Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007

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daught

Angry claim
by mother



â„¢ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

AN outraged mother has
claimed that her daughter was
denied water for five days dur-
ing a short stint'at Fox Hill
Prison. ’

She said that there is a prison-
wide water shortage which has
left many inmates ill and weak,
adding that Amnesty Internd-
tional needs to pay a visit to the
facility.

Asked to respond to the
claims yesterday, prison super-
intendent Dr Elliston Rahming
confirmed that there was a
problem with the drinking
water supply to the prison last
week.

"In every organisation of this

size, from time to time you have -

a challenge," he pointed out.
"For a short period we did have
challenge with water. In one
case one of our suppliers had
indicated that demand was so
great that he just couldn't get
around to all of his clients on a
timely basis."

"We don't manufacture

THE TRIBUNE

ro ke ed
Prison ‘denied my

er water’



@ PRISON officers ‘valk out the main dates of Fos Hill Prison te to

talk to the press yesterday

water," Dr Rahming added.
Asked to verify the claim that
inmates were not receiving
water for periods of up to five
or more days at a time, Dr Rah-

ming said he could not speak °

to any particular situation.

"All I can say is that for a
very short time there was a mat-
ter involving water and we
sought right away to rectify it. It
has been rectified.

"That's just the way it is,
every now and again you run
into something you don't antic-

ipate but you fix it and that's ©

what we were doing,” he said.

(Photo: Ana Bianca Marin)

The mother claims that the
only way her daughter was able
to get hold of drinking water
was through the efforts of the
prison chaplain, who, after hear-
ing her mother express concern,
personally delivered a gallon of
water to the inmate.

Meanwhile, the water that
comes out of the taps.in the
compound is brown, she said.

“We as the public know that
some of these people, you have
to go through the process, but
everybody deserves the human

basics — you deserve to have

water," the mother said.



Falling garbage dumpster leaves
worker in serious condition

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - A 35-year-old
West End man was seriously
injured on Wednesday morn-
ing following’a freak accident
at West End.

According to police reports,
Sanitation worker Adam
Knowles, 35, of Bank Lane,
West End, was crushed by a
garbage dumpster while standing.
at the rear of a garbage truck.

Mr Knowles is currently in

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serious condition at Rand
-Memorial Hospital.

Superintendent of police
Basil Rahming said the incident
happened around 8.15am while
Knowles and Lenwood Neely,
60, the driver of the garbage
truck, were collecting garbage
from a dumpster near the old
Power Plant at.Old Bahama
Bay.

Mr Rahming said that as the
dumpster was hoisted in the air,
a support cable snapped, caus-
ing the dumpster to spin and

drop, pinning Knowles against
the rear of the truck.

A number of bystanders ran
over to help and were able to
push the dumpster off Knowles,
who collapsed immediately.

He was taken to the West
End clinic, where he was
received emergency medical
treatment.

Knowles was later transport-
ed to hospital in Freeport,
where he in serious condition.

West End Police are investi-..

gating the accident. .

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THE TRIBUNE

“

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 3



© In brief —

First woman
Episcopal
bishop named
in Cuba

m@ HAVANA

THE Episcopal Church has
named a woman as bishop in
Cuba, the first such appoint-
ment by the church in the devel-
oping world, church officials
said Tuesday, according to
Associated Press.

Rev Nerva Cot Aguilera was
named suffragan bishop on Sun-
day during a service in the
Cuban city of Matanzas, said
Robert Williams, director of
communications for the US-
based Episcopal Church.

“Her appointment is a won-
derful reminder that in some
nations, leadership is primarily
about gifts for service and not
about gender,” said US Presid-
ing Bishop Katharine Jefferts
Schori, who took office in
November as the first woman
to lead the church.

Cot will be consecrated in
Havana on June 10, along with
Cuba’s other newly named suf-

fragan bishop, Ulises Mario.

Aguiera Prendes.

Cot, 69, told The Associated
Press that she was “tremen-
dously honoured” but also faces
“a great challenge” as the
church, with some 10,000 mem-
bers, moves toward greater
national autonomy.

She said she had not seen the
sort of divisions over the ordi-
nation of women within Cuba’s
relatively small church that
Anglican communities else-
where have experienced in
recent years.

Cot was'a secondary school
teacher before church reforms
permitted her ordination as one
of the first three Episcopal
women priests in Cuba in 1987.

Cuba was a diocese of the US
church until 1967, when it was
forced to break away because
hostility between the US and
Cuban governments made con-
tacts difficult. Cuba’s commu-
nist leaders were embracing offi-
cial atheism at the time, a stance
abandoned in the early 1990s.

_ , +, It has operated under a Met-

ropolitan Council now chaired
by the archbishop of Canada,
Andrew Hutchison. It also
includes Jefferts Schori and the
archbishop of the West Indies.

Cot said she will be responsi-
ble for western Cuba with
Aguiera heading the church in
the east.

Chinese in
Grenada are
shocked by
wrong anthem

m@ GRENADA
St George’s

THE leader of a Grenadian
police band that performed Tai-
wan’s national anthem at the
inauguration of a China-
financed stadium has been tem-
porarily relieved of his music
duties, an official said Tuesday,
according to Associated Press.

Inspector Bryan Hurst will

not lead the Royal Grenada
Police Band while investigators
determine how his ensemble
came to play the anthem of Tai-
wan instead of its rival to open
the US$40 million Queen’s Park
stadium on Saturday, according
to police spokesman Troy Gar-
vey.
Garvey said the inquiry into
the diplomatic gaffe will “utilise
all the resources” of the
Caribbean island’s national
force and that Police Commis-
sioner Winston James was
expected to formally apologise
to Chinese Ambassador Qian
Hongshan.

Qian and scores of blue-uni-
_ formed Chinese labourers who
built the stadium were visibly
uncomfortable as Taiwan’s
anthem reverberated inside the
20,000-seat venue, which will
host matches during the cricket
World Cup beginning next
month.

Chinese Embassy officials did
not immediately return calls for
comment on Tuesday.

Meanwhile, the Chinese del-
egation did not attend a recep-
tion hosted by the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs for foreign dig-
nitaries Monday evening.

The Asian rivals have both
campaigned aggressively to win
the allegiance of Caribbean
nations. Grenada switched
diplomatic allegiance from Tai-
wan to China in 2005.

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‘Workers Party call:
itchell

sack Fred M

m@ By TAMARA
FERGUSON

FOREIGN Affairs Min-
ister Fred Mitchell was
under fire yet again yester-
day as the Workers’ Party
held a demonstration in a
bid to have him stripped of
his ministerial portfolio.

During the protest, held
in Rawson Square yesterday,

party leader Rodney Mon-.

cur also appealed to \rch-
bishop Drexel Gomez to
have Mr Mitchell excom-
municated from the Angli-
can church.

Mr Moncur said the pur-
pose of yesterday’s demon-
stration was to ask Archbish-
op Gomez to intervene on
behalf of the five Nassau bag-
gage handlers arrested in the
United States on drug charges
in December of last year.

He described their arrest
as a form of “kidnapping”
and said it was carried out
with the “complicity, con-
spiracy and conniving” of
the government.

The party says it consid-
ers Mr Mitchell among those
responsible for the situation.

In a statement to the
Archbishop, the party
claimed that several Cabi-
net ministers — all but one
of whom are members of the
Anglican Church — have
denied personal knowledge
and involvement in any
attempt to lure Bahamian
citizens to the US for arrest.

“We have rejected their
individual and collective ver-
sions of the facts. These bag-
gage handlers are entitled to
protection of the govern-
ment of the Bahamas in
accordance with the law,”
the statement read.

“People everywhere want
to know if members of the
Perry G Christie government
and or their immediate fam-
ilies are so compromised by
the US law enforcement
agencies. that, they can no
longer be counted on to
defend and protect the sov-
ereignty of this nation and



= MEMBERS of the Workers Party protesting in Rawson Sqare

@
safeguard the Bahamian people
from unjustifiable search,
seizure and arrest,” it said.

The party is also claiming that
the government has abandoned
the country’s extradition laws.

According to the statement,
the country spends considerable
funds to accommodate the

- MILAT relationship with the

US, which governs how
Bahamians citizens are sent to
stand trial in the US.

Despite this, is said, five
Bahamian citizens were “fed on a
silver platter” to a justice system
that “terrorizes, rapes, beats and
kills detainees and denies other
foreign detainees due process
while holding them in illegal jails
and detention centres.”

After being instructed_to.,,

attend a training exercise in:the
US, the five Nassau Flight Ser-
vices employees were arrested

(Tim Clarke/Tribune staff)

and charged in the US with traf-
ficking cocaine on local and
international flights through the
Lynden Pindling Airport.

The training exercise was
concocted, some commentators
have alleged, to circumvent the
Bahamas’ cumbersome extra-
dition treaty with the US.

American officials have coun-
tered by saying that no “sting
operation” was conducted, and
that the baggage handlers were
considered persons of interest
for some time. US Ambassador
John Rood added that US
authorities merely seized an
opportunity.

One of the five, Roney Tony,
is set to go on trial on March
19. He is charged with four
counts.of conspiracy to,import
500 grams.or more of a sub-
stance containing a detectable
amount of cocaine.

Pierre Dupuch backs PM
Perry Christie in the House

m@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

INDEPENDENT MP for
St Margaret Pierre Dupuch
lent his full support to cur-
rent prime minister Perry
Christie during one of his
final addresses in the House
of Assembly.

Mr Dupuch, a well-
respected MP and longtime
FNM, broke ranks with the
party after being fired from
the cabinet of former prime
minister Hubert Ingraham
before the PLP came to
power in 2002.

Mr Dupuch ran as an
Independent in that election
and his FNM membership

i was revoked last year after

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Mr Ingraham regained the lead-
ership of the party in Novem-
ber.

Now a strong opponent of Mr
Ingraham, Mr Dupuch told the
House of Assembly that if it is
the last thing he does, he will
go out “hollering to the
Bahamian people” about how
dishonest a man Hubert Ingra-
ham is.

“And I don’t mind, I'll stand
on my feet here today to tell
you that I, Pierre Dupuch, will
support Perry Christie. You can
criticise him as much as you like
about being slow on making
decisions, but I'll remind every-
one else, (of) someone called
Sir Harold Christie many years
ago.

“He was very absent-mind-

ed, it took him a long time to
make a decision. But he was
considered the best — the best,
even in today’s standards — the
best real estate developer this
country has ever seen. He was
noted for being absent-mind-
ed,” he said.

Mr Dupuch remarked that if
Prime Minister Christie is criti-
cised for nothing besides being
slow to make decisions, he does
not have any problems with
such leadership.

“But let me catch him out
teefin’, or let me catch him out
lying about Bahamian people’s
money,” he warned. “On that, I

hope.I get a chance in the next ,

couple of weeks to sing my
swan song, but until then Pll
wait.”

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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



| e . e e
The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., RO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES .
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
. Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398 ‘
"Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Iran’s nuke programme unsettles Arabs

AS INTERNATIONAL efforts to rein
in Iran’s illicit nuclear research programme
stumbled last fall, Egyptian President Hos-
ni Mubarak announced his ‘country would
revive its own long dormant programme.

Two months later, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait,
United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Bahrain and
Oman committed to initiate a joint nuclear

_. programme on the Arabian Peninsula. Last
week, Jordan’s King Abdullah IT tossed his
nation’s hat into the nuclear ring.

Why the sudden interest in nuclear tech-
nology among Arab states? Israel is believed

_ to have developed a nuclear arsenal decades
ago, but its neighbours — other than Sad-

dam Hussein — never felt compelled to °

develop their own nuclear capability.

The Sunni Muslim kingdoms and autoc-
racies came to understand very early that
Israel’s nuclear capability was a defensive
fast resort, a “Samson” option. Unless they
were intent on attacking Israel, Israel and its
nuclear technology posed no threat to them.
And beyond the realm of serious annihila-
tionists in Baathist Iraq, the PLO, Hamas
and Hezbollah, a sort of nuclear status quo
has reigned for more than three decades.

Nuclear weapons in the hands of Tehran’s
mullahs, on the other hand, pose an offen-
sive threat — and an undeterable one at
that. The current Iranian leadership, espe-

cially President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad,

has brought an apocalyptic fervor to the
ancient rift between Sunnis and Shiites and

the even older enmity of Arabs and Per-.

sians.
If a regional conflagration is, from
Ahmadinejad’s religious perspective, not
only inevitable but also desirable, then Iran’s
Arab neighbours aren’t going to entrust
their security to the beneficence of the Unit-
ed Nations.

The danger of allowing Iran’s progress
toward nuclear weapons to go unchecked
isn’t only that Iran itself will possess an omi-
nous power. It is also that an unstable fam-
ily of nations that has already given us the
Muslim Brotherhood and al-Qaida will feel
compelled to attain the same power.

The realization of those twin threats may
finally be prompting responsible action by
the international community.

Oil is the Iranian regime’s shield and its
Achilles heel. Production from Iran’s aging



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oil fields is declining, as is the price of oil.
Investment sanctions, which the Bush
administration is trying to broaden in
Europe, make it difficult for the state-owned
oil industry to modernize its infrastructure.
And as oil prices have continued to slide,
Saudi Arabia recently opposed an Iranian
call for OPEC to cut production. The con-
sequences for Ahmadinejad’s government,
which derives 70 per cent of its revenue
from oil exports, could be devastating.

The international community hasn’t begun
to exploit Iran’s most immediate weakness.
Though Iran is the world’s fourth largest
exporter of oil, its dilapidated infrastruc-
ture forces it to import 40 per cent of its
refined petroleum products — principally
gasoline.

Even the limited sanctions the U.N. Secu-
rity Council finally placed on Iran last month
generated a meaningful internal response.
More and more Iranians — especially young
ones without jobs and prospects for the

future — are questioning a fanatical devo-

tion to an unfettered nuclear programme
that puts their nation on a collision course
with much of the world.

Though Iran doesn’t qualify as a repre-
sentative democracy, the signs of dissent
are palpable. Public strikes are common, as
is public criticism of Ahmadinejad, including
a stunning incident at Tehran University in
December where students heckled the pres-
ident and chanted, “Death to the dictator.”

Recently, 150.members of the 290-mem-
ber Iranian Majlis signed a letter blaming
Ahmadinejad for high unemployment and
inflation and criticizing him for travelling
to Latin America to pow-wow with

Venezuelan strongman Hugo Chavez rather °

than present a draft budget for the new fis-
cal year. ’

In confronting Iranian nuclear intransi-
gence, all options have to remain on the
table, including the military one. But if the
international community begins to address
the Iranian threat earnestly, there’s ample
evidence a Middle Eastern nuclear arms
race can be averted without resort to the
use of military force.

(This article was written by Jonathan Gur-
witz of the San Antonio Express-News-
c.2007).












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dietetics

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A reminder
concerning
our history

EDITOR, The Tribune.

- WHEN the UBP was in pow-

er, Bahamians of European
descent were controlling busi-
nesses on Bay Street while
those of African descent were
controlling businesses Over the
Hill, such as the Silver Slipper,
Zanzibar, Cat and Fiddle,
Father Allen, Shepherds Inn,
Banana Boat, The Birdland,
Rhinehardt Hotel, Mermaid
Tavern, and many more, includ-
ing the Penny Savings Bank.
Those businesses were co-exist-
ing with businesses on Bay
Street. That was when tourists
could be seen everywhere Over
the Hill.

When the Progressive Liber-
al Party became the govern-
ment in 1967, for some reason,
we put all of our focus on Bay
Street and businesses Over the
Hill began to decline. Could it
be that Sir Cecil was light years
ahead of his contemporaries?
Maybe future generations
would have the best answer to
that question.



| Sew ENtey

letters@tribunemedia.net




Entertainers who were
employed on Bay Street soon

found themselves being
replaced by disco music in the
hotels, and elsewhere. This is
a painful story but it must be
told.

After the closure of the Pen-
ny Savings Bank, Bay Street

saw the need for banking ser-

vices Over the Hill and began to
offer that badly needed service.
We have just celebrated forty
years of majority rule. Most

Bahamians saw the staging as .

a political one, when in fact it is
a national one, therefore those
so-called dissident eight who
were part of the eighteen elect-
ed in 1967, are owed an apolo-

There seems'to be an effort
to write out of the history of
January 10, 1967, those so-
called dissident eight and their

followers, unfortunately I too
was blindfolded until after the.

1972 election, fortunately the ,,

mask was removed before 1977.,
When our story is fully told,

those who were too young to ,
know, or not yet born, will .

know that on January 10,1967,

the Bahamian people went to’
the polls and elected eighteen, ,

members of the Progressive,
Liberal Party to represent them _
in the halls of Parliament, they.
were Lynden O. Pindling, ‘Cecil -
V.Wallace Whitfield, Jeffrey .
Thompson, Carlton Francis,
Elwood Donaldson, Jimmy,
Shepherd, Warren J. Levarity, .

Maurice Moore, Arthur D. "

Hanna, Milo B. Butler, Clifford,
Darling, Clarence A. Bain,
George Thompson, Preston.
Albury, Curtis McMillan, Uriah ,,
McPhee, Edmund Moxey and,:
Arthur A. Foulkes, who in my
opinion was the best orator in
the PLP at that time.

PRINCE G SMITH - %

Freeport, Grand Bahama
February 2, 2007.

The prime minister’s misuse of
Bahamas’ national airwaves.

EDITOR, The Tribune

OUR nation waited with bat-
ed breath on the evening of the
1st February 2007 after the
broadcasted announcement that
the Prime Minister would speak
to us sometime that evening on
an undisclosed subject.

Thoughts of the sttbject mat-
ter ran the gamut, from him not
being able to lead his party into
the upcoming General Election
because of illness, to announc-
ing the promised second Cabi-
net shuffle, to revealing his full
slate of candidates for the elec-
tions, to making a statement on
the Nassau Flight Services issue,
to announcing the resignation
or dismissal of the Minister of
Tourism for his recent Interna-
tional snafu regarding the West-
ern Hemisphere Travel Initia-
tive (for which the Minister has
reluctantly, angrily and
unapologetically apologised). I
even expected the signing of.a
new Heads of Agreement.

I was, as I am sure thousands
of others were, extremely dis-
appointed and angered by the
PM’s use or misuse of the
national airwaves.

We have continuously been
bombarded on national televi-
sion by the governing party’s

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Be computer literate

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public relations agenda under -

the guise of providing pertinent
information to the Bahamian
people and the disguise of
Bahamas Information Services.
Every Heads of Agreement
signing (though there is no evi-
dence when they will actually
get started) has been timed for
the evening news report and
replayed ad nauseam.

The most recent attempt by
BIS to inform the people of the
Bahamas compares the caring
and success of this Government
only to that of the previous PLP
administration led by the late
Honourable Sir Lynden Oscar
Pindling. While listening to the
professional journalist who nar-
rated I wondered if in a very
short while he will be free to say
that like a previous ZNS host he
too was directed to say and do, or
if he actually believed the drivel
that-emanated from his mouth.
Stevie Wonder ‘ain’t dat’ blind.

What a colossal joke and
waste of television time. These
ploys are pathetic and tiring.
When is “Roots” the television

epic coming on?

2

Mr Prime Minister, if you

want to effectively use the gov-

ernment run radio and televi- .
sion stations for the time you, -

have left in office please
announce that the remaining ,
monies owed to the displaced
employees of the Royal Oasis
Resort and Casino and the,
three hundred dollars ($300. 00)"
you promised old age pension-

ers almost two years ago at your .

party’s convention will be paid.

As nonsensical as it is, to now .
announce the much needed |
replacement of certain Cabinet .
Ministers and a promised Cab-
inet shuffle I would have more.’
readily accepted this, than what |
you wasted airtime to say.

As you said,
between now and the next gen-

“The ian

eral election is getting shorter .

with each passing day.”

Translation — Ain’t Long

Now

CIVIL SERVANT
Nassau
February 2 2007

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322. 1722 * Fax: 326-7452

322-1722



ISR ee mw wa wwed

ee owe K £%

SAMBO 6 wd



THE TRIBUNE



Venezuela:
we don’t need
US money to
fight drugs

@ VENEZUELA
Caracas

VENEZUELA'S foreign
minister dismissed the US gov-
ernment’s decision to cut
counter-drug aid to the South
American nation, saying his
country does not need money
from “the devil", according to
Associated Press.

“Venezuela is a sovereign
country. (US officials) can take
their resources and do whatev-
er they think they need to do,”
Foreign Minister Nicolas
Maduro told reporters Tuesday.
“We will continue fighting
against drug trafficking.”

‘US Undersecretary of State
Nicholas Burns said Monday
that US President George W
Bush’s proposed 2007-2008 bud-
get eliminated US$2.2 million
in' counter-drug aid originally
requested for Venezuela.

‘President Hugo Chavez, who
often refers to Bush as “the dev-
il,” broke off co-operation with
the US Drug Enforcement
Administration in August 2005
accusing its agents of espionage,
and has yet to come up with a

‘néw agreement governing DEA
agents’ work in the country.

US Embassy spokesman Brian
Penn told the Venezuelan news-
paper El Universal that the lack
of joint plans involving the two
governments has led to the funds
being dedicated to other more
receptive countries. “That is the
reason and not any other,” Penn
was quoted as saying in com-
ments published Wednesday.

Maduro said Chavez’s gov-
ernment doé¢s not need “money
from the devil” and accused the~
US government of offering aid
only to countries that “submit to
its commands".

‘Venezuela is a major transit
route for cocaine headed from
neighbouring Colombia to the
United States and Europe.

‘Venezuelan officials say they
are fighting drug trafficking with
increasing success, but Wash-
ington claims that because of

corruption and a weak judicial

system the amount of drugs

smuggled through Venezuela is }

increasing.

‘Washington also has watched
uneasily the close alliance
between Chavez and Bolivian
President Evo Morales, who
have spoken of plans for
Venezuela to help its Andean
neighbor industrialise coca, the
base ingredient for cocaine, into
legal products.

Maduro met Tuesday with his
Bolivian counterpart, David
Choquehuanca, to discuss bilat-
eral co-operation programmes.

In comments to the media
afterward, Choquehuanca said
his country would not permit
that “our sacred leaf, the coca
leaf, be satanised”.

‘Share
your
news

é
The Tribune wants to hear.
rom peopie who are
taking news in their
heighbourhoods. Call us
| On 322-1986 and share
j| your story.



BAHAMIAN women are
second-class citizens who are
“institutionally abused” in their
own country, it was claimed
yesterday.

Attorney Fred Smith said
they have inferior statutory
and constitutional rights and
are subjected to domestic vio-
lence “with little remedy to be
obtained from the police,
courts or other social service
institutions.”

Mr Smith, speaking to the
Canadian Women’s Club of
Grand Bahama, said the
divorce courts are dysfunc-
tional, and issues of mainte-
nance, custody; care and con-
trol chaotic. a

“Many children of Bahami-
an women, born out of wed-
lock to non-citizen compan-
ions, have no immigration

rights.

K courts are in a state of
imminent collapse. There is a
psychology of subservience to
men. Incest, under-age sex,
impregnations of women out
of wedlock and failure to main-
tain children and wives or



; ORS i
@ FRED Smith has com-
plained about the status of
women int he bahamas

female partners are an accept-
ed part of Bahamian society.”

Mr Smith’s comments came
during a speech calling for
reform of the Bahamas Immi-
gration Act. He discussed
women’s issues against a back-
ground of what he called a
“rape of rights” inflicted by the
PLP for 25 years.

“The Immigration Act has
been and remains a brutal
bludgeon of political, racial and
nationalistic discrimination and



US Judge

demands

action by Anna Nicole
Smith on DNA tests

A US judge has got tough
with Anna Nicole Smith,
ordering her to submit her
baby to DNA tests “without
further delay” or face the con-
sequences.

Judge Robert Schnider said
yesterday the cover girl could
submit to tests in the Bahamas
or Miami. But if they were not
complete by February 21, she
would be ordered to Los
Angeles to appear before the
Superior Court.

Continued refusal to follow
his orders “could result in
severe consequences”, the
judge said.

Ms Smith has been ordered
to subject baby Dannie Lynn
Hope to a DNA test in
response to paternity claims by
her ex-lover Larry Birkhead.

Mr Birkhead, a Los Angeles
photographer, claims he
fathered the child during a

two-year relationship with the ©

former Playboy Playmate.
However, Ms ,Smith’s

lawyer-companion Howard K
Stern claimed on CNN’s Lar-
ry King Live show that he was
the father.

Mr Birkhead’s attorney
Debra Opri said yesterday
that the judge would not tol-
erate any further delays or
excuses.

“The judge indicated the
test may take place in the
Bahamas without technicali-
ties or she can call her travel
agent and take the test in Mia-
mi.

“If the test is not completed
by February 21, the judge will
order Anna Nicole Smith to
Los Angeles to appear before
him in department two of the
Los Angeles Superior Court.”

Ms Smith gave birth to her
daughter at Doctors Hospital,
Nassau, last September 7 - just
three days before the death of
her 20-year-old son eet

Mr Birkhead claims she fied
to Nassau to evade his pater-
nity claims.

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oppression used against for-
eigners and Bahamians alike,”
he said.

“This ethic of discrimination
is to my mind a great blot and
shame on our modern Bahamian
society and the status of women
in the Bahamas reflects this.”

Mr Smith said women were
legally deemed inferior and had
fewer constitutional rights
“although they bear a greater
social, cultural and economic bur-
den in the Bahamas than men.”

In 2002, he said, the FNM
tried unsuccessfully through a
referendum to amend the con-
stitution by putting women on
an equal footing with men. It
was the PLP’s emphasis on racial
and nationalistic issues which
caused that defeat, he added.

“The PLP twisted and
warped the issue to the extent
that they got the vast majority
of Bahamian women to vote
against giving themselves equal
rights.

“Bahamian women were
duped by the PLP into voting
against this and, consequent-
ly, many of their own children

ARE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 5

2 In brief Women ‘second class’ in Bahamas

have no immigration rights in
the Bahamas today.”

“Unfortunately, as a nation,
we have not since 1967 sought
to develop a proactive and con-
structive immigration policy. It
has been reactive and repres-
sive. It is backward and dis-
criminatory.”

Mr Smith said immigration

law should be a tool with which

to build the nation.

“Behind most good men
stands a great woman, but in
the Bahamas that means little if






anything. It is time to change
that.

“T urge the FNM and the PLP
to see that we now aspire to be
a sophisticated and mature soci-
ety. We should reform the
Immigration Act so that it is a
constructive and positive tool
of development.”

He said it should be taken out
of the hands of Cabinet minis-
ters “and put into the hands of
decision makers who are oblig-
ed to consider criteria clearly
defined by the act.”

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Etienne Dupuch Jr Publications

Tel 323-5665



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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 7



isdom: bring complaints to me

m By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune News Editor

MINISTER of Housing
Neville Wisdom has urged new
homeowners to bring all com-
plaints directly to him follow-
ing public revelations of sub-
standard construction practices.

Over the last several months,
The Tribune has printed alle-
gations of poor workmanship
by contractors —- whose work
has been approved by Ministry
of Housing inspectors — in gov-
ernment-built subdivisions.

“As quickly as those things
are brought to my attention I
give directions for them to be
immediately attended,” Mr
Wisdom said in an interview. “I
don't want to see Bahamians
who have been ‘in some
instances 20 years waiting for a
home get something that is
inadequate. This government
does not want to see that.”

The barrage of complaints,
primarily from residents of the
Pride Estates, Excellence
Estates and Dignity Gardens
subdivisions, include the use of
low-quality materials and
incomplete work.

In some instances, the state
of the houses deteriorated
severely within weeks of being
occupied. In others, new home-
owners were greeted with an
already dire situation.

Complaints included uneven
floors, cracked tiles, damaged
cabinets, dented doors, uncon-
nected faucets, leaking appli-
ances and severe water damage.

It has further been claimed
that despite houses being built
to inferior standards than were
called for in the plans, some
buyers were charged more than
originally budgeted by the min-
istry.

Despite the higher prices
being put down by ministry offi-
cials to a “contingency fee” to
cover any extra work that might
be necessary, it was added to
the price of every house —
whether or not work had been
done — and the mortgages on
low-cost homes is calculated at
this higher rate in every
instance.

“Mr Wisdom assured home-
owners that if they come to his
ministry and lodge their com-
plaints — either verbally or in
writing — they will see results in
short order.

He added that the ministry,

has empowered “development
officers” to visit all homes being
constructed by the government
and “do continual updates as
the homes are developed”.

The. minister said that last
week, he met with homeown-
ers in Dignity Gardens to hear
their complaints. He said that
he will visit Excellence Estates
next week, followed by Pride
Estates.

When asked to explain why



B@ NEVILLE Wisdom

he thinks inferior work has been
carried out, Mr Wisdom said

the contractors hired by his min-'

istry are in most cases capable,
but have been distracted by the
current construction boom and
are “not able to give the kind of
attention that a contractor
might need to give on a home
they are building the govern-
ment.”

He claimed that many of

‘these contractors merely “drop

some fellas on the work site”
and turn their full attention to

projects “in Lyford Cay or out .

east”.

“The contractors need to do
their jobs — and that.is to build
their homes at an agreed price,
and at the standards that are
acceptable, where they get
proper occupancy certificates
and under the terms and refer-
ences of the agreements that
they signed.”

Investigation

However an earlier Tribune
investigation saw several con-
tractors allege more sinister
causes for much of the shoddy
work. These builders said they
were forced to pay bribes to cer-
tain Ministry of Housing offi-
cials in order to secure future
contracts.

Several contractors said they
are forced to cut corners dur-
ing construction because of the
heavy toll these illicit payments
exact — sometimes to the tune of
$5,000 per house.

In the wake of these claims,
Mr Wisdom lashed out at The
Tribune for casting a shadow
over his ministry.

He also announced that he

had asked the police to conduct ~

an inquiry into the matter, and
would resign if it was proven
that he had any knowledge of

wrongdoing.

Mr Wisdom also said that in
his view, the reason that many
of these contractors have
brought their complaints to the
press resulted from their reten-
tion fees being withheld.





built home in Pride Estates. -

@ A BUILDER removes a piece of mouldy dry-wall in a newly

(Photo: Ana Bianca Marin)

Now Until Sob, : ary 10th,
De also carry a large selection of body
ols, teddies and adult novelties

/imentionables

| Mall ar Marathon
Tel: 394-3205



Minister of Housing tries to shift blame for shoddy -
workmanship from ministry onto contractors |



He explained that the initial
stages of construction are often
completed to a satisfactory
degree. “It is when you get to
finishing, installation of sheet
rock, fixtures and that kind of
thing, that is where you find
some of the problems.”

Mr Wisdom said that in order
to protect “the interest of the
government and the people” a
part of the contractor’s fee is
withheld for six months follow-
ing the completion of construc-
tion, at which point homeown-
ers are asked to sign off if satis-
fied with the finished product.
Sometimes, he explained, defi-
ciencies in the work mean that
the payment is not made.

“What will happen now is
that the same contractor will
come to you and give you some
crazy story that we are discrim-
inating against him because
we’re not giving him his stage
payment,” Mr Wisdom claimed.
“The reason they cannot get
any work now is because of
shabby work before.

“The reality is inspectors
have issued work orders to
them to do work they haven't
done — and reality is that until
they do that work and until the
inspectors and the director of
housing (Gordon Major) signs
off on a particular job they can-
not get their stage payment.”

He said that while some con-
tractors return to affect the nec-
essary repairs, “some determine
that it is easier to just go to The
Tribune and complain.

“If they don't come back, as is
the case in a few instances already,
we take that final stage payment
and give the work order to anther
contractor to complete it.”

However, Mr Wisdom failed
to explain how houses could
pass inspection by his ministry
and be turned over to buyers
without the problems being rec-
tified.

At the end of the day, accord-
ing to Mr Wisdom, the: prob-
lem is not a major one.

“When you look quantita-
tively over the last four years,
government has built over 1,400
homes. But there have only
been 50 complaints. I’m not
sure if we have only 50 people
complaining and government is
preparing to right the wrong, I
don't see what the contention
is.”

Meanwhile, the officers work-
ing the alleged bribery case
have remained tight-lipped
about their progress. Mr Wis-
dom said this week that his min-
istry will not tolerate “crooked”.
officials among its ranks. He
said he does not know when an
interim report will be issued by
the police, but hopes it will be
soon.

Both investigations followed
a long battle between The Tri-
bune and Mr Wisdom’s office
for records of housing contract
allocations, which were being
sought in an effort to verify
claims that a ring of corruption
existed in the Ministry of Hous-
ing.

Lig ee
it

eee ata
PHONE: 322-2157



2007.





PAGE 8, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007



THE TRIBUNE

















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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 9

THE TRIBUNE

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7 n “EET |



PAGE 10, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007

“+

THE TRIBUNE



Prison visits cancelled as officers take action

FROM page one

Rolle, president of the prison offi-
cers association, denied that the
action, or “a little exercise" as Dr
Rahming described it, had
opened up security vulnerabili-
ties.

"We are quite fortified, the

FY

PORE rae

%
ee

.
&
~

<<

Se
SEEN

A

facility is quite secure, where a
gap might be, senior officers have
stepped in to fill that gap," said
Dr Rahming.
Nonetheless, a growing num-
ber of irate and emotional visi-
tors — primarily wives, mothers
and girlfriends — gathered out-
side the security checkpoint

throughout yesterday morning,
as they were informed that they
would not be allowed in to see
their loved ones.

One suggested that they had
spoken to inmates inside and had
received word that prisoners were
ready to riot over the cancelled
visits and recent water shortages.



Position Available

-Maintenance Technician

The Maintenance Technician shall report to the Maintenance Supervisor and must be
familiar with, understand and operate according to the relevant elements of the Coca-Cola

Quality System.

Main Duties & Responsibilities:

The Maintenance Technician shall be responsible for the following activities, within the

limits of his/her specific skill:

1. Ensure that all equipment works at its optimum level of efficiency by the:
- Installation and commissioning of all plants, equipment, services and utilities
- Maintenance of building and facilities (plumbing, painting, basic carpentry an
masonry and electric)
- Maintenance of forklifts and other vehicles
- Fabrication, machining and welding of parts or items as required
- Repairs to all electrical and mechanical equipment

2. Carry out all necessary maintenance activities covering Planned Maintenance (PM),
Condition Based Maintenance (CBM), and Improvement Projects in order to

achieve the above.

3. Log and record all work undertaken to the satisfaction of the Maintenance Supervisors
Monitor and operate any production line equipment to ensure that its working

efficiently.

-4, Report any non-conformances to the immediate supervision or QA personnel and carry
out the relevant corrective action as is recommended.

5. Perform other reasonable job related duties as may be assigned by management.

Qualifications & Experience

Certificate from a qualified institution; Ordinary Technicians Diploma in his/her area of
expertise (i.e. electrical, mechanical) or a minimum of five years experience in a similar

capacity.

‘Core Competencies:

Good working knowledge of bottling plant machinery
Possess good troubleshooting skills.
Ability to read and understand equipment manuals.

Please submit written resume to:
Caribbean Bottling Co. (Bah) Ltd.

P.O. Box N-1123
Nassau, Bahamas

ATTN: Human Resources Dept.
On Or Before Feb.16th, 2007



& machinery & services.

Clive Rolle, addressing the
press outside the main gates of
the compound, said that officers
were "tired of promises" made
by the government with respect to
their issues.

"As you are aware some time
in August last year the prime min-
ister visited and he expressed
nationally his concerns of the con-
ditions we work under and he
said that he would bring immedi-
ate relief to prison officers — to
this day nothing has happened,"
said Mr Rolle. |

Government is "definitely tak-
ing advantage" of their unique
position, which makes it impossi-
ble to take full strike action.

He complained that, although
prison officers were part of the
"disciplinary forces", they were
not being treated as such.

"We are always excluded in
everything that happens as it
relates to disciplinary forces, as
it comes to money, as it comes to
promotions," he said. f

Requests made recently on
behalf of immigration and cus-
toms officers by John Pinder,
president of the BPSU, for the
delivery of promotions were
answered with promises that they
would be given in two weeks
time, said Mr Rolle.

"Why is it that in five years the
prison cannot get one promotion,



@ MRS. ANNA WILLIAMS waits at Fox Hill Prison to see if she
will be able to visit her husband. Visitors were told that they would
not be allowed to see their loved ones. +
(Photo: Ana Bianca Marin).

not one?" he asked, surrounded 02
by a group of officers wearing facilities — such as an awning me anything!” she said. "They
pins bearing the image of corpo- _ over the car park. just tell us they taking the fodd
ral Dion Bowles, the prison offi- "What is important? The lives » but no visits today, they don't tell

cer killed during the prison break
last year. ,

Officers were also disturbed
when, despite assurances made
by Public Service Minister Fred
Mitchell that any pay increases
for disciplinary officers would be
made when the compensation
study had been concluded, an
announcement was made several
days ago that Defence Force offi-
cers would receive their increases
in February — before the study is
reviewed.

Prison officers are not being
"taken care of by this govern-
ment," he said.

Another shortfall of particular
concern is a lack of protective
gear for officers. According to Mr
Rolle, the number of vests avail-
able is "inadequate", and while
administration has claimed that
funding is an issue, officers are
angry that money has been spent
on what they see as, unnecessary

me why." oO

She said it was the first time ‘in!

. her experience that visits had
been cancelled. y
Marie Rolle was leaning
despondently against a fence fn
the prison car park, unable to sde’
her boyfriend.

"They just said they're not tak-
ing no visits today. Everythitg
was all right on Monday, but ‘T
don't know what happened
today," she said tearfully.

According to Dr Rahmin
they are assessing the status:of
the officers’ action on a "shift b
shift basis" and hope all
will be back to normal by tomér-
row. a

Meanwhile, in the House ‘of
Assembly yesterday, Mr Mitchélt
*said that promotions for prison
officers would be delivered at the
end of February — although this
will not yet include those recom-
mended in 2006.

of the officers or the cars that the
government bought?" asked Mr
Rolle.

The officers feel "let down" by
Dr Rahming, said Mr Rolle. "We
don't feel that the administration
assists us when it comes to talking
to our issues."

Meanwhile, Dr Rahming yes-
terday described complaints
about a lack of protection as a
"non-issue. "

"We have provided sufficient
protective gear. Many officers are
using them, in maximum security,
and many officers have decided to
not use them, but we have them."

Speaking outside the security
checkpoint, Mrs Anna Williams
from Cable Beach, one of many
who had been denied access to
visit their loved ones, was waiting
around to see if she would be let
into the facility later in the day.

"They tell me ain’t no visit
today — ain’t nobody want to tell

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The Ministry of
Works and Utilities








rn

Syren
aohay
TAG
ase
wR
ar)
yarn
Veet
aie
See
Yeas
SAS
SAE
Ae
SR
aA

Siveway Signs

f



RBDF apprehends Haitians
A TOTAL of 46 Haitian
Nationals were apprehended
in the Central Bahamas by
the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force on Wenesday
afternoon trying to land
illegally in Bahamaian
waters.

While on routine patrol,

HMBS P-43 - under the
command of Chief Petty

he ais tay oO Officer Ross Seymour —
PRoU Nor \ re ! ‘

none Give way Sgn

gaat




aera FE Lott turn Only














§ VEEN,
§ Ture Only

(2 Straight Anead Movement Only
Give Away ------==])



Cx net eusek

SS
AS Wa oa Gh spotted a Haitian sloop
1p fo nye aiprosintitely seven Miles

1 Fre off Belle Island in the Exuma
Chain.

A search of the vessel
discovered the Haitian
nationals — 40 males and six
females — who all appeared
< _ to be in good health. They
. ~ r were eventually taken

SS
\

\\

Shock \ onboard the Defence
WEEN Force yessel and brought to
the capital later in the
afternoon and turned
over to Immigration
authorities for further
processing.

This brings the total to
more than 300 for illegal
Haitians apprended in
Bahamian waters by the
Defence Force for 2007.

(Photos: Felipé Major/ a uarounceamenenscunieee ay
Tribunestaf)





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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 13.



Negotiators _
in Haiti to
help free
missionary

@ HAITI
Port-au-Prince

THE Coastal Avjareiees
Committee of the Bahamas, a
group of stakeholders from the
private and public sectors with
an interest in promoting the sus-
tainable development of the
Bahamas, has announced the
focus for their campaign in 2007
— trash and the problem it pos-
es to the environment.

“Our committee was formed

: to bring national attention to

: _ the challenges of sustainable
tourism development of coastal
communities,” said Earlston
McPhee, director of sustainable
development for the Ministry
of Tourism and chairman of the
Coastal Awareness Committee.
“There are five main threats
that affect coastlines. Our com-
mittee has decided to focus on
trash this year, one of the
biggest problems that threatens
our Bahamian coasts.

“We all know that trash is
having a negative affect on our
country impacting our social
and economic well-being. The
exit surveys handed in by our

’ tourists indicate that trash is one
of their biggest complaints when
visiting our country. Our, goal
is to educate the public and to
offer real solutions to people

TWO FBI hostage nego-
tiators were sent to Haiti on’
Tuesday to help secure the
release of a kidnapped
American missionary, offi-
cials said, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Nathan Jean-Dieudonne,
58, a US citizen of Haitian
descent, was abducted Sun-
day afternoon as he and
three others drove home
from church in Croix-de-
Bouquets, a suburb of Port-
au-Prince, UN _ police
spokesman Fred Blaise said.

FBI special agent Judy
Orihuela said from Miami
that Jean-Dieudonne’s fami-
ly requested help in negoti-
ating with his captors after
the kidnappers contacted
them and demanded a ran-
som for his release. Authori-
ties have declined to say how
much the kidnappers sought.

UN police spokesman Fred
Blaise said Jean-Dieudonne,
whose hometown in the US
and church denomination
were not immediately avail- :
able, apparently was.
unharmed and that his fami-
ly described him as being “in
good spirits".

Kidnappings for ransom
surged in the impoverished
Caribbean nation last year
but have fallen in recent
weeks as a 9,000-strong UN
peacekeeping force and Hait-
ian police step up patrols
around the capital.

Foreign missionaries, who
usually travel with less secu-
rity than diplomats and busi-
hesspeople, have increasing-
ly become targets.

Most kidnappings are
blamed on armed gangs that
flourished in the aftermath
of a February 2004 revolt that
‘toppled former president
Jean-Bertrand Aristide. Cor- :
rupt police officers have also’ }
been implicated.

Share
your
news

developing country and as a
tourist destination.”

The committee has already
begun plans for a clean-up of
Nassau Harbour as one of their
main activities during the month
of April, which is Coastal
Awareness Month in the
Bahamas.

Working together with the
Port Authority of Nassau, mem-
bers will target areas in the har-
bour determined to be environ-
mentally unsafe.

“Nassau’s harbour is one of
the most important resources
our country has and is also a
major attraction to our tourists
as thousands of guests visit
weekly via cruise ship,” said Mr
McPhee. “Unfortunately, our
harbour has become the site for
derelict boats, illegal dumping,
or simply unclean and unkempt
areas considered the “back of
house” for many businesses
along Bay Street. Our plan is
to clean up where we can and to
work together with the Port
Department, harbour-front
businesses and all concerned
parties to make this a harbour
we can all be proud of.”

Port Controller Captain
Anthony Allens has also joined
forces with the Coastal Aware-
ness Committee and is helping
to oversee the committee’s
clean-up in the harbour. “Since
last year, the Port Department
has begun cleaning-up derelict
vessels and other items that
pose a threat to boat traffic or
the environment in the harbour.

’ The Tribune wants to
hear from people who are

making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



We alee you

_to bea part of our WOW service team

weoceneceecenecoe,

Dietary Department

We are looking for young men and women with a positive
attitude, physically fit, high school diploma, computer literate,
excellent customer service skills, good written and oral
communication, previous food service experience preferred.

The successful candidates will be required to:

Assembly of meal trays
Delivery of meal trays
Dishwashing, Mopping
General Cleaning

Serving meals in cafe
Replenishing Supplies
Delivery of Food and Beverage
to catering functions

Excellent benefits. | Salary commensurate with experience

DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life

I Please submit resume to: Human Resources Department | Doctors Hospital
: P.O.Box N-3018 | Nassau, Bahamas | or call 302-4618 | Website: www.doctorshosp.com



that collectively will help us as a >

We will continue our efforts and
are pleased to join the Coastal
Awareness Committee in theirs.
This is a problem that affects
all Bahamians and it will take
each of us to combat it. As we
clean, we also want to strongly
encourage all boat owners to
secure their boats and lines
when adverse weather or hurri-
canes approach,” Captain
Allens said. “Securing your ves-
sel can prevent damage to your
boat and will help keep our
waters and harbour safe and
clear of debris.”

During Coastal Awareness
Month the committee will also
host, in collaboration with its
strategic partners both in the
public and private sectors, a
number of activities.

These will include: an educa-
tional marine exhibition at the
Marathon Mall; the erection of
banners; and a national school
science competition.

In addition, field trips to Dol-
phin Encounters on Blue
Lagoon Island and Dive Stuart
Cove have been arranged to pro-
vide students with an opportu-
nity to learn about. protecting
the coasts and enjoying the
marine wonders of the Bahamas.

There will also be beach
clean-ups, a national t-shirt day
and a national church service.

As this is a national initiative,
beach clean-ups and other
coastal awareness activities are
planned for the islands of Aba-
co, Andros, Bimini, Eleuthera,
Exuma and San Salvador.

“All beneficiaries of the
tourism industry must take an
interest and active role in con-
serving the resources of this
vital industry, particularly in
growing Small Island Develop-

Paint Professionals Trust

‘Bahamas,”

M@ CRUISE ships are seen in
this shot floating in Nassau
Harbour, the focus of a
clean-up by the Coastal
Awareness Committee

ing States (SIDS) like the
adds Mr McPhee.
“The economic sustainability of
the Bahamas hinges on our. abil-
ity to maintain the natural beau-
ty of these islands that attracts
millions to our shores. We
thank all those corporate spon-
sors who. contributed to this
worthwhile effort. We also ask
the public to participate in our
upcoming events as we strive to
sustain the natural beauty of
these islands for our socio-eco-
nomic welfare and that of our
guests. We are all in this togeth-
er and as our motto states ‘If
not us who? If not now when?’”

NS LAUNCH COLOR VISUALIZER

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PAT MTSU CHC EOUILITICER

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Fe AUITIC

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| Bahamas






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Weighs 17-18 Ibs.
SUFFERS OF
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REQUIRES TREATMENT

Please be advised that
Bernadette Smith is.no-
longer employed by Albury's |
Parts & Repairs and Albury’s ©
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authorized to conduct any» :
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on behalf of the company.» =

For Further information please —
call our office at 393-2996

ALBURY '

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LOCKSMITHING

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Employment Opportunity

Part-time
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We are seeking mature candidates
(Age 25 & over) with

- Excellent Customer Service Skills _

- Strong Communication Skills

- Enthusiasm

- Cash Handling Experience

Hours of Work

Monday — Thursday 10:00 a.m. — 2:00 p.m.

Friday 10:00 a.m. -

4:00 p.m.

’ Interested persons should submit their resumes
in WRITING or EMAIL along with copies of
certificates before February 16th, 2007 to:

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RE: Part-time Teller
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€

COMMONWEALTH





THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 15

ak Dea ARIAS RASA RARER

Share your news || | ive out your dreams...

The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an

award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. on your very own property in Gra nd Ba ha Mead.






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cS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 25




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PAGE 26, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007 | THE TRIBUNE
INTERNATIONAL NEWS
@ IN THIS photo released by
WCS Cambodia Program, an

endangered slender-billed vulture
sits in its nest on a tree in the for-
est in Stung Treng province in
Cambodia Wednesday, Jan. 17,
2007. Researchers working in the
remote forests of Cambodia said
Wednesday, Feb. 7, 2007, they
have discovered the only known
colony in Asia of Slender-billed »
vulture, which are considered one
of the world's most threatened
bird species.

(AP Photo/WCS Program)
















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discover

colony of rare

vultures in

Cambodia

m@ BANGKOK, Thailand last month in the jungles east

of the Mekong River in Cam-

RESEARCHERS in the bodia’s Stung Treng
remote forests of Cambodia Province.

“We discovered the nests
on top of a hill where two
other vulture species were
also found,” said Song
Chansocheat, manager of the
Cambodia Vulture Conser-

~-watiow Project..The govern-
ment project is supported by

said Wednesday they have
discovered the only known
colony in Southeast Asia of
slender-billed vultures and
scores of other endangered
birds, according to Associated
Press. fay -~ i SRA

The cdlony was discovered

weep ED OY =

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the World Conservation Soci-
ety, BirdLife International,
the World Wildlife Fund, the
Disney Wildlife Conservation
Fund and the Royal Society
for the Protection of Birds.
“Amazingly, there were
also a host of other globally
threatened species of birds
and primates,” Song

~ Chansocheat said in a state-

ment. “It’s a very special
place.”

The area was also found to
be home to several other
species listed as critically
endangered by the World
Conservation Union, includ-
ing the white-rumped vulture,
according to the New Yark-
based WCS.

The team also spotted a
red-headed vulture, giant ibis
and an endangered primate
called a silvered langur, or
leaf monkey.

Researchers said slender-
billed vultures have been
found in other parts of South-
east Asia but that the only
other known colony until now
was in‘northern India. They
are believed extinct in many
parts of Southeast Asia,
including Thailand. _

Soon after the discovery,
Song’s team set up measures
to protect against poaching
and egg collecting, and are
now working with local com-
munities to ensure that they
are involved in longer-term
conservation measures.

“We already have a suc-

cessful WCS model working
in the northern plains where
local people benefit from
conservation activities,” he
said. “I think we have a good
chance of making it work
here if we can find the sup-
port.” ;
The Slender-billed vulture
is one of several vulture
species in Asia that have been
driven to the brink of extinc-
tion in the past 12 years after
eating cattle carcasses tainted
with diclofenac, an anti-
inflammatory painkiller that’s
given to sick cows and is high-
ly toxic to vultures.

Diclofenac has lead to glob-
al population declines as high
as 99 percent in slender-billed
and other vulture species,
especially in India. Diclofenac
is now being slowly phased
out in South Asia, but not at
a pace that assures the recov-
ery of the vultures.

Because diclofenac is
almost entirely absent from
use in Cambodia, the WCS
said the country remains one
of the main hopes for the sur-
vival of the species.

Even so, the birds face
numerous other threats,
including lack of food due to
the over-hunting of large-
bodied mammals, loss of
habitat, and poaching.

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FEBRUARY 8, 2007
| 7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30
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Aodte pacha.
Tea Sak CE mal Re RR aS apa







Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 29























: Let Charlie the
| Bahamian Puppet and
| his sidekick Derek put , ay

some smiles on your

kids’s faces.











Bring your childven to the
MctHappy Hour at McDonald's in
Oakes Field every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
month of February 2007;














My

i'm lovin’ it




















.
ra










vie Gift Certificatesis
|make great gifts!







THE TRIBUNE



a :
~

Fl

oods recede.across Indonesian
d to stay on guard

‘ capital, but city to

a JAKARTA, Indonesia

THE stench of fuel fumes and
rotting garbage wafted though
’. soaked streets Wednesday and
‘residents dragged out dripping
bedding, carpets and clothing as
. flood waters receded from a dis-
aster that has killed at least 50
people, according to Associated
Press.

Floods waters remained in
many districts of the capital, espe-
cially in low-lying areas close to
rivers where mostly poor Jakar-
tans live. Electricity and power
supplies to much of the city of 12
million people were still cut off.

“In general, the water is con-
tinuing to recede further and
many people are returning
home,” said city spokesman Arie
Budhiman. “I would like to say
that the worst has passed us, but
the weather can’t be predicted.”

In one hard-hit neighborhood,

storm waters dropped almost as
quickly as they had arrived, leav-
ing behind a layer of thick, black
muck and tangled debris.
*. “We can’t live in a filthy and
smelly house like,” said Grace
Liawati, an insurance company
-executive, scrubbing dirt off the
ayall. “We are staying with our
‘relatives who are safe from flood-
ing.”

At a local military medical
.” post, where around 4,000 people
-_ are being fed every day, hundreds

lined up for medicine to treat
_ diarrhea, skin irritation and res-
piratory problems.

The death toll from the floods,
which at their peak forced some
340,000 people from their homes,
rose to at least 50, the Health
Ministry said. Most of the fatali-
ties were due to drowning or elec-
irocution.

The cost to the country so far is
estimated to be some $452 mil-
lion, planning minister Paskah
Suzzeta said.

Foreign countries donated
money and aid agencies distrib-
uted badly needed soap, towels

_.and hygiene kits in the capital,
_-even as the Indonesian govern-

ment said it would not issue a for-
mal request for international
assistance.

The European Commission
pledged $775,000, the United
States gave $100,000 and the
Netherlands — Indonesia’s for-
mer colonial ruler — separately
offered $1.3 million.






February 8th

m@ AN INDONESIAN boy
holds his brother as he wades
through floodwaters in Jakar-
ta, Indonesia. Wednesday,
Feb. 7, 2007. Deadly floods
that swamped the Indonesian
capital over the last week
began receding Wednesday,
allowing many residents to
return to their soaked, debris-
strewn homes and start a
daunting cleanup operation.

(AP Photo/
Achmad Ibrahim)

Thousands of people have
sought shelter in government
buildings, schools and mosques
to escape their flooded homes.
Overcrowding and unsanitary
conditions sparked fears of a ram-
pant spread of waterborne dis-

“eases.

On Tuesday, arqund 1,000 peo-
ple were sharing two bathrooms
and sleeping side-by-side on the
cold floor at one refugee center
located in a school.

“There is a shortage of baby
food and blankets,” said Alam-
syah, a district official as he over-
saw the preparation of pots of
rice and instant noodles. “We
need more supplies,” said Alam-
syah, who like many Indonesians
goes by a single name.

Landslides and floods kill hun-
dreds across Indonesia each year,
and the capital is not immune.
But the floods this time around
have been the worst in recent
memory, residents said, washing
indiscriminately into poor dis-
tricts, middle-class housing
estates, hospitals, schools and
shops.

Major floods last occurred in
2002 in the city, much of which is
below sea level.

Environmentalists blame rivers
clogged with rubbish, rampant
construction of shopping malls on
park land that should serve as a
water catchment areas and defor-
estation of hills to the south of
the city.

“The water is all gone, but the
smell is awful,” said Fifa, an 18-
year-old woman as she removed
bits of wood and other rubbish
from her house in downtown
Jakarta under bright, sunny skies.
“But at least we can get back to
normal now.”

DIAMOND



meMALL.
MARATHON |

Crown Jewellers and The Mall At Marathon
want you to register at an Mall
participating store to WIN an

'Nleays a Ferever”

hy a * Bip
‘ OMe ly a af

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 27 .




INTERNATIONAL NEWS


















































es Start From $50.00 & Up
elor & Bacheloreites Parties, Engagement —
‘Dayar
Parties, _

P.O. Box F-42654 *
_ Freeport, Grand Bahama
Telephone: 242-373-9550 * Fax: 242-373-9551

An elegant romantic oasis of (183) Suites spacious Deluxe, Superior and
Garden Pool View guest rooms, (3) swimming pools, famous Ferry House
Restaurant overlooking the lovely Lucayan Marina for your enjoyment.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

PELICAN BAY AT LUCAYA is seeking to employ dynamic energetic and
enthusiastic people who enjoy working in the Hospitality Industry for the
following positions: : i

EXPERIENCE RESERVATIONS SUPERVISOR

If you have extensive experience in Hotel Reservations Sales Systems, then
this is a great career opportunity for you. You must have the following;



¢ At least three (3) years experience in supervision and training of
reservations sales staff.

¢ Familiar with (HIS) Epitome System perferred.

¢ Knowledgeable of constructing Rates, Packages, Promotions,
Advertisements, Reservations.

¢ Knowledgeable with Yield Management

¢ Must possess good written and oral communication and computer
skills, along with strong attention to detail organizational skills and
follow through.

¢ Flexible work hours required for this position.

Minimum qualifications required; Associate Degree in Business
Administration or equivalent. .









* One Breakfast Server
* One Laundry Attendant
¢ Two Housemen

* Two Space Cleaners

* Two Room Attendants

¢ Two Room Inspectresses
High School graduate as well as Bahamahost graduate is a plus. A clean”
Police Certificate and other supporting documents required for all positions:
Applications are available at the Security Gate or e-mail at eg
hr@pelicanbayhotel.com, deadline is February 09, 2007. NO TELEPHONE
CALLS PLEASE! NS REGS oC PEE ER










PAGE 28, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Valentine’s Date!



nter The Tribune’s Valentine contest and become eligible to
win a dinner on the town with one of our Valentine Dates.
Men, fill out the form for Ava, and women, fill out the form for Alex
below and deliver to The Tribune’s office on Shirley & Deveaux
Streets before the deadline on Tuesday February 13, 2007 at 5:00 p.m.

_ Dinner for two at Club Land’ Or
Spa Gift Certificate
Flowers

| Tell us why you are the person
most suitable for Ava or Alex

Names et eer eee ceed
AGO Es or bien striae esenspea teraedecosen sale

Hobbies on eras sa veeveceteresuonnes

weer cece neces cecesseseseseeasceseseeesesessecseseseseoeeene
»

mec cre re cer cece cceesceseseeseesesesseeseseeosaseseseccoese

wcrc ere cc cere ccccesescccsesessereseesesssesesesaseoseseccs

I should win the date with

Ava because:

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ec Caw adc aiete doe Ie Oe CORRS O ORES CHOC ETS EES CECE EEH DESO CEESEH ODES EEE LSeLESCeaoSS EZ ORES OES
cece ct eee eee ORM ROR eee eee eee Reese EHsDeHedesesgeesesererasesseereseserenenessesesee®
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eee ccc cece cece cere cree er eee ese eeeessssesesessssessesssesusesessessseosassoeeseceeeeee

ccc ccc cece cece cece esse cccscscsscsscebccvccessssscssscssesssssessesssscscssccosscsseres

NAITO eR asta serena aaceeees
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HODDICSH 5. BE ce vececcvocupssntebenstonse

weer ccc creer ees e esses eeseseseeesesseeeeesseeoseseesseseeeeese
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I should win the date with
Alex because:

'

ecm ccc c cece eee meee ese e nee s sees eeeessessesseeeeeesseeeseasessensseseseesenreseseeeeeee

The Nassau Florist

Est. 1951



Paradise Island

Club Land or









THE TRIBUNE

@ IN THIS photo made available by the Mayors Alliance for NYCs Animals, Jennifer Stewart,
dressed as the Statue of Liberty, holds Bandit a 10 month old rat terrier/Chihuahua mix to help pro-
mote adoption of furry New Yorkers during I Love NYC Pets adoption month, in New York recent-
ly. Over 50 special pet adoption events will be held in all five boroughs to celebrate I Love NYC Pets
adoption month during February.

(AP Photo/Mayors Alliance
for NYCs Animals)





ot 6

toe emer tr oT

far ig ge Cty" ge ae Pi a







PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FRESNEL JOSEPH OF
COWPEN ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and

that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the: facts within twenty-eight
days from the 8th day of February, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.






KINGSWAY ACADEMY CAFETRIA







Kingsway Academy is seeking the services of
experienced persons to work in the cafeteria.
Job responsibilities include the ability to do the
following:







Plan menus for the entire school
Order supplies for daily needs
Prepare different foods

Assist with cashing, serving and cleaning
Assist with all cafeteria needs when necessary.





The successful candidate should have the
following:








Be a born again Christian
¢ Aminimal education at the BJC Level
e Excellent Communication Skills

‘e ~=Alove for Children

¢ High standards of morality

e Honest

. A sincere desire to work










Letters of application together with a recent color
photograph and a resume (including the names and
addresses of at least three references, one being the name
of one’s church minister) should be forwarded to:








Ms. Kelcine Hamilton
Academy Affairs Manager
Kingsway Academy Business Office
Bernard Road
Nassau






Deadline for application is
Friday February 23, 2007






ee

eo Lt ifoly




Look around you.
What would you do to
help the environment
or improve your
surroundings?

Get your school, club, church group
or friends together and enter this
contest.

There will be first, second and third
place awards in primary, junior high
and senior high school categories.

This contest is science-based.
Students must identify and solve a
problem or challenge in the coastal
environment using scientific method.
Students are expected to exhibit the
following competencies:

@ |dentify a problem or issue
@ Develop a solution

@ Recommend actions to implement
and maintain the solution

Deadline for entries is Friday,
February 16. Awards presentation
will be held in April.

For more information call
Charlene Carey 327-9000
or visit www.breef.org

i
CWVEruMCL It Pa PLATO ROAPORERERME Ot ERIEL TAUREN EDR ENRS ETA AY BONEN ROLES)

Heer ncatetten mee ay tonne aor srcRneRRRON ano ET EIRROL AUR PETROS NT

- becoming

Workplace romances.
hard for small firms ©

u By JOYCE M.
ROSENBERG
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) —
Most small business owners
have to deal at some time or
another with employees who
date, perhaps fall in love and
‘probably break up. It’s pretty
hard to prohibit workers from
romantically
involved, but owners can take
steps to ensure that a rela-
tionship doesn’t get in the way
of getting the job done.

Problems can arise no mat-
ter how the relationship turns
out or even if the relationship
never gets off the ground. So
human resources consultants
say all companies should have

‘a policy on dating and rela-

tionships among co-workers,
and to be sure that employ-
ees are aware of it.

There are two very critical
reasons for formulating such a
policy, Relationships can
affect productivity, and not
just that of the dating co-
workers. Even more serious
is the fact that workplace
affairs of the heart have the
potential of turning into sex-
ual harassment suits against
an employer.

But many HR experts say °

that realistically, such policies
can’t outright ban dating.
“People will, become
romantically involved even if
there’s a policy,” said Linda
Gravett, an HR consultant

based in Cincinnati.

Arlene Vernon, president
of HRx Inc., an Eden Prairie,
Minn.-based HR consultancy,
noted, “Where do people
meet other people? If they’re
not hanging out in bars,
they’re meeting at work.”

What a business owner can
do is, via its policy on dating,
let employees know that there
are standards of behavior they
must adhere to, and that there
can be career repercussions

Human resources
consultants say all
firms should have
policy on dating |

when they start a relationship.
For example, if two employ-
ees in the same department
are dating, one might need to
be transferred to another
department. Or one of the
employees might need to
leave the company.

Vernon said of a dating pol-
icy, “it really is setting the
rules of conduct, letting peo-
ple know what’s acceptable in
the workplace and isn’t.”

Sensitive

Vernon noted that when co-
workers are involved, “every-
one is sensitive to the rela-
tionship.” If a couple is going
through a rough patch, other
employees can sense the ten-
sion — which becomes con-
tagious and makes it painful
for everyone else. But even
when all is going well, the rest
of the workplace can feel
uneasy.if the couple indulges
in goo-goo eyes and other
public displays of affection.

“Tt can create a hostile envi-
ronment. ... People feel
harassed because they’re
watching the affective behav-
ior and it makes them uncom-
fortable,” Vernon said.

The words “hostile envi-
ronment” are key — in sexu-
al harassment lawsuits,
employees often charge an
employer with maintaining a
hostile environment in the
workplace. And yes, another
co-worker could file a com-
plaint because an employer
didn’t stop inappropriate
behavior by a couple.



Computer Technician/
Systems Engineer —

SSS SWISS SRR SS SSNS

Harassment charges obvi-
ously can have other causes,
such as one worker pursuing
another even though the
advances are’clearly rejected
and not welcome.

Bob Kustka, president of a
workplace productivity con-
sultancy, recommends busi-
ness owners be proactive to
head off such problems, and
remind romantically linked
workers about the rules.

“I would talk to the
employees about what is a
professional atmosphere —
having a relationship is fine,
but you need to keep it out
of the workplace,” said Kust-
ka, whose company, Fusion
Factor, is based in Boston.

A policy absolutely must
address the issue of dating
between a supervisor and a
subordinate, which can lead
to problems throughout an
office or company. First, there
is the possibility of a sexual
harassment claim if one party
believes he or she was pres-
sured into the relationship, or
to stay in it.

And it’s well-known that
such relationships breed
resentment among other co-
workers. Gravett noted that
other employees will be
watching like hawks for any
signs of favoritism, such as
promotions or bigger bonuses.

“Even if that doesn’t hap- .

pen, others may see that per-
son as getting a special perk,”
she said. Such a situation
could also lead to a harass-
ment complaint.

Gravett said employees
who are supervisors/super-



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THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com _



BY JOSH DUBOW
Associated Press

The University of Florida won the
recruiting crown in nearly as domi-
nating fashion as it did with the
national championship.

The Gators capitalized on last
month’s national-title victory over
Ohio State and down years from Sun-
shine State rivals Florida State and

Miami to bring in the top recruiting .

class in the country on Wednesday.
“No one is even that close to
them,” recruiting analyst Tom Lem-

' ming of CSTV said. “They got help
everywhere. In the past 10 years, this

has to rank right at the top in recruit-
ing classes. Every position is abso-
lutely loaded.”

The Gators also were picked as
the top class
Rivals.com and National Blue Chips,
beating out Southern California, SEC
rivals Tennessee and Louisiana State,
and Texas.

The Trojans closed strong, adding

- top running backs Joe McKnight

.' from Louisiana and Broderick Green

from Arkansas on Wednesday to a
class that already included another
top back in Marc Tyler; defensive
end Everson Griffen, SuperPrep’s
No. 1 overall player; the nation’s No. 1
receiver, Ronald Johnson from Mich-
igan; and blue-chip linebacker Chris
Galippo from Anaheim, Calif.

“USC continues to be the place
that a lot of skill-position players

by SuperPrep,.

COLLEGES

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

FOOTBALL | NATIONAL SIGNING DAY

Gators score again with top recruiting class



TRACY WILCOX/THE GAINESVILLE SUN

HAPPY GATOR: Florida head coach
Urban Meyer got plenty of stars.

look to first,” said analyst Bobby Bur-
ton of Rivals.com. “That doesn’t
mean the guys they get on defense
aren’t special. It just means they have
the pick of the litter when it comes to
offensive skill players.”

But the Gators’ class was best of
all, signing nine of the top 16 players
in talent-rich Florida and the No.1
players from South Carolina, Indiana,
Maryland and New England, accord-
ing to Rivals.com.

A coaching change at Miami and
another down year for Florida State
played a key part in the Gators’ suc-
cess.

“They play an exciting brand of

. ball on offense and defense, and a lot

of kids want be in that situation,” said
Allen Wallace, the national recruiting
editor for Scout.com and publisher of

BASKETBALL

Brewer, Horford

help Florida win

its 15th in a row

From Miami Herald Wire Services
Corey Brewer scored 18 points, Al

_Horford added 17, and top-ranked

Florida stretched its winning streak

_ to 15 games Wednesday night, pulling
- away in the second half for a 71-61
’ victory over host Georgia.

Florida (22-2, 9-0 Southeastern
Conference) also extended its best

- start ever in the league by sweeping

ih

its season series with the Bulldogs.

» The Gators won 67-51 in Gainesville a

month ago, dominating over the final
20 minutes after Georgia led at half-

_ time.

Georgia (13-9, 5-5) lost its third in a
row after building an 18-13 lead mid-
way through the first half. The
defending national champions
responded with nine consecutive
points and led the rest of the way,
limiting the Bulldogs to 34 percent
(20-of-59) from the field.

Brewer hit 6-of-8 shots, including

. both attempts from 3-point range. He

-’ also doled out four assists, helping

the Gators shoot 52 percent (25-
of-48) from the field.

Horford handled things on the
inside. He made 7-of-13 shots and
pulled down a game-high 10

. rebounds.

Mike Mercer led Georgia with 15
points.
The Gators were up 36-30 at half-

time and began to ease away when

Sundiata Gaines committed two turn-
overs in a row.

Joakim Noah converted a three-
point play after being whacked in the
chest by Dave Bliss, who left the Flor-
ida star sprawled on the court but
couldn’t keep him from scoring off a
lob. Taurean Green drove for an

_.\.uncontested layup that gave the
‘Gators their first double-figure lead,

43-32, then Noah got loose from
Steve Newman and dropped in an
easy one from underneath, forcing
the Bulldogs to call a timeout.

It didn’t help. Georgia went
through a stretch of nearly 6 minutes
without scoring, allowing Florida to
push the lead as high as 17 points.

The Bulldogs didn’t want to get
into a running game with Florida. But
when their half-court offense bogged
down, they often were forced to take
desperation shots with the 35-second

' clock ticking away.

Georgia made only 4-of-22 from
3-point range and is just 17-of-72 from
beyond the arc during its losing

streak. Levi Stukes went 1-for-6 and °

Billy Humphrey was 1-of-5.
Takais Brown, Georgia’s top

_ scorer at 14.4 points a game, was

.‘totally worn down by the Gators,

‘who had him huffing and puffing at

the end. He finished with 5 points on
1-of-8 shooting.

e No. 4 Wisconsin 71, Penn
State 58: Alando Tucker scored 24
points, Michael Flowers added 12,

and Wisconsin pulled away after

halftime to win in State College, Pa.

The Nittany Lions (10-12, 1-8 Big
Ten) hung close for much of the
game thanks to an active zone and
energetic forward Jamelle Cornley,
who finished with 20 points. The
Badgers (23-2, 9-1) at times couldn’t
hit shots when they did find space.

Things quickly changed midway
through the second half.

Flowers hit a couple 3s from
nearly the exact same spot in the cor-
ner to give Wisconsin a 51-43 lead
with 10 minutes left.

Then Tucker went to work in the
lane with three-point plays on con-
secutive possessions, including a
baseline reverse around Penn State’s
Milos Bogetic that led to a foul shot
to give Wisconsin a 59-47 lead with
about 6 minutes left.

Wisconsin coasted from there to
keep pace with Ohio State atop the
Big Ten. Penn State lost its eighth
game in a row.

e No. 7 Pittsburgh 60, West
Virginia 47: Sam Young scored a
career-high 21 points to lead visiting
Pittsburgh to a win for the Mountain-
eers’ first home loss of the season.

Pittsburgh (21-3, 9-1 Big East)
showed no signs of rust from a nine-

day layoff and had no trouble scoring |

inside on the Mountaineers (18-5,
7-4), who were held to a season-low
for points, West Virginia’s previous
low was 50 in a season-opening win
over Mount St. Mary’s.

e No. 9 Kansas 97, Kansas
State 70: Brandon Rush scored 18
points and host Kansas routed Kan-
sas State.

Kansas (20-4, 7-2 Big 12) began the
game with a 15-2 run and closed out
the first half on a 14-5 spurt for a 47+35
lead over the Wildcats (17-7, 6-3),
who came in with a seven-game win-
ning streak, their longest in 19 years.

e No. 11 Marquette 67, Rutgers

47: Ousmane Barro had 1 points and

11 rebounds to lead host Marquette.
The Golden Eagles (21-4, 8-2 Big

East) opened the conference season

with losses to Providence and Syra-

cuse, but are unbeaten since, winning |

eight games in a row.

Rutgers (9-15, 2-9) has lost three
consecutive games and eight of nine.

Jerel McNeal, Wesley Matthews,
David Cubillan and Dan Fitzgerald
each scored 10 points as Marquette
had little trouble in a tuneup before a
key game Saturday against No, 22
Georgetown. The Hoyas have won

six consecutive Big East games and °

trail the second-place Golden Eagles
by only a half-game.

. SuperPrep magazine. “There’s no

question they’ve moved into the cat-
bird seat in Florida. They have taken
advantage of tough times for both the
Hurricanes and Seminoles.”

Florida’s class includes John Bran-
tley, Rivals’ third-best pro-style quar-
terback; James Wilson, the nation’s
top guard; Carlos Dunlap, the top
weakside defensive end; Torrey
Davis, the second-best defensive
tackle; and Jérimy Finch and Major
Wright, the top two safeties.

Two recruits from last year’s stel-
lar class, quarterback Tim Tebow
and receiver Percy Harvin, played
key roles, in the 41-14 victory over
Ohio State in the BCS title game, and
Florida coach Urban Meyer is hoping
for similar production from some of
the players in this year’s class.

“We have taken a new attitude -

toward recruiting this year that every
freshman in my opinion will play
next year,” Meyer said. “Obviously,
that won’t happen, but we are taking
that approach. It used to be, ‘Boy, I
will be able to save this guy.’ But
that’s over.’

Florida’s haul was part of a banner
recruiting year for the SEC, where
Tennessee, LSU, South Carolina,
Auburn, Georgia and Alabama all
received at least one top-10 ranking.

“The SEC is loaded,” Burton said.
“They are, year in and year out, the
most talented conference. But even
this is unusual.”

A SUPER SLAM: Gators center Al Horfard throws down two ot his

Jimmy Clausen, the top-ranked
player by Rivals and CSTV, headlines
a top-10 class at Notre Dame and
could be ready to step in next season
as Brady Quinn’s replacement at
quarterback. Clausen is one of many
players who already have started col-

_ lege, giving him a leg up because he

can take part in spring practice.

Clausen made a high-profile com-

mitment to the Irish last April, arriv-
ing at his news conference in a limo
and predicting four national titles for
Notre Dame. :
. “He heaped pressure on himself
with the way he announced he was
going to Notre Dame,” Wallace said.
“He's demonstrated that the added
pressure has not affected him at all. If
you play quarterback, especially at
Notre Dame, you have to be able to
handle that pressure. He could be
perfectly suited for the situation.”

Notre Dame’s overall ranking was
damaged by some late defections.
Versatile athlete Greg Little switched
at the last minute to North Carolina,
and offensive lineman Chris Little
decommitted and signed with Geor-
gia. The Irish earlier lost a commit-
ment from defensive end Justin T'rat
tou from New jersey, who decided io
go to Florida.

The biggest surprise was at South
Carolina, where coach Steve Spurrier
brought in a top-10 class to a school
that normally struggies to’ attract
blue-chip players. Receiver Chris



17 points

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007 | 72

Culliver of North Carolina headlines
a class that also includes quarterback
Stephen Garcia of Tampa, Fla.

“It is sort of neat to see our name
in there with Texas, Southern Cal,
Florida and Notre Dane Spurrier
said.

Other schools that did surprisingly
well included North Carolina, Rut-
gers, Pittsburgh, Georgia Tech, Ore-

‘gon and Illinois.

New Tar Heels coach Butch Davis
got acommitment Wednesday from
CSTV’s defensive player of the year:
Marvin Austin, a defensive lineman
from Washington, D.C.

“We want to make North Carolina
a major emphasis in recruiting, and
I think we made up a tremendous
amount of ground in a short amount
of time with the: players and the
coaches in this state,” Davis said.

Illinois coach Ron Zook, who
recruited many of the players that led
Florida to the national title, signed
one of the nation’s best receivers —
Arrelious Benn of Washington, D.C.
— and beat out Notre Dame for one
of the top defensive linemen, Martez

‘Wilson of Chicago.

Despite winning only two confer-
ence games over the past two sea-
sons, Zook put together a class that
rivals Ohio State and Michigan for
the best in the Big Ten.

“Tt’s stunning that they won
those kinds of ‘recruiting battles,”
Wallace said.

JOHN BAZEMORE/AP

to help No. 1 Florida dispatch

Georgia 71-61 on Wednesday night. The Gators remained undefeated in the SEC, improving to 9-0.

e Oklahoma 67, No. 17 Okla-
homa State 60; Nate Carter scored
six of his 18 points in the final min-
utes to help host Oklahoma stave off
a late rally and preserve the upset.

Longar Longar added 13 points and
Austin Johason scored 10 for'Okla-
homa (14-8, 5-4), which moved past
Oklahoma State in the Big 12 stand-
ings.

Mario Boggan led the Cowboys
(18-5, 4-4) with 19 points, and Jame-
sOn Curry added 17.

e No. 18 Alabama 80, Missis-
sippi State 79: Ronald Steele drove
the length of the court for a layup
with 6,7 seconds left to give host Ala-
bama a victory.

Ben Hansbrough hit the second of
two free throws with 14 seconds to
play to give the Bulldogs a 79-78 lead.
Steele took the inbounds pass, took
the ball across midcourt, then accel-
erated past Jamont Gordon for the
winning basket.

The Crimson Tide (18-5, 4-5
Southeastern: Conference) trailed

77-72 atter Charles Rhodes’ basket
with 1:24 left.

Then, Mykal Riley bit a 3-pointer

for Alabama and Rhodes made 1]-ot-2
free throws with 37 sec onds to play
for a 78-75 lead.

Riley answered again, hitting a
3-pointer from the right corner 20
seconds later to tie the game.

Hansbrough drew a foul from
Brandon Hollinger before crossing
midcourt for the Bulldogs (12-10, 3-6),
who have lost four of five games.

e No. 20 Kentucky 95, South
Carolina 89: Ramel Bradley score:
21 points aid Bobby Perry added a
season-high 18 to help host Kentucky
beat South Carolina.

The Wildcats (i8-5, 7-2 Southeast-
ern Conterence) handed the Game-
cocks a 38-point thumping last moath
in Columbia -~ South Carolina’s
worst home loss since L915.

This one appeared headed that
way too before the Gamecocks (12-10,
2-7) made a furious second half run
to make it close.

e No. 21 Southern Illinois 60,
Bradley 50: Tony Young scored 25
points to lift host Southern Illinois to

. ‘the victory.

Randal Falker added 13 points and
12 rebounds for Southern Ulinois
(20-5, 10-3 Missouri Valley), which
led by.as many as 19 in the first half
but saw its margin dwindle to rive in
the closing minutes.

Will Franklin had 15 points for the
Braves (16-9, 7-6), whose only lead
came on the first basket of the game
~~ a layup by Matt Salley.

e No. 22 Georgetown 73, Lou-
isville 65: Roy Hibbert scored 20
points and grabbed 22 rebounds to
lead visiting Georgetown.

Jeff Green scored 16 points and
DaJuan Summers added 13 as the
surging Hoyas (17-5, 7-2 Big East)

_won their sixth consecutive game.

Earl Clark matched a career-high
with 14 points for Louisville (16-8
6-4).

But the Cardinals lost their 13th
game in a row to a ranked opponent.

RE AEA Se NEE OS EE ET ER aA CT A OM HT LE GENTS NE SRG WS AE RO STS SEN TY



PAGE 8E, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007



Italian Cabinet
flecree could
keep fans out of
soccer stadiums

m@ ROME

THE Italian Cabinet
approved measures
Wednesday that could
force many of the teams in
the nation’s top soccer
leagues to play in empty
stadiums, according to
Associated Press.

The decree also bans
clubs from selling blocks of
tickets to visiting fans and
allows authorities to bar
suspected hooligans from
entering stadiums, even if
they haven’t been convict-
ed of crimes.

“The measures are severe
and without precedent,”
Deputy Interior Minister
Marco Minniti said. “Our
objective isn’t to play the
games behind closed doors.
Our objective is to play the
games in safe stadiums with

open doors.”

