Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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University of Florida
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Full Text
PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Belo VTS

Norman Solomon steps down
as co-chairman of commission

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

CO-CHAIRMANSHIP of
the Nassau Economic Develop-
ment Commission was trans-
ferred from Norman Solomon
to Charles Klonaris yesterday at
a Cabinet office meeting led by
Prime Minister Christie.

The handover will see Mr
Klonaris - former chairman of
the Nassau Tourism Develop-
ment Board (NTDB) = taking
his place alongside co-chair
Charles Carter in steering the
ptogress of the Bay Street Rede-
velopment plan.

Mr Klonaris said that former
co-chairman Mr Solomon, with
the “blueprint” he had already
laid down, made it “easy for me to
run the last mile" with the plans.

Speaking to The Tribune
afterwards about what this "last
mile". would involve, Mr
Klonaris said it is especially cru-
cial that the new port is created
in the southwest of the island,
and the shipping businesses relo-
cated there. ;

“There are three major ele-
ments for the reformation of the

city," he explained. "One, the

- removal of the container termi-
nals, two, a very comprehensive
parking and transportation sys-
tem, and third is... the tools to
manage the city."

Mr Klonaris said the business
plan for the port should be com-
pleted by June.

He added it is possible con-
struction may then begin on the



new port — set to be located in -

the area between the BEC pow-
er plant and the Commonwealth
Brewery = the following summer.
Speaking of another key ele-
ment of the renovation effort,
Mr Klonaris said there is "still a
long way to go" before the leg-

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Bay workers claim

Bimini

islation enabling a Business
Improvement District (BID)
would go before parliament.

‘It is this legislation that will

provide the tools for managing

the city, Mr Klonaris explained.

A BID.= described as “a

lace-management, place-mar-

eting, and place development
organisation" — has been char-
acterised as the most important
economic Sen tool to
have emerged in the last quarter
century.

Over 1,500 cities across the
world now have a BID, which
has facilitated cleaner, safer
streets, improved appearance
and renewed economic activity



in these areas.

Mr Klonaris said he hoped
that by the summer of this year,
legislation will be ready to go
before parliament for approval,
but before that several more
meetings with legal advisers, and
a consultant from the United
States experienced in the for-
mation of BID legal frameworks
would be necessary.

The new co-chairman was
commended by the Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie for agreeing
to be a part of the private and
public sector partnership.

Mr Christie agreed that Mr
Klonaris and Mr Carter are
charged with the responsibility

(Photo: Timothy Clarke)

of executing a "radical re-engi-
neering" of the city.

This will see — once all con-
tainer shipping has been
moved from the downtown
waterfront area in the first
stage of the project - new

~ stores, condominiums, and a

shore front boardwalk in its
place, among many other
things, he said.

“We are talking about
redefining, representing, re-

‘engineering the city of Nassau,

we're talking about giving busi-
nesses the ability to have
tremendous hopes as they look
to the future," said Mr Christie.

The government, in con-

junction with the private sec-
tor, had to do something "dra-
matic" to ensure that Nassau
survived from a “business point
of view,” he continued.

An emotional Mr Solomon —
who was commended and
memorialised by Mr Carter,
Mr Christie, and Mr Klonaris
for not only his service at the

helm of the NTDB and.

NEDC, but to the Bahamas as
a whole — said he had "always
tried to think in terms of the
next generation" rather than
"the next election."

Visibly weakened by his ill-
nesses ~ Parkinson's disease and
lung cancer — Mr Solomon said
that he still intends to make
contributions to the board
"here and there," if allowed. -

"I feel I still have some
mileage left in me, I will use
that mileage and the time I
have left working for the
Bahamas," he said.

The appointment of Mr
Klonaris comes on the heels of
concerns expressed by, among
others, director general of
Tourism Vernice Walkine, that
a timely redevelopment will be
necessary to prevent a decline
in tourists visiting Nassau.

Addressing the Rotary Club
of East Nassau last month, Mrs
Walkine described downtown
Nassau as "particularly embar-
rassing".

Some Bay Street merchants —

have complained that the ren-
ovation is taking too long,
blaming the container port for
drops in sales, or in some cases,
the closure of stores.

The constant and noisy flow
of trucks up and down the
streets have left storefronts
sooty and tourists unimpressed
and disinclined to spend their
money, these merchants said.

Veeseceeancccesaonane beeaesesseans saeeeeasneeccacaes Ceaedeaseaeaseacaaeas daeceesecaceas

managers

denying employee severance package



Ca

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ANNUAL NATIONAL?
_EVANGELISTIC CRUSADE

Sunday, February 11th to Friday, February 16th, 2007

At 7:30 p.m. Nightly at

The Coral Road Tabernacle, Freeport, Grand Bahama
Under the Theme: “Jesus Will Do It For You”

_ Dynamic Speakers are:
Bishop Cleophas L. Capron, Jr. District Overseer
Bishop Arthur Knowles, District Overseer (C.O.G.)
Bishop George E. Thompson, Bishop Oliver Kennedy
Bishop Rosevelt R. Rolle & Bishop Fred Newchurch

Hear our anointed Soloists: Glenda Stubbs, Hattie Williams,
Ruth Colebrooke, Charo Charles and Others, Be blessed by our
Crusade Praise Team, our Grand Bahama District Choir and by the
Church of God District Choir,

Crusade Coordinators are:
Ministers Barry B.Morris

and Cheryl M. Forbes

‘

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feome and be blessed, inspired, challenged and changed!

FERRER PneN






â„¢ By BRENT DEAN

CLAIMS have emerged of
labour problems between the
Bimini Bay development and
some of its employees.

A source alleged that man-
agement is attempting to deny a
dismissed employee his sever-
ance package.

This situation, the source also
claimed, is indicative of a
“heavy handed” style of man-
agement that has some employ-
ees outraged.

Labour representative on the
island, Tasha Bullard-Rolle, did
not want to specifically com-
ment on the particulars of the
dispute, as it is currently in
process of conciliation.

However, she did acknowl-

‘edge that there is a matter

pending involving Bimini Bay.

The matter is in its initial
stages and, Ms Bullard-Rolle
expects that it should be
resolved through mediation
efforts.

Ms Bullard-Rolle further stat-
ed that currently, there are sev-
eral other labour disputes pend-
ing on the island involving -var-
ious companies,

Ua RAO
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
oe Pest Control

Pa ee aE as
822-2187



Once grievances are for-
mally presented to the
labour office, there are two
conciliation meetings that
take place. If no resolution
occurs, the matter is then
referred to the Industrial
Tribunal for resolution,
according to Ms Bullard-
Rolle.

Since the labour office
opened in late 2005, she
claims that no labour dis-
putes in Bimini have been
escalated to the Industrial
Tribunal beyond the concili-
ation meetings.

Representatives at Bimi-
ni Bay’s Florida office were
unreachable for comments
on the matter.

Ms Bullard-Rolle noted
that disputes are not the only
labour concern on the island.

She claimed that there is
difficulty finding qualified
labour for certain positions
that have been recently
advertised.

“A lot of persons may cry
‘or sound the alarm that
they’re making minimum
wage, but they-are not mar-
ketable. They are not quali-
fied for the positions they
would like to hold,” she said.

Ms Bullard-Rolle suggest-
ed that efforts will have to
be made to assist individu-
als on the island to better
prepare them for the oppor-
tunities that have arisen due
to increased investments.

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atnnaeransensanseesncnnsracasnsnnanennnnannsnanancennsrsennnnacacaccsccscennassnaneseansetscnscseresessscescees:



: @ ELLISON Greenslade



© In brief

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Senior officer
appointed to
international
committee

oe ae
oe”

P mn Le



ASSISTANT Commissioner
Ellison Greenslade has been
appointed a member of the
communications and technolo-
gy committee of the prestigious
International Association of
Chiefs of Police,

In making the appointment,
IACP president Chief Joseph
Carter of Boston, USA, stated:
“One of the most important
duties of the president of the
International Association of
Chiefs of Police, is to appoint

qualified members to serve on

the various committees whose
work is so important to the suc-
cess of the association.”
_Assistant Commissioner
Greenslade has been a member
of IACP since 1989. His current
appointment is for a term that
extends through the IACP
annual conference in 2009.

Assistant Commissioner
Greenslade pioneered the
development of information
technology in the Royal
Bahamas Police Force and has
to his credit, the design and
introduction of the credit card
size Bahamian driver’s licence
and a number of other techno-
logical initiatives.

Assistant Commissioner
Greenslade currently serves as
the officer in charge of Grand
Bahama and the Northern
Bahamas, a post which he has
held for the past six and a half

- years,

He is a graduate of the Col-
lege of the Bahamas and is the
holder of a Masters Degree in
Business Administration
(MBA) from the University of
Miami.

He is also a doctoral candi-
date with the University of
Phoenix, Arizona.

Alternative
music night
begins in
nightclub







i SIMON Says

A NEW night of alternative
music has started at the Bambii
nightclub in downtown Nassau.

The night, hosted by DJ
Simon Says, is held tonight and
every Wednesday from 9pm to
lipm.

Simon is a DJ, originally from
London, who specialises in
niche forms of music such as
nu-jazz, electronica, deep house,
drum and bass, old school hip-
hop, soul, funk, afrobeat, ‘and
Brazilian music.

Having DJed at other bars
across the island, Simon is hope-
ful that the new night will be a
success.

He said: “Bambi is a great
choice of venue- the club gets
very busy around midnight or
1am, but what we are creating
here is a lounge scene where
discerning Bahamians can come
to check on a variety of musical
styles that come under the
umbrella of ‘soulful under-
ground’.”

Bambi is located above the
Prince George Shopping Cen-
tre.

Share your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are mak-
ing news in their neighbour-
hoods. Call us on 322-1986
and share your story,







THE TRIBUNE





Director of
bank quits
to run for
the FNM



i MICHAEL Barnett

COMMONWEALTH
Bank announced today it has
accepted the resignation of
director Michael Barnett.

Mr Barnett, who joined the
board of directors in May
1999, resigned to pursue polit-
ical interests.

Last week, Mr Barnett was
named the FNM candidate
for Fort Charlotte in the up-
coming general elections.

“Commonwealth Bank
accepts the resignation of
Michael Barnett. effective
immediately,” said the bank
in a statement issued yester-

day.

Chairman of Common-
wealth Bank Baswell Don-
aldson thanked M. Barnett
for serving the bank with
enthusiasm, wisdom and
vision.

He said, “the bank is grate-
ful to Mr Barnett for his con-
tribution and years of service
and wishes him success in his
future endeavours.”

Venezuela
announces
plan for
inflation

M@ VENEZUELA
Caracas

VENEZUELA’S govern-
ment is drawing up a plan to
combat soaring inflation that
led to prices climbing faster
than in any other Latin
American country last year,
according to Associated Press.

Ricardo Sanguino, presi-
dent of the congressional
finance commission, told
reporters Tuesday the plan
aims to either “stop or con-
tain” the inflation rate that
jumped two per cent in Janu-
ary, a traditionally low infla-

‘tion month. The January data
marked an inauspicious start
to the government’s effort to
keep inflation to 12 per cent
or less this year.

-'- Near-record public spend-
-ing by President Hugo

Chavez’s oil-rich government

has stoked inflation: The left-
ist government has spent bil-
lions of dollars (euros) on

social programmes that: :

include subsidised food for
the poor and cash benefits for
single mothers.

Despite strong growth, the
economy has not generated
enough goods and services to
soak up the excess liquidity.
Meanwhile, strict currency
controls that prevent
Venezuelans from investing
their money abroad is trap-
ping cash in the economy.

Sanguino said the anti-
inflation plan would involve
“economic, political, indus-
trial and fiscal” measures like-
ly including tax adjustments
and an “improvement” in
government price controls.
He did not provide further
details on either measure.

But Sanguino said there
would be no changes to the
government’s _ foreign-
exchange controls that were
imposed in 2003 in an effort
'- to stabilise the economy fol-
- lowing political turmoil.

Inflation ended 2006 at 17
per cent, the highest in Latin
- America. Some economists
~ claim actual inflation rates are
even higher, saying official
results are skewed by central
bank calculations that
overemphasise price-con-
trolled products in govern-
ment-subsidised supermar-
kets.

Central Bank statistics
show food prices increased
more than 31 per cent in the
last 12 months. Enrique Gon-
zalez Porras, a Venezuelan
expert in economic regula-
tion, estimates that overall
inflation during that period
was closer to 27 per cent.

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE contract for the con-
struction of 4 new building to
house the straw market will be
awarded in the “next two

weeks”, said Works Minister.

Bradley Roberts yesterday.

The imminent awarding of
the contract comes after nego-
tiations between the govern-
ment and contractors over
what were unexpectedly high
bids.

‘Mr Roberts first announced
that the project would be put
out to tender "shortly" in June
2005. Earlier reports indicated
that groundbreaking for the
new market had been sched-
uled to begin before the end of
2006.

Yesterday, he said that most
of the bids were "way off the
Richter scale" by comparison
to costs suggested by the quan-
tity surveyors who had been

working with the government

on the project. .

The final bid — the exact cost
of which will be revealed in
coming weeks — was "negoti-
ated down", but still higher than
what the government had orig-

Contract will be awarded in
next two weeks, claims Works
Minister Bradley Roberts



inally anticipated.
According to the minister, he
was due to present the final

- paper on the matter to Cabinet

either last night, or next Tues-
day.

The original Straw Market —
which used to attract millions
of visitors each year — was
destroyed by fire in September
2001. Since that time vendors
have been housed in cramped
and hot conditions in a tempo-
rary structure adjacent to the
original site.

Several commentators,
including many vendors, have
spoken out against the difficult
working environment.

Plans for the new building —
designed to accommodate up
to 600 stalls — have revealed
that it will most likely be a
three-storey structure, featur-
ing, among other previously
lacking facilities, a much-need-

ed sprinkler system and
improved sanitary provisions.

Mr Roberts said yesterday
that the "uniqueness" of the
building, and its sea-front loca-
tion, meant that government
had had to take into considera-
tion the most appropriate build-
ing materials which would
"minimise any deterioration of
the building in short term or
medium term."

Budget allocations of $3.5
million were reportedly made
in both the 2004/2005 and
2006/2007 budgets for the new
structure. In 2005, it was pre-
dicted that the construction pro-
ject would cost between $10
million to $13 million.

M WORKMEN were seen on

the site in December 2005 —
but the site on Bay Street has
changed little since that time

Hilton may support US
embargo against Cuba

m By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE British Colonial Hilton
may have to enforce the US
embargo against Cuba following
international reports that the
US based ‘hotel chain has
banned Cuban delegations from
using its facilities all around the
world.

The report comes after an
Oslo Hotel in Norway, owned
by the US Hilton chain, refused
a. booking by a Cuban trade del-
egation to the city's travel fair
last month because of the
embargo.

According to the British
press, a Hilton spokesperson in
London has commented on the
company’s position towards
Cuba.

“We are a US company," said
Linda Bain, vice-president for
communications at the group.
"The dilemma we face is that
(if we took a booking from a
Cuban delegation) we would be
subject to fines or prison and if
anyone. (from the company)
tried to enter the US, they
would be arrested."

Ms Bain toid the press that

the company is now seeking
clarification of their position
from the US government.

The Tribune contacted the
British Colonial Nassau, which
is owned by the US Hilton
chain, and a spokesperson said
she was not aware if an official
statement had been made on

the issue as yet.

Guidance...

Karla Visconti, Hilton’s direc-
tor of communications for the
Caribbean and Latin America,
said the hotel was in the process
of contacting the appropriate
authorities, seeking guidance
on how to resolve these con-
flicts.

Ms Visconti told The Tribune:

“Hilton finds itself in a difficult ~

and regrettable position in that,
as an organisation, we do not
believe in discrimination of any
kind. We are, of course, com-

‘mitted to complying with the

laws of the countries in which
we operate, but in this situation
we are facing conflicting laws.”

After the Oslo incident last
month, Norwegian trade unions

and anti-racist organisations
complained about the hotel's
actions and decided to move
their union conferences else-
where until the policy is
changed.

The deputy leader of the Nor-

wegian Union of Municipal and ©

General Employees, Anne
Grethe Skaardal said: "It is
unacceptable for the US to dic-
tate to the whole world."

And UK Labour MP Ian
Gibson, has described the
Hilton ban as "small-minded".

Hilton Hotels Corporation is .

one of the leading global hospi-
tality companies, with nearly

- 2,800 hotels and 485,000 rooms

in more than 80 countries, and
with 150,000 team members
worldwide.

More than 2,300 hotels are
owned, managed or franchised
in the US by a group with a
portfolio of hotel brands includ-
ing Hilton, Conrad, Doubletree,
Embassy Suites Hotels, Hamp-
ton Inn, Hampton'Inn and
Suites, Hilton Garden Inn,
Hilton Grand‘ Vacations,
Homewood Suites by Hilton,

Scandic and the Waldorf Asto-

ria Collection.

Prison Officers Association claims
gsovernment has ignored concerns

THE Bahamas Prison Offi-
cers Association says it is being
“disrespected” by the govern-
ment — as all the labour con-
cerns raised by its members
have fallen on deaf ears.

_ In an official press statement,
the association stated that its
representatives have already

. met with Prime Minister Perry

Christie, Deputy Prime Minister
and Minister of National Secu-
rity Cynthia Pratt and Public
Sevice Minister Fred Mitchell,
but no one has yet resolved any
of their complaints.

The association said in the
press release: “In our industrial
agreement tabled last year we
addressed our concern on dis-
parity across the disciplined
forces.

“They assured us that this will
be addressed in the Compensa-
tion Study, yet the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force was
assured that they will be receiv-
ing an increase in salaries the
end of this month by the hon-
ourable Fred Mitchell on Tues-
day, January 3, 2007.

“Prior to this announcement
we met with him in December
2006 and he denied our claims
of giving the Defence Force any

funds until the compensation
_ Study is completed.”

The association said their oth-
er concerns are: the back pay
of squads 2001 and 2005, which
they claim are still outstanding,
the lack of protective gear for
officers, outstanding officer pro-
motions from 2002, and poor
living conditions.

“”*Mr John Pinder, the pres-
ident of the Bahamas Public
Services Union, demanded that
the government address

salaries and promotions and
other concerns of the customs
and immigration departments
giving the government 14 days
or action will be taken,” the
statement noted. “Less than a
week later, Minister Fred
Mitchell announced that rec-
ommendations for promotions
of customs and immigration
departments (was) in the
process of being compiled and
is scheduled to be delivered in
two weeks.

“The living conditions of
prison officers housed in the

Bachelor’s Quarters continues -

to be harsh and appalling even
after the prime minister’s visit
and the minister of health, the



of things we
think, say or do

1. Is it the TRUTH?

2.Is it FAIR to all
concerned?

3. Will it build
GOODWILL and
BETTER
FRIENDSHIPS?

4. Will it be
BENEFICIAL to
all concerned?

www.rotary.org

honourable Bernard Nottage.
“They say: so said, so done.
We are saying loudly: so said,

nothing done,” the statement

concluded.

ee

Tey CLC YES

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@ Valentine Mugs from ..




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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007, PAGE 3 |
Five and a half years on, Straw
Market contract to be signed

in a selection
from our

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007, PAGE 5



ERRTSRERERISN sc Sc
Roberts asks for vigilance at

Man charged
with causing
harm after
cutlass attack

FREEPORT - A 31-year-
old Freeport man was
charged in the Magistrate’s
Court in connection with last
week’s cutlass attack on a
young woman on Grand
Bahama Highway.

Eugene Beckette Sands
appeared in court three
before Magistrate Helen
Jones on Monday, where he
was charged with causing
grievous harm to 25-year-old
LaTeisha Tinker of Erickson
Drive.

It is alleged that on Janu-
ary 31, the accused caused
grievous harm to Ms Tinker
and made threats of death
towards her.

Sands pleaded not guilty
to the charges.

He was granted $7,000 bail
with sureties on the condi-
tion that he surrenders his
passport to the court, and has
no contact with the com-
plainant.

The matter was adjourned
to August 7 for trial.

Cuban anger
as Marti set
to be aired
in Miami

B HAVANA

CUBA on Monday blasted
a new move by a US-funded
TV Marti to provide its anti-
Fidel Castro programming to
Spanish-language stations in
Miami that are picked up by
popular illegal satellite dish-
es on the island, according to
Associated Press.

The Miami station WPMF-
TV, an affiliate of the Span-
ish-language Azteca Ameri-
cas network, in December
announced plans to air the :
Marti programming daily. It:
appears to be the first time
Marti programming has been
broadcast on US airwaves.
TV Marti is paying $195,000
for six months worth of
broadcasts. :

“They are trying new ways
to get their meddlesome and
subversive messages,
designed to destabilise the
Cuban revolution, seen and
heard in our country,” an
article in the Communist Par-
ty newspaper Granma said.

“The authorities of our
country, with the support of
the vast majority of the peo-
ple, are taking and will take
the necessary measures” to
halt this new effort to bring
TV Marti programming to
the country, Granma said. |

Other US government
attempts to beam TV Marti
into Cuba have largely failed
because of the communist
government’s successful
efforts to jam the signals,
most recently being sent from
a cargo plane off Florida’s
coast.

The older sister station,
Radio Marti, historically has
been more successful in
broadcasting to the island
through both shortwave and
AM signals.

This new method of broad-
casting TV Marti to Cuba
comes as the Washington-
funded program faces
renewed criticism for spend-
ing $10 million annually to
produce programmes that in
the past were rarely seen on
the communist-run island.

‘TV 13 SCHEDULE

WEDNESDAY, .
FEBRUARY 7TH

6:30am Community Page 1540AM
8:00 Bahamas @ Sunrise

9:00 Bullwinkle & Friends

9:30 King Leonardo

10:00 International Fit Dance
10:30 Real Moms, Real Stories,











Real Savy
11:00 Immediate Response
noon ZNS News Update




12:05
1:00
1:30
2:00

Immediate Response Cont'd
Island Lifestyles

Ethnic Health America
Thousand Dollar Bee


















2:30 Aqua Kids

3:00 Paul Lewis

3:30 Don Stewart

4:00 _Little Robots

4:30 Carmen San Diego

5:00 ZNS News Update

5:05 Character Counts: Take
Stock In

6:00 One Cubed

6:30 News Night 13

7:00 Bahamas Tonight

8:00 Challenged

8:30 Be Your Own Boss

8:35 BTC The Voice of The
Customer Town Meeting,
Eleuthera

10:30 News Night 13

11:00 The Bahamas Tonight




11:30 Immediate Response
1:30am Community Page 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
right to make last minute
programme oatelarol








m@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

WORKS and Utilities Min-
ister Bradley Roberts has
expressed “grave concern” over
acts of vandalism at several traf-
fic lights in New Providence.

Mr Roberts made this com-

ment while giving an update on
the road works at the intersec-
tion of Mackey and Shirley
Streets.

He commended the police
force for its support of the Min-
istry of Works, noting that dur-
ing the month of January, they
were able to apprehend one sus-
pect in connection with the
damaged traffic signals.

“T also wish to encourage the
public to be vigilant in reporting
any suspicious behavior in the
vicinity of or at any of the traf-
fic signals, including the con-
trollers,” he said.

In November of 2004, HNTB
Corporation was commissioned
by Kerzner International to
conduct a study of the access to
Paradise Island from Nassau
International Airport.

The study recommended,
among other things, that a right
turn lane should be constructed
at the corner of Mackey Street
leading on to Shirley Street and
at the same time, the signal sys-
tem should be upgraded to
increase the capacity, safety and
the free flow of vehicular traffic
through the intersection.

In October of last year, con-
tracts were awarded to Bahami-
an contractors Bill Simmons
Construction and Heavy Equip-

ment in the sum of $210,222.90
for civil works; VC Construc-
tion in the sum of $139,000 for

concrete works; and Hy-Pow-'

er International in the sum
$55,794 for the upgrade of the
traffic signals — totalling an ini-
tial contractual sum of
$405,016.90.'

Phases

Mr Roberts said that these
works were completed in phas-
es to reduce the impact of traf-
fic congestion and inconve-
nience to the public.

The initial phase of work was
completed prior to Christmas
last December and the latter
phases have been completed
within the month of January
this year, he said.

“The benefits of such an
intersection upgrade are now
being fully realised as works are
substantially completed at the
intersection. The final phase of
work at this intersection will be
completed when my ministry
undertakes the repaving of
additional sections of Bay Street
and a major portion of Shirley
Street, which is planned for
March of this year,” Mr Roberts
said.

The ministry, he said, is
presently working with the var-
ious utilities providers to ensure
that all necessary utility
upgrades on Bay and Shirley
Streets are undertaken in
advance of the re-paving so that
there will be no need to trench

‘the newly paved roads, except

in cases of emergency.

The introduction of a video
detection system, the first of its
kind in New Providence, will
enable the intersection to work
more efficiently thus increasing
its capacity, he said.

“With the implementation of
vehicular actuation, no longer
will fixed time settings be
utilised at the intersection of
Shirley and Mackey Streets, but
the traffic signals will now
respond to the effective loads
of the individual approaches
regardless of the time of day.

“Pedestrian safety has been
further enhanced with the intro-
duction of pedestrian count
down signals being phased con-
currently with the traffic signals
and the construction of side-
walks. Under such a system,
pedestrian and vehicular phases
will run concurrently without
conflict,” Mr Roberts said.

The success of this project,
he said, is another demonstra-

tion of Kerzner International’s

commitment to the progress
and development of the
Bahamian people.

Mr Roberts added that
another example of the ministry
taking action to enhance the
movement of traffic can be
found at the intersection of JF
Kennedy Drive and Gladstone
Road, where a left turning lane
has recently been installed.

“I am sure that the motoring
public would have discerned
how this intervention would
have eliminated the unneces-
sary traffic back-up on this
major roadway,” he said.

Public are encouraged PRRh a oe
to make more use of

yt

sanitary landfill site

BAHAMIANS are being
encouraged to make use of the
services provided at the newly
named New Providence Sani-
tary Landfill Site on Harrold
Road. |

The goal of the campaign is
to discourage the dangerous
practice of illicit dumping of
hazardous waste.

Natasha Morris, assistant
project engineer for the
Department of Environmen-
tal Health Services (DEHS),
explained that one of the goals
of DEHS is to dispel the
myths and misconceptions
about disposal and use of haz-
ardous materials.

“Some Bahamians believe
that it is safe to dispose their
garbage waste mixed togeth-
er, when it is not,” she said.

Moreover, Morris said,
many Bahamians feel that haz-
ardous waste including gas
containers and cleaners can be
land-filled when they should
be properly secured. “Some
believe that the ocean is a
dumping area but this slowly
destroys our ecosystem,” she
added.

DEHS officials note that the
improper disposal and use of
hazardous products can detri-
mentally affect the air we
breathe, pollute the water we
cook, clean and wash with,
destroy plants and animals and
increase illnesses among
Bahamian families.

While hazardous materials
such as paints, antifreeze,
acids, chemical supplies and
cleaning compounds can cause
permanent damage to humans
and wildlife if not properly dis-
posed of, there are many ways

to prevent or reduce the pos-.

sibility of harm.
DEHS says it is important
that Bahamians become aware

of what constitutes hazardous _

waste and how to properly
use, store and dispose of the
toxic materials, and also
become aware that these sub-
stances may enter the body
through ingestion, inhalation
and absorption through the
skin.

While some Bahamians

have adopted the “out of sight,
out of mind” mentality, Morris
said that if garbage is not dis-

' posed of properly, “it will

come back to you.”

Henry Moxey, project co-
ordinator for the Bahamas
Solid Waste Management Pro-
ject, explained many Bahami-
ans have misconceptions
regarding hazardous waste dis-
posal. “Many believe that the

volume of their garbafie dis-
posal has no impact upon
them or their physical envi-
ronment.

“Bahamians need to be
more informed about the dan-
gers that can impact their
households and those that are
negative for the environment,”
he said. /

According to Morris, there
are steps that can be taken to
ensure a cleaner Bahamas —
including recycling materials
such as aluminum cans and
reducing the number and vol-
ume of harmful substances
being used in each home.

Morris explained that more
Bahamian households should
use non-harsh cleaning prod-
ucts including vinegar and
baking soda. “You should only
purchase required amounts of
paint needed which would
eliminate left-over paint”.

She emphasised how impor-
tant it is for each family to be
responsible for cleaning their
own space and surrounding
environment.

Some suggestions offered
include: taking preventative
measures to avoid stray dogs
from knocking over garbage
bins, keeping a tight lid on
bins, removing old cars from
property or calling for some-
one to remove them.

“Education is vital,” she
said. “It is important to have
older Bahamians educating
the younger generation while
serving as examples on how to
properly dispose of waste, and
that any illicit dumping being
done in the community should
be reported to the proper
authorities.

“One day I hope that before
you can purchase another car
battery you will be required
to bring in the old one, which
would reduce the number of
batteries being left around to
further destroy the environ-
ment,” she added.

The practice of proper dis-
posal of hazardous waste,
Morris said, would result in “a
clean space and healthier envi-
ronment, reducing the possi-
bilities of fire, and explosions,
exposure to metals and toxic
chemicals that would other-
wise cause sickness or death.”

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PART OF YOUR LIFE





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007, PAGE 7





@ DARNELL BING and Samie Parker are pictured
with Sandals public relations manager Stacy Mackey.

_ NEL players add

- to Super Bowl

fever at Sandals

SUPER Bowl Sunday was an
interactive event for couples at
Sandals Royal Bahamian Spa
Resort and Offshore Island as
three NFL players mingled with
guests during pre-game events.

Sandals hosted Samie Parker,
wide receiver with the Kansas
City Chiefs; Darnell Bing, line
backer with the Oakland
Raiders and line backer Mark
Simoneau of the New Orleans
Saints.





Bahamians

On Sunday, the players hosted
a television viewing and
tailgating party for resort
guests complete with football
props.

The players also took pho-
tographs and signed autographs
for fans.

During the game, they pro-
vided run of play commentary
and interacted with guests.

Public relations manager Sta-
cy Mackey said the NFL play-

enjoy t

AV






MMOD
y

he big g

ers added to the excitement of
the Super Bowl party.

“They were able to answer
questions and share their per-
sonal experiences with guests
and fans alike who wanted to
get an inside view of the game of
football.

“We were glad to have them
visit our resort, but thrilled that
they were able to take in some of
the sights of Nassau which they
enjoyed.” —






ame

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter



FREEPORT - After an
exhaustive 10-month search,
the Sheraton and Westin at Our
Lucaya Resort has finally
appointed a new managing
director for the resort property
‘in Grand Bahama.

Randal Ha, a veteran hote-
lier with more than 30 years
experience in the industry, was
officially introduced to the
Grand Bahama community at a
welcome reception on Monday,
hosted in the Royal Palm
Room at the Westin.

Attending the function were
tourism officials, government
and union representatives and
various hoteliers on Grand
Bahama.

John Markoulis, a represen-
tative of Hutchison Lucaya, the
owners of the resort, and Dan
Davis, district manager for Star-
wood Hotels and Resorts in the
Caribbean, were also present.

Our Lucaya Resort is the
only major resort property still
open on Grand Bahama. It
comprises of 1,219 rooms and
13 restaurants and bars. There
are around 1,300 persons
employed at the resort.

Mr Markoulis extended a
warm welcome to Mr Ha, say-
ing he is confident that the new
managing director is right
choice for the resort.

“With his years of experience
in the operation of very large
resorts, and with his good spir-
its and natural leadership abil-
ity, we definitely believe he will
able to steer this resort proper-
ty in the right direction,” Mr
Markoulis said.

Mr Ha has served as manag-
ing director for the Sheraton
Waikiki and Royal Hawaiian
Hotels for the past four years,
and spent seven years as gen-
eral manager at the Sheraton
Maui Hotel, also located in
Honolulu, Hawaii.

Since joining Starwood in
1985 as the executive assistant







oS

HB VETERAN hotelier
Randal Ha

manger at the Sheraton
Princess Kaiulani and Royal
Hawaiian Hotels, he has held
various Other leadership post
including general manager of
the Sheraton Makaha Resort
and Country Club.

Mr Markoulis said that
Hutchison will provide all the
support Mr Ha’s needs to make
the property number one in the
region. He said business leaders
and residents can now expect
to see the dawn of a new era
at Our Lucaya.

“When he made the decision
to join our team, he told me
that once he had moved to
Grand Bahama he would like
to know the community and
become a part of it. And that is
the kind of attitude we would
like all our associates to have.

And to our staff, I believe
they will have a good leader
who will be a good mentor. He
will ensure everyone who has
the desire and ability to
advance in their careers will be
given the opportunity to do so.”

Starwood executive Dan
Davis said that it has been long
and exhaustive search to find
the right leader to manage the
resort.

He noted that Mr Ha started
his career out in the laundry

New managing director

at Our Lucaya Resort

area of a hotel, and moved up
the ranks from there.

“We are absolutely thrilled .
.. to have a leader that we are
so confident in. It has been a
difficult process for us to find a
gentlemen and a leader to take
this property to the next
level. i

“We have been searching for
the past 10 months with well
over 20 representatives both
international and across the
US.

“We are confident with
someone like Randy Ha, who
has over 20 years experience
with the Sheraton brands and
Starwood hotels and resorts.
We are confident we now have
the right leader to. bring that
support to every associate, to
every guest, and to make sure
he reaches out to the commu-
nity. It is a critical position.”

Mr Davis said Starwood’s
next step is to focus on remain-
ing competitive in terms of ser-
vice.

“We need to be getting back
and taking care of our cus-
tomers, and associates, and
making sure that employees
can reach their full potential.
Sheraton is all about making
warm and comforting connec-
tions with our guests, and the:
Westin is all about creating a
personal and renewing experi-
ence.”

Randal Ha, who is a graduate
of the University of Hawaii, °
thanked everyone for the warm
welcome to Grand Bahama. “I
love it here and I definitely
want to be a part of this island,”
he said.

Roy Colebrooke, president
of the Bahamas Hotel Cater-
ing and Allied Workers Union,
said the union is looking for-
ward to establishing a relation-
ship with the new managing
director.

“Apart from dealing with dis-
putes, it is very important to
build a strong relationship and
once that happens from the
head it trickles down to other
ranks,” he said.



@ FAMILY and friends meet for Super Bow! Sunday in this Lyford Cay home. Sports fans across the
Bahamas were on the edge of their seats during the Indianapolis Colts’ victory over the Chicago Bears.
(Photo: Ana Bianca Marin)



Margo Adderley
Travel Agency - Destinations

Marvin Brooks
Travel Agency - Destinations.










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Dale Davis ~~ (©)
Travel Agency - First Class Travel

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Travel Agency - First Class







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A mid-size car)
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Consultation on Proposed New Marina Policy
for the Bahamas

In November of 2006, Cabinet considered a report from the Marina
Task Force recommending changes to the policies relating to the siting
and charging for marinas. It adopted a set of policies on an interim basis
with respect to siting that were designed to protect the environment and
adjacent communities. These policies were generally in line with
policies in nearby areas, including Florida. The Task Force Also reviewed the
approach to charging for the use of the seabed and the marinas
themselves, cabinet made no decision here, but accepted the Task Force’s
recommendations that discussions be held with stakeholders involved with
marinas, before the formal a doption of a Marina Policy.



























The Task Force will be holding meetings at the following times and
locations during the week of February 12-16 between 10:00a.m and
3:00p.m., as follows:

Monday-February 12, Grand Bahama, Old Bahama Bay, West End
Tuesday-February 13, Abaco, The Methodist Hall, Dundas Town
- Wednesday-February 14, Exuma, The Resource Centre
Thursday-February 15, Eleuthera, Harbour Island,
Lighthouse Church of God
Friday-February 16, Nassau, Wyndham Crystal Palace Resort
(Cat Island Room)

All people interested in the Marina Policy are invited to attend
the location most convenient for them. Those wishing a copy of the
draft report may download it from The Ministry of Tourism’s website
www.tourismbahmas.org Afterentering the site, register, entering six
or more letter x’s in the zip code space and go to the Marina Policy
section. If you cannot access the interent, you may get a copy by contacting
Ms. Prenell Evans at the Ministry of Engery and The Environment (242)
322 6005. If you can’t attend the meetings or wish to send comments on
the draft report should send them to the Task ForceRapporteur, Malcolm
Martini, at the Ministry of Energy and the Environment,Second Floor
Claughton House, P.O.Box N-4849, Nassau, Bahamas or e-mail
Mr. Martini at malcolmmartini@ bahamas. gov.bs.





PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



eR
Man claims

he’s been on
Nassau curfew
for 14 years



Valentine’s Date!

nter The Tribune’s Valentine contest and become eligible to

win a dinner on the town with one of our Valentine Dates.
Men, fill out the form for Ava, and women, fill out the form for Alex
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Streets before the deadline on Tuesday February 13, 2007 at 5:00 p.m. °

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The Nassau Florist

€st. 1951

Paradise is land
Club Land: or





FROM page one

intended victim was never
named and the case got “divert-
ed” by a constitutional rights
challenge on behalf of one the
defendants.

Initially, they were remanded
to Fox Hill Prison, where they
stayed for a year and a half.
Then a surety stood bail and
they were freed.

Since then, repeated attempts
to have the case heard have

been ignored by successive

attorney generals while the four
ex-constables have been left in
limbo.

“I want justice,” Mr Brice
said, “Can you imagine what
it’s like to see your family go
abroad on vacation every year
and I can’t go?

“Can you imagine what it’s
like being stuck on this island,
never able to go anywhere else,
even a Family Island? It’s not
right. It isn’t fair.”

Mr Brice, from Fox Hill, said
his constituency representative,
MP Fred Mitchell, showed a
keen interest in the case when
he was in opposition.

But since coming to power in
2002, Mr Mitchell had allegedly
done nothing. “He sits at the
same table as the attorney gen-
eral, yet he says nothing on my
behalf,” he claimed.

Trouble began for the four
constables after one of them
helped pull off a major drug
bust. Mr Brice believes

“trumped up” charges brought
against them were directly relat-
ed to that.

“Whoever has heard of a





gi

Mutler’s Funeral Homes

& Crematorium

Tel: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

murder conspiracy in which the
intended victim is unknown?”
he asked. “It’s ridiculous.”

Minister of Foreign Affairs
and the Public Service, Fred
Mitchell — who is also the rep-
resentative for Fox Hill -
acknowledged that he is aware
of the matter and is working to
assist Mr Brice.

Commenting on what is now
necessary to resolve the matter
Mr Mitchell stated, “Really,
what needs to happen is a
lawyer needs to move on his
behalf to get the matter dis-
missed. And it may be that he
has a difficulty with funding.”

“Tf it is as he describes, it
seems to me at the very least
that it is oppressive and the
question is whether or not it
passes the constitutional thresh-
old of not having a fair trial
within a reasonable time. And
that is something which needs
to be tested by his attorneys,”
he said

Mr Mitchell further stated,
“As a minister of the govern-
ment, I cannot direct the attor-
ney general what to do. That
would be inappropriate. You
don’t bring political influence
to bear on what an attorney
general decides to do.”

Mr Mitchell asserted that he
understands Mr Brice’s frustra-
tion and does not fault him for
it.

Currently, Mr Mitchell also
claimed that he will work to
assist Mr Brice in finding legal
representation.

“We need to find a lawyer
for him and I’m working to do
that. Lawyers are not cheap and

‘not everyone is willing to do a

MEMORIAL ANNOUNCEMENT









A Memorial
Service for

MR.

_ THOMAS
PETER |

MAURY, 70






Michael Gittens.

of Cable Beach will be held on
Thursday, February 8th, 2007 at 3:00
p.m. at Christ Church Cathedral,
‘George Street. Officiating will be Fr.

He is survived by his Children; Anne
and Scott Paramore, John and Mary
Maury and Peter and Kathy Maury;
Four (4) Grandchildren; Camilla
Paramore, Mary Copeland-Paramore,
Demetri and Jacob Maury; Two (2)
Sisters and their spouses; Janet and
Dick McLean and Barbara and Bob
Smulik and other relatives and friends.

In lieu of flowers donations may be
made to proud Paws, P.O. Box-SS-
6159, Nassau, Bahamas.

Arran gements are being handled by
Butlers’57 Funeral Homes and
Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets.



















pro bono case. So we will try
and find someone someway to
resolve it for him,” he said.

A constitutional rights case
brought by a lawyer acting for
one defendant diverted atten-
tion from the main issue for sev-
eral years, he said.

But that was concluded in
2003 — and still no progress
had been made on the murder
conspiracy case, despite repeat-
ed pleas for action to six suc-
cessive attorney generals.

“The attorney general has °
refused to deal with this mat-
ter,” said Mr Brice, “No-one
wants to touch it. I don’t know
why this is. We need to get this.
behind us, but every lawyer we
go to wants $10,000 retainer and
who can afford that?”

When the charges were laid,
he said, he and his colleagues
were suspended on half-pay,
but never dismissed or dis-
charged from the force.

In 1994, the police commis-
sioner halted their half-pay, say-
ing their contracts had expired.

Since then, Mr Brice has been
supporting his family by driving
buses. But he says the long sus-
pension has crippled his chances
of promotion and ruined a
promising police career.

“T would definitely have been _
an inspector today,” he said. “I
was a good policeman. I had
been in the force for nine years
and been recommended for
promotion and commendation
when all this happened.

“T was 26 at the time. I am
now 41. This year would have
been 24 years in the force and
next year I would qualified for a
pension.

“On paper, we’re still sus-
pended police officers, but Iam
not getting any pay. Yet our
case is still not being heard and
I believe it’s because they are
now afraid. No-one wants to be
held accountable. _

“They know now that,
because of my loss of pay-and
status, that I could sue them for
a lot of money.

“But as things stand I have
no freedom. I can’t even go to
Freeport to see my son in a
karate tournament. I don’t have
a passport because they (the
authorities) have kept it.

“We all pleaded not guilty
and are all protesting our inno-
cence. But we aren’t being giv-
en our freedom because they, .
are so ashamed-to say to us that |

they have messed up our lives.” . '-

Referring to current attorney
general Allyson Maynard-Gib-
son’s pledge to speed up cases,
Mr Brice said: “Where is the
swift justice in our case? Even if
I go to Paradise Island, I have to
be back home by midnight. ’'m
like Cinderella — at midnight,
everything turns into a pump-
kin.”

Mr Brice has become so
impatient with the lack of action

‘ that he is now demanding that

the government set him free
and offer compensation.

He said the prolonged ordeal
had brought on high blood pres-
sure and diabetes and caused
his family endless stress.

“I was lucky to get bail 14
years ago, otherwise all of us
would still have been at Fox
Hill Prison like those Japanese
and Jamaican guys who were
kept there for years.

“But even if I had been con-
victed, I would have been out
by now. Yet here I am, still
waiting for my hearing. They
have made a big blunder and
are afraid to deal with it. Every-
one is giving us the runaround.

“T regard this as a major injus-
tice. | am a prisoner in my own
country. I still sign in at the
police station seven days a
week. It’s become a mental
thing. Give me my freedom
back.”

Mr Brice’s comments came
only a few weeks after Dame
Joan Sawyer, president of the
Court of Appeal, criticised long
delays in court proceedings.

“No-one is addressing the
problem,” said Mr Brice, “It
seems I am serving a 20-year
sentence without ever being
convicted.”



_ THE TRIBUNE

a4

S

PMD RET eK dG
story was. only. partially
ERC TMC CCN ae)
Tribune. We apologise
and today print the story
nw Ue a

Bishop Ellis

announces

four new
sub-divisions

â„¢ By BRENT DEAN

BISHOP Neil Ellis of

° Mount Tabor Full Gospel
» Church has formally

announced the creation of
four new sub-divisions to
make home ownership more
affordable for his 7,000-strong
congregation.

The announcement was
made yesterday at a press
conference attended by
Prime Minister Perry Christie.

The sub-divisions will be
created in conjunction with
Scotiabank Bahamas, Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) Limited,
Arawak Homes Ltd and
GV1I and Associates Company
Ltd.

The sub-divisions will be
called Mount Tabor Gardens,
to be situated off Carmichael
Road; Mount Tabor Sub-divi-
sion, east of Mount Tabor
Church; Mount Tabor’

. Estates, off JFK Drive, adja-
» cent to High Point Manor;

_ and Mount Tabor Manor, off

Bay Street.
In moving this initiative for-
ward, Bishop Ellis said Scotia

- Bank — the home ownership

partner — had in the last few
weeks already approved home
loans for members in excess

— of $11 million. -

Fidelity — the property
ownership partner — has
already approved loans of just

- under $2 million.

The primary feature of the

~ Fidelity lot loans will be that

Mount Tabor members will
be permitted to buy lots with-
out down payments, but with
proof of ability to make regu-

« lar monthly payments on the

- loan.

Additionally, at the time of

. closing, participants will also

benefit from reduced legal,

..fees on the mortgage from

two and a half per cent toa
flat fee of $1,000; government
stamp duty on the mortgage
of one per cent; government

_ stamp duty on the conveyance

(ranging from two to four per
cent) depending on the sales
agreement and purchase

' price; legal fees on the con-

veyance discounted from two
and a half per cent to a flat
fee of $500; and a bank com-
mitment fee of one and a half
per cent.

Scotiabank will grant

- financing for single family res-

idential use only (detached
homes, townhouses, condo-
miniums, duplexes and tri-

_ plexes where one unit is own-

er occupied) with minimum
equity requirements of five
per cent for salaried workers
and ten per cent for the self-
employed.

Bishop Ellis said he was
prompted to create the hous- °

_ ing initiative after a church

service last November when
there was a call for all individ-
uals that neither owned a
home nor property - nearly
400 people - to come forward.
He said: “We have, over the
years, diligently endeavoured

. to do everything within our

power to equip and empower
our people to be all that God
said that they can be.

“This housing initiative, we
believe, will help many more
of our people live better lives,
and it’s simply a part of more
that is ahead of us as we posi-
tion our membership for the
advancement of God’s King-
dom for the next 20 years.”

Mr Christie commended
Bishop Ellis for making the
church relevant to the lives of
its members by bringing in
financial partners to assist in
making home ownership more
accessible and affordable for a
large number of Bahamians.

Bishop Ellis also announced
that his church is in the final
stages of negotiations with the
developers of Coral Breeze
Estates to secure a certain
number of lots within the
development for church mem-
bers.

Wayde Christie of Scotia-
bank, Gregory Bethel of
Fidelity, Franklyn Wilson of

- Arawak Homes and Algernon

Allen of Coral Breeze Estates
were also at the press confer-
ence.

The first of the develop-
ments, Mount Tabor Estates,
will be formally commissioned
on February 23, 2007.

LOCAL NEWS ©

‘Opposition members 0







Boundaries Commission
— frustrated with govt’



FROM page one

nor General A D Hanna to
close the current register of
voters on March 12.

The days leading to the
election, Mr Christie cau-
tioned during an address to
the nation, are getting “short-
er with each passing day.” °

Many. have seen this
announcement by the prime
minister as a way to encour-
age the public to get out and
register.

The slow registration thus
far has impeded the work of
the boundaries commission
which has reportedly not been
able to make any decision on
how some of the constituen-
cies will be drawn up.



sioner Errold Bethel told The
Tribune yesterday that since
this announcement, registra-
tion has been increasing by
“quite a bit”.

“We're doing more than
500 a day now. I think that is
quite a pick up* because we



Asst Commissioner of police
is set to be transferred

FROM page one

Bahamas Democratic Movement (BDM), and the Workers
Party have all called for government to disclose “who knew
what and when” as questions abound over a possible contra-
vention of Bahamian laws.

When contacted by The Tribune yesterday for comment, Mr

, Ferguson said he had no idea where he was being transferred.
Beyond that he would make no comment.

“T don’t know anything about where I am going, and what my
responsibilities will become,” he said.

However, The Tribune has been told that Assistant Com-
missioner of Police Elliston Greenslade will be transferred
from Grand Bahama to take over from Mr Ferguson. He is to
be promoted to deputy commissioner of police.

When his party became the government Prime Minister
Perry Christie promised that no political victimisation would be
tolerated during his administration. The goal, as he stated,
was to collectively build a better Bahamas — regardless of
ones political affiliation.

However, as a Bahamian close to the political scene noted, if
the current attitude in local politics continues, the Bahamas’
future may not look as bright as previously promised.

Calls to Police Commissioner Paul Farquharson were not
returned up to press time.

share your news

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from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
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for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.













FOCOL HOLDINGS LIMITED
NOTICE

FOCOL Holdings Limited requested and was granted
permission by BISX in accordance with its Rules to publish
restated financial statements for fiscal year 2006 on or
before 19 February, 2007.

Subsequent to issuance of audited consolidated financial
statements and publication of audited results of FOCOL
Holdings Limited as at 31% July 2006, management
observed that certain automatically generated entries in a
subsidiary were inconsistent with others of the group. As a
result, reclassification within the consolidated balance
sheet and the consolidated statement of income were
made for consistency and comparability into the future.
Net income remains unchanged.

NOTICE ©

FOCOL Holdings Limited requested and was granted an
extension by BISX in accordance with its Rules to file its
quarterly results for the period ending 31° October 2006 on
orbefore 2 March, 2007.



An extension for publication of first quarter results was
requested in lieu of permission granted by BISX to restate
the company year end results of 31% July 2006.









Parliamentary Commis- -

were doing 200 a day, which is
more than a 100 per cent
increase,” Mr Bethel said.

The parliamentary commis-
sioner said that it is not
expected that the rate of reg-
istration would dip again.

‘At this rate, however, the
department should be “look-
ing good” in about six weeks.

“We have to constantly be
looking at the placement of
our people to make adjust-
ments. We are getting our

- biggest numbers in the malls

and average numbers in other
areas.”

Mr Symonette said that it
is usual when a prime minister
announces the date for the
register to close, for there to

be an increase in registration. |

“That is why Mr Ingraham
and myself were encouraging
the prime minister to bring
the register to a close earlier
so that the boundaries com-
mission could make their
assessment based on these
numbers.

“Unfortunately the prime
minister decided to delay it
until last week and what we
told him would happen is hap-
pening and you see more peo-
ple registering,” Mr Symon-
ette said.

He pointed out that regis-
tration was not going well
before with almost one or two
thousand persons re-register-
ing a month.

“They are expecting the
73,000 that were registered in
New Providence by the end
of last year to go 110,000
before the election so we still
have a long way to go,” Mr
Symonette.

The MP said that this leaves
the boundaries commission in
a position where it may have
to decide in certain areas
where the current register
may increase and by what per-
centage and cut the bound-
aries accordingly.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007, PAGE 9

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A FUNERAL SERVICE FOR THE LATE








MR. AARON
ISAAC
RUBENSTEIN,
57









of Nassau, The
Bahamas will be held
at The Chapel of Love,
Kemp’s Funeral Home Limited, Palmdale
Avenue and Bradley Street, Nassau on
Thursday, 8th February, 2007 at 2:00 p.m.




Interment will follow in the Jewish
Cemetery, East, Nassau, The Bahamas,


















Mr. Rubenstein is survived by his wife,
Mrs. Carolyn Rubenstein; his daughters,
Nicole Rubenstein and Vonda Davis; his
mother, Ariella Vanderveen; his father;
Richard Rubenstein and his wife Betty
Rubenstein; his grandson, Seth Davis; his
granddaughter, Mica Davis; his brother,
Jeremy Rubenstein; his sister, Hannah
Rubenstein Fiebel; his sister-in-law, Linda
Rubenstein; his brother-in-law, Fred Fiebel;
nieces, Cathryn Rubenstein and Hallie
Fiebel; nephews, Nicholas Rubenstein and
Samuel Fiebel; and many special friends
and special thanks to Dr. Ian McDowell,
Beth, Bo and Marissa Hall.

In lieu of flowers, friends may make a
donation to the Cancer Society of The
Bahamas, P.O. Box S.S. 6539, Nassau, in
Memory of Aaron Isaac Rubenstein.







The Management Offices of

THEMALLAT
MARATHON
announces that effective
February 10, 2007

we will be a

Sméke-Free
Facility





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itl





ee

7 ee i re ne re ee

cl eT ta Se cae ee ly I et ttt et EEE ALLEGE LEE OLED E ALLCLOSE ALLL ALE ALLO, Ce





if STRAW craft trainer Eloise Smith (eh ayia this niece

from one of her students in Inagua

.

a JEWELLERY of various kinds were exhibited by cn

Jet plane service to
Start in Mayaguana

IT has been announced that
Mayaguanans can look forward
to jet plane service to and from
their island this year.

Mayaguana Development
Company vice president Junaid
Yasin explained that the 7,300
feet of the runway constructed
when the island was home to
an American military facility,
will be reconstructed and a new
terminal built.

“This runway will be largé
enough to accommodate any
large aircraft,” he said. “We are
hopeful that before the end of
the year, we would have a 737
come in and land in Mayagua-
na.”

. The Mayaguana Company is,

in a joint partnership with the'
government in the $1.8 billion

residential community devel-|

opment going on in Mayaguana.

Local Government and Con-
sumer Affairs Minister Alfred
Gray and a contingent from

Bahamas Agricultural and |
Industrial Corporation (BAIC) ,

attended last weekend’s grad-

uation ceremony for partici- |

pants in the shell and straw craft

souvenir programme in |

Mayaguana and Inagua last

Runway from military facility to be reconstructed
in partnership between company and government



weekend. They also toured the
development.

“We are very pleased to be
working with the government
and our partnership is working
very well,” said Mr Yasin. “The
government is supporting us as
much as we need and together,
in the last year since we signed

the heads of agreement, we -

have made a tremendous
amount of progress on the site.”

Facilities

Office facilities have been set
up, the company’s own power
and water systems are running,
and the asphalt plant is on the
island awaiting the technical
staff, according to Mr Yasin.

“We are very pleased with
the progress and we are hoping
that before the end of the year
our runway will be complete,”

TA
e
ah
} ayy

wy
ah

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ty,
pit

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yy

F_

he said. “We are’ reconstruct-
ing the entire runway and we
are building a new terminal.
Within a year you will see some
major changes.”

Mr Gray, who is also the MP
for Mayaguana, said he is
pleased with the progress of the
project and is negotiating a
salary increase for the Bahami-
an workers.

“When the government con-
ceived anchor projects through-
out the Bahamas,” he said, “lit-
tle did 1] know Mayaguana
would have been factored into it
so early. Every able-bodied
Mayaguanian who has a posi-
tive attitude and wants to work
is in fact working.

“Prior to this it was 1945
when the base closed. This
development was God-sent and
I am looking forward to it grow-
ing from strength to strength.”

In partnership with the gov-

os ER



2 ce
4) sats wake oy. sia ie

ernment, all the roads in
Mayaguana are to be rebuilt
said Mr Gray.

It is envisioned that more
than 1,500 people will eventu-
ally be employed on that pro-

ject.

“The salary is small and the
people deserve as much as
cduld be paid,” he said. “I also
know that they are not yet mak-
ing money at the company and
so they have to go small until
they start to make money, and
when they start to make money
it is expected that the people
who work there will make much
more money as well.

* “While I am looking forward

to better for the people I also
have to be reminded that the
company does not want to run
out of business by doing too
much too soon. I will always
keep an eye on whatever effects
Mayaguana.”











aaa =o

Wy
\
NY

kOe ait ‘i

whe

aN vit

COLOMBIAN EMERALDS

INTERNATIONAL
The World's Foremost Emerald Jeweller

NASSAU: RAWSON SQUARE, BAY STREET ® 240 BAY STREET



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007, PAGE 11



@ LOCAL Government and Consumer Affairs Minister
Alfred Gray speaks to Mayaguanans



Gi SHELL and straw craft students from Inagua are pictured
during the graduation ceremony

(Photos: BIS/Gladstone a




ATLANTIS, BEACH TOWER ® ATLANTIS, ROYAL TOWERS #* MARINA VILLAGE AT ATLANTIS

ne re ences itn a _ igen, ian, elim atin, i gO Otte: pean, came aaasae catatiamn sll, Ce OO en eA cA A EI, Ln OO, ccna,

oS THIS exhibition of fnagua-made bags was a hit among the
ladies





PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007

THE TRIBUNE '



Prince praises

achievements of
awards scheme

PARADISE ISLAND - A
noted reduction in the recidi-
vism rate among young offend-
ers along with an increase in the
number of young participants
passing basic exams were just
some of the successes His Roy-
al Highness Prince Edward, the
Earl of Wessex pointed out
while lauding the many achieve-
ments of the Governor General
Youth Awards Programme.

Prince Edward was the spe-
cial guest speaker at a dinner
ceremony held at Café Mar-
tinique at Atlantis in celebration
of the programme’s 20th year of
existence in the Bahamas.

The prince: thanked scores of
local supporters who gathered
at the black tie gala, hosted by
Kerzner International. Among
those in attendance were Gov-
ernor General Arthur Hanna
and former governor general
Sir Orville Turnquest.

Over the last few years,
Prince Edward said, the pro-
gramme has been working
increasingly with young offend-
ers who have ended up on the
wrong side of the tracks.

“But we’ve come to find that
when engaged in the award,
that we can offer them a way
back. We can restore their self-
confidence, we can restore their
belief and their ability to actu-
ally do something positive. And
there are 26 countries around
the world that are now work-
ing actively with young offend-
ers and I am glad to say that
the Bahamas is one of them.”

Prince Edward noted that
South Africa has the biggest
programme of this nature where
over 15,000 young people have
completed their awards through
correctional centres. He said of
those that have been released,
only 12 have been readmitted.

“The normal re-offending
rate amongst young offenders
— and this [ regret to say is a

@ A YOUNG member of the Bahamas National Children’s







Choir directed by Patricia Bazard performs at the dinner

ceremony



@ PRINCE Edward is pictured with Kerzner International’s
chief operating officer, Nan Palmer

similar figure in most countries
around the world = is 87 to 90
per cent re-offending and those
who do the award we know we
can reduce that to two to five
per cent. So it does make a huge
difference in young people’s
lives,” he said.

Prince Edward said that in

the northwest territory of Cana-
da, there is a remote area com-
prised of indigenous young peo-
ple in which only 30 per cent
passed their basic exams. He
noted that after introducing the
awards in that region they were
able to re-engage those young
people, motivate them to come

oe

bi
jl





> Si is
ao
IA

HIS Royal Highness Prince Edward, the Earl of Wessex addresses a dinner ceremony held at
Café Martinique at Atlantis in celebration of the Governor General Youth Awards programme’s
20th year of existence in the Bahamas

are.

to school and develop in them
the belief that they could actu-
ally achieve in non-academic
areas and now 90 per cent are
passing their basic exams.
Chairman of the board of
trustees of the GGYA, Robert
Nihon said that over 10,000
young Bahamians have bene-
fitted from the programme.

EE

St

Nihon described the Bahamas
programme as “the most suc-
cessful” in the region. “We are
the envy of every country in the
Caribbean because they look up
to the Bahamas because we are
well funded, we are well organ-
ised and because we succeed,”
he said.

Over the last six years Kerzn-



& MEMBERS of the Bahamas National Children’s Choir performs at the dinner ceremony.

(Photos: Joshua Yentis)

er International along with its.

‘corporate partners have success-

fully raised nearly $500,000 for
the GGYA, for the development

‘of the youth in the Bahamas.

One of the highlights of the

: evening’s event included a spur

of the moment donation by four
donors who each pledged:
$100,000 to the awards scheme.








SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007



U

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street















Saw

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE >
Tel: (242) 351-3010





March 1 ‘critical date’ “ne:

-

%

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

aha Mar yester-
day described
March 1, 2007,
as the “critical
benchmark
date” for its $2.4 billion Cable
Beach project, as it represent-
ed the deadline for concluding
talks on a supplemental Heads
of Agreement with the Gov-

- ernment, a step that would

pave the way to comfortably
seal its joint venture agreement
with Harrah’s Entertainment.

John Forelle, Baha Mar
Resorts’ vice-chairman and
general counsel, said both the
developers and the Govern-
ment were committed to con-
cluding their negotiations in
the remaining three-and-a-half
weeks, but there was “work to
do, effort required, and a lot
of focus [needed] by us and the
Government to bring it to
fruition”.

He explained that March 1
was key for various reasons,
including Baha Mar’s con-

Developer needs to conclude agreement with sovernment to
enable it to close joint venture for $2.4bn investment by March
15, as Harrah’s and Starwood have ‘walk away’ clauses

struction schedule, and it
would also represent a “mile-
stone date” in terms of taking
the $2.4 billion project from
the transaction to operational
phase.

But Mr Forelle said that date
was of more immediate impor-
tance to Baha Mar in relation
to its joint venture agreement
with Harrah’s Entertainment,
which the two parties had
agreed to close by mid-March
2007, around March 15.

The joint venture agreement
with Harrah’s “requires us to
deliver a number of condi-
tions” precedent to both it and
Baha Mar’s other operating

SEE page 8B

- for Baha Mar project

eT NR ae TE



@ AN artist’s impression of Baha Mar’s $2.4 billion Cable Beach project





B AN aerial view of Valentine’s Resort & Marina

(Photo: Government photographer)

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

‘THE Bahamas’ established trust
legislation and a strong workforce
make it a leader in the industry
despite the emerging competitive
threat posed by Switzerland, finan-
cial services executives were told
yesterday, .

Richard Brooks, director of the
Royal Bank of Canada Trust Com-
pany told delegates attending the
Nassau Conference that the
Bahamas had a headstart over the
Swiss on trusts.

He explained that Switzerland
was completing its trust legislation,
and the level of Bahamian compet-
itiveness will depend on how much
the Bahamas continues to develop
its trust products. “The Bahamas is
so much more established,” he said.

Mr Brooks comments came dur-
ing the question and answer por-
tion of his presentation on Tax
Models in Europe, in which he took
a closer look at European tax struc-

tures and their implications to .

Bahamian structures.

He explained that when dealing ,

with European countries, it was
essential that Bahamian institutions
and intermediaries took nothing for
granted and obtained specific

advice from the country in which

their clients resided, as laws regard-
ing tax structures vary from country

.to country.

Mr Brooks warned persons doing
business in Europe, particularly in
the case of real estate sales, not to
overlook value-added tax (VAT),
because in some cases persons were
surprised when they received a sep-
arate VAT bill.

__ Ministry promises to

raise legislation pace

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

THE Ministry of Financial Services and Investments yesterday pledged
to hasten the pace of new legislation, and to expand on a branding survey
to assist the development of the financial services industry.

Minister of State for Finance, Senator James Smith, officially opened the
Nassau Conference on behalf of his cabinet colleague, the minister of
financial services and investments, Vincent Peet.

Mr Smith read Mr Peet’s prepared remarks yesterday morning. He
urged a private -public partnership that would take the industry to new

heights.

“I invite you, the stakeholders and players in the industry, to begin to
look beyond this jurisdiction as perhaps a mere service centre, and to
begin to consider yourselves as trend setters,” Mr Smith said.

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government has “a real concern
that marinas are being developed without
any clear idea of how they will fit in with the
islands where they are going”, the Prime
Minister’s chief planning consultant told
The Tribune yesterday.

