Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

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PAGE 2, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007

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THE TRIBUNE





4
v4
-,

Gomez, to attend meetings on.
future of Anglican church

@ By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer

ANGLICAN Archbishop
Drexel Gomez leaves for Dar
es Salaam, Tanzania today to
attend a series of communion
meetings which “to a large
extent” will determine the
future of the Anglican church.

The announcement was made |

at a press conference yesterday
at the Anglican Diocesan Office
on Sands Road.























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PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES.
For the right candidate, the job offers significant career and

Consecration of gay bishop tops agenda ©



uled to attend the Joint Stand-
ing Committee of the Primates
and the Anglican Consultative
Council, and the Global South

-Primates meetings, before all

38 leaders of the provinces of
the Anglican Communion gath-
er at the Full Primates Meet-

ing, which will be presided by
_the Archbishop of Canterbury.

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NATIONAL

Six key matters will be dis-
cussed:

¢ The response of the Epis-
copal Church in the United
States to the Windsor Report,
which examined challenges to
the unity of the Anglican Com-
munion following the reaction
of conservatives to the conse-

cration of the openly gay Bish-








op Gene Robinson in the US.

¢ The ongoing relationship
between the Episcopal church
and the worldwide Anglican
Commission.

¢ An Anglican Covenant

¢ The Lambeth Conference
2008

¢ Theological education in
the Anglican Communion

e Ecumenical relations

The Covenant Design Group,
a taskforce charged with detail-
ing “the way forward” for the
Anglican church in light of the
issue of homosexuality in the
clergy, will also be presenting
its report to the Anglican Com-
mission.

This ‘Covenant Design
Group, on which Archbishop
Gomez serves as chairman, was
asked to make suggestions
which would serve as a frame-
work for the denomination and
be binding upon all members
of the 38 provinces.

The group completed that



@ DREXEL GOMEZ

document over the course of .

four days.

Though members of the
group have been sworn to keep
the contents of that document a
secret, Archbishop Gomez did
reveal that the suggestions
made are “biblically rooted”
and are in accordance with the
historical teachings of the Angli-
can church.

He describes it as a “compre-

hensive document” which he
believes answers all of the ques-
tions that Anglicans are asking
concerning homosexuality and
their faith.
Archbishop Gomez said he is
“optimistic” about the
Covenant Design.Group’s
work, and is confident that the
primates’ acceptance of this
document will be a significant
step in maintaining an ongoing

relationship between the Epis-
‘copal Church and the world-

wide Anglican Commission.

In 2003, Rev V Gene Robin-
son-was consecrated the next
bishop of New Hampshire and
became the first openly gay
prelate in the Episcopal Church,
USA. :
That controversial appoint-
ment sparked contention
among Anglicans worldwide,
who are at odds with whether or
not homosexual clergymen

‘should be acknowledged... - - ;

Scheduled to return on Ash
Wednesday, (February 21),
Archbishop Gomez will make
public the findings of matters
discussed at the Anglican Com-
munion meetings.

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I’m being set up for involvement -

in death of Daniel Smith - Stern -

HOWARD K Stern, lawyer
and partner of dead celebrity
Anna Nicole Smith is claiming
that he is being set up for the
involvement in the death of
Daniel Smith. :

Speaking with the US news
show The Insider on Wednes-
day night — just one day before
the death of Ms Smith - Mr
Stern said that he was shocked
by.claims he saw in US tabloids,
which alleged that he was seen
flushing the drug Methadone
down the toilet at the Eastern
Road’ home ‘Horizons’ in the
Bahamas.

Daniel, 20, died last Septem-
ber in a Doctors Hospital room
of a lethal drug cocktail — just
days after the caesarian birth of
Ms Smith’s. daughter Dan-
nielynn.

According to police reports,
both Anna Nicole Smith and
Mr Stern were in the room at
the time of his death.

Mr Stern told the CBS news

show that there are people who
are out to set him up for the
death.

“I know I never gave Daniel

Methadone. I know I never told .
‘anyone I gave Daniel Methadone

oatss 2 @ «¢

BE MY VALENTINE

and I know I never flushed
Methadone down the toilet.

“For them to implicate me in
Daniel’s death, it’s just despi-
cable. I would never hurt
Daniel, I loved Daniel. He was
my family,” he said.

Former boyfriend of the
TrimSpa spokeswoman G Ben
Thompson and his son-in-law
Ford Shelley were:scheduled to
appear on The Insider last night.

They were expected to. be
interviewed about the events
they witnessed at’ Mr Stern’s
and Ms Smith’s home follow-
ing the death of Daniel.

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THE TRIBUNE

Theatrical
series to aid
education
of students

MINISTER of Education
Alfred Sears officially intro-
duced “Bahamas OnStage
YouTheatre” to the nation dur-
ing a Minister’s Book Club pre-
sentation on Monday.

The family theatrical series is
the brainchild of its CEO and
producer Kathy Ingraham.

“When this wonderful pro-
ject came to my attention, I was
truly touched by the passion of
Ms Ingraham,” said Mr Sears.
“She came with noble inten-
tions of making our youth
appreciate literature from an
early age and to assist those
with national exams have a bet-
ter understanding of their liter-
ature by bringing items from
the syllabus to the stage.

“Ms Ingraham’s sincerity
moved me because she did not
see the profit in it but rather

‘the benefit to making this avail-
able to all students. Her
commitment to getting inner
city children to the shows and
‘making it equal opportunity
speaks volumes of which my
ministry completely supports.”

The minister said Ms Ingra-
ham has been gathering corpo-
rate sponsors to assist schools
where students are experienc-
ing financial difficulties.

“At Bahamas OnStage
YouTheatre, we have a hands-
on approach that we hope our.
children can appreciate,”
explained Ms Ingraham. “We
want them to develop a rela-
tionship with the productions
because we want to light some
creative sparks for the future
actors, singers, writers, musi-
cians, set designers, light and
sound engineers, costumers and
others.

Ms Ingraham revealed that
children will have the opportu-
nity to meet the cast after the
show for photo opportunities
and a brief question and answer
period.

Schools attending the shows

will be given study guides that
tie in the play with various sub-
jects including math, science,
technology, geography, art and
craft and foreign languages.
' Shows planned for the sea-
son include Black Journey
which highlights the musical
evolution from slave ballads to
hip hop in African-Americans,
Beauty and the Beast, and the
Hans Christian Anderson clas-
sic The Little Mermaid.

Manager is
appointed
for Marley
Resort

MARLEY Resort and Spa,
the 16-room boutique resort
property opening this year on
Cable Beach, has announced
the appointment of Kirk Wright
as general manager.

In his new position, Mr
Wright will oversee operations,
co-ordinate the resort team and
maintain guest relations at the
new resort.

“The former winter home of

Bob and Rita Marley, the Mar-_

ley Resort and Spa will open.”

spring 2007 as an intimate
world-class sanctuary infused
with music, relaxation and live-
ly entertainment,” said the com-
pany in a statement: “Lovingly |
revived by the Marley family, '
the resort will blend exquisite
natural beauty, romantic her-
itage and rustic luxury with the
timeless essence that is the Mar-
ley legacy.” ‘
Wright joins the’ resort with
more than 17 years of experi-
ence in the® hospitality industry .
in Florida and the Caribbean.

Serving ‘as director of hotel ::

‘operations for, Antilles Resorts
Managementiin St Thomas
since 2005, Mr Wright worked
to substantially increase resort
revenue, Ofganise management
resources, and personally hire
and train staff.

Prior to that, he held the posi-
tion of general manager of Com-
fort Suites and Resorts in Seven
Mile Beach, Grand Cayman,
where he earned two Choice
Hotels International Gold
Awards for his accomplishments.

Born in Jamaica and educated
in the United States, Mr Wright
was graduated from Florida
International University with a
bachelor of science degree in.
hospitality management.

‘FOR 3 rt 1 a WT SERVICE
F ay, |i Ta
Pest Control

ie SC ELC ae
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LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 3

2m in US aid to help figh




pia and human smuggling —

m@ By BRENT DEAN

US Ambassador John Rood
announced yesterday a $3.2
million package of equipment
and technical assistance for the
Bahamas in the fight against
illicit trafficking.

This package comes as a part
of the new “Enduring Friend-
ship” initiative.

The programme in its first

stage gives aid to four coung,..,
see

tries in the region: thé

Bahamas, the Dominican -

Republic, Jamaica and Pana-
ma ~ for increased maritime
security.

As a result of the pro-
gramme, the Bahamas will
receive: four 43-foot Intercep-
tor Nor-Tech vessels with 300
hours of preventative mainte-
nance support per vessel; crew

BE JOHN Rood

training of 12 to 15 Bahamian
personnel at the US Southern
Command; four boat trailers;
two Ford 450 trucks to move
the trailers; four Jetdock boat
docks; forward looking



infrared systems for the boats;
and communications equip-
ment along with technical sup-
port.

Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of National Security,
Cynthia Pratt, thanked the
Ambassador for the aid pack-
age.

She noted that the problems
of drug trafficking, illegal
migration. and terrorism illus-
trate that security vulnerability
for the Bahamas is security vul-
nerability for the US.

Mrs Pratt assured US offi-
cials that the assets that have
been donated will be put to
efficient and: effective use in
furthering mutual interests. of
the two nations.

Ambassador Rood
described Enduring Friendship

as “a programme that shows

Government signs contracts to
improve housing communities

THE Ministry of Housing
has signed contracts for sod
grass, fencing and fruit trees
to surround the homes in
Dignity Gardens.

During a signing ceremony
yesterday, the ministry noted
that it has been mandated by
the government to carry out
the expansion of family home
construction, “and in so doing,
will aim not only to build
houses but communities.

“A multiple prong
approach has been taken to
build homes within reach of
churches, shopping centres,
clinics, recreational facilities
and to beautify, maintain and
secure yards in these com-
munities,” housing officials
said in a statement.

Dignity Gardens is one of
three subdivisions where the
government has been sub-
jected to heavy criticism by
homeowners for the poor..
construction of houses. The
ministry has in turn blamed
the contractors it hired for
the shoddy work.

Congratulating the subdi-
vision’s community associa-
tion for its efforts in beauti-
fying the area, the ministry
said it is now “incumbent
upon them to create in Dig-
nity Gardens, the communi-
ty that is to be revered
throughout the Bahamas.”

“Fruit trees will be strate-
gically placed to enhance the
beauty of the various yards
and to provide shading. And,
in years to come these trees
will produce fruits for resi-
dents to eat.

“Sod grass will provide
aesthetic beauty to yards and
the community. Fencing will
also provide security for the
home owners,” said the
statement.

It asked Dignity Gardens
residents to “join hands with
the government in this effort
of building communities.”

“We must ensure that Dig-
nity Gardens, other commu-
nities and the entire



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BM NEVILLE Wisdoni yesterday after the Ministryof Housing |
signs contracts to better the new housing communities

(Photo:Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Bahamas is kept clean, green
and pristine.”

Next Tuesday, Minister of
Housing Mr Neville Wisdom is
set to meet with residents of
Excellence Estates, another
subdivision in which the gov-
ernment has been criticised for
shoddy work, to discuss their
"community development.”
The week after, he is scheduled
to pay a visit to Pride Estates.

Earlier this week, in the wake



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of a barrage of complaints
brought to the attention of The
Tribune, Minister Wisdom
encouraged all homeowners
who have concerns about the
quality of construction or fin-
ishings in their new government
homes to bring their complaints
to him directly.

“As quickly as those things are
brought to my attention I will
give directions for them to be
attended immediately,” he said.


















* aScants each © s

ot q en 35. YER re Rd, inn an ae © Fax:[242] 322-525]



our commitment to the region;
shows our commitment, our
trust, our belief in the
Bahamas.”

He also said he expects the
addition of this programme to
further strengthen the existing
Operation Bahamas Turks and
Caicos (OPBAT) anti-drug and
human trafficking initiative.

“When the assets of OPBAT
were first challenged and we
were worried about whether or
not our capabilities were going
to be. diminished, madam
deputy prime minister, I said to
you that I was confident that
we were going to end up with
an OPBAT programme that
was going to be stronger than

Y



PALMDALE

326-5556

Sam-6pm
Monday-Gaturday

\
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ST reas

what we have now.

“And after Senator Nelson’s
visit and his commitment to the
additional helicopters, and after
this programme, where we have

. four intercept boats plus all the

latest equipment and training, {
can tell you the OPBAT pro-
gramme is going to be
stronger,” he said.

Ambassador Rood, who will
leave his post in April, informed
the press that some of the com-
munications equipment will
start to come to the Bahamas
within the next few months.

Some of the larger equipment
will arrive at the end of the year
with further deliveries arriving
in 2008, he added.

TOWN CENTRE MALL

356-3205

1@am-8pm Monday-Friday

10am-9pm Saturday

MURPHY

MURPHY

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ever made a really
big mistake?

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

The Tribune Limited Issues that must

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI

Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.



_ Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387



A wrong decision at the wrong time

THE TRANSFER of Assistant Police Com-
missioner Reginald Ferguson is certainly the
wrong decision at the wrong time. And, if the
behind-the-scenes reports are to be believed, the
transfer smacks of political interference rather
than good policing.

It is claimed that Mr Ferguson — assistant
commissioner in charge of crime since 1997 —
has been targeted for dismissal by some ele-
ments in the PLP since that party became the
government in 2002. But the difficulty, it is
alleged, was how to get rid of him without it
appearing to be political.

In all the years that we have known and
have worked with Mr Ferguson in gathering
information about crime for publication, we
have never known his politics. As far as we
knew he was a hard-working officer doing his
best to protect the public from criminals. He was
so far removed from politics in our mind that it
was only this week that we learned that Johnley
Ferguson, FNM candidate for MICAL in the
2002 election, was his brother. Why this should
affect a police officer’s career —.if in fact what
is being said is true — can only be attributed to
the weakness of petty minds.

We know that in recent years Mr Ferguson
had a difficult case to handle that involved the
son of a deceased politician. As far as we can
discover he handled the situation as an objective
police officer should, not allowing politics or
connections to cloud his investigative judgment.
Did this bring him down?

It is being said that cértain government politi-
cians wanted “one of their own in place” for this
election. If this is in fact true, it is an insult not
only to Mr Ferguson, but also to whomever is to
replace him. First of all, it suggests that Mr Fer-
guson would be unfair to a certain section of
Bahamian citizens because of their politics. On
the other hand it also infers that his replace-
ment, being “one of their own”, could be easily
manipulated by the politicians to do their bid-
ding. Either way it is no compliment to either
man.

The police force is supposed to be protected
from political interference. Only the Commis-
sioner of Police can make transfers and decide
on promotions within his force. It is being
strongly suggested that in this instance heavy
pressure is being brought on Commissioner
Farquharson to remove Mr Ferguson as his sec-
ond in command. The Commissioner has since
taken to his bed with the flu. He is now out of
the reach of probing reporters, and so the
rumours persist.

The case of the five baggage handlers — so it
is being said — was a perfect time to throw Mr
Ferguson to the howling groups calling for
someone to be punished for manoeuvring the
Bahamian handlers into the handcuffs of Amer-
ican justice. ;

What poor timing, especially before an elec-
tion. What a dreadful political mistake.

289 Market St. South ¢ P.O. Box N-7984 e Nassau,

THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

“Take te first step in faith, doubt

will just have to follow”

SUNDAY SERVICES
7:00am, 9:00am, 11:15am
PASTOR EARLE FRANCIS J.P.,D.D.
Marriage Officer, Counsellor, Intercessor
Phone: 323-6452 © 393-5798
Fax: 326-4488/394-4819





Deviva

BISHOP GLORIA REDD MINISTRIES



Now — without presuming either the inno-
cence or guilt of the five Bahamians arrested in
the US and charged with smuggling drugs into
that country — let us look at the sequence of
events in that case.

It is understood that both Bahamian and
American law enforcement officers had been
working for a long time trying to find out how
drugs were getting on planes arriving into the
US from the Bahamas.

A meeting was called last year by those
investigating the case. They met in the DEA’s
offices in Miami.

The US Attorney General’s office was also
represented at the meeting. Naturally, their
Bahamian counterparts with their attorney to
look after the interest of the Bahamas were to
attend.

The meeting was called to inform both sides
of the investigators’ findings and who had fall-
en under suspicion for indictment to the US.’

Mr Ferguson, representing the Bahamas
police force, was to attend. According to press
reports, Director of Public Prosecutions Bernard
Turner was also to be present. However, the day
before their departure, word came down that
Mr Turner had been instructed not to go to the
meeting. Therefore, Mr Ferguson, and a fellow
investigator, flew to Miami, without their legal
adviser.

We understand that, other than indictments,
nothing was discussed at that meeting of any
plans for arrest — persons under suspicion were
only identified. As any police officer will con-
firm, although the US and Bahamas cooperate
in investigations, they do not collaborate on
arrests. Each side does his own thing.

Obviously the Americans have informants —
all good investigative organisations do — who
learned of the baggage handlers mandatory
training programme in the US, and — again as
all good investigative organisations will —
snatched their opportunity. And so, knowing
how these organisations work, we can easily
believe that no one in the Bahamas knew the
details of the American plan.

As for kidnapping, it must be remembered
that no Bahamian was arrested in the Bahamas
and taken to the US against his will. The arrests
were made on US soil of Bahamians, who vol-
untarily went to Miami, and who were under
suspicion of breaking American laws. Without
prior knowledge, Bahamian law enforcement
cannot be accused of collusion in their arrest.

Remember there is a war on against the ped-
dling of drugs. The American investigators in
the course of their duties, saw a window of
opportunity and took it. They did their job, and
they did it well.

As far as we are concerned, the issue is .

not the baggage handlers. Rather it is Mr Fer-
guson, a good police officer about to be thrown
to the wolves — also for doing his job. This
cannot happen.

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EDITOR, The Tribune.

I HAVE been living in
Nassau for a year and a
half. I came with the expec-
tation that I would be living
in a relatively modern, pro-
gressive Caribbean country.
In actual fact, I have come
to the sad realisation that I
am living in a Third World
Banana Republic. I have no
political alliances or affilia-
tions and have tried to
assume the role of a com-
pliant, silent temporary res-
ident. However, the never
ending list of questionable
practices and events that
seem to occur almost daily,
have forced me to want to
share my viewpoint as an
unbiased observer with
your Bahamian readers.

Among the many situa-
tions that have caught my
attention:

¢ The Nassau airport is a
travesty for a county whose
economy relies so heavily
on tourism. The radar sys-
tem has been malfunction-
ing for months, jet fuel sup-
plies have been exhausted
during busy seasons, bag-
gage handlers have been
charged with drug traffick-
ing, the facility’s best
restaurant operates out of
the trunk of a car in the
parking lot, and deplaning
customers have been forced
to crawl through the bag-
gage carousel to enter the
terminal. No arrival and
departure notice boards
share flight information
with passengers and the
national airlines office
hours resemble banking
hours, not a service-orient-
ed venture.

¢ The education system is
a failure. Student’s perfor-
mance that is rated at a D
or F level is a horrendous
indictment of the state of
local education today as
well as a wonderful predic-
tor of the significant esca-
lation of island problems to
be expected in the future.
Teachers have not been
paid in some schools since
the beginning of the term
SIX months ago. Each Sep-
tember is highlighted by
schools not opening on time
due to unfinished repairs,
or opening in totally unsafe
or unsuitable conditions. I
have heard of schools that
use the staff car parking lot

a Ee

SANOFI AVENTIS, a leading multinational
pharmaceutical company is seeking to recruit

Professional
Medical Representatives

The successful candidates will be responsible for promoting
and detailing special lines of products.

The ideal candidate will:
@ Be highly motivated and proactive
@ Be willing to travel island-wide and overseas as

Have strong interpersonal and communication skills
Have the ability to motivate, inspire and work with
other team members

Have a car in good condition

Have residence in Nassau

© Be computer literate

Qualifications and experience:
@ A degree/diploma in science, marketing, nursing or

@ Experience in marketing and sales would be an
asset, one or two years in the pharmaceutical

Please forward your application and resume by.
February 23, 2007 to:
Lowe's Wholesale Drug Agencies Ltd.
P.O. Box N-7504
Nassau, Bahamas



IDSA MREIS

letters@triobunemedia.net








for physical education class-
es and a chronic lack of
essential supplies and
teaching materials is com-
mon. Hardly an educational
system that can make par-

ents, students or the
Bahamian public proud.

¢ The local prison has
been rated as one of the
worst in the world by
Amnesty International.
Prisoners have escaped, as a
result of lax security,
absence of modern surveil-
lance equipment, poorly
motivated and performing
staff, and failure to follow
basic security protocols for
penal institutes. A foreign
journalist was assaulted in a
government prison and a
recent prisoner was incar-
cerated for over four years
without a legitimate trial
only to be freed when a
competent judge ruled
there was not enough evi-
dence to try the accused.
The Bahamas prison system
is more typical of a 19th
century prison than one
from the 21st century.

¢ Personal health and
safety has become an
increasing issue. An island
population of about 230,000
witnessed 60 homicides last
year, while the city of a mil-
lion I come from had 24
murders. The police force
is undermanned, under
trained and has often been
involved in excessive
aggression and violence.
Dishonesty within the force,
as well as the Bahamian

militia, leave the public at ©

large feeling very insecure.
Fenced and gated resi-
dences, security bars and
screens, and miles of razor
wire are a sign of the times
in many parts of the world,
but they also provide a very
sobering reflection into the
Bahamian reality.

¢ The government pro-
vides daily examples of
either incompetence or:
inefficiency or corruption.
For example, the recon-
struction of the Straw Mar-
ket, a vital tourist attrac-
tion, has still not been
addressed FIVE years after
it was, destroyed by fire.

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Members of parliament
have resorted to the gentle-
manly art of fisticuffs to
resolve their differences of
opinions. Celebrities have
been awarded Bahamian
residency, status within
weeks, while “ordinary cit-
izens” have waited for
many years. Government
subsidised low cost housing
has been substandard and
unacceptable and tainted °
with accusations of mis-
management. A local news-
paper editor who has
worked in the Bahamas for
years had his work visa
temporarily withheld when
he publicly criticised the
government. The govern-
ment is characterised by
incessant debate, hollow
rhetoric, and constant fin-
ger pointing at the opposi-
tion while avoiding dealing
with the many issues in edu-
cation, public safety, prison
reform, the environment,
diversifying the economy,
unemployment, immigra-
tion issues, drug trafficking,
health care, and downtown
redevelopment. fd
The upcoming election .-
will involve endless heated
debates among the many
candidates hoping to find a
seat on the Bahamian gravy
train. Promises will be
made and each tongue will
be coated with honey and
visions of a wonderful
future. The next govern-
ment will be no better than
any of the previous govern-
ments unless the intention

‘of the candidates is to begin

addressing some of the
issues that are identified
above. Not with promises,
but with detailed action
plans that include a firm
timeline for implementation
and the identification of the. -

individual accountable for >.’

the completion of the action
plan. Unless implementa-
tion of plans for improve-
ment becomes the focus
and vision of the leaders of
this country, it will not only
continue to look like a
Third World Banana
Republic it will become The
Third World Bahamian
Republic.

OBSERVER
Nassau,
February, 2007.












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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 5



oO ln brief



Fertility
treatment
seminars
at Doctors

THE first in a series of
educational seminars on
infertility treatment options
in the Bahamas was held last
night at Doctor’s Hospital.

Dr Anthony Carey,
founder and director of the
Health Centre for Women
and IVF Bahamas Ltd and
Dr Juergen Eisermann of the
South Florida Institute for
Reproductive Medicine are
presenting the series.

“During each seminar,
attendees will gain valuable
information about where to
start, what to look for, who to
turn to for help, and how to
overcome their sense of
hopelessness,” said the doc-
tors in a statement.

The series begins with the
basics of infertility informa-
tion about reproductive med-
icine and infertility as it
relates to the patient.

Dr Carey will also discuss
the opening of the first invit-
ro fertilisation clinic in the
Bahamas, IVF Bahamas Ltd.
- All of the seminars are free
to attend. ;

Cuba warns
pirates over
signal from
US station

m@ HAVANA

_ THE US government
strives mightily to stamp out
intellectual property theft all
over the world — except for
Cuba, where it tries to broad-
cast anti-communist mes-
sages to anyone able to see
US programming through
illegal satellite dishes, accord-
ing to Associated Press.
Now the Cuban govern-
ment is striking back, warning
TV signal pirates that they
face stiff fines and jail terms.
The Communist Party

_mewspaper Granma dedicat-

« », ed,a full, page Thursday to an



oe

S

TET,

ee

-4



prs ct er ees

saccount of the discovery and

prosecution of four men who
sold or maintained the sort of
jerry-built satellite TV systems
believed to be hidden on thou-
sands of rooftops across Cuba.

It came three days after
Cuba denounced a US gov-
ernment strategy that began
in December to use Florida
television stations to get
around Cuban jamming of
TV Marti — a move that has
made the US-funded station,
aimed at undermining Fidel
Castro’s government, acces-
sible to thousands of Cubans.



i



(



&,

2 tedophone calle

Complaints over ‘unhealthy’

ood at Government High

PARENTS and students ‘at
Government High School are
reportedly fed up with the
unhealthy food being served to
the students on a daily basis.

To make matters worse, if
they fail to bring a packed
lunch, the students have little
choice but to eat what they are
served — as school policy dic-



tates that they are not allowed.

to receive food from anyone
during school hours.
“Everything is fried, fried
fried,” claimed one irate stu-
dent. “It is all greasy. There is
nothing healthy at all and every-
one is fed up.”

According to the student, the
problem has been brought to
the attention of several senior
officials at the school, includ-

Students and parents despair at ‘greasy’ food



ing the principal, yet no action
has been taken.

He said that. when
approached three weeks ago,
one school official assured stu-
dents that something would be
done about the problem, but
failed to make good on this
promise.

The student pointed out that
last year, the Ministry of Health
launched a campaign to pro-
mote healthy lifestyles in an
effort to combat the growing
problem of chronic, preventable
diseases. These include heart
disease and diabetes.

A problem with obesity.

among young Bahamians has
also been noted.

“They had the minister of
health come up here and speak
to the students about eating
healthy,” the source said. “I
wanted to speak him right there
after the assembly.”

The student told The Tribune
that there is widespread disqui-
et about the school’s failure to
deal with the problem, adding
that outrage is growing among
both parents and students.

One parent pointed out the
irony of Government High run-

65th Red Cross Fair to be

held at Government House

THE annual Red Cross Fair
will celebrate its 65th anniver-
sary this year on March 3.

Dame Marguerite Pindling,
chairperson for the fair com-
mittee, announced yesterday
that this year’s fair will be once
again be held in the lower gar-
dens of the Government House
grounds. ,

“History will reveal that this
is where it began some 61 years
ago and continued there until
it was moved to the Sports Cen-
tre a few years ago,” Dame
Marguerite told the press yes-
terday morning at the Red
Cross headquarters.

Dame Marguerite, who has
been involved with the Red
Cross since 1976, said that she
has enjoyed the many fairs and
retains many fond memories.

“The 65th Red Cross fair
promises to be a great event.

_ There will be many booths with
various items, including various
succulent dishes, many games
for the children including rides
and other forms of entertain-
ment for the entire family and a
disco for the young adults,” she
said.

Dame Marguerite empha-
sised that because the fair,
along with the annual ball and
major raffle “is one of the
main income generating pro-
jects, which finances our oper-
ational budget,” it is important
that it is as successful as possi-
ble.

She further reminded the
public that the Red Cross
society provides a number of
programmes and services to
the most vulnerable commu-
nities.







@ CHAIRWOMAN of the Red Cross Fair committee Dame

Marguerite Pindling, along with president of the Bahamas Red
Cross Gerald Sawyer, speaks to the press yesterday at as she

announces the dates for this
year’s fair.

(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)

These programmes, she said,
include social welfare jnitiatives,
after-school mentaying pro-
grammes, meals-on-wheels, ser-
vices to migrants, development
of Family Island branches as
well as emergency disaster
relief.

Because there were no major
hurricanes last year, the Red
Cross was able to take this
opportunity to provide training
on all the major islands, Dame
Marguerite added.

“We wish to thank all of you,
our stallholders, and look for-
ward to seeing you all at the
fair,” she said.




Te funily of the late

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ning a course for students on
balanced eating, then proceed-
ing to serve food that could be
detrimental to their health.
“Some students at the school
may be diabetic, and parents
who are working and do not
always have time to pack food
for their children should be able
to know that they can get all
the food groups,” she said. “My




















and Spikenard Roads.

Funeral Service for

Esterlitta Collins, 45

A resident of Lewis Street, will be held on Saturday February 10th, 2007,
at 2pm at St. Agnes Anglican Church, Baillou Hill Road. Officiating will be
Father L. Been. Interment will follow in Southern Cemetery, Cowpen Road

She is survived by her parents, Mary T. Collins and Edward Foster;
stepmother, Millicent Foster; three children, Jarvis, Kevin Alexus and Tina
Foster; four grandchildren, T, Shon, Jarvin, Jarvas, Javron Thompson;

care givers, Karen Johnson, Pamela Miller and Joy Bell; sisters, Ruthmae,
Cherrie of New York, Sandra of Jacksonville Fl., Joy, Bridgette Price of
Miami Fl., Deborah Prince; brothers, Steven, Ronald, Ray and Mario; uncles
Kermit of Jacksonville Fl., Vincent E. Collins, Ted Collins, Collion Collins;
aunt, Ethel Collins of Jacksonville Fl., Mary Collins; numerous nieces and
nephews including Sonia, Quitten, Mark, Jason, Jamal Nikita, O Kellyn,
Jevon, Pearlean; cousins and spécial friends, Estine Glass, Joanna Munroe,
Angela Bain, Virgins Allen, Sheland Ritchie, Edward, Herbert Glass, Mr. Ted
Sweeting, Ms, Brenda Taylor, Mary Butler, Erma Evans, Jermaine, Lisa and
the Cameron Street Community, The Bain and Grant’s Town Urban Renewal
Team and the Department of Social Services Centre A.

Friends may pay their last respects at Sweeting’s Colonial Mortuary and ;
Crematorium. Baillou Hill Road, Opposite Lewis Street on Friday from 10am
to 6pm and on Saturday from 1pm until funeral time at the church.

question is, who is overseeing
what they are doing there?
Someone from the Ministry of
Health needs to monitor what is
being offered to the students.”

The mother said she under-
stands that other parents share
her concerns.

The Tribune attempted to con-
tact the principal of the school
for comment late yesterday ©
afternoon, however calls went
unanswered up to press time.

Ministry of Health officials
also did not return calls made
late yesterday afternoon

i



325-3336



PAGE 6, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Nurses Association
aiming for better
community relations
NACB ‘looking

forward to a
dynamic year’



S S saan SY
®@ THE Nurses Association of the Commonwelth of The Bahamas (NACB), held a press conference to
announce its new slate bf officers for 2006-2008 term on Wednesday, February 7, 2007, at their Longley House
Headquarters on Doweswell Street. From left are Nursing Officer II Prescola Rolle, President; Senior Nurs-
ing Officer (SNO) Rebecca Johnson, Second Vice President, Nursing Officer II D. Aneka Johnson, Pub-
lic Relations; Staff Nurse Dominique Rox, Assistant Treasurer; Staff Nurse Rosemarie Josie, Treasurer; and
Staff Nurse Leslie Hanna-Pennerman, Membership.
: (BIS Photo: Raymond A. Bethel)

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m@ By TAMARA
FERGUSON

THE Nurses Association of
the Bahamas plans to develop
better relations with the com-
munity according to its new
president Prescola Rolle.

She was speaking at a press
conference held on Wednes-
day to announce the associa-
tion’s plans for the new year
and to officially introduce new
members.

Mrs Rolle, who became
president last month, noted
that for many years, the asso-
ciation has been the “premier
voice for the profession of
nursing, influencing policies
through local, regional and
international networks.”

She said that this year, the
association plans to promote
leadership in the nursing pro-
fession, increase the member-
ship and participation of nurs-
es in the association, and
inform all nurses about the
organisation, its functions and
benefits.

“We are looking torward to
a very dynamic year,” Ms
Rolle said.

The association was found-
ed in 1947 and is an indepen-
dent, non-governmental enti-
ty.

According to Mrs Rolle, the
NACB is comprised.of a par-
ent body in New Providence

and one branch in GrandC~

Bahama.

She noted that the associa- |

tion is a member of the Inter-
national Council of Nurses
and the Caribbean Nurses
Organisation. |

Mrs Rolle added that in
2007 the association also plans
to promote a positive image

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of nursing, establish official
policy, and have an impact on
the proposed National Health
Insurance (NHI) plan.

The NHI plan was passed
in the House of Assembly last
year after meeting with much
criticism and calls for more
consultation trom business
owners and doctors.

However Minister of Health
Dr Bernard Nottage maintains
that the aim — to “pool the
resources of Bahamians” in
an effort to secure affordable
health care for all — is a wor-
thy and workable one.

Mrs Rolle also noted that
the association intends to
organise a conference in
Grand Bahama and invite
nurses from other northern
islands to participate.

They also plan to foster an
improved communication sys-
tem between the parent body
of NACB and nurses in the
Family Islands, she said.

In addition to Mrs Rolle,
the executive members of the
NACB for 2006-2008 are:
Stephanie Poitier, first vice-
president; Rebecca Johnson,
second vice-president; Jen-
nifer .C King, secretary;

Andrea Nottage, assistant sec-

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retary; Rosemarie Josey, trea-

surer; Dominique Rox, assis-
tant treasurer.,

The standing commitee
members are Persophone
Munnings, education and
research; Stacy A Dean, socio-
economic and welfare; Karol
Mackey, nursing standards
and practice; Lies] Hanna-
Pennerman, membership;
Aneka Johnson, publicity and
public relations.

“With this dynamic team, it
is anticipated that this term
will be one of great
accomplishments for the pro-
fession thereby increasing
awareness of the association
throughout the country and

. facilitating nurses to achieve

their full potential,” Mrs Rolle
said.

Under the theme “Nurses
at the forefront dealing with
the unexpected”, the Interna-
tional Council of Nurses
(NCI) will host its 2007 con-
ference in Yokohama, Japan,
from May 27 to June 3, and
members of the NACB are
expected to attend.

According to Mrs Rolle, the
conference will prepare the
association to fulfill many of
its objectives.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBHUAN? y, cuu/, FAUE /



Bahamianisation

is discrimination,
claims attorney

THE policy of “Bahamiani-
sation” is a euphemism for insti-
tutionalised discrimination, a
lawyer has‘claimed.

The Immigration Act is a
“brutal bludgeon” used against
foreigners and Bahamians alike,

_ Fred Smith told the Canadian

Women’s Club of Grand
Bahama.

“It has long outlived the
social and political culture
which gave birth to it in 1967,”
he added.

“It is wrong, it is unconstitu-
tional and, frankly, it demeans
Bahamians. It suggests that
Bahamians are not capable of
‘competing in the market place
and we need a paternal govern-
ment to protect us.

“Bahamians should not be
automatically entitled to a job
because they are Bahamians.
Employment in a free, open and
competitive market place is
earned on merit.

“Employers should be able
to. hire competent employees
and not have to settle, in many
instances, for mediocrity and
incompetence because they are
forced to hire Bahamians.”

Mr Smith urged both major
political parties to show matu-
rity and abandon this “medieval
statute of oppression” in favour
of a more humane and respect-
ful act.

Tracing the history of the leg-
islation, Mr Smith said the
“Quiet Revolution” of the
1960s brought the Bahamas
“from a country run by an
oppressive white oligarchy to
an oppressive black majority
rule.”

He said those times also saw
the purging from Bahamian
society of expatriates and
belongers, and the breach of the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement
which caused the economic col-
lapse of Freeport.

“Foreigners by the many



HB FRED Smith

thousands fled Freeport. Fami-
lies were fractured, fortunes
were lost, and in Freeport the
goose that laid the golden egg
was shortsightedly slaughtered.”

Mr Smith said Freeport had
not recovered since. “And,
frankly, the Bahamas has been
the worse for this peaceful polit-
ical victimisation and expulsion
of foreigners.”

“However, once this ethos of
discrimination and victimisation
became embedded in Bahamian
society, the PLP soon turned
on their own Bahamian broth-
ers and sisters.

“The Immigration Act, licens-
ing laws, government favours
and political corruption were
used as tools of victimisation
against Bahamians who
opposed the PLP.”

Come to the

Mind Changing
Heart Cleansing

Today, in spite of milestones
reached during the two FNM
administrations, the Bahamas
still suffered from the “rape of
rights” inflicted by the PLP over
25 years, he said.

Mr Smith said the country
needed to realise that Bahami-
ans can’t do it all. “We have
limited technical expertise and
know-how,” he added.

“Instead of using immigra-
tion to invite the best and
brightest from abroad, our
immigration policies interna-
tionally cast a negative view on
the Bahamas.”

He said immigration policies
should identify those we want in

the Bahamas and encourage’

them to invest in the economy
and contribute to long-term
growth. ne}

RD

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follow through.

Flexible work hours required for this position.

Minimum qualifications required; Associate Degree in Business
Administration or equivalent.

¢ One Breakfast Server

¢ One Laundry Attendant
¢ Two Housemen

¢ Two Space Cleaners

¢ Two Room Attendants

¢ Two Room Inspectresses

High School graduate as well as Bahamahost graduate is a plus. Aclean
Police Certificate and other supporting documents required for all positions:

Applications are available at the Security Gate or e-mail
hr@pelicanbayhotel.com, deadline is February 09, 2007. NO TELEPHONE
CALLS PLEASE! —

IMPORTANT NOTICE

To Our Valued Clients
INTERRUPTION IN SERVICE





RBC Royal Bank of Canada and
RBC FINCO wish to advise our
clients that we will be conducting
an important upgrade to our

computer software on






Sunday, February 11, 2007
between 1:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m.



As a result, the following services
will be temporarily unavailable
during this period:







e ABM’s (Automatic Banking Machines)
¢ Internet and Telephone Banking
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caused, and recommend that you plan your
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For more information please call or visit the nearest
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.www.tbcroyalbank,com/caribbean im °d31@

(Reet 51 ©

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RB C) DASAMSA STL GUA nT AARC COTATI A GR RC CONIC CRAY TRA DLN NTE a BC of Canada



PAGE 8, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007

LET

Looking fora

THE Tribune has been inun-
dated with calls from concerned
men and women in regard to
the shallow pool of qualified
daters. In an attempt to help
single Bahamian women and
men find each other we are
introducing the “Find a date”
campaign.

With Valentine’s Day fast
approaching The Tribune, in
partnership with Bahamas @
Sunrise, is putting forward Ava
Miller and Alex Morley.

To ensure that each date is a
success, the persons selected
will be treated to a special din-
ner at one of Nassau’s top
restaurants, along with receiving
other special prizes and sur-
prises.

Interested singles (no mar-
ried people please) are invited
to send in a brief description of
themselves, along with a picture
to: .

E-mail: ybdeleveaux@tri-
bunemedia.net - with “Need a
date for the Valentine’s week-
end? - in the subject line.

You can also see the form on
page 14.

¢ Deadline for entries is Feb-
ruary 13. The winner will be



HAVA Miller

announced on February 15. The
dates with Alex and Ava will
happen on Saturday, February
17.

Up first is the lovely Ava;

Ava Miller

Age 30+

Field: Financial Services
Sector

College educated - Bachelor’s
degree

Single mother

A lady of high standards and
expectations, Ava describes her-
self as a natural-born Capricorn,
independent, fiercely loyal, lov-
ing and very romantic.

“I do not look at what an
individual is on the outside, but
rather what they have to offer
on the inside - because that is
where the personality proceeds
from. I must mention also that
throughout my life God has
been there for me and I have a
deep reverence for the things
of God, but do not boast of
being perfect.”

A natural sweetheart is how
Ava describes herself, but there
is a proviso — don’t get on the
wrong side of ‘this woman. A
woman of principles, Ava places
a premium on honesty, within
herself and others. In fact, she
prefers people to be upfront
with her.

“I am upfront with people. I
don’t hold things in. I might
hold something in for a little
while, but I always tell you
what’s on my mind...nicely or
maybe a little prickly - accord-
ing to what the situation calls
for.




has an adventurous side — any-
one up for hang gliding?

So what type of man is Ava
looking for?

Preference No 1: Dark choco-
lates

Preference No 2: Creamy
caramels

Looking at the big picture
however, Ava recognises that
her preferences are insignificant
when compared with what can
be gained by allowing the true,
character of a man to shine
through.

Ava is looking for a guy who
is sensitive in every sense of the
word, a man who respects him-
self and others equally, and a
man who lives his life based on
a strong moral code and godly
principles.

Ava wants a man who knows

the value of compromise, but .

who is also able to stand firm
when his core beliefs are being
called into question. She wants
someone who is capable of giv-
ing and receiving love and
someone who does things “just
because”. Also important to
Ava is finding a man who is
independent, and who meets
with success as he strives toward



â„¢ ALEX Morley

his goals and aspirations.

Next up is The Tribune’s own
Mr Morley;

Alex Morley

Age 27

Journalist

College educated - Bachelor's
degree

Never married

No children

A social activist, Alex has a
strong political and social bend,
and is deeply concerned about

THE TRIBUNE

» & date?

the rights of others. Possessing a
strong belief in freedom and
happiness for all, Alex is pas-
sionate about creating a world
where true equality exists, and
righting the world’s, and the
Bahamas’ wrongs.

He is described by his col-
leagues as compassionate,
warm, friendly, kind, generous,
easy-going and soft spoken.

Alex loves to have fun. He ,
loves the outdoors, going to the |

movies and his number one pas-
sion is reading — the last book

he read, re-read actually, is .
“The Black Jacobins” a story :

about the Haitian revolution.
So what type of woman is

Alex looking for?

Alex is looking for a woman

22 years old and older, with a

similar passion for social jus- °

tice, and racial and gender

equality and freedom for all. »

He likes women that are good
natured, with a personality that

grabs the attention of those :

around.

Ultimately, however, Alex |
says: "I want a woman who can

teach me something about life
and who is open to learning
from me as well."

Government plans to announce
‘national energy policy ‘soon’

THE government says it is
about to introduce a national
energy policy aimed at explor-
ing and encouraging the use of
alternative sources of power.

The announcement was made

at the commissioning ceremo-
ny of the D/A 13 - an 18 MW
slow speed diesel generator at
the Bahamas Electricity Cor-
poration’s (BEC) Clifton Pier
Power Station on Monday.

Minister of Energy and Envi-
ronment Dr Marcus Bethel said
it is also the government's inten-
tion to reduce the country’s
dependency on fossil fuels such
as the diesel and gasoline in

power generating facilities.

He disclosed that his ministry
has completed a petroleum
usage review and with the assis-
tance of the Inter-American
Development Bank, developed

erside Qruneral Chapel
“Where the river lies still.
‘24 HOURS A DAY
“Serving The Bahamas With Pride”
Frank M. Coorsr - Funeral Director

~ Market Street & Bimini Avenue
PO. BoxGT 2305
Nassay, Bahamat
Telephone: (242) 356-3721
Cellular: (242) 395-8931



Cockburn Town
San Salvador, Bahamas
Telephone:
- (242) 331-2642 :

“Honauclag

Funeral Service for the late

Sandra Dee Strachan
Knowles Cartwright,

and a resident of Foxdale Subdivision
formerly of Mangrove Cay Andros.
Service will be held at Ebenzer
Baptist Church, Charles Vincent
Street on Saturday at 11:00 a.m. and
officiating will be the Reverend Dr.
Elkin Symonette and assisted by
other ministers. Interment will follow
| in the southern cemetery on Cowpen
and Spikenard Road.




Ruby Funeral

Miss
Christine
Castin, 29







of The Haitian Village,
Joe Farrington Road
and Kool Meadow
Lane and formerly of }
Gonaives, Haiti will be
held on Saturday,

Survived by her husband, Andrew Cartwright; mother Princess
Cooper; her father, Vernal Strachan; stepmother, Mavis Strachan,
13 sisters, Helen Knowles, Harriet and Norine Francis, Pauline
Longley, Shirley Alice Pernell and Patricia Strachan, Renae
Moncur, Prenettea Antonio, Eula Marie Davis and Deborah
‘Ann Clarke; seven (7) brothers, Joseph Knowles, Shanda, Kevin
Erlin, Marcus, Marvin and Julian Strachan; three (3) aunts







Sr ' i
Emerald Ridge Martaary
& Monument Company Utd.
Mr. Wendell G. Dean Hy us neice!

Matiatag Fanene Director

Service for

a framework national energy
policy for the Bahamas.

“A national energy policy
committee is presently collat-
ing the data and will soon com-
mence public consultations
which will result in a national
energy policy for the Bahamas,”
Dr Bethel said.

The policy, he added, will
provide guidelines for energy

security for national develop- |














CA veieg a rth

me The be
@) a
( ay) Csire





w thos

ment, explore and encourage
the use of acceptable alterna-
tive sources of energy and con-
tinue the promotion of energy
conservation.

“However, it is recognised
that in the short term we will
remain dependent on fossil
fuels, but must set goals to
incrementally increase the use
of alternative and renewable
sources such as solar while we
decrease our dependence on

fossil fuels,” Dr Bethel said.

‘ Officially commissioning the
new generator, Prime Minister
Perry Christie urged the coun-
try’s only energy supplier out-
side Grand Bahama to make
electricity more affordable to
Bahamians.

“People in this country want
obviously cheaper electricity
rates. We have too great a
potential. .We are too near being
the best little country in the
world not to be able to ratio-
nalise how we go about improv-

.ing the delivery of service to

our countrymen and women
and how we are able to do so on
an increasingly more efficient
basis,” the prime minister said.

The new unit is the latest of

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd

_ Montrose Avenue

BEC’s fleet of generators, as
the corporation continues to
strategically replace older, less
reliable and less efficient gen-
erators with modern equipment
in order to stay ahead of the
load growth taking place on
New Providence, Paradise
Island and the new project on
Rose Island.

Dr Bethel underscored the
importance of BEC being able

mm

to deliver. quality and reliable -

service to consumers. -

“With the incredible amount |

of development all over the
nation, the Bahamas Electricity
Corporation continues to expe-
rience growth in the demand
for New Providence. It is also
challenged to respond to unpar-
alleled demand all over the
Family Islands,” he said.

BEC general manager Kevin

ntti ty BE OR tae Eo a

Basden said: “This unit has not :

only improved the reliability and ‘

quality of our service, but has °

already begun to assist in reduc-
ing the fuel surcharge, which
would have been higher if this
generator was not in operation,
and to’ begin to indirectly pay
for itself via savings on fuel
cost,” said Mr Basden.

Sw ww wr

4
3

MS































February 10, 2007 at 2:00pm at Gospel
Assembly Church of Jesus Christ, Minnie Street
and Balfour Avenue. Pastor St. Louis Celiner,
assisted by other Ministers will officiate and
burial will be in Southern Cemetery, Cowpen
and Spikenard Roads.

et yl ae te ie * te se a i NC A NN A BO! IL Tate NY,

Beatrice Stubbs, Victoria Missick and Princess Burrows of
Mangrove Cay, Andros; three (3) uncles, Re. Wilfred Stubbs,
Wil fred Strachan of Mangrove Cay, Andros and Val ban Roach
of Nassau, Bahamas; father-in-law, Brendan Cartwright; four
(4) sisters-in-law, Lornamae and Mickey Strachan, Jenenene
Key and Kuturch Cartwright; special friend, Joseph Jones of
Mangrove Cay, Andros and a host of other relatives including
Michelle and Clarence Major, Rodney Flowers, Berlyn Williams,
Vlema Mullings, Gregory Asquith, Valarie and Rodriquez King,
Zelderine, Judy, Michael, Anthony Jr. Roach, Janice McKenzie,
Julianne Black, Philip, Wencil, Chef, Terrance, Patrick, Kelvin
and Francine Newton. Vangerline, Arlington and Val Bastian,
Roselyn and Alexis Allen, Florina, Lee and Altermon Sweeting,
Andrew, Dwayne, Adrian, Joel, Telcine Stubbs, Laverne Rolle,
Terryann Moxey Moxey, Esther and Prince Hepburn, Sham,
Francis Moss, Florence and Kennedy Rolle, Florrie Evans,
Linda Rolle, Sheila, Shirley, Wellie, Stephanie and Inspector
Alexander Black, Williamae Poitier of Exuma, Natasha Laramore
of Exuma, Van ria and Philippa Smith and family, Mr. and Mrs.
Thomas Mingo, Mrs. June McKenzie and family, Ms. Eulamae
Greaves and family, Shurmako Burrows and family, Jeanie
Pinder and family; six (6) brothers-in-law, Captain Benjamin
and Rev. Jeffrey Francis of Bimini, Bahamas, Thomas Knowles,
Lawrence Antonio, Allan Cleare and Allan Moncur; (15) nieces
including, Nadine Curtis, Lavern McPhee, Eyvette Cooper,
Charmaine, Princess, Jenora and Alicia Francis, Jovonica Davis
and Tameko Roberts; (18) nephews including, Anthony, Charles,
Jeffrey Frederick and Jeremy Francis, Garland Cooper and
Lynden Curtis, Gregory and Larry Knowles; numerous grand
nieces including, Lynderia Curtis, Lavandra Colebrook, Jasmine
Roker, Fantasia Fritzgerald, Jessica and Jataria Francis, Eddesha,
Elizabeth, Clemenia Ellis; numerous grand nephews including,
Fabian Fritzgerald, Jaden and Jarvis Roker, Jakail Dames,
Lindreco and Lynden Jr. Curtis, The Honourable Frederick
Mitchell M.P. for Fox Hill, the entire Foxdale community, the
entire Union Village family, the entire Bimini community and
the entire Mangrove Cay, Andros community, other relatives
and friends too numerous to mention.

o

The Radiance of this “Ruby of A Gem” will
always glow in the hearts of her:
Children: Junior and Dwaine Castin;
Father: Léonce Castin;

Mother: Azéla Mondélus;

Five Brothers: Wislly, Fresnel, Silvion, and
Rivier Castin and Seauvoir Chaléstin;
Five Sisters: Enide, L éonie, Choupette,
Claire-Marthe and Mirielle Castin;
Five Nephews: Sadrack, Silverse, Silvain,
Firandy and Jhimy Castin;

Three Nieces: Darline, Carnia and Wondline
Chaleston; _

Three Uncles: Dieselle and Secret Mondélus
and Paul Castin;

Aunt: Renette Mondélus; :

Ten Cousins: Joceline, Choupette, Anite,
Asboune, Jonas, Emmania, Remy and Carida
Mondélus, Mirlaine Choisy and Makie Castin;
Three Brothers-in-law: Julio Mondélus,
Rivier Castin and Jeanty Gelin;

Many other loving family and friends.

i Ae enn

a ee

nt ete P eee)

et he le

Bahamas Bus &

gk
~ \ A“ NX

<\\

32251722

The body will be viewed in the “Emerald
Suite” Emerald Ridge Mortuary & Monument
Company Ltd. #20 Claridge Road on Friday,
February 09, 2007 from 1pm to 6pm and on
Saturday, February 10, 2007 at Gospel Assembly
Church of Jesus, from 1:00pm to service time.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Riverside
Funeral Chapel, Market Street and Bimini Avenue on Friday
from 10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. and at the Church on Saturday at
9:00 a.m. until service time.



te iM Oe a le i



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 9



Lo |
It’s time Pastor Moss was

allowed to run in Bain Town

YOUNG MAN’S VIEW

m@ By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com



Lk: WOULD be a shame
if the PLP once again
denies C B Moss, Senate vice-
president and pastor of
Mount Olive Baptist Church
(in Bain Town) the nomina-
tion as the party’s candidate
to contest the Bain and
Grants Town seat in the
upcoming general election.

In 1997, Mr Moss offered
himself as the PLP’s candi-
date for Bain Town, but he
suffered a crushing defeat to
the FNM’s Gregory Williams,
who had represented the con-
stituency since 1992.

According to political
insiders, Dr- Bernard Not-
tage’s return to the PLP has
once again hampered Mr
Moss’s chances of receiving
his party’s nod to run.

In 2002, C B Moss was
promised that he would have

been his party’s candidate for
the Bain and Grant’s Town
constituency, particularly

since the FNM had reduced
the House seats to 40 and had

thereby combined Bain and .

Grant’s Town. Current MP
Bradley Roberts was also
expected to bow out of front-
line politics. This was not to
be, as Mr Roberts ran again
and retained his seat!

After Bradley Roberts’
win, it was reported that the
Works and Utilities Minister
had promised Mr Moss that
he would retire from politics
after serving half a term,
thereby opening the door for
Mr Moss to run for the seat in
a by-election. Again, Mr Moss

Gil, B.S O°N

was duped as Mr Roberts did

not step aside as promised!
In 2005, Mr Moss wrote an

open letter to residents in the
aforementioned constituency

and asserted that Mr Roberts

had broken his word. In his
defence, Mr Roberts stated
that Prime Minister Perry
Christie had invited him to
continue on in his Cabinet as
the PM felt that he was a sig-
nificant part of the govern-
ment in view of the scale of
work that needed to be com-
pleted during the PLP’s first
term.

This was the second broken
promise that Mr Moss suf-
fered at the hands of the par-
ty that he remains loyal to.

_In Loving Memory

— Caroline D. Sawyer
15th December, 1957- 9th February, 2003

“Take Me Home”

© Tyrone G. Sawyer

Take me home!

Where the mattress greets my weary body

Like a long, lost friend.

Where all I see are great beginnings,

Where migratin
Glad

And nota daunting end.

birds outside my window
y chirp for me.

Home, where I am free!

Take me home!

Where I so blithely sleep the mellow sleep

Of the undisturbed.

Where there is warmth and peace of mind,
And where all my dreams converge.
Where I am loved and hugged and cuddled

By kin who lovest me;
Home, where I am free!

Take me home!

Where I summon hope
And cast away all doubts that st

? <
ill remain

Where I pray, or even crack a joke,

And banish all my pain!

Where~exultant and exuberant
Christ’s Spirit flows through me;

Home, where I am free!

Take me home!

Where all my earthly cares fade away.
And bid me: “Sweet goodbye!”
Where angles bear me up and take me
Far beyond the bluest sky!

Following Mr Christie’s
announcement of the March
12 closure of the old register,
where he asserted that no new
seats will be created, Mr Moss
was again thrust into the spot-
light as questions about
whether he would be the par-
ty’s nominee, considering the
speculation about Dr Not-
tage’s probable nomination
for that district, were plenti-
ful.

According to news reports,
Dr Nottage is being strongly
considered as the PLP’s can-
didate for Bain and Grant’s
Town.

Again it appears that PLP
loyalist C B Moss may be
hoodwinked by his party.

Although there have been
suggestions that Senate pres-
ident Sharon Wilson would
step down and that a new
Ministry of Religion was
being formed as compensa-
tion if Mr Moss again steps
aside, C B Moss has been
adamant about his desire to
run in the upcoming elec-
tions—and rightly so! Mr
Moss has said that he is wait-
ing for his party to abide by
their oath.

A few years ago, as a his-
tory student at the College of
the Bahamas, I was invited by
my lecturer — Chris Curry —
to assist with organising and
creating a database of files
that were related to the cam-
paign to save Clifton.

I met a newly slimmed-
down Mr Moss at his church
officg, where my lecturer and
I offered volunteer service as
we both believed in his cause.
At the office, I was also able
to observe My Moss’ interac-
tion with his would-be con-
stituents and witnessed his
passion for social and envi-
ronmental issues.

So, if C B Moss is once
again betrayed, how can he
ever trust his party? Having
given 42 years of unbroken
















of:




























on account of illness.

away the roof.

died peacefully at her home, Sunnyside, on East |
Bay Street, Saturday, February 3rd. She was |,

She was the youngest of six children, and the
only daughter of Roger Moore Lightbourn and
Mary Beatrice ‘Moon Lightbourn. Her
grandfather was the Reverend Francis Moon, who as a Methodist minister
was posted in 1854 from England to serve the church in the Bahamas.

service to the PLP, shouldn’t
Mr Moss be more deserving
of a nomination than Dr Not-
tage, who recently returned
to the PLP after a five-year
hiatus during which he led his
own party, the CDR?

_ When Dr Nottage became
disenchanted with the PLP
and felt he was treated unfair-
ly after Perry Christie’s ascen-
sion to the leadership, he left!
It’s clear that even though CB
Moss has been betrayed by
his party twice already, he has
remained amember. '

Shouldn’t his loyalty be
rewarded?

Recently, certain members
of the PLP made a racket
about the FNM’s refusal to
nominate lawyer Ramona
Farquharson for the Kennedy
constituency, claiming that it
was the iniquitous work of
party leader Hubert Ingra-
ham.

Because these persons
made such an uproar in the
newspapers and on the air-
waves, I now ask: what would
be the difference between Mr
Ingraham’s alleged denial of
the FNM nomination to
Ramona Farquharson and the
PLP’s constant betrayal and
blatant denial of their nomi-
nation to long-time Bain
Town campaigner CB Moss?

The irony is that these fel-
las have got the nerve to
shout from the hilltops that
Hubert Ingraham is stifling
candidates!

From all indications, C B
Moss is a good PLP: Howev-
er, should he not be nominat-
ed, he should run as an inde-
pendent.

The apparent victimisation
of Reginald Ferguson

S ince the Nassau Flight
Services (NFS) fiasco,

where five baggage handlers

KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED
st Tas

Ua UNA ad oon ae) a

WINIFRED
(Mrs. Mervyn)
JOHNSON
(nee Lightbourn)

Mrs Johnson attended Havergal College in Toronto, and returning to Nassau
became an English teacher at Queens College, Nassau. The Reverend Dyer,
head-master of Q.C. appreciated what he called her ‘joyous personality’. Her
students affectionately called her ‘Miss Winnie’. She loved teaching, and
boasted later that during her eleven year tenure she never missed a single day

In 1939 she married Mervyn Johnson, son of Sir George and Lady Johnson.
Mr Johnson was Registrar General for some years and then joined in partnership
with Godfrey Higgs to form the law firm of Higgs and Johnson. During the
war years Winifred was an energetic member of the Woolgatherers, and was
for many years a member of the IODE and the Nassau Garden Club. Like her
parents and grandparents before her, she was a lifelong member of Trinity
Methodist Church, until afflicted with both deafness and blindness. She played
the piano for Trinity in its temporary quarters after the 1929 hurricane blew

She was predeceased by her five brothers, Percy, Cyril, Hugh, Nelson and
Gerald and her husband predeceased her by thirty years. Left to cherish the
memories of her long life are her two daughters, Valerie Sangwine of Winchester,
England and Diane Sturm of Nassau; one son-in-law, Marcus Sangwine; one
granddaughter, Catherine Sangwine; five nephews, Ronald G. Lightbourn,
Michael E. Lightbourn, Godfrey E. (Tippy) Lightbourn, Mike Lightbourn,
Richard Lightbourn, and Tim Lightbourn; god-daughter, Carla Cole, as well
as many great-great nephews and neices, and even great-great-great nephews.
Also mourning her departure are her kind care-givers and long time canine
companions, Danny Boy, Danny Belle and Mr Brown.

A Funeral Service for Mrs Winifred Johnson will be held at Trinity Methodist
Church, Frederick Street and Trinity Place, Nassau on Saturday 10th February,

were purportedly lured to the
US and brought up on
charges of allegedly smug-
gling drugs onboard US-
bound airlines from Lynden
Pindling International Air-
port, the government has had
egg on its face.

- Several political entities
have since called for the gov-
ernment to disclose the cir-
cumstances surrounding the
suspected. entrapment
of these men, for crimes
allegedly committed in the
Bahamas.

It has been suggested that
the events surrounding this
operation were a contraven-
tion of Bahamian law.

Following the arrests, the
only person to admit knowl-
edge of the arrests was Assis-
tant Commissioner Reginald
Ferguson, while the Minister
of Foreign Affairs, the
Attorney General and Minis-
ter of National Security have
all denied knowing of
the joint US/Bahamas opera-
tion.

There is something awfully
strange about this, particular-
ly since the Commissioner of
Police reports to the PM
and the Minister of National «
Security at least once per
week. ;

It now appears that the so-
called restructuring of the
police force is a means by
which to scapegoat ACP Fer-
guson, placing all blame at his
feet and apparently demoting
him to head the Police Col-
lege.

To add fuel to the flame,
ACP Ferguson is also the
brother of FNM South
Eleuthera candidate Johnley
Ferguson.

Indeed, Mr Ferguson’s
transfer does come at an aus-
picious time and from the
looks of things, it’s becoming
abundantly clear that, “new”
PLP or not, old habits die

hard!

2007 at 3:00p.m.

Rev. Bill Higgs and Rev. Charles A. Sweeting will officiate and interment
will follow in St. Anne’s Cemetery, Fox Hill, Nassau.

Where my eternal, Faithful, loving God
In mercy, Welcome me:
Home, where I am free!






In lieu of flowers, anyone who chooses may send donations to The Bahamas
Humane Society, P.O. Box N-242, Nassau, The Salvation Army, P.O. Box N-
205, Nassau or any charity of their choice, in Memory of Mrs Winifred
Johnson.

From:

Tyrone, Nefitieri, Tyrone, Jr,
Joshua, Anwar & Family

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited.





PAUL IU, CMIVAY, FEDMUANT? Y, ZUU/

SS



STORY SO FAR: Meli and her family

have been living in.the mountains of —

Kosovo at a KLA camp while the war
with the Serbs rages on below. One morn-
ing she wakes up to find that her brother
Mehmet is missing.

CHAPTER EIGHT
Mehmet Goes Missing Again

Y FIRST thought was to

wake Papa and tell him that
Mehmet was gone. But Papa was sleep-
ing soundly for once, and I hated to wor-
ry him. Mehmet had probably just made
a trip to the latrine. That was it. I was
just being my usual anxious self. I lay
down again. Adil snuggled up closer. If it

‘was this cold in September, whatever .

would we do when winter came? I
turned so J could hear any movement of
the tent flap. Whenever it moved I stiff-
ened, willing Mehmet to come in and
lie down, but each time it was only the
wind.

Kathe

Ast Jé Sale tod

ea
cc





Finally I couldn’t stand it another sec-
ond. I carefully climbed over Adil and.

felt the ground cloth along the flap.
Then I bégan to pat frantically along

“the front of the tent. Mehmet had taken

his blanket. I covered my mouth to keep
from calling out, crawled out of the tent,
and stood up outside.

ith the cooler nights, I had

taken to sleeping in my
clothes. Good thing. I could scout
around and see if I could find him before
the rest of the family woke up. If
Mehmet.had told Papa or Mama he was
leaving, he wouldn’t have sneaked out in
the middle of the night.

There was enough moon for me to see
my way around the tents in the family
encampment. Mehmet wouldn't be here,
I was sure. He must have gone to the
KLA tents. ;

I took a deep breath and started
through the trees toward the campfires
of the guerilla fighters. I hadn’t taken
many steps before I felt cold metal pok-
ing into my backbone.

A flashlight shone in my face. “It’s
only a little girl,” a man’s rough voice
said. “Where are you going in the middle
of the night? Did you miss the path to
the latrine?”

“Pm looking for my brother.” My
voice was shaking, even though I knew
in my head that the fighters wouldn’t
hurt me.

“How old is your brother?”

“Thirteen,” I said.

“Oh,” the voice behind the flashlight

said. “I thought you meant little brother.’

_ Don’t worry, your brother can take care
ofihimself. Go back to your tent.”

‘“His—his name is Mehmet Lleshi. If
you see him, will you tell him his family
is worried about him?”

“There’s no need to worry. He’s fine,
I’m sure. Go on back, now.”

There was nothing else I could do. I
crept back into the tent and lay down
between Isuf and Adil. I couldn’t sleep,
and the night stretched on and on until,
at last, it was morning.

Papa was up first. I followed him out
of the tent and told him that Mehmet
was gone, along with his blanket. He
nodded. “Tell your mother not to wait
breakfast,” he said. “As soon as the fire
is made, I'll go look for him.”

Everyone wanted to know, of course,
where Papa and Mehmet were, but I
told them that Papa had just said we
were not to wait breakfast, that they
would be home soon. Mama gave mea
worried look, but she said nothing.

It was mid-morning before Papa
returned—with a glum-faced Mehmet
walking a few steps behind. At least my
brother still had enough respect left for
Papa not to defy him. I was relieved to
know that.

I didn’t speak of Mehmet’s disappear-
ance until later when he and I were gath-
ering firewood. “I’m glad you’re back,”
I said to him.

“T’m old enough to volunteer,” he said.
“Papa seems to forget that I spent two
months in jail. I’m not a child.”

“I’m still glad you’re back,” I said.

“When I’m fifteen Pll go, no matter

[HE | HIBUNE

a

what Papa says.”

But Mehmet wouldn’t be fifteen for -

fifteen months. Surely the war would be
long over by then. ' ;

The next morning when I woke up,
Papa was gone. “Where’s Papa?” I asked
Mehmet.

He shrugged. “I don’t know. He was
gone when I woke up. Mama said he
left the message that I was to be in
charge, so I’m expecting you to listen
to me for a change.”

He sounded almost like my bossy old

brother again. “I’m making the fire now,
so it’s up to you to organize the fuel
gathering.”

I looked for Mama and found her try-
ing to wash herself behind the tent. It
was the best anyone could do for pri-
vacy. “Where has Papa gone?” I said,
feeling as though my world was flying off
in every direction. First Mehmet, now
Papa.

“Shh. He’s gone to fetch Uncle Fadil.”

“But it’s miles—”

“He got a ride partway.” She pulled
her dress down over her head and then
put on her coat. “We’ve got to leave
here,” she said quietly. “Before we lose
your brother.”

(Continued on Tuesday)

Text copyright

© 2005 by Katherine Paterson
Illustrations copyright

© 2005 by Emily Arnold McCully
Reprinted by permission of Breakfast
Serials, Inc.
www.breakfastserials.com



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THE TRIBUNE



Ingraham

FROM page one

Sir Lynden had been short-

changed in respect of his PM’s

pension.

' “Then they discovered that I

was not double dipping; that
while I was receiving a prime
minister’s pension I was not

receiving a salary as an MP. So }
they came up witha plan to pay ;

ir Lynden Pindling’s estate half:
a million dollars out of the Public;
Treasury. They said this was :
owed in respect of his Prime Min- :

ister’s pension from August 1992
to June 1997.

l “But there was no prime min- :

ister’s pension law at the time the
PLP lost the government in
1992,” he said.

| The party leader noted that he

had promised to represent his :
constituency and serve as leader :
af the opposition without accept-

ihg payment for doing so.

“One month after the 2002
lection, during my first speech in:

parliament, and after my account
had been credited with the ee
Hay for the month of May,

asked the PLP government x
amend the law to prohibit a |

retired PM from receiving pen-
slon and an MP’s salary. They
chose not to amend the law, but

they discontinued sending the :

money.
“At their convention in 2005
they announced that I was rece

ing both my PM’s pension and
the salary of an MP. This was a:

blatant lie,” Mr Ingraham said.
, He then read the text of a Iet-

ter from the Treasurer of the :
Bahamas confirming that no :
salary had been paid to him as :

ah MP since May, 2002.

; “In July, 2005, without my

knowledge or consent, my bank
atcepted a deposit from the Trea-
sury of $86,333.33 which the gov-
ernment refuses to have me
return,” he said. “The govern-

ment deposited this money into :
my account to cover the lie they ;
told at their convention that I :
had been receiving my MP’s pay :

afl along. It was a dirty trick, but
that’s the way they go.”
‘Mr Ingraham said that w hen

he discovered what had been

done, he instructed his bank not

to accept any more funds from
the Public Treasury other than :

his PM’s pension.

‘He added that since the time |

he was appointed leader of the

opposition, his bank has also :
returned the money payable to |

him for that post.

‘Mr Ingraham then read the }
text of a letter confirming that :
the bank had agreed only to |
accept $9,500 a month for his :

monthly pension. ,
\“T give you my word now, if

they have been stashing monies
in, my name in an unauthorised ;
bank account somewhere, when :

we return to office alter the next

géneral election, your FNM gov-
ernment will put that money to :

gdod use for the benefit of the
Bahamian people,” he said.




FROM page one

Hler mother, Mrs Betty Anto-
mio, agreed, adding: “A promise is
a comfort to a fool.” She lam-
basted Mrs Hanna-Martin, say-
ing: “She was only spluttering
words to see where they splatter.”

But with a general election
approaching, Mrs Antonio said of
the government: “A fresh breeze
blew thenr in, buta foul wind will
blow them out.”

the victims spoke out again
alter receiving the medical records
which will form the basis of their
case against the government and
boat owners involved.in the
tragedy.

They claimed the records —

‘which were originally reported as

missing —— had obviously been.
tampered with or created from
scratch to reduce any. possible

‘daraages in the future,

Soine records don’t even men-
tion the Sea Hauler at all. Others
oruit serious injuries, and one file
even mixes up the records of two:
male victims.

the group’s spokesman, Lin-
coln Bain, said: “It is quite clear
that skulduggery has been going
on here. But we will have a lawyer
go through the files and press on
with our claims.

“We have a gov ernment which .

is liabic in this case. You don’t
expect them to say ‘sue us’ -— you
expect them to look after the peo-
ples”

Sophia Antonio, who suffered a
shoulder injury and bruised lung
when the Sea Hauler and Union
Star collided three years ago,
claimed that a lot of information
had been taken out of her file.

She said she had to visit a.psy-
chiatric clinic several times dur-
ing a four-month period after the

SRS SATS DRT IO INET SE

LOCAL NEWS



Sea Hauler |

incident, but her file recorded only
two visits.

“My files are incomplete. They
have obviously done this to reduce
their obligations to me.” She said
she was “not accusing them of los-
ing files,” but rather of “falsify-
ing” them,

Describing the hardship she had
suffered since the crash, she said:
“[ have to depend on the good-
ness of strangers. I can’t buy my
children the things they want and
need.”

Another victim, Cedric Hart,
33, who was crippled in the colli-
sion, said there is no mention at all
of the Sea Hauler in his record. «

“They are trying to detach my
injuries from the event,” he
claimed. “Papers have been taken
out. It seems some doctors and
politicians are in cahoots on this.

“It makes me think they are
doing a lot of wrong things. They

should stand up and honour their

word. They are putting me
through more mental stress.”
Gail Roker, 33, suffered two
broken collar-bones, three bro-
ken ribs, an injured left lung, a
bruised right lung, broken left arm
and sliced liver in the incident.
But she said only three injuries
were mentioned in her report. “As
far as I am concerned, they are
trying to reduce the settlement.
“This has left me totally dis-
traught. As for Dr Nottage, last

. week I asked him to apologise,

this week I am asking him to step
down.” In her opinion he was
involved “in trying to avoid
responsibility.”

Paulette Ramsey-Dean, 41, a
mother of four, suffered a frac-
tured pelvis and head injuries, but
claimed no reference was made





@ MINISTER of Health
Dr Bernard Nottage

to the head injuries in the file.
“The head injury was the most
significant because it has affected
my memory. I can’t work at all
and I am asking the government
to help in any way they can.”
Father-of-nine Clint Forbes, 35,

' said doctors were trying to blame

a basketball accident for his knee
injury, yet also had him listed as
DNA - ‘did not answer’ - when
examinations were carried out.

“This don’t make any sense. I
feel my record has been tampered
with. There was no reference in
the file to the Sea Hauler.”

Mr Forbes, a security guard,
said he still has time off work
when his knee swells up, and suf-
fers frequent flashbacks to the
incident itself. “I am finding it
hard to support my family because
of this,” he said.

The government was held liable
by the Wreck Commission as
licensing authority for the two ves-
sels involved. 4

The victims are also taking
action against owners of the two
vessels, which collided while on
their way to the Cat Island regat-
ta in 2003.

FROM page one Some senior officers

that way about the impending reshuffle.

"The story is that Mr Ferguson has ruthlessly
administered the police force — he has seeming-
ly had more power than the commissioner of
police," claimed the senior officer yesterday, who
alleges up to 90 per cent of the force are pleased
to see Mr Ferguson go.

Mr Ferguson has "done what he wanted to do"

. during his tenure as ACP, and in the process,

"frustrated"
claimed.

The source denied numerous reports that Mr
Ferguson's transfer may be evidence of victimi-
sation for his alleged role in the arrests of the
five baggage handlers from Nassau Flight Ser-
vices (NES).

Since their initial arrests, Mr Ferguson has
been the only official to go on record as admitting
that he knew that the men arrested in Florida
last year were under suspicion.

Che source instead suggested the decision to
remove him is due to "consistent complaints"
about his handling of officers. However, the
source provided no evidence of such complaints.

He claimed that he and,"scores of officers"
felt maligned by Mr Ferguson during his time at
the top, and the issue had "reached a peak."

On Wednesday, the senior officers who sup-
ported Mr Ferguson and objected to his transfer
alleged that the transfer was one that the com-
missioner had been forced into by political figures.

many senior officers, the officer

"have the ear of government and are seeking to
move Mr Ferguson for their own purposes."

"This is the point where the commissioner
needs to stand up and stop these politicians to
leave this force alone and let him run it," anoth-
er source said.

However, the officer who telephoned The Tri-
bune yesterday stated that he did not think the
decision was political.

"I don't think it's political. It is necessary, it is
necessary for us to restructure the organisation.
Going to the college with the wealth of experience
he has he can do a good job assisting with training
the detectives."

Another source said he felt impelled to speak
out in light of the claims made by some officers
yesterday as he "feels the members of the public
need to get a good balanced sense about what's
going on."

He emphasised that all officers are subject to
transfer at the Commissioner's discretion at any
time — and all senior officers should be willing to
accept this.

The Tribune was informed earlier in the week
that Assistant Commissioner of Police Elliston
Greenslade will be transferred from Grand
Bahama to take over from Mr Ferguson. He is to
be promoted to deputy commissioner of police.

Continuing his reticence on the entire issue,
Mr Ferguson chose to make no comment yester-

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 11





Prison officers

FROM page one

the entire housing units of the prison."
Meanwhile, when questioned about the prison officers’ con-
aie about security on Wednesday, Dr Rahming described it as
"non-issue", claiming that enough protective gear had been

nrovided already.

Yesterday, officers complained that sharing protective vests is
“unsanitary...and a health hazard" and also "breaks down the

ballistic material in the vest."

"We believe the small amount (of protective gear) provided
was purchased in the government's attempt to band-aid the sit-

uation," said the statement.

FROM page one
among Grand Bahama teach-
ers.

“It is our view that there
needs to be a complete over-
haul and revamping of the

_ government pay system for

teachers. A commission needs
to be appointed to investigate
the situation and to eliminate
bureaucratic red tape,” he
said.

Mr Sands said that teachers
marched for about one hour
in front of the International
Building.

4 It was one of the biggest
demonstration we’ve had ina
long time,” he said.

Mr Sands said that fedchers
are also staging a sit-in at all
the schools throughout the dis-
trict. He said teachers are in
the classroom, but will not
teach until the matter has
been resolved.

Belinda Wilson, secretary
general of BUT, said teachers .
are owed thousands of dollars
in’ salaries or promised

Teachers

allowances by the govern-
ment.

_ Mr Wilson said governmen-
t’s failure to honour their con-
tracts with teachers have left
them struggling to pay their
bills.

Mr Sands reported that
some teachers on Grand
Bahama have been forced to
borrow monies from anyone
who would lend them because
they are unable to provide for
themselves, and for their fam-
ilies.

“Teachers complained of
having to borrow money to
give their children lunch mon-
ey, put gas in their cars, and
others have had to drop their
insurance, simply because they
are not getting paid consis-
tently.”

Education Minister Alfred
Sears has advised his ministry
to put together an inter-min-
isterial working group to find a
resolution to the matter.

Position Available
Confidence Insurance
Brokers & Agents Ltd.

is seeking a

Receptionist
- a command for the English Language

- communication skills are a must

- must be people oriented

- able to perform under pressure
- previous experience is an asset
- a picture is preferred

- ages 25 - 55

Please hand deliver to our office on Church &

Shirley Sts. or fax a resume to

325-8486



ueen's College

Nassau, Rahamas Eat. lege

It was alleged that "a select few" senior officers

PRICE INCLUDES: FIRST SERVICE FREE
LICENSE & INSPECTION

FULL TANK OF GAS

FULL SET FLOOR MATS _
PARTS & SERVICE ASSURED

day on the latest claims.



PARENTS TEACHERS ASSOCIATION

ANNUAL

STEAK-OUT, FAIR & DANCE

Date: February 10th, 2007
Time: 12 Noon - 6:00pm
Venue: Queen’s College Campus
Village Road

IT’S THE FAIR OF THE YEAR....

ENTERTAINMENT

Royal Bahamas
Police Force Band
Visage, Landlord And
Numerous

Other Bahamian Artist

FUN ACTIVITIES

Kid’s Corner

Car Show

Carnival Rides

Donkey And Pony Rides
Hoop-la

Dart Board Games
Wack A Mole

Face Painting

Bouncing Castles
Artwork ‘

FOOD

Roasted Corn
Conch Salad
Conch Fritters

Ice Cream

Snow Cones/cotton

Candy

Candy Apples/popcorn
Hotdogs

Hamburgers

Pizza

Chicken Wings

Steaks

Native Food

Daiquiri

Sodas

REGISTER TO VOTE ON SITE
Computer Sale
Book Sale
T-shirt Sale
Valentine Gifts
Balloons
Photo Shop
Alumni Booth........
Junkanoo Rush Out-grade Two
Calling all Parent, Teachers, Students, Alumni,
Family and Friends
This 1 is Where you want to be

COME ONE

COME ALL





PAGE 12, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007

THE TRIBUNE!







@ HEALTH , :
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: New Provi-
dence Community Centre: Mondays - 6pm to 7pm.
The Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support
group meets the first Monday of each month at
6:30pm at New Providence Community Centre,
Blake Road. Dinner is provided and free blood
sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol testing is

available. For more info call 702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third
Monday of every month at 6pm @ Doctors Hos-
pital conference room. ~

wg CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colo-
nial Hilton Monday's at 7pm ® Club 612315 meets
Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable
Beach @ Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial
Hilton Mondays at 7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the month
“+ the Board Room of the British Colonial Hilton
, otel, Bay St.

fs FHEATRE

hamas Qn stage Youthe:. presents Pinoc-
chio February 19 - 21. The shows will be held at the
National Centre for the Performing Arts. For more
information contact Gloria Darville at 323.5589

TUESDAY “SOR”

* @ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: The Nassau
Group, Rosetta Street: Tuesday 6pm to 7pm /
8:30pm to 9:30pm.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at
5:30pm on the second Tuesday of each month at
their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville.
Call 323.4482 for more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes
location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval
is required. Call 364.8423 to register for more info.

@ CIVIC CLUBS
The Kiwanis Club of New Providence meets every

' _Tuesday at 7:30pm at the Holy Cross Community







Cenire; Highbury Park.

The Luncheon Pilot Club of Nassau meets every
third Tuesday at SuperClubs Breezes, Cable Beach
at 12:30pm. We invite all community minded per-
sons to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7:30pm @
C C Sweeting Senior School's Dining Room, Col-
lege Avenue off Moss Road. ¢ Club Cousteau
7343 meéts Tuesdays at 7:30pm in the Chickchar-
ney Hotel, Fresh Creek, Central Andros ¢ Club
7178 meets each Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer
Society of the Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Eta Psi Omega chap-
ter ‘meets every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ the
Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort,

Cable Beach ¢ Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets ©

every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ Atlantic House,
IBM Office, 4th floor meeting room ¢ Alpha Phi
Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday, 6:30pm
at the British Colonial Hilton. Please call
502.4842/377.4589 for more info.

The Downtown Pilot Club of Nassau meets every
third Tuesday of the month at 6pm at the J P
Whitney Building, First Terrace, Collins Avenue.

Toastmasters Club 7178 will host a special "Valen-
tine Showease" meeting on Tuesday, February 13
and extends a warm invitation to all. There will be
prizes and surprises under the theme "Simple Plea-
sures". Club 7178 meets on Tuesdays at 6pm at the
Cancer Society of the Bahamas, Third Terrace,
Cenveville-two buildings south of ZNS. Meetings
‘e open to the public. For more info email:
, pmembership7178@yahoo.com.

WEDNESDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports
Bar every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free appetizers
and numerous drink specials. °





SS
\\

» ARTIST TALK

ul ire Py Le



ANAM AHN OAT sesnaggrgagnona ee tanog SNS HASSAN ETS TET TNT Ho NINN

Marion Bethel, Poet

Thursday, February 8th at 7pm ¢ National Art Gallery. are

The NAGB invites you ta a special reading by Marion Bethel from her soon to be
oublished. work Hurricane of Desire. Bethel was born in The Bahamas where she
currently lives and works. Her work has appeared In Junction, Lignum Vitae,

At Random, Womanspeak, The Massachusetts Review, The Caribbean Writer,
Poul, and River City. She was awarded a James Michener Fellowship In 1991 and
the Casa de las Americas Prize for her book of poetry Guanahani, My Love in 1994.
Come and join us for a wonderful evening of Caribbean poetry.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: New Provi-
dence Community Centre: Wednesday - 7pm to
8pm. The Nassau Group: Rosetta Street, Wednes-
day 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

FREE Health and Wellness Lectures are held the
first Wednesday of every month at 6:30pm at New
Providence Community Center Blake Road. For
more information call 327.1660 or 327.2878. FREE
Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar and Cholesterol
Screening.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas Support
Group meets every Wednesday from 5:30pm to
7pm at Cancer Headquarters, two doors south of
ZNS. Cancer patients, survivors, their family mem-
bers and friends are invited to attend. Phone
323.4482

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of SouthEast Nassau meets every
Wednesday from 1pm — 2pm at East Villa Restau-
rant, East Bay Street. Always an interesting speak-
er and great fellowship. If you would like to attend
our meetings please send an. e-mail to
bruno.pletscher@gottardo.com or kathyv-
smith@hotmail.com.

