Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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PAGE 2, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007





RH Prince Edward pays ;
tribute to award winners

lm By PAULG
TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter

HIS Royal Highness Prince
Edward, the Earl of Wessex,
presented Gold Awards to
participants of the Governor
General’s Youth Award, and
special awards to long serving
members at Government
House yesterday.

Prince Edward congratulat-
ed and encouraged the young
recipients especially for gain-
ing their awards, and thanked
Governor General Arthur
Hanna for his support of the
Governor General’s Youth
Award (GGYA).

“The fact that you all came
here in support of these kids
means a little something extra
for these young people, and
really show the value of this
programme within the com-
munity of the Bahamas. So
thank you so very much for
that,” he said.

Prince Edward is the chair-
man of the International
Award Association, of which
the GGYA is affiliated.

While thanking the parents
and the long service awards
members, Prince Edward
reminded the audience that
the day was really in honour
of the Gold Award recipients.

They are listed as follows:
Terez Albury, Stefano Bowe,
Blaine Butler, Anaya Dean,
Santia Dean, Travis Dun-
combe, Hailey Evans, Elin-
dera Ferguson, Ashli Fox,
Esmond Johnson, Avery
Lightbourne, DeShawn
McGregor, Rayshell Minus,
Robert Moncur, Mandelia
Morris, Orson Mortimer,
Alysia Moss, Donny Nesbitt,
Teynarae Newbold, Dennise
Newton, Cassandra Nottage,
Davone Rolle, Onan Rolle,
Dontae Saunders, Jervaise
Sawyer, Deandra Smith,
Aisha Turnquest, Max Wilch-
combe, Lauren Williams, and
Danielle Sweeting- Wilson.

Long service awards for
over 20 years were presented
to Henry Curry, Constance
Miller, and Rosamund
Roberts.

_ Awards for 15 years of ser-
vice went to John Bethell, Dr
Keva Bethell, Suzanne Black,



@ HRH Prince Edward, the > Earl of Wessex and Arthur D.

eee eS ee ee ee ee

Hanna, Governor General of the Bahamas, present Avery
ehioumne with the Gold Award.

Graham Cooper, Stella Camp-
bell, Ian Fair, Lynn Glinton,
Nancy Kelly, Pericles Maillis,
Rudy Murray, Robert Nihon,
Alan Pinto, and Portia Sweet-
ing.
Awards for 10 years of ser-
vice went to William D Bir-
chall; Colin Cameron, Law-



(Photo: Ana Bianca Marin)

son ‘Clarke, Frank Crothers,
Maxwell Gibson, Elaine
Gomez, Jose Anthony
Josephs, Darlene Lewis, Vivi-
enne. Missick, William
Munnings, Alicia Newton,
James Richard, Philip Rolle,
and Jennifer Whylly.

Prince Edward attended a
fundraising dinner last night
with the governor general at
Café Martinique. A “rally pro-
gramme” is scheduled for
today at 10.30am at Govern-

ment House.

@ HRH Prince Edward,

the Earl of Wessex (right)
and Arthur D. Hanna (left),
Governor General of the
Bahamas, make their way to
the ballroom in Government
House for the awards
ceremony.

Photo: Ana Bianca
Marin)

TROPICAL
US)

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PHONE: 822-21 57.



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THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007, PAGE 3 -





Woman in
hospital
after alleged

cutlass attack

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT-A
young woman is
detained in hospital
with serious stab
wounds and multiple
chops about the body
following an alleged
vicious cutlass attack.

According to reports,
LaTeisha Parker, 25, of
Erickson Drive, was
taken to Rand Memor-
ial Hospital on
Wednesday evening
with multiple lacera-
tions to the body and
stab wounds to the
neck.

Supt Basil Rahming
said police received a
report sometime
around 6.30pm from a
woman motorist who
reported that a man
inside a red car on
Grand Bahama High-
way was chopping up a
woman with a cutlass.

Two units were dis-
patched to the scene,

_east of the Chicken

Farm, where officers -
spotted a vehicle fit-
ting the description
given by the caller. On
seeing the officers, the
suspect fled into near-
by bushes, leaving his
Nissan Sentra license
no. 32086.

Officers discovered

*. the victim inside the

vehicle, bloodied and
screaming. They took
the woman to the hos-
pital for medical atien-
tion. Her condition was
described by doctors as
serious.
i‘ In the meantime, a
second unitsearched
the buskes for the-sus-
pect, but was unstc-
cessful in locating him.
Police later appre-
hended a suspect, a 30-
year-old resident of
Sunrise Subdivision at
his residence around
10pm Thursday.
According to Mr
Rahming, police were
informed that the sus-
pect allegedly lured the
woman to meet him at
the Grand Bahama

Sports Complex, where —

she was beaten and
stabbed in the neck
with a screw driver.

It was alleged that
the woman was then
dragged into the sus-
pect’s vehicle and dri-
ven onto remote Grand
Bahama Highway,
where she was chopped
with a cutlass, and
threatened with déath.

Mr Rahming said the
quick response of the
motorist and police.
saved the young wom-

‘an’s life and averted a

potential homicide.

The suspect is
expected to be formal-
ly charged in connec-
tion with the matter on
Monday.

Not guilty
plea to

drugs °

charge

A MAN accused of
having 24 pounds of
marijuana was
arraigned in Magis-
trate’s Court.

Dennis Peterson
pleaded not guilty to
the charge.

It was alleged that on
Thursday, January 25,
he was found in posses-
sion of a quantity of
marijuana which he

‘. intended to supply to

another.

Peterson was
arraigned before Magis-
trate Carolita Bethel at
court eight in Bank
Lane.

He was remanded and
a bail hearing was set
for February 5.

morief Claim that five died in two

weeks in PMH dialysis unit

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

FIVE people died over a two-
week period in the dialysis unit
of the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital last month as a result of a
bacterial infection that has not
been eliminated since it was first
detected six months earlier, it
was claimed yesterday...

In total,16 patients have died
in the unit in the six months
since the outbreak, Mr Cassius
Stuart, ‘leader of the Bahamas

' Democratic Movement has

alleged.

His comments came when he
appeared as a guest on More94
FM's "Real Talk Live", with
host Michael Pintard.

Mr Pintard said he and the
show's regular host, Jeff Lloyd,
had made their own "indepen-
dent" effort to determine the

veracity of Mr Stuart's claims. —

This resulted in the conclu-
sion that Stuart's statistics were
"accurate" and the deaths - con-
trary to claims made by Dr Not-
tage - were indeed known to
have been caused by the infec-
tion. |

They claimed to have spoken
to physicians within PMH, who
had indicated the figures are
"unacceptably high."

Mr Stuart repeated his call
made earlier in the week for the
resignation of Minister Dr
Bernard Nottage.

He alleges that the minister
could have done more to raise
public awareness of the alleged
severity of the situation. In Mr
Stuart’s opinion he had not
done so for political reasons.

Mr Stuart and a caller both
suggested that had the BDM
not brought the issue to the
media's attention, no public
statement would have been
made by Dr Nottage.

"They have a responsibility
to protect those people in their
care, and if the people are dying
in their care I believe that per-
sons need to know — and it
shouldn't have to come from a
political party who's bringing
these’ issues to light," said Mr
Stuart.

Furthermore, in his opinion
the hospital should also be held
liable for the patient's deaths.

"They knew quite well about
the deaths of these individuals.
You cannot throw it off by (as
Dr Nottage stated on Monday)
saying their immune system is
compromised and so they're
susceptible to contracting infec-
tions regularly — these persons’
lives may have been extended if
this bacteria was not present.".

Several callers to the show,
however, expressed concern
that Mr Stuart's claims were
going to incite panic in the gen-
eral public, or were mere "pro-
paganda", useful to his politi-

cal aspirations in the run-up to.

the election.
One called on the doctors

i who have provided information

to come forward personally to
the press if the claims are true.
"Why can't the doctors
instead of being anonymous,
come on the shows and give
their facts? It's a matter of
importance," she said



lm PRINCESS Margaret Hospital

Mr Pintard repeated several
times during the show that he
and Mr Lloyd had “indepen-
dently verified" Mr Stuart's
statements, adding that "by any
yardstick, these are staggering
figures."

Mr Omar. Smith, deputy
leader of the BDM, asserted
that the Government ought to
have done more to warn the
public of the dangers present in
the unit so that they can make
an "informed" choice when
seeking dialysis.

There are currently 160 peo-
ple regularly receiving treat-
ment at the PMH unit, it was
pointed out.

"If you are going to be using
a facility that is supposed to be
helping you, and it is putting
you at risk, at the very least you
should know about the
risk before you take it," he
said.

"There are other dialysis
units in the country and there
are people who can afford to
go to these places," he noted,

adding that the government

should also pay for anyone who
cannot afford to do so, if they
do not want to be treated at
PMH while the bacteria has not
been eliminated.

One caller suggested that this
scenario is one which highlights
the need for a Freedom of
Information Act.

"We need public account-
ability; people are entitled to
greater: access to information. to
give thenr’protéction," he
claimed.

"It is very, very hard to get
access to information from the
state. They will duck you, they
will not answer your calls, you
gotta go left right and centre,
East, West, North and South
and still sometimes you don't
reach them."

A caller from Garden Hills
explained that his relative had
been in hospital a number of

times suffering from the bacte-
rial infection.

"Government has not come
forward with any answers...they
come on saying there is an
infection but no one came back.
to identify what it was and what
was the solution."

He backed Mr Stuart, assert-
ing that his political affiliation
should not diminish his claims.

"Who cares who is bringing
the message? Just because he
is in a political party does that
mean he can't bring factual
information to the public?"
asked the caller.

"Too many people are dying .

in dialysis and the government
is not doing enough to rectify
the problem. They came on last
year and said there was a prob-
lem but they never solved it —
if they had solved it my relative
would not be back in there
today. Now that's factual, that's
not political."

On Monday, Dr Nottage told

The Tribune that although

there has been an infection in,

the unit since July of last year, it
has now been brought "under
better control", with the num-
ber of cases dwindling in
December and January.

He admitted deaths had
occurred amongst those infect-
ed, but claimed that it was not
certain that these had been
caused by the bacteria.

However, the source of the
outbreak is yet to be deter-
mined, he said.

A meeting was set to take
place between the minister and
representatives of the Pan
American Health Organisation
(PAHO) yesterday to arrange a
review of steps taken so far to

bring the outbreak under con- —

trol.

Attempts to contact Dr Noi-
tage or Hospital Administrator
Mrs Coralee Adderley yester-
day for comment were unsuc-
cessful.

PHA denies claims that radiology services
cancelled due to training course

lm By BRENT DEAN

THE Public Health Authority has denied claims
that any procedures have been cancelled in the
Radiology Department because of a training course
on the department’s new equipment.

In a press release the Public Health Authority

(PHA) stated:

“The Princess Margaret Hospital wishes to advise
the public that radiology services are available 24
hours daily at the Department, and at no time have
patients been denied services nor have special pro-
cedures been cancelled during the training oF the

radiology staff.”

The training course is the result of the commis-
sioning of a 16-slice CAT Scan machine. The PHA
said this is the first time that the Princess Margaret
Hospital will own and operate its own CAT Scan

machine.

“The acquisition of this new CAT Scan machine
required the renovation and expansion of the Radi-
ology Department, and brought along with it mod-
ification in staffing, with the addition of three new
radiologists all of whom have CT experience and
meet the requisite qualifications by the Medical
Council of the Bahamas. Additionally, six new radi-

Position Available

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Local Zoo and Conservation Centre seeks
Director. Successful candidate will have a
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with animals in an administrative position

| within a zoo. Must have good people skills,
strong organizational skills, and have prior

supervisory experience.

Send resumes to Zookeeper, P.O. Box
N-4882, Nassau, Bahamas.

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ographers were employed,” said the PHA state-

ment.

“Physicians and radiographers are presently
receiving a one week completion training course in
the use of the Philips CT machine. This comes as a

' follow-up to the two week course in CT at Medical
Technology Management Institute (MTMI) in Mil-
waukee, Wisconsin, a one week systems specialist
training within the department, as well as a week
training with a radiologist and radiographer CT spe-
cialist from Canada.

“In an effort to provide the best in imaging ser-
vice, the department continues to provide 24-hour

service daily to the public, through a team of quali-

fied physicians and radiographers.”

The statement refutes public allegations that spe-
cial procedures had been cancelled at the Radiolo-
gy Department until February 12th because all med-

ical staff in that department had been sent away on

a training course.

The source of the information had expressed con-
cern that as a result of the cancellations, patients who
needed to have procedures, will either have to go to
a private facility and pay the full cost, or, wait until
the training course has been completed, thus jeop-
ardising the health of those who cannot afford to go

to a private facility.

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by awit



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AGE 4, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007




The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

tyles of |

THE TRIBUNE:





+

»

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 @ a
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 | "

Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box
Insurance Management Building.,

N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352 :
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

a

Blair won’t exit over honours scandal

LONDON (AP) — Britain will have to
“put up with me for a bit longer,” Prime Min-
ister Tony Blair said Friday, a day after police
revealed that they questioned him a second
time in an investigation into whether political
honours such as knighthoods were traded
forcash. |

The Labour leader last year became the
first serving prime minister in British history
to be questioned in a criminal investigation —
and there is growing concern in his party
about the damaging effect it is having on his

government. But Blair said he would not let’

the inquiry drive him from office.

“I think it would be particularly wrong ...
before the inquiry has even run its course
and come to any conclusions,” Blair told
British Broadcasting Corp. radio. “So you
will have to put up with me for a bit longer.”

Blair has suffered a series of setbacks over
the years but his third term has been partic-
ularly explosive — voters angry over his han-
dling of the Iraq war cost his party a signifi-
cant share of its parliamentary seats in 2005
and pummelled the party a second time in
local elections last year. It was that, defeat
that sparked a party rebellion that ultimate-
ly forced Blair to announce he'll resign by
September.

In an address planned for today at the
Labour Party’s National Policy Forum in
London, Blair says that the cash-for-honours
scandal won’t determine how Britons vote
in the next elections.

“The fourth election will not be decided by
current events,” Blair plans to say, according
to a text of his speech released in advance. “It
will be about whether we have the dynamism,
energy, vision and, above all, clear, well
thought out policies for Britain’s future.

“The biggest danger for us electorally is
not in the end what embarrasses us but what
makes the country think that on the big chal-
lenges the country faces, we only have small

-answeIs.”

The honours scandal, however, may be
Blair’s final battle as prime minister.

“JT am not going to beg for my character in
front of anyone,” Blair told the BBC Friday.
“People can make up their mind about me,
according to what they think about me, but I
know what type of person I am. And I am not
going to get into a situation where I am plead-
ing for my integrity.”

Labour Party chairman Hazel Blears says

NOTICE



not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 3rd day of
February 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

tinue to refer to himself as Prime 4

: ; [> RO if ECTI © Ni Minister. It is as if at times he has 4

NOTICE is hereby given that JANICE JOSEPH OF #83 to remind himself that yes, believe A CONCERNED ~ HY
WINDSOR LANE OFF EAST STREET, P.O. BOX N-10461, diols Gukipens it or not, he has indeed realised CITIZEN ten
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible soy HES ° | his childhood dream of being Nassau, 7 j
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization y) 6 Broun prime minister! January 30, 2007. ot
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who ; 8 |
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should We BURGLARS 4

1








the probe is having a “corrosive effect” on
Blair’s government — and Constitutional
Affairs Secretary Harriet Harman says trust
has been eroded.

Police are investigating allegations that
honours — including seats in the House of
Lords and knighthoods — were given to indi-
viduals who loaned money to the Labour
Party or the Conservatives, the main opposi-
tion party.

Blair was first questioned last year, and
his office revealed Thursday that police inter-
viewed the prime minister for a second time,
on January 26, as a witness and not under
caution — meaning it is unlikely he is sus-
pected of committing offences.

Police said they asked that the interview be
kept secret for nearly a week. They did not
offer an explanation.

Blair has acknowledged that some sup-
porters who offered loans later were nomi-
nated for honours, but has insisted he did
nothing wrong. Those candidates had been
legitimate selections, allowed under rules to
reward supporters for their service to a polit-
ical party, Blair’s office has said.

Blair’s chief fundraiser, Lord Levy, and
Ruth Turner — Blair’s director of govern-
ment relations — were arrested and released
after being accused of perverting the course
of justice. Sir Christopher Evans, a biotech-
nology entrepreneur, and Des Smith, a gov-
ernment adviser, were also questioned.

In his BBC interview, Blair declined to
answer questions about the police inquiry
until it concludes.

“All I would say to members of the public
is don’t believe everything that is ricocheting
around the media in terms of what is sup-
posed to have happened,” he said.

Blair added that he remains completely
focused on leading the country.

Still, some wonder whether the investiga-
tion — and the possibility that insiders could
be charged — may force him to leave sooner
than planned.

The honours scandal “is not so much a
fatal issue for Blair, but it is an issue hanging
over him. It’s overshadowing his final months
in office,” said Robert Kaye, an academic
researcher at the London School of Eco-
nomics.

(This-article was written by Paisley Dodds

of the Associated Press) .


























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4





















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EDITOR, The Tribune.

I WOULD be pleased if you
would allow me some of your valu-
able space to provide a commen-
tary on a very critical issue facing
our country. -

I will admit at the offset that it is
not very often that I listen or even
read the comments of Prime Min-
ister Christie since his election to
office almost five years ago. This is
because I find that he talks much
but says very little. However,
despite this there was a comment
that he made in one of the local
dailies recently about being confi-
dent that he will win the next gen-
eral election and that this election
will be a test of the leadership
styles of him and the leader of the
opposition Mr Hubert Ingraham.

I remember when our country
was at this same crossroad some
fifteen or so years ago when com-
parisons were being made again
the personality of the late Sir Lyn-
den Pindling and the newly
appointed leader of the FNM Mr
Ingraham. Comparisons were
being made between the smooth
style of Sir Lynden and the seem-
ingly harsh or unpolished style of
Mr Ingraham. We laughed at Mr
Ingraham’s pronunciation of some
words and were mesmerised at the
eloquence of Sir Lynden. “But at
the end of the day the voters made
achoice to elect Mr Ingraham and
unseat Sir Lynden because it was
determined then that being the
leader of this country required
much, much more than having a
fine polished exterior.

Today we are at the same cross-
road. As Prime Minister Christie
has stated, basically a key issue in
this election is a referendum on
the styles of leadership of the
leader of the PLP and the leader of
the FNM. Of course the election
should be about more than that as
one individual cannot run a coun-
try and therefore voters should
consider what party is putting the
BEST team forward, from which
will come members of the Cabi-
net and other key positions in this
country.
eeBut let us look at the leadership
style’of Christie v Ingraham.

‘Mr Christie has declared him-
self the best orator in the country.
I will admit that he does have the
gift of the gab. He can talk ad
infinitum, and do so with the
appropriate gesticulations and if
you did not know any better, he
could truly convince you that he
is a great speaker. But at the end of
the day after his usually long
episodes one must ask ... “what
did he say?”

And yes, Mr Christie is an excel-
lent entertainer. If it is drama and

entertainment that we want from ¢

our leader then he wins hands
down! His years as a junkanooer
have ranked him amongst the best
in terms of performatice...there is
stiff competition between him and
Vola Francis of the Saxons and
Gus Cooper of the Valley Boys.
These three individuals can give a
performance out of this world. But
should Vola and Gus be consid-

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LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



ered for the position of Prime Min-
ister because they could dance a
good junkanoo jig?

In anticipation of what we can
expect for the upcoming election a
Stalwart Counsellor was proud to
say that Mr Christie has a “new
move” for the election campaign.
She did not say that he had new
programmes and plans for the
country, but that he had a new
move for the campaign trail — that
even included a “jook”. I guess we
got a foretaste during the Fox Hill
Branch Meeting (rally) on the Fox
Hill Park the other night. I com-
mend PM Christie for his perfor-
mance and unreservedly give him
all 10’s. Perfect on execution and
perfect on performance. Always
dramatic...always entertaining,

But is this what we in this coun-
try want from our leader? Is this
who we would wish to send to the
United Nations and to meet with
world leaders to discuss how we
can progress and develop as a
nation? Last time I checked great
leaders of the more developed or
developing nations do not win sup-
port with the junkanoo shuffle,
square dancing, the waltz, calyp-
so, soca or reggae dancing or any
other form of gyration. Last time I
checked serious world leaders sat
down to discuss issues. Perhaps
this is why the PM has allowed
Minister Fred Mitchell to repre-
sent our country at most major
meetings.