Malcolm Martini, who works in the Min-
istry of Energy and the Environment, said
Cabinet’s interest in developing a policy to
regulate marina developments in the
Bahamas had been “twigged” by such pro-

ye

Last 12 months:

*Stock prices can go down as well as up, Past performance is ho guarantee of future

Choose EC
Choose Fidelity

\

‘Stand up
to BIC’

Carrier denies ‘flagrant
breaches’ of its licence
on ViBE, claiming PUC
approval not required
as not a new product

lg By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Public Utilities Commis-
sion (PUC) has been urged to
“stand up to” the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company
(BTC), and “confront flagrant and
deliberate breaches” of its licence,
by the state-owned carrier’s two
chief competitors. ‘

In a February 2, 2007, letter sent
to the telecommunications sector
regulator, Paul Hutton-Ashkenny,
president of IndiGo Networks,
alleged that BTC had “apparently
ignored the PUC” and continued
with the launch of its ViBe Voice
over Internet Protocol (VoIP) ser-
vice, despite the fact it had received
no regulatory approval to do so.

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said the
events leading up to ViBE’s launch,
as he understood them saw the

SEE page 9B

‘Real concerns’ over marina development

Harbour Island marina triggers Cabinet interest, with
chief planning consultant feeling Bahamas gives ‘too much
away’ to marinas through Hotels Encouragement Act

jects on Harbour Island.

There, the huge marina being construct-
ed for the Valentine’s Resort & Marina is
totally out of scale to the island’s shoreline
and overall size.

Mr Martini said the initiative to draft a
policy to govern marina developments was
started when he was attached to the Office

of the Prime Minister, and the carried over
to his new ministry.

The draft policy document was crafted -
by a committee featuring himself, Captain
Anthony Allens, head of the Port Depart-

SEE page 5B

Xe

Oar ee Wutelanclin)
Since Inception February 1999

results, Read the Offering Memorandum caretully before you invest.

i ) FIDELITY

NTR EME UL G

> Nassau: T 356.7764 e Freeport: T 352.6676/7

Nar Nt
aU

STOCK rene | INVESTMENT | Me sun3 |
BROKERAGE ,|_ FINANCE MANAGEMENT | ESTATE

DUO RS U TT Nae ae CM rN kg ea SULLA CHEN
mse

“My government pledges to do its

utmost to assist in this process, for a Nena ‘i anny : TALC)
example, to make the process of SEE page 5B ah ; : % Gaui tt sag SC Ay SEY

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THE MARKETS

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Wall
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shrugs
off tech

warning

BY JOE BEL BRUNO .
Associated Press x

NEW YORK — Wall Street
eked out a modest advance
Tuesday after investors found
little motivation in remarks by |
Federal Reserve officials and
also shrugged off a warning
from chip maker National Semi-
conductor. _

Major indexes squeaked by
with gains after spending most

_of the session extending Mon-
day’s losses. Investors have
been left looking for direction

after the Fed held interest rates

steady last week, and as corpo~

‘rate earnings season winds
down. —

Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke

_ did not address interest rates
when he spoke before the
Omaha Chamber of Commerce.
Similarly, speeches by two,
other central bankers and Trea- ,
sury Secretary Henry Paulson
also had little news to sway

’ investors.

National Semi warned that
sales will fall steeper than
expected; the news initially cast
a shadow across the market, but
by the close of trading, even the
tech-dominated Nasdaq com-
posite index had recovered.

The Dow rose 4.57, or 0.04
percent, to 12,666.31

Broader stock indicators fin-
ished narrowly higher. The
Standard & Poor’s 500 index
added 1.01, or 0.07 percent, to
1,448.00, and the Nasdaq rose
0.89, or 0.04 percent, to 2,471.49.

-Stocks got some support
from a decline in bond yields as
fixed-income investors place

- bets on where interest rates are
headed.

The yield on the benchmark
10-year Treasury note fell to
4.77 percent from 4.81 percent —
late Monday. The dollar was
lower against other major. cur-
rencies, while gold prices
advanced. ‘

Oil prices continued to climb
on concerns that a blast of arc-
tic weather in the Midwest and
Northeast might linger, and
drive up demand for heating
fuel. A barrel of light sweet
crude rose 14 cents to $58.88 on |
the New York Mercantile
Exchange.

Technology stocks were
among the market’s biggest
decliners, led by the semicon-
ductor sector. National Semi
fell 64 cents, or 2.8 percent, to:
$22.68 after it predicted lower-
than-expected sales in the third
quarter because of lower ship-
ments to the Asia Pacific region.

In other corporate news,
McClatchy, the nation’s second-
largest newspaper publisher,
rose 53 cents to $39.29 after its
operating earnings surpassed
Wall Street projections.

Advancing issues outnum-
bered advancers by about 2 to 1
on the New York Stock
Exchange, where consolidated
volume came to. 2.63 billion
shares, up from 2.47 billion a
day earlier.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies rose 3.34, or
0.41 percent, to 810.03. The
index surpassed 800 for the first
time last week, and reached an
all-time high of 810.49 in the
previous session.

Overseas, Japan’s .Nikkei
stock average closed up 0.36
percent. At the close, Britain’s
FTSE 100 was up 0.45 percent,
Germany’s DAX index added
0.02 percent, and France’s
CAC-40 fell 0.08 percent.

+14 Ay





RETAIL

A court’s decision will let the
nation’s largest class-action
employment discrimination
lawsuit go to trial.

BY DAVID KRAVETS
Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — A federal
appeals court ruled Tuesday that
Wal-Mart Stores, the world’s largest .
private employer, must face a class-
action lawsuit alleging female
employees were discriminated
against in pay and promotions.

UPGRADES: Cisco Systems Techni

Newer, faster routers have
helped Cisco win business and
sales of cable TV set-top boxes
also surged 21 percent in the
quarter, after Cisco bought
Scientific- Atlanta for

$6.9 billion last year.

BY JORDAN ROBERTSON
Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — Cisco Sys-
tems’ second-quarter profit surged
nearly 40 percent as the world’s
largest maker of networking gear
benefited from equipment
upgrades to support bandwidth-
hogging video downloads.

The company also raised its rev-
enue guidance for the current quar-
ter, apparently quashing analyst
concerns about slowing growth as
its customers complete the most
extensive round of network
upgrades since the pre-Y2K scram-
ble.

. Cisco shares jumped nearly 5
percent in extended-session trad-
ing.
For the quarter ended Jan. 27,
Cisco’s net income was $1.9 billion,
or 31 cents per share, compared
with $1.4 billion, or 22 cents per
share, for the same period last year.

Excluding one-time charges,
Cisco said Tuesday it earntd $2.1
billion for the quarter, or 33 cents



AUTOMOTIVES

Toyota hits

The ruling by the 9th U.S. Circuit
Court of Appeals upholds a 2004 fed-
eral judge’s decision to let the
nation’s largest class-action employ-
ment discrimination lawsuit go to
trial. The suit claims that as many as
1.5 million current and former female
employees earned less than men and
were bypassed for promotions.

The lawsuit exposes the Benton-
ville, Ark.-based retailing power-
house to the possibility of billions of
dollars in damages.

Wal-Mart claimed that the con-

ventional rules of class actions
should not apply in the case because
its 3,400 stores, including Sam’s Club
warehouse outlets, operate like inde-
pendent businesses, and that the
company did not have a policy of dis-
criminating against women.

But the court, in a 2-1 decision, dis-
agreed.

“Plaintiff's expert opinions, factual
evidence, statistical evidence and
anecdotal evidence present signifi-
cant proof of a corporate policy of
discrimination and support plaintiff's



TECHNOLOGY

cal Marketing Engineer David Lin, shown at the company’s
headquarters in San Jose, Calif., works on solutions for Cisco teleworkers who work from home.

Cisco’s second-quarter.
profit jumps 40 percent

GOOD REPORT: ‘Cisco achieved
record results,’ Chief Executive
John Chambers said.

per share. :
The San Jose-based technology
bellwether, which makes the rout-
ers and switches that direct data
over computer networks, said reve-
nue for the quarter was $8.4 billion,
a 27 percent jump from the $6.6 bil-
lion in the same period last year.
Analysts were expecting Cisco
to earn, on average, 31 cents per
share on $8.28 billion in revenue.
Cisco said $639 million of its
sales came from Scientific-Atlanta,

another

quarterly sales record

@ The report of another quarter
of record profits for Toyota Motor
painted a rosy picture fora
company trying to get to the top
spot.

BY YURI KAGEYAMA
Associated Press

TOKYO — Toyota, hot on the
heels of General Motors to become
the world’s No. 1 automaker, reported
a 7.3 percent jump in quarterly profit
Tuesday on booming sales in North
America and Europe that offset slug-
gish demand in Japan.

Toyota Motor recorded group net
profit of 426.8 billion yen ($3.6 bil-

lion) in the three months ended Dec.
31, up from 397.6 billion yen the same
period the previous year.

Quarterly sales climbed a solid 15.2
percent to 6.15 trillion yen ($51.2 bil-

lion) from 5.33 trillion yen a year ago,

as the remodeled RAV 4 sport utility
vehicle and Camry mid-sized sedan
sold briskly in North America, and
demand was strong for the Yaris
compact in Europe, Toyota said in a
release.

“Toyota’s numbers are super,
super strong,” said Koji Endo, auto
analyst with Credit Suisse First Bos-

*TURN TO TOYOTA











PHOTOS BY PAUL SAKUMA/AP

the world’s second-largest cable
television box seller that Cisco
acquired for $6.9 billion in the third
quarter of last year.

“Cisco achieved record results |
that were well balanced across our |
geographies, products, services, |

customer segments and new mar-
kets,” Cisco Chief Executive John
Chambers said in a statement. |
“This illustrates our key competi- |
tive advantage of being able to |
develop a long-term vision, execute |
on our strategy and deliver consis- |
tent results.” |
Despite Cisco’s phenomenal |
results in recent quarters, some |
analysts have expressed concerns |
about slowing growth as the initial |
boost from Scientific-Atlanta’s |
sales wears off. |
During a conference call, Cham- |
bers said the company expects |
third-quarter revenue to grow 19 to
20 percent over last year, when |
including results from Scientific- |
Atlanta. Without Scientific-Atlanta,
Cisco’s standalone revenue is |
expected to grow between 15 and 17 |
percent, Chambers said. |
The results were announced |
after financial markets ended regu- |
lar trading. Earlier, shares of Cisco |
lost 23 cents to close at $27.28 on |
the Nasdaq Stock Market. Shares
gained $1.30 in extended trading. |



Wal-Mart women bias case is sent to trial

contention that female employees
nationwide were subjected to a com-
mon pattern and practice of discrimi-
nation,” the court wrote.

U.S. District Judge Martin Jenkins,
the San Francisco trial court judge
who said the case could proceed, had
ruled that lawyers for the women had
enough anecdotal evidence to war-
rant a class-action trial. Wal-Mart
took the case to the San Francisco-
based appeals court.

*TURN TO WAL-MART

EUROPEAN
CENTRAL BANK

Opposite
views
taken on
euro’s
effect

@ Under fire by France, the
European Central Bank is poised
to keep interest rates steady until
March.

BY MATT MOORE
Associated Press

FRANKFURT, Germany — The
European Central Bank finds itself
squarely in the middle of a debate it
wants no part of: Should the coun-
tries that use the euro have an influ-
ence on its decision-making process?

The bank, which is expected to
hold interest rates for the 13-country
euro zone steady on Thursday, says it
is that independence that keeps the
economy from souring.

The two largest economies in the
common currency take opposite
views.

In France, politicians — including
presidential aspirants — have lam-
basted the bank for letting the euro
rise by nearly 15 percent in value
against the dollar; an increase that
could conceivably dull the country’s
competitive edge by making exports
more expensive, particularly to the
United States. ,

Germany, meanwhile, has
defended the ECB for keeping the
region’s growth on track. Chancellor
Angela Merkel has called the debate
worrisome and the euro a convenient
scapegoat.

“We must be careful that our diffi-
culties — adapting to globalization,
carrying out reforms, resolving social
problems — aren't all piled on the
euro’s back,” she told French news-
paper Le Monde in an interview last
month. “If we want to preserve confi-
dence in the euro, we must leave it
outside political debate, leave the
European Central Bank its indepen-

|” dence. That is the very firm German

position.”

ECB President Jean-Claude Tri-
chet has staunchly defended the
bank, saying that because of the
bank’s independence, the euro zone’s
first 12 members saw 2.7 million jobs
created in the eight years before the
currency’s introduction, and 11.7 mil-
lion in the eight years that followed.

After the bank’s last meeting, Tri-
chet said that the ECB takes into
account the needs of its 13 members,

*TURN TO RATES

KOJI SASAHARA/AP

OH WHAT A FEELING: Toyota Motor President Katsuaki Watanabe is
shown in this December photo. Toyota, hot on the heels of General
Motors to become the world’s No. 1 automaker, reported a

7.3 percent jump in quarterly profit Tuesday.



—



iy
AT.

PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007

Pavartan eV KKsmouM MO uniele
ir the PLP acknowledge the Oo ae

Uwe yibune, need we say more?
Thanks, Mr Prime Minister.



PM on The Tribune:
...no matter what

The Tribune says...
the more they do it,

the more many of you

must cut it out.

Cut it out and put it on

your headquarters’ wall.

Motivate our people.
Show them who’s trying
to take us out.

Put their faces on the

wall. Put the stories

on the wall.

If The Tribune can do this to the PLP...
imagine what we can do for your business.

Being bound to swear to
the dogmas of no master.




Lewsppyor



THE TRIBUNE |







WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007

SEGTHON

Fax: (242) 328-2398



Youth athletes
impress at
the Star
Performers
Track Classic

@ TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE
JOHNSON

Sports Reporter

THE future in track
and field is looking
brighter for the
Bahamas and the
Bahamas Association
of Athletic Association
(BAAA) now that
clubs have made
space for youth ath-
letes.

More than 100 youth

athletes participated at.

the fourth annual Bak-
er Star Performers
Track Classic held over
the weekend.

The big entry was
divided into six divi-
sions, the under nine,
11 and 13.

This was the second

‘ meet of the year that

hosted younger ath-
letes, who pleased the
crowd with their times
and dedication in

the race and field
events.

Stacked

There was also a

- stacked field in the

under 13 girls 800m.
with Talia Thompson’s
dominating.

The younger member

~ of the Strider’s Track

Club clocked 2:27.60
seconds to set anew
meet record. She was

: ‘-." followed by Eddecia
>, Carey, who also ran

under the meet record
time.

Her time was 2:33.70
seconds.

Another two records
were laid to rest by
D’ Angelo Mackey in
the under nine division
for boys.

Mackey’s reached
15.00 seconds and 31.60

-seconds in the 100m
- and 200m respectively.

Kerie Rolle added his
name to the record mix

in the under 13 boys

400m, clocking 1:03.80
seconds.
It was a stacked field

‘in the 200m in the
- under nine division.

Coming out on top was
Whittney Thompson of

Jordan Prince William

in a time of 34.80 sec-
onds, she was followed
by Daejha Moss in
35.10 seconds and,
Krista Collie in 35.80
seconds.

Asia Butler took the
under 11 girls 200m in

- 31.20 seconds, Janiece

Henderson was second
in 31.90 seconds and
Georgette Wiliams
third in 31.91 seconds.

Field

On the boys end,
Timothy Wilson head-
ed the field in 28.60
seconds, Shalom Cash
came in second in 30.30
seconds, while Julius
Nottage took the third
spot in 30.50 seconds.

The third place finish
in the 200m didn’t

‘’ bother Williams, who
“. secured victories in the
400m and long jump.

Her time in the 400m
was recorded at 1:14.70
seconds with 3.78m in
the long jump.

Tommy Outten led
the field in the boys 13
100m with a time of
13.70 seconds, he was
followed by Rolle in
28.30 seconds and Oral
Rolie in 28.31 seconds.

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

- Machines secure
championship piace

|_| TARAE SWEETING from SAC tries to hold onto the ball





as Prince William applies defence.



(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

m@ BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON

Sports Reporter

ST AUGUSTINE’S College
Big Red Machines junior girl’s
proved why they finished up in
the number one spot of the
BAISS league yesterday.

The do-or-die game saw Ali-

cia Musgrove and Tarae Sweet-
ing take charge of the Big Red
Machines’ offence to send the
number four seed Jordan Prince
William Falcons packing.

The team pulled off a come-
from-behind 37-21 victory to
secure their championship
appearance, with the Queen’s
College Comets.

The Falcons, who got off to a
quick start in the first quarter,
held the Big Red Machines to
only six points.

But the Big Red Machines
came chugging back into the
game behind the tough play of
Musgrove and Sweeting, who
ended the game with 15 and 14
points respectively.

Musgrove was the go-to man
for the outside shot while Sweet-
ing cleaned house for the Big
Red Machines on the inside.

Sweeting earned an easy six
points after pulling down three
offensive rebounds. On the
defensive end she would feed
Musgrove with the long over-

shead pass, which was placed on

the glass for two more points.
Despite the run, the Big Red
Machines still found themselves

down by one point heading into

half time.

This deficit didn’t sit well with
their head coach Annastacia
Sands-Moultrie, who rushed the






team into the locker room to
plan their second half strategy.

The Big Red Machines
returned to the court with fire in
their eyes, and for the first time
in the game the team moved
into the lead.

But the one point lead would-
n’t last that long as the Falcons’
Brittney Greenslade tied things
up once again.

This would be the last tie in
the game thanks to the aggres-
sive defence the Big Red
Machines were putting on the
Falcons. ©

Defence

The defence, which placed
Ashley Bethel on the Falcons’
hot hands Alexis Maycock, com-
pletely shut the Falcons’ offence
down.

Maycock was a one man
wreck for the Big Red
Machines, she had posted 12
points at the half. These were
the only points scored by her.

Falcons’ head coach Hattie
Moxey said: “It really wasn’t dis-
appointing to me because, my
girls, they needed a lot of prac-
tice but they never show up
when I call practice. Instead of
coming into practice they went
to the senior girls game. This
team can play a good half, but
they don’t have the endurance
to last a full game.

“They played a superb half, I
am quite comfortable about
their level of play in the first
half. I won’t change anything
about this game, they just need-
ed to be in shape and they
weren't. They weren’t able to

~ â„¢ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE

run the floor, nor did they have
the endurance to last the whole
game.”

It will be a rebuilding process
for Moxey and the Falcons next
season, only four of their right
girls will be eligible to play in
the junior division.

The Big Red Machines would
end the second half with 22
points, holding the Falcons to
just three points.

According to their head coach
Sands-Moultrie, the team will
have to continue on with their
aggressive play if they want
to defeat the Comets on Thurs-
day.

She said: “They were a little
scared in the first half so I.told

‘them that they will need to

come out and play a little hard-
er than they did if they wanted
to move on. But overall I am
pleased with the way they
played, they were able to pull it
off.

“We had to toughen up on
our defence in the second half, I
preached that to them in the
back just before we returned.
Like I always told them, defence
will bring offence, so they start-

- ed to play the type of defence

we are so used to playing and
their offence automatically
came.”

The Big Red Machines are
scheduled to play the Comets
in the first championship game,
set for Thursday at the Sir
Kendal Isaacs gym.

Up until press time the Fal-
cons* junior boys were still
awaiting the winners of the Big
Red Machines’ junior boys and
the St John’s Giants junior boys
game.

R Walker Knights shine in -
-point rout over the Magics







B BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

THE CR Walker Knights enjoyed a 39-point
rout over the Government High Magics in the
Government Secondary Schools Sports Associ-
ation senior girls matchup yesterday.

The Knights shined behind the 1-2 punch of
guards Firnethra Brown and Keva Barry as they
exploded for 21 points in a 32-2 half-time advan-
tage enroute to a 56-17 blowout victory.

CR Walker’s coach Ken Lightbourne said it
was just a matter of getting back in sync after
having their five-game winning streak snapped
with back-to-back losses against the CI Gibson
Rattlers and the CC Sweeting Cobras,

“The games that we play after those losses,
I’m trying to see if we can get an up tempo game
so that the girls can practise how we will play
when we face those big teams in the playoffs,”
said Lightbourne, whose Knights improved to
5-2.

“When we get down to the playoffs and hope-
fully the championship, we want to make sure
that we can keep our endurance up so we can run
with them.”

Lightbourne said he also tried to utilise his
players when they are in foul trouble, so that
they can be comfortable whenever the situation
arises in the postseason.

In “getting back to where we need to be,”
Lightbourne didn’t have to worry about his
team’s performance, even though it was against
the hapless Magics, who are 0-6.

Brown and Barry ran an effective up tempo
game, picking off a number of steals and scoring
on the fast break lay-ups as they helped the
Knights to jump out to an impressive 14-0 advan-
tage.

Magics’ coach Leroy Thompson kept shouting
“take the ball inside,” but Government High
had difficulties getting the ball over the half
court line as CR Walker smothered them with

their defence. ;

After a couple of unsuccessful tries, Katecha
Gilcud finally broke through the defence and
scored on a lay-up to put the Magics on the
scoreboard at 14-2.

But the Knights went right back to what got .
them started as they ran the ball and came
through with some easy baskets enroute to shut-
ting down the Magics the rest of the period.

It didn’t help Government High either as
Thompson sat down Crystal Curry - his best
player - for the majority of the period.

But after giving them a “tongue lashing” at
the break, the Magics picked their game up a
little more. They were able to get the ball to the
basket, but they missed a bundle of shots.

They fell behind 40-2 on Brown’s three-point-
er then Curry answered with a three-pointer for
a Magics’ 42-5 deficit. She was fouled on Melesha
Petterson’s fifth foul, but Curry missed the free
throw that could made it a four-point play.

Just as he did in the first half, Thompson con- .
tinued to shout at his players to “pass the ball.”
But instead, they watched as the Knights showed
them how to do it.

‘GHS’ team captain Natasha Whymms said
they just simply didn’t play up to their expecta-
tions.

“T didn’t think we played that much defence
and we didn’t put any pressure on the ball,” she
reflected. “IJ don’t know what happened today,
but we didn’t play like we practised.

“In practice, we practise hard, but we didn’t put
the plays on the court. I don’t know what hap-
pened. We might have to practise a little more.”

Using the game as a practise, the Knights got a
game high 15 from Brown, 11 from Barry, nine
from Darrenique Young and eight from Petter-
son. Nadia Seymour helped out with four and
Roickia Richardson and Megan Thompson both
had two,

Curry and Gilcud both finished with seven
and Jessica Thomas and Kaylissa Russell added
four apiece.

lm CR WALKER’S guard Firnethra Brown goes up for a lay-up over the Government High Mag-
ics in their GSSSA senior girls game yesterday at the DW Davis Gym. CR Walker went on to win

the game 56-17.

(Photo: Tim Clarke)

ee ak tt lie nt. all



ee ee Ee ae ee ea ee ee ee



PAGE 8E, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007



Liverpool aout |
to come under
American
ownership

m SOCCER
LONDON
Associated Press

FIRST it was Manchester
United. Then Aston Villa. And
now Liverpool, with a record 18
English championships, also is
about to come under American
ownership.

Liverpool chairman David
Moores said Tuesday he will sell
his 51 percent stake in the sto-
ried club to George Gillett Jr.,
owner of the Montreal Canadi-
ens, and Tom Hicks, who owns
the Texas Rangers and the Dal-
las Stars. Moores recommended
other shareholders do the same.

The $430.8 million offer from
Gillett and Hicks includes an
agreement to pay off about $89
million of club debt and pledges
to build and finance a 60,000-
seat stadium.

“TI believe this is a great step
forward for Liverpool, its share-
holders and its fans,” said
Moores, whose family has owned
the club for decades.

“This club is my passion and
forms a huge part of my life.
After much careful considera-
tion, have agreed to sell my
shares to assist in securing the
investment needed for the new
stadium and for the playing -
squad.”

Broadcaster ITV said it also
would sell its 9.9 percent stake,
and Gillett and Hicks said they
had received acceptances from
62.2 percent of Liverpool’s

. Shareholders under the deal that

values shares at $9,800 each.

The American businessmen
need to acquire 90 percent of the
shares through Kop Football
Ltd., the British company they
formed to launch the bid, before
they can assume full control. The
Kop is the name given to the sec-
tion where hardcore fans sit in
stadiums such as Anfield, where
Liverpool now plays.

“This is truly the largest sport
in the world, the most important
sport in the world, and this is the
most important club in the most
important sport in the world,”
Gillett said at a news conference
in Liverpool. “And what a privi-
lege we have to be associated
with it.”

If Gillett and Hicks succeed in
taking full control, Liverpool
would become the third Ameri-
can-owned Premier League club.
Malcolm Glazer, who owns the
Tampa Bay Buccaneers, won
control of Manchester United in
2005, while Cleveland Browns
owner Randy Lerner took over
Aston Villa in September.

Gillett stressed that the pro-
posed takeover differs from that
of Manchester United by Glazer,
who borrowed heavily against
future earnings to fund his pur-
chase.

“Owning this great franchise is
special,” Gillett said. “We want
to add to that luster, not detract
from that luster.”

The pair would be co-chair-
men of the club, with a son from
each man’s family on the board.
Rick Parry will stay as chief
executive and Moores, who has
been chairman since 1991, will
become lifetime. president.

“When I looked into this over
the past month, I was awe-struck
with the history and the true pas-
sion of the fans compared to oth-
er sports I am involved with,”
Hicks said in an interview on
Liverpool’s Web site. -

Liverpool said the proposed
takeover would be a “great step
forward” for a club that has been
European champion five times
— more than any other English
team — but last won the league
in 1990,

“T feel very excited, it has
been a long process,’ * Parry said.
“It is about three years since we |
started, so I’m very excited to be
bringing it to a conclusion.”

The deal was announced a

week after a Dubai-based con-

sortium pulled out of a proposed
takeover when it discovered Liv-
erpool was listening tothe rival
bid.

A solo bid from Gillett was
turned down in November in
favor of the approach from
Dubai International Capital,
owned by the ruler of Dubai,
Sheik Mohammed bin Rashid al-
Maktoum. Gillett renewed his
overtures after persuading Hicks
to join him when the pair talked
at the NHL All-Star game Jan.
24 in Dallas.

“When you sit in our little
country you get an unusual per-
spective, and probably an incor-
rect one, because we think our
sports are pretty popular,”
Gillett said. “Then you come
over here and see the tribal
aspects of the fans and their
affection and support for the
team and realize it’s a game
which is watched by billions.”

Liverpool received clearance
from the Liverpool City Council
in September to build a new
60,000-seat stadium, moving it
closer to moving from the
45,000-capacity Anfield it has
used since 1892.

@ CR WALKER’S double
trouble Keya Barry and Fir-
nethra Brown clamp down on
the defence of the Govern-
ment High Magics during their
GSSSA senior girls basketball
game yesterday at the DW
Davis Gym. The Knights won
the game 56-17.

e SEE SPORTS FRONT

















(Photo: Tim Clarke)



@ SAC’S Alica Mus-
grove drives to the basket
hard for two points against

the Falcons,

(Photo: Felipé Major/

Tribune staff)

sae Ssh a le

=

TRIBUNE SPORTS

. BA PRINCE William High School defender tries to stop SAC’s Alicia
Musgrove as she drives to the basket . SAC won the game 37-21.
¢ SEE SPORTS FRONT

(Photo: Felipé Major/ Tribune Staff)



Bianca has two meets to perfect jumps

@ TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Sports Reporter



BAHAMIAN Bianca Stu-
art, leading female long
jumper for Southern Illinois
University, has two more
meets before the big confer-
ence showdown. The Mis-
souri Valley Conference
Indoor championships are set
for February 23rd-24th, in
Carbondale Illinois.

Since she has already sur-
passed the provisional mark-
ing for the NCAA indoors
championships, her goal at
these two meets will be the
automatic standard.

Before she can do this, she
will have to execute every
phase of her jump to perfec-
tion.

According to her coach
Andre Scott, achieving the.
automatic standard is not out

of her reach, but will rest in
her hands when she steps on
the runway.

Coach Scoit said: “I think
she can get close to the mark
but I don’t know if she can
hit it or not, that will be left
totally up to her. I would say
the ability is there, but it
depends on how she feels
and how aggressive she is on
the runway. She can hit that
mark or come really close to
it.

°

Sprint

“I think she is on the same
pace she was on last year.
Actually we just had a meet
over the weekend and she
jumped 20-foat-3, and she is
starting to sprint well too.
We are trying to get her back
into-the shape she was in
~ before she left here to head
home for the Christmas

break.”

Over the weekend, at the
McDonalds Invitational, Stu-
art clocked 7.75 seconds to
win the open women’s 60m
dash. .She was just seconds
shy of the provisional time,
which is set at 7.44 seconds.

In the long jump she sailed
to 6.19m, surpassing the pro-
visional standards once again
and defeated the field. Last
week she had a best of
6.17m,

Scott added: “I think she
has lost some of her power
from not lifting the way she
should lift in the weight
room. But all of the elements
are coming back and hope-
fully some time soon she will
get to jump out in the 6.40m
range.

“As far as the running
part, I think she will need to
get back into the weight
room so she could get in

some back squats, a little
heavier than the weight she is
lifting; and some leg jumps
onto of boxes that will get
her back into shape and help
her put down some big
jumps.

e
Injury

“Well she will have to run
the 100m and the 4x100m
basically in the outdoor sea-
son. This was our plan last
year but unfortunately she
got that injury in that groin
area and she couldn’t sprint.
I think she ran one 100m in
our second meet outdoors
and that was it — she could-
n’t run anymore.”

Since moving to the South-
ern Illinois University, Stu-
art has made a big impact.

Last year she landed her

way into the school’s record
books with a best of 20-05.75.

Stuart also competed in the
indoor championships.

Then she was forced to
watch the outdoor champi-
onships from the stands, due
to an injury.

Scott said: “It is kind of
hard to say and track her
progress because her fresh-
man year, somewhere in the
middle of the outdoor sea-
son, she strained and pulled
her hip flexor and her groin,
so it was really hard for her
to jump. She was actually
ready to jump further then,

“That injury actually both-
ered her up until the fall of
this year. Soon as we were
able to get all of that
straightened out she strained
her hamstring, but I think
she is ready.”

The NCAA championships
will take place in March and
will be hosted by the Uni-
versity of Arkansas.

\



6

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PAGE 2E, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Sampras returns
fo competition
in Boston

TENNIS
BOSTON
Associated Press

THE last time Pete Sampras
played competitive tennis in
Boston, his doubles team
notched the only victory for
the United States in the Davis
Cup quarterfinals against Aus-
tralia in 1999,

The winner of a record 14
Grand Slam singles titles
returns in three months for his
first tournament since 2002
when he participates in the
Outback Champions Series at
Boston University from May 2-
6. He wants to see how he feels
there before committing to any
of the other five tournaments
in the series for players older
than 30.

"I just want to see how it
goes," Sampras said in a tele-
phone interview Monday. "I
don't want to commit to a
bunch of them, just see how I
enjoy the week, the playing, I
didn't want to commit to some-
thing I wasn't 100 percent sure
about."

His participation in the event
was announced last Tuesday.

Boston is the second stop on
the tour and Sampras prefers
the hardcourt on which it will
be played to other surfaces in
the series. He said he enjoyed
the city when he played in the
Davis Cup where he teamed
with Alex O'Brien for a five-
set victory. Australia won the
quarterfinal 4-1 and beat
France in the final.

The 35-year-old Sampras
retired after winning the U.S.
Open in September 2002 with
a victory over Andre Agassi.
At first, he didn't miss the gru-
eling routine of tournament
tennis and practices.

"Initially, you enjoy it, you
decompress, and it's nice not
having to worry about tennis,"
he said. "The stress of trying to
win the majors was gone. It
was fun. I did some things I
didn't get a chance to do."

One of those was golf.
"After a couple of years of
that you kind of wake up as the

mornings go on feeling you
need to do a little bit more and
feel more fulfilled," he said.
"Getting up in the morning to
play golf is fun, but you miss a
little bit of the structured life
you had."

One reason he's returning is
his relationship with series co-
founder Jim Courier, who also
will be in the eight-man field in
Boston along with John McEn-
roe. Total prize money is
$142,000. To qualify for the
series, now in its second full
year, a player must have
reached a Grand Slam singles
final, been ranked in the top
five, or played singles on a
Davis Cup championship team.

"T almost in a way wish he
came back and played (regu-
larly)," McEnroe said Monday
night after attending the
Rangers’ hockey game in New
York. "I know he sort of in a
way wants to preserve what
he's already done. But no one
can take that away."

Sampras said he won't return
to the regular tennis tour
but is ready for the competi-
tion again although it's
“nothing as intense as it used
to be."

"I know that he can beat
most of these guys still — cer-
tainly at Wimbledon - so
there's a temptation for him to
want to do that," McEnroe
said. "I know he's right. He can
handlé these guys but that's his
call."

Sampras did play some exhi-
bitions and World Team Ten-
nis last year.

"I've been hitting the ball
pretty well and using the bigger
racket with the new technology
string," Sampras said. "It's,
really given me the ability to
hit the ball better today than I
did in my prime."

For the first time in 4 1/2
years, fans will get a chance to
judge for themselves in a tour-
nament setting.

"You still have a lot of pride
and you want to play well and
you want to win," he said.,
"Every time I step on the court
I still want to hit that big shot,
hit that big serve."











HotRod Association

m@ ROAD RACING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports

Reporter

AFTER spending a con-
siderable amount of money
to develop the racing site
at the Queen Elizabeth
Sports Centre, the
Bahamas HotRod Associ-
ation is in limbo as to its
future there.

The association will kick
off its 2007 season on Sun-
day, but whether or not
they will be able to occupy
the site for the rest of the
year is uncertain.

“We intend to run busi-
ness as usual, but back in
our minds, any day now,
the government can come
to us and say that con-
struction on the stadium
starts and where that
leaves us?” BHRA presi-
dent Meriline Adderley
asked.

There were reports that
the BHRA would be relo-
cated tothe plot of land
adjacent to the Govern-
ment High School.

With the Bahamas Golf
Federation being granted
18 acres of land from the
Baillou Hills Sporting
Complex, it’s sure to reach

a portion of the land that is.

being used by the BHRA.

Additionally, the gov-
ernment is getting ready to
build the new $30 million
national stadium at the
QESC, which will definite-
ly occupy some of the
space allocated to the
BHRA.

Back in 2001, former
president Don Arahna
signed a 50-year lease with
the Free National Move-
ment government for the

:. use of the land, which they
i. were to develop as a joint

venture and they eventu-
ally split the profits.

However, Arahna said
when the Progressive Lib-
eral Party came into office
in 2002, the deal was
pushed on the back burner.
“They didn’t want any-
thing to do with it,” Arah-
na claimed.

Developing

Over the past five years,
the association and its
members have spent close
to one million dollars
developing the facility.

They have constructed a
clubhouse - used as a con-
cession stand — paved two
20-feet wide lanes of road,
erected the perimeter
fences and provided light-
ing fixtures and complete
electrical power.

With all of the work that
they have done, Arahna
said it will be a pity if they
are asked to move.

“We don’t mind re-locat-
ing, if we have to, once
they can in some way com-
pensate us,” Arahna dis-
closed. “But the thing is,
the government isn’t say-
ing anything.”

Aranha said they pre-
sented a proposal to the
government, which they
feel can benefit the touris-
tic segment of the country,
but. they are yet to hear
back.

“Imagine getting a big
event here where we have
hundreds of people com-
ing here,” Aranha pointed
out.

“We can’t pay for that
kind of exposure.”

Adderley said they want
to increase the length of
the perimeter fence to
about 200 feet so that they
can accommodate more
international racing and

X RUST

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@ ABOVE: The runway
that the Bahamas HodRod
Association has used for their
racing at the Queen Elizabeth
Sports Centre.

@ RIGHT: Past president
Don Arahna and Meriline
Adderley, the new president
of the Bahamas HodRod
Association, discuss the con-
cerns they have over their site

_ at the Queen Elizabeth Sports

Centre.

eventually get their sanc-
tion.

“That is the only thing
stopping us, but we decid-
ed not to spend the money
and then tomorrow they
tell us that we have to
move,” he stated. “So we
have to put that on hold.”

Since the BHRA were
granted the lease, their
members have spent a lot
of money improving their
cars.

Johann Pyfrom, who
owns a turbo-charged 1987
Mustang, said he’s spent
more than $50,000 over the
past two years on getting
it ready to compete.

“It ran a 60 at 115 miles
per hour with a bad tune-
up,” Pyfrom revealed.
“With a safe tune-up, I’m
just trying to learn the car,
but with a safe tune-up, I
expect it to run some very
fast times.

“I think the car will run
what the outdoor class is
running.

“It’s a pro modified car
and it’s built to compete in
the outdoor class very
shortly.”

If they are not allowed
to compete on the site,
Pyfrom said he will be
highly disappointed as well
as many other rivals, who
have spent considerably
more than he has on their
cars.

“Just like track and field,
this sport can go interna-
tionally,” he charged. “But
it seemed as if they are just
willing to throw it aside.
Hopefully things will go
our way and they can re-

locate us and we can put.

the Bahamas on the map
in drag racing.”

Minister of Youth,
Sports and Culture Neville
Wisdom was unavailable
for comments up until
presstime.



voices track concern



NS 9855



Brien and Fritzgerald
star in All-Stars clash

@ SOFTBALL



KEN O’Brien had a solid
offensive attack and Harold
‘Banker’ Fritzgerald got the
job done on the mound as the
Edward ‘Bobby’ Glinton All-
Stars clobbered the Vincent
‘Winkie’ Curry All-Stars on
Sunday in the Masters Softball
League’s All-Star Classic.

O’Brien, the left fielder for
the DHL Lions, enjoyed a 2-
for-3 day - his two hits being a
triple and a home run - as he
drove in five runs and scored
once in the Glinton All-Stars’
17-6 rout over the Curry All-
Stars at the Archdeacon
William Thompson Softball
Park at the Southern Recre-
ation Grounds.

Lion’s catcher Edwin Cul-
mer was 3-for-5 with four RBIs
and two runs scored; Miller
Lite’s second baseman Henry
Williams was 2-for-3 with three
RBIs and two runs and Bat
Miller’s utility player Kirk
Knowles was 3-for-5 with two
RBIs and two runs scored.

Firtzgerald, Miller Lite’s
pitcher, picked up the win on
the mound for the Glinton All-

Stars, managed by Anthony
Huyler of the Joshua Knights
and coached by Robert Gilbert
of the Bat Miller Panthers and
Lawrence Smith of the Miller
Lite Royals.

Mike Isaacs of DHL was
tagged with the loss for the
Curry All-Stars, managed by
Audley Williams of the Dog-
house Rangers and coached by
Pat Evans of William Con-
struction and Julian Collie of
the Bat Miller Panthers.

Donnie Lockhart, a utility
player with Joshua, went 2-for-
3 with an RBI and run scored
to lead the Curry All-Stars.
Lee Rahming, catcher of the
Jets, was 1-for-3 with two RBIs
and a run scored and John
McPhee was 1-for-2 with a run
scored.

On Saturday, the league
hosted a regular season game
with the William Construction
Jets blasting the Dog House
Rangers 23-3. Mike Dillett got
the win on the mound over
John Woodside.

Roger Demeritte went 3-for-
4 with three RBIs and three
runs scored to lead the Jets.

Gary Johnson was 2-for-4

with three RBIs and three
runs; Anthony Weech was 2-
for-2 with three RBIs and
three runs; Lee Rahming was
3-for-4 with four RBIs and
three runs; Anthony Pearce
was 2-for-3 with three RBls
and two runs and Danny
Stubbs was 2-for-3 with two
RBIs and three runs scored to
help out.

In a losing effort, Kendal
Ferguson was 1-for-2 with a
run scored; Audley Williams
was 1-for-1 with an RBI and
Joey Demeritte t-for-t with
two runs scored.

@ The MSL will coutinue its
regular season action this
weekend at the Archdeacon
William Thompson Softball
Park.

On Saturday, the DHL
Lions will take on the William
Construction Jets at 1 pam. and
the Doghouse Rangers will
face the Joshua Knights at 3
p.m.

On Sunday, the lone game
will be played at 2 p.m.
between the Bat Miller Pan-
thers and the Miller Lite Roy-
als. \



_aaaeeaennnennnean ene NOAA ASAANAAAN AAA AN EAN A A

SPORTS



IN MY OPINION

DAVID J. NEAL

dneal@MiamiHerald.com




=

Washout Bowl
will not tarnish
a super season

watery Super Bow] ended what
might have been a watershed
season for the NFL.
_ Every league has its landmark sea-
sons, which shape the direction of the
league and the perception of its stars.
Sometimes the significance of these
seasons escape recognition for a few
years or even a decade.
Take 1981. That season brought the ©
rise of the San Francisco 49ers, with
third-year quarterback Joe Montana
operating the West Coast offense,
which became one of the standard
offenses of the next decade and
watered the Bill Walsh coaching tree.
On defense, rookie
Lawrence Taylor’s
arrival with the New
York Giants began
transforming outside
linebacker into a
glamour position.
Those two were the preeminent
defensive and offensive players of the

_ decade, and they aren’t too far down
on the all-time list.

By being as dreary as the weather,
Super Bowl XLI earned a place among
the all-time big-game blahs. This .
didn’t even have the appeal of historic
dominance possessed by some of
those Super demolitions from the
mid-1980s through mid-1990s. Then
again, a new universe’s birth year

- doesn’t always end with a big bang.

THE NEW BREED

Let’s start with the 2006 rookie
class, which could be best since the
legendary 1983 class. Tennessee
Titans quarterback Vince Young
showed that “natural leader” should
be listed among his myriad skills. Reg-
gie Bush of the New Orleans Saints
wasn’t the Next Gale Sayers, but,
whether as a runner, receiver or
returner, Bush creates one or two
game-changing plays each week and
affects defenses the rest of the time.
That certainly helped open spaces for
Saints receiver Marques Colston.

Three of the four teams in the con-



Herald 4



Associated Press

AUBURN HILLS, Mich. — Bos-
ton Celtics coach Doc Rivers
knows that his team would strug-
gle to beat anyone in the NBA at
the moment.

Trying to beat the Detroit Pis-
tons with newly-acquired Chris
Webber was nearly impossible.

Webber had 17 points and six
assists as the Pistons put on a pass-
ing clinic for three quar-
ters Tuesday night while
handing the Celtics their
15th consecutive loss.
This one ended 109-102.

“We really didn’t
have a chance,” Rivers said. “We
played a better team tonight. They
had some matchup advantages, and
they went right at us. The problem
is that, with Webber in the middle,
there’s not much you can do. He
might be their best passer.”

Antonio McDyess finished with
18 points in 20 minutes, hitting his



P| | WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007

OU OOUAOSOUN DBAS IRLLERLAAEL ERDAS ALDARA LEANER ETNA

PRO BASKETBALL | DETROIT 109, BOSTON 102

first eight shots before Kendrick
Perkins blocked the ninth.

McDyess and Webber com-
bined to shoot 17-for-22 from the
field against the Celtics’ over-
matched interior defense.

“We just couldn’t stop anything
in the post,” Celtics forward Wally
Szczerbiak said. “When we didn’t
double, they got a layup. When we
did double, someone cut to the bas-

ket, they made a pass, .

and they still got a
layup.”

Pistons coach Flip
Saunders was by disap-
pointed only the fourth
quarter, which saw the Celtics rally
from a 24-point deficit to make the
tinal score respectable.

“Your main guys should have
the opportunity to sit down and ice
in the fourth quarter of a game like
that,” Saunders said. “We had to
bring those guys back with 5 min-
utes left to make sure we won.”



KIRTHMON DOXIER/MCT

GOING NOWHERE FAST: Forward
Wally Szczerbiak, center, of
the Celtics gets harassed by
Richard Hamilton, left, and
Chris Webber of the Pistons.

The Celtics, who extended the
worst losing streak in franchise
history, haven’t won since a 128-119
victory in Memphis on Jan. 5. They



3E

INTERNATIONAL EDITION





have surrendered at least 100
points in five consecutive games.

“We did what we were sup-
posed to do,” Pistons guard Chaun-
cey Billups said. “That team is
obviously struggling, and we
jumped on them. They kept fight-
ing, but we won the game.” ,

The Celtics also had to send star
forward Paul Pierce home with an
infected left elbow. Pierce, who has
missed Boston’s last 23 games with’
a foot injury, is expected to be hos-
pitalized for at least two days,
which will push his possible return
to after the All-Star break.

Billups led the Pistons with 24
points, and Richard Hamilton con-
tributed 10 points and a season-
high 11 assists.

Ryan Gomes led the Celtics
with 19 points, despite only playing
4 minutes in the second half.

The Celtics kept the game close
early but trailed 56-40 at halftime.

e BASKETBALL REPORT

Celtics’ ugly skid hits lo games



COLLEGE BASKETBALL | NO. 3 OHIO STATE 76, MICHIGAN 63

oubly dangerous

Freshman stars
Conley and Oden
spur the Buckeyes

BY RUSTY MILLER
Associated Press

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Freshman point guard
Mike Conley Jr. scored a career-high 23 points,
and Greg Oden created havoc at the defensive
end, leading No. 3 Ohio State past archrival
Michigan 76-63 on Tuesday night.

Conley was a constant force for the Buckeyes
(21-3, 9-1 Big Ten) as Oden, the acclaimed fresh-
man center, battled foul trouble and sat cut 8!

minutes of the second half. Con-
ley hit 9 of his 12 shots from the
field, including two 3-pointers,
and he made all three of his foul
shots. He also had six assists, one.
steal and just one turnover in his
38 minutes. Oden added 15 points,
eight rebounds and six blocked
shots — in addition to altering
the trajectory of numerous other

ference championship games each
had a rookie running back playing an
important role. Listing the best rook-
ies no matter the position might leave
Arizona Cardinals quarterback Matt
Leinart outside the top 10, as promis-
ing as he looks. Throw in the virtual-
rookie quarterbacks, Philip Rivers of
. the San Diego Chargers and Rex

Grossman of the Chicago Bears, and
an entire generation of stars threatens
to emerge in one season.

Chargers running back LaDainian
Tomlinson already possessed star sta-
tus, of course. Now, after setting a sin-
gle-season touchdown record, Tom-
linson is being discussed as having
all-time status.

A NEW IMAGE

One thing the Indianapolis Colts’
Super Bowl victory did was change
the story on‘head coach Tony Dungy
and quarterback Peyton Manning.
Now, instead of “Can he?” it’s ““How
much longer will he try?” or “How

as many will he win?”

Te! For Dungy, this season is similar to
what 1972 was for Don Shula. It’s easy
to forget that before that 1972 season,
the previous eight seasons had people
asking “Can he?” about Shula. Man-
ning savored Super Bowl happiness
just past halftime of his career rather
than at the two-minute warning the
way John Elway did. Manning will
want more, particularly if he quickly
feels the emptiness of a playoff miss
the way Montana and Tom Brady did
the season after their teams won the
first of multiple Super Bowls.

Sunday might be the last time Man-
ning is happy (or relieved) after the
last game of the season. Joe Namath
knows. Still, it’s easy to see us looking
back on a Manning career loaded with
records and rings, laughing at the
“Can he?” question the way we laugh
at it now with Elway.

Then there were the ways Super
Bowl head coaches Dungy and Lovie
Smith stand out among their peers.

Copycats proliferate among
coaches and NFL front offices. More
than a few future coaches still trying
to figure out how they should deal _
with players, owners, general manag-
ers and the media will give serious
consideration to emulating how
Dungy and Smith treat people.

That would be a bit of irony — ina
year of too many player arrests via
immature actions, the trend could
begin to get players to act like men by
treating them like men.

IT’S A MISMATCH: Freshman center Greg Oden, center, outmuscles Courtney Sims, left,
and Reed Baker of Michigan for a rebound during the first half. Oden scored 15 points.

Associated Press

WINTER GARDEN, Fla. — Lew
Burdette, MVP of the 1957 World
Series, when he pitched the Mil-
waukee Braves to their only cham-
pionship, died Tuesday. He was 80.

Burdette had been ill with lung
cancer for an extended period.
Family members were with him

when he died at home, they told

the Atlanta Braves.

A two-time All-Star and a mem-
ber of the Braves’ Hall of Fame,
Burdette was 203-144 with a 3.66
ERA from 1950-67. He also pitched
a no-hitter.

Burdette’s greatest success
came in the 1957 Series, when he
went 3-0 with an 0.67 ERA while
pitching three complete games



TERRY GILLIAM/AP

BASEBALL | LEW BURDETTE: 1926 - 2007

Lew Burdette, 1957 World Series MVP,,.dies at 80

against the New
York Yankees.
Burdette capped
his performance
with a seven-hit
shutout in Game 7
at Yankee Sta-
dium, finishing a
run of 24 scoreless
innings in a row.
Burdette began his career with
the Yankees and was traded to the
Boston Braves for Johnny Sain dur-
ing the 195] season. He also spent
time with the St. Louis Cardinals,
the Chicago Cubs, the Philadelphia
Phillies and the California Angels.
Burdette, a righthander, led the
National League with 21 victories
in 1959 and ERA (2.70) in 1956, and

BURDETTE



he led the league in shutouts twice.
He pitched a no-hitter against the
Phillies on Aug. 18, 1960, and was
the winning pitcher in a famous
game on May 26, 1959, in which
Harvey Haddix of the Pittsburgh
.Pirates lost a perfect game in the
13th inning. Burdette pitched all
13 innings and got the victory.
Born Selva Lewis Burdette Jr. on
Nov. 22, 1926, in Nitro, W. Va., he
was called both “Lew” and “Lou.”
He was 179-120 in 13 seasons for the
Braves and also was Atlanta’s
pitching coach in 1972-73.
Burdette went 17-9 in 1957, then
took over the World Series. He
beat the Yankees 4-2 in Game 2
and outpitched Whitey Ford for a
1-0 victory in Game 5. Burdette



shots by the Wolverines inside.

Conley and Oden were teammates at Law-
rence North High School in Indianapolis, guid-
ing the school to state titles in their last three
seasons before enrolling together at Ohio State.

Jamar Butler added 11 points for Ohio State,
and the Buckeyes blocked 14 shots in the game,
putting a serious damper on Michigan’s offense.

Courtney Sims had 17 points and Dion Harris
and Ekpe Udoh 14 each for the Wolverines (16-8,
4-5), who have lost four consecutive games.

Ohio State’s fans pointed at Michigan’s bench
and chanted “N-I-T! N-I-T!” in the final minute.

Oden picked up his third foul with Ohio State
up 41-32 at the 17:20 mark of the second half, and
the Wolverines took advantage when he went to
the bench. Forcing the ball inside and pounding
the offensive boards, they cut the lead to 47-43
on a pair of foul shots by Lester Abram.

The Buckeyes bridged the next 8'2 minutes
with Othello Hunter and Matt Terwilliger on
the front line, trying to keep Sims and Udoh
from bulling their way to the basket. When
Oden returned at the 8:52 mark, Ohio State’s
lead was 56-52, but the Buckeyes pulled away. ~

came through again three days
later to clinch the title.

Burdette was 20-10 in 1958,
again teaming with Spahn to pitch
the Braves into the World Series
against the Yankees. Burdette
homered and won ‘Game 2, but,
with chances to close out the
championship, lost Game 5 and
again in Game 7. The teams were
tied at 2 in the eighth inning of the
final game, but Bill Skowron’s
three-run home run helped the
Yankees pull away and win.

Burdette is survived by his wife,
Mary Ann; son Lewis; daughters
Madge, Mary Lou Burdette-Wielo-
szynski and Elaina Fontana; a
brother; a sister; eight grandchil-
dren; and six great-grandchildren.

EE NL

rro



4E | WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007 INTERNATIONAL EDITION



BY JEFF JACOBS
The Hartford Courant

Maybe it’s not fair. Maybe it was
never fair. But evenhandedness is not
a high priority in today’s talk-show
world.

Numbers were never going to bail
out Peyton Manning. Yardage
amassed wasn’t going to unlock his
chains. Touchdown passes weren’t
going to set him free.

It’s this simple really: A Super
Bowl victory Sunday night at rain-
swept Dolphin Stadium was the dif-
ference between Manning being Dan
Marino or John Elway.

. Manning already was a great quar-
terback.

Now he is a Super Bowl winner.

Manning already was going to the
Hall of Fame.

Now he will go to the Hall of Fame
with a very fat ring on his finger.

There was perspective to be found
in the Indianapolis Colts’ 29-17 vic-
tory over the Chicago Bears: The
Colts ran the ball down the Bears’
throats, and the Bears couldn’t move
the ball on the Colts’ defense.

Manning won the MVP award, but
he wasn’t necessarily the best player
in the game. He was the first to, say
that any number of his teammates
could have won it. Manning was
clearly superior to Rex Grossman,
but that’s not saying much.

Tired of being second-guessed,
Grossman called reporters ignorant
last week. Well, they must be even
more stupid than Grossman thought,

- because that infield-fly-rule pop-up
that turned into a 56-yard intercep-
tion return for a touchdown by Kel-
vin Hayden was enough proof that
the Bears weren’t winning any Super
Bowl with the schizoid Good
Rex/Bad Rex at the controls.

DON’T BE CRUEL...

Down deep, anybody with a lick of
sporting sense knows that one man
can’t do it by himself. Anybody with
a modicum of football knowledge
knew that a one-dimensional team
wasn’t going to win an NFL title.

But that doesn’t seem to matter, .
when it comes to judging our best »:;:
athletes. History can be cruel to those
— especially NFL quarterbacks —



PRO FOOTBALL



INSIDE THE GAME | COMMENTARY

One ring sure makes all the di



= JEFF HAYNES/AFP-GETTY IMAGES

ENOUGH SAID: Peyton Manning didn’t need a Super Bowl trophy or a ring to measure his career. But now
he’s earned them, and he passed on the chance to answer his critics. ‘It’s a card that | don’t play,’ he said.

who don’t finish the job. The ring is

the thing. And sports critics can be
especially cruel.

“I just hope the critics have some-
thing else to talk about now,” said
Colts receiver Reggie Wayne, who
caught a 53-yard touchdown pass
from Manning in the first quarter.

Before the game, Archie Manning
said he used to give certain words of
advice to his son before his high
school games.

“It was, ‘Play smart, and have
fun,’ ” Archie said Sunday night after
the game. “This morning, I told him

to play smart and have fun.”

Peyton listened.

He.didn’t pass for 400 yards. He
didn’t throw five touchdown passes.
He didn’t burn the Bears’ secondary

.others in baseball and beyond. \

Nobody said sports are fair.
Nobody said sports history is fair.

HE WAS SUPER ALREADY

“Peyton Manning is a tremendous
player,” said Tony Dungy, who
became the first African-American
coach to win a Super Bowl. “He is so
prepared, and he does everything to
win a ballgame. If people think he
had to win a Super Bowl to prove
how great he is, it’s just wrong.

“T don’t think he needed it for per-
sonal vindication. I didn’t look at that
way. He didn’t look at that way.

“But now he’s done it. He has got
it behind him. I don’t think there’s
anything anybody can say about him
except that he’s going to the Hall of
Fame — and he’s one of the greatest

with long pass after long pass. Man-
ning threw for 247 yards on 25-for-38
passing. He threw that one long TD
pass to Wayne, but mostly he took
what the Bears gave him.

_. Inthe end, Manning didn’t have to
be great in one game to prove his
greatness. Marino setthe passing 1
records. He didn’t win a Super Bowl.
It is the big asterisk next to his name.
Same with Jim Kelly. Same with Ted
Williams, Ernie Banks and so many

“Quarterback is the hardest job in
sports, in my opinion,” Manning said.
“Any time a quarterback can be com-
pared to Dan Marino, that quarter-
back ought to be honored.

Is that asterisk fair?

Yes.... And of course not.





eCrence

to ever to play the game.”

That doesn’t mean the road was
easy. Those losses to the New Eng-
land Patriots in the playoffs, and all
those big regular-season numbers
that were squashed in the postseason
defeats... they hurt.

“Tony was always so positive
Manning said. “After all those losses,
he’d say we'll go back to work, and
we'll be better for this. It was hard to
believe at times. But he was right.

“Teams beat us and went to the
Super Bowl. It was a hard pill to swal-
low. It was hard to watch it. But we
did it. We did it together. And it’s
sweet.”

Manning started slowly in this
game. He was 1-for-4 and forced a
long pass into sideline coverage for
Marvin Harrison that Bears safety
‘Chris Harris picked off. It would be
Harris, however, who was exploited
6 minutes later. Harris stepped up to
snuff the run, blew the coverage, and
Wayne was left all alone for a 53-yard
TD catch. Manning deserved kudos
for moving his feet and escaping the
grasp of Tank Johnson on the play.

There was a time when you could
disrupt Manning’s rhythm, and his
game. The Colts offense was like fine
china. If you got in and smashed their
delicate dishes, they were done.

Not anymore. The Colts can run,
and they can mix it up. Manning
worked on ad-libbing in practice,
moving around willy-nilly, and it
worked.

The real story was that he was
smart, and the Colts were smart. The
Bears gave Manning room under-
neath, and Manning found the open-
ings. He was surgical. Joseph Addai
and Dominic Rhodes pounded the
ball on the ground. They combined .
for 190 yards. Addai caught 10 of
Manning’s 25 completions.

“Peyton understood he had a lot of
players around him to take advantage
of,” Addai said. “He understood he
didn’t have to do it himself.”

Manning said he also understands
something else: He understands the
vindication game..

“And it’s a card that I don’t play,”
Manning said. “I just don’t play it.

“But I'll tell you, it’s sure nice to be
on a championship team.”

”
?

Including:

t

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Ocala. Gainesville, Clermont, Deltona, Tampa,
Winter Haven, Haines City, Jacksonville, Melbou
Edgewater, Palm Bay, Tavares, Leesburg,
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New Smyrna, Port St. Lucie, Sebring,
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Marien Wiles Home for Less elt NA Lae the Way We Do TOE



INTERNATIONAL EDITION WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007 | 34

THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com



NBA STANDINGS

PRO BASKETBALL









four-game losing streak.

The Bucks.won their seventh in a row at
home against the Magic but have still lost 15
of their past 18 games overall, in part because
star Michael Redd remains sidelined with a
sprained left knee.

Earl Boykins had 24 points, Charlie Villan-
ueva scored 22, Charlie Bell had 20 and Mo



MARY ALTAFFER/AP

ANICE VIEW: Knicks guard Stephon Marbury goes to the rim past Clippers forward

Mem. at Dal., 8:30

a Oo EASTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHEAST WL Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
1 Washington 28 19 596 - 7-3 W-1 19-5 9-14 19-10
Orlando 25 24 510 4 3-7 L-2 16-10 9-14 15-15
y ‘ Miami 23 25 «479 5% «5-5 W-4 13-10 10-15 12-14
vaste sf Atlanta 18 29 .383 10 5-5 Ll 9-14 9-15 12-19
mH aS Charlotte 18 30 .37510% 5-5 L-1 10-14 816 12-19
‘ From Miami Herald Wire Services y ais ii Tr of : 7 ae ATLANTIC WL, Pct GB L10 Str. Home __Away Conf
NEW YORK — Stephon Marbury scored e a iF Toronto 25 23 521 - 82 W-3 167 9-16 17-9
. . . P y F . 1
_c Bothias points nan eal second alr NV) re 22 AB a EH ae
-{:}) that overwhelmed the Clippers and turned AA a Philadelphia 16 33 327 9% 6-4 Wel 812 821 11-17
viele the game around, sending the New York Boston 12 35 .25512% 0-10 L-15 4-19 816 8-22
. Knicks to a 102-90 victory over Los Angeles
on Tuesday night. : CENTRAL «2. W obs Pee Str, Home Away Conf
7 Jamal Crawford and Eddy Curry each Dee RS ET gs ea Wd woe bas 20
“3 scored 23 points to lead New York, which Cleveland 27 21.563 2% 4-6 Ll 17-7 10-14 17-14
noe shot poorly and defended worse in the first Indiana 26 22 .542 3% 64 Ll 15-8 11-14 19-13
: ‘¢ two quarters before controlling the second Milwaukee 19 30 .388 11 2B W-l 119, 8-21 9-20
half in its second consecutive victory.
New York never led in the first half and WESTERN CONFERENCE
trailed by as much as 12. But the Knicks SOUTHWEST © WoL. Pet. GB L10 Str, Home Away Conf
stormed out of halftime with a 24-4 spurt, acest 7 ar ane : re Lo —f
turning a 10-point deficit into a 10-point lead San Antonio. 32 :16«.667 «7 «55 L-2 168 168 21-11
in a span of 9Â¥; minutes and handing the Houston 31 17 646 8B 64 W-2 17-6 14-11 18-15
Clippers their second consecutive loss. New Orleans 21 27 438 18 6-4 1-1 14-11 7-16 12-18
Elton Brand had 22 points and 13 rebounds Memphis 12 37 245 27% 3-7 1-3 917 3-20 6-23
‘for the Clippers, who lost for the third time NORTHWEST WL Pct. GB LI0 Str. Home Away Conf
in 10 games and fell to 1-2 on their seven- TGR ean esa Wee TW Fo ike 1st 3040
game Eastern trip. Reserve Tim Thomas also Denver 23 23 500 7% 46 L-2 13-13 10-10 10-15
had 22 points. Minnesota 22 26 .458 9% 2-8 L-4 13-9 9-17 13-18
Portland 20 29 .408 12 5:5 L-2 12-13 816 13-16
ROCKETS 98, GRIZZLIES 90 Seattle 17 31 .354.14% 4-6 L-5 13-12 4-19 7-19
MEMPHIS, Tenn. —. Tracy McGrady PACIFIC WL. Pct. GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf
scored 33 points and had eight assists to lead Phoenix 3810792 «82 Wl 20-4 186° 189
the Rockets to the victory. L.A. Lakers 30 19 .612 8% 4-6 W-2 19-6 11-13 17-10
McGra ed five Rockets in d uble fig- LA. Clippers 24 24 .500 14 7-3 L-2 17-8 «7-16 14-17
: a aie fi fe a ‘ ih ‘ . | Golden State 23 26 .469 15% % 4-6 W-1 17-8 6-18 13-15
ae as Houston won for the sixth time In iis. | Sacramento 20 26.435 17 6-4 W-3 1411 6-15 i1-18
past seven games.
Memphis, which has the worst record in RESULTS AND SCHEDULES
the NBA, has lost three in a row. Tuesday’s results Tonight’s games Monday’s results
Detroit 109, Boston 102 Miami at Bos., 7:30 Miami 113, Charlotte 93
BUCKS 116, MAGIC 111 N.Y. 102, Clippers 90. NA at Atly Lakers 90, Atlanta 83
ust A . at Tor., De , Indiana
_ MILWAUKEE — Ruben Patterson scored Mil. 116, Orlando 111 Sea. at Ind. 7 Wash. 118, Seattle 108
14 of his 27 points in the fourth quarter and Phx. at Port. tate ote HU ner ave
the struggling Bucks beat the Magic to snap a LA.C. at Cle., 7 Phoenix 113, Denver 108
G.S. at Min., 8 Utah 100, Chicago 95

Sac. 105, N.O. 99

N.O. at Den., 9

NF RV) 8

SCORING

G FG FT PTS AVG

Through Monday

REBOUNDING
GOFF DEF TOT AVG

“Wi ‘ ‘ , : : Anthony, Den. 31 358 225 960310 G Minn. 47 119 463 582 12.4
ee ade 13 oa ae as Tim Thomas early on in New York’s 102-90 comeback victory on Tuesday night. arenas Wash a7 436 368 1382 234 cay, Den. 40 104 384 488 12.2
wight Howard had 21 points an verson, Den. 3 2 q joward, Orl. f

: : OKs: : : Bryant, LAL. 45 430 3581296 288 Boozer, Utah 45 142 389 531 11.8
rebounds, his 34th double-double of the sea- Thomas was quoted in Tuesday’s editions of kee’s 48 games this season as a reserve, aver- Wade, Mia. 41 390 381 1179 288 Chandler, NOK. 46 177 352 529 11.5
son for the Magic. the Chicago Tribune as saying: “I’m just aging 3.8 points and 3.6 rebounds in about 13 Redd Me eae are aes tote 267 Okan i Ae er eos 108

going to go out there, get my check and call it minutes a game. James, Clev. 46 443 2771225 26.6 Duncan, S.A. 48 145 373 518 10.8
Se a a day.” The Bucks had hoped Michael Redd, who | QME\i 45 Her 380 Rando for. 49 Itt 4 $6 108
. ? 4 arter, . | andoiph, Po! .!

e Nuggets: Allen Iverson can run just When asked if being around some of the» is averaging 27.2 points per game, would play | FIELD GOALS ASSISTS
fine on his sprained right ankle. If only he game’s greats could be beneficial for a’ in Tuesday night’s game against the Magic | - FG FGA PCT G _AST AVG
could cut on it. - rookie, he responded, “I’m just into the free» after returning to practice on Monday for the —_Biedrins. GS. 219 S557 Nash, Phos; 46 542 118
The Nuggets point guard made it through money. That's it. Pll just do whatever when I _ first time since spraining his left knee on Jan. ON. B10 347 .605 Kidd, Na. 19430 88
practice Tuesday afternoon on the tender get out there.” 5 against the Cavaliers. But coach Terry | i", NY. 351 601 584 Davis, G.S. 40002 BT
: are ’ : : ° ‘ : \ joozer, Utah 410 721 .569 Paul, NOk. 31 267 8.6
ankle and is optimistic he’ll be ready to play . ‘The winner of the Feb. 17 event in Las Stotts said after Monday’s practice that Redd | _ Howard, orl. 285 504.565 Miller, Phil. 47 392-83
tonight against New Orleans. Iverson has Vegas gets $35,000. The runner-up earns wouldn't be available against the Magic. | Balembert, Phil eet emma’ Mea ag
missed four consecutive games after injuring $22,500, with the third and fourth-place fin- e Suns: All-Star point guard Steve Nash Bogut, wil a a Fond Jes a oes 18

the ankle against Charlotte on Jan. 29.