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta
Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated meets 6:30pm
every third Wednesday at the Bahamas National
Pride Building.

International Training in Communication, Essence
Club #3173 holds it’s bi-monthly meetings on the
1st and 3rd Wednesday of each month at Doc-
tor's Hospital Conference Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets
the second and fourth Wednesday of the month,
8pm @ St Augustine's Monastery.

The Kiwanis Club of Cable Beach invites the pub-
lic to its regular weekly meeting held every
Wednesday at 7:30pm at the British Colonial
Hilton. Kiwanis is a worldwide service organisation
dedicated to changing the world One Child, One
Community at a time."

School and Community Nature Walk and Petting
Zoo - Free Every Wednesday from 1Oam to
2:30pm at Earth Village Ranch, St Albans Drive
and Columbus Avenue (Chippingham). Call (242)
356.2274 now to make reservations. Open to all
ages and groups Monday-Sunday from 9am to
6pm. Inquire about additional activities and pro-
grammes.

TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday on the 4th
floor of the Ministry of Health, Meeting Street, at
6pm.

@ ENTERTAINMENT
Shadowhand Entertainment presents an all



THURSDAY





Bahamian Talent Explosion this and every Thurs-
day night at the Patio Bar & Grill on Carmichael
Road. This event features upcoming Bahamian
artist who are ready to showcase their original
material to the world. There will also be a freestyle
competition every week which is open to the pub-

lic at large. Doors open at 8:30pm. Ladies free . -

until I'ipm - Gentlemen - small door-charge. See u
there. ?

m@ HEALTH .

Free public health lectures featuring distinguished
physicians are held at Doctors Hospital every third
Thursday of the month at 6pm in the Doctors
Hospital Conference Room. Free screenings
between Spm & 6pm. For more information call
302.4603.

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Thursday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics Sea-
grapes location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor
approval is required. Call 364.8423 to register for
more info.

REACH - Resources & Education for Autism
and Related Challenges meets from 7pm - 9pm
the second Thursday of each month in the cafete-
ria of the BEC building, Blue Hill Road.

CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise has a breakfast
meeting every Thursday morning at 7am at the
British Colonial Hilton Hotel (Fellowship begins
at 6:45am).

The Kiwanis Club of Over-the-Hill meets every |

Thursday at 8pm at the Holy Cross Activity Cen-
tre, Soldier Road. Guests are welcome.

Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first, second
and third Thursday at the Ministry of Health &
Environment building on Meeting Street com-
mencing at 7:30pm. Everyone is welcome to attend
e TM Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8:30pm @
SuperClubs Breezes.

International Association of Administrative Pro-
fessionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the third
Thursday of every month @ SuperClubs Breezes,
Cable Beach, 6pm.

The recently established National Insurance Board
Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets every fourth
Thursday in the month, in the National Insurance
Board's (NIB) training room, Wulf Road office
complex, at 6pm. All retirees are welcome.

The Rotary Club of West Nassau holds its weekly
meeting, every Thursday at Choices Restaurant on
the campus of the College of the Bahamas. Fel-
lowship starts at 12:30pm, with the meeting held
from lpm to 2pm.



LS oASSAESARNEANNEAIEANRRARRSRNEASEANEANNAAERNNDNENN



AROUND



NASSAU



FRIDAY

@ HEALTH |.
. Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: The Nassau
Group, Rosetta Street: Friday 6pm to 7pm &

8:30pm to 9:30pm. Sacred Heart Church: Friday
6pm to 7pm. New Providence Community Centre:

‘Friday 7pm to 8pm.

mB CIVIC CLUBS
TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas
Baptist Community College Rm A19, Jean St.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second
Friday of each month, 7:30pm at the Emmaus
Centre at St Augustine’s Monastery. For more
info call 325.1947 after 4pm.

AMISTAD is a club which promotes the Spanish
language and culture in the community. Residents
of the Bahamas who speak Spanish or are learning
Spanish are invited to attend meetings on the third
Friday of the month during the academic year at
7pm in room 13 of COB's Tourism Training Cen-
tre.

@ THE ARTS

Drawing the Line - artists Jason Bennett, John
Cox, Blue Curry, Michael Edwards, Toby Lunn
and Heino Schmid will be in exhibition February,
Friday 9 at 6:30pm at Popopstudio, Chippingham.
Check out popopstudios.com for more informa-
tion.

Jewellery Exposition featuring new works by Nadia
Campbell Jewellery, Kim Riedel Designs, Judy
Darville’s BellaDonna Designs, Tesha Fritz’s Ele-
ments and Darcy Moss’ Angel Dust Collection,
will be held Friday, February 9 from 6pm-9pm
and Saturday, February 10 from 10am to 4pm at
the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas. Refresh-
ments will be served.

EEE = SATURDAY
@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: The Nassau

Group, Rosetta Street: Saturday mornings - 1Oam
to llam.



Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third

Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and December)

. the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley
treet.

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes are
offered every third Saturday of the month from
Qam-1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Commu-
nity Training Representative at 302.4732 for more

information and learn to save a life today.

m@ CIVIC CLUBS

JAR CYCLING: The Owners of JAR Cycling arc

eee to offer a cycling clinic for juniors between
0 and 17. The free clinic will be held every Sat-

urday in an effort to encourage kids to cycle. Par-

ents interested in registering their children should

contact organisers at jarcycling@gmail.com.

SUNDAY «=
@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

Traveller's Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street, fea-
tures special entertainment - Gernie, Tabitha and
the Caribbean Express - very Sunday from 6:30pm

to 9:30pm.

@ HEALTH ,

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: The Nassau
Group, Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm to 7pm /
8:30pm to 9:30pm. .

§ RELIGIOUS SERVICES °

The Bahamas Metaphysical Society Inc - A spiri-
tual teaching society leading you to greater peace
of mind, health, prosperity and happiness - holds
Higher Consciousness Services every Sunday at
10am and weekly Meditation services every
Wednesday at ae at Bowe’s Cove off Bernard
Road. Interested persons are welcome to attend.
For more information contact by e-mail @ bah-
metsol@hotmail.com or call 393.0279.

Send all your civic and social events (attach pictures
if possible) to The Tribune via fax: 328.2398 or e-
mail: ybdeleveaux@tribunemedia.net - Out there
in the subject line.





THE TRIBUNE PRI AS, fr ‘YY 9, 2007, PAGE 13

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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007

SECTION

business@tribunemedia.net



YEW yey Terr ee




il

os eee wees Se eee” eS ee Se Oe eee

Ee ee
Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

re eee



‘Many Bahamian-owned
arinas ‘barely get by’

. mm By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL

2

Tribune Business Reporter

Bahamian marina owner
and operator has been
waiting two-and-a-half
_years for'a government
agency to approve a dredg-
ing application, arguing that many marinas
“barely get by” and are not the rich, prof-
itable facilities the Government thinks.
Mario Cartwright, proprietor of the Fly-
ing Fish Marina on Long Island, described
in a letter to the Government that the state-
ment in its draft marina policy that such
facilities were “extremely profitable” was “a
gross overstatement”. :
He wrote: “Marinas may be extremely

Long Island operator waiting two-and-a-half years for dredging approval;
calls tax proposals ‘rather stiff’ and marinas in MICAL ‘not feasible’

profitable in South Florida. However, I can
assure you that is not the case here in the
Bahamas.”

South Florida marinas were often the
home base for yachts that cruises in the
Bahamas, and generated revenues from the
tying of condo sales and marinas to dock
slips. wd
Yet Mr Cartwright pointed out that
yachting was a seasonal business in the
Bahamas, with his marina enjoying a seven-

month season that lasted from January to
July.

“August to December are usually very
slow months for us. Therefore, we must
budget our money very carefully to carry us
through five slow months each year,” Mr
Cartwright said.

“Our peak season is for the three-month
period May to July, When we realise 80 per
cent plus occupancy every night. Should
hurricanes arrive early, the season ends

early. In 2005, the Bahamas was threat-
ened by Hurricane Dennis in late June.
This resulted in Flying Fish Marina’s season
ending abruptly on July 1, so we lost an
entire month.

“January to April is reasonably busy,

usual occupancy rates fluctuate between ©

30 per cent and 80 per cent. During our
five-month slow season we survive on mon-
ey made during the busy season and on
transients.” ”

Mr Cartwright added: “Marina con-

- struction is almost prohibitively expensive,
so when one considers the cost to develop a
marina, the occupancy rates for the south-
eastern Bahamas, the seasonal nature of
this business, and the other variables that
affect occupancy (such as adverse weather
conditions), marinas in my part of the

SEE page 5B

Just about every firm’ Telecoms regulation mess ‘has real

applies to Baha Mar |

financial impact on pockets of Bahamians’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

“JUST about every company
in the Bahamas has applied to
participate” in developing Baha
Mar’s $2.4 billion Cable Beach
project, The Tribune has been
told, the developers having spent
“in excess of” $100 million on
upgrading and renovating the
existing three Cable Beach
Resorts. :

Robert Sands, Baha Mar’s

tration and public affairs, said the

_ developer had made the $100 mil-

lion outlay in the 18-month peri-
od after it completed the acquisi-
tion of the Radisson, Wyndham
and Crystal Palace Casino, and
the Nassau Beach Hotel in May
2004.

Apart from the $80 million
spent on transforming the former

. Hotel Corporation-owned Radis-

son into a Sheraton, a further $20
million has-been spent on
upgrades to both the Wyndham
and Nassau Beach hotels, a pro-
gramme that is continuing.

Mr Sands and Don Robinson,
Baha Mar Resorts’ president, said

- renovation work on the Wynd-.

ham’s convention centre was due
to start on February 19.
Baha Mar planned to do “a



..Senior vice-president.of adminis- —....,..

"MN ROBERT SANDS
(FILE photo)

complete job on the convention
centre”, Mr Sands said, putting
in a new sound system, plumb-
ing, carpeting and walls.

“In the next month or so, you'll
see the Wyndham being painted.
It’ll have a whole new curb
appeal,” he added.

Mr Robinson said Baha Mar
was also preparing to undertake a
full room renovation in two Wyn-
dham towers, H & M.

He added that Sheraton exec-
utives were due in the Bahamas

SEE page 10B

St Georges seek ‘speedy

Tribune Business Editor

WITH the receivers back in at
the Grand Bahama Port Author-

_ ity (GBPA), the Haywards and

St George estate are due to
appear before Justice Anita Allen
on February 15 to determine the
next step in resolving their dis-
pute, with the estate likely to seek
a quick trial.on Sir Jack’s 75 per
cent ownership claim,

Receivers Clifford and Myles
Culmer, from the accounting firm

.. BDO Mann Judd, went back into
- the GBPA on Wednesday, Feb-

ruary 7, as this newspaper had
been first to predict last week.
They have now assumed control
over the"GBPA and its more
valuable affiliate, Port Group Ltd,
which holds the major assets.
The receivers returned after
the Haywards and St George
family proved unable to resolve
their dispute over Sir Jack’s claim
to own 75 per cent of the issued
share capital of the GBPA and
Port Group Ltd; the St George’s
alleging that ownership is split
50/50 between the two parties.
Justice Allen had previously
given them two months to Feb-
ruary 7, 2007, in a bid to let the

_. two sides settle their differences
‘without going through a court
.’ battle, but this has been to no

avail.
Fred Smith, an attorney repre-

.° senting the St George estate and

‘. “ partner in Callender’s & Co, told

x

The Tribune yesterday that the
Supreme. Court had been
informed that the two parties had
been unable to resolve their dis-

_ pute in the two months allowed.

&

~ solution to 75% Port claim

*. i By NEIL HARTNELL

Estate to oppose any
_ moves to overturn

~ receivership and —
switch trial to Cayman

He added that on February 15,
the St George estate would ask
Justice Allen to set aside all inter-
locutory matters arising from the
dispute, and “order a speedy tri-
al” on the 75 per cent ownership
claim.

“The estate believes it is in the
best interests of Freeport, and it is
the fastest way resolution to the
issues in dispute, to have the court
determine this very discretionary
and simple issue - whether the
shares are owned 50/50 between
the estate and Sir Jack, or
whether Sir Jack owns 75 per cent
as he claims,” Mr Smith said.

- He added that the estate
expected Sir Jack to apply to set
aside the receivership, a move the

estate would oppose, as the Cul-

mers were there to “hold the ring
between the parties and maintain
the value” of the GBPA and Port
Group Ltd until the ownership
issues were resolved.

It is understood that the Hay-
wards and Hannes Babak, the
GBPA chairman who is still
restrained from taking any part
in the GBPA and Port Group’s
management, wanted to see a
continuation of the two-month
consent order that attempted to

SEE page 2B

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Public Utilities Commission (PUC) |

has been urged to resolve disputes relating
to competition in’ the Bahamian telecommu-
nications market that “have real financial
impact on the pockets of more than 300,000
Bahamians and residents, and the nation’s
economic development”.

In a February 2 letter to the telecoms reg-
ulator, Paul Hutton-Ashkenny, president of
IndiGo Networks, asked the PUC why it had
allowed its chief competitor, the government-
owned Bahamas Telecommunications Com-
pany (BTC), to “frustrate competition” by
failing to resolve at least three disputes
between the two carriers.

Pointing out that part of BTC’s mandate
was to “maintain and promote effective and
sustainable competition” in the Bahamian
telecoms market, Mr Hutton-Ashkenny, in
IndiGo’s response to the PUC’s public con-
sultation on market information and data col-
lection, said the three disputes had lasted for
more than 18 months each.

They are:

* A ‘dispute over BTC’s alleged refusal to
interconnect its network with IndiGo’s on
Abaco, a dispute that was filed with the PUC
in March 2005.

* BTC’s alleged refusal “to route calls to



Disputes galore between IndiGo and BTC

unresolved for between 18 months to two years

and from the residential exchange numbers

lawfully provided to IndiGo by the PUC

under the Bahamas dial numbering plan. A
dispute was filed on August 2005.

-. * BTC’s alleged refusal “to provide any
additional interconnection capacity” between
its network and that of IndiGo’s, with a dis-

pute also filed'in August 2005. i a

BTC has repeatedly denied it has been
behaving in an anti-competitive manner, and
has accused IndiGo and others of deliberate-
ly portraying it as such.

Yet in his letter to the PUC, Mr Hutton-
Ashkenny said the regulator needed to explain
why it had allowed BTC to “stall competi-
tion”, and the benefits it brought in terms of -
lower prices, better service and technology,
and consumer choice, by failing to resolve

‘any of the disputes.

“These issues are fundamental to telecom-
munications competition in the Bahamas and
have been on the agenda of the PUC for up to
two years, with no end in sight. They are issues
that have real financial impact on the pockets

q

the ones you

Reality Check. :

of in excess of 300,000 Bahamian residents
and businesses, and on the economic devel-
opment of the nation, but the PUC has done
nothing to address them,” Mr Hutton-Ashken-

- ny said.

“We respectfully suggest that the fact that
the PUC chooses to ignore the above, and

-4nstead focus its efforts to promote competi-
tion on the publication of operator statistics, is -

an affront tothe Bahamian public and abro-
gation by the PUC of its statutory responsi-
bilities.” ; .

In another letter sent to the PUC, this time
addressing the PUC’s consultation on BT'C’s

- ViBE Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP)

product, Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said BTC had
“failed to protect the interests of the con-
sumer in Abaco” by failing to address that
particular dispute.

On the dispute over sufficient interconnec-
tion capacity between IndiGo and BTC, Mr
Hutton-Ashkenny contrasted the PUC’s

SEE page 5B

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Sue its oe est a





PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Fix the system, not the people

usiness systems are the

key to growing your

business. Just as the
human body is comprised of sys-
tems that are closely dependent
on each other, businesses consist
of interdependent systems that
need to be created and managed
effectively. Michael E. Gerber
explains the importance of sys-
tems in his seminal work, The E
Myth. Make sure you read the
book.

He writes that while most
entrepreneurs work IN the busi-
ness, their failure'to work ON the
business is often the reason they
don’t succeed.

Business development and
understanding ‘how you do it’ is

as important at ‘what you do’.
Michael Gerber states that how
the business consistently interacts
with the customer is at the
essence of the franchise revolu-
tion, and the single most success-
ful business concept in history.
By distilling how you do things
through innovation, quantifica-
tion and orchestration, and by
documenting processes, the busi-
ness will be able to be operated
by people with the lowest possible
skill, giving the consumer a pre-
dictable, consistent service.

This is how successful fran-
chises operate. Every element of
their business has been looked at
in detail, documented and per-

fected. The use of systems is the .

se?

”

| Business
Sense

By Mark Palmer



difference that allowed Ray
Crock to take over the lacklustre
business owned by the McDonald
brothers and turn it into the pow-
erhouse we see today.

Instead of asking the question:
“How will I get this done?”, Ger-
ber challenges us to ask the ques-
tion: “How will this get done, get
done correctly, over and over,
even when I am not here?” For

www. svitzerwiismuller.com

At SvitzerWijsmuller, results and values go hand in hand. With 2,500 employees and a fleet of more than 300 vessels, we provide
towage, salvage and related marine services in over 35 countries wotldwide, To sustain our position as one of the world's leading
marine services company, we encourage a culture of commitment, innovation, and entrepreneurship where all employees take

responsibility for our purpose: to provide safety and support at sea. SvitzerWijsmuller is headquartered in Denmark and is part of

the A.P. Moller - Maersk Group.

Freepoint Tug & Towing Services, Ltd. (FTTS) is a J/V company, 50/50 owned by SvitzerWijsmuller and South Riding Point Hold-
ing Ltd (World Point Terminals Inc.). FTTS operates a fleet of 4 tugs, providing services in Freeport, South Riding Point, and at
times on neighbouring islands. Additional personnel is needed to assist in the growth of our tug operation and overall exposure in

The Bahamas.

ASD TUG MASTER

Freepoint Tug & Towing Services, Ltd. — Freeport GB, Bahamas

THE POSITION

The Master will be responsible for the supervision and
leadership of all aspects of vessel management, which

include:

The position also offers an exciting and attractive career in an
international environment with the possibility of continuous de-

velopment both within SvitzerWijsmuller Group or World Point

Terminals Inc.

. Maintenance and safe operation of the tug

QUALIFICATIONS



most businesses this would be an
impossible task, as the business
processes are in the owner’s head.

The solution is to create sys-
tems using the following three-
step model:

Step 1: Design Your Systems
—- Look at the 10 system areas
described on the next page, and
start designing the systems you
need for your business. te

Step 2: Map The Process —
Then map every process in the
form of a diagram. Use software
programmes such as SmartDraw
to help you. You'll understand
your business 10 times better if
you start diagramming systems.

Step 3:,4ocument Everything —
Your final step will be to docu-
ment the diagrams and create
checklists and forms, so that every
process can be carried out by oth-
ers correctly, over and over again.

All problems in your business
come down to lack of systems,
ineffective systems, or ineffective
business processes. For example,
if you hire an accounts receivable
clerk and he doesn’t work out,
the common way to look at this is
that there is something wrong
with him. That doesn’t really help,

as that observation will not enable
you to get a better person next
time. If you just focus on the per-
son being an idiot, nothing hap-
pens that improves the business.

A better way to look at it
would be to say that there was a
failure in a system, such as the
recruitment system, and review
that process and improve it, If
you can improve this system, you
may then avoid doing that mis-
take again. By creating a system
solution you will greatly stop that
problem from reoccurring

Business is both an art and a
science, and serious business calls
for specific information and
processes to obtain that informa-
tion, and a method to use that
information productively. In the
next few weeks, I will be outlining
the systems you will need to cre-
ate for every part of your busi-
ness, to allow it to grow beyond
infancy.

* You will require a system to
manage money.

* You will require a system to
manage sales.

* You will require a system to
run your operation.

* You will require a system to
manage customer service.

* You will require a system to
manage your employees.

St Georges a ‘speedy’
solution to 75% Port claim

\

* You will require a system to
manage employee motivation.

* You will require a system to
manage your product.

* You will require a system to
manage your corporate issues.

* You will require a system to
manage production.

* You will require a system to
build scale.

Without these systems, you will
not be able to grow beyond infan-
cy, let alone survive. Don’t be an
antipreneur and ignore: the impor-
tance of working on your busi-
ness. Systems are a crucial part
of your business. So, in order to
avoid the trap of antipreneurship,
make sure you spend time on this

area, as it will pay large dividends ° y

for your future business success.

NB: Adapted from his upcom-
ing book, Antipreneurship And
How to Avoid It, Mark draws on
20 years of top level business,
marketing and communications
experience in London and the
Bahamas. He is chief operating
officer of eZpZemail, currently
lives in Nassau, and can be con-
tacted ; at
markalexpalmer@mac.com

© Mark Palmer. All rights
reserved

a cence ene

e Crew management, including crew motivation and
skill development e
. Risk management - the ability to identify, assess,
and respond to hazards and operational risks
Preparation of tug daily activity sheets
All tug stores/parts requisition
Other ad hoc tasks
Meeting the high SvitzerWijsmuller Health, Safety,
Environment, and Quality standards, including
managing all aspects of ISM and |SO9001

BMA Master's License (500grt) along with all relevant
STCWSS5 requirements, or have completed the necessary
international certification to this end

S/he must have no less than 5 years seamanship experi-
ence, with 3 years acting in the capacity of Master.

S/he must be well versed in vessel maintenance and able
to manage a small crew effectively .
Experience with ASD tugs is not mandatory but will be
considered an asset

Familiarity with the ISM Code and the ability to effectively
manage a Safety Management System

ciary Management Services (FMS), another com-
pany at the centre of the dispute, which owns 50
per cent of ICD. Sir Jack is claiming that since he
‘owns 50 per cent of FMS’ share capital, the estate
owning the other 50 per cent, together with Seashells
Investments - the company that owns the remaining
50 per cent of ICD, and which Sir Jack wholly owns

FROM page 1B

give both parties breathing space to work out their
differences.
But Mr Smith yesterday said the estate would

The Tug Master will receive support from other FTTS staff

locally in Bahamas and other SvitzerWijsmuller employees

throughout the Region.

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES
The right candidate should be strong and team-oriented,

shift system

and have the ability to achieve results through positive

interaction with crews, pilots, and shore personnel.

Furthermore, the Tug Master will have the opportunity to
gain exposure throughout various training programs and

exchanges.

CONTACTS

The right individual must also be prepared to work within a

ONLY BAHAMIAN CITIZENS, RESIDENTS OR WORK PER-
MIT HOLDERS NEED APPLY

Application with resume/CV to be sent to FTTS, Attn: Capt Lee

lee.wallace@sv
’



Wallace, #4 Milton Street, Freeport GB, Bahamas, Tel. +1 242
352 3060, Mobile. +1 242 727 0623, Fax +4 242 352 4114,
mutlear.com,



also oppose any move by the Haywards to have the
dispute switched and heard in the Cayman Islands.

The Tribune had received independent confir-
mation that the Haywards were assessing whether
the dispute should be switched to Cayman. The
grounds for doing so presumably would be that
Intercontinental Diversified Corporation (ICD),
the holding company that owns both the GBPA
and Port Group Ltd, and in which the Haywards and
St Georges control the two Bahamas-based com-
panies, is domiciled in the Cayman Islands.

Also domiciled in the Cayman Islands is Fidu-

13)

- this gives him 75 per cent control of ICD.

The St George estate, though, is arguing that
FMS is a segregated accounts company, and that
its beneficial ownership does not reflect ownership
of the assets it manages.

Among the assets they claim FMS holds is the
estate’s 50 per cent stake in ICD.

Mr Smith said the St George estate would oppose
any move to switch the dispute to the Cayman
Islands “on the basis that the Supreme Court of the
Bahamas is already seized of this matter, and has full _
jurisdiction to deal with the ownership issues”,



genie tp Ore EO AILEY ACE

. THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

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Se eee TT TL Re Os ee SE FO LL R STN SS BAF

NATIONAL BANK OF CANADA (INTERNATIONAL) LIMITED

NON-CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
AS OF OCTOBER 31, 2006

(Expressed in United States dollars)

2006 2005
ASSETS
Cash and due from banks $ 464,819,024 $ 423,613,500
Loans (Note 5) 31,082,945 36,611,848
Accrued interest and other assets 1,182,865 1,701,017
Derivative related items (Note 12) 702,599 -
Investment in securities 321,490 6 613,270
Investments in subsidiaries (Note 6) 119,381 125,666

~- Fixed assets (Note 7) 627,259 878,803
TOTAL $ 498,855,563 $ 463,544,104

Ce RE

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

LIABILITIES:
Bank overdraft - related party $ 6,210,578 $ 7,952,720
Derivative related items (Note 12) ree - $13,903
Deposits - related parties (Note 8) 81,157,262 75,207,574
Deposits - customer (Note 8) 88,251,412 87,960,155
Accrued interest and other liabilities 4,163,578 | 2,210,541

Interest free demand loan - related party
Total liabilities

120,324,420

131,964,091 324,

311,746,921 294,169,313

SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY:

Share capital (Note 9) 20,000,000 20,000,000
Fair value reserve (Note 10) (291,785) -
Retained earnings 167,400,427 _’ 149,374,791

Total shareholders' equity
TOTAL

187,108,642 169,374,791

$ 498,855,563 $ 463,544,104

See notes to non-consolidated balance sheet.

This non-consolidated balance sheet was approved by the Board of Directors on January 16, 2007,
and is signed on its behalf by:

ante = Dirgefor

NOTES TO NON-CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
AS OF OCTOBER 31, 2006
(Expressed in United States dollars)

1. GENERAL

National Bank of Canada (International) Limited (the “Bank”) was incorporated during
October 1977, in The Commonwealth of The Bahamas and is licensed under The Banks and
Trust Companies Regulations Act of 1965. The Bank is wholly owned by Natcan Holdings
International Limited which was incorporated in The Commonwealth of The Bahamas during
October 1995. National Bank of Canada, Montreal is the ultimate parent company. The
primary activities of the Bank are private banking, fund management, trust services and
securities trading.

The Bank owns 100% of the ordinary shares of Mondial Trading (Bahamas) Limited. Mondial
Trading (Bahamas) Limited in tum owns 100% of the ordinary shares of Mondial Trading
(Bahamas) Y Compania Limitada, a company incorporated in Chile. The primary activity of
Mondial Trading (Bahamas) Limited is the holding of the investment in its subsidiary.

The address of the registered office of the Bank is Goodman’s Bay Corporate Centre, West
Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

NEW AND REVISED INTERNATIONAL ACCOUNTING STANDARDS AND

INTERPRETATIONS

‘At the date of authorization of this non-consolidated balance sheet, the International *"

Accounting Standards Board (“IASB”) had issued IFRS 6, IFRS 7, and IFRIC 4-10, which are
not yet effective. Furthermore, IASB has issued amendments to IFRS 4, IAS 1, IAS 19, and
LAS 39, which are also not yet effective. ;

The Bank anticipates that the relevant adoption of these Standards and Interpretations in future
periods will have no material impact on the non-consolidated balance sheet of the Bank.

SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

The Bank’s non-consolidated balance sheet has been prepared in accordance with
International Financial Reporting Standards.

The following is a summary of the significant accounting policies:

a.

Basis of presentation - The non-consolidated balance sheet has been prepared on the
non-consolidated basis as the results of the Bank and its subsidiaries are consolidated
into the balance sheet of the ultimate parent company. Results of the subsidiaries are
recorded on the equity basis using the internally prepared, unaudited consolidated
balance sheet. Management is satisfied that the amounts carried at equity for the
subsidiaries are fully recoverable.

Translation of foreign currencies - Assets and liabilities denominated or accounted for
in currencies other than United States dollars have been translated into United States
dollars at the applicable exchange rates ruling at the non-consolidated balance sheet
date. :

. Investment in securities - Investment securities are recorded on a trade date basis and

are classified as available-for-sale.

Financial assets - The Bank classifies its investments into the following categories:
loans and receivables, held-to-maturity: financial assets, available-for-sale financial
assets and financial assets at fair value through income. The “lassification depends on
the purpose for which the investments were acquired. M. gement determines the
classification of its investments at *itial recognition and ‘re-evaluates this at every
reporting date.

Loans and receivables



Loans and receivables are non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable
payments that are not quoted in an active market, other than those that the Bank intends

to sell in the short term or that it has designated as at fair value through income or |

available-for-sale.

A loan is considered impaired when, in the opinion of Management, there is reasonable
doubt as to the ultimate collectibility of a portion of principal or interest or where
payment of interest is contractually 90 days past due, unless there is no doubt as to the
collectibility of the principal or interest. A loan may revert to performing status only
when principal and interest payments have become fully current. When a loan is deemed
impaired, interest ceases to be recorded and the carrying value of the loan is adjusted to
its estimated realizable amount by writing off all or part of the loan or by taking an
allowance for credit losses. Provisions for loan losses are maintained at a level
consideréd by management to be adequate to absorb any losses given the risk
characteristics of the loan portfolio. As of the non-consolidated balance sheet date there
were no non-performing loans.

Held-to-maturity

Held-to-maturity financial assets are non-derivative assets with fixed or determinable
payments and fixed maturities, other than those that meet the definition of loans and
receivables, that the Bank’s management has the positive intention and ability to hold to
maturity. ;

Available-for-sale financial assets

Available-for-sale investments in securities are recognized on a trade date basis and are
initially measured at cost. At subsequent reporting dates, these investments are
remeasured at fair value. Unquoted investments for which fair values cannot be reliably
determined are carried at cost. In accordance with changes to IAS 39 (revised 2004),
gains and losses arising from changes in the fair value of available-for-sale investments
are recorded in the non-consolidated statement of shareholders’ equity, except for
impairment losses and foreign exchange gains and losses, which are recognized directly
in the non-consolidated statement of income. Previously the Bank recorded gains and
losses through income. In accordance with the transitional provisions of LAS 39, the
Bank is recognizing fair value changes prospectively in equity from the adoption of the
revisions to LAS 39 at November 1, 2005.



1.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 7B

Financial assets at fair value through income

This category has two subcategories: financial assets held for trading and those
designated as fair value through income at inception. A financial asset is classified into
this category at inception if acquired principally for the purpose of selling in the short-
term, or if so designated by management.

Regular way purchases and sales of investments are-recognized on trade date - the date
on which the Bank commits to purchase or sell the asset. Investments are initially
résognized at fair value plus, in the case of all financial assets not carried at fair value
through income, transaction costs that are directly attributable to their acquisition.
Investments are derecognized. when the rights to receive cash flows from the
investments have expired or where they have been transferred and the Bank has also
transferred substantially all risks and rewards of ownership. ;

Available-for-sale financial assets and financial assets at fair value. through income are
subsequently carried at fair value. Loans and receivables and held-to-maturity financial
assets are: carried at amortized cost using the effective interest method. Realized and
unrealized gains and losses arising from changes in the fair value of the ‘financial assets
at fair value through income category are included in the non-consolidated income
statement in the period in which they arise. Unrealized gains and losses arising from
changes in the fair value of financial assets classified as available-for-sale are
recognized in equity. When financial assets classified as available-for-sale are sold or
impaired, the accumulated fair value adjustments are included in the non-consolidated
income statement in net investment income.

The fair values of quoted investments are based on current bid prices. If the market for
a financial asset is not active, the Bank and/or its Investment Manager establish fair
value by using appropriate valuation techniques. These include the use of recent arm’s
length ‘transactions, reference to other instruments that are substantially the same and
discounted cash flow analysis.

Impairment of financial assets

Financial assets carried at amortized cost

The Bank assesses at each balance sheet date whether there is objective evidence that a
financial asset or group of financial assets is impaired. A financial asset or group of
financial assets is impaired and impairment losses are incurred only if there is objective
evidence of impairment as a result of one or more events that have occurred after the
initial recognition of the asset (‘a loss event’) and that loss event(s) has an impact on the
estimated future cash flows of the financial asset or group of financial assets that can be
reliably estimated. Objective evidence that a financial asset or group of assets is
impaired includes observable data that comes to the attention of the Bank about the

following events:

e significant financial difficulty of the issuer or debtor;
© _ abreach of contract, such as a default or delinquency in payments,

e it becomes probable that the issuer or debtor will enter bankruptcy or other
financial reorganization; :

e the disappearance of an active market for that financial assets because of financial
difficulties;

e observable data indicating that there is a measurable decrease in the estimated
future cash flow from a group of financial assets since the initial recognition of
those assets, though the decrease cannot yet be identified with the individual
financial assets in the group, including:

o adverse changes in the payment status of issuers or debtors in the Bank; or

o local economic conditions that correlate with defaults on the assets in the
Bank.

If there is objective evidence that an impairment loss has been incurred on loans and
receivables or held-to-maturity investments carried at amortized cost, the amount of the
loss is measured as the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present

_ value of estimated future cash flows (excluding future credit losses that have been

incurred) discounted at the financial asset’s original effective interest rate.

The calculation of the present value of the estimated future cash flows of a collateralized .

financial asset reflects the cash flows that may result from foreclosure less costs for
obtaining and selling the collateral, whether or not foreclosure is probable. The carrying
amount of the asset is reduced through the use of an allowance account and the amount
of the loss is recognized in the consolidated statement of income. If a held-to-maturity
investment or a loan has a variable rate, the discount rate for measuring any impairment
loss is the current effective interest rate determined under contract.

If in a subsequent period, the amount of the impairment loss decreases and the decrease
can be related objectively to an event occurring after the impairment was recognized, the
previously recognized impairment loss is reversed by adjusting the allowance account.
The amount of the reversal is recognized in the non-consolidated statement of income.

Financial assets carried at fair value

The Bank assesses at each balance sheet date whether there is objective evidence that an
available-for-sale (AFS) financial asset is impaired, including in the case of equity
investments classified as AFS, a significant or prolonged decline in the fair value of the
security below its cost. If any evidence exists for AFS financial assets, the cumulative
loss, measured as the difference between the acquisition cost and current fair value, less
any impairment loss on the financial asset previously recognized in profit or loss, is
removed from equity and recognized in the consolidated statement of income.
Impairment losses recognized in the non-consolidated statement of income on equity
instruments are not subsequently reversed. The impairment loss is reversed through the
non-consolidated statement of income if in a subsequent period the fair value of a debt
instrument classified as AFS increases and the increase can be objectively related to an
event occurring after the impairment loss was recognized in profit or loss.

Assets held or liabilities incurred as nominee - The Bank is engaged in significant trust
activities. No account is taken in this non-consolidated balance sheet for assets held or
liabilities incurred by the Bank as trustee or nominee.

Related parties - Related parties include entities directly and indirectly controlled by the
ultimate parent company. Related parties also include directors and officers of the bank,
who are considered members of key management, and who are persons who have
authority for planning, directing and controlling the Bank.

Cash and cash equivalents - Cash and cash equivalents consist of cash and due from
banks net of banks overdrafts and related party deposits. Cash and cash equivalents are
recorded at their nominal value which, due to their short term nature, approximates fair

value.

Derivative financial instruments - The Bank uses various types of derivatives for
asset/liability management and for trading purposes. The derivative instruments used
most frequently are foreign exchange forward contracts, currency and interest rate swaps
and equity swaps.

These derivatives are recorded at market values and the resulting gains or losses are
recorded as income. Market values are determined using pricing models that
incorporate current market and contractual prices of the underlying instruments, time
value of money, yield curve and volatility factors.

Unrealized gains and losses are reported on the balance sheet as derivative related
amounts under assets and liabilities. Where there is both a legal right and intent to settle
these amounts simultaneously, they are presented on a net basis.

Fixed assets - Fixed assets are recorded at cost less accumulated depreciation and
amortization. Assets are depreciated or amortized on a straight-line basis over their
estimated useful lives which are as follows:

Leasehold improvements over the term of the lease
Office equipment and furniture 20%

Motor vehicles 25%

Computer equipment and software 20% - 33 “%

Impairment of fixed assets - Fixed assets and other non-current assets are reviewed for
impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying
amount of an asset exceeds its recoverable amount. Any impairment loss is recognized
in the statement of income. The recoverable amount is higher of an asset’s net selling
price and its value in use. The net selling price is the amount obtainable from the sale of
an asset in an arm’s length transaction, while value in use is the present value of
estimated future cash flows expected to arise from the continuing use of an asset and
from its disposal at the end of its useful life. Recoverable amounts are estimated for
individual assets or, if it is not possible, for the cash-generating unit.

Reversal of impairment losses recognized in prior years is recorded when there is an
indication that the impairment loss recognized for the asset no longer exists or has
decreased, though the carrying amount of the asset may not exceed the carrying
amount that would have been determined had the impairment loss not been
recognized in prior years. Management has reviewed the fixed assets and concluded
that none of them are impaired.

Taxation - The Bank’s parent company is subject to income taxes in Canada. There are
no corporate, income or capital gains taxes levied on the Bank in The Bahamas.



BUSINESS&SPORTS [}

AEROSOLS NUE BASEOIRIN SELLE ERE ILEDEY ILE DUERE AH AIIEID

SEARANAHAHHN

The Miami Herald





THE MARKETS

STOCKS, MUTUAL FUNDS, 5-6B

bow 30 12,637.63 -29.24 W

SBP 500 1448.31 = -171 W

NASDAQ 2,488.67. —«-1.83 W
_ 10-YR NOTE 473-01 W

CRUDE OIL 59.71 +2.00

Stocks
drop on
housing
fears —

BY TIM PARADIS
Associated Press

NEW YORK — Wall Street
pulled back Thursday after new
signs of weakness in the hous-
ing market prompted investors
to look past a rebound in major
retailers’ sales figures.

A weak forecast from Toll’
Brothers, the nation’s largest
builder of luxury homes, pres-

sured housing stocks and rekin- .

~dled concerns about whether
the slumping housing market
would hurt the economy. And
HSBC Holdings, the European
bank, announced an increase in
its provisions for soured mort-
gage loans, which hurt shares of
US. banks.

The Dow industrials fell
29.24, or 0.23 percent, to
12,637.63.

Broader stock indicators also
fell. The Standard & Poor’s 500
index was down 1.7], or 0.12 per-
cent, at 1,448.31, while the
Nasdaq composite index fell
1.83, or 0.07 percent, to 2,488.67.

Bond prices rose as. stocks’
retreated. The yield on the
benchmark 10-year Treasury
note fell to 4.73 percent from
4.74 percent late Wednesday.

~The dollar was mixed against
other major currencies, while
. gold prices rose.

Energy traders rushed back
into the market amid frigid tem-
peratures in the U.S. and after
Occidental Petroleum shut a
field in California. Light, sweet
crude settled up $2 at $59.71 per
barrel, its highest price this year
on the New York Mercantile
Exchange.

The market seemed little
moved by the ‘Commerce
Department’s report that
wholesale inventories fell 0.5
percent to a seasonally adjusted
$393.76 billion. Analysts
expected an increase of D 5 per-
cent.

Worries about the Rausing
market started with HSBC,
which said it was seeing an
increase in delinquencies in the
U.S. subprime lending market.

HSBC, which is traded in
American Depositary Receipts
on the New York Stock
Exchange, fell $2.44 to $89.78.

Citigroup fell 51 cents to

' $54.44, while JPMorgan Chase
was off 28 cents at $50.93.

Walt Disney Co. reported
better-than-expected fiscal

' first-quarter earnings amid
strong DVD sales for its Pirates
of the Caribbean films. Disney
slipped 19 cents to $35.29.

Electronic Data Systems’
fourth-quarter profit nearly
doubled. The computer services
company rose 84 cents, or 3.1
percent, to $27.92 after issuing a
2007 forecast that topped Wall
Street’s expectations.

Declining issues outnum-
bered advancers by about 6 to 5
on the New York Stock
Exchange, where consolidated
volume came to 2.81 billion
shares, compared with 2.62 bil-
lion Wednesday.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies rose 0.19, or
0.02 percent, to 816.39. The
index passed 800 for the first
time last week and set new clos-
ing and trading highs for the
second straight day. The previ-
ous closing and trading high
was 816.20.

Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei
stock average closed barely
higher, showing a move of less
than 0.01 percent. Britain’s
FTSE 100 ended down 0.36 per-
cent, while Germany’s DAX
index was down 0.56 percent,
and France’s CAC-40 finished
down 0.66 percent.





meearouneuenannennte

AUTOMOTIVE

@ | FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007

poiaoasoascti tte





Saturn: GM’s test of turnaround plan

§& Robert Lutz, hired six years ago
to spruce up General Motors’
designs, says the automaker is
finally producing eye-catching
vehicles, especially at Saturn.

BY TOM KRISHER
Associated Press

CHICAGO — To peek into the
future of General Motors’ turnaround
plan, just look at Saturn.

Last year, when GM’s sales skid-
ded 8.7 percent, Saturn’s rose by 6



BY KELLI KENNEDY
Associated Press

clothes.

with stilettos, not flip flops.



High fashion is going granola. But not the
grunge of hippie yoga wear and grainy hemp
T-shirts typically associated with organic

Think soft soy dresses, cropped organic terry
jackets and slim-fit organic denim joan to pair

Consumers worried about ingesting harmful
pesticides have long been purchasing organic
foods. But the philosophy is slowly hitting main- ;

percent. By fall, the small brand that
used to call itself “A Different Kind of
Car Company” will have a lineup
that’s almost completely new, with
no models older than 20 months.

Simply put, if Saturn falls from
orbit with all its new vehicles, GM
likely will follow.

“Tt’s a no-excuses product lineup,”
GM Vice Chairman for Global Prod-

uct Development Bob Lutz said in an
“to slightly more than 4 million vehi-

interview with The Associated Press
at the Chicago Auto Show. “I told the



sales and marketing guys if this

‘lineup doesn’t work, I’m out of

ideas.”

Saturn, started in 1990 as GM’s
small-car answer to the Japanese
automakers, is the canary in the mine
for the company’s desperate effort to
make itself smaller, leaner and faster
to better compete with the enemy,
mainly ‘Toyota.

‘Last year, GM’s U.S. sales dropped

clés from ane 4.5 million vehicles

FASHION

stream clothing retailers as experts warn about
the dangers pesticides pose to the environment.
Whether shoppers are buying eco-friendly
because it’s trendy or because they hope to pre-
serve Mother Earth, they no longer have to sac-
rifice fashion for philosophy. With major retail-
ers like Target, Victoria’s Secret, H&M and Nike
joining the green trend, there’s something for
fashionistas of every price range in 2007.
“We're fashion first. The fact that they’re
organic is a value added product,” says Marci
Zaroff, founder of Under the Canopy, one of the

DAVID ZALUBOWSKI/AP

REBOUND: A shopper finds success at the Cherry Creek Mall in east
Denver on Tuesday, as retailers snap back from a weak December.

Stores fare better than
expected in January

{4 Many retailers reported
better-than-expected sales in
January because shoppers
redeemed gift cards to buy
winter and spring merchandise.

BY ANNE D’INNOCENZIO ;
Associated Press

NEW YORK — The nation’s
retailers finally got their sales boost
in January, as shoppers redeeming

SS esas aS

holiday gift cards and enticed by the
belated arrival of frigid weather
splurged on winter leftovers. Now
stores are pondering how spring mer-

_ chandise — from baby doll dresses to

lightweight cashmere tops — will
fare.

“With December generally weak,
that left more [winter] goods to

*TURN TO RETAIL, 4B



EUROPE

world’s largest producers of organic clothing.

Organic cotton, which makes up 95 percent
of organic fabrics, is the driving force behind the
trend. Global organic cotton sales increased 119
percent, from $245 million to $583 million
between 2001 and 2005. Sales are expected to
reach more than $2 billion by the end of 2008,
according to the Organic Exchange, a nonprofit
trade association that works to expand the use
of organically grown cotton.

*TURN TO ORGANICS, 4B

atu enesenaneneninnenantnnennennsntetnntnnansntnansnaastnnnsenanetannranesnnrinnamnennnnmnneend

hncannbannewemnteascstannnienanseananienatnnn

in 2005. Toyota, which seemingly can
do nothing wrong in the U.S.,
reported its best year ever in 2006,
with sales up 12.9 percent to about 2.5
million vehicles.

Just two years ago, Saturn was the
metaphor for all of GM’s ills. It’s
products were old and tired, and
what once was a hot brand had been
allowed to languish as the company
ignored cars and focused on big-

* TURN TO GM, 4B



organic fashions. ‘We're fashion first. The fact that they're organic is a value-added product,’ Zaroff says.
© ; @ o
~ From hippie to hip
Organic clothing is no longer suited just for hippies -
high fashion and big brands are going green, too

JON WAY/AP
| ALL NATURAL: Marci Zaroff, founder of Under.the Canopy, one one the world’s largest producers.of organic.clothing,.displays some... -



Central bank signals

March rate increase

While the European Central
Bank held interest rates steady,
President Jean-Claude Trichet
indicated the bank will raise rates
next month to contain inflation.

BY MATT MOORE
Associated Press

FRANKFURT, Germany — The
European Central Bank held interest
rates steady at 3.5 percent Thursday,
but signaled a likely increase next
month amid rising concern that new
wage agreements and high oil prices
will spur inflation.

ECB President Jean-Claude Tri-
chet specifically cited “stronger than
currently expected wage develop-
ments,” two days after Germany’s
biggest industrial union announced it
would be seeking a 6.5 percent wage
increase amid healthy economic
growth.

“Strong vigilance remains of the
essence so as to ensure that risks to
price stability over the medium term
do not materialize,” Trichet said —

language that has augured an immi-’

nent rate increase the past six times

he has used it.

Waiting another month will give
the bank, which last raised rates in
December, the chance to examine
new inflation data and economic

. forecasts due next week for the 13-na-

tion euro region, which has a popula-
tion of 317 million and accounts for
more than 15 percent of the world’s
gross domestic product.

The ECB was joined in keeping
rates unchanged Thursday by the
Bank of England. British interest rates
remained at 5.25 percent after a sur-
prise quarter-point increase last
month. Last week, the U.S. Federal
Reserve left interest rates unchanged
at 5.25 percent for the fifth straight
time.

Another rate increase March 8
would mean higher borrowing costs
for consumers — leading to higher
mortgage and car payments — and
for companies seeking to expand. It
would likely also boost the euro,
which has already risen about 14 per-
cent against the U.S. dollar in recent

* TURN TO EUROPE, 4B





2 smerny

AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL TOY FAIR

Toy makers play with prices as shoppers spend more

BY ANNE D’INNOCENZIO
Associated Press

NEW YORK — When Spin
Master started peddling its Air
Hogs Zero Gravity vehicle two
years ago, retailers doubted
whether parents would be
willing to pay $59.99 for a
radio-controlled toy — even if
it climbed walls.

But the item ended up
being a hit and was followed
by the equally popular $79.99
Storm Launcher. This year,
Spin Master is pushing a $110
Robo Copter that transforms
from a robot to a helicopter.

“This just proved to us that
if it is a great toy, provides a
wow and introduces new
functions, consumers are will-
ing to spend the money,” said
Harold Chizick, vice president
of global promotional market-
ing for the Toronto-based toy
maker. “We just decided to
step it up.”

For years, the increasing
power of discounters like
Wal-Mart kept the toy indus-
try locked in fierce price wars.
But the toy makers are encour-
aged by parents who last holi-
day were willing to spend
$300 on Hasbro’s robotic But-
terscotch pony and. $249 for a

AUTOMOTIVE

Mindstorms NXT robotics kit
from Lego. As the annual
American International Toy
Fair starts Sunday, the toy
makers are getting bolder
when it comes to pushing pric-
ier, higher-quality toys.
Zizzle, which did well with
its $300 pinball machines last
year, is adding more lights and
sounds, and increased the
price to $350, according to
CEO Roger Shiffman. MGA
Entertainment, the maker of
the popular funky Bratz doll, is
coming out with toys that
break the $150 barrier; last
year, the threshold was $100.

FAIR’S ITEMS

Among the items at the fair,
which. features toys expected
in stores later this year: Has-
bro’s $69.99 Squawkers
McCaw Parrot, which repeats
words and responds to touch;
Mattel’s Fisher-Price guitar
system, priced at $99.99, that
plugs into the TV; VTech
Holdings’ $99.99 Gadget,
which functions as a digital

photo and video camera and

music player; and Spin Mas-
ter’s $80 Wheels ’n Whistles
foam coach.

“This game is about better

GM uses Saturn
to test new plans

°GM, FROM 1B

profit trucks and sport utility
vehicles.

At the same time, gas
prices rose and GM didn’t
have many desirable cars
while Toyota did. GM lost
market share and buckets of
money, $10.6 billion in 2005
alone. There was talk of bank-
ruptcy.

All the while, GM was try-
ing to fix itself. It started cut-
ting costs, inducing upward of
34,000 expensive hourly:
workers to leave through buy-..

* outs. or early retirement
“offers: By the end of last year,

it had cut $9 billion in annual
costs, about $2,000 from
every car it sold. It has prom-
ised a profit in the fourth
quarter, the first one in two
years.

SATURN REPLENISHED

Roughly, 18 months ago
GM also began to replenish
Saturn.

Saturn got the Sky road-
ster, a sleek two-seat sports
car. Later came the Vue small
sport utility vehicle with a
hybrid gas-electric version,
and the Aura mid-sized sedan.
The Astra, an Opel-based

EUROPE

Central

bank may
raise rates
in March

° EUROPE, FROM 1B

months — making European
exports more expensive.
Higher interest rates tend
to support currencies in the
countries that they’re rising in
because of increased returns.
More expensive exports
could hurt Germany, though,
which saw its foreign sales
rise by nearly 14 percent last
year, according to data
released Thursday that
underlined the importance of
a sustained export boom to
Europe’s biggest economy.
EU economists will
announce new forecasts for
euro-zone growth on Feb. 16.
After expanding by 2.6 per-
cent in 2006, growth is
expected to slow to 2.1 per-
cent this year before bounc-
ing back to 2.2 percent in
2008. The euro area grew just
1.4 percent in 2005.
But the ECB is also keeping
a close eye on inflation.
According to the EU, prelimi-
nary January inflation was
unchanged from December’s
1.9 percent rate — right at the
bank’s target of close to but
below 2 percent — and oil
prices were lower than they

small car to replace the aging
Ion, was unveiled Wednesday
in Chicago.

Lutz said the new models
will put pressure on Saturn
managers to beat last year’s 6
percent gain in 2007, even
though the overall U.S. mar-
ket may be flat or down.

“There is now not a weak —

sister in the batch,” he said of
Saturn’s products. ‘“‘Every-
thing is top-notch from a
design and execution stand-
point,” he said.

Mark LaNeve, GM’s vice

_president_for.sales, service

and’ marketing, said ‘GM’s
products should all be~sub-
stantially new in another 12-18
months. Key is the redesigned
Chevrolet Malibu due out
later this year to take on Toy-
ota’s Camry.

But it will take a while lon-
ger for the company to get its
message to consumers as it
rolls out competitive entries
in the small and mid-sized car
markets, LaNeve said.

“We're not going to have it
solved in the next 12 to 18
months,” he said.

David Cole, chairman of
the Center for Automotive
Research in Ann Arbor, said
GM’s cost-cutting efforts have



BERND KAMMERER/AP FILE

SIGN OF CHANGE: The Euro
sign is seen in front of the
headquarters of the
European Central Bank in
Frankfurt, Germany.

were a year ago. A cold spell
in the U.S. has driven oil

’ prices higher recently.

Trichet ‘“couldn’t have
been clearer.... The state-
ment was very hawkish and
didn’t leave a lot of room for
interpretation,” said Marco
Kramer, an economist with
UniCredit in Munich. “The
ECB gives the very clear sig-
nal that tightening monetary
policy now will prevent infla-
tionary risks in 2008.”

One question is how much
higher rates could go.

“While the general tone of
the statement suggests that
3.75 percent will probably not
be the peak in the rate cycle,
the ECB provided no clear
guidance on the precise rate
path beyond March,” said
Holger Schmieding, Bank of
America’s chief economist for
Europe.

4B | FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007 INTERNATIONAL EDITION



MARK LENNIHAN/AP

TEST DRIVE: Jasper Newell, left, in a Jeff Gordon car, and
Jalen Stewart, in a Dale Earnhardt Jr. car, take a spin in
Nascar Power Wheels toy cars from Fisher-Price at the
American International Toy Fair.

quality,” said Ronald D. Boire,
president of Toys “R” Us’ USS.
toy business. “It is not about
plastic by the pound. We have
been playing plastic by the
pound for way too long.” He
said Toys “R” Us will be mak-
ing a bigger push to carry
higher-grade toys.
Consumers’ willingness to
spend on toys is helping to
revive the toy industry, after
struggling for several years
with declining sales as kids

opted for digital music players
and video games.

Last year marked the first
time U.S. traditional toy sales
rose in several years, albeit
only slightly, according to
NPD Group, a research com-
pany based in Port Washing-
ton, N.Y. Traditional toy sales
— excluding game consoles
and related items — eked out a
0.34 percent rise to $22.3 bil-
lion compared to $22.2 billion
in 2005, and $22.7 billion in

2004. Meanwhile, the average
ticket price for toys rose 5 per-
cent in 2006 to $7.52, com-
pared to $7.17 in 2005 and
$6.97 in 2004, according to
NPD, whose figures are based
on a consumer survey.
Wedbush Morgan Securi-
ties analyst Sean McGowan
and other toy analysts believe
that NPD’s figures understate
the improvement. They cite
that Toys “R” Us, which is
under new ownership and
management, had its best holi-
day season in several years.
Privately-held KB Toys, which
emerged from bankruptcy in

2005, is also showing signs of _

improvement.

BUSINESS IMPROVING

Business at the nation’s top
two toy makers is also
strengthening. Mattel posted a
3 percent profit gain for the
fourth quarter, boosted by a
turnaround of its iconic Barbie
line and strong sales of Fisher-
Price toys, including the popu-
lar T.M.X. Elmo doll, one of
the hottest sellers for the holi-
day 2006 season. Barbie sales
increased 3 percent in the
United States, the fourth con-
secutive quarter of domestic



CHARLES REX ARBOGAST/AP

DEMO VEHICLE: Mark LaNeve, General Motors vice-president for sale, service and
marketing} poses with the 2008 Saturn Astra at the Chicago Auto Show on Thursday.

enabled it to put more money
back into products and be
more disciplined on prices.
He thinks GM’s positive
results will accelerate as more
new products hit showrooms.

“I think we’re going to see
profitability that is going to
surprise a lot of people,” Cole
said.

But David Koehler, a mar-
keting professor at the Uni-
versity of Illinois at Chicago
who has studied GM, said
while its products have
improved, it still has to over-
come its old image of lacking
fuel efficiency and quality.

“The story remains to be
told if they are able to reposi-

FASHION

tion that image,” he said.
GM’S PORTRAYAL

Lutz, a frequent critic of
media coverage, said part of

GM’s difficulties is that the
media portrays the company

inaccurately.

Some media outlets, he
said, always use the “gas-guz-
zling” prefix to describe GM
vehicles, but fail to do so on
large Toyotas that get worse
gas mileage than their GM
counterparts.

“People are starting to
think a little bit before they
automatically fall into the
conventional, easy categori-
zation of Toyota — wonder-

ful, smart, consumer focused,
energy saving. GM — dumb,
insensitive, big trucks, gas
guzzlers, don’t give a damn
about everything. We’re start-
ing to crack that open a little
bit,” Lutz said.

Toyota is well aware that
GM has momentum. At pre-
sent, though, even GM con-
cedes Toyota has consumer
preference down.

“They’re winning, no ques-
tion,” LaNeve said. “They’re
on a big roll the last year-and-
a-half or so. But we’ve made
great progress, so it’s not like
there can’t be more than one
successful car company in the
world.”

Organic clothing enters realm
of high fashion and big brands

* ORGANICS, FROM 1B

Though more retailers are
considering organic cotton, it
currently makes up for less
than 1 percent of cotton pro-
duced in the world. Designers
are also experimenting with
eco-friendly fabrics made of
bamboo, soy, Ingeo (corn)
and hempsilk.

“The market is really
expanding in large because a
number of very large retailers
are actually going to have a
lot of product available in
2007,” said Rebecca Calahan
Klein, the president of Cali-
fornia-based Organic
Exchange.

Target, which carries a
select number of organic baby
clothes, is expanding its line
this year. (Sam’s Club and
Wal-Mart are among the top
five brands that use the most

organic cotton globally,
according to. Organic
Exchange.)

Victoria’s Secret will also
add organic cotton to its col-
lection this year, Klein said.

Nike, which has been using
organic cotton for several
years, is one of the world’s
largest retail users of organic
cotton. Spokeswoman Mor-

gan Shaw says 52 percent of

the garments the company
manufactured last year con-
‘tained at least some organic

material.

Costs are slightly higher,
but comparable. A men’s vin-
tage-style organic cotton
T-shirt at Wal-Mart is $9.83,
while a similar regular cotton
T sells for $8.83. Levi Strauss
& Co. started offering organic

denim jeans in select stores in .

November — $68 for their
Red Tab jean compared to
$40 for nonorganic.

The look and feel of the
clothes are so fashion-for-
ward that many clients don’t
even realize they’re buying
organic. They just like the
style, says Zaroff, a perfect
spokeswoman for greenwear.

A yoga devotee with long,
dirty-blonde hair and lots of
hippie jewelry, Zaroff talks
about Al Gore’s movie on
global warming and other
environmental issues at her
Boca Raton, Fla., office, where
she is working on a new high-
fashion line debuting later
this year.

The 108 line of upscale
street wear includes dresses
in muted tones made of soft
soy and organic cotton voile.

She founded her company
in 1996 when organic wear
was little more than a hemp
seed. She says it will do $10
million in sales this year.

“It was frumpy and boxy
and crunchy and all those
things people don’t want,”

Zaroff said of older organic
clothing. “The consumer was
ready.”

High-end designers like
Stella McCartney are includ-
ing organic fabrics in their
collections and celebrity
entrepreneurs are also joining
the trend. U2’s Bono launched
his socially conscious cloth-
ing line, Edun, in 2005 in an
attempt to increase trade and
create sustainable employ-
ment in places like Africa.

Retailers say it’s not just
about buying organic, it’s
about the entire process.
Under The Canopy uses a dye
factory fueled by rice husks
instead of fossil fuels. Grow-
ing organic also requires crop
rotation.

“So if we get a large
amount of cotton production
moved to organic, we'll also
end up expanding the world’s
access to organic food sup-
ply,” Klein said.



OR pae 4pm. 635 p.m, Late
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Broadcoms BRCM 33.67 34.10 +.43
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iShR2K nya WM 81,05 81 +03 7954

growth. Mattel is unveiling
Chat Divas at the fair, Barbie
dolls that move and lip sync to
music hooked up to Apple’s
iPod digital music player and
can also chat on the phone.

Microchips have come
down in price, enabling toy
companies to make more
advanced toys that are still
affordable. Zizzle’s Shiffman
noted one of last year’s toys —
Lucky, a $39.99 interactive dog
that obeyed 15 different com-
mands — would have sold for
$150 five years ago.

At least 50 percent of the

‘toys that will be sold in stores

this year will have some sort
of microchip in them, accord-
ing to Jim Silver, editor-in-
chief of Toy Wishes, a trade
publication.

The threat of new hot gad-
gets is not going to go away.
The toy industry has to keep
coming out with innovative
items, said Mattel president
Neil Friedman.

“When we have great toys,
the consumer comes back to
the toy department,” he said.
“Can the toy industry and
other industries co-exist?
Absolutely. Consumers will
buy what the child wants.”

RETAIL

Stores
report
positive
sales
results

RETAIL, FROM 1B

clear,” said John Morris, a
managing director at
Wachovia Securities. “But
that’s tempering the outlook.
Stores are not getting a clear
read” on spring selling.

As retailers reported’ bet! q

ter-than-expected — sales
Thursday, winners crossed all
segments including Limited
Brands Inc., Nordstrom Inc.,
and Federated Department
Stores Inc. Wal-Mart Stores
Inc. beat Wall Street esti-
mates, though its monthly
gain was modest. Even Gay
Inc., which has long struggled.
with disappointing sales, beat
analysts’ expectations. The
merchant benefited in part
from its success in clearing
out its piles of winter left-
overs, which became attrac-
tive when the weather turned
cold.

The stragglers included
Abercrombie & Fitch, Ann-

Taylor Stores and Chico’s—

FAS.

“Across the board, the
numbers are decent,” said
Ken Perkins, president of
RetailMetrics, a research
company in Swampscott,
Mass.

Thomson Financial’s sales
tally of 55 retailers rose 3.9
percent in January, beating
the 3.1 percent estimate. The
tally is based on same-store
sales, or sales at stores open
at least a year, which are the
industry standard for measur-
ing a retailer’s health.

The solid performance in
January was soothing as it fol-
lows a largely disappointing
November-December period,
which averaged a modest 2.9
percent same-store sales gain,
according to Thomson Finan-
cial. The sales reports also
provided some encouraging
news about fourth-quarter
earnings, as many stores at
least backed their profit fore-
casts.

While January is the least
important month of the retail
calendar, its significance has
grown over the past five years
because of the impact of gift
cards.

_LATE TRADING

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EqOffPT €0P $544 55.40 -.04 4996
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For up-to-date stock quotes, go to www.MiamiNerald.com and click on Business

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 5B



TL a
Over 8,000 apply for US passport incentive

m@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

ore than 8,000 persons have
Meerstsseee applications for
the US passport reimburse-

ment programme from the Nassau/Par-
adise Island Development Board’s web-
site since the initiative was launched,
Kerzner International (Bahamas) presi-
dent said. George Markantonis told a
luncheon meeting of the South East
Rotary Club: “That could be as many as
24,000 passengers, because they are

, Many Bahamian-owned marinas ‘barely get by’



downloading the form and studying it as
a family, so I am glad we did that as a
team, as a community.”

The initiative was implemented to
combat any negative impact from the
Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative’s
(WHTI) implementation, which took
effect on January 23, 2007. The WHTI
requires all US citizens travelling to the

Bahamas and the Caribbean to possess a
valid passport on their return home.
There was concern that the $100 per
passport cost, particularly for family trav-
el, would cause a decrease in tourist
arrivals, so many Bahamian hotels and
organisations representing them decided

‘to offer reimbursements for up to four

persons per family. .

Kerzner chief says this could translate into as many as 24,000 arrivals to Bahamas

Mr Markantonis said Atlantis, as part
of the Bahamas Hotel Association
(BHA) and the Nassau/ Paradise Island
Development Board, were monitoring
the situation closely. “ I can safely say
that for all of our properties, we have
not seen a big effect yet,” Mr Markanto-

nis said. “However, there is a caveat to.

that. There has not been an affect. yet..I

FROM page 1B

Bahamas are not ‘extremely prof-
itable’; the truth is we barely. get
by.”
Marinas in the northern
Bahamas, Mr Cartwright added,
were more likely to realise a return
on their investment due to their
proximity to Florida, but “only a
small percentage of yachts” trav-
elled futher south than Great Exu-
ma.

Speaking with The Tribune, Mr
Cartwright said the Government
could generate more marina-based
tax revenues by taxing sailboaters,
rather than going after the sports
fishing industry, which was a group
that tended to spend more money
while in port. ?

He said the suggestion that mari-
nas be charged by the linear foot
for their docks, and for seabed leas-
es, business taxes, use of crown
land, and overnight stays was
“rather stiff” and could be too
expensive for smaller marinas.

According to a draft study done

for the government, the Bahamas is
earning a “very small portion of the
potential” economic of the nation’s
expanding marina and boating

_. industry, currently generating $25

million in revenues for the private
sector and $300,000 in taxes per
annum.

The Government is proposing
that all marina applications be
approved by the Docks Commit-
tee, but Mr Cartwright said his
experience with that body and the
Department of Lands and Surveys
had been “less than favourable”.

“My most recent negative expe-.
rience involves my application to «
carry out:maintenance,and expan;

PIS















3:00p.m., as follows:

All people

Consultation 0

Friday-February

sion dredging here at Flying Fish
Marina,” Mr Cartwright wrote.
“In June 2004 I submitted an
application to the Department of
Lands & Surveys for permission to
dredge my marina basin to a con-
trolling depth of eight feet. Since
the initial application I have fol-
lowed up several times; to date I
have been told that my application
rests with the Docks Committee.
“Sometime ago, I also submitted
a seabed lease application for the
area of seabed in and around my
marina basis...........4. this applica-
tion remains in a ‘pending’ mode.”

Application

He added: “The application
process for a marina development is
very slow and complicated. There is
too much bureaucracy and red tape,
and the BEST Commission serves
to retard and discourage develop-
ment, especially in areas where
there are no existing marinas and
where the Family Island economy is
stagnant and in desperate need of
cash injection. ;

“I submit that the BEST Com-
mission’s input is more appropri-
ate for areas in the Bahamas where
there is a proliferation of marinas,
such as the Abacos, New Provi-
dence, Grand Bahama, and the
Exuma Cays.”

The Government had suggested
that investment incentives be used
to encourage marina developments
in Andros and Mayaguana, Inagua,
Crooked Island and Acklins, involv-
ing 50 per cent relief from the per
foot of dock space tax “for up to
10 years”.

Yet Mr Cartwright said that
marinas in Acklins, Crooked Island

_and Inagua “will not be feasible”.

.c He explained: “When yachtsmen

Ministry of Energy and the Environment

In November of 2006, Cabinet considered a report from the Marina
Task Force recommending changes to the policies relating to the siting
and charging for marinas. It adopted a set of policies on an interim basis

‘ with respect to siting that were designed to protect the environment and
adjacent communities. These policies were generally in line with
policies in nearby areas, including Florida. The Task Force Also reviewed the
approach to charging for the use of
themselves, cabinet made no decision here, but accepted the Task Force’s
recommendations that discussions be held with stakeholders involved with
marinas, before the formal a doption of a Marina Policy.

The Task Force will be holding meetings at the following times and
locations during the week of February 12-16 between 10:00a.m and

Monday-February 12, Grand Bahama, Old Bahama Bay, West End
Tuesday-February 13, Abaco, The Methodist Hall, Dundas Town
Wednesday-February 14, Exuma, The Resource Centre
Thursday-February 15, Eleuthera, Harbour Island,

_ Lighthouse Church of God ;
16, Nassau, Wyndham Crystal Palace Resort

(Cat Island Room)

interested in the Marina Policy are invited to attend
the location most convenient for them. Those wishing a copy of the
draft report may download it from The Ministry of Tourism’s website
www.tourismbahmas.org Afterentering the site, register, entering six
or more letter x’s in the zip code space and go to the Marina Policy
section. If you cannot access the interent, you may get a copy by contacting
Ms. Prenell Evans at the Ministry of Engery and The Environment (242)
322 6005. If you can’t attend the meetings or wish to send comments on
the draft report should send them to the Task ForceRapporteur, Malcolm
Martini, at the Ministry of Energy and the Environment,Second Floor
Claughton House, P.O.Box N-4849, Nassau, Bahamas or e-mail
Mr. Martini at malcolmmartini@bahamas.gov.bs.

n Proposed New Marina Policy
for the Bahamas

the seabed and the marinas

are not fishing they want to explore
the island, they want to see things,
go on tours, and eat at different
restaurants. On Long Island there
are a number of native restaurants
and things of interest to see.

“However, we are often told by
yachtsmen that there is nothing to
do on this island. Acklins, Crooked,
and Inagua Islands are even more
remote, there is just not enough ‘to
do’ things on these islands, and lim-
ited infrastructure........

“Yacht owners have complained
about how difficult it is to get to
Long Island. They want direct
access from South Florida into
Long Island. We desperately need
to have an international airport on
this island. Eleuthera has three
international airports, why can’t
Long Island get at least one?

“The entire tourism product on
Long Island is being hindered by
lack of convenient access. Yachts-
men and other tourists hate having
to connect elsewhere in the
Bahamas before getting here. This
problem will be the same in Ack-
lins, Crooked, and Inagua Islands.”

However, Mr Cartwright called

-on the Government to provide spe-

cial investment incentives for
Bahamian marina developers, to
enable them to compete with for-
eign rivals who had greater financial
resources.

He wrote in his response to the
draft marina policy: “The quaint
little Family Island marinas are dis-
appearing, and are being run out
of business and/or being replaced
by huge mega marinas like Emerald
Bay Marina in Exuma and the oth-
er marina presently being built by
the Montana Group in Rum Cay.
The Bahamas government must do
everything possible to save small
marinas like Flying Fish Marina.”

ie























FROM page 1B

approach with that take by the Trinidad & Toba-
go regulator over a similar problem.

There, the regulator gave the incumbent for- .
mer government-owned monopoly a seven-day
ultimatum to install the required interconnec-
tion capacity, but “the consumer in the Bahamas
is waiting for similar strident action to be taken by
the PUC against BTC to address exactly the
same issue”.

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny then confirmed what
Tribune Business had revealed exclusively last
month, that IndiGo had filed another dispute
with the PUC, this time alleging that BTC was
being “anti-competitive” by “giving away inter-
island calling” to its ViBE division while charging
IndiGo on “a high toll per minute basis” of $0.13
per minute, for the same service under an inter-
connection agreement.

He alleged: “By any measure, we submit that
BTC is thereby abusing its position as the monop-
olist for fixed-line local service in the vast major-
ity of the Family Islands, and anti-competitively
using its significant market power as the dominant
operator to manipulate the market to its own
advantage.”

In addition, BTC was restricting capacity for



Email:-FOUNDATIONFOREDU








the Re

PUBLIC EDUCATION MEETING

Public Utilities Commission
IndiGo subscribers by refusing additional joining
circuits for interconnection, leaving the latter’s
customers “severely restricted” in their ability
to make or receive intra-island calls with BTC
subscribers”.

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said: “IndiGo respect-
fully submits that the PUC cannot shy away from
anti-competitive abuse by BTC of its monopo-
listic position, and must act to protect the con-
sumer by preventing BTC from distorting the
inter-island calling market. BTC must be made to
provide inter-island call termination to IndiGo for
the same price that it makes inter-island call ter-
mination available to its own ViBE division.”

Meanwhile, BTC, for its part, said it had filed
a dispute of its -wn with the PUC on December
18, 2006, this time over IndiGo’s alleged planned
launch of its VoIP service. ©

A letter to the PUC from BTC’s vice-presi-
dent for legal, regulatory.and interconnection
issues, Felicity Johnson, alleged that the regula-
tor had “prejudiced” BTC’s rights to a fair pub-
lic consultation through an interview its executive
director, Barrett Russell, had given to Tribune
Business on Monday, January 15.

Mr Russell said BTC “seems to think it can do
whatever it wants”, and Ms Johnson warned that
BTC might take “further action in this regard”.

> BIC REVIEW
9:30 - 12:30 and Ipm - 4 pm
Math, Social Studies, Science, English language & Religious Studies

> SAT REVIEW
10 AM- 1 PM AND 1PM- 4PM
Spaces are limited. Register Now!

EVERY SATURDAY
Cost: $20.00 per Saturday




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JOIN US!

Wednesday, February 14
: @7 pm
for an Educational Meeting on Birds
at The Retreat on Village Road.
Parking at Queen’s College.

Speaker: Bruce Hallet
Author of Birds of The Bahamas.
_and the Turks & Caicos Islands

BIRDS .
i

af The Sah
SS e

think it may have an effect when a dif-
ferent income group starts travelling. The
people who are visiting the Bahamas now
are not the same people who are coming
in summer, and it is not so much income
groups as it is travelling with little chil-
dren, where even a six-month-old is going
to need a passport. I'am not sure what we
are going to experience there.”


























N@YAHO0.COM




na
TX






_ Autographed
copies on sale



PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

Prince Edward unveils plaque to
mark bank’s 50th anniversary —



Ha



@ PRINCE Edward meets Bahamian politicians and members of the financial services sector ina i PRINCE Edward last week unveiled a plaque to commemorate Ansbacher Bank & Trust
private gathering in the Ansbacher boardroom, after the official unveiling of the plaque. Standing (Bahamas) 50th anniversary at Ansbacher House, Bank Lane. Standing from L to R: Prime Min-
from L to R: Hubert Ingraham, leader of the opposition; Prime Minister Perry Christie; Prince ister Perry Christie; Prince Edward; Michael Mayhew-Arnold, managing director, Ansbacher
Edward; Sir Orville Turnquest, former Governor General; James Smith, minister of state for (Bahamas); and Hugh Titcomb, Group chief executive, Ansbacher.

finance; and Michael Mayhew-Arnold, managing director, Ansbacher (Bahamas) Ltd. (Photos: Wendell Cleare)














COMMERCIAL BUILDING
FOR SALE OR LEASE
289 WULFF ROAD EAST

* BUILDING 12,000 sq.ft. 80°x150°x24 HIGH

» 3 BAY DOORS* ONE WITH LOADING
PLATFORM



*18°HIGH PALLET RACKS RAQMTATR ASS 1H

p @ PRIME Minister Perry Christie gave remarks at the 50th
anniversary celebrations of Ansbacher (Bahamas) last evening.
He congratulated the bank on their success. Seated from Lto R:
Michael Mayhew-Arnold, managing director, Anshbacher
(Bahamas); Prince Edward; and Hugh Titcomb, group chief
executive, Ansbacher.

«100 KW GENERATOR W/AUTO TRANSFER
SWITCH

» DISPLAY/SALES AREA 20600 SQ.FT.
* MEZZANINE 2000 SQ.FT.



#2 OFFICES* LUNCH ROOM* 3-BATHROOMS



*OFFERED FOR SALE AT $1,850.000.00 GROSS

» LEASE $14,000.00 MONTH NET









WANTED

Secretarial Assitant to Managing Director of Corporate Service
Company and Secretary for Partners of Associated Law Firm.
Must have ability to communicate with high net worth clients.
Computer ability essential together with knowledge of
incorporation of Bahamian companies and the preparation of
" appropriate Members and Directors Minutes.

Telephone: 327-3127
Fax: 327-6259



- Viewing by appointment only
Tel: 242-393-1778 CELL 424-4161

Monday to Friday 9am - 3pm

CONSOLIDATED WATER

“1 DELITY COMPANY LTD.












Pricing Information As Of:















Sea NOTICE is hereby given of the resignati
Ne ryeraN : s hereby given of the resignation of
TORO WTA INFORMATION 7 7 \\ ae
SO NS \ \ \ . .
OC: 0,00 17 DY row 0ade ~~ Mr. J. Bruce Bugg Jr. as a Non-Executive Director
jous Close Toda Daily Vol. Div $ P/E Yield

of CONSOLIDATED WATER COMPANY LTD.,

























































































: Abaco Markets -0.282 0.000 N/M 0.00%|

10.40 Bahamas Property Fund . 11.00 1.689 0.400 6.5 3.64% effective September 27 2006

6.90 Bank of Bahamas 8.03 0.796 0.260 10.1 3.24% >

0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.265 0.020 3.0 2.50%

1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.85 0.199 0.060 9.3 3.24% : Some eee ge Ne ee d “a :

4.12 Fidelity Bank 4.30 0.170 0.050 7.6 3.85% Mr. Bu au s responsibilities include serving as a
9.00 Cable Bahamas 10.21 0.715 0.240 14.3 2.35% 5 re .

1.64 Colina Holdings 2.00 0.078 0.040 25.6 2.00% member ol the Audit Committee and the
9.05 Commonwealth Bank 13.34 0.998 0.680 13.4 5.10% Compensation Committee of the Board of
4.22 Consolidated Water BDRs 5.12 0.134 0.045 38.2 0.88% : 4 :

2.40 Doctor's Hospital 2.44 0.295 0.000 83 0.00% Directors.

5.54 Famguard : 5.70 0.552 0.240 10.3 4.21%

10.70 Finco 12.30 0.779 0.570 15.7 4.65%

10.90 FirstCaribbean 14.50 0.921 0.500 15.7 3.45%

10.00 Focol 16.61 300 1.476 0.510 11.3 3.07% CONSOLIDATED WATER COMPANY LTD.,
0.50 Freeport Concrete wt 0.50 -0.434 0.000 N/M _ 0.00% is a company incorporated under the laws of the
7.10 ICD Utilities 7.20. 0.532 0.135 13.5 1.88% 7 2 A

8.52 J. S. Johnson 9.05 0.588 0.560 15.4 6.19% Cayman Islands and is listed on the Bahamas
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 1.269 0.795 7.9 : tae

ve “ QQ AE International Securities Exchange.
ore : os ras ae

wk-LOw

12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

For more information, please contact the company
at:
CONSOLIDATED WATER COMPANY LTD.,
' PO.Box 1114 GT
Regatta Office Park,






j
28.00 ABDAB ;
14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60
esi 0.35 RND Holdings

52wk-Low Fund Name






1.770 1.320 8.3 9.04%
0.00%
WO








1.2719 Colina Money Market Fund 1.326132" 5 \

2.6662 Fidelity Bahamas G&IFund 3.0569*** Windward Three

2.3241 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.596093** ; h me Ath Floor
1.1495 Colina Bond Fund 1.217450"*** West Bay Road



11.3545*****





10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund

INDEX - 19 Dec 1,000.00 MARKET TERMS YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price





Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands

KEY


















52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks * Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity * - 26 January 2007

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price 7 . 1 Reap } © ~
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week ** - 31 January 2007 A tte n lion M Ss. I rac cy Ebanks
Change - Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today NAV - Net Asset Value *** 31 January 2007

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M - Not Meaningful

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 **** 31 December 2006 Telephone: (345)-945-4277

Facsimile:(345)-949-2957

eee 31 January 2007
SOOO





°

PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007

7.

m. Leases - Leases in which a significant portion of the risks and rewards of ownership are
retained by the lessor are classified as operating leases. Payments made under operating
leases are charged to the consolidated statement of income on a straight-line basis over
the period of the lease. j

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING JUDGEMENTS AND KEY SOURCES OF ESTIMATION
UNCERTAINTY

The preparation of this non-consolidated balance sheet in conformity with International
Financial Reporting Standards requires management to make estimates and assumptions that
affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and
liabilities at the date of the non-consolidated balance sheet, and the reported amounts of
revenues and expenses during the reported period. Actual results could differ from those
estimates. 6

Allowance for credit losses - The allowance for credit losses reflects management’s . best
estimate, as at the balance sheet date, of probable credit losses related to on - and off-balance
sheet financial instruments, primarily loans, deposits with other banks, derivative products,
acceptances and other indirect credit commitments ‘such as letters of credit and letters of
guarantee. Management reviews portfolio credit quality on an ongoing basis to ensure that the
amount of the allowance for credit losses is adequate. In assessing the adequacy of the amount
of the allowance for credit losses, management must use its judgment in establishing
reasonable assumptions and subjective and significant estimates concerning the probability of
default, probable losses in the event of default, the amount at risk in the event of default, the
amount and dates of future cash flows, the value of the underlying collateral, and realization

. costs. Any changes in these estimates and. assumptions, as well as the use of different, but
equally reasonable, estimates and assumptions, may have an impact on the allowance for
credit losses and, consequently, onthe provision for credit losses for the year.

Fair value of financial instruments - The Bank records at fair value trading securities and
derivative financial instruments other than those held for non-trading purposes and which
qualify for hedge accounting. Any change in fair value is recognized in the non-consolidated
statement of income. Fair value is the amount at which a financial instrument could be
exchanged in an arm’s length transaction between willing parties who are under ‘no
compulsion to act, based on quoted market prices. If quoted market prices are not available,
fair value is determined using estimates. The valuation techniques used to make these
estimates incorporate current market prices, the contractual prices of the underlying
instruments, the time value of money, yield curves and volatility factors. If necessary, fair
value is adjusted to take market, model and credit risks into account, as well as the related
custs. Because of the role of judgment in estimating fair value amounts, fair values are not
necessarily comparable between financial institutions and may not be indicative of net
realizable value.

Valuation of investment account securities - Under IFRS, available-for-sale financial assets
and financial assets at fair value through income are initially carried at fair value and at each
non-consolidated balance sheet, are subsequently carried at fair value. Any impairment in such
assets is recognised in the non-consolidated statement of income. Determining whether there
has been impairment and establishing the net realizable value require judgment and estimates.
Management examines the value of investment account securities on an ongoing basis in order
to determine whether there has been any impairment in any of the securities. This
examination entails analyzing the facts specific to each investment and assessing expected

future returns on the securities.

Depreciation and amortization - Depreciation and amortization is based on management
estimates of the future useful life of fixed assets. Estimates may change due to technological
developments, competition, changes in market conditions and other factors and may result in
changes in the estimated useful life and in the amortization or depreciation charges. The Bank
reviews the future useful life of property, plant and equipment and intangible assets
periodically taking into consideration the factors mentioned above and all other important
factors. In case of significant changes in the estimated useful lives, depreciation and
amortization charges are adjusted prospectively.

Legal proceedings, claims and regulatory discussions - The Bank is subject to various legal
proceedings, claims and regulatory discussions, the outcomes of which are subject to
significant uncertainty.. The Bank evaluates, among other factors, the degree of probability of
an unfavorable outcome and the ability to make a reasonable estimate of the amount of loss.
Unaniticipated events or changes in these factors may require the Bank to increase or decrease
the amount the Bank has accrued for any matter or accrue for a matter that has not been
previously accrued because it was not considered probable or a reasonable estimate could not
be made. No events have occurred that would require management to make such a provision.

