Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

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General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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Full Text
PAGE 2, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Vote not just for ourselves
but for future generations

RIME Minister Perry Christie

has announced that the cur-
rent register of voters will come to an
end on March 12. No doubt this will
serve as an incentive for those
Bahamians who have not yet done so
to register for the next general election
only a few months away.

In every run-up to general elections
there are those who inevitably predict
that the slow pace of registration of
voters is an indication that Bahami-
ans are either fed up with the system
or with the political parties or have
simply become apathetic.

Every time they are proven wrong,
but that does not deter them from
making much the same prediction
again. Perhaps the idea is that Bahami-
ans are bound to get fed up with their
democracy at some point and refuse to
vote. Then the negative pundits will at
last be proven right.

Just before the 1997 general elec-
tion one of them came to the conclu-
sion that Bahamians had become fed
up with both political parties and that
1997 would be “the year of the inde-
pendents”.

But Bahamians did register - some:
of them late, as is their wont — and
turned out in droves to vote. The
result was that the FNM, which had
governed extraordinarily well, was
returned with an overwhelming major-
ity (34-6) and not a single indepen-
dent was elected.

ahamians have always been a
highly politicised people and
there was a passionate desire to be
involved even in the days before uni-

versal adult suffrage. In terms of voter |

turnout we have one of the best records
in the.world except for totalitarian
states and democracies where voting
is mandatory.

As a matter of fact, our voting record
is better than that of the three great
English-speaking western democracies.
In the United States only 64 per cent of
qualified citizens voted in the 2004 pres-
idential election and in Britain the
turnout is usually just above 70 per
cent. The Canadians used to be in that

neighbourhood and even higher but

they are now worried that their turnout
‘is declining; it was only 60.5 per cent in
the 2004 election. .

By contrast, the turnout of voters in
The Bahamas in 1997 was almost 93
per cent and in 2002 it was just over



90 per cent. A set of special circum-
stances in 2002 did produce an unusu-
ally high complement of independents
but that is not likely to occur again.

All that being said, it is nevertheless
important that the nation’s leadership at
all levels — political, religious and acad-
emic as well as those who help to mould
public opinion — should continue to edu-
cate younger generations especially and
to agitate for even greater involvement
in the political process.

There is a danger that we can
become too smug, selfish and apathet-
ic and take our good fortune for grant-

‘ed as so many Americans seem to do.

There is also a danger that the lessons

~of our history will be lost and that the

high points of our struggle for democ-
racy will fade in the national memory.

ome older persons never under-
stood and apparently will never



When a voter goes to the polls he is
not just voting for a particular party,
or candidate, or policy, as important
as they are; he is also simply but
powerfully laying claim to all his
privileges; he is affirming his rights as
a citizen, and renewing the democratic
contract with his fellow citizens.





The idea of democracy is always
under attack: some say it is inefficient,
wasteful, slow, sometimes corrupt and |

often exasperating. All of which may —

be true; but wiser heads have also
pointed out that a better system has

yet to be invented.



understand why it is so important that
each and every one of us should par-
ticipate in this grand exercise of
democracy at every opportunity. For-
tunately, they constitute a small minor-
ity.

What is distressing today is to hear
some educated young Bahamians giv-
ing excuses for their failure to partici-
pate in the process, for refusing to reg-
ister and vote.

They say it makes no difference
because nothing changes anyway or
that one vote does not make a differ-
ence or that they see no benefit coming
to them from voting or that all politi-
cians are self-seeking.

Fortunately, they too are in the
minority as many other young people
do participate and some register as
soon as they are qualified. They are a
credit to their parents, their teachers .
and the community. So what makes the
difference?

Are the disenchanted ones victims
of indifferent parents and unenlight-
ened teachers? Or a culture that seems
to them too wrapped up in selfish pur-

suits? Or do they take their cue from
the ivory tower dwellers who like to
pontificate that the political arena is
populated by lesser mortals? Or is it
that they are simply asking for atten-
tion?

o begin with, the excuses do

not hold water. The idea of
democracy is always under attack:
some Say it is inefficient, wasteful,
slow, sometimes corrupt and often
exasperating. All of which may be
true; but wiser heads have also point-
ed out that a better system has yet to
be invented.

Profound changes can be achieved
through democratic political process-
es and this has been demonstrated all
over the world as well as ini our own lit-
tle country.

The availability of expanding educa-
tional opportunities in The Bahamas
over the last 40 years has been just one
positive result of political action.

The system can sometimes take on
unwelcome accretions but it also has
self-correcting mechanisms, including
public debate, the law and the ballot.
The system can be exploited by rascals
but there are remedies for that as well.

That is why people who are not so
fortunate as to have a long tradition of
democracy will walk miles and even
risk life and limb at the first opportunity
to cast their ballots.

ALL YOUR DECORATING |

s On The Island”

They know that it is easier to get rid
of a would-be dictator in the democra-
tic system than to get rid of an
entrenched dictator in a totalitarian
state.

But beyond the multitude of partic-
ular changes that can be made through
the democratic procéss is the preser-
vation of the system itself.

hen a voter goes to the polls

he is not just voting for a
particular party, or candidate, or policy,
as important as they are;.he is also sim- .
ply but powerfully laying claim to all his
privileges; he is.affirming his rights as a
citizen, and renewing the democratic
contract with his fellow citizens.

Another good reason why enlight-
ened citizens of all ages and all social
and economic backgrounds go to the
polls to vote is that they understand
that they are part of a community
and responsible for the community.
Some people of very humble back-
ground and limited exposure under-
stand this, so it is perplexing that
some with high education and wide
exposure do not.

Each one of us has responsibility not
just for himself but to the entire com-
munity. That may be a difficult con-
cept for some people to absorb in these
days of rampant individualism and fre-
netic self-seeking. They scoff at the
idea that real nobility is about con-
tributing more than you receive from
the common wealth.

ur responsibility for the com-

mon good also transcends our
own generation and our own time. Just
as we who live today benefit from the
sacrifices and labour of our ancestors,
imperfect though they were, so we too
have a responsibility to leave a legacy
for those we will never know.

That is why an old man in a remote
part of Africa limps to the polls on a
crude crutch. He may be dead the next
day but he has done his duty to the
next generation.

He is educated. He is reaponeble:
He is enlightened.

He has a sense of history and a sense
of the future, a belief in the oneness
of all humankind and all generations.

He has paid his debt to his ancestors
and he has left a legacy for those who
will proudly call him ancestor.

sirarthurfoulkes@hotmail.com
bahamapundit.typepad.com

Activities to

mark Special .

Education
Week

EDUCATION officials have
launched a series of activities
to mark Special Education
Week.

The celebrations began on
Sunday with a church service a
the Bahamas Christian Fellow-
ship on Carmichael Road.

Today at 10am, the week will
be officially opened by Minister

.of Education Alfred Sears, fol-

lowed by a special students
exhibition at the Ministry of
Education on Thompson Boule-
vard.

On Wednesday at noon a lun-
cheon for special educators will
be held at Worker’s House on
Tonique Williams-Darling Dri-
ve.

On Thursday at 6.30pm, a

‘parents night will be held at

Stephen Dillet Primary School
on Wulff Road and Windsor
Lane.

On Friday, a performance
called “Culture Expressions”
will be held at the National
Centre for the Performing Arts
under the patronage of Dr
Corolyn L, Sands.

‘Young man

in hospital
following
shooting

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama Police are investigat-
ing a shooting that occurred in
West End early Sunday morn-
ing when shots fired into a
crowd struck a young man.

Henry Saunders, a 21-year-
old resident of West End, was in
the area of the Star Night Club
around 12.15am when he was
shot.

He is presently at Rand
Memorial Hospital in stable
condition with injuries to his
right thigh. —

According to Inspector
Loretta Mackey, Saunders was
among a crowd of people gath-
ered in the street near the night-
club.

Ms Mackey said some per-
sons in the crowd were throwing
bottles and fighting when a
vehicle attempted to pass.

She said occupants of the
vehicle told persons in the street
to move, but they refused.

. Then,.Ms Mackey said, an

occupant of the vehicle fired
three shots from a handgun into
the crowd, hitting Mr Saunders
in the upper right thigh.

The victim was taken to the
West End Clinic, and then later
transported by ambulance to
the Rand.

Inspector Mackey said inves-
tigations are continuing into is
shooting.

Share your news.

The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their

BILLY'S DEF
ey IDEN OLAS

neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 3



Ed
Atlantis claims not posting jobs

due to ‘miscommunication’

Ooln brief

50-year-old |
man dies on
conching
expedition

A 50 year-old man
drowned over the weekend
while on a conching trip just
off Mangrove Cay Andros.

One of the two persons
was in the water, the other
in the vessel.

As the:man in the vessel
moved the boat, he report-
edly fell overboard and
downed.

Police say they have inves-
tigated the matter, ruling out
foul play.

Florida man
arrested on.
boat with

immigrants

FREEPORT - A Florida
resident was arrested along
with 13 suspected illegal
immigrants onboard a speed-
boat two miles off Grand
Bahama over the weekend.

Inspector Loretta Mack-
ey, assistant press liaison offi-
cer, said a team of officers
from the Drug Enforcement
and the Harbour Police were
on routine patrol onboard
the HPB-1 on Saturday when
they observed a 25-foot ves-
sel with several persons
onboard.

She said the captain of the
vessel began acting in a sus-
picious manner so officers
beckoned him to stop.

When the vessel was
stopped, officers boarded it
and reportedly discovered
that the 13 persons on board
were Brazilian nationals.

Inspector Mackey said the
‘nine men and four women,
along with the captain —- who
is of Brazilian descent, and a
resident of Pompano Beach,
Florida — were taken into
custody.

The vessel was confiscat-
ed and the migrants were
handed over to immigration
officials for further investi-
gations.

Two men
arrested
after boat
pursuit

A HIGH-SPEED boat
chase on Sunday ended with
the arrest of two Bahamian
men and the seizure of 15
pounds of suspected cocaine.

According to . police
reports, a team of officers
from the Drug Enforcement
Unit and the Harbor Police
were on routine boat patrol
around 9am about four miles
off shore, near the Running
Mon Marina, when they
observed a speedboat with
two dark men onboard.

The captain of the vessel
reportedly began acting in a
suspicious manner and
refused to stop when beck-
oned by officers.

It is alleged that the sec-
ond man then ran towards
the bow of the vessel and
threw a black knapsack-type
bag into the water.

The Captain kept driving
at a high rate of speed, the
officers reported.

Police eventually inter-
cepted the boat, boarded the
vessel, told the captain of
their suspicion and conduct-
ed a search.

Nothing illegal was found
onboard.

The suspects, both from
Bimini and aged 24 and 31,
were detained and the ves-
sel secured.

Inspector Loretta Mackey
said the officers returned to
_ the area where the suspected
bag was thrown into the
water. After retrieving bag
from the water, officers dis-
covered six black taped pack-
ages, containing a substance
suspected of being cocaine
and a cellular telephone
charger.

The suspects were placed
under arrest and cautioned,
and 15 pounds of drugs were
seized.

The suspected drugs and
the men were transported to
New Providence on Monday.

Police investigations into
the matter continue.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE

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Pest Control

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@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE failure of Atlantis to
post certain jobs on its website
— making it impossible for the
public to apply - was due to
internal miscommunication, a
company representative has
-claimed.

The explanation comes amid

claims that the fact that some
listings - and hence the means
of applying for some positions —
could not be found on the site
was evidence of discrimination
against Bahamians by Atlantis
when hiring for certain posi-
tions. -
It was alleged that this covert
discrimination is also achieved
through the advertising of jobs
in the newsapers, the specifics of
which are purposefully tailored
to correspond to an individual
they have already. chosen —
often from abroad.

The specificity of the require-
ments in the print advertise-
ment then makes it highly
unlikely that any member of the
Bahamian public would fit the
description.

Ed Fields, public relations
representative at the resort,
spoke strongly against any alle-
gations of discrimination.

Mr Fields told The Tribune
yesterday that the fact the post-
ings did not appear on the
Atlantis website — the only
medium through which people
can submit applications for jobs
within the resort — was simply a
temporary oversight.

“Due to internal issues and a
communication miscue, the job
offerings for our nightclubs
were advertised (in the news-
paper) prior to going through
the internal process required
for posting online,” he said.

“We expect the positions to
be posted by no later than
tomorrow,” he added.

Mr Fields also said that the
claim that Atlantis tailors job
advertisements to the specifica-
tions of pre-selected individu-
als is “absolutely incorrect”.

i. « A number of people had con-

tacted The Tribune in the last
two weeks to complain that the
postings — including one for a
disc jockey, one for a “flair
mixologist” (or cocktail spe-
cialist), and one for a “VIP serv-
er/model” — were not available
to the public.

Furthermore, when Bahami-
an DJ Joey Jamz subsequently
called an Atlantis department
to inquire as to how he could
go about applying for the disc
jockey position, he alleges he
was told by a‘staff member that
it was a position for which no

Bahamian is qualified.

His claims correspond with
reports from several sources
that there is a tendency within
Atlantis to overlook Bahami-
ans when seeking people to fill
certain jobs.

Requirements

Elaborating on the sugges-
tion that certain requirements
in the job listings are included
with the sole aim of excluding
Bahamian applicants, the DJ
described the situation as
“unfair."

A specification within the DJ
job listing that the applicant has



had “exposure to an interna-
tional audience with a personal
high end celebrity type follow-
ing” is one that Atlantis would
likely be aware no Bahamian
DJs other than himself -
despite several being well-qual-
ified with regard to all other
specifications — would have, he
claimed.

“How many of us, in our little
country, have had exposure to
international audiences, besides
me? How many of us have a
celebrity following, besides me?
It’s not fair to advertise in such
a way where they know that no
other Bahamian is qualified.
They do it so they can bring in
the foreigners,” he said.

Bahamas in top 20 for world’s
highest prison populations



THE Bahamas has one of the
highest prison population rates
in the world, according to a new
study.

It is listed in the world’s top
20 along with 11 other nations
in the Caribbean region.

The study, by the Interna-
tional Centre for Prisons Stud-
ies at King’s College, London,
puts the USA at the top of the
list, with Russia second and the
Caribbean region third.

Twelve Caribbean region
countries, including Bermuda,
feature in the world’s top 20. St
Kitts and Nevis is third globally,
with 547 prisoners per 100,000
people compared with the US’s
738.

Apart from the Bahamas,
other Caribbean countries in
the top 20 are Belize, Cuba,
the British Virgin Islands,
Bermuda, the Cayman Islands,

Dominica, Barbados, Nether-
lands Antilles, Puerto Rico and
Suriname.

The Caribbean nations out-
side the top 50 are Haiti,
Jamaica, Martinique, Guyana
and the Dominican Republic.

Haiti has the lowest prison
population rate in the region,
with only 43 inmates for every
100,000 people.

The study revealed that more
than nine million people are
held in penal institutions around
the world - 250,000 more than
18 months ago.

The BBC reported Anton
Schelupanov, a research asso-
ciate at King’s College, as saying
that thé figures were not good
news for the region.

It meant penal policy was
biased towards imprisonment
instead of less costly communi-
ty sentences, he said.

@ FOX Hill Prison is the only
prison in the Bahamas — now
named as having one of the
highest prison populations per
100,000 people



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© Valentine Mugs from ....





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@ Paper Hearts, Cupids, Dang

Thre

“We have qualified Bahami- .

ans who would love to be over
there working — people who are
qualified,” he said.

Joey himself had wanted to
apply for the position after
being personally alerted by Per-
cy Sweeting, president of the
Bahamas Musicians and Enter-
tainment Union, and Ms Dar-
nelle Wards, director of enter-
tainment at Atlantis, of the job’s
availability.

However, his attempts were
foiled.-Aside from difficulties in
accessing an application form,

and claims that "no Bahamian is
qualified for this position", an
Atlantis staff member allegedly
informed him that Atlantis had
a policy of not-re-hiring employ-
ees who have been previously
“let go”.

The DJ had his contract ter-
minated at the resort around
three years ago, after six years
of performing. However, he
says he has since played venues
there on a one-off basis, and
questioned why the company
would be imposing that restric-
tion at this stage.

GREAT
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e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com











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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

ee ee Level with the
Bahamian people

AGE 4, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007 THE TRIBUNE



Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K. C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991 .

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-198
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Oe

Barack Obama’s race dilemma

THE LATEST CONTROVERSY involv-
ing Joe Biden confirmed the obvious about
the senator from Delaware: Glibness has its
risks.

It also revealed something about Barack
Obama: The African-American senator from
Illinois isn’t sure how to handle race as an
issue in his bid for the White House.

The last time Biden ran for president, he
dropped out after admitting that he borrowed
lines from an inspirational speech given by a
British politician. Twenty years later, his own
words undercut his announcement of another
try. In a shoot-from-the-lips interview with
the New York Observer, Biden described
Obama as “the first mainstream African-
American who is articulate and bright and
clean and a nice-looking guy.” ,

The words are controversial because they
are an honest, if awkwardly stated, expres-
sion of the white establishment view of”
African-American politicians who preceded
Obama — that their looks, speech, or lifestyle
turned off white voters, making them une-
lectable on the national stage.

Obama’s first reaction was restrained. “I
didn’t take it personally and I don’t think he
intended to offend,” he said: “But the way
he constructed the statement was probably a
little unfortunate.”

Later in the day, after other African-Amer-
ican politicians did take it personally, Obama
issued a much stronger statement: “I didn’t
take Senator Biden’s comments personally,
but obviously they were historically inaccu-
rate,” he said. “African-American presidential
candidates like Jesse Jackson, Shirley
Chisholm, Carol Moseley Braun and Al
Sharpton gave a voice to many important
issues through their campaigns and no one
would call them inarticulate.”

In short, Obama’s first instinct was to let
the remarks go, rather than use them to beat
up on Biden. He recalculated only after oth-
er African-American politicians reacted with
less understanding. For example, when Biden
called to apologize, Sharpton said, “I told
him I take a bath every day.” Eventually,
Obama realized that anything less than con-
demnation would make him sound insensi-
tive to perceived racism. *

In some ways, Obama’s political calcula-
tion when it comes to race is no different than
Hillary Clinton’s when it comes to gender or
Mitt Romney’s when it comes to religion.

Should the candidate bluntly label a com- -

ment sexist or, in Romney’s case, anti-Mor-
mon? Or, does the candidate decide there is
more to be gained by taking the high ground












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and letting voters draw their own conclusion
about the appropriateness of a remark?

But Obama’s political dilemma includes a
curious twist.

He doesn’t want to be perceived strictly as
a “black” candidate anymore than Clinton
wants to be defined strictly as a female can-
didate. To be successful, a presidential can-
didate needs broad appeal, beyond race, or
gender.

At the same time, Obama is dealing with
the sentiment expressed recently by black
author Debra J. Dickerson that “Obama isn’t
black.” This is a distinction rooted in Obama’s
heritage — he is the American-born son ofa
black father from Kenya and a white mother
from Kansas — as opposed to African-Amer-
icans descended from slaves.

If Obama allows a perceived racial insult to
go unchallenged, the only African-American
candidate in the 2008 presidential race risks
offending African-American voters who are
already ambivalent about his candidacy. If
Obama labels every insult racist, he risks
offending white voters.

Deval Patrick faced similar challenges dur-
ing the 2006 governor’s race in Massachu-
setts. He said he did not want to be “the black
candidate.” He distanced himself from others
who labelled his opponent’s tactics racist or
“race-baiting.” However, Patrick did not have
to deal with the added complication that Oba-
ma confronts via heritage. African-American
voters embraced him and helped elect him
governor.

Biden’s long shot candidacy to be presi-
dent faces a new challenge after the New
York Observer interview. In a flash, the Inter-
net pegged Biden as undisciplined at best and
possibly racist at worst.

Unfortunately, he displays an old-fash-
ioned, establishment way of looking at the
world, whether he is praising Obama as
“bright and clean” at the expense of other
African-American politicians; or praising his
state’s diversity, with last year’s comment
that “You cannot go to a 7-Eleven or a
Dunkin’ Donuts unless you have an Indian
accent.”

Obama appeals naturally to those seeking a
fresh perspective on race and ethnicity. Still,
when race comes up, as it did in Biden’s com-
ments, he faces the old challenge: how to deal
with it.

The same warning applies to Biden and
Obama. Beware loose lips. They can sink any
presidential candidate.

(* This article is by Joan Vennochi of The
Boston Globe — © 2007)

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EDITOR, The Tribune.

VERY soon, the people of
The Bahamas will go to the polls
and cast a critical ballot. They

_ will decide whether or not to

endorse the administration of
the Rt Hon Perry G Christie for
another five-year term or to
return the Rt Hon Hubert A
Ingraham to the office of Prime
Minister...It is an important day,
and I urge all eligible Bahami-
ans to register to have their
voices heard as it relates to their
choice for leader.

The question now arises:
Who is best to lead the Bahamas
at this time? Who is more com-
mitted to telling Bahamians the
truth, as it relates to matters of
national importance, or any
matter?

Who has the strength,
courage, and convictions to
speak truth no matter who it
offends, or how unpleasant it
may be? No spin, no shuffling,
just the plain truth about mat-
ters. Let me say here that I don’t
trust people who get along with
everybody or who everybody
refers to as, “a nice man.” For
me it basically means that
they’re unprincipled and have
no convictions. Principled peo-
ple offend others all the time.
Just ask the great leaders of old,
as a matter of fact it would have
been good if we could have
asked Sir Lynden, who is one of
the planks in one of the major
political party’s campaign. He
would concur that as an effec-
tive leader, it’s inevitable!

Which of these men has the
best leadership style to lead the
country forward in a Bahamas
where a foreign workforce
increasingly sees\the Bahamas
as the place to be, and come in
droves to occupy jobs, which
Bahamians can fill? Which of
these leaders has character,
commitment and honesty as
hallmarks of their make-up?

When these individuals speak
who should the Bahamian peo-
ple believe?

What should the Bahamian
people believe? I say here and

now that it’s time for the decep-_

tions; distortions and misrepre-
sentations to end.

The Bahamian people
deserve better, they deserve the
TRUTH. Instead of broad plat-
itudes, the Bahamian people
deserve the facts.

The Bahamian people
deserve some answers to the
many questions I hear them ask
everyday. Most importantly the
Bahamian people deserve a real
leader! Not one run by commit-
tees, spin, irresponsibility,
incompetence and denials. We
need a leader who answers
questions truthfully and
responds to corruption within
the ranks of his cabinet by giv-
ing the axe to whoever or
whomever that offender might
be. Let me add here, “Anything
with more than one head is a

. monster!”

Will the prime minister please
tell the Bahamian people, what
is the real deal as it relates to
the five baggage handlers? Who







- Paes C@itslewlarsianrereleuaicit



LETTERS




knew what and when did they
know? And if nobody in gov-
ernment knew what: was going
on, which I don’t believe is the
case, what else is going on in
this country of ours that impact
the lives of countiess Bahami-
ans, while our government is
asleep at the wheel? (Their
response is: Nobody in govern-
ment knew what was going on).

Will the prime minister tell
the Bahamian people what his
plans are to stabilise his gov-
ernment, which seems to be
falling apart, piece by piece,
rocked by embarrassing and

‘ridiculous scandals? (This gov-

ernment seems to have no moral
centre or principles).

Will Mr Christie tell the
Bahamian people when will his
government build some new
schools in Nassau and Freeport
in an effort to stem the over-
crowding that presently exists
in the schools we now have.
(Not one new school in four and
a half years, and their response
is that it’s not an issue).

Will the prime minister tell
the Bahamian people why he is
giving away Crown land to for-
eign investors in record num-
bers, when it was him and his
party who severely criticised the

FNM administration for selling -

too much land to foreign
investors like Sol Kerzner, San-
dals, Four Seasons, the hotels
at Port Lucaya and so on?
(These are jobs that people can
see feel and touch, not an
anchor out somewhere). And
will he disclose what the secrecy
clauses are in the heads of
agreement deal done with Bah-
Mar? The Bahamian people
deserve to know, I’m sure it’s
not a matter of national securi-
ty which is one of the only
things that could justify the
information being held from the
Bahamian public. (They say it’s
not an issue).

Will the prime minister please
tell the Bahamian people why
Chinese workers were brought
in to do the expansion on a
school, which is work that
Bahamians can do? (They say
we have a shortage of skilled
carpenters, etc, to do the work.
I know of several unemployed
or underemployed carpenters
and masons and if we do, that
means that BTVI has been a
failure over the years).

Will the prime minister
please tell the Bahamian public
when will his party leave the
media alone and allow them to
do their jobs? ZNS is a disgrace,
they’re extremely biased in their
reporting of the news. I guess
that’s what happens when you
continue to appoint the same
old PLP’s like Calsey Johnson
and others to positions of pow-
er.

Thank God for The Tribune,

‘which is now one of the focuses

of this administration. No less
of a person than the Prime Min-
ister himself made that quite
clear. mS
When will the prime minister
answer any questions with rela-
tion to Neville Wisdom? (Mil-
lion dollar bleaches fiasco, poor
workmanship on low cost

homes, alleged favours for cer-
tain contractors. They say it’s
not an issue).

When will we get the truth
about Minister Shane Gibson _

and the Anna Nicole scandal? . -

What about madam “swift jus-
tice”? Was the Hon Justice cor-
rect in his assertions? Was the
minister who is alleged to have
taken everything from one of
his mistresses, including the toi-
let bowl, ever charged with
breaking and entering?

Why are most of these per-
sons still cabinet ministers? I’m
not gonna even touch Bradley .
Roberts, adultery at a minimum
was evident there, but the
silence of the Christian Coun-
cil on the matter was deafening.
I wonder why? (But they say it
is not an issue). ,

Will the prime minister please
tell us when will Mr Peet be
questioned about what appears
to be a breach of the exchange .
control act? ite

Will the prime minister tell us
whether or not we were delib-
erately misled by the minister
of tourism, Obie Wilchcombe,
with regard to visa issue for
American travellers? We would
like to know, sir, whether or not
you were misled about the fight
in the cabinet room, or you
knew the facts, but chose to mis-
lead the Bahamian people? And
if you were misled by one of you
MP’s or Cabinet Ministers, why
are they still a part of your gov-
ernment? (He said it was more
apparent than real, then he said
it was a push and shove, then
the MP’s came to the public and
admitted to a fight).

Why is it Mr Christie, that in
an election year there are con-
tracts being issued here and con-
tracts being issued there? Here
a million, there two million and
on and on we go. Do you really
think that old tactic still works,
sir? Why is your government
rushing so much legislation
through parliament, that is obvi-
ously not properly thought out,
and affects the lives of so many
Bahamians? If you are so cer-
tain that you will win, what’s the
rush? In my opinion this is care-
less and crazy! (They say it's not
an issue, they are caring, even if
they tax the hell out of you to

‘accomplish it).

When will you stop calling
indecision cautious planning?
When are you gonna stop call-
ing ducked responsibility con-
sultation? Some things don’t
require a committee! When will
the spinning and shuffling stop
and truth rise again?

I urge The Christie Adminis-
tration to level with the Banami-
an people. Moreover, I urge Mr
Christie to level with himsclf.
Face. the facts! Stop the spin-
ning.

Get a grip of the situation.
Then please, oh please, explain
to us all where we are headed as
a country with all this mess.

I supported Mr Christie and
the PLP in the last election, but
enough. I’ve had enough, we’ve
had enough! You, Mr Prime. :,
Minister, and your governmen-: °
t’s departure is at hand!

Bring on Mr Ingraham coz
een long now!

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 5



Mitchell’s
words for
Grenada on
anniversary

m@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

FOREIGN Affairs Minis-
ter Fred Mitchell congratulat-
ed the people of Grenada yes-
terday on the 33rd anniver-
sary of their independence.

Mr Mitchell said: “I want
to extend on behalf of the

_ government of the Bahamas
‘ our warmest congratulations

to the people of Grenada.

‘' They have had a very diffi-

cult time in the last three
years with hurricanes strik-
ing the island (September
2004 and June 2005) and they

. have managed to bounce
_ back quite successfully.”

Before the arrival of Euro-
peans, Grenada was inhabit-
ed by Carib Indians who had
driven the more peaceful

. Arawaks from the island.

Columbus landed on

‘ Grenada in 1498 during his

third voyage to the new
world.

Partly because of the
Caribs, Grenada remained
uncolonised for more than

. 100 years after its discovery.

In 1650, a French company
purchased Grenada from the

. English and established a

small settlement.

The island remained under
French control until its cap-
ture by the British in 1762.
Although. the French

« regained control during the
‘ American War of Indepen-

dence, the island was restored
to Britain in 1783. .
Grenada remained British
for the remainder of the colo-
nial era.
Slavery was outlawed in

_ 1834 and in 1833, Grenada

‘ became part of the British :

' Windward Islands Adminis-

tration.
In 1958, the Windward

“Islands Administration was

dissolved, and Grenada

‘ joined the Federation of the
. West Indies, but the federa-
. tion collapsed in 1962.

Following, under the Asso-

- ciated Statehood Act in 1967
‘Grenada: was-granted full:

autonomy over its internal

affairs in March of that year °

and full independence was
granted on February 7, 1974.

Mr Mitchell said he had
joined the Grenadian com-
munity in the Bahamas on

- Sunday morning for a service

of thanksgiving at St Anselm
Church in Fox Hill. *

Funeral to
-be held for

Tommy

‘Maury

FUNERAL services will
be held for Tommy Maury,
70, at Christ Church Cathe-
dral at 3pm Thursday.

Mr Maury was found dead

- by his only son, Peter, in the

bathroom of his West Bay
Street home on Friday. It is
believed that he had been
dead for two or three days.
No foul play is suspected.
Mr Maury was the son of
the late Mr and Mrs Peter
Maury. Mr Maury, Sr, was
the co-founder of Maury
Roberts & Co, a once well
known liquor firm in Nassau.

RRR aT

TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 6TH

6:00 Community page 1540am
11:00 Immediate Response
noon ZNS News Update

12:05 Immediate Response (Cont'd) |

Island Life Destinations
Ethnic Health America
Thousand Dollar Bee
Aqua Kids
Kemp Road Ministries
Ernest Leonard .
Little Robots
Carmen San Diego
ZNS News Update
The Fun Farm
Dolphin Encounter
Seven Seas Informcial
News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight
Kerzner Today
Bahamas Business Outlook:
Predictions 2007
Be Your Own Boss Show #10
BTC The Voice Of The
Customer Town Meeting
10:30 News Night 13
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
12:30 Community Page 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13-reserves the
right to make last minute
programme changes!



ampaigner calls on voters to —



VOTERS were yesterday
urged.to give independents a
chance in the upcoming general
election to ensure “real repre-
sentation on real issues.”

Fathers’ rights champion
Clever Duncombe said it was
time to break the deadlock
between the PLP and FNM for
the good of the Bahamas.

Mr Duncombe, who is con-
testing Golden Gates as an
independent, said despite
under-funding he was confident
of unseating Immigration Min-
ister Shane Gibson.

“Having no money is a major
handicap, but J have been
promised support from PLPs
and FNMs,” he said.

“I believe we have the right
message. People have had
enough of makeweight candi-
dates who become MPs and
sometimes go on to become
ministers.

“I think because of this the
entire country is suffering. 1am

We need to break deadlock
between PLP and FNM,
says fathers’ rights activist



hoping voters will
favourably on independents
who can offer true representa-
tion.

“For 40 years we have had
the PLP and FNM and where
has it got us? We are looking
for people with a real vision of
the future and a real grasp of
national issues.”

Mr Duncombe said Mr Gib-
son’s failure to address the
Anna Nicole Smith matter
could be his downfall.

“The world is watching us. If
he gets away with it (fast-track-
ing of her residency permit) it

look.

will do the country no good.

“It leaves a question as to
whether we are a corrupt soci-
ety. It leaves a lot of questions
unanswered and it is not the
type of publicity we need at this
time.”

Mr Duncombe said the Anna
Nicole residency issue still left
“a bad taste” in the mouths of
many Bahamians because of
their own problems in getting
status for their spouses.

“As things stand, it seems
such treatment is a special
arrangement for the rich and
powerful,” he said.

consider picking independents





CLEVER Duncombe

Feasibility of hurricane
insurance for farmers and
fishermen considered

m@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE MINISTRY of Agri-
culture and Marine Resources
held a workshop at the Wynd-
ham Nassau Resort yesterday
to review the feasibility of insti-
tuting tropical storm and hur-
ricane insurance for farmers and
fishermen throughout the
Bahamas.

Opening the event, Minister
of Agriculture and Marine
Resources Leslie Miller under-
scored the importance of such a
programme.

“As currently proposed,” Mr
Miller said, “the index insur-

‘ance is a contributory pro-

gramme in which farmers and
fishermen will be required to
buy insurance annually. In the
event that a disaster is declared,
the insured farmer or fisherman
will be paid some multiple of
the value of the premium pur-

‘chased by the farmer/fisherman.

“This programme will elimi-
nate the costly delivery and dis-
tribution of relief supplies.
Farmers and fishermen will
have a choice of how to replace,
and what to replace; they will
no longer be limited to the spe-
cific ‘take it or leave it’ relief
currently offered,” he said.

The minister explained that
the workshop is the latest step
his ministry has taken in
advancing a contributory
scheme for farmers and fisher-
men — which reportedly has
been under review for nearly
four years.

“In the past, the combined
responsés received from the
Food and Agriculture Organi-
sation (FAO) and the Bahamas
government have been woeful-
ly inadequate as compensation.

“The ministry receives a bud-
geted line item of $100,000
annually for disaster relief to
farmers. However the estimated
loss to the agricultural sector

eh
Us

Wea eas

Deere,



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from the effects of Hurricane
Floyd was $52 million,” he said.

However, Mr Miller strongly
questioned this _ figure.
“Whether or not the Bahamas
as a country produced $50 mil-
lion dollars worth of food stuff
or agriculture produce for the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas I don’t know, but
again I want to emphasise that —
$52 million is a lot of money for
farmers to have lost in the last
hurricane.”

However, the minister did say
that $1.1million had been distrib-
uted to farmers and fishermen
after Hurricane Floyd in, 1999, +

Mr Miller said that in general,
there is a grave disparity
between what is allocated for
the sector and what is truly
needed by farmers in the
Bahamas.

“The ministry is now at the

point of once again consulting
with farmers and fishermen.
Your task,” he said, addressing
the out island officers, “will be
to canvas farmers and fisher-
men to determine their level of
interest in this proposed index
insurance scheme.

“This is a noble undertaking;
it is possible a viable response
mechanism in two sectors that
are, for the most part, consid-
ered uninsurable by the com-
mercial insurance industry.

“Limited insurance is cur-
rently available through com-
mercial insurers for agricultural
buildings, large fishing boats
and tractors; however, insur-
ance for crops, fruit trees, live-
stock, tools, nets, condomini-
ums, lobster traps, and fish pots
is not available.

“The greatest proportion of
both farmers and fishermen, are

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 7



Troops have ‘not
committed human
rights abuses in
Haiti — ambassador

m@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

HAITIAN Ambassador to
the Bahamas Louis Harold
Joseph has denied the accuracy
of reports that United Nations
troops have committed human-
rights abuses in Haiti.

Ambassador Joseph was
speaking at a panel discussion at
the College of the Bahamas,
entitled “Where is Haiti going?”

At the moment, the first con-
cern of the Haitian government
is good governance, he said —
adding that the new adminis-
tration is pursuing this with the
aid of the international com-

munity.

During the question and
answer period, a reporter asked
Ambassador Joseph to com-
ment on reports of human rights
abuses by UN troops and the
growing resistance to what has
been described as the “UN
occupation” of Haiti.

The ambassador replied:
“There is a lot of bad informa-
tion on the Internet about
Haiti.”

In July 2005, the Haiti Infor-
mation Project (HIP), a non-
profit alternative news service,

reported that “in the early
morning hours of July 6, more
than 350 UN troops stormed
the seaside shantytown of Cite
Soleil in a military operation
with the stated purpose of halt-
ing violence in Haiti.”

According to the Associated
Press, a military spokesman for
the UN peacekeeping mission
in Haiti said: “Armed bandits
who had tried to resist were
either killed or wounded.”

But, an HIP source said:
"Today all the popular neigh-
borhoods are under attack.
Neighborhoods like Cite Soleil,
Bel Air and Solino have been
turned into cemeteries since the
February 29, 2004 coup because
they represent the poor and the
majority of the people, who are
committed to the return of Pres-
ident Jean-Bertrand Aristide."

The international medical
group “Doctors without Bor-
ders,” reported that 26 people



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In late 2005, the Wayne State
University School of Social
Work co-ordinated a human
rights study that led a team of
12 Haitian interviewers in sur-
veying 1,260 randomly selected
households in the greater Port-
au-Prince area.

The researchers interviewed
Port-au-Prince residents about
their experiences with human
rights abuses since the installa-
tion of Gerald Latortue as inter-
im prime minister following the
violent overthrow of Haiti's
elected President, Jean-
Bertrand Aristide in February
2004.

Estimate

The report estimates that
8,000 persons were murdered
and around 35,000 were sexual-
ly assaulted in the greater Port-
au- Prince area between Feb-
ruary 2004 and December 2005.

The study found that 21 per
cent of the killings were attrib-
uted to members of the interim
government's Haitian National
Police (HNP), 13 per cent to
the demobilised army and 13
percent to anti-Lavalas gangs
such as Lame Timachet. Most
of the remainder of the viola-
tions were attributed to crimi-
nal elements.

The study also found there
has been a high degree of sexu-
al violence since Aristide's
ouster — much of it committed
by anti-Lavalas political actors.

Several other human rights
studies, such as those conducted
by the Miami University of Law
and Amnesty International,



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found the interim government
and paramilitary forces guilty
of extra-judicial violence.

In February 2006, US Con-
gresswoman Maxine Waters
denounced what she described
as “obvious attempts” to steal
the general elections in Haiti.

Congresswoman Waters said:
“The anti-Aristide forces have
done everything in their power
to imprison the leaders of the
Lavalas Party and deny Lavalas
leaders their right to run for
office and their right to voice
their opposition to the Group
of 184, the Provisional Electoral
Council, the puppet govern-
ment, the International Repub-
lican Institute, and others who
are determined to undermine
democracy in Haiti.”

And at the end of 2006, again
the Haiti Information Project
reported that UN forces had
attacked Cite Soleil in the early
morning hours of December 22
and killed more than 30 people
including women and children.

HIP commented: “The irony
is that the attack on Decem-
ber 22 seems to have been trig-
gered, not by a surge in kid-
nappings as claimed by the UN,
but by another massive demon-
stration of Lavalas supporters
that began in Cite Soleil.
About 10,000 people demon-
strated a few days before for
the return of president Aris-
tide in a clear condemnation
of what they called the foreign
military occupation of their
country.”

This year, several grass-roots
groups in Haiti, including Con-
federation des Travailleurs Hai-
tiens (Confederation of Haitian
Workers) and Femmes Vic-
times Debout (Women Victims
Stand Up) have called for Feb-

ruary 7 to be commemegated

as International Day inSoli-
darity with the People of Ffaiti.

The groups are demanding
an end to the “US/UN occu-
pation of Haiti” a stop to the
killings, sexual abuse and
massacres of the poor by UN
troops, police and paramili-
tary elements under police
control and the return of

SSSR RIS NSN EEE RH NN TE

COOOL TUT TUTTO ORLA UUTT LLL OULU LOLOL DOUTT LT OLEATE













www, novartis.com



i MEMBERS of Medicines Sans Frontiers help Odete Bosejoure, wounded during clashes



between UN peacekeepers and‘gang members at the Cite-Soleil district in Port-au-Prince on

Wednesday, January 24

President Aristide.

On Thursday, Ambassador
Joseph told the audience of stu-
dents and academics that the

René Preval-led Haitian gov-
ernment had recently requested
$7 billion from the internation-
al community to assist with

(AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

development, and he also
described Haiti’s current politi-
cal instability as part of a
nation’s “learning process.”

De also cary a large solection of body
oils, teddies and adult novelties

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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007



Deputy PM commissions first
ire truck in Mangrove Cay |

Graffiti hits Collins
Avenue businesses

LITTLE Harbour, Andros
— Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of National Securi-
ty Cynthia Pratt returned to
her birthplace of Mangrove
Cay to commission the com-
munity’s first tire truck.

The commissioning cere-
mony, held at the Govern-
ment Complex in Little Har-
bour, Mangrove Cay, ended
17 years of “reaching out to
the community” through a
series of fundraising events

“by members of the Man-
grove Cay Fire Engine Com-
mittee.

The fire truck will be
manned by a community vol-
unteer brigade headed by
Sergeant David Thompson
of the Royal Bahamas Police
Force.

Expertise

The RBPF’s fire services

division, headed by Assistant
Superintendent of Police Jef-
frey Deleveaux, provided the
volunteer fire brigade with
_the training and technical
“expertise needed to operate
the fire truck in a safe and
efficient manner.

The committee was also
assisted by the Local Gov-
ernment Council which
matched the funds raised by
the committee and the
Bahamas Oil Refining Com-
pany (BORCO), which
helped to outfit the truck.

The purchase was in
response to a series of tragic
events that have occurred in
the Mangrove Cay commu-
nity. Residents could only
stand by and watch helpless-
ly as the Administration

‘Offices in Peat’s was
destroyed by fire; as five chil-
dren perished in a house fire
in Pinder’s, and yet again, as
another member of the com-
munity lost his life in a-fire in

power windows, locks & mirrors,
immobiliser and CD player.



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Little Harbour.

Mrs Pratt said the pur-
chase of the fire engine
means that the residents will
never have to stand by help-
lessly again.

She said the purchase of
the truck, and the time the
community took raising the
money, shows the strength
and determination of
Androsians in general and
Mangrovians in particular.

“We are commissioning a
fire truck that was brought
here by the blood, sweat and
tears of the people of Man-
grove Cay and I want you to
know how grateful we are in
the government for what you
have done here as a commu-
nity today,” she said.

“This has relieved a lot of
pressure on the government
and certainly with the many
islands that do need a fire
truck, the resources are lim-
ited, but you have helped
yourselves. And so I hope
that so many other islands



are watching and that they
would take pattern after
Mangrove Cay,” Mrs Pratt
said.

Damage

She went on to note that
the damage fires can have on
individual families and col-
lective communities can be
far-reaching.

Mrs Pratt said Mangrove
Cay is the fifth island on
which fire engines have been
commissioned.

The others are Bimini,
Eleuthera, Inagua and Cat
Island.

“These were done through
the self-help of the local peo-
ple and donations,” she said.
“What this demonstrates to
me is that if a community can
get together and raise funds
for a fire truck, that those
same communities can get
together to raise children; to
be their brother’s-keeper the

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way it used to be in the old.

days.

“The spirit of togetherness
that was displayed in pur-
chasing this fire truck and
the others show our children
that the adults are concerned
about the community, and so
when they see your concern,
they too will grow with the
same attitude; having con-
cern for the community and
wanting to build the commu-

nity,” she added.

Andy Bowleg, president of
the Mangrove Cay Fire
Engine Fundraising Com-
mittee, called the day a
“proud one” for the commit-
tee and the residents of
Mangrove Cay, adding
that each resident should
“be proud and receptive to
this.”

He said while the process
towards purchasing the fire
truck began 17 years ago, it
was one that was well
worth the, effort of the com-
munity, the Local Govern-
ment Council and other per-
sons who assisted financially.

“As in many communities
in our country, the destruc-
tion of property and the loss
of life by fire has brought
much grief and sorrow to our
loved ones, and we the peo-

ple of Mangrove Cay have ©

had our share of sorrows, but
this day is a significant day
and I am just excited that we
went about the commission-
ing of the truck in this way,”
Mr Bowleg said.

“By doing it this way; by
doing it in this fashion, we
have given the community
the opportunity to see that
when you come together,

regardless of how big a task —

may be or how much it may
cost, if everybody would pull
together, you can get it
done,” Mr Bowleg added.





THE TRIBUNE

@ GRAFFITI is currently plaguing businesses in the Collins

were taken yesterday. °

; Avenue area. These pictures in the traditionally well-kept area

(Photo: Tim Clarke)



| tat PCy

The public is advised that as of September, 2006
Peter Adderley is rio longer employed with C Cube Seating or
its signature parade ‘Feel The Rush’ and is no longer
authorized to conduct any business transactions in its name.

Sponsors and the General Public needing any information on the
upcoming parade this August 3rd - 7th, 2007 in Grand Bahama please
contact: 242.646.2736 or 242.466.4363 or email c3seating @gmail.com



Ses WS





ROR Eee



THE TRIBUNE





g NADIA Hope Johnson, a TimeWorks ieee and Saskia D’ Aguilar, also a TimeWorks
volunteer and a module leader at Saturday’s programme, take the time to discuss how to be

helpful toy women in need

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 9









@ TIMEWORKS, the Lyford Cay Foundation’s volunteer outreach programme, held a programme

where women spent the day together helping one another learn about securing employment and
leading independent and healthy lives. 5

(Photos: TS Maycock)

Outreach programme holds event
on empowerment of at-risk women

A GROUP of women from
the Kemp Road Urban Renew-
al Centre and the Bahamas Cri-
sis Centre are that much closer
to leading independent, fulfill-

~ ing lives following a TimeWorks

programme on empowering
women — many recovering from
physical and verbal abuse and
difficult life circumstances.

TimeWorks, the volunteer
outreach programme adminis-
tered by the Lyford Cay Foun-
dation’s Gifts and Grants Com-
mittee, held a seminar aimed at

‘benefiting at-risk women
referred to the programme by
the Bahamas Crisis Centre and
WHEDO, Women’s Holistic
Empowerment and Develop-
ment Organisation.

The programme was held at
the Canter Caring Centre
through the support of the Can-
cer Society of the Bahamas.

“Finding a job is the begin-










Employment and health stressed as essential

ning of (making positive life)
choices,” said Jade Major,
WHEDO’s founder and _exec-
utive director. “There is no bet-
ter way to empower Bahamian
women (than by sharing) the
knowledge of how to get a job.”

Pictet Bank and Trust, RBC
Royal Bank of Canada and
Templeton Global Advisors
have supported Time Works
2006/07, both financially and by
serving as a volunteer bage.

Many of the volunteers at the
programme ‘are employed by
the corporate sponsors, includ-
ing two of the six module lead-
ers.

Four modules were crafted
to highlight all the key compo-
nents of leading a healthy and

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balanced life while launching a
job search: the need for self-
worth; physical wellness; inter-
viewing skills and resume writ-
ing and the importance of man-
aging personal finances.
Women were invited to the
programme to spend the day
alongside Time Works volun-
teers learning together.
“Timeworks has provided
[the framework] for women to
create positive changes in their
lives,” said Major. “One of the
dire needs of this society is for

_us women to understand the

power that we have.”
Following Major’s life
empowerment session, Victoria
Wallace, a certified physical fit-
ness instructor, and Pennie Bal-

The Sonata has
won the J. D.
Power initial

.dacci,





an esthetician at the
Lyford Cay Beauty Salon, led a
module focused on wellness.

Topics included the impor-
tance of exercise, proper nutri-
tion and appropriate grooming
for the workplace. Everyone
leaned that beauty is more than
skin deep.

“[The key is to] improve their
self esteem whilst equipping
them with the mind set of “if
it’s going to be, it’s up to me,”
said Baldacci.

Saskia D’ Aguilar, a consul-
tant at Graham Thompson and
Co, and Lisa Myers, a senior
vice president and portfolio
manager at Templeton Global
Advisors, tackled the topic of
how to best navigate through

the interview process.

All areas were covered —
from how to best determine
what kind of job one desires, to
correct application form sub-
mission, from the need for per-
sistent follow-up and proper
interview behavior to the
importance of a cover letter and
resume.

“If we were able to empower —

a number of the women whose
personal situations have kept
them out of the workplace with
the understanding and the abil-
ity to convey in a resume, cover
letter, or interview, the very
valuable, yet sometimes untra-
ditional, experience and wisdom
that they can bring to an
employer, it will have been a

Come to the

Mind Changing
Heart Cleansing

day well spent,” said Myers. ,

The final module was lead
by. Sanfra Foster, a personal
financial service officer at RBC
Royal Bank of Canada, and
highlighted the importance of
managing one’s personal
finances.

Foster encouraged the
women to craft personal bud-
gets that include a savings
mechanism, however modest.

“At the end of the day every-
one benefited from spending a
day together,” said Alessandra
Holowesko, a TimeWorks
organiser and chairman of the
Gifts and Grants Committee at
the Lyford Cay Foundation.

“The volunteers and partici-
pating women learned as much
from one another as from the
module leaders — we are very
grateful to everyone for their
participation and ‘for giving their
time.’ .

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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007























































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(:i0) %% SLIVER (1993, Suspense) Sharan Stone, | x PRIME (2005, Romance-Comedy) Meryl Streep, /INTIMATE SES-
MOMAX Wiliam Baldwin, Tom Berenger. Aman draws adi {Uma ‘human Arecently divorced woman dates the |SIONS
vorced editor into his voyeuristic world. © ‘R’'(CC) json of her therapist. © ‘PG-13' (CC)
ee PUSH (1997, Drama) Jason Jennings, Justin Giarla, Justin Taylor. iTV Masters of Horror (iTV) Horror an-
SHOW pe DARKO eee Aman tries to find fame and fortune as a snowboarder. thology. .
ls a % FINALENCOUNTER — |» AMERICANO (2005, Romance) Joshua Jack- | x * STATE PROPERTY 2 (2005,
TMC 2000, Science Ae Dean Cain, |son, Leonor Varela. Premiere. While in Spain a college {Crime Drama) Beanie Sigel, Damon
Justin Whalin, 'R (CC) graduate ponders his future, © ‘R’ (CC) Dash. Premiere. © ‘R’ (CC)
Dansesnsce

THE TRIBUNE

Let Charlie the
Bahamian Puppet and
his sidekick Derek put

some smiles on your &
kkids’s faces.

»

Bring your children to the |
McHappy Hour at McDonald's in.
Oakes Field every Thursday
| from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the.
' month of February 2007. 3

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.

SS

ficates



06. FoR O90, te a Aa Fe ee

.





PAGE 12, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007

Fishermen ar
convicted for

_ poaching in th

Exuma Cays

THE Bahamas National
Trust announced yesterday that
two fishermen arrested on Jan-
uary 11 were successfully pros?

ecuted for poaching marine -

resources.

“The trial was held at Black
Point in the Exumas. The arrest
and subsequent conviction were
the result of the combined and
cooperative efforts of the Exu-
ma Cays Land and Sea Park
Staff, the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force, and the police
at Staniel Cay and Black Point,”
said the Trust in a statement.

Park staff and Defence Force
marines were reportedly on a
routine patrol in the park when
they saw a small boat that
appeared to be-engaged in fish-
ing activities.

Royal Caribbean posts fourt
year-ago loss, but stock falls

@ MIAMI



ROYAL Caribbean Cruises
Ltd., the world’s,second-largest
cruise line, on Monday posted a
fourth-quarter profit from year-
ago loss, on lower cruise costs
and increased revenue, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

But Royal Caribbean shares
sank more than five per cent,
largely based on company state-
ments that its bookings so far
in the busy January-to-March
wave season were not encour-
aging. analysts said.

Net income climbed to $46.6
million, or 22 cents per share,
from a loss of $3.6 million, or 2
cents per share, during the same
period a year ago.

Revenue for the quarter rose
12 per cent to $1.15 billion ver-
sus $1.03 billion in the prior
year, as passenger ticket sales
climbed to $831.7 million and
onboard and other revenue
increased to $321.5 million .

Analysts surveyed by Thom-
son Financial were expecting
earnings of 20 cents per share
on sales of $1.16 billion.

Shares fell $2.24 to $43.60 in
afternoon trading on the New
York Stock Exchange.

Joe Hovorka, an analyst with
Raymond James and Associ-

ates, said the stock likely was

falling because of a continued
weakness in the Caribbean mar-
ket that has lasted more than a
year. Sluggishness in the
Caribbean has been offset by
good performance in Alaska
and Europe, a scenario also
faced by Royal Caribbean’s

chief competitor, Carnival, the -

world’s largest cruise group.

Richard Fain, Royal
Caribbean’s chairman and
CEO, said bookings were “less
than encouraging” for the
“wave season” — the busiest
reservation period of the year
for the cruise industry, when
many people plan summer vaca-
tions.

Hovorka said sluggishness
with Caribbean tourism is being





j The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are

making news in their

| neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a

good cause, campaigning

| for improvements in the

area or have won an

award.

If'so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.












“The patrol moved to inter-
cept the vessel, which immedi-
ately fled, while dumping items
overboard.

“Positive identification-of the
suspects was made by park staff
and their identities radioed to
the Black Point Police Station
where the suspects were arrest-
ed upon returning to port. Park
staff returned to the site of the
dumping and recovered the dis-
carded evidence,” the statement
said.

The two suspects had their
vessel and fishing equipment
confiscated by local police in
Black Point and were charged
with poaching in the Exuma
Cays Land and Sea Park.

The park has been designated
a complete no-take zone for

LOCAL NEWS

over 20 years and serves as a
valuable marine replenishment
zone for all of the Bahamas.

During the trial, held Janu-
ary 25, the men were convict-
ed after entering a “not guilty”
plea.

Stealing

Commenting on the arrest
and convictions, park adminis-
trator Tom Barbernitz said: “A
small number of individuals
continue to poach marine
resources from within the park.
These poachers are simply steal-
ing from future generations of
Bahamians.

“The Exuma Cays Land and
Sea Park serves as a breeding

ground and the larvae from the
park spread throughout the
country benefiting. all the
Bahamas.”

Eric Carey, executive director
of the Trust, added: “Having
witnessed this event and being
present during the pursuit and
recovery of the evidence, I am
pleased at the dedication of the
park staff and Royal Bahamas
Defence Force marines in
enforcing the by-laws of the
Exuma Park. |

Support wag provided by
Corporal Kevin Rolle and Con-
stable Edgecombe of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force who



quarter profit from
n Caribbean forecast



PASSENGERS enjoy a sunny day on the upper deck pool area of Royal Caribbean
International’s Mariner of the Seas, in this photo in the Caribbean Sea. Royal Caribbean Cruises,

the world’s second-largest cruise line, said
lower cruise costs and increased revenue.

seen throughout the leisure
industry.

ui
Nassau

“There’s a broader weakness
in discretionary spending for



on Monday that it swung to a fourth-qu

er profit on =

(AP Photo/. Re Kafka, file )

consumers” in {ne Caribbean,
which is seen as an entry level

HOT OFF THE GRILL..

WELCOME
PUG UE BOUIN. 2 BLN Lg
BL RC TCL 4

OTe St Ghat
BOL Cs iesihreste RDN, tear tas

worked with park staff to
ensure the park continues to
serve its valuable role for every-
one.”

Documented scientific studies
have shown the many values of
the existing no-take regulations
within the Exuma Cays Land
and Sea Park.

Grouper tagged within the
park have been caught by local
fishermen in Long Island and
other surrounding communities.

The larger benefits of the no-
take regulations are the distrib-
ution of larvae from breeding
populations that are carried by
ocean currents and winds



cruise market, Hovorka said.

For the last quarter of 2006,
the company said its net cruise
costs on a per available passen-
ger-cruise-days basis fell 3.3 per
cent due to the timing of dry-
docking and marketing costs.
Its net yields rose 3.3 per cent,
driven by strong cruise pricing
in what is traditionally the com-
pany’s softest quarter.

‘“We are particularly pleased
with the solid yield performance
of our brands, and healthy earn-
ings despite significantly higher
fuel costs,” Fain said.

The company operates 34
ships under its Royal Caribbean
International and Celebrity
Cruise brands. Those divisions
grew yields by 3.4 per cent for
the full year despite a less
robust Caribbean pricing envi-
ronment.

For the full year, earnings
were $633.9 million, or $2.94 a
share, compared to.$715.9 mil-
lion, or $3.26 a share, in 2005.
Analysts expected $2.93 per
share, a result that Fain attrib-
uted to the high price of fuel.

Looking ahead, Royal
Caribbean said it expects 2007
earnings per share to between
$3,05 and $3.20. Analyst pre-
dict $3.15 per share.

The company expects this
year’s net yields to increase in a
range around three per cent —
with the addition of Madrid-

THE TRIBUNE



sem ae €

throughout the Bahamas..*

Studies have documented the
increased numbers of larvae are’
produced by larger and older
marine specimens that are then
available for dispersion
throughout the country. : ;

When it was created in 1958;

the Exuma Cays Land and Sea.’

was the first land and sea park
in the world.
It was made a no-take marine.

reserve in 1986 — the first —

marine fishery reserve in the
wider Caribbean. It is one of 25
national parks and protected
areas managed by the Bahamas
National Trust.

based cruise and tour operator
Pullmantur SA accounting for
two percentage points of this
change. It will include Pull-
mantur’s results on a two-
month lag, and its operations
will be included in Royal
Caribbean’s consolidated finan-
cial statements beginning with
the first quarter 2007.

For the first quarter of 2007,
the company currently forecasts
net yields will decrease in a
range around 3 per cent com-
pared to the first quarter of last
year. Royal Caribbean said its
net cruise costs on a per avail-
able passenger-cruise-days basis
will increase 4 to 5 per cent, of
which about half is driven by
Pullmantur. !

Assuming fuel prices remain.
at current levels, the company

expects first quarter earnings
per share to be,3 cents to 8
cents. Analysts had predicted
earnings of 32 cents per share,
but that was before the compa-
ny Said it would be adding Pull-

mantur to its first quarter 2007, -

earnings.

Royal Caribbean also pre: _

dicted that it will have a 12.2
per cent increase in capacity in
2007, driven by Pullmantur, the
April delivery of Liberty of the
Seas, and a full year of opera-
tions by Freedom of the Seas,
currently the world’s largest
cruise ship.



Se ay
SUNT eT

aE



_



* TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007

SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

Peace ane ntti tteer ci maleic smseea enti Mioaennatt
Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street





PAWS s delat:



Jinan

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010 ©









NASSAU OFFICE





Business awaits

Taal

wees | “ | : C . | + a oP
draft? on China tie-up

International Distributors closes on CITIC, Mediterranean Shipping
deal, with warehouse’s first phase handover set for August 1

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he head of a
major Grand
Bahama-based
grocery whole-
saler and distrib-
utor yesterday told The Tri-
bune he was “just waiting on
the final draft right now” of a
contract that would seal a
three-way tie-up between his
firm, Mediterranean Shipping
Company (MSC) and a $6 bil-
lion Chinese conglomerate.
Roy Deffler, president’and
chief executive of Internation-
al Distributors of Grand
Bahama, a subsidiary of US
grocery wholesaler Associat-
ed Grocers, said he had spent
three weeks in China during
October in a bid to tie-up an
agreement with CITIC, the
state-owned company that has
long had plans to use Grand
Bahama’s Sea/Air Business
Centre. -
CITIC had signed a Memo-
randum of Understanding for
the establishment of a major

50-acre distribution facility in
February 2005, involving exhi-
bition, showrooms and ware-
housing at the Sea/Air Busi-
ness Centre, Grand Bahama’s
planned logistics and distribu-
tion hub. ,

CITIC subsequently scaled
back its plans, but Mr Deffler
revealed yesterday: “They
[CITIC] put it on hold in 2005,
and I visited China in October
2006. That fire has been rekin-
dled, and I’m awaiting the con-
tract as we speak. .

“We did it. I’m just waiting
on the final draft right now.
There’s a lot of irons in the
fire.”

Mr Deffler said the link-up
with CITIC and Mediter-
ranean Shipping Company
could even ultimately lead to
International Distributors
expanding its Grand Bahama

facilities to “five million square
feet of warehouse space”.

International Distributors
and its parent have long want-
ed to bring product from China
directly into Freeport, from
where it would be sorted,
stored and distributed to the
company’s food wholesale and
major retail clients throughout
the world, chiefly Latin Amer-
ica and the Caribbean, but also
the Middle East.

It is likely that any potential
alliance between International
Distributors, CITIC and
Mediterranean Shipping Com-
pany would involve just such a
logistics route, with CITIC sup-
plying Chinese food produce

and the latter handling the -

shipping.

This latest development
again emphasises that Grand
Bahama would appear to have

a very positive economic
future, and that things are
moving behind the scenes,
both here and with projects
such as the Morgan Stanley
and Raven Group deals.

Coupled with Ginn’s activity
in the West End, the island’s
future appears ripe with possi-
bilities, notwithstanding the
gloom surrounding the Royal
Oasis and the ongoing share-
holder dispute at the Grand
Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA).

Meanwhile, Mr Deffler said
yesterday that construction of
International Distributors
warehouse facility at the
Sea/Air Business Centre was
going “fantastically; we’re
about three weeks ahead of
schedule right now. I’m sup-
posed to get the keys on or
before August 1”.

Bahamas ‘scratches surface’ of marina industry potential

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas is earning a “very small
portion of the potential” economic bene-

$25.6 million revenues, $271,000 in taxes ‘a very small portion of the potential’
* Ministry identifies 10 Family Island sites to capitalise on sector's potential for growth

fits this nation’s expanding marina and

boating industry could generate, a draft
study for the Government has revealed,
with the sector currently generating $25

million in revenues per annum.

The study is part of ongoing efforts by
the Ministry of Tourism and other gov-
ernment agencies to develop a draft poli-
cy for regulating the growth of marina
facilities throughout the Bahamas, as there



Fidelity Bahamas
Growth & Income}

Fund

are currently “no local or national plans,
policies or written guidelines addressing
marina location or design”.

The draft policy document warned that
the Bahamas’ attraction for boaters, due to
its 2,000 cays and 100,000 square miles of
ocean, coupled with the lack of space for
new marinas in Florida, had created “sig-
nificant opportunities” that “should not

s your money?

Pee

be listed”.

Boating generated some $25.559 mil-
lion in revenues for the Bahamas annual-
ly, the Ministry of Tourism, had calculat-
ed, based on 38,875 visitor room nights.

The earnings were broken down into:

* Proposed tax shake-up to involve real property tax on seabed

SEE page 10B



14.9

Last 12 months

Average Annual Return
Since Inception
February 1999

12.50%
Last 12 Months

14.76%

6 full years Average
Annual Total Return

u.U4 70

‘Last 12 months

13.08%

Cammulative Return
Since ones
April 2004 -

FIDELITY -

y PSS



The first construction phase
involves 86,542 square feet of
warehouse space, and Mr Def-
fler said the planned Phase JI
and Phase II] expansions at
the 20-acre site were scheduled
to each involve 200,000 square
feet of warehouse space.

He was unable to say when
these phases would start,
though, adding: “There’s a lot
of things that is contingent on,
and I should have answers for
those questions shortly.”

Mr Deffler said Internation-
al Distributors had an option
on another 20 acres of land at
the Sea/Air Business Centre,
which could ultimately see a
Phase IV expansion involving
800,000 square feet of ware-
house space. Then, there’s the
CITIC and MSC contract.

He added that Associated
Grocers clients were “very

excited” about the Freeport
facility, not only in Latin
America and the Caribbean,
but also in the Middle East.
International Distributors’
parent was shipping product
to nations such as Kuwait,
Lebanon and the United Arab
Emirates, and Mr Deffler said:
“We can’t wait to get this open,
because it will make more
sense to ship there from here.”
Customers from those coun-
tries had attended Interna-
tional Distributors’ trade show
in Freeport last week, at which
some 299 vendors exhibited
their wares. Currently, the firm
is operating from a smaller
warehouse down by the cruise
port until the Sea/Air Business
Centre premises is completed.

SEE page 8B

Pink Sands being



sold to neighbour

m@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business

Reporter

HARBOUR Island’s Pink
Sands Hotel is being sold to its
neighbour, the Coral Sands
Beach Resort,-the former’s gen-
eral manager confirmed to The
Tribune yesterday.

Clemens Van Merveldt, of
Pink Sands, said the property’s

" sale was in its final stages, and is

expected to be completed very
soon. He added that this was
something that had been pend-
ing “for a while”.

“This is good for the Pink
Sands and good for Harbour
Island,” Mr Van Merveldt said.
“Coral Sands has done a lot of
good for the island and shown
lots of energy. They have a
good track record.”

Mr Van Merveldt said that
currently, there were no plans
to change the Pink Sands name.
Thé resort is being sold by the
Island Outpost group, but he
added that there were no plans
to lay off any Pink Sands staff.

The deal is more a change in
ownership on paper, and will

and not have a dramatic effect
on the day-to-day operations at
the resort, Mr Van Merveldt
added.

_Pink Sands is a 20-acre haven
set by the edge of the famous :
three-mile pink sand beach on
Harbouyr Island. Designed by
Biba founder, Barbara Hulan-
icki, in.an eclectic mixture of
styles -Moroccan, Indian, and
Balinese - Pink Sands compris-
es 25 pastel-coloured cottages.

In 1951, Pink Sands became
the island’s first resort, leading
the way to Harbour Island
becoming an elite tourist desti-
nation when J. Allen Malcolm

. opened the hotel.

Hurricane Andrew flattened
the Pink Sands in 1992, but the
ruins were quickly, bought up

-by the founder of Island

Records, Chris Blackwell, who
rebuilt the hotel via his Island
Outpost group.

Opened in 1968 and revered
as one of the best small hotels in
the Caribbean, Coral Sands
now has a brand new look,
courtesy of an extensive reno-
vation that has restored and
rejuvenated the 36-room prop-
erty.

WESTWARD VILLAS #3772: Two storey 4 bedroom 3
bath home sits beside a beautiful pond. Formal dining
room, living room and family room. Lovely outdoor wood
deck, gazebo and garage. Offered exclusively at $425,000.
Monty.Roberts@SothebysRealty.com 242.424.4944

\W Damianos

Sothebys

INTERNATIONAL REALTY

SIRbahamas.com t 242.322.2305 f 242.322.2033

rae





BUSINESS _



~

The Miami Herald

THE MARKETS

STOCKS, MUTUAL FUNDS, 5-6B
Dow30 «12,661.74 «= -+8.25 AM
S&P 500 1446.99 -140 W
NASDAQ. 2,470.60 5.28 W
10-YR NOTE asi - -02 W
CRUDE OIL -23 W

58.74

Doubts
hold |
market
steady

BY JOE BEL BRUNO |

Associated Press

-. NEW YORK — Wall Street
closed narrowly mixed Monday
as lingering concerns about the
economy offset better-than-ex-
pected sales from Wal-Mart

. Stores and a flurry of acquisi-

tion activity.
~ Wal-Mart rose after the

- world’s largest retailer said it .

- expected January same-store

- gales to rise 2.2 percent. Tem-

pering the gain was its projec-
tion that sales performance is
on track to deliver the lowest
growth rate in more than 25
years. - . Aa

Meanwhile, Wall Street
absorbed a spate of acquisition
and private equity deals — the
largest amount since the start of
the year. Triad Hospitals and
Herbalife received offers from.
-private equity funds, while State
Street agreed to buy Investors
Financial Services.

_ Investors had little reaction —
to new data that suggests con-

- tinued economic growth, which
could disrupt the Federal
Reserve’s plans to ease the
economy this year. The Insti-
tute of Supply Management's...

which covers the service sector,
increased more than analysts
were forecasting.

Wall Street is in a holding
pattern now that the Fed’s deci-
sion to hold rates is behind it,

and the quarterly earnings sea-
son is largely over. Analysts say
investors are now monitoring
what central bankers might
have to say and any corporate
or economic news .