Center Marcus Camby is still listed as
doubtful with a strained left groin.

Forward Carmelo Anthony (left wrist
sprain) and guard Steve Blake (stitches in his
lip and a hyperextended elbow) both
received treatment Tuesday and are
expected to play tonight.

e Bulls: The club fined forward Tyrus
Thomas $10,000, one day after the rookie
said he was only interested in the prize
money at the NBA’s slam-dunk contest.

He later apologized “for any negative feel-
ings that may have been caused by my com-
ments.” The first Bulls player since Scottie
Pippen in 1990 to participate in the event,

Nebraska beats Texas Tech wit

From Miami Herald Wire Services

ishers getting $16,125. Joining Thomas are
defending champion Nate Robinson of New
York, Orlando All-Star Dwight Howard and
Boston’s Gerald Green.

Also, the team will likely be without
Andres Nocioni until after the All-Star break.
Coach Scott Skiles said the forward needs
seven-to-l0 days of rest to recover from

’ plantar fasciitis in his right foot.

e Bucks: Center Dan Gadzuric dislo-
cated his left shoulder on Saturday night and
will miss six weeks. The team said that Gad-
zuric injured the shoulder late in the third
quarter of the Bucks’ 117-98 loss to the Miami
Heat.

Gadzuric has appeared in 44 of Milwau-

missed the Suns’ game at Portland late Tues-
day night because of inflammation in his
right shoulder. The NBA’s two-time defend-
ing MVP didn’t play in the second half of the
Suns’ 113-108 victory in Denver on Monday.

LATE MONDAY

e Suns 113, Nuggets 108: Amare Stou-
demire had 36 points and 13 rebounds to lead
visiting Phoenix.

e Kings 105, Hornets 99: Ron Artest
scored 20 points and tied a career high with
nine assists to lead host Sacramento.

e Jazz 100, Bulls 95: Mehmet Okur
scored 12 of Utah’s final 14 points to lead the
host Jazz.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL



|

i
i
i

. MEST CR aoe

Sunday, Feb. 18,

at the Thomas & Mack Center, Las Vegas

EASTERN CONFERENCE
STARTERS

|. Gilbert Arenas, G, Washington

Chris Bosh, F, Toronto
LeBron James, G, Cleveland
Shaquille O'Neal, C, Miami
Dwyane Wade, G, Miami
RESERVES

Chauncey Billups, G, Detroit
Caron Butler, F, Washington
Vince Carter, F, New Jersey
Richard Hamilton, G, Detroit
Dwight Howard, F, Orlando
Jason Kidd, G, New Jersey
Jermaine O'Neal, F, Indianapolis



LUBBOCK, Texas
Charles Richardson hit a
3-pointer as time expired to
lead Nebraska to a 61-59 vic-
tory over Texas Tech on
Tuesday night.

Nebraska inbounded the

ball at its end of the court with’

18 seconds remaining and got
it to Marcus Perry on the left
side. His 3-point attempt
missed, but Aleks Maric
tipped the rebound out to the
right side and Tech’s Charles
Burgess saved the ball from
going out of bounds.

Richardson grabbed it and
put it up from behind the arc
to get the victory for the Corn-
huskers (14-8, 3-5 Big 12).

The loss for Tech extended
its losing streak to four games
after the Red Raiders (15-6,
4-5) got back-to-back upsets of
top 10 teams Kansas and Texas
A&M.

Richardson scored 15 points
and Perry got 13 to lead
Nebraska, which ended the
game on a 2]-8 run.

Martin Zeno scored 18

points and Jon Plefka added 15
for Tech. ‘
OTHER ACTION

e Missouri 77, lowa

State 55: Stefhon Hannah
scored 15 points, Matt Law-
rence added 13 and visiting
Missouri used a pair of 11-0
runs in the second half to beat
Iowa State.

Kalen Grimes added 12

points and nine rebounds for
the Tigers (14-8, 3-6 Big 12),
who shot 52.5 percent from the
floor and snapped a seven-
game losing streak in Ames. .

Iowa State (12-11, 3-6)
pulled within 39-36 early in the
second half, but the Tigers
answered with their first 11-0
run and went up 14. The
Cyclones shot themselves in
the foot twice during Missou-
ri’s decisive spurt, and each
time the Tigers responded
with quick, demoralizing
scores.

e Georgia Tech $74,
North Carolina State 65:
Jevaris Crittenton scored 21
points, including 8 points in an
18-0 run in the second half, and
host Georgia Tech rallied from
an early 15-point deficit to beat
North Carolina State.

Georgia Tech forced 18
turnovers, including 11 in the
second half when its defense
sparked the decisive run. Crit-
tenton, a freshman, helped
force N.C. State senior Engin
Atsur into six turnovers and
1-for-9 shooting from the field.

Georgia Tech held the
Wolfpack scoreless for almost
8 minutes and without a field
goal for more than 11 minutes
as it turned a 56-45 deficit into
a 63-56 lead.

Thaddeus Young, also a
freshman, scored 15 points and
yet another freshman, Zach
Peacock, added 11 for Georgia
Tech.

Gavin Grant and Brandon



JOE DON BUCKNER/LUBBOCK AVALANCHE-JOURNAL

THE FINAL STROKE: Nebraska’s Charles Richardson follows
through on his game-winning 3-pointer at the buzzer.

Costner each scored 17 points
for N.C. State. Ben McCauley
added 16 and Courtney Fells
had 13.

Georgia Tech (15-8 overall,
4-6 Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence) moved past N.C. State
(13-9, 3-6) in the ACC stand-
ings.

e Villanova 56, St.
Joseph’s 39: Curtis Sumpter
scored 14 points to lead host
Villanova to the victory over

Saint Joseph’s and help cap-
ture the coveted Big 5 title out-
right for the second consecu-
tive season.

The Wildcats (16-7) won
their llth consecutive Big 5
game and used victories this
season against Penn, La Salle
and Temple to sweep the city
series for the second season in
a row.

Darrin Govens led the
Hawks (13-10) with eight

points and Ahmad Nivins had
ll rebounds. Nivins entered
averaging 17 points and was
held to only six. Pat Calathes
was averaging 13.9 points and
7.3 rebounds and finished with
paltry numbers of four points
and three boards.

e Providence 71, Cincin-
nati 70: Sharaud Curry made

- a foul shot with 14.2 seconds

left to give host Providence
the comeback victory.

Curry, who had a game-
high 24 points, made 8-of-13
shots overall and 5-of-8 3-point
attempts. Friars center Her-
bert Hill, who had 16 points
and ll rebounds, forced a miss
by Cincinnati’s John Willam-
son in the final second to pre-
serve the victory for Provi-
dence (15-7, 5-4 Big East).

Cincinnati (10-13, 1-8 Big
East), which suffered its fifth
loss in a row, was led by Wil-
liamson with 15 points.

e Wake Forest 87,
Winston-Salem 71: Kyle Vis-
ser had 15 points and ll
rebounds to lead six Wake
Forest players in double fig-
ures in the victory over visit-
ing Winston-Salem.

Jamie Skeen had his second
career double-double with 11
points and a career-high 13
rebounds for the Demon Dea-
cons (11-12, 2-8 Atlantic Coast
Conference) in the first-ever
meeting of the cross-town

, teams from different confer-

ences.
Brian Fisher hit six 3-point-

WESTERN CONFERENCE

STARTERS

Kobe Bryant, G, L.A. Lakers
Tim Duncan, F, San Antonio
Kevin Garnett, F, Minnesota
Tracy McGrady, F, Houston
Yao Ming, C, Houston

RESERVES

Carlos Boozer, F, Utah

Allen Iverson, G, Denver

Shawn Marion, F, Phoenix
Steve Nash, G, Phoenix

Dirk Nowitzki, F, Dallas

Tony Parker, G, San Antonio
Amare Stoudemire, F-C, Phoenix

h shot at buzzer

ers and finished with 25 points
and Darrell Wonge added 17
for the Rams (4-21).

ELSEWHERE

e Miami: Miami’s already-
thin frontcourt suffered
another blow when forward
Raymond Hicks was sus-
pended indefinitely for an
unspecified violation of team
rules.

Hicks was averaging 5.6
points and 2.7 rebounds for
Miami, which is already miss-
ing most of its big-man rota-
tion.

Miami (9-14, 2-7 Atlantic
Coast Conference) will try to
snap a six-game losing streak
when it hosts Boston College
(16-6, 7-2) tonight.

LATE MONDAY

e No. 6 Texas A&M 100,
Texas 82: Sophomore guard
Josh Carter scored 24 points
and freshmen Donald Sloan
and Bryan Davis combined for
19 to lead the host Aggies.

Texas A&M, coming off a
big victory at then-No. 6 Kan-
sas on Saturday night, won its
21st consecutive home game
and maintained sole posses-
sion of first place in the Big 12.

Acie Law added 21 points
and tied a school record with
15 assists for the Aggies (20-3,
8-1 Big 12). :

Freshman Kevin Durant
had 28 points and 15 rebounds
to lead the Longhorns (16-7,
6-3).



INTERNATIONALEDITION





Rivera finally ¢

From Miami Herald Wire Services

Waiting two hours on a Chicago
runway, Bears defensive coordinator
Ron Rivera wondered if icy weather
really. was delaying his flight to a job
interview in Dallas.

“There was a vicious rumor going
around [that] Chicago didn’t want me
to leave, so they weren't going to let
the plane go,” Rivera said, laughing.

Rivera finally arrived at Cowboys
headquarters late Tuesday afternoon.
He spoke with reporters before meet-
ing with team owner Jerry Jones to
discuss the head coaching vacancy
created when Bill Parcells retired
more than two weeks ago.

Rivera didn’t officially become a
candidate until speaking with Jones
on Monday night. However, he had
been expecting the call since Jones
decided to hold the job open through
Super Bowl week, when Rivera was
off-limits because he was getting his
team ready for the game.

“Just the fact that Mr. Jones waited
until now, that bodes well for me,”
Rivera said.

Rivera was the ninth person Jones
interviewed. Indianapolis Colts quar-
terbacks coach Jim Caldwell will
become No. 10 today.

Having lost to Caldwell and the
Colts on Sunday, Rivera spent Mon-
day stewing over it. He was glad to
have had a day in between the game
and the get-together with Jones.

“It gave me a chance to go through
- some things in my mind and have a

feel for them,” Rivera said. “I had a |

little chance to take a quick look at

EASTERN CONFERENCE

PRO

yo

FOOTBALL | HOCKE

PRO FOOTBALL | AROUND THE NFL

the Cowboys one last time.”

What did he see?

“Some things that can be imple-
mented to really help this defense,”
he said.

The Cowboys went 9-7 this past
season, then lost to the Seattle Sea-
hawks in the first round of the play-
offs. The Cowboys, who haven’t won
a playoff game since 1996, collapsed
in December and January — primar-
ily because of breakdowns -on
defense.

Rivera, 45, played nine seasons in
the NFL as a linebacker, all with the
Bears. He has been a coach for 10
years, the past three as defensive

coordinator of the Bears. Although he »

has never been a head coach, Rivera
has interviewed for jobs several
times in the past year.

A big question surrounding the
Cowboys is how legitimate a candi-
date Rivera is for the top job. There is
speculation that San Francisco 49ers
offensive coordinator Norv Turner
has it locked up, and that Jones wants
Rivera as defensive coordinator.

Although that would be a lateral
move, it could happen because Rive-
ra’s contract with the Bears is expir-
ing. He might be willing to leave a
great defense to run a mediocre one
for more than just the challenge —
Jones probably would pay Rivera
more than the Bears, who have a lot
of other coaches in line for raises.

When asked about his chances of
becoming defensive coordinator in
Dallas, Rivera said: “I am here to dis-
cuss being the head coach.”





JONATHAN DANIEL/GETTY IMAGES

MY TURN: Ron Rivera is the ninth
candidate to interview for the
Cowboys job since Bill Parcells
retired about two weeks ago.

Rivera probably has an idea of
what it would be like to work for
Turner because he has worked along-
side Turner’s brother, Ron, the
Bears’ offensive coordinator.

Rivera knows second-hand about
working for Jones, having discussed
it with Bears quarterbacks coach
Wade Wilson, who had the same
job with the Cowboys from 2000-02.

The biggest challenge ‘Rivera
might face with the Cowboys — as
the coach or as defensive coordinator
— is adapting a roster built for the 3-4
scheme into his 4-3 system.



Rivera said it is not much of an
issue because the Cowboys often use
a four-man front. And part of his
coaching philosophy is to mold plans
around players.

“I think a lot of times guys get
caught up in ‘This is the only thing I
do’ and not use the talent around
them,” he said. “The truth of the mat-
ter is, it’s all about the players.”

Rivera played linebacker for the
Bears from 1984-92, winning a cham-
pionship with the ’85 team, which had
Buddy Ryan as the team’s defensive
coordinator.

After retiring, Rivera spent four
years talking football on television,
then broke into coaching with the
Bears in 1997. He was linebackers
coach for the Philadelphia Eagles
under Jim Johnson from.1999-2003,
then returned to the Bears as defen-
sive coordinator when head coach
Lovie Smith took over.

Rivera credits Ryan, Johnson and
Smith for helping form his approach
to defense. The result has helped his
Bears consistently rank among the
league leaders in fewest yards
allowed and points allowed, and near
the top in creating turnovers.

As for Rivera’s offensive
approach, it’s pretty simple: “I do
think you have to run the ball to be
successful in this league,” he said.

ELSEWHERE

e Pro Bowl: Buccaneers line-.

backer Derrick Brooks was named
to the NFC Pro Bowl team for the
10th consecutive season, replacing



com | THE MIAMI HERALD



ets his shot at Cowboys job _

Lance Briggs of the Bears, who was
injured during the Super Bowl. Briggs
is the second Bears linebacker to pull
out of Saturday’s game in Hawaii.
Brian Urlacher injured a toe in the
Super Bowl and was replaced by
Antonio Pierce of the Giants. Also,
Patriots left tackle Matt Light will
replace Jonathan Ogden of the Bal-
timore Ravens on the AFC team.
Ogden also has an injured toe.

e Cardinals: Jeff Rutledge was
hired as quarterbacks coach, one of
four more assistants hired by new
head coach Ken Whisenhunt.

Freddie Kitchens was hired as
tight-ends coach, Mike Miller as
offensive assistant and Matt Raich as
defensive-quality-control coach.

e Redskins: Right tackle Jon
Jansen signed a five-year, $23 mil-
lion contract extension. The deal
includes more than $10 million in
bonus money.

e Eagles: Britt Reid, the
21-year-old son of head coach Andy
Reid, has been charged with drug
and weapon offenses stemming from
an incident in which he was accused
of pointing a gun at another motorist
in the Philadelphia area. S

Britt Reid was arraigned on nine
counts, including making terroristic
threats, possession of controlled sub-
stances — cocaine, Oxycodone and
marijuana — and a felony charge of
carrying a firearm without a license.

Reid got into an argument with
another motorist on Jan. 30, pointing
a handgun at the man and laughing
before driving off, prosecutors said.



HOCKEY


















SOUTHEAST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME = AWAY DIV
Atlanta 29 18 6 3 67172 174 14-9-3-2 15-9-3-1 12-4-4-1
Tampa Bay 30:23, s«1-. 1 62: 175 167 14-13-0-0 16-10-1-1 12-7-0-0
Carolina 27 22 3) 4 61168 177 © 14-10-1-3 13-12-2-1 —_-13-6-0-2
Washington 22 25. 2 6 52167 192 13-11-1-3 9-14-1-38-11-1-1
Florida 20 24 4 6 50153 '176 14-10-2-1 6-14-25 — 5-11-2-0
ATLANTIC WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME = AWAY DIV
New Jersey 33 15 0 6 72°146 129 19-4-0-4 14-11-0-2 14-4-0-1
Pittsburgh 27 17 «4 «5 63179 162 16-8-2-2 -11-9-2-3-13-5-1-1
N.Y. Islanders 25 21 4 3. 57159 154 12-9-3-1 13-12-1-2. 9-7-2«
N.Y. Rangers 25 24 3 2 55156 161 10-12-3-0 15-12-0-2 _-9-9-0-
Philadelphia §=13 32. 3 «4 33 130 197 -3-15-3-310-17-0-1. 3-131
NORTHEAST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV"
Buffalo 36 15 2 2 76206 159 °° 17-7-1-1 | 19-8-1-1 11-8-1-1
Montreal 29 20 1 5 64161 159 17-9-0-3 12-11-1-2 10-6-0-4.
Ottawa 30 21.2 1 63180 147 15-11-1-1 15-10-1-0 —13-8-0-
Toronto 27 21 2 «4 60174 174 11-12-1-2 16-9-1-2 - 10-8-2-2
Boston 24 24 1 3 52147 194 14-11-0-2 10-13-1-110-12-0-1

WESTERN CONFERENCE :
CENTRAL WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV ’
Nashville 37 15 2 (1 °77191 140 19-3-2-1 18-12-0-0 _17-4-1-0 ;
Detroit 3414 3 3 74166 130 19-3-1-2. 15-11-2-1. 12-3-1-1
St. Louis 2Y 25 4 4 50136 166 11-14-21 10-11-2-3 7-12-2-2
Columbus 21 28 2° 3 47133 169 12-11-1-2. 9-17-1-1—7-11-0-2
Chicago 19 26 2 5 45129 162 11-13-12 8-13-1-3 9-12-1-0
NORTHWEST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME — AWAY DIV
Calgary 29 17 3. 3 64165 133- 22-5-0-0 | 7-12-3-3° 11-5-1-2
Vancouver 29 20, 1 3 62 139 136 17-8-1-1_12-12-0:2 10-11-0-1
Minnesota 29 22 0 4. 62153 141 18-5-0-3° 11-17-0-1 96-02 SCOTT CUNNINGHAM/GETTY IMAGES
Edmonton 26 23 2 2.56147 155 16-10-1-1 10-13-1-1 9-11-1-0 : . : 2 ;
Colorado 25 23 2 2 54162 155 14-12-1-2 1-11-10. 9-7-4.0 IT’S MILLER TIME: Sabres goalie Ryan Miller blocks a shot by Jon Sim of the Thrashers. Miller had 27 saves in the game.
PACIFIC WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV ,
Anaheim 32. 13 2 6 72173 135 18-4-1-4 — 14-9-1-2 12-3-0-1 a :
San Jose 34.18 0 1 69 163 123 18-10-0-1 16-8-0-0 11-9-0-1 :
Dallas 32 20 0 2 66144 132 16-8-0-1 16-12-0-1 15-6-0-0
Phoenix 25 27 1 «1. 52 147 180 © 13-12-1-0 12-15-0-1> 7-13-1-1
Los Angeles 18 30 4 4 44156 198 11-12-4-3 . 7:18-0-1 6-14-0-2 ;

Note: Two points for a win, one point for a tie and overtime loss °

RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

From Miami Herald Wire Services

STARS 4, WILD 2

Tonight’s games

Ottawa at Buffalo, 7 ~
Phoenix at Detroit, 7:30
Phil. at Islanders, 7:30
San Jose at Anaheim, 10
Chicago at Vancouver, 10

Tuesday’s results

Florida at Colorado, late
Buffalo 4, Atlanta 3 (SO)
Phoenix 3, Columbus 0
Boston 3, Washington 2 (SO)
Carolina 2, Montreal 1
Pittsburgh 4, Nashville 1
Tampa Bay 3, L.A. 2 (SO)
NJ. 3, Rangers 2 (SO)
Dallas 4, Minnesota 2
Toronto 2, St. Louis 1
Vanc. at Edmonton, late
Chicago at Calgary, late
Anaheim at San Jose, late



Monday’s results
Detroit 4, N.Y. Rangers 3

RICK STEWART/AP

YOUNG GUNNER: He’s only 19, but Sidney Crosby of
the Pittsburgh Penguins leads the NHL in scoring.



ATLANTA — Daniel Briere scored
two goals in regulation and another in the
shootout, leading the Buffalo Sabres to a
4-3 victory over the Atlanta Thrashers on
Tuesday night.

The Eastern Conference-leading
Sabres, winning for just the fifth time in
their past 12 games, scored all three of
their regulation goals on the power play.
They took the shootout 2-0, getting goals
from Briere and Ales Kotalik.

Ryan Miller stopped Slava Kozlov and
Marian Hossa in the shootout.

Scott Mellanby scored the tying goal
for the Thrashers with 8:09 left in regula-
tion, but the Sabres knocked off one of

their top challengers in the East.

The Thrashers, first in the Southeast
Division, took their third consecutive loss
and dropped 10 points behind the Sabres
in the conference standings.

The Thrashers went 2-3-1 during a
homestand at Philips Arena and now head
off on a six-game road trip, their longest
this season.

Miller made 27 saves, including a bril-
liant stop in the final seconds of overtime.
Kozlov ‘swept in on a breakaway and
picked out the top right corner, but Miller
got enough of his glove on the shot to
send it over the crossbar.

Atlanta dropped to 6-3 in shootouts,
ending a streak of five victories in a row.
Buffalo improved to 8-2 in shootouts.

DEVILS 3, RANGERS 2 (SO)

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Brian
Gionta scored the lone shootout goal, and

6lith career goal, passing Bobby Hull for
13th on the NHL’s career list.

After Brodeur made a pad save on the
Michael Nylander on the first shootout
attempt, Gionta beat Rangers goaltender
Henrik Lundqvist with a backhander.

COYOTES 3, BLUE JACKETS 0

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Curtis Joseph
made 28 saves for his 50th career shutout,
and the Coyotes won a game delayed 35
minutes at the start by snow.

Steve Reinprecht, Shane Doan and
Mike Zigomanis scored for Phoenix,
which has won nine of 12 road games.

The Blue Jackets were shut out for the
12th time, setting a franchise season
record, They have lost three in a row
since a four-game winning streak.

He game was delayed 35 minutes
because the Coyotes were stuck in traffic
traveling from their hotel while a snow-
storm blanketed the Columbus area.

BRUINS 3, CAPITALS 2 (SO)

WASHINGTON — Phil Kessel scored
the winning shootout goal for Boston,
which held Alex Ovechkin scoreless for a
career-worst third consecutive game.

After Alexander Semin put Washing-
ton ahead 1-0 in the shootout and Patrice
Bergeron evened it, Kessel flipped a back-

hander past Olie Kolzig to give the Bruins .

their second consecutive victory after a
five-game losing streak.
LIGHTNING 3, KINGS 2 (SO)

TAMPA, Fla. — Vincent Lecavalier
scored his 34th goal and then scored again

DALLAS — Sergei Zubov scored a tie-
breaking goal on the power play with 4:41
left and the Stars overcame a two-goal
deficit to snap the Wild’s three-game win-
ning streak.

Stu Barnes added his ninth goal of the
season with 3:03 left to stretch Dallas’ lead
to 4-2. Stephane Boucher and Mike
Modano also scored for the Stars, who are
6-2-1 in their past nine games.

HURRICANES 2, CANADIENS 1

MONTREAL — Frantisek Kaberle
scored midway through the third period
in his first game of the season, helping the
Hurricanes end a four-game skid. -

Kaberle, who had shoulder surgery on
Sept. ll and missed Carolina’s first 55
games, drove a slap shot from the point
past Montreal’s David Aebischer 11:52 into
the third for the Hurricanes’ second goal
in three power-play opportunities.

PENGUINS 4, PREDATORS 1

PITTSBURGH — Mark Recchi scored
and set up rookie Evgeni Malkin for the
go-ahead goal, leading the Penguins.

Marc-Andre Fleury, who hasn’t lost in
regulation in 10 games since Jan. 9, turned
aside 25 shots as the Penguins won for the
ninth time in ll games.

Jordan Staal and Malkin, whose com-
bined age of 38 is one year younger than
Recchi’s 39, scored goals, and NHL scor-
ing leader Sidney Crosby set up two oth-
ers to give him 25 goals and 6] assists for
86 points in 50 games.

Through Monda' ‘
SCORING , GOALIES Martin Brodeur stopped all three New inthe shootout, leading the Lightning. MAPLE LEAFS 2, BLUES 1

sae tel Gh SAE Pint niga lace te wild” Sakata York attempts, leading the Devils past the Lecavalier and Blair Jones scored first- ST. LOUIS — Alex Steen snapped a tie
COSTE Me oR Se HH «Ga aaEHEE aa Se KET slumping Rangers on Tuesday night. period goals for the Lightning, who have late in the second period, and Andrew
St. Louis, TB 54 32 40 72 Backstrom, Min 17 898 = .29.1.94 Paul Martin and Zach Parise scoredin wonllof 3. Tampa Bay took the shootout Raycroft made it stand up with strong
Cae Bas aes wedne a ana Gara regulation as the Devils won their third 3-1. third-period play in goal, leading Toronto.
Heatley. Ott ae at dee 28 GiatiAna, qe = een game in a row and eighth in the past 1. Los Angeles defenseman Mike © Alexei Ponikarovsky added a power-
Savard, Bos 51 18 48 66 Kiprusoff, Cal 48 2884 109 2.27 Jaromir Jagr and Karel Rachunek Weaver, playing in his 123rd career game, play goal for the Maple Leafs, who have
pie ai eee eae oeauie Sea scored for the Rangers, who have lost scored his first NHL goal during the won the first four games of a five-game
Jagr, NYR- 53 19 44 63 Mason, Nas 32 1854 72 2.33 ‘four in a row and eight of Il. It was Jagr’s Kings’ two-goal third period. trip and have won five in a row overall.



PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007

THE TRIBUNE ~



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master ,

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., MS; B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Has a great power reached its peak?

ONLY IN hindsight can one tell when a
great power has reached its peak. Some say
that Britain’s war to extend its empire over
the intransigent Boer farmers in South Africa
a century ago marked the beginning of
decline. But even earlier, the ardent colo-
nialist Joseph Chamberlain had spoken of
his country as weary and staggering “under
the too-vast orb of its fate.”

The annual meeting of the World Eco-
nomic Forum, with its unique convening pow-
ers, is as good a place as any to detect mood
swings among those who do so much of the
world’s work, and the theme of this year’s
meeting was “the shifting power equation.”
There was a hint in the alpine air of resigna-
tion and sadness among those who admire
America that the United States was stum-
bling along, lost in Iraq and headed in the
wrong direction toward Iran. There was
lament about good will lost, of power and
prestige dissipated, and the dangers inher-
ent in the rising tide of self-inflicted anti-
Americanism.

Some of the delegates who met in the Swiss
mountain town of Davos late last month
detected a disconnect between business

chiefs, who see these times as the best of -

boom market times, and those involved with
national security who fear the worst of times,

with the demons let loose in the Middle East

and the misuse of American power.
Unlike most previous years, Washington
- sent few high-level delegates to represent the
executive branch, and there was a sense that
the Bush administration was hunkered down
and losing relevancy — something that simply
had to be waited out like a bad cold.
Delegates from China and India exuded
confidence, and there was talk of Asia’s
“renaissance,” reflecting that Asian lands
had come into their own for the first time
since the 15th century when one-half of the
world’s industrial production came from the
East, as Oxford’s Timothy Garton Ash put it.
Every day of the conference there seemed
to be another article in the world’s press pre-
dicting American decline. “New York Could
Lose Lead in Finance,” said one. “Sun May
Be Setting On Silicon Valley Supremacy,”
said another. “Indian Economy Is Seen Pass-
ing US By 2050,” and “Middle East Adjusts
To America’s Diminishing Power,” two more
headlines announced. And, perhaps the cru-
elest blow of all: “Macao Casinos Catch Up
To Las Vegas Strip.”

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The Financial Times wrote of “the rapid
haemorrhaging” of President Bush’s author-
ity, and Jacob Weisberg of Slate wrote from
Davos about the “quandary of how to deal
with the problem of a ruined president.”

Britain’s new Tory leader, David Cameron,
making his debut on the world stage, told
reporters that the special relationship with
the United States should mean telling Amer-
ica what it should hear, not just what it want-
ed to hear.

Iraqi politicians fresh from the Green Zone
shuffled through the snow from panel to pan-
el to discuss the fate of their benighted coun-
try, over which they exercise less and less
control. There was talk about how the Unit-
ed States may now have lost two colonial
wars, Vietnam and Iraq.

Iranians were noticeable, too, although °

none from the government, seeking shelter
from American war rhetoric — so reminis-
cent of pre-war Iraq. There was speculation in
the corridors whether the United States and
or Israel would attack Iran sometime before
year’s end.

One measure of shifting power is that the
ability of the United States to achieve what it
wants is diminishing, which might not be alto-
gether a bad thing, I heard delegates say.
Power was flowing away from traditional
governments and nation states toward non-
state actors, both good and bad, they said.

But for all of that, Pei Minxin of the
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

“predicted the United States will still be dom-

inant in the next 15 or 20 years. China had
only one-fifth the gross domestic product of
the United States, India less, he said. And
“these new powers will be more interested in
balancing against each other than against the
United States.” The United States had
“tremendous recuperating powers” and “self-
correcting mechanisms.” Iraq would be only
a temporary reversal, he said, and it would be
unwise to bet against the United States.
One hopes he’s right. But if America con-
tinues with the new colonialism of regime
change in Muslim lands, or goes to war with
Iran with two wars yet unfinished, then the
United States will be staggering under its

too-vast orb of fate for generations to come. |

(This column was written by H.D.S.
Greenway Boston Globe correspondent —
c. 2006 The Boston Globe).



All Bahamians |

should be
concerned |

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THE growing concern of
Chinese and Haitians enter-
ing the Bahamas and mixing
into our communities is
promising to be a “powder
keg”, possibly exploding in the
PLP’s collective faces. More
and more Bahamians are
being disenfranchised because

there is a perception that |

someone in the PLP govern-
ment is making a serious effort
to get a firm footing in the
business dealings with the Chi-
nese.

There seems to be some
special accommodation for the
Chinese. The PLP accepted
$30 million from the Chinese
but not admitting what they
promised them in return for
their money. But knowing
how shrewd the Chinese are,
they simply did not give the
Bahamas that money because
they love us. It is alleged that
the Chinese are making
demands on the PLP govern-
ment. They must control their
money because without say-
ing it, they apparently do not
trust the PLP to handle that
kind of money. The Chinese
want all of the thirty million
dollars to end up on the pro-
ject proposed, not, elsewhere.

But there are some ques-
tions to be asked and some
concerns that Chinese work-
ing on the TG Glover Junior
High School are a part of a
bigger picture. Did the con-
tractor hire these people from
China or were they already in
the Bahamas? I believe Min-
ister Wisdom when he said
that no one got permits to
work on the stadium yet. So
did the contractor bring the
Chinese working on the TG
Glover in from China himself?

I stand to be corrected, but
the cost of transporting one
Chinese from China to the
Bahamas is extremely expen-
sive. Were these people
already in the Bahamas and
then got a work permit, or was
the practice of applying for
the permit before they arrived
still adhered to, or were the
permits and visas issued in
China? These and other ques-
tions cause suspicions to be
raised as to the real story
behind the Chinese, their con-
nection with the PLP,.the
Bahamian Embassy in China,
the Minister of Foreign

Affairs, who has already been

accused of approving visas for

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DMUs

letters@tribunemedia.net



Chinese allegedly sponsored
by a PLP colleague and who,
in my opinion, has given an
asinine explanation. ,

Are the rumours true that
Minister Mitchell wanted to
bring in 200 Chinese under
the disguise of a dance troop
for the Fox Hill celebrations?
If true, what’s up with Minis-
ter Mitchell and the Chinese?
As I understand it, this par-
ticular situation caused mem-
bers of his committee to even-

tually resign from assisting

him.

Are all these things relat-
ed?

Are Chinese being shipped
here on special visas and dis-
appear in to the population,
surfacing soon in the south-
ern end of New Providence
with major business opera-
tions, “taking bread out of
Bahamians’ mouths”?

This visa scandal is “big
business”. Again if true it is
simply selling the Bahamas.
Bahamians must be concerned
about these allegations. All

Bahamians must stand up now
and say something, or shut up
and face the wall and take
whatever is rammed down
their throats. Stop it now or
suffer later.

Is the Bahamas now being
sold to China? Is there any
Minister in the PLP govern-
ment involved? Is the Prime
Minister knowledgeable, even
though he seems clueless
about everything else? Did the
Prime Minister think a visa
scandal was serious enough to
warrant him sincerely investi-
gating it himself? Is the Unit-
ed States Government silently
watching these serious events?
Something fishy is definitely
going on. The Bahamian peo-
ple are flabbergasted to see
how oblivious and uncon-
cerned Perry Christie seems -
about everything. This is
pathetic to put it mildly.

All Bahamians should be
concerned about what is hap-
pening right before their very
eyes. Be they PLP, BDM
FNM or XYZ. This Bahamas
belongs to ALL OF US.

IVOINE W INGRAHAM
Nassau,
January, 2007.

Certain bank executives
need to think before
Opening their mouths

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I THOUGHT I was hearing things this evening on both ZNS
TV-13 and Cable News that a bank wanted to entice customers
to save and blamed the customers for borrowing too much -

money.

Look, if the bank management would simply stop loaning
there would not be a liquidity problem.

The banks are too free giving out credit cards and loans and
overdrafts and you know why? They charge high interest rates.

Banks must effectively stop borrowers borrowing as much as
75 per cent of their weekly pay-cheque.

Banks are the sole controllers of who gets and what is loaned
— don’t blame the customers, just say no! \

Certain bank executives need to think before they open t! eir
mouths as they really are showing their ignorance and makig

idiots of themselves.

K L SMITH
Nassau,
January 25, 2007.

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd
: Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 ¢ Fax: 326-7452





PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





aking a look at the issues facing
the country at the next election

Nazox Security
Minister Cynthia
Pratt says we are living in a
new era: “It’s a different mind-
set. Today, we cloak our chil-
dren in wrongdoing.” She was
lamenting the social break-
down reflected by a rising tide
of violence among young peo-
ple and within families.

We have had nearly five
years of a New PLP govern-
ment that was supposed to
bring a “fresh wind” of social
reform and introduce a new
kind of politics — an obvious
attempt to regain the high
ground after the FNM’s far
more dramatic 1992 break
with the discredited policies
of the past.

But despite this govern-

ment’s patchwork of urban |

renewal initiatives and the rel-
ative prosperity of recent
years, the plain fact is that law-
lessness and social irresponsi-
bility are on the rise — with
armed robberies, assaults,
murders and sex crimes top-
ping the list.

_ People largely do as they
please. And as Prime Minister
Perry Christie acknowledged
recently, “Among young peo-
ple there is a growing discrep-
ancy with respect to order, dis-
cipline and the protection and
safety of those in our society.”

Az of this prob-
lem must begin with

a critique of government,

although wider and deeper’

factors are involved. .That’s
because politicians like to
advertise the changes they will
make, and when elected they
are in a unique position to
implement those changes.
“Our vision can be summed
up in just one sentence,” PLP
leader Perry Christie said
shortly before the May 2002
general election that brought

him to power. “The transfor-
mation of the Bahamas into a
society in which we can all live
in peace and in harmony with
one another under an umbrel-
la of social justice, equal
opportunity and prosperity for
all.”

Christie challenged voters
to choose their leaders ratio-
nally: “Not on the basis of
how they look or sound but
on the basis of who they real-
ly are and what they stand for
beneath the surface of all the
glitz and glamour, the propa-
ganda and the pageantry.”

We echo that sentiment.
And. as we are about to
engage in another political



LARRY SMITH

is complicated by our tiny uni-
verse. There are only so many
reasonably competent people
among us who are able to
commit to a political career.
And there are even fewer who
have the personality and lead-
ership skills to pull it all
together. But the challenges
we face in a rapidly spinning



But despite this government’s
patchwork of urban renewal
initiatives and the relative
prosperity of recent years, the
plain fact is that lawlessness and
social irresponsibility are on the
rise — with armed robberies,
assaults, murders and sex crimes

topping the list.



season, we should be able to
hold the candidates to some
hard positions on the real
issues that confront us. There
will, of course, be the usual
bread and circuses — that is
the nature of electoral poli-
tics. But there should also be
something that thoughtful cit-
izens can hang their hats on.
That means identifying the
top priorities, distinguishing
one set of policy prescriptions
from another, and choosing

‘ the most reliable and effective

managers to implement the
necessary changes.
In the Bahamas this process

world will not simply go away.
They will only get worse — to
our later remorse.

he head-in-the-sand
attitude of the latter-

day Pindling regime in the
face of a tanking economy and
a fracturing society — spurred
by widespread corruption, epi-
demic drug abuse and creep-
ing authoritarianism — is a
major case in point in our very
recent past. .

In the late 1980s the Pin-
dling government postponed
hard decisions and made lit-

Jon Mothouist ministries

PO Box SB-351628 - Nassau, Bahamas

:

© Phone/Fax: 242-392-4100 @ 242-324-3628
E-mail: zionmethodistministri otmai

South Beach Shopping Centre, East Street South

il.com



We invite you to join us in our 2nd Anniversary & Thanksgiving Celebrations

February 7th-11th, 2007

Theme: “ We Are Called To Be Witnesses For Christ. Are You A Witnes?” (Acts 1:8)

Renewal Service

Wednesday, February 7th

at 7:30 p.m.

Renewal Service
Thursday, February 8th
at 7:30p.m.

Preacher
Rev. Vincent Moss

Preacher
Bishop Edward Missick

Offical Anniversary Service | Preacher

Sunday, February 11th
at 3:30p.m.

Usher Ministry
Souse Out

Saturday, February 10th

7:00a.m.-12noon

Also

Sunday School Ministry

Bishop Clarence Williams

Will be distributing Children’s
Clothing between 10:00a.m. &12noon at the
South Beach Shopping Centre Grounds

Host Pastor
Rev. Charles Lewis

“A Journey in Faith & Obedience to Will of God”



tle effort to deal with the
problems they had caused.
After callously selling the
country out to foreign gang-
sters, they denied all respon-
sibility while avoiding any
effort to right the wrongs. The
result was a near catastrophe.

According to the'1984 Com-
mission of Inquiry report:
“We were alarmed by the
extent to which persons in the
public service have been cor-
rupted by money derived from
the illegal drug trade... We
were particularly concerned
to discover that these cor-
rupting influences made their
presence felt at the level of
permanent secretary and min-
ister...In our opinion, the
whole nation must accept
responsibility.”

A series of damaging news-
paper articles published in our
major tourist markets all but
destroyed the Bahamas’ image
as a good place to visit and do
business in. The result was a
precipitous drop in foreign
investment, spiralling unem-
ployment, rising crime and
social decay — combined with
a cynical urge to emigrate
among those who could.

Preranater Pindling
was defeated in the
1992 general election, which

cumstances have changed,
there are many who think we
are facing another crunch
point, because hard choices
are not being made by the
political class, or are taking
too long to be made.

We do not — at present —
have a problem attracting for-
eign investment or tourists.
The main issues relate to soci-
ety and governance, but if we
do not deal with them now we
will be mortgaging our future
at a very high interest rate.

How do we control illegal
immigration and integrate the
tens of thousands of migrants
already in our midst? How do
we fix our failed education
system so that Bahamians can
take advantage of economic
development? How do we
protect our cultural and envi-
ronmental heritage? And how
do we bring about social
renewal and institutional
reform to reduce the levels of
lawlessness and inefficiency
that plague our lives?

Pere: the biggest
potential flashpoint is”

Haitian immigration, although
its true effects may not be
readily apparent. Haitian
migrants are marginalised
from the rest of society, squat-
ting in illegal settlements in
growing numbers — vulnera-
ble and disenfranchised. And
their children face strong bar-
riers to joining society. As one
commentator put it, “If we
had set out to create an under-
class, we could not have done
a better job.”

But unfortunately, the
debate on immigration is too



Continuing to exclude, denigrate
and exploit the Haitian
community will have serious
repercussions-down the road.
The social and economic costs
will be immeasurable, and our
politicians must undertake
some unaccustomed leadership

to avoid this.



enabled a sharp break with
the past under the leadership
of an energetic and effective
new leader who set about
tackling the country’s real
issues and changing things for
the better. Government con-
trols on broadcasting were cut,
corruption was exposed and
condemned, infrastructure
was repaired, state-run hotels
were privatised, investors were
courted and accountability
became a watchword.
_ There is no political parti-
sanship intended in this
description of recent history.
That is simply the way it was.
But now, although the cir-

often hijacked by negative,
populist sloganeering, which
discourages sound policymak-
ing. The anger and frustration
of ordinary Bahamians con-
fronting this issue is palpable,
but that is entirely the fault of
the politicians. Information is
inadequate, diffuse and often
confusing.

Unless Bahamians want. to
become Haitianized, our goal
should be assimilation of
migrants within Bahamian cul-
ture. But experts say this
should be based on “the
expected outcome of full citi-
zenship, and sharing of com-
mon civic values with the

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Send resume’ to Cmajor@srb.sandals.com



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native population.”

Continuing to exclude, den-
igrate and exploit the Haitian
community will have serious
repercussions down the road.
The social and economic costs
will be immeasurable, and our
politicians must undertake
some unaccustomed leader-
ship to avoid this.

F.eecotin is the sec-
ond fundamental

issue of our time. According
to one commentator: “It is
clear that the Bahamian edu-
cation system has failed to
produce anything like the kind
of workforce that is needed to
run an economy like ours.
“Partly, this reflects a polit-
ical class lacking both the
imagination and fortitude to
introduce a modern, reformed
curriculum and to guarantee
minimum reasonable stan-
dards of performance among
government-funded schools.”
Experts say parenting is the
crux of our education and
crime problems — because
unwanted children have worse
outcomes than children who
are welcomed by their par-
ents. Many Bahamian children
are born simply as a means of
prying money from the pock-
ets of disappearing boyfriends,
or as a mistake due to igno-

rance, or as a demonstration °

of machismo.
And children who are not
nurtured by responsible par-

ents grow up with disciplinary -

problems and learning defi-
ciencies. As they reach their
late teens — in a society that
hardly bothers to enforce rules
and resorts to arch hypocrisy
on most moral issues — they
often turn to crime. :

As one analyst recently con-
cluded: “Jf one were trying to
set an agenda for the:21st cen-
tury, it would appear that the
first step in that process is to
candidly describe the present
state of affairs...Refining the
public education system can
only be accomplished with
strong leadership over a long
time using strategies that are
clearly stated and widely
endorsed.”

Yet the last annual report
to parliament on the state of
education was in 1995, and
that report failed to candidly
describe the situation. And
this is an across-the-board
problem with all government
agencies, representing a gross
failure of public accountabili-
ty.

We need less secrets, and a
real plan with meaningful tar-
gets and firm management.
And this applies not just to
immigration and education,
but to all the other issues men-
tioned at the beginning of this
article.

The time for politicians to
focus on these issues is now.
Tomorrow may be too late.

What do you _ think?
Send comments to larry@
tribunemedia.net. Or visit
www.bahamapundit.com

a

WK

SAS eS

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



—~-Ss@ elt @ bw ers






-__jyierswariONAL EDITION. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7,207 7



FIVE REASONS THE COLTS WON

‘

Leonard Shaprio has covered the NFL since 1972, He has served as a selector for the Pro Football [Hall of kame since 1982
and also is on the Hall’s Senior Selection Cominiliee. [He was inducted into the writers’ wing in Canton, Ohio, in 2002.






-PEYTON’S PARTY

Never mind the driving
rain, the slippery football
and an early interception. |
Quarterback Peyton
Manning once and for all
erased the memory of so
many disappointing
performances by
throwing for 247 yards

: and earning the Most
Valuable Player award. He took one major shot
downfield early when he found Reggie Wayne wide .
open for a 53-yard touchdown against a blown Bears
coverage, then was mostly content to throw short and
safe, including 10 completions to running back Joseph
Addai, the Colts’ leading receiver in the game.

‘CALM, COLLECTED i

The Colts’ shaky special
teams were a serious
concern going into
SBXLI, a justifiable
shortcoming magnified
when Bears return man
Devin Hester went 92
yards for a touchdown
on the opening kickoff.
" But the Colts were more
angry than rattled, and with cool-hand coach Tony ; |
Dungy reminding his players that it was only one
touchdown and nierely a seven-point deficit, the ' i
Colts never panicked or lost a smidgen of poise,
eventually coming back from an eight-point | :
second-quarter deficit to ultimately prevail.

ie}

AL DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF
RB JOSEPH ADDAI



QB PEYTON MANNING



AL DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF

6



CLOCK CONTROL

The Colts dominated
time of possession,
holding the ball for
38:04 to the Bears’
21:56. Indianapolis ran
off 46 plays in the first
=e 4 half, the Bears had only

JARED LAZARUS/MIAMI HERALD starr 19 aNd the Colts had 81

- RB DOMINIC RHODES _- Plays in the game, 33
more than Chicago. |

From the Bears’ last touch of the first half - a Rex
Grossman fumble - with 1:26 before intermission until
their first possession in the second half, with 7:21
remaining in the third quarter, 56 minutes of real time
elapsed. That hardly was a recipe for continuity.

TIGHTEN UP

The Colts came into the
playoffs allowing 173
rushing yards per game,
last.in the NFL. The
return from injury of
run-stopping safety Bob
Sanders helped, and
they allowed their first
three playoff opponents
an average of 73.3
yards, Then, the Bears ran for 111 yards, 52 on one
Thomas Jones run. But Chicago averaged 3.2 yards
- onits other 18 rushes, allowing the Colts to become
the first team in history to win a Super Bowl after
finishing last in run defense in the regular season.

(0 THAT LINE

The Colts’ offensive line
began badly with two
false-start penalties in
their first six plays of the
opening series, but
quickly settled down to
dominate the Bears the
rest of the night. They
allowed Peyton Manning
to stay upright until he
suffered his only sack of the game with nine minutes

| remaining and the Colts holding 4 12-point lead. And
their bruising blocking allowed running backs
Dominic Rhodes and Joseph Addai to gain 190 yards

€







SS

DOUG PENSINGER/GETTY IMAGES

O-LINE VS. D-LINE —

AL DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF

OL RYAN DIEM

hy tomemrserescy, | Tesi gs salbiaie
AL DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF

QB REX GROSSMAN

I TRAIN WRECK REX

Bears quarterback Rex Grossman
insisted so many poor efforts
during the regular season were
mostly an aberration. Wrong.
Though he had a 120.8 passer rating
in the first half, he unraveled in the

“ second, with two big interceptions
in the fourth quarter as he forced
plays downfield. One more time, he
was far too slow on the draw,
ending with a 68.3 rating on a night
he also lost a fumble and the Bears
turned it over five times.



Hoxton teat
aE TEe

rushing, their-second-best total of the season.

fo. ON TOP: A combination of his own cool, Peyton Manning’s play,

JOE RIMKUS JR./MIAMI HERALD STAFF

KR DEVIN HESTER

a
Z DEVIN DENIED

Rookie return man Devin Hester,
who had six return touchdowns
during the regular season, only
touched the ball twice Sunday
night. The first time, the former UM
star went 92 yards for an
electrifying, opening-play score.
The Colts then began to squib kick
the rest of the night, and he never
got another chance ona kickoff. He
also fielded only one of the Colts’
three punts. One was downed, the
other went for a touchback.




JONATHAN DANIEL/GETTY IMAGES

LB BRIAN URLACHER

«> CAN’T STOP RUN/RAIN

The Bears’ proud defense was
bounced around all night at the
point of attack by a vastly superior
Colts offensive line, with
linebackers Lance Briggs and Brian
Urlacher constantly having to stop
Colts runners far beyond the line of
scrimmage. Chicago cornerback
Charles Tillman was his team’s
second-leading tackler, with seven
solo stops and 11 tackles overall,
with many of those stops made in
the secondary after long gains.

gaurantee gE RY
CPA





SAAS, a r So. 5
DONALD MIRALLE/GETTY IMAGES

RB CEDRIC BENSON

4. MISSING IN ACTION

Bears running back Cedric Benson
hurt his knee ona 4-yard gain late in
the first quarter and never returned.
The Bears had relied on a dual
running attack for most of the
second half of the season, and
Benson had averaged 4.1 yards a
carry with six touchdowns, the
same number of scores as running
mate Thomas Jones. Behind in the
second.half, the Bears abandoned
the running game, with only four
rushes in the fourth quarter,








WALTER MICHOT/MIAMI HERALD STAFF

the offensive line and defensive lines, and clock control made Tony Dungy, above, a champion.



SIEFTREY BOAN/EL NUEVO HERALD
DB CHRIS HARRIS

a
«) WAY TOO SOFT

The Bears seemed to think Peyton
Manning was not going to beat
them deep, going with Cover-2
protection and leaving huge spaces
in'the middle of the field. They
never adjusted to Manning's
decision to adapt a mostly short
passing game, the better to cope
with a wet ball and take what the
Bears gave them. That allowed
Colts backs and tight ends to take
short passes for respectable gains
and keep the chains moving.





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| mans /Y) The Tribune

Ym lovin’ It. ’ a Poyee lt a
IRCULA

DO A FRESH SALAD!



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Volume: 103 No.64

eye epi le RCL
ow ene mR aa

SEE FRONT PAGE OF BUSINESS SECTION

CLOUDS, WITH

» STRAY SHOWER




aaa iss



¢ Miami Herald |

BAHAMAS EDITION

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007 —




SEE FRONT PAGE OF ARTS SECTION







MASA MU Tse GL








- AG's office atlvises FGSttenmectuts.
of police is set to’

Defence Force

i By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Attorney General's office’

has advised that charges should
be brought against Defence Force

officers involved in the beating,

of Mr.Dexter Wilson, 27, of
Inagua in November of last year,
The Tribune has learned.

The police file on the matter,

along with the advice, is to be for-
warded from the office of the
Attorney General back to the
police by the end of this week
ready for "charges to be made",
Mr Bernard Turner, director of

. + public. prosecutiens..said. yester-

day.

This development follows crit-
icism of the police and the Attor-
ney General — and frustration
among Inaguans — for not having
moved sooner to charge anyone

. in connection with the attack.

Despite the recommendations,
however, Mr Turner noted that
it is not guaranteed that charges

will be brought, with this next
stage now being subject to police
discretion.

Morton Salt worker Dexter
Wilson was "almost beaten to
death" by a group of Defence
Force officers on November 26th,
according to eye-witness reports.

He had to be flown to Nassau
for emergency treatment —
including a brain scan, X-rays,
and other tests.

Violence flared after a male
officer was said to have taken
exception to a conversation Wil-
son was having with a female offi-
cer outside Supers nightclub in
Mathew. Town.

In the immediate wake of the
attack, there were reports that
Inaguans were "set to riot." A
large group of an estimated 80 -
100 Inaguans gathered outside

_ the Defence Force base on the
island shouting threats to officers
inside.

In January, vandals wrecked
-two police and Defence Force

Opposition members of Boundaries
Commission ‘frustrated with govt’,

‘ @ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr

Chief Reporter

THERE is a sense of frustration among opposition members of
the Boundaries Commission that the government has been drag-
~, ging its feet in completing the work of the commission which has
. thus far been impeded by low voter registration numbers, Brent
- Symonette, MP for Montagu and the opposition representative on

the body told The Tribune.

Mr Symonette pointed out that there are only several weeks
between now and the next election and the boundaries commission
has yet to decide on the make up of the constituencies for the 2007

general election.

“We were supposed to meet on Monday and they delayed that
because the House was meeting but the House finished at 4.30 pm,
a half an hour late which would be the normal time and they can-

celled a meeting and I am unaware of when it will be rescheduled -

for,” the Montagu MP said.

Last Wednesday Prime Minister Perry Christie advised Gover-

SEE page 11

AUTO INSURANCE

CM) STAN | Wh) 0180



Eleuthera | Fumo
Teh (240) 330-2504






‘heating’ charges

vehicles, in what was described
as an act of frustration and rage
over the failure to make arrests.
There were claims that rela-
tions between officers on the
island and the local residents
would "never be the same."

In December, a senior Police
source complained that the police
were taking the rap for the slow
progress in dealing with the mat-
ter, while in fact the hold-up was
to be attributed to the Attorney
General's office, which had
requésted the file shortly after
the investigation was completed,
but failed to move quickly in

making_a decision as.to whether. .

charges should be brought.



Naren

TRIBU 18)

DCE aes Si



@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

AMID claims of victimisation
and political interference, it has
been revealed that Assistant
Commissioner of Police Regi-
nald Ferguson will be trans-
ferred to head the Police Train-
ing College.

A senior police source

_ claimed. yesterday..that certain

government officials are hoping
the move will ultimately force
him into retfrement.

Reportedly Mr Ferguson, who
has held his current post of ACP
of crime since 1997, was target-
ed by the PLP when they took
office in 2002, as his brother
Johnley Ferguson was the FNM
candidate for MICAL at the
time, Mr Johnley Ferguson lost
by only four votes to the area’s
current MP V Alfred Gray, and
is now the FNM candidate for
_ South Eleuthera,

While the police administra-
tion’s “restructuring” coines at

an auspicious time, sources sug-

Norman ere) fesse tod | steps down

@ NORMAN
Solomon couldn’t
hold back his tears
yesterday at Cabi-
net where he
stepped down as
the co-chairman of
the Nassau Eco-




Man claims he’s been on
Nassau curfew for 14 years










Movement

nomic Develop-
ment Commission.

Mr Solomon is
pictured above with
his wife Katherine;
Prime Minister Per-
ry Christie and
Deputy Prime Min-
ister Cynthia Pratt.
* See page two











(Photo:
Tim Clarke/
Tribune staff)










AN EX-CONSTABLE called
for justice last night after claim-
ing he had been kept on a night-
ly curfew in Nassau for nearly
15 years.

“J don’t have no freedom,”
said Henry Brice, 41, “My cell
is this island - 21 miles by seven -
instead of the regular 6ft by
10ft.”

Mtr Brice, a father of six, told
The Tribune that he had been
made to sign in at Central Police
Station every day since being

released on bail on a murder
conspiracy charge in 1993, And

_ he had been made to observe a

midnight to 6am curfew ever
sitice,

Yet still there was no sign of
his case being heard in court, he
said,

Mt Brice and three police col-
leagues were charged with a
murder ey in April,
1992. However, the alleged

SEE page nine

i
imjoy a ee e Fi
with medium fries
cxincd Sue



gest that amore sinister plan is
afoot.

Reportedly Mr Ferguson’s
move is also being seen as an
effort to make him the “scape-
goat” for the criticism levelled at
the PLP over the arrests of the
fivesbaggage handlers of Nas-
sau Flight Services (NFS).

Since their initial arrests, Mr
Ferguson has been the only offi-
cial to go on record as admit-
ting that he knew of the arrests
in Florida last year.

The Minister of Foreign
Affairs, the Attorney General,
and the Minister of National.
Security have all denied any
knowledge of the planned
arrests after a joint US/Bahamas
year-long surveillance opera-
tion.

Since then, NFS, the govern-
ment-owned ground handling
company, has become one of the
most heated topics of debate
leading up to the next general
election.

Political parties from the offi-
cial opposition, Free National
(FNM), the

SEE page 11

Dr Nottage:
bacterial outbreak
could have been
behind some deaths
in dialysis unit

HEALTH Minister Dr
Bernard Nottage has
acknowledged that some
deaths in the dialysis unit at
the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital could have been due to
a bacterial outbreak.

The outbreak started in
July last year, but health
officials have previously cast
doubt on whether it could be
responsible for any deaths
on the unit.

Just before press time last
night, Dr Nottage said:

“Some people have died.
Some of those deaths may
have been due to the infec-
tion, but we are doing a
detailed case-by-case investi-
gation at the moment to
determine the actual cause
of death in people who
died.”

The government has been
criticised for its handling of
the outbreak thus far by a
number of patients.

Selicaat

OU CPAP eet)

) ota iocinitos

Frodorick: StS Prt yi
cable Sry)



PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



inn DE
Risk management key
to business continuity

is not possible without

recognition of the per-
ception, it is critical to high-
light that management is an
attempt to control those per-
ceptions.

Thus far, we have estab-
lished a basic understanding of
risk and management. Let us

-continue by bring the two
terms together - risk, and man-
agement,

Outcomes are uncertain
when the enemy is us, but we
have some control over what is
going to happen - or at least
some control over the conse-
quences - of whatever other
people choose to do. Under-
standing and establishing a
process is what risk manage-
ment is all about.

Study after study has been
conducted in the field of Risk
Management to discover what
went wrong, and hopefully
reduce the risk of the event
ever happening again. Consid-
ering the vast amount of topics
that can be considered for risk
management, we focus specif-

aN

Te URS Cy

J ust as a discussion of risk

hehind the news,
a
on Mondays





ically on terrorism. But before
this is done, the relationship
of terrorism to risk and man-
agement should be clarified.

In this discussion, terrorism
is the risk. In other words, the
potential for terrorism to occur
is what is called the risk of loss
as a result of the action. Man-
aging the terrorism risk is an
attempt by persons to control
the occurrence, response and
recovery as it pertains to ter-
rorism.

‘Like other risk factors, the
individual carrying out the act
is usually given the name of
the action being done, the ter-
rorist. The terrorist, when con-
sidered, is of more significance
than terrorism. A key concept
in understanding terrorism and
any risk, is what motivates the
person who carries out the act?
This can be viewed as another
attempt to control the outcome
of events, and the beginning
of managing the risk.

Considering that the aim is
to help understand how the
public reacts and makes deci-
sions as they pertain to risk,
this thinking can also be
applied to better understand
why a person would commit
acts of terrorism. The point
being made is that motivation-

EY FIDELITY.

invites applications for the position of °
MANAGER, CARD OPERATIONS

PROFILE:

* 7+ years in the financial services industry with 5+ years in the bank card
and/or electronic banking services and card operations management

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

+ Establish operating policies, procedures & controls

responsibile for daily management of card product operations and electronic
banking delivery systems
Work with internal departments, external vendors and card
associations to assure cardholder services and compliance
Output and delivery of statements, plastics, letters and supporting
IT infrastructure
Support the development of new card and electronic banking
products and services
Team with Marketing to execute product and sales plans,
marketing strategies, customer loyalty programme.

Oversee payments and application processing, maintenance of

Safe &

Secure

By Gamal Newry



al and influencing factors are
important in understanding,
and better dealing with, indi-
viduals and groups.

The risk to be managed is
terrorism, and it is manage-
able. Roper (1999) states:
“Risk management is a
process, a theory, a procedure,
or a methodology for deter-
mining your assets, vulnerabil-
ities and threats, and then pro-
tecting them.”

The Royal Society Study
Group (1992) puts forward this
general interpretation about
risk management: “In terms of
the three basic organisational
control theories (cf. Dunsire
1978, 59-60); the setting of
goals, whether explicitly or
implicitly; the gathering and
interpretation of information,
and action to influence human
behavior; to physical structures

‘or both.”

It must be mentioned at this
point that risk management, in
any of its definitions, is the
stoppage or elimination of the
risk, be it terrorism or other-
wise. The definitions from
research stress the followingm
as summed up by the Scarman
Centre 2002 Mitigation, Readi-
ness, Response, and Recov-
ery. These four factors are crit-














ical in any disaster or risk man-
agement plan, and advocate a
reduction and limitation to the
loss factor.

The approach taken to sup-
port this point is to provide a
plan of action for an event such
as terrorism. Bearing in mind
the explanation provides earli-
er, the main purpose or objec-
tive of this process, as classi-
fied by the Scarman Centre
2002 are,

* Minimisation of risk

* Protecting people and the
environment

* Ensuring the survival of
the organisation

As mentioned earlier, the
starting point for the manage-
ment of terrorism is to under-
stand what are the motivating
factors that will cause terrorism
to take place. Wilhelm (1985),
when answering the question
about anticipating terrorism,
said: “The answer is to under-
stand the adversary, politically
and culturally”. Considering
the overwhelming number of
studies done on terrorism, and

_ the tendency to highlight reli-

gious and political causes, it
would be reasonable to con-
clude that most terrorist events
centre around such issues.
The next step in the man-

agement process is to establish .

a standard by which to mea-
sure the risk, and to ascertain
the critical level. The question
is: what is considered accept-
able when dealing with a ter-
rorist risk? Again, past inci-
dents of terror attacks can
assist greatly in this area. Even
though the Scarman Centre
2002 focuses on the measure-
ment of natural disasters, a
similar approach can be taken

- Nad









relevant experience.