LOANS
Maturity analysis of loans is as follows: MOTs Osea
: . 2006 2005
3 months and under $ 31,035,230 $ 36,579,364
7 to 12 months ‘47,715 32,484

$ 31,082,945 $ 36,611,848

INVESTMENTS IN SUBSIDIARIES
Movement on investments in subsidiaries during the year is as follows:

2006 2005

Investments at equity, beginning of year $ 125,666 $ 128,512
Write-down in value of investment in subsidiary (6,285) (2,846)

Investments at equity,endofyear i og °2 119,381 $< 125,666

FIXED ASSETS

The movement of fixed assets during the year is as follows:





2006
Beginning Ending
! Balance Additions Disposals Balance
COST:
Leasehold improvements $ 889,869 $ 203 $ - $ 890,072
Office equipment :
and furniture 334,034 27,627 - 361,661
Motor vehicle 62.216 - - 62,216
Computer equipment
and software 498,070 201,532 _ 699,602
$ 1,784,189 $ 229,362 $ $ 2,013,551
2006
Beginning Depreciation Ending
Balance Expense Disposals Balance
ACCUMULATED
DEPRECIATION
AND AMORTIZATION:
Leasehold improvements $ 304,651 $ 337,784 $ - $ 642,435
Office equipment
and furniture . 204,818 52,199 - 257,017
Motor vehicle 20,739 15,554 - 36,293
_ Computer equipment
and software 375,178 75,369 - 450,547
$ 905,386 $ 480,906 $ - $ 1,386,292
2006 Net Movement $ 878,803. $ (251,544) $ - $627,259

$1,035,591 $ (156,598) $ (190) $ 878,803

2005 Net Movement

During the year, management revised its estimate of the depreciable life of leasehold assets
from 13 years to 8 years. In accordance with IAS 8, Accounting Policies, Changes in
Accounting Estimates and Errors, the effect of such change has been recognized in the current
year and will be recognized prospectively in the non-consolidated statement of income.

DEPOSITS

Maturity analysis of customers’ deposits is as follows:

2006 2005
3 months and under $75,367,437 $62,766,725
4 to 6 months 6,841,751 7,480,672
6,042,224 17,712,758

7 to 12 months Bee
$88,251,412 $87,960,155

Deposits from related parties are payable on demand.



9.

10.

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

SHARE CAPITAL
Authorized, issued and fully paid:

2006 2005

175,000 5% non-cumulative participating
redeemable convertible preference
shares of $100 each

20,000 Non-voting non-participating preference
shares of $180 each with no

$17,500,000 - $17,500,000

2,000,000

dividend rights 2,000,000
5,000 Ordinary shares of $100 each 500,000 500,000
$20,000,000 $20,000,000
LOSSES ON TRADING ACTIVITIES - OTHERS
2006 at 2005

Net loss in fair value of investment in available for sale security:

Through the non-consolidated statement of changes in equity $_(291,785) S$:
; j
During the current year, the Bank made the election to treat fair value gains and losses on
available for sale securities through the non-consolidated statement of changes in equity.
Previously, such gains and losses were recorded through the non-consolidated statement of
income. In keeping with the transitional provisions of IAS 39 the Bank records fair value
changes prospectively in equity,

41.. ANALYSIS OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES

Geographical Distribution:

Assets Liabilities
2006 2005 2006 2005
North America 86% 30% 29% 54%
Western Europe and other 14% 10% 1% 46%

oo% 100% 100% 100%

Maturity Analysis:
: Assets Liabilities
, 2006 2005 2006 2005
Up to 1 year 99% 99% 10% 63%
1 to 5 years 1% 1% 0% 0%
Over 5 years ‘ 0% 0% 30% 37%
190% 100% . 100% 100%
Currency Analysis:
: Assets Liabilities
. 2006 2005 2006 2005
United States dollars 96% 96% 85% 84%
Canadian dollars 4% 4% 15% 16%

100% 100%

Average Interest Rates:

Loans : Deposits
2006 2005 2006 2005
Average interest rate 6.36% 5.00% 3.06% 1.57%

12. DERIVATIVE FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

13.

14.

15.

a... The Bank uses derivative instruments for trading purposes.

The notional principal amounts upon which payments are based are not indicative of the
credit risk associated with derivative financial instruments.

Credit risk arising from derivative transactions is the financial loss that may occur as a
result of a counterparty defaulting on its obligations to the Bank. Credit risk is managed
by setting credit exposure and duration limits for counterparties and dealing primarily
with G7 based dealers and financial institutions with high credit ratings.

The maturity analysis for open derivative instruments as of October 31, 2006 is as





follows:
Remaining term to maturity
‘ Greater
3months 3to6 7to12 than Total Total
and under months months 12 months 2006 2005
Equity and
commodity swaps $11,300,025 $ - $ - §$ - $11,300,025 $11,300,025
Forward contracts _72,341,895 __- _ = _- = _72,341,895 __74,584,562
$83,641,920 $ - $ - $ - $83,641,920 $85,884,587

Forward contracts are commitments to purchase or sell foreign currencies for delivery at
a specified-date in the future at a fixed rate. ee

Equity and commodity swaps are contracts involving one party paying on specified
settlement dates, an amount based on a specified floating interest rate and notional
amount while the other party pays, on specified settlement dates, an amount based on
the movement in the values of some equity, equity index, commodity index, or basket of
equities and the same notional amount as the floating rate component.

All foreign exchange forward contracts and equity swaps have been made with related
parties.

b. Derivative related items represent the net present value of the future cash flows in
relation to open derivative instruments as at the year end.

PENSION PLAN

The Bank operates a defined contribution plan for its employees which is administered by an
investment company. Contributions by the Bank amount to 5% of the earings of employees
participating in the plan and is charged against income during the year.

FAIR VALUE OF FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

Fair value of financial instruments included in assets and liabilities, except for the loan due to
related party, are assumed to approximate their carrying values due to their short-term
maturity.

Loan due to related party is not considered to be materially different from its fair value as it is
payable on demand.

The estimated fair value represents values which financial instruments could be exchanged for
2 : sae. . \ . .

in a current transaction between willing parties. Where there is no available trading market,
fair values are estimated using appropriate valuation methods.

RISK MANAGEMENT
Credit Risk:

Credit risk arises from the failure of a counter party to perform according to the terms of the
contract. From this perspective, the Bank’s significant exposure to credit risk is primarily
concentrated in cash and due from banks, investments and loans. The deposits and investment
transactions are predominantly in United States dollars and have been placed with high quality
international institutions and corporations. The loans are short term and are fully secured by
assets managed by the Bank on behalf of the customers.

Price Risk:

Price risk is comprised of currency risk, interest rate risk and market risk. Currency risk
emanates from the possibility that the value of a financial instrument will fluctuate due to
changes in foreign exchange rates. The Bank minimizes its risk by monitoring levels of
foreign currency particularly those susceptible to foreign exchange rates volatility.

Interest rate risk is the risk that the value of a financial instrument may fluctuate significantly
as a result of changes in market interest rates. The Bank’s exposure to this is minimal as the
relevant financial instruments are usually short term with fixed interest rates and are therefore
repriced on maturity.

Market risk is the risk that there will be a change in the value of a financial instrument due to
changes in the market conditions. The Bank may from time to time enter into certain contracts
on behalf of its customers in order to reduce the level of risk. The Bank tends to minimize this
risk through various control policies, monitoring procedures and hedging strategies.

100% 100%

a a

<6 ee ee ee ee

naam oe

re ee ee ee

oe ee we a a a a le ee ME TT OE ele

a lle tiers ‘=

oeceee

oe & wo eh eM te ow ~



THE TRIBUNE







COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES
Lease Commitments:

The future minimum rental payments required under a non-cancelable operating lease are as
follows:




$ 365,033
$2,002,515

Due within | year
Due between 2 - 5 years












Commitments to Extend Credit:






In the normal course of its business, the Bank enters into commitments to extend credit in
order to meet the financial needs of its customers. As of October 31, 2006, the total amount of
guarantees outstanding by the Bank was $8,488,456 (2005: $8,780,722).

y .
Contingencies:



The Bank has overdraft facilities up to an amount of $100,000 and credit card facilities for its
customers up to an aggregate limit of $3,000,000 from FirstCaribbean International Bank.

. NET FOREIGN CURRENCY EXPOSURE

Assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies at the balance sheet date are as

follows:
2006

GBP CHF

503 $ 467,995,720
__ (467,720,472)



CAD EUR US $ Equivalent










$ 498,566,713 $13,828,043 $3,368,737 $
(498,263,135) _(13,825,705) (3,367,921) -
275,248

$ 303,578 $ 2,338 $_ 816 $ 503 $

Assets -
Liabilities





2005

CAD EUR GBP CHF US $ Equivalent




















Assets $ 515,123,295 $ 13,890,924 $3,377,891 $ 178 $ -458,728,524
Liabilities (514,838,609) (13,881,445) (3,371,515) (458,464,726)
$ 284,686 $ 9,479 $ 6,376 $ 178 $263,798






The assets and liabilities disclosed on the non-consolidated balance sheet in certain instances
are presented net. This is.mainly in relation to derivative items which create both assets and
~ liabilities and which can legally be settled on a net basis. The above balances are presented
gross to give a clearer picture of the overall exposure of the Bank.

’ SUBSEQUENT EVENTS






During the first quarter of the subsequent period, the Bank received aoprovil from the Central

Bank of The Bahamas to pay a dividend in the amount of $166,000,000 to its immediate
parent company, Natcan Holdings International Limited. As at the date of authorization of this
non-consolidated balance sheet, no payment had been made.

Management has also declared its intention to repay the related party interest free demand
loan. However, as at the date of authorization of this non-consolidated balance sheet, no
formal plans for the repayment had been made.















Deloitte

Deloitte & Touche
Chartered Accountants

and Management Consultants
2nd Terrace, Centreville

P.O. Box N-7120
Nassau, Bahamas




Tel + 1 (242) 302-4800
vax, + (242) 322-3101
ettps/ www. detoitte.com.bs

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT



" To the Shareholders of
National Bank of Canada (Intemational) Limited:











We have audited: the ‘above--non-consolidated balance sheet of National Bank of Canada
(International) “Limited (the “Bank”) as of October 31, 2006, and a summary of. significant
. accounting policies and other explanatory notes.

Management’s responsibility for the balance sheet



Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of this non-consolidated balance
sheet in accordance with Intemational Financial Reporting Standards. This responsibility includes:
designing, implementing and maintaining internal controls relevant to the preparation and fair
presentation of a non-consolidated balance sheet that is free from material misstatement, whether
due to fraud or error; selecting and applying appropriate accounting policies; and making accounting
estimates that are reasonable in the circumstances.

Auditors’ responsibility







Our responsibility is to express an opinion on this non-consolidated balance sheet based on our audit.
We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those Standards
require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance as to whether the non-
consdlidated balance sheet is free of material misstatement.












An audit involves procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amount and disclosures in the non-
consolidated balance sheet. The procedures selected depend on the auditors’ judgment, including
the assessment of risks of material misstatement.of the non-consolidated balance sheet, whether due
to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to
the entity’s preparation and fair presentation in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of
expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal control. An audit also includes
evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and significant estimates made by
management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the non-consolidated balance sheet.

We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient.and appropriate to provide a Daais
for our audit opinion.



Without qualifying our opinion we draw your attention to the fact that the Bank’s policy does not
_permit us to verify customers’ loan and deposit balances and transactions by direct confirmation.
We were however able to perform alternative procedures around these balances and transactions.

Opinion







In our opinion, the non-consolidated balance sheet presents fairly, in all material respects the non-
consolidated financial position of the Bank as of October 31, 2006, in accordance with International
Financial Reporting Standards.

lite 4 Touche

January 16, 2007





Publish your Legal Notices and
Balance Sheets in The Bahamas
leading newspaper

The Tribune

Call 502-2352 thru 7 or
502-2376



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 9B



Hotel association
begins environmental
management training

programme |

THE Bahamas Hotel Asso-
ciation (BHA), in collabora-
tion with its.partners, has
begun its environmental man-
agement training programme,
which aims to help Bahamas-
based consultants better assist
small and medium-sized
(SMEs) tourism businesses.

Venture

The venture, which also
involves the Ministry of

Tourism, Antiquities, Monu-
ments and Museums Corpora-
tion, and Caribbean Alliance
for Sustainable Tourism

(CAST), includes Environ- »

mental Walk-
Through(EWT)procedures
and Environmental Manage-
ment Systems (EMS).

Among the businesses that
will benefit, from the environ-
mental management course
are hotels, marinas, other
tourism services providers, his-
torical, heritage, cultural and
natural sites and events, since
the consultants will help
improve their competitiveness
through effective environmen-
tal management and operation
procedures.

Course aims to help Bahamas-
based consultants better assist small,



medium-sized tourism businesses

The course was held over a
four-day period between
December 15-20, 2006, and has
resulted in there- now being 20
new CAST-Certified EWT
local Consultants.

Frank Comito, the Bahamas
Hotel Association’s executive
vice-president, said: “The
Bahamas Hotel Association is
extremely pleased to be in the
forefront of this landmark ini-

tiative, and looks forward to:

working with local consultants
in assisting tourism SMEs to
maximise their operational and
market potential.

“We are especially pleased
to be able to draw on the

resources and expertise of the |

Caribbean Alliance for Sus-
tainable Tourism (CAST), rep-
resented ‘by its director,
Deirdre P. Shurland, in facili-
tating the three-day Environ-
mental Walk-Through Certifi-

cation as part of the Environ-
mental Management Systems
training programme.”

The Sustainable Tourism
Entrepreneurial Management
& Marketing (STEMM) pro-
ject will bring Bahamas-based
small and medium-sized entre-
preneurs together to develop,
package and promote new
tourism products.

Provide

STEMM will provide some °

funding to these entrepreneurs
to assist them in meeting the
product and service level need-
ed to compete internationally.

Registration is currently
being accepted from pre-qual-
ified local consultants for the
Network Management and
Marketing for Tourism SMEs
training course, which is sched-
uled for February 19-23 2007.




Qs appropriate.

requirements.

resolution

systems.

FUNCTIONAL/DEPARTMENTAL DESCRIPTION

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS REQUIRED

Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited

Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited, a subsidiary of Citigroup, a leading financial institution
with a presence in over 100 countries and over 100 million customers worldwide,
is seeking candidates for the position of Business/Technology Information Security
(IS) Officer. This is a senior level position with IS responsibility for all Citigroup
businesses in the Bahamas as well as some global responsibilities.

Global Wealth Structuring forms the Citigroup international offshore trust
companies serving non-U.S. high net worth clients in Bahamas, Cayman Islands,
Switzerland, Jersey Channel Islands, New Jersey and Singapore. Products target
wealth preservation around fiduciary structure. The Technology Department
supports all locations and local applications of the business.

Serve as an IS subject matter expert and provide management support
and advise on alll IS related issues,

- Review, monitor and supervise alll IS related aspects of technology systems,
applications and databases.

- Ensure compliance with Citigroup and regulatory requirements for database
and application security, monitoring and reporting.

- Serve as lead in the preparations and management of IS ata cae ener
in accordance with generally accepted IS audits standards and guidelines.

- Review and oversight of the implementation of all Corporate |S initiatives.
Communicate the status of all |S initiatives, projects and business as usual
security issues with management.

- Facilitate IS training programs for all employees, consultants and vendors

- Periodic review and update of technology/IS policies and procedures
manuals to ensure compliance with Global Corporate poiicies and IS

- Organize/conduct third party vendor IS assessments validating third party

processes against Citigroup's standards.
- Manage the application and resource entitlement review program.
- Escalate security incidents/breaches and monitor remediation until

- Produce ad-hoc reports | in support of management requests novel
system audit logs review.

- A Bachelor's Degree with a minimum of five years experience, two of
which must be in an IS Audit/technology risk management role (an .
information technology degree would be an advantage but is not essential
with the requisite experience),

- An IS certification such as CISA, CISM, CISSP or equivalent.

- Working knowledge of Oracle. and Microsoft SQL databases.

- Knowledge in Windows 2000 Administration, MS Office Suite, LAN/WAN

- Ability to multi-task in a time sensitive work environment supporting various

application and infrastructure changes.
- Experience in process testing/evaluations and re-engineering.
- Salary will be based on qualifications and experience.

Interested candidates should fax, email OR forward a oe of their resume to
the following address by 21 February, 2007:

P.O. Box N-1576
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: (242) 302-8779

Email: Gina.Wilson@citigroup..om |





















































.



e

THE TRIBUNE.

PAGE 10B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007 .



@ By BEN DOBBIN
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — East-
man Kodak Co. said Thursday it
is cutting as many as 3,000 more
jobs as it completes a historic,
four-year transformation this fall
into a digital-imaging company
focused on consumer photogra-
phy and commercial printing.

On top of 25,000 to 27,000 lay-
offs targeted since 2004, Kodak
is reducing its payroll even fur-
ther to accommodate last mon-
th’s $2.35 billion sale of its health-
imaging unit.

“The dream was that we would
wake up in 2008 with the digital
company that we want to have.
We're still right on that track,”
Antonio Perez, Kodak’s chief
executive, said at an annual meet-
ing of Kodak analysts and ‘insti-
tutional investors. We will finish
this year. This is done. ... This is
the last year of restructuring.”

The company that put film
cameras into most homes in

BAHA MAR,

from 1B

Company completing four-year transformation into digital-imaging~

America acknowledged in Sep-
tember 2003 that its analog busi-
nesses were in irreversible
decline. It outlined an ambitious
strategy to invest in new digital
markets dominated | by
entrenched heavyweights such as
Hewlett-Packard Co., Seiko
Epson Corp. and Canon Inc.

As it battled to outpace the
drop in demand for film, its cen-
tury-old cash cow, Kodak
embarked on a nearly $3 billion
shopping spree but also ran up
$2 billion in net losses over eight,
consecutive quarters. It finally
hauled in a modest $16 million
profit in the October-December
period when, for the first time, it
generated more earnings from
digital than from film, paper and
other chemical-based businesses.

It is now eliminating 28,000 to
30,000 jobs by year-end, with
23,300 already axed. And the sale

this week to do “their first initial
planning for the reflagging” of
the Radisson into a Sheraton-
branded property.

“We're looking at that being

of its 111-year-
old health unit
— intended to
help fund its
bold leap into
the inkjet
printer market
— will strip
another 8,100
jobs. That will
shrink its pay-
roll to around
30,000, its low-
est level since
the 1930s.
“As one big
unit leaves, obviously there’s not
as much revenue or earnings, or
as much support, and that has to
be adjusted for,” Kodak
spokesman Gerard Meuchner
The cuts will bring extra
restructuring charges of $400 mil-
lion to $600 million, or total
charges of $3.6 billion to $3.8 bil-

B@ PEREZ
(AP Photo)

reflagged by Spring [2008],” Mr
Robinson said, adding that when
the $80 million renovations by
Osprey Developers were com-
pleted, it would be one of the



lion since 2004.

“By the end of the third quar-
ter, basically my hope is that
we’re done with all the announce-
ments of restructurings and jobs
and everything else and we’re just
fully concentrated on growing”
more than a dozen digital ven-
tures from cameras and online
photo services to high-volume
printing presses, Perez said in an
interview.

“If you look in the history
books, you will see this is one of
the hardest transformations to
do,” said Perez, a native of Spain
who was hired by Rochester-
based Kodak in 2003 from
Hewlett-Packard, where he
helped build an inkjet printer
behemoth that he now aims to
tackle head-on.

“We had $3 billion in assets
associated with film. You cannot
disassemble that that easily. ... It’s

Sheraton’s top global properties.

The “critical benchmark date”
for Baha Mar to conclude nego-
tiations on its supplemental
Heads of Agreement for the pro-

RELATIONSHIP MANAGER








Trust & Corporate Services

A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in The
Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guernsey, Switzerland and the United
Kingdom, Butterfield Bank offers. a wide range of services to local and
international clients.

An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter with a

record of professional achievements to join a dynamic Trast & Corporate Services

team. The successful candidate will report directly to the Senior Relationship
| Mamager

SENIOR RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

Trust & Corporate Services

A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in The
Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guemsey, Switzerland and the United
Kingdom, Butterfield. Bank offers a wide range of services to focal and
international clients.

An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter with a
record of professional achievements to join a dy namic Trust & Corporate Services
team. The successful candidate will report directly to the Head of Trust &
Corproate Services.

cceeeeescaesennannnnenesssusannsnaessnusnnssnnnesesnsssssssssssssusssnseneunesensnenstnscsnsesssesnsesenssssnesssnsnsseninsnsnssussnuenuenenancnnesuusetnene

Core Respx aerbilities

Janage 4 large portfolio af compics accounts including trust, estates and

agencies.

= Extensive experience with all aspects of trust administration.

Desired Qualifications

= Bachelor's Degree in Business or related discipline from a well recognized

university.

= A minimum of five years progressive Fiduciary experience in the Financial
J.

Services Industry.

STEP training or other suitable qualifications will be advantageous,
® Proficient in Microsoft Office suite of products.

* — Strong interpersonal, communication, problem solv ing, project management

and customer service skills.

Closing Date: February 16, 2007



Contact

. Human Resources
Butterfield Bank (Bahainas) Limited
P.O. Box N-3242
Nassau. Bahamas
Fax: (242) 393 3772

E-mail: recruitment @ butterfieldbank.bs

wow. buterfieldbank.bs

SUBS

Provide financial information to clients as requested.

Act on clients® behalf in matters dealing with lawyers, beneficiaries, etc.

















ert

A

Butterfield Bank .

UBS T rustees (Bahamas) Ltd. a leading international trust
company has an opening for the position of a

Accounting System
Specialist & Programmer

In this challenging position you will be,responsible for:

* Maintenance and development of “ePOCA Portfolio
Management” software from Cantalouppi and Hug AG;
+ Analysis of business specifications from both accounting

and IT perspectives.

* Ownership of the design phases of one or more of the

projects deliveries;

¢ Provide training and second level support to users.

Core Responsibilities

Oversee a group of complex client relationships.

Provide technical advice to staff on trust and company structures,

Act on clients’ behalf in matters dealing with lawyers, beneficiaries, ete.

Extensive experience with all aspects of trust administration,

Desired Qualifications

Bachelor's Degree in Business or related discipline from a well recognized

university.

Five - Eight years progressive Fiduciary experience in the Financial Services

Industry.

STEP training or other suitable qualification ill be advantageous.

Proficient in Microsoft Office suite of products.

Strong interpersonal, communication, problem solving, project management

and custaimer service skills.

Closing Date: February !6, 2007

Contact
Human Resources

Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited

P.O. Box N-3242
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: (242) 393 3772

E-mail: recruitment@ butterfieldbank.bs

www.butterfieldbank.bs







The Ministry of Local
Government & Consumer Affairs

INVITES
THE GENERAL PUBLIC TO PARTICIPATE INA
CONSULTATIVE MEETING
ON THE ESTABLISHMENT OF

LOCAL GOVERNMENT
FOR
NEW PROVIDENCE

EA

Butterfield Bank











a long ride but we all believe that
we have enough assets, enough
know-how and enough commit-
ment from our employees to keep
going. We’re going to be a small-
er company but a much better
company, and we’re going to start
growing again, especially in 2008
but starting in 2007,” he said.
While Kodak remains the
world’s top maker of photo-
graphic film, Perez doesn’t dis-
count someday discarding the sto-
ried business that George East-

-man launched in 1881.

“Film is going to follow its own
destiny,” he said. “Right now,
entertainment (motion-picture)
imaging is very stable, is very
good for the company. ... If that
goes digital, which eventually I
believe it will, then we’ll do some-
thing else. We will do what’s bet-
ter for the shareholders.”

While Kodak’s transition to a

ject with the Government is
March 1, 2007, as hitting this tar-
get will enable it to comfortably
complete its mid-March closing
date for the joint venture agree-
ments with Harrah’s Entertain-

’ ment and Starwood.

Once the supplemental Heads
of Agreement, and all the associ-
ated permits and approvals, are
completed, Baha Mar will then
be able to focus on key infra-
structure work, namely construc-
tion of the re-routed West Bay
Street and new Straw Market and
Commercial Village.

The latter complex is where all
the government buildings and
banks that currently line West
Bay Street will be relocated to,
making way for the main Baha
Mar resort campus.

Harrah’s Entertainment, the
world-renowned casino operator,
is scheduled to take a 43 per cent
equity stake in the $2.4 billion
project, and bring its Caesar’s
Entertainment brand to the
100,000 square foot casino, pur-
portedly the largest in the
Caribbean, and a 1,000-room
hotel.

Starwood’ will bring its four.

brands - the Westin, Sheraton, W
and St Regis to brand the remain-
ing hotels.

Mr Sands told The Tribune

‘ that the tender.for the West Bay
* Street roadworks was: due to go
* out to bid “imminently”. Pre-

qualifying had already taken
place.

He added: “Just about every
company in the Bahamas has
applied to participate in the
development of Baha Mar, and
so they should, because it repre-
sents such a significant economic
impact for our country.

“We will use the best available
expertise from the Bahamas. One
hundred and ten Bahamian com-

new world of photography was

hindered by a reluctance to phase, --
out film — it created the world’s.”
first digital camera in 1975 but. ,
only began selling mass-market _:.

digital cameras in 2001 — the,-

company didn’t lag behind in-,

research, amassing more than.

1,000 digital-imaging patents. +.-

’

“There was a lot to work with,’

Perez said: “It was disconnected
and it was incomplete ... but it»

was there. You can accuse the. .
company of being late commer~.

cializing digital products, but no ,,

one can say the company was late: ’
investing in digital technologies.” _
Luckily, we were making a lot of »’ »’
money, and that- money was going, *. ’

into that. That is what has allowed.

us to do what we’re doing.”
Kodak shares fell 24 cents to

$26.45 in early trading Thursday

on the New York Stock.

Exchange.

foeg

i

panies have been employed in,

”

this project so far.

Mr Sands said Baha Mat had»

“done a tremendous amount of,

pile testing” and other work on «,
the foundations for the new, «
resorts, in addition to land clear-,,,.

ing. =

“We've not been sitting down,._
twiddling our fingers. The plans .,
have been advancing at a huge |.

rate,” he added.

Next week, executives from, —

Harrah’s are due to be present at: ,

the Crystal Palace Casino, work- ..

ing on issues such as the casino’s

information technology (IT) sys;_,.
tem and doing preparatory work | :
on training, “to ensure skill sets _-
meet expectations going for-._

ward”. :

Baha Mar’s $2.4 billion trans-,»

formation of Cable Beach will. .

attract 500,000 guests to its vari- ,
ous resorts during the first year,

after it fully opens in 2011, with .|
the project becoming “the largest...
gaming and resort development, ..
in this Hemisphere outside Las_ ,

Vegas”.

: Speaking after the preliminary .
signing of the joint venture agree-, ~
ment with Harrah’s, Sarkis Izmir- —

lian, Baha Mar’s chairman and
chief exécutive, said then that the
completed development will

pump $560 million annually into ~

the. Bahamian economy’s gross

* domestic product (GDP). —

Mr Izmirlian reiterated that |
economic forecasting studies con-'
ducted by Global Insight had’:
shown that after opening, Baha.
Mar would create “more than,
7,000 direct and indirect jobs”.

The same study reported that
Baha Mar’s cumulative impact on-
Bahamian GDP would be some’
$11.2 billion over a 20-year peri=>
od, with more than $4.7 billion in
tax revenues produced over that,
same time period. ae

BUSINESS FOR SALE

Well established Fashion Retail
Business. Well known and

respected worldwide Franchise.
20 years at same prime location.

Email: b.inquiries@gmail.com

_General Maintenance Personnel

Exclusive property requires general maintenance personnel
with experience in carpentry, plumbing, air conditioning and

some electrical.

Successful candidate must possess at least 5 years experience

and must provide references.

Excellent salary and benefits package
Commensurate with experience.



Please Fax resumes to: (242) 362-4107 —



Gare FI RD ROBaRHETHRNBPT HT ©

mM

~wef

ee

ema wt wen

We are searching for a personality with a broad experience of
relational database modeling and process modeling with sound
knowledge in software development lifecycle. Programming

capabilities using MS DOT.NET and JAVA are a must. A suc-
cessful track record as Business Analyst/Project Manager MIS
and strong analytical skills in both IT and accounting are key
requirements to succeed in this senior position. In addition the
ideal candidate must be fluent in English and German (in order
to co-ordinate with our head office in Switzerland).

Applications in writing, enclosing a full resume, by
3ahamian nationals only on or before February 19, 2007.

Interested persons should reply on or before February 19, 2007
to:

Email:

hrbahamas@ubs,com _
or

Postal Address:

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd.
Ifuman Resources

P.O. Box N-7757

Nassau. Bahamas



SPEAKERS WILL INCLUDE





Honourable V. Alfred Gray
Minister of Local Government & Consumer Affairs





Honourable George A. Smith
Former Minister of Local Government





Dr. Pandora Johnson
Vice President- College of the Bahamas







Mr. Karl P.N.R. Spencer
Former Family Island Commissioner



Transfiguration Baptist Church Hall
Vesey Street

12th February, 2007

7:00 p.m.













NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LYDIE REMY OF P.O. BOX
F-44598, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS,
‘is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why fegistration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 9TH day of
FEBRUARY, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given: that NANNELL LAVELLE EXANTUS
OF RUSSELL TOWN, EIGHT MILE ROCK, P.O. BOX F-42986,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for

registration/naturalization as a_ citizen of The Bahamas, and

that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
9TH day of FEBRUARY, 2007 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

be aT at a

8 © oe we

re ee * ="

se ee tee



i By ANNE
D'INNOCENZIO
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — The:
nation’s retailers rebounded in
January from their disappointing
heliday season as shoppers
redeemed gift cards to buy winter
and spring merchandise. The
arrival of frigid temperatures in
much of the country helped clear
out what was left of cold weather
items.

‘As retailers reported their bet-
te?-than-expected sales Thursday,
wiainers included Limited Brands
Ine., Nordstrom Inc., and Feder-
atéd Department Stores Inc. Wal-
Mart Stores Inc. beat Wall Street
estimates, though its monthly gain
was modest. Even Gap Inc.,
which has long struggled with dis-

‘appointing sales, beat analysts’
expectations, though its sales lan-
guished at its namesake chain.

Among the losers were Aber-
crombie & Fitch Co., AnnTaylor
Stores Corp. and Chico’s FAS -
Inc.

“Across the board, the num-
bers are decent,” said Ken
Perkins, president of RetailMet-
rics LLC, a research company in
Swampscott, Mass. The one area
of weakness was women’s appar-
el stores, which he believes were
hurt by the weather. Winter
weather came too late, he said.

Thomson Financial’s sales tally
of 55 retailers rose 3.9 per cent
in January, beating the 3.1 per
cefit estimate. The tally is based
on same-store sales, or sales at
stores opened at least a year,
which are the industry standard
for measuring a retailer’s health.

The solid performance in Jan-
uary was soothing as it follows a
largely disappointing November-
December period, which aver-

aged a modest 2.9 per cent same- _

store sales gain, according to
Thomson Financial. The sales
reports also provided some
encouraging news about fourth-
quarter earnings, as many stores
- at least backed their profit fore-
casts. The retail fiscal year ends in
laté January, so companies will
be ‘reporting their fourth-quarter
results later this month.

~. While January is the least
.- important month of the retail cal-



from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

FT EPCCOOR EUW TS

Share your news

The Tribune ae to hear

endar, its significance has grown
over the past five years because of
the impact of gift cards. Retail-
ers don’t include gift card sales
in their monthly tallies until the
cards are redeemed, and the bulk
of cards given for the holidays
are used in January.

The delayed arrival of winter
weather had a mixed impact on
sales. It helped stores that sell
snow blowers and shovels or that
still had plenty of heavy boots
and coats to clear out, but hurt
those that. were heavily stocked
with spring merchandise.

Merchants also benefited from
a steady job market, which helped
send consumer confidence slight-
ly higher last month. The Labour
Department reported Thursday
that the number of newly laid off
workers filing for unemployment
benefits edged up last week but
the levels still reflected a healthy
labour market. The Labour
Department: reported that
311,000 newly jobless workers
applied for benefits last week, an
increase of 3,000 from the:previ-
ous week.

Still, stores do face challenges
ahead as the housing market
remains soft and consumers face
the possibility that job growth
may be sluggish. Last week, the
government reported that
employers slowed hiring in Janu-

‘ary, pushing the unemployment

rate to a four-month high.
What’s more alarming is that
shoppers may be on the verge of

tapping out — a government —

report issued last week said
Americans’ personal saving rate
dipped into negative territory in
2006 as consumers deplete their
saving or increase their borrowing
to finance their spending.

“TI believe that consumers are
still feeling confident about buy-
ing, but I think it is a measured
confidence,” said Janet Hoffman,
managing partner of the North
American retail division of
Accenture. “If people are not sav-
ing, they are not going to be ready
to buy that next house. There is
so much economic stimulation
when they buy that next house,”
she said.

Wal-Mart, the world’s largest
retailer, had a modest 2.2 per cent
rise in same-store sales, beating













NOTICE

EXKON EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
ORPHAN BASIN LIMITED

Nonice IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

® EXXON EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
* ORPHAN BASIN LIMITED is in dissolution under the

, provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

‘

(8) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the
“@ 7th day of February, 2007 when its Articles of Dissolution
* were submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(q) The Liquidator of the said Company is K. L. Floyd of 16945
», Northchase Drive, Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

HARRY B, SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT CO. LTD.

Diited the 7th day of February A.D., 2007.
‘
,

Attorneys for the above-named Company

: Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the
undersigned cio P. O. Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or
béfore 2nd March, A.D. 2007. In default thereof they will be

excluded from the benefit
by the Liquidator.

4

of any distribution made

Dated the 7th day of February, A.D., 2007.

K.L. Floyd
Liquidator
16945 Northcase Drive
Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.



the 1.8 per cent estimate from
Wall Street analysts surveyed by
Thomson Financial. The compa-
ny said lower temperatures
throughout the United States
drove sales of cold weather relat-
ed items.

Rival Target Corp. had a 5.1
per cent gain in same-store sales,
above the 4.6 per cent estimate.

Costco Wholesale Corp.
reported a same-store sales gain
of two per cent, below the three
per cent forecast. Costco blamed
the shortfall on a quirk in the cal-
endar: There was one less day
during the five-week reporting
period due to the timing of New
Year’s. The shift negatively affect-
ed same-store sales by about
three per cent, according to Cost-
co.

Federated had an 8.6 per cent
gain in same-store sales, well

above the 4.6 per cent analysts .

predicted. The same-store results
include only the Macy’s and
Bloomingdale’s stores that exist-
ed before September, when the
company transformed most of the
former May Department Stores

Co. branches to Macy’s units.

J.C. Penney Co. had a 3.6 per
cent gain in same-store sales at
its department store business, a
bit above the 3.5 per cent esti-
mate,

Saks Inc. reported a 11.4 per
cent gain in same-store sales,

beating the 7.0 per cent estimate. |
Nordstrom had an 11.1 per cent

gain in same-store sales, beating

the 5.9 per cent estimate.

Gap, whose CEO resigned last
month amid a string of disap-
pointing quarters, announced that
same-store sales were unchanged
from the year ago, much better
than the Wall Street estimate for
a 7.7 per cent drop. The business
was helped by strong sales at its
Banana Republic stores, and the
retailer boosted its earnings out-
look.

Meanwhile, the retailer con-
tinued to shake up its manage-
ment, announcing Thursday that
the head designer for Gap North
America was leaving.

Limited had an 11 per cent
same-store sales gain, beating the
7.8 per cent forecast.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

- SO WILLING
CORPORATION LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 6th day of February 2007. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



keeper.
¢ Administration task

programs










Job Function:



Responsibilities:



client,

Qualifications: :



financial statements.

Course would be an asset.




Benefits:






ESTATE CARETAKER

Estate Caretaker.responsiblefor large beachfront house and
property in Nassau, Bahamas.

Responsibilities include but are not limited to:

¢ Housekeeping and estate’s organization with the house

¢ Supervising and coordinating the household and
property repairs and maintenance.

* Supervising subcontractors

* Develops and implements preventive maintenance

This position offers a competitive compensation, including
housing and benefits. Apply in confidence to:

ESTATE CARETAKER
P.O.Box N449
Nassau, Bahamas

| cee Saree gaae Tl
Position 1 Available

TRUST ACCOUNTANT

® To produce accurate and timely trust and company financial
statements in accordance with internal procedures and
generally accepted accounting principles.

« Update the clients’ general ledger.

¢ Reconcile cash and securities balance; ensuring that all
entries are processed correctly in ledger.

« Prepare monthly financial statements and internal client
reports for a portfolio of complex trusts and companies.

¢ Liaise with trust and company administrators to ensure that
financial statements accurately reflect the activities of the

¢ = Bachelor’s degree in Accounting,
¢ At least five years experience preparing trust and company

Understanding of the fundamentals of trust administration.
Advance knowledge of Microsoft Excel.
e Completion of the Canadian Securities Course or Series 7

e = Ability to supervise a team of trust accountants.
¢ Proven track record of success in a similar position.

e Attractive salary commensurate with skills and experience.
Other benefits include medical insurance coverage,
excellent pension plan and performance based bonus.

Interested persons meeting the above requirements may forward their
resumes and two written references to:

Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7043
Nassau, The Bahamas



Email: trustaccountant@gmail.com




















\














































FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 11B

THE TRIBUNE : |

Retailers report better-than-expected sales results in January

AnnTaylor suffered a 10.2 per
cent same-store sales decline,
worse than the 5.4 per cent
expected.

Chico’s said same-store sales’
fell 3.5 per cent, worse than the
1.5 per cent analysts expected.
Teen retailer Abercrombie &

Fitch Co. had a six per cent same-

store sales decline; analysts pro-

jected a 1.9 per cent decrease.
On Wednesday,American

~ Eagle Outfitters Inc. reported a

17 per cent gain in same-store
sales, above the 10.9 per cent esti-
mate from analysts.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TEMPERATURE RISING INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of TEMPERATURE RISING INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has-been-issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act
(No. 46 of 2000)

COSMAN INC. ©

Registration Number: 99,660B

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
132 (2) of the International Business Companies Act
(No. 46 of 2000) COSMAN INC. is in Dissolution.

Any person having any claim against COSMAN
INC. is required on or before the 9th of March, 2007
| to’send' their name, address ‘and particulars of the
debt or claim to the Liquidator of the company, or
in default thereof they mayhave excluded from the
benefit of any distribution made before such claim

is approved.

GSO Corporate Services Ltd., of 303 Shirley Street,
Nassau, The Bahamas is the Liquidator of COSMAN

G50 Corporaie Services Lid ;
Liguidetor



Senior Client

ccountant

SG Hambros, part of SG Private Banking is a private bank
providing a comprehensive, wealth management service with
offices in the UK, Jersey, Guernsey, eibrettet and The

: Bahamas.

‘SG Hambros is currently looking to recruit a Senior Client
Accountant. Your main responsibilities will be:

@ preparation of financial
statements for a portfolio of
complex Trust and company
structures

@ for accounts requiring audit,
liaising with Trust Administrators
to schedule audit and working
directly with auditors on
accounting matters

® analyzing Broker accounts and
Reconciling and recording of
transactions

@ assistance with projects
assigned to the Department

Candidates should ideally hold

a CPA License or equivalent; a
Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting/
Finance or equivalent and have
at least 3-5 years’ experience

in Trust Accounting; have the
capacity to learn quickly in a

fast paced environment, have

SG Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited is

“good understanding of trust and

company administration, have
broad knowledge of banking
procedures and processes;
excellent communications skills
and proficient in Excel.

The position offers an attractive
salary and benefits package.

Applications should be submitted
to the following address, to arrive
on or before 16 February 2007.

Manager, Human Resources
SG Hambros Bank & Trust
(Bahamas) Limited

PO Box N7789

Nassau

Bahamas

www.sghambros.com

licensed under the Banks & Trust Companies Regulation Act.

SSC R Tenis lists

SG

Private Banking

EToTS CMe MOM meL LUE





PAGE 12B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007 | THE TRIBUNE



Petey jwuleite MS oa ie



PM on The Tribune:
_.. no matter ae

The Tribune says . . .

the more they do it,

the more many of you

| must cut it out.

Cut it out and put it on

your headquarters’ wall.

Motivate our people.

-| Show them who’s trying
to take us out. |
Put their faces on the
wall. Put the stories
on the wall.







i
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
\

If The Tribune can do this to the PLP
imagine what we can do for your business.

Being bound to swear to
the dogmas of no master.



e Tribune

My Voice. My Vlewpaper



td

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007

SECTION Q@ Fa @a ep



Fax: (242) 328-2398

‘E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

pt

Moss late

show helps.
the Falcons ©
snatch win

@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE







The Tribune ©







Pat, moron
ee BIOS aq ncn
oe Advance with ao
te BUR harg







cee

sy





@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter

FRANSON Moss
canned three foul shots
on a three-point
attempt with 6.2 sec-.
onds left on the clock
to lift the Jordan
Prince William Falcons
to a 52-51 victory over
the pennant winning St.
John's Giants, yester-
day in the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium,

With the decision, the
Falcons snatched a 1-0
lead over the Falcons
in the Bahamas Associ-
ation of Independent
Secondary Schools
Sports' junior boys
best-of-three champi-
onship series.

Game two is set for -
Monday and Moss
vowed that the Falcons,
coached by Godfrey
McQuay, will win.

"T was a little scared,
but when I shot the

’ first one, I knew I
could do it because I'm
a shooter," Moss said.
"T knew that we had to
win, so when I got

_ fouled,.I decided to go ..

for it."
Not only did Moss
deliver from the charity
. stripe, but he also led
the Falcons in scoring
with 14, eight of them
coming in the fourth
quarter as they rallied
. from a 10-point deficit
- to sneak the initial
win.
Naaman Lightbourne
helped out with 13,
-.. Andrew Forbes had 11
" and Jasper Thompson
finished with nine.
The Giants, who
_ established their inside
- presence early with |
their big line-up, were

a little disappointed at —

the end when they did-
n't get a foul call with
time running out.

But St. John's coach
Chercovie Wells said
they shouldn't have
had to wait for the
winding seconds
to decide the out-
come.

"We're a little disap-
pointed. But down in
the third and fourth
quarter, we went into a
slump scoring," he said.
"I think they got
through our press pret-
ty easy. That was the
problem. But we will
work on that and we
will be back."

Claiming that he
knows he still has the
best team in the junior

.., boys division, Wells got

“-\-a game high 20 from

Geno Bullard, includ-
ing two free throws .
with 15.5 seconds that
gave them a 51-49 lead.
Dwight Moss helped
out with 13.




-as St. Augustine's College

ss pennant winning Big Red



@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

BIG players step up big in
big games and that was what
Alicia Musgrove did for the
Big Red Machines yesterday

took game one of the

Bahamas Association of Inde- |

pendent Secondary Schools’
junior girls basketball best-of-
three championship.

In a well played game
between the two teams, the

Machines held off the defend-
ing champions Queen's Col-
lege Comets for a 38-35 over-
time victory in the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium.

"We came in here and we
wanted to win," Musgrove
said after the victory. "At first
we were a little off, but we
worked on our defence."

With the lead see-sawing

throughout the game, Mus- _
égrove said she knew that if

5

SAC was, going to win, she. _
would have to work harder

than usual.
After both teams turned the
ball over in the winding sec-

onds of regulation that saw —

the score tied at 27-27, forc-
ing the extra three minutes,
Musgrove went to work right
away.

Musgrove missed a free
throw on a three-point
attempt, but got the rebound
as the Comets stood around
waiting for a second free
throw. She went back up, was
fouled, but this time she con-
verted the two charity shots
for a SAC 32-29 lead. |

OC would ride the 1-2
punch of Debenique Knowles
and Sheddel Williams as they
took a 35-34 lead with 40 sec-
onds remaining.

But Williams fouled out and’

Musgrove took advantage as
she sank one of two foul shots
for a 35-35 tie.

With 22.2 seconds to go,
point guard Ashlee Bethel
was fouled and she converted
one of two free throws for
SAC's 36-35 lead.

Then with 3.5 seconds on
the clock, Christian Albury
got a steal and a pass to Mus-
grove, who was heading
towards their basket. She got
the ball and scored on the fast-
break lead-up for a 38-35 lead
that sealed the deal.

Musgrove finished. with a
game high 27 points, while
Bethel added 12 for SAC,
coached by Anastacia Sands-'
Moultrie.

Knowles had a side high 21
for QC. Williams chipped in
with nine. Alexandria Mar-
shall had three and Ortam
Rolle contributed a basket.

QC's coach John Myles said
it was a well played game and
his Comets shouldn't feel too

@ QUEENS College Comets’ Shed-
del Williams tries to get around the
defence of Ashlee Bethel yesterday dur-
ing the junior girls championship.

(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)

disappointed in the loss.

_ "T thought we raised our
game and it.was touch and
go," he pointed out. "We have
to give SAC credit, but we
have to come back on Mon-
day and see if we can get over

this hurdle."

Musgrove, however, said
they will go to practice today
and work on the mistakes they
made and hopefully come out
and play much better than
they did.



As a reflection of how tough
it was for both teams, SAC
held a slim 4-3 lead after the
first quarter, which started out
as a defensive battle. But they
both picked it up in the second
quarter as SAC managed to



















jump out to a 13-10 advan-
tage.

Again both teams traded
the lead in the third betore
SAC posted a 20-19 margin.at
the break, going into the
fourth quarter.





PAGE 2C, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS

Oificials say
only six
Stadiums meet
security
requirements

@ SOCCER
ROME
Associated Press

ONLY six soccer stadi-
ums in Italy meet security
requirements, meaning
that league games in other
arenas will be played
without fans following last
week’s death of a police
officer during riots at a
game in Sicily.

The Olympic Stadium in
Rome made the list drawn
up during a meeting of
security and sports offi-
cials Thursday, while the
San Siro stadium in Milan
did not, the Interior Min-
istry said.

The other stadiums that
were deemed safe were in
Genoa, Siena, Cagliari,
Turin and Palermo.

Arenas in Florence,
Naples and Bologna were
among the 25 considered
unsafe.

According to the find-
ings of security standards
at the stadiums, five of
Sunday’s Serie A games
will be played behind
closed doors, while five
will be open to the
public.

Officials said, however,
that further checks on the
stadiums would be carried
out in the coming days.
The dfficials also banned
all night matches in the
Serie A and in the lower
divisions.

Banning fans from are-
nas that are not consid-
ered safe and other securi-
ty measures were prompt-
ed by the killing of a
policeman in rioting dur-
ing and after a Serie
A match in Sicily on Fri-
day.

Italian agency and tele-
vision reports said police
were holding a 17-year-
old person who was being
investigated for the mur-
der of 38-year-old police-
man Filippo Raciti.

Sports officials halted
all games immediately
after Raciti’s death, and
the Italian soccer federa-
tion said late Wednesday
that league matches would
resume this weekend.

The safety requirements
at stadiums include having
closed circuit surveillance
cameras and turnstiles at
the entrances.

AC Milan vice president
Adriano Galliani said offi-
cials have been restructur-
ing the stadium to con-
form security measures
for some time.

“We think it’s deeply
unfair to close a stadium
like San Siro, for which
we have already spent $26
million on works that are
major,” Galliani said on
the club’s Web site. “We
have nothing to reproach
ourselves.”

Italy midfielder Gen-
naro Gattuso, who plays
with AC Milan, said emp--
ty stadiums are a disap-
pointment.

“We can’t talk about
soccer and playing it with-
out the fans,” Gattuso
said. “How enthusiastic
can you get?”

A decree approved by
the Cabinet on Wednes-
day also bans clubs from
selling blocks of tickets to
visiting fans and allows.
authorities to bar suspect-
ed hooligans from enter-
ing stadiums, even if they
have not been convicted
of crimes.

Other measures ban
clubs from having eco-
nomic ties with fan groups
and stiffen prison terms
for committing violence
against police from five to
15 years.

The measures must be
approved by parliament
within 60 days to remain
in effect. The Cabinet also
approved a proposal for
more long-term changes,
putting club stewards in
charge of guaranteeing
security inside stadiums
and involving the clubs in
the ownership of the
sports arenas, now owned
by local authorities.

At least 38 people have
been arrested, including
15 minors, following Fri-
day’s violence at Catania’s
stadium, where the local
team was playing cross-
island rival Palermo.

















Thriller sees SAC ©
claim first game

@ LEFT: Queens College Comets’ Sheddel Williams con-
trols the fast break yesterday during the junior girls champi-
onship game against St Augustines Big Red Machines.

@ BELOW: SAC’s Ashlee Bethel controls the fast break
yesterday during the junior girls championship game. SAC won
38-35,

_ © SEE SPORTS FRONT
(Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)









M@ QUEENS College Comets’
Debenique Knowles controls the fast
break yesterday against St Augustines
Big Red Machines during the junior girls
championship game.

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)







'4C.| FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007 _ INTERNATIONAL EDITION



SOCCER | PRO FOOTBALL | ETC.

- SOCCER

Six Italy stadiums ruled safe

From Miami Herald Wire Services

Only six soccer stadiums in
Italy meet security require-
ments, meaning that league
games in other arenas will be
played behind closed doors.

The Olympic Stadium in
Rome made the list drawn up
during a meeting of security
and sports officials Thursday,
while the San Siro stadium in
Milan did not, the Interior
Ministry said.

The other. stadiums that
were deemed safe were in
Genoa, Siena, Cagliari, Turin
and Palermo. Arenas in Flor-
ence, Naples and Bologna
were among the 25 considered
unsafe.

According to the findings of
security standards at the stadi-
ums, five of Sunday’s Serie A
games will be played behind
closed doors, while five will be
open to the public.

Officials said, however, that
further checks on the stadiums
would be carried out in the
coming days. The officials also
banned all night matches in
the Serie A and in the lower
divisions.

Banning fans from arenas

that are not considered safe
and other security measures
were prompted by the killing
,of a policeman in rioting dur-
ing and after a Serie A match
in Sicily on Friday. State police
said investigators in Catania
were holding and questioning
a 17-year-old person who was second-round meeting with
being investigated for the Celtic is scheduled for March
murder of 38-year-old police- 7
man Filippo Raciti.

Sports officials halted all



ENRICO LIVERANI/AP
AN EMPTY FEELING: San Siro
stadium was one of the
arenas deemed unsafe in
Thursday’s ruling in Italy.

games immediately after Raci-
ti’s death. The Italian soccer
federation said late Wednes-
‘day that league matches would
resume this weekend.

The safety requirements at
stadiums include having
closed circuit surveillance
cameras and turnstiles at the
entrances.

e Elsewhere: AC Milan
could play the home leg of its
Champions League match

- against Celtic outside Italy fol-
lowing the closure of the
country’s soccer stadiums.

UEFA said Thursday it
would meet with Milan early
this morning to discuss the
issue.

The home leg of Milan’s

The game could be moved
. to neighboring France or Swit-

SPORTS ROUNDUP

Bears lineman
—~ Tank Johnson
pleads guilty

From Miami Herald Wire Services

Chicago Bears defensive
lineman Terry “Tank” John-



coach to leave the Super Bowl
champion Indianapolis Colts,
accepting the job as defensive

son pleaded guilty on Thurs- coordinator of the Minnesota
day in Skokie, IIL. to violating Vikings. A special assistant to
probation in a 2005 gun case. Colts coach Tony Dungy and
Cook County Judge John also in charge of the team’s
Moran denied a request to lift defensive backs, Frazier
the player’s home confine- couldn’t interview for the
ment, but said Johnson could position until after the Super

leave his house to attend prac-
tices. Moran delayed sentenc-
ing until March 15 so that a
‘resentencing investigation
can be done.

The hearing Thursday
came four days after Indianap-
olis beat Chicago 29-17 in the
Super Bowl. The same judge
allowed Johnson to travel to
Miami for the game.

Dressed in a gray suit, John-
son arrived early for the hear-
ing and signed autographs for
fans while waiting for the
courtroom to open. After the
hearing, he left without speak-
ing to reporters.

Johnson was arrested on
misdemeanor weapons
charges on Dec. 14 after police

raided his home in the Lake -

County town of Gurnee, about
40 miles northwest of Chi-
cago, and found six unregis-

Bowl. Frazier, Cincinnati’s
defensive coordinator for two

years before joining the Colts 1 CONFINED: Cook County Judge John Moran denied

in 2005, worked with Vikings

coach Brad Childress when |

the two were on staff in Phila-
delphia. Frazier was defen-
sive-backs coach for the
Eagles from 1999-02. .. . Cor-
nerback Nate Clements, a
key to. the Buffalo Bills’
defense, plans to test free
agency next month. His agent,
Todd France, told The Asso-
ciated Press it’s in his client’s
best interest to pursue free
agency once the period opens
on March 2. France added that
Clements is open to re-signing

with the Bills if the team Volquez and Josh Rupe

makes a competitive offer. ...
Cleveland Browns coach

Romeo Crennel completed with the. Texas Rangers. .

the shakeup of his staff,
appointing Umberto Leone

tered firearms. defensive-quality-control




zerland if the Italian stadium
closure .prompted by last
week’s fatal attack on a police-
man during rioting by soccer
fans remains in place.

AROUND THE GLOBE

e England: Edwin van
der Sar expects to play again
for Manchester United in two
weeks. The Netherlands goal-
keeper broke his nose in a col-
lision with Tottenham striker
Robbie Keane on Sunday.
Van der Sar said on his web-
site that he aimed to be back in

training within a week, and -

playing for the Red Devils in
two weeks. ... Blackburn mid-
fielder Morten Gamst Peder-
sen is out for at least a week
after injuring his hamstring

while playing for Norway on ,

Wednesday. Pedersen, 25,
limped off in the first half of
Norway’s 2-1 loss to Croatia.
... Fulham manager Chris
Coleman is waiting for his
punishment after admitting
that he used abusive language
toward an official. Coleman
admitted to the charge and has
not requested a personal hear-
ing, the Football Association
said in a statement.

e Germany: Turkey inter-
national Hamit Altintop will
leave Schalke when his con-
tract expires at the end of the
season.

“J learned a lot at Schalke
but now I’ve decided to leave,”
Altintop said on Thursday.

Altintop reportedly has an
offer from Bayern Munich but
he did not confirm his destina-
tion. He has been at Schalke

since 2003.

His brother Hamit also
plays for Schalke, the Bundes-
liga leader.

e Spain: FC Barcelona
defender Oleguer Presas lost
his sponsorship from a sports
clothing company because of a
newspaper article he wrote
expressing sympathy for a
jailed former leader of the
armed Basque group ETA.

Alicante-based firm Kelme
said it made the decision due
to “recent comments by the
soccer player in several media
outlets,” according to Spanish
news agency Efe on Thursday.
The company said it sup-
ported “the right to freedom of
expression and free thought,”
but added “Kelme’s links with
the player are solely based on
sporting criteria, and therefore
the decision was taken to
rescind the contract unilater-
ally.”

No one at the company was
immediately available for
comment. f

e China: Coach Ratomir
Dujkovic said a fight that
broke out between his club
and the English team Queens
Park Rangers during an exhibi-
tion game in London was
unacceptable.

The fight Wednesday at
Queens Park Rangers’ training
facility forced the match to be
abandoned with Queens Park
winning 2-1 about 15 minutes
from the end.

The incident is the latest to
plague China’s Olympic soc-
cer team during its two-week
stay in London.



__ MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD











RONEN ZILBERMAN/AP

HAVING A BALL

Super Bowl MVP and Colts QB Peyton Manning signs
autographs on Thursday after the AFC’s practice in
Kapolei, Hawaii, the site of this Saturday’s Pro Bowl.





Pujols bats 100 for U.S.

Albert Pujols has won a National League MVP award, a
Gold Glove and a World Series. He added a perfect 100 on his
U.S. citizenship test to his résumé this week.

The St. Louis Cardinals’ first baseman became a U.S. citi-
zen on Wednesday during a ceremony at the Eagleton Court-
house in St. Louis. Pujols’ wife, Deidre, arranged to have
about two dozen relatives and friends watch U.S. District
Judge E. Richard Webber swear in Pujols. :

Chester Moyer, the officer in charge of the U.S. Citizen

‘ and Immigration Service office in St. Louis, said on Thursday

that Deidre Pujols served as her husband’s tutor. Moyer said
the 27-year-old Pujols spent about a year preparing for the
citizenship exam. art

“He even answered a bunch of additional questions and
gave us more answers than we asked,” Moyer said. “He:
clenched his fist and said, ‘I got 100 percent!’ Sts

“He just had a grin from ear to ear. He was thrilled to
become a citizen.”

The ceremony was open to the public, but there was no
publicity about Pujols’ participation. He was the only person
sworn in on Wednesday. :

Pujols grew up in the Dominican Republic, moved with his —
father to the Kansas City area when he was 16 and graduated
from Fort Osage High School in Independence, Mo., in 1998.
He was selected by the Cardinals in the 13th round of the 1999
amateur draft after playing baseball at Maple Woods College
in Kansas City, Mo.

on sabbatical shortly,” Bett-
man said. “That isn’t the
case, wasn’t the case. ~

“J think people were
somehow under the impres-
sion my contract had a year
to run and got fixated on
that. Those stories were, to
say the least, inaccurate.”

Bettman said he “doesn’t
really keep track” of how
long his current contract
runs, but said “it sounds
|. right” that it is for at least
four more years.

There have been reports
some owners are losing
patience with Bettman.
Some others are frustrated
with the current U.S. broad-
cast contract with Versus, a

M. SPENCER GREEN/AP

a request to lift the home confinement for Chicago
Bears defensive lineman Tank Johnson, above, but said
Johnson could leave his house to attend practices.

ing offa victory last week in
the Women’s Australian Open,
shot a 71.... The International
is no longer on the PGA Tour
schedule because Tiger
Woods and key ‘corporate
sponsors stayed away from
the majestic mountain course
at the foothills of the Rockies
outside Denver. PGA Tour
Commissioner Tim Finchem
and tournament officials spent
the past two weeks in a final
effort to find a corporate spon-
sor, but talks with two poten-
tial partners fell apart.

e Tennis: Defending

would attend any Giants
games if and when Bonds
closes in’on the mark. ...
Shannon Stewart and the
Oakland Athletics agreed to a
one-year, $1 million contract,
giving the club the additional
backup outfielder it sought
before the start of spring train-
ing... . Right-handers Robin-
son Tejeda, Edinson

were among 10 players who
agreed to one-year contracts

Right-hander Bronson
Arroyo and the Cincinnati

Bettman staying put Clijsters sits out
Gary Bettman says he Former U.S. Open cham-
isn’t leaving his job as NHL pion Kim Clijsters might
commissioner anytime soon. | miss the French Open and
' “Pye watched with fasci- limit her farewell season
nation some of the newspa- further to reduce the risk of
per reports having me going inj

jury.

Clijsters, ranked fourth in
the world, pulled out of this
week’s Open Gaz de France
in Paris because of a sore
hip to ensure she could play
in next week’s Diamond
Games in Antwerp — her
last tournament in her Bel-
gian homeland before retir-
ing at the end of the year.

On Thursday, she said
she will skip the Pacific Life
Open in Indian Wells, Calif.,
from March 5-18 so she can
play in the following Sony
Ericsson Open in Miami.
She won both in 2005.

“J will have to take more
rest after every tourna-
ment,” she said on her web-
site. “It means I will skip

Reds agreed to a two-year, $25

1

At the time, he was on pro-
bation in a November 2005
Cook County case. In that
case, he’d pleaded guilty to a
misdemeanor charge stem-
ming from an arrest in which a
nightclub valet reported see-
ing Johnson with a handgun in
his sport utility vehicle.

Johnson has pleaded not
guilty to the Lake, County
charges in the latest arrest.

Also, the Bears shook up
their coaching staff, saying
defensive-line coach Don
Johnson and assistant offen-
sive-line coach Harold Good-
win won’t return and that
another assistant has left to
take a college job. Offensive-
quality-control coach Mike
Bajakian accepted the offen-
sive coordinator job at Central
Michigan after three seasons
in Chicago.

e Elsewhere: Leslie Fra-

million contract extension
through 2010.
e Golf: England’s Robert

coach, Mike Sullivan assistant
offensive-line’ coach and
Frank Verducci offensive
assistant.... Marcus Wash- Rock’shot a 6-under 66 — his
ington had arthroscopic sur- lowest score in a PGA Euro-
gery on his left hip, the second pean Tour-sanctioned event
operation this offseason for — to take a one-stroke lead
the Washington Redskins line- after the first round of the
backer. Washington had sur- Malaysian Open in Kuala
gery on his left elbow last Lumpur. Indian rookie S.S.P.
month. His rehabilitation is Chowrasia shot a 67, and
expected to take three months, American Edward Loar was
the team said, which could another stroke back along with
affect his participation when Australia’s Kane Webber and

workouts resume in the Argentina’s Rafael Echeni-
spring. que. ... South Korea’s Ahn

Sun-ju shot, an 8-under 64 to
ETC. take a two-stroke lead after the

e Baseball: Barry Bonds first round of the Australian
might get a telephone call
from Major League Baseball
Commissioner Bud Selig
instead of a handshake if the
San Francisco Giants slugger
breaks Hank Aaron’s home
run record. Selig wouldn’t say back after 69s.

champion Karrie Webb, com-

Wales’ Rebecca Brewerton
and Sweden’s Cecilia Eke-
lundh opened with 66s. Amer-
icans Cristie Kerr and Nata-

Five-time

Ladies Masters in Gold Coast. ,

lie Gulbis were five strokes _

champion Amelie Mauresmo
battled past French compa-
triot Nathalie Dechy 6-3, 6-2
to reach the Open Gaz de
France quarterfinals in Paris.
... Top-seeded Marion Bar-
toli of France was upset by
Martina Sucha of Slovakia
4-6, 6-3, 6-3 in the second
round of the Pattaya Women’s
Open in Bangkok, Thailand.
_.. Serena Williams agreed
to play for the United States
Fed Cup team for the first time
since 2003. Fresh off her Aus-
tralian Open title, Williams
will join older sister Venus on
the squad that faces Belgium
in the first round of the Fed
Cup in April.

e Cycling: Floyd Landis
will skip the Tour de France —
and all races in France this
year — as part of an agree-
ment with French doping
authorities in a case that could
strip him of cycling’s most
prestigious title.



cable network formerly Indian Wells so I have three
known as the Outdoor Life weeks of rest until Miami.”
Network, that is unknown to . Clijsters has been dogged
many people. Others are _ by injuries in her career.
upset with the current Last year, a left wrist injury

unbalanced NHL schedule,
which means some super-
stars don’t play in certain
markets for three years.

prevented her from entering
the U.S. Open to defend her
title, and from playing in the
Fed Cup final.





‘He doesn’t get enough credit for
being the elite player that he is.
He’s definitely in that group of
players.’

~ WAYNE GRETZKY, Phoenix coach, on
Detroit’s Henrik Zetterberg, right, who
scored twice in the Red Wings’ 4-2 victory
over the Coyotes on Wednesday night.



ee Se ecinie





On this day in history:
2002 — Oakland’s Rich Gannon leads the AFC toa 38-30

victory over the NFC to capture the player of the game
award in the Pro Bowl for the second consecutive year.

zier became the first assistant on Thursday whether he



THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com



From Miami Herald Wire Services

CLEVELAND — Pete
Campbell made eight 3-point-
ers — six in the first half —
and finished with 28 points,
and No. 10 Butler showed off
its outside touch by making a
school-record 20 3s in a 92-50
blowout of Cleveland State on
Thursday night.

Ranked higher in the AP’s
poll than at any time in school
history, the Bulldogs (23-2, ll-1
Horizon League) extended
their winning streak to nine
with an eye-popping display of

‘offensive efficiency and
marksmanship. ;

Campbell led the way, mak-
ing 8-of-l) shots from beyond
the arc and Butler, which
knocked off Notre Dame, Indi-
ana, Tennessee and’Gonzaga
earlier this season, dominated
the overmatched Vikings
(8-18, 2-11) from the opening
tip.

Mike Green added 14
points, Brandon Crone had 13
and A.J. Graves scored 12 for
the Bulldogs, who made 20-
of-33 3-pointers — a league
and arena record — and set

~’ BASKETBALL

COLLEGE BASKETBALL



MARK DUNCAN/AP

SHARP SHOOTER: Butler’s Pete Campbell follows through
on one of his eight 3-pointers, helping the 10th-ranked
Bulldogs rout Cleveland State 92-50 on Thursday night.

season-highs in points, field
goals, assists and margin of
victory.

OREGON HOLDS ON

e No. 13 Oregon 55, Ari-
zona State 51: Tajuan Porter
scored 24 points and host Ore-
gon held on to beat Arizona

the field with six 3-pointers for
Oregon (20-4, 8-4 Pac-10),
which scored its fewest points
of the season.

The Sun Devils dropped to
6-17 overall and 0-12 in the
Pac-10.

OTHER ACTION

Dame 66: Wilson Chandler
scored a season-high 25 points
and blocked the potential
game-winning shot in the clos-
ing seconds as host DePaul
prevailed. Chandler’s block
came after he put the Blue
Demons ahead with a break-
away dunk.

when he stripped the Fighting
Irish’s Colin Falls near mid-
court. He retrieved the ball
near the sideline and found an
open Chandler, who made it
67-66 with 18 seconds left.

Chandler was 10-of-19 from
the field, grabbed a season-
high 14 rebounds and blocked
three shots. Burns scored ll,
and Marcus Heard added 10
for DePaul (14-11, 5-6 Big East).

Falls scored 20 for Notre
Dame (18-6, 6-5), while Rob
Kurz added 15 points and nine
rebounds.

e Drexel 95, Hofstra 87
(OT): Frank Elegar scored 26
points, including six in over-
time, to lead visiting Drexel.

Dominick Mejia added 25
points and Bashir Mason had
14 points for the Dragons (18-6,
10-4 Colonial Athletic Associa-
tion), who snapped Hofstra’s
28-game, regular-season home
winning streak. Drexel has
won six of its past eight games
overall.

Loren Stokes, who scored
his 2,000th career point with
the game’s first basket, had 29
points and grabbed nine
rebounds for the Pride (18-7,
11-3). Antoine Agudio added 19
points and Carlos Rivera had
14 points before fouling out.

e UMass 77, Rhode
Island 55: Stephane Lasme
had 18 points, 12 rebounds and
ll blocked shots to lead host
Massachusetts.

INTERNATIONAL EDITION _ FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007 | 5C

high 22 points for UMass (17-6,
7-2), which built a 23-5 lead to
start the game. Lasme deliv-
ered his third triple-double of
the season as Massachusetts
moved into first place in the
Atlantic 10.

The Rams (14-10, 7-3) didn’t
score from the field until
Jimmy Baron drove for a layup
with 8:52 to play in the first
half.

Baron scored 17 points and
Joe Mbang added 10 for Rhode
Island.

ELSEWHERE

e Arkansas: Seven-footer
Steven Hill is still questionable
for the Razorbacks’ game at
LSU on Saturday because of a
thigh injury. Hill was hurt late
in a 65-57 victory over Auburn
on Wednesday night.

e Oklahoma State: A
woman injured last year in a
drunken-driving accident
involving former Oklahoma
State coach Eddie Sutton seeks
more than $125,000 in a legal
claim filed with the state.

Teresa Barnard says the

’ university and its employees

were “grossly negligent and in
reckless disregard” of her
rights and those of the public.
The claim, filed this week with
the state’s Department of Cen-
tral Services, says Barnard
incurred nearly $40,000 in
medical and injury-related
expenses since the Feb. 10,

Oregon holds off Arizona State

LATE WEDNESDAY

e No. 2 UCLA 70, No. 19
USC 65: Darren Collison
scored 17 points and host
UCLA capitalized on a late
technical foul to beat Southern
California and take a two-
game lead in the Pac-10.

The Bruins (21-2, 10-2)
trailed until there was about
six minutes left against the
Trojans (18-7, 8-4), who
dropped to third behind
UCLA and_ second-place
Washington State.

UCLA extended its Pauley
Pavilion winning streak to 18
games as the Pac-l0’s only
undefeated team at home.

Arron Afflalo scored 13 of
his 16 points in the second half,
including two free throws that '
gave UCLA the lead for good
with 4'/ minutes left.

WOMEN’S ACTION

e No. 1 Duke 64, No. 2
North Carolina 53: Abby
Waner scored six of her 16
points during a key second-
half spurt, and visiting Duke
held off North Carolina.

Wanisha Smith had all 17 of
her points in the first half,
Lindsey Harding added 16
points and Alison Bales had 14
rebounds for the Blue Devils
(25-0, 10-0 Atlantic Coast Con-
ference).

Camille Little scored a sea-
son-high 21 points and Erlana
Larkins had 14 rebounds for

the Tar Heels (24-1, 8-1).

NETS DL Th

EASTERN CONFERENCE

e DePaul 67, Notre Draelon Burns set that up 2006, accident with Sutton.

State. Porter was 8-for-12 from Gary Forbes scored a game-



PRO BASKETBALL



| ;

va | SOUTHEAST WL Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away’ Conf
Sat Washington 28 20 583 - 6-4 L-1l 19-6 9-14 19-10
Orlando 25 25 500 4 3-7 L:3 16-10 9-15 15-16
Miami 24 25 490 4% 6-4 W-5 13-10 11-15 13-14
Atlanta 18 30 375 10 55 L-2 9-15 9-15 12-20
Charlotte 18 31 367 10% 46 L-2 10-14 8-17 12-20

From Miami Herald Wire Services x j ee SS ; ae =. oe an
OKLAHOMA CITY — Desmond Mason ' am ATLANTIC WL Pet. GB L10 Str. Home Away _ Conf
scored 24:points and David West shrugged SOroHED 26.523) S310, og BP WA lich g 046. 183
ae : | NewJersey 23 27 460 3% 3-7 W-1 13-12 10-15. 17-13
off:a‘bruised hand to add:21 points and a |. New York 22 28, 440 42 5-5 W-2 13-13, 9-15 13-18
career-high 19 rebounds as the New Orleans “Philadelphia 17 33,340 9 6-4..W-2. 9-12 821 12-17
~ Hornets beat the Milwaukee Bucks 109-101 in Boston's 12 "36 250 13% 0-10 L16 420 816 8:23
Se ae CENTRAL WL Pet. GB_LIO_Str, Home Away _Conf
ee ae ee eo ere Detroit 30 18 625 - 82 WS 15-9 15-9 21-10
victory for the Hornets, who survived on Chicago 28 21 571 2%- 6-4 Ll 20-5 815 20-8
Mason’s last-second tip-in a night earlier in Cleveland 28 21.571 2% 5-5 W-l 18-7 10-14 17-14
Denver. Indiana 26 23 531 4% 6-4 L-2 15-9 11-14 19-13
Milwaukee 19 31.380: «12° 28 L-l 11-9 822 9-20

West scored off his second consecutive
offensive rebound to give the Hornets the
lead at the outset of the second overtime, and
Bobby Jackson gave them a 103-99 edge with

WESTERN CONFERENCE

SOUTHWEST WL Pct. GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf

left for a two-game trip to the Midwest.

Iverson aggravated his sprained ankle
during overtime in the Nuggets’ loss-to New
Orleans on Wednesday night. He had 22
points, nine assists and four rebounds in his
return from a four-game absence but wasn’t
his usual self as he had to settle for jumpers.
An MRI on Thursday didn’t show any struc-
tural damage.

“I think it is one of those things where I
just came back too soon,” Iverson said. “I
couldn’t be me on the basketball court. I am
more effective being aggressive and going to
the basket and making things happen.”

Iverson will miss the Nuggets’ games at
Indiana tonight and Milwaukee on Saturday
night but hopes to play again Monday night
against Golden State.

He acknowledged, however, that he might
be sidelined through the All-Star Game on
Feb. 18 in Las Vegas.

If Iverson backs out of his eighth All-Star
appearance, that would give teammate Car-
melo Anthony another crack at making his
first All-Star team as one of Commissioner
David Stern’s injury replacement picks. Stern
has said he won’t hold Anthony’s 15-game
suspension for fighting against him when
choosing replacements.

Center Marcus Camby (groin), who hasn’t
played in a week, will be a game-time deci-
sion Saturday night.

e Suns: Steve Nash might sit out
tonight’s game against Atlanta because of a
sore right shoulder, although he and Suns
coach Mike D’Antoni believe the injury
poses noe long-term problems.

The league’s two-time defending MVP did
not practice Thursday and was noncommit-
tal on whether he would go against the
Hawks.

The near-constant spasms that Nash had

experienced in recent days have subsided, he
said.

“I’m just trying to treat my shoulder and
get the inflammation down,” Nash said. “It’s
a little swollen on the joint. It shouldn’t be
too long I’m sure.” .

Suns reserve forward Kurt Thomas could
begin practicing next week and could be
ready to play shortly after the All-Star break,
D’Antoni said. Thomas has been out since
Jan. 15 with an injured left elbow.

e Mavericks: Reserve center DJ Mbenga
will miss the rest of the season because of a
torn knee ligament. He is scheduled for sur-
gery in two weeks, and there is no timetable
for his return, the team said.

The Mavericks recalled forward Pops
Mensah-Bonsu from the Fort Worth Flyers
of the NBA D-League.

e Jazz: Forward Carlos Boozer’s broken
leg is healing, but perhaps not quickly
enough for him to play in his first All-Star
Game, the Jazz said. Boozer was injured on
Jan. 27 in a game against the Hornets.

oe Kings: Dogs owned by forward Ron

SUE OGROCKI/AP

All-OUT STRUGGLE: Bucks forward Charlie Villanueva, left, blocks a shot by Hornets
forward Hilton Armstrong during Thursday night’s double-overtime marathon.

Artest have spent a total of 77 nights at the
pound since July because of poor care by
their owner, costing the NBA star $1,942 in
boarding and impound fees, county records
show.

e Three-point contest: Dirk Nowitzki
will face Gilbert Arenas again in the 3-point
contest during next week’s All-Star weekend.
Nowitzki won the event last year in Houston,
beating Arenas 18-16 in the final.

Jason Terry, Nowitzki’s Dallas teammate,
also is back after failing to advance to the
final round last year. Rounding out the field
are Miami’s Jason Kapono, who leads the
NBA in 3-point shooting percentage at 55.9
percent; Mike Miller of the Memphis Griz-
zlies; and Damon Jones of the Cleveland
Cavaliers.

The contest will be in Las Vegas on Feb.
17, followed a day later by the All-Star Game.

LATE WEDNESDAY

e Hornets 114, Nuggets 112 (OT): Des-
mond Mason’s putback as overtime expired
lifted visiting New Orleans.



SCORING

Lakers at Tor., 7
Clippers at Phil., 7
Port. at Char., 7
N.J. at Bos., 7:30
Minn, at Memp., 8
Hou. at Dal., 8:30
Atl. at Phx., 9

Chi. at G.S., 10:30

iN] ey VE)

G FG FT PTS AVG

_ a3-pointer from the right wing with 1:42 left. Dallas 40.9 816 - 9-1 WS 23-3 17-6 28-6
Chris Paul added a pair of free throws, San Antonio 33 16 673 7 6-4 W-1 16-8 17-8 21-11
tan each hit one i Houston 31 17 646 8% 6-4 W-2 17-6 14-11 18-15
and bis eres ach hit one in the final New Orleans 23 27 460172 7-3 W-2 15-11 816 13-18
minute to put the game away. : Memphis 12 38 .24028% 2-8 L-4 9-17 3-21 6:24
The Bucks missed their first nine shots in
the second overtime and didn’t make a field NORTHWEST WL _ Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
goal until Mo Williams’ foul-line. jumper Utah” 32 17. 653) - 7-3 W-3 186 14-11 20-10
made it 107-101 with 16.4 seconds left. Denver 23 24 «489 8 «3-7 L-3_ 13-14 10-10 10-16
: Minnesota 23 26 469 «9 3-7 Wl 149 917 14-18
Tyson Chandler had ll points and a Portland 20 30 .40012% 46 1-3 12-14 816 13-17
career-high 22 rebounds, and Paul ended up Seattle 18 31 .367 14 4-6 Wl 13-12 5-19 7-19
with 14 points and 10 assists for New Orleans.
‘The Hornets, who have won seven of their PaciFiCc = WL Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
past nine games, earned their 23rd victory to Phoenix 39 10 796 - 82 W-2 20-4 19-6 19-9
match Denver, Minnesota and Golden State LA. Lakers 30 20 600 9% 46 Ll 19-6 11-14 17-10
° é F L.A. Clippers 24 25 .490 15 6-4 L-3 17-8 7-17 14-17
— the eighth, ninth and 10th-place teams in Golden State 23 27 .46016% 4-6 Ll 17-8 6-19 13-16
the West. Sacramento 20 26 .43517% 6-4 W-3 14-11 6-15 11-18
ELSEWHERE RESULTS AND SCHEDULES
e Nuggets: Allen Iverson’s swollen right Thursday’s results Tonight’s games Wednesday’s results
ankle doesn’t have any structural damage, Detroit 93, Lakers 78 Miami at Clev., 8 Miami 91, Boston 79
: : N.O. 109, Mil. 101 (20T) Den. at Ind., 7 NJ. 87, Atl. 85
but he still stayed home while the Nuggets Chi. at Sac, jate Ce | cgacat Ons T Tor. 113, Ort 103
ea. » ind.

S.A. ‘110, Was. 83

Phi. 92, Cha. 83

Cle. 94, L.A.C. 77

Min. 121, G.S.W. 93
Dal. 113, Mem. 97

N.O. 114, Den. 112 (OT)

Through Wednesday +

REBOUNDING
GOFF DEF TOT AVG





Anthony, Den. 32 367 234 987 30.8 Garnett, Minn, 48 122 475 597 12.4
Arenas, Wash. 48 446 376 1411 29.4 Camby, Den. 40 104 384 488 12.2
Bryant, LAL 45 430 358 1296 28.8 Howard, Orl. 50 164 432 596 11.9
Wade, Mia. 42 400 390 1209 28.8 Boozer, Utah 45 142 389 531 11.8
Iverson, Den. 35 338 295 1004 28.7 Chandler, NOK. 47 183 362 545 11.6
Redd, Mil. 33 302 244 914 27.7 Okafor, Char. 49 192 360 552 11.3
Allen, Sea. 39 364 208 1049 26.9 Lee, N.Y. 50 175 364 539 10.8
James, Clev. 47 447 279 1236 26.3 Duncan, S.A. 49 147 378 525 10.7
Johnson, Atl. 44 421 176 1114 25.3 Jefferson, Bos. 41 145 289 434 10.6
Nowitzki, Dall. 48 407 350 1210 25.2 O'Neal, Ind. 43 104 347 451 10.5
FIELD GOALS ASSISTS

FG FGA PCT G AST AVG
Biedrins, G.S. 223 362 .616 Nash, Phoe. 46 542 11.8
Stoudemire, Phoe. 345 569 606 —— Williams, Utah 49 447 91
Lee, N.Y. 214 353 .606 Kidd, N.J. 50 439 88
Howard, Orl. 307 527 583 —Davis, G.S. 43 372. 87
Curry, N.Y. 356 613 .581 Paul, NOk. 32 274 8.6
Boozer, Utah , 410 721 .569 Miller, Phil. 48 400 8.3
Gasol, Mem. 221 399 .554 Wade, Mia. 42 334 8.0
Brand, LAC 405 733 .553 Ford, Tor. 42 324 77
Dalembert, Phil. 217 394 .551 Billups, Det. 39 300 7.7
Bogut, Mil. 253 460 .550 Iverson, Den. 35 265 7.6

V4 SEU cal asec

Sunday, Feb. 18,

at the Thomas & Mack Center, Las Vegas

EASTERN CONFERENCE

STARTERS

Gilbert Arenas, G, Washington
Chris Bosh, F, Toronto

LeBron James, G, Cleveland
Shaquille O'Neal, C, Miami
Dwyane Wade, G, Miami

RESERVES

Chauncey Billups, G, Detroit
Caron Butler, F, Washington
Vince Carter, F, New Jersey
Richard Hamilton, G, Detroit
Dwight Howard, F, Orlando

Jason Kidd, G, New Jersey

Jermaine O'Neal, F, Indianapolis

WESTERN CONFERENCE

STARTERS

Kobe Bryant, G, L.A. Lakers
Tim Duncan, F, San Antonio
Kevin Garnett, F, Minnesota
Tracy McGrady, F, Houston
Yao Ming, C, Houston

RESERVES

Carlos Boozer, F, Utah

Allen Iverson, G, Denver

Shawn Marion, F, Phoenix
Steve Nash, G, Phoenix

Dirk Nowitzki, F, Dallas

Tony Parker, G, San Antonio
Amare Stoudemire, F-C, Phoenix

aa aaa RTT TT TTL I EL Te

—

\







6C_| FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007 _




1 FLORIDA
Top recruits: DT Torrey Davis, DE Carlos Dunlap,
QB Cameron Newton, OL James Wilson, WR
Deonte Thompson i ;

The defending champions landed every big recruit from high
school national champion Lakeland High - including star RB
Chris Rainey and six All-America defensive linemen, and ‘
nabbed Thompson away from Miami at the last minute. —

2. SOUTHERN CAL

LB Chris Galippo, DE Everson Griffen, WR Ronald
Johnson, RB Joe McKnight, OL Kristofer O’Dowd.

The Trojans landed six Rivals.com five-star recruits, including
the nation’s No. Trunning back, linebacker, receiver and
offensive tackle.

3. LOUISIANA STATE Fes RUNES RSE
S Chad Jones, WR Terrance Toliver, DT Joseph —
Barksdale, WR DeAngelo Benton, DE Sidell
Corley. eS Se
~ Despite losing offensive coordinator Jimbo Fisher (FSU), LSU
~ picked up two.of the nation’s best receivers and safeties...

4, TENNESSEE

. DB Eric Berry, LB Chris Donald, DE Ben Martin,
\ WR Kenny O'Neal, WR Ahmad Paige.

The Vols loaded up at the skill positions and got the nation’s
best cover corner in Berry.

5. TEXAS : SAS SORES
OL Tray Allen,-DB Curtis Brown, DT Andre Jones, .
WR John Chiles, FB Cody Johnson. « ‘ :

- The Longhorns have another solid class, but are hurt by the
Joss of quarterback John Brantley, who went to Florida, :

6. AUBURN

QB Kodi Burns, OL Lee Ziemba, DB Michael
McNeil, RB Enrique Davis, LB Josh Bynes.

Auburn made off witha solid, balanced class led by Burns,
whom Scout.com rates as the fifth-best quarterback recruit.