PM Christie is no doubt an
effective leader... in the confines of
a very narrow context. I believe
he is an effective leader of his polit-
ical party. They seem to be more
about entertainment and good
times and not concerned much
about substance. He no doubt will
make an excellent leader of a
junkanoo group as he could not
only talk the talk but he could also
walk the walk. He would make an
excellent front line or even a free
dancer!

Our nation is facing some seri-
ous challenges and it is important
that strong leadership is required.
We need more than a dream-
er...Wwe need an executor. We need
someone who has a vision and a
focus to ensure that that vision is
executed. We need someone who
can focus a team of individuals to
achieve a common goal for the
benefit of our country, not for the
benefit of any group of individuals.
We need a leader who can stand
up on his own two feet and repre-
sent this country and clearly artic-
ulate a vision for us. We need a
leader who can stand on his own
and get out of the shadows of Sir
Lynden or the old guard PLP. If
this is the “new” PLP, how is it
that Mr Christie has had to sur-
round hiriself with so many of the
personalities from the “old” PLP?

We need aPrime Minister who
is not still so awestruck with the
position of being prime minister
almost five years since assuming
that position that he has to con-

ASBA
iam (BAHAMIAN)
Born 2 Rule!!

Blessed Love 2 Zion my son





7
We need a prime minister who
can give focused direction to this,
country. One who can lead a cabi-
net of ministers and exercise some
influence and control over themr
We cannot have an indecisive,
prime minister who allows his min-
isters to continually dig ditches for
themselves in pursuit of their owt
personal goals and aspirations. Wes
need a prime minister who will
direct a team for the good of the
country and not for their own pert:
sonal enrichment. "»
One of the critical traits of being
a leader is being decisive. A leader
must be able to make decisions
that are consistent. A leader can-
not be indecisive and unsure of his ~
or her vision. I have heard many,-
stories of where PM Christie has
had to recant on decisions he may ,
have made because the decisions
he made were not consistent with ~
what his mentors or puppeteers
would have given. a
PM Christie has consistently:
shown that he is indecisive. Yes
there is a need for considered and !
consultative decision-making, but ,
not every decision warrants a com-,,
mission or select group to consider, ,
it. And even if you do send things
out for consideration there comes ~
a time when some decision must be "
made. 40
In 1992 when the FNM govern-
ment was elected the government -
it was clear what Hubert Ingra-»
ham and his government intended,”
to do. Everything was clearly spelt ,
out in their Manifesto 1992 and he ;,
consistently referred to the mani; .
festo as the benchmark from which .
to be judged. ‘
This was repeated in 1997 and
again in 2002. It was possible to

see the direction that this country".

was being taken and all and sundry +, °

were able to comment and to crit-
icise if they wished. a)
The PLP published “Our Plan”, °
for the 2002 election. It was obvi-
ously just a public relations exer- i
cise as it was clear that it was nev-"s
er intended to be the guidebook *
for a PLP government. Only in
recent times have I heard the PM
and some of his colleagues refer, ¢
to'this document...it’s election**
time again folks! “ey
Mr Ingraham proved during his, °.
almost ten years in office as Primév¢:
Minister that he can be trustedty:
decisive, that he is focused and that,*,
he and his team govern for the.’
benefit of ALL Bahamians. he
His focus was not on a select*e
group of his bagmen, or for his*«
party supporters, but he governede-,
in a manner that all Bahamianss#,)
whether PLP or FNM coula bene)
fit. \ =
In fact he was severely critiased $
by his own party for not doing
enough for the FNMs. His was @
vision and style for all persons irre-,
spective of political persuasion. He
restored the good name of this’
country and it was because of his!
style of leadership that serious
investors, not those who were pre+
pared to pay the 10 percent under
the table for a deal, were attracted"
to this country. C
This choice is clear! If this elec~
tion is truly to be a referendum oni
leadership...then enjoy your retire-*
ment Mr Christie. f

ae

ie te a

_ eee



© In brief

Date for
international |
dog show

THE 26th international
dog show and obedience
trials, organised by the :
Bahamas Kennel Club, will ;
be held at the Botanical
Gardens, Nassau, on
March 17 and 18.

Man sentenced
to two anda
half years after
guilty plea to
drugs charge

A MAN has been
sentenced to two and
a‘half years in jail
after pleading guilty
to a marijuana posses-
sion charge.

‘Craig Higgs, 41,
appeared before Mag-

istrate Carolita Bethel x

at Court Eight, Bank
Lane, on Thursday —
along with several
others who were sub-
sequently acquitted
“on the drug charge
after Higgs’ plea of
guilty.

Court dockets stated
that on Tuesday, Jan-
uary 30, Higgs was
found in possession of
a‘quantity of marijua-
na, which authorities
believed he intended
td supply to another.

According to prose-
cutors, he was found
- in possession of 20

‘-. pounds of marijuana.

The drug was
reportedly found at
Higgs’ Soldier Road
residence. Higgs was
jailed and fined
$5,000.

1

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
EAR
Tropical CMTE] Cig
AY AL)

TV 13 SCHEDULE

' SATURDAY
FEBRUARY 3RD
12:30 Bullwinke & Friends

1:00 King Leonardo
1:30 © The Fun Farm


































2:30 411

3:00 Matinee: Legend of The
- Ruby Silver

4:30 Sports Desk

5:00 Cricket World

5:30 — Gillette World Sports
6:00 In This Corner

6:30 Sports Lifestyle

7:00 The Bahamas Tonight

7:30 Native Show

8:00
9:00

Tropical Beat
11th Annual Cacique Awards
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
[11:30 Hustle

42:30 Comm. Pg. 1540AM

ST

SUNDAY
FEBRUARY 4TH

[
6:30am Community Pg. 1540AM

8:30 The Covenant Hour
9:00 E.M.P.A.C.T.
9:30 The Voice That Makes
’ The Difference
10:00 Effective Living
10:30 This Is The Life
44:00 Zion Baptist Church
4:00 Gillette World Sports
4:30 - Sports Desk
2:00 — Sports Lifestyles
2:30 Agape Full Gospel Baptist
©" Church
3:00 — St. John’s Jubilee
' Cathedral
3:30 - Ernest Angley Ministries
4:30 Temple Fellowship Ministries
International
5:00 — Walking In Victory
6:00 The Christian Tabernacle
© Church
6:30 One Cubed
7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
7:30 Kemp Road Ministries
8:00 Calvary Deliverance Church
8:30 Turning Point
‘| 9:00 - Movie: Once Upon A Time... }
When We Were Colored
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Bobby Jones Presents

12:30 Community Pg. 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
right to make last minute

programme changes!

i mm By ALEXANDRIO

MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE medical files of the vic-
tims from the Sea Hauler
tragedy were in fact missing, a
source has told The Tribune.

This new revelation comes
on the heels of Dr. Bernard
Nottage’s on-air announce-
ment that the files were never
missing.

Yesterday, a source told The
Tribune that a team of Public
Hospital Authority (PHA)
employees, who had been
assigned to locate the missing
files, had telephoned one of
the daily newspapers to inquire
about the actual date of the

‘ accident. ,

The source claimed PHA
had problems with “tracking
down” the files and it needed
the exact date of the accident
to find them.

On Wednesday, victims of
the sea tragedy accused Health
Minister Dr Nottage of being
“out of the loop” on the issue.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007, PAGE 5

Claim that Sea Hauler victims’

medical files were missing

Allegation follows Health Minister’s
announcement that they were never lost

Mother-of-four, Sophia
Antonio, said all the victims
were deeply upset by Dr. Not-
tage’s statements.

She said: “Now Dr. Nottage
has said these files were never
lost. He has basically accused
us of lying, but we are tired of
being lied to and pushed
around.”

Lincoln Bain, spokesperson
for the Sea Hauler protest
group, also refuted Minister
Nottage’s claims. —

He claimed it was Transport

_ and Aviation Minister Glenys

Hanna Martin who first
informed him that only two
files of the victims had been
found.

Mr. Bain suggested that
there was a break-down of
communication between the
two ministers.

New AUTEC commantler
visits govt officials

THE new commander of the Atlantic Undersea Testing
and Evaluation Centre (AUTEC) located.on Andros Island,
United States Navy Lieutenant Commander Jeffrey Pafford, vis-
ited Nassau, January 31, to pay courtesy calls on Deputy Prime
Minister Cynthia Pratt, Foreign Minister Fred Mitchell and
Energy and Environment Minister Dr. Marcus Bethel.

The discussions continued AUTEC's continuing dialogue
with government regarding AUTEC’s activities, community
engagement in Andros, efforts to expand employment oppor-
tunities for Bahamians, and environmental protection initiatives.

Lt Commander Pafford updated the ministers on AUTEC's
Coral Reef Protection Programme and the marine mammal
research programmes, part of nearly $10,000,000 the Navy
spends each year on such programmes. Lt. Commander Pafford
conveyed his appreciation for the dedicated service of the
nearly 200 Bahamian employees at AUTEC and outlined the
base's efforts to expand its Bahamian workforce and offer new

- opportunities for career growth.

In response to a request from the Deputy Prime Minister, Lt.
Commander Pafford agreed to open AUTEC to tours for
Andros schools and to explore opportunities for summer intern-
ships among local youth as part of the base's community activ-

ities.

This week's meetings followed a series of four outreach
activities organized by AUTEC and the United States Embassy
last year to raise public awareness about AUTEC'’s operations
and to open the facilities to the media and local residents.
Since those meetings, AUTEC has opened its base to a local
farmers market, organizes softball games, and continues to
work to be a good friend and neighbour to the people of

Andros.

AUTEC remains open to requests for facility tours and
community service opportunities on Andros.

@ THE photo shows, from left, Deputy Chief of
Mission Dr Brent Hardt, DPM Pratt,
AUTEC Lieutenant Commander Pafford

BEWU may

The source, who spoke on
the condition of anonymity,
said someone may have “inno-
cently” misplaced the medical
files or they were “deliberate-
ly” taken.

After the accident; the gov-
ernment appointed a wreck
commissioner to carry out a
“diligent and formal investiga-
tion” into the accident.

Investigation

The commissioner was man-
dated to carry out an investi-
gation into the “circumstances
surrounding” the collision of
the shipping vessels, the col-
lapse of an hydraulic crane
used for lifting freight on and
off the Sea Hauler, and the
deaths of Brunell Smith-Ellis,
40, Brenda Smith Leslie, 29,

travelling
‘Hauler.

Livingston Seymour, 38, and
Lynden Riley, 14.

‘The commissioner was also
to investigate the circum-
stances surrounding the
injuries sustained by about 25
persons and the possible
disappearance of passengers
on the Sea

The 2005 Wreck Commis-

sioner’s Report reads: “On the’

2nd of August 2003..... The
motor vessel Sea Hauler, a
mail boat, and the motor vessel
United Star collided with fatal
consequences; four deaths,
twenty-five injuries, grief
stricken families and
friends and strong public con-
cerns.”

Some commentators believe
The Sea-Hauler issue is threat-
ening to become a major pre-

«

election embarrassment for the
government.

In particular, the issue is
likely to be a “thorn” in the
side of Health Minister Not-
tage, because he is the govern-
ment’s number one proponent
of the proposed National
Health Insurance plan, and
Transport Minister Martin,
because she has recently come
under heavy fire for numerous
labour issues and a failing
radar system at Sir Lynden
Pindling International Airport.

According to the source, the
missing medical files repre-.
sents the “degree of disorga-
nization” of the health-care
sector in the country.

The Tribune attempted to
contact the. Public Hospital
Authority, but calls were not
returned up to press time.



ake industrial action

if grievances not addressed by BEC

THE Bahamas Electrical
Workers Union may take indus-
trial action if certain grievances
are not addressed by BEC’s
management, union president
Dennis Williams said at a press
conference at Worker’s House
yesterday.

“The members of the BEWU
will not be intimidated, vic-
timised and treated in a dis-
criminatory manner without
retaliation. We have sat at the
table in good faith for a very
long time and now we believe
that it is time for action,” a press
statement by BEWU President
Dennis Williams stated yester-
day.

In the press statement, Mr
Williams claimed; “The union
has attempted to resolve these
issues with the government and
management but it is apparent
that BEC is hell bent on violat-
ing the Code of Industrial Rela-
tions Practice by not negotiating
in good faith.” The issues
referred to include, the 40-hour
work week, shift worker’s meal
breaks and Clifton finishing
time.

In the release, Mr Williams
claimed that the past few years
in BEC have been “tumul-
tuous.” Mr Williams accused
BEC’s top level management
of “tyranny” and “unethical

behaviour.”

“Lack of respect, indecisive-
ness and confusion are the
order of the day,” the release
stated. The BEWU President
called on the government to
step in and compel BEC’s man-
agement to negotiate in good
faith.

Demand

.“We demand that the gov-
ernment and Minister of
Labour compel the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation to nego-
tiate with logic and reason. The
union will not sit idly by if the
government of the Bahamas
does not cause BEC’s manage-
ment to operate in good faith.

“Every person in this country
has a lunch break and the top
level management of BEC take
a minimum of an hour not
including, of course, the time
they take to pick up their chil-
dren. Do you think they should
afford the same right to shift
workers? There are employees
in BEC who top level manage-
ment refuses to allow a lunch
break. This is unconstitutional
and not in conformity to the
Employment Act and Industri-
al Agreement,” the release stat-
ed.

Mr Williams also claimed
that the union has spent “count-
less hours” working to have
adjustments made to the Pen-
sion Plan with the Bahamas
Electrical Utility Managerial
Union (BEUMU) which was
approved by BEC’s board in
mid-2006.

“To this date BEC’s manage-
ment has not executed the nec-
essary actions to benefit the
members of our union. We call
on the government and the
Board of BEC to force man-
agement to execute the

approved adjustment to the -

pension plan.”

“There may have to be some
form of industrial action
because we have spent months

- trying to resolve issues and

BEC is not negotiating in good
faith,” Mr Williams told The
Tribune. Mr Williams did not
specify what kind of industrial
action might occur or when any
such action would take place.

Message

The Tribune left a message
for BEC’s General Manager
Kevin Basden seeking some
comment on the situation and
tried to reach him up to press
time yesterday but without suc-
cess.

In the past several months
the management of BEC and
the Bahamas Electrical Work-
ers Union have been engaged
in a dispute over numerous
industrial issues.

The union has called repeat-
edly for the government to
step in and help solve these dis-
putes.

Last August the industrial
unrest at BEC reached a high
point when 200 workers refused
to return to work because of
unresolved issues between the
union and BEC’s management.
That dispute had initially arisen
after government reduced the
working hours from 44 per
week to 40. T

he union felt its members
were owed money because their
hours of work were not reduced
at the same time that other gov-
ernment corporations were
reduced.

The matter was forwarded to
the Industrial Tribunal.

CABINET MAKERS/ INSTALLERS

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Wanted for new state of the art factory.

Must have chop saw, circular saw, drill, hand tools & experience.
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NX

THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007, PAGE 7



OL 8 a ee

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
_ Tribune Freeport
Reporter

we ae

FNM Leader Hubert

ENM leader t

Grand Bahama Women’s
Association 8am prayer
breakfast at Church the
King Parish Hall.
Association President

near the women of the par-
ty want to give praise to
God as we seek His guid-
ance over our party and
Bahamians everywhere

LOCAL NEWS

0 attend women’s
association prayer breakfast

Hubert

Ms Ferguson said that
women in the party on
Grand Bahama are very
excited about the event.

“We are privileged to

Ingraham is in Freeport
today attending the FNM

Stephanie Ferguson said
that “as the election draws _ son.

”

during this election sea-

have the Leader of the Free
National Movement,

Upgraded skills accompany Bimini’s
increasing room numbers

BIMINI artisans are upgrading their
manufacturing skills in order to position
themselves to take advantage of increas-
ing visitor numbers to the island.

The Ministry of Tourism’s “Authenti-
cally Bahamian” unit held a three-day
training workshop for artisans of Bimini
and other islands this week. The group
was instructed on advanced tools and
methods of jewellery making.

The goal of the workshop, said organ-
isers, was to ensure that the jewellery-
making skills of the artisans were at the
highest possible level in order to ensure
the satisfaction of buyers. This would
result in more sales for the artisans, they
said.
“We want to be suppliers to the
islands,” said Rowena Rolle, general
manager of the Authentically Bahamian
unit. “We want to be supplying most of
the souvenir shops around here with all
they need.”

Ms Rolle said artisans can experience
record numbers in sales and income now
that the room inventory in Bimini is
increasing.

Apart from souvenir stores, Bimini will
soon have a new craft centre to show-
case the work of local producers.

Antoinette Stuart, acting manager of

the Bimini Tourist Office, said the new

craft centre is intended to showcase more
than craft work.

Through the centre, visitors will get a
better idea of a broad range of Bahamian
culture. The space, which is designed for
15, artisans, will feature traditional straw

at 3

@ WORKSHOP instructor Marthe Harwell is pictured working with Bahamian arti-







Ingraham, to
address our members,” she
said.

FNM Deputy Leader
Brent Symonette, Party
Chairman Desmond Ban-
nister, as well as National
Association president Ms
Caron Shepherd, and mem-
bers of the FNM Women’s
Association are expected to
travel from Nassau for the
Freeport event.

FNM candidates for
Grand Bahama are also
expected to attend.

Association vice presi-
dent Dionne Britton said
they are pleased to have a
woman candidate - Mrs
Verna Grant for Eight Mile
Rock - to put forward to
the Grand Bahama com-
munity. .

“Our Leader has
always shown confidence
in the women of our party
and has always done
his best to protect our
rights and most important-
ly, the rights of our chil-
dren in the Bahamas,” she
said.



@ FNM leader
Hubert Ingraham

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sans during the Authentically Bahamian Hands-On Jewellery Workshop.

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work as well as jewellery and other fine
examples of Bahamian work, she said.
“We have now launched into the areas
where we have more diversified prod-
ucts,” Ms Stuart said. .
The new cultural centre is. scheduled

to be completed in March.

In addition to Bimini residents, arti-
sans at the workshop also came from
Abaco, Andros, the Berry Islands, New
Providence, Harbour Island and Grand
Bahama.

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PAGE 8, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



eee EP els oc
DPM calls for continued collaboration

in the fight against criminality

_ THE “criminal element”
across the Caribbean is tak-
ing advantage of technology
to improve its operations on a
daily basis, Deputy Prime
Minister Cynthia Pratt
warned. ;

She said that criminals,
including drug traffickers, are
working “collectively and
cohesively” to advance their
enterprises.

Mrs Pratt, who is also the
minister of national security,
said the strength of the
region’s drug control initia-
tives therefore depends on co-
operation.

. We must fight collective-
ly. We cannot fight individu-
ally (because) we are no
match as individuals,” Mrs
Pratt said. “But collectively,
wé certainly step by step, will
be‘ able to destroy those who
aim to destroy our families,
’ the fabric of our societies,
which is our families and our
universe.

“We owe it to our children;
we owe it to the generations to
come to do what we can in
order to make the world a
safer place,” she said.

Commission (CICAD) Work-

shop, on Wednesday, Mrs.

Pratt told participants from 11

countries cannot, will not and
must not “sit by” and allow
their societies to be overtaken

“Addressing an Inter-Amer-

i¢an Drug Abuse Control by the scourge of illegal drugs

member states that regional

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Securit y

Abaco Markets 0.76
10.25 Bahamas Property Fund 11.30
6.90 Bank of Bahamas 8.03
0.70 Benchmark 0.80
1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.85
1.12 Fidelity Bank 1.28
9.00 Cable Bahamas 10.00
1.64 Colina Holdings 2.00
9.05 Commonwealth Bank 13.20
4.22 Consolidated Water BDRs 5.21
2.40 Doctor's Hospital 2.44
5.54 Famguard 5.80
10.70 Finco 12.30
10.90 FirstCaribbean 14.50
10.00 Focol 16.21
0.50 Freeport Concrete 0.50
7.10 ICD Utilities : 7.10

J. S. Johnson
Premier Real Estate





12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

: 28.00 ABDAB 41.00
14.60 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings



Colina Money Market Fund 1.326132"
2.6662 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.9728***
2.3220 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.500211**

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MS ECFA
YIELD - ‘ast 12 month dividends divided by closing price
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Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
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Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings



AO TRADE CALC




































and criminality. -

She noted that limited
resources is another reason
why nations in the region
should continue to collaborate
in the war on drugs and crim-
inality.