DUTIES:





Associate Degree in Business,
experience OR College of the Bahamas Diploma in

1. Works closely with each of the s
Managing Director (including the D
Biostatistcian) to ensure that workflows are appropriately coordinated.

in establishing a ‘terrorism’
measurement scale.

Further, an applicable tool,
the Fault Event Tree, can be
beneficial in helping develop
‘what-if? scenarios. This
method takes a step-by-step
look at what impact the iden-
tified risk (terrorism) would
have on key assets of a com-
pany. An attempt at answer-
ing this can also be considered
by assessing the value of the
item of the property or person
to be protected - asset identifi-
cation.

Value, when used here, is
not limited to financial worth,
but also includes the impor-
tance of an individual to the
company, such as the chief
executive. Myers (1999) indi-
cates that it makes good busi-
ness sense to begin this process
and recognise the critical com-
ponents to the continued oper-
ation of the company. This
process is also described as
Business Impact Analysis, by
Doswell (2000), who states:
“Identifying the impacts result-
ing from disruptions and dis-
aster scenarios, that can affect
the organisation, and tech-
niques that can be used to
quantify and qualify such
impacts. Establish critical func-
tions, their recovery priorities,
and interdependencies so that
recovery time objectives can
be set.”

With the identification and
measuring process completed,
it becomes necessary to recog-
nise what risks are insurable
or transferable, defined by
Doswell (2000) as “risk
removal”. Both concepts refer
to the insuring of property and
persons in the event of
loss. The obvious difficulty is

the high loss potential associ-

Public Hospitals Authority
CORPORATE OFFICE

ADVERTISEMENT

POSITION

ADMINSTRATIVE ASSISTANT Hl

The Public Hospitals Authority
the post of Administrative Assistant

Applicants must possess the following qualification:-
Secretarial Science or related field and three (3) years relevant
Secretrial Science and five (5) years

The Administrative Assistant will be reponsible for the general administrative/secretarial
duties; and assists in all required aspects of Project and programme management in support
of the office of the Deputy Managing Director.





invites applications from suitably qualified individuals for
Ill, Corporate Office, Public Hospitals Authority.

pecialized officers reporting directly to the Deputy
irector of Projects, Senior Manager for MIS and

4
ated with terrorism, which will

result in very’ high
premiums. However, the real-
isation of this factor is the aim
of the management process.
An Emergency Response
and Operational Plan can help
reduce these premiums, while
the effectiveness of the
response will determine busi-

ness continuity, contingency *.>.’"-

and recovery.

The impact of terrorism on
the global community, espe-
cially in the US, has changed
the way business will operate
for many years to come. The
nature of the beast is known
to risk and security managers
alike. Likewise, by proper
review and assessment, the
critical components have also
been identified. Their impact
on the company’s ability to
operate has also been exam-
ined. From this information,
the necessary steps must be
taken to ensure continuity of
the company. As mentioned,
the risk management process
cannot guarantee that the com-
pany will not be subject to loss
events, but it is a type of insur-

ance to reduce the amount of §-—

loss that may be associated
with these events.

NB: Gamal Newry is the
president of Preventative Mea-
sures, a loss prevention and
asset protection training and _
consulting company, specialis-
ing in policy and procedure
development, business securi-
ty reviews and audits, and
emergency and crisis manage-
ment. Comments can be sent
to PO Box N-3154 Nassau,
Bahamas, visist us at www.pre-
ventativemeasures.net or email
gnewry@preventativemea-
sures.net





















databases, cards support training, account posting and reconciliation
* Resolve cardholder disputes and process chargebacks
¢ Administer fraud and loss prevention programmes
° Participate in budgeting process
© Monitor service levels and report on performance

CRITICAL COMPETENCIES:

* Operations /financial focus with technical background

¢ Demonstrated project management experience |

+ Strong communication (verbal and written), organizational, and
supervisory skills ‘

* Strong demonstrated knowledge in banking regulation and operational risk
management

+ Excellent interpersonal skills. Ability to effectively interact with all levels
of management and employees

The person will report directly to the Executive Vice President and CFO
Competitive compensation package will include salary, benefits and bonuses.
Send resume no later than February 16th, 2007 to:

: The Director Human Resources
Dias

51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
Fax 326.3000

e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com

CARD OPERATIONS MANAG











2. Keeps abreast all activities in each of the Sections of the Planning and Evaluation
Unit(i.e.) Planning, MIS and Statistics Sections) and the PHA Headquaters Projects
Office so as to be able to provide immediate assistance when needed.

3, Maintains a structured schedule of specific activites in progress in the Deputy
Managing Director’s and related offices.

4. Assists inthe preparation of annual budget estimates for the Deputy Managing
Director’s and related offices ensuring that there is detailed valid justification for all
submissions.

5. Works on special projects on behalf of the Deputy Managing Director or any
specialized officer of this area in order to ensure well-rounded exposure and experience.

6. Assists in all required aspects of project and programme management within the
unit. '





7. Coordinates Deputy Managing Director’s schedule and appointments, arrange
meetings, prepare agendas as well as reserve and prepare the facility.

8. Conducts research, compiles reports and prepare presentations as directed.

9, Preparations and disburses documents relative to project headed by the Deputy
Managing Director.

Letters of application and curricula vitae shoould be submitted to the Director of
Human Resources, Public Hospitals Authority P.O. Box N-8200 or Manx Corporate
Centre, Dockendale House, West ay Street no later than 16th February, 2007






4B_| WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007 INTERNATIONAL EDITION

WALL STREET

BUSINESS BRIEFS 3




BY RACHEL BECK
Associated Press

NEW YORK — The higher
stocks go, the more investors
fear a correction ic coming.

That helps to explain why
all the recent stock market
positives — the Dow Jones
industrials’ record run, the
longest stretch without a large
price correction in decades,
the Federal Reserve holding
interest rates steady — are
being considered as much a
curse’as a blessing.

No one is saying the market
is destined for a free-fall any-
time soon, but there are legiti-
mate concerns that the rally
may be due for a pause.

You don’t need to look far
on Wall Street for cautionary
commentary about the bull
run that began in July. Few
expected that surge to happen
in the first place, and at many
times in recent months, there
have been forecasts that the
market will start showing
some fatigue.

Instead, the Dow went up
seven straight months through
January, 'the longest winning
streak since 1995, and that
thrust the blue chip index into
record territory, which it con-

-AUTOMOTIVES

‘Toyota rep

*TOYOTA: :

ton Securities in Tokyo. “To
be honest, it’s hard to find
anything bad at this point.”

Toyota did not comment
on where it might build its
next U.S. factory to keep up
with strong demand there.
American newspapers have
reported that Chattanooga,
Tenn., and Marion, Ark., are
among the finalists.

Net profit and sales
reached a record for any quar-
ter, said Senior Managing
Director Takeshi Suzuki. “We
believe our company wide
efforts have contributed to

_these results,” he said in a
release.

Toyota, with its reputation
for reliable, fuel-efficient cars,
has gotten a big boost lately
from the rise in oil prices. It
also is a leader in producing
hybrids, which use electricity
and gasoline.

Toyota has long beaten
struggling General Motors in
profitability, but it still trails
GM in annual global vehicle
production.

Last month, Toyota said
global vehicle production
topped 9 million in 2006, at
9.018 million vehicles, mark-
ing the fifth year straight of
growth. GM its group auto-
makers produced 9.18 million
vehicles worldwide in 2006 —

RETAIL

tinues to beat with gains
already seen this month.

The Standard & Poor’s 500
index, now at a six-year high,
had its first eight-month run in
a decade in January. Should
that continue in February, it
would be the first time since
1983 that it has had nine
months of gains.

A LONG STREAK

- The Dow industrials aver-
age hasn’t seen a 2 percent
correction in more than 130
sessions, the longest run since
1954, and it has gone 53 months
without a 10 percent correc-
tion for only the second time
in history, according to Ned
Davis Research. There has
been not been a 2 percent drop
in the S&P 500 in more than
930 sessions, the longest
stretch ever without that kind
of pullback, according to Biri-
nyi Associates.

Much of this climb has been’

built on better-than-expected
economic growth, which has
all but wiped out any concerns
of a looming recession. Infla-
tionary pressures also remain
relatively tame, containing
investors’ worries that high oil
prices would significantly

TOY FC



about 162,000 vehicles more

than its Japanese rival.
Toyota, which also makes

the Lexus luxury line, sur-

’ passed DaimlerChrysler AG

as the No. 3 auto seller in the
U.S. for the first time in 2006,
according to data from auto-
makers. Ford Motor remains
No. 2 in the U.S.

Toyota kept its vehicle

-sales forecast for the fiscal

year ending March 31
unchanged at 8.47 million

boost the cost of other goods
and services.

That economic picture
spurred Federal Reserve poli-
cymakers last August to halt a
series of 17 quarter-point
increases since June 2004 that
pushed the overnight bank
loan rate to 5.25 percent — and
then to remain on hold since
then.

At the same time, earnings
growth has been strong, with
companies in the S&P 500 tal-
lying 13 consecutive quarters
of double-digit profit gains.
The quarterly results. now
being reported might add to
that run — and break a record
by doing so — with,a growth
rate of 10.4 percent, according
to Thomson Financial.

SHARES IN PLAY

A buyout boom also has
fueled the stock market as
investors have held shares that
they believe could potentially
sell to private-equity firms. All
that dealmaking, along with
the surge in stock: buybacks,
also has reduced the number
of shares in play, therefore
boosting demand for equities.

For the current rally to con-
tinue, a lot depends on what

vehicles.

During the October-De-
cember quarter, it sold 2.16
million vehicles worldwide,
up 8.9 percent from a year
ago.

Vehicle production, mean-
while, rose 9 percent to 2.09
million units in the quarter.

Toyota said a weak yen,
which boosts the value of
overseas earnings, added 30
billion yen ($250 million) to
the third quarter, while cost

=—

investors believe the future
will hold.

' The market is pricing in
virtually no chance of the Fed
cutting interest rates between
now and September. Should
that actually happen, it would
rank as the eighth-longest
stretch of Fed inaction.

That’s good news because
the average historical gains
during the 12 longest Fed
pauses dating back to 1960
have seen an average return of
nearly 12 percent in the S&P
500, according to Birinyi Asso-
ciates.

The Fed’s steady stance
also means that companies
won't get the benefit of lower
borrowing costs anytime soon,
however. That could hurt
earnings, which already have a
more murky outlook going
forward.

Wall Street analysts sur-
veyed by Thomson Financial
are now forecasting profit
gains of around 5.1 percent in
the first two quarters of this
year, and more than double
the usual number of compa-,
nies in the S&P 500 have
issued negative earnings guid-
ance, according to the finan-
cial data provider.

orts record quarterly sales

ee

KATSUMI KASAHARA/AP
FUEL EFFICIENCY: Visitors look around.a Toyota showroom in Tokyo on Tuesday.

Toyota, with its reputation for reliable, fuel-efficient cars, has gotten a big boost lately
from the rise in oil prices.

reductions efforts contributed
another 20 billion yen ($167
million).

It also held steady its fore-
casts for the full fiscal year
through March, projecting
earnings of 1.55 trillion yen
($12.9 billion) on 23.2 trillion
yen ($193 billion) sales.

Toyota shares, which have
climbed a third in value over
the past year, closed up 1.8
percent in Tokyo at 7,960 yen
($66).

Wal-Mart women bias case sent to trial

* WAL-MART

Jenkins said if company-
wide gender discrimination is
proven at trial, Wal-Mart
‘ could be forced to pay billions
of dollars to women who
earned less than their male
counterparts, with no oppor-
tunity to dispute their individ-
ual circumstances.

Jenkins said it was
“impractical on its face” to
have individual hearings for
each plaintiff and had planned
to use a statistical formula to
compensate the women.

Wal-Mart, in seeking dis-
missal of the case, called that
an unprecedented denial of its

rights. Wal-Mart said women
who allege they were discrim-
inated against can file law-
suits against individual stores.
The women’s lawyers said the
idea was ridiculous, and
would clog the federal judi-
ciary.

“Although size of this class
action is large, mere size does
not render a case unmanage-
able,” Judge Harry Pregerson
wrote for the majority, which
upheld Jenkins’ decision in its
entirety. .

But Judge Andrew Klein-
feld wrote in a dissent that
women should perhaps file
individual lawsuits to safe-
guard Wal-Mart from paying

EUROPEN CENTRAL BANK

ECB expected to hold interest rates steady

*RATES

not one or two, when decid-
ing on policy. “We have.to
take into account the situation
of euro area as a whole and
there are big differences in
Europe, as in the U.S.,” he
said. The bank’s mission is to
monitor and control “the
threat of inflation in the euro-
zone, a 13-country bloc with a
population of 317 million that
accounts for more than 15 per-
cent of the world’s gross
domestic product.

Interest rates are currently
ai 3.5 percent, unchanged

since. December when the
sixth quarter-point increase
in a year took effect. The bank
is expected to hold steady at
Thursday’s meeting, but set
the tone for another increase
in March. Of the 51 analysts
polled by Dow Jones News-
wires, 50 said they expected
the bank to keep the rate
unchanged at 3.5 percent,
while all but two said they
expected an increase.to 3.75
percent in March.

“For central bank watchers
rattled by the gyrations of the
Bank of England and the
apparent willingness of the

those who don’t deserve
money, and would also ensure
women get the compensation
they deserve.

The appellate court’s deci-
sion, he wrote, “threatens the
rights of women injured by
sex discrimination. And it
threatens Wal-Mart’s rights.”

Brad Seligman, one of the

attorneys who represented '

the women suing Wal-Mart,
said he suspected Wal-Mart
would ask the appeals court
to rehear the case with a panel
of 15 judges.

But he said the decision
would hurt the company’s
reputation.

“No amount of PR by

Bank of Japan leaders to heed
political advice, the clear
guidance on the rate outlook
provided by ... Trichet, and
the equally firm ECB standing
against political interference,
is quite a relief,” said Gilles
Moec, a London-based econo-
mist with Bank of America.
The Bank of Japan will
decide this month whether to
lift its key interest rate from
0.25 percent. Last month, it
held off amid political pres-
sure to keep rates steady so as
not to choke Japan’s eco-
nomic recovery.
The Bank of England made

Wal-Mart is going to allow it
to deal with its legacy of dis-
crimination,” Seligman said.
Wal-Mart spokeswoman
Mona Williams said the
world’s biggest retailer was
not immediately prepared to
comment. :
Wal-Mart shares rose 6
cents to $48.58 in late trading
on the New York Stock
Exchange.
. David Nassar, executive
director of Wal-Mart Watch,
a group critical of Wal-Mart
policies, said the decision vin-
dicates the “victims of the
company’s illegal and
immoral gender discrimina-
tion.”

a surprise decision increase in
its key rate last month from 5
percent to 5.25 percent, its
highest point since May 2001.
Last week, the U.S. Federal
Reserve left interest rates
unchanged at 5.25 percent for
the fifth straight time.

Trichet, Moec said, sent
clear signals at the January
meeting that a rate increase
was in the offing in March. He
said he expected the ECB “to
signal a March rate increase
by using the ’v’ word again,
that is by calling for ’vigi-
lance’ against the upside risks
to inflation.”

MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD





AMY SANCETTA/AP

A ROUGH QUARTER: BP said adjusted net profit dropped





to $2.88 billion, after it was $3.69 billion a year ago.

BP’s 4Q profit drops

a

From Herald Wire Services

off by 22 percent

Declining oil prices and mounting safety spending sent
BP’s (BP) fourth-quarter profit down 22 percent to a two-
year low, the oil company said Tuesday.

Following a series of high-profile mishaps, including a
deadly refinery blast in Texas and an oil spill in Alaska, BP
also slashed its growth targets and raised its capital expendi-

ture forecast for this year.

BP said adjusted net profit dropped to $2.88 billion, from
$3.69 billion a year ago. Adjusted net profit measures earnings
before extraordinary items and excluding changes in the

value of inventories.

e REAL ESTATE

BLACKSTONE RAISES
ITS BID FOR EQUITY

Private equity firm
Blackstone Group raised
its cash takeover bid for
Equity Office Properties
Trust (EOP) to $23 billion,
escalating a down-to-the-
wire bidding war for the real
estate company.

Equity Office told share-
holders to vote for the deal
at a special meeting this
morning, even though it was
still less than a $23.2 billion
bid from rival suitor Vor-
nado Realty Trust (VNO).

Blackstone’s newest bid

| is for $55.50 per share, up



nearly 15 percent from its
first offer in November.
Tuesday’s sweetened offer
was a nearly 3 percent
increase from Blackstone’s
last bid of $54 a share, or
$22.3 billion. But it still fell
short of the $56-a-share
cash-and-stock proposal

_ from Vornado.

e BEVERAGES

GOVERNMENT WANTS
EX-COKE EXEC JAILED

The government said in
court papers it believes a
former Coca-Cola (KO)
secretary convicted of con-
spiring to steal trade secrets
from the beverage giant
should be jailed immedi-
ately because she poses a
flight risk. ted

In a motion filed in U.S.
District Court in Atlanta,
Assistant U.S. Attorney
Byung J. Pak said clothing,
prescription medication,
papers and other personal
items were found in Joya
Williams’ Mustang during a
search after a fire destroyed
her apartment Friday. The
fire occurred nearly 90 min-
utes after the guilty verdict
was reached in federal court
in Atlanta.



e@ MANUFACTURING

TYCO’S 1Q PROFIT
RISES BY 43 PERCENT

Bermuda-based manufac-
turing conglomerate Tyco
International (TYC) said
its first-quarter profit
climbed 43 percent as both
revenue and expenses rose
for the business, which is
preparing to split into three
separate companies.

Net income for the com-
pany rose to $793 million
from $556 million.

LATE TRADING

e TELECOM —

HELIO CELL SERVICE
EXPANDING IN APRIL

Helio (HELOF.PK) said
its youth-oriented cell
phone service will reach
100,000 subscribers in April
and that it is now generating
monthly revenue at a rate
exceeding $100 million per
year.

The rare update on oper-
ating data came as Helio, a
joint venture between
EarthLink (ELNK) and
Korea’s SK Telecom
(SKM), launched a music
store offering wireless
downloads for $1.99 per
song. It was the first time
Helio has disclosed a cus-
tomer.tally. ,

Chief Executive Sky Day-
ton said the company fin-
ished 2006 with about
70,000 customers and that
subscriber growth has been
accelerating.

e TRADE

WTO TO MEET TO
ASSESS PROGRESS

Two weeks after world
powers pledged to re-ener-
gize global free trade talks,
the WTO’s 150 members
meet today to assess the
degree of progress — or lack
thereof — toward an agree-
ment that would liberalize
the world economy.

But much hinges on two
major decisions pending in
just one country: the United
States, where Congress will
debate whether to extend
President Bush’s authority
to agree on trade deals and
whether to adopt a new
farm bill that has received a
lukewarm response from
major trading partners such
as Brazil and Europe.

The so-called Doha
round has stumbled since its
inception five years ago in
Qatar’s capital.

Rich and poor countries
have-clashed over clearing |
barriers to trade in goods
and agriculture, and nearly
incessant sniping between
the European Union and
United States has repeatedly
stalled progress. ;

One of the main stum-
bling blocks has been the
level of U.S. government
subsidies paid out to Ameri-
can farmers. Poorer nations
contend the handouts pre-
vent them from selling their
farm goods and developing
their economies.





‘pm 6:35 p.m.

Late
Chg. volume

4pm, 6:35 pm. Late
‘dose Close Chg. volume





Stock Tk. close Stock Tkr.
Cisco CSCO 27.28 +~—«2851 +—«+1.23:-:221286 | eBay EBAY 3285 3290 +05 9664
Nasdl00Tr QQQQ 44.05 44.23 «+18 84340 | CnGardAn CENTA 15.05 ° 15.00 05 9286
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Magnaénth MECA 412 4,10 -.02—-‘11190
CAUMRRX CMX. 6069669 tog8] | intel” «= INTC 21312138 #076133
GnMotr = GM 33.43, 33.83 10653 | BusnObj BOB) 39.40 +52 6057

APwCnv = APCC
SpdrHome XHB

30.83
39.33 -.02

SunMicro SUNW 653 6.55 +.02
SP Fnel XLF *

5736
37.55 * 5410

For up-to-date stock quotes, go to www.MiamiHerald.com and click on Business



THE TRIBUNE

BUSINESS.’

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007, PAGE 5B



Bahamas exchange control regime leads Caribbean region

m@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

THE Bahamas’ exchange
contol regime, and one-to-one
peg with the US dollar, is
regarded as the best of its kind
in the Caribbean, although

such systems act as a barrier
to integration with the rest of
the world’s economy, a Credit
Suisse First Boston executive
said yesterday.

Speaking at the Nassau Con-
ference, Wendall Mottley said:
“Caribbean independence
throughout much of the region
has been viewed as a disap-

pointment.
Expectation

“The expectation of rapid
growth, prosperity and self-
determination have not yet
materalised for a lot of the
region. Plantation agriculture is
dead and the promise of indus-

trialisation... has not filled the
breech.”

Mr Motley added that “shal-
low rooted sun, sand and sea
tourism” separates the region
from ruin, and the Caribbean
had not found new ways to
engaging and interact with a
rapidly globalised world.

“What we need is a






















FROM page 1B

bringing legislation and their various amend-
ments to fruition at a faster pace than has been
the experience in the past.

“On the other hand, I ask for your continued

commitment to promote the new products and
structures when they are introduced; and to
begin to think of unique ways and means of
helping each and every one of us in the trans-
formation of this great little country to a world-
class offshore financial centre.”
Mr Smith noted that the latest statistics from
the Central Bank of the Bahamas pointed to
the fact that the financial services industry con-
tributes some 15 to 20 per cent of the country’s
gross domestic product (GDP).

It employs some 4,405 people, and the aver-

cage salaries are estimated at $47,500. Capital
expenditure was estimated at $16.3 million,
while operational costs for the industry were
given at $402.7 million.
Given this potential, Mr Smith said the Min-
istry of Financial Services and Investments was
to embark on several initiatives this year, which
will seek to integrate the sector more readily
into the economy through outreach to younger
persons for job recruitment.

“In the spirit of cooperation, my govern-
ment formed a Working Group to review the
results of the Branding Survey, which was car-
ried out for us by Price WaterHousgCoopers

in conjunction with the Bahamas Financial Ser-
vice Board,” Mr Smith said.

“Tt is our intention to further engage Price-
WaterHouseCoopers to take us to the next
step in this process, and to begin to develop a
strategic plan that would provide a platform
on which the industry can not only blossom
but flourish. I also would like to mention the
work of the Financial Services Consultative
Forum, which for the past two years has been
performing - and continues to play - an invalu-
able role in the growth of this sector.”

Mr Smith said it has been a collaborative
approach between public and private sector.

“We all know where the buck stops; but
before it reaches that point there are a number
of persons and institutions who can and ought
to have some input into the decision making
process,” he added.

The Nassau Conference is hosted by found-
ing sponsor -the Association of International
Banks & Trusts (AIBT).

“This organisation, which represents inter-
national banks and trust companies operating
from the Bahamas, has been one of the leading
champions for the industry,” the minister said.

“T wish also to make special note of the inclu-
sion this year, for the first time, of the College
of the Bahamas students who have been invit-
ed to participate through the kind sponsorship
of the various institutions.

“T especially congratulate AIBT for spear-
heading such an initiative, and I trust that this
opportunity for exposure of our Bahamian stu-

Ministry promises to raise legislation pace

dents to the industry will become an integral
part of future endeavours, whether it be by
conferences such as this or by special pro-
grammes, such as was recently launched by the
Bank of the Bahamas. My ministry is eagerly
looking forward to partnering with you to take
this thrust even further into our high schools.”

M Smith said that during the BFSB retreat
in Exuma, Mr Peet said he was of the view
that government’s main role should be to pro-
vide the necessary infrastructure - physical,
regulatory and legislative. These are the areas
where most of the resources of the govern-
ment are being placed.

Noting the seminar’s theme, Mr Smith said:
“ Even though.we are a neutral tax environ-
ment, we are taxed on every side, not only on
the issue of whether or not we ought to intro-
duce some form of taxation, but on any other
number of matters pertaining to the industry.

“But we know and accept that not only the
financial services industry but life itself can be
a taxing affair, At the recent Retreat in Exuma
that I alluded to earlier, another group of stake-
holders met to discuss issues relevant to the
industry. Some participants were of the view
that the players in the industry ought to begin
to take a more leading role in promoting the
jurisdiction. But whether we ought to intro-
duce tax, whether it is the government or pri-
vate sector who should promote the industry,
the point is that we will all feel the effects if we
do not work together to promote our jurisdic-
tion.”

Caribbean business plan,” he
said. “What is the Caribbean
industrial services policy that
will integrate the Caribbean
again into the globalised world
and, more importantly, draw
a massive amount of its citi-
zens into highly productive
enterprise and jobs.” *

He added that the
Bahamas’ exchange control
regime was the best of all
Caribbean countries,

“I am certain that in the
central judgment of the
Caribbean people, the
Bahamas experience will be
regarded as the best of the lot,
despite your own grumbling
about the unnecessary inter-
ference of your Central Bank
and what you consider your
right to conduct your personal
and business affairs as you see
fit,” Mr Mottley said.

He added that some felt the

reality was that any reduction
in Central Bank reserves of US

‘ dollars automatically cause the

bank to tighten liquidity, hence
the arguments to do away with
the Bahamian dollar and
exchange controls.

Forward >

As to the way forward, Mr
Mottley said: “If you have to
take an adjustment under dol-
larisation it would be immedi-
ately felt on the domestic econ-
omy. The brunt of this adjust-
ment would be borne in the
Bahamas by the poor and
salaried.

He said the Bahamas need-
ed to take careful note of what
is happening in the Caribbean,
adding that this country needs
to have a plan which is a busi-
ness plan, and not a Central
Bank plan.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

REVIEW HOLDINGS LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Busincss Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
REVIEW HOLDINGS LIMITED has been dissolved and
struck off the Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution
issued by the Registar General on the 19th day of January, 2007.





‘Real concerns’ over marina development

FROM page 1B

ment, the Ministry of Tourism,
the Bahamas Environment, Sci-
ence and Technology Commis-
sion (BEST) and the Depart-

~. ment of Environmental Health

Services (DEHS).

Mr Martini said consultations
with marina industry stake-
holders on the ideas proposed
in the document are due to
begin next week, with meetings
in West End, Grand Bahama,
on Monday; Marsh Harbour,
Abaco, on Tuesday; Exuma on
Wednesday; Harbour Island on
Thursday and Nassau on Fri-
day. |

He added that their initial
report had been submitted to
the Cabinet in November 2006,
and the policy aimed to tackle
issues such as how marina
developments fitted into their
local communities.

Marinas often had a relative-
ly minimal impact on areas
where there was a proliferation
of these facilities, Mr Martini
said, but could have a major
effect when they were the sole
development.

“Tl think Harbour Island
developments, in particular,
twigged Cabinet’s interest, and
attracted people’s attentian,”
Mr Martini said. “That has
twigged government that it
_ needs to have a policy on '‘this.”

He added that Cabinet had
already adopted some sections
from the report, such as the
approach to analysing applica-
* tions for both major commer-
cial and small private marinas.

Mr Martini said economics
was another focus of the com-
mittee, as the Prime Minister
himself had questioned whether
the Bahamas was maximising
the benefits from the marina
and boating industry.

He added that marinas could
be “relatively inexpensive to
build and very high revenue
generators, especially if slips are
sold and sold with long-term
leases.

“From what we can tell, the
Bahamas is picking up a very
small number. The best esti-
mates for [government] revenue
is in the order of $300,000 total
from all marinas,” Mr Martini
said.

“We know slips have sold for
$500,000 and much more than
that”, indicating the Govern-
ment should assess whether its
getting its true share of taxes
from the industry.

Mr Martini said that current-
ly, the investment incentives
available under the Hotels
Encouragement Act also apply
to marina developments, some-
thing he felt meant that the
Government was giving too
much away to such projects.

“It applies right now, and I’ve
suggested it may be too strong,”
Mr Martini said. ‘““We may be
giving up too much; we’re giving

up duties, property taxes, and
on the jetties collecting $6 per
foot, per year.”

To ensure the Bahamas
maximised tax revenues from
the marina and boating indus-
tries, the policy document sug-
gested that seabed land should
be leased, not sold, with the
leases based on appraised val-
ues and renewable indefinitely.
However, there would be five-
year rental reviews.

The more radical suggestion
is to collect real property taxes
on seabed land, and on the val-
ue of improvements made to
marina property over the
seabed.

“Since property taxes related
to income streams are one of
the few income-related taxes
which are open to the
Bahamas other than the busi-
ness tax, and since property
taxes are a tax accepted wide-
ly by most of those who would
be investing in marinas, the
property tax should also be col-
lected,” the document said.

Mr Martini said the
Bahamas did not collect much
real property tax, describing it
as “a relatively unused revenue
source”, and pointed out that
leasing marina slips was the
same as a land-based real









PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, BARRY MYRTIL
of the Robinson Road Nassau, Bahamas, intend to
change my name to BARRY MYRTHILE. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box SS-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.



estate transaction, meaning
real estate taxes should be
paid.

“I’m open to a lot of discus-
sion on this one,” Mr Martini
added: “I know some people
will be unhappy with this, and
we have to listen to their con-
cerns.” JO

The policy document sug-
vested that the annual mooring
charge be continued, with the
addition of a $1 per foot, per
night, mooring charge that
would not apply to Bahamian
residents or people mooring
one boat near their own prop-
erty.

The current charges of $1.95
and $2 per foot of dock space

‘could be “waived for private

own-use haldings provided a
lease is being paid on the sea
bed”.

The document suggested
that commercial marinas
should pay the higher of the
$6.13 or $6.32 per foot of dock
space on the Family Islands
and New Providence respec-
tively, or 6 per cent of revenues
for the seabed lease, bringing
the Bahamas into line with the
taxes levied by Florida.

In assessing the tax revenues
derived from the marina and
boating industry, the draft pol-



NOTICE

PATERSON FIDELITY CORP.
Is Voluntary Liquidation

LIQUIDATIOR’S STATEMENT
PURSUANT TO SECTION 137(4) OF THE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT 2000

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137(4) of the
international Business Companies Act, 2000
PATERSON FIDELITY CORP. is in dissolution.

The date of commencement of dissolution was 29th November, 2006.

Mr. Daniel Eisenberg, with domiciled at Tucuman 1667, Floor 1°“D”,
CP 1050, Argentine
Republic is the Liquidation of PATTERSON FIDELITY CORP.

Daniel Eisenberg
Liquidator



icy document said the
Bahamas levied an annual
charge of $6.15 and $1.95 per
linear foot of dock space for
commercial and private slips
respectively in Family. Island
marinas. For New Providence,
the figures were slightly higher,
standing at $6.32 and $2 for
commercial and private dock
space respectively.

But while collection rates for
these charges on New Provi-
dence were high, they were
lower for Family Island mari-
nas. For the first 10 months in
2006, the Port Controller’s
Office had collected $156,000
in charges from New Provi-
dence, but just $115,000 from
the Family Islands.

“Apparently very little” rev-
enues for business licence fees
were collected from marinas,
while there were no charges
for the use of seabed Crown
Land. The seabed was often
leased by'the marina develop-
ers. :

MANAGER - PRIVATE BANKING & WEALTH MANAGEMENT SERVICES

PROFILE:

* Bachelors Degree in Kinance

* STEP Qualification

+ 10 years experience in advising clients on fiduciary services and developing
appropriate legal structures

David Ralph Singleton
8 Hill Street,
St. Helier, Jersey
Channel Islands
Liquidator

Legal Notice

| NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

OMRO LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
OMRO LIMITED has been -dissolved and struck off the
Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued
by the Registar General on the 19th day of January, 2007.

\

MR. ZAKHAROV ANDREY KONSTANTINOVICH
13 Raziezd Anciferovo
P/O Kostino, Raiyon Orekhovo-Zyeysky
Moscow Region, 142642 Russia
Liquidator



Jw aaw

FIDELITY BANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

A MEMBER OF THE FIDELITY GROUP OF COMPANIES

invites qualified applicants for the following position:

MANAGER -

Private Banking & Wealth Management Services

The applicant must have the following minimum qualifications:

+ Superior organization, communication, interpersonal and computer skills

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:
* Client Relationship Management
* Investment of client funds
* Monthly management reports
_ * Quarterly reports to clients

* Business development and marketing activities

* Account opening formalities

* Invoicing & booking fees

* Estate Planning

* Administration of Trusts

* Production of trust deeds, letter of wishes & testamentary trusts

+ ‘Training, management and coaching of staff

Send resume no later than February 7th, 2007 to:

The Human Resource Director
Fidelity - 51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853 » Nassau, Bahamas
f: 326.3000
e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com







PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007
GN-456



SUPREME COURT

SUPREME COURT :
PROBATE REGISTRY :
P.O. BOX N-167 ;
Nassau, The Bahamas :
February 8th, 2007 :

Probate Division
2006/PRO/npr/00738

In the Estate of STEPHEN A. ORLANDO, late of 6021

Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key in the State of Florida,

one of the United States of America,

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of :
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be :
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in its Probate :
Division by HARTIS EUGENE PINDER of Mareva House, :
George Street in the City of Nassau in the Island of New }
Providence, one of the Islands of the commonwealth of :
The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney :
in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed Grant of :
Amended Letters of Administration in the above estate ;
granted to MAURICE V. ORLANDO, the Personal :
Representative, by the Circuit Court for Manatee County :
in the State of Florida, on the 19th day of September, :

2006.
Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS }
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION }
February 8th, 2007 :

No. 2006/PRO/npr/00739

Whereas LELAND DAWKINS, of the Settlement of Crown
Haven, Abaco, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth :
of The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme :
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the :
real and personal estate of HOWARD DAWKINS late of :
Murphy Town, Abaco, one of the Islands of the :
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. :

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard |
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the :

2006/PRO/npr/00030

date hereof.

Signed
D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

SUPREME COURT :
PROBATE REGISTRY :
P.O. BOX N-167 :
Nassau, The Bahamas :
February 8th, 2007 :

; the Personal Representative, by the Circuit Court for :

Probate Division
2007/PRO/npr/00003

In the Estate of ALEXANDER SLORACH late of
Khonkaen, Mannachie Road Forres IV36 2uT in the

Sheriffdom of Grampian, Highland and Islands in Scotland,
deceased, }

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of :
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be :
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in its Probate :
‘Division by EARL A. CASH of Marlin Drive in the Western :
District in the Island of New Providence, The Bahamas,
Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas :
for obtaining the Resealed Grant of Certified Extract :
Confirmation in the above estate granted to JACQUELINE :
JEAN PEREIRA the Executor, by the Sheriff of Grampian, :
Highland and Islands at Elgin on the 8th day of iach i
} of The Bahamas have made application to the Supreme :

i Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration with }
: the Will annexed of the Real and Personal Estate of :

2006.
Signed
‘Desiree ‘Robinson
(for) Assistant Registrar

No. 2006/PRO/npr/00021

Whereas PRINCE ALBERT STUBBS of St. Vincent Road :
Western District, New Providence, one of the Islands of }
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, the Only Child, has :
made application to the Supreme Court of the Bahamas,
for letters of administration of the real and personal estate :
of AREBELLA STUBBS late of St. Vincent Road, Western }
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the :
: Whereas ALFRED DANIELS, of Buttercup Lane, South :

Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the :

date hereof.

Signed
D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

deceased. }

| of Tampa in the State of Florida, USA,

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY :
P.O. BOX N-167 :
Nassau, The Bahamas ;
February 8th, 2007 ;

Probate Division

| 2007/PRO/npr/00022

In the Estate of LILLIAN KIMBALL late of the County of
Maricopa in the State of Arizona, one of the States of the :

United States of America,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of [

fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be :

made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in its Probate :
Side by GILBERT ANSELM THOMPSON, of Chancery :
House, The Mall, in the city of Freeport, Grand Bahama, :
The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney
in The Bahamas, for obtaining the Resealed Grant of :
Letters of Personal Representative in the above estate
granted to BETTIE KENNEDY the Personal }
Representative, the Superior Court of the State of Arizona
in and for the County of Maricopa USA, on the 21st day :
i Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
: by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
: date hereof.

of March 2006

Signed
_ Desiree Robinson
(for) Assistant Registrar
SUPREME COURT :
PROBATE REGISTRY :
P.O. BOX N-167 :
Nassau, The Bahamas :
February 8th, 2007 :
Probate Division :
2006/PRO/npr/00029

In the Estate of RUTH E. SECORD late of Clearwater,
Pinellas County, Florida, USA,

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the
date hereof.
Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00034

Whereas CANDICE KING of No. 2 St Lucia Crescent,
Elizabeth Estates in the Eastern District of the Island of
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of
the Real and Personal Estate of WINIFRED GIBSON late
of No. 2 St Lucia Crescent, Elizabeth Estates in the
Eastern District of the Island of New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00035

i Whereas DUNCAN ANTHONY IRWIN DE BARROS of
: No. 7 Sky End, Eastern Estates in the Eastern District of
: the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
deceased. :
} to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of |
NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of :

Probate Division by LOUREY C. SMITH, of #4 George :

Street in the City of Nassau in the Island of New :

Providence, The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the }

: Authorizes Attorney in The Bahamas, for obtaining the :

Resealed Grant of Letters of Administration in the above :
estate granted to SHERYLL JEAN SECORD the Executrix, :
by the Circuit Court for Pinellas County of Florida, USA, :

on the 6th day of June 2005.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Assistant Registrar

SUPREME COURT |
PROBATE REGISTRY |

Le tee PO.BOX N-167 i ee
_, Whereas ‘ANASTASIA:PATRICE- FERGUSON of 386:| |"

‘avin February 8th,'2007 i.
Probate Division i

Nassau, The Bahamas

<

Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application

Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of JANET

fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be BERYL DEBAROS No. 7 Sky End, Eastern Estates in the

} made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its :

Eastern District of the Island of New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased. '

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007:
No. econ poe’

Eaton-Roead;-Yellow Elder Gardens in-the Western District
of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of

the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application
: to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of

In the Estate of LEMUEL S. CONNELLY late of the City :
: CLEARE FERGUSON late of No. 7 Sky End, Eastern

deceased. }

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of

fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be }

made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its :
Probate Side by RHONDA L. C. HULL, of the Township :

of Marsh Harbour, Abaco, The Bahamas, Attorney-At- :

Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas, for :
obtaining the Resealed Grant of Letters of Administration :
in the above estate granted to ARTHUR P. W. CONNELLY :

Hillsborough County in the State of Florida, USA, on the :

3 30th day of August 1993.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Assistant Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS |
THE SUPREME COURT |
_ PROBATE DIVISION |

No. 2006/PRO/npr/00031
Whereas PAMELA L. KLONARIS and MIKE A.

RICARDO SABOIA KHURY late of Avenida Parana 33,

Apartment 1680035-130, Curitiba, Brazil, deceased.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

February 8th, 2007

Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of ROSIE

Estates in the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof..

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00039

Whereas FEDNER J. DORSETAL of St. Albans Drive in
the Western District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of NEVILLE HOLLAND MAJOR late of

Chase Avenue in the Western District of the Island of
KLONARIS both of the Western District of the Island of :
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth :

New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the

date hereof.

: Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
: by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the :
: date hereof. i

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION ;
February 8th, 2007 :

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT ;

PROBATE DIVISION :

‘February 8th, 2007 :

: to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
: Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of LEON

No. 2006/PRO/npr/00032

Beach Estates in the Southern District of the Island of :
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth :
of The Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of }

3 the Real and Personal Estate of CHARMAINE NATASHA :

DANIELS late of No. 76 Sunrise Subdivision in the City }

of Freeport, on the Island of Grand Bahama, one of the

Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Signed
N.Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00040

Whereas LEOTHA CLYDE of the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application

ANDY BROWN late of 20101 SW 84th Avenue, Miami,
Florida, United States of America, decéased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar



THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS
GN-456



cas

SUPREME COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00041 Pee .

Whereas ARENETTA N. DAVIS of No. 63 Royal
Palm Way and Sea Breeze Lane, Lucayan Beach
Subdivision in the City of Freeport, on the Island of
Grand Bahama, one of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration
of the Real and Personal Estate of ZENDRE KATHI
MAJOR late of No..63 Royal Palm Way and Sea
Breeze Lane, Lucayan Beach Subdivision in the
City of Freeport, on the Island of Grand Bahama,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased. : ;

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 21
days from the date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00042

Whereas BASIL THOMPSON of Pyfrom Road, New
. Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
- of The Bahamas has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of

>» WILLARD: THOMPSON late of -Pyfrom'Road, New |

Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
_ days from the date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
_Nassau, The Bahamas
« February 8th, 2007
Probate Division ;
2006/PRO/npr/00043

In the Estate of EUGENE V. DELUCA (a.k.a.)
EUGENE V. DE LUCA), late of the city of Haverford
in the State of Pennsylvania, United States of
America, trace Ltstadent
deceased.
_ NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
in the Probate Division by ELLEN SERVILLE of
No. 13 East Avenue North, in the Eastern District
of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
_of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-
At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas
for obtaining the Resealed Grant of Letters
Testamentary in the above estate granted to DONNA
D. K. VOIGT (named in the said Will as DONNA
VOIGT), the Executrix, by the Registrar of Wills
Delaware County, Pennsylvania, on the 8th day of
January 2004. ' .
Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
' February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00044

Whereas C. YYVETTE MCCARTNEY-PEDROCHE
of Skyline Drive, in the Western District of the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for Letters of Administration with the Will annexed
of the Real and Personal Estate of JEAN MARIE
CLAUDE FROTIER (a.k.a.) JEAN-MARIE FORTIER
late of 3663 Riverside Drive, Suite 504 Windsor,
Ontario, Canada, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar



SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
February 8th, 2007

Probate Division
2006/PRO/npr/00045

In the Estate of HOPE L. FISHER late of -
MANHATTAN in the State of New York, U.S.A.
WS 4 deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
on its Probate Side by LOUREY C. SMITH of No.
#4 George Street in the City of Nassau in the Island
of New Providence, The Bahamas, Attorney-At-
Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas, for
obtaining the Reasealed Grant of Certificates of
Small Estates in the above estate granted to
PATRICIA A. MCCRAY the Executrix, by the
Surrogate’s Court of New York in the State of New
York, USA, on the 3rd day of May 2005.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Assistant Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00046

Whereas ROSINA FORBES of the Settlement of
Eight Mile Rock on the Island of Grand Bahama,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, one of the Beneficiaries named in the
said Will, has made application to the Supreme
Court of the Bahamas, for letters of administration

with the Will annexed of the real and personal estate |

of JOSEPH SAMUEL LINDEN late of the Settlement
of West End, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is. hereby given that such applications will

be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 21
days from the date hereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson —
(for) Registrar

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
February 8th, 2007

Probate Division
2006/PRO/npr/00047

In the Estate of ELIZABETH G. MEINERS late of

-| 11423 Holly Court in the City of Kansas City in the

State of Missouri, USA,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
in the Probate Side by WILLIAM P. HOLOWESKO
of East Lyford Lane, Western District,New
Providence, The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the
Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas, for obtaining
the Resealed Grant of Letters Testamentary in the
above estate ao to CHRISTOPHER MOHART
the Personal Representative, by the Probate Court
in the State of Missouri, USA, on the 28th day of
June 2004.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Assistant Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
; February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00048

Whereas ANDREW G. WELLS of the Eastern District
of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for Letter of Administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of HERCULES HARDING late of Moore’s
Wharf of the Island of New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased. MS ae

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days. from the date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007, PAGE 7B
(for) Registrar
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
, February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00049

Whereas JAMES ALEXANDER RAHMING of
Stapledon Gardens in the Western District of the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the

‘Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made

application to the Supreme court of The Bahamas,
for Letters of Administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of GLADYS RAHMING late of Bias Street,
off Baillou Hill Road in the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence, one of the Island of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

Signed
N Neilly
(for) Registrar

SUPREME COURT:
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167_ .
Nassau, The Bahamas
February 8th, 2007

Probate Division
2006/PRO/npr/00050

In the Estate of JUDY O’NEIL (a.k.a) JUDITH ANN
O’NEIL, late of 269 Road 11 East, Woodslee, in
the Province of Ontario, Canada, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
in the Probate Division by NEVILLE BERNARD
WILCHOMBE II of Chancery House, The Mall, in
the City of Freeport on the Island of Grand Bahama,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, The Authorized Attorney
in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed
Certificate of Appointment of Estate Trustee With
A Will in the above estate granted to ELIZABETH
ANN O’NEIL, the Persnal Representative, by the
Superior Court of Justice, Ontario, on the 6th day
of May 2004..

_ Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

* SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
February 8th, 2007

Probate Division
2006/PRO/npr/00051

In the Estate of THOMAS G. BURKE (a.k.a)
THOMAS GERALD BURKE, late of Village of Rye
Brook in the County of Westchester in the State of
New York, one of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
in the Probate Division by HARTIS EUGENE
PINDER of No. 4 George Street in the City of
Nassau, in the Island of New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed Grant of
Probate in the above estate granted to HELEN W.
BURKE, the Executrix, by the State of New York,
County of Westchester, Surrogate’s Office, on the
9th day of April 1997.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Assistant Registrar

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
February 8th, 2007

Probate Division
2006/PRO/npr/00052

In the Estate of EDWARD LEVERNE HAMBLETON
late of 1227 Sherbrooke Street, Montreal in the
Province of Quebe, Canada,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
in the Probate Division by LOUREY CLAUDETTE.
SMITH of No. 4 George Street in the City of Nassau,
in the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-
At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas
for obtaining the Resealed Judgment of Probate in
the above estate granted to JANET ELAINE
RANKIN, the Executrix, by the Superior Court of
Canada, Province of Quebec, on the 13th day of
January 2005.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Assistant Registrar



PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007

THE TRIBUNE

Ee

FROM page 1B

partner, Starwood, Mr Forelle
explained.

After concluding the agree-
ment with the Government,
Baha Mar will have about two

‘ weeks to tie-down the agree-
ments with Harrah’s, which is
its joint venture equity part-
ner, and Starwood, which is an
operating partner.

Missing the March 1 date
could place Baha Mar under
pressure to conclude its joint
venture agreement by the stip-
ulated March 15 deadline,
especially as the developer has
issues such as financing it

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JEAN-MARC JOSEPH OF
SAXON WAY, MASON ADDITION, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 7th day of February, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2005

IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/gen/00987

Common Law and Equity Division
BETWEEN

BRADJAI LTD.
Plaintiff

AND

EDWARD PENN,
Defendant

NOTICE

TO: EDWARD PENN
Nassau, Bahamas

TAKE NOTICE that, by Order of Mr. Justice
Mohammed, Justice of the Supreme Court, dated the
17th day of January, A.D., 2007, it was ordered that
personal service upon you of the Notice of Motion in
this action which is scheduled to be heard before the said
Justice on Monday the 19th day of March, A.D., 2007 at
10:00 o’clock in the forenoon be dispensed with; and it
was ordered that publication once in The Nassau Guardian

| and The Tribune of this Notice and of the reciting Order,
should be deemed good and sufficient service upon you.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to
appear on the hearing at the time and _ place
stated above the Court make such Order and such
judgment against you as the Court deems just.

LOCKHART & MUNROE
Attorneys for the Plaintiff



Pricing Information As Of: ’
200 7



Abaco Markets
* Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
.0O Premier Real Estate

_it’s not a risk we want to take.”

1,000-room hotel.

Starwood’ will bring its four
brands - the Westin, Sheraton,
W and St Regis to brand the
remaining hotels.

“There’s a supplemental
Heads of Agreement that
needs to be settled,” Mr
Forelle said, explaining that it
dealt with the details of issues
such as “physical infrastruc-
ture and concessions that have
been on the table for a long
time”.

Among the issues being
dealt with in the supplemen-
tal Heads of Agreement are
the. changes in the size and
scope of the Baha Mar project,
which has increased from $1

- billion to $2.4 billion. The
developers are seeking invest-
ment incentives that are
increased in proportion to the
development’s size.

“To make March 1, a lot of
effort and focus is required,”
he reiterated. “There’s a lot of
different [government] depart-
ments involved.

“We’ve three-and-a-half
weeks, and we are both com-
mitted to making the deadline,
both government and us. ’m
hopeful we’ll be able to be
judged positively by having
that occur on target.”

needs to. pin down with the
likes of Scotiabank.

“The consequences of not
meeting the date is that two
public companies have a ‘walk-
away’ right from the deal,” Mr
Forelle told The Tribune.

“It seems to us and, we
believe, the Government, that
it’s a risk neither of us should
take - that we get past a date
that allows Harrah’s and Star-
wood to rethink this transac-
tion.

“We have no reason to think
that anyone is going to change
their minds about the deal, but

- Mr Forelle said Baha Mar
felt as if it were in partnership
with the Government on the
development, adding: ““We had
a meeting yesterday with the
Government, and. what came
out of the meeting, and what is
clear, is that the Government
understands the deadline and
what its needs to do.”

Harrah’s Entertainment, the
world-renowned casino opera-
tor, is scheduled to take a 43

er cent equity stake in the
82.4 billion project, and bring
its Caesar’s Entertainment
brand to the 100,000 square’
foot casino, purportedly the
largest in the Caribbean, and a

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Salary will be commensurate with experience. Interested applicants
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Mail: Human Resources Manager /
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Lae LENS TES

52wk-Low
12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
sa 0.20 RND Holdings
28.00 ABDAB
14.00 Bahamas Su®8rmarkets

52wk-Hi

1.326132*
2.9728"***
2.596093**
1.217450°****
d 11.3075****"

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund





BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-HI - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

OIV $ - Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings



YIELD - last 12 mont!
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS & - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



Div $
1.365
0.640
0.000
ERR RRSERNRNAER

0.000
pte

0.000 19.4
1.320 8.3

Yield %

30

smh
ividends divide



y closing price NAY
*- 26 January 2007
** - 31 January 2007

; *** - 31 Dacember 2006

**** - 31 December 2006



- 31 December 2006
we + ~

‘Critical date’ for Baha Mar project

that allows us to do that.

“There’s a lot of paperwork,
a lot of processes, a lot of dili-
gence the Government is
doing. That is all logical and
appropriate. It just needs to
get done.”

Baha Mar’s $2.4 billion
transformation of Cable Beach
will attract 500,000 guests to
its various resorts during the
first year after it fully opens in
2011, with the project becom-
ing “the largest gaming and
resort development in this
Hemisphere outside Las
Vegas”.

Speaking after the prelimi-
nary signing of the joint ven-
ture'agreement with Harrah’s,
Sarkis Izmirlian, Baha Mar’s
chairman and chief executive,
said then that the completed
development will pump $560
million annually into the
Bahamian economy’s gross
domestic product (GDP).

Mr Izmirlian reiterated that
economic forecasting studies
conducted by Global Insight
had shown that after opening,
Baha Mar would create “more
than 7,000 direct and indirect
jobs”.

The same study reported
that Baha Mar’s cumulative
impact on Bahamian GDP
would be some $11.2 billion
over a 20-year period, with
more than $4.7 billion in tax
revenues produced over that
same time period.

“March 1 is our benchmark
date for concluding with the
Government, and then sign the
joint venture agreement to
make a living, breathing com-
pany committed to developing
this project.”

Don Robinson, Baha Mar’s
president, told The Tribune
that the developers “want to
be able to hit the ground run-
ning”, and had readied their
operations in anticipation of
the agreements with the Gov-
ernment and joint venture
partners being signed.

He added that Baha Mar
was “prepared to start very
quickly” work on the re-routed
West Bay Street (the current
road will remain open until it is
finished) and the construction
of a new Straw Market and
Commercial Village. The latter
is where all the Government
buildings and commercial
banks lining West Bay Street
will be relocated to. ;

Mr Forelle explained that |
their relocation was vital to
kickstarting the project in
earnest, as many of them lie
on the site earmarked for the
main resort campus, the Cecil
Wallace-Whitfield Centre, for
example, lying right where the
main lobby for the Caesar’s
and Westin-branded proper-
ties are scheduled to go.

Mr Robinson said: “We
would like to get this going.
This date is a critical path date

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PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that.l, BARBARA DALEY of
More Avenue off Wulff Road intend to change my name
child’s name from to CHRISTELLA TEONEY JOSEPH to
CHRISTELLA TEONEY DALEY. if there are any objections
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box SS-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of
publication of this notice.
















NOTICE

. NOTICE is hereby given that CHARLES OSAZUWA OF
TWYNAM HEIGHTS, P.O. BOX EE-16843, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and. Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization shauld
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 31st day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Poet Co ee ree te 5 ad
Position Available

TRUST ACCOUNTANT

Job Function:
e To produce accurate and timely trust and company financial

statements in accordance with internal procedures and

generally accepted accounting principles.


























Responsibilities:
e Update the clients’ general ledger.
e Reconcile cash and securities balance; ensuring that all
entries are processed correctly in ledger.
e Prepare monthly financial statements and internal client
reports for a portfolio of complex trusts and companies.
¢ — Liaise with trust and company administrators to ensure that
financial statements accurately reflect the activities of the
client.




Qualifications:

¢ Bachelor's degree in Accounting.

¢ At least five years experience preparing trust and company
financial statements.
Understanding of the fundamentals of trust administration,
Advance knowledge of Microsoft Excel.
Completion of the Canadian Securities Course or Series 7
Course would be an asset.
Ability to supervise a team of trust accountants.

e Proven track record of success ina similar position.










Benefits:
e = Attractive salary commensurate with skills and experience,
Other benefits include medical insurance coverage,
excellent pension plan and performance based bonus.

Interested persons mecting the above requirements may forward their
resumes and two written references to:

Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7043
Nassau, The Bahamas
or

Email: trustaccountant@gmail.com

cw nae we

2 eam ty

.veeaees ~~ even
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8 2 ® we ow te*_ *



A I ca

THE TRIBUNE

BTC, from 1B

PUC discussing the VoIP product
with BTC in early 2006, advising
the state-owned carrier that the ser-
vice was price regulated, and urging
it to apply for a licence amendment
to begin delivering the service.

He added that BTC began adver-
tising ViBE in July 2006, then
launched it two months later, both
events taking place without PUC
approval despite IndiGo bringing
the issue to the regulator’s atten-
tion on August 2, 2006.

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said: “The
PUC chose to do nothing in the
face of open and flagrant violation
of its advice to BTC that it was in
breach of its licence. Now, the PUC
itself, through this public consulta-
tion, seeks to make everything all
right on behalf of BTC by papering
over BTC’s violation and legitimis-
ing the events that have taken
place.”

He added that the PUC was jus-
tifying this on the grounds that
ViBE’s introduction would make
better technology and prices avail-
able to Bahamian consumers, some-
thing that was “instructive”.

__ “Henceforth, it would appear the
PUC has abrogated its responsibil-
ity to enforce the rule of law, and
regulate in an objective and non-
discriminatory manner, in prefer-
ence of allowing anything that is a
cheaper service and therefore, it

Hutton-Ashkenny said.

He added that the ViBE saga
had eerie similarities to what hap-
pened in October 2004, when BTC
reduced all its international and
inter-island long distance rates as
a supposed ‘promotion’, a move
many interpreted as an attempt to
knock-out IndiGo’s entry to the
market through predatory pricing.
Again, the price reduction received
no prior approval from the PUC.

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny described
the events surrounding ViBE as
“even more incredible”, and point-
ed out that under the Telecommu-
nications Act the PUC had powers
to “compel a licensee to adhere to
the rule of law”.

Fines for non-compliance with
the PUC’s instructions could
amount to $300,000, with a further
$10,000 per day added for contin-
ued defiance.

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny and Indi-
Go received backing from Cable
Bahamas in their demand for the
PUC to ensure a “level playing
field” in the telecoms sector, with
the regulator preventing anti-com-

" petitive and discriminatory behav-

iour. Barry Williams, .Cable
Bahamas’ finance vice-president,
suggested that over ViBe, that BTC
be fined for failing to apply for a
licence modification. It called on
the PUC to “display, in a real man-
ner, the fortitude to pursue an
enforcement action against BTC” if

opines, in the public interest,” Mr complaints against it by IndiGo

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSER GEDEUS OF
THE MUD, MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a_ citizen

of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 31st day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SHELDA EXANTIS OF
MOUNTABOR DRIVE, PINEWOOD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen'of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization shouid not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 31st day of January, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

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The Ministry of Local
Government & Consumer Affairs

INVITES
THE GENERAL PUBLIC TO PARTICIPATE IN A
CONSULTATIVE MEETING
ON THE ESTABLISHMENT OF








' LOCAL GOVERNMENT
FOR
NEW PROVIDENCE




SPEAKERS WILL INCLUDE





Honourable V. Alfred Gray
Minister of Local Government & Consumer Affairs





Honourable George A. Smith
Former Minister of Local Government






Dr. Pandora Johnson
Vice President- College of the Bahamas





Mr. Karl P.N.R. Spencer
Former Family Island Commissioner






Transfiguration Baptist Church Hall
Vesey Street





12th February, 2007

7:00 p.m.




.

proved true, and if the incumbent
was difficult on the issues of whole-
sale prices and interconnection with
its own network.

Mr Williams also urged the PUC
to resolve all interconnection and
anti-competitive disputes “within
the next two months”,

He said: “It is our contention that
the introduction of ViBe ought not
to have been done in a vacuum.
Allowing the introduction without
the necessary safeguards to pro-
mote competition such as intercon-
nection, wholesaling and facilities-
sharing falls far short of the stan-
dard of due diligence and conduct
one could legitimately expect from
a competition regulator. The situa-
tion is exacerbated when the regu-
lator signals that the public consul-
tation is perfunctory.” ‘

‘Meanwhile, Felicity Johnson,
BTC’s vice-president of legal, reg-
ulatory and interconnection ser-
vices, said the company was still
opposed to the PUC defining ViBe
as a price-regulated service.

She urged: “If the consumer is
not being harmed, and in this case

many consumers are benefiting,
then the PUC should not engage
in over-regulation by seeking to
regulate ViBE prices when no such
regulation is required under the
law, nor is such a practice econom-
ically sound.”

Ms Johnson said ViBe was a val-
ue-added service to its DSL Broad-
band product, and the Internet was
not regulated by the PUC, meaning
that the VoIP product was also not
subject to regulation as it did not
fall within voice telephony.

Now was BTC dominant in the
Bahamian VoIP market, Ms John-
son added, arguing that a 2006 sur-
vey for the company by Laura Jane
Marketing showed illegal operators
had a 60 per cent market share.

“BTC maintains that it did not
seek approval from the Commis-
sion for its ViBE product because
approval is only required for new
telecommunications services, which
ViBE is not,” Ms Johnson said,
adding. that the company had to
move rapidly to “stem the erosion
of its long distance revenues by ille-
gal operators”.





NOTICE |

NOTICE is hereby given that RODNEY CALIS OF FORT
ST. GROOVE, P.O. BOX CR-54802, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 31st day of January, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.










ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

WANTED

An Offshore Bank invites applications
for the position of an Administrative
Assistant. The candidate should possess
a minimum of an Associate Degree and
proficiency in computer operations with
strong communication skills.

Experience in offshore banking
operations in computerized environment
is desirable.

Applicant should be reliable, well
Organized and self motivated.

Responsibilities include back office
operations, secretarial assistance,
maintenance of records and handling
other routine office jobs. Salary will be
commensurate with qualifications and
experience.

Applicants should send resumé to P.O.
Box SS-19046, Nassau, within 15 days
of this advertisement.





RELATIONSHIP MANAGER





Trust & Corporate Services




A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in ‘The
Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guemsey, Switzerland and the United
Kingdom, Butterfield Bank offers a wide range of services to local and
international clients. .







An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter with a
record of professional achievements to join a dynamic Trast & Corporate Services
team. The successful candidate will report directly to the Senior Relationship
Manager.







‘rorevananennaneannnatnaceeevenmmmnnataaanananaanatasatvirntntanasananannenantnennennannnsnnnnuyesvasunisenenssnevnananenteneeewvuseeeayesnnasansasnnesacneneele

Core Responsibilities




Manage a large portfolio of complex accounts including trust. estates and
agencies,




“Provide financial information to clients as requested,

* ‘Act on clients’ behalf in matters dealing with lawyers, beneficiaries, etc.




Extensive experience with all aspects of trust administration.




Desired Qualifications




= Bachelor's Degree in Business or related discipline from a well recognized
university,





= Aminimum of five years progressive Fiduciary experience in the Financial
Services Industry.





® ‘STEP training or other suitable qualifications will be advantageous.




"Proficient in Microsoft Office suite of products,




* Strong interpersonal, communication, problem solving, project management
and customer service skills. j




Closing Date: February 16, 2007





Contact

Human Resources
Butterfield Bank (Babamas) Limited
P.O, Box N-3242

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: (242) 393 3772

E-mail: recruitment@ buttertieldbank.bs









www. butterfieldbank. bs

nas

Butterfield Bank






WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007, PAGE 9B. _~

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WILMAN PAUL OF
LIFEBOUY STREET, HOUSE NO.# 25, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement ;
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 7th day of
February, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




















ESTATE CARETAKER

Estate Caretaker responsible for large beachfront house and
property in Nassau, Bahamas.






Responsibilities include but are not limited to:



* Housekeeping and estate’s organization with the house
keeper.

* Administration task

° Supervising and coordinating the household and
property repairs and maintenance.

¢ Supervising subcontractors

* Develops and implements preventive maintenance
programs , :














This position offers a competitive compensation, including
housing and benefits. Apply in confidence to:




ESTATE CARETAKER
P.O.Box N449
Nassau, Bahamas



UBS

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd. a leading international trust
company has an opening for the position of a

Accounting System
Specialist & Programmer

In this challenging position you will be responsible for:

* Maintenance and development of “ePOCA Portfolio
Management” software from Cantalouppi and Hug AG;

* Analysis of business specifications from both accounting
and IT perspectives.

* Ownership of the design phases of one or more of the
projects deliveries;

* Provide training and second level support to users.

We are searching for a personality with a broad experience of
relational database modeling and process modeling with sound
knowledge in software development lifecycle. Programming
capabilities using MS DOT.NET and JAVA are a must. A suc-
cessful track record as Business Analyst/Project Manager MIS
_and strong analytical skills in both IT and accounting are key
,fequirements to succeed in this senior position. In addition the
ideal candidate must be fluent in English and German (in order
to co-ordinate with our head office in Switzerland).

Applications in writing, enclosing a full resume, by
Bahamian nationals only on or before February 19, 2007.

Interested persons should reply on or before February 19, 2007

Postal Address:

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources

P.O. Box N-7757

Nassau, Bahamas

SENIOR RELATIONSHIP MANAGER



Trust & Corporate Services




A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda. with offices in The
Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guemsey, Switzerland and the United
Kingdom, Butterfield Bank offers a wide range of services to focal and
international clients,





y

An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter with a
record of professional achievements to join a dynamic Trust & Corporate Services
team. The successful candidate will report directly to the Head of Trust &
Corproate Services..








‘sasemanananecusnanauacannnsssnsnsctieeannssinsussnasuasnennnsnesiennsnnnsntuniennsnsseninsaensansnnsnnsnnsnnsenstnsnenansnsnnnssnsnsesssensensanmnnscnsenenennnssncensnenasenenansesensansess
Core Responsibilities




Oversee a group of complex client relationships.




