential liability. | “Sir Jack Hayward and Mr.
19.10 8.52 J. S. Johnson 9.05 9.05 0.00 0.588 0.560 15.4 619% do recall, however, that Mr _ Babak seemed to be absessed

On October 16, 2006, Sir Jack Hayward and Mr Babak :



26S TMK SR TM Wo Oe ROD ERE SPINS IDOE we 4

vy,

v.

Pia

SF

Mind’

a

Pi AEA E EAU OEE ET FPO OS ov 2 6e%s OTS

FSSC s TT a tt.



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007, PAGE 7B



FROM page 1B

Bahamians Agitating for a Ref-
erendum in Free Trade
(BAREF), described this as “gal-
loping nonsense”.

The Tribune has been told
that the Bahamas has not yet
decided what areas of the EPA
it will seek reservations on.
These reservations would allow
this nation to reduce its import
duties and customs tariffs, plus

_open up certain areas of its

economy, over a phased peri-
od of time, and in some cases
not at all.

However, Mr Moss said yes-
terday that the notion of obtain-
ing reservations form certain
parts of the EPA was “wishful
thinking”, as if countries were
“allowed to cherry pick and do
what they want, it makes no
sense to have an agreement”.

’ -He pointed out that the EPA
would be “binding” on all
CARIFORUM members once
completed, meaning this nation
would be tied to whatever the

‘wider Caribbean agreed and

leaving it with little room to
manoevere in its own interests.

Mr Moss argued that CARI-
FORUM nations who were
much bigger exporters to the
EU than the Bahamas would
want to secure and maintain
duty-free access to the Euro-
pean markets for a much wider
range of goods and services
than this nation.

Due to the reciprocal nature
of the EPA, CARIFORUM
would then have to allow the
same goods made by EU pro-
‘ducers to enter their nations
duty free, and the binding
nature of thge agreement, Mr

“Moss said, meant these duty-

free imports would go far
beyond the $14 million the Gov-
ernment felt it would lose.

He added: “It’s going to be
one document, and that repre-
sents all the Caribbean nations.
The Bahamas will be obligated
to take into consideration or
permit the free flow’ of these
products into the Bahamas duty

. free.

“These agreements are not
just about rum and fisheries. It’s
about investment, it’s about ser-
vices, it’s about immigration.
It’s so wide-ranging. These are
the areas you have to think
about.”

Mr.:Moss said the Bahamas
would not be able to ‘reserve’



Authority.




business objectives.

to:-



financial clearances.

reviewed.



Applicants must possess the following qualifications:-

Responsibilities Duties

1. Processing recommendations for:

* Probationary appointments
* Confirmations in substantive posts

¢ Promotions and reclassification

¢ Benefits under the Authority’s policies
¢ Benefits under the law, eg. Employment Act and National Insurance Act
¢ Employee transfers and secondment

¢ Employee grievances

¢ Disciplinary actions and penalties

¢ Involuntary and voluntary terminations

the areas it thought it could, as
this would be non-compliant
with the World Trade Organi-
sation’s (WTO) rules-based
trading' system, and concepts
such as National Treatment,
reciprocity and ‘Most Favoured
Nation’.

He warned that the EU was
also likely to use the EPA as
an opportunity to try and push
the Bahamas into signing up to
its EU Savings Tax Directive
and further tax information
exchange agreements.

The Tribune reported yester-
day that the Government has
decided to give up $10-$14 million
in taxes per annum that it earns

on imports from the European .

Union (EU) in favour of protect-
ing Bahamian exports to Europe,
and the jobs associated with the
positive $20 million trade balance
they produce.

A briefing prepared for the
Cabinet’s sub-committee on trade
by the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs, which has responsibility
for international trade, warned
that the Bahamas would lose “its
favourable $20 million trade bal-
ance” with the EU if it failed to
sign the EPA, while hundreds of
jobs would be jeopardised if Bac-
ardi and Polymers International
shut their respective operations
due to their exports becoming
uncompetitive.

The Government document
detailed that the Bahamas export-
ed some $66.315 million worth of
goods to the EU in 2004, largely
made up of Bacardi’s rum and
spirits products, lobster and other
sea food products, and polymers
from Polymers International in
Freeport...

These goods entered the EU

duty-free, but if the Bahamas
remains outside the EPA, they
will attract from 2008 onwards
what is called the ‘Most Favoured
Nation’ (MEN) rate of duty. This
means that EU members have to
apply the same rate of duty to the
same imports from all nations;
they cannot discriminate.

If the Bahamas lost its duty-
free preferences by remaining
outside the EPA, the Bacardi,
Polymers International and sea
food products would all see their
prices increase and become
uncompetitive.

The Government document
added that if the Bahamas signed
on to the EPA, it would lose
about $10-$14 million in per
annum tax revenues on European
imports.

As a two-way agreement, if the
Bahamas signs on to the EPA, it
would have to offer the same tar-
iff cuts to exports from the EU
as those countries were offering
Bahamian companies, thus reduc-
ing import duties and the tax take.

The EPA would also see the
Bahamas offer market access to
EU firms in areas such as invest-
ments, services and government
procurement, provided it did not
seek any reservations or opt-outs
from particular provision.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs
concluded: “Were the Bahamas
to sign on to the EPA when it is
negotiated, the revenue loss
would be in the $10 - $14million
range, but the Bahamas would
keep its export markets and
secure a significant number of
Bahamian jobs.

“If, however, the Bahamas
were not to sign on to the EPA,
the losses could include, its
favourable $20 million trade bal-
ance with the EU, the loss of two

SOUS CHEFS

Private club is seeking experienced full-time sous
chefs with a minimum of eight (8) years experience
in the culinary field. All Standard diplomas from the
Nassau Hotel Training College are demanded. The

applicants must have

extensive

knowledge in

management skills and excellent levels of cooking skills.

Interested persons should fax resumes to #362-6245
to the attention of:

THE DIRECTOR OF CUISINE
LYFORD CAY CLUB
Lyford Cay Drive
Nassau, Bahamas



; Public Hospitals Authority

Advertisement

| Manager III (Human Resources)
Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the post
of Human Resources Manager III, Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre, Public Hospitals

Bachelors Degree in Business Administration. Management, or equivalert qualification (a
Masters degree would be an advantage); and at least three (3) years post qualification
experience in human resource management. Excellent oral written communication skills and
computer skills are essential.

The Human Resources Manager III is a part of the Human Resources Team at Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre, and shares responsibility for the day-to-day administration of human

“ resources transactions and services; to ensure that the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre human
resources policies and procedures, transactions and services are aligned with Authority’s

Within this context, the Human Resources Manager III will be responsible for, but not limited

2. Liaising with the Payrolls Unit with matters relating to salaries adjustments and

3. Managing the performances appraisal process for staff within assigned areas of responsibili-
ties, ensuring that evaluations are ongoing and appraisal forms are prepared, distributed and

Opportunities will also be given for involvement in human resources strategic functions such
as policies, developing an annual human resources plan, staff training and development, qual-
ity improvement initiatives To facilitate the Manager’s professional development and career

advancement within Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre.

Letters of application, resume, documentary evidence of qualifications and three (3) references
should be submitted through the head of your department, no later than 28th February, 2007, to
the Director Human Resources (Acting), Public Hospitals Authority PO. Box N-8200, or Ist

Floor Corporate Office, Dockendale House, West Bay Street.




























EPA may cost Bahamas more than $14m taxes

significant manufacturing opera-
tions (Bacardi and Polymers), the
revenue from lobster exports, and
the loss of a number of Bahamian
jobs.

“Once of the conclusions to be
drawn from the above analysis is
that, maintaining its preferential
access to the European market is
in the best interest of the
Bahamas. Thus in determining
the structure of ifs market access
offer, the Bahamas could seek to
mitigate its revenue losses over
the long term, while maintaining
market access.”

The Ministry recommended
that the Bahamas seek to exclude
from the EPA negotiations cuts in
tariffs on poultry, fresh meat,
fruits and vegetables.

It added that Bahamas tariff
rates between 5-30 per cent
should be cut in the short-term,
while those of 35, per cent and
higher be slashed in a phased,
long-term approach.

CAY CAMP DIRECTOR:

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000) |

LUCAS (OVERSEAS) LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
LUCAS (OVERSEAS) LIMITED has been dissolved and
struck off the Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution
issued by the Registar General on the 24th day of January, 2007.

FIDES LIQUIDATORS INC.
Arango-Orillac Building,
East 54th Street, Panama

Republic of Panama
Liquidator



four positions)

For the period July 12th, 2007 - August 20th, 2007 (Monday to Friday)

These persons must be trained teachers, must love children, be CPR
trained, sports enthusiasts, great swimmers and highly motivated.

Children attending Cay Camp will range from 4 to 12 years.

The Director of Human Resources

Lyford Cay Club
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax #362-6245



Join the leading Conservation
Organization in the country

Job Opportunity for
Education Officer

Primary Responsibility:

Responsible to the Deputy Executive Director for development
of educational programs and materials. .

Schedule and implement school presentations

Create Educational and interpretive material in support of
national parks and protected areas.

Facilitate and conduct environmental education workshops
for teachers

Responsible for oversight and maintenance of BNT Library.

Duties:

CON OO Cue NO

Responsible to the Deputy Executive Director

Assist Deputy Executive Director in the implementation of
educational components of BNT Projects and Programs
Schedule and implement School Presentations

Assist in the creation of educational materials

Coordinate the distribution of educational materials

Assist in the creation of National Park Outreach Materials ,
Assist in the creation of National Park educational signage
Facilitate and conduct environmental education workshops

for teachers
. Oversee and maintain the BNT Library

. Assist BNT Library users

. Manage the BNT Photo Library

. Conduct school tours of The Retreat Garden

. Assist other BNT Departments i.e. membership; parks and
science with materials for exhibitions and public outreach,

, Attend workshops and conferences as required.

Requirements for the post:

1. Arelevant first degree in Primary or Secondary Education or
a degree in Natural Sciences; Social Studies. Environmental
studies with teaching certification and at least three years
relevant experience in the classroom.

Experience and knowledge of the Bahamian Natural
Environment

Strong Organizational Skills

Excellent People Skills

Good writing and communication ability

Strong computer skills

Willing to travel within The Bahamas and abroad as required.

Benefits include competitive salary commensurate with qualifications
and experience, and group medical insurance.

Applications must include cover letter, resume, writing sample,

and three letters of reference. Applications should be mailed to

Bahamas National Trust, Human Resources Manager, P.O. Box N
1 4105 or email:bnt@bahamasnationaltrust.org by March 5, 2007.





“Paar we

se Geer rr uve

‘THE TRIBUNE

Commercial air service ('2.\, U4)
returns to Florida Cays
after six year hiatus

fi By ADRIAN SAINZ
-.! AP Business Writer
~" MARATHON, Florida (AP)
'__ Commercial air service
returned to the middle Florida
«Keys on Thursday after a six-
.-year hiatus, promising to bring a

«financial boost while giving»

+,tourists more direct access to the
y island chain. i

A 40-seat Delta Airlines
» regional jet landed at Florida

. Keys Marathon Airport at 12:34

pm The fully booked flight was
greeted by about 200 people,
including someone dressed as a

a7six-foot-high conch shell. Two >

* fire trucks parked on the 5,000-
’ foot runway sprayed arching
, streams of water over the plane.
‘ Delta is offering a daily flight
; to and from its Atlanta hub and
* Marathon, with an additional
¢ arrival in Marathon on Friday
‘and an additional departure to
i Atlanta on Sunday. Flights
‘ aren’t cheap, ranging from about
\ $600 to more than $1,000 per
ticket.

“I’m so happy this flight is

4
5
t . .
open because jit will save us so

much time,” said passenger’

} Katie Maginn of Atlanta. “I
’ have an amazing time whenever
I’m down here and I now can
, Start my vacation earlier.”
Marathon is.a city of 11,000
people about an hour’s drive
; from both the fishing and div-
‘ ing destination of Key Largo and
. historic Key West. For the past
six years, tourists have had the
inconvenient option of flying
¢ into Miami and driving up to

Pa a as

vw

“* three hours or more to reach

‘ their Keys destination by using
« U.S. Highway 1. They also fly

into Key West’s busy airport,
* which has 60 flights per day, and
“drive to Marathon.

+t The restored service means a

‘more direct path for tourists who
Anave the Keys and the: waters
surrounding them on theiragen-
“da. Tourism generates $2.2 bil-
_ lion-a year in the Florida Keys.
* Fhe Marathon airport
*remained open for charter and
pcorporate flights, air taxis and
«private lessons after commercial
*service ended in April 2000. At
“that time, the airport was suf-
fering from decreasing capacity
stemming from sluggish summer
traffic.
*. The rebirth of commercial ser-
pvice did not come easy. U.S.
r-Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen and
*Keys officials fought hard for an
“agreement from the Trans-
portation Safety Administration

soe ewe

Role Responsibilities

to offer baggage screeners.

The agency at first said it did
not have enough resources to
provide federal baggage screen-
ers. That caused Delta to push
back its start date from October
2006.

But Ros-Lehtinen sought help -

from Republican U.S. Rep. John
Mica, then a member of the
House aviation subcommittee.

. They lobbied the TSA to enter

in a partnership program in
which private contractors can
eventually take over the duties
of federal screeners.

“We put a lot of pressure on
the agency, but good pressure,
not pressuring them into doing
something that they shouldn't
do (but) into having them see
it’s a logical decision to open this
airport up,” said Ros-Lehtinen, a
Republican who represents Mia-
mi-Dade County and most of
the Keys.

Also secured was a $750,000
grant from the Federal Aviation
Administration for the airport,
and more than $300,000 was
raised locally to provide profit
guarantees for the first year. The
Monroé County Tourist Devel-
opment Council has pledged
$600,000 over three years for
advertising, Marathon Mayor
Chris Bull said.

Officials tout the economic

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007, PAGE 9B





BUSINESS

advantages of adding commer-
cial traffic.

The new service is estimated
to add 27 jobs and generate
about $43.7 million — more than
double the $17.1 million it gen-
erated in 2004, a study by The
Boyd Group showed.

The addition of commercial
service faced little opposition
from residents, mainly because
the airport is adding only one
flight which won’t significantly
affect noise. But some small-
business owners said they are
not sure the new service will
help them financially.

John Paryse, 61, owns the 7-
room Anchor Inn just down U.S.
1 from the airport.

He says travelers who spend
$600 or more on a flight would
more likely prefer to spend big
money on a more expensive
resort hotel with water access
and scores of amenities instead
of at his clean, inexpensive road-
side hotel.

“The people they’re going to
count on are a bit more upscale,”

_ said Paryse, who charges $75 to

$99 per room. “It might help if
they priced it more affordably,
but I don’t know.”
Ros-Lehtinen said she was
wants to expand service in
Marathon and Key West. Peter
Horton, Monroe County’s air-

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MAR-KELLON GILVERT OF
P.O. BOX CB-12627, EXUMA, BAHAMAS: is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and

that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days: from the 16th day of January, 2007 to the Minister -
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,

Nassau, Bahamas.











NOTICE

NOTICE

is hereby given that
FAITH AVENUE, CARMICHEAL ROAD SOUTH, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 16th day of
February, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

mit





ROSE REGIS OF

Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited, a subsidiary of Citigroup, a leading financial
institution with a presence in over 100 countries and over 100 million
customers worldwide, is seeking candidates for the position of Technology
Controls Officer in our Technology Department.

- Manage the Change Management Process throughout the entire lifecycle
and keep associated records updated.

Review database security audit logs, access logs, incident reports and
on-line reports using various database security tools such as SEMS
and APP Detective.

Monitor software and hardware patching and licensing to maintain

co = we ew er

compliance with Citigroup and Industry Standards.

Assist in the preparation and tracking of information for internal and
external Information Security audits in accordance with generally
accepted IS audit standards and controls.

Assist in the execution of technical Risk and Compliance Self Assessment

‘ (RCSA) and participate in the identification, recording, monitoring
: and reporting of corrective action plans.

experience

~ Knowledge/Skills Required

Strong oral and written communication skills

Provide backup for the Information Security Administrator and Business
Information Security Officer.
Bachelors of Arts/Science in Information Technology or equivalent

2-4 years related experience; experience with Information Security
audits or Compliance-related positions an asset.

Excellent time management, organization and administrative skills
Solid knowledge of Oracle and SQL

Experience with Change Management systems .
Proficient in MS Office Suite, LAN/WAN environment

Interested Bahamian candidate should forward a copy of their resume by
February 23, 2007 to: Human Resources, Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited, P.O.
Box N-1576, Nassau, Bahamas OR Fax: (242) 302-8779 OR Email:
janice.gibson @citigroup.com





JEWELLERY STORE MANAGERS

Discover a rewarding and
challenging career catering to the
country’s visitors in the exciting
retail jewelry business!!!

I

I

I

1

1

1

|
Do You Have What it Takes? '
ARE YOU... I
Confident? * A Leader? ¢ Self Motivated? I

* Professional? « Mature (25 yrs or older)? * Dedicated? :
I

I

i

[f the answer isYES then take the next step

FAX RESUME TO 326-2824

SALARY OPPORTUNITY COMMENSURATE WITH EXPERIENCE & QUALIFICATION

port director, said expanding ser-
vice at Marathon was a goal.

“We have opportunities for
other airlines as well because the
Delta numbers are so strong,”
Horton said. “I see nothing but
increased air service for this
facility.”

Â¥

a



OVE ONLY DIRECTOR/COORDINATOR Ione position) |

For the period July 9th, 2007 - August 21st, 2007 (Monday to, Friday)
except on Holidays.

This individual will report to the Pool Director and be totally
responsible for the smooth operation of the Cay Camp with all Cay
Camp Directors reporting to him/her.

The Cay Camp Director/Coordinator must be a trained teacher, must
love children, be CPR trained, a sports enthusiast and a good
swimmer. This individual must be highly motivated.

Children attending Cay Camp will range from 4 to 12 years.

The Director of Human Resources
Lyford Cay Club
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax #362-6245























The American Embassy is presently considering applications 3
i for the following position:

OQUCHER EXAMINER

Serves as the Voucher Examiner responsible for examining and
§ processing a variety of vouchers for submission to the certifying
officer. The Voucher Examiner also serves as the back up to the Chief
Time-Keeper.

This position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:



An Associate Degree in the area of Accounting or Finance.
Two years accounting experience or related fiscal work is required.
Must have a good working knowledge of Microsoft Office Suite

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:



Must have ability to meet deadlines in a timely manner and work:
independently with minimum supervision
Must possess good oral and written communication skills.




IThe successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation
package including performance-based incentives, medical and dental §
insurance, life insurance, pension and opportunities for training and:
a development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or citizens who are eligible for,
employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.




| Application forms are available from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday:
through Friday at the security area of the American Embassy, Queen

i Street. Completed applications should be returned to the Embassy :
addressed to the Human Resources Office no later than Thursday,
| February 22, 2007.
















APARTMENT 3-G

YOU'RE BEING UNREASONABLE.
T NEVER INTENDED TO @REAK
OUR CONTRACT.











ANYTHING INTERESTING IN THE
PAPER, DEAR?
























RATU, YOU

ULL GIVE YOUR NIECE ¥
THE BEST BIRTHDAY =! yy
PARTY EVER, DOWN TO

THE LAST DETAIL. - MILLS...








l€ THAT'G

wil | | YOUR
lan Ee q DE CIGION,
Se CQ a MY FRIEND BS
eae ei BOBBY WILL
f (itr AO oe se o ere

MR,





















HEY, NEP---HARRY

; HAs TO GET HOME,
CO ee WE HAVE TO GO
THE PARTY!












WANNA HEAR IT2”

The Obligatory Finesse

South dealer.
Neither side vulnerable.

%

| WE WROTE YOU A'GET WELL’ SONG,





ten or jack, hoping West started with
the doubleton ace.

PAGE 11B







THAT'S MY DAD.
ALANS LOOKING
QUT FOR ME.



























































NORTH Observe that it would be wrong
4Q4 for South to cover the jack or ten
VÂ¥AQ6 with the king because the king would :
#KI108 lose to the ace and South would later ‘
‘&9742 have to lose another spade trick. This ents - Mar 21/ ‘Apr 20.
WEST. EAST maneuver is the obligatory finesse, Poe ave to strike a balance
@A5 43102 and when the cards are favorably Perea Rice nie and common
842 ¥109753 placed for declarer, it gains him a J jo ouisi Sen AL you do so,
0763 4942 trick. uP mee a will repeatedly get
&AKQ106 $83 Occasionally, the defense can r ere
MARVIN SOUTH invoke a countermeasure to the eee - Apr rae 21
i a @K98763 obligatory finesse, as in the present , on a course Of action may
MY WIFE'S FAVORITE I HOPE You SAVED WKS Sear out is declarer at four oades prove difficult for you, Taurus.
RESPONSE WHENEVER THE RECEIPT!” @AQ5 and West cashes the K-A of clubs, While you can see all sides of the
Lick OOT A CIT s #35 then continues with the queen. ceo you also envision all of
rOR nei The bidding: - ha If South is allowed to go about his = posible outcomes.
South West North East business unimpeded, he will, as we GEMINI — May 22/Jun 21
1¢ 2% 2¢ have seen, lose only one trump trick You've found luck in love, Gemini.
26 Pass 36 and so make the contract. Your current match is a keeper and
















start playing
lead a low spi
dummy. If the que
(marking West with the ace),

4¢
Opening lead — king of clubs.

Because the play is not a favorite to
succeed, it is used by declarer more
out of desperation than by choice.
As an example, examine
North-South spade holding in this
‘, hand. The normal way for declarer to
this combination is to
ade toward the queen in
en holds the trick
declarer

But if the defense functions per-
fectly, South can be defeated. When
West leads the queen of clubs, East

South is helpless against this
defense. He is forced to overruff with
the king — otherwise, he is down
immediately — and lead a trump
toward the queen.

This does him no good because
West rises with the ace and returns
the ten of clubs. Dummy has to fol-
low suit, whereupon East once again
trumps his partner’s high club — this







the relationship will last long-term.
If you're already attached, the fires
of love will burn even more brightly.



The obligatory finesse is a play muffs with the ten, even though it CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22
used by declarer to wina trick thathe appears routine to discard on his | A friend in need could use a good
would otherwise surely partner’s high club. shoulder to cry on this week,

Cancer. Better turn off that cell
phone or PDA and devote some
attention to this person.

LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23

Some people’ are growing impa-
tient over an important choice you
have to make, Leo. Don’t let their
eagerness push you into making a
premature decision.

VIRGO -— Aug 24/Sept 22



time with the jack — to secure a one- .

next retums a spade from dummy
trick set.

‘ The urge to procrastinate rears its
and plays low after East produces the eee

ugly head, Virgo, but you won't
be swept up by the temptation.
You now know it’s faster to just
breeze through everything.
LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23

Your bubbly personality opens doors
to which others are often not granted









2)

GCOCANCS Corr / Pow seta)




Dist BY UNE REAL PRES OYHOCHTE




HOW many words of































Moe WALL IE, (HC. ; a Geraruue four letters or more ee one can you make from 2 2S 253 a access. Use this skill to your advan-
TIGER the letters shown oo 83 2 mW tage by introducing yourself to as
; here? In making a < 3 8 e 2» 8 many people as possible.
TWAS COUNTING To £ THOUGHT gietipe sess fa a a2Gek SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22
FIVE AND COLLUNT FOR SURE HE Bach must contain the ett ne Caring for others gives yon ven
REMEMBER WHAT WOULD? KNOW centre letter and there ae 3 hES and fuzzy feeling, Scorpio, even
CAME AFTER SEVEN ; must be at least one 25 85°° though they may think you're all
nine-letter word. No e<< 385 sting and no substance. Volunteer
plurals or verb forms 3geo8 g your time this week.
ending in “s”, no words with initial capitals and no g2a s 3S SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
Lic with a hyphen or apostrophe permitted. 3 g Q a c This week you hear what someone
The i word of a phrase is permitted (e.g. inkjet aggre is telling you with an exaggerated
in inkjet printer). os 2 3 Q level of clarity: The stars:are mak-
eyreG ing sure communication channels
www_kingteatures.com Cee Wey Gand 24. excellent 31 (or more) 5 2 23 “ a wade open os reception:
Solution tomorrow. , 25322 CAPRICORN — Dec 22/Jan 20
«8587 Capricorn, this week you'll be in dan-
2528 ger of giving into peer pressure, play-
77 @ ing “follow the leader” in a sense.

Resist the temptation to do so because
it’s a bad road to travel.

AQUARIUS — Jan 21/Feb 18



| CRYPTIC PUZZLE |























































ae mnie Ast , DOWN Your actions of late haven’t been the
eenataed 6) up 2 Cultivable by a Middle Easterner most commendable, but you can bal-
go pete ya rarer with left foot missing (6) ance them out with good deeds this
nolse (8) 3 : is inventively by an inventor week, Aquarius. For redemption,
9 rcaenieee in ; 6 provide a helping hand to someone.
a le a defunct deity A Abit ofa simpleton, you'll allow (3) PISCES — Feb 19/Mar 20
40 One of a couple holding up the 5 Badly riled by one that won't work i i
aor a a ; You are in ane this week, but not
( H tirely comfortable with this new
11 Are things apt to fall off the back of | 6 Growing evidence that Silas is lepraah ical aa 10 into i i
one?) upset by heartless Fay (7) Acadians, French-. oF tease
12 Just he test bit stala, perhaps (5) | 7 Tieat speed (4 speaking people 2 aaa
13 mistake that always comes out? 8 Such acid Is used in the endless in Louisiana
: . unravelling of crime (6)
: et easily seen in numbers (3) 42. Discover the French have a navy!
a emain heartless in restraint (4) (5) ;
4 ae obviously not done on | 43 Start boozing what's left of the port
49 The drink is salty! (5) Oye 5 ae
20 Don't walk out - get involved! (4,2 14 Oldie possibly enabled to run Sergey Erenburg v Shen
a ( neers: ato 15 oo South it makes Diana cross israel v China wornen, an
‘4 7
24 Thanks a lot for very litle! (3) that is (5) . team champlonship,
25 Does it strike the viewer as 16 f you want a fight, fish ‘em upt (5) Beersheva 2005. Material Is
something fishy? (7) | 148 Cause of mother's tears? (5) level, with White's extra rook
26 of French as German, it's said to 19 It pee be ET * hatanced by Black's bishop
glorious (5 21 Accommodate decepti , == Y 4
27 Half dead, but only at first 92 Apicture to draw at some risk? (6) f ' and two pawns. However,
appearance (5) _ ; 23 Keyboard work (6) ACROSS DOWN Black (to move) Is on top due
eee eee | 8 coment Seer th ae gee
: July (5) 6 Concel 3 Jee ; White's
- Lan a rey (5) 26 Hindustani word for “powder” (4) uu 9 Master-of- 4 imp S still seems plenty of play, but
“Tt Op Pi p on your leg 28 a a position you can't standl x ceremonies (7) 5 . Recreation (5) Xt took just three unlikely
10 Bend (5) 6 Favours (7) forced moves to settle the
CRYPTIGSOLUTIONS me OY sds > 11 Foo (6) 7 Tear (4) game and induce White's
a. 12 Float (5) 8 Turned down resignation. What
a 13 Solace (7) (6) Shen Yang, 16, was the
ACROSS. dtateet 7, nee iE stairs 2 Abie 13, ee 14, hey 15 a 15 Domestic 12 Sewer (5) revelation of the against mate grandmasters and
A -)Gor , Brer , Plo , S-team-boat 23, Disc(-over 24, Arts ‘1 ‘ championsh lowly Russian.
eel 27, Anna 29, Stop 32, Play 33, Boot-H 34, Panels 35, All right 36, uu 17 aise ia eseh) rated Sal her own ee LEONARD BARDEN
et-re hn
18 Shopping sound (5) .
DOWN: 1, Fleas 2, AnvcL 3, Ashe 4, Ar-son 5, Pe-as 6, Carrot 9, Teapot 11, ° street (8) 15 Errand-boys
Bob 12, D-ebts 13, Ger-many 15, Lea 16, Got 148, Recall 20, Lass-o 21, Sin 19 Felines (5) (5)
coe 23, Do-sage 25, Pot 28, N-as-a-L 30, Tough 31, P-hot-o 32, Pear 33, 20 Dried grape (6) 16 Curt (5) te eae oo ae Se
a Fewer 4) 18 Smith's block ;
24 Curve (3) (5) =
EASY SOLUTIONS 25 Angry reply (7) 19 Bounded (7)
oS 21 Legondary CHESS SOLUTIONS
king (6) nnn me
ACROSS: 4, Animal 7, Reappear 8, Statue 10, Cress 13, Soon 14, Earl 15, Sent . ae (5) 22 Find (6) “Zan pur +S EPH P29
16, Hen 17, Oval 19, Edit 21, Epidermis 23, Free 24, Cost 26, Far 27, Note 29, 23 Position (6) umanb pur Guy SHO} +TON ED H PU HED (ZAM
Told 32, Onus 33, Tower 34, Format 35, Eeriness 36, Crater . ae 25 Stiff (5) pue «cud fy € 1) ZOy € F9uO (usend au SUM
DOWN: 1, Truce 2, Paper 3, Opus 4, Arson 5, Iran 6, Amulet 9, Totems 11, Raw Y 31 Postpone (5) rd nh (*) PRR EOTT
12, Slope 13, Selects 15, Sad 16, His 18, Vienna 20, Ditto 21, Err 22, Roe 23, nish (3)




Favour 25, Ale 28, Outer 30, Owner 31, Dress 32, Omit 33, Trip





PAGE 12B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007

ewly-appointed PLP senato
calls for ‘efficient’ licensing

former Grand
Bahama Chamber of
Commerce president

yesterday called for business
licence and approvals proce-
dures to be “quick and effi-
cient”, if the Bahamas was to
preserve its attraction for inter-
national investors.

Newly-appointed PLP Sena-
tor, Dr Doswell Coakley, told
the Senate: “We cannot go into
the international arena to
invite investors through our
various networks, and when
they come here we make the
procedures unduly cumber-
some. What I want to see,
Madam President, is a more
transparent and improved
schedule on which attorneys,
consultants, business managers
and the like can rely on for the
benefit of their clients.”

Dr Coakley praised the Gov-
ernment and Grand Bahama
Port Authority (GBPA) for
the licensing of Pegasus Wire-

“less, which he described as

_ being “in the advanced stages

of relocating its corporate
headquarters and manufactur-
ing facilities to Freeport,
Grand Bahama”.

The project promised to cre-

. ate 280 jobs for Bahamians, Dr

Coakley said, adding: “Not
only has Pegasus created many
new jobs for enterprising
Bahamians in Grand Bahama,
it has also created a new inter-
national training platform for
those’ of us interested in the
world of ‘cutting edge tech-
nology’. Additionall,:’ it has
effectively established the

threshold for a brand new -
industry for the Bahamas, ‘as >

we move towards further
diversification of the economy
to meet the challenges of a new
and ever changing world
order.”

He said: “And as night fol-
lows day, other high tech com-
panies will now begin to
explore Grand Bahama and,
indeed, other points in the

ST et

in Page B6 of Src NaS Tribune Business section, it was

repo:

ed that Baha Mar Resorts “has to deliver a number of

conditions precedent” to its joint venture partners, Har-
s Entertainment and Starwood. Baha Mar pointed out
esterday that it was satisfied it had achieved those Tee

precedent.-



= 1URI Natt)

w &

“We cannot go into the international
arena to invite investors through our
various networks, and when they come
here we make the procedures unduly

cumbersome. What I want to see,

. Madam President, is a more
transparent and improved schedule on
which attorneys, consultants, business
managers and the like can rely on for

the benefit of their clients.”

Bahamas as an option for their
businesses, thereby bringing to
our shores a new wave of high-
ly skilled and technical job
opportunities.

“The Bahamas will now
undoubtedly become a house-
hold name in the international
media and_-financial trading
centres, thereby giving us free
publicity beyond immediate
estimation. Very soon, I hope
to see The Bahamas refer-
enced in print internationally
as Silicon Valley by The Sea.”

Pegasus Wireless has been
the subject of much contro-
versy, the Prime Minister and

SR. CONSTRUCTION MANAGER NEEDED

nee er ae a eee ee

Duties and Responsibilities:

Coordinate all onsite projects including budget, costs, overall progress,
general performance and unexpected events
Communicating necessary information to vendors, subcontractors, clients and field

supervision

Prepare Budget and Financial Reporting
Maintain Quality Assurance and Control
Establish & monitor administrative procedures for the project

Keep informed on requirements for insurance, Safety, Labor Relations,

and Employee Relations, maintain EEO compliances, etc.

Foster effective working relations with all involved in the project
Keep Senior Management informed on progress of project and budget
Perform other duties and take on other responsibilities as required

Qualifications: Formal engineering or, architectural training with a minimum 25 years of
experience in managing a team of professionals in the construction of very multi
component projects. The successful candidate must have a proven track record in being involvedin
projects from 100 million to 600 million. It is a prerequisite that the candidate has
; xperience in the construction of projects in the hospitality, entertainment, food service
# . and multi unit high end residential sectors. Experience in constructing marinas capable of
accommodating 120 foot plus yachts would be an asset. Candidate must be proficient in
Microsoft Office, SAGE/Timberline Software, Prolot Manager and Primavera scheduling.
Strong management, leadership, team building and interpersonal skills with the ability to
communicate both verbally and writing. Physical Demands and Work Environment to be

reviewed.

Please respond by email to:
Fax:
Mail:

jobs@ marmatglobal.com
242-363-1279

MARMAT

Attn: Office Manager

P.O.Box CR 56766



a ine em at



www svitzerwiis ler.com

At SvitzerWijsmuller, results and values go hand in hand. With 2,500 employees and a fleet of more than 300 vessels, we provide
towage, salvage and related marine services in over 35 countries worldwide. To sustain our position as one of the world's leading
marine services company, we encourage a culture of commitment, innovation, and entrepreneurship where all employees take

responsibility for our purpose: to provide safety and support at sea. SvitzerWijsmuller is headquartered in Denmark and is part of

the A.P. Moller - Maersk Group.

Freepoint Tug & Towing Services, Ltd. (FTTS) is a J/V company, 50/50 owned by SvitzerWijsmuller and South Riding Point Hold-
ing Ltd (World Point Terminals Inc.). FTTS operates a fleet of 5 tugs, providing services in Freeport, South Riding Point, and at
times on neighbouring islands. A Technical Supervisor is needed in Freeport to manage the technical maintenance of our growing

tug operation.

TECHNICAL SUPERVISOR

Freepoint Tug & Towing Services, Ltd. — Freeport GB, Bahamas

THE POSITION

The Technical Supervisor will be responsible for the super-
vision and leadership of all technical aspects of vessel

management, which include:

The right candidate should be motivated and orientated towards
growth within the operation in Freeport, advancement with up-

coming projects in The Bahamas, and potentially globally
throughout the SvitzerWijSmuller organization

" Routine Preventative Maintenance Planning and Im-

plementation

Personal development can be achieved only if the candidate:

Coordinating work with our partner and clients while

maintaining vessels in Class condition
Coordination and planning with Class and Flag’ State

surveyors

Preparing requisition and purchasing of spares, equip-

ment, materials, etc for vessels

Assist in drydock planning and supervision, including

negotiation with shipyards

Meeting the high SvitzerWijsmuller Health, Safety,

thorities

documentation

Takes an active role on building and maintaining strong
working relationship with clients, pilots, suppliers and au-

Keep records of work performed and all other contractual

Cont’ bute to the continuous development of procedures

— Dr Doswell Coakley

government intevening direct-
ly with the GBPA to ensure a
licence was granted.

The move has raised con-
cerns about alleged unwar-
ranted interference in the
Port’s business affairs.

Contacts close to the situa-
tion said the GBPA had not
wanted to issue a business
licence to Pegasus and Jasper
Knabb, its president and chief
executive, due to concerns
about the firm’s track record
and ability to deliver what it
was promising the Bahamas
and Freeport. .

The Tribune was told that

Prime Minister Perry. Christie
intervened directly to ensure
Pegasus received the necessary
GBPA approvals for its man-
ufacturing facility, which the
company had already started
to set up last week. .

It is understood that the
issue was discussed between
Mr Christie and Sir Albert
Miller, the GBPA’s chief exec-
utive, when the prime minis-
ter visited Freeport last week.

One source told The Tribune
of the GBPA’s deliberations:
“They did not issue the licence
because they were concerned
about [the firm’s] background.

“The Port Authority, mind-
ful of their regulatory obliga-
tions and the Driftwood fiasco
at the Royal Oasis, were mind-
ful not to repeat it.”

While many view. Pegasus
and its wireless products as a
good fit for Freeport, given the
city’s place as the manufactur-
ing/distribution/logistics hub
for the Bahamas, some believe

the government pushed the -

firm on the GBPA with inde-
cent haste because it was des-
perate to revive Grand
Bahama’s economy, given the
Royal Oasis situation, with an
election pending.

As The Tribune reported in
December, 2006, Pegasus
Wireless as a company has
bounced around during its his-
tory, starting out life incorpo-
rated in Nevada on April 5,
2000, as Burrard Technologies,

“THE TRIBUNE



aa

»
,

*

focusing on software develop-
ment. 2.4
In 2001, it discontinued this

business and became inactive

until December 18, 2001, when
it acquired a Swiss company
called Technocell. Then, on
April 2, 2002, it changed its
name to Blue Industries,
becoming inactive until 2003. It:

only changed its name to Pega: -.

*

sus Wireless in June 2005.
Since then, it has grown via
three acquisitions, the purchase
price being financed by a com-
bination. of cash and Pegasus .

shares. In all three deals, thé.’ 7

cash portion was financed by
Mr Knabb buying stock in
Pegasus, his own company. ©
Controversy dogged Pega-
sus in the months before it
arrived in Freeport, the com-
pany having delisted from the
Nasdaq stock market at the
end of October and retreated
to the over-the-counter mar-
ket.
At the time, Mr Knabb said

‘the move was made to try and

reduce trading volatility in

Pegasus’ stock, which had been |.

targeted by short-sellers. Then;
Pegasus was the subject of 4
class action lawsuit filed in ear-
ly November by Kahn Gauthi-
er Swick, allegedly on behalf
of the company’s sharehold-
ers, after several articles on
Internet website, the Motley
Fool, had appeared criticising
the company and its manage-
ment.

€

.












THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
RESEARCH EDGE FORUM SERIES 2007

Friday, February 16, 12 noon to 1:30pm

Lecture Theatre

Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute
_ Thompson Boulevard.

T opic: New Methods and Technology
in Introcuctory Physics Courses

Presenter: Dr. Carlton Watson, Assistant Professor, Physics, School of
Sciences and Technology.

Studies have shown that traditional methods of teaching do little to
improve students’ understanding of basic concepts of physics. In this
presentation the researcher surveys several innovative methods and
technologies, based on the principles of “active learning” and reports on
a research initiative aimed at improving the performance of students in
introductory physics classes. Dr Watson outlines future studies and ways
in which these methods can be extended beyond the physics classroom.

This is a lecture not to be missed by parents, educators, students
and anyone who has an interest in raising the bar of excellence
in science education in The Bahamas

We look forward to seeing you and encourage you to bring along





QUALIFICATIONS

. Minimum degree or certificate from vessel-related or
engineering program
Living in or willing to relocate to Freeport

Environment, and Quality standards, including
manage technical aspects of ISM and |SO09001
Regular reporting to Regional Office

Minimum 5 years technical experience with tugs or similar
vessels

Proficient in English

The Technical Supervisor will receive support from other
SvitzerWijsmmuller staff locally in Freeport and throughout
the Region, and will report to the Regional Technical
Manager in Miami, Florida, USA.

Strong Safety and Quality awareness
Employee-motivation and team-building skills

Ability to implement and promote systems and procedures
Furthermore, the Technical Supervisor will receive appro- within the organization .
priate training and education based on his/her starting
qualifications, and will have the opportunity to gain expo-

_ -9 throughout various training programs and exchanges.

CONTACTS

Application with resume/CV to be sent by to Freepoint Tug &
Towing Services Ltd., Technical Manager Marinus Lorwa, #4
Milton St., Box F-43550 Freeport G.B., Bahamas

Tel. +1 242 352 3060, Mob. +1 242 727 0046

E-mail marinus lopwa@svitzerwismuller.com

PERSOMAL DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES
For the right candidate, the job offers significant career and
personal development opportunities.

ae, SvitzerWijsmuller

Pe Coe ee YN ee



colleagues, friends and/or students. If further information is needed,
please contact








Research at telephone 326-4501/2.



The Lecture is open to the public and free of charge.




THE COLLEGE OF THE B. AF:

EDUCATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS ‘

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs



PAGE 2C, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007



US to play
Argentina,
Paraguay and
Colombia in
first round of
Copa America

mw SOCCER
CARACAS,
Venezuela
Associated Press

THE United States
will play Argentina,
Paraguay and Colombia
in the first round of this
summer’s Copa America,
soccer’s championship of
South America,

The Americans, invit-
ed as a guest, are in
Group C and open June
28 against Argentina in
Maracaibo. The United
States plays Paraguay on
July 2 in Barinas and
Colombia on July 5 in
Barquisimeto, according
to Wednesday’s draw.

“Quite obviously we

shave been put in a very

competitive group,” U.S.
interim coach Bo
Bradley said during a
telephone conference
call.

_ The U.S. opener comes
just four days after the
final of the CONCACAF
Gold Cup, the champi-
onship of North and _
Central America and the
Caribbean, is played in
Chicago. The U.S. team
figures to make several
roster changes between
tournaments.

“The Gold Cup still is
the most important event
for us,” Bradley said.
“Obviously, it’s our con-
federation champi-
onship. But the main
reason that I think it’s
extra important is
because winning the
Gold Cup will earn us
three games — three
very, very good games —
in South Africa in 2009.”

The Gold Cup champi-
on advances to the eight-
nation FIFA Confedera-
tions Cup, which will be
played a year ahead of
the 2010 World Cup in
South Africa.

The United States, try-
ing to rebound from its
first-round elimination in
last year’s World Cup, is
appearing in the Copa
America for the first
time since 1995, when it
beat Argentina 3-0 in its
final first-round game
and finished fourth in
the tournament.

Bradley is not sure he °
will even be around to
coach the team.

He was hired on an
interim basis after for-
mer Germany coach
Juergen Klinsmann with-
drew and has led the
Americans to exhibition
victories over Denmark
and Mexico.

He was happy to open
against what appears to
be the toughest team in
the group.

“Often times when you
can play that team first,
it gives you the ability to
really prepare well for
the first game,” he said.

Defending cae on
Brazil is in Group B of
the 12-nation tourna-
ment along with Chile,
Ecuador and Mexico.
Host Venezuela was
drawn into Group A
with Bolivia, Peru and
Uruguay,

The top two teams in
each group and the best
two third-place teams
advance to the quarterfi-
nals,

Venezuela plays on the
opening day against
Bolivia on June 26 at
Merida. The tournament
will be played in nine
cities, with the final July
15 in Maracaibo.

Because of the two
tournaments, some play-
ers will be missing from
Major League Soccer for
extended periods.

“I know that there’s
already been discussions,
and we will work togeth-
er, as we always do,”
Bradley said.

“Everybody under-
stands that both events
are important for U.S.
Soccer.” .

tt a es cece eee nna ecban ane iccec niin seemneines os pineete ntratomet penn sninentstcaneetr st eenncnseeseev ent ittrtete tet enet tr eerenTt ee tteenteeens eee TATA NRT EET

wenececcececececcereererererecsececcceseterecetaseeeseene eeeees see Core teeeee OTe eee TOE Ces CC CC TOTES ewe re

@ BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Sports Reporter

TEAMS are turning up the
heat, trying to sharpen their
skills for the biggest basket-
ball tournament for high
school boys — the Hugh
Campbell Invitational.

One team paving the way
to the tournament is the CV
Bethel Stingrays, bagging their
final win in the GSSSA. The
win by the Stingrays came
over the GHS Magics yester-
day, 65-42.

While the other teammates
celebrated their feat, team
leader Sherman Ferguson said
“the race isn’t over yet.”

A pleased Ferguson
expressed gratitude to his fel-
low teammates for stepping
up and playing the way they
did against the Magics, but
added that the same level of
play will have to continue if
they want to adVance through
the rounds of the Hugh
Campbell tournament and the
GSSSA season.

He said: “I think we played
a good game, everyone played
up to standard as we get ready
fot the Hugh Campbell.

“We are still in the money
for the GSSSA but we will
have to stay focused if we
want to win, We have to play
hard and disciplined.”

Even though the Stingrays
got a win before the break,
their worries aren’t over just
yet. The team is sitting on the
edge of being eliminated from
the GSSSA playoffs.

Ferguson and Romel John-
son led the Stingrays in yes-
terday’s action, Romel John-
son finishing the day with 20
points with Ferguson chipping
in with 10 points.

Top scorer for the Magics
was William Rolle with 12
points.



- WTHE STINGRAYS (in
—liyht shirts) on their way to
beating the Magics 65-42,

(Photos: Tim Clarke)





Stingrays signal intent
ahead of Hug!



TRIBUNE SPORTS

Campbel







4C| FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007



NTERNATIONAL. EDITION Pe



AUTO RACING | 2007 PREVIEW



MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

WHAT'S NEW IN NASCAR

~ ROOKIE CLASS

Last year’s crop of rookies
was considered among the
deepest in Cup history,
whereas this season’s is one
of the more diverse.

FORMER OPEN-WHEEL
DRIVERS

>> Former Formula One
driver Juan Pablo Montoya
(below), 31, will drive for Chip
Ganassi Racing with Felix
Sabates. .



>> Former Champ Car rising
star A.J. Allmendinger, 25, will
drive for start-up
Toyota-powered Team Red
Bull. :

ENCORES TO THEIR
RACING FATHERS

>> Paul Menard, 26, son of
former champion IndyCar
owner John Menard, a
billionaire and owner of
Menards home improvement
chain, will drive the third car
for Dale Earnhardt Inc.

>> David Reutimann, 36, the
son of East Coast racing
legend Buzzie Reutimann will
drive for start-up
Toyota-powered Michael
Waltrip Racing

SUCCEEDING A
LEGEND

>> David Ragan, 21,
successor of Mark Martin, will
drive for Roush Racing.

PART-TIMERS

>> Regan Smith, 23, will
share the seat with veteran
and former Roush driver
Martin.

>> Jon Wood, 25, will split
time with veteran Ken
Schrader for Wood
Brothers/JTG Racing.

>> Brandon Whitt, 24, has
sponsorship lined up for
about only one-third of the
races for CJM Racing.

UNOFFICIAL ROOKIE

>> Robert Yates Racing’s
David Gilliland is running his
first full Cup season, but
doesn’t qualify as a rookie
since he made 15 starts last
season and the maximum to
be eligible is seven.



~ TOYOTA TEAMS



No. 44

>> Will be driven by veteran
Dale Jarrett for Michael
Waltrip Racing.

No. 55

>> Will be driven and owned
by Michael Waltrip with
Michael Waltrip Racing.

No. 00

. >> Will be driven by David
Reutimann with Michael
Waltrip Racing.

No. 83

>> Will be driven by Brian
Vickers with Team Red Bull.
No. 84

>> Will be driven by A.J.
Allmendinger with:Team Red
Bull. |



98

Q7

96
95
O94
93
Q?
9]

70
6968670605646362616059585750555453



>> Casey Mears takes over
for Brian Vickers in the

No. 25 Chevrolet.

>> Mark Martin takes over
for Joe Nemechek in the
No. 01 Chevrolet. Martin will
run 20 races, sharing the
seat with rookie Regan

Smith.



TEXAS MOTOR SPEEDWAY

>> The bump between Turns 1 and 2 that Dale
Earnhardt Jr. complained about is being repaired.



here’s more behind a car
number in NASCAR thana
specialist brushing paint in a
certain shape on the side
panels.

Team owners must go through an
approval process since NASCAR owns
and controls distribution of the numbers
— on the track and for special projects,
including movies and other
entertainment opportunities.

This past offseason Jim Cassidy,
director of&yacing operations, had
several more applications pass his desk,
particularly in the Cup Series, with the
entry of manufacturer Toyota and a few
teams expanding their operations.

All Cup, Busch and Craftsman
Trucks series teams must submit
applications each offseason to receive
the license for a number. With new
teams, owners are asked to provide
requests, because NASCAR does not
always grant a team’s first choice.

“The numbers are obviously very
important to teams, some are marketing
driven and some were used in the series
the driver came from,” Cassidy said.
“There’s a lot more to it than the

__ GAME OF NUMBERS



>> Ricky Rudd takes over
for Dale Jarrett in the

No. 88 Ford. Jarrett moves
to anew Toyota teain.

>> Jeremy Mayfield
replaces Michael Waltrip on
anew Toyota team at Bill
Davis Racing, which
previously had been.
affiliated with Dodge
Mayfield will drive the

No. 36 Toyota.

GETTY IMAGES FILE

_ drive the No. 55 for his



average fan would think. Hopefully we
don’t cause too much heartburn for
these teams.”

Each season NASCAR freezes about
five numbers for “special projects,”
Cassidy said. Last year some of the
off-limit numbers appeared in Talladega
Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby.

Also, NASCAR typically does not
issue the numbers for drivers who have
died.

To gain rights for the active numbers,
a Cup owner, for example, must pay a
standard rate before each season; it
costs several thousand dollars but under
$10,000. The cost for Busch and Truck
numbers are less.

Some of this season’s new Cup teams
paid for the owner’s license before the
2006 season for marketing purposes.

Brian Vickers, who will drive for
start-up Toyota-backed Team Red Bull,
pointed out that his team applied for the
No. 83 for marketing purposes.

“There are 8.3 ounces in a Red Bull
can, even though they do offer a
12-ounce can,” he said. “For me it has
another twist, because I was born in’83
as well.”



JONATHAN FERREY/GETTY IMAGES

‘

Many changes and many new faces can be found in Nextel Cup action this season.
_ Miami Herald sportswriter Sarah Rothschild roots out some of the more interesting tidbits heading into 2007.

(12345678910111213141516171819202122

23
24
2)
20
2/
28
29
30
ol
32
30
ot
OO
30
O/

2





>> Michael Waltrip will

self-owned Toyota team.
>> Mike Bliss will drive the
No. 49 Dodge, owned by
Coral Gable residents Beth
Ann and Tony Morgenthau.
He ran six races for BAM
last year.

>> Ward Burton, 45,

. started three races for
Morgan-McClure
Motorsports in 2006 and
will run full-time in the
No. 4 Chevrolet. Burton, a
Daytona 500 champion,
came out of retirement late
in 2006 after not racing the

previous year.

ON THE TRACK





GETTY IMAGES FILE

LAS VEGAS MOTOR SPEEDWAY

>> The track, which has one Cup race, will undergo
a $100 million renovation that will include redoing

parts of the track, adding higher banking and
possibly adding a spa in the infield.





LOOSE PARTS

FOREIGN FLAVOR

>> Team Red Bull: Red Bull,
the energy drink
company, which
will field and
sponsor two
teams was
founded by
Austrian Dietrich
Mateschitz.

>> Juan Pablo
Montoya: The



‘ Miami resident who hails from

Bogota, Colombia, is ;
legitimizing NASCAR’s efforts
to become'a more global
sport. .

>> Toyota: The entry of the
Japanese company, the first
full-time foreign car maker in
Cup history, is viewed as a big
step for the sport.

GOODBYE, LEADED FUEL

>> Cup teams will switch to
unleaded fuel beginning with
the Feb. 25 race at California
Speedway. All of NASCAR’s
series will use the
Sunoco-supplied gas this
season. For decades
NASCAR, which has been
exempt from the 1970 Clean
Air Act, has used leaded fuel.

MAKE AND MODEL

>> Toyota will race the
Camry.

>> Chevrolet will run the
Impala SS in the Car of
Tomorrow races.

>> Dodge will race the
Avenger in the Car of
Tomorrow races.



‘CAR OF TOMORROW ~

ON THE SCHED



>> NASCAR will make its
debut in Canada with a Busch
race Aug. 4 in Montreal.

>> There are no new sites for
Cup races, but there were
date changes:

>> The Pepsi 400 at
Daytona International
Speedway, historically the
first race in July, delayeda
week until July 7.

>> The New Hampshire race
was moved to July 1 from the
middle of the month. i

>> The Allstate 400 at the
Brickyard was pushed up
from its traditional August
date to July 29.

>> The Pocono (Pa.)
Raceway date was moved
from end of July to Aug. 5.





GETTY IMAGES FILE

BRISTOL (TENN.) MOTOR SPEEDWAY

races,

>> Will be repaved between its March and August





THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com

New-look Sixers work hard, waiting on

BY DAN GELSTON
Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — The only
thing that fans of the Philadelphia
76ers want their team to win these
days is the NBA Draft lottery.

The playoffs are far out of reach
for the third-worst team in the NBA,
so winning games won't do anything
except lower the number of available
pingpong balls. Tune in talk radio,
read a message board or a blog, or lis-
ten to the few fans still showing up at
the Wachovia Center, and the point
is clear: Lose. A lot.

Problem is, the Sixers (17-36)
aren’t listening.

“Yeah, we hear it, and it’s kind of
weird. But we can’t pay attention,”
forward Kyle Korver said. “Everyone
in this locker room wants to win and
win now, not wait for the future.”

But waiting for the future is about

all the Sixers can do these days. This

Terry rallies the Maverick

From Miami Herald Wire Services

HOUSTON — Jason Terry hit a go-ahead

BASKETBALL |

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

PRO BASKETBALL | INSIDE THE GAME

has turned into one of the more
disastrous seasons in recent team his-
tory, and the Sixers will probably
miss the playoffs for the third time in
four seasons. Hope comes only in the
form of fantasizing about who will be
available in the draft.

How would Greg Oden or Kevin
Durant look in a Sixers uniform?

No doubt, this has been a tumultu-
ous season to forget. Allen Iverson
and his 30 points [er game, All-Star
berth and coaching clashes are now
in Denver after a franchise-shaking
blockbuster deal in December. Chris
Webber, miserable and mopey from
the day he got to Philadelphia, had
his contract bought out and finally is
happy again, in Detroit.

Two veteran All-Stars who where
expected to lead the Sixers did noth-

ing but drag the team down. They’
.demanded the ball but did little to

make their teammates better. Now

it’s smiles all around on the Sixers,
free of the distractions and selfish-
ness that had sabotaged them early.

“We were definitely distracted by
that,” forward Steven Hunter said. “It
was a circus around here a month or
so ago, with all that trade talk. Now
things are calmed down, and every-
one’s focused on basketball.”

The Sixers are a bit better since
dumping the dour duo, and they went
7-7 over the final 14 games before the
All-Star break. The Sixers were 5-18
when Iverson was traded on Dec. 19
and have been 12-18 since.

Credit goes mostly to Andre
Miller, acquired in the Iverson deal,
who has been a steady, more tradi-
tional point guard. More players are
involved now, the offense runs more
set plays, and the hot hand gets ted.

Five players average in double fig-
ures, including Miller, at 13.2 points.

“We're just not relying on a guy to

PRO BASKETBALL

come down, pull up and ‘hit a jump
shot,” Sixers coach Maurice Cheeks
said. “[Miller] gets guys layups; he
gets guys the ball in a certain time at
the right place. You can’t underesti-
mate that when you have a guy who
understands the position.”
Without Iverson around, the Six-
ers have turned mostly their new A.L:
Andre Iguodala. The third-year
swingman has absolutely flourished
in Iverson’s and Webber’s absence.
Once known only for his flashy
dunks and tantalizing potential, Iguo-
dala thrived as the go-to guy in Philly.
Iguodala scored at least 19 points
in 12 consecutive games before that
streak was snapped Wednesday
against the Washington Wizards. He
has been more aggressive, has posted
two triple-doubles, has become a bet-
ter rebounder and has watched his
scoring average leap to 17.7 points.
“When I first got here, he was a

___ FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007 | 5G

the future

complementary player to the other
guys that where here,” Cheeks said.
“Now his role has changed a little bit,
being the primary scorer. You put the
ball in his hands, and you see what he
can do.”

Samuel Dalembert still battles
inconsistency but has been solid at
center, teaming with Hunter to solid-
ify the middle. Korver and Miller
both will be part of any rebuilding
process. The lottery pick in the draft,
plus the two first-round picks they
acquired from the Nuggets in the
Iverson trade, give the Sixers reason
to believe that they can be a playoff
team again soon.

“They stayed with everything
we’ve been trying to do. They con-
tinue to give effort, and that’s all we
can ask,” Cheeks said. “Our results
aren’t what we’d like them to be, but
they’ve stayed with the program, and
they continue to work.”

| TNL

| EASTERN CONFERENCE

jumper with 1:09 left to play Thursday night,
then made two free throws in the final sec-
onds, giving the Dallas Mavericks an 80-77
victory over the Houston Rockets on Thurs-

day night. The victory extended the Maver--

icks’ winning streak to nine games.

Luther Head had a shot in the lane with
~ about 6 seconds left to give the Rockets the
lead; but the ball bounced out. The Rockets
had to foul Terry with 4.2 seconds left, and
he made both shots to extend the lead.

Terry also made a pair of free throws just
seconds before his final jumper.

Dirk Nowitzki had 26 points for the Mav-
ericks, and Jerry Stackhouse added 17.

Tracy McGrady scored 27 points to lead
the Rockets, and Juwan Howard added 14.

The Mavericks led by two points before
the Rockets took a 76-74 lead on a free throw
and a 3-pointer by McGrady with about
3 minutes remaining. ~

McGrady elicited chants of ‘M-V-P!’ from ~
the home crowd when. he cut through the ,

middle of the lane for a layup that pushed
Houston’s lead to 69-66. But Nowitzki soon

answered with two 3-pointers in a row, put-

ting Dallas back on top 72-69 with 6:16 left.

Houston trailed by three points before
going on a 6-0 run punctuated by a Dallas
turnover and a dunk by Juwan Howard that
made it 63-60 with 10:33 remaining.

A steal and a pair of baskets by Josh How-
ard, followed by two quick 3-pointers by
Stackhouse, gave Dallas a 58-55 lead with less
than 30 seconds remaining in the third quar-
ter. It was the first time the Mavericks had
led in the second half. :

Nowitzki scored eight points in the first
quarter, but didn’t score in the second, sitting
out almost half of it with two early fouls.

One of the highlights of the first half came
when Nowitzki bit on a fake on the baseline
by Head, who drove past Nowitzki for the
two-handed dunk. The play earned the sec-
ond-year player a standing ovation from the
sellout crowd.

The Rockets trailed 21-12 before going on
a 3-0 run to take a 25-21 lead early in the sec-
ond quarter. Shane Battier hit three free
throws at the end of the second quarter to
push Houston’s lead to 45-38 at halftime.

LATE WEDNESDAY

e Hawks 96, Clippers 93: Joe Johnson,
selected earlier in the day for his first NBA
All-Star Game as an injury replacement for
Jason Kidd of the Nets, scored six of his 27



eu

OUTTA MY WAY: Mavericks forward Dirk Nowitzki drives past Rockets defender
Juwan Howard during the second half. Nowitzki led the Mavericks with 26 points.

points in the final 19 seconds to rally Atlanta
in Los Angeles.

e Sonics 114, Suns 90: Ray Allen had 31
points, and host Seattle handed Phoneix,
without injured Steve Nash and Boris Diaw,
its worst loss of the season.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

e Jazz 99, Cavaliers 98: Deron Wil-
liams scored 33 points and added 12 assists,
and host Utah won its sixth game in a row.

e Warriors 120, Knicks 101: Stephen
Jackson scored 36 points for host Golden
State, which blew most of a 3]-point lead.





RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Thursday’s results

Dal. 80, Hou. 77
Cle. at L.A.L., late

Tonight’s games
NO GAMES SCHEDULED

| SOUTMEAST_W__L_Pet_ GB. L10__str. Home _Away__<&st
| Washington 29 21 580 - 5-5 Wl 19-7 10-14 20-10
, Orlando 27 26 «509 3%. 4-6 W-1 1810 9-16 15-17
| Miami 26 26 500 4 7-3 W-2 15-10 11-16 13-15
| Atlanta 20 31 .392 9% 5-5 - Ll 9-15 11-16 12-20
| Charlotte 19 33 .365 11 46 W-1 11-15 818 13-20
| ATLANTIC WL _‘Pet_ GB 18 str. Home _Away Cont
| Toronto 29 24 547. - 82 W-2 19-7 10-17 20-10
New Jersey 25 29 463 4% 4-6 (L-2 14-13 11-16 19-14
| New York 23 30 «4.434. 65S L-1 (13-13, 10-17 13-18
| philadelphia 17 36 321 12 46 L3 915 821 12-18
Boston 13 38 «255 15 1-9 W-l 5-21 817 9-24
CENTRAL WL Pet GB L190 Str. Home Away Conf
Detroit 32.19 627 - 82 L-l 17-10 15-9 22-10
Cleveland 30 22 577 2% 64 L-l 20-7 10-15 18-14
Indiana 28 24 538 4% 6-4 W-2 17-10 11-14 19-13
Chicago 29 25 .537 4% 46 L-2 20-7 9-18 20-10
Milwaukee 19 34 358 14 2-8 L-4 11-11 8-23 9-21
WESTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHWEST WL Pet. GB L10 Str. Home Away _ Conf
Dallas 44.9 830 - 9-1 W-9 24-3 20-6 30-6
San Antonio 35 18 .660 9 55 W-2 16-8 19-10 21-11
Houston 33.19 .63510% 7-3 Ll 19-7 14-12 19-17
New Orleans 25 28 .472 19 7-3 W-1 17-11 8-17 15-19
Memphis 14 40 .25930% 3-7 L-l 11-17 3-23 8-25
NORTHWEST WL Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away _ Conf
Utah 35 17 673 - 7-3 W-6 21-6 14-11 20-10
Denver 26 25 510 8% 4:6 L-1 14-14 12-11 11-17
Minnesota 25 27 481 10 5-5 W-2 16-9 9-18 15-19
Portland 22 32 «407 «14 44-6 L-2 12-14 10-18 13-17
Seattle 20 32. 385 15 4-6 W-2 14-13 6-19 9-20
PACIFIC” ears WN _L Pet. GB 10 Str. Home Away Conf
Phoenix 39 130.750 0 - «55 L3) -20-6 §=19-7 19-10
L.A. Lakers 30. 23.566 91 3-7 L-4 19-7 11-16 °17-10 ~
L.A. Clippers 25 27 .481 14 46 12 17-8 8-19 14-17
Golden State 25 29 .463 15 4-6 W-l 19-9 6-20 13-7
Sacramento 22 29 .43116% 5-5 L-3 15-12 7-17 12-21

Wednesday’s results

Ind. 114, Mem.

104

Orl. 103, Port. 91
Tor. 120, NJ 109
Cha. 100, Chi. 85
Was. 92, Phi. 85
Bos. 117, Mil. 97

S.A. 90, Det. 81

Min. 99, Den. 94
NO 110, Sac. 93
Utah 99, Cle. 98
Sea. 114, Pho. 90

GS 120, NY 101

Atl. 96, Clpprs 93

: NBA LEADERS





Through Wednesday
SCORING REBOUNDING
G FG FT PTS AVG GOFF DEF TOT AVG
Anthony, Den. 36 413 260 1106 30.7 Garnett, Minn. 51 133 509 642 12.6
Arenas, Wash. 50 457 384 1442 28.8 Chandler, NOK. 51 211 410 621 12.2
| Wade, Mia. 45 434 408 1297 28.8 Howard, Orl. 53 170 462 632 11.9
| Bryant, LAL 49 466390 1406 28.7 Camby, Den. 42 106 392 498 11.9
| Iverson, Den. 35 338 295 1004 28.7 Boozer, Utah 45 142 389 531 11.8
" Redd, Mil. 33 302 244 914 27.7 Okafor, Char §2 202 393 595 11.4
i Allen, Sea. 42 393 224 1134 27.0 Duncan, SA. 53 156 412 568 10.7
PAT SULLIVAN/AP | James, Clev. 50 473 296 1306 26.1 Lee, N.Y. 53 184 380 564 10.6
| Nowitzki, Dall. 51 438 362 1287 25.2 Jefferson, Bos. 44 150 318 468 10.6
Johnson, Atl. 48 453 199 1208 25.2 Marion, Phoe. 52 109 426 535 10.3
i ‘

| FIELD GOALS ASSISTS
| FG FGA PCT G AST AVG
| Tee, NY. 230 376 612 Nash, Phoe. a 542 ‘118
Biedrins, G.S. 241 395 610 — Williams, Utah 52 478 9.2
| Howard, Or. 337 568 593 Kidd, NJ. 52 454 BT
| Stoudemire, Phoe. 370 627 590 _—Davis, G.S. 43 372, 87
Curry, N.Y. 380 654 .581 Paul, NOk. 36 311 8.6
Boozer, Utah 410 721 .569 Miller, Phil. 51 418 8.2
Brand, LAC 416 761 547 Wade, Mia. 45 353 7.8
Bogut, Mil. 271 496 546 Ford, Tor. 46 357 7.8
Okafor, Char. 322 596 540 __ Billups, Det. 43 326 7.6
Dalembert, Phil. 230 426 540 Iverson, Den. 35 265 7.6

UCLA beats Arizona State; Purdue dumps Indiana

From Miami Herald Wire Services

Arron Afflalo scored 24 points,
Darren Collison added 18, and fifth-
ranked UCLA rallied from a 10-point
deficit to beat host Arizona State
67-61 on Thursday night.

Trailing 49-39 with 10:24 left to
play, the Bruins took command with
an 18-2 run, with Darren Collison hit-
ting three 3-pointers and Afflalo
another to put UCLA ahead 57-51.

Arizona State. pulled to 63-61
on Serge Angounou’s 3-pointer with
16 seconds left, but Afflalo hit two
free throws, and Josh Shipp added
two more to ice the victory.

Afflalo has scored in double fig-
ures in 24 consecutive games, the
longest active streak in the Pac-10.

UCLA (22-3, 11-2) bounced back
from a 70-65 loss at West Virginia on
Saturday, and the Bruins remained
atop the Pac-10, a half-game ahead of
No. 10 Washington State.

Jeff Pendergraph scored 14 points
and Alan Morill added 11 for Arizona
State (6-20, 0-14), which lost its 15th

onsecutive game, a school record.

UCLA now has beaten Arizona State
six times in a row.

Afflalo scored 13 consecutive
points — nine on 3-pointers — mid-
way through the first half. He fin-
ished the half with 15 points, but only
two other Bruins scored as UCLA
seemed baffled by Arizona State’s
tenacious zone defense.

The Sun Devils went on a 7-0 run
to take a 21-17 lead on Pendergraph’s
3-point play with 10:10 to go. After
trailing for much of the half, UCLA
scored the final four points on a bas-
ket by Afflalo and a full-court drive
by Collison, who laid the ball in at the
buzzer to send the Bruins into the
locker room with a 34-31 lead.

e Purdue 81, No. 24 Indiana
68: David Teague scored a career-
high 32 points, and the host Boiler-
makers snapped a five-game losing
streak in the intrastate rivalry.

Teague made ll of 18 field goals,
including 6-for-8 from 3-point range.
He also grabbed seven rebounds.

Carl Landry added 22 points and
11 rebounds and Tarrance Crump



CATHERINE JUN/ARIZONA REPUBLIC
COLD SHOULDER: Michael Roll, left,
of UCLA tries to hold off Allen
Morill of Arizona State and they
scramble for the ball Thursday.

added 13 points for Purdue (17-9, 6-6
Big Ten).

D.J.. White scored 20 points,
Armon Bassett scored 16 and Roder-

ick Wilmont added 15 for Indiana
(17-7, 7-4).

Purdue improved to 14-1 at home
and boosted its NCAA Tournament
hopes with its second victory over a
ranked team this season. The Boiler-
makers shot 50 percent from the field
and outrebounded the Hoosiers
32-28.

Indiana won the previous meeting
85-58 on Jan. 10 in Bloomington. The
Hoosiers had won eight of the previ-
ous 10 games in the series.

The game was moved from
Wednesday to Thursday because of
snowy weather that slowed travel
throughout Indiana.

Purdue led 34-32 at halftime, but
Indiana took a 50-48 lead on a
3-pointer by Bassett with 13:15 to go.

A bad Indiana pass and a scramble
led to an uncontested layup by Tea-
gue, and Gordon Watt’s steal and
layup gave the Boilermakers a 55-52
lead. A bucket and a 3-point play by
Landry, followed by a 3-pointer by
Teague, pushed Pu.due’s lead to
63-54 with 7:29 lett. Purdue led by at

least six points the rest of the way.

The tension on the court became
evident when White went for a
rebound with 8:27 left in the first half.
Purdue’s Chris Kramer tied him up,
and it led to a skirmish that got the
sellout crowd more involved.

Purdue led by ll points in the first
half, but Indiana chipped away until
halftime. Earl Calloway’s short
jumper in the closing seconds of the
half cut Purdue’s lead to two points at
the break, 34-32. :

LATE WEDNESDAY

e No. 10 Washington State 65,
Washington 61: Taylor Rochestie
scored a season-high 16 points off the
bench, and Derrick Low hit two tree
throws with 16.7 seconds left, and the
Cougars (22-4, ll-4) beat the host
Huskies (16-9, 6-8 Pac-10).

e No. 11 Nevada 68, San Jose
State 60: Nick Fazekas had 20
points and 10 rebounds —- his 16th
double-double — to lead the host
Wolf Pack (23-2, N-1 Western Ath-
letic) past the Spartans (4-21, 3-10).

COnSECUTIVE BN TSS



6C | FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16,2007 INTERNATIONAL EDITION

HOCKEY/BASEBALL



NTT UPI
EASTERN CONFERENCE





From Miami Herald Wire Services

PHILADELPHIA — Peter
Forsberg never gave Philadel-
phia a firm answer about a
contract extension because of
lingering concerns about his

So the Flyers decided his
short-term future for him,
trading the star center to the
Division-leading
Nashville Predators on Thurs-
day night for forward Scottie

SOUTHEAST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME = AWAY DIV

Atlanta 30 21 6 3 69182 189 14-9-3-2 16-12-3-1 12-4-4-1

TampaBay 33 24 «1 1 68187 178 16-13-0-0 17-11-1-1 13-7-0-0

Carolina 29 24 «3 4 65.180 189 15-11-1-3 14-13-2-1 | 13-6-0-2

Washington 23 26 2 7 55175 203 14-12-13 9-14-14 B-1-1-2

Florida 22 26 5 6 55165 191 15-10-2-1 7-16-35 —5-11-2-0
ATLANTIC = WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV

New Jersey. 35 16 0 6 76154 135 21-5-0-4 14-11-0-2 15-4-0-1

Pittsburgh «30:17. 4 «5S 69.195 175 17-B2-2 © 13-9-2-3 14-511

NY Islanders 28 22 4 4 64171 163 14-9-3-1 14-13-1-3 10-8-2-0

NY. Rangers 28 24 3 2 GL 170 164 11-12-3-0 17-12-0-2 9-9-0-1 :
Philadelphia. 15 34 3 5 38146 212 5-16-3-4 10-18-0-1 3-14-1-4 right foot.
NORTHEAST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY _DIV

Buffalo 30°15 2 2 82.214 164 20-7-1-119-B-1-1.—12-8-1-1

Ottawa 3322 2 «1 69195 154 17-1l-l-1 16-11-10 15-9-0-1 | Central
Montreal 29 24. «1 5 64167 174 17-11-0-3 12-13-1-2 10-8-0-4

Toronto 38 22. 3 5 64187 189 11-12-23 17-10-1-2 —10-B-2-2

Boston 26 26 1 3 56 157.206 16-12-0-2 10-14-1-1 10-12-0-1



Upshall, defenseman Ryan
Parent and two draft picks.

“I liked it here and every-
thing, it’s just hard when I
couldn’t commit and that’s
why they had to move me,”
Forsberg said. “I understand

The 33-year-old Swede, in
the final months of a two-year,
$11.5 million contract, had 11
goals and 29 assists in 40
games for the Flyers this sea-
son, his second with Philadel-
phia after 10 years with Que-

The former NHL MVP has
acknowledged he thought

CENTRAL == WL OL SLPTS GF GA = HOME = AWAY DU

Nashville 39 16 2 1 81 201 146 18-12-0-0 —-17+4-1-0

Detroit 37 16 3 3 80181 144 16-13-2-1-12-4-1-1

St. Louis 23 26 5 4 55 149 178 11-11-3-3-9-12-2-2

Chicago 22 27° 2 «6 52 145 175 11-14-1-4 — 10-12-1-0

Columbus 22 30 2 #3 49 141 179 9-17-1-1 7-13-0-2 at”
that.

NORTHWEST W Lt OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV

Vancouver 32 21 #1 #3 68150 145 14-12-0-2. 12-11-0-1

Calgary 30 19 3 5 68178 149 7-14-3-4 -11-5-1-2

Minnesota 31 22 1 «4 67 164 150 11-17-0-1 9-6-1-2

Edmonton 28 25 3 2 61 157 167 10-14-2-1-9-12-1-0

Colorado 27:25 2 «22 «58177 172 11-12-1-0 9-7-1-0

Paciic = «Wik OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY _—DIV

Anaheim 33 16 2 6 74 182 145 15-11-1-2 13-5-0-1 bec and Colorado.

San Jose 36 20 O. 1 73176 142 18-9-0-0 12-10-0-1

Dallas 34°21 .0 2 70 153 ‘140 16-12-0-1 16-6-0-0

Phoenix 25 30 1 #1 52 154 194 12-18-0-1-7-13-1-1

Los Angeles 19 31 5 4 47164 205 11-12-4-3 8-19-1-1 — 6-14-0-2

Note: Two points for a win, one point for a tie and overtime loss

RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Wednesday’s results

Tonight’s games

S.J. at Columbus, 7
Pitt. at NJ., 7:30
N'ville at St. Louis, 8
Vancouver at Chi., 8:30

Thursday’s results

Buffalo 2, Edmonton 1 (OT)
Rangers 4, Carolina 1

Toronto 4, Philadelphia 2
Islanders 4, Boston 1

Tampa Bay 3, Washington 2 (SO)
Anaheim at Phoenix, late
Colorado at Calgary, late



Ottawa 4, Florida 0

St. Louis 4, Columbu'
Pittsburgh 5, Chicag
New Jersey 5, Montr

Is 2
ja 4 (SO)
eal 2

Nashville 5, San Jose 0

Detroit 3, Dallas 1

Vancouver 3, Minnesota 2 (OT)

NTT



about retiring at the end of this
season because of a painful
condition that makes his right
foot feel crooked in his skate.
He had offseason surgery to
repair loose ligaments in his
right ankle, but the operation
has made little difference.
“Tm going to evaluate this
summer how I feel and if I’m

| going to continue to play,” he

said. °
Forsberg can become an
unrestricted free agent at the
end of the season, and the
Flyers decided to get some
value for their captain rather
than risk losing him for noth-

“I’m a little shocked,” Fors-
berg said. “I could not commit
to another year because I don’t
know what’s going to happen.
I felt like I was being fair to

Through Wednesday
SCORING GOALIES
Playersteam GP oat GA AVG ing
ssby, Pit 353. 48 “Sauron, CHEANA Ss 21.36 ¥
Lecavalier, TB 68137 6300 16 coun : : :
foot Smith, Dal 15 760 26 2.05
Soe = z 16 Brodeur, NJ. 55 3328 115 2.07
Ornons Hasek, Det 42. 2485 86 2.08
Ovechkin, Was 57 34 38 72 Gigu, Ana 40 2263 81 2.15
ea a ot ee eS bake LA. 9 529 19 2.16
Savard Bos be ig 82 79 Backstrom, Minn 21 1142) 42: 2.21
jagr, NYR ee as 69 «Kiprusoff, Cal 52 3088 117 2.27
Whitney, Car 59 26 42 68 Luongo, Van 54 3148 123 2.34

Bonds finally sig

From Miami Herald Wire Services

Barry Bonds finally signed his
one-year, $15.8 million deal on Thurs-
day, ending more than two months of
wrangling between the slugger and
the San Francisco Giants over con-
tract language.