The Italian news ¢ agency
ANSA said that only six
soccer stadiums in Italy
meet the required security
standards, including
Rome’s Stadio Olimpico.
The San Siro stadium —
home to AC Milan and
Inter Milan — is among the
stadiums completing work
to meet the requirements,
ANSA reported.

The Italian soccer league
said its officials will meet
Thursday in Rome with the
presidents of all 42 teams
in Serie A and Serie B —

Italy’s top two leagues. The :

stadiums subject to the
spectator ban will be
announced then.

Other measures ban
clubs from having econom-
ic ties with fan groups and
stiffen prison terms for
committing violence
against police from five to
15 years..

The measures must be
approved by parliament
within 60 days to remain in
effect. The Cabinet also
approved a proposal for
more long-term changes,
putting club stewards in
charge of guaranteeing
security inside stadiums
and involving the clubs in
the ownership of the sports
arenas, now owned by local
authorities.

Premier Romano Prodi’s
Cabinet was reacting to the
fatal attack on a policeman
in rioting last week during
and after a Serie A match
in Sicily.

At least 38 people have
been arrested, including 15
minors, and at least two
more taken in for question-
ing in Friday’s violence at
Catania’s stadium, where -
the local team was playing
cross-island rival Palermo.

The violence led to the
postponement of Italian
league games Saturday and
Sunday, and the soccer fed-
eration has said it would
decide when to resume play
once the government’s
measures were passed.

Investigators in Catania
were examining a film of
the fatal attack in hopes of
identifying suspects, police
said.

Authorities did not say
what the stadium’s closed-
circuit cameras contained.
Italian news reports said
the film showed the fight-
ing outside that began after
the Catania-Palermo match
had started Friday night,
including youths with par-
tially covered faces
approaching 38-year-old
Filippo Raciti and one of
them hitting him in the
abdomen.

The Apcom news agency
reported that the film
showed Raciti being hit
with a sink that had proba-
bly been ripped out of one
of the stadium’s bath-
rooms.

Raciti continued to work,
but about 45 minutes later
he climbed out of his car
when someone tossed a fire
cracker inside, and col-
lapsed to the ground as a
small, crude bomb went off
next to him, newspapers
reported.

Police initially believed
Raciti was killed by the
bomb, but officials later
said he died from severe
injuries to his liver, proba-
bly after being hit by a
blunt object.







TRIBUNE SPORTS.

| eas z | oy

@ SOUTH Africa's batsman Shaun Pollock, center, plays a deliver) from Pakistan's bowler Shahid Afridi right, as teammate wicketkeeper Kamran Akmal,
left, looks on during the second five-match One-Day International against Pakistan at Kingsmead in Durban, South Africa, Wednesday, Feb. 7, 2007.

Pakistan d

@ CRICKET | :
DURBAN, South Africa
Associated Press

PAKISTAN defeated South
Africa by 141 runs at Kingsmead
Stadium in the second one-day
international and tied the five-
match series 1-1 on Wednesday. '

Mohammad Yousuf hit an unde-
feated 101 and Shahid Afridi
smashed his first 50 runs in only
20 balls, as Pakistan scored 351-4.

It was the highest one-day score |
achieved at the Kingsmead Stadi- |
um, beating South Africa's total of |
329-6 against Zimbabwe in 2005. |

Yousuf's 12th one-day interna-
tional century was his first against,
South Africa.

Inzamam-ul-Haq won the toss
for Pakistan and elected to bat. It:
appeared to be a poor decision
when Kamran Akmal was trapped |
leg before wicket by Shaun Pol- |
lock in the opening over,

| Argentina beat France

FRANCE'S Franck Ribery, right, and Argentina's Gabriel Heinze
fight for the ball during their international friendly soccer match at the
Stade de France stadium in Saint-Denis, north of Paris, Wednesday,
Feb. 7, 2007. ponents won the match 1-0.

(AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

Aowalen, Imran Nazir then hit.
57 off 39 balls -— with eight fours
and two sixes — before being dis-
missed leg before wicket to Charl
Langeveldt, leaving Pakistan on
80-2 in just the 12th over.

Yousuf and Younis Khan batted
together for a third-wicket part-
nership of 124, keeping the scor-
ing rate at around six runs an over.

Younis was dismissed for 93,
caught by Charl Langeveldt off
Graeme Smith as he tried to hit

(AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)

efeats South Africa by 141 runs

the South African captain out of
the ground.

Inzamam was run out for 13; and
that brought Afridi to the crease.

Afridi smashed the second-
fastest one-day 50 ever, reaching
the mark in 20 balls — one fewer
than the record set by Mark
Boucher for South Africa against
Kenya.

Afridi went on to reach 77 not
out off 35 bails with five fours and
Six sixes.







°

PG 14 e Thursday, February 8, 2007 REL N The Tribune





Soran errr eee

WITH camera in hand, The Tribune's senior photographer Felipé Major has vowed to capture
the picturesque hallways of churches in New Providence to delight of our dedicated RELIGION
section readers. In this week’s collage, he chose to feature Zion Yamacraw Baptist Church, where
Bishop Sam Greene is the pastor. See Page 15





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES




FREEPORT
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 © Fax: (242) 373-3005




MARCIA ANITA HEPBURN, 38





BAHAMA WILL BE HELD ON
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10,









BE FATHER REGINALD
DEMERITTE ASSISTED BY;
DEACON
HOLLINGSWORTH.







THE GRAND BAHAMA MEMORIAL PARK, FROBISHER
DRIVE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA.




Father: Ezra Hepburn; 5 Sisters: Merlita & Catherine Hepburn,




Brothers: Dwuane Sawyer, Mark Pinder, Trevor & Ralph




U.S.A, Gloria Thomas-Russell, Carmen Thomas, Leah Rolle,
Pricilla Jarret, Leona and Angela Hepburn; 2 Grand Aunts:







Nixon; 3 Sisters-in-law: Paulette & Louise Hepburn and Lavern








Foster and A Host of Other Relatives & Friends including:




Russell, Kevin Russell, Frank Saunders, Hayward Thomas,
Carmel Russell, Lovely Hield, Jenny Colo, Leannie Russell,





Rev. & Mrs. Edwin Pinder, Lloyd & Gloria Thomas, Mr. &




Miller & family, Joy Rahming & family, June Penn & family,






Resteiow Memorial Moluay
and Crematouum Limited

~ FUNERAL tec} 0) ee

i family, Fr. Dwight Rolle & eave Clandia owes & “family,
: Dennis Rolle & family, Sandra Hepburn, Franz Hepburn of
: London, Yvette Gibson & family, Leontyne Hepburn, Simeon

OF CHURCHILL RD., SOUTH | Hepburn & family, Altamese Hepburn & family, Patterson

BAHAMIA, FREEPORT, GRAND :

Left to cherish her memories are her Mother: Sharon Thomas; |

ie: 3 OF LIMEWOOD LANE, FREEORT, GRAND BAHAMA
Jeannie Missick, Dale Rahming and Vantrice Bowleg; 5 _ AND FORMERLY OF AUX CAYES DU FORT, HAITI WILL

; : ; : BE HELD ON SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2007 AT 11:00
Hepburn and Deanza Thompson; 7 Aunts: Veronica Ellis of _ A.M. AT TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH, SETTLER’S

' WAY. OFFICIATING WILL BE PASTOR PHARNES LOUIS

Mable Russell & Leanora Stubbs; 6 Uncles: Pius and John AND PASTOR ALPHEUS WOODSIDE. E CE

: ce : FOLLOW AT THE GRAND BAHAMA MEMORIAL PARK,
Wilbert Thomas, Kemuel and Wellington Hepburn, Leviticus : FROBISHER DRIVE. FREEPORT. GRAND BAHAMA
Rolle and William Ted Russell; 5 Grand Uncles: Richard and : : c :

Willis Russell, Dr. J.J. Stubbs, Elder Leon Stubbs and Paul Left to cherish her precious memories are her long time friend:

Pinder: 6 Nieces: Trekeisha, India & Tatum Hepburn, Simona Christopher Apathy and Other Relatives & Friends including:

& D’ Andrea Pinder and Diamonte’ Barr; 1 Grand Niece: : : : : :
Keeara Butler; 5 Nephews: Dustin, Chad & Markell Sawyer, : and family, Conceptia Jean Baptiste and family, Jetta Baptiste-
Ralph Hepburn Te Chis Barr and Bian dane Partier. Volar B : Polynice and family, Pastor Gesnal Charles and the pe |
Ti eee ; : oN ... : Of Philadelphia Baptist Church, Pastor Gentil Smith and the
Clete Titlon’ Erlend. andra Bore, Ged enue te) dull members of Hope Church of the Nazareen, Harold Pierre and

: : ee family, Mrs. Solange Monestime and family, Sidney Baptiste
Agatha Rolle, Sylvia Russell, Martin & Virgil Hunt, Pearl : and family, Belinda and the Management and Staff of the Grand
: Bahama Home for the Aged and other friends, family from

Sylvia Stuart, Aretha Johnson, Kendra Williams, Nicole Pinder, Haiti, Bimini and the United States.

Barbara Saunders, Sheryl Cawn of U.S.A, Joanne Moxey, The VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE “PERPETUAL SUITE”

Mrs. Reckley Leroy & Mary Glinton, Nora Brutti, Juledor & OF RESTVIEW MEMORIAL

Monique Corneille, Monique Carter, Mrs. Valerie Clarke, Gloria FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA ON FRIDAY FROM 10:00

Rev. Iram Lewis & family, Eleanor, Dennis, Christine, Joslyn A.M TO 6:00 P.M, AND AT THE CHURCH ON SATURDAY

& Carl Jarrett, Jennifer Braynen & family, Ingrid Gibson & |

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 27



NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
.0. Box CB- 12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 © Fax: oe 340- oo

Hepburn & family, Vaughn & Vincent Hepburn, Bert & Bridget

: Moss, Monique Cartwright, Realin Duncombe, Norma
: Symonette, Isreal & Cathlene Rolle, Quentin Levarity and The
2007 AT 12:45 P.M. AT ST. : staff of Bahamas Business Solutions Ltd., Nassau/ Freeport
VINCENT DE PAUL CATHOLIC :
CHURCH, HUNTER’S, GRAND :
BAHAMA. OFFICIATING WILL :
: VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE “CELESTIAL SUITE”
ee : OF RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND

including: Jeff Roberts, Marcia Winder, Andreen, Courtney
Coleridge and Patricia Gooding.

CREMATORIUM LIMITED, 11-A EAST CORAL ROAD,

: FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA ON FRIDAY FROM 10:00
INTERMENT WILL FOLLOW AT :

A.M TO 6:00 P.M, AND AT THE CHURCH ON SATURDAY

FROM 11:00 A.M UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

JANET JENNIE BOURNE, 76

Anne Marie Rolle, Carol, Madeline, Harry, Bennetho Baptiste

MORTUARY AND
CREMATORIUM LIMITED, 11-A EAST CORAL ROAD,

FROM 9:30 A.M UNTIL SERVICE TIME.






The Tribune

PG 28 ¢ Thursday, February 8, 2007

RELIGION

@ ELDER Mark Barrett
receives his certificate of
ordination



m@ By ANASTACIA MOREE
@ CALVARY Deliverance Church, during a special service held last Tribune Feature Writer
month, saw three men commissioned into the ministry and one man
and one woman ordained as ministers of the gospel. Pictured from left
are Ricardo Clarke, Albert Campbell, Elder Mark Barrett, Elder
James Newry who gave the charge to the candidates and the church,

Elder Lena Pratt and Darren Henfield.

‘TAKING the initiative to help better the
lives of his 7,000-plus members, Bishop Neil
C Ellis, pastor of Mount Tabor Full Gospel
Baptist Church, has embarked on plans to
make home ownership affordable and avail-
able to every qualified member of his church.
On Monday, Bishop Ellis announced the
establishment of four subdivisions to assist
in meeting the housing needs of his members
- Mount Tabor Gardens, Mount Tabor Sub-
divisions, Mount Tabor Estates and Mount
‘Tabor Manor. He also revealed that already
153 persons have been qualified for some $13
million in loans. Through the church’s home
ownership partner, Scotia Bank, more than
$11 blli5n has been approved in housing # BISHOP NEIL C ELLIS
loans, while Fidelity Bank, Mount Tabor’s
property ownership partner, was said to have (FILE photo)
approved some $2 million in property loans.
The project, believed to be the most ambi-
tious private-sector housing initiative in the history of the Bahamas, is expect-
ed to provide thousands of persons from every income bracket with the oppor-
tunity to own a home of their own or a plot of land.
The announcement came in the midst of the church’s 20th Anniversary cel-



@ ELDER-eclect Darren
Henfield receives a Bible from
senior pastor Bishop Clarke



@ FOLLOWING the robing ceremony, Elder Lena Pratt and Senior Pas-
tor Bishop Clarke (at pulpit) bask in the presence of the Lord and offer up
a praise of thanksgiving. Pictured at the far right is Elder Mark Barrett in

@ ELDER-elect Albert
Campbell receives a Bible from

quiet worship.

Commissioned
and ordained

‘iving up to its mandate to

L wees the gospel and

equip the men and women
of God to share the good news with
power and authority, Calvary
Deliverance Church, during a spe-
cial. service held last month, saw
three men commissioned into the
ministry and one man and one
woman ordained as ministers of the
gospel.

Being ordained were Elders
Lena Pratt and Mark Barrett. The
candidates commissioned as
Elders-elect were Darren Henfield,
Ricardo Clarke and Albert Camp-
bell.

Bishop V G Clarke, senior pas-
tor and visionary leader of the
church which is located on East
Street South, challenged the can-
didates to keep their focus on Jesus
Christ and to know, believe and
understand the God they serve.

As men and women marked by
God for his service, Bishop Clarke,
aware that the enemy would seek
to bring the disciples down and
cripple their newly birthed min-
istries, encouraged them that as
they preach the gospel with a sense
of urgency, that they make
absolutely sure that they live what



" PROUD PARENTS: Bishop V

G Clarke and his wife, Elder B M
Clarke, stand with their son, Elder-
elect Ricardo Clarke, as they wel-
come him into the ministry at Cal-
vary Deliverance during a special
Ordination and Commissioning
Service held recently. .

body of believers and equip each

senior pastor, Bishop Clarke

they preach and teach.

He told them also that as they
had been lifted up by the elders of
the church and supported through .
prayer, ministry and teaching, that
they look to edify and build up the

member to do the work of the min-
istry.

Perhaps of most importance, the
five candidates were cautioned by
Bishop Clarke to maintain a careful
and committed prayer life in an
effort to remain within the pres-
ence of the Lord at all times and to
position themselves to be able to
recognise the master’s voice when
He speaks to them.

Finally, Bishop Clarke admon-
ished the leaders to continue to
seck God for the desperatesneeds
of His people, their individual min-
istry, the community, nation and
the world.

Indeed, Sunday, January 28 was

a red-letter day in the life of Cal-
vary Deliverance.
- And on hand to witness the
sacred service were many family
members and friends who travelled
from the islands of the Bahamas
and the United States to witness
the occasion.

ebrations. As part of a special week of services, internationally renowned
speaker and minister, Prophetess Juanita Bynum, will be the guest speaker on
Thursday and Friday nights. :

In an interview with The Tribune, Bishop Ellis spoke passionately as he
explained how overwhelmed he became after learning that many of his mem-
bers did not own their own homes and were either living with family or renting.

It was during the annual Week in the Word Conference last November,
that Bishop Ellis’ eyes were opened to the situation within his own body.

According to Bishop Ellis, after an especially anointed message brought
forth by Pastor Patt Francis, from Toronto, Canada, the minister went on to chal-
lenge the congregation to go forward and better their lives.

“We asked all of the people in the congregation who didn’t own a home or
property to come forward. 1 wanted to just/pray that a way would be made for
them. I was blown away. | was thrown off-guard because more than 400 persons
came to the altar," he said.

Becoming emotional as he spoke about his surprise, Bishop Ellis said that he
was moved to tears that night after seeing hey many persons in his church were
without their own homes.

Not able to live with knowing the eseital number of persons who did not
have a home to call their own, Bishop Ellis said that almost right away he called
every bank in the Bahamas, and that was when Scotia Bank responded.

For two nights applications were submitted and out of the 300 persons who
applied, 144 applications have already been approved.

When asked by Tribune Religion about other pastors coming forward to help
their own members, Bishop Ellis said that everyone’s calling is different.

"We have, over the years, diligently endeavoured to do everything within our
power to equip and empower our people to be all that God said that they can
be. :

“This is not our first housing initiative, but [the subdivisions] are by far our
most ambitious. For the past 20 years of our existence, as a ministry, we have
been endeavouring every step of the way to enhance the lives of our people
through the practical presentation and demonstration of the gospel of Jesus
Christ.”

Prime Minister Perry Christie and Franklyn Wilson, chairman of Arawak
Homes Ltd, were also present at the announcement.

Mr Christie said that all of what Bishop Ellis is doing is evidence that you can-
not undermine a person's determination. He noted further that Bishop Ellis,
through the establishment of the mortgage drive, has embarked on a journey to
transform the lives of his members. :

"To be a defining church, you must mean that you are about setting standards.
Bishop Ellis ts one that has come a long way and he is now making his member's
lives better than it was for him." .

Mr Wilson also saluted Bishop Ellis for embarking on a project that would
help transform lives.

“It is everyone's dream to own a home or property to call their own. I think
that for a very long time Bishop Ellis has set out to help persons achieve this
dream. I commend Bishop Ellis for all-of the sacrifices that he has made to help
the members of Mount Tabor.”

Plans for the subdivision have been made possible through partnerships
with Scotia Bank and Fidelity Bank, Arawak Homes and other businesses
and developers.





PAGE 30, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007





THING?

MR. GIBBS, ARE YOU -

WHY 1S REGGIE BLACK
SO HUNG UP ON THE
FAMILY VALUES

HE SEES IT AS
THE ONLY WAY
HE CAN BEAT



NO, THAT'S








REGGIE CERTAINLY
CAN'T RUN ON HIS

DISTINGUISHED
LEGAL CAREER!



TELLING ME THIS STUDIO/ NOT WHAT | GOODNESS!

IS HAUNTED 77

YOU LOOK LIKE YOU'VE HAD A

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b
tn

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TIGER .









10
13
14
15
16
17

19
21

23
24

26
27

29
32

33

34
35

36



MORE COFFEE.)
DORIS?

ROUGH DAY, HONEY





YES, BUTNOT
THAT HORRID
STUFF YOU




GO To

THANK

BE ADEAR AND

AND GET ME
A DOUBLE LATTE
| SUPREME






STARBUCKS

reserves








©2006 by Norm Amenca Syndicate. inc Word fig

O'06 Wiley WK, Ie,

SRANDPA GAIV HE
USED TOVIP |

GEANUMAS FISTAILS
IN AN INKWeLL





3 CRYPTIC PUZZLE

ACROSS

Yesterday's cryptic solutions .

ACROSS: 1, Slight 7, Rasp-t-tin 8, M-o-na 10, Draw up 11,
S-trip-E 14, Met 16, Tuner 17, RE-ar 19, Tot-em 21,
Mowed 22, Ro-we-d 23, F-old 26, S-al-ad 28, Pah 29, Pro-

fit 30, Docile 31, Up to 32, Consumed 33, Su-rely

°















































Yesterday's easy solutions
ACROSS:1, Damage 7, Scot-free B, Slap 10, Canopy 11,
Facade 14, Owe 16, Mates 17, Tows 19, Roger 21, Tiger
22, Debut 23, Chap 26, Decor 28, Bee 29, Adhere 30,
Mirage 31, Edit 32, Cardinal 33, Teeter

GLUT WHAT
THE HECK IS
AN \NKWeLLl?



DOWN: 1, Spider 2, Glower 3, Trap 4, Spotted 5, Stein 6,
Under 6, MA-MA 9, NUT 12, Rum 13, Pearl 15, (the)
To-wel 18, Elgar 19, To-W 20, Ted 21, M-od-ic-um 22, RAF
23, F-actor 24, Oh--O 25, Dressy 26, Space 27, Lo-ans.
28, Pop 30, Duds

DOWN: 1, Dulcet 2, Allows 3, Espy 4, Steamer 5, Great 6,
Cedes 8, Snow 9, Ape 12, Car 13, Delta 15, Mogul! 18,
Owned 19, Rib 20, Get 21, Terrain 22, Doe 23,

Cerise 24, Heat 25, Prefer 26, Dance 27, Chart 28,

Bid 30, Melt



0, HE TROTE OUT
CELESTE, HIG RICH,
ALCOHOLIC WIFE!

| THIS WHOLE BUILDING 15
HAUNTEDS J




WHERE ARE_Y To pick uPA
YOU GOING? /cuP OF COFFEE
AND SOME

ARSENIC






Be eta. \c

Dennis



~PUAS Eosrary REN ORD.

la

Woo">N!



East dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.
NORTH
4853
Â¥Q64
#QJ51073
HKQ
WEST
#31097
VK5
©9642
kAT72

EAST
#642
Â¥AJ102
85
#10953
SOUTH
@AKQ
Â¥9873
AK
#I864
The bidding:
East South West North
Pass 1 NT Pass 3 NT
Opening lead — jack of spades.

Assume you’re West and lead the
jack of spades against three notrump.
Your partner plays the deuce and
declarer the ace. South’s ace play
doesn’t fool you a bit, because he’s
sure to have the A-K-Q, considering
East’s low spade play.

Declarer now cashes the A-K of
diamonds before leading a club. You
win with the ace and, as a steady
reader of this column, shift.to the
king of hearts! Again your partner
plays the deuce (he can’t afford a
higher card), but you continue the
suit anyway. Your partner thereupon
cashes three more heart tricks, and






a,

“OKAY, COWBOY, TIME TO KOUNP UP
TOYS ANP TAKE THEM TO YOUR ROOM.”

__BySteveBecker
A Switch in Time Saves Nine

GOCOINGS. COM / por ScantTUR

WIG E @EARTHLIOE NET











(©2007 by King Feature Eyricicame, ine. World rights mserved.



’ DOWN
One can stand It inactively or 1 Asadrink might i be potentially ae
generously, we hear (6) shocking? (5) hey
Having alean time, presumably @) |" 2 Simply ove to make a fuss again (5) | | | be
Like one's passion for that old ash 3 One takes some risks with her! (4) | i:
blonde? (6) 4 Robir's advert on radto (5) alele| pede
its in the army that some sprockets 5 Fliers slow to crash (4) Ea ; eee eS [|
Tay tum the wrong way (5) 6 Figure to be not so sensitive (6) ay
Prejudice at bowts? (4) 9 It means immobilise rather than {|
The woman's right — alwayel (4
serene — Ey
11 Insufficiently oval eggs? (3
mre, | woommmae” | Py
a an : "
precedence? (5) ;
figure (4) 13 {t's rubbish, and nothing more, in the EJ ae || eas |
Seen | coe |
wingitee en Ge 15 Like the latest cons (3) R a 7
on some ii ces cae 16 It's in polyester, and that’s positive (3) | | ee
; : 18 Derby mount, perhaps (6) ;
socks, etc. (4) fr
ieee eee 20 It's clumsy, spoling a pit by dropping #8]
cigarette end in (5
lait any (4) Since, | ACROSS
A.cide (the left, for instance) (3) Joke to leave you speechless? (3) 4 Mooring device (6)
Maintain there's only one sound key 22 Many have a mission to clean things 7. Fatal (8)
on the plano! (4) up (3) 8 — Male goose (6)
23 Meanto need badly (6) 10 Cane
They‘re all in favour (4) y (6) 13 Throw (4)
Depend on central Hammersmith 25 Game in which a half century is ut 14 Mix up (4)
having a cathedral (4) fohowed by a ‘pair (3) iN Oe a
Not the only one standing around in | 28 Electricians have to choose, of > 17. Fencing sword (4)
thie cornfield (5) course (5) a. 19 Second-hand (4)
Sallor taking a drink on watch? (8) | 30. Sculptor who used wrought iron, Gs | tc neag ane )
Fine face It's posible to find having ultimate need (5) < 24 Prophet (4)
etimulating (8) 31 Weal look up to them (5) Ly 26 Humour (3)
Odd number of players one too 32 _ Is this book always tom? (4 ‘ 27, Summit (4)
, = ) 29 Type of word (4
many to have sex) (6) 33 Thus the feet are not hardened (4) 3 Aoratine
33 Cut (5)
34 Assessed (6
35 canbed
36 Hire charge (6)




_ Calvin



sus



cos THIS AWAY AND




THE CLASS!





THESE

the contract quickly goes down one.

High-class defense, but not very
difficult when you are looking at all
four hands, you might say. Neverthe-
less, that’s the correct defense, even
if you see only the West and North
hands.

The suggested line of defense is
right because, on the first three
tricks, it becomes clear that South
started with the A-K-Q of spades and
A-K of diamonds. He may not have
any more than these 16 points for his
16- to-18-point notrump bid. In any
case, he can’t have the ace of hearts
also, which would give him 20
points, so you know your partner has
that card.

Furthermore, you realize’ that
declarer has at least nine tricks —
three spades, five diamonds and a
club — if you make a “safe” return
after taking the ace of clubs. So, after
saying to yourself that necessity is
the mother of invention, you play the
king and another heart.

While it is granted that you are
very lucky to find East with four
hearts to the ‘A-J-10, it is also true
that East might have held five hearts
headed by the A-J, in which case you
would have been even luckier. The
point is that unless partner has one of
these two holdings, you can’t set the
contract, so you have no choice but
to switch to the king and hope for the
best.

TARGET

The
Target
uses
words in
the main
body of
Chambers
21st
Century
Dictionary
(1999
edition)

HOW many words of four
letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here?
In making a word, each letter
may be used once only. Each
must contain the centre letter
and there must be at least one
+ nine-letter word. No plurals
TODAY’S TARGET
Good 15; very good 22;
excellent 30 (or more). Solution
tomorrow.

















DOWN
Hidden store (5)
Regions (5)
Occasion (4)
Water organisms (5)
European coin (4)
Unwrapped (6)
Perceptive (6)
1 Faucet (3)
In that place (5)
Dairy products (7)
Damp (3)
For every (3)
Soup (6)
Walt (5)
Kitty (3)
Gander (3)
Corsair (6)
Mineral (3) ‘
Foot lever (5)
Dodge (5)
Wite (5)
Female relative (4)
Casserole (4)

o
zs
oT

28D
EYog
= BSPyrH
ox
EL OxES
3900 of
baad i
OxD oR Ye
Av DH
YOR DGS
Soe é
ieosia
aD eRe
Goes 5S
>,
um moo
8 SAEU SS
Pomdeak







} invent
Be ek chy ee
“something new:
yaar tiie ta Col
or experiment.







Chris Ward v Richard Palliser,
British rapidplay, Halifax 2006.
Yorkshireman Palliser, who
shared first place with London
grandmaster Danny Gormally,
scored a dever win in today's
position. Black (to move) is two

THAT DIRTY SUSIE DERKINS.

SHELL. BE SORRN IF SHE...

TRIES To PASS ANOTHER
NOTE .



Tees Noe

EAD \T IN FRONT OF

THE TRIBUNE









PSST...CALNIN! PASS
THIS SECRET NOTE TO
JESSICA, OKAN?












s

0

“DEAR JESSICA,
YOU KNOW WHAT T HATE,

ABOUT CALVIN? HE'S A

SQUEALER ! SIGNED, SUSIE.”

|




















THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 8

ARIES — March 21/April 20

Healthy suspicion is on thing, but
you’re flirting with paranoia this
week, Aries. Now is the time to put
your energy to more productive use.

TAURUS - April 21/May 21
You may have to finally deal with
something you’ve been avoiding,
Taurus. Once you take care of it,
you'll find-it easier to trust col-
leagues. In turn, they’ll feel more
comfortable confiding in you.

GEMINI - May 22/June 21
Don’t be afraid to go off in another
direction this week, Gemini, as an
old relationship comes to an end.
New beginnings are also on the
horizon, most likely with regard to
your career. :

CANCER - June 22/July 22
Your luck will change for the better
this week, and with it your attitude
will also become more positive,
Cancer. An old friend will stop by
to say hello on Thursday.

LEO - July 23/August 23
Resist the urge to criticize this week,
Leo, even if you’re not convinced
that those in charge know what
they’re doing. :

VIRGO -— Aug 24/Sept 22

If you have a complaint to make,
then.now is the time to.speak up,
Virgo: However, you'll also have to
listen to what others say about you.

LIBRA -— Sept 23/Oct 23

This is the, time to focus on work
and health issues, Libra. If you’ve
been feeling poorly in any way,
you must restore balance. This is a
lucky week for romantic getaways.

SCORPIO -— Oct 24/Nov 22
Don’t fret so much about your cash
flow situation. This is an enterprising
time for you Scorpio, and you’ll find
a way to make ends meet. Make time
for old friends this week, they can
help you more than you realize.

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
Now is a good time to take stock of
how far you’ve come and how far
you have to go to achieve your goals
this year. There’s still time to make
your dreams come true.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
You’ve worked hard in recent
weeks and you deserve some kind
of reward, Capricorn. Cheer up!
Things can only get better, espe-

cially with regard to your social life.
AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18

You'll make sure you can afford the
good things in life, and you’ll make
Sure others are aware of your suc-
cess. But don’t brag too much.

PISCES — Feb 19/March 20
You don’t'need to cut comers or break
rules to make it to the top, Pisces.
Success is close at hand, and you'll
soon feel a boost in your self-esteem.
Remember, anything is possible.



oy ens) Leonard Barden





pawns ahead, while White has ote
the immediate threat to queen ote
his c7 pawn. Black can draw tet.
easily by continual rook checks: vate
' RE4+ Kxg5 RIS + Kg4 R5f4+, Ete
but Palliser wanted more. Most rear
amateurs are well aware that Lath
two rooks on the seventh row ‘eps
are powerful, and that a single ai ate
rook can checkmate a back rank vegee
king, but the ability of rooks to “stats
combine in a mid-board vejece.
operation is less widely known, ateve®
Palliser used this rook function Jehet
to play an accurate sequence Pah
which forced White to resign in ety
just two turns. What happened? LEONARD BARDEN - “ote
~ @ 6
ae * : « ate
op
Chess solution 8303: L..Rc3 (threat Rg2 mate) 2 3.08
Kxg5 Rc4! and White resigned in the face of the s ee
double threat RS mate and Rg2 mate. maha
Mensa quiz: Duel, due, cue, clue and glue. oF gy
One possible word ladder solution is: HORN, com, ty ‘
core, coke, poke, pike, PIPE 1?
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ee
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business@tribunemedia.net

Manage
mulled at

@ By NEN HARTNELL,
Tribune Business Editor
PT eee



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007

ment
insurance firm

SEP 9 ae

buyout plan

|
Bahamian leading proposed deal
= for British American Insurance





The Bohamiss






uw the buyout Pan gues iinderstond to be Britsh AMES 2 and heabh
ahwad, The Prfsor understands — ican Holding, fe controlled ky inauranes unset h AT
Y URat these will be no Inrpact ov Moauritige: ased Dawood incressingy CuuBpotiee NEES
i
‘ B HOW The Tribune first revealed the deal

uyout

m By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BRITISH American Insur-
ance Company yesterday said
it planned to launch a mutual
fund, and will today open a
branch office in Abaco, fol-
lowing completion of the
“eight-figure” management

| ‘Eight figure’
| insurance
closed

British American to
open Abaco office,

in wake of deal led
by Chester Cooper
and management

buy-out of the company by a “100 per cent” Bahamian

group.

|
launch mutual fund

Chester Cooper, British American’s president and chief |
executive who led the BAB Holdings buyout of the compa-
ny from its parent, British American International Corpo-

| ration, said the new owners would look to “reenergise the

innovate, and with which we will grow”.

The Tribune first exclusively revealed the British Ameri-
can Insurance Company buyout last September, and Mr
Cooper said the ultimate goal he and his partners held was
“to be the best in the market

». All necessary regulatory

brand” and create “a vibrant platform with which we will

| approvals from the Registrar of Insurance and the Gevern-

ment have been received, and the deal was completed on

Monday. February 5. »

4
;

Among those said by sources to have once been interest-
ed in joining Mr Cooper in the
buyout was Franklyn Wilson
and the general insurer he

ee

SEE page 13B

Atlantis water park
.to open in 8 days

i By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL ;
Tribune Business
Reporter : :

ATLANTIS will open
Aquayenturé, its new 63-acre
water park, in eight days,
marking the unveiling of the
first part of the $1 billion Phase
III development.

Speaking to the South East

Nassau Rotaty Club yesterday,
George Markantonis, Kerzn-
er International (Bahamas)
president, said the opening of
the unique water park will take
place on February 16, 2007.
_ *Aguaventure will include
63 acres of water scape, a one-
mile river, caves and grottos,
swimming pools and beaches
and, in the middle, is the pow-
er tower with four slides,” he
added.

‘Mr Markantonis said that
unlike in the past, where
Kerzner-was,only able to offer
water access to hotel guests,
the resort will be able to offer
an access policy to Bahamians,
so they have access to Aqua-
venture and Dolphin Cay (the.
dolphin encaunter facility) at a
discounted rate.

He said cruise passenger
access will be limited to 100
per day, and the rest of the
access will)be reserved for
resort guests. The Aquaven-
ture park can accommodate
* about 3,000 persons.

“A week later, we will open
our.famous Dolphin Cay,” Mr
Markantonis said. “This fea-
ture will include 11 acres and
three lagoons, and is now the
home of the {dolphins rescued
from Hurridane Katrina. As
part of that Dolphin Cay, there
will be the first marine mam-
mal rescue ahd rehabilitation
centre in the/Bahamas.”
“Mr Markantonis | said
Atlantis whs working to
accommodate an anticipated
10,000 Bahamian school stu-
dents on class tours of both
facilities anqually, providing ,




*
i
|

} |
|

educational and fun experi-
ence, as well as exposure to
possible careers in marine biol-

ogy: .

He also highlighted a num-
ber of other projects that will
be completed shortly,

* On March 28, the new
Mandera Spa will be opened
with 30,000 square feet over
two storeys. This will include
specialised spa services for
young children and teens, a
‘time for men ‘programme and
a signature fitness programme
for children, .

** The mainstay of Phase III,
the 600-room all suite tower
Cove at Atlantis, will also open
on March 28, “It is a state of
the art tower. You could put
that up in any city in North
America, and it would proba-
bly blow away most of its
rivals, What we have there is
truly remarkable; the rooms
average from 750 square feet
and up, the facilities in the
rooms are completely new, and
some of them have never been
seen in hotel rooms before. We
are very excited,” Mr Markan-
tonis said.

“Some people have said to
us as a criticism: ‘You know
that Atlantis is just getting to
big, you have to walk too far,
you have to shuttle too far,
there’s traffic everywhere’, and
we're trying to point out that it
is really ‘not too big when you
consider that it is not a hotel
any more.

“It is a destination. Atlantis
is a destination and there are a
lot of dimensions to that desti-
nation, whether it is with the
Royal Towers and The Dig
that we have today, or whether
it’s the new Aquaventure
waterscape that we are open-
ing or the Cove, whatever it
is.”

* Two new nightclubs are

scheduled to be opened. Aqua °

is scheduled to open on April 1

SEE page 14B



‘erzner: Hurricane Hole
aza deal, plans detailed

'

w@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Re



erzner Interna-
tional is in the
process of closing
the purchase of
‘ the Hurricane
Hole Shopping Plaza, planning
to create.a second Marina Vil-
lage and'‘timeshare facility on
the site, it was announced yes-
terday. ||

George Markantonis, presi-
dent of Kerzner International
(Bahamas), told the South East
Rotary Club that “as you prob-
ably well know, we are involved,
but have not closed, with a pur-
chase of a certain shopping mall
that borders our Hurricane Hole
Marina. We’re talking about a
Marina Village Phase II devel-
opment, That is what will go
there”,

He said this is not advanced



_ yet. “But we do have all of that

waiting in the pipeline, because
there is just so many things one
can build in a short period of
time.” 1

The Tribune revealed the
Hurricane Hole deal on Janu-
ary 9, 2007.

Among the owners Kerzner
International is negotiating with
are Emanuel Alexiou, an attor-
ney and principal in A.F, Hold-

~ The Tribune

BUSIN

ee eee eee
Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street









Money Safe.
Money Fast.

at

Company plans timeshare, Marina Village II on site of acquisition yet to close

ings, owner of the Colina group
of companies, and attorney Col-
in Callender, The pair are
involved in other business ven-
tures, such as the Nassau
Guardian, Vag
Mr Markantonis said Kerzne
International anticipates adding
200-300 units of timeshare above
the Marina Village Phase II
development, .
“But this time over the village
- over a real village, with:living,
breathing shops, six food and
beverage outlets, a completely.
redone, renovated Hurricane
Hole Marina that will be able to

take the larger yachts as.well as.

the smaller ones, the 150 and
200 footers,” Mr Markantonis
said,

He added that if gverything
goes according to plan, “ we will
probably go in the ground at
the end of this year, It will be
pretty accerlated, Of course,
right now it takes second place
because we have so much else
we are announcing”,

Another project that is being
placed on the backburner is the
proposed golf course on Athol
Island, Mr.Markantonis told The
Tribune that the project was
designed initially to meet the
demands of occupants in the

495-unit Residences of Atlantis,
and to provide an alternative to
the Ocean Club golf course, —

With the Residences notr
opening until the end of this
year, demand has not increased,
so Kerzner International has
postponed working on the Athol
Island project until later,

Retailers

Several retailers based in the
Hurricane Hole Shopping Plaza
plaza have expressed concerns
to The Tribune over whether
they would fit in with Kerzner
International's plans for the
location, and whether the
Atlantis and One & Only Ocean
Club owner would make ‘it
uneconomic for them to remain
in the plaza by increasing rental
rates, aS

A Kerzner International
acquisition of the Hurricane
Hole Shopping Plaza would
make logical and strategic sense
for the company, though.

Kerzner International
acquired the Hurricane Hole
Marina, the nearby condomini-
ums and 11 acres of surrounding
land for $23 million in June 2005,
giving it control of all the main
waterborne access points to Par-

adise Island.
The marina was purchased
from Driftwood and its financial
backer, Lehman Brothers' pri-
vate equity arm.
Kerzner International is
understood to have long been
interested in the Hurricane Hole
Shopping Plaza, and its acquisi-
tion would enable it to be rede-
veloped to fit in with the com-
pany's plans to redevelop the
marina and surrounding area.
Among the retailers currently
operating in the plaza are the
News Cafe, an Italian restaurant
that shares the News cafe's own-
ership, a Solomon's Mines out-
let, two food stores, another
restaurant and a mix of outlets
catering to tourists. Several have
expressed concerns about
whether they will have to vacate
the plaza. 3
Kerzner International is plan-
ning to redevelop the Hurricane
Hole Marina in partnership with
New York-based Island Global
Yachting once government
approvals are obtained, the lat-
ter's chairman and chief execu-

tive, Andrew Farkas, told The .

Tribune last month. This news-
paper has been told that a June
2007 start date for the marina is
being eyed,

AES denies ‘funding end’ for Bahamian Ocean Cay project

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE project director for the proposed
Bahamas-based liquefied natural gas (LNG)
terminal yesterday denied claims that its
shareholders had “discontinued funding”
due to uncertainty over whether the Gov-
ernment would approve the development,
saying new equity capital had been injected

recently, ,

Aaron Samson, project director for AES

Ocean Express, said the company and its



m@ AARON SAMSON

\
\
\

\\
KK
i

\
FN

Company ‘optimistic we're almost
there’ despite Broward County dispute

two equity partners in the venture were
“optimistic we're almost there” in terms of
regulations and an environmental manage-
ment plan to govern the project being com-
pleted, the “final step” towards signing a
Heads of Agreement, _

SEE page 12B





>







“THE MARKETS
‘STOCKS, MUTUAL FUNDS, 5-68

‘DOW30 —«-'12,666.87 +0.56 AN
“SBP 500 1,450.02 +2.02 4X
‘NASDAQ —>-2,490.50.+19.01 Ab
"10-YR NOTE 474 -03 W

sa W

pe OlL

: Glocks
advance
despite |
oil drop:

. BY TIM PARADIS

Associated Press — at
NEW YORK — Wall Street



ended a fractious session

slightly higher: Wednesday after

falling oil prices hurt energy

~ stocks and overshadowed a
. stronger-than-expected produc-
tivity reading. A Federal
~ Reserve official’s comments on

interest rates also soured the: —

market’s early good mood.

_. Arobust sales forecast from
_ Cisco Systems gave a boost to
: technology stocks, however.

Despite indecision shown by
the Dow Jones industrials,

which were up for much of the

day but ended essentially flat,
stocks rose moderately overall.
Advancing issues outnumbered

- decliners by about 3 to 2 on the
_New: York Stock Exchange,
where consolidated volume .

came to 2.62 billion shares,
compared with 2.63 billion

_. Tuesday.
“y- 'The Dow inched up 0. 56, or

less than 0.01 percent, to

- 12,666.87. The Dow moved past

12,700 for the first time, trading

as high as 12,700.28. The previ-
ous trading record of 12,683.93
was set Friday.

Broader stock indicators °

_ showed more substantive gains.

The Standard & Poor’s 500
index rose 2.02, or 0.14 percent,

“ to 1,450.02, and the tech-focused

Nasdaq composite
‘responding to Cisco’s news,

_ sury note falling to 4.74 percent

index,

rose 19.01, or 0.77 Percent, to
2,490.50.

Bonds rose following the
economic data, with the yield
on the benchmark 10-year Trea-

_ from 4.77 percent late Tuesday.

The dollar was mixed against

- other major currencies, while
o gold prices fell.

“Light, sweet crude settled |

‘down $1.17 at $57.71 per barrel

on the New York Mercantile
Exchange. It had been up briefly
after the Energy Department’s
weekly domestic inventory data

showed a small decrease in
crude stockpiles.

“Crude hasn’t been able to

_ get above $60 for three days so
' the energy names are weak,”

said Neil Massa, equity trader at

John. Hancock Funds, He sug-

g some investors were ;

simply taking profits... ee
Al Goldman, chief market -
strategist with A.G, Edwards & °

Sons, said Wednesday’s trading
reflects “a normal pause” and,

more specifically, a pullback in

the energy companies.

“The price of oil dropped

dramatically and they tend to be
‘major factors over all,” he said

of the energy companies.
_ Still, he remains confident in
the market’s prospects. “We've

“come a long way and we're just

taking a time out.”

_. Cisco rose 81 cents, or 3 per-
cent, to $28.09 after the com-

, pany, which makes networking

equipment, predicted its third-

: quarter revenue would rise 19 to
_ 20 percent.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies, which sur-

. passed 800 for the first time last
- ‘week, set a new closing and

trading high of 816.20 after ris-

ing 5.79, or 0.71 percent. The
previous closing high of 810.03
came Wednesday while the ear-

lier trading high, set Monday,

was 810.49,

_ Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei
stock average closed down 0.66
percent. Britain’s FTSE 100

. Closed up 0.37 percent, Germa-

‘ny’s DAX index was up 0.58
‘percent, and France’s CAC-40

finished up 0.46 percent.



ECONOMY

SS

upon nara ANNAN ANARANAAAARANAMRAQHAARARENSAMAN LARA AY AAR RAIA AAA NAN EAA AN RAN PAN NANA AAR NAAR BSAA NAAN AMAIA ARAN RANA AAR AAA AAPA AA AEROS SLUHOROBOSCOEBEAOSLS OAL RCOMSLEL A GOOICOOEMOLODIICYOLCA

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007

Productivity jumps; aii cost slows

i Workers stepped up their
efficiency in the final three
months of 2006, yet productivity
still turned in the weakest yearly
performance in almost a decade.
The rise in the cost of labor
slowed.

BY SHOBHANA CHANDRA
Bloomberg News

U.S. worker productivity grew at
the fastest rate in almost a year last
quarter and labor costs rose at a
slower pace, suggesting wages may
pose less of an inflation threat.

The 3 percent gain in productivity,
a measure of how much an employee
produces for each hour of work, fol-
lowed a revised 0.1 percent decline in



the third quarter, the Labor Depart-
ment said Wednesday in Washing-
ton. A measure of labor costs
increased 1.7 percent after rising 3.2
percent.

The rebound makes it easier for
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S.
Bernanke, who presents his semi-an-
nual report to Congress next week, to
keep interest rates unchanged even
as economic growth picks up. Phila-
delphia Fed President Charles Plos-
ser said Wednesday that credit may
yet have to be tightened and that it’s
“too soon to declare victory.”

“This report certainly gives the
Fed a sense of relief,” said Mark Vit-
ner, a senior economist at Wachovia
in Charlotte, N.C. “They’ll stay on

BALANCING ACT



hold through all of 2007 and a good
part of 2008.”

For all of 2006, productivity rose
2.1 percent, after 2.3 percent in 2005,
marking the fourth straight year effi-
ciency gains have slowed. Labor
costs increased 3.2 percent last year,

up from 2 percent in 2005 and the

biggest rise since 2000.

A separate report from the Fed
Wednesday showed borrowing by
U.S. households rose in December as
consumers took out more personal
loans. Additional figures from the
Mortgage Bankers Association
showed applications to buy a home
or refinance an existing loan fell in
the week ended Feb. 2.

Some policy makers say produc-

tivity is still strong enough to contain
inflation as wages rise. In the 1990s,
former Fed Chairman Alan Green-
span championed the idea that higher
productivity rates would keep a lid
on inflation even as the U.S. economy
was gaining strength and unemploy-
ment was low.

,Economists had forecast a 2 per-
cent gain in fourth-quarter produc-
tivity, based on the median of 70 fore-
casts in a Bloomberg News survey.
Estimates ranged from 1 percent to
2.8 percent.

“The Fed must be very happy,”
said Nariman Behravesh, chief econ-
omist at Global Insight in Lexington,

*TURN TO ECONOMY







FOUR OUT OF FIVE U.S. WORKERS STILL HOPE TO FIND
THEIR DREAM JOB, AND THEY’RE SEEKING FUN OVER MONEY

t Google, you don’t have
A to leave work to indulge

in roasted black bass
with parsley pesto. The com-

pany runs ll free gourmet caf-
eterias at its Mountain View,

Calif., headquarters. Of course,

when it comes to America’s
Best Company to Work For,
food is just one perk.

You also can work out in
the gym, study a foreign lan-
guage, play volleyball or video
games, even take part ina
company ski trip. You can
come to work in your flannels
on Pajama Day or brainstorm

. With software desingers ina

music filled conference room.
“It’s not just that the place

‘ . is fun,” says ©
Google
spokeswoman
Sunny Gettin-
ger. “It’s that
the work is
fun.”

And that
explains why
Google, the
company try-
ing to improve your Internet
search experience, gets 3,000
résumés a day.

Sure, most Americans want
to make as much money as



CINDY Oy REECE
GOODMAN

cgoodman@
MiamiHerald.com

possible. But work environ-
ment has become increasingly
important, too. Four of five
U.S. workers still hope to find
their dream job, a new survey
by Harris Interactive con-
ducted for CareerBuilder.com
shows. If we landed our dream
job, most of us would choose
having more fun over making
more money, the survey

*TURN TO BALANCING ACT

7 MIAMIHERALD.COM: CLICK ON

m BLOGS FOR CINDY KRISCHER
GOODMAN’S BLOG: THE
WORK/LIFE BALANCING ACT

AIRCRAFT INDUSTRY

Airbus flight

Shows off
troubled —
superjumbo

@ Airbus took 200 journalists for a
flight in the new superjumbo
A380, allowing them to wander
between the two decks of the
aircraft certified to fly as many as
873 people.

BY LAURENCE FROST
Associated Press
ABOARD AN AIRBUS A380 — So
this is what all the trouble was about.
Airbus’ A380 — the world’s largest

1. ~~ serfospassenger plane.--.has had a two-year

production delay. But a trip on the first
flight open to the media demonstrated
why all but one customer, a cargo car-

rier, think the superjumbo is worth the

wait.

The interior is roomy, and economy
seats leave ample
elbow room in the
540-seat demon-
stration cabin fitted
by Airbus.

Airlines Qantas,
Emirates and Sin-
gapore Airlines
plan to go further,
fitting the plane
with fewer than
500 seats to give each passenger more
space. Other airlines are expected to
follow their lead, Airbus Chief Operat-
ing Officer John Leahy said.

“It’s a game-changing airplane,” the
European aircraft maker’s top sales-
man said, shortly before boarding the
flight with about 200 reporters at Air-
bus’ headquarters in Toulouse, south-
ern France. “The only minor problem

LEAHY

*TURN TO AIRBUS

TECHNOLOGY.

Amazon,

TiVo link
video files

to TV sets

In anew partnership, TiVo and
Amazon.com will beam movies
and TV shows directly to their
customers’ living rooms.

BY CURT WOODWARD
Associated Press

SEATTLE — Amazon.com and
TiVo have. jumped into the digital
download wars — with a twist. “We're
providing people with the simplest
way to actually play back their digital
content on a television set,” said said
Bill Carr, Amazon.com’s vice president
of digital media.

The new partners said a test version
of their new service, called Amazon
Unbox on TiVo, has begun with an
with an unspecified number of TiVo
customers.

The full service is expected to debut
later this year, available for the 1.5 mil-

lion TiVo digital video recorders with

broadband Internet capability. Offi-

*TURN TO TECHNOLOGY.







PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007



THE TRIBUNE



3 FOS 7 |
o ° , -
A Fo
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+, 8S
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4 . : ' : . : ‘ i me
nder general banking account becomes the property | from the authorised Attorney deceased account holder was t A
law, the property of the surviving joint account | (under the aforementioned domiciled at death. It mustindi- =.”
(monies) in a holder inthe event of the death | Power of Attorney) inthe cate the entitlement of the 1%
deceased account holder's bank of the other, by virtue of the | Bahamas, claimant under that country’s...
account passes to his legal rep- Surviving account holder’s right : (b) An independent, written laws of succession, This is to **
resentatives, by operation of of enn ; ; verification of the identification establish the claimant’s legal 4,1,
law, on the death of a client. Therefore, the property inthe | of the Executor or Administra-. entitlement to the credit bal-
The property is then distributed deceased account holder’s | tor from a Notary Public or ance of the deceased account -/i/
to the appropriate or named account, subject to the terms — | lawyer in his country of domi- holder. Oat
beneficiary, in accordance with and conditions of the bank’s | cile, g0)
the provisions of the deceased mandate or contract with the | (c) Letter from the Executor 3, Affidavit/Declaration by
account holder’s will or the _ client, cannot be disposed in any | By Tyrone Fitzgerald stating that he has been advised the claimant, duly certified by a
rules of intestacy, depending way that the bank chooses. This | : g| by Bahamian legal counsel Notary Public in the Bahamas
upon whether the deceased _ is because the legal ownership | and/or the authorised attorney or lawyer in his country of
account holder died having a the elie in the account Is a the estate of the deceased, domicile (as prescribed by Sec-
made a valid, inter vivos will, that of the personal represen- a ‘ stigma Gh ; ad j , that all the relevant probate — tion 8 of the Oaths Act), that
or died intestate (without a_tative(s) of the deceased a dla lea hel al ‘ am a Ae rules and procedures have been __ the deceased person has no real
will). account holder, + probate of the will, or letters of — the personal representatives of followed and completed, estate in the Bahamas, and his,
However, if the account isa _ Notwithstanding the forego- 4 qministration for the estate of the deceased account holder. regarding the Resealing of the — total personal estate does not +’
joint account, the balance inthe — Ing legal principle, the personal the deceased account holder, as This is notwithstanding the fact Grant of ; Probate in the exceed the amount standing to
required by Section 49 (1) and that the will of the deceased eas oe a tines his credit at the bank.
toe f the Supreme Court Act aoe ist Beebe pee been complied with, as prelim- 4, Actual or certified copies of a
Although it is the duty of the country of domicile, and a RNY ab in requesting the Notices evidencing the fact that
personal representative to give | Grant of Probate issued in his release of the property/monies at least three aby oe re eee
notice of the deceased account country of domicile, in the deceased account hold- — given by the claimant, throug
holder's death as soon as possi: ‘The foreign will or letter of | °™* ALONE: mee auleue Pe Bs ae
ble, the bank, being organised — administration must be probat- a
i VA : ain thie tiriedictt The Executor should also Bahamas, requesting that all.
and operated under the laws of — ed again in this Leal and make a formal request for the. persons/creditors having any!














At any one moment

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eae aps whe Sassi spp MOP Sacrdeal Come dane AD yes mmaneed Seps Regeey ae Gada von art Panes

from $649
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ea tee

the Bahamas, may act only
upon a Grant of Probate or Let-
ter of Administration in this
jurisdiction,

Under common law, a bank
who pays the monies remain-
ing in a deceased account hold-
er’s account to a person who
has not obtained one of the

estate, acts in some way as if
he/it was an executor or admin-
istrator), The bank will also be
liable to pay such penalties and
duties as would have been
payable on grant of probate or
administration,

The probate requirements in
the Bahamas must be fulfilled
before property in a deceased
account holder’s bank account,

Bon Savings & Investments

To help with: + Retirement
+ College
+ Savings.
+ Investments

We offer Flexible Annuities
starting with an inital contribution of
$500 minimum and contributions
as low as $100 per month,
Single Annuities with a

Probate issued

a new Grant o
to the personal representative

of the deceased account holder
for the property in his account
situated in or related to the
Bahamas, The Grant of Probate
or Administration, whatever the
case may be, must be resealed
in the Bahamas,

Under the Probate Rules of

Return
(c) Return
(d) Administration Bond (for

resealing Letters of Adminis-'

tration)

(e) Power of Attorney (to be
issued to the person acting on
behalf of the personal repre-
sentative of the deceased
account holder, in submitting
the documents to the Probate
Regisyy of the Bahamas)

(f) Affidavit of Domicile and
Assets

(g) Affidavit of the validity
of the Will

(h) Three certified copies of
the Will

(i) Three certified copies of
the Grant of Probate or Letters
of Administration

The foregoing documents are
submitted to the Probate Reg-
istry of the Supreme Court of
the Bahamas, and the process
may take from three months
to a year, depending upon the
proper completion and submis-
sion of the documents, the
nature of the assets, and the
complete fulfillment of the pro-
bate requirements,

1. Upon receipt of the Grant

of Resealing of Probate in the
Bahamas, the bank should
require the following informa-
tion before release of the prop-
erty in a deceased account hold-
er’s account; ° :

(a) Certified copy of the
Grant of Resealing of Probate

release or distribution of the
property/monies in
deceased account holder’s
account, indicating the specific
reasons for the release or dis-
tribution, He should also pro-
vide the bank with his specimen
signature, duly certified by a
Notary Public or lawyer in his

of deceased account holders, as
it provides an easier, more effi-

cient alternative to the formal

requirements of the Act, under
certain specified conditions.

Section 50 (1) of the Act gives
the manager or assistant man-
ager of a bank the discretion to
pay “any sum standing to the
credit of a deceased person to
any person who, upon produc-
ing satisfactory proof of death
of such deceased person, and
upon producing such evidence
as may be required by the man-
ager or assistant manager to be
entitled by law to the said sum
standing to the credit of the
deceased person”, without the
production of probate or letters
of administration,

To satisfy the requirements
of Section 50 of the Act, the
claimant of the credit balance
of the deceased account holder
must produce the following doc-
uments/information, before
payment of the funds is made to
them:

1. Certified copy of the death
certificate of the deceased
account holder, duly notarised
or apostilled (as a ae to
deceased account holders domi-
ciled outside of the Bahamas
requiring such legalisation).

2. Certified copy of the will
of the deceased account holder
and/or a certified copy of an
Affidavit of Law from an attor-
ney in the country where the

the

claims to the estate of the
deceased account holder to
notify the bank in writing of
such claims. :

The bank must then ensure
that no other claims to the
estate of the deceased person
have been received by the bank.

Section 50 of the Act should be
used in a discretionary manner
by the manager or assistant
manager of the bank. This is in
addition to, and in compliance
with, its internal verification and
due diligence policies and pro-
cedures regarding such
accounts, : nek
‘Where the stat
dure proves to he more open

rev

to. scrutiny or, arguably. less *

stringent in its application than
the standards of the -Fank’s
internal policies, procedures and
overali mandate, it may be
advisable that the bank exer-

utory. proce-_,

have foregoing grants of representa- -

we a tion becomes, by operation of _ the Act, in order to reseal the country of domicile, or alterna- ‘The bank must then a

million ways to enjoy the Caribbean. inwiian executor de son tort foreign grant in the Bahamas,,.< 06» copies of the first four or the statutory declaration, along
(one who, being either an the following documents are relevant pages of his passport, _ with the evidence of advertise-

DAY 8 DAY executor or administrator, who required; Section 50 (1) (a)-(d) of the ment for creditors of the

Carnival Spirit Carnival Liberty has obtained a Grant of Pro- (a) Petition for Resealing the ~ sleet Leann : the oO eure oe oe
Leaves April 8.07 Leaves April 14,07 bate or Administration in the Grant 7 sa 7 ‘lit b I 3 Ts te FE it a , id b esi 7 a
Mexican Riviera | Bxotic Westorn Caribbean deceased account holder’s —_(b) Bond for Making, a etree 2 anes oe DOIG DE BPN eet eta

| onshore and offshore accounts statutory procedure outlined in





cise its discretion in following .

the standard probate procedure
in Section 49 of the Act, as a
precautionary measure.

Copyright: Tyrone Fitzgerald
NB; The information ¢on-

~ tained in this article does not

constitute, nor is it a substitute
for legal advice, Persons reading
this article and/or column, gen-
erally, are encouraged to seek
the relevant legal advice and
assistance regarding issues that
may affect them and may relate
to the information presented.

Tyrone L. E, Fitzgerald is a’

practising attorney in the Cham-
bers of Fitzgerald & Fitzgerald,
Should you haye any comments
regarding this article, you may
contact Mr Fitzgerald at Suite
212, Lagoon Court Building,
Olde Towne Mall at Sandyport,
West Bay St.. RP, oO, Box CB-
11173, Nassau, Bahamas

yew. svitzerwiismuller.com

At SvitzerWijsmuller, results and values go hand in hand. With 2,600 employees and a fleet of more than 300 vessels, we provide
towage, salvage and related marine services in aver 36 countries worldwide. To sustain our position as one of the world's leading
merine services company, we encaurage a culture of commitment, innovation, and entrepreneurship where all employees take
responsibility fer our purpase: to provide safety and support at sea SvitzerWijsmuller is headquartered in Denmark and ig part of

the A.P. Moller - Maersk Group,

Freepoint Tug & Towing Services, Ltd. (FTTS) is a J/V company, 60/50 owned by SvitzerWijsmuller and South Riding Point Hold-
Ing Ltd (World Point Terminals Inc.) FTTS operates a fleet of 4 tugs, providing services in Freeport, South Riding Point, and at
times en neighbouring Islands. Additional personnel is needed to assist in the growth of our tug operation and overall exposure In

The Rehamas,

ASD TUG MASTER

Freepoint Tug & Towing Services, Ltd. — Freeport GB, Bahamas

THE POSITION \

The Master will be responsible for the supervision and
leadership of all aspects of vessel management, wWhish

include:

Terminals Inc.

The position also offers an exciting and attractive career In an
international environment with the possibility of continuous de-
velopment both within SvitzerWijsmulier Group oF Word Point

° Maintenanse and safe operation of the tug
. Crew management, including srew motivation and
skill development ' °
° Risk management - the ability to identify, assess,
and respond to hazerds and operational risks
Preparation of tug daily activity sheets
Alltug stores/parts requisition
Other ad has tasks
Mesting the high SvitzerWijsmuller Health, Safety,
Environment, and Quality standards, including
managing all aspects of SM and 1SQ9001

minimum contribution of $2,500,

QUALIFICATIONS

BMA Master's License (500grt) along with alll relevant
STCW95 requirements, or have completed the necessary
international certification to this end

S/he must have no less than 5 years seamanship expert
ence, with 3 years acting in the capacity of Master

S/he must be well versed in vessel maintenance and able
to manage @ small crew effectively

Experience with ASD tugs is not mandatory but Will, be
considered an asset

Familiarity with the [SM Code and the ability to effectively
manage a Safety Management System

The nght individual must also be prepared to work within @
shift system

ONLY BAHAMIAN CITIZENS, RESIDENTS OR WORK PER-
MIT HOLDERS NEED APPLY

The Tug Master will receive support fram other FT TS staff
Jocally in Bahamas and other ByitzerWijsmuller employees
throughout the Region

PERSONAL PEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES

The right candidate should be strong and team-oriented,
and have the ability to achieve results through positive
interaction with crews, pilots, and shore personnel.

For more information call:
British American Insurance at 242-461-1000
Freeport 242-352-7209 Exuma 242-336-3035

bafinanclal@babinsurance,com

CONTACTS

Application with resume/CY to be sent to FTTS, Attn: Capt Lee
Wallace, #4 Milton Street, Freeport GB, Bahamas, Tel +1 242
362 3060, Mobile, +1 242 727 0623, Fax +1 242 362 41 ta
les.wallage@syitzermilsmuller.cand,

Lib , SvitzerWearulier

Furthermore, the Tug Master will have the epportunity to
gain exposure throughout various training programs and
exchanges, \





4B_| THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007 __

AUTOMOBILES

New CEO revives car that once saved Ford

BY TOM KRISHER
Associated Press

CHICAGO — On his first
day at work as chief executive
of Ford, Alan Mulally had a
question that no one could
answer: Why get rid of the
Taurus? :

Long before he was hired
last September, the struggling
company had decided to stop
making what once was the
most popular car in the U.S., a

decision that had him per-.

plexed.
“How can it go away?” he
. remembered asking. “It’s the
best-selling car in America.”

On Wednesday, at Mulal-
ly’s insistence, the company
announced that it was reviving
the Taurus name.

The Dearborn, Mich.-based
automaker made the official
announcement at the Chicago
Auto Show that it would place
the storied moniker on the
2008 version of the Five Hun-
dred.

ECONOMY

In addition, an upgraded
version of the Freestyle cross-
over vehicle will be re-badged
as the Taurus X, and the Mer-
cury Montego, the Five Hun-
dred’s cousin, will be renamed
the Sable in
the coming
model year.

The Sable
was the Tau-
rus’ nearly

identical
cousin, with
2 million sold
under the
Mercury
name.
Mulally, in an interview
with The Associated Press,
said the Taurus’ demise was
one of the biggest disappoint-
ments he discovered as he
started work.
He still hasn’t found out
why the company gave up on





MULALLY

the name of a car purchased

by 7 million buyers during its
21-year history. All he knows

is the decision was wrong and
needed to be fixed.’

“The Taurus, of course, has
been an icon for Ford and its
customers,” Mulally told the
AP. “The customers want it
back. They didn’t want it to go
away. They wanted us to keep
improving it.”

The Five Hundred, which
Mulally used for a time as his
personal car, should have been
named the Taurus all along
rather than starting with a new
name, he said.

“Think of how much time
and attention and money it
takes to establish a brand,”
Mulally said. “It's going to take
unlimited effort and time to
try to build up the brand that
we have with the Taurus.”

The Five Hundred, built on
a Volvo frame and considered
a capable but dull car by
industry analysts, never took
hold in the marketplace. It
sold moderately well in 2005,
its first full year on the market,

MARK ELIAS/BLOOMBERG NEWS FILE

TWISTING DOWN: Jerry Francisco rebuilds a hydraulic cylinder at Kelly Tractor in West
Palm Beach, Fla., last year. For 2006, productivity rose 2.1 percent, after a 2.3 percent
rise in 2005, marking the fourth straight year efficiency gains have slowed.

Productivity

rebounds in

4Q but still slows for year

*ECONOMY

Mass. “Employment growth
was strong and productivity
was strong, and on top of that
we had a fairly modest
increase in labor costs.”

PRICE OF LABOR

Unit labor costs, which are
adjusted for efficiency gains,
were projected to rise at a 2.1
percent pace last quarter after
a 2.3 percent increase initially
reported.

Smaller gains in productiv-
ity last year accompanied
weaker growth in the econ-
omy during the second and
third quarters. At the same
time, unemployment close to
a, five-year low pushed up
wage growth.

Slower productivity
growth and accelerating labor
costs are among reasons Fed
policy makers will maintain
their view that inflation is a
risk to the economy.

Plosser, who doesn’t vote
on policy this year, said the
Fed may need to raise its rates

TECHNOLOGY

as recent stronger economic
growth increases the risk that
inflation won’t moderate.

“With growth prospects of
the economy improving, there
is some risk that we may not
see a return to price stability
unless monetary conditions
are further tightened,” Plos-
ser said in a speech Wednes-
day to the Greater Philadel-
phia Chamber of Commerce.

The productivity and cost
figures are the first for the
quarter and will be revised
with the Labor Department’s
March 6 release.

Hours worked rose at a 1.2
percent pace last quarter after
a 2 percent increase in the
previous three months. Out-
put increased at a 4.2 percent
rate after 1.9 percent.

Productivity rose last quar-
ter because the gain in hours
worked was smaller than the
increase in output.

COMPENSATION

Compensation for each
hour worked rose at an annual
rate of 4.8 percent in the

fourth quarter, compared
with a 3.1 percent rate in the
prior three months.

Among manufacturers,
productivity rose at a 2.2 per-
cent pace, after surging at a
6.3 percent rate the prior
quarter.

Productivity at non-finan-
cial corporations, a measure
watched by the Fed, increased
at a 5.7 percent rate in the
third quarter after falling 4.3
percent in the previous three
months. :

Recent government data
signal pay gains are cooling.
Wages rose 0.2 percent in Jan-
uary after a 0.4 percent gain
the previous month, the Labor
Department’s employment
report on Feb. 2 showed.

Productivity growth aver-
aged 2.1 percent a quarter dur-
ing the 10-year expansion that
ended in March 2001. Before
today’s figures, the average
increased to an annual rate of
2.9 percent since the first
three months of 2002, the first
full quarter that followed the
end of the last recession.

TiVo, Amazon link videos to TV

* TECHNOLOGY

cials refused to give a target
date for the service’s launch.

Thousands of movies from
several major studios and TV
shows from CBS and Fox will
be available, said Carr. Both
companies expect agreements
with more studios and net-
works in the future.

“We think this is a break-
through,” Carr said.

Unbox on TiVo joins a rash
of new digital download ser-
vices from retailers and enter-
tainment companies, and
builds on the Unbox service
that Amazon.com launched
last year.

Wal-Mart entered the mar-
ket Tuesday, when it unveiled
an online movie download
store. Other competitors
include Movielink, owned by
five studios, and CinemaNow.

Most online download ser-

essentially trapped on the
customer’s computer. TiVo
and Amazon.com’s major
advantage is their ability to
deliver movies and TV shows
directly to the TiVo. box,
observers said.

“Frankly, nobody else has
the solution that allows you
get something over an Inter-

. het connection and watch it

with the click of the button,”
said James McQuivey, princi-
pal analyst at Forrester
Research.

Apple TV, the new set-top,
video-streaming box coming
this month from Apple,
should be a top rival. Like
Unbox on TiVo, Apple T'V is
designed to move digital con-
tent from a user’s computer to
their TV set.

But Unbox on TiVo may
have an advantage in the cus-
tomers who already have
broadband-ready TiVo hard-

new Apple TV box will cost
around $300, the only addi-
tional cost for a TiVo user
will be the price of a movie or
TV show over the existing
Unbox download service.

TV episodes will sell for
$1.99, with most movies
priced between $9.99 and
$14.99, the companies said.
Movie rentals will start at
$1.99. No extra hardware pur-
chases are required, and there
will be no additional subscrip-
tion fees, the companies said.

TiVo and Amazon.com are
betting that their ability to
integrate downloads with the
existing choices on a TiVo
video recorder will give them
a distinct advantage in grab-
bing a share of the market. |

“J suspect we will see a
parade of similar kinds of
devices over the next several
years,” said Larry Gerbrandt,
general manager of Nielsen







but sales nose-dived last year
from almost 108,000 to about
84,000. '

It will get a new, more pow-
erful engine, standard elec-
tronic stability control and
some cosmetic updates for the
2008 model year, when the

BALANCING ACT

‘ \ CHARLES REX ARBOGAST/AP
NEW COUSIN: Francisco N. Codina, group vice president
for Ford North American marketing and sales, unveils
the Ford Taurus X crossover vehicle on Wednesday.

name change will take place.
The new version will be in
showrooms this summer, com-
pany officials have said.

The Taurus name is one of
the top three most recognized
Ford nameplates, behind only
the F-Series pickup trucks and

MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

the Mustang, said Cisco Cod-

ina, Ford’s vice president of

North American marketing.
The Taurus was among the

company’s most recognizable :

brands in the 1980s and 1990s,
but by the end of its lifetime it

was almost exclusively sold to -

rental companies and other
fleet buyers.

Last year, Ford lost $12.7
billion, and it was forced to
mortgage its factories to set up

. acredit line of more than $20

billion as it undergoes a radi-
cal restructuring plan.

The Taurus, redesigned in
1996, became a symbol of the
company’s current ills. It was
left almost unchanged for 10

years with little advertising’

support as the company
focused on high-profit trucks
and sport utility vehicles.

- Ford, left with few desir-
able cars, was caught flat-
footed this year when con-
sumer tastes shifted away
from trucks.

Most want fun over money

*BALANCING ACT

shows.

“Let’s face it, work is never
going to be the same as having
fun on a Saturday night,” says
Richard Castellini, vice presi-
dent of consumer marketing
for CareerBuilder.com. “But if
at the end of the day you feel
challenged and enjoy your
work environment, that’s
what people are looking for.”

‘RUN WITH IT’

One 20-something gave me
an insightful look at Ameri-
ca’s emphasis on work envi-
ronment, Nick Mora, 24,
joined Kimley-Horn’s Port St.
Lucie, Fla., office in 2005. He
says he likes the people he
works with and the way his
project managers give him
opportunities “to run with it.”

Indeed, the people-ori-
ented culture and benefits
have landed Kimley-Horn &
Associates on Fortune maga-
zine’s list of Best Places to
Work for the past three years.
Although Mora typically
works 46 to 48 hours a week,
he says: “If you like your job
and are having fun, you don’t
mind the hours.”

Even though many jobs at
Disney pay just above mini-
mum wage, applications pour
in. “When we ask people...
what brought them here, hav-
ing a fun job is at the top of
their list,” says Tracy Mon-
toya, vice president of recruit-

AIRCRAFT INDUSTRY

‘ment for Disney Parks and

Resorts.

In industries that compete
for workers, the fun factor has
become more critical. Castel-
lini says CareerBuilder holds
contests and happy hours. It
even relocated its offices from
suburban Chicago. “We're in
a competitive, sales-driven
organization, and young peo-
ple find it more fun to be
downtown,”’ Castellini
explains.

In accounting, a profession
battling a talent shortage, cre-
ating a fun work environment
factors into recruiting and
retaining young! staffers,
explains Denise Diaz, a part-
ner with Ocariz, Gitlin &
Zomerfeld in Coral Gables,
Fla.

ACTIVITIES MATTER

Diaz says recruits assume
salary is competitive and
want to know what “fun activ-
ities” her firm offers. “They
are very interested to see if
we have picnics, parties,
happy hours.” Diaz says her
firm now offers massages dur-
ing tax season and a party
afterward, happy hours
throughout the year and spon-
taneous raffles for event tick-
ets and gift certificates.

Some law firms have gone
even further to create a fes-
tive environment. At Perkins
Coie and Bingham
McCutchen in Seattle, each
office has it own “happiness

committee” that surprises
attorneys and staff with small
gifts and spontaneous cele-
brations. Initially,
sounded silly to some the law-
yers at Perkins Coie. Not any-
more, says Darrin Emerick,
Perkins Coie’s chief person-
nel officer. °
Perkin Coie has landed on
Fortune’s list of Best Places to
Work for the past five years
and also offers perks such as

paid sabbaticals and flexible

work schedules.

COMPETITIVE EDGE

“Our lawyers realize they
can go down the street and
make more money, but they
won’t have the same benefits
or firm culture,” Emerick
says.

At Holland & Knight, a
large Florida law firm, recruit-
ing partner Adolfo Jimenez
thinks happiness committees
are a waste. Instead, he says
his firm should concentrate
on creating a better wurk
environment through mentor-
ing and training programs.

“Regardless of what gener-
ation, people want a satisfying
professional experience,”
Jimenez says.

Maintaining a people-ori-
ented culture or happy work-
place gets more challenging
when a company retrenches.
Experts says that might be the
time to give employees more
say in training programs or
new strategies.

Airbus shows off troubled A380

* AIRBUS

is that we couldn’t build it on
time.”

Announcing the latest pro-
duction setback, Airbus par-
ent European Aeronautic
Defence and Space Co. said
last year that the accumulated
two-year delay would wipe
$6.2 billion off profit by 2010.
Last month the Franco-
German defense. group
warned that the final bill
would be higher, without giv-
ing a figure.

FedEx canceled its 10
orders for the superjumbo
freighter and ordered Boeings
instead, but Singapore Air-
lines ordered more A380s —
and Airbus said Wednesday it
expects to sell at least 20
more in 2007, to two or more
customers,

“We have a lot of interest
in the aircraft, despite all the
problems we had last year,”
Leahy said.

CANCELLATIONS?

Airbus is still negotiating
compensation with airlines

whose deliveries are delayed, |

and some — including FedEx
rival UPS — have said cancel-
lations have not been ruled
out. Nevertheless, Leahy
sounded more confident than
ever that none of the remain-
ing 15 customers will defect.
“All those customers, all of
whom have cancellation
rights on this program, have
decided not to cancel,” he
said. Airbus is on track to
deliver the first A380 to
launch customer Singapore in
October, company officials

Leahy was _ tightlipped
about the custom - features
planned by airlines but sug-
gested that some of the wilder
predictions — which. have
included onboard casinos,
beauty salons and even hot

tubs — were wide of the
mark.
‘LITTLE BIT OF HYPE’

There is “a little bit of
hype,” he said. “The reality
will be lounges, the reality
will be duty free shops where
you can generate some extra
revenue.”’ One. carrier
installed a shower in first
class, Leahy added, declining
to identify the airline.

The superjumbo used for
Wednesday’s flight boasted a
bar on each of the decks —
linked by two large staircases,
making it easy to roam
around.

Noise was noticeably sub-
dued, even during takeoff at
full thrust, when the engine
roar outside could have
passed for a neighbor mowing
the grass half a block away.

The Rolls Royce Trent 900
engines are the quietest now
available and, thanks to a
wingspan 24 percent longer
than the 747s, they are further

4 6:35 p.m. Late
EMC Cp EMC = 13.60 1455) +95 48447
Nasd100Tr 4446 44.56 9 +.10 42565
AkamaiT AKAM 56.95 56.00 = -.95 =. 27078
Windstrm = WIN 1463 1463 * 19500
TimeWwam TWX 21.76 2176 * 18105
CSXs CSX 37.10 37.05.05 16502
GenElec —- GE 36.10 = 3613 +03 13728
WinsCos = WMB 27.35 927.35 * 11165
Appleinc AAPL = 86.15 86.58 = #4310928
BrMySq BMY 2886 2886 * 10024
OwensC in OC 30.02 30.15 +13 10000
Disney DIS 3548 36.12 +.64 = 962
Microsoft MSFT 29.37 29.39 +02 8650

For up-to-date stock quotes, go to www.MiamiHerald.com and click on Business

vices, however, leave content ware in their homes. While a Analytics. said Wednesday. eee ee ee eC CES

than usual from the cabin —
where advances in, sound-
proofing and air conditioning
technologies also contribute
to the sense of calm. Outside,
Airbus claims that the A380’s

that —

“noise footprint” is half the

size of that of rival Boeing.

Just as a larger boat gives a
smoother ride across choppy
seas, turbulence is felt less
violently aboard the A380.

“Where on a smaller air-
plane you would be shaken, in
this airplane everything is
really quite smooth,” said Fer-
nando Alonso, vice president
of the Airbus flight test divi-
sion.

The superjumbo may turn
heads, but whether it can turn
a profit remains to be seen.
Analysts estimate the pro-
gram’s total cost has reached
as much as $19.5 billion. .

The A380 may be an “engi-
neer-driven” program that
“will not make a penny for the
next 10 years,” Liberge said —
but that does not mean it will
not be a commercial success
for decades after that.

“Like the 747, it should be
operating for the next 40
years,” Liberge said. “The
demand is definitely there —
this isn’t another Concorde.”

4 6:35 pum,

Stock Tk. one Close volume
Charttm CHTR 336 3.36 * 8397
SPDR SPY 14521 9 145.12 -.09 8101
PhelpsDs = PD 122.00 122.00 * 8013
Motorola = MOT 19.91 19.94 +.03 8003
Sybase SY 25.80 25.800 * 8000
AmkorT if = AMKR = 11.96 W724 +22 7817
Qwesttm = Q 8.25 831 +06 7710
Medtmic = MOT 53.24 53.24 *

Chemtura CEM 77 W777 7136
TXUCorp = TXU 56.33 5633 * 6740
Level3 Wit 657 6.63 +.06 6703
ApolloG if APOL 46.27 4427 = ° 6414

|
|
|
sais



THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS | | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 5B
ivi MUS | SEI f . February 8th, 2007
| The Tribune

MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES

DUNDAS TOWN CROWN ALLOTMENT,
DUNDAS TOWN ABACO









All that parcel of land having an area of 14,400 sq. ft. being a portion of the Dundas Town Crown allotment this land is rectangular in shape with
dimensions of 80 ft by 180. Located on the above mentioned lot is a concrete block structure with dimensions of 27 x40. This house is an approxifnate
30 year old single family, residence comprising of 3-bedrooms, 1-bathroom, living/dining area and kitchen. This house is in fairly good condition for its
age with a projected future life of about 25 to 30 more years. The land rises above road level, to a height in excess of approximately 15ft above sea
level, with no likelihood of flooding in an hurricane. The grounds are sparsely landscaped.

_ Appraisal: $90,000.00



This house is located in Dundas Town Abaco which is adjacent to Marsh Harbour and is painted white trimmed teal green.

KENNEDY SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)

Lot no. 21 all utilities available 10 year old single story house, 3 bedroom 2 bathroom, living room, dining area, family room, kitchen, study, laundry
and an entry porch.

Appraisal: $188,406.00

Heading west along Soldier Road take main entrance to Kennedy Subdivision on the left, then take the 1st corner on the left then 1st right, house
is second on your right with garage.





_ CROWN ALLOTMENT NO. 77 MURPHY TOWN, ABACO

) All that lot of land having an area of 6,790 sq. ft. being Crown allotment No. 77, of Murphy Town, Abaco Bahamas. Located on the subject property is a single storey single family concerete
building. This house is less than 5 year old and is in good condition with approximately 1,750 sq. ft of living space and contains 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, living room, dining, kitchen, laundry
and utility spaces. There is no significant improvements or deterioration evident. The property is very well drained and not susceptible to flooding. Landscaping efforts are still in remedial stages.
All major public and private utilities are situate within 100 ft of the subject site. Property bounderies are clearly delineated.