* * Provide technical advice to staff on trust and company structures,




* Act on clients’ behalf in matters dealing with lawyers, beneficiaries, etc,

Extensive experience with all aspects of trust administration.



Desired Qualifications




Bachelor's Degree in Business or related discipline from a well recognized
university,



® Five - Bight years progressive Fiduciary experience in the Financial Services
Industry. :




* - STEP training or other suitable qualifications will be advantageous.




® Proficient in Microsoft Office suite of products.




* Strong interpersonal, communication, problem solving, project management
and customer service skills,




Closing Date; February 16, 2007





Contact

Human Resources

Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-3242

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: (242) 393 3772

E-mail; recruitment@ butterfieldbank.bs









www. butterfieldbank.bs

BA .

Butterfield Bank

eT ae ee







PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007 | | THE TRIBUNE *
FEBRUARY 7, 2007 | ne 3 | | |



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Full Text


PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Belo VTS

Norman Solomon steps down
as co-chairman of commission

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

CO-CHAIRMANSHIP of
the Nassau Economic Develop-
ment Commission was trans-
ferred from Norman Solomon
to Charles Klonaris yesterday at
a Cabinet office meeting led by
Prime Minister Christie.

The handover will see Mr
Klonaris - former chairman of
the Nassau Tourism Develop-
ment Board (NTDB) = taking
his place alongside co-chair
Charles Carter in steering the
ptogress of the Bay Street Rede-
velopment plan.

Mr Klonaris said that former
co-chairman Mr Solomon, with
the “blueprint” he had already
laid down, made it “easy for me to
run the last mile" with the plans.

Speaking to The Tribune
afterwards about what this "last
mile". would involve, Mr
Klonaris said it is especially cru-
cial that the new port is created
in the southwest of the island,
and the shipping businesses relo-
cated there. ;

“There are three major ele-
ments for the reformation of the

city," he explained. "One, the

- removal of the container termi-
nals, two, a very comprehensive
parking and transportation sys-
tem, and third is... the tools to
manage the city."

Mr Klonaris said the business
plan for the port should be com-
pleted by June.

He added it is possible con-
struction may then begin on the



new port — set to be located in -

the area between the BEC pow-
er plant and the Commonwealth
Brewery = the following summer.
Speaking of another key ele-
ment of the renovation effort,
Mr Klonaris said there is "still a
long way to go" before the leg-

Porc errrriererrireriirrr trier rrir trite seaneeeune Weeaeeeatecanusseuae WALd beeen ne eeandanaeaseacconaceseauas MAEDEUU ONDE abe Nee ee RENE AUR e GAA ONAN E UN GA EAE AA AGE EE AU AG NEGRO NACA GAEL AU ALOU AMARA EERE OPO EOGOAEG HEE EEEGS

Bay workers claim

Bimini

islation enabling a Business
Improvement District (BID)
would go before parliament.

‘It is this legislation that will

provide the tools for managing

the city, Mr Klonaris explained.

A BID.= described as “a

lace-management, place-mar-

eting, and place development
organisation" — has been char-
acterised as the most important
economic Sen tool to
have emerged in the last quarter
century.

Over 1,500 cities across the
world now have a BID, which
has facilitated cleaner, safer
streets, improved appearance
and renewed economic activity



in these areas.

Mr Klonaris said he hoped
that by the summer of this year,
legislation will be ready to go
before parliament for approval,
but before that several more
meetings with legal advisers, and
a consultant from the United
States experienced in the for-
mation of BID legal frameworks
would be necessary.

The new co-chairman was
commended by the Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie for agreeing
to be a part of the private and
public sector partnership.

Mr Christie agreed that Mr
Klonaris and Mr Carter are
charged with the responsibility

(Photo: Timothy Clarke)

of executing a "radical re-engi-
neering" of the city.

This will see — once all con-
tainer shipping has been
moved from the downtown
waterfront area in the first
stage of the project - new

~ stores, condominiums, and a

shore front boardwalk in its
place, among many other
things, he said.

“We are talking about
redefining, representing, re-

‘engineering the city of Nassau,

we're talking about giving busi-
nesses the ability to have
tremendous hopes as they look
to the future," said Mr Christie.

The government, in con-

junction with the private sec-
tor, had to do something "dra-
matic" to ensure that Nassau
survived from a “business point
of view,” he continued.

An emotional Mr Solomon —
who was commended and
memorialised by Mr Carter,
Mr Christie, and Mr Klonaris
for not only his service at the

helm of the NTDB and.

NEDC, but to the Bahamas as
a whole — said he had "always
tried to think in terms of the
next generation" rather than
"the next election."

Visibly weakened by his ill-
nesses ~ Parkinson's disease and
lung cancer — Mr Solomon said
that he still intends to make
contributions to the board
"here and there," if allowed. -

"I feel I still have some
mileage left in me, I will use
that mileage and the time I
have left working for the
Bahamas," he said.

The appointment of Mr
Klonaris comes on the heels of
concerns expressed by, among
others, director general of
Tourism Vernice Walkine, that
a timely redevelopment will be
necessary to prevent a decline
in tourists visiting Nassau.

Addressing the Rotary Club
of East Nassau last month, Mrs
Walkine described downtown
Nassau as "particularly embar-
rassing".

Some Bay Street merchants —

have complained that the ren-
ovation is taking too long,
blaming the container port for
drops in sales, or in some cases,
the closure of stores.

The constant and noisy flow
of trucks up and down the
streets have left storefronts
sooty and tourists unimpressed
and disinclined to spend their
money, these merchants said.

Veeseceeancccesaonane beeaesesseans saeeeeasneeccacaes Ceaedeaseaeaseacaaeas daeceesecaceas

managers

denying employee severance package



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Sunday, February 11th to Friday, February 16th, 2007

At 7:30 p.m. Nightly at

The Coral Road Tabernacle, Freeport, Grand Bahama
Under the Theme: “Jesus Will Do It For You”

_ Dynamic Speakers are:
Bishop Cleophas L. Capron, Jr. District Overseer
Bishop Arthur Knowles, District Overseer (C.O.G.)
Bishop George E. Thompson, Bishop Oliver Kennedy
Bishop Rosevelt R. Rolle & Bishop Fred Newchurch

Hear our anointed Soloists: Glenda Stubbs, Hattie Williams,
Ruth Colebrooke, Charo Charles and Others, Be blessed by our
Crusade Praise Team, our Grand Bahama District Choir and by the
Church of God District Choir,

Crusade Coordinators are:
Ministers Barry B.Morris

and Cheryl M. Forbes

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â„¢ By BRENT DEAN

CLAIMS have emerged of
labour problems between the
Bimini Bay development and
some of its employees.

A source alleged that man-
agement is attempting to deny a
dismissed employee his sever-
ance package.

This situation, the source also
claimed, is indicative of a
“heavy handed” style of man-
agement that has some employ-
ees outraged.

Labour representative on the
island, Tasha Bullard-Rolle, did
not want to specifically com-
ment on the particulars of the
dispute, as it is currently in
process of conciliation.

However, she did acknowl-

‘edge that there is a matter

pending involving Bimini Bay.

The matter is in its initial
stages and, Ms Bullard-Rolle
expects that it should be
resolved through mediation
efforts.

Ms Bullard-Rolle further stat-
ed that currently, there are sev-
eral other labour disputes pend-
ing on the island involving -var-
ious companies,

Ua RAO
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
oe Pest Control

Pa ee aE as
822-2187



Once grievances are for-
mally presented to the
labour office, there are two
conciliation meetings that
take place. If no resolution
occurs, the matter is then
referred to the Industrial
Tribunal for resolution,
according to Ms Bullard-
Rolle.

Since the labour office
opened in late 2005, she
claims that no labour dis-
putes in Bimini have been
escalated to the Industrial
Tribunal beyond the concili-
ation meetings.

Representatives at Bimi-
ni Bay’s Florida office were
unreachable for comments
on the matter.

Ms Bullard-Rolle noted
that disputes are not the only
labour concern on the island.

She claimed that there is
difficulty finding qualified
labour for certain positions
that have been recently
advertised.

“A lot of persons may cry
‘or sound the alarm that
they’re making minimum
wage, but they-are not mar-
ketable. They are not quali-
fied for the positions they
would like to hold,” she said.

Ms Bullard-Rolle suggest-
ed that efforts will have to
be made to assist individu-
als on the island to better
prepare them for the oppor-
tunities that have arisen due
to increased investments.

meracsansnncnncnsnnnessarsnanscensnneanassananannsnnannsannnscsnnscenansnnannenncnenncnenssnnannnnaccennsenccenanesannsasacnsnssecccsce,
atnnaeransensanseesncnnsracasnsnnanennnnannsnanancennsrsennnnacacaccsccscennassnaneseansetscnscseresessscescees:



: @ ELLISON Greenslade



© In brief

eeue SOOM ean needs neen ese naeseeseeessseesssesenssasctsasaeeete

Senior officer
appointed to
international
committee

oe ae
oe”

P mn Le



ASSISTANT Commissioner
Ellison Greenslade has been
appointed a member of the
communications and technolo-
gy committee of the prestigious
International Association of
Chiefs of Police,

In making the appointment,
IACP president Chief Joseph
Carter of Boston, USA, stated:
“One of the most important
duties of the president of the
International Association of
Chiefs of Police, is to appoint

qualified members to serve on

the various committees whose
work is so important to the suc-
cess of the association.”
_Assistant Commissioner
Greenslade has been a member
of IACP since 1989. His current
appointment is for a term that
extends through the IACP
annual conference in 2009.

Assistant Commissioner
Greenslade pioneered the
development of information
technology in the Royal
Bahamas Police Force and has
to his credit, the design and
introduction of the credit card
size Bahamian driver’s licence
and a number of other techno-
logical initiatives.

Assistant Commissioner
Greenslade currently serves as
the officer in charge of Grand
Bahama and the Northern
Bahamas, a post which he has
held for the past six and a half

- years,

He is a graduate of the Col-
lege of the Bahamas and is the
holder of a Masters Degree in
Business Administration
(MBA) from the University of
Miami.

He is also a doctoral candi-
date with the University of
Phoenix, Arizona.

Alternative
music night
begins in
nightclub







i SIMON Says

A NEW night of alternative
music has started at the Bambii
nightclub in downtown Nassau.

The night, hosted by DJ
Simon Says, is held tonight and
every Wednesday from 9pm to
lipm.

Simon is a DJ, originally from
London, who specialises in
niche forms of music such as
nu-jazz, electronica, deep house,
drum and bass, old school hip-
hop, soul, funk, afrobeat, ‘and
Brazilian music.

Having DJed at other bars
across the island, Simon is hope-
ful that the new night will be a
success.

He said: “Bambi is a great
choice of venue- the club gets
very busy around midnight or
1am, but what we are creating
here is a lounge scene where
discerning Bahamians can come
to check on a variety of musical
styles that come under the
umbrella of ‘soulful under-
ground’.”

Bambi is located above the
Prince George Shopping Cen-
tre.

Share your
news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are mak-
ing news in their neighbour-
hoods. Call us on 322-1986
and share your story,




THE TRIBUNE





Director of
bank quits
to run for
the FNM



i MICHAEL Barnett

COMMONWEALTH
Bank announced today it has
accepted the resignation of
director Michael Barnett.

Mr Barnett, who joined the
board of directors in May
1999, resigned to pursue polit-
ical interests.

Last week, Mr Barnett was
named the FNM candidate
for Fort Charlotte in the up-
coming general elections.

“Commonwealth Bank
accepts the resignation of
Michael Barnett. effective
immediately,” said the bank
in a statement issued yester-

day.

Chairman of Common-
wealth Bank Baswell Don-
aldson thanked M. Barnett
for serving the bank with
enthusiasm, wisdom and
vision.

He said, “the bank is grate-
ful to Mr Barnett for his con-
tribution and years of service
and wishes him success in his
future endeavours.”

Venezuela
announces
plan for
inflation

M@ VENEZUELA
Caracas

VENEZUELA’S govern-
ment is drawing up a plan to
combat soaring inflation that
led to prices climbing faster
than in any other Latin
American country last year,
according to Associated Press.

Ricardo Sanguino, presi-
dent of the congressional
finance commission, told
reporters Tuesday the plan
aims to either “stop or con-
tain” the inflation rate that
jumped two per cent in Janu-
ary, a traditionally low infla-

‘tion month. The January data
marked an inauspicious start
to the government’s effort to
keep inflation to 12 per cent
or less this year.

-'- Near-record public spend-
-ing by President Hugo

Chavez’s oil-rich government

has stoked inflation: The left-
ist government has spent bil-
lions of dollars (euros) on

social programmes that: :

include subsidised food for
the poor and cash benefits for
single mothers.

Despite strong growth, the
economy has not generated
enough goods and services to
soak up the excess liquidity.
Meanwhile, strict currency
controls that prevent
Venezuelans from investing
their money abroad is trap-
ping cash in the economy.

Sanguino said the anti-
inflation plan would involve
“economic, political, indus-
trial and fiscal” measures like-
ly including tax adjustments
and an “improvement” in
government price controls.
He did not provide further
details on either measure.

But Sanguino said there
would be no changes to the
government’s _ foreign-
exchange controls that were
imposed in 2003 in an effort
'- to stabilise the economy fol-
- lowing political turmoil.

Inflation ended 2006 at 17
per cent, the highest in Latin
- America. Some economists
~ claim actual inflation rates are
even higher, saying official
results are skewed by central
bank calculations that
overemphasise price-con-
trolled products in govern-
ment-subsidised supermar-
kets.

Central Bank statistics
show food prices increased
more than 31 per cent in the
last 12 months. Enrique Gon-
zalez Porras, a Venezuelan
expert in economic regula-
tion, estimates that overall
inflation during that period
was closer to 27 per cent.

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE contract for the con-
struction of 4 new building to
house the straw market will be
awarded in the “next two

weeks”, said Works Minister.

Bradley Roberts yesterday.

The imminent awarding of
the contract comes after nego-
tiations between the govern-
ment and contractors over
what were unexpectedly high
bids.

‘Mr Roberts first announced
that the project would be put
out to tender "shortly" in June
2005. Earlier reports indicated
that groundbreaking for the
new market had been sched-
uled to begin before the end of
2006.

Yesterday, he said that most
of the bids were "way off the
Richter scale" by comparison
to costs suggested by the quan-
tity surveyors who had been

working with the government

on the project. .

The final bid — the exact cost
of which will be revealed in
coming weeks — was "negoti-
ated down", but still higher than
what the government had orig-

Contract will be awarded in
next two weeks, claims Works
Minister Bradley Roberts



inally anticipated.
According to the minister, he
was due to present the final

- paper on the matter to Cabinet

either last night, or next Tues-
day.

The original Straw Market —
which used to attract millions
of visitors each year — was
destroyed by fire in September
2001. Since that time vendors
have been housed in cramped
and hot conditions in a tempo-
rary structure adjacent to the
original site.

Several commentators,
including many vendors, have
spoken out against the difficult
working environment.

Plans for the new building —
designed to accommodate up
to 600 stalls — have revealed
that it will most likely be a
three-storey structure, featur-
ing, among other previously
lacking facilities, a much-need-

ed sprinkler system and
improved sanitary provisions.

Mr Roberts said yesterday
that the "uniqueness" of the
building, and its sea-front loca-
tion, meant that government
had had to take into considera-
tion the most appropriate build-
ing materials which would
"minimise any deterioration of
the building in short term or
medium term."

Budget allocations of $3.5
million were reportedly made
in both the 2004/2005 and
2006/2007 budgets for the new
structure. In 2005, it was pre-
dicted that the construction pro-
ject would cost between $10
million to $13 million.

M WORKMEN were seen on

the site in December 2005 —
but the site on Bay Street has
changed little since that time

Hilton may support US
embargo against Cuba

m By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE British Colonial Hilton
may have to enforce the US
embargo against Cuba following
international reports that the
US based ‘hotel chain has
banned Cuban delegations from
using its facilities all around the
world.

The report comes after an
Oslo Hotel in Norway, owned
by the US Hilton chain, refused
a. booking by a Cuban trade del-
egation to the city's travel fair
last month because of the
embargo.

According to the British
press, a Hilton spokesperson in
London has commented on the
company’s position towards
Cuba.

“We are a US company," said
Linda Bain, vice-president for
communications at the group.
"The dilemma we face is that
(if we took a booking from a
Cuban delegation) we would be
subject to fines or prison and if
anyone. (from the company)
tried to enter the US, they
would be arrested."

Ms Bain toid the press that

the company is now seeking
clarification of their position
from the US government.

The Tribune contacted the
British Colonial Nassau, which
is owned by the US Hilton
chain, and a spokesperson said
she was not aware if an official
statement had been made on

the issue as yet.

Guidance...

Karla Visconti, Hilton’s direc-
tor of communications for the
Caribbean and Latin America,
said the hotel was in the process
of contacting the appropriate
authorities, seeking guidance
on how to resolve these con-
flicts.

Ms Visconti told The Tribune:

“Hilton finds itself in a difficult ~

and regrettable position in that,
as an organisation, we do not
believe in discrimination of any
kind. We are, of course, com-

‘mitted to complying with the

laws of the countries in which
we operate, but in this situation
we are facing conflicting laws.”

After the Oslo incident last
month, Norwegian trade unions

and anti-racist organisations
complained about the hotel's
actions and decided to move
their union conferences else-
where until the policy is
changed.

The deputy leader of the Nor-

wegian Union of Municipal and ©

General Employees, Anne
Grethe Skaardal said: "It is
unacceptable for the US to dic-
tate to the whole world."

And UK Labour MP Ian
Gibson, has described the
Hilton ban as "small-minded".

Hilton Hotels Corporation is .

one of the leading global hospi-
tality companies, with nearly

- 2,800 hotels and 485,000 rooms

in more than 80 countries, and
with 150,000 team members
worldwide.

More than 2,300 hotels are
owned, managed or franchised
in the US by a group with a
portfolio of hotel brands includ-
ing Hilton, Conrad, Doubletree,
Embassy Suites Hotels, Hamp-
ton Inn, Hampton'Inn and
Suites, Hilton Garden Inn,
Hilton Grand‘ Vacations,
Homewood Suites by Hilton,

Scandic and the Waldorf Asto-

ria Collection.

Prison Officers Association claims
gsovernment has ignored concerns

THE Bahamas Prison Offi-
cers Association says it is being
“disrespected” by the govern-
ment — as all the labour con-
cerns raised by its members
have fallen on deaf ears.

_ In an official press statement,
the association stated that its
representatives have already

. met with Prime Minister Perry

Christie, Deputy Prime Minister
and Minister of National Secu-
rity Cynthia Pratt and Public
Sevice Minister Fred Mitchell,
but no one has yet resolved any
of their complaints.

The association said in the
press release: “In our industrial
agreement tabled last year we
addressed our concern on dis-
parity across the disciplined
forces.

“They assured us that this will
be addressed in the Compensa-
tion Study, yet the Royal
Bahamas Defence Force was
assured that they will be receiv-
ing an increase in salaries the
end of this month by the hon-
ourable Fred Mitchell on Tues-
day, January 3, 2007.

“Prior to this announcement
we met with him in December
2006 and he denied our claims
of giving the Defence Force any

funds until the compensation
_ Study is completed.”

The association said their oth-
er concerns are: the back pay
of squads 2001 and 2005, which
they claim are still outstanding,
the lack of protective gear for
officers, outstanding officer pro-
motions from 2002, and poor
living conditions.

“”*Mr John Pinder, the pres-
ident of the Bahamas Public
Services Union, demanded that
the government address

salaries and promotions and
other concerns of the customs
and immigration departments
giving the government 14 days
or action will be taken,” the
statement noted. “Less than a
week later, Minister Fred
Mitchell announced that rec-
ommendations for promotions
of customs and immigration
departments (was) in the
process of being compiled and
is scheduled to be delivered in
two weeks.

“The living conditions of
prison officers housed in the

Bachelor’s Quarters continues -

to be harsh and appalling even
after the prime minister’s visit
and the minister of health, the



of things we
think, say or do

1. Is it the TRUTH?

2.Is it FAIR to all
concerned?

3. Will it build
GOODWILL and
BETTER
FRIENDSHIPS?

4. Will it be
BENEFICIAL to
all concerned?

www.rotary.org

honourable Bernard Nottage.
“They say: so said, so done.
We are saying loudly: so said,

nothing done,” the statement

concluded.

ee

Tey CLC YES

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@ Valentine Mugs from ..




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@ Paper Hearts, Cupids, Dangling

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007, PAGE 3 |
Five and a half years on, Straw
Market contract to be signed

in a selection
from our

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007, PAGE 5



ERRTSRERERISN sc Sc
Roberts asks for vigilance at

Man charged
with causing
harm after
cutlass attack

FREEPORT - A 31-year-
old Freeport man was
charged in the Magistrate’s
Court in connection with last
week’s cutlass attack on a
young woman on Grand
Bahama Highway.

Eugene Beckette Sands
appeared in court three
before Magistrate Helen
Jones on Monday, where he
was charged with causing
grievous harm to 25-year-old
LaTeisha Tinker of Erickson
Drive.

It is alleged that on Janu-
ary 31, the accused caused
grievous harm to Ms Tinker
and made threats of death
towards her.

Sands pleaded not guilty
to the charges.

He was granted $7,000 bail
with sureties on the condi-
tion that he surrenders his
passport to the court, and has
no contact with the com-
plainant.

The matter was adjourned
to August 7 for trial.

Cuban anger
as Marti set
to be aired
in Miami

B HAVANA

CUBA on Monday blasted
a new move by a US-funded
TV Marti to provide its anti-
Fidel Castro programming to
Spanish-language stations in
Miami that are picked up by
popular illegal satellite dish-
es on the island, according to
Associated Press.

The Miami station WPMF-
TV, an affiliate of the Span-
ish-language Azteca Ameri-
cas network, in December
announced plans to air the :
Marti programming daily. It:
appears to be the first time
Marti programming has been
broadcast on US airwaves.
TV Marti is paying $195,000
for six months worth of
broadcasts. :

“They are trying new ways
to get their meddlesome and
subversive messages,
designed to destabilise the
Cuban revolution, seen and
heard in our country,” an
article in the Communist Par-
ty newspaper Granma said.

“The authorities of our
country, with the support of
the vast majority of the peo-
ple, are taking and will take
the necessary measures” to
halt this new effort to bring
TV Marti programming to
the country, Granma said. |

Other US government
attempts to beam TV Marti
into Cuba have largely failed
because of the communist
government’s successful
efforts to jam the signals,
most recently being sent from
a cargo plane off Florida’s
coast.

The older sister station,
Radio Marti, historically has
been more successful in
broadcasting to the island
through both shortwave and
AM signals.

This new method of broad-
casting TV Marti to Cuba
comes as the Washington-
funded program faces
renewed criticism for spend-
ing $10 million annually to
produce programmes that in
the past were rarely seen on
the communist-run island.

‘TV 13 SCHEDULE

WEDNESDAY, .
FEBRUARY 7TH

6:30am Community Page 1540AM
8:00 Bahamas @ Sunrise

9:00 Bullwinkle & Friends

9:30 King Leonardo

10:00 International Fit Dance
10:30 Real Moms, Real Stories,











Real Savy
11:00 Immediate Response
noon ZNS News Update




12:05
1:00
1:30
2:00

Immediate Response Cont'd
Island Lifestyles

Ethnic Health America
Thousand Dollar Bee


















2:30 Aqua Kids

3:00 Paul Lewis

3:30 Don Stewart

4:00 _Little Robots

4:30 Carmen San Diego

5:00 ZNS News Update

5:05 Character Counts: Take
Stock In

6:00 One Cubed

6:30 News Night 13

7:00 Bahamas Tonight

8:00 Challenged

8:30 Be Your Own Boss

8:35 BTC The Voice of The
Customer Town Meeting,
Eleuthera

10:30 News Night 13

11:00 The Bahamas Tonight




11:30 Immediate Response
1:30am Community Page 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
right to make last minute
programme oatelarol








m@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

WORKS and Utilities Min-
ister Bradley Roberts has
expressed “grave concern” over
acts of vandalism at several traf-
fic lights in New Providence.

Mr Roberts made this com-

ment while giving an update on
the road works at the intersec-
tion of Mackey and Shirley
Streets.

He commended the police
force for its support of the Min-
istry of Works, noting that dur-
ing the month of January, they
were able to apprehend one sus-
pect in connection with the
damaged traffic signals.

“T also wish to encourage the
public to be vigilant in reporting
any suspicious behavior in the
vicinity of or at any of the traf-
fic signals, including the con-
trollers,” he said.

In November of 2004, HNTB
Corporation was commissioned
by Kerzner International to
conduct a study of the access to
Paradise Island from Nassau
International Airport.

The study recommended,
among other things, that a right
turn lane should be constructed
at the corner of Mackey Street
leading on to Shirley Street and
at the same time, the signal sys-
tem should be upgraded to
increase the capacity, safety and
the free flow of vehicular traffic
through the intersection.

In October of last year, con-
tracts were awarded to Bahami-
an contractors Bill Simmons
Construction and Heavy Equip-

ment in the sum of $210,222.90
for civil works; VC Construc-
tion in the sum of $139,000 for

concrete works; and Hy-Pow-'

er International in the sum
$55,794 for the upgrade of the
traffic signals — totalling an ini-
tial contractual sum of
$405,016.90.'

Phases

Mr Roberts said that these
works were completed in phas-
es to reduce the impact of traf-
fic congestion and inconve-
nience to the public.

The initial phase of work was
completed prior to Christmas
last December and the latter
phases have been completed
within the month of January
this year, he said.

“The benefits of such an
intersection upgrade are now
being fully realised as works are
substantially completed at the
intersection. The final phase of
work at this intersection will be
completed when my ministry
undertakes the repaving of
additional sections of Bay Street
and a major portion of Shirley
Street, which is planned for
March of this year,” Mr Roberts
said.

The ministry, he said, is
presently working with the var-
ious utilities providers to ensure
that all necessary utility
upgrades on Bay and Shirley
Streets are undertaken in
advance of the re-paving so that
there will be no need to trench

‘the newly paved roads, except

in cases of emergency.

The introduction of a video
detection system, the first of its
kind in New Providence, will
enable the intersection to work
more efficiently thus increasing
its capacity, he said.

“With the implementation of
vehicular actuation, no longer
will fixed time settings be
utilised at the intersection of
Shirley and Mackey Streets, but
the traffic signals will now
respond to the effective loads
of the individual approaches
regardless of the time of day.

“Pedestrian safety has been
further enhanced with the intro-
duction of pedestrian count
down signals being phased con-
currently with the traffic signals
and the construction of side-
walks. Under such a system,
pedestrian and vehicular phases
will run concurrently without
conflict,” Mr Roberts said.

The success of this project,
he said, is another demonstra-

tion of Kerzner International’s

commitment to the progress
and development of the
Bahamian people.

Mr Roberts added that
another example of the ministry
taking action to enhance the
movement of traffic can be
found at the intersection of JF
Kennedy Drive and Gladstone
Road, where a left turning lane
has recently been installed.

“I am sure that the motoring
public would have discerned
how this intervention would
have eliminated the unneces-
sary traffic back-up on this
major roadway,” he said.

Public are encouraged PRRh a oe
to make more use of

yt

sanitary landfill site

BAHAMIANS are being
encouraged to make use of the
services provided at the newly
named New Providence Sani-
tary Landfill Site on Harrold
Road. |

The goal of the campaign is
to discourage the dangerous
practice of illicit dumping of
hazardous waste.

Natasha Morris, assistant
project engineer for the
Department of Environmen-
tal Health Services (DEHS),
explained that one of the goals
of DEHS is to dispel the
myths and misconceptions
about disposal and use of haz-
ardous materials.

“Some Bahamians believe
that it is safe to dispose their
garbage waste mixed togeth-
er, when it is not,” she said.

Moreover, Morris said,
many Bahamians feel that haz-
ardous waste including gas
containers and cleaners can be
land-filled when they should
be properly secured. “Some
believe that the ocean is a
dumping area but this slowly
destroys our ecosystem,” she
added.

DEHS officials note that the
improper disposal and use of
hazardous products can detri-
mentally affect the air we
breathe, pollute the water we
cook, clean and wash with,
destroy plants and animals and
increase illnesses among
Bahamian families.

While hazardous materials
such as paints, antifreeze,
acids, chemical supplies and
cleaning compounds can cause
permanent damage to humans
and wildlife if not properly dis-
posed of, there are many ways

to prevent or reduce the pos-.

sibility of harm.
DEHS says it is important
that Bahamians become aware

of what constitutes hazardous _

waste and how to properly
use, store and dispose of the
toxic materials, and also
become aware that these sub-
stances may enter the body
through ingestion, inhalation
and absorption through the
skin.

While some Bahamians

have adopted the “out of sight,
out of mind” mentality, Morris
said that if garbage is not dis-

' posed of properly, “it will

come back to you.”

Henry Moxey, project co-
ordinator for the Bahamas
Solid Waste Management Pro-
ject, explained many Bahami-
ans have misconceptions
regarding hazardous waste dis-
posal. “Many believe that the

volume of their garbafie dis-
posal has no impact upon
them or their physical envi-
ronment.

“Bahamians need to be
more informed about the dan-
gers that can impact their
households and those that are
negative for the environment,”
he said. /

According to Morris, there
are steps that can be taken to
ensure a cleaner Bahamas —
including recycling materials
such as aluminum cans and
reducing the number and vol-
ume of harmful substances
being used in each home.

Morris explained that more
Bahamian households should
use non-harsh cleaning prod-
ucts including vinegar and
baking soda. “You should only
purchase required amounts of
paint needed which would
eliminate left-over paint”.

She emphasised how impor-
tant it is for each family to be
responsible for cleaning their
own space and surrounding
environment.

Some suggestions offered
include: taking preventative
measures to avoid stray dogs
from knocking over garbage
bins, keeping a tight lid on
bins, removing old cars from
property or calling for some-
one to remove them.

“Education is vital,” she
said. “It is important to have
older Bahamians educating
the younger generation while
serving as examples on how to
properly dispose of waste, and
that any illicit dumping being
done in the community should
be reported to the proper
authorities.

“One day I hope that before
you can purchase another car
battery you will be required
to bring in the old one, which
would reduce the number of
batteries being left around to
further destroy the environ-
ment,” she added.

The practice of proper dis-
posal of hazardous waste,
Morris said, would result in “a
clean space and healthier envi-
ronment, reducing the possi-
bilities of fire, and explosions,
exposure to metals and toxic
chemicals that would other-
wise cause sickness or death.”

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PART OF YOUR LIFE


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007, PAGE 7





@ DARNELL BING and Samie Parker are pictured
with Sandals public relations manager Stacy Mackey.

_ NEL players add

- to Super Bowl

fever at Sandals

SUPER Bowl Sunday was an
interactive event for couples at
Sandals Royal Bahamian Spa
Resort and Offshore Island as
three NFL players mingled with
guests during pre-game events.

Sandals hosted Samie Parker,
wide receiver with the Kansas
City Chiefs; Darnell Bing, line
backer with the Oakland
Raiders and line backer Mark
Simoneau of the New Orleans
Saints.





Bahamians

On Sunday, the players hosted
a television viewing and
tailgating party for resort
guests complete with football
props.

The players also took pho-
tographs and signed autographs
for fans.

During the game, they pro-
vided run of play commentary
and interacted with guests.

Public relations manager Sta-
cy Mackey said the NFL play-

enjoy t

AV






MMOD
y

he big g

ers added to the excitement of
the Super Bowl party.

“They were able to answer
questions and share their per-
sonal experiences with guests
and fans alike who wanted to
get an inside view of the game of
football.

“We were glad to have them
visit our resort, but thrilled that
they were able to take in some of
the sights of Nassau which they
enjoyed.” —






ame

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter



FREEPORT - After an
exhaustive 10-month search,
the Sheraton and Westin at Our
Lucaya Resort has finally
appointed a new managing
director for the resort property
‘in Grand Bahama.

Randal Ha, a veteran hote-
lier with more than 30 years
experience in the industry, was
officially introduced to the
Grand Bahama community at a
welcome reception on Monday,
hosted in the Royal Palm
Room at the Westin.

Attending the function were
tourism officials, government
and union representatives and
various hoteliers on Grand
Bahama.

John Markoulis, a represen-
tative of Hutchison Lucaya, the
owners of the resort, and Dan
Davis, district manager for Star-
wood Hotels and Resorts in the
Caribbean, were also present.

Our Lucaya Resort is the
only major resort property still
open on Grand Bahama. It
comprises of 1,219 rooms and
13 restaurants and bars. There
are around 1,300 persons
employed at the resort.

Mr Markoulis extended a
warm welcome to Mr Ha, say-
ing he is confident that the new
managing director is right
choice for the resort.

“With his years of experience
in the operation of very large
resorts, and with his good spir-
its and natural leadership abil-
ity, we definitely believe he will
able to steer this resort proper-
ty in the right direction,” Mr
Markoulis said.

Mr Ha has served as manag-
ing director for the Sheraton
Waikiki and Royal Hawaiian
Hotels for the past four years,
and spent seven years as gen-
eral manager at the Sheraton
Maui Hotel, also located in
Honolulu, Hawaii.

Since joining Starwood in
1985 as the executive assistant







oS

HB VETERAN hotelier
Randal Ha

manger at the Sheraton
Princess Kaiulani and Royal
Hawaiian Hotels, he has held
various Other leadership post
including general manager of
the Sheraton Makaha Resort
and Country Club.

Mr Markoulis said that
Hutchison will provide all the
support Mr Ha’s needs to make
the property number one in the
region. He said business leaders
and residents can now expect
to see the dawn of a new era
at Our Lucaya.

“When he made the decision
to join our team, he told me
that once he had moved to
Grand Bahama he would like
to know the community and
become a part of it. And that is
the kind of attitude we would
like all our associates to have.

And to our staff, I believe
they will have a good leader
who will be a good mentor. He
will ensure everyone who has
the desire and ability to
advance in their careers will be
given the opportunity to do so.”

Starwood executive Dan
Davis said that it has been long
and exhaustive search to find
the right leader to manage the
resort.

He noted that Mr Ha started
his career out in the laundry

New managing director

at Our Lucaya Resort

area of a hotel, and moved up
the ranks from there.

“We are absolutely thrilled .
.. to have a leader that we are
so confident in. It has been a
difficult process for us to find a
gentlemen and a leader to take
this property to the next
level. i

“We have been searching for
the past 10 months with well
over 20 representatives both
international and across the
US.

“We are confident with
someone like Randy Ha, who
has over 20 years experience
with the Sheraton brands and
Starwood hotels and resorts.
We are confident we now have
the right leader to. bring that
support to every associate, to
every guest, and to make sure
he reaches out to the commu-
nity. It is a critical position.”

Mr Davis said Starwood’s
next step is to focus on remain-
ing competitive in terms of ser-
vice.

“We need to be getting back
and taking care of our cus-
tomers, and associates, and
making sure that employees
can reach their full potential.
Sheraton is all about making
warm and comforting connec-
tions with our guests, and the:
Westin is all about creating a
personal and renewing experi-
ence.”

Randal Ha, who is a graduate
of the University of Hawaii, °
thanked everyone for the warm
welcome to Grand Bahama. “I
love it here and I definitely
want to be a part of this island,”
he said.

Roy Colebrooke, president
of the Bahamas Hotel Cater-
ing and Allied Workers Union,
said the union is looking for-
ward to establishing a relation-
ship with the new managing
director.

“Apart from dealing with dis-
putes, it is very important to
build a strong relationship and
once that happens from the
head it trickles down to other
ranks,” he said.



@ FAMILY and friends meet for Super Bow! Sunday in this Lyford Cay home. Sports fans across the
Bahamas were on the edge of their seats during the Indianapolis Colts’ victory over the Chicago Bears.
(Photo: Ana Bianca Marin)



Margo Adderley
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Consultation on Proposed New Marina Policy
for the Bahamas

In November of 2006, Cabinet considered a report from the Marina
Task Force recommending changes to the policies relating to the siting
and charging for marinas. It adopted a set of policies on an interim basis
with respect to siting that were designed to protect the environment and
adjacent communities. These policies were generally in line with
policies in nearby areas, including Florida. The Task Force Also reviewed the
approach to charging for the use of the seabed and the marinas
themselves, cabinet made no decision here, but accepted the Task Force’s
recommendations that discussions be held with stakeholders involved with
marinas, before the formal a doption of a Marina Policy.



























The Task Force will be holding meetings at the following times and
locations during the week of February 12-16 between 10:00a.m and
3:00p.m., as follows:

Monday-February 12, Grand Bahama, Old Bahama Bay, West End
Tuesday-February 13, Abaco, The Methodist Hall, Dundas Town
- Wednesday-February 14, Exuma, The Resource Centre
Thursday-February 15, Eleuthera, Harbour Island,
Lighthouse Church of God
Friday-February 16, Nassau, Wyndham Crystal Palace Resort
(Cat Island Room)

All people interested in the Marina Policy are invited to attend
the location most convenient for them. Those wishing a copy of the
draft report may download it from The Ministry of Tourism’s website
www.tourismbahmas.org Afterentering the site, register, entering six
or more letter x’s in the zip code space and go to the Marina Policy
section. If you cannot access the interent, you may get a copy by contacting
Ms. Prenell Evans at the Ministry of Engery and The Environment (242)
322 6005. If you can’t attend the meetings or wish to send comments on
the draft report should send them to the Task ForceRapporteur, Malcolm
Martini, at the Ministry of Energy and the Environment,Second Floor
Claughton House, P.O.Box N-4849, Nassau, Bahamas or e-mail
Mr. Martini at malcolmmartini@ bahamas. gov.bs.


PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



eR
Man claims

he’s been on
Nassau curfew
for 14 years



Valentine’s Date!

nter The Tribune’s Valentine contest and become eligible to

win a dinner on the town with one of our Valentine Dates.
Men, fill out the form for Ava, and women, fill out the form for Alex
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Streets before the deadline on Tuesday February 13, 2007 at 5:00 p.m. °

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The Nassau Florist

€st. 1951

Paradise is land
Club Land: or





FROM page one

intended victim was never
named and the case got “divert-
ed” by a constitutional rights
challenge on behalf of one the
defendants.

Initially, they were remanded
to Fox Hill Prison, where they
stayed for a year and a half.
Then a surety stood bail and
they were freed.

Since then, repeated attempts
to have the case heard have

been ignored by successive

attorney generals while the four
ex-constables have been left in
limbo.

“I want justice,” Mr Brice
said, “Can you imagine what
it’s like to see your family go
abroad on vacation every year
and I can’t go?

“Can you imagine what it’s
like being stuck on this island,
never able to go anywhere else,
even a Family Island? It’s not
right. It isn’t fair.”

Mr Brice, from Fox Hill, said
his constituency representative,
MP Fred Mitchell, showed a
keen interest in the case when
he was in opposition.

But since coming to power in
2002, Mr Mitchell had allegedly
done nothing. “He sits at the
same table as the attorney gen-
eral, yet he says nothing on my
behalf,” he claimed.

Trouble began for the four
constables after one of them
helped pull off a major drug
bust. Mr Brice believes

“trumped up” charges brought
against them were directly relat-
ed to that.

“Whoever has heard of a





gi

Mutler’s Funeral Homes

& Crematorium

Tel: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

murder conspiracy in which the
intended victim is unknown?”
he asked. “It’s ridiculous.”

Minister of Foreign Affairs
and the Public Service, Fred
Mitchell — who is also the rep-
resentative for Fox Hill -
acknowledged that he is aware
of the matter and is working to
assist Mr Brice.

Commenting on what is now
necessary to resolve the matter
Mr Mitchell stated, “Really,
what needs to happen is a
lawyer needs to move on his
behalf to get the matter dis-
missed. And it may be that he
has a difficulty with funding.”

“Tf it is as he describes, it
seems to me at the very least
that it is oppressive and the
question is whether or not it
passes the constitutional thresh-
old of not having a fair trial
within a reasonable time. And
that is something which needs
to be tested by his attorneys,”
he said

Mr Mitchell further stated,
“As a minister of the govern-
ment, I cannot direct the attor-
ney general what to do. That
would be inappropriate. You
don’t bring political influence
to bear on what an attorney
general decides to do.”

Mr Mitchell asserted that he
understands Mr Brice’s frustra-
tion and does not fault him for
it.

Currently, Mr Mitchell also
claimed that he will work to
assist Mr Brice in finding legal
representation.

“We need to find a lawyer
for him and I’m working to do
that. Lawyers are not cheap and

‘not everyone is willing to do a

MEMORIAL ANNOUNCEMENT









A Memorial
Service for

MR.

_ THOMAS
PETER |

MAURY, 70






Michael Gittens.

of Cable Beach will be held on
Thursday, February 8th, 2007 at 3:00
p.m. at Christ Church Cathedral,
‘George Street. Officiating will be Fr.

He is survived by his Children; Anne
and Scott Paramore, John and Mary
Maury and Peter and Kathy Maury;
Four (4) Grandchildren; Camilla
Paramore, Mary Copeland-Paramore,
Demetri and Jacob Maury; Two (2)
Sisters and their spouses; Janet and
Dick McLean and Barbara and Bob
Smulik and other relatives and friends.

In lieu of flowers donations may be
made to proud Paws, P.O. Box-SS-
6159, Nassau, Bahamas.

Arran gements are being handled by
Butlers’57 Funeral Homes and
Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets.



















pro bono case. So we will try
and find someone someway to
resolve it for him,” he said.

A constitutional rights case
brought by a lawyer acting for
one defendant diverted atten-
tion from the main issue for sev-
eral years, he said.

But that was concluded in
2003 — and still no progress
had been made on the murder
conspiracy case, despite repeat-
ed pleas for action to six suc-
cessive attorney generals.

“The attorney general has °
refused to deal with this mat-
ter,” said Mr Brice, “No-one
wants to touch it. I don’t know
why this is. We need to get this.
behind us, but every lawyer we
go to wants $10,000 retainer and
who can afford that?”

When the charges were laid,
he said, he and his colleagues
were suspended on half-pay,
but never dismissed or dis-
charged from the force.

In 1994, the police commis-
sioner halted their half-pay, say-
ing their contracts had expired.

Since then, Mr Brice has been
supporting his family by driving
buses. But he says the long sus-
pension has crippled his chances
of promotion and ruined a
promising police career.

“T would definitely have been _
an inspector today,” he said. “I
was a good policeman. I had
been in the force for nine years
and been recommended for
promotion and commendation
when all this happened.

“T was 26 at the time. I am
now 41. This year would have
been 24 years in the force and
next year I would qualified for a
pension.

“On paper, we’re still sus-
pended police officers, but Iam
not getting any pay. Yet our
case is still not being heard and
I believe it’s because they are
now afraid. No-one wants to be
held accountable. _

“They know now that,
because of my loss of pay-and
status, that I could sue them for
a lot of money.

“But as things stand I have
no freedom. I can’t even go to
Freeport to see my son in a
karate tournament. I don’t have
a passport because they (the
authorities) have kept it.

“We all pleaded not guilty
and are all protesting our inno-
cence. But we aren’t being giv-
en our freedom because they, .
are so ashamed-to say to us that |

they have messed up our lives.” . '-

Referring to current attorney
general Allyson Maynard-Gib-
son’s pledge to speed up cases,
Mr Brice said: “Where is the
swift justice in our case? Even if
I go to Paradise Island, I have to
be back home by midnight. ’'m
like Cinderella — at midnight,
everything turns into a pump-
kin.”

Mr Brice has become so
impatient with the lack of action

‘ that he is now demanding that

the government set him free
and offer compensation.

He said the prolonged ordeal
had brought on high blood pres-
sure and diabetes and caused
his family endless stress.

“I was lucky to get bail 14
years ago, otherwise all of us
would still have been at Fox
Hill Prison like those Japanese
and Jamaican guys who were
kept there for years.

“But even if I had been con-
victed, I would have been out
by now. Yet here I am, still
waiting for my hearing. They
have made a big blunder and
are afraid to deal with it. Every-
one is giving us the runaround.

“T regard this as a major injus-
tice. | am a prisoner in my own
country. I still sign in at the
police station seven days a
week. It’s become a mental
thing. Give me my freedom
back.”

Mr Brice’s comments came
only a few weeks after Dame
Joan Sawyer, president of the
Court of Appeal, criticised long
delays in court proceedings.

“No-one is addressing the
problem,” said Mr Brice, “It
seems I am serving a 20-year
sentence without ever being
convicted.”
_ THE TRIBUNE

a4

S

PMD RET eK dG
story was. only. partially
ERC TMC CCN ae)
Tribune. We apologise
and today print the story
nw Ue a

Bishop Ellis

announces

four new
sub-divisions

â„¢ By BRENT DEAN

BISHOP Neil Ellis of

° Mount Tabor Full Gospel
» Church has formally

announced the creation of
four new sub-divisions to
make home ownership more
affordable for his 7,000-strong
congregation.

The announcement was
made yesterday at a press
conference attended by
Prime Minister Perry Christie.

The sub-divisions will be
created in conjunction with
Scotiabank Bahamas, Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) Limited,
Arawak Homes Ltd and
GV1I and Associates Company
Ltd.

The sub-divisions will be
called Mount Tabor Gardens,
to be situated off Carmichael
Road; Mount Tabor Sub-divi-
sion, east of Mount Tabor
Church; Mount Tabor’

. Estates, off JFK Drive, adja-
» cent to High Point Manor;

_ and Mount Tabor Manor, off

Bay Street.
In moving this initiative for-
ward, Bishop Ellis said Scotia

- Bank — the home ownership

partner — had in the last few
weeks already approved home
loans for members in excess

— of $11 million. -

Fidelity — the property
ownership partner — has
already approved loans of just

- under $2 million.

The primary feature of the

~ Fidelity lot loans will be that

Mount Tabor members will
be permitted to buy lots with-
out down payments, but with
proof of ability to make regu-

« lar monthly payments on the

- loan.

Additionally, at the time of

. closing, participants will also

benefit from reduced legal,

..fees on the mortgage from

two and a half per cent toa
flat fee of $1,000; government
stamp duty on the mortgage
of one per cent; government

_ stamp duty on the conveyance

(ranging from two to four per
cent) depending on the sales
agreement and purchase

' price; legal fees on the con-

veyance discounted from two
and a half per cent to a flat
fee of $500; and a bank com-
mitment fee of one and a half
per cent.

Scotiabank will grant

- financing for single family res-

idential use only (detached
homes, townhouses, condo-
miniums, duplexes and tri-

_ plexes where one unit is own-

er occupied) with minimum
equity requirements of five
per cent for salaried workers
and ten per cent for the self-
employed.

Bishop Ellis said he was
prompted to create the hous- °

_ ing initiative after a church

service last November when
there was a call for all individ-
uals that neither owned a
home nor property - nearly
400 people - to come forward.
He said: “We have, over the
years, diligently endeavoured

. to do everything within our

power to equip and empower
our people to be all that God
said that they can be.

“This housing initiative, we
believe, will help many more
of our people live better lives,
and it’s simply a part of more
that is ahead of us as we posi-
tion our membership for the
advancement of God’s King-
dom for the next 20 years.”

Mr Christie commended
Bishop Ellis for making the
church relevant to the lives of
its members by bringing in
financial partners to assist in
making home ownership more
accessible and affordable for a
large number of Bahamians.

Bishop Ellis also announced
that his church is in the final
stages of negotiations with the
developers of Coral Breeze
Estates to secure a certain
number of lots within the
development for church mem-
bers.

Wayde Christie of Scotia-
bank, Gregory Bethel of
Fidelity, Franklyn Wilson of

- Arawak Homes and Algernon

Allen of Coral Breeze Estates
were also at the press confer-
ence.

The first of the develop-
ments, Mount Tabor Estates,
will be formally commissioned
on February 23, 2007.

LOCAL NEWS ©

‘Opposition members 0







Boundaries Commission
— frustrated with govt’



FROM page one

nor General A D Hanna to
close the current register of
voters on March 12.

The days leading to the
election, Mr Christie cau-
tioned during an address to
the nation, are getting “short-
er with each passing day.” °

Many. have seen this
announcement by the prime
minister as a way to encour-
age the public to get out and
register.

The slow registration thus
far has impeded the work of
the boundaries commission
which has reportedly not been
able to make any decision on
how some of the constituen-
cies will be drawn up.



sioner Errold Bethel told The
Tribune yesterday that since
this announcement, registra-
tion has been increasing by
“quite a bit”.

“We're doing more than
500 a day now. I think that is
quite a pick up* because we



Asst Commissioner of police
is set to be transferred

FROM page one

Bahamas Democratic Movement (BDM), and the Workers
Party have all called for government to disclose “who knew
what and when” as questions abound over a possible contra-
vention of Bahamian laws.

When contacted by The Tribune yesterday for comment, Mr

, Ferguson said he had no idea where he was being transferred.
Beyond that he would make no comment.

“T don’t know anything about where I am going, and what my
responsibilities will become,” he said.

However, The Tribune has been told that Assistant Com-
missioner of Police Elliston Greenslade will be transferred
from Grand Bahama to take over from Mr Ferguson. He is to
be promoted to deputy commissioner of police.

When his party became the government Prime Minister
Perry Christie promised that no political victimisation would be
tolerated during his administration. The goal, as he stated,
was to collectively build a better Bahamas — regardless of
ones political affiliation.

However, as a Bahamian close to the political scene noted, if
the current attitude in local politics continues, the Bahamas’
future may not look as bright as previously promised.

Calls to Police Commissioner Paul Farquharson were not
returned up to press time.

share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.













FOCOL HOLDINGS LIMITED
NOTICE

FOCOL Holdings Limited requested and was granted
permission by BISX in accordance with its Rules to publish
restated financial statements for fiscal year 2006 on or
before 19 February, 2007.

Subsequent to issuance of audited consolidated financial
statements and publication of audited results of FOCOL
Holdings Limited as at 31% July 2006, management
observed that certain automatically generated entries in a
subsidiary were inconsistent with others of the group. As a
result, reclassification within the consolidated balance
sheet and the consolidated statement of income were
made for consistency and comparability into the future.
Net income remains unchanged.

NOTICE ©

FOCOL Holdings Limited requested and was granted an
extension by BISX in accordance with its Rules to file its
quarterly results for the period ending 31° October 2006 on
orbefore 2 March, 2007.



An extension for publication of first quarter results was
requested in lieu of permission granted by BISX to restate
the company year end results of 31% July 2006.









Parliamentary Commis- -

were doing 200 a day, which is
more than a 100 per cent
increase,” Mr Bethel said.

The parliamentary commis-
sioner said that it is not
expected that the rate of reg-
istration would dip again.

‘At this rate, however, the
department should be “look-
ing good” in about six weeks.

“We have to constantly be
looking at the placement of
our people to make adjust-
ments. We are getting our

- biggest numbers in the malls

and average numbers in other
areas.”

Mr Symonette said that it
is usual when a prime minister
announces the date for the
register to close, for there to

be an increase in registration. |

“That is why Mr Ingraham
and myself were encouraging
the prime minister to bring
the register to a close earlier
so that the boundaries com-
mission could make their
assessment based on these
numbers.

“Unfortunately the prime
minister decided to delay it
until last week and what we
told him would happen is hap-
pening and you see more peo-
ple registering,” Mr Symon-
ette said.

He pointed out that regis-
tration was not going well
before with almost one or two
thousand persons re-register-
ing a month.

“They are expecting the
73,000 that were registered in
New Providence by the end
of last year to go 110,000
before the election so we still
have a long way to go,” Mr
Symonette.

The MP said that this leaves
the boundaries commission in
a position where it may have
to decide in certain areas
where the current register
may increase and by what per-
centage and cut the bound-
aries accordingly.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007, PAGE 9

KEMP’S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A FUNERAL SERVICE FOR THE LATE








MR. AARON
ISAAC
RUBENSTEIN,
57









of Nassau, The
Bahamas will be held
at The Chapel of Love,
Kemp’s Funeral Home Limited, Palmdale
Avenue and Bradley Street, Nassau on
Thursday, 8th February, 2007 at 2:00 p.m.




Interment will follow in the Jewish
Cemetery, East, Nassau, The Bahamas,


















Mr. Rubenstein is survived by his wife,
Mrs. Carolyn Rubenstein; his daughters,
Nicole Rubenstein and Vonda Davis; his
mother, Ariella Vanderveen; his father;
Richard Rubenstein and his wife Betty
Rubenstein; his grandson, Seth Davis; his
granddaughter, Mica Davis; his brother,
Jeremy Rubenstein; his sister, Hannah
Rubenstein Fiebel; his sister-in-law, Linda
Rubenstein; his brother-in-law, Fred Fiebel;
nieces, Cathryn Rubenstein and Hallie
Fiebel; nephews, Nicholas Rubenstein and
Samuel Fiebel; and many special friends
and special thanks to Dr. Ian McDowell,
Beth, Bo and Marissa Hall.

In lieu of flowers, friends may make a
donation to the Cancer Society of The
Bahamas, P.O. Box S.S. 6539, Nassau, in
Memory of Aaron Isaac Rubenstein.







The Management Offices of

THEMALLAT
MARATHON
announces that effective
February 10, 2007

we will be a

Sméke-Free
Facility





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itl


ee

7 ee i re ne re ee

cl eT ta Se cae ee ly I et ttt et EEE ALLEGE LEE OLED E ALLCLOSE ALLL ALE ALLO, Ce





if STRAW craft trainer Eloise Smith (eh ayia this niece

from one of her students in Inagua

.

a JEWELLERY of various kinds were exhibited by cn

Jet plane service to
Start in Mayaguana

IT has been announced that
Mayaguanans can look forward
to jet plane service to and from
their island this year.

Mayaguana Development
Company vice president Junaid
Yasin explained that the 7,300
feet of the runway constructed
when the island was home to
an American military facility,
will be reconstructed and a new
terminal built.

“This runway will be largé
enough to accommodate any
large aircraft,” he said. “We are
hopeful that before the end of
the year, we would have a 737
come in and land in Mayagua-
na.”

. The Mayaguana Company is,

in a joint partnership with the'
government in the $1.8 billion

residential community devel-|

opment going on in Mayaguana.

Local Government and Con-
sumer Affairs Minister Alfred
Gray and a contingent from

Bahamas Agricultural and |
Industrial Corporation (BAIC) ,

attended last weekend’s grad-

uation ceremony for partici- |

pants in the shell and straw craft

souvenir programme in |

Mayaguana and Inagua last

Runway from military facility to be reconstructed
in partnership between company and government



weekend. They also toured the
development.

“We are very pleased to be
working with the government
and our partnership is working
very well,” said Mr Yasin. “The
government is supporting us as
much as we need and together,
in the last year since we signed

the heads of agreement, we -

have made a tremendous
amount of progress on the site.”

Facilities

Office facilities have been set
up, the company’s own power
and water systems are running,
and the asphalt plant is on the
island awaiting the technical
staff, according to Mr Yasin.

“We are very pleased with
the progress and we are hoping
that before the end of the year
our runway will be complete,”

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e
ah
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ah

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ty,
pit

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he said. “We are’ reconstruct-
ing the entire runway and we
are building a new terminal.
Within a year you will see some
major changes.”

Mr Gray, who is also the MP
for Mayaguana, said he is
pleased with the progress of the
project and is negotiating a
salary increase for the Bahami-
an workers.

“When the government con-
ceived anchor projects through-
out the Bahamas,” he said, “lit-
tle did 1] know Mayaguana
would have been factored into it
so early. Every able-bodied
Mayaguanian who has a posi-
tive attitude and wants to work
is in fact working.

“Prior to this it was 1945
when the base closed. This
development was God-sent and
I am looking forward to it grow-
ing from strength to strength.”

In partnership with the gov-

os ER



2 ce
4) sats wake oy. sia ie

ernment, all the roads in
Mayaguana are to be rebuilt
said Mr Gray.

It is envisioned that more
than 1,500 people will eventu-
ally be employed on that pro-

ject.

“The salary is small and the
people deserve as much as
cduld be paid,” he said. “I also
know that they are not yet mak-
ing money at the company and
so they have to go small until
they start to make money, and
when they start to make money
it is expected that the people
who work there will make much
more money as well.

* “While I am looking forward

to better for the people I also
have to be reminded that the
company does not want to run
out of business by doing too
much too soon. I will always
keep an eye on whatever effects
Mayaguana.”











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Wy
\
NY

kOe ait ‘i

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COLOMBIAN EMERALDS

INTERNATIONAL
The World's Foremost Emerald Jeweller

NASSAU: RAWSON SQUARE, BAY STREET ® 240 BAY STREET



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007, PAGE 11



@ LOCAL Government and Consumer Affairs Minister
Alfred Gray speaks to Mayaguanans



Gi SHELL and straw craft students from Inagua are pictured
during the graduation ceremony

(Photos: BIS/Gladstone a




ATLANTIS, BEACH TOWER ® ATLANTIS, ROYAL TOWERS #* MARINA VILLAGE AT ATLANTIS

ne re ences itn a _ igen, ian, elim atin, i gO Otte: pean, came aaasae catatiamn sll, Ce OO en eA cA A EI, Ln OO, ccna,

oS THIS exhibition of fnagua-made bags was a hit among the
ladies


PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007

THE TRIBUNE '



Prince praises

achievements of
awards scheme

PARADISE ISLAND - A
noted reduction in the recidi-
vism rate among young offend-
ers along with an increase in the
number of young participants
passing basic exams were just
some of the successes His Roy-
al Highness Prince Edward, the
Earl of Wessex pointed out
while lauding the many achieve-
ments of the Governor General
Youth Awards Programme.

Prince Edward was the spe-
cial guest speaker at a dinner
ceremony held at Café Mar-
tinique at Atlantis in celebration
of the programme’s 20th year of
existence in the Bahamas.

The prince: thanked scores of
local supporters who gathered
at the black tie gala, hosted by
Kerzner International. Among
those in attendance were Gov-
ernor General Arthur Hanna
and former governor general
Sir Orville Turnquest.

Over the last few years,
Prince Edward said, the pro-
gramme has been working
increasingly with young offend-
ers who have ended up on the
wrong side of the tracks.

“But we’ve come to find that
when engaged in the award,
that we can offer them a way
back. We can restore their self-
confidence, we can restore their
belief and their ability to actu-
ally do something positive. And
there are 26 countries around
the world that are now work-
ing actively with young offend-
ers and I am glad to say that
the Bahamas is one of them.”

Prince Edward noted that
South Africa has the biggest
programme of this nature where
over 15,000 young people have
completed their awards through
correctional centres. He said of
those that have been released,
only 12 have been readmitted.

“The normal re-offending
rate amongst young offenders
— and this [ regret to say is a

@ A YOUNG member of the Bahamas National Children’s







Choir directed by Patricia Bazard performs at the dinner

ceremony



@ PRINCE Edward is pictured with Kerzner International’s
chief operating officer, Nan Palmer

similar figure in most countries
around the world = is 87 to 90
per cent re-offending and those
who do the award we know we
can reduce that to two to five
per cent. So it does make a huge
difference in young people’s
lives,” he said.

Prince Edward said that in

the northwest territory of Cana-
da, there is a remote area com-
prised of indigenous young peo-
ple in which only 30 per cent
passed their basic exams. He
noted that after introducing the
awards in that region they were
able to re-engage those young
people, motivate them to come

oe

bi
jl





> Si is
ao
IA

HIS Royal Highness Prince Edward, the Earl of Wessex addresses a dinner ceremony held at
Café Martinique at Atlantis in celebration of the Governor General Youth Awards programme’s
20th year of existence in the Bahamas

are.

to school and develop in them
the belief that they could actu-
ally achieve in non-academic
areas and now 90 per cent are
passing their basic exams.
Chairman of the board of
trustees of the GGYA, Robert
Nihon said that over 10,000
young Bahamians have bene-
fitted from the programme.

EE

St

Nihon described the Bahamas
programme as “the most suc-
cessful” in the region. “We are
the envy of every country in the
Caribbean because they look up
to the Bahamas because we are
well funded, we are well organ-
ised and because we succeed,”
he said.

Over the last six years Kerzn-



& MEMBERS of the Bahamas National Children’s Choir performs at the dinner ceremony.

(Photos: Joshua Yentis)

er International along with its.

‘corporate partners have success-

fully raised nearly $500,000 for
the GGYA, for the development

‘of the youth in the Bahamas.

One of the highlights of the

: evening’s event included a spur

of the moment donation by four
donors who each pledged:
$100,000 to the awards scheme.





SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007



U

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street















Saw

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE
Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE >
Tel: (242) 351-3010





March 1 ‘critical date’ “ne:

-

%

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

aha Mar yester-
day described
March 1, 2007,
as the “critical
benchmark
date” for its $2.4 billion Cable
Beach project, as it represent-
ed the deadline for concluding
talks on a supplemental Heads
of Agreement with the Gov-

- ernment, a step that would

pave the way to comfortably
seal its joint venture agreement
with Harrah’s Entertainment.

John Forelle, Baha Mar
Resorts’ vice-chairman and
general counsel, said both the
developers and the Govern-
ment were committed to con-
cluding their negotiations in
the remaining three-and-a-half
weeks, but there was “work to
do, effort required, and a lot
of focus [needed] by us and the
Government to bring it to
fruition”.

He explained that March 1
was key for various reasons,
including Baha Mar’s con-

Developer needs to conclude agreement with sovernment to
enable it to close joint venture for $2.4bn investment by March
15, as Harrah’s and Starwood have ‘walk away’ clauses

struction schedule, and it
would also represent a “mile-
stone date” in terms of taking
the $2.4 billion project from
the transaction to operational
phase.

But Mr Forelle said that date
was of more immediate impor-
tance to Baha Mar in relation
to its joint venture agreement
with Harrah’s Entertainment,
which the two parties had
agreed to close by mid-March
2007, around March 15.

The joint venture agreement
with Harrah’s “requires us to
deliver a number of condi-
tions” precedent to both it and
Baha Mar’s other operating

SEE page 8B

- for Baha Mar project

eT NR ae TE



@ AN artist’s impression of Baha Mar’s $2.4 billion Cable Beach project





B AN aerial view of Valentine’s Resort & Marina

(Photo: Government photographer)

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

‘THE Bahamas’ established trust
legislation and a strong workforce
make it a leader in the industry
despite the emerging competitive
threat posed by Switzerland, finan-
cial services executives were told
yesterday, .

Richard Brooks, director of the
Royal Bank of Canada Trust Com-
pany told delegates attending the
Nassau Conference that the
Bahamas had a headstart over the
Swiss on trusts.

He explained that Switzerland
was completing its trust legislation,
and the level of Bahamian compet-
itiveness will depend on how much
the Bahamas continues to develop
its trust products. “The Bahamas is
so much more established,” he said.

Mr Brooks comments came dur-
ing the question and answer por-
tion of his presentation on Tax
Models in Europe, in which he took
a closer look at European tax struc-

tures and their implications to .

Bahamian structures.