Mrs Pratt pointed out that
the Bahamas, for example, is
laid out over 100,000 square
miles of water, and made up
of 700 islands with a Defence
Force “of about 1,000'men.”

“Certainly, 100,000 square
miles of water is a lot to patrol
on a daily basis and so you can
see that we need help. And
many of our sister countries
face some of the same chal-
lenges.”

She said collaborative ini-
tiatives such as the CICAD
workshops allow countries to
strengthen each other’s efforts
in the war on drug trafficking
and criminal activity.

“We all have the same prob-
lems, we all have challenges
in trying to reduce the pro-
duction, trafficking and use
and abuse of drugs within our
region and so we definitely
must continue to fight.”

Mrs Pratt praised CICAD
for “the excellent work they
have done” within the region.

The organisation has pro-
vided both financial and tech-
nical assistance to all of its
member states while creating
expert groups on various
aspects of the drug trade
(money laundering, diversion
of chemicals and pharmaceu-
ticals, firearms and demand

reduction, etc); developed.

model regulations in the area
of drug control; provided
funding to conduct surveys on
the prevalence of drugs and
established the Multilateral
Evaluation Mechanism
(MEM) to review the anti-
drug efforts of each member
state, identifying any weak-
nesses.

CICAD was established in

—

crAK












1.320'
0.000



‘07
Yield %

fo

ea A

* = 26 January 2007

** .31 December 2006

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

*** - 31 December 2006

**** . 31 December 2006



1986 by the General Assembly
of the Organisation of Amer-
ican States (OAS) as the
Western Hemisphere’s policy
forum on all aspects of the
drug problem. .

‘Its core mission is to
strengthen the human and

institutional capabilities and

harness the collective energy
of its member states to reduce
the production, trafficking and
use and abuse of drugs in the
Americas.

The mission is carried out
through the fostering of mul-

tilateral co-operation on drug
issues; strengthening capacity
in national drug commissions
and promoting drug-related
research, information sharing .
and specialised training and
technical assistance.

“Clearly, we in the
Caribbean and in this hemi-
sphere have benefited from
the work of CICAD and we
expect that their commitment
will continue to be manifested
in tangible and meaningful
contributions,” Mrs Pratt
said.

~_Asylum-seeking Cuban
doctors mired in legal limbo

m BOGOTA, Colombia

AT LEAST 38 Cuban doctors who defected from a mission in
Venezuela have been stranded for months in Colombia, where they have
been refused refugee status as they await word on possible asylum in the
United States, according to a relief organization.

The doctors are stranded despite a shift in U.S. policy, announced in
August; that Cuban medical personnel working abroad would be
allowed into the United States once routine background checks were
made, according to Associated Press.

But most of the defecting doctors who reached Colombia have been

waiting as long as six months for a response, according to an advocacy
group in Miami and several doctors who spoke to The Associated
Press. At least two have been rejected by U.S. officials.

Physician Jorge Toledo, 39, and his ophthalmologist wife Leticia
Viamonte were notified on Dec. 27 that their request to enter the
United States under the Cuban Medical Professional Parole program
was denied.

The AP obtained a copy of the letter on the decision — which can no
be appealed — that was signed by Barbara Strack, chief of the refugee
affairs division at the Department of Homeland Security.

A spokesman for the U.S. Embassy in Bogota said he could not
comment on specific asylum cases. And Colombia's Foreign Ministry did

‘ not return repeated phone calls and e-mails seeking comment about the

Cubans' legal status.

Joanna Gonzalez, a Homeland Security spokeswoman in Washington,
would also not comment on the Cuban doctors marooned in Colombia,
but she said that any applicants under the program "must pass a back-
ground check" like any others wanting to enter the United States.

Julio Cesar Alfonso, president of the Miami-based relief organization
Solidarity Without Borders, said his three-year-old organization has pro-
vided economic and legal assistance to 38 Cuban doctors trying to
leave Colombia. He estimates the overall number of defected doctors
here could exceed 100. *

"There's no explanation for the delay — these applications should've
taken a maximum two or three months," Said Alfonso, a Cuban-trained
physician who himself immigrated to the United States seven years ago.

Cuban officials last year said they had 31,000 doctors serving in
humanitarian missions in 68 countries around the world — a major
point of pride for the communist nation.

More than 20,000 are on loan to Venezuela and another 1,700 are
based in Bolivia, whose leftist President Evo Morales is a frequent
visitor to Havana. .

Prior to the policy shift, which occurred two weeks after ailing Cuban
leader Fidel Castro handed power to his brother Raul, U.S. officials con-
sidered the doctors to be residents of the country where they defected
— which meant they were often expected to stay there. :

More than 500 doctors are believed to have fled the two missions in
recent years, most from Venezuela, Alfonso said.

Like Toledo and Viamonte, who live in a tiny apartment where
even the plates and dish towels are on loan, the majority of asylum-seek-
ing Cuban doctors are living in precarious tenements because they are
unable to work in Colombia without refugee status.

The couple said they applied for refugee status at the U.S. Embassy
on Aug. 11, the same day the new program was announced in Wash-
ington. Only one of eight other doctors who applied the same day has
so far been granted entry to the U.S., they said.

Toledo and Viamonte said they sneaked into Colombia in December
2005, switching taxis five times while driving from town to town and slip-
ping across the border from Venezuela at night.

A friend later smuggled out of Cuba their university diplomas and oth-
er government records accrediting them as doctors.

Toledo and Viamonte were assigned to Venezuela in mid-2003 as part
of the Miracle Mission in which Cuba and Venezuela have provided free
eye surgery to more than 375,000 poor Latin Americans.

The couple said they were forced to work seven days a week for lit-
tle pay in the countryside near Caracas, and their relations with
Venezuelans were tightly controlled. :

"We couldn't call our families or go out after 5 p.m. The Venezuelan
national guard and Cuban authorities watched our every move," Via-
monte said. "We never planned on abandoning our duty, but we got
tired of being treated like slaves."

The couple planned their escape over a year, even keeping their
plans secret from their 12-year old son, who lives with Viamonte's
parents, when they returned to Cuba for a vacation in July 2005.

Alfonso said Colombia's government — Washington's closest ally in
Latin America — has so far only given the Cuban doctors a pass of
safe-conduct that is renewable every three months.

BKG/410.03

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE BAHAMAS
GOVERNMENT TREASURY BILLS

Sealed tenders for B$47,369,000.00 of 91-Day Treasury
will be received by the banking manager, The Central
Bank of The Bahamas, Frederick Street, Nassau up to
3:00 p.m on Tuesday, February 6, 2007. Successful
tenderers, who will be advised should take up their
bills against payment on Thursday, February 8, 2007.
These bills will be in minimum multiples of B$100.00,

Tenders are to be on special forms obtainable from the
Central Bank of The Bahamas or commercial banks.

Tenders must state the net price percent (in multiples of one
cent) and should be marked “Tender”. The Central Bank of
the Bahamas reserves the right to reject any or all tenders,

Vent
warden nes Fovnoennene





THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007, PAGE 9

Se ct a
Sunland Baptist
Academy students
make courtesy call
on Governor General

STUDENTS of Sunland Baptist Academy, a teacher, parents
and guardians made a courtesy call on Governor General
Arthur Hanna at Government House on Wednesday.

(BIS photo: Raymond A Bethel)



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CLAUDIA LORISTON OF
MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS is applying to

_the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 27th day of January, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE.

NOTICE is hereby given that JEAN SIMON OF

MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS is applying to-
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for

registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and

that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written

and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight

days from the 27th day of January, 2007 to the Minister

responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,

.Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LINDA LOUIS-PIERRE.
OF PEACH STREET, #P.0. BOX CR-54802, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization,
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 3rd day of
February 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



\
{ if

FIDELITY

invites applications for the position of
MANAGER, CARD OPERATIONS

PROFILE:

+ 7+ years in the financial services industry with 5+ years in the bank card

and/or electronic banking services and card operations management
RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

Establish operating policies. procedures & controls
responsibile for daily management of card product operations and electronic
banking delivery systems

Work with internal departments, external vendors and card
associations to assure cardholder services and compliance

Output and delivery of statements. plastics, letters and supporting
I'l infrastructure

Support the development of new card and electronic banking
products and services

Team with Marketing to execute product and sales plans,
marketing strategies, customer loyalty programme

Oversee payments and application processing, maintenance of
databases, cards support training, account posting and reconciliation
Resolve cardholder disputes and process chargebacks

Administer fraud and loss prevention programmes

Participate in budgeting process

Monitor service levels and report on performance

CRITICAL COMPETENCIES:

Operations /financial focus with technical background

Demonstrated project management experience

Strong communication (verbal and written), organizational. and
supervisory skills

Strong demonstrated knowledge in banking regulation and operational risk
management

Excellent interpersonal skills. Ability to effectively interact with all levels

of management and employees

The person will report directly to the Executive Vice President and CFO
Competitive compensation package will include salary, benefits and bonuses.
Send resume no later than February 16th, 2007 to:

The Director Human Resources
= ) FIDELITY |
51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853

Nassau
Fax 326.3000

e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com















MONDAY



S HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: New Providence
Community Centre: Mondays - 6pm to 7pm. The
Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support
‘group meets the first Monday of each month at
6:30pm at New Providence Community Centre,
Blake Road. Dinner is provided and free blood
sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol testing is
available. For more info call 702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third
Monday of every month at 6pm @ Doctors Hospi-
tal conference room.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colo-
nial Hilton Monday's at 7pm ® Club 612315 meets
Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable
Beach ® Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial
Hilton Mondays at 7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas’ Pan-Hellenic Council
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the month in
the Board Room of the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel, Bay St.



LEE TUESDAY

B ART EXHIBITION
ART IS FOR LOVERS
Roses are Red

Violets are Blue

Grand Bahama Artists
Have a Valentine for you!

The Grand Bahama Artists Association (GBAA) is
giving all lovers on Grand Bahama Island an oppor-
tunity to show their sweetheart the real depth of
their love.

We all know that art in all its forms speaks to the
soul and exciting art is what you will find Tuesday,
February 8 from 7pm-10pm at the GBAA’s Valen-
tine Art Exhibition, Freeport Art Centre. Well
known and emerging artists of Grand Bahama’s
artistic community are exhibiting great creations
that will express your feelings to that special some-
one in your life.

Many artists exhibiting will be in attendance. They
will assist you in choosing just the right piece that
will delight your loved one! It is important to note
that one does not need to spend a lot of money for
an original art piece. The GBAA’s Valentine Art
Exhibition has a wide selection of beautiful art
pieces in all price ranges. Private viewing with the
artists can be arranged by calling 351.4603 or at
gbaa@batelnet.bs.

As February is the month for lovers the Valentine
Art Exhibition continues all month at the Freeport
Art Centre, Monday to Friday 9am to 5pm and
Saturday 9am to 12pm.

B HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: The Nassau
Group, Rosetta Street: Tuesday 6pm to 7pm /
8:30pm to 9:30pm. 3

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at
5:30pm on the second Tuesday of each month at
their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville.
Call 323.4482 for more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes
location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval
is required. Call 364.8423 to register for more info.

@ CIVIC CLUBS .

The Kiwanis Club of New Providence meets every
Tuesday at 7:30pm at the Holy Cross Community
Centre; Highbury Park. ;

The Luncheon Pilot Club of Nassau meets every
third Tuesday at SuperClubs Breezes, Cable Beach
at 12:30pm.

We invite all community minded persons to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7:30pm @
C C Sweeting Senior School's Dining Room, Col-
lege Avenue off Moss Road. ¢ Club Cousteau 7343
meets Tuesdays at 7:30pm in the Chickcharney
Hotel, Fresh Creek, Central Andros * Club 7178
meets each Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer Society
of the Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Eta Psi Omega chap-
ter meets every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ the

| Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort,







"The brewery of The Bahamas"

ALAA RE ELOMAAACOAARAMLLOSRONAEAROALAE SAAD MARLAASAMRLEMAEE RYERSS LELE EERE LIANE EE HE
HENNE en

PAGE 10, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007





Cable Beach * Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets
every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ Atlantic House,
IBM Office, 4th floor meeting room ¢ Alpha Phi
Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday, 6:30pm
at the British Colonial Hilton. Please call
502.4842/377.4589 for more info.

The Downtown Pilot Club of Nassau meets every
third Tuesday of the month at 6pm at the J P Whit-
ney Building, First Terrace, Collins Avenue.

The Rotary Club of Nassau meets every Tuesday at
Luciano's of Chicago on East Bay Street. Fellow-
ship starts at 12:30pm with the meeting held from
lpm-2pm.

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar
every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free appetizers and
numerous drink specials

WEDNESDAY ‘QQQRaaal

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: New Providence
Community Centre: Wednesday - 7pm to 8pm. The
Nassau Group: Rosetta Street, Wednesday 6pm to
Tpm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

FREE Health and Wellness Lectures are held the
first Wednesday of every month at 6:30pm at New
Providence Community Center Blake Road. For
more information call 327.1660 or 327.2878. FREE
Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar and Cholesterol
Screening.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas Support Group
meets every Wednesday from 5:30pm to 7pm at
Cancer Headquarters, two doors south of ZNS.
Cancer patients, survivors, their family members
and friends are invited to attend. Phone 323.4482

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of SouthEast Nassau meets every
Wednesday from 1pm - 2pm at East Villa Restau-
rant, East Bay Street. Always an interesting speak-
er and great fellowship. If you would like to attend
our meetings please send an e-mail to
bruno.pletscher@gottardo.com or
kathyvsmith@hotmail.com.

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta
Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated meets 6:30pm
every third Wednesday at the Bahamas National
Pride Building.

International Training in Communication, Essence
Club #3173 holds it’s bimonthly meetings on the
1st and 3rd Wednesday of each month at Doctor's
Hospital Conference Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets
the second and fourth Wednesday of the month,
8pm @ St Augustine's Monastery.

The Kiwanis Club of Cable Beach invites the pub-
lic to its regular weekly meeting held every
Wednesday at 7:30pm at the British Colonial
Hilton. Kiwanis is a worldwide service organisation
dedicated to changing the world One Child, One
Community at a time."

School and Community Nature Walk and Petting
Zoo - Free Every Wednesday from 1Oam to 2:30pm
at Earth Village Ranch, St Albans Drive and
Columbus Avenue (Chippingham). Call (242)
356.2274 now to make reservations. Open to all
ages and groups Monday-Sunday from 9am to 6pm.
Inquire about additional activities and programmes.







NEW EXHIBITION OPENING

Bahamian Art:
Pre-Columbian to the Present

OPENS TO THE PUBLIC: THURSDAY, FEB 22, 2007
This is a survey show on Bahamian Art History. itis
designed to support the publication of the National
Art Gallery's Educational Pack for teachers scheduled
for release in 2007.






TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday on the 4th
floor of the Ministry of Health, Meeting Street, at
6pm.

@ ART EXHIBITION

Arts And Entertainment: Portraits from Jerome
Miller’s Coloring Book, a charity exhibit, will be
held Thursday, February 8 at the Dundas Centre
for Performing Arts, Mackey Street from 7pm to
9pm. Entertainment and wines sponsored by
Cacique International and Bristol Wines And Spir-
its. Admission is free, but donations will be accept-
ed. All monies will go to the endowment fund for a
scholarship in memory of the late Winston Saun-
ders. Dress is smart casual. The paintings will hang
at Azure Spa, British Colonial Hilton from Febru-
ary 10 through 28.

THURSDAY Ql

@ ENTERTAINMENT

Shadowhana Entertainment presents an all
Bahamian Talent Explosion this and every Thurs-
day night at the Patio Bar & Grill on Carmichael
Road. This event features upcoming Bahamian
artist who are ready to showcase their original
material to the world. There will also be a freestyle
competition every week which is open to the pub-
lic at large. Doors open at 8:30pm. Ladies free
until 11pm - Gentlemen - small door charge. See u
there.

@ HEALTH

Free public health lectures featuring distinguished
physicians are held at Doctors Hospital every third
Thursday of the month at 6pm in the Doctors Hos-
pital Conference Room. Free screenings between
Spm & 6pm. For more information call 302.4603.

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to.inform the pub-
lic its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Thursday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes
location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval’

is required. Call 364.8423 to register for more info.

REACH - Resources & Education for Autism and
Related Challenges meets from 7pm - 9pm the sec-
ond Thursday of each month in the cafeteria of
the BEC building, Blue Hill Road.

B CIVIC CLUBS ;

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise has a breakfast
meeting every Thursday morning at Jam at the
British Colonial Hilton Hotel (Fellowship begins at
6:45am).

The Kiwanis Club of Over-the-Hill meets every
Thursday at 8pm at the Holy Cross Activity Centre,
Soldier Road. Guests are welcome. :

Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first, second

and third Thursday at the Ministry of Health & ©

Environment building on Meeting Street com-
mencing at 7:30pm. Everyone is welcome to attend
¢ TM Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8:30pm @ Super-
Clubs Breezes.

International. Association of Administrative Pro-
fessionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the third Thurs-
day of every month @ SuperClubs Breezes, Cable
Beach, 6pm. :

The recently established National Insurance Board
Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets every fourth

Thursday in the month, in the National Insurance -

Board's (NIB) training room, Wulf Road office
complex, at 6pm. All retirees are welcome.



THE TRIBUNE

PHoTOS WELCOME



The Rotary Club of West Nassau holds its weekly
meeting, every Thursday at Choices Restaurant
on the campus of the College of the Bahamas. Fel-
lowship starts at 12:30pm, with the meeting held
from 1pm to 2pm.

FRIDAY



g@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: The Nassau
Group, Rosetta Street: Friday 6pm to 7pm. &
8:30pm to 9:30pm. Sacred Heart Church: Friday
6pm to 7pm. New Providence Community Centre:
Friday 7pm to 8pm.

@ CIVIC CLUBS
TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas Bap-
tist Community College Rm A19, Jean St.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Fri-
day of each month, 7:30pm at the Emmaus Centre
at St Augustine’s Monastery. For more info call
325.1947 after 4pm.

AMISTAD is a club which promotes the Spanish
language and culture in the community. Residents
of the Bahamas who speak Spanish or are learning
Spanish are invited to attend meetings on the third
Friday of the month during the academic year at
7pm in room 13 of COB's Tourism Training Centre.

EEE «SATURDAY “a
@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: The Nassau
Group, Rosetta Street: Saturday mornings - l|Oam
to llam. :

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third
Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and December) @
the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley

. Street.

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes are
offered every third Saturday of the month from
9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Community
Training Representative at 302.4732 for more infor-
mation and learn to save a life today.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

JAR CYCLING: The Owners of JAR Cycling arc
pleased to offer a cycling clinic for juniors between
10 and 17. The free clinic will be held every Satur-
day in an effort to encourage kids to cycle. Parents
interested in registering their children should con-
tact organisers at jarcycling@gmail.com.

@ ATHLETICS

Star Trackers Track and Field Club will be host-
ing the Baker Construction Bahamas, Ltd Star
Performers Track Classic on Saturday, February 3
from 9am to 7pm at the Thomas A Robinson
Track and Field Stadium, Queen Elizabeth Sports
Centre. The BAAA-sanctioned event is for divi-
sions U9-Open.