: 7.SOUTHCAROLINA = Sos MS
WR Chris Culliver, DE Cliff Matthews, S Mark

Barnes, QB Stephen Garcia, DE Travian
Robertson. seat

Coach Steve Spurrier has put together one of the best classes
_in the program’s history - nabbing 12 players from Florida,
including a star quarterback in Garcia. — ee '

8. NOTRE DAME

QB Jimmy Claussen, WR Duval Kamara, OL Matt
S Romine, CB Gary Gray, RB Armando Allen.

The Irish have one of the nation’s top offensive classes - led
by the nation’s No. 1 quarterback in Claussen.




9. OREGON . we
- DT Myles Wade, DT Simi Fili, OLB Malachi Lewis,
OL Darrion Weems, LB Terrance Pritchett. ;

The Ducks made off with the best defensive class in the
country, getting two of the biggest and most talented tackles
in Wade and Fili. RS

10. MICHIGAN

QB Ryan Mallett, CB Donovan Warren, DB

Michael Williams, DE Ryan:Van. Bergen, WR

Toney Clemons. 9% <3: t ,
Another strong defensive class for coach Lloyd Carr, but he
also got the nation’s No. 2 quarterback prospect in Mallet.

Tl. GEORGIA

RB Caleb King, OT Chris Little, OT Trinton

Sturdivant, OL Justin Anderson, LB Bennie Curran
The Dawgs went heavy, getting eight offensive line prospects
and the best running back in Georgia in King. .

12. ALABAMA

DE Luther Davis, DT Kerry Murphy, LB Rolando
sea McClain, WR Brandon Gibson, QB Nick Fanuzzi

Former Dolphins coach Nick Saban got off to a late start, but

closed strong, getting a class that is heavy on talent on

defense.



13. NORTH CAROLINA aes
SN 8 DT Marvin Austin, DT Tydreke Powell, LB
_@ Da’Norris Searcy, LB Quan. Sturdivant, QB Mike
Paulus ies tes

Former UM coach Butch Davis and his staff did a great job

pulling in some of the nation’s best, including a lethal
defensive tackle tandem, three big receivers anda solid
quarterback. sees

14. OHIO STATE

S Eugene Clifford, LB Brian Rolle, S Nate Oliver,
CB James Scott, RB Brandon Saine.

‘The Buckeyes had limited scholarships, but still managed to
pull ina solid stockpile of defensive backs.

15. NEBRASKA
WR Niles Paul, DB Larry Asante, DT Joseph
Townsend, QB Zach Lee, OT Jaivorio Brukes.

The Cornhuskers, looking fora quick fix, grabbed five SuperPrep
100 junior college players, including the nation’s top junior college
quarterback and other talented high school recruits.

16. CALIFORNIA / :

OT Sam Demartinis, RB Jahvid Best, OL Matt

Suvins-Gavin, LB D.J. Holt, QB Brock Mansion
The Bears went heavy on offense and went to Texas to get
Mansion, one of the nation’s top quarterbacks.

17. PITTSBURGH

ares, RB Sean McCoy, QB Pat Bostick, OL Chris
CED Jacobson, DE Tony Tucker, FB Henry Hynoski
Former Dolphins coach Davce Wannstedt grabbed former
Canes recruit McCoy, and added him to a class loaded with
offensive talent. g :

18. MIAMI

LB Allen Bailey, RB Graig Cooper, OL Harland

ie Gunn, GB Robert Marve, CB Doug Wiggins
Despite the coaching change, Randy Shannon was still able
to get a franchise quarterback in Marve, three running backs,
a healthy receiving corps and possibly the best defensive
backfield class in the nation.

19. GEORGIA TECH
Gr QB Josh Nesbitt, QB Steven Threet, RB Jonathan
j Dwyer, DE Derrick Morgan, S D.J. Donley.
The Yellow Jackets banked on their ACC success and managed
‘to get four of the state’s top seven recruits in Georgia and two
scary-good running backs and quarterbacks.

20. ILLINOIS
WR Arrelious Benn, DE Martez Wilson, DT
D’Angelo McCray, DT Josh Brent, OL Mark
Jackson
Former UF coach Ron Zook grabbed two of the nation’s best
recruits and filled the rest with several solid acquisitions -
especially on the defensive side.















- MANNY NAVARRO

sence



_INTERNATIONAL EDITION ____

COLLEGE F






INSIDE THE GAME



SEAN GARDNER/AP

TAILBACKS EVERYWHERE: Joe McKnight was the top-rated
high school running back in the United States, and he

will find plenty of

BY SCOTT WOLF

Los Angeles Daily News

LOS ANGELES — The Uni-
versity of Southern California
made a splash on signing day,
but even bigger news could be
looming for the Trojans: Uni-
versity of Arkansas quarter-
back Mitch Mustain will visit
sometime in the next two
weeks, with the idea of trans-
ferring in the fall.

Mustain, who started eight
games for the Razorbacks,

would be more than just a fin-

ishing touch on Wednesday’s
recruiting class, which was
ranked No. 1 by ESPN an
No. 2 by Rivals.com. .

“Tt looks as power-packed
as any group we’ve had,” USC
head coach Pete Carroll said.
“We've got all kinds of big
guys, tough guys, power guys.
We held our own. It’s a highly-
regarded class.

“Of the 17 we signed, 14 can

_ make an immediate impact.”

If the Trojans lost some
commitments in the past few
weeks, they made up for it
Wednesday morning when
the top-rated tailback recruit,
Joe McKnight of River Ridge,
La., chose USC over Louisiana
State.

McKnight touched the ball

. 82 times last season and

scored 30 touchdowns. He
averaged 15.5 yards per carry.

-Carroll compared him to Reg-

gie Bush in his ability to catch
passes out of the backfield or
line up at wide receiver.

“BJe’s a tremendous ath-
lete,” Carroll said. “He can do
everything — he’s incredibly
versatile.”

What’s more surprising is
that McKnight chose USC
even though running backs
Marc Tyler of Los Angeles
and Broderick Green of Little
Rock, Ark., also signed with
the Trojans. In addition, tail-
backs Chauncey Washington,
CJ. Gable, Emmanuel Moody,
Allen Bradford, Stafon John-
son and Hershel Dennis also
are currently on the roster:

The 10th tailback on the
team, Michael Coleman, will
move to fullback. And USC’s
first commitment for 2008,
D.J. Shoemate from Servite
High, also is a tailback.

“Each guy sees his unique-
ness,” Carroll said of the new
recruits. “Broderick saw we
did not have a big, physical
back. Marc thinks he can doa
little bit of everything. Who
plays is going to be deter-
mined by the competition.”

Or maybe who transfers.
Johnson is expected to make a
decision at the end of the
semester.

As highly-regarded as the
class was by analysts, the Tro-
jans actually lost out on two of

company
Trojans will have 10 tailbacks fighting

JOIN THE

CROWD

Trojans get another
great class - and
maybe Mitch Mustain

at Southern California. The

for playing time.

their top targets, with wide
receivers Ahmad Paige (Ten-
nessee) and Deonte Thomp-
son (Florida) going elsewhere.

“You don’t ever get every-
one you want,” Carroll said.

Florida suddenly became a
nuisance to USC, taking °
Thompson and getting offen-
sive guard James Wilson to
decommit, in addition to lur-
ing quarterback Tim Tebow
last year.

“We were butting heads
with them a lot,” Carroll said
of the Gators.

USC also made one last run
at cornerback Donovan War-
ren of Long Beach, Calif., on
Wednesday, but Warren stuck
with his original choice of
Michigan. But the Trojans
hurt the Wolverines by sign-
ing wide receiver Ronald
Johnson, the No. 8-ranked
player in the United States by
Rivals.

Johnson will play the same
spot as wide receiver Steve
Smith, Carroll said.

“He can make touchdowns
from anywhere on the field,”
Carroll said of Johnson.

Another impact player is
defensive end Everson Grif-
fen, who runs a 4.5 40-yard
dash and is talented enough to
play tailback, according to
Carroll, who said Griffen is
the top prospect he recruited
since arriving at USC.

“Some people think he
could play in the NFL now,”
Carroll said.

In a mild surprise, line-

backer Jordan Campbell of °

Norco will be switched to full-
back because of the Trojans’
lack of depth at that position.

Linebacker Chris Galippo
from Anaheim, Calif., also is
considered a top-10 player,
and Carroll credited him with
being an unofficial recruiter.

“He set the tempo and did a
great job at the All-American
Bowl keeping things
together,” Carroll said.

Carroll said nearly all the
freshmen will play next sea-
son, a tradition he likes to
enhance at USC.

“We had 16 freshman play
last season, and three scored
in the first game,” he said.

That first game was against
Arkansas, and Mustain
entered in the second half and
played well against the Tro-
jans. Adding to the intrigue is
that Mustain’s teammate,
Arkansas freshman wide
receiver Damian Williams,
already is enrolled at USC this
semester.

Williams will redshirt next
season.

“T know he’s going to be a
factor to help other people
play well [in practice],” Car-
roll said.

{

|
|

|

OOTBALL | RECRUITING CLASSES

~=400 meters'in 11:1 seconds. He is eventually expected to bulk up and become one of
the nation’s premier pass rushers. : . a



GATOR-BOUND: Florida Gators recruit
beside his mother, Diane Ross, as he



MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD



THE GAME’S TOP 25 RECRUITS |



NAME, POS , HT WT 40 TIME HOMETOWN COLLEGE

1 JIMMY CLAUSEN, QB 6-3 200 4.6 West. Village, Calif. Notre Dame

Considered by analysts to be the most polished and complete high school quarter-
back in more than 10 years, He finished 45-0 as a starter and passed for 3,428 yards
and 49 touchdowns in his senior season.

2. JOE MCKNIGHT, RB 5-11 193 4.4 River Ridge, La. usc

Considered the nation’s No. 1 running back after leading his school to the Class 2A
state title.



3. RYAN MALLETT, QB 67 250 4.6 Texarkana, Texas Michigan
Big, strong-armed quarterback who can throw the ball more than 70 yards down-
field. Was a star in the U.S. Army All-American game.

4. MARVIN AUSTIN, DT 6-3 300 49 Washington N. Carolina

Features rare agility and quickness, and is considered the No. 1 defensive tackle in

the country by Rivals.com and Scout.com.

5. EVERSON GRIFFEN, DE 64°265 4.55 Avondale, Ariz. usc
’ Considered the best player to come out of Arizona and the top-rated player in the

nation according to Scout.com.

6. ERIC BERRY, CB 6-0 194 435 Fairburn, Ga. Tennessee

Considered the top defensive back in the country after playing quarterback in high
school, where he totaled more than 2,000 yards of total offense and 22 touchdowns.
His father was a star at Tennessee.

/ 7, CHRIS GALLIPO, LB 63 235 46 Anaheim, Calif. usc

Rated the No. 1 outside linebacker in the country by Rivals.com, Galippo dominated
at the U.S. Army All-American game and proved ready to be an immediate contribu-
tor on the college level. sO ‘

8. MARC TYLER, RB 6-0 215 4.5 West. Village, Calif. usc

The Gatorade Player of the Year in California, Tyler was the running back behind
Jimmy Clausen, the nation’s top-rated quarterback. Tyler broke his fibula and tibia
at the end of his senior season. |

9. NOEL DEVINE, RB 5-8 175 4.35 Fort Myers, Fla. Undecided

Few players have been as highly touted by recruiting websites and few have |
received such few offers as Devine, whose highlight reel has been a YouTube hit i
since he was a sophomore. His suitors include Alabama, Florida State, LSU and.
West Virginia. .

Wisconsin

10. JOHN OGLESBY, OL 68 315 5.3 Milwaukee

The highest-rated tackle in the nation by Rivals.com, Scout.com and CSTV.com.
Oglesby is expected to add 30 to 40 pounds at the college level and become a
monster in the trenches.

1. TERRANCE TOLIVER, WR6-4Â¥2 195 45 Hempstead, Texas LSU
Finished his senior season with 42 catches for 842 yards and six touchdowns. Com-
pared to Detroit Lions receiver Roy Williams. :

12. ARRELIOUS BENN, WR = 6-2 205 4.5 Washington, D.C. Illinois

As asenior, he caught 56 passes for 1,039 yards and nine touchdowns. Is considered |
the biggest catch for Ron Zook since he left Florida for Illinois. |

13. TRAY ALLEN, OL 64 305 53 Grand Prairie, Tex. Texas
Considered the nation’s top guard by Rivals.com and Scout.com.

i
14, TORREY DAVIS, DT 65 290 49 Seffner, Fla. Florida

A tremendous athlete, Davis finished the season earning All-State honors forthe |
second year in a row. He also is a state qualifier in the shot put and discus.
1s. MARTEZ WILSON, DE 6-4 228 4.5 Chicago Illinois |
Another huge commitment for Zook, Wilson actually played receiver and ran the

16. RYAN MILLER, OL 6-8 280 5.1 Littleton, Colo. Colorado |

Rated the nation’s No. 2 tackle according to Rivals.com. He chose his home state
team over Notre Dame. Anchored Columbine High to the Class 5A state title.

17. BEN MARTIN, DE 6-5 255 4.65 Cincinnati Tennessee
Had more than 100 tackles and totaled seven sacks his senior season.
18. TYROD TAYLOR, QB 62 200 4.55 Hampton, Va. Va. Tech

Every year, there is talk about who the next Michael Vick will be in Blacksburg.
Taylor is considered the latest model after leading his team to the Class 5A state
title and being named Gatorade Player of the Year. ‘

19, CHAD JONES, S 6-3 232 4.5 Baton Rouge, la. : - LSU
Considered the nation’s No. 1 athlete by Rivals.com. .
20. CHRIS DONALD, LB 62 220 45 Huntingdon, Tenn. Tennessee

Rated the nation’s top inside linebacker by Rivals.com, Donald chose the Vols at the
U.S. Army All-American game. He had hamstring injuries for most of his senior
season while playing running back and linebacker.

21. RONALD JOHNSON, ATH 6-0 1854.4 Muskegon, Mich. usc
“Has climbed the charts this season and is considered the No. 1 wideout in the nation
by Rivals.com ‘

22. KRISTOFER O'DOWD, C 6-5 315 5.1 Tucson - USC

Considered the nation's top-rated center by Rivals.com, O’Dowd chose USC over
hometown Arizona and UCLA.

23, MAJOR WRIGHT, S 61 200. 4.5. Fort Lauderdale Florida
He helped lead St. Thomas Aquinas to three straight state runner-up finishes.



24. JAMES WILSON, OL . 65 305 49. Ponte Vedra, Fla. Florida
Considered the state’s top offensive lineman, Wilson helped lead Nease High to
back-to-back state championship appearances.

25. CALEB KING, RB 5-11 195 44 Norcross, Ga. Georgia
After rushing for 2,500 yards as a junior, he ran for 939 yards and 13 touchdowns as
a senior.

List compiled by Miami Herald sportswriter Manny Navarro,
based on information from Rivals.com and Scout.com.





MIC SMITH/THE POST AND COURIER/AP

Carlos Dunlap stands
talks to the media.








THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com _



EARN
HLTA

__INTERNATIONAL EDITION __ FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007 |'7C

HOCKEY

-THURSDAY’S NHL GAMES

ea ed
< Anak

0. OSs A

Qete
ir




i ANDY MARLIN/GETTY IMAGES
IT’S ALL ABOUT NOTHING: Devils goaltender Martin Brodeur stops a shot by Jason Blake on his way to a 2-O shutout of the Islanders. Brodeur leads the NHL with 10 shutouts.

Brodeur gets another shutout

From Miami Herald Wire Services

EAST RUTHERFORD, NJ.
— Martin Brodeur posted his
NHL-best 10th shutout of the
season on Thursday night,
stopping 25 shots to lead the
New Jersey Devils to a 2-0 vic-
tory over the New York
Islanders.

Jamie Langenbrunner broke
a scoreless tie midway
through the second period,
and Jay Pandolfo added a
short-handed goal with 3:36
left, to lead the Devils to their
fourth consecutive victory and
their 1th in 20 games.

The Devils moved to within
four points of the Buffalo
Sabres for the best record in
the Eastern Conference. New
Jersey has played one fewer

‘game. ’

Brodeur, who benefited
from a shot off the post by
Jason Blake in the second
period, had to work hard late
to preserve his 90th career
regular-season shutout. He
made a terrific glove save on
Brendan Witt’s slap shot with
about 6 minutes left in the
game, then stopped Tom Poti,
Blake and Mike Sillinger dur-
ing the power play on which
Pandolfo scored.

For the Islanders, the loss
overshadowed an outstanding,
35-save performance by goalie
Rick DiPietro, who posted his
fifth NHL shutout on Wednes-
day night. It also marked the
first time in nine games (5-1-3)
that the Islanders failed to
earn a point. ‘

Brodeur has 90 career shut-
outs, four behind George Hai-
nesworth.for second place in
NHL history. Terry Sawchuk
has the record, with 103.

Langenbrunner started and
ended the play on the Devils’
first goal. He sent a back pass
from along the boards in the
Devils zone to Paul Martin.
The defenseman made a quick,
cross-ice pass that sent Zach
Parise and Travis Zajac on a
break.

Islanders defenseman
Bruno Gervais prevented Par-
ise from getting a good shot,
but DiPietro seemed to lose
his footing. Langenbrunner
swatted the loose puck past
him on the second try.

The goal came a little less
than 3 minutes after Blake

clanged a shot from the circle
off the right post.

Pandolfo’s goal iced the
game for the Devils.

SENATORS 4,
CANADIENS 1

OTTAWA — Dany Heatley
scored his team-high 32nd goal
early in the second period, and
Peter Schaefer scored during a
power play later in the period,
leading the Senators.

Jason Spezza scored his 21st
goal with 1:31 remaining, an
unassisted effort that pushed
Ottawa:'one point ahead of
Montreal for second place in
the Northeast Division.

Chris Phillips scored in the
first period and Ray Emery
made 27 saves for the Sena-
tors, who lost 3-2 in Buffalo on
Wednesday.

Canadiens rookie Guil-
laume Latendresse scored ona
penalty shot late in the second
to cut Montreal’s deficit to 3-1.

PENGUINS 5,
FLYERS 4 (SO)

PHILADELPHIA — Sidney
Crosby scored the only goal in
a shootout, winning it for the
Penguins and extending the
Flyers’ franchise-worst, home-
losing streak to 13 games.

Mike Knuble’s second goal
with 1:24 left in regulation
forced overtime, and Simon
Gagne had two power-play
goals for Philadelphia, which
has the fewest victories (13)
and points (34) in the NHL.
Flyers captain Peter Forsberg
had three assists.

Mark Recchi and Erik
Christensen scored 30 seconds
apart early in the third period,
and Jordan Staal and Michel
Ouellet also had goals for the
Penguins, who have won 10 of
12, with two overtime losses.

The Flyers haven’t won at
home since Nov. 24, and they
have just three victories there
in 25 games.

BLUE JACKETS 2,
FLAMES 1

COLUMBUS,
David Vyborny and Fredrik
Modin ended a long Blue Jack-
ets scoring drought with third-
period goals.

Fredrik Norrena stopped
24 shots for Columbus, which
ended a three-game skid.

TRAST LL Teh)



EASTERN CONFERENCE

SOUTHEAST WL OL SLPS GF
Atlanta 30 18 6 3 69 178
Carolina 28 22, 3%, 41 63 173
Tampa Bay 30 23 «#1 1 62 175
Washington 23 25 2 #6 54 171
Florida 20 25 5 6 5] 159
ATLANTIC =W_ L OL SLPTS GF
New Jersey 34.15 0 6 74 148
Pittsburgh 28 17 4 5 65 184
N.Y. Islanders 26 22) 4 3 59 161
N.Y. Rangers 25 24 3 2 55 156
Philadelphia 13 33) 3 5 34 134
NORTHEAST WwW L OL SL PTS GF
Buffalo 37) IS 2 2 78 209
Ottawa 31 22. 2 1 65 186
Montreal 29 21 #1 5 64 162
Toronto 27 22)=«2 4 60 176
Boston 24 25 1 3 52 149

WESTERN CONFERENCE

CENTRAL = W_ L OL SLPTS GF
Nashville 38 15 2 1, 79 195
Detroit 35 15 3 3 76 170
St. Louis 22 25 4 4 52 137
Columbus 22 28 2 3. 49 135
Chicago, 21 26 2 5 49 135
NORTHWEST Ww et OL SLPTS GF
Calgary 29 18 3 4 65 168
Vancouver 30 21 #1 3 64 144
Minnesota 30 22 0 4 64 157
Colorado 26 24 2 2 = 56 170
Edmonton 26 24 2 2 56 149
PACIFIC Wk OL. SL PTS | GF.
Anaheim 33 14 é 6 74 182
San Jose 35 19 1 71 170
Dallas 32 20 0 2 66 144
Phoenix 25 28 J 1 52 149
Los Angeles 18 30 5 4 45 159

GA HOME AWAY piv
177 14-9-3-2. 16-9-3-L 124-41
179 14-10-1-3-—-14-42-2-1—13-6-0-2
167 14-13-0-0 16-10-1-1. ——:12-7-0-0
195 14-1b-1-3 914-123 BL]
185 9 14-10-2-16-15-3-5 5+ L1-2-0
GA HOME = AWAY WV
129 20-4-0-4 14-11-0-2.15-4-0-1
166 -16-B-2-2.12-9-2-3.—14-5-1-1
156 -13-9-3-113-13-1-2.——-10-8-2-0
161 10-12-3-0 15-12-0-2., -9-9-0-1
204 = 3-15-3-4 10-18-0-1. «3-14-14
GA HOME AWAY oD
161 18-7-1-1.—19-8-1-1—12-8-1-1
151 WG-11-1-1 15-11-1-0 > 14-9-0-1
163 17-9-0-3. -12-12-1-2—-10-7-0-4
178 11-12-1-216-10-1-2—-10-8-2-2
199 14-12-0-2. 10-13-1-1—10-12-0-1
GA HOME AWAY OW
142 .20-3-2-1-18-12-0-0 —-17-4-1-0
133 20-3-1-2.15-12-2-1 1241-1
166 12-14-2-1—10-11-2-3. 8-12-2-2
170 A3-LN-1-2 9-17-11 7-11-0-2
164 11-13-1-2-10-13-1-3.-9-12-1-0
GA HOME AWAY —_—ODIV
138 -22-5-0-1 —-7-13-3-3. 1-5 1-2
141 17-9-L-L 13-12-02 11-11-01
143, -19-5-0-3. 11-17-0-1 9-6-0-2
165 15-13-1-2. Ld-L-1-0 9-7 1-0
160 UG-L1-1-110-13-1-19-12-1-0
GA HOME = AWAY, so
142 18-5-1-4—15-9-1-2-13-4-0-1
132 18-11-0-1—-17-8-0-0 .12-10-0-1
132. 16-8-0-1 -16-12-0-1 —-15-6-0-0
184 13-12-1-012-16-0-1 7-13-L-1
202 11-12-43 7-1B-1-1. 6 14-0-2

Note: Two points for a win, one point for a tie and overtime loss

RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Thursday’s results

Minnesota 4, Florida 2
Columbus 2, Calgary 1
Carolina 5, Boston 2
Wash. 4, L.A. 3 (OT)

Pittsburgh 5, Phila. 4 (SO)

Ottawa 4, Montreal 1
New Jersey 2, Islanders 0
St. Louis 1, Detroit 0
Nashville 4, Toronto 2
Atlanta 6, Colorado'3

Tonight’s games

Tampa Bay at N.Y. Rangers, 7
Chicago at Edmonton, 9

Matthew Lombardi scored

Ohio —

for the Flames, and Kristian
Huselius extended his points
streak to 14 games.

The Blue Jackets had not
scored for 133 minutes and
26 seconds, but they overcame
a 1-0 deficit with two goals in
47 seconds.

HURRICANES 5, BRUINS 2
BOSTON — Ray Whitney
had three goals and an assist to
lift Carolina over Boston.
Carolina trailed 10 but
scored four goals in the final

Wednesday’s results

Buffalo 3, Ottawa 2
Detroit 4, Phoenix 2
Islanders 2, Philadelphia 0
Chicago 3, Vancouver 0

~ San Jose 3, Anaheim 2

4:24 of the second period.
Whitney needed only 1:40 to
notch his second NHL hat
trick, and then he helped set
up Justin Williams’ team-lead-
ing 28th goal with 2.6 seconds
left in the period.

Hurricanes left wing Erik
Cole had to be helped off the
ice with a lower-body injury at
8:46 of the second period, and
he didn’t return.

Rod Brind’Amour added an
empty-net goal and had three
assists tor the Hurricanes, and
Cam Ward made 34 saves.

Brandon Bochenski scored
twice and Paul Mara had his
second point in 12 games for
Boston, which dropped its
fourth game in a row at home
and six of its past eight overall.

CAPITALS 4, KINGS 3 (OT)

WASHINGTON — Dainius
Zubrus poked in.a rebound
2:28 into overtime, winning it
for the Capitals.

Boyd Gordon, Ben Clymer

and Chris Clark also scored -

for the Capitals, and Alex
Ovechkin earned a second-
period assist to end the lon-

gest scoring drought of his

young career — he had gone
three games without a point.

Anze Kopitar, Alexander
Frolov and Lubomir Visnov-
sky scored for the Kings.

BLUES 1, RED WINGS O
ST. LOUIS — Bill Guerin
scored, and Manny Legace and

-0, Curtis Sanford combined to

stop 23 shots, as the Blues
handed the Red Wings their
first shutout loss in 176 games.

The Red Wings last were
shut out on Jan. 7, 2004, in a
3-0 loss to the Bruins.

The Calgary Flames hold
the NHL record for consecu-
tive games without being
blanked — 264 from Nov. 12,
1981 to Jan. 9, 1985.

Backup goalie Joey Mac:
Donald started his fifth game
for the Red Wings, who gave
Dominik Hasek the night off.

WILD 4, PANTHERS 2

ST. PAUL, Minn. -~ Brent
Burns had a goal and an assist
in the third period, and Niklas
Backstrom made 41 saves,
leading the Wild.

Mark Parrish, odd White
and Pavol Demitra also scored
for the Wild, who moved
within one point of Northwest
Division-leading Calgary.

Nathan Horton and Martin
Gelinas scored for the strug-
gling Panthers, who couldn’t
overcome a shaky night from
4l-year-old goalie Ed Belfour.

PREDATORS 4,
MAPLE LEAFS 2

NASHVILLE, Tenn. —
Steve Sullivan scored a power-
play goal and assisted on
another, leading the Predators.

David Legwand, Jean-Pierre

ae ass 3



Through Wednesday
SCORING
Player, team GP G A Pts
Crosby, Pit 50 25 61 86
St. Louis, TB 55 32 40 72
Lecavalier, TB 55 34 36 70
Ovechkin, Was 55 33 37 70
Thornton, SJ 55 14 56 70
Savard, Bos 52 18 50 68
Heatley, Ott 55 31 36 67
Hossa, Atl 56 31 36 67
Briere, Buf 56 23 44 67
Jagr, NYR 54 20 44 64
GOALIES
Player, team GP MIN GA AVG
Caron, Chi-Ana - 2 88 2 1.36
Backstrom, Min 18 958 33 2.07
Brodeur, NJ 52 3149 109 2.08
Hasek, Det 41 2425 84 2.08
Smith, Dal 12. 611 22 2.16
Gigu, Ana 38 2145 78 2.18
Kiprusoff, Cal 49 2949 111 2.26
Nabokov, SJ 26 1373 §3 2.32
Turco, Dal 48 2652. 103 2.33
Toskala, SJ 32 1853 72 2.33

Dumont and Vernon Fiddler
added goals for Nashville,
which won its eighth game ina

-row at home.

Alexei Ponikarovsky and
Chad Kilger scored for
Toronto, but the team’s five-
game winning streak ended.

THRASHERS 6,
AVALANCHE 3

DENVER — Karlis Skras-
tins will remember the Ava-
lanche’s loss to for more than
just breaking Tim Horton’s
durability record for a
defenseman.

Garnet Exelby's first goal of
the season glanced off Skras-
tins and went past goalie Jose
Theodore, who was pulled
after giving up three goals on
U1 shots in the first period.

Skrastins. broke Tim Hor-
ton’s NHL record for durabil-
ity by a defenseman by playing
in his 487th consecutive regu-
lar-season game, He was hon-
ored in a pregame ceremony.

LATE WEDNESDAY

e Blackhawks 3,
Canucks O: Patrick Lalime
stopped 34 shots in his season
debut to earn his first shutout
in almost three years for visit-
ing Chicago. Lalime hadn’t
played an NHL game since
April and had surgery for a
herniated disk in September.

@ Sharks 3, Ducks 2: Jon-
athan Cheechoo had two goals
and Milan Michalek scored on
a power play with 3:46 remain-
ing to lift San Jose in Anaheim.

MERE AIDES Sse Pe ET A TD SP A PO SYR NT TE TN HUTT SRST







ATHER REPORT

TTS TL TT, CS

Saturday
High Low W

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MODERATE HIGH




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ABACO Temperature 158p.m. 18 8:06pm. 0.3
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Boston 32/0 19/-7 pc 35/1 22/-5 pe St. Louis 29/-1 19/-7 i
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WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: Nat5-10 Knots 5 0-1 Feet 6-7 Miles 77°F
Saturday: _ VAR at 5-10 Knots 1-2 Feet 5-7 Miles i
FREEPORT Today: N at 5-10 Knots 1-2 Feet 6-7 Miles 75° F
Saturday: Wat 5-10 Knots 1-2 Feet 6-7 Miles qo: F
ABACO Today: NNW at 6-12 Knots 1-3 Feet 6-7 Miles 13°F
Saturday: | WSW at 6-12 Knots 1-3 Feet 6-7 Miles 75°F

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Stationary Mexg=nfi

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PAGE 10C, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Serena
Williams to
play Fed Cup —
for first time
since 2003

M TENNIS

FRESH off her Aus-
tralian Open title, Serena
Williams has agreed to play
for the U.S. Fed Cup team
for the first time since 2003
— joining older sister Venus
on the squad that faces Bel-
gium in the first round in
April.

“T was very happy when
Serena called me and said
she wanted to play, especial-
ly coming after her big win
in Australia,” U.S. captain
Zina Garrison told The
Associated Press in a
telephone interview Thurs-
day.

“She had texted me a
couple of times and said she
was contemplating playing
Fed Cup. She actually let
me know last week she’ll
play.”

The U.S. Tennis Associa-
tion made a formal
announcement later Thurs-
day. Venus Williams’ partic-
ipation was announced last
week.

“T’m excited to see them
back on the court and work-
ing hard and defying all the
odds of what people think
or say about them,” Garri-
son said.

Serena Williams is unde-
feated in her Fed Cup
career, going 3-0 in singles

and 3-0 in doubles. She last
played for the United States
four years ago, in a first-
round victory over the
Czech Republic.

The only other year she
played Fed Cup was in 1999,
helping win the title. The
United States repeated as
champion the next year
without Serena Williams,
but it hasn’t won the Fed
Cup since.

The USS. team is 3-3
under Garrison, never going
beyond the semifinals.

The sisters “have said
they are both very interest-
ed in bringing the title back
home,” Garrison said, “and
both of them know what
sort of commitment that
means.”

The younger Williams
entered the Australian
Open last month unseeded,
‘ranked 81st, and without a
title from any tournament in
two years, in part because of
injuries that sidelined her
for months at a time.

But she knocked off six
seeded players in Mel-
bourne, capped by a 6-1, 6-2
victory over top-seeded ~
Maria Sharapova in the
final. That gave the Ameri-
can her eighth Grand Slam
singles title and moved her
up to No. 14in the WTA |,
rankings. She’s 15th this
week.

“Serena is Serena. If she
decides that’s what she’s
going to do, she’ll do it.
Does she have the potential
to back at No. 1? Of
course,” Garrison said. “At
the Australian Open, you
saw that hunger in her eyes
again.”

Getting both Williams sis-
ters to play against Belgium
— at Delray Beach, Fla., on
April 21-22 — is a coup for
Garrison, who was given a
one-year contract extension
. for 2007. The U.S. team
should be heavily favored:
Belgium’s top two players,
Grand Slam title winners
Justine Henin and Kim Cli-
jsters, won’t be there.

“Serena’s a lot like me.
When she makes up her
mind, if she’s not going to
want to do it, you can’t per-
suade her,” Garrison said.

“T did a lot of talking to
her and her agent, Jill
Smoller, saying I’ve got a
one-year contract and I
would like to bring the
championship home now,
because you don’t know
what next year will bring.”

Fed Cup captains have
until 10 days before a match
to select their four-woman
squad, and Garrison hasn’t
decided whether the
Williams sisters will be her
doubles team.

“They'll do whatever you
ask. If you want themto .
play, they'll play. And if you
say, ’I don’t need you in this
particular match,’ they’re
OK with that, too,” Garri-
son said.

“They’re a lot more team
oriented than people real-
ize.”

Jayasuriya slams
-hall-century before
rain forces one- -dayer

~ tobe abandoned ©

Series opener between
India and Sri Lanka

@ CRICKET
CALCUTTA, India
Associated Press

SRI LANKAN opener
Sanath Jayasuriya posted his
62nd limited-overs half-cen-

. tury Thursday before rain

forced the series opener
against India to be aban-
doned as a draw.

Jayasuriya was unbeaten
on 63 in Sri Lanka's total of
102 for three from 18.2 overs
when unseasonable showers
disrupted play and forced
players to scamper to the
dressing room.

The heavy showers lasted
half an hour, but left the'out-
field waterlogged and play
could not resume due to the
slippery conditions.

Umpires Simon Taufel and
Suresh Shastri waited for the
ground staff to dry the field
for 4-1/2 hours before aban-
doning the game.

The series will feature four
one-dayers, the last interna-
tional fixtures for both India
and Sri Lanka ahead of the
World Cup in the West
Indies starting next month.

India defeated Sri Lanka
6-1 in one-dayers during the
last series in 2005.

Put to bat first by Indian

Lanka lost opener Upul Tha-
ranga (14), skipper Mahela
Jayawardene (zero) and
Kumar Sangakkara (12)
cheaply but Jayasuriya was
in smashing form.

Former skipper Jayasuriya
struck 13 boundaries off 61
deliveries as he cut, pulled

and drove firmly to assert his.

authority against the Indian
pacers. Sri Lanka's most
experienced player, Jaya-
suriya has also scored 23
hundreds in 376 one-dayers.

Another former captain,
Marvan Atapattu was bat-
ting on five when play was
suspended.

Jayasuriya sent India's
fielders to retrieve the ball
from the fence 11 times as
he raced to his half-century
in 48 balls. Jayasuriya was
particularly severe on Shan-
takumaran Sreesanth, hitting
him for six boundaries.

Jayasuriya also took five
boundaries off paceman
Munaf Patel, who was mak-
ing a comeback to the Indian

team after missing last mon-
th's series against the West
Indies due to an ankle injury.

Despite suffering at the .

hands of Jayasuriya, Patel
claimed two for 25. by dis-
missing Tharanga and
Jayawardene.

Tharanga deflected a deliv-
ery on to his stumps when
attempting a pull shot, while
Jayawardene lofted an
easy catch to Dravid at mid-
on before getting off the
mark.

Sangakkara perished as he
edged a Sreesanth delivery
to wicketkeeper Mahendra
Dhoni.

®@ SRI LANKA'S Sanath
Jayasuriya plays a shot
against India during the
first one-day international
cricket match in Calcutta,
India Thursday, Feb. 8,
2007.

(AP Photo/
Aman Sharma)

















skipper Rahul Dravid, Sri



Landis agrees not to ride
again in France this year

mw CYCLING
PARIS
Associated Press

FLOYD LANDIS wil skip the Tour
de France — and all races in France this
year — as part of an agreement with
French doping authorities in a case that
could strip him of cycling’s most presti-
gious title.

Last year’s Tour champion had hip-
replacement surgery 4 1/2 months ago and
was unlikely to have competed in this
year’s Tour. He agreed Thursday not to
race again in France until 2008, and in
return the French anti-doping agency post-
poned its decision on whether to suspend
him from competing in France fora max-
imum of two years because of a positive
doping test.

“Floyd is pleased that the AFLD has
agreed with his counsel’s request that they
suspend this proceeding,” spokesman
Michael Henson said.

Earlier, AFLD president Pierre Bor-
dry said Landis “understood perfectly that
if he didn’t act today, we would start the
procedure immediately.”

Landis will go before the U.S. Anti-
Doping Agency on May 14 and, following
that, the AFLD will deliver its verdict in
June.

“We will let Landis defend himself as he
wishes,” Bordry said.

The American, who has denied wrong-
doing, did not appear at Thursday’s meet-
ing of the AFLD’s nine-member panel,
but sent a lawyer who read his request
for a delay.

In the letter, a copy of which was |

obtained by The Associated Press, Landis
said the parallel cases in France and the
United States were complicating matters.
He asked the French agency to hold off
until after the U.S. agency rules. The
USADA will hold its hearings May 14.

“In this case, and in order to avoid any
misunderstanding, I agree to voluntarily
not participate in any professional or ama-
teur cycling event in France until Decem-
ber 31, 2007, and in particular the Tour de
France 2007,” Landis said in the letter.

Bordry said Landis deserves to be heard
by the USADA. However, Bordry echoed
Tour de France president Christian Prud-
homme’s sentiment, that the American
agency was dragging out its process.

Landis spokesman Michael Henson said
Landis was happy with the AFLD’s deci-
sion.

“Floyd is pleased that the AFLD has
agreed with his counsel’s request that they
suspend this proceeding until the (USA-
DA) heari ‘| is held in May,” Henson said

by telephone. é

Landis’ urine sample after a 17th-stage
win in last year’s Tour de France was
found to contain elevated testosterone to
epitestosterone levels. He risks being the
first rider in the 104-year history of the
race to be stripped of his title. Prudhomme
has said the Tour no longer considers him
the winner.

Landis argues that the Chatenay-Mal-
abry laboratory which carried out the tests
is unreliable,.a view shared by seven-time
Tour champion Lance Armstrong.

Landis insisted again on his innocence at
a fundraising rally in New York on
Wednesday night. He vowed to fight the
“lack of leadership at the top of cycling
and at the top of the anti-doping agen-
cies.”

Bordry said Landis reserves the right to

contest the French lab, but maintains the,

“A” and “B” samples both showed posi-
tive readings.

“The ’A’ sample tested positive for
testosterone. So we asked Mr. Landis, at
the time, if he wanted to do a ’B’ sample
test,” Bordry said. “A ’B’-sample test was
done at Chatenay-Malabry in the pres-
ence of an expert nominated by Mr. Lan-
dis, (and) paid by him.”

Also present, Bordry said, were “an
expert nominated by the USADA, and
an expert nominated by the International
Cycling Union.”

He said all “these experts signed the
report” agreeing that the tests showed a
positive reading.

Had disciplinary procedures started
Thursday, Landis strongly risked a two-
year suspension in accordance with French
law applying WADA’s maximum penalty
for a first-time failed doping test.

France is one of 47 countries which has
ratified the WADA code, which effec-
tively gives the anti-doping agency gov-
ernment backing to apply its code sanc-
tions.

The United States has yet to ratify
WADA’s code.

This could lead to a peculiar situation
whereby, even if the USADA rules in
Landis’s favor, the. AFLD can still pre-
vent him from racing in France.

“We are absolutely not tied to the
USADA’s decision as France has ratified
the world code, not the United States,”
Bordry said.

However, the AFLD does not have any
power over any other governments and,
should Landis be cleared, the UCI would
then review the case and may allow him to
compete in major races outside of France
such as the Giro d’Italia and the Spanish
Vuelta.

O ride

re
s



@ FLOYD LANDIS at last year’s Tour de France.
(AP FILE Photo}

‘
'
'







PAGE 16, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007 a THE TRIBUNE

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Volume: 103 No.66

Many Bahamian-owned
HRA EVA

aaa ee aN Sta Ut)

Celebrity dies suddenly
five months after son’s
death in the Bahamas

@ By KARIN HERIG Labour and Immigration Minister

Tribune Staff Reporter Shane Gibson up until yesterday
afternoon.

US CELEBRITY Anna Nicole Ms Smith’s lawyer in the

Bahamas Wayne Munroe, how-
ever, said he had no information
about the baby's whereabouts.

Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, Mr Munroe said that
her death was "very unfortunate."

"She was a very pleasant
client," he said.

However, he said he could not.
comment on when he had last
talked with her or in what condi-
tion she was in at the time as this
information was confidential.

Smith died yesterday at the age of.
39 of unknown causes in Holly-
wood, Florida.

- Only five months after her 20-
year-old son Daniel died of a
deadly drug cocktail in the
Bahamas, the former Playboy
playmate was declared dead at
the Hollywood Memorial Hospi-
tal at 2.49pm yesterday.

The former reality star col-
lapsed yesterday just after 2pm
at the Seminole Hard Rock Cafe
and Casino in Hollywood, Flori-
da, where she was staying with
her partner and long-time lawyer
Howard K Stern. :

At the time of her death the
former reality star's five-month-
old daughter Dannielynn Hope
was reportedly in Nassau. US
entertainment magazine People
claimed that the baby was in fact
in the care of the mother of

Relatives of Williemae Pratt
School fire victims are
still seeking compensation

â„¢@ By BRENT DEAN

of Ms Smith’s former boyfriend G
Ben Thompson, told The Tribune
last night that he “was moving
towards (the Eastern Road home
‘Horizons’) to secure the proper-
ty. ”

He alleged that the home was

SEE page 14

ANGRY relatives of victims of the fatal 2003 fire at the Williemae
Pratt School for Girls are still seeking compensation. The govern-
ment was ruled to have been negligent in the accident more than a year
ago by a coroner’s court.

The 2003 fire killed Anastacia Alexandria and Deshawn Bassett-
Ingraham. Shantia Minnis was also severely injured in the fire.

Mr Paul Ingraham, father of Deshawn Bassett-Ingraham, spoke to
The Tribune about his frustration regarding the inaction of government
on awarding compensation for the grieving and frustrated victim and
families.

SEE page 14





























BREAKFAST Nn ‘Th

’ Godfrey ‘Pro’ Pinder, lawyer ;



‘he Tribune



BAHAMAS EDITION

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007

AN FNM supporter
_looks on towards the
stage ahead of last night’s
FNM rally on Prince
Charles Drive.
(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)



FNM leader Hubert Ingra-
ham told supporters last
night that the PLP is only
attacking him to disguise
their own terrible perfor-
mance in office.

Speaking at a mass rally
| on Prince Charles Drive for

the Montagu, Elizabeth and
Yamacraw constituencies,
the party leader noted that
Wednesday was “Beat up on
Ingraham Day” in the House
of Assembly.

“There is no way they can
explain their miserable stew-
ardship over these five years,
so their plan is to attack me,
create as much confusion as

tracks,” he said.

Mr Ingraham said the PLP
came into office with “a plan
to double-dip” into the Pub-
lic Treasury to make addi-
tional pension payments to
the late Sir Lynden Pindling’s
estate. ,

“While alive he (Sir Lyn-
den) never claimed any enti-
tlement to pension prior to
the passage of the Prime
Minister’s Pension Bill in
| 1997, Between 1992 and 1997
he was paid as leader of the
opposition,” he said.

Mr Ingraham said prior to
their election in 2002, the
government never claimed

SEE page 11

possible and try to cover their |

Prison officers |
continue their
‘work to rule’

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter:

PRISON officers continued
their "work to rule". action

-yesterday — slowing down the

pace of work at Fox Hill
Prison and leading to anoth-
er day of delays at the courts.

Last night officers from the
association responded angrily
to Public Services Minister
Fred Mitchell's statements in
the House of Assembly indi-
cating that their grievances are
being addressed,

"In responding to the Hon-
ourable Minister we acknowl-
edge that the government did
provide some. vests, but 33
shank proof vests were pro-
vided for 400 officers. They
were supposed to do what?"
the Bahamas Prison Officers

. Association asked in a state-

ment.

"The association advised the
minister'‘and the Superinten-
dent of Prisons, Dr Elliston
Rahming months ago that the
amount of vests provided was
inadequate to even furnish all
the officers detailed for duty in

SEE page 11

cH ———77F
‘> am | Che Mliami Herald



"Some senior police
-in favour of transfer

| of Asst Commissioner

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter _

AMIDST claims of victimi-
sation on both sides, some
senior police officers have.spo-
ken out in favour of the immi-
nent transfer of Assistant
Commissioner Reginald Fer-
guson, claiming that the move

s "poetic justice" for the
senior officer.

The officers were respond-
ing to an article in The Tri-
bune on Wednesday which
detailed reports of several oth-
er senior officers’ support for
Mr Ferguson, and calls to
Police Commissioner Paul
Farquharson to block plans to
move him to the police train-
ing college.

A supportive senior officer,
claiming to speak for a group
of officers, contended that Mr
Ferguson — an “honest,
upright man" — is being "vic-
timised in its fullest form."

However, yesterday another
senior officer contacted The
Tribune to objéct to this sug-
gestion on the grounds that
the public needed to be aware
that not all senior officers feel

SEE page 11
















































WILSONART

9 WILSONART ADHESIVES
“LAMINATE FOR R COUNTERTOPS & & Se a





Sea Hauler
victims dismiss
Dr Nottage as
‘bag of wind’

HEALTH Minister Dr
Bernard Nottage was last night
dismissed as “a big bag of wind” as
Sea Hauler victims accused the
government of deceit and skul-
duggery.

They claim the government not
only lost their original medical
files, but also fabricated incom-
plete “substitute” records to

-underplay their injuries.

Now they want Prime Minister

., Perry Christie to-address the mat-

ter personally, claiming they had
lost faith in both Dr Nottage and
Transport Minister Glenys Han-
na-Martin, who has been involved

in negotiations with the group.

“We don’t want the puppets,
we want the puppet-master,” said
mother-of-four Sophia Antonio.
“Dr Nottage is a big bag of wind.
I am asking the prime minister to
step up to the plate and compen-
sate the Sea Hauler victims.”

SEE page 11

400 teachers
protest at Ministry
of Education's —
office in Freeport

: By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - More than
400 teachers on Grand Bahama
demonstrated at the Ministry
of Education’s office in
Freeport on Thursday in what
has been described “as one of
the biggest protests by teachers
here in recent years.”

Rudy Sands, Bahamas Union
of Teachers area vice president,
led hundreds of teachers on a
march around 9.30am from the
union’s office in the Bahamas
Public Services Union Hall on
West Atlantic Drive to the Min- —
istry’s headquarters in the Inter-
national Building.

“Teachers are fed up and
frustrated over the situation
regarding funds that they are
owed from the government,”
he said.

Mr Sands said that the Min-
istry of Education’s failure to
pay teachers their salaries has
caused great economic hardship

SEE page 11









a

PAGE 14, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007

LOCAL NEWS.

alentine’s Date!



nter The Tribune’s Valentine contest and become eligible to

win a dinner on the town with one of our Valentine Dates.
Men, fill out the form for Ava, and women, fill out the form for Alex. |
below and deliver to The Tribune’s office on Shirley & Deveaux |.
Streets before the deadline on Tuesday February 13, 2007 at >: 00 P. m.

for two at Club Land’ Or



Dinner
Spa Gift Certificate
Flowers

Tell us why you are the person
most suitable for Ava or Alex

, ‘ »

fl By DENISE.MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - Associated
Grocers made a donation of
food items and other supplies
totalling $75,000 to several char-
itable organisations on Grand
Bahama.

The company donated meat,
fresh fruit, cleaning supplies,
pots and pans, and much more
from its three-day Associated
Grocers, Island Dreams Food
Show held last week at the
Westin Resort.

Noel Bostick of Associated
Grocers presented the items to
representatives from the Grand
Bahama Children’s Homes, the
Salvation Army and the Grand
Bahama Red Cross, the Home
for the Aged and Burrows
Home for the Aged.

“Its tremendous to be able to
help like this’” said Mr Bostick.
“I was raised in foster homes

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and iter yepeeint to mesthat«

STAFF at Associated Grocers with some of their donations

Company makes
supplies donation

we can help here. I know my
company is not looking for
credit, they just like to help.”

Associated Grocers is one of
Grand Bahama’s newest cor-
porate companies, and the first
major international entity to
begin constructing a facility at
the Grand Bahama Sea/Air
Business Centre.

Opportunity

The Food Show organised by
Associated Grocers (Interna-
tional Distributors) was an
opportunity for the company to
showcase all the newest prod-
ucts to buyers.

Each time Associated has one
of these events they donate the
food to a local charity.

Geneva Rutherford, a mem-
ber of the GBCH executive
committee, said she was very
grateful for the donation.

Advertisement

Applicants must possess the following qualifications: -

1. Processing recommendations for:

Probationary appointments
Confirmations in substantive posts
Promotions and reclassification

Benefits under the Authority’s policies

CO em eee race eee eee Se RSOEAH OSHC EEEE SESE EE EOE E EEE EEE HEE HERE HELE DEDEDE EH ESSE OES

Employee transfers and secondment

COPS SME HEHEHE ROOSHHO HEH HEHEHE EEEHE SHEET H HEHEHE HEHEHE HE HEH HEHE HEE HEROS OHH E HEHEHE EERO

Employee grievances

Disciplinary actions and penalties

COCO HHRTH ASO OOOOH HOHE HOSES EHOEAEHESE HEHEHE HHHHEHHHHHHESEHEHFEHE SESH EEE EEE EH EHH ESE EE OE

Arr rrr rrr rrr rrr eee ee eee ee ee ee er)

financial clearances.

Involuntary and voluntary terminations

THE TRIBUNE



this donation,” said Mrs
Rutherford. “This donation
should help us tremendously
with our home costs and will
save us thousands.

“We actually cannot take on
all that we have been given and
the perishable foods will be
divided between several chari-
ties including: the Salvation
Army, the Bahamas Red
Cross, the Home for the Aged,
Burrows Home for the Aged
and the other homes in the vil-
lage.”

Captain Mathias of the Sal-
vation Army said the donation

- was very timely and would assist

them with their food distribu-
tion programme.

“This donation came in the
nick of time as the beginning of
the year is pretty slow for dona-
tions because people are recov-
ering from Christmas and pay-
ing the January bills, and so this
donation could not have come
ata better time for us,” he said.

- Public Hospitals Authority

Manager WI (Human Resources)
Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the post
of Human Resources Manager III, Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre, Public Hospitals

Bachelors Degree in Business Administration. Management, or equivalent qualification (a
Masters degree would be an advantage); and at least three (3) years post qualification
experience in human resource management. Excellent oral written communication skills and
computer skills are essential. —

The Human Resources Manager III is a part of the Human Resources Team at Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre, and shares responsibility for the day-to-day administration of human
resources transactions and services; to ensure that the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre human
resources policies and procedures, transactions and services are aligned with Authority’s

Within this context, the Human Resources Manager III will be responsible for, but not limited

Benefits under the law, eg. Employment Act and National Insurance Act

2. Liaising with the Payrolls Unit with matters relating to salaries adjustments and

3. Managing the performances appraisal process for staff within assigned areas of responsibili-
ties, ensuring that evaluations are ongoing and appraisal forms are prepared, distributed and

reviewed.



The Nassau Florist

st. 1951

Paradise Island

Club Land or





Opportunities will also be given for involvement in human resources strategic functions such
as policies, developing an annual human resources plan, staff training and development, qual-
ity improvement initiatives To facilitate the Manager’s professional dev elopment and career

advancement within Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre.

Letters of application, resume, documentary evidence of qualifications and three (3) references
should be submitted through the head of your department, no later than 28th February, 2007, to
the Director Human Resources (Acting), Public Hospitals Authority P.O. Box N-8200, or Ist

Floor Corporate Office, Dockendale House, West Bay Street.



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ml WASHINGTON \

IN nearly equal measure,
Americans say they do not like
Cuban President Fidel Castro
but do want the United States
to re-establish regular diplo-
matic relations with the com-
munist island nation after 46
years of estrangement, accord-
ing to Associated Press. |

Less than half of those polled
think Cuba will become a democ-
racy after the 80-year-old revo-
lutionary leader dies or perma-
nently steps aside. However, 89
per cent in The Associated Press-
Ipsos poll say they think Cubans
will be better off or about the
same when Castro is gone.»

__ “It's probably not very likely
in the short term," Kelly Shan-

ley, 29, of North Haven, Conn.,.

said of prospects for a democ-
ratic shift. "I just hope for the
citizens of Cuba that it's some-
thing that's realised in the nex
few decades." |
Castro has appeared to be in
failing health for six months and
has temporarily shifted power
_to his younger brother Raul.
Rumours have been rampant
about his ailments and how long
he can survive.
The poll suggests the Cold

War animosity that has defined -

US-Cuba relations for nearly a
half-century may be fading. |

Although US administrations
from left to right have called
Castro a dictator and a tyrant
and have spent millions trying
to undermine him, 27 per cent
of poll respondents said they

hadn't heard enough about Cas:

tro to form an opinion. ht

The poll showed 64 per cent of
respondents had a very or some-+
what unfavorable opinion of
Castro, the revolutionary leader
who has said he will be a Marx-,
ist-Leninist until the day he dies.

"He has not done much for his:
country. The country has not:

progressed," said Shiraz Damji,
61, of Woodland Hills, Calif. "It's; °

still in the '40s or something like
that. Leadership must grow the

country and he's not done that." |
Castro got slightly better

reviews from younger people — |

60 per cent of those under 35 |

had an unfavourable view of |
Castro while 66 per cent of old- ,
er people felt that way — and |
younger people were more like-

ly to reserve judgment about
him. Among people 18-34, 35
per cent said they don't know
enough about Castro to have
an opinion, while 24 per cent of
those 35 and older said that.

Contact

Even so, a large majority of
_ people — 62 per cent — said the
United States should re-estab-
lish diplomatic ties. The scant
contact between the two coun-
tries is now handled through
Switzerland or via low-level
diplomatic offices called inter-
ests sections.

The US cut off diplomatic ties
with Cuba in 1961, two years
after Castro led an armed revo-
lution that drove out US-
backed dictator Fulgencio
Batista. Decades-old trade and
travel embargoes made it illegal
for American businesses to
trade in an economy they once
dominated, and few Americans
have visited Cuba.

Although the tropical island
90 miles off Florida was once a
vacation playground famed for
its nightlife, nearly half of those
polled, 46 per cent, said they
would not be at all interested
in vacationing in Cuba. Forty
per cent of those polled said

eaeneaves

Americans dis
Castro but want new |
relations with Cuba

But 48 per cent want to -
keep embargo in new poll |



they would be interested in
vacationing there if a long-
standing travel ban were lifted.

_ Despite the public's interest
in diplomacy with Cuba, 48 per
cent of those polled said the
United States should continue
its trade embargo against Cuba.
A majority of Hispanics sur-

regime will be replaced by a
democracy while just 38 per
cent of non-Hispanics think that
will happen. Among Hispanics,
70 per cent say Cubans will be
better off after Castro, com-
pared with 53 per cent of non-
Hispanics.

Castro stunned his nation on
July 31 by temporarily ceding
power to his younger brother,
the 75-year-old defence minis-
ter. Raul Castro has led the

| nation at the head of a collabo-
‘ative leadership that has kept
_ the government running calmly
| in his brother's absence from
\ public life.
| Fidel Castro appeared more
| vigorous in recent television
| images, but many US Cuba ana-
\lysts assume he will never
| resume power.
|. The Bush administration
‘receives relatively little criticism
for its Cuba policies.

Cuba could seek more normal
relations or an end to the trade
embargo after Castro leaves the
scene, but for now there is little
domestic political pressure on
Bush to engage Cuba.

_ Among Republicans polled,
82 per cent had an unfavorable
opinion of Castro while 59 per-
cent of Democrats felt that way.
Similarly, 62.per cent of Repub-
licans doubted the prospects for
democracy in a post-Castro
Cuba, compared with 50 per-
cent of Democrats, and 72 per
cent of Democrats said they
favour establishing diplomatic
relations, compared with 51 per
cent of Republicans.
‘The poll of 1,000 adults was
taken January 30 to February
1 and has a margin of error of

\





@ THIS photo released by Cuba’s daily newspaper Juventud
Rebelde shows Cuba’s leader Fidel Castro,
Venezuela’s President Hugo Chavez in Havana on January 29

veyed said it is likely Castro's -

—— oe eS idl

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 15

rude Mer lm we 1M oe

STAFF members of the Sandilands Geriatric Centre hosted a birthday party for special patient,
Harrold Miller who was born in 1901 and is celebrating his 106th birthday. Mr Miller has five chil-
dren, 13 grand children, 25 great-grand children, 12 great-great-grand children and one adopted
daughter. Pictured are members of the Sandilands Geriatric Centre with Harrold Miller and his
granddaughter Faye Lewis.



(Photo: BIS/Kristaan Ingraham)







ave eet.

TH OVER 30

_ CostRIGHT, Furniture Pl
Fas

an

left, meeting with ;

(AP Photo/Juventud Rebelde)

plus or minus 3 percentage
points.











IN MY OPINION



Feel that draft?
It’s decision time
for the Dolphins

e’re emerging from the
\ N Super Bowl backwash.
National signing day, both
the most meaningful and most blind-
ly-overanalyzed day in college foot-
ball, is done. The Pro Bowl — who
cares about a psuedo-football game
that is really a Hawaiian vacation for
players who can afford it anyway?
So we have officially tucked in the
2006 football season. So let’s check
out the 2007 NFL Draft. >

The Miami Dolphins possess the —

~ ninth overall pick in a draft that
appears to fall short of what, in retro-
‘spect, the 2006 pick-and-pray was.
~ Such is the Dolphins’ luck. When they
held the No. 2 overall pick in 2005,
they were looking at
one of the worst draft
classes in the past
20 years.
Moving up to the
first round’s tower
: suites or penthouse,
especially if you have to give up picks,
is the double-down move of any draft,



copie ones enaeyeahs ROHAN TRAINERS AE ARTEMIS

particularly for a rebuilding franchise. |

You better know youre drafting a 10-
year-Gatorade-commercial star, or
you've stalled your franchise for at:

~ least one year, and probably three.

_ That’s the prelude to saying that
unless strange rumors of drug use or
excessive partying drop Brady Quinn
or JaMarcus Russell to No. 9, — not
like that would ever happen — the

Dolphins should keep their chips on .

Daunte Culpepper’s knee or Cleo
Lemon’s potential for another year.

GOTTA PLUG HOLES

Forget that “best player available”

business also, unless the best player
available is coveted to a sinful degree
by some team willing to give up
oodles of draft picks for him. Unless
somebody is willing to give you more
bullets, best to take your best shot at
directly filling a need.

The Dolphins defense is aging,
especially along the line, and espe-
cially in the interior of that line. That

makes Louisville defensive tackle
Amobi Okoye attractive. At 20 years
old, he is 6 feet 1, 317 pounds, quick
~- and strong.

The offense, however, is stagnant.

For all the criticism of the offen-
sive line, the Dolphins were 13th in
yards per rush, their highest ranking
in any offensive category, and 18th in
sacks per pass play. Certainly not
overwhelming, but not the Oakland
Raiders, either. Unless the Dolphins
see the next Anthony Munoz in some-
one such as Penn State offensive
tackle Levi Brown, they should use
the pick on a ball-handling position.

WHERE'S THE JUICE?

When it comes to dangerous play-
ers on offense or special teams, the
_ Dolphins have less electricity than
suburban Kabul. Ronnie Brown won't
' threaten Jim Brown’s career numbers,
_and he often gets caught from behind.
Yet over Ronnie Brown’s two sea-
sons, the Dolphins have shown a ten-

dency to stop the music once the run: |

ning game gets boogieing. ©
They spent a No. 2 overall pick on
the man. They should act like it.
Chris Chambers... well, his TV
show would be Everybody Likes Chris.

Nice guy, but only a nice receiver, too.

In six.seasons, only over the last sev-
eral games of the 2005 season did
Chambers combine dependability
with explosiveness. The quarterbacks
throwing to the Cleveland native
haven't exactly been Otto Graham
and Bernie Kosar, but Chamber’s
friend and fellow Wisconsin alumnus
Lee Evans is keeping J.P. Losman’
employed up in Buffalo, so sometimes
you've got to make do. /

_ That’s why the Dolphins might
want to tap another Cleveland native.
If Ohio State’s Ted Ginn Jr. makes it
to the ninth spot in the draft, he
shouldn’t slip any further.

Ginn’s speed would make him the
kick- and punt-returning threat that
Wes Welker is only when the block-
ing, coverage and stars align. What
Ginn lacks as a receiver can be taught,
unless he lacks the willingness to go
over the middle against a spleen-
splattering safety or linebacker. Also,
as the son of a football coach, Ginn’s
grasp of the game should be better

- than most players with his talent.

Whomever the Dolphins pick, they
shouldn’t take a player because he
will excite the fans, as Ginn would.
The Dolphins should take him
because he will scare opponents.

ei

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007

owe Cowboys

BY STEPHEN HAWKINS
Associated Press
IRVING, Texas — Wade Phil-
lips was hired Thursday to coach
the Dallas Cowboys, providing the
club with an experienced replace-
ment for Bill Parcells and someone
well-versed in the 3-4' defense.
The seventh coach in team his-
tory, Phillips, 59, is only the second
to arrive in Dallas with previous
head coaching experience.
The other was Parcells, who
retired on Jan. 22 after four
seasons with the Cowboys.
Phillips, defensive coordi-
nator for the San Diego Char-
gers the past three seasons, has a
48-42 head coaching record over
three seasons with the Buffalo
Bills, two'with the Denver Broncos
and season-ending, interim stints
with the New Orleans Saints and
the Atlanta Falcons. The, son of
longtime Houston Oilers coach
Bum Phillips has been in the NFL
for 30 of the past 31 seasons.
Wade Phillips joins Tom Landry

RIGHT UP THE MIDDLE: Pistons forward Tayshaun Prince drives to the basket past Lakers

and Jimmy Johnson as the only |

Texas natives to lead the Cowboys.
Landry and Johnson each won two
Super Bowls in Dallas.
“It’s great to have these cow
boys boots back in Texas,” Phillips
said, showing his boots from the
podium, where his father sat to his
right. “I’m excited about it.”
Cowboys owner Jerry Jones

- interviewed 10 candidates before

hiring his sixth coach since

\. buying the team in 1989.

Phillips was interviewed two

weeks ago, and his chances

of getting the job seemed to

be fading when supposed

favorite Norv Turner was among
five more who followed him.

But Jones chose the defensive-
minded Phillips over Turner, a
two-time head coach who was the
Cowboys’ offensive coordinator
for Super Bowl titles after the 1992
and 1993 seasons.

“We needed to get it right. In
my mind we got it right,” Jones
said, getting emotional as he intro-

ee

3C_

_ PRO FOOTBALL | OFFSEASON MOVES

riding with Phillips



RON HEFLIN/AP

HERE’S MY PLAN: Wade Phillips

inherits a Cowboys team that
hasn’t won a playoff game in

any of the past 10 seasons.

duced Phillips to the media.

After Jason Garrett, a former
Cowboys backup quarterback,
interviewed for the head coaching
vacancy Jan. 25, Jones hired him for
an unspecified role on the coach-
ing staff. It has been presumed that
Garrett will be the offensive coor-
dinator, but Phillips said he didn’t
want to discuss Garrett’s role until

PRO BASKETBALL | DETROIT 93, LOS ANGELES 78

Pistons pound Lakers



PAUL SANCYA/AP

center Andrew Bynum in the first half Thursday. Prince led all scorers with 20 points.

Mickelson eagles final hole for share of the lead.

BY DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. — Four
tournaments into his new season,
Phil Mickelson showed signs of
turning the corner on Thursday.

Mickelson, nowhere near the
leaderboard since his collapse at
the U.S. Open last summer, eagled
his final hole at Poppy Hills for a
7-under 65 to share the lead with
Nick Watney and PGA Tour
rookie John Mallinger in the
Pebble Beach National Pro-Am.

Whether this week marks the
return of Mickelson, a two-time
champion at Pebble Beach, won’t



GOLF | PEBBLE BEACH NATIONAL PRO-AM

be decided for
three more days.
One thing that
was clear on a
gray afternoon on
the Monterey
Peninsula was the
return of the mis-
erable conditions
that have made
this tournament infamous over the
years. It was cold, wet and windy
— known as “Crosby” weather in
these parts because of the years
when the late Bing Crosby was the
host of the tournament.
Mickelson and Watney played

MICKELSON



at Poppy Hills, the
easiest of three
courses in the
rotation because it
is the farthest
from the Pacific
Ocean and is
shielded by trees.

The best round
belonged to Mal-
linger, a 27-year-old rookie who
was on the wrong course at the
right time. He was at Pebble Beach,
which is exposed to the wind along
the cliffs of the ocean. Mallinger,
however, began his round on the
10th tee in the virtual calm of the



WATNEY

SPORTSWEEKEND _

INTERNATIONAL EDITION



he had a chance to talk to him.

Phillips’ head coaching record
includes 3-4 as a fill-in for the
Saints and the Falcons. He is 0-3 in
the playoffs, most notably as the
losing coach in the “Music City
Miracle,” when the Tennessee
Titans used a trick kick return for
the winning touchdown in the final
seconds against the Bills in 2000.

Phillips has handled the dubious
task of replacing Super Bowl
coaches Dan Reeves in Denver and
Marv Levy in Buffalo. So the idea
of following Parcells in Dallas
shouldn’t bother him.

Parcells, who won two Super
Bowls with the New York Giants,
went 34-32 in four years in Dallas
and lost twice in the playoffs. The
Cowboys haven’t won a postsea-
son game in.10 seasons — the lon-
gest drought in club history.

Phillips joined his father’s staff
with the Oilers as a linebackers
coach in 1976 and has been in the
NEL ever since, except for 2001

e MORE NFL NEWS

Detroit maintains
its home-court edge
against Bryant & Co.

BY LARRY LAGE
Associated Press

AUBURN HILLS, Mich. — Tayshaun Prince
scored 20 points, and Chris Webber had 18
points and ll rebounds, leading the Detroit Pis-
tons to a 93-78 victory over the Los Angeles Lak-
ers on Thursday night. ~

The Pistons have won five games in a row —
building a two-game lead for the best record in
the Eastern Conference —.and are 9-2 with
Webber in the starting lineup.

Lakers star Kobe Bryant had 18
points on 5-of-13 shooting, and he
also had eight turnovers — one
short of his career high.

The Pistons built a double-
digit lead in the first quarter with
crisp ball movement that led to
ll assists on 12 baskets, and they
didn’t have much trouble main-
taining the cushion for the rest of
the game. The Pistons have won eight ges in a
row at home against Los Angeles, including
three victories in the 2004 Finals that were Sha-
quille O’Neal’s last games with the Lakers.

Rasheed Wallace scored 18 points and had 10
rebounds for the Pistons, and Richard Hamilton
had 16 points and seven assists. Webber had his
third double-double since signing with the Pis-
tons three weeks ago, and he scored at least
12 points for the fifth consecutive game.

The Lakers had balanced scoring, but much
of it came too late in the game. Ronny Turiaf
scored 13 points, Lamar Odom had 12, Smush
Parker scored ll and rookie Jordan Farmar con-

’ tributed 10, but the Lakers fell to 3-3 on their
eight-game road trip.

The Pistons looked fantastic on offense dur-
ing the first quarter, and Webber had a lot to do
with it. Without the ball, Webber’s passing has
encouraged his teammates to cut through the

_lane and curl around picks more often. Four dif-
ferent players had assists, and the Pistons made
60 percent of their shots to help build a 28-17
lead. Webber had eight points, five rebounds,
three assists and no turnovers in the quarter.





ik



TRS

e BASKETBALL REPORT

morning, and

gusts strong
enough to topple a
t r e e

at Spyglass Hill
didn’t arrive until
he had only five
holes remaining.
Jim Furyk
played his best
golf in the worst conditions, mak-
ing five birdies on the back nine at
Spyglass Hill for a 67. Also at 67
was Arjun Atwal, another early
starter at Pebble Beach who went
without a bogey until the 18th.
e MORE GOLF



MALLINGER



4a





—

SRG eee




























THE BU/LDING ) YEP. WELL, TIME TO

{ PUT GAS IN
YOUR CAR, DAD










YEP.,No NORE
TOORIAD, NNO



Vv. t
YOURE ONE

HORACE, HOW DLO
YOU KNOW SO MUCH
ABOUT REGGIE

ONE OF HIS
CRONIES!

15 HAUNTED 2.2 GET BACK TO WORK.

JEN, I BELIEVE
You'RE BEING A OH
LITTLE OVERLY AR

NaN 115 FOUR NNONTHS OF
FREE TINE ON NY RANDS

Nag

IN A MILLION



ACROSS ~.

Cheat at “9 Across”? (5)
There's nothing in cutting up a
chop for the dog (5)

A game of bridge? (7)

Too much interest is taken in this
(5)

Draws up in reverse as we leave
Wells (5)

Foul journeys? (5) é
They're spent going north from the
Pennines (7)

Faint figures (3)

Having made it, one's left (4)
Gadget to rid of a fault? (6)

It’s not the seconds that rush
madly round the ring! (5)

Frederic had a bit of a jaw about
his music (6)

Something good for a boy to burst
into? (4)

A layer of papier-mache, normally
3










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ge ©

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(3)

Animal providing man.with a sort
of shirt (7) ua

Material | mend patchily! (5)
Source of entertainment or aid,
possibly (5)

Father's thanks for the food (5)
Anciently a match for Satan (7)
Solid figures? (5)

Stave off having to pay out fora
Rolls (5)






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PAGE 8C, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007








E

Ob WILEY IPE. WH.

iM

Western county, one fancies (6)
Prints wrongly, dash it! (6)

Play Tolstoy finished (3)

Makes the coffee go round (5)
A growing source of sound food (7)
Responsibility for giving a ring at
sunrise (4) i
One side of Glasgow (6)

Being in joint partnership, figure
ahead (5)

Sit and fish (5)

Nothing added by a former
president (5)

One knocked out with a club? (5)
Unite in an emergency (5)

Gem of a goal? (5)

Being ugly, gets out of sight about
half an hour (7)

Messenger possibly heard going
round a corner (6)

Ah, a woman out in the desert! (6)

Something to wash down the
ambrosia (6)

A [ittle letter or note (5)
Flavouring that makes many
unwell? (4)

Investment in energy (3)



’ ACROSS: 4, A-round 7, Underfed 8, Aflame 10, Corps 13, Bias 14, Eve-R_ 15,
Mars 16, Ye-W 17, I'd-ol 19, Tier 21, Goo-d o-me-ns 23, Da-RN 24, No-NE 26,
L-e.g. 27, Kee-p 29, Pros 32, R-Ely 33, Stook 34, Pop-eye 35, Caffeine 36,

DOWN: 1, Juice 2, Ado-re 3, I-ris 4, Ad.-air 5, Owls 6, Number 9, Fasten 11,
Ova 12, Prior 13, B-alone-y 15, Mod 16, Yes 18, Donkey 20, In-e-pt 21, Gag
22, M-Op. 23, Denote 25, L-OO 28, Elect 30, Ro-d-in 31, Skies 32, Rent 33,

errr



REMIND ME
NOT TO TELL
§ RANDY_.-HE
WOULDN'T
APPROVE!




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THE GHOSTS, LU ANN. '

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ACROSS: 4, Anchor 7, Terminal 8, Gander 10, State 13, Cast 14, Hash 15, Whet
16, Pew 17, Epee 19, Used 21, Protester 23, Poet 24, Seer 26, Wit 27, Apex
29, Verb’ 32, Ages 33, Sever 34, Valued 35, Ascended 36, Rental

DOWN: 1, Stash 2, Areas 3, Time 4, Algae 5, Cent 6, Opened 9, Astute 11, Tap
12, There 13, Cheeses 15, Wet 16, Per 18, Potage 20, Serve 21, Pot 22, Sex
23, Pirate 25, Ore 28, Pedal 30, Evade 31, Bride 32, Aunt 33, Stew

Ce

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THAT CIGAR#

AG

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N I BROUGHT
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Too svete?!

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Faith (5)
Deadly (5)
Main city (7)
Weasel-like
animal (5)
Minimum (5)
Achievements

(5)

Young hare (7)
Body of water
(3)

Dry (4)
Commands (6)
Scorches (5)
Rubber (6)
Domesticated
(4)

Zero (3)
Student (7)
Entire range
(5)

Small object
5)

Happen (5)
Attribute (7)
Gemstone (5)
Treatise (5)

COMICS PAGE

MMARGARET WILL P





































































OF SOMETHING."

South dealer.

North-South vulnerable.
NORTH
64
VK87
@AK62_ .
&K 1073
WEST EAST
@Q985 @#KIJ1032
Â¥Q95 9310642
4QI597 8
62 95
SOUTH
@A7
VA3
#10543
AQITBR4
The bidding:
South West North East
1 Pass 1¢ 14@
2¢ 2% 44 Pass
5

Opening lead — five of spades.

When faced with the combination
10-x-x-x opposite A-K-x-x, you
can’t be sure how many tricks you
will win or lose in the suit. The
answer depends on how the missing
cards in the suit are divided.

You will lose no tricks if either
opponent was dealt Q-J alone. In all
other cases where the suit breaks 3-2,
you lose one trick, and when the suit
divides 4-1 or 5-0, you usually lose
two tricks. !

“An most deals, declarer has no.
control over the number of losers in”
the suit. But in some deals, declarer”

can manipulate the play so as to lose
only one trick even though there

HOW many words of
four letters or more
can you make from the
letters shown here? In
making a word, each
letter may be used once
only. Each must contain
the centre letter and
there must be at least
one nine-letter word, No
plurals or verb forms
ending in “s", no words
with initial capitals and
no words with a hyphen
or apostrophe
Perultted:

he first word of a phrase is permitted (e.g. inkjet in

inkjet printer).
TODAY‘S TARGET

Good 10; very good 15; excellent 19 (or more).

Solution tomorrow.







os
oa Ff

nm
&
N
w















2 Cad (6) &
3 Climbed (6) 4
4 Rubbish (3) ‘
§ Metal fastener
(5)
6 Hesitates (7)
7 Beers (4)
8 Reply (6)
12 Thighbone (5)
13 Loaded (5)
14. Essential (5)
15. Type of chair
* (8)
16 Flower (5)
18 Beginning (5)
19 Since (7)° ~~

24 Coming up (6)

22 Vestiges (6)

23 Gorgon (6)

25 Money (5)

26 Farm animal
(4)

28 Honour (3)





ROB’LY GROW UP To BEA
JUPGE. SHE’S ALWAYS FINDIN’ ME GUILTY

Solving a Diamond Dilemma

‘and dummy’s last heart is ruffed. A

swould win the spade, be forced to

~the-same: dead end.

Ni

TRIBUNE SPORTS



NOH LOOK! YOU GOT
| UG SENT To THE
PRINCIPAL'S OFFICE!



GOSH! DO YOU THINK
WELL GET PADDLED ??.

1













GIRLS HANE MORE
DELICATE HEINIES.














































appear to be two losers.

An example of the latter case
appears in today’s hand. From the
outset, all of declarer’s attention
should be riveted on the diamond
suit. The contract depends on not los-
ing two diamond tricks, since a spad
must be lost in any case. .

South notes that if the missing
diamonds are divided 3-2, the con-
tract is sure to be made. All of his
thoughts should therefore be focused
on finding a line of play that would
protect him against a 4-1 break.

The spade lead is won with the
ace, and two rounds of trumps are
taken. The A-K of hearts are cashed,

ARIES - March 21/April 20

Don’t let others tell you what to do
this week.

TAURUS - April 21/May 21
Usually, you prefer to play it safe,
but this week you may be tempted
to gamble on something. Be careful, .
this is not a good time to take risks
with what you own andearn.

GEMINI - May 22/June 21

You'll feel a burst of energy this
week, Gemini. The good times have
returned for you. Live it up —
you've worked hard in recent weeks,
and deserve the chance to celebrate.
Getaway for the weekend if you can.

CANCER - June 22/July 22

low diamond to the king and a spade
back create a position where it no
longer matters how the diamonds are
actually divided.

East cannot afford to win the
spade because he will have to yield a
ruff-and-discard. He therefore ducks,
and West wins the trick.

West must now lead a diamond.
If he leads the queen or jack, South
allows him to hold the trick, secure
in the knowledge that if East follows
suit, the contract is made, while if
East fails to follow, West is end-
played. And if West leads the nine,
declarer simply plays low from

large, Cancer, and at long last, the
chance to prove yourself has
arrived. Make the most of it — stop
dreaming and start doing.

LEO - July 23/August 23

Power struggles of one sort or
another may highlight your week,
Leo, but things will get better by the
-weekend. In the meantime, try to
work with.people, not against them.
VIRGO -— Aug 24/Sept 22

You won’t be able to please every-
one this week, Virgo, so you're
going to have to make a choice.
Then, you have to stick to your guns

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23
Optimism is a great thing, and you
certainly have a lot of it this week,
Libra. However, be careful not to let
this translate into risky behavior
Even you are not invincible.
SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22
Something that has worried you for
some time will no longer matter th)s
week. The problem itself may net.
change, but your attitude toward at
will. This, as you will see, makes all
the difference.

SAGITTARIUS = Noy 23/Dec 21
Are you someone who brings peo-
ple together or pushes them apart?
If you’re lucky, it’s the former, but
if not, now is the time to make a
positive change. ,

CAPRICORN -— Dec 22/Jan 20
You'll accomplish more if you
don’t try to fit everything into. a
rigid timetable this week. A little
chaos may be a good thing and
inspire you to be more creative. sy

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
The trials and tribulations of recent
weeks have passed. There has nevet
been a better time to begin your dite
anew. Think only of the future.

PISCES — Feb 19/March 20

ummy. 8
Virtually the same ending devel:’
ops if East started with Q-J-x-x. He

start the diamond suit and run into

A

foam

k

ream rearm reform remark
roam roamer warm warmer

marker marrow more mower
worm wormer

amok fame farm farmer
forearm form former frame
framer FRAMEWORK from
make maker mare mar

YESTERDAY’S SOLUTION




ay

word
| radio






Ta RU As Someone out there may make Jite
TTI toda tough for you this week, but your'll
magnetic give as good as you get. -By
waves to carry Thursday, things will settle down,
sound. and you can get back to your old self.



Juan Vaimana Canto v Pentata
Harikrishna, Spanish team
championship 2006. India’s
Harikrishna, 20, Is the best
young grandmaster in a fast- 8
rising chess nation. He Is already 7
ranked In the world top 40, and
ts noted for his ability to 6
demolish weaker opponents. 5
Today's puzzle, Harikrishna
against a little-known Spaniard ‘
rated hundreds of points 3
beneath him, should have been
straightforward. Black has an
extra pawn, while his latesttum 1
e6-e5 plans e5xf4 winning a
pawn or fxe5 Nxe5S activating e
Black's pieces. So when Canto ‘e"
hesitatingly went 1 Rd3, the GM *.
assumed his opponent had .°
blundered and quiddy answered {
exf4, What did Black overlook? ;

. %_*, 2 OF
eer

LEONARD BARDEN «

&

Chess solution 8304: 1 Rd3 exf4? 2 Rog6l wins a
piece because of hay6 3 exf4 and Black cannot
prevent 4 fth3 mate. White later won on material.
Ateresa quit: 2) 39 (Add one and multiply by three)
b) 24.5 (itadtiply manber by itself and divide by two).
‘re poselhte word tndder soutien bs: WALL), rrvid,
We, mate, mace, race, RICE.

eetone s
‘2 .

eg Oa ah ee! et Ss Ce

Remember that you are free to make. °
your own decisions in. life, Aries. °°

You want to succeed in the world at ©







Full Text


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PAGE 2, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007

Oe eee ee ee ee ee ee, ey ee a eg.

THE TRIBUNE





4
v4
-,

Gomez, to attend meetings on.
future of Anglican church

@ By PETURA BURROWS
Tribune Feature Writer

ANGLICAN Archbishop
Drexel Gomez leaves for Dar
es Salaam, Tanzania today to
attend a series of communion
meetings which “to a large
extent” will determine the
future of the Anglican church.

The announcement was made |

at a press conference yesterday
at the Anglican Diocesan Office
on Sands Road.























the A.P. Moller - Maersk Group.

tug operation.





THE POSITION
management, which include:
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surveyors

ment, materials, etc for vessels

negotiation with shipyards

SvitzerWi/s
Manager in Miami, Florida, USA.

personal development opportunities.

y oe

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Archbishop Gomez is sched-

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Routine Preventative Maintenance Planning and !m- "

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Coordination and planning with Class and Flag State

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Assist in drydock planning and supervision, including

Meeting the high SvitrerWijsmuller Health, Safety,
Environment, and Quality standards, including
manage technical aspects of iSM and |S09001
Regular reporting to Regional Office x

The Technical Supervisor will receive support from other
muller staff locally in Freeport and throughout
“the Region, and will report to the Regional Technical

Furthermore, the Technical Supervisor will receive appro-
priate training and education based on his/her starting
qualifications, and will have the opportunity to gain expo-
sure throughout various training programs.and exchanges,

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES.
For the right candidate, the job offers significant career and

Consecration of gay bishop tops agenda ©



uled to attend the Joint Stand-
ing Committee of the Primates
and the Anglican Consultative
Council, and the Global South

-Primates meetings, before all

38 leaders of the provinces of
the Anglican Communion gath-
er at the Full Primates Meet-

ing, which will be presided by
_the Archbishop of Canterbury.

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Personal development can be achieved only if the candidate:

Takes an active role on building and maintaining strong
working relationship with clients, pilots, suppliers and au-

Keep records of work performed and all other contractual
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Living In or willing to relocate to Freeport

Minimum 5 years technical experience with tugs or similar

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Employee-motivation and team-building skills

Ability to implement and promote syatems and procedures
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Application with resume/CV to be sent by to Freepoint Tug &
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Tel. +41 242 352 3060, Mob. +1 242 727 0046
Marinus, lorwaghsvitzerwilsmuller.com

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NATIONAL

Six key matters will be dis-
cussed:

¢ The response of the Epis-
copal Church in the United
States to the Windsor Report,
which examined challenges to
the unity of the Anglican Com-
munion following the reaction
of conservatives to the conse-

cration of the openly gay Bish-








op Gene Robinson in the US.