With both sides satisfied, Bonds is
scheduled to report Monday to
spring training in Scottsdale, Ariz. He
is likely to participate in the Giants’
first full-squad workout on Tuesday.
_ “I expect he will be ready to go,”
general manager Brian Sabean said. '

Bonds, 42, is 22 homers shy of
breaking Hank Aaron’s career
record of 755.

Bonds’ deal was approved by the
commissioner’s office. His agent,
Jeff Borris, and the Giants reached a
preliminary agreement on Dec. 7.

The team announced the deal on
Jan. 29 and Bonds did an interview
via conference call. But he never
signed the contract, and problems
developed.

At issue were specifics about what
would happen if Bonds were to be
indicted or face further legal trouble,
along with details about a personal-
appearance provision that was
rejected by the commissioner’s
office.

The Giants sent revised docu-
ments to Borris, which Bonds signed
Thursday. Only the personal-appear-
ance provision was deleted from the
deal, two baseball officials said. They
spoke on condition of anonymity
because of the sensitivity of the situa-
tion.

A federal grand jury is investigat-
ing whether Bonds perjured himself
when he testified in 2003 in the Bay
Area Laboratory Co-Operative ste-
roid distribution case that he hadn’t
knowingly taken any performance-
enhancing drugs.

Bonds has long denied knowingly
using steroids.

Bonds will fill the final spot on the
team’s 40-man roster, which had
stood at 39 after catcher Mike Math-
eny went on the voluntary retire-
ment list with a concussion.

The seven-time National League
MVP has been working out all offsea-
son at UCLA and appears as healthy
as ever, according to the Giants,
Bonds’ trainer and his agent. He had
arthroscopic surgery on his trouble-
some left elbow after the 2006 sea-
son.

After missing all but 14 games in



give up the no-trade clause

MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD



HOCKEY

Forsberg dealt to Predators





GEORGE WIDMAN/AP.

HEADING TO NASHVILLE: The Flyers traded star center Peter
Forsberg, who was near the end of a two-year contract.

and they get something for me.
It kind of worked out.”

Forsberg, drafted by Phila-
delphia in 1991 but dealt to
Quebec in 1992 in the Eric Lin-
dros trade, was the NHL’s
Most Valuable Player with
Colorado in 2003.

He helped the Avalanche
capture the Stanley Cup in
1996 and 2001.

ELSEWHERE

e Coyotes: Forward Pat-
rick Fischer will be out of the
lineup for six-to-eight weeks
following abdominal surgery.

Fischer has been in and out
of the lineup since December
with a groin injury.

The surgery was performed
Wednesday in Philadelphia,
team officials said.

THURSDAY’S ACTION

- @ MapleLeafs 4, Flyers
2: Mats Sundin had a goal and
an assist to help visiting
Toronto snap a three-game
losing streak.

Jeff O’Neill, Niki Antropov
and Carlo Colaiacovo also
scored for the Maple Leafs,
who had won seven of eight
before their losing streak.

Simon Gagne and Mike
Knuble scored for the Flyers,
who had won two in a row
after a franchise-record 13 con-
secutive home losses.

e Islanders 4, Bruins 1:
Mike Sillinger scored the go-
ahead goal midway through
the third period to lift host
New York.

Sillinger, who got the only
assist on Jeff Tambellini’s first



goal of the season in the open-
ing period, shook off an injury
and scored his 19th at 10:56.
That gave the Islanders at
least one standings point for
the llth time in 12 games
(7-1-4).

e Sabres 2, Oilers 1
(OT): Daniel Briere scored 62
seconds into overtime to lift
host Buffalo.

Maxim Afinogenov also
scored for the Sabres, who ral-
lied from a 1-0 deficit to win
their fourth in a row. Ryan
Miller made 27 saves as Buf-
falo won its sixth consecutive
home game, the team’s longest
streak since winning seven in
a row early in the 1999-2000
season. ng

e Lightning 3, Capitals 2
(SO): Vincent Lecavalier
scored two goals and Martin
St. Louis had the lone shootout
goal, leading host Tampa Bay.

Lecavalier has a career-high
39 goals, three shy of Brian
Bradley’s team record set dur-
ing the 1992-93 season. Lecava-
lier has scored a goal in 15 of 19
games.

e Rangers 4, Hurricanes
1: Karel Rachunek and
Michael Nylander each had a
goal and an assist to lead visit-
ing New York.

Rachunek scored one of
three power-play goals for the
Rangers, who have won three
in a row.

Matt Cullen, who played
for Carolina last season, added
two assists for New York.
Brendan Shanahan and Pascal
Dupuis, in his Rangers debut,
also scored for New York.

LATE WEDNESDAY

e Canucks 3, Wild 2
(OT): Sami Salo’s goal 4:20
into overtime lifted visiting
Vancouver. The Canucks,
15-3-3 since Christmas, also got
goals from Daniel Sedin and
Markus Naslund.



!

2005 following three operations on
his right knee, Bonds batted .270 with
26 homers and 77 RBIs and drew 115
walks in 130 games last year.

ELSEWHERE

e Cubs: Carlos Zambrano
backed off recent comments that he
would leave the club as a free agent
after this season if he doesn’t get a
multiyear contract during spring
training.

Although he would rather get a
new deal done by Opening Day, the
pitcher said Thursday he would be
willing to negotiate in the fall. He
won't discuss a contract during the
season, though.

“They have the first look,” Zam-

OED Teo

RnR o en

BASEBALL | AROUND THE MAJOR LEAGUES

ns deal with Giants

pan



: ELAINE THOMPSON/AP
IT’S ABOUT TIME: With his one-year contract signed, Giants slugger

Barry Bonds is scheduled to report to spring training on Monday
and is likely to participate in the first full-squad workout Tuesday.

brano said after the club’s initial
workout for pitchers and catchers in
Mesa, Ariz.

“J didn’t say that if they don’t sign
me before the end of spring training I
will not sign with the Cubs. I didn’t
say that. I just said they have till the
beginning of the season. If not, I don’t
want to talk about a contract during
the season.”

But in an interview with WGN-TV
this week, the Cubs’ ace was adamant
that he would leave as a free agent if
he didn’t have a multiyear contract
by the opener... . Elsewhere, oft-in-
jured Kerry Wood is out again —
this time because of a flub in a hot
tub. The Cubs pitcher is not expected
to throw off a mound for a few days

after he slipped this week getting out
of a hot tub at home. Wood landed on
his stomach and chest.

“It was just a little spill,” Wood
said Thursday. “I didn’t think any-
thing of it. Nothing’s wrong. It’s just
going to be a few extra days. My arm
feels great. My body feels good.”

Wood said he probably would not
have thrown off a mound until today
had he not gotten hurt. He partici-
pated in most drills on Thursday
when pitchers and catchers worked
out for the first time.

Bothered by an injured right
shoulder the past three seasons,
Wood is being converted to a reliever
after being limited to four starts last
year.

e Twins: Right fielder Michael
Cuddyer and the team agreed to a
one-year, $3,575,000 contract, avoid-
ing arbitration minutes before their
scheduled hearing.

Cuddyer batted .284 with 24
homers, 109 RBIs and 102 runs scored
last season, hitting cleanup between
American League batting champion
Joe Mauer and league MVP Justin
Morneau. Cuddyer’s -H- outfield
assists were tied for third in the
league as well.

The deal includes a $50,000 bonus
if Cuddyer gets at least 650 plate
appearances in 2007.

After making $1.35 million last year
and posting career-best numbers in
his first full season as a regular, Cud-
dyer asked for $4.25 million and the
Twins offered $3 million.

The sides were together in a room
waiting to argue their cases before
the three-person panel when they
walked out and settled in the hall.

Minnesota had six players eligible
for arbitration this year, but settled
on contracts with each of them with-
out going to a hearing. Twins pitch-
ers and catchers are required to
report to spring training in Fort
Myers, Fla., by Sunday, with the full
squad due by Feb. 23.

@ Mets: Catcher Paul Lo Duca is
completely healthy following offsea-
son thumb surgery — and he would
Jove a contract extension.

“J’ve been vocal that I want to stay
here,” the four-time All-Star said
after reporting to spring training in
Port St. Lucie, Fla.

Lo Duca, who will turn 35 in April,
is entering the final season of a three-
year deal that will pay him $6.25 mil-
lion this season. He hit a team-lead-

ing .318 last year with five home runs
and 49 RBIs, helping New York cap-
ture the National League East for the
first time since 1988.

e Yankees: Joe Torre spoke to
Bernie Williams and the message
from the Yankees manager was clear:
Come to spring training.

Williams, feeling slighted by the
only major league team he’s played
for, has thus far refused to accept a
minor-league contract. After Torre
left some telephone messages, the 38-
year-old outfielder called back on
Wednesday afternoon.

“The only thing I stressed to him
yesterday is: ‘If you want to continue
to play, you can’t do it if you stay up
there. We have to see you,” Torre
said on Thursday.

Torre said that if Williams does
come to spring training, he would
have a real chance of earning a spot
on the Yankees’ 25-man roster.

“Tt doesn’t mean you have to hit
.400,” Torre said. “I think it’s what
you see more so than what the num-
bers are.”

Williams has been one of Torre’s
favorites and helped the Yankees
capture four World Series and six
American League pennants. Williams
said last week that he was leaning
against accepting the minor-league
contract but said he hadn’t made up
his mind.

“Yeah, it would be tough for me if
you had to say goodbye,” Torre said.
“I sense he feels confident that he can
still play this game.” ... George
Steinbrenner’s son-in-law and des-
ignated successor to run the Yankees
was arrested early Thursday for sus-
picion of driving under the influence.

Yankees general partner Steve
Swindal, 52, was arrested by the St.
Petersburg (Fla.) Police at 4:26 a.m.
EST, according to a copy of the
charge report posted on the Pinellas
County Sherriff’s Office’s website.
He was booked for a misdemeanor
and released on $250 bond. ... The
Yankees will honor the memory of
Cory Lidle by wearing black arm
bands on the left sleeves of their uni-
forms this season.

Lidle was acquired by the Yankees
last summer from Philadelphia, and
the 34-year-old pitcher died on Oct. 11
when his plane crashed into a Man-
hattan apartment building. The Yan-
kees have not assigned No. 30, the
number Lidle wore, to anyone in
spring training.

FITTEST







\
| _
> |
i iy Le



76F



60F; #3»





_——

“NOT AS WARM,
WITH A SHOWER

’ The Tribune



BAHAMAS EDITION

he Hiami Herald





Volume: 103 No.72



Local government's
RIT RSE TILL

SEE FRONT PAGE OF BUSINESS SECTION

Promise of island-wide
demonstration if further
punitive action taken

Bi By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

MEMBERS of the National
Congress of Trade Unions yester-
day threw their full support behind

the Prison Staff Association,

promising to lead an island-wide
demonstration against government
.if any further punitive action is
taken against the prison officers.

Speaking with The Tribune yes-
terday afternoon, president of the
NCTU John Pinder said that a
demonstration would be the first
step in an “action plan” by the
umbrella organisation to support
the prison officers.

Following’ Wednesday’s
announcement by Minister of
National Security Cynthia Pratt
that the four-day work stoppage at
the prison was illegal and that all
participating officers will receive
the maximum punishment, union
leader Mr Pinder yesterday spoke
out in support of the prison staff
members.

“Weare of the view that any
discipline taken against the offi-

cers of the Bahamas Prison Offi-
cers Staff Association (BPOSA)
is victimisation and would result in
the NCTU and its affiliates bring-
ing pressure on the government
in support of the BPOSA,” Mr
Pinder said yesterday at a press
conference.

Deputy Prime Minister Pratt
told the House of Assembly on
Wednesday night that all officers
who participated in the go-slow
which turned into a massive sick-
out will be fined for the days in
question, will suffer the reduction
of three days in his or her accu-
mulated leave and will be required
to make a public apology.

Mr Pinder yesterday told The
Tribune that the NCTU consid-
ered this punishment too exccs-
sive.

“When you're sick, you present
a sick slip, they (the officers) all
provided a sick slip, but the min-
ister made the determination that
it was an illegal strike.

SEE page 14

Nurses union threaten
industrial action

THE Bahamas Nurses Union is threatening industrial action if

government does not agree to provide them with a proper industrial

agreement. .

President of the union, Cleola Hamilton, made this announce-
ment yesterday at a press conference in response to the Ministry of
Health offering the nurses a memorandum of understanding instead

of an industrial agreement.

Ms Hamilton warned that nurses do:not make “vain or idle
threats” and that the union does not understand how they are the
only members of the public service without an industrial agreement.

However, the union president said that the nurses are optimistic

SEE page 14














































































































‘ Sj
ond drinks

y « Whopper Jr. i
‘with cates fries 3: 89 ‘.



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007
mu Long

B MEMBERS of the
Crime Scene Unit were
yesterday at ‘Horizons’,
the Eastern Road resi-
dence shared by Anna
Nicole Smith and her
companion Howard K
Stern. International
media surrounded mem-
bers of the unit.
(Photo: Ana Bianca
Marin)

f By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
POLICE officers yester-

day entered the embattled

Eastern Road home ‘Hori-

zons’ in search of evidence

in the case of the burglary

report filed by Howard K

Stern.

Uniformed officers were
seen arriving at the mansion
at around [0 o'clock yester-
day morning.

They were followed a
short time after by a crime
scene unil van and officers
getting out of the vehicle
were seen taking pictures of
the $900,000 property before
leaving the premises at
around 11.30am.

Assistant Police Commis-
sioner Reginald Ferguson,
officer in charge of crime,
confirmed for The Tribune
last night that the officers

_ SEE page 14



Ingraham
hits out at

Shane Gibson. employee ‘resistance’

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

AS IMMIGRATION Minister
Shane Gibson secured employment
with Anna Nicole Smith for his
mother, his father and his father’s
companion, Prime Minister Perry
Christie didn’t think to tell him that
his behaviour was inappropriate;
that it reeked of nepotism; that it
represented serious conflict of
interest for a Cabinet Minister to
use his official position for person-
al, private gain, Opposition leader
Hubert Ingraham claimed at a ral-
ly in the Golden Gates Con-
stituency Wednesday.

Mr Ingraham said that Mr Gib-
son is chiefly responsible for having
set this unfortunate chain of events
in motion.

“He is the one who has acted








inappropriately and improperly. He ;

is the one. He was chiefly respon-
sible, not only for granting Ms
Smith permanent residence under
dubious circumstances, but of fast-

SEE page 14.





MnoneRT

} ~ LAMINATE FOR COUNTERTOPS & aoe

PRICE — 75¢




































Trade union leader
says Cable Beach
hotels should expect

Recall on
Peter Pan,
Great Value
peanut butter

: @ By PAUL TURNQUEST
CABLE BEACH hotels should : Tribune Staff Reporter
expect employee “resistance” to :

the recently implemented Early
Retirement and Voluntary Sepa-
ration Plan, says trade union
leader Thomas Bastian.

In an exclusive interview with
The Tribune, the former president
of the Bahamas Hotel Catering &
Allied Workers Union claimed
that only the Baha Mar Group
would benefit from the plan, while
long-time employees would end According to the Food and
: up losing their benefits and senior- | Drug Administration (FDA), the
i ity. iC DC has linked 288 cases of

Yesterday, Baha Mar CEO : food-borne illness in 39 states to
Don Robinson said he did not see} consuinption of varying types of
“any major hurdles” that would } Peter Pan peanut butter. The
prevent the $2.4 billion Cable ; Great Value peanut butter is
Beach developer from hitting its | manufactured at the same plant in
March | target for clinching a sup- {| Georgia, and as a result could car-
plemental agreement with the gov- } tya similar risk of contamination.
ernment, as the company unveiled ; However, Great Value peanut
its Early Retirement and Volun- } butter made by other manufac-

SEE page 14 SEE page 14

m@ By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter



THE Ministry of Agriculture
and Marine Resources issued an
alert to local consumers after
ConAgra Foods Inc, acting on
the advice of the Centre for Dis-
ease Control and Prevention,
issued a recall on its Peter Pan
and Great Value peanut butter
products due to salmonella cont-
amination.







WILSONART ADHESIVES



. the DW Davis Gymnasi-

oe

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

@ BASKETBALL
NPWBA ACTION

The New Providence
, Women’s Basketball
Association continued its
regular season on Tues-
day night at the DW
Davis Gymnasium with
the Cleaning Center
Angels blasting the Col-
lege of the Bahamas
Caribs 78-61. |

Suzette McKenzie
scored 21 points with 11
rebounds, Keisha
Richardson had 21 points
and four steals, Sharell
Cash had 12 points and
Kecia Smith has 12
points, nine assists and
six steals,

In a losing effort,
Kavionne Newbold
scored 17 points with 18
rebounds. Diasti Delancy
had 14 points and Chris-
tine Sinclair added 13
points.

m@ ALL-STAR CLASSIC

The New Providence
Women’s Basketball
Association is gearing up
for its All-Star and Leg-
ends’ Classic on Saturday
night at the DW Davis
Gymnasium.

At 7 p.m., the past leg-
ends of the game will be
in action. That will be fol-
lowed by a three-point
shootout. And in the fea-
ture contest, the current
stars in the league will
play in their All-Star
game.

lm NPBA ACTION

The New Providence
Basketball Association
will continue its regular
season action tonight
with a double header at

um. In the 7 p.m. opener,
the Sunshine Auto Ruff
Rdyers will play the
Cable Bahamas Enter-
tainers and at 8:15 p.m.,
the Millennium Jammers
will take on the Com-
monwealth Bank Giants.

A double header is
scheduled for Saturday as
well. In the 7 p.m. open-
er, the Millennium Jam-
mers will take on the
Police Crimestoppers and
at 8:15 p.m., the Cable
Bahamas Entertainers
will meet the Y-Care
Wreckers.

@ SOFTBALL
MSL ACTION

The Masters Softball
League will continue its
regular season action on
Saturday at the Archdea-
con William Thompson
Softball Park at the
Southern Recreation
Ground with a double
header on tap.

In the 1 p.m. opener,
the DHL Lions will take
on the Jousha Knights.
At 3 p.m., the Doghouse
Rangers will play the Bat

’ Miller Panthers.

No game will be played
on Sunday.

# FOOTBALL
CAFL ACTION

The Commonwealth
American Football
League will be back in
action with a double
header on tap this week-
end at the DW Davis
playing field.

In the lone game on
Saturday, starting at 1

- p.m., the Pros will take

on the Stingrays and on
Sunday in the lone game,
also at 1 p.m., the Jets
will meet the Sunburners.



lM BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS.

Senior Sports Reporter

THE Jordan Prince William
Falcons and coach Godfrey
McQuay made history on Tues-
day at the Kendal Isaacs Gym-
nasium. i

They became the first schoo
to win both the Bahamas Asso-
ciation of Independent Sec-
ondary Schools’ junior and
senior boys basketball titles at
the same time.

Arid McQuay became the
first coach in the history of the
BAISS to move from one
school and accomplish the feat
in his first year as a new coach,

“I wasn’t trying to set that
goal, but it became a personal
goal,” said McQuay, who took
ovet from Dexter Cambridge
in September. “I don’t think
any toach has won both at the
same time and did it in his first
year.

In 1989, McQuay won the
first of five senior boys basket-
ball titles when he made his
debut with the St. Anne's Blue-
waves, He went on to win three
junior boys titles as well, albeit
at different times.

McQuay thanked God and
the support he got from Jordan
Prince Williams’ head of the
Physical Education Depart-
ment Hattie Moxey anid his
assistant Horatio ‘Yellow’ Poiti-
ef.

He said that while he knew
that the Falcons’ senior boys
team had a solid base to work
with, he was particularly
pleased with the way the junior
boys came around to win their
title.

“The relationship with them
just grew and grew with them
understanding me and me
understanding them,” McQuay
pointed out.

“But with the senior boys, we
expected them, They have a
good team, They are very
young and I felt that we were
the number one team in private
school and St. John’s played
well as the number two school
behind us.”

In the senior boys clincher,
the Falcons knocked off the
Giants 51-47 as Ollen Smith
scored 13 points and Rashad
Williams had 10 as they secured



Be

MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

a 2+1 victory in the series.
The pennant winning Falcons

finished the year with a 15-1

witt-loss record.

Shartairj Wallace had 18 and
Ricardo Moultrie added 14 in
the loss.

In the junior boys clincher,
the Falcons pulled off a 50-40
decision over the Giants for a 2-
1 win in the series as Andrew

Forbes scored 18 and Jasper

Thompson added 13.
Runners-up in the pennant
race, the Falcons posted a 14-2
record to claim their title.
Terrell Sandiford had 11 and
Dwight Moss 10 in the loss. |
After both series were tied
at 1-1, McQuay said he had a
little bit of concern, but he
knew that they had the teams
that were able to pull it off,
especially the senior boys.
“We had about three things
that caused us to lose the game,
I can’t tell you one of them,” he
stated, “But the other two of
them was because we made

pach make hi

numerous turnovers and we

‘ didn’t play defence,

“We knew that once we set-

‘tled down, we had the ability

to come back and pull it off. So
it was just a matter of us doing
what we had to do to win.”

AS a few coach coming in,
McQuay said he never envi-
sioned having the kind of suc-
cess that he achieved with both
teams, although back in his
mind, he was confident as the
season ee that they
could achieve it,

“The kids adopted me quick-
ly and they started calling me
‘Daddy’ again,” he pointed out.
“So once you feel the kids and
you feel you are a part of them,
you ate on your way,

“That really didn't happen
until the second half of the sea-
son when they started to come
around and they started to
show the discipline and the con-
fidence in me.

“That was when we felt that
we could do it, not just with




one, but the two divisions.”

Jordan Prince William also
contested the senior girls title,
but they fell short as they were
swept by St. John’s in two
straight gaines in the final.

The Giants went on to ink
theit names in the record
books, having won their first
senior pirls title. It came dur-
ing their 60th anniversary cele-
brations.

Jordan Prince William are
looking for a celebration of
their own. They are just waiting
on confirmation on a date from
the Bahamas National Baptist
Missionary and Educational
Convention.

In the meantime, Moxey said
when che lured McQuay to Jor-
dan Prince William, she said
she knew that she was bringing
a proven coach to the Falcons.

“DT knew the person | was pet-
ting. I knew he was a person
who was into basketball and
other sporting events and that
he would give 100 per cent,”

@ MIAMI HERALD

ea ———_ SPORTS INSIDE

i









Moxey stressed,

“So | encouraged him after
he came out of St. Anne's and
he did.”

Moxey said Jordan Prince
William has been blessed over
the years with a wealth of tal-
ent, but it was just a matter of
time before they display it.

“This school is based with a
lot of natural talent,” she insist-
ed.

“We just need to put more
emphasis on the children and
help to get them to go into a
different direction so that they
can perform in a better posi-
tion.”

The double dose of basket-
ball victory, she added, will
hopefully propel the Falcons as
they look ahead to the other
sports like track and field.

“We have the talent here, but
the children themselves don't
realise what they have,” she
quipped. “It’s just tor us to
bring the talent out of them like
we did tn basketball”







CCE EE —E——EE———e—=——O

ee Se Se Ee ee oe ee me ee

PAGE 8C, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007

Pollard in
the West
Indies
squad for
World Cup

@ CRICKET
KINGSTOWN,
St. Vincent

Associated Press

ALLROUNDER
Kieron Pollard was
named Thursday in the
West Indies 15-man
squad for the cricket
World Cup.

Allrounder Marlon
Samuels was also
included despite being
under investigation by
the International Crick-
et Council anti-corrup-
tion unit. |

The 19-year-old Pol-
lard got his first inter-
national callup after
impressive perfor-
mances for Trinidad &
Tobago in regional
tournament play over
the last two months. His
debut first-class season
included two quick cen-
turies in the Carib Beer
Cup tournament.

West Indies captain
Brian Lara, 37, will play
his fifth World Cup =
this one in front of a
home crowd in the
Caribbean ‘where the
tournament is being
held for the first time.
Lara made his World
Cup debut in 1992.

Batsman Shivnarine
Chanderpaul, 32, is ©
back for his fourth
World Cup. He and
Lara lead a seasoned
batting lineup alongside
Chris Gayle,
Ramnaresh Sarwan and
Samuels. :

The ICC has sanc-
tioned Samuels to play
dependent on the find-
ings of an anti-corrup-
tion probe. Indian
police alleged that a
taped telephone conver-
sation suggested
Samuels disclosed team
information to a book-
maker during the recent
limited-overs series in
India.

Sarwan was absent
through injury since last
December and missed
the one-day series in
Pakistan and India. |

Lendl Simmons and
Devon Smith were cho-
sen as back-up batsmen.

Simmons made his
debut in November in
Pakistan while the left-
handed Smith was cho-
sen for impressing
against India last month
after two and a half
years out of the team.

Pollard joined
Dwayne Bravo and
Dwayne Smith as the
medium-paced batting
allrounders.

The main bowling is
limited to four fast
bowlers with Fidel
Edwards named only as
a reserve. Left-armer
Ian Bradshaw and
Corey Collymore pro-
duce controlled seam
while the West Indies
will look to Jerome
Taylor and Daren Pow-
ell for express pace.

There was no spot for
a specialist spinner with
allrounders Gayle and
Samuels offering effec-:
tive off-spin.

Denesh Ramdin was
retained as wicket-
keeper.

West Indies is in
Group D for the open-
ing round with Pakistan,
Zimbabwe and Ireland.

The tournament starts
March 13.

M@ SQUAD: Brian
Lara (captain),
Ramnaresh Sarwan,
Chris Gayle, Shivnarine
Chanderpaul, Marlon
Samuels, Lendl Sim-
mons, Devon Smith,
Dwayne Bravo, Dwayne
Smith, Kieron Pollard,

Telios Academy, Faith Temple
enter Hugh Campbell Classic

m@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

TELIOS Academy and Faith
Temple were the latest teams
entered in the 25th Hugh
Campbell Basketball Classic,
bringing the total to a record

All four pools, according to
Alfred Forbes, will now be
stacked with nine teams each.
At the end of the day, a total of
67 teams will be played before
the champion is decided.

“LT see a longer tournament,
which will be extended by a
couple of games,” said Forbes,
who is responsible for setting
up the pools. “Last year, we had
36 teams, but we didn’t have
one of the teams entered.

“This year will go just as last
year with the same amount of
sessions and games played. It
won’t be exactly the same tour-
nament because the same teams

are not in the same pools. But

the structure will be the same as
last year.”

Telios, coached by Pastor
Dave Adams, will be making
their debut in the tournament,

‘North Andros High Invitational highlights

Say ae ee ew ee ee He



SPORTS

\

TU aay

¢ HERE’S a look at the final list of teams in the four pools for
the 25th Hugh Campbell Basketball Classic, scheduled to start
on Monday at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium:

Pool 1 - CI Gibson, Catholic High, St. John’s, Bishop Eldon,
Government High, Harbour Island, Mangrove Cay, Galilee
and Aquinas College. ;

Pool Il - St. George’s, CC Sweeting, Alpha/Omega, Dame
Doris Johnson, St. Anne’s, SC Bootle, Turks and Cacios, King’s

College and Telios Academy.

Pool II - Eight Mile Rock, CR Walker, Sunland Lutheran,
RM Bailey, Mt. Carmel, Church of God, North Andros, Bimi- '

ni and Old Bight.

Pool IV - Jordan Prince William, Tabernacle Christian Acad-
emy, CV Bethel, Jack Hayward, Nassau Christian Academy,
Kingsway Academy, South Andros, Preston Albury and Faith

Temple.

while Faith Temple, coached by
Ray Evans, will be a returning
team.

“We’re happy to have all of
the teams in the tournament
(this year),” Forbes stressed.
“We are hoping that all of the
teams will show up and they will
do very well.”

With the exception of 1986
when there was a dispute
between the teachers that even-
tually led to a split in the gov-

qancauae

PrePITIer TTC dbbedeenenee Preerereeere ie)



ernment and private schools,
the tournament has stood its
ground and is now considered
the only event in New Provi-
dence that has had such a
longevity.

The tournament is on par
with the Catholic High Christ-
mas Invitational Tournament
that is held in Grand Bahama.
But Forbes, a former chairman
of the tournament, said the
hype surrounding this presti-

DPM SMG a ill cmc roe rts |
TRITON PLM CULSrTURG LT a ELE 4
r 4



w@ A RUNNER rounds the bend in relay heats



@ A NORTH Andros
High School student
runs at the North
Andros High School

gious event us unparalleled.
“Every year it’s a new tour-

hament, even thought its old in

its structure,” he explained.

“Every year, it’s new in its .

excitement and with this being
the 25th anniversary, the excite-
ment is building up as one that
will stand out.”

While there is a lot of excite-

‘ment mounding as the tourna-

ment draws nigh on Monday,
the Jordan Prince William Fal-
cons are hoping that this will be
the year that a private school
in New Providence finally wins
the title.

Fresh off their championship
feat over the St. John’s Giants
in the BAISS final on Tuesday
at the Kendal Isaacs Gym, first
year coach Godfrey McQuay
said it would certainly put the
icing on the cake on what has
been a remarkable year for Jor-
dan Prince William.

“It’s not something that I put
any emphasis on, but that is the
one title that I’m missing and
Jordan Prince William is miss-
ing,” McQuay pointed out.

“We were always heading to
Hugh Campbell. That is why
we went to the Grand Bahama

my Me %

6

”
'
,
'

eu gre

‘k

tournament and Stateside to s
view some other teams in Jand-
ary,” McQuay said. “So we

were gearing towards it. fs |
“So now that we’ve been suc- >

cessful in winning this title, I

_ hope that we will stay focussed ‘

and go out there and win it all in -
the tournament.” sf eh
Bahamas National Baptist
Missionary ‘and Educational
Convention’s president, the
Rey. Dr. William Thompson, .
concurred with McQuay.

“We feel confident. We fully: .
do;” Thompson proclaimed. :
“We feel we can win the Hugh.”

Campbell.” ‘

The Government Secondary
Schools Sports Association have
yet to complete their basketball
season. Their playoffs and
championships won’t be played
until after the Hugh Campbell
Tournament is held. ms

The CI Gibson Rattlers are
the defending champions and
they are considered to be the!
team to watch out of the GSS.
SA.

As for the teams coming in,
all eight of the teams from

sebneadeee AAUGeseecceesaesbassabacsbeseGeeseseUedssdeadssedAssssssseensaEssesessssdsAsdASbLEAGELEdEEe SASS EAA Ged EGS eE eS EEESSLUGAGLSAUTEALAL UGA GSALLGAGALAEEAEUAAASEEAASEAUAS USUAL AALBEOU ESE SATE GS



@ A MEMBER of the C.1. Gibson Rattlers relay team takes the baton in heats ait
the North Andros High School 20th Annual Invitational Track and Field Meet on
Friday, Feb. 9, 2007 in Nicholl's Town, North Andros.

(BIS Photo: Tim Aylen)

Wy phyla ee renee ee

ve
soe
ie

.



J

Grand Bahama are listed as-:
potential candidates to win it, ; -*-











Denesh Ramdin, Ian
Bradshaw, Corey Colly-

20th Annual Invitational
more, Jerome Taylor,
j

(BIS Photo:
Tim Aylen)

at the North Andros High School 20th Annual
' Lavitational Track and Field Meet.
(BIS Photo: Tim A ylen)



Daren Powell.





PAGE 14, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007 |

if CER
jngr
FROM page one

tracking the process. He is the one.
“And, he is chiefly responsible
for the potentially protracted liti-
gation that is likely to tie up some
of our courts — for months if not
yo ais — as they try to sort out the
tess: Who owns the house? Who
is the baby’s father? He is the
one,” the former prime minister.
The opposition leader also
blomed the minister for all of the
“sleazy international publicity
brought gown on the Bahamas.”
Mr Gibson, according to Mr
yooraham, exercised incredibly bad
judgment as a minister and is
chictly responsible for the mess that
followed,
“The stark truth is that Anna

Nicole Smith was given permanent

residence in the Bahamas on the
fast track, not because she was a
prize investor; not because she was
~ a celebrity of the kind that would
add grace and luster to our
Bahamas: she was afforded special
treatment simply because she was a
good, nay an especially good, kind
and generous friend of Immigra-
tion Minister Shane Gibson:
“They took us all for fools and
now it’s blowing up in their faces,
big time. So who's looking like fools
now? They are the ones, The prob-
lem is that it is making the whole
country look bad.. And for what?
They should have known better, all
of them. Many people living on this
_ planet would have known some-

“it.

FROM page one

tary Separation Programme for employ-
ees.
Under the plan, all full-time employees

i _ up to the director level working in the

Bahamas and Florida have been offered a
one-time, completely voluntary opportu-
nity to end their employment with Cable
Beach Resorts and receive an attractive
compensation package based on their posi-
tions and length of employment.
Baha Mar said the plan complies with
all labour laws and union guidelines, and
that employees have been given a
six-week window during which to consider

who participate in the plan and can prove
that they have enhanced their skills through
continuing education or specialized training

after leaving Cable Beach resorts, will

receive first interview consideration when
hiring begins for Baha Mar in 2010.

‘Baha Mar CEO Don Robinson told Tri-
bune Business: “As we start mobilizing for
the project some of the rooms will come
down, so the workforce has to come down
with that.”

Although Voluntary Separation Plans
are considered a “best practice” amongst
the world’s leading corporations, Dr. Bas-
tian said he believed the early retirement
plan was proof that the developer was
breaking a promise that it made to the gov-

»

FROM page one

In addition, the developer said that those ;

LOCAL NEWS

ernment when it first bought the Cable
Beach hotels.

“Baha Mar is breaching the commitment
they made to the government and which
the government made to the Bahamian
people, that nobody would have to lose
their jobs despite the purchase of the Cable

. Beach strip,” Dr. Bastian claimed.

According to him, Kerzner Internation-
al did not offer a retirement package to its
employees during construction of Atlantis.

“What they did was tune down each
department and they allowed employees
to work the number of days that were avail-
able and many people went on the con-
struction site to work, but workers were
allowed to retain their seniority and all
their benefits.”

Asked whether he thought employees
would rush to participate in the plan, Dr.
Bastian predicted that many persons would
not be able to find an alternative job, there-

Trade Union leader

fore workers would not be attracted to the |

plan.

He said the plan is going to cause “quite
a stir” amongst hotel employees.

He explained: “If the employees start a
new job they will be starting all over again
because all of their accrued benefits after
long years of service at the hotel will come
to an end.” ,

Baha Mar’s Retirement and Voluntary

Separation Plan applies to employees of ;

Radisson Cable Beach Resort, the Nassau
Beach Hotel and Wyndham Nassau Resort
& Crystal Palace Casino.

‘Horizons’ home

Bahamas Nurses Union

FROM page one

THE TRIBUNE



that they will soon reach an agreement with the Ministry of Health.
The Ministry of Public Health yesterday evening responded to the comments
of the Nurses Union, stating that the “matter of the difficulty of signing of the nurs-

es’ contract was brought to the attention of the Minister of Public Service during -

the last meeting with the representatives of the various services union and staff

association representatives.”

“At that time, the minister undertook to bring some degree of finality to the .

: matter and he continues to see that this is carried out in the shortest possible time,”
: the statement read.

FROM page one

“(The officers) agreed to have three
days taken from their leave, but you can’t
punish people three times for the same
offence. They lost their vacation days, you
turn around and cut (their salary) for three
days and you still want a public apology.
We just thought that that was a bit too
much,” he said.

The union leader said that in the
NCTU’s view this decision by the Ministry
of National Security was “intimidation,
victimisation, and union-busting tactics.”

Mr Pinder also claimed that some of
the issues the prison officers are concerne
about were matters that have been over-
due for resolution for more than two
years.

“We wish to remind the government
that in December 2006, executives of the

NCTU met with Prime Minister Christie, .

Deputy Prime Minister Pratt, Minister of

turers is not affected.

FROM page one

Prison officers

Labour and Immigration Gibson and the
Minister for the Public Service Mitchell to
discuss the outstanding issues regarding
the prison officers,” he said. ‘
During the course of this meeting, he
said, “government committed to having all
outstanding monies paid to the prison
officers before Christmas as well as com-
mitting to a timetable for resolution ‘of
the other issues.”
“None of these commitments were met
-by the government and no explanation
was given as to why they were not met,”
‘Mr Pinder said. :
National Security Minister Pratt on
Wednesday told parliament that the con-
cerns of the prison officers included mon-
- ey matters that had either already been
resolved or were in the process of resolu-
tion, and that the Prison Staff Associa-
tion was aware of this fact.

Recall

thing of the history of Anna Nicole
Smith,” Mr Ingraliam said. © .

It was the prime minister’s duty
when the Immigration Minister,
blinded by his relationship, brought
this matter to Cabinet, to tell him
no, Mr Ingtaham said. .

So far the opposition leader has
not called for Mr Gibson’s resig-
nation as it was “too late for that
now”. :

“Resignations will not save the.
country. Leave them right where
they are so we can get rid of the
lot of them one time and done. As
Ministers of the Government do
their own thing for their own rea--
sons, Prime Minister Christie is
busy looking down at his feet while
the country goes to hell in a hand-
basket. You cannot trust.them,”
Mr Ingraham said.

‘Cedar Crest Funeral Home

? Robinson Road and First Street P.0.Box N-603 « Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
\ Telephone: 1-242-325-51 68/328-1944/393-1352

state of Texas.
















F

TYRONE GARY ROLLE
JOHNSON AGE, 59



a resident Polhemus Street, Bain Town 11:00 a.m.
Saturday, 17th February, 2007 at Bethel Baptist
Church Meeting Street. Officiating Rev.
Timothy Stewart and associate ministers.
‘Interment follows in Southern Cemetery
-Spikenard and Cowpen Roads.

SLATY LSTA LN aE ra

Cherished memory are held by his son, PC
2786 Darren Johnson Sr.; daughters,
Bernadette Whyms, Melonie Williams, Latoya
Johnson, Verenique Smith Sands and Tameka
Johnson Rahming; numerous grandchildren
and great grandchildren including, Tiereace
Scavella, Manesha Johnson. Darren Johnson
Jr., Deja Johnson, Audrey, Violet, Ruth,
Brittany, Bridget, Marco, Kevin, Charlie,
Antonio, Tonya, Anthony, Shavetta, Meltina,
Kentroy, Natasha, Samuel Jr., Saminique,
Rayesha, Saminia, Latrel, Jamelo, Jvar, Jason,
Jr., Darneka and Kentashae; father, Solomon
Johnson: brother, Godfrey Rolle; sons-in-law,
George Whyms, Robert Williams, Samuel
Moss, Tamaro Rahming, Kirklin Sands and
« host of other relatives and friends including,
Rev. Janet Smith-Butler, Patrice Saunders,
Alexandria Smith, Edward Alexander, Jan,
Dwayne, Yvette, Brenell, Marjorie, Elricka,
Romeo, Erroll, Sonovia, Fabian, Angelo,
lesha, Bruce, Stephen, Dominique, Sandy,
Mrs. Shirley Simmons and family, Mrs. Ruth
| Burnside and family, Mrs. Joyce Rolle, Rose
| Greene and family, Mrs. Mizpah Bosfield and
family, Mrs. Moxey and family, Frankie Moss
and family, Pearline Dorsett and family, Dolly
Rahming and family, Johnson, Munroe,
Brennen and Campbell families, Cynthia
Davis and family, Kenneth Dean and family,
Ms. Moxey and family, Yvette Ferguson and
family, Mariona Linden and family, Christine
Cooper and family, Brenda Johnson and
family, David Strachan and family, Vanda
Dean and family, Albert McKinney and family,
Cambridge Street; Dean's Street, Polhemus .
Street and Parker Street families.

AVS EA SAN




































Relatives and friends may pay their last
respects at Cedar Crest Funeral Home,
Robinson Road and First Street on Friday
from 12noon to 5pm and at the church on
Saturday from 9:30 a.m. until service time.

were in fact “in pursuit of the investigation of an
earlier report of a break-in.”

Mr Stern, partner and long-time lawyer of the
deceased celebrity Anna Nicole Smith, filed a
burglary report with local police on the weekend,
claiming that Ms Smith’s personal effects, includ-
ing a computer hard drive, home videos and oth-
er items had been stolen from the Eastern Road
home the couple had shared in the past months.

Meanwhile in Florida — where the former Play-
boy playmate died suddenly last Thursday — the
heated fight over Ms Smith’s body and the custody
cof her five-month-old Bahamas-born daughter
Dannielynn continued yesterday.

Mr Stern, who claims he is executor of Ms
Smith’s will, told the media that he wants to have
her buried next to her son Daniel in the Lakeview
Cemetery in the Bahamas. He said Ms Smith
bought a plot there a few months ago.

However, Ms Smith’s mother, Virgie Arthur,
says she wants her daughter buried in her home




UNERAL SERVICE FOR,

of the deceased’s cheek.

ciated Press reported.

said at the emergency hearing yesterday.
of Dannielynn’s parentage remains unanswered.
the celebrity infant.

lars.

mmeritte’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
¢ MARKET STREET —
° P.O. BOX GT-2097 * TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Bruce Anthony "Panther"
Colebrooke, 53

-a resident of Bowe's
Alley, will be held at Mt.
Olive Baptist Church,
Meadow Street, on
Saturday February 17th,
2007 at 11:00 a.m.
Officiating will be Rev.
C.B. Moss. Interment
follows in Southern
Cemetery, Cowpen and
Spikenard Roads.

























Left to cherish precious

and wonderful memory

are his mother Amanda

Colebrooke; children,

“Bruce, Navio and Nikitha Colebrooke; grand children,
Jawuan and Bernell Colebrooke; brothers and sister Selva
Colebrooke-Hudson, Lisa and Walter Johnson; nieces and
nephews Robertha, Selisha, Damia, Angel, Terelle, Ryan,
and Selva Hudson and Melody Rozak; grand niece and
nephews, Elizabeth, Philli and Javen, Hudson; uncle and
aunts, David, Anna and Elosie Colebrooke, Hattie Gardiner-
Sweeting, David and Edith Pratt, Rev. Rubien and Belthine
Duncombe; great grand aunt, Corrita Wallace Jones; special .
friends, Cheryl and Neville Johnson, Isadora Johnson,
Jeanette Rolle; godchildren Terran Moss, Evna Bain,
Lavitra Strachan, Stavrox McIntosh, Jr., and Carrynika
Dean; other relatives and friends including, Dorothy and
Edward Prosper, Betty Davis, Marjorie Ramsey, Jacklyn
and James McKinney, Carolyn Bastian, Lee Sweeting,
Finetta Evans, Edward Prosper Jr., and family, Wendel
Francis and family, Derek Moss and family, Andrew Moss
and family, Henson Prosper and family, Pastor David
McPhee and family, Sandra Butler and family, Leana and
Tanie Jones, the Smith family of Coral City, Florida,
Paulette Larrimore and family of Florida, Shirley Wilson
and family of Ft. Lauderdale, Debbie McFall and family,
Bradley, Dio Malancus and Monique, Donna and Dez
Bascombe and family, Deinal and Virgil Bowe and family,
Wendly and Bill Mills and family, Rosett Pratt, Samuel
Pinder, Susan, Vernal, Victoria and Victor Johnson, Deborab
Pratt, Prince and Hannibal Saunders, Vanburen Gaitor,
Ida Saunders, Maraget Hanna, Samuel and Sonia Adderley,
Jeffrey and Dorothy Saunders, Betty Saunders, Idamae
Taylor, Dianna Ward, Christopher and Nicola Pratt, Tony
Mackey, Stavrox and Carol McIntosh, Jefferson Stevens
and family, Sean Steven, Trover Rolle, Mario Hanna,
Sheandra Pratt, Dacel Mott, Indianna Johnson, Altemese °
and Anastasia Tinker, Buba Brown, Anthony Palacious,
Walter Walkes, Elvis Roberts, Mace Beneby, Vincent
Sulliven, Sidney Bethel, Collins Neely, Cameron Mitchell,
Glenroy Russell, Jean Simion, Jorrnen Adderley, Michael
Rahming Brent Lockhart, the Community of Bain Town,
Calvalier Construction Company and many others.

MAY HIS SOUL REST IN










































Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
Home, Market Street, from 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Friday
and on Syturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service
time.





Fort Lauderdale Circuit Judge Larry Seidlin :

yesterday ordered that another DNA sample be : : : : ,
. wns : : a product code located on the lid of the jar that begins with the num-
taken from Ms Smith's body in the form of a ye : ber “2111”. Both the Peter Pan and Gréat Value brands are manu-

The judge said he wanted to make sure all sam- : factured in a single facility in Georgia by ConAgra, and the FDA
ples ae ae before Ms Smith was buri Sdeats said Great Value peanut butter made by other manufacturers is not
her body wouldn’t have to be exhumed, the Asso- : affected.

The affected jars of Peter Pan and Great Value peanut butter have

Most persons infected with Salmonella develop diarrhoea, fever, and

“When we bury her, I want it to be forever,” he : abdominal cramps 12 to 72 hours after infection.

‘ The illness usually lasts four to seven days, and most persons recov-

Judge Seidlin also said that he does not feel er without treatment.

comfortable in making a decision on who takes’ : : : f
dy of Ms Smith’ ion ; Patient needs to be hospitalized. In these patients, the Salmonella
custody of Ms Smith’s body as long as the question, : infection may spread from the intestines to the blood stream, and

As : :? then to other body sites and‘can cause death unless the person is
pee : oe Soe ee BNA tes Wil i treated promptly with antibiotics. The elderly, infants, and those with
Brave that he is in fact the biological father of : impaired immune systems are more likely to have a severe illness.

However, in some persons the diarrhoea may be so severe that the’

Speaking with The Tribune yesterday, Agriculture and Marine

Mr Stern, with two other men, is also claiming Re cs a ee pan that his vue! Sei sends
to have fathered the five-month-old baby ; % nee duet ee. eck an aie he ute - ; Be ii ob ro
girl, who could eventually inherit millions of dol- owners to conduct similar checks and in the interest of public satety,

i take any possibly contaminated products off their shelves.























Yer ier Hone Chor

Queen’s Highway :
“P.O. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 # Paging:.352-6222 #1724... s
ae Fax: 351-3301 .

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

CORINE PATRICIA —
SWEETING, 49



of #302 Haddock Street, |
Freeport and formerly of

McCleans Town, Grand
Bahama, will be held on |
Saturday, February 17, 2007,
11:00 a.m., at Emmanuel
Baptist Church, High Rock,
Grand Bahama, Officiating will
be Pastor Napthali Cooper and |
Minister Frederick Carey.
Interment will be made in the |
High Rock Public Cemetery.



- Left to cherish her memory are her husband Bradley Sweeting; one
son, Anthony King Jr; three daughters, Keishan and Lavanda Cartwright
and Samantha King; four grandchildren, Travis, Treamine and Tristan

- Cartwright and Douglas Higgs Jr. one stepson, Boloana White; two
brothers, Frederick and Kingsley Carey; five sisters, Daisy Musgrove,
Gloria Basden, Roselyn Ramsey, Berthamae Curry and Angela
Munnings; 10 stepbrothers and sisters including, Jewel, Alvin, Ethelyn,
Rosemary, Alrick and Anthony Rolle, Eula Aranha, Sheena Dames,
Donna, Ingrid, Nicole, Judy, Christine and Lee Balfour; four sisters-
in-law, Gloria and Dale Carey, Nita and Stephanie Sweeting; 11

-brothers-in-law, Wingo Musgrove, Audley Basden, Anthony Ramsey,
Shockley Curry, Rendall Munnigs Sr., Junior, Jeffrey, Kendall, Lionel,
John and Louise Sweeting; 15 nieces, Lisa Rolle Evans, Tamara
Johnson, Meoshi and Rashan Albury, Tangia Turnquest, Opal Burnside,
Xaviera Mills, Antionette Ramsey, Xonevea Fox, Avion Forbes,
Katrina and Antonia Carey, Sasha’ Miyake Chin, Jaya Mills and
Henranique Burnside; 16 nephews, Benny Roberts, Kevin McDonald,
Keno Basden, Rendall Munnings Jr., Rendwood ‘and Reangelo
Munnings, Kareem Pinder, Lavar, Lakale and Lashad Carey, Staniko
Farrington, Shanard Evans, Patricko and Patrick Basden Jr., Henrico .

- Burnside, Damarion Fox; 16 nieces-in-law and 15 nephews-in-law;
three uncles, Solomon Mitchell, Nehemiah Rolle and Vernal McIntosh;
two aunts, Florence Rolle and Olga Hanna; cousins, Rev. Wendal and
Minister Ebby McIntosh, Melanie, Bernie, Inetta, Enoch, Dave and
Robert McIntosh, Pearl, Beulah, Nathaniel, Hansel, Bertram, Wally
and Allen Carey, Helen, Selva, Cleora and Brian Carey, Ucille Hanna,
Relda Pinder, Debbie Curry, Carla, Glenda, Darnell and April;
godsisters, Euna and Berthrum Cooper; adopted mother, Laura Roberts;
godchildren, Tatiana Rolle and Natalie Carey; Dher pastor, Pastor
Napthali and Mrs, Cooper, Pastor Carolyn Cooper, The Invaders for
Christ family, Rosetta Curry, Carolyn Sands, Quincey and Leroy
Mather, Maggie Mather, Ann Higgs and family, Peggy Bridgewater
Kemp, Annie Mather and Patsy Russell, Dr. Michael Darville, Mercedes
Fulford, Pastor Hubert King, Nurse Debbie and special confidant
Eleanore Carey; the entire East End community and a host of other
relatives and friends.


























Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral Home
and Crematorium, Queens Highway, Freeport on Friday from 2:00
noon until 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday at the church from 9:30 a.m.
until service time.












O06

Vows

v%

GO nogntesy:

‘\
pvse

> ey



%
%,
2

sre orD,

a ¢
ak
oe
--F

EDF YT
£6 os

~ %, t, %
y

Â¥

4

Nyt

Z
“Sy




‘

WEL,

%
wy
Ep Mahe

13,

a
-

#.

an

yee

io e's 4 "5
ae kK 2

ete

Mee 4 a,
7-18 BaeOee
SFA so

ti pe wh’

ee

3

he
7

wees






THE Bahamas Film Festival
has announced plans for its
upcoming fourth annual Festi-
val which is slated for July 5-7.

Continuing the trend of hon-
ouring Bahamians who have giv-
en much to the industry, screen
legend Calvin Lockhart will be
given The Minister of Culture
Award at this years festival.

At a press conference
announcing plans for the festi-
val, Mr Lockhart thanked Mr

‘Moss and TBFF for honouring

him in this way. Mr Lockhart
has many movies to his credit,
including Predator 2, Coming
to America and Uptown Satur-
day Night, the latter which also
featured fellow Bahamian Sir
Sidney Poitier.

He remembers vividly grow-
ing up in Masons Addition and
performing in church. He spoke
briefly about the movie he is
currently in: Rain, funded by
Hollywood but written by a

UN extends peacekeepin

@ UNITED NATIONS

THE Security Council voted
unanimously Thursday to
extend the UN peacekeeping
mission in Haiti for eight
months following an agreement
between the United States and
China on the length of the new
mandate, according to Associ-
ated Press. ;

In a report in December, for-
mer UN Secretary-General
Kofi Annan recommended that
the 8,800-strong mission be
extended for one year when its:
mandate expired on February
15, a view backed by the
Friends of Haiti, whose mem-
bers include the United States,
Canada, Brazil, France and
Britain.

But China, which has no
diplomatic relations with Haiti,
pushed for another six-month
mandate. :

China’s UN Ambassador



At SvitzerWijsmuller, results and values go hand in hand. With 2,500 employees and a fleet
towage, salvage and related marine services in over 35 coun’
marine services company, we encourage a culture of commit
responsibility for our purpose: to provide safety and support at

the A.P. Moller - Maersk Group.

PAGE 16, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007

Film festival to honour Ba

CALVIN Lockhart

Bahamian.

Another Bahamian receiving
a high honour is James Catalyn,
in whose name the festival is

“Wang Guangya said Beijing

agreed to eight months to allow
time for an assessment of the
security risks, challenges and
priorities facing Haiti and rec-
ommendations on how to accel-
erate peacebuilding in the poor-
est country in the Western
hemisphere.

The council will consider the
assessment and recommenda-
tions when considering a
renewal of the mandate, which
expires October 15, he said.
But Wang made it clear Bei-
jing wants six-month extensions
in the future. :

Diplomats in Haiti have said

China wanted the shorter
mandate because of Haiti’s
support for Taiwan’s bid to
join the United Nations. Haiti

. is one of a handful of coun-

tries that has diplomatic ties
with Taiwan. China and Tai-
wan split amid civil war in
1949, but Beijing still claims

tries worldwide. To sustain our



being produced. He was also on
hand and thanked Mr Moss and
(TBFF) for what he describes
as “this great honour. I am elat-



sovereignty over the island.
Acting US ambassador Ale-

jandro Wolff called the vote “

an important signal of the deter-

-mination of the international

community” to support the UN
mission.

“This is good news,” he said,
noting that all previous exten-
sions had been for six months
and this was the lengthiest
extension for the mission.

China’s Wang said the “cen-
tral task” for the UN mission
in the next eight months “is to
assist Haiti in its transition from
peacekeeping to peacebuild-
ing.”

He complained that the reso-
lution was “not as balanced and
comprehensive as expected”
because some paragraphs
“overemphasise military means
but fail to pay adequate atten-
tion to such important priori-
ties as political reconciliation
and economic recovery.”

of more than 300 vessels, we provide
position as one of the world's leading
ment, innovation, and entrepreneurship where all employees take
sea. SvitzerWijsmuller is headquartered in Denmark and is part of

Freepoint Tug & Towing Services, Ltd. (FTTS) is a JV company, 50/50 owned by SvitzerWijsmuller and South Riding Point Hold-

ing Ltd (World Point Terminals Inc.). FT TS operates a fleet of 4 tugs,
times on neighbouring islands. Additional personnel is needed to assi

The Bahamas.

providing services in Freeport, South Riding Point, and at
ist in the growth of our tug operation and overall exposure in

ASD TUG MASTER -

Freepoint Tug & Towing Services, Ltd. — Freeport GB, Bahamas

THE POSITION ; \

The Master will be responsible for the supervision and
leadership of all aspects of vessel management, which

include:

The position also offers an exciting and attractive career in an
international environment with the possibility of continuous de-

velopment both within SvitzerWijsmuller Group or World Point

Terminals Inc.

Maintenance and safe operation of the tug

Crew management, including crew motivation and*

skill development

Risk management - the ability to identify, assess,
and respond to hazards and operational risks
Preparation of tug daily activity sheets

All tug stores/parts requisition
Other ad hoc tasks

Meeting the high SvitzerWijsmuller Health, Safety, «
Environment, and Quality standards, including
managing all aspects of ISM and |SO9001

The Tug Master will receive support from other FTTS staff
locally in Bahamas and other SvitzerWijsmuller employees °.

throughout the Region.

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES
The right candidate should be strong and team-oriented,

QUALIFICATIONS
°

BMA Master's License (500grt) along with all relevant

STCWS95 requirements, or have completed the necessary
international certification to this end 4
S/he must have no less than 5 years searttanship experi-

ence, with 3 years acting in the capacity of Master.
S/he must be well versed in vessel maintenance and able

shift system

and have the ability to achieve results through positive

interaction with crews, pilots, and shore personnel.

Furthermore, the Tug Master will have the opportunity to
gain exposure throughout various training programs and

exchanges.

CONTACTS.

HERE TODAY. GON

to manage a small crew effectively
Experience with ASD tugs is not mandatory but will be
considered an asset
. Familiarity with the ISM Code and the ability to effectively
manage a Safety Management System
The right individual must also be prepared to work within a

ONLY BAHAMIAN CITIZENS, RESIDENTS OR WORK PER-
MIT HOLDERS NEED APPLY .

Application with resume/CV to be sent to FTTS, Attn: Capt Lee
Wallace, #4 Milton Street, Freeport GB, Bahamas, Tel. +1 242
* 352 3060, Mobile. +1242 727 0623, Fax +1 242 352 4114,

*, SvitzerWijsmuller







CALVIN Lockhart, J

|

ed by this kind gesture and
humbled that this festival is
being held in my honour.”

He also spoke about his

|
|

. 1

Nonetheless, Wang said, Chi-
na “agreed' to
some pending issues and did its
best to facilitate|a consensus.”

The UN peacekeeping force —
which includes about 125 Chi-
nese police officers — has recent-
ly stepped up offensives to root
out armed gangs|that hold sway
in slums in Haiti's capital, Port-
au-Prince. The gangs are
blamed for a wave of kidnap-
pings and other violence.

Resolution

The resolution calls on the
UN force to “continue the
increased tempo of operations”
against the armed gangs to sup-
port the Haitian police “to
restore security, notably in Port-
au-Prince.” It encourages the
government and the UN force
“to undertake|co-ordinated
deterrent actions to decrease

t
ssnvesenceeeeceesececoesecaneneee ‘

|

|

Egyptian Ambassador Designate
Minister of Foreign Affairs

cal
visits

@ HIS Excellency Abdel Fattah Moustafa,
Foreign Affairs|and the Public Service Fre
eign Affairs yesterday. Mr Moustafa expressed his inte

ames Catalyn and Celi Moss"

er

utting aside.



lengthy involvement in the arts.
“T also began in church as most
of us do, I suppose.” and went
on to describe how Meta Cum-

the level of violence,”

It asks the UN force “to:

\

accelerate efforts to reorient its
‘disarmament, demobilization
and reintegration resources
towards a comprehensive vio-
lence reduction programme” in
co-ordination with the govern-
ment. -

The resolution recognises the

government of Haiti’s “owner-
_ship and primary responsibility

... over all aspects of the coun-

try’s stabilisation and good gov-

ernance” and the UN role in

supporting the government’s .

efforts.

China’s Wang stressed the
government’s responsibility.

“The Haitian people have a
growing demand for improved
living conditions, a revitalised
reconciliation process, economic
development, social justice and
rule of law,” Wang said. “The
elected government should take
positive measures to fulfill their

‘brations.

Fs
Ambassador Designate of Egypt, chats with Minister of
d Mitchell during a courtesy call at the Ministry of For
rest in a cultural exchange between the |.”

Â¥

THE TRIBUNE :

"a
berbatch molded him in many”
disciplines but especially in the.
area of timing. He continues to.
produce the ever popular Sum=

mer Madness twice yearly-and, « ’

addresses what he calls “typi>'
cal, timely topics”. = Se
This year’s festival has been,
changed to July to coincide with
Bahamas Fashion Week and,
The 34th Independence Cele- '

Celi Moss, festival president?)

said: ‘This years Festival will bé' ,

bigger and better. The focus has
always been the talent of the
Bahamian people. This year.
being no different, the commit- .
tee has decided to bring it ta:
the people, by having some 6f*
the activities on Arawak Cay.
It will certainly be a fun-filled
family atmosphere.: :
The opening movie will be
shown at RND Cinema and
some of the activities will also
be held at The Corner Hotel. ;

ssion in Haiti



; gs
expectations for a credibley. ’

competent and transparent. gov- t
ernment.” Bee

Panama’s UN Ambassador ,
Ricardo Arias, whose country
co-sponsored the resolution
with France and Peru, said the.

Haitian government must:
undertake. reforms, but he said.

the country will depend on sup=,
port from the United Nations:
and neighboring countries “not*
for just 12 months but fat«
beyond.” Bh

ae
be

_As the government makes.
progress, he expressed hope:

that “in the next months @r'
years” the UN can reduce the
number of troops and ad
police and civilians to help bufl¢-

government institutions. &

When that happens, Arias*

said, the Security Council can.

‘wrap up the peacekeeping mis>
sion and the new UN Peace¥
building Commission can help,
Haiti promote developmentz-_



Bahamas and Egypt, which would include a television documentary exchange programme.

(Photo: BIS/Tim Aylen)

of

i



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007

SECTION

business@tribunemedia.net

BU

FE Oe
Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street





ocal government finances
in Inagua were misused
and “extravagantly dis-
bursed” between 2001-
2004, a damning report
by the Auditor-C Jeneral has revealed.
Its audit identifigd potential conflicts of
interest in contraéghaWards, and a sham-
bolic accountingiBÂ¥s






$m in which con-

trols and checks al balances appeared

almost non-existent.

In a report addressed to the perma-
nent secretary responsible for the
Department of Local Government, the
Auditor-General detailed numerous
discrepancies, omi§sions and improper
accounting procedures involving the
Inagua local government district for
the period July 2001-September 2004.

The Auditor-General concluded that

Local government’
accounting shambles

Public funds ‘extravagantly disbursed’ and misused in Inagua, as audit
identifies potential conflicts of interest and no internal controls

“public funds were extravagantly dis-
bursed on minor non-technical tasks”,
including the cleaning of drains and
beautification projects, “without regard
to costs or specified guidelines”.

“It appeared that there was a misuse
of funds and that value for money was
not received,” the Auditor-General
concluded. j

It noted that in one case, more than
$16,000 in public monies were spent
on purchasing and installing a fence at
a school.

“Our observation of the school
premises revealed poles partially plant-
ed around the perimeter, with no fence
attached. We also noted some fencing
material (wire and poles) laying in the
backyard of the school,” the Auditor-
General’s report said, recommending
that inspections be carried out to
ensure the promised work was done.

The report also called for the local
government district in Inagua to com-
pel the contractors who received funds
for the fence’s construction to “be

made to complete the task they have
been paid to do” or the money
returned. ;

In addition, it expressed concerns
about a possible “conflict of interest”
given that Leon Turnquest and his
business, Far East Enterprise, were the
recipient of many local government
contracts with him being a council
member. :

The report said Mr Turnquest
“should not have been awarded con-
tracts during his tenure, unless he was

the only person capable of perform-
ing those tasks”.

Among the contracts received by Mr
Turnquest and his company was an
$8,000 deal in June 2002 for repairs to
water tanks situated at the administra-
tor’s residence; cleaning inside public
wells; and construction of a retaining
wall around a natural Spring.

Then, in 2003, he’received more than

SEE page 8B

St George estate alleges ‘sinister conspiracy”

@ DELTA Airlines reported that some of their Nassau-bound
flights were delayed throughout the week, but they did not have to
cancel any. —_

(AP Photo: Andy Newman)

US weather causes
no tourism impact



m@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

THE St George estate has
applied to be joined as inter-
ested parties in a legal action
involving a petition to wind-
up the Grand Bahama Port
Authority (GBPA) over a
$1.218 million default judge-
ment, Lady Henrietta St
George describing the affair as
a “sinister conspiracy”.

Documents filed with the
Supreme Court on Wednesday
show the estate is applying to
be joined as interested parties,
support the GBPA, in which
they are claiming a 50 per cent
stake, and set aside the judge-
ment in an action involving the
Island Bay Condominium
Phase III Association.

A $1.218 million default
judgement was entered against
the GBPA on Island Bay’s

behalf on December 21, 2006,
by its attorney, Greg Moss. Mr
Moss had been the GBPA’s
outside counsel, but resigned
last year after it did not settle
legal actions against clients he
had been representing before
the appointment. _ j

Lady Henrietta, in her affi-
davit, described this as “quite
extraordinary” given that Mr
Moss was representing Sir Jack
Hayward, the estate’s fellow
GBPA shareholder, and oust-
ed GBPA chairman Hannes
Babak in the action against the
estate involving Sir Jack’s
claim to 75 per cent ownership
in the GBPA and Port Group
Ltd.

She questioned why Mr
Moss would seek to wind-up
an entity that represented a
major asset for his client, Sir

Jack, in another matter, alleg-

ing: “I find this even more

extraordinary given that Mr »

Moss and Sir Jack are aware
that the GBPA has a lot of
ASSETS....sssisseese and through such
representation and discussions
with Mr Babak and Sir Jack
Hayward, must have been ful-
ly aware that the GBPA was
quite capable of paying its
debts.”

Lady Henrietta alleged that
the writ in the Island Bay
action, which led to the default
judgement, was filed in
December 2006 and apparent-
ly served in Sir Jack, who was
still attempting to exclude the
St George estate from the
GBPA and Port Group Ltd’s
daily management and opera-
tional affairs.

Lady Henrietta alleged that
“a far more sinister conspira-
cy”. was afoot, and the estate
was concerned that its com-
mercial interests and those of

the GBPA had been targeted
for harm. :

The Hayward family
announced that they had com-’
mitted more than $1 million to
purchase the Island Bay judge-
ment, but Lady Henrietta
alleged that: Anne Mellor, a

“member of the ‘Association,

had told her on January 31,
2007, that the group had not
been aware that the judgement
was purchased until they read
it in the press. i

The Association had been
due to receive $500,000 on Fri-
day, February 2, 2007, with the
balance due in six months.

In a supporting affidavit, Sir
Albert Miller, the GBPA’s
chief executive, alleged that
Mr Babak had “exerted sub-
stantial pressure” on Carey

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business

Reporter

THE massive snow storms
affecting the US, which left

thousands stranded at airports ©

around that country, have not
had a major negative impact on
Bahamian tourism, industry
officials said yesterday.
According to an American

x caused only two flights to be
-7- cancelled - the in-bound and
out-bound flights between Nas-

j sau and Chicago on Tuesday.

Delta Airlines reported that
some of their Nassau-bound

. . flights were delayed through-

out the week, but they did not
have to cancel any.

Bahamian hotels also indi-
cated they did not have massive
cancellations due to the weath-
er.

A Sandals reservation agent
noted they had received a few
cancellations, but these had no
big impact on guest arrivals.

Robert Sands, senior vice-
president of administration and
external affairs at Baha Mar

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A BAHAMIAN trade cam-
paigner yesterday expressed
concerns that the Government
would lose more than $10-$14
million per annum if it signed

position on areas of the EPA
that wee not in its best interests,
Paul Moss, a.leading member of

if

Airlines agent, the bad weather -

EPA may cost Bahamas
more than $14m taxes

up to the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) with the Euro-
pean Union (EU) as part of the CARIFORUM offer, as this
nation would be bound to whatever the wider Caribbean agreed.

Although the Government said it would reserve the Bahamas’

Resorts, added that their prop-
erties did not have any material
cancellations.

‘Blizzards have hit the north-
east and mid-west of the US,
causing hundreds of flights to
be cancelled from the New
York City area's three major
airports, and in Albany, Boston,
Washington, Chicago, Philadel-
phia, Cincinnati and Indi-
anapolis..

In New Jersey, a corporate
jet veered off a runway while
landing, officials said. None of
the nine people on board were
hurt, but the airport closed for
more than two hours.

At least 13 deaths were
blamed on the huge storms.
The bad weather forced the
closing of schools and'business-
es from Kentucky to Maine.
Many of those stuck at home
had no heat or lights because
of blackouts that affected more
than a quarter-million cus-
tomers.

Blizzard warnings were post-
ed for parts of New Hampshire,
Massachusetts and Maine,
where as much as 2 feet of snow
was possible. Some areas
reported more than 3 feet.

Trade campaigner
warns Bahamas would be
‘bound’ by wide-ranging

CARIFORUM offer

SEE page 7B






~ Bahama

u

TRE: EAST BAY STREET, NASSAU PO. BOX SS 6232

SEE page 6B

ee ee

get.a health plan_
as individual as you?

Reality Check.

With BahamaHealth you can.

We've got health plans with flexible

ns that suit your individual needs.

or information on individual

roup coverage,

a in to www.familyguardian.com today!



Health

Via Gane A “ude Madieer ean

~

TLY

INSURANCE
COMPANY

Bal i i ae ee



__ INTERNATIONAL EDITION, _ FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007 | 7@

| 2007 PREVIEW



2 INT on Va chee

NASCAR NEXTEL CUP
DAYTONA DUEL RESULTS
At Daytona International Speedway
Daytona Beach
RACE 1

DRIVER, CAR LAPS, WINNINGS
1, Tony Stewart, Chevy - 63, $51,793
2, Dale Earnhardt, Chevy 63, $36,783
3, Jeff Burton, Chevy 63, $31,783
4, David Gilliland, Ford 63, $26,783

» 5, Denny Hamlin, Chevy 63, $24,783
“6. Clint Bowyer, Chevy 63, $22,383
7, Martin Truex, Chevy 63, $21,283
8. Michael Waltrip, Toy 63, $20,283
9, Casey Mears, Chevy 63, $20,258
10. Kenny Schrader, Ford 63, $20,233
11, J. Johnson, Chevy 63, $20,208
12. Boris Sald, Ford 63, $20,183
13, Mike Bliss, Dodge 63, $20,158
14, Johnny Sauter, Chevy 63, $20,133
15, Jeremy Mayfield, Toy 63, $20,108
16. Greg Biffle, Ford 63, $20,083
17. Kenny Wallace, Chevy 63, $20,058
18, Dale Jarrett, Toy 63, $20,008
19. S. Barrett, Chevy 63, $19,983
20. Bill Elliott, Dodge 63, $19,958
21, Brandon Whitt, Chevy 63, $19,908
_ 22, Bobby Labonte, Dodge 63, $19,883
. «+ 23, James Hylton, Chevy 63, $19,833
~." 24 Kyle Petty, Dodge 63, $19,808
25. Jeff Green, Chevy 58, $19,783
26, Ward Burton, Chevy 56, $19,758
27. R. Sorenson, Dodge 50, gees
28, David Ragan, Fo 44, $19,70
29, Ac Allmendinger, Toy 23, $19,683
30, Dave Blaney, Toy 22, $19,658

Race Statistics ‘
Time of Race: 1 hour, 23 minutes, 16 seconds,
Margin of Victory: 0.170 seconds,
Caution Flags: Seven for 21 laps,
Lead Changes: Six among five drivers,
Leaders: D.Ragan 1:3; D.Gilliland 4-11;

ey
M.Waltrip 12-17) T.Stewart 18-41} J.Burton

42-50; T.Stewart 51-63.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Lead, Laps
Led): T,Stewart, 2 times for 37 laps; J.Burton,
e Ltime for 9 laps; D.Gilliland, 1 time for 8 laps;
M.Waltrip, 1 time for 6 laps; D.Ragan, 1 time
> _¢ for 3 laps.

‘i RACE 2
DRIVER, CAR LAPS, WINNINGS
1. Jeff Gordon, Chevy * 60, $51,793
2, Kurt Busch, Dodge 60, $36,783
3. D. Stremme, Dodge 60, $31,783
4, Kyle Busch, Chevy 60, $26,783
5, Matt Keriseth, Ford ~ 60, $24,783
6. JJ, Yeley, Chev 60, $22,38.
7. Carl Edwards, Ford 60, $21,283
8, Ryan Newman, Dodge 60, $20,283
9, Joe Nemechek, Chevy 60, $20,258
10. Tony Raines, Chevy 60, $20,233
11. Mike Wallace, Chevy 60, goats
12, Sterling Marlin, Chevy 60, $20,183
13, Jamie McMurray, Ford 60, $20,158
14, Mark Martin, Chevy 60, $20,133
15. Paul Menard, Chevy 60, $20,108
16. Kasey Kahne, Dodge 60, $20,083
17, Kevin Lepage, Dodge 60, $20,058
. 18, Derrike Cope, Dodge 60, $20,008
~ 19, Regan Smith, Chev! oo ee
20, Frank Kimmel, Fo 60, $19,958
_ DL Elliott Sadler, Dodge 60, $19,908
~. 22. Ricky Rudd, Ford 60, $19,883
~ 23. Erle McClure, Chevy 60, $19,833
24, K, Shelmerdine, Chevy 60, $19,808
~ 25-Séott Rigas, Dodge 59, $19,783
26. Brian Vickers, Toy 49, $19,788
27, Mike Skinner, Toy 35, $19,733
28. David Reutimann, Toy 33, $19,708
29, Kevin Harvick, Chevy _ 26, $19,683
30. Juan Montoya, Dodge 24, $19,658
a Race Statistics
4 a of Race: 12 hours, 58 minutes, 05 sec
> ond. +
d fargin of Victory: 0,187 seconds.
~ Caution Flags: Two for eight laps.

Lead Changes: Five among five drivers.
Lap Leaders: D.Stremme 1-4; J,Montoya 5-22;
ky.Busch 23-53; Ku.Busch 54-59; J.Gordon 60,

Leaders Suencaary pares, Times Lead, Laps
Led): Ky.Busch, 1 time for 31 sag eet
me for

. ie 1 time for 18 i: Ku.Buseh,,
>. 6 laps; D.Stremme, 1 time for 4 laps; J.Gor-
* , don, i time for 1 lap.

NASCAR CRAFTSMAN
TRUCKS
_ CHEVY SILVERADO HD 250
ic At Daytona International
waa Speedway
= SRG Daytona Beach
>_< DRIVER, CAR SPEED
~*~. Adack Sprague, Toyota 179,508
2, Carl Edwards, Ford 78.742
- 3, Todd Bodine, Toyota 178.370
~, 4 Travis Kvapil, Ford 478,080
Be Erik Darnell, Ford 477,574
> 6 Tyler Walker, Toyota 177.144
_ + 1, Terry Cook, Toyota 177.061
8, Ted Musgrave, Toyota 176.550
9, Mike Skinner, Toyota 176.547

- 10.Johnny Benson, Toyota 176.405
11. Ad. Allmendinger, Toyota 176.401
* 12, Aaron Fike, Toyota 176.246
- 13, Rick Crawford, Ford 175.620

~ 14, Cale Gale, Chevy 5.6
» 15. Chase Miller, Dodge 175,322
16. Ron Hornaday Jr, Chevy 175.148
17. Kraig Kinser, Chevy 175.022
18, Joey Clanton, Ford 175,022
19. David Start, Ford. 174,999
20. Stac' Comipior Ford 174,886
21,Ken Schrader Dodge 174.564
22. Mike walnne heyy

23, Tim Sauter, Chevy 174,260
24. Willie Allen, Chevy 174,041
" 25, Kelly Bites, Ford 173.960

26, Matt Crafton, hrevy 173.940
27, Brendan Gaughan, Chevy 173,859
29, Derrike Cope, Chevy 173,531
30, Chad MeCumbee, Chevy 173.390
31, Dennis Setzer, Chevy 172,596

_ 32. Mike Bliss, Chevy
- 33, Bill Lester, Chevy
34, Brandon Knupp, Chevy 171,926
ord 171,697

35, Jason White,
. 36. Latry Foyt, Chevy 170.380,
_ Failed to qualify

37, Wayne Edwards, Ford = = 167,654

Bien ere ae

At Daytona International Speedway,
: Daytona Beach, Fla.