Appraisal: $167,580.00



The subject property is situate off the front street, Murphy Town, Abaco and is painted light yellow trimmed dark yellow.

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY - MUST SELL
Lot NO.83, Lower Bogue ELEUTHERA

Alll that piece parcel or lot of land being No. 83 on a plan on record in the department of Lands and Survey as plan no. 763 and comprising 21,674 sq. ft.
this site encompasses a 2 year old single storey home consisting of 2-bedrooms; 1 bathroom, living/dining room in one, and kitchen with a total living area
| of 1,452 sq. ft. There is also a unit to this structure to be used as a bakery which could bring in an average of approximately $600 to $800 per month. There
is also 2 covered porch areas to the front of this building, with an area of 90.4 sq. ft. (one at the front entrance and one at the entrance to the bakery) this
home is in very good condition and appears to have been built in accordance with the plans and specifications as approved, and at a standard that was
ss} acceptable to the Ministry of Public Works. The land is flat and properly landscaped.

Appraisal: $177,412.00

This property is situated on the Western side of the main Eleuthera Highway and approximately 1,200 ft Northerly from four-for-nothing Road in the Settlement of Lower Bogue.







-» = LOT NO. 24, FRELIA SUBDIVISION

: All that lot-of Jand having an area of 6,724 sq. ft. being lot No. 24 of the subdivision known and designated. as Frelia Subdivision, the said subdivision
situated in the Southwestern District of New Providence Bahamas. This property is comprised of a 4-year old single storey residence consisting of approximately
1,223 sq. ft of enclosed living space, with 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, living/dining rooms, kitchen and utility room. The land is flat and slightly below the
level of the roadway, but was brought up to road level by land fill to disallow the possibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods of the year. The
grounds are fairly kept, with minimal landscaping in place. The yard is open at the front and enclosed on its sides and back with 7ft chain linked fencing.
Remedial work required to the house includes repair of cracks in the partitions belts and columns.

Appraisal: $161,000.00

" Travel south on Sir Milo Butler Highway until you get to Fire Trail Road. Turn left onto Fire Trail Road, go all the way to the last bend right, take first left then
first right the subject house is the 5th house right painted white trimmed yellow.





LOT 194 BOYD SUBDIVISION (NASSAU)

All that lot of land having an area of 6,400 sq. ft. being lot no 194 of the subdivision known as Boyd Subdivision, situated in the central district of New
Providence this property is comprised of a 35 year old single family, single story residence encompassing approximately 1,278 sq. ft. of enclosed living
area and inclusive of separate living and dining rooms, and an average size kitchen, three bedrooms, two bathrooms and an entry porch, of approximately
88 sq. ft. ventilation is by 2 wall unit air conditioners. The property is at grade and level with good drainage, landscaping is minimal, consisting of lawns
) and shrubs in the front, the subject is enclosed with stone walls mounted with wrought iron and chain link fencing and a wrought iron gate in front there is
a 208 sq. ft. cement driveway leading to a single covered carport of 250 sq. ft. the subject site also has a concrete block storage shed measuring of
approximately 143 sq. ft.

Appraisal: $133,570.00

Traveling west on Boyd Road, turn left onto Foster Street, continue on Foster Street to the 4th corner right, (Roland Ave.) the subject property is the 5th
property on the left side painted orange with red/white trim.





(Lot No. 62, Lower Bogue) ELEUTHERA

All that piece parcel or lot of land and improvements, in the settlement of Lower Bogue, North Eleuthera, being No. 62, comprising of about 34,210
sq. ft., this site encompasses a 12 year old single storney home comprising of 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, front room, dining, breakfast room, kitchen
and laundry raom, with a total living area of approximately 2,342.06. Property also includes a double car garage, and front entrance with a total sq. ft.
of approximately 655.75. This home is approximately 85% completed. The property is well landscaped with crab grass, fiascos and some fruit trees.

Appraisal: $235,638.00

This property is situated on the western side of Eleuthera Highway in the settlement of Lower Bogue.

LOT NO. 370 GRENADA CLOSE GOLDEN GATES #2 (Nassau)

j All that lot of land having an area of 5,500 sq. ft., being lot 370 Grenada Close of the subdivision known and designated as Golden Gates No. 2,
situated in the Southwestern district of New Providence Bahamas. This property is comprised of 25 years old single family residence consisting of
approximately. 1,234 sq. ft., of enclosed living space with 3 bedrooms, two bathrooms, living/dining room, and kitchen. The Land is on a grade and :
level and appear to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods. The grounds are fairly kept, with
improvements including driveway, walkway and low shrubs. Yard is enclosed with chain linked fencing to the sides and rear.

Appraisal: $149,405.60

Traveling south along Blue Hill Road, turn et at the Farmers Market just after passing the Golden Gates Seppe Center, take 1st corner left,
Windward Isles Way, then take 3rd: corner right, St Thomas Road, then first left, grenada Crest, drive around the bend then ‘st left again the subject
property is the 2nd property left house #4 painted peach trimmed black. :

__ VACANT PROPERTIES















RAINBOW SUBDIVISION LOT NO. 3 BLOCK 27 (ELEUTHERA)

All that vacant lot of land having an area of approximately 14,052.59 sq. ft. being lot no. 3, block 27, of Rainbow Subdivision with residential zoning. This property is bounded
about 103.44 ft north by Queens Highway, and 137.02 ft. east and about 99.94 ft south of Rainbow Hill Circul 139.91 ft west, all utilities and services available.

Appraisal: $37,440.00





DUNDAS TOWN

Lot # 21, crown allotment, this is vacant land approximately 10,810 sq. ft. situated off s.c. bootle drive. APPRAISAL: $15,890.00



NORTH ELEUTHERA HEIGHTS (ELEUTHERA), Lot #20 approximately 11,200 sq. ft., and bounded on North by Early Settler Drive and South by Deal Investment Ltd., this is a
single family zoning and 50 ft., above sea level. This site encompasses a foundation with plumbing and roughing inplace and well compacked quarry fill. The concrete floor has
not been poured as yet. The foundation is 2,511 sq. ft. Lot #20 situated 1.5 miles east wardly of the Bluff Settlement. The said lot is vacant and a hill over looking the Atlantic
Ocean. Appraisal: $41,275.00

a0) Peele ts Cy Y=) WNT other information contact



Philip White @ 502-3077 email philip.white@scotiabank.com or Harry Collie @ 502-3034 ¢ email harry.collie@scotiabank.com Peace cio



)\



PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007

BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE



“SENIOR RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

1
\ Trust & Corporate Services
























A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in The
Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guernsey, Switzerland and the United
Kingdom, Butterfield Bank offers a wide range of services to local and
international clients.

'

yAb exciting opportunity Currently exists for a results oriented self starter with a
secord of professional achievements to joip a dynamic Trust & Corporate Services
team. The successful candidate will report directly to the Head of Trast &
poipmaie Services.

‘
Core Responsibilities

= Oversee a group of complex client relationships.

| ‘s Provide technical advice to staff on trust and company structures,

fs Acton chents’ behalf in matters dealing with lawyers, beneficiaries, etc.
® Extensive experience with all aspects of trust administration.

ai

‘Desired Qualifications

'
_ =
® Bachelor's Degree in Business or related discipline from a well recognized
4 university,

'

â„¢ ~ Five - Fight years progressive Fiduciary experience in the Financial Services
‘. Industry.

“ STEP training or other sultable qualifications will be advantageous,
â„¢ Proficient in Microsoft Office suite of products,

* Strong interpersonal, communication, problem solving, project management
and customer service skills,

‘Closing Date: February 16, 2007



Contact

Human Resourees

Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O, Box N-3242

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: (242) 393 3772

Femail: recruitment? butterficldbank. bs

www. buttertieldbank.bs 4 BBO)

: a : . ae 2 brace ce Enya



Pricing Information As Of:
Wednesday, 7 February 2007

52wk-Hi
}7.85
12.05
8.03
0.85
1.85

52wk-Low
0.54
10.40
6.90
0.70
1.26
1.12
9.00
1.64
9.05
4.22
2.40
5.54
10.70
10.90
10.00
0.50
7.10

Securit
Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas

- Colina Holdings

Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
Premier Real Estate

ymbol
Sanamac Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
ND Holdin

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

NA V
1.326132"
3 0569***
2.596093°"
1.217450****
11.3545*****

Sete eso Fund Name
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund
oe Prime Income pond

52wk-Hi
M3264 *
3.0569
2H961
VW2175
414.3545 /
a ee 2 _ PINDEX: CLOSE TTAB?

19 Dec 0 ,000.00
Highest closing price in last 52 weeks.

4 g
BISX% ALL SHARE INDEX
S2wk-Hi

SÂ¥usk-Low

MARKET TERMS.

Bid § -
Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks Ask $
Bleviour Close - Previous day's weighted price fo
- Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change in closing price from day to day

jaily volume:
Loday's Clase
Ghange
Wily Vol
DIV $
Beste Closing price

Number of total shares traded today
Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
divided by the last 12 mon'h earnings

0.55

YIEL D - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Paradise Island credit union

announces its name change

m@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

THE Paradise Island Resort
and Casino Cooperative Cred-
it Union (PIRCCCU) yester-
day announced it has changed
its name to the Bahamas
Islands Resorts and Casinos

' Cooperative Credit Union

(BIRCCCU), in an effort to
attract all resort and casino

- workers in the Bahamas.

Credit

Paulette Dean, the credit
union’s chairperson, said that
considering the expansion of
resort properties all over the





Bahamas, it wanted to elimi-

nate the perception that the

credit union only accommo-
dated workers on Paradise
Island.

“We wanted all the resort
properties to be able to bene-
fit,” she said.

“AS we expand, we see a
dire need to extend our finan-
cial services to all resort
employees through the entire
Bahamas. Our name change
will play a critical role in
allowing us to achieve our
objective to assist all resort
employees throughout the
country, including resort and
hotel employees on the islands
of Exuma and Grand
Bahama,” added Linda

PROFESSIONAL
COMPUTER TRAINING

BIZJET
BUSINESS CENTER

Rosetta Street @ Mt. Royal Avenue

PHONE: (242) 356-5760 retary.

RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

Trust & Corporate Services

A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in The
Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guemsey, Switzerland and the United
Kingdom, Butterfield Bank offers a wide range of services to local and
international clients,

An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter with a
record of professional achievements to join a dynamic Trust & Corporate Services
team. The successful candidate will report directly to the Senior Relationship
Manager.

Core Responsibilities

Manage a large portfolio of complex accounts including trust, estates and
agencies.
Provide financial information to clients as requested.
a
Act ou clients’ behalf in matters dealing with lawyers, beneficiaries, ete.

Extensive experience with all aspects of trust administration.

Desired Qualifications

* Bachelor's Degree in Business or related discipline from a well recognized
university.

A minimum of five years progressive Fiduciary experience in the Financial
Services Industry.

STEP training or other suitable qualifications will be advantageous.
Proficient in Microsoft Office suite of products.

Strong interpersonal, communication, problem solving, pile management
and customer service skills.

Closing Date: February 16, 2007

Contact

Human Resources

Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O, Box N-3242

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: (242) 393 3772

E-mail: recruitment butterfieldbank.bs

ww. butterfieldbank. bs Ai

‘Butterfield Bank 4

oo.

acre
0.CO%
3.64%
3.24%
2.50%
3.24%
3.85%
2.35%
2.00%
5.10%
0.88%
0.00%
4.21%
4.65%
3.45%
3.07%
0.00%
1.88%]
6.19%
7.95%

Yield

Daily Vol. E
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.21
0.00
0.00
-0.02
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.40
0.00
0.10
0.00
0.00

-0.282
1.689
0.796
0.265
0.199
0.170
0.715
0.078
0.998
0.134
0.295
0.552
0.779
0.921
1.476

-0.434
0.532
0.588
1.269

1,900
878
2,000

EPS $
1.766
0.000
0.021

Last Price
14.00
10.00

Weekly Vol.
NM
26.2

SSIES
9.4

0.640
0.000

‘00%
9.04%
%

BISX Listed Mutual Funds:
YTD%

Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %

NAV KEY.

Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price ~
Weekly Vol.

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-562-7010 7 FIDELITY 242-356-7

- Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

* - 26 January 2007

Last traded over the-counter price

**~ 31 January 2007
*** 31 January 2007
**** - 31 December 2006

- = 34 saaaeiaaae 2007

Symonette, the Board’s sec-’

She said that over 20 years,
BIRCCCU had grown its
membership to close to 3,000
members, with assets totalling
over $20 million, and mem-
bership reflective of almost all
the resort properties in Nas-
sau.

Ms Symonette said it was
the only credit union to estab-
lish an Internet Teller, allow-
ing members the ease and
convenience of viewing their
accounts, and applying for
loans, in the privacy of their
homes or at work.

As it celebrated its 20-year
history and name change,
BIRCCCU will celebrate the
expansion with several activi-
ties this month.

They include a customer
appreciation day on Wednes-
day, February 14, at the cred-
it union’s Village Road office,
a special unveiling ceremony
during the week of February

26, 2007, along with recogni-
tion of three of their initial ’

members, a membership drive
at major resorts in the



Bahamas and a media blitz.

Oliver Hutchinson, BIRC-
CCU’s general manager, said
the credit union will be
acknowledging the efforts of
the Queen’s College Credit
Union - a school effort they
manage and mentor for stu-
dents to save.

With 88 members and their
own board of directors, the
students have assets of
$30,000.

Members

“We encourage all members
to join us in this month of cel-
ebration. More importantly,
we encourage members to
start the year 2007 right by,
taking a serious look at their
savings and investment plans.
Here at BIRCCCU, we firmly
believe: “Your dream to finan-
cial freedom is attainable, and
the decisions that you make
today ‘as it pertains to your
saving and investing will deter-
mine the life you live tomor-
row’, said Ms Symonette.

ELOY Lol WYN

ma C2) Beale Fashion Rey]
Business. Well known and

respected worldwide eae

CAUCE Bello alu) location.

iE) He od TENTH oN)

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LIONEZ FILS DANIEL OF
#5 GLENBURN DRIVE BLOCK 16, P.O. BOX F-42515,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization.as a citizen of. The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from ‘he
8TH day of FEBRUARY, 2007 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

ACCOUNTING & SMALL BUSINESS
CONSULTING SERVICES:
eAccounting records in bad shape?
*Need financial statements for the bank?
*Need a business plan and financial proposal prepared?
*Need business licence prepared certified?

CALL US WE CAN HELP
eBusiness Start-Up Assistance: Consultations
Compliance Commission Examinations
*Construction & Contract Accounting
¢Small Business Customized Accounting Packages
¢Computerized-quickbooks-Setup-Training
eSmall Business ee Handbook

Business ‘Senanars - Resuaton $35
(Materials and Refreshments)
eSmall Business Financing - Feb. 24@ 10 AM
eBusiness Financing Consultations (By Appointment)

TEL: 325-7313 OR 322-6000 Fax: 323-3700

FA. HEPBURN & CO.
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS

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Single Family, Quptax, Triplex & Fourpiex

LOTS FOR SALE and going FAST!

PRICE STARTING @ $90,000
Tel: 328-6447/9 or 325-6456





NSU Salat
WRECK-A-MENDS

m@ By KIMBERLY BLANTON
Globe Staff
c. 2006 The Boston Globe

MORTGAGE lenders submit-
ted a record 19,487 foreclosure
filings in Massachusetts last year,
leaving more homeowners in dan-
ger of losing their homes than at
any time since the real estate
recession of the 1990s.

Housing advocates have said
the foreclosure crisis is reaching
alarming levels in some areas.
The biggest increase in last year’s
filings occurred in Barnstable
County, where Cape Cod’s vaca-
tion-home market is in a severe
slump. Filings in Barnstable
County rose 91 percent, to 934 in
2006, according to Foreclosures-
Mass.com, which released its
report Tuesday of filings in the
state’s Land Court.

But the greatest number of fil-
ings was in Worcester County -
2,987, up 76 percent - followed
by Middlesex County. Statewide,
filings rose nearly 70 percent,
from 11,493 in 2005, with the pace
quickening at year end.

Jeremy Shapiro, president of
















3)sisnana

FIDELITY BANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

A MEMBER OF THE FIDELITY GROUP OF COMPANIES




invites qualified applicants for the following position:

MANAGER -
Private Banking & Wealth Management Services

The applicant must have the following minimum qualifications:

PROFILE:
. e Bachelors Degree in Finance
¢ STEP Qualification
+ 10 years experience in advising clients on fiduciary services and developing
appropriate legal structures

PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007

ForeclosuresMass.com, said the
data are a clear indication of

widespread financial distress. “At .

the end of the day, we’re still talk-
ing about over 19,000 people in
2006 whose homes are going into
foreclosure,” he said.

Statement

Kevin Cuff, executive director
of the Massachusetts Mortgage
Bankers Association, said Tues-
day in a statement that home-
ownership has increased, due to
the greater availability of mort-
gages. “2003 through 2005 were
historic years for 1/8mortgage
3/8 production in Massachusetts,”
his statement said, “and it would
correlate to the increased fore-
closure results for 2006.”

Foreclosure filings statewide,
when measured as a share of all
mortgages outstanding, remain
well below their peak. In early
1992, filings were almost 2 per-
cent of all loans, according to the
Mortgage Bankers Association,
a lender industry group. In the
third quarter of 2006, the most
recent figures available, filings

MODEL CALL

THE TRIBUNE

were less than 1 percent of loans. .

Massachusetts secretary of
housing and economic develop-
ment, Daniel O’Connell, said
Tuesday the new administration is
looking at ways to help ease the
growing foreclosure problem by
educating homebuyers about
their loan terms prior to signing
mortgage agreements. The
administration is weighing addi-
tional regulation of the mortgage
industry “to call upon the entity
writing the mortgage to have
requirements for better disclo-
sure,” he said.

When borrowers are at least
30 days past due on a mortgage
payment, lenders file a notice of
intent to foreclose in Land Court.
Often, borrowers can negotiate
with the lender to catch up on
payments or sell the house to pay
the loan off. About two-thirds of
homeowners who receive the
notices are never actually fore-
closed on, but that varies depend-
ing on the condition of the hous-
ing market.

Market

“When the market was hot,
hot, hot, if you were facing fore-
closure, you could sell at a dis-
count” and still pay off the mort-
gage, Shapiro said. “Now, putting
your property on the market, it
can’t sell fast enough or for the

I
Home foreclosures strike record levels

MODEL CALL

International Celebrity &
“Jet” Magazine Photographer

Phil Collins

Will be hosting a photo shoot for all female
models or females interested in having the
opportunity to appear in Jet and other
international magazine centerfolds.

amount of money you need to
settle that foreclosure.” :
Bruce Marks, a former hous- ‘
ing activist and now chief execu- '
tive of Neighborhood Assistance
Corp. of America, a nonprofit ,
that makes home-purchase loans +
to moderate-income people at a
fixed, 5.5 percent rate, said he is
swamped with borrowers on the
brink of delinquency.
Many have subprime loans, a «.
recently popular financing tool
for people that provides credit to ‘
customers with low credit ratings
by charging a higher interest to ,
compensate for the risk. They get .
into trouble, he said, when their -
interest rates rise, after the low ;
introductory rate expires, adding |
hundreds to the monthly pay-
_ments.
“After two years, an afford-














+ Superior organization, communication, interpersonal and computer skills

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

* Client Relationship Management

+ Investment of client funds

* Monthly management reports

* Quarterly reports to clients

- Business development and marketing activities
- Account opening formalities

+ Invoicing & booking fees

+ Estate Planning
Registration deadline March 25th 2007. Onetime
registration fee $49.95

Call 325-6770

« Administration of Trusts
« Production of trust deeds, letter of wishes & testamentary trusts
- Training, management and coaching of staff

Send resume no later than February 7th, 2007 to:






The Human Resource Director
Fidelity » 51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853 + Nassau, Bahamas
f: 326.3000
e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com

Global

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HIGHLIGHTS:

Tuesday, March 13
-6-8:00 PM
British Colonial Hilton

322-3301

uf
yr

Meet Gretchen Herbst
1-727-384-5500 ext 257
gherbst@farragut.org






year period.





Did you know that in 1970, a (5)
same bag of grits increased 0.90 percent. Howe
costs the general public an average of $2.90, an

contributors, Have a BLESSED and a Prosperous new year!

Sponsored by

; ®
COSMETICS & SPA



The Department of Statistics

Average Prices for Selected Items
New Providence: Selected First Years 1998-2006

1998



1.93

Between 1998 to 2001, the cost of chicken parts decreased 24.71% and a further
decrease of 2.08% for the period of 2001- 2006.



The Consumer Price Index (CPI) Section wishes to sincerely thank all its valuable

2001

|
ca a
Parts 1.92

five pound bag of grits cost 0.77 cents? In 1980, that
ver, in 2006, that very same bag now
increase of 276.62 percent over a 46

able, introductory rate becomes

unaffordable, and they’re pan-

icked,” he said.

Marks said state and federal ; .

officials have not given adequate ;

attention to foreclosures.

“The regulators have been

he said.






















Me a sae tT nT lM I EE EEO I a F

tesiarsw ernest ewe

" absent in taking on that issue,” ~

~

St RE a AAP A le ~~ a

eT LE EET PB

a a

a ee ee



PAGE 6, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Commissioner: we’re ready to
keep order during elections

THE Royal Bahamas Police
Force is fully prepared to keep
the peace during the the upcom-
ing general elections, Commis-
sioner Paul Farquharson said.

all of its human and other
resources, including regular and
reserve forces, to guarantee
“safety and peacefulness”
before, during and after the

Mr Farquharson said his — elections.

force will maximise the use of



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happiness is in

“It is expected that officers

[7:00 The Bahamas Tonight

will utilise their training in
public order and crowd con-
trol so as to prevent or min-
imise any disruptions at politi-
cal rallies and polling stations,”
he said.

“We must and will ensure
that voters are not subjected to
fear or any form of intimida-
tion. No form of anarchy will
be tolerated and such behavior
is non-negotiable,” he said.

Addressing the police
reserve constables conclave on
Saturday at Police Headquar-

ters, Mr Farquharson Said the

2007 election campaign
promises to be vibrant, active
and challenging.

He said while the Bahamas
has been fortunate to have a
population that has histori-

TV 13 SCHEDULE

THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 9TH

6:30am Community Page 1540AM










11:00 Immediate Response
12:00 | ZNS News Update
12:05 Immediate Response Cont'd



1:00 Legends

1:30 Ethnic Health America

2:00 Thousand Dollar Bee

2:30 Aqua Kids

3:00. Bishop Leroy Emmanuel

3:30 Contract Signing of A New
Government Sch., Freeport

4:00 _Little Robots

4:30 Carmen San Diego

5:00 ZNS News Update

5:05 The 411

5:30 - You & Your Money

6:00 One Cubed

6:30 News Night 13















8:00 Native Show

8:30 Be Your Own Boss

8:35 ASpecial Report on the
Commissioning of the D-A-13
Slow Speed Engine

9:00 The Envy Life

9:30 Crouches










10:00 Caribbean Newsline
10:30 News Night 13

11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response




1:30am Community Page 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
right to make last minute
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@ POLICE Commissioner
Paul Farquharson says that
the force is ready for the
challenges of the
upcoming elections

cally taken part in general
elections without violence, his
officers will approach this
election season with strategic
planning and will “be pre-
pared for all incidents that
relate to public nuisance and
disturbance.” —

Reserves

The commissioner said the
reserve force is expected to play
an integral role in the elections
as part of the overall strategic
plan.

He said reserves will be called
upon to man police stations in
the absence of the regulars, who
will be called to duty elsewhere
within the Bahamas.

Mr Farquharson said the
force Force has been preparing
for the elections since last year,
with senior commanders and
middle managers attended
numerous seminars and meet-
ings covering topics such as the
role and authority of the Par-
liamentary Registration Depart-
ment; the electoral process and ©
procedures; public order and
enforcement of all laws under
the Parliamentary Registration
Act and limitations and obliga-
tions of the police before, dur-
ing and after the election peri-
od.

The commissioner said police
will work with the Parliamen-
tary Registration Department
to ensure a “peaceful election
season”.

In addition to maintaining
public order at events and
polling booths,. the police are
also setting up a special investi-
gation unit in a bod to adopt a
zero tolerance-approach to all
crime-related incidents.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 11

LOCAL NEW



46°

'
'
'
\
'

‘
'
'
'
'

OR the past four plus
U years our nation has

had a leader in Prime Minister

Perry Christie who has little or

nq influence over his Cabinet

and parliamentary colleagues.

‘eHe has also been a leader

Who often avoids his co-ordi-

nating and supervisory duties

as chairman of the executive
. branch of government.
‘néss in the machinery of gov-
ernment; slackness in the per-
formance of ministers; confu-
sion on the part of some agents
and agencies of the government;
ag«well as scandals as a common
feature of the Christie adminis-
tfation.

“The reality is that this state
f affairs has resulted overall in
ewer and fewer people having

confidence in PM Christie’s
ability to supervise the nation’s
affairs.
PM Christie gets bogged
down in the ceremonial. He has
taken on few weighty issues in
this nation. He avoids con-
frontation at all cost. He leaves
far too much to his often arro-
gant, clumsy and unskilful Cab-
inet colleagues.

It has become obvious over
the past several years that he
sets no clear goals for his Cabi-
net and plays too little role in
the collective decision-making
of the government.

,Under Prime Minister
Christie’s leadership, too many
things have been left to simply
drift while he attempts to stay
on good terms with everyone.
He remains dangerously
unaware of important matters
and is incapable of commanding
the facts when necessary.

a
1 M Christie does not
understand that most
people serving with a leader
want autonomy but they also
nt to exist in an environment
Where there is order.
»* Good government is impos-
sible where there is chaos; no
control over oneself or others;
qo repercussions for breach of
conduct; and control is domi-
frant at the bottom so that indi-
vidual egos and ambitions are
fnore important than the coun-
try’s progress.
«’ Good results in government
tannot come where the Cabi-
jtet is unregulated, leaderless,
and where cabinet ministers
have an all-out competition to
tty to maximise his/her self-
mterests.
*. The PM’s apologists confuse
his leadership style with that of

:Christie’s hands
off leadership has
been a problem

STRAIGHT UP TALK

ZLZHIVARG

ness. He allows things to carry
on until they buck up, crises set
in and everyone is ducking and
dodging.

he fact is that far from

being a democratic,
consultative or empowering
leader, PM Christie is a classic
case of “Laissez-Faire Leader-
ship”.

He is that type of leader who
lets every man or woman have
their way in order to be liked by
them. He encourages little gen-
uine planning and allows things

Oo LE ALYONEG

with both Caribbean and US
colleagues.

Minister Wilchcombe’s error
has damaged trust. Do not
expect to have the US ambas-
sador or any Caribbean author-
ity to say this; diplomatic pro-
tocol will not allow such a thing
for now.

Indeed, there will continue to
be polite picture taking and
press conferencing between our
representatives.

In fact, the ever-smiling,
smooth-talking Minister Wilch-
combe will lead the way. In the
meantime, however, don’t be



Good results in government
cannot come where the
Cabinet is unregulated,
leaderless, and where cabinet
ministers have an all-out |
competition to try to maximise
his/her self-interests.



to drift.

Such leadership can only suc-
ceed where his team-mates are
highly skilled, experienced, and
educated; where they are not
self-serving; have pride in their
responsibilities and are trust-
worthy.

The last four years has
demonstrated that PM Christie
does not have such a team and
that is why his leadership has
failed this nation. The times
called for a deliberate, decisive,
disciplined leader. We got one
who is drifting, indecisive and
undisciplined.

Worse still, he came with a
package of highly egotistical,
overly ambitious prima donnas
who can smooth talk créme out
of coffee.

THE OBIE WILCHCOMBE
WHI DEBACLE
CONTINUES

ver the smooth talker,
Minister Obie Wilch-

combe came to the public.

attempting to wiggle his way
out of an embarrassing misrep-
resentation of the truth about
obtaining a 30-day extension on



eae

>.

e

: Obie Wilchcombe’s apology
mounted to thisrYou people

did not understand what I was
trying to say and therefore I
apologise for your lack of abili-
ty to understand what I was.

trying to say.

i

%:
‘democratic leadership or con-
Sultative leadership. Some of
them have even dared to sug-
gest that his style is one of
Empowering management. Far
om it!
*s Empowering leadership
ihvolves a leader’s active dele-
tion of responsibility to others
fo fulfil some assignment; how-
ever, the leader remains vigi-
Jant in following up to see if the
Assignment is fulfilled and if not,
‘Gonsequences flow as a result.
‘e He will allow those delegated
With responsibility to continue
along the road that he and they
agree upon until problems arise,
én which case he will step in to
ftnake necessary adjustments.
:) This is not PM Christie. He
ias a hands-off approach to
leadership that borders on lazi-




pg poe



CAVES VILLAGE

ON ABRAT, WA AMA 8 crrrrrrrrrrerreereees



the implementation/enforce-
ment of the US Western Hemi-
sphere Initiative (WHI).

He offered what some sug-
gested was an apology for what
was clearly an untruth. His apol-
ogy amounted to this: You peo-
ple did not understand what I
was trying to say and therefore
I apologise for your lack of abil-
ity to understand what I was
trying to say.

In other words, at the very
least, it was the unintelligence of
the listeners, not the untruthful
words of the communicator that
caused the confusion. His apol-
ogy was an insult to the intelli-
gence of clear-thinking souls.

Minister Wilchcombe’s faux
pas will have repercussions for
some time to come. It will make
awkward our ongoing relations



surprised if there are those
invisible memos passed by our
neighbours that go out saying:
“careful with those ones; they
may misrepresent the truth”.

TOURISM HAS BEEN
TRENDING UPWARD
SINCE 1971

he other day a Tribune
article classifying min-
isters according to their perfor-
mances noted that Minister
Wilchcombe was one of the-few
aces in the deck. Of course this
was before the WHI debacle.
One of the reasons given for
this was that he had presided
over The Bahamas achieving
over five million tourists. The

fact is that if this is worthy of °

note and can be ascribed to
Minister Wilchcombe, then
there were many ministers of
tourism that were aces.

The fact is that, since 1971,
total tourist arrivals in The
Bahamas have only seen seven
year-to-year decreases. In other
words, out of 35 years of record-
ing total visitor arrivals to the
Bahamas, 28 of those years or
80 per cent tourism increased
from year to year.

We reached the 1,000,000
mark before 1971; the 2,000,000
mark in 1983; the 3,000,000
mark in 1986; the 4,000,000
mark in 2000; and the 5,000,000
in 2004. Each of these was a
milestone and at the time, the
ministers responsible for
tourism could have been
regarded as aces.

Of course, the hard-working
executives and workers of
hotels, cruise lines and the US
and world economies might
want some credit for these
things but the ministers would
surely have gotten noted.

# Looking at the numbers,
however, Minister Wilchcombe
deserves no special note
because he has merely inherit-
ed an almost 40-year trend and
had the benefit of a tourism
product that has experienced a
decade long multi-billion dol-
lar upgrade prior to his arrival,
featuring the likes of world-
class Kerzner International’s
Atlantis Resorts on Paradise
Island.

THOUGHT FOR THE
WEEK
“66 od’s mouth

knows not to

utter falsehood,
but he will perform each word.”
— Prometheus

: . ow 7
YOUR CONNECTION’TO THE WORLD

THE BAHAMAS TELECOMMUN ICATIONS COMPANY LTD

TENDER FOR NEW VEHICLE & EQUIPMENT

The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd is pleased to invite
qualified companies to apply for tender for New Vehicle and Equipment.

Interested companies can pick up a_ specification document from
BTC’S Administration Building John F Kennedy Drive and The
Mall Drive Freeport, Grand Bahama February 5, to February 19,
2007 between the hours of 9:00am to 5:00pm Monday to Friday.

Tender should be sealed in

EQUIPMENT TENDER”

Mr. Leon Williams
_ President & CEO
The Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd >
P.O. Box N-3048
Nassau, Bahamas

an envelope marked

and delivered to the attention of:-

Bids should reach the company’s administration office on John FE Kennedy Drive
by 4:00 p.m. Monday February, 19th, 2006.
Companies submitting bids are invited to attend une bid opening on
Tuesday, February 29th, 2007 at 10:00 A.M. at BTC’S Perpall Tract location.

BTC reserves the right to reject any or all tenders.





































































OLN FORT NAY 8

‘ e AIRPORT

t¥FORD CAY
e








_ THE TRIBUNE

BUSINESS

Mortgage lending

boss gets 20 years on

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 11B



firm’s bankruptcy

li By. SEANNA ADCOX
Associated Press

Writer |

LEXINGTON, S.C. (AP)
* — Investor Gene Gregory
was elated Wednesday to
hear one of the men he
blames for bilking him out
of $1.4 million was sen-
’ tengéd to.20 years in prison.

“Amen, brother!” said
Gregory, after hearing for-

megriomeGold top execu- .

tives Ronald Sheppard
received the harshest sen-
tence so far in the collapse
of the mortgage lending
company and its subsidiary
investment company in what
was one of the largest bank-
tuptcies in state history.

“I’m so happy. You don’t
knéw how much that means
to me,” the 73-year-old own-
er of Gené’s Fine Food in
Union said’ by phone.

‘Investors |

When HomeGold and its
subsidiary, Carolina
Investors, collapsed in 2003,
ardund 8,000 investors lost
roughly $275 million. Like
Gregory, many saw their life
savings.vanish.

The collapse happened
just months after Gregory
hadiput $1.4 million in Car-
olina Investors, planning to
make some extra money
before retiring from the
restaurant he had run for
four'decades.

He heard about problems
withthe companies, but left
his nest egg in because for-
mériCarolina Investors pres-
ident and chief executive
Larry Owen, serving eight
years behind bars for his role
in the scheme, assured Gre-
gory in writing it was a safe
and profitable company.

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f
4
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Actually, both companies
were deep in debt with exec-
utives trying to hide the poor
financial conditions from
investors.

“They chose to be dishon-
est and steal our money,”
Gregory said. “I’m still in
here working seven days a
week for the past four years,
trying to recover.”

Sheppard was sentenced
Wednesday a day after a
jury convicted him of securi-
ties fraud, conspiracy and
obtaining property by false
pretenses. After listening to
pleas from an investor and
Sheppard’s wife, Judge
James Johnson sentenced
the 49-year-old executive to
consecutive terms of 10
years on the fraud charge
and five years each on the
other two. He had faced a
maximum sentence of 25
years,

Sheppard’s
James Griffin, called it a
“harsh sentence” that “sends
a strong message.” He
expects Sheppard to appeal.

Sheppard was the fifth for-
mer executive of the compa-
nies to be convicted or plead
guilty in the scandal.

Prosecutor Jennifer Evans
told the judge Sheppard
deserved to spend the most
time behind bars because he
was most culpable, control-
ling HomeGold completely
and spending lavishly while
taking © money from
investors, as the company’s
debt skyrocketed.

“The debt under his
tenure increased most dra-
matically,” Evans said. “He
actually recruited people to
come into the conspiracy
and create criminal acts.”

Griffin asked the judge for
mercy. Sheppard could not
address the court because he
was “completely distraught”

attorney,

after spending a night in jail.
He slept on the floor and
didn’t get a shower, his
lawyer said.

The companies already
were in bad shape when

. Sheppard came aboard, and

he worked tirelessly to try
to turn it around.

“It was not Mr. Sheppard’s
doing.

“Tt clearly was his undo-
ing,” Griffin said.

The collapse cost Shep-
pard millions of dollars too,
and he can’t even pay his
bills, Griffin said.

Trials

One more executive is
awaiting trial. Former
HomeGold chairman and
chief executive John “Jack”
Sterling Jr. has been indicted
on three criminal counts
including securities fraud
and conspiracy.

Along with Owen and
Sheppard, the three other
executives who have faced
justice in the case are:

— Owen’s wife and former
Carolina Investors vice pres-
ident, Anne, sentenced to 10
years, suspended to 90 days
with five years probation,
home detention and
electronic monitoring for 18

months after pleading guilty.

— Former Carolina
Investors chairman and for-
mer Lt. Gov. Earle Morris
has been sentenced to 44
months in prison and is out
on bail pending his appeal
of his conviction of securi-
ties fraud.

— Former HomeGold
chief financial officer Karen
Miller’s sentencing has been
delayed while she cooper-

ates with the investigation: ~
She pleaded guilty t to con--

spiracy.

Biter

The public is advised that as of September,
Peter Adderley is no longer employed with C Cube Seating or

its signature parade ‘Feel The Rush’ and is no longer

authorized to conduct any business transactions in its name.

2006

Sponsors and the General Public needing any information on the
upcoming parade this August 3rd - 7th, 2007 in Grand Bahama please
contact: 242.646.2736 or 242.466.4363 or email c3seating @gmail.com

8
i SEATING

éarng oo 3-7 Emancipation Weekend



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Networking Essentials
Project Management
Technical Drawing with CAD
A+ Certification
AutoCAD
Quickbooks
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Photoshop

Registration Starts Today!

Please contact:
Candice Albury
Office Assistant/Training Coordinator
Lignum Technologies (Bahamas) Ltd.
Location: Harbor Bay Shopping Plaza
Email: Candice@lignumtech.com
Ph: (242) 393-2164
Fax: (242) 394-4971

Sy calle,

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Cititrust (Bahamas) Limited, a subsidiary of Citigroup, a leading financial institution
with a presence in over 100 countries and over 100 million customers worldwide,
is seeking candidates for the position of Business/Technology Information Security

(IS) Officer. This is a senior level position with IS responsibility for all Citigroup

businesses in the Bahamas as well as some global responsibilities.
FUNCTIONAL/DEPARTMENTAL DESCRIPTION

Global Wealth Structuring forms the Citigroup international offshore trust
companies serving non-U.S. high net worth clients in Bahamas, Cayman Islands,
Switzerland, Jersey Channel Islands, New Jersey and Singapore. Producis target
wealth preservation around fiduciary structure. The Technology Department
supports all locations and local applications of the business.

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

- Serve as an IS subject matter expert and provide management support
and advise on alll IS related issues.

- Review, monitor and supervise all IS related aspects of fechnology systems,

‘applications and databases.

- Ensure compliance with Citigroup and regulatory requirements for database
and application security, monitoring and reporting.

- Serve aslead in the preparations and management of IS quidits/adsessments
in accordance with generally accepted IS audits standards and guidelines.

- Review and oversight of the implementation of all Corporate IS initiatives.
Communicate the status of all |S initiatives, projects and business as usual
security issues with management.

- Facilitate IS training programs for all employees, consultants and vendors
as appropriate.

- Periodic review and update of technology/I$ policies and procedures
manuals to ensure compliance with Global Corporate policies and |S
requirements.

- Organize/conduct third party vendor I$ assessments validating third party
processes against Citigroup's standards.

- Manage the application and resource entitlement review program.

- Escalate security incidents/breaches and monitor remediation until
resolution

~ - Produce ad-hoc reports in support of management requests including
system audit logs review.

KNOWLEDGE/SKILLS REQUIRED

- ABachelor’s Degree with a minimum of five years experience, two of
which must be in an |S Audit/technology risk management role (an
information technology degree would be an advantage but is not essential

_with the requisite experience),

- An IS certification such as CISA, CISM, CISSP or equivalent.

- Working knowledge of Oracle and Microsoft SQL databases.

- Knowledge in Windows 2000 Administration, MS Office Suite, LAN/WAN
systems,

- Ability to multi-task in a time sensitive work environment supporting various
application and infrastructure changes.

- Experience in process testing/evaluations and re-engineering,

- Salary will be based on qualifications and experience.

Interested candidates should fax, email OR forward a copy of their resume to

|

Ein



.PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007

THE TRIBUNE









HARBORSIDE RESORT AT ATLANTIS
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Oe ak ate te de Me as A ee

For immediate consideration, please respond to

the Recruiter, Harborside Resort at Atlantis, on or

1 before February | 4. Qualified candidates may submit

x resumes online at starwoodvacationownership/careers,
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FROM page 1B

He was responding after The Tribune
contacted him about a January 25 letter
sent to the US energy regulatory body,
FERC, by Broward County in Florida.

Paul Stanton, assistant to the director of
Port Everglades’ port department, said
Broward County was opposing the FERC’s
decision to grant AES a two-year exten-
sion, to January 29, 2009, to the date when
their proposed multi- million LNG terminal
and pipeline should be completed and oper-
ational.

Mr Stanton alleged that AES had failed
to make a scheduled January 2007 payment
to Broward County on a 30-year licence
agreement, which gave the company rights-
of-way on land where it would construct
and lay the LNG pipeline connecting the
terminal on Ocean Cay.

The letter claimed: “AES has opted to
discontinue payments under the agreement,
citing delays in obtaining agreement from
the Bahamian government, which has
prompted the pipeline project’s sharehold-
ers to discontinue funding. AES has not
indicated when, if ever, the Bahamian gov-
ernment will approve the project.”

Mr Stanton alleged that Broward Coun-
ty had given a 30-day notice to AES on
January 18, 2007, to make good the default-
ed payment. He added that if AES failed to
do so, the county would “consider exercis-
ing its rights to terminate the agreement”
and seek legal redress.

Mr Samson told The Tribune that there

were “many things that are incorrect in that

letter sent to FERC”.

He denied that AES and its two partners
had discontinued funding the Ocean
Express project, as they had just injected
fresh equity capital into it. AES has a 65 per
cent stake in the project, and one of its
partners is Value Act Capital, a private

equity firm.
Powerful

A former partner was the powerful Span-
ish energy firm, Repsol-YPF, but Mr Sam-
son said the company had “lost patience”
with the wait for the Government to
approve the project, and long pulled out.

As for the real estate payment, Mr Sam-
son said AES Ocean Express had already

- paid Broward County $1 million in fees

over a two-year period to reserve land upon

’ which it would lay the pipeline, Other land

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denies ‘funding end’ for
ahamian Ocean Cay project

had been reserved for use as construction
areas by AES.

Mr Samson explained that AES and its
partners did “not want to pay for real estate
we’re not using”, and had reached out to
Broward County in an attempt to re-nego-
tiate the 30-year agreement “in good faith”.
Yet all the company had received in
response was that letter to the FERC.

“It’s just part of the ongoing issue related
to the development, which we believe are
coming to an end,” Mr Samson said.

Group

Since 2001, he said AES and its group
had spent $65 million on the project, includ-
ing the initial acquisition of Ocean Cay and
the mining operations there, and an envi-
ronmental clean-up, which cost around $4. 5
million.

Mr Samson said AES had incurred fur-
ther costs in maintaining Ocean Cay over
the past five years, especially the port, which
had to remain compliant with the Interna-
tional Shipping and Port Security (ISPS)
code. Fees had been incurred in keeping
approvals and permits current, insurance,
reserving real estate and paying employ-
ees.

Dr Marcus Bethel, the minister of energy
and the environment, previously told The
Tribune that the AES Heads of Agreement
application was still before the Cabinet,
with the Government hoping to sign off on
the regulations governing the Bahamas-
based terminal’s operations and pipeline
by the end of February 2007 - this month.

He added that as Cabinet was dependent
on its international consultants - likely to be
Washington-based ICF Consulting - to con-
clude negotiations and the regulations, they
could not proceed further until that process
was completed.

Mr Samson yesterday said AES was hop-
ing the regulations would be completed a
little sooner, adding: “We’re just kind of
waiting for the work to be completed, trans-
forming the international regulations into
what BEST can manage.

“We believe that will be coming to an
end shortly, and ultimately that will be the
final step to the Heads of Agreement being
signed. We’re optimistic we’re close to the
end here. I think we’re feeling pretty good.
It’s almost there.”

AES and its partners were gearing back
up in anticipation‘of receiving the necessary
approvals, ensuring:contractors were in

PROFILE:

banking delivery systems

IT infrastructure

products and services

Participate in budgeting process

responsibile for daily management of card product operations and electronic

Work with internal departments, external vendors and card '
associations to assure cardholder services and compliance
Output and delivery of statements, plastics, letters and supporting



place and ready to move.

Mr Samson said the Heads of Agreement
would include all the regulations,; includ-
ing AES’s obligations to impose all the nec-
essary controls and pay for the hiring of
outside consultants to monitor the, devel-
opments.

He added that the Heads of Agreement
lays out stipulations governing on-site.con-
struction, plus fines for violations.

The AES LNG terminal on Ocean Cay, a
man-made island near Bimini, would re-
gas LNG brought by ship to the island in
liquid form. A 95-mile pipeline would then
take some 842,000 dekatherms of LNG to
Florida per day, where it will supply the
state’s electricity needs.

Both former Florida governor Jeb Bush
and US officials have previously impressed
upon the Government their desire for the
AES project to be approved, given the
state’s power demand.

AES has been waiting patiently for five
years for a decision from the Prime Minis-
ter and his Cabinet. ‘

Leslie Miller, minister of agriculture and
fisheries, has previously said the Bahiamas
could earn $1.2 billion in revenue over the
lifetime of the AES project. 1

Project

When completed, the project promises -
to create permanent jobs that could be filled
by Bahamians with engineering and sci-
ence-related degrees and qualifications.
Such skilled workers have relatively few
opportunities in the current economy, and
the AES project would give much- needed
diversification.

The major benefits from the AES Ocean
Express project are likely to come from
revenues paid by the company to the Pub-
lic-Treasury. Apart from annual business
licence fees and sums paid to lease the sea
bed and land on Ocean Cay, AES Ocean
Express would also pay a throughput fee
linked to the Henry Hub natural gas index.

When the price of LNG pumped to Flori-
da by AES exceeds the Henry Hub index,
the Government would gain a percentage of
the additional revenues. The Tribune
understands that last in 2005, this would
have generated an extra $40-$50 million
for the Government.

Such money, although unbudgeted, could

‘be used to defray the costs of unanticipated .

spending in other areas, such as BEC's fuel
imports. .. ficantant #

FIDELITY

invites applications for the position of
MANAGER, CARD OPERATIONS

* 7+ years in the financial services industry with 5+ years in the bank card
and/or electronic banking services and card operations management

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

Establish operating policies, procedures & controls

a at

ra

Support the development of new card and electronic banking

Team with Marketing to execute product and sales plans,

marketing strategies, customer loyalty programme

Oversee payments and application processing, maintenance of
databases, cards support training, account posting and reconciliation
Resolve cardholder disputes and process chargebacks

Administer fraud and loss prevention programmes

Monitor service levels and report on performance

CRITICAL COMPETENCIES:

Operations /financial focus with technical background
Demonstrated project management experience
Strong communication (verbal and written), organizational, and

supervisory skills

Strong demonstrated knowledge in banking regulation and scecstonal risk

management

Excellent interpersonal skills. Ability to effectively interact with all levels

of management and employees

eSB TAROT. LE SSS SSSA ESSERE ESS LENT RT aR CTE



Lignum Institiute of Technology (L.I.T.)
Course starting Feb. 13th, 2007

(Every Tues. & Thurs. from 6:00p.m. to 8:00p.m.)
for 8 weeks





_. Mail or Fax Address
Lignum Institute of Technology (LIT)
P.O. Box 6295 Nassau, Bahamas

Telephone: (242) 393-2164
_ | Fax: (242) 394-4971





The person will report directly to the Executive Vice President and CFO
Competitive Compensation package will include salary, benefits and bonuses.
Send resume no later than February 16th, 2007 to:

The Director Human Resources

=) FIDELITY

51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
Fax 326.3000

e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com







THE TRIBUNE



INSURANCE BUYOUT, from 1B

chairs, RoyalStar Assurance,
but they are understood to
have pulled out.

Mr. Cooper yesterday
declined to provide a precise
purchase price, although First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas) provided some
debt financing. The Tribune
understands that the purchase
price moved around, having
started at around $20 million
before British American
Insurance Company out-
sourced the risk in its health
insurance portfolio to Assicu-
razoni Generali, part of the
Italian-based Generali group,
regarded as Europe’s fourth
largest insurer.

Sources indicated that dis-
cussions subsequently moved
to a price in the $14-$16 mil-
lion range, but the final sum
has not been confirmed. The
seller was British American
International Corporation,
whose chairman is Mauritius-
based, Dawood Rawat.

When asked whether British
American Insurance Compa-
ny’s future progress could be
impacted if a significant
amounft of leverage was
involved in the buyout, Mr
Cooper replied: “The funda-
mentals of the financials of
British American Insurance
Company are strong. There is
no leverage on the books of
British American Insurance
Company.

“FirstCaribbean have been
partners with respect to pro-
viding some debt financing at
the parent level.

“I am extremely comfort-
able with the structure we
have. The fundamentals of the
financials are extremely
strong, the capital base is in
excellent strength, and I’m
looking forward to competing
head-on with other members
of the industry.”

This indicates that any debt
has been loaded on to the buy-
out vehicle, BAB Holdings,
rather than the underlying
British American Insurance
Company, leaving the latter’s
balance sheet and cash flows
unencumbered by debt.

British American Insurance
Company has more than 200

employees and agents spread

between its three offices on
New Providence, Grand
Bahama, Exuma and now
Marsh Harbour, Abaco.

Mr Cooper said the compa-
ny has “more than 70,000 poli-
cies” spread across life insur-
ance, its investments division
and all products, and over
50,000 policyholders.

He added that the manage-
ment buyout, spearheaded by
himself, fellow BAB Holdings
director and principal, John
Wilson, a partner at McKin-
ney, Bancroft & Hughes, and
the British American Insur-
ance Company management

CLERK/MESSENGER
WANTED —

Mature Male for the position of General Clerk,
Data Entry’ Messenger duties.

Requirements (these are a must):

Age 21-25 years;

A High School Graduate with BGCSE

passes in English and Math at Grade *C’ or above;
Computer Literate (MS Office);

Hardworking, Honest, Reliable, and

Possess a valid Drivers’ Licence

Fringe Benefits include:

¢ Life and Health Coverage +

e Pension

Interested person should submit their Resume along

with the following:

¢ Acurrent Police Certificate
¢ Two (2) Character References

Manager Human Resources
HSBC Nassau P.O. Box N-4917

Nassau, Bahamas

or

Fax: 502-2566/2577

BUSINESS

team, would have no impact
on staffing or employment lev-
els. ;

“I am pleased to confirm all
rights and privileges under the
existing policies and contracts
will remain unchanged,” Mr
Cooper said in a message to
the company’s policyholders.

He pledged that “new and
exciting initiatives” would be
unveiled in the coming weeks,
adding: “In time, the full
impact of this announcement
will be realised, and the full
strength of British American
Insurance Company will be
revealed.”

Mr Wilson added that a new
Board of Directors would be
announced shortly, saying:
“British American Insurance

Company, going forward, will.

represent everything good cor-
porate governance should be
about.”

The firm has been operat-
ing in the Bahamas for 87
years, having been established
in 1920, and Mr Wilson said:
“It became a multinational
company from a base in the
Bahamas. We think it’s only
fitting that British American
Insurance Company complet-
ed its evolution. It’s now in
the hands of a fully-owned
Bahamian entity.”

Mr Cooper said in addition
to its traditional life insurance
and annuity products, British
American Insurance Company
would also focus on its invest-
ments side, going beyond tra-

+ UBS

ditional areas to become a full-
service financial services firm,
launching a mutual fund and
providing mortgages and pen-
sions.

Vincent Peet, minister of.

financial services and invest-
ments, said the BAB Holdings
purchase showed the Govern-
ment’s policy of giving quali-
fied Bahamian companies
“preemptive rights” to bid on
foreign-owned insurers oper-
ating in the Bahamas “clearly,
is working”.

He added that Mr Cooper
and his buyout team had
moved into “the big league”,
by making British American
Insurance Company fully
owned by Bahamians, a deal
that had also strengthened the
financial services industry.

Mr Peet said the deal repre-
sented a vote of confidence in
the Bahamian economy by
Bahamians, and vindicated the
Government’s and Domestic
Investment Board’s goal of
encouraging ownership of the
economy by Bahamians.

Describing Mr Cooper and
his team as “trailblazers”, Mr
Peet said British American
Insurance Company would
become the “model” for other
Bahamians, with their success
determining the success of
those who came behind them.

“While employment and
jobs are good and valuable,
we believe equity ownership
is the ultimate goal for
Bahamians,” Mr Peet said.

“UBS Tnustees (Bahamas) Ltd. a leading international trust
company has an opening for the position of a

Accounting System

Specialist & Programmer

In this challenging position you will be responsible for:

* Maintenance and development of “ePOCA Portfolio
Management” software from Cantalouppi and Hug AG;
¢ Analysis of business specifications from both accounting

and IT perspectives.

© Ownership of the design phases of one or more of.the

projects deliveries;

Provide training and second level support to users.

We are searching for a personality with a broad experience of
relational database modeling and process modeling with sound
knowledge in software development lifecycle. Programming
capabilities using MS DOT.NET and JAVA are a must. A suc-
cessful track record as Business Analyst/Project Manager MIS
and strong analytical skills in both IT and accounting are key
requirements to succeed in this senior position. In addition the
ideal candidate must be fluent in English and German (in order
to co-ordinate with our head office in Switzerland).

Applications in writing, enclosing a full resume, by
Bahamian nationals only on or before February 19, 2007.

Interested persons should reply on or before February 19, 2007

Postal Address:

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 13B

The general public is hereby notified that

all cheques for the payment of Business
Licence and Real Property Tax should be
made payable to the PUBLIC TREASURY.



KINGSWAY ACADEMY
Vacancies for Teachers for September 2007

Kingsway Academy, an _ interdenominational,
evangelical; co-educational Christian day school,
invites applicants from qualified and experienced
candidates for teaching positions at both
Elementary level (Kindergarten through grade
6) and all subjects at the High School levei

(grades 7 through 12).
should. be able to

High School applicants

~ teach to the AP level with at least a Bachelor’s

Degree in the particular subject area and Teachers
Certification. A Masters Degree in the content area

or in education for the su iect area would ‘be an

asset.
The successful candidates should have the following:

e An Academic Degree in the area of
specialization
¢ A Teaching Certificate
* Excellent Communication Skills
_ © A love for children and learning
* High standards of morality
° Be a born again Christian

Letters of application together with a recent color photo-
graph and detailed Curriculum Vita (including the names
and addresses of at least three references, one being the
name of one’s church minister) should be forwarded to:

Ms. Kelcine Hamilton

Academy Affairs Manager
Kingsway Academy Business Office
Bernard Road

Nassau.

Deadline for applications is Fnday February 23, 2007.



€

Application Deadline: Friday, 9 February 2007

Temfple a

“Teach Me, O Lord, Thy Way"...Psalm 119:33

TEMPLE CHRISTIAN

School

HIGH SCHOOL

ENTRANCE
EXAMINATION

Temple Christian High School will hold
its Entrance Examination on Saturday
February 10th, 2007 at the school on Shirley
Street from 8:00 a.m. - 12 noon for students
wishing to enter grades 7,8,9 and 10.

Application forms are available at the
High School Office. The application fee
is twenty dollars ($20.00). Application
forms should be returned to the school
on or before Friday, February 9th, 2007.

For Further Information

please call
394-4481 or call 394-4484

Our school is a member of the
Association of Christian Schools International



Place:

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources

P.O. Box N-7757

Nassau, Bahamas

The Ministry of Local
Government & Consumer Affairs

INVITES
THE GENERAL PUBLIC TO PARTICIPATE INA
CONSULTATIVE MEETING
ON THE ESTABLISHMENT OF

LOCAL GOVERNMENT
FOR
NEW PROVIDENCE

Honourable V. Alfred Gray
Minister of Local Government & Consumer Affairs

Honourable George A. Smith
Former Minister of Local Government

Dr. Pandora Johnson
Vice President- College of the Bahamas

Mr. Karl P.N.R. Spencer
Former Family Island Commissioner
Transfiguration Baptist Church Hall
Vesey Street

12th February, 2007

7:00 p.m.





HARBORSIDE RESORT AT ATLANTIS .
IS HIRING SALES TEAM LEADERS

Are you searching for a career with an ocean’
of earning potential?

Harborside Resort at Adiantis is currently seeking Sales Team
Leaders to join our team in generating maximum vacation
ownership sales while maintaining both a professional personal
image and upholding company standards of integrity and
professionalism in servicing our clients. We are poo.

for leaders with: ‘

* Proven vacation ownership sales management experience
Ability to: provide team direction and create

a positive work environment

Focus on efficiency, net closing, sales volume

and Owner services

Excallent. communication skills at all levels

College education (a plus)

°

At Harborside Resort at Atlantis you'll discover all the
advantages you would expect from one of the world’s leading
travel and hospitality companies, including outstanding
compensation and benefits. If you want.a career that will help.
you sail into the sunset one day, ic starts with Harborside
Resort at Adlantis. .

For immediate consideration, please respond to the Recruiter,
Harborside Resort at Atlantis, on or before February 14.

For more information, call 242-363-7500.

Qualified candidates may submit resumes online at
starwoodvacationownership.com/careers, fax to :
242-363-6822, email to hrarecruitment@starwoodvo.com
or deliver ‘to:

Human Resources Department
Marina One Ferry Terminal Building
Third Floor

Paradise Island, Nassau, The Bahamas



TNE ATARI RAGASTIN CAR,

Equal Opportunity Employer/Drug-free Workplace

{



THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 14B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007 | :

‘Atlantis water park to open

FROM page 1B

&

and will be located in the mid-
dle of the casino. It will be con-
nected by a grand staircase
from additional space in the
casino.

CALEDONIA

CORPORATE MANAGEMENT GROUP LI MITED

Invites applicants for the Full Time position of TRADER

RESPONSIBILITES INCLUDE:

* Executing Equity and Fixed Income trades as directed
by clients and colleagues in North American Markets.

* Monitoring of trades and proactive communication with

clients

QUALIFICATIONS

¢ Minimum of 3 years experience with trading

¢ Series 7 or Canadian Securities Course

* Working knowledge of Microsoft Office and basic

trading platforms ~

* Strong organizational and communication (verbal

and written) skills

* Client oriented and team player.

* Must be prepared to work on Bahamian Holidays ©
when North American markets are open.

Salary will be‘commensurate with experience. Interested applicants
must submit applications by February 23rd, 2007 via:

Human Resources Manager
Caledonia Corporate Management Group Limited

PO.Box N-8165
Nassau, Bahamas

info@caledoniagroup.com —

242.356.3969 ©

Caledonia Corporate Management Group Lim ited is a well
established, independent and licensed Bahamian brokerage and
financial services firm, offering a com prehensive range of wealth
management solutions for private clients.



“We are bringing, as
licensees, the famous Pure
Management Group out of Las
Vegas. You probably know
their night club in Las Vegas is
ranked number one in all of
North America. They will
advise to tell us the kinds of
things we can do,” Mr Markan-

.. tonis said.

The nightclub should accom-
modate about 400-500 persons

each night.

The second nightclub will be
a high-energy casino lounge,
which will feature larger games
with virtual reality dealers and
machines in some cases.
Guests can listen to the con-
temporary music coming from
the disc jockeys in the night-
clubs.

* The condominiums at the

‘Ocean Club Residences will

CONSOLIDATED WATER
COMPANY LTD.

NOTICE is hereby given of the resignation of
Mr. J. Bruce Bugg Jr. as a Non-Executive Director
of CONSOLIDATED WATER COMPANY LTD.,
effective September 27, 2006

|Mr. Bugg’s responsibilities included serving as a
member. of the Audit Committee and the
Compensation Committee of the Board of

Directors.

CONSOLIDATED WATER COMPANY LITD.,
is a company incorporated under the laws of the
Cayman Islands and is listed on the Bahamas

International Securities Exchange.

For more information, please contact the company

CONSOLIDATED WATER COMPANY LTD.,
P.O.Box 1114 GT
Regatta Office Park,
Windward Three, 4th Floor
West Bay Road
Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands

Attention: Ms. Tracey Ebanks

Telephone: (345)-945-4277
Facsimile:(345)-949-2957

The world’s smallest
glucose meter

m World's smallest sample size
(0.3 pL, about the size of a pinhead).

m Fast 7 second average test time.

m Test yourself on different, less painful areas, such as
the palm of your hand, forearms, thighs, or calves.

m 4alarms to remind patients when it’s time to test.

_Ask for it at your favorite drug store.

FRE

10AM — 1PM

E GLUCOSE TESTING

These dates and locations:

Monday, Feb 12
Prescription Centre
Rosetta St.

Tuesday, Feb. 27
Centerville Pharmacy
Collins Ave.

by Lowe's Wholesale . Tel: 393-7111 ey CL Ct







IVF Bahamas Ltd.

Experience the ‘Miracle at Home

open on April 4, and occupants
will be able to take possession
of their properties at that date.

“That has been very suc-
cessful. Of the 88 units, 84 are
sold as of this date. So there
are only four left and, of
course, construction wise then
there is the Residences at
Atlantis, 495 condo units that
start in the region of 1,000
square feet,” Mr Markantonis
said. “Sales are going on both
in the Bahamas and in North
America, and we are almost
50 per cent sold, but they are
not due to open till December
15.”

* The final project he out-
lined was the completion of
the new 100,000 square foot
convention centre, opening
three days before the Cove at
Atlantis tower. The ballroom
in that facility will accommo-
date 4,000-5000 persons seated
for dinner.

“This will be a great
enhancement to the commu-
nity, because it allows Nassau
to bring city wide conventions
here - not conventions that will
just be located at Atlantis - but

conventions that can occupy
rooms in every other hotel on
the island. At least they will
have the meeting space some-
where as a convention centre

where they would gravitate,”

Mr Markantonis said

He said Atlantis would nev-
er accept 5,000 group ropms .

anyway.

“But it would be great for i
Nassau to be able to say: “Yes, *

we can bring such a conven-

tion, so that is a huge thing for .

us,” Mr Markantonis said;
“For us is this is a very excit+

ing time. You can see it hap-

pening. The lights are ob at.
night, and we are on a 24-hour .
schedule now where all of pur
construction and development i

sites are. ‘

oh
“We have been calling this
thing Phase III, but it is really |

such an unattractive and not

very explanatory title, because .

the reality is that what is about .

to happen over there over the —

next few months is truly spec-. |

tacular, not only for the resort
but I think for the whole com
munity, and for Nassau a$-a
destination and the Bahamas.”




Legal Notice
NOTICE

PETROLIN (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) PETROLIN (BAHAMAS) LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commenced

on the 6th February, 2007 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the

Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse Trust

of Geneva, Rue de Lausanne 17 bis, 1211 Geneva 70.

Dated this 8th day of February, A.D. 2007.

a

ene ee
Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator

IVF Bahamas Ltd.

Experience The Miracle At Home
Let our family help you start yours.

~

Infertility can be a stressful and emotional condition. Knowing your
options and getting your questions answered by a caring and ;
compassionate physician is the best place to start. The Health

Centre for Women presents: |

Dr, Anthony Carey, Founder & Director of The Health Centre For Women
and IVE Bahamas Ltd. and Dr. Juergen Eisermann of The South Florida
Institute For Reproductive Medicine are proud to present the first of several
educational seminars regarding infertility treatment options in The Bahamas.

During each seminar, attendees wil gain valuable information about where
to start, what to look for, who to tum to for help, and how to overcome
their sense of hopelessness. The seminar series begins with the basics
of infertility and proceeds to clarify the spectrum of reproductive medicine
and infertility as it relates to the patient. Dr. Carey will also discuss the
opening of the first In Vitro Fertilization clinic in the Bahamas, IVF Bahamas Ltd.
Attendees may attend one, some or all the free seminars.

Doctor’s Hospital

Collins Avenue & Shirley Street

Nassau, Bahamas

Thursday, February 8 2007

6:00 p.m.

For more information about IVF Bahamas or the
upcoming seminar call The Health Centre

For Women at 322-6619





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investment products.

Nassau, Bahamas

FirstCo 326-5044
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JFK Drive 323-2422
Marathon Mall 393-4386
Palmdale 322-8824

SandyPort 327-8361
Shirley Street 322-8455
Thompson Blvd 323-6062

Bay Street 326-0327

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v





-

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com







TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Sports Reporter

BAHAMIAN track and field
enthusiasts can expect great things
from one member of the Golden
Girls team this year. The national
record holder in the 200m has
revealed that she is taking a new
approach to her long season.

An excited Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie said she has pin-pointed
the nagging problem that is costing
her insome international races and
is more than ready to show both
the Bahamian and international
fans that she is back — in full force.

According to Ferguson-McKen-
zie, when she eliminated the word
‘fun’ from her training and races
things started to become compli-
cated. But now she says she is
ready for the challenge.

Although she will have a late
start, since opting not to compete

.in any indoor meets or champi- *

onships, the sprinting queen is opti-
mistic about her year.
Ferguson-McKenzie said: “Well
hopefully I will get a chance next
month and April to run a series. of
relays, starting in Miami then mov-
ing onto the Penn Relays and
Florida Relays. I will run my first

oa outdoor meet in May, in Osaka.

“You know what is so amazing

about this year as far as training
goes - 1 am 31 this year and I can
actually say that I am enjoying
training. I think that is one thing
that comes with maturity and age.
Yes, I am getting older but I’ve
gotten wiser and things that once
were such a fuss and challenge
aren’t anymore, I think I am so
strong.

“T’ve asked my coach to not just
train me as a sprinter but half and
half, as a quartermiler as well. But
I am not running the 400m, don’t
get too excited. I think that has
helped me a lot on my true form
and I am really excited about how
things are’ going.

“Tam honestly praying that the

Lord keeps me healthy so I can
get a chance to be back where I
was.
“Tf I can get to the point where I
was at in college, where I was
vicious but I had fun in what I do
and I competed in the utmost of
that word. I am just excited about
this year.”

Ferguson-McKenzie is enjoying
basically the same weather as
home while training in the Miami,
Florida.

She trains alongside American
top sprinter Lauren Williams.

“Basically some persons get
adapted to that particular climate,
but at the end of the day I still have



‘MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

my advantage,” she said. “If Iam
training in a warm climate I am
used to it, so this is like a big
advantage to me because every-

‘one else is training in cold climates.

“Sq when they get to hotter
areas they aren’t used to it and
have to adjust a lot. So I don’t wor-
ry about stuff like that. I don’t wor-
ry about where I am about to go
and compete or about the track. I
don’t care how cold it is or if it is
raining. These are things everyone
is experiencing and it shouldn’t be
a factor as far as competing.”

Last year was quiet one for Fer-
guson-McKenzie, as she tried to
make a comeback from injury.

The last full year for Ferguson-
McKenzie was 2003, at the World
Championships. Ferguson-McKen-
zie advanced to the semi-finals of
the 100m, finishing fifth in a time of
11.27 seconds. In the 200m she was
fourth in the second rounds with a
best time of 22.98 seconds.

“Tam not even looking towards
any time in my first meet. I think
for me this year, L only want to go
out there and compete, I love com-
peting. Once [ compete I can see
where I am. But this year, | am
confident because training is going
very well. Once I compete, I will be
able to take it from there and take
it into Osaka.”

Osaka is the host city of the

‘The Tribune

. estly feel as though 10.80 or any-

IAAF World Championships, set
to take place in August in Japan.
For Ferguson-McKenzie, this year
is one of the most important, for all

professional athletes.

‘She said: “For most athletes this
year is more important for the ath-
letes because in my opinion World
Championships is for the athletes.
Olympics, yes, is a big meet but it is
for all the glory. And everyone
knows that World Championships
is the big ‘pay day’. So you will see
a lot of athletes come out from the
woodwork.

“No doubt that it will be a busy
year, everyone is training and try-
ing to stay focused, so it will all
boil down to is on top of their
game that day in Osaka.

“I have my goals set for the
World Championships and I hon-

thing around there will win it. So I
feel confident ahead of it and for
me, I am trying to focus more on
the 200m. But in Europe they real-
ly don’t run the 200m all the time
so I will have to get consistent in
the 100m and, by the time the
World Championships come
around, decide if I want to run the
100m, 200m or both.”

Ht GOLDEN Girl Debbie
Ferguson-McKenzie

m@ SAILING
By KELSIE
JOHNSON

Sports Reporter

THE dates have
changed but the
excitement that sur-
rounds the 14th annu-
al Frank Hanna All
Andros Regatta is sky
rocketing. .

The regatta, which
will serve as the first
Family Island show-

down, is set to take
place on March 29th-
April 1st, at the Olympic
stadium.

According to Alphonso
Smith, the regatta’s
c o'm -



































modore, the reason for
changing the regatta’s date
was to ensure the participa-
tion of all the boats in every
class.

Smith also added that the
new date will create space
between the All Andros
Regatta and the Exuma
Regatta...

The All Andros Regatta
was slated for April 12th-
15th, a two week space
between the Exuma Regat-
ta.

He said: “The committee
thought it fitting to name
the regatta after one of the
pioneers of the All Andros
Regatta, Mr Frank Hanna.

“Mr Hanna has made
many significant contribu-
tions to the regatta, he is:
also an active Androsian.

“We also thought it best

- to change the dates of. this

regatta because we want
this one to’be the first
horse out of the gate.
So we want to cap-
ture all of those
persons who
would have gone
to other events.
They will
come to us
first and then
attend what is
left.

“There was always a mix
up between our regatta and
the Exuma Regatta. We had
sailors who. wanted to attend
the All Andros Regatta, but
they only had two weeks to
fix any damages their boats
would have gotten, if they
wanted to take part in the
Exuma Regatta.

“This time wasn’t suffi-
cient so some of them had
to choose which one of the
regattas they will attend.”

The Frank Hanna Regat-
ta will come on the eve of

the Valentine’s Day Mas-.

sacre, which is set for Feb-
ruary 16th-19th, at the Mon-

tagu Beach.

The honouree, Frank
Hanna, was one of the
founding members of the
All Andros Regatta and for

him this token of apprecia- :

tion from his fellow coun-
trymen couldn’t come at a
better time.

Hanna said: “I am hon-
oured, I feel great, I am so
proud to have such an hon-
our being bestowed upon
me.”

Boats will compete in the
A, B and C classes. This will
be the first regatta which
sailors can gather-points
towards the BahaMar Boat
of the Year Award.

@ FRANK HANNA will be honoured with the
14th annual Frank Hanna All Andros Regatta

(Photo: Tim Clarke)

@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE



a Hie puts the Tun

@ BASKETBALL

The championship picture is set in the BAISS
league with the game getting underway today
at the Sir Kendal Isaacs gym.

The first tip-off will see the St Augustine’s
College Big Red Machines take on the Queen’s
College Comets. This game is schedule to start at
3:30pm.

The three remaining divisions, the junior boys
and the senior girls,and: boys, wilkihave the St
John’s College taking on the Prince William Fal-
cons.

@ TRACK AND FIELD

Club Monica will host their annual track meet
at the Thomas A Robinson stadium this Friday
and Saturday.

The meet will feature the Bahamas’ top junior
and senior athletes hoping to qualify for the var-
ious international competitions. Entry deadline
is today.

The annual North Andros meet is set to begin
on Friday at the Carl Oliver stadium.

@ GSSSA

The GSSSA continued on with their regular
season with three games on schedule.

In the junior girls division the CC Sweeting
Scorpions destroyed the LW Young Golden
Eagles, taking the game 43-5. :

The game’s high scorer was Shanae Armbris-
ter with 17 points. The CH Reeves Raptors
proved to the HO Nash Lions that their first
win over them wasn’t a fluke.

The Raptors, led by Patrico Leadon, ended
the game with a score of 32-19.

.The third game saw the SC McPherson Sharks
and AF Adderley Tigers battle things out for a
playoff spot.

The Tigers would get the edge over the Sharks
with a 40-32 victory. Top scorer was Avery Arm.
brister with 17 points.



[f\

rmiovin' it’.



-



PAGE 2E, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007

* TRIBUNE SPORTS.








Tyler Hamilton returns to
stage-race cycling in France

m CYCLING
MARSEILLE, France
Associated Press

TYLER HAMILTON
returned to his first stage
race Wednesday after a
two-year doping ban, fin-
ishing deep in the pack.

The Olympic gold medal-
ist was 66th in the first
stage of the Etoile de
Bessages race between
Pezenas and Palavas-les-
Flots in southern France,













































Florida Stock R
mmetiiate Sh

11 seconds behind stage
winner Angelo Furlan of
Italy.

A day earlier, the 34-
year-old American rode in
the GP La Marseillaise,
also finishing in the main
pack.

Hamilton has signed a
one-year contract with a
new Italian-Russian team —
Tinkoff Credit Systems —
for the 2007 season.

He was banned for two
years after testing positive








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Let’s show

our

support

for veteran

ET'S rally around
and show our sup-

port once again for veteran
ZNS sportscaster Phil
Smith.

If last year's Legends
Basketball Classic was any
indication, I'm sure that
the public support for "A
Six Pack for Phil" should
go extremely well.

This is a new initiative
that is being introduced by
Island Wholesale and the
Broadcasting Corporation
of the Bahamas.

What it calls for is for
you (the public) to pur-
chase a six-pack of Malta
Olympic from any store.
The funds derived from the
sale of the energy drink
will be turned out into a
medical fund established
by ZNS.

Olympic bronze medalist
Frank Rutherford, a long-
time friend of Smith, intro-
duced the initiative to the
public.

He said it's one of the
easiest ways for the public
to help Smith, who is in a
dire need of a kidney trans-
plant.

Smith has done a tremen-
dous job for more than two
decades promoting sports
in the Bahamas through
the-sairwaves and on
national television at ZNS.

Thisais only a drop in the
bucket for the public to
repay him and assist him in
his time of need.

Smith is currently endur-
ing a lot. So whenever you
have a chance to assist,
stop by any store selling
the product to show your
support.

Smith certainly needs all
of the support that he can
get right now and your
contribution will definite-
ly go a long way in his
recovery.

LAND, LAND AND
MORE LAND

AST week the
Bahamas Govern-
ment turned over 18 acres
of land at the Baillou Hills
Sporting Complex to the
Bahamas Golf Federa-
tion so that they can devel-
op a driving and putting
range, a clubhouse and a

aw diigo bon

6e Bandages keep up with today's active
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Our solutions include waterproof protection,
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sportscaster

Back then when the lease
was signed, I don't think
the FNM were expecting
the development of a new
national stadium from the
Chinese Government.

But if the PLP govern-
ment have any problems

‘with the association occu-
pying the site, they should
be given an alternate site
to develop and compensat-
ed (in some way) for the
monies they have invested
in the site.

The association has done
a remarkable job in their
self-help initiative to get
the facility to the stage that
it is in. They cannot and
should not be allowed to
just walk away without
something tangible in their
hands or pockets.

STUBBS

abet

Clearing

The BGF has followed
suit in that they have start-
ed the clearing of the land
on their own. And while
they are getting ready to
target corporate Bahamas,
they have indicated that
there are sufficient mem-
bers that they can bring on
board to help get the job
done.

There is sufficient land
located between the QESC
and Baillou Hills for the
majority of sporting events
to take place. So let's make
sure ‘that we allow the
BHRA to settle down ina
permanent home.

Car owners need to be in
a controlled atmosphere
like the one that has
already been developed.

par-3 nine-hole golf course.

That is admirable, con-
sidering that the plans are
to have the entire site at
Baillou Hills and the
Queen Elizabeth Sports
Center transformed into a
spectacular sports facility.

But in the midst of all of
the development is the
Bahamas HotRod Associ-
ation.

They have received a 50
year lease from the Free
National Movement in
2001 when they were in
power. But the association
is now concerned that they
may be removed from the
site.

Alana and Nikia set for
Southeastern Conference
Championships

m@ SWIMMING
By KELSIE JOHNSON

Sports Reporter ine

BAHAMIANS Alana Dillette and Nikia Deveaux have
their hands full at this year’s Southeastern Conference (SEC)
championships. :

The event, which got started yesterday at the Lancaster
Aquatic Centre, in Lexington, Kentucky, will be the duo’s
last opportunity to qualify for an individual event, for the
NCAA championships.

Both Dillette and Deveaux will represent their universities
in the relays and if they want to hit the pools in their special-
ties, they will have to shave off a few seconds.

The home court advantage should pay off for Deveaux, a
junior at the University of Kentucky.

The Olympian will compete in the 50m and 100m free,
along with the 200m free and the 400m free relays.

Deveaux has a season’s best time of 23.71 seconds in the
50m free. The A standard is set at 22.75 seconds and the B at
23.43 seconds. ;

In the 100m free Deveaux will need to swim under 49.49
seconds if she wants to achieve the A standard and under
50.97 seconds for the B-standards.

Currently Deveaux is ranked fourth in her school in both
the 50m free and 100m free.

Dillette will also have to make a splash if she intends to
make the cut in the 50m free. Her fastest. time on the year in
the event was recorded at 23.77 seconds.

But her biggest challenge will come in the 100m free. Dil-
lette turned a season’s best of 51.28 seconds in the event, she
will also need to dip under 49.49 seconds if she wants to
achieve the A standard and under 50.97 seconds for the B-
standards.

The University of Kentucky’s relay team, which includes
Heather Bradford, Jenny Bradford, Deveaux and Lauren
Willis, has qualified for the 200m free. The team posted a
time of 1:31.73 seconds to surpass the B standard of 1:33.74
seconds,

The 400m free relay, which consist of the same team mem-
bers, has recorded a time of 3:20.93 seconds, the B standards
were set at 3:244,91 seconds.

The Auburn Tigers’ 200 medley relay team includes Dil-
lette, Anne Amardeilh, Margo McCawley and Kara Denby.
The team recorded a season’s best of 1:43.85 seconds.

The results in the 200m medley relay were not available up
until press time.

Both Dillette and Deveaux will be in action today compet-
ing in the 50m free.



seesnmnannnnennneeneaanesnnnnegsqngwsnarn

_ SPORTS ©



BASEBALL
COMMENTARY



JIM McISAAC/GETTY IMAGES .

BOSTON DILEMMA: Manny Ramirez.

Best to keep
these players
on speed dial

. BY STAN MCNEAL
The Sporting News

a way out of the cold for snow-
birds. It means hope for every
fan, daily rounds of golf for players
and traffic jams in Winter Haven, Fla.
It also marks an end to a winter of
speculation for players who thought
they would be changing teams.
Atemporary end, that is:

‘READY TO MOVE

e RHP Scott Linebrink, Padres.
Just days after Padres general man-
ager Kevin Towers told me why his

- club has resisted years of temptation
to move its setup man, Linebrink’s
name was out there again — this time
in talks for Phillies outfielder Aaron
Rowand. So far, Towers has held off.
But if left fielder Terrmel Sledge or
third baseman Kevin Kouzmanoff
struggles, and the bullpen shows it

has enough depth in spring training,
Towers probably will deal Linebrink.

e 1B Todd Helton, Rockies. After
botching talks with the Red Sox, the
Rockies will have a, well, rocky rela-

‘ tionship with their franchise player.