“We're just going to have a
topsy-turvy market until inves-
tors figure out which direction
to take,” said Todd Leone, man-
aging director of equity trading
for Cowen & Co. “We're seeing
some buying come back into the
market because there still is a
lot of money on the sidelines.
And, all these deals announced

- are really helping the market
ou ”?

The Dow Jones industrial
average rose 8.25, or 0.07 per-
cent, to 12,661.74.

Broader stock indicators
were lower. The Standard &
Poor’s 500 index was down 1.40,
or 0.10 percent, at 1,446.99, and
the Nasdaq composite index fell
5.28, or 0.21 percent, to 2,470.60.

- Treasuries largely shrugged
off the ISM numbers. Bonds
rose, with the yield on the
benchmark 10-year Treasury
note down to 4.81 percent from
4.82 percent late Friday.

Also squeezing stocks was a

_ rebound in oil prices to near
$60 per gallon as a cold snap hit
the Northeast. However, oil
reversed course and a barrel of
‘light sweet crude was down 28
cents at $58.74 on the New York
Mercantile Exchange.

The dollar was mixed against
‘other major currencies, while
gold prices were up.

Advancing issues led decli-
ners by 2 to 1 on the New York
Stock Exchange, where consoli-
dated volume came to 2.46 bil-
lion shares, compared with. 2.55
billion on Friday.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies was down
2.73, or 0.34 percent, at 806.69.
The index surpassed the 800
mark for the first time last
week, and hit an intraday high

of 810.49 before paring gains.
Japan’s Nikkei stock average
closed down 115 percent. Brit-
ain’s FTSE 100 was up 0.11 per-
cent, Germany’s DAX index fell
0.17 percent, and France’s
CAC-40 was up 0.07 percent.





pees soaannguannsennneni



LITIGATION

Apple, Beatles

Apple and Apple Corps, the
Beatles’ guardian, announced
they have reached a settlement
over logo and naming rights, but
both were silent about whether

’ Beatles music will become

available online.

BY JORDAN ROBERTSON
Associated Press

SAN JOSE, Calif. — “We can work
it out.”

That was the message that iPod
maker Apple and The Beatles’ guard-
ian Apple Corps sent Monday in

ee
—

SURO LAR COLLULUR ECS

So

Sete Seren Scr ce Sars $

SSE SSN Ce



Starting in the first quarter, a
goofy spot for Doritos showing a
hapless driver distracted by a
pretty woman marked the first time
a purely amateur-created ad aired
during the Super Bowl. Frito-Lay,
the PepsiCo division that makes
Doritos, ran an online competition
to pick the winning spot.

Katie Crabb, a freshman at the
University of Wisconsin at Stevens
Point, was the winner of a separate
contest by General Motors and had
her idea for an ad made into reality
by Chevrolet’s marketing division.

Despite being made by a new-



BANKING

‘ | ruesoat, FEBRUARY 6, 2007

We Loy

burying nearly three decades of
trademark strife over the iconic apple
logo and name.

Like the warring lovers striving for
reconciliation in The Beatles’ 1965 hit
tune, the two Apples agreed to quash
a long-simmering rivalry and years of

‘ vicious legal battles between one of

the world’s largest music sellers and
one of history’s most beloved bands.

The settlement gives Cupertino-
based Apple ownership of the name
and logo in return for agreeing to
license some of those trademarks

back to London-based Apple Corps

SUPER BOWL

eR

PS :
menemenenamee: SP SGCOMSSE SHH Says
we oe ie

J

“ y= nd

YO QUIERO LIONS: Talking animals, like these lions in a Taco Bell ad, was one of the tactics used by
companies for their Super Bowl commercials, which cost $2.6 million for a 30-second spot:--~~~

ADVERTISING
SHOWDOWN

IN THE BATTLE FOR ATTENTION DURING THE MOST-WATCHED PROGRAM
ALL YEAR, SOME COMPANIES RELIED HEAVILY ON AMATEURS FOR THE FIRST
TIME TO CREATE THEIR SUPER BOWL COMMERCIALS.

BY SETH SUTEL
Associated Press

NEW YORK — Along with the trademark Clydesdales, talking
animals and high-end computer graphics, there was a new entry this year
in the annual showdown of advertisers in the Super Bowl: amateurs.

comer, that ad was true to the tradi-
tion of using oddball humor in
Super Bowl ads, showing a number
of men stripping off their shirts —
and some other articles of clothing
— at the sight of anew Chevy HHR
rolling down the street.

Sight gags were back, including
one from Bud Light early in the
game showing a rather unusual tac-
tic for winning at rock-paper-scis-
sors-— throwing an actual rock at
the head of your opponent. The gag
wasn’t completely new, however,
‘since last year Sprint Nextel fea-
tured a phone with a “crime deter-

ars aM Bae uF SIC & BERNESE



* bot Cetin ok Ley S

it
|

— guardian of The Beatles’ commer-
cial interests — for their continued
use.

It ends the ongoing trademark
lawsuit’ between the two companies,
with each side paying its own legal
costs. Other terms of the settlement
were not disclosed.

But the truce was silent on a cru-
cial issue for consumers about
whether the catalog of Beatles songs
will become available for download
any time soon.

The Beatles have so far been the
most prominent holdout from iTunes



sevnrevveeeevneeveeevetneeremeoreevertieeevnweeiettetnteeeitceirntre ter nteretete tet

ee eS)

* SCREENSHOT FROM TACO BELL



WN



SCREENSHOT FROM DORITOS

|

'

i

|

i
AMATEUR APPROACH: ‘Check Out
Girl’ was one of the Super Bowl |
ads Doritos ran from its |
competition for amateurs. |
rent” — which turned out to be
throwing the phone at someone’s |
head. |
{

|

\

|

FedEx combined a sight gag with
another trademark of big ticket

*TURN TO ADVERTISING



3B

sass en bONbOe scl OR LHO4SY SEUAIBROYSLLLOEESLUIESSS SECU UDLUAIHOURUENIMESDULAAAN EINE ELENA ENEMA

settle trademark suit

and other online music services, and
Apple’s overtures to put the music
online have been stymied by the

ongoing litigation.

And it appears consumers will still
have to wait to buy such Beatles hits
as Love Me Do or Hey Jude on Apple’s
iTunes online store, though industry
analysts said a resolution on putting
The Beatles’ music online is likely
already in the works.

“It goes from impossible to a lock
that it’s going to happen — it’s.a

*TURN TO APPLE

ECONOMY

Services
sector
driving
srowth

i For the 46th consecutive
month, the services industry
reported growth. Analysts
believe expansion in the sector,
which represents about
three-qaurters of the economy, is
enough to stimulate overall
economic growth.

BY EILEEN ALT POWELL
Associated Press

NEW YORK — Weakness in the

' manufacturing sector, especially the

auto industry, may be dampening the
nation’s economic prospects, but the .
bigger services sector appears to be
more.than making up for it.

The Institute for Supply Manage-
ment, which is based in Tempe, Ariz.,
said Monday that its index of busi-
ness activity in the non-manufactur-
ing sector advanced to 59.0 in Janu-
ary from 56.7 in December. Wall
Street analysts had expected a read-
ing of 57 for the latest month.

A reading above 50 indicates
expansion, while one below that indi-
cates contraction.

Mark Vitner, senior economist
with Wachovia Securities in Char-
lotte, N.C., noted that the trade
group’s report last week on the man-
ufacturing sector indicated that it
was contracting in January in con-
trast to the services sector, which
grew for the 46th consecutive month.

“Manufacturing is weakening as
domestic auto manufacturers cut
back and as residential construction
declines,” Vitner said, but noted that
this makes up just about one-quarter
of the economy. Meanwhile, the ser-
vice sector, which represents about
three-quarters of the economy, con-
tinued to grow.

“The message to take away from
the two is that economic growth will
slow, but there will be growth,” Vit-
ner said.

Most economists are looking for
the non-manufacturing sector to be a
driver of growth in 2007.

Scott Brown, chief economist with
Raymond James & Associates in St.
Petersburg, Fla., said the “headline

* TURN TO REPORT.

Checks hang on as electronic payments gain

@ As the number of debit card
transactions nearly doubled from
2000 to 2003, fewer people are
using checks, but many think the
paper form of payment will
remain popular.

BY JOSH FUNK
Associated Press

OMAHA, Neb. — Richard Kester-
son slid his debit card out of his wal-
let even before the cashier at a Hy-
Vee grocery store in west Omaha
rang up his total.

Kesterson, like millions of other
Americans, didn’t even consider pay-
ing by check. Using a debit card is
easier, he said.

Kesterson also eschews checks
when paying his bills in favor of
online bill pay, and then lets his bank
keep track of his spending.

“J haven’t balanced my account in
ten years,” Kesterson said.

EEE

Such habits are part of the reason
why check writing has declined
sharply since 1995. The Federal
Reserve estimates that 49.5 billion
checks were paid in the United States
in 1995; that figure dropped to 36.6
billion checks paid in 2003, according
to the most recent Fed studies.
Increasingly, some checks are even
being converted into electronic pay-
ments by merchants, who prefer elec-
tronic transfers to handling paper
checks.

The widespread availability of
debit cards and the growing popular-
ity of plastic are the biggest factors in
the decline. Between 2000 and 2003,
the number of debit card transactions
nearly doubled from 8.3 billion to 15.6
billion, and the number of credit card
transactions jumped from 15.6 billion
to 19 billion.

Julie O’Neill of Omaha said she
thinks her credit card is more con-



venient than writing a check, and all
her spending is compiled on one
statement at the end of the month.

When it comes time to pay bills,
O’Neill turns to her computer instead
of her checkbook because she can
pay her bills at the last minute.

“T procrastinate, so then I can go
online and not have to go through
snail mail” to pay bills, O’Neill said.

Together, credit and debit card
use accounted for 43 percent of all
non-cash payments in 2003, up from
33 percent in 2000.

In some cases, consumers may still
write a check, but increasingly, mer-
chants are scanning those checks and
converting them into an electronic
payment. So the Federal Reserve
counts those checks as electronic
payments and not as checks; pay-
checks electronically deposited in

* TURN TO CHECKS



NATIHARNIK/AP

KEEPS A RECORD: Cheryl Carlson
pays by check at a grocery
store, in Omaha, Neb.





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 9B



- Study says Florida c:

cut fossil fuel electric

m@ By STEPHEN MAJORS
Associated Press Writer

TALLAHASSEE, Fla.
(AP) — Florida can reduce its
consumption of fossil fuel-pro-

duced electricity by nearly half

over the next 15 years through
conservation and renewable
energies. a study released
Monday said

A lack of concern and fore-
sight has put Florida behind
other states in adapting to
energy challenges, but an
aggressive shift in policy can
cut traditional electricity use
by 45 percent by 2023, said
Neal Elliott. a director at the
Washington-based American
Council for an Energy-Effi-
cient Economy, which
released the report.

States

“Florida has not been one

of the progressive states in -

terms of energy policy with
respect to efficiency or renew-

4

able energy,” Elliott said. “We
suggest that this is a real
opportunity to set the state on
a more sustainable economic
and environmental path in the
future.”

Florida currently produces
most of its electricity with non-
renewable fuels such as petro-
leum, nuclear, coal and nat-
ural gas energy. It only gets
0.1 percent of its electricity
trom renewable resources,
compared to a national aver-
age of 2.3 percent, the study
said.

The state’s electricity con-
sumption is growing faster
than its population because of
widespread use of devices like
cell phones and high-defini-
tion TVs, Elliott said.

Florida can conserve energy
by 19 percent — balancing out
rising demand — by enacting
stricter building energy codes
and providing incentives to
utility companies to promote
consumer energy efficiency,
Elliott said.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)

FALCONCLIFF CORPORATION
_IBC No. 89336B

In Voluntary Liquidation

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section 131 (2)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 46 of 2000),
Falconcliff Corporation is in Dissolution

The date of Commencement of dissolution was 3rd day of

November 2006.

‘ Aimilios Vrachipedis of 19 Aretis Street, 166 72 Vari, Greece is
the Liquidator of Falconcliff Corporation.

Elliot also urged the state
to spend $250 million to $350
million a year for 15 years to
promote energy conservation
and renewable energy.

Provided

The state provided a sales-
tax holiday last year for high
energy-efficiency appliances
and Gov. Charlie Crist called
for a repeat this year in his
budget recommendation.

To promote renewable
energy, the state should man-
date that utilities produce 5
percent of their power by
using renewable fuels, the
study recommended.

Elliott said although, offi-

cials have not focused on wind .

and solar energy as some oth-
er states, like Texas, but
experts say it. is well-posi-
tioned to convert sugarcane
and waste materials into
ethanol. Ethanol has been
promoted as an alternative
motor fuel, but can also be

used to produce electricity.

Crist’s recommended
spending y $68 million on alter-
native energy, including $50
million on ethanol and
biodiesel projects.

The Florida House wants to
spend around $100 million in
total. Elliott said Crist’s pro-
posal lacked focus in the area
of energy efficiency.

House Committee on Ener-
gy Chairman Rep. Bob Allen,
R-Merritt Island, agreed with
the study but said it’s unlikely
the state will spend what
Elliott recommended.

“We're going to do it within
our means but it’s certainly
more of a priority than it was
last year,” Allen said.

He also agreed Florida
needs to promote energy effi-
cient building codes.

“As we harden our homes
for storms and tornadoes and
hurricanes, we need to build
them energy wise,” he said.
“If you have really thick storm
windows you've also got good

NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)
CITY OF LONDON FIDUCIARIES LTD.

LIQUIDATOR’S NOTICE

PURSUANT ¥6'SECTION 137 (6) OF THE
INTERANTIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES, AC T

I, Mark Ashley BRUCE-SMITH , Liquidator of City

of London Fiduciaries Ltd.,

hereby certify that the

winding-up and dissolution of City of London
Fiduciaries Ltd., has been completed in
accordance with the Articles of Dissolution.

Dated the 31st day of January, 2007.

bau Satu, MA.

Liquidator

energy windows.”
Growth

While Florida’s high growth
presents it with more chal-
lenges than many other states,
California has provided an



example by reducing its.ener-
gy consumption 1.7 percent a
year with conservation mea-
sures alone, Elliott said.
There is “a willingness to
_ entertain these opportunities
that I haven’t seen before in
the state of Florida,” he said.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 4s follows:

(a) GREAT HEIGHTS OVERSEAS HOLDINGS S.A. is in
dissolution under the provisions of the international Business
Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on February 2, 2007
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by Registrar

General.

(c) The liquidator of the said company is Alisa Richardson of 2nd Terrace

West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the Sth day of March to send their names and
addresses and particulars of their-debts or claims to the Liquidator of the
company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of
any distribution made before such debts are proved.

February 5, 2007

ALISA RICHARDSON

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY



Legal Notice

_. ..NOTICE
GOLDIE INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

NOTICE 1s TIEREBY GIVEN as fi ollows:

(a) GOLDIE INTERNATIONAL LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced

on the 5th February, 2007 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the

Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse Trust

of Geneva, Rue de Lausanne 17 bis, 1211 Geneva 70

Dated this 6th day of February, A.D. 2007

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No 45 of 2000)

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No 45 of 2000) Credit Suisse Trust Limited

Liquidator

Position Available

TRUST ACCOUNTANT

Job Function: .
e To produce accurate and timely trust and company financial
statements in accordance with infernal procedures and
generally accepted accounting principles.



STEWART HOLDINGS LTD
LIQUIDATOR’S NOTICE

ARABIC WORLD TRADING LLC
LIQUIDATOR’S NOTICE

PURSUANT TO SECTION 137°(6) OF
THE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

PURSUANT TO SECTION 137 (6) OF
THE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT



We, Redcorn Consultants Limited, Liquidator of STEWART
HOLDINGS LTD hereby certify that the winding up and
dissolutioon of STEWART HOLDINGS LTD has been
complete in accordance with the Articles of Dissolution.

We, Redcorn Consultants Limited, Liquidator of ARABIC
WORLD TRADING LLC hereby certify that the winding up
and dissolutioon of ARABIC WORLD TRADING LLC has
been complete in accordance with the Articles of Dissolution.

Responsibilities:
e Update the clients’ general ledger.
« Reconcile cash and securities balance: ensuring that all
entries are processed correctly in ledger.
com onsultants Limited © Prepare monthly financial statements and internal client
Seat \ reports for a portfolio of complex trusts and companies.
e — Liaise with trust and company administrators to ensure that
financial statements accurately reflect the activities of the

client.

Dated the 21st day of November A.D., 2006 Dated the 31st day of January, A.D., 2006

onsultants Limited



Qualifications:

e¢ Bachelor's degree in Accounting.

: «Atleast five years experience preparing trust and company
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT financial statements. —
(No 45 of 2000) Understanding of the fundamentals of trust administration
e Advance knowledge of Microsoft Excel.

NOTICE NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No 45 of 2000)

area beatin HOEDINGS LID BRIARWOOD CAPITAL LTD . * Completion of the Canadian Securities Course of Series 7
LIQUIDATOR’S NOTICE LIQUIDATOR’S NOTICE Course would be an asset.
aa ee | e Ability to supervise a team of trust accountants
PURSUANT TO SECTION 137 (6) OF PURSUANT TO SECTION 137 (6) OF e Proven track record of success ina similar position,
THE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT THE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
Benefits:

Attractive salary commensurate with skills and experience.
Other benefits include medical insurance coverage,
excellent pension plan and performance based bonus.

We, Redcorn Consultants Limited, Liquidator of BRIAR- °
WOOD CAPITAL LTD hereby certify that the winding up
and dissolutioon of BRIARWOOD CAPITAL LTD has been
complete in accordance with the Articles of Dissolution.

We, Redcorn Consultants Limited, Liquidator of PALM
VILLAS HOLDINGS LTD hereby certify that the winding up
and dissolutioon of PALM VILLAS HOLDINGS LTD has been
complete in accordance with the Articles of Dissolution. Interested persons meeting the above requirements may forward their
resumes and two written references to:

Human Resources :
P.O. Box N-7043
Nassau, The Bahamas

Dated the 31st day of January, A.D., 2006 Dated the 31st day of January, A.D., 2006

or

Redcorn Consultants Limited
dator

Email: trustaccountant(@@gmail.com





PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Bahamas ‘scratches surface’

of marina industry potential

FROM page 1B

* Room revenues - $5.818
million

* Fuel - $6.206 million

* Meals and entertainment
- $9.929 million

* Dockage - $1.862 million

* Fees - $1.745 million

In addition, the boating and
marina industry had generated
$271,000 in revenues for the
Government during the first
10 months of 2006.

The draft policy document
pointed out that there were
several opportunities for the
Bahamas to expand its mari-
na industry, particularly since
most resort investments
approved by the current gov-
ernment - especially those in
the Family Islands - included a
strong marina component, with
these facilities set to act as
major revenue drivers.

The Government document
said the Bahamas currently



B.
Kin
international cHents.





mg ¢ PS CURT

j prok.

Manager.

Core Responsibilities

" Manage a large portfolio of complex accounts including trust, estates and

agencies.

* Provide financial information to clients as requested.
® ~~ Act on clients’ behalf in matters dealing with lawyers, beneficiaries, etc.

= Extensive experience with all aspects of trust administration.

Desired Qualifications

=" Bachelor's Degree in Business or related discipline from a well recognized

university.

Services Industry.

and customer service skills.

Closing Date: February 16, 2007

Contact

Hunan Resources
Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited

. RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

Trust & Corporate Services

A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in The
vas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guernsey, Switzerland and the United
om. Butterfield Bank offers a wide range of services to local and

; vionat achiovements (0 4.
tcam. The successful candidate will report directly to the Senior Relationship

* Aminimum of five years progressive Fiduciary experience in the Financial

© STEP training or other suitable qualifications will be advantageous.
= Proficient in Microsoft Office suite of products,

® Strong interpersonal, communication, problem solving, project management

boasted some 64 marinas with
10 or more boat slips, collec-
tively providing 3,106 slips.
Slips in locations such as Har-
bour Island sold for between
$500,000 to $1 million, with
rents ranging from $0.5 to $3
per foot of dock space.

Yet the draft. marina policy
document pointed out: “There
is almost no marina capacity
south of Stella Maris on the
northern tip of Long Island.
Yet this route is the gateway to
the Caribbean via the Wind-
ward Passage between Cubs
and Haiti.”

The Ministry of Tourism had
identified a number of poten-
tial new marina sites, the doc-
ument said. These included:

* Andros - near Driggs Hill,
Congo Town

* Eleuthera - between
Hatchet Bay and Governor’s
Harbour, and at Cape
Eleuthera

* Exuma - Rolletown

* Cat Island - Arthur’s Town















sults orlented v with a
i dy tami Trust & Corpoiie Services

* Acklins Island
* Crooked Island
* Inagua - Matthew Town

In assessing the tax revenues
derived from the marina and
boating industry, the draft pol-
icy document said the
Bahamas levied an annual
charge of $6.15 and $1.95 per
linear foot of dock space for
commercial and private slips
respectively in Family Island
marinas. For New Providence,
the figures were slightly higher,
standing at $6.32 and $2 for
commercial and private dock
space respectively.

But while collection rates for
these charges on New Provi-
dence were high, they were
lower for Family Island mari-
nas. For the first 10 months in
2006, the Port Controller’s
Office had collected $156,000
in charges from New Provi-
dence, but just $115,000 from
the Family Islands.

“Apparently very little” rev-

enues for business licence fees
were collected from marinas,
while there were no charges
for the use of seabed Crown
Land. The seabed was often
leased by the marina develop-
ers.

“There are no mooring or
anchoring charges other than
the $300 cruising permit and
the annual mooring charge of
$30 for private moorings and
$100 for commercial moorings
in the Family Islands, and $50
and $200 respectively in New
Providence,” the draft policy
document said.

It added that areas such as
Elizabeth Harbour in Exuma
had become popular anchor-
ages, with some boaters staying
for four to six months and only
paying $300 for a seasonal per-
mit.

“Some may, although it
appears few do, pay an annual
fee - $100 for a private anchor-
age and $150 for a commercial
anchorage on the Family

SENIOR RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

Trust & Corporate Services

A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in The
Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guermsey, Switzerland and the United
Kingdom, Butterfield Bank offers a wide range of services to Jocal and

international clients.

An exciting opportunity carrently exists for a results oriented self starter with a
record of professional achievements to join a dynamic Trast & Corporate Services
team. The successful candidate will report directly to the Head of Trust &

Corproate Services..

Core Responsibilities

Oversee a group of complex client relationships.

Provide technical advice to staff on trust and-eompany structures.

Act on clients’ behalf in matters dealing with lawyers, beneficiaries, etc.

id €

Extensive experience with all aspects of trust administration.

Desired Qualifications

® Bachelor's Degree in Business or related discipline from a well recognized

university.

Five - Eight years progressive Fiduciary experience in the Financial Services

Industry.

STEP training or other suitable qualifications will be advantageous.

Proficient in Microsoft Office suite of products.

Strong interpersonal, commanication, problem solving, project management

and customer service skills.

Closing Date: February 16, 2007

Contact

Human Resources

Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited



Islands, and $150 and $200
respectively for New Provi-

dence,” the document said.

“Such boaters contribute
very little to.the economy and
may, through improper waste

management practices and |

anchoring practices, be dam-
aging the environment.”

Anchoring could damage
underwater reefs and grasses,
and their had been reports of
illegal dumping of waste,
including bilge. Such boaters
had also been accused of over-
fishing in Bahamian waters,
the document argued, with the
fish then sold to other boaters
to enable the culprits to earn a
living.

To ensure the Bahamas

‘maximised tax revenues from

the marina and boating indus-
tries, the policy document sug-
gested that seabed land should
be leased, not sold, with the
leases based on appraised val-
ues and renewable indefinitely.
However, there would be five-
year rental reviews.

The more radical suggestion
is to collect real property taxes
on seabed land, and on the val-
ue of improvements made to
marina property over the
seabed.

“In the same way that the
Bahamas secures revenue from
overnight accommodation at
hotels, government should
receive revenue from boaters’
overnight stays on a per night
basis,” the policy document
suggested.

“Similarly, government
should receive revenue for the
use of land which they alienate,
just as they do for Crown
Land. And, whether it be lease

or sale, it should be based, at a.

minimum, on market value.
“Finally,:since property tax-
es related to income-streams

PUBLIC NOTICE

are one of the few income-
related taxes which are open
to the Bahamas other than the
business tax, and since prop-
erty taxes are a tax accepted
widely by most of those who
would be investing in marinas,
the property tax should also
be collected.”

The policy document sug-

sees

gested that the annual mooring °
charge be continued, with the ;

addition of a $1 per foot, per
night, mooring charge that

would not apply to Bahamian ¢

residents or people mooring
one boat near their own prop-
erty. i

The current charges of $1.95
and $2 per foot of dock space
could be “waived for private

- own-use holdings provided a

lease is being paid on the sea |

bed”.

The document suggested
that commercial marinas
should pay the higher of the
$6.13 or $6.32 per foot of dock
space on the Family Islands
and New Providence respec-
tively, or 6 per cent of revenues
for the seabed lease, bringing

the Bahamas into line with the |

taxes levied by Florida.

“In addition, local govern-
ment could be charged with
the collection of these revenues
from [property taxes and

mooring charges], and would '
be allowed to keep 75 per cent "
of the collections as an incen- -
tive to collect fees as well as °
enforce regulations,” the poli-

cy document said.
It added that investment

incentives to encourage marina

development should only be
offered in Andros and
Mayaguana, Inagua, Crooked
Island and Acklins, involving
50 per cent relief from the per

foot of dock space tax “for up-'

to.10 years”.

| INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, SHERLINE SAINT
JILLIS of Soldier Road, Church Hill Subdivision, PO.
Box SB-50431, Nassau, Bahamas intend to change my
name to SHERLINE SAINT-JILUS. If there are any

‘objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box SS-742; Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is

hereby given

that RAMEINA SYLVINA

SAUNDERS OF WEST END, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,







BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for

P.O, Bos N-3242 P.O. Box N-3242

registration/naturalization








































































Nassau, Bahamas Nassau, Bahamas .
fax: (242) 393 3772 Fax: (242) 393 3772 as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who | »
E-mail: recruitment@ butterfieldbank.bs E-mail: recruitment@ batterfieldbank.bs knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should | *
www butterficldbank.bs wow. butterfieldbank. bs not be granted, should send a written and signed statement | !
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 6TH day of | -
aN FEBRAURY, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality | -
Butterfield Bank Butterfield Bank and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas. | °
se ‘
7 :
snes = Bcc bome 3 Ty
= FIDELITY NOTICE is hereby given that LESLIE FILS-AIME OF |!
Pricing Intormation As Of: RUPERT DEAN LANE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying | »
Monday, 5 Febtua 7 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,- | *
(COC for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, | :
Os oo and that any person who knows any reason why registration/ :
Abaco Markets Previous Crees oy Yield naturalization should not be granted, should send a written | {
Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 ; : and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight | -
Bank of Bahamas 8.03 . . ; days from the 6th day of Febraury, 2007 to the Minister | -
ero 0:60 . responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, | '
ahamas Waste 1.85 7 : F 6
Fidelity Bank 1.25 3 ; : Nassau, Bahamas. r
Cable Bahamas 10.00 : : : r,
Colina Holdings 2.00 5 F i »
Commonwealth Bank 13.26 0.04 2,200 0.998 0.680 13.3 5.11% .
Consolidated Water BDRs 5.17 -0.09 0.134 0.045 38.6 0.87%
Doctor's Hospital 2.44 0.00 0.295 0.000 8.3 0.00%| ‘
Famguard 5.70 0.00 0.552 0.240 10.3 4.21%
Finco : ; : 0.570 5.7 85% : 4
Fre onsen ee 209 cre Sore gr Saat NOTICE ?
Focol 16.21 0.00 1.476 0.510 11.0 3.15%
Freeport Concrete 0.50 0.00 -0.434 0.000 N/M 0.00% PATERSON FIDELITY CORP. *
ICD Utilities : .53 ‘ 13.3 1.90% : ‘ . . :
J. S. Johnson 15.4 6.19% Is Voluntary Liquidation
Premier Real Estat 2 crooner 95%
SEA ; :
Last Price Weekly Vol. Yield *
Bahamas Supermarkets LIQUIDATIOR’S STATEMENT
ea iebesp Crossings (Pref) PURSUANT TO SECTION 137(4) OF THE :
ye INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT 2000 .
4




Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137(4) of the ,
international Business Companies Act, 2000

PATERSON FIDELITY CORP is in dissolution. .













Fund Name Last 12 Months Div $



Colina Money Market Fund 1.326132*

Fidelity Bahamas G &| Fund —-.2.9728"** “
Colina MS! Preferred Fund 2.500211** 4
Colina Bond Fund 1.217450"*** The date of commencement of dissolution was 29th November, 2006.




i.

















NAY KEY

Mr. Daniel Eisenberg, with domiciled at Tucuman 1667, Floor 1°“D”,
CP 1050, Argentine
Republic is the Liquidation of PATTERSON FIDELITY CORP.

t 12 month dividends divided by closi
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS §$ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
INAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINOEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol, - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

* - 26 January 2007

** - 31 December 2006

Ah Os &”

*** - 31 Decamber 2006
Daniel Eisenberg
Liquidator

**** ~ 31 December 2006



mber 2006





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 11B



Business highlights

ii By The Associated
Press

Bush unveils
$2.9 trillion
spending plan

WASHINGTON (AP) —
President Bush on Monday
unveiled a $2.9 trillion spend-
ing plan that devotes billions
more to fighting the war in
Iraq but pinches pennies on
programs promised to voters
by Democrats now running
Congress. Democrats widely
attacked the plan and even a
prominent Republican con-
ceded it faced bleak prospects.

Bush’s spending plan would
make his first-term tax cuts
permanent, at a cost of $1.6
trillion over 10 years. He is
seeking $78 billion in savings
in the government’s big health
care programs — Medicare
and Medicaid — over the next
five years, in part by increas-
ing premiums for higher-
income Medicare recipients.

Apple Inc.
resolves bitter
trademark dispute

SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) —
For the third time in nearly
three decades, iPod maker
Apple Inc. has resolved a bit-
ter trademark dispute with
The Beatles’ guardian Apple
Corps Ltd. over use of the
iconic apple logo and name.

But while the truce
announced Monday appeared
to finally bury the long-sim-
mering animosity, music
lovers will still need to wait
for the right to buy such songs
as “Love Me Do” or “Hey
Jude” on Apple Inc.’s iTunes
online store.

The announcement —
made jointly by one of the
world’s largest music sellers
and one of history’s most
beloved bands — was silent

on whether the. catalog: of:
Beatles songs. will become)
available for download any:

time soon.

The Beatles have so far
been the most prominent
holdout from iTunes and oth-
er online music services, and
Apple’s overtures to put the
music online have been
stymied by the ongoing litiga-
tion.

Weakness in auto
industry may be
dampening nation’s
economic prospects

NEW YORK (AP) —
Weakness in the manufactur-
ing sector, especially the auto
industry, may be dampening
the nation’s economic

The Tribune wants to hear
| from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
} award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

BEC ama
Mi LT ae :

eae

| Pon rT)

HIF ae

just call 322-—
Poe



prospects, but the bigger ser-
vices sector appears to be
more than making up for it.

The Institute for Supply
Management, which is based
in Tempe, Ariz., said Monday
that its index of business activ-
ity in the non-manufacturing
sector advanced to’59.0 in Jan-
uary from 56.7 in December.
Wall Street analysts had
expected a reading of 57 for
the latest month.

A reading above 50 adic
cates expansion, while one
below that indicates contrac-
tion.

Most economists are look-
ing for the non-manufactur-
ing sector to be a driver of
growth in 2007.

Triad Hospitals Inc.
agrees to be taken
private in a $4.7
billion sale

PLANO, Texas (AP) —
Triad Hospitals Inc. said Mon-
day it agreed to be taken pri-
vate in a $4.7 billion sale to
an affiliate of Goldman Sachs

and a firm spun off from’

JPMorgan Chase & Co.

The ‘Triad announcement
comes on the heels of hospital
giant HCA Inc.’s sale to pri-
vate owners.

The hospital industry is
struggling with flat volume
and rising numbers of unpaid
bills from uninsured patients.
Triad said Monday its provi-
sion for “doubtful accounts”
would equal. one-eighth its
revenue in the fourth quarter
and cut into earnings.

Triad agreed to be pur-
chased for $50.25 per share, a
16 percent premium over Tri-
ad’s closing stock price on Fri-

day. The buyers, affiliates of

CCMP Capital Advisors and
GS Capital Partners, will also

"assume $1.7 billion in debt.

State Street.Corp to
buy Investors Financial

' Services Corp. for $4.16
billion in stock

BOSTON (AP) — State
Street Corp. said Monday it
will buy Investors Financial
Services Corp. for $4.16 bil-
lion in stock to expand into
providing institutional asset
services for the fast-growing
hedge fund industry and funds
managed overseas.

State Street said it eclipsed
other bidders to reach an
agreement between two
Boston-based firms that would
pay IFS investors a hefty pre-
mium on their shares. That
premium shrank quickly Mon-
day, from 38 percent before
the deal was announced to 29
percent as the news dragged

down State Street’s stock.
Shares of Investors Financial
Services still soared 27 per-
cent.

IFS provides investment ser-

vices for $2.2 trillion in assets.

‘Tts revenue has grown at an

annual rate of 18 percent over
the past three years. State
Street is far larger, with $11.9
trillion in assets under custody.

Lear Corp. says group
affiliated with billionaire
investor offered to buy
company for about
$2.61 billion

DETROIT (AP) — Auto-
motive equipment supplier
Lear Corp. said Monday a
group affiliated with billion-
aire investor activist Carl
Icahn offered to buy the com-
pany for about $2.61 billion.
But its share price climbed
well above the offered price.

The offer of $36 a share
from American Real Estate
Partners LP represents a pre-
mium of 4 percent over the
stock’s Friday closing price of
$34.67.

But Lear shares rose $3.97,
or 11.45 percent, to close at
$38.64 on the New York Stock
Exchange after briefly touch-
ing a new 52-week high of
$39.88.

Southfield-based Lear,
whose products include seats
and electronic systems, and
the bidder are negotiating spe-
cific terms and there is no for-
mal agreement, the company
said.

Simon Property Group Inc.
and Farallon Capital Man-
agement LLC offering $24 per
share in cash for mega-mall
developer

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) —
Simon Property Group Inc.
and Farallon Capital Man-
agement LLC said Monday
they are offering $24 per share
in cash, or more than $1.6 bil-
lion, for mega-mall develop-
er Mills Corp., topping a pre-
vious $1.35 billion deal from
Canadian investor Brookfield
Asset Management.

In a letter to Mills, Simon
Property and Farallon said
they will each provide $650
million of equity for the trans-
action. Funds managed by
Farallon currently own about
10.9 percent of Mills out-
standing shares, making it the
largest reported Mills share-
holder.

Simon Property and Faral-
lon said their proposed ten-
der offer would give Mills’
shareholders payment at least
six months faster than the
Brookfield deal.



WANTED

Mature Male for the position of General Clerk,
| Data Entry: Messenger duties.

Requirements (these are a must):

’ Age 21-25 years;

A High School Graduate with BGCSE

passes in English and Math at Grade ‘C’ or above;
Computer Literate (MS Office);

Hardworking, Honest, Reliable, and

Possess a valid Drivers’ Licence

Fringe Benefits include:

* Life and Health Coverage

e Pension

Interested person should submit their Resume along

with the following:

¢ Acurrent Police Certificate
¢ Two (2) Character References

Manager Human Resources
HSBC Nassau P.O. Box N-4917

Nassau, Bahamas

or

Fax: 502-2566/2577

‘Application Deadline: Friday, 9 February 2007 ©



Federal Trade
Commission
finalises ruling

SAN FRANCISCO (AP)
— The Federal Trade Com-
mission finalized its ruling that
Rambus Inc. violated antitrust
laws, imposing limits on the
royalties the memory chip
designer can charge.

Wall Street was bracing for
a potentially harsher order
than the one that the FTC
released Monday, and Ram-
bus stock surged more than
24 percent.

The FTC’s final opinion
provides the sharpest criticism
to date against Rambus.

The order said Rambus vio-
lated federal antitrust laws “by
deliberately engaging in a pat-
tern of anticompetitive acts to
deceive an industry-wide stan-
dard-setting organization,
which caused or threatened to
cause substantial harm to
competition and consumers.”

Brookfield Asset
Management Inc

to buy Longview Fibre
Co. for about $1.6 billion

SEATTLE (AP) — Brook-
field Asset Management Inc.
plans to buy Longview Fibre
Co. for about $1.6 billion,
adding nearly 600,000 acres of
private tree farms and more
than a dozen forest products
plants to the Canadian firm’s
holdings.

Toronto-based Brookfield
would purchase Longview
Fibre for $24.75 per share in a
deal valued at $1.63 billion.
Brookfield also would assume
about $518 million in debt, the
companies said Monday.

Longview Fibre’s private
timberlands — ‘some 588,000
acres in Washington state and
Oregon — were the primary
lure for Brookfield, which
already owns or manages 2
million acres of timber in
North America and Brazil.

PepsiCo Inc. says
Nooyi will assume
additional title

of chairwoman

NEW YORK (AP) — Pep-
siCo Inc. said Monday that
Chief Executive Indra K.
Nooyi will assume the addi-
tional title of chairwoman of
the soft drink and snack food
company. As its CEO, she was
already one of the highest
ranked women leaders in cor-
porate America.

Nooyi takes the second title

TEN clea VEET NAN CR MTT VEL UN Nell asta ers

PROFILE:

* Bachelors Degree in Finance

¢ STEP Qualification

¢ 10 years experience in advising clients on fiduciary services and developing
appropriate legal structures

effective May 2 at the retire-
ment of former CEO Steven
Reinemund as chairman. She
succeeded him as CEO on
Oct. 1. .

With PepsiCo ranked No.
61 on the Fortune 500, Nooyi
ranks No. 2 among 10 female
CEOs of the nation’s biggest
companies. Only Patricia A.
Woertz ranks higher as chief

of Archer Daniels Midland .-

Co.; which is’No. 56 on the
list, according to the Catalyst
organization.

Dow rises
The Dow industrial average

rose 8.25, or 0.07 pele to
12,661. 74.

The Standard & Poor’s 500
index was down 1.40, or 0.10
percent, at 1,446.99, and the
Nasdaq composite index fell
5.28, or 0.21 percent, to
2,470.60.

Light, sweet crude for
March delivery slipped 28
cents to settle at $58.74 a bar-
rel on the New York Mercan-
tile Exchange.

Natural gas futures settled
at $7.634, up nearly 16 cents. -

Heating oil futures slipped
nearly a penny to settle at
$1.6756 a gallon, while gaso-
line futures settled at $1.5599
a gallon, down more than 1
cent. Brent crude for March
delivery on the ICE Futures
exchange fell 31 cents to settle
at $58.10 a barrel. .

® CALEDONIA

CORPORATE MANAGEMENT GROUP LIMITED

Invites applicants for the Full Time position of TRADER

RESPONSIBILITES INCLUDE:

+ Executing Equity and Fixed Income trades as directed
by clients and colleagues in North American Markets.

* Monitoring of trades and proactive communication with

clients

QUALIFICATIONS

* Minimum of 3 years experience with trading

a

¢ Series 7 or Canadian Securities Course

¢ Working knowledge of Microsoft Office and basic

trading platforms

* Strong organizational and communication (verbal

and written) skills

* Client oriented and team player.

¢ Must be prepared to work on Bahamian Holidays
when North American markets are open.

Salary will be commensurate with experience. Interested applicants
must submit applications by February 23rd, 2007 via:

Mail:

Human Resources Manager

Caledonia Corporate Management Group Limited

PO.Box N-8165
Nassau, Bahamas

Email:

Fax: 242.356.3969

info@caledoniagroup.com

Caledonia Corsorie Management Group Limited is a well
established, independent and licensed Bahamian brokerage and
Jinancial services firm, offering a comprehensive range of wealth
management solutions for private clients.

Jaa

FIDELITY BANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

A MEMBER OF THE FIDELITY GROUP OF COMPANIES

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:
* Client Relationship Management

* Investment of client funds

* Monthly management reports

* Quarterly reports to clients

* Business development and marketing activities

* Account opening formalities
* Invoicing & booking fees

¢ Estate Planning

¢ Administration of Trusts

* Production of trust deeds, letter of wishes & testamentary trusts
¢ Training, management and coaching of staff

Send resume no later than February 7th, 2007 to:



invites qualified applicants for the following position:

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The applicant must have the following minimum qualifications:

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The Human Resource Director
Fidelity > 51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853 » Nassau, Bahamas

f: 326.3000

e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com





THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 12B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007

Naito Prime Minister Perry Christie
aoe wld aes Ee OU the ABO Oi



PM on The Tribune:

“Cut it out and
put it on your
headquarters’ wall.”

“Put the stories
on the wall.”

use it to) “Motivate
our people.



| : , |
If The Tribune can do this to the PLP...
imagine what we can do for your business.

Being bound to swear to
the dogmas of no master.



ee, The Tribune

My Voice. My Hewspapo!

'
|
|
\







oe
o@ %
oe ee

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398





B@ TRACK

’ SPIRIT OF
EXCELLENCE
PROTEST

The Spirit of Excel-
lence Track Club has
lodged a protest with the
Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations
over the results of Satur-
day’s under-17 girls 100
metre finish at the Star
Trackers Classic that was
sponsored by Baker’s ,
Construction.

In what was a close fin-
ish at the line, Printassia
Johnson of Star Trackers
was declared the winner
in a hand time of 11.7.
Spirit of Excellence’s
Sparkyl Cash was given
second in 12.0, just
ahead of her team-mate
Leeza Glinton in 12.2.

= SWIMMING.
BSF’s TIME TRIAL

The Bahamas Swim-
ming Federation will
hold a time trial for all
swimmers interested in
qualifying for the
upcoming XXII Carifta
Swimming Champi-
onships and the

- Bahamas National Swim-

nee SS

ming Championships.

The trials will be con-
tested at the Betty Kelly
Kenning Aquatic Center
on Friday; starting at 6
p.m.. There wili be two
sessions on Saturday,
starting at 9:30 a.m. and
again at 6:30 p.m.. -

All events are open
events and all swimmers
are urged to attend.

The Carifta Swimming -
Championships will be
held April 6-11 at the
National Stadium,
Knutsford Court, New
Kingston, Jamaica. The -
Carifta Water Polo
Championships will be
held from April 12-15 at
the Pisina Benny Leito
Otrabanda, Curacao.

@ CHEERLEADING
WALTON ALBURY/
CH REEVES
WINNERS

The Wilton Albury
Primary School was the
overall winner of the
Government Secondary
Schools Sports Associa-
tion’s junior cheerlead-
ing competition that was
held on Saturday at the
CI Gibson Gym.

CH Reeves won the

junior segment of the

competition. °

On Saturday at CI
Gibson, starting at 8
p-m., the senior division
of the competition will

.*, be contested.

- ed States," he stated.

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

Te \

@ BOXING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

SHERMAN ‘the Tank'
Williams is still hoping that
he can get to come home and
fight in a live television event.

The Grand Bahama native
fighting out of Florida, had a
fight lined up for last month
with his Silver Hawks Pro-
motional team from Las
Vegas. But the fight was post-
poned until a later date.

In town over the weekend
to meet with the Minister of
Youth, Sports:and Housing

Neville Wisdom to secure a

new date and financial sup-
port from the Bahamas Govy-

ernment, Williams said it's |

important that he fights at
home so the world can see
where the triple crown holder
comes from.

Last May, Williams

: _ became the first Bahamian to

win a world heavyweight title
- the National Boxing Associ-
ation's crown - and just the
second, behind Elisha Obed,
to hold-a world title. Obed
was the World Boxing Coun-
cils' middleweight champion
in 1976.

Williams has had a stellar
career fighting in the United
States where he's won more
fights than any other Bahami-
an. But since he became a
professional, Williams has
only fought twice in the
Bahamas.

While he continues to wait
for the much anticipated
return home, Williams said
he's trying to stay as active as
he can. He's already fought
and won for the year and he's
looking forward to. his second
appearance in the ring soon.

"My phone has been ring-
ing off the hook since that last
fight in Mississippi. I have an
offer to fight in Germany and
two offers to fight in the Unit-
"No
decision has been made as
yet.

"As you know, Silver
Hawks is still working on try-
ing to get the fight here. They
have the TV ready and they
want to come to the Bahamas.
I think they are only waiting
for the commitment from the
Bahamas Government."

Williams said he's in line to
fight for the International
Boxing Organisation's Inter-
continental title in North Car-
olina. He's currently ranked
number two and so there's a

En

MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

Tank’ still aiming
for fight at home

Promotions may just jump on
that if they can't get the fight
here.

"They're looking at either
late February or early March
to put that fight together," he
pointed out. "I've had a little



break since I won the last
fight, but I started back in the
gym on Wednesday and I will
commence training on Mon-
day and see what happens."
Williams said he specifical-
ly came home this weekend



with Silver Hawk representa-
tives so that he could iron out
some of the details with Wis-
dom and the hotels. But he
said the ball is now in the
court of the Bahamas Gov-
ernment and the Bahamas






@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE

Hi HOME is where the
heart is: Sherman ‘The
Tank’ Williams. i
(Photo: Tim Clarke)

Boxing Commission.

"Silver Hawks has the TV
production in California that
they just used to shoot a fight
last week Friday in Orlando,"
Williams revealed. "It's cost-
ing them well over $300,000
and they want to make sure
that the commitment from the
Bahamas Government is
going to come through before
they bring their TV crew to
Nassau."

This show, if it comes off,
could be bigger than the
Mohammed _ Ali-Trevor
Berberk "Drama in Bahama"
that was held in 1980. The
show has been dubbed: "Big
Drama in Lil Bahama" and
they a lot of people who are
eager to come to the
Bahamas.

"T'm looking forward to it,
but business is business.
That's why I took the fight
two weeks ago," he stressed.
"I came back from Grand
Bahama on January 2. I went
back to training camp and I
learnt on January 6 that the
fight in the Bahamas had to
be pushed up.

"I stayed in the gym, con-
tinuing to train because I
knew there was a fight at the
end of January. A week later
they told me about the fight in
Mississippi as a replacement.
So I was happy to accept the
challenge because I was in the
gym training.to fight in Nas-
sau on January 27."

~.. Williams said he's happy to

hold the NBA title and

already, the president of the

organisation has emailed Sil-
ver Hawks informing them
that he may have to go to
South Africa to defend the
title during the summer.

"I'm really looking forward
to that, but definitely my
heart and my mind is on see-
ing this fight come to fruition
in Nassau," he said. "Every-
thing is in place and I know it
will not only be good for me,
but for tourism because of the
amount of people who want
to come here."

Williams said Silver Hawks
is not just looking at a one
shot deal, but they want to
make it a long term deal
where they will bring a series
of fights to the Bahamas pro-
moting Williams in his home-
town.

possibility that Silver Hawks

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Sands leaps to fourth place
in his second meet of 2007

@ TRACK AND FIELD
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter



LEEVAN ‘Superman’ Sands
picked up a fourth place finish in
the men’s triple jump, while Chan-
dra Sturrup failed to make the final
of the 60 metres at the Sparkassen
Cup over the weekend. °

Competing in his second meet for
the year after sitting out last year
with a three-month suspension,
Sands popped a leap of 55 feet, sev-

en inches on his third attempt.
The winning leap was 56-3 by
Nelson Evora from Portugal on his
second attempt. Nathan Douglas of
Great Britain did 56-2 on his third
attempt for second, while Aarik
Wilson of the United States cleared
55-8 on his third attempt for third.
The weekend before at the Sam-
sung Eurojump in Goteborg, Sands
opened his season with a third place
finish as he cleared 55-1. Cuban’
Onial Tosca won with 55-7, while
Wilson was second with 55-5.

Sands’ 55-7 feat has him tied for
10th spot on the world list with
Tosca.

The list is headed by David Giralt
of Cuba with 57-0, while world and
Olympic champion Christian Ols-
son of Swedan is sitting in second at
56-5.

Sands and Olsson have yet to go
head-to-head in competition this
year.

Meanwhile, also at the meet over
the weekend in Stuttgart, Sturrup,
running out lane four in the last of

two heats of the women’s 60, fin-
ished sixth in a time of 7.47 sec-
onds.

Training

Sturrup, who is now training on
her own after her Jamaican born-
American coach Trevor Graham
was inducted by a Grand Jury last
year over drug allegations, didn’t
make it to the final.

She posted the ninth best time in
the two heats combined: Only seven

J

competitors advanced to the final
that was won by LaVerne Jones of
the United States Virgin Islands in
7.16.

Jones’ winning time was posted
as the best in the world this year.
She also doubled at the meet with a
winning time of 51.60 in the 400.

Both Tonique Williams-Darling
and Christine Amertil-Ling have
yet to compete for the year in the
400, while Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie has not entered in a 60
race as yel.

j
|
|

e -¢



PAGE 2E, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Malisse wins
Delray Beach title

m@ TENNIS
DELRAY BEACH, Fla.
Associated Press

XAVIER MALISSE won
his second career Delray
Beach International with a 5-
7, 6-4, 6-4 victory over top-
seeded James Blake on Mon-
day.

The third-seeded Malisse,
who has appeared in the final
here a record five times, was
trailing Blake 7-5, 3-3 when
rain suspended play on Sun-
day night. The win was
notable for the 31st-ranked
Malisse, who captured his
third career title and 200th
career match win with the vic-
tory.

“The court is almost perfect
speed for me,” Malisse said. “I
feel like I can get to every ball
if I’m in good shape. It’s not
too fast. Once you feel com-
fortable on a court it’s just the
way it goes sometimes.

When the two came back
on court Monday, the condi-
tions were extremely windy
and Malisse made the adjust-
ment quicker and better than
Blake.

“Thave to tell you if we
would have played yesterday I
probably would have lost,”
Malisse said. “He was hitting
it hard yesterday and really
clean. Today with the wind it
slowed down his ball a little:
bit especially against the
wind.”

Blake, who came into the
match with a 2-0 record
against Malisse, agreed that
he had the harder time adjust-
ing to the conditions.

“J think wind is the biggést
equalizer in tennis,” Blake
said. “It’s pretty difficult to
play your game the way you
want to. But he did a better
job of adjusting today and
deserves to win. Yesterday, I
felt I had more opportuni-
ties.”

It was Malisse’s 11th career
victory in 38 matches played
against a top-10 player — his
last came en route to winning
the Chennai title last month
when he upset second-ranked
Rafael Nadal in the semifi-
nals.

With the hybrid round
robin format played at the
tournament, Malisse lost one
of his round robin matches
against Rainer Schuettler of
Germany but still was able to
capture the title.

“It does feel weird winning
a tournament having lost a
match,” Malisse said. “That’s
just the way it is. But I don’t
feel any different. I won the
matches I had to win.”

The ninth-ranked Blake’s
loss made him the fourth top
seed to lose in the final at the
Delray Beach tournament —
a top seed has never won the
title in the tournament’s 15-
year history.:

Blake, who was looking for
his 10th career title, never
found his form on Monday
and struggled with his back-
hand.

When the match resumed at
3-3 on Monday morning,
Blake immediately went in a
hole by losing his serve in the
seventh game, enough of an
advantage for Malisse to even
the score at one set apiece.

In the third set, Blake sur-
rendered his service game at
15-40 in the third game.

Malisse also won the dou-
bles title at the tournament. It
is the second time this year he
has picked up both singles and
doubles titles at the same ©
tournament. ;

Malisse and partner Hugo
Armando won 6-3, 6-7 (5)
over fourth seeds James
Auckland and Stephen Huss.

“Tt feels awesome,” Malisse
said of the double victory. “I
feel a little tired now. It’s a
good feeling.”

Malisse is the first player to
win the singles and doubles at
two tournaments in one year
since Yevgeni Kaselnikov
picked up wins in Prague and
the French Open in 1996.









Major celebrates his
12th birthday in style

CYCLING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

JAY Major could not have
picked a better way to cele-
brate his 12th birthday than
winning his age group title in
the fourth annual Tour de
Bahamas Cycling Classic.

Major, who turned 12 on
Saturday, wrapped up the
series on Sunday in South
Ocean with a combined total
of two hours, nine minutes
and 29 seconds to clinch the
10-12 title.

“It was kind of tough,
attacks being thrown and my
legs being tired from yester-
day,” Major reflected. “The
competition felt kind of easy
yesterday. But today, they
stepped up their game. They
got stronger.”

Major, representing Team
JAR Cycling, said he gives
his rivals their respect when
he travels to Florida to com-
pete, but he wanted to make
sure that they respect him at
home.

And in turning 12 on Sat-
urday, Major said he didn’t
want to spoil his birthday cel-
ebrations.

‘ While Major was the lone
Bahamian to win his category
and be awarded a blue jacket
and trophy for his perfor-
mance, four other Bahami-
ans reached the podium to
collect their trophies.

Anthony Colebrooke was
third behind Major, but he
was not present to receive his
award.

In the 13-14 category, -

Yorkell Bain, a 13-year-old
CC Sweeting student also
competing for Team JAR,
was third in 2:14.19. Amir
Merali of Team Laser/Santi
Gabino won the title in
°2:06:29 with team-mate Ale-
jandr Nillabon Bs 09.29) sec-
ond.

“The race was good. The.

attacks they were throwing
were hard,” he said. “I felt I
did my best against them. I

just have to work on my strat-
egy and answering their

- attacks.”

Said Merali, 13: “It was
pretty good. It was different
from Miami, a lot more
aggressive. I was able to
improve on my second place
last year, so I’m happy.”

In the 15-16 division, 15-
year-old Kingsway Academy
student Laurence Jupp of
Team JAR was second in
2:06.42. He lost out to Marcus
Rodriquez (2:06.10) from
Team Laser.

“It was very hard headiise
both of us broke away from
the pack and just tried to stay
ahead of the pack,” he said.
“Before I would usually come
fifth, but I got second, so I
really improved.”

Rodriquez, 15, noted: “I
had a few breakaways. Yes-
terday, I took first in both
races, but I got second today.
This is my first time here, so I
was pleased with my perfor-
mance. Hopefully I can be
back next year.”

And in the 17-18 division,
Kevin Richardson had to set-
tle for third place in 2:15.36.
The title went to Miquel Her-
nandez from Team
Laser/Santi Gabino (2:15.26)
with team-mate Andres Cano
(2:15.31) second.

“TI felt bad because I want-
ed to come first, but it was
pretty hard for me,” said
Richardson, a 17-year-old
12th grader at CR Walker.

“IT just didn’t come
through.

“It was just me against four
guys from the same team. I
had to-keep trying to attack
against them. But I felt weak
at the end. I knew if I had
some help, I could have done
better.”

Hernandez, 17, said he has-
n’t been training as much as
he should have and he felt it
during the race. But he knew
what his performance was in
the time trial and his victory
in the road race made the dif-
ference iets



irae del Eee oo
at the double
in BSC event

f CRICKET

IRELAND'S wicketkeeper Niall O'Brien
appeals after he stumped Netherlands' batsman
Peter Borren during the ICC World Cricket
League Division 1 match at the Nairobi
Gymkhana Club in Nairobi, Monday, Feb. 5,
2007. The Netherlands won by six runs.





* (AP Photo/Sayyid Azim)

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‘UE DAA? Hol

@ BASKETBALL

THE Baptist Sports Council
kicked off its 2007 Rev. Tyrone
Knowles Basketball Classic on
Saturday atthe Charles W. Saun-
ders High School, Jean Street.

Macedonia Baptist escaped
with two close victories in the
boys 15-and-under and 19-and-
under divisions, while Faith Unit-
ed, while Kemp Road Ministries
pulled off a sneaker in the men's
division and Faith United had to
go to double overtime for a big
15-and-under victory.

© Here's a summary of the
sulla pune:
acedonia 23, New
Caria 20: Marvin Roberts
pumped in 10 points and Jamaal
Brown contributed nine as Mace-
donia held on to win their 15-
and-under opener, welcoming
New Covenant into the league.
Rhemar Lewis scored seven
and Kerbie Oxgenor added five
in the loss.

@ Kemp Road Ministries 50,
Temple Fellowship 47: Dario
Rolle canned 18, Dennisaon
Johnson had 10 and Leonardo
Morris added eight as Kemp
Road Ministries made a success-
ful debut into the men's division.

Drexel Burrows scored 15, Ish-
ban Lynes had 12 and Edwin
Burrows nine in the loss.

i Macedonia 49, Faith United
48: Dominic Sweeting led a bal-
anced scoring attack with 14,

Rohn Johnson had nine,
Cordero Johnson eight and
Anwar Smith finished with six
to lead Macedonia to their 19-
and-under opener.

D'Angelo Miller had a game
high 16 and Stephano Johnson
chipped in with 12 to pace Faith
United in the loss.

@ Faith United 26, Mt. Tabor
22: Lamar Albury converted two
free throws and.Charlton Robin-
son added a lay-up as Faith
United held Mt. Tabor scoreless
in the second overtime to win
their 15-and-under opener.

The game was tied at 18 at the
end of regulation and 22 at the
end of the first extra two minute
period.

Albury finished with a game
high 15 and Robinson had four in
the win.

Cressward Cox led Mt. Tabor
with five and Tovann Adderley
had four.



from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

i

Share your news

The Tribune, wants to hear

A full slate of games are on tap
on two courts on Saturday:

Court One - 10 a.m. Golden
Gates vs Transfiguration (15-
and-ynder); 11 a.m. St. Paul's
Bias Street vs New Covenant
(19-and-under); Noon Calvary
Bible vs St. Paul's Bias Street
(M); 1 p.m. St. Paul's Fox Hill
vs First Baptist (M); 2 p.m. First

Baptist vs St. Paul's (15-and- .:.

under); 3 p.m. Golden Gates vs
Everlasting Life Ministries (19-
and-under).

Court Two - 10 a.m. Ebenezer
vs Kemp Road ministries (15-
and-under); 11 a.m. First Baptist
vs Ebenezer (19-and-under);
Noon Church of Nazerene vs
Transfiguration (19-and-under);
1 p.m. Bahamas Harvest vs Mt.
Tabor (M); 2 p.m. Church of
Nazarene vs Macedonia (M); 3
p.m. New Bethlehem vs New
Covenant (M).:













.





saaaanessannssenaneannnennnneeeiannnnneannnanaheOanneemnnnennennennseennnannne anne

The Aiami Herald



PRO FOOTBALL
COMMENTARY



DAVID DUPREY/AP

SPORTSMANSHIP: Indianapolis head
coach Tony Dungy, right, hugs

Chicago head coach Lovie Smith a

after Dungy’s Colts beat the
Bears 29-17 in the Super Bowl on
Sunday night in Miami.

Dungy and
the Colts
will be back

BY DAVE GOLDBERG
Associated Press

MIAMI — There never should
have been any doubt about Tony
Dungy as a coach, even without a
Super Bowl ring.

Now that he has one, anyone ho
doesn’t list him at the top of the heap
among today’s coaches isn’t in touch
with the NFL. Dungy, though, in his
characteristi-
cally humble
manner, dis-
missed that

— notion Monday.
Se . “IT grew up
under Chuck Noll,” he replied when
asked about comparisons with his
mentor. “No, he’s not someone I think
Icanbe grouped with.”

Think it, Tony.

Yes, Noll won four Super Bowls in
six seasons with Pittsburgh inthe |
1970s. But that was in an era where,
without free agency, he didn’t have to
worry about losing a Joe Greene, Jack
Lambert, Lynn Swann, John Stali-
worth or Terry Bradshaw. Those
players were there, season after sea-
son until age got to them.

Dungy?

The day after he won his first
Super Bowl, he was thinking about the
possibility of losing Dwight Freeney,
Dominic Rhodes and Cato June, three
core players. The Colts might protect
Freeney with a franchise player tag,
not always the best thing because it
can lead to bitterness and potential
holdouts and divide a unified team.

_ COMPARISONS

But that’s the way of this decade .
and it hasn’t hurt Bill Belichick, who
has won three Super Bowls with New
England despite letting many of his
most important players go — from
Lawyer Milloy after the first win in
2002 to Deion Branch and Willie
McGinest last season. Even so, the
Patriots made it to the AFC champi-

. onship game, led Indianapolis 21-3 in
the first half and most likely would
have beaten Chicago if a late drive by
Peyton Manning hadn’t put the Colts
in the Super Bowl instead of the
Patriots.

Compare Dungy with Belichick?

Sure.

Since becoming coach of the Colts
in 2002 — after (unwisely) being fired
by Tampa Bay — he is 60-20 in the
regular season. That’s one game bet-
ter than Belichick, who is 59-21 over
the same period.

Yes, Belichick has three Super
Bow! wins, one of them earned the -

. year before Dungy took over the
Colts.

But there’s no reason that Dungy’s
first title, the result of his team’s 29-17
win over Chicago on Sunday night in
the Miami rain has to be his last.

He reiterated Monday that he will
stick around and that he wants more.
“I still have a lot of passion and

enthusiasm for the game,” he said.
“After a night like last night, how
could you not love it? So I’m not
burned out, I’m not tired at all. ’'m
very fired up and looking forward to
coming back.”

A UNIQUE MAN

There are a number of things that
make Dungy unique, many of them off
the field. He talked Monday about
growing up in Jackson, Mich., hoping
to become an NFL player but never
dreaming of becoming a coach — that
just wasn’t for blacks.

He was a very average player at
best.

But he became a pioneer among
coaches — if not the first of his race in
the NFL, certainly the best. One ques-
tioner during his news conference



* TURN TO GOLDBERG

vsannnaennnygcnnannnnnanoncabap nanan oAAneeee AAA AARNE NANNARAAALE AAA

"| | TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007
iy :

sss DODARARRUADR WOR EOEEIDESDEDIRLI ACIDE NOULALAED RD LADLE BCE RAUBER RIOD ILEC SEL CSEEREEDESLORYULE DEEL ELLA BUELL BIES. nema



INTERNATIONAL EDITION

SUPER BOWL | INDIANAPOLIS COLTS

Frigid city unites for a warm rally

BY STEVE HERMAN
Assaciated Press

INDIANAPOLIS — The India-
napolis Colts shared triumphant
shouts and high-fives with fans
who braved the 8-degree chill to
flock to their floats as the Super
Bowl champions paraded through
downtown Monday night.

An estimated 40,000
fans packed the RCA Dome
to welcome the team home
at.a post-parade rally. Some
had been there for hours.
The parade, first scheduled
for 4 p.m., got under way
about 6 p.m. after the Colts’ plane
from Miami was about an hour

late. ABA championship
Already, some fans were lodking
ahead to another run for the NFL
crown next year.

“J think if they just stay healthy

“It might be a once-in-a-lifetime
thing,” Robert Smith of Indianapo-
lis said while watching a giant-
screen TV replay of Sunday night’s

29-17 victory over Chicago.

Many of the fans were wearing
Colts blue.

“I don’t know how to explain it.
These are exciting times,” fan Eric
Dycus of Indianapolis said. “The
Indianapolis Colts waited for this
for a long time. We went through
the hard times and all of the muck

and mire. This is worth cel-
ebrating.”

The Colts won the Super

Bowl in 1971, when the team

was based in Baltimore, but

Sunday’s victory over Chi-

cago gave the city its first

major pro title in any sport since

the Indiana Pacers won their third

again,” Dycus said.

build the RCA Dome.

great,” Fairchild said.

in 1973.
again.”

tributed to this report.

and do what they’ve been doing,
we might be able to pull it off

Roger Fairchild, a construction
worker from Brownsburg, helped

“I spent a lot of cold days in
here before the roof was on. This is

The Colts will play one more
year in the Dome before moving
into the new Lucas Oil Stadium,
which is expected to be completed
in time for the 2008 season.

“T know at times I wondered if it
would happen in this building
when they started building a new
stadium,” Fairchild said.
highly ‘likely they can pull it off

AP Sports Writer Cliff Brunt con-

e MORE NFL NEWS

rps



“Tt’s

TOM STRICKLAND/AP

THE PARTY PLACE: Colts fans °
wait to enter the RCA Dome
to attend a Super Bowl rally in
Indianapolis on Monday.

PRO BASKETBALL | LOS ANGELES LAKERS 90, ATLANTA 83

Carrying the broom



\\S
Ss
SS

GREGORY SMITH/AP

LAKERS’ LEADER: Lakers guard Kobe Bryant, right, takes a shot against Hawks guard
Joe Johnson in the fourth quarter on Monday in Atlanta. Bryant scored 27 points,
nine straight in the fourth quarter, to lead Los Angeles to a 90-83 victory.



PRO BASKETBALL | STRATEGY

Not free of charge

ii Players have been more willing in the past decade to pay the price and take a charge
in an effort to dissuade opposing players from attacking the basket.

BY ISRAEL GUTIERREZ
igutierrez@MiamiHerald.com

It takes vision, courage and a pinch of fool-
ishness.

It requires good basketball instincts, but a
complete disregard for all human instincts.

It is arguably the most unnatural act in
sports.

And, really, all it entails is standing abso-
lutely still — and bracing fora painful collision.

Taking a charge in the NBA is the sports

equivalent of jumping in front of a moving vehi- -

cle and simply waiting to absorb the impact. It’s
literally taking one for the team.

It is a fundamental defensive play that has
become about as common in basketball’s
trenches as blocking a shot. Although the NBA
does not keep charges taken as an official statis-
tic, it appears to have become a more common
practice in the past decade or so, with more
players realizing the benefit of taking the hit to
keep points off the board.

* TURN TO HEAT

Lakers sweep
season series
from Hawks

BY CHARLES ODUM
Associated Press

ATLANTA — Kobe Bryant, mostly quiet
through three quarters, scored nine straight
fourth-quarter points to lead the Los Angeles
Lakers to a 90-83 victory over the Atlanta Hawks
on Monday night.

Bryant scored 27 points, including 11 in the
final period, as the Lakers swept the Hawks for -
the first time in seven years. The Lakers
improved to 3-2 on their eight-game road trip
with their second straight win.

Bryant wagged his index finger at Atlanta
fans after his fourth straight jumper in his hot

streak, which left the Lakers with a 77-71 lead.

The Hawks, who pulled within three points
early in the period, came no closer than six the
rest of the way.

Joe Johnson led Atlanta with 27 points but
made only 10 of 26 shots. Josh Smith scored 20
points and Zaza Pachulia added 14.

Only two players joined Bryant in double fig-
ures for the Lakers. Lamar Odom had 15 points
and 18 rebounds, and Andrew Bynum added
another double-double with 14 points and 10
rebounds.

The Lakers, who beat Atlanta 106-95 at home
on Dec. 8, completed their first season sweep of
the Hawks since the 1999-00 season. Even in
recent seasons, when the Hawks bottomed out
with 13- and 26-win totals, the Lakers managed
no better than a split of the two games.

Lakers coach Phil Jackson said he was aware
of his team’s inability to take advantage of poor
Atlanta teams in recent years:

“This game is a little space in time,” Jackson
said before the game. “I’m always concerned
about Atlanta. We don’t play well here.”

The Lakers didn’t play their best early but
still led almost from the start. Smith opened the
game with a reverse jam — his first of four
flashy slam dunks in the game — but the Lakers
quickly pulled even on a tip by Bynum and
never again trailed.

Bryant was held to nine points in the first
half.

e MORE NBA GAMES



STEVE C. WILSON/AP

FALL GUY: ‘It’s a way you can play effective
interior defense without being a shot
blocker,’ Michael Doleac, left, said of
taking charges.