HESS ss SUNDAY WW
@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS
Traveller's Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street, fea-
tures special entertainment - Gernie, Tabitha and

. the Caribbean Express - very Sunday from 6:30pm

to 9:30pm.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: The Nassau
Group, Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm to 7pm /
8:30pm to 9:30pm.

m@ SUNDAY
RELIGIOUS SERVICES

The Bahamas Metaphysical Society Inc - A spiritual
teaching society leading you to greater peace of
mind, health, prosperity and happiness - holds
Higher Consciousness Services every Sunday at
10am and weekly Meditation services every
Wednesday at 7pm at Bowe’s Cove off Bernard
Road. Interested persons are welcome to attend.
For more information contact by e-mail @ bah-
metsol@hotmail.com or call 393.0279.

cecuuaauceseseeccueeuucacnecseeeaseaauanseeeusasaaaussesceeegaueneceusauaunaneeaenu ans egsenses

Send all your civic and social events (attach pic-
tures if possible) to The Tribune via fax: 328.2398 or
e-mail: ybdeleveaux@tribunemedia.net - Out there in
the subject line.



~

owe ete

oes nee

re



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007, PAGE 11



a LOCAL NEWS .

‘Paid at the
Pumps’ raffle
kicks-off

FOR two years Grand
Bahamians have been
earning valuable Paid at
the Pumps booklets at
Freeport Jet Wash and
redeeming them for great
merchandise at Kelly’s.
Now it’s time to turn
those same booklets in
for a chance to win a new
car!

To celebrate the suc-
cess and completion of
the popular Paid at the
Pumps promotion, Kelly’s
True Value and Freeport
Jet Wash & Auto Mart
Ltd have planned a two-
month long raffle to win a
2007 Jeep Compass.

From Thursday, Febru-
ary lst, everyone with
completed Paid at the
Pumps booklets can drop
the books off at Kelly’s or
Freeport Jet Wash to be
used as raffle tickets. The
drawing will be held at
noon on Saturday, March
31st, in Kelly’s parking
lot.

“We, at Freeport Jet
Wash would like to sin-
cerely thank the general
public for their support of
this promotion, without
which, it would not have
been a success. We also
wanted to help the declin-
ing economy during a
time of need, especially
after the hurricanes, and
found that this was an
effective way of doing so.
Again, we want to extend
our wholehearted appre-
ciation to our customers,
without whom, we would
not be here today,” said —
Larry Albury, General
Manager of Freeport Jet
Wash.

Be sure to fill in your
name, address and tele-
phone contacts on the
space provided on the
booklet. For those who
still need: additional
stamps to complete cur-
rent books or for those
who haven't participated
in the programme before,
but would like ‘the chance
to win a new car just for
buying gas, Jet Wash will
continue distributing
stamps until the raffle
day. Consumers receive
one stamp for every $20
of gas purchased.

On the day of the raffle
Kelly’s will be having oth-
er fun activities for the
community, including a
special visit by the Easter
Bunny for the children.

“Paid at the Pumps has
been a great partnership
between two companies
on the island and more of
this type of business net-
working would be great,”
said Christopher Lowe,
Operations Manager at
Kelly’s. “We’ve enjoyed
giving back to the com-
munity and we thought
this raffle, for the chance
to. win a new vehicle and
other great prizes, would
be a great way to wrap up
this programme.”

. As from February 1st,
Paid at the Pumps books
are only eligible for the
raffle. Customers who
have enjoyed the Paid at
the Pumps programme
can look forward to new
exciting promotions from
Kelly’s and Jet Wash.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are

} making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the

j area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986

| and share your story.







ae

Regatta awards
are held at
Govt House

MINISTRY of Local Gov-
ernment and Consumer
Affairs, Regatta Division,
held its first Awards and

’ Recognition Ceremony at
Government House. From
left, front row, are Ferarin
‘Hanna, Miss Culture; Minis-
ter of Local Government
and Consumer Affairs, V

‘Alfred Gray; Governor Gen-
eral Arthur Hanna, and
James Wallace, treasurer,
Regatta Committee; (back
tow) Harrison Thompson,
permanent secretary;
Clement Fox, M D Kirkland,
Rueben Knowles, Kirk John-
son (accepting on behalf of
his father Ted Johnson,
deceased) and Eric Gibson.

=
—

SN

(BIS photo:
Raymond A Bethel)

‘Unprecedented opportunities’

n the year ahead for Grenada

NATION CELEBRATES 33RD ANNIVERSARY OF INDEPENDENCE

AS GRENADA celebrates its thirty-third
anniversary of independence, Prime Minister
Dr Keith Mitchell said that this year “promis-
es to be one filled with unprecedented oppor-
tunities” for Grenadians.

In a message to his people, Dr Mitchell said
that although they have gone through trying
times “formidable challenges” still lie ahead.
However, he said, there has been “significant
advancement in rebuilding the nation.”

He pointed out that the government of
Grenada has spent “well over $86 million build-
ing and repairing thousands of homes for the
most vulnerable families.”

It has also spent close to $83 million rebuild-
ing schools so that Grenadian children can
have a “comfortable learning environment.”

_» Also more than $60 million has been spent on

/ community, centres, health centres and public
buildings with $59 million going to resuscitate
and revitalize their farms.

“Therefore,” he said, “we endeavour to
expand our social safety nets and develop pro-
grammes to bring the best standard of living to
all our people.

“We have also made considerable progress in
revising outdated policies and developing new
strategies. We can be proud that we now have
national policies for agriculture, health, edu-
cation, youth and an investment policy which is
charting the way for Grenada as a preferred
location for foreign and local investment.”

Dr Mitchell said he was “pleased to
announce that the first working Draft of
Grenada's National Strategic Development
Plan has been completed. This policy embraces
the rich heritage that nurtures community and
family values, and guides the way for the con-
tinuance of peace, opportunity and an
enhanced quality of life.”

On Sunday Grenadians resident in Nassau
will worship as a group at the 10am mass at St-
Anselm’s Catholic Church, Fox Hill, to cele-
brate the independence of Grenada, Carria-
‘cou and Petite Martinique. February 7th is the
country’s independence day.

@ GRENADA Prime Minister
Dr Keith Mitchell —



Grenadians attending the St Anselm’s ser-
vice are asked to arrive early so that they can sit
together. Seats will not be reserved.

Ambassador of Argentina



@ MARIO JOSE PINO, non-resident ambassador of the
Republic of Argentina (right), presented his letters of credence
to Arthur Hanna, Governor General, on Thursday at Govern-
ment House. Pictured in background is Mrs Bernice Bowe,
senior assistant secretary to the Governor General.

(BIS photo: Raymond A Bethel)





presents letters of credence HRP?5 WP-74



Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd

| AO KPA SILC |
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

_ PEPSI-COLA BAHAMAS BOTTLING COMPANY

Applicants are invited from suitably qualified individuals to fill the position of:

PRODUCTION MANAGER

The incumbent will have overall responsibility of managing all aspects
of the manufacturing operation which include the control of raw material
utilization, finished goods production, quality assurance and_ plant

maintenance.

Ideal candidate would at minimum have an Associate’s Degree ina
technical field, experience in Supervisory Management and five years
experience in manufacturing plant operations

Please send resume to:

Human Resources Manager
P. O. Box N-3004

Nassau, Bahamas

FAX: 364-2123

Telephone calls will not be accepted.





PAGE 12, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007

Young author
releases Forest
of the Sprites

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport *
Reporter

FREEPORT - An ambi-
tious young Bahamian
author has released a new
children’s book, Forest of
the Sprites, the first part of
a trilogy that takes its read-
ers on a magical story
adventure of good versus
evil.

Lester Ferguson, author
and artist, said his self-pub-
lished book is not consid-
ered as a traditional
Bahamian story, and was
inspired by classic children’s
literature, such as The
Chronicles of Narnia, Peter
Pan, and Lord of the Rings.

Like these popular novel
series that have become best
sellers and adapted for
major movie films, Mr Fer-
guson has high hopes for the
Forest of Sprites trilogy and
is expected to meet with
Minister of Education
Alfred Sears this month.

It took Mr Ferguson six
years to write and illustrate
a storybook that would cap-

ture the imagination of chil- .

dren age eight to 12.

“IT was always exposed
and fascinated to so much
wonderful children’s litera-
ture at an early age, such as
CS Lewis’s Chronicles of
Narnia, Sir James Barrie’s
Peter Pan, and John
Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings,
and also good story telling,
and these had a profound
affect on me,” he said.

Mr Ferguson, who has
sold 500 copies so far in the
US, has printed 100 copies
to test the Bahamian mar-
ket.

The book is available at
Bellevue Business Depot in
Freeport. It is also available
at Barnes & Noble and
Amazon.

As a self-published
Bahamian author, Mr Fer-
guson believes that govern-
ment should make grants
available to help budding
Bahamian authors.

Additionally, he said, that
there should be literary
awards to expose Bahamian
literature as is done in the
UK and Canada.

He commended the Edu-
cation Minister on establish-
ing a Minister’s Book Club,
and hopes that his book can
be added to the Minister’s
book selection list.

“T am a big supporter of
ljterature and I think that a *
lot of our children need to
go back to the fascinating
world of reading.

“Some people may look at
the book and say it is not
Bahamian, but it depends
on what you define Bahami-
an as. People think that you
have to speak a dialect, but
that’s not the point, we live
in such a big world, and the
Bahamas is not in a world
by itself,” he said.

Mr Ferguson, who is a
‘native of Grand Bahama
and attended the former
Sunland Lutheran School,
was graduated from the
Government High. He has
completed studies at the Art
Institute of Fort Laud-







@ THIS photo released by the Canadi
arctic off Northern Alaska. The words of warning about global warming from the top panel of interna

ing of the climate system is unequivocal," the cause is "very likely" man-made, and "would continue for centuries.

how, what and why the planet is warming —

slobal warming report
akes for grim reading —

tal Panel on Climate Change.

z

a

an Ice Service Friday Feb. 2, 2007 and taken by photographer Dan Crosbie in
tional scientists

THE TRIBUNE |

2004 shows two polar bears on a chunk of ice in the
Friday Feb. 2, 2007 were purposely biunt: "warm-,
" Officially releasing a 21-page report in Paris on the
though not telling the world what to do about it — the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change gave a bleak observation
of what is happening now and an even more dire prediction for the future. ¥

(AP Photo/Dan Crosbie/Canadian Ice Service via PA, HO)

FROM page one

ist Sam Duncombe of
ReEarth told The Tribune

- that she hopes this report

serves as a wake-up call to the
country’s government, adding
that our new Ministry of
Energy and Environment will
become one of the most
important agencies within the
government in the next few
years,

“The Bahamas should be
very, very concerned, not only
about sea levels encroaching
on our very, very limited land
mass, but also the effect that
global warming will have on
our fresh water resources,”
Mrs Duncombe said.

She explained that when sea
levels rise, because fresh
water is lighter than sea water,
the sea water will push the
fresh water up and bring it to
the surface where it will evap-
orate due to the warmer cli-
mate. °

Warmer seas, in addition to
increasing the possibility of
more frequent and stronger
hurricanes, will also have a
huge negative impact on coral
reefs, which so far have pro-

tected us from storm surges

and offered habitats to fishes,
Mrs Duncombe said.

“In general when we do any
type of development we need
to be very mindful that sea
levels will be playing a huge
role in our lives in the future
and we.need to plan accord-
ingly,” she said.

The environmentalist said
that this also is why it is
so important that
government does not allow a
Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG)
terminal to built in the
Bahamas.

Since gas emissions are at
the root of the global warming
trend, she said, Bahamians
would be “aiding and abetting
their demise” if they say yes
to LNG.

The UN’s Intergovernmen-

(IPCC), which issued the 21-
page report, said that they are
90 per cent certain that man-
made emissions of greenhouse
gases can already be blamed
for “fewer cold days, hotter
nights, killer heat waves,
floods and heavy rains, dev-
astating droughts, and an
increase in hurricane and
tropical storm strength — par-
ticularly in the Atlantic
Ocean.”

“Warming of the climate

system is unequivocal, as is |

now evident from observa-
tions of increases in global
average air and ocean tem-
peratures, widespread
melting of snow and ice, and
rising global mean sea
level,” the UN panel’s report

‘said.

Another report by the
IPCC, expected to be released
later this year, will address the
most effective measures for
government to slow down
global warming. ,

@ FRENCH President Jacques Chirac delivers a speech during the opening of a high-level conference
on world environmental governance Friday, Feb. 2, 2007 in Paris. Jacques Chirac sought Friday to par- ‘
lay world worry about global warming into support for his bid for a new international body to protect
the environment, and perhaps punish nations who abuse it. "In the face of this urgency, it is no longer

erdale.

The Forest of the Sprites
is colourfully illustrated and
presents an adventure story

of a once flawless world that
has become contaminated
by evil. There are creatures
in the forest of the sprites
that are trying to restore
goodness back in the world,
and have to overcome an
evil queen, who is trying to
kill the trees, which have
special abilities.

Mr Ferguson said that the
moral of the story is that
even though we go through
bad and hard times, good
will triumph over evil.

He said good writers, such
as CS Lewis and James Bar-
rie, were exposed to war
which traumatised them and
was inspiration for their
writings.

“T have never been to
war, but I have seen what
war can do. We are living in
a war right now, and
although we are thousands
of miles away, we are still
being affected by it. We live
in a time of terrorists,” he
said.

Mr Ferguson said the
book is an imaginative story
that has a little bit of reality
and will make the reader cry
and smile.

He says he has received
positive feedback from an
actor in the UK who pur-
chased the book for his child
while on location in Grand
Bahama for the filming of
Pirates of the Caribbean
film.

Mr Ferguson is expected
to have a book signing in
New Providence to launch
“Forest of the Sprites”.





FROM page one

saw the Minister. By the time
the police arrived a few seconds
later, the worker was nowhere
to be found.

Mr Miller said that responsi-
bility for land extraction lies
with the Town Planning divi-
sion of the Ministry of Works.
He told the press that Mr
Michael Major — from that
department — had informed him
that the individuals on the site
near the Milo Butler highway
had no permission to extract fill.

“I have had numerous com-
plaints about this site from the
residents of my constituency
because obviously they have to
pass this way everyday to go to
work. And, in some cases, boul-
ders have fallen on to the road-
way. I have witnessed that,” he
said.



Minister leads ‘raid’



Minister Miller had the
police stop work on this site
also. oo

Police questioned workers on:
both sites. Inspector Chester
Thomas said there would be an
investigation.

However, no worker on
either site was arrested.

Mr Miller said that new and
tougher laws were needed to
deal with these matters.

He said a new land policy is
being developed to deal with
these cases.

This new policy will fine indi-
viduals as much as $20,000 in
addition to the confiscation of
their equipment. According to
Mr Miller, the current fines only
go up to a few thousand dol-
lars.

Mr Miller hopes this piece of
legislation will be made law
before this current parliament
ends.



the time for half-measures. It is time for a revolution," he said. Writing on the podium reads "Citizens.

of the Earth".

Baggage handler
accused of conspiracy
to import cocaine



FROM page one

aboard a Spirit Airlines flight.

The men had been sent to Ft. Lauderdale
by NFS for Transportation Safety Adminis-
tration training.

Tony's case is unique compared to three
of the other men — Lester Bain, Delvino
Rigby, and Marcus Rolle who were
arraigned together early last month.

The case of Lester Bain vs The USA,
under which the three men fall, alleges that
they knowingly imported a substance con-
taining a detectable amount of cocaine
between November 9, 2006 and November
10, 2006.

However, Tony is set to be tried on four
counts of Known importation of a substance
containing a detectable amount of cocaine
between January 22 and January 27 of last
year, along with co-defendant Trujillo
Darville, who was convicted of cocaine
importation in June of last year.

According to an affidavit signed by Spe-

(

’



(AP Photo/Patrick Kovarik, Pool) |

“

> %

o@

cial Agent Jorge Gomez of Immigration and

Customs Enforcement, Darville, while dis- .

embarking a Spirit Airlines Flight from Nas-
sau was discovered to have traces of nar-
cotics on his person by canine "Dottie." Sub-
sequently, he was found to be carrying 4.82
pounds of cocaine in his luggage, and admit-
ted to law enforcement officers that he was
to receive $1,500 for transporting the nar-
cotics to an unknown man in Ft Lauderdale.

Darville was arraigned in Federal Court
last March where he initially pleaded not

guilty to two counts of importation of an...
illicit substance, but later changed his plea to.

guilty and received a 46-month sentence on
both charges.

Now, Darville, who was arraigned yes-
terday on four counts of knowingly attempt-
ing to import a controlled substance, is set to
be tried along with Tony in March.

‘Information released by the US Embassy
shortly after the group's arrest suggested
that they had been under surveillance for
more than a year.

°





‘.’° Three-time Desert Classic

'+|+"-and ninth and finished with




Pe crete we

Woods chasing
_ jittle known
Englishman

in Dubai

mg GOLF
DUBAI,
United Arab Emirates
Associated Press

EIGHT years ago, Ross
Fisher was fetching balls for
_- Tiger Woods on the practice
‘range. Now, the Englishman
holds a five-shot lead over
the defending champion
going into the third round of
the Dubai Desert Classic.

Fisher shot a second con-
secutive 7-under 65 Friday
for a halfway score of 14
under, while Woods strug-
gled with his putting for the
second straight day and fin-
ished with a 67 to stand at 9
under.

"It was kind of weird,"
Woods said. "I just didn't
feel like I made many putts
today. I was all around the
hole and most of them were:
actually misreads." i

winner Ernie Els climbed i
within two strokes of the i
lead with an eagle on the
13th hole before play was
cut short by darkness at the
Emirates Golf Club. A rare
Dubai thunderstorm
delayed play for more than
two hours, leaving Fisher
with a clubhouse lead of i
four strokes over Peter 3
Hanson and Graeme :
McDowell. :

"I'm hitting the ball prob-
ably as good as I've ever hit
it," said Fisher, who had
eight birdies and a bogey.
"It would be tough to have a
third 65, but you know it's
out there if you play well."

The Desert Classic is just

_- the second tournament in
.'.* which Fisher has been the
leader — the first was the
2005 China Open.

The 26-year-old English-
man described how he'd
spent his early years in awe
of Woods, and said the clos-
est contact he had with him
was when he worked as a
teenager on a driving range
at the World Match Play
Championship at Went-
worth in England.

"I've never met him or
spoke to him," he said.

_», Now Fisher faces the pos-
sibility of playing alongside
Woods on Sunday if they
are the top two heading into

the final round.

. "It would be an absolute
_.° thrill to play with the best

player in the world," Fisher
said. “Obviously all the
pressure is going to be on
him because he's expected
to win. No one's going to be
thinking, 'I think Ross can
take this guy on.' I'll try not
to watch him too closely
because at the end of the
day, I'm going to try and
beat the guy."

Woods had five birdies
and no bogeys. On the 13th,
Woods fell to his knees and
bashed the ground with his
club in frustration after a
chip for an eagle dribbled a
few inches from the hole.
He settled for a birdie.

“I've got to go practice
first of all and get organized
and be ready for tomor-
row," Woods said. "It's just
a matter of going out there
and making a bunch of
birdies. The golf course is
pretty benign."

Playing the back nine
first, Woods dueled all day
with partner Miguel Angel
Jimenez. The Spaniard was
at 11 under for a few holes

_ before he bogeyed the 15th

-’-'a 68. He was tied with
Woods at 9 under.

Woods enjoyed bantering
with the ponytailed
Jimenez.

"He's so funny," Woods
said. "Some of the one-lin-
ers he comes up with out
there are pretty good."

By day's end, Els was at
12 under after 14 holes, with
McDowell and Hanson in
the clubhouse at 10 under.
Swede Henrik Stenson was
also at 10 under with four
holes left to play. Stenson,
Els and 34 others are to
complete the second round
Saturday morning.

Els said the rain had
slowed the greens and left

_ him slipping in the mud. But
. .the South African made the
‘green on the par-5, 13th
hole in two shots, then
holed a 12-foot putt for an
eagle.

"I've got to keep my foot
on the pedal," Els said.
"There's so many guys
involved. I've just got to
keep up the pace."





rd fought victory
or ‘Choo Choo’

@ ACTION from Jer-
maine ‘Choo Choo’
Mackey’s World Boxing
Council’s CABOFE
Caribbean Boxing Fed-
eration’s super mid-
dleweight title bout on
Thursday night against
Puerto Rican Anibal ‘El
Olimpico’ Acevedo.

Mackey won with a
knockout in the seventh
round.

e SEE STORY ON
SPORTS FRONT

(Photo above by
Felipé Major,
all others by
Tim Clarke)









PAGE 4B, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS.