¢ The ongoing relationship
between the Episcopal church
and the worldwide Anglican
Commission.

¢ An Anglican Covenant

¢ The Lambeth Conference
2008

¢ Theological education in
the Anglican Communion

e Ecumenical relations

The Covenant Design Group,
a taskforce charged with detail-
ing “the way forward” for the
Anglican church in light of the
issue of homosexuality in the
clergy, will also be presenting
its report to the Anglican Com-
mission.

This ‘Covenant Design
Group, on which Archbishop
Gomez serves as chairman, was
asked to make suggestions
which would serve as a frame-
work for the denomination and
be binding upon all members
of the 38 provinces.

The group completed that



@ DREXEL GOMEZ

document over the course of .

four days.

Though members of the
group have been sworn to keep
the contents of that document a
secret, Archbishop Gomez did
reveal that the suggestions
made are “biblically rooted”
and are in accordance with the
historical teachings of the Angli-
can church.

He describes it as a “compre-

hensive document” which he
believes answers all of the ques-
tions that Anglicans are asking
concerning homosexuality and
their faith.
Archbishop Gomez said he is
“optimistic” about the
Covenant Design.Group’s
work, and is confident that the
primates’ acceptance of this
document will be a significant
step in maintaining an ongoing

relationship between the Epis-
‘copal Church and the world-

wide Anglican Commission.

In 2003, Rev V Gene Robin-
son-was consecrated the next
bishop of New Hampshire and
became the first openly gay
prelate in the Episcopal Church,
USA. :
That controversial appoint-
ment sparked contention
among Anglicans worldwide,
who are at odds with whether or
not homosexual clergymen

‘should be acknowledged... - - ;

Scheduled to return on Ash
Wednesday, (February 21),
Archbishop Gomez will make
public the findings of matters
discussed at the Anglican Com-
munion meetings.

ADA en eeneneeeeeeeeeenneneeeee eee eegeeeeeeeeeneeeeneeeeseeneGeeseeESEeG eRe SeRen ee eNOS ERSOSEDESENSEOTeEESeeeEsGSEES ONTO OAG SURE UUSEEEIESOASERISESSESEOSEDENGUADSDSEDESSSONOSENSSSSEUSSOLOSESODS SESS OCOES

I’m being set up for involvement -

in death of Daniel Smith - Stern -

HOWARD K Stern, lawyer
and partner of dead celebrity
Anna Nicole Smith is claiming
that he is being set up for the
involvement in the death of
Daniel Smith. :

Speaking with the US news
show The Insider on Wednes-
day night — just one day before
the death of Ms Smith - Mr
Stern said that he was shocked
by.claims he saw in US tabloids,
which alleged that he was seen
flushing the drug Methadone
down the toilet at the Eastern
Road’ home ‘Horizons’ in the
Bahamas.

Daniel, 20, died last Septem-
ber in a Doctors Hospital room
of a lethal drug cocktail — just
days after the caesarian birth of
Ms Smith’s. daughter Dan-
nielynn.

According to police reports,
both Anna Nicole Smith and
Mr Stern were in the room at
the time of his death.

Mr Stern told the CBS news

show that there are people who
are out to set him up for the
death.

“I know I never gave Daniel

Methadone. I know I never told .
‘anyone I gave Daniel Methadone

oatss 2 @ «¢

BE MY VALENTINE

and I know I never flushed
Methadone down the toilet.

“For them to implicate me in
Daniel’s death, it’s just despi-
cable. I would never hurt
Daniel, I loved Daniel. He was
my family,” he said.

Former boyfriend of the
TrimSpa spokeswoman G Ben
Thompson and his son-in-law
Ford Shelley were:scheduled to
appear on The Insider last night.

They were expected to. be
interviewed about the events
they witnessed at’ Mr Stern’s
and Ms Smith’s home follow-
ing the death of Daniel.

Exchange LG Chocolates this Valentine's Day!

Come to Town Centre Mall between February 8 and 13 &
enter to win fabulous prizes for you and your valentine!

His & Hers LG Chocolate Cellular Phones
Dinner for 2 at Lucianos of Chicago |
His & Her Gift Basket Se.
Gift Certificates -

Stoo by the Security
Booth, fill out your entry
form, & you're entered!
NO PURCHASE NECESSARY!

Tune into Island EM

FEBRUARY 13

between. 2 - 6 p.m.
for the LVE Drawing!

Meet us in Centre Court for complimentary cider
packs & FREE chocolate bars for everyone!

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THE TRIBUNE

Theatrical
series to aid
education
of students

MINISTER of Education
Alfred Sears officially intro-
duced “Bahamas OnStage
YouTheatre” to the nation dur-
ing a Minister’s Book Club pre-
sentation on Monday.

The family theatrical series is
the brainchild of its CEO and
producer Kathy Ingraham.

“When this wonderful pro-
ject came to my attention, I was
truly touched by the passion of
Ms Ingraham,” said Mr Sears.
“She came with noble inten-
tions of making our youth
appreciate literature from an
early age and to assist those
with national exams have a bet-
ter understanding of their liter-
ature by bringing items from
the syllabus to the stage.

“Ms Ingraham’s sincerity
moved me because she did not
see the profit in it but rather

‘the benefit to making this avail-
able to all students. Her
commitment to getting inner
city children to the shows and
‘making it equal opportunity
speaks volumes of which my
ministry completely supports.”

The minister said Ms Ingra-
ham has been gathering corpo-
rate sponsors to assist schools
where students are experienc-
ing financial difficulties.

“At Bahamas OnStage
YouTheatre, we have a hands-
on approach that we hope our.
children can appreciate,”
explained Ms Ingraham. “We
want them to develop a rela-
tionship with the productions
because we want to light some
creative sparks for the future
actors, singers, writers, musi-
cians, set designers, light and
sound engineers, costumers and
others.

Ms Ingraham revealed that
children will have the opportu-
nity to meet the cast after the
show for photo opportunities
and a brief question and answer
period.

Schools attending the shows

will be given study guides that
tie in the play with various sub-
jects including math, science,
technology, geography, art and
craft and foreign languages.
' Shows planned for the sea-
son include Black Journey
which highlights the musical
evolution from slave ballads to
hip hop in African-Americans,
Beauty and the Beast, and the
Hans Christian Anderson clas-
sic The Little Mermaid.

Manager is
appointed
for Marley
Resort

MARLEY Resort and Spa,
the 16-room boutique resort
property opening this year on
Cable Beach, has announced
the appointment of Kirk Wright
as general manager.

In his new position, Mr
Wright will oversee operations,
co-ordinate the resort team and
maintain guest relations at the
new resort.

“The former winter home of

Bob and Rita Marley, the Mar-_

ley Resort and Spa will open.”

spring 2007 as an intimate
world-class sanctuary infused
with music, relaxation and live-
ly entertainment,” said the com-
pany in a statement: “Lovingly |
revived by the Marley family, '
the resort will blend exquisite
natural beauty, romantic her-
itage and rustic luxury with the
timeless essence that is the Mar-
ley legacy.” ‘
Wright joins the’ resort with
more than 17 years of experi-
ence in the® hospitality industry .
in Florida and the Caribbean.

Serving ‘as director of hotel ::

‘operations for, Antilles Resorts
Managementiin St Thomas
since 2005, Mr Wright worked
to substantially increase resort
revenue, Ofganise management
resources, and personally hire
and train staff.

Prior to that, he held the posi-
tion of general manager of Com-
fort Suites and Resorts in Seven
Mile Beach, Grand Cayman,
where he earned two Choice
Hotels International Gold
Awards for his accomplishments.

Born in Jamaica and educated
in the United States, Mr Wright
was graduated from Florida
International University with a
bachelor of science degree in.
hospitality management.

‘FOR 3 rt 1 a WT SERVICE
F ay, |i Ta
Pest Control

ie SC ELC ae
i 822-2157



LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 3

2m in US aid to help figh




pia and human smuggling —

m@ By BRENT DEAN

US Ambassador John Rood
announced yesterday a $3.2
million package of equipment
and technical assistance for the
Bahamas in the fight against
illicit trafficking.

This package comes as a part
of the new “Enduring Friend-
ship” initiative.

The programme in its first

stage gives aid to four coung,..,
see

tries in the region: thé

Bahamas, the Dominican -

Republic, Jamaica and Pana-
ma ~ for increased maritime
security.

As a result of the pro-
gramme, the Bahamas will
receive: four 43-foot Intercep-
tor Nor-Tech vessels with 300
hours of preventative mainte-
nance support per vessel; crew

BE JOHN Rood

training of 12 to 15 Bahamian
personnel at the US Southern
Command; four boat trailers;
two Ford 450 trucks to move
the trailers; four Jetdock boat
docks; forward looking



infrared systems for the boats;
and communications equip-
ment along with technical sup-
port.

Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of National Security,
Cynthia Pratt, thanked the
Ambassador for the aid pack-
age.

She noted that the problems
of drug trafficking, illegal
migration. and terrorism illus-
trate that security vulnerability
for the Bahamas is security vul-
nerability for the US.

Mrs Pratt assured US offi-
cials that the assets that have
been donated will be put to
efficient and: effective use in
furthering mutual interests. of
the two nations.

Ambassador Rood
described Enduring Friendship

as “a programme that shows

Government signs contracts to
improve housing communities

THE Ministry of Housing
has signed contracts for sod
grass, fencing and fruit trees
to surround the homes in
Dignity Gardens.

During a signing ceremony
yesterday, the ministry noted
that it has been mandated by
the government to carry out
the expansion of family home
construction, “and in so doing,
will aim not only to build
houses but communities.

“A multiple prong
approach has been taken to
build homes within reach of
churches, shopping centres,
clinics, recreational facilities
and to beautify, maintain and
secure yards in these com-
munities,” housing officials
said in a statement.

Dignity Gardens is one of
three subdivisions where the
government has been sub-
jected to heavy criticism by
homeowners for the poor..
construction of houses. The
ministry has in turn blamed
the contractors it hired for
the shoddy work.

Congratulating the subdi-
vision’s community associa-
tion for its efforts in beauti-
fying the area, the ministry
said it is now “incumbent
upon them to create in Dig-
nity Gardens, the communi-
ty that is to be revered
throughout the Bahamas.”

“Fruit trees will be strate-
gically placed to enhance the
beauty of the various yards
and to provide shading. And,
in years to come these trees
will produce fruits for resi-
dents to eat.

“Sod grass will provide
aesthetic beauty to yards and
the community. Fencing will
also provide security for the
home owners,” said the
statement.

It asked Dignity Gardens
residents to “join hands with
the government in this effort
of building communities.”

“We must ensure that Dig-
nity Gardens, other commu-
nities and the entire



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(Photo:Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Bahamas is kept clean, green
and pristine.”

Next Tuesday, Minister of
Housing Mr Neville Wisdom is
set to meet with residents of
Excellence Estates, another
subdivision in which the gov-
ernment has been criticised for
shoddy work, to discuss their
"community development.”
The week after, he is scheduled
to pay a visit to Pride Estates.

Earlier this week, in the wake



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of a barrage of complaints
brought to the attention of The
Tribune, Minister Wisdom
encouraged all homeowners
who have concerns about the
quality of construction or fin-
ishings in their new government
homes to bring their complaints
to him directly.

“As quickly as those things are
brought to my attention I will
give directions for them to be
attended immediately,” he said.


















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our commitment to the region;
shows our commitment, our
trust, our belief in the
Bahamas.”

He also said he expects the
addition of this programme to
further strengthen the existing
Operation Bahamas Turks and
Caicos (OPBAT) anti-drug and
human trafficking initiative.

“When the assets of OPBAT
were first challenged and we
were worried about whether or
not our capabilities were going
to be. diminished, madam
deputy prime minister, I said to
you that I was confident that
we were going to end up with
an OPBAT programme that
was going to be stronger than

Y



PALMDALE

326-5556

Sam-6pm
Monday-Gaturday

\
SOE TS

ST reas

what we have now.

“And after Senator Nelson’s
visit and his commitment to the
additional helicopters, and after
this programme, where we have

. four intercept boats plus all the

latest equipment and training, {
can tell you the OPBAT pro-
gramme is going to be
stronger,” he said.

Ambassador Rood, who will
leave his post in April, informed
the press that some of the com-
munications equipment will
start to come to the Bahamas
within the next few months.

Some of the larger equipment
will arrive at the end of the year
with further deliveries arriving
in 2008, he added.

TOWN CENTRE MALL

356-3205

1@am-8pm Monday-Friday

10am-9pm Saturday

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“2. Bie
PAGE 4, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

The Tribune Limited Issues that must

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI

Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.



_ Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387



A wrong decision at the wrong time

THE TRANSFER of Assistant Police Com-
missioner Reginald Ferguson is certainly the
wrong decision at the wrong time. And, if the
behind-the-scenes reports are to be believed, the
transfer smacks of political interference rather
than good policing.

It is claimed that Mr Ferguson — assistant
commissioner in charge of crime since 1997 —
has been targeted for dismissal by some ele-
ments in the PLP since that party became the
government in 2002. But the difficulty, it is
alleged, was how to get rid of him without it
appearing to be political.

In all the years that we have known and
have worked with Mr Ferguson in gathering
information about crime for publication, we
have never known his politics. As far as we
knew he was a hard-working officer doing his
best to protect the public from criminals. He was
so far removed from politics in our mind that it
was only this week that we learned that Johnley
Ferguson, FNM candidate for MICAL in the
2002 election, was his brother. Why this should
affect a police officer’s career —.if in fact what
is being said is true — can only be attributed to
the weakness of petty minds.

We know that in recent years Mr Ferguson
had a difficult case to handle that involved the
son of a deceased politician. As far as we can
discover he handled the situation as an objective
police officer should, not allowing politics or
connections to cloud his investigative judgment.
Did this bring him down?

It is being said that cértain government politi-
cians wanted “one of their own in place” for this
election. If this is in fact true, it is an insult not
only to Mr Ferguson, but also to whomever is to
replace him. First of all, it suggests that Mr Fer-
guson would be unfair to a certain section of
Bahamian citizens because of their politics. On
the other hand it also infers that his replace-
ment, being “one of their own”, could be easily
manipulated by the politicians to do their bid-
ding. Either way it is no compliment to either
man.

The police force is supposed to be protected
from political interference. Only the Commis-
sioner of Police can make transfers and decide
on promotions within his force. It is being
strongly suggested that in this instance heavy
pressure is being brought on Commissioner
Farquharson to remove Mr Ferguson as his sec-
ond in command. The Commissioner has since
taken to his bed with the flu. He is now out of
the reach of probing reporters, and so the
rumours persist.

The case of the five baggage handlers — so it
is being said — was a perfect time to throw Mr
Ferguson to the howling groups calling for
someone to be punished for manoeuvring the
Bahamian handlers into the handcuffs of Amer-
ican justice. ;

What poor timing, especially before an elec-
tion. What a dreadful political mistake.

289 Market St. South ¢ P.O. Box N-7984 e Nassau,

THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

“Take te first step in faith, doubt

will just have to follow”

SUNDAY SERVICES
7:00am, 9:00am, 11:15am
PASTOR EARLE FRANCIS J.P.,D.D.
Marriage Officer, Counsellor, Intercessor
Phone: 323-6452 © 393-5798
Fax: 326-4488/394-4819





Deviva

BISHOP GLORIA REDD MINISTRIES



Now — without presuming either the inno-
cence or guilt of the five Bahamians arrested in
the US and charged with smuggling drugs into
that country — let us look at the sequence of
events in that case.

It is understood that both Bahamian and
American law enforcement officers had been
working for a long time trying to find out how
drugs were getting on planes arriving into the
US from the Bahamas.

A meeting was called last year by those
investigating the case. They met in the DEA’s
offices in Miami.

The US Attorney General’s office was also
represented at the meeting. Naturally, their
Bahamian counterparts with their attorney to
look after the interest of the Bahamas were to
attend.

The meeting was called to inform both sides
of the investigators’ findings and who had fall-
en under suspicion for indictment to the US.’

Mr Ferguson, representing the Bahamas
police force, was to attend. According to press
reports, Director of Public Prosecutions Bernard
Turner was also to be present. However, the day
before their departure, word came down that
Mr Turner had been instructed not to go to the
meeting. Therefore, Mr Ferguson, and a fellow
investigator, flew to Miami, without their legal
adviser.

We understand that, other than indictments,
nothing was discussed at that meeting of any
plans for arrest — persons under suspicion were
only identified. As any police officer will con-
firm, although the US and Bahamas cooperate
in investigations, they do not collaborate on
arrests. Each side does his own thing.

Obviously the Americans have informants —
all good investigative organisations do — who
learned of the baggage handlers mandatory
training programme in the US, and — again as
all good investigative organisations will —
snatched their opportunity. And so, knowing
how these organisations work, we can easily
believe that no one in the Bahamas knew the
details of the American plan.

As for kidnapping, it must be remembered
that no Bahamian was arrested in the Bahamas
and taken to the US against his will. The arrests
were made on US soil of Bahamians, who vol-
untarily went to Miami, and who were under
suspicion of breaking American laws. Without
prior knowledge, Bahamian law enforcement
cannot be accused of collusion in their arrest.

Remember there is a war on against the ped-
dling of drugs. The American investigators in
the course of their duties, saw a window of
opportunity and took it. They did their job, and
they did it well.

As far as we are concerned, the issue is .

not the baggage handlers. Rather it is Mr Fer-
guson, a good police officer about to be thrown
to the wolves — also for doing his job. This
cannot happen.

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in the Bahamas

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I HAVE been living in
Nassau for a year and a
half. I came with the expec-
tation that I would be living
in a relatively modern, pro-
gressive Caribbean country.
In actual fact, I have come
to the sad realisation that I
am living in a Third World
Banana Republic. I have no
political alliances or affilia-
tions and have tried to
assume the role of a com-
pliant, silent temporary res-
ident. However, the never
ending list of questionable
practices and events that
seem to occur almost daily,
have forced me to want to
share my viewpoint as an
unbiased observer with
your Bahamian readers.

Among the many situa-
tions that have caught my
attention:

¢ The Nassau airport is a
travesty for a county whose
economy relies so heavily
on tourism. The radar sys-
tem has been malfunction-
ing for months, jet fuel sup-
plies have been exhausted
during busy seasons, bag-
gage handlers have been
charged with drug traffick-
ing, the facility’s best
restaurant operates out of
the trunk of a car in the
parking lot, and deplaning
customers have been forced
to crawl through the bag-
gage carousel to enter the
terminal. No arrival and
departure notice boards
share flight information
with passengers and the
national airlines office
hours resemble banking
hours, not a service-orient-
ed venture.

¢ The education system is
a failure. Student’s perfor-
mance that is rated at a D
or F level is a horrendous
indictment of the state of
local education today as
well as a wonderful predic-
tor of the significant esca-
lation of island problems to
be expected in the future.
Teachers have not been
paid in some schools since
the beginning of the term
SIX months ago. Each Sep-
tember is highlighted by
schools not opening on time
due to unfinished repairs,
or opening in totally unsafe
or unsuitable conditions. I
have heard of schools that
use the staff car parking lot

a Ee

SANOFI AVENTIS, a leading multinational
pharmaceutical company is seeking to recruit

Professional
Medical Representatives

The successful candidates will be responsible for promoting
and detailing special lines of products.

The ideal candidate will:
@ Be highly motivated and proactive
@ Be willing to travel island-wide and overseas as

Have strong interpersonal and communication skills
Have the ability to motivate, inspire and work with
other team members

Have a car in good condition

Have residence in Nassau

© Be computer literate

Qualifications and experience:
@ A degree/diploma in science, marketing, nursing or

@ Experience in marketing and sales would be an
asset, one or two years in the pharmaceutical

Please forward your application and resume by.
February 23, 2007 to:
Lowe's Wholesale Drug Agencies Ltd.
P.O. Box N-7504
Nassau, Bahamas



IDSA MREIS

letters@triobunemedia.net








for physical education class-
es and a chronic lack of
essential supplies and
teaching materials is com-
mon. Hardly an educational
system that can make par-

ents, students or the
Bahamian public proud.

¢ The local prison has
been rated as one of the
worst in the world by
Amnesty International.
Prisoners have escaped, as a
result of lax security,
absence of modern surveil-
lance equipment, poorly
motivated and performing
staff, and failure to follow
basic security protocols for
penal institutes. A foreign
journalist was assaulted in a
government prison and a
recent prisoner was incar-
cerated for over four years
without a legitimate trial
only to be freed when a
competent judge ruled
there was not enough evi-
dence to try the accused.
The Bahamas prison system
is more typical of a 19th
century prison than one
from the 21st century.

¢ Personal health and
safety has become an
increasing issue. An island
population of about 230,000
witnessed 60 homicides last
year, while the city of a mil-
lion I come from had 24
murders. The police force
is undermanned, under
trained and has often been
involved in excessive
aggression and violence.
Dishonesty within the force,
as well as the Bahamian

militia, leave the public at ©

large feeling very insecure.
Fenced and gated resi-
dences, security bars and
screens, and miles of razor
wire are a sign of the times
in many parts of the world,
but they also provide a very
sobering reflection into the
Bahamian reality.

¢ The government pro-
vides daily examples of
either incompetence or:
inefficiency or corruption.
For example, the recon-
struction of the Straw Mar-
ket, a vital tourist attrac-
tion, has still not been
addressed FIVE years after
it was, destroyed by fire.

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Members of parliament
have resorted to the gentle-
manly art of fisticuffs to
resolve their differences of
opinions. Celebrities have
been awarded Bahamian
residency, status within
weeks, while “ordinary cit-
izens” have waited for
many years. Government
subsidised low cost housing
has been substandard and
unacceptable and tainted °
with accusations of mis-
management. A local news-
paper editor who has
worked in the Bahamas for
years had his work visa
temporarily withheld when
he publicly criticised the
government. The govern-
ment is characterised by
incessant debate, hollow
rhetoric, and constant fin-
ger pointing at the opposi-
tion while avoiding dealing
with the many issues in edu-
cation, public safety, prison
reform, the environment,
diversifying the economy,
unemployment, immigra-
tion issues, drug trafficking,
health care, and downtown
redevelopment. fd
The upcoming election .-
will involve endless heated
debates among the many
candidates hoping to find a
seat on the Bahamian gravy
train. Promises will be
made and each tongue will
be coated with honey and
visions of a wonderful
future. The next govern-
ment will be no better than
any of the previous govern-
ments unless the intention

‘of the candidates is to begin

addressing some of the
issues that are identified
above. Not with promises,
but with detailed action
plans that include a firm
timeline for implementation
and the identification of the. -

individual accountable for >.’

the completion of the action
plan. Unless implementa-
tion of plans for improve-
ment becomes the focus
and vision of the leaders of
this country, it will not only
continue to look like a
Third World Banana
Republic it will become The
Third World Bahamian
Republic.

OBSERVER
Nassau,
February, 2007.












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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 5



oO ln brief



Fertility
treatment
seminars
at Doctors

THE first in a series of
educational seminars on
infertility treatment options
in the Bahamas was held last
night at Doctor’s Hospital.

Dr Anthony Carey,
founder and director of the
Health Centre for Women
and IVF Bahamas Ltd and
Dr Juergen Eisermann of the
South Florida Institute for
Reproductive Medicine are
presenting the series.

“During each seminar,
attendees will gain valuable
information about where to
start, what to look for, who to
turn to for help, and how to
overcome their sense of
hopelessness,” said the doc-
tors in a statement.

The series begins with the
basics of infertility informa-
tion about reproductive med-
icine and infertility as it
relates to the patient.

Dr Carey will also discuss
the opening of the first invit-
ro fertilisation clinic in the
Bahamas, IVF Bahamas Ltd.
- All of the seminars are free
to attend. ;

Cuba warns
pirates over
signal from
US station

m@ HAVANA

_ THE US government
strives mightily to stamp out
intellectual property theft all
over the world — except for
Cuba, where it tries to broad-
cast anti-communist mes-
sages to anyone able to see
US programming through
illegal satellite dishes, accord-
ing to Associated Press.
Now the Cuban govern-
ment is striking back, warning
TV signal pirates that they
face stiff fines and jail terms.
The Communist Party

_mewspaper Granma dedicat-

« », ed,a full, page Thursday to an



oe

S

TET,

ee

-4



prs ct er ees

saccount of the discovery and

prosecution of four men who
sold or maintained the sort of
jerry-built satellite TV systems
believed to be hidden on thou-
sands of rooftops across Cuba.

It came three days after
Cuba denounced a US gov-
ernment strategy that began
in December to use Florida
television stations to get
around Cuban jamming of
TV Marti — a move that has
made the US-funded station,
aimed at undermining Fidel
Castro’s government, acces-
sible to thousands of Cubans.



i



(



&,

2 tedophone calle

Complaints over ‘unhealthy’

ood at Government High

PARENTS and students ‘at
Government High School are
reportedly fed up with the
unhealthy food being served to
the students on a daily basis.

To make matters worse, if
they fail to bring a packed
lunch, the students have little
choice but to eat what they are
served — as school policy dic-



tates that they are not allowed.

to receive food from anyone
during school hours.
“Everything is fried, fried
fried,” claimed one irate stu-
dent. “It is all greasy. There is
nothing healthy at all and every-
one is fed up.”

According to the student, the
problem has been brought to
the attention of several senior
officials at the school, includ-

Students and parents despair at ‘greasy’ food



ing the principal, yet no action
has been taken.

He said that. when
approached three weeks ago,
one school official assured stu-
dents that something would be
done about the problem, but
failed to make good on this
promise.

The student pointed out that
last year, the Ministry of Health
launched a campaign to pro-
mote healthy lifestyles in an
effort to combat the growing
problem of chronic, preventable
diseases. These include heart
disease and diabetes.

A problem with obesity.

among young Bahamians has
also been noted.

“They had the minister of
health come up here and speak
to the students about eating
healthy,” the source said. “I
wanted to speak him right there
after the assembly.”

The student told The Tribune
that there is widespread disqui-
et about the school’s failure to
deal with the problem, adding
that outrage is growing among
both parents and students.

One parent pointed out the
irony of Government High run-

65th Red Cross Fair to be

held at Government House

THE annual Red Cross Fair
will celebrate its 65th anniver-
sary this year on March 3.

Dame Marguerite Pindling,
chairperson for the fair com-
mittee, announced yesterday
that this year’s fair will be once
again be held in the lower gar-
dens of the Government House
grounds. ,

“History will reveal that this
is where it began some 61 years
ago and continued there until
it was moved to the Sports Cen-
tre a few years ago,” Dame
Marguerite told the press yes-
terday morning at the Red
Cross headquarters.

Dame Marguerite, who has
been involved with the Red
Cross since 1976, said that she
has enjoyed the many fairs and
retains many fond memories.

“The 65th Red Cross fair
promises to be a great event.

_ There will be many booths with
various items, including various
succulent dishes, many games
for the children including rides
and other forms of entertain-
ment for the entire family and a
disco for the young adults,” she
said.

Dame Marguerite empha-
sised that because the fair,
along with the annual ball and
major raffle “is one of the
main income generating pro-
jects, which finances our oper-
ational budget,” it is important
that it is as successful as possi-
ble.

She further reminded the
public that the Red Cross
society provides a number of
programmes and services to
the most vulnerable commu-
nities.







@ CHAIRWOMAN of the Red Cross Fair committee Dame

Marguerite Pindling, along with president of the Bahamas Red
Cross Gerald Sawyer, speaks to the press yesterday at as she

announces the dates for this
year’s fair.

(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)

These programmes, she said,
include social welfare jnitiatives,
after-school mentaying pro-
grammes, meals-on-wheels, ser-
vices to migrants, development
of Family Island branches as
well as emergency disaster
relief.

Because there were no major
hurricanes last year, the Red
Cross was able to take this
opportunity to provide training
on all the major islands, Dame
Marguerite added.

“We wish to thank all of you,
our stallholders, and look for-
ward to seeing you all at the
fair,” she said.




Te funily of the late

- wibh to enpress CU gratitude
to cur manyfriends fer the kindness and sympalhy
Ufowr wisits, cards, floral arrangements,
/ and prayers sorued le
Me sincerely thank oe ee



and sincere ufprecialion

lighten es ged |

ea









Be) fe
EXTERMINATORS
PEST CONTROL:
PHONE: 322-2157

Colors:
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Rosetta St.

ning a course for students on
balanced eating, then proceed-
ing to serve food that could be
detrimental to their health.
“Some students at the school
may be diabetic, and parents
who are working and do not
always have time to pack food
for their children should be able
to know that they can get all
the food groups,” she said. “My




















and Spikenard Roads.

Funeral Service for

Esterlitta Collins, 45

A resident of Lewis Street, will be held on Saturday February 10th, 2007,
at 2pm at St. Agnes Anglican Church, Baillou Hill Road. Officiating will be
Father L. Been. Interment will follow in Southern Cemetery, Cowpen Road

She is survived by her parents, Mary T. Collins and Edward Foster;
stepmother, Millicent Foster; three children, Jarvis, Kevin Alexus and Tina
Foster; four grandchildren, T, Shon, Jarvin, Jarvas, Javron Thompson;

care givers, Karen Johnson, Pamela Miller and Joy Bell; sisters, Ruthmae,
Cherrie of New York, Sandra of Jacksonville Fl., Joy, Bridgette Price of
Miami Fl., Deborah Prince; brothers, Steven, Ronald, Ray and Mario; uncles
Kermit of Jacksonville Fl., Vincent E. Collins, Ted Collins, Collion Collins;
aunt, Ethel Collins of Jacksonville Fl., Mary Collins; numerous nieces and
nephews including Sonia, Quitten, Mark, Jason, Jamal Nikita, O Kellyn,
Jevon, Pearlean; cousins and spécial friends, Estine Glass, Joanna Munroe,
Angela Bain, Virgins Allen, Sheland Ritchie, Edward, Herbert Glass, Mr. Ted
Sweeting, Ms, Brenda Taylor, Mary Butler, Erma Evans, Jermaine, Lisa and
the Cameron Street Community, The Bain and Grant’s Town Urban Renewal
Team and the Department of Social Services Centre A.

Friends may pay their last respects at Sweeting’s Colonial Mortuary and ;
Crematorium. Baillou Hill Road, Opposite Lewis Street on Friday from 10am
to 6pm and on Saturday from 1pm until funeral time at the church.

question is, who is overseeing
what they are doing there?
Someone from the Ministry of
Health needs to monitor what is
being offered to the students.”

The mother said she under-
stands that other parents share
her concerns.

The Tribune attempted to con-
tact the principal of the school
for comment late yesterday ©
afternoon, however calls went
unanswered up to press time.

Ministry of Health officials
also did not return calls made
late yesterday afternoon

i



325-3336
PAGE 6, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Nurses Association
aiming for better
community relations
NACB ‘looking

forward to a
dynamic year’



S S saan SY
®@ THE Nurses Association of the Commonwelth of The Bahamas (NACB), held a press conference to
announce its new slate bf officers for 2006-2008 term on Wednesday, February 7, 2007, at their Longley House
Headquarters on Doweswell Street. From left are Nursing Officer II Prescola Rolle, President; Senior Nurs-
ing Officer (SNO) Rebecca Johnson, Second Vice President, Nursing Officer II D. Aneka Johnson, Pub-
lic Relations; Staff Nurse Dominique Rox, Assistant Treasurer; Staff Nurse Rosemarie Josie, Treasurer; and
Staff Nurse Leslie Hanna-Pennerman, Membership.
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m@ By TAMARA
FERGUSON

THE Nurses Association of
the Bahamas plans to develop
better relations with the com-
munity according to its new
president Prescola Rolle.

She was speaking at a press
conference held on Wednes-
day to announce the associa-
tion’s plans for the new year
and to officially introduce new
members.

Mrs Rolle, who became
president last month, noted
that for many years, the asso-
ciation has been the “premier
voice for the profession of
nursing, influencing policies
through local, regional and
international networks.”

She said that this year, the
association plans to promote
leadership in the nursing pro-
fession, increase the member-
ship and participation of nurs-
es in the association, and
inform all nurses about the
organisation, its functions and
benefits.

“We are looking torward to
a very dynamic year,” Ms
Rolle said.

The association was found-
ed in 1947 and is an indepen-
dent, non-governmental enti-
ty.

According to Mrs Rolle, the
NACB is comprised.of a par-
ent body in New Providence

and one branch in GrandC~

Bahama.

She noted that the associa- |

tion is a member of the Inter-
national Council of Nurses
and the Caribbean Nurses
Organisation. |

Mrs Rolle added that in
2007 the association also plans
to promote a positive image

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of nursing, establish official
policy, and have an impact on
the proposed National Health
Insurance (NHI) plan.

The NHI plan was passed
in the House of Assembly last
year after meeting with much
criticism and calls for more
consultation trom business
owners and doctors.

However Minister of Health
Dr Bernard Nottage maintains
that the aim — to “pool the
resources of Bahamians” in
an effort to secure affordable
health care for all — is a wor-
thy and workable one.

Mrs Rolle also noted that
the association intends to
organise a conference in
Grand Bahama and invite
nurses from other northern
islands to participate.

They also plan to foster an
improved communication sys-
tem between the parent body
of NACB and nurses in the
Family Islands, she said.

In addition to Mrs Rolle,
the executive members of the
NACB for 2006-2008 are:
Stephanie Poitier, first vice-
president; Rebecca Johnson,
second vice-president; Jen-
nifer .C King, secretary;

Andrea Nottage, assistant sec-

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retary; Rosemarie Josey, trea-

surer; Dominique Rox, assis-
tant treasurer.,

The standing commitee
members are Persophone
Munnings, education and
research; Stacy A Dean, socio-
economic and welfare; Karol
Mackey, nursing standards
and practice; Lies] Hanna-
Pennerman, membership;
Aneka Johnson, publicity and
public relations.

“With this dynamic team, it
is anticipated that this term
will be one of great
accomplishments for the pro-
fession thereby increasing
awareness of the association
throughout the country and

. facilitating nurses to achieve

their full potential,” Mrs Rolle
said.

Under the theme “Nurses
at the forefront dealing with
the unexpected”, the Interna-
tional Council of Nurses
(NCI) will host its 2007 con-
ference in Yokohama, Japan,
from May 27 to June 3, and
members of the NACB are
expected to attend.

According to Mrs Rolle, the
conference will prepare the
association to fulfill many of
its objectives.

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBHUAN? y, cuu/, FAUE /



Bahamianisation

is discrimination,
claims attorney

THE policy of “Bahamiani-
sation” is a euphemism for insti-
tutionalised discrimination, a
lawyer has‘claimed.

The Immigration Act is a
“brutal bludgeon” used against
foreigners and Bahamians alike,

_ Fred Smith told the Canadian

Women’s Club of Grand
Bahama.

“It has long outlived the
social and political culture
which gave birth to it in 1967,”
he added.

“It is wrong, it is unconstitu-
tional and, frankly, it demeans
Bahamians. It suggests that
Bahamians are not capable of
‘competing in the market place
and we need a paternal govern-
ment to protect us.

“Bahamians should not be
automatically entitled to a job
because they are Bahamians.
Employment in a free, open and
competitive market place is
earned on merit.

“Employers should be able
to. hire competent employees
and not have to settle, in many
instances, for mediocrity and
incompetence because they are
forced to hire Bahamians.”

Mr Smith urged both major
political parties to show matu-
rity and abandon this “medieval
statute of oppression” in favour
of a more humane and respect-
ful act.

Tracing the history of the leg-
islation, Mr Smith said the
“Quiet Revolution” of the
1960s brought the Bahamas
“from a country run by an
oppressive white oligarchy to
an oppressive black majority
rule.”

He said those times also saw
the purging from Bahamian
society of expatriates and
belongers, and the breach of the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement
which caused the economic col-
lapse of Freeport.

“Foreigners by the many



HB FRED Smith

thousands fled Freeport. Fami-
lies were fractured, fortunes
were lost, and in Freeport the
goose that laid the golden egg
was shortsightedly slaughtered.”

Mr Smith said Freeport had
not recovered since. “And,
frankly, the Bahamas has been
the worse for this peaceful polit-
ical victimisation and expulsion
of foreigners.”

“However, once this ethos of
discrimination and victimisation
became embedded in Bahamian
society, the PLP soon turned
on their own Bahamian broth-
ers and sisters.

“The Immigration Act, licens-
ing laws, government favours
and political corruption were
used as tools of victimisation
against Bahamians who
opposed the PLP.”

Come to the

Mind Changing
Heart Cleansing

Today, in spite of milestones
reached during the two FNM
administrations, the Bahamas
still suffered from the “rape of
rights” inflicted by the PLP over
25 years, he said.

Mr Smith said the country
needed to realise that Bahami-
ans can’t do it all. “We have
limited technical expertise and
know-how,” he added.

“Instead of using immigra-
tion to invite the best and
brightest from abroad, our
immigration policies interna-
tionally cast a negative view on
the Bahamas.”

He said immigration policies
should identify those we want in

the Bahamas and encourage’

them to invest in the economy
and contribute to long-term
growth. ne}

RD

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Sunday, February 11th to Friday, February 16th, 2007

At 7:30 p.m. Nightly at

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Under the Theme: “Jesus Will Do It For You”

Dynamic Speakers are:

Bishop Cleophas L. Capron, Jr. District Overseer
Bishop Arthur Knowles, District Overseer (C.O.G.)
Bishop George E. Thompson, Bishop Oliver Kennedy
Bishop Rosevelt R. Rolle & Bishop Fred Newchurch

Hear our anointed Soloists: Glenda Stubbs, Hattie Williams,
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Come and be blessed, inspired, challen

Crusade Coordinators are:
Ministers Barry B.Morris

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Familiar with (HIS) Epitome System perferred.

Knowledgeable of constructing Rates, Packages, Promotions,
Advertisements, Reservations.

Knowledgeable with Yield Management

Must possess good written and oral communication and computer
skills, along with strong attention to detail organizational skills and
follow through.

Flexible work hours required for this position.

Minimum qualifications required; Associate Degree in Business
Administration or equivalent.

¢ One Breakfast Server

¢ One Laundry Attendant
¢ Two Housemen

¢ Two Space Cleaners

¢ Two Room Attendants

¢ Two Room Inspectresses

High School graduate as well as Bahamahost graduate is a plus. Aclean
Police Certificate and other supporting documents required for all positions:

Applications are available at the Security Gate or e-mail
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INTERRUPTION IN SERVICE





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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007

LET

Looking fora

THE Tribune has been inun-
dated with calls from concerned
men and women in regard to
the shallow pool of qualified
daters. In an attempt to help
single Bahamian women and
men find each other we are
introducing the “Find a date”
campaign.

With Valentine’s Day fast
approaching The Tribune, in
partnership with Bahamas @
Sunrise, is putting forward Ava
Miller and Alex Morley.

To ensure that each date is a
success, the persons selected
will be treated to a special din-
ner at one of Nassau’s top
restaurants, along with receiving
other special prizes and sur-
prises.

Interested singles (no mar-
ried people please) are invited
to send in a brief description of
themselves, along with a picture
to: .

E-mail: ybdeleveaux@tri-
bunemedia.net - with “Need a
date for the Valentine’s week-
end? - in the subject line.

You can also see the form on
page 14.

¢ Deadline for entries is Feb-
ruary 13. The winner will be



HAVA Miller

announced on February 15. The
dates with Alex and Ava will
happen on Saturday, February
17.

Up first is the lovely Ava;

Ava Miller

Age 30+

Field: Financial Services
Sector

College educated - Bachelor’s
degree

Single mother

A lady of high standards and
expectations, Ava describes her-
self as a natural-born Capricorn,
independent, fiercely loyal, lov-
ing and very romantic.

“I do not look at what an
individual is on the outside, but
rather what they have to offer
on the inside - because that is
where the personality proceeds
from. I must mention also that
throughout my life God has
been there for me and I have a
deep reverence for the things
of God, but do not boast of
being perfect.”

A natural sweetheart is how
Ava describes herself, but there
is a proviso — don’t get on the
wrong side of ‘this woman. A
woman of principles, Ava places
a premium on honesty, within
herself and others. In fact, she
prefers people to be upfront
with her.

“I am upfront with people. I
don’t hold things in. I might
hold something in for a little
while, but I always tell you
what’s on my mind...nicely or
maybe a little prickly - accord-
ing to what the situation calls
for.




has an adventurous side — any-
one up for hang gliding?

So what type of man is Ava
looking for?

Preference No 1: Dark choco-
lates

Preference No 2: Creamy
caramels

Looking at the big picture
however, Ava recognises that
her preferences are insignificant
when compared with what can
be gained by allowing the true,
character of a man to shine
through.

Ava is looking for a guy who
is sensitive in every sense of the
word, a man who respects him-
self and others equally, and a
man who lives his life based on
a strong moral code and godly
principles.

Ava wants a man who knows

the value of compromise, but .

who is also able to stand firm
when his core beliefs are being
called into question. She wants
someone who is capable of giv-
ing and receiving love and
someone who does things “just
because”. Also important to
Ava is finding a man who is
independent, and who meets
with success as he strives toward



â„¢ ALEX Morley

his goals and aspirations.

Next up is The Tribune’s own
Mr Morley;

Alex Morley

Age 27

Journalist

College educated - Bachelor's
degree

Never married

No children

A social activist, Alex has a
strong political and social bend,
and is deeply concerned about

THE TRIBUNE

» & date?

the rights of others. Possessing a
strong belief in freedom and
happiness for all, Alex is pas-
sionate about creating a world
where true equality exists, and
righting the world’s, and the
Bahamas’ wrongs.

He is described by his col-
leagues as compassionate,
warm, friendly, kind, generous,
easy-going and soft spoken.

Alex loves to have fun. He ,
loves the outdoors, going to the |

movies and his number one pas-
sion is reading — the last book

he read, re-read actually, is .
“The Black Jacobins” a story :

about the Haitian revolution.
So what type of woman is

Alex looking for?

Alex is looking for a woman

22 years old and older, with a

similar passion for social jus- °

tice, and racial and gender

equality and freedom for all. »

He likes women that are good
natured, with a personality that

grabs the attention of those :

around.

Ultimately, however, Alex |
says: "I want a woman who can

teach me something about life
and who is open to learning
from me as well."

Government plans to announce
‘national energy policy ‘soon’

THE government says it is
about to introduce a national
energy policy aimed at explor-
ing and encouraging the use of
alternative sources of power.

The announcement was made

at the commissioning ceremo-
ny of the D/A 13 - an 18 MW
slow speed diesel generator at
the Bahamas Electricity Cor-
poration’s (BEC) Clifton Pier
Power Station on Monday.

Minister of Energy and Envi-
ronment Dr Marcus Bethel said
it is also the government's inten-
tion to reduce the country’s
dependency on fossil fuels such
as the diesel and gasoline in

power generating facilities.

He disclosed that his ministry
has completed a petroleum
usage review and with the assis-
tance of the Inter-American
Development Bank, developed

erside Qruneral Chapel
“Where the river lies still.
‘24 HOURS A DAY
“Serving The Bahamas With Pride”
Frank M. Coorsr - Funeral Director

~ Market Street & Bimini Avenue
PO. BoxGT 2305
Nassay, Bahamat
Telephone: (242) 356-3721
Cellular: (242) 395-8931



Cockburn Town
San Salvador, Bahamas
Telephone:
- (242) 331-2642 :

“Honauclag

Funeral Service for the late

Sandra Dee Strachan
Knowles Cartwright,

and a resident of Foxdale Subdivision
formerly of Mangrove Cay Andros.
Service will be held at Ebenzer
Baptist Church, Charles Vincent
Street on Saturday at 11:00 a.m. and
officiating will be the Reverend Dr.
Elkin Symonette and assisted by
other ministers. Interment will follow
| in the southern cemetery on Cowpen
and Spikenard Road.




Ruby Funeral

Miss
Christine
Castin, 29







of The Haitian Village,
Joe Farrington Road
and Kool Meadow
Lane and formerly of }
Gonaives, Haiti will be
held on Saturday,

Survived by her husband, Andrew Cartwright; mother Princess
Cooper; her father, Vernal Strachan; stepmother, Mavis Strachan,
13 sisters, Helen Knowles, Harriet and Norine Francis, Pauline
Longley, Shirley Alice Pernell and Patricia Strachan, Renae
Moncur, Prenettea Antonio, Eula Marie Davis and Deborah
‘Ann Clarke; seven (7) brothers, Joseph Knowles, Shanda, Kevin
Erlin, Marcus, Marvin and Julian Strachan; three (3) aunts







Sr ' i
Emerald Ridge Martaary
& Monument Company Utd.
Mr. Wendell G. Dean Hy us neice!

Matiatag Fanene Director

Service for

a framework national energy
policy for the Bahamas.

“A national energy policy
committee is presently collat-
ing the data and will soon com-
mence public consultations
which will result in a national
energy policy for the Bahamas,”
Dr Bethel said.

The policy, he added, will
provide guidelines for energy

security for national develop- |














CA veieg a rth

me The be
@) a
( ay) Csire





w thos

ment, explore and encourage
the use of acceptable alterna-
tive sources of energy and con-
tinue the promotion of energy
conservation.

“However, it is recognised
that in the short term we will
remain dependent on fossil
fuels, but must set goals to
incrementally increase the use
of alternative and renewable
sources such as solar while we
decrease our dependence on

fossil fuels,” Dr Bethel said.

‘ Officially commissioning the
new generator, Prime Minister
Perry Christie urged the coun-
try’s only energy supplier out-
side Grand Bahama to make
electricity more affordable to
Bahamians.

“People in this country want
obviously cheaper electricity
rates. We have too great a
potential. .We are too near being
the best little country in the
world not to be able to ratio-
nalise how we go about improv-

.ing the delivery of service to

our countrymen and women
and how we are able to do so on
an increasingly more efficient
basis,” the prime minister said.

The new unit is the latest of

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd

_ Montrose Avenue

BEC’s fleet of generators, as
the corporation continues to
strategically replace older, less
reliable and less efficient gen-
erators with modern equipment
in order to stay ahead of the
load growth taking place on
New Providence, Paradise
Island and the new project on
Rose Island.

Dr Bethel underscored the
importance of BEC being able

mm

to deliver. quality and reliable -

service to consumers. -

“With the incredible amount |

of development all over the
nation, the Bahamas Electricity
Corporation continues to expe-
rience growth in the demand
for New Providence. It is also
challenged to respond to unpar-
alleled demand all over the
Family Islands,” he said.

BEC general manager Kevin

ntti ty BE OR tae Eo a

Basden said: “This unit has not :

only improved the reliability and ‘

quality of our service, but has °

already begun to assist in reduc-
ing the fuel surcharge, which
would have been higher if this
generator was not in operation,
and to’ begin to indirectly pay
for itself via savings on fuel
cost,” said Mr Basden.

Sw ww wr

4
3

MS































February 10, 2007 at 2:00pm at Gospel
Assembly Church of Jesus Christ, Minnie Street
and Balfour Avenue. Pastor St. Louis Celiner,
assisted by other Ministers will officiate and
burial will be in Southern Cemetery, Cowpen
and Spikenard Roads.

et yl ae te ie * te se a i NC A NN A BO! IL Tate NY,

Beatrice Stubbs, Victoria Missick and Princess Burrows of
Mangrove Cay, Andros; three (3) uncles, Re. Wilfred Stubbs,
Wil fred Strachan of Mangrove Cay, Andros and Val ban Roach
of Nassau, Bahamas; father-in-law, Brendan Cartwright; four
(4) sisters-in-law, Lornamae and Mickey Strachan, Jenenene
Key and Kuturch Cartwright; special friend, Joseph Jones of
Mangrove Cay, Andros and a host of other relatives including
Michelle and Clarence Major, Rodney Flowers, Berlyn Williams,
Vlema Mullings, Gregory Asquith, Valarie and Rodriquez King,
Zelderine, Judy, Michael, Anthony Jr. Roach, Janice McKenzie,
Julianne Black, Philip, Wencil, Chef, Terrance, Patrick, Kelvin
and Francine Newton. Vangerline, Arlington and Val Bastian,
Roselyn and Alexis Allen, Florina, Lee and Altermon Sweeting,
Andrew, Dwayne, Adrian, Joel, Telcine Stubbs, Laverne Rolle,
Terryann Moxey Moxey, Esther and Prince Hepburn, Sham,
Francis Moss, Florence and Kennedy Rolle, Florrie Evans,
Linda Rolle, Sheila, Shirley, Wellie, Stephanie and Inspector
Alexander Black, Williamae Poitier of Exuma, Natasha Laramore
of Exuma, Van ria and Philippa Smith and family, Mr. and Mrs.
Thomas Mingo, Mrs. June McKenzie and family, Ms. Eulamae
Greaves and family, Shurmako Burrows and family, Jeanie
Pinder and family; six (6) brothers-in-law, Captain Benjamin
and Rev. Jeffrey Francis of Bimini, Bahamas, Thomas Knowles,
Lawrence Antonio, Allan Cleare and Allan Moncur; (15) nieces
including, Nadine Curtis, Lavern McPhee, Eyvette Cooper,
Charmaine, Princess, Jenora and Alicia Francis, Jovonica Davis
and Tameko Roberts; (18) nephews including, Anthony, Charles,
Jeffrey Frederick and Jeremy Francis, Garland Cooper and
Lynden Curtis, Gregory and Larry Knowles; numerous grand
nieces including, Lynderia Curtis, Lavandra Colebrook, Jasmine
Roker, Fantasia Fritzgerald, Jessica and Jataria Francis, Eddesha,
Elizabeth, Clemenia Ellis; numerous grand nephews including,
Fabian Fritzgerald, Jaden and Jarvis Roker, Jakail Dames,
Lindreco and Lynden Jr. Curtis, The Honourable Frederick
Mitchell M.P. for Fox Hill, the entire Foxdale community, the
entire Union Village family, the entire Bimini community and
the entire Mangrove Cay, Andros community, other relatives
and friends too numerous to mention.

o

The Radiance of this “Ruby of A Gem” will
always glow in the hearts of her:
Children: Junior and Dwaine Castin;
Father: Léonce Castin;

Mother: Azéla Mondélus;

Five Brothers: Wislly, Fresnel, Silvion, and
Rivier Castin and Seauvoir Chaléstin;
Five Sisters: Enide, L éonie, Choupette,
Claire-Marthe and Mirielle Castin;
Five Nephews: Sadrack, Silverse, Silvain,
Firandy and Jhimy Castin;

Three Nieces: Darline, Carnia and Wondline
Chaleston; _

Three Uncles: Dieselle and Secret Mondélus
and Paul Castin;

Aunt: Renette Mondélus; :

Ten Cousins: Joceline, Choupette, Anite,
Asboune, Jonas, Emmania, Remy and Carida
Mondélus, Mirlaine Choisy and Makie Castin;
Three Brothers-in-law: Julio Mondélus,
Rivier Castin and Jeanty Gelin;

Many other loving family and friends.

i Ae enn

a ee

nt ete P eee)

et he le

Bahamas Bus &

gk
~ \ A“ NX

<\\

32251722

The body will be viewed in the “Emerald
Suite” Emerald Ridge Mortuary & Monument
Company Ltd. #20 Claridge Road on Friday,
February 09, 2007 from 1pm to 6pm and on
Saturday, February 10, 2007 at Gospel Assembly
Church of Jesus, from 1:00pm to service time.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Riverside
Funeral Chapel, Market Street and Bimini Avenue on Friday
from 10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. and at the Church on Saturday at
9:00 a.m. until service time.



te iM Oe a le i
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 9



Lo |
It’s time Pastor Moss was

allowed to run in Bain Town

YOUNG MAN’S VIEW

m@ By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com



Lk: WOULD be a shame
if the PLP once again
denies C B Moss, Senate vice-
president and pastor of
Mount Olive Baptist Church
(in Bain Town) the nomina-
tion as the party’s candidate
to contest the Bain and
Grants Town seat in the
upcoming general election.

In 1997, Mr Moss offered
himself as the PLP’s candi-
date for Bain Town, but he
suffered a crushing defeat to
the FNM’s Gregory Williams,
who had represented the con-
stituency since 1992.

According to political
insiders, Dr- Bernard Not-
tage’s return to the PLP has
once again hampered Mr
Moss’s chances of receiving
his party’s nod to run.

In 2002, C B Moss was
promised that he would have

been his party’s candidate for
the Bain and Grant’s Town
constituency, particularly

since the FNM had reduced
the House seats to 40 and had

thereby combined Bain and .

Grant’s Town. Current MP
Bradley Roberts was also
expected to bow out of front-
line politics. This was not to
be, as Mr Roberts ran again
and retained his seat!

After Bradley Roberts’
win, it was reported that the
Works and Utilities Minister
had promised Mr Moss that
he would retire from politics
after serving half a term,
thereby opening the door for
Mr Moss to run for the seat in
a by-election. Again, Mr Moss

Gil, B.S O°N

was duped as Mr Roberts did

not step aside as promised!
In 2005, Mr Moss wrote an

open letter to residents in the
aforementioned constituency

and asserted that Mr Roberts

had broken his word. In his
defence, Mr Roberts stated
that Prime Minister Perry
Christie had invited him to
continue on in his Cabinet as
the PM felt that he was a sig-
nificant part of the govern-
ment in view of the scale of
work that needed to be com-
pleted during the PLP’s first
term.

This was the second broken
promise that Mr Moss suf-
fered at the hands of the par-
ty that he remains loyal to.

_In Loving Memory

— Caroline D. Sawyer
15th December, 1957- 9th February, 2003

“Take Me Home”

© Tyrone G. Sawyer

Take me home!

Where the mattress greets my weary body

Like a long, lost friend.

Where all I see are great beginnings,

Where migratin
Glad

And nota daunting end.

birds outside my window
y chirp for me.

Home, where I am free!

Take me home!

Where I so blithely sleep the mellow sleep

Of the undisturbed.

Where there is warmth and peace of mind,
And where all my dreams converge.
Where I am loved and hugged and cuddled

By kin who lovest me;
Home, where I am free!

Take me home!

Where I summon hope
And cast away all doubts that st

? <
ill remain

Where I pray, or even crack a joke,

And banish all my pain!

Where~exultant and exuberant
Christ’s Spirit flows through me;

Home, where I am free!

Take me home!

Where all my earthly cares fade away.
And bid me: “Sweet goodbye!”
Where angles bear me up and take me
Far beyond the bluest sky!

Following Mr Christie’s
announcement of the March
12 closure of the old register,
where he asserted that no new
seats will be created, Mr Moss
was again thrust into the spot-
light as questions about
whether he would be the par-
ty’s nominee, considering the
speculation about Dr Not-
tage’s probable nomination
for that district, were plenti-
ful.

According to news reports,
Dr Nottage is being strongly
considered as the PLP’s can-
didate for Bain and Grant’s
Town.

Again it appears that PLP
loyalist C B Moss may be
hoodwinked by his party.

Although there have been
suggestions that Senate pres-
ident Sharon Wilson would
step down and that a new
Ministry of Religion was
being formed as compensa-
tion if Mr Moss again steps
aside, C B Moss has been
adamant about his desire to
run in the upcoming elec-
tions—and rightly so! Mr
Moss has said that he is wait-
ing for his party to abide by
their oath.

A few years ago, as a his-
tory student at the College of
the Bahamas, I was invited by
my lecturer — Chris Curry —
to assist with organising and
creating a database of files
that were related to the cam-
paign to save Clifton.

I met a newly slimmed-
down Mr Moss at his church
officg, where my lecturer and
I offered volunteer service as
we both believed in his cause.
At the office, I was also able
to observe My Moss’ interac-
tion with his would-be con-
stituents and witnessed his
passion for social and envi-
ronmental issues.

So, if C B Moss is once
again betrayed, how can he
ever trust his party? Having
given 42 years of unbroken
















of:




























on account of illness.

away the roof.

died peacefully at her home, Sunnyside, on East |
Bay Street, Saturday, February 3rd. She was |,

She was the youngest of six children, and the
only daughter of Roger Moore Lightbourn and
Mary Beatrice ‘Moon Lightbourn. Her
grandfather was the Reverend Francis Moon, who as a Methodist minister
was posted in 1854 from England to serve the church in the Bahamas.

service to the PLP, shouldn’t
Mr Moss be more deserving
of a nomination than Dr Not-
tage, who recently returned
to the PLP after a five-year
hiatus during which he led his
own party, the CDR?

_ When Dr Nottage became
disenchanted with the PLP
and felt he was treated unfair-
ly after Perry Christie’s ascen-
sion to the leadership, he left!
It’s clear that even though CB
Moss has been betrayed by
his party twice already, he has
remained amember. '

Shouldn’t his loyalty be
rewarded?

Recently, certain members
of the PLP made a racket
about the FNM’s refusal to
nominate lawyer Ramona
Farquharson for the Kennedy
constituency, claiming that it
was the iniquitous work of
party leader Hubert Ingra-
ham.

Because these persons
made such an uproar in the
newspapers and on the air-
waves, I now ask: what would
be the difference between Mr
Ingraham’s alleged denial of
the FNM nomination to
Ramona Farquharson and the
PLP’s constant betrayal and
blatant denial of their nomi-
nation to long-time Bain
Town campaigner CB Moss?

The irony is that these fel-
las have got the nerve to
shout from the hilltops that
Hubert Ingraham is stifling
candidates!

From all indications, C B
Moss is a good PLP: Howev-
er, should he not be nominat-
ed, he should run as an inde-
pendent.

The apparent victimisation
of Reginald Ferguson

S ince the Nassau Flight
Services (NFS) fiasco,

where five baggage handlers

KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED
st Tas

Ua UNA ad oon ae) a

WINIFRED
(Mrs. Mervyn)
JOHNSON
(nee Lightbourn)

Mrs Johnson attended Havergal College in Toronto, and returning to Nassau
became an English teacher at Queens College, Nassau. The Reverend Dyer,
head-master of Q.C. appreciated what he called her ‘joyous personality’. Her
students affectionately called her ‘Miss Winnie’. She loved teaching, and
boasted later that during her eleven year tenure she never missed a single day

In 1939 she married Mervyn Johnson, son of Sir George and Lady Johnson.
Mr Johnson was Registrar General for some years and then joined in partnership
with Godfrey Higgs to form the law firm of Higgs and Johnson. During the
war years Winifred was an energetic member of the Woolgatherers, and was
for many years a member of the IODE and the Nassau Garden Club. Like her
parents and grandparents before her, she was a lifelong member of Trinity
Methodist Church, until afflicted with both deafness and blindness. She played
the piano for Trinity in its temporary quarters after the 1929 hurricane blew

She was predeceased by her five brothers, Percy, Cyril, Hugh, Nelson and
Gerald and her husband predeceased her by thirty years. Left to cherish the
memories of her long life are her two daughters, Valerie Sangwine of Winchester,
England and Diane Sturm of Nassau; one son-in-law, Marcus Sangwine; one
granddaughter, Catherine Sangwine; five nephews, Ronald G. Lightbourn,
Michael E. Lightbourn, Godfrey E. (Tippy) Lightbourn, Mike Lightbourn,
Richard Lightbourn, and Tim Lightbourn; god-daughter, Carla Cole, as well
as many great-great nephews and neices, and even great-great-great nephews.
Also mourning her departure are her kind care-givers and long time canine
companions, Danny Boy, Danny Belle and Mr Brown.

A Funeral Service for Mrs Winifred Johnson will be held at Trinity Methodist
Church, Frederick Street and Trinity Place, Nassau on Saturday 10th February,

were purportedly lured to the
US and brought up on
charges of allegedly smug-
gling drugs onboard US-
bound airlines from Lynden
Pindling International Air-
port, the government has had
egg on its face.

- Several political entities
have since called for the gov-
ernment to disclose the cir-
cumstances surrounding the
suspected. entrapment
of these men, for crimes
allegedly committed in the
Bahamas.

It has been suggested that
the events surrounding this
operation were a contraven-
tion of Bahamian law.

Following the arrests, the
only person to admit knowl-
edge of the arrests was Assis-
tant Commissioner Reginald
Ferguson, while the Minister
of Foreign Affairs, the
Attorney General and Minis-
ter of National Security have
all denied knowing of
the joint US/Bahamas opera-
tion.

There is something awfully
strange about this, particular-
ly since the Commissioner of
Police reports to the PM
and the Minister of National «
Security at least once per
week. ;

It now appears that the so-
called restructuring of the
police force is a means by
which to scapegoat ACP Fer-
guson, placing all blame at his
feet and apparently demoting
him to head the Police Col-
lege.

To add fuel to the flame,
ACP Ferguson is also the
brother of FNM South
Eleuthera candidate Johnley
Ferguson.

Indeed, Mr Ferguson’s
transfer does come at an aus-
picious time and from the
looks of things, it’s becoming
abundantly clear that, “new”
PLP or not, old habits die

hard!

2007 at 3:00p.m.

Rev. Bill Higgs and Rev. Charles A. Sweeting will officiate and interment
will follow in St. Anne’s Cemetery, Fox Hill, Nassau.

Where my eternal, Faithful, loving God
In mercy, Welcome me:
Home, where I am free!






In lieu of flowers, anyone who chooses may send donations to The Bahamas
Humane Society, P.O. Box N-242, Nassau, The Salvation Army, P.O. Box N-
205, Nassau or any charity of their choice, in Memory of Mrs Winifred
Johnson.

From:

Tyrone, Nefitieri, Tyrone, Jr,
Joshua, Anwar & Family

Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited.


PAUL IU, CMIVAY, FEDMUANT? Y, ZUU/

SS



STORY SO FAR: Meli and her family

have been living in.the mountains of —

Kosovo at a KLA camp while the war
with the Serbs rages on below. One morn-
ing she wakes up to find that her brother
Mehmet is missing.

CHAPTER EIGHT
Mehmet Goes Missing Again

Y FIRST thought was to

wake Papa and tell him that
Mehmet was gone. But Papa was sleep-
ing soundly for once, and I hated to wor-
ry him. Mehmet had probably just made
a trip to the latrine. That was it. I was
just being my usual anxious self. I lay
down again. Adil snuggled up closer. If it

‘was this cold in September, whatever .

would we do when winter came? I
turned so J could hear any movement of
the tent flap. Whenever it moved I stiff-
ened, willing Mehmet to come in and
lie down, but each time it was only the
wind.

Kathe

Ast Jé Sale tod

ea
cc





Finally I couldn’t stand it another sec-
ond. I carefully climbed over Adil and.

felt the ground cloth along the flap.
Then I bégan to pat frantically along

“the front of the tent. Mehmet had taken

his blanket. I covered my mouth to keep
from calling out, crawled out of the tent,
and stood up outside.

ith the cooler nights, I had

taken to sleeping in my
clothes. Good thing. I could scout
around and see if I could find him before
the rest of the family woke up. If
Mehmet.had told Papa or Mama he was
leaving, he wouldn’t have sneaked out in
the middle of the night.

There was enough moon for me to see
my way around the tents in the family
encampment. Mehmet wouldn't be here,
I was sure. He must have gone to the
KLA tents. ;

I took a deep breath and started
through the trees toward the campfires
of the guerilla fighters. I hadn’t taken
many steps before I felt cold metal pok-
ing into my backbone.

A flashlight shone in my face. “It’s
only a little girl,” a man’s rough voice
said. “Where are you going in the middle
of the night? Did you miss the path to
the latrine?”

“Pm looking for my brother.” My
voice was shaking, even though I knew
in my head that the fighters wouldn’t
hurt me.

“How old is your brother?”

“Thirteen,” I said.

“Oh,” the voice behind the flashlight

said. “I thought you meant little brother.’

_ Don’t worry, your brother can take care
ofihimself. Go back to your tent.”

‘“His—his name is Mehmet Lleshi. If
you see him, will you tell him his family
is worried about him?”

“There’s no need to worry. He’s fine,
I’m sure. Go on back, now.”

There was nothing else I could do. I
crept back into the tent and lay down
between Isuf and Adil. I couldn’t sleep,
and the night stretched on and on until,
at last, it was morning.

Papa was up first. I followed him out
of the tent and told him that Mehmet
was gone, along with his blanket. He
nodded. “Tell your mother not to wait
breakfast,” he said. “As soon as the fire
is made, I'll go look for him.”

Everyone wanted to know, of course,
where Papa and Mehmet were, but I
told them that Papa had just said we
were not to wait breakfast, that they
would be home soon. Mama gave mea
worried look, but she said nothing.

It was mid-morning before Papa
returned—with a glum-faced Mehmet
walking a few steps behind. At least my
brother still had enough respect left for
Papa not to defy him. I was relieved to
know that.

I didn’t speak of Mehmet’s disappear-
ance until later when he and I were gath-
ering firewood. “I’m glad you’re back,”
I said to him.

“T’m old enough to volunteer,” he said.
“Papa seems to forget that I spent two
months in jail. I’m not a child.”

“I’m still glad you’re back,” I said.

“When I’m fifteen Pll go, no matter

[HE | HIBUNE

a

what Papa says.”

But Mehmet wouldn’t be fifteen for -

fifteen months. Surely the war would be
long over by then. ' ;

The next morning when I woke up,
Papa was gone. “Where’s Papa?” I asked
Mehmet.

He shrugged. “I don’t know. He was
gone when I woke up. Mama said he
left the message that I was to be in
charge, so I’m expecting you to listen
to me for a change.”

He sounded almost like my bossy old

brother again. “I’m making the fire now,
so it’s up to you to organize the fuel
gathering.”

I looked for Mama and found her try-
ing to wash herself behind the tent. It
was the best anyone could do for pri-
vacy. “Where has Papa gone?” I said,
feeling as though my world was flying off
in every direction. First Mehmet, now
Papa.

“Shh. He’s gone to fetch Uncle Fadil.”

“But it’s miles—”

“He got a ride partway.” She pulled
her dress down over her head and then
put on her coat. “We’ve got to leave
here,” she said quietly. “Before we lose
your brother.”

(Continued on Tuesday)

Text copyright

© 2005 by Katherine Paterson
Illustrations copyright

© 2005 by Emily Arnold McCully
Reprinted by permission of Breakfast
Serials, Inc.
www.breakfastserials.com



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THE TRIBUNE



Ingraham

FROM page one

Sir Lynden had been short-

changed in respect of his PM’s

pension.

' “Then they discovered that I

was not double dipping; that
while I was receiving a prime
minister’s pension I was not

receiving a salary as an MP. So }
they came up witha plan to pay ;

ir Lynden Pindling’s estate half:
a million dollars out of the Public;
Treasury. They said this was :
owed in respect of his Prime Min- :

ister’s pension from August 1992
to June 1997.

l “But there was no prime min- :

ister’s pension law at the time the
PLP lost the government in
1992,” he said.

| The party leader noted that he

had promised to represent his :
constituency and serve as leader :
af the opposition without accept-

ihg payment for doing so.

“One month after the 2002
lection, during my first speech in:

parliament, and after my account
had been credited with the ee
Hay for the month of May,

asked the PLP government x
amend the law to prohibit a |

retired PM from receiving pen-
slon and an MP’s salary. They
chose not to amend the law, but

they discontinued sending the :

money.
“At their convention in 2005
they announced that I was rece

ing both my PM’s pension and
the salary of an MP. This was a:

blatant lie,” Mr Ingraham said.
, He then read the text of a Iet-

ter from the Treasurer of the :
Bahamas confirming that no :
salary had been paid to him as :

ah MP since May, 2002.

; “In July, 2005, without my

knowledge or consent, my bank
atcepted a deposit from the Trea-
sury of $86,333.33 which the gov-
ernment refuses to have me
return,” he said. “The govern-

ment deposited this money into :
my account to cover the lie they ;
told at their convention that I :
had been receiving my MP’s pay :

afl along. It was a dirty trick, but
that’s the way they go.”
‘Mr Ingraham said that w hen

he discovered what had been

done, he instructed his bank not

to accept any more funds from
the Public Treasury other than :

his PM’s pension.

‘He added that since the time |

he was appointed leader of the

opposition, his bank has also :
returned the money payable to |

him for that post.

‘Mr Ingraham then read the }
text of a letter confirming that :
the bank had agreed only to |
accept $9,500 a month for his :

monthly pension. ,
\“T give you my word now, if

they have been stashing monies
in, my name in an unauthorised ;
bank account somewhere, when :

we return to office alter the next

géneral election, your FNM gov-
ernment will put that money to :

gdod use for the benefit of the
Bahamian people,” he said.




FROM page one

Hler mother, Mrs Betty Anto-
mio, agreed, adding: “A promise is
a comfort to a fool.” She lam-
basted Mrs Hanna-Martin, say-
ing: “She was only spluttering
words to see where they splatter.”

But with a general election
approaching, Mrs Antonio said of
the government: “A fresh breeze
blew thenr in, buta foul wind will
blow them out.”

the victims spoke out again
alter receiving the medical records
which will form the basis of their
case against the government and
boat owners involved.in the
tragedy.

They claimed the records —

‘which were originally reported as

missing —— had obviously been.
tampered with or created from
scratch to reduce any. possible

‘daraages in the future,

Soine records don’t even men-
tion the Sea Hauler at all. Others
oruit serious injuries, and one file
even mixes up the records of two:
male victims.

the group’s spokesman, Lin-
coln Bain, said: “It is quite clear
that skulduggery has been going
on here. But we will have a lawyer
go through the files and press on
with our claims.

“We have a gov ernment which .

is liabic in this case. You don’t
expect them to say ‘sue us’ -— you
expect them to look after the peo-
ples”

Sophia Antonio, who suffered a
shoulder injury and bruised lung
when the Sea Hauler and Union
Star collided three years ago,
claimed that a lot of information
had been taken out of her file.

She said she had to visit a.psy-
chiatric clinic several times dur-
ing a four-month period after the

SRS SATS DRT IO INET SE

LOCAL NEWS



Sea Hauler |

incident, but her file recorded only
two visits.

“My files are incomplete. They
have obviously done this to reduce
their obligations to me.” She said
she was “not accusing them of los-
ing files,” but rather of “falsify-
ing” them,

Describing the hardship she had
suffered since the crash, she said:
“[ have to depend on the good-
ness of strangers. I can’t buy my
children the things they want and
need.”

Another victim, Cedric Hart,
33, who was crippled in the colli-
sion, said there is no mention at all
of the Sea Hauler in his record. «

“They are trying to detach my
injuries from the event,” he
claimed. “Papers have been taken
out. It seems some doctors and
politicians are in cahoots on this.

“It makes me think they are
doing a lot of wrong things. They

should stand up and honour their

word. They are putting me
through more mental stress.”
Gail Roker, 33, suffered two
broken collar-bones, three bro-
ken ribs, an injured left lung, a
bruised right lung, broken left arm
and sliced liver in the incident.
But she said only three injuries
were mentioned in her report. “As
far as I am concerned, they are
trying to reduce the settlement.
“This has left me totally dis-
traught. As for Dr Nottage, last

. week I asked him to apologise,

this week I am asking him to step
down.” In her opinion he was
involved “in trying to avoid
responsibility.”

Paulette Ramsey-Dean, 41, a
mother of four, suffered a frac-
tured pelvis and head injuries, but
claimed no reference was made





@ MINISTER of Health
Dr Bernard Nottage

to the head injuries in the file.
“The head injury was the most
significant because it has affected
my memory. I can’t work at all
and I am asking the government
to help in any way they can.”
Father-of-nine Clint Forbes, 35,

' said doctors were trying to blame

a basketball accident for his knee
injury, yet also had him listed as
DNA - ‘did not answer’ - when
examinations were carried out.

“This don’t make any sense. I
feel my record has been tampered
with. There was no reference in
the file to the Sea Hauler.”

Mr Forbes, a security guard,
said he still has time off work
when his knee swells up, and suf-
fers frequent flashbacks to the
incident itself. “I am finding it
hard to support my family because
of this,” he said.

The government was held liable
by the Wreck Commission as
licensing authority for the two ves-
sels involved. 4

The victims are also taking
action against owners of the two
vessels, which collided while on
their way to the Cat Island regat-
ta in 2003.

FROM page one Some senior officers

that way about the impending reshuffle.

"The story is that Mr Ferguson has ruthlessly
administered the police force — he has seeming-
ly had more power than the commissioner of
police," claimed the senior officer yesterday, who
alleges up to 90 per cent of the force are pleased
to see Mr Ferguson go.

Mr Ferguson has "done what he wanted to do"

. during his tenure as ACP, and in the process,

"frustrated"
claimed.

The source denied numerous reports that Mr
Ferguson's transfer may be evidence of victimi-
sation for his alleged role in the arrests of the
five baggage handlers from Nassau Flight Ser-
vices (NES).

Since their initial arrests, Mr Ferguson has
been the only official to go on record as admitting
that he knew that the men arrested in Florida
last year were under suspicion.

Che source instead suggested the decision to
remove him is due to "consistent complaints"
about his handling of officers. However, the
source provided no evidence of such complaints.

He claimed that he and,"scores of officers"
felt maligned by Mr Ferguson during his time at
the top, and the issue had "reached a peak."

On Wednesday, the senior officers who sup-
ported Mr Ferguson and objected to his transfer
alleged that the transfer was one that the com-
missioner had been forced into by political figures.

many senior officers, the officer

"have the ear of government and are seeking to
move Mr Ferguson for their own purposes."

"This is the point where the commissioner
needs to stand up and stop these politicians to
leave this force alone and let him run it," anoth-
er source said.

However, the officer who telephoned The Tri-
bune yesterday stated that he did not think the
decision was political.

"I don't think it's political. It is necessary, it is
necessary for us to restructure the organisation.
Going to the college with the wealth of experience
he has he can do a good job assisting with training
the detectives."

Another source said he felt impelled to speak
out in light of the claims made by some officers
yesterday as he "feels the members of the public
need to get a good balanced sense about what's
going on."

He emphasised that all officers are subject to
transfer at the Commissioner's discretion at any
time — and all senior officers should be willing to
accept this.

The Tribune was informed earlier in the week
that Assistant Commissioner of Police Elliston
Greenslade will be transferred from Grand
Bahama to take over from Mr Ferguson. He is to
be promoted to deputy commissioner of police.

Continuing his reticence on the entire issue,
Mr Ferguson chose to make no comment yester-

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 11





Prison officers

FROM page one

the entire housing units of the prison."
Meanwhile, when questioned about the prison officers’ con-
aie about security on Wednesday, Dr Rahming described it as
"non-issue", claiming that enough protective gear had been

nrovided already.

Yesterday, officers complained that sharing protective vests is
“unsanitary...and a health hazard" and also "breaks down the

ballistic material in the vest."

"We believe the small amount (of protective gear) provided
was purchased in the government's attempt to band-aid the sit-

uation," said the statement.

FROM page one
among Grand Bahama teach-
ers.

“It is our view that there
needs to be a complete over-
haul and revamping of the

_ government pay system for

teachers. A commission needs
to be appointed to investigate
the situation and to eliminate
bureaucratic red tape,” he
said.

Mr Sands said that teachers
marched for about one hour
in front of the International
Building.

4 It was one of the biggest
demonstration we’ve had ina
long time,” he said.

Mr Sands said that fedchers
are also staging a sit-in at all
the schools throughout the dis-
trict. He said teachers are in
the classroom, but will not
teach until the matter has
been resolved.

Belinda Wilson, secretary
general of BUT, said teachers .
are owed thousands of dollars
in’ salaries or promised

Teachers

allowances by the govern-
ment.

_ Mr Wilson said governmen-
t’s failure to honour their con-
tracts with teachers have left
them struggling to pay their
bills.

Mr Sands reported that
some teachers on Grand
Bahama have been forced to
borrow monies from anyone
who would lend them because
they are unable to provide for
themselves, and for their fam-
ilies.

“Teachers complained of
having to borrow money to
give their children lunch mon-
ey, put gas in their cars, and
others have had to drop their
insurance, simply because they
are not getting paid consis-
tently.”

Education Minister Alfred
Sears has advised his ministry
to put together an inter-min-
isterial working group to find a
resolution to the matter.

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is seeking a

Receptionist
- a command for the English Language

- communication skills are a must

- must be people oriented

- able to perform under pressure
- previous experience is an asset
- a picture is preferred

- ages 25 - 55

Please hand deliver to our office on Church &

Shirley Sts. or fax a resume to

325-8486



ueen's College

Nassau, Rahamas Eat. lege

It was alleged that "a select few" senior officers

PRICE INCLUDES: FIRST SERVICE FREE
LICENSE & INSPECTION

FULL TANK OF GAS

FULL SET FLOOR MATS _
PARTS & SERVICE ASSURED

day on the latest claims.



PARENTS TEACHERS ASSOCIATION

ANNUAL

STEAK-OUT, FAIR & DANCE

Date: February 10th, 2007
Time: 12 Noon - 6:00pm
Venue: Queen’s College Campus
Village Road

IT’S THE FAIR OF THE YEAR....

ENTERTAINMENT

Royal Bahamas
Police Force Band
Visage, Landlord And
Numerous

Other Bahamian Artist

FUN ACTIVITIES

Kid’s Corner

Car Show

Carnival Rides

Donkey And Pony Rides
Hoop-la

Dart Board Games
Wack A Mole

Face Painting

Bouncing Castles
Artwork ‘

FOOD

Roasted Corn
Conch Salad
Conch Fritters

Ice Cream

Snow Cones/cotton

Candy

Candy Apples/popcorn
Hotdogs

Hamburgers

Pizza

Chicken Wings

Steaks

Native Food

Daiquiri

Sodas

REGISTER TO VOTE ON SITE
Computer Sale
Book Sale
T-shirt Sale
Valentine Gifts
Balloons
Photo Shop
Alumni Booth........
Junkanoo Rush Out-grade Two
Calling all Parent, Teachers, Students, Alumni,
Family and Friends
This 1 is Where you want to be

COME ONE

COME ALL


PAGE 12, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007

THE TRIBUNE!







@ HEALTH , :
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: New Provi-
dence Community Centre: Mondays - 6pm to 7pm.
The Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support
group meets the first Monday of each month at
6:30pm at New Providence Community Centre,
Blake Road. Dinner is provided and free blood
sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol testing is

available. For more info call 702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third
Monday of every month at 6pm @ Doctors Hos-
pital conference room. ~

wg CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colo-
nial Hilton Monday's at 7pm ® Club 612315 meets
Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable
Beach @ Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial
Hilton Mondays at 7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the month
“+ the Board Room of the British Colonial Hilton
, otel, Bay St.

fs FHEATRE

hamas Qn stage Youthe:. presents Pinoc-
chio February 19 - 21. The shows will be held at the
National Centre for the Performing Arts. For more
information contact Gloria Darville at 323.5589

TUESDAY “SOR”

* @ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: The Nassau
Group, Rosetta Street: Tuesday 6pm to 7pm /
8:30pm to 9:30pm.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at
5:30pm on the second Tuesday of each month at
their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville.
Call 323.4482 for more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes
location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval
is required. Call 364.8423 to register for more info.

@ CIVIC CLUBS
The Kiwanis Club of New Providence meets every

' _Tuesday at 7:30pm at the Holy Cross Community







Cenire; Highbury Park.

The Luncheon Pilot Club of Nassau meets every
third Tuesday at SuperClubs Breezes, Cable Beach
at 12:30pm. We invite all community minded per-
sons to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7:30pm @
C C Sweeting Senior School's Dining Room, Col-
lege Avenue off Moss Road. ¢ Club Cousteau
7343 meéts Tuesdays at 7:30pm in the Chickchar-
ney Hotel, Fresh Creek, Central Andros ¢ Club
7178 meets each Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer
Society of the Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Eta Psi Omega chap-
ter ‘meets every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ the
Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort,

Cable Beach ¢ Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets ©

every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ Atlantic House,
IBM Office, 4th floor meeting room ¢ Alpha Phi
Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday, 6:30pm
at the British Colonial Hilton. Please call
502.4842/377.4589 for more info.

The Downtown Pilot Club of Nassau meets every
third Tuesday of the month at 6pm at the J P
Whitney Building, First Terrace, Collins Avenue.

Toastmasters Club 7178 will host a special "Valen-
tine Showease" meeting on Tuesday, February 13
and extends a warm invitation to all. There will be
prizes and surprises under the theme "Simple Plea-
sures". Club 7178 meets on Tuesdays at 6pm at the
Cancer Society of the Bahamas, Third Terrace,
Cenveville-two buildings south of ZNS. Meetings
‘e open to the public. For more info email:
, pmembership7178@yahoo.com.

WEDNESDAY

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports
Bar every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free appetizers
and numerous drink specials. °





SS
\\

» ARTIST TALK

ul ire Py Le



ANAM AHN OAT sesnaggrgagnona ee tanog SNS HASSAN ETS TET TNT Ho NINN

Marion Bethel, Poet

Thursday, February 8th at 7pm ¢ National Art Gallery. are

The NAGB invites you ta a special reading by Marion Bethel from her soon to be
oublished. work Hurricane of Desire. Bethel was born in The Bahamas where she
currently lives and works. Her work has appeared In Junction, Lignum Vitae,

At Random, Womanspeak, The Massachusetts Review, The Caribbean Writer,
Poul, and River City. She was awarded a James Michener Fellowship In 1991 and
the Casa de las Americas Prize for her book of poetry Guanahani, My Love in 1994.
Come and join us for a wonderful evening of Caribbean poetry.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: New Provi-
dence Community Centre: Wednesday - 7pm to
8pm. The Nassau Group: Rosetta Street, Wednes-
day 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

FREE Health and Wellness Lectures are held the
first Wednesday of every month at 6:30pm at New
Providence Community Center Blake Road. For
more information call 327.1660 or 327.2878. FREE
Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar and Cholesterol
Screening.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas Support
Group meets every Wednesday from 5:30pm to
7pm at Cancer Headquarters, two doors south of
ZNS. Cancer patients, survivors, their family mem-
bers and friends are invited to attend. Phone
323.4482

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of SouthEast Nassau meets every
Wednesday from 1pm — 2pm at East Villa Restau-
rant, East Bay Street. Always an interesting speak-
er and great fellowship. If you would like to attend
our meetings please send an. e-mail to
bruno.pletscher@gottardo.com or kathyv-
smith@hotmail.com.