He explained that when dealing ,

with European countries, it was
essential that Bahamian institutions
and intermediaries took nothing for
granted and obtained specific

advice from the country in which

their clients resided, as laws regard-
ing tax structures vary from country

.to country.

Mr Brooks warned persons doing
business in Europe, particularly in
the case of real estate sales, not to
overlook value-added tax (VAT),
because in some cases persons were
surprised when they received a sep-
arate VAT bill.

__ Ministry promises to

raise legislation pace

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

THE Ministry of Financial Services and Investments yesterday pledged
to hasten the pace of new legislation, and to expand on a branding survey
to assist the development of the financial services industry.

Minister of State for Finance, Senator James Smith, officially opened the
Nassau Conference on behalf of his cabinet colleague, the minister of
financial services and investments, Vincent Peet.

Mr Smith read Mr Peet’s prepared remarks yesterday morning. He
urged a private -public partnership that would take the industry to new

heights.

“I invite you, the stakeholders and players in the industry, to begin to
look beyond this jurisdiction as perhaps a mere service centre, and to
begin to consider yourselves as trend setters,” Mr Smith said.

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government has “a real concern
that marinas are being developed without
any clear idea of how they will fit in with the
islands where they are going”, the Prime
Minister’s chief planning consultant told
The Tribune yesterday.

Malcolm Martini, who works in the Min-
istry of Energy and the Environment, said
Cabinet’s interest in developing a policy to
regulate marina developments in the
Bahamas had been “twigged” by such pro-

ye

Last 12 months:

*Stock prices can go down as well as up, Past performance is ho guarantee of future

Choose EC
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\

‘Stand up
to BIC’

Carrier denies ‘flagrant
breaches’ of its licence
on ViBE, claiming PUC
approval not required
as not a new product

lg By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Public Utilities Commis-
sion (PUC) has been urged to
“stand up to” the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company
(BTC), and “confront flagrant and
deliberate breaches” of its licence,
by the state-owned carrier’s two
chief competitors. ‘

In a February 2, 2007, letter sent
to the telecommunications sector
regulator, Paul Hutton-Ashkenny,
president of IndiGo Networks,
alleged that BTC had “apparently
ignored the PUC” and continued
with the launch of its ViBe Voice
over Internet Protocol (VoIP) ser-
vice, despite the fact it had received
no regulatory approval to do so.

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said the
events leading up to ViBE’s launch,
as he understood them saw the

SEE page 9B

‘Real concerns’ over marina development

Harbour Island marina triggers Cabinet interest, with
chief planning consultant feeling Bahamas gives ‘too much
away’ to marinas through Hotels Encouragement Act

jects on Harbour Island.

There, the huge marina being construct-
ed for the Valentine’s Resort & Marina is
totally out of scale to the island’s shoreline
and overall size.

Mr Martini said the initiative to draft a
policy to govern marina developments was
started when he was attached to the Office

of the Prime Minister, and the carried over
to his new ministry.

The draft policy document was crafted -
by a committee featuring himself, Captain
Anthony Allens, head of the Port Depart-

SEE page 5B

Xe

Oar ee Wutelanclin)
Since Inception February 1999

results, Read the Offering Memorandum caretully before you invest.

i ) FIDELITY

NTR EME UL G

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Nar Nt
aU

STOCK rene | INVESTMENT | Me sun3 |
BROKERAGE ,|_ FINANCE MANAGEMENT | ESTATE

DUO RS U TT Nae ae CM rN kg ea SULLA CHEN
mse

“My government pledges to do its

utmost to assist in this process, for a Nena ‘i anny : TALC)
example, to make the process of SEE page 5B ah ; : % Gaui tt sag SC Ay SEY

CREDIT & | Wen RUT Ni | RETIREMENT |
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AANAHANNNANNS

he Mia

OO ereeereeaeees

THE MARKETS

STOCKS, MUTUAL FUNDS, 5-6B

DOW 30 12,666.31 +4.57 Ad

S&P 500 1,448.00 -+1.01 AX

NASDAQ 2,471.49 +0.89 Ad

10-YR NOTE 477-04 W
58.88

CRUDE OIL

Wall
Street |
shrugs
off tech

warning

BY JOE BEL BRUNO .
Associated Press x

NEW YORK — Wall Street
eked out a modest advance
Tuesday after investors found
little motivation in remarks by |
Federal Reserve officials and
also shrugged off a warning
from chip maker National Semi-
conductor. _

Major indexes squeaked by
with gains after spending most

_of the session extending Mon-
day’s losses. Investors have
been left looking for direction

after the Fed held interest rates

steady last week, and as corpo~

‘rate earnings season winds
down. —

Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke

_ did not address interest rates
when he spoke before the
Omaha Chamber of Commerce.
Similarly, speeches by two,
other central bankers and Trea- ,
sury Secretary Henry Paulson
also had little news to sway

’ investors.

National Semi warned that
sales will fall steeper than
expected; the news initially cast
a shadow across the market, but
by the close of trading, even the
tech-dominated Nasdaq com-
posite index had recovered.

The Dow rose 4.57, or 0.04
percent, to 12,666.31

Broader stock indicators fin-
ished narrowly higher. The
Standard & Poor’s 500 index
added 1.01, or 0.07 percent, to
1,448.00, and the Nasdaq rose
0.89, or 0.04 percent, to 2,471.49.

-Stocks got some support
from a decline in bond yields as
fixed-income investors place

- bets on where interest rates are
headed.

The yield on the benchmark
10-year Treasury note fell to
4.77 percent from 4.81 percent —
late Monday. The dollar was
lower against other major. cur-
rencies, while gold prices
advanced. ‘

Oil prices continued to climb
on concerns that a blast of arc-
tic weather in the Midwest and
Northeast might linger, and
drive up demand for heating
fuel. A barrel of light sweet
crude rose 14 cents to $58.88 on |
the New York Mercantile
Exchange.

Technology stocks were
among the market’s biggest
decliners, led by the semicon-
ductor sector. National Semi
fell 64 cents, or 2.8 percent, to:
$22.68 after it predicted lower-
than-expected sales in the third
quarter because of lower ship-
ments to the Asia Pacific region.

In other corporate news,
McClatchy, the nation’s second-
largest newspaper publisher,
rose 53 cents to $39.29 after its
operating earnings surpassed
Wall Street projections.

Advancing issues outnum-
bered advancers by about 2 to 1
on the New York Stock
Exchange, where consolidated
volume came to. 2.63 billion
shares, up from 2.47 billion a
day earlier.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies rose 3.34, or
0.41 percent, to 810.03. The
index surpassed 800 for the first
time last week, and reached an
all-time high of 810.49 in the
previous session.

Overseas, Japan’s .Nikkei
stock average closed up 0.36
percent. At the close, Britain’s
FTSE 100 was up 0.45 percent,
Germany’s DAX index added
0.02 percent, and France’s
CAC-40 fell 0.08 percent.

+14 Ay





RETAIL

A court’s decision will let the
nation’s largest class-action
employment discrimination
lawsuit go to trial.

BY DAVID KRAVETS
Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — A federal
appeals court ruled Tuesday that
Wal-Mart Stores, the world’s largest .
private employer, must face a class-
action lawsuit alleging female
employees were discriminated
against in pay and promotions.

UPGRADES: Cisco Systems Techni

Newer, faster routers have
helped Cisco win business and
sales of cable TV set-top boxes
also surged 21 percent in the
quarter, after Cisco bought
Scientific- Atlanta for

$6.9 billion last year.

BY JORDAN ROBERTSON
Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — Cisco Sys-
tems’ second-quarter profit surged
nearly 40 percent as the world’s
largest maker of networking gear
benefited from equipment
upgrades to support bandwidth-
hogging video downloads.

The company also raised its rev-
enue guidance for the current quar-
ter, apparently quashing analyst
concerns about slowing growth as
its customers complete the most
extensive round of network
upgrades since the pre-Y2K scram-
ble.

. Cisco shares jumped nearly 5
percent in extended-session trad-
ing.
For the quarter ended Jan. 27,
Cisco’s net income was $1.9 billion,
or 31 cents per share, compared
with $1.4 billion, or 22 cents per
share, for the same period last year.

Excluding one-time charges,
Cisco said Tuesday it earntd $2.1
billion for the quarter, or 33 cents



AUTOMOTIVES

Toyota hits

The ruling by the 9th U.S. Circuit
Court of Appeals upholds a 2004 fed-
eral judge’s decision to let the
nation’s largest class-action employ-
ment discrimination lawsuit go to
trial. The suit claims that as many as
1.5 million current and former female
employees earned less than men and
were bypassed for promotions.

The lawsuit exposes the Benton-
ville, Ark.-based retailing power-
house to the possibility of billions of
dollars in damages.

Wal-Mart claimed that the con-

ventional rules of class actions
should not apply in the case because
its 3,400 stores, including Sam’s Club
warehouse outlets, operate like inde-
pendent businesses, and that the
company did not have a policy of dis-
criminating against women.

But the court, in a 2-1 decision, dis-
agreed.

“Plaintiff's expert opinions, factual
evidence, statistical evidence and
anecdotal evidence present signifi-
cant proof of a corporate policy of
discrimination and support plaintiff's



TECHNOLOGY

cal Marketing Engineer David Lin, shown at the company’s
headquarters in San Jose, Calif., works on solutions for Cisco teleworkers who work from home.

Cisco’s second-quarter.
profit jumps 40 percent

GOOD REPORT: ‘Cisco achieved
record results,’ Chief Executive
John Chambers said.

per share. :
The San Jose-based technology
bellwether, which makes the rout-
ers and switches that direct data
over computer networks, said reve-
nue for the quarter was $8.4 billion,
a 27 percent jump from the $6.6 bil-
lion in the same period last year.
Analysts were expecting Cisco
to earn, on average, 31 cents per
share on $8.28 billion in revenue.
Cisco said $639 million of its
sales came from Scientific-Atlanta,

another

quarterly sales record

@ The report of another quarter
of record profits for Toyota Motor
painted a rosy picture fora
company trying to get to the top
spot.

BY YURI KAGEYAMA
Associated Press

TOKYO — Toyota, hot on the
heels of General Motors to become
the world’s No. 1 automaker, reported
a 7.3 percent jump in quarterly profit
Tuesday on booming sales in North
America and Europe that offset slug-
gish demand in Japan.

Toyota Motor recorded group net
profit of 426.8 billion yen ($3.6 bil-

lion) in the three months ended Dec.
31, up from 397.6 billion yen the same
period the previous year.

Quarterly sales climbed a solid 15.2
percent to 6.15 trillion yen ($51.2 bil-

lion) from 5.33 trillion yen a year ago,

as the remodeled RAV 4 sport utility
vehicle and Camry mid-sized sedan
sold briskly in North America, and
demand was strong for the Yaris
compact in Europe, Toyota said in a
release.

“Toyota’s numbers are super,
super strong,” said Koji Endo, auto
analyst with Credit Suisse First Bos-

*TURN TO TOYOTA











PHOTOS BY PAUL SAKUMA/AP

the world’s second-largest cable
television box seller that Cisco
acquired for $6.9 billion in the third
quarter of last year.

“Cisco achieved record results |
that were well balanced across our |
geographies, products, services, |

customer segments and new mar-
kets,” Cisco Chief Executive John
Chambers said in a statement. |
“This illustrates our key competi- |
tive advantage of being able to |
develop a long-term vision, execute |
on our strategy and deliver consis- |
tent results.” |
Despite Cisco’s phenomenal |
results in recent quarters, some |
analysts have expressed concerns |
about slowing growth as the initial |
boost from Scientific-Atlanta’s |
sales wears off. |
During a conference call, Cham- |
bers said the company expects |
third-quarter revenue to grow 19 to
20 percent over last year, when |
including results from Scientific- |
Atlanta. Without Scientific-Atlanta,
Cisco’s standalone revenue is |
expected to grow between 15 and 17 |
percent, Chambers said. |
The results were announced |
after financial markets ended regu- |
lar trading. Earlier, shares of Cisco |
lost 23 cents to close at $27.28 on |
the Nasdaq Stock Market. Shares
gained $1.30 in extended trading. |



Wal-Mart women bias case is sent to trial

contention that female employees
nationwide were subjected to a com-
mon pattern and practice of discrimi-
nation,” the court wrote.

U.S. District Judge Martin Jenkins,
the San Francisco trial court judge
who said the case could proceed, had
ruled that lawyers for the women had
enough anecdotal evidence to war-
rant a class-action trial. Wal-Mart
took the case to the San Francisco-
based appeals court.

*TURN TO WAL-MART

EUROPEAN
CENTRAL BANK

Opposite
views
taken on
euro’s
effect

@ Under fire by France, the
European Central Bank is poised
to keep interest rates steady until
March.

BY MATT MOORE
Associated Press

FRANKFURT, Germany — The
European Central Bank finds itself
squarely in the middle of a debate it
wants no part of: Should the coun-
tries that use the euro have an influ-
ence on its decision-making process?

The bank, which is expected to
hold interest rates for the 13-country
euro zone steady on Thursday, says it
is that independence that keeps the
economy from souring.

The two largest economies in the
common currency take opposite
views.

In France, politicians — including
presidential aspirants — have lam-
basted the bank for letting the euro
rise by nearly 15 percent in value
against the dollar; an increase that
could conceivably dull the country’s
competitive edge by making exports
more expensive, particularly to the
United States. ,

Germany, meanwhile, has
defended the ECB for keeping the
region’s growth on track. Chancellor
Angela Merkel has called the debate
worrisome and the euro a convenient
scapegoat.

“We must be careful that our diffi-
culties — adapting to globalization,
carrying out reforms, resolving social
problems — aren't all piled on the
euro’s back,” she told French news-
paper Le Monde in an interview last
month. “If we want to preserve confi-
dence in the euro, we must leave it
outside political debate, leave the
European Central Bank its indepen-

|” dence. That is the very firm German

position.”

ECB President Jean-Claude Tri-
chet has staunchly defended the
bank, saying that because of the
bank’s independence, the euro zone’s
first 12 members saw 2.7 million jobs
created in the eight years before the
currency’s introduction, and 11.7 mil-
lion in the eight years that followed.

After the bank’s last meeting, Tri-
chet said that the ECB takes into
account the needs of its 13 members,

*TURN TO RATES

KOJI SASAHARA/AP

OH WHAT A FEELING: Toyota Motor President Katsuaki Watanabe is
shown in this December photo. Toyota, hot on the heels of General
Motors to become the world’s No. 1 automaker, reported a

7.3 percent jump in quarterly profit Tuesday.
—



iy
AT.

PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007

Pavartan eV KKsmouM MO uniele
ir the PLP acknowledge the Oo ae

Uwe yibune, need we say more?
Thanks, Mr Prime Minister.



PM on The Tribune:
...no matter what

The Tribune says...
the more they do it,

the more many of you

must cut it out.

Cut it out and put it on

your headquarters’ wall.

Motivate our people.
Show them who’s trying
to take us out.

Put their faces on the

wall. Put the stories

on the wall.

If The Tribune can do this to the PLP...
imagine what we can do for your business.

Being bound to swear to
the dogmas of no master.




Lewsppyor



THE TRIBUNE |




WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007

SEGTHON

Fax: (242) 328-2398



Youth athletes
impress at
the Star
Performers
Track Classic

@ TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE
JOHNSON

Sports Reporter

THE future in track
and field is looking
brighter for the
Bahamas and the
Bahamas Association
of Athletic Association
(BAAA) now that
clubs have made
space for youth ath-
letes.

More than 100 youth

athletes participated at.

the fourth annual Bak-
er Star Performers
Track Classic held over
the weekend.

The big entry was
divided into six divi-
sions, the under nine,
11 and 13.

This was the second

‘ meet of the year that

hosted younger ath-
letes, who pleased the
crowd with their times
and dedication in

the race and field
events.

Stacked

There was also a

- stacked field in the

under 13 girls 800m.
with Talia Thompson’s
dominating.

The younger member

~ of the Strider’s Track

Club clocked 2:27.60
seconds to set anew
meet record. She was

: ‘-." followed by Eddecia
>, Carey, who also ran

under the meet record
time.

Her time was 2:33.70
seconds.

Another two records
were laid to rest by
D’ Angelo Mackey in
the under nine division
for boys.

Mackey’s reached
15.00 seconds and 31.60

-seconds in the 100m
- and 200m respectively.

Kerie Rolle added his
name to the record mix

in the under 13 boys

400m, clocking 1:03.80
seconds.
It was a stacked field

‘in the 200m in the
- under nine division.

Coming out on top was
Whittney Thompson of

Jordan Prince William

in a time of 34.80 sec-
onds, she was followed
by Daejha Moss in
35.10 seconds and,
Krista Collie in 35.80
seconds.

Asia Butler took the
under 11 girls 200m in

- 31.20 seconds, Janiece

Henderson was second
in 31.90 seconds and
Georgette Wiliams
third in 31.91 seconds.

Field

On the boys end,
Timothy Wilson head-
ed the field in 28.60
seconds, Shalom Cash
came in second in 30.30
seconds, while Julius
Nottage took the third
spot in 30.50 seconds.

The third place finish
in the 200m didn’t

‘’ bother Williams, who
“. secured victories in the
400m and long jump.

Her time in the 400m
was recorded at 1:14.70
seconds with 3.78m in
the long jump.

Tommy Outten led
the field in the boys 13
100m with a time of
13.70 seconds, he was
followed by Rolle in
28.30 seconds and Oral
Rolie in 28.31 seconds.

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

- Machines secure
championship piace

|_| TARAE SWEETING from SAC tries to hold onto the ball





as Prince William applies defence.



(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

m@ BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON

Sports Reporter

ST AUGUSTINE’S College
Big Red Machines junior girl’s
proved why they finished up in
the number one spot of the
BAISS league yesterday.

The do-or-die game saw Ali-

cia Musgrove and Tarae Sweet-
ing take charge of the Big Red
Machines’ offence to send the
number four seed Jordan Prince
William Falcons packing.

The team pulled off a come-
from-behind 37-21 victory to
secure their championship
appearance, with the Queen’s
College Comets.

The Falcons, who got off to a
quick start in the first quarter,
held the Big Red Machines to
only six points.

But the Big Red Machines
came chugging back into the
game behind the tough play of
Musgrove and Sweeting, who
ended the game with 15 and 14
points respectively.

Musgrove was the go-to man
for the outside shot while Sweet-
ing cleaned house for the Big
Red Machines on the inside.

Sweeting earned an easy six
points after pulling down three
offensive rebounds. On the
defensive end she would feed
Musgrove with the long over-

shead pass, which was placed on

the glass for two more points.
Despite the run, the Big Red
Machines still found themselves

down by one point heading into

half time.

This deficit didn’t sit well with
their head coach Annastacia
Sands-Moultrie, who rushed the






team into the locker room to
plan their second half strategy.

The Big Red Machines
returned to the court with fire in
their eyes, and for the first time
in the game the team moved
into the lead.

But the one point lead would-
n’t last that long as the Falcons’
Brittney Greenslade tied things
up once again.

This would be the last tie in
the game thanks to the aggres-
sive defence the Big Red
Machines were putting on the
Falcons. ©

Defence

The defence, which placed
Ashley Bethel on the Falcons’
hot hands Alexis Maycock, com-
pletely shut the Falcons’ offence
down.

Maycock was a one man
wreck for the Big Red
Machines, she had posted 12
points at the half. These were
the only points scored by her.

Falcons’ head coach Hattie
Moxey said: “It really wasn’t dis-
appointing to me because, my
girls, they needed a lot of prac-
tice but they never show up
when I call practice. Instead of
coming into practice they went
to the senior girls game. This
team can play a good half, but
they don’t have the endurance
to last a full game.

“They played a superb half, I
am quite comfortable about
their level of play in the first
half. I won’t change anything
about this game, they just need-
ed to be in shape and they
weren't. They weren’t able to

~ â„¢ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE

run the floor, nor did they have
the endurance to last the whole
game.”

It will be a rebuilding process
for Moxey and the Falcons next
season, only four of their right
girls will be eligible to play in
the junior division.

The Big Red Machines would
end the second half with 22
points, holding the Falcons to
just three points.

According to their head coach
Sands-Moultrie, the team will
have to continue on with their
aggressive play if they want
to defeat the Comets on Thurs-
day.

She said: “They were a little
scared in the first half so I.told

‘them that they will need to

come out and play a little hard-
er than they did if they wanted
to move on. But overall I am
pleased with the way they
played, they were able to pull it
off.

“We had to toughen up on
our defence in the second half, I
preached that to them in the
back just before we returned.
Like I always told them, defence
will bring offence, so they start-

- ed to play the type of defence

we are so used to playing and
their offence automatically
came.”

The Big Red Machines are
scheduled to play the Comets
in the first championship game,
set for Thursday at the Sir
Kendal Isaacs gym.

Up until press time the Fal-
cons* junior boys were still
awaiting the winners of the Big
Red Machines’ junior boys and
the St John’s Giants junior boys
game.

R Walker Knights shine in -
-point rout over the Magics







B BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

THE CR Walker Knights enjoyed a 39-point
rout over the Government High Magics in the
Government Secondary Schools Sports Associ-
ation senior girls matchup yesterday.

The Knights shined behind the 1-2 punch of
guards Firnethra Brown and Keva Barry as they
exploded for 21 points in a 32-2 half-time advan-
tage enroute to a 56-17 blowout victory.

CR Walker’s coach Ken Lightbourne said it
was just a matter of getting back in sync after
having their five-game winning streak snapped
with back-to-back losses against the CI Gibson
Rattlers and the CC Sweeting Cobras,

“The games that we play after those losses,
I’m trying to see if we can get an up tempo game
so that the girls can practise how we will play
when we face those big teams in the playoffs,”
said Lightbourne, whose Knights improved to
5-2.

“When we get down to the playoffs and hope-
fully the championship, we want to make sure
that we can keep our endurance up so we can run
with them.”

Lightbourne said he also tried to utilise his
players when they are in foul trouble, so that
they can be comfortable whenever the situation
arises in the postseason.

In “getting back to where we need to be,”
Lightbourne didn’t have to worry about his
team’s performance, even though it was against
the hapless Magics, who are 0-6.

Brown and Barry ran an effective up tempo
game, picking off a number of steals and scoring
on the fast break lay-ups as they helped the
Knights to jump out to an impressive 14-0 advan-
tage.

Magics’ coach Leroy Thompson kept shouting
“take the ball inside,” but Government High
had difficulties getting the ball over the half
court line as CR Walker smothered them with

their defence. ;

After a couple of unsuccessful tries, Katecha
Gilcud finally broke through the defence and
scored on a lay-up to put the Magics on the
scoreboard at 14-2.

But the Knights went right back to what got .
them started as they ran the ball and came
through with some easy baskets enroute to shut-
ting down the Magics the rest of the period.

It didn’t help Government High either as
Thompson sat down Crystal Curry - his best
player - for the majority of the period.

But after giving them a “tongue lashing” at
the break, the Magics picked their game up a
little more. They were able to get the ball to the
basket, but they missed a bundle of shots.

They fell behind 40-2 on Brown’s three-point-
er then Curry answered with a three-pointer for
a Magics’ 42-5 deficit. She was fouled on Melesha
Petterson’s fifth foul, but Curry missed the free
throw that could made it a four-point play.

Just as he did in the first half, Thompson con- .
tinued to shout at his players to “pass the ball.”
But instead, they watched as the Knights showed
them how to do it.

‘GHS’ team captain Natasha Whymms said
they just simply didn’t play up to their expecta-
tions.

“T didn’t think we played that much defence
and we didn’t put any pressure on the ball,” she
reflected. “IJ don’t know what happened today,
but we didn’t play like we practised.

“In practice, we practise hard, but we didn’t put
the plays on the court. I don’t know what hap-
pened. We might have to practise a little more.”

Using the game as a practise, the Knights got a
game high 15 from Brown, 11 from Barry, nine
from Darrenique Young and eight from Petter-
son. Nadia Seymour helped out with four and
Roickia Richardson and Megan Thompson both
had two,

Curry and Gilcud both finished with seven
and Jessica Thomas and Kaylissa Russell added
four apiece.

lm CR WALKER’S guard Firnethra Brown goes up for a lay-up over the Government High Mag-
ics in their GSSSA senior girls game yesterday at the DW Davis Gym. CR Walker went on to win

the game 56-17.

(Photo: Tim Clarke)

ee ak tt lie nt. all
ee ee Ee ae ee ea ee ee ee



PAGE 8E, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007



Liverpool aout |
to come under
American
ownership

m SOCCER
LONDON
Associated Press

FIRST it was Manchester
United. Then Aston Villa. And
now Liverpool, with a record 18
English championships, also is
about to come under American
ownership.

Liverpool chairman David
Moores said Tuesday he will sell
his 51 percent stake in the sto-
ried club to George Gillett Jr.,
owner of the Montreal Canadi-
ens, and Tom Hicks, who owns
the Texas Rangers and the Dal-
las Stars. Moores recommended
other shareholders do the same.

The $430.8 million offer from
Gillett and Hicks includes an
agreement to pay off about $89
million of club debt and pledges
to build and finance a 60,000-
seat stadium.

“TI believe this is a great step
forward for Liverpool, its share-
holders and its fans,” said
Moores, whose family has owned
the club for decades.

“This club is my passion and
forms a huge part of my life.
After much careful considera-
tion, have agreed to sell my
shares to assist in securing the
investment needed for the new
stadium and for the playing -
squad.”

Broadcaster ITV said it also
would sell its 9.9 percent stake,
and Gillett and Hicks said they
had received acceptances from
62.2 percent of Liverpool’s

. Shareholders under the deal that

values shares at $9,800 each.

The American businessmen
need to acquire 90 percent of the
shares through Kop Football
Ltd., the British company they
formed to launch the bid, before
they can assume full control. The
Kop is the name given to the sec-
tion where hardcore fans sit in
stadiums such as Anfield, where
Liverpool now plays.

“This is truly the largest sport
in the world, the most important
sport in the world, and this is the
most important club in the most
important sport in the world,”
Gillett said at a news conference
in Liverpool. “And what a privi-
lege we have to be associated
with it.”

If Gillett and Hicks succeed in
taking full control, Liverpool
would become the third Ameri-
can-owned Premier League club.
Malcolm Glazer, who owns the
Tampa Bay Buccaneers, won
control of Manchester United in
2005, while Cleveland Browns
owner Randy Lerner took over
Aston Villa in September.

Gillett stressed that the pro-
posed takeover differs from that
of Manchester United by Glazer,
who borrowed heavily against
future earnings to fund his pur-
chase.

“Owning this great franchise is
special,” Gillett said. “We want
to add to that luster, not detract
from that luster.”

The pair would be co-chair-
men of the club, with a son from
each man’s family on the board.
Rick Parry will stay as chief
executive and Moores, who has
been chairman since 1991, will
become lifetime. president.

“When I looked into this over
the past month, I was awe-struck
with the history and the true pas-
sion of the fans compared to oth-
er sports I am involved with,”
Hicks said in an interview on
Liverpool’s Web site. -

Liverpool said the proposed
takeover would be a “great step
forward” for a club that has been
European champion five times
— more than any other English
team — but last won the league
in 1990,

“T feel very excited, it has
been a long process,’ * Parry said.
“It is about three years since we |
started, so I’m very excited to be
bringing it to a conclusion.”

The deal was announced a

week after a Dubai-based con-

sortium pulled out of a proposed
takeover when it discovered Liv-
erpool was listening tothe rival
bid.

A solo bid from Gillett was
turned down in November in
favor of the approach from
Dubai International Capital,
owned by the ruler of Dubai,
Sheik Mohammed bin Rashid al-
Maktoum. Gillett renewed his
overtures after persuading Hicks
to join him when the pair talked
at the NHL All-Star game Jan.
24 in Dallas.

“When you sit in our little
country you get an unusual per-
spective, and probably an incor-
rect one, because we think our
sports are pretty popular,”
Gillett said. “Then you come
over here and see the tribal
aspects of the fans and their
affection and support for the
team and realize it’s a game
which is watched by billions.”

Liverpool received clearance
from the Liverpool City Council
in September to build a new
60,000-seat stadium, moving it
closer to moving from the
45,000-capacity Anfield it has
used since 1892.

@ CR WALKER’S double
trouble Keya Barry and Fir-
nethra Brown clamp down on
the defence of the Govern-
ment High Magics during their
GSSSA senior girls basketball
game yesterday at the DW
Davis Gym. The Knights won
the game 56-17.

e SEE SPORTS FRONT

















(Photo: Tim Clarke)



@ SAC’S Alica Mus-
grove drives to the basket
hard for two points against

the Falcons,

(Photo: Felipé Major/

Tribune staff)

sae Ssh a le

=

TRIBUNE SPORTS

. BA PRINCE William High School defender tries to stop SAC’s Alicia
Musgrove as she drives to the basket . SAC won the game 37-21.
¢ SEE SPORTS FRONT

(Photo: Felipé Major/ Tribune Staff)



Bianca has two meets to perfect jumps

@ TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Sports Reporter



BAHAMIAN Bianca Stu-
art, leading female long
jumper for Southern Illinois
University, has two more
meets before the big confer-
ence showdown. The Mis-
souri Valley Conference
Indoor championships are set
for February 23rd-24th, in
Carbondale Illinois.

Since she has already sur-
passed the provisional mark-
ing for the NCAA indoors
championships, her goal at
these two meets will be the
automatic standard.

Before she can do this, she
will have to execute every
phase of her jump to perfec-
tion.

According to her coach
Andre Scott, achieving the.
automatic standard is not out

of her reach, but will rest in
her hands when she steps on
the runway.

Coach Scoit said: “I think
she can get close to the mark
but I don’t know if she can
hit it or not, that will be left
totally up to her. I would say
the ability is there, but it
depends on how she feels
and how aggressive she is on
the runway. She can hit that
mark or come really close to
it.

°

Sprint

“I think she is on the same
pace she was on last year.
Actually we just had a meet
over the weekend and she
jumped 20-foat-3, and she is
starting to sprint well too.
We are trying to get her back
into-the shape she was in
~ before she left here to head
home for the Christmas

break.”

Over the weekend, at the
McDonalds Invitational, Stu-
art clocked 7.75 seconds to
win the open women’s 60m
dash. .She was just seconds
shy of the provisional time,
which is set at 7.44 seconds.

In the long jump she sailed
to 6.19m, surpassing the pro-
visional standards once again
and defeated the field. Last
week she had a best of
6.17m,

Scott added: “I think she
has lost some of her power
from not lifting the way she
should lift in the weight
room. But all of the elements
are coming back and hope-
fully some time soon she will
get to jump out in the 6.40m
range.

“As far as the running
part, I think she will need to
get back into the weight
room so she could get in

some back squats, a little
heavier than the weight she is
lifting; and some leg jumps
onto of boxes that will get
her back into shape and help
her put down some big
jumps.

e
Injury

“Well she will have to run
the 100m and the 4x100m
basically in the outdoor sea-
son. This was our plan last
year but unfortunately she
got that injury in that groin
area and she couldn’t sprint.
I think she ran one 100m in
our second meet outdoors
and that was it — she could-
n’t run anymore.”

Since moving to the South-
ern Illinois University, Stu-
art has made a big impact.

Last year she landed her

way into the school’s record
books with a best of 20-05.75.

Stuart also competed in the
indoor championships.

Then she was forced to
watch the outdoor champi-
onships from the stands, due
to an injury.

Scott said: “It is kind of
hard to say and track her
progress because her fresh-
man year, somewhere in the
middle of the outdoor sea-
son, she strained and pulled
her hip flexor and her groin,
so it was really hard for her
to jump. She was actually
ready to jump further then,

“That injury actually both-
ered her up until the fall of
this year. Soon as we were
able to get all of that
straightened out she strained
her hamstring, but I think
she is ready.”

The NCAA championships
will take place in March and
will be hosted by the Uni-
versity of Arkansas.

\



6

‘Yesterday's basketball action —

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<8

Sl en in ee aie ine


Late

PAGE 2E, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Sampras returns
fo competition
in Boston

TENNIS
BOSTON
Associated Press

THE last time Pete Sampras
played competitive tennis in
Boston, his doubles team
notched the only victory for
the United States in the Davis
Cup quarterfinals against Aus-
tralia in 1999,

The winner of a record 14
Grand Slam singles titles
returns in three months for his
first tournament since 2002
when he participates in the
Outback Champions Series at
Boston University from May 2-
6. He wants to see how he feels
there before committing to any
of the other five tournaments
in the series for players older
than 30.

"I just want to see how it
goes," Sampras said in a tele-
phone interview Monday. "I
don't want to commit to a
bunch of them, just see how I
enjoy the week, the playing, I
didn't want to commit to some-
thing I wasn't 100 percent sure
about."

His participation in the event
was announced last Tuesday.

Boston is the second stop on
the tour and Sampras prefers
the hardcourt on which it will
be played to other surfaces in
the series. He said he enjoyed
the city when he played in the
Davis Cup where he teamed
with Alex O'Brien for a five-
set victory. Australia won the
quarterfinal 4-1 and beat
France in the final.

The 35-year-old Sampras
retired after winning the U.S.
Open in September 2002 with
a victory over Andre Agassi.
At first, he didn't miss the gru-
eling routine of tournament
tennis and practices.

"Initially, you enjoy it, you
decompress, and it's nice not
having to worry about tennis,"
he said. "The stress of trying to
win the majors was gone. It
was fun. I did some things I
didn't get a chance to do."

One of those was golf.
"After a couple of years of
that you kind of wake up as the

mornings go on feeling you
need to do a little bit more and
feel more fulfilled," he said.
"Getting up in the morning to
play golf is fun, but you miss a
little bit of the structured life
you had."

One reason he's returning is
his relationship with series co-
founder Jim Courier, who also
will be in the eight-man field in
Boston along with John McEn-
roe. Total prize money is
$142,000. To qualify for the
series, now in its second full
year, a player must have
reached a Grand Slam singles
final, been ranked in the top
five, or played singles on a
Davis Cup championship team.

"T almost in a way wish he
came back and played (regu-
larly)," McEnroe said Monday
night after attending the
Rangers’ hockey game in New
York. "I know he sort of in a
way wants to preserve what
he's already done. But no one
can take that away."

Sampras said he won't return
to the regular tennis tour
but is ready for the competi-
tion again although it's
“nothing as intense as it used
to be."

"I know that he can beat
most of these guys still — cer-
tainly at Wimbledon - so
there's a temptation for him to
want to do that," McEnroe
said. "I know he's right. He can
handlé these guys but that's his
call."

Sampras did play some exhi-
bitions and World Team Ten-
nis last year.

"I've been hitting the ball
pretty well and using the bigger
racket with the new technology
string," Sampras said. "It's,
really given me the ability to
hit the ball better today than I
did in my prime."

For the first time in 4 1/2
years, fans will get a chance to
judge for themselves in a tour-
nament setting.

"You still have a lot of pride
and you want to play well and
you want to win," he said.,
"Every time I step on the court
I still want to hit that big shot,
hit that big serve."











HotRod Association

m@ ROAD RACING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports

Reporter

AFTER spending a con-
siderable amount of money
to develop the racing site
at the Queen Elizabeth
Sports Centre, the
Bahamas HotRod Associ-
ation is in limbo as to its
future there.

The association will kick
off its 2007 season on Sun-
day, but whether or not
they will be able to occupy
the site for the rest of the
year is uncertain.

“We intend to run busi-
ness as usual, but back in
our minds, any day now,
the government can come
to us and say that con-
struction on the stadium
starts and where that
leaves us?” BHRA presi-
dent Meriline Adderley
asked.

There were reports that
the BHRA would be relo-
cated tothe plot of land
adjacent to the Govern-
ment High School.

With the Bahamas Golf
Federation being granted
18 acres of land from the
Baillou Hills Sporting
Complex, it’s sure to reach

a portion of the land that is.

being used by the BHRA.

Additionally, the gov-
ernment is getting ready to
build the new $30 million
national stadium at the
QESC, which will definite-
ly occupy some of the
space allocated to the
BHRA.

Back in 2001, former
president Don Arahna
signed a 50-year lease with
the Free National Move-
ment government for the

:. use of the land, which they
i. were to develop as a joint

venture and they eventu-
ally split the profits.

However, Arahna said
when the Progressive Lib-
eral Party came into office
in 2002, the deal was
pushed on the back burner.
“They didn’t want any-
thing to do with it,” Arah-
na claimed.

Developing

Over the past five years,
the association and its
members have spent close
to one million dollars
developing the facility.

They have constructed a
clubhouse - used as a con-
cession stand — paved two
20-feet wide lanes of road,
erected the perimeter
fences and provided light-
ing fixtures and complete
electrical power.

With all of the work that
they have done, Arahna
said it will be a pity if they
are asked to move.

“We don’t mind re-locat-
ing, if we have to, once
they can in some way com-
pensate us,” Arahna dis-
closed. “But the thing is,
the government isn’t say-
ing anything.”

Aranha said they pre-
sented a proposal to the
government, which they
feel can benefit the touris-
tic segment of the country,
but. they are yet to hear
back.

“Imagine getting a big
event here where we have
hundreds of people com-
ing here,” Aranha pointed
out.

“We can’t pay for that
kind of exposure.”

Adderley said they want
to increase the length of
the perimeter fence to
about 200 feet so that they
can accommodate more
international racing and

X RUST

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@ ABOVE: The runway
that the Bahamas HodRod
Association has used for their
racing at the Queen Elizabeth
Sports Centre.

@ RIGHT: Past president
Don Arahna and Meriline
Adderley, the new president
of the Bahamas HodRod
Association, discuss the con-
cerns they have over their site

_ at the Queen Elizabeth Sports

Centre.

eventually get their sanc-
tion.

“That is the only thing
stopping us, but we decid-
ed not to spend the money
and then tomorrow they
tell us that we have to
move,” he stated. “So we
have to put that on hold.”

Since the BHRA were
granted the lease, their
members have spent a lot
of money improving their
cars.

Johann Pyfrom, who
owns a turbo-charged 1987
Mustang, said he’s spent
more than $50,000 over the
past two years on getting
it ready to compete.

“It ran a 60 at 115 miles
per hour with a bad tune-
up,” Pyfrom revealed.
“With a safe tune-up, I’m
just trying to learn the car,
but with a safe tune-up, I
expect it to run some very
fast times.

“I think the car will run
what the outdoor class is
running.

“It’s a pro modified car
and it’s built to compete in
the outdoor class very
shortly.”

If they are not allowed
to compete on the site,
Pyfrom said he will be
highly disappointed as well
as many other rivals, who
have spent considerably
more than he has on their
cars.

“Just like track and field,
this sport can go interna-
tionally,” he charged. “But
it seemed as if they are just
willing to throw it aside.
Hopefully things will go
our way and they can re-

locate us and we can put.

the Bahamas on the map
in drag racing.”

Minister of Youth,
Sports and Culture Neville
Wisdom was unavailable
for comments up until
presstime.



voices track concern



NS 9855



Brien and Fritzgerald
star in All-Stars clash

@ SOFTBALL



KEN O’Brien had a solid
offensive attack and Harold
‘Banker’ Fritzgerald got the
job done on the mound as the
Edward ‘Bobby’ Glinton All-
Stars clobbered the Vincent
‘Winkie’ Curry All-Stars on
Sunday in the Masters Softball
League’s All-Star Classic.

O’Brien, the left fielder for
the DHL Lions, enjoyed a 2-
for-3 day - his two hits being a
triple and a home run - as he
drove in five runs and scored
once in the Glinton All-Stars’
17-6 rout over the Curry All-
Stars at the Archdeacon
William Thompson Softball
Park at the Southern Recre-
ation Grounds.

Lion’s catcher Edwin Cul-
mer was 3-for-5 with four RBIs
and two runs scored; Miller
Lite’s second baseman Henry
Williams was 2-for-3 with three
RBIs and two runs and Bat
Miller’s utility player Kirk
Knowles was 3-for-5 with two
RBIs and two runs scored.

Firtzgerald, Miller Lite’s
pitcher, picked up the win on
the mound for the Glinton All-

Stars, managed by Anthony
Huyler of the Joshua Knights
and coached by Robert Gilbert
of the Bat Miller Panthers and
Lawrence Smith of the Miller
Lite Royals.

Mike Isaacs of DHL was
tagged with the loss for the
Curry All-Stars, managed by
Audley Williams of the Dog-
house Rangers and coached by
Pat Evans of William Con-
struction and Julian Collie of
the Bat Miller Panthers.

Donnie Lockhart, a utility
player with Joshua, went 2-for-
3 with an RBI and run scored
to lead the Curry All-Stars.
Lee Rahming, catcher of the
Jets, was 1-for-3 with two RBIs
and a run scored and John
McPhee was 1-for-2 with a run
scored.

On Saturday, the league
hosted a regular season game
with the William Construction
Jets blasting the Dog House
Rangers 23-3. Mike Dillett got
the win on the mound over
John Woodside.

Roger Demeritte went 3-for-
4 with three RBIs and three
runs scored to lead the Jets.

Gary Johnson was 2-for-4

with three RBIs and three
runs; Anthony Weech was 2-
for-2 with three RBIs and
three runs; Lee Rahming was
3-for-4 with four RBIs and
three runs; Anthony Pearce
was 2-for-3 with three RBls
and two runs and Danny
Stubbs was 2-for-3 with two
RBIs and three runs scored to
help out.

In a losing effort, Kendal
Ferguson was 1-for-2 with a
run scored; Audley Williams
was 1-for-1 with an RBI and
Joey Demeritte t-for-t with
two runs scored.

@ The MSL will coutinue its
regular season action this
weekend at the Archdeacon
William Thompson Softball
Park.

On Saturday, the DHL
Lions will take on the William
Construction Jets at 1 pam. and
the Doghouse Rangers will
face the Joshua Knights at 3
p.m.

On Sunday, the lone game
will be played at 2 p.m.
between the Bat Miller Pan-
thers and the Miller Lite Roy-
als. \
_aaaeeaennnennnean ene NOAA ASAANAAAN AAA AN EAN A A

SPORTS



IN MY OPINION

DAVID J. NEAL

dneal@MiamiHerald.com




=

Washout Bowl
will not tarnish
a super season

watery Super Bow] ended what
might have been a watershed
season for the NFL.
_ Every league has its landmark sea-
sons, which shape the direction of the
league and the perception of its stars.
Sometimes the significance of these
seasons escape recognition for a few
years or even a decade.
Take 1981. That season brought the ©
rise of the San Francisco 49ers, with
third-year quarterback Joe Montana
operating the West Coast offense,
which became one of the standard
offenses of the next decade and
watered the Bill Walsh coaching tree.
On defense, rookie
Lawrence Taylor’s
arrival with the New
York Giants began
transforming outside
linebacker into a
glamour position.
Those two were the preeminent
defensive and offensive players of the

_ decade, and they aren’t too far down
on the all-time list.

By being as dreary as the weather,
Super Bowl XLI earned a place among
the all-time big-game blahs. This .
didn’t even have the appeal of historic
dominance possessed by some of
those Super demolitions from the
mid-1980s through mid-1990s. Then
again, a new universe’s birth year

- doesn’t always end with a big bang.

THE NEW BREED

Let’s start with the 2006 rookie
class, which could be best since the
legendary 1983 class. Tennessee
Titans quarterback Vince Young
showed that “natural leader” should
be listed among his myriad skills. Reg-
gie Bush of the New Orleans Saints
wasn’t the Next Gale Sayers, but,
whether as a runner, receiver or
returner, Bush creates one or two
game-changing plays each week and
affects defenses the rest of the time.
That certainly helped open spaces for
Saints receiver Marques Colston.

Three of the four teams in the con-



Herald 4



Associated Press

AUBURN HILLS, Mich. — Bos-
ton Celtics coach Doc Rivers
knows that his team would strug-
gle to beat anyone in the NBA at
the moment.

Trying to beat the Detroit Pis-
tons with newly-acquired Chris
Webber was nearly impossible.

Webber had 17 points and six
assists as the Pistons put on a pass-
ing clinic for three quar-
ters Tuesday night while
handing the Celtics their
15th consecutive loss.
This one ended 109-102.

“We really didn’t
have a chance,” Rivers said. “We
played a better team tonight. They
had some matchup advantages, and
they went right at us. The problem
is that, with Webber in the middle,
there’s not much you can do. He
might be their best passer.”

Antonio McDyess finished with
18 points in 20 minutes, hitting his



P| | WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007

OU OOUAOSOUN DBAS IRLLERLAAEL ERDAS ALDARA LEANER ETNA

PRO BASKETBALL | DETROIT 109, BOSTON 102

first eight shots before Kendrick
Perkins blocked the ninth.

McDyess and Webber com-
bined to shoot 17-for-22 from the
field against the Celtics’ over-
matched interior defense.

“We just couldn’t stop anything
in the post,” Celtics forward Wally
Szczerbiak said. “When we didn’t
double, they got a layup. When we
did double, someone cut to the bas-

ket, they made a pass, .

and they still got a
layup.”

Pistons coach Flip
Saunders was by disap-
pointed only the fourth
quarter, which saw the Celtics rally
from a 24-point deficit to make the
tinal score respectable.

“Your main guys should have
the opportunity to sit down and ice
in the fourth quarter of a game like
that,” Saunders said. “We had to
bring those guys back with 5 min-
utes left to make sure we won.”



KIRTHMON DOXIER/MCT

GOING NOWHERE FAST: Forward
Wally Szczerbiak, center, of
the Celtics gets harassed by
Richard Hamilton, left, and
Chris Webber of the Pistons.

The Celtics, who extended the
worst losing streak in franchise
history, haven’t won since a 128-119
victory in Memphis on Jan. 5. They



3E

INTERNATIONAL EDITION





have surrendered at least 100
points in five consecutive games.

“We did what we were sup-
posed to do,” Pistons guard Chaun-
cey Billups said. “That team is
obviously struggling, and we
jumped on them. They kept fight-
ing, but we won the game.” ,

The Celtics also had to send star
forward Paul Pierce home with an
infected left elbow. Pierce, who has
missed Boston’s last 23 games with’
a foot injury, is expected to be hos-
pitalized for at least two days,
which will push his possible return
to after the All-Star break.

Billups led the Pistons with 24
points, and Richard Hamilton con-
tributed 10 points and a season-
high 11 assists.

Ryan Gomes led the Celtics
with 19 points, despite only playing
4 minutes in the second half.

The Celtics kept the game close
early but trailed 56-40 at halftime.

e BASKETBALL REPORT

Celtics’ ugly skid hits lo games



COLLEGE BASKETBALL | NO. 3 OHIO STATE 76, MICHIGAN 63

oubly dangerous

Freshman stars
Conley and Oden
spur the Buckeyes

BY RUSTY MILLER
Associated Press

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Freshman point guard
Mike Conley Jr. scored a career-high 23 points,
and Greg Oden created havoc at the defensive
end, leading No. 3 Ohio State past archrival
Michigan 76-63 on Tuesday night.

Conley was a constant force for the Buckeyes
(21-3, 9-1 Big Ten) as Oden, the acclaimed fresh-
man center, battled foul trouble and sat cut 8!

minutes of the second half. Con-
ley hit 9 of his 12 shots from the
field, including two 3-pointers,
and he made all three of his foul
shots. He also had six assists, one.
steal and just one turnover in his
38 minutes. Oden added 15 points,
eight rebounds and six blocked
shots — in addition to altering
the trajectory of numerous other

ference championship games each
had a rookie running back playing an
important role. Listing the best rook-
ies no matter the position might leave
Arizona Cardinals quarterback Matt
Leinart outside the top 10, as promis-
ing as he looks. Throw in the virtual-
rookie quarterbacks, Philip Rivers of
. the San Diego Chargers and Rex

Grossman of the Chicago Bears, and
an entire generation of stars threatens
to emerge in one season.

Chargers running back LaDainian
Tomlinson already possessed star sta-
tus, of course. Now, after setting a sin-
gle-season touchdown record, Tom-
linson is being discussed as having
all-time status.

A NEW IMAGE

One thing the Indianapolis Colts’
Super Bowl victory did was change
the story on‘head coach Tony Dungy
and quarterback Peyton Manning.
Now, instead of “Can he?” it’s ““How
much longer will he try?” or “How

as many will he win?”

Te! For Dungy, this season is similar to
what 1972 was for Don Shula. It’s easy
to forget that before that 1972 season,
the previous eight seasons had people
asking “Can he?” about Shula. Man-
ning savored Super Bowl happiness
just past halftime of his career rather
than at the two-minute warning the
way John Elway did. Manning will
want more, particularly if he quickly
feels the emptiness of a playoff miss
the way Montana and Tom Brady did
the season after their teams won the
first of multiple Super Bowls.

Sunday might be the last time Man-
ning is happy (or relieved) after the
last game of the season. Joe Namath
knows. Still, it’s easy to see us looking
back on a Manning career loaded with
records and rings, laughing at the
“Can he?” question the way we laugh
at it now with Elway.

Then there were the ways Super
Bowl head coaches Dungy and Lovie
Smith stand out among their peers.

Copycats proliferate among
coaches and NFL front offices. More
than a few future coaches still trying
to figure out how they should deal _
with players, owners, general manag-
ers and the media will give serious
consideration to emulating how
Dungy and Smith treat people.

That would be a bit of irony — ina
year of too many player arrests via
immature actions, the trend could
begin to get players to act like men by
treating them like men.

IT’S A MISMATCH: Freshman center Greg Oden, center, outmuscles Courtney Sims, left,
and Reed Baker of Michigan for a rebound during the first half. Oden scored 15 points.

Associated Press

WINTER GARDEN, Fla. — Lew
Burdette, MVP of the 1957 World
Series, when he pitched the Mil-
waukee Braves to their only cham-
pionship, died Tuesday. He was 80.

Burdette had been ill with lung
cancer for an extended period.
Family members were with him

when he died at home, they told

the Atlanta Braves.

A two-time All-Star and a mem-
ber of the Braves’ Hall of Fame,
Burdette was 203-144 with a 3.66
ERA from 1950-67. He also pitched
a no-hitter.

Burdette’s greatest success
came in the 1957 Series, when he
went 3-0 with an 0.67 ERA while
pitching three complete games



TERRY GILLIAM/AP

BASEBALL | LEW BURDETTE: 1926 - 2007

Lew Burdette, 1957 World Series MVP,,.dies at 80

against the New
York Yankees.
Burdette capped
his performance
with a seven-hit
shutout in Game 7
at Yankee Sta-
dium, finishing a
run of 24 scoreless
innings in a row.
Burdette began his career with
the Yankees and was traded to the
Boston Braves for Johnny Sain dur-
ing the 195] season. He also spent
time with the St. Louis Cardinals,
the Chicago Cubs, the Philadelphia
Phillies and the California Angels.
Burdette, a righthander, led the
National League with 21 victories
in 1959 and ERA (2.70) in 1956, and

BURDETTE



he led the league in shutouts twice.
He pitched a no-hitter against the
Phillies on Aug. 18, 1960, and was
the winning pitcher in a famous
game on May 26, 1959, in which
Harvey Haddix of the Pittsburgh
.Pirates lost a perfect game in the
13th inning. Burdette pitched all
13 innings and got the victory.
Born Selva Lewis Burdette Jr. on
Nov. 22, 1926, in Nitro, W. Va., he
was called both “Lew” and “Lou.”
He was 179-120 in 13 seasons for the
Braves and also was Atlanta’s
pitching coach in 1972-73.
Burdette went 17-9 in 1957, then
took over the World Series. He
beat the Yankees 4-2 in Game 2
and outpitched Whitey Ford for a
1-0 victory in Game 5. Burdette



shots by the Wolverines inside.

Conley and Oden were teammates at Law-
rence North High School in Indianapolis, guid-
ing the school to state titles in their last three
seasons before enrolling together at Ohio State.

Jamar Butler added 11 points for Ohio State,
and the Buckeyes blocked 14 shots in the game,
putting a serious damper on Michigan’s offense.

Courtney Sims had 17 points and Dion Harris
and Ekpe Udoh 14 each for the Wolverines (16-8,
4-5), who have lost four consecutive games.

Ohio State’s fans pointed at Michigan’s bench
and chanted “N-I-T! N-I-T!” in the final minute.

Oden picked up his third foul with Ohio State
up 41-32 at the 17:20 mark of the second half, and
the Wolverines took advantage when he went to
the bench. Forcing the ball inside and pounding
the offensive boards, they cut the lead to 47-43
on a pair of foul shots by Lester Abram.

The Buckeyes bridged the next 8'2 minutes
with Othello Hunter and Matt Terwilliger on
the front line, trying to keep Sims and Udoh
from bulling their way to the basket. When
Oden returned at the 8:52 mark, Ohio State’s
lead was 56-52, but the Buckeyes pulled away. ~

came through again three days
later to clinch the title.

Burdette was 20-10 in 1958,
again teaming with Spahn to pitch
the Braves into the World Series
against the Yankees. Burdette
homered and won ‘Game 2, but,
with chances to close out the
championship, lost Game 5 and
again in Game 7. The teams were
tied at 2 in the eighth inning of the
final game, but Bill Skowron’s
three-run home run helped the
Yankees pull away and win.

Burdette is survived by his wife,
Mary Ann; son Lewis; daughters
Madge, Mary Lou Burdette-Wielo-
szynski and Elaina Fontana; a
brother; a sister; eight grandchil-
dren; and six great-grandchildren.

EE NL

rro
4E | WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007 INTERNATIONAL EDITION



BY JEFF JACOBS
The Hartford Courant

Maybe it’s not fair. Maybe it was
never fair. But evenhandedness is not
a high priority in today’s talk-show
world.

Numbers were never going to bail
out Peyton Manning. Yardage
amassed wasn’t going to unlock his
chains. Touchdown passes weren’t
going to set him free.

It’s this simple really: A Super
Bowl victory Sunday night at rain-
swept Dolphin Stadium was the dif-
ference between Manning being Dan
Marino or John Elway.

. Manning already was a great quar-
terback.

Now he is a Super Bowl winner.

Manning already was going to the
Hall of Fame.

Now he will go to the Hall of Fame
with a very fat ring on his finger.

There was perspective to be found
in the Indianapolis Colts’ 29-17 vic-
tory over the Chicago Bears: The
Colts ran the ball down the Bears’
throats, and the Bears couldn’t move
the ball on the Colts’ defense.

Manning won the MVP award, but
he wasn’t necessarily the best player
in the game. He was the first to, say
that any number of his teammates
could have won it. Manning was
clearly superior to Rex Grossman,
but that’s not saying much.

Tired of being second-guessed,
Grossman called reporters ignorant
last week. Well, they must be even
more stupid than Grossman thought,

- because that infield-fly-rule pop-up
that turned into a 56-yard intercep-
tion return for a touchdown by Kel-
vin Hayden was enough proof that
the Bears weren’t winning any Super
Bowl with the schizoid Good
Rex/Bad Rex at the controls.

DON’T BE CRUEL...

Down deep, anybody with a lick of
sporting sense knows that one man
can’t do it by himself. Anybody with
a modicum of football knowledge
knew that a one-dimensional team
wasn’t going to win an NFL title.

But that doesn’t seem to matter, .
when it comes to judging our best »:;:
athletes. History can be cruel to those
— especially NFL quarterbacks —



PRO FOOTBALL



INSIDE THE GAME | COMMENTARY

One ring sure makes all the di



= JEFF HAYNES/AFP-GETTY IMAGES

ENOUGH SAID: Peyton Manning didn’t need a Super Bowl trophy or a ring to measure his career. But now
he’s earned them, and he passed on the chance to answer his critics. ‘It’s a card that | don’t play,’ he said.

who don’t finish the job. The ring is

the thing. And sports critics can be
especially cruel.

“I just hope the critics have some-
thing else to talk about now,” said
Colts receiver Reggie Wayne, who
caught a 53-yard touchdown pass
from Manning in the first quarter.

Before the game, Archie Manning
said he used to give certain words of
advice to his son before his high
school games.

“It was, ‘Play smart, and have
fun,’ ” Archie said Sunday night after
the game. “This morning, I told him

to play smart and have fun.”

Peyton listened.

He.didn’t pass for 400 yards. He
didn’t throw five touchdown passes.
He didn’t burn the Bears’ secondary

.others in baseball and beyond. \

Nobody said sports are fair.
Nobody said sports history is fair.

HE WAS SUPER ALREADY

“Peyton Manning is a tremendous
player,” said Tony Dungy, who
became the first African-American
coach to win a Super Bowl. “He is so
prepared, and he does everything to
win a ballgame. If people think he
had to win a Super Bowl to prove
how great he is, it’s just wrong.

“T don’t think he needed it for per-
sonal vindication. I didn’t look at that
way. He didn’t look at that way.

“But now he’s done it. He has got
it behind him. I don’t think there’s
anything anybody can say about him
except that he’s going to the Hall of
Fame — and he’s one of the greatest

with long pass after long pass. Man-
ning threw for 247 yards on 25-for-38
passing. He threw that one long TD
pass to Wayne, but mostly he took
what the Bears gave him.

_. Inthe end, Manning didn’t have to
be great in one game to prove his
greatness. Marino setthe passing 1
records. He didn’t win a Super Bowl.
It is the big asterisk next to his name.
Same with Jim Kelly. Same with Ted
Williams, Ernie Banks and so many

“Quarterback is the hardest job in
sports, in my opinion,” Manning said.
“Any time a quarterback can be com-
pared to Dan Marino, that quarter-
back ought to be honored.

Is that asterisk fair?

Yes.... And of course not.





eCrence

to ever to play the game.”

That doesn’t mean the road was
easy. Those losses to the New Eng-
land Patriots in the playoffs, and all
those big regular-season numbers
that were squashed in the postseason
defeats... they hurt.

“Tony was always so positive
Manning said. “After all those losses,
he’d say we'll go back to work, and
we'll be better for this. It was hard to
believe at times. But he was right.

“Teams beat us and went to the
Super Bowl. It was a hard pill to swal-
low. It was hard to watch it. But we
did it. We did it together. And it’s
sweet.”

Manning started slowly in this
game. He was 1-for-4 and forced a
long pass into sideline coverage for
Marvin Harrison that Bears safety
‘Chris Harris picked off. It would be
Harris, however, who was exploited
6 minutes later. Harris stepped up to
snuff the run, blew the coverage, and
Wayne was left all alone for a 53-yard
TD catch. Manning deserved kudos
for moving his feet and escaping the
grasp of Tank Johnson on the play.

There was a time when you could
disrupt Manning’s rhythm, and his
game. The Colts offense was like fine
china. If you got in and smashed their
delicate dishes, they were done.

Not anymore. The Colts can run,
and they can mix it up. Manning
worked on ad-libbing in practice,
moving around willy-nilly, and it
worked.

The real story was that he was
smart, and the Colts were smart. The
Bears gave Manning room under-
neath, and Manning found the open-
ings. He was surgical. Joseph Addai
and Dominic Rhodes pounded the
ball on the ground. They combined .
for 190 yards. Addai caught 10 of
Manning’s 25 completions.

“Peyton understood he had a lot of
players around him to take advantage
of,” Addai said. “He understood he
didn’t have to do it himself.”

Manning said he also understands
something else: He understands the
vindication game..

“And it’s a card that I don’t play,”
Manning said. “I just don’t play it.

“But I'll tell you, it’s sure nice to be
on a championship team.”

”
?

Including:

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Ocala. Gainesville, Clermont, Deltona, Tampa,
Winter Haven, Haines City, Jacksonville, Melbou
Edgewater, Palm Bay, Tavares, Leesburg,
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Marien Wiles Home for Less elt NA Lae the Way We Do TOE
INTERNATIONAL EDITION WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007 | 34

THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com



NBA STANDINGS

PRO BASKETBALL









four-game losing streak.

The Bucks.won their seventh in a row at
home against the Magic but have still lost 15
of their past 18 games overall, in part because
star Michael Redd remains sidelined with a
sprained left knee.