Discussions with the
Red Sox began quietly
in December, but the
Rockies believed they
could pressure the
Red Sox into a trade
by leaking the offer to
the media. Bad decision, Still, Helton
to the Sox makes too much sense; this
deal will probably be revisited.

e CF Rocco Baldelli, Devil Rays.
A strong second half last season and a
bargain contract make him the young
Rays outfielder most likely to be
traded. But first the Rays need to
lower their demands and realize that,
given their surplus of prospects, Bal-
delliis more valuable to them ina
trade than he is on the field.

e RHPs Jon Lieber, Phillies;
Brad Penny, Dodgers; and Ervin
Santana, Angels. With pitching in
such great demand, only a few clubs
have six capable starters. Philly and
the Los Angeles teams are three of
those, and they know it. By the end of
spring training, they also will know
which clubs are even more desperate
for starters.

MANNY AND A-ROD

e LF Manny Ramirez, Red Sox.
Rarely does a month pass without a
Manny-wants-out story and the Red
Sox trying to oblige him. Both sides
are nuts. Sure, Ramirez is on the flaky
side, but he also is the best right-
handed hitter in the American
League. And if Ramirez doesn’t like
all the attention, shouldn’t he go to
general manager Theo Epstein’s
office and ask to be traded tue than
doing so through reporters? ;

e 3B Alex Rodriguez, Yankees.
The only reason I can come up with
why A-Rod won’t have another night-.
mare season: He’s too good not to
produce in big at-bats. But ifhe |
doesn’t break out soon, call the
Angels. They still need a third base-
man with power, and they have some
good prospects to spare.

MORE TRADE BAIT

e RHP Armando Benitez,
Giants. After a dreadful 2006, the big
closer reportedly has shed 40 pounds
and already is throwing in Arizona.
Advice to the Giants: Move Benitez
before the games start.

e LF Pat Burrell, Phillies. Philly
would trade him if it could. Some-
thing about the $27 million he is owed
over the next two seasons depresses
the market.

e@ RHP Chad Cordero, Nationals.
The Red Sox need a closer; the

. Nationals have little use for one.
What’s the holdup?

e OF Geoff Jenkins, Brewers.
Once a franchise cornerstone, he is
now an unneeded veteran in the final
year of his contract.

‘@ 3B Mike Lowell, Red Sox. He
was part of the Linebrink, then Hel-
ton, trade talks. But, hey, the Sox are
still glad to have him.

e@ RHP Carl Pavano, Yankees.
You know the Yankees would like
him gone. But first Pavano has to
show that he still can pitch.

: S pring training brings more than .







BY ANDREW BAGNATO
Associated Press ‘

GLENDALE, Ariz. — Jimmy
Conrad scored his first interna-
tional goal, and Landon Donovan
converted a late breakaway, lead-
ing the United States to a 2-0 exhi-
bition victory over Mexico on
Wednesday night that kept up the
Americans’ dominance of their
regional soccer rival.

Conrad headed home a corner
kick by Donovan in the 52nd min-
ute, beating Mexican goalkeeper
Oswaldo Sanchez inside the left
post. It was the first international
goal for Conrad, who was playing
in his 19th game for the Americans,
and the 24th career assist for Don-
ovan, the U.S. career leader.

Donovan added the clincher in
the 90th minute off a pass by
Ricardo Clark. It was the 27th goal

P) | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007



ecasgacoaeasoneceeetaasoit



3E

INTERNATIONAL EDITION





SOCCER | UNITED STATES 2,MEXICO O

U.S. team stays on top of Mexico

in 86 international appearances for
Donovan, who scored in his sec-

ond consecutive game after going .

scoreless in 18 national team
appearances over 1! years.

Playing in front of a heavily
pro-Mexican sellout crowd of
64,462, the Americans improved to
8-2-1 against Mexico since 2000.
The United States is 7-0-1 against
Mexico on home soil in that
stretch, outscoring its southern
neighbor 13-0.

“I think we showed what we’re
made of,” said Conrad, who played
an outstanding two-way game.

But Mexico didn’t go quietly in
the first game under coach Hugo
Sanchez. The Mexicans had nine
shots — seven in the second half —
and pressured the Americans
relentlessly after Conrad’s goal.

Tim Howard, bidding to take



PAUL CONNORS/AP

BODY SHOT: U.S. midfielder Clint
Dempsey uses his chest to gain

» control of the ball Wednesday.

over from Kasey Keller as the top
American goalkeeper, shut out the
Mexicans in his first national team
appearance since last May.

Both teams are preparing for the
CONCACAF Gold Cup, the cham-

pionship of North and Central’
America and the Caribbean, and
the start of 2010 World Cup quali-
fying next year.

Emotions flared late, with Mexi-
can captain Rafael Marquez and
American forward Eddie Johnson
exchanging shoves.

It was the first game for the
Americans against the Tricolores
since Sept. 3, 2005, when the
United States clinched its fifth
World Cup berth in a row with a
2-0 victory at Columbus, Ohio.

This match was considered by
some to be a test for U.S. interim
coach Bob Bradley.

Before the game, USSF presi-
dent Sunil Gulati told reporters
that the result “is not going to lead
to a direct decision as to who the
national team coach will be.”

e MORE SOCCER



COLLEGE BASKETBALL | NO. 5 NORTH CAROLINA 79, NO. 16 DUKE 73

Tar Heels survive

HANGING IN THERE: Brandan Wright of North Carolina finishes off a dunk over Duke



Late comeback
spoils the party
for Cameron fans

BY AARON BEARD
Associated Press
DURHAM, N.C. — For the second consecu-
tive year, North Carolina’s youngsters walked
into one of college basketball’s most intimidat-
ing arenas and came out with a confidence-
building victory Wednesday night. :
Freshman Brandan Wright scored 19 points,
and Tyler Hansbrough added 16, to lead the
fifth-ranked Tar Heels past No. 16 Duke 79-73,

earning their second victory ina
row at Cameron Indoor Stadium.
Freshman Ty Lawson added 15
points for the Tar Heels (21-3, 7-2
Atlantic Coast Conference), who -
trailed by 10 points early in the
second half before finally going
ahead to stay in the final minutes.
Freshman Jon Scheyer had a
career-high 26 points for the Blue
Devils (18-6, 5-5), who have lost



GRANT HALVERSON/GETTY IMAGES

defender Josh McRoberts. UNC’s late comeback handed Duke its third loss ina row.

Associated Press
John Amaechi is gay, and now

the first NBA player to come out

publicly is ready to talk about it.

Amaechi, a center who spent
five seasons with four teams, is
scheduled to appear on ESPN’s
Outside the Lines on Sunday, and
his autobiography, Man in the Mid-
dle, will be released on Feb. 14.

“He is coming out of the closet
as a gay man,” Amaechi’s publicist
Howard Bragman said Wednesday.

NBA Commissioner David
Stern said a player’s sexuality is
not important.

“We have a very diverse
league,” Stern said.

“The question at the NBA is
always, ‘Have you got game?’
That’s it, end of inquiry.”

a

PRO BASKETBALL | JOHN AMAECHI

Three years
after his playing
career ended,
Amaechi, who is
36, has become
the sixth profes-
sional male ath-
lete from one of
the four major
American sports
(NBA, MLB, NFL, NHL) to pub-
licly discuss his homosexuality.

Former NFL running back
David Kopay came out in 1977, and
offensive lineman Roy Simmons
and defensive lineman Esera
Tuaolo came out more recently.
Glenn Burke, an outfielder for the
Los Angeles Dodgers and the Oak-
land A’s in the 1970s, and Billy
Bean, a utility player in the 1980s
and 1990s, also have come out.

AMAECHI



In his book, Amaechi describes
the challenge of being gay in a
league where it is assumed that all
players are heterosexual. He writes
that while playing in Utah, Jazz
coach Jerry Sloan used anti-gay
innuendo to describe him.

Sloan said Wednesday that
although his relationship with
Amaechi was “shaky” because of
the player’s attitude, he didn’t
know Amaechi was gay. Sloan had
no comment about Amaechi’s con-
tention in the book that Sloan used
anti-gay innuendo when referring
to him. Amaechi said he found out
about it in e-mails from friends in
the Jazz front office.

When asked if knowing Amae-
chi was gay would have mattered,
Sloan said: “Oh, yeah, it would
have probably mattered. I don’t

three consecutive games for the first time since
1999 — when they lost to Connecticut in the
NCAA Championship Game and opened the
1999-2000 season with two losses in a row.

Last season, Hansbrough led a youth-laden
group into Cameron to close the regular season
and spoil All-American J.J. Redick’s final home

' game in an 83-76 Tar Heels victory. And, once
again, the Tar Heels rallied from a double-digit
deficit and came up with the game’s big baskets
in the final minutes.

It was a strong way to bounce back after an
surprising weekend loss to North Carolina State
— an 83-79 setback that had an irked Tar Heels
coach Roy Williams calling his team “fat and
happy” afterward.

He won't be saying that now.

After trailing by as many as 10 points in the
second half, the Tar Heels hung around by send-
ing in an endless stream of fresh bodies while
pressuring Duke’s ballhandlers the entire way.

By the time the game was entering its final
minutes, North Carolina looked fresher and
found ways to knock down the critical shots.

e COLLEGE REPORT



Former NBA center had a secret: He’s gay

BY BILL KONIGSBERG

know exactly, but I always have
peoples’ feelings at heart. People
do what they want to do. I don’t
have a problem with that.” :

Amaechi, a 6-foot-10 center who
is British, played college ball for
Penn State, then played 301 NBA
games over five seasons. He aver-
aged 6.2 points and 2.6 rebounds
per game in the NBA.

Amaechi began his NBA career
with the Cleveland Cavaliers in
1995-96, then spent a few years
playing in Europe. He rejoined the

_NBA to play for the Orlando Magic

from 1999-01, then played two sea-
sons for the Utah Jazz.

The Jazz traded Amaechi to the
Houston Rockets, who then traded
him to the New York Knicks.

When the Knicks waived Amae-
chi in January 2004, he retired.



4E | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007 _



BY JAYMES SONG
Associated Press :

HONOLULU — Tiki Barber will
end his football career much like it
began when he was 8 years old —
with a wide grin and as teammates
with his twin brother.

The Pro Bowl, on Saturday, will be
the final game for Barber, who is
retiring after 10 seasons with the
New York Giants. His brother
Ronde, from the Tampa Bay Bucs, is
a cornerback on the NFC team.

“Tt’s like a family vacation paid for
by the NFL,” said Barber, 31, who
goes out as the NFL’s 17th leading
rusher, with 10,449 career yards.

Wearing a floral lei and looking
out at the Waikiki skyline, Tiki Bar-
ber said he has no second thoughts
about his decision to retire.

“It’s exciting, really, because I had
a great career, and it ended on my
terms,” he said. “I wasn’t carried off
the field on a stretcher. I didn’t sus-
tain a major injury that prevented me
from doing what I love to do. Now I
get to do something else.”

Barber’s only regret is not winning
a Super Bowl. He played in the game
in 2001, when the Giants were beaten
34-7 by the Baltimore Ravens.

“My fear, which ultimately came
true, is I wouldn’t get a chance to try
again,” he said. “That’s the NFL and
the unpredictable nature of team
sports. There’s been a lot of greats
that never got a chance to even play.”

Barber said he still has some game
left in him. He proved it this past sea-
son by running for 1,662 yards, his
fifth consecutive 1,000-yard season
and the second-highest total of his
career. Barber ran for 371 yards in the
final two games, including a team-re-
cord 234 yards in a 34-28 victory over
the Washington Redskins that earned
the Giants a playoff berth.

“I like the saying ‘Always leave
them wanting more. Leave too early
rather than too late, ” he said.

This past season, Barber joined
Marshall Faulk and Marcus Allen as

_INTERNATIONAL EDITION

_PRO FOOTBALL | HOCKEY





JAMIE SQUIRE/GETTY IMAGES

END OF THE LINE: Giants running
back Tiki Barber finishes his NFL
career Saturday in the Pro Bowl.

the only NFL players with 10,000
yards rushing and 5,000 yards receiv-
ing. And the weekly punishment on
his 5-foot-10, 205-pound frame has
taken its toll.

He specifically remembers the
second game of the season, against
the Philadelphia Eagles, who later
defeated the Giants in the playoffs on
a last-second field goal.

“Jeremiah Trotter: I think he hit
me every play,” Barber said. “I only
rushed for 40 yards or so, and we
ended up coming back and winning
the game — but, physically, I took a
pounding.”



PRO FOOTBALL

Unlike previous years, it took until
about Friday of that week for Barber
to recover.

“You start to realize this is a
young man’s game. This is for guys
who can get hit, knocked up, beat up
and be fine on Tuesday,” he said.

Barber nearly retired after the
2005 season, when he ran for a team-
record 1,860: yards. He returned for
another year because he thought the
team was talented enough to win the
Super Bowl.

Although the Giants showed signs
of being a Super Bowl contender by
opening 6-2, they struggled with off-
field bickering and team chemistry
and stumbled into the postseason
with an 8-8 record.

“The circumstances of getting
beat up, losing the passion a little bit
for it, told me it was time to do some-
thing else,” he said.

Barber plans to keep busy after he
hangs up his cleats.

He already is building a career in
TV broadcasting. He plans to.spend
more time with his two young sons,

_A.J. and Chason, and write more

children’s books, with one scheduled
to be released this year.

Barber also is working on a per-
sonal memoir, and he is an investor
in a company that makes a fruit-in-
fused drink called O Water.

“I’m in temporary retirement,”
Barber said. “I’m not sitting on a
hammock for the rest of my life.”

AROUND THE NFL

e Colts: Peyton Manning
always wanted to be late to the Pro
Bowl. He finally got the chance to
make the dramatic entrance reserved
for champions, thanks to the four
teammates with him in Hawaii and
the other 48 who delivered a title to
Indianapolis.

When Manning and the rest of the
Colts’ All-Pro selections took the
practice field with the AFC squad
Wednesday, they received the cus-
tomary greetings for new champs:





MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD



On the run: Barber plans to stay busy



REED SAXON/AP

ALOHA FROM HAWAII: Fresh off the Colts’ Super Bowl victory, QB Peyton
Manning takes snaps on Wednesday during practice for the Pro Bowl.

backslaps, best wishes and plenty of
rib-crunching hugs.

In his previous six trips to the Pro
Bowl, Manning tried to be among the
first to hand out those greetings, to
everybody from Colts nemesis Tom
Brady, the quarterback of the New
England Patriots, to Pittsburgh Stee-
ler guard Alan Faneca last season.

This time, Manning was on the
receiving end — and the Colts’ cham-
pionship suddenly seemed real to
Manning, the Super Bowl MVP.

“['d always noticed at the Tuesday
practices that the champions aren’t
here yet,” Manning said. “I thought it
would be nice to come over here late.
... I truly appreciate the support,
[but] you get a little bit embarrassed,
especially when people are loud.

“T just don’t like a lot of noise,
especially when somebody comes up
and picks you up, grabs you.”

After a late night of postgame par-
tying and a raucous rally back home
in Indianapolis on Monday, Manning
joined receivers Marvin Harrison

HOCKEY

and Reggie Wayne and offensive
linemen Tarik Glenn and Jeff Sat-
urday for a lengthy chartered flight
to Hawaii on Tuesday, courtesy of
the Colts owners. They found some-
thing to make the 4,340 miles fly,
however: They watched the tape of
Indianapolis’ 29-17 victory over the
Chicago Bears for the first time.

“Not much sleep. I wouldn’t say
I’m very well-rested, but it’s the kind
that you like,” Manning said. “Being
able to fly out here yesterday on Air
Irsay, as I call it, with my teammates,
and then to watch the Super Bowl on
the plane, that’s hard to beat.”

e Chargers: Safety Terrence
Kiel pleaded guilty to felony and mis-
demeanor drug charges for shipping
codeine-based cough syrup to Texas,
part of a plea bargain that could allow
him to avoid jail time. Kiel was
ordered to get counseling for gam-
bling and do 100 hours of volunteer
work, including talking to young peo-
ple about the dangers of drugs.

— ASSOCIATED PRESS











Note: Two points for a win, one point for a tie and overtime loss

RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Tonight’s games

Calgary at Columbus, 7
Carolina at Boston, 7

L.A. at Washington, 7

Pitt. at Philadelphia, 7
Montreal at Ottawa, 7:30
Islanders at N.J., 7:30
Detroit at St. Louis, 8
Florida at Minnesota, 8
Toronto at Nashville, 8
Atlanta at Colorado, 9 p.m.

Wednesday’s results

Buffalo 3, Ottawa 2
Detroit 4, Phoenix 2
Islanders 2, Philadelphia 0
San Jose at Anaheim, late
Chicago at Vancouver, late

Tuesday’s results

Colorado 5, Florida 4 (OT)
Buffalo 4, Atlanta 3 (SO)
Phoenix 3, Columbus 0
Boston 3, Washington 2 (SO)
Carolina 2, Montreal 1
Pittsburgh 4, Nashville 1
Tampa Bay 3, L.A. 2 (SO)
N.J. 3, Rangers 2 (SO)
Dallas 4, Minnesota 2
Toronto 2, St. Louis 1
Vancouver 5, Edmonton 2
Chicago 3, Calgary 2 (SO)
Anaheim 7, San Jose 4

NHL LEADERS tas

Through Tuesday
SCORING GOALIES
Plover teat Player, team GP MIN GAAVG
Crosby, Pit 50 25 61 86 Caron, Chi-Ana 2 88 21.36
eee i 32 40 72 — Backstrom, Min 18 958. 33 2.07
ecavalier, 55 34 36 70 Brodeur, NJ 52 3149 109 2.08
Ovechkin, Was 55 33 37 70 Hasek, Det 41 2425 84 2.08
Savard, Bos 52 18 50 68 — Smith, Dal 12 G11 22: 2.16
Thornton, SJ 54 14 54 68 Gigu, Ana 38 2145 78 2.18
poaey ee ea 31 36 67 Kiprusoff, Cal 49 2949 111 2.26
Hossa, All 31 36 67 — Nabokov, SJ 26 1373 53 2.32
Briere, Bu 55 23 44 67 — Turco, Dal 48 2652 103 2.33
Jagr, NYR 54 20 44 64 © 'Toskala, SJ 32 1853 72 2.33

iN} | or 1 3, LY

Feb. 27 - Trade deadline, 3 p.m. EST.
April 8 - Last day of regular season.
April 11 - Stanley Cup playoffs begin.
April 27-May 13 - IIHF World Championship.
May 29-June 2 - NHL combine, in Toronto.
June 23 - NHL Draft, in Columbus, Ohio.

uly 1 - Free-agency signing period begins.

TRANSACTIONS

Atlanta Thrashers: Assigned D Braydon Cob-
urn to Chicago of the AHL.

Minnesota Wild: Recalled RW Joel Ward
from Houston of the AHL.

New York Rangers: Assigned D Bryce Lamp-
man to Hartford of the AHL.

Vancouver Cauncks: Recalled D Alexander
Edler from Manitoba of the AHL.





Vanek slipped it into the open side.

The goal made up for a questionable
penalty call that went against the Sabres
earlier in the period and led to Schaefer’s
goal, which tied the score at 2.

Schaefer scored during a scramble
when he converted Mike Fisher’s
rebound.

The goal came on a Senators power
play, when officials incorrectly penalized
Teppo Numminen for delay of game after
the Sabres defenseman’s clearing attempt

_ went over the glass. Replays showed that

Numminen’s backhander first hit the
boards — which should have negated the
penalty — before going out of play.
Questionable call aside, this marked
the fifth time in seven: games that the
Sabres have allowed an opponent to tie
the score in the third period — with the
Sabres losing three of those outings.

ISLANDERS 2, FLYERS O

UNIONDALE, N.Y. — Rick DiPietro
made 27 saves in his fifth shutout of the
season, and the Islanders finally figured
out the Flyers at home.

DiPietro, who is 4-0-2 in his past six
starts, turned aside some challenging
shots but wasn’t really tested in posting
his lth NHL shutout.

The Islanders stretched their point
streak to a season-high eight games
(5-0-3) and moved within two points of
the Carolina Hurricanes, the eighth-place
team in the Eastern Conference.

. Knocking off the Flyers at Nassau Coli-

EASTERN CONFERENCE a
SOUTHEAST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV
Atlanta 29.18 6 3 G67 172 174 14-9-3-2 15-9-3-1 — 12-4-4-1
TampaBay 30 23 1 1 62175 167 14-13-0-0 16-10-1-112-7-0-0
Carolina 27-22. 3 «4 61168 177 14-10-1-3 | 13-12-2-1—13-6-0-2' :
Washington 22 25 2 6 52167 192 13-11-1-3 9-14-1-3 © 8-L]-1-1
Florida 20 24 5 6 51157 181 14-10-2-1 6-14-35 —5-11-2-0 From Miami Herald Wire Services
ATLANTIC WL OL SLPTS.GF GA HOME _ AWAY DIV BUFFALO, N.Y. — Thomas Vanek
Newlesey 33 15 0 6 72 146 29 1940-4 Is-11-02 i4401 | Scored twice, including the game-winner
Pittsburgh 27°17 «4«©S «63.179 162 :16-8-2-2,—:11-9-2-3.13-5-1-1 with 4 minutes left, to lift the Buffalo
NY. Islanders 26 21 4 3 59161 154 13-9-3-1 13-12-1-2 10-7-2-0 -2 vi
NY. Rangers 25 24 3 2 55156 161 10-12-3-0 15-12-02 9-9-0-1 sea roe ae ea over the Ottawa
Philadelphia 13 33. 3 4 33130 199 3-15-3-3 10-18-0-1— 3-14-1-3 enators on Wednesday night.

: Maxim Afinogenov also scored in help-
NORTHEAST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV ing the Sabres successfully open a season-
Buffalo 37.15 2 2.78209 161 18-7-1-1 19-B-1-1—12-8-1-1 high, six-game homestand and end a four-
Montreal 29 20 1 5 64161 159 17-9-0-3 12-11-1-2 10-6-0-4 : : :

Ottawa - 30 22 2 «1 «63:182 150 1S-11-1-1 15-11-10 139-01 | Bame losing streak against their Northeast
Toronto 27 21 2 4 60174 174 11-12-1-2 © 16-9-1-2 10-8-2-2 Division rivals. Backup goalie Martin
Boston 3424 «1 «3 52 147 194 14-11-0-2 10-13-1-1 10-12-01 | Biron was sharp in making 28 saves.
: Peter Schaefer and Dean McCammond

WESTERN CONFERENCE scored for the Senators, who dropped to
CENTRAL WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV ae a past . ners eed
Nashville 3718 2-1 77 :191 140 19-3-2-1 18-12-00 17-4-1-0 , e, Sabres, .wnho, twice: squanesre
Detroit 315 2 6170 132 20312 151121 12311 '| One-goal leads, won despite playing on
St. Louis 21 25 4 4 50136 166 11-14-2-1 10-11-2-3 7-12-2-2 consecutive nights after a 4-3 shootout
Columbus 21 28 2 3 47133 169 12-11-1-2 © 9-17-1-1—7-11-0-2 :
Chicago a ek apie leat Mdd2 S91sTal, Sidon Oe Be Atlanta. And they defeated a

; well-rested opponent — the Senators had
NORTHWEST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV been off since a 3-2 shootout loss against
Calgary 29 17. 3 4 65167 136 22-5-0-1 7-12-3-3-—_—11-5-1-2 the Toronto Maple Leafs on Saturday.
Vancouver 30 20 1 3 64 144 138 17-8-1-1 13-12-0-2 = 11-11-0-1 Vanek’s second goal came on the
Minnesota. 29 22 0 4 62153 141 18-5-0-3 11-17-0-1 —9-6-0-2 | ‘ : :
Colorado 26 23 2 «2 56167 159 15-1212 11-11-1-0 97-1-0 | PROWer play, during a wild scramble in
Edmonton 26 24 2 2 56149 160 16-11-1-1 10-13-1-1, 9-12-1-0 front of the goal. Vanek’s first shot from -
siciic 5 eure the slot — and with Senators goalie Ray
PACING 3.2 2 be oe a ae HOME _AWAY DIV | Emery out of position — was stopped by
Anaheim 33 13 2 .6 74180 139 18-4-1-4 15-9-1-2. 13-3-0-1 diving defenseman Anton Volchenkov.
San Jose 3419 0 1. 69 167 130 18-11-0-1 16-8-0-0 11-10-0-1 :
Dallas 4 18} ee its a2 1e801 1612041 15600 | The puck caromed to the left circle,
Phoenix 25.28 1 1 52149 184 13-12-1-0 12-16-0-1 — 7-13-1-1 where Ales Kotalik fanned on his attempt,
Los Angeles , 18 30 4 4 44 156 198 11-12-4-3 _7-18-0-1 . 6-14-0-2 but the shot slid to the right post, and



DAVID DUPREY/AP

BRING IT ON: Sabres goalie Martin Biron tracks a shot by Jason Spezza of the
Senators in the second period. Biron made 28 saves in the Sabres’ 3-2 victory.

seum has turned into as tough a task as
any for the Islanders. New York won both
matchups in Philadelphia this season —
where the Flyers have won only three
times — but dropped two on home ice,
joining Atlanta as the only teams to lose
multiple games to them this season.

Viktor Kozlov scored in the first
period Wednesday night, and Miroslav
Satan doubled the lead in the second
period. That was enough to break the
Islanders’ four-game, home-losing streak
to the Flyers, who are 14-4-1-] in their past
20 trips to Long Island.

RED WINGS 4, COYOTES 2

DETROIT — Henrik Zetterberg
scored twice, including a go-ahead goal
early in the third period that was the
100th of his career, to lead the Red Wings.

Robert Lang and Pavel Datsyuk also
scored for the Red Wings, who have won
five games in a row to pull within a point
of the Central Division-leading Nashville
Predators. The Red Wings have won Il in
a row at home — matching their longest
winning streak in three years — and are
20-3-3 overall at Joe Louis Arena.

Owen Nolan and Shane Doan scored

for the Coyotes, who have lost four of
their past six games.
Dominik Hasek made 20 saves in goal
for the Red Wings.
‘Curtis Joseph faced a lot more shots,
stopping 44 to give the Coyotes a chance
against one of his former teams.

LATE TUESDAY

e Avalanche 5, Panthers 4 (OT):
Joe Sakic scored a power-play goal 25 sec-
onds into overtime, and host Colorado
rallied past Florida.

Sakic got open in front of the goal, and
Paul Stastny hit him with a pass from
behind the net.

e Canucks 5, Oilers 2: Daniel
Sedin’s hat trick led Vancouver past host
Edmonton. Sedin’s twin brother, Henrik,
had four assists.

e Blackhawks 3, Flames 2 (SO):
Martin Havlat scored twice in the final
three minutes and again in the shootout
as Chicago rallied past host Calgary.

e Ducks 7, Sharks 4: Travis Moen’s
second goal capped Anaheim’s four-goal
second period, and the Ducks won the
front half of a key home-and-home series
with host San Jose.

see A



THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com



Police say Pacers trio involved in

From Miami Herald Wire Services

INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana
Pacers guard Jamaal Tinsley
and teammates Marquis Dan-
iels and Keith McLeod were
involved in a fight with a bar
manager after a home loss to
Golden State, police said.

No one was immediately
arrested or charged after the
Tuesday fight.

Indianapolis police Lt.
Doug Scheffel said Wednes-
day it would take several days
to complete the investigation
to determine if charges would
be filed. .

The Indianapolis police
report said the bar manager of

the 8 Seconds Saloon might .

have a fractured jaw and sev-
ered earlobe.

He told officers that Tin-
sley had threatened to kill him,
the report said. Witnesses told
officers that McLeod had
shoved people during the scuf-
fle that happened about 2:15
a.m. EST at the club on the
city’s west side.

The confrontation followed
another fight involving a per-
son who employees thought
was trying to steal coats from
the coat check area, police
said.

The manager and witnesses

told officers that Tinsley, Dan-
iels and a man with them
punched the manager in the
face and head. :

The manager “stated that
he was unable to defend him-
self, at which time both wit-
nesses... Stated that they felt
that the life of the victim was
in danger,” according to the
report. Pacers CEO Donnie
Walsh said in a statement
Wednesday that the team was
aware of the allegations but
would have no further com-
ment until police complete the
investigation.

“I had nothing to do with
this,” Tinsley said in a state-
ment released by the Pacers.
“l’m extremely upset that my
name has been associated with

_ this.”

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

PRO BASKETBALL

AROUND THE NBA



MICHAEL CONROY/AP

PM INNOCENT: Pacers guard
Jamaal Tinsley said: ‘I had
nothing to do with this.’

Daniels’ agent, Glenn
Schwartzman, said the players
were at the nightclub for an
event celebrating the India-
napolis Colts’ Super Bowl vic-
tory and that Daniels was not
involved in the fight.

“Tt is 100 percent, no doubt
about it,” Schwartzman told

The Associated Press. “He is a
good guy who did nothing
wrong other than be an NBA
player and out with the com-

munity after the Colts won the

Super Bowl.”

Tinsley was at a strip club
with then-Pacers teammate
Stephen Jackson in October
when a fight broke out during
which Jackson fired a gun into
the air several times before he
was hit by a car.

Tinsley was not charged in
that fight, but Jackson faces
criminal recklessness and
other charges. Jackson has
pleaded not guilty.

e Elsewhere: Forward
Jermaine O’Neal was deacti-
vated for Wednesday night’s
game against Seattle because
of swelling in his left knee.

O’Neal, Indiana’s leading
scorer and rebounder, banged
his knee in a game at Memphis
last week. He played Monday
night against Golden State, but
the swelling worsened
Wednesday.



KENT HORNER/GETTY IMAGES
OUT OF ACTION: Pacers
forward Jermaine O’Neal
has swelling in his knee.

‘AROUND THE LEAGUE

e Kings: Animal services
officers seized a Great Dane
from the mansion of Sacra-
mento star Ron Artest, saying
the dog was underfed.

Neighbors complained for
weeks that the dog — named
Socks — appeared to be starv-

WEDNESDAY’S GAMES

Sours take out Wizards

From Miami Herald Wire Services

WASHINGTON — Tony Parker and Tim
Duncan scored 20 points apiece, and the San
Antonio Spurs pulled even on their rodeo
road trip Wednesday night with a 110-83 vic-
tory over the Washington Wizards.

The Spurs never trailed, shot 62 percent
in the first half and led by double digits for all
but the first 4:05 of the game. They had
assists on 29 of their 42 field goals and
became the latest Western Conference con-
tender to handle a Wizards team that’s bat-
tling for the best record in the East.

Before the game, coach Gregg Popovich
said the Spurs’ eight-game stretch on the
road was a “a season-making trip for us — or
season-breaking.” San Antonio had dropped
two in.a row, but the victory over the Wiz-
ards put the Spurs at 2-2 during their annual
get-out-of-town that coincides with the Feb-
ruary’rodeo show back home.

The Spurs have had trouble holding onto
big leads, and that nearly happened again
Wednesday.

A 24-point, second-half lead was down to
ll in the final minute of the third quarter, but
Fabricio Oberto kept a possession alive by
punching a missed free throw to a teammate.
The sequence helped put San Antonio ahead
84-70 entering the fourth, and Manu Ginobili
opened the final period with three 3-pointers
and a pair of free throws in a 12-2 run to
increase the lead back to 24.

Ginobili finished with 18 points on 6-for-8
shooting. Duncan, who frequently had his
.way against the undersized Wizards front-
court, shot 9-for-16 and’‘had seven rebounds
and five assists.

Gilbert Arenas scored 29 points but made
only 10-of-24 shots for the Wizards, who fell
to 1-3 sincé Antawn Jamison was sidelined
with a knee injury. In the past month, Wash-
ington has lost by 22 to Phoenix, by 16 to the
Los Angeles Lakers and by 13 and 27 to the
Spurs. The Wizards also lost by 27 to Dallas
in November.

HEAT 91, CELTICS 79

BOSTON — The Heat keep winning, and
the Celtics keep on losing. Dwyane Wade
had 30 points and nine assists to lead the
Heat to their fifth consecutive victory, beat-
ing Boston and sending the Celtics.to a fran-
chise-record 16th loss in a row.

Boston led by as many as 12 in the first
quarter before the Heat went on a 19-2 run to
take the lead for good. Wade had six points
and an assist during a 13-4 Miami spurt at the
_ beginning of the third that made it 57-44. The
Heat then started the fourth with a 14-3 run
to blow it open.

Shaquille O’Neal scored nine points in 25
minutes as he recovers from knee surgery.
Jason Kapono scored 19 and Udonis Haslem
had nine points and 10 rebounds for the

defending champions, who pulled within a —

game of .500.

Boston has not won since beating Mem-
phis on Jan. 5. Now the Celtics and Grizzlies
are fighting for the best spot in the draft lot-
tery and a chance to draft Ohio State’s Greg
Oden or Texas’ Kevin Durant.

Ryan Gomes led Boston with 15 points,
and Wally Szczerbiak had 14 despite sprain-
ing his left ankle and leaving with 15 minutes
left in the game. Al Jefferson had 13 points

‘ and 17 rebounds.

CAVALIERS 94, CLIPPERS 77

CLEVELAND —' Zydrunas Ilgauskas
scored 16 points with a season-high 16
rebounds, Larry Hughes scored 15 points and
the Cavaliers hardly needed LeBron James in
an easy victory.

James scored ll points — three above his
season low and 15 below his average — and
spent the first half of the fourth quarter
watching as the scuffling Cavaliers, who
came in just 4-8 since Jan. 16, won their fifth
in a row at home against the Clippers.



HARRY E. WALKER/MCT

AN EASY TWO: Spurs forward Tim Duncan slams home two of his 20 points as
Wizards forward Etan Thomas can only watch in San Antonio’s 110-83 victory.

Sasha Pavlovic added 16 points and Drew
Gooden had 13 for Cleveland, which held the
Clippers to 35 percent shooting.

RAPTORS 113, MAGIC 103

“TORONTO — Chris Bosh scored a
career-high 41 points and outplayed Dwight
Howard in a matchup of All-Star big men as
the Raptors won their season-high fourth in a
row.

Bosh also had eight rebounds for the
Atlantic Division-leading Raptors, who have
won nine of ll.

Howard had 32 points on 13-for-14 shoot- .

ing for the Magic, who have lost 11 of 14 to fall
to .500 (25-25) for the first time since early
November.

NETS 87, HAWKS 85

ATLANTA — Vince Carter made the go-
ahead layup with 7.6 seconds remaining,
grabbed a critical rebound on Atlanta’s final
possession, and the Nets stopped a four-
game losing streak.

Carter led the Nets with 22 points and
nine boards. Mikki Moore added 19 points
and Jason Kidd had nine assists.

MAVERICKS 113, GRIZZLIES 97

DALLAS — Dirk Nowitzki scored 18 of his
38 points in a flawless first quarter, and the
Mavericks beat the Grizzlies to match a fran-
chise record by winning their 16th consecu-
tive home game.

Nowitzki made all seven of his field goals
in the opening quarter, including a 14-footer
at the buzzer, to go along with 4-of-4 free

throws, four rebounds, two assists and two
steals.

SUPERSONICS 103, PACERS 102

INDIANAPOLIS — Ray Allen scored 33
points and rookie Andre Brown made the go-
ahead basket with 23 seconds remaining, lift-
ing the SuperSonics over the Pacers.

Allen had 10 points in the fourth quarter,
including two consecutive baskets after the
Pacers went ahead 99-92 in the final minutes.

TIMBERWOLVES 121, WARRIORS 93 »

MINNEAPOLIS — Kevin Garnett had 17
points, 15 rebounds and 10 assists, and Min-
nesota snapped a four-game losing streak.

Garnett had 11 points, 10 rebounds and
eight assists in the first half, then earned his
17th career triple-double with an assist with
3:05 remaining in the third quarter.

76ERS 92, BOBCATS 83

PHILADELPHIA — Andre Iguodala
scored 27 points and Andre Miller had 13 to
lead the suddenly surging 76ers.

Gerald Wallace and Emeka Okafor each
scored 16 points for the Bobcats.

LATE TUESDAY

e Suns 109, Trail Blazers 102 (OT):
Amare Stoudemire scored 36 points and
Leandro Barbosa added 23 of his 25 after half-
time to lead visiting Phoenix to the victory.

Phoenix was missing two-time MVP Steve
Nash, who sat out with a shoulder injury that
kept him out of the second half in Monday’s
113-108 victory at Denver.



|
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i
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i
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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007 | 9

ar fight ©

ing inside a gated area on Art-
est’s $1.85 million estate in
rural Loomis, according to a
county report.

On Jan. 30, animal services
officers visited Artest’s home
and issued a “pre-seizure”’
notice, warning him that the
female Great Dane would be
taken into custody if the ani-
mal care didn’t improve.

Placer County animal ser-
vices officers returned to Art-
est’s home Monday and
removed Socks. Artest has 10
days to request a hearing,
county spokeswoman Anita
Yoder said.

e Lakers: Center Kwame
Brown will. be sidelined |
another four-to-six weeks
after seeking a second opinion
with a foot doctor in Indianap-
olis on his severely sprained
left ankle. j

e Mavericks: Starting
center Erick Dampier missed
the game against Memphis on
Wednesday night because of a
sore right knee.



NBA STANDINGS ~

EASTERN CONFERENCE



SOUTHEAST W L Pet. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Washington 28 20 .583 - 64 L-1 19-6 9-14 19-10
Orlando 25 25 500 4 3-7 L3 16-10 9-15 15-16
Miami 24 25 «490 4% 6-4 W-5 13-10 11-15 13-14
Atlanta 18 30 375 10° 5-5 L2 9-15 915 12-20
Charlotte 18 31 367 10% 4-6 L-2 10-14 8-17 12-20
ATLANTIC W/L Pet. GB 10 Str. Home Away _ Conf
Toronto 26 23. 531 - 82 W-4. 17-7 9-16 18-9
New Jersey 23 27 .460 3% 3-7 W-l 13-12 10-15 17-13
New York 22 28 .440 4% 5-5 W-2 13-13 9-15 13-18
Philadelphia 17 33 .340 9% 6-4 W-2 9-12 821 12-17
Boston 12 36 250 13% 0-10 L-16 4-20 816 8-23
CENTRAL WL Pet. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Detroit 29 18 617 - 82 W-4 14-9 15-9 21-10
Chicago 28 21 S71 2 64 Ll 20-6 815 20-8
Cleveland 28 21. 571 2 5-5 W-l 18-7 10-14 17-14
indiana 26 23 531 4 «64 L-2 15-9 11-14 19-13

"388 11 2-8 W-l 11-9 821 9-20

Milwaukee 19 30

WESTERN CONFERENCE

Sea. 103, Ind. 102
S.A. 110, Was. 83
Phi. 92, Cha. 83
Cle. 94, L.A.C. 77
Min. 121, G.S.W. 93
Mem. at Dal.,-late
N.O. at Den., late

SOUTHWEST WL. Pct. GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf
Dallas 39 9 813 - 9-1 W-4 22-3. 17-6 27-6
San Antonio ; 33 16 673 6% 6-4 W-1 16-8 17-8 21-11
Houston 31 17° 646° 8 6-4 W-2 . 17-6 “14-11 18-15
New Orleans 21, 27, ..438. 18 . 6-4 L-1. 14-11 7-16 12-18
Memphis"! © 12 37° %245 27% 3-7 L-3 9-17 3-20 6-23
NORTHWEST W.L_ Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Utah 32 17. 653 - 7-3 W-3 18-6 14-11 20-10
Denver 23 23 500 7% 4-6 L-2 13-13 10-10 10-15
Minnesota 23 26 «4.469 «9: «(3-7 Wel. 14-9 917 14-18
Portland 20 30 .40012% 46 L-3 12-14 8-16 13-17
Seattle 18 31 .367 14 4-6 W-1 13-12) 5-19 7-19
PACIFIC = W_L_ Pct. GB 10 Str. Home Away Conf
Phoenix 39 10 796 - 82 W-2 20-4, 19-6 19-9
L.A. Lakers 30 19 .612 9 4-6 W-2 19-6 11-13 17-10
L.A. Clippers 24 25 490-15 6-4 L-3.. 17-8 7-17 14-17
Golden State 23 27 .46016% 46 L-l 17-8 6-19 13-16
Sacramento 20 26 .43517% 6-4 W-3. 14-11 6-15 11-18
RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Wednesday’s results Tonight’s games Tuesday’s results
Miami 91, Boston 79 Mil. at N.O., 8 Detroit 109, Boston 102
NJ. 87, Atl. 85 LA.L. at Det., 8 N.Y. 102, Clippers 90
Tor. 113, Orl. 103 Chi. at Sac., 10:30 Houston 98, Memphis 90

Mil. 116, Orlando 111
Pho. 109, Port. 102 (OT)

A) 8S





Through Tuesday
SCORING REBOUNDING
G FG FT PTS AVG G OFF DEF ‘TOT AVG
Anthony, Den. 31 358 225 960 31.0 Garnett, Minn. 47 119 463 582 12.4
Arenas, Wash. 47 436 368 1382 29.4 Camby, Den. 40 104 384 488 12.2
Iverson, Den. 34 329 292 982 28.9 Howard, Orl. 49 161 426 587 12.0
Bryant, LAL 45 430 358 1296 28.8 Boozer, Utah 45 142 389 531 11.8
Wade, Mia. 41 390 3811179 288 Chandler, NOk. 46 177 352 529 11.5
Redd, Mil. 33 302 244 914 27.7 Okafor, Char. 48 190 354 544 11.3
Allen, Sea. 38 354 199 1016 26.7 Duncan, S.A. 48 145 373 518 10.8
* James, Clev. 46 443 277 1225 26.6 ~— Lee, N.Y. 50 175 364 539 10.8
Johnson, Atl. 43 416 176 1104 25.7 O'Neal, Ind. 43 104 347 451 10.5
Carter, NJ. 49 432 267 1223 25.0 Randolph, Port. 49 148 360 508 10.4
FIELD GOALS ASSISTS
FG FGA PCT G AST AVG
Biedrins, G.S. 219 355 .617 Nash, Phoe. 46 542 11.8
Stoudemire, Phoe, 345 569 .606 Williams, Utah 49 447 9.1
Lee, N.Y. 214 353 .606 = Kidd, NJ. 49 430 88
Curry, N.Y. 356 613 .581 Davis, G.S. 43 372. 87
Howard, Orl. 294 513 573 Paul, NOk. 31 267 8.6
Boozer, Utah 410 721 569 Miller, Phil. 47 392 8.3
Brand, LAC 397 710 .559 Wade, Mia. 4l 325 7.9
Dalembert, Phil. 215 385 .558 _ Billups, Det. 39 300 «7.7
Bogut, Mil. 253 460 550 —‘ Ford, Tor. 41 3137.6
Gasol, Mem. 208 380 .547 Iverson, Den. 34 256 7.5

UR eS

Sunday, Feb. 18,

at the Thomas & Mack Center, Las Vegas

EASTERN CONFERENCE

STARTERS

Gilbert Arenas, G, Washington
Chris Bosh, F, Toronto

LeBron James, G, Cleveland
Shaquille O'Neal, C, Miami
Dwyane Wade, G, Miami

RESERVES

Chauncey Billups, G, Detroit
‘Caron Butler, F, Washington

* Vince Carter, F, New Jersey

Richard Hamilton, G, Detroit
Dwight Howard, F, Orlando
Jason Kidd, G, New Jersey
Jermaine O'Neal, F, Indianapolis

WESTERN CONFERENCE

STARTERS

Kobe Bryant, G, L.A. Lakers
Tim Duncan, F, San Antonio
Kevin Garnett, F, Minnesota
Tracy McGrady, F, Houston
Yao Ming, C, Houston

RESERVES

Carlos Boozer, F, Utah

Allen Iverson, G, Denver

Shawn Marion, F, Phoenix

Steve Nash, G, Phoenix

Dirk Nowitzki, F, Dallas

Tony Parker, G, San Antonio
Amare Stoudemire, F-C, Phoenix

oe NBA AWARDS

PLAYER OF THE MONTH

November
Eastern Conference: Dwigh
ard, Orlando Magic
Western Conference: Yao
Houston Rockets

December

Eastern Conference: Gilbert Arenas,

Washington Wizards
Western Conference: Kobe
Los Angeles Lakers

January

Eastern Conference: Chris Bosh, To-

ronto Raptors

Eastern Conference: Steve Nash,

Phoenix Suns

ROOKIE OF THE MONTH

November
Eastern Conference: Adam Morri-
son, Charlotte Bobcats
Western Conference: Rudy Gay,
Memphis Grizzlies

t How-

Ming,

December
Eastern Conference: Jorge Garba-
josa, Toronto Raptors
Western Conference: Randy Foye,
Minnesota Timberwolves

Bryant,

January ‘
Eastern Conference: Andrea Bargnani,
Toronto Raptors
Western Conference: Brandon Roye,
Portland Trail Blazers



6E | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2







INTERNATIONAL EDITION .





_ MiamiHerald.com |_THE MIAMI HERALD

JOHN RAOUX/AP

IT ALL STARTS HERE: NASCAR officially drops the flag on the 2007 season with the Daytona 500, on Feb. 18. The Budweiser Shootout, an early exhibition race, is Saturday night.



NASCAR roars back to life this month, —

and

BY JENNA FRYER
' Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Buckle up,
race fans, for a season that promises
to be like nothing ever seen before.

With the mandated Car of Tomor-
row, changes to the Chase for the
Championship, Toyota’s arrival,
ESPN’s return and the introduction
of former Formula One driver Juan
Pablo Montoya, 2007 will prove that
this ain’t your Daddy’s NASCAR. _

This season will be a pivotal one
for NASCAR, which is aiming to
rebound after a mediocre 2006 that
saw television ratings slip and made
many wonder if the sport had
reached its plateau.

But NASCAR chairman Brian
France hasn’t strayed from his belief
that all is well in his family-owned
business.

“We're in a very strong position,”
France said. “We are still the No. 2
sport on television. Promoters con-
tinue to enjoy great ticket sales
throughout the year, and I know
2007, with all of the things that are
going on, will make for an exciting
season.”

FIRST UP: DAYTONA

It all begins this weekend at Day-
tona International Speedway, where
the best of the Nextel Cup Series will
kick-start the season with Saturday
night’s Budweiser Shootout, an exhi-
bition race.

Preparations begin the next day
for the season-opening Daytona 500,
on Feb: 18. The race will mark the
first time that a Japanese automaker
will take the green flag in NASCAR’s
top series, as Toyota is expected to
have at least a handful of its Camrys
in the field. Seven different drivers
will race Camrys this season, includ-
ing two-time Daytona 500 winner
Michael Waltrip and 1999 Cup cham-
pion Dale Jarrett.

The inclusion of a foreign auto
maker in a decidedly American sport
has rankled many longtime fans,
which Jarrett believes is a closed-
minded attitude.

“I’m as American as the next per-
son that’s here, and I pay my taxes
just like everybody else, and I love
this country,” Jarrett said. “Toyota is



SESS
GREGORY SHAMUS/GETTY IMAGES.

THE FUTURE IS NOW: NASCAR adds a new look with the Car of Tomorrow, a universal body style that will
be phased into competition this season with 16 races, beginning in March at Bristol Motor Speedway.
Each automaker will build a version of its own based on standard, aerodynamic design requirements,
including an adjustable rear wing. Michael Waltrip, above, took one out for a test drive back in August.

a big part of the United States econ-
omy. They’re going to put a lot of
dollars in the sport, in promoting
our sport, and that’s going to be
good for our sport as a whole.”

HERE COMES MONTOYA

The race also will include Mon-
toya, a native of Colombia who will
be the only minority driver in
NASCAR’s top series this season. A
former CART champion, Indianapo-
lis 500 winner and popular F1 driver,
Montoya is starting what is expected
to be abumpy transition from open-
wheel dominance to the stock-car
track.

An aggressive and outspoken
driver, Montoya also has proved to
be a quick study on the NASCAR cir-
cuit, leading many insiders to predict
that he will end up in Victory Lane at
least once this season.

PEALE Tea ee





Montoya says he
just wants to take it
one race at a time.

“This is a learning
process for me, and
there’s no rush for
me to be perfect,”
Montoya said.

“But I am also not
here for fun. This is
serious business, and I plan on win-
ning races.”



MONTOYA

Montoya is expected to bring new

fans to NASCAR, and they will have
no problem finding him — he will be
featured heavily on satellite radio
and television.

NASCAR is ramping up its expo-
sure through Sirius Satellite Radio,
which has an entire NASCAR chan-
nel that will provide flag-to-flag cov-
erage on race day, and by welcoming
back ESPN after a long hiatus.

GS HAUSE LOTT LE

L

EXPANDING THE VIEW

ESPN was one of NASCAR's origi-
nal broadcast partners, but the net-
work was frozen out of coverage in
the 2001 television package, which
awarded the broadcast rights to Fox
and NBC.

But the sports network is back
with a vengeance, promising to
devote hours upon hours of air time
and a nightly NASCAR Now news
program.

“A lot has changed at ESPN since
we did our last race in 2000,” said
John Skipper, the network’s vice
president of content.

“We no longer think of the races
as a three-hour event. We think of the
races as an opportunity for us to
establish ESPN as the 24-7 home of
the NASCAR fan.” . ‘

ESPN also will be home to the
Busch Series, promising NASCAR's



t promises to be a season of change:

junior varsity the first stable pro-
gramming schedule in its history.

THE CAR OF TOMORROW

All that coverage should make it
easy to decide if NASCAR’s Car of
Tomorrow helps or hinders the
sport. The futuristic vehicle, a uni-
versal body style designed and devel-
oped by NASCAR, will be phased
into competition this season with 16
races, beginning with the March race
at Bristol Motor Speedway. Each
automaker will build its own version
based on standard, aerodynamic
design requirements, including an
adjustable rear wing.

Intended to improve racing, cut
costs and bolster.safety, the Car of
Tomorrow has drawn a wide differ-
ence in opinion around the garage.
And many believe that the team that
adapts the fastest will be crowned
Nextel Cup champion — the car will
be used in five of the 10 Chases.

‘IT’S A CRAPSHOOT’

“J think it’s really going to come
down to who has the best feel for that
car,” said two-time Cup champion
Tony Stewart. “It’s a crapshoot, I
think, and we’re all going to have to
wait and see who has their stuff
together on the Car of Tomorrow.”

It also comes down to winning, as
NASCAR puts an emphasis on finish-
ing first through tweaks to the Chase
format. NASCAR always has been an
exercise in consistency, with most
drivers content to settle for a top-10
finish. But France hopes to change
that by awarding five more points for
victories this year.

Those triumphs also will be good
for bonuses when the Chase begins
—- for every victory scored during
the “regular season,” a driver will get
a 10-point cushion to be used in seed-
ing the playoff field.

It’s all a lot to ingest, but France is
confident that fans will adapt.

“We're very careful with our fan
base and loyalties, and we’re not
going to squander that away,” he
said. “We're going to make changes
that we think they’ll like, and that
enhance competition on the track
first and foremost.

“That’s where it starts for us.”






.
©
’

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roe
oe
oe



THE TRIBUNE

Nata ih une) y rN Bay ae)

|
|
|
|

PASE

“-" § CHINESE President, Hu Jintao, delivers a keynote address Wednesday, Feb. 7, 2007, in Preto-
ria, South Africa. Hu said his government would increase imports from Africa to balance the trade
between China and the continent.

~

(AP Photo/Lisa van Deventer)

on wide ToS

thee}

BOPAT ttt Cees tenet Reker Bey Mia os a



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 23

says China will
increase imports

from Africa to

balance trade

@ PRETORIA, South Africa

CHINESE President Hu
Jintao promised Wednesday
to increase imports from

Africa, responding to fears

about the trade deficit that
increased as China pumped
unprecedented aid, invest-
ment and loans into the poor
but resource-rich continent,
according to Associated Press.

Hu spoke in South Africa
on the sixth stop of an eight-
nation tour of the continent,
where Beijing’s pursuit of
energy and mineral resources
has boosted business but also

raised fears about its support

for nations condemned for
human rights violations.

“China takes seriously the
concerns about the imbalance
in the structure in China-
Africa trade,” Hu said in an
address at the University of
Pretoria, promising “effective
steps to address those con-
cerns.”

On Tuesday, Hu signed
agreements on economic and
technical cooperation in the
mining and energy sectors
and inaugurated a Web site
to foster commercial ties.

China is an old friend of the
African National Congress
party of President Thabo
Mbeki, which it supported
while South Africa was under
a racist white regime. It pro-
vided arms and military train-
ing for guerrilla fighters, uni-
versity scholarships and diplo-

" matic support in the interna-

tional arena.

When South = Africa
achieved majority rule a
decade ago, the new govern-

ment switched sides from Tai-
wan and soon became China’s
biggest trade partner in
Africa.

Trade between China and
South Africa, the continent’s
economic powerhouse and a
major gold producer, reached
$240 million in the first 11
months of 2006, an increase
of 34,5 percent over the pre-
vious year.

But there has been growing
criticism of increasing Chi-
nese domination and aid with
infrastructure projects tied to
Chinese companies and labor.

South African trade unions
have complained that Chinese
textile imports have cost some
100,000 jobs in the domestic
industry. This forced both
governments to agree, to
restrict imports.

Chinese, Ambassador Liu
Guijin said this week that
China was ready to fund pro-
grams that would help create
jobs, including in. training,

capacity building and agricul- _

tural development.

“We in Africa like the
investment side and China’s
hassle-free loans, but the

trade issue can become very:
said-- Eric’ play a large economic role in

problematic,”
Skosana, an information sci-
ences student among dozens
who crowded outside the
capacity-filled auditorium

_ where Hu addressed nearly

1,500 people.

Accountant student Alvin
Kee, whose parents emigrated
to South Africa from Hong
Kong, said “I can see China
being good for Africa. Peo-
ple think they are coming just

for our resources, but they

Li

py,

Ey,

also are coming for, develop-
ment and_ increasing
trade.”

Hu already has visited
Cameroon,:Liberia, Sudan,
Zambia and Namibia and
leaves Wednesday for
Mozambique before heading
to the Seychelles. His trip has
focused on boosting trade ties
and ensuring aid pledges
made at last year’s China-

' Africa summit are realized, ~
including reducing debt, -.

increasing aid and cutting
import tariffs.

Namibia and opposition
politicians in South Africa
objected to China’s support
for corrupt governments
accused of human rights abus-
es, such as those in Zimbabwe
and Sudan.

China has been criticized

against Sudan, Beijing’s third

eta

“ates

%

Human rights activists in 2

2m

for blocking U.N. resolutions *”

largest supplier of oil, whose *

troops and government-fund-

ed militia are blamed for

killings of more than 200,000
-people in Darfur.

“ The opposition Democratic

Alliance urged Mbeki to
“ensure that if China is to

Africa, it must not be at the
expense of good governance
and sound human rights prac-
tices.”

Mbeki said Tuesday that
Hu’s visit — his second to

South Africa —“emphasizes

the determination on both
sides to develop relations.”

“China is one of our. most
critical, most important eco-
nomic partners globally,”
Mbeki said.

DSA MAA NAS AG

.

Chinese president ae

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.

|









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ae Cini i i

PAGE 24, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007 THE TRIBUNE



Rawson . ;
Square Be

RAWSON SQUARE was
packed recently when the ~.
Bahamas International Film a
Festival screened the first. -* : one
film in their Monthly Film’. Sa
Series.

Eleutheran Adventure; z a,
documentary directed by -
Kareem Mortimer, claimed '
the 2006 BIFF Audience §«
Award for Best Documen=!
tary,.and proved to be a hit:
again for this special screen-
ing Dee are: ’

_. The Monthly Film Series*, - ,
continues on February 24 at:
Rawson Square with the -*.*.°
screening of Half Nelson, A {
starring Ryan Gosling and + re
Anthony Mackie. The ce. te
starts at 7.30pm. Be aes
}





eae *




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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

_ IN LOVING MEMORY




WI,

EAST SUN @pRISE MORTUARY

A New Commitment To Service’
mT ts 7 ryt SAY ae

ROSEMARY.
AGATHA
STORR-FRANCIS, 56

of Pastell Gardens, and formerly a
resident of Bullock Harbour, Berry
Islands and Cockburn Town, San
Salvador (birthplace) will be held on
Saturday at 10 a.m. at The Anglican
Church of the Epiphany, Prince
Charles Drive. Officiating will be Fr.
Delano Archer. Interment will follow
in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.
















Juan Carlos Deveaux
March 22nd, 1975-February 7th, 1999



She is survived by 2 daughters, Denise and Yvette Francis; 2 sons,
Clinton and Neil Francis; 1 stepson, James Francis Jr.; her
grandchildren, Stephen and Kaylisa Thompson, Catika Rolle, Busker,
Brandon, Gabrielle and Christon Panza; Cordero, James Ill, Brittany,
Emmitt and Aria Francis and Brandy Rodriquez; 2 sisters, Eleanor
Tinker and Caroline Fernander; nieces, Sandra Lewis-Bethel, Paula
Jones, Debbie Edgecombe Bullard, Joanne and Keva Edgecombe,
Tameka and Tamara Fowler, Jennifer Bethel, Melissa Mackey, Jessica
Lynden, Valencia Francis, Wanda Newton, Latoya McPhee, Vernel
Francis and Dorothy Hart; nephews, Derek, Dominic, Tafari and Jade
Edgecombe, Weldon Fernander, Tavares Fowler, Ralph Jr., Andre,
Jason, Valence Jr., Wavel Jr., Winton and Taz Francis; aunts, Hazel
and Leanna Edgecombe, Fredricka Johnson, Catherine Feuteux of
Boston; brothers-in-law, Ralph Sr., Valence Sr., Wayde and Wavel §
Francis; sisters-in-law, Oria and Monique Francis, Ruth Edgecombe;
nephews-in-law, Peter Jones, Gregory Bethel, Lucian Bullard, Billy
Mackey, Roma Bethel, Kendrick Hart; niece-in-law, Patrice Fernander,
Dorell Darville-Edgecombe; stepdaughter-in-law, Monique Francis;
special friend, Christopher Bethel; other relatives and friends including,
Elaine Cartwright, Eula Hall, Mildred Johnson, Bertha Roberts, Sister
Agatha Hunt OSB, Rosemary, Martin and Macy Hunt, Portia Barnett,
Millie Minnis and family, Mae Ward and family, Idell Jones and family,
Mavis Vanderpool, Pamela Williams-Munroe, Lillis Sweeting, Brenda
Whylly and family, Livingstone Rolle, John Panza and family, Martin
Laing, Michael Brennen, Cynthia Bastian, Roland and Maudline
Pinder, Bill Gilbert, Mr. and Mrs. Luden Gibson, Raymond Wilson,
Lorraine Johnson, Melvern Rolle, Idell Hanna and family, Karen Rolle
and family, the staff at H.S.B.C., Collins Rollins and family, Dr. Bastian,
the entire community of Bullocks Harbour, the Dean, Winder, Brennen, §
Roberts and Pinder families, doctors and nurses of Female Medical
Il of the Princess Margaret Hospital.







Wonder why you left us?
With such an emptiness in our hearts?
But God knows the answer
You were His from the start

















You left us oh so suddenly

With no when’s, no where’s no how...
We said each day since that Sunday, why Juan
Did you have to leave us now?





























But God gave you to us,
For a short time, to Love and Care for
You were special to us
And, made our family complete.~















Although this had to happen
We don't claim to understand
But we as well as others
Must hold to God’s unchanging hands!



















. We love you and can’t wait to see you again.





Friends may pay their last’ respects at East Sunrise Mortuary, Rosetta Love,
Street, Palmdale from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and from 9 a.m.

at the church on Saturday until service time.

- EAST SUNRISE MORTUARY.

“A New Commitment To Service”

#27 Rosetta Street, P.O.Box C.B. 12248 / Palmdale,
_ Nassau, Bahamas — s«




Parents, Edward “Shark” and Beverly Deveaux; brothers,
Ricardo & Dion; Sister, Deidre; Sisters-in-law, Pamela & Tonette;
Brother-in-law, Berkley; nieces, Diontae, Richea and Destiny, aunts,
uncles and nephews, Mykle and the entire Deveaux family and
friends especially Jamaal.






_ Tel: (242) 323-EAST — (242) 326-4209 Fax: 356-2957
24 hrs. Emergency Service
Cell #: 357-9151 ¢ Beeper: 380-1450 or 380-1117




Permanent online memorial

http://juan-deveaux.memory-of.com





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 3









. a P Jr., Brenton, Philipian, Donathon, Rashard, Janico,
ee oy Serving with : ‘

Emerald Ringe Mortnary es 7 y Be eo} Arlington Jr., Mario, Antiono, Freeman Jr., and
rie C 2 toi Lencur + Wendell Jr.;

& Mouument Compary HD. S QD) Bie 3 Thirteen Nieces: Jernice Tequila Jonell, Rynesha
Mameate ee ee : Cheyenna, Cradell, Netta, Barbara, Sharaka, Wendia, |
_° +? Raynell, Teeria and Ricardranae;

: Two Brothers-in-law: Ryan Hepburn and
Reginald Johnson Sr.; /

Three Sisters-in-law: Jane Rolle, Janice and

Phillipa Brown.

Other loving family and friends including:
Claudette Kelly, Almber Clarke, Stephanie, Marva,
Margaret, Kevin, Broyan, Bruce and Wenzel Gray
and the Kemp and St. James Road Communities.















who Diz,



“fonuuriag |












Sapphire Funeral Services







for |
The body will be viewed in the “Sapphire Suite”
MR. DONALD : Emerald Ridge Mortuary & Monument Company
VINCENT : Ltd. #20 Claridge Road on Friday, February 09, 2007
“Duck” : from ipm to 6pm and on Saturday, February 10,
: ! 2007 at United Christian Cathedral Flamingo
BROWN, 39 'Gardens, from 11:30am to service time.





of Rolleville, Exuma, Bahamas i... ;
-Visit our website:

and formerly of St. James : E : :
Road, Nassau N. P., Bahamas } www.emeraldridgemortuary.com view video

will be held on Saturday, February 10, 2007 at : tributes, sign guest book and send
12:30pm at United Christian Cathedral, Flamingo : condolence, sympathy, love and memories.
Gardens Nassau N. P., Bahamas. Bishop Albert H. $0 -2e-----e--reeren nner
Hepburn DD, JP, OBE, assisted by other Ministers

Il officiate and burial will be in Southern Cemetery, | =
Cowpen and Spikenard Roads. 2 Pearl ~~ Notice
| : } or







The Radiance of this “Sapphire of A Gem” will
always glow in the hearts of his: se
Mother: Betty Bain-Curtis; : MR. DOMINIC
Step-Father: Hensel Rolle; EAN AUGUSTUS |
Seven Brothers: Police Constable 2494 Freeman REDHEAD, 36

Rolle Sr., Craig, Wendell Sr., Ricardo, Calvin, Vernal
Jr. and Arlington “Gugu” Brown; of Adelaide Village, Nassau N.

Three Sisters: Donna Curtis, Brenda Johnson and : P.; Bahamas passed away on
Sherese Hepburn; | Adelaide Road, on Monday,

Adopted Sister: Claudette Taylor; February 05, 2007.
‘Special Friend: Angela Clarke;
Two Uncles: Frank and Sam Brown;

Three Aunts: Leotha Whylly, Rita Mortimer and
Murthis Edwards;

Thirteen Nephews: Jamal, Clemente, Reginald







i



Pearl Funeral Service are incomplete at this
time, check website for updates.



sees 2 a a STRAT



EE
PAGE 4, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007

Oe ORS a ON A fs Je. YER EF H sth
Emerald Ridge Mortoary wing w

& Monument Company Hd.

AA OEP

Topaz Death Notice
for

MR. YUL GEORGE
6 Shaky”
HANNA, 28

of Sunshine Park, Nassau N. P., Bahamas passed
away at his residence on Sunday, February 04,
2007.

The Radiance of This “Topaz of A Gem’ will
always glow in the hearts of his:

Father: Derek Hanna;

Step-Mother: Josiane Hanna;

Grand Mother: Edith Hanna;

Three Brothers: Austin Stuart, Thorne and
Eric Hanna;

Four Sisters: Alextine "Tenny" Daxon, Chantel
Cooper, Inga Hanna and Cher Williams;

iVisit
: www.emeraldridgemortuary.com view
: video tributes, sign guest book and send
: condolence, sympathy, love and
: memories.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Ten Nephews: Brendon, Anton, Hubert,
: Delwin, Kristoff, Rashawn, Richeno, Damian,
Dario and Sario;

Three Nieces: Sheniquewa, Lachandra, De'shae;
: Grand-Niece: Brentae’ Clarke; |

: Six Uncles: Gillwhitney and George Eugene

Hanna, Gershwyn Wilkinson, Gilbert Hepburn,

Craig Mitchell, Walter Odom of Rocklige, Florida;

Ten Aunts: Magistrate Linda Virgill, Deborah

: Mitchell, Wendy and Terry Hanna, Shane
: Wilkinson, Sharmaine Odom, Rose White, Freda
Harris,
: Three Grand-Uncles: Campbell, Nathanial
: and Anthony Dean;

: Six Grand-Aunts: Hildred Miller, Dora, Bertha
| Vernita and Linda Dean, Rose Eberhart of Miami,
: Florida; |

: Three Brothers-In-Laws: Jethro Daxon,
: William Cooper and Denrellio Willams,
| Sister-In-Law: Grace Stuart;

: God Parents: Mrs. Majone Brown and Mrs.
: Sharon Ferguson;

} Many other loving family and friends.

Ellen Rolle and Cynthia Smith;

| Topaz Funeral Service are incomplete at
: this time, check website for updates.

our website:





The Tribune RELIGION | Thursday, February 8, 2007 *PG5

‘A need for love nestles in each heart’

m@ By REVEREND ANGELA
PALACIOUS _.

o my adult readers, I pose the
| following questions: Who did

you talk to you when you were a
teen? What was the best part of church
when you were a child? What were Sun-
days like in your home if that was your
designated day of Sabbath worship and
rest? Who taught you to pray? Who read
the Bible to you and with you? Who
involved you in ministry projects with
others? Have you strayed away from
your spiritual grounding or did these
early lessons remain with you over the
years? Are you a godly role model?

To my younger readers, I am putting
these questions to you: To who do you
talk to when you have something on
your mind? What does God mean to you
in this season of your life? Do you know
how to pray? Can you read your Bible
every day? Are family devotions done at
the table before meals, at the start or the
end of your day? What would you say to
someone dying if you were the only per-
son near? If younger children watched
your every move would they do what is
right most of the time or would they def-
initely be led astray?

The generations have always had dif-
ferent music, clothing styles, slang, and
ways to fit in, but many have met on the





@ REV ANGELA PALACIOUS

middle ground in our homes and church-
es. For example, in our honest search for
God, we can share our struggles. The
pain of death, grief, loss, of injustice,
reflection, abandonment, guilt and
shame, are common to us all.

In our celebration of God’s goodness
and grace, we can tell each other our sto-
ries. We may all learn from a little one

MEDITATION



“In our celebration of God's
goodness and grace, we can tell
each other our stories. We may

-all learn from a little one who

speaks of knowing about God
in a language that is simple and
clear so that we too are able to

trust the Lord and find peace,

_ joy, and relief: When we rest
in the Spirit it is as if we are
asleep in the arms of Jesus.”

— Rev A Palacious

who speaks of knowing about God in a
language that is simple and clear so that
we too are able to trust the Lord and
find peace, joy, and relief. When we rest
in the Spirit it is as if we are asleep in the
arms of Jesus.

Questions such as What do you do
when you are hurt and how do you try to
get over it? What do you do when you

are angry and how do you come to feel
better? How do we listen for God’s
direction? What do we do when we can’t
have what we want from God and we
seem not to be satisfied with any other
answer? And why do terrible things hap-
pen to innocent people, opens doors to
discovering together how prayer eventu-
ally can ease hurt, anger, disappoint-
ment. By listening to another’s heart, to
hear another’s dreams, to share another's
pain, we find our common identity in
what makes us all human.

On other occasions, we can ask our
young people to put questions to us that
puzzle them, and we can share how we
have arrived at the place where we are
at, even if it means saying “I am still puz-
zled myself. Let us explore the possibili-
ties together.” This requires spending
time, being around, doing things togeth-
er at mutually convenient times.

Readily offer words of thanks for
tasks completed, words of praise for any.
good done, words of encouragement
when efforts fail to bring desired results,
words of love no matter what.

Smaller size does not mean smaller
struggles, and fewer years do not mean
fewer fears. A great spirit is hidden in
each secret space and a need for love
nestles in each heart. We have more in
common with each other than whatever
seems to be keeping us apart.

‘Come after me and I will make you fishers of men’

@ By CLEMENT JOHNSON

A FEW weeks ago I listened attentively to the
Gospel where Jesus said to Peter and his brother
Andrew, "Come after me and I will make you fishers
of men". They immediately abandoned their nets
and became his followers. Shortly thereafter,
Zebedee's sons, James and John, left their father to
follow Jesus.

I am sure we all wonder what they recognized in
Jesus that they would give up their family, friends
and professions in order to follow the Lord. Why did
they follow and others, more intelligent, not recognize
the Messiah? oe

You know, I think that most of us, if not all of us,
struggle from time to time with knowing exactly who
Jesus is too.

And, you know what? It's OK to have those con-
cerns because if we're to see God in our lives, He'll
come to us in so many different ways that it's not
always possible to recognize Him. Perhaps a short
story might help illustrate what I'm trying to say.

A young boy was walking through the park. He had
just gotten out of his Sunday School class where his
teacher had told them that you could never tell when
you'll meet Jesus.

As he was walking through the park, he noticed an

old woman sitting on a bench. She looked very lone-
ly, so he sat down next to her. He said "Hi" and pro-
ceeded to offer her a piece of his candy bar, which he
had been saving. She accepted the piece of chocolate
with a smile. They talked for a while about nothing in
particular and then the boy offered her another piece,
which she also gladly accepted.

They chatted a little while longer and then the boy
got up to leave. As he began to walk away, he turned
around, ran back to the bench and gave the woman a
big hug. And she gave him her very biggest smile.

Arrived

When he arrived home, his mother saw a big smile
on his face and asked, "What made you so happy
today?"

"T’shared my chocolate bar with Jesus. And guess
what Mom? She has a great smile."

Meanwhile, the old woman returned to her little
apartment which she shared with her sister.

"You're all smiles today," said the sister. "What
made you so happy?”

"Well, I was sitting in the park sharing a chocolate
bar with Jesus.

And, you know what? He looks a lot younger than
1 expected!"

So, it is clear we do not know where we will find
God. Is He only way up there in the sky somewhere?
Is He so far away that He doesn't really care about us?
No, He's right here, right now, among us. God is
right here at the heart of all our activities and with
every one of us.

And He's not just here. God challenges everybody
- each and every one of us - to see the sacred in the
ordinary events of our lives - to see Him in all people
- even the ones who we're not particularly crazy
about. We're to do this because, in those people and
in the events which may seem awful at the time, Jesus
comes to us in disguise.

So, how does Jesus come to you? Does He come as
a school teacher who is trying his/her best to give the
students a moral rudder in today's world - a world that
says, "Don't worry about tomorrow, just have fun
today. Don't worry about any consequences S

Does Jesus come to you as a doctor or a lawyer or
a tradesman or any person who does the best job
possible, because he/she does their job as if they're
doing it for Christ?

Regardless of wherever we are in our lives -
whether we're happy or sad, rich or poor, young or old
- we can be sure of one thing. Jesus will come and sur-
prise us, if, like the boy and the lady in our story,
we'll just keep our eyes and hearts open to Him.

-7- 75



The Tribune

PG 6 ° Thursday, February 8, 2007 ELIGION

‘It’s time for the body of Christ to unite as one

m By PASTOR MATTHEW
ALLEN

ur so called Christian
country, our homes,
schools and churches

anaes
leaders meet
with Rice

over Mideast
MeN AUNTY



WASHINGTON (AP) —
United States Christian,
Jewish and Muslim leaders
held a private meeting with
Secretary of State Con-
doleezza Rice to press for a
greater US role in ending
Mideast violence.

Roman Catholic Cardinal
Theodore McCarrick,
retired archbishop of Wash-
ington, said the religious
leaders asked for high-level
engagement with both the
Israelis and the Palestinians
“that holds both sides
accountable in a step-by-
step peace process.”

The group also promised
to “say tough things to our
communities here and in the
region” about what must be
done to bring about peace.

Along with Rice and
McCarrick, the meeting
Monday included Bishop
Mark Hanson, presiding
bishop of the Evangelical
Lutheran Church in Ameri-
ca; Episcopal Presiding
Bishop Katharine Jefferts
Schori; Sayyid M. Syeed,
national director of the
Islamic Society of North
America; Rabbi Paul
Menitoff, a leader in
Reform Judaism; and Rabbi
Amy Small, a leader of the
Reconstructionist branch of
Judaism.

The leaders are part of
the National Interreligious
Initiative for Peace in the
Middle East, which repre-
sents more than 35 religious
groups and supports a two-
state solution for the Israeli-
. Palestinian conflict.





























are filled with all kinds of dra-
ma, strife and ‘hell’. Notwith-
standing that there are lots of
positive things going on through-
out the islands as it relates to
tourism developments, the ques-
tion still remains how do we as a
people “Get the hell out?”

What sacrifices are we willing
to make in order to have God
show up in our lives? Yes, I know
that most of us go to church and
are faithful to our religious com-
mitments and duties. Let’s be real
though, even as you read this
article, you know of a family
member, a friend or a close rela-
tive who is still going through the
same mess and situation that they
were dealing with for years.

We wear arm bands of
“WWJD” which means What
Would Jesus Do? As I study the
life Yeshuwa Messiah, I’m see-
ing that every where He went
one of two things happened, “a
riot or a revolution.” The enemy
knows that whenever Yeshuwa
shows up he, the enemy, will be
evicted and cast out. Therefore in
order to “Get the hell out” of
our homes, schools and churches
we need the leading men of God
in our country to humble them-
selves, put down their titles and
unite as one man.

Both internationally and local-
ly Sunday is one of the most seg-
regated days on the Christian cal-
endar. This is the day when the
body of Christ is most divided.
The church still doesn’t have a
true understanding of the power
that is made available in unity.
This is the unity where the Father

Parents of convicted arsonist
visit burned church in Panola



m@ PASTOR ALLEN

commands His blessing (His
empowerment to prosper).

Psalms 133:1-3 says, Behold,
how good and how pleasant it ts
for brethren to dwell together in
unity! It is like the precious oint-
ment upon the head, that ran
down upon the beard, even
Aaron's beard: that went down to
the skirts of his garments. As the
dew of Hermon, and as the dew
that descended upon the moun-
tains of Zion: for there the LORD
commanded the blessing, even life
for ever more.

It’s time for the body of Christ
to unite as one, that’s if we really
are a part of the body of Christ.
I'm finding it very difficult and
hard to digest that there are pas-
tors and other church leaders
who refused to forgive and get

along with one another; pastors
who will not support another.
There are Pastors who have taint-
ed and manipulated their con-
gregations into their way of
thinking and accepting their
immature behaviour over some
trivial matter.

Now, if a Pastor is involved in
a serious and weighty matter, for
example sexual immorality, lack
of integrity, consistent ungodly
behavior, and the pastors/church
leaders, after being confronted
by some of their peers as the
bible instructed in Matthew
18:15-18 and I Corinthians 5:1-5
which speak of church discipline,
then I can see such separation.
The responsibility to confront
such a brother or church leader
for any questionable act or
behaviour is threefold:

¢ Personal, (you go and tell
him)

e Private, (take two or three
witnesses)

¢ Corporate, (tell it unto the
church)

1 Tell him his fault: this should
not be done in vindictive anger,
but in the spirit of love and
straightforward honesty. Failing
to speak up is to be dishonest
and hypocritical and will only
lead to harbouring continued bit-
terness.

2 (Privately) Take two or
three witnesses: have a meeting
with such brother or leader, so
that in the mouth of two or three
witnesses every spoken word
may be established.

3 Tell it to the church: after
meeting and confronting such a



Carnival mask of Jesus
prompts rebuke by

brother or church leader and he
neglects to hear and receive you,
make his fault known to the
church and if he also neglects to
hear the church then he should
be viewed as heathen.

Such leaders should be made
known and avoided so that the
spirit in which they operate in is
not transferred and spread
throughout the body of Christ.

How do we “Get the hell out”
of our homes, schools churches
and country? It’s not by hiding
as wimps and sissies under the
umbrella of prayer. Listen! The
enemy you run from today, you'll
have to face tomorrow and he
gets stronger as the days go by.

It’s not the hypocrites in the
world that I’m concerned about,
it’s the ones in the church who
are pretending that they’ve got
it all together. Let’s be real and
“Get the hell out” of our homes,
our marriages, our finances and
let’s walk in the promises of God.

Remember! All of God’s
promises are conditional - Isaiah
1:19 says, If you are willing and
obedient, and Deuteronomy 28:1
says, If you hearken diligently.

e¢ Join Pastor Brendalee and I
along with the family of King-
dom Minded Fellowship Centre
Int’l, every Sunday morning @
10:30am and Thursday nights @
7:30pm at the Bishop Michael
Eldon High School Auditorium,
where we will share more of
God’s powerful word with you.
Contact us via E-mail:pastor-
mallen@yahoo.com or by phone
441.2021 or 351.7368.



PANOLA, Ala. (AP) — The par-
ents of a former Birmingham-South-
ern College student who pleaded guilty
in a series of rural church arsons visit-
ed with the congregation of one burned
church, asking for forgiveness and
expressing remorse.

“My son wants you to know how sor-
ry he is,” Mike Cloyd told members of
Galilee Baptist Church on January 28.

Mike and Kim Cloyd of Pelham are
the parents of Matthew Cloyd, one of
three former college students who
pleaded guilty to federal charges in the
church arsons. The couple spoke with
the congregation, which is meeting in a
trailer as its new church building is
being constructed.

The Rev Bob Little said he prays for
solace for his congregation, the con-
victed arsonists and their families.

“We thank God for the opportunity

to bring about some healing,” Little
said. “We need to embrace each other
in times of trial.”

The Cloyds said the visit to Galilee
Baptist, where the congregation dedi-
cated songs and hugged them during
two hours of worship, is part of a pil-
grimage to see the rural churches their
son admitted to burning in February
2006.

Matthew Cloyd, 21, Benjamin Mose-
ley, 20, and Russell DeBusk, 20, await

sentencing in federal court and also

face state charges in the arson case.

Five churches were burned in Bibb
County on February 3; the others were
burned four days later in Greene, Pick-
ens and Sumter counties. “I know your
hearts were broken the night your
church was burned,” Kim Cloyd said.
“But we love our son. We will not leave
his side.”



Italian bishop

ROME (AP) — A “Jesus” mask on sale in Verona
for Italy's winter Carnival, a celebration that comes
every February, prompted a rebuke from the local
bishop.

The mask appeared recently in a store in the north-
ern Italian city and consists of a fake beard and a long,
brown-haired wig made in China, according to the
ANSA news agency. On the box are the words “Jesus,”
and a drawing of Christ with a crown of thorns.