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta
Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated meets 6:30pm
every third Wednesday at the Bahamas National
Pride Building.

International Training in Communication, Essence
Club #3173 holds it’s bi-monthly meetings on the
1st and 3rd Wednesday of each month at Doc-
tor's Hospital Conference Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets
the second and fourth Wednesday of the month,
8pm @ St Augustine's Monastery.

The Kiwanis Club of Cable Beach invites the pub-
lic to its regular weekly meeting held every
Wednesday at 7:30pm at the British Colonial
Hilton. Kiwanis is a worldwide service organisation
dedicated to changing the world One Child, One
Community at a time."

School and Community Nature Walk and Petting
Zoo - Free Every Wednesday from 1Oam to
2:30pm at Earth Village Ranch, St Albans Drive
and Columbus Avenue (Chippingham). Call (242)
356.2274 now to make reservations. Open to all
ages and groups Monday-Sunday from 9am to
6pm. Inquire about additional activities and pro-
grammes.

TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday on the 4th
floor of the Ministry of Health, Meeting Street, at
6pm.

@ ENTERTAINMENT
Shadowhand Entertainment presents an all



THURSDAY





Bahamian Talent Explosion this and every Thurs-
day night at the Patio Bar & Grill on Carmichael
Road. This event features upcoming Bahamian
artist who are ready to showcase their original
material to the world. There will also be a freestyle
competition every week which is open to the pub-

lic at large. Doors open at 8:30pm. Ladies free . -

until I'ipm - Gentlemen - small door-charge. See u
there. ?

m@ HEALTH .

Free public health lectures featuring distinguished
physicians are held at Doctors Hospital every third
Thursday of the month at 6pm in the Doctors
Hospital Conference Room. Free screenings
between Spm & 6pm. For more information call
302.4603.

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Thursday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics Sea-
grapes location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor
approval is required. Call 364.8423 to register for
more info.

REACH - Resources & Education for Autism
and Related Challenges meets from 7pm - 9pm
the second Thursday of each month in the cafete-
ria of the BEC building, Blue Hill Road.

CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise has a breakfast
meeting every Thursday morning at 7am at the
British Colonial Hilton Hotel (Fellowship begins
at 6:45am).

The Kiwanis Club of Over-the-Hill meets every |

Thursday at 8pm at the Holy Cross Activity Cen-
tre, Soldier Road. Guests are welcome.

Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first, second
and third Thursday at the Ministry of Health &
Environment building on Meeting Street com-
mencing at 7:30pm. Everyone is welcome to attend
e TM Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8:30pm @
SuperClubs Breezes.

International Association of Administrative Pro-
fessionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the third
Thursday of every month @ SuperClubs Breezes,
Cable Beach, 6pm.

The recently established National Insurance Board
Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets every fourth
Thursday in the month, in the National Insurance
Board's (NIB) training room, Wulf Road office
complex, at 6pm. All retirees are welcome.

The Rotary Club of West Nassau holds its weekly
meeting, every Thursday at Choices Restaurant on
the campus of the College of the Bahamas. Fel-
lowship starts at 12:30pm, with the meeting held
from lpm to 2pm.



LS oASSAESARNEANNEAIEANRRARRSRNEASEANEANNAAERNNDNENN



AROUND



NASSAU



FRIDAY

@ HEALTH |.
. Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: The Nassau
Group, Rosetta Street: Friday 6pm to 7pm &

8:30pm to 9:30pm. Sacred Heart Church: Friday
6pm to 7pm. New Providence Community Centre:

‘Friday 7pm to 8pm.

mB CIVIC CLUBS
TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas
Baptist Community College Rm A19, Jean St.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second
Friday of each month, 7:30pm at the Emmaus
Centre at St Augustine’s Monastery. For more
info call 325.1947 after 4pm.

AMISTAD is a club which promotes the Spanish
language and culture in the community. Residents
of the Bahamas who speak Spanish or are learning
Spanish are invited to attend meetings on the third
Friday of the month during the academic year at
7pm in room 13 of COB's Tourism Training Cen-
tre.

@ THE ARTS

Drawing the Line - artists Jason Bennett, John
Cox, Blue Curry, Michael Edwards, Toby Lunn
and Heino Schmid will be in exhibition February,
Friday 9 at 6:30pm at Popopstudio, Chippingham.
Check out popopstudios.com for more informa-
tion.

Jewellery Exposition featuring new works by Nadia
Campbell Jewellery, Kim Riedel Designs, Judy
Darville’s BellaDonna Designs, Tesha Fritz’s Ele-
ments and Darcy Moss’ Angel Dust Collection,
will be held Friday, February 9 from 6pm-9pm
and Saturday, February 10 from 10am to 4pm at
the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas. Refresh-
ments will be served.

EEE = SATURDAY
@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: The Nassau

Group, Rosetta Street: Saturday mornings - 1Oam
to llam.



Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third

Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and December)

. the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley
treet.

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes are
offered every third Saturday of the month from
Qam-1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Commu-
nity Training Representative at 302.4732 for more

information and learn to save a life today.

m@ CIVIC CLUBS

JAR CYCLING: The Owners of JAR Cycling arc

eee to offer a cycling clinic for juniors between
0 and 17. The free clinic will be held every Sat-

urday in an effort to encourage kids to cycle. Par-

ents interested in registering their children should

contact organisers at jarcycling@gmail.com.

SUNDAY «=
@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS
& RESTAURANTS

Traveller's Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street, fea-
tures special entertainment - Gernie, Tabitha and
the Caribbean Express - very Sunday from 6:30pm

to 9:30pm.

@ HEALTH ,

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: The Nassau
Group, Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm to 7pm /
8:30pm to 9:30pm. .

§ RELIGIOUS SERVICES °

The Bahamas Metaphysical Society Inc - A spiri-
tual teaching society leading you to greater peace
of mind, health, prosperity and happiness - holds
Higher Consciousness Services every Sunday at
10am and weekly Meditation services every
Wednesday at ae at Bowe’s Cove off Bernard
Road. Interested persons are welcome to attend.
For more information contact by e-mail @ bah-
metsol@hotmail.com or call 393.0279.

Send all your civic and social events (attach pictures
if possible) to The Tribune via fax: 328.2398 or e-
mail: ybdeleveaux@tribunemedia.net - Out there
in the subject line.


THE TRIBUNE PRI AS, fr ‘YY 9, 2007, PAGE 13

ee = stem

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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007

SECTION

business@tribunemedia.net



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Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street

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‘Many Bahamian-owned
arinas ‘barely get by’

. mm By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL

2

Tribune Business Reporter

Bahamian marina owner
and operator has been
waiting two-and-a-half
_years for'a government
agency to approve a dredg-
ing application, arguing that many marinas
“barely get by” and are not the rich, prof-
itable facilities the Government thinks.
Mario Cartwright, proprietor of the Fly-
ing Fish Marina on Long Island, described
in a letter to the Government that the state-
ment in its draft marina policy that such
facilities were “extremely profitable” was “a
gross overstatement”. :
He wrote: “Marinas may be extremely

Long Island operator waiting two-and-a-half years for dredging approval;
calls tax proposals ‘rather stiff’ and marinas in MICAL ‘not feasible’

profitable in South Florida. However, I can
assure you that is not the case here in the
Bahamas.”

South Florida marinas were often the
home base for yachts that cruises in the
Bahamas, and generated revenues from the
tying of condo sales and marinas to dock
slips. wd
Yet Mr Cartwright pointed out that
yachting was a seasonal business in the
Bahamas, with his marina enjoying a seven-

month season that lasted from January to
July.

“August to December are usually very
slow months for us. Therefore, we must
budget our money very carefully to carry us
through five slow months each year,” Mr
Cartwright said.

“Our peak season is for the three-month
period May to July, When we realise 80 per
cent plus occupancy every night. Should
hurricanes arrive early, the season ends

early. In 2005, the Bahamas was threat-
ened by Hurricane Dennis in late June.
This resulted in Flying Fish Marina’s season
ending abruptly on July 1, so we lost an
entire month.

“January to April is reasonably busy,

usual occupancy rates fluctuate between ©

30 per cent and 80 per cent. During our
five-month slow season we survive on mon-
ey made during the busy season and on
transients.” ”

Mr Cartwright added: “Marina con-

- struction is almost prohibitively expensive,
so when one considers the cost to develop a
marina, the occupancy rates for the south-
eastern Bahamas, the seasonal nature of
this business, and the other variables that
affect occupancy (such as adverse weather
conditions), marinas in my part of the

SEE page 5B

Just about every firm’ Telecoms regulation mess ‘has real

applies to Baha Mar |

financial impact on pockets of Bahamians’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

“JUST about every company
in the Bahamas has applied to
participate” in developing Baha
Mar’s $2.4 billion Cable Beach
project, The Tribune has been
told, the developers having spent
“in excess of” $100 million on
upgrading and renovating the
existing three Cable Beach
Resorts. :

Robert Sands, Baha Mar’s

tration and public affairs, said the

_ developer had made the $100 mil-

lion outlay in the 18-month peri-
od after it completed the acquisi-
tion of the Radisson, Wyndham
and Crystal Palace Casino, and
the Nassau Beach Hotel in May
2004.

Apart from the $80 million
spent on transforming the former

. Hotel Corporation-owned Radis-

son into a Sheraton, a further $20
million has-been spent on
upgrades to both the Wyndham
and Nassau Beach hotels, a pro-
gramme that is continuing.

Mr Sands and Don Robinson,
Baha Mar Resorts’ president, said

- renovation work on the Wynd-.

ham’s convention centre was due
to start on February 19.
Baha Mar planned to do “a



..Senior vice-president.of adminis- —....,..

"MN ROBERT SANDS
(FILE photo)

complete job on the convention
centre”, Mr Sands said, putting
in a new sound system, plumb-
ing, carpeting and walls.

“In the next month or so, you'll
see the Wyndham being painted.
It’ll have a whole new curb
appeal,” he added.

Mr Robinson said Baha Mar
was also preparing to undertake a
full room renovation in two Wyn-
dham towers, H & M.

He added that Sheraton exec-
utives were due in the Bahamas

SEE page 10B

St Georges seek ‘speedy

Tribune Business Editor

WITH the receivers back in at
the Grand Bahama Port Author-

_ ity (GBPA), the Haywards and

St George estate are due to
appear before Justice Anita Allen
on February 15 to determine the
next step in resolving their dis-
pute, with the estate likely to seek
a quick trial.on Sir Jack’s 75 per
cent ownership claim,

Receivers Clifford and Myles
Culmer, from the accounting firm

.. BDO Mann Judd, went back into
- the GBPA on Wednesday, Feb-

ruary 7, as this newspaper had
been first to predict last week.
They have now assumed control
over the"GBPA and its more
valuable affiliate, Port Group Ltd,
which holds the major assets.
The receivers returned after
the Haywards and St George
family proved unable to resolve
their dispute over Sir Jack’s claim
to own 75 per cent of the issued
share capital of the GBPA and
Port Group Ltd; the St George’s
alleging that ownership is split
50/50 between the two parties.
Justice Allen had previously
given them two months to Feb-
ruary 7, 2007, in a bid to let the

_. two sides settle their differences
‘without going through a court
.’ battle, but this has been to no

avail.
Fred Smith, an attorney repre-

.° senting the St George estate and

‘. “ partner in Callender’s & Co, told

x

The Tribune yesterday that the
Supreme. Court had been
informed that the two parties had
been unable to resolve their dis-

_ pute in the two months allowed.

&

~ solution to 75% Port claim

*. i By NEIL HARTNELL

Estate to oppose any
_ moves to overturn

~ receivership and —
switch trial to Cayman

He added that on February 15,
the St George estate would ask
Justice Allen to set aside all inter-
locutory matters arising from the
dispute, and “order a speedy tri-
al” on the 75 per cent ownership
claim.

“The estate believes it is in the
best interests of Freeport, and it is
the fastest way resolution to the
issues in dispute, to have the court
determine this very discretionary
and simple issue - whether the
shares are owned 50/50 between
the estate and Sir Jack, or
whether Sir Jack owns 75 per cent
as he claims,” Mr Smith said.

- He added that the estate
expected Sir Jack to apply to set
aside the receivership, a move the

estate would oppose, as the Cul-

mers were there to “hold the ring
between the parties and maintain
the value” of the GBPA and Port
Group Ltd until the ownership
issues were resolved.

It is understood that the Hay-
wards and Hannes Babak, the
GBPA chairman who is still
restrained from taking any part
in the GBPA and Port Group’s
management, wanted to see a
continuation of the two-month
consent order that attempted to

SEE page 2B

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Public Utilities Commission (PUC) |

has been urged to resolve disputes relating
to competition in’ the Bahamian telecommu-
nications market that “have real financial
impact on the pockets of more than 300,000
Bahamians and residents, and the nation’s
economic development”.

In a February 2 letter to the telecoms reg-
ulator, Paul Hutton-Ashkenny, president of
IndiGo Networks, asked the PUC why it had
allowed its chief competitor, the government-
owned Bahamas Telecommunications Com-
pany (BTC), to “frustrate competition” by
failing to resolve at least three disputes
between the two carriers.

Pointing out that part of BTC’s mandate
was to “maintain and promote effective and
sustainable competition” in the Bahamian
telecoms market, Mr Hutton-Ashkenny, in
IndiGo’s response to the PUC’s public con-
sultation on market information and data col-
lection, said the three disputes had lasted for
more than 18 months each.

They are:

* A ‘dispute over BTC’s alleged refusal to
interconnect its network with IndiGo’s on
Abaco, a dispute that was filed with the PUC
in March 2005.

* BTC’s alleged refusal “to route calls to



Disputes galore between IndiGo and BTC

unresolved for between 18 months to two years

and from the residential exchange numbers

lawfully provided to IndiGo by the PUC

under the Bahamas dial numbering plan. A
dispute was filed on August 2005.

-. * BTC’s alleged refusal “to provide any
additional interconnection capacity” between
its network and that of IndiGo’s, with a dis-

pute also filed'in August 2005. i a

BTC has repeatedly denied it has been
behaving in an anti-competitive manner, and
has accused IndiGo and others of deliberate-
ly portraying it as such.

Yet in his letter to the PUC, Mr Hutton-
Ashkenny said the regulator needed to explain
why it had allowed BTC to “stall competi-
tion”, and the benefits it brought in terms of -
lower prices, better service and technology,
and consumer choice, by failing to resolve

‘any of the disputes.

“These issues are fundamental to telecom-
munications competition in the Bahamas and
have been on the agenda of the PUC for up to
two years, with no end in sight. They are issues
that have real financial impact on the pockets

q

the ones you

Reality Check. :

of in excess of 300,000 Bahamian residents
and businesses, and on the economic devel-
opment of the nation, but the PUC has done
nothing to address them,” Mr Hutton-Ashken-

- ny said.

“We respectfully suggest that the fact that
the PUC chooses to ignore the above, and

-4nstead focus its efforts to promote competi-
tion on the publication of operator statistics, is -

an affront tothe Bahamian public and abro-
gation by the PUC of its statutory responsi-
bilities.” ; .

In another letter sent to the PUC, this time
addressing the PUC’s consultation on BT'C’s

- ViBE Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP)

product, Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said BTC had
“failed to protect the interests of the con-
sumer in Abaco” by failing to address that
particular dispute.

On the dispute over sufficient interconnec-
tion capacity between IndiGo and BTC, Mr
Hutton-Ashkenny contrasted the PUC’s

SEE page 5B

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Sue its oe est a


PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Fix the system, not the people

usiness systems are the

key to growing your

business. Just as the
human body is comprised of sys-
tems that are closely dependent
on each other, businesses consist
of interdependent systems that
need to be created and managed
effectively. Michael E. Gerber
explains the importance of sys-
tems in his seminal work, The E
Myth. Make sure you read the
book.

He writes that while most
entrepreneurs work IN the busi-
ness, their failure'to work ON the
business is often the reason they
don’t succeed.

Business development and
understanding ‘how you do it’ is

as important at ‘what you do’.
Michael Gerber states that how
the business consistently interacts
with the customer is at the
essence of the franchise revolu-
tion, and the single most success-
ful business concept in history.
By distilling how you do things
through innovation, quantifica-
tion and orchestration, and by
documenting processes, the busi-
ness will be able to be operated
by people with the lowest possible
skill, giving the consumer a pre-
dictable, consistent service.

This is how successful fran-
chises operate. Every element of
their business has been looked at
in detail, documented and per-

fected. The use of systems is the .

se?

”

| Business
Sense

By Mark Palmer



difference that allowed Ray
Crock to take over the lacklustre
business owned by the McDonald
brothers and turn it into the pow-
erhouse we see today.

Instead of asking the question:
“How will I get this done?”, Ger-
ber challenges us to ask the ques-
tion: “How will this get done, get
done correctly, over and over,
even when I am not here?” For

www. svitzerwiismuller.com

At SvitzerWijsmuller, results and values go hand in hand. With 2,500 employees and a fleet of more than 300 vessels, we provide
towage, salvage and related marine services in over 35 countries wotldwide, To sustain our position as one of the world's leading
marine services company, we encourage a culture of commitment, innovation, and entrepreneurship where all employees take

responsibility for our purpose: to provide safety and support at sea. SvitzerWijsmuller is headquartered in Denmark and is part of

the A.P. Moller - Maersk Group.

Freepoint Tug & Towing Services, Ltd. (FTTS) is a J/V company, 50/50 owned by SvitzerWijsmuller and South Riding Point Hold-
ing Ltd (World Point Terminals Inc.). FTTS operates a fleet of 4 tugs, providing services in Freeport, South Riding Point, and at
times on neighbouring islands. Additional personnel is needed to assist in the growth of our tug operation and overall exposure in

The Bahamas.

ASD TUG MASTER

Freepoint Tug & Towing Services, Ltd. — Freeport GB, Bahamas

THE POSITION

The Master will be responsible for the supervision and
leadership of all aspects of vessel management, which

include:

The position also offers an exciting and attractive career in an
international environment with the possibility of continuous de-

velopment both within SvitzerWijsmuller Group or World Point

Terminals Inc.

. Maintenance and safe operation of the tug

QUALIFICATIONS



most businesses this would be an
impossible task, as the business
processes are in the owner’s head.

The solution is to create sys-
tems using the following three-
step model:

Step 1: Design Your Systems
—- Look at the 10 system areas
described on the next page, and
start designing the systems you
need for your business. te

Step 2: Map The Process —
Then map every process in the
form of a diagram. Use software
programmes such as SmartDraw
to help you. You'll understand
your business 10 times better if
you start diagramming systems.

Step 3:,4ocument Everything —
Your final step will be to docu-
ment the diagrams and create
checklists and forms, so that every
process can be carried out by oth-
ers correctly, over and over again.

All problems in your business
come down to lack of systems,
ineffective systems, or ineffective
business processes. For example,
if you hire an accounts receivable
clerk and he doesn’t work out,
the common way to look at this is
that there is something wrong
with him. That doesn’t really help,

as that observation will not enable
you to get a better person next
time. If you just focus on the per-
son being an idiot, nothing hap-
pens that improves the business.

A better way to look at it
would be to say that there was a
failure in a system, such as the
recruitment system, and review
that process and improve it, If
you can improve this system, you
may then avoid doing that mis-
take again. By creating a system
solution you will greatly stop that
problem from reoccurring

Business is both an art and a
science, and serious business calls
for specific information and
processes to obtain that informa-
tion, and a method to use that
information productively. In the
next few weeks, I will be outlining
the systems you will need to cre-
ate for every part of your busi-
ness, to allow it to grow beyond
infancy.

* You will require a system to
manage money.

* You will require a system to
manage sales.

* You will require a system to
run your operation.

* You will require a system to
manage customer service.

* You will require a system to
manage your employees.

St Georges a ‘speedy’
solution to 75% Port claim

\

* You will require a system to
manage employee motivation.

* You will require a system to
manage your product.

* You will require a system to
manage your corporate issues.

* You will require a system to
manage production.

* You will require a system to
build scale.

Without these systems, you will
not be able to grow beyond infan-
cy, let alone survive. Don’t be an
antipreneur and ignore: the impor-
tance of working on your busi-
ness. Systems are a crucial part
of your business. So, in order to
avoid the trap of antipreneurship,
make sure you spend time on this

area, as it will pay large dividends ° y

for your future business success.

NB: Adapted from his upcom-
ing book, Antipreneurship And
How to Avoid It, Mark draws on
20 years of top level business,
marketing and communications
experience in London and the
Bahamas. He is chief operating
officer of eZpZemail, currently
lives in Nassau, and can be con-
tacted ; at
markalexpalmer@mac.com

© Mark Palmer. All rights
reserved

a cence ene

e Crew management, including crew motivation and
skill development e
. Risk management - the ability to identify, assess,
and respond to hazards and operational risks
Preparation of tug daily activity sheets
All tug stores/parts requisition
Other ad hoc tasks
Meeting the high SvitzerWijsmuller Health, Safety,
Environment, and Quality standards, including
managing all aspects of ISM and |SO9001

BMA Master's License (500grt) along with all relevant
STCWSS5 requirements, or have completed the necessary
international certification to this end

S/he must have no less than 5 years seamanship experi-
ence, with 3 years acting in the capacity of Master.

S/he must be well versed in vessel maintenance and able
to manage a small crew effectively .
Experience with ASD tugs is not mandatory but will be
considered an asset

Familiarity with the ISM Code and the ability to effectively
manage a Safety Management System

ciary Management Services (FMS), another com-
pany at the centre of the dispute, which owns 50
per cent of ICD. Sir Jack is claiming that since he
‘owns 50 per cent of FMS’ share capital, the estate
owning the other 50 per cent, together with Seashells
Investments - the company that owns the remaining
50 per cent of ICD, and which Sir Jack wholly owns

FROM page 1B

give both parties breathing space to work out their
differences.
But Mr Smith yesterday said the estate would

The Tug Master will receive support from other FTTS staff

locally in Bahamas and other SvitzerWijsmuller employees

throughout the Region.

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES
The right candidate should be strong and team-oriented,

shift system

and have the ability to achieve results through positive

interaction with crews, pilots, and shore personnel.

Furthermore, the Tug Master will have the opportunity to
gain exposure throughout various training programs and

exchanges.

CONTACTS

The right individual must also be prepared to work within a

ONLY BAHAMIAN CITIZENS, RESIDENTS OR WORK PER-
MIT HOLDERS NEED APPLY

Application with resume/CV to be sent to FTTS, Attn: Capt Lee

lee.wallace@sv
’



Wallace, #4 Milton Street, Freeport GB, Bahamas, Tel. +1 242
352 3060, Mobile. +1 242 727 0623, Fax +4 242 352 4114,
mutlear.com,



also oppose any move by the Haywards to have the
dispute switched and heard in the Cayman Islands.

The Tribune had received independent confir-
mation that the Haywards were assessing whether
the dispute should be switched to Cayman. The
grounds for doing so presumably would be that
Intercontinental Diversified Corporation (ICD),
the holding company that owns both the GBPA
and Port Group Ltd, and in which the Haywards and
St Georges control the two Bahamas-based com-
panies, is domiciled in the Cayman Islands.

Also domiciled in the Cayman Islands is Fidu-

13)

- this gives him 75 per cent control of ICD.

The St George estate, though, is arguing that
FMS is a segregated accounts company, and that
its beneficial ownership does not reflect ownership
of the assets it manages.

Among the assets they claim FMS holds is the
estate’s 50 per cent stake in ICD.

Mr Smith said the St George estate would oppose
any move to switch the dispute to the Cayman
Islands “on the basis that the Supreme Court of the
Bahamas is already seized of this matter, and has full _
jurisdiction to deal with the ownership issues”,
genie tp Ore EO AILEY ACE

. THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

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Se eee TT TL Re Os ee SE FO LL R STN SS BAF

NATIONAL BANK OF CANADA (INTERNATIONAL) LIMITED

NON-CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
AS OF OCTOBER 31, 2006

(Expressed in United States dollars)

2006 2005
ASSETS
Cash and due from banks $ 464,819,024 $ 423,613,500
Loans (Note 5) 31,082,945 36,611,848
Accrued interest and other assets 1,182,865 1,701,017
Derivative related items (Note 12) 702,599 -
Investment in securities 321,490 6 613,270
Investments in subsidiaries (Note 6) 119,381 125,666

~- Fixed assets (Note 7) 627,259 878,803
TOTAL $ 498,855,563 $ 463,544,104

Ce RE

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

LIABILITIES:
Bank overdraft - related party $ 6,210,578 $ 7,952,720
Derivative related items (Note 12) ree - $13,903
Deposits - related parties (Note 8) 81,157,262 75,207,574
Deposits - customer (Note 8) 88,251,412 87,960,155
Accrued interest and other liabilities 4,163,578 | 2,210,541

Interest free demand loan - related party
Total liabilities

120,324,420

131,964,091 324,

311,746,921 294,169,313

SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY:

Share capital (Note 9) 20,000,000 20,000,000
Fair value reserve (Note 10) (291,785) -
Retained earnings 167,400,427 _’ 149,374,791

Total shareholders' equity
TOTAL

187,108,642 169,374,791

$ 498,855,563 $ 463,544,104

See notes to non-consolidated balance sheet.

This non-consolidated balance sheet was approved by the Board of Directors on January 16, 2007,
and is signed on its behalf by:

ante = Dirgefor

NOTES TO NON-CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
AS OF OCTOBER 31, 2006
(Expressed in United States dollars)

1. GENERAL

National Bank of Canada (International) Limited (the “Bank”) was incorporated during
October 1977, in The Commonwealth of The Bahamas and is licensed under The Banks and
Trust Companies Regulations Act of 1965. The Bank is wholly owned by Natcan Holdings
International Limited which was incorporated in The Commonwealth of The Bahamas during
October 1995. National Bank of Canada, Montreal is the ultimate parent company. The
primary activities of the Bank are private banking, fund management, trust services and
securities trading.

The Bank owns 100% of the ordinary shares of Mondial Trading (Bahamas) Limited. Mondial
Trading (Bahamas) Limited in tum owns 100% of the ordinary shares of Mondial Trading
(Bahamas) Y Compania Limitada, a company incorporated in Chile. The primary activity of
Mondial Trading (Bahamas) Limited is the holding of the investment in its subsidiary.

The address of the registered office of the Bank is Goodman’s Bay Corporate Centre, West
Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

NEW AND REVISED INTERNATIONAL ACCOUNTING STANDARDS AND

INTERPRETATIONS

‘At the date of authorization of this non-consolidated balance sheet, the International *"

Accounting Standards Board (“IASB”) had issued IFRS 6, IFRS 7, and IFRIC 4-10, which are
not yet effective. Furthermore, IASB has issued amendments to IFRS 4, IAS 1, IAS 19, and
LAS 39, which are also not yet effective. ;

The Bank anticipates that the relevant adoption of these Standards and Interpretations in future
periods will have no material impact on the non-consolidated balance sheet of the Bank.

SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

The Bank’s non-consolidated balance sheet has been prepared in accordance with
International Financial Reporting Standards.

The following is a summary of the significant accounting policies:

a.

Basis of presentation - The non-consolidated balance sheet has been prepared on the
non-consolidated basis as the results of the Bank and its subsidiaries are consolidated
into the balance sheet of the ultimate parent company. Results of the subsidiaries are
recorded on the equity basis using the internally prepared, unaudited consolidated
balance sheet. Management is satisfied that the amounts carried at equity for the
subsidiaries are fully recoverable.

Translation of foreign currencies - Assets and liabilities denominated or accounted for
in currencies other than United States dollars have been translated into United States
dollars at the applicable exchange rates ruling at the non-consolidated balance sheet
date. :

. Investment in securities - Investment securities are recorded on a trade date basis and

are classified as available-for-sale.

Financial assets - The Bank classifies its investments into the following categories:
loans and receivables, held-to-maturity: financial assets, available-for-sale financial
assets and financial assets at fair value through income. The “lassification depends on
the purpose for which the investments were acquired. M. gement determines the
classification of its investments at *itial recognition and ‘re-evaluates this at every
reporting date.

Loans and receivables



Loans and receivables are non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable
payments that are not quoted in an active market, other than those that the Bank intends

to sell in the short term or that it has designated as at fair value through income or |

available-for-sale.

A loan is considered impaired when, in the opinion of Management, there is reasonable
doubt as to the ultimate collectibility of a portion of principal or interest or where
payment of interest is contractually 90 days past due, unless there is no doubt as to the
collectibility of the principal or interest. A loan may revert to performing status only
when principal and interest payments have become fully current. When a loan is deemed
impaired, interest ceases to be recorded and the carrying value of the loan is adjusted to
its estimated realizable amount by writing off all or part of the loan or by taking an
allowance for credit losses. Provisions for loan losses are maintained at a level
consideréd by management to be adequate to absorb any losses given the risk
characteristics of the loan portfolio. As of the non-consolidated balance sheet date there
were no non-performing loans.

Held-to-maturity

Held-to-maturity financial assets are non-derivative assets with fixed or determinable
payments and fixed maturities, other than those that meet the definition of loans and
receivables, that the Bank’s management has the positive intention and ability to hold to
maturity. ;

Available-for-sale financial assets

Available-for-sale investments in securities are recognized on a trade date basis and are
initially measured at cost. At subsequent reporting dates, these investments are
remeasured at fair value. Unquoted investments for which fair values cannot be reliably
determined are carried at cost. In accordance with changes to IAS 39 (revised 2004),
gains and losses arising from changes in the fair value of available-for-sale investments
are recorded in the non-consolidated statement of shareholders’ equity, except for
impairment losses and foreign exchange gains and losses, which are recognized directly
in the non-consolidated statement of income. Previously the Bank recorded gains and
losses through income. In accordance with the transitional provisions of LAS 39, the
Bank is recognizing fair value changes prospectively in equity from the adoption of the
revisions to LAS 39 at November 1, 2005.



1.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 7B

Financial assets at fair value through income

This category has two subcategories: financial assets held for trading and those
designated as fair value through income at inception. A financial asset is classified into
this category at inception if acquired principally for the purpose of selling in the short-
term, or if so designated by management.

Regular way purchases and sales of investments are-recognized on trade date - the date
on which the Bank commits to purchase or sell the asset. Investments are initially
résognized at fair value plus, in the case of all financial assets not carried at fair value
through income, transaction costs that are directly attributable to their acquisition.
Investments are derecognized. when the rights to receive cash flows from the
investments have expired or where they have been transferred and the Bank has also
transferred substantially all risks and rewards of ownership. ;

Available-for-sale financial assets and financial assets at fair value. through income are
subsequently carried at fair value. Loans and receivables and held-to-maturity financial
assets are: carried at amortized cost using the effective interest method. Realized and
unrealized gains and losses arising from changes in the fair value of the ‘financial assets
at fair value through income category are included in the non-consolidated income
statement in the period in which they arise. Unrealized gains and losses arising from
changes in the fair value of financial assets classified as available-for-sale are
recognized in equity. When financial assets classified as available-for-sale are sold or
impaired, the accumulated fair value adjustments are included in the non-consolidated
income statement in net investment income.

The fair values of quoted investments are based on current bid prices. If the market for
a financial asset is not active, the Bank and/or its Investment Manager establish fair
value by using appropriate valuation techniques. These include the use of recent arm’s
length ‘transactions, reference to other instruments that are substantially the same and
discounted cash flow analysis.

Impairment of financial assets

Financial assets carried at amortized cost

The Bank assesses at each balance sheet date whether there is objective evidence that a
financial asset or group of financial assets is impaired. A financial asset or group of
financial assets is impaired and impairment losses are incurred only if there is objective
evidence of impairment as a result of one or more events that have occurred after the
initial recognition of the asset (‘a loss event’) and that loss event(s) has an impact on the
estimated future cash flows of the financial asset or group of financial assets that can be
reliably estimated. Objective evidence that a financial asset or group of assets is
impaired includes observable data that comes to the attention of the Bank about the

following events:

e significant financial difficulty of the issuer or debtor;
© _ abreach of contract, such as a default or delinquency in payments,

e it becomes probable that the issuer or debtor will enter bankruptcy or other
financial reorganization; :

e the disappearance of an active market for that financial assets because of financial
difficulties;

e observable data indicating that there is a measurable decrease in the estimated
future cash flow from a group of financial assets since the initial recognition of
those assets, though the decrease cannot yet be identified with the individual
financial assets in the group, including:

o adverse changes in the payment status of issuers or debtors in the Bank; or

o local economic conditions that correlate with defaults on the assets in the
Bank.

If there is objective evidence that an impairment loss has been incurred on loans and
receivables or held-to-maturity investments carried at amortized cost, the amount of the
loss is measured as the difference between the asset’s carrying amount and the present

_ value of estimated future cash flows (excluding future credit losses that have been

incurred) discounted at the financial asset’s original effective interest rate.

The calculation of the present value of the estimated future cash flows of a collateralized .

financial asset reflects the cash flows that may result from foreclosure less costs for
obtaining and selling the collateral, whether or not foreclosure is probable. The carrying
amount of the asset is reduced through the use of an allowance account and the amount
of the loss is recognized in the consolidated statement of income. If a held-to-maturity
investment or a loan has a variable rate, the discount rate for measuring any impairment
loss is the current effective interest rate determined under contract.

If in a subsequent period, the amount of the impairment loss decreases and the decrease
can be related objectively to an event occurring after the impairment was recognized, the
previously recognized impairment loss is reversed by adjusting the allowance account.
The amount of the reversal is recognized in the non-consolidated statement of income.

Financial assets carried at fair value

The Bank assesses at each balance sheet date whether there is objective evidence that an
available-for-sale (AFS) financial asset is impaired, including in the case of equity
investments classified as AFS, a significant or prolonged decline in the fair value of the
security below its cost. If any evidence exists for AFS financial assets, the cumulative
loss, measured as the difference between the acquisition cost and current fair value, less
any impairment loss on the financial asset previously recognized in profit or loss, is
removed from equity and recognized in the consolidated statement of income.
Impairment losses recognized in the non-consolidated statement of income on equity
instruments are not subsequently reversed. The impairment loss is reversed through the
non-consolidated statement of income if in a subsequent period the fair value of a debt
instrument classified as AFS increases and the increase can be objectively related to an
event occurring after the impairment loss was recognized in profit or loss.

Assets held or liabilities incurred as nominee - The Bank is engaged in significant trust
activities. No account is taken in this non-consolidated balance sheet for assets held or
liabilities incurred by the Bank as trustee or nominee.

Related parties - Related parties include entities directly and indirectly controlled by the
ultimate parent company. Related parties also include directors and officers of the bank,
who are considered members of key management, and who are persons who have
authority for planning, directing and controlling the Bank.

Cash and cash equivalents - Cash and cash equivalents consist of cash and due from
banks net of banks overdrafts and related party deposits. Cash and cash equivalents are
recorded at their nominal value which, due to their short term nature, approximates fair

value.

Derivative financial instruments - The Bank uses various types of derivatives for
asset/liability management and for trading purposes. The derivative instruments used
most frequently are foreign exchange forward contracts, currency and interest rate swaps
and equity swaps.

These derivatives are recorded at market values and the resulting gains or losses are
recorded as income. Market values are determined using pricing models that
incorporate current market and contractual prices of the underlying instruments, time
value of money, yield curve and volatility factors.

Unrealized gains and losses are reported on the balance sheet as derivative related
amounts under assets and liabilities. Where there is both a legal right and intent to settle
these amounts simultaneously, they are presented on a net basis.

Fixed assets - Fixed assets are recorded at cost less accumulated depreciation and
amortization. Assets are depreciated or amortized on a straight-line basis over their
estimated useful lives which are as follows:

Leasehold improvements over the term of the lease
Office equipment and furniture 20%

Motor vehicles 25%

Computer equipment and software 20% - 33 “%

Impairment of fixed assets - Fixed assets and other non-current assets are reviewed for
impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying
amount of an asset exceeds its recoverable amount. Any impairment loss is recognized
in the statement of income. The recoverable amount is higher of an asset’s net selling
price and its value in use. The net selling price is the amount obtainable from the sale of
an asset in an arm’s length transaction, while value in use is the present value of
estimated future cash flows expected to arise from the continuing use of an asset and
from its disposal at the end of its useful life. Recoverable amounts are estimated for
individual assets or, if it is not possible, for the cash-generating unit.

Reversal of impairment losses recognized in prior years is recorded when there is an
indication that the impairment loss recognized for the asset no longer exists or has
decreased, though the carrying amount of the asset may not exceed the carrying
amount that would have been determined had the impairment loss not been
recognized in prior years. Management has reviewed the fixed assets and concluded
that none of them are impaired.

Taxation - The Bank’s parent company is subject to income taxes in Canada. There are
no corporate, income or capital gains taxes levied on the Bank in The Bahamas.
BUSINESS&SPORTS [}

AEROSOLS NUE BASEOIRIN SELLE ERE ILEDEY ILE DUERE AH AIIEID

SEARANAHAHHN

The Miami Herald





THE MARKETS

STOCKS, MUTUAL FUNDS, 5-6B

bow 30 12,637.63 -29.24 W

SBP 500 1448.31 = -171 W

NASDAQ 2,488.67. —«-1.83 W
_ 10-YR NOTE 473-01 W

CRUDE OIL 59.71 +2.00

Stocks
drop on
housing
fears —

BY TIM PARADIS
Associated Press

NEW YORK — Wall Street
pulled back Thursday after new
signs of weakness in the hous-
ing market prompted investors
to look past a rebound in major
retailers’ sales figures.

A weak forecast from Toll’
Brothers, the nation’s largest
builder of luxury homes, pres-

sured housing stocks and rekin- .

~dled concerns about whether
the slumping housing market
would hurt the economy. And
HSBC Holdings, the European
bank, announced an increase in
its provisions for soured mort-
gage loans, which hurt shares of
US. banks.

The Dow industrials fell
29.24, or 0.23 percent, to
12,637.63.

Broader stock indicators also
fell. The Standard & Poor’s 500
index was down 1.7], or 0.12 per-
cent, at 1,448.31, while the
Nasdaq composite index fell
1.83, or 0.07 percent, to 2,488.67.

Bond prices rose as. stocks’
retreated. The yield on the
benchmark 10-year Treasury
note fell to 4.73 percent from
4.74 percent late Wednesday.

~The dollar was mixed against
other major currencies, while
. gold prices rose.

Energy traders rushed back
into the market amid frigid tem-
peratures in the U.S. and after
Occidental Petroleum shut a
field in California. Light, sweet
crude settled up $2 at $59.71 per
barrel, its highest price this year
on the New York Mercantile
Exchange.

The market seemed little
moved by the ‘Commerce
Department’s report that
wholesale inventories fell 0.5
percent to a seasonally adjusted
$393.76 billion. Analysts
expected an increase of D 5 per-
cent.

Worries about the Rausing
market started with HSBC,
which said it was seeing an
increase in delinquencies in the
U.S. subprime lending market.

HSBC, which is traded in
American Depositary Receipts
on the New York Stock
Exchange, fell $2.44 to $89.78.

Citigroup fell 51 cents to

' $54.44, while JPMorgan Chase
was off 28 cents at $50.93.

Walt Disney Co. reported
better-than-expected fiscal

' first-quarter earnings amid
strong DVD sales for its Pirates
of the Caribbean films. Disney
slipped 19 cents to $35.29.

Electronic Data Systems’
fourth-quarter profit nearly
doubled. The computer services
company rose 84 cents, or 3.1
percent, to $27.92 after issuing a
2007 forecast that topped Wall
Street’s expectations.

Declining issues outnum-
bered advancers by about 6 to 5
on the New York Stock
Exchange, where consolidated
volume came to 2.81 billion
shares, compared with 2.62 bil-
lion Wednesday.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies rose 0.19, or
0.02 percent, to 816.39. The
index passed 800 for the first
time last week and set new clos-
ing and trading highs for the
second straight day. The previ-
ous closing and trading high
was 816.20.

Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei
stock average closed barely
higher, showing a move of less
than 0.01 percent. Britain’s
FTSE 100 ended down 0.36 per-
cent, while Germany’s DAX
index was down 0.56 percent,
and France’s CAC-40 finished
down 0.66 percent.





meearouneuenannennte

AUTOMOTIVE

@ | FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007

poiaoasoascti tte





Saturn: GM’s test of turnaround plan

§& Robert Lutz, hired six years ago
to spruce up General Motors’
designs, says the automaker is
finally producing eye-catching
vehicles, especially at Saturn.

BY TOM KRISHER
Associated Press

CHICAGO — To peek into the
future of General Motors’ turnaround
plan, just look at Saturn.

Last year, when GM’s sales skid-
ded 8.7 percent, Saturn’s rose by 6



BY KELLI KENNEDY
Associated Press

clothes.

with stilettos, not flip flops.



High fashion is going granola. But not the
grunge of hippie yoga wear and grainy hemp
T-shirts typically associated with organic

Think soft soy dresses, cropped organic terry
jackets and slim-fit organic denim joan to pair

Consumers worried about ingesting harmful
pesticides have long been purchasing organic
foods. But the philosophy is slowly hitting main- ;

percent. By fall, the small brand that
used to call itself “A Different Kind of
Car Company” will have a lineup
that’s almost completely new, with
no models older than 20 months.

Simply put, if Saturn falls from
orbit with all its new vehicles, GM
likely will follow.

“Tt’s a no-excuses product lineup,”
GM Vice Chairman for Global Prod-

uct Development Bob Lutz said in an
“to slightly more than 4 million vehi-

interview with The Associated Press
at the Chicago Auto Show. “I told the



sales and marketing guys if this

‘lineup doesn’t work, I’m out of

ideas.”

Saturn, started in 1990 as GM’s
small-car answer to the Japanese
automakers, is the canary in the mine
for the company’s desperate effort to
make itself smaller, leaner and faster
to better compete with the enemy,
mainly ‘Toyota.

‘Last year, GM’s U.S. sales dropped

clés from ane 4.5 million vehicles

FASHION

stream clothing retailers as experts warn about
the dangers pesticides pose to the environment.
Whether shoppers are buying eco-friendly
because it’s trendy or because they hope to pre-
serve Mother Earth, they no longer have to sac-
rifice fashion for philosophy. With major retail-
ers like Target, Victoria’s Secret, H&M and Nike
joining the green trend, there’s something for
fashionistas of every price range in 2007.
“We're fashion first. The fact that they’re
organic is a value added product,” says Marci
Zaroff, founder of Under the Canopy, one of the

DAVID ZALUBOWSKI/AP

REBOUND: A shopper finds success at the Cherry Creek Mall in east
Denver on Tuesday, as retailers snap back from a weak December.

Stores fare better than
expected in January

{4 Many retailers reported
better-than-expected sales in
January because shoppers
redeemed gift cards to buy
winter and spring merchandise.

BY ANNE D’INNOCENZIO ;
Associated Press

NEW YORK — The nation’s
retailers finally got their sales boost
in January, as shoppers redeeming

SS esas aS

holiday gift cards and enticed by the
belated arrival of frigid weather
splurged on winter leftovers. Now
stores are pondering how spring mer-

_ chandise — from baby doll dresses to

lightweight cashmere tops — will
fare.

“With December generally weak,
that left more [winter] goods to

*TURN TO RETAIL, 4B



EUROPE

world’s largest producers of organic clothing.

Organic cotton, which makes up 95 percent
of organic fabrics, is the driving force behind the
trend. Global organic cotton sales increased 119
percent, from $245 million to $583 million
between 2001 and 2005. Sales are expected to
reach more than $2 billion by the end of 2008,
according to the Organic Exchange, a nonprofit
trade association that works to expand the use
of organically grown cotton.

*TURN TO ORGANICS, 4B

atu enesenaneneninnenantnnennennsntetnntnnansntnansnaastnnnsenanetannranesnnrinnamnennnnmnneend

hncannbannewemnteascstannnienanseananienatnnn

in 2005. Toyota, which seemingly can
do nothing wrong in the U.S.,
reported its best year ever in 2006,
with sales up 12.9 percent to about 2.5
million vehicles.

Just two years ago, Saturn was the
metaphor for all of GM’s ills. It’s
products were old and tired, and
what once was a hot brand had been
allowed to languish as the company
ignored cars and focused on big-

* TURN TO GM, 4B



organic fashions. ‘We're fashion first. The fact that they're organic is a value-added product,’ Zaroff says.
© ; @ o
~ From hippie to hip
Organic clothing is no longer suited just for hippies -
high fashion and big brands are going green, too

JON WAY/AP
| ALL NATURAL: Marci Zaroff, founder of Under.the Canopy, one one the world’s largest producers.of organic.clothing,.displays some... -



Central bank signals

March rate increase

While the European Central
Bank held interest rates steady,
President Jean-Claude Trichet
indicated the bank will raise rates
next month to contain inflation.

BY MATT MOORE
Associated Press

FRANKFURT, Germany — The
European Central Bank held interest
rates steady at 3.5 percent Thursday,
but signaled a likely increase next
month amid rising concern that new
wage agreements and high oil prices
will spur inflation.

ECB President Jean-Claude Tri-
chet specifically cited “stronger than
currently expected wage develop-
ments,” two days after Germany’s
biggest industrial union announced it
would be seeking a 6.5 percent wage
increase amid healthy economic
growth.

“Strong vigilance remains of the
essence so as to ensure that risks to
price stability over the medium term
do not materialize,” Trichet said —

language that has augured an immi-’

nent rate increase the past six times

he has used it.

Waiting another month will give
the bank, which last raised rates in
December, the chance to examine
new inflation data and economic

. forecasts due next week for the 13-na-

tion euro region, which has a popula-
tion of 317 million and accounts for
more than 15 percent of the world’s
gross domestic product.

The ECB was joined in keeping
rates unchanged Thursday by the
Bank of England. British interest rates
remained at 5.25 percent after a sur-
prise quarter-point increase last
month. Last week, the U.S. Federal
Reserve left interest rates unchanged
at 5.25 percent for the fifth straight
time.

Another rate increase March 8
would mean higher borrowing costs
for consumers — leading to higher
mortgage and car payments — and
for companies seeking to expand. It
would likely also boost the euro,
which has already risen about 14 per-
cent against the U.S. dollar in recent

* TURN TO EUROPE, 4B


2 smerny

AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL TOY FAIR

Toy makers play with prices as shoppers spend more

BY ANNE D’INNOCENZIO
Associated Press

NEW YORK — When Spin
Master started peddling its Air
Hogs Zero Gravity vehicle two
years ago, retailers doubted
whether parents would be
willing to pay $59.99 for a
radio-controlled toy — even if
it climbed walls.

But the item ended up
being a hit and was followed
by the equally popular $79.99
Storm Launcher. This year,
Spin Master is pushing a $110
Robo Copter that transforms
from a robot to a helicopter.

“This just proved to us that
if it is a great toy, provides a
wow and introduces new
functions, consumers are will-
ing to spend the money,” said
Harold Chizick, vice president
of global promotional market-
ing for the Toronto-based toy
maker. “We just decided to
step it up.”

For years, the increasing
power of discounters like
Wal-Mart kept the toy indus-
try locked in fierce price wars.
But the toy makers are encour-
aged by parents who last holi-
day were willing to spend
$300 on Hasbro’s robotic But-
terscotch pony and. $249 for a

AUTOMOTIVE

Mindstorms NXT robotics kit
from Lego. As the annual
American International Toy
Fair starts Sunday, the toy
makers are getting bolder
when it comes to pushing pric-
ier, higher-quality toys.
Zizzle, which did well with
its $300 pinball machines last
year, is adding more lights and
sounds, and increased the
price to $350, according to
CEO Roger Shiffman. MGA
Entertainment, the maker of
the popular funky Bratz doll, is
coming out with toys that
break the $150 barrier; last
year, the threshold was $100.

FAIR’S ITEMS

Among the items at the fair,
which. features toys expected
in stores later this year: Has-
bro’s $69.99 Squawkers
McCaw Parrot, which repeats
words and responds to touch;
Mattel’s Fisher-Price guitar
system, priced at $99.99, that
plugs into the TV; VTech
Holdings’ $99.99 Gadget,
which functions as a digital

photo and video camera and

music player; and Spin Mas-
ter’s $80 Wheels ’n Whistles
foam coach.

“This game is about better

GM uses Saturn
to test new plans

°GM, FROM 1B

profit trucks and sport utility
vehicles.

At the same time, gas
prices rose and GM didn’t
have many desirable cars
while Toyota did. GM lost
market share and buckets of
money, $10.6 billion in 2005
alone. There was talk of bank-
ruptcy.

All the while, GM was try-
ing to fix itself. It started cut-
ting costs, inducing upward of
34,000 expensive hourly:
workers to leave through buy-..

* outs. or early retirement
“offers: By the end of last year,

it had cut $9 billion in annual
costs, about $2,000 from
every car it sold. It has prom-
ised a profit in the fourth
quarter, the first one in two
years.

SATURN REPLENISHED

Roughly, 18 months ago
GM also began to replenish
Saturn.

Saturn got the Sky road-
ster, a sleek two-seat sports
car. Later came the Vue small
sport utility vehicle with a
hybrid gas-electric version,
and the Aura mid-sized sedan.
The Astra, an Opel-based

EUROPE

Central

bank may
raise rates
in March

° EUROPE, FROM 1B

months — making European
exports more expensive.
Higher interest rates tend
to support currencies in the
countries that they’re rising in
because of increased returns.
More expensive exports
could hurt Germany, though,
which saw its foreign sales
rise by nearly 14 percent last
year, according to data
released Thursday that
underlined the importance of
a sustained export boom to
Europe’s biggest economy.
EU economists will
announce new forecasts for
euro-zone growth on Feb. 16.
After expanding by 2.6 per-
cent in 2006, growth is
expected to slow to 2.1 per-
cent this year before bounc-
ing back to 2.2 percent in
2008. The euro area grew just
1.4 percent in 2005.
But the ECB is also keeping
a close eye on inflation.
According to the EU, prelimi-
nary January inflation was
unchanged from December’s
1.9 percent rate — right at the
bank’s target of close to but
below 2 percent — and oil
prices were lower than they

small car to replace the aging
Ion, was unveiled Wednesday
in Chicago.

Lutz said the new models
will put pressure on Saturn
managers to beat last year’s 6
percent gain in 2007, even
though the overall U.S. mar-
ket may be flat or down.

“There is now not a weak —

sister in the batch,” he said of
Saturn’s products. ‘“‘Every-
thing is top-notch from a
design and execution stand-
point,” he said.

Mark LaNeve, GM’s vice

_president_for.sales, service

and’ marketing, said ‘GM’s
products should all be~sub-
stantially new in another 12-18
months. Key is the redesigned
Chevrolet Malibu due out
later this year to take on Toy-
ota’s Camry.

But it will take a while lon-
ger for the company to get its
message to consumers as it
rolls out competitive entries
in the small and mid-sized car
markets, LaNeve said.

“We're not going to have it
solved in the next 12 to 18
months,” he said.

David Cole, chairman of
the Center for Automotive
Research in Ann Arbor, said
GM’s cost-cutting efforts have



BERND KAMMERER/AP FILE

SIGN OF CHANGE: The Euro
sign is seen in front of the
headquarters of the
European Central Bank in
Frankfurt, Germany.

were a year ago. A cold spell
in the U.S. has driven oil

’ prices higher recently.

Trichet ‘“couldn’t have
been clearer.... The state-
ment was very hawkish and
didn’t leave a lot of room for
interpretation,” said Marco
Kramer, an economist with
UniCredit in Munich. “The
ECB gives the very clear sig-
nal that tightening monetary
policy now will prevent infla-
tionary risks in 2008.”

One question is how much
higher rates could go.

“While the general tone of
the statement suggests that
3.75 percent will probably not
be the peak in the rate cycle,
the ECB provided no clear
guidance on the precise rate
path beyond March,” said
Holger Schmieding, Bank of
America’s chief economist for
Europe.

4B | FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007 INTERNATIONAL EDITION



MARK LENNIHAN/AP

TEST DRIVE: Jasper Newell, left, in a Jeff Gordon car, and
Jalen Stewart, in a Dale Earnhardt Jr. car, take a spin in
Nascar Power Wheels toy cars from Fisher-Price at the
American International Toy Fair.

quality,” said Ronald D. Boire,
president of Toys “R” Us’ USS.
toy business. “It is not about
plastic by the pound. We have
been playing plastic by the
pound for way too long.” He
said Toys “R” Us will be mak-
ing a bigger push to carry
higher-grade toys.
Consumers’ willingness to
spend on toys is helping to
revive the toy industry, after
struggling for several years
with declining sales as kids

opted for digital music players
and video games.

Last year marked the first
time U.S. traditional toy sales
rose in several years, albeit
only slightly, according to
NPD Group, a research com-
pany based in Port Washing-
ton, N.Y. Traditional toy sales
— excluding game consoles
and related items — eked out a
0.34 percent rise to $22.3 bil-
lion compared to $22.2 billion
in 2005, and $22.7 billion in

2004. Meanwhile, the average
ticket price for toys rose 5 per-
cent in 2006 to $7.52, com-
pared to $7.17 in 2005 and
$6.97 in 2004, according to
NPD, whose figures are based
on a consumer survey.
Wedbush Morgan Securi-
ties analyst Sean McGowan
and other toy analysts believe
that NPD’s figures understate
the improvement. They cite
that Toys “R” Us, which is
under new ownership and
management, had its best holi-
day season in several years.
Privately-held KB Toys, which
emerged from bankruptcy in

2005, is also showing signs of _

improvement.

BUSINESS IMPROVING

Business at the nation’s top
two toy makers is also
strengthening. Mattel posted a
3 percent profit gain for the
fourth quarter, boosted by a
turnaround of its iconic Barbie
line and strong sales of Fisher-
Price toys, including the popu-
lar T.M.X. Elmo doll, one of
the hottest sellers for the holi-
day 2006 season. Barbie sales
increased 3 percent in the
United States, the fourth con-
secutive quarter of domestic



CHARLES REX ARBOGAST/AP

DEMO VEHICLE: Mark LaNeve, General Motors vice-president for sale, service and
marketing} poses with the 2008 Saturn Astra at the Chicago Auto Show on Thursday.

enabled it to put more money
back into products and be
more disciplined on prices.
He thinks GM’s positive
results will accelerate as more
new products hit showrooms.

“I think we’re going to see
profitability that is going to
surprise a lot of people,” Cole
said.

But David Koehler, a mar-
keting professor at the Uni-
versity of Illinois at Chicago
who has studied GM, said
while its products have
improved, it still has to over-
come its old image of lacking
fuel efficiency and quality.

“The story remains to be
told if they are able to reposi-

FASHION

tion that image,” he said.
GM’S PORTRAYAL

Lutz, a frequent critic of
media coverage, said part of

GM’s difficulties is that the
media portrays the company

inaccurately.

Some media outlets, he
said, always use the “gas-guz-
zling” prefix to describe GM
vehicles, but fail to do so on
large Toyotas that get worse
gas mileage than their GM
counterparts.

“People are starting to
think a little bit before they
automatically fall into the
conventional, easy categori-
zation of Toyota — wonder-

ful, smart, consumer focused,
energy saving. GM — dumb,
insensitive, big trucks, gas
guzzlers, don’t give a damn
about everything. We’re start-
ing to crack that open a little
bit,” Lutz said.

Toyota is well aware that
GM has momentum. At pre-
sent, though, even GM con-
cedes Toyota has consumer
preference down.

“They’re winning, no ques-
tion,” LaNeve said. “They’re
on a big roll the last year-and-
a-half or so. But we’ve made
great progress, so it’s not like
there can’t be more than one
successful car company in the
world.”

Organic clothing enters realm
of high fashion and big brands

* ORGANICS, FROM 1B

Though more retailers are
considering organic cotton, it
currently makes up for less
than 1 percent of cotton pro-
duced in the world. Designers
are also experimenting with
eco-friendly fabrics made of
bamboo, soy, Ingeo (corn)
and hempsilk.

“The market is really
expanding in large because a
number of very large retailers
are actually going to have a
lot of product available in
2007,” said Rebecca Calahan
Klein, the president of Cali-
fornia-based Organic
Exchange.

Target, which carries a
select number of organic baby
clothes, is expanding its line
this year. (Sam’s Club and
Wal-Mart are among the top
five brands that use the most

organic cotton globally,
according to. Organic
Exchange.)

Victoria’s Secret will also
add organic cotton to its col-
lection this year, Klein said.

Nike, which has been using
organic cotton for several
years, is one of the world’s
largest retail users of organic
cotton. Spokeswoman Mor-

gan Shaw says 52 percent of

the garments the company
manufactured last year con-
‘tained at least some organic

material.

Costs are slightly higher,
but comparable. A men’s vin-
tage-style organic cotton
T-shirt at Wal-Mart is $9.83,
while a similar regular cotton
T sells for $8.83. Levi Strauss
& Co. started offering organic

denim jeans in select stores in .

November — $68 for their
Red Tab jean compared to
$40 for nonorganic.

The look and feel of the
clothes are so fashion-for-
ward that many clients don’t
even realize they’re buying
organic. They just like the
style, says Zaroff, a perfect
spokeswoman for greenwear.

A yoga devotee with long,
dirty-blonde hair and lots of
hippie jewelry, Zaroff talks
about Al Gore’s movie on
global warming and other
environmental issues at her
Boca Raton, Fla., office, where
she is working on a new high-
fashion line debuting later
this year.

The 108 line of upscale
street wear includes dresses
in muted tones made of soft
soy and organic cotton voile.

She founded her company
in 1996 when organic wear
was little more than a hemp
seed. She says it will do $10
million in sales this year.

“It was frumpy and boxy
and crunchy and all those
things people don’t want,”

Zaroff said of older organic
clothing. “The consumer was
ready.”

High-end designers like
Stella McCartney are includ-
ing organic fabrics in their
collections and celebrity
entrepreneurs are also joining
the trend. U2’s Bono launched
his socially conscious cloth-
ing line, Edun, in 2005 in an
attempt to increase trade and
create sustainable employ-
ment in places like Africa.

Retailers say it’s not just
about buying organic, it’s
about the entire process.
Under The Canopy uses a dye
factory fueled by rice husks
instead of fossil fuels. Grow-
ing organic also requires crop
rotation.

“So if we get a large
amount of cotton production
moved to organic, we'll also
end up expanding the world’s
access to organic food sup-
ply,” Klein said.



OR pae 4pm. 635 p.m, Late
Stock Tkr. dese close Chg.

Broadcoms BRCM 33.67 34.10 +.43
PhelpsDs PD *
FMCG FCX 53.43 5343 *

Nasdl00Tr QQQQ 44.45 4453 +08 14109
EmersnEls EMR 44.70 44.70 * 13013
SPDR SPY 145.02 144.95 -.07 12707
U-Store-It YS! 2291 2291 * 11894
DukeEgys DUK 20.16 20.19 = +.03 11005
CSX CSX 36.83 3683 * 11000

Intel INTC) = 21.36 21.35 -,01 10760
iShREst lyR 93.85 ae +10 10015
John JNJ 65.76 8480
iShR2K nya WM 81,05 81 +03 7954

growth. Mattel is unveiling
Chat Divas at the fair, Barbie
dolls that move and lip sync to
music hooked up to Apple’s
iPod digital music player and
can also chat on the phone.

Microchips have come
down in price, enabling toy
companies to make more
advanced toys that are still
affordable. Zizzle’s Shiffman
noted one of last year’s toys —
Lucky, a $39.99 interactive dog
that obeyed 15 different com-
mands — would have sold for
$150 five years ago.

At least 50 percent of the

‘toys that will be sold in stores

this year will have some sort
of microchip in them, accord-
ing to Jim Silver, editor-in-
chief of Toy Wishes, a trade
publication.

The threat of new hot gad-
gets is not going to go away.
The toy industry has to keep
coming out with innovative
items, said Mattel president
Neil Friedman.

“When we have great toys,
the consumer comes back to
the toy department,” he said.
“Can the toy industry and
other industries co-exist?
Absolutely. Consumers will
buy what the child wants.”

RETAIL

Stores
report
positive
sales
results

RETAIL, FROM 1B

clear,” said John Morris, a
managing director at
Wachovia Securities. “But
that’s tempering the outlook.
Stores are not getting a clear
read” on spring selling.

As retailers reported’ bet! q

ter-than-expected — sales
Thursday, winners crossed all
segments including Limited
Brands Inc., Nordstrom Inc.,
and Federated Department
Stores Inc. Wal-Mart Stores
Inc. beat Wall Street esti-
mates, though its monthly
gain was modest. Even Gay
Inc., which has long struggled.
with disappointing sales, beat
analysts’ expectations. The
merchant benefited in part
from its success in clearing
out its piles of winter left-
overs, which became attrac-
tive when the weather turned
cold.

The stragglers included
Abercrombie & Fitch, Ann-

Taylor Stores and Chico’s—

FAS.

“Across the board, the
numbers are decent,” said
Ken Perkins, president of
RetailMetrics, a research
company in Swampscott,
Mass.

Thomson Financial’s sales
tally of 55 retailers rose 3.9
percent in January, beating
the 3.1 percent estimate. The
tally is based on same-store
sales, or sales at stores open
at least a year, which are the
industry standard for measur-
ing a retailer’s health.

The solid performance in
January was soothing as it fol-
lows a largely disappointing
November-December period,
which averaged a modest 2.9
percent same-store sales gain,
according to Thomson Finan-
cial. The sales reports also
provided some encouraging
news about fourth-quarter
earnings, as many stores at
least backed their profit fore-
casts.

While January is the least
important month of the retail
calendar, its significance has
grown over the past five years
because of the impact of gift
cards.

_LATE TRADING

4 6:35 p.m. Late
46357 ColdwtrCrk CWTR = 19.04 1722-182 7692
MartMM . MLM 12385 12385 * 7542

EngyConv ENER 35.50 ‘3145 4.05 6408
RAITFin = RAS 37.74 (34 * 6235
Quiksivr = ZQK 1452 13.00 -152 6138

EMC Cp EMC 1450 «1450 * 5966
AmintGp if AIG 69.59 6959 ° 5001
NewellRub NWL 30.29 30.29 * $000

EqOffPT €0P $544 55.40 -.04 4996
AmTower AMT 40.15 = 40.16 +.01 4611
Qualcom § QCOM 3826 3825 ~—-.01 4103
ArvMerit ARM =—-19.46. 19.48 +.02 3755

For up-to-date stock quotes, go to www.MiamiNerald.com and click on Business

Se

FOP PE Miran

te

2 ET I te OLE

>
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EMMA

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SLL EAA ML TE EM TOI REL Mk a I ID ORR EL ee Fa he ORE PE ED

=
THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 5B



TL a
Over 8,000 apply for US passport incentive

m@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

ore than 8,000 persons have
Meerstsseee applications for
the US passport reimburse-

ment programme from the Nassau/Par-
adise Island Development Board’s web-
site since the initiative was launched,
Kerzner International (Bahamas) presi-
dent said. George Markantonis told a
luncheon meeting of the South East
Rotary Club: “That could be as many as
24,000 passengers, because they are

, Many Bahamian-owned marinas ‘barely get by’



downloading the form and studying it as
a family, so I am glad we did that as a
team, as a community.”

The initiative was implemented to
combat any negative impact from the
Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative’s
(WHTI) implementation, which took
effect on January 23, 2007. The WHTI
requires all US citizens travelling to the

Bahamas and the Caribbean to possess a
valid passport on their return home.
There was concern that the $100 per
passport cost, particularly for family trav-
el, would cause a decrease in tourist
arrivals, so many Bahamian hotels and
organisations representing them decided

‘to offer reimbursements for up to four

persons per family. .

Kerzner chief says this could translate into as many as 24,000 arrivals to Bahamas

Mr Markantonis said Atlantis, as part
of the Bahamas Hotel Association
(BHA) and the Nassau/ Paradise Island
Development Board, were monitoring
the situation closely. “ I can safely say
that for all of our properties, we have
not seen a big effect yet,” Mr Markanto-

nis said. “However, there is a caveat to.

that. There has not been an affect. yet..I

FROM page 1B

Bahamas are not ‘extremely prof-
itable’; the truth is we barely. get
by.”
Marinas in the northern
Bahamas, Mr Cartwright added,
were more likely to realise a return
on their investment due to their
proximity to Florida, but “only a
small percentage of yachts” trav-
elled futher south than Great Exu-
ma.

Speaking with The Tribune, Mr
Cartwright said the Government
could generate more marina-based
tax revenues by taxing sailboaters,
rather than going after the sports
fishing industry, which was a group
that tended to spend more money
while in port. ?

He said the suggestion that mari-
nas be charged by the linear foot
for their docks, and for seabed leas-
es, business taxes, use of crown
land, and overnight stays was
“rather stiff” and could be too
expensive for smaller marinas.

According to a draft study done

for the government, the Bahamas is
earning a “very small portion of the
potential” economic of the nation’s
expanding marina and boating

_. industry, currently generating $25

million in revenues for the private
sector and $300,000 in taxes per
annum.

The Government is proposing
that all marina applications be
approved by the Docks Commit-
tee, but Mr Cartwright said his
experience with that body and the
Department of Lands and Surveys
had been “less than favourable”.

“My most recent negative expe-.
rience involves my application to «
carry out:maintenance,and expan;

PIS















3:00p.m., as follows:

All people

Consultation 0

Friday-February

sion dredging here at Flying Fish
Marina,” Mr Cartwright wrote.
“In June 2004 I submitted an
application to the Department of
Lands & Surveys for permission to
dredge my marina basin to a con-
trolling depth of eight feet. Since
the initial application I have fol-
lowed up several times; to date I
have been told that my application
rests with the Docks Committee.
“Sometime ago, I also submitted
a seabed lease application for the
area of seabed in and around my
marina basis...........4. this applica-
tion remains in a ‘pending’ mode.”

Application

He added: “The application
process for a marina development is
very slow and complicated. There is
too much bureaucracy and red tape,
and the BEST Commission serves
to retard and discourage develop-
ment, especially in areas where
there are no existing marinas and
where the Family Island economy is
stagnant and in desperate need of
cash injection. ;

“I submit that the BEST Com-
mission’s input is more appropri-
ate for areas in the Bahamas where
there is a proliferation of marinas,
such as the Abacos, New Provi-
dence, Grand Bahama, and the
Exuma Cays.”

The Government had suggested
that investment incentives be used
to encourage marina developments
in Andros and Mayaguana, Inagua,
Crooked Island and Acklins, involv-
ing 50 per cent relief from the per
foot of dock space tax “for up to
10 years”.

Yet Mr Cartwright said that
marinas in Acklins, Crooked Island

_and Inagua “will not be feasible”.

.c He explained: “When yachtsmen

Ministry of Energy and the Environment

In November of 2006, Cabinet considered a report from the Marina
Task Force recommending changes to the policies relating to the siting
and charging for marinas. It adopted a set of policies on an interim basis

‘ with respect to siting that were designed to protect the environment and
adjacent communities. These policies were generally in line with
policies in nearby areas, including Florida. The Task Force Also reviewed the
approach to charging for the use of
themselves, cabinet made no decision here, but accepted the Task Force’s
recommendations that discussions be held with stakeholders involved with
marinas, before the formal a doption of a Marina Policy.

The Task Force will be holding meetings at the following times and
locations during the week of February 12-16 between 10:00a.m and

Monday-February 12, Grand Bahama, Old Bahama Bay, West End
Tuesday-February 13, Abaco, The Methodist Hall, Dundas Town
Wednesday-February 14, Exuma, The Resource Centre
Thursday-February 15, Eleuthera, Harbour Island,

_ Lighthouse Church of God ;
16, Nassau, Wyndham Crystal Palace Resort

(Cat Island Room)

interested in the Marina Policy are invited to attend
the location most convenient for them. Those wishing a copy of the
draft report may download it from The Ministry of Tourism’s website
www.tourismbahmas.org Afterentering the site, register, entering six
or more letter x’s in the zip code space and go to the Marina Policy
section. If you cannot access the interent, you may get a copy by contacting
Ms. Prenell Evans at the Ministry of Engery and The Environment (242)
322 6005. If you can’t attend the meetings or wish to send comments on
the draft report should send them to the Task ForceRapporteur, Malcolm
Martini, at the Ministry of Energy and the Environment,Second Floor
Claughton House, P.O.Box N-4849, Nassau, Bahamas or e-mail
Mr. Martini at malcolmmartini@bahamas.gov.bs.

n Proposed New Marina Policy
for the Bahamas

the seabed and the marinas

are not fishing they want to explore
the island, they want to see things,
go on tours, and eat at different
restaurants. On Long Island there
are a number of native restaurants
and things of interest to see.

“However, we are often told by
yachtsmen that there is nothing to
do on this island. Acklins, Crooked,
and Inagua Islands are even more
remote, there is just not enough ‘to
do’ things on these islands, and lim-
ited infrastructure........

“Yacht owners have complained
about how difficult it is to get to
Long Island. They want direct
access from South Florida into
Long Island. We desperately need
to have an international airport on
this island. Eleuthera has three
international airports, why can’t
Long Island get at least one?

“The entire tourism product on
Long Island is being hindered by
lack of convenient access. Yachts-
men and other tourists hate having
to connect elsewhere in the
Bahamas before getting here. This
problem will be the same in Ack-
lins, Crooked, and Inagua Islands.”

However, Mr Cartwright called

-on the Government to provide spe-

cial investment incentives for
Bahamian marina developers, to
enable them to compete with for-
eign rivals who had greater financial
resources.

He wrote in his response to the
draft marina policy: “The quaint
little Family Island marinas are dis-
appearing, and are being run out
of business and/or being replaced
by huge mega marinas like Emerald
Bay Marina in Exuma and the oth-
er marina presently being built by
the Montana Group in Rum Cay.
The Bahamas government must do
everything possible to save small
marinas like Flying Fish Marina.”

ie























FROM page 1B

approach with that take by the Trinidad & Toba-
go regulator over a similar problem.

There, the regulator gave the incumbent for- .
mer government-owned monopoly a seven-day
ultimatum to install the required interconnec-
tion capacity, but “the consumer in the Bahamas
is waiting for similar strident action to be taken by
the PUC against BTC to address exactly the
same issue”.

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny then confirmed what
Tribune Business had revealed exclusively last
month, that IndiGo had filed another dispute
with the PUC, this time alleging that BTC was
being “anti-competitive” by “giving away inter-
island calling” to its ViBE division while charging
IndiGo on “a high toll per minute basis” of $0.13
per minute, for the same service under an inter-
connection agreement.

He alleged: “By any measure, we submit that
BTC is thereby abusing its position as the monop-
olist for fixed-line local service in the vast major-
ity of the Family Islands, and anti-competitively
using its significant market power as the dominant
operator to manipulate the market to its own
advantage.”

In addition, BTC was restricting capacity for



Email:-FOUNDATIONFOREDU








the Re

PUBLIC EDUCATION MEETING

Public Utilities Commission
IndiGo subscribers by refusing additional joining
circuits for interconnection, leaving the latter’s
customers “severely restricted” in their ability
to make or receive intra-island calls with BTC
subscribers”.

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said: “IndiGo respect-
fully submits that the PUC cannot shy away from
anti-competitive abuse by BTC of its monopo-
listic position, and must act to protect the con-
sumer by preventing BTC from distorting the
inter-island calling market. BTC must be made to
provide inter-island call termination to IndiGo for
the same price that it makes inter-island call ter-
mination available to its own ViBE division.”

Meanwhile, BTC, for its part, said it had filed
a dispute of its -wn with the PUC on December
18, 2006, this time over IndiGo’s alleged planned
launch of its VoIP service. ©

A letter to the PUC from BTC’s vice-presi-
dent for legal, regulatory.and interconnection
issues, Felicity Johnson, alleged that the regula-
tor had “prejudiced” BTC’s rights to a fair pub-
lic consultation through an interview its executive
director, Barrett Russell, had given to Tribune
Business on Monday, January 15.

Mr Russell said BTC “seems to think it can do
whatever it wants”, and Ms Johnson warned that
BTC might take “further action in this regard”.

> BIC REVIEW
9:30 - 12:30 and Ipm - 4 pm
Math, Social Studies, Science, English language & Religious Studies

> SAT REVIEW
10 AM- 1 PM AND 1PM- 4PM
Spaces are limited. Register Now!

EVERY SATURDAY
Cost: $20.00 per Saturday




yy

JOIN US!

Wednesday, February 14
: @7 pm
for an Educational Meeting on Birds
at The Retreat on Village Road.
Parking at Queen’s College.

Speaker: Bruce Hallet
Author of Birds of The Bahamas.
_and the Turks & Caicos Islands

BIRDS .
i

af The Sah
SS e

think it may have an effect when a dif-
ferent income group starts travelling. The
people who are visiting the Bahamas now
are not the same people who are coming
in summer, and it is not so much income
groups as it is travelling with little chil-
dren, where even a six-month-old is going
to need a passport. I'am not sure what we
are going to experience there.”


























N@YAHO0.COM




na
TX






_ Autographed
copies on sale
PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007 THE TRIBUNE

Prince Edward unveils plaque to
mark bank’s 50th anniversary —



Ha



@ PRINCE Edward meets Bahamian politicians and members of the financial services sector ina i PRINCE Edward last week unveiled a plaque to commemorate Ansbacher Bank & Trust
private gathering in the Ansbacher boardroom, after the official unveiling of the plaque. Standing (Bahamas) 50th anniversary at Ansbacher House, Bank Lane. Standing from L to R: Prime Min-
from L to R: Hubert Ingraham, leader of the opposition; Prime Minister Perry Christie; Prince ister Perry Christie; Prince Edward; Michael Mayhew-Arnold, managing director, Ansbacher
Edward; Sir Orville Turnquest, former Governor General; James Smith, minister of state for (Bahamas); and Hugh Titcomb, Group chief executive, Ansbacher.

finance; and Michael Mayhew-Arnold, managing director, Ansbacher (Bahamas) Ltd. (Photos: Wendell Cleare)














COMMERCIAL BUILDING
FOR SALE OR LEASE
289 WULFF ROAD EAST

* BUILDING 12,000 sq.ft. 80°x150°x24 HIGH

» 3 BAY DOORS* ONE WITH LOADING
PLATFORM



*18°HIGH PALLET RACKS RAQMTATR ASS 1H

p @ PRIME Minister Perry Christie gave remarks at the 50th
anniversary celebrations of Ansbacher (Bahamas) last evening.
He congratulated the bank on their success. Seated from Lto R:
Michael Mayhew-Arnold, managing director, Anshbacher
(Bahamas); Prince Edward; and Hugh Titcomb, group chief
executive, Ansbacher.

«100 KW GENERATOR W/AUTO TRANSFER
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» LEASE $14,000.00 MONTH NET









WANTED

Secretarial Assitant to Managing Director of Corporate Service
Company and Secretary for Partners of Associated Law Firm.
Must have ability to communicate with high net worth clients.
Computer ability essential together with knowledge of
incorporation of Bahamian companies and the preparation of
" appropriate Members and Directors Minutes.

Telephone: 327-3127
Fax: 327-6259



- Viewing by appointment only
Tel: 242-393-1778 CELL 424-4161

Monday to Friday 9am - 3pm

CONSOLIDATED WATER

“1 DELITY COMPANY LTD.












Pricing Information As Of:















Sea NOTICE is hereby given of the resignati
Ne ryeraN : s hereby given of the resignation of
TORO WTA INFORMATION 7 7 \\ ae
SO NS \ \ \ . .
OC: 0,00 17 DY row 0ade ~~ Mr. J. Bruce Bugg Jr. as a Non-Executive Director
jous Close Toda Daily Vol. Div $ P/E Yield

of CONSOLIDATED WATER COMPANY LTD.,

























































































: Abaco Markets -0.282 0.000 N/M 0.00%|

10.40 Bahamas Property Fund . 11.00 1.689 0.400 6.5 3.64% effective September 27 2006

6.90 Bank of Bahamas 8.03 0.796 0.260 10.1 3.24% >

0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.265 0.020 3.0 2.50%

1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.85 0.199 0.060 9.3 3.24% : Some eee ge Ne ee d “a :

4.12 Fidelity Bank 4.30 0.170 0.050 7.6 3.85% Mr. Bu au s responsibilities include serving as a
9.00 Cable Bahamas 10.21 0.715 0.240 14.3 2.35% 5 re .

1.64 Colina Holdings 2.00 0.078 0.040 25.6 2.00% member ol the Audit Committee and the
9.05 Commonwealth Bank 13.34 0.998 0.680 13.4 5.10% Compensation Committee of the Board of
4.22 Consolidated Water BDRs 5.12 0.134 0.045 38.2 0.88% : 4 :

2.40 Doctor's Hospital 2.44 0.295 0.000 83 0.00% Directors.

5.54 Famguard : 5.70 0.552 0.240 10.3 4.21%

10.70 Finco 12.30 0.779 0.570 15.7 4.65%

10.90 FirstCaribbean 14.50 0.921 0.500 15.7 3.45%

10.00 Focol 16.61 300 1.476 0.510 11.3 3.07% CONSOLIDATED WATER COMPANY LTD.,
0.50 Freeport Concrete wt 0.50 -0.434 0.000 N/M _ 0.00% is a company incorporated under the laws of the
7.10 ICD Utilities 7.20. 0.532 0.135 13.5 1.88% 7 2 A

8.52 J. S. Johnson 9.05 0.588 0.560 15.4 6.19% Cayman Islands and is listed on the Bahamas
10.00 Premier Real Estate 10.00 1.269 0.795 7.9 : tae

ve “ QQ AE International Securities Exchange.
ore : os ras ae

wk-LOw

12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.20 RND Holdings

For more information, please contact the company
at:
CONSOLIDATED WATER COMPANY LTD.,
' PO.Box 1114 GT
Regatta Office Park,






j
28.00 ABDAB ;
14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60
esi 0.35 RND Holdings

52wk-Low Fund Name






1.770 1.320 8.3 9.04%
0.00%
WO








1.2719 Colina Money Market Fund 1.326132" 5 \

2.6662 Fidelity Bahamas G&IFund 3.0569*** Windward Three

2.3241 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.596093** ; h me Ath Floor
1.1495 Colina Bond Fund 1.217450"*** West Bay Road



11.3545*****





10.0000 Fidelity Prime Income Fund

INDEX - 19 Dec 1,000.00 MARKET TERMS YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price





Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands

KEY


















52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks * Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity * - 26 January 2007

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price 7 . 1 Reap } © ~
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week ** - 31 January 2007 A tte n lion M Ss. I rac cy Ebanks
Change - Change in closing price from day to day EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today NAV - Net Asset Value *** 31 January 2007

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M - Not Meaningful

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 **** 31 December 2006 Telephone: (345)-945-4277

Facsimile:(345)-949-2957

eee 31 January 2007
SOOO


°

PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007

7.

m. Leases - Leases in which a significant portion of the risks and rewards of ownership are
retained by the lessor are classified as operating leases. Payments made under operating
leases are charged to the consolidated statement of income on a straight-line basis over
the period of the lease. j

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING JUDGEMENTS AND KEY SOURCES OF ESTIMATION
UNCERTAINTY

The preparation of this non-consolidated balance sheet in conformity with International
Financial Reporting Standards requires management to make estimates and assumptions that
affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and
liabilities at the date of the non-consolidated balance sheet, and the reported amounts of
revenues and expenses during the reported period. Actual results could differ from those
estimates. 6

Allowance for credit losses - The allowance for credit losses reflects management’s . best
estimate, as at the balance sheet date, of probable credit losses related to on - and off-balance
sheet financial instruments, primarily loans, deposits with other banks, derivative products,
acceptances and other indirect credit commitments ‘such as letters of credit and letters of
guarantee. Management reviews portfolio credit quality on an ongoing basis to ensure that the
amount of the allowance for credit losses is adequate. In assessing the adequacy of the amount
of the allowance for credit losses, management must use its judgment in establishing
reasonable assumptions and subjective and significant estimates concerning the probability of
default, probable losses in the event of default, the amount at risk in the event of default, the
amount and dates of future cash flows, the value of the underlying collateral, and realization

. costs. Any changes in these estimates and. assumptions, as well as the use of different, but
equally reasonable, estimates and assumptions, may have an impact on the allowance for
credit losses and, consequently, onthe provision for credit losses for the year.

Fair value of financial instruments - The Bank records at fair value trading securities and
derivative financial instruments other than those held for non-trading purposes and which
qualify for hedge accounting. Any change in fair value is recognized in the non-consolidated
statement of income. Fair value is the amount at which a financial instrument could be
exchanged in an arm’s length transaction between willing parties who are under ‘no
compulsion to act, based on quoted market prices. If quoted market prices are not available,
fair value is determined using estimates. The valuation techniques used to make these
estimates incorporate current market prices, the contractual prices of the underlying
instruments, the time value of money, yield curves and volatility factors. If necessary, fair
value is adjusted to take market, model and credit risks into account, as well as the related
custs. Because of the role of judgment in estimating fair value amounts, fair values are not
necessarily comparable between financial institutions and may not be indicative of net
realizable value.

Valuation of investment account securities - Under IFRS, available-for-sale financial assets
and financial assets at fair value through income are initially carried at fair value and at each
non-consolidated balance sheet, are subsequently carried at fair value. Any impairment in such
assets is recognised in the non-consolidated statement of income. Determining whether there
has been impairment and establishing the net realizable value require judgment and estimates.
Management examines the value of investment account securities on an ongoing basis in order
to determine whether there has been any impairment in any of the securities. This
examination entails analyzing the facts specific to each investment and assessing expected

future returns on the securities.