Ljuhicic

aivances to
semifinals of
Zagreb Open

MTENNIS .
ZAGREB, Croatia
Associated Press

DEFENDING champion
Ivan Ljubicic defeated
Thomas Johansson of Swe-
den after three tiebreakers
Friday to advance to the
semifinals of the Zagreb
Open.

Ljubicic won 7-6 (8), 6-7
(8), 7-6 (4) with only one
break of serve by each
player in the final set.

The Croat served 28 aces
but struggled with careless
shots from the baseline and
at the net. Ljubicic rallied
from 4-1 down in the first
tiebreaker but could not
clinch the match in straight
sets _ despite staving off
four set-points in the sec-
ond tiebreaker.

The top seed broke in
the opening game of the
third set. Johansson struck
right back and forced a
final tiebreaker, which Lju-
bicic won after taking a 3-0
lead.

Ljubicic faces fourth-
seeded Mikhail Youzhny in
the semifinal after the
Russian defeated Marc
Gicquel of France 7-5, 6-2.

Youzhny struggled to
take control until the 12th
game of the first set and
then never relinquished
control with fine serving
and a series of winners.

Alexander Peya beat
Michael Llodra of France
6-3, 6-3. The Austrian had
to qualify for the main
draw and had previously
never made it to an ATP |
quarterfinal.

Peya broke in the sev-
enth game of the first set
and went on to win the sec-
ond set despite dropping
his serve twice.

Peya faces the winner
between second-seeded
Marcos Baghdatis of
Cyprus and Arnaud
Clemente of France in the
other quarterfinal.

In last year's tourna-
ment, Stefan Koubek of
Austria qualified for the
main draw and made it to
the final where he lost to
Ljubicic.

Hicks hits
to purchase
50 per cent
interest in
Liverpool

m@ SOCCER
DALLAS
Associated Press

TOM HICKS, owner of
the Dallas Stars and the
Texas Rangers, is close to
adding England’s Liver-
pool soccer club to his list
of sports holdings.

Hicks has agreed to join
Montreal Canadiens owner
George Gillett Jr. in a bid
to purchase the five-time
European champions, a
person familiar with the
negotiations said Thursday,
speaking on condition of
anonymity because no
announcement had been
made.

The decision by Hicks to
join Gillette’s bid was first
reported by The Dallas
Morning News on its Web
site Thursday. Hicks did
not immediately return
messages seeking com-
ment.

Hicks would have a 50
percent stake in the group.
Gillette’s offer seemed
imminent after a Dubai-
based consortium pulled
out of a proposed $882 mil-
lion offer Wednesday.
Dubai International Capi-
tal, owned by the ruler of
Dubai, Sheik Mohammed
bin Rashid al-Maktoum,
called off negotiations after
hearing that the board of
directors was considering a
bid from Gillett.

Liverpool has won a
record 18 English league
titles and is planning to
build a 60,000-seat stadi-
um. The club has been
looking for a buyer to help
fund construction of a new
stadium and provide the
financial power to compete
with Chelsea and Manches-
ter United in the transfer
market

Ireland needs early victory over.







m@ RUGBY
LONDON
Associated Press

THE top three Six Nations
favorites — Ireland, England

and France — all have extra.

incentive to win their opening
matches in the rugby union
championship this weekend.

Ireland has a difficult match
at Wales on Sunday and while
defeat in Cardiff wouldn't nec-
essarily end its hopes of break-
ing a 22-year wait for the title,
it would make it harder for
the bookmakers' No. lL
favorite.

England is relying on Jonny
Wilkinson's return after more

than three years out to turn,

things round. Having lost eight
games in its last nine, England
won't want to lose to Scotland
at Twickenham on Saturday
for the first time since 1983
with a World Cup defense to
follow later this year.

As host of the World Cup in
September and October,
France will be confident of
beating Italy for the 27th time
in 28 games on Saturday as it
bids to win the Six Nations for
the second straight year.

Criticism

Defeat to an Italian team
improving under former
French captain Pierre
Berbizier in Rome would
heap more criticism upon
France coach Bernard
Laporte.

Ireland won its opening
three games in 2005 to lift
hopes of winning the title, but
losses to France and Wales
gave the title ~ and the Grand
Slam — to Wales.

‘Ireland coach Eddie O'Sul-
livan is happy for his team to

be tavored — if it doesn t lead

to complacency.

"IT suppose you picter to be
favorites, but it's a notional
thing and a reflection of where
the team is given ils recent
performances." he said “Its a
nice accolade, but it can bite
you more often than not if you
pay too much attention to it.

"We know there's accertain
amount of expectation, which
is fair and it's a lot better than
the expectations we had 12
months ago. But what goes
with that is a responsibility to
continue with the level of per-
formances that earned that
reputation. We have to put
five performances together."

O'Sullivan will have a set-
tled lineup which has played

NS

Wales to justify favorites tag _



@ RHYS THOMAS of Wales is brought down by Ireland's Shane Hogan, on the ground no. 14, during their Six Nations Rugby match °.' .

at Lansdowne Road, Dublin, Sunday Feb. 26, 2006. Ireland beat Wales 31-5. Ireland play Wale

together for several champi-
onships and is led by star cen-
ter Brian O'Driscoll at the
Millennium Stadium.

Wales has lost backs Shane
Williams, Tom Shanklin and
Mark Jones to injury and
Gareth Thomas to suspension,
while Gavin Henson has been
diopped and doesn't even
make the bench. Despite the
rise of center James Hook,
Wales looks considerably
weaker than when it won'the
Grand Slam im 2005.

icugiand lost fullback Lain
Balshaw lo a groim injury on
Friday and coach Brian Ash-
ton promoted Olly Morgan
for his test debut. Ashton has
already gambled by naming
Wilkinson and two rugby
league converts. — Jason
Robinson and Andy Farrell —
in his backline.

In his first game in charge
since he replaced Andy
Robinson, Ashton selected



Robinson on the wing after
he ended his international
retirement from 2005 and
picked Farrell at inside cen-
ter after starting just seven
club.rugby games.

~ With Twickenham expect-
ed to be at full 82,000-capaci-
ty, Morgan will also be test-
ed.

Selection

"1 did not consider moving
Lewsey or Robinson because
they are best on the wing,"
Ashton said of his selection.
"Olly was very close to playing
during the autumn before he
was injured. He has all the
qualities of an old-fashioned
fullback, which he will find
handy against Scotland.

"He is good under the high
ball, he is strong, and I am
sure when the time is right he
will come into the attack."

France coach Laporte, who
has been accused of tinkering
too often with his lineup with
the World Cup in mind, has
even tried 28 different pair-
ings at halfback.

With Frederic Michalak
expected to return from a
long-term Knee injury for the
World Cup, flyhalt David
Skrela will make his second
appearance for France six
years after his first.

"We want to be able to go
to the players, look into the
eyes of all those who want a
place in the World Cup squad,
and tell them they had a
chance to prove themselves.
Then the time will come to
choose," Laporte said.

"Of course we want to win
these (Six Nations) games.
When.a team like France
enters a tournament, they aim
to win it. But the important
thing is to try out as many
players as possible. We are

s again on Sunday.

(AP Photo/John Cogill)

using the Six Nations to put
the finishing touches to our
plans."

Italy coach Berbizier has
also made a surprise choice at
flyhalf with 33-year-old
Andrea Scanavacca replacing
Ramiro Pez.

Berbizier wants to make full
use of Italy's standout for-
wards and see if Scanavacca. - |
has an attacking vision rather. *
than just kick for position and —
territorial gains.

HB ENGLAND'S Iain Bal-
shaw, left, attempts to get
away from Harry Ellis, right,
and Josh Lewsey during a
training session at Twicken-
ham Stadium in London,
Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2007, ahead
of this weekend's opening 6
Nations clash with Scotland.

(AP Photo/Sang Tan)







TRIBUNE SPORTS

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007, PAGE 5B

TRIBUNE SPORTS

‘Sharapova

“and Hingis
atvance at
Pan Pacific

@ TENNIS
TOKYO
Associated Press

TOP-RANKED Maria
Sharapova rallied from a
set down to cruise past
Japan’s Ai Sugiyama 4-
~ 6, 6-0, 6-1 on Friday and
* advance to the Pan J
- Pacific Open semifinals.
~ Sugiyama broke
» Sharapova to win the
first set but was no
match for the No. | seed
- from then on.

, “It’s never easy

» against Sugiyama,”

* Sharapova said. “She
had the crowd behind

_ her and was able to take
« the first set, but I’m glad
* I was able to come back
and win.”

Sharapova will face
fifth-seeded Ana
Ivanovic of Serbia in
* Saturday’s semifinals.

Ivanovic outlasted
fourth-seeded compatri-
ot Jelena Jankovic 3-6,
6-4, 6-2.

Second-seeded Marti-
_na Hingis coasted to a 6-
0, 6-1 win over Australi-
»a’s Samantha Stosur to

advance to the semifi-
nals.

Surface

“It’s no coincidence
that I play well here,”
said Hingis, who has
- won here four times.

“The surface suits me

and everyone treats me
' so well here in Japan so

7 eee

eer
oe . %

*

rr 7m

“!.\» that I’m able to relax.”

Hingis will next face
defending champion
Elena Dementieva of
Russia, who downed
. Italy’s Roberta Vinci 6-

- 1, 6-2.

As in Thursday’s
, match against Francesca
- Schiavone, Sharapova

struggled with her serve,
~ conceding 14 double-

‘faults and hitting just

, one ace.

Once again, her coach
Michael Joyce had some
-’. advice between sets.
* “She was playing
aggressively in the first
set and I wasn’t making
my shots,” Sharapova
's' said. “Michael told me
to move it around and
play more aggressively,
and I started making my
shots and gave her less
. time to do what she
- wanted to do.”
In their only previous
meeting, Sharapova beat
- Sugiyama in the 2004
Wimbledon quarterfi-
nals.

Sharapova said she
didn’t let her serving
problems get the better
- | of her.

“I worried about the
«serve a little too much in
‘the first set,” Sharapova
.said. “There are going to
‘be days when your serve

isn’t working and when

that happens you just

-have to concentrate on
the things that are going
well.”

,

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.















@ ENGLAND'S captain Andrew Flintoff, front left, claps as he and his team le



ave the pitch after defeating Australia in their one day international cricket match in Syd-

ney, Friday, Feb. 2, 2007. England won by 92 runs after making 292 in their innings.

England finally takes

(AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)

win over Australia

m@ CRICKET
SYDNEY, Australia
Associated Press



THREE months after Eng-
land began its cricket tour of
Australia, the visitors finally
have their first win over the
home side. :

Opener Ed Joyce smashed
107 for his maiden one-day
international century and Eng-
land kept its hopes of a tri-
series finals alive with a 92-run
victory over Australia at the
Sydney Cricket Ground on Fri-
day.
Set 293 to win, Australia was
all out for 200 in 38.5 overs,
despite a fighting 51 from
Matthew Hayden, while

-Andrew Symonds retired hurt

on 39.

The result leaves England
equal with New Zealand on
nine points while Australia is
on 27 and guaranteed a spot in
the best-of-three final series.

Australia will hope to regain
captain Ricky Ponting from a
hip injury for Sunday's match
against New Zealand in Mel-
bourne. Symonds suffered a
biceps injury and is also in
doubt for the match.

England and New Zealand
meet in the last round-robin
match Tuesday in Brisbane,
with the best-of-three finals
series starting in Melbourne on
Feb. 9.

England scored its highest
total of the series, 292-7, led
by man-of-the-match Joyce
after Andrew Flintoff won the
toss and elected to bat first.

Glenn McGrath (2-51) and
Shaun Tait (2-68) were Aus-
tralia's only multiple wicket-
takers, with Tait conceding
nine of Australia's 19 wides.

Liam Plunkett (3-24) and
Sajid Mahmood (2-38) led
England's pace attack as the
visitors made early inroads in
defending its total.

Australia lost stand-in skip-
per Adam Gilchrist first ball
to paceman Liam Plunkett and
Brad Hodge (1) was dismissed
the next over off Mahmood.

Michael Clarke (18) became
Plunkett's second victim before
Symonds and Hayden added
71 off 50 balls for the fourth
wicket.

But within the space of five
overs, Australia lost Hayden,
closing specialist Mike Hussey
(6) and Symonds, who hit four
fours and one six.

Having lost five of its open-
ing six matches, England start-
ed strongly as Dublin-born
Joyce, who came into the Eng-
land squad for the injured
Kevin Pietersen, hit 10 fours
and faced 142 balls before he
was finally out with the score at
256-5 in the 47th over. The 28-
year-old left-hander shared an
opening stand of 58 with Mal
Loye (29) before sharing a 111-
run, second wicket partnership
with Ian Bell (51).

Loye's ambitious sweep-shot
attempt off the bowling of
McGrath in the 11th over end-
ed badly with the right-hander
struck flush on the chin. After
an on-field break for some
icing on the wound, Loye was
out next ball and taken to hos-

pital where he was give three |

stitches.

"I thought we played great
tonight," said England captain
Andrew Flintoff. "We hada
great start, Adam Gilchrist first
ball.

"We have a point to prove,
we've been working hard," he
added. "I'm glad it's come."

Gilchrist said Australia was
"outplayed in almost every
area."

"We never any illusions
about the quality of their
team," he said. "This could give
them some momentum."

Joyce was thrilled with his
century and England's first big
reason for celebration after los-
ing the Ashes 5-0.

"I don't have words to
describe it," said Joyce. "I
know this is our first victory
across Australia, but it's been a
great series."

B@ ENGLAND'S Liam
Plunkett celebrates taking the
wicket of Australia's Glenn
McGrath, back, in their one
day international cricket
match in Sydney, Friday, Feb.
2, 2007. England won by 92
runs after making 292 in their
innings.

(AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)









PAGE 6B, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007









JUDGE PARKER













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| CRYPTIC PUZZLE |















CROSS DOWN

1 Hide sorne sticks of wood? (5) 2 — Writing about helsts that have

6 — Untidy as certain eating places? gone wrong? (6)
(5) district in South

9 Such remarks can have a goading 3 a a cay

* effect (7)

20 Run over in a mad caper (5) 4 To jump is hot work! (3)

11 Revolutionary linen maker (5) 5. Anose for tobacco (5)

12 . Republic, American backed and 6 This mixture gives me a new angle
reorganised (5) (7)

13° Far from detached? (7) 7 Place of unprecedented pleasure

* 15 It's bad when one has to take a (4) :

Corner twice! (3) 8 — Protection thrown around a novice

47° Alot of land (4) (6)

13 fee ae girl out as a matter 12 Sound asleep! (5)

‘YS Amachine to stretch your neck? 13 Move rhythmically with a chap at
(5) half pace (5)

20 Stick to business in this place (6) 14 A good deal of sense (5)

22 Keep moving, pet (4) 15_Not the big picture (5)

24 Little creature's contribution to beef 16 Water leaks, possibly (5)
tea (3) 18 Some boys, after a girl, cause

25 = They usually need one or two displeasure (5)
players (7) i 19 Vessel right behind Tom (7)

26 enn person who'd like 21 Whence the workers get away for
a joint? (6) : tefreshment (6)

27 Aremoval sign (5) 22. Promise dad a part (6

28 Lists of bad actors not including romise dad a part (6)
Charlie (5) 23 = In Hawaii, he starts as he finishes

29 |s his military career all over? (7) (6) ;

30 Fathead always in a heated state 25 Salesmen use It in untidy piles (5)

(5) 26
32 A bit of a bloomer (5)

A big squeeze, sweetheart! (4)
Strike quickly, not idly (3)

CRYPTIC SOLUTIONS

ACROSS: 4, Supine 7, War paint 8, Ad-on-is 10, F-rail 13, Flip 14, Turn 15,
No-el 16, P-EN 17, Fair 19, A-las 21, Collector 23, Surf 24, Sued 26, Y-E.T.
27, Rate 29, Goes 32, Hers 33, He-Art 34, No-mad-s. 35, Operated 36, Strain

DOWN: 1, Swift 2, F-R-iar 3, Ma-il 4, Stal-e 5, Poop 6, No-l-ses 9, Dilate 11,
Rug 12, In for 13, Forests 15, Nil 16, P-A-R 18, Alfred 20, Lodge 21, Cut 22,
Cue 23, S-e-t out 25, Per 28, Arson 30, Oasts 31, Study 32, H-a-H-a 33, Harm

EASY SOLUTIONS

ACROSS: 4, Eleven 7, Appendix 8, Thames 10, Erase 13, Moon 14, Dart 15, Ball
16, Beg 17, Abet 19, Loud 21, Credulous 23, Sued 24, Rows 26, Nib 27, Suet
29, Trip 32, Dips 33, Aside 34, Spouts 35, Elephant 36, Resent

DOWN: 1, Faced 2, Spear 3, Once 4, Extol 5, Elan 6, Evened 9, Hollow 11, Ram
12, Stare 13, Matures 15, Bed 16, Bus 18, Bedsit 20, Ousts 21, Cub 22, Lot 23,
Simple 25, Bid 28, Upset 30, Rival 31, Pesto 32, Dune 33, Asps





EVERYWHERE
FOR LAST
Em SUMMER


















BRESoos

COMICS PAGE

North dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.
NORTH
@KI8
Â¥Q63
K96
AQI2
WEST
A632
Â¥875
#Q 103
£1098

EAST
a4
VAKJ2
#37542
£643

SOUTH
#Q10975
V1094
A8
#K75

The bidding:

North East

1 NT Pass

4¢

Opening lead — ten of clubs.

There are times when a defender
wants to send an urgent come-on sig-
nal to his partner, but lacks the nec-
essary cards to do so in the usual
fashion. In that case, he tries to get
the message across by telling his
partner what not to do.

Consider this deal where South
gets to four spades and West leads
the ten of clubs. If you look at all
four hands, it’s easy to see that the
defenders can take four tricks before
declarer can take 10. But this is more
easily said than done. When West

South West
34 Pass

COOCOMECS. Cow | Hon Seuss

HOW many words of four letters
or more can you make from the
letters shown here? In making a
word, each letter may be used
once only. Each must contain
the centre letter and there must
be at least one nine-letter word.
No plurals.

TODAY'S TARGET

Good 13 very good 20; excellent
26 (or more). Solution tomorrow.






=
o hee

— Be
ome
ie



































Down
ACROSS 2 = - Hung (6)
Decree (5) "3 Swiss villa (6)
Couples (5) 4 — Unit of weight
Vacation (7) (3)
Heathen (5) 5 — Sacked (5)
Harvests (5) 6 Companion (7)
Defeats (5) 7 Affirmative
Crossed out votes (4)
(7) 8 Mend (6)
Noise (3) 12 Stomach (5)
Revise (4) 13 Hollows (5)
Sedate (6) 14 Swimming-
Painful pools (5)
Pan - sae (5)
tickly (6
Skin ome aint 18 a material
(4)
Distress signal : - eel
(3)
respect (6)
fae 22 Deer's horn (6)
est (5) 23° Snuggle (6)
Paddla-boat (5) 25° Liquid
Chosen (5) measures (5)
Ecstasy (7) 26 Centre (4)
Prise (5) 28 Before (3)
Strayed (5)









“THE ONLY PROBLEM WITH MARGARET 16 THAT
SHE DOESN'T HAVE AN OFF BUTTON."

Actions Speak Louder Than Words









BAND
CUETIRGAT P



sooner or later gains the lead with his
ace of trumps, he will have to shift to
a heart or else South will make the
contract.

Unfortunately, East does not have
a high heart that he can afford to dis-
card as trumps are being drawn to
show that he wants the suit led by
partner. Nevertheless, if East-West
cooperate perfectly, they can find the
winning defense.

When the deal occurred, declarer
tried to muddy the waters for the
defenders by putting up dummy’s
ace of clubs at trick one (on which
East played the three, a discouraging
signal). South then led dummy’s king
of spades, hoping to lose the trick at
once to the ace.

But West wanted to see his part-
ner’s discard on the next trump lead,
so he held up the ace. On the next
spade lead, East discarded the dia-
mond deuce, another negative signal.

East’s two discouraging signals .

in the minor suits got the message
across to West loud and clear. East
did not appear to have the king of
clubs, nor was he interested in a dia-
mond lead. Only one hope remained
— hearts.