“J felt humiliated. For me and for millions of people
the suffering Christ is a beloved image, and instead it
is mocked,” Bishop of Verona Flavio Carraro said
Tuesday. “We must respect the religious sentiments
of our people,” Carraro added. “That image is part of
art history and poetry, and it’s bad to ruin it like that.”

Carnival festivities, which were centered:in Venice
and have since spread throughout the country, hit their
zenith in the 1700s when European nobility were drawn
by the promise of an anonymous good time before

Ash Wednesday and the somber Lenten season.







THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES



MR. PRINCE ALBERT
SMITH, 78

Cemetery.

in-Law, Henry Stubbs; nieces, Linda Ferguson,





Stoeeting’s Colonial Mortuary And Crematorinm

84 Blue Hil! Road « P.O. Box N-8161 ¢ Tel: 325-7867 ¢ Fax: 325-7867

FINAL RITES AND BURIAL

: Garth, Randy, Tiege, Ovando and Jeffery
: Stubbs, Perry Wood, Eugene Smith and Rudolph
' Ferguson; grand-nieces, Odia, Uwonka, Shante,
: Christina and Keisha Stubbs, Tina and Kristy
: Johnson, Tehillah and Rhema Ferguson,
: Lyndisha, Lynell, Lovell, Anique and Erin
: Murphy and Averill Smith; grand-nephews,
| Theo and Keith Stubbs Jr., Julius and Chris
: Johnson, Cyrus and Rudolph Ferguson Jr.,
: Kenny, Rio and D' Andre Murphy, Eugene and
' Gene Smith and a host of other relatives and
: friends including, Victoria Moss, Rev. Leon
_ and Manara Johnson, Eric and Shelly Johnson,
: Mavis Fowler, Jenny Johnson, Lydia Ferguson,
! Lyn Granger, Claudimae Farrington, Elaine
a resident of Hatchet Bay Eleuthera and :
formerly of Long Bay Cays Andros, will be :
held on Saturday 10th February 2007 at St. :
Stephen's Baptist Church Hatchet Bay Eleuthera |
at 2:00 p.m. Officiating will be Rev. Lamrick :
Farrington assisted by Deacon Eric Johnson. :
Interment will follow the Hatchet Bay Public
| : The body will repose at the Chapel of the Saints
' Sweeting's
Left to cherish his memory are sister, Mable : Crematorium, #84 Blue Hill Rd. from 12.00
Stubbs; sister-in-Law, Aremena Smith; brother- :

Sandra Johnson, Sophia McDonald, Gaylene :
and Joan Stubbs, Susan Wood, Lillian Smith :
and Shellie Murphy; nephews, Steve, Keith, :

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 7





























Isaacs, Hattie, Aniska Darville, Lavern
Saunders, Mike, Walt and Cladwell Farrington
Jr., Jack, Peter, Lynden and Earnest Davis,
Chriss Barr, Myrtis Farrington, Rose Wood,
Florence Scavella, the Hatchet Bay Community
and the New Mt. Zion Baptist Church families.

Colonial Mortuary and

noon on Thursday until 6.00pm and on Friday
from 5.30 p.m. at the Church until service time.



vy eee’




COVA Dee LAAT gee

PAGE 8, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007




EULA PRESCOLA
ARTHUR, 69

Baptist Church, Blue Hill Road South.
assisted by Minister Cranston V.G.

be made in Woodlawn Gardens,
Soldier Road.



Left with cherished memory are six sons, Roscoe Sands, Barry, Perry,
Jerry and Jeffrey Arthur and Patrick Sands; three daughters, Suzette |

Arthur Jacqueline Deleveaux and Monique Sands; 13 grandchildren,
_ Latoya, Napoleon, Chris, Gerika, Gerald, Michael, Oranique, J acqueline,
Preston, Perrinique, Jade, Gerard and Jamecka; three great grandchildren,

Torianno, Nathaneal and Taneisha; eight sisters, Agnes Moxey, Katrina
Syrkett, Annismae Curtis, Ruth Glinton, Paula Young, Mildred Cooper,
Sylvia and Patsy Morley; five brothers, Richard, Lance, Eutal, Lionel |
and Leslie Sands; one uncle, Samuel Delancey; four aunts, Gladys |
Butler, Rosena Butterfield, Victoria Smith, Helena Delancey; one son- |
in-law, Oral Deleveaux, three daughters-in-law, Betsy Sands, Daphne |
and Shanrecka Arthur; one brother-in-law, Oral Curtis; six sisters-in- |
law, Audrey Telson, Mavis and Yvonne Sands, Corene Robinson, |
Geraldine Taylor, Janet Arthur, numerous nieces and nephews including, :
Antionette Saunders, Wayde Moxey, Dr. Marva Mims, Robert Syrkett,
Phillipa and Mona Sands, Gail Francis, Margo, Zhirvargo, Theresa, |

Mazel and Alphonso Curtis, Jennifer Bannister, Maxine Darling,
Catherine Newbold, Peter and Joel Brown, Nichola Sands, Ettajane |
Taylor, Vaneria Neely, Stephen, J effery, Cloretta, Pauline and Candina |
Sands, Gloria Armbrister, Rochelle and Desmond Sands, Constance
Glinton, Sean, Kasey, Tracey and Larona Adderley, Kizzy Bowe,
Anthony, Clarise and Zhirvargo Young, Annimae, Natasha, Laverne,
Karen, Ricardo, Rodger and Eddie Sands, Bettyjoe Bodie, Tamara, }
Richard Jr., Adrian and Jason Sands, Cleo Rolle and Kayshann

Thompson.

A host of other relatives and friends including the following families, |
the Arthurs, Sands, Whylly, Richards, Rev. Lavania Stewart, The Shoal :
Restaurant: also the entire Colombian Emeralds staff, staff at Doctors' :
Hospital, the Birthday Girls Club, Fredericka Minnis, Rena Roberts,
Boston Morley, Heslyn Fernander, Sybil Archer, Arganald and Patricia |
Sands, Velma Butler, Margaret Richards, Miriam Whylly, Rev.
Lockwood Deleveaux and family, Paulette Brown, Sandy Morley, Edna |
and Eloise Sands, Charles and Leona Whylly, Katrina Rolle, Tracee' |
Guierrier, Clarence and Cynthia, Gladys Sands, Kevin Musgrove,

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030

Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026



#8 Garden View, off Bernard Road
and formerly of Green Castle,
Eleuthera will be held on Saturday at
11:00 a.m. at The New Mount Zion |

Assistant Pastor Alfred Stewart

Evans will officiate. Interment will



~~ mn =~ e of

HE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES




Verlene Taylor, Terry Bain, Walter Henfield, Sheila Butler, Ethel and
Agnes, Hosea and Verna Douglas, Kirk, Bridgette, Tiffany Michelle
and Kim.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians #44
Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday
at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

GERTRUDE
GIBSON, 77

of Danottage Estates, will be held
on Sunday at 1:00 p.m. at Centreville
Seventh-Day Adventist Church,
Collins Avenue. Pastor Leonard A.
Johnson and Pastor Hugh A. Roach,
assisted by Pastor Valentino
Campbell and Elder Andrew Gilbert
will officiate. Interment will be made
in Western Cemetery, Nassau Street.

Gertrude is pre-deceased by her two

sisters Thelma Gibson and Sylvia
Gibson-Treadwell. She is survived by her many nephews and nieces
including, William (Bill) Gibson, Arnold Gibson, Nathan Gibson-
Treadwell, Joel Williams, Dwayne Gibson, Vaughan Gibson, Arnold
Gibson Jr., Ajene Gibson, Shanny Gibson, Althea Gibson-Treadwell -
Arron, Yolanda Fernander, Donna Gibson-Morris and Allayah Gibson.
Other relatives and friends including the following and their families,
Gertrude Burnside, Mayrona Seymour, Marilyn Major, Ida Hanna,
Yvonne Symonette, Irene Pyfrom (of Rock Sound Eleuthera), Thelma
Smith, Althea Wallace, Sheila Moss, Richard Smith, Esther Adderley,
Louise Adderley, Corrine Fountain, Ruth Sands, Mr. and Mrs. Ken
Sands, Ken Arron, Sean Fernander, Eudene Brown, Maurine Gibson,
Ella Gibson-Whitfield, the Carter, Thelma Sands, Thelma Johnson,
Lillymae Beckford Lockhart, Mr. and Mrs. Earl Deveaux, Rev. Beryl
Francis-Culmer, the Francis, Pansy Hamilton Brown, Donna Edwards,
Yvonne Phillpotts, Kirk Pinder, Sister Nelda Bowe, Marie A.G. Taylor,
the Gullieun family, Dorothea Ritchie, Pastor and Mrs. Valentino
Campbell, Pastor Leonard Johnson, Benson Knowles, the Mortimer,
Erma Nicholls Levarity, Ruth Nicholls-Nottage, Dr. Wavell Thompson,
Vera Cartwright, Pastor H. A. Roach, Blanch Moss, Dr. Ruby Major,
Mr. and Mrs Antonio, the Gibson Family Reunion, the Fort Fincastle
Community, the officers and members of The Seventh-Day Adventist
Church and the entire community of Dannottage.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians #44
Nassau Street on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Sunday
at the church from 11:30 a.m. until service time.



we ee eye



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

IN LOVING MEMORY cor

ROSELLE ALMINA SMITH

JANUARY 13, 1916-FEBRUARY 8, 2007

When family ties are broken
And loved ones have to part
It leaves a wound that never heals
And also broken hearts
We mourn the day we lost you
And secret tears still flow
For what it means to lose you
No one will ever know
To some you may be forgotten
To others a part of the past
But to us who loved and lost you
Your memory will always last
~Author unknown

Sadly missed and cherished by her daughter, Joyce Ifill;
son, Urice Smith; son-in-law Grafton Ifill Sr.;
daughter-in-law, Julieta Smith; grandchildren,

great-grandchildren and other relatives and friends.

“REST IN PEACE MAMA”



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 9

NEWBOLD BROTHERS
CHAPEL

#10 Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street
P.O. Box N-3572 7

Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: (242) 326-5773

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

MIRACLE
JEPHTHANIQUE
ARMBRTISTER,
11 days

























will be held on Saturday,|”
February 10th, 2007, at 1:00}
p.m. at Smith's Chapel
A.M.E. Zion Church,
Kennedy Subdivision.
Officiating will be Rev. Jacobl_»
Hanna, assisted by other
ministers. Interment follows in the Old Trail Cemetery,
Old Trail Road.

































Miracle is survived by her mother, Ivadell Walkine;
father, Jephthah Armbrister; one brother, Jephthah
Armbrister Jr.; two grandmothers, Ruth Hanna and
Deloris Ferguson;-one step grandmother, Gelita Brown,
two grandfathers, Jephthah Armbrister and John
Wallace; one great grandmother, Isadora Ferguson,
eleven aunts, Shacantila, Italia, Bloniva, Helen,
Stephanie, Diane, Sherry, Melvern, Rosetta, Denise
and Margo; ten uncles, Trevor, Troy, Brad, Zuri, Askew,
Marlon, Tony, Mario, Kenneth and Alfred, many
cousins, grandaunts and granduncles and a host of
other relatives and friends including, Rochelle Davis
and family, Kim Outten and family, the Rose family,
Rev. Jacob Hanna and family, Carmen Hanna, and
family, Linda Brown, the Brown family, the McIntosh
family, Margaret Knowles and family, the Ferguson
family, the Suffront, the Miller family, Jean and family,
Katherine Bullard, Lamont Ramsey, Miss Williams
and family, Staff of Storm Frame Windows Factory,
Dollar Plus; Broadway and Vows Mall at Marathon
and many others too numerous to mention.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at
Newbold Brothers Chapel, Palmetto Avenue and
Acklins Street, off Market and East Streets on Friday,
from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Saturday at the church
from 12:00 noon until service time



PAGE 10, THUR

we OS VO ALTE TD VWeaceriiits!

SDAY. FEBRUARY 8, 2007

emICTAT I oes
“s PAALY IEC

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES



‘ #10 Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street ¢- P.O. Box N-3572 . :
Nassau, Bahamas ® Tel: (242) 326-5773



HENRY
SMALL, 67

of Jacaranda Street, Pinewood
Gardens and formerly of St. Anne's
Jamaica will be held on Saturday,
February 10th 2007, at 11:00 a.m.,

God In Christ, #95 Pinedale Street,
off Wulff Road. Officiating will be
Supt. Tony Leroy Hanna. Interment
follows in the Southern Cemetery,
Cowpen and Spikenard Road.

His survivors includes, his wife of 21 years, Shirley Mae Small;
three children, Suzette, Jamal and Ashley Small; two sisters, Hazel
Williamson and Beryl Small; one brother, Leon Small; mother-in-
Jaw, Raphelita Williams; brother-in-law, Philip Knowles, other in-
laws including, Betty and Robert Rose, Sheila and Geoffrey Clarke,
Fairlene and Timothy Williams and Janay Carroll, numerous nieces
and nephews including, Sherelle, Faith, Takara, Andrea, Patsy,
Tessa, Donna, Chuvene, Kino, Winter, Ricky, Timothy, Tray,
Rodney, Robert Jr., Kendal, Kenvaughn, Dillon, Ruddy, Humphrey
and Tony; a host of relatives and friends including, Bishop and
Mother William Grant and Pentecostal Temple Church of God In
Christ family, Pastor Glen Miller, Deliverance Temple Church of
God in Christ family, Supt. Joseph Cunningham, Miracle Valley
Church of God In Christ, Pastors Clint and Ellen Williams, Victory
Tabernacle, End Time Deliverance Church of God In Christ, Tony
Hanna, Redeemed Tabernacle Church of God In Christ, Dr. Alfredo
Burrows, Believers Church of God In Christ, Pastor Wayne and
Anna Clarke, Sherry Whitfield and family, Prince Hepburn and
family, Mazie Moss and family, Joseph Forbes and family, Albert
Forbes and family, the entire Bahamas Jurisdiction Church of God
In Christ family, Mr. and Mrs. Dean and family, Mr. and Mrs.
McIntosh and family, Ms. Dorcas Forbes and family, Ms. Finley
and family, Pastor Idez Laroda and family, Maria Coakley and
family, numerous godchildren including, Sheneka Pennerman and
Sherry Munnings; special thanks, The Oncology Staff, Male
Medical I and II, Bahamas Customs, Rev. Tony Leroy Hanna and
family and Pastor Helen Alleyne and family.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Newbold

and East Streets on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Saturday
at the Church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

"FUNERAL SERVICES FOR _





at Pentecostal Temple Church of

LINDA ANN
PRATT, 48

| of Armbrister Street, Fox Hill, will
| be held on Saturday, February 10th,
2007, at 11:00 a.m., St. Paul's
Baptist Church, Bernard Road, Fox
Hill. Officiating will be Rev. Dr. J.
Carl Rahming, assisted by Minister
Samuel McIntosh. - Interment
follows in the Fox Hill Cemetery,
Fox Hill Road. ;

: Left to mourn her passing is her mother, Betty Pratt; six sisters,
: Brenda Pratt, Laverne Ferguson, Cora Davis, Pamela Rahming,
: Nelcita Patrice Moss and Maria Munroe; nine brothers, Dennis
: Bain, Ezekiel Jr., Joseph, Dereck, Mario, Kirkland, Chuck, Larry,
: Perry and Kevin Pratt; four brothers-in-law, Rupert Ferguson,
: Garth Munroe, Frederick Moss and Rocky Rahming; six sisters-
: in-law, Ruthmae Bain, Joyann, Garnell, Renay, Claramae and
: Cleora Pratt; two aunts, Pauline and Merlina Cleare; sixty-one
i nieces and nephews including, Monique, Erica, Damico, Andrew,
: Racquel, Valentino, Frederick, Sharona, Shabreka, Shakia, Lakiesh,
: Sherele, Lebaron, Sherese, Rothia, Damaine, Krystale, Chrisnika,
: Rodino, Gwendolyn, Tino, Shanovia, Lenique, Kirky, Shantell,
: Alexa, Jeron, Shanquiera, Taquiera, Byron, Jeriko, Alex, Delvin
: Jr., Jerome, Brendon, Sheniqua, Elizabeth, Shakia, Ezekiel, Cadero,
: Larissa, Sasha, Dereck Jr., Anastacia, Jada, Tyrone, Marinicia,
: Danisha, Mario, Andre, Oprah, Racquel, Franchot, Hosea, Monique,
: Adasa, Lashan, Latoya, Trevor, Dennis Jr., Denise, K‘ iliah, }*ulette,
: Virgill and Denero; twenty-one great grand nieces and nephews;
: special friend, Elaine Morley; numerous cousins and friends —
: including, Rubyann Simmons, The Nassau Dairy Products Staff,
: Doris, Ann, Queenie, Cheryl Diane, Flossymae, Lori, Lorna. Penny,
: Elva Bootie, Bettyanne, Raine, Lisa, Liez, Charles, Shannaine,
: Inez Johnson, Peggy, Andrea, Iris, Elton and the entire (x Hill
: Community.

Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Newbold
: Brothers Chapel, Palmetto Avenue and Acklins Street, off Market
: and East Streets, on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Saturday

Brothers Chapel, Palmetto A venue and Acklins Street, off Market 2 at the church fonn 10:00 a.m. until service time.

ryt fh Coe
at

Pr

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,

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES : THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 11

KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED
Fikes Frnoral \ SOE SLO iM
Hime

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas
244 Market Street ¢ P.O. Box EE-16634
Tel: 322-2070 or 322-2072

A FUNERAL SERVICE FOR _
FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

WINIFRED
(Mrs. Mervyn)
Charlton
“FUZZY”

JOHNSON
Lightbourne-Johnson,
50
























(nee Lightbourn)



died peacefully at her home, Sunnyside,
on East Bay Street, Saturday, February }
3rd. She was 97.

She was the youngest of six children, =
and the only daughter of Roger Moore Lightbourn and Mary Beatrice
Moon Lightbourn. Her grandfather was the Reverend Francis Moon,
who as a Methodist minister was posted in 1854 from England to
serve the church in the Bahamas.




















of Hay Street West will be held on
Saturday, February 10th, 2007 at
10:00a.m. at New Destiny Baptist
Church, Blue Hill Road. Officiating
will be Bishop Delton Fernander;
assisted by other Ministers. Interment
will follow in Western Cemetery,
Nassau Street.



Mrs Johnson attended Havergal College in Toronto, and returning |
to Nassau became an English teacher at Queens College, Nassau.
The Reverend Dyer, head-master of Q.C. appreciated what he called
her ‘joyous personality’. Her students affectionately called her “Miss
Winnie’. She loved teaching, and boasted later that during her eleven
year tenure she never missed a single day on account of illness.










Left to cherish his memories is his
devoted Mother: Shelia Johnson, (1) Daughter: Melissa Lightbourne;
(9) Brothers: Ronald Saunders, Rev. Eric Knowles of Memphis Tennesse,
Quentin Porter, Rev. Darcy Deveaux of Memphis Tennesse, Paul, Lopez,
Patrick, Philip & Anthony Lightbourne, (10) Sisters: Beverley Worrell,
Vanessa Henry of Atlanta Georgia, Bernadette Johnson, Edvina Deveaux,
Jackie Conyers, Denise M. Lightbourne, Sandra, Denise, Sherry & Donna
Lightbourne; (5) Uncles: Charles Lightbourne, Alexander & Cleveland
Hepburn, Christopher & Marion Pratt; (6) Aunts: Martha Johnson, Althea
Conliffe, Judy Dean of Boynton Beach Florida, Shirley PapaGeorge,
Betty & Branhilda Lightbourne, (16) Nieces: Shanelle & Robert Cartwright,
Shantavia Roberts, Chamar, Terez, Chavez, Chaquava, Paige, Denisia,
Aniskka of Tallahasse Fla & Charzia Lightbourne, Denisha Cooper,
Samantha Deveaux, Alexis Knowles, Elcara Hanna, Aaliyah Roberts &
Tesean Henfield; (6) Sisters-in-law: Paula Saunders, Arnetria Knowles,
Sharmaine Porter, Theresa Deveaux, Pelenanna & Wendy Lightbourne,
(18) Nephews: Odrick Roberts, Deallo, Shaqueno, Shaquan, Shaquent
& Shaquay Porter, Charles, Tyler, Denko, Anthony Jr., Andre & C.J.
Lightbourne, Eric Knowles Jr., Marid Rahming, Akeem Deveaux, Jeremy
Hendfield, Odrick Roberts Jr., Ulrick Roberts; (2) Grand Uncles: Bishop
Albert Hepburn & Enral Robinson; (3) Grand Aunts: Esterlyn Bethel,
Julia Bain & Alicia Armbrister; (32) Cousins: Cheryl Watson, Gail
Conliffe, Rochelle Lightbourne, Karen Barrett, Michelle Mattox, Joann
McSweeney, Franklyn & Barrington Hall, Addington Cabridge, Gailin
& Blaise Rolle Jr., Devaldo Hanna, Dora Culmer, Able Seaman Lacalle
Johnson, PC 2575 Darvin Johnson, Brent Johnson, Nursing Officer Janet
Hepburn, Lisa Elliot, Paul Hepburn, Anthony, PC #700 Ashley Hepburn,
Matthew, Patrick, Cheryl & Mark Hepburn, Roseo & Dewitt Wallace,
Marsha Peters, Vera Allen, Victora, Christopher & Patrick Pratt; A host
of other relatives and friends including: Samantha Roberts, Bishop
Rodney Roberts, Rev. Robert Colebrook, Rev. Cyril Sands, Mrs. Mary
Butler, Rev. Venera Johnson, Carol Gilbert, Althea Butler, Richard Martin
& Family, Mavis Rolle, Iva Johnson, Gwendolyn Hall, Creg Woodside,
Greg “Cookie” Higgs, Management & Staff of Chichos Restaurant,
Pokers Soft Ball Team, Doctors & Nurses of the Male Surgical IT Ward,
Bishop Delton Fernander & Members of New Destiny Baptist Church &
the entire Bain Town, Grants Town, Camron & Hay Street Communities.





In 1939 she married Mervyn Johnson, son of Sir George and Lady
Johnson. Mr Johnson was Registrar General for some years and
then joined in partnership with Godfrey Higgs to form the law firm
of Higgs and Johnson. During the war years Winifred was an
energetic member of the Woolgatherers, and was for many years a
member of the IODE and the Nassau Garden Club. Like her parents
and grandparents before her, she was a lifelong member of Trinity
Methodist Church, until afflicted with both deafness and blindness.
She played the piano for Trinity in its temporary quarters after the
1929 hurricane blew away the roof. -




























She was predeceased by her five brothers, Percy, Cyril, Hugh,
Nelson and Gerald and her husband predeceased her by thirty years.
Left to cherish the memories of her long life are her two daughters,
Valerie Sangwine of Winchester, England and Diane Sturm of
Nassau; one son-in-law, Marcus Sangwine; one granddaughter,
Catherine Sangwine; five nephews, Ronald G. Lightbourn, Michael
E. Lightbourn, Godfrey E. (Tippy) Lightbourn, Mike Lightbourn,
Richard Lightbourn, and Tim Lightbourn; god-daughter, Carla Cole,
as well as many great-great nephews and neices, and even great-
great-great nephews. Also mourning her departure are her kind care-
givers and long time canine companions, Danny Boy, Danny Belle
and Mr Brown.

A Funeral Service for Mrs Winifred Johnson will be held at Trinity
Methodist Church, Frederick Street and Trinity Place, Nassau on
Saturday 10th February, 2007 at 3:00p.m.

Rev. Bill Higgs and Rev. Charles A. Sweeting will officiate and
interment will follow in St. Anne’s Cemetery, Fox Hill, Nassau.










































In lieu of flowers, anyone who chooses may send donations to The »
Bahamas Humane Society, P.O. Box N-242, Nassau, The Salvation
Army, P.O. Box N-205, Nassau or any charity of their choice, in
Viewing will be held at Clarke’s Funeral #244 Market Street on Friday, Memory of Mrs Winifred Johnson.
February 9th from 10:00am to 6:00pm and on Saturday, January 10th

- from 9:00am at the church until service time.




Arrangements by Kemp's Funeral Home Limited.





PAGE 12, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007



Yager funera

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

| Home &© Crematorium

Queen’s Highway
P.O. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas

MR. MARCEL
ROLLE, 77

formerly of Holmes Rock, Grand
Bahama and a resident of West End,
Grand Bahama, will be held on
Saturday. February 10, 2007 at 2:00
p.m. at St. Mary Magdalene Anglican
Church, West End, Grand Bahama.
Officiating will be Rev. Fr. Stephen
Grant and interment will be made in
the West End Public Cemetery.




Left to cherish his memory are his loving and devoted wife of fifty
years Roselyn Rolle; four sons, Harcourt, Andrew, Benjamin and Gavin
Rolle; six daughters, Gloria, Muriel, Elizabeth, Barbara, Julia and Diane
Rolle; adopted daughter, Darlene Culmer; 23 grandchildren, Emmanuel,
Melissa, Jonathon, Crystal, Linda, Leslie, Lester, Anthony, Anton, Deon,
Timothy, Destiney, Michael, Teniqua, Timicko, Clesha, G'mae, Lavisha,
Austinea, Anton, Andrew Jr., Gavin Jr., and Georgiemae; three great
grandchildren, Shanere, Gabriel and Christina; nieces, Mavis Rolle,
Tassalena Mondesir, Cynthia, Sandra and Elizabeth McPhee, Analee,
Joanna and Dianne Rolle and Dianne Wildgoose; two nephews, Anthony
Wallace, Fabian Rolle; numerous grandnieces and nephews including
Corey Rolle, Kennecia, Vita and Sybilene Grant, Kendra Carey and
Learlene Davis, Ivan and Jerreth Rolle, three sisters-in-law, Virginia
McQueen, Kathy Curry, Mavis McQueen, Fredericka Gardiner and
Florine Rolle; two brothers-in-law, George McQueen and Errol Curry,
and a host of other relatives and friends including Harold Rolle and
family, James and Darlene Culmer and family, Eudene McQueen and
family, Irene Parker and family, Hilton Pinder and family, Charlotte
Ferguson and family, Livingston Smith, Yvonne Russell and familly,
Mabel Colton and family, Alvina Russell and family, Agnes Scavella
and family, Milles Newton, Granville Garvey and family, the entire
Bowleg family of West End, Susan McPhee and family, Fr. Stephen
Grant and family, Fr. Norman Lighbourne and family, Fr. Donald Kerr
and family, Fr. Curtis Robinson and family, Fr. Ranfurly Brown and
family, Fr. Winfield Goodridge and family, the staff of The West End
Clinic, the staff of Princess Margaret Hospital, the staff of Ambulance
Department of Rand Memorial Hospital, the entire West End and Holmes
Rock communities, Felix Scrubby Cleare and family, Ernst Armbrister
and family, Lilly and Sam, Samuel and Joseph Knowles, Simeon Brown
and family, Clara Wallace, Emily Bethel, Drexell Wallace and family.
Gwen Rolle, Ida King, Michael Munnings, Bertram Carey, Ruth Hanna
and family, Troy Joffre, Ellen Smith, Laverne Bauld, Joel Hepburn, Dr.
Fernandez and family, Cyril Barr and family, Marvin McQueen and
family, Rene Pierre and family, Joel Roberts and family and Gerore
Williams.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral Home
and Crematorium, Queen's Highway, Freeport, on Friday from 12:00
noon until 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday at the church from 9:00 a.m. until
service time.

Tel: 352-8118 @ Paging: 352-6222 #1724 © Fax: 351-3301

DONALD
LAING, 76

of West End, Grand Bahama and




Elvis, Donald Jr. and Robert Laing and Ettamae Rolle, Fairlane Moxey,
Mena Russell and Patricia Russell; three adopted children, Robertha
Miller, Rudolph and Hasting Laing; three sisters, Rowena Saunders,
Sabrina Laing and Eloise Oliver; 25 grandchildren, Sophia, Elaine,
Elvis Jr., Shirleymae, Ranardo, Gary, Melinda, Roger Jr., Cindy, Ricardo,
Craig, Scottie, Kenny, Steven, Mitchel, Sandy, Donella, Tamiko, Ramano,
Robby Jr., Dominique, Robinique, Radisha, Camille and Raheem; 14
great grandchildren; one great, great grandchild; two sons-in-law, Jarrett
and George Russell; two daughters-in-law, Stasha and Joann Laing; 16
nieces, Peggy Wilchombe, Maxine Rolle, Janet Russell, Pauline, Vincent,
Kathleen and Gartrell Saunders, Kenice Adderley, Gloria Darville,
Yvette, Lorraine, Miranda, Melinda Oliver, Lahoma and Wendy Oliver;
nine nephews, Felix, Philip and Moses Saunders, Barry, Gary and
Elkanah Oliver, Benton, Dion and Cupid Oliver; 50 grandnieces and
grandnephews; six sisters-in-law, Iva Cooper, Lavenia Russell, Laura
Rolle, Vhital Rolle, Delores Pratt and Perrial Stuart, two brothers-in-
law, Erik and Villman Cephas of Fort Lauderdale, Florida and a host
of other relatives and friends including Bishop Roosevelt Rolle, Clifford
Collins, Amos, Tanny and Freeman Hield, Solomon Hield, Amos and
Jolly Russell, Bishop Velock Russell, Lloyd and Gerald Rolle, Henry
Stuart, Benjamin Oliver, Steven Pratt, Pastor Lornal Wilchombe, Merline
Hield and Fairdoll Hield, Blanch Mador, Rica, Oneita Williams, Virginia,
Cyril Lewis and family, lram Lewis and family, Hosea Lewis and family,
Hattie Williams and family, Floramae Saunders and family, Gladstone
Young and family, Ruthmae Cooper and family, Maxine Cephas and
Sharlene Cephas, Vera Poitier and family, Mabel Colton and family,
Flora Smith and family, Loma Cartwright and family, Madlyn Pinder
and family, the staff at the Eight Mile Rock Community Clinic, the
nurses and doctors of Male Surgical Ward at The Rand Memorial
Hospital and the entire community clinic of West End.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral Home


















E:

formerly of Water Cay will be held on
Saurday, February, 10 2007 at 10:00
a.m. at Church of God of Prophecy, §
West End. Officiating will be Bishop §
Roosevelt Rolle, assisted by Pastor E
Lornal Wilchombe, Joseph Taylor and §
other ministers. Interment will be made §
in the West Public Cemetery. §

Left to cherish his memory are his §
loving wife Clarissa Loretta; children, §

and Crematorium on Friday from 12:00 noon until 6:00 p.m. and at the J

church on Saturday from 9:00 a.m. until service time.







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The Tribune





PAGE 16, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007





FREEPORT

- 11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312

Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471

Pager: (242) 340-8043 ° Fax: (242) 373-3005







EMEICO OMA RUSSELL, 31



of Wilson Street East will be held on
Saturday, February 10th, 2007 at 10:00
a. m. at Transfiguration Baptist Church,
Market and Vesey Streets. Officiating
will be Rev. Dr. Stephen E. Thompson,
assisted by Rev. Basil Johnson. Interment






Road.



Left to cherish his memories are his
Mother: Sabrina Marie Baker, Father:
Silbert Russell Sr., Step Mother: Margaret
Russell, Daughter: Ahejah Russell, Son:
Ainsley Russell, Brothers: Dargo
McIntosh, Anthony, Tenio, and Silbert J. R. Russell, Sisters: Aeisha
and Ashlon Baker, Kenva Russell-Thomas of Kansas, Missouri, and






Russell, Aunts: Shonalee Griffin, Denise Smith, Theresa and Kim
Baker, Norma Joseph, Iris Goodman, Shirley Russell-Greenslade,
Darnell Russell-Ferguson, Cherry Nixon, Patricia Cooper, Lynda,
Elizabeth, Sedricka, Cheryl and Willamae Russell, Alma Russell-Munroe
and Julietta Wilson of Hatchet Bay, Eleuthera, Uncles: Steven, Gregory,






Kenneth Russell, Earl Greenslade, Andrew Griffin Sr., Bruthnell Munroe,
Nieces: Jade Roker and Janel Harris of Freeport, G. B., Nephews:




Harris and Ken Roker of Freeport, G. B., Sister-in-law: Tomeko
McIntosh, Brothers-in-law: Dr. Mark Thomas of Kansas, Missouri and
Craig Roker of Freeport, G. B., Grand Uncle: Cyril Baker and Eskin
Wells of Fox Town, Abaco, Grand Aunt: Olga Russell, God Mothers:
Patsy Dupuch and Myrtis Lockhart, Cousins: Tamara, Bernicka,
Angelique, Keino Jr., Samanthana, Gregory, Shingregor, Edouardo,
Renardo (Alpha), Preston, Shervante, Perdallion, Jason of Atlanta,
Georgia, Louise of Freeport, G. B., Dorette, Latisha, Latana, Lolita,








and' Gwendesha Gibson, Close Friends and Family: Sean Johnson,
Teral Hines, Sheldon and Darren Newton, Lamont Smith, Lakisha Ward,
Antione Smith, Trevor Thompson, Feron Palmer, Randy Dean, Nado
Thompson, Mr. and Mrs. Lamber Sweeting, Christian Baker, Leila
1 Bullard and Family, Sandra Newton, Michelle Taff, Mickey Bodie and







of Jingles Beauty Salon, Management and Staff at Smith’s Motel,
| Management and Staff of Fantasy Club, Wilson St. Family, Farrington
Rd. and Chippingham Family, Management and Staff of Bahamian
Club, Management and Staff of Radisson and Wyndham Hotel, Eddie
Green and Staff at Shanandoah’s , Jones Communications Family, and
all Construction Workers at Atlantis, Phase II Site.









Ros bose “, ol Mork ;

. FUNERAL SERVICES FOR
will follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier 3

Joan Russell-Roker of Freeport, G. B., Grand Mothers: Remanda ;
Goodman, Leona Russell, and Marjorie Baker, Grand Father: Erick



Norman and Cyril Baker, Oswall Goodman of Decator, Georgia, Robert ;
Wilson of Hatchet Bay, Eleuthera, Eddison, Wendell of West Palm :
Beach, Erick of Boston, Anthony, Keith, Carlton, Michael, Herman and

Dargo Jr., Nathen and Keven Thomas of Kansas, Missouri, Reychard’

James, Lashan, Brittany, and Lawrence, Special Friends: Latrice Gibson

Friends, Transfiguration Baptist Church Family, Management and Staff

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

NASSAU

Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072

Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047

Pager: (242) 340-8043 ¢.Fax: (242) 340-8034

: Viewing will be held in the “Serenity” Suite at Restview Memorial
: Mortuary & Crematorium Ltd., Robinson and Soldier Road on Friday
: from 10:00 a. m. until 6:00 p. m. and then again at the church on
: Saturday from 8:45 a. m. until service time.



VIOLA SMITH, 82

of Fox Dale, and formerly of Stuart’s
Manor, Exuma, will be held on Saturday,
February 10th, 2007 at 1:00 p. m. at
Pilgrim Baptist Temple, St. James Road.
Officiating will be Bishop E. Randy
Fraser, assisted by other Ministers of
Religion. Interment will follow in
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road.

Cherishing her memory are her survivors
which include One Son: Donald Rolle,
Daughter: Rowena Johnson, Adopted
: Daughters: Fairlyn Smith, Elsie-mae
: Smith, and Geneva Lloyd, Adopted Sons: Lenoard Smith, Jerry Smith,
: and Leroy Demeritte, Son-in-law: Rubean Johnson, Daughter-in-law:
: Jenifer Rolle, Sister: Ethlyn Rolle, Adopted Brother: George Smith,
: Grand Children: Michael and Magaretta Barr, Corey, Robin and Katrina
: Rolle, Julieanna Smith, and Nakia Hield, Great Grand Children: Ashley,
Terrance, Durante,, Tyshia, Tyler, Kavaughte, Coryn, T’Aquawn, Jerlysia,
: and Jerquano, Sisters-in-law: Florence, Gladys, and Agnes Smith,
: Nieces and Nephews: Rev. Cedric and Marion Smith, Nathalee Smith-
: and Jenniemae McKenzie, Evella Ambrister, Rev. Armold Rolle of
: Tampa, Fl, Normon, Rose Mary and Rev. Cedric Rolle, Kerlean Lloyd,
: Theresa Lloyd Kelly, Althea and Hughrie Lloyd, Eloise and Nigel
: Thompson, Grethal and Norman Lloyd, Holland, Abel and Hubert Rolle,
: Gelean Rolle Laing, Livingston and Joyce Smith, Emerean and Rev.
: Leon Williams, Bettyanne Smith Rolle, Rettamae and Millicent Smith,
: Lennex, Harrold, Roland and Genva Rolle, Myrtle Rolle, Pinder,
: Eulamae, Leonard, Kenneth, and Rena Rolle, Alfred (Tuffy) Smith of
: Virginia, Lee Bodie, and Jan Smith, Two Hundred Grand Nieces and
: Nephews too numerous to mention, and Relatives and Friends including:
: Elder William Rolle, Conelus Rolle, Bishop Hartman Rolle, Lillian
: and Naomie McKenzie, Carolina Munnings, Rev. Dr. Ivan Clarke,
: Bishop and Lady Fraser, Iclyn Morley, Shirley, Papa George and Family,
: Barr and Morley Families, Pilgrim Temple Family, Fox Dale Community,
: Staff of Female Medical I, Yolanda Bodie and Rudolph Pinder and their
: Families, Crystal Butler, Breezer,s Staff, Dan Knowles, Rev. Willis
: Johnson, Apostle Philimon Ferguson, Richmond Hill Community, Rev.
: Ben Bailey, Glenis Rolle, Tanaz Morley, and Mr. A. Brown and their
: Families, and other Relatives and Friends too numerous to mention.

: Viewing will be held in the ,,Halycion%o Suite at Restview Memorial
: Mortuary & Crematorium Ltd., Robinson and Soldier Roads on Friday
: from 10:00 a. m. until 6:00 p. m. and then again at the church on
: Saturday from 11:30 a. m. until service time.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES



FREEPORT
411A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 ¢ Fax: (242) 373-3005



ANTHONY LEMUEL MCPHEE, 30

Officiating will be Apostle Paul J. Butler.
Interment will follow in Woodlawn Gardens,
Soldier Road.



to mention. We love you all!

May his soul rest in peace.

Viewing will be held in the ,,Irenic%o Suite at Restview Memorial Mortuary
and Crematorium Ltd., Robinson and Soldier Roads on Friday from 10:00 a. :
m. until 6:00 p. m. and then again at the church on Saturday from 9:30 a. m. }

until service time.

Annamae “Ann” Marie Dean, 51

of Rowena Drive, Claridge Road, and formerly of Dunmore’s, Long Island,
will be held on Saturday, February 10th, 2007 at 11:00 a. m. at St. Thomas i

More Parish, Madeira Street, Palmdale. Officiating will be Msgr. Alfred C.
Interment will follow in Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Road. :

Culmer.

adel’ Woninsiate wuss Puauteed

Botany ey ai oe

“EMA, of Market Street, will be held on Saturday,
<<) February 10th, 2007 at 10:00 a, m. at Bahamas ;
‘ Christian Fellowship Centre, Carmichael Road. :

. ss oh3 :
1) Left to cherish his unforgettable memories are :
his Parents: Rev. Levi and Florence McPhee, ;
One Son: Isiah Levi McPhee, Former Wife:
<<| Pauline McPhee, Four Brothers: Floyd, Levi :
Jr., Sandy and Erol McPhee, Adopted Brother: ;
Jacob Fowler, Six Sisters: Phyllis Monds of }
Hopewell, Vriginia, Daphne Demeritte, Paula ;
Mills, Cyprianna Moss, Denise Ford, and Joan i
Michelle McPhee, Four Brothers-in-law: Ray :
Demeritee, Ervin Moss, Kirk Ford, and Troy Mills, Two Sisters-in-law: Rev. }
Renee McPhee and Michelle McPhee, Twelve Nieces: Calpournia, McQuelle, :
Denise and Micheann McPhee, Ervanna and Ervisha Moss, Sarah Mills, Gina }
Johnson, Roella, Anika and Tiffany Woodside, and Danielle Ford, Fourteen :
Nephews: Levi Jr., Geovanni, Ahmad, Mikhial McPhee, David and Malik :
Monds, Rasheed, Akil, Khalid Demeritte, Nicholas Moss, Drake Mills, Edward :
Johnson, Owen Johnson and Cecil Carey, Four Aunts: Effie and Joann McPhee :
and Family, Irene Johnson, and Lucielle Mitchelle, One Uncle: Daniel Gibson :
and Family, A host of Relatives and Friends including: The Families of Mr. }
and Mrs. Nesbitt Higgins, Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Higgins, Mrs. Ena Charlton, Edna }
Deveaux, Hester Collie, Rev. Cleveland and Mrs. Murphy, Mrs. Mildred :
Williamson, Mr. and Mrs. Byron Collie, Eva Hamilton, Nora Smith, Gloria’ i
Greenslade, and Rosie Miller, Tony Mitchell, Drucilla, Geletha, Bradley, ;
Wellington, Edroy Brown, Roviana Charlton, Curlain Hanna, Martha Murphy, }
Drucilla Leadon Mr. and Mrs. Hayward McKinney and their Families, Iva ;
White, Mr. and Mrs. Clayton Taylor, Easter McPhee, Mr. and Mrs. Betty Bain, }
Meomi, Ellamae and their Families, Cybilene McPhee, Laura McPhee, Paula :
Delancy, Miss Mackey, Ms. John, Cassie McPhee, Florida Forbes, Mr. and Mrs. :
Sidney Demeritte, and their Families, Apostle Paul Butler, Pastor Ellison }
Greenslade, Pastor Ranford Patterson and their Families, the Family in the :
Project, Hon. Cynthia Pratt and Family, Faculty and Staff of St. John,s College, :
St. Augustine College, North Carolina Family and Friends, Management and }
Staff of BahamasAir, Bahamas Christian Fellowship Family, Bible Truth Family, :
Lenny Dames and Family, and many more Relatives and Friends too numerous }

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 17







‘ NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072 :
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 ° Fax: (242) 340-8034





’ Left to cherish her memories are her Son:
\ Derrington Dean, Three Daughters: Mekell
Knowles. Cassandra Evans, and Lashan Lewis,
One Daughter-in-law: Carol Dean, Two Sons-
in-law: Eugene Knowles and Lennox Evans,
Fourteen Grand Children: Jennifer, Felicia,
Georgeann, and Janel Knowles, Derrinado,
Derricka, Derrinicka. Junior, and Carissa Dean,
Lennisha, Khadazia and Carissa Evans, and
Iesha Lewis, and Andre Dixon, Six Sisters:
Beverley Adderley, Shirley Bryan, Monica
| Ferguson. Geletha Hall. Marina Evans of
~ | Freeport, G. B., and Elaine Cecelia Dean, Two

Brothers: Livingston and Cephas Dean,
Brothers-in-law: John Adderley, Uriah Bryan,
and Glen Hall, Sisters-in-law: Pansy and Shirley

Dean. Nieces: Lotricia Ferguson, Leonamae, Bettymae, Michelle and Casey
Dean. Joan Bethel, Brendalee Musgrove, Tanya Clarke, Angela Hanna, Lasheika |
Bannister Bethel, Lakeisha and Dayvette Taylor, Urica Bryan, Natasha, Inga,
Latoya Adderley and Nakita Smith, Nephews: Paul, Ovando Ferguson, Shawn
Bethel, Glenroy, Geremy, and Geron Hall, Nieces-in-law: Veronica and Delma
Ferguson, and Suzette Dean, Nephews-in-law: Daniel Bethel, Julian Musgrove,
Rodger Clarke, Steven Hanna, and Alfred Smith, Numerous Grand Nieces and
Nephews including: Ashlee, Kara, Dominique, S. J., Don J., Lil Kita, and
Astria, James and Cephas Dean Jr., Uncles: Livian, Stanley of Tampa, Fl, and
Bishop Samuel Mortimer and Clement Dean of Dunmore’s, Long Island, Aunts:
Eva, Esther, and Mary Mortimer, and Curlene Dean of Dunmore’s, Long Island,
Numerous Cousins including: Gertrude and Christopher Knowles, Joan, James,
Stanley, Larry Mortimer, Delroy, Naomi, Winifred Taylor, Shelia, Elaine, Edith,
Mike, Jerimiah, Alexander, Sinclair, Gerald, and Fred Dean, Perry and Stanley
Mortimer Jr., Adopted Daughters: Terez Petty and Raquel Williams, Many
other Relatives and Friends including: Roberta, Sylvia Gibson, and Barbara
Duncan, , Norma, the Families of Jeane Cartwright, Oswald Pinder, Ms. Kelly,
Mr. and Mrs. Bain, Cleomi Adderly, Pastor Adderley, Wellington Lewis, Dr.
Philip Hyler’s Office, Mrs. Barbara Johnson, and Eulease Hall, City Market,
Rosetta Street, Super Value, Blue Hill Road and East Street, Carissa Taylor,
John Collie, Judith Sherman, Mrs. Munnings, Joy, Mr. Major, Checker’s
Restaurants, the Doctors and Staff of I. C. U, Dr. Neil Parker and Dr. Grant
Taylor, Sarah and Marie Wallace, Mr. and Mrs. John Hall and Family, Tyrone
Babbs, Franklyn Clarke, Orthneil Lewis and Rodney Wright, Dunmore’s, Long
Island Family, Claridge Road Family, Olive and Family, McDonald and Family,
Dorcas Moxey, Marion Williams and Plantol Street Family, Sandra Munroe,
Shirley Evans, Audrey Perpall, Arlene Wilson, Arabella Tinker, Eula Patton,
David Taylor, United Christian Church, Lincoln Blvd. and Flamingo Gardens

: Families, and other Relatives and Friends too many to mention.

Viewing will be held in the ,,Celestial%o Suite at Restview Memorial Mortuary
& Crematorium Ltd., on Friday from 10:00 a. m. until 6:00 p. m. and then again
at the church on Saturday from 9:30 a. m. until service time.

MEMORIAL SERVICE
Annamae “Ann” Marie Dean, 51

of Rowena Drive, Claridge Road, and formerly of Dunmore,s, Long Island,
will be held on Thursday, February 8th, 2007 at 7:30 p. m, at United Apostolic
Church, Honeycomb Street off East Street North. Officiating will be Pastor
Franklyn Ferguson.






PAGE 18, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007




FREEPORT

141A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312

Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471

Pager: (242) 340-8043 ¢ Fax: (242) 373-3005















Dorothy Georgina Davis, 88

February 7th, 2007.










announced later.



Mack Greene 51

2007.










Two Brothers:

and Friends.



announced later.



Anton Griffin Thompson, 10














February 2nd, 2007.

announced later.

es DEATH NOTICES

of Musgrove Street, Chippingham,
died at her daughter's residence in }
Winton Heights on Wednesday, :

She is survived by Five Daughters: }
Vanrea Thomas, Judith Dawkins, :
Dorothea and Sandfa Oliver, and }
Casscine Grant-Kinnear, and a host of :
other Relatives and Friends. :

Funeral arrangements will be |



of Sandy Point, Abaco, died at his |
residence on Monday, February Sth, :

He is survived by One Son: Marco, :.
One Daughter: Marguerite Bullard, :
James and David }
Greene, and a host of other Relatives :

Funeral arrangements will be |

* “RJ.” Saunders II, and Braxton Graham, Step-Nieces:

of Ridgeland Park West, died at the
Princess Margaret Hospital on Friday, :

| Funeral arrangements will be

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 340-8034



MEMORIAL SERVICE

William Wellington Johnson II, 38 —

of Quail Roost, San Souci, will be
held on Saturday, February 10th,
2007 at 3:00 p. m. at the Assembly
Hall of Jehovah,s Witness, Dolphin
Drive. Officiating will be Brother
Cordell Knowles. Cremation will
follow. ;

“Billy” is survived by his Wife:
Melissa Johnson, Son: Landon,
Mother: Sheila Johnson, Parents-
in-law: Paul and Cindy Ritchie,
Sisters: Gail Johnson, Debbie Sawyer, Karen Saunders,
Sabrina Graham, and Daphne McIntosh, Brother: Jeffery
Johnson, Brothers-in-law: Jerome “Dicey” Sawyer,
Lawrence Sawyer, Alcott Tago McIntosh, Morgan
Graham, Stephen Johnson, Richard and Christopher Ritchie,
Sisters-in-law: Kimra Johnson, Chennika and LaTonya
Ritchie, Aunts: Olga Smith, Inez Gillings, Beverly Johnson,
Fredricka Ferguson, Winifred Lockhart, Edith Outten,
Beverly Bain, Barbara Doars, and Bery! Blair, Grand Aunt:
Megan Taylor, Nieces: Sheena Pratt, Ashley McIntosh,
Jenay McIntosh, and Shante Graham, Nephews: Robert

Lisa McCartney and Nikki Sawyer, Step-Grand Mother:
Winifred Blair, Grand Parents-in-law: Charles Ritchie and
Iva Delancy, Cousins: Allison, Maxwell, Kendric and
Michael Dean, Yvonne Manninen, Paulette, Donna, George,
Anthony Smith, Van Ferguson, ‘Raynel Griffin, Franz
Johnson, Dodson, Trevor, Keith, Don, Vaughn, Kenny,
Ricky Outten, and a host of other cherished Family Members
and Friends too numerous to mention.

Viewing will be held in the “Serenity” Suite at Restview
Memorial Mortuary & Crematorium Ltd., Robinson and
Soldier Roads on Friday from 10:00 a. m. until 6:00 p. m.
and then on Saturday from 10:00 a. m. until 1:00 p. m.
There will be no viewing at the church.



eu LEN “SYpic rsuy
CNG AUTIEAO B4USITAT Sh

The Tribune

‘Family and Fri
Assembly World Outreach

‘olden Gates Assembly World Outreach

C prises has dubbed Sunday, 11, Feb-

ruary, “Family and Friends Day”.

Led by Bishop Ros L Davis and Pastor Althea
Davis, the officers and members of this great church,
located on Carmichael Road and Antigua Street,
will come together under the theme “Unity”, taken
from the text Psalm 133:1 = 3, to celebrate life and

to give thanks to God for his bountiful blessings |

over the past year.

This verv special occasion will bring together
family members and friends who may not regular-
ly have the opportunity to interact with each other
and more importantly, those who may not have the
opportunity to worship as a group.

Once again the organizing committee is pleased
to announce that Pastor Derrick W Hutchins of
Columbia, South Carolina will be the guest preach-
er for this special event.

Pastor Hutchins is the senior pastor of Family
Life Centre of God in Christ, Columbia, South Car-
olina and also serves as the pastor of New Life
Church of Orlando, Florida. He also serves as super-
intendent of the Progressive District in South Car-
olina and superintendent of the Orlando District in
the Central Florida jurisdiction.

Members are reminded to extend a special invi-
tation to family and friends to join us in this grand
celebration of unity and thanksgiving as we sing
praises to our God.

Following the divine worship service, family and
friends as well as special guests will be hosted to a



Baptists sending soldiers Christian magazines instead of ‘lad mags’

RELIGION



@ PASTOR DERRICK HUTCHINS

grand luncheon in the community centre where
everyone will have a further opportunity to fellow-
ship and reminisce in a cordial atmosphere.

The planning committee wishes to thank the
entire congregation of Golden Gates Assembly
World Outreach Ministries and, most particularly,
expresses its gratitude to Bishop Ros Davis and
Pastor Althea Davis for the high level of coopera-
tion given in this all important initiative.

“AMO sv N f 3032 VWacieoartiwsyr a}
IOS EB VAAUSIAA YANSRUAT Bt

evs ©

Thursday, February 8, 2007 * PG 19

riends Day’ at Golden Gates
Ministries



@ BISHOP ROS AND PASTOR ALTHEA DAVIS

SOAS



@ By ROSE FRENCH
: Associated Press Writer

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — In with
Bible verses, out with bikinis.

‘Southern Baptists are sending Christ-
ian magazines to troops in Iraq as an alter-
native to the “lad mags” that feature scant-
ily clad women, hoping to get clean, posi-
tive imagés in front of the servicemen.

Lifeway Christian Resources, the pub-
lishing arm of the Southern Baptist Con-
vention, is working with Baptist associa-
tions and churches to create “Lifeboxes,”
which include magazines like Christian
Single, notes of encouragement, gum,
socks, candy, stationery supplies and wet
wipes.

“Soldiers have said that mail and mag-
azines are greatly appreciated, and now

we have an opportunity to have a posi- °

tive impact on their lives,” said Rhonda
Buescher, director of Lifeway’s magazine
advertising and circulation.

Nearly 3,500 churches across the coun-
try are trying to mail between 35,000 and
50,000 boxes to troops by March 23, so
they can arrive by Easter on April 8.

Buescher said Nashville-based Lifeway
helped launch the project after hearing

’ from Fort Campbell soldiers who said they

would be interested i in receiving Christ-
ian magazines.

- “They said, ‘Frankly, when we’re away
from our families, we don’t need to be
seeing soft-core pornography,” she said.

Maxim and other “lad mags” such as
Stuff and FHM feature partly-clothed
women posing provocatively, but without
the explicit nudity that’s in Playboy and
other men’s magazines.

The soldiers from Fort Campbell, locat-
ed on the Kentucky-Tennessee line, said
US troops were getting Maxim free of
charge, and they wanted a Christian alter-
native, Buescher said.

Maxim spokesman Sean Evans said the
magazine is not pornography and that sol-
diers have requested it since the war in
Iraq began nearly four years ago.

Evans said he didn’t know how many
copies of Maxim have been sent to troops
in Iraq, or if the magazines were sent free
of charge without soldiers requesting them.

“We congratulate Lifeway on their
much-needed Lifebox project for soldiers
overseas,” Evans said. “The soldiers have
written to us by the thousands about the
popular movies, TV shows, DVDs they
read about in Maxim that they wish they
could be’seeing back home.”

Fort Campbell spokesman Terry Web-

ster said troops get reading material from
families and church groups, but they are
not allowed to receive pornographic mate-
rial in Iraq.

“Basically everybody has different taste
and choices in reading material,” Webster
said. “If they don’t want to read a certain
publication, they don’t have to read that.”

Dozens of Lifeway boxes have already
been mailed to troops by churches in the
Fort Campbell area and in Virginia as part
of a pilot program, Buescher said.

Jimmie Miles, a retired military chaplain
and minister of education at Winfree

Memorial Baptist Church in Midlothian,

Va., sent about 50 boxes in November to
troops in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The congregation mailed most of the
boxes to soldiers from Fort Lee, located
about 20 miles south of the church. Miles
said the congregation has received a num-
ber of thank-you notes from troops for
the boxes.

“There are all types of magazines avail-
able to troops, but I know from my
requests from the troops, it was basically,
‘We'd like to have this type of magazine,
more family-oriented,” Miles said.

Sgt Conway Dooley IV, with the 2nd
Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain
Division (Light Infantry) from Fort Drum,

N.Y., is on-his second tour in Iraq and
recently got one of the boxes from Winfree
Memorial Baptist.

“It is a great idea to send packages to

the troops,” Dooley said by e-mail. “It -

keeps up the morale of the soldiers. Sol-
diers have to deal with what is going on

‘ here and back home and it is very hard for

some of them to deal with that. Receiving
packages from home helps them.”

As part of the project, churches donate
money to their local Baptist association
to pay for magazines and postage. Bap-
tist associations then order magazines
including HomeLife, Christian Single or
Journey through Lifeway at a special dis-
count and enlist churches to participate.

Addresses of military personnel or chap-
lains are collected from churches and from
Web sites that have names of military per-
sonnel who wish to receive mail. Church-
es then assemble and mail the boxes.

Sandy Bain, director of missions for
New River Baptist Association in Jack-
sonville, N.C., is on the Lifeway committee
that helped create the boxes. “We feel like
for them to have something on a more
Christian basis would be better for them
and their families as well,” Bain said.

“It shows that somebody cares. It’s also
giving them a chance to teed their faith.”



PG 20 ° Thursday, February 8, 2007




Chattanooga

votes to leave
Presbyterian





CHATTANOOGA, Tenn.
(AP) — Signal Mountain
Presbyterian Church has vot-
ed to leave the Presbyterran
Church (USA) because of
the congregation's theologi-
cal differences with the
national denomination.

The 2,000-member church
voted overwhelmingly Janu-
ary 28 to break away and join
the Evangelical Presbyterian
Church. which has fewer
than 200 churches and a

92

lion-member Presbyterian
Church (USA).

The Presbyterian Church
(USA), like other mainline
Protestant groups, has been
struggling for years to recon-
cile members who disagree
over how to interpret Scrip-
ture on many issues, includ-
ing ordaining partnered gays.

In June of last year, a Pres-
byterian national assembly
voted to give local congrega-
tions and-regional bodies
some leeway to install gay
clergy and lay officers with
same-sex partners.

The assembly also voted
to allow church officials to
propose experimental phras-
ings for the divine Trinity,
including gender-inclusive
language for the traditional
“Father, Son and Holy Spir-
it,” without requiring con-
gregations to use the alter-
native wording.

The Presbytery of East
Tennessee will now consider
whether the Signal Mountain
church can take its building
and property when it leaves.



































congregation.

Church (USA)

more conservative view of |
Scripture than the 2.3 mil- |









RELIGION

@ POPE Benedict XVI blesses a child upon his arrival in the Paul VI Hall during the weekly

The Tribune

general audience at the Vatican yesterday

(AP Photo: Pier Paolo Cito)

ates Sa a ge Se eS

Indiana Senate begins session with prayer
for first time since court ruling

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The Indiana
Senate began its session with an official
prayer for the first time since a federal judge’s
ruling barred sectarian House invocations as
part of legislative business.

The Senate had been observing a moment
of silent prayer or meditation at the start of
each session day since November 2005, when

US District Judge David Hamilton ruled that
official House prayers that mentioned Jesus
Christ amounted to state endorsement of a
religion. That case is now on appeal before
the 7th US Circuit Court of Appeals in Chica-
go. The American Civil Liberties Union of
Indiana filed the lawsuit in 2005 on behalf
of four people, including a Quaker lobbyist,

who said they found the tradition of offering
mostly Christian prayers offensive.

Senate leaders said members felt it was
important to return to the practice of an oral
prayer, even if the invocations cannot mention
Jesus. Senator Dennis Kruse gave the open-
ing prayer, which asked for “divine guid-
ance.”

Methodists turn Web site into social networking center

WASHINGTON, D.C. (AP) —
Methodists have a new way to connect.

United Methodist Communications on
Monday unveiled the church’s redesigned
Web page that is meant to function as a
-social-networking site, similar to MySpace
or Facebook.

The church spent more than two years

developing the new umc.org, to allow vis-
itors to set up personal profiles, upload
photos, create a blog and establish a net-
work of friends.

The online community has filters that
edit out offensive language, among other
safety tools, that allow users to flag inap-
propriate posts for review by an adminis-

trator.

“It’s about relationships and bringing
people of faith together in innovative new
ways,” said the Rev Larry Hollon, chief
executive of United Methodist Communi-
cations.

Other site features include resources for
church leaders, a “people” section that

includes inspirational stories, a section to
submit prayer requests, a volunteer oppor-
tunities section, a “MethoPedia™ or ency-
clopedia for Methodists, and a church loca-
tor.

The United Methodist Church claims
8.3 million U.S. members, along with many
members overseas.



The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, February 8, 2007 ° PG 21

Churches use Super Bowl
Sunday to reach new people

m@ By MATT SEDENSKY
Associated Press Writer

MIAMI (AP) — Football’s
faithful filed into house parties,
bars and, of course, Dolphin Sta-
dium on Super Bowl Sunday to
observe their holiest of holy days.
But they also turned out in force
at churches across the country,
which are tapping the popularity
of sports in hopes of saving souls.

Organizers of church-spon-
sored Super Bowl gatherings see
the events as a departure from
the formality of organized reli-
gion — the type of events that
could make someone who does-
n't typically attend services feel
more at home..

“It’s a way of reaching out into
our community in a very infor-
mal, low-key way where we show
people we’re regular Joes like
they are without the pressure of
church,” said Pastor Luis Acosta
of Pines Baptist Church, a South-
ern Baptist congregation north
of Miami in Pembroke Pines.

Pines Baptist has been hold-
ing Super Bowl events for a few

yy)
Vy,

yyy,

YY
Vp



B FOOTBALLS faithful filed into house parties, bars and, of course, Dolphin Stadium in Miami, Fla., on Super Bowl Sunday. But
fans also turned out in force at churches across the country, which are tapping the popularity of sports in hopes of saving souls. The
Carrollwood Baptist Church in Tampa, Fla., has been holding a Super Bowl gathering for more than 15 years and advertises the

years and expects about 300 peo-
ple, mostly men, at its flag foot-
ball game and watch party this

year. The church drew about 250
people to a block party January
13 which featured NFL-themed
games, former Dolphins players
signing autographs and giveaways
including a plasma television.

Acosta said the church doesn’t
take a heavy-handed approach
to non-believers who join in such
events. There won’t be so much
as a prayer at the Super Bowl
Sunday event. If a guest enjoys
himself, a member might invite
him to a church social group
meeting, then maybe a Bible
study, then perhaps an actual
service.

“We just follow God’s lead,”
Acosta said.

Pastor Mike Pierce of the non-
denominational Poplar Creek
Church in the Chicago suburb of
Bartlett, Ill., takes a similar
approach. About 100 people will
watch the game on the big screen
in the sanctuary. Like other
church events — including a car-
nival, a play and a pig roast — it’s
meant to simply create a friendly,
fun environment, but not an
overtly religious one.

“We don’t turn everything into
a spiritual event,” Pierce said.
“Good, clean fun is still spiritu-

event on this sign in front of the church.

“It’s a way of reaching out into
our community in a very informal,
low-key way where we show people
we're regular Joes like they are
without the pressure of church.’

al.”

Many pastors agree, simply
trying to make their churches
welcoming environments for new
guests.

Carrollwood Baptist Church
in Tampa has been holding a
Super Bowl gathering for more
than 15 years and attendees have
become so comfortable at the
event that some bring recliners
from home.

“J like it because it’s very laid
back,” said Robert Smith, a 32-
year-old Rockford, Ill., resident
who has attended Super Bowl

— Pastor Luis Acosta

partics at Dominion Christian
Center there. “There’s no pres-
sure.”

Churches also are aware many
people are unwilling to do any-
thing other than watch the game
on Super Bowl Sunday.

“We can offer a good event
surrounding something the cul-
ture uses or we can just hold
church and no one’s going to
come,” said Jim Waters, an asso-
ciate pastor and minister to stu-
dents at First Baptist Church in
Milton in the Florida Panhandle.

Like many other churches

holding Super Bowl events, the
Milton congregation will screen
“Power to Win,” a video featur-
ing Christian NFL stars, during
halftime.

Some churches are using the
Super Bowl as an opportunity to

~ reach the poor.

A number of Nashville church-
es hosted the homeless, fed them,
washed their clothes, letting them
watch the game on big-screen
TVs and giving them a bed to
sleep in on Super Bowl Sunday.

And at St Joseph’s Catholic
Church in Libertyville, Ill., mem-
bers gathered donations to help
fund the parish food pantry,
another one for the larger com-
munity, and a school under con-
struction for African orphans.

William Baker, a retired Uni-
versity of Maine professor who
has written two books about
sports and religion, says the inter-
play between the two dates back
to ancient times, and that in mod-
ern-day America, evangelical
Christians make the most of the
relationship.

(AP Photo: Chris O’Meara)

He calls sports part of the new
“American trinity” — along with
religion and patriotism.

“Any visitor from Mars on
Super Sunday, whether he watch-
es television or goes to the stadi-
um in Miami,” Baker said,
“would say these people believe,
maybe in God, but for sure they
believe in the American flag and
in the flyover military display and
in patriotism, but most surely
they believe in sports.”

Baker said evangelicals had
long rejected sports — for the
gambling it often fueled, for it
often being played on the Sab-
bath and for the general baccha-
nalia that it was associated with.

But they eventually realized
they shared athletes’ win-or-lose
take on the world (only one team
steps off the field victorious, and
only believers are rewarded after
death) and wanted to take advan-
tage of the immense reach of ath-
letic competition.

“Sport becomes a kind of fish
hook to catch the unbelievers,”
he said.













PAGE 22, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007

Hemeritte’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET « P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR




THERESA SHIRLEY
FERGUSON, 56




a resident of Rainbow










J Fond memory will linger in the hearts of
her husband, Freddie Ferguson; son
,Domico Ferguson; mother, Lillian Bethel; daughter-in-law, Heather
Ferguson; grandchildren, Dylan, Daunte and Kaitlyn Ferguson; mother-
in-law, Ida Brown; step sons, Wesley, Dale, Clyde and Matthew Ferguson;
step daughter, Corene Ferguson; sisters, Berniece Rolle, Ruth Bethel
of Freeport, Frissie Ward of Nassau; brothers, James Bethel of Freeport



and Raymond Bethel; aunts, Doris Bethel, Laura Rolle, Lida Scavella

and Elaine Scavella; uncles, Ronald and James Scavella,

James"Buck"Johnson; eight nieces, Margo Rolle, Lyvette and Penny :
Bethel, Gema Bethel, Malinda, Sherika, Nioka and Nioche Ward; nine
nephews, Gregory, Dwayne, Rev. Theophilus of Freeport, Naaman and }
i Cash and Ms. Emerald Cash of Lower Bogue, Eleuthera; nieces and

Romeo Rolle, Ricardo and Craig Bethel, Horatio and Lancer Ward;

brothers-in-Iaw, Lionel Rolle and James Ward; numerous other relatives :
and friends including, Ruth Thompson, Sarah Williamson, Estherlene :
Johnson, James and Gloria Rolle and family, George and Hilda Rolle

and family, best friend, Judy Gardiner; godchildren, Warren Johnson,

Carnetta Gaitor and Khalila Evans, Barb Steinhaus of Nebraska, Nurse
Gloria Gardiner, Jim and Vangy Lewis, Delores Newbold, Marilyn |

| James, Harrison, Donald and Rudolph Bethel, Levard, Ben, Shad,

Johnny and Jerry Rolle, Lavardo Ingraham, Levanda Cranston, Blair :
: _Oprah, Ramon, Kriotin, Phillip, La-Stacia, Bria, Marco, Charles, Samuel,

and Coomodore Clifford Butch Scavella of RBDF, Maryann, Aretha,

and Evona Rolle, Janet Ferguson, Billy Stubbs and family, William |
Whyte and family, Garnet Thompson and family, Evelyn Johnson of |
Freeport, Levard and Andrea Rolle, Ethel Cartwright of Freeport, Elsie ;
Johnson and family, Pres. of Bahamas Conference Methodist Churches, |
Kendris Carey, Pastor Henry Whyte and family, Rev. Godfrey Bethel |
and family, Dr. Reginald Eldon, BCMC, Rev. Kenneth Huggins and.
family, MCCA, Rev. Shirley Burrows of Living Word Ministry, Pastor :
Phillip Bethel and family, Pastor Remilda Carey and family, William :
and Dewitt Whyte and family, Florence Scavella and family, Ken Keene |
and family, Charlie Moore and family, Hon. Alvin Smith and family, |
Nurse Priscilla Scavella, Nurse Monique Roberts, Dr. Delton Farquarson, ;

Dr. Nicholas Hepburn, Una Reckley, Advilda Mather, Dorothy Bethel,

Cecil and Kirk Johnson, Ervin Kelly of Spanish Wells, Linda Boller of :
Ft. Pierce, Florida, Virginia Harvey of Lexington, Kentucky, The Kelly's :
of Pennsylvania, Tammy Canden of Key West Florida, Jim and Deborah :
Marshall of Canada, Stephanie McMillian of New York, Christine |
Buchanan of California, Jeff Moore and family of Kansas, Fitzroy :
Rampersad of Africa, Matt Houpes, Pres. of RBPOA, Tom Schimmerling |
of New York, Richard Randall of Palm Coast Florida, Regina Sawyer
of Belgium, The Methodist Church family, the James Cistern. Gregory :

Town, Hatchet Bay, Governor's Harbour and Palmetto Point communities.



Bay, Eleuthera, will }
be held at Wesley Methodist Church, James }
Cistern, Eleuthera, on Saturday at 11:00 :
a.m. Officiating will be Rev. Godfrey :
Bethell, assisted by Rev. Theophilus Rolle. ;
Interment follows in James Cistern Public ;
Cemetery, James Cistern, Eleuthera. ;



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES










Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Rock
Sound, from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m. on Friday and at the church in James
Cistern from 7:00 p.m. until service time on Saturday.



KATHLEEN MARIE
RUSSELL CASH, 51

y aresident of Comfort Street, will be held
| at Soul Winning Church of God in-Christ,
Lyon Road off Shirley Street, on Saturday
at 11:00 a.m. Officiating will be Bishop
Ervin Hart, assisted by Rev. Ednol Cash.
Interment follows in Woodlawn Gardens,
Soldier Road.

Left to cherish her memory are her husband,

= : Basil Cash; 3 sisters, Francis Kerr, Virginia
Ferguson and Patsy Rolle; 1 brother, Stephen Ferguson; 5 aunts, Myrtle
Minnis, Francis Rahming, Gloria Forbes, Thelma Neilly and Olga Frazier
of Lower Bogue; 2 uncles, Eugene Rahming and Oswald Frazier; 3
sisters-in-law, Nurse Mrs. Margaret Fernander, Educator Ms. Geneva

nephews, Princess Sears, Brendalee Williams, Sandy Ferguson, William
and Constance Rahming, Newton and Melony Rahming, Patrick and
Paulette Rahming, Gelitha and Benjamin Ferguson, Abaston Rahming,
Jeppha and Veronica Rahming, Jerome and Carlton Sears, Orville,

‘Lance, Joanne and Kojak Mott, Oswald, Dino, Jerome and Valentino

Mcintosh, Reno, Keno, Phillippa, Loranda and Gloria Williams, Theresa
Forbes, Deanne Demeritte, Avis Wright, Clarabell, Vernita, Carmetta,
Tronia, Shanae, Shanika, LaKeisha, Danielle, Latoya, Tonique, Marco,

Bernard, Deresha, Scott, Derenik, Cordero, Marion, Philippa, Derek,
Shawn and Melba Johnson, Annamae Forbes, Donnie Cash, Elouise
Fernander, Ricardo Fernander, Fran Brice of Grand Bahama, Kincade
Fernander of Orlando, Fla., Rev. McKennon Fernander of Orlando,
Fla., Elaine Ferguson, Linda Cash, Pamela Culmer, Annamae Davis,
Ismae Newbold, Iva Williams, Ednol Cash Jr.. William and Edison
Cash, Shenell Cash, Issie Frazier, Alvin Frazier, Florie Ferguson,
Alpheaus Neilly; grand nieces and nephews, Rodney Kelly, Deniro,
Anson, Alexander, Stephone and Denira Johnson, Cristel, Tiffany, Manda
and Kimbley Thompson; other relatives and friends including, Joseph
Rolle, Mrs. Irma Johnson and family, Mr. Anthony Lowe and family,
Aldon Cooper, Florence Cooper, Martti Rolle, Bernard Colebrook, Chris
Malakius, Min. Mercita Johnson and famliy, Craig and Sandra Flowers, |
Mary Stubbs, Munnings family, Marco Pierre, Mr. and Mrs. Trevor

Smith, Dorothy Saunders, Sabrina Pratt, Rose Hamilton, Elder Major,
Huge Edward Rollins and family, Joy Reckley, Relcina Pennerman,
Jimmy Sands, the Comfort Street family, the Sears family of Brougham
Street and the doctors and nurses of P M H Female Medical #1.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home. Market
Street. from 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Friday and on Saturday at the
church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.






PAGE 24, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007

Aeme






EVA MARIE
FERGUSON WILLIAMS,
78












































and family, The Black Village Family.

a a

ritte’s Huneral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR _

a resident of Rupert Dean Lane and
formerly of Simms, Long Island, will be :
held at Our Lady's Catholic Church, ; |
Deveaux Street, on Saturday at 2:45 p.m. | |
Officiating will be Msgr. Alfred Culmer, if
assisted by Rev. Deacon Peter Rahming ;

and Rev. Deacon Maxwell Johnson. }
Interment follows in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, JFK Drive. if



Left to cherish her memory are, her daughters, Woman Sgt 212 Bernedette :
Williams and Janet Williams-Young, Damaris "Peaches" Thompson- ;
Dawkins; 1 adopted daughter, Sharon Rodgers-Fraser; | adopted son,
Wesley Peet; grandsons, Brendan Dean, Christoff and Anthony Dillet,
Tristan Strachan, Matthew Williams, Dominique, Dennis Jr. and Dario |
- Dawkins, John Etienne; granddaughters, Deniesha, Alexis and Nikkie :
Dawkins; brother, Michael Knowles; sisters-in-law, Helen Hutchinson, }
Florine Ferguson, Agatha Williams and Eudene Knowles; brother-in-
law, Ted Hutchinson; sons-in-law, Dennis Dawkins Sr. Joe Fraser;
daughter-in-law, Donna Lee-Peet; nieces, Malvese Ramsey, Denelle, :
Phelicia, Brenda, Ellen and Vernica Ferguson, Denise Johnson of }
Orlando, Fla., Heather Rolle, Tamara, Michaela, Mia Knowles, Hon.
Theresa Moxey-Ingraham Deborah Ball Orlando, Fla., Pauline Dawkins }
of Mississippi, Thomasina "Ida" Wilson, Dr. Sophie and Bridgette Rolle, }
Lily Mortimer, Sharon Ambrister, Sherry Knowles, Sally Hutchinson, :
Karen Marshall, Gwendyln King, Velma Edwards, Jaclyn and Andrea :
Jenour, Claudine Butler, Chantel Wildgoose, Deborah Adderley, Gloria }
Whymms, Evelyn Sawyer; nephews, Supt. Larry, Bradley, Brain, Albert : as YW: : :
and Freddie Ferguson, Michael Knowles Jr., Ted Jr., Terrance and } Glenda Laing, Judy Williams, Lenora Moncur, Doris Gomez, Sabrina
Michael Hutchinson, Latario Jenour, Derick and Andy Whymms;
numerous grand, great-grand and great-great grand nieces and nephews;
other close relatives and friends including, Nathalie Butler, Sylvia and |
Russel Davis, Valeria and Samuel Knowles, Patrice Knowles-Swain }
and family, Gwen and Les Albury and family, Mr. Rodger Munnings, :
Esther Colebrooke and family, Mrs. Frazier and family, Mrs. Constance
Evans and family, Dr. Gail Saunders and family, the McKenzie family, :
Maria Outten, Shirley Pearson and family, Shantelly Symonette and }
family, Erica Humes and family, Mrs. Mildred "Small Heaven" Maurice }
and family, Our Lady's Church family, Msgr. Alfred Culmer and family, :
Msgr. John Johnson and family, Bert Williams and family, Martha Major :
and family, Fern Knowles and family, Daria Etienne, Rita Wells and :
family, Lawrence C. Knowles and family, Sarah "Moody" Knowles and :
family, Sis. Cecilia Albury and family, Mrs. Saunders, Mrs. Thompson, }
The St. Joseph Adult Center family, the officers and members of the :
Bahamas Mothers' Club, Lynn Lewis and family, Chief Insp. Prince i
Cornish, the Staff of Arawak Cay and Fort Charlotte Police Stations, }
Aman Joseph and family, Dorian Joseph and family, Philip, Florence :
and Quincy Pinder and family, Joniece Adderley and family, Harlean :
and Ivan Saunders and family, Nathalie Cash, Louis and Clarence Smith

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES




Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market
Street, from 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m,. on Friday and on Saturday from 9:00
a.m.-1 :00 p.m. and at the church from 2:00 p.m. until service time.

HELENA PATRICIA
FERGUSON-BETHEL, 69

a resident of Market Street, will be held at
St. Barnabas Anglican Church, Wulff and
| Baillou Hill Roads, on Saturday at 10:00

a.m. Officiating will be Canon Basil Tynes.
Interment follows in St. Barnabas Church
Cemetery, Moore Avenue.
her memory are her 2 daughters, Avon and
Dale Bethel; 1 son, Gerard Bethel;
grandchildren, Stevette and Stephen Taylor;
brothers, David "Rudy" Grant and Alfred "Pepsi" Ferguson; nephew,
Stephen H. Ferguson, Shawn Ferguson, Chevon Ferguson, Sharrado
Ferguson, Myles Ledge; nieces, Theresa Sands-Roker, Trina March,
Rhonda Adderley, Madrie Ferguson, Dionne Newman, Drena Saunders
and Lynette Smith; cousins, Caroline Newbold, Dorothy Moss, Dorothy
Newton, Alma Walkine, Clarinda Sands-Major, Hester Johnson, Frances
Lede, Ethel Bowe, Enid Ingraham, Rosheva Hepburn, Vernella Curry;
children of Sybil Dorsette (Deceased), Max and Maxine Julian, Ellamae
Ferguson, Admiral Ferguson and family, Cecil Ferguson and family,
Rev. S.A Hepburn, Edgar Bonimy, Nursing Officer Stephanie Johnson,
Cyprianna Strachan-Smith, Rev. Clifton Hepburn, Gwendolyn King,
Joanna Clarke (Cousin Sue); other relatives and friends, Philip "Brave"
Davis Jr. and Sr., Charles and Barbara Saunders, Rose Bodie, Wendy
Miller, Jenny and Chery] Taylor, Stephen Taylor Sr., Sanda Pickstock,

Wright, Dr. Margo Munroe, Dr. Ian McDowell, Lease Sands and family,
Fr. Colin Saunders, Fr. Joseph Mycklewhite, George Robinson Sr.,
Decosta Williams, Julian Alleyne, Gia Duncanson, Shenika Taylor,
Karen and Rodger Brown, Philip and Yvonne Clarke, Maryann Clarke,
Leonard Minns, Keith Arahna, Prince Whitely and family, Gwen Moncur,
Charles and Lois Bethel, Barbara Bowland, Barbara Dixs, Wyn Ferguson,
Ruth and Joyce Ferguson, Myrtis and Mia Miller, Artie Johnson, Leon
and Cassandra Saunders, Cyprianna Armbrister, Verona Seymour,
Jeffrey Henfield and family, Deborah Major, Ernestine Douglas, Marcia
Duncan, Alphonzo and Olga Butler, David Knowles Sr., Michaela
Strachan and Courtney Strachan Sr. and family, Valerie and Fulton
Samuels, Brian and Lyniska Wilson, Brenville "Bulla" Hanna, Rodney
McKay, William Strachan, Sonia Weech, Beverly J.T. Taylor, Don
Campbell, Debbie Saunders, Arthur Duncombe, Bertam and Judy
Armaly, St. Barnabas and St. Ambrose Church family, Cannan Lane
and Hawkins Hilltoppers and Market Street family, Management and
Staff of Bahamian Paint.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market
Street, from 10-6:00 p.m. on Friday and on Saturday at at the church
from 9:00 a.m. until service time.