Depreciation and amortization - Depreciation and amortization is based on management
estimates of the future useful life of fixed assets. Estimates may change due to technological
developments, competition, changes in market conditions and other factors and may result in
changes in the estimated useful life and in the amortization or depreciation charges. The Bank
reviews the future useful life of property, plant and equipment and intangible assets
periodically taking into consideration the factors mentioned above and all other important
factors. In case of significant changes in the estimated useful lives, depreciation and
amortization charges are adjusted prospectively.

Legal proceedings, claims and regulatory discussions - The Bank is subject to various legal
proceedings, claims and regulatory discussions, the outcomes of which are subject to
significant uncertainty.. The Bank evaluates, among other factors, the degree of probability of
an unfavorable outcome and the ability to make a reasonable estimate of the amount of loss.
Unaniticipated events or changes in these factors may require the Bank to increase or decrease
the amount the Bank has accrued for any matter or accrue for a matter that has not been
previously accrued because it was not considered probable or a reasonable estimate could not
be made. No events have occurred that would require management to make such a provision.

LOANS
Maturity analysis of loans is as follows: MOTs Osea
: . 2006 2005
3 months and under $ 31,035,230 $ 36,579,364
7 to 12 months ‘47,715 32,484

$ 31,082,945 $ 36,611,848

INVESTMENTS IN SUBSIDIARIES
Movement on investments in subsidiaries during the year is as follows:

2006 2005

Investments at equity, beginning of year $ 125,666 $ 128,512
Write-down in value of investment in subsidiary (6,285) (2,846)

Investments at equity,endofyear i og °2 119,381 $< 125,666

FIXED ASSETS

The movement of fixed assets during the year is as follows:





2006
Beginning Ending
! Balance Additions Disposals Balance
COST:
Leasehold improvements $ 889,869 $ 203 $ - $ 890,072
Office equipment :
and furniture 334,034 27,627 - 361,661
Motor vehicle 62.216 - - 62,216
Computer equipment
and software 498,070 201,532 _ 699,602
$ 1,784,189 $ 229,362 $ $ 2,013,551
2006
Beginning Depreciation Ending
Balance Expense Disposals Balance
ACCUMULATED
DEPRECIATION
AND AMORTIZATION:
Leasehold improvements $ 304,651 $ 337,784 $ - $ 642,435
Office equipment
and furniture . 204,818 52,199 - 257,017
Motor vehicle 20,739 15,554 - 36,293
_ Computer equipment
and software 375,178 75,369 - 450,547
$ 905,386 $ 480,906 $ - $ 1,386,292
2006 Net Movement $ 878,803. $ (251,544) $ - $627,259

$1,035,591 $ (156,598) $ (190) $ 878,803

2005 Net Movement

During the year, management revised its estimate of the depreciable life of leasehold assets
from 13 years to 8 years. In accordance with IAS 8, Accounting Policies, Changes in
Accounting Estimates and Errors, the effect of such change has been recognized in the current
year and will be recognized prospectively in the non-consolidated statement of income.

DEPOSITS

Maturity analysis of customers’ deposits is as follows:

2006 2005
3 months and under $75,367,437 $62,766,725
4 to 6 months 6,841,751 7,480,672
6,042,224 17,712,758

7 to 12 months Bee
$88,251,412 $87,960,155

Deposits from related parties are payable on demand.



9.

10.

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

SHARE CAPITAL
Authorized, issued and fully paid:

2006 2005

175,000 5% non-cumulative participating
redeemable convertible preference
shares of $100 each

20,000 Non-voting non-participating preference
shares of $180 each with no

$17,500,000 - $17,500,000

2,000,000

dividend rights 2,000,000
5,000 Ordinary shares of $100 each 500,000 500,000
$20,000,000 $20,000,000
LOSSES ON TRADING ACTIVITIES - OTHERS
2006 at 2005

Net loss in fair value of investment in available for sale security:

Through the non-consolidated statement of changes in equity $_(291,785) S$:
; j
During the current year, the Bank made the election to treat fair value gains and losses on
available for sale securities through the non-consolidated statement of changes in equity.
Previously, such gains and losses were recorded through the non-consolidated statement of
income. In keeping with the transitional provisions of IAS 39 the Bank records fair value
changes prospectively in equity,

41.. ANALYSIS OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES

Geographical Distribution:

Assets Liabilities
2006 2005 2006 2005
North America 86% 30% 29% 54%
Western Europe and other 14% 10% 1% 46%

oo% 100% 100% 100%

Maturity Analysis:
: Assets Liabilities
, 2006 2005 2006 2005
Up to 1 year 99% 99% 10% 63%
1 to 5 years 1% 1% 0% 0%
Over 5 years ‘ 0% 0% 30% 37%
190% 100% . 100% 100%
Currency Analysis:
: Assets Liabilities
. 2006 2005 2006 2005
United States dollars 96% 96% 85% 84%
Canadian dollars 4% 4% 15% 16%

100% 100%

Average Interest Rates:

Loans : Deposits
2006 2005 2006 2005
Average interest rate 6.36% 5.00% 3.06% 1.57%

12. DERIVATIVE FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

13.

14.

15.

a... The Bank uses derivative instruments for trading purposes.

The notional principal amounts upon which payments are based are not indicative of the
credit risk associated with derivative financial instruments.

Credit risk arising from derivative transactions is the financial loss that may occur as a
result of a counterparty defaulting on its obligations to the Bank. Credit risk is managed
by setting credit exposure and duration limits for counterparties and dealing primarily
with G7 based dealers and financial institutions with high credit ratings.

The maturity analysis for open derivative instruments as of October 31, 2006 is as





follows:
Remaining term to maturity
‘ Greater
3months 3to6 7to12 than Total Total
and under months months 12 months 2006 2005
Equity and
commodity swaps $11,300,025 $ - $ - §$ - $11,300,025 $11,300,025
Forward contracts _72,341,895 __- _ = _- = _72,341,895 __74,584,562
$83,641,920 $ - $ - $ - $83,641,920 $85,884,587

Forward contracts are commitments to purchase or sell foreign currencies for delivery at
a specified-date in the future at a fixed rate. ee

Equity and commodity swaps are contracts involving one party paying on specified
settlement dates, an amount based on a specified floating interest rate and notional
amount while the other party pays, on specified settlement dates, an amount based on
the movement in the values of some equity, equity index, commodity index, or basket of
equities and the same notional amount as the floating rate component.

All foreign exchange forward contracts and equity swaps have been made with related
parties.

b. Derivative related items represent the net present value of the future cash flows in
relation to open derivative instruments as at the year end.

PENSION PLAN

The Bank operates a defined contribution plan for its employees which is administered by an
investment company. Contributions by the Bank amount to 5% of the earings of employees
participating in the plan and is charged against income during the year.

FAIR VALUE OF FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

Fair value of financial instruments included in assets and liabilities, except for the loan due to
related party, are assumed to approximate their carrying values due to their short-term
maturity.

Loan due to related party is not considered to be materially different from its fair value as it is
payable on demand.

The estimated fair value represents values which financial instruments could be exchanged for
2 : sae. . \ . .

in a current transaction between willing parties. Where there is no available trading market,
fair values are estimated using appropriate valuation methods.

RISK MANAGEMENT
Credit Risk:

Credit risk arises from the failure of a counter party to perform according to the terms of the
contract. From this perspective, the Bank’s significant exposure to credit risk is primarily
concentrated in cash and due from banks, investments and loans. The deposits and investment
transactions are predominantly in United States dollars and have been placed with high quality
international institutions and corporations. The loans are short term and are fully secured by
assets managed by the Bank on behalf of the customers.

Price Risk:

Price risk is comprised of currency risk, interest rate risk and market risk. Currency risk
emanates from the possibility that the value of a financial instrument will fluctuate due to
changes in foreign exchange rates. The Bank minimizes its risk by monitoring levels of
foreign currency particularly those susceptible to foreign exchange rates volatility.

Interest rate risk is the risk that the value of a financial instrument may fluctuate significantly
as a result of changes in market interest rates. The Bank’s exposure to this is minimal as the
relevant financial instruments are usually short term with fixed interest rates and are therefore
repriced on maturity.

Market risk is the risk that there will be a change in the value of a financial instrument due to
changes in the market conditions. The Bank may from time to time enter into certain contracts
on behalf of its customers in order to reduce the level of risk. The Bank tends to minimize this
risk through various control policies, monitoring procedures and hedging strategies.

100% 100%

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THE TRIBUNE







COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES
Lease Commitments:

The future minimum rental payments required under a non-cancelable operating lease are as
follows:




$ 365,033
$2,002,515

Due within | year
Due between 2 - 5 years












Commitments to Extend Credit:






In the normal course of its business, the Bank enters into commitments to extend credit in
order to meet the financial needs of its customers. As of October 31, 2006, the total amount of
guarantees outstanding by the Bank was $8,488,456 (2005: $8,780,722).

y .
Contingencies:



The Bank has overdraft facilities up to an amount of $100,000 and credit card facilities for its
customers up to an aggregate limit of $3,000,000 from FirstCaribbean International Bank.

. NET FOREIGN CURRENCY EXPOSURE

Assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies at the balance sheet date are as

follows:
2006

GBP CHF

503 $ 467,995,720
__ (467,720,472)



CAD EUR US $ Equivalent










$ 498,566,713 $13,828,043 $3,368,737 $
(498,263,135) _(13,825,705) (3,367,921) -
275,248

$ 303,578 $ 2,338 $_ 816 $ 503 $

Assets -
Liabilities





2005

CAD EUR GBP CHF US $ Equivalent




















Assets $ 515,123,295 $ 13,890,924 $3,377,891 $ 178 $ -458,728,524
Liabilities (514,838,609) (13,881,445) (3,371,515) (458,464,726)
$ 284,686 $ 9,479 $ 6,376 $ 178 $263,798






The assets and liabilities disclosed on the non-consolidated balance sheet in certain instances
are presented net. This is.mainly in relation to derivative items which create both assets and
~ liabilities and which can legally be settled on a net basis. The above balances are presented
gross to give a clearer picture of the overall exposure of the Bank.

’ SUBSEQUENT EVENTS






During the first quarter of the subsequent period, the Bank received aoprovil from the Central

Bank of The Bahamas to pay a dividend in the amount of $166,000,000 to its immediate
parent company, Natcan Holdings International Limited. As at the date of authorization of this
non-consolidated balance sheet, no payment had been made.

Management has also declared its intention to repay the related party interest free demand
loan. However, as at the date of authorization of this non-consolidated balance sheet, no
formal plans for the repayment had been made.















Deloitte

Deloitte & Touche
Chartered Accountants

and Management Consultants
2nd Terrace, Centreville

P.O. Box N-7120
Nassau, Bahamas




Tel + 1 (242) 302-4800
vax, + (242) 322-3101
ettps/ www. detoitte.com.bs

INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT



" To the Shareholders of
National Bank of Canada (Intemational) Limited:











We have audited: the ‘above--non-consolidated balance sheet of National Bank of Canada
(International) “Limited (the “Bank”) as of October 31, 2006, and a summary of. significant
. accounting policies and other explanatory notes.

Management’s responsibility for the balance sheet



Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of this non-consolidated balance
sheet in accordance with Intemational Financial Reporting Standards. This responsibility includes:
designing, implementing and maintaining internal controls relevant to the preparation and fair
presentation of a non-consolidated balance sheet that is free from material misstatement, whether
due to fraud or error; selecting and applying appropriate accounting policies; and making accounting
estimates that are reasonable in the circumstances.

Auditors’ responsibility







Our responsibility is to express an opinion on this non-consolidated balance sheet based on our audit.
We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those Standards
require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance as to whether the non-
consdlidated balance sheet is free of material misstatement.












An audit involves procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amount and disclosures in the non-
consolidated balance sheet. The procedures selected depend on the auditors’ judgment, including
the assessment of risks of material misstatement.of the non-consolidated balance sheet, whether due
to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to
the entity’s preparation and fair presentation in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of
expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal control. An audit also includes
evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and significant estimates made by
management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the non-consolidated balance sheet.

We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient.and appropriate to provide a Daais
for our audit opinion.



Without qualifying our opinion we draw your attention to the fact that the Bank’s policy does not
_permit us to verify customers’ loan and deposit balances and transactions by direct confirmation.
We were however able to perform alternative procedures around these balances and transactions.

Opinion







In our opinion, the non-consolidated balance sheet presents fairly, in all material respects the non-
consolidated financial position of the Bank as of October 31, 2006, in accordance with International
Financial Reporting Standards.

lite 4 Touche

January 16, 2007





Publish your Legal Notices and
Balance Sheets in The Bahamas
leading newspaper

The Tribune

Call 502-2352 thru 7 or
502-2376



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 9B



Hotel association
begins environmental
management training

programme |

THE Bahamas Hotel Asso-
ciation (BHA), in collabora-
tion with its.partners, has
begun its environmental man-
agement training programme,
which aims to help Bahamas-
based consultants better assist
small and medium-sized
(SMEs) tourism businesses.

Venture

The venture, which also
involves the Ministry of

Tourism, Antiquities, Monu-
ments and Museums Corpora-
tion, and Caribbean Alliance
for Sustainable Tourism

(CAST), includes Environ- »

mental Walk-
Through(EWT)procedures
and Environmental Manage-
ment Systems (EMS).

Among the businesses that
will benefit, from the environ-
mental management course
are hotels, marinas, other
tourism services providers, his-
torical, heritage, cultural and
natural sites and events, since
the consultants will help
improve their competitiveness
through effective environmen-
tal management and operation
procedures.

Course aims to help Bahamas-
based consultants better assist small,



medium-sized tourism businesses

The course was held over a
four-day period between
December 15-20, 2006, and has
resulted in there- now being 20
new CAST-Certified EWT
local Consultants.

Frank Comito, the Bahamas
Hotel Association’s executive
vice-president, said: “The
Bahamas Hotel Association is
extremely pleased to be in the
forefront of this landmark ini-

tiative, and looks forward to:

working with local consultants
in assisting tourism SMEs to
maximise their operational and
market potential.

“We are especially pleased
to be able to draw on the

resources and expertise of the |

Caribbean Alliance for Sus-
tainable Tourism (CAST), rep-
resented ‘by its director,
Deirdre P. Shurland, in facili-
tating the three-day Environ-
mental Walk-Through Certifi-

cation as part of the Environ-
mental Management Systems
training programme.”

The Sustainable Tourism
Entrepreneurial Management
& Marketing (STEMM) pro-
ject will bring Bahamas-based
small and medium-sized entre-
preneurs together to develop,
package and promote new
tourism products.

Provide

STEMM will provide some °

funding to these entrepreneurs
to assist them in meeting the
product and service level need-
ed to compete internationally.

Registration is currently
being accepted from pre-qual-
ified local consultants for the
Network Management and
Marketing for Tourism SMEs
training course, which is sched-
uled for February 19-23 2007.




Qs appropriate.

requirements.

resolution

systems.

FUNCTIONAL/DEPARTMENTAL DESCRIPTION

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS REQUIRED

Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited

Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited, a subsidiary of Citigroup, a leading financial institution
with a presence in over 100 countries and over 100 million customers worldwide,
is seeking candidates for the position of Business/Technology Information Security
(IS) Officer. This is a senior level position with IS responsibility for all Citigroup
businesses in the Bahamas as well as some global responsibilities.

Global Wealth Structuring forms the Citigroup international offshore trust
companies serving non-U.S. high net worth clients in Bahamas, Cayman Islands,
Switzerland, Jersey Channel Islands, New Jersey and Singapore. Products target
wealth preservation around fiduciary structure. The Technology Department
supports all locations and local applications of the business.

Serve as an IS subject matter expert and provide management support
and advise on alll IS related issues,

- Review, monitor and supervise alll IS related aspects of technology systems,
applications and databases.

- Ensure compliance with Citigroup and regulatory requirements for database
and application security, monitoring and reporting.

- Serve as lead in the preparations and management of IS ata cae ener
in accordance with generally accepted IS audits standards and guidelines.

- Review and oversight of the implementation of all Corporate |S initiatives.
Communicate the status of all |S initiatives, projects and business as usual
security issues with management.

- Facilitate IS training programs for all employees, consultants and vendors

- Periodic review and update of technology/IS policies and procedures
manuals to ensure compliance with Global Corporate poiicies and IS

- Organize/conduct third party vendor IS assessments validating third party

processes against Citigroup's standards.
- Manage the application and resource entitlement review program.
- Escalate security incidents/breaches and monitor remediation until

- Produce ad-hoc reports | in support of management requests novel
system audit logs review.

- A Bachelor's Degree with a minimum of five years experience, two of
which must be in an IS Audit/technology risk management role (an .
information technology degree would be an advantage but is not essential
with the requisite experience),

- An IS certification such as CISA, CISM, CISSP or equivalent.

- Working knowledge of Oracle. and Microsoft SQL databases.

- Knowledge in Windows 2000 Administration, MS Office Suite, LAN/WAN

- Ability to multi-task in a time sensitive work environment supporting various

application and infrastructure changes.
- Experience in process testing/evaluations and re-engineering.
- Salary will be based on qualifications and experience.

Interested candidates should fax, email OR forward a oe of their resume to
the following address by 21 February, 2007:

P.O. Box N-1576
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: (242) 302-8779

Email: Gina.Wilson@citigroup..om |





















































.
e

THE TRIBUNE.

PAGE 10B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007 .



@ By BEN DOBBIN
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — East-
man Kodak Co. said Thursday it
is cutting as many as 3,000 more
jobs as it completes a historic,
four-year transformation this fall
into a digital-imaging company
focused on consumer photogra-
phy and commercial printing.

On top of 25,000 to 27,000 lay-
offs targeted since 2004, Kodak
is reducing its payroll even fur-
ther to accommodate last mon-
th’s $2.35 billion sale of its health-
imaging unit.

“The dream was that we would
wake up in 2008 with the digital
company that we want to have.
We're still right on that track,”
Antonio Perez, Kodak’s chief
executive, said at an annual meet-
ing of Kodak analysts and ‘insti-
tutional investors. We will finish
this year. This is done. ... This is
the last year of restructuring.”

The company that put film
cameras into most homes in

BAHA MAR,

from 1B

Company completing four-year transformation into digital-imaging~

America acknowledged in Sep-
tember 2003 that its analog busi-
nesses were in irreversible
decline. It outlined an ambitious
strategy to invest in new digital
markets dominated | by
entrenched heavyweights such as
Hewlett-Packard Co., Seiko
Epson Corp. and Canon Inc.

As it battled to outpace the
drop in demand for film, its cen-
tury-old cash cow, Kodak
embarked on a nearly $3 billion
shopping spree but also ran up
$2 billion in net losses over eight,
consecutive quarters. It finally
hauled in a modest $16 million
profit in the October-December
period when, for the first time, it
generated more earnings from
digital than from film, paper and
other chemical-based businesses.

It is now eliminating 28,000 to
30,000 jobs by year-end, with
23,300 already axed. And the sale

this week to do “their first initial
planning for the reflagging” of
the Radisson into a Sheraton-
branded property.

“We're looking at that being

of its 111-year-
old health unit
— intended to
help fund its
bold leap into
the inkjet
printer market
— will strip
another 8,100
jobs. That will
shrink its pay-
roll to around
30,000, its low-
est level since
the 1930s.
“As one big
unit leaves, obviously there’s not
as much revenue or earnings, or
as much support, and that has to
be adjusted for,” Kodak
spokesman Gerard Meuchner
The cuts will bring extra
restructuring charges of $400 mil-
lion to $600 million, or total
charges of $3.6 billion to $3.8 bil-

B@ PEREZ
(AP Photo)

reflagged by Spring [2008],” Mr
Robinson said, adding that when
the $80 million renovations by
Osprey Developers were com-
pleted, it would be one of the



lion since 2004.

“By the end of the third quar-
ter, basically my hope is that
we’re done with all the announce-
ments of restructurings and jobs
and everything else and we’re just
fully concentrated on growing”
more than a dozen digital ven-
tures from cameras and online
photo services to high-volume
printing presses, Perez said in an
interview.

“If you look in the history
books, you will see this is one of
the hardest transformations to
do,” said Perez, a native of Spain
who was hired by Rochester-
based Kodak in 2003 from
Hewlett-Packard, where he
helped build an inkjet printer
behemoth that he now aims to
tackle head-on.

“We had $3 billion in assets
associated with film. You cannot
disassemble that that easily. ... It’s

Sheraton’s top global properties.

The “critical benchmark date”
for Baha Mar to conclude nego-
tiations on its supplemental
Heads of Agreement for the pro-

RELATIONSHIP MANAGER








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An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter with a

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| Mamager

SENIOR RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

Trust & Corporate Services

A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in The
Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guemsey, Switzerland and the United
Kingdom, Butterfield. Bank offers a wide range of services to focal and
international clients.

An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter with a
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Janage 4 large portfolio af compics accounts including trust, estates and

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= Extensive experience with all aspects of trust administration.

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STEP training or other suitable qualifications will be advantageous,
® Proficient in Microsoft Office suite of products.

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Closing Date: February 16, 2007



Contact

. Human Resources
Butterfield Bank (Bahainas) Limited
P.O. Box N-3242
Nassau. Bahamas
Fax: (242) 393 3772

E-mail: recruitment @ butterfieldbank.bs

wow. buterfieldbank.bs

SUBS

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Act on clients® behalf in matters dealing with lawyers, beneficiaries, etc.

















ert

A

Butterfield Bank .

UBS T rustees (Bahamas) Ltd. a leading international trust
company has an opening for the position of a

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In this challenging position you will be,responsible for:

* Maintenance and development of “ePOCA Portfolio
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* Ownership of the design phases of one or more of the

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Provide technical advice to staff on trust and company structures,

Act on clients’ behalf in matters dealing with lawyers, beneficiaries, ete.

Extensive experience with all aspects of trust administration,

Desired Qualifications

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Five - Eight years progressive Fiduciary experience in the Financial Services

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STEP training or other suitable qualification ill be advantageous.

Proficient in Microsoft Office suite of products.

Strong interpersonal, communication, problem solving, project management

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Closing Date: February !6, 2007

Contact
Human Resources

Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited

P.O. Box N-3242
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: (242) 393 3772

E-mail: recruitment@ butterfieldbank.bs

www.butterfieldbank.bs







The Ministry of Local
Government & Consumer Affairs

INVITES
THE GENERAL PUBLIC TO PARTICIPATE INA
CONSULTATIVE MEETING
ON THE ESTABLISHMENT OF

LOCAL GOVERNMENT
FOR
NEW PROVIDENCE

EA

Butterfield Bank











a long ride but we all believe that
we have enough assets, enough
know-how and enough commit-
ment from our employees to keep
going. We’re going to be a small-
er company but a much better
company, and we’re going to start
growing again, especially in 2008
but starting in 2007,” he said.
While Kodak remains the
world’s top maker of photo-
graphic film, Perez doesn’t dis-
count someday discarding the sto-
ried business that George East-

-man launched in 1881.

“Film is going to follow its own
destiny,” he said. “Right now,
entertainment (motion-picture)
imaging is very stable, is very
good for the company. ... If that
goes digital, which eventually I
believe it will, then we’ll do some-
thing else. We will do what’s bet-
ter for the shareholders.”

While Kodak’s transition to a

ject with the Government is
March 1, 2007, as hitting this tar-
get will enable it to comfortably
complete its mid-March closing
date for the joint venture agree-
ments with Harrah’s Entertain-

’ ment and Starwood.

Once the supplemental Heads
of Agreement, and all the associ-
ated permits and approvals, are
completed, Baha Mar will then
be able to focus on key infra-
structure work, namely construc-
tion of the re-routed West Bay
Street and new Straw Market and
Commercial Village.

The latter complex is where all
the government buildings and
banks that currently line West
Bay Street will be relocated to,
making way for the main Baha
Mar resort campus.

Harrah’s Entertainment, the
world-renowned casino operator,
is scheduled to take a 43 per cent
equity stake in the $2.4 billion
project, and bring its Caesar’s
Entertainment brand to the
100,000 square foot casino, pur-
portedly the largest in the
Caribbean, and a 1,000-room
hotel.

Starwood’ will bring its four.

brands - the Westin, Sheraton, W
and St Regis to brand the remain-
ing hotels.

Mr Sands told The Tribune

‘ that the tender.for the West Bay
* Street roadworks was: due to go
* out to bid “imminently”. Pre-

qualifying had already taken
place.

He added: “Just about every
company in the Bahamas has
applied to participate in the
development of Baha Mar, and
so they should, because it repre-
sents such a significant economic
impact for our country.

“We will use the best available
expertise from the Bahamas. One
hundred and ten Bahamian com-

new world of photography was

hindered by a reluctance to phase, --
out film — it created the world’s.”
first digital camera in 1975 but. ,
only began selling mass-market _:.

digital cameras in 2001 — the,-

company didn’t lag behind in-,

research, amassing more than.

1,000 digital-imaging patents. +.-

’

“There was a lot to work with,’

Perez said: “It was disconnected
and it was incomplete ... but it»

was there. You can accuse the. .
company of being late commer~.

cializing digital products, but no ,,

one can say the company was late: ’
investing in digital technologies.” _
Luckily, we were making a lot of »’ »’
money, and that- money was going, *. ’

into that. That is what has allowed.

us to do what we’re doing.”
Kodak shares fell 24 cents to

$26.45 in early trading Thursday

on the New York Stock.

Exchange.

foeg

i

panies have been employed in,

”

this project so far.

Mr Sands said Baha Mat had»

“done a tremendous amount of,

pile testing” and other work on «,
the foundations for the new, «
resorts, in addition to land clear-,,,.

ing. =

“We've not been sitting down,._
twiddling our fingers. The plans .,
have been advancing at a huge |.

rate,” he added.

Next week, executives from, —

Harrah’s are due to be present at: ,

the Crystal Palace Casino, work- ..

ing on issues such as the casino’s

information technology (IT) sys;_,.
tem and doing preparatory work | :
on training, “to ensure skill sets _-
meet expectations going for-._

ward”. :

Baha Mar’s $2.4 billion trans-,»

formation of Cable Beach will. .

attract 500,000 guests to its vari- ,
ous resorts during the first year,

after it fully opens in 2011, with .|
the project becoming “the largest...
gaming and resort development, ..
in this Hemisphere outside Las_ ,

Vegas”.

: Speaking after the preliminary .
signing of the joint venture agree-, ~
ment with Harrah’s, Sarkis Izmir- —

lian, Baha Mar’s chairman and
chief exécutive, said then that the
completed development will

pump $560 million annually into ~

the. Bahamian economy’s gross

* domestic product (GDP). —

Mr Izmirlian reiterated that |
economic forecasting studies con-'
ducted by Global Insight had’:
shown that after opening, Baha.
Mar would create “more than,
7,000 direct and indirect jobs”.

The same study reported that
Baha Mar’s cumulative impact on-
Bahamian GDP would be some’
$11.2 billion over a 20-year peri=>
od, with more than $4.7 billion in
tax revenues produced over that,
same time period. ae

BUSINESS FOR SALE

Well established Fashion Retail
Business. Well known and

respected worldwide Franchise.
20 years at same prime location.

Email: b.inquiries@gmail.com

_General Maintenance Personnel

Exclusive property requires general maintenance personnel
with experience in carpentry, plumbing, air conditioning and

some electrical.

Successful candidate must possess at least 5 years experience

and must provide references.

Excellent salary and benefits package
Commensurate with experience.



Please Fax resumes to: (242) 362-4107 —



Gare FI RD ROBaRHETHRNBPT HT ©

mM

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ee

ema wt wen

We are searching for a personality with a broad experience of
relational database modeling and process modeling with sound
knowledge in software development lifecycle. Programming

capabilities using MS DOT.NET and JAVA are a must. A suc-
cessful track record as Business Analyst/Project Manager MIS
and strong analytical skills in both IT and accounting are key
requirements to succeed in this senior position. In addition the
ideal candidate must be fluent in English and German (in order
to co-ordinate with our head office in Switzerland).

Applications in writing, enclosing a full resume, by
3ahamian nationals only on or before February 19, 2007.

Interested persons should reply on or before February 19, 2007
to:

Email:

hrbahamas@ubs,com _
or

Postal Address:

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd.
Ifuman Resources

P.O. Box N-7757

Nassau. Bahamas



SPEAKERS WILL INCLUDE





Honourable V. Alfred Gray
Minister of Local Government & Consumer Affairs





Honourable George A. Smith
Former Minister of Local Government





Dr. Pandora Johnson
Vice President- College of the Bahamas







Mr. Karl P.N.R. Spencer
Former Family Island Commissioner



Transfiguration Baptist Church Hall
Vesey Street

12th February, 2007

7:00 p.m.













NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LYDIE REMY OF P.O. BOX
F-44598, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS,
‘is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why fegistration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 9TH day of
FEBRUARY, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given: that NANNELL LAVELLE EXANTUS
OF RUSSELL TOWN, EIGHT MILE ROCK, P.O. BOX F-42986,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for

registration/naturalization as a_ citizen of The Bahamas, and

that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
9TH day of FEBRUARY, 2007 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

be aT at a

8 © oe we

re ee * ="

se ee tee
i By ANNE
D'INNOCENZIO
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — The:
nation’s retailers rebounded in
January from their disappointing
heliday season as shoppers
redeemed gift cards to buy winter
and spring merchandise. The
arrival of frigid temperatures in
much of the country helped clear
out what was left of cold weather
items.

‘As retailers reported their bet-
te?-than-expected sales Thursday,
wiainers included Limited Brands
Ine., Nordstrom Inc., and Feder-
atéd Department Stores Inc. Wal-
Mart Stores Inc. beat Wall Street
estimates, though its monthly gain
was modest. Even Gap Inc.,
which has long struggled with dis-

‘appointing sales, beat analysts’
expectations, though its sales lan-
guished at its namesake chain.

Among the losers were Aber-
crombie & Fitch Co., AnnTaylor
Stores Corp. and Chico’s FAS -
Inc.

“Across the board, the num-
bers are decent,” said Ken
Perkins, president of RetailMet-
rics LLC, a research company in
Swampscott, Mass. The one area
of weakness was women’s appar-
el stores, which he believes were
hurt by the weather. Winter
weather came too late, he said.

Thomson Financial’s sales tally
of 55 retailers rose 3.9 per cent
in January, beating the 3.1 per
cefit estimate. The tally is based
on same-store sales, or sales at
stores opened at least a year,
which are the industry standard
for measuring a retailer’s health.

The solid performance in Jan-
uary was soothing as it follows a
largely disappointing November-
December period, which aver-

aged a modest 2.9 per cent same- _

store sales gain, according to
Thomson Financial. The sales
reports also provided some
encouraging news about fourth-
quarter earnings, as many stores
- at least backed their profit fore-
casts. The retail fiscal year ends in
laté January, so companies will
be ‘reporting their fourth-quarter
results later this month.

~. While January is the least
.- important month of the retail cal-



from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

FT EPCCOOR EUW TS

Share your news

The Tribune ae to hear

endar, its significance has grown
over the past five years because of
the impact of gift cards. Retail-
ers don’t include gift card sales
in their monthly tallies until the
cards are redeemed, and the bulk
of cards given for the holidays
are used in January.

The delayed arrival of winter
weather had a mixed impact on
sales. It helped stores that sell
snow blowers and shovels or that
still had plenty of heavy boots
and coats to clear out, but hurt
those that. were heavily stocked
with spring merchandise.

Merchants also benefited from
a steady job market, which helped
send consumer confidence slight-
ly higher last month. The Labour
Department reported Thursday
that the number of newly laid off
workers filing for unemployment
benefits edged up last week but
the levels still reflected a healthy
labour market. The Labour
Department: reported that
311,000 newly jobless workers
applied for benefits last week, an
increase of 3,000 from the:previ-
ous week.

Still, stores do face challenges
ahead as the housing market
remains soft and consumers face
the possibility that job growth
may be sluggish. Last week, the
government reported that
employers slowed hiring in Janu-

‘ary, pushing the unemployment

rate to a four-month high.
What’s more alarming is that
shoppers may be on the verge of

tapping out — a government —

report issued last week said
Americans’ personal saving rate
dipped into negative territory in
2006 as consumers deplete their
saving or increase their borrowing
to finance their spending.

“TI believe that consumers are
still feeling confident about buy-
ing, but I think it is a measured
confidence,” said Janet Hoffman,
managing partner of the North
American retail division of
Accenture. “If people are not sav-
ing, they are not going to be ready
to buy that next house. There is
so much economic stimulation
when they buy that next house,”
she said.

Wal-Mart, the world’s largest
retailer, had a modest 2.2 per cent
rise in same-store sales, beating













NOTICE

EXKON EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
ORPHAN BASIN LIMITED

Nonice IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

® EXXON EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
* ORPHAN BASIN LIMITED is in dissolution under the

, provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

‘

(8) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the
“@ 7th day of February, 2007 when its Articles of Dissolution
* were submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(q) The Liquidator of the said Company is K. L. Floyd of 16945
», Northchase Drive, Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

HARRY B, SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT CO. LTD.

Diited the 7th day of February A.D., 2007.
‘
,

Attorneys for the above-named Company

: Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the
undersigned cio P. O. Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or
béfore 2nd March, A.D. 2007. In default thereof they will be

excluded from the benefit
by the Liquidator.

4

of any distribution made

Dated the 7th day of February, A.D., 2007.

K.L. Floyd
Liquidator
16945 Northcase Drive
Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.



the 1.8 per cent estimate from
Wall Street analysts surveyed by
Thomson Financial. The compa-
ny said lower temperatures
throughout the United States
drove sales of cold weather relat-
ed items.

Rival Target Corp. had a 5.1
per cent gain in same-store sales,
above the 4.6 per cent estimate.

Costco Wholesale Corp.
reported a same-store sales gain
of two per cent, below the three
per cent forecast. Costco blamed
the shortfall on a quirk in the cal-
endar: There was one less day
during the five-week reporting
period due to the timing of New
Year’s. The shift negatively affect-
ed same-store sales by about
three per cent, according to Cost-
co.

Federated had an 8.6 per cent
gain in same-store sales, well

above the 4.6 per cent analysts .

predicted. The same-store results
include only the Macy’s and
Bloomingdale’s stores that exist-
ed before September, when the
company transformed most of the
former May Department Stores

Co. branches to Macy’s units.

J.C. Penney Co. had a 3.6 per
cent gain in same-store sales at
its department store business, a
bit above the 3.5 per cent esti-
mate,

Saks Inc. reported a 11.4 per
cent gain in same-store sales,

beating the 7.0 per cent estimate. |
Nordstrom had an 11.1 per cent

gain in same-store sales, beating

the 5.9 per cent estimate.

Gap, whose CEO resigned last
month amid a string of disap-
pointing quarters, announced that
same-store sales were unchanged
from the year ago, much better
than the Wall Street estimate for
a 7.7 per cent drop. The business
was helped by strong sales at its
Banana Republic stores, and the
retailer boosted its earnings out-
look.

Meanwhile, the retailer con-
tinued to shake up its manage-
ment, announcing Thursday that
the head designer for Gap North
America was leaving.

Limited had an 11 per cent
same-store sales gain, beating the
7.8 per cent forecast.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

- SO WILLING
CORPORATION LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 6th day of February 2007. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



keeper.
¢ Administration task

programs










Job Function:



Responsibilities:



client,

Qualifications: :



financial statements.

Course would be an asset.




Benefits:






ESTATE CARETAKER

Estate Caretaker.responsiblefor large beachfront house and
property in Nassau, Bahamas.

Responsibilities include but are not limited to:

¢ Housekeeping and estate’s organization with the house

¢ Supervising and coordinating the household and
property repairs and maintenance.

* Supervising subcontractors

* Develops and implements preventive maintenance

This position offers a competitive compensation, including
housing and benefits. Apply in confidence to:

ESTATE CARETAKER
P.O.Box N449
Nassau, Bahamas

| cee Saree gaae Tl
Position 1 Available

TRUST ACCOUNTANT

® To produce accurate and timely trust and company financial
statements in accordance with internal procedures and
generally accepted accounting principles.

« Update the clients’ general ledger.

¢ Reconcile cash and securities balance; ensuring that all
entries are processed correctly in ledger.

« Prepare monthly financial statements and internal client
reports for a portfolio of complex trusts and companies.

¢ Liaise with trust and company administrators to ensure that
financial statements accurately reflect the activities of the

¢ = Bachelor’s degree in Accounting,
¢ At least five years experience preparing trust and company

Understanding of the fundamentals of trust administration.
Advance knowledge of Microsoft Excel.
e Completion of the Canadian Securities Course or Series 7

e = Ability to supervise a team of trust accountants.
¢ Proven track record of success in a similar position.

e Attractive salary commensurate with skills and experience.
Other benefits include medical insurance coverage,
excellent pension plan and performance based bonus.

Interested persons meeting the above requirements may forward their
resumes and two written references to:

Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7043
Nassau, The Bahamas



Email: trustaccountant@gmail.com




















\














































FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 11B

THE TRIBUNE : |

Retailers report better-than-expected sales results in January

AnnTaylor suffered a 10.2 per
cent same-store sales decline,
worse than the 5.4 per cent
expected.

Chico’s said same-store sales’
fell 3.5 per cent, worse than the
1.5 per cent analysts expected.
Teen retailer Abercrombie &

Fitch Co. had a six per cent same-

store sales decline; analysts pro-

jected a 1.9 per cent decrease.
On Wednesday,American

~ Eagle Outfitters Inc. reported a

17 per cent gain in same-store
sales, above the 10.9 per cent esti-
mate from analysts.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TEMPERATURE RISING INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of TEMPERATURE RISING INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has-been-issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

International Business Companies Act
(No. 46 of 2000)

COSMAN INC. ©

Registration Number: 99,660B

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
132 (2) of the International Business Companies Act
(No. 46 of 2000) COSMAN INC. is in Dissolution.

Any person having any claim against COSMAN
INC. is required on or before the 9th of March, 2007
| to’send' their name, address ‘and particulars of the
debt or claim to the Liquidator of the company, or
in default thereof they mayhave excluded from the
benefit of any distribution made before such claim

is approved.

GSO Corporate Services Ltd., of 303 Shirley Street,
Nassau, The Bahamas is the Liquidator of COSMAN

G50 Corporaie Services Lid ;
Liguidetor



Senior Client

ccountant

SG Hambros, part of SG Private Banking is a private bank
providing a comprehensive, wealth management service with
offices in the UK, Jersey, Guernsey, eibrettet and The

: Bahamas.

‘SG Hambros is currently looking to recruit a Senior Client
Accountant. Your main responsibilities will be:

@ preparation of financial
statements for a portfolio of
complex Trust and company
structures

@ for accounts requiring audit,
liaising with Trust Administrators
to schedule audit and working
directly with auditors on
accounting matters

® analyzing Broker accounts and
Reconciling and recording of
transactions

@ assistance with projects
assigned to the Department

Candidates should ideally hold

a CPA License or equivalent; a
Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting/
Finance or equivalent and have
at least 3-5 years’ experience

in Trust Accounting; have the
capacity to learn quickly in a

fast paced environment, have

SG Hambros Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited is

“good understanding of trust and

company administration, have
broad knowledge of banking
procedures and processes;
excellent communications skills
and proficient in Excel.

The position offers an attractive
salary and benefits package.

Applications should be submitted
to the following address, to arrive
on or before 16 February 2007.

Manager, Human Resources
SG Hambros Bank & Trust
(Bahamas) Limited

PO Box N7789

Nassau

Bahamas

www.sghambros.com

licensed under the Banks & Trust Companies Regulation Act.

SSC R Tenis lists

SG

Private Banking

EToTS CMe MOM meL LUE


PAGE 12B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007 | THE TRIBUNE



Petey jwuleite MS oa ie



PM on The Tribune:
_.. no matter ae

The Tribune says . . .

the more they do it,

the more many of you

| must cut it out.

Cut it out and put it on

your headquarters’ wall.

Motivate our people.

-| Show them who’s trying
to take us out. |
Put their faces on the
wall. Put the stories
on the wall.







i
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
|
\

If The Tribune can do this to the PLP
imagine what we can do for your business.

Being bound to swear to
the dogmas of no master.



e Tribune

My Voice. My Vlewpaper
td

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007

SECTION Q@ Fa @a ep



Fax: (242) 328-2398

‘E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

pt

Moss late

show helps.
the Falcons ©
snatch win

@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE







The Tribune ©







Pat, moron
ee BIOS aq ncn
oe Advance with ao
te BUR harg







cee

sy





@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports
Reporter

FRANSON Moss
canned three foul shots
on a three-point
attempt with 6.2 sec-.
onds left on the clock
to lift the Jordan
Prince William Falcons
to a 52-51 victory over
the pennant winning St.
John's Giants, yester-
day in the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium,

With the decision, the
Falcons snatched a 1-0
lead over the Falcons
in the Bahamas Associ-
ation of Independent
Secondary Schools
Sports' junior boys
best-of-three champi-
onship series.

Game two is set for -
Monday and Moss
vowed that the Falcons,
coached by Godfrey
McQuay, will win.

"T was a little scared,
but when I shot the

’ first one, I knew I
could do it because I'm
a shooter," Moss said.
"T knew that we had to
win, so when I got

_ fouled,.I decided to go ..

for it."
Not only did Moss
deliver from the charity
. stripe, but he also led
the Falcons in scoring
with 14, eight of them
coming in the fourth
quarter as they rallied
. from a 10-point deficit
- to sneak the initial
win.
Naaman Lightbourne
helped out with 13,
-.. Andrew Forbes had 11
" and Jasper Thompson
finished with nine.
The Giants, who
_ established their inside
- presence early with |
their big line-up, were

a little disappointed at —

the end when they did-
n't get a foul call with
time running out.

But St. John's coach
Chercovie Wells said
they shouldn't have
had to wait for the
winding seconds
to decide the out-
come.

"We're a little disap-
pointed. But down in
the third and fourth
quarter, we went into a
slump scoring," he said.
"I think they got
through our press pret-
ty easy. That was the
problem. But we will
work on that and we
will be back."

Claiming that he
knows he still has the
best team in the junior

.., boys division, Wells got

“-\-a game high 20 from

Geno Bullard, includ-
ing two free throws .
with 15.5 seconds that
gave them a 51-49 lead.
Dwight Moss helped
out with 13.




-as St. Augustine's College

ss pennant winning Big Red



@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

BIG players step up big in
big games and that was what
Alicia Musgrove did for the
Big Red Machines yesterday

took game one of the

Bahamas Association of Inde- |

pendent Secondary Schools’
junior girls basketball best-of-
three championship.

In a well played game
between the two teams, the

Machines held off the defend-
ing champions Queen's Col-
lege Comets for a 38-35 over-
time victory in the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium.

"We came in here and we
wanted to win," Musgrove
said after the victory. "At first
we were a little off, but we
worked on our defence."

With the lead see-sawing

throughout the game, Mus- _
égrove said she knew that if

5

SAC was, going to win, she. _
would have to work harder

than usual.
After both teams turned the
ball over in the winding sec-

onds of regulation that saw —

the score tied at 27-27, forc-
ing the extra three minutes,
Musgrove went to work right
away.

Musgrove missed a free
throw on a three-point
attempt, but got the rebound
as the Comets stood around
waiting for a second free
throw. She went back up, was
fouled, but this time she con-
verted the two charity shots
for a SAC 32-29 lead. |

OC would ride the 1-2
punch of Debenique Knowles
and Sheddel Williams as they
took a 35-34 lead with 40 sec-
onds remaining.

But Williams fouled out and’

Musgrove took advantage as
she sank one of two foul shots
for a 35-35 tie.

With 22.2 seconds to go,
point guard Ashlee Bethel
was fouled and she converted
one of two free throws for
SAC's 36-35 lead.

Then with 3.5 seconds on
the clock, Christian Albury
got a steal and a pass to Mus-
grove, who was heading
towards their basket. She got
the ball and scored on the fast-
break lead-up for a 38-35 lead
that sealed the deal.

Musgrove finished. with a
game high 27 points, while
Bethel added 12 for SAC,
coached by Anastacia Sands-'
Moultrie.

Knowles had a side high 21
for QC. Williams chipped in
with nine. Alexandria Mar-
shall had three and Ortam
Rolle contributed a basket.

QC's coach John Myles said
it was a well played game and
his Comets shouldn't feel too

@ QUEENS College Comets’ Shed-
del Williams tries to get around the
defence of Ashlee Bethel yesterday dur-
ing the junior girls championship.

(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)

disappointed in the loss.

_ "T thought we raised our
game and it.was touch and
go," he pointed out. "We have
to give SAC credit, but we
have to come back on Mon-
day and see if we can get over

this hurdle."

Musgrove, however, said
they will go to practice today
and work on the mistakes they
made and hopefully come out
and play much better than
they did.



As a reflection of how tough
it was for both teams, SAC
held a slim 4-3 lead after the
first quarter, which started out
as a defensive battle. But they
both picked it up in the second
quarter as SAC managed to



















jump out to a 13-10 advan-
tage.

Again both teams traded
the lead in the third betore
SAC posted a 20-19 margin.at
the break, going into the
fourth quarter.


PAGE 2C, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS

Oificials say
only six
Stadiums meet
security
requirements

@ SOCCER
ROME
Associated Press

ONLY six soccer stadi-
ums in Italy meet security
requirements, meaning
that league games in other
arenas will be played
without fans following last
week’s death of a police
officer during riots at a
game in Sicily.

The Olympic Stadium in
Rome made the list drawn
up during a meeting of
security and sports offi-
cials Thursday, while the
San Siro stadium in Milan
did not, the Interior Min-
istry said.

The other stadiums that
were deemed safe were in
Genoa, Siena, Cagliari,
Turin and Palermo.

Arenas in Florence,
Naples and Bologna were
among the 25 considered
unsafe.

According to the find-
ings of security standards
at the stadiums, five of
Sunday’s Serie A games
will be played behind
closed doors, while five
will be open to the
public.

Officials said, however,
that further checks on the
stadiums would be carried
out in the coming days.
The dfficials also banned
all night matches in the
Serie A and in the lower
divisions.

Banning fans from are-
nas that are not consid-
ered safe and other securi-
ty measures were prompt-
ed by the killing of a
policeman in rioting dur-
ing and after a Serie
A match in Sicily on Fri-
day.

Italian agency and tele-
vision reports said police
were holding a 17-year-
old person who was being
investigated for the mur-
der of 38-year-old police-
man Filippo Raciti.

Sports officials halted
all games immediately
after Raciti’s death, and
the Italian soccer federa-
tion said late Wednesday
that league matches would
resume this weekend.

The safety requirements
at stadiums include having
closed circuit surveillance
cameras and turnstiles at
the entrances.

AC Milan vice president
Adriano Galliani said offi-
cials have been restructur-
ing the stadium to con-
form security measures
for some time.

“We think it’s deeply
unfair to close a stadium
like San Siro, for which
we have already spent $26
million on works that are
major,” Galliani said on
the club’s Web site. “We
have nothing to reproach
ourselves.”

Italy midfielder Gen-
naro Gattuso, who plays
with AC Milan, said emp--
ty stadiums are a disap-
pointment.

“We can’t talk about
soccer and playing it with-
out the fans,” Gattuso
said. “How enthusiastic
can you get?”

A decree approved by
the Cabinet on Wednes-
day also bans clubs from
selling blocks of tickets to
visiting fans and allows.
authorities to bar suspect-
ed hooligans from enter-
ing stadiums, even if they
have not been convicted
of crimes.

Other measures ban
clubs from having eco-
nomic ties with fan groups
and stiffen prison terms
for committing violence
against police from five to
15 years.

The measures must be
approved by parliament
within 60 days to remain
in effect. The Cabinet also
approved a proposal for
more long-term changes,
putting club stewards in
charge of guaranteeing
security inside stadiums
and involving the clubs in
the ownership of the
sports arenas, now owned
by local authorities.

At least 38 people have
been arrested, including
15 minors, following Fri-
day’s violence at Catania’s
stadium, where the local
team was playing cross-
island rival Palermo.

















Thriller sees SAC ©
claim first game

@ LEFT: Queens College Comets’ Sheddel Williams con-
trols the fast break yesterday during the junior girls champi-
onship game against St Augustines Big Red Machines.

@ BELOW: SAC’s Ashlee Bethel controls the fast break
yesterday during the junior girls championship game. SAC won
38-35,

_ © SEE SPORTS FRONT
(Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)









M@ QUEENS College Comets’
Debenique Knowles controls the fast
break yesterday against St Augustines
Big Red Machines during the junior girls
championship game.

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)




'4C.| FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007 _ INTERNATIONAL EDITION



SOCCER | PRO FOOTBALL | ETC.

- SOCCER

Six Italy stadiums ruled safe

From Miami Herald Wire Services

Only six soccer stadiums in
Italy meet security require-
ments, meaning that league
games in other arenas will be
played behind closed doors.

The Olympic Stadium in
Rome made the list drawn up
during a meeting of security
and sports officials Thursday,
while the San Siro stadium in
Milan did not, the Interior
Ministry said.

The other. stadiums that
were deemed safe were in
Genoa, Siena, Cagliari, Turin
and Palermo. Arenas in Flor-
ence, Naples and Bologna
were among the 25 considered
unsafe.

According to the findings of
security standards at the stadi-
ums, five of Sunday’s Serie A
games will be played behind
closed doors, while five will be
open to the public.

Officials said, however, that
further checks on the stadiums
would be carried out in the
coming days. The officials also
banned all night matches in
the Serie A and in the lower
divisions.

Banning fans from arenas

that are not considered safe
and other security measures
were prompted by the killing
,of a policeman in rioting dur-
ing and after a Serie A match
in Sicily on Friday. State police
said investigators in Catania
were holding and questioning
a 17-year-old person who was second-round meeting with
being investigated for the Celtic is scheduled for March
murder of 38-year-old police- 7
man Filippo Raciti.

Sports officials halted all



ENRICO LIVERANI/AP
AN EMPTY FEELING: San Siro
stadium was one of the
arenas deemed unsafe in
Thursday’s ruling in Italy.

games immediately after Raci-
ti’s death. The Italian soccer
federation said late Wednes-
‘day that league matches would
resume this weekend.

The safety requirements at
stadiums include having
closed circuit surveillance
cameras and turnstiles at the
entrances.

e Elsewhere: AC Milan
could play the home leg of its
Champions League match

- against Celtic outside Italy fol-
lowing the closure of the
country’s soccer stadiums.

UEFA said Thursday it
would meet with Milan early
this morning to discuss the
issue.

The home leg of Milan’s

The game could be moved
. to neighboring France or Swit-

SPORTS ROUNDUP

Bears lineman
—~ Tank Johnson
pleads guilty

From Miami Herald Wire Services

Chicago Bears defensive
lineman Terry “Tank” John-



coach to leave the Super Bowl
champion Indianapolis Colts,
accepting the job as defensive

son pleaded guilty on Thurs- coordinator of the Minnesota
day in Skokie, IIL. to violating Vikings. A special assistant to
probation in a 2005 gun case. Colts coach Tony Dungy and
Cook County Judge John also in charge of the team’s
Moran denied a request to lift defensive backs, Frazier
the player’s home confine- couldn’t interview for the
ment, but said Johnson could position until after the Super

leave his house to attend prac-
tices. Moran delayed sentenc-
ing until March 15 so that a
‘resentencing investigation
can be done.

The hearing Thursday
came four days after Indianap-
olis beat Chicago 29-17 in the
Super Bowl. The same judge
allowed Johnson to travel to
Miami for the game.

Dressed in a gray suit, John-
son arrived early for the hear-
ing and signed autographs for
fans while waiting for the
courtroom to open. After the
hearing, he left without speak-
ing to reporters.

Johnson was arrested on
misdemeanor weapons
charges on Dec. 14 after police

raided his home in the Lake -

County town of Gurnee, about
40 miles northwest of Chi-
cago, and found six unregis-

Bowl. Frazier, Cincinnati’s
defensive coordinator for two

years before joining the Colts 1 CONFINED: Cook County Judge John Moran denied

in 2005, worked with Vikings

coach Brad Childress when |

the two were on staff in Phila-
delphia. Frazier was defen-
sive-backs coach for the
Eagles from 1999-02. .. . Cor-
nerback Nate Clements, a
key to. the Buffalo Bills’
defense, plans to test free
agency next month. His agent,
Todd France, told The Asso-
ciated Press it’s in his client’s
best interest to pursue free
agency once the period opens
on March 2. France added that
Clements is open to re-signing

with the Bills if the team Volquez and Josh Rupe

makes a competitive offer. ...
Cleveland Browns coach

Romeo Crennel completed with the. Texas Rangers. .

the shakeup of his staff,
appointing Umberto Leone

tered firearms. defensive-quality-control




zerland if the Italian stadium
closure .prompted by last
week’s fatal attack on a police-
man during rioting by soccer
fans remains in place.

AROUND THE GLOBE

e England: Edwin van
der Sar expects to play again
for Manchester United in two
weeks. The Netherlands goal-
keeper broke his nose in a col-
lision with Tottenham striker
Robbie Keane on Sunday.
Van der Sar said on his web-
site that he aimed to be back in

training within a week, and -

playing for the Red Devils in
two weeks. ... Blackburn mid-
fielder Morten Gamst Peder-
sen is out for at least a week
after injuring his hamstring

while playing for Norway on ,

Wednesday. Pedersen, 25,
limped off in the first half of
Norway’s 2-1 loss to Croatia.
... Fulham manager Chris
Coleman is waiting for his
punishment after admitting
that he used abusive language
toward an official. Coleman
admitted to the charge and has
not requested a personal hear-
ing, the Football Association
said in a statement.

e Germany: Turkey inter-
national Hamit Altintop will
leave Schalke when his con-
tract expires at the end of the
season.

“J learned a lot at Schalke
but now I’ve decided to leave,”
Altintop said on Thursday.

Altintop reportedly has an
offer from Bayern Munich but
he did not confirm his destina-
tion. He has been at Schalke

since 2003.

His brother Hamit also
plays for Schalke, the Bundes-
liga leader.

e Spain: FC Barcelona
defender Oleguer Presas lost
his sponsorship from a sports
clothing company because of a
newspaper article he wrote
expressing sympathy for a
jailed former leader of the
armed Basque group ETA.

Alicante-based firm Kelme
said it made the decision due
to “recent comments by the
soccer player in several media
outlets,” according to Spanish
news agency Efe on Thursday.
The company said it sup-
ported “the right to freedom of
expression and free thought,”
but added “Kelme’s links with
the player are solely based on
sporting criteria, and therefore
the decision was taken to
rescind the contract unilater-
ally.”

No one at the company was
immediately available for
comment. f

e China: Coach Ratomir
Dujkovic said a fight that
broke out between his club
and the English team Queens
Park Rangers during an exhibi-
tion game in London was
unacceptable.

The fight Wednesday at
Queens Park Rangers’ training
facility forced the match to be
abandoned with Queens Park
winning 2-1 about 15 minutes
from the end.

The incident is the latest to
plague China’s Olympic soc-
cer team during its two-week
stay in London.



__ MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD











RONEN ZILBERMAN/AP

HAVING A BALL

Super Bowl MVP and Colts QB Peyton Manning signs
autographs on Thursday after the AFC’s practice in
Kapolei, Hawaii, the site of this Saturday’s Pro Bowl.





Pujols bats 100 for U.S.

Albert Pujols has won a National League MVP award, a
Gold Glove and a World Series. He added a perfect 100 on his
U.S. citizenship test to his résumé this week.

The St. Louis Cardinals’ first baseman became a U.S. citi-
zen on Wednesday during a ceremony at the Eagleton Court-
house in St. Louis. Pujols’ wife, Deidre, arranged to have
about two dozen relatives and friends watch U.S. District
Judge E. Richard Webber swear in Pujols. :

Chester Moyer, the officer in charge of the U.S. Citizen

‘ and Immigration Service office in St. Louis, said on Thursday

that Deidre Pujols served as her husband’s tutor. Moyer said
the 27-year-old Pujols spent about a year preparing for the
citizenship exam. art

“He even answered a bunch of additional questions and
gave us more answers than we asked,” Moyer said. “He:
clenched his fist and said, ‘I got 100 percent!’ Sts

“He just had a grin from ear to ear. He was thrilled to
become a citizen.”

The ceremony was open to the public, but there was no
publicity about Pujols’ participation. He was the only person
sworn in on Wednesday. :

Pujols grew up in the Dominican Republic, moved with his —
father to the Kansas City area when he was 16 and graduated
from Fort Osage High School in Independence, Mo., in 1998.
He was selected by the Cardinals in the 13th round of the 1999
amateur draft after playing baseball at Maple Woods College
in Kansas City, Mo.

on sabbatical shortly,” Bett-
man said. “That isn’t the
case, wasn’t the case. ~

“J think people were
somehow under the impres-
sion my contract had a year
to run and got fixated on
that. Those stories were, to
say the least, inaccurate.”

Bettman said he “doesn’t
really keep track” of how
long his current contract
runs, but said “it sounds
|. right” that it is for at least
four more years.

There have been reports
some owners are losing
patience with Bettman.
Some others are frustrated
with the current U.S. broad-
cast contract with Versus, a

M. SPENCER GREEN/AP

a request to lift the home confinement for Chicago
Bears defensive lineman Tank Johnson, above, but said
Johnson could leave his house to attend practices.

ing offa victory last week in
the Women’s Australian Open,
shot a 71.... The International
is no longer on the PGA Tour
schedule because Tiger
Woods and key ‘corporate
sponsors stayed away from
the majestic mountain course
at the foothills of the Rockies
outside Denver. PGA Tour
Commissioner Tim Finchem
and tournament officials spent
the past two weeks in a final
effort to find a corporate spon-
sor, but talks with two poten-
tial partners fell apart.

e Tennis: Defending

would attend any Giants
games if and when Bonds
closes in’on the mark. ...
Shannon Stewart and the
Oakland Athletics agreed to a
one-year, $1 million contract,
giving the club the additional
backup outfielder it sought
before the start of spring train-
ing... . Right-handers Robin-
son Tejeda, Edinson

were among 10 players who
agreed to one-year contracts

Right-hander Bronson
Arroyo and the Cincinnati

Bettman staying put Clijsters sits out
Gary Bettman says he Former U.S. Open cham-
isn’t leaving his job as NHL pion Kim Clijsters might
commissioner anytime soon. | miss the French Open and
' “Pye watched with fasci- limit her farewell season
nation some of the newspa- further to reduce the risk of
per reports having me going inj

jury.

Clijsters, ranked fourth in
the world, pulled out of this
week’s Open Gaz de France
in Paris because of a sore
hip to ensure she could play
in next week’s Diamond
Games in Antwerp — her
last tournament in her Bel-
gian homeland before retir-
ing at the end of the year.

On Thursday, she said
she will skip the Pacific Life
Open in Indian Wells, Calif.,
from March 5-18 so she can
play in the following Sony
Ericsson Open in Miami.
She won both in 2005.

“J will have to take more
rest after every tourna-
ment,” she said on her web-
site. “It means I will skip

Reds agreed to a two-year, $25

1

At the time, he was on pro-
bation in a November 2005
Cook County case. In that
case, he’d pleaded guilty to a
misdemeanor charge stem-
ming from an arrest in which a
nightclub valet reported see-
ing Johnson with a handgun in
his sport utility vehicle.

Johnson has pleaded not
guilty to the Lake, County
charges in the latest arrest.

Also, the Bears shook up
their coaching staff, saying
defensive-line coach Don
Johnson and assistant offen-
sive-line coach Harold Good-
win won’t return and that
another assistant has left to
take a college job. Offensive-
quality-control coach Mike
Bajakian accepted the offen-
sive coordinator job at Central
Michigan after three seasons
in Chicago.

e Elsewhere: Leslie Fra-

million contract extension
through 2010.
e Golf: England’s Robert

coach, Mike Sullivan assistant
offensive-line’ coach and
Frank Verducci offensive
assistant.... Marcus Wash- Rock’shot a 6-under 66 — his
ington had arthroscopic sur- lowest score in a PGA Euro-
gery on his left hip, the second pean Tour-sanctioned event
operation this offseason for — to take a one-stroke lead
the Washington Redskins line- after the first round of the
backer. Washington had sur- Malaysian Open in Kuala
gery on his left elbow last Lumpur. Indian rookie S.S.P.
month. His rehabilitation is Chowrasia shot a 67, and
expected to take three months, American Edward Loar was
the team said, which could another stroke back along with
affect his participation when Australia’s Kane Webber and

workouts resume in the Argentina’s Rafael Echeni-
spring. que. ... South Korea’s Ahn

Sun-ju shot, an 8-under 64 to
ETC. take a two-stroke lead after the

e Baseball: Barry Bonds first round of the Australian
might get a telephone call
from Major League Baseball
Commissioner Bud Selig
instead of a handshake if the
San Francisco Giants slugger
breaks Hank Aaron’s home
run record. Selig wouldn’t say back after 69s.

champion Karrie Webb, com-

Wales’ Rebecca Brewerton
and Sweden’s Cecilia Eke-
lundh opened with 66s. Amer-
icans Cristie Kerr and Nata-

Five-time

Ladies Masters in Gold Coast. ,

lie Gulbis were five strokes _

champion Amelie Mauresmo
battled past French compa-
triot Nathalie Dechy 6-3, 6-2
to reach the Open Gaz de
France quarterfinals in Paris.
... Top-seeded Marion Bar-
toli of France was upset by
Martina Sucha of Slovakia
4-6, 6-3, 6-3 in the second
round of the Pattaya Women’s
Open in Bangkok, Thailand.
_.. Serena Williams agreed
to play for the United States
Fed Cup team for the first time
since 2003. Fresh off her Aus-
tralian Open title, Williams
will join older sister Venus on
the squad that faces Belgium
in the first round of the Fed
Cup in April.

e Cycling: Floyd Landis
will skip the Tour de France —
and all races in France this
year — as part of an agree-
ment with French doping
authorities in a case that could
strip him of cycling’s most
prestigious title.



cable network formerly Indian Wells so I have three
known as the Outdoor Life weeks of rest until Miami.”
Network, that is unknown to . Clijsters has been dogged
many people. Others are _ by injuries in her career.
upset with the current Last year, a left wrist injury

unbalanced NHL schedule,
which means some super-
stars don’t play in certain
markets for three years.

prevented her from entering
the U.S. Open to defend her
title, and from playing in the
Fed Cup final.





‘He doesn’t get enough credit for
being the elite player that he is.
He’s definitely in that group of
players.’

~ WAYNE GRETZKY, Phoenix coach, on
Detroit’s Henrik Zetterberg, right, who
scored twice in the Red Wings’ 4-2 victory
over the Coyotes on Wednesday night.



ee Se ecinie





On this day in history:
2002 — Oakland’s Rich Gannon leads the AFC toa 38-30

victory over the NFC to capture the player of the game
award in the Pro Bowl for the second consecutive year.

zier became the first assistant on Thursday whether he
THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com



From Miami Herald Wire Services

CLEVELAND — Pete
Campbell made eight 3-point-
ers — six in the first half —
and finished with 28 points,
and No. 10 Butler showed off
its outside touch by making a
school-record 20 3s in a 92-50
blowout of Cleveland State on
Thursday night.

Ranked higher in the AP’s
poll than at any time in school
history, the Bulldogs (23-2, ll-1
Horizon League) extended
their winning streak to nine
with an eye-popping display of

‘offensive efficiency and
marksmanship. ;

Campbell led the way, mak-
ing 8-of-l) shots from beyond
the arc and Butler, which
knocked off Notre Dame, Indi-
ana, Tennessee and’Gonzaga
earlier this season, dominated
the overmatched Vikings
(8-18, 2-11) from the opening
tip.

Mike Green added 14
points, Brandon Crone had 13
and A.J. Graves scored 12 for
the Bulldogs, who made 20-
of-33 3-pointers — a league
and arena record — and set

~’ BASKETBALL

COLLEGE BASKETBALL



MARK DUNCAN/AP

SHARP SHOOTER: Butler’s Pete Campbell follows through
on one of his eight 3-pointers, helping the 10th-ranked
Bulldogs rout Cleveland State 92-50 on Thursday night.

season-highs in points, field
goals, assists and margin of
victory.

OREGON HOLDS ON

e No. 13 Oregon 55, Ari-
zona State 51: Tajuan Porter
scored 24 points and host Ore-
gon held on to beat Arizona

the field with six 3-pointers for
Oregon (20-4, 8-4 Pac-10),
which scored its fewest points
of the season.

The Sun Devils dropped to
6-17 overall and 0-12 in the
Pac-10.

OTHER ACTION

Dame 66: Wilson Chandler
scored a season-high 25 points
and blocked the potential
game-winning shot in the clos-
ing seconds as host DePaul
prevailed. Chandler’s block
came after he put the Blue
Demons ahead with a break-
away dunk.

when he stripped the Fighting
Irish’s Colin Falls near mid-
court. He retrieved the ball
near the sideline and found an
open Chandler, who made it
67-66 with 18 seconds left.

Chandler was 10-of-19 from
the field, grabbed a season-
high 14 rebounds and blocked
three shots. Burns scored ll,
and Marcus Heard added 10
for DePaul (14-11, 5-6 Big East).

Falls scored 20 for Notre
Dame (18-6, 6-5), while Rob
Kurz added 15 points and nine
rebounds.

e Drexel 95, Hofstra 87
(OT): Frank Elegar scored 26
points, including six in over-
time, to lead visiting Drexel.

Dominick Mejia added 25
points and Bashir Mason had
14 points for the Dragons (18-6,
10-4 Colonial Athletic Associa-
tion), who snapped Hofstra’s
28-game, regular-season home
winning streak. Drexel has
won six of its past eight games
overall.

Loren Stokes, who scored
his 2,000th career point with
the game’s first basket, had 29
points and grabbed nine
rebounds for the Pride (18-7,
11-3). Antoine Agudio added 19
points and Carlos Rivera had
14 points before fouling out.

e UMass 77, Rhode
Island 55: Stephane Lasme
had 18 points, 12 rebounds and
ll blocked shots to lead host
Massachusetts.

INTERNATIONAL EDITION _ FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007 | 5C

high 22 points for UMass (17-6,
7-2), which built a 23-5 lead to
start the game. Lasme deliv-
ered his third triple-double of
the season as Massachusetts
moved into first place in the
Atlantic 10.

The Rams (14-10, 7-3) didn’t
score from the field until
Jimmy Baron drove for a layup
with 8:52 to play in the first
half.

Baron scored 17 points and
Joe Mbang added 10 for Rhode
Island.

ELSEWHERE

e Arkansas: Seven-footer
Steven Hill is still questionable
for the Razorbacks’ game at
LSU on Saturday because of a
thigh injury. Hill was hurt late
in a 65-57 victory over Auburn
on Wednesday night.

e Oklahoma State: A
woman injured last year in a
drunken-driving accident
involving former Oklahoma
State coach Eddie Sutton seeks
more than $125,000 in a legal
claim filed with the state.

Teresa Barnard says the

’ university and its employees

were “grossly negligent and in
reckless disregard” of her
rights and those of the public.
The claim, filed this week with
the state’s Department of Cen-
tral Services, says Barnard
incurred nearly $40,000 in
medical and injury-related
expenses since the Feb. 10,

Oregon holds off Arizona State

LATE WEDNESDAY

e No. 2 UCLA 70, No. 19
USC 65: Darren Collison
scored 17 points and host
UCLA capitalized on a late
technical foul to beat Southern
California and take a two-
game lead in the Pac-10.

The Bruins (21-2, 10-2)
trailed until there was about
six minutes left against the
Trojans (18-7, 8-4), who
dropped to third behind
UCLA and_ second-place
Washington State.

UCLA extended its Pauley
Pavilion winning streak to 18
games as the Pac-l0’s only
undefeated team at home.

Arron Afflalo scored 13 of
his 16 points in the second half,
including two free throws that '
gave UCLA the lead for good
with 4'/ minutes left.

WOMEN’S ACTION

e No. 1 Duke 64, No. 2
North Carolina 53: Abby
Waner scored six of her 16
points during a key second-
half spurt, and visiting Duke
held off North Carolina.

Wanisha Smith had all 17 of
her points in the first half,
Lindsey Harding added 16
points and Alison Bales had 14
rebounds for the Blue Devils
(25-0, 10-0 Atlantic Coast Con-
ference).

Camille Little scored a sea-
son-high 21 points and Erlana
Larkins had 14 rebounds for

the Tar Heels (24-1, 8-1).

NETS DL Th

EASTERN CONFERENCE

e DePaul 67, Notre Draelon Burns set that up 2006, accident with Sutton.

State. Porter was 8-for-12 from Gary Forbes scored a game-



PRO BASKETBALL



| ;

va | SOUTHEAST WL Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away’ Conf
Sat Washington 28 20 583 - 6-4 L-1l 19-6 9-14 19-10
Orlando 25 25 500 4 3-7 L:3 16-10 9-15 15-16
Miami 24 25 490 4% 6-4 W-5 13-10 11-15 13-14
Atlanta 18 30 375 10 55 L-2 9-15 9-15 12-20
Charlotte 18 31 367 10% 46 L-2 10-14 8-17 12-20

From Miami Herald Wire Services x j ee SS ; ae =. oe an
OKLAHOMA CITY — Desmond Mason ' am ATLANTIC WL Pet. GB L10 Str. Home Away _ Conf
scored 24:points and David West shrugged SOroHED 26.523) S310, og BP WA lich g 046. 183
ae : | NewJersey 23 27 460 3% 3-7 W-1 13-12 10-15. 17-13
off:a‘bruised hand to add:21 points and a |. New York 22 28, 440 42 5-5 W-2 13-13, 9-15 13-18
career-high 19 rebounds as the New Orleans “Philadelphia 17 33,340 9 6-4..W-2. 9-12 821 12-17
~ Hornets beat the Milwaukee Bucks 109-101 in Boston's 12 "36 250 13% 0-10 L16 420 816 8:23
Se ae CENTRAL WL Pet. GB_LIO_Str, Home Away _Conf
ee ae ee eo ere Detroit 30 18 625 - 82 WS 15-9 15-9 21-10
victory for the Hornets, who survived on Chicago 28 21 571 2%- 6-4 Ll 20-5 815 20-8
Mason’s last-second tip-in a night earlier in Cleveland 28 21.571 2% 5-5 W-l 18-7 10-14 17-14
Denver. Indiana 26 23 531 4% 6-4 L-2 15-9 11-14 19-13
Milwaukee 19 31.380: «12° 28 L-l 11-9 822 9-20

West scored off his second consecutive
offensive rebound to give the Hornets the
lead at the outset of the second overtime, and
Bobby Jackson gave them a 103-99 edge with

WESTERN CONFERENCE

SOUTHWEST WL Pct. GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf

left for a two-game trip to the Midwest.

Iverson aggravated his sprained ankle
during overtime in the Nuggets’ loss-to New
Orleans on Wednesday night. He had 22
points, nine assists and four rebounds in his
return from a four-game absence but wasn’t
his usual self as he had to settle for jumpers.
An MRI on Thursday didn’t show any struc-
tural damage.

“I think it is one of those things where I
just came back too soon,” Iverson said. “I
couldn’t be me on the basketball court. I am
more effective being aggressive and going to
the basket and making things happen.”

Iverson will miss the Nuggets’ games at
Indiana tonight and Milwaukee on Saturday
night but hopes to play again Monday night
against Golden State.

He acknowledged, however, that he might
be sidelined through the All-Star Game on
Feb. 18 in Las Vegas.

If Iverson backs out of his eighth All-Star
appearance, that would give teammate Car-
melo Anthony another crack at making his
first All-Star team as one of Commissioner
David Stern’s injury replacement picks. Stern
has said he won’t hold Anthony’s 15-game
suspension for fighting against him when
choosing replacements.

Center Marcus Camby (groin), who hasn’t
played in a week, will be a game-time deci-
sion Saturday night.

e Suns: Steve Nash might sit out
tonight’s game against Atlanta because of a
sore right shoulder, although he and Suns
coach Mike D’Antoni believe the injury
poses noe long-term problems.

The league’s two-time defending MVP did
not practice Thursday and was noncommit-
tal on whether he would go against the
Hawks.

The near-constant spasms that Nash had

experienced in recent days have subsided, he
said.

“I’m just trying to treat my shoulder and
get the inflammation down,” Nash said. “It’s
a little swollen on the joint. It shouldn’t be
too long I’m sure.” .

Suns reserve forward Kurt Thomas could
begin practicing next week and could be
ready to play shortly after the All-Star break,
D’Antoni said. Thomas has been out since
Jan. 15 with an injured left elbow.

e Mavericks: Reserve center DJ Mbenga
will miss the rest of the season because of a
torn knee ligament. He is scheduled for sur-
gery in two weeks, and there is no timetable
for his return, the team said.

The Mavericks recalled forward Pops
Mensah-Bonsu from the Fort Worth Flyers
of the NBA D-League.

e Jazz: Forward Carlos Boozer’s broken
leg is healing, but perhaps not quickly
enough for him to play in his first All-Star
Game, the Jazz said. Boozer was injured on
Jan. 27 in a game against the Hornets.

oe Kings: Dogs owned by forward Ron

SUE OGROCKI/AP

All-OUT STRUGGLE: Bucks forward Charlie Villanueva, left, blocks a shot by Hornets
forward Hilton Armstrong during Thursday night’s double-overtime marathon.

Artest have spent a total of 77 nights at the
pound since July because of poor care by
their owner, costing the NBA star $1,942 in
boarding and impound fees, county records
show.

e Three-point contest: Dirk Nowitzki
will face Gilbert Arenas again in the 3-point
contest during next week’s All-Star weekend.
Nowitzki won the event last year in Houston,
beating Arenas 18-16 in the final.

Jason Terry, Nowitzki’s Dallas teammate,
also is back after failing to advance to the
final round last year. Rounding out the field
are Miami’s Jason Kapono, who leads the
NBA in 3-point shooting percentage at 55.9
percent; Mike Miller of the Memphis Griz-
zlies; and Damon Jones of the Cleveland
Cavaliers.

The contest will be in Las Vegas on Feb.
17, followed a day later by the All-Star Game.

LATE WEDNESDAY

e Hornets 114, Nuggets 112 (OT): Des-
mond Mason’s putback as overtime expired
lifted visiting New Orleans.



SCORING

Lakers at Tor., 7
Clippers at Phil., 7
Port. at Char., 7
N.J. at Bos., 7:30
Minn, at Memp., 8
Hou. at Dal., 8:30
Atl. at Phx., 9

Chi. at G.S., 10:30

iN] ey VE)

G FG FT PTS AVG

_ a3-pointer from the right wing with 1:42 left. Dallas 40.9 816 - 9-1 WS 23-3 17-6 28-6
Chris Paul added a pair of free throws, San Antonio 33 16 673 7 6-4 W-1 16-8 17-8 21-11
tan each hit one i Houston 31 17 646 8% 6-4 W-2 17-6 14-11 18-15
and bis eres ach hit one in the final New Orleans 23 27 460172 7-3 W-2 15-11 816 13-18
minute to put the game away. : Memphis 12 38 .24028% 2-8 L-4 9-17 3-21 6:24
The Bucks missed their first nine shots in
the second overtime and didn’t make a field NORTHWEST WL _ Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
goal until Mo Williams’ foul-line. jumper Utah” 32 17. 653) - 7-3 W-3 186 14-11 20-10
made it 107-101 with 16.4 seconds left. Denver 23 24 «489 8 «3-7 L-3_ 13-14 10-10 10-16
: Minnesota 23 26 469 «9 3-7 Wl 149 917 14-18
Tyson Chandler had ll points and a Portland 20 30 .40012% 46 1-3 12-14 816 13-17
career-high 22 rebounds, and Paul ended up Seattle 18 31 .367 14 4-6 Wl 13-12 5-19 7-19
with 14 points and 10 assists for New Orleans.
‘The Hornets, who have won seven of their PaciFiCc = WL Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
past nine games, earned their 23rd victory to Phoenix 39 10 796 - 82 W-2 20-4 19-6 19-9
match Denver, Minnesota and Golden State LA. Lakers 30 20 600 9% 46 Ll 19-6 11-14 17-10
° é F L.A. Clippers 24 25 .490 15 6-4 L-3 17-8 7-17 14-17
— the eighth, ninth and 10th-place teams in Golden State 23 27 .46016% 4-6 Ll 17-8 6-19 13-16
the West. Sacramento 20 26 .43517% 6-4 W-3 14-11 6-15 11-18
ELSEWHERE RESULTS AND SCHEDULES
e Nuggets: Allen Iverson’s swollen right Thursday’s results Tonight’s games Wednesday’s results
ankle doesn’t have any structural damage, Detroit 93, Lakers 78 Miami at Clev., 8 Miami 91, Boston 79
: : N.O. 109, Mil. 101 (20T) Den. at Ind., 7 NJ. 87, Atl. 85
but he still stayed home while the Nuggets Chi. at Sac, jate Ce | cgacat Ons T Tor. 113, Ort 103
ea. » ind.

S.A. ‘110, Was. 83

Phi. 92, Cha. 83

Cle. 94, L.A.C. 77

Min. 121, G.S.W. 93
Dal. 113, Mem. 97

N.O. 114, Den. 112 (OT)

Through Wednesday +

REBOUNDING
GOFF DEF TOT AVG





Anthony, Den. 32 367 234 987 30.8 Garnett, Minn, 48 122 475 597 12.4
Arenas, Wash. 48 446 376 1411 29.4 Camby, Den. 40 104 384 488 12.2
Bryant, LAL 45 430 358 1296 28.8 Howard, Orl. 50 164 432 596 11.9
Wade, Mia. 42 400 390 1209 28.8 Boozer, Utah 45 142 389 531 11.8
Iverson, Den. 35 338 295 1004 28.7 Chandler, NOK. 47 183 362 545 11.6
Redd, Mil. 33 302 244 914 27.7 Okafor, Char. 49 192 360 552 11.3
Allen, Sea. 39 364 208 1049 26.9 Lee, N.Y. 50 175 364 539 10.8
James, Clev. 47 447 279 1236 26.3 Duncan, S.A. 49 147 378 525 10.7
Johnson, Atl. 44 421 176 1114 25.3 Jefferson, Bos. 41 145 289 434 10.6
Nowitzki, Dall. 48 407 350 1210 25.2 O'Neal, Ind. 43 104 347 451 10.5
FIELD GOALS ASSISTS

FG FGA PCT G AST AVG
Biedrins, G.S. 223 362 .616 Nash, Phoe. 46 542 11.8
Stoudemire, Phoe. 345 569 606 —— Williams, Utah 49 447 91
Lee, N.Y. 214 353 .606 Kidd, N.J. 50 439 88
Howard, Orl. 307 527 583 —Davis, G.S. 43 372. 87
Curry, N.Y. 356 613 .581 Paul, NOk. 32 274 8.6
Boozer, Utah , 410 721 .569 Miller, Phil. 48 400 8.3
Gasol, Mem. 221 399 .554 Wade, Mia. 42 334 8.0
Brand, LAC 405 733 .553 Ford, Tor. 42 324 77
Dalembert, Phil. 217 394 .551 Billups, Det. 39 300 7.7
Bogut, Mil. 253 460 .550 Iverson, Den. 35 265 7.6

V4 SEU cal asec

Sunday, Feb. 18,

at the Thomas & Mack Center, Las Vegas

EASTERN CONFERENCE

STARTERS

Gilbert Arenas, G, Washington
Chris Bosh, F, Toronto

LeBron James, G, Cleveland
Shaquille O'Neal, C, Miami
Dwyane Wade, G, Miami

RESERVES

Chauncey Billups, G, Detroit
Caron Butler, F, Washington
Vince Carter, F, New Jersey
Richard Hamilton, G, Detroit
Dwight Howard, F, Orlando

Jason Kidd, G, New Jersey

Jermaine O'Neal, F, Indianapolis

WESTERN CONFERENCE

STARTERS

Kobe Bryant, G, L.A. Lakers
Tim Duncan, F, San Antonio
Kevin Garnett, F, Minnesota
Tracy McGrady, F, Houston
Yao Ming, C, Houston

RESERVES

Carlos Boozer, F, Utah

Allen Iverson, G, Denver

Shawn Marion, F, Phoenix
Steve Nash, G, Phoenix

Dirk Nowitzki, F, Dallas

Tony Parker, G, San Antonio
Amare Stoudemire, F-C, Phoenix

aa aaa RTT TT TTL I EL Te

—

\




6C_| FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007 _




1 FLORIDA
Top recruits: DT Torrey Davis, DE Carlos Dunlap,
QB Cameron Newton, OL James Wilson, WR
Deonte Thompson i ;

The defending champions landed every big recruit from high
school national champion Lakeland High - including star RB
Chris Rainey and six All-America defensive linemen, and ‘
nabbed Thompson away from Miami at the last minute. —

2. SOUTHERN CAL

LB Chris Galippo, DE Everson Griffen, WR Ronald
Johnson, RB Joe McKnight, OL Kristofer O’Dowd.

The Trojans landed six Rivals.com five-star recruits, including
the nation’s No. Trunning back, linebacker, receiver and
offensive tackle.

3. LOUISIANA STATE Fes RUNES RSE
S Chad Jones, WR Terrance Toliver, DT Joseph —
Barksdale, WR DeAngelo Benton, DE Sidell
Corley. eS Se
~ Despite losing offensive coordinator Jimbo Fisher (FSU), LSU
~ picked up two.of the nation’s best receivers and safeties...

4, TENNESSEE

. DB Eric Berry, LB Chris Donald, DE Ben Martin,
\ WR Kenny O'Neal, WR Ahmad Paige.

The Vols loaded up at the skill positions and got the nation’s
best cover corner in Berry.

5. TEXAS : SAS SORES
OL Tray Allen,-DB Curtis Brown, DT Andre Jones, .
WR John Chiles, FB Cody Johnson. « ‘ :

- The Longhorns have another solid class, but are hurt by the
Joss of quarterback John Brantley, who went to Florida, :

6. AUBURN

QB Kodi Burns, OL Lee Ziemba, DB Michael
McNeil, RB Enrique Davis, LB Josh Bynes.

Auburn made off witha solid, balanced class led by Burns,
whom Scout.com rates as the fifth-best quarterback recruit.