Accordingly, West took the spade

“ace at trick three and shifted to the

eight of hearts, and East quickly col-
lected three heart tricks to put the
contract down one.



’S SOLUTION
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flight flit
gilt hilt left
ght lithe tile
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FLYWEIGHT

YESTERDAY
ethyl felt
filthy fitl
lefty life lift 1i
welt wet]

wilt wily

oa alas
grant that
legally protects
an invention



Vassily Ivanchuk v Ivan Sokolov,
European Club Cup 2006. It’s a
dassical formation known to :

every attacking player. The 7

white queen combines with a

knight at g5 or with abishopon °
the b1-h7 dlagonaltolauncha = 5
checkmate attack on the black =,

king holed up at g8 or h8. The
paradoxical problem in today's 3

ARE A Pee ae
\RATES



TRIBUNE SPORTS



SATURDAY,
FEBRUARY 3

ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20
Romantic interests take center stage,
Aries, as you attract the attention of a
would-be special someone. Tum on
the charm that makes you irrisistible
and you’re bound to make a match.

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21
Travel plans will have to be post-'
poned, Taurus. An unexpected turn of
events requires you to stay close to
home base for the time being. It
should blow over in a few days.
GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21
Maintaining a long-term friendship
is on your mind, Gemini. Don’t

worry, that minor argument you had” - | - ”

is not enough to sever the relation: , - ’

ship. Hurt feelings will mend. '

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22

You have taken on a project that is a
step above your skill level. Instead .
of doing it all wrong, accept that you

might need a little help, and call in

the reinforcements.

LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23

Don’t let past experience put a.
damper on your upcoming trip with '
friends. This time around you’ll be '
pleasantly surprised at the results..'
Romantic sparks will fly. ‘

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sep 22
If you haven’t had much luck .with |

relationships, Virgo, it might be time . -.
to look in the mirror. Instead of plac- .° .

ing blame on‘‘them,’ the problem
could lie with you.

LIBRA — Sep 23/Oct 23

You feel especially confined this,'.
week, Libra. It could be that your,', ’

A
we
Nels
‘

same old routine has gotten you
down. Change things up a bit and
you are sure to boost your spirits.

SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22

You have an admirer, Scorpio, and

as luck would have it, it’s that neigh- | '
bor who has been glancing in your *

direction. Pursue the relationship
and enjoy your chemistry.

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21

Your nervous energy could be put ;
to better use, Sagittarius. Why not |

try a home-improvement
project or take up a hobby that
puts idle fingers to work?

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20 .~
Waking up on the wrong side of the .'

bed doesn’t give you free reign to min

the days of others. To make it through: '
the week, plaster a smile on your face, .

even if-it doesn’t reflect your mood.

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18

Lately you’ve been demonstrating a | -
quick temper, Aquarius. YOu must .

keep it in check or those around you
are bound to take offense, especially
loved ones.

PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20

If you’ve been feeling a bit under the ;
weather, you may want to, have ail- |
ments checked out. It’s better to be _

prepared than sorry later.





puzzle Is that White has too
many plausible options. ee E:
Ukraine's world top 10 HAT Td ft Lek
grandmaster lvanchuk would 2 bc de f gh
like to eliminate Sokolov's
defensive f6 knight to enable Ineffective here. lvanchuk saw
Qh7 mate, but the knight is through the confusing variety of
guarded by Its partner atd5so choice. After his next tum, Black
that, for example, 1 Rxf6 falls _ resigned. What White's winning
foul of Nxf6. And spectacular move?
altematives like 1 Bg8 and 1
Nxf7+ which sometimes solve
such positions are also LEONARD BARDEN

(SEE,

”
Chess solution 8294: 1 Be4! Resigns. White

threatens 2 BxdS Nxd5 3 Qh7 mate. If Bb7 2 BxdS BxdS
3 Rxf6! with the same mate threat. If g6 2 BrodS NoadS 3
Qed! NIG 4 Rodi6 Qxf6 5 Qh4+ Kg7 6 Qh7 mate.
Mensa quiz: L 88. Add the two digits together and
increase the number by this amount. 2. 76. The
alphabetical positions of the two letters are added
together and then multiplied by two.

One possible word ladder solution ts: TAKE, tale,

tall, tell, teal, teat, THAT.





TRIBUNE SPORTS SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007, PAGE 7B

FEBRUARY 4, 2007





SATURDAY EVENING - ‘FEBRUARY 3, 2007 | | | SUNDAY EVENING
7:30 | 8:00] 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30 7:30 [8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30
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‘PACKED FULL OF BARGAINS - SEE INSIDE

Members of the
Bahamas Hotel
Managerial Association
vote ‘yes’ on document
headed ‘strike vote’

@ By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

INDUSTRIAL action is on
the horizon for Cable Beach
hotels as members of the
Bahamas Hotel Managerial
Association voted “yes” for
strike action. The vote was tak-
en yesterday at the House of
Labour on Wulff Road.

According to BHMA presi-
dent Obie Ferguson, 131 mem-
bers voted yes and four
abstained from indicating
whether they supported the
action.

Mr Ferguson told The Tri-
bune: “This shows that there is
considerable support from the
workers to withdraw labour,
despite Baha Mar’s attempt to
mislead them.”

Mr Ferguson said his mem-
bers were “fed up” with Baha
Mar executives’ refusal to com-
plete negotiations on their
industrial agreement and man-
agement’s decision last year to
pay employees a one week
Christmas bonus, instead of the
two weeks that the workers
normally receive.

Yesterday, BHMA members
were asked to tick “yes” or
“no” on a document headed:
“Strike Vote.”

The document read: “In fur-
therance of our dispute with
management at Radisson
Cable Beach and Golf Resort,
Nassau Beach Hotel and Wyn-
dham Nassau Resort now trad-
ing as ‘Baha Mar Company
Limited’ the Bahamas Hotel
Managerial Association is seek-
ing in accordance with article
20(c) of the Industrial Rela-
tions Act Ch.321, a sttike vote
against our said employers.

“Do you support taking a
strike against Radisson Cable
Beach & Golf Resort, Wynd-
ham Nassau Beach, and Crystal
Palace Casino and the Nassau
Beach Hotel to aid the resolu-
tion of our association’s dispute
over the unilateral reduction in
the payment in Christmas
bonus and failure to negotiate
our industrial agreement on a
timely basis?”

The “yes” vote comes a day

after Baha Mar executive

Mpbert Sands expressed seri-
us concerns following

\mours of “some form of

ilustrial action” at the Wynd-

Fp Nassau Resort on Super

wl Sunday.

Mr Sands said that any form

if industrial action not only had
ihe potential of permanently

"es.

jeopardising the feputation of
the casino, but the employees’
livelihoods and the well-being
of their individual families.

The senior vice president also
said that the hotel had recently
introduced a number of posi-
tive initiatives in response to
the employee’s concerns,
among them the introduction
of a non-contributory plan and
the revision of the medical plan.

He added that the entire
compensation and bonus incen-
tive plan is also now under
review for all employees.

However, Mr Ferguson
claims that Mr Sand’s state-
ments are only “empty promis-
3”

The Tribune asked Mr Fer-
guson when the strike action
would occur. The date was still
“under review,” he replied.

Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007

@ HRH Prince Edward, the Earl of Wessex
and Arthur D. Hanna, Governor General of the
Bahamas, present Ms. Elaine Gomez with the
Governor-General’s Youth Award for 10 years of
service.

¢ SEE STORY ON PAGE TWO

(Photo: Ana Bianca Marin)

Minister leads ‘raid’ on
land fill removal sites

@ By BRENT DEAN

LESLIE Miller, Minister of
Agriculture and Marine
Resources, led the press on a
“raid” of two sites where land
fill was being removed without
proper authorisation.

Mr Miller, accompanied by the.

police, pulled up to the first site
in the Carmichael Road area yes-
terday afternoon. He confronted
workers on the site asking who
gave them permission to extract
fill. He ordered them to stop.

“What you all are doing here
is totally destroying the land
from any sort of cultivation or
anything else by going down
about six feet below the road
grade. I mean this is a total dis-
grace. Why would you do this?
Why would you gouge out the
land like this?”



Mi MINISTER of Agriculture
and Marine Resources
Leslie Miller

Minister Miller then instructed the workers to give nn the tele-

phone number of their boss.

The Minister called and spoke with their boss in front of the press.
Mr Miller informed the man that he was removing fill from agri-
cultural land. The Minister got the name of the person who had
hired the work crew and gave this information to the police officers

standing nearby.

The police ordered the workers to stop the extraction immedi-

ately.

Meanwhile, Mr Miller said he would have the Ministries of
Environmental Health and Works posta bora notice to stop all

extraction on the site.

Minister Miller then took the press to a site next to the Sir Milo
Butler highway where major extractions have taken place, leaving
a dangerously thin layer of rock next to the road — which may in

time collapse with erosion.

As the Minister arrived on the site, a worker on a tractor — who
may have been foreign — jumped'and ran from the vehicle when he

SEE page 12

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PRICE — 75¢

UN global warming report makes

orim reading for the Bahamas

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas could see a
dangerous decrease in fresh
water supplies, stronger hur-
ricanes and loss of land mass
in the'next few decades due
to the global warming trend,
according to the results of a
new United Nations report
released yesterday in Paris.

In their most dire progno-
sis on global warming to
date, 133 of the world’s top
climate scientists yesterday
‘released their findings on the

levels are rising faster than
anticipated and that as a con-
sequence places like the

Bahamas and Florida will be

partially submerged within
the next few decades.

The report, which is pre-
dicting a bleak future, is con-
sidered to be “a little cau-
tious and conservative”
because it represents the
views of more than 1,000 sci-
entists from more than LOO
different nations.

Scientists and Environ-
mentalists are warning that
it is time for low-lying coun-
tries such as the Bahamas to

stop “sticking their heads in
the sand” and address the
consequences and future
implications of a drastic cli-
mate change.

Speaking to the public
after the release of the
report, French President
Jacques Chirac called for an
economic and political “rev-
olution” to save the planet.

“We are on the historic
threshold of the irre-
versible,” warned President
Chirac.

Bahamian environmental-

SEE page 12

phenomenon, stating that sea

Baggage handler accused of
conspiracy to import cocaine

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS

MIAMI, Florida — Nassau Flight Services
baggage handler Roney Tony is to go on tri-
al March 19 charged with four counts of con-
spiracy to import 500 grams or more of a sub-
stance containing a detectable amount of
cocaine. The USA may also introduce evi-
dence accusing Tony of conspiring to illegal-
ly import blasting caps.

According to official court dockets, the
US Government may introduce into evidence
that Tony conspired on or about May 9, 2006,

to illegally import 500 grams or more of

cocaine into the United States.
"On May 9, 2006, defendant Tony met

with another individual at the Nassau Beach
Hotel and agreed to import one kilogram of
cocaine into the United States using a couri-
er he identified as Ladaria Higgs," the court
document alleged.

"The Government may also introduce...evi-
dence that defendant Tony conspired on or
about May 17, 2006, to illegally transport
blasting caps into the United States."

Tony was arraigned on these charges ina
Miami Federal Court on December 19, one
day after he and four other NFS baggage
handlers were arrested at the Fort Laud-
erdale airport when they arrived from Nassau

SEE page 12



SS ee







PAGE 6, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007

THE TRIBUNE |



Positive response’ for Professional
Security Association of the Bahamas

THE newly-formed Profes-
sional Security Association of
the Bahamas has received an
“overwhelming” positive
response from all sectors of
Bahamian society, according
to its president Byron Rogers.

Since the organisation was
formed in November 30, 2006
representatives from the busi-
ness community, government
agencies, hotels and civil
organisations, have expressed
their support, he said.

Mr Rogers noted that this
followed an initial endorse-
ment from Commissioner of
Police Paul Farquharson, his
deputy John Rolle and sever-
al assistant police commis-
sioners.

Private Security Companies
in The Bahamas, along with
other ancillary security service
providers, have long sought,
since 1974 to come together
to form one body and address
the many concerns that hold
back growth within the indus-
try. The PSAB and its mem-
bers are making strides to
change the overall attitude for
the betterment of all members
by speaking with one voice.

‘After many sacrifices and
efforts made by key individu-
als since the year 2000, and
continuing with a resurgence
of those efforts throughout the
year 2006, The Professional
Security Association Of the
Bahamas (PSAB) was again
reintroduced officially on
November 30, 2006.

The association’s previous
constitution was extensively
amended after being reviewed
and discussed from the attend-
ing body of security compa-
nies and later ratified, along
with confirming elected offi-






Sunday School: 10am

Radio Bible Hour:
Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2

FUNDAMENTAL
Preachering 11am & 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC

Pastor:H. Mills

Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm . °

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
Pastor: H. Mills * Phone: 393-0563 * Box N-3622



THEB



11:00AM

Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM



Bernard Road
11:00AM

Zion Boulevard
10:00AM
7:00AM

East Shirley Street
11:00AM
7:00PM

9:30AM

Avenue
8:00AM
9:30AM

11:00AM




RADIO PROGRAMMES

Your Host:

Your Host:



Church at 7:30pm.



Ad 8 Chi

AHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
owen P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
seme Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-81 35

Mame CHURCH SERVICES
Cr SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2007
THIRD SUNDAY BEFORE LENT

AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road
Rev. Mark Carey/HC

ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,

Rev. Dr. Laverne Lockhart/HC
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Pastor Sharon Loyley/HC
CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,

Rev. Charles Sweeting/HC
Rev. Charles Sweeting.

EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,

Pastor Martin Loyley/HC
Pastor Martin Loyley

GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH,
Queen’s College Campus
Rev. James Neilly/HC

ST. MICHAEL’S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill

Connections - Rev. Phillip Stubbs
Rev. Philip Stubbs/HC

.. TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
Mr. Reginald W. Eldon/HC
7:00PM Mr. David Higgs

FAI ICI IOI IOI ITI IIIT OO TOC IO IOI OOOO IO TOTO III TOT AITO IIT

RENEWAL’ on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1

Rev. Dr. Laverne R. Lockhart
‘METHODIST MOMENTS! on each weekday at 6:55a.m,
Rev. Dr. Laverne R. Lockhart

BAHAMAS METHODIST WOMEN’S FELLOWSHIP (NASSAU REGION) will be holding
their monthly meeting on Monday, February 5, 2007 at St Michael’s Methodist

COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH will be holding a Dedication Service for
their New Extension on Sunday, February 18, 2007 at 3:00pm.

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www. gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 4TH, 2007
7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Bro. Ernest Miller
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Usher Board Anniversary
7:00 p.m. Sis. Tezel Anderson/Board of Finance & Investments _

mele lg Col ALLL. Le us” (1 Peter 5:7)

cers, directors and the
appointment of.a number of
committees after a series of
meetings. As the security pro-
fession remains a “special-
ized” service, the two main
objectives that the PSAB will
be seeking to secure are as fol-
lows:



@ MR ROGERS said there
* was an initial endorsement
from Commissioner of Police

Paul Farquharson (pictured)

Comprehensive statutory
recognition and protection for
the industry, and have the
right to self-regulate the affairs
of the security industry.

- The PSAB is well on its
way, despite the efforts by
independent factions who
want to “divide” the member-
ship. by desiring to create
another security associa-
tion....to assume leadership
without having invested any










































OBKCRaMe









effort from the beginning.

Said the PSAB statement:

“The PSAB has brought
and will continue to bring the
best and the brightest minds to
work together for the better-
ment of the membership in
the security industry. We
sought to combine our efforts
in that regard by inviting rele-
vant professional expertise in
the areas of business, law,
finance, professional leader-
ship and law enforcement
partnerships and with tremen-
dous emphasis on training.
Undoubtedly, the PSAB
membership through training,
will realize a much higher
standard of service than is cur-
rently being provided to its
clients.

“In short, the PSAB visual-
izes greater benefits for its
members,)such as:

“Training syllabus designed
to upgrade and certify securi-
ty officers;

increased wages and bene-
fits;

major medical/life insur-
ance;

employers liability for secu-
rity officers;

improved working condi-
tions;

- emergency relief fund (loss
of employment due to special
circumstances). There will also
bea

credit union for members;

discount members credit
card;

develop a pension scheme
(retirement plan);
attorney/legal representation
for members and security
companies; participate within
a Special Security Task Force
(candidates who qualify),
executive, administrative and
training facilities/offices.

“With regard to the busi-
ness community and general
public, the PSAB is develop-
ing and has installed the fol-
lowing to date:

¢ Clear Code of Conduct;




Sunday School: 9:45am

Prayer Time: 6:30pm

Center

each Sunday morning on
Joy 101.9 at 8:30a.m

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ° Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 4TH, 2007
11:30 a.m. & 7:00 p.m. Services

Speaker:Pastor Marcel Lightbourne

| LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
| Grounded In The Past & Geared To the Future

Worship Time: lam & 7pm

Place; The Madeira Shopping

Pastor Knowles can be heard

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles
P.O. Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
Email-lynnk@batelnet.bs

e Mission statement
(designed for the PSAB by
Mr. Paul Thompson, Advis-
er);

© More accountability from
the security companies

¢ Membership data bank

¢ Complaint division (re:
customers/clients and general
public);

¢ Security Disciplinary Tri-
bunal;

¢ Public liability to protect
the clients’ properties, staff
and customers.”

The PSAB said that Com-
missioner of Police Paul Far-
quharson and his office,
Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of National Security,
Mrs. Cynthia Pratt, and other
business entities are impressed
with its mandate to move
ahead.

Internationally, the PSAB
said, it has also received

! Torn Bibles, broken pews, flattened
homes are left in tornado’s path



m@ LADY LAKE, Fla.

PARISHIONERS walked over
the splintered remains of the
Lady Lake Church of God on Fri-
day, rescuing torn Bibles from the
jumble of broken pews, altar and
glass left behind by a tornado,
according to Associated Press.
’ Someone had pulled a framed
religious poem nearly unscathed
from the rubble. Its title: “The

. Touch of the Master’s Hand.”

The reinforced building had
been considered an emergency
shelter before the storm early Fri-
day turned it into a twisted mess
of wood and metal. Pieces of alu-
minum roof hung from oak
branches and clanked in the wind.

Across a 30-mile swath, the
twister:and thunderstorms killed
at least 19 people and laid waste
to, hundreds of homes.

People pulled the bodies of
their neighbors from under the
rubble in the rural central Florida











Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles






Girace and Peace Wesleyan Church

A Society of The Free

Worship time: Lla.m. & 7pm,
Adult Sunday School: I0a.m.
Church School during Worship Service

Place: Twynam Heights

off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O.Box SS-563]1
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

‘OME T



RSHIP_LEAVE TO SE



endorsements from several of
the United States’ “most
respected high profile and
credible law enforcement
associations, one of whom is
associated directly with the
US Homeland Security and
other associations from the
Caribbean.”

As an example the PSAB
named:

¢ International Association
of Chiefs of Police (IACP);

¢ National Organization of
Black Law Enforcement
Executives (NOBLE);

e American Society for
Industrial Security (ASIS);

* Council of International



@ ANGELINA JOLIE
(AP Photo)

Angelina Jolie
to ‘scatter her
mother's ashes
in Bahamas’

HOLLYWOOD actress
Angelina Jolie will scatter
her mother’s ashes in the
Bahamas, the US enter-
tainment media has report-

Investigators (CII) and the ed.
¢ Association of Caribbean The celebrity is said to
Chiefs of Police (AACP) - have chosen a secret spot
The PSAB said it is the only in the chain of islands

because her mother, actress
Marcheline Bertrand, loved
spending time here.

Ms Bertrand was with
her son James Haven, her
daughter Angelina and
Brad Pitt when she lost her
lengthy battle with cancer
last Saturday at the age of
56.

recognized security associa-
tion, as accepted by the secu-
rity industry in The Bahamas.



area northwest of Orlando.

“Hell opened up and half the
demons came out,” said Russell
Timmons, of Lady Lake.

In the Lake Mack section of
Paisley, Bernadette Fields, 67,
said her house sustained little
damage, but friends told her the
force of the tornado blew two of
her neighbors out the bedroom
wall of their mobile homes and
into the lake where they died.

The couple’s dog found them,
she said.