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 25

~ Demeritte’s FH uneral Some

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY



-FUNERAL SE

ICELYN BERTHA
MILLER
(nee) KNOWLES, 66

a resident of Saunders Road off Rock :
Crusher Road & formerly of Simms, Long }
Island will be held at Mt. Moriah Baptist
Church, Farrington Road, on Saturday at
11:00 a.m. Officiating will be Rev. Dr.
Wilton Strachan, assisted by other
ministers of the gospel. Interment follows in Lakeview Memorial :
Gardens, JFK Drive.



1 Left to cherish her memory are her husband, Charley Miller; sons,
Steve, Lindon, Christopher, Fritzgerald, Spencer, Abrandale Rodger, :
and Jefferson; daughter, Jennifer Moss; son and daughter-in-law, Dino }
Moss and Bridgette Miller; siblings, Edwin and Danzella Knowles, :
Reta Morley, Raphael, Emily Smith and Ameris Knowles, grand and }
great grand children, Katia, Dominique, Charlie, Schanttia, Benson, ;
Keshea, De'mika, Chad, Antay, Jefferson Jr., Shannon, Damien, Candy,
Brendon, Shantel, Fitz Dianne, Spencer Jr., Sterrell, Kerron, Katio, :
Salathia, Shamari and Alexi; step-mother-in-Iaw, Laura Miller of
Arthurs Town, Cat Island; brothers and sisters-in-law, Sammy and
Sada Miller and family, Norris Miller, Clara Miller and family, Drucilla :
Kemp Miller and family, Ken Miller and family, Rhoda Rolle and }
family and Reginald Williams Knowles; nieces and nephews, Telford, i
Tyrell and Thrale Miller, Loretta Carey, Lillian Taylor, Estella Smith, i
Ida Strachan, Katherine Smith, Loretta Young, Evelyn Brannen, Marilyn
Davis, Roselyn, Ashley, Fredericka, Ivy, Judymae, Constance, Susan, i
Margarette Knowles, Sam, Wilfred, David Smith, Wayne, Willie Jr,
Melford, Hercules, Paul, Pablo, Wildren, Albourn, Philip, Gregory
Knowles, Bertram and Haywood Morley, Sonia, Nekia, Anita and ;
Reginald Williams, Ann, Robert, Andrew, Jeffrey, Peggy, Monique,
Ingrid, Agatha, Sandra and Lin; adopted sons and daughters, Lucille
McDonald, Shawn Williams, Judy Demeritte, Diana Miller, Eureka |
Lockhart, Darryl, Brian, Grantley Miller, Terry and Davy Gibson and
Beatrice Seymour and family; uncle and aunts, Melvin Knowles and |
family, Jenny and Doris Knowles, Rebecca Williams and Emeretta |
Ferguson; other relatives and friends including, Rev. T.G. Morrison
and family, Rev. Wilton Strachan and family, Fr. Bernard Been and :
family, Fr. Rodney Burrows and family, Mrs. Linda Lorondos and :
family, James Dean and family, Spence Dean and family, Sis. Williamson
and family, Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Wallace and family, Mrs. Peggy }
Gibson and family, Whealthy Wilson, Ivy Ferguson, Sandra Moxey, }
Norman and Idamae Duncombe, Vernice Dorsett, Evelyn Rolle, Deacon }
and Mrs. Peet, Sis. Saunders, Sis. Helen Rolle, Tony Duncombe, Kevin
Rolle, Coral, Omanique, Alfreda Clarke, Rhonda, Veronica, Norman,
Joycelyn Bain, Thelma Newman, Marion Rolle, Eleanor McQueen, |
Dr. Curling, Dr. Turnquest, Dr. Danny Johnson, Dr. Martin Makik, :
Dorothy, Mr. and Mrs. David Johnson and family, Sharon Byfield |

MARKET STREET ° P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782










RV

(USA), the McPhee family, Nazareth Centre family, the entire Rock
Crusher Road Community, St. Agnes Parish family, Juliet Felon and
family, Betty Bullard and family, St. Agnes Church Marching Band,
Mt. Moriah Baptist Church family, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Burrows and
family, Lorondos Air Condition family, Hon. Minister Alfred Sears,
Tina Miller, Jan, Zion United Women and Zion Baptist Church family
and North Cat Island Development Association.

: ‘Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,

Market Street, from 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Friday and on Saturday
at the church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

HECTOR |
"Bookie"
ROLLE, 106

a resident of Fleming Street and formerly
of Holmes Rock, Grand Bahama, will be
} held at Church of God of Prophecy,
| Meadow Street and Hospital Lane, on

~| Saturday at 12:00 noon. Officiating will
be Bishop Hulan A. Hanna, Sr. Pastor,
assisted by Min. Philip D. Ferguson. Interment follows in Old Trail
Cemetery, Old Trail Road.

Left to cherish his memory are his 4 nieces, Anita Pinder, Arilee Cox,
Althea Johnson and Nickey Cash of Freeport, Grand Bahama; 32
grand nieces including, Roni Douglas and Deborah Davis; 19 grand
nephews, 49 great grand nieces, 33 great grand nephews including,
Mark Johnson; 12 great great grand nieces and 19 great great grand
nephews; niece-in-law, Mildred Adderley; other relatives and friends
including, Bishop Solomon Humes and family, Bishop Hulan Hanna
and family, the Church of God of Prophecy family, Doctors and Nurses
of Male Medical I and I and Accident and Emergency, Elizabeth
Whylly, Fleming Street family, Grant and Bain Town family, Bishop
Joseph Swann and family, Mildred Munnings, Diann Evans, the Davis
family, the Rolle family, Rev. Dr. Prince Hepburn, Benjamin Ramsey,
Rev. Sammy Saunders and family, Apostle Charles Wallace and family
and the Bullard family.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,
Market Street, from 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Friday and on Saturday
at the church from 11:00 a.m. until service time.





PAGE 26, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007







_ Harewood Sinclair Higgs L.F.D.
President/Managing Olrector

MAZIE DUNCOMBE, 84

| aresident fo Baillou Hill Road and
formerly of Black Point, South
Andros will be held on Sunday,
February 11, 2007 at 1:00 a.m. at
the Johnson Road, Seventh-Day
Adventist Church, Farrin gton Road.
{) Officiating will be Pastor Leroy
Sewell, assisted by Pastor Eric
Clarke, Pastor Barrington Brennen and Pastor Jeremiah
Duncombe. Interment will follow in the Old Trail
Cemetery, Abundant Life Road.

Fond memory will remain in the hearts of her children,
Samuel Duncombe and Esther Rahming; 13
grandchildren, Mandrielle, Stephon, Jarrel and Cordero
Adderley, Devon Duncombe, Elvis Swain, Kenva
Colebrook, Donella Adderley Miller, Cassandra,
Shandera and Kendira Adderley, Jamie and Angela
Duncombe; six adopted grandchildren, LaToya and
Sheena Munnings, Sandy Colby, Alexander Neely,
Ricardo Bell and Melon Lissiant; 12 great grandchildren;
two brothers, Ishmael and Hencie Rahming of Miami,
Florida; three sisters, Florina Johnson, Flossie Rolle
and Monekerbeil Canter; two brothers-in-law, Jeremiah
Rolle and Alphonso Canter; three sisters-in-law, Daisy,
Geneva and Mazella Rahming, 23 nephews, 31 nieces;
other relatives and friends including, the Johnson Park
S.D.A. family, Harry Adderley, Eliza Miller, Maria,
Ruth, Evelyn, Ms. Sylvia Munnigs, staff of
Housekeeping Sandilands Hospital, the Sears and
Johnson families, Sophia Rigby, Deloris Ferguson,
Sheva Rolle and Patrice Burrows.

Friends may pay their last respects at Gate Way
Memorial Funeral Chapel on Mount Royal Avenue and
Kenwood Street, and on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to
6:00 p.m., and on Sunday from 9:30 a.m. to service
time at the church.



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Rock of Ages Funeral Chapel

Wulff Road & Pinedale
Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 ¢ Fax: 328-8852

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR ©

MERLENE RAHMING
_ PEREZ, 51

of The Bluff, South Andros will be |
held at Christian Life Church,
Seabreeze Lane on Saturday, February
10, 2007 at 2:00 p.m. Officiating will
be Rev. Theophilus Neely, assisted by
Rev. Clement Neely. Interment will
be on Old Trail Cemetery, Old Trail
Road.












Left to cherish her memory are her

loving husband, Julian Perez; two
daughters, Tameka Rahming and Donette Goodman; four sons, Dwayne
and Dwight Forbes, Jamal Rahming and Dominic Goodman; one
grandson, Lavantha Rahming; one son-in-law, Godfrey Rolle; father,
Daniel Rahming Sr.; four brothers, Daniel Jr., Frederick Sr., Arthur
Sr., and Israel Rahming Sr., of West Palm Beach, Florida; four sisters,
Gloria Cartwright, Florence Smith, Doralene Gibson and Kathleen
Rahming; two brothers-in-law, Timothy Cartwright and Lecitus Gibson;
one sister-in-law, Anna Rahming; 35 nieces, Joyce and W. Cpl. 2312
Maltice Cartwright, Sherrymae Laroda, R.C. Carolyn Forbes, Rosenell
Cooper, Debbie, Janet, Marie, Madeline, Maydon, Maxine and Tammy
Smith, Dorothy Robins, Prescola Rolle, W. Cpl 1768 Idell and Nethalee
Gibson, Danrea Turnquest, Nacoya Pratt, Nikita Johnson, Katherine
John, Euta, Yvonne Charlton, J udy, Claudine Johnson, Carla Duncombe,
Samanthan Davis, Faith Raguel, Karen Black-Allen and Vazel Curtis,
Remilda Rahming, Sheena Neely and Roshelle; thirty two nephews,
Leading Seaman Jacob and Prison Officer Roswell Cartwright,
Alexander Smith, Edison, Jonathan, Kevin, Cadwell, Dave, P.C. 3097 |
Wayde, Keith and Ricardo Gibson, Nacodo Johnson, Frederick
Rahming Jr., McDonald, Ephraim, Derek, Jason, Cliff, Lawrence,
Loranzo, Spence, Arnold, Arthur Sr., Kenneth, Dan, Cadet, Officers
10 Leslie Brown and 26 Vakeito Ferguson, Edwin, Albert, Israel,
Alvin, Cleveland, Sherman Rahming, Marvin McKenzie and Troy
Black; nine nephews-in-law; thirteen nieces-in-law; numerous grand
and great grandnieces and nephews.





















Other relatives and friends including, Rev. Theophilus and Mrs. Neely;
Albertha Demeritte, Century Dean, Ms. Lloyd, Sharon Henfield,
Barbara Deleveaux, Kendra Johnson, Louise Neely; the Green, Rolle,
Johnson, Taylor, Neely and Kelly families; Carl, Carla, Una, Doris
and Stephen Kemp, Marion, Richard and Candice Chestnut, Michelle,
Tabytha and Trent Wells, Rudy, Luke and Laura and Mrs. Janette
Carroll; McKinney, Smith, Ferguson, Lewis and Bevans families; the
South Andros Christian Centre family, and the Bluff family especially
Remilda Smith, Viola Adderley, Estella McPhee, Magnolia Brown,
Amarita Pratt, Ezekiel and Alfred Johnson, William Hepburn and the
Sands families; Kate and Theresa Rahming, William Rolle, David
Moxey, Kenhugh Rolle, Whitney Bastian M.P. for South Andros
Constituency and family, and the entire South Andros community.








Friends may pay their last respecst at Rock of Ages Funeral Chapel
on Wulff Road and Pinedale in the Petra Suite on Friday from 10:00
a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday at the Church from 1:00 p.m. until
_ funeral time.









‘THE TRIBUNE



Kerzner struggles on
less-skilled hirings

Resort has to equip Bahamians with necessary skills
before interview, 400 passing through initiative

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business

Reporter

OF the 1,700 new jobs need-
ed for the new 600-room all-
suite Cove at Atlantis resort,
to date about 1,400 persons
have been hired, Kerzner Inter-
national (Bahamas) president

committed, through its Atlantis
University, to ensuring that
Bahamians continued training
and moving up the job ladder.

“That is a development pro-
gramme that builds people’s

leadership skills, giving them
self confidence, letting them
understand what a financial
document looks like and the
sort of things that they are going

to promote them to leadership,”
Mr Markantonis said.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 200/, PAGE /B

Share your news

The Tribune wants to
hear from people who
are making news in
their neighbourhoods.
Perhaps you are

raising funds for a
good cause,

| campaigning for

improvements in the.
area or have won an
award. If so, call us on
322-1986 and share
your story.



to need later on when we want
said yesterday.

George Markantonis told
South East Rotarians: “We’ve
had our most difficulty in hiring
the less skilled and specialised
jobs. That is to be expected -
culinarians, stewarding areas.
Lifeguards were particularly dif-
ficult because of the amount of
lifeguards we were trying to
hire.

“Aquaventure [the resort’s
new waterscape], in just one
shift needs 91 lifeguards, and so
to run two shifts, which we are
going to have to do, we’re talk-
ing about 180 lifeguards.

“We have had to develop
advanced training programmes
to develop people to be able to
interview. When we know peo-
ple couldn’t apply for jobs
because they didn’t have the
skills we were asking for, we
created - in certain categories -
training for people who weren’t
being interviewed, so we could
train them to get the skills and
then apply to us to be inter-
viewed to probably get the job.”

Mr Markantonis said this may
seem like a roundabout way of
recruiting, but up to 400 per-
sons have been through the pro-
gramme. All those who com-
pleted the training have been
hired, he said.

Mr Markantonis said that
when all relevant Phase III
components are completed, the
staff at Atlantis will increase to
9,500 Bahamians, including the
Marina Village and the Resi-
dences at Atlantis.

He added that the resort was

P.O. Box N-467O
Nassau, bahamas

Tel: 242-328-0264 /57

COMMERCIAL BUILDING
FOR SALE OR LEASE
289 WULFF ROAD EAST

+ Vacation Specials!

These prices includes round trip
airfare and 1 day car rentall

Ft. Lauderdale = $198.20

Orlando = $234.90

@ BUILDING 12,000 sq.ft. 80’ X 140" X 24’ HIGH

Miami = $218.20

e 3BAY DOORS* ONE WITH LOADING PLATFORM

AP UGH CAPERS EAGER West Palm Beach = $276.70
100 KW GENERATOR W/AUTO TRANSFER SWITCH

DISPLAY/SALES AREA 2000 SQ.FT.



MEZZANINE 2000 SQ. FT.
2 OFFICES * LUNCH ROOM * 3 BATHROOMS

PEPSI-COLA BAHAMAS BOTTLING COMPANY

OFFERED FORSALE AT $1,850.000.00 GROSS ‘
wp Applicants are invited from suitably qualified individuals to fill the position of:



LEASE $14,000.00 MONTH NET

Viewing by appointment only
Tel: 242-393-1778 CELL 424-4161

Monday to Friday 9am - 3pm

PRODUCTION MANAGER



The incumbent will have overall responsibility of managing all aspects
of the manufacturing operation which include the control of raw material
utilization, finished goods production, quality assurance and plant
maintenance.

The Department of Statistics
Average Prices for Selected
Construction Building Materials

New Providence: Selected First Quarters 2002-2006 Ideal candidate would at minimum have an Associate’s Degree in a

technical field, experience in Supervisory Management and five years
experience in manufacturing plant operations

| ITEMS AND DESCRIPTION: | UNIT

Human Resources Manager
P. O. Box N-3004

Nassau, Bahamas

FAX: 364-2123

Please send resume to:

8” Hollow Block 146 | 1,72

4” Hollow Block | ho : | 118 | 129 | 132
Steel 5/8” | 72 | 1685 | 17.08 |
Mesh Wire (6° x150°) 12457 | 147.21 | 226.46 | 220,02 |

194 | 1.64 145
21.97

17.73
2 | 22.90 | 21.58
[a | 15.24 [1422 | 16.03 | 16.41 | 19.39
| 1° 1727 | 1732 | 19.07 | 20.26

48,09

Telephone calls will not be accepted.





(SHIRLE

Pe
te









Ul

Te

141.90"
172.43
79,81.

893.26



Peete.
Door Trims 9,93 |. 10.34 10.53 |
3’x 3’ Aluminum Awning Fach | 127.36 | 125.90 | 128,75 |

4x3’ Aluminum Awning | Each | 147.33 | 146.53, | 159.13

[#12 Cable “Roll | 4895 | 49.90 | 51.54

Me rapa eet eal ae
Kach | 766.70 | 718.68 | 812.54 |

Complete Bathroom set
white

Did you know that the prices for 8 and 4 inch hollow blocks climbed 28.36% and 28.81%
since the first quarter of 2002?



|
i

—-

‘ of



HIGHLIGHTS:

Brand new upscale mini mall, offices and apartment
located Shirley & Church Streets near, Paradise Island
Bridge, and along bus routes, lots of parking.

Prices soared between the first quarters of 2002 and 2006 for mesh wire (6° x 150”) and 710 sq ft - Retail Store « mil sq ft - Beauty Salon/Barber Shop
5/8” steel. The increases during this period were 76.65% and 75.18%, respectively.
In the Floor and Walls section, floor tile (ceramic 12” sq) and wall tile ( ceramic 4.5”)
decreased 26.02% and 20.07%, respectively.

The prices for aluminum awning windows dropped between the first quarters of 2002
and 2003. However, from 2003 to the first quarter in 2006, prices increased steadily.





~ CONTACT

MONDAY-FRIDAY « 9AM-5PM
s x N ~ ww ’ \ Wy s YW ; ey vy se w , WN ~ s ~
fo & Oa. & a ° ay ee a UD < a) ©

~A1-ZIS4 aiter 6pm

The Department of Statistics wishes to sincerely thank all its valuable contributors;
have a blessed and prosperous New Year.

&





‘THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 9B



in Q4 rebound

m By MARTIN
CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

not spread to wage
demands, the Fed will be
content to stay on the side-
lines.

It did so last week, leav-
ing interest rates
unchanged.

Growth

Productivity growth
lagged for more than two
decades as the country
struggled to cope with a
series of oil price shocks in
the 1970s.

Beginning in the mid-
1990s, productivity started
to improve as the impact
of high-tech tools such as
‘computers made workers
more efficient.

Since a gain of 4.1 per-
cent in 2002, productivity
has declined gradually.

The 2.1 percent rise for
last year, while down from
a 2.3 percent gain in 2005,
nonetheless was nearly a
full percentage point above

keeping close tabs on the
performance of productivi-
ty and unit labor costs. Pol-
icymakers are watching for
signs that slowing produc-
tivity and rising wage pres-
sures are having an adverse
impact on inflation. The
hope is that businesses will
meet workers’ wage
demands by trimming their
record profits rather than
making goods more expen-
sive.

The rebound in produc-
tivity in the fourth quarter
was double what had been
expected. Analysts said
that performance and the
slowdown in unit labor
costs should ease inflation
worries at the Fed.

“The strong productivity
in the fourth quarter is
good news for the econo-
my and good news for the
Fed. Productivity is what
keeps inflation under con-
trol. It helps workers get
pay increases without price
increases,” said David

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Workers stepped up their
efficiency in the final three
months of 2006, yet pro-
ductivity still turned in the
weakest yearly perfor-
mance in almost a decade.

The Labor Department
reported Wednesday that
productivity, the amount of
output per hour of work,
rose at a 3 percent annual
rate for October through
December. That compares
with a 0.1 percent decline
in three previous months.

For the entire year, pro-
ductivity edged up by 2.1
percent, the weakest per-
formance since a 1.6 per-
cent rise in 1997.

Vital

Productivity is the vital
element needed to boost

living standards. It allows : : the average annual
businesses to pay workers ee Gees, gains from 1973 through
more, because of their 1993.

York.

On Wall Street, the Dow
Jones industrial average
edged up 0.56 point to
close at 12,666.87 as falling
oil prices hurt energy
stocks.

Many economists believe
that as long as last year’s
spike in energy prices does

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, WINSTON ARLINGTON
RITCHIE of Deadman’s Cay, Long Island, Bahamas and now
City of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada intend to change my

name from to VINCENT ARLINGTON RITCHIE. If there are

any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may
write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box
SS-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after
the date of publication of this notice... mug.

The improvement in the
fourth quarter reflected the
rebounding economy after
slowing sharply in the
spring and summer.

Overall output grew at
an annual rate of 3.5 per-
cent in the final three
months of 2006.

increased output, without
having to raise the cost of
their products.

A gauge of wage pres-
sures tied to productivity
jumped by 3.2 percent last
year, the biggest annual
increase in six years. But
over the final three months
of 2006, the cost of labor
per unit of output did
improve. It slowed to an
increase of 1.7 percent,
compared with a 3.2 per-
cent rise from July through
September.

Rising wages are good
for workers. The concern
is that if wage increases
outstrip gains in productiv-
ity, businesses will start
raising prices, setting off a
classic wage-price spiral.

The Federal Reserve is












BAS



FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

in
Wealth Management
Financial Advisor/Investment Manager
Bahamas

We are expanding our capabilities in wealth management and are now seeking to recruit
seasoned financial advisers who have the gravitas and expertise to contribute significantly
to the growth of AUM by developing investment relationships with HNWIs, professional
trustees and COIs. :

Qualifications:
Recognised Financial Planning or Investment qualification (e.g. FPC or CFA).
Qualification in Banking, Law or Accounting.
A self-motivator with excellent sales management and business development skills.
Detailed and technical knowledge of investment management and the investment
product range as it relates to non-residents/ non-nationals, HNWIs, trustees and
COIs. 5
Full awareness of the local and international competitive environments.
Good understanding of the qualitative and quantitative aspects of investment
management including, Alfa, Beta and Total Return considerations and analytical
depth in respect of their impact on sector allocations and individual stock picks.
Sound experience in global capital markets.

General Requirements/Responsibilities:

" Must have a minimum of 5 years international investment portfolio management
or financial advisory experience.
Must be able to deliver a high level of expert investment advice and service with
the aim of developing significant sales and new business, covering investment and
fiduciary services and the cross-selling of other banking services.
Proven track record in providing investment recommendations to both corporate
and personal clients as well as client performance reporting. This includes a full
understanding of the mathematical and statistical basis of portfolio diversification.
Must be totally at ease with the concept of personal affluence and high-net worth
clients.
Experience of, or at least be at ease with clients from differing social, religious,
ethnic and cultural backgrounds.
Experience of selling other banking and / or regulated products is desirable

Remuneration:

Salary commensurate with the position’s seniority level 8 (The Bank has 11 pay



levels).
Benefits- includes a car allowance, variable incentive pay (bonus) and preferred
loan rates

Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter via email by February
9", 2007 to: deangelia.deleveaux@FirstCaribbeanBank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for their interest,
however only those under consideration will be contacted.








FINCO







Lot#18, Rockwall Subdivision, N.P.
Single Family Residence

4 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 950 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $170,000.00
Travel west on Carmichael Road, turn north onto McKinney Drive
and west onto Rocky Pine Road, take the 3rd right and thesubject
is the 3rd house.

















Lot#8, Carmichael Road, N.P.
Single Family Residence

2 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 19,123 sq.ft
Building Size: 2,752 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $405,000.00
From Carmichael Road and Faith Ave travel south on Faith
Avenue take the fifth right and the subject property is the sixth
on the left peach trim white.

Lot # 1267 Sugar Apple Street, N.P.
Single Family Residence

(3) Bedroom, (2) Bathroom
Property Size:5,000 s.q. ft.
Building Size: 1,000 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $148,000.00
Travelling west on Pinewood Drive turn on to Willow Tree Drive;
which is the 1st cornor on the right side after the Pinewood round
about heading north on Willow Tree Dr. Take the 3rd cornor on
the left side which is Sugar Apple St. and the property is the 7th
lot on the left side. The lot is olive green trim with white.

























Lot #124 Foxdale Subd.
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 4,500 sq. ft

Building Size: 1,009 sq. ft

Appraised Value: TBA

Enter Foxdale from Bernard Road opposite Post Office at "T"
Junction turn right turn 1st left property is on corner of 1st st. on
right, color of building bright and light yellow trim with white
(Fenced in).

Lot#482 Elizabeth Estates Subdivision, N.P.
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 1 Bathroom

Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,002 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $115,000.00

From Prince Charles Drive turn onto Commonwealth Blvd. travel
south on Commonwealth Blvd. pass Thelma Gibson Primary
School, take the first right after the school and the subject is the
second house on the right. The house is white trimmed with tan.

Lot#1342, Pinewood Gardens Subdivision, N.P.
Single Family Residence

3- Bedrooms, 2- Bedrooms

Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,192 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $132,000.00

Turn north onto Thatch Palm Avenue from Pinewood Drive.
Travelling north on Thatch Palm turn through the second corner
on the left-hand side, which is Bread fruit street, and the property
is the 16th lot on the left-hand side.


















Lot#449, Elizabeth Estates, N.P.
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 1 Bathroom
Property Size: 4,688 sq.ft
Building Size: 927 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $104,000.00
From Prince Charles Drive Travel South on Commonwealth
Boulevard to the intersection before Thelma Gibson Primary
school and the subject is on the north east comer of that intersectio
(No.449). The house is painted white trimmed green.

Lot#1398, Pinewood Gardens Subdivision, N.P.
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,252 sq.ft

praised Value: $158,720.00, ‘

Pinewood Ave, tum at the first right onto Willow Tree Avenue take
the first left onto Guinep Tree Street, travel west onto Guinep Tree
Street and the subject is the eleventh house on the right. The
colour is White trimmed Red.













Lot#350, Elizabeth Estates Subdivision, N.P.
Single Family Residence
3 Bedrooms, 1 Bathroom
Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft





Lot#8, Southwind Gardens Subdivision, N.P.

Vacant Land

Property Size: 11,451 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $124,000.00

Travel south on Blue Hill Road take the first right after Marshall
Road (South wind Gardens Subdivision and the subject is the
ninth property on the left . The subject is vacant property with a
foundation in place and the initial stages of blocking up.



















































Lot#1852, Pinewood Gardens, N.P.

Triplex Apartment

2 - (2)Bed, (1)Bath, 1 -(1)Bed, (1)Bath

Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,757 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $180,000.00

Tum south onto Thatch Palm Ave. from Pinewood Drive. Travelling
south on Thatch Palm Ave. the 3 building is situated on the fourth
comer on the left-hand side, which is the junction of Thatch Palm
Ave. and Spice Street.

Lots#33,34,35,36 Blk#40, Nassau Village, N.P.

Commercial Building

3- b Bedroom, 1 Bathroom .

1 - (2) Bedrooms, 1 Bathroom

1 Retail Store

Property Size: 10,100 sq.ft

Building Size: 4,900 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $491,000.00

Travel east on Alexandria Blvd. to the intersection of Alexandria
Blvd. and Taylor Street and the subject is on the south-west
comer of that intersection which is a commercial bldg. The building
is painted tan trimmed with brown.

Lot#342, Stapledon Gardens Subdivision, N.P.
Duplex Apartment

1-3 Bedrooms, 2-Bathrooms

1-2 Bedrooms, 1-Bathroom

Property Size: 4,800 sq.ft

Building size: 1,920 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $358,000.00

From the round -about at Sir Milo Butler highway travel west
along Tonique Williams Darling Highway (Harold Rd) to christie
avenue, turn right on McKinney Ave, then first right (Hampden
Rd.) cross over Walrus Rd. and property is the fifth on the Northern
side of Hampden Rd.

Lot "D1", of Gladstone Road Crown Land Allotment 68
Duplex Apartment

2 Bedrooms, 1 Bathroom
Property Size: 6,756 sq.ft
Building Size: 1,625 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $218,000.00
From Sir Milo Butler Highway travel south onto Faith Ave turn
through the second corner on the left-hand side (Hamster
Road). The property is located on the right hand side of the third
comer on the right. The subject building is green with white trim.

Lot#16, BIk33, Sea Beach Estates, N.P.
Duplex Apartment

1 - 3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms,

1-2 Bedrooms, 1 Bathrooms

Property Size: 6,563 sq.ft

Building Size: 2,425 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $325,000.00

Travel west on West Bay Street, turn left at Sun Fun Resort and
travel east to the first right, turn right and the subject is the ninth
property on the left a duplex. The duplex is painted white and
trimmed ice blue.





®Registered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada

PROPERTIES LISTED FOR SALE

























































Travel west from the round about in Pinewood Gardens onto f

VACANT LAND

APARTMENTS/CONDOMINIUMS



- 1-3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms









"We providing financing to qualified buyers

CONTACT INFORMATION
RBC Royal Bank of Canada and RBC FINCO Loans Collection Centre
Tel: 393-2004



â„¢The Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada






Building Size: 690 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $124, 000.00

Travel east on Prince Charles Drive turn right onto Trindad Ave. ©
Elizabeth Estates Subdivision travel south on Trindad Avenue to

Malaysia Way turn Avenue and the subject is the fourth property

on the right. The house is painted white trimmed blue -

Lot B, Off Faith Avenue
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size:21,780 sq.ft
Building Size: 2,850 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $405,000.00
From Carmichael Road and Faith Avenue, take the fifth right and
the subject property is presently the sixth house on the left.
























Lot #82, Sunset Park Subdivision, N.P

Single Family Residence ‘

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 7,500 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,262 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $193,000.00

House #6, on the northern side of the fourth road north of
Carmichael Road Post Office, third house west of Wendal Drive
directly at lamp pole #128. ;










Lot#1861, Pinewood Gardens, N.P.
Single Family Residence ,
(2) Bedrooms, (1) Bathroom
Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft
Building Size: 980 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $89,000.00
From East Street, travel east on Pinewood Drive, turn right at the
fourth corner, travel south to the fourth corner (Spice Street), turn
west onto Spice Street and the subject is the fourteenth property
on the right (No. 1861), The house is painted white and trimmed
green.
















Lot# 1852, Pinewood Gardens

Single Family Residence

2 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 914 sq.ft .

Appraised value: $107,000.00

Turn onto Pinewood Drive from East Street South and travelling
east and take the third corner on the right hand side, which is
Thatch Palm Ave. Travelling souh on Thatch Palm Ave turn through
the 4th corner on the left hand side which is Spice Street and
the property is the 7th lot on the left hand side. The building is
pink trimmed with white.






















Lot#36, Bel-Air Estates, N.P.
Single Family Residence

2 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms
Property Size: 5,913 sq.ft
Building Size: 986 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $137,000.00
From Carmichael Road and Faith Avenue travel south on Faith
Ave and the subject property is the twenty-third lot on the left.






Lot corner Rose Street & Fox Hill, N.P.

Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,533 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $167,000.00
Travelling north on Fox Hill Rd. pass the National Insurance Board
building the building is on the corner immediately passing the
first corner on the left hand side.













Lot#701, Pinewood Gardéns Subdivision, N.P.

Single Family Residence

2 Bedrooms, 1 Bathroom

Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 960 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $118,812.00

From the roundabout at Pinewood Gardens travel north on Pigeon
Plum Stree turn at the fifth (plane Street) and trave! east on Plane
Street to the intersection of Plane Street & Buttonwood Avenue
the subject property is at the intersection and the end of Panes
Street on the left white trimmed blue.

















Lot#450, Elizabeth Estates Subdivision, N.P.
Single Family Residence

3 Bedrooms, 1 Bathroom

Property Size: 4,688 sq.ft

Building Size: 1,002 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $101, 000. 00

From Prince Charles Drive travel south on Commonwealth
Boulevard to the intersection before Thelma Gibson Primary
School and the subject is on the south east corner of that
intersection. The house is 9painted white trimmed maroone.











Lot#180, St. Andrews Estates Subdivision, N.P.
Vacant Property

Property Size: 12,992 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $125,000.00

From Yamacraw Hill Rd & Commonwealth Blvd. Travel east on
Yamacraw Hill road take the second right St.Andrews Circle west
travel all the way down and bear left around the curve take the
first left turn Zanaida Drive the subject property is the first on the
right. 5










Lot#23876 & 2388, Pinewood Gardens, N.P.
Commercial Building -- 2 Office Space
Property Space: 20,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 2,440 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $431,000.00

Travel to the West entry of Charles W. Saunders Highway and
the subject is on the first corner on the right (Southside opposite
Cleveland Eneas Primary School which is a single storey
commercial building housing a laundrymat a convience store and
aresturant. The subject is painted mauve and pink.

















Lot#18, Evansville Sub., N.P.
Duplex

2-Bedrooms, 1- Bathrooms Each
Property Size: 7,328'sq. ft
Building Size: 1723 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $199,000.00"
From Spike Kenard Rd. travel west along Carmicheal Rd. on the
left. The property is the second on the left. It is painted rust trim






with white.




















Lot Joe Farrington Road, N.P.
Duplex Apartment





1-2 Bedrooms, 1 Bathroom
Property Size: 23,400 sq.ft
Building Size: 1,800 sq.ft
Appraised Value: $366,000.00
Enter Joe Farrington Road from Fox Hill Rd. south. Travelling
west on Joe Farrington Road the property is on the Southern
side of Joe Farrington Rd, opposite the church of God Auditorium,
through an unpaved private road. Counting from the junction of
Joe Farrington Rd. and Fox Hill Rd. ten lamp poles will bring you
to the entrance of the unpaved road: opposite the pole. The
building cannot be seen from the road unless one drives through
the unpaved private road. The building is white trimmed with
white on the eastern side of the unpaved road.



Lot of Land Francis Ave, Fox Hill, N.P.
Duplex Apartment

1-2 Bedrooms, 1-Bathrooms

1- 4 Bedrooms, 3-Bathrooms
Property Size: 5,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 2,291 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $216,000.00

From Fox Hill Road round -about travel south on Fox Hill Road
take the second left Davis Street turn keft of the T-junction
Armbrister Street then the first right Francis avenue, then the first
left and the subject property is the first on the right.












Lot#3, Blk#2, South Beach Estates, N.P.

Duplex Apartment

1 - 2 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms/ 1- 1 Bedroom, 1 Bathroom
Property Size: 6,000 sq.ft

Building Size: 2,248 sq.ft

Appraised Value: $216,000.00

Travel south on East Street South turn right onto Pineway Drive (intersection
at South Beach Police Station) travel west on Pineway Drive after the first
corer on the left (Oleander Avenue), the subject is the second property
on the left (duplex), The duplex is painted white and trimmed maroon.












Sy RBC
NG) FINCO
aus.



ee eee ee ee ee

Volume: te No.65

CLASSIFIEDS TRADER







~ CLOUDY WITH |
SHOWERS



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| CIRCULA

he Siam Hera era

BAHAMAS poor



_ [HURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007





B
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Pees
Obituaries and
LCT ese dC
SEE INSIDE

Bers’ Dealaincen lervthe*t
vioney. Balance bot! h. |
#



}



Bishop sex case in court

Mother testifies in

trial of Randy Fraser

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE

THE trial of Bishop Randy
Fraser continued in magistrate’s
court yesterday with the moth-
er of the girl with whom he is
alleged to have had a sexual
relationship being the first to
take the witness stand.

The mother told the court
that she had known Fraser for
{2 years and had been a mem-
ber of his Pilgrim, Baptist
Church.

During questioning by the
prosecutor the mother told the
court that one Saturday in June
of 2005 she and her daughter
had an argument at Montagu
Beach where at the time she
operated a hot-dog stand. She
told the court that her daughter,
who is now 18 years old, was
working with her.

She told the court that she
and her daughter got into an
argument because her daugh-
ter was being rude to her. She

claimed that she subsequently
packed up and left her daughter
at Montagu.

Later that evening her sister,
with her daughter, appeared at

her home and they talked things ,

over. She said that her sister
kept her daughter that night.
The woman testified that she
saw her daughter again the fol-
lowing day when her mother,
Bishop Fraser and her daughter
caine to her home. According to
her, Fraser told her that he had
been told that her daughter had
been rude to her and he wanted
to talk the matter over. The
woman told the court, however,
that at that point she told Fras-
er that she could handle the sit-
uation. The woman claimed
that Fraser then turned to her
mother and asked her to do him
a favour.

She said that Fraser asked her
mother to let her granddaughter

SEE page 16

Wilchcombe tables documents
indicating 30-day approach to the
passport rule was not always i in pace

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

TOURISM Minister Obie Wilchcombe yesterday in the House
of Assembly tabled documents which indicated that the 30-day
“flexible implementation” approach to the new US passport rule
was not always in place, but was in fact obtained by US Congress-
man Benny Thompson.at the “eleventh hour.”

Amidst criticism that he misled the Bahamian public on the
issue of obtaining a “waiver” of the Western Hemisphere Travel Ini-

SEE page 14























@ PRISON officers
speak to the press about
working conditions and
pay at Fox Hill Prison.
(Photo: Ana Bianca
Marin)

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter



VISITATIONS were
cancelled yesterday at Fox
Hill Prison after prison

‘ officers took action over

working conditions, pay

and undelivered promo-
tions.

Although the precise
nature of the action was
not made clear — officers
denied they were ona "go-
slow", while prison admin-
istration said "everything
is normal" — the decision
by the officers to. stress
their grievances again
appeared to have ruffled
the feathers of the admin-
istration.

Aside from cancelling
visitations, Eastern divi-
sion police officers were
called in to stand guard
outside the main gates
from \early yesterday.
morning. é

However, both chief
superintendent Dr Elliston
Rahming and Mr Clive

SEE page 10

Senior police officers call for

Prison visits cancelled as officers take action




Ferguson transfer to be blocked

m By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

SENIOR police officers with-
in the force are supporting
Assistant Commissioner of
Police Reginald Ferguson, and
are now calling on Police Com-
missioner Paul Farquharson to
block his transfer to the Police

_ Training College.

Mr Ferguson, who many
claim is being victimized for his
role in the arrests of the five

baggage handlers from Nassau
Flight Services (NFS), is being }
demoted to head the Training. :

College with a view to his even-
tual retirement.

Also it was claimed that cer-.
tain officers, as one source }
explained, have the ear of gov- }
ernment and are seeking to }
move Mr Ferguson for their

own purposes.

It is claimed that the police E

SEE page 14

Mitchell challenges Ingraham to.
return pension since leaving office

@ By BRENT DEAN

FOREIGN Affairs Minister Fred Mitchell challenged former
PM Hubert Ingraham to return the Prime Minister’s pension that
he would have received since leaving office —

of half a million dollars.

This challenge was issued yesterday in parliament as Mr Mitchell i

led off debate on a bill to amend the Prime Minister’s Pension.

The proposed amendments to the act have two provisions. The }
first provision ceases the payment of the prime minister’s pension;
to anyone who becomes governor general, prime minister or par- ;
_ liamentarian for the period of time that person holds any of those :

positions.

SEE page 16



an amount in excess }

Claim that
constituency
name change

could force Keod
Smith to reapply

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

MOUNT Moriah constituency
will be renamed Holy Trinity .
forcing Keod Smith to reapply
for the constituency, political
pundits claim. -

This would give the PLP an
opportunity to refuse the embat-
tled MP’s nomination, thus

“ allowing-them to rid themselves

of the “extra baggage” Smith
would bring to their campaign.

This comes amid increasing ~
speculation that, along with the
embattled Mr Smith, MPs Sid-
ney Stubbs and Kenyatta Gib-
son may not receive a nod from
their party for the 2007 general
election.

However, in an interview with
The Tribune Mr Stubbs said he
was very confident that “at the
end of the day that good sense
and good politics will prevail.”

SEE page 14

_ Teachers in
Freeport threaten
action over funds

owed by govt

By ALISONLOWE~.
Tribune Staff Reporter

SEVERAL hundred teach-
ers in Freeport are to take
industrial action “in short
order" if they do not receive
funds that they are owed from

the government, The Tribune

has learned. y

Meanwhile, Education Min-
ister Alfred Sears has stated
that he was not aware of the
extent of the teachers’ griev-
ances until last night, and has
given specific instructions to his
ministry to "take extraordinary
measures" to address the disas-
trous situation.

According to Belinda Wilson,
secretary-general of the
Bahamas Union of Teachers
(BUT), hundreds of educators
have had enough of the. "gov-
ernment incompetence" which
has seen some lose out on thou-
sands of dollars worth of
salaries or promised allowances,

_ leaving them without means to

SEE page 16 -

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Nassau rats de pubaabhovade lem La 1 ae SOMIUM sd 310mg







PAGE 14, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007



FROM page one

tiative (WHTI), Mr Wilch-
combe yesterday outlined for
parliament his ministry’s efforts
to gain the attention of the rel-
evant US agencies and have
them hear the Bahamas’ con-
cerns about’ the economic
impact of the initiative on the
country’s tourism industry.

However, Mr Wilchcombe
did not state if his lobbying of
those agencies actually led to
the granting of the 30-day flex-
ible implementation approach
to the WHTI.

“How the US arrived at the
decision to give the waiver, I
simply don’t care. What I care
about is that we have it and our
tourism industry has not been
negatively impacted,” he said.

In one of the documents
tabled — the official minutes

Wilchcombe tables documents

— members of the office of Con-
gressman Thompson informed
the Bahamian delegation that
“upon the proverbial eleventh
hour Congressman Thompson
as chairman of the Committee
on Homeland Security has been
able to obtain a 30-day waiver
of the provisions of the. initia-
tive.”

Mr Wilchcombe emphasised
that the word “waiver” was the
one used by the office of Con-
gressman Thompson.

Mr Wilchcombe also read the
part of the minutes in which he
and his delegation to Washing-
ton, DC, were informed that
there were “further
(favourable) prospects towards
obtaining a 12-14 month peri-
od to ‘phase-in’ the provisions
of the initiative.”

Last week the minister and
US Ambassador John Rood
held a joint press conference to
emphasise that the law of the
travel initiative was in place.
They both stated that a “flexible
implementation” approach is
being taken, however, conced-
ing that the terminology used
in Mr Wilchcombe’s announce-
ment may have been mislead-
ing.

FNM leader Hubert Ingra-
ham last Saturday claimed that
The Tribune was duped into
writing a story that said that
Minister Wilchcombe had con-
vinced members of US Con-

gress to extend the implemen- |

tation period of the WHTI.
“He went up there and got

the US Congress to change

American law! Do you know

how hard it is to get the
Bahamas to change our laws?”
Mr Ingraham asked at an FNM
prayer breakfast held in Grand
Bahama last Saturday.

The PLP’s branch chairman
for Holy Cross Anne McMillan
in a letter to The Nassau
Guardian went so far as to say
that under the Westminster par-
liamentary system, Mr Wilch-
combe would have been asked
to resign if he had misled the
Bahamian people on this issue.

In a bid to clarify the circum-
stances of his initial announce-
ment, Mr Wilchcombe yester-
day tabled documents, including
his letter to the Secretary of the
Department of Homeland Secu-
rity Michael Chertoff, and a let-
ter to Congressman Thompson.

Mr Wilchcombe emphasised

that “many have been working
on this issue, and no one person
can take credit for it, and no
one ever tried to.”

The minister said that it is
“most unfortunate that what
has and is being done in the
national interest has been
undermined and politicised
away from the principle objec-

‘tive which is to protect the

country’s tourism industry.”

“I am embarrassed and dis-
appointed that there are those
in this country who would pre-
fer disaster over success and
whose behaviour suggests that
they would have wished we did
nothing exposing the country
to disaster and ourselves to con-
demnation from the Bahamian
people,” Mr Wilchcombe said.

H MINISTER of Tourism
Obie Wilchcombe



THE TRIBUNE

from a meeting on Capitol Hill

Claim that constituency name change
could force Keod Smith to reapply

FROM page one

“I support the leadership of Perry. Christie, he is
a consummate politician and I don’t think he would
be interested in disappointing the good people of

Holy Cross,” Mr Stubbs said.
On Wednesday a letter was released by PLP
branch chairman for Holy Cross, Anne McMillan,
which defended the three MPs.

She claimed that the prime minister does not
hold his “erring Cabinet Ministers” to the same
standard that he does his backbench. Ms McMillan
said the “apparent inability to call for the resigna-
tion of Cabinet Ministers has pervaded the Christie
administration.

“The Backbench has not been so lucky,” she
wrote, “one by one they became the expendable
fodder of the Christie government. Who can forget

the Member of Parliament for Holy Cross, Sidney

Stubbs, and his total vilification by the Bahamian
press.

“He was blamed for the firing of the BAIC
staffers when the press and the entire country knew
that no chairman can fire anyone without the
instruction of his Minister, who would seek the
permission and advice of his Cabinet colleagues, or
a mandated directive from the Board of Directors
of the Corporation, again with the concurrence of
‘the Minister.

“But Stubbs became the scapegoat for the
Christie government, and the villain in a contrived
docudrama, which has now impacted whether he is
to be renominated by the very ones who made
him the unwitting scapegoat,” the letter read.

When asked if he agreed with Ms McMillan that

‘he had become this administration’s scapegoat, Mr

Stubbs said that when “people keep beating up on
you, you begin to start examining yourself and ask-
ing why”.

“T can understand the frustrations of people in my
constituency that it would appear to them each
time something happens they see my name in print
and they get frustrated with things like that,” the
MP said.

Ms McMillan also asserted that along with Mr
Stubbs, Mount Moriah MP Keod Smith and
Kennedy MP Kenyatta Gibson are now faced with
the problem of renomination by a PLP Candi-
date's Committee whose members for the most
part, “would like to see the back of Keod Smith, but
are faced with the dilemma of how do you run
Gibson and dump Smith, without the whole coun-
try seeing it as the biggest set up after the Korean
boat saga and the BAIC staff firing”.

Mr Stubbs said that not only does he have the
support of Ms McMillan, but he enjoys the support
of his entire constituency.

“I have the support of my branch they have
always supported me, they have not deviated from
that. Within the constituency there may be one or
two disgruntled people who say that I have not
done anything for them,” he said.

As for his performance in the constituency amid
all of the controversies that stalked him over the
past five years, Mr Stubbs said that while there
are always disgruntled persons in any community
there is nothing you can do to appease them, you
just have to continue to be focused.

“There are some detractors out there, but by —

and large I have the support of people in the vari-
ous constituencies. What makes it unique is it is an
area from which I hail. I grew up there and I am in
the constituency every day,” Mr Stubbs said.

IMPORTANT NOTICE

To Our Valued Clients
INTERRUPTION IN SERVICE



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TOMO NO CKoconme lI BE
Ferguson transfer to be blocked























FROM page one

commissioner is “furious” about the restruc-
turing orders given to him, however he
has yet to make a public statement on the
matter.

“My honest truth to you is that the com-
missioner is sick and fed up,” one source said.
“This is to the point where the commissioner
needs to stand up and stop these politicians to
leave this force alone and allow him to run it.
Because he is constitutionally empowered to
run this force, and they really cannot move
him unless he is in breach of some discipline.
But they can’t find any kind of faults with
him.

“But this particular government is not
allowing the commissioner to run the force.
And I want to go on record as a senior officer,
lending my support to the ACP of crime,
because he is not being dealt a fair blow. Mr
Reginald Ferguson is a honest, upright man.
Now certain police officers might not share
that view. Certain senior police officers who
happen to have the ear of this government
might not share that view. But Reginald Fer-
guson has always been known as a no-non-
sense man, who doesn’t tolerate corruption,
and who is straight as a pin,” he said.

The officer, whose name is being withheld,





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told The Tribune that the force has become
totally demoralized. He called for the Deputy
Prime Minister and Minister of National
Security to explain why Mr Ferguson is being
moved.

“The Minister of National Security needs to
explain her position. She needs to remem-
ber that she carries two ministerial positions.
One in the church and one in the govern-
ment. Mr Ferguson is being victimized in its
fullest form. The Minister of National Secu-
rity cannot say to you what these recommen-

dations are. The Commissioner is damn right |

sick of this. They are moving his right hand
man, and he is sick of it!” said the police offi-
cer.

This imminent move has caused some sig-
nificant upheaval within the force the source
explained, as he continued to outline a num-
ber of accomplishments that Mr Ferguson
had attained — to the obvious displeasure
of a “select few”.

In response to the claims, police press liai-
son officer Walter Evans said that referrals
are made on an annual basis. He said an offi-
cial comment will be made shortly.

Attempts once again to reach Commis-
sioner Farquharson for comment proved
fruitless.

According to an officer, he was out of office
with the ’flu. .

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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007 ,

FROM page one

support themselves, or their
families.

"We have teachers who have
actually called the union cry-
ing," said Mrs Wilson.

She said that the governmen-
t's failure to honour their con-
tracts with the teachers — who
are allegedly experiencing sim-
ilar financial problems all over
the country — has left them
struggling to pay basic bills,
"like rent, light, water, food to
keep on the table for their fam-
ily."

"The union has given some
teachers loans, some we have
given donations — we're not
financially equipped to be tak-
ing care of the Ministry of Edu-
cation's bills, but we have

helped our members as best we.

could," she said. _

An early morning meeting
was held in Grand Bahama yes-
terday when it was decided that
"enough is enough" and action
was the only answer.

"I have spoken to the minis-
ter, we're hoping to meet with
the prime minister, but I'm sick
and tired of talking," said Mrs
Wilson.

"We need action now, we
need the teachers paid."

She said that in the 18 months

‘she has been secretary-general
of the union, this is the worst
school opening yet in terms of
the conditions teachers are fac-
ing. 5
The problem has been com-
pounded by evasive action on
behalf of all relevant govern-
ment departments.

"Every entity we talk to they
send us to someone else. You
‘talk to the ministry of educa-
tion, they send us to the depart-
ment of public service, you call

the department of public ser-:

vice, they tell you it’s the min-
istry, you call the treasury they
tell you it’s the ministry or the
department of public service.
It's just a big runaround."
"The blame is square on the
government," said Mrs Wilson.
She explained that the situa-
tion has become so desperate
for some teachers that the union
has had to contact Iandlords on
their behalf to plead that they

Teachers

not be evicted from their
homes.

Unpaid rental allowances —
up to six months worth in cer-
tain cases — is one of the major

sources of contention for the

union.

Another area which has been
sorely neglected is the payment
of gratuities to expatriate teach-
ers. All are due to receive these
"lump sum" gratuity payments
upon expiration of their con-
tracts. However, "about 60" are
still awaiting these payments,
according to Mrs Wilson.

Furthermore, 80 PE teachers
are without their coaching
allowances since 2005.

In other instances, according
to Mrs Wilson, many teachers
have simply been paid the

wrong salary amount for years,

including one, Mrs Eva Adder-
ley, who has taught three gen-
erations of children over a peri-
od of 35 years.

"For over 35 years now she's
been here and her salary is
incorrect and we cannot get any
resolution to the payments for
her. Her documents have been
into the AG's office, the depart-
ment of public service, the min-
istry of education, but they have
misplaced her documents," said
Mrs Wilson. .

She said she talked Mrs
Adderley out of retirement last
year because she thinks it would
be an injustice for her to leave
the profession after 35 years
without receiving the funds she
is owed.

"I told her to hang in
there...so she's hanging in there.
She's taught three generations
of children in Abaco and she
cannot get her funds."

Yesterday Education Minis-
ter Alfred Sears said he had not
been made aware yet of any
pending strike action, but that
he too was "very frustrated"
with the situation.

He said he was awaiting a
"full accounting" of the situa-
tion from his chief executive
officer, Mr Creswell Sturrup,
since he had not realised the
extent of the teachers’ griev-
ances until he saw a ZNS report

Mitchell challenges Ingraham to
return pension since leaving office

FROM page one

The second provision allows the present recipient of the pension
—~ Mr Ingraham - if he is willing, to within 21 days of the coming into
operation of this bill, suspend the receipt of the pension he now
receives, until he is retired.

The bill would not take away the pension of Mr Ingraham if he
is not willing to cease such payments.

Mr Mitchell went further and suggested that if Mr Ingraham is
willing, he could suspend the pension he currently receives, and also
backdate and return all of his prime ministerial pension received
since he left office.

According to Mr Mitchell, as of January 2007, the sum of
$102,666.65 has been placed in a treasury special deposit account for
Mr Ingraham at the Royal Bank of Canada. This money was
attempted to be returned to the Treasury by Mr Ingraham. How-
ever, there is no provision under law for the money to be denied
him or to be returned to the government, Mr Mitchell stated, as the
money is owed to him from a combination of his parliamentary
salary and his salary as leader of the opposition since July 2005.

“The monies are there to his‘account and to his order. He can col-
lect it as he wishes and if he does not collect it, his estate is its ben-
eficiary,” Mr Mitchell said.

Independent MP for St Margaret’s, Pierre Dupuch, stated that the
money returned by Mr Ingraham is the money that was owed to him
for his positions as member of parliament and leader of the oppo-
sition. However, Mr Dupuch questioned the money that Mr Ingra-
ham received for his pension.

“We're looking for the pension money that he refused to pay (for-
mer prime minister) Sir Lynden and we are looking for him to
return that. And that figure at the end of this term would be
$570,000. That’s the money we’re looking for — not this. We’re not
looking for this. We’re looking for that,” he said.

This controversy regarding the prime minister’s pension comes
after the government made provision under the 2003/2004 budget
to pay Lady Pindling — the widow of former PM Sir Lynden Pindling
— $500,000 it claimed was owed Sir Lynden during the period
between 1992 and 1997 when he served as leader of the opposition.

At the time, Mr Christie pointed out that Mr Ingraham enjoys the °

right to receive his due payment under the Prime Minister’s Pen-
sion Act, while having denied that right to Sir Lynden while he was
a sitting member of parliament.

Questions were also raised as to what happened to Mr Ingraham’s
member of parliament salary between May of 2002 and June 2005,
as it is not accounted for in the figures presented by Mr Mitchell.

Bahamas Office & School Supplies





@ BELINDA WILSON,
secretary-general of the
Bahamas Union of Teachers

on Tuesday evening.

"I was quite astonished by
some of the teachers’ claims on
the news account," he said.

Mr Sears claimed the prob-
lems had originally arisen out
of government's decision to hire
almost "twice as many teachers
this year as we hired last year"
to solve the "perennial prob-
lem of under coverage in cer-
tain areas of the curriculum."

It was the fact that documents
required by the ministry of
finance or department of public
service to give financial clear-
ance to some of these teachers
had not been supplied that had
led to certain payments not
being made, he said.

He stated that the ministry of
finance in conjunction with the
ministry of public service was
currently seeking to address the
issue of salary adjustments.

Mr Sears said he has advised
his ministry to put together an
inter-ministerial working group
to find a resolution to the mat-
ter.

THE TRIBUNE

Mother testifies in trial of Randy Fraser.

FROM page one:

stay with her until the matter was resolved.
The woman told the court that she told them
that she did not want her daughter to stay
with her mother. However Fraser said that

he needed to counsel her. The woman claimed "

that she allowed Fraser counsel her daughter
because he was her pastor.

_ The mother also told the court how on April
9, 2006 she confronted Fraser at his church
in front of his congregation and told him that
he was a child molester. The mother told the

‘court that she went on to tell Fraser that he

was not a man of God and needed to take off
his cloak. :

After this she said she went into Fraser’s
office where she, her mother, her sister, Fras-
er and several church members, including
Fraser’s wife were. There she said she con-
tinued to question Fraser as to why he had
done what he did. The mother told the court
that her sister had put a cellular phone to
Fraser’s wife’s ear.

At this point lawyer Wayne Munroe object-
ed to her stating what was said on the cellular
phone. He said it was inadmissible.

The mother went on to’'state that in the

‘office Fraser just sat and listened to her alle-

gations. Following the confrontation, the
woman told the court that she and her daugh-
ter went to the police station.

During cross-examination, Mr Munroe
highlighted what he claimed were inconsis-
tencies between what the mother told the
court yesterday and what she had told police.
Mr Munroe pointed out that the woman had
told police that when she had confronted Fras-
er with the rape allegations he had denied
them but yesterday told the court that he had
remained silent. During cross-examination the
mother told the court that she went to Fraser’s
church around 11 am and when he saw her, he
stepped down from the pulpit. Mr Munroe

again pointed to the statement she had given
police. He told the court that according to her
statement she had gone to Fraser’s church to
have a meeting with him. The mother said
she was not lying, however, Mr Munroe sug-
gested that when she gave the statement to
police she had not yet had a chance to speak
with anyone on what way best to tell her sto-
ry.

Mr Munroe said that according to the moth-
er’s police statement, while at Montagu her
daughter had refused to get into the car and
she had driven off. However, she did not say
this during questioning by Inspector Bannister:
Mr Munroe claimed that according to her
statement her daughter refused to get into
the car with her because she was threatening
to take her to the doctor as they had got into
an argument over a boyfriend she had. Mr
Munroe also pointed out that according to

the statement she had given police, when her

daughter had shown up at her home with her
mother and Fraser she was angry and told her.
that she did not want to stay with her any-
more, but wanted to live with her grand-.
mother. The mother claimed that this was not
so. Mr Munroe suggested that she had lied to
the police. She subsequently admitted that
she had. She also told the court she and her
daughter began attending the Crisis Centre,
though not together. She also denied the sug-
gestion by Mr Munroe that while there she
had been told that she should tell her story a
different way and was instructed on how to,
prepare her story for court. :

The 17 year old’s best friend as well as ar
aunt of the alleged victim also took the stand
yesterday. They did not give any substantial
testimony however, as Mr Munroe success?.
fully argued, their evidence was merely
“hearsay”. A woman who had been an evan-
gelist and youth minister at Fraser’s church
was also called to the stand yesterday and tes.

+

‘tified that she had known the alleged victim. -

*

for three or four years. +"

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THE TRIBUNE




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a THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBHUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 21
BUMS

Fire truck for
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BAR-S |
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"| DEPUTY Prime Minister and Minister of National Security Cynthia Pratt commissions the first
Mangrove Cay Fire Truck during ceremonies held in Little Harbour, Mangrove Cay, Andros.

Mrs Pratt applauded Mangrovians for their resolve in purchasing the truck, which will be manned
by an all-volunteer group of firefighters led by Police Sergeant David Thompson of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force. Pictured (from left) are: Assistant Superintendent of Police Jeffrey
Deleveaux, director of fire services, Royal Bahamas Police Force; Harrison Thompson, permanent
secretary in the Ministry of Local Government and Consumer Affairs; Andy Bowleg, president of
the Mangrove Cay Fire Engine Fundraising Committee and Gary Knowles, administrator.





U.S. CHOICE U.S. ed bed bed
CHUCK BONE- Ls bas M@ MRS Pratt got the
first opportunity to sit

behind the wheel and
honk the horn of the
Mangrove Cay Fire
Truck following
commissioning
ceremonies held in
Little Harbour,
Mangrove Cay,
Andros. Police
Sergeant David
Thompson of the
Royal Bahamas
Police Force is
shown assisting

the Deputy

Prime Minister.

(Photos: BIS/
Patrick Hanna)

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THE TRIBUNE













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@ BAHAMAS Realty CEO Larry Roberts, left, congratulates Stuart Halbert who was named

Bahamas Realty’s 2006 top sales agent of the year

ealtor makes it

WHEN Stuart Halbert was
named Bahamas Realty’s top
producing non-partner sales
associate for the fifth consecu-
tive year, the honour came with
a new twist and literally from a
new direction.

and west sides.

Suddenly, in 2005 and 2006,
southwest and west New Provi-
dence was hot. As soon as a
new subdivision was
announced, lots were selling.”

Part of the southward and





five

most affordable, though land
sales in general all over New
Providence are very strong.”
He also thinks that a massive
developmental thrust is now
underway on many of the Fam-
ily Islands and that most

Your look at what’s going on in your community eh

A
s 2 ¢
s+ 6
ve eg
se +
Ca
he

“The local real estate market westward expansion, Halbert Bahamians would be surprised
COLOMB EMERALDS changed in 2006,” said Halbert, believes, is a natural progres- at the scope of the projects ."
who’s held the top slot for sev- sion. As the north coast has which are already underway. ,
. INTERNATIONAL en of the eight years he’s been become increasingly populated, In New Providence, the most >
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time this company was formed
in 1949, that’s more than half a
century ago and long before we
moved to this address at East
Bay Street, the hardest sell or
slowest moving property in New
Providence was,on the south

scarcer and more expensive.
“At the same time,” he said,
“more Bahamians, especially
young Bahamians in the mid-
dle income range, are in a posi-
tion to buy. The south coast and
along the southern areas are

the south is what’s to come:
government's announcement
that a new container port would
be built on the south side near
Clifton Pier, creating the equiv-
alent of a new city, plus other-
projects planned or underway.




‘

see & He Be >

et F eb iw





yA
wow

~ ‘THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 19





NASSAU LIFE

ATTA ANN



BS tis a

Hl FROM left are Vincent Peet and Dame Marguerite Pindling. @ NORTH Andros High School, Agriculture Farm.
In the back ground are Dr Huntley Christie, administrator for Photos: BIS/R dB
North Andros and the Berry Islands, and Alphonso Smith, ; (Photos: BIS/Raymond Bethel)
manager of the Bahamas Agricultural and Industrial

Corporation (BAIC) in North Andros.





BITHE technical classroom building (still under construction) at
.‘+‘« North Andros High School.



; e visits Andros school —

ees | OAME Marguerite
students reunited: Heian
a former Prime
Minister Sir Lynden
Pindling, toured
North Andros High
School’s newly
constructed
cafeteria, classroom
blocks, technical
class building .
(still under
construction) and
vegetable farm in
Nicholl’s Town,
North Andros on

+ *























Saturday.
@ RAI Budhu,
~ CX \ agriculture teacher
SS SS Ss , at North Andros
@ ON Sunday, January 14 scholars who were among the first students to enter St John’s High School,
-.} College in 1947, joined with present day staff and students at a Pontifical Concelebrated explaining to Dame
\-| Eucharist at Christ Church Cathedral on George Street. The chief celebrant of the mass was Marguerite Pindling
.'| Archbishop Drexel Gomez. Among those bringing greetings was the principal of the school, about bell peppers
| Cleomie Woods. Seen here are some of the first students who entered St John's College 60 during her visit to

the school’s farm on

_ years ago. Standing from left to right are Gloria Prescod, Elizabeth Johnson, Carolyn Bartlette,
Saturday

. Valderine Barnett, Lady Jacqueline Fawkes (Head girl 1948), Juanita Butler and Billie Godet. _







announces that effective
February 10, 2007
we will bea



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THE TRIBUNE . THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 15B




@ SHOWN (L to R): Lawrence Lewis, council an
member; Cheryl Carey, student affairs, COB; .
Christina Smith, student awardee; BICA council

and student education chair, Theofanis Cochi-

namogolus; BICA president Kendrick Christies and

second vice-presdent, Milford Lockhart.

(Photo courtesy)























TRUST ACCOUNTANT

Job Function;

e ‘To praduce accurate and timely trust and company financial
statements in accordance with internal procedures and

generally accepted accounting principles.








Responsibilities:

¢ Update the clients’ general ledger,

e Reconcile cash and securities balance; ensuring that all
entries are processed correctly in ledger.

e Prepare monthly financial statements and internal client
reports for a portfolio af complex trusts and companies.

e Liaise with trust and company administrators to ensure that

financial statements accurately reflect the activities of the

client.




Qualifications:
® Bachelor's degree in Accounting.
¢ At least five years experience preparing trust and company
financial statements,
© Understanding of the fundamentals of trust administration.
Advance knowledge of Microsoft Excel.
Completion of the Canadian Securities Course or Series 7
Course would be an asset.
Ability to supervise a team of trust accountants.
Proven track record of success in a similar position,













«¢ ANDRE Yp,
scHooL §

BICA to provide
two deserving
COB students with

ST ANDREW'S SCHOOL

Invites you to join us for

Benefits:
e Attractive salary commensurate with skills and experience,
Other benefits include medical insurance coverage,
excellent pension plan and performance based bonus.



Interested persons meeting the above requirements may forward their

_ WINE & CHEESE
















| anda h l h e resumes and two written references to:
SILENT AUCTION SC O ars Ips over Human Resources
; j P.O, Box N-7043
\ Hosted by @ Nassau, The Bahamas
| ‘
| the next five years
++ _|| The St Andrew's Alumni and Friends Association ee oa -Bmai
+4 ; Email: trustaccountant@gmail.com
ry _(STAAFA) i chpene nye eae
: Ai i tewa's pzcie : i ¢-e
Thursday THE Bahamas Institute of
ee cceaa Sra
will provide an annual scholar-
March 8, 2007 ship over the next five years to
| at two deserving students in the no
| accounting programme at the ‘corporate and
Nassau, Yacht Club College of the Bahamas investment bankir
; (COB).
| East Bay Street The initial award towards the - .
| 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm ranted to Clisstina Sth, at |
; . = a : Wn, . ;
} P P ee ieee cincnn CITIBANK N. A. NASSAU BAHAMAS BRANCH
| ; programme at COB, o~e
Hors d'oeuvres Beginning in 2007, the annu- .
! Wine selections by Bristol Cellars al acholaranie will be aiyen to
. two deserving students, A por-
i aoe he assist with textbooks
i and other supplies, while the
Werth eae lg 0 8
} é aduating student in the
| Available in the school’s office from Margo teh bene at the
‘ ‘ 0 amas,
Albury or from: Committee members: BICA said it aimed to sup
Jeanne Treco (457-1692) ort young Bahamians in ful-
Irene Cathopoulis (325-4944) illing their career choice and
Kirstie Smollett (324-7737) atc eet itle he
scholarship award brings these
Dana Thompson (565-8418) students une contact with per
sons in the organisation who
Parking Available may be able to assist in job
| a Ns Oa placement and mentoring.

yi ' yaw. av iizenwijamuller.cam

At SvitzerWijsmuller, results and values go hand in hand.-With 2,800 employees and a fleet of more than 300 vessels, we provide

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‘ 1 Freepoint Tug & Towing Services, Ltd. (FTTS) ia a W/V company, 60/50 owned by SvitzerWijamuller and South Riding Point Hald-
: ing Ltd (World Point Terminals Inc.) FTTS aperates a fleet of 5 tugs, providing services in Freeport, South Riding Point, and at

aes on neighbouring islands. A Techniaal Supervisor ia needed in Freapart ta manage the technical maintenance of aur growing
ug operatian.

|) TECHNICAL SUPERVISOR

Freepoint Tug & Towing Services, Ltd. — Freeport GB, Bahamas

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The Technical Supervisor will be responsible for the super- The right candidate should be motivated and orientated towards
| | vision and leadership of all technical aspects of vessel growth within the operation in Freeport. advancement with up~
} management, which include: gaming projects in The Bahamas, and potentially globally
i , throughout the SvitzerWiemuller organization.
} } 4 Routine Preventative Maintenance Planning and Im-
\ plementation : Personal development aan be achieved only if the candidate:
| + + Coordinating werk with aur partner and cliente while
\ maintaining vesgels in Class condition . Takes an active role an building and maintaining strong
1 Coordination and planning with Class and Flag State working relationship with alients, pilots, auppliers and au-
) surveyors’ : ° thorities
} Preparing requisition and purchasing of spares, equip- . Keep records of work performed and all other cantractual
i ment, materials, ete for vessels doaumentation Se ee Ai
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ation ahipyaras
| negotiation with shipyard ‘
} Meeting the high SvitzerWismuller Health, Safety, QUALIFICATIONS
tee and ually peri el . fee degree or certificate from vessel-related or

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} Regular reporting to Regional Office ’ Living in Sa ing to relocate to Freepart e emp oyees 0 ave note ter ar wor ’
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Ne Fea Netra wt feces Suber fom Sinse vessels ; ° ® s
| jsmuller staff locally in Freeport and thraughou Praficlant in English d d d mm m h mM d ad d
; the Region, and will report te the Regianal Technical Strang Safety ane Quality awareness \ e ication an co ut ent to t e tea an awar e
\ ‘| Manager in Miami, Florida, USA. Se an, ane team-building skille L
) i ty fo Implement and promote ayatems and procedures e e
5 Furthermore, the Technical Supervisor will reqeive appra- li h di l C l P d k
{¢ : priate training and edugatian paved an his/her starting. eee er accor n ‘ on ratu ations atrice an ee up
aualiesl ans: She will nave He opportunity to gain expo- CONTAQTS 4 P
] sure throughout various training programs and exchanges. Application with resume/GV to be sent by to Freepoint Tug & ’
Towing Services Ltd,, Technical Manager Marinus Larwa, #4 g k L R R N M H. d rf
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES Milton &t., Box F-43980 Freeport @.8., Bahamas t e 00 wor 2 to enee oore, ea Q
| Porie ae eae the see Ghote significant career and Tel, +1 242 962 3000, Mob. +1 242 727 0040 <6

| | ‘personal development oppertunities, G-maill marinus lorwa@ayitzerwilamuller.cem Treasury. P t A R Il Tr M d
| , Patricia A. Russell, Treasury Manager an



Luis Carlos Ochoa, Business Head.



a na el = a







Preparing |
space shuttle
for launch
in March

@ ABOVE: A NASA worker
is dwarfed by the tail section of
the space shuttle Atlantis in The
Vehicle Assembly Building at
the Kennedy Space Center in
Cape Canaveral, Fla., Wednes-
day, Feb. 7, 2007. Atlantis will
be lifted to a bay where it will
be mated with its external fuel
tank and solid rocket boosters
in preparation for its scheduled
March launch.

@ RIGHT: The space shuttle
Atlantis sits in The Vehicle

Assembly Building at the

Kennedy Space Center.

_ (AP Photos/
Peter Cosgrove)







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PAGE 22, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007







INTERNATIONAL NEWS »

m TOKYO

JAPAN’S prime minister
pledged Wednesday to regain
four disputed northern islands
from Russia, saying it was time
to end the bickering between
Tokyo and Moscow over the
prime fishing grounds, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

“The territorial issue is a
matter of national concern,
and it is important for each
person to be interested in the
problem to mobilize efforts,”
Prime Minister Shinzo Abe
said at an annual rally to gar-
: ner support for the islands’
: , return. sf
i “Progress in Japan-Russia
relations has a big potential to
benefit both countries. It is
crucial to make persistent
effort to resolve the dispute
over the Northern Territories,
which is the long-pending
problem,” Abe said.

Moscow seized the four-
island chain, called the south-
ern Kurils by Russia and the
Northern Territories by Japan,
from Tokyo in the closing days
of World War II. The dispute
has kept the two countries
from signing a formal peace
treaty. .

Later, Abe told reporters
there is no change in Tokyo’s
position that the issue must be
resolved before a treaty can
be signed.

~ i Wednesday was Japan’s
S “oyeb Northern Territory Day,
: marking the anniversary of an
1855 Japan-Russia friendship
treaty that gave Japan posses-
sion of the islands.

The event, attended by
1,500 people, including gov-
ernment officials, civic groups
and ordinary citizens, also
attracted dozens of ultra-right
activists who shouted their ter-
ritorial demands on speaker-
loaded trucks outside the
venue.

Abe’s government has cam-
paigned for more assertiveness
in Japan’s foreign affairs and





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THE TRIBUNE





J +jJapan vows to step
up effort to resolve
territorial disputes
with Russia

international military role. As
-part of the goal, the govern-
ment is also pushing for edu-
cation reforms to foster patri-

*. otism.

Northern Territories Minis-
ter Sanae Takaichi, also at the
rally, urged schools to place

more emphasis‘on the issue to”

promote “accurate” ‘uridé

standing of the issue through

education.

The islands, surrounded by

prime fishing waters, are part
of a chain running from
Japan’s northern main island
of Hokkaido to Russia’s east-
ern Kamchatka Peninsula. —

Russia said Wednesday it -

was prepared to look for
mutually acceptable solutions
to the problem, but insisted
that its control of the islands
was not up for negotiation.
“Our position is, well-
known, and it has not changed.
We proceed from the principle
of inviolability of the results
of World War II,” Russian
Foreign Ministry spokesman
Mikhail Kamynin said.
“At the same time we are

open to continuing dialogue’

with Tokyo with the aim of
looking for mutually accept-
able solutions in Russian-
Japanese relations,” Kamynin
said on Russia’s state-con-
trolled Channel One televi-
sion, commenting on Abe’s
earlier remarks.

In recent months, there
have been frequent seizures
of Japanese boats; Russian
authorities have stepped up
patrols in and around the
islands, escalating tensions.

About 17,000 people, near-
ly all Russians, live on the
islands. Thousands of Japan-
ese who lived there were
forced out just before the end
of World War II.

Abe and Russian President
Vladimir Putin agreed in
November to expand eco-
nomic and political exchanges
and end differences over the
islands.














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THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 13

Yager Funeral Home & Crematorium

Queen’s Highway
P.O. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 © Paging: 352-6222 #1724 ¢ Fax: 351-3301



Matias) ees sada

) EDWIN SHERINGTON
"APPLE"
| ELLIOTT, 71

of #74 East Beach Drive, Freeport and
formerly of Nassau will be held on
Saturday, February 10, 2007 at 11:00
4 a.m. at The Pro Cathedral of Christ The
| King, East Atlantic Drive and Pioneer's
§ Way. Officiating will be Canon Harry
Bain and interment will be made in The
Grand Bahama Memorial Park, Frobisher
Drive.



Left to cherish his memory are his loving wife Una Elliott; three
daughters, Sheari Strachan, Lynette Turnquest and Kahlil Elliott; two
sons, Temy and Julian Elliott; four brothers, Robert, Leslie, and Lionel
Elliott and Leonard Sears; three sisters, Cynthia Adderley, Charlene
and Cherry Elliott; four grandchildren, Travis and Tiffany Strachan,
Andre' and Megan Turnquest; two sons-in-law, Patrick Strachan and
Trevor Turnquest; two adopted sons, Clayton Curtis and Otlin Stuart;
mother-in-law, Merle Wells; sisters-in-law, Meta Bethel, Eleanor Elliott,
Veronica Wells and Marina Pinder; brother-in-law, John Wells; 12 nieces
including Michelle Cargill, Melanie Munnings, June Wells and Nancy
Bethel; 16 nephews including Stephen Elliott, Craig and Earle Bethel,
Godwin Cargill, Jonathan Wells and Kirkwood Munnings and other
relatives and friends including Madrica Roberts and family, Lillian
Davis Wilson, Herman Wilson, Winifred Jackson and Felice Myer of
Boston, Gabe Villani of Miami, Ernie Dill of New York and Janet
Adderley and family, Allison Bethel and family, Lois Knowles and
family, Peter and Sonia Turnquest and family, Terrance and Lavandar
Roberts and family, The Rev. Canon Harry Bain and family, ‘The Rev.
Canon Winfield Goodridge, The Rev. Bernard Been and family, The
Rev. Tellison Glover, The Venerable Keith Cartwright, The Venerable
Cornell Moss and family, The Rev. Curtis Robinson and family, Pastors
Anthony and Ann Grant and the family of Agape House, Pastor Lucian
Curry and the family of Calvary Bible, Pastor Sobig Kemp and family
of Freedom International Ministries, Olga Reid, Ashely and Elvy Smith
and family, Althea Knowles, Ivan and Florence Deveaux, Andrew
Sweeting and family, Ralph Munnings and family, Dennis Donaldson
and family, Sheila Ferguson, Ralph Hall and family, Patrick Russell
and family, Ronnie McKenzie and family, Kyle Weech and family,
Clifton Seymour and family, Muriel Edwards and family, Louise Gibbs
and family, Donald and Yvonne Ward and family, Harrison Cooper and
family, George and Ann Curtis and family, Kenneth and Felice Saunders
and family, Shelly Carey, Geron and Sylvia Turnquest and family,
Stephen Strachan, Patricia Laing and family, Neko Grant and family,
. Sandy Wallace and family, The Pro Cathedral of Christ The King, The
~ Grand Bahama Chorale, The Tennie Club, The Friday Night Fish Fry
Crew, BTC family, Musical Peacock family, Cancer Association,
Georgia's School of Dance and Theatre, the staff of The Rand Memorial
Hospital, Yager Funeral Home and others too numerous to mention.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral Home

and Crematorium , Queen's Highway, Freeport on Friday from 12:00
noon until 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday at the church from 9:30 a.m. until
service time.

In lieu of floral tributes donations may be sent to The Cancer Association
of Grand Bahama, c/o P.O. Box F-41635 in memory of Edwin Sherrington
"Apple" Elliott. z

| ARTHUR
"CALANEY"
DEAN, 60

of #174 Watlins Lane, Freeport and
formerly of Fritz Lane, Nassau, will be
held on Saturday, February 10, 2007 at
1:00 p.m. at Central Church of God,
Coral Road, Freeport. Officating will be
“yj Rev. Rudy Roberts and interment will

) be made in The Grand Bahama Memorial
Park, Frobisher Drive.



Left to cherish his memory are his loving
wife Inetta Dean; one daughter, Marion Agatha Dean; mother Sylvia
Dean of Lower Manhattan, New York; one sister, Agatha M. Delancy;
four stepchildren, Erron and Kimara Fowler, Kevin, Kiko and Nathaniel
Bain, 13 step grandchildren; mother-in-law, Minister, Mother Laura
Roberts; three uncles, Leo Dean, Arthur Brennen and Fernley Palmer;
three aunts, Thelma Edgecombe, Marion Palmer and Geneive Dean of
Bailey Town, Bimini; one nephew, Eugene "Paco" Delancy; two nieces,
Philippa Beckles; Michel and Eugenia Delancy Brown; eight brothers- §
in-law, Eugene Delancy, Rev. Rudolph, Malachi, Philip, Branville, Don
and Willard Roberts and Alpheus Russell; seven sisters-in-law, Maronetta
Russell, Enid, Catherine, Rebecca, Yvette, Ruthamae and Disa Roberts;
28 nieces and nephews-in-law; five grand nephews-in-law; one grand
niece-in-law; seven aunts-in-law, Milderine Cooper, Brenda Laing,
Loris Pinder, Betty, Myrtle and Louise Roberts, Hazel Baillou; four
uncles-in-law, Hortia, Baillou, Elvich Kemp, Otis Carey and Austin
Roberts; numerous cousins including Leona Roach, James Edgecombe,
Charlie and Driscal Rubins, Simeon Richardson and family, Bernadine
Grey and Ruthiemae Percentie and a host of other relatives and friends
including Ruby Swiss Restaurant family, Pinky, Mildred, Nolie Watson,
Rev. Lawrence Pinder, Bishop Huden Roberts, Rosilee Canceto, Rev.
Joel Saunders, Bishop Godfrey and Minister Iris Williams, Minister
Kenny Roberts, Pastor Granville Romer, Rev. Freddie Laing, Rev.
Edwin Pinder, and the entire East End Community, Rev. Rudolph K.
Roberts, Ministries and the Whole Man Christian Centre family, the
doctors and nurses at The Rand Memorial Centre.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral Home
and Crematorium, Queen's Highway, Freeport on Friday from 12:00
noon until 6:00 p.m. and on Saturday at the church from 11:30 a.m. §
until service time.



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES






BERNEIL THEOPHILOUS
BETHEL, 43 ;












Memorial Gardens, JFK Drive.

