4E | TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007 _ INTERNATIONAL EDITION



LOUISVILLE

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Crum’s legacy comes full circle

BY WILL GRAVES
Associated Press

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — The
coach in Denny Crum is still
there, percolating under the
ever-present grin and just-so
hair. But these days, the for-
mer Louisville coach keeps his
opinions to himself.

“My wife doesn’t want to
hear it anyway,” Crum said
with a laugh.

So instead, the man who led
the Cardinals to 675 wins and a
pair of national champion-

ships simply watches from the ,

stands at Freedom Hall, trying
his best to blend in with the
rest of the 18,000 red-clad
Louisville supporters.

Of course, when you spend
three decades building a pro-
gram into one of the nation’s
best, blending in can be a little
difficult. During a recent Lou-
isville home game, Crum
received a standing ovation

when an in-house camera’

panned to him, during a time-
out. '

The ever-bashful 69-year-
old Crum simply waved and
looked away, almost embar-
rassed by the outpouring of
support.

“I didn’t even realize why
they were cheering,” Crum

MEN’S TOP 25 POLL

said. “My wife had to poke
me.”

Crum won’t need to be
prodded Wednesday night,
when the university dedicates
Denny Crum Court at Free-
dom Hall before the Cardinals
face Georgetown.

It’s an honor that was hard
to imagine six years ago, when
Crum abruptly retired after
losing a battle of wills with
Louisville athletic director
Tom Jurich following a 12-19
season in 2000-01.

“It was disappointing the
way it all had to happen,” Jur-
ich said. “But it was a fact of
life that we had to face. I wish
it would have been different.
One of the reasons I came here
was because of Denny Crum.
That made it more difficult.”

Looking back, however,

‘ Crum views his retirement as

a blessing. While the passion
to coach still bubbles up from
time to time, he’s focused on
finding a life away from
crowded gyms on cold winter
nights.

He’s more likely to carry a
fishing pole these days than
the folded up program he’d
smack against his hands dur-
ing games, a habit he picked
from his mentor, former

Florida Gators
are unanimous
No. 1 selection

BY DOUG FEINBERG
Associated Press

The Florida Gators are No.
‘1 for the fourth straight week...

played play after play down
the stretch,” said Aggies coach

“Billy Gillispie. “I guess that is

how you win games on the

This time, there’s no doubt: =,oad. It’s aigreat win for us.”

about it.

Florida became the first
unanimous No. 1 in The Asso-
ciated Press college basketball
poll in nearly two years, gar-
nering all 72 first place votes
Monday. ,

The Gators had 45 first
place votes last week, but the
defending national champions
benefited from losses by
then-No. 2 Wisconsin and No.
3 North Carolina. The last
unanimous No. 1 was Illinois
in the final poll of 2004-05.
The Illini were unanimous in
six of the final seven polls that
season.

_ “We're very honored to be
voted a unanimous No. 1 in the
nation. I realize it doesn’t hap-
pen very often,” said Florida
coach Billy Donovan. “At the
same time, we’re aware that a
lot of that has to do with what
other teams have done around
us. There’s still a long way to
go and we’re just trying to get
better each day, but it’s cer-
tainly always flattering to be
No. 1 in the nation.”

- Florida (21-2) beat then-No.
24 Vanderbilt 74-64 and Ten-
nessee 94-78 last week.:

UCLA moved up three
spots to No. 2 after beating
Oregon 69-57 and routing Ore-
gon State 82-35 on Saturday.
The Bruins finished two
points ahead of Ohio State, fol-
lowed by Wisconsin and
North Carolina.

Completing the top 10 were
No. 6 Texas A&M, followed
by Pittsburgh, Memphis, Kan-
sas, and Butler. Texas A&M
moved up four spots after a
thrilling 69-66 win at Kansas
on Saturday.

“We just hung in there. We

The victory left the Aggies
(19-3, 7-1 Big 12) all alone in
first place just three years
after stumbling 0-16 through
the conference season.

Marquette starts the second
10 in the rankings, followed by
Nevada, Oregon, which
dropped four spots after being
swept by UCLA and USC,
Washington State and Air
Force.

Duke took the biggest fall of
teams still in the poll, drop-
ping eight spots to No. 16 after
losing in the final seconds to
Virginia and Florida State this
week. It is the Blue Devils’
lowest ranking since the 2000
season. :

-The Blue Devils face rival
North Carolina on Wednesday
night and will try and avoid
their first three-game losing
streak since 1999 — when
Duke lost its last game of the
1998-99 season and dropped
the first two in 1999-00.

“We've lost a couple in a

row, and no matter who it is,
we're going to be ready to
play,” Duke guard Greg Paulus
said.
_ Oklahoma State fell five
spots to No. 17 after losing at
Colorado 89-77 on Saturday.
Alabama moved up one spot
to 18th.

USC re-entered the poll at
No. 19 after beating Oregon
State and Oregon.

“We’ve been in so many
close games. They understand
close games and know how to
win,” Trojans coach Tim
Floyd said. “We’re showing
great poise when we need
poise, and we’re showing
attack when we need to
attack.”

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Bales leads N 5 l Duke’s rout of Clemson

Associated Press

DURHAM, N.C. — Alison
Bales scored 15 of her season-
high 21 points in the first half
and No. 1 Duke routed Clem-
son 105-53 on Monday night to
remain perfect entering its
showdown with second-
ranked North Carolina.

Carrem Gay scored 18
points and Abby Waner had 16
for the Blue Devils (24-0, 9-0
Atlantic Coast Conference),
who matched the Tar Heels’
spotless record. The Tobacco

Road rivals play Thursday in
Chapel Hill in a meeting of the
last two remaining unbeatens.

Wanisha Smith added 13
points for Duke.

D’Lesha Lloyd scored 14
points to lead the struggling
Tigers (10-13, 2-6).

e No. 3 Tennessee 73,
No. 9 Georgia 57: In Knox-
ville, Tenn., Candace Parker
had 22 points and 11 rebounds,

.and Tennessee pulled away in

the second half to beat Geor-
gia.

UCLA coach John Wooden.

“T’ve really enjoyed my life
since I stepped down,” Crum
said. “I spent my whole life
coaching. I didn’t know what a
normal life was. But after a
few months of living in a dif-
ferent world, I really enjoyed
having the kinds of freedoms
that I never had as a coach.”

Freedoms such as hunting,
fishing and playing poker with
some of his former players,
spending time with his family
and co-hosting a local sports
talk show with former Ken-
tucky coach Joe B. Hall.

Yet where so many legend- :

ary coaches fade into the shad-
ows once they step down,
Crum has remained visible. He
works as a special assistant to
president James Ramsey and
attends various alumni func-
tions with former players like
Darrell Griffith, who helped
the Cardinals win their first
national title in 1980.

“His outreach goes beyond
the athletics and Freedom
Hall,” Griffith said. “He’s had
an influence on this commu-
nity that you can’t even put
into words.”

The hard feelings that sur- ©

rounded Crum’s retirement
are gone. He is now embraced



by the same alumni base that
was screaming for change at
the end of his career. An
alumni meeting Crum
attended in Chicago last

Month stretched two hours

longer than expected, as fans
asked for one more picture,
one more story, one more
handshake.

“Coach Crum is Louisville
basketball,” said Rick Pitino,

‘who. was Jurich’s surprise

replacement for Crum despite
taking arch rival Kentucky to
the national championship in
1996. “He’s built an unbeliev-
able tradition. It’s very
unusual that someone could
bypass all the temptations of
professional basketball and
other jobs and stay and be so
loyal to the university.”

That loyalty includes deftly
sidestepping any questions
about the current state of Lou-
isville basketball. Pitino led
the Cardinals to the Final Four
in 2005, but has struggled
somewhat since joining the
Big East last season. Yet Crum
has been respectful and sup-
portive, even. as the coach
inside him screams to be let
out from time to time.

“You can’t coach for 41
years and then all of a sudden

cS

PHIL SANDLIN/AP

MAKING HIS POINTS: Florida’s Joakim Noah reacts to his
making two points in the second half of the Gators’
94-78 victory over Tennessee on Saturday.

The Trojans were followed
by Kentucky, Southern Illinois
and Georgetown — all of
whom were new to the Top 25
this week.

The Wildcats, who were
last ranked in week 10, beat
Arkansas 82-74 on Saturday.

The Hoyas came back into
the media poll for the first
time since week 3. They
routed Cincinnati and St.
John’s.

Southern Illinois has won
five straight and came into the
poll for the first time since the
end of the 2003-04 season.

“Its a nice reward for our
players, who have worked
extremely hard to achieve this
level of success,” said South-
ern Illinois coach Chris Low-

Alexis Hornbuckle added 14
points and Alex Fuller had 11
for the Lady Vols (21-2, 8-0
Southeastern Conference).

ELSEWHERE

A former Penn State wom-
en’s basketball player on Mon-
day settled a discrimination
lawsuit against longtime coach
Rene Portland, more than a
year after claiming that Port-
land had a “no lesbian” policy
on her team.

Penn State spokesman Bill

ery. “At the same time we
can’t become complacent
because we’re in the heart of
our conference schedule right
now and every game is criti-
cal.”

Vanderbilt, Arizona and
Stanford round out the Top 25.

Virginia Tech fell out of the
poll after being ranked No. 16
last week. The Hokies lost to
N.C. State and Boston College.
Texas, Notre Dame and Clem-
son also left the Top 25.

There are five games
between ranked teams this
week, and two are on Wednes-
day: USC at UCLA and North
Carolina at Duke; Florida at
Kentucky, Marquette at
Georgetown and Arizona at
Oregon are on Saturday.

Mahon and the lawyer for for-
mer player Jennifer Harris
said the agreement called for
settlement terms to remain
confidential.

In a December 2005 law-
suit, Harris accused Portland
of “humiliating, berating and
ostracizing” her, and claimed
she was told that she needed
to look “more feminine.” .

The suit alleged that Port-
land tried to force Harris, who
says she is not gay, to leave the
team.



MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD



not think about what’s going
on there,” Crum said. “I see a
lot more than a lot of people
do. But I just try to be a fan. I
don’t think I’ll ever get to the
point where I won’t enjoy a -
good game, especially where .
it’s Louisville.”

Now, the coach who never
intended on spending 30 years
playing at a school that perpet-
ually lingered in the shadows
of Kentucky before he got
there finds himself a perma-

|
{
|

| BY CHUCK SCHOFFNER
For The Associated Press

The defending champs are
slipping and the Colonials
are rising.

Maryland, which led the
AP women’s basketball poll
for the first 10 weeks this sea-
son, fell two more places to
sixth Monday after losing to
an unranked opponent for
the first time in two years.

The Terrapins’ 77-72 loss
at Georgia Tech last Thurs-
day came four days after they
lost at home to North Caro-
lina. While they rebounded
to beat Boston College 71-39,
coach Brenda Frese’s team
has gone just 4-3 since start-
ing 18-0.

Duke, North Carolina and
| Tennessee remained the top
| three teams, while George
| Washington jumped three
places to eighth, matching
the Colonials’ highest rank-
ing in 15 years. And for just
the third time in the last 12
weeks, the poll had no new-
comers.

The teams ranked 21
through 25 last week went a
combined 9-0, including vic-
tories over higher ranked
opponents by California,
Nebraska and Rutgers. Cal
beat then-No. 8 Stanford,
Nebraska defeated then-No.
13. Baylor and Rutgers
knocked off Marquette,
which had been 16th.
‘Duke (23-0) received 42 of
50 first-place votes from a
national media panel and had
1,242 points to lead the poll
for the fourth straight week.
The Blue Devils. beat Vir-
ginia Tech and Virginia last
week. They played Clemson
on Monday night, then face a
showdown at North Carolina
on Thursday.

North Carolina (24-0)
received the eight other first-
place votes and had 1,208
points. The Tar Heels should
be well rested for Duke
| because it will be their first
| game in a week. They beat
Boston College 82-60 in their
only game last week.

Tennessee (20-2), which
has lost only to Duke and
North Carolina, had 1,135
points in the voting.

No. 4 Ohio State and No. 5
Connecticut each climbed
one place to move ahead of
Maryland. The Terrapins

i
i
|
:
|
i
|
i
:
i
3
i
i
i
i
i
|
|
\

third after their Jan. 13 loss to
Duke, then fell to fourth last
week after the loss to North
Carolina.

LSU remained seventh
and was followed by George
Washington, Georgia and
Arizona State.

George Washington (19-2)
has won 12 straight since a
Dec. 7 loss at Tennessee and
| matched the No. 8 ranking it
held the week of Feb. 2, 1992.
The Colonials’ highest rank-
ing is sixth, a position they
held for three weeks in Janu-



WOMEN’S TOP 25 POLL

UM
had dropped from first to:



DAVID LONGSTREATH/AP FILE PHOTO

ABOUT TO BE HONORED: LouisviHe coach Denny Crum
gestures to his team as players from the bench begin to
celebrate during the closing moments of their 88-77
victory over LSU in the NCAA semifinals on March 29,
1986, in Dallas. Louisville is renaming its basketball floor
the Denny Crum Court.

nent part of the program he
turned into a national power.
“You can’t spend 30 years
at a place and not grow to love
it or you’d have been gone
long before,” Crum said. “The
fact that I loved it here and
they seemed to want me here
and it just seemed to go on for
a long time (is special). It’s not
a common thing in this busi-
ness for coaches to stay at one
place. There’s only a few of us
who get a chance to do that.”

GW rises

ary of 1992,

Georgia beat LSU 53-51
last week and jumped five
places to ninth, the biggest
gain in the poll. The Lady
Bulldogs have been as high
as eighth this season. Arizona
State moved up two spots.

Stanford dropped three
places to llth after Sunday’s
72-57 loss to Cal, the Bears’
first victory over the Cardi-
nal since 2001. Stanford lost
point guard JJ Hones to a
knee injury in that game. Cal
lost its starting point guard,
Alexis Gray-Lawson, to a
season-ending knee injury in
December.

No. 12 Oklahoma and No.
13 Purdue also fell three
places. Oklahoma: lost to
unranked Texas before beat-
ing Oklahoma State. Purdue
lost to Ohio State, then beat
Minnesota.

Vanderbilt climbed one

spot to 14th and was followed
by Baylor, Texas A&M, Lou-
isville, Bowling Green, Mid-
dle Tennessee and Califor-
nia.
Nebraska, Rutgers, Mar-
quette, Wisconsin-Green Bay
and James Madison held the
final five places.

Filling those last spots has
been a challenge this season,
said voter Patricia Babcock
McGraw of The Daily Herald
in Arlington Heights, II.

Several teams have moved
in at the bottom of the poll
during the season only to fall
out a short time later, includ-
ing Texas Tech, Arkansas,
Pittsburgh, Mississippi,
Texas, Kansas State and New
Mexico. Nebraska has been
ranked the last three weeks
but had a ‘one-week stay in
December.

“I think there definitely
has been some parity rearing
its head,” McGraw said. “The
thing I thought has been
interesting, I’m starting to
look more seriously at mid-
major conferences. We even
see that in our poll now.
There are smaller schools in
there with staying power.”

George Washington is
one. The Colonials joined the
poll at No. 23 on Nov. 20 and
have been climbing steadily
since. Bowling Green has
been ranked for eight weeks,
while Middle Tennessee has
been in the Top 25 for the
last five weeks. Wisconsin-
Green Bay and James Madi-
son both stayed in for a sec-
ond straight week.

“I’m looking at those
teams a lot more this year,”
McGraw said. ‘Because
there’s been so much move-
ment in the bigger leagues
and a lack of consistency in
the bigger leagues.”

Marquette had the biggest
drop in the poll, falling from
16th to 23rd. The Golden
Eagles were beaten at home
by Connecticut after losing
at Rutgers.







PAGE 6, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



TL aU
‘Ingraham: we'll fix Freeport problems



































m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT — FNM Leader
Hubert Ingraham has promised
to restore economic confidence
in Freeport if the Free Nation-
al Movement is returned to
office.

He said the party will focus
on restoring Freeport’s poten-
tial as the country’s second city,
and give reputable, well funded
investors the confidence they
require to acquire, restore, and
upgrade properties like the
Royal Oasis Resort.

While on Grand Bahama

over the weekend attending the:

FNM Grand Bahama Women’s
Association prayer breakfast,
Mr Ingraham said things have
not been as bad as they present-
ly are in Freeport and Grand
Bahama in general since the last
PLP government.

SEER,

“Some people believed those
PLP hard times would never
come again — not to this won-
derful island and not after the
transformation 1992 brought.
They were wrong.

“They believed there was a
plan, a fresh wind blowing, help
and hope. They weren’t alone.
Most of the Bahamas believed
and voted for them,” he said.

Mr Ingraham claims that the
PLP have betrayed the Bahami-
an people’s trust.

“They are the same self-inter-
ested, self-promoting, and
unethical grouping. They are
unfocused, incompetent, ineffi-
cient, and as scandal-ridden as
the last PLP government,” he
said.

“Their leader, Perry Christie,
went to a rally in Fox Hill earli-
er this week to deliver a mes-
sage to his party faithful, and
made a threat to ordinary

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Bahamians, but most particu-
larly to FNMs.

“Mr Christie told them to get
to know all of those who are
against them, to cut their pic-
tures and their stories out of
The Tribune and post them on
their headquarters’ walls so that
they could, and I quote him, ‘...
spare no effort to go to every
crook and cranny of the
Bahamas, and to ensure that
every time they (that’s you) rise
up, we (that’s them) put them
(that’s you again) back down’.

“And that is what they have
been doing — going after every
FNM they can find and doing
their best to bring them down,”
he said.

Mr Ingraham said victimisa-
tion started under the present
government at BAIC in 2002
and has not let up. He said the
PLP cannot be trusted. ,

Mr Ingraham pointed to a
number of things the FNM will
do in Grand Bahama if they win
the election.

He said the party will ensure
that the highest standards are
observed by all developers so
as to safeguard the environment
from further degradation.

The FNM, he said, will part-
ner with investors in Grand
Bahama’s tourism sector to
more effectively promote the
island’s resorts and tourism
facilities internationally.







Na
Rey. Cyril C. Sands
Host Pastor










- Accounts Associate

Evangelistic Centre Ministries
PRESENTS

Single’s Summit

2007

Theme:

“Soaring Through Your Singleness”

On
Tuesday, 6th February, 2007
At: 7:00p.m

Venue: UWI Dinning Room .
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Thompson Blvd.

Come & Experience :

A Hand clapping, foot stomping glorious time of praise and
worship, anointed dancing, dynamic speaking -

Come and be blessed

THE PUBLIC IS INVITED TO ATTEND
For further information please call
Tel. 325-8045/422-300

The party will also support
the industrial sector of Grand
Bahama so as to facilitate the
kind of expansion in that sec-
tor experienced between 1992
and 2002, he said.

Mr Ingraham said the FNM
we will determine the appro-
priate levels and kinds of sup-
port required to promote and
encourage the revitalisation of
Grand Bahama’s agricultural
sector.

“We will affect greater link-
ages between the productive
sectors of your economy,” he
said.

As election draws near, Mr
Ingraham urged FNMs, partic-
ularly in Grand Bahama, to
begin in earnest their prepara-
tions.

“IT want to express the
tremendous gratitude we hold
for all those who, in these per-
ilous economic times on this
island, have carried the banner
of true help and hope on their
mission to rescue the perishing
and care for the socially mar-
ginalised.

“And we record our thank-

fulness and appreciation to all |

those who during these difficult,
trying months and years con-
tinued to hold high the torch
throughout this island as a sym-
bol and a promise that better
will come again with the FNM,”
he said.







‘Rey. Ilsa Evans
Mt. Tabor





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PAGE 8B, ILUESUVAY, FEBHUARY 6, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





EFG @ Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd






POSITION AVAILABLE

A growing offshore financial institution is currently
seeking to fill the following position:

CREDIT RISK OFFICER








The position will entail the administration and
maintenance of credit risk, inclusive of preparing,
evaluating and processing loans and other credit
instruments offered by the Bank. Additional duties
and responsibilities will encompass the preparation
of weekly and monthly reports.

Minimum preferred qualifications: Degree in Banking
and Finance or equivalent, plus two (2) years’ related
experience.









‘Analytical skills: The ability to read and proficiently
interpret financial statements is required.



Working knowledge of Microsoft Office is essential,
including Word and Excel; written and spoken Spanish
would be an asset; the candidate should have good
organizational skills and. be a self-starter.






Compensation will be commensurate with
experience. Interested applicants must submit
applications by February 13, 2007 to:




\



EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited
Human Resources Manager
(Re: Credit Risk Officer) —
P. 0. Box SS-6289
. Nassau, Bahamas
or fax to (242) 393-1161







LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000) ©

LATIN AMERICAN
INFRASTRUCTURE III FUND INC.

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No.45
of 2000, the Dissolution of LATN AMERICAN
INFRASTRUCTURE III FUND INC. has _ been
completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has _ been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register. The date of completion’ of the dissolution was
8th day of January. 2007.

ALRENA MOXEY
LIQUIDATOR

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of: 2000),
NEW DIMENSION PROPERTIES LTD. is in dissolution. Mrs.
Alrena Moxey is in the Liquidator and can be contacted at The
Winterbotham Trust Company Limited, Marlborough & Queen
Streets, Nassau, Bahamas. All persons having claims against the
above-named company are required to send their names addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the liquidator before
Sth March, 2007.

\

ALRENA MOXEY
LIQUIDATOR

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
CIT MANAGEMENT (USA) BAHAMAS LIMITED is in
dissolution. Mrs. Alrena Moxey is in the Liquidator and can be |
contacted at The Winterbotham Trust Company Limited,
Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau, Bahamas. All persons
having claims against the above-named company are required to send
their names addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
liquidator before the Olst day of February, 2007.

ALRENA MOXEY
LIQUIDATOR

Business awaits
‘final draft on —
China tie-up

FROM page 1B

International Distributors
was attracted to Freeport’s
transhipment/logistics/distrib-
ution potential because of its
tax-free status, and the fact it
was “the only port in the West-
ern Hemisphere large enough
to take the post-Panamax
ships”. =

Development of the Grand
Bahama distribution facility
will “save a tremendous
amount of trouble and
expense” .for Associated
Growers and its customers.

The company has a lot of
non-US customers, and has
found that importing produce
from China and other markets
to its US distribution facilities
for re-export to other markets
is “knocking the price up” as a
result of having to pay US
import duties.

Therefore, the Bahamas
facility would be used to
receive product from other
markets that was due to be
exported to regions such as
Latin and South America, and
provide customers with better
prices that they can pass on to
consumers.

Currently, International Dis-

INSIGHT

For the stories behind the
news, read Insight Mondays



tributors’ Grand Bahama facil-
ity cannot supply Bahamian

wholesalers and the major food
chains with produce, but Mr
Deffler replied “absolutely”
when asked whether the com-
pany wanted to do this.

He added: “We did speak to
the Prime Minister and’ had
lengthy discussions last
Wednesday about that. We
currently supply a lot of the

’ wholesalers and retailers out

of Miami, and if we can supply
them from there, it would
make more sense to do it from
here.”
The Tribune understands
that pressure from some major
Nassau-based wholesale agen-
cies was responsible for the ini-
tial stipulation that the Grand
Bahama facility could not
directly supply Bahamians.
They are understood to have

feared that the arrangement

would disrupt the established
supply chain in the Bahamas,
and could allow ordinary peo-
ple and ‘mom and pop’ stores
to purchase their goods direct
from International Distribu-

tors.

However, the latter’s pro-
duce will be boxed, shipped
and stored in a secure, sterile
warehouse area in Freeport
that cannot be accessed by the
public. International Distribu-
tors deals only with bulk
orders, making it impossible
for ordinary people to effect
purchases, especially if mini-
mum orders and the produc-
tion of a business licence is
required.

The savings wholesalers and
the major food chains would
make from International Dis-
tributors facility could then be

passed on to Bahamian con- -'. ’
sumers through lower prices, ’. ’

a subject many have been
grumbling about recently in
relation to alleged price
increases at Bahamas Super-
markets.

Mr Deffler said Internation-
al Distributors would employ
about 200 people when the
warehouse’s first phase was fin-
ished, adding: “We’ve been
taking applications. I’m getting
a rush right and left, and we’ll
start taking resumes officially .
in June.”

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in cccemdance wih Section 138 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
CAPRI INVESTMENTS SERVICES’ INC. is_ in
dissolution. Mrs. Alrena Moxey is in the Liquidator and can be
contacted at The Winterbotham Trust Company Limited,
Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau, Bahamas. All persons
having claims against the above-named company are required to send
their names addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
liquidator before 5th March, 2007.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

VALUED PARTNERS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No.45 of
2000, the Dissolution of VALUED PARTNERS LIMITED
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was
8th day of January. 2007.

ALRENA MOXEY
LIQUIDATOR

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
LIQUIDITY INVESTMENTS & GROWTH FUND LTD. is in
dissolution. Mrs. Alrena Moxey is in the Liquidator and can be
contacted at The Winterbotham Trust Company Limited,
Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau, Bahamas. All persons
having claims against the above-named company are required to send
their names addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
liquidator before 5th March, 2007.

ALRENA MOXEY
LIQUIDATOR



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
INVESTPRO FUND INC. is in dissolution. Mrs. Alrena Moxey
is in the Liquidator and can be contacted at The Winterbotham
Trust Company Limited, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send. their names addresses and particulars
of their debts or claims to the liquidator before Sth March, 2007.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

OPPORTUNITY VETURES
INVESTMENTS FUND INC.

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No.45
of 2000, the Dissolution of OPPORTUNITY
VENTURES INVESTMENTS FUND INC. _ has
been. completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was
| 8th day of January. 2007.

LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

LATAM ADVISORS INCORPORATED

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8)

of the International Business Companies Act, No.45 of 2000,
the Dissolution of LATAM ADVISORS INCORPORATED
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was

8th day of January. 2007.





THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com





RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Monday’s results Tonight’s games






Sunday’s results



PRO BASKETBALL

From Miami Herald Wire Services

WASHINGTON — Caron Butler scored a
career-high 38 points to help the Washington
Wizards overcome Gilbert Arenas’ mediocre
night and beat Seattle 118-108 on Monday, the
SuperSonics’ franchise-record 15th consecu-
tive road loss. ;

With Arenas held to 16 points on 4-for-14
shooting and Antawn Jamison out with a
sprained left knee, the Wizards needed to
find scoring elsewhere — and they did. Bren-
dan Haywood added a season-high 20 points
and ll rebounds, second-year forward
Andray Blatche contributed a career-high 14
points, and DeShawn Stevenson added 15

WARRIORS 113, PACERS 98

INDIANAPOLIS — Stephen Jackson
scored a season-high 36 points against his
former team, leading the Warriors.

Jackson was a key part of the eight-player
trade between the teams on Jan. 17, and this
was the first meeting between the clubs

Al Harrington, another player involved in
the trade, had 16 points, 10 rebounds and five
assists. Andris Biedrins added 10 points and
15 rebounds for the Warriors.

76ERS 100, NETS 98 (OT)

PHILADELPHIA — Andre Iguodala had
23 points, 15 assists and seven rebounds to

EASTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHEAST W L Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away _ Conf
Washington 28 19 .596 - 7-3 W-1 19-5 9-14 19-10
Orlando 25 23 521 3% 3-7 L-l 16-10 9-13 15-14
Miami 23-25 «A795 55 ~W-4 13-10 10-15 12-14
Atlanta 18 29 383 10 55 L-l 9-14 9-15 12-19
Charlotte 18 30 375 10% 5-5 L-1 10-14 8-16 12-19
ATLANTIC = WL Pet. GB L10" Str. Home Away Conf
Toronto 25 23 521 - 16-7 9-16 17-9
New Jersey 22 27 .449 3% 3-7 L-4 13-12 9-15 16-13
New York 21 28 429 4% 4-6 W-l 12-13 9-15 13-18
Philadelphia 16 33 .327 9% 6-4 W-l 812 8-21 117 |
Boston 12 34 .261 12 0-10 L-14 419 8-15 821 |

;
CENTRAL = WoL Pet. |__.Cont
Detroit 28 18 .609 20-10 |
Chicago 28 20. .583 20-6 20-8
Cleveland 27 21 «563 17-7 10-14 17-14
Indiana 26 22 542 15-8 11-14 19-13
Milwaukee 18 30.375 10-9 8-21 8-20
1
i

WESTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHWEST WL Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Dallas 39 9 B13 “- 91 W-4 22-3 17-6 27-6
San Antonio 32 16 667 7 55 L-2 168 16-8 21-11 :
Houston 30 17 638 8% 6-4 W-1 17-6 13-11 17-15 points.
New Orleans 21 26 .44717% 6-4 W-2 14-11 7-15 12-17
Memphis 12 36 .250 27 3-7 L-2 916 3-20 6-22

i
NORTHWEST WL Pct, GB 110 Str. Home Away _ Conf
Utah 31 17 646 - 7-3 W-2 17-6 14-11 20-10 |
Denver 23 22 «511 6% 5:5 Ll 13-12 10-10 10-14 |
Minnesota 22 26 458 «#49 28 L4 13-9 9-17 13-18 |
Portland 20 29 .40811% 5-5 L-2 12-13 816 13-16 |
Seattle 17 31 4.354 14 «4-6 «LS 13-12 4-19 7-19 |
PACIFIC = WL _ Pet, GB L110 Str. Home Away _ Conf | since.
Phoenix 37 10.787 - «B82 OL 20-4 «17-6 17-9 |
L.A. Lakers 30 19 .612 8 4-6 W-2 19-6 11-13 17-10 |
LA. Clippers 24 23 SIL 13) 7-3 LL 17-8 7-15 14-17 |
Golden State 23 26 .469 15 46° W-l 17-8 6-18 13-15) |
Sacramento 19 26 .422 17 5-5 W-2 13-41 6-15 10-18 |
|
|
{
{

Bos. at Detroit, 7:30
Clippers at N.Y., 7:30
Hou. at Memp., 8
Orlando at Mil., 8
Phx. at Port., 10

Miami 113, Charlotte 93
Lakers 90, Atlanta 83
GS. 113, Indiana 98
Wash. 118, Seattle 108
Phil. 100, N.J. 98 (OT)
Houston 105, Minn. 77
Phx. at Den, late

Chi. at Utah, late

N.O. at Sac., late

Tor. 122, L.A.C. 110
- Atl. 101, N.J. 99 (OT)
Det. 90, Cle. 78

lead the 76ers to the overtime victory.

Samuel Dalembert scored 14 points and
grabbed 17 rebounds, and Andre Miller had
18 points to give the Sixers their fifth victory
in eight games.



INTERNATIONAL EDITION

PRO BASKETBALL | HOCKEY

HARAZ N. GHANEARUAR
THE HOT HAND: Wizards forward Caron

Butler shoots over SuperSonics center
Johan Petro during his 38-point night.

HEAT 113, BOBCATS 93

MIAMI — Dwyane Wade scored 27
points and Shaquille O’Neal had his best
scoring game since returning from knee sur-
gery, scoring 22 points to lead the Heat.

ROCKETS 105, TIMBERWOLVES 77 :

HOUSTON — Tracy McGrady scored 16
of his 32 points in the third quarter to lead
the Rockets.

SLAM DUNK COMPETITION

NEW YORK — The guys judging the slam
dunk competition might be better than the
ones competing in it.

__TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007 | 5E





Butler powers Wizards by Sonics

Former dunk champions Michael Jordan
and Dominique Wilkins lead a prominent list
of judges for the last competition of All-Star
Saturday night. They will be joined by Hall of
Famer Julius Erving and two other champs
who will play in the All-Star Game: Kobe
Bryant and Vince Carter.

New York guard Nate Robinson will try to
defend his title in the Feb. 17 event in Las
Vegas. Orlando All-Star Dwight Howard,
Chicago rookie Tyrus Thomas and Boston’s
Gerald Green round out the field.

ELSEWHERE

e Heat: Guard Gary Payton was sus-
pended for one game without pay for talking
back to an official who ejected him during a
victory over the Milwaukee Bucks on Satur-
day night. Payton served the suspension
Monday night when Miami hosted the Char-
lotte Bobcats.

e Nuggets: The team was without stars
Allen Iverson and Marcus Camby for its
game against the Phoenix Suns late Monday
night. Camby, the league’s No. 2 rebounder
and shot blocker, strained his left groin Sat-
urday night at sacramento. Iverson missed
his fourth consecutive game with a sprained
right ankle and said he hoped to return
Wednesday night against the Hornets.

e SuperSonics: Forward Rashard Lewis
will participate in full-contact practice today
after missing 12 months with a right hand
injury and could be back in the lineup as
soon as Saturday.

e Bulls: Forward Andres Nocioni was
taken out of the lineup for Monday night’s
game at Utah betause of a foot injury.





FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

A ‘painful’ and
more prominent
part of an already
physical game

*HEAT

“It’s a way you can play
effective interior defense
without being a shot blocker,”
Heat center Michael Doleac
said. “Being a shot blocker is a
hard thing to do.”

Taking a charge is no cake-
walk, either. But as scorers
continue to find ways to avoid
getting their shots blocked,
taking a charge has become a
more effective way of defend-
ing against a driving guard, a
big man with a head of steam
or even an oncoming fast
break.

“[The charge] has become
more prominent now,” Knicks
forward David Lee said. “I
think it’s just because guys
have gotten crafty on offense
with their shots and avoiding
the block. You’ve got to find a
way to play defense on that.”

It might seem like an easy
concept, standing in front of
another player and drawing
an offensive foul. But there
are several elements that
make it fairly complicated.

In most cases, taking a
charge involves a_ help
defender anticipating an
offensive player’s movement,
beating him to that spot and
establishing a legal defensive
position with his feet set
before contact is made.

ANTICIPATION

“Being able to take a
charge, it’s like you see the
play a couple of steps or a
couple of frames before it
actually develops,” Jazz guard
Derek Fisher said. “Especially
now with the athletes we have
in the league, if you’re a half
second late in getting there,
you’re either going to get
dunked on or they’re going to
call a blocking foul.”

In most cases, those colli-
sions are coming in the paint.
So that semicircle right in
front of the basket adds
another component. Inside of
the semicircle is called the
restricted area, meaning a
player attempting to take a
charge cannot be standing
within, on or straddling over
that boundary.

“That’s the biggest thing I
fight with taking charges is
getting out of [the restricted
area] early enough,” Doleac
said. “I’m not the quickest guy
in the world, so when plays
happen I’ve got to be right on
top of it and come quick just
to get out of there in time.”

Then there’s one final ele-
ment that always completes
the charge process: falling
backward.

“If you don’t go down,
you're not going to get the call
— which doesn’t make any
sense,” Doleac said. “You
have to go down and go down
hard like you got hit by a
truck.”

The combination of taking
a hit up front and falling.on
your behind can make for
some painful, often memo-
rable collisions.

“In practice in L.A., I took a
charge on [Shaquille O’Neal]
one time, and that was the last
time I ever tried to do that,”
said Fisher, a former team-
mate of O’Neal’s with the Lak-
ers. “It probably took me two
to three days to feel normal
again, or to feel comfortable
standing in front of a big guy
coming through the lane. He
was coming with a lot of
speed that day.”

Some players have become
particularly skilled at drawing
charges. Houston’s Shane Bat-
tier has built a reputation as a
strong defender in large part
because of his penchant for
drawing the offensive foul.
James Posey and Udonis Has-
lem are probably the best at it
among Heat players.

“If somebody knows I’m
going to be there to take a
charge, I’m pretty sure they’re
going to think before they go
to the basket,” Posey said.
“Therefore, they’re shooting
jump shots. If that’s the case,
they’ll have to shoot a high
percentage on their jump
shots. That’s part of the game,
that’s how I play.”

MAKING A CHANGE
For others such as Antoine

. Walker, it’s an act forced’

upon them. In his previous 10
seasons in the league, Walker
has never been a take-charge
guy. Last season, his first with
the Heat, he estimates that he
took one the entire season. So
after a few strong words from
Heat coach Pat Riley this sea-
son, Walker is near 20 for the
season, according to stats the
team keeps, and among the
team leaders.

“I just never really had to
do it in my career,” Walker
said. “When I watched film,
there were so many opportu-
nities for me to take charges.
[Riley] told me I should start
taking hits. He felt like I was
cheating the team by not tak-











NICK LAHAM/GETTY IMAGES

HE’S STILL A NOVICE: ‘I just never really had to do it in my
career,’ Antoine Walker, right, said of taking charges.

ing hits because everybody
else was willing to do it.

“It’s painful. Sometimes
you get hit in the wrong areas.
But it’s not as bad as J thought
it would be.”

For offensive players driv-
ing the lane, avoiding the
charge has become its own
skill. It takes creative foot-
work, adjusted flight patterns
and sometimes body contor-
tion.

But the biggest adjustment
is simply getting used to the
whole concept. In pick-up
games, there’s no such thing
as a charge. So some players
still consider it a cheap way of
playing defense.

“I used to [think that
way],” Heat guard Dwyane
Wade said. “But now I under-
stand because I’m on a team
with guys that take a lot of
charges and we did it at Mar-
quette. I understand it’s part
of the game. It’s a smart part
of the game. But as an offen-
sive player, you hate it.”

O’Neal believes there is
honor in going for a blocked

shot rather than taking a
charge — particularly for the
big men.

“A lot of big guys take
charges because they know
the referee knows they’re
inferior to the guy that they’re
guarding, so they’re going to
flop and they’re going to get
the call,” O’Neal said. “A lot
of these charges shouldn’t be
charges.”

Much to O’Neal’s chagrin,

however, the unathletic act of |

standing still and taking a
beating has become an
increasingly common prac-
tice.

And to the ones withstand-
ing the pain, it hurts so good.

“J think on this level and in
college, it’s got to be a part of
the game,” Lee said. “I don’t
think there’s anything cheap
about it. Not everybody’s ath-
letic enough to block shots,
and there has got to be a way,
when a guy takes off, to get
the defense to stop him. It’s a
good play.

“There’s got to be a sacri-
fice.”





HOCKEY

Wings rally to
upend Rangers

From Miami Herald Wire Services

NEW YORK — Henrik
Zetterberg capped Detroit’s
three-goal third period with a
power-play tally, and the Red
Wings overcame Dominik
Hasek’s shaky start to. beat
the New York Rangers 4-3 on
Monday night.

Zetterberg got to a loose
puck off the stick of Rangers
forward Blair Betts in front
of the New York net and
quickly slammed in a shot to
break a 3-3 tie with 7:24 left.
It gave Detroit its fourth con-
secutive victory and eighth
in ll games.

The Red Wings will cer-
tainly want more trips to

_ New York than the current

schedule allows. Their past
two road games have both
been in the metropolitan area
and featured big third peri-
ods in comeback victories.
Detroit, which hadn’t
played at Madison Square

Garden since Oct. 25, 2003,
erased a 3-0 deficit to the
Islanders in the third period
last Tuesday before winning
in overtime.

Hasek earned the victory
despite making only 17 saves.
Henrik Lundqvist stopped 22
shots for the Rangers.

ELSEWHERE

e Kings-Rangers trade:
Sean Avery, the most-penal-
ized player the past two sea-
sons, was traded to the New
York Rangers in a deal that
sent checking forward Jason
Ward to Los Angeles.

Avery had 10 goals, 18
assists and 116 penalty min-
utes in 55 games this season
with the Kings, who also
acquired the rights to
unsigned forwards Marc-
Andre Cliche and Jan Marek.
Los Angeles sent 19-year-old
prospect John Seymour to
the Rangers.

EASTERN CONFERENCE

SOUTHEAST W eoL OL SLPTS GF
Atlanta 29 18 6 2. 66 169
Tampa Bay 29 23 1. 1 #60172
Carolina 26 22 3 4 59 166
Washington 22 25 2 = #5 51 165
Florida 20 24 4 #6 = 50 153

ATLANTIC

New Jersey
Pittsburgh
N.Y. Islanders
N.Y. Rangers
Philadelphia

NORTHEAST

Buffalo
Montreal ~
Ottawa
Toronto
Boston 23 24

OL SLPTS GF

190
3 74 166
4 50 135
3
5

Nashville 37 (14
Detroit 34 14
St. Louis 21 24
Columbus 21 27
Chicago 19 26

47 133
45 129

NN PWPh



Calgary 3
Vancouver 29 20 1 3 = 62 139
Minnesota 29 21 O 4 62151
Edmonton 26 23 2 2 56147
Colorado 25 23 2 2 54 162
L OL SLPTS GF
1392 «6 72 :173
San Jose 34 18 O 1 69 163
Dallas 31 20 0 2 64 140
Phoenix 24 27 1 #1 50 144
Los Angeles 18 30 4 3 43 154









GA HOME
170 -14-9-3-1
165 13-13-0-0 16-
176 = 14-10-1-3
189 13-11-1-2
176 = -14-10-2-1










GA

136.
130
164
166
162

137
155
155
TGA NOME 2 AWAY a
135. 18-4-1-4 14-9-1-2 12-3-0-1
123 18-10-0-1 16-8-0-0—11-9-0-1
130 15-8-0-1 16-12-0-1 15-6-0-0
180 13-12-1-0 11-15-0-17-13-1-1
195 11-12-4-3 7-18-0-0 6-14-0-2

Note: Two points for a win, one point for a tie and overtime loss

RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Monday’s results
Detroit 4, N.Y. Rangers 3

Tonight’s games

Florida at Colorado, 9
Buffalo at Atl., 7
Boston at Wash.,

Sundays results

Washington 2, Islanders 1 (SO)
Montreal 4, Pittsburgh 3 (OT)

7

Phoenix at Columbus, 7
Carolina at Mont., 7:30
N'ville at Pitt., 7:30

L.A. at Tampa Bay, 7:30
Rangers at NJ., 7:30
Minnesota at Dallas, 8
Toronto at St. Louis, 8
Vancouver at Edmonton, 9
Chicago at Calgary, 9
Anaheim at San Jose, 10:30



OE | TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007__ INTERNATIONAL EDITION



BY JENNA FRYER
Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Jim-
mie Johnson was the clear
favorite to win last season’s
Nextel Cup championship, an
easy pick after coming so very
close so many times before.

This year’s pick isn’t nearly
as obvious, with 50 drivers
revving their motors in pursuit

*of dethroning NASCAR’s new-
est champion. Jeff Gordon
wants a fifth Nextel Cup title.
Tony Stewart is fired up after
missing last year’s Chase, and
Matt Kenseth’s goal is to win a
second title, this time under a
new points system.

But no matter how you
break it down, the champion-
ship is Johnson’s to lose.

“It’s hard to win one, much
less back to back, and to do
anything twice in a row is
tough,” said Stewart, who won
titles in 2002 and 2005. “I can
go to Vegas and put a whole
bunch of money on a number,
and to have it hit once is some-
thing, but to come back again
and have it hit again.”

Only seven drivers have
won consecutive Cup titles —
none since Gordon in 1997 and
1998.

Even though the odds are
clearly against him, Johnson
plans to make a full-speed run
at title No. 2.

“I am a race car driver, and
I want to win championships,”
he said. “I always wanted to
win one, and now I’ve got it.

DEFENSE CLOSES IN:
Harvard’s Paul
Dufault, center,
attempts a shot
against Boston
College goaltender
Cory Schneider, left,
as BC’s Brent
Motherwell, right,
and others defend
in Boston on
Monday. ..



That whole experience makes
you hungry and want to come
back and do it again.

“I feel with the team and

_everything that we have [at

Hendrick Motorsports], we
could be a contender for a few
more of these.”

Johnson has every reason to
believe he can do it again,
because his 2006 title was no
fluke. Since entering the Nex-
tel Cup Series five years ago,
Johnson consistently has been
among NASCAR’s top drivers.

The No. 48 team never has
been lower than fifth in the
standings and was twice
runner-up in the champion-
ship. That earned Johnson the
dubious distinction of being

AUTO RACING | ETC.

_..MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD



NASCAR | IN THE PITS

Johnson looks to pull off rare Nextel repeat



the Peyton Manning of
NASCAR — the guy who
dominated the regular season,
only to come up short when
everything was on the line.

When Johnson and crew
chief Chad Knaus finally
cleared that final hurdle last
November, overcoming a
disastrous start to the Chase,
Johnson was freed of that
label.

“A lot was said that they
might not be able to win it, and
Jimmie couldn’t get it if he
didn’t get it last year,” car
owner Rick Hendrick said.
“Well, he did. I think a lot of
the pressure is off. The pres-
sure now is not to prove he
can be a champion. The pres-



n MITCHELL LAYTON/GETTY IMAGES AND LISA BLUMENFELD/GETTY IMAGES
AT PRAISE AND AT WORK: At left, 2006 Nextel Cup champion Jimmie Johnson poses with President Bush inside the
White House Oval Office on Monday in Washington, D.C. At right, Johnson drives during NASCAR testing at Las
Vegas Motor Speedway on Jan. 30.

sure is on himself to come

back and be in the hunt again.”

It again starts with Knaus,
who learned valuable lessons
last season. First, he realized
he had to back off just a bit to
sustain the energy and drive
Johnson needed over the long
36-race season.

Knaus also learned to dele-
gate but had trouble easing up
initially. When he was caught
cheating during Daytona 500
preparations, a four-week sus-
pension forced Knaus to slow
down. With the crew chief
watching from home, Johnson
rallied to win at Daytona and
again in Las Vegas two weeks
later.

When Knaus returned to

the track, he was able to main-
tain an even pace the rest of
the year.

Now, his challenge will be
allowing his guys to celebrate
last season’s success without
losing the intensity that made
them champions.

“You have to give the guys
an opportunity to go out there
and soak it in and feel a sense
of accomplishment,” Knaus
said. “Because if they are
working continuously and
they don’t get any type of
reward for what they have
done, they are going to feel
like "Why am I applying
myself and working myself to
death for nothing?’ ‘

“The drivers take off and g

to France and Italy (during the -°."-
offseason), but the guys are in *."

here working like crazy. It’s a
balance that you’ve got to find,
and I think we did a good job.
We just have to wait and see.”

The mind-set of Knaus and
his crew will be just one part

of Johnson’s success, which

also will depend on how he
handles his new role as ambas-
sador to the sport.

The demands on Johnson’s
time have increased, and the
spotlight magnifies every- .
thing. He learned that the hard

way last December when he . |

fell off a golf cart and broke his -_
wrist while goofing around. °

Reluctant to reveal exactly
how he was injured, Johnson

had to backtrack when the °

truth came out.

“It can get overwhelming ie

with the expectations,” said
Gordon. “Every show, every
print and TV, every media,
every fan wants more of you. .
That’s a good thing, but at the
same time, it can be hard to
manage.”

The only certainty is John-
son plans to give his pursuit of
a repeat title his full attention. ©

“I think we have to go out
there and prove ourselves
every week,” Knaus said.
“Anytime somebody rolls into
a season or an event thinking
that they are the favorite, you
are going to get your butt
handed to you. So we won't
take the mentality that we are
the favorites.”





ELISEAMENDOLA/AP

Boston University meets
ollege in final

Boston C

Associated Press

BOSTON — Benn Ferri-
ero had a goal and an assist,
Cory Schneider stopped 20.
shots and Boston College
advanced to the finals of the
55th Beanpot Tournament
with a 3-1 win over Harvard :
on Monday night.

Nathan Gerbe and Brian -
Boyle also scored for the
Eagles, who reached the
championship game for the
fourth time in five seasons
and will play Boston Univer-
sity for the title next Monday
night. Earlier, John Curry
made 27 saves to lead the
two-time defending cham-
pion Terriers past Northeast-
ern 4-0.

The annual tournament
features Boston’s four Divi-
sion I hockey programs
vying for a coveted trophy
and citywide bragging rights.
The Eagles have won the
tournament 13 times — sec-
ond to BU’s 27.

The two rivals will meet
in the final for the sixth time
since 2000, including the sec-
ond consecutive year. BU
beat BC 3-2 for last year’s
championship before .the
Eagles went on a late-season
run and advanced to the
national title game, where
they lost to Wisconsin.

Dan McGoff had two
goals to help BU advance to
its 13th consecutive Beanpot:
title game. Pete MacArthur
and Kenny Roche also scored
for the Terriers.

BU, which has won 10 of
the last 12 championships
and advanced to 23 of the
past 24 title games, has as
many championships as the
other three schools com-
bined.

“I thought this was our
most thorough game of the
year,” Terriers coach Jack

Parker said. “We did a lot of
things very well, which
helped us control our own
destiny.”

The Terriers, ranked No.
8 in the nation, entered ona
three-game winless skid
(0-1-2) and were coming off a
0-0 tie last Friday against
UMass-Lowell. ©

“We needed a confidence

booster,” Curry said. “Last

Friday wasn’t the best game,
but tonight we came out and
we really refocused quickly.
We only had two days of
practice and the next day we
were a little bit down, but we
had to get geared up for this
game. We couldn’t dwell on
it.”

They didn’t. After getting
outshot' 11-8 in the first
period, BU outshot North-
eastern 29-16 the rest of the
way and scored twice in 48
seconds midway through the
second period to break a
scoreless tie.

MacArthur retrieved a
pass from Chris Higgins just
to the right of the crease,
then sneaked the puck past
Northeastern goalie Brad
Thiessen to give BU a 1-0
lead 8:59 into the second
period.

Roche made it 2-0 when
he faked left, then beat
Thiessen to the right on a
breakaway at 9:47.

Thiessen saved 33 shots
for Northeastern, which
hasn’t won the Beanpot since
1988 and has failed to
advance past the first round
in four of the past five years.

“We came into this Bean-
pot thinking we were going
to win,” Northeastern for-
ward Mike Morris said.
“We've been playing good
hockey and we are a confi-
dent group.”

The Huskies had a chance

to make it a close game, but
couldn’t get anything past
Curry during a 5-on-3 power
play spanning the second and
third periods.

Curry stopped 11 shots in
the first period, nine in the
second and seven more in
the third to improve to 4-0 in
Beanpot competition, includ-
ing wins in each of the last
two title games.

McGoff scored both his
goals in the third period to
give the Terriers a cushion.

“T really felt this game was
men against boys,” North-
eastern coach Greg Cronin
said. “The bottom line is,
they outskated us, they
outhit us and they out-pos-
sessed us with the puck.
Game over.”

In the second game, Dylan
Reese scored and Kyle Rich-
ter made 29 saves for Har-
vard, which hasn’t advanced
to a Beanpot final since 1998
and hasn’t won the tourna-
ment since 1993.

The Crimson jumped out
to a 1-0 lead when Reese
fired a slap shot through a
crowd and past Schneider
8:12 into the first period. But
the 15th-ranked Eagles
stormed back, outshooting
the Crimson a combined
21-15 in the second and third
periods.

After BC tied it l-all by the
end of the first on Ferriero’s
goal from just inside the blue
line; Gerbe’s short-handed
goal put BC up 2-1 6:22 into
the second. A streaking
Gerbe retrieved a pass from
Ferriero, then glided the
puck between the post and
Richter’s glove.

Schneider stopped nine
shots in the second period
and six more in the third.
Boyle scored an empty-net
goal in the closing seconds.



SPORTS ROUNDUP

Coroner says USC kicker was
drunk when plunging to death

From Miami Herald Wire Services

Southern California kicker
Mario Danelo was drunk
when he plunged over a cliff
to his death, but the coro-
ner’s office Monday was
unable to say why he fell.

A toxicological report
accompanying Danelo’s
autopsy report found he had
a 0.23 blood-alcohol level,
nearly three times the legal
limit in California. No drugs
were detected in his body,
the report said.

The autopsy report said
the cause of death was multi-
ple traumatic injuries, but
“because of the unanswered
questions, we are stating the
manner of death as undeter-
mined,” Deputy Medical
Examiner Jeffrey Gutstadt
of the Los Angeles County
Coroner’s office wrote in the
report.

The 21-year-old player
was found Jan. 6 more than
100 feet down a rocky cliff in
San Pedro, Calif. Police said
from the outset that foul play
was ruled out and his death
was either an accident or a
suicide.

Following Danelo’s death,
several Southern California
players said they were con-
vinced the kicker did not
take his own life.

A USC spokesman
declined to comment about
the coroner’s report. Dane-
lo’s brother, Joey Danelo,
was not immediately avail-
able for comment.

The report also couldn’t
ascertain Danelo’s state of
mind before his death, but he
“would have had to scale a
wall to get to the strip of land
before the steep drop of
about 150 feet while under
the influence of alcohol.”

Danelo, the son of former

NFL kicker Joe Danelo,'

made 15-of-16 field goals this
season and led the Trojans in
scoring with 89 points. He
made two field goals in the
Rose Bowl on New Year’s
Day to help USC beat Michi-
gan 32-18.

He missed two field goals
in his two-year career at
USC, going 26-for-28, and he
was 127-of-134 on extra
points.

He set NCAA single-sea-
son records with 83 extra
points and 86 attempts in the
2005 season.

Danelo was a walk-on at
USC in 2003 and received a
scholarship two years later.

ETC.
e Auto racing: Casey
Mears got a new crew chief

Monday, just four days _

before NASCAR begins
preparations for the season-
opening Daytona 500.
Fortunately for Mears,
he’s teaming with last year’s
race-winning crew chief.
Darian Grubb, who led
Jimmie Johnson to the
Daytona 500 victory, will
now lead Mears’ No. 25 team

at Hendrick Motorsports. -

Grubb, an engineer on John-
son’s crew, filled in for Chad
Knaus during his four-race
suspension last season.
Grubb led Johnson to a pair
of victories during his stint.

“Darian is one of the most
respected voices in our orga-
nization and has proven to'be
a terrific leader,” team owner
Rick Hendrick said. “He and
Casey represent an exciting
new combination for the No.
25 team, its sponsors and its
fans.”

Grubb takes over for
Lance McGrew, who was
crew chief for Brian Vickers
when he drove the No. 25.
McGrew will stay with Hen-
drick Motorsports in a lead-
ership role.

e Skiing: Sami Musto-
nen of Finland and Olympic
champion Jennifer Heil of
Canada won freestyle World
Cup moguls events in La
Plagne, France.

Mustonen beat Alexan-
dre Bilodeau of Canada,
with Olympic champion
Dale Begg-Smith of Aus-
tralia in third.

Guilbaut Colas of
France, who finished fifth,
maintains the lead in the
World Cup moguls standings
with 257 points. Begg-Smith
is second with 234 points.

Heil beat Deborah Scan-
zio of Italy, and Margarita
Marbler of Austria was third.

Shannon Bahrke of the
United States placed fifth
and still leads the moguls
standings with 290 points —
six points ahead of Heil. ...
The start of the Alpine Skiing
World Championships was
postponed for a third day
Monday because of strong
wind and poor visibility in
Are, Sweden. The men’s
super-G, which had already
been postponed from Satur-
day, was moved to today.
The championships will now
open today with both the
men’s and women’s super-

G’s — one race run right
after the other. The women’s
race was postponed Sunday.

e Baseball: Julian
Tavarez pitched three-hit
ball into the sixth inning and
the unbeaten Dominican
Republic eliminated defend-
ing champion Venezuela
from title contention in the
Caribbean Series with a 7-1
victory in Carolina, Puerto
Rico.

It was the second time in
four days that the Dominican
Republic’s Cibao Eagles
(4-0) defeated Venezuela’s
Aragua Tigers (1-3), includ-
ing a 4-3 victory in 18 innings
on Friday.

Tony Batista hit an RBI
double for the Dominican
Republic and Jose Fer-
nandez had a pair of RBI
singles.

Puerto Rico played Mex-
ico in the late game Monday.

e Doping: The World
Anti-Doping Agency is
counting on increased gov-
ernmental backing, a revision
of banned substances and
more funding to fight the use
of banned drugs in sports.

WADA vice chairman
Jean-Francois Lamour,
director general David
Howman and UNESCO
director-general Koichiro
Matsuura spoke Monday at
the opening of a conference
of countries that have signed
up to an international con-
vention against doping.

The conference will be
asked to approve any
changes to the 2007 list of
prohibited substances. Mat-
suura called it “vital” that a
banned list “is universally
accepted, so athletes and
support personnel are fully
informed.”

During the three-day con-
ference, delegates will also
create a global monitoring
fund to help eradicate dop-
ing. Matsuura said govern-
ments around the world have
a crucial role in providing a
“much-needed framework to
implement the world ant-
doping code” and that uni-
form guidelines are needed
“to ensure the seamless
application of the conven-
tion.”

Unanimously adopted by
UNESCO’s General Confer-
ence on Oct. 19, 2005, the
anti-doping convention was
ratified by member states
and entered into force on
Feb. 1.





THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com __



SUPER BOWL



PRO F



~tnepeenseneanmnannrannrna rve yan tina tviernatirnenntenatfen ne natnirAnn vin

OOTBALL



INTERNATIONAL EDITION __ TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007 | 7



Colts stand tall on bear of a night

he rain never let up.
| Neither did the
Colts.
The rain only got stronger.
So did the Colts.
That was what impressed
‘you most about Indianapolis
raising the Vince Lombardi
Trophy as Super Bowl XLI
champion here after a Sunday
night as his-
toric as it was
sodden.

It was
Bears
weather that
Peyton Man-
ning and.
coach Tony
Dungy’s
Colts over-
came.

It was conditions that didn’t
suit the Colts through which
Manning erased all of the
harping about his inability to
win a championship, and
through which Dungy was car-
ried off the field on shoulders
and into history as the first
black coach to win a Super
Bowl.

Everything about the rug-
ged elements seemed to favor
the run-first, defense-oriented
and supposedly more physical
Bears, the team that thrives
through bitter winters at Sol-
dier Field.

The wetter it stayed and
the muddier it got, the less
Chicago seemed like an under-
dog at all as the NFL’s colossus
event finally drew near — and
especially after former UM
lightning bolt Devin Hester
shifted and sped 92 yards with
the game’s opening kickoff to
electrify a rain-slickered
crowd dominated by Bears
fans.

“No panic whatsoever,”
Manning said.

NIGHTMARE WEATHER

The weather was a South
Florida organizing committee

nightmare after an otherwise
well-received week as host.



FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

Expect the Colts.
fo make return
visit to big game

*GOLDBERG

Monday even asked him if
he thought of himself as
Jackie Robinson.

In his usual self-
deprecating way, Dungy
replied: “Oh no. I never had
to go through the things that
he did.”

Of course. Times are dif-
ferent. \

But the quiet passion that
makes him so effective as a
coach has also made him
THE front man for the NFL’s
black coaches, a man who
never has been afraid to
speak up when he thought
minorities were being
slighted in the quest for head
coaching jobs.

That makes it fitting that
he is the first of his race to
win the Vince Lombardi tro-
phy, named after the epit-
ome of the “middle-aged
white men with fiery
demeanors” Dungy would
watch on the sidelines as a
teenager.

It is also fitting that he
and his friend and protege

BUFFALO BILLS

Wire gets

Associated Press

_ ORCHARD PARK, N.Y.
— The Buffalo Bills re-signed
special teams player Coy
Wire to a multiyear deal on
Monday.

Wire,

Buffalo’s_ third-

round pick in 2002, has been ©

a fixture on the Bills special
teams, and finished fourth on
the team with 17 special
teams tackles in 2006.

Late in the season, Wire
was moved from safety to
linebacker when starter



AL DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF






DONALD MIRALLE/GETTY IMAGES

SUPER MOMENTS: Clockwise from left, Joseph Addai fights for yardage, Peyton Manning reacts after a Colts
touchdown, Dominic Rhodes gets pulied down by Charles Tillman and Reggie Wayne heads for the end zone.

But it was weather Bears
coach Lovie Smith might have
conjured in a pregame day-
dream, elements that might
have worked to neutralize
Manning.

No, nothing about the
sweeping, sheeting rain made
you think it suited a pass-first
and finesse-oriented Colts
team accustomed to the pre-
cipitation-free, climate-con-
trolled comfort of its home
dome.

“Purple Rain.”

Yet through the rélentless-
ness of it?

Colts reign. Unmistakably.

Lovie Smith, the coach he
beat Sunday, were the first
two black men to coach in’
this game.

Dungy’s other contribu-
tion is to demonstrate that
you don’t have to breathe
fire to coach in the NFL.
He’s not Bill Parcells or his
disciples — Belichick and
Tom Coughlin to name two.

In fact, Dungy has his
own coaching tree now:
Smith, Rod Marinelli of
Detroit and Mike Tomlin,
just hired by Pittsburgh, and
others. Marinelli fits the
more standard profile and
Tomlin’s style has yet to be
determined, but all are
beholden to a man who will
finish his career right up
there with Noll or Don
Shula, who presented him
with the Lombardi trophy.

That has nothing to do
with race or style.

It has to do with the fact
that he wins.

And if he wins more
politely and quietly, then the
NFL and the rest of the
sports world are better for it.

new deal

Angelo Crowell and his
backup, Keith Ellison, were
forced out of the lineup
because of injuries. Wire fin-
ished with 15 tackles and is
expected to compete at line-
backer in 2007.

Wire played linebacker at
Stanford but was moved to
safety when he arrived in
Buffalo. He started 15 games
at strong safety as a rookie,
but was replaced in 2003
when the Bills signed Lawyer
Milloy.

Impressively.

It was Indianapolis’ first
major championship in sports
since the Pacers of the old
ABA days, this one over-
whelming that one. It elevates
Manning to Johnny Unitas’
plane among men who have
worn the horseshoe helmet.

It wasn’t a pretty victory,
for sure, or artful in the least.
Nothing about it commended
the word “finesse.” There
were a gruesome eight turn-
overs in the game, five of them
fumbles as the football slipped
like a wet watermelon seed.

But there were the sup-

CHICAGO BEARS

posed finesse Colts, dominat-

ing the supposed bruising
Bears, controlling both lines of
scrimmage, operating 80 plays
to Chicago’s 47, working
nearly a 2-to-1 advantage in
time of possession.

Smashmouth was not a
game Indy was supposed to
win Sunday night. But Indy
did. With the weather limiting
Manning, the pass-first Colts
in turn beat up Chicago for 191
yards rushing.

Perceptions and stigmas
were peeling away and disap-
pearing all night, by degrees,
as the rain fell and fell and



Indianapolis lifted and lifted.
“We were a team that can’t
win outside the dome, a team
that can’t win in the postsea-
son,” Dungy said of Colts rep-
utations now erased. “We got
to show what we’re all about.
How mentally tough we are.
How physical we could be.”

STATS AND DOUBTS

Yes, and Manning was the
quarterback of great statistics
who saw Tom Brady and other
rivals surpass him when the
playoffs rolled around. Man-
ning was heading tc a dubious
spot with Dan Marino as the._,








DONALDMIRALLE/GETTYIMAGES

greatest QB to never wina
Super Bowl.

That was before he passed
for 247 yards and was named
Super Bowl MVP, lifting the
silver trophy that shimmered
in the rain.

Validation?

“I don’t play that card,”

' Manning said.

Except that many of the

~nore than 140 million Ameri-

cans watching Sunday’s game
were playing it. It was Man-
ning’s burden, acknowledged
or not.

“He’s got that game behind
him now,” as Dungy put it.

He Shall Overcome might
work to encapsulate Man-
ning’s Sunday, though,
because in one game he over-
came everything. All of it.

Whatever was thrown at
Manning here, he got past it,
put it behind him so that it will
never bother him again.

He overcame an immediate
deficit, his own early intercep-
tion, the weather and a
defense most considered the
NFL’s best. In doing so, he
overcame the one burden that
weighed heaviest, the one only
a championship would make
disappear.

What Dungy overcame

might have been an even

greater stigma, because it was
about race, about prejudice.

“T’m proud. It means a lot to
our country,” he said of a
black head coach reaching the
summit of America’s most
popular sport for the first
time. Dungy was typically
demure, exuding class, men-
tioning others who came
before him, “great coaches
who could have done it if they
had the opportunity.”

And Dungy, deeply reli-
gious, always with a perspec-
tive uncommon in his profes-
sion.

“It’s not the biggest thing in
the world,” he said of winning
a Super Bowl, even as he held
the trophy, “but it feels great.”

BALL ON THE
GROUND: Bears QB
Rex Grossman,
right, fumbles the
snap and looks to
recover the ball in
the third quarter
of Super Bowl XLI
on Sunday night
in Miami.



NFC.champs fall short of their goal

BY RICK GANO
Associated Press
MIAMI -— Those large
“Finish” banners hanging in
their Super Bowl] hotel were
hard to miss. The Chicago
Bears saw them OK, they just
couldn’t follow the advice.
Getting to the Super Bowl
and losing may be the empti-
est feeling of all.
“When you say, ‘Super
Bowl or bust,’ it takes a little
bit out of it not
to finish it,”
linebacker
Lance Briggs
said. “Destiny
not fulfilled.”
Straight
ahead is a painful offseason for
the Bears, who could lose
defensive coordinator Ron
Rivera -— a coaching candidate
in Dallas — and must decide
whether to stick a franchise
tag on Pro Bowler Briggs, who
can become a free agent.
There’s also the matter, and
not a small one, of giving
coach Lovie Smith a raise and
extension from his league-low
salary of $1.35 million.
All this in the aftermath of

Sunday night’s disheartening
29-17 loss to the Indianapolis
Colts, who exposed the Bears’
weaknesses for all to see.

Chicago’s defense couldn’t
stop the Colts’ running attack
and, like many teams, failed to
get enough pressure on Pey-
ton Manning.

Throw in five turnovers by
the team that led the league in
taking the ball away with 44
during the regular season, and
the Bears’ bid for a first cham-
pionship in 21 years was
squashed on a rainy night in

Quarterback Rex Grossman
completed his up-and-down
season on a downer with two
fourth-quarter interceptions
that crushed any chance of
victory.

“I don’t have any excuses,”
said Grossman, who stood up
in the face of constant criti-
cism and answered questions.
Grossman’s contract runs
through next season.

Thomas Jones, who’s
rushed for more than 1,200
yards in back-to-back seasons,
also has one year to go on his
deal. What the Bears do with

him and Cedric Benson will be
a topic again once spring
workouts begin. Benson, a reli-
able backup knocked out in
the first quarter Sunday night
with a knee injury, is eager to
be the starter. And the Bears
gave him $16 miilion in guar-
anteed money when they
drafted him in the first round
in 2005.

The Bears’ special teams
turned into the team’s strength
with Pro Bowl kicker Robbie
Gould and rookie Devin Hes-
ter, who took the Super Bowl’s
opening kickotf 92 yards for a
TD after setting an NFL
record with six touchdown
returns during the regular sea-
son.

Chicago is also counting on
the return of two injured
defensive stars who didn’t
play Sunday night. Defensive
tackle Tommie Harris was
missed for his speed and push
in the middle.

And safety Mike Brown,
one of the team leaders who
has a knack for scoring defen-
sive touchdowns, was also
sidelined.

A promising young defen-

sive player did emerge this
season. Defensive end Mark
Anderson had 12 sacks as a
rookie and then recovered a
fumble against the Colts.

“We are going to continue
to take steps in building our
program,” Smith said.

“This is our third year and I
felt like we took a:big step.
Hopefully next season we can
take one more step and finish
the job,” he added.

The Bears jumped out 7-0
this season and finished 15-4,
losing three games to AFC
teams and also their meaning-
less regular-season finale to
Green Bay after they'd already
clinched home field advan-
tage.

Chicago will be the favorite
again next season in the NFC
North, even with Brett Favre
returning to the Packers.

But getting to the Super
Bowl and losing does not bode
well for the next season. Seat-
tle’s first-round win over the
Cowboys last month marked
the first time since 1997 a
Super Bowl: runner-up had
won a postseason game the
following season.