DRIVER, CAR
1. David Gilliland, Ford
2, Ricky Rudd, Ford
3, Tony Stewart, Chevrolet
4, Kurt Busch, Dodge
5. Dale Earnhardt Jr. Chevrolet
6, David Stremme, Dodge
7. Jeff Burton, Chevrolet
8, Kyle Busch, Chevrolet
9, Denny Hamlin, Chevrolet
10. Matt-Kenseth, Ford
11. Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet
12, JJ, Yeley, Chevrolet
13, Martin Truex Jn, Chevrolet
14, Carl Edwards, Fotd
15, Michael Waltrip, Toyota
16, Ryan Newman, bodge
17, Casey Mears, Chevrolet
18, Joe Nemechek, Chevrolet
19, Kenny Schrader, Ford
20, Tony Raines, Chevrolet
21, Jimmie Jolinson, Chevrolet
_ 722. Mike Wallace, Chevrolet
.” «23, Borls Sald, Ford
» _* 24, Jamle MeMurray, Ford
- 25, Greg Biffle, Ford
26. Mark Martin, Chevrolet
27, Bobby Labonte, Dodge
28, Kasey Kahne, Bodge
29, Kyle Patty, Dodge
30. Elliott Sadler, Dodge
31, Jeff Green, Chevrolet
32. Scott Riggs, rg
33, Reed Sorenson, Dodge
* 34, Kevin Harvick, CHevrolet
36, David Ragan ord
36, Juan Pablo Montoya, Dodge
37, Dave Blaney, Toyota
38, Sterling Marlin, Chevrolet
39, Robby Gordon, Ford
40, David Reutimann, Toyota
41, Johnny Sauter, Chevrolet
42. Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet
43, Dale Jarrett, Toyota.
. Failed to Quali
44, Mike Bliss, Dod

. . e
- ~” 46, Jeremy Mayfield, Toyota

46, Paul Menatd, Chevrolet
47, Kenny Wallace, Chevrolet
48, Kevin Lepage, Dodge
49, Derrike Cope, Dodge
50. Stanton Barrett, Chevrolet
51, Regat Sinith chevrolet
52, Bill Elllott, Dodge
53. Frank Kirimel, Ford
54, Brandon Whitt, Chevrolet
55, James Hylton, Chevrolet
56. Eric McClure, Chevrolet
_-, ‘67, Kitk Shelmerdine, Chevrolet
+58, Ward Burton, Chevrolet
* 59. Brian Vickers, Toyota
_ + 60. Mike Skinner, Toyota
- "61, Aud Allmendinger, Toyota













AUTO RACING





BRIAN BAHR/GETTY IMAGES

UNFULFILLED: Despite winning $2,836,652, Travis Kvapil said ‘not many Sundays did we go home happy, and it’s hard to put that behind you.’

Bi After a frustrating season
in Nextel Cup, Travis Kvapil
will return to the NASCAR
Craftsman Trucks series for
2007 to recapture his
winning 2003 formula.

BY SARAH ROTHSCHILD
srothschild@MiamiHerald.com
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla, —
Travis Kvapll couldn’t bear
running another season for an
underfunded Cup team, so he
is taking a step back and
returning to his NASCAR
roots,
’ ‘No more checking entry
lists each week, analyzing how
many drivers he would have to
beat to qualify for the race on
speed,
For a change, he will be a
favorite to win a champion:
ship — the Craftsman Trucks
championship.

Kvapil will drive the No. 6
Ford for Roush Fenway Rac-
ing in the same car Mark Mar-
tin won six of 14 races last sea-
son,

“The biggest thing is go out,
run out front, win races and
put my name back on the
map,” said Kvapil, the 2003
Trucks champion who has
been on multiple Cup teams
that have folded, “I didn’t feel
like another year running
toward the back of the Cup*
pele would have much longev-
ty.

“Hopefully, this will pay
dividends so I can go to Cup
and do the job over there.”

For now, Kvapil, 30, just
wants a chance to contend
after a dismal 2006.

With PPI Motorsports,
owned by Call Wells, Kvapil’s

best finish was 19th. He failed

to qualify for three races for
PPI and one with Furniture
Row Racing and missed one
Cup race.

He collectéd $2,836,652 in
winnings, little consolation
after his frustration mounted
throughout the season.

“Not many Sundays did we
go home happy, and it’s hard
to put that behind you,” Kvapil
said, “I was very discouraged
and spent a lot of time dwell-
ing about our performance.”

He became nostalgic for the
past, for a worthwhile oppor-
tunity, for the pressure to win
and just attempt to compete.

Then owner Jack Roush
came calling, shortly after
Martin announced he would
leave Roush for a part-time
opportunity with Ginn Racing.

“He's from the Midwest,
he’s got that work ethic and

SHIFTING GEARS | MICHAEL WALTRIP

that competitive spirit and
he’s my kind of guy,” Roush
said, “We'll use him or find a
place for him on the Cup side,
but in the meantime we've got
some business in the Truck
series.”

Roush added that even if
future opportunities aren’t
available for Kvapil- at his

‘ organization, he would be

open to making the driver
available to other owners with
Cup vacancies.

Racing for a topflight team
this season, the soft-spoken
Kvapil is expected to pose a
major challenge for defending
champion Todd Bodine.

But some believe he is
somewhat under the radar.

“He’s our forgotten cham-
pion,” said Owen Kearns,
senior manager of communi-
cation for the Trucks series.

~HAPPY TO RUN A SECOND LAP

“Travis gets lost in the mold.
He doesn’t have that image of
being a two-fisted character,
Our champions virtually all
have been flamboyant — Mike
Skinner, Bobby Hamilton, Ron
Hornaday, Mike Bliss, Ted
Musgrave, Todd Bodine.”

But others such as Bodine
are not overlooking Kvapil.
Bodine, who relates to Kvapil
because of his own experi-
ences with low-budget teams,
said he expects the Janesville,

Wis.,, to turn in a season simi-

lar to 2003.

"T told Travis it feels good
to drive something that runs,”
Bodine said. “He went to Cup
and struggled with a not-so-
good team, and figured out it’s
not all about being in Cup, it’s
about running well, and you
have to have to good people
and [equipment] to do it.”

Waltrip shows remorse after cheating episode

BY JENNA FRYER
Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. =
Michael Waltrip cheated,
apologized and then vindi-
cated himself the only way he
knew how: He drove his way
into the Daytona 500.

The two-time Daytona win-
ner — almost too embarrassed
to get behind the wheel after
his team was caught in
NASCAR's biggest cheating
scandal —- capped a roller-+
coaster week Thursday by
earning a spot in the Great
American Race.

“T know I am good enough
to do it without having any
cheating on my car,” Waltrip
said, “I don’t need it. I can go
fast without it. I think we
proved that.”

Waltrip’s elghth-place fin-
ish in the first qualifying race
at Daytona International
Speedway was good enough to
get him into Sunday’s field.

Because of NASCAR's com
plicated qualifying format for
this event, it also guaranteed

rookie David Reutimann a

spot along with the two other
Toyota Camrys that Waltrip
owns, Reutimann would have
had to race his way in other-
wise.

But there was little celebra-
tion at the finish line, where
Waltrip sat stone-faced inside
his car as he battled a wave of
contlicting emotions.

“Pm probably the most
depressed guy you have ever
seen make the Daytona 500,”
he said with a sigh. “I’m thank«
ful. ’'m sad. I’m happy at the
same time. Daytona does that
to you.”

So does cheating,

Waltrip’s humiliating debut
with Toyota began Sunday
when NASCAR found a suspl+
cious substance in his intake
manifold. After three days of
examination, it was deter-
mined to be a fuel additive
designed to dramatically boost

horsepower in a car that previ- .

ously had struggled with
speed,

NASCAR tossed out two
key Waltrip employees,
handed crew chief David

Hyder a $100,000 fine — the.

largest in series history — and
docked Waltrip 100 points.

But NASCAR didn’t kick
Waltrip out of the garage
something other drivers ques+
tloned,

“To tell you the truth, I
think he got off easy,” Joe
Nemechek said. “It gave the
sport a black eye. I think
Michael Waltrip is very fortu-
nate to be in this race.”

Waltrip expected that reac-
tion from some, and he sald
NASCAR president Mike Hel-
ton encouraged him to race
Thursday, when all Waltrip
wanted to do was go home and
hide.



SAR
es ‘y



MATTHEW STOCKMAN/GETTY IMAGES

SCANDALIZED: Michael Waltrip, whose team was docked
$100,000 and 100 points, offered an apology Thursday.

“TY came real close to not
racing today,” Waltrip said
hours before his qualifying
race, “I just felt like there
would be a cloud over what-
ever I accomplished today
because of what happened.”

Toyota officials, conspicu-
ously absent at his morning
apology session, gathered
around him after the race,

“T couldn't be happier for
Michael and his organization.
..» What a turn of events,”
said Lee White, general man-
ager of Toyota Racing Devel-
opment. “Michael Waltrip car-
tied two cars in — that’s 7,000
pounds, a pretty heavy load
for the guy.”

Teammate Dale Jarrett

‘yushed to. Waltrip’s side on a

chaotic pit road, grabbing his
boss in a bear hug.

“Proud of you, Want you to
know that,” Jarrett said.

“T appreciate that,” Waltrip
said, lips quivering.

“I knew you could handle it,
anyway,” Jarrett replied.

But someone on Waltrip’s
crew thought otherwise, wor-
rying so much that Waltrip
wouldn't make the race that
the team member broke. the
code of the Nextel Cup garage
by tampering with the fuel.

NASCAR suspended Hyder
and competition director
Bobby Kennedy indefinitely;

Waltrip blamed an unidenti-
fied individual or individuals
within his team, adding that no
one had been fired.

But Waltrip’s profession of
innocence has not gone
unquestioned this week —
even by former teammate Dale
Rarnharat Jr.

“There’s a fine line there
because when the driver is the
owner he should have quite a

-bit of knowledge of what's

going on,” Earnhardt said. “It
makes me want to kind of
believe Michael when he says
he was unaware of it.

“As a driver, I would take
that for what it’s worth. But
it’s hard to imagine, as an
owner, that you wouldn’t
know something about that.”

Jarrett defended his boss,
however, pointing out that
Waltrip has worked tirelessly
to put together the flagship
Toyota team.

“He's worn so many hats
coming in here. It’s incredi-
ble,” Jarrett said, “He proved
right there how good a race
driver he is.

“T told him before the race
that if anybody here could get
the car in, he could do it, and
he went out and did it.”

Waltrip now will focus on
Sunday’s race — and trying to
restore his image.

“We've just got to start try~
ing to rebuild people’s faith
and trust,” he said,



PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



oa conn aren IU SNES "Sten ew MA Va

OFFICE ASSISTANT REEDED

To assist in General Office Work. Duties include,
but not limited to, Receptionist, Filing, Typing,
Banking and Postal Duties. Will also be required
to perform some Accounting and Payroll
Functions. Excellent Computer Skills Necessary.







Ideal candidate will be honest, responsible,
punctual and self-motivated.

Salary commensurate with experience.
FAX 326-2824.

HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER

a Oy Ta TAY

rN) PEL PEPE ete
Pe Ser 1 lay

Applicant must possess the following.
key competencies:

@ Motivated self-starter

@ Excellent communication skills |
@ Good telephone etiquette
_@ Typing & word processing skills

@ Ability to work with minimal

' supervision

@ Literate in all MS Office programs -
Excel in particular

@ Knowledge of the Adobe suite of
programs a plus

Please send your reply by post to:

P. O. Box SS-6136
Nassau, Bahamas
Re: Secretary.TB-0207 —



for a:

requirements:-

client &
services.

Salary range Cl $65,000 - $100,000

INESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVE - INSURANCE

P.O. Box 10091



Bm ) FIDELITY

With origins in The Bahamas since 1978 and in the Cayman Islands
and the Turks and Caicos Islands since 1980, Fidelity is a financial
‘services group offering a comprehensive range of insurance
services, domestic and international banking, estate planning, pen-
sion services and corporate finance as well as other financial prod-
ucts and services. Fidelity is now inviting applications in Cayman

Systems cruci

al to

managing money

hether you are self-
employed or a busi-
ness owner, manag-

ing the money in your business

_ should be a high priority. Make

sure you implement the. follow-
ing systems:

1. Bookkeeping System - The
first system you need to imple-
ment is a bookkeeping system.
Ask your accountant whether
you need a paper, double entry,
single entry, or software solu-
tion. Delegate bookkeeping if
you don’t have the time. Make
sure somebody does it, and make
sure you keep records of the fol-
lowing transactions:

* Revenues and expenses —
The money you make and the
money you spend.

* Petty Cash - The cash
expenses you pay out in your
business. Either pay for your
cash expenses yourself and then
bill the. business, or keep a petty
cash tin at work and record pay-
ments in and out.

* Inventory — Keep records of
date purchased, stock number of
item purchased, purchase price,
date sold, and sale price of your
inventory to avoid pilfering, to
keep track of your inventory
trends and minimise your inven-
tory.

* Accounts Receivables — The
money that you are owed. If you
sell items on credit, keep track of
invoice date, invoice number,
invoice amount, terms, date paid,
amount paid, and the name of
who is being billed. Most soft-
ware packages allow you to pre-
pare professionally looking
invoices.

* Accounts Payables - The
money that you owe. If you pay
on credit, to help you manage
your money and.to avoid going
into a cash flow crisis, keep track
of invoice date, invoice number,
invoice amount, date paid,
amount paid and balance.



BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVE — INSURANCE

Reporting directly to the Vice President & Regional Marketing Man-
ager, the successful candidate will have the following minimum

« Business or Finance related Bachelor's Degree Qualification

* Professional Insurance Qualification, i.e. FCI, ACI or CPCU

* Ten years commercial insurance experience :

+ Proven track record in new business development

» Self motivated in addition to being a good team player

¢ Excellent organizational and strong analytical skills }

* Must be proficient with Excell, Powerpoint and Mircosoft Word

* Ability to relocate and reside in the Cayman Islands

* Ability to prepare & deliver high level presentations

- Knowledge of the local insurance market would be an advantage
The successful applicant will primarily be responsible for new busi-

- ness development as well as maintaining & developing existing
carrier relationships across a broad range of products &

An attractive compensation package, including a comprehensive
range of employee benefits and relocation is being offered.

Deadline for resumes is the 16th March 2007

Business Development Executive
SteppingStones Recruitment

Grand Cayman KY1-1001
Tel (345) 946 7837
Fax (345) 946 7836
Email jobs@steppingstonescayman.com





| Business
Sense

By Mark Palmer




2. General Accounting Sys-
tem - The second system you will
need to implement is a general
accounting system. As your busi-
ness grows, consider the follow-
ing important accounting tasks.
Your accountant can advise you
which of these are important for
your size of business and how to
do them. Outsource these func-
tions to a financial controller as
you grow in size.

* Regular Reporting - To keep
track of what is going on in your
business.

* Budget Forecasting — So that
you can predict the future.

* Preparation of Financial
Statements — So that you, your
bankers, stakeholders and
investors can see how the busi-
ness is doing.

* Establishing Credit Lines -
So that you have enough cash in
future.

* Internal Controls - To pro-
tect yourself against internal
fraud.>

* Securing Future Borrowing
Requirements — To ensure you
have enough capital in the busi-
ness to meet current and future
needs.

* Treasury Function — To get
the best rate of return on your
cash and assets.

* Payroll Function - To make
sure your employees are paid on
time.

* Taxes and Returns —- To
make sure all your taxes are paid
on time.

* Monitor Business Ratios —
To see how well you are doing
compared to the standard in your

industry and your competition.

een

3. Accounts Receivable Sys-
tem - The third system you need
to implement is a revenue and

atnasparee







































requirements

resources

Technology Manager



projects including:

project

1

accounts receivable system.
Implement the following systems
to streamline your sales process-
es so that you invoice promptly,
collect quickly, deal with refunds
and credits efficiently, and min-
imise your arrears.

* Billing Process - To invoice
your sales quickly so that you
receive payment quicker, get
deposits up front and give credit
to customers.

* Collection Process ~ To
actively collect the money that
is due to you.

* Authorising Credit - To
decide who to give credit to, how
much and what the minimum
order size for credit will be.

* Arrears Policy — To decide
whether you are going to charge
late payment penalties, and how
you are going to enforce them.

4. Accounts Payable System -
The fourth system you need to
implement is an expenses and
accounts payable system.

Implement the following sys-
tems to streamline your pur-
chasing process, so that you pay
late, keep your costs under con-
trol, obtain credit and ensure all
your purchases are properly
authorised.

* Payment Process -— To
ensure you take the maximum
time to pay your suppliers, keep-
ing supplies and inventory at a

.sensible level.

* Cost Control — To ensure
you keep your overheads to a
minimum by having a system to
justify every cost in the business.

* Obtaining Credit - To ask
for extended credit up front from
your suppliers, as well as dis-
counted terms for paying early.

* Purchasing Procedures And
Approvals — To make sure that
whoever makes a purchase is
authorised to make it through
the use of purchase orders.

5. Cash Flow System - The
fifth system you need to imple-
ment‘is a system to manage cash
flow: : Concentrate on the fol-
lowing areas to help your busi-
ness maximise its cash flow. Get-

Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited, a subsidiary of Citigroup, a leading financial institution with
a presence in over 100 countries and over 100 million customers worldwide, is seeking
candidates for the positions detailed below in our Technology Department. These positions
support our Global Wealth Structuring (GWS) business unit, which offers a world-class array
of fiduciary solutions to those who seek to preserve and protect their wealth. We have locations
in The Bahamas, Cayman Islands, Switzerland, Jersey and Singapore. The Technology
Department supports all locations and applications for the business.

AREA MANAGER-TECHNOLOGY (Global Wealth Structuring)
Reporting to the GWS Head of Technology, the position is responsible for:
- Long-range organizational and strategic planning for business an associated technology

Managing large-scale and/or global strategic technology-base projects or applications
Oversee all technology infrastructure initiatives and ensure ongoing management of these

Ensure all business risk management and regulatory requirements are adhered to and an
effective control environment is in place and monitored
Oversee all external vendor relationships

Monitor the adherence to corporate information security requirements

People management including staffing, coaching, work-flow coordination, performance
management and career development
- Managing the departmental budget and any associated reporting and monitoring activities

The following skills, knowledge and experience are required:

- Bachelor’s degree required; post-graduate degree an asset
- Minimum 10+ years related experience; minimum 4

- Excellent relationship management, interpersonal and leadership skills
- Moderate financial management skills
- Excellent people management skills with a hands-on approach
- Strong communication skills; both oral arid written
- MS Office, Oracle, SQL, (historic programming experience with language and web

applications) Crystal Reports; Imaging technologies.
- Excellent project management skills

PROJECT LEADER-TECHNOLOGY
Reporting to the GWS Head of Technology, the position is responsible for:
- Managing all technology components of assigned business and/or technology based

Reviewing master project plans and advising on technical requirements; write
technical design documents, set technology standards.

' Writing and/or reviewing code and testing
Act as system architect as needed.
Problem-resolution as required
Managing and tracking all technology resources and deadlines associated with the

¢ Coordinate and manage User Acceptance Testing
¢ Assist with project budgeting and approvals

The following skills, knowledge and experience are required:

Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science or equivalent experience.

Minimum 3+ years DBA hands-on programming experience

SQL and Oracle programming and/or DBA experience required, Visual Basic, Citrix,
Crystal Reports, Net; Win2K, Web technologies, MS Office applications, DBMS
knowledge, programming skills in a windows environment.

Historic programming experience with languages and web applications.

Strong oral and written communications skills.
Excellent relationship management skills; experience working with external vendors
Demonstrated project management skills

Interested Bahamian candidates should forward a copy of their resume by February 19, 2007
to: Technology Unit Head, Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited, P.O. Box N-1576, Nassau, Bahamas
OR Fax: (242) 302-8779 OR Email: janice.gibson@citigroup.com

+ years experience as a Senior

ting this right will stop you plung-
ing into a crisis and having to
borrow extra unnecessary mon-

y:

* Overdue Receivables — To
keep an eye on overdue money
that is owed to you. Track them
and act on any that are older
than 30 days.

* Stretch Payables — To take
the maximum time to pay your
suppliers.

* Early Payment Incentives —
To get a discount on the money
that you owe. Ask suppliers for
early payment discounts.

* Retainer —.To help predict
future income. Move some of
your customers on to a retainer
so that you get a regular income.

* Pricing —- To review your
pricing and increase it with the
Retail Price Index

* Buy Supplies — To buy sup-
plies at the best rate. Use dis-
counters except where you need
an added value service.

* Renegotiate — To review
your suppliers once a year and
get the most competitive quotes.

* Leasing — To improve your
balance sheet and cash flow.

As you can see, managing
money effectively will take quite
a few systems. Money is the
lifeblood of your. business, and
managing it will require constant
effort. So, become fanatical
about your numbers and start
implementing systems now. In
order to avoid the trap of
antipreneurship, make sure you
spend sufficient time on this area
to ensure business success.

NB: Adapted from his upcom-
ing book, Antipreneurship And
How to Avoid It, Mark draws
on 20 years of top level business,
marketing and communications
experience in London and the
Bahamas. He is chief operating
officer of www.ezpzemail.com,
currently lives in Nassau, and can
be contacted at markalex-
palmer@mac.com

© Mark Palmer. All rights
reserved









erarenreomsoneees AEN

SPORTSWEEKEND |




aot henmNESR aR Se

Che Miami Her Herald

"IN My OPINION
DAVID J. NEA

dneal@Miamiteral



ee big cud
who’s well-versed _
at being ignorant —

negative, “hate” stands as the ©
biggest four-letter word you —
~ can use on ABC. People aecustemed

B ecause we tend to focus on the .

to having their publicly-spoken co s

recorded or written for posterity

know to handle that word as if it were ;

a glass of nitroglycerin.
Which is just one reason to say _

“please” to any apology from former _ a
Miami Heat guard Tim Hardayey for

saying “I hate gay people” o

_ Wednesday during a radio intervicH a
that also included Hardaway’s admis-

sion that, basically, he wouldn’t be .

able to deal with ateammate whois __

known to be gay.

Thus did Hardaway give voiceto

the feelings shared by the majority of

-professional athletes and by manyin _
~ America. Nothing wrong with that. At _

least he was honest. In America, it’s
your right to be a bigot so long as it —
doesn’t infringe on someone else’s

- right to just be.

When we lose the right to bigotry,

we no longer live in America.

MONEY COMES FIRST
That is an America where capital-.

ism holds a daily referendum in which

the people’s voice can be heard via __
the wallet. ‘The NBA, conscious that
gays.and lesbians buy season tickets
— and LeBron James jerseys, too —

distanced itself from Hardaway much — 1

quicker than the league’s daughter,
the WNBA, embraced the lesbian
presence in its fandom.

The dress-coded NBA’s reflex i isto” ;
_ Mean no offense to any potential Pay? a

ing customer.
Not that I agree with Hardaway’s

opinion one iota. It’s an insult to some.

good neighbors, some close friends
and members of my immediate blood
family. But it’s really hard to get
worked up over gay hatred by a
retired professional athlete. We're not

talking about the most learned orthe _

most sophisticated people in that
group. I’m more reminded of some
_ ironies and incongruities:

| SHARING THE SPACE

e NFL and NBA players romp
happily about the South Beach play-
ground. It’s axiomatic that South
Beach’s allure to a visiting team one
night is worth a few points to the Heat
the next night. South Beach might no

longer be the place for the jet set, but . -

it still is the place for many athletes.

Funny thing is, a healthy portionof

South Beach’s vibe and energy comes
from the local gay population that _
those athletes generally would
eschew as teammates. When it comes
to acceptance of homosexuality,
South Beach ranks as one of the topes
places in the world. .

Anybody else reminded of the
white folks who used to slide up into
Harlem clubs and speakeasies sun
the Renaissance? -

_ @ Hardaway is a rel conditioned?
guy, a former.world-class athlete.

Still, Mr. I Hate Gay People might
‘want to avoid those South Florida
gyms, in which most of the clientele is
gay, with biceps bigger than their
dogs; the average bench press is
“Toyota”; and tolerance for intoler-
ance is zero. They might just turn
Hardaway into Tiny Tim.

Heck, Hardaway could bring that
attitude to some condo meetings and

come out Some Reassembly Required.

SUSPICIOUS CHARACTERS

e Forget the false characterization
of the NBA as a bunch of off-the-cor-

ner thugs — a broad-brush stereotype _

based on a few thugs but even more
on unfamiliar hairstyles, attire, body
art and speech patterns. After all, for-
mer NFL quarterback Art Schlichter
has done more time than any three
Portland Jail Blazers combined.

That said, it does seem kind of
ridiculous when anyone from the’

~ NBA claims that they couldn’t handle
having a gay teammate.

Some teams have former felons, or
guys who would be former felons had
their basketball ability not gotten
them a pass. There are players whose
entourages have more guns than they
have good sense.

Nor do you hear of anyone saying
they don’t want to share a locker
room with a seed-spreader leaving
children and single mamas in multiple
road cities. Guys such as Shawn Kemp
have done more to damage the urban
neighborhoods than Doogie Howser
(Neil Patrick Harris, the actor who
recently came out himself).









FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007

BY MELISSA MURPHY
Associated Press

The NBA has banished former
player Tim Hardaway from All-
Star Weekend because of anti-gay
remarks he made Wednesday ona
Miami radio show.

Hardaway, who played in five
All-Star Games during the 1990s,
already was in Las Vegas and was
scheduled to make a series
of public appearances this
week on behalf of the league.

But after Hardaway said “I
hate gay people” during a
radio interview, NBA Com-
missioner David Stern stepped in.

“It is inappropriate for him to be
representing us, given the disparity
between his views and ours,” Stern
said in a statement Thursday.

Hardaway’s comments — for
which he later issued an apology —
came a week after John Amaechi



BY MIKE HARRIS
Associated Press

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — Just when it

Pedal

Stewart wins first
qualifier; Gordon
wins, gets penalty

eenate renal eat

I LA MLAS ISSR ALI SESSA SESE ELON ODED

3C,

INTERNATIONAL EDITION



PRO BASKETBALL | CONTROVERSY SWIRLS

Hardaway pays for bashing gays

became the first former NBA.

player to reveal that he is gay.

“I don’t need Tim’s comments
to realize. there’s a problem,”
Amaechi told The Associated
Press in a phone interview. “Peo-
-ple said that I should just shut up
and go away — now they have to
rethink that.”

On the radio show Wednesday, |

Miami Herald columnist
Dan Le Batard asked Hard-
away how he would interact
if he had a gay teammate.
“First of all, I wouldn’t
want him on my team,” said
Hardaway, who played for the
Miami Heat from 1995-2001. “And,
second of all, if he was on my team,
I would, you know, really distance
myself from him because, uh, I
don’t think that is right. I don’t
think he should be in the locker
room while we are”







JOE MURPHY/NBA-GETTY IMAGES, 2006

FLAGRANT FOUL: Tim Hardaway
won't be appearing on ‘NBA
Insiders’ again any time soon.

. When Le Batard told Hardaway
that those comments were “flatly
homophobic” and “bigotry,” Har-
dawgy continued his remarks.

“ou know, I hate gay people,
so I let it be known. I don’t like gay

people, and I don’t like to be

AUTO RACING | DAYTONA 500

around gay people,” Hardaway

said. “I’m homophobic. I don’t like .
it. It shouldn’t be in the world or in

the United States.”

Amaechi, who detailed his life
in his new book, Man in the Middle,
said anti-gay sentiments remain
despite Hardaway’s apology.

“His words pollute the atmo-
sphere,” Amaechi said. “It creates
an atmosphere that allows young
gays and lesbians to be hazassed in -
school, creates an atmosphere
where, in 33 states, you can lose
your job, and where anti-gay and
lesbian issues are used for political
gain. It’s an atmosphere that hurts
all of us — not just gay people.

“It’s vitriolic — and may be
exactly what he feels. Whether he’s
honest or not doesn’t inoculate us
from his words. It’s not progress to
hear hateful words.”

e NBA REPORT

to the me

looked as if racing would snatch the spotlight
from the cheaters at Daytona, Jeff Gordon’ s
winning car failed inspection.

Gordon, who won the second of Thursday’ s
two 150-mile qualifying races, now will start the
Daytona 500 from the 42nd position.

NASCAR inspectors said Gordon’s Chevro-
let was almost an inch too low, but they blamed
the violation on a part failure — not cheating.
Gordon was not stripped of the victory.

“We feel it was unintentional, and actually
fairly unsafe,” NASCAR competition director
Robin Pemberton said. “We feel that it was a
part failure, and we feel that it was unintention-
ally done. I think it would be marginal, at best, if
there was any advantage.

“I am 100 percent sure this is unintentional.”

NASCAR said it believed a mechanic made a
mistake when the shocks were installed.

Gordon’s was the sixth team in three days to
be caught with technical violations. The earlier
problems led to expulsions, suspensions, fines
and loss of championship points — and the sea-
son hasn’t even begyn yet.

The most serious of the violations was com-
mitted by the new team of Michael Waltrip,
whose Toyota Camry failed inspection after an
illegal substance was found in the gas line: Wal-
trip’s crew chief and his team director were sus-
pended indefinitely and kicked out of Daytona
International Speedway. Waltrip was docked
100 driver and car-owner points.

That penalty was on the heels of lesser viola-

- tions by the teams of Matt Kenseth, Kasey

Kahne, Elliott Sadler and Scott Riggs, whose
crew chiefs all were fined and suspended. All of
those drivers also lost points.

“You couldn’t stage this stuff, even if you
wanted to,” Pemberton said.

Tony Stewart was the day’s first winner, tak-
ing the first 150-mile qualifying race to firmly
establish himself as the Daytona 500 favorite.
There were no questions about Stewart’s vic-
tory after he easily held off former Daytona 500



DAVID GRAHAM/AP

CROSSING THE LINE: Tony Stewart takes the checkered flag as ya wins the first of two
qualifying races, beating Dale Earnhardt Jr. (8), Jeff Burton (31) and David Gilliland.

winner Dale Earnhardt Jr. in the closing laps.
Four drivers — two from each race — raced
their way into the lineup, including Waltrip,

_who got what he wanted — a chance to prove

that he didn’t need to cheat to make the race.
With an eighth-place finish, Waltrip and
Boris Said, who nosed out Mike Bliss for 12th
place, advanced in the first qualifying race.
They will be joined in the Daytona 500 by Joe
Nemechek and Mike Wallace, who finished
ninth and llth, respectively, in the second race.

GOLF | NISSAN OPEN

Kyle Busch led most of the second race but
lost the lead to his older brother Kurt and fell to
sixth place on the 54th lap. Kurt Busch wound
up second, followed by David Stremme, Kyle
Busch and former series’ champion Kenseth,
who raced from the rear of the 30-car field after
his qualifying speed Sunday was disqualified.

AJ. Allmendinger, his teammate Brian Vick-
ers, two-time Daytona winner Bill Elliott, 2002
Daytona 500 winner Ward Burton and 1990
winner Derrike Cope all failed to sae

Harrington opens with a 63, leads by three shots

BY DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — Padraig Har-
rington is a newcomer to the Nis-
san Open, still not sure when to hit
the brakes and when to fire at the
flags. He chose the latter Thursday
and zoomed past Phil Mickelson
and everyone else at Riviera.Coun-
try Club with an 8-under 63.

Harrington opened with three
consecutive birdies. He ran off four
in a row after making the turn and
even picked one up on the tough
15th hole when his 5-iron shot hit
the pin and settled 4 feet away.

Harrington’s only bogey came
from a three-putt on the par-3 14th,
and the Irishman had a reasonable
explanation for that.

“At this stage, I’m feeling invin-
cible,” he said. “I didn’t think I was
ever not going to make birdie.”

Harrington held a three-shot
lead over Mickelson, Briny Baird
and Pat Perez. Jim Furyk, Sergio
Garcia and David Howell were
among those in the group at 67 ona
spectacular day of sunshine and
shotmaking on the storied course
off Sunset Boulevard.

Six players failed to finish the
first round when it was too dark to
continue; they will finish it today.

Mickelson is playing Riviera for
the first time since 2001, and he has
never had much success here. But
coming off a five-shot victory last
weekend at Pebble Beach, where
he tied the tournament scoring



MATT SAYLES/AP

IRON WILL: Padraig Harrington. -

record, Mickelson kept right on
rolling, with a bogey-free 66. He hit
only six fairways, but the rough is
negligible this week, and Mickel-
son wasn’t off-target by much.

His only disappointment was
being three shots behind.

“It’s a little humbling to shoot
what I thought was a good round
and then get lapped,” he said.

The only other time Howell has
played Riviera was two years ago,
when it took four days to complete
36 holes because of rain. The Eng-
lishman found conditions quite dif-
ferent this year, and he was duly
impressed Thursday — by Riviera
and by Harrington.

“This is a great golf course,” he
said. “And that is a hell of a round.”

Vijay Singh started eagle-birdie,
but a couple of late bogeys brought
him a 68. Retief Goosen made only
seven pars in his round of 71.

e MORE GOLF





Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EM93FG258_I17MW0 INGEST_TIME 2011-10-03T14:42:56Z PACKAGE UF00084249_02821
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


PAGE 2, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Tec RMR BCRUNEWS RRC HPAI VA OATES ae
FNM call for action on constructing new school |

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - The FNM on
Grand Bahama is criticising the
PLP government for its neglect
of overcrowding in the public
education system and its failure
to construct a much needed
junior high school in Freeport.

“For almost five years the
Christie administration has
neglected the education needs
of Grand Bahama,” said the
Free National Movement in a
statement.

“Our children have been
forced to attend severely over-
crowded schools because the
much needed Junior High
School which the FNM left
plans and funding arrangements
in place to construct was
neglected by this uncaring PLP
administration,” it said.

FNM MPs and candidates on
Grand Bahama visited the pro-
posed site for the new junior
high school in the Heritage Sub-
division, where only mounds of
dirt and fill have been piled
along the road side.

St George’s High School,
which was constructed under

the FNM administration and '

was built to accommodate some
900 students, has an enrollment
of almost 1,700 students. Jack
Hayward High, which was also
constructed for 900 students,



a PICTURED (lett to right) are FNM Pineridge « candidate Kwasi Thoinpacik: Marco City candi-
date Zhivargo Laing, MP for Lucaya, Neko Grant, High Rock MP Ken Russell and FNM Eight
MileRock candidate Verna Grant in front of the planned Heritage Junior School site in Grand

Bahama.

currently has an enrollment of

1,500 students.
The FNM claims: “The gov-
ernment of Prime Minister

Christie has made thousands of

Bahamian students and their
educators suffer needlessly
because of their incompetence,
inefficiency and ineffectiveness.

“How much progress have
our children lost because this

uncaring administration could
not follow-through on a plan
left for them to construct the
junior high school? One won-
ders if the overcrowding at
these schools has not con-

tributed to needless social prob-

lems at the schools, including
lower than expected academic
performance, violence among
students, and attacks against

teachers. We know that secu-
rity has been a major concern
over the last several years.”
When the FNM left office in
2002, according to the party,
there were plans drawn for a
junior high school, a site had
been selected for the school, and
there was a $3-million commit-
ment from the Grand Bahama
Port Authority toward financing

the construction of the school.

It was further stated that the
FNM government had made
budgetary provisions for the
financing of the school.

“How uncaring can this gov-
ernment be to have taken
almost five years to build a des-
perately needed school? How
inept can they have been to not
be able to attend to this critical
education need?

The FNM is also demanding
that the government meet the
needs of hundreds of Grand
Bahama teachers who are owed
salaries and other payments.

“Over four hundred teachers
in Grand Bahama found it nec-
essary recently to leave their’
beloved students and the calling
to which they have committed
themselves because the gov-
ernment could not see about
their pay.

The FNM said that both for-
eign and Bahamian teachers
have had to struggle to meet
their obligations while govern-

‘ment ministers collect their full

salaries on time each month.
“Tt is outrageous that the Min-
ister of Education went to the
Parliament and said that these
matters had been resolved. Yet,
these teachers say not so. They
confirm by their industrial action
that it is not so. We cry shame
on this incompetent and inept
administration.”



- Ingraham: education system is in
chaos and the minister incapable

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

THE Ministry of Education

is in a state of disarray and con-
fusion reigns in the country’s
education system, Opposition
leader Hubert Ingraham said

last night at an FNM Rally in
the Golden Gates Constituency.

Mr Ingraham pointed out
that no new schools had been

rn

built in the government’s five
years in office and there had
been a failure by the .govern-
ment to get schools repaired in

”
_ MONT LSU) AVE, Rainy: eee PD ie RPS oe

PRICE INCLUDES: FIRST SERVICE E FREE
LICENSE & INSPECTION

FULL TANK OF GAS :
FULL SET FLOOR MATS

_ PARTS & SERVICE ASSU RED





time for opening or paying new
teachers in a timely fashion.

“At first, the excuse was that
the PLP Minister of Education
was too busy, had too much on
his plate. So during his so-called
Cabinet shuffle, which came
much too late and was not much
of a shuffle anyway, Mr Christie
relieved Minister Alfred Sears
of his responsibility as Attor-
ney General so he could con-
centrate on education.

“And things went from bad
to worse. It wasn’t that the min-
ister had too. much to do; the
problem was, and still is, that
he doesn’t know what to do.
And so our children suffer,” Mr
Ingraham said.

If elected, the opposition
leader said that one of his first
priorities would be to revive the
education system by placing
emphasis on the basics: Litera-
cy, numeracy and oracy in early
education.

He also promised that a gov-
ernment led by him would
meet a great challenge which
will tax the country’s resources,
imagination and commitment,
rescuing those young people
who have already fallen
through the cracks and are
presently unemployed or
unemployable.

“In collaboration with the
churches, youth organisations,
service clubs, civic associations,
the College of The Bahamas
and international agencies, we
will implement programmes to
reach out to these young peo-
ple, to motivate them, to offer
them opportunities for training
so that they can become pro-
ductive citizens.

“We simply cannot afford to

_have large numbers of alienated

young people, especially young
men, sitting on the sidelines
while the country develops and
life passes them by. There

’ would be a high cost in that for

all of us. First, we would have to:
import more and more foreign
workers to do the work that we
should be doing ourselves,” he
said,

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

PEST CONTROL
it aa ya der Lg













In brief

Castro’ Ss son
Says recovery
progress is
‘satisfactory’
a HAVANA



FIDEL Castro’s eldest son
and namesake said Thursday
his father’s comeback from
intestinal surgery has been

“satisfactory” and that he
could eventually recover
completely, Iaccording‘to
Associated Press. i

“As Raul said officials), as
well as other leaders: his state
of health is! progressing i
satisfactory and anainined
manner,” Fidel Castro Diaz
Balart told reporters. \3

Raul Castro, Fidel’s Broth!
er and the 75-year-gl\
defense minister, has beet
acting president since his 80-
year-old sibling stepped aside
more than six months ago to
recover from the surgery. '

“That’s the same percep-
tion that I have,” the 56-year-
old known as “Fidelito” said
on the sidelines of an inter-
national book fair. “We
believe that bit by bit, com-
rade Fidel will achieve total
recovery. That’s the hope of
the Cuban people and the
revolutionaries of the world.”

The bearded revolution-
ary’s brothers Raul and
Ramon, 82, said separately
last week that Castro was
recovering well. Raul added
that his brother was exercis-
ing and frequently using the
telephone.

Cuban officials have denied
US government reports that
Fidel suffered from cancer. A
Spanish newspaper reported
last month that he had diver-
ticular disease, a weakening
of the walls of the colon.

Trial set for
Cuban militant
accused of

lying

@ TEXAS
El Paso Y :

AN anti-Castro Cuban mil
itant accused of lying to
immigration officials in a bid
to become a,US citizen
should stand trial in May, a
federal judge ruled Thursday,
according to Associated Press.

US District Judge Kathleen
Cardone set May 11 for jury
selection in the case against
Luis Posada Carriles, who has
been in US immigration cus-
tody since May 2005 after sur-
facing in Miami. ~

Posada, a former CJA
operative and US Army sol-
dier, is accused of lying about
how he illegally. entered the
United States from Mexico
in 2005 and several other
details in interviews and on
an application to become a
naturalized US citizen.

According to a seven-count
indictment handed down last
month, Posada told investi-
gators he paid a smuggler to
drive him across the border
into South Texas but really
entered the country aboard
a boat with several men he
had denied seeing.

He is also accused of lying
about using an alias.

Posada was arrested ona
charge that he illegally
entered the country. Since
then, an immigration judge
has ruled that he should be
deported, but ordered that he
could not be sent to Cuba,
where he was, born, or
Venezuela, where he is a nat-
uralised citizen.

Governments of both
countries want Posada
deported to Venezuela so he
can stand trial on charges that
he was in Caracas when he
plotted the deadly 1976
bombing of a Cuban jetliner:

Posada has denied any
wrongdoing and has pleaded
not guilty in the federal crim-
inal case.



<¢

5

tw 4

4

a7. FP Owe: [wwe wee se

Oe om ee Oe
THE TRIBUNE





In brief



16-year-old
in hospital
with serious |
head injuries

A 16-YEAR-OLD boy is
in critical condition in the
intensive care unit at Princess
Margaret Hospital after he
received serious head
injuries.

According to, police, the
boy was found lying uncon-
scious on the ground on Tay-
lor Street in the Nassau Vil-
lage area at Spm on Wednes-
day.

He had a wound to his
head when he was discovered
and was taken to hospital.

Investigations are contin-
uing.

Haitian gang
members flee

to Dominican
Republic

w HAITI
Port-au-Prince

AN aggressive new UN
offensive has prompted sev-

eral Haitian gang members.

to flee their slum strongholds
and cross the border into the
Dominican Republic, the top
official of the international
body in Haiti said Thursday,
according to Associated Press.

Edmond Mulet, the United
Nations special envoy to
Haiti, said Dominican
authorities have captured
several of the gang members
crossing into their territory
‘since the UN peacekeepers
launched a series of crack-
downs on gangs in two Port-
au-Prince slums earlier this
month.

“We heard from the
Dominican authorities ... that
they have arrested several
gang members or people try-
ing to flee to the Dominican
Republic,” Mulet told the
Associated Press.

“This is normal, especially
if you are a gang member and
have money, just to leave the
country to go somewhere

here you will not be

nown,” he added.
Officials in the Dominican
Republic — which shares the.
Caribbean island of Hispan-
iola with Haiti — did not
immediately return phone
calls seeking comment.

UN troops and Haitian
police raided the Martissant
slum last weekend and arrest-
ed 31 gang members. On Fri-
day, more than 700 troops
raided another slum, Cite.
Soleil, and killed one sus-
pected gang member and
wounded four others.

In January, UN troops
killed four suspected gang
members in Cite Soleil during
a raid to seize an abandoned
_ schoolhouse that the UN said
had been used to stage
attacks on peacekeepers. A
month earlier, peacekeepers
fought a five-hour gun battle
with gangs during another
raid in Cite Soleil. The UN
said six gang members died,
but slum dwellers claimed 10
died and all were civilians.

Mulet said the 8,800-strong
UN force and Haitian police
would continue going after
gangs in Port-au-Prince but
had no plans to beef up
patrols along the 243-mile
Haitian-Dominican border.

The UN Security Council
on Thursday voted unani-
mously to extend the peace-
keeping mission for eight
months following an agree-

_ment between the United
States and China on the
length of the new mandate.

The blue-helmeted UN
force arrived in July 2004.

“ye 4,
‘The Tribune wants to hear
} from’people who are
making news in, their
J neigh yourhoods. Perhaps
you ate raising funds for a
goodicause, campaigning
for itiprovements in the
area Or have won an
award,

24











@ By BRENT DEAN

A WEEK after Deputy
Prime Minister and Minister of
National Security Cynthia Pratt
said senior police restructuring
would occur, no announcement
has yet been made regarding
the shuffle.

In particular, significant con-
troversy has emerged sur-
rounding the potential transfer

‘of Assistant Commissioner
Reginald Ferguson from his job .

as crime chief to head the police
college.

Many view such a move as a
demotion that may be intended
to force Mr-Ferguson into
retirement.

Mr Ferguson is the brother
of FNM candidate for South
Eleuthera, Johnley Ferguson,
and public accusations have
arisen that his transfer is politi-
cally motivated. :

Other accusations suggest the

‘transfer would make him the

‘scapegoat’ over the arrest of
five Nassau Flight Services bag-
gage handlers in Florida last
year — thus deflecting criticism

ae Meoley.\ Ba | VS

Still no announcement on ©
senior police reshuffling —

from the government.
Mrs Pratt has vehemently
denied accusations that the

impending transfers are either

politically motivated or related
to the NFS controversy.

Mrs. Pratt has also gone on
record as stating that the trans-
fers would be implemented. at

‘ the discretion of the commis-

sioner, and would give senior
officers experience in other
areas of the force.

Mr Ferguson’s transfer has
led many officers to make pub-
lic remarks surrounding the
controversy. Some senior offi-
cers have spoken in support of
Mr Ferguson, indicating that
they do not desire to see him
moved. ,

Other senior offices said Mr
Ferguson has been head of
crime for too long - ten years -
and a change of direction was
now necessary.

Though Mr Ferguson’s
potential move has dominated
discourse surrounding the trans-
fers, the move of Assistant
Commissioner Elliston
Greenslade has also sparked

keen interest.

Mr Greenslade has been
head of the Northern Bahamas
for the last few years and
sources have indicated that his
‘return to Nassau, to potentially
take over Mr Ferguson’s crime

portfolio, indicates that he is

being groomed to succeed Mr
Paul Farquharson as commis-
sioner when Mr Farquharson
leaves office.

Reports have also suggested

that Mr Greenslade may even ,

be about to take over as deputy
commissioner. But for this to
occur, the current deputy John
Rolle would need to retire.

It is unclear if the public con-
troversy created by reports in
The Tribune, and subsequent
discussion on talk radio regard-
ing the transfers, have led the
government to delay or re-eval-
uate the transfers.

Attempts to contact Mrs
Pratt were unsuccessful up to
press time.

i CYNTHIA Pratt

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007, PAGE 3





FNM leader pledges to strengthen police

force and to provide adequate payment

IN response to the country’s
continuing problem with crime,
FNM leader Hubert Ingraham
yesterday promised prospective
voters that his party would
make strengthening the police
force a priority. :

Speaking last night at the
FNM’s rally in the Golden
Gates constituency, Mr Ingra-
ham said that his party is
“acutely aware that the high
incidence of crime, especially
violent crime, is threatening our
society.”

“We are also aware that to
defeat this threat we must

mount a vigorous and multi-

‘
faceted response,” he said.

Mr Ingraham said that it will
be one of the FNM’s first prior-
ities if they win the government
to give police officers the pay

they deserve as well as the.

equipment they need to keep
the: population safe and the
streets crime-free.

In addition to improving the
police force, the FNM leader
told his audience, his party will
also “strengthen, equip and ade-
quately pay the men: ‘and
women of the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force.” ~~

“While we go about our busi-
ness, or while we sleep in our

homes at night, we must know
that they are able to protect us
from drug runners, illegal immi-
grants and those who would
steal our marine resources,” he
said.

Objectives.

Mr Ingraham outlined the -

objectives of the FNM, explain-
ing that his party intends to
strengthen and equip the
Defence Force base at Inagua,
establish a permanent Defence
Force outpost at Farmer’s Cay
in the Exumas, as well as a

Cars wrecked in crash |

EE 3

a

@ A CRASH in front of the Nassau Beach Hotel in Cable Beach left two cars seriously damaged

on Wednesday night- however, there were no injuries



of things we
think, say or do

1.|s it the TRUTH?

2.\s it FAIR to all
concerned?

3. Will it build
GOODWILL and
BETTER
FRIENDSHIPS?

4.Willitbe
BENEFICIAL to
all concerned?

www. rotary.org

















(Photo: Ana Bianca Marin)





satellite presence in the Ragged
Island chain “so as to minimise,
if not eliminate altogether, the
trafficking in human beings
from the south.”
“We believe that with the

right sea and air craft and mod-

ern surveillance equipment we
should be able to stop them
from continuing to cruise
through our islands right into

. Nassau Harbour.

“Tf we can stop them in the
south and process them at
Inagua, that should do two
things. It should discourage
some of them from coming in
the first place, and it will cer-



kssaplie PEF * 3
Sacovs

Ltr TLe
CSI SA. GR





WMO

EFFECTIVE FEBRUARY 09TH, 2007

evi [en | Jom few [5
new | 200 |

15
new | 15 [840 [wa [eto [an | rs |
wew | tad [WA [a0 | tao Tum | rosa
t [sn [2m [an [oto [oa [1050
| sm [325 [Ma
rnewessemen TL tay [880 [NR
srowrmevand TL ty (85 NA
WT sag [3a |_| 620
sarees

_ GALLERIA 6 - JFK DRIVE

QUB E-CARD TQ RESER KET A

DADDY'S LITTLE GIRLS
| DADDY'S LITTLE GIRLS





BRIDGE TO TERABITHIA
MUSIC & LYRICS

WORBIT.
HANNIBAL RISING














ARTHUR AND THE INVISIBLES
DREAMGIRLS

DADDY'S LITTLE GIRLS NEW






BRIDGE TO TERABITHIA NEW

NORBIT T
HANNIBAL RISING .

STOMP THE YARD T

SS RNS ees TS



The Mall-at-Marathon

BOX OFFICE OPENS AT 10:00 AM DAILY

Tee



rat |
cen [a [a8 | WA | [|
sa | | ea
[Pk | |
re [sa [ak | [| |

va 395_ [WA | 600 | 826 [1046

, RS S SEN ETE WON

tainly make it less burdensome
on the Public Treasury to repa-
triate them from Inagua instead
of Nassau,” Mr Ingraham said.

The party leader further said

. the next. FNM government will
undertake a “complete reap-

praisal of public policy as it
relates to the employment of
expatiates in the Bahamas — not
only at the low end but also at
the high end.”

“One of the things we will
immediately address is the pro-
liferation of ghettos by immi-
grants, whether legal or illegal.
We simply cannot allow this to
continue,” he said.












reece NC
















[eff
SiS TMA | gas [025 [108





1h:
a

ae

=>
2










&





ss_|
re
ee |
ea

ital

OB WWW,GALLERIAVINEN OM
[wa | ean | os | 1035




PAGE 4, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007



The Tribune Limited





NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH,

Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.;
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., MS., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

: Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas ~
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

Bahamianisation and discrimination

AT LEAST one Bahamian lawyer considers
“Bahamianisation” a euphemism for institu-
tionalised discrimination. We couldn’t agree
with him more. We also agree that it has out-

lived its usefulness and has for years protected °

and encouraged mediocrity in this country.

Lawyer Fred Smith of Freeport— like many
Bahamians of his age — believes that “Bahami-
anisation” was a creation of the PLP. It was
not. wm
Bahamianisation was first introduced by the
UBP government to protect qualified Bahami-
ans from unfair outside competition. An
employer had to look to our own people first to
fill a vacancy. If that failed he was free to search
beyond our shores.

Bahamianisation took on new meaning when
the Progressive Liberal Party became the gov-
ernment in 1967. It was then that this Bahami-
ans-first policy became a political tool to blud-
geon government’s opponents out of commer-
cial existence. That ig why it has always — and
will always — be considered a PLP creation.

We recall several bank managers complain-
ing that when the bank’s essential work per-
mits were pending, they could be certain that a
government politician would appear and apply
for a bank loan. The bank would send these
applications to head office because it was known
that in the ordinary course of business — such as

credit ratings — these loans would not be -

approved. However, the bank also knew that if
the loan were not approved, neither would be
the work permits. They were also aware that if
the politician did not honour his payments on
the loan, the bank had to remain mute for the
same reason. No matter which way an employ-
er squirmed, Bahamianisation under the PLP,
had him pinned to the wall.

The same thing happened at the hotels when
certain members of the PLP wanted board and
lodging and free entertainment. rae

We recall a certain PLP Immigration Minis-
ter who had the impudence to tell the late Sir
Etienne Dupuch, publisher of this newspaper,
that he was a liar because he failed to retire
from The Tribune on his son-in-law being grant-
ed a work permit — apparently Sir Etienne’s
retirement in this puny man’s mind was condi-
tional on the work permit. Even to this day,
we would like to know who that minister
thought he was.

We could write a book about the abuse and
threats that those who publish this newspaper
had to endure daily under the Pindling reign of
terror. That administration succeeded in turning
this country into a frightened society. But that
cringing fear, that buckled men’s knees, stopped

at The Tribune’s doorstep. We insisted that .

regardless of the threats, the Bahamian people
had a right to know. We stood by our convic-
tions, closed our ears to the abuse and continued
to write and to publish.

And so today when they get out there blus-
tering, and flexing their muscles about what
they are going to make The Tribune do, they are
wasting their breath. The Tribune is going to do
nothing that we do. not consider in the best



. South

SUNDAY SERVICES
7:00am, 9:00am, 11:15am
PASTOR EARLE FRANCIS J.P.,D.D.
Marriage Officer, Counsellor, Intercessor.
- Phone: 323-6452 » 393-5798
Fax: 326-4488/394-4819

ATTENTION ALL RESIDENTS
OF LONG ISLAND

Re-Bath Bahamas will be making
installations in Clarence Town beginning
15 February 2007 for 4 days.

_ To arrange an appointment to receive a
quotation to refurbish your bathroom with

our Re-Bath system.

Contact Michael Duggan at
Phone 242-393-8501 or 242-477-1671



interest of the Bahamian people. We do not
insult the Bahamians by treating them like chil-
dren, whose reading material has to be cen-
sored. They have a right to know what their
elected officials are doing or failing to do so
that they can make informed decisions. The

- ‘Tribune is not here to protect any minister of
any government. Government ministers should
know the rules. They should also know that
when they break those rules and abuse the trust
put in them by the Bahamian people, The Tri-
bune will report them to the people. We are
not here to-put on rose-coloured glasses and
call a thorn a rose when we know that it’s an
undesirable thorn.

“Bahamians should not be automatically enti-
tled to a job because they are Bahamians,” Mr
Smith continued in his commentary on Bahami-
anisation. “Employment in a free, open and
competitive market place is earned on merit.

“Employers should be able to hire competent
employees and not have to settle, in many
instances, for mediocrity and incompetence
because they are forced to hire Bahamians.”

It was this protective policy that shackled
Bahamians in mediocrity and incompetence.
Many felt that they did not have to compete, nor
did they have to qualify. The fact that they were
Bahamian was the only qualification required.
We recall a former PLP gentlemen telling us
many years ago about a disagreement that broke
out among PLPs — we believe it was a branch
election. This gentleman, a man of years and
much experience, told of how an unqualified
upstart pushed his arm out and pointed to the
colour of his skin. The older gentleman’s skin
colour would have been described as “bright”,
the younger man’s was ebony black. They were
both PLPs. But the younger man felt that he had
more rights, not because he was better qualified,
because he certainly was not, but because he
had the darker skin. The darker skin won the
day. The older gentleman came to our offices to

- tell Sir Etienne of his experience, and announce
that he was leaving a party that he had helped
mould — because, of all things, it was racist.

Bahamians will never qualify if they are not
pushed to compete. Today all doors are open to
them. All educational opportunities are avail-
able. Many scholarships are offered for those
who qualify.

For Bahamians with ambition, the sky is the

- limit. For those who do not take advantage of

-the opportunities open to them, they, like the
disappearing dinosaurs, will be left behind. But

this country cannot be held back, and local busi- ~

nesses crippled, because a people are too lazy to
exert themselves.

We agree with Mr Smith that “the Immi-
gration Act, licensing laws, government favours
and political corruption were used as tools of
victimisation against Bahamians who opposed
the PLP.” This has to stop.

We believe that employers should still adver-
tise for Bahamians for positions that are open in
their firms, but that they should be free to select
the best man or woman for the job, regardless of
nationality.













NE TTTOU Sno
“To Obey Is Better Than Sacrifice”



Spy aRe)s i) VM =a maton em 1h

National Art

‘98 HYUNDAI ELANTRA Best offer
~ 499 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
‘00 HYUNDAI GALLOPER
‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE
‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE

Very low mileage, very clean

‘05 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
Only 5,000 miles plus very clean

‘03 SUZUKI BALENO |
‘03 SUZUKI XL-7

7-Passenger, dual A/C & low mileage

‘89 TOYOTA BUS Best offer

QUALIT

#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775 * 325-3079

Visit our showroom at Quallty Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals * Queen's Highway * 352-6122

THE TRIBUNE



Gallery not the
place for these
exhibitions

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I WRITE this criticism
‘with much trepidation. I
have reason to believe that
many agree with me but
prefer not to go public. I
will reluctantly hide behind
a synonym because I don’t
want my telephone ringing
at 3:00 in the morning.

By chance I was recently
drawn into a cordial but
somewhat charged
exchange with a curator of
the National Art Gallery of
the Bahamas. I expressed




LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net

the view that I was very
unhappy with the trend that
I see taking place in the
exhibitions. I went so far as
to say that I do not even
consider as Art displays
(called “installations” )
involving toilets and oil-
cans, lawn mowers, objects
on the floor that have to be
stepped over, or film loops

The achievements of

hard-working students
can be belittled quickly

EDITOR, The Tribune.

AFTER having a good laug

h at the jokes listed in the

letter of Mr Bruce Raine in your column on December

20th, as a teacher and college
realised the unfortunate cons

First. of all, many of the jok
different context, so I do hop

be taken in a light manner.

counsel for many years, I
equence of such a letter.

es I have heard before in a

e that the letter was meant to

However, the danger is that the achievements of so

_many hard-working students in our schools can be belit-

tled so quickly by the stroke of a pen and uninformed

readers.

The old GCS. exams that many of us experienced were
replaced by the BGCSE for valid reasons. mina
However, that is a topic that would take me away: from :

the purpose of my letter.

The BGCSE exam results are used as a yard-stick for
admission to colleges and universities across North Amer-
ica (the UK and Europe require a step further, either A--
levels or the IB) and I have watched many students gain
entrance to top tertiary institutions based on their
BGCSE achievements. In addition, after their first semes-.
ter, I have listened to students report that they felt better
prepared than most of their peers starting off as freshman

in college.

Yes, we have things to fix in our educational system,
most countries do, but please don’t take away the pride,
the satisfaction and the dignity that should be held by the
students who worked very hard to successfully pass these
rigorous exams and course work projects.

JUDY REIACH.
Nassau,
December 20, 2006.

PS: Mr Raine forgot the one where the student was
asked, “What is the national flower of The Bahamas? The
student responded, “Robin Hood”.

auto
sales

LIMITED




Employment Opportunity

projected on a wall depict-
ing a man coughing end-

lessly into his hand.

No doubt these ‘are
intended to make powerful
and valuable social state-
ments, but I feel strongly.
that the NAGB is not the
place to make them. I
believe that most of the
people who contributed
their time: and money
toward the establishment
of a National Art Gallery
never envisioned it to be
used for this purpose.

But to be fair, I was
informed that the curators
of the recent show have
received numerous acco-
lades on the works, which
were first shown in Ger- .
many earlier in 2006. Acco-
lades were received “not

only from Bahamians but

from persons and critics all
over the globe”. Fron.

Still, the curator had to
acknowledge that public
daytime attendance at the
NAGB is disappointing. I
was there myself several
times during 2006, and nev-
er saw a soul. As a busi-
nessman, I winced to think
about the funds being
devoted to air conditioning,
security, cashier, and
administrative staff.

My by-no-means-com-

plete vision for the NAGB

is that it be a traditional art
gallery for things of beauty,
sentiment, culture, tragedy,
style, and historic interest
— in the form of paintings,
water-colours, photographs,

sculpture, carvings, and

pottery. I would much pre-
fer to see paintings of
Junkanoo costumes, rather
than the real thing, for
which there is already a
museum. I am sure my
vision can be improved
upon.

For those who enjoy pon-

. dering Great Truths behind

exhibitions of dead sheep,
embalmed babies, and bas- °
ket balls in fish tanks, there
is always the Tate Modern
in London and the Whitney
in New York.

' Such cities are large
enough to justify them, but
not little Nassau.

ONE MAN’S
OPINION
Nassau,
February 4, 2007.



eo) a Ua lanl
Tellers


















- Enthusiasm

Hours of Work



We are seeking mature candidates
(Age 25 & over) with:

- Excellent Customer Service Skills
- Strong Communication Skills

- Cash Handling Experience

Monday — Thursday 10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Friday 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Interested persons should submit their resumes
in WRITING or EMAIL along with copies of
certificates before February 16th, 2007 to:

Human Resources Department —
RE: Part-time Teller
P.O. Box $S-6263
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 394-0758
Email address: anne.lightbourn@combankitd.com






In brief
Fibre-optic
-cable to run
from Cuba to

Venezuela
B HAVANA

‘A NEW undersea fibre-
optic cable from Cuba to
Venezuela should be finished
within two years, a Venezue-
lan communications official
said Thursday, dramatically
expanding Cuba’s internet
and telephone capacity,
caccording to Associated Press.

‘Julio’ Duran, president of

state-run Telecom Venezuela, *

told Associated Press that the

deal signed in late January
» calls for a line with a capacity

.of 160 gigabytes per second.

That is.well.over 1,000
times the capacity of Cuba’s
current satellite-based inter-
net link, which was listed as

- 65 megabytes per second on
upload and 124 megabytes a
second on download by
‘Cuban Communications Min-
ister Ramiro Valdes.

It will break through what
Cuban officials describe as
choking restrictions imposed
by the US commercial
embargo on Cuba, which
they blame for blocking pos-
sible connections with exist-
ing privately owned fiber-

. optic lines in the region.

“It’s a very important pro-
ject, not only for Venezuela

- and Cuba, it’s for all Latin
.American countries,” Duran
said during an interview at
an informatics convention in
the Cuban capital, Havana.

The project was part of a G

series of agreements signed

‘late last month as Venezue-
la’s socialist President Hugo
Chavez moved toward firmer
political and economic ties
with his Cuban ally.

Duran declined to give a
possible cost for the 964-mile
link, saying it was still under
study. But he said officials
were speaking with compa-

nies from China and Europe

for fiber-optic line or other
assistance.

=». | -He said contracts could be

ari signed: by the end of ‘April
ini sand:the, project itself should

c

ee nm en a nr i RE RET RE UTR TE SR mee

_ebé finished in “léss than :two
years".
_ Interconnect points should
allow other countries in the
Caribbean or Central Amer-
ica to hook up as well.
._ Cuba has one of the
net usage. Officials say that is
because the current band-
width restrictions and US
threats against foreign sup-
pliers of technology to Cuba
force them to give priority to
‘schools, researchers and
essential businesses. Critics
have accused the government
-of restricting internet access
to limit Cubans’ exposure to
criticism or information from
abroad.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

Tropical Exterminators
EAL]

DET
































FRIDAY,
“FEBRUARY 16TH
11:00. Immediate Response
~Noon ZNS News Update
{2:05 Immediate Response

Cont'd
1:00 One Cubed
1:30 Ethnic Health America
2:00 Thousand Dollar Bee
2:30 Aqua Kids
3:00 Fellowship Of Christians
& Jews
3:30 Ed Young
4:00 Little Robots
4:30 Carmen San Diego
5:00 ZNS News Update
5:05 The Fun Farm
6:00 Caribbean Passport
6:30 News Night 13
7:00 The Bahamas Tonight .
8:00 55 Degrees North
9:00 The Envy Life
9:30 3D’ Funk Studio
10:00 Caribbean Newsline
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30 Community Page 1540 am




SATURDAY,
FEBRUARY 17TH
6:30am Community Page 1540AM

9:00 Bahamas @ Sunrise
10:00 Int'l Fit Dance

10:30 Dennis The Menace
11:00 Carmen San Diego
11:30 Little Robots

noon Underdog



. NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
right to make last minute
‘programme. changes!

i 24 His sister Leandra’Esfakis "'

region’s lowest rates of inter-



@ THE Cessna aircraft

\





oS

@ THE landing wheel which broke off during touchdown

THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007, PAGE 5

%





Aircraft crash lands after landing gear collapses

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT -
engine aircraft crash landed at
Grand Bahama International
Airport on Thursday when the
plane’s landing gearing col-

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

RELATIVES and friends of
the deceased Christopher
Esfakis spoke yesterday at an
inquest into his death of how
he died unexpectedly three days
after he was admitted to Doc-
tor's Hospital for burn injuries.

His sister Leandra Esfakis tes-
tified that at the time of his death
his lungs were almost entirely
full of fluid, and he appeared
virtually unrecognisable to those
who knew him best — his body
so swollen that he looked like a
"balloon about to burst."

Yesterday in court number
seven at Victoria Gardens, Lisa
Esfakis, wife of the deceased,
Leandra Esfakis, sister of the
deceased, Diana Esfakis, also
sister of the deceased, and Vin-
cent Pallacious, a friend and

housemate, described the events "
surrounding Mr Esfakis' death -

on Monday, April 22, 2002.

claimed her brother: was

Es neglected by'staff at the private

hospital following an accident.

Lisa Esfakis, his wife, said
that the couple had hosted a
party at their home on Friday,
April 19, 2002. That night, Mr
Esfakis was allegedly drinking

_and, in a series of events, lit his

shirt on fire. Flames engulfed
his upper body, but the fire was
quickly extinguished by his wife.

Lisa Esfakis told the coro-
ner's court that when he was

A single

lapsed on touch down on the
runway.

According to Supt Basil Rah-
ming, three persons onboard a
Cessna, two doctors and the
pilot, were not seriously injured
during the incident, which
occurred around 4.30pm.

Mr Rahming said Peter Sko-

bian, 55, of Fort Lauderdale and
a resident of Island Bay Con-
dominium was piloting Cessna
182 registration N6340S was
arriving from Fort Lauderdale
to Freeport. Doctors Jay Ma
Rolina and Tanacawan Lour-
des were traveling with him.
As the’ aircraft came in on

final approach to runway 024,
the nose gear collapsed on touch
down, resulting in the aircraft
becoming uncontrollable. Mr
Skobian was able to maneuver
the aircraft onto the grass verge,
north of the control town, where

he safely brought it to a stop.

Skobian, an auto-mechanic at

Municipal Motors, sustained
minor injuries to his right leg
and thumb. His two female doc-
tors were unhurt. i

Mr Rahming said the Civil
Aviation Department and the
National Transportation Safe-
ty Aviation board are investi-
gating the accident.

claims patient neglected

Inquest after burn victim dies at Doctors Hospital



first admitted to the hospital he
laughed and joked with nurses,
and the following morning,
appeared cheerful.

Dr James Iferenta — the doc-
tor in charge — informed Mr
Esfakis that he had first, sec-
ond and third degree burns. He
was told that he would require
skin grafts, and may need to be
in the hospital for upto a
month, said his wife.

However, Leandra Esfakis
described how later that after-
noon Christopher's face
appeared "swollen", and Lisa

Esfakis spoke of how he felt he ,
was having difficulty breathing,

as if he were being "strangled."

Relatives said nurses assured
the family that these symptoms
were to be expected.

Lisa Esfakis testified that she
was given the duty of assisting
her husband in urinating into a
"gadget" for the most'of the day
after he expressed a desire not
to have a catheter insérted.

However, on Sunday morn-
ing family members were called
and told that Mr Esfakis had
suffered a "setback".

Leandra Esfakis testified that
she found Christopher had been
moved from his third floor hos-
pital room to the intensive care
unit (ICU): He had become
"swollen to a grotesque figure",
was "completely unrecognis-

able" and appeared to be
unconscious, she said.

Leandra Esfakis said that at
this time she asked for a doctor
but could not find a doctor on
that floor of the hospital.

She added that the nurse at
the nurses station was having a
private telephone conversation
and filling out a passport appli-
cation as she was asking her for
help, completely ignoring Mrs
Esfakis until she "slammed her
hands on the desk and demand-
ed she speak to me".

Mrs Esfakis said that at
11.30am Dr Iferenta appeared
and told the family that Christo-
pher was "seriously ill". Lean-
dra Esfakis claimed that’
Christopher was rarely tended
to throughout Sunday.

On Monday morning Lean-
dra Esfakis stated that Christo-
pher Esfakis's head was wrapped ,
in bandages — his face so
swollen that there was no "trace :
of his facial characteristics."

"His skin was absolutely
turgid," she stated.

She told the court that Dr
Iferenta showed x-rays which evi-
denced that Mr Esfakis' lungs
were filling with fluid. He had
only a small pocket left in one
lung that was not filled with fluid.

‘ It was suggested for a second

- time that Mr Esfakis be

removed to Jackson Memorial |

Union claims Morton Salt
management refusing to
negotiate agreement

@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY.
Tribune Staff Reporter

INDUSTRIAL action is on
the horizon at the Morton Salt
Company on Inagua, as union
officials claim that management
refuses to continue negotiations
on their industrial agreement.

The Bahamas Industrial
Manufacturers and Allied
Workers Union says it has “no
other alternative” than to apply
to the Minister of Labour for a
strike vote against the company.

According to an official press
release, negotiations between
management and union were
planned for December 4-7, but
the managing director of the
company never showed up.

In addition, the release said
that on February 9 union offi-
cers travelled from Inagua to
Nassau for a series of scheduled

‘meetings, but the company

decided to end the negotiations
before any issues were resolved.

The press release reads: “At
the evening session (on Febru-
ary 13) at about 4.30pm the
company decided that they
were no longer going to negoti-
ate and walked out of the meet-
ing.”

The union claims Morton Salt
has had over a year and a half
to consider their position in

respect to the industrial agree-.

ment, but no progress had been
made.

The release adds: “The com-
pany is not trustworthy, and it
appears as if they are trying to
stall as much as possible.”

The union claimed the com-
pany felt as if it was “above the
law” and accused it of having
no regard for its employees, the
union, or the laws of the
Bahamas.

In September, 2006, the

union accused management of
being. anti-union, and
BIMAAWU president Wilfred
Seymour said the union was not
willing to negotiate with Morton
officials or even consider its
counter-proposal for a contract.

Addressing the press during a
news conference at the House
of Labour last year, Mr Sey-
mour said the union submitted
its proposal for a new contract
and requested management’s
counter-proposal from back in
September, 2005.

Noting that the union did not
receive that counter-proposal
until September 7, 2006, he
expressed complete dissatisfac-
tion with its terms.

"I find this document to be
nothing else but a draft when it
comes to union busting," he
said.

Mr Seymour said one of its
provisions stipulated that for




DRYGLEAN

We are the leading garment care organization
and have the following challenging positions
for energetic, dynamic and team oriented individuals.

TEAM LEADERS/SUPERVISORS
Are you fed up with “graveyard” shifts or low pay?
Do you like to smile? Do you have a positive attitude
and work well with others?

If you have answered "YES" to “ALL” of these questions
please fax your resume to 393-8902 or pick-up
an application at the Harbour Bay Shopping Plaza.

NO TELEPHONE CALLS, PLEASE

employees to qualify for a
Christmas -bonus they would
have to process close to two mil-
lion tons of salt.

He described that term as an
attempt to avoid having to pay
the bonus.

However, vice-president and
executive manager of Morton
Salt Glen Bannister said the
union, not management, had
been primarily responsible for
delays that had plagued the
process so far.

Mr Bannister also criticised
what he described as attempts
by union officials to negotiate in
the press.

But, according to the press
release, industrial action is
imminent at Morton Salt.

‘The Tribune tried to contact
the company for comment, but
calls were not returned before
press time.











Hospital by air ambulance.

’. An argument then broke out .

between the family and a doctor
over the chance of Mr Esfakis
surviving the flight, said Lean-
dra Esfakis.

‘It was shortly afterwards
when an air ambulance arrived
that Leandra Esfakis testified
to witnessing a "huge argu-
ment" breaking out between air
ambulance staff and Doctor's
Hospital staff.

She told the court that as she
stood by her brother's hospital
bedside, air ambulance person-

PALMDALE

Qam-6pm
Monday-Saturday

Must be service orientated.
Willing to work long hours.

Should be a self starter.

(French or Italian is a plus)

Must be service orientated.

Willing to work long hours.

Should be a self starter.

and qualifications.



Send resume to: cmajor@sr

. Me TOWN CENTRE MALL
326-5556...
_10am-8pm Monday-Friday



‘Don't migg it!

Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort

Invite application for the mentioned positions:-
FOOD & BEVERAGE MANAGER

Successful applicants should possess the following qualifications:

* University or Collage degree in Hospitality Management with

special emphasis Food & Beverage Management

A minimum of 5 years in a similar position of a luxury hotel/resort

operation with multiple food & beverage outlets.

Good knowledge of the culinary arts and international cuisine.

Knowledgeable on fine wines, being a Sommelier would be a plus.

Experience in food & beverage training.

Must be computer literate in Excel & Word.

Strong corimunication skills oral and written.

Have strong organizational and leadership skills.

Fluently speaks another language besides English

BEVERAGE MANAGER
Successful applicants should possess the following qualifications:
Education from a tertiary level institution
A minimum of 5 years in a similar position of a luxury hotel/resort
operation with multiple food & beverage outlets.
Must be computer literate in Excel & Word.

Strong communication skills oral and written.

Have strong organizational and leadership skills.
Competitive compensation package commensurate with experience

sandals,c

nel on one side of his bed told
doctor's hospital personnel on
the other that "this man is in
no condition to fly‘and will not
make it to the hospital door"
and that they were against mov-
ing him from the hospital.
Doctor's Hospital staff
allegedly tried to convince the
air ambulance staff that his con- .
dition had stabilised and he
could fly. Shortly afterwards she

_ was sent out of the room, she

claimed.
At 7pm, Mr Esfakis was pro-

‘nounced dead. His dead body

leaked fluid from the eyesock-
ets, nostrils and mouth, said
Leandra Esfakis.

The inquest continues today.







356-3205

10am-9pm Saturday
















oy it

wee lig eye csresee cc coke rm te
4 @ Sw

0 a

'

THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 6, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007



@ DONALD Saunders

THE FNM will return “good
leadership and integrity” to
public life when it is returned
to power, a candidate said last
night.

The pledge came when Don-
ald Saunders launched an attack
on Golden Gates MP Shane
Gibson over the Anna Nicole
Smith affair.

Charging that Mr Gibson
should have known better, he
told the FNM rally at Golden
Gates that the minister of immi-
gration should have acted more
responsibly.

Mr Saunders, at 32 one of the
FNM’s youngest candidates,

-criticised Mr Gibson over the

fallout from his relationship
with Ms Smith.




















grades 8 and 9

~ 2007 —

and interviewed.

2621.



+ ag

ORGANIZATION

e Be of the highest academic standing, ”
¢ Be at least 14 years old and not older than 15 years by 31st August

Application forms should be returned to: -

Robert F. Wade
Principal

St Andrew’s School
The International School of The Bahamas
PO Box EE 17340
Nassau, Bahamas



“Regrettably, for the next few
months, Golden Gates is sad-
dled with an MP who is a Cabi-
net member who should have
known. the implications of his
association with someone of the
reputation and notoriety of
Anna Nicole Smith. Her

* lifestyle was never a secret. She

bared it in Playboy Magazine.
She exposed ‘it on reality TV.
He should have known better.

“As a representative of the
people, as a minister of govern-
ment, he ought to have known
better and acted more respon-
sibly,” he stated.

Mr Saunders charged that the
relationship between*Mr Gib-
son and Ms Smith-has brought
international disrepute to the

ANDREY,,
SCHOOL ©

The International School of The Bahamas
FOUNDED L988

~ ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIPS

A limited number of scholarships to attend St Andrew’s School is offered
annually to students attending Ministry of Education secondary schools.