“The wind picked me up four
times and put me back down,”
said Nellie Byrd, who huddled
with her husband as the storm
shook their home.

A lone baby doll lay in the
street, clothes hung from downed
trees and telephone poles jutted
at 45-degree angles. Mobile
homes had crumpled in on them-
selves, creating massive garbage
heaps. A pickup truck lay upside
down in a field.




She died on January 27

at Cedars-Sinai Medical

_ Centre in Los Angeles after

a more than seven year bat-
tle with the disease.

It was revealed earlier
this week that Marcheline
died happy in the knowl- -
edge her daughter had
finally found love and sta-
bility with Pitt.












ly magazine that Ms
Bertrand approved “com-
pletely” of the celebrity
couple’s relationship and
that she loved Pitt.

Ms Bertrand, whose first
husband was Oscar-win-
ning actor Jon Voight —
father of her two children —
had small roles in 80s
movies Lookin' to Get Out
and The Man Who Loved
Women.
















THE BAHAMAS, TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS
CONFERENCE
OF THE METHODIST CHURCH IN THE
CARIBBEAN AND THE AMERICAS _
L’EGLISE METHODISTE DANS LA CARAIBE

ET LES AMERIQUES
NASSAU CIRCUIT Or cHURCErS tem
108 Montrose Avenue
P.O. Box EE=16379, Nassau, Bahamas; Telephone: 325-6432; Fax:
328-2784; rhodesmethod@batelnet.bs
METHODISM: RAISED UP IN THE. PROVIDENCE OF GOD,
TO REFORM THE NATION, BUT ESPECIALLY THE CHURCH
AND TO SPREAD SCRIPTURAL HOLINESS THROUGHOUT
THE LAND (Father John Wesley)
“Celebrating 223 years of continuous Methodist witness
for Christ in The Bahamas”
THE SIXTH LORD’S DAY AFTER THE NATIVITY,
FEBRUARY 4, 2007
COLLECT:
Almighty God, by whose grace alone we are accepted and called to
your service: strengthen us by your Holy Spirit and make us worthy
of our calling; through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord, who is alive
and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now
and forever. = :

$





















WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malcolm Rd East)
9:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes (Holy Communion)
3:00 p.m. Circuit Youth March and Rally




RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (108 Montrose
Ave. near Wulff Rd)







7:00 a.m. Bishop Rev. Dr. Raymond R. Neilly
(Holy Communion)
10:00 a.m. Sis. Patrice Strachan
11:00 a.m. Rev. Emily A. Demeritte / Rev. Mark. S. Christmas



COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (Rose Street, Fox
Hill)
11:00 a.m. Rev. Leonard G. Roberts, Jr. (Holy Communion)
Live Broadcast on 1540
PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plaza)
11:00 a.m. Rev. Stacia Williams- Christmas (Holy Communion)
HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHODIST CHURCH
(28 Crawford St, Oakes Field) ‘

7:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes (Holy Communion)
10:00 a.m. Bishop Rev. Dr, Raymond R. Neilly
GOOD SHEPHERD METHODIST CHURCH

8:00 a.m. Rev. Emily A. Demeritte (Holy Communion)
CROIX-DES-MISSIONS ALDERSGATE (Quackoo Street)

5:30 p.m. Fridays Children’s Club

9:30a.m. Sunday —_ Circuit Mission and Evangelism
METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo St) -Thrift Shop and
other Ministries
JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE (28 Crawford St., Oakes
Field) Reception to Primary
















FASTING FOR JUSTICE - All Methodists of the Conference are
urged to fast for Justice to in the Methodist Cases. The fast begins
weekly after the evening meal on Thursday and ends at noon on
Friday. This we proclaim unswervingly: “My God and My Right.”







RADIO PROGRAMS

“Vision” - On the Lord’s Day, ZNS | at 9 p.m.; “Great Hymns of

Inspiration” - On the Lord’s Day, Radio 810 at 5:30 p.m; “Family
Vibes” ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.; “To God be the Glory” ZNS 1,
Tuesday, 7:45 p.m.









PRAYERS
For Justice to prevail in the Methodist Cases. Our brothers and sisters
in the Middle East, those affected by hurricanes and other natural disasters,
and the Privy Council Appeal.




A source told Us Week-. .°.-.





—

}

Fax: (242) 328-2398

.. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007

SECTION

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

‘

MIAMI HERALD SPORTS






The

Hees MA ganay
ted ag gah
{hytong

Se,
aaa
aa





@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE






“*.° BOXING
By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter

IN A rare battle of two

"7. southpaws, it was Jermaine

‘Choo Choo’ Mackey’s right
hand that finished Puerto
Rican Anibal ‘El Olimpico’
Acevedo on Thursday night at
the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasi-
um.

Mackey took advantage of
his height and his effective
right jab and uppercut to stop
Acevedo in the seventh round
to retain his World Boxing
Council’s CABOFE
Caribbean Boxing Federa-
tion’s super middleweight title.
Two minutes and nine sec-
-*.*, onds into the seventh of the

-- 12 scheduled rounds main
event bout on the First Class
Promotion’s first professional
show for the year, Acevedo
turned his back and knelt
down for a mandatory eight
count,

However, he didn’t continue
fighting and Mackey was
awarded a TKO decision.
Instead, Acevedo had to be
treated for quite some time in
his corner by the ring doctors
for what appeared to be a bro-
Ken nose.

“I was really excited, going
against an opponent with 19
fights,” reflected Mackey of

. the one-time Olympic silver

medalist who came from Puer-

“I: to Rico with 14-4-1 record. “I

know I had to work hard here.
I did my homework. I said I
would put it all in the ring.

“For the first three rounds, it

- was really hard. I knew he
would come on strong. I start-
ed to slunk, but my coach (Ray
Minus Jr.) told me that’s not
the way to go. So I just fought
my fight and it came in.”

In the third, Acevedo took
control of the fight when
caught Mackey with a series
of combinations. Mackey tried
to counter punch, but the
Puerto Rican avoided getting
him, leaving the Bahamian
swinging at the air.

“He could throw some com-
bination. He caught me with
some combinations,” Mackey
stated. “I was dizzy, but I
shook it off. But I said I was
training hard and there’s no
way he’s going to beat.”

After regaining control of
the fight in the fourth, Mackey
went into another gear in the
fifth as he threw what seemed
like a million shots, rocking

_..._ the head and body of Aceve-

572 GO,

oe “T came out very aggressive,
but I wasn’t willing to take a
chance. I wanted to knock out
bad, but I said I will wait on it.

I got a couple (shots) in that
round, so I said I will wait on
it.”

In the sixth, nothing much
happened as both fighters
slowed down the pace.

But Mackey went back to
the head and body of Acevedo
and with the fans on their feet

cheering, he threw another
series of punches that set up
the knockdown.

_ “It was off the hook. He
knew the jab was coming, so I
threw a jab uppercut that
caught him right on the nose,”
said Mackey of the big blow.
“T had already softened up his
nose with the jab. The upper-
cut just caught him and it
broke his nose.”

Despite the way he ended
it, Mackey knew that he was in
for a real battle.

“TI had to change up my
punches and throw more

honke ” -- :

a a ee eee



he counter-attacked Acevedo.
“T had the jab off the hook,
straight rights. He caught me
with a couple shots, so I said I
would stay off him because
he’s a real slugger.”

Mackey said with Acevedo
having the edge in experience,
having fought at the Olympic
Games, he wanted to be a little
cautious and wait until the
opportune time to strike.

When he did, he said he
knew that there was no way
that the Puerto Rican could
stop him,

Now Mackey said he wants
to go after the British Com-
monwealth title. The last
Bahamian to hold a British
Commonwealth title was
Minus Jr., who was the ban-
tamweight and lightweight
champion,

“Pll be back in the gym
come Monday,” stressed
Mackey as he looks ahead to
his future.

Promoter Michelle Minus,
wife of Minus Jr., said they
were quite pleased with Mack-
ey’s performance and they are
definitely going to pursue the
British Commonwealth title
shot this year.

She revealed that they will
lobby to host it here at the
Kendal Isaacs Gym, but if it’s
too costly to bring to the
Bahamas, then they will have
to go on the road and fight in
the champion’s hometown.

Mackey’s only defeat came
last year when he traveled to
Canada and lost a split deci-
sion,

@ JERMAINE ‘CHOO
CHOO’ Mackey in action
against Anibal ‘El Olimpico’
Acevedo.

(Photo: Tim Clarke)



CE y

STAR TRACKERS TRACK



}

fifteen Thousand



@ FRONT: L-R Coach David Charlton,
Back: L-R Coach Trevor Strachan,

@ STAR Trackers Track & Field
Club will be hosting the Baker Con-
struction Bahamas, Ltd. “Star Per-
formers Track Classic 2007” on Sat-
urday, February 3rd. The mect will
take place at the Thomas A. Robinson
Track & Field Stadium at the Queen
Elizabeth Sports Centre. The meet will
run from 10am until 7pm. Tickets will
cost $5 for adults, $3 for children and
$10 for V.LP.

This track meet is for divisions under
sine tx anen Tt is sanctioned by the

Bahamas Association of Athletic
Associations (B.A.A.A.) and Interna-
tional Amateur Athletic Federation
(L.A.A.F.) rules apply.

This meet is being held under the
distinguished patronage of Debbie Fer-
guson-McKenzie. Competing in this
meet will be two of Jamaica’s Star
Junior Athletes, Yohan Blake and
Carrie Russell, Both of them were
2006 World Junior Bronze Medalists.
There will be over 500 athletes com-

peting from Nassau, Freeport and the .

Laura Pratt-Charlton, J.R. McDonald (Baker Cons
Henry Bethel (Baker Construction), Coach Rudolph Ferguson

Turks and Caicos Islands.

The Star Trackers are proud to have
Baker Construction Bahamas, Ltd. as
the title sponsor for the second year.

Star Trackers Track & Field Club
is a non-profit club, officially started in
2001, and has over 35 high school ath-
letes, David Charlton, well known
Carifta athlete, is the head coach. He
is assisted by coaches Rudolph Fergu-
son and Trevor Strachan,

The Star Trackers are proud to state
that in their short history they have

truction),



i OA) AN
LS CGH i( }

®
q

obtained nine athletic scholarships to
colleges or universities in the United
States. Eighty percent of the club’s
current athletes hold-a 3.0 or higher
grade point average,

For more information on the club,
Visit their website at http:/Avww.star-
trackersbahamas.com,

¢ FOR HIGHLIGHTS FROM
THE STAR TRACKERS’
RECENT TRIP TO JAMAICA -
SEE PAGE TWO

‘Choo Choo’ retains title
with seventh ro






















































\
\



PAGE 2B, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORIS



Ronaldo out
to prove
he's not
finished

m SOCCER
MILAN, Italy

Associated Press

RONALDO is deter-
mined to prove he can
still score goals.

“I'm not finished,” the
30-year-old Brazilian
striker said Friday at his
first news conference
since joining AC Milan
from Real Madrid. “I’ve
had little opportunity to
play in the last six
months, but here at»
Milan I'll have the
chance to show the
whole world that the
Ronaldo story goes on.”

The three-time FIFA
world player of the year
signed an 18-month deal

-with Milan on Tuesday,

hoping to re-ignite his
season — and career —
after limited play under
Madrid coach Fabio
Capello.

“My time with Capello
was short, ugly and sad,”
Ronaldo said, “He did-
n’t have faith in me and
he never told me why.”

He was relegated toa
part-time role after
Capello arrived in
Madrid in the summer.
Ronaldo didn’t play
until October because of
a knee injury, which lat-
er recurred to keep him
out another month. He
scored only one league
goal in seven appear-
ances, mostly as a sub-
stitute, compared with
82 goals in 120 league
games in his first four

seasons at Madrid.

“I’ve come to Milan
because it represents a
sporting challenge, the
most important of my
life,” Ronaldo said.

Ronaldo was flanked
by Milan vice president
Adriano Galliani, who
brokered the $9.7 mil-
lion transfer.

“Ronaldo’s resume is
stratospheric,” Galliani
said. “He is a phenome-
non.”

Ronaldo has won
almost ever major tro-
phy in world soccer at
least once. He’s lifted
the World Cup twice —
in 1994 and 2002 — and
is the tournament’s all-
time leading scorer with
15 goals.

“Capello told me over
lunch last Wednesday
that Ronaldo is the most
talented player he has
ever coached,” Galliani
said,

The transfer brought
Ronaldo back to the city
where he spent five
years with crosstown
rival Inter Milan
between 1997 and 2002.

“My time at Inter was
very beautiful but it
ended badly,” said
Ronaldo, who left for
Madrid after falling out

’ with then coach Hector

Cuper.

At the time, Ronal-
do’s decision upset Inter
fans because the club
had helped the forward
recover from a knee
injury that restricted
him to a handful of
appearances from 1998,

“Everyone has their
own path to take,”
Ronaldo said, “I’m in
love with soccer and
with playing soccer, All
I expect is respect.”

Milan is ninth in
Italy’s Serie A after
starting the season with
an eight-point penalty
from a match-fixing
scandal,

“My objective is to get
Milan in the top four (in
Serie A),” Ronaldo said,

‘Inter leads the league
with 57 points, 30 more
than Milan.

“ll do everything
that (Milan coach Carlo
Ancelotti) tells me to do
to reach my objective,”
Ronaldo said. “The
challenge is the most
important thing, it
always has been. ... I'll
do my talking on the
pitch.”

Theophile loses
in comeback bout

BOXING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter



WILSON ‘Kid Wonder’ Theophile was .

hoping to make his comeback a grand
one Thursday night. Puerto Rican Joseph
de los Santos, however, had other plans.

Sluggish after sitting out the past two
years with a fractured jaw, Theophile
gave it all he had, but Santos prevailed in
the end with an unanimous decision in
the co main event of the First Class Pro-
motions’ first professional show for the
year.

“TI feel it was a fair decision. I just came
on late in the fight, but he won that one,”
Theophile reflected. “I felt as thought I
was behind in the fight and so my coach
told me to throw a little more punches.”

Santos out-jabbed and counter-
punched well against Theophile for the
first two rounds before he went to work in
the third, That was when Santos caught
Theophile with a left hook that sent him
flat on his back for an eight count.

Theophile got back up on his feet and
continued fighting, but Santos went on
to win another round,

It wasn’t until the fifth that Theophile
was more the aggressor as he picked the
pace. And in the sixth, he had the fans on
their feet cheering for him as he out-.
slugged Santos.

Santos, however, regained control of
the fight at the end of the round as
Theophile turned his back at least twice
before the bell sounded,

For Theophile, it wasn't what he
expected in his return after the two-year
lay-off, And, if his performance was any
indication, he admits that he has a lot of
work to do.

“I did my best. He did his best, That's
all we could ask for,” he charged, “But
the best man won. I tip my hat off to him.
He beat me tonight,” ‘

In what was perhaps the most exciting
bout on the undercard, Damian ‘the
Blade’ Tinker was just a little too much
for Hensley ‘the Bruiser’ Strachan to han-
dle,

In their four round junior welterweight
bout, Tinker established his speed as he
used his height to get on the inside to
out-box Strachan in the first two rounds.

To his credit, Strachan made a gallant
effort in the final two rounds as he
counter-punched well, But he kept his
guard down and Tinker came back on

DUODO DEERE RSE DOPED ED EO DEP OP ORD ROPER DOP SPEREDEREF EP EDI DOOD OR

Star Trackers sp
at Jamaican m

@ TRACK AND FIELD

































THE Star Trackers Track &

Field Club returned home AARON WILMORE
eee with ats to be proud 200m — 23.05 (4th)
of. Sixteen of their athletes
competed at the 3rd Edition of THEREZE MISSICK ’
the Douglas Forrest Invitation- 400m — 1:00.81 PR (4th)
al Meet in Kingston, Jamaica DEVON CREARY
on Saturday, January 13th 200m - 23.11 (Sth )
which saw performances from ee
over 2,000 athletes from TAI DORSETT
Jamaica, Cayman Islands and 400mH — 1:09.94 (6th)
the Bahamas. ;

P’LAR DORSETT

The team was lead by Coach-
es David Charlton and Rudolph
Ferguson, along with Team
Manager Laura Pratt-Charlton,

: LAUREN CHARLTON
parents and supporters. The
team left a lasting first impres- HJ — 1.35m (9th)
sion in Jamaica as they record- NEJMI BURNSIDE
ed some spectacular perfor- 400mH — 59.90 PR
mances,
The athletes started off the (19th/35)
meet by Natalya Beneby win- REMAAL THOMPSON

ning the very first event on the
track, the Open Women’s 400m
Hurdles in a time of 1:03.20 and

they ended the meet with bang | LEEZA GLINTON
as Trevor Strachan Jr. ran away 200m — 27.65 (26th/63) —
with the 1500m in a personal :
best time of 4:19.02. res ont ee he Suhel
" h ighli r » ( 7 ° ATTN me 5 08
Pag highlight of the mcet Was 3:26.94 Place 5th (Remaal Printassia pce

the Open Men 1,600 Sprint
Medley. The team of Nathan

OTHER PERFORMANCES:

100mH -16.28 (8th)
200m - 27.22 (18th/63)

200m ~ 23.04 (24th/135)
400m - 52.25 PR (30th/120)

Thompson, Kenneth Wal-

both occasions and made him pay dearly
for it.

“My coach told me that if I had one
more week of workout, I would have
been able to take him out,” Tinker stated.
“T was trying to get in shape, but I only
had two weeks.”

Tinker, 20, said he wasn't concerned
about the blows that Strachan threw
because he knew that it would have tak-
en alot more to put him down,

One of the bouts on the undercard was
to be staged between Alpachino ‘Banger’
Allen and Sean ‘Patches’ McPhee.

But McPhee fought Ryan ‘Big Youth’
McKenzie instead and McKenzie used
his height as he stopped McPhee in the

. we

WWE WAPSo sy





Johnson (left) in

first round of their scheduled four round
light heavyweight bout.

“I'm staying in the gym, trying to devel-
op my skills,” said McKenzie, 21, who
improved to 4-0, “Anyone who steps in
my way, they have to get it. They have to
get what everybody else get.

“But I expected this to be a good fight
because I’ve been training every day,

- working with Kenny (Minus). So very

soon, I will be up there in ‘Choo Choo’
league. I want to go for the title.”
Allen, disappointed that he didn’t get
ta fight, said he had a lot of fans who
came to watch him perform and even
though he claimed he was on time for the
third bout, they Ict his opponent fight in

Arnett, Aaron Wilmore, Nejmi lace-Whitfield, Nejmi the 200m
Burnside and Dwayne Fergu- Burnside and Nathan
son, running the 400m, 200m, Arnett)
200m and 800m respectively,
won the event in 3:31.70, This OPEN WOMEN
win came much to the surpri 1,600 SPRINT MEDLEY
Prise | 4:31.43 4th (Thereze Mi

of the Jamaicans whose aunties: eek Gath Ee EO AUR
announcer had already boast- sick, Printassia Johnson,
ed, “The Bahamians not taking | Leeza Glinton and Tai
home the GOLD"! Dorsett)

The baby of the group, Print-
assia Johnson, won the 200m in — overall he was sed wi ‘

’ s pleased with the

25.14 and Kenneth Wallace- performances of all the athletes
Whitfield won the 800m in and they all gave 110 per cent.
1:55.88, surpassing the Carifta He was even more impressed
qualifying standards and also with the fact that this was the
recording his personal best. first meet for the season and
Nathan Arnett placed 2nd in can hardly wait for the rest of
the Open Men 400m Hurdles in (he season’s meets. The team
a time of 54,76, Devon Creary competes again at the 4th Star
placed 3rd in the 400m in atime performers Track Classic today.
of 51.14 (PR). Dwayne Fergu- — H¢ is also looking forward to @ RIGHT:
son was 3rd in the 800m in a taking the team back to Jamaica Remaal
time of 1:58.70, for the Gibson Relays in Feb- Thompson

Coach Charlton said that in the 400m

ruary,



the first fight.

“T don’t think it was fair to me and to
my fans,” said Allen, who was looking
forward to taking on McPhee, “A lot of
people spent a lot of money to come and
watch me fight, but they didn’t allow me '
to fight.”