PAGE 8E, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007

” °
4 9
ee @

TRIBUNE SPORTS —



Fans could be
harred from
Italian soccer
stadiums

m SOCCER
ROME
Associated Press

SOCCER fans won’t be
allowed into stadiums in Italy
unless security measures are '
met, a decision that comes
days after rioting at a game in
Sicily in which a police officer
was killed.

Interior Minister Giuliano
Amato also said Monday that
clubs will not be able to sell
blocks of tickets to visiting
fans, allowing for better con-
trol of those entering stadi-
ums. These decisions and oth-
ers need to be approved at a
Cabinet meeting Wednesday,
Amato added.

“T know it is extravagant to
think of soccer play without
the public,” he said. “But I
think it is a worse extrava-
gance to have someone die for
something like that.”

Luca Pancalli, the Italian

soccer federation commission- -

er, Said the decision on resum-

ing professional play would be

made after the Cabinet meet-

ing. He said that would give

the league enough time to

schedule games for next week-

end.

Games in the country’s top

‘ league, scheduled for last Sat-
urday and Sunday, were called
off because of Friday’s riot
after Palermo beat host Cata-.
nia 2-1.

The Italian sports daily
Gazzetta dello Sport reported
Monday that only four stadi-
ums used by clubs in the Serie
A satisfy the safety norms —
the Stadio Olimpico in Rome,
the Stadio Olimpico in Turin,
the Artemio Franchi stadium
in Siena, and the Renzo Bar-
bera stadium in Palermo. San °

. Siro, the stadium shared by
AC Milan and Inter Milan,
does not meet the criteria.

Sports minister Giovanna
Melandri also said soccer
clubs must cut ties to fan clubs
and opponents should be
regarded as “adversaries, not
enemies.”

In the Sicilian city of Cata-
nia, thousands of mourners
flocked to a cathedral for the
funeral of the slain police offi-
cer. Pope Benedict XVI
expressed his “spiritual close-
ness” to the family of 38-year-
old Filippo Raciti.

“In reiterating his firm con-
demnation for any act of vio-
lence that stains the world of
soccer, the Holy Father urges
protagonists to promote
respect for legality with
greater determination,” the
pope said in a telegram of con-
dolences that was read during
the funeral.

In a sign of respect, people
applauded as Raciti’s coffin,
draped in the Italian flag, was
carried inside the Duomo
Cathedral followed by his
youngest son dressed in a
police uniform.

“I only hope that your death
will push society to make
changes,” Raciti’s teenage |
daughter, Fabiana, said during
a tearful speech.

Amato has said the violence
must stop, or the games will.
But officials will also have to
consider the economic impact
of not allowing a quick return
to play.

AC Milan and Juventus are ~

the world’s third- and fourth-
biggest clubs by revenue,
according to accounting firm
Deloitte. During the 2004-05
season, along with rival giants
Inter Milan and AS Roma, the
clubs generated more than $1
billion through game-day
receipts, broadcast deals,
sponsorships and merchandis-
ing.

“This is among Italy’s most
important industries, and it
needs to continue,” Antonio
Matarrese, the president of
the Italian soccer league, said
in Monday’s editions of La
Repubblica. “We are sad-
dened, but the show must go

_on.”

“Unfortunately, deaths ...
are part of this huge move-
ment, which law enforcement
officials. still can’t control,” he
said. ;

Matarrese’s comments drew
immediate criticism, with the
Italian Olympic Committee
calling them “seriously offen-
sive.” Matarrese later said he
had been misunderstood and
had not intended to sound as
if he was taking the violence
lightly.

“Those that have done
wrong must be punished,” AC
Milan defender Paolo Maldini
said.

“But playing with the doors
closed would be the death of
soccer.”

m SOCCER
MADRID, Spain
Associated Press

REAL MADRID'S board
of directors expressed sup-
port for manager Fabio
Capello on Monday, a day
after the club, suffered its
fourth loss in six games.

The board met following
Madrid's 1-0 loss to Levante,
which triggered protests at
the Santiago Bernabeu sta-
dium with many in the
crowd demanding Capello's
resignation. The loss left
Read Madrid in fourth
place, five points behind
league leader FC Barcelona.

"Fabio deserves all our

confidence," club sport
director Predrag Mijatovic
said. "Capello continues as
coach and things haven't
changed.

"What we have to do is
work harder, resolve our
sport problems and trust
that at the end of the year
we'll be happy," added
Mijatovic, who played for
the club from 1996-1999,

Board spokesman Miguel
Angel Arroyo told reporters
Capello needed more time
to carry out his changes.

"He is the only one capa-

ble of carrying out the reno- °°”

vation of Real Madrid that
we all want," Arroyo said,
Madrid's loss to Levante

goals in 21 league matches,

was its first in history against
the small team. Madrid was
eliminated from the Copa
del Rey last month, beaten
by Real Betis in the fifth
round.

The team has scored 28

its fewest in the 16 years.

- Madrid was playing its
1,000th league. game at the
Bernabeu but first since
Ronaldo completed a
US$9.7 million move to AC
Milan on Tuesday.

Under Capello, Real
Madrid also has seen David
Beckham commit to trans-
ferring to the Los Angeles
Galaxy after the European
season is complete. Beck-
ham watched Sunday's game
from the stands.

Madrid has not won a tro-
phy since 2003 — its longest
drought since the early
1950s. Capello was hired in
July as Madrid's sixth coach
in three years.

@ REAL MADRID

coach Fabio Capello reacts
during his teams Spanish
League soccer match
against Levante at the San-
. tiago Bernabeu stadium in
Madrid, Sunday, Feb. 4,
oer 2007.

(AP Phoio/
Jasper Juinen)

Real Madrid board expresses suppo
- for Capello despite mounting losses

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um in London , Saturday Feb. 3, 2007.

m@ RUGBY
LONDON
Associated Press

JONNY .WILKINSON is still in a
daze after leading England to victory in
his first test in more than three years.

Wilkinson scored 27 points as Eng-
land beat Scotland 42-20 at Twicken-

ham in the opening Six Nations round -

on Saturday, and the British press on
Sunday lauded his performance.

"To be back and to be involved after
some of the feelings I have had over
my injury period does feel like a bit of
dream, really," Wilkinson told BBC
Radio on Sunday. "I give myself a day
to enjoy it, and then it is back to busi-
ness on Monday."

The 27-year-old flyhalf had missed 30
tests for England, and been out of the
side for 1,169 days since he kicked the
team to its only Rugby World Cup title
in November 2003.

His international career seemed to
be jinxed because of injuries to his
neck, shoulder, arm, knee, appendix,

groin and, most recently, kidney. He'd
only had 50 minutes of rugby for club
Newcastle after a 12-week injury layoff
before playing at Twickenham on Sat-
urday.

"Whether it is my 20th game in a
row, or my first after 3 1/2 years, it is
just something you care about so
much," Wilkinson said.

"You want it to go well, you want
to win and the team to do well, to ful-
fill your role. Because you have pre-

-pared so hard, it does mean a lot, so the

nerves come from that. Without being
there for a long time, you do feel it
maybe a bit more than usual."

England winger Jason Robinson said
Wilkinson was "outstanding."

"When you are around Jonny and
you see the attention he gives to detail
and the time he spends perfecting what
he does, it is no surprise," Robinson
said. "It is not a fluke, it is achieved by
a lot of hard work and dedication."

Wilkinson scored a contentious try in
the second half. Replays showed that
his right foot was out as he put the ball



down one-handed while diving, and
Scotland coach Frank Hadden was furi-
ous that the video referee allowed it.

"I thought my leg was close to the
touchline going down just on or before
my hand did," Wilkinson said. "Some-
one has a chance to watch it very close-
ly, and can get the decision right, but it
is not something I really reflect on."

England's next game is at home to
Italy on Saturday and fans are hoping
the team's revival continues. England
lost eight of nine tests last year, which
led to Brian Ashton replacing Andy
Robinson as coach.

"I was convinced in my mind that if
Jonny said to me he was ready to play
international rugby in every sense —
medically, technically, tactically, phys-
ically — then | would have no hesitation
in choosing him," Ashton said.

Ashton was full of praise for Wilkin-
son, saying his improved footwork cre-
ated problems for defenders.

"And his passing is spot-on — tech-
nically, it is excellent," Ashton said.
"He can fire a pass from anything

(

\

B ENGLAND'S Jonny Wilkinson, left, goes over the line to score a try against Scotland in their Six nations rugby union international match at Twickenham stadi-:

Wilkinson still in daze
after England return

between five and 15 meters (yards)
with unerring accuracy off both
hands." :

The Sunday Times said Wilkinson *.°.--

had “orchestrated a revival that gave 4.
team on the verge of complete disinte-
gration last autumn (November) soar-,

ing hope for the remainder of the Six, .

Nations." st
"Quite simply what he achieved on~
the field was amazing," former Eng-'
land international Stuart Barnes wrote
in The Sunday Times. "Amazing but.
not surprising." vt

The Observer, also running a pics,
ture of Wilkinson's split lip, labeled
him a "Bloody marvel." :

"It takes a rare kind of sportsman.
to go from his sickbed to the interna-»
tional stage without bothering with any’.
action in between," the Observer.
wrote. "But it seems, if we did not
know, that Wilkinson is that type of ©
performer."

A headline in The Sunday Telegraph
said it all: "Perfect script unfolds for
comeback king." é

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Volume: 103 No.63 ;

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SEE FRONT PAGE OF BUSINESS SECTION






Deputy PM confirms
restructuring will

be announced by —
the end of week

Speaking yesterday, Mrs
Pratt updated The Tribune on
the likely timeline for the
move, but said she would be
acting “prematurely” if she
were to comment any further
on which officers would be
transferred, or to which posi-
tions. :

This will be done at the dis-
cretion of the commissioner
of police, Mr Paul Farquhar-
son, she noted.

Furthermore, she denied
emphatically a claim made in

SEE page 11

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A RESTRUCTURING of
the upper levels of the police
force is due to be announced
by the end of the week, Min-
ister of National Security Cyn-
thia Pratt confirmed yester-
day.

- However, Mrs Pratt vehe-
mently denied reports in
another newspaper that the
move is in response to the
conduct of certain officers in
relation to the Nassau Flight
Services arrests in the US.

four new sub-divisions

@ By BRENT DEAN



BISHOP Neil Ellis of Mount Tabor Full Gospel Church has
formally announced the creation of four new sub-divisions to make
home ownership more affordable for his 7,000-strong congregation.

The announcement was made yesterday at a press conference
attended by Prime Minister Perry Christie.

The sub-divisions will be created in conjunction with Scotia-
bank Bahamas, Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited, Arawak Homes:
Ltd and GVI and Associates Company Ltd. :

The sub-divisions will be called Mount Tabor Gardens, to be sit-
uated off Carmichael Road; Mount Tabor Sub-division, east of
Mount Tabor Church; Mount Tabor Estates, off JFK Drive, adja-

SEE page 11


































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“She Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

@ THE scene of the
accident on Adelaide
Road.

(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)

THE country recorded
its second traffic fatality
of the year early yester-
day morning when a man
in his thirties was killed
in a three-vehicle collision
on Adelaide Road.

The accident left six
othets in hospital in seri-
ous condition.

Inspector Walter
Evans told The Tribune
that the accident took
place around lam Mon-
day just east of the
entrance to Adelaide Vil-
lage.

Details are sketchy but
Inspector Evans said it is
believed that a green
Toyota Avalon was trav-
elling west on Adelaide
Road and a Ford F150
truck and Ford Ranger
were heading east at the
time.

After the collision the
Ford F150 truck over-
turned. Two fire engines
with jaws of life equip-
ment were brought to the

scene to free those
_ trapped in the F150 and

Ford Ranger trucks, six
persons in all.

SEE page 11

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007



Two appear in court on





double murder charges

@ By NATARIO
McKENZIE

TWO men were arraigned
together in magistrate’s court
yesterday on double murder
charges ‘as well as an armed
robbery charge.

Jamal Armbrister, 24, of
Williams Lane, and Jacob
Woodside, 22, of Dan N ottage
Estates, were arraigned before
magistrate Roger Gomez at
Court One, Bank Lane, yes-
terday.

Armbrister was represent-
ed by attorney Ellsworth
Johnson and Inspector Althea
Porter was the prosecutor.

Court dockets state that on
Thursday, January 25, by
means of unlawful harm,
Armbrister. and Woodside
caused the death of Shervin
Miller Jr. The men were also
charged with the January 26

‘shooting death of Emico Rus-

sell.

SEE page 11

Ingraham criticises Wilchcombe
over passport rule statements

_ & By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport Reporter

. FREEPORT ~— FNM leader Hubert Ingraham has criticised
Tourism Minister Obie Wilchcombe for statements he made

' regarding a 30-day extension for the Bahamas and Caribbean

before implementation of the new US passport rule.

Mr Ingraham said The Tribune was duped into writing a sto-
ry which said that Mr Wilchcombe convinced members of the US
Congress to extend the implementation period for the Caribbean.

Referring to the story dated January 26 headlined ‘Passport

SEE page 11

Di

‘ne



— ee. eo oe) eee











=

Claim that casino
workers’ sick-out
has ‘escalated’
from week ago

l By RUPERT MISSICK JR
and KARIN HERIG

Tribune Staff Reporter .

THE SICK-out staged by
Wyndham Crystal Palace casino
workers has “escalated” from
where it started a week ago, it
was claimed yesterday.

But hotel management has
been able to continue operat-
ing smoothly and service all its
customers, Robert Sands, vice-
president for the Cable Beach
hotels, told The Tribune yester-
day.

The sick-out started from last
Wednesday through the week
and over the weekend.

Mr Sands was optimistic that
the situation would be resolved,
however, as the Baha Mar
Group’s hotel management and
casino workers - led by presi-
dent of the Bahamas Hotel
Managerial Association Obie
Ferguson - were scheduled to
meet today at 2pm in a bid to
resolve their differences.

However, up to press time

SEE page 11













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ON ee

THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007

Bermuda, Cayman show way

with work permit ‘term limits’

uring the past three
weeks, I spent time
in both Bermuda

and Grand Cayman, where I
frequently travel for work.
Both countries are competi-
tors of the Bahamas in finan-
cial services and tourism.
Bermuda, of course, is the
leader in captive insurance,
while Cayman is the leader in
fund administration.

In a future article, I will
examine why Bermuda and
Cayman have been able to
leave the Bahamas scrambling
as a minor player in captive
insurance, and a less competi-
tive player in fund administra-
tion.

Today, however, I will talk
about the ‘Term Limit’ immi-
gration policy adopted by both
Bermuda and the Cayman
Islands.

However, before talking
about the policy, it will be use-
ful to provide some back-
ground information about



BAHAMAS AIR SEA RESCUE
ASSOCIATION

Annual General Meeting
~ BASRA Headquarters,
February 23rd, 2007-7:30pm
All members are urged to attend.
Refreshments will be served.

these economies.

Bermuda has a total popula-
tion of about 65,000 and a
workforce of 38,000 persons.

It is estimated that there are _

roughly 8,000 work permit
holders, which represents
about 21 per cent of the work-
force. Cayman, on the other
hand, has a total population of
about 45,000 and a workforce
of 24,000 persons. According
to local reports in Cayman,
about 33 per cent of the work-
force is on work permits. -

-Term Limits

The concept of term limits
is more frequently applied in a
political context. For instance,
in the US, the president is lim-
ited to a maximum of two four-
year terms in office. In much of
Latin America, the president
is limited to one seven-year
term in office.

Term limits have a long his-
tory, going back to ancient






Public Hospitals Authority



Greek and Roman civilisa-
tions. In these ancient societies,
certain elected positions were
subjected to term limits. There
are numerous arguments for
and against term limits. Per-
sonally, I tend to favour polit-
ical term limits.

Immigration Term Limits
Bermuda

In 2001, Bermuda
announced its immigration
term limit policy. The policy
basically required that any for-
eign worker (who is not grant-
ed an exemption), who has
been in Bermuda for six years,
will have to leave Bermuda at
the expiration of their work
permit. The policy took effect
from that point forward.

Therefore, as of April 1,
2007, there will be a significant
rotation in expatriate workers.
This policy gave businesses six
years to prepare for this policy
implementation.

Concurrent with the
announcement of this policy,
the government also granted
status to some 2,000 persons
who had resided in Bermuda
for 20 years by 1998. Also, in
certain cases, expatriate work-
ers could apply for and be
granted ministerial exemption,
which would allow them to
stay up to nine years.

Cayman

As aresult of Cayman’s new
law, seven years is the maxi-

mum length of time a work
permit holder can work con-
tinuously in the Cayman
Islands. After this period, a
worker is required to leave the
country for a period of two
years before being eligible to
apply for another permit.

The only exceptions to this
would be a worker designated
as an ‘exempted employee’ in a
business staffing plan, or where
the Immigration Department
deem that there are excep-
tional circumstances. In such
cases the Immigration Depart-
ment may, at its discretion,
grant additional work permits
to enable the person to com-

- plete an aggregate period of

eight years, thus making the
worker eligible to apply for the
grant of permanent residence.

Unlike Bermuda, Cayman’s
policy is retroactive. Thus if
you have been in Cayman for
seven years, at your next
renewal you must leave unless
you obtain an exemption.

At the time of passage of the
new immigration law, persons
residing in Cayman for
between eight and 15 years
were given a three-year win-
dow to apply for permanent
residence (which is not auto-
matic). The law further pro-
vided that for applicants (with-
in the three-year window) who
have resided in Cayman for 15
years would be regularised, in
the absence of exceptional cir-
cumstances.

Official Position

Robert Horton, Bermuda's
Permanent Secretary of
Labour and Immigration,
while speaking at the recent
Cayman Business Outlook,
was resolute in saying the Cay-
man Islands had nothing to
fear from its own policy of lim-





iting work permit holders to
either a seven-year or nine-
year stay.

“Bermuda has a similar law
limiting permit holders to six
years on the island, a law that
was passed in 2001. Unlike in
the Cayman Islands, Bermu-
da's policy is not retroactive.
This year will mark the first
time that work permit holders
reach the end of their six-year
tenure and are required to
leave,” Mr Horton said.

He added: “Critics have stat-
ed that the term limits will be
bad for Bermuda and will lead

‘to an exodus of qualified work-

ers. The government rejects
that criticism."

Mr Horton said the law
strikes a "satisfactory balance"
between the "legitimate needs
of Bermudians and the needs
of the business community".

Implications for
the Bahamas

While the effect of these ini-
tiatives will be unfolding in the

coming months in Bermuda -

and Cayman, there is no evi-
dence, at least so far, that they
will be any significant disrup-
tion in either economy. From
what I can tell, there seems to
have been a clear articulation
of the respective policies, and
appropriate room for exemp-
tion where legitimately war-
ranted.

I think it is fair to say that we
are not quite there yet in terms
of policy formulation and
implementation. What amazes
me is that although both coun-
tries are much smaller than the
Bahamas in terms of popula-
tion and Gross Domestic Prod-
uct (GDP), in many respects

_ they seem to be more focused,

especially when it comes to
long-term economic and social

planning.

There is absolutely no doubt
that if just half the announced
investment projects were to
materialiwe, the Bahamas will
need many trained workers in
a very short period of time.
Given the inadequacy of the
general quality of new school
leavers (the D+ national aver-
age), many of our youngsters
may be resigned to the side-
lines, while the country pro-
duces entry level jobs for expa-

‘ triate workers with good work

ethics. I am astounded by busi-
nesspersons who complain
about how difficult it is to fill
entry level positions with
Bahamians with suitable per-
sons. There are people out

there... but many lack the’

basic skills required for the job
market.

This is all very serious stuff,
but rather than policymakers
addressing such issues res-
olutely and systematically from
a national perspective, writers
such as myself seem to only be
able to stimulate intellectual
conversation for a very: small
minority. Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a
Chartered Financial Analyst,
is vice-president - pensions,
Colonial Pensions Services
(Bahamas), a wholly-owned
subsidiary of Colonial Group
International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance
and is a major shareholder of
Security & General Insurance
Company in the Bahamas.

The views expressed are
those of the author and do not
necessarily represent those of
Colonial Group International
or any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct any questions or com-
ments to rlgibson@atlantic-
house.com.bs






CORPORATE OFFICE
ADVERTISEMENT

POSITION
ADMINSTRATIVE ASSISTANT Hk

The Public Hospitals Authority invites applications from suitably qualified individuals for
the post of Administrative Assistant III, Corporate Office, Public Hospitals Authority.



Applicants must possess the following qualification:-

Associate Degree in Business, Secretarial Science or related field and three (3) years relevant
experience OR College of the Bahamas Diploma in Secretrial Science and five (5) years
relevant experience.








The Administrative Assistant will be reponsible for the general administrative/secretarial
duties; and assists in all required aspects of Project and programme management in support
of the office of the Deputy Managing Director.

DUTIES:

1. Works closely with cach of the specialized officers reporting directly to the Deputy
Managing Director (including the Director of Projects, Senior Manager for MIS and
Biostatistcian) to ensure that workflows are appropriately coordinated.

2. Keeps abreast all activities in each of the Sections of the Planning and Evaluation
Unit(i.e.) Planning, MIS and Statistics Sections) and the PHA Headquaters Projects
Office so as to be able to provide immediate assistance when needed.







3.Maintains a structured schedule of specific activites in progress in the Deputy
‘Managing Director’s and related offices.

4. Assists inthe preparation of annual budget estimates for the Deputy Managing
Director’s and related offices ensuring that there is detailed valid justification for all
submissions.




5, Works on special projects on behalf of the Deputy Managing Director or any
specialized officer of this area in order to ensure well-rounded exposure and experience.



6. Assists in all required aspects of project and programme management within the
unit.







7. Coordinates Deputy Managing Director's schedule and appointments; arrange
meetings, prepare agendas as well as reserve and prepare the facility.

8, Conducts research, compiles reports and prepare presentations as directed.

9, Preparations and disburses documents relative to project headed by the Deputy
Managing Director.

Letters of application and curricula vitae shoould be submitted to the Director of
Human Resources, Public Hospitals Authority P.O. Box N-8200 or Manx Corporate
Centre, Dockendale House, West ay Street no later than 16th February, 2007




cS





























FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK



CAREER OPPORTUNITY
in
Wealth Management
Financial Advisor/Investment Manager
Bahamas :

We are expanding our capabilities in wealth management and are now seeking to recruit
seasoned financial advisers who have the gravitas and expertise to contribute significantly
to the growth of AUM by developing investment relationships with HNWIs, professional
trustees and COIs.




Qualifications:

Recognised Financial Planning or Investment qualification (e.g. FPC or CFA).

Qualification in Banking, Law or Accounting.

A self-motivator with excellent sales management and business development skills.

Detailed and technical knowledge of investment management and the investment

product range as it relates to non-residents/ non-nationals, HNWIs, trustees and

COIs.

. Full awareness of the local and international competitive environments.

" Good understanding of the qualitative and quantitative aspects of investment
management including, Alfa, Beta and Total Return considerations and analytical
depth in respect of their impact on sector allocations and individual stock picks.

" Sound experience in global capital markets.

General Requirements/Responsibilities:

" Must have a minimum of 5 years international investment portfolio management
or financial advisory experience.
. Must be able to deliver a high level of expert investment advice and service with

the aim of developing significant sales and new business, covering investment and
fiduciary services and the cross-selling of other banking services.

" Proven track record in providing investment recommendations to both corporate
and personal clients as well as client performance reporting. This includes a full
understanding of the mathematical and statistical basis of portfolio diversification.

" Must be totally at ease with the concept of personal affluence and. high-net worth
clients.
" Experience of, or at least be at ease with clients from differing social, religious,

ethnic and cultural backgrounds.
Experience of selling other banking and / or regulated products is desirable

Remuneration:





. Salary commensurate with the position’s seniority level 8 (The Bank has 11 pay
levels).

° Benefits- includes a car allowance, variable incentive pay (bonus) and preferred
loan rates

Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter via email by February
9", 2007 to: deangelia.deleveaux@FirstCaribbeanBank.com




FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for their interest,
however only those under consideration will be contacted.

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AB | TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007 __INTERNATIONAL EDITION

INVESTMENT BANKS

State Street to buy Investors Financial Services for $4.2B

BY MARK JEWELL
Associated Press

BOSTON — State Street
said Monday it will buy Inves-
tors Financial Services for
$4.16 billion in stock to expand
into providing institutional
asset services for the fast-
growing hedge fund industry
and funds managed overseas.

State Street said it eclipsed
other bidders to reach an
agreement between two Bos-
ton-based firms that would
pay IFS investors a hefty pre-
mium on their shares. That
premium shrank quickly Mon-
day, from 38 percent before
the deal was announced to 29
percent as the news dragged
down State Street’s stock.
Shares of Investors Financial
Services still soared 27 per-
cent.

IFS provides investment

LITIGATION

services for $2.2 trillion in
assets. Its revenue has grown
at an annual rate of 18 percent
over the past three years. State
Street is far larger, with $11.9
trillion in assets under cus-
tody.

“J think the price paid was
very high,” said Thomas Bur-
nett, research director at the
New York-based brokerage
firm Wall Street Access, who
predicted no new bids would
emerge to trump State Street’s.

‘UNDER PRESSURE’

Burnett said State Street
came under pressure to
expand after the Bank of New
York in December agreed to
take over Mellon Financial for

’ $16.5 billion — a deal by two

State Street rivals joining to
become the world’s largest so-

called trust bank providing

banking, stock lending and
other services to investment
funds.

The acquisition of Inves-
tors Financial will make State
Street the No. 2 trust bank
ranking behind the newly
combined Bank of New York
Mellon, with JPMorgan Chase
in the No. 3 slot, Burnett said.

State Street Chairman and
Chief Executive Ronald Logue
asserted that his company was
paying a fair price.

“you have a property here
that has been growing top-line

revenue dramatically,” Logue ~

said during a conference call.
The transaction is expected
to yield cost savings by elimi-
nating roughly 1,700 redun-
dant staff positions while com-
bining real estate holdings and
technology, State Street said.
He called the deal a logical

Apple, Beatles end
issues over ‘Apple’
name and logos

* APPLE

function of time at this point,”
said Gene Munster, senior
research analyst with invest-
ment bank Piper Jaffray & Co.
“J bet they move pretty fast.
For Apple, it was critical that
they got this taken care of.”
Jaffray estimates that
Apple paid The Beatles $50
million to $100 million for the
rights to the Apple name.
That would come on top of
more than $26.5 million Apple

paid to settle past disputes .

with Apple Corps.

BEATLES FAN
It’s no secret that Steve

Jobs — Apple’s chief execu-. |

tive officer and a huge Beatles
fan — has wanted the British
band’s music.on iTunes,
which has sold more than 2
billion songs worldwide and
has catapulted Apple into the
top ranks of music sellers.

Jobs even cued up some
Beatles music and album art
in unveiling the company’s
highly anticipated iPhone
gadget at the Macworld Con-
ference and Expo last month,
setting off rampant specula-
tion that some type of deal
might be in the works.

However, decades of legal
disputes between the two
companies have thus far made
any partnership all but impos-
sible.

“We love the Beatles, and it
has been painful being at odds

BANKING

with them over these trade-
marks,” Jobs said in a state-
ment. “It feels great to resolve
this in a positive manner, and
in a way that should remove
the potential of further dis-
agreements in the future.”

The Beatles had been one
of the few remaining big-
name musical acts to reject
any legal distribution of its
work on the Internet. For-
merly hesitant artists from
Madonna to Metallica have
made peace with online cus-
tomers as digital downloads
have continued to grow in
popularity — with iTunes
holding the bulk of the mar-
ket.

Artists have complained
that online distribution leaves
them with too small a profit
and that iTunes wrecks the
artistic integrity of an album
by‘ allowing songs to be pur-
chased for 99 cents apiece.
Bands such as AC/DC have
sold albums only at other,
more flexible sites.

But the Beatles’ recording
label, Britain’s EMI Group,
has rebuffed all suitors.

Elizabeth Freund, the U.S.
spokeswoman for Apple
Corps, said EMI would first
need an agreement with
Apple Corps before licensing
any music to Apple or other
online services. She said no
such deal has been reached

yet.
EMI officials declined to
comment.

Fewer consumers
are using checks

* CHECKS

employees’ bank accounts are
also included in this category.

Converting checks to elec-
tronic payments allows mer-
chants to get paid quicker,
and it may help reduce the
number of insufficient funds
checks businesses have to
deal with. Processing checks
electronically is also cheaper
than processing paper checks.

In 2003, about 8.9 billion
converted checks were
reported, accounting for
about 11 percent of all non-
cash payments.

‘At some stores that pro-
cess checks electronically,
such as Wal-Mart and cloth-
ing retailers’ the Gap and
Banana Republic, the clerk
hands the check back to the
consumer with their receipt
after scanning it and claiming
an electronic payment for the
store.

Consumers may not realize
that many of the checks they
write to utilities, mortgage
companies and other busi-
nesses are also being con-
verted to electronic payments
when those companies
receive the checks, said Terri
Bradford, a payments
researcher with the Federal
Reserve Bank of Kansas City.

The decline in check writ-

- increase in electronic check

processing, prompted the
Federal Reserve to dramati-
cally reduce the size of its
check-processing department,
whose operations are covered
by the processing fees it
charges for handling checks
and electronic transfers.

Since 2003, the Fed has
closed more than half of its 45
check processing centers, and
by the end of 2008, only 18
such centers will remain
operational.

Demographics are part of
the reason why checks con-
tinue to be used, because
older consumers are comfort-
able with what they’ve used
for years.

And Bradford said there
are still some transactions
checks are better suited for,
such as paying the neighbor
kid who mowed the lawn or
making a contribution to the
church, to have a record of
charitable donations at tax
time.

Joe Abboud wrote a check
for his groceries at Hy-Vee

recently because that’s what »

he always does.

“I write alot of checks,” he
said.

Abboud will occasionally
use a credit card, but the 90-
year-old is more comfortable
with checks.

Apple Corps was founded
by the Fab Four in 1968 and is
still owned by Paul McCart-
ney, Ringo Starr, the widow of
John Lennon and the estate of
George Harrison.

LONG HISTORY

The Beatles’ company,
whose corporate logo is a
giant green Granny Smith
apple, first sued what was
until last month Apple Com-
puter for trademark infringe-
ment in 1978. The computer
maker agreed in 1981 to pay
$80,000 and never enter the
music business.

Apple Corps sued again
nearly a decade later, alleging
the musical instrument digital
interface, or MIDI, software
included on Apple’s Macin-
tosh computers violated those
terms. Apple again settled,
agreeing in 1991 to pay $26.5
million to secure the rights to
the apple logo for selling com-
puters and software, while
Apple Corps would get it for
producing and selling music.

But the tension flared again
in 2003 while Apple was sign-
ing up recording labels to
offer their songs through
Apple’s new iTunes down-
load store and attempted to
woo The Beatles’ manage-
ment.

Apple Corps contended
that Apple’s use of the logo on
iTunes amounted to a breach

-of the 1991 agreement. Law-
yers for Apple have argued



NATI HARNIK/AP

CONVENIENCE: Richard
Kesterson of Omaha, Neb.,
swipes his debit card at a
supermarket in Omaha.

Cheryl Carlson, said she usu-
ally writes checks to keep
track of her spending. When
she writes a check, she always
writes the amount down in
her register, but she some-
times forgets with her debit
card.

“The only time I use my
debit card is when I leave the
checkbook at home,” said
Carlson, who is in her 40s.

Bradford, the payments
expert, said checks might
remain popular when pay-
ment must be guaranteed,
such as at real estate closings,
especially for individuals and
small businesses.

Wire transfers could also
be. used to guarantee pay-
ment, but Bradford said those
transfers can be costly for
people who don’t use them

ften.

step to combine two Boston
companies with complemen-
tary strengths amid consolida-
tion among other firms that
serve as custodians for assets
of clients ranging from pen-
sion and mutual funds to
insurance companies.

Logue said State Street and
Investors Financial will be rel-
atively easy to integrate, since
both are in similar lines of
business. The two companies,
Logue said, “already share a
similar focus, service model
and customer type, which
makes for a seamless and swift
consolidation.”

While State Street’s busi-
ness involves a wide range of
back office processing for
large clients, IFS has moved
into higher-growth areas serv-
ing hedge funds — a risky, but
often high-yield investment

MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

vehicle initially favored by
wealthy individuals that’s
grown rapidly in popularity
among institutional money
managers.

FEW REMAINING PLAYERS

Logue said IFS was one of
the few remaining players in
the business available for State
Street to purchase. The deal
also will help State Street
expand into investment ser-
vices for the growing private
equity market.

Investors Financial Ser-
vices shareholders will receive
0.906 shares of State Street
common stock for each share
of IFS common stock.

Shares of Investors Finan-
cial Services rose $12.85 to
close at $59.80 on the Nasdaq
Stock Market, while shares of
State Street fell $4.67 to $67.08



PAUL SAKUMA/AP

LET THERE BE PEACE: Apple CEO Steve Jobs recently
playeda Beatles Song on iTunes as he introduced the

new iPhone.

that music lovers are smart
enough to tell the difference
between the logos. Apple
Corps uses a shiny green
apple as its logo, while Apple
has a cartoon-like apple with
a bite taken out.

A British judge ruled in
May that Apple’s logo is used
in association with the store
— not the music — and thus
permitted. The settlement
announced Monday replaces
the 199] agreement and makes
an appeal of that ruling
unnecessary.

ECONOMY

Neil Aspinall, manager of
Apple Corps, said the com-
pany was glad to resolve the
dispute.

Apple still faces another
high-profile trademark law-
suit, one over its iPhone.

Networking equipment
company Cisco Systems,
whose Linksys division has an
identically named product,
sued Apple last month.

Shares of Apple fell 81
cents to close Monday at
$83.94 on the Nasdaq Stock
Market.

Services sector
driving growth

*REPORT

figure was stronger than the
details,” suggesting that the
survey — like other recent
economic data. — wasn’t
sending clear signals about
the near-term.

Still, he added, “‘the econ-
omy certainly is still expand-
ing.” He projects economic
growth in the 2.5 percent to 3
percent range.

There was little reaction in
the stock and bond markets to
the report.

Anthony Nieves, chairman
of the group’s non-manufac-
turing business survey com-
mittee, noted that new orders
and employment increased at
slower rates in January than
the previous month and that
the price index also eased.

Still, he added, ‘The over-
all indication in January is
continued economic growth
in the non-manufacturing sec-
tor at a faster pace than in
December.”

The new orders index
weakened slightly to 55.4 in
January from 55.6 in Decem-
ber, while the backiog of
orders strengthened to 49.0
from 48.0 the previous month.

Prices increased at a
slower rate, with the prices
index registering 55.2 in Janu-
ary, down from 59.7 in

December. Some of the
respondents told the trade
group that “costs are starting
to come down — especially
petroleum-related costs,” the

study said. Crude oil prices

were up Monday on expecta-
tions of cold weather in major
U.S. markets. The services
employment index, mean-
while, moved down to 51.7 in
January from 53.2 in Decem-
ber..

Seven industries reported
growth: utilities; transporta-
tion and warehousing; profes-
sional, scientific and technical
services; information; finance
and insurance; health care
and social assistance; and
miscellaneous services.

Seven reported decreased
activity, and three were
unchanged. The ISM trade
association represents
approximately 40,000 supply
management professionals.

on the New York Stock
Exchange. The drop by State
Street sliced more than $300
million off the value of the
deal, which was $4.5 billion
before it was announced.

State Street has about
21,000 employees compared
with about 4,500 at IFS.

Logue said about 1,700 jobs
would be eliminated over
about 18 months through a
combination of layoffs and
vacancies left unfilled, with
some workers transferring to
different posts. He declined to
offer a number on how many
jobs would be cut.

Together, the companies
employ nearly 2,000 people in
Dublin, Ireland, serving off-
shore investment clients.
Because of overseas invest-
ment growth, Logue said he
didn’t anticipate cuts there.

SUPER BOWL

Amateurs
develop
Super
Bowl ads

* ADVERTISING

Super Bowl spots, fancy com-
puter graphics, with an other-
worldy ad showing an office
worker drifting off into space
from the world’s first office

- on the moon, only to be clob-

bered by a passing meteor.

A lot is riding on the ads,
and not just because CBS is
charging as much as $2.6 mil-
lion for a 30-second spot dur-
ing the game. With some 90
million people watching, it’s
the most-viewed program all
year on television and the ads
are subject to intense scru-
tiny, both by amateurs and the
marketing industry.

Coca-Cola was back in the
game after a long absence,
taking on its rival Pepsi with a
number of creative ads,
including an homage to Black
History Month with an under- .
stated ad showing the chang-
ing shapes of Coke bottles .
over time as milestones in
black history appeared along-
side.

That ad referred indirectly
to the fact that, for the first
time, both coaches in the
game are black, and at least
one other spot also high-
lighted Black History Month.

Some of the uses of humor
didn’t resonate well with

- experts. Stephen Greyser, a

professor at Harvard Busines.
School specializing in ccm-
munications and the business _
of sports, said the rock-throw-
ing spot by Anheuser-Busch’s
Bud Light was “attention-get-
ting” but also “had a nasty
character to it.”

Bud Light, which often
swings for the fences with
wacky jabs at humor, scored
better with Greyser with a dif-
ferent spot showing an auc-
tioneer saying wedding vows
at hyper-fast speed.

Greyser said that spot had
a much broader appeal. The
job-search company Career-
Builder ditched its longtime
office-monkey pitchmen of
years past in favor of a jungle
combat scene among office
workers, where office sup-
plies become weapons.

Think of Dilbert meets
Lord of the Flies.

Tim Calkins, a marketing
professor at the Kellogg
School of Management at
Northwestern University who
runs a panel of students to
rate the ads, called this year’s
batch a “mixed bag,” saying
advertisers were “being safe,”
with no one “pushing the edge
of either creativity or taste.”

Revlon was one of a rare
few to appeal to the female
audience, unveiling a spot
with scenes of the singer
Sheryl Crow on tour and
doing a rendition of Buddy
Holly’s Not Fade Away.



4 pm 6:35 p.m. Late
Stock Tkr. close Chg. volume
Pfizer PFE 26.88 26.88 130650
Intel INTC 21.28 21.28 89928
SPDR SPY 144.85 144.87 +02 54996
Nasdi00h QQQQ 44.12 44120 * 25363
txxonMbi = XOM 15,67 75.70 +03 © 23221
EqOHPT EOP 55.46 55.45 +01 18276
Wyeth WE 50.43 50.43 * 14264
Chevron CVX 73.78 73.79 +,01 12443
Vodafone VOD 29.28 29.28 i 12250
Citigrp Cc 54.75 54.75 10771
Westwone WON = 7.00 7.00 - 10000
GileadSci —-GILD 10.02 69.99 03 8065
ishsPGlb = 100 74.79 74.82 +.03 8000



4 6:35 pum. Late

Tk. ose dese < voheme

ConsolEs CNX 35.95 3595 * 7640
Anheusr BUD 51.13 5145 +32 1437
InvFnSv \FIN 59.80 59.89 -+.09 5523
Cisco csco 27.51 2758 = +.07 5463
ReliantEn —RRI 16.09 16.09 5270
3Com COMS 3.99 4.01 +.02 5244
CMS Eng CMS 17.04 17.04 : 4986
HunuB JBHT =. 24.72 242 = * 4955
Mirant MIR 34.70 34.70 * 415
BostProp BXP 126.42 12645 +.03 4288
Jabil If JBL 24.47 watt 4031
~ Hess $ HES 54.12 54,12 . 4000

~ For up-to-date stock quotes, go to www.MiamiHerald.com and click on Business



ing, combined with the Another grocery customer, 0



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 5B





Ministry hopes for
inimal large group
impact from WHITI

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

THE Western Hemisphere
Travel Initiative’s (WHTI)
impact on group travel to the
Bahamas will be minimised for
groups who used agents to
make their travel plans, The
Tribune was told yesterday.

‘James Malcolm, director of
group travel for the Ministry
of Tourism, said that while the

added expense of multiple
passports for group travellers
was an obstacle that had to be
overcome, in many cases larg-
er groups, such as conventions
and meetings, booked their
travel many months in
advance. They did this through
reputable travel and booking
agents who would be well
aware of the WHTI initiative
and its effects on US air trav-
ellers.

“We’re certainly still con-
cerned,” Mr Malcolm said,

“but the professionals who
handle their arrangements are
well aware of the laws. Often,
they book almost a year out.”

He added that given the
incentives of booking a larger
group, travel agents would
have been warning their clients
of the need for proper docu-
ments well in advance.

“They take a largely proac-
tive role,” Mr Malcolm said.

He added that group travel
for weddings and family
reunions, and other smaller

groups, posed a bigger chal-
lenge, because often this
involved people making sepa-
rate travel arrangements, some
of whom may be less travelled
and aware of the WHTT’s pass-
port requirements.
Currently, SuperClubs
Breezes is the only Bahamas-
based resort to offer group
reimbursements for passport.
In a working paper on the
WHTI, the Ministry of
Tourism said it was monitoring
four areas it felt could feel the

Long Island still suffers from airport problems

m@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

RESIDENTS in Long Island
continue to suffer an econom-
ic. downturn due to the limited
availability of airlift to the Stel-
la Maris Airport, The Tribune
was told yesterday.

Ever since its closure for
repairs last February, residents
have been warning that they
cannot rebound from the lost
revenue the closure hasjcreat-
ed. Although now open,
Bahamasair has not resumed
service, but residents are grate-
ful that some. private airlift
charters, such as Southern and

PROFILE:

Pineapple Air, are able to
bring in tourists.

James ‘Docky’ Smith, owner
of the Stella Maris-based
Bonafide Bonefishing, and
president of the north Long
Island BoneFish Association,
told The Tribune that the area
was still being negatively
impacted by the situation at
the airport.

Business

However, business had
improved with the now-daily
commuter service offered by
Southern Air and Pineapple
Air directly into Stella Maris.

Mr Smith credited the min-
ister of transport and aviation,

Glenys Hanna-Martin, saying
she had a done a great job in
ensuring charter flights were
now able to land in Stella
Maris again.

He added that the airport

still has major limitations, and
hoped work will continue so
that larger aircraft - especially

* direct flights from Florida - can

commence flying into Stella
Maris, and also enable
Bahamasair to resume their
schedule.

"Long Islanders are very
proud, and we will try to make
things happen for ourselves.
All we ask is that the needed
infrastructure is put in place,"
Mr Smith said.

Another person, who asked

FIDELITY

invites applications for the position of

MANAGER, CARD OPERATIONS

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

Establish operating policies, procedures & controls

banking delivery systems

IT infrastructure
products and services

marketing strategies, customer loyalty programme

+ 7+ years in the financial services industry with 5+ years in the bank card
and/or electronic banking services and card operations management

responsibile for daily management of card product operations and electronic
Work with internal departments, external vendors and card

associations to assure cardholder services and compliance

Output and delivery of statements, plastics, letters and supporting

Support the development of new card and electronic banking

Team with Marketing to execute product and sales plans,

Oversee payments and application processing, maintenance of

databases, cards support training, account posting and reconciliation
Resolve cardholder disputes and process chargebacks

that their business not be
named, said commere was very
slow. “It is hot as productive,
because people do not want to
have to pay $100 both ways to
take a taxi to get here from
Deadman’s Cay,” they said.

Closure

The airport’s closure has had
a devastating effect on the
area’s two primary resorts,
Cape Santa Maria and the Stel-
la Maris Resort, which have
both over the past few months
seen cancellations that have
drastically cut profits, both for
them and the surrounding busi-
nesses which rely on their
guests to make an income.

heaviest impact from the ini-

tiative, which requires Ameri- —

cans to have passports for
reentry into the United States.

They included group and
convention travel, weddings,
spring breakers and the sum-
mer family businesses. Com-
bined, these four groups
accounted for almost 250,000
of the visitors arriving to the
Bahamas in 2006.

The Ministry noted that
group business travel was gen-
erated through three channels
- independent meeting plan
ners, corporate meeting plan-
ners and business incentive
houses. They accounted for 30
per cent, 30 per cent and 40
per cent of the group/conven-
tion business respectively.

Based on 2006 Immigration
departure cards, the groups,
convention and conference
business brought 42,000 visi-
tors to the Bahamas, these
people staying an average of

4.3 nights for a total of 180,000
visitor nights.

According to Immigration
arrivals cards, in 2006, 43,000
visitors came for a wedding in
the Bahamas, staying on aver-
age 4.5 nights or a total 192,000
visitor nights.

Almost 50,000 visitors
between the ages of 12 and 24
arrived in the Bahamas on a
vacation during March and
April 2006, traditionally Spring
Break time, averaging 5.6
nights in the Bahamas and
totaling 280,000 visitor nights.

The Working paper added
that based on June to August

2006 air arrivals, potentially

40,000 families visited the
Bahamas. Assuming a family
consists of one male, one
female and children under 12,
that translated into about
113,000 persons spending
613,000 visitor nights. Their
average length of stay was 5.5
nights.

TM Toy Nae

Well established Fashion Retail

Business. Well known and
respected worldwide Franchise.

20 years at same prime location.
P. O. Box CB11098

Enquiries to:

dave





Administer fraud and loss prevention programmes
Participate in budgeting process
Monitor service levels and report on performance

CRITICAL COMPETENCIES:

Operations /financial focus with technical background

Demonstrated project management experience

Strong communication (verbal and written), organizational, and
supervisory skills

Strong demonstrated knowledge in banking regulation and operational risk
management

Excellent interpersonal skills. Ability to effectively interact with all levels
of management and employees

The person will report directly to the Executive Vice President and CFO
Competitive compensation package will include salary, benefits and bonuses.
Send resume no later than February 16th, 2007 to:

The Director Human Resources
21a

51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
Fax 326.3000

e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com



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PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007
GN-456



G4

SUPREME COURT

SUPREME COURT :
-PROBATE REGISTRY :
P.O. BOX N-167 :
Nassau, The Bahamas :
February 8th, 2007 :

Probate Division
2006/PRO/npr/00738

In the Estate of STEPHEN A. ORLANDO, late of 6021

Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key in the State of Florida,

one of the United States of America,

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of :
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be :
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in its Probate ;
Division by HARTIS EUGENE PINDER of Mareva House, :
George Street in the City of Nassau in the Island of New ;
Providence, one of the Islands of the commonwealth of :
The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney :
in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed Grant of :
Amended Letters of Administration in the above estate :
granted to MAURICE V. ORLANDO, the Personal :
Representative, by the Circuit Court for Manatee County }
in the State of Florida, on the 19th day of September, :

2006.
‘ Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

nS EEE UEnEEEE EE

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :
PROBATE DIVISION :
February 8th, 2007 :

No. 2006/PRO/npr/00739

Whereas LELAND DAWKINS, of the Settlement of Crown
Haven, Abaco, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth :
of The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme ;
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the ;
real and personal estate of HOWARD DAWKINS late of :
Murphy Town, Abaco, one of the Islands of the :
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. }

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the

_ 2006/PRO/npr/00030

i In the Estate of LEMUEL S. CONNELLY late of the City
: of Tampa in the State of Florida, USA,

date hereof.

Signed
D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

SUPREME COURT :
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167 :
Nassau, The Bahamas :
February 8th, 2007 :

Probate Division
2007/PRO/npr/00003

In the Estate of ALEXANDER SLORACH late of
Khonkaen, Mannachie Road Forres IV36 2UT in the

Sheriffdom of Grampian, Highland and Islands in Scotland,
deceased. :

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be ;
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in its Probate ;
Division by EARL A. CASH of Marlin Drive in the Western :
District in the Island of New Providence, The Bahamas, :
_ Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas :

‘for obtaining the Resealed Grant of Certified Extract ;
Confirmation in the above estate granted to JACQUELINE :
JEAN PEREIRA the Executor, by the Sheriff of Grampian, :
Highland and Islands at Elgin on the 8th day of August, ;

2006.
Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Assistant Registrar



No. 2006/PRO/npr/00021

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the ;

date hereof.

Signed
D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

deceased. |

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY :
P.O. BOX N-167 :
Nassau, The Bahamas
February 8th, 2007 :

Probate Division

| 2007/PRO/npr/00022

In the Estate of LILLIAN KIMBALL late of the County of
Maricopa in the State of Arizona, one of the States of the :

United States of America,

: -NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of }
: fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be :
: made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in its Probate ;
Side by GILBERT ANSELM THOMPSON, of Chancery :
House, The Mall, in the city of Freeport, Grand Bahama, ;
The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney ;
in The Bahamas, for obtaining the Resealed Grant of :
Letters of Personal Representative in the above estate :
granted to BETTIE KENNEDY the Personal
Representative, the Superior Court of the State of Arizona ;
: in and for the County of Maricopa USA, on the 21st day :

of March 2006 i

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Assistant Registrar

i

SUPREME COURT :
PROBATE REGISTRY :
P.O. BOX N-167 :
Nassau, The Bahamas :
February 8th, 2007 :
Probate Division :

: Whereas DUNCAN ANTHONY IRWIN DE BARROS of
i No. 7 Sky End, Eastern Estates in the Eastern District of
i the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
deceased. ;

: to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of

i _ NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of :
: fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be :
: made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its ;
: Probate Division by LOUREY C. SMITH, of #4 George :
: Street in the City of Nassau in the Island of New :
: Providence, The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the ;
? Authorizes Attorney in The Bahamas, for obtaining the :
Resealed Grant of Letters of Administration in the above :
estate granted to SHERYLL JEAN SECORD the Executrix, ;
by the Circuit Court for Pinellas County of Florida, USA, :

2006/PRO/npr/00029

In the Estate of RUTH E. SECORD late of Clearwater,
Pinellas County, Florida, USA,

on the 6th day of June 2005.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Assistant Registrar



SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY :

198 P.O. BOX N-167
) t Nassau, The Bahamas :
; February 8th, 2007
Probate Division :

i the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application '

: to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Assistant Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007 :

: Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the Real and }

: Personal Estate of NEVILLE HOLLAND MAJOR late of |!
Whereas PAMELA L. KLONARIS and MIKE A. :
KLONARIS both of the Western District of the Island of :
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth ;
: of The Bahamas have made application to the Supreme :
: Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration with
: the Will annexed of the Real and Personal Estate of ;
? RICARDO SABOIA KHURY late of Avenida Parana 33, ;
? Apartment 1680035-130, Curitiba, Brazil, deceased. :

No. 2006/PRO/npr/00031

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
: by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the ;
} date hereof. i
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION :
February 8th, 2007 :

Be

Whereas PRINCE ALBERT STUBBS of St. Vincent Road :
Western District, New Providence, one of the Islands of :
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, the Only Child, has
made application to the Supreme Court of the Bahamas, :
for letters of administration of the real and personal estate
of AREBELLA STUBBS late of St. Vincent Road, Western :
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the :
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. :

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

No. 2006/PRO/npr/00032

deceased.

| No. 2006/PRO/npr/00039

i No. 2006/PRO/npr/00040

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :
PROBATE DIVISION :
February 8th, 2007 :

: to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of

: Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of LEON

Whereas ALFRED DANIELS, of Buttercup Lane, South |
Beach Estates in the Southern District of the Island of ;
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth i
of The Bahamas; has made application to the Supreme
: Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of
: the Real and Personal Estate of CHARMAINE NATASHA :
DANIELS late of No. 76 Sunrise Subdivision in the City ;
: of Freeport, on the Island of Grand Bahama, one of the }
! Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. :

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the
date hereof.
Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00034

Whereas CANDICE KING of No. 2 St Lucia Crescent,
Elizabeth Estates in the Eastern District of the Island of
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of
the Real and Personal Estate of WINIFRED GIBSON late
of No. 2 St Lucia Crescent, Elizabeth Estates in the
Eastern District of the Island of New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

: Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
i by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

ED

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00035

Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application

Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of JANET
BERYL DEBAROS No. 7 Sky End, Eastern Estates in the
Eastern District of the Island of New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALJH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2006/PRO/npr/00038

February 8th, 2007

Whereas ANASTASIA PATRICE FERGUSON of 386.

Eaton Road, Yellow Elder Gardens in the Western District

of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of |

Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of ROSIE °

. | CLEARE FERGUSON late of No. 7 Sky End, Eastern
deceased. :
: Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
: NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of :
: fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be :
: made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its ;
Probate Side by RHONDA L. C. HULL, of the Township :
of Marsh Harbour, Abaco, The Bahamas, Attorney-At-
Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas, for :
obtaining the Resealed Grant of Letters of Administration
in the above estate granted to ARTHUR P. W. CONNELLY :
: the Personal Representative, by the Circuit Court for :
: Hillsborough County in the State of Florida, USA, on the :
i 30th day of August 1993.

Estates in the Eastern District of the Island of New
The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

a ———L—LK

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

THE SUPREME COURT },

PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007

Whereas FEDNER J. DORSETAL of St. Albans Drive in

the Western District of the Island of New Providence, one |

of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas

has made application to the Supreme Court of The |;

Chase Avenue in the Western District of the Island of |,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth

of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard

by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

Ban

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007

Whereas LEOTHA CLYDE of the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application

ANDY BROWN late of 20101 SW 84th Avenue, Miami,
Florida, United States of America, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar



- THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

ec
i

GN-456



SUPREME COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00041

Whereas ARENETTA N. DAVIS of No. 63 Royal
Palm Way and Sea Breeze Lane, Lucayan Beach
Subdivision in the City of Freeport, on the Island of
Grand Bahama, one of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration
of the Real and Personal Estate of ZENDRE KATHI
MAJOR late of No. 63 Royal Palm Way and Sea
Breeze Lane, Lucayan Beach Subdivision in the
City of Freeport, on the Island of Grand Bahama,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 21
days from the date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF. THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00042

Whereas BASIL THOMPSON of Pyfrom Road, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of
WILLARD THOMPSON late of Pyfrom Road, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth

“of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
February 8th, 2007

Probate Division
2006/PRO/npr/00043

In the Estate of EUGENE V. DELUCA (a.k.a.)
EUGENE V. DE LUCA), late of the city of Haverford
in the State of Pennsylvania, United States of
America,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
in the Probate Division by ELLEN SERVILLE of
No. 13 East Avenue North, in the Eastern District
of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-
At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas
for obtaining the Resealed Grant of Letters
Testamentary in the above estate granted to DONNA
D. K. VOIGT (named in the said Will as DONNA
VOIGT), the Executrix, by the Registrar of Wills
Delaware County, Pennsylvania, on the 8th day of

~ January 2004.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00044

Whereas C. YYETTE MCCARTNEY-PEDROCHE
of Skyline Drive, in the Western District of the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for Letters of Administration with the Will annexed
of the Real and Personal Estate of JEAN MARIE
CLAUDE FROTIER (a.k.a.) JEAN-MARIE FORTIER
late of 3663 Riverside Drive, Suite 504 Windsor,
Ontario, Canada, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
February 8th, 2007

Probate Division
2006/PRO/npr/00045

In the Estate of HOPE L.. FISHER late of
MANHATTAN in the State of New York, U.S.A.
_ deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
on its Probate Side by LOUREY C. SMITH of No.
#4 George Street in the City of Nassau in the Island
of New Providence, The Bahamas, Attorney-At-
Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas, for

obtaining the Reasealed Grant of Certificates of -

Small Estates in the above estate granted to
PATRICIA A. MCCRAY the Executrix, by the
Surrogate’s Court of New York in the State of New
York, USA, on the 3rd day of May 2005.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Assistant Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00046

Whereas ROSINA FORBES of the Settlement of
Eight Mile Rock on the Island of Grand Bahama,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, one of the Beneficiaries named in the
said Will, has made application to the Supreme
Court of the Bahamas, for letters of administration
with the Will annexed of the real and personal estate
of JOSEPH SAMUEL LINDEN late of the Settlement
of West End, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 21
days from the date hereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
February 8th, 2007

Probate Division
2006/PRO/npr/00047

In the Estate of ELIZABETH G. MEINERS late of
11423 Holly Court in the City of Kansas City in the
State of Missouri, USA,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
in the Probate Side by WILLIAM P. HOLOWESKO
of East Lyford Lane, Western District, New
Providence, The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the
Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas, for obtaining
the Resealed Grant of Letters Testamentary in the
above estate granted to CHRISTOPHER MOHART
the Personal Representative, by the Probate Court
in the State of Missouri, USA, on the 28th day of
June 2004.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Assistant Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00048

Whereas ANDREW G. WELLS of the Eastern District
of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for Letter of Administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of HERCULES HARDING late of Moore’s
Wharf of the Island of New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 7B

(for) Registrar
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00049

Whereas JAMES ALEXANDER RAHMING of
Stapledon Gardens in the Western District of the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made
application to the Supreme court of The Bahamas,
for Letters of Administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of GLADYS RAHMING late of Bias Street,
off Baillou Hill Road in the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence, one of the Island of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

Signed
N Neilly
(for) Registrar

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
February 8th, 2007

Probate Division
2006/PRO/npr/00050

In the Estate of JUDY O’NEIL (a.k.a) JUDITH ANN
O’NEIL, late of 269 Road 11 East, Woodslee, in
the Province of Ontario, Canada, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
in the Probate Division by NEVILLE BERNARD
WILCHOMBE II of Chancery House, The Mall, in
the City of Freeport on the Island of Grand Bahama,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, The Authorized Attorney
in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed
Certificate of Appointment of Estate Trustee With
A Will in the above estate granted to ELIZABETH
ANN O’NEIL, the Persnal Representative, by the
Superior Court of Justice, Ontario, on the 6th day
of May 2004..

_ Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

._., SUPREME COURT
_, PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
February 8th, 2007

Probate Division
2006/PRO/npr/00051

In the Estate of THOMAS G. BURKE (a.k.a)
THOMAS GERALD BURKE, late of Village of Rye
Brook in the County of Westchester in the State of
New York, one of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
in the Probate Division by HARTIS EUGENE
PINDER of No. 4 George Street in the City of
Nassau, in the Island of New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed Grant of
Probate in the above estate granted to HELEN W.
BURKE, the Executrix, by the State of New York,
County of Westchester, Surrogate’s Office, on the
9th day of April 1997.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Assistant Registrar

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
February 8th, 2007

Probate Division
2006/PRO/npr/00052

In the Estate of EDWARD LEVERNE HAMBLETON
late of 1227 Sherbrooke Street, Montreal in the
Province of Quebe, Canada,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
in the Probate Division by LOUREY CLAUDETTE.
SMITH of No. 4 George Street in the City of Nassau,
in the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-
At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas
for obtaining the Resealed Judgment of Probate in
the above estate granted to JANET ELAINE
RANKIN, the Executrix, by the Superior Court of
Canada, Province of Quebec, on the 13th day of
January 2005.

Signed

Desiree Robinson
(for) Assistant Registrar



ee ee



a ee —_
: —— os ee

Two in ©

court —
FROM page one

Russell was shot in the
chest at the Fantasy Night-
club on Madeira Street when
two gunmen entered the club
around lam. He was taken to
hospital where he died a short

. time later. ;
Both men were also }

charged with armed robbery.
According to a court docket,
they both on Thursday, Janu-
ary 25, while armed with a
handgun, robbed Shervin

‘Miller. Jr of -a 1999 Ford

Explorer valued at $5,000.
The men were not
required to plead and the

‘matters were adjourned to

February 22 and transferred

~ to Court 10 Nassau Street.

After the men wére
arraigned, attorney Johnson
said he had been informed
that his client some time yes-
terday had been taken to a
doctor where blood samples
were taken from him against
his will.

Mr Johnson made an appli-
cation to have the samples
destroyed. He said he had no

’ knowledge that blood sam-

ples were going to be taken :

from his client.

The magistrate noted the
application. Mr Johnson also
filed a formal complaint in
court yesterday for assault of
blood.

Armbrister -was also

arraigned yesterday on sepa- 4
rate charges of armed rob- +

bery, housebreaking, stealing

and receiving. ,

It is alleged that on Tues-

day, January 16, he robbed i

Anton Smith of $700. It is also: -
alleged that on Friday, : ©

December 1, 2006, he broke: :
into the home of Richard ;

mit a felony.

There it is alleged that he :
stole a black 12-gauge shot- i ~
gun valued at $400, the prop- :-
erty of Richard Parker. He i:

Parker with the intent to com- |;

was also charged.with receiv- i
ing the gun knowing that it }
was obtained by a‘an offence.

Armbrister.pleaded not }
guilty to all charges and the }
matters were adjourned to. }




May 9 and transferred to }
~Court 10 Nassau Street. :

en EL ENTE ee,

FROM page one

rule extension,’ Mr Ingraham
said that Mr Wilchcombe
should simply apologise for his
comments.

Mr Ingraham was speaking
at the FNM Grand Bahama
Women’s Prayer Breakfast at
Christ the King Church Hall on
Saturday.

The US Western Hemispher-
ic Travel Initiative (WHTI),
which was implemented on Jan-
uary 24, requires all US citizens
to have a passport to re-enter
the United States.

There has been great concern
among tourism officials
throughout the Caribbean that
the implementation of the trav-
el initiative would discourage
Americans from travelling

‘abroad, and impact the tourism

industry in terms of revenue

and jobs losses.

Mr Ingraham said the US
government decided it wanted
to make sure all Americans

- coming back home, if they trav-

elled abroad, had a passport.

He ‘stated that included the
Bahamas, the Caribbean, Cana-
da and Mexico,

Mr Ingraham said no coun-
try -. America,.the Bahamas, or
any democratic country - can
stop its citizens from returning
back home.

“You may be inconve-
nienced, but once you can show
and prove you are an Ameri-
can citizen, you will get back
home. Just as you come to the
Bahamas, if you can show you
are Bahamian you will be back
home.

“Obie Wilchcombe went up
to Washington, and The Tri-

ea ee ee ee ee te, ee ee ——= +



bune was duped into the story
which says ‘Wilchcombe con-
vinces members of US Congress
to extend implementation peri-
od for the Caribbean.’

“That’s a very big man we’ve

got,” Mr Ingraham said, mock- -
ingly. “Not the Prime Minister, °

Affairs, not Jamaica, ngt Bar-
bados, not Trinidad, bag Obie

not the Minister of i
Wilchcombe from Wes

nd!

“He went up there and got
the US Congress to change
American law! Do you know
how hard it is to get the

Bahamas to change our laws?”

he said.

Mr Ingraham further quoted:
“The Bahamas and the rest of
the Caribbean have been given
a 30-days respite from US new
passport rule with the prospects

Casino workers’ sick-out

FROM page one

yesterday Mr Ferguson said he was unaware
that the meeting was to take place.

He also placed the situation squarely on Mr
Sands’ shoulders, saying that when he was pro-
moted to his new position, Mr Sands decided
that he could reduce the workers’ Christmas
bonus from two weeks to one week without
consulting the union.

Mr Ferguson said that in various public pro-
nouncements Mr Sands had said that the hotel’s
revenue had increased in 2006, a fact which
gives him no justification for discontinuing one
week of Christmas bonus.

“There was no economic situation to justify
the ‘dismal position he was predicting. Even if

_there was a reason to do it there ought to have

‘been consultation with the parties. You just
can’t discontinue a benefit a worker would have
had for the past 10 years,” the union leader
said. °

Mr Ferguson said the respect previous owners
of the property would have had seems to have
disappeared.

“What used to happen was if the hotel cor-

poration had intended not to pay a bonus they
had already agreed to pay they would have
called the union. The union and the corporation
would have come to an arrangement, the union
would have gone to its members and the union
would say .to its members this reduction would
_take effect having regard to these factors.
“This did not happen. Mr Sands has been
with the Wyndham for a very long time and I do
not know why.he would have taken this
approach,” Mr Ferguson said.
Mr Sands said that the sick-out was intended
‘to disrupt service to customers, particularly in

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the casino on perhaps the property’s second
busiest weekend of any year.
“We have called the meeting to discuss our

concerns and to hear what concerns they may
have and we will certainly listen to them jj also
outline what we consider to be the for-

ward. :

“We are now aware, Mr Ferguson, president
of the Bahama Hotel Managerial Association,
has been agitating this group and we think it is
unfortunate that that is taking place.

“A number of persons participated in it. How-
ever, I am very happy to say it was almost seam-
less in terms of the impact on our customers.
Our services went on without disruption,” Mr
Sands said.

The number of staff since last Wednesday
participating in the sick-out, Mr Sands said, is
increasing.

“Tt was an escalating increase of persons —
last night was Superbowl — but there was no
impact on our ability to operate and deliver
service to our customers within the
casino. ;

“We are concerned by the action and Geet
ing of all the team members will be held4t 2pm
on Tuesday,” Mr Sands said.

Mr Sands had suggested that there would be
consequences for those persons participating
in the sick-out. Yesterday, the hotelier said
management is reviewing the situation.

“We had at the time said we would be very
concerned and disappointed if persons partici-
pated. We’re in the process of reviewing the
situation that took place between Wednesday
and last night.

“We will make a statement to that effect (as
to the consequences) as soon as we find a posi-
tion after we review the entire weekend,” Mr
Sands said.



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Ingraham criticises Wilchcombe over passport rule statements

of gaining a further year long
delay to the new requirement
for region.”

“Now, we know that is not
true,” he added, “The US
ambassador made a statement
that no waiver has taken place
and none was contemplated.

“Why wouldn’t Mr Wilch-
combe just simply say I’m sorry
for telling you a lie, I made it up
in my own head, it’s not a mis-
take, it’s not misleading, I just
lied to you — you caught me
lying!”

Tourism Minister Wilch-

combe and US Ambassador -

John Rood held a joint press
conference on February 1 to
clear up confusion about the
government’s announcement
that it had obtained a 30-day
waiver on the US’ new passport
rule.

Mr Rood and Mr Wilch-
combe agreed that terminolo-
gy used in the announcement
may have been misleading.
They went on to explain that



EDM leader
Hubert Ingraham

the WHTI, which requires US
citizens to obtain a passport for
all international air travel, is in
place, but that it is being imple-
mented in a flexible manner.

Man is killed in

three-vehicle collision.

FROM page one

The driver of the Toyota Avalon died at the scene. He has
been identified as Dominic Redhead, 36, of Adelaide Village.
Redhead is the country’s second traffic fatality victim for the year.
Nearly two weeks ago, the country recorded its first traffic fatal-
ity victim of the year when Anthony McPhee, 30, of Market
Street, was killed after losing control of his car and crashing into

a wall on East Street.

FROM page one

the Bahama Journal that the
shuffle was provoked by the
conduct of certain officers in

relation to the arrest of the .

five baggage handlers.

“No, no, no...when you see
the changes you'll know it had
nothing to do with that,” she
said.

She explained that it is
important for senior offices to
gain experience in other areas
of the force during their
careers.

“From time to time there
are changes in leadership, the
assistant commissioners move
from island to island, and




dati



NASSAU: RAWSON SQUARE, BAY STREET ¢ 240 BAY STREET
ATLANTIS, BEACH TOWER * ATLANTIS, ROYAL TOWERS * MARINA VILLAGE AT ATLANTIS

&



Shuffle

‘there’s a shuffle,” she said.

-. (On Monday, the Bahama:
- Journal reported insiders as
claiming that three officers. -

were to be transferred, one of
them Assistant Commissioner
Mr Reginald Ferguson. :
Mr Ferguson said he had
been “verbally notified” of the
impending transfer.
However, the two other

officers whose names had sur- -

faced in connection with the
reports said they were

unaware of any imminent

reshuffling.






'
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Full Text
PAGE 2, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Vote not just for ourselves
but for future generations

RIME Minister Perry Christie

has announced that the cur-
rent register of voters will come to an
end on March 12. No doubt this will
serve as an incentive for those
Bahamians who have not yet done so
to register for the next general election
only a few months away.