Earl Boykins had 24 points, Charlie Villan-
ueva scored 22, Charlie Bell had 20 and Mo



MARY ALTAFFER/AP

ANICE VIEW: Knicks guard Stephon Marbury goes to the rim past Clippers forward

Mem. at Dal., 8:30

a Oo EASTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHEAST WL Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
1 Washington 28 19 596 - 7-3 W-1 19-5 9-14 19-10
Orlando 25 24 510 4 3-7 L-2 16-10 9-14 15-15
y ‘ Miami 23 25 «479 5% «5-5 W-4 13-10 10-15 12-14
vaste sf Atlanta 18 29 .383 10 5-5 Ll 9-14 9-15 12-19
mH aS Charlotte 18 30 .37510% 5-5 L-1 10-14 816 12-19
‘ From Miami Herald Wire Services y ais ii Tr of : 7 ae ATLANTIC WL, Pct GB L10 Str. Home __Away Conf
NEW YORK — Stephon Marbury scored e a iF Toronto 25 23 521 - 82 W-3 167 9-16 17-9
. . . P y F . 1
_c Bothias points nan eal second alr NV) re 22 AB a EH ae
-{:}) that overwhelmed the Clippers and turned AA a Philadelphia 16 33 327 9% 6-4 Wel 812 821 11-17
viele the game around, sending the New York Boston 12 35 .25512% 0-10 L-15 4-19 816 8-22
. Knicks to a 102-90 victory over Los Angeles
on Tuesday night. : CENTRAL «2. W obs Pee Str, Home Away Conf
7 Jamal Crawford and Eddy Curry each Dee RS ET gs ea Wd woe bas 20
“3 scored 23 points to lead New York, which Cleveland 27 21.563 2% 4-6 Ll 17-7 10-14 17-14
noe shot poorly and defended worse in the first Indiana 26 22 .542 3% 64 Ll 15-8 11-14 19-13
: ‘¢ two quarters before controlling the second Milwaukee 19 30 .388 11 2B W-l 119, 8-21 9-20
half in its second consecutive victory.
New York never led in the first half and WESTERN CONFERENCE
trailed by as much as 12. But the Knicks SOUTHWEST © WoL. Pet. GB L10 Str, Home Away Conf
stormed out of halftime with a 24-4 spurt, acest 7 ar ane : re Lo —f
turning a 10-point deficit into a 10-point lead San Antonio. 32 :16«.667 «7 «55 L-2 168 168 21-11
in a span of 9Â¥; minutes and handing the Houston 31 17 646 8B 64 W-2 17-6 14-11 18-15
Clippers their second consecutive loss. New Orleans 21 27 438 18 6-4 1-1 14-11 7-16 12-18
Elton Brand had 22 points and 13 rebounds Memphis 12 37 245 27% 3-7 1-3 917 3-20 6-23
‘for the Clippers, who lost for the third time NORTHWEST WL Pct. GB LI0 Str. Home Away Conf
in 10 games and fell to 1-2 on their seven- TGR ean esa Wee TW Fo ike 1st 3040
game Eastern trip. Reserve Tim Thomas also Denver 23 23 500 7% 46 L-2 13-13 10-10 10-15
had 22 points. Minnesota 22 26 .458 9% 2-8 L-4 13-9 9-17 13-18
Portland 20 29 .408 12 5:5 L-2 12-13 816 13-16
ROCKETS 98, GRIZZLIES 90 Seattle 17 31 .354.14% 4-6 L-5 13-12 4-19 7-19
MEMPHIS, Tenn. —. Tracy McGrady PACIFIC WL. Pct. GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf
scored 33 points and had eight assists to lead Phoenix 3810792 «82 Wl 20-4 186° 189
the Rockets to the victory. L.A. Lakers 30 19 .612 8% 4-6 W-2 19-6 11-13 17-10
McGra ed five Rockets in d uble fig- LA. Clippers 24 24 .500 14 7-3 L-2 17-8 «7-16 14-17
: a aie fi fe a ‘ ih ‘ . | Golden State 23 26 .469 15% % 4-6 W-1 17-8 6-18 13-15
ae as Houston won for the sixth time In iis. | Sacramento 20 26.435 17 6-4 W-3 1411 6-15 i1-18
past seven games.
Memphis, which has the worst record in RESULTS AND SCHEDULES
the NBA, has lost three in a row. Tuesday’s results Tonight’s games Monday’s results
Detroit 109, Boston 102 Miami at Bos., 7:30 Miami 113, Charlotte 93
BUCKS 116, MAGIC 111 N.Y. 102, Clippers 90. NA at Atly Lakers 90, Atlanta 83
ust A . at Tor., De , Indiana
_ MILWAUKEE — Ruben Patterson scored Mil. 116, Orlando 111 Sea. at Ind. 7 Wash. 118, Seattle 108
14 of his 27 points in the fourth quarter and Phx. at Port. tate ote HU ner ave
the struggling Bucks beat the Magic to snap a LA.C. at Cle., 7 Phoenix 113, Denver 108
G.S. at Min., 8 Utah 100, Chicago 95

Sac. 105, N.O. 99

N.O. at Den., 9

NF RV) 8

SCORING

G FG FT PTS AVG

Through Monday

REBOUNDING
GOFF DEF TOT AVG

“Wi ‘ ‘ , : : Anthony, Den. 31 358 225 960310 G Minn. 47 119 463 582 12.4
ee ade 13 oa ae as Tim Thomas early on in New York’s 102-90 comeback victory on Tuesday night. arenas Wash a7 436 368 1382 234 cay, Den. 40 104 384 488 12.2
wight Howard had 21 points an verson, Den. 3 2 q joward, Orl. f

: : OKs: : : Bryant, LAL. 45 430 3581296 288 Boozer, Utah 45 142 389 531 11.8
rebounds, his 34th double-double of the sea- Thomas was quoted in Tuesday’s editions of kee’s 48 games this season as a reserve, aver- Wade, Mia. 41 390 381 1179 288 Chandler, NOK. 46 177 352 529 11.5
son for the Magic. the Chicago Tribune as saying: “I’m just aging 3.8 points and 3.6 rebounds in about 13 Redd Me eae are aes tote 267 Okan i Ae er eos 108

going to go out there, get my check and call it minutes a game. James, Clev. 46 443 2771225 26.6 Duncan, S.A. 48 145 373 518 10.8
Se a a day.” The Bucks had hoped Michael Redd, who | QME\i 45 Her 380 Rando for. 49 Itt 4 $6 108
. ? 4 arter, . | andoiph, Po! .!

e Nuggets: Allen Iverson can run just When asked if being around some of the» is averaging 27.2 points per game, would play | FIELD GOALS ASSISTS
fine on his sprained right ankle. If only he game’s greats could be beneficial for a’ in Tuesday night’s game against the Magic | - FG FGA PCT G _AST AVG
could cut on it. - rookie, he responded, “I’m just into the free» after returning to practice on Monday for the —_Biedrins. GS. 219 S557 Nash, Phos; 46 542 118
The Nuggets point guard made it through money. That's it. Pll just do whatever when I _ first time since spraining his left knee on Jan. ON. B10 347 .605 Kidd, Na. 19430 88
practice Tuesday afternoon on the tender get out there.” 5 against the Cavaliers. But coach Terry | i", NY. 351 601 584 Davis, G.S. 40002 BT
: are ’ : : ° ‘ : \ joozer, Utah 410 721 .569 Paul, NOk. 31 267 8.6
ankle and is optimistic he’ll be ready to play . ‘The winner of the Feb. 17 event in Las Stotts said after Monday’s practice that Redd | _ Howard, orl. 285 504.565 Miller, Phil. 47 392-83
tonight against New Orleans. Iverson has Vegas gets $35,000. The runner-up earns wouldn't be available against the Magic. | Balembert, Phil eet emma’ Mea ag
missed four consecutive games after injuring $22,500, with the third and fourth-place fin- e Suns: All-Star point guard Steve Nash Bogut, wil a a Fond Jes a oes 18

the ankle against Charlotte on Jan. 29.

Center Marcus Camby is still listed as
doubtful with a strained left groin.

Forward Carmelo Anthony (left wrist
sprain) and guard Steve Blake (stitches in his
lip and a hyperextended elbow) both
received treatment Tuesday and are
expected to play tonight.

e Bulls: The club fined forward Tyrus
Thomas $10,000, one day after the rookie
said he was only interested in the prize
money at the NBA’s slam-dunk contest.

He later apologized “for any negative feel-
ings that may have been caused by my com-
ments.” The first Bulls player since Scottie
Pippen in 1990 to participate in the event,

Nebraska beats Texas Tech wit

From Miami Herald Wire Services

ishers getting $16,125. Joining Thomas are
defending champion Nate Robinson of New
York, Orlando All-Star Dwight Howard and
Boston’s Gerald Green.

Also, the team will likely be without
Andres Nocioni until after the All-Star break.
Coach Scott Skiles said the forward needs
seven-to-l0 days of rest to recover from

’ plantar fasciitis in his right foot.

e Bucks: Center Dan Gadzuric dislo-
cated his left shoulder on Saturday night and
will miss six weeks. The team said that Gad-
zuric injured the shoulder late in the third
quarter of the Bucks’ 117-98 loss to the Miami
Heat.

Gadzuric has appeared in 44 of Milwau-

missed the Suns’ game at Portland late Tues-
day night because of inflammation in his
right shoulder. The NBA’s two-time defend-
ing MVP didn’t play in the second half of the
Suns’ 113-108 victory in Denver on Monday.

LATE MONDAY

e Suns 113, Nuggets 108: Amare Stou-
demire had 36 points and 13 rebounds to lead
visiting Phoenix.

e Kings 105, Hornets 99: Ron Artest
scored 20 points and tied a career high with
nine assists to lead host Sacramento.

e Jazz 100, Bulls 95: Mehmet Okur
scored 12 of Utah’s final 14 points to lead the
host Jazz.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL



|

i
i
i

. MEST CR aoe

Sunday, Feb. 18,

at the Thomas & Mack Center, Las Vegas

EASTERN CONFERENCE
STARTERS

|. Gilbert Arenas, G, Washington

Chris Bosh, F, Toronto
LeBron James, G, Cleveland
Shaquille O'Neal, C, Miami
Dwyane Wade, G, Miami
RESERVES

Chauncey Billups, G, Detroit
Caron Butler, F, Washington
Vince Carter, F, New Jersey
Richard Hamilton, G, Detroit
Dwight Howard, F, Orlando
Jason Kidd, G, New Jersey
Jermaine O'Neal, F, Indianapolis



LUBBOCK, Texas
Charles Richardson hit a
3-pointer as time expired to
lead Nebraska to a 61-59 vic-
tory over Texas Tech on
Tuesday night.

Nebraska inbounded the

ball at its end of the court with’

18 seconds remaining and got
it to Marcus Perry on the left
side. His 3-point attempt
missed, but Aleks Maric
tipped the rebound out to the
right side and Tech’s Charles
Burgess saved the ball from
going out of bounds.

Richardson grabbed it and
put it up from behind the arc
to get the victory for the Corn-
huskers (14-8, 3-5 Big 12).

The loss for Tech extended
its losing streak to four games
after the Red Raiders (15-6,
4-5) got back-to-back upsets of
top 10 teams Kansas and Texas
A&M.

Richardson scored 15 points
and Perry got 13 to lead
Nebraska, which ended the
game on a 2]-8 run.

Martin Zeno scored 18

points and Jon Plefka added 15
for Tech. ‘
OTHER ACTION

e Missouri 77, lowa

State 55: Stefhon Hannah
scored 15 points, Matt Law-
rence added 13 and visiting
Missouri used a pair of 11-0
runs in the second half to beat
Iowa State.

Kalen Grimes added 12

points and nine rebounds for
the Tigers (14-8, 3-6 Big 12),
who shot 52.5 percent from the
floor and snapped a seven-
game losing streak in Ames. .

Iowa State (12-11, 3-6)
pulled within 39-36 early in the
second half, but the Tigers
answered with their first 11-0
run and went up 14. The
Cyclones shot themselves in
the foot twice during Missou-
ri’s decisive spurt, and each
time the Tigers responded
with quick, demoralizing
scores.

e Georgia Tech $74,
North Carolina State 65:
Jevaris Crittenton scored 21
points, including 8 points in an
18-0 run in the second half, and
host Georgia Tech rallied from
an early 15-point deficit to beat
North Carolina State.

Georgia Tech forced 18
turnovers, including 11 in the
second half when its defense
sparked the decisive run. Crit-
tenton, a freshman, helped
force N.C. State senior Engin
Atsur into six turnovers and
1-for-9 shooting from the field.

Georgia Tech held the
Wolfpack scoreless for almost
8 minutes and without a field
goal for more than 11 minutes
as it turned a 56-45 deficit into
a 63-56 lead.

Thaddeus Young, also a
freshman, scored 15 points and
yet another freshman, Zach
Peacock, added 11 for Georgia
Tech.

Gavin Grant and Brandon



JOE DON BUCKNER/LUBBOCK AVALANCHE-JOURNAL

THE FINAL STROKE: Nebraska’s Charles Richardson follows
through on his game-winning 3-pointer at the buzzer.

Costner each scored 17 points
for N.C. State. Ben McCauley
added 16 and Courtney Fells
had 13.

Georgia Tech (15-8 overall,
4-6 Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence) moved past N.C. State
(13-9, 3-6) in the ACC stand-
ings.

e Villanova 56, St.
Joseph’s 39: Curtis Sumpter
scored 14 points to lead host
Villanova to the victory over

Saint Joseph’s and help cap-
ture the coveted Big 5 title out-
right for the second consecu-
tive season.

The Wildcats (16-7) won
their llth consecutive Big 5
game and used victories this
season against Penn, La Salle
and Temple to sweep the city
series for the second season in
a row.

Darrin Govens led the
Hawks (13-10) with eight

points and Ahmad Nivins had
ll rebounds. Nivins entered
averaging 17 points and was
held to only six. Pat Calathes
was averaging 13.9 points and
7.3 rebounds and finished with
paltry numbers of four points
and three boards.

e Providence 71, Cincin-
nati 70: Sharaud Curry made

- a foul shot with 14.2 seconds

left to give host Providence
the comeback victory.

Curry, who had a game-
high 24 points, made 8-of-13
shots overall and 5-of-8 3-point
attempts. Friars center Her-
bert Hill, who had 16 points
and ll rebounds, forced a miss
by Cincinnati’s John Willam-
son in the final second to pre-
serve the victory for Provi-
dence (15-7, 5-4 Big East).

Cincinnati (10-13, 1-8 Big
East), which suffered its fifth
loss in a row, was led by Wil-
liamson with 15 points.

e Wake Forest 87,
Winston-Salem 71: Kyle Vis-
ser had 15 points and ll
rebounds to lead six Wake
Forest players in double fig-
ures in the victory over visit-
ing Winston-Salem.

Jamie Skeen had his second
career double-double with 11
points and a career-high 13
rebounds for the Demon Dea-
cons (11-12, 2-8 Atlantic Coast
Conference) in the first-ever
meeting of the cross-town

, teams from different confer-

ences.
Brian Fisher hit six 3-point-

WESTERN CONFERENCE

STARTERS

Kobe Bryant, G, L.A. Lakers
Tim Duncan, F, San Antonio
Kevin Garnett, F, Minnesota
Tracy McGrady, F, Houston
Yao Ming, C, Houston

RESERVES

Carlos Boozer, F, Utah

Allen Iverson, G, Denver

Shawn Marion, F, Phoenix
Steve Nash, G, Phoenix

Dirk Nowitzki, F, Dallas

Tony Parker, G, San Antonio
Amare Stoudemire, F-C, Phoenix

h shot at buzzer

ers and finished with 25 points
and Darrell Wonge added 17
for the Rams (4-21).

ELSEWHERE

e Miami: Miami’s already-
thin frontcourt suffered
another blow when forward
Raymond Hicks was sus-
pended indefinitely for an
unspecified violation of team
rules.

Hicks was averaging 5.6
points and 2.7 rebounds for
Miami, which is already miss-
ing most of its big-man rota-
tion.

Miami (9-14, 2-7 Atlantic
Coast Conference) will try to
snap a six-game losing streak
when it hosts Boston College
(16-6, 7-2) tonight.

LATE MONDAY

e No. 6 Texas A&M 100,
Texas 82: Sophomore guard
Josh Carter scored 24 points
and freshmen Donald Sloan
and Bryan Davis combined for
19 to lead the host Aggies.

Texas A&M, coming off a
big victory at then-No. 6 Kan-
sas on Saturday night, won its
21st consecutive home game
and maintained sole posses-
sion of first place in the Big 12.

Acie Law added 21 points
and tied a school record with
15 assists for the Aggies (20-3,
8-1 Big 12). :

Freshman Kevin Durant
had 28 points and 15 rebounds
to lead the Longhorns (16-7,
6-3).
INTERNATIONALEDITION





Rivera finally ¢

From Miami Herald Wire Services

Waiting two hours on a Chicago
runway, Bears defensive coordinator
Ron Rivera wondered if icy weather
really. was delaying his flight to a job
interview in Dallas.

“There was a vicious rumor going
around [that] Chicago didn’t want me
to leave, so they weren't going to let
the plane go,” Rivera said, laughing.

Rivera finally arrived at Cowboys
headquarters late Tuesday afternoon.
He spoke with reporters before meet-
ing with team owner Jerry Jones to
discuss the head coaching vacancy
created when Bill Parcells retired
more than two weeks ago.

Rivera didn’t officially become a
candidate until speaking with Jones
on Monday night. However, he had
been expecting the call since Jones
decided to hold the job open through
Super Bowl week, when Rivera was
off-limits because he was getting his
team ready for the game.

“Just the fact that Mr. Jones waited
until now, that bodes well for me,”
Rivera said.

Rivera was the ninth person Jones
interviewed. Indianapolis Colts quar-
terbacks coach Jim Caldwell will
become No. 10 today.

Having lost to Caldwell and the
Colts on Sunday, Rivera spent Mon-
day stewing over it. He was glad to
have had a day in between the game
and the get-together with Jones.

“It gave me a chance to go through
- some things in my mind and have a

feel for them,” Rivera said. “I had a |

little chance to take a quick look at

EASTERN CONFERENCE

PRO

yo

FOOTBALL | HOCKE

PRO FOOTBALL | AROUND THE NFL

the Cowboys one last time.”

What did he see?

“Some things that can be imple-
mented to really help this defense,”
he said.

The Cowboys went 9-7 this past
season, then lost to the Seattle Sea-
hawks in the first round of the play-
offs. The Cowboys, who haven’t won
a playoff game since 1996, collapsed
in December and January — primar-
ily because of breakdowns -on
defense.

Rivera, 45, played nine seasons in
the NFL as a linebacker, all with the
Bears. He has been a coach for 10
years, the past three as defensive

coordinator of the Bears. Although he »

has never been a head coach, Rivera
has interviewed for jobs several
times in the past year.

A big question surrounding the
Cowboys is how legitimate a candi-
date Rivera is for the top job. There is
speculation that San Francisco 49ers
offensive coordinator Norv Turner
has it locked up, and that Jones wants
Rivera as defensive coordinator.

Although that would be a lateral
move, it could happen because Rive-
ra’s contract with the Bears is expir-
ing. He might be willing to leave a
great defense to run a mediocre one
for more than just the challenge —
Jones probably would pay Rivera
more than the Bears, who have a lot
of other coaches in line for raises.

When asked about his chances of
becoming defensive coordinator in
Dallas, Rivera said: “I am here to dis-
cuss being the head coach.”





JONATHAN DANIEL/GETTY IMAGES

MY TURN: Ron Rivera is the ninth
candidate to interview for the
Cowboys job since Bill Parcells
retired about two weeks ago.

Rivera probably has an idea of
what it would be like to work for
Turner because he has worked along-
side Turner’s brother, Ron, the
Bears’ offensive coordinator.

Rivera knows second-hand about
working for Jones, having discussed
it with Bears quarterbacks coach
Wade Wilson, who had the same
job with the Cowboys from 2000-02.

The biggest challenge ‘Rivera
might face with the Cowboys — as
the coach or as defensive coordinator
— is adapting a roster built for the 3-4
scheme into his 4-3 system.



Rivera said it is not much of an
issue because the Cowboys often use
a four-man front. And part of his
coaching philosophy is to mold plans
around players.

“I think a lot of times guys get
caught up in ‘This is the only thing I
do’ and not use the talent around
them,” he said. “The truth of the mat-
ter is, it’s all about the players.”

Rivera played linebacker for the
Bears from 1984-92, winning a cham-
pionship with the ’85 team, which had
Buddy Ryan as the team’s defensive
coordinator.

After retiring, Rivera spent four
years talking football on television,
then broke into coaching with the
Bears in 1997. He was linebackers
coach for the Philadelphia Eagles
under Jim Johnson from.1999-2003,
then returned to the Bears as defen-
sive coordinator when head coach
Lovie Smith took over.

Rivera credits Ryan, Johnson and
Smith for helping form his approach
to defense. The result has helped his
Bears consistently rank among the
league leaders in fewest yards
allowed and points allowed, and near
the top in creating turnovers.

As for Rivera’s offensive
approach, it’s pretty simple: “I do
think you have to run the ball to be
successful in this league,” he said.

ELSEWHERE

e Pro Bowl: Buccaneers line-.

backer Derrick Brooks was named
to the NFC Pro Bowl team for the
10th consecutive season, replacing



com | THE MIAMI HERALD



ets his shot at Cowboys job _

Lance Briggs of the Bears, who was
injured during the Super Bowl. Briggs
is the second Bears linebacker to pull
out of Saturday’s game in Hawaii.
Brian Urlacher injured a toe in the
Super Bowl and was replaced by
Antonio Pierce of the Giants. Also,
Patriots left tackle Matt Light will
replace Jonathan Ogden of the Bal-
timore Ravens on the AFC team.
Ogden also has an injured toe.

e Cardinals: Jeff Rutledge was
hired as quarterbacks coach, one of
four more assistants hired by new
head coach Ken Whisenhunt.

Freddie Kitchens was hired as
tight-ends coach, Mike Miller as
offensive assistant and Matt Raich as
defensive-quality-control coach.

e Redskins: Right tackle Jon
Jansen signed a five-year, $23 mil-
lion contract extension. The deal
includes more than $10 million in
bonus money.

e Eagles: Britt Reid, the
21-year-old son of head coach Andy
Reid, has been charged with drug
and weapon offenses stemming from
an incident in which he was accused
of pointing a gun at another motorist
in the Philadelphia area. S

Britt Reid was arraigned on nine
counts, including making terroristic
threats, possession of controlled sub-
stances — cocaine, Oxycodone and
marijuana — and a felony charge of
carrying a firearm without a license.

Reid got into an argument with
another motorist on Jan. 30, pointing
a handgun at the man and laughing
before driving off, prosecutors said.



HOCKEY


















SOUTHEAST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME = AWAY DIV
Atlanta 29 18 6 3 67172 174 14-9-3-2 15-9-3-1 12-4-4-1
Tampa Bay 30:23, s«1-. 1 62: 175 167 14-13-0-0 16-10-1-1 12-7-0-0
Carolina 27 22 3) 4 61168 177 © 14-10-1-3 13-12-2-1 —_-13-6-0-2
Washington 22 25. 2 6 52167 192 13-11-1-3 9-14-1-38-11-1-1
Florida 20 24 4 6 50153 '176 14-10-2-1 6-14-25 — 5-11-2-0
ATLANTIC WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME = AWAY DIV
New Jersey 33 15 0 6 72°146 129 19-4-0-4 14-11-0-2 14-4-0-1
Pittsburgh 27 17 «4 «5 63179 162 16-8-2-2 -11-9-2-3-13-5-1-1
N.Y. Islanders 25 21 4 3. 57159 154 12-9-3-1 13-12-1-2. 9-7-2«
N.Y. Rangers 25 24 3 2 55156 161 10-12-3-0 15-12-0-2 _-9-9-0-
Philadelphia §=13 32. 3 «4 33 130 197 -3-15-3-310-17-0-1. 3-131
NORTHEAST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV"
Buffalo 36 15 2 2 76206 159 °° 17-7-1-1 | 19-8-1-1 11-8-1-1
Montreal 29 20 1 5 64161 159 17-9-0-3 12-11-1-2 10-6-0-4.
Ottawa 30 21.2 1 63180 147 15-11-1-1 15-10-1-0 —13-8-0-
Toronto 27 21 2 «4 60174 174 11-12-1-2 16-9-1-2 - 10-8-2-2
Boston 24 24 1 3 52147 194 14-11-0-2 10-13-1-110-12-0-1

WESTERN CONFERENCE :
CENTRAL WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV ’
Nashville 37 15 2 (1 °77191 140 19-3-2-1 18-12-0-0 _17-4-1-0 ;
Detroit 3414 3 3 74166 130 19-3-1-2. 15-11-2-1. 12-3-1-1
St. Louis 2Y 25 4 4 50136 166 11-14-21 10-11-2-3 7-12-2-2
Columbus 21 28 2° 3 47133 169 12-11-1-2. 9-17-1-1—7-11-0-2
Chicago 19 26 2 5 45129 162 11-13-12 8-13-1-3 9-12-1-0
NORTHWEST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME — AWAY DIV
Calgary 29 17 3. 3 64165 133- 22-5-0-0 | 7-12-3-3° 11-5-1-2
Vancouver 29 20, 1 3 62 139 136 17-8-1-1_12-12-0:2 10-11-0-1
Minnesota 29 22 0 4. 62153 141 18-5-0-3° 11-17-0-1 96-02 SCOTT CUNNINGHAM/GETTY IMAGES
Edmonton 26 23 2 2.56147 155 16-10-1-1 10-13-1-1 9-11-1-0 : . : 2 ;
Colorado 25 23 2 2 54162 155 14-12-1-2 1-11-10. 9-7-4.0 IT’S MILLER TIME: Sabres goalie Ryan Miller blocks a shot by Jon Sim of the Thrashers. Miller had 27 saves in the game.
PACIFIC WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV ,
Anaheim 32. 13 2 6 72173 135 18-4-1-4 — 14-9-1-2 12-3-0-1 a :
San Jose 34.18 0 1 69 163 123 18-10-0-1 16-8-0-0 11-9-0-1 :
Dallas 32 20 0 2 66144 132 16-8-0-1 16-12-0-1 15-6-0-0
Phoenix 25 27 1 «1. 52 147 180 © 13-12-1-0 12-15-0-1> 7-13-1-1
Los Angeles 18 30 4 4 44156 198 11-12-4-3 . 7:18-0-1 6-14-0-2 ;

Note: Two points for a win, one point for a tie and overtime loss °

RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

From Miami Herald Wire Services

STARS 4, WILD 2

Tonight’s games

Ottawa at Buffalo, 7 ~
Phoenix at Detroit, 7:30
Phil. at Islanders, 7:30
San Jose at Anaheim, 10
Chicago at Vancouver, 10

Tuesday’s results

Florida at Colorado, late
Buffalo 4, Atlanta 3 (SO)
Phoenix 3, Columbus 0
Boston 3, Washington 2 (SO)
Carolina 2, Montreal 1
Pittsburgh 4, Nashville 1
Tampa Bay 3, L.A. 2 (SO)
NJ. 3, Rangers 2 (SO)
Dallas 4, Minnesota 2
Toronto 2, St. Louis 1
Vanc. at Edmonton, late
Chicago at Calgary, late
Anaheim at San Jose, late



Monday’s results
Detroit 4, N.Y. Rangers 3

RICK STEWART/AP

YOUNG GUNNER: He’s only 19, but Sidney Crosby of
the Pittsburgh Penguins leads the NHL in scoring.



ATLANTA — Daniel Briere scored
two goals in regulation and another in the
shootout, leading the Buffalo Sabres to a
4-3 victory over the Atlanta Thrashers on
Tuesday night.

The Eastern Conference-leading
Sabres, winning for just the fifth time in
their past 12 games, scored all three of
their regulation goals on the power play.
They took the shootout 2-0, getting goals
from Briere and Ales Kotalik.

Ryan Miller stopped Slava Kozlov and
Marian Hossa in the shootout.

Scott Mellanby scored the tying goal
for the Thrashers with 8:09 left in regula-
tion, but the Sabres knocked off one of

their top challengers in the East.

The Thrashers, first in the Southeast
Division, took their third consecutive loss
and dropped 10 points behind the Sabres
in the conference standings.

The Thrashers went 2-3-1 during a
homestand at Philips Arena and now head
off on a six-game road trip, their longest
this season.

Miller made 27 saves, including a bril-
liant stop in the final seconds of overtime.
Kozlov ‘swept in on a breakaway and
picked out the top right corner, but Miller
got enough of his glove on the shot to
send it over the crossbar.

Atlanta dropped to 6-3 in shootouts,
ending a streak of five victories in a row.
Buffalo improved to 8-2 in shootouts.

DEVILS 3, RANGERS 2 (SO)

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Brian
Gionta scored the lone shootout goal, and

6lith career goal, passing Bobby Hull for
13th on the NHL’s career list.

After Brodeur made a pad save on the
Michael Nylander on the first shootout
attempt, Gionta beat Rangers goaltender
Henrik Lundqvist with a backhander.

COYOTES 3, BLUE JACKETS 0

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Curtis Joseph
made 28 saves for his 50th career shutout,
and the Coyotes won a game delayed 35
minutes at the start by snow.

Steve Reinprecht, Shane Doan and
Mike Zigomanis scored for Phoenix,
which has won nine of 12 road games.

The Blue Jackets were shut out for the
12th time, setting a franchise season
record, They have lost three in a row
since a four-game winning streak.

He game was delayed 35 minutes
because the Coyotes were stuck in traffic
traveling from their hotel while a snow-
storm blanketed the Columbus area.

BRUINS 3, CAPITALS 2 (SO)

WASHINGTON — Phil Kessel scored
the winning shootout goal for Boston,
which held Alex Ovechkin scoreless for a
career-worst third consecutive game.

After Alexander Semin put Washing-
ton ahead 1-0 in the shootout and Patrice
Bergeron evened it, Kessel flipped a back-

hander past Olie Kolzig to give the Bruins .

their second consecutive victory after a
five-game losing streak.
LIGHTNING 3, KINGS 2 (SO)

TAMPA, Fla. — Vincent Lecavalier
scored his 34th goal and then scored again

DALLAS — Sergei Zubov scored a tie-
breaking goal on the power play with 4:41
left and the Stars overcame a two-goal
deficit to snap the Wild’s three-game win-
ning streak.

Stu Barnes added his ninth goal of the
season with 3:03 left to stretch Dallas’ lead
to 4-2. Stephane Boucher and Mike
Modano also scored for the Stars, who are
6-2-1 in their past nine games.

HURRICANES 2, CANADIENS 1

MONTREAL — Frantisek Kaberle
scored midway through the third period
in his first game of the season, helping the
Hurricanes end a four-game skid. -

Kaberle, who had shoulder surgery on
Sept. ll and missed Carolina’s first 55
games, drove a slap shot from the point
past Montreal’s David Aebischer 11:52 into
the third for the Hurricanes’ second goal
in three power-play opportunities.

PENGUINS 4, PREDATORS 1

PITTSBURGH — Mark Recchi scored
and set up rookie Evgeni Malkin for the
go-ahead goal, leading the Penguins.

Marc-Andre Fleury, who hasn’t lost in
regulation in 10 games since Jan. 9, turned
aside 25 shots as the Penguins won for the
ninth time in ll games.

Jordan Staal and Malkin, whose com-
bined age of 38 is one year younger than
Recchi’s 39, scored goals, and NHL scor-
ing leader Sidney Crosby set up two oth-
ers to give him 25 goals and 6] assists for
86 points in 50 games.

Through Monda' ‘
SCORING , GOALIES Martin Brodeur stopped all three New inthe shootout, leading the Lightning. MAPLE LEAFS 2, BLUES 1

sae tel Gh SAE Pint niga lace te wild” Sakata York attempts, leading the Devils past the Lecavalier and Blair Jones scored first- ST. LOUIS — Alex Steen snapped a tie
COSTE Me oR Se HH «Ga aaEHEE aa Se KET slumping Rangers on Tuesday night. period goals for the Lightning, who have late in the second period, and Andrew
St. Louis, TB 54 32 40 72 Backstrom, Min 17 898 = .29.1.94 Paul Martin and Zach Parise scoredin wonllof 3. Tampa Bay took the shootout Raycroft made it stand up with strong
Cae Bas aes wedne a ana Gara regulation as the Devils won their third 3-1. third-period play in goal, leading Toronto.
Heatley. Ott ae at dee 28 GiatiAna, qe = een game in a row and eighth in the past 1. Los Angeles defenseman Mike © Alexei Ponikarovsky added a power-
Savard, Bos 51 18 48 66 Kiprusoff, Cal 48 2884 109 2.27 Jaromir Jagr and Karel Rachunek Weaver, playing in his 123rd career game, play goal for the Maple Leafs, who have
pie ai eee eae oeauie Sea scored for the Rangers, who have lost scored his first NHL goal during the won the first four games of a five-game
Jagr, NYR- 53 19 44 63 Mason, Nas 32 1854 72 2.33 ‘four in a row and eight of Il. It was Jagr’s Kings’ two-goal third period. trip and have won five in a row overall.
PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007

THE TRIBUNE ~



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master ,

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., MS; B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
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Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Has a great power reached its peak?

ONLY IN hindsight can one tell when a
great power has reached its peak. Some say
that Britain’s war to extend its empire over
the intransigent Boer farmers in South Africa
a century ago marked the beginning of
decline. But even earlier, the ardent colo-
nialist Joseph Chamberlain had spoken of
his country as weary and staggering “under
the too-vast orb of its fate.”

The annual meeting of the World Eco-
nomic Forum, with its unique convening pow-
ers, is as good a place as any to detect mood
swings among those who do so much of the
world’s work, and the theme of this year’s
meeting was “the shifting power equation.”
There was a hint in the alpine air of resigna-
tion and sadness among those who admire
America that the United States was stum-
bling along, lost in Iraq and headed in the
wrong direction toward Iran. There was
lament about good will lost, of power and
prestige dissipated, and the dangers inher-
ent in the rising tide of self-inflicted anti-
Americanism.

Some of the delegates who met in the Swiss
mountain town of Davos late last month
detected a disconnect between business

chiefs, who see these times as the best of -

boom market times, and those involved with
national security who fear the worst of times,

with the demons let loose in the Middle East

and the misuse of American power.
Unlike most previous years, Washington
- sent few high-level delegates to represent the
executive branch, and there was a sense that
the Bush administration was hunkered down
and losing relevancy — something that simply
had to be waited out like a bad cold.
Delegates from China and India exuded
confidence, and there was talk of Asia’s
“renaissance,” reflecting that Asian lands
had come into their own for the first time
since the 15th century when one-half of the
world’s industrial production came from the
East, as Oxford’s Timothy Garton Ash put it.
Every day of the conference there seemed
to be another article in the world’s press pre-
dicting American decline. “New York Could
Lose Lead in Finance,” said one. “Sun May
Be Setting On Silicon Valley Supremacy,”
said another. “Indian Economy Is Seen Pass-
ing US By 2050,” and “Middle East Adjusts
To America’s Diminishing Power,” two more
headlines announced. And, perhaps the cru-
elest blow of all: “Macao Casinos Catch Up
To Las Vegas Strip.”

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The Financial Times wrote of “the rapid
haemorrhaging” of President Bush’s author-
ity, and Jacob Weisberg of Slate wrote from
Davos about the “quandary of how to deal
with the problem of a ruined president.”

Britain’s new Tory leader, David Cameron,
making his debut on the world stage, told
reporters that the special relationship with
the United States should mean telling Amer-
ica what it should hear, not just what it want-
ed to hear.

Iraqi politicians fresh from the Green Zone
shuffled through the snow from panel to pan-
el to discuss the fate of their benighted coun-
try, over which they exercise less and less
control. There was talk about how the Unit-
ed States may now have lost two colonial
wars, Vietnam and Iraq.

Iranians were noticeable, too, although °

none from the government, seeking shelter
from American war rhetoric — so reminis-
cent of pre-war Iraq. There was speculation in
the corridors whether the United States and
or Israel would attack Iran sometime before
year’s end.

One measure of shifting power is that the
ability of the United States to achieve what it
wants is diminishing, which might not be alto-
gether a bad thing, I heard delegates say.
Power was flowing away from traditional
governments and nation states toward non-
state actors, both good and bad, they said.

But for all of that, Pei Minxin of the
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

“predicted the United States will still be dom-

inant in the next 15 or 20 years. China had
only one-fifth the gross domestic product of
the United States, India less, he said. And
“these new powers will be more interested in
balancing against each other than against the
United States.” The United States had
“tremendous recuperating powers” and “self-
correcting mechanisms.” Iraq would be only
a temporary reversal, he said, and it would be
unwise to bet against the United States.
One hopes he’s right. But if America con-
tinues with the new colonialism of regime
change in Muslim lands, or goes to war with
Iran with two wars yet unfinished, then the
United States will be staggering under its

too-vast orb of fate for generations to come. |

(This column was written by H.D.S.
Greenway Boston Globe correspondent —
c. 2006 The Boston Globe).



All Bahamians |

should be
concerned |

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THE growing concern of
Chinese and Haitians enter-
ing the Bahamas and mixing
into our communities is
promising to be a “powder
keg”, possibly exploding in the
PLP’s collective faces. More
and more Bahamians are
being disenfranchised because

there is a perception that |

someone in the PLP govern-
ment is making a serious effort
to get a firm footing in the
business dealings with the Chi-
nese.

There seems to be some
special accommodation for the
Chinese. The PLP accepted
$30 million from the Chinese
but not admitting what they
promised them in return for
their money. But knowing
how shrewd the Chinese are,
they simply did not give the
Bahamas that money because
they love us. It is alleged that
the Chinese are making
demands on the PLP govern-
ment. They must control their
money because without say-
ing it, they apparently do not
trust the PLP to handle that
kind of money. The Chinese
want all of the thirty million
dollars to end up on the pro-
ject proposed, not, elsewhere.

But there are some ques-
tions to be asked and some
concerns that Chinese work-
ing on the TG Glover Junior
High School are a part of a
bigger picture. Did the con-
tractor hire these people from
China or were they already in
the Bahamas? I believe Min-
ister Wisdom when he said
that no one got permits to
work on the stadium yet. So
did the contractor bring the
Chinese working on the TG
Glover in from China himself?

I stand to be corrected, but
the cost of transporting one
Chinese from China to the
Bahamas is extremely expen-
sive. Were these people
already in the Bahamas and
then got a work permit, or was
the practice of applying for
the permit before they arrived
still adhered to, or were the
permits and visas issued in
China? These and other ques-
tions cause suspicions to be
raised as to the real story
behind the Chinese, their con-
nection with the PLP,.the
Bahamian Embassy in China,
the Minister of Foreign

Affairs, who has already been

accused of approving visas for

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DMUs

letters@tribunemedia.net



Chinese allegedly sponsored
by a PLP colleague and who,
in my opinion, has given an
asinine explanation. ,

Are the rumours true that
Minister Mitchell wanted to
bring in 200 Chinese under
the disguise of a dance troop
for the Fox Hill celebrations?
If true, what’s up with Minis-
ter Mitchell and the Chinese?
As I understand it, this par-
ticular situation caused mem-
bers of his committee to even-

tually resign from assisting

him.

Are all these things relat-
ed?

Are Chinese being shipped
here on special visas and dis-
appear in to the population,
surfacing soon in the south-
ern end of New Providence
with major business opera-
tions, “taking bread out of
Bahamians’ mouths”?

This visa scandal is “big
business”. Again if true it is
simply selling the Bahamas.
Bahamians must be concerned
about these allegations. All

Bahamians must stand up now
and say something, or shut up
and face the wall and take
whatever is rammed down
their throats. Stop it now or
suffer later.

Is the Bahamas now being
sold to China? Is there any
Minister in the PLP govern-
ment involved? Is the Prime
Minister knowledgeable, even
though he seems clueless
about everything else? Did the
Prime Minister think a visa
scandal was serious enough to
warrant him sincerely investi-
gating it himself? Is the Unit-
ed States Government silently
watching these serious events?
Something fishy is definitely
going on. The Bahamian peo-
ple are flabbergasted to see
how oblivious and uncon-
cerned Perry Christie seems -
about everything. This is
pathetic to put it mildly.

All Bahamians should be
concerned about what is hap-
pening right before their very
eyes. Be they PLP, BDM
FNM or XYZ. This Bahamas
belongs to ALL OF US.

IVOINE W INGRAHAM
Nassau,
January, 2007.

Certain bank executives
need to think before
Opening their mouths

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I THOUGHT I was hearing things this evening on both ZNS
TV-13 and Cable News that a bank wanted to entice customers
to save and blamed the customers for borrowing too much -

money.

Look, if the bank management would simply stop loaning
there would not be a liquidity problem.

The banks are too free giving out credit cards and loans and
overdrafts and you know why? They charge high interest rates.

Banks must effectively stop borrowers borrowing as much as
75 per cent of their weekly pay-cheque.

Banks are the sole controllers of who gets and what is loaned
— don’t blame the customers, just say no! \

Certain bank executives need to think before they open t! eir
mouths as they really are showing their ignorance and makig

idiots of themselves.

K L SMITH
Nassau,
January 25, 2007.

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd
: Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 ¢ Fax: 326-7452


PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





aking a look at the issues facing
the country at the next election

Nazox Security
Minister Cynthia
Pratt says we are living in a
new era: “It’s a different mind-
set. Today, we cloak our chil-
dren in wrongdoing.” She was
lamenting the social break-
down reflected by a rising tide
of violence among young peo-
ple and within families.

We have had nearly five
years of a New PLP govern-
ment that was supposed to
bring a “fresh wind” of social
reform and introduce a new
kind of politics — an obvious
attempt to regain the high
ground after the FNM’s far
more dramatic 1992 break
with the discredited policies
of the past.

But despite this govern-

ment’s patchwork of urban |

renewal initiatives and the rel-
ative prosperity of recent
years, the plain fact is that law-
lessness and social irresponsi-
bility are on the rise — with
armed robberies, assaults,
murders and sex crimes top-
ping the list.

_ People largely do as they
please. And as Prime Minister
Perry Christie acknowledged
recently, “Among young peo-
ple there is a growing discrep-
ancy with respect to order, dis-
cipline and the protection and
safety of those in our society.”

Az of this prob-
lem must begin with

a critique of government,

although wider and deeper’

factors are involved. .That’s
because politicians like to
advertise the changes they will
make, and when elected they
are in a unique position to
implement those changes.
“Our vision can be summed
up in just one sentence,” PLP
leader Perry Christie said
shortly before the May 2002
general election that brought

him to power. “The transfor-
mation of the Bahamas into a
society in which we can all live
in peace and in harmony with
one another under an umbrel-
la of social justice, equal
opportunity and prosperity for
all.”

Christie challenged voters
to choose their leaders ratio-
nally: “Not on the basis of
how they look or sound but
on the basis of who they real-
ly are and what they stand for
beneath the surface of all the
glitz and glamour, the propa-
ganda and the pageantry.”

We echo that sentiment.
And. as we are about to
engage in another political



LARRY SMITH

is complicated by our tiny uni-
verse. There are only so many
reasonably competent people
among us who are able to
commit to a political career.
And there are even fewer who
have the personality and lead-
ership skills to pull it all
together. But the challenges
we face in a rapidly spinning



But despite this government’s
patchwork of urban renewal
initiatives and the relative
prosperity of recent years, the
plain fact is that lawlessness and
social irresponsibility are on the
rise — with armed robberies,
assaults, murders and sex crimes

topping the list.



season, we should be able to
hold the candidates to some
hard positions on the real
issues that confront us. There
will, of course, be the usual
bread and circuses — that is
the nature of electoral poli-
tics. But there should also be
something that thoughtful cit-
izens can hang their hats on.
That means identifying the
top priorities, distinguishing
one set of policy prescriptions
from another, and choosing

‘ the most reliable and effective

managers to implement the
necessary changes.
In the Bahamas this process

world will not simply go away.
They will only get worse — to
our later remorse.

he head-in-the-sand
attitude of the latter-

day Pindling regime in the
face of a tanking economy and
a fracturing society — spurred
by widespread corruption, epi-
demic drug abuse and creep-
ing authoritarianism — is a
major case in point in our very
recent past. .

In the late 1980s the Pin-
dling government postponed
hard decisions and made lit-

Jon Mothouist ministries

PO Box SB-351628 - Nassau, Bahamas

:

© Phone/Fax: 242-392-4100 @ 242-324-3628
E-mail: zionmethodistministri otmai

South Beach Shopping Centre, East Street South

il.com



We invite you to join us in our 2nd Anniversary & Thanksgiving Celebrations

February 7th-11th, 2007

Theme: “ We Are Called To Be Witnesses For Christ. Are You A Witnes?” (Acts 1:8)

Renewal Service

Wednesday, February 7th

at 7:30 p.m.

Renewal Service
Thursday, February 8th
at 7:30p.m.

Preacher
Rev. Vincent Moss

Preacher
Bishop Edward Missick

Offical Anniversary Service | Preacher

Sunday, February 11th
at 3:30p.m.

Usher Ministry
Souse Out

Saturday, February 10th

7:00a.m.-12noon

Also

Sunday School Ministry

Bishop Clarence Williams

Will be distributing Children’s
Clothing between 10:00a.m. &12noon at the
South Beach Shopping Centre Grounds

Host Pastor
Rev. Charles Lewis

“A Journey in Faith & Obedience to Will of God”



tle effort to deal with the
problems they had caused.
After callously selling the
country out to foreign gang-
sters, they denied all respon-
sibility while avoiding any
effort to right the wrongs. The
result was a near catastrophe.

According to the'1984 Com-
mission of Inquiry report:
“We were alarmed by the
extent to which persons in the
public service have been cor-
rupted by money derived from
the illegal drug trade... We
were particularly concerned
to discover that these cor-
rupting influences made their
presence felt at the level of
permanent secretary and min-
ister...In our opinion, the
whole nation must accept
responsibility.”

A series of damaging news-
paper articles published in our
major tourist markets all but
destroyed the Bahamas’ image
as a good place to visit and do
business in. The result was a
precipitous drop in foreign
investment, spiralling unem-
ployment, rising crime and
social decay — combined with
a cynical urge to emigrate
among those who could.

Preranater Pindling
was defeated in the
1992 general election, which

cumstances have changed,
there are many who think we
are facing another crunch
point, because hard choices
are not being made by the
political class, or are taking
too long to be made.

We do not — at present —
have a problem attracting for-
eign investment or tourists.
The main issues relate to soci-
ety and governance, but if we
do not deal with them now we
will be mortgaging our future
at a very high interest rate.

How do we control illegal
immigration and integrate the
tens of thousands of migrants
already in our midst? How do
we fix our failed education
system so that Bahamians can
take advantage of economic
development? How do we
protect our cultural and envi-
ronmental heritage? And how
do we bring about social
renewal and institutional
reform to reduce the levels of
lawlessness and inefficiency
that plague our lives?

Pere: the biggest
potential flashpoint is”

Haitian immigration, although
its true effects may not be
readily apparent. Haitian
migrants are marginalised
from the rest of society, squat-
ting in illegal settlements in
growing numbers — vulnera-
ble and disenfranchised. And
their children face strong bar-
riers to joining society. As one
commentator put it, “If we
had set out to create an under-
class, we could not have done
a better job.”

But unfortunately, the
debate on immigration is too



Continuing to exclude, denigrate
and exploit the Haitian
community will have serious
repercussions-down the road.
The social and economic costs
will be immeasurable, and our
politicians must undertake
some unaccustomed leadership

to avoid this.



enabled a sharp break with
the past under the leadership
of an energetic and effective
new leader who set about
tackling the country’s real
issues and changing things for
the better. Government con-
trols on broadcasting were cut,
corruption was exposed and
condemned, infrastructure
was repaired, state-run hotels
were privatised, investors were
courted and accountability
became a watchword.
_ There is no political parti-
sanship intended in this
description of recent history.
That is simply the way it was.
But now, although the cir-

often hijacked by negative,
populist sloganeering, which
discourages sound policymak-
ing. The anger and frustration
of ordinary Bahamians con-
fronting this issue is palpable,
but that is entirely the fault of
the politicians. Information is
inadequate, diffuse and often
confusing.

Unless Bahamians want. to
become Haitianized, our goal
should be assimilation of
migrants within Bahamian cul-
ture. But experts say this
should be based on “the
expected outcome of full citi-
zenship, and sharing of com-
mon civic values with the

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native population.”

Continuing to exclude, den-
igrate and exploit the Haitian
community will have serious
repercussions down the road.
The social and economic costs
will be immeasurable, and our
politicians must undertake
some unaccustomed leader-
ship to avoid this.

F.eecotin is the sec-
ond fundamental

issue of our time. According
to one commentator: “It is
clear that the Bahamian edu-
cation system has failed to
produce anything like the kind
of workforce that is needed to
run an economy like ours.
“Partly, this reflects a polit-
ical class lacking both the
imagination and fortitude to
introduce a modern, reformed
curriculum and to guarantee
minimum reasonable stan-
dards of performance among
government-funded schools.”
Experts say parenting is the
crux of our education and
crime problems — because
unwanted children have worse
outcomes than children who
are welcomed by their par-
ents. Many Bahamian children
are born simply as a means of
prying money from the pock-
ets of disappearing boyfriends,
or as a mistake due to igno-

rance, or as a demonstration °

of machismo.
And children who are not
nurtured by responsible par-

ents grow up with disciplinary -

problems and learning defi-
ciencies. As they reach their
late teens — in a society that
hardly bothers to enforce rules
and resorts to arch hypocrisy
on most moral issues — they
often turn to crime. :

As one analyst recently con-
cluded: “Jf one were trying to
set an agenda for the:21st cen-
tury, it would appear that the
first step in that process is to
candidly describe the present
state of affairs...Refining the
public education system can
only be accomplished with
strong leadership over a long
time using strategies that are
clearly stated and widely
endorsed.”

Yet the last annual report
to parliament on the state of
education was in 1995, and
that report failed to candidly
describe the situation. And
this is an across-the-board
problem with all government
agencies, representing a gross
failure of public accountabili-
ty.

We need less secrets, and a
real plan with meaningful tar-
gets and firm management.
And this applies not just to
immigration and education,
but to all the other issues men-
tioned at the beginning of this
article.

The time for politicians to
focus on these issues is now.
Tomorrow may be too late.

What do you _ think?
Send comments to larry@
tribunemedia.net. Or visit
www.bahamapundit.com

a

WK

SAS eS

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



—~-Ss@ elt @ bw ers



-__jyierswariONAL EDITION. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7,207 7



FIVE REASONS THE COLTS WON

‘

Leonard Shaprio has covered the NFL since 1972, He has served as a selector for the Pro Football [Hall of kame since 1982
and also is on the Hall’s Senior Selection Cominiliee. [He was inducted into the writers’ wing in Canton, Ohio, in 2002.






-PEYTON’S PARTY

Never mind the driving
rain, the slippery football
and an early interception. |
Quarterback Peyton
Manning once and for all
erased the memory of so
many disappointing
performances by
throwing for 247 yards

: and earning the Most
Valuable Player award. He took one major shot
downfield early when he found Reggie Wayne wide .
open for a 53-yard touchdown against a blown Bears
coverage, then was mostly content to throw short and
safe, including 10 completions to running back Joseph
Addai, the Colts’ leading receiver in the game.

‘CALM, COLLECTED i

The Colts’ shaky special
teams were a serious
concern going into
SBXLI, a justifiable
shortcoming magnified
when Bears return man
Devin Hester went 92
yards for a touchdown
on the opening kickoff.
" But the Colts were more
angry than rattled, and with cool-hand coach Tony ; |
Dungy reminding his players that it was only one
touchdown and nierely a seven-point deficit, the ' i
Colts never panicked or lost a smidgen of poise,
eventually coming back from an eight-point | :
second-quarter deficit to ultimately prevail.

ie}

AL DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF
RB JOSEPH ADDAI



QB PEYTON MANNING



AL DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF

6



CLOCK CONTROL

The Colts dominated
time of possession,
holding the ball for
38:04 to the Bears’
21:56. Indianapolis ran
off 46 plays in the first
=e 4 half, the Bears had only

JARED LAZARUS/MIAMI HERALD starr 19 aNd the Colts had 81

- RB DOMINIC RHODES _- Plays in the game, 33
more than Chicago. |

From the Bears’ last touch of the first half - a Rex
Grossman fumble - with 1:26 before intermission until
their first possession in the second half, with 7:21
remaining in the third quarter, 56 minutes of real time
elapsed. That hardly was a recipe for continuity.

TIGHTEN UP

The Colts came into the
playoffs allowing 173
rushing yards per game,
last.in the NFL. The
return from injury of
run-stopping safety Bob
Sanders helped, and
they allowed their first
three playoff opponents
an average of 73.3
yards, Then, the Bears ran for 111 yards, 52 on one
Thomas Jones run. But Chicago averaged 3.2 yards
- onits other 18 rushes, allowing the Colts to become
the first team in history to win a Super Bowl after
finishing last in run defense in the regular season.

(0 THAT LINE

The Colts’ offensive line
began badly with two
false-start penalties in
their first six plays of the
opening series, but
quickly settled down to
dominate the Bears the
rest of the night. They
allowed Peyton Manning
to stay upright until he
suffered his only sack of the game with nine minutes

| remaining and the Colts holding 4 12-point lead. And
their bruising blocking allowed running backs
Dominic Rhodes and Joseph Addai to gain 190 yards

€







SS

DOUG PENSINGER/GETTY IMAGES

O-LINE VS. D-LINE —

AL DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF

OL RYAN DIEM

hy tomemrserescy, | Tesi gs salbiaie
AL DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF

QB REX GROSSMAN

I TRAIN WRECK REX

Bears quarterback Rex Grossman
insisted so many poor efforts
during the regular season were
mostly an aberration. Wrong.
Though he had a 120.8 passer rating
in the first half, he unraveled in the

“ second, with two big interceptions
in the fourth quarter as he forced
plays downfield. One more time, he
was far too slow on the draw,
ending with a 68.3 rating on a night
he also lost a fumble and the Bears
turned it over five times.



Hoxton teat
aE TEe

rushing, their-second-best total of the season.

fo. ON TOP: A combination of his own cool, Peyton Manning’s play,

JOE RIMKUS JR./MIAMI HERALD STAFF

KR DEVIN HESTER

a
Z DEVIN DENIED

Rookie return man Devin Hester,
who had six return touchdowns
during the regular season, only
touched the ball twice Sunday
night. The first time, the former UM
star went 92 yards for an
electrifying, opening-play score.
The Colts then began to squib kick
the rest of the night, and he never
got another chance ona kickoff. He
also fielded only one of the Colts’
three punts. One was downed, the
other went for a touchback.




JONATHAN DANIEL/GETTY IMAGES

LB BRIAN URLACHER

«> CAN’T STOP RUN/RAIN

The Bears’ proud defense was
bounced around all night at the
point of attack by a vastly superior
Colts offensive line, with
linebackers Lance Briggs and Brian
Urlacher constantly having to stop
Colts runners far beyond the line of
scrimmage. Chicago cornerback
Charles Tillman was his team’s
second-leading tackler, with seven
solo stops and 11 tackles overall,
with many of those stops made in
the secondary after long gains.

gaurantee gE RY
CPA





SAAS, a r So. 5
DONALD MIRALLE/GETTY IMAGES

RB CEDRIC BENSON

4. MISSING IN ACTION

Bears running back Cedric Benson
hurt his knee ona 4-yard gain late in
the first quarter and never returned.
The Bears had relied on a dual
running attack for most of the
second half of the season, and
Benson had averaged 4.1 yards a
carry with six touchdowns, the
same number of scores as running
mate Thomas Jones. Behind in the
second.half, the Bears abandoned
the running game, with only four
rushes in the fourth quarter,








WALTER MICHOT/MIAMI HERALD STAFF

the offensive line and defensive lines, and clock control made Tony Dungy, above, a champion.



SIEFTREY BOAN/EL NUEVO HERALD
DB CHRIS HARRIS

a
«) WAY TOO SOFT

The Bears seemed to think Peyton
Manning was not going to beat
them deep, going with Cover-2
protection and leaving huge spaces
in'the middle of the field. They
never adjusted to Manning's
decision to adapt a mostly short
passing game, the better to cope
with a wet ball and take what the
Bears gave them. That allowed
Colts backs and tight ends to take
short passes for respectable gains
and keep the chains moving.


ee ee Oe ee Ce ee ee ee ee ee a ee oe! eT N, eee

te I yg

| mans /Y) The Tribune

Ym lovin’ It. ’ a Poyee lt a
IRCULA

DO A FRESH SALAD!



i A \ | i | Ve | =
aie |
|
a

[2 Ay! iy

—
&
®





68F








Volume: 103 No.64

eye epi le RCL
ow ene mR aa

SEE FRONT PAGE OF BUSINESS SECTION

CLOUDS, WITH

» STRAY SHOWER




aaa iss



¢ Miami Herald |

BAHAMAS EDITION

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007 —




SEE FRONT PAGE OF ARTS SECTION







MASA MU Tse GL








- AG's office atlvises FGSttenmectuts.
of police is set to’

Defence Force

i By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Attorney General's office’

has advised that charges should
be brought against Defence Force

officers involved in the beating,

of Mr.Dexter Wilson, 27, of
Inagua in November of last year,
The Tribune has learned.

The police file on the matter,

along with the advice, is to be for-
warded from the office of the
Attorney General back to the
police by the end of this week
ready for "charges to be made",
Mr Bernard Turner, director of

. + public. prosecutiens..said. yester-

day.

This development follows crit-
icism of the police and the Attor-
ney General — and frustration
among Inaguans — for not having
moved sooner to charge anyone

. in connection with the attack.

Despite the recommendations,
however, Mr Turner noted that
it is not guaranteed that charges

will be brought, with this next
stage now being subject to police
discretion.

Morton Salt worker Dexter
Wilson was "almost beaten to
death" by a group of Defence
Force officers on November 26th,
according to eye-witness reports.

He had to be flown to Nassau
for emergency treatment —
including a brain scan, X-rays,
and other tests.

Violence flared after a male
officer was said to have taken
exception to a conversation Wil-
son was having with a female offi-
cer outside Supers nightclub in
Mathew. Town.

In the immediate wake of the
attack, there were reports that
Inaguans were "set to riot." A
large group of an estimated 80 -
100 Inaguans gathered outside

_ the Defence Force base on the
island shouting threats to officers
inside.

In January, vandals wrecked
-two police and Defence Force

Opposition members of Boundaries
Commission ‘frustrated with govt’,

‘ @ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr

Chief Reporter

THERE is a sense of frustration among opposition members of
the Boundaries Commission that the government has been drag-
~, ging its feet in completing the work of the commission which has
. thus far been impeded by low voter registration numbers, Brent
- Symonette, MP for Montagu and the opposition representative on

the body told The Tribune.

Mr Symonette pointed out that there are only several weeks
between now and the next election and the boundaries commission
has yet to decide on the make up of the constituencies for the 2007

general election.

“We were supposed to meet on Monday and they delayed that
because the House was meeting but the House finished at 4.30 pm,
a half an hour late which would be the normal time and they can-

celled a meeting and I am unaware of when it will be rescheduled -

for,” the Montagu MP said.

Last Wednesday Prime Minister Perry Christie advised Gover-

SEE page 11

AUTO INSURANCE

CM) STAN | Wh) 0180



Eleuthera | Fumo
Teh (240) 330-2504






‘heating’ charges

vehicles, in what was described
as an act of frustration and rage
over the failure to make arrests.
There were claims that rela-
tions between officers on the
island and the local residents
would "never be the same."

In December, a senior Police
source complained that the police
were taking the rap for the slow
progress in dealing with the mat-
ter, while in fact the hold-up was
to be attributed to the Attorney
General's office, which had
requésted the file shortly after
the investigation was completed,
but failed to move quickly in

making_a decision as.to whether. .

charges should be brought.



Naren

TRIBU 18)

DCE aes Si



@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

AMID claims of victimisation
and political interference, it has
been revealed that Assistant
Commissioner of Police Regi-
nald Ferguson will be trans-
ferred to head the Police Train-
ing College.

A senior police source

_ claimed. yesterday..that certain

government officials are hoping
the move will ultimately force
him into retfrement.

Reportedly Mr Ferguson, who
has held his current post of ACP
of crime since 1997, was target-
ed by the PLP when they took
office in 2002, as his brother
Johnley Ferguson was the FNM
candidate for MICAL at the
time, Mr Johnley Ferguson lost
by only four votes to the area’s
current MP V Alfred Gray, and
is now the FNM candidate for
_ South Eleuthera,

While the police administra-
tion’s “restructuring” coines at

an auspicious time, sources sug-

Norman ere) fesse tod | steps down

@ NORMAN
Solomon couldn’t
hold back his tears
yesterday at Cabi-
net where he
stepped down as
the co-chairman of
the Nassau Eco-




Man claims he’s been on
Nassau curfew for 14 years










Movement

nomic Develop-
ment Commission.

Mr Solomon is
pictured above with
his wife Katherine;
Prime Minister Per-
ry Christie and
Deputy Prime Min-
ister Cynthia Pratt.
* See page two











(Photo:
Tim Clarke/
Tribune staff)










AN EX-CONSTABLE called
for justice last night after claim-
ing he had been kept on a night-
ly curfew in Nassau for nearly
15 years.

“J don’t have no freedom,”
said Henry Brice, 41, “My cell
is this island - 21 miles by seven -
instead of the regular 6ft by
10ft.”

Mtr Brice, a father of six, told
The Tribune that he had been
made to sign in at Central Police
Station every day since being

released on bail on a murder
conspiracy charge in 1993, And

_ he had been made to observe a

midnight to 6am curfew ever
sitice,

Yet still there was no sign of
his case being heard in court, he
said,

Mt Brice and three police col-
leagues were charged with a
murder ey in April,
1992. However, the alleged

SEE page nine

i
imjoy a ee e Fi
with medium fries
cxincd Sue



gest that amore sinister plan is
afoot.

Reportedly Mr Ferguson’s
move is also being seen as an
effort to make him the “scape-
goat” for the criticism levelled at
the PLP over the arrests of the
fivesbaggage handlers of Nas-
sau Flight Services (NFS).

Since their initial arrests, Mr
Ferguson has been the only offi-
cial to go on record as admit-
ting that he knew of the arrests
in Florida last year.

The Minister of Foreign
Affairs, the Attorney General,
and the Minister of National.
Security have all denied any
knowledge of the planned
arrests after a joint US/Bahamas
year-long surveillance opera-
tion.

Since then, NFS, the govern-
ment-owned ground handling
company, has become one of the
most heated topics of debate
leading up to the next general
election.

Political parties from the offi-
cial opposition, Free National
(FNM), the

SEE page 11

Dr Nottage:
bacterial outbreak
could have been
behind some deaths
in dialysis unit

HEALTH Minister Dr
Bernard Nottage has
acknowledged that some
deaths in the dialysis unit at
the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital could have been due to
a bacterial outbreak.

The outbreak started in
July last year, but health
officials have previously cast
doubt on whether it could be
responsible for any deaths
on the unit.

Just before press time last
night, Dr Nottage said:

“Some people have died.
Some of those deaths may
have been due to the infec-
tion, but we are doing a
detailed case-by-case investi-
gation at the moment to
determine the actual cause
of death in people who
died.”

The government has been
criticised for its handling of
the outbreak thus far by a
number of patients.

Selicaat

OU CPAP eet)

) ota iocinitos

Frodorick: StS Prt yi
cable Sry)
PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



inn DE
Risk management key
to business continuity

is not possible without

recognition of the per-
ception, it is critical to high-
light that management is an
attempt to control those per-
ceptions.

Thus far, we have estab-
lished a basic understanding of
risk and management. Let us

-continue by bring the two
terms together - risk, and man-
agement,

Outcomes are uncertain
when the enemy is us, but we
have some control over what is
going to happen - or at least
some control over the conse-
quences - of whatever other
people choose to do. Under-
standing and establishing a
process is what risk manage-
ment is all about.

Study after study has been
conducted in the field of Risk
Management to discover what
went wrong, and hopefully
reduce the risk of the event
ever happening again. Consid-
ering the vast amount of topics
that can be considered for risk
management, we focus specif-

aN

Te URS Cy

J ust as a discussion of risk

hehind the news,
a
on Mondays





ically on terrorism. But before
this is done, the relationship
of terrorism to risk and man-
agement should be clarified.

In this discussion, terrorism
is the risk. In other words, the
potential for terrorism to occur
is what is called the risk of loss
as a result of the action. Man-
aging the terrorism risk is an
attempt by persons to control
the occurrence, response and
recovery as it pertains to ter-
rorism.

‘Like other risk factors, the
individual carrying out the act
is usually given the name of
the action being done, the ter-
rorist. The terrorist, when con-
sidered, is of more significance
than terrorism. A key concept
in understanding terrorism and
any risk, is what motivates the
person who carries out the act?
This can be viewed as another
attempt to control the outcome
of events, and the beginning
of managing the risk.

Considering that the aim is
to help understand how the
public reacts and makes deci-
sions as they pertain to risk,
this thinking can also be
applied to better understand
why a person would commit
acts of terrorism. The point
being made is that motivation-

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al and influencing factors are
important in understanding,
and better dealing with, indi-
viduals and groups.

The risk to be managed is
terrorism, and it is manage-
able. Roper (1999) states:
“Risk management is a
process, a theory, a procedure,
or a methodology for deter-
mining your assets, vulnerabil-
ities and threats, and then pro-
tecting them.”

The Royal Society Study
Group (1992) puts forward this
general interpretation about
risk management: “In terms of
the three basic organisational
control theories (cf. Dunsire
1978, 59-60); the setting of
goals, whether explicitly or
implicitly; the gathering and
interpretation of information,
and action to influence human
behavior; to physical structures

‘or both.”

It must be mentioned at this
point that risk management, in
any of its definitions, is the
stoppage or elimination of the
risk, be it terrorism or other-
wise. The definitions from
research stress the followingm
as summed up by the Scarman
Centre 2002 Mitigation, Readi-
ness, Response, and Recov-
ery. These four factors are crit-














ical in any disaster or risk man-
agement plan, and advocate a
reduction and limitation to the
loss factor.