These scholarships cover all tuition and book charges throughout years 10,
11 and 12. Eligible students should meet the following criteria:

e Attendance at a government school for at least two years, including

Applications will require the endorsement of the principal or guidance counsellor
of the student’s school. The students awarded these scholarships will be
expected to follow a full programme of BGCSE and advanced courses leading
to graduation at the end of year 12.

The scholarships will be awarded on a competitive basis and all candidates

will sit the scholarship examinations at 9am on Saturday, 10 March 2007 at
St Andrew’s School. Successful examination candidates will be short-listed

Application forms will be circulated to the Ministry of Education secondary
schools in New Providence and several in the Family Islands or can be
obtained from the administration office of St Andrew's School.

Further details are available from St Andrew’s School, telephone: 1-242-324-

The closing date for applications is Wednesday, 28 February 2007.




maintaining a 3.0 GPA or above

i - Authorized by: oe : =~\ Accredited by:
% » INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE [ggg : 2 COUNCIL OF INFERNA TIONAL S¢ HOOLS
“ z, NEW ENGLAND ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOLS

< ie & COLLEGES













Golden Gates constituency

image of the Bahamas. And he
argued that the Bahamas must
not let its reputation revert to
where it was in the 1980s.

Reputation

“We must not go back to the
compromised image and repu-
tations of Bahamian govern-
ment ministers in the 980s
ministers of government
accused by the international
press of making us a nation for
sale to the highest bidder,
regardless of the business of the
highest bidder. No, not again.
We don’t want to go there
again,” he said.

Mr Saunders further criticised





a SHANE Gibson, the man Don Sau





nders will face in the

the PLP for not building new
schools during their term in
otfice.

“Bahamian parents now live
in a Bahamas where their chil-
dren must study in overcrowded
classrooms, or in makeshift class-
rooms set up in trailers on school
grounds, that sometimes resem-
ble construction sites more than
playgrounds,” he said.

Mr Saunders asserted that, as
the representative under an
FNM government, the planned
high school, which the FNM
had in preparation before they
left office in 2002, would be
built to service the needs of
Golden Gates and the entire
southwest area of New Provi-
dence.. '

$28,344.00



Best
selling

SUV in its
class





SmartChoice







Petition launched to

Gibson challenger: we'll

call for resignation
of Shane Gibson

restore good leadership

m@ By TAMARA FERGUSON

A PETITION calling for

: Shane Gibson to be stripped of

2.3L 4 Cylinder Automatic

se
y &
<

EMAIL: friendlymotors@hotmail.com ¢

his ministerial portfolio was
launched by the Workers Par-
ty in Rawson Square on
Wednesday.

Two days after photos pub-
lished by the Tribune showed
Immigration Minister Shane
Gibson and late celebrity
Anna Nicole Smith in a close
embrace, members of the par-
ty are calling for the immedi-
ate resignation of the Immi-
gration Minister as a result of
what they claim is a ‘scan-
dalous dealing’ of Mr Gibson
and the government in the
matter of Anna Nicole Smith.

In a petition to Governor
General, Arthur Hanna, the
Workers Party claim that
Prime Minister Perry Christie
has lost control of his interim
government,

“Ministers in the PLP gov-
ernment are doing their own
“thing” without regard for the
law or common decency,” the
petition stated.

“Never in the history of the
Bahamas has there been a per-
manent residence granted with
such fast tracking procedure.
There is corruption within our
government,” party
spokesman Rodney Moncur
said.

According to the petition,

the involvement of the Minis-
ter of Immigration and his
family with the American
celebrity Anna Nicole Smith
smacks of corruption.

Mr Gibson responded to
allegations made against him
concerning photos in the Tri-
bune in an interview with
Jerome Sawyer, director of
Island FM News on Monday.

Mt Gibson said that Ms
Smith was a family friend. He
added that his wife, Jackie
Gibson, a minister in the Full
Gospel Church offered spiri-
tual guidance to Ms Smith, and
his mother was the babysitter
to Ms Smith’s daughter Dan-
nielynn.

The minister also claimed

&

See the full line of your favourite Ford vehicles at

FRIENDLY MOTORS LTD _

THOMPSON BOULEVARD TEL.: 356-7100 ¢ FAX: 328-6094
WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbah

2006 FORD EXPLORER

that the photos published in
the Tribune on Monday were
innocent and that he did noth-
ing wrong.

The Workers Party is claim-
ing that Mr Gibson must stand
condemned for embroiling his
own family in the affair.

Mr Gibson became the
centre of media attention fol-
lowing claims of fast tracking
the permanent residence
application for Anna Nicole
Smith, who was found dead
in a hotel room in Florida a
week ago.

“There are many persons
who apply for permanent res-
idency in the Bahamas, why
was Anna Nicole Smith given
such special consideration,
when others have to wait long
periods of time?” Mr Moncur
said.

Minister Gibson is also fac-
ing pressure from leader of the
opposition, Hubert Ingraham,
who is seeking answers after
reports that the minister
received a Rolex watch from
the celebrity.

Cassius Stuart, leader of the
Bahamas Democratic Move-
ment (BDM), also said that
the Immigration Minister
should resign in an interview in
Rawson Square.

“Government ministers.
need to be held accountable
for their actions,” Mr. Stuart
said.

According to Mr Stuart, Mr
Gibson should also resign
because he is violating Parlia-
ment convention.

“There are many other
Bahamians who need help and

_ special attention,” he said.

Mr Stuart said that Mr Gib-
son needs to face the public
and realise that he has stan-
dards to uphold as a minister.

Representatives from the
various local media houses as
well as international medial
houses, waited at the House
of Assembly anticipating the
arrival of the immigration min-
ister to hear his response.

‘However, the minister was
“unavailable during the first ses-

sion.

$32,400.00

4.0L V6 Automatic

The world’s
most trusted
SUN




amas.com PART OF YOUR LIFE


THE TRIBUNE |




EM
It’s time for Gibson
to be given the boot

QO: Monday, The Tri-
bune’s ultra-explosive

front page photographs of
Immigration Minister Shane
Gibson and the late Anna
Nicole Smith stunned thousands
of Bahamians, leaving many
with wide eyes and dropped
jaws as they stared at pictures
_ showing the minister apparent-
ly canoodling with a woman to
whom he had recently granted
permanent residency status.

It was highly inappropriate
for Mr Gibson to have estab-
lished such an overly friendly

_ relationship with an applicant
to his ministry.

In compliance with Cabinet
procedures, Mr Gibson and Ms
Smith’s relationship should have
been nowhere near what we’ve
now been told.

Last year, it was this same
minister who fast-tracked Anna
Nicole’s permanent residency
permit in 21 work days. He
defended his actions as just a
result of his ministry’s new-
found efficiency.

When criticised, this brash
and boastful minister declared
that he would have granted his
friend her residency status in a
day if he had had his way.
‘Although Mr Gibson’s actions
led to a hailstorm of criticism,
he refused to resign.

Following the death of Anna
Nicole last week, the eyes of the
world again turned to the
Bahamas. i

Then, on Monday, the
Bahamas and the world were
shocked by the publication of
photos showing our government
minister in compromising posi-

‘tions with the former soft-core
porn star.

The Bahamas, once again,
was made to look like a banana
republic and a nation for sale.

Mr Gibson’s relations with
Anna Nicole were scrutinised
across the globe, bringing
shame to many Bahamians. For
this, I say, shame on Shane!

I appears that compas-
sionate Shane Gibson’s

desire to mingle with celebrity
types may result in the probable
demise of what once was a very
promising political career. ,

It is absolutely astonishing
that Mr Gibson would jeopar-
dise his career and go this far,
particularly for a “close friend”
he claimed to have just met in
the late summer of 2006.

It appears that when it came
to Anna Nicole, Mr Gibson was
mesmerised and gave the
impression of a deer caught in
headlights.

On Monday evening, Mr
Gibson and his wife Jacqueline
appeared in an interview on
ZNS TV. During the interview,
Mr Gibson exuded an air of
immodesty, even blaming The

Tribune for the storm he now -

must weather, as if the daily told
him to take the compromising
pictures.

Admittedly, I had anticipated
that Shane Gibson was going on
air to apologise to the Bahamian

‘ people for what appears to be a
breach in Cabinet protocols; and
to announce his resignation.
This was not to be. Under the
Westminster system of govern-
ment, Mr Gibson’s resignation
should have been forthright.

During the interview, the
Bahamas discovered that not
only was Shane Gibson a close
friend of Anna, but that it was a




ms








: _ From his grammys, Catherine M
arents, Amos and Stella; god parents, Dr. P. W. Thompson, Miguel and
| Valaria Obregon; sisters and brothers, uncles and aunts. —



A DaRol AwN

'YouNG MANn’s VIEW
GBS ON



family affair! ©

On the face of it, Mr Gibson
obtained permanent residency
status for Anna at breakneck
speed, his wife led consolation
and prayers, his father travelled
to Florida to pilot Anna’s new
boat to the Bahamas, and his

mother was the pin-up girl’s



I would advise
Prime Minster |
Perry Christie to
follow his own
advice and post
Monday’s
jaw-dropping
photos on his
office wall,
simply to remind
himself of what
his government is
up against and to
wake up to the
embarrassing
reality of being at
the fore ofa
wayward Cabinet.

STE

baby sitter.

Fiction writers couldn’t make
this stuff up! Our minister of
immigration not only appeared
to be tied into an exclusive



How many other
foreigners, who
did not have the
celebrity status or
riches of Ms
Smith, has Shane
Gibson befriended
because they were
in a “strange
land?”

RSS

baby-sittinig service for a per-
manent resident, but for Ms
Smith, he must have seemed to
be a jack of all trades and ser-
vices!

M: Gibson also
claimed that he

befriended. Anna because he
was concerned about people
taking advantage of her, partic-
ularly as she was in a strange
land: What a load of rubbish!

How many other foreigners,
who did not have the celebrity
status or riches of Ms Smith,
has Shane Gibson befriended
because they were in a “strange
land?”

Did. we hire Mr Gibson to
chaperone foreigners that, of
their own will, seek to become
permarient residents in our
country? Mr Gibson’s reason-
ing seems illogical.

vishes as he further his studies and swimming at
Western Kentucky University. _

TRAVANO

cPhee and Cathy Knowles;

It is interesting that Mr Gib-
son declined to provide a
straight answer when asked by

interviewer Jerome Sawyer

whether he and his family had:
offered the same courtesies that
had been bestowed upon Anna
to any other permanent resi-
dency applicant. And, why does
Mr Gibson need to think deeply
on whether or not he has any
regrets? Is the answer no?

I would also like to pose
some outstanding questions to
Mr Gibson: What was in the
box that you were seen holding
in one of the photos? Was casu-
ally sitting on a lounge chair
with Anna, as she downed what
seems to be a beer, a part of
the consoling and ministering
process? Was Anna puckering
her lips, in one of the photos, to
give you a kiss?

W hen the Anna
Nicole controversy

initially began to brew last year,
I originally thought this woman
could not be much of an asset to
our country. To some extent, I
was wrong as her presence here
has led to many troubling reve-
lations about our immigration
department, our court system,
the breakdown of the West-
minster system of government
and, by extension, the inade-
quacies of our current govern-
ment.

As the election approaches,
an old adage is certainly coming
to pass. That is: ‘The higher the
monkey climbs, the more his
tail is exposed’.

Shane Gibson appears to
have acted with total disregard
for decency and Cabinet proto-
cols. o

I would advise Prime Minster
Perry Christie to follow his own
advice and post Monday’s jaw-
dropping photos on his office
wall, simply to remind himself
of what his government is up
against and to wake up to the
embarrassing reality of being at
the fore of a wayward Cabinet.

It is clear that, as is his modus
operandi, Mr Christie is giving
the country the silent treatment
and possibly hoping that every-

thing will eventually just die

down.

If Mr Christie refuses to
request Shane Gibson’s resig-
nation or fire him, he would
then confirm the suspicions of
many - that the PLP has set up a
Third World government that
encourages nepotism, cronyism
and slackness!

It is a shame that to this day,
Mr Gibson has yet to resign.
While I feel it’s still not too late
to do the honourable thing,

* Shane Gibson’s resignation

should have been written and
announced by noon on Mon-
day (the day the photos were
published). For Shane Gibson,
the fat lady has sung!

Mr Christie, the Bahamian
people are demanding that you
act and swiftly kick Mr Gibson
out of your Cabinet. Sir, in the
name of the Bahamian people,
just give Mr Gibson the steel-
tipped end of the boot and save
face!

ajbahama@hotmail.com









to

who graduated
~ from

Western Kentucky
University _
on oe
16th December 2006 |

with a
_Bs in Kinesiology



|

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 20U0/, PAGE /

Don't let your -
DIABETES control you.



Introducing NEW Precision Xtra”

The simple solution for accurate and reliable blood glucose monitoring.

_ Everyday simplicity

I Distinctive oversized numbers and clear backlit display make reading results
effortless in any light. : He

1 Compact and ideally shaped to fit comfortably in the palm of your hand. _

I Three simple-to-use buttons offer the most direct route to optional meter
functions (e.g. stored results) : ah

I Starts automatically —simply insert the strip and add a small droplet of
blood. .

Everyday accuracy and reliability —

i Designed to minimize errors and deliver consistently reliable test results.
Everyday commitment

I. The Precision® Friends for Life Program—a customer care program
dedicated to helping healthcare professionals and people with diabetes.







REE BLOOD GLUCOSE TES
t LOWE’S PHARMACY 10am

“Soldier Road, Feb. 17 | Palmdale, Feb. 2









Precision Xtra”

oe _
DYER eat CLM em RO ERM Lie) RRS L Loam ca 393-7111 « Fax: 393-0440



of the late

SSS SS SASS

REV. DR. CHARLES
CLIFFORD SMITH IT

Former Pastor of Zion Baptist Church
who departed this life eight years ago

OCTOBER 1, 1939 - FEBRUARY 16, 1999

Sweet Hour Of Prayer!
-Sweet Hour Of Prayer!
May I Thy Consolation Share



And From Mt Pisgah’s Lofty Heights
I View My Place And Take My Flight

This Rob Of Flesh I’ll Drop And Rise
To Seize Thee Everlasting Prize
And Shout While Passing Through The Air
Farewell! Farewell! Sweet Hour Of Prayer
auses to remember the Life, Labour and Loving Service of the late Rev. Charles Clifford
Smith II. Who occupied the scared office of Pastor from 1970 - 1999 on this 8th Anniversary
Chis death we extend prayful encouragement to his wife, Sis. Coralee Jacquline Smith, sons:

apewile Charles Clifford Smith III, Rev Joseph, Minister Benjamin, Makarnios and David Smith
along with their spouses and children; brothers, sisters, nieces, nephews, cousins and in-laws.

IN




PAGE 8, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007






MONDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
‘ lic of its meeting times and places: New Providence

Community Centre: Mondays -.6pm to 7pm. The

Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support
group meets the first Monday of each month at
6:30pm at New Providence Community Centre,
Blake Road. Dinner is provided and free blood
sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol testing is
available. For more info call 702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third
Monday of every month at 6pm @ Doctors Hospi-
tal conference room.

@ CIVIC CLUBS
Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colo-
nial Hilton Monday's at 7pm ¢ Club.612315 meets
Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable
Beach ® Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial
Hilton Mondays at 7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the month in
the Board Room of the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel, Bay St. ;

B THEATRE

Bahamas On Stage Youtheatre presents Pinoc-
chio February 19 - 21. The shows will be held at the
National Centre for the Performing Arts. For more
information contact Gloria Darville at 323.5589

TUESDAY



@ HEALTH

- Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: The Nassau
Group, Rosetta Street: Tuesday 6pm to 7pm /
8:30pm to 9:30pm.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at
5:30pm on the second Tuesday of each month at
their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville.
Call 323.4482 for more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes

location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval »

is required. Call 364.8423 to register for more info.

@ CIVIC CLUBS ;

The Kiwanis Club of New Providence meets every
Tuesday at 7:30pm at the Holy Cross Community
Centre; Highbury Park.

The Luncheon Pilot Club of Nassau meets every
third Tuesday at SuperClubs Breezes, Cable Beach
at 12:30pm. We invite all community minded per-
sons to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7:30pm
@ C C Sweeting Senior School's Dining Room,
College Avenue off Moss Road. * Club Cousteau
7343 meets Tuesdays at 7:30pm in the Chickcharney
Hotel, Fresh Creek, Central Andros ¢ Club 7178
meets each Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer Society
of the Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Eta Psi Omega chap-
ter meets every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ the
Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort,
Cable Beach ¢ Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets
every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ Atlantic House,
IBM Office, 4th floor meeting room ¢ Alpha Phi
Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday, 6:30pm
at the British Colonial Hilton. Please call
502.4842/377.4589 for. more info.

The Downtown Pilot Club of Nassau meets every
third Tuesday of the month at 6pm at the J P Whit-
ney Building, First Terrace, Collins Avenue.



WEDNESDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS _.

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports
Bar every Wednesday Spm-8pm. Free appetizers
and numerous drink specials.

@ HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-











NEW EXHIBITION OPENING





lic of its meeting times and places: New Providence
Community Centre: Wednesday -.7pm to 8pm. The
Nassau Group: Rosetta Street, Wednesday 6pm to
7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

FREE Health and Wellness Lectures are held the
first Wednesday of every month at 6:30pm at New
Providence Community Center Blake Road. For
more information call 327.1660 or 327.2878. FREE
Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar and Cholesterol
Screening.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas Support Group
meets every Wednesday from 5:30pm to 7pm at
Cancer Headquarters, two doors south of ZNS.
Cancer patients, survivors, their family members
and friends are invited to attend, Phone 323.4482

m@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of SouthEast Nassau meets every
Wednesday from 1pm — 2pm at East Villa Restau-
rant, East Bay Street. Always an interesting speak-
er and great fellowship. If you would like to attend
our meetings please send an e-mail to bruno.pletsch-
er@gottardo.com or kathyvsmith@hotmail.com.

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta

’ Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated meets 6:30pm

every third Wednesday at the Bahamas National
Pride Building.

International Training in Communication, Essence
Club #3173 holds it’s bi-monthly meetings on the Ist
and 3rd Wednesday of each month at Doctor's
Hospital Conference Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets
the second and fourth Wednesday of the month,

’ 8pm @ St Augustine's Monastery.

The Kiwanis Club of Cable Beach invites the pub-
lic to its regular weekly meeting held every Wednes-
day at 7:30pm at the British Colonial Hilton. Kiwa-
nis is a worldwide service organisation dedicated to
changing the world One Child, One Community at
atime." - ;

School and Community Nature Walk and Petting
Zoo - Free Every Wednesday from 1Oam to 2:30pm

“at Earth Village Ranch, St Albans Drive and

Columbus Avenue (Chippingham). Call (242)
356.2274 now to make reservations. Open to all
ages and groups Monday-Sunday from 9am to 6pm.
Inquire about additional activities and programmes.

_ TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday on the 4th
floor of the Ministry of Health, Meeting Street, at
6pm.

THURSDAY

@ ENTERTAINMENT
Shadowhand Entertainment presents an all Bahami-
an Talent Explosion this and every Thursday night
at the Patio Bar & Grill on Carmichael Road. This
event features upcoming Bahamian artist who are
ready to showcase their original material to the
world. There will also be a freestyle competition
every week which is open to the public at large.
Doors open at 8:30pm. Ladies free until 11pm -
Gentlemen - small door charge. See u there.

@ HEALTH

Free public health lectures featuring distinguished
physicians are held at Doctors Hospital every third
Thursday of the month at 6pm in the Doctors Hos-
pital Conference Room. Free screenings between
5pm & 6pm. For more information call 302.4603. :

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public ‘



Bahamian Art:

Pre-Columbian to the Present

OPENS TO THE PUBLIC: THURSDAY, FEB 22, 2007
This is a survey show on Bahamian Art History. Itis
designed to support the publication of the National

Art Gallery's Educational Pack for teachers scheduled
for release in 2007.

its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Thursday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics Sea-
grapes location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor
approval is required. Call 364.8423 to register for
more info.

REACH - Resources & Education for Autism and
Related Challenges meets from 7pm.- 9pm the
second Thursday of each month in the cafeteria of
the BEC building, Blue Hill Road.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise has a breakfast
meeting every Thursday morning at 7am at the
British Colonial Hilton Hotel (Fellowship begins at
6:45am).

4
The Kiwanis Club of Over-the-Hill meets every
Thursday at 8pm at the Holy Cross Activity Centre,
Soldier Road. Guests are welcome.

Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first, second
and third Thursday at the Ministry of Health &
Environment building on Meeting Street com-
mencing at 7:30pm. Everyone is welcome to attend
¢ TM Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8:30pm @ Super-
Clubs Breezes.

International Association of Administrative Pro-

. fessionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the third Thurs-

day of every month @ SuperClubs Breezes, Cable
Beach, 6pm.

The recently established National Insurance Board
Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets every fourth
Thursday in the month, in the National Insurance
Board's (NIB) training room, Wulf Road office
complex, at 6pm. All retirees are welcome.

The Rotary Club of West Nassau holds its weekly
meeting, every Thursday at Choices Restaurant

- On the campus of the College of the Bahamas. Fel-

lowship starts at 12:30pm, with the meeting held
from 1pm to 2pm.



AK FRIDAY



CONCERT

Chariots of Fire Album release concert: Come see
and hear the best in gospel music, with perfor-
mances by Selector, Manifest, Counsellor, Mr Lynx,
Christian Massive and internationally acclaimed
recording artist Landlord and many more, Febru-
ary 23 @ 7:30pm at Workers House, Tonique
Williams Darling Highway. Box Offices @ the Juke
Box, Oasis Music Centre, and Faith Life Book
Store. Fore More information call 544.8078 or
455.3067

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: The Nassau
Group, Rosetta Street: Friday 6pm to Tpm &
8:30pm to 9:30pm. Sacred Heart Church: Friday
6pm to 7pm. New Providence Community Cen-
tre: Friday 7pm to 8pm.

@ CIVIC CLUBS
TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas Bap-
tist Community College Rm A19, Jean St.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second
Friday of each month, 7:30pm at the Emmaus Cen-
tre at St Augustine’s Monastery. For more info

call 325.1947 after 4pm.

AMISTAD is a club which promotes the Spanish



ceavoonne







"The brewery of The Bahamas"

A ROU

THE TRIBUNE

Nb NASSAU





WELCOME

language and culture in the community. Residents
of the Bahamas who speak Spanish or are learning
Spanish are invited to attend meetings on the third
Friday of the month during the academic year at
7pm in room 13 of COB's Tourism Training Cen-
tre. :



SATURDAY
@ EVENTS

The Pinewood Gardens Outreach Association is
having its 1st annual Pinewood Fest, March 3 @
7am - midnight at Pinewood Gardens Park. Includ-
ed in the days activities are a breakfast and a
Fun\Run and Walk @ 7am. Come out and bring

the entire family... Join the domino teams and bas-
ketball tournaments, and many other games. Bring
your kids to the toddlers town and let them expe-
rience bouncing castles and carnival rides, games,
face painting, complimentary lunch from 1-2 pm.
There will be performances by Ancient Man, Lassie
Doh Boys, and internationally acclaimed recording
artist Landlord and many more. Come and see the
Junkanoo Rush Out by the Pinewood Gardens
Crusaders Junkanoo Group. For more informa-
tion call 392.1618 or 565-8870

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: The Nassau
Group, Rosetta Street: Saturday mornings - 10am
to llam..

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third
Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and December)
@ the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley
Street. |

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes are
offered every third Saturday of the month from
9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Communi-
ty Training Representative at 302.4732 for more
information and learn to save a life today.

@ CIVIC CLUBS :

JAR CYCLING: The Owners of JAR Cycling arc
pleased to offer a cycling clinic for juniors between
10 and 17. The free clinic will be held every Satur-
day in an effort to encourage kids to cycle. Parents
interested in registering their children should con-
tact organisers at jarcycling@gmail.com.

Toastmasters Club 7178 10th Anniversary Ban-
quet: Saturday, March 17 at the British Colonial
Hilton at 7pm. The Club will honor it’s 10 past
presidents in grand style. For tickets e-mail:

prezsj@tc7178.org. A special invitation is extended .

to persons who were a part of or visited the club
during its earlier years. Come out to see old friends

and toastmasters. The public is invited and guests .

are always welcomed.



| SUNDAY
@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

Traveller's Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street, fea-
tures special entertainment - Gernie, Tabitha and
the Caribbean Express - very Sunday from 6:30pm
to 9:30pm.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-’

lic of its meeting times and places: The Nassau
Group, Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm to 7pm /
8:30pm to 9:30pm.

@ RELIGIOUS SERVICES

The Bahamas Metaphysical Society Inc - A spiritual
teaching society leading you to greater peace of
mind, health, prosperity and happiness - holds
Higher Consciousness Services every Sunday at
10am and weekly Meditation services every
Wednesday at 7pm at Bowe’s Cove off Bernard
Road. Interested persons are welcome to attend.
For more information contact by e-mail @ bah-
metsol@hotmail.com or call 393.0279.

Send all your civic and social events (attach pic-
tures if possible) to The Tribune via fax: 328.2398 or
e-mail: ybdeleveaux@tribunemedia.net - Out there in
the subject line.






ae
Nee

t

e028 8 0 SL Pa E FRADE LL Ee LPP AID EDM, CEPI ECAR LLG FPO RES

Wit FIM EE TOE HE af od

oer

=
THE TRIBUNE





FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007, PAGE 9

‘Community organisations collect _

$160,000 from Kerzner at awards

Kerzner International donat-
ed $160,000 to 29 non-profit
organisations during its eighth
annual Community Service
Awards on Tuesday.

. The donation brought Kerzn-

er’s total donations under the. ”

Kerzner Community Service
Awards Programme over the
last eight years to over $1 mil-
lion. ’

The Bahamas Sailing Asso-
ciation (BSA), led by its Presi-
dent Sir Durward Knowles, was
presented with the. ‘Outstand-

. ing Community Service Award’,
- worth $20,000.

The Bahamas Sailing Asso-
ciation is a non-profit organi-
sation which promotes and
encourages amateur sailing in
The Bahamas. It is responsible
for the Bahamas National Sail-
ing School which it founded in
November 2004 for the further
development of the sport of
amateur sailing in The
Bahamas. The sailing school is

currently. working with seven |

public schools in New Provi-

dence including DW Davis, CH

_. Reeves, Yellow Elder and. H O
_ Nash.

Sir ‘Durward, the first

Bahamian Olympic gold medal

_ winner, said‘“To see these chil-

dren on the waterfront sailing |

among each other brings us
tremendous delight. :

“Kerzner has recognised us

and the $20,000 will go a long
way to keep us going. We have
sponsors throughout the busi-
ness sector in The Bahamas, but
without this big donation we
would not be able to carry on.”

Nan Palmer, Kerzner Inter-
national’s chief operating offi-
cer: “We applaud your efforts
and we do so with money, but
we do so in spirit'as well.

Kerzner International’s Com-
munity Service Awards are
divided into eight categories:
Arts and Culture; Education;
Social Community Service;
Senior Citizens; Civic Commu-
nity Service; Youth Related
Services; the special Harborside
at Atlantis presentation award
and Sporting.

Each of the awardees of the
various categories of the awards
scheme were presented with
$5,000. The awardees for the
various categories included.

For Arts & Culture -The
National Art Gallery of the
Bahamas, Bahamas Dance The-
atre, Bahamas National Youth
Choir and the Bahamas Nation-
al Youth Orchestra.

Education - PACE Founda-
tion, Project Read, Stapledon
School and the Hopedale Cen-
tre.

Social Community Service -
The Royal Bahamas Police
Dependants Trust, Physically
Challenged Children’s Com-

@ PICTURED are officials of
The Bahamas Sailing
Association (BSA), this year’s
winners of Kerzner
International’s ‘Outstanding
Community Service Award,”
which has an award prize of
$20,000. Pictured left to right
is Nan Palmer, Kerzner

International’s chief operating _

officer, Jimmy Lowe of the
BSA and Sir Durward
-Knowles, president

of the BSA and Barrie
Farrington, Kerzner
International’s senior
vice-president of
administration.

(Photo: Joshua Yentis)

mittee, Drug Action Service,
Abilities Unlimited, Bahamas
Association for the Physically
Disabled and the Bahamas
Infant Stimulation Programme.

Senior Citizens - Persis
Rodgers Home for the Aged,
Mary Ingraham Intergenera-
tional Care Centre and the
Good Samaritan’s Senior Citi-
zens Home.

Civic Community Service -
The Mission Foundation and

Wild Horses of Abaco Preser- .

vation Society (WHOA).
Youth Related Services - The
Scout Association of the
Bahamas, Bahamas Children’s
Emergency Hostel and The

Art installation opened at

THE Ministry of Tourism,
Kerzner International and the
New Providence Community
Centre officially opened “Wel-
come” on the corner of Blake

Hairs from slain Canadian in

Road and JFK Drive yesterday
evening
This public art installation by

Bahamian artists Antonius

Roberts and Tyrone Ferguson

occupies one of the most visible

- corners in New Providence and

is a popular location for both
locals and visitors alike.
‘Welcome’, say the artists, is

-

Ranfurly Home for Children.
Sports - Bahamas Amateur
Cycling Federation, Bahamas
Junior Golf Association, Road
Runners Track & Field Club
and The Dolphin Swim Club.
Harborside Awards — Annu-
al Commitnient - The Bahamas

“Crisis Center and Special

Olympics.

junction

an attempt to define the
Bahamian connection to our nat-
ural beauty as well as modeling a
healthy and prophetic vision of
what this connection means.

Rico belong to victim, not accused

@ PUERTORICO ||
San Juan |

DNA testing on hairs found
under the fingernails of a Cana-
dian executive slain in Puerto
Rico show they are his own, and

- do not belong toa man charged
in his death, a prosecutor said

Wednesday, according to Asso-

ciated Press.
Two of the hairs belong to
. Adam Anhang, and a third could
not be fully tested because it did
not contain enough genetic mate-
rial, Jimara Gabriel Maisonet
said during a court hearing.
‘Defence lawyers had sought

the DNA testing hoping it would

’, show that ‘someone other than
Jonathan Roman, who has

pleaded nat guilty not to a first-
degree murder charge, was
responsible for the September
2005 stabbing and beating death.
Anhang and his wife, Aurea
Vazquez Rijos, were walking to
their car from her Old San Juan
restaurant when a man with a
knife attacked them. They had
been discussing their divorce.
Vazquez was treated for head
injuries, and police say she has
declined to co-operate with
investigators.
Defence lawyers have said
they want Vazquez’ medical file
to learn what she told medical

personnel about the attack.

On Wednesday, San Juan
Superior Court Judge Isabel
Llompart said she had not given
the file to the defense because
Vazquez had not been properly
notified under US privacy laws.

Maisonet said he believed
that Vazquez was in Italy, but
that it was not possible to con-
firm her whereabouts.

Anhang, 32, moved to Puerto
Rico from Winnipeg in 2004.
He had been a real estate
investor in several hotel pro-
jects in the US Caribbean terri-
tory and chief executive officer
of an internet gambling soft-
ware company.















and Equipment.

YOUR SAE Gere: THE WORLD ~

_'THEBAHAMAS |

TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANY LTD
TENDER FOR NEW VEHICLE & EQUIPMENT.

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to
invite qualified companies to apply for tender for New Vehicle

Interested companies can pick up a specification document from
BTC’s Administration Building John F. Kennedy Drive and The
_ Mall Drive Freeport, Grand Bahama February 5, to February 19,
2007 between the hours of 9:00am to 5:00pm Monday to Friday.

Tender should be sealed in an envelope marked “WEHICLE &
EQUIPMENT TENDER?” and delivered to the attention of: -

Mr. Leon Williams
- President & CEO

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd

P.O. Box N-3048
Nassau, Bahamas

Bids should reach the company’s administration office on John F.
Kennedy Drive by 4:00 p.m. Wednesday, February, 21st, 2007.

Companies submitting bids are invited to attend the bid opening
on Thursday, February 22nd, 2007 at 10:00 A.M. at BTC’s
Perpall Tract location. .

BTC reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.



\

IBO-





Prince Cision Orive
PC. Hox N. BASS
Nesssi, Bararmnas

El NEW LIFE CHRISTIAN CENTER
AN Apostolic Church

You are invited to worship the Lord with.us

“Come Expecting”
Sabbath Worship _

Service: -Saturday 11:00a.m.

Attend and experience the presence of Almighty God

Location:
Second Building
East of Saint Augustine’s College
Entrance on Prince Charles Dive
Telephone: 324-5493
P.O.Box N-8852 :









f





STEAK
CHICKEN BINGO~
TOONEY
BURGERS





BALLOONS
CURRY

PRIZES |
DANCE.







tian





ae


































PAGE 10, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007







STORY SO FAR: The months go by
slowly at the KLA camp, but finally Meli’s
father returns and they pack up what few
belongings they have and head for Uncle
Fadil’s farm. The only reluctant traveler is
Mehmet, who feels he’s old enough to join
the KLA. A

CHAPTER TEN
Life at Uncle Fadil’s

T WAS late when we reached Uncle
Fadil’s, but everyone was up and
waiting except the grandchildren. While
we were on the mountain, our cousin Nex-
ima had come home with her three-year-
old son and twin infants, a boy and a girl.

‘ Her husband was not with them, and no

one spoke of him—which meant to me
that he was not among the disappeared,

~ but more likely KLA. I had come to real-

ize on the mountain that if a man had dis-
appeared, he was talked about and won-
dered about. But if he was KLA, no one
breathed a word.

BNVY

Nexima gave her bed in Granny’s room
to Mama and Papa and brought her chil-
dren into the small parlor to sleep with us
five Lleshi children. We completely cov-
ered the floor. Papa took one look and

laughed. “Pve seen orange sections with

more room to sleep than this,” he said. It

was nice to laugh for a change, and actually,

it was no more crowded than the tent and
a lot warmer. Even though the floor was
hard, there were no rocks poking into your
back. So I was soon sound asleep.

The next morning the household was
stirring by the time the first rooster crowed.
Uncle Fadil and Papa were like generals in
a little army. Everyone except Nexima’s
little ones had orders to carry out. I was in
charge of the water brigade. Uncle Fadil
didn’t have running water in the farm-
house, but why should that bother us? A
backyard pump and a proper outhouse
seemed luxurious after only a stream and
trench latrines at our mountain camp.

The first day as sergeant of the water
detail, I was so excited about my job that I
had the little boys and Vlora help me fill
with water every pot we could lay our
hands on. Aunt Burbuge threw up her
hands in amazement. “Ah, Meli, you are
such a marvelous water carrier, you have

left us nothing to cook in! Oh, well, fill up -

the tub, we'll be bathing babies before the
day is done, I’m sure.”

Papa and Uncle Fadil had brought in
most of the crops while we were waiting on
the mountain—a farmer can’t leave in the
middle of the harvest season—but there
were still potatoes to be dug and wood to
be chopped in preparation for the winter.

‘Between chores, Mehmet and I held
school for Isuf'and Adil. Vlora was always
jumping up and down, demanding atten-
tion, so in the end'we gave up and let her
come as well. The house was too small for

THE TRIBUNE



an indoor school, so we wore our coats
and had our lessons outdoors.

Despite the crowding, I look back on
that time as one of the happiest of my life.
Even Mehmet seemed more content than
he had since the spring-before.

Papa and Uncle Fadil took care to treat
him as one of the men. And when news
from the outside world reached the farm,
Mehmet was told first, even before the
women.

o it was Mehmet who told me that
NATO was threatening to bomb
Serbian military targets, forcing Milosevic
to withdraw thousands of his troops from
IKosovo.
“Now it will be safe for everyone to leave
the mountains,” I said.
“Not everyone will want to,’ said
Mehmet. “We must be prepared. Milosevic

.

- ig a snake. Only a fool would trust him.

We'll be back at war in no time, you'll
see.”

And we were. The KLA may have start-
ed it. They attacked four policemen in
Racak, and the Serbian security forces
retaliated by killing forty-five Albanians,
then, not two weeks later, twenty-four
more. NATO demanded that both sides,
Albanian and Serbian, meet in a peace
conference. But Milosevic refused to
attend. ...

“Didn't I tell you?” Mehmet said. “That
old snake Milosevic wouldn’t come to the
talks. He just sent some flunky. It'll be war
by spring!” He was smiling as he said it.

How could he smile at the thought of
more killing and misery? I felt sick inside.

But Mehmet was right. The peace talks
failed. Once more Serb troops poured over
the border into Kosovo. NATO planes
pounded them from the air, but that didn’t







stop the Serbs on the ground. If the KLA
made a raid and killed one Serb police-
man, several dozen Albanians were sure to
die. The NATO powers threatened and
lectured, but Milosevic paid no heed.

But there on Uncle Fadil’s farm, life

went on as it had for several months. We

had our chores to do. Mehmet and I con-
ducted our little school. The twins grew
fat and funny. We were all well and happy
until the night when I, who was sleeping

close to the front door, heard a quiet rap-

ping. ;

I sat up and listened. Should I answer? I
was the closest, but I guess I am at heart a
coward. |

I decided to go and wake Papa. I made
my way carefully around the sleeping bod-
ies on the floor of the parlor, but before I

- could get to Papa, I met Uncle Fadil as he

stumbled out of his room.

“J think there’s someone at the door,” I
said.

“Yes,” he said, putting a finger to his
lips. “I'll take care of it. Go back to sleep.”

I followed him back into the parlor, both
of us intent on keeping our feet from
touching any of the children.
_ “Go back to sleep, Meli,” Uncle Fadil
repeated in a whisper.

I lay down obediently, but how could j
go back to sleep? Something was up.

(Due to Mid-term Break, the story
resumes February 27, 2007.)

Text copyright

© 2005 by Katherine Paterson
Illustrations copyright

© 2005 by Emily Arnold McCully
Reprinted by permission

of Breakfast Serials, Inc.
www.breakfastserials.com

St AE AI TN TN Wil a A te a


Pe we “THE TRIBUNE



Transport Ministry
holds maritime crisis
management course

@ By LLONELLA GILBERT
Bahamas Information
Services eo _ Be
IN RESPONSE to weaknesses

found during a simulation exer-

cise testing the preparedness of
the country for a disaster, the Min-
istry of Transport and Aviation is
holding a maritime crisis manage-
ment course in collaboration with
the United States Coast Guard.
The week long training is taking
place so that in a real crisis, the
weaknesses would be virtually
non-existent, Transport Minister

Glenys Hanna-Martin said at the

opening of the course Monday,

February 12, 2007.

Instructors from the US Coast

Guard’s International Training

Division from Yorktown, Virginia

will facilitate the course, whose .

participants include a cross-sec-
tion of persons from the Royal
Bahamas Defence and Police
Forces, hospitals, port officials and
the National Emergency Manage-
ment Agency (NEMA).

A majority of the millions of
tourists and tonnes of goods enter
ing the country each year come
through the seaports, noted
Deputy Chief of Missions at the
US Embassy Dr Brent Hart.

“As an island nation with busy
and vitally important freight and
cruise ship ports,” he said, “vigi-
lance and protection of these ports
is particularly important to main.
taining the strength of the Bahami-
an economy.

“The possibility of maritime dlis-

‘aster is too often not at the fore-

front of our thoughts. But with the
growth of global terrorism, our
seaports and borders are increas-
ingly susceptible to attacks and we
must prepare not only for inten-
tional harm but also accidental
harm.”

The course is designed to allow
various stakeholders to be
equipped to protect the economy,
security, people and the environ-
ment of the Bahamas and the US,
he explained.

“While you will be trained in
crisis response, this course will also
offer broader exposure to port
security issues,” Dr Hart said.
“This seminar is the latest exam-
ple, of the many joint activities
carried out by the military, securi-
ty and law enforcement person-
nel of the United States and the
Bahamas:” .

Minister Hanna-Martin said she
was pleased the Bahamas is ‘again
collaborating with the United
States. °?''

“As Dr Hart indicated,” she
said, “there are common interests
and challenges both nations face
and there is an intertwining of
fates by way of trade, tourism and
movement of people that cause us
as a matter of necessity to under-
stand we have a common goal.”

She told participants that when
the training exercise is over they
should be able to protect the inter-

‘ests of the Bahamians and others

persons who are in the country.

Mrs Hanna-Martin also noted
that her Ministry is engaged in an
overview of maritime legislation.

“Our legislation domestically is
fairly outdated and has not been
comprehensively consolidated and
updated for decades.

“There have been some amend-
ments here and there, but a com-
prehensive overview.of Maritime
Legislation is presently being

‘undertaken by my Ministry,” she

said.

“We are hoping everyday that it
will be completed very shortly so
that we can introduce that to Par-
liament.

“We need to put in place mod-
ern standards for the maritime
industry, these things will help with
enforcement, and minimise risk,
particularly as it relates to safe-

ty.”

The Ba

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007, PAGE 11



hamas gets boost

from Superbowl events

SUPERBOWL XLI has
enhanced the Bahamas’ image
following a spectacular slate of
promotions surrounding the
event held in Miami on February
4.

The powerful weekend of pro- -

motions included pitches to tar.
geted segments of Florida resi-
dents and placements of high-

’ profile Bahamas ads in informa-
tion booklets and maps that were

placed in the hands of thousands
of Florida visitors. In addition to
the 2.5 million residents of the
Greater Miami area, the
Bahamas’ tourism team took
pr ime opportunities to market a
vacation expericnee lo the
125.000 visitors that the Greatei
Miami Convention and Visitors
Bureau estimated to enter the
city for Superbowl events.
As a member of the Super

‘bowl Host Committee, the

Bahamas Ministry of Tourism
had the privilege of placing
advertising in the 100,000 Super
bowl host booklets that were dis:
tributed to Miami visitors at atr-
ports, hotels, and other venues
during Superbowl festivities. The
tourism ads were also placed in
250,000 maps that were distrib-
utéd to the thousands of visitors
who rented cars for the occasion.
The Superbowl Host Com-
mittee’s VIP Party drove the
Bahamas experience into the
limelight on February 2. The










@ THE list of Bahamian headliners included junkanoo and special
appearances by Miss Bahamas Universe Samantha Carter

of the 3,400 media covering the
Superbowl.

Committee invited 2,500 local
and visiting VIPs to the event.
In addition, it was open to many

Le
+ Fa







12:00 noon -

*Adults $3. 00

Norma Wilkinson of the

Vl

Bahamas Tourist Office in Plan-
tation, Florida, said the

Bahamas’ participation in the

Superbowl events:is certain to
attract the attention of thousands
of Florida residents and visitors.
She said the Bahamas has
enjoyed a long relationship with
professional sporting teams, and
the involvement with the Super-
bowl Host Committee became
a beneficial extension of those
relationships.

“And it won’t end with the
Superbowl,” Ms Wilkinson said.
“There’s more to come. We have
two Bahamas-theme nights com-
ing up with the Miami Heat.”

During the Bahamas theme
nights, the more than 20,000 fans
each night at the American Air-
lines Arena will be a captive
audience as the Bahamas
tourism team highlights the
many resorts and vacation expe-
riences within The Bahamas.

For the Superbowl events,
Bahamas Out Islands Promotion
Board Director Anthony Stuart,
commended the Ministry of
Tourism for taking advantage of
being a part of the VIP Party at
Carnival Performing Arts Centre

_ on February 2. He said it was an

event that the Out Islands Pro-
motion Board took full advan-

‘tage of also.

Mr'Stuart said the VIP Party
allowed his board to make
potential visitors more familiar

o—

Saturday, February 17”, 2007
11:00 am - until...
Sunday, February 18", 200

until .

with the Family Islands, which
do not have the recognition of
Nassau/Paradise Island and
Grand Bahama.

“Another thing we are trying
to do is attract business,” Mr Stu-
art said. “From this, we can get
group business, We can get some
incentive business. We can get
people even coming to vacation.”

Mr Stuart said those who
attended the party were within
the target visitor group of the
Family Islands.

“We knew with the VIP event,
there would be the CEOs of the
major companies that are spon-
sors.” he said.“We knew there
would be all the major sponsors
would be there. We knew all the
team officials would be
there... This gave us a great
opportunity to showcase the Out
Islands to a group of individuals
who can not only afford our
product, but who are actually
looking for that.”

The Bahamas tourism team
included many prominent
Bahamians and segments of the
Bahamian culture to highlight
during the Superbowl XLI expe-
rience

The list of Bahamian headlin-
ers included junkanoo and spe-
cial appearances by Miss
Bahamas Universe Samantha
Carter, music artist Avvy and
Bahamian NFL players Devard
Darling and Alex Smith.








ak Orthodox Church Grounds - West Street
; Children $1.00

OD, GREEK BEER, OUZO!!
VE BOUZOUKI BAND, Dé
; & MORE...

Dit








When you choose the 2007 Camry
you have the peace of mind that
you're driving a car created to set
a new global standard for safety.
The new Camry offers enhanced
comfort and superior design
amenities, as well as generous
legroom and trunk space. And the
fuel-efficient 4 cylinder, 2400CC
engine gives up to 34 mpg (EPA
highway rating). Available

options- V-6 engine, right or left
hand drive.







Auto Mall, Shirley Street (opp. St Matthew's € “hurch)

Open Mon to Fri Sam - S30pm
Sat 8am - [2noon

Tel; 397-1 700

E-mail: exeomotor@ebatelnet. bs

Parts and service guaraniced

EXECUTIVE
MOTORS LTD

AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER
Available in Grand Bahama at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) * Queens Hwy, 352-8122 * Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2918

All new Toyota vehicles are backed by a 3-year/60,000-mile factory warranty.



Visit our new showroom at the‘AUTO MALL on Shirley Street,
opposite St Matthew's Church and test drive the new Toyota Camry,

a ee en ee ee ee ee eer ee ee eee


PAGE 12,FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007



FRIDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 16, 2007

7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

NETWORK CHANNELS

Issues Round: Washington [McLaughlin — jAre You cme May to Decem- |The Vicar of Di- |Fawlty Towers -
WPBT {table discussion. |Week (N) — [Group iN) (CC) |Served? Again! |ber Surprise for |bley Geraldine _|*Communications
(CC) Zoe. plays Cupid. |Problems”
The Insider (N) Ghost Whisperer ‘The Cradle Will Close to Home ‘Barren’ Awoman |NUMB3RS A mixed-martial-arts
@} WFORIn cc) Rock’ (N) (CC) is charged with killing the surrogate igh dies while training for a
: mother of her baby. i championship match. (N) (CC)
Access Holy. 1 vs, 100 Contestants play for$1 |Las Vegas Sam's long-lost love Law & Order “Melting Pot’ An ac-
WTV4J |wood (N) (CC) {million apa amob that includes fawakes froma 20-year coma; Ed tress is found hanging in her office.
IRS auditors. (N) (CC) wants a new housekeeper. (N) |(N) 1 (CC)
= Deco Drive Nanny 911 “Mills Family” Nanny — | Trading sone Meet Your New |News (CC)
@ WSvN Yvonne helps an Orlando family with| Mommy Rock 'n’ roll singer; unap- ;
a beer-drinking father. (N) 0 preciated housewife. (N)
Jeopardy! “Teen [America’s Funniest Home Videos ‘No Business in Show Business” Per- 20/20 (CC)
WPLG oe (N) an clips from school plays, concerts and other public venues. ! .
i ; CABLE CHANNELS
(:00) CSI: Miami |CSI: Miami The team searches for |CSI: Miami “Shock” A spoiled CSI: Miami “Rampage” The team is
A&E Dead Air’ 1 |the killer of two people on a cruise heiress is found dead. (CC) _- jon the verge of puting away mem-
(CC) ship docked in Miami, (CC) bers of the Mal Noche gang.
Football Focus |BBC News World Business |BBC News Our World Mar- |BBC News Football Focus
BBCI (Latenight). |Report (Latenight). |garet Beckett. _|(Latenight).
Hotwyred (CC) |% x JUICE (1992, Crime Drama) Omar Epps, Tupac Shakur. A ghetto |Comicview (C0)
BET youth Leste his accomplices in a bungled robbery, (CC) :
CBC This Hour Has [Royal Canadian Rick Mercer Re- |CBC Winnipeg Comedy Festival |CBC News: The National (CC)
22 Minutes (CC) |Air Farce (CC) jport (CC) . “Best Medicine’ (N) cc,
:00) On the The Apprentice: Los Angeles 1 |The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
CNBC cis [Mr [ee |
CNN (:00) The Situa- |Paula Zahn Now (CC) Larry King Live (CC) Anderson Cooper 360 (CC)
tion Room







COURT Cops 1 (CC) ‘ Justice |Video Justice |Forensic Files |Forensic Files be “ou “Canyon of Se-
crets
The Suite Life of/Hannah Mon- {Cory in the THE PROUD FAMILY (2005, Fantasy) Voices of Kyla Pratt,.Tommy
DISN Zack & Cody {tana 1 (CC) _|House ‘Napper’s |Davidson, Paula Jai Parker. Animated. A mad scientist unleashes evil
Scouts. 1 (bo) Delight’ clones of a family. 4 (CC)

DIY This Old House [Kitchen Renova-|Kitchen Renova-|Classic Car [Classic Car — |Classic Rides | Classic Rides
A (CC) tions tions Restoration Restoration (N) (N)
Quadriga Journal: Europa Aktuell |Journal: In Journal: Quadriga
pw gma
E! The Daily 10 (N) [American Idol: Girls Rule: The E! |Simon Cowell: The E! True Holly- |The Soup (N) _|Starveillance
: Sa] True Hollywood Story 1 (CC). |wood Story Simon Cowell. (CC) Britney Spears.
ESPN (:00) NBA Basketball 2007 McDonald's All-Star Cel |U.S. Poker Championship From |U.S. Poker Championship From
ebrity Game. From Las Vegas. (Live) (CC) Atlantic City, N.J. (Taped) Atlantic City, N.J. (Taped)

- |Winter X-Games From Aspen, Colo. (Taped) (Part 2 of SportsCenter ~ International Edi- |Boxing Friday Ni
ESPNI (co Boe ee lon Le) Hono vs, Vl







Night Fights. Martin
demir Pereira.

Daily Mass: Our |The World Over Life Is Worth |The Holy Rosary|Defending Life Crash Course in
EWTN [ay Living i hier =e

:00) Cardio |Navy SEALs Training: BUD/s ~ |Navy SEALs Training: BUD/s —|Navy SEALs Training: BUD/s
FIT TV. Se \oate234-Heleek (cc) (Clase 234 (CC "9 Clade 34 lonestett (CC

On the Record With Greta Van

Fox Report-
FOX-NC shepard Smith Susteren (Live) (CC)
Best Damn Top 50 Beatdowns- |Aroundthe |The FSN Final

:00) Women’s College Basketball North Carolina at

FSNFL th Carolina State. ‘Live d Part 2 (Live) Score (Live)
6:30) LPGA Golf SBS Open at Turtle Bay - Second |PGA Golf Nissan Open - Second Round. From Riviera Country Club in
GOLF filtten Oaly nai Li) : Pacic Palisades, Calf. (CC) H

Lingo (CC) _ ‘ia Wants to Be a Millionaire ( Dog Eat Dog © (CC) action
go (CC) 6 10g Eat Dog 11 ( (cc (ce
I

(C
; 00) Attack of {X-Play “College |X-Play Morgan in|Star Trek: The Next Generation “Indianapo- “Indi
GATech [ie brow ty Hood 2k (europe. f20Suddenly Human" 9 (CC) re Cg Iisa tec

The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) |Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC)







/










I've Got a Secre'

oO
B
=
a
2

4



i



‘i

Morris Cerullo |Breakthrough Inspiration To- Life Today (CC) |This Is Your Day |The Go:
INSP [nec fegiaroah faster ren Pee eS
Reba Barbra Wife and |Accordingto {Accordingto [Friends ‘The Everybody Everybody
KTLA _\vean’s new dog Kis “OfMice |Jim ‘Scary lis for|One Where No |Loves Raymond |Loves Raymond
goes missing. Jand Men” (CC) jMovie” (CC) |therapist. {One Proposes’ | "Not So Fast” "PT. &A’ ioc)
Still Standing /Reba Reba takes|Reba ‘Best Lil /FOR MY DAUGHTER'S HONOR (1996, Drama) Gary Cole, Mary Kay
an of the in hurricane sur- |Haunted House Place, Nicholle Tom. A teenager is seduced by her 's most popular
LIFE Man of th in hurri Haunted House |Place, Nicholle Tom. A t is seduced by her school’s most popu
house. © (CC) |vivors. in Texas” (CC) . (CC)

:00) Hardball + |Countdown With Keith Olber- — |MSNBC Investigates Pelican Bay MSNBC Investigates “Lockup: In-
MSNBC cc mann State Prison. " : side Holman” Holman prison.

Jimmy Neutron: [SpongeBob |Full House [Nicktoons TV [Nicktoons TV |Growing Pains |Growing Pains
NICK | enius SquarePants A4(CC) a a :

:00) NUMB3RS Friday Night Lights (CC Las Vegas ‘The Burning Bedouin” |News © (CC)
NTV fae [MSO ae

NCTS Setu NASCAR Racing Craftsman Truck Series -- Chevy Silverado HD 250. From Daytona Inter- | Trackside At...
SPEED (Live) , national Seine, in Daytona Beach, Fla. (ive)

Primary Focus |Behind the The Hal Lindsey |Joel Osteen Dr. Frederick K. |Praise the Lord (CC)
TBN {Scenes (CC) _ |Report (CC) Price (CC) |

body |x & MISS CONGENIALITY (2000, Com ) (PA) Sandra Bullock, |e DOWN TO EARTH (2001 :
Loves Raymond |Michael Caine, Benjamin Bratt. A clumsy FBI agent goes under cover at a en Chris Rock, Regina King,
“Crazy Chin” {beauty pageant. (CC) (DVS) Chazz Palminteri.

Take Home Chef|Wild Weddings A bride needs to go|What Not to Wear ‘KerriA.”A | What Not to Wear An office manag-
TLC “Jen” Roasted to the bathroom; garter games; cer- |county court counselor wears old, jer and mother-of-two needs a more
lobster. emony bloopers. (CC) oversized clothes. (N) (CC) professional wardrobe. (CC)

00) Law & Or- /Law & Order An undercover re- — [NBA Basketball T-Mobile Rookie Challenge & Youth Jam. From the
TNT der “Identity” |porter is murdered while bing to {Thomas & Mack Center in Las Vegas. (Live) (CC)
CC) (DVS) expose a gang of thugs. .

Home for Imagi-/Class of 3000 |MyGym Part- |SquirrelBoy |CampLazio — |Codename: Kids/My Gym Part-
TOON nary Friends [Am | Blue?” ners Monkey : ee Ae ent

Storm Stories Abrams & Bettes It Could Happen |Full Force Na- | Weather: Evening Edition (CC
TWC [iene [mete enor fe 65 seo

:00) Duelo de La Fea Mads Bella Lety es una nifia |Mundo de Fieras (N) Casos de la Vida Real: Edicion
UNIV asiones dulce, romédntica ¢ inteligente, pero Especial Reina Beleza.
apenas atractiva, (N)

=
3
oOo
s
a
F<)

E

‘t



gs
—_=

=]
oO
wn
m
e

=o ge

=>



)
) Law
nt ‘One’
:00) | Love New |The White Rapper Show 1 The White Rapper Show Rappers |Hogan Knows Hogan Knows
VHi omen bean been
vs Guide To Dangerous Escape tothe Best & Worst of |Quest forthe |The Huntley | Fly Fishing
. Outdoors Game (CC) Wild Tred Barta One - Way America.
:00) America’s |VIEW OF TERROR (2003, Suspense) Shannen Doherty, Michel Fran- | WGN News at Nine 1 (CC)
unniest Home |coeur, Jayne Heitmeyer. A mysterious voyeur stalks a young woman.
Videos (CC) |(CC) ‘

Everybod WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) 4 (CC, CWii News at Ten With Kai
WPIX — Love Reon ve } ane Tong, Jim Watins (CC)

Jeopardy! “Teen |Dr. Phil 0 (CC Jeopardy! ‘Teen Frasier Donald Frasier Frasier
WSBK _ _[Toumament’ (N) . ( i Tounament O'Connor quest’ |tries to concoct a
(CC) (CC) stars. © (CC) theme song.

; PREMIUM CHANNELS
i *%% — |%% BIG MOMMA'S HOUSE 2 (2006, Comedy) Martin i Breach: — |Rome “Heroes of the Republic”
HBO-E [ROLL BOUNCE |Lawrence. An FBI agent reprises his disguise, posing |HBO First Look |Vorenus returns to the Collegium.
(2005) ‘PG-13' jas a heavy nanny. (1 'PG-13' (CC) (CC) (CC)

Se *% KING’S RANSOM (2005,
omedy) Anthony Anderson, Jay

(:00) Law & Or- [Law & Order: Special Victims Unit/Monk A millionaire with leprosy Psych “Game, Set ... Muuurder?” A j.
USA der: Criminal In- |A murdered woman's twin may havelhires Monk to recover some papers |tennis star disappears. (N) (CC)
tent “One” (CC) |stolen her identity. (CC) from his estate. (CC)
00
The

=





eae Making] * % %% RETURN OF THE JEDI (1983, Science Fiction) Mark Hamil,
HBO-P f: King Kong [Harrison Ford, Carrie Fisher. Luke Skywalker and his comrades face a fi-
n cc} nal confrontation. 1 ‘PG’ (CC) Mohr. £ ‘PG-13' (CC)

+ % DATE MOVIE (2006, Romance-Comedy) Alyson | # %» ROLL BOUNCE (2005, Comedy-Drama) Bow Wow, Chi McBride,
HBO-W _[Hannigan. A hopeless romantic faces many obstacles |Mike Epps. A roller-skater prepares for a big showdown. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC)
inher courtship. ( ‘PG-13' (CC)


















ee 49 [Big Love ‘Where There’s a Will” | * & * NORTH COUNTRY (2005, Drama) Charlize Theron, Frances Mc-
HBO-S [105 (1980) Jane|Barb is a finalist for Mother of the _|Dormand, Sean Bean. A miner charges her employer with sexual harass-
Fonda. Year. 1 (CC) ment. 1 ‘R’ (CC)
* + BATMAN BEGINS (2005, Action) Christian Bale, Michael Caine, Liam Neeson. % & THE 40-YEAR-OLD VIRGIN
Bruce Wayne becomes Gotham City's Dark Knight. “ 'PG-13' (CC) ae Romance-Comedy) Steve
arall, O'R’ (CC)
lee,
|AMES CAN-
CUN 2 (2006)



band leaves her. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC) n(
* & & COACH CARTER ee Drama) Samuel L. Jackson, Robert —_|(:45) & # IN TOO DEEP (1999, Crime Drama) Omar

Ri'chard, Rob Brown. A high-school basketball coach pushes his team to Epps, LL Cool J, Nia Long. Nn undercover cop starts
excel. MV 'PG-13' (CC) losing his identity. RCC)

pi) % & DIARY OF A MAD BLACK WOMAN (2005) |The L Word “Luck Be a Lady” iM Masters of Horror “Washingtoni-
imberly Elise, iTV. A woman starts over after her hus- ica) enjoys a new romance, ans” fay! Granny's possessions,

(10) ¥ * FIRE DOWN BELOW (1997, Action) Steven] # % % ATL (2006, Comedy-Drama) Tip ‘T.1.” Harris,
eagal, Marg Helgenberger. A lone agent tackles toxic-/Lauren London, Mykelti Williamson. Four Atlanta teens
waste dumping in Kentucky. © ‘R’ (CC) face challenges. \ ‘PG-13' (CC)

TMC

4

Scrubs J.D’s |The Daily Show |The Colbert Re- Chappelle's /Chappelle’s Coney Central |Comedy Central
COM new girlfriend | With Jon Stew- |port Shashi Tha- |Show Eddie Grif- |Show (CC) Presents ‘Tom {Presents Maria
does not laugh. art (CC) roor. (CC) fin. (CC) Papa’ Bamford.
)

00) Walker, _- Walker, Texas Ranger A geneticist | % % * WHEN HARRY MET SALLY (1989, Romance-Comedy) Bil
HALL Pes Ranger is Knapp by Som looking to | Crystal, Meg Ryan, Carrie Fisher. Two romantically bruised New Nits
N (CC) misuse her work. (CC). become close friends.
Buy Me ( (CC) [Million Dollar Listing ‘Hollywood’ {House Hunters |World’s Most — |Relocation, Relocation ‘Victoria
HGTV 1 [ORCC 2ahe aa tn iaratina 1 [Etre Homes Jand Henn” (CC) ohhh
i longhouse:

sak 3 THE TRIBUNE

er Charlie the
Bahamian Puppet and
his sidekick Derek put

some smiles on your

kids’s faces.

Bring your children to the
McHappy Hour at McDonald's in
Oakes Field every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
month of February 2007.

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun. |

i'm lovin’ it

Movie Gift Cert

make great gi


THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007, PAGE 13





INTERNATIONAL NEWS

[share your news| Records show January the hottest
ee, Oy ever, thanks to El Nino and
f=" ee | global warming, scientists say —

\» | from people who are
~° | making news in their
Fs neighbourhoods. Perhaps
|. J you are raising funds for a

If so, call us on 322-1986

ce nmr ee mene

PPO ORE KEES

SS err ee + ea FT LEER NES

and share your story.

wwe

+3. 7 F o Z.
CSS TREES

HTL RAD RHO PISS LS

we

~ 4a ee eS

ae.

ee

=

eae

A Meare FFF 3G >

ee ae

ALRITE Re ICIS Varro a One mi
Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 ¢ Fax: 32

m@ WASHINGTON

IT MAY be cold comfort ,

during a frigid February, but
last. month was by far the
hottest January ever, according

ually warming world, according
to U.S. scientists who reported
the data Thursday. Records on
the planet's temperature have
been kept since 1880.
Spurred on by unusually
warm Siberia, Canada, north-
ern Asia and Europe, the
world's land areas were 3.4
degrees Fahrenheit warmer
than a normal January, accord-
ing to the U.S. National Ch-
matic Data Center in Asheville,
N.C. That didn't just nudge past



the old record set in 2002, but
broke that mark by 0.81

degrees, which meteorologists -

said is a lot, since such records
often are broken by hundredths
of a degree at a time.

scientific services chief, David
Easterling. "I was very sur-
prised."

The scientists went beyond
their normal doublechecking
and took the unusual step of
running computer climate mod-
els "just to make sure that what
we're seeing was real," Easter-
ling said.

It was.

"From one standpoint it is
not unusual to have a new
record because we've become

accustomed to having records
broken," said Jay Lawrimore,
climate monitoring branch
chief. But January, he said, was
a bigger jump than the world
has seen in about 10 years.

surement — was 1.53 degrees
Fahrenheit warmer than nor-
mal, breaking the old record by
more than one-quarter of a
degree.. Ocean temperatures
alone didn't set a record.

In the Northern Hemisphere,
land areas were 4.1 degrees
Fahrenheit warmer than nor-
mal for January, breaking the
‘old record by about three-quar-
tersofadegree. —

But the United States was
about normal. The nation was



Official says US supports international
cooperation on global warming

m@ WASHINGTON



A GROUP of global lawmakers signed a reso-

tion with other countries on combatting global

warming.

"I've detected a really quite remarkable change



lution Thursday calling for a new agreement lim-
iting greenhouse gas emissions by 2009 to succeed
the Kyoto protocol, which is set to expire in 2012,
according to Associated Press.

The resolution reached after a two-day forum
on global warming attended by lawmakers from
about 20 countries, including members of Con-
gress, urged the Group of Eight industrialized
countries to commit to the 2009 deadline when
they next meet in June.

Wednesday, German Chancellor Angela
Merkel, whose country holds the rotating presi-
dencies of the G-8 and the European Union, out-
lined her priorities on global warming when she
addressed the forum by video. Merkel has agreed
to convene an international meeting on climate
change in May to prepare for the G-8 summit in
the north German resort of Heiligendamm June
6-8.

Lawmakers attending the forum held ina US.
Senate building said that after hearing from US.
lawmakers who attended that they sensed a polit-
ical shift in Washington toward greater coopera-

here on climate change," said Elliot Morley, a
British MP who chaired the forum.

A senior State Department official told the

attendees Thursday that the U.S. is committed to
working with other countries on the issue.

"We share with other countries the goals of
reducing greenhouse gas emissions and intro-
ducing new, cleaner technologies," said State
Department Undersecretary Paula J. Dobrian-
sky.

Dobriansky outlined steps taken by the US. in
reducing emissions, but made no mention of the
Kyoto treaty, which the U.S. has refused to
endorse since it was negotiated in 1997.

President George W. Bush has made clear that
his administration will not agree to the kind of
mandatory emission caps required under Kyoto,
because the administration believes the restric-
tions will harm U.S. businesses.

Thirty-fve other industrial nations, who have
endorsed the pact, agreed to cut their global-
warming gases by .S.percent on average below
1990 levels by 2012.



wo fino isesys |



€—
©
=7
=
Wo
©
©
=
(2
(D



0.94 degrees Fahrenheit above
normal for January, ranking
only the 49th warmest since
1895.

The world's temperature
record was driven by northern
latitudes. Siberia was on aver-

ee to Associated Press. "That's pretty unusual for a The temperature of the
r The broken record was fueled record to be broken by that world's land and water com- age 9 degrees Fahrenheit
6-7452 by a waning El Nino anda grad- much," said the data center's bined — the most effective mea- | warmer than normal. Eastern

Europe had temperatures aver-
aging 8 degrees Fahrenheit
above normal.

Canada on average was more
than 5 degrees warmer than
normal.

Larger increases in tempera-
ture farther north, compared to
mid-latitudes, is "sort of the
global warming signal," Easter-
ling said. It is what climate sci-
entists predict happens and will
happen more frequently with
global warming, according to
an authoritative report by hun-
dreds of climate scientists issued
this month. :

Meteorologists aren't blam- .
ing the warmer January on
global warming alone, but they
said the higher temperature was
consistent with climate change.

Easterling said a weakening
El Nino — a warming of the cen-
tral Pacific Ocean that tends to
cause changes in weather across
the globe — was a factor, but not
a big one. But Kevin Trenberth,
director of climate analysis at
the National Center for Atmos-
pheric Research, said El Nino
made big changes worldwide
that added up.

Temperature records break
regularly with global warming.
Trenberth said, but “with a little
bit of El Nino thrown in, you
don't just break records, you
smash records."

As much of the United States
already knows, February does-
n't seem.as unusually warm as
January was.

"Even with global warming,
you're not going to keep that:
cold air bottled up in Alaska
and Canada forever," Easter-
ling said. :




2
WN \

Ly






John S. George
Here to help, every step of fhe wn










WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NW at 10-20 Knots : 2-3 Feet 4-7 Miles 76° F

NW at 6-12 Knots 1-2 Feet 76° F
: NW at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet





WASSAU Today:











5-7 Miles 7o° F





salt


































|
| 4 alate WNW at 6-12 Knots 1-3 Feet 6-7 Miles 15°F
4 i ' } | e niKa 5 WNW at 12-25 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-7 Miles 75° F
Not as warm witha | Ashower possible in © Mostly sunny. | Partly sunny, windy 4 Breezy and cool with Some sun. |. The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the oped Es Saturday: | WNW at 6-12 Knots 2-4 Feet 6-7 Miles 75° F i
shower. } the evening. | ; | and cool. 4 some sun. greater the need for eye and skin protection. =
j j High: 72° High: 72° i High: 72° High: 71°
High: 76° ; Low: 60" 4 Low: 58° Low: 58° 4 Low: 60° i Low: 62° 54

3 a q S.