In every run-up to general elections
there are those who inevitably predict
that the slow pace of registration of
voters is an indication that Bahami-
ans are either fed up with the system
or with the political parties or have
simply become apathetic.

Every time they are proven wrong,
but that does not deter them from
making much the same prediction
again. Perhaps the idea is that Bahami-
ans are bound to get fed up with their
democracy at some point and refuse to
vote. Then the negative pundits will at
last be proven right.

Just before the 1997 general elec-
tion one of them came to the conclu-
sion that Bahamians had become fed
up with both political parties and that
1997 would be “the year of the inde-
pendents”.

But Bahamians did register - some:
of them late, as is their wont — and
turned out in droves to vote. The
result was that the FNM, which had
governed extraordinarily well, was
returned with an overwhelming major-
ity (34-6) and not a single indepen-
dent was elected.

ahamians have always been a
highly politicised people and
there was a passionate desire to be
involved even in the days before uni-

versal adult suffrage. In terms of voter |

turnout we have one of the best records
in the.world except for totalitarian
states and democracies where voting
is mandatory.

As a matter of fact, our voting record
is better than that of the three great
English-speaking western democracies.
In the United States only 64 per cent of
qualified citizens voted in the 2004 pres-
idential election and in Britain the
turnout is usually just above 70 per
cent. The Canadians used to be in that

neighbourhood and even higher but

they are now worried that their turnout
‘is declining; it was only 60.5 per cent in
the 2004 election. .

By contrast, the turnout of voters in
The Bahamas in 1997 was almost 93
per cent and in 2002 it was just over



90 per cent. A set of special circum-
stances in 2002 did produce an unusu-
ally high complement of independents
but that is not likely to occur again.

All that being said, it is nevertheless
important that the nation’s leadership at
all levels — political, religious and acad-
emic as well as those who help to mould
public opinion — should continue to edu-
cate younger generations especially and
to agitate for even greater involvement
in the political process.

There is a danger that we can
become too smug, selfish and apathet-
ic and take our good fortune for grant-

‘ed as so many Americans seem to do.

There is also a danger that the lessons

~of our history will be lost and that the

high points of our struggle for democ-
racy will fade in the national memory.

ome older persons never under-
stood and apparently will never



When a voter goes to the polls he is
not just voting for a particular party,
or candidate, or policy, as important
as they are; he is also simply but
powerfully laying claim to all his
privileges; he is affirming his rights as
a citizen, and renewing the democratic
contract with his fellow citizens.





The idea of democracy is always
under attack: some say it is inefficient,
wasteful, slow, sometimes corrupt and |

often exasperating. All of which may —

be true; but wiser heads have also
pointed out that a better system has

yet to be invented.



understand why it is so important that
each and every one of us should par-
ticipate in this grand exercise of
democracy at every opportunity. For-
tunately, they constitute a small minor-
ity.

What is distressing today is to hear
some educated young Bahamians giv-
ing excuses for their failure to partici-
pate in the process, for refusing to reg-
ister and vote.

They say it makes no difference
because nothing changes anyway or
that one vote does not make a differ-
ence or that they see no benefit coming
to them from voting or that all politi-
cians are self-seeking.

Fortunately, they too are in the
minority as many other young people
do participate and some register as
soon as they are qualified. They are a
credit to their parents, their teachers .
and the community. So what makes the
difference?

Are the disenchanted ones victims
of indifferent parents and unenlight-
ened teachers? Or a culture that seems
to them too wrapped up in selfish pur-

suits? Or do they take their cue from
the ivory tower dwellers who like to
pontificate that the political arena is
populated by lesser mortals? Or is it
that they are simply asking for atten-
tion?

o begin with, the excuses do

not hold water. The idea of
democracy is always under attack:
some Say it is inefficient, wasteful,
slow, sometimes corrupt and often
exasperating. All of which may be
true; but wiser heads have also point-
ed out that a better system has yet to
be invented.

Profound changes can be achieved
through democratic political process-
es and this has been demonstrated all
over the world as well as ini our own lit-
tle country.

The availability of expanding educa-
tional opportunities in The Bahamas
over the last 40 years has been just one
positive result of political action.

The system can sometimes take on
unwelcome accretions but it also has
self-correcting mechanisms, including
public debate, the law and the ballot.
The system can be exploited by rascals
but there are remedies for that as well.

That is why people who are not so
fortunate as to have a long tradition of
democracy will walk miles and even
risk life and limb at the first opportunity
to cast their ballots.

ALL YOUR DECORATING |

s On The Island”

They know that it is easier to get rid
of a would-be dictator in the democra-
tic system than to get rid of an
entrenched dictator in a totalitarian
state.

But beyond the multitude of partic-
ular changes that can be made through
the democratic procéss is the preser-
vation of the system itself.

hen a voter goes to the polls

he is not just voting for a
particular party, or candidate, or policy,
as important as they are;.he is also sim- .
ply but powerfully laying claim to all his
privileges; he is.affirming his rights as a
citizen, and renewing the democratic
contract with his fellow citizens.

Another good reason why enlight-
ened citizens of all ages and all social
and economic backgrounds go to the
polls to vote is that they understand
that they are part of a community
and responsible for the community.
Some people of very humble back-
ground and limited exposure under-
stand this, so it is perplexing that
some with high education and wide
exposure do not.

Each one of us has responsibility not
just for himself but to the entire com-
munity. That may be a difficult con-
cept for some people to absorb in these
days of rampant individualism and fre-
netic self-seeking. They scoff at the
idea that real nobility is about con-
tributing more than you receive from
the common wealth.

ur responsibility for the com-

mon good also transcends our
own generation and our own time. Just
as we who live today benefit from the
sacrifices and labour of our ancestors,
imperfect though they were, so we too
have a responsibility to leave a legacy
for those we will never know.

That is why an old man in a remote
part of Africa limps to the polls on a
crude crutch. He may be dead the next
day but he has done his duty to the
next generation.

He is educated. He is reaponeble:
He is enlightened.

He has a sense of history and a sense
of the future, a belief in the oneness
of all humankind and all generations.

He has paid his debt to his ancestors
and he has left a legacy for those who
will proudly call him ancestor.

sirarthurfoulkes@hotmail.com
bahamapundit.typepad.com

Activities to

mark Special .

Education
Week

EDUCATION officials have
launched a series of activities
to mark Special Education
Week.

The celebrations began on
Sunday with a church service a
the Bahamas Christian Fellow-
ship on Carmichael Road.

Today at 10am, the week will
be officially opened by Minister

.of Education Alfred Sears, fol-

lowed by a special students
exhibition at the Ministry of
Education on Thompson Boule-
vard.

On Wednesday at noon a lun-
cheon for special educators will
be held at Worker’s House on
Tonique Williams-Darling Dri-
ve.

On Thursday at 6.30pm, a

‘parents night will be held at

Stephen Dillet Primary School
on Wulff Road and Windsor
Lane.

On Friday, a performance
called “Culture Expressions”
will be held at the National
Centre for the Performing Arts
under the patronage of Dr
Corolyn L, Sands.

‘Young man

in hospital
following
shooting

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama Police are investigat-
ing a shooting that occurred in
West End early Sunday morn-
ing when shots fired into a
crowd struck a young man.

Henry Saunders, a 21-year-
old resident of West End, was in
the area of the Star Night Club
around 12.15am when he was
shot.

He is presently at Rand
Memorial Hospital in stable
condition with injuries to his
right thigh. —

According to Inspector
Loretta Mackey, Saunders was
among a crowd of people gath-
ered in the street near the night-
club.

Ms Mackey said some per-
sons in the crowd were throwing
bottles and fighting when a
vehicle attempted to pass.

She said occupants of the
vehicle told persons in the street
to move, but they refused.

. Then,.Ms Mackey said, an

occupant of the vehicle fired
three shots from a handgun into
the crowd, hitting Mr Saunders
in the upper right thigh.

The victim was taken to the
West End Clinic, and then later
transported by ambulance to
the Rand.

Inspector Mackey said inves-
tigations are continuing into is
shooting.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 3



Ed
Atlantis claims not posting jobs

due to ‘miscommunication’

Ooln brief

50-year-old |
man dies on
conching
expedition

A 50 year-old man
drowned over the weekend
while on a conching trip just
off Mangrove Cay Andros.

One of the two persons
was in the water, the other
in the vessel.

As the:man in the vessel
moved the boat, he report-
edly fell overboard and
downed.

Police say they have inves-
tigated the matter, ruling out
foul play.

Florida man
arrested on.
boat with

immigrants

FREEPORT - A Florida
resident was arrested along
with 13 suspected illegal
immigrants onboard a speed-
boat two miles off Grand
Bahama over the weekend.

Inspector Loretta Mack-
ey, assistant press liaison offi-
cer, said a team of officers
from the Drug Enforcement
and the Harbour Police were
on routine patrol onboard
the HPB-1 on Saturday when
they observed a 25-foot ves-
sel with several persons
onboard.

She said the captain of the
vessel began acting in a sus-
picious manner so officers
beckoned him to stop.

When the vessel was
stopped, officers boarded it
and reportedly discovered
that the 13 persons on board
were Brazilian nationals.

Inspector Mackey said the
‘nine men and four women,
along with the captain —- who
is of Brazilian descent, and a
resident of Pompano Beach,
Florida — were taken into
custody.

The vessel was confiscat-
ed and the migrants were
handed over to immigration
officials for further investi-
gations.

Two men
arrested
after boat
pursuit

A HIGH-SPEED boat
chase on Sunday ended with
the arrest of two Bahamian
men and the seizure of 15
pounds of suspected cocaine.

According to . police
reports, a team of officers
from the Drug Enforcement
Unit and the Harbor Police
were on routine boat patrol
around 9am about four miles
off shore, near the Running
Mon Marina, when they
observed a speedboat with
two dark men onboard.

The captain of the vessel
reportedly began acting in a
suspicious manner and
refused to stop when beck-
oned by officers.

It is alleged that the sec-
ond man then ran towards
the bow of the vessel and
threw a black knapsack-type
bag into the water.

The Captain kept driving
at a high rate of speed, the
officers reported.

Police eventually inter-
cepted the boat, boarded the
vessel, told the captain of
their suspicion and conduct-
ed a search.

Nothing illegal was found
onboard.

The suspects, both from
Bimini and aged 24 and 31,
were detained and the ves-
sel secured.

Inspector Loretta Mackey
said the officers returned to
_ the area where the suspected
bag was thrown into the
water. After retrieving bag
from the water, officers dis-
covered six black taped pack-
ages, containing a substance
suspected of being cocaine
and a cellular telephone
charger.

The suspects were placed
under arrest and cautioned,
and 15 pounds of drugs were
seized.

The suspected drugs and
the men were transported to
New Providence on Monday.

Police investigations into
the matter continue.

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@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE failure of Atlantis to
post certain jobs on its website
— making it impossible for the
public to apply - was due to
internal miscommunication, a
company representative has
-claimed.

The explanation comes amid

claims that the fact that some
listings - and hence the means
of applying for some positions —
could not be found on the site
was evidence of discrimination
against Bahamians by Atlantis
when hiring for certain posi-
tions. -
It was alleged that this covert
discrimination is also achieved
through the advertising of jobs
in the newsapers, the specifics of
which are purposefully tailored
to correspond to an individual
they have already. chosen —
often from abroad.

The specificity of the require-
ments in the print advertise-
ment then makes it highly
unlikely that any member of the
Bahamian public would fit the
description.

Ed Fields, public relations
representative at the resort,
spoke strongly against any alle-
gations of discrimination.

Mr Fields told The Tribune
yesterday that the fact the post-
ings did not appear on the
Atlantis website — the only
medium through which people
can submit applications for jobs
within the resort — was simply a
temporary oversight.

“Due to internal issues and a
communication miscue, the job
offerings for our nightclubs
were advertised (in the news-
paper) prior to going through
the internal process required
for posting online,” he said.

“We expect the positions to
be posted by no later than
tomorrow,” he added.

Mr Fields also said that the
claim that Atlantis tailors job
advertisements to the specifica-
tions of pre-selected individu-
als is “absolutely incorrect”.

i. « A number of people had con-

tacted The Tribune in the last
two weeks to complain that the
postings — including one for a
disc jockey, one for a “flair
mixologist” (or cocktail spe-
cialist), and one for a “VIP serv-
er/model” — were not available
to the public.

Furthermore, when Bahami-
an DJ Joey Jamz subsequently
called an Atlantis department
to inquire as to how he could
go about applying for the disc
jockey position, he alleges he
was told by a‘staff member that
it was a position for which no

Bahamian is qualified.

His claims correspond with
reports from several sources
that there is a tendency within
Atlantis to overlook Bahami-
ans when seeking people to fill
certain jobs.

Requirements

Elaborating on the sugges-
tion that certain requirements
in the job listings are included
with the sole aim of excluding
Bahamian applicants, the DJ
described the situation as
“unfair."

A specification within the DJ
job listing that the applicant has



had “exposure to an interna-
tional audience with a personal
high end celebrity type follow-
ing” is one that Atlantis would
likely be aware no Bahamian
DJs other than himself -
despite several being well-qual-
ified with regard to all other
specifications — would have, he
claimed.

“How many of us, in our little
country, have had exposure to
international audiences, besides
me? How many of us have a
celebrity following, besides me?
It’s not fair to advertise in such
a way where they know that no
other Bahamian is qualified.
They do it so they can bring in
the foreigners,” he said.

Bahamas in top 20 for world’s
highest prison populations



THE Bahamas has one of the
highest prison population rates
in the world, according to a new
study.

It is listed in the world’s top
20 along with 11 other nations
in the Caribbean region.

The study, by the Interna-
tional Centre for Prisons Stud-
ies at King’s College, London,
puts the USA at the top of the
list, with Russia second and the
Caribbean region third.

Twelve Caribbean region
countries, including Bermuda,
feature in the world’s top 20. St
Kitts and Nevis is third globally,
with 547 prisoners per 100,000
people compared with the US’s
738.

Apart from the Bahamas,
other Caribbean countries in
the top 20 are Belize, Cuba,
the British Virgin Islands,
Bermuda, the Cayman Islands,

Dominica, Barbados, Nether-
lands Antilles, Puerto Rico and
Suriname.

The Caribbean nations out-
side the top 50 are Haiti,
Jamaica, Martinique, Guyana
and the Dominican Republic.

Haiti has the lowest prison
population rate in the region,
with only 43 inmates for every
100,000 people.

The study revealed that more
than nine million people are
held in penal institutions around
the world - 250,000 more than
18 months ago.

The BBC reported Anton
Schelupanov, a research asso-
ciate at King’s College, as saying
that thé figures were not good
news for the region.

It meant penal policy was
biased towards imprisonment
instead of less costly communi-
ty sentences, he said.

@ FOX Hill Prison is the only
prison in the Bahamas — now
named as having one of the
highest prison populations per
100,000 people



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“We have qualified Bahami- .

ans who would love to be over
there working — people who are
qualified,” he said.

Joey himself had wanted to
apply for the position after
being personally alerted by Per-
cy Sweeting, president of the
Bahamas Musicians and Enter-
tainment Union, and Ms Dar-
nelle Wards, director of enter-
tainment at Atlantis, of the job’s
availability.

However, his attempts were
foiled.-Aside from difficulties in
accessing an application form,

and claims that "no Bahamian is
qualified for this position", an
Atlantis staff member allegedly
informed him that Atlantis had
a policy of not-re-hiring employ-
ees who have been previously
“let go”.

The DJ had his contract ter-
minated at the resort around
three years ago, after six years
of performing. However, he
says he has since played venues
there on a one-off basis, and
questioned why the company
would be imposing that restric-
tion at this stage.

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

ee ee Level with the
Bahamian people

AGE 4, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007 THE TRIBUNE



Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K. C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991 .

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-198
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Oe

Barack Obama’s race dilemma

THE LATEST CONTROVERSY involv-
ing Joe Biden confirmed the obvious about
the senator from Delaware: Glibness has its
risks.

It also revealed something about Barack
Obama: The African-American senator from
Illinois isn’t sure how to handle race as an
issue in his bid for the White House.

The last time Biden ran for president, he
dropped out after admitting that he borrowed
lines from an inspirational speech given by a
British politician. Twenty years later, his own
words undercut his announcement of another
try. In a shoot-from-the-lips interview with
the New York Observer, Biden described
Obama as “the first mainstream African-
American who is articulate and bright and
clean and a nice-looking guy.” ,

The words are controversial because they
are an honest, if awkwardly stated, expres-
sion of the white establishment view of”
African-American politicians who preceded
Obama — that their looks, speech, or lifestyle
turned off white voters, making them une-
lectable on the national stage.

Obama’s first reaction was restrained. “I
didn’t take it personally and I don’t think he
intended to offend,” he said: “But the way
he constructed the statement was probably a
little unfortunate.”

Later in the day, after other African-Amer-
ican politicians did take it personally, Obama
issued a much stronger statement: “I didn’t
take Senator Biden’s comments personally,
but obviously they were historically inaccu-
rate,” he said. “African-American presidential
candidates like Jesse Jackson, Shirley
Chisholm, Carol Moseley Braun and Al
Sharpton gave a voice to many important
issues through their campaigns and no one
would call them inarticulate.”

In short, Obama’s first instinct was to let
the remarks go, rather than use them to beat
up on Biden. He recalculated only after oth-
er African-American politicians reacted with
less understanding. For example, when Biden
called to apologize, Sharpton said, “I told
him I take a bath every day.” Eventually,
Obama realized that anything less than con-
demnation would make him sound insensi-
tive to perceived racism. *

In some ways, Obama’s political calcula-
tion when it comes to race is no different than
Hillary Clinton’s when it comes to gender or
Mitt Romney’s when it comes to religion.

Should the candidate bluntly label a com- -

ment sexist or, in Romney’s case, anti-Mor-
mon? Or, does the candidate decide there is
more to be gained by taking the high ground












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and letting voters draw their own conclusion
about the appropriateness of a remark?

But Obama’s political dilemma includes a
curious twist.

He doesn’t want to be perceived strictly as
a “black” candidate anymore than Clinton
wants to be defined strictly as a female can-
didate. To be successful, a presidential can-
didate needs broad appeal, beyond race, or
gender.

At the same time, Obama is dealing with
the sentiment expressed recently by black
author Debra J. Dickerson that “Obama isn’t
black.” This is a distinction rooted in Obama’s
heritage — he is the American-born son ofa
black father from Kenya and a white mother
from Kansas — as opposed to African-Amer-
icans descended from slaves.

If Obama allows a perceived racial insult to
go unchallenged, the only African-American
candidate in the 2008 presidential race risks
offending African-American voters who are
already ambivalent about his candidacy. If
Obama labels every insult racist, he risks
offending white voters.

Deval Patrick faced similar challenges dur-
ing the 2006 governor’s race in Massachu-
setts. He said he did not want to be “the black
candidate.” He distanced himself from others
who labelled his opponent’s tactics racist or
“race-baiting.” However, Patrick did not have
to deal with the added complication that Oba-
ma confronts via heritage. African-American
voters embraced him and helped elect him
governor.

Biden’s long shot candidacy to be presi-
dent faces a new challenge after the New
York Observer interview. In a flash, the Inter-
net pegged Biden as undisciplined at best and
possibly racist at worst.

Unfortunately, he displays an old-fash-
ioned, establishment way of looking at the
world, whether he is praising Obama as
“bright and clean” at the expense of other
African-American politicians; or praising his
state’s diversity, with last year’s comment
that “You cannot go to a 7-Eleven or a
Dunkin’ Donuts unless you have an Indian
accent.”

Obama appeals naturally to those seeking a
fresh perspective on race and ethnicity. Still,
when race comes up, as it did in Biden’s com-
ments, he faces the old challenge: how to deal
with it.

The same warning applies to Biden and
Obama. Beware loose lips. They can sink any
presidential candidate.

(* This article is by Joan Vennochi of The
Boston Globe — © 2007)

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EDITOR, The Tribune.

VERY soon, the people of
The Bahamas will go to the polls
and cast a critical ballot. They

_ will decide whether or not to

endorse the administration of
the Rt Hon Perry G Christie for
another five-year term or to
return the Rt Hon Hubert A
Ingraham to the office of Prime
Minister...It is an important day,
and I urge all eligible Bahami-
ans to register to have their
voices heard as it relates to their
choice for leader.

The question now arises:
Who is best to lead the Bahamas
at this time? Who is more com-
mitted to telling Bahamians the
truth, as it relates to matters of
national importance, or any
matter?

Who has the strength,
courage, and convictions to
speak truth no matter who it
offends, or how unpleasant it
may be? No spin, no shuffling,
just the plain truth about mat-
ters. Let me say here that I don’t
trust people who get along with
everybody or who everybody
refers to as, “a nice man.” For
me it basically means that
they’re unprincipled and have
no convictions. Principled peo-
ple offend others all the time.
Just ask the great leaders of old,
as a matter of fact it would have
been good if we could have
asked Sir Lynden, who is one of
the planks in one of the major
political party’s campaign. He
would concur that as an effec-
tive leader, it’s inevitable!

Which of these men has the
best leadership style to lead the
country forward in a Bahamas
where a foreign workforce
increasingly sees\the Bahamas
as the place to be, and come in
droves to occupy jobs, which
Bahamians can fill? Which of
these leaders has character,
commitment and honesty as
hallmarks of their make-up?

When these individuals speak
who should the Bahamian peo-
ple believe?

What should the Bahamian
people believe? I say here and

now that it’s time for the decep-_

tions; distortions and misrepre-
sentations to end.

The Bahamian people
deserve better, they deserve the
TRUTH. Instead of broad plat-
itudes, the Bahamian people
deserve the facts.

The Bahamian people
deserve some answers to the
many questions I hear them ask
everyday. Most importantly the
Bahamian people deserve a real
leader! Not one run by commit-
tees, spin, irresponsibility,
incompetence and denials. We
need a leader who answers
questions truthfully and
responds to corruption within
the ranks of his cabinet by giv-
ing the axe to whoever or
whomever that offender might
be. Let me add here, “Anything
with more than one head is a

. monster!”

Will the prime minister please
tell the Bahamian people, what
is the real deal as it relates to
the five baggage handlers? Who







- Paes C@itslewlarsianrereleuaicit



LETTERS




knew what and when did they
know? And if nobody in gov-
ernment knew what: was going
on, which I don’t believe is the
case, what else is going on in
this country of ours that impact
the lives of countiess Bahami-
ans, while our government is
asleep at the wheel? (Their
response is: Nobody in govern-
ment knew what was going on).

Will the prime minister tell
the Bahamian people what his
plans are to stabilise his gov-
ernment, which seems to be
falling apart, piece by piece,
rocked by embarrassing and

‘ridiculous scandals? (This gov-

ernment seems to have no moral
centre or principles).

Will Mr Christie tell the
Bahamian people when will his
government build some new
schools in Nassau and Freeport
in an effort to stem the over-
crowding that presently exists
in the schools we now have.
(Not one new school in four and
a half years, and their response
is that it’s not an issue).

Will the prime minister tell
the Bahamian people why he is
giving away Crown land to for-
eign investors in record num-
bers, when it was him and his
party who severely criticised the

FNM administration for selling -

too much land to foreign
investors like Sol Kerzner, San-
dals, Four Seasons, the hotels
at Port Lucaya and so on?
(These are jobs that people can
see feel and touch, not an
anchor out somewhere). And
will he disclose what the secrecy
clauses are in the heads of
agreement deal done with Bah-
Mar? The Bahamian people
deserve to know, I’m sure it’s
not a matter of national securi-
ty which is one of the only
things that could justify the
information being held from the
Bahamian public. (They say it’s
not an issue).

Will the prime minister please
tell the Bahamian people why
Chinese workers were brought
in to do the expansion on a
school, which is work that
Bahamians can do? (They say
we have a shortage of skilled
carpenters, etc, to do the work.
I know of several unemployed
or underemployed carpenters
and masons and if we do, that
means that BTVI has been a
failure over the years).

Will the prime minister
please tell the Bahamian public
when will his party leave the
media alone and allow them to
do their jobs? ZNS is a disgrace,
they’re extremely biased in their
reporting of the news. I guess
that’s what happens when you
continue to appoint the same
old PLP’s like Calsey Johnson
and others to positions of pow-
er.

Thank God for The Tribune,

‘which is now one of the focuses

of this administration. No less
of a person than the Prime Min-
ister himself made that quite
clear. mS
When will the prime minister
answer any questions with rela-
tion to Neville Wisdom? (Mil-
lion dollar bleaches fiasco, poor
workmanship on low cost

homes, alleged favours for cer-
tain contractors. They say it’s
not an issue).

When will we get the truth
about Minister Shane Gibson _

and the Anna Nicole scandal? . -

What about madam “swift jus-
tice”? Was the Hon Justice cor-
rect in his assertions? Was the
minister who is alleged to have
taken everything from one of
his mistresses, including the toi-
let bowl, ever charged with
breaking and entering?

Why are most of these per-
sons still cabinet ministers? I’m
not gonna even touch Bradley .
Roberts, adultery at a minimum
was evident there, but the
silence of the Christian Coun-
cil on the matter was deafening.
I wonder why? (But they say it
is not an issue). ,

Will the prime minister please
tell us when will Mr Peet be
questioned about what appears
to be a breach of the exchange .
control act? ite

Will the prime minister tell us
whether or not we were delib-
erately misled by the minister
of tourism, Obie Wilchcombe,
with regard to visa issue for
American travellers? We would
like to know, sir, whether or not
you were misled about the fight
in the cabinet room, or you
knew the facts, but chose to mis-
lead the Bahamian people? And
if you were misled by one of you
MP’s or Cabinet Ministers, why
are they still a part of your gov-
ernment? (He said it was more
apparent than real, then he said
it was a push and shove, then
the MP’s came to the public and
admitted to a fight).

Why is it Mr Christie, that in
an election year there are con-
tracts being issued here and con-
tracts being issued there? Here
a million, there two million and
on and on we go. Do you really
think that old tactic still works,
sir? Why is your government
rushing so much legislation
through parliament, that is obvi-
ously not properly thought out,
and affects the lives of so many
Bahamians? If you are so cer-
tain that you will win, what’s the
rush? In my opinion this is care-
less and crazy! (They say it's not
an issue, they are caring, even if
they tax the hell out of you to

‘accomplish it).

When will you stop calling
indecision cautious planning?
When are you gonna stop call-
ing ducked responsibility con-
sultation? Some things don’t
require a committee! When will
the spinning and shuffling stop
and truth rise again?

I urge The Christie Adminis-
tration to level with the Banami-
an people. Moreover, I urge Mr
Christie to level with himsclf.
Face. the facts! Stop the spin-
ning.

Get a grip of the situation.
Then please, oh please, explain
to us all where we are headed as
a country with all this mess.

I supported Mr Christie and
the PLP in the last election, but
enough. I’ve had enough, we’ve
had enough! You, Mr Prime. :,
Minister, and your governmen-: °
t’s departure is at hand!

Bring on Mr Ingraham coz
een long now!

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 5



Mitchell’s
words for
Grenada on
anniversary

m@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

FOREIGN Affairs Minis-
ter Fred Mitchell congratulat-
ed the people of Grenada yes-
terday on the 33rd anniver-
sary of their independence.

Mr Mitchell said: “I want
to extend on behalf of the

_ government of the Bahamas
‘ our warmest congratulations

to the people of Grenada.

‘' They have had a very diffi-

cult time in the last three
years with hurricanes strik-
ing the island (September
2004 and June 2005) and they

. have managed to bounce
_ back quite successfully.”

Before the arrival of Euro-
peans, Grenada was inhabit-
ed by Carib Indians who had
driven the more peaceful

. Arawaks from the island.

Columbus landed on

‘ Grenada in 1498 during his

third voyage to the new
world.

Partly because of the
Caribs, Grenada remained
uncolonised for more than

. 100 years after its discovery.

In 1650, a French company
purchased Grenada from the

. English and established a

small settlement.

The island remained under
French control until its cap-
ture by the British in 1762.
Although. the French

« regained control during the
‘ American War of Indepen-

dence, the island was restored
to Britain in 1783. .
Grenada remained British
for the remainder of the colo-
nial era.
Slavery was outlawed in

_ 1834 and in 1833, Grenada

‘ became part of the British :

' Windward Islands Adminis-

tration.
In 1958, the Windward

“Islands Administration was

dissolved, and Grenada

‘ joined the Federation of the
. West Indies, but the federa-
. tion collapsed in 1962.

Following, under the Asso-

- ciated Statehood Act in 1967
‘Grenada: was-granted full:

autonomy over its internal

affairs in March of that year °

and full independence was
granted on February 7, 1974.

Mr Mitchell said he had
joined the Grenadian com-
munity in the Bahamas on

- Sunday morning for a service

of thanksgiving at St Anselm
Church in Fox Hill. *

Funeral to
-be held for

Tommy

‘Maury

FUNERAL services will
be held for Tommy Maury,
70, at Christ Church Cathe-
dral at 3pm Thursday.

Mr Maury was found dead

- by his only son, Peter, in the

bathroom of his West Bay
Street home on Friday. It is
believed that he had been
dead for two or three days.
No foul play is suspected.
Mr Maury was the son of
the late Mr and Mrs Peter
Maury. Mr Maury, Sr, was
the co-founder of Maury
Roberts & Co, a once well
known liquor firm in Nassau.

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TUESDAY,
FEBRUARY 6TH

6:00 Community page 1540am
11:00 Immediate Response
noon ZNS News Update

12:05 Immediate Response (Cont'd) |

Island Life Destinations
Ethnic Health America
Thousand Dollar Bee
Aqua Kids
Kemp Road Ministries
Ernest Leonard .
Little Robots
Carmen San Diego
ZNS News Update
The Fun Farm
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Seven Seas Informcial
News Night 13
The Bahamas Tonight
Kerzner Today
Bahamas Business Outlook:
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10:30 News Night 13
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
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programme changes!



ampaigner calls on voters to —



VOTERS were yesterday
urged.to give independents a
chance in the upcoming general
election to ensure “real repre-
sentation on real issues.”

Fathers’ rights champion
Clever Duncombe said it was
time to break the deadlock
between the PLP and FNM for
the good of the Bahamas.

Mr Duncombe, who is con-
testing Golden Gates as an
independent, said despite
under-funding he was confident
of unseating Immigration Min-
ister Shane Gibson.

“Having no money is a major
handicap, but J have been
promised support from PLPs
and FNMs,” he said.

“I believe we have the right
message. People have had
enough of makeweight candi-
dates who become MPs and
sometimes go on to become
ministers.

“I think because of this the
entire country is suffering. 1am

We need to break deadlock
between PLP and FNM,
says fathers’ rights activist



hoping voters will
favourably on independents
who can offer true representa-
tion.

“For 40 years we have had
the PLP and FNM and where
has it got us? We are looking
for people with a real vision of
the future and a real grasp of
national issues.”

Mr Duncombe said Mr Gib-
son’s failure to address the
Anna Nicole Smith matter
could be his downfall.

“The world is watching us. If
he gets away with it (fast-track-
ing of her residency permit) it

look.

will do the country no good.

“It leaves a question as to
whether we are a corrupt soci-
ety. It leaves a lot of questions
unanswered and it is not the
type of publicity we need at this
time.”

Mr Duncombe said the Anna
Nicole residency issue still left
“a bad taste” in the mouths of
many Bahamians because of
their own problems in getting
status for their spouses.

“As things stand, it seems
such treatment is a special
arrangement for the rich and
powerful,” he said.

consider picking independents





CLEVER Duncombe

Feasibility of hurricane
insurance for farmers and
fishermen considered

m@ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE MINISTRY of Agri-
culture and Marine Resources
held a workshop at the Wynd-
ham Nassau Resort yesterday
to review the feasibility of insti-
tuting tropical storm and hur-
ricane insurance for farmers and
fishermen throughout the
Bahamas.

Opening the event, Minister
of Agriculture and Marine
Resources Leslie Miller under-
scored the importance of such a
programme.

“As currently proposed,” Mr
Miller said, “the index insur-

‘ance is a contributory pro-

gramme in which farmers and
fishermen will be required to
buy insurance annually. In the
event that a disaster is declared,
the insured farmer or fisherman
will be paid some multiple of
the value of the premium pur-

‘chased by the farmer/fisherman.

“This programme will elimi-
nate the costly delivery and dis-
tribution of relief supplies.
Farmers and fishermen will
have a choice of how to replace,
and what to replace; they will
no longer be limited to the spe-
cific ‘take it or leave it’ relief
currently offered,” he said.

The minister explained that
the workshop is the latest step
his ministry has taken in
advancing a contributory
scheme for farmers and fisher-
men — which reportedly has
been under review for nearly
four years.

“In the past, the combined
responsés received from the
Food and Agriculture Organi-
sation (FAO) and the Bahamas
government have been woeful-
ly inadequate as compensation.

“The ministry receives a bud-
geted line item of $100,000
annually for disaster relief to
farmers. However the estimated
loss to the agricultural sector

eh
Us

Wea eas

Deere,



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from the effects of Hurricane
Floyd was $52 million,” he said.

However, Mr Miller strongly
questioned this _ figure.
“Whether or not the Bahamas
as a country produced $50 mil-
lion dollars worth of food stuff
or agriculture produce for the
Commonwealth of the
Bahamas I don’t know, but
again I want to emphasise that —
$52 million is a lot of money for
farmers to have lost in the last
hurricane.”

However, the minister did say
that $1.1million had been distrib-
uted to farmers and fishermen
after Hurricane Floyd in, 1999, +

Mr Miller said that in general,
there is a grave disparity
between what is allocated for
the sector and what is truly
needed by farmers in the
Bahamas.

“The ministry is now at the

point of once again consulting
with farmers and fishermen.
Your task,” he said, addressing
the out island officers, “will be
to canvas farmers and fisher-
men to determine their level of
interest in this proposed index
insurance scheme.

“This is a noble undertaking;
it is possible a viable response
mechanism in two sectors that
are, for the most part, consid-
ered uninsurable by the com-
mercial insurance industry.

“Limited insurance is cur-
rently available through com-
mercial insurers for agricultural
buildings, large fishing boats
and tractors; however, insur-
ance for crops, fruit trees, live-
stock, tools, nets, condomini-
ums, lobster traps, and fish pots
is not available.

“The greatest proportion of
both farmers and fishermen, are

cr

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now effectively excluded from

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 7



Troops have ‘not
committed human
rights abuses in
Haiti — ambassador

m@ By ALEXANDRIO MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

HAITIAN Ambassador to
the Bahamas Louis Harold
Joseph has denied the accuracy
of reports that United Nations
troops have committed human-
rights abuses in Haiti.

Ambassador Joseph was
speaking at a panel discussion at
the College of the Bahamas,
entitled “Where is Haiti going?”

At the moment, the first con-
cern of the Haitian government
is good governance, he said —
adding that the new adminis-
tration is pursuing this with the
aid of the international com-

munity.

During the question and
answer period, a reporter asked
Ambassador Joseph to com-
ment on reports of human rights
abuses by UN troops and the
growing resistance to what has
been described as the “UN
occupation” of Haiti.

The ambassador replied:
“There is a lot of bad informa-
tion on the Internet about
Haiti.”

In July 2005, the Haiti Infor-
mation Project (HIP), a non-
profit alternative news service,

reported that “in the early
morning hours of July 6, more
than 350 UN troops stormed
the seaside shantytown of Cite
Soleil in a military operation
with the stated purpose of halt-
ing violence in Haiti.”

According to the Associated
Press, a military spokesman for
the UN peacekeeping mission
in Haiti said: “Armed bandits
who had tried to resist were
either killed or wounded.”

But, an HIP source said:
"Today all the popular neigh-
borhoods are under attack.
Neighborhoods like Cite Soleil,
Bel Air and Solino have been
turned into cemeteries since the
February 29, 2004 coup because
they represent the poor and the
majority of the people, who are
committed to the return of Pres-
ident Jean-Bertrand Aristide."

The international medical
group “Doctors without Bor-
ders,” reported that 26 people



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UN operation.

In late 2005, the Wayne State
University School of Social
Work co-ordinated a human
rights study that led a team of
12 Haitian interviewers in sur-
veying 1,260 randomly selected
households in the greater Port-
au-Prince area.

The researchers interviewed
Port-au-Prince residents about
their experiences with human
rights abuses since the installa-
tion of Gerald Latortue as inter-
im prime minister following the
violent overthrow of Haiti's
elected President, Jean-
Bertrand Aristide in February
2004.

Estimate

The report estimates that
8,000 persons were murdered
and around 35,000 were sexual-
ly assaulted in the greater Port-
au- Prince area between Feb-
ruary 2004 and December 2005.

The study found that 21 per
cent of the killings were attrib-
uted to members of the interim
government's Haitian National
Police (HNP), 13 per cent to
the demobilised army and 13
percent to anti-Lavalas gangs
such as Lame Timachet. Most
of the remainder of the viola-
tions were attributed to crimi-
nal elements.

The study also found there
has been a high degree of sexu-
al violence since Aristide's
ouster — much of it committed
by anti-Lavalas political actors.

Several other human rights
studies, such as those conducted
by the Miami University of Law
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found the interim government
and paramilitary forces guilty
of extra-judicial violence.

In February 2006, US Con-
gresswoman Maxine Waters
denounced what she described
as “obvious attempts” to steal
the general elections in Haiti.

Congresswoman Waters said:
“The anti-Aristide forces have
done everything in their power
to imprison the leaders of the
Lavalas Party and deny Lavalas
leaders their right to run for
office and their right to voice
their opposition to the Group
of 184, the Provisional Electoral
Council, the puppet govern-
ment, the International Repub-
lican Institute, and others who
are determined to undermine
democracy in Haiti.”

And at the end of 2006, again
the Haiti Information Project
reported that UN forces had
attacked Cite Soleil in the early
morning hours of December 22
and killed more than 30 people
including women and children.

HIP commented: “The irony
is that the attack on Decem-
ber 22 seems to have been trig-
gered, not by a surge in kid-
nappings as claimed by the UN,
but by another massive demon-
stration of Lavalas supporters
that began in Cite Soleil.
About 10,000 people demon-
strated a few days before for
the return of president Aris-
tide in a clear condemnation
of what they called the foreign
military occupation of their
country.”

This year, several grass-roots
groups in Haiti, including Con-
federation des Travailleurs Hai-
tiens (Confederation of Haitian
Workers) and Femmes Vic-
times Debout (Women Victims
Stand Up) have called for Feb-

ruary 7 to be commemegated

as International Day inSoli-
darity with the People of Ffaiti.

The groups are demanding
an end to the “US/UN occu-
pation of Haiti” a stop to the
killings, sexual abuse and
massacres of the poor by UN
troops, police and paramili-
tary elements under police
control and the return of

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between UN peacekeepers and‘gang members at the Cite-Soleil district in Port-au-Prince on

Wednesday, January 24

President Aristide.

On Thursday, Ambassador
Joseph told the audience of stu-
dents and academics that the

René Preval-led Haitian gov-
ernment had recently requested
$7 billion from the internation-
al community to assist with

(AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

development, and he also
described Haiti’s current politi-
cal instability as part of a
nation’s “learning process.”

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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007



Deputy PM commissions first
ire truck in Mangrove Cay |

Graffiti hits Collins
Avenue businesses

LITTLE Harbour, Andros
— Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of National Securi-
ty Cynthia Pratt returned to
her birthplace of Mangrove
Cay to commission the com-
munity’s first tire truck.

The commissioning cere-
mony, held at the Govern-
ment Complex in Little Har-
bour, Mangrove Cay, ended
17 years of “reaching out to
the community” through a
series of fundraising events

“by members of the Man-
grove Cay Fire Engine Com-
mittee.

The fire truck will be
manned by a community vol-
unteer brigade headed by
Sergeant David Thompson
of the Royal Bahamas Police
Force.

Expertise

The RBPF’s fire services

division, headed by Assistant
Superintendent of Police Jef-
frey Deleveaux, provided the
volunteer fire brigade with
_the training and technical
“expertise needed to operate
the fire truck in a safe and
efficient manner.

The committee was also
assisted by the Local Gov-
ernment Council which
matched the funds raised by
the committee and the
Bahamas Oil Refining Com-
pany (BORCO), which
helped to outfit the truck.

The purchase was in
response to a series of tragic
events that have occurred in
the Mangrove Cay commu-
nity. Residents could only
stand by and watch helpless-
ly as the Administration

‘Offices in Peat’s was
destroyed by fire; as five chil-
dren perished in a house fire
in Pinder’s, and yet again, as
another member of the com-
munity lost his life in a-fire in

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Mrs Pratt said the pur-
chase of the fire engine
means that the residents will
never have to stand by help-
lessly again.

She said the purchase of
the truck, and the time the
community took raising the
money, shows the strength
and determination of
Androsians in general and
Mangrovians in particular.

“We are commissioning a
fire truck that was brought
here by the blood, sweat and
tears of the people of Man-
grove Cay and I want you to
know how grateful we are in
the government for what you
have done here as a commu-
nity today,” she said.

“This has relieved a lot of
pressure on the government
and certainly with the many
islands that do need a fire
truck, the resources are lim-
ited, but you have helped
yourselves. And so I hope
that so many other islands



are watching and that they
would take pattern after
Mangrove Cay,” Mrs Pratt
said.

Damage

She went on to note that
the damage fires can have on
individual families and col-
lective communities can be
far-reaching.

Mrs Pratt said Mangrove
Cay is the fifth island on
which fire engines have been
commissioned.

The others are Bimini,
Eleuthera, Inagua and Cat
Island.

“These were done through
the self-help of the local peo-
ple and donations,” she said.
“What this demonstrates to
me is that if a community can
get together and raise funds
for a fire truck, that those
same communities can get
together to raise children; to
be their brother’s-keeper the

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way it used to be in the old.

days.

“The spirit of togetherness
that was displayed in pur-
chasing this fire truck and
the others show our children
that the adults are concerned
about the community, and so
when they see your concern,
they too will grow with the
same attitude; having con-
cern for the community and
wanting to build the commu-

nity,” she added.

Andy Bowleg, president of
the Mangrove Cay Fire
Engine Fundraising Com-
mittee, called the day a
“proud one” for the commit-
tee and the residents of
Mangrove Cay, adding
that each resident should
“be proud and receptive to
this.”

He said while the process
towards purchasing the fire
truck began 17 years ago, it
was one that was well
worth the, effort of the com-
munity, the Local Govern-
ment Council and other per-
sons who assisted financially.

“As in many communities
in our country, the destruc-
tion of property and the loss
of life by fire has brought
much grief and sorrow to our
loved ones, and we the peo-

ple of Mangrove Cay have ©

had our share of sorrows, but
this day is a significant day
and I am just excited that we
went about the commission-
ing of the truck in this way,”
Mr Bowleg said.

“By doing it this way; by
doing it in this fashion, we
have given the community
the opportunity to see that
when you come together,

regardless of how big a task —

may be or how much it may
cost, if everybody would pull
together, you can get it
done,” Mr Bowleg added.





THE TRIBUNE

@ GRAFFITI is currently plaguing businesses in the Collins

were taken yesterday. °

; Avenue area. These pictures in the traditionally well-kept area

(Photo: Tim Clarke)



| tat PCy

The public is advised that as of September, 2006
Peter Adderley is rio longer employed with C Cube Seating or
its signature parade ‘Feel The Rush’ and is no longer
authorized to conduct any business transactions in its name.

Sponsors and the General Public needing any information on the
upcoming parade this August 3rd - 7th, 2007 in Grand Bahama please
contact: 242.646.2736 or 242.466.4363 or email c3seating @gmail.com



Ses WS





ROR Eee
THE TRIBUNE





g NADIA Hope Johnson, a TimeWorks ieee and Saskia D’ Aguilar, also a TimeWorks
volunteer and a module leader at Saturday’s programme, take the time to discuss how to be

helpful toy women in need

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 9









@ TIMEWORKS, the Lyford Cay Foundation’s volunteer outreach programme, held a programme

where women spent the day together helping one another learn about securing employment and
leading independent and healthy lives. 5

(Photos: TS Maycock)

Outreach programme holds event
on empowerment of at-risk women

A GROUP of women from
the Kemp Road Urban Renew-
al Centre and the Bahamas Cri-
sis Centre are that much closer
to leading independent, fulfill-

~ ing lives following a TimeWorks

programme on empowering
women — many recovering from
physical and verbal abuse and
difficult life circumstances.

TimeWorks, the volunteer
outreach programme adminis-
tered by the Lyford Cay Foun-
dation’s Gifts and Grants Com-
mittee, held a seminar aimed at

‘benefiting at-risk women
referred to the programme by
the Bahamas Crisis Centre and
WHEDO, Women’s Holistic
Empowerment and Develop-
ment Organisation.

The programme was held at
the Canter Caring Centre
through the support of the Can-
cer Society of the Bahamas.

“Finding a job is the begin-










Employment and health stressed as essential

ning of (making positive life)
choices,” said Jade Major,
WHEDO’s founder and _exec-
utive director. “There is no bet-
ter way to empower Bahamian
women (than by sharing) the
knowledge of how to get a job.”

Pictet Bank and Trust, RBC
Royal Bank of Canada and
Templeton Global Advisors
have supported Time Works
2006/07, both financially and by
serving as a volunteer bage.

Many of the volunteers at the
programme ‘are employed by
the corporate sponsors, includ-
ing two of the six module lead-
ers.

Four modules were crafted
to highlight all the key compo-
nents of leading a healthy and

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alongside Time Works volun-
teers learning together.
“Timeworks has provided
[the framework] for women to
create positive changes in their
lives,” said Major. “One of the
dire needs of this society is for

_us women to understand the

power that we have.”
Following Major’s life
empowerment session, Victoria
Wallace, a certified physical fit-
ness instructor, and Pennie Bal-

The Sonata has
won the J. D.
Power initial

.dacci,





an esthetician at the
Lyford Cay Beauty Salon, led a
module focused on wellness.

Topics included the impor-
tance of exercise, proper nutri-
tion and appropriate grooming
for the workplace. Everyone
leaned that beauty is more than
skin deep.

“[The key is to] improve their
self esteem whilst equipping
them with the mind set of “if
it’s going to be, it’s up to me,”
said Baldacci.

Saskia D’ Aguilar, a consul-
tant at Graham Thompson and
Co, and Lisa Myers, a senior
vice president and portfolio
manager at Templeton Global
Advisors, tackled the topic of
how to best navigate through

the interview process.

All areas were covered —
from how to best determine
what kind of job one desires, to
correct application form sub-
mission, from the need for per-
sistent follow-up and proper
interview behavior to the
importance of a cover letter and
resume.

“If we were able to empower —

a number of the women whose
personal situations have kept
them out of the workplace with
the understanding and the abil-
ity to convey in a resume, cover
letter, or interview, the very
valuable, yet sometimes untra-
ditional, experience and wisdom
that they can bring to an
employer, it will have been a

Come to the

Mind Changing
Heart Cleansing

day well spent,” said Myers. ,

The final module was lead
by. Sanfra Foster, a personal
financial service officer at RBC
Royal Bank of Canada, and
highlighted the importance of
managing one’s personal
finances.

Foster encouraged the
women to craft personal bud-
gets that include a savings
mechanism, however modest.

“At the end of the day every-
one benefited from spending a
day together,” said Alessandra
Holowesko, a TimeWorks
organiser and chairman of the
Gifts and Grants Committee at
the Lyford Cay Foundation.

“The volunteers and partici-
pating women learned as much
from one another as from the
module leaders — we are very
grateful to everyone for their
participation and ‘for giving their
time.’ .

Body Healing, Spiritual Imparting

Life Transforming and

Soul Restoring

ANNUAL NATIONAL *
EVANGIEILIS TIC CRUSADIE

Sunday, February 11th to Friday, February 16th, 2007

At 7:30 p.m. Nightly at

The Coral Road Tabernacle, Freeport, Grand Bahama
Under the Theme: “Jesus Will Do It For You”

Dynamic Speakers are:
Bishop Cleophas L. Capron, Jr. District Overseer
Bishop Arthur Knowles, District Overseer (C.O.G.)

quality award for
best entry-level,
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improve cornering stability and ride quality.

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Bishop Rosevelt R. Rolle & Bishop Fred Newchurch




Hear our anointed Soloists: Glenda Stubbs, Hattie Williams,
Ruth Colebrooke, Charo Charles and Others, Be blessed by our
Crusade Praise Team, our Grand Bahama District Choir and by the
Church of God District Choir.

Crusade Coordinators are:
Ministers Barry B.Morris
and Cheryl M. Forbes

Price includes rustproofing, licensing and inspection to birthday, full tank of fuel,
24,000 miles/24 months warranty and emergency roadside assistance.

QUALITY i!

LIMITED
#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET 322-3775 © 325-3079

Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals, Queens Highway, 325-6122
or Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2916

_ 4

Come and be blessed, inspired, challen


sete
-*
. 4%

. yma “

ey

PAGE 10, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007























































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Dansesnsce

THE TRIBUNE

Let Charlie the
Bahamian Puppet and
his sidekick Derek put

some smiles on your &
kkids’s faces.

»

Bring your children to the |
McHappy Hour at McDonald's in.
Oakes Field every Thursday
| from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the.
' month of February 2007. 3

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.

SS

ficates



06. FoR O90, te a Aa Fe ee

.


PAGE 12, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007

Fishermen ar
convicted for

_ poaching in th

Exuma Cays

THE Bahamas National
Trust announced yesterday that
two fishermen arrested on Jan-
uary 11 were successfully pros?

ecuted for poaching marine -

resources.

“The trial was held at Black
Point in the Exumas. The arrest
and subsequent conviction were
the result of the combined and
cooperative efforts of the Exu-
ma Cays Land and Sea Park
Staff, the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force, and the police
at Staniel Cay and Black Point,”
said the Trust in a statement.

Park staff and Defence Force
marines were reportedly on a
routine patrol in the park when
they saw a small boat that
appeared to be-engaged in fish-
ing activities.

Royal Caribbean posts fourt
year-ago loss, but stock falls

@ MIAMI



ROYAL Caribbean Cruises
Ltd., the world’s,second-largest
cruise line, on Monday posted a
fourth-quarter profit from year-
ago loss, on lower cruise costs
and increased revenue, accord-
ing to Associated Press.

But Royal Caribbean shares
sank more than five per cent,
largely based on company state-
ments that its bookings so far
in the busy January-to-March
wave season were not encour-
aging. analysts said.

Net income climbed to $46.6
million, or 22 cents per share,
from a loss of $3.6 million, or 2
cents per share, during the same
period a year ago.

Revenue for the quarter rose
12 per cent to $1.15 billion ver-
sus $1.03 billion in the prior
year, as passenger ticket sales
climbed to $831.7 million and
onboard and other revenue
increased to $321.5 million .

Analysts surveyed by Thom-
son Financial were expecting
earnings of 20 cents per share
on sales of $1.16 billion.

Shares fell $2.24 to $43.60 in
afternoon trading on the New
York Stock Exchange.

Joe Hovorka, an analyst with
Raymond James and Associ-

ates, said the stock likely was

falling because of a continued
weakness in the Caribbean mar-
ket that has lasted more than a
year. Sluggishness in the
Caribbean has been offset by
good performance in Alaska
and Europe, a scenario also
faced by Royal Caribbean’s

chief competitor, Carnival, the -

world’s largest cruise group.

Richard Fain, Royal
Caribbean’s chairman and
CEO, said bookings were “less
than encouraging” for the
“wave season” — the busiest
reservation period of the year
for the cruise industry, when
many people plan summer vaca-
tions.

Hovorka said sluggishness
with Caribbean tourism is being





j The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are

making news in their

| neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a

good cause, campaigning

| for improvements in the

area or have won an

award.

If'so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.












“The patrol moved to inter-
cept the vessel, which immedi-
ately fled, while dumping items
overboard.

“Positive identification-of the
suspects was made by park staff
and their identities radioed to
the Black Point Police Station
where the suspects were arrest-
ed upon returning to port. Park
staff returned to the site of the
dumping and recovered the dis-
carded evidence,” the statement
said.

The two suspects had their
vessel and fishing equipment
confiscated by local police in
Black Point and were charged
with poaching in the Exuma
Cays Land and Sea Park.

The park has been designated
a complete no-take zone for

LOCAL NEWS

over 20 years and serves as a
valuable marine replenishment
zone for all of the Bahamas.

During the trial, held Janu-
ary 25, the men were convict-
ed after entering a “not guilty”
plea.

Stealing

Commenting on the arrest
and convictions, park adminis-
trator Tom Barbernitz said: “A
small number of individuals
continue to poach marine
resources from within the park.
These poachers are simply steal-
ing from future generations of
Bahamians.

“The Exuma Cays Land and
Sea Park serves as a breeding

ground and the larvae from the
park spread throughout the
country benefiting. all the
Bahamas.”

Eric Carey, executive director
of the Trust, added: “Having
witnessed this event and being
present during the pursuit and
recovery of the evidence, I am
pleased at the dedication of the
park staff and Royal Bahamas
Defence Force marines in
enforcing the by-laws of the
Exuma Park. |

Support wag provided by
Corporal Kevin Rolle and Con-
stable Edgecombe of the Royal
Bahamas Police Force who



quarter profit from
n Caribbean forecast



PASSENGERS enjoy a sunny day on the upper deck pool area of Royal Caribbean
International’s Mariner of the Seas, in this photo in the Caribbean Sea. Royal Caribbean Cruises,

the world’s second-largest cruise line, said
lower cruise costs and increased revenue.

seen throughout the leisure
industry.

ui
Nassau

“There’s a broader weakness
in discretionary spending for



on Monday that it swung to a fourth-qu

er profit on =

(AP Photo/. Re Kafka, file )

consumers” in {ne Caribbean,
which is seen as an entry level

HOT OFF THE GRILL..

WELCOME
PUG UE BOUIN. 2 BLN Lg
BL RC TCL 4

OTe St Ghat
BOL Cs iesihreste RDN, tear tas

worked with park staff to
ensure the park continues to
serve its valuable role for every-
one.”

Documented scientific studies
have shown the many values of
the existing no-take regulations
within the Exuma Cays Land
and Sea Park.

Grouper tagged within the
park have been caught by local
fishermen in Long Island and
other surrounding communities.

The larger benefits of the no-
take regulations are the distrib-
ution of larvae from breeding
populations that are carried by
ocean currents and winds



cruise market, Hovorka said.

For the last quarter of 2006,
the company said its net cruise
costs on a per available passen-
ger-cruise-days basis fell 3.3 per
cent due to the timing of dry-
docking and marketing costs.
Its net yields rose 3.3 per cent,
driven by strong cruise pricing
in what is traditionally the com-
pany’s softest quarter.

‘“We are particularly pleased
with the solid yield performance
of our brands, and healthy earn-
ings despite significantly higher
fuel costs,” Fain said.

The company operates 34
ships under its Royal Caribbean
International and Celebrity
Cruise brands. Those divisions
grew yields by 3.4 per cent for
the full year despite a less
robust Caribbean pricing envi-
ronment.

For the full year, earnings
were $633.9 million, or $2.94 a
share, compared to.$715.9 mil-
lion, or $3.26 a share, in 2005.
Analysts expected $2.93 per
share, a result that Fain attrib-
uted to the high price of fuel.

Looking ahead, Royal
Caribbean said it expects 2007
earnings per share to between
$3,05 and $3.20. Analyst pre-
dict $3.15 per share.

The company expects this
year’s net yields to increase in a
range around three per cent —
with the addition of Madrid-

THE TRIBUNE



sem ae €

throughout the Bahamas..*

Studies have documented the
increased numbers of larvae are’
produced by larger and older
marine specimens that are then
available for dispersion
throughout the country. : ;

When it was created in 1958;

the Exuma Cays Land and Sea.’

was the first land and sea park
in the world.
It was made a no-take marine.

reserve in 1986 — the first —

marine fishery reserve in the
wider Caribbean. It is one of 25
national parks and protected
areas managed by the Bahamas
National Trust.

based cruise and tour operator
Pullmantur SA accounting for
two percentage points of this
change. It will include Pull-
mantur’s results on a two-
month lag, and its operations
will be included in Royal
Caribbean’s consolidated finan-
cial statements beginning with
the first quarter 2007.

For the first quarter of 2007,
the company currently forecasts
net yields will decrease in a
range around 3 per cent com-
pared to the first quarter of last
year. Royal Caribbean said its
net cruise costs on a per avail-
able passenger-cruise-days basis
will increase 4 to 5 per cent, of
which about half is driven by
Pullmantur. !

Assuming fuel prices remain.
at current levels, the company

expects first quarter earnings
per share to be,3 cents to 8
cents. Analysts had predicted
earnings of 32 cents per share,
but that was before the compa-
ny Said it would be adding Pull-

mantur to its first quarter 2007, -

earnings.

Royal Caribbean also pre: _

dicted that it will have a 12.2
per cent increase in capacity in
2007, driven by Pullmantur, the
April delivery of Liberty of the
Seas, and a full year of opera-
tions by Freedom of the Seas,
currently the world’s largest
cruise ship.



Se ay
SUNT eT

aE



_
* TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007

SECTION



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Business awaits

Taal

wees | “ | : C . | + a oP
draft? on China tie-up

International Distributors closes on CITIC, Mediterranean Shipping
deal, with warehouse’s first phase handover set for August 1

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he head of a
major Grand
Bahama-based
grocery whole-
saler and distrib-
utor yesterday told The Tri-
bune he was “just waiting on
the final draft right now” of a
contract that would seal a
three-way tie-up between his
firm, Mediterranean Shipping
Company (MSC) and a $6 bil-
lion Chinese conglomerate.
Roy Deffler, president’and
chief executive of Internation-
al Distributors of Grand
Bahama, a subsidiary of US
grocery wholesaler Associat-
ed Grocers, said he had spent
three weeks in China during
October in a bid to tie-up an
agreement with CITIC, the
state-owned company that has
long had plans to use Grand
Bahama’s Sea/Air Business
Centre. -
CITIC had signed a Memo-
randum of Understanding for
the establishment of a major

50-acre distribution facility in
February 2005, involving exhi-
bition, showrooms and ware-
housing at the Sea/Air Busi-
ness Centre, Grand Bahama’s
planned logistics and distribu-
tion hub. ,

CITIC subsequently scaled
back its plans, but Mr Deffler
revealed yesterday: “They
[CITIC] put it on hold in 2005,
and I visited China in October
2006. That fire has been rekin-
dled, and I’m awaiting the con-
tract as we speak. .

“We did it. I’m just waiting
on the final draft right now.
There’s a lot of irons in the
fire.”

Mr Deffler said the link-up
with CITIC and Mediter-
ranean Shipping Company
could even ultimately lead to
International Distributors
expanding its Grand Bahama

facilities to “five million square
feet of warehouse space”.

International Distributors
and its parent have long want-
ed to bring product from China
directly into Freeport, from
where it would be sorted,
stored and distributed to the
company’s food wholesale and
major retail clients throughout
the world, chiefly Latin Amer-
ica and the Caribbean, but also
the Middle East.

It is likely that any potential
alliance between International
Distributors, CITIC and
Mediterranean Shipping Com-
pany would involve just such a
logistics route, with CITIC sup-
plying Chinese food produce

and the latter handling the -

shipping.

This latest development
again emphasises that Grand
Bahama would appear to have

a very positive economic
future, and that things are
moving behind the scenes,
both here and with projects
such as the Morgan Stanley
and Raven Group deals.

Coupled with Ginn’s activity
in the West End, the island’s
future appears ripe with possi-
bilities, notwithstanding the
gloom surrounding the Royal
Oasis and the ongoing share-
holder dispute at the Grand
Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA).

Meanwhile, Mr Deffler said
yesterday that construction of
International Distributors
warehouse facility at the
Sea/Air Business Centre was
going “fantastically; we’re
about three weeks ahead of
schedule right now. I’m sup-
posed to get the keys on or
before August 1”.

Bahamas ‘scratches surface’ of marina industry potential

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas is earning a “very small
portion of the potential” economic bene-

$25.6 million revenues, $271,000 in taxes ‘a very small portion of the potential’
* Ministry identifies 10 Family Island sites to capitalise on sector's potential for growth

fits this nation’s expanding marina and

boating industry could generate, a draft
study for the Government has revealed,
with the sector currently generating $25

million in revenues per annum.

The study is part of ongoing efforts by
the Ministry of Tourism and other gov-
ernment agencies to develop a draft poli-
cy for regulating the growth of marina
facilities throughout the Bahamas, as there



Fidelity Bahamas
Growth & Income}

Fund

are currently “no local or national plans,
policies or written guidelines addressing
marina location or design”.

The draft policy document warned that
the Bahamas’ attraction for boaters, due to
its 2,000 cays and 100,000 square miles of
ocean, coupled with the lack of space for
new marinas in Florida, had created “sig-
nificant opportunities” that “should not

s your money?

Pee

be listed”.

Boating generated some $25.559 mil-
lion in revenues for the Bahamas annual-
ly, the Ministry of Tourism, had calculat-
ed, based on 38,875 visitor room nights.

The earnings were broken down into:

* Proposed tax shake-up to involve real property tax on seabed

SEE page 10B



14.9

Last 12 months

Average Annual Return
Since Inception
February 1999

12.50%
Last 12 Months

14.76%

6 full years Average
Annual Total Return

u.U4 70

‘Last 12 months

13.08%

Cammulative Return
Since ones
April 2004 -

FIDELITY -

y PSS



The first construction phase
involves 86,542 square feet of
warehouse space, and Mr Def-
fler said the planned Phase JI
and Phase II] expansions at
the 20-acre site were scheduled
to each involve 200,000 square
feet of warehouse space.

He was unable to say when
these phases would start,
though, adding: “There’s a lot
of things that is contingent on,
and I should have answers for
those questions shortly.”

Mr Deffler said Internation-
al Distributors had an option
on another 20 acres of land at
the Sea/Air Business Centre,
which could ultimately see a
Phase IV expansion involving
800,000 square feet of ware-
house space. Then, there’s the
CITIC and MSC contract.

He added that Associated
Grocers clients were “very

excited” about the Freeport
facility, not only in Latin
America and the Caribbean,
but also in the Middle East.
International Distributors’
parent was shipping product
to nations such as Kuwait,
Lebanon and the United Arab
Emirates, and Mr Deffler said:
“We can’t wait to get this open,
because it will make more
sense to ship there from here.”
Customers from those coun-
tries had attended Interna-
tional Distributors’ trade show
in Freeport last week, at which
some 299 vendors exhibited
their wares. Currently, the firm
is operating from a smaller
warehouse down by the cruise
port until the Sea/Air Business
Centre premises is completed.

SEE page 8B

Pink Sands being



sold to neighbour

m@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business

Reporter

HARBOUR Island’s Pink
Sands Hotel is being sold to its
neighbour, the Coral Sands
Beach Resort,-the former’s gen-
eral manager confirmed to The
Tribune yesterday.

Clemens Van Merveldt, of
Pink Sands, said the property’s

" sale was in its final stages, and is

expected to be completed very
soon. He added that this was
something that had been pend-
ing “for a while”.

“This is good for the Pink
Sands and good for Harbour
Island,” Mr Van Merveldt said.
“Coral Sands has done a lot of
good for the island and shown
lots of energy. They have a
good track record.”

Mr Van Merveldt said that
currently, there were no plans
to change the Pink Sands name.
Thé resort is being sold by the
Island Outpost group, but he
added that there were no plans
to lay off any Pink Sands staff.

The deal is more a change in
ownership on paper, and will

and not have a dramatic effect
on the day-to-day operations at
the resort, Mr Van Merveldt
added.

_Pink Sands is a 20-acre haven
set by the edge of the famous :
three-mile pink sand beach on
Harbouyr Island. Designed by
Biba founder, Barbara Hulan-
icki, in.an eclectic mixture of
styles -Moroccan, Indian, and
Balinese - Pink Sands compris-
es 25 pastel-coloured cottages.

In 1951, Pink Sands became
the island’s first resort, leading
the way to Harbour Island
becoming an elite tourist desti-
nation when J. Allen Malcolm

. opened the hotel.

Hurricane Andrew flattened
the Pink Sands in 1992, but the
ruins were quickly, bought up

-by the founder of Island

Records, Chris Blackwell, who
rebuilt the hotel via his Island
Outpost group.

Opened in 1968 and revered
as one of the best small hotels in
the Caribbean, Coral Sands
now has a brand new look,
courtesy of an extensive reno-
vation that has restored and
rejuvenated the 36-room prop-
erty.

WESTWARD VILLAS #3772: Two storey 4 bedroom 3
bath home sits beside a beautiful pond. Formal dining
room, living room and family room. Lovely outdoor wood
deck, gazebo and garage. Offered exclusively at $425,000.
Monty.Roberts@SothebysRealty.com 242.424.4944

\W Damianos

Sothebys

INTERNATIONAL REALTY

SIRbahamas.com t 242.322.2305 f 242.322.2033

rae


BUSINESS _



~

The Miami Herald

THE MARKETS

STOCKS, MUTUAL FUNDS, 5-6B
Dow30 «12,661.74 «= -+8.25 AM
S&P 500 1446.99 -140 W
NASDAQ. 2,470.60 5.28 W
10-YR NOTE asi - -02 W
CRUDE OIL -23 W

58.74

Doubts
hold |
market
steady

BY JOE BEL BRUNO |

Associated Press

-. NEW YORK — Wall Street
closed narrowly mixed Monday
as lingering concerns about the
economy offset better-than-ex-
pected sales from Wal-Mart

. Stores and a flurry of acquisi-

tion activity.
~ Wal-Mart rose after the

- world’s largest retailer said it .

- expected January same-store

- gales to rise 2.2 percent. Tem-

pering the gain was its projec-
tion that sales performance is
on track to deliver the lowest
growth rate in more than 25
years. - . Aa

Meanwhile, Wall Street
absorbed a spate of acquisition
and private equity deals — the
largest amount since the start of
the year. Triad Hospitals and
Herbalife received offers from.
-private equity funds, while State
Street agreed to buy Investors
Financial Services.

_ Investors had little reaction —
to new data that suggests con-

- tinued economic growth, which
could disrupt the Federal
Reserve’s plans to ease the
economy this year. The Insti-
tute of Supply Management's...

which covers the service sector,
increased more than analysts
were forecasting.

Wall Street is in a holding
pattern now that the Fed’s deci-
sion to hold rates is behind it,

and the quarterly earnings sea-
son is largely over. Analysts say
investors are now monitoring
what central bankers might
have to say and any corporate
or economic news .

“We're just going to have a
topsy-turvy market until inves-
tors figure out which direction
to take,” said Todd Leone, man-
aging director of equity trading
for Cowen & Co. “We're seeing
some buying come back into the
market because there still is a
lot of money on the sidelines.
And, all these deals announced

- are really helping the market
ou ”?

The Dow Jones industrial
average rose 8.25, or 0.07 per-
cent, to 12,661.74.

Broader stock indicators
were lower. The Standard &
Poor’s 500 index was down 1.40,
or 0.10 percent, at 1,446.99, and
the Nasdaq composite index fell
5.28, or 0.21 percent, to 2,470.60.

- Treasuries largely shrugged
off the ISM numbers. Bonds
rose, with the yield on the
benchmark 10-year Treasury
note down to 4.81 percent from
4.82 percent late Friday.

Also squeezing stocks was a

_ rebound in oil prices to near
$60 per gallon as a cold snap hit
the Northeast. However, oil
reversed course and a barrel of
‘light sweet crude was down 28
cents at $58.74 on the New York
Mercantile Exchange.