: 7.SOUTHCAROLINA = Sos MS
WR Chris Culliver, DE Cliff Matthews, S Mark

Barnes, QB Stephen Garcia, DE Travian
Robertson. seat

Coach Steve Spurrier has put together one of the best classes
_in the program’s history - nabbing 12 players from Florida,
including a star quarterback in Garcia. — ee '

8. NOTRE DAME

QB Jimmy Claussen, WR Duval Kamara, OL Matt
S Romine, CB Gary Gray, RB Armando Allen.

The Irish have one of the nation’s top offensive classes - led
by the nation’s No. 1 quarterback in Claussen.




9. OREGON . we
- DT Myles Wade, DT Simi Fili, OLB Malachi Lewis,
OL Darrion Weems, LB Terrance Pritchett. ;

The Ducks made off with the best defensive class in the
country, getting two of the biggest and most talented tackles
in Wade and Fili. RS

10. MICHIGAN

QB Ryan Mallett, CB Donovan Warren, DB

Michael Williams, DE Ryan:Van. Bergen, WR

Toney Clemons. 9% <3: t ,
Another strong defensive class for coach Lloyd Carr, but he
also got the nation’s No. 2 quarterback prospect in Mallet.

Tl. GEORGIA

RB Caleb King, OT Chris Little, OT Trinton

Sturdivant, OL Justin Anderson, LB Bennie Curran
The Dawgs went heavy, getting eight offensive line prospects
and the best running back in Georgia in King. .

12. ALABAMA

DE Luther Davis, DT Kerry Murphy, LB Rolando
sea McClain, WR Brandon Gibson, QB Nick Fanuzzi

Former Dolphins coach Nick Saban got off to a late start, but

closed strong, getting a class that is heavy on talent on

defense.



13. NORTH CAROLINA aes
SN 8 DT Marvin Austin, DT Tydreke Powell, LB
_@ Da’Norris Searcy, LB Quan. Sturdivant, QB Mike
Paulus ies tes

Former UM coach Butch Davis and his staff did a great job

pulling in some of the nation’s best, including a lethal
defensive tackle tandem, three big receivers anda solid
quarterback. sees

14. OHIO STATE

S Eugene Clifford, LB Brian Rolle, S Nate Oliver,
CB James Scott, RB Brandon Saine.

‘The Buckeyes had limited scholarships, but still managed to
pull ina solid stockpile of defensive backs.

15. NEBRASKA
WR Niles Paul, DB Larry Asante, DT Joseph
Townsend, QB Zach Lee, OT Jaivorio Brukes.

The Cornhuskers, looking fora quick fix, grabbed five SuperPrep
100 junior college players, including the nation’s top junior college
quarterback and other talented high school recruits.

16. CALIFORNIA / :

OT Sam Demartinis, RB Jahvid Best, OL Matt

Suvins-Gavin, LB D.J. Holt, QB Brock Mansion
The Bears went heavy on offense and went to Texas to get
Mansion, one of the nation’s top quarterbacks.

17. PITTSBURGH

ares, RB Sean McCoy, QB Pat Bostick, OL Chris
CED Jacobson, DE Tony Tucker, FB Henry Hynoski
Former Dolphins coach Davce Wannstedt grabbed former
Canes recruit McCoy, and added him to a class loaded with
offensive talent. g :

18. MIAMI

LB Allen Bailey, RB Graig Cooper, OL Harland

ie Gunn, GB Robert Marve, CB Doug Wiggins
Despite the coaching change, Randy Shannon was still able
to get a franchise quarterback in Marve, three running backs,
a healthy receiving corps and possibly the best defensive
backfield class in the nation.

19. GEORGIA TECH
Gr QB Josh Nesbitt, QB Steven Threet, RB Jonathan
j Dwyer, DE Derrick Morgan, S D.J. Donley.
The Yellow Jackets banked on their ACC success and managed
‘to get four of the state’s top seven recruits in Georgia and two
scary-good running backs and quarterbacks.

20. ILLINOIS
WR Arrelious Benn, DE Martez Wilson, DT
D’Angelo McCray, DT Josh Brent, OL Mark
Jackson
Former UF coach Ron Zook grabbed two of the nation’s best
recruits and filled the rest with several solid acquisitions -
especially on the defensive side.















- MANNY NAVARRO

sence



_INTERNATIONAL EDITION ____

COLLEGE F






INSIDE THE GAME



SEAN GARDNER/AP

TAILBACKS EVERYWHERE: Joe McKnight was the top-rated
high school running back in the United States, and he

will find plenty of

BY SCOTT WOLF

Los Angeles Daily News

LOS ANGELES — The Uni-
versity of Southern California
made a splash on signing day,
but even bigger news could be
looming for the Trojans: Uni-
versity of Arkansas quarter-
back Mitch Mustain will visit
sometime in the next two
weeks, with the idea of trans-
ferring in the fall.

Mustain, who started eight
games for the Razorbacks,

would be more than just a fin-

ishing touch on Wednesday’s
recruiting class, which was
ranked No. 1 by ESPN an
No. 2 by Rivals.com. .

“Tt looks as power-packed
as any group we’ve had,” USC
head coach Pete Carroll said.
“We've got all kinds of big
guys, tough guys, power guys.
We held our own. It’s a highly-
regarded class.

“Of the 17 we signed, 14 can

_ make an immediate impact.”

If the Trojans lost some
commitments in the past few
weeks, they made up for it
Wednesday morning when
the top-rated tailback recruit,
Joe McKnight of River Ridge,
La., chose USC over Louisiana
State.

McKnight touched the ball

. 82 times last season and

scored 30 touchdowns. He
averaged 15.5 yards per carry.

-Carroll compared him to Reg-

gie Bush in his ability to catch
passes out of the backfield or
line up at wide receiver.

“BJe’s a tremendous ath-
lete,” Carroll said. “He can do
everything — he’s incredibly
versatile.”

What’s more surprising is
that McKnight chose USC
even though running backs
Marc Tyler of Los Angeles
and Broderick Green of Little
Rock, Ark., also signed with
the Trojans. In addition, tail-
backs Chauncey Washington,
CJ. Gable, Emmanuel Moody,
Allen Bradford, Stafon John-
son and Hershel Dennis also
are currently on the roster:

The 10th tailback on the
team, Michael Coleman, will
move to fullback. And USC’s
first commitment for 2008,
D.J. Shoemate from Servite
High, also is a tailback.

“Each guy sees his unique-
ness,” Carroll said of the new
recruits. “Broderick saw we
did not have a big, physical
back. Marc thinks he can doa
little bit of everything. Who
plays is going to be deter-
mined by the competition.”

Or maybe who transfers.
Johnson is expected to make a
decision at the end of the
semester.

As highly-regarded as the
class was by analysts, the Tro-
jans actually lost out on two of

company
Trojans will have 10 tailbacks fighting

JOIN THE

CROWD

Trojans get another
great class - and
maybe Mitch Mustain

at Southern California. The

for playing time.

their top targets, with wide
receivers Ahmad Paige (Ten-
nessee) and Deonte Thomp-
son (Florida) going elsewhere.

“You don’t ever get every-
one you want,” Carroll said.

Florida suddenly became a
nuisance to USC, taking °
Thompson and getting offen-
sive guard James Wilson to
decommit, in addition to lur-
ing quarterback Tim Tebow
last year.

“We were butting heads
with them a lot,” Carroll said
of the Gators.

USC also made one last run
at cornerback Donovan War-
ren of Long Beach, Calif., on
Wednesday, but Warren stuck
with his original choice of
Michigan. But the Trojans
hurt the Wolverines by sign-
ing wide receiver Ronald
Johnson, the No. 8-ranked
player in the United States by
Rivals.

Johnson will play the same
spot as wide receiver Steve
Smith, Carroll said.

“He can make touchdowns
from anywhere on the field,”
Carroll said of Johnson.

Another impact player is
defensive end Everson Grif-
fen, who runs a 4.5 40-yard
dash and is talented enough to
play tailback, according to
Carroll, who said Griffen is
the top prospect he recruited
since arriving at USC.

“Some people think he
could play in the NFL now,”
Carroll said.

In a mild surprise, line-

backer Jordan Campbell of °

Norco will be switched to full-
back because of the Trojans’
lack of depth at that position.

Linebacker Chris Galippo
from Anaheim, Calif., also is
considered a top-10 player,
and Carroll credited him with
being an unofficial recruiter.

“He set the tempo and did a
great job at the All-American
Bowl keeping things
together,” Carroll said.

Carroll said nearly all the
freshmen will play next sea-
son, a tradition he likes to
enhance at USC.

“We had 16 freshman play
last season, and three scored
in the first game,” he said.

That first game was against
Arkansas, and Mustain
entered in the second half and
played well against the Tro-
jans. Adding to the intrigue is
that Mustain’s teammate,
Arkansas freshman wide
receiver Damian Williams,
already is enrolled at USC this
semester.

Williams will redshirt next
season.

“T know he’s going to be a
factor to help other people
play well [in practice],” Car-
roll said.

{

|
|

|

OOTBALL | RECRUITING CLASSES

~=400 meters'in 11:1 seconds. He is eventually expected to bulk up and become one of
the nation’s premier pass rushers. : . a



GATOR-BOUND: Florida Gators recruit
beside his mother, Diane Ross, as he



MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD



THE GAME’S TOP 25 RECRUITS |



NAME, POS , HT WT 40 TIME HOMETOWN COLLEGE

1 JIMMY CLAUSEN, QB 6-3 200 4.6 West. Village, Calif. Notre Dame

Considered by analysts to be the most polished and complete high school quarter-
back in more than 10 years, He finished 45-0 as a starter and passed for 3,428 yards
and 49 touchdowns in his senior season.

2. JOE MCKNIGHT, RB 5-11 193 4.4 River Ridge, La. usc

Considered the nation’s No. 1 running back after leading his school to the Class 2A
state title.



3. RYAN MALLETT, QB 67 250 4.6 Texarkana, Texas Michigan
Big, strong-armed quarterback who can throw the ball more than 70 yards down-
field. Was a star in the U.S. Army All-American game.

4. MARVIN AUSTIN, DT 6-3 300 49 Washington N. Carolina

Features rare agility and quickness, and is considered the No. 1 defensive tackle in

the country by Rivals.com and Scout.com.

5. EVERSON GRIFFEN, DE 64°265 4.55 Avondale, Ariz. usc
’ Considered the best player to come out of Arizona and the top-rated player in the

nation according to Scout.com.

6. ERIC BERRY, CB 6-0 194 435 Fairburn, Ga. Tennessee

Considered the top defensive back in the country after playing quarterback in high
school, where he totaled more than 2,000 yards of total offense and 22 touchdowns.
His father was a star at Tennessee.

/ 7, CHRIS GALLIPO, LB 63 235 46 Anaheim, Calif. usc

Rated the No. 1 outside linebacker in the country by Rivals.com, Galippo dominated
at the U.S. Army All-American game and proved ready to be an immediate contribu-
tor on the college level. sO ‘

8. MARC TYLER, RB 6-0 215 4.5 West. Village, Calif. usc

The Gatorade Player of the Year in California, Tyler was the running back behind
Jimmy Clausen, the nation’s top-rated quarterback. Tyler broke his fibula and tibia
at the end of his senior season. |

9. NOEL DEVINE, RB 5-8 175 4.35 Fort Myers, Fla. Undecided

Few players have been as highly touted by recruiting websites and few have |
received such few offers as Devine, whose highlight reel has been a YouTube hit i
since he was a sophomore. His suitors include Alabama, Florida State, LSU and.
West Virginia. .

Wisconsin

10. JOHN OGLESBY, OL 68 315 5.3 Milwaukee

The highest-rated tackle in the nation by Rivals.com, Scout.com and CSTV.com.
Oglesby is expected to add 30 to 40 pounds at the college level and become a
monster in the trenches.

1. TERRANCE TOLIVER, WR6-4Â¥2 195 45 Hempstead, Texas LSU
Finished his senior season with 42 catches for 842 yards and six touchdowns. Com-
pared to Detroit Lions receiver Roy Williams. :

12. ARRELIOUS BENN, WR = 6-2 205 4.5 Washington, D.C. Illinois

As asenior, he caught 56 passes for 1,039 yards and nine touchdowns. Is considered |
the biggest catch for Ron Zook since he left Florida for Illinois. |

13. TRAY ALLEN, OL 64 305 53 Grand Prairie, Tex. Texas
Considered the nation’s top guard by Rivals.com and Scout.com.

i
14, TORREY DAVIS, DT 65 290 49 Seffner, Fla. Florida

A tremendous athlete, Davis finished the season earning All-State honors forthe |
second year in a row. He also is a state qualifier in the shot put and discus.
1s. MARTEZ WILSON, DE 6-4 228 4.5 Chicago Illinois |
Another huge commitment for Zook, Wilson actually played receiver and ran the

16. RYAN MILLER, OL 6-8 280 5.1 Littleton, Colo. Colorado |

Rated the nation’s No. 2 tackle according to Rivals.com. He chose his home state
team over Notre Dame. Anchored Columbine High to the Class 5A state title.

17. BEN MARTIN, DE 6-5 255 4.65 Cincinnati Tennessee
Had more than 100 tackles and totaled seven sacks his senior season.
18. TYROD TAYLOR, QB 62 200 4.55 Hampton, Va. Va. Tech

Every year, there is talk about who the next Michael Vick will be in Blacksburg.
Taylor is considered the latest model after leading his team to the Class 5A state
title and being named Gatorade Player of the Year. ‘

19, CHAD JONES, S 6-3 232 4.5 Baton Rouge, la. : - LSU
Considered the nation’s No. 1 athlete by Rivals.com. .
20. CHRIS DONALD, LB 62 220 45 Huntingdon, Tenn. Tennessee

Rated the nation’s top inside linebacker by Rivals.com, Donald chose the Vols at the
U.S. Army All-American game. He had hamstring injuries for most of his senior
season while playing running back and linebacker.

21. RONALD JOHNSON, ATH 6-0 1854.4 Muskegon, Mich. usc
“Has climbed the charts this season and is considered the No. 1 wideout in the nation
by Rivals.com ‘

22. KRISTOFER O'DOWD, C 6-5 315 5.1 Tucson - USC

Considered the nation's top-rated center by Rivals.com, O’Dowd chose USC over
hometown Arizona and UCLA.

23, MAJOR WRIGHT, S 61 200. 4.5. Fort Lauderdale Florida
He helped lead St. Thomas Aquinas to three straight state runner-up finishes.



24. JAMES WILSON, OL . 65 305 49. Ponte Vedra, Fla. Florida
Considered the state’s top offensive lineman, Wilson helped lead Nease High to
back-to-back state championship appearances.

25. CALEB KING, RB 5-11 195 44 Norcross, Ga. Georgia
After rushing for 2,500 yards as a junior, he ran for 939 yards and 13 touchdowns as
a senior.

List compiled by Miami Herald sportswriter Manny Navarro,
based on information from Rivals.com and Scout.com.





MIC SMITH/THE POST AND COURIER/AP

Carlos Dunlap stands
talks to the media.





THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com _



EARN
HLTA

__INTERNATIONAL EDITION __ FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007 |'7C

HOCKEY

-THURSDAY’S NHL GAMES

ea ed
< Anak

0. OSs A

Qete
ir




i ANDY MARLIN/GETTY IMAGES
IT’S ALL ABOUT NOTHING: Devils goaltender Martin Brodeur stops a shot by Jason Blake on his way to a 2-O shutout of the Islanders. Brodeur leads the NHL with 10 shutouts.

Brodeur gets another shutout

From Miami Herald Wire Services

EAST RUTHERFORD, NJ.
— Martin Brodeur posted his
NHL-best 10th shutout of the
season on Thursday night,
stopping 25 shots to lead the
New Jersey Devils to a 2-0 vic-
tory over the New York
Islanders.

Jamie Langenbrunner broke
a scoreless tie midway
through the second period,
and Jay Pandolfo added a
short-handed goal with 3:36
left, to lead the Devils to their
fourth consecutive victory and
their 1th in 20 games.

The Devils moved to within
four points of the Buffalo
Sabres for the best record in
the Eastern Conference. New
Jersey has played one fewer

‘game. ’

Brodeur, who benefited
from a shot off the post by
Jason Blake in the second
period, had to work hard late
to preserve his 90th career
regular-season shutout. He
made a terrific glove save on
Brendan Witt’s slap shot with
about 6 minutes left in the
game, then stopped Tom Poti,
Blake and Mike Sillinger dur-
ing the power play on which
Pandolfo scored.

For the Islanders, the loss
overshadowed an outstanding,
35-save performance by goalie
Rick DiPietro, who posted his
fifth NHL shutout on Wednes-
day night. It also marked the
first time in nine games (5-1-3)
that the Islanders failed to
earn a point. ‘

Brodeur has 90 career shut-
outs, four behind George Hai-
nesworth.for second place in
NHL history. Terry Sawchuk
has the record, with 103.

Langenbrunner started and
ended the play on the Devils’
first goal. He sent a back pass
from along the boards in the
Devils zone to Paul Martin.
The defenseman made a quick,
cross-ice pass that sent Zach
Parise and Travis Zajac on a
break.

Islanders defenseman
Bruno Gervais prevented Par-
ise from getting a good shot,
but DiPietro seemed to lose
his footing. Langenbrunner
swatted the loose puck past
him on the second try.

The goal came a little less
than 3 minutes after Blake

clanged a shot from the circle
off the right post.

Pandolfo’s goal iced the
game for the Devils.

SENATORS 4,
CANADIENS 1

OTTAWA — Dany Heatley
scored his team-high 32nd goal
early in the second period, and
Peter Schaefer scored during a
power play later in the period,
leading the Senators.

Jason Spezza scored his 21st
goal with 1:31 remaining, an
unassisted effort that pushed
Ottawa:'one point ahead of
Montreal for second place in
the Northeast Division.

Chris Phillips scored in the
first period and Ray Emery
made 27 saves for the Sena-
tors, who lost 3-2 in Buffalo on
Wednesday.

Canadiens rookie Guil-
laume Latendresse scored ona
penalty shot late in the second
to cut Montreal’s deficit to 3-1.

PENGUINS 5,
FLYERS 4 (SO)

PHILADELPHIA — Sidney
Crosby scored the only goal in
a shootout, winning it for the
Penguins and extending the
Flyers’ franchise-worst, home-
losing streak to 13 games.

Mike Knuble’s second goal
with 1:24 left in regulation
forced overtime, and Simon
Gagne had two power-play
goals for Philadelphia, which
has the fewest victories (13)
and points (34) in the NHL.
Flyers captain Peter Forsberg
had three assists.

Mark Recchi and Erik
Christensen scored 30 seconds
apart early in the third period,
and Jordan Staal and Michel
Ouellet also had goals for the
Penguins, who have won 10 of
12, with two overtime losses.

The Flyers haven’t won at
home since Nov. 24, and they
have just three victories there
in 25 games.

BLUE JACKETS 2,
FLAMES 1

COLUMBUS,
David Vyborny and Fredrik
Modin ended a long Blue Jack-
ets scoring drought with third-
period goals.

Fredrik Norrena stopped
24 shots for Columbus, which
ended a three-game skid.

TRAST LL Teh)



EASTERN CONFERENCE

SOUTHEAST WL OL SLPS GF
Atlanta 30 18 6 3 69 178
Carolina 28 22, 3%, 41 63 173
Tampa Bay 30 23 «#1 1 62 175
Washington 23 25 2 #6 54 171
Florida 20 25 5 6 5] 159
ATLANTIC =W_ L OL SLPTS GF
New Jersey 34.15 0 6 74 148
Pittsburgh 28 17 4 5 65 184
N.Y. Islanders 26 22) 4 3 59 161
N.Y. Rangers 25 24 3 2 55 156
Philadelphia 13 33) 3 5 34 134
NORTHEAST WwW L OL SL PTS GF
Buffalo 37) IS 2 2 78 209
Ottawa 31 22. 2 1 65 186
Montreal 29 21 #1 5 64 162
Toronto 27 22)=«2 4 60 176
Boston 24 25 1 3 52 149

WESTERN CONFERENCE

CENTRAL = W_ L OL SLPTS GF
Nashville 38 15 2 1, 79 195
Detroit 35 15 3 3 76 170
St. Louis 22 25 4 4 52 137
Columbus 22 28 2 3. 49 135
Chicago, 21 26 2 5 49 135
NORTHWEST Ww et OL SLPTS GF
Calgary 29 18 3 4 65 168
Vancouver 30 21 #1 3 64 144
Minnesota 30 22 0 4 64 157
Colorado 26 24 2 2 = 56 170
Edmonton 26 24 2 2 56 149
PACIFIC Wk OL. SL PTS | GF.
Anaheim 33 14 é 6 74 182
San Jose 35 19 1 71 170
Dallas 32 20 0 2 66 144
Phoenix 25 28 J 1 52 149
Los Angeles 18 30 5 4 45 159

GA HOME AWAY piv
177 14-9-3-2. 16-9-3-L 124-41
179 14-10-1-3-—-14-42-2-1—13-6-0-2
167 14-13-0-0 16-10-1-1. ——:12-7-0-0
195 14-1b-1-3 914-123 BL]
185 9 14-10-2-16-15-3-5 5+ L1-2-0
GA HOME = AWAY WV
129 20-4-0-4 14-11-0-2.15-4-0-1
166 -16-B-2-2.12-9-2-3.—14-5-1-1
156 -13-9-3-113-13-1-2.——-10-8-2-0
161 10-12-3-0 15-12-0-2., -9-9-0-1
204 = 3-15-3-4 10-18-0-1. «3-14-14
GA HOME AWAY oD
161 18-7-1-1.—19-8-1-1—12-8-1-1
151 WG-11-1-1 15-11-1-0 > 14-9-0-1
163 17-9-0-3. -12-12-1-2—-10-7-0-4
178 11-12-1-216-10-1-2—-10-8-2-2
199 14-12-0-2. 10-13-1-1—10-12-0-1
GA HOME AWAY OW
142 .20-3-2-1-18-12-0-0 —-17-4-1-0
133 20-3-1-2.15-12-2-1 1241-1
166 12-14-2-1—10-11-2-3. 8-12-2-2
170 A3-LN-1-2 9-17-11 7-11-0-2
164 11-13-1-2-10-13-1-3.-9-12-1-0
GA HOME AWAY —_—ODIV
138 -22-5-0-1 —-7-13-3-3. 1-5 1-2
141 17-9-L-L 13-12-02 11-11-01
143, -19-5-0-3. 11-17-0-1 9-6-0-2
165 15-13-1-2. Ld-L-1-0 9-7 1-0
160 UG-L1-1-110-13-1-19-12-1-0
GA HOME = AWAY, so
142 18-5-1-4—15-9-1-2-13-4-0-1
132 18-11-0-1—-17-8-0-0 .12-10-0-1
132. 16-8-0-1 -16-12-0-1 —-15-6-0-0
184 13-12-1-012-16-0-1 7-13-L-1
202 11-12-43 7-1B-1-1. 6 14-0-2

Note: Two points for a win, one point for a tie and overtime loss

RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Thursday’s results

Minnesota 4, Florida 2
Columbus 2, Calgary 1
Carolina 5, Boston 2
Wash. 4, L.A. 3 (OT)

Pittsburgh 5, Phila. 4 (SO)

Ottawa 4, Montreal 1
New Jersey 2, Islanders 0
St. Louis 1, Detroit 0
Nashville 4, Toronto 2
Atlanta 6, Colorado'3

Tonight’s games

Tampa Bay at N.Y. Rangers, 7
Chicago at Edmonton, 9

Matthew Lombardi scored

Ohio —

for the Flames, and Kristian
Huselius extended his points
streak to 14 games.

The Blue Jackets had not
scored for 133 minutes and
26 seconds, but they overcame
a 1-0 deficit with two goals in
47 seconds.

HURRICANES 5, BRUINS 2
BOSTON — Ray Whitney
had three goals and an assist to
lift Carolina over Boston.
Carolina trailed 10 but
scored four goals in the final

Wednesday’s results

Buffalo 3, Ottawa 2
Detroit 4, Phoenix 2
Islanders 2, Philadelphia 0
Chicago 3, Vancouver 0

~ San Jose 3, Anaheim 2

4:24 of the second period.
Whitney needed only 1:40 to
notch his second NHL hat
trick, and then he helped set
up Justin Williams’ team-lead-
ing 28th goal with 2.6 seconds
left in the period.

Hurricanes left wing Erik
Cole had to be helped off the
ice with a lower-body injury at
8:46 of the second period, and
he didn’t return.

Rod Brind’Amour added an
empty-net goal and had three
assists tor the Hurricanes, and
Cam Ward made 34 saves.

Brandon Bochenski scored
twice and Paul Mara had his
second point in 12 games for
Boston, which dropped its
fourth game in a row at home
and six of its past eight overall.

CAPITALS 4, KINGS 3 (OT)

WASHINGTON — Dainius
Zubrus poked in.a rebound
2:28 into overtime, winning it
for the Capitals.

Boyd Gordon, Ben Clymer

and Chris Clark also scored -

for the Capitals, and Alex
Ovechkin earned a second-
period assist to end the lon-

gest scoring drought of his

young career — he had gone
three games without a point.

Anze Kopitar, Alexander
Frolov and Lubomir Visnov-
sky scored for the Kings.

BLUES 1, RED WINGS O
ST. LOUIS — Bill Guerin
scored, and Manny Legace and

-0, Curtis Sanford combined to

stop 23 shots, as the Blues
handed the Red Wings their
first shutout loss in 176 games.

The Red Wings last were
shut out on Jan. 7, 2004, in a
3-0 loss to the Bruins.

The Calgary Flames hold
the NHL record for consecu-
tive games without being
blanked — 264 from Nov. 12,
1981 to Jan. 9, 1985.

Backup goalie Joey Mac:
Donald started his fifth game
for the Red Wings, who gave
Dominik Hasek the night off.

WILD 4, PANTHERS 2

ST. PAUL, Minn. -~ Brent
Burns had a goal and an assist
in the third period, and Niklas
Backstrom made 41 saves,
leading the Wild.

Mark Parrish, odd White
and Pavol Demitra also scored
for the Wild, who moved
within one point of Northwest
Division-leading Calgary.

Nathan Horton and Martin
Gelinas scored for the strug-
gling Panthers, who couldn’t
overcome a shaky night from
4l-year-old goalie Ed Belfour.

PREDATORS 4,
MAPLE LEAFS 2

NASHVILLE, Tenn. —
Steve Sullivan scored a power-
play goal and assisted on
another, leading the Predators.

David Legwand, Jean-Pierre

ae ass 3



Through Wednesday
SCORING
Player, team GP G A Pts
Crosby, Pit 50 25 61 86
St. Louis, TB 55 32 40 72
Lecavalier, TB 55 34 36 70
Ovechkin, Was 55 33 37 70
Thornton, SJ 55 14 56 70
Savard, Bos 52 18 50 68
Heatley, Ott 55 31 36 67
Hossa, Atl 56 31 36 67
Briere, Buf 56 23 44 67
Jagr, NYR 54 20 44 64
GOALIES
Player, team GP MIN GA AVG
Caron, Chi-Ana - 2 88 2 1.36
Backstrom, Min 18 958 33 2.07
Brodeur, NJ 52 3149 109 2.08
Hasek, Det 41 2425 84 2.08
Smith, Dal 12. 611 22 2.16
Gigu, Ana 38 2145 78 2.18
Kiprusoff, Cal 49 2949 111 2.26
Nabokov, SJ 26 1373 §3 2.32
Turco, Dal 48 2652. 103 2.33
Toskala, SJ 32 1853 72 2.33

Dumont and Vernon Fiddler
added goals for Nashville,
which won its eighth game ina

-row at home.

Alexei Ponikarovsky and
Chad Kilger scored for
Toronto, but the team’s five-
game winning streak ended.

THRASHERS 6,
AVALANCHE 3

DENVER — Karlis Skras-
tins will remember the Ava-
lanche’s loss to for more than
just breaking Tim Horton’s
durability record for a
defenseman.

Garnet Exelby's first goal of
the season glanced off Skras-
tins and went past goalie Jose
Theodore, who was pulled
after giving up three goals on
U1 shots in the first period.

Skrastins. broke Tim Hor-
ton’s NHL record for durabil-
ity by a defenseman by playing
in his 487th consecutive regu-
lar-season game, He was hon-
ored in a pregame ceremony.

LATE WEDNESDAY

e Blackhawks 3,
Canucks O: Patrick Lalime
stopped 34 shots in his season
debut to earn his first shutout
in almost three years for visit-
ing Chicago. Lalime hadn’t
played an NHL game since
April and had surgery for a
herniated disk in September.

@ Sharks 3, Ducks 2: Jon-
athan Cheechoo had two goals
and Milan Michalek scored on
a power play with 3:46 remain-
ing to lift San Jose in Anaheim.

MERE AIDES Sse Pe ET A TD SP A PO SYR NT TE TN HUTT SRST




ATHER REPORT

TTS TL TT, CS

Saturday
High Low W

FIC FI Cc




MODERATE HIGH




‘Ankara
Athens





Partly cloudy. Times of clouds and Intervals of clouds Mainly cloudy, a Mostly cloudy. The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
. greater the need for eye and skin protection.

sun. and sunshine. shower possible. .

; High: 79° High: 77° High: 77° High: 81°
Low: 66° Low: 64°. Low: 64° Low: 69°
PY rite gees AccuWeather ek reece uta giles AccuWeather ye ‘

The exclusive ah RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines 7 effects of temperature, wind, aah sunshine intensity, re precipitation, Sak and Today 12:08pm. 19 6:17am. 04
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. ~ ae 6:16 p.m. 0.2

Saturday 12:49am. 22 7:13am. 05
' 12:58p.m. 18 7:07pm. 0.3

Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Sunday 47am. 22 Bioam. 0.5





























ABACO Temperature 158p.m. 18 8:06pm. 0.3
High: 75° F/24°C ; , High visddavededscundnarecedessdssdnazassassbarsensses 73° F/23° C Monday 2:52 a.m. 23 9:21am. 0.4 5
.. 64° F/18° C 3:05pm. 18 9:10pm. 02 68/20 56/13 s_





77° F/25° C 86/30 67/19 pe.









E> LOW: ccpvcsetezisans
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Last year’s high... 79° FC | AI ‘Cancun ORT 69120"
Last year’s OW. ....sssssssssseesessseessesssseees O7° F/19° C 83/28 70/21 s
Precipitation Sunrise......6:49a.m. Moonrise........none : s
AS Of 1 p.m. yesterday. ...eesesssessssssssscsseeeeeseee 0.00” ae p.m. Moonset .... 10:47 a.m.
Year to date .......-sseeer rm Full
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Low: 61° F/16°C 2
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Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights’s lows.



High: 77° F/25°C
Low:67°F/19°C





20/-6 6/- 14 c
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Low: 65° F/18°t Z
Today Saturday Saturday § MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W Ws High- Low W High: 82° F/28° C
Fe FC Fc FC FIC Fie
Albuquerque 5945 37/2 pe 55/12 37/2 ¢ Indianapolis =
Anchorage 29/-1 22/-5 pe 29/-1 19/-7 pc Jacksonville sere 41/5 Phoenix 75/23 53/11
Atlanta = 47/8 29/4 4/12 36/2 pe: i “=? 28/-2-13/-10 “2. 15/- » Pit °23/-5 12/- /-
Atlantic City 34/1 16/-8 s 39/3 20/-6 pc ena 48/8 __- Portland, OR 50/10 38/3 50/10. 38/3 See
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Boston 32/0 19/-7 pc 35/1 22/-5 pe St. Louis 29/-1 19/-7 i
Buffalo 2° = 20/-6. 45/-9 sf 25/-3.14/-10- sf : Salt Lake City 46/7 32/0
Charleston,SC 54/12 31/0 c 59/15 39/3 pe 42/5 25/-3 San Antonio 66/18 55/12 c 65/18 57/13 Sr:
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NASSAU Today: Nat5-10 Knots 5 0-1 Feet 6-7 Miles 77°F
Saturday: _ VAR at 5-10 Knots 1-2 Feet 5-7 Miles i
FREEPORT Today: N at 5-10 Knots 1-2 Feet 6-7 Miles 75° F
Saturday: Wat 5-10 Knots 1-2 Feet 6-7 Miles qo: F
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Saturday: | WSW at 6-12 Knots 1-3 Feet 6-7 Miles 75°F

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Stationary Mexg=nfi

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PAGE 10C, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Serena
Williams to
play Fed Cup —
for first time
since 2003

M TENNIS

FRESH off her Aus-
tralian Open title, Serena
Williams has agreed to play
for the U.S. Fed Cup team
for the first time since 2003
— joining older sister Venus
on the squad that faces Bel-
gium in the first round in
April.

“T was very happy when
Serena called me and said
she wanted to play, especial-
ly coming after her big win
in Australia,” U.S. captain
Zina Garrison told The
Associated Press in a
telephone interview Thurs-
day.

“She had texted me a
couple of times and said she
was contemplating playing
Fed Cup. She actually let
me know last week she’ll
play.”

The U.S. Tennis Associa-
tion made a formal
announcement later Thurs-
day. Venus Williams’ partic-
ipation was announced last
week.

“T’m excited to see them
back on the court and work-
ing hard and defying all the
odds of what people think
or say about them,” Garri-
son said.

Serena Williams is unde-
feated in her Fed Cup
career, going 3-0 in singles

and 3-0 in doubles. She last
played for the United States
four years ago, in a first-
round victory over the
Czech Republic.

The only other year she
played Fed Cup was in 1999,
helping win the title. The
United States repeated as
champion the next year
without Serena Williams,
but it hasn’t won the Fed
Cup since.

The USS. team is 3-3
under Garrison, never going
beyond the semifinals.

The sisters “have said
they are both very interest-
ed in bringing the title back
home,” Garrison said, “and
both of them know what
sort of commitment that
means.”

The younger Williams
entered the Australian
Open last month unseeded,
‘ranked 81st, and without a
title from any tournament in
two years, in part because of
injuries that sidelined her
for months at a time.

But she knocked off six
seeded players in Mel-
bourne, capped by a 6-1, 6-2
victory over top-seeded ~
Maria Sharapova in the
final. That gave the Ameri-
can her eighth Grand Slam
singles title and moved her
up to No. 14in the WTA |,
rankings. She’s 15th this
week.

“Serena is Serena. If she
decides that’s what she’s
going to do, she’ll do it.
Does she have the potential
to back at No. 1? Of
course,” Garrison said. “At
the Australian Open, you
saw that hunger in her eyes
again.”

Getting both Williams sis-
ters to play against Belgium
— at Delray Beach, Fla., on
April 21-22 — is a coup for
Garrison, who was given a
one-year contract extension
. for 2007. The U.S. team
should be heavily favored:
Belgium’s top two players,
Grand Slam title winners
Justine Henin and Kim Cli-
jsters, won’t be there.

“Serena’s a lot like me.
When she makes up her
mind, if she’s not going to
want to do it, you can’t per-
suade her,” Garrison said.

“T did a lot of talking to
her and her agent, Jill
Smoller, saying I’ve got a
one-year contract and I
would like to bring the
championship home now,
because you don’t know
what next year will bring.”

Fed Cup captains have
until 10 days before a match
to select their four-woman
squad, and Garrison hasn’t
decided whether the
Williams sisters will be her
doubles team.

“They'll do whatever you
ask. If you want themto .
play, they'll play. And if you
say, ’I don’t need you in this
particular match,’ they’re
OK with that, too,” Garri-
son said.

“They’re a lot more team
oriented than people real-
ize.”

Jayasuriya slams
-hall-century before
rain forces one- -dayer

~ tobe abandoned ©

Series opener between
India and Sri Lanka

@ CRICKET
CALCUTTA, India
Associated Press

SRI LANKAN opener
Sanath Jayasuriya posted his
62nd limited-overs half-cen-

. tury Thursday before rain

forced the series opener
against India to be aban-
doned as a draw.

Jayasuriya was unbeaten
on 63 in Sri Lanka's total of
102 for three from 18.2 overs
when unseasonable showers
disrupted play and forced
players to scamper to the
dressing room.

The heavy showers lasted
half an hour, but left the'out-
field waterlogged and play
could not resume due to the
slippery conditions.

Umpires Simon Taufel and
Suresh Shastri waited for the
ground staff to dry the field
for 4-1/2 hours before aban-
doning the game.

The series will feature four
one-dayers, the last interna-
tional fixtures for both India
and Sri Lanka ahead of the
World Cup in the West
Indies starting next month.

India defeated Sri Lanka
6-1 in one-dayers during the
last series in 2005.

Put to bat first by Indian

Lanka lost opener Upul Tha-
ranga (14), skipper Mahela
Jayawardene (zero) and
Kumar Sangakkara (12)
cheaply but Jayasuriya was
in smashing form.

Former skipper Jayasuriya
struck 13 boundaries off 61
deliveries as he cut, pulled

and drove firmly to assert his.

authority against the Indian
pacers. Sri Lanka's most
experienced player, Jaya-
suriya has also scored 23
hundreds in 376 one-dayers.

Another former captain,
Marvan Atapattu was bat-
ting on five when play was
suspended.

Jayasuriya sent India's
fielders to retrieve the ball
from the fence 11 times as
he raced to his half-century
in 48 balls. Jayasuriya was
particularly severe on Shan-
takumaran Sreesanth, hitting
him for six boundaries.

Jayasuriya also took five
boundaries off paceman
Munaf Patel, who was mak-
ing a comeback to the Indian

team after missing last mon-
th's series against the West
Indies due to an ankle injury.

Despite suffering at the .

hands of Jayasuriya, Patel
claimed two for 25. by dis-
missing Tharanga and
Jayawardene.

Tharanga deflected a deliv-
ery on to his stumps when
attempting a pull shot, while
Jayawardene lofted an
easy catch to Dravid at mid-
on before getting off the
mark.

Sangakkara perished as he
edged a Sreesanth delivery
to wicketkeeper Mahendra
Dhoni.

®@ SRI LANKA'S Sanath
Jayasuriya plays a shot
against India during the
first one-day international
cricket match in Calcutta,
India Thursday, Feb. 8,
2007.

(AP Photo/
Aman Sharma)

















skipper Rahul Dravid, Sri



Landis agrees not to ride
again in France this year

mw CYCLING
PARIS
Associated Press

FLOYD LANDIS wil skip the Tour
de France — and all races in France this
year — as part of an agreement with
French doping authorities in a case that
could strip him of cycling’s most presti-
gious title.

Last year’s Tour champion had hip-
replacement surgery 4 1/2 months ago and
was unlikely to have competed in this
year’s Tour. He agreed Thursday not to
race again in France until 2008, and in
return the French anti-doping agency post-
poned its decision on whether to suspend
him from competing in France fora max-
imum of two years because of a positive
doping test.

“Floyd is pleased that the AFLD has
agreed with his counsel’s request that they
suspend this proceeding,” spokesman
Michael Henson said.

Earlier, AFLD president Pierre Bor-
dry said Landis “understood perfectly that
if he didn’t act today, we would start the
procedure immediately.”

Landis will go before the U.S. Anti-
Doping Agency on May 14 and, following
that, the AFLD will deliver its verdict in
June.

“We will let Landis defend himself as he
wishes,” Bordry said.

The American, who has denied wrong-
doing, did not appear at Thursday’s meet-
ing of the AFLD’s nine-member panel,
but sent a lawyer who read his request
for a delay.

In the letter, a copy of which was |

obtained by The Associated Press, Landis
said the parallel cases in France and the
United States were complicating matters.
He asked the French agency to hold off
until after the U.S. agency rules. The
USADA will hold its hearings May 14.

“In this case, and in order to avoid any
misunderstanding, I agree to voluntarily
not participate in any professional or ama-
teur cycling event in France until Decem-
ber 31, 2007, and in particular the Tour de
France 2007,” Landis said in the letter.

Bordry said Landis deserves to be heard
by the USADA. However, Bordry echoed
Tour de France president Christian Prud-
homme’s sentiment, that the American
agency was dragging out its process.

Landis spokesman Michael Henson said
Landis was happy with the AFLD’s deci-
sion.

“Floyd is pleased that the AFLD has
agreed with his counsel’s request that they
suspend this proceeding until the (USA-
DA) heari ‘| is held in May,” Henson said

by telephone. é

Landis’ urine sample after a 17th-stage
win in last year’s Tour de France was
found to contain elevated testosterone to
epitestosterone levels. He risks being the
first rider in the 104-year history of the
race to be stripped of his title. Prudhomme
has said the Tour no longer considers him
the winner.

Landis argues that the Chatenay-Mal-
abry laboratory which carried out the tests
is unreliable,.a view shared by seven-time
Tour champion Lance Armstrong.

Landis insisted again on his innocence at
a fundraising rally in New York on
Wednesday night. He vowed to fight the
“lack of leadership at the top of cycling
and at the top of the anti-doping agen-
cies.”

Bordry said Landis reserves the right to

contest the French lab, but maintains the,

“A” and “B” samples both showed posi-
tive readings.

“The ’A’ sample tested positive for
testosterone. So we asked Mr. Landis, at
the time, if he wanted to do a ’B’ sample
test,” Bordry said. “A ’B’-sample test was
done at Chatenay-Malabry in the pres-
ence of an expert nominated by Mr. Lan-
dis, (and) paid by him.”

Also present, Bordry said, were “an
expert nominated by the USADA, and
an expert nominated by the International
Cycling Union.”

He said all “these experts signed the
report” agreeing that the tests showed a
positive reading.

Had disciplinary procedures started
Thursday, Landis strongly risked a two-
year suspension in accordance with French
law applying WADA’s maximum penalty
for a first-time failed doping test.

France is one of 47 countries which has
ratified the WADA code, which effec-
tively gives the anti-doping agency gov-
ernment backing to apply its code sanc-
tions.

The United States has yet to ratify
WADA’s code.

This could lead to a peculiar situation
whereby, even if the USADA rules in
Landis’s favor, the. AFLD can still pre-
vent him from racing in France.

“We are absolutely not tied to the
USADA’s decision as France has ratified
the world code, not the United States,”
Bordry said.

However, the AFLD does not have any
power over any other governments and,
should Landis be cleared, the UCI would
then review the case and may allow him to
compete in major races outside of France
such as the Giro d’Italia and the Spanish
Vuelta.

O ride

re
s



@ FLOYD LANDIS at last year’s Tour de France.
(AP FILE Photo}

‘
'
'




PAGE 16, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007 a THE TRIBUNE

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Volume: 103 No.66

Many Bahamian-owned
HRA EVA

aaa ee aN Sta Ut)

Celebrity dies suddenly
five months after son’s
death in the Bahamas

@ By KARIN HERIG Labour and Immigration Minister

Tribune Staff Reporter Shane Gibson up until yesterday
afternoon.

US CELEBRITY Anna Nicole Ms Smith’s lawyer in the

Bahamas Wayne Munroe, how-
ever, said he had no information
about the baby's whereabouts.

Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, Mr Munroe said that
her death was "very unfortunate."

"She was a very pleasant
client," he said.

However, he said he could not.
comment on when he had last
talked with her or in what condi-
tion she was in at the time as this
information was confidential.

Smith died yesterday at the age of.
39 of unknown causes in Holly-
wood, Florida.

- Only five months after her 20-
year-old son Daniel died of a
deadly drug cocktail in the
Bahamas, the former Playboy
playmate was declared dead at
the Hollywood Memorial Hospi-
tal at 2.49pm yesterday.

The former reality star col-
lapsed yesterday just after 2pm
at the Seminole Hard Rock Cafe
and Casino in Hollywood, Flori-
da, where she was staying with
her partner and long-time lawyer
Howard K Stern. :

At the time of her death the
former reality star's five-month-
old daughter Dannielynn Hope
was reportedly in Nassau. US
entertainment magazine People
claimed that the baby was in fact
in the care of the mother of

Relatives of Williemae Pratt
School fire victims are
still seeking compensation

â„¢@ By BRENT DEAN

of Ms Smith’s former boyfriend G
Ben Thompson, told The Tribune
last night that he “was moving
towards (the Eastern Road home
‘Horizons’) to secure the proper-
ty. ”

He alleged that the home was

SEE page 14

ANGRY relatives of victims of the fatal 2003 fire at the Williemae
Pratt School for Girls are still seeking compensation. The govern-
ment was ruled to have been negligent in the accident more than a year
ago by a coroner’s court.

The 2003 fire killed Anastacia Alexandria and Deshawn Bassett-
Ingraham. Shantia Minnis was also severely injured in the fire.

Mr Paul Ingraham, father of Deshawn Bassett-Ingraham, spoke to
The Tribune about his frustration regarding the inaction of government
on awarding compensation for the grieving and frustrated victim and
families.

SEE page 14





























BREAKFAST Nn ‘Th

’ Godfrey ‘Pro’ Pinder, lawyer ;



‘he Tribune



BAHAMAS EDITION

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007

AN FNM supporter
_looks on towards the
stage ahead of last night’s
FNM rally on Prince
Charles Drive.
(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)



FNM leader Hubert Ingra-
ham told supporters last
night that the PLP is only
attacking him to disguise
their own terrible perfor-
mance in office.

Speaking at a mass rally
| on Prince Charles Drive for

the Montagu, Elizabeth and
Yamacraw constituencies,
the party leader noted that
Wednesday was “Beat up on
Ingraham Day” in the House
of Assembly.

“There is no way they can
explain their miserable stew-
ardship over these five years,
so their plan is to attack me,
create as much confusion as

tracks,” he said.

Mr Ingraham said the PLP
came into office with “a plan
to double-dip” into the Pub-
lic Treasury to make addi-
tional pension payments to
the late Sir Lynden Pindling’s
estate. ,

“While alive he (Sir Lyn-
den) never claimed any enti-
tlement to pension prior to
the passage of the Prime
Minister’s Pension Bill in
| 1997, Between 1992 and 1997
he was paid as leader of the
opposition,” he said.

Mr Ingraham said prior to
their election in 2002, the
government never claimed

SEE page 11

possible and try to cover their |

Prison officers |
continue their
‘work to rule’

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter:

PRISON officers continued
their "work to rule". action

-yesterday — slowing down the

pace of work at Fox Hill
Prison and leading to anoth-
er day of delays at the courts.

Last night officers from the
association responded angrily
to Public Services Minister
Fred Mitchell's statements in
the House of Assembly indi-
cating that their grievances are
being addressed,

"In responding to the Hon-
ourable Minister we acknowl-
edge that the government did
provide some. vests, but 33
shank proof vests were pro-
vided for 400 officers. They
were supposed to do what?"
the Bahamas Prison Officers

. Association asked in a state-

ment.

"The association advised the
minister'‘and the Superinten-
dent of Prisons, Dr Elliston
Rahming months ago that the
amount of vests provided was
inadequate to even furnish all
the officers detailed for duty in

SEE page 11

cH ———77F
‘> am | Che Mliami Herald



"Some senior police
-in favour of transfer

| of Asst Commissioner

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter _

AMIDST claims of victimi-
sation on both sides, some
senior police officers have.spo-
ken out in favour of the immi-
nent transfer of Assistant
Commissioner Reginald Fer-
guson, claiming that the move

s "poetic justice" for the
senior officer.

The officers were respond-
ing to an article in The Tri-
bune on Wednesday which
detailed reports of several oth-
er senior officers’ support for
Mr Ferguson, and calls to
Police Commissioner Paul
Farquharson to block plans to
move him to the police train-
ing college.

A supportive senior officer,
claiming to speak for a group
of officers, contended that Mr
Ferguson — an “honest,
upright man" — is being "vic-
timised in its fullest form."

However, yesterday another
senior officer contacted The
Tribune to objéct to this sug-
gestion on the grounds that
the public needed to be aware
that not all senior officers feel

SEE page 11
















































WILSONART

9 WILSONART ADHESIVES
“LAMINATE FOR R COUNTERTOPS & & Se a





Sea Hauler
victims dismiss
Dr Nottage as
‘bag of wind’

HEALTH Minister Dr
Bernard Nottage was last night
dismissed as “a big bag of wind” as
Sea Hauler victims accused the
government of deceit and skul-
duggery.

They claim the government not
only lost their original medical
files, but also fabricated incom-
plete “substitute” records to

-underplay their injuries.

Now they want Prime Minister

., Perry Christie to-address the mat-

ter personally, claiming they had
lost faith in both Dr Nottage and
Transport Minister Glenys Han-
na-Martin, who has been involved

in negotiations with the group.

“We don’t want the puppets,
we want the puppet-master,” said
mother-of-four Sophia Antonio.
“Dr Nottage is a big bag of wind.
I am asking the prime minister to
step up to the plate and compen-
sate the Sea Hauler victims.”

SEE page 11

400 teachers
protest at Ministry
of Education's —
office in Freeport

: By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - More than
400 teachers on Grand Bahama
demonstrated at the Ministry
of Education’s office in
Freeport on Thursday in what
has been described “as one of
the biggest protests by teachers
here in recent years.”

Rudy Sands, Bahamas Union
of Teachers area vice president,
led hundreds of teachers on a
march around 9.30am from the
union’s office in the Bahamas
Public Services Union Hall on
West Atlantic Drive to the Min- —
istry’s headquarters in the Inter-
national Building.

“Teachers are fed up and
frustrated over the situation
regarding funds that they are
owed from the government,”
he said.

Mr Sands said that the Min-
istry of Education’s failure to
pay teachers their salaries has
caused great economic hardship

SEE page 11






a

PAGE 14, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007

LOCAL NEWS.

alentine’s Date!



nter The Tribune’s Valentine contest and become eligible to

win a dinner on the town with one of our Valentine Dates.
Men, fill out the form for Ava, and women, fill out the form for Alex. |
below and deliver to The Tribune’s office on Shirley & Deveaux |.
Streets before the deadline on Tuesday February 13, 2007 at >: 00 P. m.

for two at Club Land’ Or



Dinner
Spa Gift Certificate
Flowers

Tell us why you are the person
most suitable for Ava or Alex

, ‘ »

fl By DENISE.MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - Associated
Grocers made a donation of
food items and other supplies
totalling $75,000 to several char-
itable organisations on Grand
Bahama.

The company donated meat,
fresh fruit, cleaning supplies,
pots and pans, and much more
from its three-day Associated
Grocers, Island Dreams Food
Show held last week at the
Westin Resort.

Noel Bostick of Associated
Grocers presented the items to
representatives from the Grand
Bahama Children’s Homes, the
Salvation Army and the Grand
Bahama Red Cross, the Home
for the Aged and Burrows
Home for the Aged.

“Its tremendous to be able to
help like this’” said Mr Bostick.
“I was raised in foster homes

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STAFF at Associated Grocers with some of their donations

Company makes
supplies donation

we can help here. I know my
company is not looking for
credit, they just like to help.”

Associated Grocers is one of
Grand Bahama’s newest cor-
porate companies, and the first
major international entity to
begin constructing a facility at
the Grand Bahama Sea/Air
Business Centre.

Opportunity

The Food Show organised by
Associated Grocers (Interna-
tional Distributors) was an
opportunity for the company to
showcase all the newest prod-
ucts to buyers.

Each time Associated has one
of these events they donate the
food to a local charity.

Geneva Rutherford, a mem-
ber of the GBCH executive
committee, said she was very
grateful for the donation.

Advertisement

Applicants must possess the following qualifications: -

1. Processing recommendations for:

Probationary appointments
Confirmations in substantive posts
Promotions and reclassification

Benefits under the Authority’s policies

CO em eee race eee eee Se RSOEAH OSHC EEEE SESE EE EOE E EEE EEE HEE HERE HELE DEDEDE EH ESSE OES

Employee transfers and secondment

COPS SME HEHEHE ROOSHHO HEH HEHEHE EEEHE SHEET H HEHEHE HEHEHE HE HEH HEHE HEE HEROS OHH E HEHEHE EERO

Employee grievances

Disciplinary actions and penalties

COCO HHRTH ASO OOOOH HOHE HOSES EHOEAEHESE HEHEHE HHHHEHHHHHHESEHEHFEHE SESH EEE EEE EH EHH ESE EE OE

Arr rrr rrr rrr rrr eee ee eee ee ee ee er)

financial clearances.

Involuntary and voluntary terminations

THE TRIBUNE



this donation,” said Mrs
Rutherford. “This donation
should help us tremendously
with our home costs and will
save us thousands.

“We actually cannot take on
all that we have been given and
the perishable foods will be
divided between several chari-
ties including: the Salvation
Army, the Bahamas Red
Cross, the Home for the Aged,
Burrows Home for the Aged
and the other homes in the vil-
lage.”

Captain Mathias of the Sal-
vation Army said the donation

- was very timely and would assist

them with their food distribu-
tion programme.

“This donation came in the
nick of time as the beginning of
the year is pretty slow for dona-
tions because people are recov-
ering from Christmas and pay-
ing the January bills, and so this
donation could not have come
ata better time for us,” he said.

- Public Hospitals Authority

Manager WI (Human Resources)
Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre

Applications are invited from suitably qualified individuals for the post
of Human Resources Manager III, Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre, Public Hospitals

Bachelors Degree in Business Administration. Management, or equivalent qualification (a
Masters degree would be an advantage); and at least three (3) years post qualification
experience in human resource management. Excellent oral written communication skills and
computer skills are essential. —

The Human Resources Manager III is a part of the Human Resources Team at Sandilands
Rehabilitation Centre, and shares responsibility for the day-to-day administration of human
resources transactions and services; to ensure that the Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre human
resources policies and procedures, transactions and services are aligned with Authority’s

Within this context, the Human Resources Manager III will be responsible for, but not limited

Benefits under the law, eg. Employment Act and National Insurance Act

2. Liaising with the Payrolls Unit with matters relating to salaries adjustments and

3. Managing the performances appraisal process for staff within assigned areas of responsibili-
ties, ensuring that evaluations are ongoing and appraisal forms are prepared, distributed and

reviewed.



The Nassau Florist

st. 1951

Paradise Island

Club Land or





Opportunities will also be given for involvement in human resources strategic functions such
as policies, developing an annual human resources plan, staff training and development, qual-
ity improvement initiatives To facilitate the Manager’s professional dev elopment and career

advancement within Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre.

Letters of application, resume, documentary evidence of qualifications and three (3) references
should be submitted through the head of your department, no later than 28th February, 2007, to
the Director Human Resources (Acting), Public Hospitals Authority P.O. Box N-8200, or Ist

Floor Corporate Office, Dockendale House, West Bay Street.



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\
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ml WASHINGTON \

IN nearly equal measure,
Americans say they do not like
Cuban President Fidel Castro
but do want the United States
to re-establish regular diplo-
matic relations with the com-
munist island nation after 46
years of estrangement, accord-
ing to Associated Press. |

Less than half of those polled
think Cuba will become a democ-
racy after the 80-year-old revo-
lutionary leader dies or perma-
nently steps aside. However, 89
per cent in The Associated Press-
Ipsos poll say they think Cubans
will be better off or about the
same when Castro is gone.»

__ “It's probably not very likely
in the short term," Kelly Shan-

ley, 29, of North Haven, Conn.,.

said of prospects for a democ-
ratic shift. "I just hope for the
citizens of Cuba that it's some-
thing that's realised in the nex
few decades." |
Castro has appeared to be in
failing health for six months and
has temporarily shifted power
_to his younger brother Raul.
Rumours have been rampant
about his ailments and how long
he can survive.
The poll suggests the Cold

War animosity that has defined -

US-Cuba relations for nearly a
half-century may be fading. |

Although US administrations
from left to right have called
Castro a dictator and a tyrant
and have spent millions trying
to undermine him, 27 per cent
of poll respondents said they

hadn't heard enough about Cas:

tro to form an opinion. ht

The poll showed 64 per cent of
respondents had a very or some-+
what unfavorable opinion of
Castro, the revolutionary leader
who has said he will be a Marx-,
ist-Leninist until the day he dies.

"He has not done much for his:
country. The country has not:

progressed," said Shiraz Damji,
61, of Woodland Hills, Calif. "It's; °

still in the '40s or something like
that. Leadership must grow the

country and he's not done that." |
Castro got slightly better

reviews from younger people — |

60 per cent of those under 35 |

had an unfavourable view of |
Castro while 66 per cent of old- ,
er people felt that way — and |
younger people were more like-

ly to reserve judgment about
him. Among people 18-34, 35
per cent said they don't know
enough about Castro to have
an opinion, while 24 per cent of
those 35 and older said that.

Contact

Even so, a large majority of
_ people — 62 per cent — said the
United States should re-estab-
lish diplomatic ties. The scant
contact between the two coun-
tries is now handled through
Switzerland or via low-level
diplomatic offices called inter-
ests sections.

The US cut off diplomatic ties
with Cuba in 1961, two years
after Castro led an armed revo-
lution that drove out US-
backed dictator Fulgencio
Batista. Decades-old trade and
travel embargoes made it illegal
for American businesses to
trade in an economy they once
dominated, and few Americans
have visited Cuba.

Although the tropical island
90 miles off Florida was once a
vacation playground famed for
its nightlife, nearly half of those
polled, 46 per cent, said they
would not be at all interested
in vacationing in Cuba. Forty
per cent of those polled said

eaeneaves

Americans dis
Castro but want new |
relations with Cuba

But 48 per cent want to -
keep embargo in new poll |



they would be interested in
vacationing there if a long-
standing travel ban were lifted.

_ Despite the public's interest
in diplomacy with Cuba, 48 per
cent of those polled said the
United States should continue
its trade embargo against Cuba.
A majority of Hispanics sur-

regime will be replaced by a
democracy while just 38 per
cent of non-Hispanics think that
will happen. Among Hispanics,
70 per cent say Cubans will be
better off after Castro, com-
pared with 53 per cent of non-
Hispanics.

Castro stunned his nation on
July 31 by temporarily ceding
power to his younger brother,
the 75-year-old defence minis-
ter. Raul Castro has led the

| nation at the head of a collabo-
‘ative leadership that has kept
_ the government running calmly
| in his brother's absence from
\ public life.
| Fidel Castro appeared more
| vigorous in recent television
| images, but many US Cuba ana-
\lysts assume he will never
| resume power.
|. The Bush administration
‘receives relatively little criticism
for its Cuba policies.

Cuba could seek more normal
relations or an end to the trade
embargo after Castro leaves the
scene, but for now there is little
domestic political pressure on
Bush to engage Cuba.

_ Among Republicans polled,
82 per cent had an unfavorable
opinion of Castro while 59 per-
cent of Democrats felt that way.
Similarly, 62.per cent of Repub-
licans doubted the prospects for
democracy in a post-Castro
Cuba, compared with 50 per-
cent of Democrats, and 72 per
cent of Democrats said they
favour establishing diplomatic
relations, compared with 51 per
cent of Republicans.
‘The poll of 1,000 adults was
taken January 30 to February
1 and has a margin of error of

\





@ THIS photo released by Cuba’s daily newspaper Juventud
Rebelde shows Cuba’s leader Fidel Castro,
Venezuela’s President Hugo Chavez in Havana on January 29

veyed said it is likely Castro's -

—— oe eS idl

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007, PAGE 15

rude Mer lm we 1M oe

STAFF members of the Sandilands Geriatric Centre hosted a birthday party for special patient,
Harrold Miller who was born in 1901 and is celebrating his 106th birthday. Mr Miller has five chil-
dren, 13 grand children, 25 great-grand children, 12 great-great-grand children and one adopted
daughter. Pictured are members of the Sandilands Geriatric Centre with Harrold Miller and his
granddaughter Faye Lewis.



(Photo: BIS/Kristaan Ingraham)







ave eet.

TH OVER 30

_ CostRIGHT, Furniture Pl
Fas

an

left, meeting with ;

(AP Photo/Juventud Rebelde)

plus or minus 3 percentage
points.








IN MY OPINION



Feel that draft?
It’s decision time
for the Dolphins

e’re emerging from the
\ N Super Bowl backwash.
National signing day, both
the most meaningful and most blind-
ly-overanalyzed day in college foot-
ball, is done. The Pro Bowl — who
cares about a psuedo-football game
that is really a Hawaiian vacation for
players who can afford it anyway?
So we have officially tucked in the
2006 football season. So let’s check
out the 2007 NFL Draft. >

The Miami Dolphins possess the —

~ ninth overall pick in a draft that
appears to fall short of what, in retro-
‘spect, the 2006 pick-and-pray was.
~ Such is the Dolphins’ luck. When they
held the No. 2 overall pick in 2005,
they were looking at
one of the worst draft
classes in the past
20 years.
Moving up to the
first round’s tower
: suites or penthouse,
especially if you have to give up picks,
is the double-down move of any draft,



copie ones enaeyeahs ROHAN TRAINERS AE ARTEMIS

particularly for a rebuilding franchise. |

You better know youre drafting a 10-
year-Gatorade-commercial star, or
you've stalled your franchise for at:

~ least one year, and probably three.

_ That’s the prelude to saying that
unless strange rumors of drug use or
excessive partying drop Brady Quinn
or JaMarcus Russell to No. 9, — not
like that would ever happen — the

Dolphins should keep their chips on .

Daunte Culpepper’s knee or Cleo
Lemon’s potential for another year.

GOTTA PLUG HOLES

Forget that “best player available”

business also, unless the best player
available is coveted to a sinful degree
by some team willing to give up
oodles of draft picks for him. Unless
somebody is willing to give you more
bullets, best to take your best shot at
directly filling a need.

The Dolphins defense is aging,
especially along the line, and espe-
cially in the interior of that line. That

makes Louisville defensive tackle
Amobi Okoye attractive. At 20 years
old, he is 6 feet 1, 317 pounds, quick
~- and strong.

The offense, however, is stagnant.

For all the criticism of the offen-
sive line, the Dolphins were 13th in
yards per rush, their highest ranking
in any offensive category, and 18th in
sacks per pass play. Certainly not
overwhelming, but not the Oakland
Raiders, either. Unless the Dolphins
see the next Anthony Munoz in some-
one such as Penn State offensive
tackle Levi Brown, they should use
the pick on a ball-handling position.

WHERE'S THE JUICE?

When it comes to dangerous play-
ers on offense or special teams, the
_ Dolphins have less electricity than
suburban Kabul. Ronnie Brown won't
' threaten Jim Brown’s career numbers,
_and he often gets caught from behind.
Yet over Ronnie Brown’s two sea-
sons, the Dolphins have shown a ten-

dency to stop the music once the run: |

ning game gets boogieing. ©
They spent a No. 2 overall pick on
the man. They should act like it.
Chris Chambers... well, his TV
show would be Everybody Likes Chris.

Nice guy, but only a nice receiver, too.

In six.seasons, only over the last sev-
eral games of the 2005 season did
Chambers combine dependability
with explosiveness. The quarterbacks
throwing to the Cleveland native
haven't exactly been Otto Graham
and Bernie Kosar, but Chamber’s
friend and fellow Wisconsin alumnus
Lee Evans is keeping J.P. Losman’
employed up in Buffalo, so sometimes
you've got to make do. /

_ That’s why the Dolphins might
want to tap another Cleveland native.
If Ohio State’s Ted Ginn Jr. makes it
to the ninth spot in the draft, he
shouldn’t slip any further.

Ginn’s speed would make him the
kick- and punt-returning threat that
Wes Welker is only when the block-
ing, coverage and stars align. What
Ginn lacks as a receiver can be taught,
unless he lacks the willingness to go
over the middle against a spleen-
splattering safety or linebacker. Also,
as the son of a football coach, Ginn’s
grasp of the game should be better

- than most players with his talent.

Whomever the Dolphins pick, they
shouldn’t take a player because he
will excite the fans, as Ginn would.
The Dolphins should take him
because he will scare opponents.

ei

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007

owe Cowboys

BY STEPHEN HAWKINS
Associated Press
IRVING, Texas — Wade Phil-
lips was hired Thursday to coach
the Dallas Cowboys, providing the
club with an experienced replace-
ment for Bill Parcells and someone
well-versed in the 3-4' defense.
The seventh coach in team his-
tory, Phillips, 59, is only the second
to arrive in Dallas with previous
head coaching experience.
The other was Parcells, who
retired on Jan. 22 after four
seasons with the Cowboys.
Phillips, defensive coordi-
nator for the San Diego Char-
gers the past three seasons, has a
48-42 head coaching record over
three seasons with the Buffalo
Bills, two'with the Denver Broncos
and season-ending, interim stints
with the New Orleans Saints and
the Atlanta Falcons. The, son of
longtime Houston Oilers coach
Bum Phillips has been in the NFL
for 30 of the past 31 seasons.
Wade Phillips joins Tom Landry

RIGHT UP THE MIDDLE: Pistons forward Tayshaun Prince drives to the basket past Lakers

and Jimmy Johnson as the only |

Texas natives to lead the Cowboys.
Landry and Johnson each won two
Super Bowls in Dallas.
“It’s great to have these cow
boys boots back in Texas,” Phillips
said, showing his boots from the
podium, where his father sat to his
right. “I’m excited about it.”
Cowboys owner Jerry Jones

- interviewed 10 candidates before

hiring his sixth coach since

\. buying the team in 1989.

Phillips was interviewed two

weeks ago, and his chances

of getting the job seemed to

be fading when supposed

favorite Norv Turner was among
five more who followed him.

But Jones chose the defensive-
minded Phillips over Turner, a
two-time head coach who was the
Cowboys’ offensive coordinator
for Super Bowl titles after the 1992
and 1993 seasons.

“We needed to get it right. In
my mind we got it right,” Jones
said, getting emotional as he intro-

ee

3C_

_ PRO FOOTBALL | OFFSEASON MOVES

riding with Phillips



RON HEFLIN/AP

HERE’S MY PLAN: Wade Phillips

inherits a Cowboys team that
hasn’t won a playoff game in

any of the past 10 seasons.

duced Phillips to the media.

After Jason Garrett, a former
Cowboys backup quarterback,
interviewed for the head coaching
vacancy Jan. 25, Jones hired him for
an unspecified role on the coach-
ing staff. It has been presumed that
Garrett will be the offensive coor-
dinator, but Phillips said he didn’t
want to discuss Garrett’s role until

PRO BASKETBALL | DETROIT 93, LOS ANGELES 78

Pistons pound Lakers



PAUL SANCYA/AP

center Andrew Bynum in the first half Thursday. Prince led all scorers with 20 points.

Mickelson eagles final hole for share of the lead.

BY DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press

PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. — Four
tournaments into his new season,
Phil Mickelson showed signs of
turning the corner on Thursday.

Mickelson, nowhere near the
leaderboard since his collapse at
the U.S. Open last summer, eagled
his final hole at Poppy Hills for a
7-under 65 to share the lead with
Nick Watney and PGA Tour
rookie John Mallinger in the
Pebble Beach National Pro-Am.

Whether this week marks the
return of Mickelson, a two-time
champion at Pebble Beach, won’t



GOLF | PEBBLE BEACH NATIONAL PRO-AM

be decided for
three more days.
One thing that
was clear on a
gray afternoon on
the Monterey
Peninsula was the
return of the mis-
erable conditions
that have made
this tournament infamous over the
years. It was cold, wet and windy
— known as “Crosby” weather in
these parts because of the years
when the late Bing Crosby was the
host of the tournament.
Mickelson and Watney played

MICKELSON



at Poppy Hills, the
easiest of three
courses in the
rotation because it
is the farthest
from the Pacific
Ocean and is
shielded by trees.

The best round
belonged to Mal-
linger, a 27-year-old rookie who
was on the wrong course at the
right time. He was at Pebble Beach,
which is exposed to the wind along
the cliffs of the ocean. Mallinger,
however, began his round on the
10th tee in the virtual calm of the



WATNEY

SPORTSWEEKEND _

INTERNATIONAL EDITION



he had a chance to talk to him.

Phillips’ head coaching record
includes 3-4 as a fill-in for the
Saints and the Falcons. He is 0-3 in
the playoffs, most notably as the
losing coach in the “Music City
Miracle,” when the Tennessee
Titans used a trick kick return for
the winning touchdown in the final
seconds against the Bills in 2000.

Phillips has handled the dubious
task of replacing Super Bowl
coaches Dan Reeves in Denver and
Marv Levy in Buffalo. So the idea
of following Parcells in Dallas
shouldn’t bother him.

Parcells, who won two Super
Bowls with the New York Giants,
went 34-32 in four years in Dallas
and lost twice in the playoffs. The
Cowboys haven’t won a postsea-
son game in.10 seasons — the lon-
gest drought in club history.

Phillips joined his father’s staff
with the Oilers as a linebackers
coach in 1976 and has been in the
NEL ever since, except for 2001

e MORE NFL NEWS

Detroit maintains
its home-court edge
against Bryant & Co.

BY LARRY LAGE
Associated Press

AUBURN HILLS, Mich. — Tayshaun Prince
scored 20 points, and Chris Webber had 18
points and ll rebounds, leading the Detroit Pis-
tons to a 93-78 victory over the Los Angeles Lak-
ers on Thursday night. ~

The Pistons have won five games in a row —
building a two-game lead for the best record in
the Eastern Conference —.and are 9-2 with
Webber in the starting lineup.

Lakers star Kobe Bryant had 18
points on 5-of-13 shooting, and he
also had eight turnovers — one
short of his career high.

The Pistons built a double-
digit lead in the first quarter with
crisp ball movement that led to
ll assists on 12 baskets, and they
didn’t have much trouble main-
taining the cushion for the rest of
the game. The Pistons have won eight ges in a
row at home against Los Angeles, including
three victories in the 2004 Finals that were Sha-
quille O’Neal’s last games with the Lakers.

Rasheed Wallace scored 18 points and had 10
rebounds for the Pistons, and Richard Hamilton
had 16 points and seven assists. Webber had his
third double-double since signing with the Pis-
tons three weeks ago, and he scored at least
12 points for the fifth consecutive game.

The Lakers had balanced scoring, but much
of it came too late in the game. Ronny Turiaf
scored 13 points, Lamar Odom had 12, Smush
Parker scored ll and rookie Jordan Farmar con-

’ tributed 10, but the Lakers fell to 3-3 on their
eight-game road trip.

The Pistons looked fantastic on offense dur-
ing the first quarter, and Webber had a lot to do
with it. Without the ball, Webber’s passing has
encouraged his teammates to cut through the

_lane and curl around picks more often. Four dif-
ferent players had assists, and the Pistons made
60 percent of their shots to help build a 28-17
lead. Webber had eight points, five rebounds,
three assists and no turnovers in the quarter.





ik



TRS

e BASKETBALL REPORT

morning, and

gusts strong
enough to topple a
t r e e

at Spyglass Hill
didn’t arrive until
he had only five
holes remaining.
Jim Furyk
played his best
golf in the worst conditions, mak-
ing five birdies on the back nine at
Spyglass Hill for a 67. Also at 67
was Arjun Atwal, another early
starter at Pebble Beach who went
without a bogey until the 18th.
e MORE GOLF



MALLINGER



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ABOUT REGGIE

ONE OF HIS
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15 HAUNTED 2.2 GET BACK TO WORK.

JEN, I BELIEVE
You'RE BEING A OH
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NaN 115 FOUR NNONTHS OF
FREE TINE ON NY RANDS

Nag

IN A MILLION



ACROSS ~.

Cheat at “9 Across”? (5)
There's nothing in cutting up a
chop for the dog (5)

A game of bridge? (7)

Too much interest is taken in this
(5)

Draws up in reverse as we leave
Wells (5)

Foul journeys? (5) é
They're spent going north from the
Pennines (7)

Faint figures (3)

Having made it, one's left (4)
Gadget to rid of a fault? (6)

It’s not the seconds that rush
madly round the ring! (5)

Frederic had a bit of a jaw about
his music (6)

Something good for a boy to burst
into? (4)

A layer of papier-mache, normally
3










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ge ©

Beh GR FE





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(3)

Animal providing man.with a sort
of shirt (7) ua

Material | mend patchily! (5)
Source of entertainment or aid,
possibly (5)

Father's thanks for the food (5)
Anciently a match for Satan (7)
Solid figures? (5)

Stave off having to pay out fora
Rolls (5)






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CRYPTIC SOLUTIONS




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EASY SOLUTIONS



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PAGE 8C, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2007








E

Ob WILEY IPE. WH.

iM

Western county, one fancies (6)
Prints wrongly, dash it! (6)

Play Tolstoy finished (3)

Makes the coffee go round (5)
A growing source of sound food (7)
Responsibility for giving a ring at
sunrise (4) i
One side of Glasgow (6)

Being in joint partnership, figure
ahead (5)

Sit and fish (5)

Nothing added by a former
president (5)

One knocked out with a club? (5)
Unite in an emergency (5)

Gem of a goal? (5)

Being ugly, gets out of sight about
half an hour (7)

Messenger possibly heard going
round a corner (6)

Ah, a woman out in the desert! (6)

Something to wash down the
ambrosia (6)

A [ittle letter or note (5)
Flavouring that makes many
unwell? (4)

Investment in energy (3)



’ ACROSS: 4, A-round 7, Underfed 8, Aflame 10, Corps 13, Bias 14, Eve-R_ 15,
Mars 16, Ye-W 17, I'd-ol 19, Tier 21, Goo-d o-me-ns 23, Da-RN 24, No-NE 26,
L-e.g. 27, Kee-p 29, Pros 32, R-Ely 33, Stook 34, Pop-eye 35, Caffeine 36,

DOWN: 1, Juice 2, Ado-re 3, I-ris 4, Ad.-air 5, Owls 6, Number 9, Fasten 11,
Ova 12, Prior 13, B-alone-y 15, Mod 16, Yes 18, Donkey 20, In-e-pt 21, Gag
22, M-Op. 23, Denote 25, L-OO 28, Elect 30, Ro-d-in 31, Skies 32, Rent 33,

errr



REMIND ME
NOT TO TELL
§ RANDY_.-HE
WOULDN'T
APPROVE!




NOW, DON‘T WORRY ABOUT
THE GHOSTS, LU ANN. '

THEYRE FRIENDLY SPIRITS} j

yea

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EASY PUZZLE

ACROSS: 4, Anchor 7, Terminal 8, Gander 10, State 13, Cast 14, Hash 15, Whet
16, Pew 17, Epee 19, Used 21, Protester 23, Poet 24, Seer 26, Wit 27, Apex
29, Verb’ 32, Ages 33, Sever 34, Valued 35, Ascended 36, Rental

DOWN: 1, Stash 2, Areas 3, Time 4, Algae 5, Cent 6, Opened 9, Astute 11, Tap
12, There 13, Cheeses 15, Wet 16, Per 18, Potage 20, Serve 21, Pot 22, Sex
23, Pirate 25, Ore 28, Pedal 30, Evade 31, Bride 32, Aunt 33, Stew

Ce

1A

HORACE, WHAT ARE } “==
YOU POING WITH
THAT CIGAR#

AG

WELL, ENOUGH
TO GET ME

N I BROUGHT
HER LUNCH TODAN, SHE
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WAIT... THAT NS -
Too svete?!

YENA...GRAN' MA
BINS DROWN Lest
WIS NUANCE
DETECTOR

RBGES HG BE

ZBSBR ON BRS

























Faith (5)
Deadly (5)
Main city (7)
Weasel-like
animal (5)
Minimum (5)
Achievements

(5)

Young hare (7)
Body of water
(3)

Dry (4)
Commands (6)
Scorches (5)
Rubber (6)
Domesticated
(4)

Zero (3)
Student (7)
Entire range
(5)

Small object
5)

Happen (5)
Attribute (7)
Gemstone (5)
Treatise (5)

COMICS PAGE

MMARGARET WILL P





































































OF SOMETHING."

South dealer.

North-South vulnerable.
NORTH
64
VK87
@AK62_ .
&K 1073
WEST EAST
@Q985 @#KIJ1032
Â¥Q95 9310642
4QI597 8
62 95
SOUTH
@A7
VA3
#10543
AQITBR4
The bidding:
South West North East
1 Pass 1¢ 14@
2¢ 2% 44 Pass
5

Opening lead — five of spades.

When faced with the combination
10-x-x-x opposite A-K-x-x, you
can’t be sure how many tricks you
will win or lose in the suit. The
answer depends on how the missing
cards in the suit are divided.

You will lose no tricks if either
opponent was dealt Q-J alone. In all
other cases where the suit breaks 3-2,
you lose one trick, and when the suit
divides 4-1 or 5-0, you usually lose
two tricks. !

“An most deals, declarer has no.
control over the number of losers in”
the suit. But in some deals, declarer”

can manipulate the play so as to lose
only one trick even though there

HOW many words of
four letters or more
can you make from the
letters shown here? In
making a word, each
letter may be used once
only. Each must contain
the centre letter and
there must be at least
one nine-letter word, No
plurals or verb forms
ending in “s", no words
with initial capitals and
no words with a hyphen
or apostrophe
Perultted:

he first word of a phrase is permitted (e.g. inkjet in

inkjet printer).
TODAY‘S TARGET

Good 10; very good 15; excellent 19 (or more).

Solution tomorrow.







os
oa Ff

nm
&
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2 Cad (6) &
3 Climbed (6) 4
4 Rubbish (3) ‘
§ Metal fastener
(5)
6 Hesitates (7)
7 Beers (4)
8 Reply (6)
12 Thighbone (5)
13 Loaded (5)
14. Essential (5)
15. Type of chair
* (8)
16 Flower (5)
18 Beginning (5)
19 Since (7)° ~~

24 Coming up (6)

22 Vestiges (6)

23 Gorgon (6)

25 Money (5)

26 Farm animal
(4)

28 Honour (3)





ROB’LY GROW UP To BEA
JUPGE. SHE’S ALWAYS FINDIN’ ME GUILTY

Solving a Diamond Dilemma

‘and dummy’s last heart is ruffed. A

swould win the spade, be forced to

~the-same: dead end.

Ni

TRIBUNE SPORTS



NOH LOOK! YOU GOT
| UG SENT To THE
PRINCIPAL'S OFFICE!



GOSH! DO YOU THINK
WELL GET PADDLED ??.

1













GIRLS HANE MORE
DELICATE HEINIES.














































appear to be two losers.

An example of the latter case
appears in today’s hand. From the
outset, all of declarer’s attention
should be riveted on the diamond
suit. The contract depends on not los-
ing two diamond tricks, since a spad
must be lost in any case. .

South notes that if the missing
diamonds are divided 3-2, the con-
tract is sure to be made. All of his
thoughts should therefore be focused
on finding a line of play that would
protect him against a 4-1 break.

The spade lead is won with the
ace, and two rounds of trumps are
taken. The A-K of hearts are cashed,

ARIES - March 21/April 20

Don’t let others tell you what to do
this week.

TAURUS - April 21/May 21
Usually, you prefer to play it safe,
but this week you may be tempted
to gamble on something. Be careful, .
this is not a good time to take risks
with what you own andearn.

GEMINI - May 22/June 21

You'll feel a burst of energy this
week, Gemini. The good times have
returned for you. Live it up —
you've worked hard in recent weeks,
and deserve the chance to celebrate.
Getaway for the weekend if you can.

CANCER - June 22/July 22

low diamond to the king and a spade
back create a position where it no
longer matters how the diamonds are
actually divided.

East cannot afford to win the
spade because he will have to yield a
ruff-and-discard. He therefore ducks,
and West wins the trick.

West must now lead a diamond.
If he leads the queen or jack, South
allows him to hold the trick, secure
in the knowledge that if East follows
suit, the contract is made, while if
East fails to follow, West is end-
played. And if West leads the nine,
declarer simply plays low from

large, Cancer, and at long last, the
chance to prove yourself has
arrived. Make the most of it — stop
dreaming and start doing.

LEO - July 23/August 23

Power struggles of one sort or
another may highlight your week,
Leo, but things will get better by the
-weekend. In the meantime, try to
work with.people, not against them.
VIRGO -— Aug 24/Sept 22

You won’t be able to please every-
one this week, Virgo, so you're
going to have to make a choice.
Then, you have to stick to your guns

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23
Optimism is a great thing, and you
certainly have a lot of it this week,
Libra. However, be careful not to let
this translate into risky behavior
Even you are not invincible.
SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22
Something that has worried you for
some time will no longer matter th)s
week. The problem itself may net.
change, but your attitude toward at
will. This, as you will see, makes all
the difference.

SAGITTARIUS = Noy 23/Dec 21
Are you someone who brings peo-
ple together or pushes them apart?
If you’re lucky, it’s the former, but
if not, now is the time to make a
positive change. ,

CAPRICORN -— Dec 22/Jan 20
You'll accomplish more if you
don’t try to fit everything into. a
rigid timetable this week. A little
chaos may be a good thing and
inspire you to be more creative. sy

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
The trials and tribulations of recent
weeks have passed. There has nevet
been a better time to begin your dite
anew. Think only of the future.

PISCES — Feb 19/March 20

ummy. 8
Virtually the same ending devel:’
ops if East started with Q-J-x-x. He

start the diamond suit and run into

A

foam

k

ream rearm reform remark
roam roamer warm warmer

marker marrow more mower
worm wormer

amok fame farm farmer
forearm form former frame
framer FRAMEWORK from
make maker mare mar

YESTERDAY’S SOLUTION




ay

word
| radio






Ta RU As Someone out there may make Jite
TTI toda tough for you this week, but your'll
magnetic give as good as you get. -By
waves to carry Thursday, things will settle down,
sound. and you can get back to your old self.



Juan Vaimana Canto v Pentata
Harikrishna, Spanish team
championship 2006. India’s
Harikrishna, 20, Is the best
young grandmaster in a fast- 8
rising chess nation. He Is already 7
ranked In the world top 40, and
ts noted for his ability to 6
demolish weaker opponents. 5
Today's puzzle, Harikrishna
against a little-known Spaniard ‘
rated hundreds of points 3
beneath him, should have been
straightforward. Black has an
extra pawn, while his latesttum 1
e6-e5 plans e5xf4 winning a
pawn or fxe5 Nxe5S activating e
Black's pieces. So when Canto ‘e"
hesitatingly went 1 Rd3, the GM *.
assumed his op