Lo wed [oF | * (srr) 68°-53° F ‘Teese ) Cerri
60, 15 55/12
12:05am. -02 eee oa







Today 6:36am. 2.9
6:51pm. 2.5 12:50p.m. -0.2

Saturday 723am. 3.0 12:57am. -0.4
7:39p.m. 2.7 1:33 p.m. -0.4

Bam. 30 1:47am. -0.5

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature? is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, = precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect hs ae EH and the low for the day. ~









Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday















Sund 8:
ABACO Temperature 2 8:27 p.m. 2.9 2:16p.m. -0.5
Sepa High esetuusenusnueaeineee BO° F/30° C : : 7
High: 70° F/21°C eee Monday O04am. 29 2:38am. -0.5
io o : Ow ... vesesstssessesssessesseseee LO” F/23° © . : 5
Low: 57° F/14°C Nara Holy ccvansenntonwosancl? BED’ C g14pm. 3.0 2:59pm. “05
Normal low ...... 64° F/18° C


































WEST PALM BEACH Last year's high 76° F/24° C
High: 65° F/18°C Last year’s low ... censenees BT? FAVA? C
Low: 45° F/7°C i Precipitation ae ieabes a a.m. — Bocas S a.m.
eee AS of 1 p.m. yesterday ........ssssssceeeeessessssnenee {aCe unset.......6:04 p.m. Moonset..... 9:15 p.m.
FREEPORT Year to date sceccsescccsssesccsssecsccssseessessseessssseeesss BLO”
oe os High: 68° F/20° C Normal year tO date ....sesssccsserssssssnerseeseenes 2.69” ris all =
Low:55° F/13°C
AccuWeather.com
Be, All forecasts and maps provided by. " : Showers a cases
aE — ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc.©2007 —. ~ Mar. 3 Mar. 11 asa
High:71° F/22°C oa °EDpAe “ [a"4™) Rain
2 see = 3 Front:
Low:52°F/11°C NASSAU. High: . cae : ~— 7 398 f=] Fluries Cold
: High: 76° F23°C : 7/8. 4 x S Shown are noon positions of weather systems and W.
now precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. ArT) elie
{yy Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Memgenfle



Low: 60° F/16°C



85/29 76/24

Cer











| Racal CATISLAND
P Low: 58° F/14°C ot: 76 ee oa sai Se

maicleen oD.





os

63/7 sa







REAT Monterrey 4/1
_ GRE enn F _SAN SALVADOR
High: 77° F/25°C High: 79° F/26°C

Low: 66°F/19°C Low:68°F/20°C










Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ee ee
highs and tonights's lows. High: 75° F/24°C :
Low: 62° F/17°C -
Lo e532 :
High: 80° F, : se ,
toad eI gee so one Low: 69° F/21 :
Today Saturday Today ~ Saturday Today Saturday MAYAGUANA 2 S
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W _ High: 84°F/29°C =
; aes Low: 72° F/22°C 4]





i Fic

| Albuquerque 54/12 32/0 pe
P|

m




Me

Anchorage 30/-1_ 16/-8 Prenat EB. il.
Atlanta

(hs



ye

AM 18-7 8 49/9 RAGGEDISLAND Wah he

ny
































alate City 26-3 19410 po__ 3a 251-3 ¢ 72/22 446 Portl aan art
zi Meal eles a gear ar
9-7 sf 3a _25/-3 c__Los Angeles 34/1 29/-1_ :
of 22-5 16-8 sn Louisville 0/10 26/-3 GREAT INAGUA
Charleston, sc ae 24/-4 s 58/14 37/2 ~ 94° O
Chicago 19-7 19-7 sn 287-2 13-10 ee
Cleveland ——‘16/-8 14/-10_ sf 26-3. 181-7 65/18. 50/10 Low: 72" F226 CE BROKERS & AGENTS
gs 2 SONS 40 s GONE
53/11 22-5 42/5 ee e ee ee Sete = pe Anon | h
7 31/07 ‘18! pe Oklahoma a City Tucson 75/23 45/7 76/24 50/10 bac 24 ere oe Va 3 ) i lager I |
aera ahoma 8 pe . Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, ¢-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder- = Skt. va
6 3 679 425s Orlando Washington, DC 25/-3 18/-7 s 32/0 26/-3 sn ‘storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prep-precipitation, Tr-trace — : a —



ap eins we eee tgp en eS IO STOLL I IN A



ee eee ee
THE MIAMI HERALD



WORLD MARKET PROFILE



Wa







| MiamiHerald.com

INTERNATIONAL EDITION





3B





WHAT THE U.S. MARKETS DID
















































































































































































































U.S. WINNERS AND LOSERS











































































































































































































World Stocks Latin American Stocks NYSE NASDAQ AMEX NYSE NASDAQ — AMEX
Prev. 52wk 52Wk Traded In New York Prev. Prev. Prev.
Today day High _Low_ | CcFemsa .34e 47,600 40.50 39.80 40.25 +.28 Today day Today day ory ‘hay |__Most Active _ Most Active ___ Most Active
arisierdem 50807 50666 509.88 412.87 7 Advanced 759 727 | Advanced 1773-1813 | Advanced 9 OTT Te verge eae ea
het Se ee ha ten Emplca 45,800 46.09 45.42. 45.77 +.13 | pecii ned 367 386 | Declined “148 1181 | Declined 367 386 Name Volume Cis, %Chg | Name Volume Cls. %Chg | Name Volume Cls, %Chg
ek Bt Stl TES SST | csata Ste 500 27.64 2745 2745+ | Uretamed 97 91 | Unchanged 165 169 | Unchanged 37 BS | Ford 53559100 8.51 +06 | NasdlO0TrI20205200 4460 +74 | SPDR 63726000 145.61. +95
New Highs 196 70 | New Highs 176 118 | New Highs 196 70 | AMO 31850500 1495 +435 | HudsCty 64550400 13.90 +21. | iSHRZK nya660720 80.75 +407
Brussels 4547.83 4528.09 4555.08 3445.10 GpgRadio .6le 4,000 11.00 10.89 10.99 +.04
pe RAS Sa ee | OC f 00 10.89 10.99 +.04 | Newlows 18 19 | Newlows 27 39 | Newlows 18 19 | Genflec 31404300 3647 +70. | SunMicro 62967300 640 * | SPEngy 23255500 5843. +01
Caren’ sotesa1 4518081 6201272 2644408 | GPOSImec * 1,067,300 13.20 12.70 13.02 +.23 ee 2,037,061 2,043,602 | Adv. volume 1,739,103 1,182,609] Adv. volume 332,290 277,175 | Pfizer 27884800 26.58 +.19 | ApldMatl 57657700 18.89. +.71 | SemiHTr 16905300 3447 +.75
REE eee a TaN Situs | cideaeite BIW tole AAT wane AOU | 4 Dec le | 3826 612986 Deck. volume 52329 35.230 | Meron 25958600 1256 4.35 | Microsoft $5204300 2940 +29 | ishmMkt 1193200 117.45 +248
eri nak? Onan: aaee0 7 STAL .16e 2,943, 16 29.61 u30.12+. vol (000) 2,711,485 2,635,091 | TE. vol. (000) 2,190,543 1,855,544 | TH, vol. (000) 398,994 323,011 Met zen 19.21 -13 | intel 55010000. 21.14 +27 | OSVHT 11384200 138.64 +.05
FISE 100 S212 ae ae moThag aezougg | TeMexL 73 2,320,700 3089 29.76 30.85+1.05 0 1470 +21 | Cisco 48105700 27.46 +28 | SPFncl . 9716700 37.71 +3
lide hoes he 2 al Pee ga nek i 2a ca ae Most Widely Held U.S. Stocks AT@T Inc 21601400 37.19 * | Oracle 41999600 16.7 +.15 | PrushQQQ n7713400 si ie
er Ee ee eat. Gait F x HASTA | saaa-s chard ane Nani the west shareholders HomeDp 20045000 41.73. -03 | tev 36181600 627, +19 | DUADiam 7309000 1748 +85
CAC-40 5725.84 5682.69 ST11.04 4615.44 Cervecer 1.07e 8,700 31.96 31.35 u31.77+.52 | stock Div. PE Sales High ‘ow Close cha. NokiaCp 19294300 22.96 +.72 | Qualcom 31387400 39.66 +1.59 | iShEAFE 5537400 76.32 +1.02
Kuala Lumpur 1245.64" 1234.31 124883 886.48 | EEIChile —.48e 52,500 43.08 41.49 u42.51+1.26 . Aj
ie a ee oars ATT Inc 142f 20.0 216014 «37.56 37.08 37.19 * Gai G
ae 05.70 1462460 TSS0 INSTE | Ener 20e + 628400 1730 1660 ul7.05+.38 | VerizonCm 1.62 180 115421 3876 38.05 3863 +59 Iners ainers Gainers
Manila 3300.94 3233.91 3281.90 2057.7 | Madeco * 11,900 12.90 12.43 u12.58+.25 | Exxon 1.28 11.0 169454 76.00 74.99 75.60 +.15 | Name Last Chg %Chg | Name Last _Chg %Chg | Name Last Chg %Chg
Aas og a ean ae SocQ&M 2.808 29200 140.49. 13475 u140.25+4.27 GM 1.00 * -y97865 36.70 36.16 36.50 +.16 ae 22.65 +490 +27.6 Corillian 5.00 +1.55 +449] CumbRsg 7.42 +148 +25.0
ia Ts26¢ EQL4S ITERSL OSE | inacone age 2,000 3495 34.30 3475 +50 General Electric 112° 180 314043 3650 35.79 36.47 +.70 Eat Peat bare nena ela +18.0
Sitpore «18221314816 323660 zzan7 | Metrogas * 25,600 S11 485° 496-13 (BM * 120 16.0 56288 99.43 98.25 99.20 +91 | Hangrorth 1134 +103 +100 Cyclacelpf 670 +140 OL ne I a
SaoPaulo 4595.61 45197.45 45382.6 TcmArg * 116,600 22.80 22.42 22.79 +.31 i : gu a ' Rains
say 5561 aT 48 sam su A eee ee aaiacea TrinaSoln 41.22 43.64 497 | SGXPhm 5.22 +107 4258| BSDMed 7.75 +84 +122
Taipei 7809.45 7736.83 7935.54 6257.80 | Aracruz 2.20e 676,200 57.29 55.85 §6.75+1.18 DOW JONES INDUSTRIAL AVERAGE aes an oa aed ace: er A atllekon cis
Toronto 1320446 13171.76 13237.74 10860.72 TelBrasH 2.28r 17,600 29.85 29.10 29.64 +.49 Daily closes for the past year. He eEBES setae teen ee aa
~ Sa Rail persia DaimirC 69.78 +5.33 +83] BCSBBk 17.25 +2.45 +16.6 | EmpireF 2.75 +26 +104
Baie Ba, SR PN SUN TASS bls 1061 +80 +82] SprtHaley 4.60 +65 +165] NevGCas 2.60 +24 +102
hea ama sa aus rae PRECIOUS MET, ‘AL Wednes day eFunds 25.84 +182. +7.6| MartenT 17.63 +2.39 +15.7| Fortuneind 4.24 .
ilan . 00 33057.00 26543.00 S 7
Johannesburg 2631.42 26023.35 | 2602335 18380.06 N.Y. Comex close 12741.86 | Losers Losers Losers
Athens 4699.00 4647.49 4802.53 3379.28 Close Name %Chg
Stockholm 1212.24 1190.10 1206.02 878.16 | Gold Market Price 667.40 ao Name__last_Chy Chg | Name ___tast _Ch eo
Zurich SPI T3IAIT 732391 737158. $573.99 | Silver Market Price 13.933 +0.052 Carterss 21.05 -4.22 -16.7 | Daktrnicss 30.09 8.00 -21.0 Aurora0Gn 2.72 -.58
Bente Spas te eines aa Handy & Harman WattsWir 38.41. -4.94 -11.4| AdeptTch 7.85 -145 16.6 | Friedmind 9.70 -2.02
rae ATT oy ciORICOLS DEAE TA VISOASL Ga CrwfdB 6.05. 59-89 | AdvancPh 2.35 40-145 WellsGard 3.71 ~73
DENG Laon » She ChoiceHtls 37.28 -349 -86 Gullfisland 33.60 -439 -11.6| MetroHith 245-37
a-AEX Index, b-Bel-20, dx-deutscher, Atkien, | silver Market Price Fao E GA WeWatch 49.61 4.07 7.6 RschFrnt, 9.85 -1.25 -113|GSESy 7.22 -58
30-Financial Times, 100-Financial Times, ipc- : CrwfdA 520-36 -6.5| AmRailcar 27.14 -2.86 -9.5] TiensBio 5.23 -.39
d London Aft
im ices pea ected es ie? cc-CAC ondon Afternoon WarnerMus 18.12 -127 -6.5| Channell 3.88. -.39 -91) CdnSEng 2,20 -.14
pera a TT Sed tudo oe Gbse Sha. ScottishRe 4.22 -28 -6.2| Intrgnth = 4.96 458.3] Xethanoln 2.50 -.16
a table, mMIB Telematico, x-holiday. or 4 3 Nordickm 35.44 -2.09 -5.6| EnvoyCm 3.37 -30 -8.2] IderaPhrs 8.70 -.55
‘ EncoreAcq 24.90 -1.39 -5.3| PeopEduc 3.85 -34 81 Iteris 240-14
; Vol. High Low Close Chg. Vol. High Low Close Chg. | _ ____Vol._High Low Close Chg. | _ Vol. High Low’ Close Cig. Vol. High Low Close Chg.
DiKeRity 1085” 46.68 4605 46.15 57 | IShchin2S 1116 106.66 105.07 106.15 +15|Nextwaven 1103 12.07 11.87 12.00 +14) SwstnEngy 1064 SBS TGF SBT +20
: : Dyn 4784.15 TAT 7.70 +21] iShOTr 1126 92.08 90.05 92.02 +1.85 | NikeB 1669 105.78 10495 10538 +18 | SovrgnBep 2181 25.99 25.77 25.87 +.11
. Serie ie Ge re eel Fal Re A tle IY EE Ee RM culimaoe ier be Ge Ga ta
oad 5288. 70 54.23 55:61 +1. n 75 26.16 +.50 | UBS! : +
gett or ore ee en ae $55 ish EAFE 5537 76.40 75.63 7632 +1.02 |Nokiacp 18294 33.00 2250 22.96 +72| SpectBrds 1604 886 B61 8.75 +08] USAirwy 3107 58.18 57.49 57-79 -1.38
cs ns cine en ee RY 2980147 Madd 1470 421 ISROKV nya 1097 8312 8238 82.58 *|NordicAm 1195 37.00 35.22 35.44 -2.09| SprintNex 15655 18.63 18.35 1853 4.17 USEC 1399 14.20 13.66 13.86 -.12
ees Mo a IG) ig AN Talemom Joe Gat ae voltae 8 AS Ue Be eles, UN ee ioe elie, ia) Se SE oe
Vol.__High Low Close Chg. Vol High Low Close _chg. | ertaink Tat eS ISRESt 5126 93408 a1s 222 “8 Nortel irs 6783 36 7394 30s re SeMe. Bie anys star nD 423 utstrem =. 171 om sae 362 401
; ] aaa . ‘ 53 + gt g i i 77 +.04 “19 | UUniao 1199 98.50 95. . .
Brandyw 1963 35.25. 3420 34.40 -52 Sear Eos 1323 +120 TWs 1761 5293 52.02 5277 +82 | NorthropG © 2379 74.96 73.84 74.48 | -.12 Stat ims 284 3e9 Dey i¢| UnionPac 3755 104.70 ions 10448 +158
ABB Ltd TERI Brinker s 2333 35.24 34.85 35.19 *| Ectipsys 1328 2001 1885 19.18 on Mumina 1880 37.35 36.47. 37.22 +.03]|NovaChem 1250 32.71 31.89 32.22 +.39| SP Engy 23255 59.04 5812 5843 +.01| UnionStAn 1192 74 725 «7320 *
9.25 18.65 19.13. +58] BrMySq 4981 27.98 27ST 27.72. +13 : s18 0 | ImunoGn 323. 5.20 4.99 5.12 -.10 | Novartis 1472 59.64 59,03 59.51 +.84 : : 36 | Uni 292 +
ACE Ltd Tet PTL S811 S830 ©4230 | oeonims. 14aast 2455 3371 3450 +98) ccsonint 1498 46.91 46.36 46.75 +39] imunmd 1084 463 447 461 +19] NovaStar 3163 :17.78 16.25 17.38 +1.03 ine amie 3781 3740 377 +38) anita s ta) 2350 ni 22.95 a
ACMMD 40795 7.91 7.93 +02 Bredecm 15186 883 830 8.62 +29 cue 1630 26.25 2340 2584 +182| inaymac 2640 «3795 3651 3788 +83] NvtIWrls 1622 1253 12.20 iow +e cpane See ae a i are a7 | UDO 1365 3386 33.42 - 33.64 eH
"07 16.63 16.99 +.34 | BrooksAuto 1603. 1547 1590 +58 . 17 | informat -«1368.«13,63. 13.32 1357 +23|Novellif ‘6712 7.12 7.01. 7.07 -.02 : “a, | UPS B 32. 7A: ‘
AeScom 1769 65 NY DB 08 |onnswick IMS BY BS BE +2 Eidorcidg 1618 68 00 611 +15) infosyss 1585 5065 $7185 $820 +1.77| Novus ANE The 315 31a) 920 | nee ee ery 2725 +5 | US Banerp Gat 009 3607 3620 08
AFLAC 1994 4802 A764 4790 5.25 | BUNS ASSL AST BSL 65,0205 EDs S219 SHS AB70 SUAB $3 ingerad 208) 42.99 2.6L 12.81 +20 Munoedn eT ee tea) faa | Sames, SAMA 248 2670 2S Typ | uSOlFdn 4829 40155 48.08 4845-91
AKSteel 1650-2177 21.29 2149-16 FBrashero 1217 ASA 4425 455 +5 nomed & OTT L048 00 #01 NutrSys soe Rath GL aes ASHE 32 | rt 2 OO NEE ee ae beiresn rae Gad 6710 BbiT 4124
AMBPr ‘1814. 6538 63.72 63.99 -.88 | CA Inc 2011 26.94 2655 26.84 +04) Emdeon 3999 14.64 14.29 “14.59 +.11 | intgdy 2529 1628 1602 1617 +.07 | Nuvelo PU Re ert ERY Percents Tet reo MLC any pay diae et utah ees aor Loe aLA0
AMR Weld 6538 6372 6399-88) CN, Fag VAS 17-00 1745 +20| EMmersnEls 3623 4595 4439 4580 +144 |inte| 5010 21.30 2094 21.4 +27 | Nv ITS Se rM2| Stoynas, 1386 3886 3898 38.00 -2 ltt —SH05 5193 sat ake #03
AR ae ee ee sete e112 |CBREliss 2610, 3748 36.06 37.34 +134) Emulex 1465 BLA 1766 IRE St) Intent 3593, 154.50 148.25 151.64 +78 503347 3355 45 Statics 108 2139 2065 2105 “A1| ion hess 35) aD SD
Na TE ae eee ey ee CBSB '- 2Br2” 3227 31.95 3189 tai] EnCanm 2962. 4886, ARGS GAT 28 | IntNAP es ” = 365 | 1858. 1845 1893 +38 sroadd 38126665 6597 6637 +53 [trot Sse em 2eek 2603 42
aU opton 2003 1505 14st 1504 +60 | COC 254 088 tase 1085 +23 Encoehcg 1530 2617" 2449 2490 138 | py gio 1898 1845 1883 +38 ocr mest 1365 avo2 4008 4037 +32) SMrdeRt = BB UGG Ro rite, eae er crear
45 43,63 42.85 43.50 +.75 | CH Robins 21 5161 53.12 +1.454 Encysi 733.62 3.63 - ‘ “31! Occipets. 11699 48.46. 46.67 48. tryker = «1741.62.70 61.32 61.82 - 99 34.14.
ee ae en a ng CIGNA ae ae ate) azar 2i¢9| EndoPhrm 1055 3088 2997 2398-47 tnt Coal 36T 506 Ae aty age | Ocwenmn 1248 13.05 1687 eee ae SturmRug 100-1007 9.91 aa 6
Abtlab” 5078 S318. 5267 5270 ~01/CITGD 2330 «GLA 5903. S982 +70 EngyConv 2771 3067 2819 3066 +195] rtp”? 57 grag Seal a7a3 x34 | OfeDpt S568 37.73. 35:19 3621-130] SON eer GAT. 6.37 , 6.40 * | ValeroE, = 8771 56.44 55.40 551 4.14
Abtbrg «1708 316 310315 +02 | CMGI 2330 604t 5003 SPST TTT | EngyPrt 1654 22.66 21.81 2196-96 intpect 1129 43.36 42.63 42.09 +32 | OISVHT. 1138 ire et weed #05 | Suncorg 2357 75.00 7318 ‘7354 -71| ValueClick 1935 26.12 25.72 2583-24
AO ee ee aes aa | CMSENy cys. Lene 1743 “1755 - 17.63 "00 | ENSCO oo 2M S82 ASRS SOS 52 | mba We det i248 1258 220 0lStates 1190 3002 28.01 2912 60 Sunoco. «2679-6214 60.82 61.47 +39] VKSrinc 1197-899 873 881 -.17
Moe eee a70G 2290 22568 eA | CNET. ere ete goa 895 10 Entegrs 2046 111.06 10.66 10.97 +17 | Intersil 3500: 126L--12AS 91253 4-10 | ousands gn 1661" 409 |) 392 4.03. +3 SuniseS Ht 1137 3825 3671 31 +133 varianss 4521. 47-50 4377 47-10 +4.00
Acquicor wt 1604 ‘2 06 SCC + | CSXS 16554 °° 42.53 39.11 42.10 +2.73| Entergy 1079 100.39 99.51 99.95 +.43] intuits 1701 31.54 30.99 31.49 +42 Omnicom 3187 102.65 100.61 102.14 -.42 | Suntech 4538 39.29 37.64 39.05 +1.69| Vasogengh 2531 38 35° 37 +.00
ACUI ee te Fase par | CNS Co pie ONES © 3272 SLM 0.72 ca | LAW 5 ERE = RETR RGR BAD #207 | Uveasv 1682 , 6273 3099 312 Ttz | Omniture n 1184 1464 1384 1431-64] SunTst 1008 85-86 B27 85.79 4.73 | VeraSun nT 1580 15.12 1517-60
fe ae cae, BE AS AS elie EE eee te eS SIS ee a ieee Se ae :
0 365 «(367 90 1476 1489 +. R : 3g | onsmen 03 9.65 9.87 +18] SwiftTm 1086 69 30.81 +. 58 25.56 26.
Adaptec 1601 3.70 3.65 367 “43 | Camecogs, 1422 37-76 3688 37aa 24) Esteeldr = aH ATA AGES ATL 448 lonatron, = 1139 S77 $35 $62 +26) onstreamM 1281 "3.683.433.4613 Sycamore 2223 3087 ee SUE Taal veruacm 1s? 878 3808 5863 459
acoesy 5864 610 ke aa 2 cameron 218 E780 5635 Br 31 Bn rst 492988 am 2a $8 meme |OvN—_6434 24 2455 2480 122 | Symantec 17234 18.37 1786 1833 +42|VertxPh 1316 32.26 31.36 32.07 +.60
olorcp 39666 680 Al "18 3888 39.05 + 04 63:50 63, pnwvSy 11873 9,07 +.34| Synagro 15 5 + sl +,
ea 3153, 689 G68 880 15 | GanNRy gs 1044 A718 4653 46.82 +30) Expedia = 2388 2249 2164 2227 +62] JASolarn 2361 19.60 1800 1862 +1.12 | ontXprs 137 24.90 2408 2472 +04] Synovus wn 3802 320 a 44s VonPnn = ae 138 a8 Ua
Advaita 12123779 3693 37.02 -4g|COMNRSg — 2609 51.89 S071 50.90 -42 Expdintls, 4581 4451 4290 4410 +52 | JOS Unirs 12086 16.09 1565 1599 +37] Oracle 41999 16.94 1668 16.77 +15 | SyntaxBrll_ 3306 B44 B.S 825 -30|Viragenh 4754 16 4 6
AMD ji 318 3683 HG Al Caneticg 1049 1248 12.34 1247 4.08) ExDSerpts 2835 77.06 TEE) 785 +144 | JpMorgch 10734 S155 51.00 51.42 +47 | OraSure 1249816 6.50 8.06 -10| Syntrocp ©1596. 3.55 3.07 3.46 #41 | VirgnMdah 2114 28.41 27.04 27.9
AMD oh eee ee te 23 cap Capone 2663 82.63 81.68 81.87 409] Dorel 1059 7.75 751 7.62. +.08 | Jabill 1495 2664 2613 26.39. +36 | OshkoshT 1341 55.03 53.47 _ 55.03 +1.57 | § 22773458 3425 3434 410 ViroPhrm = 1148 17.62 17.18 at at
AdvancPM ey aus 4260 436A 421 | Capltsroe — 1879 2712. 2654 2675-25 twit 5230 4.72 460 465 +19) Januscap 1971 22.06 21.43 22.03 +45 . mmm | Visha 1203 1438 14, 6
AfcmpSv 2804 5412 5210 5344 +297 | Cost 75299087 dt BrxonMbl 16945. 76.00 74,99 _75.60_+.15 | Jarden 1440 37.90 37.07 37.68 +.88 Vistern a tae oo a +16
Affymetrix 1711. 27.66 27117 2740 +49} Cardnitith 1508 72.77 7207 7245 +21 jyBire —-BISS. 1323 1282 1323 +24 PDLBIO 3848 19.44 1889 19.00 -35| TAMSAn = 1133 32.58 32.00 32.35 +29) vivopart 1899 ear ate
Aruesys, 1843 94S 19.06 1959 +54 | CareerEd 1717 2949 2929 2946 Hl) pyc Ten 1456 65.00 63 ote 7248 6890 6540, 6585 4A7|PECHNG — 4274 4486 42.56 43.05 42.86) TD Ameritr 3432 17.25 16.90 1722 427 | Vodafone 1 “2922 2951 +.
Avent 2882-3340 32.85 32.94 04 CareMKRK 10202 62.31 6097 63.30 +42 eh ASS 748 Jon 1181 © 3428 533.50. 3278 | a6 | COBECD Oi MTT AB T3.; ARDS © AR 09 | TEGO 1122 1697 met 2024 TAG 1883 Lil
Avnicog 3735 40.98 39.93 40.21 -1.01| CarMax 1313. 56.69 55.32 5661 +149 Fakor 1285 59.86 5942 $965 +21 | jovciny” 1543 A758 46.36 47.05 4.95 /PMCSa GHZ 681. 68S GRY AE) THO Shee WaT S28 +198 ee” eo ate Lest 1381 al
farumg 2056. 3883 3.22 3156, 19,4 Cama. 20 4858 4883 245 Palani Tee koe ahs 31.00 220 | ON SMS 12S SS 4i| Pini mes aa an20 ans) an70 88 | ty Peewee Ww
amaiT 2524 56.85 55.61 56.60 +1.06 95° 70, + 7 S781 58. i828 |e a2 .
AlskAr a aoe avers aBats se | carters; 6145 22492053, 21.05, 4.22 Fane eee RE i489 “LITO 406 : Poco a0 3735 3880. 3718 425| Taman a Sao ieee ledge 2ag|Wolcm’s 2218 2875 7222 7331 +111
7 Se Ae ae Se ae ag eee ae a Eileen ao ie OB Hale UR A diets ee a aa ge
Alcatelluc’ 8416.13.30 13.14 13.27 +24 Caterpillar 7428 66.48. 65.17 66.16 +1.43 | Figninfo 2519.47.00 45.35. 46. AT : , : 4270] Taketwo. 3741-206 1921 2097 +161 | Wachovia 5563 58.22 57. :
: ! 75 +153] KLA Tne (| ! 3936 50.81 49.59 50.39 +99] Pacerinth © 1243 -27.46 26.50 27.32 + i : at plo Riar
Alcoa 11830 35.00 3439 3457 -43| Celanese 1505 29.21 28.55 28-73-26) Fifhthind 2155 41.27 40.74 : “73 | TalismE gs 2933 17.40 16.99. 17.02.25) WalMart L747 48.13 47-75 A787 tt
Aligntech 1142-17-42 16.75 16.96» -.03 | CeleraGrp 393 1550 1499 15.00 ~45] Finearif 17194 329A at 4.06 | KCSouthn’? 1499 34.86 3333 3454 +.96|PacSunwr 1146 19.72 19.35 19.44 +11 Target “~~ °3260 62.60 61.90° 62.44 +31|Walgm - 3140 45.20 481 44.93 -.04
NlignTech 1102 1142 1675 1696-03) Cocicg 7B A628 639 408/ erenatas "3984 868 2506 22h $40] Kelogs sal 4876 4806 4863-9 Palmincs 5290 15.65 15.31 15.39 -.06| taser 166 815-780 803 +29 Walterinds 2383 2472 23.90 244-14
AllegTch 2755 101.47 99.26 100.69 +97] Celgenes “3007 S401 5314 53.95 +72) FtMars 1415 $0.26 4832 49.56 +7 | Ki Use 3249 3600 S057 faa/ POUT! 2155 AL A 2A | Totes Lis? moae a sat | Mamemis 2 Pe Tse
Alibata, «2155 «GL 97 6035 61.23 +119) CeliThera 228161157158 01) stSolarn © 5728 M485 40.01 43.7 +37 |KimbCk 1212 6982 Gad 6957 71) Pavchex ze M19} HOH ALT *90/ Tenor, e793) Ls) Lal +20] Mea A a aes 8) al
alidata 2155 SLT 6035 6123-4119 |Comexs 2945 3714 3572 3695 +121 | Fratngy 1369 GAITERS 4372 +844 | Kimo 2063 5260 50.36 5213 +13|PaylShoe 1458 31.74 31.01 31.23 -27} telMext 2320 30.89 29.76 30.85 +1.05 | WREIT 21 4325 42.65. 4280-40
Miemeore 549 3087 2068 3074 e114 | CentenniBk 1066 B69 850 850 +01 rey nee ! 84 +.40|KindredH 1101 32.35 32.14 32.17 -10 |) PeabdyE = A452 4149 40.34 40.68 +13 | Telikinc 1675- 603 567 5.70 -29| WsteMinc 3787 35.51 35.02 35.30 +28
AiedCap 1269 3087 2865 314 +114 Conteront 2247 1824 1800 1817 4.5 "78 1152. 1169 +15] Kineticc 3320 51.59 4875 49.94 -157|Pengrthg 1380 17.24 17.00 17.18 +.25 : ;
Hivee Ge ua ae Le vate HG Be ao ne tole ME ES ha oa calmery te Ge ie bn tlhe it ae GE he al wae, Ge Ae Me he Sa | wane de kn Ser tae
Allstate 3538 «62.15 61.27 61.88 +68 | coma 42 1B.N2 «1B 4.05 Y x 0517 i 12. 31, : :
leat 5M Gis a Ge eles te Hen et ae clemee ee OR le falas’ feo ei ne Hw te reget DB RD US US +21/ Tee iso Mak Aas AT Al Wivatcl 2878 5138 4902 4961 -407
AphaNRS stone 2093 202 2088 427 cera ee tras Tea | forestiad 2410 52.90 S218 52.58 +28 | Kohls 260) BEIT BS AMS ari | Peregrine 3695126 116 119-4) Rnetith 2800 RTE egg +12 Wee beep gas ata? Obes il
Altria se a ee ee) gy | ceradyne 432. 56.67 55.76 56M +74 Fortress 2608 29.47 28.01 29.44 +.54 | Kraft yooe SSL SELL 4d iz Perrveliss 130 3150 3054 aay -a4|Teadyn TRS ea) a0 ver ee Sea) Sead Seal lA
Amazon 671. 4028 30:14 4014 +83 Ceridian 2302 33.93 33.33 33.56 +.19 FredMec 2000 Be ee gees +Lit | Kupke eee EE has ae tent Mat ee 3 WAT +4) Tetum eal 2682 230 4204 Wesrind 1687 6.2 i sas 02
aMorl e857 M867 A779 4850.55 neg ate a 8 SAL DoE ie FregM pV 275 2515 2506 22 +12 — 367 1000 3.6) 395 238) Perio ioe TT S410 Oar «187 i 3322 1680 16.07 1652 +36. vaceae BAGS ae
48.50 47.01 47.94 +1. Bes i 63 +44 Ptrogst : ro 1660 87.04 85. . al
AgagleOs | 4765 31.75 30.88 31.74 +.80 nels re 3.23 3.09 3.18 ~02} Fremont -«-2785«1.79 12.95 1348 +32|LCAVis . 1170 7.54 45.56 47.19 -.26 | Pfizer areas MSS 22 ie tetrats 1580 er foal 85-68 39 | WOigitl If 3007 19.22 1872 19.02 +30
AE 1428 46.32 45.74 45.95 +.17 eran Sh nn a res sa FriedBR te 73 716 724 06] ESILog «11815 9.15. 8.86 9.09 +.23 | PhelpsDs ° 6859. 124.68 oe ne re TevaPhrm 11178 38.00 3706 37.96 +101 | WstiUnn = 3432-2235 21-99 22.32 +.36
ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee eee eee ee eee ge
i Pe aoa Chemtura 2338 1201 1172 1201 +21 69 eerie eet | Rains 21 48.26 4875-47 ore P74 AT-O0 S47.) 4,68 46 91. :
antinity ieee 268 3150 2 +22 chetng Sal M72 W201 421) FuwelF 1370 11.80 10.25 11.30 +78 Cammachce BSTU Gi 3 oA Gelb a) | ens i Lt £174 BRIS ae Wyoribg ES aoe eae Aron ar wan dela» A888 LS eee can
AmerMed 1067. 20.75 20.28 40.62 ~13) Gave” 04 71.78 7219-12 WWSands ‘1673 9390 9210 92.75 +. \ eae i a tal .
amorbio” 248 27 AL te +3 Cc Mies 1600 2 abe a +08) Guarketn 1247 2100 1852 2085 +136 | Lawsnsht 460 Bn Tat Tat orelne Toe ats Suse SOL sal Theos 513317882 On a8 Wnsson ire 3828 a8 245
‘00 3093 3098 +. : 99 m Ol 1789 +15] Learcorp 1345 39.12 38.07 38.32 -.66| Pridelnti 2208 28.00 27.55. 27: Tidwtr x "Ay |Windstrm 47-1500 1487 1499 +.12
Amstand 2594 5439 °5329 5357 -.06| ciiMaMble "2612, 48.00 (45.76.4775 +36) Gulls 3 2470 2401 2466 +25|LegoMason 1265 10508 101.65 10402 +227 | primed THREE eh dees alse aor x32 | Wins 2496 26.90 al
amstand 2504 54 GuowOs: ° 2883 748 “708 “738 +3| carn ‘08 101.65 10402 +227 | Primedia 1551. 2.24200 219 +08) Tifany 1137. 4245 41.56 42.07 +32 | Wath 25.00 «2681
Ameriprise 3192 4003 35) et sling | Chipotle 1087 61.51 59.60 5969-76 | Gap et ee Shis. ias anos [ewan Se ee eT Bre) cae | pagan THis. Sean, BLae 126 $54 |TimeWam 17527 2161 2145.21.48 22] Winn Te20 10433 10249 10336_ 4.93
Ameriprise 03 oT eee ebay ss [Choicehts 1764 3871 3637 37-28 348) Garmins 12964 $9.30 S511 19 saza (tome, ais, 630 ge aT ~02 rushQdgn 7713 $290 $1.25 S142 1.58} TW Tle BS Be ee aLig — Eee
pret eye tion thea val Tete Chordnt If 1402 330 310 330 +10) Gateway ooo de as Sega ve LOL tee? | Lemaak owns sel eae eH ProctGam 5945 ° 65.07 64.62 6488 +.17| TitanMts - 5374 35.95 34.56 35.24 +1.19
Amylin Be toes 21g | ctubbs 1188 52.92 5243 5269 +20) Gemstar 3818 4.23 4.08 A419 +13) LibMintAn 2499 G28 SLES Sb ee | Promesstll visas oven veee iniaaas Lead Tivo lng ay 1397 20 595 S88 i 598 84.1 XM Sita TS 1
aye Ee B28! 472 A190 415 CienaCprs S711. 30.72 29.24 30.07 +1.39 | GenProbe 3053 5129. 4829 43,00 320 LigandPhn 1158 1188 Terie e a ProgCp s 3293 23.52 23.18 23.35 +.10} Todco 1177 33.07 32.38 32.78 +.28 | XOMA 1062 3.16 «3.07 3.11 +01
snacks 4476 4225 4.72 A180 +15) Goueel” ote 505 481 504 +08) Genuah 25D at | een ae Le ee ee ea 14) Protogs, 1637, 7096 69.30 7010 +28 TollBros 2128 32.75 3201 3242 +31/XTOEngy 4719 51.79 5053 S089 +80
rage se Sea anos saaa ear [cueety 3042 DLT 21.03 2122-141 Gencoship 1643 315 3090 31.16 SAL] vel USA Shee Sage aa [pee dee aa ae at 482 TotalSAs” 2464 7039 6965 70.4 +1.66| Yeeingy 1413. 2453 2420 2430 4.09
Analogdev 2539 33.66 3308 3343 +4) Girus Se eee eee eee ee ae eae rat | me PAM tian: Sah ode aa #23 | psc 27827397 7218 7354 +1.52| Transocn 8680 79.00 76.70. 77.08 -.82 | Xerox 79 1804 1767 1793 +25
ance ase 1081 RTT 18 5 | cso Re te Stas Te] Semamet Ue aeaT foal feq) cas [Uneaten oO) Le? 3008 3140 iteH 18593274 31.98 32.34 +.15| TriadH 1949 49.65 4942 49.53 +.05 | Xilinx 6604 2593 2487 2558 +73
Angoams 1421 2523 2483 2515 +73 Citigrp 12439 "54.44 53.74 5418 +.47| GenElec . 31404 .3650 35.79 3647 +.70| Loewss 2109 437 B71 4405 5 Tribune 1144 30.81 30.32 30.72 +.32 | Yahoo 30569 30.86 29.64 30.66 +1.10
anglohms zl 2523 2482 25.15 7 |ctzcomm 1455 1490 1459 1489 +19) GnGrtherp 35326520 6210 G12 +1.74| Laac Il 2156 2131 2137 +10 | QUT MDDS ATO SOF SGT, seal | MUAY Sar Mize ALAR 240.25 41.60 4135 | man Ge A NE es GS aT
Anheuser 2538 5049 50.04 5023 +7 CMS, STR De ae Tea] Gero BSH Sis saz eas |lowess 7868 3363 3317 3344 -a7 [Qiong — 1206 1822 171 1810 +67 TiQuint «1334-498 4.83495 4.05) YumBrds. 1372 60.09 5949 60.03 +27
MMEeT cose TS BR2D'ST.63. SRL 1.23 | CARSON UR SATS, 8 ot | Sa i Ue Bere Oe eat LO a a A sey] Oimodan 1708 1526 1445 1506 +50/ Yeon” = St 32.05 31.84 31.96 +16) ZebraT 3028 38.35 34.56 37.97 +142
Aoatay 1880 3570 3814 3866 +21 | Cory od NGL 3640 3655-705) Gh cha” 1073 2528) 2501 2528 +l nS ee Soor ansz coo | Qlogics 1936 1850 1827 1850 +23| YS" 3802 1880 1847 1862 -14| Zimmer 1462 84.96 83.92 84.62 1.4
aonaly 1620 40k LT BST 32 | coach = aT05 aah 4781 1938 +113 Sere EN TAL. 7298 TAQD +81 Quan Ny aust 2037 2180 #30
toe a ee ae ag [cocace | AMAL 2125 2100 2103 +08) Genta 6330 52.5051. 4.04 | MEMC 4713 54.71 5330 5441 +1.89 | Questsfhif 2124 16.60 15.83 1658 +.74 TORONTO STOCKS
aatiny AeA Te Lie cL CocaC ' 15601 48.56 4173 4788-33) Genworth 1732-36-77 3631 3663 +20|MGIC «2633.67.41. 65.13 66.16 +.92 | Questar == 1141 83.69 81.41 8246 +31
Aesiv 1079. 1469 13468 1450 +80 | COU, . 1 1 "448 417| Gensyme $429 G7BA 6610 67.30 42.10 | MGMMir 4600 74.15 70.17 7038 +14) QksivRes 1089 41.00 3942 40.00 22 Vol. High Low Close Cha. | Vol. High Low Close_Chg.
Anes, Ios A653 GIT aed 27 | COSTES 04 9437 92.30 94.32 41.84] Gaculf Se ot Roos 2008 5g | MIPS Tech 1198 9.72 9.38 9.60 +64 Quiksivr 2261.14.33 1395 14.06 +.15 : 5 ‘
poolosY 19 465) ETT AEM AT lCognosg SSS alg. 4073 AL. MAA) Gacult | 155 2072 1998 2004 SET MRVcm «MIB 439418428 4.05 | Owestom 12292 827 195 1406 +15 1277g044 o1Commurique.s6 80 | 66 +08 2185457 LakeShoreGld2.08 187 2.05 +22
Apple inc 17940 85.64 84.57 85.30 +.60 cotter 2370 1942. 1868 1937 +51|Gerdaus 2437 1872 1827 1850 +33|Macrvsn 2030 27.66 25.82 26.90 +1.48 | RF MicD 9507 803 7.75 792 +21 017983 ATSAutoTIngl2.20, 10.81 1093 -L47 | 2861673 ore tee ya8 dat 1296 488
Applebees 2951 27.13 26.21 26.84 +52 colores i oat ia fe a Glleadsc 4034 71.74 70.51 71.72 41.15 Maia ae Be 70 “71 +06] RTIIntiM 1128 84.03 81.97 82.70 +.82 1999182 Ma aga aaae tie 28| a180169 tern aoe 39.90 4002 “8
pplBio 1281 33.20 32.71 32.83 +.01 . 38-02] GlaxoSKin 3952 58.74 , 57.80 58.37 +1.11 | Malaysa .95 870 8.95 +.35 | RackSys 2155 17.29 16.72 17.06, +.30 | 1688877 Al : 32 6338 - i : OL 5.28 +:
Salers iee Sipe AEN Ure er k ; r06, +. can inc 6475 6332 6338 -.52| 4090226 MiramarMng 537 5.01 5.28 +52
wehed sie? 1908 ea 1889 471 | case to ses aa? 1357-06 |Mamma 2323 5.56 5.10 523-15 | Radian 9225 GA10 6185 6293 +1.05 | 1566630 AlexisNinnUn19.10 1887 19.10 +58 i
mia ome sp «3572.41.25 40,66 40.96 +27| GlobPa ‘ 06 | trarathon 2759-9350 92.01 9280 +. roe o2TIe 2300. " 10 SA | StLASRG Mitac Telecom. 23 Fe ae ea
Aria aa 3 - sae 3.50 +06] Cmtouchh 1198 ° 1.58 142 149° -.04 Glnbaleee A an oa ee “30 Maranon Ae toot 4 ae? oH Be ef RadioShk 1110 23.06 22.72 23.00. +12 1636595 Anatolia) 5.39 5.21 5.25 -.10 | 1712827 NortelNetwork35.66 34.90 35.48 +.09
pria 55 30.75 31.40 +78 | cmepi . 91.82 .09 +05] Rambuslf 4015 22.17 21.83 22.00 +15 (071 AurResources21.21 20.63 .20.88 +.17] 1451494 NovaChem 38.15 8
apantive 1589 2683 2588 2618 07 | SM NI 1069 3414 3369 3388 +.20|Goldritd 32941760 1725 1743 +.17\MarsiM 2336 29.57 29.24 29.38 +04) Raytheon 1899 55.48 54.95 3291676 BCE Inc 31-25 30.62 31.20 +.60 inscoR a ie a
Ale 1589 2663 2585 2618-07 | Cocnceov 1483 42.87 42.13 42.60 42.26] coldcrpg . 1779 29.49 W125 WA} ti | MarvellT sif 13490 1869 1835 1849 +23] RealNwk 3606 10.89 10.39 496-30 | #291678 BCE Ine ara Seed 3658 23 | leecwe Nwae ok 3S -o1
Me SET AGG. CART? NOD 9008 | Cone AN eS Rn mht SRT Fe) Gams "3831 3.92. 3.77 3:92 +.18| Masco 6055 31.74 30.01 31.70 -11|Realogyn 3028 30.00 29.82 N67 32 | 2054423 BemaGldo 684 670 6.77 +.03 SE ee teas apc atl
ArcelorMit 2267 48.38 48.77 482242031 cyRD pts 4168 3087 2870 3055 +78) Goldmans 7682 21910 Mag) ntvag chan | MasseyEn 1323 2415 23.79 2408 +26] RedHat 2697 25.00 24.02 29.85 ~15 | 3750149 BombdrBSV 4.55, 449 453 +04 1553171 PaadinOno 924 907 924 ~Ol
ArchCs | 3440 30.74 79.98 3064 fp [CompCrd 3192 36.09 31.14 35.18 +351 Goodyear 5206 25.00 Mee arte toy | MasterCdn 4724 108.82 104.10 108.02 +333 | RegionsFn 1369 37.49 37.10 37. “04 gGoe Brenwatertesit? 113 175 $2) dass Petocanaaess S15 A882 “88
Fea at oe aera BOBS GO? 67 | Comps ALL? 54.83, 54.02 S419 18 | Google 5547 469.13 459.22 465.93 +6.83 | Mattel 2604 2669 26.18 26.63 +.21 | Reliante MS SEO , TAS | *AU2 | 1546416 Buran © 28 © ae wee ape | uaase Pat fi “a4
ad a Seah et . 33 46, 69 26.18 26.63 +. nn. 1681 16.21 15,91 16.06 +.09 | 1543632 CGIGrpASV 9.60 9.46 9.55 +0 intNrthEgy .07 05.06 ~.04
athst 1382 61.08 $983 6012-67 |Compuwre 2718921 8.97 9.4 +15} GrantPrde 2108 A485 42.88 4446 +17 Maxim if 46743112 3030 3105 473|RschMotn 5994 13822 133.52 137.59 +3.65|2021330 CampbeliRes “17 16 17 “Ot | 1383827 Queenstake 20°20 20 +.01
Arad MBB. SB S20 552 44) [conmara 4368 2602 2579 2545-12) Greywoll 3165609. G58 682 tT McClatchy 283 38.32 37.75 3823 *|RetallHT 2041 104.90 104.05 10466 +.26 | 2087648 CaNathes 6047 E910 S943. mal | 3022020 RloNarcenGld 336 32? oe LOL
Arba inc 2140 1040-1000 1018 +42) Conerant 9123203 1.94 2.02 +.08) Gposimec 1067 13.20 1270" 13.02 +23 McClatchy aes anos NTL 4502 +d2|RiteAld 621315 G07 612 | 1512217 Celesticasv 748 7.32 744 4.10 2367269 RogersCommBs 7.70 36.86, /37.68 +101
Acne 108s 7.68 756 7.63 +17 Conocphil $474 68.10 67.20 67-46 4.19] Ghelewsas 2943 30:16 236) 1302 +23) MoGrwH 1404 68.07 67.31 68,07 +48 | RossStrs 2380 34.7833. Trasteaachariotneso 82) 72 77 +02] A421177, Royal Bnk” S487 SAG S488 220
ATi A Sue A Mae ANAL Pp | Comes 1G, 3589. 3079, SRL pt NG 2.61 3012 GS) ickesson 1416 56.90 56.19 5631 +.10| Rowan 2380 HB BaT 3463 +123 | 1285100 CoalcorpMino 69 6969 Bee et lees Tasioe ct
Arrowel, 1222 3762 3688 3762 +66 | ConstelA 1604 2468 2420 2450 1.43 Mcfesson ite Shar a86T soat 50 | RODSMIA 1683 678 GEL gums 10 |24300ss0Cumberando 877, Bal 868 +179 Saree ShawcommBNyAQO74087 4207 +12
prtfech 2617 2482.05 2.07 08) cir 2811 4433 2.13 A3a6 +96] HAET Pm 110 TAB 129 1343 +06|Mechel 1331 30.90 29.30 30-50 +1.23| Ryerson 1872 31.03 29.30 31.01 4:38 2680540 DenisonMinesi2.42 1195 1217 +22) Sarzarg et rae Rll ald
pve 2225 1979 19.27 1976 +331 CooperCo 1124 46.76 4595 46.14 +.06 Hallibins 14861 30.90 30.27 30.70 +.05|Medimun 4145 31.61 31.18 31.25 -.21 032330 3101 4.96 /4811353 Domtarinc. 9.34 913 932 +19] THARP Mew nestomia ga 1247 1286 tld
AMRoad 215174573944 +02 | Cooperinds S89 93.55 91.75. 93485 +125 HancFab 13° 359 351 352 -03|Medarex if, 1795 - 1399 1373 1391 +.16 TRAITTRAEasternPlat 180° 1.75 1.76 +07 | HER) She ge an? 24
AiheGne 2502 1214 LYS 1204 +20 conan 21788 5.04 5.00 5.0 41.55] Hanesbin 330 2665 2637 2664 432 | MedcoHth 1207 6125 6012 61.18 +1.06/SAFLINKH 3490-1210 +00 AIB7SAD EldoradaGld 719 7.00 712 +17 | Tae Sie rar Beae aETS 84
Atheros 1108 2620 2560 2578 +22) CornPats 1066 3209 32.95 33.00 +.05| Hanover 1330 2865 2637 FG eI Medico L412. 3048 2914 2965 1.01 |/SAPAG 1474 47.85 47.38 47.63 +66 2136068 EnanaCorp 58.12 S669 5725-09} (Oe) Hema Soy eye leat 30
ATMOS 237 S17 585. 559 18) Corning 15438 2243 21.76 22.4 +32] Hansnshif 2617 38.32 37.25 38,02. +.32 | Medicis BL 3806 3736 3749 -61/SBACom 1086 29.40 28.32 2876 +.43 238379 Ea ETN toe 183 1190 4.07 | 5183850 Tomnnese. 10 8 ao 01
furoraoGn 2525 330264 272-58 | Cntwa ae rie Sey, eros 439|HarleyD 1600 69.00 67.97 6891 +1.06|Medtmic 4027 54.67 S419 5458 +.16|SGXPhm 1277 , 5.67 3.50 5.22 41.07) 1asTAI EXmmPRWtA 57 4855 3:03 | 3430400 TwinMiningo (09 109.09 *
Autodeskit 2827 4301 41.25 . 4.68 +1.35 ein Be ne 40.84 42.00 +.52|HarmonyG 1961 13.69 13.35 13.52 +.23)MelcoPBLn 2995 18.44 17.86 18.21 +.57 SLM Cp 3086 4277 4241 4261 +19| 2013928 FirstClgryo 637 6.06 6.32 +05 | 3440876 UEXCorpo 508 485 498 +16
Str saat ee pri Coanail poy yyy Rar aye 52) Mirae 1370 8552. 8516 85.39 +13 |Mellonfne 1798 4591 45.19 4555 +27 SpdrHome 1874 38.47 37.73 38.14. +.35 | 2315878 GabrielReso 50L~ 486 4.88 +.04 | 1825081 UTSEngyCorp4.15 4.07 4.09. -.01
Meee ae a. 1S LL. al teed 14 23.54 24.00 +.43| HarrisCorp 1316 51.02 49.93 50.62 -1.17 | Merck 6100. 44.23 43.90 44.06 +.11 | SPSS 1203 37.28 3370 35.87 43.99 | 1421876 GammonLakeol9.79 18.66 19.70 +1.01 | 2314874 Ur Energyo 4.48 4.10 4.00 +38
janx eee ni wee ARO? 422 oventryH 1105 5492 54.07 54.68. +.60| HartfdFn 1528 97.65 96.75 96.78 -.45| Merriillyn 5413 94.35 92.05 93.80 +1.50 erMicro. «1272-19-21 1893. 1917 #28 | 4507829 Goldcorpinc 34.50 33.37 33.58 +.33 | 2283212 VictoryNklo | 86 78 86 +.03
Ba ate, TREE ea | ee 203 1246 12.00 12.28 04] Hasbro, 1622 29.00 2845 2898 +51|Metlife 3804 65.79 64.25 6534 +49 SIiveHold 4493. «S247 3238 32:39 03 | 2408688 HudBayMnriso22.63 21.69 22.26 +.66 | 1839709 Westictalr, 16.08 15.08 18-50-10
Avnet 1515 7716 2690 27.05 +08 | Credsys 1689 502° 492 493.02) Hawalll TL 2743 2718 2726 . -.01 | Micrel 3804 65.79 O45 Gat 45 | Safeway 3299 3700 3627 3665 +47 | S4L02R lamagiecornla sh 10.07 10.26 +.21 | 3393233 WestshoreRt 04 0304
71 3485 3531. +30 | crocs 1689 Sar Ad AOR 2) MncrPr 1470. 4033. 39683983 46 | Microchp 220 22 | ae ety 65 +47] 320562 InterPipeUn 890 8.67 8.77 -.02 | 2387392 YamanaGldo 16.48 16.21 16.24 +.05
‘Avon 1789 3899 3848 3871 #d1|crecstle | 1543 3844. 34 : rochp =. 2202«-36.40 35.62 36.19 +.69 104 41,64 41,93 +.28 | 1487308 WanhoeMinesl1.95 11.66 11.80 +.06 | 290693
han, Ag tlie BM Ah Sgt He Hg Ae Aig Soltis “ies Re US hi calms toe Wn ae a
xi . 26 +. . ; 88 +. jcroSem 19 17.56 18.02 +. ; } 03 +. VER nto wet Ew UR Owe
AXIS Ca 1216 34.83 34.32 34.73 +.43 parece 1082 a Hy s5.4 61.82 ui HeclaM 2161 A AS AE mM Mirosof 55204 29.69 ue ea et ee 2551 50.13 aid ue ass DIVIDENDS
25 7.42 +1, 28 46.49. 46.92 +.33 | MillPha OL 107 1114 +02 | SanDls 6094 40.95. 39.85 40.80 +:
BETO It 4356 4343-4380 +20 | cummins 1918 146.80 138.58 144.72 46.39) HelmPay s 1462 27.55 2693 2703-27 | Millcomint tear 7875 Tas 7686 4735 | Sanmina 5140 an a “at tl WEDNESDAY DIVIDENDS DECLARED
BRAT Cp 1374 4398 4343 43-80 +20 | Currpnn ° 1253 3.16 82.68 63.10 +41 | Hemisphrx 729240 1.93 2.04 +08) MilsCpIt, 2082, 26.6 26.05 26.35 +11 | Sanofl 3201 43.76 43.49 43.76 +.36 Ceitex Carp Qh 86 aT
Be Aero | 107k 3174. 095 UH $3} | cypsem 2504 1936 Ingo 1927 +42 Herballe | 1570 3873 3185 TE 8 Mindspeed 1448-238 217 227 +07 |Saralee 3704 17.49 17.30 1742 +01 Pe Stk of pay: Citizens Fat Bnep 09 BIS 2822
BHP pillt 4004 4595 45.23 45.60 +58 | UTRK an ae eon gap alo| Hershey. 1584 51.61 50.84 5130 +47| Miramar 1335 4.60 4.25 460 +50) Savlenth 486.1490 14.59 1467 +.05 tod rate record able HNI Corp Q 195 223 Fd
8 sie en 21.33 2675 oo “6 ‘ogen 252 2.48 2.50 +.01 West i Be ee 538 st Minn 1492 3587 35.38 35.69 +.33 mikes Pl a are 24.75 24.76 -.10 IRREGULAR Compx Intl Inc Q 125 3:9 3-26
67 3202 3244 4, 35 2917 29.33 + u 4212.20 1241 + s 33 6415 64.66 +. :
BP PLC 3553 63.06 62.44 62.83 +.02| DJIADiam 7309 127.83 126.70 127.48 +.85 Hewat? 8252 42.99 42.37 42.83 +.24]Monogrm 6240 2.00 1.73 196 Tar | Schwab 8809 18.39. 18.89 1931 a an hal ir Sear Mass ties) Bee aE Gs
BT Gr ae ee ee eres bal 2007 3118 3020 3100 478| tiotten deel eBy eae 08 ye | Mone ibe 218 54.68 5575 41.20] Seopa ke akon 2660 433 ie oat crack ae hain aoc Ne
BT Grp 125.62 6152 6223 +36 |ORHoron, 2981 2853 7744 ZEB +.22/ Hoagie "str BEE Rig Be 1a eet oak alee oe ft | SORT VETS earn ae ee date SI odie x record date unannounced.
BakrHu -4843«72.55 70.84 5.00 +1.70 | DROGOLDH 4490777475. 01) HomeDp 20045. «41.96 41.50 41.73 -.03 voici 2908 g2.94 8129 8236 +111) Semee tes Naas BTA 1938 WES; | Cooper: Inches Xm 228 315 Dentsplay Intl Q ob 32749
SE ee ee ee eee ee ares Gabe gear (ace imeem 4-128 ee ey tse 23 |Motoa 2248 1843 2169 2314 +10 | er ios ae) 888 MAT % 2 for 1 split.
BcoBrades 2249 A148 39.64 416 +1.56 | DTE 1620 4859 48.00 4832 432 | HOmenron 1125 Gee ea a0 | Move Inc 4245 1943 1918 19.21 ~13| SemiHTr 16905 346033933447 475) 6c in EI Paso Corp Q 4 32 2
Ecotec e ae 4 ant DadeBeh 1311’ 43.75 42.03 4225 +011 Honwilintl 44874765 46.20 47/54 44.03 Murpho. i363 sae sns3 shee +53 Sepracor 1953 330 5325 3387 zh for Cee es at ae ee
BkofAm 183 S417 5357 50s 32 DaimirC 4363. 70.60 66.55 69.78 +5.33| HosppT 1519 47.77 47.50 47.69 ~15 | MylanLab 1883 22.49 2187 21.91 =1] | Svemstr 1527 13.40 13.20. 13.32 +04 Son Exchange Natl Beshrs Q 21 315 at
BofA ui ‘05 +32|aktrnicss 10318 | 3045 28.25 30.09 -8.00| Hostrotls 3652 2849 2785 2796 175 cme | StawG 24 3113 3L6l +. INCREASED
sei aISS 4 251 4290 4.42| Daren” 36 4280 1245 1259 -08| Homane uN? 3508 3418 ean ShawGp MOD 22k 3S ae +25 | Brookfld AssetMomnt Q 8 ST S31 Foiwand A COD eS me
Beck bat a8 G02r a3 (Dystar Ide 3st ae aan ei [ely Oe 3508 418 80 21 |NUHidg 1525 74.23 71.06 73.84 43,09 Siemac 160 gta 2¢6 3679 4128 | CSK Corp By kia Sos gayts 3a enn NS RO SS ee
Barter pe Sak On «Ale, OE | Geese 14s wl a 331 +11 |tumoe, "1623 Le? 1143 1147 al |NYSEGDn 4737 “91.00 89.01 89.55.64) SierraHS 1091 40.40 39.75 40.11 +32| piebol : IMS Health Q 03 31 3:29
Beatin 1 OP's Gee ae 7) 10815 11191 49.241 queen —go74 g2as 5988 61.98 +1.97| Naborss 4700 30.23 29.71 29.85 -.01 | SierrPac 1221 18.03 1776 1799 a7 | ema me OE ee Se ed
‘ ; : 81 +5.71 | Dell incif 19041 24.07 23.56 23.90 +.29) Honty “ee 7g | NasdlO0Tr 128209 44.71 44.0: i t "30 +97 | Energy West Inc Mo 215 fend B06 ne OOS 9.223 ee
pear ot Ged RSs eal Bay +06 Dnd 9] Hine «3093 2674 26.14 2655-10 71 4404 4460 4.74] SierraWr 1393 1499 1410 1480 +97 | TOTO) Q. Be
BearngP it 3672855 841 847 M6 |Dndreon 1261480 4078 HuntB 0832674 2614 26 oy |Nastag ©7497 3201 31.36 3160 +50 SigmAls 1829 39.98 39.43 38.74 +81 | HN! Corp O 2195 teas ae eas MES US We OE Tag Os 08 COs SI SIE
HLS Mi ears ab ecg gy ier ec AEM Niort LE eer a ear Naticity 2440 38.35 3814 3828 4.09 Sllcmimg 3510 9.34 9.16 9.27 +08 | Jeffersonville B Midsouth Bancorp = Q 06 3:14 4:2
Beda 296 AOD ALL 4296 4.77 | Dev 1 6844 67.14 67.35. +.26| Hvar 1D se aeay 909 1 | NolVarco 2756 69.40 68.00 6894 -.09] silentab 1823 32.22 ee ae See i 5
Berkleys 1281 34.23 32.82 34.02 +14 ae eel 9k tases 19M 223) Comms, MA LU A aE sas| NatSemi 5097 23.28 2257 2324 +73 |Slenvare 1712-924 87598 +49 MD Te dicistica enh oe saris
Bestuy $143. S072 4981 0.07 “S| DigRver 258 2733 5510 57-00 +1.56 | eet atte Navten MAL 388). 3487 ee a5 | Simone 1900 Leg? ges TS 2 Lsudgennnnae eiearnk 1 LE SO Nee tk Sie ote
Be eee a aay: shan diay | DotA SAE 24.29 23.86 23.92 -.03 Naar ote 21 18s 1278 410 | Smplteh” {rat Meg bet eel 08 Pal CocitCe 7G _A88 08 cat ae PE Me
Biogenide 3599 SSL 49-0 S048 ee eek 1812. 1685 1631 1652 419| lACInter 1828 4015 39.63 3985 +11 | NetLogic 1090 2460. 23.86 24.18 +.05 om otyen ez ket 38 a0? guNTAL abate Ot iy eg
Bova 1808 A2AB 42.20 a0 He intee et SLR aE ee 75 +16) ICICIBR 2185 4367 42.00 43.61 +1.37 | Netflix 5167 23.19 22.20 22.60 -.30| Sixlags 2102 ae aE eta cig | Cooper Indus n x 42-2628 AQ Quest Diagnostics = Q 10 418
Bip UG Me ae fata | Dame, > ay mg 11.38 1185 soo | lease ise 2435 2467 2495 26 Netwide, Se dtar iba 19ys sLig| ening, N08 a2at alae aL “0 | gues Pekan ce Bacaie ts wal cop aise Bae
47 TAL TAL + e 03 3311 34.00 +70] IShBrazil © 7625 49.10 57 +. "O11 1720 +, sti OF ae = WOT RAL foie 226 3 orp 195 22300 34
Bog A AG LE At [Comes 212) 8756 6-70 9681-01) IShHK 1960 ae ae te Ca[aviimee 1808 2587 2500 2878 459 tne SS dead Tear 1208 49 | Nemetinc A ° od 5 pence Chit] ° 315 418 430
04 23.46 23.86 +. 10 26.75 26.90 +. apan 1490 1463 1480 +24|NewellRub 3205 31.73 3014 31.70 41. a 334336 +
Blocks 1482 os pal 658 +04|Domtarg 6812.-««8.01. 7.83 8.01 +18] ISh Kor 2182 50.64 49.87 50.43 +77|NewfldExp 2005 i139 4030 ALTO a i 138 et Catt Sian a ae
Boeing, #482907, 0.27, 02.84 +63 | Dov See ier 5007 S058 417 ishMalasia 5088 10.85 10.72 1075 407|NewmtM 7267 4656 45.78 46.30 +39] SonyCp 1635 52.04 51.40 cee Sha | donee RAINS OBS Se vee Supreme Indus Q 095 227. 35
Borand LMT S13 508 SAL +08 Dowchm $e) Ee Oe SA licieeg aie ait ine eo sal|Newscrs 1M 1497 24 2355 +8) Souinco 18 3670345 ESL + oon Ree b ate! Metionim acti og Ane dh AN
Bost ra 1704 W721 +09 : ‘ 19 + i . 09 +.21 | NewsCp 4190 2497 2469 2479 -.08| SthnCopps 2293 68.34 66.74 68.00 +.75 | Baylake Corp Q 16 3-1 ~—-3+15 Washington RIEstinv AIS 3 :
Duketgys 11380, 20.28 20.03 20:06 -12| iShTalwan 5485 1450 1422 1446 +36|Nexengs 1509 61.44 60.26 6045-09 | Swstin| 6947 16.14 15.76 16.09. +.29 | CNB Frcl PA Q 15 3235 : 0° saison brid a
'

4B

















INT
ERNATIONAL EDITION

M
ARKET REVIEW

a

NAV Chg.