The dollar was mixed against
‘other major currencies, while
gold prices were up.

Advancing issues led decli-
ners by 2 to 1 on the New York
Stock Exchange, where consoli-
dated volume came to 2.46 bil-
lion shares, compared with. 2.55
billion on Friday.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies was down
2.73, or 0.34 percent, at 806.69.
The index surpassed the 800
mark for the first time last
week, and hit an intraday high

of 810.49 before paring gains.
Japan’s Nikkei stock average
closed down 115 percent. Brit-
ain’s FTSE 100 was up 0.11 per-
cent, Germany’s DAX index fell
0.17 percent, and France’s
CAC-40 was up 0.07 percent.





pees soaannguannsennneni



LITIGATION

Apple, Beatles

Apple and Apple Corps, the
Beatles’ guardian, announced
they have reached a settlement
over logo and naming rights, but
both were silent about whether

’ Beatles music will become

available online.

BY JORDAN ROBERTSON
Associated Press

SAN JOSE, Calif. — “We can work
it out.”

That was the message that iPod
maker Apple and The Beatles’ guard-
ian Apple Corps sent Monday in

ee
—

SURO LAR COLLULUR ECS

So

Sete Seren Scr ce Sars $

SSE SSN Ce



Starting in the first quarter, a
goofy spot for Doritos showing a
hapless driver distracted by a
pretty woman marked the first time
a purely amateur-created ad aired
during the Super Bowl. Frito-Lay,
the PepsiCo division that makes
Doritos, ran an online competition
to pick the winning spot.

Katie Crabb, a freshman at the
University of Wisconsin at Stevens
Point, was the winner of a separate
contest by General Motors and had
her idea for an ad made into reality
by Chevrolet’s marketing division.

Despite being made by a new-



BANKING

‘ | ruesoat, FEBRUARY 6, 2007

We Loy

burying nearly three decades of
trademark strife over the iconic apple
logo and name.

Like the warring lovers striving for
reconciliation in The Beatles’ 1965 hit
tune, the two Apples agreed to quash
a long-simmering rivalry and years of

‘ vicious legal battles between one of

the world’s largest music sellers and
one of history’s most beloved bands.

The settlement gives Cupertino-
based Apple ownership of the name
and logo in return for agreeing to
license some of those trademarks

back to London-based Apple Corps

SUPER BOWL

eR

PS :
menemenenamee: SP SGCOMSSE SHH Says
we oe ie

J

“ y= nd

YO QUIERO LIONS: Talking animals, like these lions in a Taco Bell ad, was one of the tactics used by
companies for their Super Bowl commercials, which cost $2.6 million for a 30-second spot:--~~~

ADVERTISING
SHOWDOWN

IN THE BATTLE FOR ATTENTION DURING THE MOST-WATCHED PROGRAM
ALL YEAR, SOME COMPANIES RELIED HEAVILY ON AMATEURS FOR THE FIRST
TIME TO CREATE THEIR SUPER BOWL COMMERCIALS.

BY SETH SUTEL
Associated Press

NEW YORK — Along with the trademark Clydesdales, talking
animals and high-end computer graphics, there was a new entry this year
in the annual showdown of advertisers in the Super Bowl: amateurs.

comer, that ad was true to the tradi-
tion of using oddball humor in
Super Bowl ads, showing a number
of men stripping off their shirts —
and some other articles of clothing
— at the sight of anew Chevy HHR
rolling down the street.

Sight gags were back, including
one from Bud Light early in the
game showing a rather unusual tac-
tic for winning at rock-paper-scis-
sors-— throwing an actual rock at
the head of your opponent. The gag
wasn’t completely new, however,
‘since last year Sprint Nextel fea-
tured a phone with a “crime deter-

ars aM Bae uF SIC & BERNESE



* bot Cetin ok Ley S

it
|

— guardian of The Beatles’ commer-
cial interests — for their continued
use.

It ends the ongoing trademark
lawsuit’ between the two companies,
with each side paying its own legal
costs. Other terms of the settlement
were not disclosed.

But the truce was silent on a cru-
cial issue for consumers about
whether the catalog of Beatles songs
will become available for download
any time soon.

The Beatles have so far been the
most prominent holdout from iTunes



sevnrevveeeevneeveeevetneeremeoreevertieeevnweeiettetnteeeitceirntre ter nteretete tet

ee eS)

* SCREENSHOT FROM TACO BELL



WN



SCREENSHOT FROM DORITOS

|

'

i

|

i
AMATEUR APPROACH: ‘Check Out
Girl’ was one of the Super Bowl |
ads Doritos ran from its |
competition for amateurs. |
rent” — which turned out to be
throwing the phone at someone’s |
head. |
{

|

\

|

FedEx combined a sight gag with
another trademark of big ticket

*TURN TO ADVERTISING



3B

sass en bONbOe scl OR LHO4SY SEUAIBROYSLLLOEESLUIESSS SECU UDLUAIHOURUENIMESDULAAAN EINE ELENA ENEMA

settle trademark suit

and other online music services, and
Apple’s overtures to put the music
online have been stymied by the

ongoing litigation.

And it appears consumers will still
have to wait to buy such Beatles hits
as Love Me Do or Hey Jude on Apple’s
iTunes online store, though industry
analysts said a resolution on putting
The Beatles’ music online is likely
already in the works.

“It goes from impossible to a lock
that it’s going to happen — it’s.a

*TURN TO APPLE

ECONOMY

Services
sector
driving
srowth

i For the 46th consecutive
month, the services industry
reported growth. Analysts
believe expansion in the sector,
which represents about
three-qaurters of the economy, is
enough to stimulate overall
economic growth.

BY EILEEN ALT POWELL
Associated Press

NEW YORK — Weakness in the

' manufacturing sector, especially the

auto industry, may be dampening the
nation’s economic prospects, but the .
bigger services sector appears to be
more.than making up for it.

The Institute for Supply Manage-
ment, which is based in Tempe, Ariz.,
said Monday that its index of busi-
ness activity in the non-manufactur-
ing sector advanced to 59.0 in Janu-
ary from 56.7 in December. Wall
Street analysts had expected a read-
ing of 57 for the latest month.

A reading above 50 indicates
expansion, while one below that indi-
cates contraction.

Mark Vitner, senior economist
with Wachovia Securities in Char-
lotte, N.C., noted that the trade
group’s report last week on the man-
ufacturing sector indicated that it
was contracting in January in con-
trast to the services sector, which
grew for the 46th consecutive month.

“Manufacturing is weakening as
domestic auto manufacturers cut
back and as residential construction
declines,” Vitner said, but noted that
this makes up just about one-quarter
of the economy. Meanwhile, the ser-
vice sector, which represents about
three-quarters of the economy, con-
tinued to grow.

“The message to take away from
the two is that economic growth will
slow, but there will be growth,” Vit-
ner said.

Most economists are looking for
the non-manufacturing sector to be a
driver of growth in 2007.

Scott Brown, chief economist with
Raymond James & Associates in St.
Petersburg, Fla., said the “headline

* TURN TO REPORT.

Checks hang on as electronic payments gain

@ As the number of debit card
transactions nearly doubled from
2000 to 2003, fewer people are
using checks, but many think the
paper form of payment will
remain popular.

BY JOSH FUNK
Associated Press

OMAHA, Neb. — Richard Kester-
son slid his debit card out of his wal-
let even before the cashier at a Hy-
Vee grocery store in west Omaha
rang up his total.

Kesterson, like millions of other
Americans, didn’t even consider pay-
ing by check. Using a debit card is
easier, he said.

Kesterson also eschews checks
when paying his bills in favor of
online bill pay, and then lets his bank
keep track of his spending.

“J haven’t balanced my account in
ten years,” Kesterson said.

EEE

Such habits are part of the reason
why check writing has declined
sharply since 1995. The Federal
Reserve estimates that 49.5 billion
checks were paid in the United States
in 1995; that figure dropped to 36.6
billion checks paid in 2003, according
to the most recent Fed studies.
Increasingly, some checks are even
being converted into electronic pay-
ments by merchants, who prefer elec-
tronic transfers to handling paper
checks.

The widespread availability of
debit cards and the growing popular-
ity of plastic are the biggest factors in
the decline. Between 2000 and 2003,
the number of debit card transactions
nearly doubled from 8.3 billion to 15.6
billion, and the number of credit card
transactions jumped from 15.6 billion
to 19 billion.

Julie O’Neill of Omaha said she
thinks her credit card is more con-



venient than writing a check, and all
her spending is compiled on one
statement at the end of the month.

When it comes time to pay bills,
O’Neill turns to her computer instead
of her checkbook because she can
pay her bills at the last minute.

“T procrastinate, so then I can go
online and not have to go through
snail mail” to pay bills, O’Neill said.

Together, credit and debit card
use accounted for 43 percent of all
non-cash payments in 2003, up from
33 percent in 2000.

In some cases, consumers may still
write a check, but increasingly, mer-
chants are scanning those checks and
converting them into an electronic
payment. So the Federal Reserve
counts those checks as electronic
payments and not as checks; pay-
checks electronically deposited in

* TURN TO CHECKS



NATIHARNIK/AP

KEEPS A RECORD: Cheryl Carlson
pays by check at a grocery
store, in Omaha, Neb.


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 9B



- Study says Florida c:

cut fossil fuel electric

m@ By STEPHEN MAJORS
Associated Press Writer

TALLAHASSEE, Fla.
(AP) — Florida can reduce its
consumption of fossil fuel-pro-

duced electricity by nearly half

over the next 15 years through
conservation and renewable
energies. a study released
Monday said

A lack of concern and fore-
sight has put Florida behind
other states in adapting to
energy challenges, but an
aggressive shift in policy can
cut traditional electricity use
by 45 percent by 2023, said
Neal Elliott. a director at the
Washington-based American
Council for an Energy-Effi-
cient Economy, which
released the report.

States

“Florida has not been one

of the progressive states in -

terms of energy policy with
respect to efficiency or renew-

4

able energy,” Elliott said. “We
suggest that this is a real
opportunity to set the state on
a more sustainable economic
and environmental path in the
future.”

Florida currently produces
most of its electricity with non-
renewable fuels such as petro-
leum, nuclear, coal and nat-
ural gas energy. It only gets
0.1 percent of its electricity
trom renewable resources,
compared to a national aver-
age of 2.3 percent, the study
said.

The state’s electricity con-
sumption is growing faster
than its population because of
widespread use of devices like
cell phones and high-defini-
tion TVs, Elliott said.

Florida can conserve energy
by 19 percent — balancing out
rising demand — by enacting
stricter building energy codes
and providing incentives to
utility companies to promote
consumer energy efficiency,
Elliott said.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)

FALCONCLIFF CORPORATION
_IBC No. 89336B

In Voluntary Liquidation

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with Section 131 (2)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 46 of 2000),
Falconcliff Corporation is in Dissolution

The date of Commencement of dissolution was 3rd day of

November 2006.

‘ Aimilios Vrachipedis of 19 Aretis Street, 166 72 Vari, Greece is
the Liquidator of Falconcliff Corporation.

Elliot also urged the state
to spend $250 million to $350
million a year for 15 years to
promote energy conservation
and renewable energy.

Provided

The state provided a sales-
tax holiday last year for high
energy-efficiency appliances
and Gov. Charlie Crist called
for a repeat this year in his
budget recommendation.

To promote renewable
energy, the state should man-
date that utilities produce 5
percent of their power by
using renewable fuels, the
study recommended.

Elliott said although, offi-

cials have not focused on wind .

and solar energy as some oth-
er states, like Texas, but
experts say it. is well-posi-
tioned to convert sugarcane
and waste materials into
ethanol. Ethanol has been
promoted as an alternative
motor fuel, but can also be

used to produce electricity.

Crist’s recommended
spending y $68 million on alter-
native energy, including $50
million on ethanol and
biodiesel projects.

The Florida House wants to
spend around $100 million in
total. Elliott said Crist’s pro-
posal lacked focus in the area
of energy efficiency.

House Committee on Ener-
gy Chairman Rep. Bob Allen,
R-Merritt Island, agreed with
the study but said it’s unlikely
the state will spend what
Elliott recommended.

“We're going to do it within
our means but it’s certainly
more of a priority than it was
last year,” Allen said.

He also agreed Florida
needs to promote energy effi-
cient building codes.

“As we harden our homes
for storms and tornadoes and
hurricanes, we need to build
them energy wise,” he said.
“If you have really thick storm
windows you've also got good

NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)
CITY OF LONDON FIDUCIARIES LTD.

LIQUIDATOR’S NOTICE

PURSUANT ¥6'SECTION 137 (6) OF THE
INTERANTIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES, AC T

I, Mark Ashley BRUCE-SMITH , Liquidator of City

of London Fiduciaries Ltd.,

hereby certify that the

winding-up and dissolution of City of London
Fiduciaries Ltd., has been completed in
accordance with the Articles of Dissolution.

Dated the 31st day of January, 2007.

bau Satu, MA.

Liquidator

energy windows.”
Growth

While Florida’s high growth
presents it with more chal-
lenges than many other states,
California has provided an



example by reducing its.ener-
gy consumption 1.7 percent a
year with conservation mea-
sures alone, Elliott said.
There is “a willingness to
_ entertain these opportunities
that I haven’t seen before in
the state of Florida,” he said.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 4s follows:

(a) GREAT HEIGHTS OVERSEAS HOLDINGS S.A. is in
dissolution under the provisions of the international Business
Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on February 2, 2007
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by Registrar

General.

(c) The liquidator of the said company is Alisa Richardson of 2nd Terrace

West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the Sth day of March to send their names and
addresses and particulars of their-debts or claims to the Liquidator of the
company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit of
any distribution made before such debts are proved.

February 5, 2007

ALISA RICHARDSON

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY



Legal Notice

_. ..NOTICE
GOLDIE INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

NOTICE 1s TIEREBY GIVEN as fi ollows:

(a) GOLDIE INTERNATIONAL LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced

on the 5th February, 2007 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the

Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Credit Suisse Trust

of Geneva, Rue de Lausanne 17 bis, 1211 Geneva 70

Dated this 6th day of February, A.D. 2007

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No 45 of 2000)

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No 45 of 2000) Credit Suisse Trust Limited

Liquidator

Position Available

TRUST ACCOUNTANT

Job Function: .
e To produce accurate and timely trust and company financial
statements in accordance with infernal procedures and
generally accepted accounting principles.



STEWART HOLDINGS LTD
LIQUIDATOR’S NOTICE

ARABIC WORLD TRADING LLC
LIQUIDATOR’S NOTICE

PURSUANT TO SECTION 137°(6) OF
THE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

PURSUANT TO SECTION 137 (6) OF
THE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT



We, Redcorn Consultants Limited, Liquidator of STEWART
HOLDINGS LTD hereby certify that the winding up and
dissolutioon of STEWART HOLDINGS LTD has been
complete in accordance with the Articles of Dissolution.

We, Redcorn Consultants Limited, Liquidator of ARABIC
WORLD TRADING LLC hereby certify that the winding up
and dissolutioon of ARABIC WORLD TRADING LLC has
been complete in accordance with the Articles of Dissolution.

Responsibilities:
e Update the clients’ general ledger.
« Reconcile cash and securities balance: ensuring that all
entries are processed correctly in ledger.
com onsultants Limited © Prepare monthly financial statements and internal client
Seat \ reports for a portfolio of complex trusts and companies.
e — Liaise with trust and company administrators to ensure that
financial statements accurately reflect the activities of the

client.

Dated the 21st day of November A.D., 2006 Dated the 31st day of January, A.D., 2006

onsultants Limited



Qualifications:

e¢ Bachelor's degree in Accounting.

: «Atleast five years experience preparing trust and company
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT financial statements. —
(No 45 of 2000) Understanding of the fundamentals of trust administration
e Advance knowledge of Microsoft Excel.

NOTICE NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No 45 of 2000)

area beatin HOEDINGS LID BRIARWOOD CAPITAL LTD . * Completion of the Canadian Securities Course of Series 7
LIQUIDATOR’S NOTICE LIQUIDATOR’S NOTICE Course would be an asset.
aa ee | e Ability to supervise a team of trust accountants
PURSUANT TO SECTION 137 (6) OF PURSUANT TO SECTION 137 (6) OF e Proven track record of success ina similar position,
THE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT THE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
Benefits:

Attractive salary commensurate with skills and experience.
Other benefits include medical insurance coverage,
excellent pension plan and performance based bonus.

We, Redcorn Consultants Limited, Liquidator of BRIAR- °
WOOD CAPITAL LTD hereby certify that the winding up
and dissolutioon of BRIARWOOD CAPITAL LTD has been
complete in accordance with the Articles of Dissolution.

We, Redcorn Consultants Limited, Liquidator of PALM
VILLAS HOLDINGS LTD hereby certify that the winding up
and dissolutioon of PALM VILLAS HOLDINGS LTD has been
complete in accordance with the Articles of Dissolution. Interested persons meeting the above requirements may forward their
resumes and two written references to:

Human Resources :
P.O. Box N-7043
Nassau, The Bahamas

Dated the 31st day of January, A.D., 2006 Dated the 31st day of January, A.D., 2006

or

Redcorn Consultants Limited
dator

Email: trustaccountant(@@gmail.com


PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Bahamas ‘scratches surface’

of marina industry potential

FROM page 1B

* Room revenues - $5.818
million

* Fuel - $6.206 million

* Meals and entertainment
- $9.929 million

* Dockage - $1.862 million

* Fees - $1.745 million

In addition, the boating and
marina industry had generated
$271,000 in revenues for the
Government during the first
10 months of 2006.

The draft policy document
pointed out that there were
several opportunities for the
Bahamas to expand its mari-
na industry, particularly since
most resort investments
approved by the current gov-
ernment - especially those in
the Family Islands - included a
strong marina component, with
these facilities set to act as
major revenue drivers.

The Government document
said the Bahamas currently



B.
Kin
international cHents.





mg ¢ PS CURT

j prok.

Manager.

Core Responsibilities

" Manage a large portfolio of complex accounts including trust, estates and

agencies.

* Provide financial information to clients as requested.
® ~~ Act on clients’ behalf in matters dealing with lawyers, beneficiaries, etc.

= Extensive experience with all aspects of trust administration.

Desired Qualifications

=" Bachelor's Degree in Business or related discipline from a well recognized

university.

Services Industry.

and customer service skills.

Closing Date: February 16, 2007

Contact

Hunan Resources
Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited

. RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

Trust & Corporate Services

A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in The
vas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guernsey, Switzerland and the United
om. Butterfield Bank offers a wide range of services to local and

; vionat achiovements (0 4.
tcam. The successful candidate will report directly to the Senior Relationship

* Aminimum of five years progressive Fiduciary experience in the Financial

© STEP training or other suitable qualifications will be advantageous.
= Proficient in Microsoft Office suite of products,

® Strong interpersonal, communication, problem solving, project management

boasted some 64 marinas with
10 or more boat slips, collec-
tively providing 3,106 slips.
Slips in locations such as Har-
bour Island sold for between
$500,000 to $1 million, with
rents ranging from $0.5 to $3
per foot of dock space.

Yet the draft. marina policy
document pointed out: “There
is almost no marina capacity
south of Stella Maris on the
northern tip of Long Island.
Yet this route is the gateway to
the Caribbean via the Wind-
ward Passage between Cubs
and Haiti.”

The Ministry of Tourism had
identified a number of poten-
tial new marina sites, the doc-
ument said. These included:

* Andros - near Driggs Hill,
Congo Town

* Eleuthera - between
Hatchet Bay and Governor’s
Harbour, and at Cape
Eleuthera

* Exuma - Rolletown

* Cat Island - Arthur’s Town















sults orlented v with a
i dy tami Trust & Corpoiie Services

* Acklins Island
* Crooked Island
* Inagua - Matthew Town

In assessing the tax revenues
derived from the marina and
boating industry, the draft pol-
icy document said the
Bahamas levied an annual
charge of $6.15 and $1.95 per
linear foot of dock space for
commercial and private slips
respectively in Family Island
marinas. For New Providence,
the figures were slightly higher,
standing at $6.32 and $2 for
commercial and private dock
space respectively.

But while collection rates for
these charges on New Provi-
dence were high, they were
lower for Family Island mari-
nas. For the first 10 months in
2006, the Port Controller’s
Office had collected $156,000
in charges from New Provi-
dence, but just $115,000 from
the Family Islands.

“Apparently very little” rev-

enues for business licence fees
were collected from marinas,
while there were no charges
for the use of seabed Crown
Land. The seabed was often
leased by the marina develop-
ers.

“There are no mooring or
anchoring charges other than
the $300 cruising permit and
the annual mooring charge of
$30 for private moorings and
$100 for commercial moorings
in the Family Islands, and $50
and $200 respectively in New
Providence,” the draft policy
document said.

It added that areas such as
Elizabeth Harbour in Exuma
had become popular anchor-
ages, with some boaters staying
for four to six months and only
paying $300 for a seasonal per-
mit.

“Some may, although it
appears few do, pay an annual
fee - $100 for a private anchor-
age and $150 for a commercial
anchorage on the Family

SENIOR RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

Trust & Corporate Services

A reputable financial institution headquartered in Bermuda, with offices in The
Bahamas, Barbados, the Cayman Islands, Guermsey, Switzerland and the United
Kingdom, Butterfield Bank offers a wide range of services to Jocal and

international clients.

An exciting opportunity carrently exists for a results oriented self starter with a
record of professional achievements to join a dynamic Trast & Corporate Services
team. The successful candidate will report directly to the Head of Trust &

Corproate Services..

Core Responsibilities

Oversee a group of complex client relationships.

Provide technical advice to staff on trust and-eompany structures.

Act on clients’ behalf in matters dealing with lawyers, beneficiaries, etc.

id €

Extensive experience with all aspects of trust administration.

Desired Qualifications

® Bachelor's Degree in Business or related discipline from a well recognized

university.

Five - Eight years progressive Fiduciary experience in the Financial Services

Industry.

STEP training or other suitable qualifications will be advantageous.

Proficient in Microsoft Office suite of products.

Strong interpersonal, commanication, problem solving, project management

and customer service skills.

Closing Date: February 16, 2007

Contact

Human Resources

Butterfield Bank (Bahamas) Limited



Islands, and $150 and $200
respectively for New Provi-

dence,” the document said.

“Such boaters contribute
very little to.the economy and
may, through improper waste

management practices and |

anchoring practices, be dam-
aging the environment.”

Anchoring could damage
underwater reefs and grasses,
and their had been reports of
illegal dumping of waste,
including bilge. Such boaters
had also been accused of over-
fishing in Bahamian waters,
the document argued, with the
fish then sold to other boaters
to enable the culprits to earn a
living.

To ensure the Bahamas

‘maximised tax revenues from

the marina and boating indus-
tries, the policy document sug-
gested that seabed land should
be leased, not sold, with the
leases based on appraised val-
ues and renewable indefinitely.
However, there would be five-
year rental reviews.

The more radical suggestion
is to collect real property taxes
on seabed land, and on the val-
ue of improvements made to
marina property over the
seabed.

“In the same way that the
Bahamas secures revenue from
overnight accommodation at
hotels, government should
receive revenue from boaters’
overnight stays on a per night
basis,” the policy document
suggested.

“Similarly, government
should receive revenue for the
use of land which they alienate,
just as they do for Crown
Land. And, whether it be lease

or sale, it should be based, at a.

minimum, on market value.
“Finally,:since property tax-
es related to income-streams

PUBLIC NOTICE

are one of the few income-
related taxes which are open
to the Bahamas other than the
business tax, and since prop-
erty taxes are a tax accepted
widely by most of those who
would be investing in marinas,
the property tax should also
be collected.”

The policy document sug-

sees

gested that the annual mooring °
charge be continued, with the ;

addition of a $1 per foot, per
night, mooring charge that

would not apply to Bahamian ¢

residents or people mooring
one boat near their own prop-
erty. i

The current charges of $1.95
and $2 per foot of dock space
could be “waived for private

- own-use holdings provided a

lease is being paid on the sea |

bed”.

The document suggested
that commercial marinas
should pay the higher of the
$6.13 or $6.32 per foot of dock
space on the Family Islands
and New Providence respec-
tively, or 6 per cent of revenues
for the seabed lease, bringing

the Bahamas into line with the |

taxes levied by Florida.

“In addition, local govern-
ment could be charged with
the collection of these revenues
from [property taxes and

mooring charges], and would '
be allowed to keep 75 per cent "
of the collections as an incen- -
tive to collect fees as well as °
enforce regulations,” the poli-

cy document said.
It added that investment

incentives to encourage marina

development should only be
offered in Andros and
Mayaguana, Inagua, Crooked
Island and Acklins, involving
50 per cent relief from the per

foot of dock space tax “for up-'

to.10 years”.

| INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, SHERLINE SAINT
JILLIS of Soldier Road, Church Hill Subdivision, PO.
Box SB-50431, Nassau, Bahamas intend to change my
name to SHERLINE SAINT-JILUS. If there are any

‘objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box SS-742; Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is

hereby given

that RAMEINA SYLVINA

SAUNDERS OF WEST END, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,







BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for

P.O, Bos N-3242 P.O. Box N-3242

registration/naturalization








































































Nassau, Bahamas Nassau, Bahamas .
fax: (242) 393 3772 Fax: (242) 393 3772 as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who | »
E-mail: recruitment@ butterfieldbank.bs E-mail: recruitment@ batterfieldbank.bs knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should | *
www butterficldbank.bs wow. butterfieldbank. bs not be granted, should send a written and signed statement | !
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 6TH day of | -
aN FEBRAURY, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality | -
Butterfield Bank Butterfield Bank and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas. | °
se ‘
7 :
snes = Bcc bome 3 Ty
= FIDELITY NOTICE is hereby given that LESLIE FILS-AIME OF |!
Pricing Intormation As Of: RUPERT DEAN LANE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying | »
Monday, 5 Febtua 7 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,- | *
(COC for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, | :
Os oo and that any person who knows any reason why registration/ :
Abaco Markets Previous Crees oy Yield naturalization should not be granted, should send a written | {
Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 ; : and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight | -
Bank of Bahamas 8.03 . . ; days from the 6th day of Febraury, 2007 to the Minister | -
ero 0:60 . responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, | '
ahamas Waste 1.85 7 : F 6
Fidelity Bank 1.25 3 ; : Nassau, Bahamas. r
Cable Bahamas 10.00 : : : r,
Colina Holdings 2.00 5 F i »
Commonwealth Bank 13.26 0.04 2,200 0.998 0.680 13.3 5.11% .
Consolidated Water BDRs 5.17 -0.09 0.134 0.045 38.6 0.87%
Doctor's Hospital 2.44 0.00 0.295 0.000 8.3 0.00%| ‘
Famguard 5.70 0.00 0.552 0.240 10.3 4.21%
Finco : ; : 0.570 5.7 85% : 4
Fre onsen ee 209 cre Sore gr Saat NOTICE ?
Focol 16.21 0.00 1.476 0.510 11.0 3.15%
Freeport Concrete 0.50 0.00 -0.434 0.000 N/M 0.00% PATERSON FIDELITY CORP. *
ICD Utilities : .53 ‘ 13.3 1.90% : ‘ . . :
J. S. Johnson 15.4 6.19% Is Voluntary Liquidation
Premier Real Estat 2 crooner 95%
SEA ; :
Last Price Weekly Vol. Yield *
Bahamas Supermarkets LIQUIDATIOR’S STATEMENT
ea iebesp Crossings (Pref) PURSUANT TO SECTION 137(4) OF THE :
ye INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT 2000 .
4




Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137(4) of the ,
international Business Companies Act, 2000

PATERSON FIDELITY CORP is in dissolution. .













Fund Name Last 12 Months Div $



Colina Money Market Fund 1.326132*

Fidelity Bahamas G &| Fund —-.2.9728"** “
Colina MS! Preferred Fund 2.500211** 4
Colina Bond Fund 1.217450"*** The date of commencement of dissolution was 29th November, 2006.




i.

















NAY KEY

Mr. Daniel Eisenberg, with domiciled at Tucuman 1667, Floor 1°“D”,
CP 1050, Argentine
Republic is the Liquidation of PATTERSON FIDELITY CORP.

t 12 month dividends divided by closi
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS §$ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
INAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINOEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol, - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

* - 26 January 2007

** - 31 December 2006

Ah Os &”

*** - 31 Decamber 2006
Daniel Eisenberg
Liquidator

**** ~ 31 December 2006



mber 2006


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 11B



Business highlights

ii By The Associated
Press

Bush unveils
$2.9 trillion
spending plan

WASHINGTON (AP) —
President Bush on Monday
unveiled a $2.9 trillion spend-
ing plan that devotes billions
more to fighting the war in
Iraq but pinches pennies on
programs promised to voters
by Democrats now running
Congress. Democrats widely
attacked the plan and even a
prominent Republican con-
ceded it faced bleak prospects.

Bush’s spending plan would
make his first-term tax cuts
permanent, at a cost of $1.6
trillion over 10 years. He is
seeking $78 billion in savings
in the government’s big health
care programs — Medicare
and Medicaid — over the next
five years, in part by increas-
ing premiums for higher-
income Medicare recipients.

Apple Inc.
resolves bitter
trademark dispute

SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) —
For the third time in nearly
three decades, iPod maker
Apple Inc. has resolved a bit-
ter trademark dispute with
The Beatles’ guardian Apple
Corps Ltd. over use of the
iconic apple logo and name.

But while the truce
announced Monday appeared
to finally bury the long-sim-
mering animosity, music
lovers will still need to wait
for the right to buy such songs
as “Love Me Do” or “Hey
Jude” on Apple Inc.’s iTunes
online store.

The announcement —
made jointly by one of the
world’s largest music sellers
and one of history’s most
beloved bands — was silent

on whether the. catalog: of:
Beatles songs. will become)
available for download any:

time soon.

The Beatles have so far
been the most prominent
holdout from iTunes and oth-
er online music services, and
Apple’s overtures to put the
music online have been
stymied by the ongoing litiga-
tion.

Weakness in auto
industry may be
dampening nation’s
economic prospects

NEW YORK (AP) —
Weakness in the manufactur-
ing sector, especially the auto
industry, may be dampening
the nation’s economic

The Tribune wants to hear
| from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
} award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

BEC ama
Mi LT ae :

eae

| Pon rT)

HIF ae

just call 322-—
Poe



prospects, but the bigger ser-
vices sector appears to be
more than making up for it.

The Institute for Supply
Management, which is based
in Tempe, Ariz., said Monday
that its index of business activ-
ity in the non-manufacturing
sector advanced to’59.0 in Jan-
uary from 56.7 in December.
Wall Street analysts had
expected a reading of 57 for
the latest month.

A reading above 50 adic
cates expansion, while one
below that indicates contrac-
tion.

Most economists are look-
ing for the non-manufactur-
ing sector to be a driver of
growth in 2007.

Triad Hospitals Inc.
agrees to be taken
private in a $4.7
billion sale

PLANO, Texas (AP) —
Triad Hospitals Inc. said Mon-
day it agreed to be taken pri-
vate in a $4.7 billion sale to
an affiliate of Goldman Sachs

and a firm spun off from’

JPMorgan Chase & Co.

The ‘Triad announcement
comes on the heels of hospital
giant HCA Inc.’s sale to pri-
vate owners.

The hospital industry is
struggling with flat volume
and rising numbers of unpaid
bills from uninsured patients.
Triad said Monday its provi-
sion for “doubtful accounts”
would equal. one-eighth its
revenue in the fourth quarter
and cut into earnings.

Triad agreed to be pur-
chased for $50.25 per share, a
16 percent premium over Tri-
ad’s closing stock price on Fri-

day. The buyers, affiliates of

CCMP Capital Advisors and
GS Capital Partners, will also

"assume $1.7 billion in debt.

State Street.Corp to
buy Investors Financial

' Services Corp. for $4.16
billion in stock

BOSTON (AP) — State
Street Corp. said Monday it
will buy Investors Financial
Services Corp. for $4.16 bil-
lion in stock to expand into
providing institutional asset
services for the fast-growing
hedge fund industry and funds
managed overseas.

State Street said it eclipsed
other bidders to reach an
agreement between two
Boston-based firms that would
pay IFS investors a hefty pre-
mium on their shares. That
premium shrank quickly Mon-
day, from 38 percent before
the deal was announced to 29
percent as the news dragged

down State Street’s stock.
Shares of Investors Financial
Services still soared 27 per-
cent.

IFS provides investment ser-

vices for $2.2 trillion in assets.

‘Tts revenue has grown at an

annual rate of 18 percent over
the past three years. State
Street is far larger, with $11.9
trillion in assets under custody.

Lear Corp. says group
affiliated with billionaire
investor offered to buy
company for about
$2.61 billion

DETROIT (AP) — Auto-
motive equipment supplier
Lear Corp. said Monday a
group affiliated with billion-
aire investor activist Carl
Icahn offered to buy the com-
pany for about $2.61 billion.
But its share price climbed
well above the offered price.

The offer of $36 a share
from American Real Estate
Partners LP represents a pre-
mium of 4 percent over the
stock’s Friday closing price of
$34.67.

But Lear shares rose $3.97,
or 11.45 percent, to close at
$38.64 on the New York Stock
Exchange after briefly touch-
ing a new 52-week high of
$39.88.

Southfield-based Lear,
whose products include seats
and electronic systems, and
the bidder are negotiating spe-
cific terms and there is no for-
mal agreement, the company
said.

Simon Property Group Inc.
and Farallon Capital Man-
agement LLC offering $24 per
share in cash for mega-mall
developer

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) —
Simon Property Group Inc.
and Farallon Capital Man-
agement LLC said Monday
they are offering $24 per share
in cash, or more than $1.6 bil-
lion, for mega-mall develop-
er Mills Corp., topping a pre-
vious $1.35 billion deal from
Canadian investor Brookfield
Asset Management.

In a letter to Mills, Simon
Property and Farallon said
they will each provide $650
million of equity for the trans-
action. Funds managed by
Farallon currently own about
10.9 percent of Mills out-
standing shares, making it the
largest reported Mills share-
holder.

Simon Property and Faral-
lon said their proposed ten-
der offer would give Mills’
shareholders payment at least
six months faster than the
Brookfield deal.



WANTED

Mature Male for the position of General Clerk,
| Data Entry: Messenger duties.

Requirements (these are a must):

’ Age 21-25 years;

A High School Graduate with BGCSE

passes in English and Math at Grade ‘C’ or above;
Computer Literate (MS Office);

Hardworking, Honest, Reliable, and

Possess a valid Drivers’ Licence

Fringe Benefits include:

* Life and Health Coverage

e Pension

Interested person should submit their Resume along

with the following:

¢ Acurrent Police Certificate
¢ Two (2) Character References

Manager Human Resources
HSBC Nassau P.O. Box N-4917

Nassau, Bahamas

or

Fax: 502-2566/2577

‘Application Deadline: Friday, 9 February 2007 ©



Federal Trade
Commission
finalises ruling

SAN FRANCISCO (AP)
— The Federal Trade Com-
mission finalized its ruling that
Rambus Inc. violated antitrust
laws, imposing limits on the
royalties the memory chip
designer can charge.

Wall Street was bracing for
a potentially harsher order
than the one that the FTC
released Monday, and Ram-
bus stock surged more than
24 percent.

The FTC’s final opinion
provides the sharpest criticism
to date against Rambus.

The order said Rambus vio-
lated federal antitrust laws “by
deliberately engaging in a pat-
tern of anticompetitive acts to
deceive an industry-wide stan-
dard-setting organization,
which caused or threatened to
cause substantial harm to
competition and consumers.”

Brookfield Asset
Management Inc

to buy Longview Fibre
Co. for about $1.6 billion

SEATTLE (AP) — Brook-
field Asset Management Inc.
plans to buy Longview Fibre
Co. for about $1.6 billion,
adding nearly 600,000 acres of
private tree farms and more
than a dozen forest products
plants to the Canadian firm’s
holdings.

Toronto-based Brookfield
would purchase Longview
Fibre for $24.75 per share in a
deal valued at $1.63 billion.
Brookfield also would assume
about $518 million in debt, the
companies said Monday.

Longview Fibre’s private
timberlands — ‘some 588,000
acres in Washington state and
Oregon — were the primary
lure for Brookfield, which
already owns or manages 2
million acres of timber in
North America and Brazil.

PepsiCo Inc. says
Nooyi will assume
additional title

of chairwoman

NEW YORK (AP) — Pep-
siCo Inc. said Monday that
Chief Executive Indra K.
Nooyi will assume the addi-
tional title of chairwoman of
the soft drink and snack food
company. As its CEO, she was
already one of the highest
ranked women leaders in cor-
porate America.

Nooyi takes the second title

TEN clea VEET NAN CR MTT VEL UN Nell asta ers

PROFILE:

* Bachelors Degree in Finance

¢ STEP Qualification

¢ 10 years experience in advising clients on fiduciary services and developing
appropriate legal structures

effective May 2 at the retire-
ment of former CEO Steven
Reinemund as chairman. She
succeeded him as CEO on
Oct. 1. .

With PepsiCo ranked No.
61 on the Fortune 500, Nooyi
ranks No. 2 among 10 female
CEOs of the nation’s biggest
companies. Only Patricia A.
Woertz ranks higher as chief

of Archer Daniels Midland .-

Co.; which is’No. 56 on the
list, according to the Catalyst
organization.

Dow rises
The Dow industrial average

rose 8.25, or 0.07 pele to
12,661. 74.

The Standard & Poor’s 500
index was down 1.40, or 0.10
percent, at 1,446.99, and the
Nasdaq composite index fell
5.28, or 0.21 percent, to
2,470.60.

Light, sweet crude for
March delivery slipped 28
cents to settle at $58.74 a bar-
rel on the New York Mercan-
tile Exchange.

Natural gas futures settled
at $7.634, up nearly 16 cents. -

Heating oil futures slipped
nearly a penny to settle at
$1.6756 a gallon, while gaso-
line futures settled at $1.5599
a gallon, down more than 1
cent. Brent crude for March
delivery on the ICE Futures
exchange fell 31 cents to settle
at $58.10 a barrel. .

® CALEDONIA

CORPORATE MANAGEMENT GROUP LIMITED

Invites applicants for the Full Time position of TRADER

RESPONSIBILITES INCLUDE:

+ Executing Equity and Fixed Income trades as directed
by clients and colleagues in North American Markets.

* Monitoring of trades and proactive communication with

clients

QUALIFICATIONS

* Minimum of 3 years experience with trading

a

¢ Series 7 or Canadian Securities Course

¢ Working knowledge of Microsoft Office and basic

trading platforms

* Strong organizational and communication (verbal

and written) skills

* Client oriented and team player.

¢ Must be prepared to work on Bahamian Holidays
when North American markets are open.

Salary will be commensurate with experience. Interested applicants
must submit applications by February 23rd, 2007 via:

Mail:

Human Resources Manager

Caledonia Corporate Management Group Limited

PO.Box N-8165
Nassau, Bahamas

Email:

Fax: 242.356.3969

info@caledoniagroup.com

Caledonia Corsorie Management Group Limited is a well
established, independent and licensed Bahamian brokerage and
Jinancial services firm, offering a comprehensive range of wealth
management solutions for private clients.

Jaa

FIDELITY BANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

A MEMBER OF THE FIDELITY GROUP OF COMPANIES

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:
* Client Relationship Management

* Investment of client funds

* Monthly management reports

* Quarterly reports to clients

* Business development and marketing activities

* Account opening formalities
* Invoicing & booking fees

¢ Estate Planning

¢ Administration of Trusts

* Production of trust deeds, letter of wishes & testamentary trusts
¢ Training, management and coaching of staff

Send resume no later than February 7th, 2007 to:



invites qualified applicants for the following position:

MANAGER -
Private Banking & Wealth Management Services

The applicant must have the following minimum qualifications:

¢ Superior organization, communication, interpersonal and computer skills

The Human Resource Director
Fidelity > 51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853 » Nassau, Bahamas

f: 326.3000

e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com


THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 12B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007

Naito Prime Minister Perry Christie
aoe wld aes Ee OU the ABO Oi



PM on The Tribune:

“Cut it out and
put it on your
headquarters’ wall.”

“Put the stories
on the wall.”

use it to) “Motivate
our people.



| : , |
If The Tribune can do this to the PLP...
imagine what we can do for your business.

Being bound to swear to
the dogmas of no master.



ee, The Tribune

My Voice. My Hewspapo!

'
|
|
\




oe
o@ %
oe ee

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398





B@ TRACK

’ SPIRIT OF
EXCELLENCE
PROTEST

The Spirit of Excel-
lence Track Club has
lodged a protest with the
Bahamas Association of
Athletic Associations
over the results of Satur-
day’s under-17 girls 100
metre finish at the Star
Trackers Classic that was
sponsored by Baker’s ,
Construction.

In what was a close fin-
ish at the line, Printassia
Johnson of Star Trackers
was declared the winner
in a hand time of 11.7.
Spirit of Excellence’s
Sparkyl Cash was given
second in 12.0, just
ahead of her team-mate
Leeza Glinton in 12.2.

= SWIMMING.
BSF’s TIME TRIAL

The Bahamas Swim-
ming Federation will
hold a time trial for all
swimmers interested in
qualifying for the
upcoming XXII Carifta
Swimming Champi-
onships and the

- Bahamas National Swim-

nee SS

ming Championships.

The trials will be con-
tested at the Betty Kelly
Kenning Aquatic Center
on Friday; starting at 6
p.m.. There wili be two
sessions on Saturday,
starting at 9:30 a.m. and
again at 6:30 p.m.. -

All events are open
events and all swimmers
are urged to attend.

The Carifta Swimming -
Championships will be
held April 6-11 at the
National Stadium,
Knutsford Court, New
Kingston, Jamaica. The -
Carifta Water Polo
Championships will be
held from April 12-15 at
the Pisina Benny Leito
Otrabanda, Curacao.

@ CHEERLEADING
WALTON ALBURY/
CH REEVES
WINNERS

The Wilton Albury
Primary School was the
overall winner of the
Government Secondary
Schools Sports Associa-
tion’s junior cheerlead-
ing competition that was
held on Saturday at the
CI Gibson Gym.

CH Reeves won the

junior segment of the

competition. °

On Saturday at CI
Gibson, starting at 8
p-m., the senior division
of the competition will

.*, be contested.

- ed States," he stated.

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

Te \

@ BOXING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

SHERMAN ‘the Tank'
Williams is still hoping that
he can get to come home and
fight in a live television event.

The Grand Bahama native
fighting out of Florida, had a
fight lined up for last month
with his Silver Hawks Pro-
motional team from Las
Vegas. But the fight was post-
poned until a later date.

In town over the weekend
to meet with the Minister of
Youth, Sports:and Housing

Neville Wisdom to secure a

new date and financial sup-
port from the Bahamas Govy-

ernment, Williams said it's |

important that he fights at
home so the world can see
where the triple crown holder
comes from.

Last May, Williams

: _ became the first Bahamian to

win a world heavyweight title
- the National Boxing Associ-
ation's crown - and just the
second, behind Elisha Obed,
to hold-a world title. Obed
was the World Boxing Coun-
cils' middleweight champion
in 1976.

Williams has had a stellar
career fighting in the United
States where he's won more
fights than any other Bahami-
an. But since he became a
professional, Williams has
only fought twice in the
Bahamas.

While he continues to wait
for the much anticipated
return home, Williams said
he's trying to stay as active as
he can. He's already fought
and won for the year and he's
looking forward to. his second
appearance in the ring soon.

"My phone has been ring-
ing off the hook since that last
fight in Mississippi. I have an
offer to fight in Germany and
two offers to fight in the Unit-
"No
decision has been made as
yet.

"As you know, Silver
Hawks is still working on try-
ing to get the fight here. They
have the TV ready and they
want to come to the Bahamas.
I think they are only waiting
for the commitment from the
Bahamas Government."

Williams said he's in line to
fight for the International
Boxing Organisation's Inter-
continental title in North Car-
olina. He's currently ranked
number two and so there's a

En

MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

Tank’ still aiming
for fight at home

Promotions may just jump on
that if they can't get the fight
here.

"They're looking at either
late February or early March
to put that fight together," he
pointed out. "I've had a little



break since I won the last
fight, but I started back in the
gym on Wednesday and I will
commence training on Mon-
day and see what happens."
Williams said he specifical-
ly came home this weekend



with Silver Hawk representa-
tives so that he could iron out
some of the details with Wis-
dom and the hotels. But he
said the ball is now in the
court of the Bahamas Gov-
ernment and the Bahamas






@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE

Hi HOME is where the
heart is: Sherman ‘The
Tank’ Williams. i
(Photo: Tim Clarke)

Boxing Commission.

"Silver Hawks has the TV
production in California that
they just used to shoot a fight
last week Friday in Orlando,"
Williams revealed. "It's cost-
ing them well over $300,000
and they want to make sure
that the commitment from the
Bahamas Government is
going to come through before
they bring their TV crew to
Nassau."

This show, if it comes off,
could be bigger than the
Mohammed _ Ali-Trevor
Berberk "Drama in Bahama"
that was held in 1980. The
show has been dubbed: "Big
Drama in Lil Bahama" and
they a lot of people who are
eager to come to the
Bahamas.

"T'm looking forward to it,
but business is business.
That's why I took the fight
two weeks ago," he stressed.
"I came back from Grand
Bahama on January 2. I went
back to training camp and I
learnt on January 6 that the
fight in the Bahamas had to
be pushed up.

"I stayed in the gym, con-
tinuing to train because I
knew there was a fight at the
end of January. A week later
they told me about the fight in
Mississippi as a replacement.
So I was happy to accept the
challenge because I was in the
gym training.to fight in Nas-
sau on January 27."

~.. Williams said he's happy to

hold the NBA title and

already, the president of the

organisation has emailed Sil-
ver Hawks informing them
that he may have to go to
South Africa to defend the
title during the summer.

"I'm really looking forward
to that, but definitely my
heart and my mind is on see-
ing this fight come to fruition
in Nassau," he said. "Every-
thing is in place and I know it
will not only be good for me,
but for tourism because of the
amount of people who want
to come here."

Williams said Silver Hawks
is not just looking at a one
shot deal, but they want to
make it a long term deal
where they will bring a series
of fights to the Bahamas pro-
moting Williams in his home-
town.

possibility that Silver Hawks

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Sands leaps to fourth place
in his second meet of 2007

@ TRACK AND FIELD
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter



LEEVAN ‘Superman’ Sands
picked up a fourth place finish in
the men’s triple jump, while Chan-
dra Sturrup failed to make the final
of the 60 metres at the Sparkassen
Cup over the weekend. °

Competing in his second meet for
the year after sitting out last year
with a three-month suspension,
Sands popped a leap of 55 feet, sev-

en inches on his third attempt.
The winning leap was 56-3 by
Nelson Evora from Portugal on his
second attempt. Nathan Douglas of
Great Britain did 56-2 on his third
attempt for second, while Aarik
Wilson of the United States cleared
55-8 on his third attempt for third.
The weekend before at the Sam-
sung Eurojump in Goteborg, Sands
opened his season with a third place
finish as he cleared 55-1. Cuban’
Onial Tosca won with 55-7, while
Wilson was second with 55-5.

Sands’ 55-7 feat has him tied for
10th spot on the world list with
Tosca.

The list is headed by David Giralt
of Cuba with 57-0, while world and
Olympic champion Christian Ols-
son of Swedan is sitting in second at
56-5.

Sands and Olsson have yet to go
head-to-head in competition this
year.

Meanwhile, also at the meet over
the weekend in Stuttgart, Sturrup,
running out lane four in the last of

two heats of the women’s 60, fin-
ished sixth in a time of 7.47 sec-
onds.

Training

Sturrup, who is now training on
her own after her Jamaican born-
American coach Trevor Graham
was inducted by a Grand Jury last
year over drug allegations, didn’t
make it to the final.

She posted the ninth best time in
the two heats combined: Only seven

J

competitors advanced to the final
that was won by LaVerne Jones of
the United States Virgin Islands in
7.16.

Jones’ winning time was posted
as the best in the world this year.
She also doubled at the meet with a
winning time of 51.60 in the 400.

Both Tonique Williams-Darling
and Christine Amertil-Ling have
yet to compete for the year in the
400, while Debbie Ferguson-
McKenzie has not entered in a 60
race as yel.

j
|
|

e -¢
PAGE 2E, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Malisse wins
Delray Beach title

m@ TENNIS
DELRAY BEACH, Fla.
Associated Press

XAVIER MALISSE won
his second career Delray
Beach International with a 5-
7, 6-4, 6-4 victory over top-
seeded James Blake on Mon-
day.

The third-seeded Malisse,
who has appeared in the final
here a record five times, was
trailing Blake 7-5, 3-3 when
rain suspended play on Sun-
day night. The win was
notable for the 31st-ranked
Malisse, who captured his
third career title and 200th
career match win with the vic-
tory.

“The court is almost perfect
speed for me,” Malisse said. “I
feel like I can get to every ball
if I’m in good shape. It’s not
too fast. Once you feel com-
fortable on a court it’s just the
way it goes sometimes.

When the two came back
on court Monday, the condi-
tions were extremely windy
and Malisse made the adjust-
ment quicker and better than
Blake.

“Thave to tell you if we
would have played yesterday I
probably would have lost,”
Malisse said. “He was hitting
it hard yesterday and really
clean. Today with the wind it
slowed down his ball a little:
bit especially against the
wind.”

Blake, who came into the
match with a 2-0 record
against Malisse, agreed that
he had the harder time adjust-
ing to the conditions.

“J think wind is the biggést
equalizer in tennis,” Blake
said. “It’s pretty difficult to
play your game the way you
want to. But he did a better
job of adjusting today and
deserves to win. Yesterday, I
felt I had more opportuni-
ties.”

It was Malisse’s 11th career
victory in 38 matches played
against a top-10 player — his
last came en route to winning
the Chennai title last month
when he upset second-ranked
Rafael Nadal in the semifi-
nals.

With the hybrid round
robin format played at the
tournament, Malisse lost one
of his round robin matches
against Rainer Schuettler of
Germany but still was able to
capture the title.

“It does feel weird winning
a tournament having lost a
match,” Malisse said. “That’s
just the way it is. But I don’t
feel any different. I won the
matches I had to win.”

The ninth-ranked Blake’s
loss made him the fourth top
seed to lose in the final at the
Delray Beach tournament —
a top seed has never won the
title in the tournament’s 15-
year history.:

Blake, who was looking for
his 10th career title, never
found his form on Monday
and struggled with his back-
hand.

When the match resumed at
3-3 on Monday morning,
Blake immediately went in a
hole by losing his serve in the
seventh game, enough of an
advantage for Malisse to even
the score at one set apiece.

In the third set, Blake sur-
rendered his service game at
15-40 in the third game.

Malisse also won the dou-
bles title at the tournament. It
is the second time this year he
has picked up both singles and
doubles titles at the same ©
tournament. ;

Malisse and partner Hugo
Armando won 6-3, 6-7 (5)
over fourth seeds James
Auckland and Stephen Huss.

“Tt feels awesome,” Malisse
said of the double victory. “I
feel a little tired now. It’s a
good feeling.”

Malisse is the first player to
win the singles and doubles at
two tournaments in one year
since Yevgeni Kaselnikov
picked up wins in Prague and
the French Open in 1996.









Major celebrates his
12th birthday in style

CYCLING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

JAY Major could not have
picked a better way to cele-
brate his 12th birthday than
winning his age group title in
the fourth annual Tour de
Bahamas Cycling Classic.

Major, who turned 12 on
Saturday, wrapped up the
series on Sunday in South
Ocean with a combined total
of two hours, nine minutes
and 29 seconds to clinch the
10-12 title.

“It was kind of tough,
attacks being thrown and my
legs being tired from yester-
day,” Major reflected. “The
competition felt kind of easy
yesterday. But today, they
stepped up their game. They
got stronger.”

Major, representing Team
JAR Cycling, said he gives
his rivals their respect when
he travels to Florida to com-
pete, but he wanted to make
sure that they respect him at
home.

And in turning 12 on Sat-
urday, Major said he didn’t
want to spoil his birthday cel-
ebrations.

‘ While Major was the lone
Bahamian to win his category
and be awarded a blue jacket
and trophy for his perfor-
mance, four other Bahami-
ans reached the podium to
collect their trophies.

Anthony Colebrooke was
third behind Major, but he
was not present to receive his
award.

In the 13-14 category, -

Yorkell Bain, a 13-year-old
CC Sweeting student also
competing for Team JAR,
was third in 2:14.19. Amir
Merali of Team Laser/Santi
Gabino won the title in
°2:06:29 with team-mate Ale-
jandr Nillabon Bs 09.29) sec-
ond.

“The race was good. The.

attacks they were throwing
were hard,” he said. “I felt I
did my best against them. I

just have to work on my strat-
egy and answering their

- attacks.”

Said Merali, 13: “It was
pretty good. It was different
from Miami, a lot more
aggressive. I was able to
improve on my second place
last year, so I’m happy.”

In the 15-16 division, 15-
year-old Kingsway Academy
student Laurence Jupp of
Team JAR was second in
2:06.42. He lost out to Marcus
Rodriquez (2:06.10) from
Team Laser.

“It was very hard headiise
both of us broke away from
the pack and just tried to stay
ahead of the pack,” he said.
“Before I would usually come
fifth, but I got second, so I
really improved.”

Rodriquez, 15, noted: “I
had a few breakaways. Yes-
terday, I took first in both
races, but I got second today.
This is my first time here, so I
was pleased with my perfor-
mance. Hopefully I can be
back next year.”

And in the 17-18 division,
Kevin Richardson had to set-
tle for third place in 2:15.36.
The title went to Miquel Her-
nandez from Team
Laser/Santi Gabino (2:15.26)
with team-mate Andres Cano
(2:15.31) second.

“TI felt bad because I want-
ed to come first, but it was
pretty hard for me,” said
Richardson, a 17-year-old
12th grader at CR Walker.

“IT just didn’t come
through.

“It was just me against four
guys from the same team. I
had to-keep trying to attack
against them. But I felt weak
at the end. I knew if I had
some help, I could have done
better.”

Hernandez, 17, said he has-
n’t been training as much as
he should have and he felt it
during the race. But he knew
what his performance was in
the time trial and his victory
in the road race made the dif-
ference iets



irae del Eee oo
at the double
in BSC event

f CRICKET

IRELAND'S wicketkeeper Niall O'Brien
appeals after he stumped Netherlands' batsman
Peter Borren during the ICC World Cricket
League Division 1 match at the Nairobi
Gymkhana Club in Nairobi, Monday, Feb. 5,
2007. The Netherlands won by six runs.





* (AP Photo/Sayyid Azim)

Florida Stock Readly for Immediate Shipment



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‘UE DAA? Hol

@ BASKETBALL

THE Baptist Sports Council
kicked off its 2007 Rev. Tyrone
Knowles Basketball Classic on
Saturday atthe Charles W. Saun-
ders High School, Jean Street.

Macedonia Baptist escaped
with two close victories in the
boys 15-and-under and 19-and-
under divisions, while Faith Unit-
ed, while Kemp Road Ministries
pulled off a sneaker in the men's
division and Faith United had to
go to double overtime for a big
15-and-under victory.

© Here's a summary of the
sulla pune:
acedonia 23, New
Caria 20: Marvin Roberts
pumped in 10 points and Jamaal
Brown contributed nine as Mace-
donia held on to win their 15-
and-under opener, welcoming
New Covenant into the league.
Rhemar Lewis scored seven
and Kerbie Oxgenor added five
in the loss.

@ Kemp Road Ministries 50,
Temple Fellowship 47: Dario
Rolle canned 18, Dennisaon
Johnson had 10 and Leonardo
Morris added eight as Kemp
Road Ministries made a success-
ful debut into the men's division.

Drexel Burrows scored 15, Ish-
ban Lynes had 12 and Edwin
Burrows nine in the loss.

i Macedonia 49, Faith United
48: Dominic Sweeting led a bal-
anced scoring attack with 14,

Rohn Johnson had nine,
Cordero Johnson eight and
Anwar Smith finished with six
to lead Macedonia to their 19-
and-under opener.

D'Angelo Miller had a game
high 16 and Stephano Johnson
chipped in with 12 to pace Faith
United in the loss.

@ Faith United 26, Mt. Tabor
22: Lamar Albury converted two
free throws and.Charlton Robin-
son added a lay-up as Faith
United held Mt. Tabor scoreless
in the second overtime to win
their 15-and-under opener.

The game was tied at 18 at the
end of regulation and 22 at the
end of the first extra two minute
period.

Albury finished with a game
high 15 and Robinson had four in
the win.

Cressward Cox led Mt. Tabor
with five and Tovann Adderley
had four.



from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

i

Share your news

The Tribune, wants to hear

A full slate of games are on tap
on two courts on Saturday:

Court One - 10 a.m. Golden
Gates vs Transfiguration (15-
and-ynder); 11 a.m. St. Paul's
Bias Street vs New Covenant
(19-and-under); Noon Calvary
Bible vs St. Paul's Bias Street
(M); 1 p.m. St. Paul's Fox Hill
vs First Baptist (M); 2 p.m. First

Baptist vs St. Paul's (15-and- .:.

under); 3 p.m. Golden Gates vs
Everlasting Life Ministries (19-
and-under).

Court Two - 10 a.m. Ebenezer
vs Kemp Road ministries (15-
and-under); 11 a.m. First Baptist
vs Ebenezer (19-and-under);
Noon Church of Nazerene vs
Transfiguration (19-and-under);
1 p.m. Bahamas Harvest vs Mt.
Tabor (M); 2 p.m. Church of
Nazarene vs Macedonia (M); 3
p.m. New Bethlehem vs New
Covenant (M).:













.


saaaanessannssenaneannnennnneeeiannnnneannnanaheOanneemnnnennennennseennnannne anne

The Aiami Herald



PRO FOOTBALL
COMMENTARY



DAVID DUPREY/AP

SPORTSMANSHIP: Indianapolis head
coach Tony Dungy, right, hugs

Chicago head coach Lovie Smith a

after Dungy’s Colts beat the
Bears 29-17 in the Super Bowl on
Sunday night in Miami.

Dungy and
the Colts
will be back

BY DAVE GOLDBERG
Associated Press

MIAMI — There never should
have been any doubt about Tony
Dungy as a coach, even without a
Super Bowl ring.

Now that he has one, anyone ho
doesn’t list him at the top of the heap
among today’s coaches isn’t in touch
with the NFL. Dungy, though, in his
characteristi-
cally humble
manner, dis-
missed that

— notion Monday.
Se . “IT grew up
under Chuck Noll,” he replied when
asked about comparisons with his
mentor. “No, he’s not someone I think
Icanbe grouped with.”

Think it, Tony.

Yes, Noll won four Super Bowls in
six seasons with Pittsburgh inthe |
1970s. But that was in an era where,
without free agency, he didn’t have to
worry about losing a Joe Greene, Jack
Lambert, Lynn Swann, John Stali-
worth or Terry Bradshaw. Those
players were there, season after sea-
son until age got to them.

Dungy?

The day after he won his first
Super Bowl, he was thinking about the
possibility of losing Dwight Freeney,
Dominic Rhodes and Cato June, three
core players. The Colts might protect
Freeney with a franchise player tag,
not always the best thing because it
can lead to bitterness and potential
holdouts and divide a unified team.

_ COMPARISONS

But that’s the way of this decade .
and it hasn’t hurt Bill Belichick, who
has won three Super Bowls with New
England despite letting many of his
most important players go — from
Lawyer Milloy after the first win in
2002 to Deion Branch and Willie
McGinest last season. Even so, the
Patriots made it to the AFC champi-

. onship game, led Indianapolis 21-3 in
the first half and most likely would
have beaten Chicago if a late drive by
Peyton Manning hadn’t put the Colts
in the Super Bowl instead of the
Patriots.

Compare Dungy with Belichick?

Sure.

Since becoming coach of the Colts
in 2002 — after (unwisely) being fired
by Tampa Bay — he is 60-20 in the
regular season. That’s one game bet-
ter than Belichick, who is 59-21 over
the same period.

Yes, Belichick has three Super
Bow! wins, one of them earned the -

. year before Dungy took over the
Colts.

But there’s no reason that Dungy’s
first title, the result of his team’s 29-17
win over Chicago on Sunday night in
the Miami rain has to be his last.

He reiterated Monday that he will
stick around and that he wants more.
“I still have a lot of passion and

enthusiasm for the game,” he said.
“After a night like last night, how
could you not love it? So I’m not
burned out, I’m not tired at all. ’'m
very fired up and looking forward to
coming back.”

A UNIQUE MAN

There are a number of things that
make Dungy unique, many of them off
the field. He talked Monday about
growing up in Jackson, Mich., hoping
to become an NFL player but never
dreaming of becoming a coach — that
just wasn’t for blacks.

He was a very average player at
best.

But he became a pioneer among
coaches — if not the first of his race in
the NFL, certainly the best. One ques-
tioner during his news conference



* TURN TO GOLDBERG

vsannnaennnygcnnannnnnanoncabap nanan oAAneeee AAA AARNE NANNARAAALE AAA

"| | TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007
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INTERNATIONAL EDITION

SUPER BOWL | INDIANAPOLIS COLTS

Frigid city unites for a warm rally

BY STEVE HERMAN
Assaciated Press

INDIANAPOLIS — The India-
napolis Colts shared triumphant
shouts and high-fives with fans
who braved the 8-degree chill to
flock to their floats as the Super
Bowl champions paraded through
downtown Monday night.

An estimated 40,000
fans packed the RCA Dome
to welcome the team home
at.a post-parade rally. Some
had been there for hours.
The parade, first scheduled
for 4 p.m., got under way
about 6 p.m. after the Colts’ plane
from Miami was about an hour

late. ABA championship
Already, some fans were lodking
ahead to another run for the NFL
crown next year.

“J think if they just stay healthy

“It might be a once-in-a-lifetime
thing,” Robert Smith of Indianapo-
lis said while watching a giant-
screen TV replay of Sunday night’s

29-17 victory over Chicago.

Many of the fans were wearing
Colts blue.

“I don’t know how to explain it.
These are exciting times,” fan Eric
Dycus of Indianapolis said. “The
Indianapolis Colts waited for this
for a long time. We went through
the hard times and all of the muck

and mire. This is worth cel-
ebrating.”

The Colts won the Super

Bowl in 1971, when the team

was based in Baltimore, but

Sunday’s victory over Chi-

cago gave the city its first

major pro title in any sport since

the Indiana Pacers won their third

again,” Dycus said.

build the RCA Dome.

great,” Fairchild said.

in 1973.
again.”

tributed to this report.

and do what they’ve been doing,
we might be able to pull it off

Roger Fairchild, a construction
worker from Brownsburg, helped

“I spent a lot of cold days in
here before the roof was on. This is

The Colts will play one more
year in the Dome before moving
into the new Lucas Oil Stadium,
which is expected to be completed
in time for the 2008 season.

“T know at times I wondered if it
would happen in this building
when they started building a new
stadium,” Fairchild said.
highly ‘likely they can pull it off

AP Sports Writer Cliff Brunt con-

e MORE NFL NEWS

rps



“Tt’s

TOM STRICKLAND/AP

THE PARTY PLACE: Colts fans °
wait to enter the RCA Dome
to attend a Super Bowl rally in
Indianapolis on Monday.

PRO BASKETBALL | LOS ANGELES LAKERS 90, ATLANTA 83

Carrying the broom



\\S
Ss
SS

GREGORY SMITH/AP

LAKERS’ LEADER: Lakers guard Kobe Bryant, right, takes a shot against Hawks guard
Joe Johnson in the fourth quarter on Monday in Atlanta. Bryant scored 27 points,
nine straight in the fourth quarter, to lead Los Angeles to a 90-83 victory.



PRO BASKETBALL | STRATEGY

Not free of charge

ii Players have been more willing in the past decade to pay the price and take a charge
in an effort to dissuade opposing players from attacking the basket.

BY ISRAEL GUTIERREZ
igutierrez@MiamiHerald.com

It takes vision, courage and a pinch of fool-
ishness.

It requires good basketball instincts, but a
complete disregard for all human instincts.

It is arguably the most unnatural act in
sports.

And, really, all it entails is standing abso-
lutely still — and bracing fora painful collision.

Taking a charge in the NBA is the sports

equivalent of jumping in front of a moving vehi- -

cle and simply waiting to absorb the impact. It’s
literally taking one for the team.

It is a fundamental defensive play that has
become about as common in basketball’s
trenches as blocking a shot. Although the NBA
does not keep charges taken as an official statis-
tic, it appears to have become a more common
practice in the past decade or so, with more
players realizing the benefit of taking the hit to
keep points off the board.

* TURN TO HEAT

Lakers sweep
season series
from Hawks

BY CHARLES ODUM
Associated Press

ATLANTA — Kobe Bryant, mostly quiet
through three quarters, scored nine straight
fourth-quarter points to lead the Los Angeles
Lakers to a 90-83 victory over the Atlanta Hawks
on Monday night.

Bryant scored 27 points, including 11 in the
final period, as the Lakers swept the Hawks for -
the first time in seven years. The Lakers
improved to 3-2 on their eight-game road trip
with their second straight win.

Bryant wagged his index finger at Atlanta
fans after his fourth straight jumper in his hot

streak, which left the Lakers with a 77-71 lead.

The Hawks, who pulled within three points
early in the period, came no closer than six the
rest of the way.

Joe Johnson led Atlanta with 27 points but
made only 10 of 26 shots. Josh Smith scored 20
points and Zaza Pachulia added 14.

Only two players joined Bryant in double fig-
ures for the Lakers. Lamar Odom had 15 points
and 18 rebounds, and Andrew Bynum added
another double-double with 14 points and 10
rebounds.

The Lakers, who beat Atlanta 106-95 at home
on Dec. 8, completed their first season sweep of
the Hawks since the 1999-00 season. Even in
recent seasons, when the Hawks bottomed out
with 13- and 26-win totals, the Lakers managed
no better than a split of the two games.

Lakers coach Phil Jackson said he was aware
of his team’s inability to take advantage of poor
Atlanta teams in recent years:

“This game is a little space in time,” Jackson
said before the game. “I’m always concerned
about Atlanta. We don’t play well here.”

The Lakers didn’t play their best early but
still led almost from the start. Smith opened the
game with a reverse jam — his first of four
flashy slam dunks in the game — but the Lakers
quickly pulled even on a tip by Bynum and
never again trailed.

Bryant was held to nine points in the first
half.

e MORE NBA GAMES



STEVE C. WILSON/AP

FALL GUY: ‘It’s a way you can play effective
interior defense without being a shot
blocker,’ Michael Doleac, left, said of
taking charges.
4E | TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007 _ INTERNATIONAL EDITION



LOUISVILLE

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Crum’s legacy comes full circle

BY WILL GRAVES
Associated Press

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — The
coach in Denny Crum is still
there, percolating under the
ever-present grin and just-so
hair. But these days, the for-
mer Louisville coach keeps his
opinions to himself.

“My wife doesn’t want to
hear it anyway,” Crum said
with a laugh.

So instead, the man who led
the Cardinals to 675 wins and a
pair of national champion-

ships simply watches from the ,

stands at Freedom Hall, trying
his best to blend in with the
rest of the 18,000 red-clad
Louisville supporters.

Of course, when you spend
three decades building a pro-
gram into one of the nation’s
best, blending in can be a little
difficult. During a recent Lou-
isville home game, Crum
received a standing ovation

when an in-house camera’

panned to him, during a time-
out. '

The ever-bashful 69-year-
old Crum simply waved and
looked away, almost embar-
rassed by the outpouring of
support.