Dwayne, Kendalyn, Verona, Detris and Rodger) Simeon Patton and his

Johnson and family, Alfred and Margaret Patton and their children,

KayeLinda, Iva Patton-Beckford and children, Anne, Brenda, Iva,








Bemeritte’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
-MARKET STREET ° P.O. BOX GT-2097.¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

: church fi 9:00 a.m. until ice time.
a resident of Farrington Road, will be held : eae Ray ae

at Church of God Convention Centre, Joe
Farrington Road, on Saturday at 10:00 a.m. :
Officiating will be Rev. Dr. Moses Johnson, i
Senior Pastor, assisted by Minister Eileen
Johnson. Interment follows in Lakeview :

Left to cherish his memory are his wife, Shantia Bethel; daughter, :
Brenae Bethel; mother, Dorothy Bethel; father, John Bethel (deceased); }
brother, Andrew Bethel (Minnesota); sisters, Leazona Richard (Abaco), :
Demeatria Edgecombe, Marina Major, Thelma Williamson; brothers- : |g
in-law, James Richard, Falcon Edgecombe, Quentin Rolle (Miami Fl), } ff

Aaron Major, Rev. Howard Williamson; sisters-in-law, Colleen Bethel, |
Tarsha Rolle, Sasha Davis (Miami,FL); nieces and nephews, Zuri and }
Devano Bethel, Donte and Khalea Richard, Chrispen Clarke, Farron i
and Farran Edgecombe, Quentin Jr., Kiana and Darius; mother and
father-in-law, Sonia and Sam Davis (Miami FL); grandmother, Naomi } a. Og : : : :
Rolle: aunts and uncles and their children, ‘igs. Alben Patton and taenily: Joycelyn Alouidor; 8 sisters, Maria Demeritte, Francis Dawkins, Theresa

Maudline Josey and her children (Patrick, Alfred, Eric, Vincent, Glen, : CashTurnquest and Debra Cash; 7 brothers, Calvin Major, George,

: Andrew, Paul, John, Michael and Anthony Cash; 1 aunt, Mary Roker;
children, Edward, Daphne, Karen, Antoinette, Marsha, and Simeon Jr. } BE a Oe od a aaa Sa eae

(Rock Sound, Eleuthera) Robert and Lena Patton and their children,
Robrette, Emile, Ravon and Vonette (Gladstone VA); Bishop William ;



Constance and Mark (Stuart FL), Sybil Deveaux and her children, ee Ricardo, Pedro and Ron Demeritte, Wilfred and Javar both of Miami,
Eileen, Eric, Craig and Janica; Margaret Patton and her daughter, }
Kendal, Jeffrey, Roderick, Desareen Patton-Nygard and her son, Peter, Dean Jr., Cpl Paul Cash Jr., Laron, Andrew Jr., Anton, John Tease
Caroline Adderley and her children, Patsy, Denzella, Iva, Marina, }
Cynthia, Godfrey and Charles, Louise Sweeting and Florina, Patricia, | Toni, Penni and Geiovanni Cash, Welanda Davis, Marissa Demeritte,
and Pamela, John Henry, Rudolph, and Elgen, Rosa Adderley (Burnt ;
Ground Long Is.) Ruth and Naomi, Beatrice Pratt (Seymour's Long Is) :
and her children, Bernita, Louise and Kenya, Garth Andre Stone, }
Genevieve Adderley and her children, Tanya, Cleo, Ollie, Monique and
Nathaniel, Garnette, Virginia Gray, Sherry, Steven, Sherman and Sharlton; :
great-grand aunt, Izola Francis (Palm Bch., FL); extended family,
McPhee family, Gardiner family, Ferguson family, Perpall family, Dolly,
Emmerson, Allan and Petral Lok, Chris Barr, Natasha Barr, Don and :
Debbie Barr, Elizabeth Bullard, Kermit and Alzona Rolle, Alston and
Dorothy Rolle, Patience Clarke, Mr. and Mrs. Nigel Rolle, Mr. and Mrs. } Mitchell, Marva Gilcot, Marvin Camacho and family, the Moss family,
Vinky Rolle, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Rolle, Kate Rolle, Jennifer Rolle, |
Jeffrey and Zilpha Rahming, Patrick and Leoni Wilson, Ivan and Sharon |
Rolle, Isaac Rolle, Lynden Rolle, Dell Ewing, Kuala Rolle and Harriet }
Thompson; numerous relatives and friends Including, Church of God |
families, St. Gregory Parish family, Antioch Baptist family, First Baptist
family, Minus family, Patton family, Arnette family, Forbes family, :
Neymour family, Heastie family, Edgecombe family, Richard family,
Williams family, Johnson family, Kayla Burrows and family, Corene :
Rolie and family, Beryl Butler and family, Lena Burrows and family, }
Bishop Brice Thompson and family, Rose Gibson and family, Stephanie :

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 23



Sargent and family and the Wulff Rd. community.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market
Street, from 10:00 a.m-6:00 p.m. on Friday and on Saturday at the

CATHERINE PATRICIA
CASH, 45

a resident of Reeves Street, Fox Hill, will
be held at St. Anselm's Roman Catholic
Church, Bernard Road, Fox Hill on Saturday
at 2:00 p.m. Officiating will be Msgr. Preston
\ A. Moss. Interment follows in St. Anselm's
Cemetery, Bernard Road.

: Left to cherish her memory are her common
law husband, Ryan Davis; 2 children, Tavon Cash and Shavon Davis;
1 grandson, Tavon Cash Jr.; 2 adopted children, Shackia Archer and

Knowles, Agnes Cash, Mary Dean, Margaret Wilson, Bernadette

1 uncle, Franklyn Cash, brothers-in-law, Fredrick Demeritte, Alexander
Wilson and Rudolph Turnquest; sisters-in-law, Barbara, Philippa,
Bridgette and Blanch Cash; 30 nephews, Kevin Curry, Fredrick, Wendal,

Chendrew Dawkins, Prison Officer Donald Hanna, Franklyn and Antonio
Russell, Vernon Davis, George Strachan of Miami, John Green Jr., Basil

Cash, Rudolph Jr. and Randon Turnquest, Anthony Jr., Antonio,
Christopher, Sareno and Debaron Cash, and Kentoll Dawkins; 17 nieces,

Donnel Dawkins, Bernadette Dawkins Mullins of Miami, Debra Hanna,
Raquel Russell, Joanna Greene, Samatha Jackson, Latoya Dean, Tamika
Brown, Nadia, Tanisha and Anthonique Cash and Kendra Dawkins;
numerous grand nieces and nephews and a host of other relatives and
friends including, the Davis family, Sharon Morley and family, Ms.
Alouidor and family, Duke Basden, Benson and Orvia Knowles, Janet
Farrington, Peggy, Lorraine Bethel, Jacinta Higgs and family, Norma
Dean and family, John Greene, Linda Marche, Willie Dawkins, Capazine,
Annamae Knowles and family, Bernadette Collie and family, Hon. Fred

Rev. Pinder and family, Miraim Brennen, Marsha Demeritte, the Dill
family, Susan McKenzie, Kevin Strachan, Sheldon Brown, staff and
students of Sandilands Primary, staff of McCartney's Dental Office,
Steven Newbold, the Moncur family and the entire Fox Hill community.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home, Market
Street,from 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Friday and on Saturday from 9:00 |
a.m.-12:00 noon and at the church from 1:00 p.m. until service time.







Full Text
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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007

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daught

Angry claim
by mother



â„¢ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

AN outraged mother has
claimed that her daughter was
denied water for five days dur-
ing a short stint'at Fox Hill
Prison. ’

She said that there is a prison-
wide water shortage which has
left many inmates ill and weak,
adding that Amnesty Internd-
tional needs to pay a visit to the
facility.

Asked to respond to the
claims yesterday, prison super-
intendent Dr Elliston Rahming
confirmed that there was a
problem with the drinking
water supply to the prison last
week.

"In every organisation of this

size, from time to time you have -

a challenge," he pointed out.
"For a short period we did have
challenge with water. In one
case one of our suppliers had
indicated that demand was so
great that he just couldn't get
around to all of his clients on a
timely basis."

"We don't manufacture

THE TRIBUNE

ro ke ed
Prison ‘denied my

er water’



@ PRISON officers ‘valk out the main dates of Fos Hill Prison te to

talk to the press yesterday

water," Dr Rahming added.
Asked to verify the claim that
inmates were not receiving
water for periods of up to five
or more days at a time, Dr Rah-

ming said he could not speak °

to any particular situation.

"All I can say is that for a
very short time there was a mat-
ter involving water and we
sought right away to rectify it. It
has been rectified.

"That's just the way it is,
every now and again you run
into something you don't antic-

ipate but you fix it and that's ©

what we were doing,” he said.

(Photo: Ana Bianca Marin)

The mother claims that the
only way her daughter was able
to get hold of drinking water
was through the efforts of the
prison chaplain, who, after hear-
ing her mother express concern,
personally delivered a gallon of
water to the inmate.

Meanwhile, the water that
comes out of the taps.in the
compound is brown, she said.

“We as the public know that
some of these people, you have
to go through the process, but
everybody deserves the human

basics — you deserve to have

water," the mother said.



Falling garbage dumpster leaves
worker in serious condition

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - A 35-year-old
West End man was seriously
injured on Wednesday morn-
ing following’a freak accident
at West End.

According to police reports,
Sanitation worker Adam
Knowles, 35, of Bank Lane,
West End, was crushed by a
garbage dumpster while standing.
at the rear of a garbage truck.

Mr Knowles is currently in

Lato

(@) RadioShack

Harbour Ba Shope ing

Center Tel: 393-3
& Marathon Mall

serious condition at Rand
-Memorial Hospital.

Superintendent of police
Basil Rahming said the incident
happened around 8.15am while
Knowles and Lenwood Neely,
60, the driver of the garbage
truck, were collecting garbage
from a dumpster near the old
Power Plant at.Old Bahama
Bay.

Mr Rahming said that as the
dumpster was hoisted in the air,
a support cable snapped, caus-
ing the dumpster to spin and

drop, pinning Knowles against
the rear of the truck.

A number of bystanders ran
over to help and were able to
push the dumpster off Knowles,
who collapsed immediately.

He was taken to the West
End clinic, where he was
received emergency medical
treatment.

Knowles was later transport-
ed to hospital in Freeport,
where he in serious condition.

West End Police are investi-..

gating the accident. .

We have re the
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Tel: 356-2217
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THE TRIBUNE

“

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 3



© In brief —

First woman
Episcopal
bishop named
in Cuba

m@ HAVANA

THE Episcopal Church has
named a woman as bishop in
Cuba, the first such appoint-
ment by the church in the devel-
oping world, church officials
said Tuesday, according to
Associated Press.

Rev Nerva Cot Aguilera was
named suffragan bishop on Sun-
day during a service in the
Cuban city of Matanzas, said
Robert Williams, director of
communications for the US-
based Episcopal Church.

“Her appointment is a won-
derful reminder that in some
nations, leadership is primarily
about gifts for service and not
about gender,” said US Presid-
ing Bishop Katharine Jefferts
Schori, who took office in
November as the first woman
to lead the church.

Cot will be consecrated in
Havana on June 10, along with
Cuba’s other newly named suf-

fragan bishop, Ulises Mario.

Aguiera Prendes.

Cot, 69, told The Associated
Press that she was “tremen-
dously honoured” but also faces
“a great challenge” as the
church, with some 10,000 mem-
bers, moves toward greater
national autonomy.

She said she had not seen the
sort of divisions over the ordi-
nation of women within Cuba’s
relatively small church that
Anglican communities else-
where have experienced in
recent years.

Cot was'a secondary school
teacher before church reforms
permitted her ordination as one
of the first three Episcopal
women priests in Cuba in 1987.

Cuba was a diocese of the US
church until 1967, when it was
forced to break away because
hostility between the US and
Cuban governments made con-
tacts difficult. Cuba’s commu-
nist leaders were embracing offi-
cial atheism at the time, a stance
abandoned in the early 1990s.

_ , +, It has operated under a Met-

ropolitan Council now chaired
by the archbishop of Canada,
Andrew Hutchison. It also
includes Jefferts Schori and the
archbishop of the West Indies.

Cot said she will be responsi-
ble for western Cuba with
Aguiera heading the church in
the east.

Chinese in
Grenada are
shocked by
wrong anthem

m@ GRENADA
St George’s

THE leader of a Grenadian
police band that performed Tai-
wan’s national anthem at the
inauguration of a China-
financed stadium has been tem-
porarily relieved of his music
duties, an official said Tuesday,
according to Associated Press.

Inspector Bryan Hurst will

not lead the Royal Grenada
Police Band while investigators
determine how his ensemble
came to play the anthem of Tai-
wan instead of its rival to open
the US$40 million Queen’s Park
stadium on Saturday, according
to police spokesman Troy Gar-
vey.
Garvey said the inquiry into
the diplomatic gaffe will “utilise
all the resources” of the
Caribbean island’s national
force and that Police Commis-
sioner Winston James was
expected to formally apologise
to Chinese Ambassador Qian
Hongshan.

Qian and scores of blue-uni-
_ formed Chinese labourers who
built the stadium were visibly
uncomfortable as Taiwan’s
anthem reverberated inside the
20,000-seat venue, which will
host matches during the cricket
World Cup beginning next
month.

Chinese Embassy officials did
not immediately return calls for
comment on Tuesday.

Meanwhile, the Chinese del-
egation did not attend a recep-
tion hosted by the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs for foreign dig-
nitaries Monday evening.

The Asian rivals have both
campaigned aggressively to win
the allegiance of Caribbean
nations. Grenada switched
diplomatic allegiance from Tai-
wan to China in 2005.

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‘Workers Party call:
itchell

sack Fred M

m@ By TAMARA
FERGUSON

FOREIGN Affairs Min-
ister Fred Mitchell was
under fire yet again yester-
day as the Workers’ Party
held a demonstration in a
bid to have him stripped of
his ministerial portfolio.

During the protest, held
in Rawson Square yesterday,

party leader Rodney Mon-.

cur also appealed to \rch-
bishop Drexel Gomez to
have Mr Mitchell excom-
municated from the Angli-
can church.

Mr Moncur said the pur-
pose of yesterday’s demon-
stration was to ask Archbish-
op Gomez to intervene on
behalf of the five Nassau bag-
gage handlers arrested in the
United States on drug charges
in December of last year.

He described their arrest
as a form of “kidnapping”
and said it was carried out
with the “complicity, con-
spiracy and conniving” of
the government.

The party says it consid-
ers Mr Mitchell among those
responsible for the situation.

In a statement to the
Archbishop, the party
claimed that several Cabi-
net ministers — all but one
of whom are members of the
Anglican Church — have
denied personal knowledge
and involvement in any
attempt to lure Bahamian
citizens to the US for arrest.

“We have rejected their
individual and collective ver-
sions of the facts. These bag-
gage handlers are entitled to
protection of the govern-
ment of the Bahamas in
accordance with the law,”
the statement read.

“People everywhere want
to know if members of the
Perry G Christie government
and or their immediate fam-
ilies are so compromised by
the US law enforcement
agencies. that, they can no
longer be counted on to
defend and protect the sov-
ereignty of this nation and



= MEMBERS of the Workers Party protesting in Rawson Sqare

@
safeguard the Bahamian people
from unjustifiable search,
seizure and arrest,” it said.

The party is also claiming that
the government has abandoned
the country’s extradition laws.

According to the statement,
the country spends considerable
funds to accommodate the

- MILAT relationship with the

US, which governs how
Bahamians citizens are sent to
stand trial in the US.

Despite this, is said, five
Bahamian citizens were “fed on a
silver platter” to a justice system
that “terrorizes, rapes, beats and
kills detainees and denies other
foreign detainees due process
while holding them in illegal jails
and detention centres.”

After being instructed_to.,,

attend a training exercise in:the
US, the five Nassau Flight Ser-
vices employees were arrested

(Tim Clarke/Tribune staff)

and charged in the US with traf-
ficking cocaine on local and
international flights through the
Lynden Pindling Airport.

The training exercise was
concocted, some commentators
have alleged, to circumvent the
Bahamas’ cumbersome extra-
dition treaty with the US.

American officials have coun-
tered by saying that no “sting
operation” was conducted, and
that the baggage handlers were
considered persons of interest
for some time. US Ambassador
John Rood added that US
authorities merely seized an
opportunity.

One of the five, Roney Tony,
is set to go on trial on March
19. He is charged with four
counts.of conspiracy to,import
500 grams.or more of a sub-
stance containing a detectable
amount of cocaine.

Pierre Dupuch backs PM
Perry Christie in the House

m@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

INDEPENDENT MP for
St Margaret Pierre Dupuch
lent his full support to cur-
rent prime minister Perry
Christie during one of his
final addresses in the House
of Assembly.

Mr Dupuch, a well-
respected MP and longtime
FNM, broke ranks with the
party after being fired from
the cabinet of former prime
minister Hubert Ingraham
before the PLP came to
power in 2002.

Mr Dupuch ran as an
Independent in that election
and his FNM membership

i was revoked last year after

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Mr Ingraham regained the lead-
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ber.

Now a strong opponent of Mr
Ingraham, Mr Dupuch told the
House of Assembly that if it is
the last thing he does, he will
go out “hollering to the
Bahamian people” about how
dishonest a man Hubert Ingra-
ham is.

“And I don’t mind, I'll stand
on my feet here today to tell
you that I, Pierre Dupuch, will
support Perry Christie. You can
criticise him as much as you like
about being slow on making
decisions, but I'll remind every-
one else, (of) someone called
Sir Harold Christie many years
ago.

“He was very absent-mind-

ed, it took him a long time to
make a decision. But he was
considered the best — the best,
even in today’s standards — the
best real estate developer this
country has ever seen. He was
noted for being absent-mind-
ed,” he said.

Mr Dupuch remarked that if
Prime Minister Christie is criti-
cised for nothing besides being
slow to make decisions, he does
not have any problems with
such leadership.

“But let me catch him out
teefin’, or let me catch him out
lying about Bahamian people’s
money,” he warned. “On that, I

hope.I get a chance in the next ,

couple of weeks to sing my
swan song, but until then Pll
wait.”

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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



| e . e e
The Tribune Limited
NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., RO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES .
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
. Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398 ‘
"Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Iran’s nuke programme unsettles Arabs

AS INTERNATIONAL efforts to rein
in Iran’s illicit nuclear research programme
stumbled last fall, Egyptian President Hos-
ni Mubarak announced his ‘country would
revive its own long dormant programme.

Two months later, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait,
United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Bahrain and
Oman committed to initiate a joint nuclear

_. programme on the Arabian Peninsula. Last
week, Jordan’s King Abdullah IT tossed his
nation’s hat into the nuclear ring.

Why the sudden interest in nuclear tech-
nology among Arab states? Israel is believed

_ to have developed a nuclear arsenal decades
ago, but its neighbours — other than Sad-

dam Hussein — never felt compelled to °

develop their own nuclear capability.

The Sunni Muslim kingdoms and autoc-
racies came to understand very early that
Israel’s nuclear capability was a defensive
fast resort, a “Samson” option. Unless they
were intent on attacking Israel, Israel and its
nuclear technology posed no threat to them.
And beyond the realm of serious annihila-
tionists in Baathist Iraq, the PLO, Hamas
and Hezbollah, a sort of nuclear status quo
has reigned for more than three decades.

Nuclear weapons in the hands of Tehran’s
mullahs, on the other hand, pose an offen-
sive threat — and an undeterable one at
that. The current Iranian leadership, espe-

cially President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad,

has brought an apocalyptic fervor to the
ancient rift between Sunnis and Shiites and

the even older enmity of Arabs and Per-.

sians.
If a regional conflagration is, from
Ahmadinejad’s religious perspective, not
only inevitable but also desirable, then Iran’s
Arab neighbours aren’t going to entrust
their security to the beneficence of the Unit-
ed Nations.

The danger of allowing Iran’s progress
toward nuclear weapons to go unchecked
isn’t only that Iran itself will possess an omi-
nous power. It is also that an unstable fam-
ily of nations that has already given us the
Muslim Brotherhood and al-Qaida will feel
compelled to attain the same power.

The realization of those twin threats may
finally be prompting responsible action by
the international community.

Oil is the Iranian regime’s shield and its
Achilles heel. Production from Iran’s aging



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oil fields is declining, as is the price of oil.
Investment sanctions, which the Bush
administration is trying to broaden in
Europe, make it difficult for the state-owned
oil industry to modernize its infrastructure.
And as oil prices have continued to slide,
Saudi Arabia recently opposed an Iranian
call for OPEC to cut production. The con-
sequences for Ahmadinejad’s government,
which derives 70 per cent of its revenue
from oil exports, could be devastating.

The international community hasn’t begun
to exploit Iran’s most immediate weakness.
Though Iran is the world’s fourth largest
exporter of oil, its dilapidated infrastruc-
ture forces it to import 40 per cent of its
refined petroleum products — principally
gasoline.

Even the limited sanctions the U.N. Secu-
rity Council finally placed on Iran last month
generated a meaningful internal response.
More and more Iranians — especially young
ones without jobs and prospects for the

future — are questioning a fanatical devo-

tion to an unfettered nuclear programme
that puts their nation on a collision course
with much of the world.

Though Iran doesn’t qualify as a repre-
sentative democracy, the signs of dissent
are palpable. Public strikes are common, as
is public criticism of Ahmadinejad, including
a stunning incident at Tehran University in
December where students heckled the pres-
ident and chanted, “Death to the dictator.”

Recently, 150.members of the 290-mem-
ber Iranian Majlis signed a letter blaming
Ahmadinejad for high unemployment and
inflation and criticizing him for travelling
to Latin America to pow-wow with

Venezuelan strongman Hugo Chavez rather °

than present a draft budget for the new fis-
cal year. ’

In confronting Iranian nuclear intransi-
gence, all options have to remain on the
table, including the military one. But if the
international community begins to address
the Iranian threat earnestly, there’s ample
evidence a Middle Eastern nuclear arms
race can be averted without resort to the
use of military force.

(This article was written by Jonathan Gur-
witz of the San Antonio Express-News-
c.2007).












required

dietetics

industry preferred

A reminder
concerning
our history

EDITOR, The Tribune.

- WHEN the UBP was in pow-

er, Bahamians of European
descent were controlling busi-
nesses on Bay Street while
those of African descent were
controlling businesses Over the
Hill, such as the Silver Slipper,
Zanzibar, Cat and Fiddle,
Father Allen, Shepherds Inn,
Banana Boat, The Birdland,
Rhinehardt Hotel, Mermaid
Tavern, and many more, includ-
ing the Penny Savings Bank.
Those businesses were co-exist-
ing with businesses on Bay
Street. That was when tourists
could be seen everywhere Over
the Hill.

When the Progressive Liber-
al Party became the govern-
ment in 1967, for some reason,
we put all of our focus on Bay
Street and businesses Over the
Hill began to decline. Could it
be that Sir Cecil was light years
ahead of his contemporaries?
Maybe future generations
would have the best answer to
that question.



| Sew ENtey

letters@tribunemedia.net




Entertainers who were
employed on Bay Street soon

found themselves being
replaced by disco music in the
hotels, and elsewhere. This is
a painful story but it must be
told.

After the closure of the Pen-
ny Savings Bank, Bay Street

saw the need for banking ser-

vices Over the Hill and began to
offer that badly needed service.
We have just celebrated forty
years of majority rule. Most

Bahamians saw the staging as .

a political one, when in fact it is
a national one, therefore those
so-called dissident eight who
were part of the eighteen elect-
ed in 1967, are owed an apolo-

There seems'to be an effort
to write out of the history of
January 10, 1967, those so-
called dissident eight and their

followers, unfortunately I too
was blindfolded until after the.

1972 election, fortunately the ,,

mask was removed before 1977.,
When our story is fully told,

those who were too young to ,
know, or not yet born, will .

know that on January 10,1967,

the Bahamian people went to’
the polls and elected eighteen, ,

members of the Progressive,
Liberal Party to represent them _
in the halls of Parliament, they.
were Lynden O. Pindling, ‘Cecil -
V.Wallace Whitfield, Jeffrey .
Thompson, Carlton Francis,
Elwood Donaldson, Jimmy,
Shepherd, Warren J. Levarity, .

Maurice Moore, Arthur D. "

Hanna, Milo B. Butler, Clifford,
Darling, Clarence A. Bain,
George Thompson, Preston.
Albury, Curtis McMillan, Uriah ,,
McPhee, Edmund Moxey and,:
Arthur A. Foulkes, who in my
opinion was the best orator in
the PLP at that time.

PRINCE G SMITH - %

Freeport, Grand Bahama
February 2, 2007.

The prime minister’s misuse of
Bahamas’ national airwaves.

EDITOR, The Tribune

OUR nation waited with bat-
ed breath on the evening of the
1st February 2007 after the
broadcasted announcement that
the Prime Minister would speak
to us sometime that evening on
an undisclosed subject.

Thoughts of the sttbject mat-
ter ran the gamut, from him not
being able to lead his party into
the upcoming General Election
because of illness, to announc-
ing the promised second Cabi-
net shuffle, to revealing his full
slate of candidates for the elec-
tions, to making a statement on
the Nassau Flight Services issue,
to announcing the resignation
or dismissal of the Minister of
Tourism for his recent Interna-
tional snafu regarding the West-
ern Hemisphere Travel Initia-
tive (for which the Minister has
reluctantly, angrily and
unapologetically apologised). I
even expected the signing of.a
new Heads of Agreement.

I was, as I am sure thousands
of others were, extremely dis-
appointed and angered by the
PM’s use or misuse of the
national airwaves.

We have continuously been
bombarded on national televi-
sion by the governing party’s

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public relations agenda under -

the guise of providing pertinent
information to the Bahamian
people and the disguise of
Bahamas Information Services.
Every Heads of Agreement
signing (though there is no evi-
dence when they will actually
get started) has been timed for
the evening news report and
replayed ad nauseam.

The most recent attempt by
BIS to inform the people of the
Bahamas compares the caring
and success of this Government
only to that of the previous PLP
administration led by the late
Honourable Sir Lynden Oscar
Pindling. While listening to the
professional journalist who nar-
rated I wondered if in a very
short while he will be free to say
that like a previous ZNS host he
too was directed to say and do, or
if he actually believed the drivel
that-emanated from his mouth.
Stevie Wonder ‘ain’t dat’ blind.

What a colossal joke and
waste of television time. These
ploys are pathetic and tiring.
When is “Roots” the television

epic coming on?

2

Mr Prime Minister, if you

want to effectively use the gov-

ernment run radio and televi- .
sion stations for the time you, -

have left in office please
announce that the remaining ,
monies owed to the displaced
employees of the Royal Oasis
Resort and Casino and the,
three hundred dollars ($300. 00)"
you promised old age pension-

ers almost two years ago at your .

party’s convention will be paid.

As nonsensical as it is, to now .
announce the much needed |
replacement of certain Cabinet .
Ministers and a promised Cab-
inet shuffle I would have more.’
readily accepted this, than what |
you wasted airtime to say.

As you said,
between now and the next gen-

“The ian

eral election is getting shorter .

with each passing day.”

Translation — Ain’t Long

Now

CIVIL SERVANT
Nassau
February 2 2007

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322. 1722 * Fax: 326-7452

322-1722



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THE TRIBUNE



Venezuela:
we don’t need
US money to
fight drugs

@ VENEZUELA
Caracas

VENEZUELA'S foreign
minister dismissed the US gov-
ernment’s decision to cut
counter-drug aid to the South
American nation, saying his
country does not need money
from “the devil", according to
Associated Press.

“Venezuela is a sovereign
country. (US officials) can take
their resources and do whatev-
er they think they need to do,”
Foreign Minister Nicolas
Maduro told reporters Tuesday.
“We will continue fighting
against drug trafficking.”

‘US Undersecretary of State
Nicholas Burns said Monday
that US President George W
Bush’s proposed 2007-2008 bud-
get eliminated US$2.2 million
in' counter-drug aid originally
requested for Venezuela.

‘President Hugo Chavez, who
often refers to Bush as “the dev-
il,” broke off co-operation with
the US Drug Enforcement
Administration in August 2005
accusing its agents of espionage,
and has yet to come up with a

‘néw agreement governing DEA
agents’ work in the country.

US Embassy spokesman Brian
Penn told the Venezuelan news-
paper El Universal that the lack
of joint plans involving the two
governments has led to the funds
being dedicated to other more
receptive countries. “That is the
reason and not any other,” Penn
was quoted as saying in com-
ments published Wednesday.

Maduro said Chavez’s gov-
ernment doé¢s not need “money
from the devil” and accused the~
US government of offering aid
only to countries that “submit to
its commands".

‘Venezuela is a major transit
route for cocaine headed from
neighbouring Colombia to the
United States and Europe.

‘Venezuelan officials say they
are fighting drug trafficking with
increasing success, but Wash-
ington claims that because of

corruption and a weak judicial

system the amount of drugs

smuggled through Venezuela is }

increasing.

‘Washington also has watched
uneasily the close alliance
between Chavez and Bolivian
President Evo Morales, who
have spoken of plans for
Venezuela to help its Andean
neighbor industrialise coca, the
base ingredient for cocaine, into
legal products.

Maduro met Tuesday with his
Bolivian counterpart, David
Choquehuanca, to discuss bilat-
eral co-operation programmes.

In comments to the media
afterward, Choquehuanca said
his country would not permit
that “our sacred leaf, the coca
leaf, be satanised”.

‘Share
your
news

é
The Tribune wants to hear.
rom peopie who are
taking news in their
heighbourhoods. Call us
| On 322-1986 and share
j| your story.



BAHAMIAN women are
second-class citizens who are
“institutionally abused” in their
own country, it was claimed
yesterday.

Attorney Fred Smith said
they have inferior statutory
and constitutional rights and
are subjected to domestic vio-
lence “with little remedy to be
obtained from the police,
courts or other social service
institutions.”

Mr Smith, speaking to the
Canadian Women’s Club of
Grand Bahama, said the
divorce courts are dysfunc-
tional, and issues of mainte-
nance, custody; care and con-
trol chaotic. a

“Many children of Bahami-
an women, born out of wed-
lock to non-citizen compan-
ions, have no immigration

rights.

K courts are in a state of
imminent collapse. There is a
psychology of subservience to
men. Incest, under-age sex,
impregnations of women out
of wedlock and failure to main-
tain children and wives or



; ORS i
@ FRED Smith has com-
plained about the status of
women int he bahamas

female partners are an accept-
ed part of Bahamian society.”

Mr Smith’s comments came
during a speech calling for
reform of the Bahamas Immi-
gration Act. He discussed
women’s issues against a back-
ground of what he called a
“rape of rights” inflicted by the
PLP for 25 years.

“The Immigration Act has
been and remains a brutal
bludgeon of political, racial and
nationalistic discrimination and



US Judge

demands

action by Anna Nicole
Smith on DNA tests

A US judge has got tough
with Anna Nicole Smith,
ordering her to submit her
baby to DNA tests “without
further delay” or face the con-
sequences.

Judge Robert Schnider said
yesterday the cover girl could
submit to tests in the Bahamas
or Miami. But if they were not
complete by February 21, she
would be ordered to Los
Angeles to appear before the
Superior Court.

Continued refusal to follow
his orders “could result in
severe consequences”, the
judge said.

Ms Smith has been ordered
to subject baby Dannie Lynn
Hope to a DNA test in
response to paternity claims by
her ex-lover Larry Birkhead.

Mr Birkhead, a Los Angeles
photographer, claims he
fathered the child during a

two-year relationship with the ©

former Playboy Playmate.
However, Ms ,Smith’s

lawyer-companion Howard K
Stern claimed on CNN’s Lar-
ry King Live show that he was
the father.

Mr Birkhead’s attorney
Debra Opri said yesterday
that the judge would not tol-
erate any further delays or
excuses.

“The judge indicated the
test may take place in the
Bahamas without technicali-
ties or she can call her travel
agent and take the test in Mia-
mi.

“If the test is not completed
by February 21, the judge will
order Anna Nicole Smith to
Los Angeles to appear before
him in department two of the
Los Angeles Superior Court.”

Ms Smith gave birth to her
daughter at Doctors Hospital,
Nassau, last September 7 - just
three days before the death of
her 20-year-old son eet

Mr Birkhead claims she fied
to Nassau to evade his pater-
nity claims.

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oppression used against for-
eigners and Bahamians alike,”
he said.

“This ethic of discrimination
is to my mind a great blot and
shame on our modern Bahamian
society and the status of women
in the Bahamas reflects this.”

Mr Smith said women were
legally deemed inferior and had
fewer constitutional rights
“although they bear a greater
social, cultural and economic bur-
den in the Bahamas than men.”

In 2002, he said, the FNM
tried unsuccessfully through a
referendum to amend the con-
stitution by putting women on
an equal footing with men. It
was the PLP’s emphasis on racial
and nationalistic issues which
caused that defeat, he added.

“The PLP twisted and
warped the issue to the extent
that they got the vast majority
of Bahamian women to vote
against giving themselves equal
rights.

“Bahamian women were
duped by the PLP into voting
against this and, consequent-
ly, many of their own children

ARE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 5

2 In brief Women ‘second class’ in Bahamas

have no immigration rights in
the Bahamas today.”

“Unfortunately, as a nation,
we have not since 1967 sought
to develop a proactive and con-
structive immigration policy. It
has been reactive and repres-
sive. It is backward and dis-
criminatory.”

Mr Smith said immigration

law should be a tool with which

to build the nation.

“Behind most good men
stands a great woman, but in
the Bahamas that means little if






anything. It is time to change
that.

“T urge the FNM and the PLP
to see that we now aspire to be
a sophisticated and mature soci-
ety. We should reform the
Immigration Act so that it is a
constructive and positive tool
of development.”

He said it should be taken out
of the hands of Cabinet minis-
ters “and put into the hands of
decision makers who are oblig-
ed to consider criteria clearly
defined by the act.”

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PLEASE CONTACT
Etienne Dupuch Jr Publications

Tel 323-5665



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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 7



isdom: bring complaints to me

m By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune News Editor

MINISTER of Housing
Neville Wisdom has urged new
homeowners to bring all com-
plaints directly to him follow-
ing public revelations of sub-
standard construction practices.

Over the last several months,
The Tribune has printed alle-
gations of poor workmanship
by contractors —- whose work
has been approved by Ministry
of Housing inspectors — in gov-
ernment-built subdivisions.

“As quickly as those things
are brought to my attention I
give directions for them to be
immediately attended,” Mr
Wisdom said in an interview. “I
don't want to see Bahamians
who have been ‘in some
instances 20 years waiting for a
home get something that is
inadequate. This government
does not want to see that.”

The barrage of complaints,
primarily from residents of the
Pride Estates, Excellence
Estates and Dignity Gardens
subdivisions, include the use of
low-quality materials and
incomplete work.

In some instances, the state
of the houses deteriorated
severely within weeks of being
occupied. In others, new home-
owners were greeted with an
already dire situation.

Complaints included uneven
floors, cracked tiles, damaged
cabinets, dented doors, uncon-
nected faucets, leaking appli-
ances and severe water damage.

It has further been claimed
that despite houses being built
to inferior standards than were
called for in the plans, some
buyers were charged more than
originally budgeted by the min-
istry.

Despite the higher prices
being put down by ministry offi-
cials to a “contingency fee” to
cover any extra work that might
be necessary, it was added to
the price of every house —
whether or not work had been
done — and the mortgages on
low-cost homes is calculated at
this higher rate in every
instance.

“Mr Wisdom assured home-
owners that if they come to his
ministry and lodge their com-
plaints — either verbally or in
writing — they will see results in
short order.

He added that the ministry,

has empowered “development
officers” to visit all homes being
constructed by the government
and “do continual updates as
the homes are developed”.

The. minister said that last
week, he met with homeown-
ers in Dignity Gardens to hear
their complaints. He said that
he will visit Excellence Estates
next week, followed by Pride
Estates.

When asked to explain why



B@ NEVILLE Wisdom

he thinks inferior work has been
carried out, Mr Wisdom said

the contractors hired by his min-'

istry are in most cases capable,
but have been distracted by the
current construction boom and
are “not able to give the kind of
attention that a contractor
might need to give on a home
they are building the govern-
ment.”

He claimed that many of

‘these contractors merely “drop

some fellas on the work site”
and turn their full attention to

projects “in Lyford Cay or out .

east”.

“The contractors need to do
their jobs — and that.is to build
their homes at an agreed price,
and at the standards that are
acceptable, where they get
proper occupancy certificates
and under the terms and refer-
ences of the agreements that
they signed.”

Investigation

However an earlier Tribune
investigation saw several con-
tractors allege more sinister
causes for much of the shoddy
work. These builders said they
were forced to pay bribes to cer-
tain Ministry of Housing offi-
cials in order to secure future
contracts.

Several contractors said they
are forced to cut corners dur-
ing construction because of the
heavy toll these illicit payments
exact — sometimes to the tune of
$5,000 per house.

In the wake of these claims,
Mr Wisdom lashed out at The
Tribune for casting a shadow
over his ministry.

He also announced that he

had asked the police to conduct ~

an inquiry into the matter, and
would resign if it was proven
that he had any knowledge of

wrongdoing.

Mr Wisdom also said that in
his view, the reason that many
of these contractors have
brought their complaints to the
press resulted from their reten-
tion fees being withheld.





built home in Pride Estates. -

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Minister of Housing tries to shift blame for shoddy -
workmanship from ministry onto contractors |



He explained that the initial
stages of construction are often
completed to a satisfactory
degree. “It is when you get to
finishing, installation of sheet
rock, fixtures and that kind of
thing, that is where you find
some of the problems.”

Mr Wisdom said that in order
to protect “the interest of the
government and the people” a
part of the contractor’s fee is
withheld for six months follow-
ing the completion of construc-
tion, at which point homeown-
ers are asked to sign off if satis-
fied with the finished product.
Sometimes, he explained, defi-
ciencies in the work mean that
the payment is not made.

“What will happen now is
that the same contractor will
come to you and give you some
crazy story that we are discrim-
inating against him because
we’re not giving him his stage
payment,” Mr Wisdom claimed.
“The reason they cannot get
any work now is because of
shabby work before.

“The reality is inspectors
have issued work orders to
them to do work they haven't
done — and reality is that until
they do that work and until the
inspectors and the director of
housing (Gordon Major) signs
off on a particular job they can-
not get their stage payment.”

He said that while some con-
tractors return to affect the nec-
essary repairs, “some determine
that it is easier to just go to The
Tribune and complain.

“If they don't come back, as is
the case in a few instances already,
we take that final stage payment
and give the work order to anther
contractor to complete it.”

However, Mr Wisdom failed
to explain how houses could
pass inspection by his ministry
and be turned over to buyers
without the problems being rec-
tified.

At the end of the day, accord-
ing to Mr Wisdom, the: prob-
lem is not a major one.

“When you look quantita-
tively over the last four years,
government has built over 1,400
homes. But there have only
been 50 complaints. I’m not
sure if we have only 50 people
complaining and government is
preparing to right the wrong, I
don't see what the contention
is.”

Meanwhile, the officers work-
ing the alleged bribery case
have remained tight-lipped
about their progress. Mr Wis-
dom said this week that his min-
istry will not tolerate “crooked”.
officials among its ranks. He
said he does not know when an
interim report will be issued by
the police, but hopes it will be
soon.

Both investigations followed
a long battle between The Tri-
bune and Mr Wisdom’s office
for records of housing contract
allocations, which were being
sought in an effort to verify
claims that a ring of corruption
existed in the Ministry of Hous-
ing.

Lig ee
it

eee ata
PHONE: 322-2157



2007.


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007



THE TRIBUNE

















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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007

“+

THE TRIBUNE



Prison visits cancelled as officers take action

FROM page one

Rolle, president of the prison offi-
cers association, denied that the
action, or “a little exercise" as Dr
Rahming described it, had
opened up security vulnerabili-
ties.

"We are quite fortified, the

FY

PORE rae

%
ee

.
&
~

<<

Se
SEEN

A

facility is quite secure, where a
gap might be, senior officers have
stepped in to fill that gap," said
Dr Rahming.
Nonetheless, a growing num-
ber of irate and emotional visi-
tors — primarily wives, mothers
and girlfriends — gathered out-
side the security checkpoint

throughout yesterday morning,
as they were informed that they
would not be allowed in to see
their loved ones.

One suggested that they had
spoken to inmates inside and had
received word that prisoners were
ready to riot over the cancelled
visits and recent water shortages.



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& machinery & services.

Clive Rolle, addressing the
press outside the main gates of
the compound, said that officers
were "tired of promises" made
by the government with respect to
their issues.

"As you are aware some time
in August last year the prime min-
ister visited and he expressed
nationally his concerns of the con-
ditions we work under and he
said that he would bring immedi-
ate relief to prison officers — to
this day nothing has happened,"
said Mr Rolle. |

Government is "definitely tak-
ing advantage" of their unique
position, which makes it impossi-
ble to take full strike action.

He complained that, although
prison officers were part of the
"disciplinary forces", they were
not being treated as such.

"We are always excluded in
everything that happens as it
relates to disciplinary forces, as
it comes to money, as it comes to
promotions," he said. f

Requests made recently on
behalf of immigration and cus-
toms officers by John Pinder,
president of the BPSU, for the
delivery of promotions were
answered with promises that they
would be given in two weeks
time, said Mr Rolle.

"Why is it that in five years the
prison cannot get one promotion,



@ MRS. ANNA WILLIAMS waits at Fox Hill Prison to see if she
will be able to visit her husband. Visitors were told that they would
not be allowed to see their loved ones. +
(Photo: Ana Bianca Marin).

not one?" he asked, surrounded 02
by a group of officers wearing facilities — such as an awning me anything!” she said. "They
pins bearing the image of corpo- _ over the car park. just tell us they taking the fodd
ral Dion Bowles, the prison offi- "What is important? The lives » but no visits today, they don't tell

cer killed during the prison break
last year. ,

Officers were also disturbed
when, despite assurances made
by Public Service Minister Fred
Mitchell that any pay increases
for disciplinary officers would be
made when the compensation
study had been concluded, an
announcement was made several
days ago that Defence Force offi-
cers would receive their increases
in February — before the study is
reviewed.

Prison officers are not being
"taken care of by this govern-
ment," he said.

Another shortfall of particular
concern is a lack of protective
gear for officers. According to Mr
Rolle, the number of vests avail-
able is "inadequate", and while
administration has claimed that
funding is an issue, officers are
angry that money has been spent
on what they see as, unnecessary

me why." oO

She said it was the first time ‘in!

. her experience that visits had
been cancelled. y
Marie Rolle was leaning
despondently against a fence fn
the prison car park, unable to sde’
her boyfriend.

"They just said they're not tak-
ing no visits today. Everythitg
was all right on Monday, but ‘T
don't know what happened
today," she said tearfully.

According to Dr Rahmin
they are assessing the status:of
the officers’ action on a "shift b
shift basis" and hope all
will be back to normal by tomér-
row. a

Meanwhile, in the House ‘of
Assembly yesterday, Mr Mitchélt
*said that promotions for prison
officers would be delivered at the
end of February — although this
will not yet include those recom-
mended in 2006.

of the officers or the cars that the
government bought?" asked Mr
Rolle.

The officers feel "let down" by
Dr Rahming, said Mr Rolle. "We
don't feel that the administration
assists us when it comes to talking
to our issues."

Meanwhile, Dr Rahming yes-
terday described complaints
about a lack of protection as a
"non-issue. "

"We have provided sufficient
protective gear. Many officers are
using them, in maximum security,
and many officers have decided to
not use them, but we have them."

Speaking outside the security
checkpoint, Mrs Anna Williams
from Cable Beach, one of many
who had been denied access to
visit their loved ones, was waiting
around to see if she would be let
into the facility later in the day.

"They tell me ain’t no visit
today — ain’t nobody want to tell

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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007 THE TRIBUNE





The Ministry of
Works and Utilities








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Syren
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TAG
ase
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Veet
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See
Yeas
SAS
SAE
Ae
SR
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Siveway Signs

f



RBDF apprehends Haitians
A TOTAL of 46 Haitian
Nationals were apprehended
in the Central Bahamas by
the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force on Wenesday
afternoon trying to land
illegally in Bahamaian
waters.

While on routine patrol,

HMBS P-43 - under the
command of Chief Petty

he ais tay oO Officer Ross Seymour —
PRoU Nor \ re ! ‘

none Give way Sgn

gaat




aera FE Lott turn Only














§ VEEN,
§ Ture Only

(2 Straight Anead Movement Only
Give Away ------==])



Cx net eusek

SS
AS Wa oa Gh spotted a Haitian sloop
1p fo nye aiprosintitely seven Miles

1 Fre off Belle Island in the Exuma
Chain.

A search of the vessel
discovered the Haitian
nationals — 40 males and six
females — who all appeared
< _ to be in good health. They
. ~ r were eventually taken

SS
\

\\

Shock \ onboard the Defence
WEEN Force yessel and brought to
the capital later in the
afternoon and turned
over to Immigration
authorities for further
processing.

This brings the total to
more than 300 for illegal
Haitians apprended in
Bahamian waters by the
Defence Force for 2007.

(Photos: Felipé Major/ a uarounceamenenscunieee ay
Tribunestaf)





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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 13.



Negotiators _
in Haiti to
help free
missionary

@ HAITI
Port-au-Prince

THE Coastal Avjareiees
Committee of the Bahamas, a
group of stakeholders from the
private and public sectors with
an interest in promoting the sus-
tainable development of the
Bahamas, has announced the
focus for their campaign in 2007
— trash and the problem it pos-
es to the environment.

“Our committee was formed

: to bring national attention to

: _ the challenges of sustainable
tourism development of coastal
communities,” said Earlston
McPhee, director of sustainable
development for the Ministry
of Tourism and chairman of the
Coastal Awareness Committee.
“There are five main threats
that affect coastlines. Our com-
mittee has decided to focus on
trash this year, one of the
biggest problems that threatens
our Bahamian coasts.

“We all know that trash is
having a negative affect on our
country impacting our social
and economic well-being. The
exit surveys handed in by our

’ tourists indicate that trash is one
of their biggest complaints when
visiting our country. Our, goal
is to educate the public and to
offer real solutions to people

TWO FBI hostage nego-
tiators were sent to Haiti on’
Tuesday to help secure the
release of a kidnapped
American missionary, offi-
cials said, according to Asso-
ciated Press.

Nathan Jean-Dieudonne,
58, a US citizen of Haitian
descent, was abducted Sun-
day afternoon as he and
three others drove home
from church in Croix-de-
Bouquets, a suburb of Port-
au-Prince, UN _ police
spokesman Fred Blaise said.

FBI special agent Judy
Orihuela said from Miami
that Jean-Dieudonne’s fami-
ly requested help in negoti-
ating with his captors after
the kidnappers contacted
them and demanded a ran-
som for his release. Authori-
ties have declined to say how
much the kidnappers sought.

UN police spokesman Fred
Blaise said Jean-Dieudonne,
whose hometown in the US
and church denomination
were not immediately avail- :
able, apparently was.
unharmed and that his fami-
ly described him as being “in
good spirits".

Kidnappings for ransom
surged in the impoverished
Caribbean nation last year
but have fallen in recent
weeks as a 9,000-strong UN
peacekeeping force and Hait-
ian police step up patrols
around the capital.

Foreign missionaries, who
usually travel with less secu-
rity than diplomats and busi-
hesspeople, have increasing-
ly become targets.

Most kidnappings are
blamed on armed gangs that
flourished in the aftermath
of a February 2004 revolt that
‘toppled former president
Jean-Bertrand Aristide. Cor- :
rupt police officers have also’ }
been implicated.

Share
your
news

developing country and as a
tourist destination.”

The committee has already
begun plans for a clean-up of
Nassau Harbour as one of their
main activities during the month
of April, which is Coastal
Awareness Month in the
Bahamas.

Working together with the
Port Authority of Nassau, mem-
bers will target areas in the har-
bour determined to be environ-
mentally unsafe.

“Nassau’s harbour is one of
the most important resources
our country has and is also a
major attraction to our tourists
as thousands of guests visit
weekly via cruise ship,” said Mr
McPhee. “Unfortunately, our
harbour has become the site for
derelict boats, illegal dumping,
or simply unclean and unkempt
areas considered the “back of
house” for many businesses
along Bay Street. Our plan is
to clean up where we can and to
work together with the Port
Department, harbour-front
businesses and all concerned
parties to make this a harbour
we can all be proud of.”

Port Controller Captain
Anthony Allens has also joined
forces with the Coastal Aware-
ness Committee and is helping
to oversee the committee’s
clean-up in the harbour. “Since
last year, the Port Department
has begun cleaning-up derelict
vessels and other items that
pose a threat to boat traffic or
the environment in the harbour.

’ The Tribune wants to
hear from people who are

making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



We alee you

_to bea part of our WOW service team

weoceneceecenecoe,

Dietary Department

We are looking for young men and women with a positive
attitude, physically fit, high school diploma, computer literate,
excellent customer service skills, good written and oral
communication, previous food service experience preferred.

The successful candidates will be required to:

Assembly of meal trays
Delivery of meal trays
Dishwashing, Mopping
General Cleaning

Serving meals in cafe
Replenishing Supplies
Delivery of Food and Beverage
to catering functions

Excellent benefits. | Salary commensurate with experience

DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life

I Please submit resume to: Human Resources Department | Doctors Hospital
: P.O.Box N-3018 | Nassau, Bahamas | or call 302-4618 | Website: www.doctorshosp.com



that collectively will help us as a >

We will continue our efforts and
are pleased to join the Coastal
Awareness Committee in theirs.
This is a problem that affects
all Bahamians and it will take
each of us to combat it. As we
clean, we also want to strongly
encourage all boat owners to
secure their boats and lines
when adverse weather or hurri-
canes approach,” Captain
Allens said. “Securing your ves-
sel can prevent damage to your
boat and will help keep our
waters and harbour safe and
clear of debris.”

During Coastal Awareness
Month the committee will also
host, in collaboration with its
strategic partners both in the
public and private sectors, a
number of activities.

These will include: an educa-
tional marine exhibition at the
Marathon Mall; the erection of
banners; and a national school
science competition.

In addition, field trips to Dol-
phin Encounters on Blue
Lagoon Island and Dive Stuart
Cove have been arranged to pro-
vide students with an opportu-
nity to learn about. protecting
the coasts and enjoying the
marine wonders of the Bahamas.

There will also be beach
clean-ups, a national t-shirt day
and a national church service.

As this is a national initiative,
beach clean-ups and other
coastal awareness activities are
planned for the islands of Aba-
co, Andros, Bimini, Eleuthera,
Exuma and San Salvador.

“All beneficiaries of the
tourism industry must take an
interest and active role in con-
serving the resources of this
vital industry, particularly in
growing Small Island Develop-

Paint Professionals Trust

‘Bahamas,”

M@ CRUISE ships are seen in
this shot floating in Nassau
Harbour, the focus of a
clean-up by the Coastal
Awareness Committee

ing States (SIDS) like the
adds Mr McPhee.
“The economic sustainability of
the Bahamas hinges on our. abil-
ity to maintain the natural beau-
ty of these islands that attracts
millions to our shores. We
thank all those corporate spon-
sors who. contributed to this
worthwhile effort. We also ask
the public to participate in our
upcoming events as we strive to
sustain the natural beauty of
these islands for our socio-eco-
nomic welfare and that of our
guests. We are all in this togeth-
er and as our motto states ‘If
not us who? If not now when?’”

NS LAUNCH COLOR VISUALIZER

RAUCH ALR UCSC
SATO R CCL R
PAT MTSU CHC EOUILITICER

www.sherwin.com

Fe AUITIC

AUT ALUN TTC Meas
DTM
AAA CISL

| Bahamas






And Security procedures

Qualifications:

SPA MANAGER

maximizing profitability.
* Customer service skill a must

STRUCTURAL ENGINEER

required.

members is essential.

Salary:

work experience.



Or hand deliver.



\\

Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort & Offshore Island

Invite application for the following positions:

INFORMATION SYSTEMS MANAGER

Applicant will support users and systems at site and function as a member of

i. larger team with specialized resources they will be responsible for
Training and Development of all users .

* Establishing documenting and maintaining system Management

* Actas Project Leader on I.S.Projects.
* Maintain and update systems in accordance with group standards

University Degree or Diploma in Computer Science or equivalent experience
with Novell Networks in support environment. Be quick learner and able to act
decisively within group guidelines. Good management alike.

* Applicant must have excellent Management/Employee Relations skills
* Intensive background in the wellness industry/proven track record in

* Qualified candidates must have 3-5 years experience as a Spa Manager

Strong Architectural engineering background.

* Must display good interpersonal and organizational skills ability to work as
part of a larger corporate team is essential.

* Must be prepared to travel to offshore properties and work weekends when

Qualifications a Bachelor’s Degree in one of the engineering technology disciplines
five years supervisory experience in the construction industry with emphasis on
assessing finishes. Command of basic computer skills including Microsoft word
excel and project scheduling programs.
GUESTS VALET/BUTLER TRAINERS
* Individuals should be experienced hotel worker strong food and beverage
housekeeping, guest reception and public relations skills.
° ‘Must display good interpersonal skills and the ability to motivate team

* Proficiency in English and a second language i is an asset,

An attractive package offered along with benefits based on qualifications and

Send resume’ to Cmajor@srb.sandals.com

RYLEY Ys

Prince Charles Drive















































Last seen Sunday January 28 at
11am in the morning on
Skyline Drive and Lakeview Road

Contact Owner
424-8630 or 457-4921 .
327-7942 or 323-0800

“tackle Nassau Harbour dean dip.



Round black eyes
Black nose |
Neutered -

- Rash pink spots

Looks like a cotton ball
Weighs 17-18 Ibs.
SUFFERS OF
SEVERE ALLERGIES
REQUIRES TREATMENT

Please be advised that
Bernadette Smith is.no-
longer employed by Albury's |
Parts & Repairs and Albury’s ©
Locksmithing and is not
authorized to conduct any» :
My business or receive payments ©
on behalf of the company.» =

For Further information please —
call our office at 393-2996

ALBURY '

PARTS & REPAIRS
LOCKSMITHING

"For ALL Your Aluminium & Security Needs*



Employment Opportunity

Part-time
Tellers

We are seeking mature candidates
(Age 25 & over) with

- Excellent Customer Service Skills _

- Strong Communication Skills

- Enthusiasm

- Cash Handling Experience

Hours of Work

Monday — Thursday 10:00 a.m. — 2:00 p.m.

Friday 10:00 a.m. -

4:00 p.m.

’ Interested persons should submit their resumes
in WRITING or EMAIL along with copies of
certificates before February 16th, 2007 to:

Human Resources Department
RE: Part-time Teller
P.O. Box S$S-6263
Nassau, Bahamas
Fax: 394-0758 :
Email address: anne. lightbourn@combankltd.com

€

COMMONWEALTH


THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 15

ak Dea ARIAS RASA RARER

Share your news || | ive out your dreams...

The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an

award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. on your very own property in Gra nd Ba ha Mead.






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PAGE 26, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007 | THE TRIBUNE
INTERNATIONAL NEWS
@ IN THIS photo released by
WCS Cambodia Program, an

endangered slender-billed vulture
sits in its nest on a tree in the for-
est in Stung Treng province in
Cambodia Wednesday, Jan. 17,
2007. Researchers working in the
remote forests of Cambodia said
Wednesday, Feb. 7, 2007, they
have discovered the only known
colony in Asia of Slender-billed »
vulture, which are considered one
of the world's most threatened
bird species.

(AP Photo/WCS Program)
















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of the Mekong River in Cam-

RESEARCHERS in the bodia’s Stung Treng
remote forests of Cambodia Province.

“We discovered the nests
on top of a hill where two
other vulture species were
also found,” said Song
Chansocheat, manager of the
Cambodia Vulture Conser-

~-watiow Project..The govern-
ment project is supported by

said Wednesday they have
discovered the only known
colony in Southeast Asia of
slender-billed vultures and
scores of other endangered
birds, according to Associated
Press. fay -~ i SRA

The cdlony was discovered

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the World Conservation Soci-
ety, BirdLife International,
the World Wildlife Fund, the
Disney Wildlife Conservation
Fund and the Royal Society
for the Protection of Birds.
“Amazingly, there were
also a host of other globally
threatened species of birds
and primates,” Song

~ Chansocheat said in a state-

ment. “It’s a very special
place.”

The area was also found to
be home to several other
species listed as critically
endangered by the World
Conservation Union, includ-
ing the white-rumped vulture,
according to the New Yark-
based WCS.

The team also spotted a
red-headed vulture, giant ibis
and an endangered primate
called a silvered langur, or
leaf monkey.

Researchers said slender-
billed vultures have been
found in other parts of South-
east Asia but that the only
other known colony until now
was in‘northern India. They
are believed extinct in many
parts of Southeast Asia,
including Thailand. _

Soon after the discovery,
Song’s team set up measures
to protect against poaching
and egg collecting, and are
now working with local com-
munities to ensure that they
are involved in longer-term
conservation measures.

“We already have a suc-

cessful WCS model working
in the northern plains where
local people benefit from
conservation activities,” he
said. “I think we have a good
chance of making it work
here if we can find the sup-
port.” ;
The Slender-billed vulture
is one of several vulture
species in Asia that have been
driven to the brink of extinc-
tion in the past 12 years after
eating cattle carcasses tainted
with diclofenac, an anti-
inflammatory painkiller that’s
given to sick cows and is high-
ly toxic to vultures.

Diclofenac has lead to glob-
al population declines as high
as 99 percent in slender-billed
and other vulture species,
especially in India. Diclofenac
is now being slowly phased
out in South Asia, but not at
a pace that assures the recov-
ery of the vultures.

Because diclofenac is
almost entirely absent from
use in Cambodia, the WCS
said the country remains one
of the main hopes for the sur-
vival of the species.

Even so, the birds face
numerous other threats,
including lack of food due to
the over-hunting of large-
bodied mammals, loss of
habitat, and poaching.

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THE TRIBUNE .















































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Aodte pacha.
Tea Sak CE mal Re RR aS apa







Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 29























: Let Charlie the
| Bahamian Puppet and
| his sidekick Derek put , ay

some smiles on your

kids’s faces.











Bring your childven to the
MctHappy Hour at McDonald's in
Oakes Field every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
month of February 2007;














My

i'm lovin’ it




















.
ra










vie Gift Certificatesis
|make great gifts!




THE TRIBUNE



a :
~

Fl

oods recede.across Indonesian
d to stay on guard

‘ capital, but city to

a JAKARTA, Indonesia

THE stench of fuel fumes and
rotting garbage wafted though
’. soaked streets Wednesday and
‘residents dragged out dripping
bedding, carpets and clothing as
. flood waters receded from a dis-
aster that has killed at least 50
people, according to Associated
Press.

Floods waters remained in
many districts of the capital, espe-
cially in low-lying areas close to
rivers where mostly poor Jakar-
tans live. Electricity and power
supplies to much of the city of 12
million people were still cut off.

“In general, the water is con-
tinuing to recede further and
many people are returning
home,” said city spokesman Arie
Budhiman. “I would like to say
that the worst has passed us, but
the weather can’t be predicted.”

In one hard-hit neighborhood,

storm waters dropped almost as
quickly as they had arrived, leav-
ing behind a layer of thick, black
muck and tangled debris.
*. “We can’t live in a filthy and
smelly house like,” said Grace
Liawati, an insurance company
-executive, scrubbing dirt off the
ayall. “We are staying with our
‘relatives who are safe from flood-
ing.”

At a local military medical
.” post, where around 4,000 people
-_ are being fed every day, hundreds

lined up for medicine to treat
_ diarrhea, skin irritation and res-
piratory problems.

The death toll from the floods,
which at their peak forced some
340,000 people from their homes,
rose to at least 50, the Health
Ministry said. Most of the fatali-
ties were due to drowning or elec-
irocution.

The cost to the country so far is
estimated to be some $452 mil-
lion, planning minister Paskah
Suzzeta said.

Foreign countries donated
money and aid agencies distrib-
uted badly needed soap, towels

_.and hygiene kits in the capital,
_-even as the Indonesian govern-

ment said it would not issue a for-
mal request for international
assistance.

The European Commission
pledged $775,000, the United
States gave $100,000 and the
Netherlands — Indonesia’s for-
mer colonial ruler — separately
offered $1.3 million.






February 8th

m@ AN INDONESIAN boy
holds his brother as he wades
through floodwaters in Jakar-
ta, Indonesia. Wednesday,
Feb. 7, 2007. Deadly floods
that swamped the Indonesian
capital over the last week
began receding Wednesday,
allowing many residents to
return to their soaked, debris-
strewn homes and start a
daunting cleanup operation.

(AP Photo/
Achmad Ibrahim)

Thousands of people have
sought shelter in government
buildings, schools and mosques
to escape their flooded homes.
Overcrowding and unsanitary
conditions sparked fears of a ram-
pant spread of waterborne dis-

“eases.

On Tuesday, arqund 1,000 peo-
ple were sharing two bathrooms
and sleeping side-by-side on the
cold floor at one refugee center
located in a school.

“There is a shortage of baby
food and blankets,” said Alam-
syah, a district official as he over-
saw the preparation of pots of
rice and instant noodles. “We
need more supplies,” said Alam-
syah, who like many Indonesians
goes by a single name.

Landslides and floods kill hun-
dreds across Indonesia each year,
and the capital is not immune.
But the floods this time around
have been the worst in recent
memory, residents said, washing
indiscriminately into poor dis-
tricts, middle-class housing
estates, hospitals, schools and
shops.

Major floods last occurred in
2002 in the city, much of which is
below sea level.

Environmentalists blame rivers
clogged with rubbish, rampant
construction of shopping malls on
park land that should serve as a
water catchment areas and defor-
estation of hills to the south of
the city.

“The water is all gone, but the
smell is awful,” said Fifa, an 18-
year-old woman as she removed
bits of wood and other rubbish
from her house in downtown
Jakarta under bright, sunny skies.
“But at least we can get back to
normal now.”

DIAMOND



meMALL.
MARATHON |

Crown Jewellers and The Mall At Marathon
want you to register at an Mall
participating store to WIN an

'Nleays a Ferever”

hy a * Bip
‘ OMe ly a af

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 27 .




INTERNATIONAL NEWS


















































es Start From $50.00 & Up
elor & Bacheloreites Parties, Engagement —
‘Dayar
Parties, _

P.O. Box F-42654 *
_ Freeport, Grand Bahama
Telephone: 242-373-9550 * Fax: 242-373-9551

An elegant romantic oasis of (183) Suites spacious Deluxe, Superior and
Garden Pool View guest rooms, (3) swimming pools, famous Ferry House
Restaurant overlooking the lovely Lucayan Marina for your enjoyment.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

PELICAN BAY AT LUCAYA is seeking to employ dynamic energetic and
enthusiastic people who enjoy working in the Hospitality Industry for the
following positions: : i

EXPERIENCE RESERVATIONS SUPERVISOR

If you have extensive experience in Hotel Reservations Sales Systems, then
this is a great career opportunity for you. You must have the following;



¢ At least three (3) years experience in supervision and training of
reservations sales staff.

¢ Familiar with (HIS) Epitome System perferred.

¢ Knowledgeable of constructing Rates, Packages, Promotions,
Advertisements, Reservations.

¢ Knowledgeable with Yield Management

¢ Must possess good written and oral communication and computer
skills, along with strong attention to detail organizational skills and
follow through.

¢ Flexible work hours required for this position.

Minimum qualifications required; Associate Degree in Business
Administration or equivalent. .









* One Breakfast Server
* One Laundry Attendant
¢ Two Housemen

* Two Space Cleaners

* Two Room Attendants

¢ Two Room Inspectresses
High School graduate as well as Bahamahost graduate is a plus. A clean”
Police Certificate and other supporting documents required for all positions:
Applications are available at the Security Gate or e-mail at eg
hr@pelicanbayhotel.com, deadline is February 09, 2007. NO TELEPHONE
CALLS PLEASE! NS REGS oC PEE ER







PAGE 28, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

Valentine’s Date!



nter The Tribune’s Valentine contest and become eligible to
win a dinner on the town with one of our Valentine Dates.
Men, fill out the form for Ava, and women, fill out the form for Alex
below and deliver to The Tribune’s office on Shirley & Deveaux
Streets before the deadline on Tuesday February 13, 2007 at 5:00 p.m.

_ Dinner for two at Club Land’ Or
Spa Gift Certificate
Flowers

| Tell us why you are the person
most suitable for Ava or Alex

Names et eer eee ceed
AGO Es or bien striae esenspea teraedecosen sale

Hobbies on eras sa veeveceteresuonnes

weer cece neces cecesseseseseeasceseseeesesessecseseseseoeeene
»

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wcrc ere cc cere ccccesescccsesessereseesesssesesesaseoseseccs

I should win the date with

Ava because:

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ec Caw adc aiete doe Ie Oe CORRS O ORES CHOC ETS EES CECE EEH DESO CEESEH ODES EEE LSeLESCeaoSS EZ ORES OES
cece ct eee eee ORM ROR eee eee eee Reese EHsDeHedesesgeesesererasesseereseserenenessesesee®
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ccc ccc cece cece cece esse cccscscsscsscebccvccessssscssscssesssssessesssscscssccosscsseres

NAITO eR asta serena aaceeees
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HODDICSH 5. BE ce vececcvocupssntebenstonse

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wee e rec cr er eesescersesesseseseseseseseseessessssesscesesr

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I should win the date with
Alex because:

'

ecm ccc c cece eee meee ese e nee s sees eeeessessesseeeeeesseeeseasessensseseseesenreseseeeeeee

The Nassau Florist

Est. 1951



Paradise Island

Club Land or









THE TRIBUNE

@ IN THIS photo made available by the Mayors Alliance for NYCs Animals, Jennifer Stewart,
dressed as the Statue of Liberty, holds Bandit a 10 month old rat terrier/Chihuahua mix to help pro-
mote adoption of furry New Yorkers during I Love NYC Pets adoption month, in New York recent-
ly. Over 50 special pet adoption events will be held in all five boroughs to celebrate I Love NYC Pets
adoption month during February.

(AP Photo/Mayors Alliance
for NYCs Animals)





ot 6

toe emer tr oT

far ig ge Cty" ge ae Pi a




PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FRESNEL JOSEPH OF
COWPEN ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and

that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the: facts within twenty-eight
days from the 8th day of February, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.






KINGSWAY ACADEMY CAFETRIA







Kingsway Academy is seeking the services of
experienced persons to work in the cafeteria.
Job responsibilities include the ability to do the
following:







Plan menus for the entire school
Order supplies for daily needs
Prepare different foods

Assist with cashing, serving and cleaning
Assist with all cafeteria needs when necessary.





The successful candidate should have the
following:








Be a born again Christian
¢ Aminimal education at the BJC Level
e Excellent Communication Skills

‘e ~=Alove for Children

¢ High standards of morality

e Honest

. A sincere desire to work










Letters of application together with a recent color
photograph and a resume (including the names and
addresses of at least three references, one being the name
of one’s church minister) should be forwarded to:








Ms. Kelcine Hamilton
Academy Affairs Manager
Kingsway Academy Business Office
Bernard Road
Nassau






Deadline for application is
Friday February 23, 2007






ee

eo Lt ifoly




Look around you.
What would you do to
help the environment
or improve your
surroundings?

Get your school, club, church group
or friends together and enter this
contest.

There will be first, second and third
place awards in primary, junior high
and senior high school categories.

This contest is science-based.
Students must identify and solve a
problem or challenge in the coastal
environment using scientific method.
Students are expected to exhibit the
following competencies:

@ |dentify a problem or issue
@ Develop a solution

@ Recommend actions to implement
and maintain the solution

Deadline for entries is Friday,
February 16. Awards presentation
will be held in April.

For more information call
Charlene Carey 327-9000
or visit www.breef.org

i
CWVEruMCL It Pa PLATO ROAPORERERME Ot ERIEL TAUREN EDR ENRS ETA AY BONEN ROLES)

Heer ncatetten mee ay tonne aor srcRneRRRON ano ET EIRROL AUR PETROS NT

- becoming

Workplace romances.
hard for small firms ©

u By JOYCE M.
ROSENBERG
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) —
Most small business owners
have to deal at some time or
another with employees who
date, perhaps fall in love and
‘probably break up. It’s pretty
hard to prohibit workers from
romantically
involved, but owners can take
steps to ensure that a rela-
tionship doesn’t get in the way
of getting the job done.

Problems can arise no mat-
ter how the relationship turns
out or even if the relationship
never gets off the ground. So
human resources consultants
say all companies should have

‘a policy on dating and rela-

tionships among co-workers,
and to be sure that employ-
ees are aware of it.

There are two very critical
reasons for formulating such a
policy, Relationships can
affect productivity, and not
just that of the dating co-
workers. Even more serious
is the fact that workplace
affairs of the heart have the
potential of turning into sex-
ual harassment suits against
an employer.

But many HR experts say °

that realistically, such policies
can’t outright ban dating.
“People will, become
romantically involved even if
there’s a policy,” said Linda
Gravett, an HR consultant

based in Cincinnati.

Arlene Vernon, president
of HRx Inc., an Eden Prairie,
Minn.-based HR consultancy,
noted, “Where do people
meet other people? If they’re
not hanging out in bars,
they’re meeting at work.”

What a business owner can
do is, via its policy on dating,
let employees know that there
are standards of behavior they
must adhere to, and that there
can be career repercussions

Human resources
consultants say all
firms should have
policy on dating |

when they start a relationship.
For example, if two employ-
ees in the same department
are dating, one might need to
be transferred to another
department. Or one of the
employees might need to
leave the company.

Vernon said of a dating pol-
icy, “it really is setting the
rules of conduct, letting peo-
ple know what’s acceptable in
the workplace and isn’t.”

Sensitive

Vernon noted that when co-
workers are involved, “every-
one is sensitive to the rela-
tionship.” If a couple is going
through a rough patch, other
employees can sense the ten-
sion — which becomes con-
tagious and makes it painful
for everyone else. But even
when all is going well, the rest
of the workplace can feel
uneasy.if the couple indulges
in goo-goo eyes and other
public displays of affection.

“Tt can create a hostile envi-
ronment. ... People feel
harassed because they’re
watching the affective behav-
ior and it makes them uncom-
fortable,” Vernon said.

The words “hostile envi-
ronment” are key — in sexu-
al harassment lawsuits,
employees often charge an
employer with maintaining a
hostile environment in the
workplace. And yes, another
co-worker could file a com-
plaint because an employer
didn’t stop inappropriate
behavior by a couple.



Computer Technician/
Systems Engineer —

SSS SWISS SRR SS SSNS

Harassment charges obvi-
ously can have other causes,
such as one worker pursuing
another even though the
advances are’clearly rejected
and not welcome.

Bob Kustka, president of a
workplace productivity con-
sultancy, recommends busi-
ness owners be proactive to
head off such problems, and
remind romantically linked
workers about the rules.

“I would talk to the
employees about what is a
professional atmosphere —
having a relationship is fine,
but you need to keep it out
of the workplace,” said Kust-
ka, whose company, Fusion
Factor, is based in Boston.

A policy absolutely must
address the issue of dating
between a supervisor and a
subordinate, which can lead
to problems throughout an
office or company. First, there
is the possibility of a sexual
harassment claim if one party
believes he or she was pres-
sured into the relationship, or
to stay in it.

And it’s well-known that
such relationships breed
resentment among other co-
workers. Gravett noted that
other employees will be
watching like hawks for any
signs of favoritism, such as
promotions or bigger bonuses.

“Even if that doesn’t hap- .

pen, others may see that per-
son as getting a special perk,”
she said. Such a situation
could also lead to a harass-
ment complaint.

Gravett said employees
who are supervisors/super-



PC Assembly
RC Repairs and. Maintenance

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Good Customer Service

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Lignum Technologies (Bahamas) Ltd.
Harbor Bay Shopping Plaza
Email: info@lignumtech.com

| | Please Bring in, Fax, or Email your
resume.



Ph: 393-2164
Fax: 394-4971



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such as transfers or dismissalg :*7
if they do become involved.
“If one of them doesnt: 3
decide to leave (the compa-*
ny) or stop the relationship,’
then we have to make the
judgment call that one of'
them has to leave,” Gravett ae
said. a
When a couple breaks up, it »
can be painful and awkward. 'd
for many people at work. ‘
But HR consultants say the.' |
owner doesn’t need to gét’
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aren’t any problems growing’ it
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workplace. i “9

Difficult | 7.”

A more difficult situation is , ;
where one party keeps pur-
suing the other outside of the ,
workplace. Kustka said that, j
if one of the workers comes to
the owner or a manager for
help, then the company does
have to intervene.

“If that type of thing’is

; going on, it’s probably impact-'.»

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ing on the workplace,” he’
said, warning that this: could:’ =
also be grounds for a harass+'\-*
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and art company, many of the'.*
employees are quite young.
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another. a aid
Owner Matt Revelli said «i
that “when things have gone’:
south, we’ve actually moved: .'
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THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com _



BY JOSH DUBOW
Associated Press

The University of Florida won the
recruiting crown in nearly as domi-
nating fashion as it did with the
national championship.

The Gators capitalized on last
month’s national-title victory over
Ohio State and down years from Sun-
shine State rivals Florida State and

Miami to bring in the top recruiting .

class in the country on Wednesday.
“No one is even that close to
them,” recruiting analyst Tom Lem-

' ming of CSTV said. “They got help
everywhere. In the past 10 years, this

has to rank right at the top in recruit-
ing classes. Every position is abso-
lutely loaded.”

The Gators also were picked as
the top class
Rivals.com and National Blue Chips,
beating out Southern California, SEC
rivals Tennessee and Louisiana State,
and Texas.

The Trojans closed strong, adding

- top running backs Joe McKnight

.' from Louisiana and Broderick Green

from Arkansas on Wednesday to a
class that already included another
top back in Marc Tyler; defensive
end Everson Griffen, SuperPrep’s
No. 1 overall player; the nation’s No. 1
receiver, Ronald Johnson from Mich-
igan; and blue-chip linebacker Chris
Galippo from Anaheim, Calif.

“USC continues to be the place
that a lot of skill-position players

by SuperPrep,.

COLLEGES

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

FOOTBALL | NATIONAL SIGNING DAY

Gators score again with top recruiting class



TRACY WILCOX/THE GAINESVILLE SUN

HAPPY GATOR: Florida head coach
Urban Meyer got plenty of stars.

look to first,” said analyst Bobby Bur-
ton of Rivals.com. “That doesn’t
mean the guys they get on defense
aren’t special. It just means they have
the pick of the litter when it comes to
offensive skill players.”

But the Gators’ class was best of
all, signing nine of the top 16 players
in talent-rich Florida and the No.1
players from South Carolina, Indiana,
Maryland and New England, accord-
ing to Rivals.com.

A coaching change at Miami and
another down year for Florida State
played a key part in the Gators’ suc-
cess.

“They play an exciting brand of

. ball on offense and defense, and a lot

of kids want be in that situation,” said
Allen Wallace, the national recruiting
editor for Scout.com and publisher of

BASKETBALL

Brewer, Horford

help Florida win

its 15th in a row

From Miami Herald Wire Services
Corey Brewer scored 18 points, Al

_Horford added 17, and top-ranked

Florida stretched its winning streak

_ to 15 games Wednesday night, pulling
- away in the second half for a 71-61
’ victory over host Georgia.

Florida (22-2, 9-0 Southeastern
Conference) also extended its best

- start ever in the league by sweeping

ih

its season series with the Bulldogs.

» The Gators won 67-51 in Gainesville a

month ago, dominating over the final
20 minutes after Georgia led at half-

_ time.

Georgia (13-9, 5-5) lost its third in a
row after building an 18-13 lead mid-
way through the first half. The
defending national champions
responded with nine consecutive
points and led the rest of the way,
limiting the Bulldogs to 34 percent
(20-of-59) from the field.

Brewer hit 6-of-8 shots, including

. both attempts from 3-point range. He

-’ also doled out four assists, helping

the Gators shoot 52 percent (25-
of-48) from the field.

Horford handled things on the
inside. He made 7-of-13 shots and
pulled down a game-high 10

. rebounds.

Mike Mercer led Georgia with 15
points.
The Gators were up 36-30 at half-

time and began to ease away when

Sundiata Gaines committed two turn-
overs in a row.

Joakim Noah converted a three-
point play after being whacked in the
chest by Dave Bliss, who left the Flor-
ida star sprawled on the court but
couldn’t keep him from scoring off a
lob. Taurean Green drove for an

_.\.uncontested layup that gave the
‘Gators their first double-figure lead,

43-32, then Noah got loose from
Steve Newman and dropped in an
easy one from underneath, forcing
the Bulldogs to call a timeout.

It didn’t help. Georgia went
through a stretch of nearly 6 minutes
without scoring, allowing Florida to
push the lead as high as 17 points.

The Bulldogs didn’t want to get
into a running game with Florida. But
when their half-court offense bogged
down, they often were forced to take
desperation shots with the 35-second

' clock ticking away.

Georgia made only 4-of-22 from
3-point range and is just 17-of-72 from
beyond the arc during its losing

streak. Levi Stukes went 1-for-6 and °

Billy Humphrey was 1-of-5.
Takais Brown, Georgia’s top

_ scorer at 14.4 points a game, was

.‘totally worn down by the Gators,

‘who had him huffing and puffing at

the end. He finished with 5 points on
1-of-8 shooting.

e No. 4 Wisconsin 71, Penn
State 58: Alando Tucker scored 24
points, Michael Flowers added 12,

and Wisconsin pulled away after

halftime to win in State College, Pa.

The Nittany Lions (10-12, 1-8 Big
Ten) hung close for much of the
game thanks to an active zone and
energetic forward Jamelle Cornley,
who finished with 20 points. The
Badgers (23-2, 9-1) at times couldn’t
hit shots when they did find space.

Things quickly changed midway
through the second half.

Flowers hit a couple 3s from
nearly the exact same spot in the cor-
ner to give Wisconsin a 51-43 lead
with 10 minutes left.

Then Tucker went to work in the
lane with three-point plays on con-
secutive possessions, including a
baseline reverse around Penn State’s
Milos Bogetic that led to a foul shot
to give Wisconsin a 59-47 lead with
about 6 minutes left.

Wisconsin coasted from there to
keep pace with Ohio State atop the
Big Ten. Penn State lost its eighth
game in a row.

e No. 7 Pittsburgh 60, West
Virginia 47: Sam Young scored a
career-high 21 points to lead visiting
Pittsburgh to a win for the Mountain-
eers’ first home loss of the season.

Pittsburgh (21-3, 9-1 Big East)
showed no signs of rust from a nine-

day layoff and had no trouble scoring |

inside on the Mountaineers (18-5,
7-4), who were held to a season-low
for points, West Virginia’s previous
low was 50 in a season-opening win
over Mount St. Mary’s.

e No. 9 Kansas 97, Kansas
State 70: Brandon Rush scored 18
points and host Kansas routed Kan-
sas State.