MiamiH

_Aaminiera

erald.com | THE MIAMI HER
ALD




















































































1 ec
UT =
Tk ON
i .__NAV
GlbOppA KGDAX ltr Prem
a KHYAX Saale bt, cs
gd Muni 552 +0 va ee ee
NYIXA en 9.07 oh Ae rh ae
RREEF p aa 10.83 itt EqincB te 14.91 +.08 uly na "el .
The list incl StratincA te 29.44 -20 EqindB p li 2388 421 va vorx si sf han
the roe largest Techa Gu Tica nn HAAT 4.42 aed FVDEX re oe Each econ ‘ene
: ca —— en ATCA 1194 +21 ee oD 1033 +02 eae FSISX ae an Grain asco 2.82 4.23 aor PIFAX NAV Chg. | Fund Tkr.
set value. Tkt i urities D y 5 Scudder 40 +.03 SOBB LEK. tale a “al ae : e
Fund . Tkr is ti ealers. Drei ler CIC: 03) Ome EKIBX 7.04 +.06 iklw FW 5.46 +.68 ne oe ox | oe ih Fs
Zs fs : cr he ae WEX 20.79 GrSt “SGRX 30.26 +. CrpBdA PB 5.85 +.01 jassMutu ig. | Fund
Al NAV ol pw. CX 51.5 PreMtlB t E X 24,59 4.25 elity Selects: oes vain te, aah =
i = Se = cc is : : : ; ee oe Hot et 15.10 +.13 utltya PTYAX He i ee MIEDX 16.79 + Oppenheim Fund
AIMI p LCEAX 14.03 +11 aa WSHBX wy Cha. CorPlsine mens 52.09 +51 wire Ane ae +03 pet THOK ne x ot 7 i al : : is : : 4 : J
BasicBal stments A: el Mutual Fas: 57 +22 | EMMkin Si 12.69. +.05 vergreen C: 4.94 +.10 | Bi Nn — FBIOX a +16 | Smc pGCMAX 40, 5 +02 | JennisonD: 2151 +18 | Ra Sas ia Ba ‘2 =
p BBLAX AD : E CEMX 1 205 | Astallc * Hoke 6.65 +5 nCapA GS: ee me afi is i i, : i :
BasValA 13.54 yprec. CAA mMkGr 2.45 +.05 ICt EA Che FSLBX 51 St SMX 45 rowthC j isin ei a aa g ‘
p GTVLX +09 | Ariel PX 50.6 E TSEMGX 2 05 | Ome CFX 14.65 ‘hem FSC 78.39 41.3: rulnt p GC ea? 120 | Je rc = : = f : SI :
: : ae - ace eee FSCHX 7 32] Gg CIAX 15 5 | Tech 15.46 +19 | Asians X 17.28 ala p QI 74 +10 | PA OEGX 14 | Divi unds: Tk.
p ACDAX +.28 | Arti FX 55.3 Gl SCGEX 33 | E OCX 2465 +24 omequip 150 + ‘oldman S 5.47 +20 C _PTYCX 19] opi &l_ MAC 28 +.19 | QO AX 22.8 TE 9.47 +.0 ividend kr. NAV
ChartA 19.48 isan Funds: 33. +.45 NMA S 38.93 +. vergreen |: 65 +.25 | Cl ip FSDCX 431 ¢ achs B: .20 | Jenni 8.10 China SX 19.40 pptyA QVOI 86 +30 | R PTEPX 07 lend STMOX STIGrAd Chg.
rs fe afc ates 36 | C I; 25| Comp F 20.82. + ‘apGrB p : sonDryden +12 a MCHI 40 +.23 | OF QVOPK 30.8 src p O11 +, Multi-Ca 41.08 -.35 VFSUX s
Const p X 15.85 IbBdS r 14.73 + orBdl D FDCPX 4 37] G p GSCBX Growtl Z&l: Paci FX 25.67 ppenheim a aT 0 i a 2 e
z ae vat sat Sete ESBIX 1 fAar 0.87 +.45 incB p 20.97 +.2 WZ PIFZX 17. ger MAPT 67 +.22 | Ltd er Roch: xAp P 6.74 +.15 SunAmeri 43.91 + im VSMAX 02
5 : = $3 a in| nal E 0.43 +.04 | Elec FSDAX & 45 | Hi GSGBX 21 | Jensen J X 17.48 Mell X 24.26 INYAp L i TF TAEX A erica Ful 33 | TxMCa 34.08
‘S ls i is eae 04 | | EKIZX 04 | Electr 86.98 + i¥IdB p 29.41 +. JENSX 27. +21 jon Funds: 26 +.25 | LNY TNYX 3 nAp P 876 +.0 NwCenA nds: pr VICLX +11
: : = a rt Se + va 9.28 +01 | & FSELX 45 44 p GSHBX 20 | John Hi X 27.60 Em s: ; ct OL 40 +.01 | TF PNAX 1 01 nA p SEGA: TMG 70.05
p AEDAX +.45 | Mid RTKX 2846 +. G SCGDX 37} | ESICX 1 01 | Enray 45.10 + Goldm 8.23 +. lancock A: +19 gMkts MEM RoN TNCX 338 HYA 481 +02) Simp a. ae :
IntGvA 42.92 idCap A 46 +.27 roles 21.00 + ntleqh = 0.65 +.08 | & FSENX 99 an Sachs C: .02 | BondA A IntlFd KX 21 tMuC tO! 3g—* | US THAX 1 oe match 3) is
p AGOV +.60 | Mid RTMX 3 att SCDGX 29 igcpl EKZYX 1 08 | EngSv 49.55. +. CapGrc s C: p JHN M 39 +.26 | RON BN 12 “ eel os s f
= ae a i #21 ales 22.64 +, gcpeEql E 102 +.13 | Fi FSESX 6 10 GSPCX Classi BX 14.87 LoC| PITX 17.4 oNtMuB tORN! 84 +.02 | Vstad PGSIX 1 02 merica Fo +13 | TStkA LX 9,99
AIIEX 02 | SC TOX 2135 + Hi SCHLX 2 18 | Spe VSYX 1838 +. inSv 309 +03 | coldm 20.94 + sicVI p PZFV: .87 +.06 pstk MPL 49. +.19 | RoM BX 12.90 + p P 305 +05 | Felntes el =i a8
se 2 mn ees iVId Tx 6.10 +. pecval 38 +14 | Gi FIDSX 12 03 an Sach: 21 | HSCiA ° X 28.56 MdCy CX 1 uA p RMI 90 +02 | VO VISX 1 5 qc FIN USGI SAX 35.2
p IEGAX +.35 | SC RTSX 18. AZ| SHYTX 1 15 | St ESPIX 28 oldr 2.25 +1.0 CoreFxd S Inst: JHGRX 38! +24 pStk MPM 7 +.10 | Ren UNX 18 yAp P 174 +13 | TOW ee ak 33
LrgCGAt 25.50 ‘apVal A 58 Ct ntTkAMT 2.96 + 1Grol 33 +07 | H FSAGX 00 xd GSFI Lcps X 38.87 M CX 13 tMuA OR 79 +.05 | Putnam ee 2 = ral
LCGAX +30 | Al RTVX 18, \ SCMTX .02 | Excelsi ESGIX 3 07 | Health 3750 +42 | EMME IX 9.86 elp MSBI 87 +.23 ellon Inst 78 +11 | PI INAX 12 Fu 891 +22 | Pi i san a2
MdCpCe 11.89 tlas Funds: 49 +.01 ntl FdS 11.09 +.0 xcelsiol 0.80 +.34 | Hi FSPHX 1 ao) aed GEM 86. +.04 | ROBKA FX 19.33 Intl st Funds: IMCO Admi 87 +.03 | C nds B: 22 | DivFocus Ww VIAX 27 3
'q pGTAG) +11] 6 s: Ti SCINX 01} r Funds: 34 | Home 99,90 +81 | Hivield IX 24.74 FRB .33 +.12 lEqty : Shi min PIMS: apApr t : Ta om a i.
RealEst X 27.29 vtSec gCpvis 64.36 + mgMkt r k \ FSVLX 81 GSH +.38 | SmC AX 38.54 M SDIEX 4 tTmAd 3 C PCABX elEqty! 3.86 +.1 VVWIAX
p IARAX +.19 | Gi ASGMX l t KDCSX 80 rUMEMX nEqp OF 50.72 +53 | tM 1 IX 8.23 PEGA SPV 54 +.10 lergerFd 4.15 +.59 | 1 p PSFAX onvB t 21.93 +18 | T ae 3 an
: : : z is = oA sv ‘53 | HYMuni GHY 23. +.02 | Svin IAX 22.61 Meridi MERFX 15, 59 | TotRtAd 9.95 +.01 | D' PCNBX 18 | Tamarack 19.65 +31 | Wit inmVWENX 25
p GTSAX -.14 | St ASGIX 2 03} L SCQGX 2 16 UMBIX 55, 22 | Wnsur 32.46 +4 MidCay IX 11.55 wAp SOVI 61 +.03 leridian Ful 88-01 thd = PTRAX 1 01 | DvrinBt 1997 +.11| Mi ck Funds: BEd am
: 2 a ee 2 | Sa 5523 4.41 | Mater FSPCX AB pV GSMCX 41. +02 | USGIb IX 19.40 Gi nds: PIMCO I 0.36 +.04 | E PSIBX “1 | Microcpv. } VWNEX 65 38
15 TSAX 28 | M q SLAFX 6 27 nds: 41 | Material 7124 +35 | Sula X 41.06 dr USG 1g) crwth M inst! PIMS: .04 | EuE 9,90 +, pValTMVSX | Wasrltad 65.00 +
: | = - as ne im Me FSDPX 51. a gva GCVIX 15. +33 | John H LX 29.52 Val ERDX 41 AllAsset FLT PEUBX 3 02 | Value X 23.19 +.0 VWNAX A9
a = # tee i amiuee 432 | Value M 69 +17] C PAAIX KBt 0.22 +.41 TVASX 40.5 .02 | Van 63.56 +
ChartB t X 34.77 sset TFS SCI ‘og +01 | FBR Ful sii +50 | MdE SHCX 51 GCIIX +4.07 | Hivldc x i i i, el : = : i :
BCHT! +26 | Gi BARAX Pa MAX 14, 01 nds: gg | MdEasys.F 51.45 +.35 GrnCntBl ia mn a “f é = : : :
ConstB t X 15.20 rowth 62.94 +.44 Opps r SC 419 +.02 Gasutlid Mul SMEX 28.16 +. ICntBlp GCBLX +21 | Joh CX 5.75 T fest Fs: 27, | DevicMk 1399 + | Hlth PGIBX 2 02 | EmMS it: etn VAN
CSTBX +11] P BGRFX 5 Ad | SPS OPX 21.97 +. id r GASFX ultmd Fl 16 +05 | Suides 18.14 +, in Hancock 75 4.01 | lotRetBd Mi i Di rPLMIX 1 IthBt — PI 0.35 4.1 p TEEMX CAIT PX 29.5
EurGrB t 24.91 artners 1.85 +.1 00s Ss ‘97 +24 | mca 20.93 NtG BMPX 48. tone Ful 13 | LSA Cli: T WTRX ivinc 0.67 +.05 | Hiv HSBX 54. .17 | ForEqs aa me ae
: a = WE oo Hd aS sop | NGS F 96 +20 | CPOPG nds: gor J : fotRtBd! 9.74 +.04 | & PDIIX 1 o5 | HivldBt PI 37 +.48 | Thi TFEQX +34 C cAIX 1
HYIdB t X 40.57 mCap 3.77 +2 TmBdS S| 34 +15 FMIF 56.55 N SNGX 39 pGS4 GCOZ LSB; ILAX 15, . MWTIX 04 | EMMkBd 112 +.03 | Intl HBBX 48 | Third ia oe) ee
AHYBX +56 _ BSCFK 2 23) DW: CSTX 991 +. unds: agg | NatResr FN 51-01 | SIEAGS X 16.48 alanc J 29 +14 | Midas Fu 9.74 +04 | Fl PEBIX 1 ‘03 | IntlEqp P 8.20 +.02 |" salting “3 me
AIM Invest 459° Berkshire Fu 4.04 +.04 S Scudd 91 +02 | Focus Pa IARX 28, 4 GGBZX +.13 | LSC ILBX 14.68 ; nds: 04 | FitInc r 1.04 +05 | NwO OVBX 3: pay . Ee i
: i a | . er a 96 +.06 | SrincGs: 17.82 onsrv JIL 68. +49 | Midas Fd Fol PFIIX 10.60 + pBt PN 139 +37 TAVI Di HCOX 3787 +:
DivrsDiv or Cl: Focus : qBOOIL ; FPA Fi X 33.93 Retai PFX 34.9; 4 GGIZX +16 | [SGrwt! CX 13.47 MIDSX rBdUnr PI 60 +01 | OTC OBX 45. RIEstVI aes iY ee
: : 3 a o ee ‘92 17 | STEAGS4 14.90 he JIL 47 +.07 | Monetta 456 +13 | FF FUIX 10.01 +4 Bt PO 85 +44 1 TAREX 36. +.10 | Di DAIX 2 5
Dynm X 14.03 Bernstei 7.99 +1 WS Scud 10 +1.29 | Capit Soft RPX 56.4 GGEZX +.10 | LSMod! GX 15.12 i Funds: 33 FrgnBd PI 01 +.06 | Res He i a Z a
FIDY! +11 in Fds: 14] der Inv: i FPP wr FS 47 +37 | MtEaGs 18.54 Moder JILM 12 +.12 | MidCa Hiv! FORX 10. esrchBt PRI 28 +.06 ‘ap TASC: 61 +29] E VDIGX 2
: ‘ = e : ra ee a CSX 67.6 4 GIEZX 4.21 | Jul X 13.78 ip p MMCEX dP 13 +.01 | Vist FBX 15, Value X, 26.49 nergy 14.95 +
FSTE +.20 SNIDX I BTIEX 1 ic FPN 70 +.20 n FS “G1 +1.07 | Mares 19.59 ius Baer Fu 18 +08) Nona ss : | | a ‘ =; : :
a ka nd ae ntlEgS 63.43 +1.28 | PPAC IX 10.91 Tel PTX 70:7. 4 GMDZX +.23 | Intl nds: a MONTX og | Lowou P 96 +.02 | YovB TBX 10, Tho! X 61.89 Eqinc 6431 +
: , : = ue : 7 1a 9 a : MontagG 13.36 Mod TLOX 9, 4 yBt — PVO 14 +11 mburg Fd: 89 +46] £ VEIPX 18
Sh aa) +05 paMy 14.14 +, Davis Fu 33.26 + Fairhol X 26.74 Tra TCX 51.5 4 GVEZX +.05 | Intl JIEIX 45, gGr | MCGIX +12 | wo Dur PMI 89 +02 | Pu BX 16. Int SC Exple EIPX 26.05 +
. NDPX 01 inds A: 39 me FAI 74 +08) wire FS ‘55 +43 | Harb 19.28 EqA iB. 12. +65 | Morg oe . oe | = = 7
SummitP BCX - 15.24 NYMu 13.96 + NYVen A. NYVT Fed IRX 29.31 Wi RFX 55 jor Funds: +15 | Inte JBIX 44, organ Stanl ‘427 | RealRet_ 93 +.04 | G nds C: Th GCX 27, FLUT X 78.62
: i = a a Ha fess 76 +1.25 | Sond y qAt JET 19 +64 | Divath ley A: Re RAIX 11.03 +. rOppc p PI J jornbur: 94 +29 VFLT +49
AMF Funds: 13.30 +, xMgIntV 13.79 +, Davi 39.55 Amt : Fideli RLX 7.25 HAB Inte AX 15, A DIVA alRtnl =P 03 +.11 | Pu sae ! vs ‘ .
‘ 12 SNIVX 01 is Funds B: +.30 drA FAL idelity S 25. +08 | CAPA OX 11.61 qiitr J 74. +24 | EQWtdA an i ao me = = :
UItShrtMt Intval2 a7 4a7 | NYven8 : CapApA DX 24.96 Eqld partan: plnst HACAX 34. ‘6 sh © = oe zs j : : i
: =e = : 7 = na ee +23 | FocGroA 43.71 TotRt HX 9.9) yrincp Pi y BuildA t TI 27 +31 Ey VHGE +.04
2 E sa : = i i = eae +41 | Kin VX 26.84 : AMOAX +36 PTT 95 +.01 | Pui DVMX Int IBAX 20 Grol X 23.94
3 f 3 hh i ane +.20 kin FSE 60 +40 | intr 63.98 + etics Funds: +10 | Hivida yan +46 |e! RX 10.36 tnam Ful 9,89 +.02 ntValue! Tt 96 +.10 mic VQNPX 36: 4.26
CapAprt s B: Berwyn Fu 961 +65 | NYVenY Y: MktOpA 594 0G | eo MX 40.47 s iASCX | mee ! = a 2 : : ,
ACAP: Fi nds: DNVYX p FMAAX 06 x(nv fFSMK} gig | Scpvilnst 64.48 +. et WWF) iS GvtA 1.80 +.0 TRIII 9.84 lnc : eAt TVA 82 +31 4 VGE +.30
LgCpGBt X 11.43 und BI NYVen C 40.01 MuSech 12.49 - Intliny X 100.75 inst HASCX 94 | IntEmG ys a ne : es nh a - ‘ ‘
: : : = f ie : a a 8 a 21.90 + mGr WWWE 95 +17 | Morgan si 895 +02 | PIMCO 9.18 come P 0.75 +.1 TV 08 +.35 mp VWEH +.16
SmCapGr t X 11.06 come 037-1 Delafield 38.12 S GvtA ine? +02 | OM IK 45.96 g Loevnel 12 | Medic X 5.00 tanley B: 02 Funds A: +.04 | Intl NCYX 17) Thei IFX 41.6 HIthC Xx 6.27
‘ : : : : = ie rai 2) : ‘al MEDR! +06 | EvroB y B: AlAs : Eq Pl 6.81 +.0 hrivent Fds A: 69 +.36 re VGHCX 151.6 +01
Alger Fund: X 6.21 +. jirmMCG p BI 2.50 +.0 Dela 27.03 Federat 7.68 + Fideli X 40.89 r HLEMX tM 1 ss fe : | ‘ : ;
. 05 | Bl p BMCFX 21, “pg | Delaware Inves +16! ated B: “og | Fidelity Spart +.29 | Hartford 45.49. + WWNPX +20 | FocGroB 22.70 + ComRR |AX 12.63 loy 2) ae cos ee s
MidCpGrl s Inst: jackRock A: ‘on +1g | Diver In t A: ALdIBt EqldxA art Adv: lord Fds A: 52 | LSWValE 26.76 +21 | Slbdi AMOBX 26 p PCRAX 63 +.06 | RS YYX 19.56 +: Lgc HYX 5. Intl: SX 11.82
: 2 = i = 3 ae 1 DivB WI +. LwDurA 1379 * Funds: 56 +.22 ycpstk AA 20° xplr VIN 82. +.07
zg c Ss a ne Aust 35,02 +15 | OMA X 51.61 pb ITTAX Laudus 19.94 +15 |!" GLBBX 1 A PTLAX Co Midc LGX 28.7 IntlG EX 22.50
: i s : : : rt "Rt auth Funds: “5 | IntlvalBt I 6.70 +.1 RealRtA 9.89 +, rEQBt GU idCpGr LBM 10 +.21 r VWI 50 +35
SCapVI I; apA pMDi 39 4.14 | bead WS +, aufmB p 549 +0 IntAd 1 EVX 40.48 Di p ITHAX 13 | IntIMstrl Pa VQBX 13. 14] Pp PRTNX 02 | Core PBX 37. Midc GX 16.3 IntlVval GX 24.80
apVip_AMRI BaVIA CPX 27.9 l p DEGIX 03 | Fe p KAUBX 5 09] 5 FSIVX 4.19 | DivGtha ee oo Ss Ae = i : = : i ,
AllianceBel X 19.21 +, p MDBA 95 +1 | LOCPVIA 16.29. +.22 ederated 572 +05 | eee FS 45,96 +.64 | Fl p (HGIX 2 (43 | Intsmcp 21,60 +.27 | SP50 RBX 20.79 +: PTTAX 07 | RSIA SFX 35.1 MuniBd X 16.93 ITIG IX 41.93
: C : : : | ‘le 33 a [SPP 79 +24 | PIMCO Fu 10.36 +.0: ge p RSI 14 +.36 AAMBX 11. gq | Mirage AFG 3 457
. #3 ss oe i596 81 PXHFLAX 10.16 Lazard I 2.23 +27 | SPV IBX 15.2 T nds B: .04 | RSNER FX 16.18 Tocquevi K 1131 Isr CX 9.72
p CABN! GIAIA X 20.17 TP, ELTX 20. “19 Mk AUCX 5.7 : I rFSTVX 40.8 “7g | MidCpA p H 16 JE nstl: 27 lB SVFI 27 +.12 RRB t ; sp RSNR: 8 +.23 queville Fas: et ° se a
BIWIStrA pA X 18.32 +, rt MDLO! ea1 | Pade D 96 +.24 tOppc FMRC 52 +05 First Ar 40.89 +29] 4 FMCX 23 mgMkt! USG BX 16.2 PTTBX RSPart X 32.17 Gold t st Lifec TX 10.74
e ie X16 2 Y MRCX 1 08| oa Fas ¥: 29 | Hartford Fd: J71 +2 LZEMX GvIB_-USG 05+ | PIMCO Fu 10.36 + rt RSPFX 36. +12 Tou ifeCon VSC 74 +.04
aievine pABWAX 13.95 vincly CCGA way] Kusano TD to2 | Federated 239-02 | Cree ; i i >| aa _ : : : : :
ANAGX 7. #10 | HivinvA X 10.70 De MTFX. 1162 -03'| Instl: 02 FFUIX ‘pAppB ; jason: Fd 3 UTL 97 4,02 | AllAsset K sr Ba vl .
= 8 “s +13 | pelawae 62. +.03 Ai Vid Eqicp Fi 10.99 p IHCAX Oppt-Fl Valu BX 15.6. t_ PASCX SmCoGi X 28.99 Fund Ss: Lif SGX 24.5
: = 2 3 a : S ae. +04 | Hartford 35.38 + p LMOFX ep VLU 63 +10 | COMRR 12.53 + iCoGr p RSSG 99 +24) 10 ifeinc 59 +.20
; E i 2 i che 1099 rd Fs C: 38 | Opport 20.80 M BX 14.9 p PCRCX 06 | Raini X 21.82 T RYX 43 Life ASIX 14
: : : =. : oS “ 3 9 LMOFK 20 +28 organ Stan! 197 +.10 | RealRic 13.64 - jer Inv Mgt: +13 | Touchsto A312 447 ifeMod VS .11 +.07
GrowthA X 4.56 p MODLV 12 | lntleast 18.97. +. MidCap 5.94 +.06 Intl 26.96 pc t HCACX Spiny X 20.41 Fo ley D: p PRTCX .01 | SmM gt: M ne Family: i SMGX 2 :
: p AGRF: +.03 | S&P500 X 19.78 Se DEIEX 10 | Fidel FMDCX 06 FAICX +21 | FitRatec 35.55 p UMASX. 41. “£3 | FoeGroD AM Hi TotRtC t 10.66 +. Cap RIM CpGrA , i ae
: : z 2 z z ey nf ns Hoe +.38 | Vallr 41.74 Invi ODX 30. PTICX 07 | S/MC SX 38.84 TEGAX U WESX 14
AHYAX +50 | Black 17.84 DVEBX 2 ly Adv Foc A: bl oe? FISGX +.22 | Hartf 10.16 p LMVIX +50 ald IV 57 +47 | PIMCO 10.36 +, pinst RA\ 27 A ee zs e
, = = - = ee ie Saute +.01 | Leg 74.43 M QDX 13 Funds D: .04 | Re ISX 39.3: A: 22 VUSTX 08
p AWPAX «| GIAIB C: led Trust: | ore FACDX agle: . +.54 | Capa A: 9 Mason I +64 | MorganStan 69 +15 | COmMR ynolds Ful 3 +28 cio i
= is ro nies 3: Fidelit B21 4 GIDIA apApp — HIAC) ValTrF nstl: N ley Ins ; R pPCRD: BIC inds: p IMLAX VMRGX 09
2 ae s : ast ity Adv Foc +.12 SGEN DiscE X 55.11 Ip LMVI tint! t: TRtn X 13.80 hGrp Rl JanGro\ 13.19 Muy 19.58
LgCpGrA 23.02 t MCL 11 +.13 | Dimensi 24.14 Energ Tt Over X 47.02 iscEq HIN +.59 | ValTr FX 80.5 E MSACX p PTTD lo BCGX 3 Wp IDETX +09 VWAHX +18
pAPGAX +.26 | GlbVal OX 17.4 nsional Fads: 44 | ET HAG seasASGO! 02. +33 | Div&G GX 14.42 inst LMN' 5g | EmMkt IM 16.74 +.21 | Pax Worl X 10.36 polyp 118. +.25 | TAID 25.86 * Mulnsl 10.87
2 : “ 2 wal ‘ Be SNX 40.94 SGenci VX 25.78 rHIA +.10 | Leg VX 82.8 c GEMX 21 id: 4.04 | Ri OPPX 1 25 EX C: 6 g VIL) +.01
: = : : ae vol oan ¢ va} a a ig Masol 86 +71 rPIFInst 29.94 +40 | Baa verSo 366. +15 | ASAIM : Mulnt X 12.60
: * cal ae — mana ee X 21.30 drs HIALX 20. +.18 | AgGi n Ptrs A: \ MPFIX 1 “4q | Balanced PAX' B urce A: : od t IMO wit +.02
p ALTHX +02 | BlackRo X 13.86 V DFEVX 33! +27 aT FACTX. 22. +19 hand Funds: 4.33 | Grwthoy ae ie a a ee = : :
: : a aks as tea ee eco nds: ithOpp HAGO +.25 | AD RAX 117, I MSISX 2 03 h PXWe 22. +21 | Di INMUX Gr t IML 52 +.08 id VMLT +.02
: ; = -E : alee cn x 2076 prdp SH 96 +.97 ntlEq 5.50 +29 | Payd GX 13.00 ispEqA 1130 +07 | ASAIS LX 13.1 MuLor X 10.70
TMgBIWI Q 27.98 etl CC LgCol X 22.27 Utilities F X 18.43 GlbTe QX 4.2 ers HADA +.31 | Capl IAPX 15. \ MSIQX 2 ydenfunds: +17 | DI p AQEAX 07 rt IAAI 3 +.09 ong VWLTX +01
pAGIAX 12. +.16 | Bl BBX 9.5 idx DFUSX 11. £30 | alata FAUFX. 20. 437 [eae ST 26. +.05 | Stock X 23.07 apincA SO! 70 +11 ntlEqB p 133 +23 | Mk ss rE Z17 +05 | © LX 13.5 MuS UTX 11.2
USGovtA 12.70 jackRock 50 +03 | IM US X 11.40 Fideli AUFX 20.37 Tec! FQX 47 HSTA +17 | Fav PAX 17 Ltd MIQBX 2 23 | MktRet_ PY Di INDZX ‘o5 | Turner Funds: Mii a a
GovtA p ABUSX + | Intl Instl: Sm DFTSX 27. +.09 | pj ity Advi +13 hinny TI 70. +07 | Mdex X 54.05 alNp SHI 29 +.11 Dur 113. +22 | Pen MRX 11, ivrBd 13.20 +11 | Mid si NL STX 15,
Alliance: 6.16 ntivalr = MAI USLgC X 27.37 Divi sor A: Tect FOX 10.0: HIA +.48 | LOC FVX 16. M MPLOX “57 | PennMtC p R 98 +.08 | 0 INBNX “11 | MidepGth 7 T 57 +.01
: a # a4 ie ou gCpGAp SB 56 +.13 CapGr Mi 10.27 +.01 | Phoeni NPCK 1125 +, vOppA 4.85 +.02| MGFX 30 NY VIUTX. 1185 +
IntValAdv Adv: BaVll MAI 03 +.40 | UStva X 42.75 EqGrA AX 23.79 4 Tech V QX 20.32 {Opp HIAOX +.26 | MoM LGX 24.53 MCG PEGX 29 “01 nixFund 25 +.04 | Eavi WM |S ne a :
ABIYX BalC: BAX 34.4 a OFLVX +33 At EPGAX 5 +36 al TVF " «| MidCa 15.84 + WA pSHMMX 15. +26 rAd pMA 00 +.23 | Bal s A: qVal p 22 +.05 | Sl rowne: PAL NYTX 1
= _ ns alee 25 ie 53.04 +6 For QX 39.31 pp HIMCX .19 | MCay X 15.6 Sr CGX 28. janA PHI Gi IEVAX 1 5 | GlobVal T vl 27 +.02
ianceBern B: .26 | TotR CPX 28.0 Vas DFUVX ' ie Let - FEI gq | Forward Funds: 31 4.54 | TotRetBd tat + a eo: ok 7 : !
BalanB t B: etl BEM 3 +19 | US Micro 20.33 +.15 MdCpA 30.33 + Hoovs ids: HIABX 25 | SocAWA X 21.84 USLC SGX 13.71 pGrA PHI 92. +.09 | Hil INIDX 3268 +. BS Fund ie ve nS
CABB GIbAll CX 9.48 U DFSCX AS Ap FMCDX 25, 2 SCap FFSC Hartford 1134 + p SSIAX 21. +.16 pGrAMSE 76 +.08 | EmMk RX 16.04 ividBd IN 68 +.33 | D: s Cl A: 19] p PMX. 29
EmMObtB X 17.33 loc r MALO +03 | US Small 16.15. +.0 Nwinsgh 3551 4.22 | Fra X 21.50 tford HLS IB : .05 | Legg M 21.26 USR QX 21.5 tA PEMAX 8: +14 | Hivd EAX 2.9! ee = Le
= E co 3 me 22) ante 50 bag | Advisor ; 9 Mason Ptrs +11 eal MSU! 51 +30 | Srinca X 8.94 TEA IN 99 «= | Gi tBNAAX P PCCX 1 :
GrincB p pAGDBX 8.90 | MAFG) 1a | USSmva 22.10 +05 StrlA ror +18 | Ace p Frnk A: sp HAIBX AgGrB B: Muh SX 31.1 ; POI +.05 | Intls HYX 4, lobAllo t ae ca re
CBBD. +.03 | NatM X 20.67 | a DFSVX rh eae FSTAX 1 +18 SEAp AGEF : | Capa 23.25 "Bt SAGBX 10: lenk = MUH' ‘16-16 | MidGi AX 17.89 elVip API 40 +.01 rae ns °
LgCpGrB t X 4.48 un MANLX 10. £2, | lntlsmco 30.84 +. Fidelity Advi X 11.76 +03 | Ballnv ERX 2 apApp p_HIBCX +17 | Alloc7 BX 104.5 Munder LX 87.97 TA PHSKX 17. +.15 | Loc APIAX 10.9) UBS Fu 14.42 +, elValu r 149 +8
APGBX +.03 | S&P50 X 10.56 Gi DFISX 10 Advisor B: “gg | Balliav FR 15 +01 | W&Gr 54.80 OpcBSGRI 52 +.85 Fund: "97 +.86 | MUIFIA X 17.25 pEqp ALI 98 +.13 inds CIC: ll VASVX 86
= ; E i. eae : ce aK 2 ‘0 p HDGBX +.59 | CoreB BX 13.84 Mdc s A: NAM +14 | MC EAX 6 Globall : STAR 22.09 +
p ALCB: +19 | LgCpCi X 17.89 E DGEIX 2d FGIS isAp Fi 67 +59 | TotRet 23.34 ‘oreBdB t TRB 84 +.10 pCGr tMGi MulsS| FX 11.08 CpGrA IN 04 +.05 op BNPC: VGsTX 14
TMgBIWI X 11.02 pCri MALRX +14 | EmgMkt 15.43 +. Fideli X 19.51 Call BDIX 61.7 and Fis. “a ea ee : = - i :
IgBIWI p AGIBX +02 | Bramwell 14.90 Fi DFEMX 2 12] ity Advisor C: 51 +17 | op nsAp FR 7g +44 | Heartland 11.28 + ncial p SBFB) ee ne cals : = : Z : : :
= : i: Se : ci oi 6h Fas: 04 | FVAIB X 16.22 Hlth inds C/I: PHRAX +.01 | Strt VAX 9.3 Int€qt s P: STred 10.57 +
iancel + | Growth : Gi DFIHX 1 Ad C FADC FA FPR 2.69 +.02 | Value valBt — SFVBX 22 +14 thcreC pMFI i. ; 40.04 - trtgcAlA IMR aN ee puck Ee
Si : a . , 1g + | Nivlnsah X 22.92 FedTF TX 11.98 HRTVX HilnB t 15.43 Mi HCX 24. ixFunds B: 22 | RiverSo FX 11.87 LCGEP 20.20 STTsr 10.28 +.
| a: a ae be be +02 | Hend 52.37 SHIBX 7. +12 | Munder Funds 29. +13 | CapGrB : eck Bet A +09 PCLCX 18: +24 y VFISX 02
i " ie +.19 FxIn 37+ | Fidelity Advi 18.60 FIxCpG IX 12.13 lerson Gibl +.06 | LgCpGB 7.07 MC Y: 8B PGTB) DEIt : LCGEqP X 18.55 Straten 10.27
S 1 : i FOX 1 idelity Advisor I: +16 pGrA FKCG) 13. +.02 | Into Fas: t SBLB +.02 pCGrY rM ee EmMkt X 14.67 ID qP—-PCLV: +.18 q VSE +.01
LgCpGrc t 22.65 BL a 26 +04 | OV! or I: FIRLDA X 44.4) ppA p HFO Leg X 22.87 RI TMGOYX 2 mMKtB p PEM +.12 | Loc EBX 13 UMB rag ut or
APGC. +.25 | Bnd UEX 32.8 Int DFIVX 2425 +33 | 2! i) p FAF 44 +.55 | He AX 24.4 g Mason Ptrs a7 +.24 | RIEStEY M 667 +22)? BX 8.71 pEqt AL ar eit ‘ eh :
USGovtC t X 18.97 lywn BRW .89 +.41 ntVa3 25 +33 | VG VIX 24,1 FLTFA RX 10.09 nnessy Fu 46 +.35 | AggG Cc: URYX 2 22 r Funds +.05 EBX 5, Worl fg uf tae
7 ABUCX +.19 | Brid IX 35.5 Gib OFVIX 22 i tht FD 14 4.37 p FR . +|C inds: ggGrc SAG * Mutual Seri 6.36 -12 | Cull A | mie io , al z-
Alli 6.77 Igeway Ful 56 +27 SFxInc DF 83. +3) | EXGE GIX 13.85 Founda ones va 2 ms : : 7 s: : : 2 ;
ianceBern I: * | USCM nds: LCa GBX 10.60 EQPGX 56. +.08 Ip FFALX 14: +.02 | CorV CGX 18.8 eC SHICX 7. +87 | FinSvzZ ClassBa ‘CX 20.67 nape l a 2 = a
: -: a i. = : ore all X 7.07 B TEFAX 2 IA AOBLX +.17 | Roy SCX 21.82 +: ALA investors: Tgth VX 13.42
. ARIIX Brwnsi IX 19.99 TMUS: LX 25.1 EQPIX 31. +.69 AFKRCX +.09 | Focu NX 15.9 ]g Mason Ptrs o7 +01 | Beacnz 8B 3.87 +17 | EaUncA 10.95 ce Funds: a2 +06] Bstne “ = .
Allianz Inst! 19.14 -.0) mci BCS +.08 SV DTM! 9 +30 | Nwins X 31.13 GrvthA a ag Fn tl : : : : : i 2 7
-.07 | Buffal IX 34.91 TMI VX 26.22 gt! FINSX 19. +23 p FKGRX +39 | Heri FX 13.50 gGrolt SAGYX 12 0 co] ee = % a s :
NFIDWI MMS: lo Funds: ar (aunt DIMIX 20. +07 | Fideli INSX 19.16 HYTFA 4371 ritage Fu 50 +.10 | LacrG mk al en et ef =) HH :
es Bala TMMKt IX 20.71 ty Advisor T: +17 p FRHIX +.35 | Gr& nds: pGrl SBLY: .21 +1.01 uropZ MI 10 +.2 IntivalA 11.14 icroCapl R 75 909 mt a - =
Allianz Fu NFIEX 17.72 ncd BUF twVDTMM: +9 | BalancT rT: IncomA ae why : th : - 5 Pioneer i s 3 |
3 : : i EE = he - rat ak nar ay ualfdZ M 6.10 +.27 MdCVA 25.41 +. pptylr RY 19. +.09 hr USE 92 +11 Bal VT! 78 +.12
= , et : a a o ea 2 +0 Ap HRI 33. +.07 | Equi 0: Sha QIFX 23.04 +. Pi p PCGRX 33 | PennMul PNX 1367 +, Holm RX 16.17 TM MFX 20.3
: : : : iE : As ae Mase : resZ_ MUTH 04 +.17 ionFdA 23.85 +. nMul r PENI 67 +.05 esGr ACB 17 +.16 Int TR 38 +.09
SmCpV A 17.55 inds: +21 q DTMEX +.12 | DivGrT 23.55 + TFA p) 12.26 +.0 pHMCAX 97 +.01 | Leg RX 15.77 Navelli X 27.1 p PIODX 19 | Premi INX 11.9 USChi Be ane Us6 =
PCVAX +14 | CapD' 2YGIFxd 15.35 p FOGTX 36 | NY FMISX 1 .02 | SCapA 29.08 9 Mason 7 +13 lier v7 +27 | RIEStA 49.90 + jerl r RYP Coane vn a z. “3
RCMTch t 32.58 y LOMC . DFGFX sea | EMAINT FF 13.65 + InsA p 191 +0 pA pHRSC +.24 | DvS Ptrs 1: Mid : Vi PWREX 50 | Speck RX 18.40 WidP OX 10.5 us VIMSX 26
RAGTX +.06 | Focu X 29.06 OFARIE w4i9* FAEMX .08 | NY FRNYX 1 -03 | Hotchki X 37.54 trl CSGWX Ik idCpG NPI 3 alueA 36.60 - qir RYS! ee Anup ae = ul
Allianz Ful 41.81 s CGM 434] pi DFREX EqGrT 12.40 + TFAp 158 +.0 ichkis & Wi +.05 | Leu WX 18. Ne MOX 32 alueA p _ PIOTX 23 | TotR ee nat on 3 “
: r S et s z rat | ts ete iley: thold Funds: 73 +14 leedham 52 +39 17.19 + etl RYT! 40 Group: 39. 432 | Uovalue V 1888 +.23
TargetB t B: CGMRX 29: +25 fied Inst: 27 | Ealut 53.04 +.64 isDvAp FRI 1.78 +.02 eVall_ HWCL on {com : oe “| 2 AE i : : S
f PTAB: CRM Fu 29.57 - Stkldx 3 G FEIRX 3 64 | SMC DPX 3697 +. LgCpVi X 15.05 Invst LCO ener ; = : : "i : :
Allianz Fu X 20.37 nds: 08 p _ DISFX rOppT 0.69 +2 pGrA FR ‘or +24 | tgcp al HWL aie — = rt 3 z= : 4 : 2 : :
: He es 2g ae ee 1] Strat SGX 4011 + LoCpVIA IX 26.50 leaf 26 +14 72 +22 11.20 +.03 | Di HI Funds S: +.09 tr USC 38-436 | Welt. 2.13 +10
NFIDWVIt vil CRIMX al&inc p _DIVIX ‘or | Hilnadt p FAH 38. +44 tine p_ FRST sIL +49 pHWLAX +.15 | Parti : Foc Inv: H Funds C: .03 | DivBdS : EmgMk\ RX 27.45 Wi WELK 33.06 +.
: PNEC: Calam 31.53 Diversifd 170 #12 | Mide YX 10 USGov X 10.34 MCpVIA 3.3 “7 at : = | 5 E :
Allianz Fu X 17.43 10s Funds: +23 Inv Fas: “1 | Midepr p FM 84 +.02 SovAp FK +.03 | Mi pHWMA’ +.15 | Intl LPFX 36. Genesi BSSX 3 i PYICX DivEgS X 23.24 FStrt AX 20.5 Wi WNDX
: ae 7 = | : aan isn ee MidCpVi X 31.13 Lu 90: 4:34 [en NB 2.33 +32 1131 +. aS RDESX 50, +11 Gr UFSG: 57 435) Wadsll Vv 19.26 +.1
3 : = 3 oS nie wie A Es 42 4.02 | Hi fal HWMIX +.14 | SmC INX 19.61 Gen GNX 34.64 E Adv: 03 | EmerMkts X 50.04 GNMA X 10.66 V. WNFX 35 15
tech p DRBN Gr&incC 19.54 fal&inc 23.19 +. smile X 189 Frank/ X 14.27 jussmnst ae is Sve a s a S E 2 :
Alpine Fu X 25.45 t CVTCX +11 DVEIX 19 pTp FSC bond? Tmp Fm +.08 } IC rGIHSGFX Hf cn = a = = : : :
nds: +29 | Gr&incA 32.40 +, Dodge&Ci 9683 #24 | 2nT TX 23.07 FATE A k Adv: M SmCo eae ise als f ay = al : :
= con 26 | B: OX: BM Fi FSIAX IL, +17 dv FAFIX. 12) Ico ICSCX 39. .02 } LSBo es: Intl r JAX 19.43 Hiv! TRSAX 32 0 | MstrtBdS 78.60 +.9 Gr&inc X 15.82 + VFINX 1
: = : : : mi 2 nn eae nd LSBI NBISX 24! + ig| vide Pi 34 +38 | RMSSX 1 96 USGRX “19 | Balanced 34.28 +1.
IntIRE X 13.22 G p CVGRX 26 | | DODBX ity Freedom: +04 FRIAX +02 | Condisc LSSCV DX 14.51 Manh X 24.94 Val AHIX 7. uantEgs Rt Te a ne a =
EGLRX +13 | GrowthB t C' 55.55 +.6. income 89.46 +.5 FF2000 om: Frank/Tk AX 2,69 onDisc | C" Nec ao a â„¢ ae : Le i : !
a na c ae 63 | | DODIX 55 FFFB emp Fr +.01 | Eql CCCX 13. Strine X 27.41 Partne X 9.66 Pri AVLX 27.73 +. ecS 233 +31 | ne 17.36 + VDMIX 14
AIGYX ag | Growth tC 6.74 +.6 ntistk er +04 | Zot X 12.65 Incom nk B: incl p 63 +.11 C NECZX 15, +.09 NPRTX. 31. +11 ice Funds: 13. +.23 | Sh RESX 60. 31 USAIX 11 | EMkt 13.14 +
Amer Bea 29.85 VGCX 52.48 6415 ODFX 04 FFFC: +.04 NBL p FIC HI IOEIX 1 LSBo X 15,05 SocRe: X 31.92 Bal DrBdS HS i _ < :
~12 | Calvert Gi 2.48 +.5 tock =D 4574 +60 | ee! X 14.94 Income BX 271 theare IC rare oP fet : — Je é 2 e
: = SE a af ated “ys ae AK StrincA X 14.46 Neu X 26.67 BIChi RPBAX 2 pecGrs aes 403 | 10.04 + VEURX +37
: : fF : ae me a an ech ICT AG +11 NEFZX +.08 +26 | BiChio 1.79 +16 | Ru! SPSX 52.69 +. N USIFX .04 | Extend 37.58 +.
Amer Be 2430 +20 | & CFICX \ oc Inv: FFFDX .08 Temp Fro +0] | Materi EX 9 Lord Abb 14.99 Genesi Tr Ci RBCX 3 4 ssell In 9 +33 | Nasda 0 28.17 + VEXMX 56
e 0 gCpGr t 16.85 +.0 SclEq FF2025 X 15.96 + Found p Frnk C: erials ICB en a _ a : 2 4 a2 ; :
es a eS aia 06 | Soc! DIEQX 20. FF FFIWX 13. 12 Alp FFACX : ING Fu MX 1255 4 AMIA p Partner 49.55 + DvSi WCX 2115 + qll REA’ recMM UU 5.63 +.09 joc VFTSX +19
- : Es - : Sa mc ns +.05 LAFFX N NBPTX aq | bvsmGr PRO 15 +12] & SX 34, S& SAGX 2892 +, Growth 9.57 +.
LgCapInst 24.67 Cambi: EX 38. D SEFX 34, i FFFEX 16. 0 t FCISX +.09 | Cor A AllvalA 15.62 jewalt 24.64 DivG SX 14.98 qQi_ oR 14 +.34 P idx 92 +3 VIGRX 08
‘AADEX +31 biar Fu 26 +30 reyfus: 44 +32 2035 e534 | Franky 272 pldrA LEX LOFVX +.10 | Ni NALFX +22 ro PRD 98 +.09 | Intl EDSX 38.77 +: : use 2 |i
SmCpinst 24.56 0 inds: A 32 | FF FFTHX 13 4 Temp M +01 | Hivld XCX 22.5) BalStratA es N ral i. | 3 : : 3 2
: = = mA 653 +14] Bac tl A&B: Ap HY. 52 +21 LABFX 08 | Nj Grou 62 B PREMX 13: +22 NSX 49.00 +: Shi USPRX 2 18 | LTBnd X 10.24
Amer Bea 262 +07 | ° MWX A DRBDX | FFFX 9. eacnA TE : IntVs AX 9. BdDebA rat ih t : : 3 Ryde: : : : ,
‘o7 | Oppinv 20.74 +.1 prec 13.51 +.0 ncome 079 +09 | DSA BIX 17.42 ala p NIV ah ci al : 3 uf = a \
: 3 : = “he mi ‘at «oe AX 21.35 HYMnBd Bl + Nichit) 60.17 +, EmMktS X 33.13 ggStrc p RALCK Fin OU 8.87 +.02 ap VIMSX 20. +.10
AAGP! Capstone: 72 +17 siCS&P .13 +29 idelity I "i ‘6G +03 | EUTOPA 31.76 aA p LETR 35 +.28 | Mi pHYMAX 02 NCLEX , +58 PRMS! +.34 | Bal od . a He ze
SCpPlan X 23.47 G S Di DSPIX 30. 29] A invest: pAp TEM +.29 | ING X 62.97 idCpA 15.98 + 20.20' +. Eqinc X 32.99 StrCp Ri 69 +.10 ae 1 28 4 ce :
2 3 - 4 = on at LE less p LAVLX 02 I 12 PRFDX 30. +33 BLCX 1229 + TE SATX 13.19 +. REIT CX 13.0.
Amer Centu 216 +07 | C2 TROFX D Pe aeace aes DEGX p TFSI +.27 | Intl 5 rp 2 ) : f Rydex H Class: = / :
= : = iE i ne beet SCpB p NAI T LRSCX 13 NTHFX ex PREIX 39. +.20 | Ba R3: -08 | TxES USTEX 1 02 | Smc SIX 28.2
Eqinc p ry Adv: insti ay Intl: .05 | DryMi REVX 10. -26 | AN ‘ASMX 16 18 t TEQIX +.17 | ING pee’ “e sn no = 2 ; : : q
5 3 = aa oe ete LANSX 1 : NTHEX +22 PRESX +31 p RBLOX 12 VAI SSTX 10.60 +. Smic ESX 34.0
Amer 76 +.05 |!" r CIVIX 20.40. Dr50 SPX 31.13 +. AM SGX 1674 +. cA TESIX 26 +.16 | JPM mVI p LAI 153 +0; 788 - Extindx 21.13 +. x Dynami 39 +0 LIC : 60 +.01 pGth VI .06 +11
: Centu os | Investor r 0:40>4.2 OInt PEO! 13 +.20 gr20r F 14 +.12 SharesB a ve : e i = i : |
: : = a Se Se “| Pas FLAp LA 370 +06 | HX FinSves 1724 + nvSP500H ntlEq Cpvl_ VI 31 +10
= 35 | TBE 2 ae ma * a 95 +.24 | TN FIX 473 +4 NOFIX G PRISX 07 | tn RYTPX 3 Md VCIEX 1 STB SVX 177
z ae sn Eng ie gas BlueC LX 20.08 «| Frank/Temp Mtl C: 16 | TRPG! EIX 50.0 YAp W 73. +01 | CE 9.87 NMA 22.15 + vOTCH R 0.13 -.46 Cpldx V 0.71 +.1 nd OV 14 +.02
ee are 3 eae 08 +12 | Piscct Cc: rEql ITC 01 +.42 | Lord NYX 1126 +02 | NOGEX +.04 | G PRGMX 20 | OTC YVNX 16.28 -! SciT MIDX 24 -13 | TotB BISX 9
: : : E = eile Mc: ee IX 61.12 tt B: 6 +02 | HivFxinc 16.62 + rowth =P 9.36 +.03 HRY 28 -.58 iTech VC! 79 +.16 nd = VBR 89 +.02
BEQGX itizens Fu 92 +.20 GNYMX 02 la FICDX 437 | SharesC UT 31.52. +.2 ,M,Q&d: +.72 | Affild B: I NHFIX 14 | Gr& RGFX 3259 +. SaP5 YX 24.4 smC| STX 12.85 Totll MFX 9,9)

: : a ie , vie Hi 8.27 + rain 59 +.38 00C pRYTN 40 +.82 pdx VC +20 ntl Vt 99 +.04
‘E = vn seh 415 | Frank/Te 2666 +16 | IntV pQ NAG! Bd FBX 15. \ NOITX 01 | HithSci RGIX 2: X 49, Stk SLX 18. Tot GTSX 18
FLMuBnd IX 876 Cit! WAIDX 2 UGrinR 18.30 + CapDevO 28.53 + emp Tem 16 | IntVall vee et oe a = = B 3 7 : : :
= : : 2 fee x NG 13. +.83 | Lo NBX B12 +, I T NOINX 01 | HIV HSX 2 19 | MC : Valu TIX 37. V SMX 35.

GNMAI 10.63 Ci AEGX 1 .23 | MdcpVI 16.50 Cplncr 12.91 p TEDMX Re ae, es. “3 . : c S : :
: : : e a : a e ¥. 36 +.28 | Af tt C: ‘ NOIGX Intl RHYX 16 pRYMDX Value Li CULX 9 “ VIVAX 25
Gift X 10.16 Cli WAGEX 2 21 | MunBd 34.26 Chinak 9.03 Gi p TEMFX 45 | NoA\ fildC p LgCapval ee roe =e 3 i e :

= - . & : a ae X 14.05 + joAm p NO) Bai LAFCX 1 S NOLVX 20 | IntDi RPIBX OL | Bi 36 ine Fd: 10 Inst! Fds: AT
GlGold 23.24 Coh CFIMX 93 21 | NY Tax \X 11.89. +. Contra 24.99 +.19 | & p TPINX 16 | IXIS Advi AMX 7.3 DbC’p * BI 5.64 +.10 mCpGr 14.05 + tDis PI 9.56 +.07 Biotech ) ca =
BGEIX 19. +32 jen &S 38 +.74 rt DRNYX 02 a FCNTX 9 +19 | SISCOA X 1101 + Advisoi 32. +.03 | MdC DLAX 8. 10 | 1x NSGRX 11 | Intl ROX 4974 + Mi a e ci
GI Grwth 19.71 \ teers: NYTEr 14.81 CnvSe 66.65 p TEMGX 05 | Hi Cl A: MACVG. «L 13 +0 Expt 13.82. + Gal 74 +63 | 22.56 ‘onv 509 + | DvMiktins! X 21.84
TWGG: +25 | InstlRity DRNIX +.03 | pi FCVSX +60 | Grwtha 953 +, arFocVl NI Lord AB AUMCCX 2 03 | NOTEX 06 | Intl TRIGX 1 Z "ain “- we 3
Growth! X 1.17 | CSRIX SmCStk 17.95 DisEq 26.49 p TEPLX 07] H RSAX 1 2.09. +.12 echnly 10.46 +.0: ae Tat 234 a me : ' S :
wthl TWCG V7 a1g | mtiRitya 62.43. - r_ DISSX +.02 | pi FDEQX +12 | WorldA p 26.30 + aruCVIAN 1.80 +.08 | Af tt ¥: 12] us NTCHX 1 02 | Jay PRITX 17. RYNVX +.08 VLIFX gg | Eurolnst. VE 02 +.18
E E | = ie a = me | te 24] Ls EFOX 1 08 | AfY Govt. Ni 257 +1 pan Pl 31 +.24 orc 32.09 + Inc&Gro nas +11} 2! SIX 37.6
TWH +24 | RityShrs 19.92 + fal DSCVX +09 | Di FDIVX 23 | Frank/Te 19.97 +. CrBdA 5.92 +11 | R LAFYX Ni jOUGX 17 | Lata RUPX 1 RYOCX 35 VALIX Ane Vv 62 +.56
IncGro IX 16.85 5 CSRSX 9} 26 | Dreyfu 26.16 +. DivStkO 38.24 + emp Tm 19 | USDI NEFRX 1 “11 | RschSCy 15.66. +. juveen Cl 9.78 +.0 m — PRLA AT +.10 SEI 12.06 +. NY TE aso +04} o™ IEIX 40.
BIGRX £93 | Spectocs! C 8.64 -.65 | Di is Founders: 20} pi FDESX 45 | Frondv p Adv: DivrA p N 1.32 +.05 | M LRSYX 3 10} Fy A: .03 | MDB X 39.7, folios: 21 ves ee ee
= ie s eK 65 | DiscvF ers: DivGth 16.06 + TFFAX Ix EFSX 2423 +. Funds: 2.08 +.09 LMB p ‘ond ~MDX 73 4.41 | COTEFRA US Gvt 77 +03 | Inf _ WIGIX 30.
nd BEGBX 36, +28 | Columbi 6.30 5 p FOIS! Emr FDGFX 14 | Grthav 14.00 IS Advi 23. +.21 | B wy Hl FLOTX MediaTl BX 10.65 Ei “ae he . =
= i ato e 58 | EqGrthr X 30.38 mrMk 32.36 + TGADX +.16 | USDi isor Cl B: 4 randes! YMuBd 10.16 +, ediaTl PRM 65 +02 | ETMHt 10.31 +. Van Eck 1138 +.04| VIPIX
“yo | Acorn t FRMU +.09 | E FEMKX 19 | Frank/Te 26.33 SDivB ns BIIEX Gi pNHMAX 01 | MidC: TX 45.53 p SIEMX 05 ie a ne
IntlGrot EGX 16.09 LACAX IntlEga X 6.04 q inc 24.83. +. emp Tmi +24 p NESBX MFS Fu 25.31 + wth 2277 +. ‘ap RPM +53 | Ealdxa 17.13 EmgMkA | VINIX 4 06
z ale ae oe as +06 FEQIX 30 | For p Tmp B&C: Ivy Funds: 245 + nds A: 32 p_NRGAX .06 | MC GX 56.2 TROIX +25 pGBFAX 13.8: nsPl 33.27 +1
LgCoVal X 13.03 F t LTFAX 17 | Dreyfi X 17.32 EQli 60.37 +. gnC pp TEFT ° s: .18 | IntlOvA cnn a =e : : e : a : .
ALVIX +21 | FocEaAt 27.83 + yfus Premi +23] E FEQTX 43 | GrwthC Nese is 2 ‘s 4 3 : :
: 2 a : a Se ee nC p TEG +16 t WASCX MITA 16.18 GrwthB er PRWAX 41g | IntMuniA 863 +, Van Kam 16.53 VITBX 4
REAC +05 | Intlvala 22.89 + pct DBO Europ FECAX 17 | GAM TX 25.65 AssetSta 20.10 MITT. +21 p NRGBX NAsi 32.44 \ SEIMX 01 p Funds “ei an
= a : en ae ee CX 20.5 urope + 28.41 + CO Funds: +24 pWASAX +.14'| MIGA X 21.38 LrgCVB 21.87 as PRASX 14 #34 | IntlEGA ros2 +02 | 699° inds A: : ix VITNX 0
TWCl «14 | LSCRValA 25.19 + BdA DS: 59 +.10 FIEUX 40 | GIC nds: CoreEqc 20.45 MIGFX +18 p NNGBX +.22 | New E X 14.49 SEITX 2 Ap ACS =
SGov IX 38.32 NVLEX 31 | Corv! INX 14.3 Export 40.79 +.55 OnAAAG, ‘ac tWTRC +14 | Cap} Ww Nuveen 27.96 ra PRN 4g +.08 | L9CGTOA 15.00 +21 | CTSA x 198 ae
é a ae aa 35. +.06 | Fi FEXPX 55 | GiTe AGCX 5. CoreEqB X 9.68 pp MCOF +15 cic: 4.25 | N Hori EX 46.9 SELCX 21 p ACS 32 +.24 | MidCrl 31.74
SmCpvl X 9.34 M tNMTAX 13 | EmgM VIX 32.89 idel 23.92 + eIAAA GA 59 +.02 qB t WCEBX +10 | EmGA X 16.14 HYMuB riz PRNH! 7 4.27 | LgCvala nig3 +20 | EA nk ar ate :
ASVIX +02 | MarsGrAt 14.89 +. gMktA DRFM 89 +.22 | Fil FFIDX 37. 221 | Math SABIX. 2357 +. GINatRsA ie eu e : e : : fi ce :
: : : | d - me 9 +a Aor +.10 | GITOtA 38.90 Nu X 22.76 PRC +22 | SMCGIA 23.62 Eql X 147. VPK +17
: S : : - : ‘ ee = aS NS ce veen Cl R: 76 +.06 | NIB IX 89 SSCGX aig | EalncAp AC 72. +.18 | REIT! IX 13.05
: : zr = sedi ae sC p IGNCX +31 | GrAlIA X 14.69 InMi fond NITFX 1 +03 | SMCValA 30.86 +10 | ClOFra EIX 9.2 instr VGS 05 +.16
TWSAX +04 | Stetina 15.49 + Ap OR 25 +.03 | F ir FFRHX 241 58 : 01 | JPM 28.60 MAGW +13 un R NI NYBo! 175 wl SESVX 10 np VG 28 +05 | SC! NX 18.66
StrConv 8.57 D COSIX 11 | LtdH DEX 25.6 LMur 993 * &S Inc jorgan A Cl. +.29 | IntNwDA aE om ar es : = ae fy t |
: dE o a tof eth Sg GESLX Gwtha ass: MIDA +14 MBd NU 80 +.03 | PSBal X 11.34 TMLCX 04 p ACG! 69 +.21 | TBI CIX 34
=: tf = i ie ‘ocsdStk 140 + &S PM 11.16 +0 nAdv p VH MCapA X 28.54 HYM VBX 8: TRPB! +03 Fu 1392 +11 |S"! VX 9. st Vv 10 +11
78. +.03 | Columbi 13.72 YdA p DP 39 +.01 1 FTQGX 01 | I GESSX .04 | Inv B WAX 7.58 pA OTCA) +45 junBdNH 97 +.01 | PSGro X 20.58 inds: “1 | Grime AC pat se Ee
: a = ie 7 rest mt axEX 475d +4 ap OGI 58 +.07 | MuBdA X 9,95 Oak MRX 22.78 + Ww TRSG! 17 | EmgMkt Harb) GIX 22 Inst 99 +.04
BTTNX 91, +,05 | Acorn t B: YB p DL 39 +01] Gi FFNOX 3 AY Ti ELFTX AL | InG&l Hany aa : : cafe : : f 2 :
192020 X 91.00 LACB) MAM: TBX 7. NMA 30.4% + iusts 172. +0: SIA ONGIX 14 +07 | MuHiA X 10.44 Pi $ t TRE! +26 | Intistock aH in ma : -
: ce : ae le ro al ELENX 5 02 | MCpV IX 14,83 t_ MMHY: “£92 | PinOkAg_ PO R2010 X 27,74 SSAIX +34 uA p AC 11 +.08 VIVIX 25
Tech 59.23 mbia Class +.16 | MIM AX 11.6 owtine 10.77 +0. GE Inst! Fu 5272 +48 pval p JAMC 18) pes eae a. = ie i: = :
ATCIX 211 +.61 | Acornt Cc: uA PSM 69 +.03 | G FGOVX 1 04 | | nds: 48 | JPM X 26.91 MFFLX 01 itOkKSGWO re al wan a es ie : z :
Ultra 21.80 LIAC Mei IK 15.18 +0 r0Co ata oe ee organ | +14 | ResBdA 1001 org = ie z a : |
‘ ie a oe 8 |e Het 04] GI GIEIX Md nstl: MRBFX +02] 0° alue 01 88. +.59 R2020 12.70 4.19, Gth pVG 53 +.04 pp VPAOX
Util X 27.85 jumbia Cl 03 +.16 | MuBd RX 15.46 rolnc 7131 +6 MOEMMK cn oan ‘a a : fe: : 2 :
BULIX 17: +.29 | Aco jass Z: JA PTE 46 +.10 | GrDi FGRIX 3 64 | G V tGEMVX. lee ct on i: e : . : : : |
= - ae Mi se rDiscv 196 +.2 MO Ti 21.28 +. organ Se 31 +15 | Reina 25,02 E inds I: TRRHX +15 | Hi¥idl 13.32 REStA X15) Eqinc 977
TW +09 | Ac INK 42 ee FDSVX “Sq | CMO Trust I: B16 lect: ee ae atyiner OAKBX rts 2 3 = ia
= 3 i mae eae ighint r 1308 it | ee -S : ond TotRA 20.01 +27| AKBX 26. TRRCX +11 | IntEq! X 10.87 StrG REX 34.47 Growth IX 10.20
; AMVI +.05 | Ac X 28. oA OT 34 +.41 | Inde SPHIX el GMFRX HB BSEX : MSFRX “7 | Global. a +12] s : : = is
: 3 a 1 «| lok eh ndepn 913. +01 | SMO 19.04 SMkNe 9.28 +.0 UtiIA 16.61 Int! AKGX 2 12 TRRIX - +.18 | InEInd! X 17.01 StrM EGX 44, Gri RX 9.88
TWCVX 18: +.04 | AStAl SAX 29.76 +. CnZ_ DRT! 15 +43]! FDFFX 01 Trust Ill: +.24 | Int pHSKSX 16. 03 MMUFX aay | intro 6.33 +.29 R2040 13.60 SIEIX +21 mney & 4a i 3
American 18.02 | GAA 76 +.09 | ET HX 9.83 nProBd 2271 +19 | EMME : neq os +01 | aves rar +14 IMs AKIX 26.2 TRROX +12 | UCPRIVIL 1822 van ae : a
: ey a oe ot 83. +.09 | Int FINPX 1 19 rt GMOE Int SIEX 39, : MEIAX 14 mCp r OAl 3 +32 SciTec 19.36 + CRVAX +24 tgeA VKM 65 +.01 vp 83 +.10
AmcpA A: dz GHOT! 18 +.12 | Kob s: Bd FT 070 +06 | GMOEX 21.35 repGr JP 09 +.54 MFS Fund: a782 +25 | Ck KEX 23 s PRSCX 18 | QuGrStkc eit te ee : a
i : 2 2 mS ee +.33 | MC GSX 23. s B: (5 | Cakmark rOA 90 +.19 htBd 21.82 +. tSTTFX 25.56 13 Kamp Fu 31 +.03 gTG VPLGX : 99 +.16
AMutlA X 20.76 qzt NFE +.05 | Ea GRX 14. mMu Fi a7 +93 | MtlGre 19.12 Val JM 44 +23 | MAITB Sel KMX 47, SI PRWBX 37 | SmCpGrl 2556 +19] 4 inds B: MPT GX i452
‘ | ri ee) 5+ | Intl LIMX 9.94 + q GMIG +.25 | ShtTi SX : MITBX lectr OA 29 +.25 mCpStk 4.69 +. SSCTX “1g | AggGrB p VA : idGr VP 25.28 +23
BalA p X 30.07 SRE oA. +22 | FIR ce Adv: RlEstr Fi ot op | uintevl y ae oi | 2 : ) : E a : :
: “ fe me Pe WREX 1737 +. GMOIX +.43 | USEquit) BSX 9. pB ~MCOBX +17 Mutual 31 423 | mana 35.73 +.16 | 52! p STTAX “yg | CmstB.t AC 16 +21 ictory Funds: 14.82 4.18
BondA p 19.40 SETM +.03 | E ABLX 9, Disc F 37 4.19 | intsm 36.16 quity JU 53 +01 | MGB 14.68 Gwt Adv Il: 5 PRSVX “16 | SandsCpGi 2762 +21) & SWX 19. D 3:
ABND) +12 | IntEqZ X 10.32 aton Vani 88 Intl IGRX 3931 +: ; GMISX +.45 | JP ESX 11. MIGBX +14 hZ Ol pecGr 45 +, rl CISGX 21) ast A B te i.
CapWA X 13.35 4 NIE +02] T ce Cl A: Scpr Fi 31 +52 | Mal pie at malt 2 = : cE = : :
: a i aton ‘ intl ISMX 25. < E GTMI +19 | C Sel Cls: p MFWBX +13 | Lgcez 4.08 +2 pecin 21.09 +, ler Funds: “ts | HarbBt A 12 +06 | YM Blai X 18.08 +.
S : : He ai i 31 +52) sane X 21.32 ‘oreBd Wi MCapB 14.93 M OLCVX 1 25) 7 RPSIX 20 | NAMEqI 3 ' REs CHAX 16. 6 air Fds Inst. 25
p CAB +12 | IntviZ X 19.64 hina 20.71 45,25 | v8 COX 16.9 35 yEq GQET +28] E OBDX OTCBX +12 | MdCrz 1 5.16 +.1 Finc 12.18 + qin SNAEX Bt Al 05 4.07 | (nl inst:
CapWGA X 62.40 EMIE +25 | F p EVCGX 95 | ISB FB “98 +33 | UoCaree Yt ne a ale : . : i = : 2
pcwcl +39 | LCpCrZ X 25.93 loatRt 2440 +1 | 2 NDX 738 +. eEq GMUE! +10 | Hi HLEIX 3 04 | ti MTRBX +09 | SelGrz_ 0 16.80. +.1 KFrH 10.03 +, Fund: 4.99 | SelGrthB rv 3-18 | WM Blai me
EupacA X 43.26 Z — NSEP: +31 | HI EVBLX aay | 2apan 3 "38 +.03 | SMO X 15.31 iVIdBd 3.18 +.2 UtiIB 16.60 TS. BHEX 2 15 | 5 PRFHX 02 | CoreE i vs = ‘ se =
p AEPG) +.43 | LgCapG X 15.16 IthSA 1022 | Jens JPNX 17 ‘ Trust IV: +11 | I OHYFX 26 MMUBX +1 | PS8WwSCvZ 6.18 +.3 xFrSl 12.14 +. ‘oreEq SWA rGwth At ae ly a :
FdlnvA X 48.08 pGr GEGT +12} 1 p ETHSX pnsm AT 4.25 | Core : ntmTFBd gos +01 | ue 17.10 Te OSMVX 4) T PRFSX .03 | DivE NX 19.3 V mee “|e .
i 2 : sel 3 | =f : n 25 ae 413 | Te&Comz 26.56 +. jotindex 5.33 +. ivEqinv SW 34 4.13 fan Kam 7.53 +.4 BIGIX
GovtA p X 41.39 pidxZ NIND +25 | L EVIBX 05 | LePv! FSI 90 +.16 | Ec BFX 10.4 ntlEq! 10.61 +0: MFS Fu X 27.65 Old OBTCX 12] y POMIX 01 | Dive DIX 15.3 p Funds C: oe im
AMUS +34 | LCpviz Xx 28.20 gcpval 659+ | Lala LX. 15.50 + ndt GM 49 +03 |! OIEAX 2 sol nds C: +26 1329 +23 | vane 15.82 +. qSel SWD! 30 4.09 | AggGrct c: & Reed 40
GwthA X 13.34 NVLU: +221 N EHSTX mF 5.50 +.09 | En DFX 10 intrdAme m4 39 ate = : : de f : |
p AGTH 34 +.05 | MarsG X 15.69 atIMun 2189 +18 | beveos LATX’ 47. niMkt GM .67 4.07 | M oan 2 _ : | = = ; :
HI TrA p IX 33.68 rZNGIPX ‘ +13 | TI EANAX 18 oStk FLV ‘QL +73 | Forel AEFX 21.2 eek iy Mr a 3 S SS = i = : ;
s 2 : : ee i . 3 |Mo a 2 MEIC +11 | RealRet 14.18 + Principal 7.93. +.2 r SW ig +03 | Ealnect 19.82 + p_ UNAS $3 +07
x oe Nr le ETTGX ‘o3 | towPr FL 50 4.18 | lntlc FEX 19, unilne Liv -02 | MFS X 27.6 OWRRX 18 Funds: 24) MTA ISX 22, ACERX .13 | Corel X 9.66
S e cE z fe ‘ =e Bah rel 02 Funds I: 61 +.25 | Olstei 12.05 +, 1720301 lIEq SWI 44 +26 | Van Wai 9.16 +. vA UNC! 9.66 +.07
: : £ o 7 sla as FX 19 mCpCor 9.74 +.01 | Rel i in Funds: r00'| nase PMTIX MT EGX 14 goner Ful “06 | NCcpta fi MX 63
: e E te aE 3 a Hua ‘on | Rent = Mi Allcpva Princi 14.01 Gro SWI 34 +11 | Ema nds: pta p UN 32 4.07
: is - alee & gun ee 5 | Janus : 49.46 +.16 | Ya! RSIX 20 Val. OFALX pal Inv: +.10 | 100 HGX 19 mgGro p VWEG Sct ECX 11.55
p AIBAX 13. +11 | MdCpvl X 12.87 Eaton Vi Baz +14] Mid MX U1 MO Tru: 14 +45 : “1g | Valuel 9M 53 +28 | OPpenhel we ma : 2 aE : S :
ICAA p X 13.43 pviZ pNAMA\ +.09 | chit ance CIB: “iq | Midcap FMC 90 +.02 | st VI: 5 | Balanced Ie at nS at rs : : 2 :
AINSK 34. +04 | SmCpC X 15.51 ChinaB t ' MCpvl EF: SX 30.9 mgMkts 1G xd JABAX Funds 95 +.26 | AMTF A: DiscLCl 1X 10.68 Sel * SN 55 +32 | Van CX 9.92 ng UNVGX 67 +11
NEcoA p 3431 pCor2SMCEX +11 EMCGX pvl FSM 98 +.32 | | EMMX Contrari 492 +20) fy te fe es j E 3 :
: : : : f is a BRK 90 | IntlEg AMTR AX 10.3; Divintlt X 16.46 EQS! SWI 54 +32 | As imiral: asatch: 15 +.09
N PerA X 27.61 pIPZ_ NMSC +.04 | Hil EVFLX at | Migsec FM 14 +11] GMIPX 25, 33 | Enterpr ea Se se ‘ _ j :
; = ; : - = “ a 20 | Sa rad 0.79 +26 | CAPA YX 13.2 IntiGth IX 14.33 Pinv S 39 +.07 | Bi VAARX 6 CoreGr
NwWrldA X 32.63 0Z ACRN: +.08 | Hi EVHIX yon | Muniine FH 05. +.03 GCEFX 10 | FedTe 50.35 +, Ss: 2g | CapApA p OPTI 29 +.04 Inst PIT +18 | S& WPIX 22. alAdml 6.33 +.46 | Mi WGROX
: 2 : : cai a i eth Aen “4g | CoreStkB Capl FX 48.0 LgGriN IX 13.22 PSel S 45 +1 VBIAX AG | Mic-C 42.14
SmCpA X 50.03 Bd NSF +17 t EVHY: unr FN. 14 +.03 cGMFIX ‘5g | FlxBnd 7.00 MMPGX pincA p OPI 2 +61 PGLI +.18 | S&l WPPX 2 17 | CAITAdm oe oN a
pSMCWX 41. +.56 | Com: IX 9.76 StrincB X 10.73 NwM JHX 11.5 USCoreEqGMC 25.32. - JAFIX +.02 | IntmincB ae om a ma - : a : = ss
TXEXA X 41.13 stock Pa +.05 t EVSG +01 ktr FN 50 +.02 GMCOQX 04 | Fund 9.42 MMPIX +11 plncA pO 49 +.05 In PLW 10 +.08 | SI ISLCX .18 | CpOpAd! rors cra :
Z ‘ z % : ge = = inka +03 | (ntlB p 968 +04 | OM pOPCHX 9.65 PtrlV IX 14.03 mcpst 11.50 +0 VHCAX 87 01 | Wei EX 38.14 +27
WshA p X 1251 pv DRCVX 2 Lt EMTG: * ill FN 84 +07 yEq’ GQLOX +1 | Fundae ai a ae : : S : =
AWSHX 35, +.02 | Strato VX 214 Eaton X 25.60 NYM MILX 30.1 Gabelli 22.35 + daEq —_JAEIX +35 | Mainst war +20 | DS AX 42.1 PtrLGl | IX 15.73 jotBond S' ae 0 ma VER 2c
American X 35,80 t CPS 14 -.02 Vance Cl C: +21 un FTF .17 +.23 i Funds: 19 | Gl LifeSci 26.41 +. AainStay Funds A: 20 p OPO 19 +.55 in PLGIX +12 | Viewpoi WLBX 08 | EqinAd X 120.79 +, ickory WEHIX
Fund +22 | CG Ca FX 2.45 FloatRt Cc: Nordi MX 12.7 ABC p y cir JAGLX 27 | HiVIdBA s A: Equi CX 48.85 Ptrintl 855 iewpointS 9.84 +.04 nt VEX sh on
AmcpB t nds B: p Mkt Fd : ‘ t ECBLX ic + FNO ATT +,02 p GABCX GlbOpp 20.76 + \dBA MHCAX ityA — OEQA) 85 +31 in —PINIX +.10 | Yid WOBX 1333 +, EuroAd ae new a
AMPB Intl s: NatIMC LX 9.88 ore RX 41.97 Asset x 10,20 +01 | Se JGVAX 13 | Mains' 657 GlobA X 11.35 RealEstl 16.11 Pist S' 33 +12 AAD alr ie
BalB t X 20.04 q TIE t ECHMX +01 FOCP: +89 GABAX 4.01 | Slech r 14.58 + tay Fund +01 p OPPA +13 PIREX +21 | Vid WYPX 9. ExplAd 88.29 + jalue — WVALX 504 4.13
BALBX 19. +15 | LgGrw UX 15.1 TMSG C 11.97 Ovrse CPX 42.64 +.5 Eqlne 49.53 G JAGTX 11 | HYIdBB s B: Glbo X 75.32 SAMBalA 29.06 - Piss]. SW 69 * De “| ne |
BondB t 19.33 TLGI 1 +19 ECMGX +.03 a FOS| +.58 p\ GABEX +.33 | Guin 13.45 +. t MKHC) ppA OPGI +.89 SABPX 19 | Secuti YSX ExtdAd 73.21 fells Fal AG +18
BFAB! +13 | Loval UX 14.4 Empire Bui 12.66 PcBas SF FX 46.30. 4.55 GIOPAAA pG 21.65 M JAGIX .24.| Mai X 6.53 Gold IX 37.14 SAMBalB 15.04 +, rity 969° im VEXA) . : crea ,
CaplBB t X 13.35 TW 8 +.16 pire Builder: +.05 FPBI 4.55 A pGABO qq | McVilnst 38.95 + inStay Fund: +01 p — OPGS +36 SBBPX 09 curity Funds: sok Me cn
a ‘ : : i i re ih alk 41 | ICAP si: GrthA X 30.23 SAMBalC 15.00 + Equity m VEL 16 +.18 loc NVCBX
CpWGrB t X 62.40 y COI 0 +.09 nd EMB Munir FPX +34 MA GABG +29 | MdCpval ies va ig : g | : :
=) se a - Bro A 1X 10.74 Valuet 6 ix 31.51 Dilan, JMCVX .20 | MAP AEX 46. IntBd SX 32.87 SAMGrA 14.92 Selected 6.15 dml VE 60 +.03 | wel NVIN +.09
ErpacB t X 43.03 it Suisse 56 +.25 Gl EN 56 +02 1 FPURX 20. +01 et GAB 51 4.30 | Oe" 24.99 +. 1 MU 13. +.40 Ap OIBAl 87 +.41 p SAGPX +.09 Funds: oe ie = fa
: 8 : : - sn x un Sy VX 18.33 0 JORNX .20 | ICAP: BFX 38.82 +. Inte X 6.00 SAMGrC 17.25. +. Amsh MAAd VI 30 +1.05 s Fargo 30 +44
FdinvB t X 47.51 +, cus p CU rgreen A: +.09 E FRE 5 +13 rtmore Fd #10) reser aa 2 oe Ps 3 u = | i '
51 +.60 | DFi FAX 16 AstAl : Stint\ SX 40.65 Nati s D t JAOSX 15 | S&P! SLX 42 33-1 Intlsi ‘AX 29.1 SAMGrB 16.60 Amst are mn ae me
GrwthB t AFIBX 41.27 ‘A Funds: 99 +.23 Ip EA tintMu FST 5-05 ationwD Mi scvinst me = a - H f : : a:
AGRBX 32. +.35 | Ini s: -23 | Bal AFX 15.0 STBF FX 10.18 Gi UIFX 19. s JAMRX 10 | Mail SPIX 33, 43] LTGVA AX 27,7 StrGA 16.73 Seli SX 47.13 srwAdm eon me ae
: d S" . : lie ee a airs & 59 +.26 p Opa eT +24 p SACAX ‘12 | Seligman G +35] H VIGAX 3 E STCSX 20. 6
= st Ss 2 3 cor ree 30 | Gi rs 26 | LtdTn VX 9,93 WCStEgA 19.16 Cc roup: IthCr 0.88 4.29 nterpr 20.92 +.12
: : i : as e et oe 27.19 + rowth = M mMu OPITX 15. +01 stEqA CMNWX 415 | Comunat SU Hi VGHAX 6 ae SENTX 31.6 12
IFABX +.02 | DW! FOTX 1219 +. HiYid AX 9.3 SmillCpS. X 22.08 M GIXIX Twe JSCVX 08 | Mi PGFX 79, MnstF X 15.92 Purisit 4503 +30 |S MCX 34 ividcp V eee sen a
ICABt 20.68 S Scud 419 +.07 dA EKH 30 +.01 pSr FSLCX 41g | MCoMktd! 11.32 + wenty 26.95 +. janage 716 +5 ‘dA MSI +01 ima Funds: “39 | SrowthA Si JIL +50 YAPA. 232 a ae
AICBX +11 | Bi der Cl A: 07 | Intle AX 3.3 Scpval 19.83 N x GMXIX 15 | y JAVLX 08 | Fi rs Funds: 56 | MnSto/ GX 41.84 TotRet Ss: HYd GRFX. 4 50 | InfProAd es oni oe
NwPersp t 34.13 ala : qa EK 38 t falur FCPV aig | NwBaldst 16.28 + entur 56.30 +. remntBd A pOMS| +34 p PURI BDt SI 61 +.06 viLOK : ie :
NPFB} +23 | Bluchi KTRAX Mu ZAX 10 SEAsia X 14.53 GBXIX AL] Wi JAVTX 62 MBDFX MSSCI OX 15.2 Putni X 23.68 MAMuni HYDX 06 | InsdLTAd qa ae “s
SmCpB t X 32.09 luChipA 10.00 +. inBdA EK 93 +.14 ja FSEA\ ey | S&P5001 10.77 +. rldW 65.50 +, Frmtelbl ee cma ae ra : = a: : - |
s : ; : E = ‘ on o Meee +.05 | S&Md SX 23.15 AAB s A: luni SMATX ITBdAd 12.60 sT Bd X 43.58
39.65 +3 rHIRA KI 21.50 + egA EKO) 54 +02 in FSDIX 4,33 | Gartm 12.43 +. Janus Ad 52.48 +. EssxLCGI 15.09 +. CpVIQVsc .15 +11 alAp PABA) Sentinel G 7.93 +.01 ma ‘ oo va
: s e A a rs oe 10 | F VS Shrst 62 | £ tT MGCAX 3 13 | Strind X 39.25 AAGTA X 12.66 Cc roup: 01 | ITsryAdi 1034 405| oes X 8.51
, z : 2 e = ee | ash mMkEq MEM 0.45 +52 | V p _OPSIX +38 | bwrima PAEAX 14. 407 | Soms.Ap SEN \ ml VFIUX 10. 05 alZ pSSMVX +01
a inn rad 58.45. +75 rReRtr FSR 63. +.03 | IDM pNDMSX 11.35 Jan RTX 31.62 Globalbd EX 24.95 alued p CGR 4.32 +.02 wind p Pl 1459. +.10 | LtlEQA CX 33.89 ntGrAdm VW 14 4.04 UltStiny STADX 32.13 +.09
e = Aes i PO 0a us Aspen | 62 +.33 MGGBX 5 +39] O WX 27.2 Eql DINX 9.98 +. qAp SWRLX +.30 | ITAd IX 78.9 uls STADX 9.1
eee | EVUAX 15. +.08 dd FIBFX + | Gate X 11.16 Balanced stl: IntDurGv M12 +1 ppenheimer .21 +.25 map PEYAX. 18. +02 | SmCOA 216 + dint. VWIU 822-408 Wat rang A -
Le : 14.95 +.10 Trend TRI 10.46 +.04] G way Funds: +.07 | wel ced JABLX 28. ShDurG' MGIDX 10.53 12 | GlobIB t B: EuEq X 1818 +15 | 2°! Ap SAGWX 7.7 .25 | TGrAdm x OT 405 me cag
iE ey = 3 cia ical rGv MGSDX 9 +.03 | IntBd OGLBX 70, FLTXA PEUGX 31.1! 15] g ia SEQUX 70+ | uta VeIDX 972 405 | ol Ils Fargo Admin:
as Ee on = ae hour ogy Bt OIBB 01 +.83 PTFLX “19. +42 | Skvineta 156.87 +1.0 rAd VMU a72 +05 | Dvea! nin:
i a i : Wo wae GSEX 87. MnStFd X 5.98 GeoA an +01 | 9 SKSEX 26. 08} UrGradm! VW UX 10.70 G NVDEX 40.58
: = 2 a coe +05 p PGEO 01 ndSh 93 4.0 dint VW oy | St8al DEX 40.58 +.38
GICIX 21.45 424 BlendA ak +24 Masi ins 24.97 i StrincB t race “a +32 “ee PEQUX ie +12 oer ne aie a Noe a ns +28 este me Bo
D ; | A [ 24 | GlbTotRIA 20.14 ocusp MI 2 Oppenheimer C. .33 +.02 | H p PGRWX “a4 eat | Fund N SI pAdml VIM 29 | an ae
: = le == ope ay IthA p— PHS 20.70 +17 | St PECX 9.52 MorgAdr AX 95.15 +75 | © mn Asset: 3 477
Advantst stocks fro Pca wl acca aunt +19) Gob ODVCX 41.25 HIYA p TX 6131 +55 | 8a imAseoes #1 | AMuHyAdVWALX a ‘ee
Alumina 48.15 m various int ss stCnt p MXXIX 112 +21 Inte p OGLCX 71.2 +55 | Incma PHIGX 824 + lan STFBX p capt VMK a aa rt
| | x aan 5 WACPX .
AsiaSat 23.05 +2.32 | Amari ernational wo NEW = HIG ~ 15.98 +.14| M IC OIBCX 5 +.85 | intle p PINCX 676 ‘| Gwth STF 56.41 +29 imCap r VPMAX 39 Westwood ae
BHP BillLt 22.65 +0.08 Amarin 18 rd stock mark HIGHS BarcBk pr Delhai HS & ieee en nStFdC MIGCX 5.98 +.05 | Int qp POVSX 32, +,03 | Sterling FGX 58.68 +.40 PacfAdml VPA\ ee oe :
CNOOC 45.60 +4,90 BASF te +0.01 | HS ets. AAR Barclay elhaize Fi LOW oe 40.54 +.32 CapO p PNVAX 61 +.38 | SCapV Capital: 40} ReitAdm r oe s a a
: = = = i ee tay Debit Fret a S InvAp —PINV 38.86 +.52 et al SPSCX 15. .| STsyAd VGSLX 120.57 “fb AIAN WEBAX
ChinaMbl 52.12 +0.74 BHPBA a +0.89 Hide 90.28 +0.65 | Smi ABM BlueSq Deltixe SabllE pi sh Tr KVPI X 15.86 +.17 tegic Partn 64 4.04] STB al aan oN
ChinaNet 47.16 +0.57 BHFEIL Ble ae +0.29 ine 80.38 +1.88 Smith&N ABN A\ BiillChina Diageo GnCable iShSP500 KV HB NkeB aionuuee 17 | IntvalA PI ers: dAdml. VBIRX go OTe i :
CityTIcm 49:51 +0.36 BcBilVE an +0.78 {ron Les 45.18 +0.55 Sodexho 62.36 +21 AGCO BikldAs gs Bae con Bas a = 5 = : ss :
GeneticT 348 +0.06 Hate 6223 +036 og 42.19 +0.04 SparkNet Pad ot ASE BShEMA cE ee shi ma oe = = . : oe : :
pete, rae aie ee 2622 +028 imptoh 14.44 40.33 Spirent ei 4020 [ANB ge Seng DepSie: » aoaug are at ise = = | A" = e :
Intrntinits 31:90 Pa Bare8k pt aaa +1.59 Infineon 86.55 +0.86 Statoil 4.96 TOOL AX, Pr CBSB Dist&Srv Gerdau iShSPVal UAN Air ordstim Sal sforce — Vulear ° Ytd, COR Al Bon :
Konami 1021 40.30 | BioProg aot +0.05 inVista 16.18 +0.29 StoraEnso 26.47 aon ae CGI Dollar! GerNew ishMmSC LINTV NoAmEn gn ene ws ed oe 23
MetalSt ee Bit 6176, +00 IntCtHt rs Bb 1028 | ane ies) 0.lt ecenture i Gaon Sx oe ee SE : |
¢ . q 32 : sss iq | AlflMgrs CIGNA jonlleyRR sac Fob er : 7 |
S wie : ; = ae sit 1653 +405 iIMgis CN DuP Goodti ishsPG LatADisc loves mmpraEn WW aC Am FordCr 6 Ytd. Clo: = ON
: ; : 5 : i : : = a i sea Anis. HGbl Du ont Gia yc iSh Ib Lloyd TSI NovoNdk Shinhan Jeyerh mFnGp 7109 6 dCresws 6 se Chg. ae DS
= i i ie 0 FN a 1535 +0. INT NV 35.23 +0.10 AuProd SX s ical Gp my BhMCGIh Lock B NSTI ShipFin WT Dieta 91 10314 B41 992 : r
) 37 Lloyd 38.5 .18 | Techni 4 0.20 | Al CIBC Dune poAS iShLel mM 3 : : | ; |
4 : 3 ig S ie i ; Gp ie 1G InGn — Luxotti OmegaHl SierrPac WTDiefaHi BauschL 7! GMAC 2112 +¥2 | Moran 88 Ytd. Ch =
Nidec 161.65 40.27 Bune! ee 7h +0.30 Me Serono 48.04 +0.66 | TelefEsp 65.35 jad Allete Cap&lnco BynGorp n creeas iShLeCred n Hac ONEO! It Singap WTEurHi f Ya28 7.04 me ‘ an BMS! Cv ae
NippnTT 16.51 +L11 | Cadby bj ory +114 Ned 22.08 +0.16 Telenor 67.40 wae Alliant&g one yo ee or a 8 = - . ; :
| : i ae S as a cng ae HAT BD iShLet-3Â¥ n JacQUIIDY Grentet pel meee n_ | BurN 6.558200 a | Gokims 7.8510 a | OcciP 1010 ats
Novogen 23.39 -0.16 ean ae +0.45 Natori 48,65 +0.49 Ternium 47.70 it Aldlristi ch CarolinaG Fue Sie ene me : 2 5 : = “ 3 3
i: : i S a a ina “ah eel CanSi pp EatnVa HanPtSot , SUSPM n MartMM iC lexho Eqn Be oy -18 1S 30 P
f 31 . s 2.04 nBevC tv nvan H . lat. Masi POS Solerind Writ, REI =
PCCW Ltd 150.76 +0.08 | Conv e0V 2 a 0.01 Woktac a0 O17 Total SA 5 20.40 40.46 | APS CascdeC EDS janesbrd n iShuti jasisa SA CO Sth WT )100.n a nn ma
Pharmax 5.98 +176 Credsuls a +2.26 Norske 2.96 +0.72 Trintech 70,14 ree Anbar Celane p — EAndinB HangrOrth iShMins Mattel PPLCop = S Copp s IntLC n ORE Exe 2
= : i = s a a 2 iy UPM Ky 3.85 + 66 | 4 acF «Ce se Bra Hansot iShM Vv MeAt PallCp wiGas WT IntMC n FO en Fey ( alla
a . ; 951 +0, UtdUti 26 0:30 | AMovill. MOX S asAero n iShMCVal eelt = Pi Steri WT RE ae
i 2 5 | ou im +0.95 | P voNdk St +0.84 tils 16.27 +0.32 | AE Co EmersnE HartidF iShSPUIi MeadW arkwy eris IntsC i GN 913 785
Ri -0.09 jone 87-0, arson 92.70 Van 30.3 32. | AEP rvecer : SnEls n iShSPUiln No sal v . ;
inker 1.80 Delhiai soon Pleif Ny v Mool 0.34 40.14 | A Chspk EmployH HealthNet _‘ShSP Mens = s e : ’ .
Toyota 7388 40.54 DeutTel, 85.86 +0.28 | Pl Vac iH +0.23 eoliaEnv 5.87 +01 mStand Cl ro EEC He a & ee : j : :
; ¢ y : 23 “10 | Ameripri hittend IChile Cancn (ShSPC! lensW ‘oHold paTot n a re
: : : 2 : : : : : e ie a tt Laie inden — End HSET nj isn MetLi PetkEl SubPpne WT LgCl Argent (P jay Yeste foreign ——
: : : : : = : : oe i i ini ca E uS pid HSP% ach ‘Shinds M ife si SunLtFn WM Dvn | Aust (Peso) 322 rday — Toda’ currency ——$——_—
ABBLtd 100.51 foal EON iM 13. +125 Prud UK 4.71 Wolscley 5 19.20 aaa Amotek s oach Enel H atCren ‘ShDUAero n atLifoun tine — SunaF 9 wrens ralia (Dollar) a oat na a
E 0.23 | El AG 12 +0, ublicis 28.48 | AMovilL. 21:8 38 | Apria 5 Comeric Energiz ate sto ts = = : = 3 | 7 ; 3
: F : a : : : = = =. ce ore iat PS USIK Sunt Wirctin calieay 2.6525 sft ah 3.1030 | Lebano veal wot
Adecco 43.50 +0. 9 } Elan 644 +0.15 | Re ISNV 6. 0. SeMeX § 48.35 AntowEl RD pts Enersis Ho no iShKLDSS rant ‘alt x Us TotOvn Britain 4179 6524 3 1.2826 n (Pound) ; esterday 7 oy yesterda
Ahold 16.99 +0.75 | Enel Oa -0.10 Reeds plc iol 0.05 CCFemsa 3698 +127 |au CompssMn Ennis Inc jomoxDov _'ShDJHI Mirant wtA ProcCastpt Te 1Capis WTlntUtn c ‘ain (Pound) ATAG 3770 77 Malaysia (Ringgi es sr 8
AFrance 10.44 +0.45 | Epco is 40.17 Repsol aa +0.16 FEMSA 40.25 ata i ConsGp Enterg Honda ist tn Mirant PrinFnel foletEsp WT Intl ‘anada (Doll fn ca sl a ae
f 5 . : : .28 vn ph y H hBasMt! wiB Te nn chi ar) 9457 2.10 ico (Peso) os mn ms
Aixtron 45.91 0.08 | Euron ante +0.66 mos 3.44 +0.20 Gruma 133.27 +4.38 sl Constollé Enlorgy un jonwilint ISNT MolsCoors ProgrssEn mplein WT Inte ile (Peso) 8584 5097 1080 | N. Ze 7 0915 2887 510.57
Alcatell 531 +0.12 Eurotrust ta +0.98 | STI AG a +0.08 GAerPac n 1372 10.24 | MS stat Copattok! EntorPT ING phot MolsC 1A ProsStico TmpeM) WT Int n | China (Yu 00185 8572 ‘5140 | Ne aland (Dollar) 6 i, ee A
. ‘39 ‘08 | Gl 38 Asse G SHE 2 1.1650 Norw Pa a .
Allianz Ug 13.27 40.22 France te B a 0.07 oreo te +0.66 GpAerCN nv 42.60 +0 a Aut neds Corpb lold = Equifax iShBelg ish ur350. Mone RE fw mn ; : f = : = ,
AltanaAG 20:59 +0.24 | Gall nM 47. 4 +0.27 | Si nofi 9.17 +0.28 GpoASur 24.15 -0.01 | A toDala Cc nee ExcalM ishbvazi cc Ee * : = : : :
ae iE ele ot nebo Shey F ishrrare ishSCV. osalc Hl k Pete laezee ‘000451. BT 542.30 (Rupee) 2 1608 i \
61.50 +0 Gene 88.69 .04 | Sc ) +0.36 | G ba 1092 | Avnet CredSui FPLG ShFranco ON nic = 3 , | : =
.85 aheoekin: 69 +0,59 otPwrn AIT +0.0. 3rpoFin 745 net Suiss Fi D iShtta iShMSCIG lovado A Tox olseley 8 Denm una) 0464 ae oe mst = ,
jaxoSKin Lil Shire 60.59 + 04 | GpoSim on 4031 BASF CrownHold acts IS aly ITT Cops NTTO0C LICp ag Inds WoorlF ark (Krone) 0463 217.50 22 Philpins (Pe a6 3 60.82 6
58.37 +111 SkillSoft 64.31 0.79 | Home: ec 3 +0.31 | Bairn Cummins FMao pM iShNeth \ ‘Comps NtAus 0 =O APM Titfany XTO n Dominicar ay sa iS ha : ! ; :
li | Skyel 31 +165 mexDev 02 +0.2 neo Cl ins Fe iShs Idearc n ust Tit Eng E n Rep (Pes 1749 - : sa i - 2 :
yePh 719 +013 IndBach 63.80 + .23 | BeoSnCH urtdpnn eto ShSpain Indep NatGrid ReinsGp un se oe " rc “ aE :
4.57 ve Metro 28.41 147 | BcSancl OPL Fiat iShSweden | pHid ——-NtPres' Reliant Toro Co x ngy Euro ( ) Wi 0299 ’ 5.7191 ia (Ruble) 3 3M 48.24 i
iE ; is = “i Sh ren resto A n THC (OrOX Euro) 1756 33.45 Saudi A 0381 297 3
assur 4.96 -0.1 BkAm plD TF TxF idINFin is nLV— IntShi NatwHP. itchle g rriCont! Zions Hong K 131 1755 33.40 | Si rab (Riyal) 5 os : :
6.75 ie Bklrel Dail FidNInfo ishMinlG | P Niwt RockT TrinaSoln pia ‘ong (Dollar) JB 1.30 56935 Singapore (D a : i “
08 | a eind DeanFd FlaEstCs iShMinlC IntShip pt HP piB Re on Tu Hungary (F ar) 1280 3376 5.6968 | SI ollar) 68 oles a 1
BRNY fae FEE inp Noh Nanos en utrepar NeW LOWS aoe ,0052 i Tes aon ee is oH isn st
rankRes shsP1s00 J snctl Ne sub — S&PCo UniFitst lors 8 Indnsia ( or om oa : : cs : : :
= = es | ‘i Cats ja (Rupiah) 0227 1,83 ~ 194 10, Korea (Won) 1392 1379 26.14 se
KPN NtwkEq SCANA vont Hino} u srael (Shekel) a mr lo b : : :
Newallftub SGL Cib sSteol AR ptr | Japan (Ve 2367 OOOLL 909 44.039 | 8 (Krona) poInSy RS ae
sT DEUS! Unvsic G Felt en) 236 90.91 90 Switzerind (Franc ee a “ :
JEuStx valeroGP i UDom ptB atte 008279 eel 4.2240 wn enna te = i
Warner Mus enya (Shilling) Lalla hal 120.79 1) 350 | Thailand (8 ; tr : a i
eee ut eee ae 21.18 | Turkey ant) 0299 0302 33.02 L247
inar) O45 i 7085 ey (Ura) 7 tn : ns
3.4584 69.05 7085 | UAE. (DL 102 sen aw 33.12
ons aN iran) ot :
: ri 80 | Uruguay tn wn “
280) | Ven ay (New Peso) 0 ) ns i : i
enue (Bi a na 3
ativan) y ui uk
QOOIEE O00 en zi
D166 2145.92 eu
92 2145.92
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007, PAGE 5B





- Supreme Court

orders Mosaic
omposite Ltd
_ be wound-up

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Fr I “he Supreme Court has
ordered that the key
counterparty for a

Bahamas-domiciled investment
fund, which contained more

than $400 million in investor

- monies that are now missing, be

last year, where they were being
stored and destroyed.