“I didn’t even realize why
they were cheering,” Crum

MEN’S TOP 25 POLL

said. “My wife had to poke
me.”

Crum won’t need to be
prodded Wednesday night,
when the university dedicates
Denny Crum Court at Free-
dom Hall before the Cardinals
face Georgetown.

It’s an honor that was hard
to imagine six years ago, when
Crum abruptly retired after
losing a battle of wills with
Louisville athletic director
Tom Jurich following a 12-19
season in 2000-01.

“It was disappointing the
way it all had to happen,” Jur-
ich said. “But it was a fact of
life that we had to face. I wish
it would have been different.
One of the reasons I came here
was because of Denny Crum.
That made it more difficult.”

Looking back, however,

‘ Crum views his retirement as

a blessing. While the passion
to coach still bubbles up from
time to time, he’s focused on
finding a life away from
crowded gyms on cold winter
nights.

He’s more likely to carry a
fishing pole these days than
the folded up program he’d
smack against his hands dur-
ing games, a habit he picked
from his mentor, former

Florida Gators
are unanimous
No. 1 selection

BY DOUG FEINBERG
Associated Press

The Florida Gators are No.
‘1 for the fourth straight week...

played play after play down
the stretch,” said Aggies coach

“Billy Gillispie. “I guess that is

how you win games on the

This time, there’s no doubt: =,oad. It’s aigreat win for us.”

about it.

Florida became the first
unanimous No. 1 in The Asso-
ciated Press college basketball
poll in nearly two years, gar-
nering all 72 first place votes
Monday. ,

The Gators had 45 first
place votes last week, but the
defending national champions
benefited from losses by
then-No. 2 Wisconsin and No.
3 North Carolina. The last
unanimous No. 1 was Illinois
in the final poll of 2004-05.
The Illini were unanimous in
six of the final seven polls that
season.

_ “We're very honored to be
voted a unanimous No. 1 in the
nation. I realize it doesn’t hap-
pen very often,” said Florida
coach Billy Donovan. “At the
same time, we’re aware that a
lot of that has to do with what
other teams have done around
us. There’s still a long way to
go and we’re just trying to get
better each day, but it’s cer-
tainly always flattering to be
No. 1 in the nation.”

- Florida (21-2) beat then-No.
24 Vanderbilt 74-64 and Ten-
nessee 94-78 last week.:

UCLA moved up three
spots to No. 2 after beating
Oregon 69-57 and routing Ore-
gon State 82-35 on Saturday.
The Bruins finished two
points ahead of Ohio State, fol-
lowed by Wisconsin and
North Carolina.

Completing the top 10 were
No. 6 Texas A&M, followed
by Pittsburgh, Memphis, Kan-
sas, and Butler. Texas A&M
moved up four spots after a
thrilling 69-66 win at Kansas
on Saturday.

“We just hung in there. We

The victory left the Aggies
(19-3, 7-1 Big 12) all alone in
first place just three years
after stumbling 0-16 through
the conference season.

Marquette starts the second
10 in the rankings, followed by
Nevada, Oregon, which
dropped four spots after being
swept by UCLA and USC,
Washington State and Air
Force.

Duke took the biggest fall of
teams still in the poll, drop-
ping eight spots to No. 16 after
losing in the final seconds to
Virginia and Florida State this
week. It is the Blue Devils’
lowest ranking since the 2000
season. :

-The Blue Devils face rival
North Carolina on Wednesday
night and will try and avoid
their first three-game losing
streak since 1999 — when
Duke lost its last game of the
1998-99 season and dropped
the first two in 1999-00.

“We've lost a couple in a

row, and no matter who it is,
we're going to be ready to
play,” Duke guard Greg Paulus
said.
_ Oklahoma State fell five
spots to No. 17 after losing at
Colorado 89-77 on Saturday.
Alabama moved up one spot
to 18th.

USC re-entered the poll at
No. 19 after beating Oregon
State and Oregon.

“We’ve been in so many
close games. They understand
close games and know how to
win,” Trojans coach Tim
Floyd said. “We’re showing
great poise when we need
poise, and we’re showing
attack when we need to
attack.”

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Bales leads N 5 l Duke’s rout of Clemson

Associated Press

DURHAM, N.C. — Alison
Bales scored 15 of her season-
high 21 points in the first half
and No. 1 Duke routed Clem-
son 105-53 on Monday night to
remain perfect entering its
showdown with second-
ranked North Carolina.

Carrem Gay scored 18
points and Abby Waner had 16
for the Blue Devils (24-0, 9-0
Atlantic Coast Conference),
who matched the Tar Heels’
spotless record. The Tobacco

Road rivals play Thursday in
Chapel Hill in a meeting of the
last two remaining unbeatens.

Wanisha Smith added 13
points for Duke.

D’Lesha Lloyd scored 14
points to lead the struggling
Tigers (10-13, 2-6).

e No. 3 Tennessee 73,
No. 9 Georgia 57: In Knox-
ville, Tenn., Candace Parker
had 22 points and 11 rebounds,

.and Tennessee pulled away in

the second half to beat Geor-
gia.

UCLA coach John Wooden.

“T’ve really enjoyed my life
since I stepped down,” Crum
said. “I spent my whole life
coaching. I didn’t know what a
normal life was. But after a
few months of living in a dif-
ferent world, I really enjoyed
having the kinds of freedoms
that I never had as a coach.”

Freedoms such as hunting,
fishing and playing poker with
some of his former players,
spending time with his family
and co-hosting a local sports
talk show with former Ken-
tucky coach Joe B. Hall.

Yet where so many legend- :

ary coaches fade into the shad-
ows once they step down,
Crum has remained visible. He
works as a special assistant to
president James Ramsey and
attends various alumni func-
tions with former players like
Darrell Griffith, who helped
the Cardinals win their first
national title in 1980.

“His outreach goes beyond
the athletics and Freedom
Hall,” Griffith said. “He’s had
an influence on this commu-
nity that you can’t even put
into words.”

The hard feelings that sur- ©

rounded Crum’s retirement
are gone. He is now embraced



by the same alumni base that
was screaming for change at
the end of his career. An
alumni meeting Crum
attended in Chicago last

Month stretched two hours

longer than expected, as fans
asked for one more picture,
one more story, one more
handshake.

“Coach Crum is Louisville
basketball,” said Rick Pitino,

‘who. was Jurich’s surprise

replacement for Crum despite
taking arch rival Kentucky to
the national championship in
1996. “He’s built an unbeliev-
able tradition. It’s very
unusual that someone could
bypass all the temptations of
professional basketball and
other jobs and stay and be so
loyal to the university.”

That loyalty includes deftly
sidestepping any questions
about the current state of Lou-
isville basketball. Pitino led
the Cardinals to the Final Four
in 2005, but has struggled
somewhat since joining the
Big East last season. Yet Crum
has been respectful and sup-
portive, even. as the coach
inside him screams to be let
out from time to time.

“You can’t coach for 41
years and then all of a sudden

cS

PHIL SANDLIN/AP

MAKING HIS POINTS: Florida’s Joakim Noah reacts to his
making two points in the second half of the Gators’
94-78 victory over Tennessee on Saturday.

The Trojans were followed
by Kentucky, Southern Illinois
and Georgetown — all of
whom were new to the Top 25
this week.

The Wildcats, who were
last ranked in week 10, beat
Arkansas 82-74 on Saturday.

The Hoyas came back into
the media poll for the first
time since week 3. They
routed Cincinnati and St.
John’s.

Southern Illinois has won
five straight and came into the
poll for the first time since the
end of the 2003-04 season.

“Its a nice reward for our
players, who have worked
extremely hard to achieve this
level of success,” said South-
ern Illinois coach Chris Low-

Alexis Hornbuckle added 14
points and Alex Fuller had 11
for the Lady Vols (21-2, 8-0
Southeastern Conference).

ELSEWHERE

A former Penn State wom-
en’s basketball player on Mon-
day settled a discrimination
lawsuit against longtime coach
Rene Portland, more than a
year after claiming that Port-
land had a “no lesbian” policy
on her team.

Penn State spokesman Bill

ery. “At the same time we
can’t become complacent
because we’re in the heart of
our conference schedule right
now and every game is criti-
cal.”

Vanderbilt, Arizona and
Stanford round out the Top 25.

Virginia Tech fell out of the
poll after being ranked No. 16
last week. The Hokies lost to
N.C. State and Boston College.
Texas, Notre Dame and Clem-
son also left the Top 25.

There are five games
between ranked teams this
week, and two are on Wednes-
day: USC at UCLA and North
Carolina at Duke; Florida at
Kentucky, Marquette at
Georgetown and Arizona at
Oregon are on Saturday.

Mahon and the lawyer for for-
mer player Jennifer Harris
said the agreement called for
settlement terms to remain
confidential.

In a December 2005 law-
suit, Harris accused Portland
of “humiliating, berating and
ostracizing” her, and claimed
she was told that she needed
to look “more feminine.” .

The suit alleged that Port-
land tried to force Harris, who
says she is not gay, to leave the
team.



MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD



not think about what’s going
on there,” Crum said. “I see a
lot more than a lot of people
do. But I just try to be a fan. I
don’t think I’ll ever get to the
point where I won’t enjoy a -
good game, especially where .
it’s Louisville.”

Now, the coach who never
intended on spending 30 years
playing at a school that perpet-
ually lingered in the shadows
of Kentucky before he got
there finds himself a perma-

|
{
|

| BY CHUCK SCHOFFNER
For The Associated Press

The defending champs are
slipping and the Colonials
are rising.

Maryland, which led the
AP women’s basketball poll
for the first 10 weeks this sea-
son, fell two more places to
sixth Monday after losing to
an unranked opponent for
the first time in two years.

The Terrapins’ 77-72 loss
at Georgia Tech last Thurs-
day came four days after they
lost at home to North Caro-
lina. While they rebounded
to beat Boston College 71-39,
coach Brenda Frese’s team
has gone just 4-3 since start-
ing 18-0.

Duke, North Carolina and
| Tennessee remained the top
| three teams, while George
| Washington jumped three
places to eighth, matching
the Colonials’ highest rank-
ing in 15 years. And for just
the third time in the last 12
weeks, the poll had no new-
comers.

The teams ranked 21
through 25 last week went a
combined 9-0, including vic-
tories over higher ranked
opponents by California,
Nebraska and Rutgers. Cal
beat then-No. 8 Stanford,
Nebraska defeated then-No.
13. Baylor and Rutgers
knocked off Marquette,
which had been 16th.
‘Duke (23-0) received 42 of
50 first-place votes from a
national media panel and had
1,242 points to lead the poll
for the fourth straight week.
The Blue Devils. beat Vir-
ginia Tech and Virginia last
week. They played Clemson
on Monday night, then face a
showdown at North Carolina
on Thursday.

North Carolina (24-0)
received the eight other first-
place votes and had 1,208
points. The Tar Heels should
be well rested for Duke
| because it will be their first
| game in a week. They beat
Boston College 82-60 in their
only game last week.

Tennessee (20-2), which
has lost only to Duke and
North Carolina, had 1,135
points in the voting.

No. 4 Ohio State and No. 5
Connecticut each climbed
one place to move ahead of
Maryland. The Terrapins

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third after their Jan. 13 loss to
Duke, then fell to fourth last
week after the loss to North
Carolina.

LSU remained seventh
and was followed by George
Washington, Georgia and
Arizona State.

George Washington (19-2)
has won 12 straight since a
Dec. 7 loss at Tennessee and
| matched the No. 8 ranking it
held the week of Feb. 2, 1992.
The Colonials’ highest rank-
ing is sixth, a position they
held for three weeks in Janu-



WOMEN’S TOP 25 POLL

UM
had dropped from first to:



DAVID LONGSTREATH/AP FILE PHOTO

ABOUT TO BE HONORED: LouisviHe coach Denny Crum
gestures to his team as players from the bench begin to
celebrate during the closing moments of their 88-77
victory over LSU in the NCAA semifinals on March 29,
1986, in Dallas. Louisville is renaming its basketball floor
the Denny Crum Court.

nent part of the program he
turned into a national power.
“You can’t spend 30 years
at a place and not grow to love
it or you’d have been gone
long before,” Crum said. “The
fact that I loved it here and
they seemed to want me here
and it just seemed to go on for
a long time (is special). It’s not
a common thing in this busi-
ness for coaches to stay at one
place. There’s only a few of us
who get a chance to do that.”

GW rises

ary of 1992,

Georgia beat LSU 53-51
last week and jumped five
places to ninth, the biggest
gain in the poll. The Lady
Bulldogs have been as high
as eighth this season. Arizona
State moved up two spots.

Stanford dropped three
places to llth after Sunday’s
72-57 loss to Cal, the Bears’
first victory over the Cardi-
nal since 2001. Stanford lost
point guard JJ Hones to a
knee injury in that game. Cal
lost its starting point guard,
Alexis Gray-Lawson, to a
season-ending knee injury in
December.

No. 12 Oklahoma and No.
13 Purdue also fell three
places. Oklahoma: lost to
unranked Texas before beat-
ing Oklahoma State. Purdue
lost to Ohio State, then beat
Minnesota.

Vanderbilt climbed one

spot to 14th and was followed
by Baylor, Texas A&M, Lou-
isville, Bowling Green, Mid-
dle Tennessee and Califor-
nia.
Nebraska, Rutgers, Mar-
quette, Wisconsin-Green Bay
and James Madison held the
final five places.

Filling those last spots has
been a challenge this season,
said voter Patricia Babcock
McGraw of The Daily Herald
in Arlington Heights, II.

Several teams have moved
in at the bottom of the poll
during the season only to fall
out a short time later, includ-
ing Texas Tech, Arkansas,
Pittsburgh, Mississippi,
Texas, Kansas State and New
Mexico. Nebraska has been
ranked the last three weeks
but had a ‘one-week stay in
December.

“I think there definitely
has been some parity rearing
its head,” McGraw said. “The
thing I thought has been
interesting, I’m starting to
look more seriously at mid-
major conferences. We even
see that in our poll now.
There are smaller schools in
there with staying power.”

George Washington is
one. The Colonials joined the
poll at No. 23 on Nov. 20 and
have been climbing steadily
since. Bowling Green has
been ranked for eight weeks,
while Middle Tennessee has
been in the Top 25 for the
last five weeks. Wisconsin-
Green Bay and James Madi-
son both stayed in for a sec-
ond straight week.

“I’m looking at those
teams a lot more this year,”
McGraw said. ‘Because
there’s been so much move-
ment in the bigger leagues
and a lack of consistency in
the bigger leagues.”

Marquette had the biggest
drop in the poll, falling from
16th to 23rd. The Golden
Eagles were beaten at home
by Connecticut after losing
at Rutgers.




PAGE 6, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



TL aU
‘Ingraham: we'll fix Freeport problems



































m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT — FNM Leader
Hubert Ingraham has promised
to restore economic confidence
in Freeport if the Free Nation-
al Movement is returned to
office.

He said the party will focus
on restoring Freeport’s poten-
tial as the country’s second city,
and give reputable, well funded
investors the confidence they
require to acquire, restore, and
upgrade properties like the
Royal Oasis Resort.

While on Grand Bahama

over the weekend attending the:

FNM Grand Bahama Women’s
Association prayer breakfast,
Mr Ingraham said things have
not been as bad as they present-
ly are in Freeport and Grand
Bahama in general since the last
PLP government.

SEER,

“Some people believed those
PLP hard times would never
come again — not to this won-
derful island and not after the
transformation 1992 brought.
They were wrong.

“They believed there was a
plan, a fresh wind blowing, help
and hope. They weren’t alone.
Most of the Bahamas believed
and voted for them,” he said.

Mr Ingraham claims that the
PLP have betrayed the Bahami-
an people’s trust.

“They are the same self-inter-
ested, self-promoting, and
unethical grouping. They are
unfocused, incompetent, ineffi-
cient, and as scandal-ridden as
the last PLP government,” he
said.

“Their leader, Perry Christie,
went to a rally in Fox Hill earli-
er this week to deliver a mes-
sage to his party faithful, and
made a threat to ordinary

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Bahamians, but most particu-
larly to FNMs.

“Mr Christie told them to get
to know all of those who are
against them, to cut their pic-
tures and their stories out of
The Tribune and post them on
their headquarters’ walls so that
they could, and I quote him, ‘...
spare no effort to go to every
crook and cranny of the
Bahamas, and to ensure that
every time they (that’s you) rise
up, we (that’s them) put them
(that’s you again) back down’.

“And that is what they have
been doing — going after every
FNM they can find and doing
their best to bring them down,”
he said.

Mr Ingraham said victimisa-
tion started under the present
government at BAIC in 2002
and has not let up. He said the
PLP cannot be trusted. ,

Mr Ingraham pointed to a
number of things the FNM will
do in Grand Bahama if they win
the election.

He said the party will ensure
that the highest standards are
observed by all developers so
as to safeguard the environment
from further degradation.

The FNM, he said, will part-
ner with investors in Grand
Bahama’s tourism sector to
more effectively promote the
island’s resorts and tourism
facilities internationally.







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The party will also support
the industrial sector of Grand
Bahama so as to facilitate the
kind of expansion in that sec-
tor experienced between 1992
and 2002, he said.

Mr Ingraham said the FNM
we will determine the appro-
priate levels and kinds of sup-
port required to promote and
encourage the revitalisation of
Grand Bahama’s agricultural
sector.

“We will affect greater link-
ages between the productive
sectors of your economy,” he
said.

As election draws near, Mr
Ingraham urged FNMs, partic-
ularly in Grand Bahama, to
begin in earnest their prepara-
tions.

“IT want to express the
tremendous gratitude we hold
for all those who, in these per-
ilous economic times on this
island, have carried the banner
of true help and hope on their
mission to rescue the perishing
and care for the socially mar-
ginalised.

“And we record our thank-

fulness and appreciation to all |

those who during these difficult,
trying months and years con-
tinued to hold high the torch
throughout this island as a sym-
bol and a promise that better
will come again with the FNM,”
he said.







‘Rey. Ilsa Evans
Mt. Tabor





B ae iS

Do you thrive on analytical tasks

and have a strong desir € to learn new things?

We are seeking a results orientated Accounts

Associate to provide assistance in the areas of

a timely manner.

Plus Group of Companies is an established

continuing to build it's team of professionals

in various areas.



auditing, analyzing and reconciling financial

and accounting records with accuracy and in .

Bahamian owned group that is growing &

We offer a competitive salary & benefits °
package as well as ongoing professional

training & development. .

Skills Required:

e An Associates Degree in Accounting

Engineering or Mathematics

A minimum of two years accounting

experience working in finance.

An in-depth knowledge of financial

processes, relating to operational and

inventory intensive retail issues

A strong team player able to interact with

many departments

A solid work ethic with regard to being on

time & completion of work

A working knowledge of Microsoft Office®

FURNI



‘If you would like to work with the very best, Let’s Talk!

Limited

aaa Seen aE
Furniture « Appliances ¢ Electronics

Please submit your application by Mail to:
Director of Human Resources

The Plus Group

PO. Box N713

Nassau, Bahamas

or eMail: jobs@theplusgroup.com

We thank all applicants, however only those

selected for an interview will be ‘contacted.

a al
PAGE 8B, ILUESUVAY, FEBHUARY 6, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





EFG @ Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd






POSITION AVAILABLE

A growing offshore financial institution is currently
seeking to fill the following position:

CREDIT RISK OFFICER








The position will entail the administration and
maintenance of credit risk, inclusive of preparing,
evaluating and processing loans and other credit
instruments offered by the Bank. Additional duties
and responsibilities will encompass the preparation
of weekly and monthly reports.

Minimum preferred qualifications: Degree in Banking
and Finance or equivalent, plus two (2) years’ related
experience.









‘Analytical skills: The ability to read and proficiently
interpret financial statements is required.



Working knowledge of Microsoft Office is essential,
including Word and Excel; written and spoken Spanish
would be an asset; the candidate should have good
organizational skills and. be a self-starter.






Compensation will be commensurate with
experience. Interested applicants must submit
applications by February 13, 2007 to:




\



EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited
Human Resources Manager
(Re: Credit Risk Officer) —
P. 0. Box SS-6289
. Nassau, Bahamas
or fax to (242) 393-1161







LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000) ©

LATIN AMERICAN
INFRASTRUCTURE III FUND INC.

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No.45
of 2000, the Dissolution of LATN AMERICAN
INFRASTRUCTURE III FUND INC. has _ been
completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has _ been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register. The date of completion’ of the dissolution was
8th day of January. 2007.

ALRENA MOXEY
LIQUIDATOR

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of: 2000),
NEW DIMENSION PROPERTIES LTD. is in dissolution. Mrs.
Alrena Moxey is in the Liquidator and can be contacted at The
Winterbotham Trust Company Limited, Marlborough & Queen
Streets, Nassau, Bahamas. All persons having claims against the
above-named company are required to send their names addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the liquidator before
Sth March, 2007.

\

ALRENA MOXEY
LIQUIDATOR

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
CIT MANAGEMENT (USA) BAHAMAS LIMITED is in
dissolution. Mrs. Alrena Moxey is in the Liquidator and can be |
contacted at The Winterbotham Trust Company Limited,
Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau, Bahamas. All persons
having claims against the above-named company are required to send
their names addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
liquidator before the Olst day of February, 2007.

ALRENA MOXEY
LIQUIDATOR

Business awaits
‘final draft on —
China tie-up

FROM page 1B

International Distributors
was attracted to Freeport’s
transhipment/logistics/distrib-
ution potential because of its
tax-free status, and the fact it
was “the only port in the West-
ern Hemisphere large enough
to take the post-Panamax
ships”. =

Development of the Grand
Bahama distribution facility
will “save a tremendous
amount of trouble and
expense” .for Associated
Growers and its customers.

The company has a lot of
non-US customers, and has
found that importing produce
from China and other markets
to its US distribution facilities
for re-export to other markets
is “knocking the price up” as a
result of having to pay US
import duties.

Therefore, the Bahamas
facility would be used to
receive product from other
markets that was due to be
exported to regions such as
Latin and South America, and
provide customers with better
prices that they can pass on to
consumers.

Currently, International Dis-

INSIGHT

For the stories behind the
news, read Insight Mondays



tributors’ Grand Bahama facil-
ity cannot supply Bahamian

wholesalers and the major food
chains with produce, but Mr
Deffler replied “absolutely”
when asked whether the com-
pany wanted to do this.

He added: “We did speak to
the Prime Minister and’ had
lengthy discussions last
Wednesday about that. We
currently supply a lot of the

’ wholesalers and retailers out

of Miami, and if we can supply
them from there, it would
make more sense to do it from
here.”
The Tribune understands
that pressure from some major
Nassau-based wholesale agen-
cies was responsible for the ini-
tial stipulation that the Grand
Bahama facility could not
directly supply Bahamians.
They are understood to have

feared that the arrangement

would disrupt the established
supply chain in the Bahamas,
and could allow ordinary peo-
ple and ‘mom and pop’ stores
to purchase their goods direct
from International Distribu-

tors.

However, the latter’s pro-
duce will be boxed, shipped
and stored in a secure, sterile
warehouse area in Freeport
that cannot be accessed by the
public. International Distribu-
tors deals only with bulk
orders, making it impossible
for ordinary people to effect
purchases, especially if mini-
mum orders and the produc-
tion of a business licence is
required.

The savings wholesalers and
the major food chains would
make from International Dis-
tributors facility could then be

passed on to Bahamian con- -'. ’
sumers through lower prices, ’. ’

a subject many have been
grumbling about recently in
relation to alleged price
increases at Bahamas Super-
markets.

Mr Deffler said Internation-
al Distributors would employ
about 200 people when the
warehouse’s first phase was fin-
ished, adding: “We’ve been
taking applications. I’m getting
a rush right and left, and we’ll
start taking resumes officially .
in June.”

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in cccemdance wih Section 138 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
CAPRI INVESTMENTS SERVICES’ INC. is_ in
dissolution. Mrs. Alrena Moxey is in the Liquidator and can be
contacted at The Winterbotham Trust Company Limited,
Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau, Bahamas. All persons
having claims against the above-named company are required to send
their names addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
liquidator before 5th March, 2007.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

VALUED PARTNERS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No.45 of
2000, the Dissolution of VALUED PARTNERS LIMITED
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was
8th day of January. 2007.

ALRENA MOXEY
LIQUIDATOR

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
LIQUIDITY INVESTMENTS & GROWTH FUND LTD. is in
dissolution. Mrs. Alrena Moxey is in the Liquidator and can be
contacted at The Winterbotham Trust Company Limited,
Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau, Bahamas. All persons
having claims against the above-named company are required to send
their names addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
liquidator before 5th March, 2007.

ALRENA MOXEY
LIQUIDATOR



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
INVESTPRO FUND INC. is in dissolution. Mrs. Alrena Moxey
is in the Liquidator and can be contacted at The Winterbotham
Trust Company Limited, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau,
Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-named
company are required to send. their names addresses and particulars
of their debts or claims to the liquidator before Sth March, 2007.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

OPPORTUNITY VETURES
INVESTMENTS FUND INC.

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No.45
of 2000, the Dissolution of OPPORTUNITY
VENTURES INVESTMENTS FUND INC. _ has
been. completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was
| 8th day of January. 2007.

LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

LATAM ADVISORS INCORPORATED

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 137 (8)

of the International Business Companies Act, No.45 of 2000,
the Dissolution of LATAM ADVISORS INCORPORATED
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was

8th day of January. 2007.


THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com





RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Monday’s results Tonight’s games






Sunday’s results



PRO BASKETBALL

From Miami Herald Wire Services

WASHINGTON — Caron Butler scored a
career-high 38 points to help the Washington
Wizards overcome Gilbert Arenas’ mediocre
night and beat Seattle 118-108 on Monday, the
SuperSonics’ franchise-record 15th consecu-
tive road loss. ;

With Arenas held to 16 points on 4-for-14
shooting and Antawn Jamison out with a
sprained left knee, the Wizards needed to
find scoring elsewhere — and they did. Bren-
dan Haywood added a season-high 20 points
and ll rebounds, second-year forward
Andray Blatche contributed a career-high 14
points, and DeShawn Stevenson added 15

WARRIORS 113, PACERS 98

INDIANAPOLIS — Stephen Jackson
scored a season-high 36 points against his
former team, leading the Warriors.

Jackson was a key part of the eight-player
trade between the teams on Jan. 17, and this
was the first meeting between the clubs

Al Harrington, another player involved in
the trade, had 16 points, 10 rebounds and five
assists. Andris Biedrins added 10 points and
15 rebounds for the Warriors.

76ERS 100, NETS 98 (OT)

PHILADELPHIA — Andre Iguodala had
23 points, 15 assists and seven rebounds to

EASTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHEAST W L Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away _ Conf
Washington 28 19 .596 - 7-3 W-1 19-5 9-14 19-10
Orlando 25 23 521 3% 3-7 L-l 16-10 9-13 15-14
Miami 23-25 «A795 55 ~W-4 13-10 10-15 12-14
Atlanta 18 29 383 10 55 L-l 9-14 9-15 12-19
Charlotte 18 30 375 10% 5-5 L-1 10-14 8-16 12-19
ATLANTIC = WL Pet. GB L10" Str. Home Away Conf
Toronto 25 23 521 - 16-7 9-16 17-9
New Jersey 22 27 .449 3% 3-7 L-4 13-12 9-15 16-13
New York 21 28 429 4% 4-6 W-l 12-13 9-15 13-18
Philadelphia 16 33 .327 9% 6-4 W-l 812 8-21 117 |
Boston 12 34 .261 12 0-10 L-14 419 8-15 821 |

;
CENTRAL = WoL Pet. |__.Cont
Detroit 28 18 .609 20-10 |
Chicago 28 20. .583 20-6 20-8
Cleveland 27 21 «563 17-7 10-14 17-14
Indiana 26 22 542 15-8 11-14 19-13
Milwaukee 18 30.375 10-9 8-21 8-20
1
i

WESTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHWEST WL Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Dallas 39 9 B13 “- 91 W-4 22-3 17-6 27-6
San Antonio 32 16 667 7 55 L-2 168 16-8 21-11 :
Houston 30 17 638 8% 6-4 W-1 17-6 13-11 17-15 points.
New Orleans 21 26 .44717% 6-4 W-2 14-11 7-15 12-17
Memphis 12 36 .250 27 3-7 L-2 916 3-20 6-22

i
NORTHWEST WL Pct, GB 110 Str. Home Away _ Conf
Utah 31 17 646 - 7-3 W-2 17-6 14-11 20-10 |
Denver 23 22 «511 6% 5:5 Ll 13-12 10-10 10-14 |
Minnesota 22 26 458 «#49 28 L4 13-9 9-17 13-18 |
Portland 20 29 .40811% 5-5 L-2 12-13 816 13-16 |
Seattle 17 31 4.354 14 «4-6 «LS 13-12 4-19 7-19 |
PACIFIC = WL _ Pet, GB L110 Str. Home Away _ Conf | since.
Phoenix 37 10.787 - «B82 OL 20-4 «17-6 17-9 |
L.A. Lakers 30 19 .612 8 4-6 W-2 19-6 11-13 17-10 |
LA. Clippers 24 23 SIL 13) 7-3 LL 17-8 7-15 14-17 |
Golden State 23 26 .469 15 46° W-l 17-8 6-18 13-15) |
Sacramento 19 26 .422 17 5-5 W-2 13-41 6-15 10-18 |
|
|
{
{

Bos. at Detroit, 7:30
Clippers at N.Y., 7:30
Hou. at Memp., 8
Orlando at Mil., 8
Phx. at Port., 10

Miami 113, Charlotte 93
Lakers 90, Atlanta 83
GS. 113, Indiana 98
Wash. 118, Seattle 108
Phil. 100, N.J. 98 (OT)
Houston 105, Minn. 77
Phx. at Den, late

Chi. at Utah, late

N.O. at Sac., late

Tor. 122, L.A.C. 110
- Atl. 101, N.J. 99 (OT)
Det. 90, Cle. 78

lead the 76ers to the overtime victory.

Samuel Dalembert scored 14 points and
grabbed 17 rebounds, and Andre Miller had
18 points to give the Sixers their fifth victory
in eight games.



INTERNATIONAL EDITION

PRO BASKETBALL | HOCKEY

HARAZ N. GHANEARUAR
THE HOT HAND: Wizards forward Caron

Butler shoots over SuperSonics center
Johan Petro during his 38-point night.

HEAT 113, BOBCATS 93

MIAMI — Dwyane Wade scored 27
points and Shaquille O’Neal had his best
scoring game since returning from knee sur-
gery, scoring 22 points to lead the Heat.

ROCKETS 105, TIMBERWOLVES 77 :

HOUSTON — Tracy McGrady scored 16
of his 32 points in the third quarter to lead
the Rockets.

SLAM DUNK COMPETITION

NEW YORK — The guys judging the slam
dunk competition might be better than the
ones competing in it.

__TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007 | 5E





Butler powers Wizards by Sonics

Former dunk champions Michael Jordan
and Dominique Wilkins lead a prominent list
of judges for the last competition of All-Star
Saturday night. They will be joined by Hall of
Famer Julius Erving and two other champs
who will play in the All-Star Game: Kobe
Bryant and Vince Carter.

New York guard Nate Robinson will try to
defend his title in the Feb. 17 event in Las
Vegas. Orlando All-Star Dwight Howard,
Chicago rookie Tyrus Thomas and Boston’s
Gerald Green round out the field.

ELSEWHERE

e Heat: Guard Gary Payton was sus-
pended for one game without pay for talking
back to an official who ejected him during a
victory over the Milwaukee Bucks on Satur-
day night. Payton served the suspension
Monday night when Miami hosted the Char-
lotte Bobcats.

e Nuggets: The team was without stars
Allen Iverson and Marcus Camby for its
game against the Phoenix Suns late Monday
night. Camby, the league’s No. 2 rebounder
and shot blocker, strained his left groin Sat-
urday night at sacramento. Iverson missed
his fourth consecutive game with a sprained
right ankle and said he hoped to return
Wednesday night against the Hornets.

e SuperSonics: Forward Rashard Lewis
will participate in full-contact practice today
after missing 12 months with a right hand
injury and could be back in the lineup as
soon as Saturday.

e Bulls: Forward Andres Nocioni was
taken out of the lineup for Monday night’s
game at Utah betause of a foot injury.





FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

A ‘painful’ and
more prominent
part of an already
physical game

*HEAT

“It’s a way you can play
effective interior defense
without being a shot blocker,”
Heat center Michael Doleac
said. “Being a shot blocker is a
hard thing to do.”

Taking a charge is no cake-
walk, either. But as scorers
continue to find ways to avoid
getting their shots blocked,
taking a charge has become a
more effective way of defend-
ing against a driving guard, a
big man with a head of steam
or even an oncoming fast
break.

“[The charge] has become
more prominent now,” Knicks
forward David Lee said. “I
think it’s just because guys
have gotten crafty on offense
with their shots and avoiding
the block. You’ve got to find a
way to play defense on that.”

It might seem like an easy
concept, standing in front of
another player and drawing
an offensive foul. But there
are several elements that
make it fairly complicated.

In most cases, taking a
charge involves a_ help
defender anticipating an
offensive player’s movement,
beating him to that spot and
establishing a legal defensive
position with his feet set
before contact is made.

ANTICIPATION

“Being able to take a
charge, it’s like you see the
play a couple of steps or a
couple of frames before it
actually develops,” Jazz guard
Derek Fisher said. “Especially
now with the athletes we have
in the league, if you’re a half
second late in getting there,
you’re either going to get
dunked on or they’re going to
call a blocking foul.”

In most cases, those colli-
sions are coming in the paint.
So that semicircle right in
front of the basket adds
another component. Inside of
the semicircle is called the
restricted area, meaning a
player attempting to take a
charge cannot be standing
within, on or straddling over
that boundary.

“That’s the biggest thing I
fight with taking charges is
getting out of [the restricted
area] early enough,” Doleac
said. “I’m not the quickest guy
in the world, so when plays
happen I’ve got to be right on
top of it and come quick just
to get out of there in time.”

Then there’s one final ele-
ment that always completes
the charge process: falling
backward.

“If you don’t go down,
you're not going to get the call
— which doesn’t make any
sense,” Doleac said. “You
have to go down and go down
hard like you got hit by a
truck.”

The combination of taking
a hit up front and falling.on
your behind can make for
some painful, often memo-
rable collisions.

“In practice in L.A., I took a
charge on [Shaquille O’Neal]
one time, and that was the last
time I ever tried to do that,”
said Fisher, a former team-
mate of O’Neal’s with the Lak-
ers. “It probably took me two
to three days to feel normal
again, or to feel comfortable
standing in front of a big guy
coming through the lane. He
was coming with a lot of
speed that day.”

Some players have become
particularly skilled at drawing
charges. Houston’s Shane Bat-
tier has built a reputation as a
strong defender in large part
because of his penchant for
drawing the offensive foul.
James Posey and Udonis Has-
lem are probably the best at it
among Heat players.

“If somebody knows I’m
going to be there to take a
charge, I’m pretty sure they’re
going to think before they go
to the basket,” Posey said.
“Therefore, they’re shooting
jump shots. If that’s the case,
they’ll have to shoot a high
percentage on their jump
shots. That’s part of the game,
that’s how I play.”

MAKING A CHANGE
For others such as Antoine

. Walker, it’s an act forced’

upon them. In his previous 10
seasons in the league, Walker
has never been a take-charge
guy. Last season, his first with
the Heat, he estimates that he
took one the entire season. So
after a few strong words from
Heat coach Pat Riley this sea-
son, Walker is near 20 for the
season, according to stats the
team keeps, and among the
team leaders.

“I just never really had to
do it in my career,” Walker
said. “When I watched film,
there were so many opportu-
nities for me to take charges.
[Riley] told me I should start
taking hits. He felt like I was
cheating the team by not tak-











NICK LAHAM/GETTY IMAGES

HE’S STILL A NOVICE: ‘I just never really had to do it in my
career,’ Antoine Walker, right, said of taking charges.

ing hits because everybody
else was willing to do it.

“It’s painful. Sometimes
you get hit in the wrong areas.
But it’s not as bad as J thought
it would be.”

For offensive players driv-
ing the lane, avoiding the
charge has become its own
skill. It takes creative foot-
work, adjusted flight patterns
and sometimes body contor-
tion.

But the biggest adjustment
is simply getting used to the
whole concept. In pick-up
games, there’s no such thing
as a charge. So some players
still consider it a cheap way of
playing defense.

“I used to [think that
way],” Heat guard Dwyane
Wade said. “But now I under-
stand because I’m on a team
with guys that take a lot of
charges and we did it at Mar-
quette. I understand it’s part
of the game. It’s a smart part
of the game. But as an offen-
sive player, you hate it.”

O’Neal believes there is
honor in going for a blocked

shot rather than taking a
charge — particularly for the
big men.

“A lot of big guys take
charges because they know
the referee knows they’re
inferior to the guy that they’re
guarding, so they’re going to
flop and they’re going to get
the call,” O’Neal said. “A lot
of these charges shouldn’t be
charges.”

Much to O’Neal’s chagrin,

however, the unathletic act of |

standing still and taking a
beating has become an
increasingly common prac-
tice.

And to the ones withstand-
ing the pain, it hurts so good.

“J think on this level and in
college, it’s got to be a part of
the game,” Lee said. “I don’t
think there’s anything cheap
about it. Not everybody’s ath-
letic enough to block shots,
and there has got to be a way,
when a guy takes off, to get
the defense to stop him. It’s a
good play.

“There’s got to be a sacri-
fice.”





HOCKEY

Wings rally to
upend Rangers

From Miami Herald Wire Services

NEW YORK — Henrik
Zetterberg capped Detroit’s
three-goal third period with a
power-play tally, and the Red
Wings overcame Dominik
Hasek’s shaky start to. beat
the New York Rangers 4-3 on
Monday night.

Zetterberg got to a loose
puck off the stick of Rangers
forward Blair Betts in front
of the New York net and
quickly slammed in a shot to
break a 3-3 tie with 7:24 left.
It gave Detroit its fourth con-
secutive victory and eighth
in ll games.

The Red Wings will cer-
tainly want more trips to

_ New York than the current

schedule allows. Their past
two road games have both
been in the metropolitan area
and featured big third peri-
ods in comeback victories.
Detroit, which hadn’t
played at Madison Square

Garden since Oct. 25, 2003,
erased a 3-0 deficit to the
Islanders in the third period
last Tuesday before winning
in overtime.

Hasek earned the victory
despite making only 17 saves.
Henrik Lundqvist stopped 22
shots for the Rangers.

ELSEWHERE

e Kings-Rangers trade:
Sean Avery, the most-penal-
ized player the past two sea-
sons, was traded to the New
York Rangers in a deal that
sent checking forward Jason
Ward to Los Angeles.

Avery had 10 goals, 18
assists and 116 penalty min-
utes in 55 games this season
with the Kings, who also
acquired the rights to
unsigned forwards Marc-
Andre Cliche and Jan Marek.
Los Angeles sent 19-year-old
prospect John Seymour to
the Rangers.

EASTERN CONFERENCE

SOUTHEAST W eoL OL SLPTS GF
Atlanta 29 18 6 2. 66 169
Tampa Bay 29 23 1. 1 #60172
Carolina 26 22 3 4 59 166
Washington 22 25 2 = #5 51 165
Florida 20 24 4 #6 = 50 153

ATLANTIC

New Jersey
Pittsburgh
N.Y. Islanders
N.Y. Rangers
Philadelphia

NORTHEAST

Buffalo
Montreal ~
Ottawa
Toronto
Boston 23 24

OL SLPTS GF

190
3 74 166
4 50 135
3
5

Nashville 37 (14
Detroit 34 14
St. Louis 21 24
Columbus 21 27
Chicago 19 26

47 133
45 129

NN PWPh



Calgary 3
Vancouver 29 20 1 3 = 62 139
Minnesota 29 21 O 4 62151
Edmonton 26 23 2 2 56147
Colorado 25 23 2 2 54 162
L OL SLPTS GF
1392 «6 72 :173
San Jose 34 18 O 1 69 163
Dallas 31 20 0 2 64 140
Phoenix 24 27 1 #1 50 144
Los Angeles 18 30 4 3 43 154









GA HOME
170 -14-9-3-1
165 13-13-0-0 16-
176 = 14-10-1-3
189 13-11-1-2
176 = -14-10-2-1










GA

136.
130
164
166
162

137
155
155
TGA NOME 2 AWAY a
135. 18-4-1-4 14-9-1-2 12-3-0-1
123 18-10-0-1 16-8-0-0—11-9-0-1
130 15-8-0-1 16-12-0-1 15-6-0-0
180 13-12-1-0 11-15-0-17-13-1-1
195 11-12-4-3 7-18-0-0 6-14-0-2

Note: Two points for a win, one point for a tie and overtime loss

RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Monday’s results
Detroit 4, N.Y. Rangers 3

Tonight’s games

Florida at Colorado, 9
Buffalo at Atl., 7
Boston at Wash.,

Sundays results

Washington 2, Islanders 1 (SO)
Montreal 4, Pittsburgh 3 (OT)

7

Phoenix at Columbus, 7
Carolina at Mont., 7:30
N'ville at Pitt., 7:30

L.A. at Tampa Bay, 7:30
Rangers at NJ., 7:30
Minnesota at Dallas, 8
Toronto at St. Louis, 8
Vancouver at Edmonton, 9
Chicago at Calgary, 9
Anaheim at San Jose, 10:30
OE | TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007__ INTERNATIONAL EDITION



BY JENNA FRYER
Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Jim-
mie Johnson was the clear
favorite to win last season’s
Nextel Cup championship, an
easy pick after coming so very
close so many times before.

This year’s pick isn’t nearly
as obvious, with 50 drivers
revving their motors in pursuit

*of dethroning NASCAR’s new-
est champion. Jeff Gordon
wants a fifth Nextel Cup title.
Tony Stewart is fired up after
missing last year’s Chase, and
Matt Kenseth’s goal is to win a
second title, this time under a
new points system.

But no matter how you
break it down, the champion-
ship is Johnson’s to lose.

“It’s hard to win one, much
less back to back, and to do
anything twice in a row is
tough,” said Stewart, who won
titles in 2002 and 2005. “I can
go to Vegas and put a whole
bunch of money on a number,
and to have it hit once is some-
thing, but to come back again
and have it hit again.”

Only seven drivers have
won consecutive Cup titles —
none since Gordon in 1997 and
1998.

Even though the odds are
clearly against him, Johnson
plans to make a full-speed run
at title No. 2.

“I am a race car driver, and
I want to win championships,”
he said. “I always wanted to
win one, and now I’ve got it.

DEFENSE CLOSES IN:
Harvard’s Paul
Dufault, center,
attempts a shot
against Boston
College goaltender
Cory Schneider, left,
as BC’s Brent
Motherwell, right,
and others defend
in Boston on
Monday. ..



That whole experience makes
you hungry and want to come
back and do it again.

“I feel with the team and

_everything that we have [at

Hendrick Motorsports], we
could be a contender for a few
more of these.”

Johnson has every reason to
believe he can do it again,
because his 2006 title was no
fluke. Since entering the Nex-
tel Cup Series five years ago,
Johnson consistently has been
among NASCAR’s top drivers.

The No. 48 team never has
been lower than fifth in the
standings and was twice
runner-up in the champion-
ship. That earned Johnson the
dubious distinction of being

AUTO RACING | ETC.

_..MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD



NASCAR | IN THE PITS

Johnson looks to pull off rare Nextel repeat



the Peyton Manning of
NASCAR — the guy who
dominated the regular season,
only to come up short when
everything was on the line.

When Johnson and crew
chief Chad Knaus finally
cleared that final hurdle last
November, overcoming a
disastrous start to the Chase,
Johnson was freed of that
label.

“A lot was said that they
might not be able to win it, and
Jimmie couldn’t get it if he
didn’t get it last year,” car
owner Rick Hendrick said.
“Well, he did. I think a lot of
the pressure is off. The pres-
sure now is not to prove he
can be a champion. The pres-



n MITCHELL LAYTON/GETTY IMAGES AND LISA BLUMENFELD/GETTY IMAGES
AT PRAISE AND AT WORK: At left, 2006 Nextel Cup champion Jimmie Johnson poses with President Bush inside the
White House Oval Office on Monday in Washington, D.C. At right, Johnson drives during NASCAR testing at Las
Vegas Motor Speedway on Jan. 30.

sure is on himself to come

back and be in the hunt again.”

It again starts with Knaus,
who learned valuable lessons
last season. First, he realized
he had to back off just a bit to
sustain the energy and drive
Johnson needed over the long
36-race season.

Knaus also learned to dele-
gate but had trouble easing up
initially. When he was caught
cheating during Daytona 500
preparations, a four-week sus-
pension forced Knaus to slow
down. With the crew chief
watching from home, Johnson
rallied to win at Daytona and
again in Las Vegas two weeks
later.

When Knaus returned to

the track, he was able to main-
tain an even pace the rest of
the year.

Now, his challenge will be
allowing his guys to celebrate
last season’s success without
losing the intensity that made
them champions.

“You have to give the guys
an opportunity to go out there
and soak it in and feel a sense
of accomplishment,” Knaus
said. “Because if they are
working continuously and
they don’t get any type of
reward for what they have
done, they are going to feel
like "Why am I applying
myself and working myself to
death for nothing?’ ‘

“The drivers take off and g

to France and Italy (during the -°."-
offseason), but the guys are in *."

here working like crazy. It’s a
balance that you’ve got to find,
and I think we did a good job.
We just have to wait and see.”

The mind-set of Knaus and
his crew will be just one part

of Johnson’s success, which

also will depend on how he
handles his new role as ambas-
sador to the sport.

The demands on Johnson’s
time have increased, and the
spotlight magnifies every- .
thing. He learned that the hard

way last December when he . |

fell off a golf cart and broke his -_
wrist while goofing around. °

Reluctant to reveal exactly
how he was injured, Johnson

had to backtrack when the °

truth came out.

“It can get overwhelming ie

with the expectations,” said
Gordon. “Every show, every
print and TV, every media,
every fan wants more of you. .
That’s a good thing, but at the
same time, it can be hard to
manage.”

The only certainty is John-
son plans to give his pursuit of
a repeat title his full attention. ©

“I think we have to go out
there and prove ourselves
every week,” Knaus said.
“Anytime somebody rolls into
a season or an event thinking
that they are the favorite, you
are going to get your butt
handed to you. So we won't
take the mentality that we are
the favorites.”





ELISEAMENDOLA/AP

Boston University meets
ollege in final

Boston C

Associated Press

BOSTON — Benn Ferri-
ero had a goal and an assist,
Cory Schneider stopped 20.
shots and Boston College
advanced to the finals of the
55th Beanpot Tournament
with a 3-1 win over Harvard :
on Monday night.

Nathan Gerbe and Brian -
Boyle also scored for the
Eagles, who reached the
championship game for the
fourth time in five seasons
and will play Boston Univer-
sity for the title next Monday
night. Earlier, John Curry
made 27 saves to lead the
two-time defending cham-
pion Terriers past Northeast-
ern 4-0.

The annual tournament
features Boston’s four Divi-
sion I hockey programs
vying for a coveted trophy
and citywide bragging rights.
The Eagles have won the
tournament 13 times — sec-
ond to BU’s 27.

The two rivals will meet
in the final for the sixth time
since 2000, including the sec-
ond consecutive year. BU
beat BC 3-2 for last year’s
championship before .the
Eagles went on a late-season
run and advanced to the
national title game, where
they lost to Wisconsin.

Dan McGoff had two
goals to help BU advance to
its 13th consecutive Beanpot:
title game. Pete MacArthur
and Kenny Roche also scored
for the Terriers.

BU, which has won 10 of
the last 12 championships
and advanced to 23 of the
past 24 title games, has as
many championships as the
other three schools com-
bined.

“I thought this was our
most thorough game of the
year,” Terriers coach Jack

Parker said. “We did a lot of
things very well, which
helped us control our own
destiny.”

The Terriers, ranked No.
8 in the nation, entered ona
three-game winless skid
(0-1-2) and were coming off a
0-0 tie last Friday against
UMass-Lowell. ©

“We needed a confidence

booster,” Curry said. “Last

Friday wasn’t the best game,
but tonight we came out and
we really refocused quickly.
We only had two days of
practice and the next day we
were a little bit down, but we
had to get geared up for this
game. We couldn’t dwell on
it.”

They didn’t. After getting
outshot' 11-8 in the first
period, BU outshot North-
eastern 29-16 the rest of the
way and scored twice in 48
seconds midway through the
second period to break a
scoreless tie.

MacArthur retrieved a
pass from Chris Higgins just
to the right of the crease,
then sneaked the puck past
Northeastern goalie Brad
Thiessen to give BU a 1-0
lead 8:59 into the second
period.

Roche made it 2-0 when
he faked left, then beat
Thiessen to the right on a
breakaway at 9:47.

Thiessen saved 33 shots
for Northeastern, which
hasn’t won the Beanpot since
1988 and has failed to
advance past the first round
in four of the past five years.

“We came into this Bean-
pot thinking we were going
to win,” Northeastern for-
ward Mike Morris said.
“We've been playing good
hockey and we are a confi-
dent group.”

The Huskies had a chance

to make it a close game, but
couldn’t get anything past
Curry during a 5-on-3 power
play spanning the second and
third periods.

Curry stopped 11 shots in
the first period, nine in the
second and seven more in
the third to improve to 4-0 in
Beanpot competition, includ-
ing wins in each of the last
two title games.

McGoff scored both his
goals in the third period to
give the Terriers a cushion.

“T really felt this game was
men against boys,” North-
eastern coach Greg Cronin
said. “The bottom line is,
they outskated us, they
outhit us and they out-pos-
sessed us with the puck.
Game over.”

In the second game, Dylan
Reese scored and Kyle Rich-
ter made 29 saves for Har-
vard, which hasn’t advanced
to a Beanpot final since 1998
and hasn’t won the tourna-
ment since 1993.

The Crimson jumped out
to a 1-0 lead when Reese
fired a slap shot through a
crowd and past Schneider
8:12 into the first period. But
the 15th-ranked Eagles
stormed back, outshooting
the Crimson a combined
21-15 in the second and third
periods.

After BC tied it l-all by the
end of the first on Ferriero’s
goal from just inside the blue
line; Gerbe’s short-handed
goal put BC up 2-1 6:22 into
the second. A streaking
Gerbe retrieved a pass from
Ferriero, then glided the
puck between the post and
Richter’s glove.

Schneider stopped nine
shots in the second period
and six more in the third.
Boyle scored an empty-net
goal in the closing seconds.



SPORTS ROUNDUP

Coroner says USC kicker was
drunk when plunging to death

From Miami Herald Wire Services

Southern California kicker
Mario Danelo was drunk
when he plunged over a cliff
to his death, but the coro-
ner’s office Monday was
unable to say why he fell.

A toxicological report
accompanying Danelo’s
autopsy report found he had
a 0.23 blood-alcohol level,
nearly three times the legal
limit in California. No drugs
were detected in his body,
the report said.

The autopsy report said
the cause of death was multi-
ple traumatic injuries, but
“because of the unanswered
questions, we are stating the
manner of death as undeter-
mined,” Deputy Medical
Examiner Jeffrey Gutstadt
of the Los Angeles County
Coroner’s office wrote in the
report.

The 21-year-old player
was found Jan. 6 more than
100 feet down a rocky cliff in
San Pedro, Calif. Police said
from the outset that foul play
was ruled out and his death
was either an accident or a
suicide.

Following Danelo’s death,
several Southern California
players said they were con-
vinced the kicker did not
take his own life.

A USC spokesman
declined to comment about
the coroner’s report. Dane-
lo’s brother, Joey Danelo,
was not immediately avail-
able for comment.

The report also couldn’t
ascertain Danelo’s state of
mind before his death, but he
“would have had to scale a
wall to get to the strip of land
before the steep drop of
about 150 feet while under
the influence of alcohol.”

Danelo, the son of former

NFL kicker Joe Danelo,'

made 15-of-16 field goals this
season and led the Trojans in
scoring with 89 points. He
made two field goals in the
Rose Bowl on New Year’s
Day to help USC beat Michi-
gan 32-18.

He missed two field goals
in his two-year career at
USC, going 26-for-28, and he
was 127-of-134 on extra
points.

He set NCAA single-sea-
son records with 83 extra
points and 86 attempts in the
2005 season.

Danelo was a walk-on at
USC in 2003 and received a
scholarship two years later.

ETC.
e Auto racing: Casey
Mears got a new crew chief

Monday, just four days _

before NASCAR begins
preparations for the season-
opening Daytona 500.
Fortunately for Mears,
he’s teaming with last year’s
race-winning crew chief.
Darian Grubb, who led
Jimmie Johnson to the
Daytona 500 victory, will
now lead Mears’ No. 25 team

at Hendrick Motorsports. -

Grubb, an engineer on John-
son’s crew, filled in for Chad
Knaus during his four-race
suspension last season.
Grubb led Johnson to a pair
of victories during his stint.

“Darian is one of the most
respected voices in our orga-
nization and has proven to'be
a terrific leader,” team owner
Rick Hendrick said. “He and
Casey represent an exciting
new combination for the No.
25 team, its sponsors and its
fans.”

Grubb takes over for
Lance McGrew, who was
crew chief for Brian Vickers
when he drove the No. 25.
McGrew will stay with Hen-
drick Motorsports in a lead-
ership role.

e Skiing: Sami Musto-
nen of Finland and Olympic
champion Jennifer Heil of
Canada won freestyle World
Cup moguls events in La
Plagne, France.

Mustonen beat Alexan-
dre Bilodeau of Canada,
with Olympic champion
Dale Begg-Smith of Aus-
tralia in third.

Guilbaut Colas of
France, who finished fifth,
maintains the lead in the
World Cup moguls standings
with 257 points. Begg-Smith
is second with 234 points.

Heil beat Deborah Scan-
zio of Italy, and Margarita
Marbler of Austria was third.

Shannon Bahrke of the
United States placed fifth
and still leads the moguls
standings with 290 points —
six points ahead of Heil. ...
The start of the Alpine Skiing
World Championships was
postponed for a third day
Monday because of strong
wind and poor visibility in
Are, Sweden. The men’s
super-G, which had already
been postponed from Satur-
day, was moved to today.
The championships will now
open today with both the
men’s and women’s super-

G’s — one race run right
after the other. The women’s
race was postponed Sunday.

e Baseball: Julian
Tavarez pitched three-hit
ball into the sixth inning and
the unbeaten Dominican
Republic eliminated defend-
ing champion Venezuela
from title contention in the
Caribbean Series with a 7-1
victory in Carolina, Puerto
Rico.

It was the second time in
four days that the Dominican
Republic’s Cibao Eagles
(4-0) defeated Venezuela’s
Aragua Tigers (1-3), includ-
ing a 4-3 victory in 18 innings
on Friday.

Tony Batista hit an RBI
double for the Dominican
Republic and Jose Fer-
nandez had a pair of RBI
singles.

Puerto Rico played Mex-
ico in the late game Monday.

e Doping: The World
Anti-Doping Agency is
counting on increased gov-
ernmental backing, a revision
of banned substances and
more funding to fight the use
of banned drugs in sports.

WADA vice chairman
Jean-Francois Lamour,
director general David
Howman and UNESCO
director-general Koichiro
Matsuura spoke Monday at
the opening of a conference
of countries that have signed
up to an international con-
vention against doping.

The conference will be
asked to approve any
changes to the 2007 list of
prohibited substances. Mat-
suura called it “vital” that a
banned list “is universally
accepted, so athletes and
support personnel are fully
informed.”

During the three-day con-
ference, delegates will also
create a global monitoring
fund to help eradicate dop-
ing. Matsuura said govern-
ments around the world have
a crucial role in providing a
“much-needed framework to
implement the world ant-
doping code” and that uni-
form guidelines are needed
“to ensure the seamless
application of the conven-
tion.”

Unanimously adopted by
UNESCO’s General Confer-
ence on Oct. 19, 2005, the
anti-doping convention was
ratified by member states
and entered into force on
Feb. 1.


THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com __



SUPER BOWL



PRO F



~tnepeenseneanmnannrannrna rve yan tina tviernatirnenntenatfen ne natnirAnn vin

OOTBALL



INTERNATIONAL EDITION __ TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007 | 7



Colts stand tall on bear of a night

he rain never let up.
| Neither did the
Colts.
The rain only got stronger.
So did the Colts.
That was what impressed
‘you most about Indianapolis
raising the Vince Lombardi
Trophy as Super Bowl XLI
champion here after a Sunday
night as his-
toric as it was
sodden.

It was
Bears
weather that
Peyton Man-
ning and.
coach Tony
Dungy’s
Colts over-
came.

It was conditions that didn’t
suit the Colts through which
Manning erased all of the
harping about his inability to
win a championship, and
through which Dungy was car-
ried off the field on shoulders
and into history as the first
black coach to win a Super
Bowl.

Everything about the rug-
ged elements seemed to favor
the run-first, defense-oriented
and supposedly more physical
Bears, the team that thrives
through bitter winters at Sol-
dier Field.

The wetter it stayed and
the muddier it got, the less
Chicago seemed like an under-
dog at all as the NFL’s colossus
event finally drew near — and
especially after former UM
lightning bolt Devin Hester
shifted and sped 92 yards with
the game’s opening kickoff to
electrify a rain-slickered
crowd dominated by Bears
fans.

“No panic whatsoever,”
Manning said.

NIGHTMARE WEATHER

The weather was a South
Florida organizing committee

nightmare after an otherwise
well-received week as host.



FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

Expect the Colts.
fo make return
visit to big game

*GOLDBERG

Monday even asked him if
he thought of himself as
Jackie Robinson.

In his usual self-
deprecating way, Dungy
replied: “Oh no. I never had
to go through the things that
he did.”

Of course. Times are dif-
ferent. \

But the quiet passion that
makes him so effective as a
coach has also made him
THE front man for the NFL’s
black coaches, a man who
never has been afraid to
speak up when he thought
minorities were being
slighted in the quest for head
coaching jobs.

That makes it fitting that
he is the first of his race to
win the Vince Lombardi tro-
phy, named after the epit-
ome of the “middle-aged
white men with fiery
demeanors” Dungy would
watch on the sidelines as a
teenager.

It is also fitting that he
and his friend and protege

BUFFALO BILLS

Wire gets

Associated Press

_ ORCHARD PARK, N.Y.
— The Buffalo Bills re-signed
special teams player Coy
Wire to a multiyear deal on
Monday.

Wire,

Buffalo’s_ third-

round pick in 2002, has been ©

a fixture on the Bills special
teams, and finished fourth on
the team with 17 special
teams tackles in 2006.

Late in the season, Wire
was moved from safety to
linebacker when starter



AL DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF






DONALD MIRALLE/GETTY IMAGES

SUPER MOMENTS: Clockwise from left, Joseph Addai fights for yardage, Peyton Manning reacts after a Colts
touchdown, Dominic Rhodes gets pulied down by Charles Tillman and Reggie Wayne heads for the end zone.

But it was weather Bears
coach Lovie Smith might have
conjured in a pregame day-
dream, elements that might
have worked to neutralize
Manning.

No, nothing about the
sweeping, sheeting rain made
you think it suited a pass-first
and finesse-oriented Colts
team accustomed to the pre-
cipitation-free, climate-con-
trolled comfort of its home
dome.

“Purple Rain.”

Yet through the rélentless-
ness of it?

Colts reign. Unmistakably.

Lovie Smith, the coach he
beat Sunday, were the first
two black men to coach in’
this game.

Dungy’s other contribu-
tion is to demonstrate that
you don’t have to breathe
fire to coach in the NFL.
He’s not Bill Parcells or his
disciples — Belichick and
Tom Coughlin to name two.

In fact, Dungy has his
own coaching tree now:
Smith, Rod Marinelli of
Detroit and Mike Tomlin,
just hired by Pittsburgh, and
others. Marinelli fits the
more standard profile and
Tomlin’s style has yet to be
determined, but all are
beholden to a man who will
finish his career right up
there with Noll or Don
Shula, who presented him
with the Lombardi trophy.

That has nothing to do
with race or style.

It has to do with the fact
that he wins.

And if he wins more
politely and quietly, then the
NFL and the rest of the
sports world are better for it.

new deal

Angelo Crowell and his
backup, Keith Ellison, were
forced out of the lineup
because of injuries. Wire fin-
ished with 15 tackles and is
expected to compete at line-
backer in 2007.

Wire played linebacker at
Stanford but was moved to
safety when he arrived in
Buffalo. He started 15 games
at strong safety as a rookie,
but was replaced in 2003
when the Bills signed Lawyer
Milloy.

Impressively.

It was Indianapolis’ first
major championship in sports
since the Pacers of the old
ABA days, this one over-
whelming that one. It elevates
Manning to Johnny Unitas’
plane among men who have
worn the horseshoe helmet.

It wasn’t a pretty victory,
for sure, or artful in the least.
Nothing about it commended
the word “finesse.” There
were a gruesome eight turn-
overs in the game, five of them
fumbles as the football slipped
like a wet watermelon seed.

But there were the sup-

CHICAGO BEARS

posed finesse Colts, dominat-

ing the supposed bruising
Bears, controlling both lines of
scrimmage, operating 80 plays
to Chicago’s 47, working
nearly a 2-to-1 advantage in
time of possession.

Smashmouth was not a
game Indy was supposed to
win Sunday night. But Indy
did. With the weather limiting
Manning, the pass-first Colts
in turn beat up Chicago for 191
yards rushing.

Perceptions and stigmas
were peeling away and disap-
pearing all night, by degrees,
as the rain fell and fell and



Indianapolis lifted and lifted.
“We were a team that can’t
win outside the dome, a team
that can’t win in the postsea-
son,” Dungy said of Colts rep-
utations now erased. “We got
to show what we’re all about.
How mentally tough we are.
How physical we could be.”

STATS AND DOUBTS

Yes, and Manning was the
quarterback of great statistics
who saw Tom Brady and other
rivals surpass him when the
playoffs rolled around. Man-
ning was heading tc a dubious
spot with Dan Marino as the._,








DONALDMIRALLE/GETTYIMAGES

greatest QB to never wina
Super Bowl.

That was before he passed
for 247 yards and was named
Super Bowl MVP, lifting the
silver trophy that shimmered
in the rain.

Validation?

“I don’t play that card,”

' Manning said.

Except that many of the

~nore than 140 million Ameri-

cans watching Sunday’s game
were playing it. It was Man-
ning’s burden, acknowledged
or not.

“He’s got that game behind
him now,” as Dungy put it.

He Shall Overcome might
work to encapsulate Man-
ning’s Sunday, though,
because in one game he over-
came everything. All of it.

Whatever was thrown at
Manning here, he got past it,
put it behind him so that it will
never bother him again.

He overcame an immediate
deficit, his own early intercep-
tion, the weather and a
defense most considered the
NFL’s best. In doing so, he
overcame the one burden that
weighed heaviest, the one only
a championship would make
disappear.

What Dungy overcame

might have been an even

greater stigma, because it was
about race, about prejudice.

“T’m proud. It means a lot to
our country,” he said of a
black head coach reaching the
summit of America’s most
popular sport for the first
time. Dungy was typically
demure, exuding class, men-
tioning others who came
before him, “great coaches
who could have done it if they
had the opportunity.”

And Dungy, deeply reli-
gious, always with a perspec-
tive uncommon in his profes-
sion.

“It’s not the biggest thing in
the world,” he said of winning
a Super Bowl, even as he held
the trophy, “but it feels great.”

BALL ON THE
GROUND: Bears QB
Rex Grossman,
right, fumbles the
snap and looks to
recover the ball in
the third quarter
of Super Bowl XLI
on Sunday night
in Miami.



NFC.champs fall short of their goal

BY RICK GANO
Associated Press
MIAMI -— Those large
“Finish” banners hanging in
their Super Bowl] hotel were
hard to miss. The Chicago
Bears saw them OK, they just
couldn’t follow the advice.
Getting to the Super Bowl
and losing may be the empti-
est feeling of all.
“When you say, ‘Super
Bowl or bust,’ it takes a little
bit out of it not
to finish it,”
linebacker
Lance Briggs
said. “Destiny
not fulfilled.”
Straight
ahead is a painful offseason for
the Bears, who could lose
defensive coordinator Ron
Rivera -— a coaching candidate
in Dallas — and must decide
whether to stick a franchise
tag on Pro Bowler Briggs, who
can become a free agent.
There’s also the matter, and
not a small one, of giving
coach Lovie Smith a raise and
extension from his league-low
salary of $1.35 million.
All this in the aftermath of

Sunday night’s disheartening
29-17 loss to the Indianapolis
Colts, who exposed the Bears’
weaknesses for all to see.

Chicago’s defense couldn’t
stop the Colts’ running attack
and, like many teams, failed to
get enough pressure on Pey-
ton Manning.

Throw in five turnovers by
the team that led the league in
taking the ball away with 44
during the regular season, and
the Bears’ bid for a first cham-
pionship in 21 years was
squashed on a rainy night in

Quarterback Rex Grossman
completed his up-and-down
season on a downer with two
fourth-quarter interceptions
that crushed any chance of
victory.

“I don’t have any excuses,”
said Grossman, who stood up
in the face of constant criti-
cism and answered questions.
Grossman’s contract runs
through next season.

Thomas Jones, who’s
rushed for more than 1,200
yards in back-to-back seasons,
also has one year to go on his
deal. What the Bears do with

him and Cedric Benson will be
a topic again once spring
workouts begin. Benson, a reli-
able backup knocked out in
the first quarter Sunday night
with a knee injury, is eager to
be the starter. And the Bears
gave him $16 miilion in guar-
anteed money when they
drafted him in the first round
in 2005.

The Bears’ special teams
turned into the team’s strength
with Pro Bowl kicker Robbie
Gould and rookie Devin Hes-
ter, who took the Super Bowl’s
opening kickotf 92 yards for a
TD after setting an NFL
record with six touchdown
returns during the regular sea-
son.

Chicago is also counting on
the return of two injured
defensive stars who didn’t
play Sunday night. Defensive
tackle Tommie Harris was
missed for his speed and push
in the middle.

And safety Mike Brown,
one of the team leaders who
has a knack for scoring defen-
sive touchdowns, was also
sidelined.

A promising young defen-

sive player did emerge this
season. Defensive end Mark
Anderson had 12 sacks as a
rookie and then recovered a
fumble against the Colts.

“We are going to continue
to take steps in building our
program,” Smith said.

“This is our third year and I
felt like we took a:big step.
Hopefully next season we can
take one more step and finish
the job,” he added.

The Bears jumped out 7-0
this season and finished 15-4,
losing three games to AFC
teams and also their meaning-
less regular-season finale to
Green Bay after they'd already
clinched home field advan-
tage.

Chicago will be the favorite
again next season in the NFC
North, even with Brett Favre
returning to the Packers.

But getting to the Super
Bowl and losing does not bode
well for the next season. Seat-
tle’s first-round win over the
Cowboys last month marked
the first time since 1997 a
Super Bowl: runner-up had
won a postseason game the
following season.


PAGE 8E, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007

” °
4 9
ee @

TRIBUNE SPORTS —



Fans could be
harred from
Italian soccer
stadiums

m SOCCER
ROME
Associated Press

SOCCER fans won’t be
allowed into stadiums in Italy
unless security measures are '
met, a decision that comes
days after rioting at a game in
Sicily in which a police officer
was killed.