Kansas (20-4, 7-2 Big 12) began the
game with a 15-2 run and closed out
the first half on a 14-5 spurt for a 47+35
lead over the Wildcats (17-7, 6-3),
who came in with a seven-game win-
ning streak, their longest in 19 years.

e No. 11 Marquette 67, Rutgers

47: Ousmane Barro had 1 points and

11 rebounds to lead host Marquette.
The Golden Eagles (21-4, 8-2 Big

East) opened the conference season

with losses to Providence and Syra-

cuse, but are unbeaten since, winning |

eight games in a row.

Rutgers (9-15, 2-9) has lost three
consecutive games and eight of nine.

Jerel McNeal, Wesley Matthews,
David Cubillan and Dan Fitzgerald
each scored 10 points as Marquette
had little trouble in a tuneup before a
key game Saturday against No, 22
Georgetown. The Hoyas have won

six consecutive Big East games and °

trail the second-place Golden Eagles
by only a half-game.

. SuperPrep magazine. “There’s no

question they’ve moved into the cat-
bird seat in Florida. They have taken
advantage of tough times for both the
Hurricanes and Seminoles.”

Florida’s class includes John Bran-
tley, Rivals’ third-best pro-style quar-
terback; James Wilson, the nation’s
top guard; Carlos Dunlap, the top
weakside defensive end; Torrey
Davis, the second-best defensive
tackle; and Jérimy Finch and Major
Wright, the top two safeties.

Two recruits from last year’s stel-
lar class, quarterback Tim Tebow
and receiver Percy Harvin, played
key roles, in the 41-14 victory over
Ohio State in the BCS title game, and
Florida coach Urban Meyer is hoping
for similar production from some of
the players in this year’s class.

“We have taken a new attitude -

toward recruiting this year that every
freshman in my opinion will play
next year,” Meyer said. “Obviously,
that won’t happen, but we are taking
that approach. It used to be, ‘Boy, I
will be able to save this guy.’ But
that’s over.’

Florida’s haul was part of a banner
recruiting year for the SEC, where
Tennessee, LSU, South Carolina,
Auburn, Georgia and Alabama all
received at least one top-10 ranking.

“The SEC is loaded,” Burton said.
“They are, year in and year out, the
most talented conference. But even
this is unusual.”

A SUPER SLAM: Gators center Al Horfard throws down two ot his

Jimmy Clausen, the top-ranked
player by Rivals and CSTV, headlines
a top-10 class at Notre Dame and
could be ready to step in next season
as Brady Quinn’s replacement at
quarterback. Clausen is one of many
players who already have started col-

_ lege, giving him a leg up because he

can take part in spring practice.

Clausen made a high-profile com-

mitment to the Irish last April, arriv-
ing at his news conference in a limo
and predicting four national titles for
Notre Dame. :
. “He heaped pressure on himself
with the way he announced he was
going to Notre Dame,” Wallace said.
“He's demonstrated that the added
pressure has not affected him at all. If
you play quarterback, especially at
Notre Dame, you have to be able to
handle that pressure. He could be
perfectly suited for the situation.”

Notre Dame’s overall ranking was
damaged by some late defections.
Versatile athlete Greg Little switched
at the last minute to North Carolina,
and offensive lineman Chris Little
decommitted and signed with Geor-
gia. The Irish earlier lost a commit-
ment from defensive end Justin T'rat
tou from New jersey, who decided io
go to Florida.

The biggest surprise was at South
Carolina, where coach Steve Spurrier
brought in a top-10 class to a school
that normally struggies to’ attract
blue-chip players. Receiver Chris



17 points

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007 | 72

Culliver of North Carolina headlines
a class that also includes quarterback
Stephen Garcia of Tampa, Fla.

“It is sort of neat to see our name
in there with Texas, Southern Cal,
Florida and Notre Dane Spurrier
said.

Other schools that did surprisingly
well included North Carolina, Rut-
gers, Pittsburgh, Georgia Tech, Ore-

‘gon and Illinois.

New Tar Heels coach Butch Davis
got acommitment Wednesday from
CSTV’s defensive player of the year:
Marvin Austin, a defensive lineman
from Washington, D.C.

“We want to make North Carolina
a major emphasis in recruiting, and
I think we made up a tremendous
amount of ground in a short amount
of time with the: players and the
coaches in this state,” Davis said.

Illinois coach Ron Zook, who
recruited many of the players that led
Florida to the national title, signed
one of the nation’s best receivers —
Arrelious Benn of Washington, D.C.
— and beat out Notre Dame for one
of the top defensive linemen, Martez

‘Wilson of Chicago.

Despite winning only two confer-
ence games over the past two sea-
sons, Zook put together a class that
rivals Ohio State and Michigan for
the best in the Big Ten.

“Tt’s stunning that they won
those kinds of ‘recruiting battles,”
Wallace said.

JOHN BAZEMORE/AP

to help No. 1 Florida dispatch

Georgia 71-61 on Wednesday night. The Gators remained undefeated in the SEC, improving to 9-0.

e Oklahoma 67, No. 17 Okla-
homa State 60; Nate Carter scored
six of his 18 points in the final min-
utes to help host Oklahoma stave off
a late rally and preserve the upset.

Longar Longar added 13 points and
Austin Johason scored 10 for'Okla-
homa (14-8, 5-4), which moved past
Oklahoma State in the Big 12 stand-
ings.

Mario Boggan led the Cowboys
(18-5, 4-4) with 19 points, and Jame-
sOn Curry added 17.

e No. 18 Alabama 80, Missis-
sippi State 79: Ronald Steele drove
the length of the court for a layup
with 6,7 seconds left to give host Ala-
bama a victory.

Ben Hansbrough hit the second of
two free throws with 14 seconds to
play to give the Bulldogs a 79-78 lead.
Steele took the inbounds pass, took
the ball across midcourt, then accel-
erated past Jamont Gordon for the
winning basket.

The Crimson Tide (18-5, 4-5
Southeastern: Conference) trailed

77-72 atter Charles Rhodes’ basket
with 1:24 left.

Then, Mykal Riley bit a 3-pointer

for Alabama and Rhodes made 1]-ot-2
free throws with 37 sec onds to play
for a 78-75 lead.

Riley answered again, hitting a
3-pointer from the right corner 20
seconds later to tie the game.

Hansbrough drew a foul from
Brandon Hollinger before crossing
midcourt for the Bulldogs (12-10, 3-6),
who have lost four of five games.

e No. 20 Kentucky 95, South
Carolina 89: Ramel Bradley score:
21 points aid Bobby Perry added a
season-high 18 to help host Kentucky
beat South Carolina.

The Wildcats (i8-5, 7-2 Southeast-
ern Conterence) handed the Game-
cocks a 38-point thumping last moath
in Columbia -~ South Carolina’s
worst home loss since L915.

This one appeared headed that
way too before the Gamecocks (12-10,
2-7) made a furious second half run
to make it close.

e No. 21 Southern Illinois 60,
Bradley 50: Tony Young scored 25
points to lift host Southern Illinois to

. ‘the victory.

Randal Falker added 13 points and
12 rebounds for Southern Ulinois
(20-5, 10-3 Missouri Valley), which
led by.as many as 19 in the first half
but saw its margin dwindle to rive in
the closing minutes.

Will Franklin had 15 points for the
Braves (16-9, 7-6), whose only lead
came on the first basket of the game
~~ a layup by Matt Salley.

e No. 22 Georgetown 73, Lou-
isville 65: Roy Hibbert scored 20
points and grabbed 22 rebounds to
lead visiting Georgetown.

Jeff Green scored 16 points and
DaJuan Summers added 13 as the
surging Hoyas (17-5, 7-2 Big East)

_won their sixth consecutive game.

Earl Clark matched a career-high
with 14 points for Louisville (16-8
6-4).

But the Cardinals lost their 13th
game in a row to a ranked opponent.

RE AEA Se NEE OS EE ET ER aA CT A OM HT LE GENTS NE SRG WS AE RO STS SEN TY
PAGE 8E, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007



Italian Cabinet
flecree could
keep fans out of
soccer stadiums

m@ ROME

THE Italian Cabinet
approved measures
Wednesday that could
force many of the teams in
the nation’s top soccer
leagues to play in empty
stadiums, according to
Associated Press.

The decree also bans
clubs from selling blocks of
tickets to visiting fans and
allows authorities to bar
suspected hooligans from
entering stadiums, even if
they haven’t been convict-
ed of crimes.

“The measures are severe
and without precedent,”
Deputy Interior Minister
Marco Minniti said. “Our
objective isn’t to play the
games behind closed doors.
Our objective is to play the
games in safe stadiums with

open doors.”

The Italian news ¢ agency
ANSA said that only six
soccer stadiums in Italy
meet the required security
standards, including
Rome’s Stadio Olimpico.
The San Siro stadium —
home to AC Milan and
Inter Milan — is among the
stadiums completing work
to meet the requirements,
ANSA reported.

The Italian soccer league
said its officials will meet
Thursday in Rome with the
presidents of all 42 teams
in Serie A and Serie B —

Italy’s top two leagues. The :

stadiums subject to the
spectator ban will be
announced then.

Other measures ban
clubs from having econom-
ic ties with fan groups and
stiffen prison terms for
committing violence
against police from five to
15 years..

The measures must be
approved by parliament
within 60 days to remain in
effect. The Cabinet also
approved a proposal for
more long-term changes,
putting club stewards in
charge of guaranteeing
security inside stadiums
and involving the clubs in
the ownership of the sports
arenas, now owned by local
authorities.

Premier Romano Prodi’s
Cabinet was reacting to the
fatal attack on a policeman
in rioting last week during
and after a Serie A match
in Sicily.

At least 38 people have
been arrested, including 15
minors, and at least two
more taken in for question-
ing in Friday’s violence at
Catania’s stadium, where -
the local team was playing
cross-island rival Palermo.

The violence led to the
postponement of Italian
league games Saturday and
Sunday, and the soccer fed-
eration has said it would
decide when to resume play
once the government’s
measures were passed.

Investigators in Catania
were examining a film of
the fatal attack in hopes of
identifying suspects, police
said.

Authorities did not say
what the stadium’s closed-
circuit cameras contained.
Italian news reports said
the film showed the fight-
ing outside that began after
the Catania-Palermo match
had started Friday night,
including youths with par-
tially covered faces
approaching 38-year-old
Filippo Raciti and one of
them hitting him in the
abdomen.

The Apcom news agency
reported that the film
showed Raciti being hit
with a sink that had proba-
bly been ripped out of one
of the stadium’s bath-
rooms.

Raciti continued to work,
but about 45 minutes later
he climbed out of his car
when someone tossed a fire
cracker inside, and col-
lapsed to the ground as a
small, crude bomb went off
next to him, newspapers
reported.

Police initially believed
Raciti was killed by the
bomb, but officials later
said he died from severe
injuries to his liver, proba-
bly after being hit by a
blunt object.







TRIBUNE SPORTS.

| eas z | oy

@ SOUTH Africa's batsman Shaun Pollock, center, plays a deliver) from Pakistan's bowler Shahid Afridi right, as teammate wicketkeeper Kamran Akmal,
left, looks on during the second five-match One-Day International against Pakistan at Kingsmead in Durban, South Africa, Wednesday, Feb. 7, 2007.

Pakistan d

@ CRICKET | :
DURBAN, South Africa
Associated Press

PAKISTAN defeated South
Africa by 141 runs at Kingsmead
Stadium in the second one-day
international and tied the five-
match series 1-1 on Wednesday. '

Mohammad Yousuf hit an unde-
feated 101 and Shahid Afridi
smashed his first 50 runs in only
20 balls, as Pakistan scored 351-4.

It was the highest one-day score |
achieved at the Kingsmead Stadi- |
um, beating South Africa's total of |
329-6 against Zimbabwe in 2005. |

Yousuf's 12th one-day interna-
tional century was his first against,
South Africa.

Inzamam-ul-Haq won the toss
for Pakistan and elected to bat. It:
appeared to be a poor decision
when Kamran Akmal was trapped |
leg before wicket by Shaun Pol- |
lock in the opening over,

| Argentina beat France

FRANCE'S Franck Ribery, right, and Argentina's Gabriel Heinze
fight for the ball during their international friendly soccer match at the
Stade de France stadium in Saint-Denis, north of Paris, Wednesday,
Feb. 7, 2007. ponents won the match 1-0.

(AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

Aowalen, Imran Nazir then hit.
57 off 39 balls -— with eight fours
and two sixes — before being dis-
missed leg before wicket to Charl
Langeveldt, leaving Pakistan on
80-2 in just the 12th over.

Yousuf and Younis Khan batted
together for a third-wicket part-
nership of 124, keeping the scor-
ing rate at around six runs an over.

Younis was dismissed for 93,
caught by Charl Langeveldt off
Graeme Smith as he tried to hit

(AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)

efeats South Africa by 141 runs

the South African captain out of
the ground.

Inzamam was run out for 13; and
that brought Afridi to the crease.

Afridi smashed the second-
fastest one-day 50 ever, reaching
the mark in 20 balls — one fewer
than the record set by Mark
Boucher for South Africa against
Kenya.

Afridi went on to reach 77 not
out off 35 bails with five fours and
Six sixes.




°

PG 14 e Thursday, February 8, 2007 REL N The Tribune





Soran errr eee

WITH camera in hand, The Tribune's senior photographer Felipé Major has vowed to capture
the picturesque hallways of churches in New Providence to delight of our dedicated RELIGION
section readers. In this week’s collage, he chose to feature Zion Yamacraw Baptist Church, where
Bishop Sam Greene is the pastor. See Page 15


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES




FREEPORT
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 © Fax: (242) 373-3005




MARCIA ANITA HEPBURN, 38





BAHAMA WILL BE HELD ON
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10,









BE FATHER REGINALD
DEMERITTE ASSISTED BY;
DEACON
HOLLINGSWORTH.







THE GRAND BAHAMA MEMORIAL PARK, FROBISHER
DRIVE, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA.




Father: Ezra Hepburn; 5 Sisters: Merlita & Catherine Hepburn,




Brothers: Dwuane Sawyer, Mark Pinder, Trevor & Ralph




U.S.A, Gloria Thomas-Russell, Carmen Thomas, Leah Rolle,
Pricilla Jarret, Leona and Angela Hepburn; 2 Grand Aunts:







Nixon; 3 Sisters-in-law: Paulette & Louise Hepburn and Lavern








Foster and A Host of Other Relatives & Friends including:




Russell, Kevin Russell, Frank Saunders, Hayward Thomas,
Carmel Russell, Lovely Hield, Jenny Colo, Leannie Russell,





Rev. & Mrs. Edwin Pinder, Lloyd & Gloria Thomas, Mr. &




Miller & family, Joy Rahming & family, June Penn & family,






Resteiow Memorial Moluay
and Crematouum Limited

~ FUNERAL tec} 0) ee

i family, Fr. Dwight Rolle & eave Clandia owes & “family,
: Dennis Rolle & family, Sandra Hepburn, Franz Hepburn of
: London, Yvette Gibson & family, Leontyne Hepburn, Simeon

OF CHURCHILL RD., SOUTH | Hepburn & family, Altamese Hepburn & family, Patterson

BAHAMIA, FREEPORT, GRAND :

Left to cherish her memories are her Mother: Sharon Thomas; |

ie: 3 OF LIMEWOOD LANE, FREEORT, GRAND BAHAMA
Jeannie Missick, Dale Rahming and Vantrice Bowleg; 5 _ AND FORMERLY OF AUX CAYES DU FORT, HAITI WILL

; : ; : BE HELD ON SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2007 AT 11:00
Hepburn and Deanza Thompson; 7 Aunts: Veronica Ellis of _ A.M. AT TABERNACLE BAPTIST CHURCH, SETTLER’S

' WAY. OFFICIATING WILL BE PASTOR PHARNES LOUIS

Mable Russell & Leanora Stubbs; 6 Uncles: Pius and John AND PASTOR ALPHEUS WOODSIDE. E CE

: ce : FOLLOW AT THE GRAND BAHAMA MEMORIAL PARK,
Wilbert Thomas, Kemuel and Wellington Hepburn, Leviticus : FROBISHER DRIVE. FREEPORT. GRAND BAHAMA
Rolle and William Ted Russell; 5 Grand Uncles: Richard and : : c :

Willis Russell, Dr. J.J. Stubbs, Elder Leon Stubbs and Paul Left to cherish her precious memories are her long time friend:

Pinder: 6 Nieces: Trekeisha, India & Tatum Hepburn, Simona Christopher Apathy and Other Relatives & Friends including:

& D’ Andrea Pinder and Diamonte’ Barr; 1 Grand Niece: : : : : :
Keeara Butler; 5 Nephews: Dustin, Chad & Markell Sawyer, : and family, Conceptia Jean Baptiste and family, Jetta Baptiste-
Ralph Hepburn Te Chis Barr and Bian dane Partier. Volar B : Polynice and family, Pastor Gesnal Charles and the pe |
Ti eee ; : oN ... : Of Philadelphia Baptist Church, Pastor Gentil Smith and the
Clete Titlon’ Erlend. andra Bore, Ged enue te) dull members of Hope Church of the Nazareen, Harold Pierre and

: : ee family, Mrs. Solange Monestime and family, Sidney Baptiste
Agatha Rolle, Sylvia Russell, Martin & Virgil Hunt, Pearl : and family, Belinda and the Management and Staff of the Grand
: Bahama Home for the Aged and other friends, family from

Sylvia Stuart, Aretha Johnson, Kendra Williams, Nicole Pinder, Haiti, Bimini and the United States.

Barbara Saunders, Sheryl Cawn of U.S.A, Joanne Moxey, The VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE “PERPETUAL SUITE”

Mrs. Reckley Leroy & Mary Glinton, Nora Brutti, Juledor & OF RESTVIEW MEMORIAL

Monique Corneille, Monique Carter, Mrs. Valerie Clarke, Gloria FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA ON FRIDAY FROM 10:00

Rev. Iram Lewis & family, Eleanor, Dennis, Christine, Joslyn A.M TO 6:00 P.M, AND AT THE CHURCH ON SATURDAY

& Carl Jarrett, Jennifer Braynen & family, Ingrid Gibson & |

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007, PAGE 27



NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
.0. Box CB- 12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 © Fax: oe 340- oo

Hepburn & family, Vaughn & Vincent Hepburn, Bert & Bridget

: Moss, Monique Cartwright, Realin Duncombe, Norma
: Symonette, Isreal & Cathlene Rolle, Quentin Levarity and The
2007 AT 12:45 P.M. AT ST. : staff of Bahamas Business Solutions Ltd., Nassau/ Freeport
VINCENT DE PAUL CATHOLIC :
CHURCH, HUNTER’S, GRAND :
BAHAMA. OFFICIATING WILL :
: VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE “CELESTIAL SUITE”
ee : OF RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND

including: Jeff Roberts, Marcia Winder, Andreen, Courtney
Coleridge and Patricia Gooding.

CREMATORIUM LIMITED, 11-A EAST CORAL ROAD,

: FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA ON FRIDAY FROM 10:00
INTERMENT WILL FOLLOW AT :

A.M TO 6:00 P.M, AND AT THE CHURCH ON SATURDAY

FROM 11:00 A.M UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

JANET JENNIE BOURNE, 76

Anne Marie Rolle, Carol, Madeline, Harry, Bennetho Baptiste

MORTUARY AND
CREMATORIUM LIMITED, 11-A EAST CORAL ROAD,

FROM 9:30 A.M UNTIL SERVICE TIME.



The Tribune

PG 28 ¢ Thursday, February 8, 2007

RELIGION

@ ELDER Mark Barrett
receives his certificate of
ordination



m@ By ANASTACIA MOREE
@ CALVARY Deliverance Church, during a special service held last Tribune Feature Writer
month, saw three men commissioned into the ministry and one man
and one woman ordained as ministers of the gospel. Pictured from left
are Ricardo Clarke, Albert Campbell, Elder Mark Barrett, Elder
James Newry who gave the charge to the candidates and the church,

Elder Lena Pratt and Darren Henfield.

‘TAKING the initiative to help better the
lives of his 7,000-plus members, Bishop Neil
C Ellis, pastor of Mount Tabor Full Gospel
Baptist Church, has embarked on plans to
make home ownership affordable and avail-
able to every qualified member of his church.
On Monday, Bishop Ellis announced the
establishment of four subdivisions to assist
in meeting the housing needs of his members
- Mount Tabor Gardens, Mount Tabor Sub-
divisions, Mount Tabor Estates and Mount
‘Tabor Manor. He also revealed that already
153 persons have been qualified for some $13
million in loans. Through the church’s home
ownership partner, Scotia Bank, more than
$11 blli5n has been approved in housing # BISHOP NEIL C ELLIS
loans, while Fidelity Bank, Mount Tabor’s
property ownership partner, was said to have (FILE photo)
approved some $2 million in property loans.
The project, believed to be the most ambi-
tious private-sector housing initiative in the history of the Bahamas, is expect-
ed to provide thousands of persons from every income bracket with the oppor-
tunity to own a home of their own or a plot of land.
The announcement came in the midst of the church’s 20th Anniversary cel-



@ ELDER-eclect Darren
Henfield receives a Bible from
senior pastor Bishop Clarke



@ FOLLOWING the robing ceremony, Elder Lena Pratt and Senior Pas-
tor Bishop Clarke (at pulpit) bask in the presence of the Lord and offer up
a praise of thanksgiving. Pictured at the far right is Elder Mark Barrett in

@ ELDER-elect Albert
Campbell receives a Bible from

quiet worship.

Commissioned
and ordained

‘iving up to its mandate to

L wees the gospel and

equip the men and women
of God to share the good news with
power and authority, Calvary
Deliverance Church, during a spe-
cial. service held last month, saw
three men commissioned into the
ministry and one man and one
woman ordained as ministers of the
gospel.

Being ordained were Elders
Lena Pratt and Mark Barrett. The
candidates commissioned as
Elders-elect were Darren Henfield,
Ricardo Clarke and Albert Camp-
bell.

Bishop V G Clarke, senior pas-
tor and visionary leader of the
church which is located on East
Street South, challenged the can-
didates to keep their focus on Jesus
Christ and to know, believe and
understand the God they serve.

As men and women marked by
God for his service, Bishop Clarke,
aware that the enemy would seek
to bring the disciples down and
cripple their newly birthed min-
istries, encouraged them that as
they preach the gospel with a sense
of urgency, that they make
absolutely sure that they live what



" PROUD PARENTS: Bishop V

G Clarke and his wife, Elder B M
Clarke, stand with their son, Elder-
elect Ricardo Clarke, as they wel-
come him into the ministry at Cal-
vary Deliverance during a special
Ordination and Commissioning
Service held recently. .

body of believers and equip each

senior pastor, Bishop Clarke

they preach and teach.

He told them also that as they
had been lifted up by the elders of
the church and supported through .
prayer, ministry and teaching, that
they look to edify and build up the

member to do the work of the min-
istry.

Perhaps of most importance, the
five candidates were cautioned by
Bishop Clarke to maintain a careful
and committed prayer life in an
effort to remain within the pres-
ence of the Lord at all times and to
position themselves to be able to
recognise the master’s voice when
He speaks to them.

Finally, Bishop Clarke admon-
ished the leaders to continue to
seck God for the desperatesneeds
of His people, their individual min-
istry, the community, nation and
the world.

Indeed, Sunday, January 28 was

a red-letter day in the life of Cal-
vary Deliverance.
- And on hand to witness the
sacred service were many family
members and friends who travelled
from the islands of the Bahamas
and the United States to witness
the occasion.

ebrations. As part of a special week of services, internationally renowned
speaker and minister, Prophetess Juanita Bynum, will be the guest speaker on
Thursday and Friday nights. :

In an interview with The Tribune, Bishop Ellis spoke passionately as he
explained how overwhelmed he became after learning that many of his mem-
bers did not own their own homes and were either living with family or renting.

It was during the annual Week in the Word Conference last November,
that Bishop Ellis’ eyes were opened to the situation within his own body.

According to Bishop Ellis, after an especially anointed message brought
forth by Pastor Patt Francis, from Toronto, Canada, the minister went on to chal-
lenge the congregation to go forward and better their lives.

“We asked all of the people in the congregation who didn’t own a home or
property to come forward. 1 wanted to just/pray that a way would be made for
them. I was blown away. | was thrown off-guard because more than 400 persons
came to the altar," he said.

Becoming emotional as he spoke about his surprise, Bishop Ellis said that he
was moved to tears that night after seeing hey many persons in his church were
without their own homes.

Not able to live with knowing the eseital number of persons who did not
have a home to call their own, Bishop Ellis said that almost right away he called
every bank in the Bahamas, and that was when Scotia Bank responded.

For two nights applications were submitted and out of the 300 persons who
applied, 144 applications have already been approved.

When asked by Tribune Religion about other pastors coming forward to help
their own members, Bishop Ellis said that everyone’s calling is different.

"We have, over the years, diligently endeavoured to do everything within our
power to equip and empower our people to be all that God said that they can
be. :

“This is not our first housing initiative, but [the subdivisions] are by far our
most ambitious. For the past 20 years of our existence, as a ministry, we have
been endeavouring every step of the way to enhance the lives of our people
through the practical presentation and demonstration of the gospel of Jesus
Christ.”

Prime Minister Perry Christie and Franklyn Wilson, chairman of Arawak
Homes Ltd, were also present at the announcement.

Mr Christie said that all of what Bishop Ellis is doing is evidence that you can-
not undermine a person's determination. He noted further that Bishop Ellis,
through the establishment of the mortgage drive, has embarked on a journey to
transform the lives of his members. :

"To be a defining church, you must mean that you are about setting standards.
Bishop Ellis ts one that has come a long way and he is now making his member's
lives better than it was for him." .

Mr Wilson also saluted Bishop Ellis for embarking on a project that would
help transform lives.

“It is everyone's dream to own a home or property to call their own. I think
that for a very long time Bishop Ellis has set out to help persons achieve this
dream. I commend Bishop Ellis for all-of the sacrifices that he has made to help
the members of Mount Tabor.”

Plans for the subdivision have been made possible through partnerships
with Scotia Bank and Fidelity Bank, Arawak Homes and other businesses
and developers.


PAGE 30, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007





THING?

MR. GIBBS, ARE YOU -

WHY 1S REGGIE BLACK
SO HUNG UP ON THE
FAMILY VALUES

HE SEES IT AS
THE ONLY WAY
HE CAN BEAT



NO, THAT'S








REGGIE CERTAINLY
CAN'T RUN ON HIS

DISTINGUISHED
LEGAL CAREER!



TELLING ME THIS STUDIO/ NOT WHAT | GOODNESS!

IS HAUNTED 77

YOU LOOK LIKE YOU'VE HAD A

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tn

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ith

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10
13
14
15
16
17

19
21

23
24

26
27

29
32

33

34
35

36



MORE COFFEE.)
DORIS?

ROUGH DAY, HONEY





YES, BUTNOT
THAT HORRID
STUFF YOU




GO To

THANK

BE ADEAR AND

AND GET ME
A DOUBLE LATTE
| SUPREME






STARBUCKS

reserves








©2006 by Norm Amenca Syndicate. inc Word fig

O'06 Wiley WK, Ie,

SRANDPA GAIV HE
USED TOVIP |

GEANUMAS FISTAILS
IN AN INKWeLL





3 CRYPTIC PUZZLE

ACROSS

Yesterday's cryptic solutions .

ACROSS: 1, Slight 7, Rasp-t-tin 8, M-o-na 10, Draw up 11,
S-trip-E 14, Met 16, Tuner 17, RE-ar 19, Tot-em 21,
Mowed 22, Ro-we-d 23, F-old 26, S-al-ad 28, Pah 29, Pro-

fit 30, Docile 31, Up to 32, Consumed 33, Su-rely

°















































Yesterday's easy solutions
ACROSS:1, Damage 7, Scot-free B, Slap 10, Canopy 11,
Facade 14, Owe 16, Mates 17, Tows 19, Roger 21, Tiger
22, Debut 23, Chap 26, Decor 28, Bee 29, Adhere 30,
Mirage 31, Edit 32, Cardinal 33, Teeter

GLUT WHAT
THE HECK IS
AN \NKWeLLl?



DOWN: 1, Spider 2, Glower 3, Trap 4, Spotted 5, Stein 6,
Under 6, MA-MA 9, NUT 12, Rum 13, Pearl 15, (the)
To-wel 18, Elgar 19, To-W 20, Ted 21, M-od-ic-um 22, RAF
23, F-actor 24, Oh--O 25, Dressy 26, Space 27, Lo-ans.
28, Pop 30, Duds

DOWN: 1, Dulcet 2, Allows 3, Espy 4, Steamer 5, Great 6,
Cedes 8, Snow 9, Ape 12, Car 13, Delta 15, Mogul! 18,
Owned 19, Rib 20, Get 21, Terrain 22, Doe 23,

Cerise 24, Heat 25, Prefer 26, Dance 27, Chart 28,

Bid 30, Melt



0, HE TROTE OUT
CELESTE, HIG RICH,
ALCOHOLIC WIFE!

| THIS WHOLE BUILDING 15
HAUNTEDS J




WHERE ARE_Y To pick uPA
YOU GOING? /cuP OF COFFEE
AND SOME

ARSENIC






Be eta. \c

Dennis



~PUAS Eosrary REN ORD.

la

Woo">N!



East dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.
NORTH
4853
Â¥Q64
#QJ51073
HKQ
WEST
#31097
VK5
©9642
kAT72

EAST
#642
Â¥AJ102
85
#10953
SOUTH
@AKQ
Â¥9873
AK
#I864
The bidding:
East South West North
Pass 1 NT Pass 3 NT
Opening lead — jack of spades.

Assume you’re West and lead the
jack of spades against three notrump.
Your partner plays the deuce and
declarer the ace. South’s ace play
doesn’t fool you a bit, because he’s
sure to have the A-K-Q, considering
East’s low spade play.

Declarer now cashes the A-K of
diamonds before leading a club. You
win with the ace and, as a steady
reader of this column, shift.to the
king of hearts! Again your partner
plays the deuce (he can’t afford a
higher card), but you continue the
suit anyway. Your partner thereupon
cashes three more heart tricks, and






a,

“OKAY, COWBOY, TIME TO KOUNP UP
TOYS ANP TAKE THEM TO YOUR ROOM.”

__BySteveBecker
A Switch in Time Saves Nine

GOCOINGS. COM / por ScantTUR

WIG E @EARTHLIOE NET











(©2007 by King Feature Eyricicame, ine. World rights mserved.



’ DOWN
One can stand It inactively or 1 Asadrink might i be potentially ae
generously, we hear (6) shocking? (5) hey
Having alean time, presumably @) |" 2 Simply ove to make a fuss again (5) | | | be
Like one's passion for that old ash 3 One takes some risks with her! (4) | i:
blonde? (6) 4 Robir's advert on radto (5) alele| pede
its in the army that some sprockets 5 Fliers slow to crash (4) Ea ; eee eS [|
Tay tum the wrong way (5) 6 Figure to be not so sensitive (6) ay
Prejudice at bowts? (4) 9 It means immobilise rather than {|
The woman's right — alwayel (4
serene — Ey
11 Insufficiently oval eggs? (3
mre, | woommmae” | Py
a an : "
precedence? (5) ;
figure (4) 13 {t's rubbish, and nothing more, in the EJ ae || eas |
Seen | coe |
wingitee en Ge 15 Like the latest cons (3) R a 7
on some ii ces cae 16 It's in polyester, and that’s positive (3) | | ee
; : 18 Derby mount, perhaps (6) ;
socks, etc. (4) fr
ieee eee 20 It's clumsy, spoling a pit by dropping #8]
cigarette end in (5
lait any (4) Since, | ACROSS
A.cide (the left, for instance) (3) Joke to leave you speechless? (3) 4 Mooring device (6)
Maintain there's only one sound key 22 Many have a mission to clean things 7. Fatal (8)
on the plano! (4) up (3) 8 — Male goose (6)
23 Meanto need badly (6) 10 Cane
They‘re all in favour (4) y (6) 13 Throw (4)
Depend on central Hammersmith 25 Game in which a half century is ut 14 Mix up (4)
having a cathedral (4) fohowed by a ‘pair (3) iN Oe a
Not the only one standing around in | 28 Electricians have to choose, of > 17. Fencing sword (4)
thie cornfield (5) course (5) a. 19 Second-hand (4)
Sallor taking a drink on watch? (8) | 30. Sculptor who used wrought iron, Gs | tc neag ane )
Fine face It's posible to find having ultimate need (5) < 24 Prophet (4)
etimulating (8) 31 Weal look up to them (5) Ly 26 Humour (3)
Odd number of players one too 32 _ Is this book always tom? (4 ‘ 27, Summit (4)
, = ) 29 Type of word (4
many to have sex) (6) 33 Thus the feet are not hardened (4) 3 Aoratine
33 Cut (5)
34 Assessed (6
35 canbed
36 Hire charge (6)




_ Calvin



sus



cos THIS AWAY AND




THE CLASS!





THESE

the contract quickly goes down one.

High-class defense, but not very
difficult when you are looking at all
four hands, you might say. Neverthe-
less, that’s the correct defense, even
if you see only the West and North
hands.

The suggested line of defense is
right because, on the first three
tricks, it becomes clear that South
started with the A-K-Q of spades and
A-K of diamonds. He may not have
any more than these 16 points for his
16- to-18-point notrump bid. In any
case, he can’t have the ace of hearts
also, which would give him 20
points, so you know your partner has
that card.

Furthermore, you realize’ that
declarer has at least nine tricks —
three spades, five diamonds and a
club — if you make a “safe” return
after taking the ace of clubs. So, after
saying to yourself that necessity is
the mother of invention, you play the
king and another heart.

While it is granted that you are
very lucky to find East with four
hearts to the ‘A-J-10, it is also true
that East might have held five hearts
headed by the A-J, in which case you
would have been even luckier. The
point is that unless partner has one of
these two holdings, you can’t set the
contract, so you have no choice but
to switch to the king and hope for the
best.

TARGET

The
Target
uses
words in
the main
body of
Chambers
21st
Century
Dictionary
(1999
edition)

HOW many words of four
letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here?
In making a word, each letter
may be used once only. Each
must contain the centre letter
and there must be at least one
+ nine-letter word. No plurals
TODAY’S TARGET
Good 15; very good 22;
excellent 30 (or more). Solution
tomorrow.

















DOWN
Hidden store (5)
Regions (5)
Occasion (4)
Water organisms (5)
European coin (4)
Unwrapped (6)
Perceptive (6)
1 Faucet (3)
In that place (5)
Dairy products (7)
Damp (3)
For every (3)
Soup (6)
Walt (5)
Kitty (3)
Gander (3)
Corsair (6)
Mineral (3) ‘
Foot lever (5)
Dodge (5)
Wite (5)
Female relative (4)
Casserole (4)

o
zs
oT

28D
EYog
= BSPyrH
ox
EL OxES
3900 of
baad i
OxD oR Ye
Av DH
YOR DGS
Soe é
ieosia
aD eRe
Goes 5S
>,
um moo
8 SAEU SS
Pomdeak







} invent
Be ek chy ee
“something new:
yaar tiie ta Col
or experiment.







Chris Ward v Richard Palliser,
British rapidplay, Halifax 2006.
Yorkshireman Palliser, who
shared first place with London
grandmaster Danny Gormally,
scored a dever win in today's
position. Black (to move) is two

THAT DIRTY SUSIE DERKINS.

SHELL. BE SORRN IF SHE...

TRIES To PASS ANOTHER
NOTE .



Tees Noe

EAD \T IN FRONT OF

THE TRIBUNE









PSST...CALNIN! PASS
THIS SECRET NOTE TO
JESSICA, OKAN?












s

0

“DEAR JESSICA,
YOU KNOW WHAT T HATE,

ABOUT CALVIN? HE'S A

SQUEALER ! SIGNED, SUSIE.”

|




















THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 8

ARIES — March 21/April 20

Healthy suspicion is on thing, but
you’re flirting with paranoia this
week, Aries. Now is the time to put
your energy to more productive use.

TAURUS - April 21/May 21
You may have to finally deal with
something you’ve been avoiding,
Taurus. Once you take care of it,
you'll find-it easier to trust col-
leagues. In turn, they’ll feel more
comfortable confiding in you.

GEMINI - May 22/June 21
Don’t be afraid to go off in another
direction this week, Gemini, as an
old relationship comes to an end.
New beginnings are also on the
horizon, most likely with regard to
your career. :

CANCER - June 22/July 22
Your luck will change for the better
this week, and with it your attitude
will also become more positive,
Cancer. An old friend will stop by
to say hello on Thursday.

LEO - July 23/August 23
Resist the urge to criticize this week,
Leo, even if you’re not convinced
that those in charge know what
they’re doing. :

VIRGO -— Aug 24/Sept 22

If you have a complaint to make,
then.now is the time to.speak up,
Virgo: However, you'll also have to
listen to what others say about you.

LIBRA -— Sept 23/Oct 23

This is the, time to focus on work
and health issues, Libra. If you’ve
been feeling poorly in any way,
you must restore balance. This is a
lucky week for romantic getaways.

SCORPIO -— Oct 24/Nov 22
Don’t fret so much about your cash
flow situation. This is an enterprising
time for you Scorpio, and you’ll find
a way to make ends meet. Make time
for old friends this week, they can
help you more than you realize.

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21
Now is a good time to take stock of
how far you’ve come and how far
you have to go to achieve your goals
this year. There’s still time to make
your dreams come true.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
You’ve worked hard in recent
weeks and you deserve some kind
of reward, Capricorn. Cheer up!
Things can only get better, espe-

cially with regard to your social life.
AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18

You'll make sure you can afford the
good things in life, and you’ll make
Sure others are aware of your suc-
cess. But don’t brag too much.

PISCES — Feb 19/March 20
You don’t'need to cut comers or break
rules to make it to the top, Pisces.
Success is close at hand, and you'll
soon feel a boost in your self-esteem.
Remember, anything is possible.



oy ens) Leonard Barden





pawns ahead, while White has ote
the immediate threat to queen ote
his c7 pawn. Black can draw tet.
easily by continual rook checks: vate
' RE4+ Kxg5 RIS + Kg4 R5f4+, Ete
but Palliser wanted more. Most rear
amateurs are well aware that Lath
two rooks on the seventh row ‘eps
are powerful, and that a single ai ate
rook can checkmate a back rank vegee
king, but the ability of rooks to “stats
combine in a mid-board vejece.
operation is less widely known, ateve®
Palliser used this rook function Jehet
to play an accurate sequence Pah
which forced White to resign in ety
just two turns. What happened? LEONARD BARDEN - “ote
~ @ 6
ae * : « ate
op
Chess solution 8303: L..Rc3 (threat Rg2 mate) 2 3.08
Kxg5 Rc4! and White resigned in the face of the s ee
double threat RS mate and Rg2 mate. maha
Mensa quiz: Duel, due, cue, clue and glue. oF gy
One possible word ladder solution is: HORN, com, ty ‘
core, coke, poke, pike, PIPE 1?
’ oe
ee
es
tee
+ os :
a : ve
wo

eR
Naty) — |
| ;

Cb we nt zeY

*

“es 4

* 4
o>;

see

*

D4 @ e's




|

.
_———$$————t

oer yore ey

SECTION

: {

business@tribunemedia.net

Manage
mulled at

@ By NEN HARTNELL,
Tribune Business Editor
PT eee



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007

ment
insurance firm

SEP 9 ae

buyout plan

|
Bahamian leading proposed deal
= for British American Insurance





The Bohamiss






uw the buyout Pan gues iinderstond to be Britsh AMES 2 and heabh
ahwad, The Prfsor understands — ican Holding, fe controlled ky inauranes unset h AT
Y URat these will be no Inrpact ov Moauritige: ased Dawood incressingy CuuBpotiee NEES
i
‘ B HOW The Tribune first revealed the deal

uyout

m By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BRITISH American Insur-
ance Company yesterday said
it planned to launch a mutual
fund, and will today open a
branch office in Abaco, fol-
lowing completion of the
“eight-figure” management

| ‘Eight figure’
| insurance
closed

British American to
open Abaco office,

in wake of deal led
by Chester Cooper
and management

buy-out of the company by a “100 per cent” Bahamian

group.

|
launch mutual fund

Chester Cooper, British American’s president and chief |
executive who led the BAB Holdings buyout of the compa-
ny from its parent, British American International Corpo-

| ration, said the new owners would look to “reenergise the

innovate, and with which we will grow”.

The Tribune first exclusively revealed the British Ameri-
can Insurance Company buyout last September, and Mr
Cooper said the ultimate goal he and his partners held was
“to be the best in the market

». All necessary regulatory

brand” and create “a vibrant platform with which we will

| approvals from the Registrar of Insurance and the Gevern-

ment have been received, and the deal was completed on

Monday. February 5. »

4
;

Among those said by sources to have once been interest-
ed in joining Mr Cooper in the
buyout was Franklyn Wilson
and the general insurer he

ee

SEE page 13B

Atlantis water park
.to open in 8 days

i By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL ;
Tribune Business
Reporter : :

ATLANTIS will open
Aquayenturé, its new 63-acre
water park, in eight days,
marking the unveiling of the
first part of the $1 billion Phase
III development.

Speaking to the South East

Nassau Rotaty Club yesterday,
George Markantonis, Kerzn-
er International (Bahamas)
president, said the opening of
the unique water park will take
place on February 16, 2007.
_ *Aguaventure will include
63 acres of water scape, a one-
mile river, caves and grottos,
swimming pools and beaches
and, in the middle, is the pow-
er tower with four slides,” he
added.

‘Mr Markantonis said that
unlike in the past, where
Kerzner-was,only able to offer
water access to hotel guests,
the resort will be able to offer
an access policy to Bahamians,
so they have access to Aqua-
venture and Dolphin Cay (the.
dolphin encaunter facility) at a
discounted rate.

He said cruise passenger
access will be limited to 100
per day, and the rest of the
access will)be reserved for
resort guests. The Aquaven-
ture park can accommodate
* about 3,000 persons.

“A week later, we will open
our.famous Dolphin Cay,” Mr
Markantonis said. “This fea-
ture will include 11 acres and
three lagoons, and is now the
home of the {dolphins rescued
from Hurridane Katrina. As
part of that Dolphin Cay, there
will be the first marine mam-
mal rescue ahd rehabilitation
centre in the/Bahamas.”
“Mr Markantonis | said
Atlantis whs working to
accommodate an anticipated
10,000 Bahamian school stu-
dents on class tours of both
facilities anqually, providing ,




*
i
|

} |
|

educational and fun experi-
ence, as well as exposure to
possible careers in marine biol-

ogy: .

He also highlighted a num-
ber of other projects that will
be completed shortly,

* On March 28, the new
Mandera Spa will be opened
with 30,000 square feet over
two storeys. This will include
specialised spa services for
young children and teens, a
‘time for men ‘programme and
a signature fitness programme
for children, .

** The mainstay of Phase III,
the 600-room all suite tower
Cove at Atlantis, will also open
on March 28, “It is a state of
the art tower. You could put
that up in any city in North
America, and it would proba-
bly blow away most of its
rivals, What we have there is
truly remarkable; the rooms
average from 750 square feet
and up, the facilities in the
rooms are completely new, and
some of them have never been
seen in hotel rooms before. We
are very excited,” Mr Markan-
tonis said.

“Some people have said to
us as a criticism: ‘You know
that Atlantis is just getting to
big, you have to walk too far,
you have to shuttle too far,
there’s traffic everywhere’, and
we're trying to point out that it
is really ‘not too big when you
consider that it is not a hotel
any more.

“It is a destination. Atlantis
is a destination and there are a
lot of dimensions to that desti-
nation, whether it is with the
Royal Towers and The Dig
that we have today, or whether
it’s the new Aquaventure
waterscape that we are open-
ing or the Cove, whatever it
is.”

* Two new nightclubs are

scheduled to be opened. Aqua °

is scheduled to open on April 1

SEE page 14B



‘erzner: Hurricane Hole
aza deal, plans detailed

'

w@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Re



erzner Interna-
tional is in the
process of closing
the purchase of
‘ the Hurricane
Hole Shopping Plaza, planning
to create.a second Marina Vil-
lage and'‘timeshare facility on
the site, it was announced yes-
terday. ||

George Markantonis, presi-
dent of Kerzner International
(Bahamas), told the South East
Rotary Club that “as you prob-
ably well know, we are involved,
but have not closed, with a pur-
chase of a certain shopping mall
that borders our Hurricane Hole
Marina. We’re talking about a
Marina Village Phase II devel-
opment, That is what will go
there”,

He said this is not advanced



_ yet. “But we do have all of that

waiting in the pipeline, because
there is just so many things one
can build in a short period of
time.” 1

The Tribune revealed the
Hurricane Hole deal on Janu-
ary 9, 2007.

Among the owners Kerzner
International is negotiating with
are Emanuel Alexiou, an attor-
ney and principal in A.F, Hold-

~ The Tribune

BUSIN

ee eee eee
Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street









Money Safe.
Money Fast.

at

Company plans timeshare, Marina Village II on site of acquisition yet to close

ings, owner of the Colina group
of companies, and attorney Col-
in Callender, The pair are
involved in other business ven-
tures, such as the Nassau
Guardian, Vag
Mr Markantonis said Kerzne
International anticipates adding
200-300 units of timeshare above
the Marina Village Phase II
development, .
“But this time over the village
- over a real village, with:living,
breathing shops, six food and
beverage outlets, a completely.
redone, renovated Hurricane
Hole Marina that will be able to

take the larger yachts as.well as.

the smaller ones, the 150 and
200 footers,” Mr Markantonis
said,

He added that if gverything
goes according to plan, “ we will
probably go in the ground at
the end of this year, It will be
pretty accerlated, Of course,
right now it takes second place
because we have so much else
we are announcing”,

Another project that is being
placed on the backburner is the
proposed golf course on Athol
Island, Mr.Markantonis told The
Tribune that the project was
designed initially to meet the
demands of occupants in the

495-unit Residences of Atlantis,
and to provide an alternative to
the Ocean Club golf course, —

With the Residences notr
opening until the end of this
year, demand has not increased,
so Kerzner International has
postponed working on the Athol
Island project until later,

Retailers

Several retailers based in the
Hurricane Hole Shopping Plaza
plaza have expressed concerns
to The Tribune over whether
they would fit in with Kerzner
International's plans for the
location, and whether the
Atlantis and One & Only Ocean
Club owner would make ‘it
uneconomic for them to remain
in the plaza by increasing rental
rates, aS

A Kerzner International
acquisition of the Hurricane
Hole Shopping Plaza would
make logical and strategic sense
for the company, though.

Kerzner International
acquired the Hurricane Hole
Marina, the nearby condomini-
ums and 11 acres of surrounding
land for $23 million in June 2005,
giving it control of all the main
waterborne access points to Par-

adise Island.
The marina was purchased
from Driftwood and its financial
backer, Lehman Brothers' pri-
vate equity arm.
Kerzner International is
understood to have long been
interested in the Hurricane Hole
Shopping Plaza, and its acquisi-
tion would enable it to be rede-
veloped to fit in with the com-
pany's plans to redevelop the
marina and surrounding area.
Among the retailers currently
operating in the plaza are the
News Cafe, an Italian restaurant
that shares the News cafe's own-
ership, a Solomon's Mines out-
let, two food stores, another
restaurant and a mix of outlets
catering to tourists. Several have
expressed concerns about
whether they will have to vacate
the plaza. 3
Kerzner International is plan-
ning to redevelop the Hurricane
Hole Marina in partnership with
New York-based Island Global
Yachting once government
approvals are obtained, the lat-
ter's chairman and chief execu-

tive, Andrew Farkas, told The .

Tribune last month. This news-
paper has been told that a June
2007 start date for the marina is
being eyed,

AES denies ‘funding end’ for Bahamian Ocean Cay project

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE project director for the proposed
Bahamas-based liquefied natural gas (LNG)
terminal yesterday denied claims that its
shareholders had “discontinued funding”
due to uncertainty over whether the Gov-
ernment would approve the development,
saying new equity capital had been injected

recently, ,

Aaron Samson, project director for AES

Ocean Express, said the company and its



m@ AARON SAMSON

\
\
\

\\
KK
i

\
FN

Company ‘optimistic we're almost
there’ despite Broward County dispute

two equity partners in the venture were
“optimistic we're almost there” in terms of
regulations and an environmental manage-
ment plan to govern the project being com-
pleted, the “final step” towards signing a
Heads of Agreement, _

SEE page 12B





>




“THE MARKETS
‘STOCKS, MUTUAL FUNDS, 5-68

‘DOW30 —«-'12,666.87 +0.56 AN
“SBP 500 1,450.02 +2.02 4X
‘NASDAQ —>-2,490.50.+19.01 Ab
"10-YR NOTE 474 -03 W

sa W

pe OlL

: Glocks
advance
despite |
oil drop:

. BY TIM PARADIS

Associated Press — at
NEW YORK — Wall Street



ended a fractious session

slightly higher: Wednesday after

falling oil prices hurt energy

~ stocks and overshadowed a
. stronger-than-expected produc-
tivity reading. A Federal
~ Reserve official’s comments on

interest rates also soured the: —

market’s early good mood.

_. Arobust sales forecast from
_ Cisco Systems gave a boost to
: technology stocks, however.

Despite indecision shown by
the Dow Jones industrials,

which were up for much of the

day but ended essentially flat,
stocks rose moderately overall.
Advancing issues outnumbered

- decliners by about 3 to 2 on the
_New: York Stock Exchange,
where consolidated volume .

came to 2.62 billion shares,
compared with 2.63 billion

_. Tuesday.
“y- 'The Dow inched up 0. 56, or

less than 0.01 percent, to

- 12,666.87. The Dow moved past

12,700 for the first time, trading

as high as 12,700.28. The previ-
ous trading record of 12,683.93
was set Friday.

Broader stock indicators °

_ showed more substantive gains.

The Standard & Poor’s 500
index rose 2.02, or 0.14 percent,

“ to 1,450.02, and the tech-focused

Nasdaq composite
‘responding to Cisco’s news,

_ sury note falling to 4.74 percent

index,

rose 19.01, or 0.77 Percent, to
2,490.50.

Bonds rose following the
economic data, with the yield
on the benchmark 10-year Trea-

_ from 4.77 percent late Tuesday.

The dollar was mixed against

- other major currencies, while
o gold prices fell.

“Light, sweet crude settled |

‘down $1.17 at $57.71 per barrel

on the New York Mercantile
Exchange. It had been up briefly
after the Energy Department’s
weekly domestic inventory data

showed a small decrease in
crude stockpiles.

“Crude hasn’t been able to

_ get above $60 for three days so
' the energy names are weak,”

said Neil Massa, equity trader at

John. Hancock Funds, He sug-

g some investors were ;

simply taking profits... ee
Al Goldman, chief market -
strategist with A.G, Edwards & °

Sons, said Wednesday’s trading
reflects “a normal pause” and,

more specifically, a pullback in

the energy companies.

“The price of oil dropped

dramatically and they tend to be
‘major factors over all,” he said

of the energy companies.
_ Still, he remains confident in
the market’s prospects. “We've

“come a long way and we're just

taking a time out.”

_. Cisco rose 81 cents, or 3 per-
cent, to $28.09 after the com-

, pany, which makes networking

equipment, predicted its third-

: quarter revenue would rise 19 to
_ 20 percent.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies, which sur-

. passed 800 for the first time last
- ‘week, set a new closing and

trading high of 816.20 after ris-

ing 5.79, or 0.71 percent. The
previous closing high of 810.03
came Wednesday while the ear-

lier trading high, set Monday,

was 810.49,

_ Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei
stock average closed down 0.66
percent. Britain’s FTSE 100

. Closed up 0.37 percent, Germa-

‘ny’s DAX index was up 0.58
‘percent, and France’s CAC-40

finished up 0.46 percent.



ECONOMY

SS

upon nara ANNAN ANARANAAAARANAMRAQHAARARENSAMAN LARA AY AAR RAIA AAA NAN EAA AN RAN PAN NANA AAR NAAR BSAA NAAN AMAIA ARAN RANA AAR AAA AAPA AA AEROS SLUHOROBOSCOEBEAOSLS OAL RCOMSLEL A GOOICOOEMOLODIICYOLCA

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007

Productivity jumps; aii cost slows

i Workers stepped up their
efficiency in the final three
months of 2006, yet productivity
still turned in the weakest yearly
performance in almost a decade.
The rise in the cost of labor
slowed.

BY SHOBHANA CHANDRA
Bloomberg News

U.S. worker productivity grew at
the fastest rate in almost a year last
quarter and labor costs rose at a
slower pace, suggesting wages may
pose less of an inflation threat.

The 3 percent gain in productivity,
a measure of how much an employee
produces for each hour of work, fol-
lowed a revised 0.1 percent decline in



the third quarter, the Labor Depart-
ment said Wednesday in Washing-
ton. A measure of labor costs
increased 1.7 percent after rising 3.2
percent.

The rebound makes it easier for
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S.
Bernanke, who presents his semi-an-
nual report to Congress next week, to
keep interest rates unchanged even
as economic growth picks up. Phila-
delphia Fed President Charles Plos-
ser said Wednesday that credit may
yet have to be tightened and that it’s
“too soon to declare victory.”

“This report certainly gives the
Fed a sense of relief,” said Mark Vit-
ner, a senior economist at Wachovia
in Charlotte, N.C. “They’ll stay on

BALANCING ACT



hold through all of 2007 and a good
part of 2008.”

For all of 2006, productivity rose
2.1 percent, after 2.3 percent in 2005,
marking the fourth straight year effi-
ciency gains have slowed. Labor
costs increased 3.2 percent last year,

up from 2 percent in 2005 and the

biggest rise since 2000.

A separate report from the Fed
Wednesday showed borrowing by
U.S. households rose in December as
consumers took out more personal
loans. Additional figures from the
Mortgage Bankers Association
showed applications to buy a home
or refinance an existing loan fell in
the week ended Feb. 2.

Some policy makers say produc-

tivity is still strong enough to contain
inflation as wages rise. In the 1990s,
former Fed Chairman Alan Green-
span championed the idea that higher
productivity rates would keep a lid
on inflation even as the U.S. economy
was gaining strength and unemploy-
ment was low.

,Economists had forecast a 2 per-
cent gain in fourth-quarter produc-
tivity, based on the median of 70 fore-
casts in a Bloomberg News survey.
Estimates ranged from 1 percent to
2.8 percent.

“The Fed must be very happy,”
said Nariman Behravesh, chief econ-
omist at Global Insight in Lexington,

*TURN TO ECONOMY







FOUR OUT OF FIVE U.S. WORKERS STILL HOPE TO FIND
THEIR DREAM JOB, AND THEY’RE SEEKING FUN OVER MONEY

t Google, you don’t have
A to leave work to indulge

in roasted black bass
with parsley pesto. The com-

pany runs ll free gourmet caf-
eterias at its Mountain View,

Calif., headquarters. Of course,

when it comes to America’s
Best Company to Work For,
food is just one perk.

You also can work out in
the gym, study a foreign lan-
guage, play volleyball or video
games, even take part ina
company ski trip. You can
come to work in your flannels
on Pajama Day or brainstorm

. With software desingers ina

music filled conference room.
“It’s not just that the place

‘ . is fun,” says ©
Google
spokeswoman
Sunny Gettin-
ger. “It’s that
the work is
fun.”

And that
explains why
Google, the
company try-
ing to improve your Internet
search experience, gets 3,000
résumés a day.

Sure, most Americans want
to make as much money as



CINDY Oy REECE
GOODMAN

cgoodman@
MiamiHerald.com

possible. But work environ-
ment has become increasingly
important, too. Four of five
U.S. workers still hope to find
their dream job, a new survey
by Harris Interactive con-
ducted for CareerBuilder.com
shows. If we landed our dream
job, most of us would choose
having more fun over making
more money, the survey

*TURN TO BALANCING ACT

7 MIAMIHERALD.COM: CLICK ON

m BLOGS FOR CINDY KRISCHER
GOODMAN’S BLOG: THE
WORK/LIFE BALANCING ACT

AIRCRAFT INDUSTRY

Airbus flight

Shows off
troubled —
superjumbo

@ Airbus took 200 journalists for a
flight in the new superjumbo
A380, allowing them to wander
between the two decks of the
aircraft certified to fly as many as
873 people.

BY LAURENCE FROST
Associated Press
ABOARD AN AIRBUS A380 — So
this is what all the trouble was about.
Airbus’ A380 — the world’s largest

1. ~~ serfospassenger plane.--.has had a two-year

production delay. But a trip on the first
flight open to the media demonstrated
why all but one customer, a cargo car-

rier, think the superjumbo is worth the

wait.

The interior is roomy, and economy
seats leave ample
elbow room in the
540-seat demon-
stration cabin fitted
by Airbus.

Airlines Qantas,
Emirates and Sin-
gapore Airlines
plan to go further,
fitting the plane
with fewer than
500 seats to give each passenger more
space. Other airlines are expected to
follow their lead, Airbus Chief Operat-
ing Officer John Leahy said.

“It’s a game-changing airplane,” the
European aircraft maker’s top sales-
man said, shortly before boarding the
flight with about 200 reporters at Air-
bus’ headquarters in Toulouse, south-
ern France. “The only minor problem

LEAHY

*TURN TO AIRBUS

TECHNOLOGY.

Amazon,

TiVo link
video files

to TV sets

In anew partnership, TiVo and
Amazon.com will beam movies
and TV shows directly to their
customers’ living rooms.

BY CURT WOODWARD
Associated Press

SEATTLE — Amazon.com and
TiVo have. jumped into the digital
download wars — with a twist. “We're
providing people with the simplest
way to actually play back their digital
content on a television set,” said said
Bill Carr, Amazon.com’s vice president
of digital media.

The new partners said a test version
of their new service, called Amazon
Unbox on TiVo, has begun with an
with an unspecified number of TiVo
customers.

The full service is expected to debut
later this year, available for the 1.5 mil-

lion TiVo digital video recorders with

broadband Internet capability. Offi-

*TURN TO TECHNOLOGY.




PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007



THE TRIBUNE



3 FOS 7 |
o ° , -
A Fo
k é ‘ ry ve
Ww LO VE
+, 8S
j 1 aa
4 . : ' : . : ‘ i me
nder general banking account becomes the property | from the authorised Attorney deceased account holder was t A
law, the property of the surviving joint account | (under the aforementioned domiciled at death. It mustindi- =.”
(monies) in a holder inthe event of the death | Power of Attorney) inthe cate the entitlement of the 1%
deceased account holder's bank of the other, by virtue of the | Bahamas, claimant under that country’s...
account passes to his legal rep- Surviving account holder’s right : (b) An independent, written laws of succession, This is to **
resentatives, by operation of of enn ; ; verification of the identification establish the claimant’s legal 4,1,
law, on the death of a client. Therefore, the property inthe | of the Executor or Administra-. entitlement to the credit bal-
The property is then distributed deceased account holder’s | tor from a Notary Public or ance of the deceased account -/i/
to the appropriate or named account, subject to the terms — | lawyer in his country of domi- holder. Oat
beneficiary, in accordance with and conditions of the bank’s | cile, g0)
the provisions of the deceased mandate or contract with the | (c) Letter from the Executor 3, Affidavit/Declaration by
account holder’s will or the _ client, cannot be disposed in any | By Tyrone Fitzgerald stating that he has been advised the claimant, duly certified by a
rules of intestacy, depending way that the bank chooses. This | : g| by Bahamian legal counsel Notary Public in the Bahamas
upon whether the deceased _ is because the legal ownership | and/or the authorised attorney or lawyer in his country of
account holder died having a the elie in the account Is a the estate of the deceased, domicile (as prescribed by Sec-
made a valid, inter vivos will, that of the personal represen- a ‘ stigma Gh ; ad j , that all the relevant probate — tion 8 of the Oaths Act), that
or died intestate (without a_tative(s) of the deceased a dla lea hel al ‘ am a Ae rules and procedures have been __ the deceased person has no real
will). account holder, + probate of the will, or letters of — the personal representatives of followed and completed, estate in the Bahamas, and his,
However, if the account isa _ Notwithstanding the forego- 4 qministration for the estate of the deceased account holder. regarding the Resealing of the — total personal estate does not +’
joint account, the balance inthe — Ing legal principle, the personal the deceased account holder, as This is notwithstanding the fact Grant of ; Probate in the exceed the amount standing to
required by Section 49 (1) and that the will of the deceased eas oe a tines his credit at the bank.
toe f the Supreme Court Act aoe ist Beebe pee been complied with, as prelim- 4, Actual or certified copies of a
Although it is the duty of the country of domicile, and a RNY ab in requesting the Notices evidencing the fact that
personal representative to give | Grant of Probate issued in his release of the property/monies at least three aby oe re eee
notice of the deceased account country of domicile, in the deceased account hold- — given by the claimant, throug
holder's death as soon as possi: ‘The foreign will or letter of | °™* ALONE: mee auleue Pe Bs ae
ble, the bank, being organised — administration must be probat- a
i VA : ain thie tiriedictt The Executor should also Bahamas, requesting that all.
and operated under the laws of — ed again in this Leal and make a formal request for the. persons/creditors having any!














At any one moment

POS gn Oe EN Coe axcqmeg aly arta Fe Vin ext Garvercer hasten BA) are aero nes Rees aude
eae aps whe Sassi spp MOP Sacrdeal Come dane AD yes mmaneed Seps Regeey ae Gada von art Panes

from $649
-. Carnival.
eens

ea tee

the Bahamas, may act only
upon a Grant of Probate or Let-
ter of Administration in this
jurisdiction,

Under common law, a bank
who pays the monies remain-
ing in a deceased account hold-
er’s account to a person who
has not obtained one of the

estate, acts in some way as if
he/it was an executor or admin-
istrator), The bank will also be
liable to pay such penalties and
duties as would have been
payable on grant of probate or
administration,

The probate requirements in
the Bahamas must be fulfilled
before property in a deceased
account holder’s bank account,

Bon Savings & Investments

To help with: + Retirement
+ College
+ Savings.
+ Investments

We offer Flexible Annuities
starting with an inital contribution of
$500 minimum and contributions
as low as $100 per month,
Single Annuities with a

Probate issued

a new Grant o
to the personal representative

of the deceased account holder
for the property in his account
situated in or related to the
Bahamas, The Grant of Probate
or Administration, whatever the
case may be, must be resealed
in the Bahamas,

Under the Probate Rules of

Return
(c) Return
(d) Administration Bond (for

resealing Letters of Adminis-'

tration)

(e) Power of Attorney (to be
issued to the person acting on
behalf of the personal repre-
sentative of the deceased
account holder, in submitting
the documents to the Probate
Regisyy of the Bahamas)

(f) Affidavit of Domicile and
Assets

(g) Affidavit of the validity
of the Will

(h) Three certified copies of
the Will

(i) Three certified copies of
the Grant of Probate or Letters
of Administration

The foregoing documents are
submitted to the Probate Reg-
istry of the Supreme Court of
the Bahamas, and the process
may take from three months
to a year, depending upon the
proper completion and submis-
sion of the documents, the
nature of the assets, and the
complete fulfillment of the pro-
bate requirements,

1. Upon receipt of the Grant

of Resealing of Probate in the
Bahamas, the bank should
require the following informa-
tion before release of the prop-
erty in a deceased account hold-
er’s account; ° :

(a) Certified copy of the
Grant of Resealing of Probate

release or distribution of the
property/monies in
deceased account holder’s
account, indicating the specific
reasons for the release or dis-
tribution, He should also pro-
vide the bank with his specimen
signature, duly certified by a
Notary Public or lawyer in his

of deceased account holders, as
it provides an easier, more effi-

cient alternative to the formal

requirements of the Act, under
certain specified conditions.

Section 50 (1) of the Act gives
the manager or assistant man-
ager of a bank the discretion to
pay “any sum standing to the
credit of a deceased person to
any person who, upon produc-
ing satisfactory proof of death
of such deceased person, and
upon producing such evidence
as may be required by the man-
ager or assistant manager to be
entitled by law to the said sum
standing to the credit of the
deceased person”, without the
production of probate or letters
of administration,

To satisfy the requirements
of Section 50 of the Act, the
claimant of the credit balance
of the deceased account holder
must produce the following doc-
uments/information, before
payment of the funds is made to
them:

1. Certified copy of the death
certificate of the deceased
account holder, duly notarised
or apostilled (as a ae to
deceased account holders domi-
ciled outside of the Bahamas
requiring such legalisation).

2. Certified copy of the will
of the deceased account holder
and/or a certified copy of an
Affidavit of Law from an attor-
ney in the country where the

the

claims to the estate of the
deceased account holder to
notify the bank in writing of
such claims. :

The bank must then ensure
that no other claims to the
estate of the deceased person
have been received by the bank.

Section 50 of the Act should be
used in a discretionary manner
by the manager or assistant
manager of the bank. This is in
addition to, and in compliance
with, its internal verification and
due diligence policies and pro-
cedures regarding such
accounts, : nek
‘Where the stat
dure proves to he more open

rev

to. scrutiny or, arguably. less *

stringent in its application than
the standards of the -Fank’s
internal policies, procedures and
overali mandate, it may be
advisable that the bank exer-

utory. proce-_,

have foregoing grants of representa- -

we a tion becomes, by operation of _ the Act, in order to reseal the country of domicile, or alterna- ‘The bank must then a

million ways to enjoy the Caribbean. inwiian executor de son tort foreign grant in the Bahamas,,.< 06» copies of the first four or the statutory declaration, along
(one who, being either an the following documents are relevant pages of his passport, _ with the evidence of advertise-

DAY 8 DAY executor or administrator, who required; Section 50 (1) (a)-(d) of the ment for creditors of the

Carnival Spirit Carnival Liberty has obtained a Grant of Pro- (a) Petition for Resealing the ~ sleet Leann : the oO eure oe oe
Leaves April 8.07 Leaves April 14,07 bate or Administration in the Grant 7 sa 7 ‘lit b I 3 Ts te FE it a , id b esi 7 a
Mexican Riviera | Bxotic Westorn Caribbean deceased account holder’s —_(b) Bond for Making, a etree 2 anes oe DOIG DE BPN eet eta

| onshore and offshore accounts statutory procedure outlined in





cise its discretion in following .

the standard probate procedure
in Section 49 of the Act, as a
precautionary measure.

Copyright: Tyrone Fitzgerald
NB; The information ¢on-

~ tained in this article does not

constitute, nor is it a substitute
for legal advice, Persons reading
this article and/or column, gen-
erally, are encouraged to seek
the relevant legal advice and
assistance regarding issues that
may affect them and may relate
to the information presented.

Tyrone L. E, Fitzgerald is a’

practising attorney in the Cham-
bers of Fitzgerald & Fitzgerald,
Should you haye any comments
regarding this article, you may
contact Mr Fitzgerald at Suite
212, Lagoon Court Building,
Olde Towne Mall at Sandyport,
West Bay St.. RP, oO, Box CB-
11173, Nassau, Bahamas

yew. svitzerwiismuller.com

At SvitzerWijsmuller, results and values go hand in hand. With 2,600 employees and a fleet of more than 300 vessels, we provide
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THE POSITION \

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° Maintenanse and safe operation of the tug
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° Risk management - the ability to identify, assess,
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Preparation of tug daily activity sheets
Alltug stores/parts requisition
Other ad has tasks
Mesting the high SvitzerWijsmuller Health, Safety,
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S/he must have no less than 5 years seamanship expert
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4B_| THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 2007 __

AUTOMOBILES

New CEO revives car that once saved Ford

BY TOM KRISHER
Associated Press

CHICAGO — On his first
day at work as chief executive
of Ford, Alan Mulally had a
question that no one could
answer: Why get rid of the
Taurus? :

Long before he was hired
last September, the struggling
company had decided to stop
making what once was the
most popular car in the U.S., a

decision that had him per-.

plexed.
“How can it go away?” he
. remembered asking. “It’s the
best-selling car in America.”

On Wednesday, at Mulal-
ly’s insistence, the company
announced that it was reviving
the Taurus name.

The Dearborn, Mich.-based
automaker made the official
announcement at the Chicago
Auto Show that it would place
the storied moniker on the
2008 version of the Five Hun-
dred.

ECONOMY

In addition, an upgraded
version of the Freestyle cross-
over vehicle will be re-badged
as the Taurus X, and the Mer-
cury Montego, the Five Hun-
dred’s cousin, will be renamed
the Sable in
the coming
model year.

The Sable
was the Tau-
rus’ nearly

identical
cousin, with
2 million sold
under the
Mercury
name.
Mulally, in an interview
with The Associated Press,
said the Taurus’ demise was
one of the biggest disappoint-
ments he discovered as he
started work.
He still hasn’t found out
why the company gave up on





MULALLY

the name of a car purchased

by 7 million buyers during its
21-year history. All he knows

is the decision was wrong and
needed to be fixed.’

“The Taurus, of course, has
been an icon for Ford and its
customers,” Mulally told the
AP. “The customers want it
back. They didn’t want it to go
away. They wanted us to keep
improving it.”

The Five Hundred, which
Mulally used for a time as his
personal car, should have been
named the Taurus all along
rather than starting with a new
name, he said.

“Think of how much time
and attention and money it
takes to establish a brand,”
Mulally said. “It's going to take
unlimited effort and time to
try to build up the brand that
we have with the Taurus.”

The Five Hundred, built on
a Volvo frame and considered
a capable but dull car by
industry analysts, never took
hold in the marketplace. It
sold moderately well in 2005,
its first full year on the market,

MARK ELIAS/BLOOMBERG NEWS FILE

TWISTING DOWN: Jerry Francisco rebuilds a hydraulic cylinder at Kelly Tractor in West
Palm Beach, Fla., last year. For 2006, productivity rose 2.1 percent, after a 2.3 percent
rise in 2005, marking the fourth straight year efficiency gains have slowed.

Productivity

rebounds in

4Q but still slows for year

*ECONOMY

Mass. “Employment growth
was strong and productivity
was strong, and on top of that
we had a fairly modest
increase in labor costs.”

PRICE OF LABOR

Unit labor costs, which are
adjusted for efficiency gains,
were projected to rise at a 2.1
percent pace last quarter after
a 2.3 percent increase initially
reported.

Smaller gains in productiv-
ity last year accompanied
weaker growth in the econ-
omy during the second and
third quarters. At the same
time, unemployment close to
a, five-year low pushed up
wage growth.

Slower productivity
growth and accelerating labor
costs are among reasons Fed
policy makers will maintain
their view that inflation is a
risk to the economy.

Plosser, who doesn’t vote
on policy this year, said the
Fed may need to raise its rates

TECHNOLOGY

as recent stronger economic
growth increases the risk that
inflation won’t moderate.

“With growth prospects of
the economy improving, there
is some risk that we may not
see a return to price stability
unless monetary conditions
are further tightened,” Plos-
ser said in a speech Wednes-
day to the Greater Philadel-
phia Chamber of Commerce.

The productivity and cost
figures are the first for the
quarter and will be revised
with the Labor Department’s
March 6 release.

Hours worked rose at a 1.2
percent pace last quarter after
a 2 percent increase in the
previous three months. Out-
put increased at a 4.2 percent
rate after 1.9 percent.

Productivity rose last quar-
ter because the gain in hours
worked was smaller than the
increase in output.

COMPENSATION

Compensation for each
hour worked rose at an annual
rate of 4.8 percent in the

fourth quarter, compared
with a 3.1 percent rate in the
prior three months.

Among manufacturers,
productivity rose at a 2.2 per-
cent pace, after surging at a
6.3 percent rate the prior
quarter.

Productivity at non-finan-
cial corporations, a measure
watched by the Fed, increased
at a 5.7 percent rate in the
third quarter after falling 4.3
percent in the previous three
months. :

Recent government data
signal pay gains are cooling.
Wages rose 0.2 percent in Jan-
uary after a 0.4 percent gain
the previous month, the Labor
Department’s employment
report on Feb. 2 showed.

Productivity growth aver-
aged 2.1 percent a quarter dur-
ing the 10-year expansion that
ended in March 2001. Before
today’s figures, the average
increased to an annual rate of
2.9 percent since the first
three months of 2002, the first
full quarter that followed the
end of the last recession.

TiVo, Amazon link videos to TV

* TECHNOLOGY

cials refused to give a target
date for the service’s launch.

Thousands of movies from
several major studios and TV
shows from CBS and Fox will
be available, said Carr. Both
companies expect agreements
with more studios and net-
works in the future.

“We think this is a break-
through,” Carr said.

Unbox on TiVo joins a rash
of new digital download ser-
vices from retailers and enter-
tainment companies, and
builds on the Unbox service
that Amazon.com launched
last year.

Wal-Mart entered the mar-
ket Tuesday, when it unveiled
an online movie download
store. Other competitors
include Movielink, owned by
five studios, and CinemaNow.

Most online download ser-

essentially trapped on the
customer’s computer. TiVo
and Amazon.com’s major
advantage is their ability to
deliver movies and TV shows
directly to the TiVo. box,
observers said.

“Frankly, nobody else has
the solution that allows you
get something over an Inter-

. het connection and watch it

with the click of the button,”
said James McQuivey, princi-
pal analyst at Forrester
Research.

Apple TV, the new set-top,
video-streaming box coming
this month from Apple,
should be a top rival. Like
Unbox on TiVo, Apple T'V is
designed to move digital con-
tent from a user’s computer to
their TV set.

But Unbox on TiVo may
have an advantage in the cus-
tomers who already have
broadband-ready TiVo hard-

new Apple TV box will cost
around $300, the only addi-
tional cost for a TiVo user
will be the price of a movie or
TV show over the existing
Unbox download service.

TV episodes will sell for
$1.99, with most movies
priced between $9.99 and
$14.99, the companies said.
Movie rentals will start at
$1.99. No extra hardware pur-
chases are required, and there
will be no additional subscrip-
tion fees, the companies said.

TiVo and Amazon.com are
betting that their ability to
integrate downloads with the
existing choices on a TiVo
video recorder will give them
a distinct advantage in grab-
bing a share of the market. |

“J suspect we will see a
parade of similar kinds of
devices over the next several
years,” said Larry Gerbrandt,
general manager of Nielsen







but sales nose-dived last year
from almost 108,000 to about
84,000. '

It will get a new, more pow-
erful engine, standard elec-
tronic stability control and
some cosmetic updates for the
2008 model year, when the

BALANCING ACT

‘ \ CHARLES REX ARBOGAST/AP
NEW COUSIN: Francisco N. Codina, group vice president
for Ford North American marketing and sales, unveils
the Ford Taurus X crossover vehicle on Wednesday.

name change will take place.
The new version will be in
showrooms this summer, com-
pany officials have said.

The Taurus name is one of
the top three most recognized
Ford nameplates, behind only
the F-Series pickup trucks and

MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

the Mustang, said Cisco Cod-

ina, Ford’s vice president of

North American marketing.
The Taurus was among the

company’s most recognizable :

brands in the 1980s and 1990s,
but by the end of its lifetime it

was almost exclusively sold to -

rental companies and other
fleet buyers.

Last year, Ford lost $12.7
billion, and it was forced to
mortgage its factories to set up

. acredit line of more than $20

billion as it undergoes a radi-
cal restructuring plan.

The Taurus, redesigned in
1996, became a symbol of the
company’s current ills. It was
left almost unchanged for 10

years with little advertising’

support as the company
focused on high-profit trucks
and sport utility vehicles.

- Ford, left with few desir-
able cars, was caught flat-
footed this year when con-
sumer tastes shifted away
from trucks.

Most want fun over money

*BALANCING ACT

shows.

“Let’s face it, work is never
going to be the same as having
fun on a Saturday night,” says
Richard Castellini, vice presi-
dent of consumer marketing
for CareerBuilder.com. “But if
at the end of the day you feel
challenged and enjoy your
work environment, that’s
what people are looking for.”

‘RUN WITH IT’

One 20-something gave me
an insightful look at Ameri-
ca’s emphasis on work envi-
ronment, Nick Mora, 24,
joined Kimley-Horn’s Port St.
Lucie, Fla., office in 2005. He
says he likes the people he
works with and the way his
project managers give him
opportunities “to run with it.”

Indeed, the people-ori-
ented culture and benefits
have landed Kimley-Horn &
Associates on Fortune maga-
zine’s list of Best Places to
Work for the past three years.
Although Mora typically
works 46 to 48 hours a week,
he says: “If you like your job
and are having fun, you don’t
mind the hours.”

Even though many jobs at
Disney pay just above mini-
mum wage, applications pour
in. “When we ask people...
what brought them here, hav-
ing a fun job is at the top of
their list,” says Tracy Mon-
toya, vice president of recruit-

AIRCRAFT INDUSTRY

‘ment for Disney Parks and

Resorts.

In industries that compete
for workers, the fun factor has
become more critical. Castel-
lini says CareerBuilder holds
contests and happy hours. It
even relocated its offices from
suburban Chicago. “We're in
a competitive, sales-driven
organization, and young peo-
ple find it more fun to be
downtown,”’ Castellini
explains.

In accounting, a profession
battling a talent shortage, cre-
ating a fun work environment
factors into recruiting and
retaining young! staffers,
explains Denise Diaz, a part-
ner with Ocariz, Gitlin &
Zomerfeld in Coral Gables,
Fla.

ACTIVITIES MATTER

Diaz says recruits assume
salary is competitive and
want to know what “fun activ-
ities” her firm offers. “They
are very interested to see if
we have picnics, parties,
happy hours.” Diaz says her
firm now offers massages dur-
ing tax season and a party
afterward, happy hours
throughout the year and spon-
taneous raffles for event tick-
ets and gift certificates.

Some law firms have gone
even further to create a fes-
tive environment. At Perkins
Coie and Bingham
McCutchen in Seattle, each
office has it own “happiness

committee” that surprises
attorneys and staff with small
gifts and spontaneous cele-
brations. Initially,
sounded silly to some the law-
yers at Perkins Coie. Not any-
more, says Darrin Emerick,
Perkins Coie’s chief person-
nel officer. °
Perkin Coie has landed on
Fortune’s list of Best Places to
Work for the past five years
and also offers perks such as

paid sabbaticals and flexible

work schedules.

COMPETITIVE EDGE

“Our lawyers realize they
can go down the street and
make more money, but they
won’t have the same benefits
or firm culture,” Emerick
says.

At Holland & Knight, a
large Florida law firm, recruit-
ing partner Adolfo Jimenez
thinks happiness committees
are a waste. Instead, he says
his firm should concentrate
on creating a better wurk
environment through mentor-
ing and training programs.

“Regardless of what gener-
ation, people want a satisfying
professional experience,”
Jimenez says.

Maintaining a people-ori-
ented culture or happy work-
place gets more challenging
when a company retrenches.
Experts says that might be the
time to give employees more
say in training programs or
new strategies.

Airbus shows off troubled A380

* AIRBUS

is that we couldn’t build it on
time.”

Announcing the latest pro-
duction setback, Airbus par-
ent European Aeronautic
Defence and Space Co. said
last year that the accumulated
two-year delay would wipe
$6.2 billion off profit by 2010.
Last m