He explained that he had
been contacted in May 2006 by
an anonymous informant, who
claimed that documents related
to the fund were at a private
club in the US state of Min-
nesota. x

The informant alleged that

shield companies a complete
and satisfactory explanation or
reconciliation as to the signifi-
cant shortfall between investor
claims and the value of the iden-
tified assets.”

Another report by Mr Massi,
filed with the Canadian courts,
had revealed how Mr Xan-
thoudakis and Dale Smith, Nor-

rt
fey
|

fd

|
NATIONAL BANK OF CANADA |

Auditors’ —_1o the Shareholders of National Bank of Canada

RGROU * Gee saceiciaredne tenes
ave audited the Consolidated Balance Sheets of National Bank of Canada (the “B:
ank”)
October 31, 2006 and 2005 and the Consolidated Statements of Income, Changes in seaccee:
Equity and Cash Flows for the years then ended, These financial statements are the responsibility of

» the Bank's Management Our respor sibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements

We conducted our audits In accordance with Canadian generally accepted auditing standards Those
Standards require that we plan and perform an audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether the
financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis
evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, An audit also includes
assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by Management, as wel!
evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. " °

», Inouropinion, these consolidated financial statements present fairl i
: , J y, in all material respects, the financial
sain of the Bank as at October 31, 2006 and 2005 and the results of its operations and its cash flows
or the years then ended in accordance with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles.

treme (Lillie J ebetesticd, re eee

Samson Bélair/Deloitte & Touche s.e.n.c.rl.
Chartered Accountants

Montreal, Canada, November 30, 2006

- Consolidated Statement |

of Income :

Year ended October 31
(milltons of dollars) Note 2006 2005
Interest Income
Loans 2,648 2,122
Securities. 960 739
Deposits with flnancjgl instituttons 314 193

3,922 3,054

i a

Interest expense

Deposits 1,877 1,109
Subordinated debentures : 90 100
Other : 663 404

ga





2630613









wound-up. the documents “were being _ shield’s leading executives, had jaime oo ise
Justice Cheryl Albury — stored and/or destroyedonthe claimed they were unable to
ordered on January 24, 2007, premises of a private club in _ identify the beneficial owners Se tee ; as eh
that Mosaic Composite Ltd be Minnesota, US”. of BICE International, a Deposit and payment service charges 208 201
wound-up under the provisions Mr Massi added: “After Bahamian company that was TRE ee tani ots ce =
of the International Business obtaining the requisite search Olympus Univest’s majority Card sarvica revenues os 61 63
Companies Act 2000, with BDO and seizure court orders, we shareholder and put the fund é Pepbiee eo ae : =
Mann Judd accountant Clifford attended at the premises where _into what was initially a volun- ane ee , Care ey
Culmer appointed as one of the these documents were located __ tary liquidation. Foreign exchange revenues 98 76
joint liquidators. and, with the aid of the US mar- The duo also claimed they ee oe ae Eas
His fellow liquidator will be _shalls service, we retrieved 35 were unable to identify the ben- 2
Canadian Raymond Massi of _ boxes of documents.” eficial owners of Mosaic Com- eet es ican 3 4
RSM Richter, with whom he is The receiver said the docu- posite, and neither Norshield ea he Re ee ee ee eS re
also working on the court-super- _ ments were now being reviewed. _nor Cardinal International had peep haar sian ris haat
vised liquidation of Olympus The discovery of Olympus _ been able to supply the liquida- Occupancy 164 160
Univest, the Bahamian-regis- | Univest documents in Minneso- _ tors with a copy of the invest- eae ee ary sity
tered investment fund into ta provided clear evidence ofan ment agreement between Olym- Professional fees 145 136
which the missing monies were attempted cover-up of the pus Univest and Mosaic. Other ei ng BR 5
placed by scandal-plagued mon- _fund’s affairs, and those of Mr Xanthoudakis had also income before Income taxes and now-controlling boterest atc mote ama
ey manager, Norshield Asset Mosaic Composite and Nor- _ failed to provide “information UMCOMme ORS ne ee BR
Management. shield. : and documents” on Cardinal Hon-contvolling interest a ote Os
Mosaic Composite was re- Mr Massi said previously that —International’s activities as the Netincome a ee ee eae es Co ert | 855
domiciled to the US state of John Xanthoudakis, Norshield- Olympus Univest fund’s admin- i nn mn ee TN eee he ee Aaa
Minnesota shortly after Olym- __’s former principal, had written __istrator. Es ais tae ee tek
pus Univest was placed into ini- to investors.in the Bahamian In an implicit criticism of Car- ree ne er ay - fat ee es
tial voluntary liquidation, and _ entities on May 11, 2006. dinal International’s role in the plluted eee ee 165,549 168.964"
its return to this jurisdiction and The liquidator added blunt- —_ affair, Mr Massi previously told Earnings per common share (dollars) 18
. : . . . . : . Basic 5.22 4.98
eventual winding-up was viewed __ly: “Despite its ongoing review _investors that the net asset value Diluted 5.13 4.90
as key to a successful recovery _ of available books and records, | (NAV) calculations for Olym- Dividends per common share (dolla) ee sae MOTE 896 eR
of investor funds. and the numerous requests for pus Univest - for which Cardinal
am In his first report to investors, | documents and information as was responsible for as adminis- Consolidated Balance Sheet mt
before Olympus Univest was © well as examinations under oath, _ trator - resulted in redemption eat '
moved to a court-supervised liqg- the receiver has not received values that were overstated, feeaeas daisy Note 2006 _ sa05
uidation, Mr Culmer noted that from Mr Xanthoudakis or from _ while subscription prices were oe mS Pe je epee nF RE ys oe
Mosaic Composite (MCL) had any other principals of the Nor- _ also overvalued. =. ses a
moved from the Bahamas in Deposits with financlallnstRutions 8061 80,087"
January 2005 to Anguilla, before
eae . : Securitles
domiciling in Minnesota, where Investment account 3 6,814 6,869
it had merged into a US com- ' Trading account fe a teal ee oS sae —--- 218
pany. Sy i eek ace AN, SR reat rag Me eet mere
Mr Culmer said: “It is of sig- Securities purchased under reverse repurchase agreements 0 PR 7023
nificance to the issue of co-oper- ane a.5and6
ation that the liquidator has also Residential mortgage . pe etl
requested that MCL be re-domi- - ee cere a
ciled in the Bahamas, and thus I JEWELLERY SALES ASSOCIATES I a a i a aa 7
far this request has not been I Allowance for credit losses_ -——--- ae
acceded to by the directors of I an ae -
MCL. : I Mus : be... I ae liability under acceptances < as aac,
“It is anticipated that failure H t, Relial) i ee 8 ‘33 355
p I onest, Relial le, Dedicated, \ quip
to accede to his request affects a I Prof 7 IE tic & Goodwill : bie a
major part of the liquidation.” eee nergene I ea 10 5,736 6,685
All investor funds that Nor- | SELF MOTIVATED I ae Te
shield channelled into Olympus | I ——_ eee igre SG, Pi
Univest were invested into | - LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
Mosaic Composite, which in I Excellent S$s Bonus Potential soa ‘ . 11 ai seas
turn placed them into a variety 1 i . Business and government an anars
of investments, including the Deposit-taking institutions 225 oe
. . or ODO”.
BISX-listed real estate invest- ! [JQ YOU HAVE WHAT IT TAKES? i Depo from NBC Ea st tg
ment trust (REIT), Premier | : l es
Real Estate Investment Corpo- | , I Acceptances : ; 3,725 3,242
ration. If the answer IS YES then take the next step. Obligations related to securities sold short 15,621 15,504
: I I Securities sold under repurchase agreements 9,517 12,915
In a report to Canadian FAX RESUME TO 326-2824 Fair value of trading derivative financial instruments 21 1,646 1,846
‘ ba I 8 ¥ 6,058
investors, Mr Massi said docu- I Other liabilities 2 —_ nr Tacs
vest and Mosaic Composite APPLY VE Subordinated debentures 34
were recovered in Minnesota Non-controlling Interest
Shareholders’ equity
fe Preferred shares 16 400 400
Common shares 16 1,566 1,565
buted surpl 23 =
tena cage translation adjustments ‘ ; ay 2 pied
Retained earnings
4,788 4,597
Sa ee a ee ee ; 116,885 107,970
pat Se ss ee ee Se
: : Réal Raymond : Pierre Bowrgie
PEPSI-COLA BAHAMAS BOTTLING COMPANY Peta a
: Consolidated Statement of |
: © as : es ee eh ; ei Changes in Shareholders’ Equity
Applicants are invited from suitably qualified individuals to fill the position Year ended October 31 |
of:
: (millions of dollars) aa Note ___ 2006 2005
Preferred shares at beginning : 400 375
QUALITY CO NTROL TECHNICIAN Issuance of preferred shares, Series 16 . a 200
, Redemption of preferred shares, Series 13, for cancellation __ ee nt oe i eS
Preferred shares at end NO ae 400
The incumbent will: Common shares at begining. , 4,865 1,545
- issuance jon share
' Dividend pe caninas Share Purchase Plan 15 12
Perform standardized qualitative and quantitative tests on beverages, hei eee an os)
in order to ensure compliance with established standards and regulations. ‘pact of shares acquired or sol for tadng purposes —_—______._-______@. __—+-
Analyze test results and compare results with Pepsi-Cola International Peer a ee, ~ eS
Quality Assurance standard tables. Stock option expense 7 12 6
Sample and approve incoming raw material as well as product in process Cevtfbciad spt ated ————_—_—_)—_+3
to ensure that specifications are met. Unrealized foreign currency translation adjustments at beginning (26) (10)
Record and compile test results, prepare graphs, charts and reports Losses on foreign exchange operations with a functional currency
other than the Canadian dollar, netofincometaxes a Ge (66) 6)
Unreallzed foreign currency translation adjusimentsatend 8)
Ideal candidate would at minimum have an Associates Degree in Chemistry. Retained eapnings at beginning eas 2,287
At least three years experience in an analytical or industrial chemistry ae a aiid ; me sa
laboratory, including training in Statistical Quality or Process Control. ee. a a ea
Common shares 1460 (320) (286)
Please send resume to: eee
‘ Human Resources Manager Retained earingaatend 2,893 ios
P.O. Box N-3004 Shareholenrs equity - ie ee 4,708, 4,597.

ments related to Olympus Uni-



Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 364-2123

Telephone calls will not be accepted.































Interested parties may obtain a complete copy of the audited accounts

from National Bank of Canada (International) Ltd., Is¢ Floor

oe Bay Corporate Center, P.O..Box N-3015, Nassau,
ahamas.

IC 404
THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007






St George estate alleges
‘sinister conspiracy’








FROM page 1B Hayward and Mr Babak pre-
pared a further directors’ reso-






































































Premier Real Estate 10.00 0.795 7.9

10.00 10.00 _ Premier Re
wk-Hi wk-LOw y

14.30 12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets :

10.14. * 40.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 8.00 8.25 : 3 Albert told Mr Babak he was in trying to get me to sign this

Leonard did want to have out- with getting four directors to
side counsel’s advice,” Sir sign. Mr Moss was also present
Albert alleged. during my discussions with Sir





Last Price













0.54 0.20 RND Holdings csi 0.45 unable to sign a GBPA Board —_ directors’ resolution.
..... cc . of Directors resolution autho- “When I refused to sign it,
43.00 28.00 ABDAB rising the Island Bay settlement. Mr Moss declared that he

14.60 * 44.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60 15.50 14.00
0.60 = 0.35 RND Holdings .
wk-Hi -Low und Name
1.2736 Colina Money Market Fund 1.328271"
3.0569 . 2.6662 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.0569***
2.5961 2.3241 Colina MSI Preferred Fund . 2.596093**
1.2248 1.1547 Colina Bond Fund 4.224792****
11.3545 | = 10.0000 ‘ a Rrime Income, Fund 11.3545""""*

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 =

He then alleged: “After Lady would resign as counsel to the
Henrietta St George had appar- GBPA. I said to Mr Moss that if
ently received advice not to sign he thought that was what he
the directors resolution, Sir Jack should do, then so be it.”















Last 12 Months


















NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LYDIE REMY OF P.O. BOX





















































MARKET TERMS YIELD - last 42 month dividends divided by NAV KEY.
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity F-44598, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS,
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity * -9 February 2007 IS applying to the Minister responsible for National ity and
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a_ citizen
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week ** 34 January 2007 of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
Change - Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ - Acompany's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today NAV - Net Asset Value *** 34 January 2007 granted, should send a written and signed statement of
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M - Not Meaningful the facts within twenty-eight days from the 9TH day of
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 42 month earnings FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 **** 34 January 2007 FEBRUARY, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality

and Citizenship, P.O.Box .N-71 47, Freeport, Bahamas.

re sere ONE
(L242) 904-2503 .

PUA ssa ales

Well established Fashion Retail
Business. Well known and |

Rrecy rccacee ela NL (accel

20 years at same prime location.

@)

Email: b.inquiries@gmail.com

WANTED

ion f the 1 Ath anniversary a the \ Secretarial Assitant to Managing Director of Corporate Service






Sa Sp . CK Company and Secretary for Partners of Associated Law Firm.
in the Methodist Cases TOA ‘Must have ability to communicate with high net worth clients.




Computer ability essential together with knowledge of
incorporation of Bahamian companies and the preparation of
appropriate Members and Directors Minutes.





he Nassau Circuit of the Bahamas

aicos Islands Conference of the Methodist Church . :




he Caribbean and the Amer

Telephone: 327-3127
Fax: 327-6259





“NOTICE

‘ NOTICE is hereby given that NANNELL LAVELLE EXANTUS
OF RUSSELL TOWN, EIGHT MILE ROCK, P.O. BOX F-42986,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
9TH day of FEBRUARY, 2007 to the Minister responsible for

Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.













Rh emorial Methodist Church
08 Montrose Avenue, Nassau, Bahama
Saturday, February 17, 200

READY FOR MIRACLES!
READY FOR PEACE AND JUSTICE
FOR ALL OF GOD’S CHILDREN! —

PSALM 20:6-9

Se RES ARREST EE

for ad rates

ee

WK <« 9 x
ACO’ | 3.60 | CHG 00.00 / %CHG 00.00 F o 04. lution for the GBPA in which
52wk-Hi — 52wk-Low Security Previous Close Today's Clase__ Change Daily Vol. EPS$ Div$ _ there was only a minimum quo-
1.85 0.54. ~~ Abaco Markets 0.76 0.76 - 0.00 -0.282 0.000 N/M Leonard, its general counsel,in rum of four directors to sign the
12.05 40.40 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 11.00 0.00 1.689 0400 6.5 3.64% October 2006 to reach a settle- resolution. This was produced
8.11 6.90 Bank of Bahamas 8.11 : 8.11 0.00 200 0.796 0.260 10.2 3.21% ment on the Island Bay dispute. to me on October 23, 2006. I
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 * 0.00 0.265 0.020 3.0 2.50% He was allegedly trying to get refused to sign the further res-
1.85 1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.85 1.85 0.00 0.199 0.060 93 3.24%| Mr Leonard to advise and sup- olution.
1.49 1.12 Fidelity Bank 1.27 1.27 0.00 0.170 0.050 7.5 3.94% port a settlement with Island “I was very upset that I was
10.24 9.00 Cable Bahamas 10.24 10.24 0.00 0.715 0.240 14.3 2.34% Bay that would result in the _ being asked to sign this new res-
2.20 1.64 Colina Holdings 2.00 2.00 0.00. 0.078 0.040 25.6 200% GBPA paying $800,000, plus olution since T had received con-
13.34 9.25 Commonwealth Bank 13.34 13.34 0.00 0.998 0.680 13.4 5.10% $120,000 in fees to their attor- _firmation from Christopher Caf-
6.26 4.22 _ Consolidated Water BDRs 5.17 5.19 , 0.02 0.134 0.045 38.6 0.87%] ney, Mr Moss. ferata, a co-Trustee of Lady
2.88 2.40 | Doctor's Hospital 2.44 2.44 0.00 0.295 0.000 83 0.00% “J recall that Mr Carey Henrietta St George’s, that he
6.21 5.54 Famguard 5.70 5.70 0.00 0.552 0.240 10.3 4.21% Leonard was uncomfortable = was now her alternate and Mr
12.30 10.70 Finco 12.30 12.30 0.00 0.779 0.570 15.7 4.65%] and unhappy with the proposed Cafferata had told Mr Leonard
14.60 40.90 _ FirstCaribbean 14.60 14.60 0.00 0.921 0.500 15.9 3.42% settlement amount, although he _ that he would not sign the draft
16.71 10.00 — Focol 16.71 16.71 0.00 1.476 0.510 11.3 3.05% considered that it was perhaps resolution of October 16, '
1.15 0.50 Freeport Concrete 0.50 0.50 0.00 0.434. 0.000 NIM 0.00% advisable for the GBPA to set- 2006......+++
10.20 7.10 ICD Utilities 7.25 7.25 0.00: 0532 0.100 13.6 1.38%) tle to avoid potential liability. | “Sir Jack Hayward and Mr.
19.10 8.52 J. S. Johnson 9.05 9.05 0.00 0.588 0.560 15.4 619% do recall, however, that Mr _ Babak seemed to be absessed

On October 16, 2006, Sir Jack Hayward and Mr Babak :



26S TMK SR TM Wo Oe ROD ERE SPINS IDOE we 4

vy,

v.

Pia

SF

Mind’

a

Pi AEA E EAU OEE ET FPO OS ov 2 6e%s OTS

FSSC s TT a tt.
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007, PAGE 7B



FROM page 1B

Bahamians Agitating for a Ref-
erendum in Free Trade
(BAREF), described this as “gal-
loping nonsense”.

The Tribune has been told
that the Bahamas has not yet
decided what areas of the EPA
it will seek reservations on.
These reservations would allow
this nation to reduce its import
duties and customs tariffs, plus

_open up certain areas of its

economy, over a phased peri-
od of time, and in some cases
not at all.

However, Mr Moss said yes-
terday that the notion of obtain-
ing reservations form certain
parts of the EPA was “wishful
thinking”, as if countries were
“allowed to cherry pick and do
what they want, it makes no
sense to have an agreement”.

’ -He pointed out that the EPA
would be “binding” on all
CARIFORUM members once
completed, meaning this nation
would be tied to whatever the

‘wider Caribbean agreed and

leaving it with little room to
manoevere in its own interests.

Mr Moss argued that CARI-
FORUM nations who were
much bigger exporters to the
EU than the Bahamas would
want to secure and maintain
duty-free access to the Euro-
pean markets for a much wider
range of goods and services
than this nation.

Due to the reciprocal nature
of the EPA, CARIFORUM
would then have to allow the
same goods made by EU pro-
‘ducers to enter their nations
duty free, and the binding
nature of thge agreement, Mr

“Moss said, meant these duty-

free imports would go far
beyond the $14 million the Gov-
ernment felt it would lose.

He added: “It’s going to be
one document, and that repre-
sents all the Caribbean nations.
The Bahamas will be obligated
to take into consideration or
permit the free flow’ of these
products into the Bahamas duty

. free.

“These agreements are not
just about rum and fisheries. It’s
about investment, it’s about ser-
vices, it’s about immigration.
It’s so wide-ranging. These are
the areas you have to think
about.”

Mr.:Moss said the Bahamas
would not be able to ‘reserve’



Authority.




business objectives.

to:-



financial clearances.

reviewed.



Applicants must possess the following qualifications:-

Responsibilities Duties

1. Processing recommendations for:

* Probationary appointments
* Confirmations in substantive posts

¢ Promotions and reclassification

¢ Benefits under the Authority’s policies
¢ Benefits under the law, eg. Employment Act and National Insurance Act
¢ Employee transfers and secondment

¢ Employee grievances

¢ Disciplinary actions and penalties

¢ Involuntary and voluntary terminations

the areas it thought it could, as
this would be non-compliant
with the World Trade Organi-
sation’s (WTO) rules-based
trading' system, and concepts
such as National Treatment,
reciprocity and ‘Most Favoured
Nation’.

He warned that the EU was
also likely to use the EPA as
an opportunity to try and push
the Bahamas into signing up to
its EU Savings Tax Directive
and further tax information
exchange agreements.

The Tribune reported yester-
day that the Government has
decided to give up $10-$14 million
in taxes per annum that it earns

on imports from the European .

Union (EU) in favour of protect-
ing Bahamian exports to Europe,
and the jobs associated with the
positive $20 million trade balance
they produce.

A briefing prepared for the
Cabinet’s sub-committee on trade
by the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs, which has responsibility
for international trade, warned
that the Bahamas would lose “its
favourable $20 million trade bal-
ance” with the EU if it failed to
sign the EPA, while hundreds of
jobs would be jeopardised if Bac-
ardi and Polymers International
shut their respective operations
due to their exports becoming
uncompetitive.

The Government document
detailed that the Bahamas export-
ed some $66.315 million worth of
goods to the EU in 2004, largely
made up of Bacardi’s rum and
spirits products, lobster and other
sea food products, and polymers
from Polymers International in
Freeport...

These goods entered the EU

duty-free, but if the Bahamas
remains outside the EPA, they
will attract from 2008 onwards
what is called the ‘Most Favoured
Nation’ (MEN) rate of duty. This
means that EU members have to
apply the same rate of duty to the
same imports from all nations;
they cannot discriminate.

If the Bahamas lost its duty-
free preferences by remaining
outside the EPA, the Bacardi,
Polymers International and sea
food products would all see their
prices increase and become
uncompetitive.

The Government document
added that if the Bahamas signed
on to the EPA, it would lose
about $10-$14 million in per
annum tax revenues on European
imports.

As a two-way agreement, if the
Bahamas signs on to the EPA, it
would have to offer the same tar-
iff cuts to exports from the EU
as those countries were offering
Bahamian companies, thus reduc-
ing import duties and the tax take.

The EPA would also see the
Bahamas offer market access to
EU firms in areas such as invest-
ments, services and government
procurement, provided it did not
seek any reservations or opt-outs
from particular provision.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs
concluded: “Were the Bahamas
to sign on to the EPA when it is
negotiated, the revenue loss
would be in the $10 - $14million
range, but the Bahamas would
keep its export markets and
secure a significant number of
Bahamian jobs.

“If, however, the Bahamas
were not to sign on to the EPA,
the losses could include, its
favourable $20 million trade bal-
ance with the EU, the loss of two

SOUS CHEFS

Private club is seeking experienced full-time sous
chefs with a minimum of eight (8) years experience
in the culinary field. All Standard diplomas from the
Nassau Hotel Training College are demanded. The

applicants must have

extensive

knowledge in

management skills and excellent levels of cooking skills.

Interested persons should fax resumes to #362-6245
to the attention of:

THE DIRECTOR OF CUISINE
LYFORD CAY CLUB
Lyford Cay Drive
Nassau, Bahamas



; Public Hospitals Authority

Advertisement

| Manager III (Human Resources)
Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the post
of Human Resources Manager III, Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre, Public Hospitals

Bachelors Degree in Business Administration. Management, or equivalert qualification (a
Masters degree would be an advantage); and at least three (3) years post qualification
experience in human resource management. Excellent oral written communication skills and
computer skills are essential.

The Human Resources Manager III is a part of the Human Resources Team at Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre, and shares responsibility for the day-to-day administration of human

“ resources transactions and services; to ensure that the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre human
resources policies and procedures, transactions and services are aligned with Authority’s

Within this context, the Human Resources Manager III will be responsible for, but not limited

2. Liaising with the Payrolls Unit with matters relating to salaries adjustments and

3. Managing the performances appraisal process for staff within assigned areas of responsibili-
ties, ensuring that evaluations are ongoing and appraisal forms are prepared, distributed and

Opportunities will also be given for involvement in human resources strategic functions such
as policies, developing an annual human resources plan, staff training and development, qual-
ity improvement initiatives To facilitate the Manager’s professional development and career

advancement within Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre.

Letters of application, resume, documentary evidence of qualifications and three (3) references
should be submitted through the head of your department, no later than 28th February, 2007, to
the Director Human Resources (Acting), Public Hospitals Authority PO. Box N-8200, or Ist

Floor Corporate Office, Dockendale House, West Bay Street.




























EPA may cost Bahamas more than $14m taxes

significant manufacturing opera-
tions (Bacardi and Polymers), the
revenue from lobster exports, and
the loss of a number of Bahamian
jobs.

“Once of the conclusions to be
drawn from the above analysis is
that, maintaining its preferential
access to the European market is
in the best interest of the
Bahamas. Thus in determining
the structure of ifs market access
offer, the Bahamas could seek to
mitigate its revenue losses over
the long term, while maintaining
market access.”

The Ministry recommended
that the Bahamas seek to exclude
from the EPA negotiations cuts in
tariffs on poultry, fresh meat,
fruits and vegetables.

It added that Bahamas tariff
rates between 5-30 per cent
should be cut in the short-term,
while those of 35, per cent and
higher be slashed in a phased,
long-term approach.

CAY CAMP DIRECTOR:

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000) |

LUCAS (OVERSEAS) LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
LUCAS (OVERSEAS) LIMITED has been dissolved and
struck off the Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution
issued by the Registar General on the 24th day of January, 2007.

FIDES LIQUIDATORS INC.
Arango-Orillac Building,
East 54th Street, Panama

Republic of Panama
Liquidator



four positions)

For the period July 12th, 2007 - August 20th, 2007 (Monday to Friday)

These persons must be trained teachers, must love children, be CPR
trained, sports enthusiasts, great swimmers and highly motivated.

Children attending Cay Camp will range from 4 to 12 years.

The Director of Human Resources

Lyford Cay Club
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax #362-6245



Join the leading Conservation
Organization in the country

Job Opportunity for
Education Officer

Primary Responsibility:

Responsible to the Deputy Executive Director for development
of educational programs and materials. .

Schedule and implement school presentations

Create Educational and interpretive material in support of
national parks and protected areas.

Facilitate and conduct environmental education workshops
for teachers

Responsible for oversight and maintenance of BNT Library.

Duties:

CON OO Cue NO

Responsible to the Deputy Executive Director

Assist Deputy Executive Director in the implementation of
educational components of BNT Projects and Programs
Schedule and implement School Presentations

Assist in the creation of educational materials

Coordinate the distribution of educational materials

Assist in the creation of National Park Outreach Materials ,
Assist in the creation of National Park educational signage
Facilitate and conduct environmental education workshops

for teachers
. Oversee and maintain the BNT Library

. Assist BNT Library users

. Manage the BNT Photo Library

. Conduct school tours of The Retreat Garden

. Assist other BNT Departments i.e. membership; parks and
science with materials for exhibitions and public outreach,

, Attend workshops and conferences as required.

Requirements for the post:

1. Arelevant first degree in Primary or Secondary Education or
a degree in Natural Sciences; Social Studies. Environmental
studies with teaching certification and at least three years
relevant experience in the classroom.

Experience and knowledge of the Bahamian Natural
Environment

Strong Organizational Skills

Excellent People Skills

Good writing and communication ability

Strong computer skills

Willing to travel within The Bahamas and abroad as required.

Benefits include competitive salary commensurate with qualifications
and experience, and group medical insurance.

Applications must include cover letter, resume, writing sample,

and three letters of reference. Applications should be mailed to

Bahamas National Trust, Human Resources Manager, P.O. Box N
1 4105 or email:bnt@bahamasnationaltrust.org by March 5, 2007.


“Paar we

se Geer rr uve

‘THE TRIBUNE

Commercial air service ('2.\, U4)
returns to Florida Cays
after six year hiatus

fi By ADRIAN SAINZ
-.! AP Business Writer
~" MARATHON, Florida (AP)
'__ Commercial air service
returned to the middle Florida
«Keys on Thursday after a six-
.-year hiatus, promising to bring a

«financial boost while giving»

+,tourists more direct access to the
y island chain. i

A 40-seat Delta Airlines
» regional jet landed at Florida

. Keys Marathon Airport at 12:34

pm The fully booked flight was
greeted by about 200 people,
including someone dressed as a

a7six-foot-high conch shell. Two >

* fire trucks parked on the 5,000-
’ foot runway sprayed arching
, streams of water over the plane.
‘ Delta is offering a daily flight
; to and from its Atlanta hub and
* Marathon, with an additional
¢ arrival in Marathon on Friday
‘and an additional departure to
i Atlanta on Sunday. Flights
‘ aren’t cheap, ranging from about
\ $600 to more than $1,000 per
ticket.

“I’m so happy this flight is

4
5
t . .
open because jit will save us so

much time,” said passenger’

} Katie Maginn of Atlanta. “I
’ have an amazing time whenever
I’m down here and I now can
, Start my vacation earlier.”
Marathon is.a city of 11,000
people about an hour’s drive
; from both the fishing and div-
‘ ing destination of Key Largo and
. historic Key West. For the past
six years, tourists have had the
inconvenient option of flying
¢ into Miami and driving up to

Pa a as

vw

“* three hours or more to reach

‘ their Keys destination by using
« U.S. Highway 1. They also fly

into Key West’s busy airport,
* which has 60 flights per day, and
“drive to Marathon.

+t The restored service means a

‘more direct path for tourists who
Anave the Keys and the: waters
surrounding them on theiragen-
“da. Tourism generates $2.2 bil-
_ lion-a year in the Florida Keys.
* Fhe Marathon airport
*remained open for charter and
pcorporate flights, air taxis and
«private lessons after commercial
*service ended in April 2000. At
“that time, the airport was suf-
fering from decreasing capacity
stemming from sluggish summer
traffic.
*. The rebirth of commercial ser-
pvice did not come easy. U.S.
r-Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen and
*Keys officials fought hard for an
“agreement from the Trans-
portation Safety Administration

soe ewe

Role Responsibilities

to offer baggage screeners.

The agency at first said it did
not have enough resources to
provide federal baggage screen-
ers. That caused Delta to push
back its start date from October
2006.

But Ros-Lehtinen sought help -

from Republican U.S. Rep. John
Mica, then a member of the
House aviation subcommittee.

. They lobbied the TSA to enter

in a partnership program in
which private contractors can
eventually take over the duties
of federal screeners.

“We put a lot of pressure on
the agency, but good pressure,
not pressuring them into doing
something that they shouldn't
do (but) into having them see
it’s a logical decision to open this
airport up,” said Ros-Lehtinen, a
Republican who represents Mia-
mi-Dade County and most of
the Keys.

Also secured was a $750,000
grant from the Federal Aviation
Administration for the airport,
and more than $300,000 was
raised locally to provide profit
guarantees for the first year. The
Monroé County Tourist Devel-
opment Council has pledged
$600,000 over three years for
advertising, Marathon Mayor
Chris Bull said.

Officials tout the economic

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007, PAGE 9B





BUSINESS

advantages of adding commer-
cial traffic.

The new service is estimated
to add 27 jobs and generate
about $43.7 million — more than
double the $17.1 million it gen-
erated in 2004, a study by The
Boyd Group showed.

The addition of commercial
service faced little opposition
from residents, mainly because
the airport is adding only one
flight which won’t significantly
affect noise. But some small-
business owners said they are
not sure the new service will
help them financially.

John Paryse, 61, owns the 7-
room Anchor Inn just down U.S.
1 from the airport.

He says travelers who spend
$600 or more on a flight would
more likely prefer to spend big
money on a more expensive
resort hotel with water access
and scores of amenities instead
of at his clean, inexpensive road-
side hotel.

“The people they’re going to
count on are a bit more upscale,”

_ said Paryse, who charges $75 to

$99 per room. “It might help if
they priced it more affordably,
but I don’t know.”
Ros-Lehtinen said she was
wants to expand service in
Marathon and Key West. Peter
Horton, Monroe County’s air-

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MAR-KELLON GILVERT OF
P.O. BOX CB-12627, EXUMA, BAHAMAS: is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and

that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days: from the 16th day of January, 2007 to the Minister -
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,

Nassau, Bahamas.











NOTICE

NOTICE

is hereby given that
FAITH AVENUE, CARMICHEAL ROAD SOUTH, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 16th day of
February, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

mit





ROSE REGIS OF

Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited, a subsidiary of Citigroup, a leading financial
institution with a presence in over 100 countries and over 100 million
customers worldwide, is seeking candidates for the position of Technology
Controls Officer in our Technology Department.

- Manage the Change Management Process throughout the entire lifecycle
and keep associated records updated.

Review database security audit logs, access logs, incident reports and
on-line reports using various database security tools such as SEMS
and APP Detective.

Monitor software and hardware patching and licensing to maintain

co = we ew er

compliance with Citigroup and Industry Standards.

Assist in the preparation and tracking of information for internal and
external Information Security audits in accordance with generally
accepted IS audit standards and controls.

Assist in the execution of technical Risk and Compliance Self Assessment

‘ (RCSA) and participate in the identification, recording, monitoring
: and reporting of corrective action plans.

experience

~ Knowledge/Skills Required

Strong oral and written communication skills

Provide backup for the Information Security Administrator and Business
Information Security Officer.
Bachelors of Arts/Science in Information Technology or equivalent

2-4 years related experience; experience with Information Security
audits or Compliance-related positions an asset.

Excellent time management, organization and administrative skills
Solid knowledge of Oracle and SQL

Experience with Change Management systems .
Proficient in MS Office Suite, LAN/WAN environment

Interested Bahamian candidate should forward a copy of their resume by
February 23, 2007 to: Human Resources, Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited, P.O.
Box N-1576, Nassau, Bahamas OR Fax: (242) 302-8779 OR Email:
janice.gibson @citigroup.com





JEWELLERY STORE MANAGERS

Discover a rewarding and
challenging career catering to the
country’s visitors in the exciting
retail jewelry business!!!

I

I

I

1

1

1

|
Do You Have What it Takes? '
ARE YOU... I
Confident? * A Leader? ¢ Self Motivated? I

* Professional? « Mature (25 yrs or older)? * Dedicated? :
I

I

i

[f the answer isYES then take the next step

FAX RESUME TO 326-2824

SALARY OPPORTUNITY COMMENSURATE WITH EXPERIENCE & QUALIFICATION

port director, said expanding ser-
vice at Marathon was a goal.

“We have opportunities for
other airlines as well because the
Delta numbers are so strong,”
Horton said. “I see nothing but
increased air service for this
facility.”

Â¥

a



OVE ONLY DIRECTOR/COORDINATOR Ione position) |

For the period July 9th, 2007 - August 21st, 2007 (Monday to, Friday)
except on Holidays.

This individual will report to the Pool Director and be totally
responsible for the smooth operation of the Cay Camp with all Cay
Camp Directors reporting to him/her.

The Cay Camp Director/Coordinator must be a trained teacher, must
love children, be CPR trained, a sports enthusiast and a good
swimmer. This individual must be highly motivated.

Children attending Cay Camp will range from 4 to 12 years.

The Director of Human Resources
Lyford Cay Club
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax #362-6245























The American Embassy is presently considering applications 3
i for the following position:

OQUCHER EXAMINER

Serves as the Voucher Examiner responsible for examining and
§ processing a variety of vouchers for submission to the certifying
officer. The Voucher Examiner also serves as the back up to the Chief
Time-Keeper.

This position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:



An Associate Degree in the area of Accounting or Finance.
Two years accounting experience or related fiscal work is required.
Must have a good working knowledge of Microsoft Office Suite

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:



Must have ability to meet deadlines in a timely manner and work:
independently with minimum supervision
Must possess good oral and written communication skills.




IThe successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation
package including performance-based incentives, medical and dental §
insurance, life insurance, pension and opportunities for training and:
a development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or citizens who are eligible for,
employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.




| Application forms are available from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday:
through Friday at the security area of the American Embassy, Queen

i Street. Completed applications should be returned to the Embassy :
addressed to the Human Resources Office no later than Thursday,
| February 22, 2007.













APARTMENT 3-G

YOU'RE BEING UNREASONABLE.
T NEVER INTENDED TO @REAK
OUR CONTRACT.











ANYTHING INTERESTING IN THE
PAPER, DEAR?
























RATU, YOU

ULL GIVE YOUR NIECE ¥
THE BEST BIRTHDAY =! yy
PARTY EVER, DOWN TO

THE LAST DETAIL. - MILLS...








l€ THAT'G

wil | | YOUR
lan Ee q DE CIGION,
Se CQ a MY FRIEND BS
eae ei BOBBY WILL
f (itr AO oe se o ere

MR,





















HEY, NEP---HARRY

; HAs TO GET HOME,
CO ee WE HAVE TO GO
THE PARTY!












WANNA HEAR IT2”

The Obligatory Finesse

South dealer.
Neither side vulnerable.

%

| WE WROTE YOU A'GET WELL’ SONG,





ten or jack, hoping West started with
the doubleton ace.

PAGE 11B







THAT'S MY DAD.
ALANS LOOKING
QUT FOR ME.



























































NORTH Observe that it would be wrong
4Q4 for South to cover the jack or ten
VÂ¥AQ6 with the king because the king would :
#KI108 lose to the ace and South would later ‘
‘&9742 have to lose another spade trick. This ents - Mar 21/ ‘Apr 20.
WEST. EAST maneuver is the obligatory finesse, Poe ave to strike a balance
@A5 43102 and when the cards are favorably Perea Rice nie and common
842 ¥109753 placed for declarer, it gains him a J jo ouisi Sen AL you do so,
0763 4942 trick. uP mee a will repeatedly get
&AKQ106 $83 Occasionally, the defense can r ere
MARVIN SOUTH invoke a countermeasure to the eee - Apr rae 21
i a @K98763 obligatory finesse, as in the present , on a course Of action may
MY WIFE'S FAVORITE I HOPE You SAVED WKS Sear out is declarer at four oades prove difficult for you, Taurus.
RESPONSE WHENEVER THE RECEIPT!” @AQ5 and West cashes the K-A of clubs, While you can see all sides of the
Lick OOT A CIT s #35 then continues with the queen. ceo you also envision all of
rOR nei The bidding: - ha If South is allowed to go about his = posible outcomes.
South West North East business unimpeded, he will, as we GEMINI — May 22/Jun 21
1¢ 2% 2¢ have seen, lose only one trump trick You've found luck in love, Gemini.
26 Pass 36 and so make the contract. Your current match is a keeper and
















start playing
lead a low spi
dummy. If the que
(marking West with the ace),

4¢
Opening lead — king of clubs.

Because the play is not a favorite to
succeed, it is used by declarer more
out of desperation than by choice.
As an example, examine
North-South spade holding in this
‘, hand. The normal way for declarer to
this combination is to
ade toward the queen in
en holds the trick
declarer

But if the defense functions per-
fectly, South can be defeated. When
West leads the queen of clubs, East

South is helpless against this
defense. He is forced to overruff with
the king — otherwise, he is down
immediately — and lead a trump
toward the queen.

This does him no good because
West rises with the ace and returns
the ten of clubs. Dummy has to fol-
low suit, whereupon East once again
trumps his partner’s high club — this







the relationship will last long-term.
If you're already attached, the fires
of love will burn even more brightly.



The obligatory finesse is a play muffs with the ten, even though it CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22
used by declarer to wina trick thathe appears routine to discard on his | A friend in need could use a good
would otherwise surely partner’s high club. shoulder to cry on this week,

Cancer. Better turn off that cell
phone or PDA and devote some
attention to this person.

LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23

Some people’ are growing impa-
tient over an important choice you
have to make, Leo. Don’t let their
eagerness push you into making a
premature decision.

VIRGO -— Aug 24/Sept 22



time with the jack — to secure a one- .

next retums a spade from dummy
trick set.

‘ The urge to procrastinate rears its
and plays low after East produces the eee

ugly head, Virgo, but you won't
be swept up by the temptation.
You now know it’s faster to just
breeze through everything.
LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23

Your bubbly personality opens doors
to which others are often not granted









2)

GCOCANCS Corr / Pow seta)




Dist BY UNE REAL PRES OYHOCHTE




HOW many words of































Moe WALL IE, (HC. ; a Geraruue four letters or more ee one can you make from 2 2S 253 a access. Use this skill to your advan-
TIGER the letters shown oo 83 2 mW tage by introducing yourself to as
; here? In making a < 3 8 e 2» 8 many people as possible.
TWAS COUNTING To £ THOUGHT gietipe sess fa a a2Gek SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22
FIVE AND COLLUNT FOR SURE HE Bach must contain the ett ne Caring for others gives yon ven
REMEMBER WHAT WOULD? KNOW centre letter and there ae 3 hES and fuzzy feeling, Scorpio, even
CAME AFTER SEVEN ; must be at least one 25 85°° though they may think you're all
nine-letter word. No e<< 385 sting and no substance. Volunteer
plurals or verb forms 3geo8 g your time this week.
ending in “s”, no words with initial capitals and no g2a s 3S SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
Lic with a hyphen or apostrophe permitted. 3 g Q a c This week you hear what someone
The i word of a phrase is permitted (e.g. inkjet aggre is telling you with an exaggerated
in inkjet printer). os 2 3 Q level of clarity: The stars:are mak-
eyreG ing sure communication channels
www_kingteatures.com Cee Wey Gand 24. excellent 31 (or more) 5 2 23 “ a wade open os reception:
Solution tomorrow. , 25322 CAPRICORN — Dec 22/Jan 20
«8587 Capricorn, this week you'll be in dan-
2528 ger of giving into peer pressure, play-
77 @ ing “follow the leader” in a sense.

Resist the temptation to do so because
it’s a bad road to travel.

AQUARIUS — Jan 21/Feb 18



| CRYPTIC PUZZLE |























































ae mnie Ast , DOWN Your actions of late haven’t been the
eenataed 6) up 2 Cultivable by a Middle Easterner most commendable, but you can bal-
go pete ya rarer with left foot missing (6) ance them out with good deeds this
nolse (8) 3 : is inventively by an inventor week, Aquarius. For redemption,
9 rcaenieee in ; 6 provide a helping hand to someone.
a le a defunct deity A Abit ofa simpleton, you'll allow (3) PISCES — Feb 19/Mar 20
40 One of a couple holding up the 5 Badly riled by one that won't work i i
aor a a ; You are in ane this week, but not
( H tirely comfortable with this new
11 Are things apt to fall off the back of | 6 Growing evidence that Silas is lepraah ical aa 10 into i i
one?) upset by heartless Fay (7) Acadians, French-. oF tease
12 Just he test bit stala, perhaps (5) | 7 Tieat speed (4 speaking people 2 aaa
13 mistake that always comes out? 8 Such acid Is used in the endless in Louisiana
: . unravelling of crime (6)
: et easily seen in numbers (3) 42. Discover the French have a navy!
a emain heartless in restraint (4) (5) ;
4 ae obviously not done on | 43 Start boozing what's left of the port
49 The drink is salty! (5) Oye 5 ae
20 Don't walk out - get involved! (4,2 14 Oldie possibly enabled to run Sergey Erenburg v Shen
a ( neers: ato 15 oo South it makes Diana cross israel v China wornen, an
‘4 7
24 Thanks a lot for very litle! (3) that is (5) . team champlonship,
25 Does it strike the viewer as 16 f you want a fight, fish ‘em upt (5) Beersheva 2005. Material Is
something fishy? (7) | 148 Cause of mother's tears? (5) level, with White's extra rook
26 of French as German, it's said to 19 It pee be ET * hatanced by Black's bishop
glorious (5 21 Accommodate decepti , == Y 4
27 Half dead, but only at first 92 Apicture to draw at some risk? (6) f ' and two pawns. However,
appearance (5) _ ; 23 Keyboard work (6) ACROSS DOWN Black (to move) Is on top due
eee eee | 8 coment Seer th ae gee
: July (5) 6 Concel 3 Jee ; White's
- Lan a rey (5) 26 Hindustani word for “powder” (4) uu 9 Master-of- 4 imp S still seems plenty of play, but
“Tt Op Pi p on your leg 28 a a position you can't standl x ceremonies (7) 5 . Recreation (5) Xt took just three unlikely
10 Bend (5) 6 Favours (7) forced moves to settle the
CRYPTIGSOLUTIONS me OY sds > 11 Foo (6) 7 Tear (4) game and induce White's
a. 12 Float (5) 8 Turned down resignation. What
a 13 Solace (7) (6) Shen Yang, 16, was the
ACROSS. dtateet 7, nee iE stairs 2 Abie 13, ee 14, hey 15 a 15 Domestic 12 Sewer (5) revelation of the against mate grandmasters and
A -)Gor , Brer , Plo , S-team-boat 23, Disc(-over 24, Arts ‘1 ‘ championsh lowly Russian.
eel 27, Anna 29, Stop 32, Play 33, Boot-H 34, Panels 35, All right 36, uu 17 aise ia eseh) rated Sal her own ee LEONARD BARDEN
et-re hn
18 Shopping sound (5) .
DOWN: 1, Fleas 2, AnvcL 3, Ashe 4, Ar-son 5, Pe-as 6, Carrot 9, Teapot 11, ° street (8) 15 Errand-boys
Bob 12, D-ebts 13, Ger-many 15, Lea 16, Got 148, Recall 20, Lass-o 21, Sin 19 Felines (5) (5)
coe 23, Do-sage 25, Pot 28, N-as-a-L 30, Tough 31, P-hot-o 32, Pear 33, 20 Dried grape (6) 16 Curt (5) te eae oo ae Se
a Fewer 4) 18 Smith's block ;
24 Curve (3) (5) =
EASY SOLUTIONS 25 Angry reply (7) 19 Bounded (7)
oS 21 Legondary CHESS SOLUTIONS
king (6) nnn me
ACROSS: 4, Animal 7, Reappear 8, Statue 10, Cress 13, Soon 14, Earl 15, Sent . ae (5) 22 Find (6) “Zan pur +S EPH P29
16, Hen 17, Oval 19, Edit 21, Epidermis 23, Free 24, Cost 26, Far 27, Note 29, 23 Position (6) umanb pur Guy SHO} +TON ED H PU HED (ZAM
Told 32, Onus 33, Tower 34, Format 35, Eeriness 36, Crater . ae 25 Stiff (5) pue «cud fy € 1) ZOy € F9uO (usend au SUM
DOWN: 1, Truce 2, Paper 3, Opus 4, Arson 5, Iran 6, Amulet 9, Totems 11, Raw Y 31 Postpone (5) rd nh (*) PRR EOTT
12, Slope 13, Selects 15, Sad 16, His 18, Vienna 20, Ditto 21, Err 22, Roe 23, nish (3)




Favour 25, Ale 28, Outer 30, Owner 31, Dress 32, Omit 33, Trip


PAGE 12B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007

ewly-appointed PLP senato
calls for ‘efficient’ licensing

former Grand
Bahama Chamber of
Commerce president

yesterday called for business
licence and approvals proce-
dures to be “quick and effi-
cient”, if the Bahamas was to
preserve its attraction for inter-
national investors.

Newly-appointed PLP Sena-
tor, Dr Doswell Coakley, told
the Senate: “We cannot go into
the international arena to
invite investors through our
various networks, and when
they come here we make the
procedures unduly cumber-
some. What I want to see,
Madam President, is a more
transparent and improved
schedule on which attorneys,
consultants, business managers
and the like can rely on for the
benefit of their clients.”

Dr Coakley praised the Gov-
ernment and Grand Bahama
Port Authority (GBPA) for
the licensing of Pegasus Wire-

“less, which he described as

_ being “in the advanced stages

of relocating its corporate
headquarters and manufactur-
ing facilities to Freeport,
Grand Bahama”.

The project promised to cre-

. ate 280 jobs for Bahamians, Dr

Coakley said, adding: “Not
only has Pegasus created many
new jobs for enterprising
Bahamians in Grand Bahama,
it has also created a new inter-
national training platform for
those’ of us interested in the
world of ‘cutting edge tech-
nology’. Additionall,:’ it has
effectively established the

threshold for a brand new -
industry for the Bahamas, ‘as >

we move towards further
diversification of the economy
to meet the challenges of a new
and ever changing world
order.”

He said: “And as night fol-
lows day, other high tech com-
panies will now begin to
explore Grand Bahama and,
indeed, other points in the

ST et

in Page B6 of Src NaS Tribune Business section, it was

repo:

ed that Baha Mar Resorts “has to deliver a number of

conditions precedent” to its joint venture partners, Har-
s Entertainment and Starwood. Baha Mar pointed out
esterday that it was satisfied it had achieved those Tee

precedent.-



= 1URI Natt)

w &

“We cannot go into the international
arena to invite investors through our
various networks, and when they come
here we make the procedures unduly

cumbersome. What I want to see,

. Madam President, is a more
transparent and improved schedule on
which attorneys, consultants, business
managers and the like can rely on for

the benefit of their clients.”

Bahamas as an option for their
businesses, thereby bringing to
our shores a new wave of high-
ly skilled and technical job
opportunities.

“The Bahamas will now
undoubtedly become a house-
hold name in the international
media and_-financial trading
centres, thereby giving us free
publicity beyond immediate
estimation. Very soon, I hope
to see The Bahamas refer-
enced in print internationally
as Silicon Valley by The Sea.”

Pegasus Wireless has been
the subject of much contro-
versy, the Prime Minister and

SR. CONSTRUCTION MANAGER NEEDED

nee er ae a eee ee

Duties and Responsibilities:

Coordinate all onsite projects including budget, costs, overall progress,
general performance and unexpected events
Communicating necessary information to vendors, subcontractors, clients and field

supervision

Prepare Budget and Financial Reporting
Maintain Quality Assurance and Control
Establish & monitor administrative procedures for the project

Keep informed on requirements for insurance, Safety, Labor Relations,

and Employee Relations, maintain EEO compliances, etc.

Foster effective working relations with all involved in the project
Keep Senior Management informed on progress of project and budget
Perform other duties and take on other responsibilities as required

Qualifications: Formal engineering or, architectural training with a minimum 25 years of
experience in managing a team of professionals in the construction of very multi
component projects. The successful candidate must have a proven track record in being involvedin
projects from 100 million to 600 million. It is a prerequisite that the candidate has
; xperience in the construction of projects in the hospitality, entertainment, food service
# . and multi unit high end residential sectors. Experience in constructing marinas capable of
accommodating 120 foot plus yachts would be an asset. Candidate must be proficient in
Microsoft Office, SAGE/Timberline Software, Prolot Manager and Primavera scheduling.
Strong management, leadership, team building and interpersonal skills with the ability to
communicate both verbally and writing. Physical Demands and Work Environment to be

reviewed.

Please respond by email to:
Fax:
Mail:

jobs@ marmatglobal.com
242-363-1279

MARMAT

Attn: Office Manager

P.O.Box CR 56766



a ine em at



www svitzerwiis ler.com

At SvitzerWijsmuller, results and values go hand in hand. With 2,500 employees and a fleet of more than 300 vessels, we provide
towage, salvage and related marine services in over 35 countries worldwide. To sustain our position as one of the world's leading
marine services company, we encourage a culture of commitment, innovation, and entrepreneurship where all employees take

responsibility for our purpose: to provide safety and support at sea. SvitzerWijsmuller is headquartered in Denmark and is part of

the A.P. Moller - Maersk Group.

Freepoint Tug & Towing Services, Ltd. (FTTS) is a J/V company, 50/50 owned by SvitzerWijsmuller and South Riding Point Hold-
ing Ltd (World Point Terminals Inc.). FTTS operates a fleet of 5 tugs, providing services in Freeport, South Riding Point, and at
times on neighbouring islands. A Technical Supervisor is needed in Freeport to manage the technical maintenance of our growing

tug operation.

TECHNICAL SUPERVISOR

Freepoint Tug & Towing Services, Ltd. — Freeport GB, Bahamas

THE POSITION

The Technical Supervisor will be responsible for the super-
vision and leadership of all technical aspects of vessel

management, which include:

The right candidate should be motivated and orientated towards
growth within the operation in Freeport, advancement with up-

coming projects in The Bahamas, and potentially globally
throughout the SvitzerWijSmuller organization

" Routine Preventative Maintenance Planning and Im-

plementation

Personal development can be achieved only if the candidate:

Coordinating work with our partner and clients while

maintaining vessels in Class condition
Coordination and planning with Class and Flag’ State

surveyors

Preparing requisition and purchasing of spares, equip-

ment, materials, etc for vessels

Assist in drydock planning and supervision, including

negotiation with shipyards

Meeting the high SvitzerWijsmuller Health, Safety,

thorities

documentation

Takes an active role on building and maintaining strong
working relationship with clients, pilots, suppliers and au-

Keep records of work performed and all other contractual

Cont’ bute to the continuous development of procedures

— Dr Doswell Coakley

government intevening direct-
ly with the GBPA to ensure a
licence was granted.

The move has raised con-
cerns about alleged unwar-
ranted interference in the
Port’s business affairs.

Contacts close to the situa-
tion said the GBPA had not
wanted to issue a business
licence to Pegasus and Jasper
Knabb, its president and chief
executive, due to concerns
about the firm’s track record
and ability to deliver what it
was promising the Bahamas
and Freeport. .

The Tribune was told that

Prime Minister Perry. Christie
intervened directly to ensure
Pegasus received the necessary
GBPA approvals for its man-
ufacturing facility, which the
company had already started
to set up last week. .

It is understood that the
issue was discussed between
Mr Christie and Sir Albert
Miller, the GBPA’s chief exec-
utive, when the prime minis-
ter visited Freeport last week.

One source told The Tribune
of the GBPA’s deliberations:
“They did not issue the licence
because they were concerned
about [the firm’s] background.

“The Port Authority, mind-
ful of their regulatory obliga-
tions and the Driftwood fiasco
at the Royal Oasis, were mind-
ful not to repeat it.”

While many view. Pegasus
and its wireless products as a
good fit for Freeport, given the
city’s place as the manufactur-
ing/distribution/logistics hub
for the Bahamas, some believe

the government pushed the -

firm on the GBPA with inde-
cent haste because it was des-
perate to revive Grand
Bahama’s economy, given the
Royal Oasis situation, with an
election pending.

As The Tribune reported in
December, 2006, Pegasus
Wireless as a company has
bounced around during its his-
tory, starting out life incorpo-
rated in Nevada on April 5,
2000, as Burrard Technologies,

“THE TRIBUNE



aa

»
,

*

focusing on software develop-
ment. 2.4
In 2001, it discontinued this

business and became inactive

until December 18, 2001, when
it acquired a Swiss company
called Technocell. Then, on
April 2, 2002, it changed its
name to Blue Industries,
becoming inactive until 2003. It:

only changed its name to Pega: -.

*

sus Wireless in June 2005.
Since then, it has grown via
three acquisitions, the purchase
price being financed by a com-
bination. of cash and Pegasus .

shares. In all three deals, thé.’ 7

cash portion was financed by
Mr Knabb buying stock in
Pegasus, his own company. ©
Controversy dogged Pega-
sus in the months before it
arrived in Freeport, the com-
pany having delisted from the
Nasdaq stock market at the
end of October and retreated
to the over-the-counter mar-
ket.
At the time, Mr Knabb said

‘the move was made to try and

reduce trading volatility in

Pegasus’ stock, which had been |.

targeted by short-sellers. Then;
Pegasus was the subject of 4
class action lawsuit filed in ear-
ly November by Kahn Gauthi-
er Swick, allegedly on behalf
of the company’s sharehold-
ers, after several articles on
Internet website, the Motley
Fool, had appeared criticising
the company and its manage-
ment.

€

.












THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
RESEARCH EDGE FORUM SERIES 2007

Friday, February 16, 12 noon to 1:30pm

Lecture Theatre

Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute
_ Thompson Boulevard.

T opic: New Methods and Technology
in Introcuctory Physics Courses

Presenter: Dr. Carlton Watson, Assistant Professor, Physics, School of
Sciences and Technology.

Studies have shown that traditional methods of teaching do little to
improve students’ understanding of basic concepts of physics. In this
presentation the researcher surveys several innovative methods and
technologies, based on the principles of “active learning” and reports on
a research initiative aimed at improving the performance of students in
introductory physics classes. Dr Watson outlines future studies and ways
in which these methods can be extended beyond the physics classroom.

This is a lecture not to be missed by parents, educators, students
and anyone who has an interest in raising the bar of excellence
in science education in The Bahamas

We look forward to seeing you and encourage you to bring along





QUALIFICATIONS

. Minimum degree or certificate from vessel-related or
engineering program
Living in or willing to relocate to Freeport

Environment, and Quality standards, including
manage technical aspects of ISM and |SO09001
Regular reporting to Regional Office

Minimum 5 years technical experience with tugs or similar
vessels

Proficient in English

The Technical Supervisor will receive support from other
SvitzerWijsmmuller staff locally in Freeport and throughout
the Region, and will report to the Regional Technical
Manager in Miami, Florida, USA.

Strong Safety and Quality awareness
Employee-motivation and team-building skills

Ability to implement and promote systems and procedures
Furthermore, the Technical Supervisor will receive appro- within the organization .
priate training and education based on his/her starting
qualifications, and will have the opportunity to gain expo-

_ -9 throughout various training programs and exchanges.

CONTACTS

Application with resume/CV to be sent by to Freepoint Tug &
Towing Services Ltd., Technical Manager Marinus Lorwa, #4
Milton St., Box F-43550 Freeport G.B., Bahamas

Tel. +1 242 352 3060, Mob. +1 242 727 0046

E-mail marinus lopwa@svitzerwismuller.com

PERSOMAL DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES
For the right candidate, the job offers significant career and
personal development opportunities.

ae, SvitzerWijsmuller

Pe Coe ee YN ee



colleagues, friends and/or students. If further information is needed,
please contact








Research at telephone 326-4501/2.



The Lecture is open to the public and free of charge.




THE COLLEGE OF THE B. AF:

EDUCATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS ‘

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs
PAGE 2C, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007



US to play
Argentina,
Paraguay and
Colombia in
first round of
Copa America

mw SOCCER
CARACAS,
Venezuela
Associated Press

THE United States
will play Argentina,
Paraguay and Colombia
in the first round of this
summer’s Copa America,
soccer’s championship of
South America,

The Americans, invit-
ed as a guest, are in
Group C and open June
28 against Argentina in
Maracaibo. The United
States plays Paraguay on
July 2 in Barinas and
Colombia on July 5 in
Barquisimeto, according
to Wednesday’s draw.

“Quite obviously we

shave been put in a very

competitive group,” U.S.
interim coach Bo
Bradley said during a
telephone conference
call.

_ The U.S. opener comes
just four days after the
final of the CONCACAF
Gold Cup, the champi-
onship of North and _
Central America and the
Caribbean, is played in
Chicago. The U.S. team
figures to make several
roster changes between
tournaments.

“The Gold Cup still is
the most important event
for us,” Bradley said.
“Obviously, it’s our con-
federation champi-
onship. But the main
reason that I think it’s
extra important is
because winning the
Gold Cup will earn us
three games — three
very, very good games —
in South Africa in 2009.”

The Gold Cup champi-
on advances to the eight-
nation FIFA Confedera-
tions Cup, which will be
played a year ahead of
the 2010 World Cup in
South Africa.

The United States, try-
ing to rebound from its
first-round elimination in
last year’s World Cup, is
appearing in the Copa
America for the first
time since 1995, when it
beat Argentina 3-0 in its
final first-round game
and finished fourth in
the tournament.

Bradley is not sure he °
will even be around to
coach the team.

He was hired on an
interim basis after for-
mer Germany coach
Juergen Klinsmann with-
drew and has led the
Americans to exhibition
victories over Denmark
and Mexico.

He was happy to open
against what appears to
be the toughest team in
the group.

“Often times when you
can play that team first,
it gives you the ability to
really prepare well for
the first game,” he said.

Defending cae on
Brazil is in Group B of
the 12-nation tourna-
ment along with Chile,
Ecuador and Mexico.
Host Venezuela was
drawn into Group A
with Bolivia, Peru and
Uruguay,

The top two teams in
each group and the best
two third-place teams
advance to the quarterfi-
nals,

Venezuela plays on the
opening day against
Bolivia on June 26 at
Merida. The tournament
will be played in nine
cities, with the final July
15 in Maracaibo.

Because of the two
tournaments, some play-
ers will be missing from
Major League Soccer for
extended periods.

“I know that there’s
already been discussions,
and we will work togeth-
er, as we always do,”
Bradley said.

“Everybody under-
stands that both events
are important for U.S.
Soccer.” .

tt a es cece eee nna ecban ane iccec niin seemneines os pineete ntratomet penn sninentstcaneetr st eenncnseeseev ent ittrtete tet enet tr eerenTt ee tteenteeens eee TATA NRT EET

wenececcececececcereererererecsececcceseterecetaseeeseene eeeees see Core teeeee OTe eee TOE Ces CC CC TOTES ewe re

@ BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Sports Reporter

TEAMS are turning up the
heat, trying to sharpen their
skills for the biggest basket-
ball tournament for high
school boys — the Hugh
Campbell Invitational.

One team paving the way
to the tournament is the CV
Bethel Stingrays, bagging their
final win in the GSSSA. The
win by the Stingrays came
over the GHS Magics yester-
day, 65-42.

While the other teammates
celebrated their feat, team
leader Sherman Ferguson said
“the race isn’t over yet.”

A pleased Ferguson
expressed gratitude to his fel-
low teammates for stepping
up and playing the way they
did against the Magics, but
added that the same level of
play will have to continue if
they want to adVance through
the rounds of the Hugh
Campbell tournament and the
GSSSA season.

He said: “I think we played
a good game, everyone played
up to standard as we get ready
fot the Hugh Campbell.

“We are still in the money
for the GSSSA but we will
have to stay focused if we
want to win, We have to play
hard and disciplined.”

Even though the Stingrays
got a win before the break,
their worries aren’t over just
yet. The team is sitting on the
edge of being eliminated from
the GSSSA playoffs.

Ferguson and Romel John-
son led the Stingrays in yes-
terday’s action, Romel John-
son finishing the day with 20
points with Ferguson chipping
in with 10 points.

Top scorer for the Magics
was William Rolle with 12
points.



- WTHE STINGRAYS (in
—liyht shirts) on their way to
beating the Magics 65-42,

(Photos: Tim Clarke)





Stingrays signal intent
ahead of Hug!



TRIBUNE SPORTS

Campbel




4C| FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007



NTERNATIONAL. EDITION Pe



AUTO RACING | 2007 PREVIEW



MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

WHAT'S NEW IN NASCAR

~ ROOKIE CLASS

Last year’s crop of rookies
was considered among the
deepest in Cup history,
whereas this season’s is one
of the more diverse.

FORMER OPEN-WHEEL
DRIVERS

>> Former Formula One
driver Juan Pablo Montoya
(below), 31, will drive for Chip
Ganassi Racing with Felix
Sabates. .



>> Former Champ Car rising
star A.J. Allmendinger, 25, will
drive for start-up
Toyota-powered Team Red
Bull. :

ENCORES TO THEIR
RACING FATHERS

>> Paul Menard, 26, son of
former champion IndyCar
owner John Menard, a
billionaire and owner of
Menards home improvement
chain, will drive the third car
for Dale Earnhardt Inc.

>> David Reutimann, 36, the
son of East Coast racing
legend Buzzie Reutimann will
drive for start-up
Toyota-powered Michael
Waltrip Racing

SUCCEEDING A
LEGEND

>> David Ragan, 21,
successor of Mark Martin, will
drive for Roush Racing.

PART-TIMERS

>> Regan Smith, 23, will
share the seat with veteran
and former Roush driver
Martin.

>> Jon Wood, 25, will split
time with veteran Ken
Schrader for Wood
Brothers/JTG Racing.

>> Brandon Whitt, 24, has
sponsorship lined up for
about only one-third of the
races for CJM Racing.

UNOFFICIAL ROOKIE

>> Robert Yates Racing’s
David Gilliland is running his
first full Cup season, but
doesn’t qualify as a rookie
since he made 15 starts last
season and the maximum to
be eligible is seven.



~ TOYOTA TEAMS



No. 44

>> Will be driven by veteran
Dale Jarrett for Michael
Waltrip Racing.

No. 55

>> Will be driven and owned
by Michael Waltrip with
Michael Waltrip Racing.

No. 00

. >> Will be driven by David
Reutimann with Michael
Waltrip Racing.

No. 83

>> Will be driven by Brian
Vickers with Team Red Bull.
No. 84

>> Will be driven by A.J.
Allmendinger with:Team Red
Bull. |



98

Q7

96
95
O94
93
Q?
9]

70
6968670605646362616059585750555453



>> Casey Mears takes over
for Brian Vickers in the

No. 25 Chevrolet.

>> Mark Martin takes over
for Joe Nemechek in the
No. 01 Chevrolet. Martin will
run 20 races, sharing the
seat with rookie Regan

Smith.



TEXAS MOTOR SPEEDWAY

>> The bump between Turns 1 and 2 that Dale
Earnhardt Jr. complained about is being repaired.



here’s more behind a car
number in NASCAR thana
specialist brushing paint in a
certain shape on the side
panels.

Team owners must go through an
approval process since NASCAR owns
and controls distribution of the numbers
— on the track and for special projects,
including movies and other
entertainment opportunities.

This past offseason Jim Cassidy,
director of&yacing operations, had
several more applications pass his desk,
particularly in the Cup Series, with the
entry of manufacturer Toyota and a few
teams expanding their operations.

All Cup, Busch and Craftsman
Trucks series teams must submit
applications each offseason to receive
the license for a number. With new
teams, owners are asked to provide
requests, because NASCAR does not
always grant a team’s first choice.

“The numbers are obviously very
important to teams, some are marketing
driven and some were used in the series
the driver came from,” Cassidy said.
“There’s a lot more to it than the

__ GAME OF NUMBERS



>> Ricky Rudd takes over
for Dale Jarrett in the

No. 88 Ford. Jarrett moves
to anew Toyota teain.

>> Jeremy Mayfield
replaces Michael Waltrip on
anew Toyota team at Bill
Davis Racing, which
previously had been.
affiliated with Dodge
Mayfield will drive the

No. 36 Toyota.

GETTY IMAGES FILE

_ drive the No. 55 for his



average fan would think. Hopefully we
don’t cause too much heartburn for
these teams.”

Each season NASCAR freezes about
five numbers for “special projects,”
Cassidy said. Last year some of the
off-limit numbers appeared in Talladega
Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby.

Also, NASCAR typically does not
issue the numbers for drivers who have
died.

To gain rights for the active numbers,
a Cup owner, for example, must pay a
standard rate before each season; it
costs several thousand dollars but under
$10,000. The cost for Busch and Truck
numbers are less.

Some of this season’s new Cup teams
paid for the owner’s license before the
2006 season for marketing purposes.

Brian Vickers, who will drive for
start-up Toyota-backed Team Red Bull,
pointed out that his team applied for the
No. 83 for marketing purposes.

“There are 8.3 ounces in a Red Bull
can, even though they do offer a
12-ounce can,” he said. “For me it has
another twist, because I was born in’83
as well.”



JONATHAN FERREY/GETTY IMAGES

‘

Many changes and many new faces can be found in Nextel Cup action this season.
_ Miami Herald sportswriter Sarah Rothschild roots out some of the more interesting tidbits heading into 2007.

(12345678910111213141516171819202122

23
24
2)
20
2/
28
29
30
ol
32
30
ot
OO
30
O/

2





>> Michael Waltrip will

self-owned Toyota team.
>> Mike Bliss will drive the
No. 49 Dodge, owned by
Coral Gable residents Beth
Ann and Tony Morgenthau.
He ran six races for BAM
last year.

>> Ward Burton, 45,

. started three races for
Morgan-McClure
Motorsports in 2006 and
will run full-time in the
No. 4 Chevrolet. Burton, a
Daytona 500 champion,
came out of retirement late
in 2006 after not racing the

previous year.

ON THE TRACK





GETTY IMAGES FILE

LAS VEGAS MOTOR SPEEDWAY

>> The track, which has one Cup race, will undergo
a $100 million renovation that will include redoing

parts of the track, adding higher banking and
possibly adding a spa in the infield.





LOOSE PARTS

FOREIGN FLAVOR

>> Team Red Bull: Red Bull,
the energy drink
company, which
will field and
sponsor two
teams was
founded by
Austrian Dietrich
Mateschitz.

>> Juan Pablo
Montoya: The



‘ Miami resident who hails from

Bogota, Colombia, is ;
legitimizing NASCAR’s efforts
to become'a more global
sport. .

>> Toyota: The entry of the
Japanese company, the first
full-time foreign car maker in
Cup history, is viewed as a big
step for the sport.

GOODBYE, LEADED FUEL

>> Cup teams will switch to
unleaded fuel beginning with
the Feb. 25 race at California
Speedway. All of NASCAR’s
series will use the
Sunoco-supplied gas this
season. For decades
NASCAR, which has been
exempt from the 1970 Clean
Air Act, has used leaded fuel.

MAKE AND MODEL

>> Toyota will race the
Camry.

>> Chevrolet will run the
Impala SS in the Car of
Tomorrow races.

>> Dodge will race the
Avenger in the Car of
Tomorrow races.



‘CAR OF TOMORROW ~

ON THE SCHED



>> NASCAR will make its
debut in Canada with a Busch
race Aug. 4 in Montreal.

>> There are no new sites for
Cup races, but there were
date changes:

>> The Pepsi 400 at
Daytona International
Speedway, historically the
first race in July, delayeda
week until July 7.

>> The New Hampshire race
was moved to July 1 from the
middle of the month. i

>> The Allstate 400 at the
Brickyard was pushed up
from its traditional August
date to July 29.

>> The Pocono (Pa.)
Raceway date was moved
from end of July to Aug. 5.





GETTY IMAGES FILE

BRISTOL (TENN.) MOTOR SPEEDWAY

races,

>> Will be repaved between its March and August


THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com

New-look Sixers work hard, waiting on

BY DAN GELSTON
Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — The only
thing that fans of the Philadelphia
76ers want their team to win these
days is the NBA Draft lottery.

The playoffs are far out of reach
for the third-worst team in the NBA,
so winning games won't do anything
except lower the number of available
pingpong balls. Tune in talk radio,
read a message board or a blog, or lis-
ten to the few fans still showing up at
the Wachovia Center, and the point
is clear: Lose. A lot.

Problem is, the Sixers (17-36)
aren’t listening.

“Yeah, we hear it, and it’s kind of
weird. But we can’t pay attention,”
forward Kyle Korver said. “Everyone
in this locker room wants to win and
win now, not wait for the future.”

But waiting for the future is about

all the Sixers can do these days. This

Terry rallies the Maverick

From Miami Herald Wire Services

HOUSTON — Jason Terry hit a go-ahead

BASKETBALL |

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

PRO BASKETBALL | INSIDE THE GAME

has turned into one of the more
disastrous seasons in recent team his-
tory, and the Sixers will probably
miss the playoffs for the third time in
four seasons. Hope comes only in the
form of fantasizing about who will be
available in the draft.

How would Greg Oden or Kevin
Durant look in a Sixers uniform?

No doubt, this has been a tumultu-
ous season to forget. Allen Iverson
and his 30 points [er game, All-Star
berth and coaching clashes are now
in Denver after a franchise-shaking
blockbuster deal in December. Chris
Webber, miserable and mopey from
the day he got to Philadelphia, had
his contract bought out and finally is
happy again, in Detroit.

Two veteran All-Stars who where
expected to lead the Sixers did noth-

ing but drag the team down. They’
.demanded the ball but did little to

make their teammates better. Now

it’s smiles all around on the Sixers,
free of the distractions and selfish-
ness that had sabotaged them early.

“We were definitely distracted by
that,” forward Steven Hunter said. “It
was a circus around here a month or
so ago, with all that trade talk. Now
things are calmed down, and every-
one’s focused on basketball.”

The Sixers are a bit better since
dumping the dour duo, and they went
7-7 over the final 14 games before the
All-Star break. The Sixers were 5-18
when Iverson was traded on Dec. 19
and have been 12-18 since.

Credit goes mostly to Andre
Miller, acquired in the Iverson deal,
who has been a steady, more tradi-
tional point guard. More players are
involved now, the offense runs more
set plays, and the hot hand gets ted.

Five players average in double fig-
ures, including Miller, at 13.2 points.