The approach taken to sup-
port this point is to provide a
plan of action for an event such
as terrorism. Bearing in mind
the explanation provides earli-
er, the main purpose or objec-
tive of this process, as classi-
fied by the Scarman Centre
2002 are,

* Minimisation of risk

* Protecting people and the
environment

* Ensuring the survival of
the organisation

As mentioned earlier, the
starting point for the manage-
ment of terrorism is to under-
stand what are the motivating
factors that will cause terrorism
to take place. Wilhelm (1985),
when answering the question
about anticipating terrorism,
said: “The answer is to under-
stand the adversary, politically
and culturally”. Considering
the overwhelming number of
studies done on terrorism, and

_ the tendency to highlight reli-

gious and political causes, it
would be reasonable to con-
clude that most terrorist events
centre around such issues.
The next step in the man-

agement process is to establish .

a standard by which to mea-
sure the risk, and to ascertain
the critical level. The question
is: what is considered accept-
able when dealing with a ter-
rorist risk? Again, past inci-
dents of terror attacks can
assist greatly in this area. Even
though the Scarman Centre
2002 focuses on the measure-
ment of natural disasters, a
similar approach can be taken

- Nad









relevant experience.

DUTIES:





Associate Degree in Business,
experience OR College of the Bahamas Diploma in

1. Works closely with each of the s
Managing Director (including the D
Biostatistcian) to ensure that workflows are appropriately coordinated.

in establishing a ‘terrorism’
measurement scale.

Further, an applicable tool,
the Fault Event Tree, can be
beneficial in helping develop
‘what-if? scenarios. This
method takes a step-by-step
look at what impact the iden-
tified risk (terrorism) would
have on key assets of a com-
pany. An attempt at answer-
ing this can also be considered
by assessing the value of the
item of the property or person
to be protected - asset identifi-
cation.

Value, when used here, is
not limited to financial worth,
but also includes the impor-
tance of an individual to the
company, such as the chief
executive. Myers (1999) indi-
cates that it makes good busi-
ness sense to begin this process
and recognise the critical com-
ponents to the continued oper-
ation of the company. This
process is also described as
Business Impact Analysis, by
Doswell (2000), who states:
“Identifying the impacts result-
ing from disruptions and dis-
aster scenarios, that can affect
the organisation, and tech-
niques that can be used to
quantify and qualify such
impacts. Establish critical func-
tions, their recovery priorities,
and interdependencies so that
recovery time objectives can
be set.”

With the identification and
measuring process completed,
it becomes necessary to recog-
nise what risks are insurable
or transferable, defined by
Doswell (2000) as “risk
removal”. Both concepts refer
to the insuring of property and
persons in the event of
loss. The obvious difficulty is

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2. Keeps abreast all activities in each of the Sections of the Planning and Evaluation
Unit(i.e.) Planning, MIS and Statistics Sections) and the PHA Headquaters Projects
Office so as to be able to provide immediate assistance when needed.

3, Maintains a structured schedule of specific activites in progress in the Deputy
Managing Director’s and related offices.

4. Assists inthe preparation of annual budget estimates for the Deputy Managing
Director’s and related offices ensuring that there is detailed valid justification for all
submissions.

5. Works on special projects on behalf of the Deputy Managing Director or any
specialized officer of this area in order to ensure well-rounded exposure and experience.

6. Assists in all required aspects of project and programme management within the
unit. '





7. Coordinates Deputy Managing Director’s schedule and appointments, arrange
meetings, prepare agendas as well as reserve and prepare the facility.

8. Conducts research, compiles reports and prepare presentations as directed.

9, Preparations and disburses documents relative to project headed by the Deputy
Managing Director.

Letters of application and curricula vitae shoould be submitted to the Director of
Human Resources, Public Hospitals Authority P.O. Box N-8200 or Manx Corporate
Centre, Dockendale House, West ay Street no later than 16th February, 2007



4B_| WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007 INTERNATIONAL EDITION

WALL STREET

BUSINESS BRIEFS 3




BY RACHEL BECK
Associated Press

NEW YORK — The higher
stocks go, the more investors
fear a correction ic coming.

That helps to explain why
all the recent stock market
positives — the Dow Jones
industrials’ record run, the
longest stretch without a large
price correction in decades,
the Federal Reserve holding
interest rates steady — are
being considered as much a
curse’as a blessing.

No one is saying the market
is destined for a free-fall any-
time soon, but there are legiti-
mate concerns that the rally
may be due for a pause.

You don’t need to look far
on Wall Street for cautionary
commentary about the bull
run that began in July. Few
expected that surge to happen
in the first place, and at many
times in recent months, there
have been forecasts that the
market will start showing
some fatigue.

Instead, the Dow went up
seven straight months through
January, 'the longest winning
streak since 1995, and that
thrust the blue chip index into
record territory, which it con-

-AUTOMOTIVES

‘Toyota rep

*TOYOTA: :

ton Securities in Tokyo. “To
be honest, it’s hard to find
anything bad at this point.”

Toyota did not comment
on where it might build its
next U.S. factory to keep up
with strong demand there.
American newspapers have
reported that Chattanooga,
Tenn., and Marion, Ark., are
among the finalists.

Net profit and sales
reached a record for any quar-
ter, said Senior Managing
Director Takeshi Suzuki. “We
believe our company wide
efforts have contributed to

_these results,” he said in a
release.

Toyota, with its reputation
for reliable, fuel-efficient cars,
has gotten a big boost lately
from the rise in oil prices. It
also is a leader in producing
hybrids, which use electricity
and gasoline.

Toyota has long beaten
struggling General Motors in
profitability, but it still trails
GM in annual global vehicle
production.

Last month, Toyota said
global vehicle production
topped 9 million in 2006, at
9.018 million vehicles, mark-
ing the fifth year straight of
growth. GM its group auto-
makers produced 9.18 million
vehicles worldwide in 2006 —

RETAIL

tinues to beat with gains
already seen this month.

The Standard & Poor’s 500
index, now at a six-year high,
had its first eight-month run in
a decade in January. Should
that continue in February, it
would be the first time since
1983 that it has had nine
months of gains.

A LONG STREAK

- The Dow industrials aver-
age hasn’t seen a 2 percent
correction in more than 130
sessions, the longest run since
1954, and it has gone 53 months
without a 10 percent correc-
tion for only the second time
in history, according to Ned
Davis Research. There has
been not been a 2 percent drop
in the S&P 500 in more than
930 sessions, the longest
stretch ever without that kind
of pullback, according to Biri-
nyi Associates.

Much of this climb has been’

built on better-than-expected
economic growth, which has
all but wiped out any concerns
of a looming recession. Infla-
tionary pressures also remain
relatively tame, containing
investors’ worries that high oil
prices would significantly

TOY FC



about 162,000 vehicles more

than its Japanese rival.
Toyota, which also makes

the Lexus luxury line, sur-

’ passed DaimlerChrysler AG

as the No. 3 auto seller in the
U.S. for the first time in 2006,
according to data from auto-
makers. Ford Motor remains
No. 2 in the U.S.

Toyota kept its vehicle

-sales forecast for the fiscal

year ending March 31
unchanged at 8.47 million

boost the cost of other goods
and services.

That economic picture
spurred Federal Reserve poli-
cymakers last August to halt a
series of 17 quarter-point
increases since June 2004 that
pushed the overnight bank
loan rate to 5.25 percent — and
then to remain on hold since
then.

At the same time, earnings
growth has been strong, with
companies in the S&P 500 tal-
lying 13 consecutive quarters
of double-digit profit gains.
The quarterly results. now
being reported might add to
that run — and break a record
by doing so — with,a growth
rate of 10.4 percent, according
to Thomson Financial.

SHARES IN PLAY

A buyout boom also has
fueled the stock market as
investors have held shares that
they believe could potentially
sell to private-equity firms. All
that dealmaking, along with
the surge in stock: buybacks,
also has reduced the number
of shares in play, therefore
boosting demand for equities.

For the current rally to con-
tinue, a lot depends on what

vehicles.

During the October-De-
cember quarter, it sold 2.16
million vehicles worldwide,
up 8.9 percent from a year
ago.

Vehicle production, mean-
while, rose 9 percent to 2.09
million units in the quarter.

Toyota said a weak yen,
which boosts the value of
overseas earnings, added 30
billion yen ($250 million) to
the third quarter, while cost

=—

investors believe the future
will hold.

' The market is pricing in
virtually no chance of the Fed
cutting interest rates between
now and September. Should
that actually happen, it would
rank as the eighth-longest
stretch of Fed inaction.

That’s good news because
the average historical gains
during the 12 longest Fed
pauses dating back to 1960
have seen an average return of
nearly 12 percent in the S&P
500, according to Birinyi Asso-
ciates.

The Fed’s steady stance
also means that companies
won't get the benefit of lower
borrowing costs anytime soon,
however. That could hurt
earnings, which already have a
more murky outlook going
forward.

Wall Street analysts sur-
veyed by Thomson Financial
are now forecasting profit
gains of around 5.1 percent in
the first two quarters of this
year, and more than double
the usual number of compa-,
nies in the S&P 500 have
issued negative earnings guid-
ance, according to the finan-
cial data provider.

orts record quarterly sales

ee

KATSUMI KASAHARA/AP
FUEL EFFICIENCY: Visitors look around.a Toyota showroom in Tokyo on Tuesday.

Toyota, with its reputation for reliable, fuel-efficient cars, has gotten a big boost lately
from the rise in oil prices.

reductions efforts contributed
another 20 billion yen ($167
million).

It also held steady its fore-
casts for the full fiscal year
through March, projecting
earnings of 1.55 trillion yen
($12.9 billion) on 23.2 trillion
yen ($193 billion) sales.

Toyota shares, which have
climbed a third in value over
the past year, closed up 1.8
percent in Tokyo at 7,960 yen
($66).

Wal-Mart women bias case sent to trial

* WAL-MART

Jenkins said if company-
wide gender discrimination is
proven at trial, Wal-Mart
‘ could be forced to pay billions
of dollars to women who
earned less than their male
counterparts, with no oppor-
tunity to dispute their individ-
ual circumstances.

Jenkins said it was
“impractical on its face” to
have individual hearings for
each plaintiff and had planned
to use a statistical formula to
compensate the women.

Wal-Mart, in seeking dis-
missal of the case, called that
an unprecedented denial of its

rights. Wal-Mart said women
who allege they were discrim-
inated against can file law-
suits against individual stores.
The women’s lawyers said the
idea was ridiculous, and
would clog the federal judi-
ciary.

“Although size of this class
action is large, mere size does
not render a case unmanage-
able,” Judge Harry Pregerson
wrote for the majority, which
upheld Jenkins’ decision in its
entirety. .

But Judge Andrew Klein-
feld wrote in a dissent that
women should perhaps file
individual lawsuits to safe-
guard Wal-Mart from paying

EUROPEN CENTRAL BANK

ECB expected to hold interest rates steady

*RATES

not one or two, when decid-
ing on policy. “We have.to
take into account the situation
of euro area as a whole and
there are big differences in
Europe, as in the U.S.,” he
said. The bank’s mission is to
monitor and control “the
threat of inflation in the euro-
zone, a 13-country bloc with a
population of 317 million that
accounts for more than 15 per-
cent of the world’s gross
domestic product.

Interest rates are currently
ai 3.5 percent, unchanged

since. December when the
sixth quarter-point increase
in a year took effect. The bank
is expected to hold steady at
Thursday’s meeting, but set
the tone for another increase
in March. Of the 51 analysts
polled by Dow Jones News-
wires, 50 said they expected
the bank to keep the rate
unchanged at 3.5 percent,
while all but two said they
expected an increase.to 3.75
percent in March.

“For central bank watchers
rattled by the gyrations of the
Bank of England and the
apparent willingness of the

those who don’t deserve
money, and would also ensure
women get the compensation
they deserve.

The appellate court’s deci-
sion, he wrote, “threatens the
rights of women injured by
sex discrimination. And it
threatens Wal-Mart’s rights.”

Brad Seligman, one of the

attorneys who represented '

the women suing Wal-Mart,
said he suspected Wal-Mart
would ask the appeals court
to rehear the case with a panel
of 15 judges.

But he said the decision
would hurt the company’s
reputation.

“No amount of PR by

Bank of Japan leaders to heed
political advice, the clear
guidance on the rate outlook
provided by ... Trichet, and
the equally firm ECB standing
against political interference,
is quite a relief,” said Gilles
Moec, a London-based econo-
mist with Bank of America.
The Bank of Japan will
decide this month whether to
lift its key interest rate from
0.25 percent. Last month, it
held off amid political pres-
sure to keep rates steady so as
not to choke Japan’s eco-
nomic recovery.
The Bank of England made

Wal-Mart is going to allow it
to deal with its legacy of dis-
crimination,” Seligman said.
Wal-Mart spokeswoman
Mona Williams said the
world’s biggest retailer was
not immediately prepared to
comment. :
Wal-Mart shares rose 6
cents to $48.58 in late trading
on the New York Stock
Exchange.
. David Nassar, executive
director of Wal-Mart Watch,
a group critical of Wal-Mart
policies, said the decision vin-
dicates the “victims of the
company’s illegal and
immoral gender discrimina-
tion.”

a surprise decision increase in
its key rate last month from 5
percent to 5.25 percent, its
highest point since May 2001.
Last week, the U.S. Federal
Reserve left interest rates
unchanged at 5.25 percent for
the fifth straight time.

Trichet, Moec said, sent
clear signals at the January
meeting that a rate increase
was in the offing in March. He
said he expected the ECB “to
signal a March rate increase
by using the ’v’ word again,
that is by calling for ’vigi-
lance’ against the upside risks
to inflation.”

MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD





AMY SANCETTA/AP

A ROUGH QUARTER: BP said adjusted net profit dropped





to $2.88 billion, after it was $3.69 billion a year ago.

BP’s 4Q profit drops

a

From Herald Wire Services

off by 22 percent

Declining oil prices and mounting safety spending sent
BP’s (BP) fourth-quarter profit down 22 percent to a two-
year low, the oil company said Tuesday.

Following a series of high-profile mishaps, including a
deadly refinery blast in Texas and an oil spill in Alaska, BP
also slashed its growth targets and raised its capital expendi-

ture forecast for this year.

BP said adjusted net profit dropped to $2.88 billion, from
$3.69 billion a year ago. Adjusted net profit measures earnings
before extraordinary items and excluding changes in the

value of inventories.

e REAL ESTATE

BLACKSTONE RAISES
ITS BID FOR EQUITY

Private equity firm
Blackstone Group raised
its cash takeover bid for
Equity Office Properties
Trust (EOP) to $23 billion,
escalating a down-to-the-
wire bidding war for the real
estate company.

Equity Office told share-
holders to vote for the deal
at a special meeting this
morning, even though it was
still less than a $23.2 billion
bid from rival suitor Vor-
nado Realty Trust (VNO).

Blackstone’s newest bid

| is for $55.50 per share, up



nearly 15 percent from its
first offer in November.
Tuesday’s sweetened offer
was a nearly 3 percent
increase from Blackstone’s
last bid of $54 a share, or
$22.3 billion. But it still fell
short of the $56-a-share
cash-and-stock proposal

_ from Vornado.

e BEVERAGES

GOVERNMENT WANTS
EX-COKE EXEC JAILED

The government said in
court papers it believes a
former Coca-Cola (KO)
secretary convicted of con-
spiring to steal trade secrets
from the beverage giant
should be jailed immedi-
ately because she poses a
flight risk. ted

In a motion filed in U.S.
District Court in Atlanta,
Assistant U.S. Attorney
Byung J. Pak said clothing,
prescription medication,
papers and other personal
items were found in Joya
Williams’ Mustang during a
search after a fire destroyed
her apartment Friday. The
fire occurred nearly 90 min-
utes after the guilty verdict
was reached in federal court
in Atlanta.



e@ MANUFACTURING

TYCO’S 1Q PROFIT
RISES BY 43 PERCENT

Bermuda-based manufac-
turing conglomerate Tyco
International (TYC) said
its first-quarter profit
climbed 43 percent as both
revenue and expenses rose
for the business, which is
preparing to split into three
separate companies.

Net income for the com-
pany rose to $793 million
from $556 million.

LATE TRADING

e TELECOM —

HELIO CELL SERVICE
EXPANDING IN APRIL

Helio (HELOF.PK) said
its youth-oriented cell
phone service will reach
100,000 subscribers in April
and that it is now generating
monthly revenue at a rate
exceeding $100 million per
year.

The rare update on oper-
ating data came as Helio, a
joint venture between
EarthLink (ELNK) and
Korea’s SK Telecom
(SKM), launched a music
store offering wireless
downloads for $1.99 per
song. It was the first time
Helio has disclosed a cus-
tomer.tally. ,

Chief Executive Sky Day-
ton said the company fin-
ished 2006 with about
70,000 customers and that
subscriber growth has been
accelerating.

e TRADE

WTO TO MEET TO
ASSESS PROGRESS

Two weeks after world
powers pledged to re-ener-
gize global free trade talks,
the WTO’s 150 members
meet today to assess the
degree of progress — or lack
thereof — toward an agree-
ment that would liberalize
the world economy.

But much hinges on two
major decisions pending in
just one country: the United
States, where Congress will
debate whether to extend
President Bush’s authority
to agree on trade deals and
whether to adopt a new
farm bill that has received a
lukewarm response from
major trading partners such
as Brazil and Europe.

The so-called Doha
round has stumbled since its
inception five years ago in
Qatar’s capital.

Rich and poor countries
have-clashed over clearing |
barriers to trade in goods
and agriculture, and nearly
incessant sniping between
the European Union and
United States has repeatedly
stalled progress. ;

One of the main stum-
bling blocks has been the
level of U.S. government
subsidies paid out to Ameri-
can farmers. Poorer nations
contend the handouts pre-
vent them from selling their
farm goods and developing
their economies.





‘pm 6:35 p.m.

Late
Chg. volume

4pm, 6:35 pm. Late
‘dose Close Chg. volume





Stock Tk. close Stock Tkr.
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Nasdl00Tr QQQQ 44.05 44.23 «+18 84340 | CnGardAn CENTA 15.05 ° 15.00 05 9286
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SunMicro SUNW 653 6.55 +.02
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For up-to-date stock quotes, go to www.MiamiHerald.com and click on Business
THE TRIBUNE

BUSINESS.’

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007, PAGE 5B



Bahamas exchange control regime leads Caribbean region

m@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

THE Bahamas’ exchange
contol regime, and one-to-one
peg with the US dollar, is
regarded as the best of its kind
in the Caribbean, although

such systems act as a barrier
to integration with the rest of
the world’s economy, a Credit
Suisse First Boston executive
said yesterday.

Speaking at the Nassau Con-
ference, Wendall Mottley said:
“Caribbean independence
throughout much of the region
has been viewed as a disap-

pointment.
Expectation

“The expectation of rapid
growth, prosperity and self-
determination have not yet
materalised for a lot of the
region. Plantation agriculture is
dead and the promise of indus-

trialisation... has not filled the
breech.”

Mr Motley added that “shal-
low rooted sun, sand and sea
tourism” separates the region
from ruin, and the Caribbean
had not found new ways to
engaging and interact with a
rapidly globalised world.

“What we need is a






















FROM page 1B

bringing legislation and their various amend-
ments to fruition at a faster pace than has been
the experience in the past.

“On the other hand, I ask for your continued

commitment to promote the new products and
structures when they are introduced; and to
begin to think of unique ways and means of
helping each and every one of us in the trans-
formation of this great little country to a world-
class offshore financial centre.”
Mr Smith noted that the latest statistics from
the Central Bank of the Bahamas pointed to
the fact that the financial services industry con-
tributes some 15 to 20 per cent of the country’s
gross domestic product (GDP).

It employs some 4,405 people, and the aver-

cage salaries are estimated at $47,500. Capital
expenditure was estimated at $16.3 million,
while operational costs for the industry were
given at $402.7 million.
Given this potential, Mr Smith said the Min-
istry of Financial Services and Investments was
to embark on several initiatives this year, which
will seek to integrate the sector more readily
into the economy through outreach to younger
persons for job recruitment.

“In the spirit of cooperation, my govern-
ment formed a Working Group to review the
results of the Branding Survey, which was car-
ried out for us by Price WaterHousgCoopers

in conjunction with the Bahamas Financial Ser-
vice Board,” Mr Smith said.

“Tt is our intention to further engage Price-
WaterHouseCoopers to take us to the next
step in this process, and to begin to develop a
strategic plan that would provide a platform
on which the industry can not only blossom
but flourish. I also would like to mention the
work of the Financial Services Consultative
Forum, which for the past two years has been
performing - and continues to play - an invalu-
able role in the growth of this sector.”

Mr Smith said it has been a collaborative
approach between public and private sector.

“We all know where the buck stops; but
before it reaches that point there are a number
of persons and institutions who can and ought
to have some input into the decision making
process,” he added.

The Nassau Conference is hosted by found-
ing sponsor -the Association of International
Banks & Trusts (AIBT).

“This organisation, which represents inter-
national banks and trust companies operating
from the Bahamas, has been one of the leading
champions for the industry,” the minister said.

“T wish also to make special note of the inclu-
sion this year, for the first time, of the College
of the Bahamas students who have been invit-
ed to participate through the kind sponsorship
of the various institutions.

“T especially congratulate AIBT for spear-
heading such an initiative, and I trust that this
opportunity for exposure of our Bahamian stu-

Ministry promises to raise legislation pace

dents to the industry will become an integral
part of future endeavours, whether it be by
conferences such as this or by special pro-
grammes, such as was recently launched by the
Bank of the Bahamas. My ministry is eagerly
looking forward to partnering with you to take
this thrust even further into our high schools.”

M Smith said that during the BFSB retreat
in Exuma, Mr Peet said he was of the view
that government’s main role should be to pro-
vide the necessary infrastructure - physical,
regulatory and legislative. These are the areas
where most of the resources of the govern-
ment are being placed.

Noting the seminar’s theme, Mr Smith said:
“ Even though.we are a neutral tax environ-
ment, we are taxed on every side, not only on
the issue of whether or not we ought to intro-
duce some form of taxation, but on any other
number of matters pertaining to the industry.

“But we know and accept that not only the
financial services industry but life itself can be
a taxing affair, At the recent Retreat in Exuma
that I alluded to earlier, another group of stake-
holders met to discuss issues relevant to the
industry. Some participants were of the view
that the players in the industry ought to begin
to take a more leading role in promoting the
jurisdiction. But whether we ought to intro-
duce tax, whether it is the government or pri-
vate sector who should promote the industry,
the point is that we will all feel the effects if we
do not work together to promote our jurisdic-
tion.”

Caribbean business plan,” he
said. “What is the Caribbean
industrial services policy that
will integrate the Caribbean
again into the globalised world
and, more importantly, draw
a massive amount of its citi-
zens into highly productive
enterprise and jobs.” *

He added that the
Bahamas’ exchange control
regime was the best of all
Caribbean countries,

“I am certain that in the
central judgment of the
Caribbean people, the
Bahamas experience will be
regarded as the best of the lot,
despite your own grumbling
about the unnecessary inter-
ference of your Central Bank
and what you consider your
right to conduct your personal
and business affairs as you see
fit,” Mr Mottley said.

He added that some felt the

reality was that any reduction
in Central Bank reserves of US

‘ dollars automatically cause the

bank to tighten liquidity, hence
the arguments to do away with
the Bahamian dollar and
exchange controls.

Forward >

As to the way forward, Mr
Mottley said: “If you have to
take an adjustment under dol-
larisation it would be immedi-
ately felt on the domestic econ-
omy. The brunt of this adjust-
ment would be borne in the
Bahamas by the poor and
salaried.

He said the Bahamas need-
ed to take careful note of what
is happening in the Caribbean,
adding that this country needs
to have a plan which is a busi-
ness plan, and not a Central
Bank plan.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

REVIEW HOLDINGS LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Busincss Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
REVIEW HOLDINGS LIMITED has been dissolved and
struck off the Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution
issued by the Registar General on the 19th day of January, 2007.





‘Real concerns’ over marina development

FROM page 1B

ment, the Ministry of Tourism,
the Bahamas Environment, Sci-
ence and Technology Commis-
sion (BEST) and the Depart-

~. ment of Environmental Health

Services (DEHS).

Mr Martini said consultations
with marina industry stake-
holders on the ideas proposed
in the document are due to
begin next week, with meetings
in West End, Grand Bahama,
on Monday; Marsh Harbour,
Abaco, on Tuesday; Exuma on
Wednesday; Harbour Island on
Thursday and Nassau on Fri-
day. |

He added that their initial
report had been submitted to
the Cabinet in November 2006,
and the policy aimed to tackle
issues such as how marina
developments fitted into their
local communities.

Marinas often had a relative-
ly minimal impact on areas
where there was a proliferation
of these facilities, Mr Martini
said, but could have a major
effect when they were the sole
development.

“Tl think Harbour Island
developments, in particular,
twigged Cabinet’s interest, and
attracted people’s attentian,”
Mr Martini said. “That has
twigged government that it
_ needs to have a policy on '‘this.”

He added that Cabinet had
already adopted some sections
from the report, such as the
approach to analysing applica-
* tions for both major commer-
cial and small private marinas.

Mr Martini said economics
was another focus of the com-
mittee, as the Prime Minister
himself had questioned whether
the Bahamas was maximising
the benefits from the marina
and boating industry.

He added that marinas could
be “relatively inexpensive to
build and very high revenue
generators, especially if slips are
sold and sold with long-term
leases.

“From what we can tell, the
Bahamas is picking up a very
small number. The best esti-
mates for [government] revenue
is in the order of $300,000 total
from all marinas,” Mr Martini
said.

“We know slips have sold for
$500,000 and much more than
that”, indicating the Govern-
ment should assess whether its
getting its true share of taxes
from the industry.

Mr Martini said that current-
ly, the investment incentives
available under the Hotels
Encouragement Act also apply
to marina developments, some-
thing he felt meant that the
Government was giving too
much away to such projects.

“It applies right now, and I’ve
suggested it may be too strong,”
Mr Martini said. ‘““We may be
giving up too much; we’re giving

up duties, property taxes, and
on the jetties collecting $6 per
foot, per year.”

To ensure the Bahamas
maximised tax revenues from
the marina and boating indus-
tries, the policy document sug-
gested that seabed land should
be leased, not sold, with the
leases based on appraised val-
ues and renewable indefinitely.
However, there would be five-
year rental reviews.

The more radical suggestion
is to collect real property taxes
on seabed land, and on the val-
ue of improvements made to
marina property over the
seabed.

“Since property taxes related
to income streams are one of
the few income-related taxes
which are open to the
Bahamas other than the busi-
ness tax, and since property
taxes are a tax accepted wide-
ly by most of those who would
be investing in marinas, the
property tax should also be col-
lected,” the document said.

Mr Martini said the
Bahamas did not collect much
real property tax, describing it
as “a relatively unused revenue
source”, and pointed out that
leasing marina slips was the
same as a land-based real









PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, BARRY MYRTIL
of the Robinson Road Nassau, Bahamas, intend to
change my name to BARRY MYRTHILE. If there are
any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box SS-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.



estate transaction, meaning
real estate taxes should be
paid.

“I’m open to a lot of discus-
sion on this one,” Mr Martini
added: “I know some people
will be unhappy with this, and
we have to listen to their con-
cerns.” JO

The policy document sug-
vested that the annual mooring
charge be continued, with the
addition of a $1 per foot, per
night, mooring charge that
would not apply to Bahamian
residents or people mooring
one boat near their own prop-
erty.

The current charges of $1.95
and $2 per foot of dock space

‘could be “waived for private

own-use haldings provided a
lease is being paid on the sea
bed”.

The document suggested
that commercial marinas
should pay the higher of the
$6.13 or $6.32 per foot of dock
space on the Family Islands
and New Providence respec-
tively, or 6 per cent of revenues
for the seabed lease, bringing
the Bahamas into line with the
taxes levied by Florida.

In assessing the tax revenues
derived from the marina and
boating industry, the draft pol-



NOTICE

PATERSON FIDELITY CORP.
Is Voluntary Liquidation

LIQUIDATIOR’S STATEMENT
PURSUANT TO SECTION 137(4) OF THE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT 2000

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137(4) of the
international Business Companies Act, 2000
PATERSON FIDELITY CORP. is in dissolution.

The date of commencement of dissolution was 29th November, 2006.

Mr. Daniel Eisenberg, with domiciled at Tucuman 1667, Floor 1°“D”,
CP 1050, Argentine
Republic is the Liquidation of PATTERSON FIDELITY CORP.

Daniel Eisenberg
Liquidator



icy document said the
Bahamas levied an annual
charge of $6.15 and $1.95 per
linear foot of dock space for
commercial and private slips
respectively in Family. Island
marinas. For New Providence,
the figures were slightly higher,
standing at $6.32 and $2 for
commercial and private dock
space respectively.

But while collection rates for
these charges on New Provi-
dence were high, they were
lower for Family Island mari-
nas. For the first 10 months in
2006, the Port Controller’s
Office had collected $156,000
in charges from New Provi-
dence, but just $115,000 from
the Family Islands.

“Apparently very little” rev-
enues for business licence fees
were collected from marinas,
while there were no charges
for the use of seabed Crown
Land. The seabed was often
leased by'the marina develop-
ers. :

MANAGER - PRIVATE BANKING & WEALTH MANAGEMENT SERVICES

PROFILE:

* Bachelors Degree in Kinance

* STEP Qualification

+ 10 years experience in advising clients on fiduciary services and developing
appropriate legal structures

David Ralph Singleton
8 Hill Street,
St. Helier, Jersey
Channel Islands
Liquidator

Legal Notice

| NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

OMRO LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
OMRO LIMITED has been -dissolved and struck off the
Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued
by the Registar General on the 19th day of January, 2007.

\

MR. ZAKHAROV ANDREY KONSTANTINOVICH
13 Raziezd Anciferovo
P/O Kostino, Raiyon Orekhovo-Zyeysky
Moscow Region, 142642 Russia
Liquidator



Jw aaw

FIDELITY BANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

A MEMBER OF THE FIDELITY GROUP OF COMPANIES

invites qualified applicants for the following position:

MANAGER -

Private Banking & Wealth Management Services

The applicant must have the following minimum qualifications:

+ Superior organization, communication, interpersonal and computer skills

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:
* Client Relationship Management
* Investment of client funds
* Monthly management reports
_ * Quarterly reports to clients

* Business development and marketing activities

* Account opening formalities

* Invoicing & booking fees

* Estate Planning

* Administration of Trusts

* Production of trust deeds, letter of wishes & testamentary trusts

+ ‘Training, management and coaching of staff

Send resume no later than February 7th, 2007 to:

The Human Resource Director
Fidelity - 51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853 » Nassau, Bahamas
f: 326.3000
e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com




PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007
GN-456



SUPREME COURT

SUPREME COURT :
PROBATE REGISTRY :
P.O. BOX N-167 ;
Nassau, The Bahamas :
February 8th, 2007 :

Probate Division
2006/PRO/npr/00738

In the Estate of STEPHEN A. ORLANDO, late of 6021

Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key in the State of Florida,

one of the United States of America,

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of :
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be :
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in its Probate :
Division by HARTIS EUGENE PINDER of Mareva House, :
George Street in the City of Nassau in the Island of New }
Providence, one of the Islands of the commonwealth of :
The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney :
in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed Grant of :
Amended Letters of Administration in the above estate ;
granted to MAURICE V. ORLANDO, the Personal :
Representative, by the Circuit Court for Manatee County :
in the State of Florida, on the 19th day of September, :

2006.
Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS }
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION }
February 8th, 2007 :

No. 2006/PRO/npr/00739

Whereas LELAND DAWKINS, of the Settlement of Crown
Haven, Abaco, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth :
of The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme :
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the :
real and personal estate of HOWARD DAWKINS late of :
Murphy Town, Abaco, one of the Islands of the :
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. :

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard |
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the :

2006/PRO/npr/00030

date hereof.

Signed
D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

SUPREME COURT :
PROBATE REGISTRY :
P.O. BOX N-167 :
Nassau, The Bahamas :
February 8th, 2007 :

; the Personal Representative, by the Circuit Court for :

Probate Division
2007/PRO/npr/00003

In the Estate of ALEXANDER SLORACH late of
Khonkaen, Mannachie Road Forres IV36 2uT in the

Sheriffdom of Grampian, Highland and Islands in Scotland,
deceased, }

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of :
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be :
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in its Probate :
‘Division by EARL A. CASH of Marlin Drive in the Western :
District in the Island of New Providence, The Bahamas,
Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas :
for obtaining the Resealed Grant of Certified Extract :
Confirmation in the above estate granted to JACQUELINE :
JEAN PEREIRA the Executor, by the Sheriff of Grampian, :
Highland and Islands at Elgin on the 8th day of iach i
} of The Bahamas have made application to the Supreme :

i Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration with }
: the Will annexed of the Real and Personal Estate of :

2006.
Signed
‘Desiree ‘Robinson
(for) Assistant Registrar

No. 2006/PRO/npr/00021

Whereas PRINCE ALBERT STUBBS of St. Vincent Road :
Western District, New Providence, one of the Islands of }
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, the Only Child, has :
made application to the Supreme Court of the Bahamas,
for letters of administration of the real and personal estate :
of AREBELLA STUBBS late of St. Vincent Road, Western }
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the :
: Whereas ALFRED DANIELS, of Buttercup Lane, South :

Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the :

date hereof.

Signed
D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

deceased. }

| of Tampa in the State of Florida, USA,

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY :
P.O. BOX N-167 :
Nassau, The Bahamas ;
February 8th, 2007 ;

Probate Division

| 2007/PRO/npr/00022

In the Estate of LILLIAN KIMBALL late of the County of
Maricopa in the State of Arizona, one of the States of the :

United States of America,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of [

fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be :

made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in its Probate :
Side by GILBERT ANSELM THOMPSON, of Chancery :
House, The Mall, in the city of Freeport, Grand Bahama, :
The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney
in The Bahamas, for obtaining the Resealed Grant of :
Letters of Personal Representative in the above estate
granted to BETTIE KENNEDY the Personal }
Representative, the Superior Court of the State of Arizona
in and for the County of Maricopa USA, on the 21st day :
i Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
: by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
: date hereof.

of March 2006

Signed
_ Desiree Robinson
(for) Assistant Registrar
SUPREME COURT :
PROBATE REGISTRY :
P.O. BOX N-167 :
Nassau, The Bahamas :
February 8th, 2007 :
Probate Division :
2006/PRO/npr/00029

In the Estate of RUTH E. SECORD late of Clearwater,
Pinellas County, Florida, USA,

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the
date hereof.
Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00034

Whereas CANDICE KING of No. 2 St Lucia Crescent,
Elizabeth Estates in the Eastern District of the Island of
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of
the Real and Personal Estate of WINIFRED GIBSON late
of No. 2 St Lucia Crescent, Elizabeth Estates in the
Eastern District of the Island of New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00035

i Whereas DUNCAN ANTHONY IRWIN DE BARROS of
: No. 7 Sky End, Eastern Estates in the Eastern District of
: the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
deceased. :
} to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of |
NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of :

Probate Division by LOUREY C. SMITH, of #4 George :

Street in the City of Nassau in the Island of New :

Providence, The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the }

: Authorizes Attorney in The Bahamas, for obtaining the :

Resealed Grant of Letters of Administration in the above :
estate granted to SHERYLL JEAN SECORD the Executrix, :
by the Circuit Court for Pinellas County of Florida, USA, :

on the 6th day of June 2005.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Assistant Registrar

SUPREME COURT |
PROBATE REGISTRY |

Le tee PO.BOX N-167 i ee
_, Whereas ‘ANASTASIA:PATRICE- FERGUSON of 386:| |"

‘avin February 8th,'2007 i.
Probate Division i

Nassau, The Bahamas

<

Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application

Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of JANET

fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be BERYL DEBAROS No. 7 Sky End, Eastern Estates in the

} made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its :

Eastern District of the Island of New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased. '

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007:
No. econ poe’

Eaton-Roead;-Yellow Elder Gardens in-the Western District
of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of

the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application
: to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of

In the Estate of LEMUEL S. CONNELLY late of the City :
: CLEARE FERGUSON late of No. 7 Sky End, Eastern

deceased. }

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of

fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be }

made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its :
Probate Side by RHONDA L. C. HULL, of the Township :

of Marsh Harbour, Abaco, The Bahamas, Attorney-At- :

Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas, for :
obtaining the Resealed Grant of Letters of Administration :
in the above estate granted to ARTHUR P. W. CONNELLY :

Hillsborough County in the State of Florida, USA, on the :

3 30th day of August 1993.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Assistant Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS |
THE SUPREME COURT |
_ PROBATE DIVISION |

No. 2006/PRO/npr/00031
Whereas PAMELA L. KLONARIS and MIKE A.

RICARDO SABOIA KHURY late of Avenida Parana 33,

Apartment 1680035-130, Curitiba, Brazil, deceased.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

February 8th, 2007

Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of ROSIE

Estates in the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof..

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00039

Whereas FEDNER J. DORSETAL of St. Albans Drive in
the Western District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of NEVILLE HOLLAND MAJOR late of

Chase Avenue in the Western District of the Island of
KLONARIS both of the Western District of the Island of :
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth :

New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the

date hereof.

: Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
: by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the :
: date hereof. i

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION ;
February 8th, 2007 :

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT ;

PROBATE DIVISION :

‘February 8th, 2007 :

: to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
: Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of LEON

No. 2006/PRO/npr/00032

Beach Estates in the Southern District of the Island of :
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth :
of The Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of }

3 the Real and Personal Estate of CHARMAINE NATASHA :

DANIELS late of No. 76 Sunrise Subdivision in the City }

of Freeport, on the Island of Grand Bahama, one of the

Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Signed
N.Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00040

Whereas LEOTHA CLYDE of the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application

ANDY BROWN late of 20101 SW 84th Avenue, Miami,
Florida, United States of America, decéased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar
THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS
GN-456



cas

SUPREME COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00041 Pee .

Whereas ARENETTA N. DAVIS of No. 63 Royal
Palm Way and Sea Breeze Lane, Lucayan Beach
Subdivision in the City of Freeport, on the Island of
Grand Bahama, one of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration
of the Real and Personal Estate of ZENDRE KATHI
MAJOR late of No..63 Royal Palm Way and Sea
Breeze Lane, Lucayan Beach Subdivision in the
City of Freeport, on the Island of Grand Bahama,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased. : ;

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 21
days from the date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00042

Whereas BASIL THOMPSON of Pyfrom Road, New
. Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
- of The Bahamas has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of

>» WILLARD: THOMPSON late of -Pyfrom'Road, New |

Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
_ days from the date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
_Nassau, The Bahamas
« February 8th, 2007
Probate Division ;
2006/PRO/npr/00043

In the Estate of EUGENE V. DELUCA (a.k.a.)
EUGENE V. DE LUCA), late of the city of Haverford
in the State of Pennsylvania, United States of
America, trace Ltstadent
deceased.
_ NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
in the Probate Division by ELLEN SERVILLE of
No. 13 East Avenue North, in the Eastern District
of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
_of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-
At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas
for obtaining the Resealed Grant of Letters
Testamentary in the above estate granted to DONNA
D. K. VOIGT (named in the said Will as DONNA
VOIGT), the Executrix, by the Registrar of Wills
Delaware County, Pennsylvania, on the 8th day of
January 2004. ' .
Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
' February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00044

Whereas C. YYVETTE MCCARTNEY-PEDROCHE
of Skyline Drive, in the Western District of the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for Letters of Administration with the Will annexed
of the Real and Personal Estate of JEAN MARIE
CLAUDE FROTIER (a.k.a.) JEAN-MARIE FORTIER
late of 3663 Riverside Drive, Suite 504 Windsor,
Ontario, Canada, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar



SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
February 8th, 2007

Probate Division
2006/PRO/npr/00045

In the Estate of HOPE L. FISHER late of -
MANHATTAN in the State of New York, U.S.A.
WS 4 deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
on its Probate Side by LOUREY C. SMITH of No.
#4 George Street in the City of Nassau in the Island
of New Providence, The Bahamas, Attorney-At-
Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas, for
obtaining the Reasealed Grant of Certificates of
Small Estates in the above estate granted to
PATRICIA A. MCCRAY the Executrix, by the
Surrogate’s Court of New York in the State of New
York, USA, on the 3rd day of May 2005.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Assistant Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00046

Whereas ROSINA FORBES of the Settlement of
Eight Mile Rock on the Island of Grand Bahama,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, one of the Beneficiaries named in the
said Will, has made application to the Supreme
Court of the Bahamas, for letters of administration

with the Will annexed of the real and personal estate |

of JOSEPH SAMUEL LINDEN late of the Settlement
of West End, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is. hereby given that such applications will

be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 21
days from the date hereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson —
(for) Registrar

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
February 8th, 2007

Probate Division
2006/PRO/npr/00047

In the Estate of ELIZABETH G. MEINERS late of

-| 11423 Holly Court in the City of Kansas City in the

State of Missouri, USA,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
in the Probate Side by WILLIAM P. HOLOWESKO
of East Lyford Lane, Western District,New
Providence, The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the
Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas, for obtaining
the Resealed Grant of Letters Testamentary in the
above estate ao to CHRISTOPHER MOHART
the Personal Representative, by the Probate Court
in the State of Missouri, USA, on the 28th day of
June 2004.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Assistant Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
; February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00048

Whereas ANDREW G. WELLS of the Eastern District
of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for Letter of Administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of HERCULES HARDING late of Moore’s
Wharf of the Island of New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased. MS ae

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days. from the date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007, PAGE 7B
(for) Registrar
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
, February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00049

Whereas JAMES ALEXANDER RAHMING of
Stapledon Gardens in the Western District of the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the

‘Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made

application to the Supreme court of The Bahamas,
for Letters of Administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of GLADYS RAHMING late of Bias Street,
off Baillou Hill Road in the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence, one of the Island of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

Signed
N Neilly
(for) Registrar

SUPREME COURT:
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167_ .
Nassau, The Bahamas
February 8th, 2007

Probate Division
2006/PRO/npr/00050

In the Estate of JUDY O’NEIL (a.k.a) JUDITH ANN
O’NEIL, late of 269 Road 11 East, Woodslee, in
the Province of Ontario, Canada, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
in the Probate Division by NEVILLE BERNARD
WILCHOMBE II of Chancery House, The Mall, in
the City of Freeport on the Island of Grand Bahama,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, The Authorized Attorney
in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed
Certificate of Appointment of Estate Trustee With
A Will in the above estate granted to ELIZABETH
ANN O’NEIL, the Persnal Representative, by the
Superior Court of Justice, Ontario, on the 6th day
of May 2004..

_ Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

* SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
February 8th, 2007

Probate Division
2006/PRO/npr/00051

In the Estate of THOMAS G. BURKE (a.k.a)
THOMAS GERALD BURKE, late of Village of Rye
Brook in the County of Westchester in the State of
New York, one of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
in the Probate Division by HARTIS EUGENE
PINDER of No. 4 George Street in the City of
Nassau, in the Island of New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed Grant of
Probate in the above estate granted to HELEN W.
BURKE, the Executrix, by the State of New York,
County of Westchester, Surrogate’s Office, on the
9th day of April 1997.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Assistant Registrar

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
February 8th, 2007

Probate Division
2006/PRO/npr/00052

In the Estate of EDWARD LEVERNE HAMBLETON
late of 1227 Sherbrooke Street, Montreal in the
Province of Quebe, Canada,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
in the Probate Division by LOUREY CLAUDETTE.
SMITH of No. 4 George Street in the City of Nassau,
in the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-
At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas
for obtaining the Resealed Judgment of Probate in
the above estate granted to JANET ELAINE
RANKIN, the Executrix, by the Superior Court of
Canada, Province of Quebec, on the 13th day of
January 2005.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Assistant Registrar
PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007

THE TRIBUNE

Ee

FROM page 1B

partner, Starwood, Mr Forelle
explained.

After concluding the agree-
ment with the Government,
Baha Mar will have about two

‘ weeks to tie-down the agree-
ments with Harrah’s, which is
its joint venture equity part-
ner, and Starwood, which is an
operating partner.

Missing the March 1 date
could place Baha Mar under
pressure to conclude its joint
venture agreement by the stip-
ulated March 15 deadline,
especially as the developer has
issues such as financing it

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JEAN-MARC JOSEPH OF
SAXON WAY, MASON ADDITION, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 7th day of February, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2005

IN THE SUPREME COURT CLE/gen/00987

Common Law and Equity Division
BETWEEN

BRADJAI LTD.
Plaintiff

AND

EDWARD PENN,
Defendant

NOTICE

TO: EDWARD PENN
Nassau, Bahamas

TAKE NOTICE that, by Order of Mr. Justice
Mohammed, Justice of the Supreme Court, dated the
17th day of January, A.D., 2007, it was ordered that
personal service upon you of the Notice of Motion in
this action which is scheduled to be heard before the said
Justice on Monday the 19th day of March, A.D., 2007 at
10:00 o’clock in the forenoon be dispensed with; and it
was ordered that publication once in The Nassau Guardian

| and The Tribune of this Notice and of the reciting Order,
should be deemed good and sufficient service upon you.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to
appear on the hearing at the time and _ place
stated above the Court make such Order and such
judgment against you as the Court deems just.

LOCKHART & MUNROE
Attorneys for the Plaintiff



Pricing Information As Of: ’
200 7



Abaco Markets
* Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco
FirstCaribbean
Focol
Freeport Concrete
ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson
.0O Premier Real Estate

_it’s not a risk we want to take.”

1,000-room hotel.

Starwood’ will bring its four
brands - the Westin, Sheraton,
W and St Regis to brand the
remaining hotels.

“There’s a supplemental
Heads of Agreement that
needs to be settled,” Mr
Forelle said, explaining that it
dealt with the details of issues
such as “physical infrastruc-
ture and concessions that have
been on the table for a long
time”.

Among the issues being
dealt with in the supplemen-
tal Heads of Agreement are
the. changes in the size and
scope of the Baha Mar project,
which has increased from $1

- billion to $2.4 billion. The
developers are seeking invest-
ment incentives that are
increased in proportion to the
development’s size.

“To make March 1, a lot of
effort and focus is required,”
he reiterated. “There’s a lot of
different [government] depart-
ments involved.

“We’ve three-and-a-half
weeks, and we are both com-
mitted to making the deadline,
both government and us. ’m
hopeful we’ll be able to be
judged positively by having
that occur on target.”

needs to. pin down with the
likes of Scotiabank.

“The consequences of not
meeting the date is that two
public companies have a ‘walk-
away’ right from the deal,” Mr
Forelle told The Tribune.

“It seems to us and, we
believe, the Government, that
it’s a risk neither of us should
take - that we get past a date
that allows Harrah’s and Star-
wood to rethink this transac-
tion.

“We have no reason to think
that anyone is going to change
their minds about the deal, but

- Mr Forelle said Baha Mar
felt as if it were in partnership
with the Government on the
development, adding: ““We had
a meeting yesterday with the
Government, and. what came
out of the meeting, and what is
clear, is that the Government
understands the deadline and
what its needs to do.”

Harrah’s Entertainment, the
world-renowned casino opera-
tor, is scheduled to take a 43

er cent equity stake in the
82.4 billion project, and bring
its Caesar’s Entertainment
brand to the 100,000 square’
foot casino, purportedly the
largest in the Caribbean, and a

CALEDONIA

CORPORATE MANAGEMENT GROUP LIMITED

&

Invites applicants for the Full Time position of TRADER

RESPONSIBILITES INCLUDE:

¢ Executing Equity and Fixed Income trades as directed
by clients and colleagues in North American Markets.

* Monitoring of trades and proactive communication with
clients

QUALIFICATIONS

¢ Minimum of 3 years experience with trading

; here
¢ Series 7 or Canadian Securities Course
2 {I
¢ Working knowledge of Microsoft Office and basic
trading platforms

¢ Strong organizational and communication (verbal
and written) skills

* Client oriented and team player.

¢ Must be prepared to work on Bahamian Holidays
when North American markets are open.

Salary will be commensurate with experience. Interested applicants
must submit applications by February 23rd, 2007 via:

Mail: Human Resources Manager /
Caledonia Corporate Management Group Limited
P.O.Box N-8165

Nassau, Bahamas

info@caledoniagroup.com
Fax: 242.356.3969
Caledonia Corporate Management Group Limited is a well
established, independent and licensed Bahamian brokerage and

financial services firm, offering a comprehensive range of wealth
management solutions for private clients.



Lae LENS TES

52wk-Low
12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
sa 0.20 RND Holdings
28.00 ABDAB
14.00 Bahamas Su®8rmarkets

52wk-Hi

1.326132*
2.9728"***
2.596093**
1.217450°****
d 11.3075****"

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund





BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-HI - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

OIV $ - Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month eamings



YIELD - last 12 mont!
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS & - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



Div $
1.365
0.640
0.000
ERR RRSERNRNAER

0.000
pte

0.000 19.4
1.320 8.3

Yield %

30

smh
ividends divide



y closing price NAY
*- 26 January 2007
** - 31 January 2007

; *** - 31 Dacember 2006

**** - 31 December 2006



- 31 December 2006
we + ~

‘Critical date’ for Baha Mar project

that allows us to do that.

“There’s a lot of paperwork,
a lot of processes, a lot of dili-
gence the Government is
doing. That is all logical and
appropriate. It just needs to
get done.”

Baha Mar’s $2.4 billion
transformation of Cable Beach
will attract 500,000 guests to
its various resorts during the
first year after it fully opens in
2011, with the project becom-
ing “the largest gaming and
resort development in this
Hemisphere outside Las
Vegas”.

Speaking after the prelimi-
nary signing of the joint ven-
ture'agreement with Harrah’s,
Sarkis Izmirlian, Baha Mar’s
chairman and chief executive,
said then that the completed
development will pump $560
million annually into the
Bahamian economy’s gross
domestic product (GDP).

Mr Izmirlian reiterated that
economic forecasting studies
conducted by Global Insight
had shown that after opening,
Baha Mar would create “more
than 7,000 direct and indirect
jobs”.

The same study reported
that Baha Mar’s cumulative
impact on Bahamian GDP
would be some $11.2 billion
over a 20-year period, with
more than $4.7 billion in tax
revenues produced over that
same time period.

“March 1 is our benchmark
date for concluding with the
Government, and then sign the
joint venture agreement to
make a living, breathing com-
pany committed to developing
this project.”

Don Robinson, Baha Mar’s
president, told The Tribune
that the developers “want to
be able to hit the ground run-
ning”, and had readied their
operations in anticipation of
the agreements with the Gov-
ernment and joint venture
partners being signed.

He added that Baha Mar
was “prepared to start very
quickly” work on the re-routed
West Bay Street (the current
road will remain open until it is
finished) and the construction
of a new Straw Market and
Commercial Village. The latter
is where all the Government
buildings and commercial
banks lining West Bay Street
will be relocated to. ;

Mr Forelle explained that |
their relocation was vital to
kickstarting the project in
earnest, as many of them lie
on the site earmarked for the
main resort campus, the Cecil
Wallace-Whitfield Centre, for
example, lying right where the
main lobby for the Caesar’s
and Westin-branded proper-
ties are scheduled to go.

Mr Robinson said: “We
would like to get this going.
This date is a critical path date

FU cena le

Well established Fashion Retail
Business. Well known and

‘respected worldwide Franchise.
20 years at same prime location.

Email: b.inquiries@gmail.com

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that.l, BARBARA DALEY of
More Avenue off Wulff Road intend to change my name
child’s name from to CHRISTELLA TEONEY JOSEPH to
CHRISTELLA TEONEY DALEY. if there are any objections
to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box SS-742,
Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of
publication of this notice.
















NOTICE

. NOTICE is hereby given that CHARLES OSAZUWA OF
TWYNAM HEIGHTS, P.O. BOX EE-16843, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and. Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization shauld
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 31st day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Poet Co ee ree te 5 ad
Position Available

TRUST ACCOUNTANT

Job Function:
e To produce accurate and timely trust and company financial

statements in accordance with internal procedures and

generally accepted accounting principles.


























Responsibilities:
e Update the clients’ general ledger.
e Reconcile cash and securities balance; ensuring that all
entries are processed correctly in ledger.
e Prepare monthly financial statements and internal client
reports for a portfolio of complex trusts and companies.
¢ — Liaise with trust and company administrators to ensure that
financial statements accurately reflect the activities of the
client.




Qualifications:

¢ Bachelor's degree in Accounting.

¢ At least five years experience preparing trust and company
financial statements.
Understanding of the fundamentals of trust administration,
Advance knowledge of Microsoft Excel.
Completion of the Canadian Securities Course or Series 7
Course would be an asset.
Ability to supervise a team of trust accountants.

e Proven track record of success ina similar position.










Benefits:
e = Attractive salary commensurate with skills and experience,
Other benefits include medical insurance coverage,
excellent pension plan and performance based bonus.

Interested persons mecting the above requirements may forward their
resumes and two written references to:

Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7043
Nassau, The Bahamas
or

Email: trustaccountant@gmail.com

cw nae we

2 eam ty

.veeaees ~~ even
’ -

se eee

8 2 ® we ow te*_ *
A I ca

THE TRIBUNE

BTC, from 1B

PUC discussing the VoIP product
with BTC in early 2006, advising
the state-owned carrier that the ser-
vice was price regulated, and urging
it to apply for a licence amendment
to begin delivering the service.

He added that BTC began adver-
tising ViBE in July 2006, then
launched it two months later, both
events taking place without PUC
approval despite IndiGo bringing
the issue to the regulator’s atten-
tion on August 2, 2006.

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny said: “The
PUC chose to do nothing in the
face of open and flagrant violation
of its advice to BTC that it was in
breach of its licence. Now, the PUC
itself, through this public consulta-
tion, seeks to make everything all
right on behalf of BTC by papering
over BTC’s violation and legitimis-
ing the events that have taken
place.”

He added that the PUC was jus-
tifying this on the grounds that
ViBE’s introduction would make
better technology and prices avail-
able to Bahamian consumers, some-
thing that was “instructive”.

__ “Henceforth, it would appear the
PUC has abrogated its responsibil-
ity to enforce the rule of law, and
regulate in an objective and non-
discriminatory manner, in prefer-
ence of allowing anything that is a
cheaper service and therefore, it

Hutton-Ashkenny said.

He added that the ViBE saga
had eerie similarities to what hap-
pened in October 2004, when BTC
reduced all its international and
inter-island long distance rates as
a supposed ‘promotion’, a move
many interpreted as an attempt to
knock-out IndiGo’s entry to the
market through predatory pricing.
Again, the price reduction received
no prior approval from the PUC.

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny described
the events surrounding ViBE as
“even more incredible”, and point-
ed out that under the Telecommu-
nications Act the PUC had powers
to “compel a licensee to adhere to
the rule of law”.

Fines for non-compliance with
the PUC’s instructions could
amount to $300,000, with a further
$10,000 per day added for contin-
ued defiance.

Mr Hutton-Ashkenny and Indi-
Go received backing from Cable
Bahamas in their demand for the
PUC to ensure a “level playing
field” in the telecoms sector, with
the regulator preventing anti-com-

" petitive and discriminatory behav-

iour. Barry Williams, .Cable
Bahamas’ finance vice-president,
suggested that over ViBe, that BTC
be fined for failing to apply for a
licence modification. It called on
the PUC to “display, in a real man-
ner, the fortitude to pursue an
enforcement action against BTC” if

opines, in the public interest,” Mr complaints against it by IndiGo

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSER GEDEUS OF
THE MUD, MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a_ citizen

of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 31st day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SHELDA EXANTIS OF
MOUNTABOR DRIVE, PINEWOOD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen'of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization shouid not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 31st day of January, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Become self-sufficient and acquire the skills to

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Alpha Entrepreneurial Management Training &
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PHASE I

‘February, 19, 20, 22, 26, 27 &
March 1, 2007 6pm-9pm

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February 24, 2007 9am-3pm

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SPACE IS LIMITED! |






The Ministry of Local
Government & Consumer Affairs

INVITES
THE GENERAL PUBLIC TO PARTICIPATE IN A
CONSULTATIVE MEETING
ON THE ESTABLISHMENT OF








' LOCAL GOVERNMENT
FOR
NEW PROVIDENCE




SPEAKERS WILL INCLUDE





Honourable V. Alfred Gray
Minister of Local Government & Consumer Affairs





Honourable George A. Smith
Former Minister of Local Government






Dr. Pandora Johnson
Vice President- College of the Bahamas





Mr. Karl P.N.R. Spencer
Former Family Island Commissioner






Transfiguration Baptist Church Hall
Vesey Street





12th February, 2007

7:00 p.m.




.

proved true, and if the incumbent
was difficult on the issues of whole-
sale prices and interconnection with
its own network.

Mr Williams also urged the PUC
to resolve all interconnection and
anti-competitive disputes “within
the next two months”,

He said: “It is our contention that
the introduction of ViBe ought not
to have been done in a vacuum.
Allowing the introduction without
the necessary safeguards to pro-
mote competition such as intercon-
nection, wholesaling and facilities-
sharing falls far short of the stan-
dard of due diligence and conduct
one could legitimately expect from
a competition regulator. The situa-
tion is exacerbated when the regu-
lator signals that the public consul-
tation is perfunctory.” ‘

‘Meanwhile, Felicity Johnson,
BTC’s vice-president of legal, reg-
ulatory and interconnection ser-
vices, said the company was still
opposed to the PUC defining ViBe
as a price-regulated service.

She urged: “If the consumer is
not being harmed, and in this case

many consumers are benefiting,
then the PUC should not engage
in over-regulation by seeking to
regulate ViBE prices when no such
regulation is required under the
law, nor is such a practice econom-
ically sound.”

Ms Johnson said ViBe was a val-
ue-added service to its DSL Broad-
band product, and the Internet was
not regulated by the PUC, meaning
that the VoIP product was also not
subject to regulation as it did not
fall within voice telephony.

Now was BTC dominant in the
Bahamian VoIP market, Ms John-
son added, arguing that a 2006 sur-
vey for the company by Laura Jane
Marketing showed illegal operators
had a 60 per cent market share.

“BTC maintains that it did not
seek approval from the Commis-
sion for its ViBE product because
approval is only required for new
telecommunications services, which
ViBE is not,” Ms Johnson said,
adding. that the company had to
move rapidly to “stem the erosion
of its long distance revenues by ille-
gal operators”.





NOTICE |

NOTICE is hereby given that RODNEY CALIS OF FORT
ST. GROOVE, P.O. BOX CR-54802, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 31st day of January, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.










ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

WANTED

An Offshore Bank invites applications
for the position of an Administrative
Assistant. The candidate should possess
a minimum of an Associate Degree and
proficiency in computer operations with
strong communication skills.

Experience in offshore banking
operations in computerized environment
is desirable.

Applicant should be reliable, well
Organized and self motivated.

Responsibilities include back office
operations, secretarial assistance,
maintenance of records and handling
other routine office jobs. Salary will be
commensurate with qualifications and
experience.

Applicants should send resumé to P.O.
Box SS-19046, Nassau, within 15 days
of this advertisement.





RELATIONSHIP MANAGER





Trust & Corporate Services




A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in ‘The
Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guemsey, Switzerland and the United
Kingdom, Butterfield Bank offers a wide range of services to local and
international clients. .







An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter with a
record of professional achievements to join a dynamic Trast & Corporate Services
team. The successful candidate will report directly to the Senior Relationship
Manager.







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Core Responsibilities




Manage a large portfolio of complex accounts including trust. estates and
agencies,




“Provide financial information to clients as requested,

* ‘Act on clients’ behalf in matters dealing with lawyers, beneficiaries, etc.




Extensive experience with all aspects of trust administration.




Desired Qualifications




= Bachelor's Degree in Business or related discipline from a well recognized
university,





= Aminimum of five years progressive Fiduciary experience in the Financial
Services Industry.





® ‘STEP training or other suitable qualifications will be advantageous.




"Proficient in Microsoft Office suite of products,




* Strong interpersonal, communication, problem solving, project management
and customer service skills. j




Closing Date: February 16, 2007





Contact

Human Resources
Butterfield Bank (Babamas) Limited
P.O, Box N-3242

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: (242) 393 3772

E-mail: recruitment@ buttertieldbank.bs









www. butterfieldbank. bs

nas

Butterfield Bank






WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007, PAGE 9B. _~

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WILMAN PAUL OF
LIFEBOUY STREET, HOUSE NO.# 25, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement ;
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 7th day of
February, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




















ESTATE CARETAKER

Estate Caretaker responsible for large beachfront house and
property in Nassau, Bahamas.






Responsibilities include but are not limited to:



* Housekeeping and estate’s organization with the house
keeper.

* Administration task

° Supervising and coordinating the household and
property repairs and maintenance.

¢ Supervising subcontractors

* Develops and implements preventive maintenance
programs , :














This position offers a competitive compensation, including
housing and benefits. Apply in confidence to:




ESTATE CARETAKER
P.O.Box N449
Nassau, Bahamas



UBS

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd. a leading international trust
company has an opening for the position of a

Accounting System
Specialist & Programmer

In this challenging position you will be responsible for:

* Maintenance and development of “ePOCA Portfolio
Management” software from Cantalouppi and Hug AG;

* Analysis of business specifications from both accounting
and IT perspectives.

* Ownership of the design phases of one or more of the
projects deliveries;

* Provide training and second level support to users.

We are searching for a personality with a broad experience of
relational database modeling and process modeling with sound
knowledge in software development lifecycle. Programming
capabilities using MS DOT.NET and JAVA are a must. A suc-
cessful track record as Business Analyst/Project Manager MIS
_and strong analytical skills in both IT and accounting are key
,fequirements to succeed in this senior position. In addition the
ideal candidate must be fluent in English and German (in order
to co-ordinate with our head office in Switzerland).

Applications in writing, enclosing a full resume, by
Bahamian nationals only on or before February 19, 2007.

Interested persons should reply on or before February 19, 2007

Postal Address:

UBS Trustees (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources

P.O. Box N-7757

Nassau, Bahamas

SENIOR RELATIONSHIP MANAGER



Trust & Corporate Services




A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda. with offices in The
Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guemsey, Switzerland and the United
Kingdom, Butterfield Bank offers a wide range of services to focal and
international clients,





y

An exciting opportunity currently exists for a results oriented self starter with a
record of professional achievements to join a dynamic Trust & Corporate Services
team. The successful candidate will report directly to the Head of Trust &
Corproate Services..








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Core Responsibilities




Oversee a group of complex client relationships.




* * Provide technical advice to staff on trust and company structures,




* Act on clients’ behalf in matters dealing with lawyers, beneficiaries, etc,

Extensive experience with all aspects of trust administration.



Desired Qualifications




Bachelor's Degree in Business or related discipline from a well recognized
university,



® Five - Bight years progressive Fiduciary experience in the Financial Services
Industry. :




* - STEP training or other suitable qualifications will be advantageous.




® Proficient in Microsoft Office suite of products.




* Strong interpersonal, communication, problem solving, project management
and customer service skills,




Closing Date; February 16, 2007





Contact

Human Resources

Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-3242

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax: (242) 393 3772

E-mail; recruitment@ butterfieldbank.bs









www. butterfieldbank.bs

BA .

Butterfield Bank

eT ae ee




PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2007 | | THE TRIBUNE *
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