Interior Minister Giuliano
Amato also said Monday that
clubs will not be able to sell
blocks of tickets to visiting
fans, allowing for better con-
trol of those entering stadi-
ums. These decisions and oth-
ers need to be approved at a
Cabinet meeting Wednesday,
Amato added.

“T know it is extravagant to
think of soccer play without
the public,” he said. “But I
think it is a worse extrava-
gance to have someone die for
something like that.”

Luca Pancalli, the Italian

soccer federation commission- -

er, Said the decision on resum-

ing professional play would be

made after the Cabinet meet-

ing. He said that would give

the league enough time to

schedule games for next week-

end.

Games in the country’s top

‘ league, scheduled for last Sat-
urday and Sunday, were called
off because of Friday’s riot
after Palermo beat host Cata-.
nia 2-1.

The Italian sports daily
Gazzetta dello Sport reported
Monday that only four stadi-
ums used by clubs in the Serie
A satisfy the safety norms —
the Stadio Olimpico in Rome,
the Stadio Olimpico in Turin,
the Artemio Franchi stadium
in Siena, and the Renzo Bar-
bera stadium in Palermo. San °

. Siro, the stadium shared by
AC Milan and Inter Milan,
does not meet the criteria.

Sports minister Giovanna
Melandri also said soccer
clubs must cut ties to fan clubs
and opponents should be
regarded as “adversaries, not
enemies.”

In the Sicilian city of Cata-
nia, thousands of mourners
flocked to a cathedral for the
funeral of the slain police offi-
cer. Pope Benedict XVI
expressed his “spiritual close-
ness” to the family of 38-year-
old Filippo Raciti.

“In reiterating his firm con-
demnation for any act of vio-
lence that stains the world of
soccer, the Holy Father urges
protagonists to promote
respect for legality with
greater determination,” the
pope said in a telegram of con-
dolences that was read during
the funeral.

In a sign of respect, people
applauded as Raciti’s coffin,
draped in the Italian flag, was
carried inside the Duomo
Cathedral followed by his
youngest son dressed in a
police uniform.

“I only hope that your death
will push society to make
changes,” Raciti’s teenage |
daughter, Fabiana, said during
a tearful speech.

Amato has said the violence
must stop, or the games will.
But officials will also have to
consider the economic impact
of not allowing a quick return
to play.

AC Milan and Juventus are ~

the world’s third- and fourth-
biggest clubs by revenue,
according to accounting firm
Deloitte. During the 2004-05
season, along with rival giants
Inter Milan and AS Roma, the
clubs generated more than $1
billion through game-day
receipts, broadcast deals,
sponsorships and merchandis-
ing.

“This is among Italy’s most
important industries, and it
needs to continue,” Antonio
Matarrese, the president of
the Italian soccer league, said
in Monday’s editions of La
Repubblica. “We are sad-
dened, but the show must go

_on.”

“Unfortunately, deaths ...
are part of this huge move-
ment, which law enforcement
officials. still can’t control,” he
said. ;

Matarrese’s comments drew
immediate criticism, with the
Italian Olympic Committee
calling them “seriously offen-
sive.” Matarrese later said he
had been misunderstood and
had not intended to sound as
if he was taking the violence
lightly.

“Those that have done
wrong must be punished,” AC
Milan defender Paolo Maldini
said.

“But playing with the doors
closed would be the death of
soccer.”

m SOCCER
MADRID, Spain
Associated Press

REAL MADRID'S board
of directors expressed sup-
port for manager Fabio
Capello on Monday, a day
after the club, suffered its
fourth loss in six games.

The board met following
Madrid's 1-0 loss to Levante,
which triggered protests at
the Santiago Bernabeu sta-
dium with many in the
crowd demanding Capello's
resignation. The loss left
Read Madrid in fourth
place, five points behind
league leader FC Barcelona.

"Fabio deserves all our

confidence," club sport
director Predrag Mijatovic
said. "Capello continues as
coach and things haven't
changed.

"What we have to do is
work harder, resolve our
sport problems and trust
that at the end of the year
we'll be happy," added
Mijatovic, who played for
the club from 1996-1999,

Board spokesman Miguel
Angel Arroyo told reporters
Capello needed more time
to carry out his changes.

"He is the only one capa-

ble of carrying out the reno- °°”

vation of Real Madrid that
we all want," Arroyo said,
Madrid's loss to Levante

goals in 21 league matches,

was its first in history against
the small team. Madrid was
eliminated from the Copa
del Rey last month, beaten
by Real Betis in the fifth
round.

The team has scored 28

its fewest in the 16 years.

- Madrid was playing its
1,000th league. game at the
Bernabeu but first since
Ronaldo completed a
US$9.7 million move to AC
Milan on Tuesday.

Under Capello, Real
Madrid also has seen David
Beckham commit to trans-
ferring to the Los Angeles
Galaxy after the European
season is complete. Beck-
ham watched Sunday's game
from the stands.

Madrid has not won a tro-
phy since 2003 — its longest
drought since the early
1950s. Capello was hired in
July as Madrid's sixth coach
in three years.

@ REAL MADRID

coach Fabio Capello reacts
during his teams Spanish
League soccer match
against Levante at the San-
. tiago Bernabeu stadium in
Madrid, Sunday, Feb. 4,
oer 2007.

(AP Phoio/
Jasper Juinen)

Real Madrid board expresses suppo
- for Capello despite mounting losses

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um in London , Saturday Feb. 3, 2007.

m@ RUGBY
LONDON
Associated Press

JONNY .WILKINSON is still in a
daze after leading England to victory in
his first test in more than three years.

Wilkinson scored 27 points as Eng-
land beat Scotland 42-20 at Twicken-

ham in the opening Six Nations round -

on Saturday, and the British press on
Sunday lauded his performance.

"To be back and to be involved after
some of the feelings I have had over
my injury period does feel like a bit of
dream, really," Wilkinson told BBC
Radio on Sunday. "I give myself a day
to enjoy it, and then it is back to busi-
ness on Monday."

The 27-year-old flyhalf had missed 30
tests for England, and been out of the
side for 1,169 days since he kicked the
team to its only Rugby World Cup title
in November 2003.

His international career seemed to
be jinxed because of injuries to his
neck, shoulder, arm, knee, appendix,

groin and, most recently, kidney. He'd
only had 50 minutes of rugby for club
Newcastle after a 12-week injury layoff
before playing at Twickenham on Sat-
urday.

"Whether it is my 20th game in a
row, or my first after 3 1/2 years, it is
just something you care about so
much," Wilkinson said.

"You want it to go well, you want
to win and the team to do well, to ful-
fill your role. Because you have pre-

-pared so hard, it does mean a lot, so the

nerves come from that. Without being
there for a long time, you do feel it
maybe a bit more than usual."

England winger Jason Robinson said
Wilkinson was "outstanding."

"When you are around Jonny and
you see the attention he gives to detail
and the time he spends perfecting what
he does, it is no surprise," Robinson
said. "It is not a fluke, it is achieved by
a lot of hard work and dedication."

Wilkinson scored a contentious try in
the second half. Replays showed that
his right foot was out as he put the ball



down one-handed while diving, and
Scotland coach Frank Hadden was furi-
ous that the video referee allowed it.

"I thought my leg was close to the
touchline going down just on or before
my hand did," Wilkinson said. "Some-
one has a chance to watch it very close-
ly, and can get the decision right, but it
is not something I really reflect on."

England's next game is at home to
Italy on Saturday and fans are hoping
the team's revival continues. England
lost eight of nine tests last year, which
led to Brian Ashton replacing Andy
Robinson as coach.

"I was convinced in my mind that if
Jonny said to me he was ready to play
international rugby in every sense —
medically, technically, tactically, phys-
ically — then | would have no hesitation
in choosing him," Ashton said.

Ashton was full of praise for Wilkin-
son, saying his improved footwork cre-
ated problems for defenders.

"And his passing is spot-on — tech-
nically, it is excellent," Ashton said.
"He can fire a pass from anything

(

\

B ENGLAND'S Jonny Wilkinson, left, goes over the line to score a try against Scotland in their Six nations rugby union international match at Twickenham stadi-:

Wilkinson still in daze
after England return

between five and 15 meters (yards)
with unerring accuracy off both
hands." :

The Sunday Times said Wilkinson *.°.--

had “orchestrated a revival that gave 4.
team on the verge of complete disinte-
gration last autumn (November) soar-,

ing hope for the remainder of the Six, .

Nations." st
"Quite simply what he achieved on~
the field was amazing," former Eng-'
land international Stuart Barnes wrote
in The Sunday Times. "Amazing but.
not surprising." vt

The Observer, also running a pics,
ture of Wilkinson's split lip, labeled
him a "Bloody marvel." :

"It takes a rare kind of sportsman.
to go from his sickbed to the interna-»
tional stage without bothering with any’.
action in between," the Observer.
wrote. "But it seems, if we did not
know, that Wilkinson is that type of ©
performer."

A headline in The Sunday Telegraph
said it all: "Perfect script unfolds for
comeback king." é

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SEE FRONT PAGE OF BUSINESS SECTION






Deputy PM confirms
restructuring will

be announced by —
the end of week

Speaking yesterday, Mrs
Pratt updated The Tribune on
the likely timeline for the
move, but said she would be
acting “prematurely” if she
were to comment any further
on which officers would be
transferred, or to which posi-
tions. :

This will be done at the dis-
cretion of the commissioner
of police, Mr Paul Farquhar-
son, she noted.

Furthermore, she denied
emphatically a claim made in

SEE page 11

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A RESTRUCTURING of
the upper levels of the police
force is due to be announced
by the end of the week, Min-
ister of National Security Cyn-
thia Pratt confirmed yester-
day.

- However, Mrs Pratt vehe-
mently denied reports in
another newspaper that the
move is in response to the
conduct of certain officers in
relation to the Nassau Flight
Services arrests in the US.

four new sub-divisions

@ By BRENT DEAN



BISHOP Neil Ellis of Mount Tabor Full Gospel Church has
formally announced the creation of four new sub-divisions to make
home ownership more affordable for his 7,000-strong congregation.

The announcement was made yesterday at a press conference
attended by Prime Minister Perry Christie.

The sub-divisions will be created in conjunction with Scotia-
bank Bahamas, Fidelity Bank (Bahamas) Limited, Arawak Homes:
Ltd and GVI and Associates Company Ltd. :

The sub-divisions will be called Mount Tabor Gardens, to be sit-
uated off Carmichael Road; Mount Tabor Sub-division, east of
Mount Tabor Church; Mount Tabor Estates, off JFK Drive, adja-

SEE page 11


































You've Gotta Fold dt! |
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thin and cut into 6 big slices. It's got extra large qm
Pepperoni or sausage toppings, perfect for
folding. You've got to fold a slice this big.

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“She Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

@ THE scene of the
accident on Adelaide
Road.

(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)

THE country recorded
its second traffic fatality
of the year early yester-
day morning when a man
in his thirties was killed
in a three-vehicle collision
on Adelaide Road.

The accident left six
othets in hospital in seri-
ous condition.

Inspector Walter
Evans told The Tribune
that the accident took
place around lam Mon-
day just east of the
entrance to Adelaide Vil-
lage.

Details are sketchy but
Inspector Evans said it is
believed that a green
Toyota Avalon was trav-
elling west on Adelaide
Road and a Ford F150
truck and Ford Ranger
were heading east at the
time.

After the collision the
Ford F150 truck over-
turned. Two fire engines
with jaws of life equip-
ment were brought to the

scene to free those
_ trapped in the F150 and

Ford Ranger trucks, six
persons in all.

SEE page 11

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007



Two appear in court on





double murder charges

@ By NATARIO
McKENZIE

TWO men were arraigned
together in magistrate’s court
yesterday on double murder
charges ‘as well as an armed
robbery charge.

Jamal Armbrister, 24, of
Williams Lane, and Jacob
Woodside, 22, of Dan N ottage
Estates, were arraigned before
magistrate Roger Gomez at
Court One, Bank Lane, yes-
terday.

Armbrister was represent-
ed by attorney Ellsworth
Johnson and Inspector Althea
Porter was the prosecutor.

Court dockets state that on
Thursday, January 25, by
means of unlawful harm,
Armbrister. and Woodside
caused the death of Shervin
Miller Jr. The men were also
charged with the January 26

‘shooting death of Emico Rus-

sell.

SEE page 11

Ingraham criticises Wilchcombe
over passport rule statements

_ & By DENISE MAYCOCK

Tribune Freeport Reporter

. FREEPORT ~— FNM leader Hubert Ingraham has criticised
Tourism Minister Obie Wilchcombe for statements he made

' regarding a 30-day extension for the Bahamas and Caribbean

before implementation of the new US passport rule.

Mr Ingraham said The Tribune was duped into writing a sto-
ry which said that Mr Wilchcombe convinced members of the US
Congress to extend the implementation period for the Caribbean.

Referring to the story dated January 26 headlined ‘Passport

SEE page 11

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=

Claim that casino
workers’ sick-out
has ‘escalated’
from week ago

l By RUPERT MISSICK JR
and KARIN HERIG

Tribune Staff Reporter .

THE SICK-out staged by
Wyndham Crystal Palace casino
workers has “escalated” from
where it started a week ago, it
was claimed yesterday.

But hotel management has
been able to continue operat-
ing smoothly and service all its
customers, Robert Sands, vice-
president for the Cable Beach
hotels, told The Tribune yester-
day.

The sick-out started from last
Wednesday through the week
and over the weekend.

Mr Sands was optimistic that
the situation would be resolved,
however, as the Baha Mar
Group’s hotel management and
casino workers - led by presi-
dent of the Bahamas Hotel
Managerial Association Obie
Ferguson - were scheduled to
meet today at 2pm in a bid to
resolve their differences.

However, up to press time

SEE page 11










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THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007

Bermuda, Cayman show way

with work permit ‘term limits’

uring the past three
weeks, I spent time
in both Bermuda

and Grand Cayman, where I
frequently travel for work.
Both countries are competi-
tors of the Bahamas in finan-
cial services and tourism.
Bermuda, of course, is the
leader in captive insurance,
while Cayman is the leader in
fund administration.

In a future article, I will
examine why Bermuda and
Cayman have been able to
leave the Bahamas scrambling
as a minor player in captive
insurance, and a less competi-
tive player in fund administra-
tion.

Today, however, I will talk
about the ‘Term Limit’ immi-
gration policy adopted by both
Bermuda and the Cayman
Islands.

However, before talking
about the policy, it will be use-
ful to provide some back-
ground information about



BAHAMAS AIR SEA RESCUE
ASSOCIATION

Annual General Meeting
~ BASRA Headquarters,
February 23rd, 2007-7:30pm
All members are urged to attend.
Refreshments will be served.

these economies.

Bermuda has a total popula-
tion of about 65,000 and a
workforce of 38,000 persons.

It is estimated that there are _

roughly 8,000 work permit
holders, which represents
about 21 per cent of the work-
force. Cayman, on the other
hand, has a total population of
about 45,000 and a workforce
of 24,000 persons. According
to local reports in Cayman,
about 33 per cent of the work-
force is on work permits. -

-Term Limits

The concept of term limits
is more frequently applied in a
political context. For instance,
in the US, the president is lim-
ited to a maximum of two four-
year terms in office. In much of
Latin America, the president
is limited to one seven-year
term in office.

Term limits have a long his-
tory, going back to ancient






Public Hospitals Authority



Greek and Roman civilisa-
tions. In these ancient societies,
certain elected positions were
subjected to term limits. There
are numerous arguments for
and against term limits. Per-
sonally, I tend to favour polit-
ical term limits.

Immigration Term Limits
Bermuda

In 2001, Bermuda
announced its immigration
term limit policy. The policy
basically required that any for-
eign worker (who is not grant-
ed an exemption), who has
been in Bermuda for six years,
will have to leave Bermuda at
the expiration of their work
permit. The policy took effect
from that point forward.

Therefore, as of April 1,
2007, there will be a significant
rotation in expatriate workers.
This policy gave businesses six
years to prepare for this policy
implementation.

Concurrent with the
announcement of this policy,
the government also granted
status to some 2,000 persons
who had resided in Bermuda
for 20 years by 1998. Also, in
certain cases, expatriate work-
ers could apply for and be
granted ministerial exemption,
which would allow them to
stay up to nine years.

Cayman

As aresult of Cayman’s new
law, seven years is the maxi-

mum length of time a work
permit holder can work con-
tinuously in the Cayman
Islands. After this period, a
worker is required to leave the
country for a period of two
years before being eligible to
apply for another permit.

The only exceptions to this
would be a worker designated
as an ‘exempted employee’ in a
business staffing plan, or where
the Immigration Department
deem that there are excep-
tional circumstances. In such
cases the Immigration Depart-
ment may, at its discretion,
grant additional work permits
to enable the person to com-

- plete an aggregate period of

eight years, thus making the
worker eligible to apply for the
grant of permanent residence.

Unlike Bermuda, Cayman’s
policy is retroactive. Thus if
you have been in Cayman for
seven years, at your next
renewal you must leave unless
you obtain an exemption.

At the time of passage of the
new immigration law, persons
residing in Cayman for
between eight and 15 years
were given a three-year win-
dow to apply for permanent
residence (which is not auto-
matic). The law further pro-
vided that for applicants (with-
in the three-year window) who
have resided in Cayman for 15
years would be regularised, in
the absence of exceptional cir-
cumstances.

Official Position

Robert Horton, Bermuda's
Permanent Secretary of
Labour and Immigration,
while speaking at the recent
Cayman Business Outlook,
was resolute in saying the Cay-
man Islands had nothing to
fear from its own policy of lim-





iting work permit holders to
either a seven-year or nine-
year stay.

“Bermuda has a similar law
limiting permit holders to six
years on the island, a law that
was passed in 2001. Unlike in
the Cayman Islands, Bermu-
da's policy is not retroactive.
This year will mark the first
time that work permit holders
reach the end of their six-year
tenure and are required to
leave,” Mr Horton said.

He added: “Critics have stat-
ed that the term limits will be
bad for Bermuda and will lead

‘to an exodus of qualified work-

ers. The government rejects
that criticism."

Mr Horton said the law
strikes a "satisfactory balance"
between the "legitimate needs
of Bermudians and the needs
of the business community".

Implications for
the Bahamas

While the effect of these ini-
tiatives will be unfolding in the

coming months in Bermuda -

and Cayman, there is no evi-
dence, at least so far, that they
will be any significant disrup-
tion in either economy. From
what I can tell, there seems to
have been a clear articulation
of the respective policies, and
appropriate room for exemp-
tion where legitimately war-
ranted.

I think it is fair to say that we
are not quite there yet in terms
of policy formulation and
implementation. What amazes
me is that although both coun-
tries are much smaller than the
Bahamas in terms of popula-
tion and Gross Domestic Prod-
uct (GDP), in many respects

_ they seem to be more focused,

especially when it comes to
long-term economic and social

planning.

There is absolutely no doubt
that if just half the announced
investment projects were to
materialiwe, the Bahamas will
need many trained workers in
a very short period of time.
Given the inadequacy of the
general quality of new school
leavers (the D+ national aver-
age), many of our youngsters
may be resigned to the side-
lines, while the country pro-
duces entry level jobs for expa-

‘ triate workers with good work

ethics. I am astounded by busi-
nesspersons who complain
about how difficult it is to fill
entry level positions with
Bahamians with suitable per-
sons. There are people out

there... but many lack the’

basic skills required for the job
market.

This is all very serious stuff,
but rather than policymakers
addressing such issues res-
olutely and systematically from
a national perspective, writers
such as myself seem to only be
able to stimulate intellectual
conversation for a very: small
minority. Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a
Chartered Financial Analyst,
is vice-president - pensions,
Colonial Pensions Services
(Bahamas), a wholly-owned
subsidiary of Colonial Group
International, which owns
Atlantic Medical Insurance
and is a major shareholder of
Security & General Insurance
Company in the Bahamas.

The views expressed are
those of the author and do not
necessarily represent those of
Colonial Group International
or any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct any questions or com-
ments to rlgibson@atlantic-
house.com.bs






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ADMINSTRATIVE ASSISTANT Hk

The Public Hospitals Authority invites applications from suitably qualified individuals for
the post of Administrative Assistant III, Corporate Office, Public Hospitals Authority.



Applicants must possess the following qualification:-

Associate Degree in Business, Secretarial Science or related field and three (3) years relevant
experience OR College of the Bahamas Diploma in Secretrial Science and five (5) years
relevant experience.








The Administrative Assistant will be reponsible for the general administrative/secretarial
duties; and assists in all required aspects of Project and programme management in support
of the office of the Deputy Managing Director.

DUTIES:

1. Works closely with cach of the specialized officers reporting directly to the Deputy
Managing Director (including the Director of Projects, Senior Manager for MIS and
Biostatistcian) to ensure that workflows are appropriately coordinated.

2. Keeps abreast all activities in each of the Sections of the Planning and Evaluation
Unit(i.e.) Planning, MIS and Statistics Sections) and the PHA Headquaters Projects
Office so as to be able to provide immediate assistance when needed.







3.Maintains a structured schedule of specific activites in progress in the Deputy
‘Managing Director’s and related offices.

4. Assists inthe preparation of annual budget estimates for the Deputy Managing
Director’s and related offices ensuring that there is detailed valid justification for all
submissions.




5, Works on special projects on behalf of the Deputy Managing Director or any
specialized officer of this area in order to ensure well-rounded exposure and experience.



6. Assists in all required aspects of project and programme management within the
unit.







7. Coordinates Deputy Managing Director's schedule and appointments; arrange
meetings, prepare agendas as well as reserve and prepare the facility.

8, Conducts research, compiles reports and prepare presentations as directed.

9, Preparations and disburses documents relative to project headed by the Deputy
Managing Director.

Letters of application and curricula vitae shoould be submitted to the Director of
Human Resources, Public Hospitals Authority P.O. Box N-8200 or Manx Corporate
Centre, Dockendale House, West ay Street no later than 16th February, 2007




cS





























FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK



CAREER OPPORTUNITY
in
Wealth Management
Financial Advisor/Investment Manager
Bahamas :

We are expanding our capabilities in wealth management and are now seeking to recruit
seasoned financial advisers who have the gravitas and expertise to contribute significantly
to the growth of AUM by developing investment relationships with HNWIs, professional
trustees and COIs.




Qualifications:

Recognised Financial Planning or Investment qualification (e.g. FPC or CFA).

Qualification in Banking, Law or Accounting.

A self-motivator with excellent sales management and business development skills.

Detailed and technical knowledge of investment management and the investment

product range as it relates to non-residents/ non-nationals, HNWIs, trustees and

COIs.

. Full awareness of the local and international competitive environments.

" Good understanding of the qualitative and quantitative aspects of investment
management including, Alfa, Beta and Total Return considerations and analytical
depth in respect of their impact on sector allocations and individual stock picks.

" Sound experience in global capital markets.

General Requirements/Responsibilities:

" Must have a minimum of 5 years international investment portfolio management
or financial advisory experience.
. Must be able to deliver a high level of expert investment advice and service with

the aim of developing significant sales and new business, covering investment and
fiduciary services and the cross-selling of other banking services.

" Proven track record in providing investment recommendations to both corporate
and personal clients as well as client performance reporting. This includes a full
understanding of the mathematical and statistical basis of portfolio diversification.

" Must be totally at ease with the concept of personal affluence and. high-net worth
clients.
" Experience of, or at least be at ease with clients from differing social, religious,

ethnic and cultural backgrounds.
Experience of selling other banking and / or regulated products is desirable

Remuneration:





. Salary commensurate with the position’s seniority level 8 (The Bank has 11 pay
levels).

° Benefits- includes a car allowance, variable incentive pay (bonus) and preferred
loan rates

Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter via email by February
9", 2007 to: deangelia.deleveaux@FirstCaribbeanBank.com




FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for their interest,
however only those under consideration will be contacted.

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AB | TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007 __INTERNATIONAL EDITION

INVESTMENT BANKS

State Street to buy Investors Financial Services for $4.2B

BY MARK JEWELL
Associated Press

BOSTON — State Street
said Monday it will buy Inves-
tors Financial Services for
$4.16 billion in stock to expand
into providing institutional
asset services for the fast-
growing hedge fund industry
and funds managed overseas.

State Street said it eclipsed
other bidders to reach an
agreement between two Bos-
ton-based firms that would
pay IFS investors a hefty pre-
mium on their shares. That
premium shrank quickly Mon-
day, from 38 percent before
the deal was announced to 29
percent as the news dragged
down State Street’s stock.
Shares of Investors Financial
Services still soared 27 per-
cent.

IFS provides investment

LITIGATION

services for $2.2 trillion in
assets. Its revenue has grown
at an annual rate of 18 percent
over the past three years. State
Street is far larger, with $11.9
trillion in assets under cus-
tody.

“J think the price paid was
very high,” said Thomas Bur-
nett, research director at the
New York-based brokerage
firm Wall Street Access, who
predicted no new bids would
emerge to trump State Street’s.

‘UNDER PRESSURE’

Burnett said State Street
came under pressure to
expand after the Bank of New
York in December agreed to
take over Mellon Financial for

’ $16.5 billion — a deal by two

State Street rivals joining to
become the world’s largest so-

called trust bank providing

banking, stock lending and
other services to investment
funds.

The acquisition of Inves-
tors Financial will make State
Street the No. 2 trust bank
ranking behind the newly
combined Bank of New York
Mellon, with JPMorgan Chase
in the No. 3 slot, Burnett said.

State Street Chairman and
Chief Executive Ronald Logue
asserted that his company was
paying a fair price.

“you have a property here
that has been growing top-line

revenue dramatically,” Logue ~

said during a conference call.
The transaction is expected
to yield cost savings by elimi-
nating roughly 1,700 redun-
dant staff positions while com-
bining real estate holdings and
technology, State Street said.
He called the deal a logical

Apple, Beatles end
issues over ‘Apple’
name and logos

* APPLE

function of time at this point,”
said Gene Munster, senior
research analyst with invest-
ment bank Piper Jaffray & Co.
“J bet they move pretty fast.
For Apple, it was critical that
they got this taken care of.”
Jaffray estimates that
Apple paid The Beatles $50
million to $100 million for the
rights to the Apple name.
That would come on top of
more than $26.5 million Apple

paid to settle past disputes .

with Apple Corps.

BEATLES FAN
It’s no secret that Steve

Jobs — Apple’s chief execu-. |

tive officer and a huge Beatles
fan — has wanted the British
band’s music.on iTunes,
which has sold more than 2
billion songs worldwide and
has catapulted Apple into the
top ranks of music sellers.

Jobs even cued up some
Beatles music and album art
in unveiling the company’s
highly anticipated iPhone
gadget at the Macworld Con-
ference and Expo last month,
setting off rampant specula-
tion that some type of deal
might be in the works.

However, decades of legal
disputes between the two
companies have thus far made
any partnership all but impos-
sible.

“We love the Beatles, and it
has been painful being at odds

BANKING

with them over these trade-
marks,” Jobs said in a state-
ment. “It feels great to resolve
this in a positive manner, and
in a way that should remove
the potential of further dis-
agreements in the future.”

The Beatles had been one
of the few remaining big-
name musical acts to reject
any legal distribution of its
work on the Internet. For-
merly hesitant artists from
Madonna to Metallica have
made peace with online cus-
tomers as digital downloads
have continued to grow in
popularity — with iTunes
holding the bulk of the mar-
ket.

Artists have complained
that online distribution leaves
them with too small a profit
and that iTunes wrecks the
artistic integrity of an album
by‘ allowing songs to be pur-
chased for 99 cents apiece.
Bands such as AC/DC have
sold albums only at other,
more flexible sites.

But the Beatles’ recording
label, Britain’s EMI Group,
has rebuffed all suitors.

Elizabeth Freund, the U.S.
spokeswoman for Apple
Corps, said EMI would first
need an agreement with
Apple Corps before licensing
any music to Apple or other
online services. She said no
such deal has been reached

yet.
EMI officials declined to
comment.

Fewer consumers
are using checks

* CHECKS

employees’ bank accounts are
also included in this category.

Converting checks to elec-
tronic payments allows mer-
chants to get paid quicker,
and it may help reduce the
number of insufficient funds
checks businesses have to
deal with. Processing checks
electronically is also cheaper
than processing paper checks.

In 2003, about 8.9 billion
converted checks were
reported, accounting for
about 11 percent of all non-
cash payments.

‘At some stores that pro-
cess checks electronically,
such as Wal-Mart and cloth-
ing retailers’ the Gap and
Banana Republic, the clerk
hands the check back to the
consumer with their receipt
after scanning it and claiming
an electronic payment for the
store.

Consumers may not realize
that many of the checks they
write to utilities, mortgage
companies and other busi-
nesses are also being con-
verted to electronic payments
when those companies
receive the checks, said Terri
Bradford, a payments
researcher with the Federal
Reserve Bank of Kansas City.

The decline in check writ-

- increase in electronic check

processing, prompted the
Federal Reserve to dramati-
cally reduce the size of its
check-processing department,
whose operations are covered
by the processing fees it
charges for handling checks
and electronic transfers.

Since 2003, the Fed has
closed more than half of its 45
check processing centers, and
by the end of 2008, only 18
such centers will remain
operational.

Demographics are part of
the reason why checks con-
tinue to be used, because
older consumers are comfort-
able with what they’ve used
for years.

And Bradford said there
are still some transactions
checks are better suited for,
such as paying the neighbor
kid who mowed the lawn or
making a contribution to the
church, to have a record of
charitable donations at tax
time.

Joe Abboud wrote a check
for his groceries at Hy-Vee

recently because that’s what »

he always does.

“I write alot of checks,” he
said.

Abboud will occasionally
use a credit card, but the 90-
year-old is more comfortable
with checks.

Apple Corps was founded
by the Fab Four in 1968 and is
still owned by Paul McCart-
ney, Ringo Starr, the widow of
John Lennon and the estate of
George Harrison.

LONG HISTORY

The Beatles’ company,
whose corporate logo is a
giant green Granny Smith
apple, first sued what was
until last month Apple Com-
puter for trademark infringe-
ment in 1978. The computer
maker agreed in 1981 to pay
$80,000 and never enter the
music business.

Apple Corps sued again
nearly a decade later, alleging
the musical instrument digital
interface, or MIDI, software
included on Apple’s Macin-
tosh computers violated those
terms. Apple again settled,
agreeing in 1991 to pay $26.5
million to secure the rights to
the apple logo for selling com-
puters and software, while
Apple Corps would get it for
producing and selling music.

But the tension flared again
in 2003 while Apple was sign-
ing up recording labels to
offer their songs through
Apple’s new iTunes down-
load store and attempted to
woo The Beatles’ manage-
ment.

Apple Corps contended
that Apple’s use of the logo on
iTunes amounted to a breach

-of the 1991 agreement. Law-
yers for Apple have argued



NATI HARNIK/AP

CONVENIENCE: Richard
Kesterson of Omaha, Neb.,
swipes his debit card at a
supermarket in Omaha.

Cheryl Carlson, said she usu-
ally writes checks to keep
track of her spending. When
she writes a check, she always
writes the amount down in
her register, but she some-
times forgets with her debit
card.

“The only time I use my
debit card is when I leave the
checkbook at home,” said
Carlson, who is in her 40s.

Bradford, the payments
expert, said checks might
remain popular when pay-
ment must be guaranteed,
such as at real estate closings,
especially for individuals and
small businesses.

Wire transfers could also
be. used to guarantee pay-
ment, but Bradford said those
transfers can be costly for
people who don’t use them

ften.

step to combine two Boston
companies with complemen-
tary strengths amid consolida-
tion among other firms that
serve as custodians for assets
of clients ranging from pen-
sion and mutual funds to
insurance companies.

Logue said State Street and
Investors Financial will be rel-
atively easy to integrate, since
both are in similar lines of
business. The two companies,
Logue said, “already share a
similar focus, service model
and customer type, which
makes for a seamless and swift
consolidation.”

While State Street’s busi-
ness involves a wide range of
back office processing for
large clients, IFS has moved
into higher-growth areas serv-
ing hedge funds — a risky, but
often high-yield investment

MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

vehicle initially favored by
wealthy individuals that’s
grown rapidly in popularity
among institutional money
managers.

FEW REMAINING PLAYERS

Logue said IFS was one of
the few remaining players in
the business available for State
Street to purchase. The deal
also will help State Street
expand into investment ser-
vices for the growing private
equity market.

Investors Financial Ser-
vices shareholders will receive
0.906 shares of State Street
common stock for each share
of IFS common stock.

Shares of Investors Finan-
cial Services rose $12.85 to
close at $59.80 on the Nasdaq
Stock Market, while shares of
State Street fell $4.67 to $67.08



PAUL SAKUMA/AP

LET THERE BE PEACE: Apple CEO Steve Jobs recently
playeda Beatles Song on iTunes as he introduced the

new iPhone.

that music lovers are smart
enough to tell the difference
between the logos. Apple
Corps uses a shiny green
apple as its logo, while Apple
has a cartoon-like apple with
a bite taken out.

A British judge ruled in
May that Apple’s logo is used
in association with the store
— not the music — and thus
permitted. The settlement
announced Monday replaces
the 199] agreement and makes
an appeal of that ruling
unnecessary.

ECONOMY

Neil Aspinall, manager of
Apple Corps, said the com-
pany was glad to resolve the
dispute.

Apple still faces another
high-profile trademark law-
suit, one over its iPhone.

Networking equipment
company Cisco Systems,
whose Linksys division has an
identically named product,
sued Apple last month.

Shares of Apple fell 81
cents to close Monday at
$83.94 on the Nasdaq Stock
Market.

Services sector
driving growth

*REPORT

figure was stronger than the
details,” suggesting that the
survey — like other recent
economic data. — wasn’t
sending clear signals about
the near-term.

Still, he added, “‘the econ-
omy certainly is still expand-
ing.” He projects economic
growth in the 2.5 percent to 3
percent range.

There was little reaction in
the stock and bond markets to
the report.

Anthony Nieves, chairman
of the group’s non-manufac-
turing business survey com-
mittee, noted that new orders
and employment increased at
slower rates in January than
the previous month and that
the price index also eased.

Still, he added, ‘The over-
all indication in January is
continued economic growth
in the non-manufacturing sec-
tor at a faster pace than in
December.”

The new orders index
weakened slightly to 55.4 in
January from 55.6 in Decem-
ber, while the backiog of
orders strengthened to 49.0
from 48.0 the previous month.

Prices increased at a
slower rate, with the prices
index registering 55.2 in Janu-
ary, down from 59.7 in

December. Some of the
respondents told the trade
group that “costs are starting
to come down — especially
petroleum-related costs,” the

study said. Crude oil prices

were up Monday on expecta-
tions of cold weather in major
U.S. markets. The services
employment index, mean-
while, moved down to 51.7 in
January from 53.2 in Decem-
ber..

Seven industries reported
growth: utilities; transporta-
tion and warehousing; profes-
sional, scientific and technical
services; information; finance
and insurance; health care
and social assistance; and
miscellaneous services.

Seven reported decreased
activity, and three were
unchanged. The ISM trade
association represents
approximately 40,000 supply
management professionals.

on the New York Stock
Exchange. The drop by State
Street sliced more than $300
million off the value of the
deal, which was $4.5 billion
before it was announced.

State Street has about
21,000 employees compared
with about 4,500 at IFS.

Logue said about 1,700 jobs
would be eliminated over
about 18 months through a
combination of layoffs and
vacancies left unfilled, with
some workers transferring to
different posts. He declined to
offer a number on how many
jobs would be cut.

Together, the companies
employ nearly 2,000 people in
Dublin, Ireland, serving off-
shore investment clients.
Because of overseas invest-
ment growth, Logue said he
didn’t anticipate cuts there.

SUPER BOWL

Amateurs
develop
Super
Bowl ads

* ADVERTISING

Super Bowl spots, fancy com-
puter graphics, with an other-
worldy ad showing an office
worker drifting off into space
from the world’s first office

- on the moon, only to be clob-

bered by a passing meteor.

A lot is riding on the ads,
and not just because CBS is
charging as much as $2.6 mil-
lion for a 30-second spot dur-
ing the game. With some 90
million people watching, it’s
the most-viewed program all
year on television and the ads
are subject to intense scru-
tiny, both by amateurs and the
marketing industry.

Coca-Cola was back in the
game after a long absence,
taking on its rival Pepsi with a
number of creative ads,
including an homage to Black
History Month with an under- .
stated ad showing the chang-
ing shapes of Coke bottles .
over time as milestones in
black history appeared along-
side.

That ad referred indirectly
to the fact that, for the first
time, both coaches in the
game are black, and at least
one other spot also high-
lighted Black History Month.

Some of the uses of humor
didn’t resonate well with

- experts. Stephen Greyser, a

professor at Harvard Busines.
School specializing in ccm-
munications and the business _
of sports, said the rock-throw-
ing spot by Anheuser-Busch’s
Bud Light was “attention-get-
ting” but also “had a nasty
character to it.”

Bud Light, which often
swings for the fences with
wacky jabs at humor, scored
better with Greyser with a dif-
ferent spot showing an auc-
tioneer saying wedding vows
at hyper-fast speed.

Greyser said that spot had
a much broader appeal. The
job-search company Career-
Builder ditched its longtime
office-monkey pitchmen of
years past in favor of a jungle
combat scene among office
workers, where office sup-
plies become weapons.

Think of Dilbert meets
Lord of the Flies.

Tim Calkins, a marketing
professor at the Kellogg
School of Management at
Northwestern University who
runs a panel of students to
rate the ads, called this year’s
batch a “mixed bag,” saying
advertisers were “being safe,”
with no one “pushing the edge
of either creativity or taste.”

Revlon was one of a rare
few to appeal to the female
audience, unveiling a spot
with scenes of the singer
Sheryl Crow on tour and
doing a rendition of Buddy
Holly’s Not Fade Away.



4 pm 6:35 p.m. Late
Stock Tkr. close Chg. volume
Pfizer PFE 26.88 26.88 130650
Intel INTC 21.28 21.28 89928
SPDR SPY 144.85 144.87 +02 54996
Nasdi00h QQQQ 44.12 44120 * 25363
txxonMbi = XOM 15,67 75.70 +03 © 23221
EqOHPT EOP 55.46 55.45 +01 18276
Wyeth WE 50.43 50.43 * 14264
Chevron CVX 73.78 73.79 +,01 12443
Vodafone VOD 29.28 29.28 i 12250
Citigrp Cc 54.75 54.75 10771
Westwone WON = 7.00 7.00 - 10000
GileadSci —-GILD 10.02 69.99 03 8065
ishsPGlb = 100 74.79 74.82 +.03 8000



4 6:35 pum. Late

Tk. ose dese < voheme

ConsolEs CNX 35.95 3595 * 7640
Anheusr BUD 51.13 5145 +32 1437
InvFnSv \FIN 59.80 59.89 -+.09 5523
Cisco csco 27.51 2758 = +.07 5463
ReliantEn —RRI 16.09 16.09 5270
3Com COMS 3.99 4.01 +.02 5244
CMS Eng CMS 17.04 17.04 : 4986
HunuB JBHT =. 24.72 242 = * 4955
Mirant MIR 34.70 34.70 * 415
BostProp BXP 126.42 12645 +.03 4288
Jabil If JBL 24.47 watt 4031
~ Hess $ HES 54.12 54,12 . 4000

~ For up-to-date stock quotes, go to www.MiamiHerald.com and click on Business



ing, combined with the Another grocery customer, 0
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 5B





Ministry hopes for
inimal large group
impact from WHITI

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

THE Western Hemisphere
Travel Initiative’s (WHTI)
impact on group travel to the
Bahamas will be minimised for
groups who used agents to
make their travel plans, The
Tribune was told yesterday.

‘James Malcolm, director of
group travel for the Ministry
of Tourism, said that while the

added expense of multiple
passports for group travellers
was an obstacle that had to be
overcome, in many cases larg-
er groups, such as conventions
and meetings, booked their
travel many months in
advance. They did this through
reputable travel and booking
agents who would be well
aware of the WHTI initiative
and its effects on US air trav-
ellers.

“We’re certainly still con-
cerned,” Mr Malcolm said,

“but the professionals who
handle their arrangements are
well aware of the laws. Often,
they book almost a year out.”

He added that given the
incentives of booking a larger
group, travel agents would
have been warning their clients
of the need for proper docu-
ments well in advance.

“They take a largely proac-
tive role,” Mr Malcolm said.

He added that group travel
for weddings and family
reunions, and other smaller

groups, posed a bigger chal-
lenge, because often this
involved people making sepa-
rate travel arrangements, some
of whom may be less travelled
and aware of the WHTT’s pass-
port requirements.
Currently, SuperClubs
Breezes is the only Bahamas-
based resort to offer group
reimbursements for passport.
In a working paper on the
WHTI, the Ministry of
Tourism said it was monitoring
four areas it felt could feel the

Long Island still suffers from airport problems

m@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

RESIDENTS in Long Island
continue to suffer an econom-
ic. downturn due to the limited
availability of airlift to the Stel-
la Maris Airport, The Tribune
was told yesterday.

Ever since its closure for
repairs last February, residents
have been warning that they
cannot rebound from the lost
revenue the closure hasjcreat-
ed. Although now open,
Bahamasair has not resumed
service, but residents are grate-
ful that some. private airlift
charters, such as Southern and

PROFILE:

Pineapple Air, are able to
bring in tourists.

James ‘Docky’ Smith, owner
of the Stella Maris-based
Bonafide Bonefishing, and
president of the north Long
Island BoneFish Association,
told The Tribune that the area
was still being negatively
impacted by the situation at
the airport.

Business

However, business had
improved with the now-daily
commuter service offered by
Southern Air and Pineapple
Air directly into Stella Maris.

Mr Smith credited the min-
ister of transport and aviation,

Glenys Hanna-Martin, saying
she had a done a great job in
ensuring charter flights were
now able to land in Stella
Maris again.

He added that the airport

still has major limitations, and
hoped work will continue so
that larger aircraft - especially

* direct flights from Florida - can

commence flying into Stella
Maris, and also enable
Bahamasair to resume their
schedule.

"Long Islanders are very
proud, and we will try to make
things happen for ourselves.
All we ask is that the needed
infrastructure is put in place,"
Mr Smith said.

Another person, who asked

FIDELITY

invites applications for the position of

MANAGER, CARD OPERATIONS

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

Establish operating policies, procedures & controls

banking delivery systems

IT infrastructure
products and services

marketing strategies, customer loyalty programme

+ 7+ years in the financial services industry with 5+ years in the bank card
and/or electronic banking services and card operations management

responsibile for daily management of card product operations and electronic
Work with internal departments, external vendors and card

associations to assure cardholder services and compliance

Output and delivery of statements, plastics, letters and supporting

Support the development of new card and electronic banking

Team with Marketing to execute product and sales plans,

Oversee payments and application processing, maintenance of

databases, cards support training, account posting and reconciliation
Resolve cardholder disputes and process chargebacks

that their business not be
named, said commere was very
slow. “It is hot as productive,
because people do not want to
have to pay $100 both ways to
take a taxi to get here from
Deadman’s Cay,” they said.

Closure

The airport’s closure has had
a devastating effect on the
area’s two primary resorts,
Cape Santa Maria and the Stel-
la Maris Resort, which have
both over the past few months
seen cancellations that have
drastically cut profits, both for
them and the surrounding busi-
nesses which rely on their
guests to make an income.

heaviest impact from the ini-

tiative, which requires Ameri- —

cans to have passports for
reentry into the United States.

They included group and
convention travel, weddings,
spring breakers and the sum-
mer family businesses. Com-
bined, these four groups
accounted for almost 250,000
of the visitors arriving to the
Bahamas in 2006.

The Ministry noted that
group business travel was gen-
erated through three channels
- independent meeting plan
ners, corporate meeting plan-
ners and business incentive
houses. They accounted for 30
per cent, 30 per cent and 40
per cent of the group/conven-
tion business respectively.

Based on 2006 Immigration
departure cards, the groups,
convention and conference
business brought 42,000 visi-
tors to the Bahamas, these
people staying an average of

4.3 nights for a total of 180,000
visitor nights.

According to Immigration
arrivals cards, in 2006, 43,000
visitors came for a wedding in
the Bahamas, staying on aver-
age 4.5 nights or a total 192,000
visitor nights.

Almost 50,000 visitors
between the ages of 12 and 24
arrived in the Bahamas on a
vacation during March and
April 2006, traditionally Spring
Break time, averaging 5.6
nights in the Bahamas and
totaling 280,000 visitor nights.

The Working paper added
that based on June to August

2006 air arrivals, potentially

40,000 families visited the
Bahamas. Assuming a family
consists of one male, one
female and children under 12,
that translated into about
113,000 persons spending
613,000 visitor nights. Their
average length of stay was 5.5
nights.

TM Toy Nae

Well established Fashion Retail

Business. Well known and
respected worldwide Franchise.

20 years at same prime location.
P. O. Box CB11098

Enquiries to:

dave





Administer fraud and loss prevention programmes
Participate in budgeting process
Monitor service levels and report on performance

CRITICAL COMPETENCIES:

Operations /financial focus with technical background

Demonstrated project management experience

Strong communication (verbal and written), organizational, and
supervisory skills

Strong demonstrated knowledge in banking regulation and operational risk
management

Excellent interpersonal skills. Ability to effectively interact with all levels
of management and employees

The person will report directly to the Executive Vice President and CFO
Competitive compensation package will include salary, benefits and bonuses.
Send resume no later than February 16th, 2007 to:

The Director Human Resources
21a

51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853
Nassau
Fax 326.3000

e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com



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PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007
GN-456



G4

SUPREME COURT

SUPREME COURT :
-PROBATE REGISTRY :
P.O. BOX N-167 :
Nassau, The Bahamas :
February 8th, 2007 :

Probate Division
2006/PRO/npr/00738

In the Estate of STEPHEN A. ORLANDO, late of 6021

Gulf of Mexico Drive, Longboat Key in the State of Florida,

one of the United States of America,

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of :
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be :
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in its Probate ;
Division by HARTIS EUGENE PINDER of Mareva House, :
George Street in the City of Nassau in the Island of New ;
Providence, one of the Islands of the commonwealth of :
The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney :
in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed Grant of :
Amended Letters of Administration in the above estate :
granted to MAURICE V. ORLANDO, the Personal :
Representative, by the Circuit Court for Manatee County }
in the State of Florida, on the 19th day of September, :

2006.
‘ Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

nS EEE UEnEEEE EE

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :
PROBATE DIVISION :
February 8th, 2007 :

No. 2006/PRO/npr/00739

Whereas LELAND DAWKINS, of the Settlement of Crown
Haven, Abaco, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth :
of The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme ;
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the ;
real and personal estate of HOWARD DAWKINS late of :
Murphy Town, Abaco, one of the Islands of the :
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. }

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the

_ 2006/PRO/npr/00030

i In the Estate of LEMUEL S. CONNELLY late of the City
: of Tampa in the State of Florida, USA,

date hereof.

Signed
D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

SUPREME COURT :
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167 :
Nassau, The Bahamas :
February 8th, 2007 :

Probate Division
2007/PRO/npr/00003

In the Estate of ALEXANDER SLORACH late of
Khonkaen, Mannachie Road Forres IV36 2UT in the

Sheriffdom of Grampian, Highland and Islands in Scotland,
deceased. :

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be ;
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in its Probate ;
Division by EARL A. CASH of Marlin Drive in the Western :
District in the Island of New Providence, The Bahamas, :
_ Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas :

‘for obtaining the Resealed Grant of Certified Extract ;
Confirmation in the above estate granted to JACQUELINE :
JEAN PEREIRA the Executor, by the Sheriff of Grampian, :
Highland and Islands at Elgin on the 8th day of August, ;

2006.
Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Assistant Registrar



No. 2006/PRO/npr/00021

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the ;

date hereof.

Signed
D. Robinson
(for) Registrar

deceased. |

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY :
P.O. BOX N-167 :
Nassau, The Bahamas
February 8th, 2007 :

Probate Division

| 2007/PRO/npr/00022

In the Estate of LILLIAN KIMBALL late of the County of
Maricopa in the State of Arizona, one of the States of the :

United States of America,

: -NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of }
: fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be :
: made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in its Probate ;
Side by GILBERT ANSELM THOMPSON, of Chancery :
House, The Mall, in the city of Freeport, Grand Bahama, ;
The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney ;
in The Bahamas, for obtaining the Resealed Grant of :
Letters of Personal Representative in the above estate :
granted to BETTIE KENNEDY the Personal
Representative, the Superior Court of the State of Arizona ;
: in and for the County of Maricopa USA, on the 21st day :

of March 2006 i

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Assistant Registrar

i

SUPREME COURT :
PROBATE REGISTRY :
P.O. BOX N-167 :
Nassau, The Bahamas :
February 8th, 2007 :
Probate Division :

: Whereas DUNCAN ANTHONY IRWIN DE BARROS of
i No. 7 Sky End, Eastern Estates in the Eastern District of
i the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
deceased. ;

: to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of

i _ NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of :
: fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be :
: made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its ;
: Probate Division by LOUREY C. SMITH, of #4 George :
: Street in the City of Nassau in the Island of New :
: Providence, The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the ;
? Authorizes Attorney in The Bahamas, for obtaining the :
Resealed Grant of Letters of Administration in the above :
estate granted to SHERYLL JEAN SECORD the Executrix, ;
by the Circuit Court for Pinellas County of Florida, USA, :

2006/PRO/npr/00029

In the Estate of RUTH E. SECORD late of Clearwater,
Pinellas County, Florida, USA,

on the 6th day of June 2005.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Assistant Registrar



SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY :

198 P.O. BOX N-167
) t Nassau, The Bahamas :
; February 8th, 2007
Probate Division :

i the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application '

: to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Assistant Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007 :

: Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the Real and }

: Personal Estate of NEVILLE HOLLAND MAJOR late of |!
Whereas PAMELA L. KLONARIS and MIKE A. :
KLONARIS both of the Western District of the Island of :
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth ;
: of The Bahamas have made application to the Supreme :
: Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration with
: the Will annexed of the Real and Personal Estate of ;
? RICARDO SABOIA KHURY late of Avenida Parana 33, ;
? Apartment 1680035-130, Curitiba, Brazil, deceased. :

No. 2006/PRO/npr/00031

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
: by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the ;
} date hereof. i
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION :
February 8th, 2007 :

Be

Whereas PRINCE ALBERT STUBBS of St. Vincent Road :
Western District, New Providence, one of the Islands of :
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, the Only Child, has
made application to the Supreme Court of the Bahamas, :
for letters of administration of the real and personal estate
of AREBELLA STUBBS late of St. Vincent Road, Western :
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the :
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. :

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

No. 2006/PRO/npr/00032

deceased.

| No. 2006/PRO/npr/00039

i No. 2006/PRO/npr/00040

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS :
THE SUPREME COURT :
PROBATE DIVISION :
February 8th, 2007 :

: to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of

: Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of LEON

Whereas ALFRED DANIELS, of Buttercup Lane, South |
Beach Estates in the Southern District of the Island of ;
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth i
of The Bahamas; has made application to the Supreme
: Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of
: the Real and Personal Estate of CHARMAINE NATASHA :
DANIELS late of No. 76 Sunrise Subdivision in the City ;
: of Freeport, on the Island of Grand Bahama, one of the }
! Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. :

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the
date hereof.
Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00034

Whereas CANDICE KING of No. 2 St Lucia Crescent,
Elizabeth Estates in the Eastern District of the Island of
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of
the Real and Personal Estate of WINIFRED GIBSON late
of No. 2 St Lucia Crescent, Elizabeth Estates in the
Eastern District of the Island of New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

: Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
i by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

ED

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00035

Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application

Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of JANET
BERYL DEBAROS No. 7 Sky End, Eastern Estates in the
Eastern District of the Island of New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALJH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2006/PRO/npr/00038

February 8th, 2007

Whereas ANASTASIA PATRICE FERGUSON of 386.

Eaton Road, Yellow Elder Gardens in the Western District

of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of |

Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of ROSIE °

. | CLEARE FERGUSON late of No. 7 Sky End, Eastern
deceased. :
: Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
: NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of :
: fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be :
: made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas on its ;
Probate Side by RHONDA L. C. HULL, of the Township :
of Marsh Harbour, Abaco, The Bahamas, Attorney-At-
Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas, for :
obtaining the Resealed Grant of Letters of Administration
in the above estate granted to ARTHUR P. W. CONNELLY :
: the Personal Representative, by the Circuit Court for :
: Hillsborough County in the State of Florida, USA, on the :
i 30th day of August 1993.

Estates in the Eastern District of the Island of New
The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

a ———L—LK

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

THE SUPREME COURT },

PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007

Whereas FEDNER J. DORSETAL of St. Albans Drive in

the Western District of the Island of New Providence, one |

of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas

has made application to the Supreme Court of The |;

Chase Avenue in the Western District of the Island of |,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth

of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard

by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

Ban

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007

Whereas LEOTHA CLYDE of the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made application

ANDY BROWN late of 20101 SW 84th Avenue, Miami,
Florida, United States of America, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar
- THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

ec
i

GN-456



SUPREME COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00041

Whereas ARENETTA N. DAVIS of No. 63 Royal
Palm Way and Sea Breeze Lane, Lucayan Beach
Subdivision in the City of Freeport, on the Island of
Grand Bahama, one of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration
of the Real and Personal Estate of ZENDRE KATHI
MAJOR late of No. 63 Royal Palm Way and Sea
Breeze Lane, Lucayan Beach Subdivision in the
City of Freeport, on the Island of Grand Bahama,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 21
days from the date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF. THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00042

Whereas BASIL THOMPSON of Pyfrom Road, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of
WILLARD THOMPSON late of Pyfrom Road, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth

“of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
February 8th, 2007

Probate Division
2006/PRO/npr/00043

In the Estate of EUGENE V. DELUCA (a.k.a.)
EUGENE V. DE LUCA), late of the city of Haverford
in the State of Pennsylvania, United States of
America,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
in the Probate Division by ELLEN SERVILLE of
No. 13 East Avenue North, in the Eastern District
of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-
At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas
for obtaining the Resealed Grant of Letters
Testamentary in the above estate granted to DONNA
D. K. VOIGT (named in the said Will as DONNA
VOIGT), the Executrix, by the Registrar of Wills
Delaware County, Pennsylvania, on the 8th day of

~ January 2004.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00044

Whereas C. YYETTE MCCARTNEY-PEDROCHE
of Skyline Drive, in the Western District of the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for Letters of Administration with the Will annexed
of the Real and Personal Estate of JEAN MARIE
CLAUDE FROTIER (a.k.a.) JEAN-MARIE FORTIER
late of 3663 Riverside Drive, Suite 504 Windsor,
Ontario, Canada, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
February 8th, 2007

Probate Division
2006/PRO/npr/00045

In the Estate of HOPE L.. FISHER late of
MANHATTAN in the State of New York, U.S.A.
_ deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
on its Probate Side by LOUREY C. SMITH of No.
#4 George Street in the City of Nassau in the Island
of New Providence, The Bahamas, Attorney-At-
Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas, for

obtaining the Reasealed Grant of Certificates of -

Small Estates in the above estate granted to
PATRICIA A. MCCRAY the Executrix, by the
Surrogate’s Court of New York in the State of New
York, USA, on the 3rd day of May 2005.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Assistant Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00046

Whereas ROSINA FORBES of the Settlement of
Eight Mile Rock on the Island of Grand Bahama,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, one of the Beneficiaries named in the
said Will, has made application to the Supreme
Court of the Bahamas, for letters of administration
with the Will annexed of the real and personal estate
of JOSEPH SAMUEL LINDEN late of the Settlement
of West End, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 21
days from the date hereof.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
February 8th, 2007

Probate Division
2006/PRO/npr/00047

In the Estate of ELIZABETH G. MEINERS late of
11423 Holly Court in the City of Kansas City in the
State of Missouri, USA,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
in the Probate Side by WILLIAM P. HOLOWESKO
of East Lyford Lane, Western District, New
Providence, The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the
Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas, for obtaining
the Resealed Grant of Letters Testamentary in the
above estate granted to CHRISTOPHER MOHART
the Personal Representative, by the Probate Court
in the State of Missouri, USA, on the 28th day of
June 2004.

Signed
Desiree Robinson
(for) Assistant Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00048

Whereas ANDREW G. WELLS of the Eastern District
of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for Letter of Administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of HERCULES HARDING late of Moore’s
Wharf of the Island of New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

Signed
N. Neilly

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2007, PAGE 7B

(for) Registrar
COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION
February 8th, 2007
No. 2006/PRO/npr/00049

Whereas JAMES ALEXANDER RAHMING of
Stapledon Gardens in the Western District of the
Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas has made
application to the Supreme court of The Bahamas,
for Letters of Administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of GLADYS RAHMING late of Bias Street,
off Baillou Hill Road in the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence, one of the Island of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will
be heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14
days from the date hereof.

Signed
N Neilly
(for) Registrar

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
February 8th, 2007

Probate Division
2006/PRO/npr/00050

In the Estate of JUDY O’NEIL (a.k.a) JUDITH ANN
O’NEIL, late of 269 Road 11 East, Woodslee, in
the Province of Ontario, Canada, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
in the Probate Division by NEVILLE BERNARD
WILCHOMBE II of Chancery House, The Mall, in
the City of Freeport on the Island of Grand Bahama,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, The Authorized Attorney
in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed
Certificate of Appointment of Estate Trustee With
A Will in the above estate granted to ELIZABETH
ANN O’NEIL, the Persnal Representative, by the
Superior Court of Justice, Ontario, on the 6th day
of May 2004..

_ Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Registrar

._., SUPREME COURT
_, PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
February 8th, 2007

Probate Division
2006/PRO/npr/00051

In the Estate of THOMAS G. BURKE (a.k.a)
THOMAS GERALD BURKE, late of Village of Rye
Brook in the County of Westchester in the State of
New York, one of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
in the Probate Division by HARTIS EUGENE
PINDER of No. 4 George Street in the City of
Nassau, in the Island of New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed Grant of
Probate in the above estate granted to HELEN W.
BURKE, the Executrix, by the State of New York,
County of Westchester, Surrogate’s Office, on the
9th day of April 1997.

Signed
N. Neilly
(for) Assistant Registrar

SUPREME COURT
PROBATE REGISTRY
P.O. BOX N-167
Nassau, The Bahamas
February 8th, 2007

Probate Division
2006/PRO/npr/00052

In the Estate of EDWARD LEVERNE HAMBLETON
late of 1227 Sherbrooke Street, Montreal in the
Province of Quebe, Canada,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration
of fourteen days from the date hereof, application
will be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas
in the Probate Division by LOUREY CLAUDETTE.
SMITH of No. 4 George Street in the City of Nassau,
in the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-
At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas
for obtaining the Resealed Judgment of Probate in
the above estate granted to JANET ELAINE
RANKIN, the Executrix, by the Superior Court of
Canada, Province of Quebec, on the 13th day of
January 2005.

Signed

Desiree Robinson
(for) Assistant Registrar
ee ee



a ee —_
: —— os ee

Two in ©

court —
FROM page one

Russell was shot in the
chest at the Fantasy Night-
club on Madeira Street when
two gunmen entered the club
around lam. He was taken to
hospital where he died a short

. time later. ;
Both men were also }

charged with armed robbery.
According to a court docket,
they both on Thursday, Janu-
ary 25, while armed with a
handgun, robbed Shervin

‘Miller. Jr of -a 1999 Ford

Explorer valued at $5,000.
The men were not
required to plead and the

‘matters were adjourned to

February 22 and transferred

~ to Court 10 Nassau Street.

After the men wére
arraigned, attorney Johnson
said he had been informed
that his client some time yes-
terday had been taken to a
doctor where blood samples
were taken from him against
his will.

Mr Johnson made an appli-
cation to have the samples
destroyed. He said he had no

’ knowledge that blood sam-

ples were going to be taken :

from his client.

The magistrate noted the
application. Mr Johnson also
filed a formal complaint in
court yesterday for assault of
blood.

Armbrister -was also

arraigned yesterday on sepa- 4
rate charges of armed rob- +

bery, housebreaking, stealing

and receiving. ,

It is alleged that on Tues-

day, January 16, he robbed i

Anton Smith of $700. It is also: -
alleged that on Friday, : ©

December 1, 2006, he broke: :
into the home of Richard ;

mit a felony.

There it is alleged that he :
stole a black 12-gauge shot- i ~
gun valued at $400, the prop- :-
erty of Richard Parker. He i:

Parker with the intent to com- |;

was also charged.with receiv- i
ing the gun knowing that it }
was obtained by a‘an offence.

Armbrister.pleaded not }
guilty to all charges and the }
matters were adjourned to. }




May 9 and transferred to }
~Court 10 Nassau Street. :

en EL ENTE ee,

FROM page one

rule extension,’ Mr Ingraham
said that Mr Wilchcombe
should simply apologise for his
comments.

Mr Ingraham was speaking
at the FNM Grand Bahama
Women’s Prayer Breakfast at
Christ the King Church Hall on
Saturday.

The US Western Hemispher-
ic Travel Initiative (WHTI),
which was implemented on Jan-
uary 24, requires all US citizens
to have a passport to re-enter
the United States.

There has been great concern
among tourism officials
throughout the Caribbean that
the implementation of the trav-
el initiative would discourage
Americans from travelling

‘abroad, and impact the tourism

industry in terms of revenue

and jobs losses.

Mr Ingraham said the US
government decided it wanted
to make sure all Americans

- coming back home, if they trav-

elled abroad, had a passport.

He ‘stated that included the
Bahamas, the Caribbean, Cana-
da and Mexico,

Mr Ingraham said no coun-
try -. America,.the Bahamas, or
any democratic country - can
stop its citizens from returning
back home.

“You may be inconve-
nienced, but once you can show
and prove you are an Ameri-
can citizen, you will get back
home. Just as you come to the
Bahamas, if you can show you
are Bahamian you will be back
home.

“Obie Wilchcombe went up
to Washington, and The Tri-

ea ee ee ee ee te, ee ee ——= +



bune was duped into the story
which says ‘Wilchcombe con-
vinces members of US Congress
to extend implementation peri-
od for the Caribbean.’

“That’s a very big man we’ve

got,” Mr Ingraham said, mock- -
ingly. “Not the Prime Minister, °

Affairs, not Jamaica, ngt Bar-
bados, not Trinidad, bag Obie

not the Minister of i
Wilchcombe from Wes

nd!

“He went up there and got
the US Congress to change
American law! Do you know
how hard it is to get the

Bahamas to change our laws?”

he said.

Mr Ingraham further quoted:
“The Bahamas and the rest of
the Caribbean have been given
a 30-days respite from US new
passport rule with the prospects

Casino workers’ sick-out

FROM page one

yesterday Mr Ferguson said he was unaware
that the meeting was to take place.

He also placed the situation squarely on Mr
Sands’ shoulders, saying that when he was pro-
moted to his new position, Mr Sands decided
that he could reduce the workers’ Christmas
bonus from two weeks to one week without
consulting the union.

Mr Ferguson said that in various public pro-
nouncements Mr Sands had said that the hotel’s
revenue had increased in 2006, a fact which
gives him no justification for discontinuing one
week of Christmas bonus.

“There was no economic situation to justify
the ‘dismal position he was predicting. Even if

_there was a reason to do it there ought to have

‘been consultation with the parties. You just
can’t discontinue a benefit a worker would have
had for the past 10 years,” the union leader
said. °

Mr Ferguson said the respect previous owners
of the property would have had seems to have
disappeared.

“What used to happen was if the hotel cor-

poration had intended not to pay a bonus they
had already agreed to pay they would have
called the union. The union and the corporation
would have come to an arrangement, the union
would have gone to its members and the union
would say .to its members this reduction would
_take effect having regard to these factors.
“This did not happen. Mr Sands has been
with the Wyndham for a very long time and I do
not know why.he would have taken this
approach,” Mr Ferguson said.
Mr Sands said that the sick-out was intended
‘to disrupt service to customers, particularly in

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the casino on perhaps the property’s second
busiest weekend of any year.
“We have called the meeting to discuss our

concerns and to hear what concerns they may
have and we will certainly listen to them jj also
outline what we consider to be the for-

ward. :

“We are now aware, Mr Ferguson, president
of the Bahama Hotel Managerial Association,
has been agitating this group and we think it is
unfortunate that that is taking place.

“A number of persons participated in it. How-
ever, I am very happy to say it was almost seam-
less in terms of the impact on our customers.
Our services went on without disruption,” Mr
Sands said.

The number of staff since last Wednesday
participating in the sick-out, Mr Sands said, is
increasing.

“Tt was an escalating increase of persons —
last night was Superbowl — but there was no
impact on our ability to operate and deliver
service to our customers within the
casino. ;

“We are concerned by the action and Geet
ing of all the team members will be held4t 2pm
on Tuesday,” Mr Sands said.

Mr Sands had suggested that there would be
consequences for those persons participating
in the sick-out. Yesterday, the hotelier said
management is reviewing the situation.

“We had at the time said we would be very
concerned and disappointed if persons partici-
pated. We’re in the process of reviewing the
situation that took place between Wednesday
and last night.

“We will make a statement to that effect (as
to the consequences) as soon as we find a posi-
tion after we review the entire weekend,” Mr
Sands said.



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Ingraham criticises Wilchcombe over passport rule statements

of gaining a further year long
delay to the new requirement
for region.”

“Now, we know that is not
true,” he added, “The US
ambassador made a statement
that no waiver has taken place
and none was contemplated.

“Why wouldn’t Mr Wilch-
combe just simply say I’m sorry
for telling you a lie, I made it up
in my own head, it’s not a mis-
take, it’s not misleading, I just
lied to you — you caught me
lying!”

Tourism Minister Wilch-

combe and US Ambassador -

John Rood held a joint press
conference on February 1 to
clear up confusion about the
government’s announcement
that it had obtained a 30-day
waiver on the US’ new passport
rule.

Mr Rood and Mr Wilch-
combe agreed that terminolo-
gy used in the announcement
may have been misleading.
They went on to explain that



EDM leader
Hubert Ingraham

the WHTI, which requires US
citizens to obtain a passport for
all international air travel, is in
place, but that it is being imple-
mented in a flexible manner.

Man is killed in

three-vehicle collision.

FROM page one

The driver of the Toyota Avalon died at the scene. He has
been identified as Dominic Redhead, 36, of Adelaide Village.
Redhead is the country’s second traffic fatality victim for the year.
Nearly two weeks ago, the country recorded its first traffic fatal-
ity victim of the year when Anthony McPhee, 30, of Market
Street, was killed after losing control of his car and crashing into

a wall on East Street.

FROM page one

the Bahama Journal that the
shuffle was provoked by the
conduct of certain officers in

relation to the arrest of the .

five baggage handlers.

“No, no, no...when you see
the changes you'll know it had
nothing to do with that,” she
said.

She explained that it is
important for senior offices to
gain experience in other areas
of the force during their
careers.

“From time to time there
are changes in leadership, the
assistant commissioners move
from island to island, and




dati



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Shuffle

‘there’s a shuffle,” she said.

-. (On Monday, the Bahama:
- Journal reported insiders as
claiming that three officers. -

were to be transferred, one of
them Assistant Commissioner
Mr Reginald Ferguson. :
Mr Ferguson said he had
been “verbally notified” of the
impending transfer.
However, the two other

officers whose names had sur- -

faced in connection with the
reports said they were

unaware of any imminent

reshuffling.






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