“We're just not relying on a guy to

PRO BASKETBALL

come down, pull up and ‘hit a jump
shot,” Sixers coach Maurice Cheeks
said. “[Miller] gets guys layups; he
gets guys the ball in a certain time at
the right place. You can’t underesti-
mate that when you have a guy who
understands the position.”
Without Iverson around, the Six-
ers have turned mostly their new A.L:
Andre Iguodala. The third-year
swingman has absolutely flourished
in Iverson’s and Webber’s absence.
Once known only for his flashy
dunks and tantalizing potential, Iguo-
dala thrived as the go-to guy in Philly.
Iguodala scored at least 19 points
in 12 consecutive games before that
streak was snapped Wednesday
against the Washington Wizards. He
has been more aggressive, has posted
two triple-doubles, has become a bet-
ter rebounder and has watched his
scoring average leap to 17.7 points.
“When I first got here, he was a

___ FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007 | 5G

the future

complementary player to the other
guys that where here,” Cheeks said.
“Now his role has changed a little bit,
being the primary scorer. You put the
ball in his hands, and you see what he
can do.”

Samuel Dalembert still battles
inconsistency but has been solid at
center, teaming with Hunter to solid-
ify the middle. Korver and Miller
both will be part of any rebuilding
process. The lottery pick in the draft,
plus the two first-round picks they
acquired from the Nuggets in the
Iverson trade, give the Sixers reason
to believe that they can be a playoff
team again soon.

“They stayed with everything
we’ve been trying to do. They con-
tinue to give effort, and that’s all we
can ask,” Cheeks said. “Our results
aren’t what we’d like them to be, but
they’ve stayed with the program, and
they continue to work.”

| TNL

| EASTERN CONFERENCE

jumper with 1:09 left to play Thursday night,
then made two free throws in the final sec-
onds, giving the Dallas Mavericks an 80-77
victory over the Houston Rockets on Thurs-

day night. The victory extended the Maver--

icks’ winning streak to nine games.

Luther Head had a shot in the lane with
~ about 6 seconds left to give the Rockets the
lead; but the ball bounced out. The Rockets
had to foul Terry with 4.2 seconds left, and
he made both shots to extend the lead.

Terry also made a pair of free throws just
seconds before his final jumper.

Dirk Nowitzki had 26 points for the Mav-
ericks, and Jerry Stackhouse added 17.

Tracy McGrady scored 27 points to lead
the Rockets, and Juwan Howard added 14.

The Mavericks led by two points before
the Rockets took a 76-74 lead on a free throw
and a 3-pointer by McGrady with about
3 minutes remaining. ~

McGrady elicited chants of ‘M-V-P!’ from ~
the home crowd when. he cut through the ,

middle of the lane for a layup that pushed
Houston’s lead to 69-66. But Nowitzki soon

answered with two 3-pointers in a row, put-

ting Dallas back on top 72-69 with 6:16 left.

Houston trailed by three points before
going on a 6-0 run punctuated by a Dallas
turnover and a dunk by Juwan Howard that
made it 63-60 with 10:33 remaining.

A steal and a pair of baskets by Josh How-
ard, followed by two quick 3-pointers by
Stackhouse, gave Dallas a 58-55 lead with less
than 30 seconds remaining in the third quar-
ter. It was the first time the Mavericks had
led in the second half. :

Nowitzki scored eight points in the first
quarter, but didn’t score in the second, sitting
out almost half of it with two early fouls.

One of the highlights of the first half came
when Nowitzki bit on a fake on the baseline
by Head, who drove past Nowitzki for the
two-handed dunk. The play earned the sec-
ond-year player a standing ovation from the
sellout crowd.

The Rockets trailed 21-12 before going on
a 3-0 run to take a 25-21 lead early in the sec-
ond quarter. Shane Battier hit three free
throws at the end of the second quarter to
push Houston’s lead to 45-38 at halftime.

LATE WEDNESDAY

e Hawks 96, Clippers 93: Joe Johnson,
selected earlier in the day for his first NBA
All-Star Game as an injury replacement for
Jason Kidd of the Nets, scored six of his 27



eu

OUTTA MY WAY: Mavericks forward Dirk Nowitzki drives past Rockets defender
Juwan Howard during the second half. Nowitzki led the Mavericks with 26 points.

points in the final 19 seconds to rally Atlanta
in Los Angeles.

e Sonics 114, Suns 90: Ray Allen had 31
points, and host Seattle handed Phoneix,
without injured Steve Nash and Boris Diaw,
its worst loss of the season.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

e Jazz 99, Cavaliers 98: Deron Wil-
liams scored 33 points and added 12 assists,
and host Utah won its sixth game in a row.

e Warriors 120, Knicks 101: Stephen
Jackson scored 36 points for host Golden
State, which blew most of a 3]-point lead.





RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Thursday’s results

Dal. 80, Hou. 77
Cle. at L.A.L., late

Tonight’s games
NO GAMES SCHEDULED

| SOUTMEAST_W__L_Pet_ GB. L10__str. Home _Away__<&st
| Washington 29 21 580 - 5-5 Wl 19-7 10-14 20-10
, Orlando 27 26 «509 3%. 4-6 W-1 1810 9-16 15-17
| Miami 26 26 500 4 7-3 W-2 15-10 11-16 13-15
| Atlanta 20 31 .392 9% 5-5 - Ll 9-15 11-16 12-20
| Charlotte 19 33 .365 11 46 W-1 11-15 818 13-20
| ATLANTIC WL _‘Pet_ GB 18 str. Home _Away Cont
| Toronto 29 24 547. - 82 W-2 19-7 10-17 20-10
New Jersey 25 29 463 4% 4-6 (L-2 14-13 11-16 19-14
| New York 23 30 «4.434. 65S L-1 (13-13, 10-17 13-18
| philadelphia 17 36 321 12 46 L3 915 821 12-18
Boston 13 38 «255 15 1-9 W-l 5-21 817 9-24
CENTRAL WL Pet GB L190 Str. Home Away Conf
Detroit 32.19 627 - 82 L-l 17-10 15-9 22-10
Cleveland 30 22 577 2% 64 L-l 20-7 10-15 18-14
Indiana 28 24 538 4% 6-4 W-2 17-10 11-14 19-13
Chicago 29 25 .537 4% 46 L-2 20-7 9-18 20-10
Milwaukee 19 34 358 14 2-8 L-4 11-11 8-23 9-21
WESTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHWEST WL Pet. GB L10 Str. Home Away _ Conf
Dallas 44.9 830 - 9-1 W-9 24-3 20-6 30-6
San Antonio 35 18 .660 9 55 W-2 16-8 19-10 21-11
Houston 33.19 .63510% 7-3 Ll 19-7 14-12 19-17
New Orleans 25 28 .472 19 7-3 W-1 17-11 8-17 15-19
Memphis 14 40 .25930% 3-7 L-l 11-17 3-23 8-25
NORTHWEST WL Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away _ Conf
Utah 35 17 673 - 7-3 W-6 21-6 14-11 20-10
Denver 26 25 510 8% 4:6 L-1 14-14 12-11 11-17
Minnesota 25 27 481 10 5-5 W-2 16-9 9-18 15-19
Portland 22 32 «407 «14 44-6 L-2 12-14 10-18 13-17
Seattle 20 32. 385 15 4-6 W-2 14-13 6-19 9-20
PACIFIC” ears WN _L Pet. GB 10 Str. Home Away Conf
Phoenix 39 130.750 0 - «55 L3) -20-6 §=19-7 19-10
L.A. Lakers 30. 23.566 91 3-7 L-4 19-7 11-16 °17-10 ~
L.A. Clippers 25 27 .481 14 46 12 17-8 8-19 14-17
Golden State 25 29 .463 15 4-6 W-l 19-9 6-20 13-7
Sacramento 22 29 .43116% 5-5 L-3 15-12 7-17 12-21

Wednesday’s results

Ind. 114, Mem.

104

Orl. 103, Port. 91
Tor. 120, NJ 109
Cha. 100, Chi. 85
Was. 92, Phi. 85
Bos. 117, Mil. 97

S.A. 90, Det. 81

Min. 99, Den. 94
NO 110, Sac. 93
Utah 99, Cle. 98
Sea. 114, Pho. 90

GS 120, NY 101

Atl. 96, Clpprs 93

: NBA LEADERS





Through Wednesday
SCORING REBOUNDING
G FG FT PTS AVG GOFF DEF TOT AVG
Anthony, Den. 36 413 260 1106 30.7 Garnett, Minn. 51 133 509 642 12.6
Arenas, Wash. 50 457 384 1442 28.8 Chandler, NOK. 51 211 410 621 12.2
| Wade, Mia. 45 434 408 1297 28.8 Howard, Orl. 53 170 462 632 11.9
| Bryant, LAL 49 466390 1406 28.7 Camby, Den. 42 106 392 498 11.9
| Iverson, Den. 35 338 295 1004 28.7 Boozer, Utah 45 142 389 531 11.8
" Redd, Mil. 33 302 244 914 27.7 Okafor, Char §2 202 393 595 11.4
i Allen, Sea. 42 393 224 1134 27.0 Duncan, SA. 53 156 412 568 10.7
PAT SULLIVAN/AP | James, Clev. 50 473 296 1306 26.1 Lee, N.Y. 53 184 380 564 10.6
| Nowitzki, Dall. 51 438 362 1287 25.2 Jefferson, Bos. 44 150 318 468 10.6
Johnson, Atl. 48 453 199 1208 25.2 Marion, Phoe. 52 109 426 535 10.3
i ‘

| FIELD GOALS ASSISTS
| FG FGA PCT G AST AVG
| Tee, NY. 230 376 612 Nash, Phoe. a 542 ‘118
Biedrins, G.S. 241 395 610 — Williams, Utah 52 478 9.2
| Howard, Or. 337 568 593 Kidd, NJ. 52 454 BT
| Stoudemire, Phoe. 370 627 590 _—Davis, G.S. 43 372, 87
Curry, N.Y. 380 654 .581 Paul, NOk. 36 311 8.6
Boozer, Utah 410 721 .569 Miller, Phil. 51 418 8.2
Brand, LAC 416 761 547 Wade, Mia. 45 353 7.8
Bogut, Mil. 271 496 546 Ford, Tor. 46 357 7.8
Okafor, Char. 322 596 540 __ Billups, Det. 43 326 7.6
Dalembert, Phil. 230 426 540 Iverson, Den. 35 265 7.6

UCLA beats Arizona State; Purdue dumps Indiana

From Miami Herald Wire Services

Arron Afflalo scored 24 points,
Darren Collison added 18, and fifth-
ranked UCLA rallied from a 10-point
deficit to beat host Arizona State
67-61 on Thursday night.

Trailing 49-39 with 10:24 left to
play, the Bruins took command with
an 18-2 run, with Darren Collison hit-
ting three 3-pointers and Afflalo
another to put UCLA ahead 57-51.

Arizona State. pulled to 63-61
on Serge Angounou’s 3-pointer with
16 seconds left, but Afflalo hit two
free throws, and Josh Shipp added
two more to ice the victory.

Afflalo has scored in double fig-
ures in 24 consecutive games, the
longest active streak in the Pac-10.

UCLA (22-3, 11-2) bounced back
from a 70-65 loss at West Virginia on
Saturday, and the Bruins remained
atop the Pac-10, a half-game ahead of
No. 10 Washington State.

Jeff Pendergraph scored 14 points
and Alan Morill added 11 for Arizona
State (6-20, 0-14), which lost its 15th

onsecutive game, a school record.

UCLA now has beaten Arizona State
six times in a row.

Afflalo scored 13 consecutive
points — nine on 3-pointers — mid-
way through the first half. He fin-
ished the half with 15 points, but only
two other Bruins scored as UCLA
seemed baffled by Arizona State’s
tenacious zone defense.

The Sun Devils went on a 7-0 run
to take a 21-17 lead on Pendergraph’s
3-point play with 10:10 to go. After
trailing for much of the half, UCLA
scored the final four points on a bas-
ket by Afflalo and a full-court drive
by Collison, who laid the ball in at the
buzzer to send the Bruins into the
locker room with a 34-31 lead.

e Purdue 81, No. 24 Indiana
68: David Teague scored a career-
high 32 points, and the host Boiler-
makers snapped a five-game losing
streak in the intrastate rivalry.

Teague made ll of 18 field goals,
including 6-for-8 from 3-point range.
He also grabbed seven rebounds.

Carl Landry added 22 points and
11 rebounds and Tarrance Crump



CATHERINE JUN/ARIZONA REPUBLIC
COLD SHOULDER: Michael Roll, left,
of UCLA tries to hold off Allen
Morill of Arizona State and they
scramble for the ball Thursday.

added 13 points for Purdue (17-9, 6-6
Big Ten).

D.J.. White scored 20 points,
Armon Bassett scored 16 and Roder-

ick Wilmont added 15 for Indiana
(17-7, 7-4).

Purdue improved to 14-1 at home
and boosted its NCAA Tournament
hopes with its second victory over a
ranked team this season. The Boiler-
makers shot 50 percent from the field
and outrebounded the Hoosiers
32-28.

Indiana won the previous meeting
85-58 on Jan. 10 in Bloomington. The
Hoosiers had won eight of the previ-
ous 10 games in the series.

The game was moved from
Wednesday to Thursday because of
snowy weather that slowed travel
throughout Indiana.

Purdue led 34-32 at halftime, but
Indiana took a 50-48 lead on a
3-pointer by Bassett with 13:15 to go.

A bad Indiana pass and a scramble
led to an uncontested layup by Tea-
gue, and Gordon Watt’s steal and
layup gave the Boilermakers a 55-52
lead. A bucket and a 3-point play by
Landry, followed by a 3-pointer by
Teague, pushed Pu.due’s lead to
63-54 with 7:29 lett. Purdue led by at

least six points the rest of the way.

The tension on the court became
evident when White went for a
rebound with 8:27 left in the first half.
Purdue’s Chris Kramer tied him up,
and it led to a skirmish that got the
sellout crowd more involved.

Purdue led by ll points in the first
half, but Indiana chipped away until
halftime. Earl Calloway’s short
jumper in the closing seconds of the
half cut Purdue’s lead to two points at
the break, 34-32. :

LATE WEDNESDAY

e No. 10 Washington State 65,
Washington 61: Taylor Rochestie
scored a season-high 16 points off the
bench, and Derrick Low hit two tree
throws with 16.7 seconds left, and the
Cougars (22-4, ll-4) beat the host
Huskies (16-9, 6-8 Pac-10).

e No. 11 Nevada 68, San Jose
State 60: Nick Fazekas had 20
points and 10 rebounds —- his 16th
double-double — to lead the host
Wolf Pack (23-2, N-1 Western Ath-
letic) past the Spartans (4-21, 3-10).

COnSECUTIVE BN TSS
6C | FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16,2007 INTERNATIONAL EDITION

HOCKEY/BASEBALL



NTT UPI
EASTERN CONFERENCE





From Miami Herald Wire Services

PHILADELPHIA — Peter
Forsberg never gave Philadel-
phia a firm answer about a
contract extension because of
lingering concerns about his

So the Flyers decided his
short-term future for him,
trading the star center to the
Division-leading
Nashville Predators on Thurs-
day night for forward Scottie

SOUTHEAST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME = AWAY DIV

Atlanta 30 21 6 3 69182 189 14-9-3-2 16-12-3-1 12-4-4-1

TampaBay 33 24 «1 1 68187 178 16-13-0-0 17-11-1-1 13-7-0-0

Carolina 29 24 «3 4 65.180 189 15-11-1-3 14-13-2-1 | 13-6-0-2

Washington 23 26 2 7 55175 203 14-12-13 9-14-14 B-1-1-2

Florida 22 26 5 6 55165 191 15-10-2-1 7-16-35 —5-11-2-0
ATLANTIC = WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV

New Jersey. 35 16 0 6 76154 135 21-5-0-4 14-11-0-2 15-4-0-1

Pittsburgh «30:17. 4 «5S 69.195 175 17-B2-2 © 13-9-2-3 14-511

NY Islanders 28 22 4 4 64171 163 14-9-3-1 14-13-1-3 10-8-2-0

NY. Rangers 28 24 3 2 GL 170 164 11-12-3-0 17-12-0-2 9-9-0-1 :
Philadelphia. 15 34 3 5 38146 212 5-16-3-4 10-18-0-1 3-14-1-4 right foot.
NORTHEAST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY _DIV

Buffalo 30°15 2 2 82.214 164 20-7-1-119-B-1-1.—12-8-1-1

Ottawa 3322 2 «1 69195 154 17-1l-l-1 16-11-10 15-9-0-1 | Central
Montreal 29 24. «1 5 64167 174 17-11-0-3 12-13-1-2 10-8-0-4

Toronto 38 22. 3 5 64187 189 11-12-23 17-10-1-2 —10-B-2-2

Boston 26 26 1 3 56 157.206 16-12-0-2 10-14-1-1 10-12-0-1



Upshall, defenseman Ryan
Parent and two draft picks.

“I liked it here and every-
thing, it’s just hard when I
couldn’t commit and that’s
why they had to move me,”
Forsberg said. “I understand

The 33-year-old Swede, in
the final months of a two-year,
$11.5 million contract, had 11
goals and 29 assists in 40
games for the Flyers this sea-
son, his second with Philadel-
phia after 10 years with Que-

The former NHL MVP has
acknowledged he thought

CENTRAL == WL OL SLPTS GF GA = HOME = AWAY DU

Nashville 39 16 2 1 81 201 146 18-12-0-0 —-17+4-1-0

Detroit 37 16 3 3 80181 144 16-13-2-1-12-4-1-1

St. Louis 23 26 5 4 55 149 178 11-11-3-3-9-12-2-2

Chicago 22 27° 2 «6 52 145 175 11-14-1-4 — 10-12-1-0

Columbus 22 30 2 #3 49 141 179 9-17-1-1 7-13-0-2 at”
that.

NORTHWEST W Lt OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV

Vancouver 32 21 #1 #3 68150 145 14-12-0-2. 12-11-0-1

Calgary 30 19 3 5 68178 149 7-14-3-4 -11-5-1-2

Minnesota 31 22 1 «4 67 164 150 11-17-0-1 9-6-1-2

Edmonton 28 25 3 2 61 157 167 10-14-2-1-9-12-1-0

Colorado 27:25 2 «22 «58177 172 11-12-1-0 9-7-1-0

Paciic = «Wik OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY _—DIV

Anaheim 33 16 2 6 74 182 145 15-11-1-2 13-5-0-1 bec and Colorado.

San Jose 36 20 O. 1 73176 142 18-9-0-0 12-10-0-1

Dallas 34°21 .0 2 70 153 ‘140 16-12-0-1 16-6-0-0

Phoenix 25 30 1 #1 52 154 194 12-18-0-1-7-13-1-1

Los Angeles 19 31 5 4 47164 205 11-12-4-3 8-19-1-1 — 6-14-0-2

Note: Two points for a win, one point for a tie and overtime loss

RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Wednesday’s results

Tonight’s games

S.J. at Columbus, 7
Pitt. at NJ., 7:30
N'ville at St. Louis, 8
Vancouver at Chi., 8:30

Thursday’s results

Buffalo 2, Edmonton 1 (OT)
Rangers 4, Carolina 1

Toronto 4, Philadelphia 2
Islanders 4, Boston 1

Tampa Bay 3, Washington 2 (SO)
Anaheim at Phoenix, late
Colorado at Calgary, late



Ottawa 4, Florida 0

St. Louis 4, Columbu'
Pittsburgh 5, Chicag
New Jersey 5, Montr

Is 2
ja 4 (SO)
eal 2

Nashville 5, San Jose 0

Detroit 3, Dallas 1

Vancouver 3, Minnesota 2 (OT)

NTT



about retiring at the end of this
season because of a painful
condition that makes his right
foot feel crooked in his skate.
He had offseason surgery to
repair loose ligaments in his
right ankle, but the operation
has made little difference.
“Tm going to evaluate this
summer how I feel and if I’m

| going to continue to play,” he

said. °
Forsberg can become an
unrestricted free agent at the
end of the season, and the
Flyers decided to get some
value for their captain rather
than risk losing him for noth-

“I’m a little shocked,” Fors-
berg said. “I could not commit
to another year because I don’t
know what’s going to happen.
I felt like I was being fair to

Through Wednesday
SCORING GOALIES
Playersteam GP oat GA AVG ing
ssby, Pit 353. 48 “Sauron, CHEANA Ss 21.36 ¥
Lecavalier, TB 68137 6300 16 coun : : :
foot Smith, Dal 15 760 26 2.05
Soe = z 16 Brodeur, NJ. 55 3328 115 2.07
Ornons Hasek, Det 42. 2485 86 2.08
Ovechkin, Was 57 34 38 72 Gigu, Ana 40 2263 81 2.15
ea a ot ee eS bake LA. 9 529 19 2.16
Savard Bos be ig 82 79 Backstrom, Minn 21 1142) 42: 2.21
jagr, NYR ee as 69 «Kiprusoff, Cal 52 3088 117 2.27
Whitney, Car 59 26 42 68 Luongo, Van 54 3148 123 2.34

Bonds finally sig

From Miami Herald Wire Services

Barry Bonds finally signed his
one-year, $15.8 million deal on Thurs-
day, ending more than two months of
wrangling between the slugger and
the San Francisco Giants over con-
tract language.

With both sides satisfied, Bonds is
scheduled to report Monday to
spring training in Scottsdale, Ariz. He
is likely to participate in the Giants’
first full-squad workout on Tuesday.
_ “I expect he will be ready to go,”
general manager Brian Sabean said. '

Bonds, 42, is 22 homers shy of
breaking Hank Aaron’s career
record of 755.

Bonds’ deal was approved by the
commissioner’s office. His agent,
Jeff Borris, and the Giants reached a
preliminary agreement on Dec. 7.

The team announced the deal on
Jan. 29 and Bonds did an interview
via conference call. But he never
signed the contract, and problems
developed.

At issue were specifics about what
would happen if Bonds were to be
indicted or face further legal trouble,
along with details about a personal-
appearance provision that was
rejected by the commissioner’s
office.

The Giants sent revised docu-
ments to Borris, which Bonds signed
Thursday. Only the personal-appear-
ance provision was deleted from the
deal, two baseball officials said. They
spoke on condition of anonymity
because of the sensitivity of the situa-
tion.

A federal grand jury is investigat-
ing whether Bonds perjured himself
when he testified in 2003 in the Bay
Area Laboratory Co-Operative ste-
roid distribution case that he hadn’t
knowingly taken any performance-
enhancing drugs.

Bonds has long denied knowingly
using steroids.

Bonds will fill the final spot on the
team’s 40-man roster, which had
stood at 39 after catcher Mike Math-
eny went on the voluntary retire-
ment list with a concussion.

The seven-time National League
MVP has been working out all offsea-
son at UCLA and appears as healthy
as ever, according to the Giants,
Bonds’ trainer and his agent. He had
arthroscopic surgery on his trouble-
some left elbow after the 2006 sea-
son.

After missing all but 14 games in



give up the no-trade clause

MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD



HOCKEY

Forsberg dealt to Predators





GEORGE WIDMAN/AP.

HEADING TO NASHVILLE: The Flyers traded star center Peter
Forsberg, who was near the end of a two-year contract.

and they get something for me.
It kind of worked out.”

Forsberg, drafted by Phila-
delphia in 1991 but dealt to
Quebec in 1992 in the Eric Lin-
dros trade, was the NHL’s
Most Valuable Player with
Colorado in 2003.

He helped the Avalanche
capture the Stanley Cup in
1996 and 2001.

ELSEWHERE

e Coyotes: Forward Pat-
rick Fischer will be out of the
lineup for six-to-eight weeks
following abdominal surgery.

Fischer has been in and out
of the lineup since December
with a groin injury.

The surgery was performed
Wednesday in Philadelphia,
team officials said.

THURSDAY’S ACTION

- @ MapleLeafs 4, Flyers
2: Mats Sundin had a goal and
an assist to help visiting
Toronto snap a three-game
losing streak.

Jeff O’Neill, Niki Antropov
and Carlo Colaiacovo also
scored for the Maple Leafs,
who had won seven of eight
before their losing streak.

Simon Gagne and Mike
Knuble scored for the Flyers,
who had won two in a row
after a franchise-record 13 con-
secutive home losses.

e Islanders 4, Bruins 1:
Mike Sillinger scored the go-
ahead goal midway through
the third period to lift host
New York.

Sillinger, who got the only
assist on Jeff Tambellini’s first



goal of the season in the open-
ing period, shook off an injury
and scored his 19th at 10:56.
That gave the Islanders at
least one standings point for
the llth time in 12 games
(7-1-4).

e Sabres 2, Oilers 1
(OT): Daniel Briere scored 62
seconds into overtime to lift
host Buffalo.

Maxim Afinogenov also
scored for the Sabres, who ral-
lied from a 1-0 deficit to win
their fourth in a row. Ryan
Miller made 27 saves as Buf-
falo won its sixth consecutive
home game, the team’s longest
streak since winning seven in
a row early in the 1999-2000
season. ng

e Lightning 3, Capitals 2
(SO): Vincent Lecavalier
scored two goals and Martin
St. Louis had the lone shootout
goal, leading host Tampa Bay.

Lecavalier has a career-high
39 goals, three shy of Brian
Bradley’s team record set dur-
ing the 1992-93 season. Lecava-
lier has scored a goal in 15 of 19
games.

e Rangers 4, Hurricanes
1: Karel Rachunek and
Michael Nylander each had a
goal and an assist to lead visit-
ing New York.

Rachunek scored one of
three power-play goals for the
Rangers, who have won three
in a row.

Matt Cullen, who played
for Carolina last season, added
two assists for New York.
Brendan Shanahan and Pascal
Dupuis, in his Rangers debut,
also scored for New York.

LATE WEDNESDAY

e Canucks 3, Wild 2
(OT): Sami Salo’s goal 4:20
into overtime lifted visiting
Vancouver. The Canucks,
15-3-3 since Christmas, also got
goals from Daniel Sedin and
Markus Naslund.



!

2005 following three operations on
his right knee, Bonds batted .270 with
26 homers and 77 RBIs and drew 115
walks in 130 games last year.

ELSEWHERE

e Cubs: Carlos Zambrano
backed off recent comments that he
would leave the club as a free agent
after this season if he doesn’t get a
multiyear contract during spring
training.

Although he would rather get a
new deal done by Opening Day, the
pitcher said Thursday he would be
willing to negotiate in the fall. He
won't discuss a contract during the
season, though.

“They have the first look,” Zam-

OED Teo

RnR o en

BASEBALL | AROUND THE MAJOR LEAGUES

ns deal with Giants

pan



: ELAINE THOMPSON/AP
IT’S ABOUT TIME: With his one-year contract signed, Giants slugger

Barry Bonds is scheduled to report to spring training on Monday
and is likely to participate in the first full-squad workout Tuesday.

brano said after the club’s initial
workout for pitchers and catchers in
Mesa, Ariz.

“J didn’t say that if they don’t sign
me before the end of spring training I
will not sign with the Cubs. I didn’t
say that. I just said they have till the
beginning of the season. If not, I don’t
want to talk about a contract during
the season.”

But in an interview with WGN-TV
this week, the Cubs’ ace was adamant
that he would leave as a free agent if
he didn’t have a multiyear contract
by the opener... . Elsewhere, oft-in-
jured Kerry Wood is out again —
this time because of a flub in a hot
tub. The Cubs pitcher is not expected
to throw off a mound for a few days

after he slipped this week getting out
of a hot tub at home. Wood landed on
his stomach and chest.

“It was just a little spill,” Wood
said Thursday. “I didn’t think any-
thing of it. Nothing’s wrong. It’s just
going to be a few extra days. My arm
feels great. My body feels good.”

Wood said he probably would not
have thrown off a mound until today
had he not gotten hurt. He partici-
pated in most drills on Thursday
when pitchers and catchers worked
out for the first time.

Bothered by an injured right
shoulder the past three seasons,
Wood is being converted to a reliever
after being limited to four starts last
year.

e Twins: Right fielder Michael
Cuddyer and the team agreed to a
one-year, $3,575,000 contract, avoid-
ing arbitration minutes before their
scheduled hearing.

Cuddyer batted .284 with 24
homers, 109 RBIs and 102 runs scored
last season, hitting cleanup between
American League batting champion
Joe Mauer and league MVP Justin
Morneau. Cuddyer’s -H- outfield
assists were tied for third in the
league as well.

The deal includes a $50,000 bonus
if Cuddyer gets at least 650 plate
appearances in 2007.

After making $1.35 million last year
and posting career-best numbers in
his first full season as a regular, Cud-
dyer asked for $4.25 million and the
Twins offered $3 million.

The sides were together in a room
waiting to argue their cases before
the three-person panel when they
walked out and settled in the hall.

Minnesota had six players eligible
for arbitration this year, but settled
on contracts with each of them with-
out going to a hearing. Twins pitch-
ers and catchers are required to
report to spring training in Fort
Myers, Fla., by Sunday, with the full
squad due by Feb. 23.

@ Mets: Catcher Paul Lo Duca is
completely healthy following offsea-
son thumb surgery — and he would
Jove a contract extension.

“J’ve been vocal that I want to stay
here,” the four-time All-Star said
after reporting to spring training in
Port St. Lucie, Fla.

Lo Duca, who will turn 35 in April,
is entering the final season of a three-
year deal that will pay him $6.25 mil-
lion this season. He hit a team-lead-

ing .318 last year with five home runs
and 49 RBIs, helping New York cap-
ture the National League East for the
first time since 1988.

e Yankees: Joe Torre spoke to
Bernie Williams and the message
from the Yankees manager was clear:
Come to spring training.

Williams, feeling slighted by the
only major league team he’s played
for, has thus far refused to accept a
minor-league contract. After Torre
left some telephone messages, the 38-
year-old outfielder called back on
Wednesday afternoon.

“The only thing I stressed to him
yesterday is: ‘If you want to continue
to play, you can’t do it if you stay up
there. We have to see you,” Torre
said on Thursday.

Torre said that if Williams does
come to spring training, he would
have a real chance of earning a spot
on the Yankees’ 25-man roster.

“Tt doesn’t mean you have to hit
.400,” Torre said. “I think it’s what
you see more so than what the num-
bers are.”

Williams has been one of Torre’s
favorites and helped the Yankees
capture four World Series and six
American League pennants. Williams
said last week that he was leaning
against accepting the minor-league
contract but said he hadn’t made up
his mind.

“Yeah, it would be tough for me if
you had to say goodbye,” Torre said.
“I sense he feels confident that he can
still play this game.” ... George
Steinbrenner’s son-in-law and des-
ignated successor to run the Yankees
was arrested early Thursday for sus-
picion of driving under the influence.

Yankees general partner Steve
Swindal, 52, was arrested by the St.
Petersburg (Fla.) Police at 4:26 a.m.
EST, according to a copy of the
charge report posted on the Pinellas
County Sherriff’s Office’s website.
He was booked for a misdemeanor
and released on $250 bond. ... The
Yankees will honor the memory of
Cory Lidle by wearing black arm
bands on the left sleeves of their uni-
forms this season.

Lidle was acquired by the Yankees
last summer from Philadelphia, and
the 34-year-old pitcher died on Oct. 11
when his plane crashed into a Man-
hattan apartment building. The Yan-
kees have not assigned No. 30, the
number Lidle wore, to anyone in
spring training.

FITTEST




\
| _
> |
i iy Le



76F



60F; #3»





_——

“NOT AS WARM,
WITH A SHOWER

’ The Tribune



BAHAMAS EDITION

he Hiami Herald





Volume: 103 No.72



Local government's
RIT RSE TILL

SEE FRONT PAGE OF BUSINESS SECTION

Promise of island-wide
demonstration if further
punitive action taken

Bi By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

MEMBERS of the National
Congress of Trade Unions yester-
day threw their full support behind

the Prison Staff Association,

promising to lead an island-wide
demonstration against government
.if any further punitive action is
taken against the prison officers.

Speaking with The Tribune yes-
terday afternoon, president of the
NCTU John Pinder said that a
demonstration would be the first
step in an “action plan” by the
umbrella organisation to support
the prison officers.

Following’ Wednesday’s
announcement by Minister of
National Security Cynthia Pratt
that the four-day work stoppage at
the prison was illegal and that all
participating officers will receive
the maximum punishment, union
leader Mr Pinder yesterday spoke
out in support of the prison staff
members.

“Weare of the view that any
discipline taken against the offi-

cers of the Bahamas Prison Offi-
cers Staff Association (BPOSA)
is victimisation and would result in
the NCTU and its affiliates bring-
ing pressure on the government
in support of the BPOSA,” Mr
Pinder said yesterday at a press
conference.

Deputy Prime Minister Pratt
told the House of Assembly on
Wednesday night that all officers
who participated in the go-slow
which turned into a massive sick-
out will be fined for the days in
question, will suffer the reduction
of three days in his or her accu-
mulated leave and will be required
to make a public apology.

Mr Pinder yesterday told The
Tribune that the NCTU consid-
ered this punishment too exccs-
sive.

“When you're sick, you present
a sick slip, they (the officers) all
provided a sick slip, but the min-
ister made the determination that
it was an illegal strike.

SEE page 14

Nurses union threaten
industrial action

THE Bahamas Nurses Union is threatening industrial action if

government does not agree to provide them with a proper industrial

agreement. .

President of the union, Cleola Hamilton, made this announce-
ment yesterday at a press conference in response to the Ministry of
Health offering the nurses a memorandum of understanding instead

of an industrial agreement.

Ms Hamilton warned that nurses do:not make “vain or idle
threats” and that the union does not understand how they are the
only members of the public service without an industrial agreement.

However, the union president said that the nurses are optimistic

SEE page 14














































































































‘ Sj
ond drinks

y « Whopper Jr. i
‘with cates fries 3: 89 ‘.



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007
mu Long

B MEMBERS of the
Crime Scene Unit were
yesterday at ‘Horizons’,
the Eastern Road resi-
dence shared by Anna
Nicole Smith and her
companion Howard K
Stern. International
media surrounded mem-
bers of the unit.
(Photo: Ana Bianca
Marin)

f By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
POLICE officers yester-

day entered the embattled

Eastern Road home ‘Hori-

zons’ in search of evidence

in the case of the burglary

report filed by Howard K

Stern.

Uniformed officers were
seen arriving at the mansion
at around [0 o'clock yester-
day morning.

They were followed a
short time after by a crime
scene unil van and officers
getting out of the vehicle
were seen taking pictures of
the $900,000 property before
leaving the premises at
around 11.30am.

Assistant Police Commis-
sioner Reginald Ferguson,
officer in charge of crime,
confirmed for The Tribune
last night that the officers

_ SEE page 14



Ingraham
hits out at

Shane Gibson. employee ‘resistance’

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

AS IMMIGRATION Minister
Shane Gibson secured employment
with Anna Nicole Smith for his
mother, his father and his father’s
companion, Prime Minister Perry
Christie didn’t think to tell him that
his behaviour was inappropriate;
that it reeked of nepotism; that it
represented serious conflict of
interest for a Cabinet Minister to
use his official position for person-
al, private gain, Opposition leader
Hubert Ingraham claimed at a ral-
ly in the Golden Gates Con-
stituency Wednesday.

Mr Ingraham said that Mr Gib-
son is chiefly responsible for having
set this unfortunate chain of events
in motion.

“He is the one who has acted








inappropriately and improperly. He ;

is the one. He was chiefly respon-
sible, not only for granting Ms
Smith permanent residence under
dubious circumstances, but of fast-

SEE page 14.





MnoneRT

} ~ LAMINATE FOR COUNTERTOPS & aoe

PRICE — 75¢




































Trade union leader
says Cable Beach
hotels should expect

Recall on
Peter Pan,
Great Value
peanut butter

: @ By PAUL TURNQUEST
CABLE BEACH hotels should : Tribune Staff Reporter
expect employee “resistance” to :

the recently implemented Early
Retirement and Voluntary Sepa-
ration Plan, says trade union
leader Thomas Bastian.

In an exclusive interview with
The Tribune, the former president
of the Bahamas Hotel Catering &
Allied Workers Union claimed
that only the Baha Mar Group
would benefit from the plan, while
long-time employees would end According to the Food and
: up losing their benefits and senior- | Drug Administration (FDA), the
i ity. iC DC has linked 288 cases of

Yesterday, Baha Mar CEO : food-borne illness in 39 states to
Don Robinson said he did not see} consuinption of varying types of
“any major hurdles” that would } Peter Pan peanut butter. The
prevent the $2.4 billion Cable ; Great Value peanut butter is
Beach developer from hitting its | manufactured at the same plant in
March | target for clinching a sup- {| Georgia, and as a result could car-
plemental agreement with the gov- } tya similar risk of contamination.
ernment, as the company unveiled ; However, Great Value peanut
its Early Retirement and Volun- } butter made by other manufac-

SEE page 14 SEE page 14

m@ By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter



THE Ministry of Agriculture
and Marine Resources issued an
alert to local consumers after
ConAgra Foods Inc, acting on
the advice of the Centre for Dis-
ease Control and Prevention,
issued a recall on its Peter Pan
and Great Value peanut butter
products due to salmonella cont-
amination.







WILSONART ADHESIVES
. the DW Davis Gymnasi-

oe

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

@ BASKETBALL
NPWBA ACTION

The New Providence
, Women’s Basketball
Association continued its
regular season on Tues-
day night at the DW
Davis Gymnasium with
the Cleaning Center
Angels blasting the Col-
lege of the Bahamas
Caribs 78-61. |

Suzette McKenzie
scored 21 points with 11
rebounds, Keisha
Richardson had 21 points
and four steals, Sharell
Cash had 12 points and
Kecia Smith has 12
points, nine assists and
six steals,

In a losing effort,
Kavionne Newbold
scored 17 points with 18
rebounds. Diasti Delancy
had 14 points and Chris-
tine Sinclair added 13
points.

m@ ALL-STAR CLASSIC

The New Providence
Women’s Basketball
Association is gearing up
for its All-Star and Leg-
ends’ Classic on Saturday
night at the DW Davis
Gymnasium.

At 7 p.m., the past leg-
ends of the game will be
in action. That will be fol-
lowed by a three-point
shootout. And in the fea-
ture contest, the current
stars in the league will
play in their All-Star
game.

lm NPBA ACTION

The New Providence
Basketball Association
will continue its regular
season action tonight
with a double header at

um. In the 7 p.m. opener,
the Sunshine Auto Ruff
Rdyers will play the
Cable Bahamas Enter-
tainers and at 8:15 p.m.,
the Millennium Jammers
will take on the Com-
monwealth Bank Giants.

A double header is
scheduled for Saturday as
well. In the 7 p.m. open-
er, the Millennium Jam-
mers will take on the
Police Crimestoppers and
at 8:15 p.m., the Cable
Bahamas Entertainers
will meet the Y-Care
Wreckers.

@ SOFTBALL
MSL ACTION

The Masters Softball
League will continue its
regular season action on
Saturday at the Archdea-
con William Thompson
Softball Park at the
Southern Recreation
Ground with a double
header on tap.

In the 1 p.m. opener,
the DHL Lions will take
on the Jousha Knights.
At 3 p.m., the Doghouse
Rangers will play the Bat

’ Miller Panthers.

No game will be played
on Sunday.

# FOOTBALL
CAFL ACTION

The Commonwealth
American Football
League will be back in
action with a double
header on tap this week-
end at the DW Davis
playing field.

In the lone game on
Saturday, starting at 1

- p.m., the Pros will take

on the Stingrays and on
Sunday in the lone game,
also at 1 p.m., the Jets
will meet the Sunburners.



lM BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS.

Senior Sports Reporter

THE Jordan Prince William
Falcons and coach Godfrey
McQuay made history on Tues-
day at the Kendal Isaacs Gym-
nasium. i

They became the first schoo
to win both the Bahamas Asso-
ciation of Independent Sec-
ondary Schools’ junior and
senior boys basketball titles at
the same time.

Arid McQuay became the
first coach in the history of the
BAISS to move from one
school and accomplish the feat
in his first year as a new coach,

“I wasn’t trying to set that
goal, but it became a personal
goal,” said McQuay, who took
ovet from Dexter Cambridge
in September. “I don’t think
any toach has won both at the
same time and did it in his first
year.

In 1989, McQuay won the
first of five senior boys basket-
ball titles when he made his
debut with the St. Anne's Blue-
waves, He went on to win three
junior boys titles as well, albeit
at different times.

McQuay thanked God and
the support he got from Jordan
Prince Williams’ head of the
Physical Education Depart-
ment Hattie Moxey anid his
assistant Horatio ‘Yellow’ Poiti-
ef.

He said that while he knew
that the Falcons’ senior boys
team had a solid base to work
with, he was particularly
pleased with the way the junior
boys came around to win their
title.

“The relationship with them
just grew and grew with them
understanding me and me
understanding them,” McQuay
pointed out.

“But with the senior boys, we
expected them, They have a
good team, They are very
young and I felt that we were
the number one team in private
school and St. John’s played
well as the number two school
behind us.”

In the senior boys clincher,
the Falcons knocked off the
Giants 51-47 as Ollen Smith
scored 13 points and Rashad
Williams had 10 as they secured



Be

MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

a 2+1 victory in the series.
The pennant winning Falcons

finished the year with a 15-1

witt-loss record.

Shartairj Wallace had 18 and
Ricardo Moultrie added 14 in
the loss.

In the junior boys clincher,
the Falcons pulled off a 50-40
decision over the Giants for a 2-
1 win in the series as Andrew

Forbes scored 18 and Jasper

Thompson added 13.
Runners-up in the pennant
race, the Falcons posted a 14-2
record to claim their title.
Terrell Sandiford had 11 and
Dwight Moss 10 in the loss. |
After both series were tied
at 1-1, McQuay said he had a
little bit of concern, but he
knew that they had the teams
that were able to pull it off,
especially the senior boys.
“We had about three things
that caused us to lose the game,
I can’t tell you one of them,” he
stated, “But the other two of
them was because we made

pach make hi

numerous turnovers and we

‘ didn’t play defence,

“We knew that once we set-

‘tled down, we had the ability

to come back and pull it off. So
it was just a matter of us doing
what we had to do to win.”

AS a few coach coming in,
McQuay said he never envi-
sioned having the kind of suc-
cess that he achieved with both
teams, although back in his
mind, he was confident as the
season ee that they
could achieve it,

“The kids adopted me quick-
ly and they started calling me
‘Daddy’ again,” he pointed out.
“So once you feel the kids and
you feel you are a part of them,
you ate on your way,

“That really didn't happen
until the second half of the sea-
son when they started to come
around and they started to
show the discipline and the con-
fidence in me.

“That was when we felt that
we could do it, not just with




one, but the two divisions.”

Jordan Prince William also
contested the senior girls title,
but they fell short as they were
swept by St. John’s in two
straight gaines in the final.

The Giants went on to ink
theit names in the record
books, having won their first
senior pirls title. It came dur-
ing their 60th anniversary cele-
brations.

Jordan Prince William are
looking for a celebration of
their own. They are just waiting
on confirmation on a date from
the Bahamas National Baptist
Missionary and Educational
Convention.

In the meantime, Moxey said
when che lured McQuay to Jor-
dan Prince William, she said
she knew that she was bringing
a proven coach to the Falcons.

“DT knew the person | was pet-
ting. I knew he was a person
who was into basketball and
other sporting events and that
he would give 100 per cent,”

@ MIAMI HERALD

ea ———_ SPORTS INSIDE

i









Moxey stressed,

“So | encouraged him after
he came out of St. Anne's and
he did.”

Moxey said Jordan Prince
William has been blessed over
the years with a wealth of tal-
ent, but it was just a matter of
time before they display it.

“This school is based with a
lot of natural talent,” she insist-
ed.

“We just need to put more
emphasis on the children and
help to get them to go into a
different direction so that they
can perform in a better posi-
tion.”

The double dose of basket-
ball victory, she added, will
hopefully propel the Falcons as
they look ahead to the other
sports like track and field.

“We have the talent here, but
the children themselves don't
realise what they have,” she
quipped. “It’s just tor us to
bring the talent out of them like
we did tn basketball”




CCE EE —E——EE———e—=——O

ee Se Se Ee ee oe ee me ee

PAGE 8C, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007

Pollard in
the West
Indies
squad for
World Cup

@ CRICKET
KINGSTOWN,
St. Vincent

Associated Press

ALLROUNDER
Kieron Pollard was
named Thursday in the
West Indies 15-man
squad for the cricket
World Cup.

Allrounder Marlon
Samuels was also
included despite being
under investigation by
the International Crick-
et Council anti-corrup-
tion unit. |

The 19-year-old Pol-
lard got his first inter-
national callup after
impressive perfor-
mances for Trinidad &
Tobago in regional
tournament play over
the last two months. His
debut first-class season
included two quick cen-
turies in the Carib Beer
Cup tournament.

West Indies captain
Brian Lara, 37, will play
his fifth World Cup =
this one in front of a
home crowd in the
Caribbean ‘where the
tournament is being
held for the first time.
Lara made his World
Cup debut in 1992.

Batsman Shivnarine
Chanderpaul, 32, is ©
back for his fourth
World Cup. He and
Lara lead a seasoned
batting lineup alongside
Chris Gayle,
Ramnaresh Sarwan and
Samuels. :

The ICC has sanc-
tioned Samuels to play
dependent on the find-
ings of an anti-corrup-
tion probe. Indian
police alleged that a
taped telephone conver-
sation suggested
Samuels disclosed team
information to a book-
maker during the recent
limited-overs series in
India.

Sarwan was absent
through injury since last
December and missed
the one-day series in
Pakistan and India. |

Lendl Simmons and
Devon Smith were cho-
sen as back-up batsmen.

Simmons made his
debut in November in
Pakistan while the left-
handed Smith was cho-
sen for impressing
against India last month
after two and a half
years out of the team.

Pollard joined
Dwayne Bravo and
Dwayne Smith as the
medium-paced batting
allrounders.

The main bowling is
limited to four fast
bowlers with Fidel
Edwards named only as
a reserve. Left-armer
Ian Bradshaw and
Corey Collymore pro-
duce controlled seam
while the West Indies
will look to Jerome
Taylor and Daren Pow-
ell for express pace.

There was no spot for
a specialist spinner with
allrounders Gayle and
Samuels offering effec-:
tive off-spin.

Denesh Ramdin was
retained as wicket-
keeper.

West Indies is in
Group D for the open-
ing round with Pakistan,
Zimbabwe and Ireland.

The tournament starts
March 13.

M@ SQUAD: Brian
Lara (captain),
Ramnaresh Sarwan,
Chris Gayle, Shivnarine
Chanderpaul, Marlon
Samuels, Lendl Sim-
mons, Devon Smith,
Dwayne Bravo, Dwayne
Smith, Kieron Pollard,

Telios Academy, Faith Temple
enter Hugh Campbell Classic

m@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

TELIOS Academy and Faith
Temple were the latest teams
entered in the 25th Hugh
Campbell Basketball Classic,
bringing the total to a record

All four pools, according to
Alfred Forbes, will now be
stacked with nine teams each.
At the end of the day, a total of
67 teams will be played before
the champion is decided.

“LT see a longer tournament,
which will be extended by a
couple of games,” said Forbes,
who is responsible for setting
up the pools. “Last year, we had
36 teams, but we didn’t have
one of the teams entered.

“This year will go just as last
year with the same amount of
sessions and games played. It
won’t be exactly the same tour-
nament because the same teams

are not in the same pools. But

the structure will be the same as
last year.”

Telios, coached by Pastor
Dave Adams, will be making
their debut in the tournament,

‘North Andros High Invitational highlights

Say ae ee ew ee ee He



SPORTS

\

TU aay

¢ HERE’S a look at the final list of teams in the four pools for
the 25th Hugh Campbell Basketball Classic, scheduled to start
on Monday at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium:

Pool 1 - CI Gibson, Catholic High, St. John’s, Bishop Eldon,
Government High, Harbour Island, Mangrove Cay, Galilee
and Aquinas College. ;

Pool Il - St. George’s, CC Sweeting, Alpha/Omega, Dame
Doris Johnson, St. Anne’s, SC Bootle, Turks and Cacios, King’s

College and Telios Academy.

Pool II - Eight Mile Rock, CR Walker, Sunland Lutheran,
RM Bailey, Mt. Carmel, Church of God, North Andros, Bimi- '

ni and Old Bight.

Pool IV - Jordan Prince William, Tabernacle Christian Acad-
emy, CV Bethel, Jack Hayward, Nassau Christian Academy,
Kingsway Academy, South Andros, Preston Albury and Faith

Temple.

while Faith Temple, coached by
Ray Evans, will be a returning
team.

“We’re happy to have all of
the teams in the tournament
(this year),” Forbes stressed.
“We are hoping that all of the
teams will show up and they will
do very well.”

With the exception of 1986
when there was a dispute
between the teachers that even-
tually led to a split in the gov-

qancauae

PrePITIer TTC dbbedeenenee Preerereeere ie)



ernment and private schools,
the tournament has stood its
ground and is now considered
the only event in New Provi-
dence that has had such a
longevity.

The tournament is on par
with the Catholic High Christ-
mas Invitational Tournament
that is held in Grand Bahama.
But Forbes, a former chairman
of the tournament, said the
hype surrounding this presti-

DPM SMG a ill cmc roe rts |
TRITON PLM CULSrTURG LT a ELE 4
r 4



w@ A RUNNER rounds the bend in relay heats



@ A NORTH Andros
High School student
runs at the North
Andros High School

gious event us unparalleled.
“Every year it’s a new tour-

hament, even thought its old in

its structure,” he explained.

“Every year, it’s new in its .

excitement and with this being
the 25th anniversary, the excite-
ment is building up as one that
will stand out.”

While there is a lot of excite-

‘ment mounding as the tourna-

ment draws nigh on Monday,
the Jordan Prince William Fal-
cons are hoping that this will be
the year that a private school
in New Providence finally wins
the title.

Fresh off their championship
feat over the St. John’s Giants
in the BAISS final on Tuesday
at the Kendal Isaacs Gym, first
year coach Godfrey McQuay
said it would certainly put the
icing on the cake on what has
been a remarkable year for Jor-
dan Prince William.

“It’s not something that I put
any emphasis on, but that is the
one title that I’m missing and
Jordan Prince William is miss-
ing,” McQuay pointed out.

“We were always heading to
Hugh Campbell. That is why
we went to the Grand Bahama

my Me %

6

”
'
,
'

eu gre

‘k

tournament and Stateside to s
view some other teams in Jand-
ary,” McQuay said. “So we

were gearing towards it. fs |
“So now that we’ve been suc- >

cessful in winning this title, I

_ hope that we will stay focussed ‘

and go out there and win it all in -
the tournament.” sf eh
Bahamas National Baptist
Missionary ‘and Educational
Convention’s president, the
Rey. Dr. William Thompson, .
concurred with McQuay.

“We feel confident. We fully: .
do;” Thompson proclaimed. :
“We feel we can win the Hugh.”

Campbell.” ‘

The Government Secondary
Schools Sports Association have
yet to complete their basketball
season. Their playoffs and
championships won’t be played
until after the Hugh Campbell
Tournament is held. ms

The CI Gibson Rattlers are
the defending champions and
they are considered to be the!
team to watch out of the GSS.
SA.

As for the teams coming in,
all eight of the teams from

sebneadeee AAUGeseecceesaesbassabacsbeseGeeseseUedssdeadssedAssssssseensaEssesessssdsAsdASbLEAGELEdEEe SASS EAA Ged EGS eE eS EEESSLUGAGLSAUTEALAL UGA GSALLGAGALAEEAEUAAASEEAASEAUAS USUAL AALBEOU ESE SATE GS



@ A MEMBER of the C.1. Gibson Rattlers relay team takes the baton in heats ait
the North Andros High School 20th Annual Invitational Track and Field Meet on
Friday, Feb. 9, 2007 in Nicholl's Town, North Andros.

(BIS Photo: Tim Aylen)

Wy phyla ee renee ee

ve
soe
ie

.



J

Grand Bahama are listed as-:
potential candidates to win it, ; -*-











Denesh Ramdin, Ian
Bradshaw, Corey Colly-

20th Annual Invitational
more, Jerome Taylor,
j

(BIS Photo:
Tim Aylen)

at the North Andros High School 20th Annual
' Lavitational Track and Field Meet.
(BIS Photo: Tim A ylen)



Daren Powell.


PAGE 14, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007 |

if CER
jngr
FROM page one

tracking the process. He is the one.
“And, he is chiefly responsible
for the potentially protracted liti-
gation that is likely to tie up some
of our courts — for months if not
yo ais — as they try to sort out the
tess: Who owns the house? Who
is the baby’s father? He is the
one,” the former prime minister.
The opposition leader also
blomed the minister for all of the
“sleazy international publicity
brought gown on the Bahamas.”
Mr Gibson, according to Mr
yooraham, exercised incredibly bad
judgment as a minister and is
chictly responsible for the mess that
followed,
“The stark truth is that Anna

Nicole Smith was given permanent

residence in the Bahamas on the
fast track, not because she was a
prize investor; not because she was
~ a celebrity of the kind that would
add grace and luster to our
Bahamas: she was afforded special
treatment simply because she was a
good, nay an especially good, kind
and generous friend of Immigra-
tion Minister Shane Gibson:
“They took us all for fools and
now it’s blowing up in their faces,
big time. So who's looking like fools
now? They are the ones, The prob-
lem is that it is making the whole
country look bad.. And for what?
They should have known better, all
of them. Many people living on this
_ planet would have known some-

“it.

FROM page one

tary Separation Programme for employ-
ees.
Under the plan, all full-time employees

i _ up to the director level working in the

Bahamas and Florida have been offered a
one-time, completely voluntary opportu-
nity to end their employment with Cable
Beach Resorts and receive an attractive
compensation package based on their posi-
tions and length of employment.
Baha Mar said the plan complies with
all labour laws and union guidelines, and
that employees have been given a
six-week window during which to consider

who participate in the plan and can prove
that they have enhanced their skills through
continuing education or specialized training

after leaving Cable Beach resorts, will

receive first interview consideration when
hiring begins for Baha Mar in 2010.

‘Baha Mar CEO Don Robinson told Tri-
bune Business: “As we start mobilizing for
the project some of the rooms will come
down, so the workforce has to come down
with that.”

Although Voluntary Separation Plans
are considered a “best practice” amongst
the world’s leading corporations, Dr. Bas-
tian said he believed the early retirement
plan was proof that the developer was
breaking a promise that it made to the gov-

»

FROM page one

In addition, the developer said that those ;

LOCAL NEWS

ernment when it first bought the Cable
Beach hotels.

“Baha Mar is breaching the commitment
they made to the government and which
the government made to the Bahamian
people, that nobody would have to lose
their jobs despite the purchase of the Cable

. Beach strip,” Dr. Bastian claimed.

According to him, Kerzner Internation-
al did not offer a retirement package to its
employees during construction of Atlantis.

“What they did was tune down each
department and they allowed employees
to work the number of days that were avail-
able and many people went on the con-
struction site to work, but workers were
allowed to retain their seniority and all
their benefits.”

Asked whether he thought employees
would rush to participate in the plan, Dr.
Bastian predicted that many persons would
not be able to find an alternative job, there-

Trade Union leader

fore workers would not be attracted to the |

plan.

He said the plan is going to cause “quite
a stir” amongst hotel employees.

He explained: “If the employees start a
new job they will be starting all over again
because all of their accrued benefits after
long years of service at the hotel will come
to an end.” ,

Baha Mar’s Retirement and Voluntary

Separation Plan applies to employees of ;

Radisson Cable Beach Resort, the Nassau
Beach Hotel and Wyndham Nassau Resort
& Crystal Palace Casino.

‘Horizons’ home

Bahamas Nurses Union

FROM page one

THE TRIBUNE



that they will soon reach an agreement with the Ministry of Health.
The Ministry of Public Health yesterday evening responded to the comments
of the Nurses Union, stating that the “matter of the difficulty of signing of the nurs-

es’ contract was brought to the attention of the Minister of Public Service during -

the last meeting with the representatives of the various services union and staff

association representatives.”

“At that time, the minister undertook to bring some degree of finality to the .

: matter and he continues to see that this is carried out in the shortest possible time,”
: the statement read.

FROM page one

“(The officers) agreed to have three
days taken from their leave, but you can’t
punish people three times for the same
offence. They lost their vacation days, you
turn around and cut (their salary) for three
days and you still want a public apology.
We just thought that that was a bit too
much,” he said.

The union leader said that in the
NCTU’s view this decision by the Ministry
of National Security was “intimidation,
victimisation, and union-busting tactics.”

Mr Pinder also claimed that some of
the issues the prison officers are concerne
about were matters that have been over-
due for resolution for more than two
years.

“We wish to remind the government
that in December 2006, executives of the

NCTU met with Prime Minister Christie, .

Deputy Prime Minister Pratt, Minister of

turers is not affected.

FROM page one

Prison officers

Labour and Immigration Gibson and the
Minister for the Public Service Mitchell to
discuss the outstanding issues regarding
the prison officers,” he said. ‘
During the course of this meeting, he
said, “government committed to having all
outstanding monies paid to the prison
officers before Christmas as well as com-
mitting to a timetable for resolution ‘of
the other issues.”
“None of these commitments were met
-by the government and no explanation
was given as to why they were not met,”
‘Mr Pinder said. :
National Security Minister Pratt on
Wednesday told parliament that the con-
cerns of the prison officers included mon-
- ey matters that had either already been
resolved or were in the process of resolu-
tion, and that the Prison Staff Associa-
tion was aware of this fact.

Recall

thing of the history of Anna Nicole
Smith,” Mr Ingraliam said. © .

It was the prime minister’s duty
when the Immigration Minister,
blinded by his relationship, brought
this matter to Cabinet, to tell him
no, Mr Ingtaham said. .

So far the opposition leader has
not called for Mr Gibson’s resig-
nation as it was “too late for that
now”. :

“Resignations will not save the.
country. Leave them right where
they are so we can get rid of the
lot of them one time and done. As
Ministers of the Government do
their own thing for their own rea--
sons, Prime Minister Christie is
busy looking down at his feet while
the country goes to hell in a hand-
basket. You cannot trust.them,”
Mr Ingraham said.

‘Cedar Crest Funeral Home

? Robinson Road and First Street P.0.Box N-603 « Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
\ Telephone: 1-242-325-51 68/328-1944/393-1352

state of Texas.
















F

TYRONE GARY ROLLE
JOHNSON AGE, 59



a resident Polhemus Street, Bain Town 11:00 a.m.
Saturday, 17th February, 2007 at Bethel Baptist
Church Meeting Street. Officiating Rev.
Timothy Stewart and associate ministers.
‘Interment follows in Southern Cemetery
-Spikenard and Cowpen Roads.

SLATY LSTA LN aE ra

Cherished memory are held by his son, PC
2786 Darren Johnson Sr.; daughters,
Bernadette Whyms, Melonie Williams, Latoya
Johnson, Verenique Smith Sands and Tameka
Johnson Rahming; numerous grandchildren
and great grandchildren including, Tiereace
Scavella, Manesha Johnson. Darren Johnson
Jr., Deja Johnson, Audrey, Violet, Ruth,
Brittany, Bridget, Marco, Kevin, Charlie,
Antonio, Tonya, Anthony, Shavetta, Meltina,
Kentroy, Natasha, Samuel Jr., Saminique,
Rayesha, Saminia, Latrel, Jamelo, Jvar, Jason,
Jr., Darneka and Kentashae; father, Solomon
Johnson: brother, Godfrey Rolle; sons-in-law,
George Whyms, Robert Williams, Samuel
Moss, Tamaro Rahming, Kirklin Sands and
« host of other relatives and friends including,
Rev. Janet Smith-Butler, Patrice Saunders,
Alexandria Smith, Edward Alexander, Jan,
Dwayne, Yvette, Brenell, Marjorie, Elricka,
Romeo, Erroll, Sonovia, Fabian, Angelo,
lesha, Bruce, Stephen, Dominique, Sandy,
Mrs. Shirley Simmons and family, Mrs. Ruth
| Burnside and family, Mrs. Joyce Rolle, Rose
| Greene and family, Mrs. Mizpah Bosfield and
family, Mrs. Moxey and family, Frankie Moss
and family, Pearline Dorsett and family, Dolly
Rahming and family, Johnson, Munroe,
Brennen and Campbell families, Cynthia
Davis and family, Kenneth Dean and family,
Ms. Moxey and family, Yvette Ferguson and
family, Mariona Linden and family, Christine
Cooper and family, Brenda Johnson and
family, David Strachan and family, Vanda
Dean and family, Albert McKinney and family,
Cambridge Street; Dean's Street, Polhemus .
Street and Parker Street families.

AVS EA SAN




































Relatives and friends may pay their last
respects at Cedar Crest Funeral Home,
Robinson Road and First Street on Friday
from 12noon to 5pm and at the church on
Saturday from 9:30 a.m. until service time.

were in fact “in pursuit of the investigation of an
earlier report of a break-in.”

Mr Stern, partner and long-time lawyer of the
deceased celebrity Anna Nicole Smith, filed a
burglary report with local police on the weekend,
claiming that Ms Smith’s personal effects, includ-
ing a computer hard drive, home videos and oth-
er items had been stolen from the Eastern Road
home the couple had shared in the past months.

Meanwhile in Florida — where the former Play-
boy playmate died suddenly last Thursday — the
heated fight over Ms Smith’s body and the custody
cof her five-month-old Bahamas-born daughter
Dannielynn continued yesterday.

Mr Stern, who claims he is executor of Ms
Smith’s will, told the media that he wants to have
her buried next to her son Daniel in the Lakeview
Cemetery in the Bahamas. He said Ms Smith
bought a plot there a few months ago.

However, Ms Smith’s mother, Virgie Arthur,
says she wants her daughter buried in her home




UNERAL SERVICE FOR,

of the deceased’s cheek.

ciated Press reported.

said at the emergency hearing yesterday.
of Dannielynn’s parentage remains unanswered.
the celebrity infant.

lars.

mmeritte’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
¢ MARKET STREET —
° P.O. BOX GT-2097 * TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

Bruce Anthony "Panther"
Colebrooke, 53

-a resident of Bowe's
Alley, will be held at Mt.
Olive Baptist Church,
Meadow Street, on
Saturday February 17th,
2007 at 11:00 a.m.
Officiating will be Rev.
C.B. Moss. Interment
follows in Southern
Cemetery, Cowpen and
Spikenard Roads.

























Left to cherish precious

and wonderful memory

are his mother Amanda

Colebrooke; children,

“Bruce, Navio and Nikitha Colebrooke; grand children,
Jawuan and Bernell Colebrooke; brothers and sister Selva
Colebrooke-Hudson, Lisa and Walter Johnson; nieces and
nephews Robertha, Selisha, Damia, Angel, Terelle, Ryan,
and Selva Hudson and Melody Rozak; grand niece and
nephews, Elizabeth, Philli and Javen, Hudson; uncle and
aunts, David, Anna and Elosie Colebrooke, Hattie Gardiner-
Sweeting, David and Edith Pratt, Rev. Rubien and Belthine
Duncombe; great grand aunt, Corrita Wallace Jones; special .
friends, Cheryl and Neville Johnson, Isadora Johnson,
Jeanette Rolle; godchildren Terran Moss, Evna Bain,
Lavitra Strachan, Stavrox McIntosh, Jr., and Carrynika
Dean; other relatives and friends including, Dorothy and
Edward Prosper, Betty Davis, Marjorie Ramsey, Jacklyn
and James McKinney, Carolyn Bastian, Lee Sweeting,
Finetta Evans, Edward Prosper Jr., and family, Wendel
Francis and family, Derek Moss and family, Andrew Moss
and family, Henson Prosper and family, Pastor David
McPhee and family, Sandra Butler and family, Leana and
Tanie Jones, the Smith family of Coral City, Florida,
Paulette Larrimore and family of Florida, Shirley Wilson
and family of Ft. Lauderdale, Debbie McFall and family,
Bradley, Dio Malancus and Monique, Donna and Dez
Bascombe and family, Deinal and Virgil Bowe and family,
Wendly and Bill Mills and family, Rosett Pratt, Samuel
Pinder, Susan, Vernal, Victoria and Victor Johnson, Deborab
Pratt, Prince and Hannibal Saunders, Vanburen Gaitor,
Ida Saunders, Maraget Hanna, Samuel and Sonia Adderley,
Jeffrey and Dorothy Saunders, Betty Saunders, Idamae
Taylor, Dianna Ward, Christopher and Nicola Pratt, Tony
Mackey, Stavrox and Carol McIntosh, Jefferson Stevens
and family, Sean Steven, Trover Rolle, Mario Hanna,
Sheandra Pratt, Dacel Mott, Indianna Johnson, Altemese °
and Anastasia Tinker, Buba Brown, Anthony Palacious,
Walter Walkes, Elvis Roberts, Mace Beneby, Vincent
Sulliven, Sidney Bethel, Collins Neely, Cameron Mitchell,
Glenroy Russell, Jean Simion, Jorrnen Adderley, Michael
Rahming Brent Lockhart, the Community of Bain Town,
Calvalier Construction Company and many others.

MAY HIS SOUL REST IN










































Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral
Home, Market Street, from 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Friday
and on Syturday at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service
time.





Fort Lauderdale Circuit Judge Larry Seidlin :

yesterday ordered that another DNA sample be : : : : ,
. wns : : a product code located on the lid of the jar that begins with the num-
taken from Ms Smith's body in the form of a ye : ber “2111”. Both the Peter Pan and Gréat Value brands are manu-

The judge said he wanted to make sure all sam- : factured in a single facility in Georgia by ConAgra, and the FDA
ples ae ae before Ms Smith was buri Sdeats said Great Value peanut butter made by other manufacturers is not
her body wouldn’t have to be exhumed, the Asso- : affected.

The affected jars of Peter Pan and Great Value peanut butter have

Most persons infected with Salmonella develop diarrhoea, fever, and

“When we bury her, I want it to be forever,” he : abdominal cramps 12 to 72 hours after infection.

‘ The illness usually lasts four to seven days, and most persons recov-

Judge Seidlin also said that he does not feel er without treatment.

comfortable in making a decision on who takes’ : : : f
dy of Ms Smith’ ion ; Patient needs to be hospitalized. In these patients, the Salmonella
custody of Ms Smith’s body as long as the question, : infection may spread from the intestines to the blood stream, and

As : :? then to other body sites and‘can cause death unless the person is
pee : oe Soe ee BNA tes Wil i treated promptly with antibiotics. The elderly, infants, and those with
Brave that he is in fact the biological father of : impaired immune systems are more likely to have a severe illness.

However, in some persons the diarrhoea may be so severe that the’

Speaking with The Tribune yesterday, Agriculture and Marine

Mr Stern, with two other men, is also claiming Re cs a ee pan that his vue! Sei sends
to have fathered the five-month-old baby ; % nee duet ee. eck an aie he ute - ; Be ii ob ro
girl, who could eventually inherit millions of dol- owners to conduct similar checks and in the interest of public satety,

i take any possibly contaminated products off their shelves.























Yer ier Hone Chor

Queen’s Highway :
“P.O. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 # Paging:.352-6222 #1724... s
ae Fax: 351-3301 .

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

CORINE PATRICIA —
SWEETING, 49



of #302 Haddock Street, |
Freeport and formerly of

McCleans Town, Grand
Bahama, will be held on |
Saturday, February 17, 2007,
11:00 a.m., at Emmanuel
Baptist Church, High Rock,
Grand Bahama, Officiating will
be Pastor Napthali Cooper and |
Minister Frederick Carey.
Interment will be made in the |
High Rock Public Cemetery.



- Left to cherish her memory are her husband Bradley Sweeting; one
son, Anthony King Jr; three daughters, Keishan and Lavanda Cartwright
and Samantha King; four grandchildren, Travis, Treamine and Tristan

- Cartwright and Douglas Higgs Jr. one stepson, Boloana White; two
brothers, Frederick and Kingsley Carey; five sisters, Daisy Musgrove,
Gloria Basden, Roselyn Ramsey, Berthamae Curry and Angela
Munnings; 10 stepbrothers and sisters including, Jewel, Alvin, Ethelyn,
Rosemary, Alrick and Anthony Rolle, Eula Aranha, Sheena Dames,
Donna, Ingrid, Nicole, Judy, Christine and Lee Balfour; four sisters-
in-law, Gloria and Dale Carey, Nita and Stephanie Sweeting; 11

-brothers-in-law, Wingo Musgrove, Audley Basden, Anthony Ramsey,
Shockley Curry, Rendall Munnigs Sr., Junior, Jeffrey, Kendall, Lionel,
John and Louise Sweeting; 15 nieces, Lisa Rolle Evans, Tamara
Johnson, Meoshi and Rashan Albury, Tangia Turnquest, Opal Burnside,
Xaviera Mills, Antionette Ramsey, Xonevea Fox, Avion Forbes,
Katrina and Antonia Carey, Sasha’ Miyake Chin, Jaya Mills and
Henranique Burnside; 16 nephews, Benny Roberts, Kevin McDonald,
Keno Basden, Rendall Munnings Jr., Rendwood ‘and Reangelo
Munnings, Kareem Pinder, Lavar, Lakale and Lashad Carey, Staniko
Farrington, Shanard Evans, Patricko and Patrick Basden Jr., Henrico .

- Burnside, Damarion Fox; 16 nieces-in-law and 15 nephews-in-law;
three uncles, Solomon Mitchell, Nehemiah Rolle and Vernal McIntosh;
two aunts, Florence Rolle and Olga Hanna; cousins, Rev. Wendal and
Minister Ebby McIntosh, Melanie, Bernie, Inetta, Enoch, Dave and
Robert McIntosh, Pearl, Beulah, Nathaniel, Hansel, Bertram, Wally
and Allen Carey, Helen, Selva, Cleora and Brian Carey, Ucille Hanna,
Relda Pinder, Debbie Curry, Carla, Glenda, Darnell and April;
godsisters, Euna and Berthrum Cooper; adopted mother, Laura Roberts;
godchildren, Tatiana Rolle and Natalie Carey; Dher pastor, Pastor
Napthali and Mrs, Cooper, Pastor Carolyn Cooper, The Invaders for
Christ family, Rosetta Curry, Carolyn Sands, Quincey and Leroy
Mather, Maggie Mather, Ann Higgs and family, Peggy Bridgewater
Kemp, Annie Mather and Patsy Russell, Dr. Michael Darville, Mercedes
Fulford, Pastor Hubert King, Nurse Debbie and special confidant
Eleanore Carey; the entire East End community and a host of other
relatives and friends.


























Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral Home
and Crematorium, Queens Highway, Freeport on Friday from 2:00
noon until 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday at the church from 9:30 a.m.
until service time.












O06

Vows

v%

GO nogntesy:

‘\
pvse

> ey



%
%,
2

sre orD,

a ¢
ak
oe
--F

EDF YT
£6 os

~ %, t, %
y

Â¥

4

Nyt

Z
“Sy




‘

WEL,

%
wy
Ep Mahe

13,

a
-

#.

an

yee

io e's 4 "5
ae kK 2

ete

Mee 4 a,
7-18 BaeOee
SFA so

ti pe wh’

ee

3

he
7

wees



THE Bahamas Film Festival
has announced plans for its
upcoming fourth annual Festi-
val which is slated for July 5-7.

Continuing the trend of hon-
ouring Bahamians who have giv-
en much to the industry, screen
legend Calvin Lockhart will be
given The Minister of Culture
Award at this years festival.

At a press conference
announcing plans for the festi-
val, Mr Lockhart thanked Mr

‘Moss and TBFF for honouring

him in this way. Mr Lockhart
has many movies to his credit,
including Predator 2, Coming
to America and Uptown Satur-
day Night, the latter which also
featured fellow Bahamian Sir
Sidney Poitier.

He remembers vividly grow-
ing up in Masons Addition and
performing in church. He spoke
briefly about the movie he is
currently in: Rain, funded by
Hollywood but written by a

UN extends peacekeepin

@ UNITED NATIONS

THE Security Council voted
unanimously Thursday to
extend the UN peacekeeping
mission in Haiti for eight
months following an agreement
between the United States and
China on the length of the new
mandate, according to Associ-
ated Press. ;

In a report in December, for-
mer UN Secretary-General
Kofi Annan recommended that
the 8,800-strong mission be
extended for one year when its:
mandate expired on February
15, a view backed by the
Friends of Haiti, whose mem-
bers include the United States,
Canada, Brazil, France and
Britain.

But China, which has no
diplomatic relations with Haiti,
pushed for another six-month
mandate. :

China’s UN Ambassador



At SvitzerWijsmuller, results and values go hand in hand. With 2,500 employees and a fleet
towage, salvage and related marine services in over 35 coun’
marine services company, we encourage a culture of commit
responsibility for our purpose: to provide safety and support at

the A.P. Moller - Maersk Group.

PAGE 16, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2007

Film festival to honour Ba

CALVIN Lockhart

Bahamian.

Another Bahamian receiving
a high honour is James Catalyn,
in whose name the festival is

“Wang Guangya said Beijing

agreed to eight months to allow
time for an assessment of the
security risks, challenges and
priorities facing Haiti and rec-
ommendations on how to accel-
erate peacebuilding in the poor-
est country in the Western
hemisphere.

The council will consider the
assessment and recommenda-
tions when considering a
renewal of the mandate, which
expires October 15, he said.
But Wang made it clear Bei-
jing wants six-month extensions
in the future. :

Diplomats in Haiti have said

China wanted the shorter
mandate because of Haiti’s
support for Taiwan’s bid to
join the United Nations. Haiti

. is one of a handful of coun-

tries that has diplomatic ties
with Taiwan. China and Tai-
wan split amid civil war in
1949, but Beijing still claims

tries worldwide. To sustain our



being produced. He was also on
hand and thanked Mr Moss and
(TBFF) for what he describes
as “this great honour. I am elat-



sovereignty over the island.
Acting US ambassador Ale-

jandro Wolff called the vote “

an important signal of the deter-

-mination of the international

community” to support the UN
mission.

“This is good news,” he said,
noting that all previous exten-
sions had been for six months
and this was the lengthiest
extension for the mission.

China’s Wang said the “cen-
tral task” for the UN mission
in the next eight months “is to
assist Haiti in its transition from
peacekeeping to peacebuild-
ing.”

He complained that the reso-
lution was “not as balanced and
comprehensive as expected”
because some paragraphs
“overemphasise military means
but fail to pay adequate atten-
tion to such important priori-
ties as political reconciliation
and economic recovery.”

of more than 300 vessels, we provide
position as one of the world's leading
ment, innovation, and entrepreneurship where all employees take
sea. SvitzerWijsmuller is headquartered in Denmark and is part of

Freepoint Tug & Towing Services, Ltd. (FTTS) is a JV company, 50/50 owned by SvitzerWijsmuller and South Riding Point Hold-

ing Ltd (World Point Terminals Inc.). FT TS operates a fleet of 4 tugs,
times on neighbouring islands. Additional personnel is needed to assi

The Bahamas.

providing services in Freeport, South Riding Point, and at
ist in the growth of our tug operation and overall exposure in

ASD TUG MASTER -

Freepoint Tug & Towing Services, Ltd. — Freeport GB, Bahamas

THE POSITION ; \

The Master will be responsible for the supervision and
leadership of all aspects of vessel management, which

include:

The position also offers an exciting and attractive career in an
international environment with the possibility of continuous de-

velopment both within SvitzerWijsmuller Group or World Point

Terminals Inc.

Maintenance and safe operation of the tug

Crew management, including crew motivation and*

skill development

Risk management - the ability to identify, assess,
and respond to hazards and operational risks
Preparation of tug daily activity sheets

All tug stores/parts requisition
Other ad hoc tasks

Meeting the high SvitzerWijsmuller Health, Safety, «
Environment, and Quality standards, including
managing all aspects of ISM and |SO9001

The Tug Master will receive support from other F