However, promoter Micktelle Minus:
said Allen wasn’t on time when the World
Boxing Council’s representatives, present
to assist First Class Promotions, checked
the line-up to get the card going,

Despite not getting the opportunity to
fight, Allen said he wil get right back in
the gym to train and he will take his frus-
tration out on whoever he faces in the
next show.

DUD eeeeeenP Aree ePePePREROREEDEOER ODD DSDDOEERRSDEDEDEREGEPEODENGDEDEDSDSDED OSE EF OSES PIES ESRESESEDSHEDO SPE O USED OPER ED ELEODIVEDEDEDEDEDIDEDEDODELESEDONTI SSRI VELEREIEVEGY Nee peenenerernnerennennen eee nreene PONDS Pee OR DORSET EPR RU TONDO R REET ERS ASSRE RR eRe naeaeene na ee eee nee ean ee eH Tey eee






"s weather. Temperatures are today
highs and tonights's lows.

Shown is today

Albuquerque 44/6 23/-5 49/9 28/-2
45/7 30/-1
32/0 10/-12
27-2 10/-12

22/-5 13/-10

46/7 28/-2
36/2 17/-8
35/1 15/-9
32/0 18/-7
19/-7 5/-15
Charleston,SC 56/13 31/0
10/-12 -4/-20
20/-6 5/-15
42/5 32/0
26/-3 18/-7
12/-11 3/-16
78/25 60/15 s

Atlantic City

Ss





jaaeic ae

Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Liftle Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville -

New Orleans

New York

Oklahoma City

Orlando

Chance of a late-night

Mostly cloudy.



AccuWeather

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFee
elevation on the

| ATF8 8-6. -—§ 5415 sf
56/13 34/1
SAT 8d.
60/15 37/2
40/4 25/-3
73/22 48/8
29/1 12/-11
40/4 27/-2
82/27 65/18
-2)-18-12/-24
36/2 24/-6
51/10 39/3
- 32/0 14/-10
34/1 24/-4
66/18 46/7 c.

B13 pe



°° 73/22 6317 sh





Low: 69°







High

: «FC
Philadelphia == 34

Phoenix 66/18



Pittsburgh
Portland, OR 4718

Raleigh-Durham 46/7 ©

St. Louis * 23/-5

Salt Lake City —-28/-2.

San Antonio 49/9

SanDiego = 64/17

San Francisco 59/15
Seattle 46/7
Tallahassee 52/11

Tampa titsé~ BD

Tucson 64/17
Washington, DC 36/2

Amsterdam

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.

A couple of showers Mostly cloudy.

possible; windy.

High: 77°

Mostly cloudy, a
shower possible.

High: 75°

Rather cloudy with
spotty showers.

High: 79° © Bangkok

High: 70°



Barcelona
PR mace - pdb

75°-64° F
nsity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
gh and the low for the day.

PPR rma

70°-59° F

Yan CYuamattia as

of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine inte
Id a person feels. Temperatures reflect the hi

Yom rma

78°-63° F

| Temperature? is an index that combines the effects
human body—everything that effects how warm or co





46am. -0.2



Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday

_ Temperature

. 86° F/30° C
... 67° F/19° C
77° F/25° C
. 64° F/18° C
. 79° F/26° C
.... 65° F/18° C

3:47 p.m. -0.1









Normal high
Normal low
Last year’s high .
Last years low

Te ft



Caracas

As of 1 p.m. yesterday
Year to date
Normal year to date

AccuWeather.com

All forecasts and maps provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007

‘Dublin




SAN SALVADOR

High: 83° F/28° C
Low: 73° F/23°C





MAYAGUANA

Today
High: 85° F/29°C
72/22 - 47/8
10-12 OF 17

ATES RAGGED ISLAND

High: 84° F/29° C
Low: 70° F/21°C

Low: 74° F/23°C




25/-3 13/-10 |
ae GREAT INAGUA
85° F/29°C

Low: 74° F/23°C







INSURANCE MANAGEMEN

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS








NIARINE FORECAST - PAE eS
Today Sunday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
High Low W High Low W HASSAU Today: VAR at 6-12 Knots 0-1 Feet 5-7 Miles 76° F
FIC FIC F/C F/C Sunday: NE at 7-14 Knots 1-2 Feet 3-5 Miles 76° F








» 99/31 73/22 pe ~~ ~—« 88/31. 73/22 © ~— FREEPORT Today: NNW at 10-20 Knots 2-3 Feet 4-7 Miles 75° F
35/1 pc. 44/6 38/3 s Sunday: Nat 12-25 Knots 3-5 Feet 3-5 Miles 75°F








‘Ankara, Turkey 154-9 sn (28/2 21-6 sn ABACO Today: NNW at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 4-7 Miles 75°F
Athens 43/6 po 45/7 42/5 sh Sunday: __NNE at 12-25 Knots 3-5 Feet 3-5 Miles 75° F
‘Auckland “60/15 pe ——s« 72/22. BOIS pe



91/32 72/22 s P
wana 75a pe PV
5713 44/6 pc
5915 56/13 6

S4/1 251-3 c
45/7 36/2 pc
68/20 58/14 sh



Fe gH Cay











5IA0 30/4 s~
40/4 _ 31/0 pc



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41/5

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\

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88/31








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O15 48/8 pc Ze.
84/28 69/20 pe Ze
25/-3 10/-12 ¢
" 83/28 69/20. pe



Casablanca
Copenhagen

Frankfurt































































Halifax 30/-1 14/-10 pe 22/5 7/-13 pe Pos hed

Havana 86/30 66/18 pe BIAS c 2 aS

Helsinki 34/1 23/-5 ¢ /-4 sn

Hong Kong 6518 56/13 s A Flurries -

isamabad 79726 SIMO po BEE sow LATO eo tce Wena

Istanbul 87/2 32/0 pe [y_Â¥! Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Menges

Jerusalem 48/8 40/46 sak : ot ee

Johannesburg = 74723 59/15 pe

Kingston 89/31 76/24 pc

lima 76/24 68/20 pe

London 50/10 37/2 pe

Manila 83/28 71/21 s

Mexico City (TIT BK

Monterrey 5110 «= 44/6 +

‘Montreal GA SE

Moscow 47/-8 12/-11 sn

Munich ~~ 2S = SAT = 31/0 pe |

Nairobi a 8227 «55/12 c 7 :

NewDelhi 7925 5040s «76/24. S3t s

Oslo 34/1 = 34/1 pe 35/1 25/-3

pie SS CAS 46/f 38/3 s—

Prague 39/3 29/-1 c

Rio de Janeiro 1/27 72/22 : : iS
Riyadh 72/22 57/3 pe _ ES - SS SS . =
Rome ota sae Or you can rest easy knowing

a ees at hat you have excellent insurance ff
Sap Salis eae Se el coverage no matter which :
antiago = 2s : = pe — = =
Santo Domingo 85/29 way the wind blows.

‘Sao Paulo 1322 = =

Seoul 44/6 46/7 30/-1 s 7

‘Stockholm S72 39/3 29/-1 c obody does 1t better. a
Sydney 81/27 69 81/27 69/20 pc = =
Taipei 6890 573s 74/23 GANT S- =
Tokyo eas 49/9 39/3 s «47/8 38/3 S

en ae MANAGEMENT
Trinidad —87/80. 73/22 r 88/31 75/23 sh | (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS .

Vancoar a7 88 poo Ab | SORE : 2 :
Viera =—i(wsti(‘<«*é‘*é GIS:=BI-Z pc AOA 84M pc Fleuthera Fron

‘Warsaw: S962 O72 sn 88/0 38/0 ec BOHR

Winnipeg -12/-24 -23/-30 c -6/-21 -19/-28 ¢

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder- Sees = = SS

storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prep-precipitation, Tr-trace



Full Text
4 RY RE eg PR IEEE 9 gg tre gener eR ATI TPR RS rg FIT TU erty rane eer ORY SENSIS Sy OPS

PAGE 2, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007





RH Prince Edward pays ;
tribute to award winners

lm By PAULG
TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter

HIS Royal Highness Prince
Edward, the Earl of Wessex,
presented Gold Awards to
participants of the Governor
General’s Youth Award, and
special awards to long serving
members at Government
House yesterday.

Prince Edward congratulat-
ed and encouraged the young
recipients especially for gain-
ing their awards, and thanked
Governor General Arthur
Hanna for his support of the
Governor General’s Youth
Award (GGYA).

“The fact that you all came
here in support of these kids
means a little something extra
for these young people, and
really show the value of this
programme within the com-
munity of the Bahamas. So
thank you so very much for
that,” he said.

Prince Edward is the chair-
man of the International
Award Association, of which
the GGYA is affiliated.

While thanking the parents
and the long service awards
members, Prince Edward
reminded the audience that
the day was really in honour
of the Gold Award recipients.

They are listed as follows:
Terez Albury, Stefano Bowe,
Blaine Butler, Anaya Dean,
Santia Dean, Travis Dun-
combe, Hailey Evans, Elin-
dera Ferguson, Ashli Fox,
Esmond Johnson, Avery
Lightbourne, DeShawn
McGregor, Rayshell Minus,
Robert Moncur, Mandelia
Morris, Orson Mortimer,
Alysia Moss, Donny Nesbitt,
Teynarae Newbold, Dennise
Newton, Cassandra Nottage,
Davone Rolle, Onan Rolle,
Dontae Saunders, Jervaise
Sawyer, Deandra Smith,
Aisha Turnquest, Max Wilch-
combe, Lauren Williams, and
Danielle Sweeting- Wilson.

Long service awards for
over 20 years were presented
to Henry Curry, Constance
Miller, and Rosamund
Roberts.

_ Awards for 15 years of ser-
vice went to John Bethell, Dr
Keva Bethell, Suzanne Black,



@ HRH Prince Edward, the > Earl of Wessex and Arthur D.

eee eS ee ee ee ee

Hanna, Governor General of the Bahamas, present Avery
ehioumne with the Gold Award.

Graham Cooper, Stella Camp-
bell, Ian Fair, Lynn Glinton,
Nancy Kelly, Pericles Maillis,
Rudy Murray, Robert Nihon,
Alan Pinto, and Portia Sweet-
ing.
Awards for 10 years of ser-
vice went to William D Bir-
chall; Colin Cameron, Law-



(Photo: Ana Bianca Marin)

son ‘Clarke, Frank Crothers,
Maxwell Gibson, Elaine
Gomez, Jose Anthony
Josephs, Darlene Lewis, Vivi-
enne. Missick, William
Munnings, Alicia Newton,
James Richard, Philip Rolle,
and Jennifer Whylly.

Prince Edward attended a
fundraising dinner last night
with the governor general at
Café Martinique. A “rally pro-
gramme” is scheduled for
today at 10.30am at Govern-

ment House.

@ HRH Prince Edward,

the Earl of Wessex (right)
and Arthur D. Hanna (left),
Governor General of the
Bahamas, make their way to
the ballroom in Government
House for the awards
ceremony.

Photo: Ana Bianca
Marin)

TROPICAL
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THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007, PAGE 3 -





Woman in
hospital
after alleged

cutlass attack

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT-A
young woman is
detained in hospital
with serious stab
wounds and multiple
chops about the body
following an alleged
vicious cutlass attack.

According to reports,
LaTeisha Parker, 25, of
Erickson Drive, was
taken to Rand Memor-
ial Hospital on
Wednesday evening
with multiple lacera-
tions to the body and
stab wounds to the
neck.

Supt Basil Rahming
said police received a
report sometime
around 6.30pm from a
woman motorist who
reported that a man
inside a red car on
Grand Bahama High-
way was chopping up a
woman with a cutlass.

Two units were dis-
patched to the scene,

_east of the Chicken

Farm, where officers -
spotted a vehicle fit-
ting the description
given by the caller. On
seeing the officers, the
suspect fled into near-
by bushes, leaving his
Nissan Sentra license
no. 32086.

Officers discovered

*. the victim inside the

vehicle, bloodied and
screaming. They took
the woman to the hos-
pital for medical atien-
tion. Her condition was
described by doctors as
serious.
i‘ In the meantime, a
second unitsearched
the buskes for the-sus-
pect, but was unstc-
cessful in locating him.
Police later appre-
hended a suspect, a 30-
year-old resident of
Sunrise Subdivision at
his residence around
10pm Thursday.
According to Mr
Rahming, police were
informed that the sus-
pect allegedly lured the
woman to meet him at
the Grand Bahama

Sports Complex, where —

she was beaten and
stabbed in the neck
with a screw driver.

It was alleged that
the woman was then
dragged into the sus-
pect’s vehicle and dri-
ven onto remote Grand
Bahama Highway,
where she was chopped
with a cutlass, and
threatened with déath.

Mr Rahming said the
quick response of the
motorist and police.
saved the young wom-

‘an’s life and averted a

potential homicide.

The suspect is
expected to be formal-
ly charged in connec-
tion with the matter on
Monday.

Not guilty
plea to

drugs °

charge

A MAN accused of
having 24 pounds of
marijuana was
arraigned in Magis-
trate’s Court.

Dennis Peterson
pleaded not guilty to
the charge.

It was alleged that on
Thursday, January 25,
he was found in posses-
sion of a quantity of
marijuana which he

‘. intended to supply to

another.

Peterson was
arraigned before Magis-
trate Carolita Bethel at
court eight in Bank
Lane.

He was remanded and
a bail hearing was set
for February 5.

morief Claim that five died in two

weeks in PMH dialysis unit

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

FIVE people died over a two-
week period in the dialysis unit
of the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital last month as a result of a
bacterial infection that has not
been eliminated since it was first
detected six months earlier, it
was claimed yesterday...

In total,16 patients have died
in the unit in the six months
since the outbreak, Mr Cassius
Stuart, ‘leader of the Bahamas

' Democratic Movement has

alleged.

His comments came when he
appeared as a guest on More94
FM's "Real Talk Live", with
host Michael Pintard.

Mr Pintard said he and the
show's regular host, Jeff Lloyd,
had made their own "indepen-
dent" effort to determine the

veracity of Mr Stuart's claims. —

This resulted in the conclu-
sion that Stuart's statistics were
"accurate" and the deaths - con-
trary to claims made by Dr Not-
tage - were indeed known to
have been caused by the infec-
tion. |

They claimed to have spoken
to physicians within PMH, who
had indicated the figures are
"unacceptably high."

Mr Stuart repeated his call
made earlier in the week for the
resignation of Minister Dr
Bernard Nottage.

He alleges that the minister
could have done more to raise
public awareness of the alleged
severity of the situation. In Mr
Stuart’s opinion he had not
done so for political reasons.

Mr Stuart and a caller both
suggested that had the BDM
not brought the issue to the
media's attention, no public
statement would have been
made by Dr Nottage.

"They have a responsibility
to protect those people in their
care, and if the people are dying
in their care I believe that per-
sons need to know — and it
shouldn't have to come from a
political party who's bringing
these’ issues to light," said Mr
Stuart.

Furthermore, in his opinion
the hospital should also be held
liable for the patient's deaths.

"They knew quite well about
the deaths of these individuals.
You cannot throw it off by (as
Dr Nottage stated on Monday)
saying their immune system is
compromised and so they're
susceptible to contracting infec-
tions regularly — these persons’
lives may have been extended if
this bacteria was not present.".

Several callers to the show,
however, expressed concern
that Mr Stuart's claims were
going to incite panic in the gen-
eral public, or were mere "pro-
paganda", useful to his politi-

cal aspirations in the run-up to.

the election.
One called on the doctors

i who have provided information

to come forward personally to
the press if the claims are true.
"Why can't the doctors
instead of being anonymous,
come on the shows and give
their facts? It's a matter of
importance," she said



lm PRINCESS Margaret Hospital

Mr Pintard repeated several
times during the show that he
and Mr Lloyd had “indepen-
dently verified" Mr Stuart's
statements, adding that "by any
yardstick, these are staggering
figures."

Mr Omar. Smith, deputy
leader of the BDM, asserted
that the Government ought to
have done more to warn the
public of the dangers present in
the unit so that they can make
an "informed" choice when
seeking dialysis.

There are currently 160 peo-
ple regularly receiving treat-
ment at the PMH unit, it was
pointed out.

"If you are going to be using
a facility that is supposed to be
helping you, and it is putting
you at risk, at the very least you
should know about the
risk before you take it," he
said.

"There are other dialysis
units in the country and there
are people who can afford to
go to these places," he noted,

adding that the government

should also pay for anyone who
cannot afford to do so, if they
do not want to be treated at
PMH while the bacteria has not
been eliminated.

One caller suggested that this
scenario is one which highlights
the need for a Freedom of
Information Act.

"We need public account-
ability; people are entitled to
greater: access to information. to
give thenr’protéction," he
claimed.

"It is very, very hard to get
access to information from the
state. They will duck you, they
will not answer your calls, you
gotta go left right and centre,
East, West, North and South
and still sometimes you don't
reach them."

A caller from Garden Hills
explained that his relative had
been in hospital a number of

times suffering from the bacte-
rial infection.

"Government has not come
forward with any answers...they
come on saying there is an
infection but no one came back.
to identify what it was and what
was the solution."

He backed Mr Stuart, assert-
ing that his political affiliation
should not diminish his claims.

"Who cares who is bringing
the message? Just because he
is in a political party does that
mean he can't bring factual
information to the public?"
asked the caller.

"Too many people are dying .

in dialysis and the government
is not doing enough to rectify
the problem. They came on last
year and said there was a prob-
lem but they never solved it —
if they had solved it my relative
would not be back in there
today. Now that's factual, that's
not political."

On Monday, Dr Nottage told

The Tribune that although

there has been an infection in,

the unit since July of last year, it
has now been brought "under
better control", with the num-
ber of cases dwindling in
December and January.

He admitted deaths had
occurred amongst those infect-
ed, but claimed that it was not
certain that these had been
caused by the bacteria.

However, the source of the
outbreak is yet to be deter-
mined, he said.

A meeting was set to take
place between the minister and
representatives of the Pan
American Health Organisation
(PAHO) yesterday to arrange a
review of steps taken so far to

bring the outbreak under con- —

trol.

Attempts to contact Dr Noi-
tage or Hospital Administrator
Mrs Coralee Adderley yester-
day for comment were unsuc-
cessful.

PHA denies claims that radiology services
cancelled due to training course

lm By BRENT DEAN

THE Public Health Authority has denied claims
that any procedures have been cancelled in the
Radiology Department because of a training course
on the department’s new equipment.

In a press release the Public Health Authority

(PHA) stated:

“The Princess Margaret Hospital wishes to advise
the public that radiology services are available 24
hours daily at the Department, and at no time have
patients been denied services nor have special pro-
cedures been cancelled during the training oF the

radiology staff.”

The training course is the result of the commis-
sioning of a 16-slice CAT Scan machine. The PHA
said this is the first time that the Princess Margaret
Hospital will own and operate its own CAT Scan

machine.

“The acquisition of this new CAT Scan machine
required the renovation and expansion of the Radi-
ology Department, and brought along with it mod-
ification in staffing, with the addition of three new
radiologists all of whom have CT experience and
meet the requisite qualifications by the Medical
Council of the Bahamas. Additionally, six new radi-

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ographers were employed,” said the PHA state-

ment.

“Physicians and radiographers are presently
receiving a one week completion training course in
the use of the Philips CT machine. This comes as a

' follow-up to the two week course in CT at Medical
Technology Management Institute (MTMI) in Mil-
waukee, Wisconsin, a one week systems specialist
training within the department, as well as a week
training with a radiologist and radiographer CT spe-
cialist from Canada.

“In an effort to provide the best in imaging ser-
vice, the department continues to provide 24-hour

service daily to the public, through a team of quali-

fied physicians and radiographers.”

The statement refutes public allegations that spe-
cial procedures had been cancelled at the Radiolo-
gy Department until February 12th because all med-

ical staff in that department had been sent away on

a training course.

The source of the information had expressed con-
cern that as a result of the cancellations, patients who
needed to have procedures, will either have to go to
a private facility and pay the full cost, or, wait until
the training course has been completed, thus jeop-
ardising the health of those who cannot afford to go

to a private facility.

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CODENAME: THE CLEANERS = T [WA [WA | NA | NA TWA 11030 |
AKT oR EY



by awit
P




AGE 4, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007




The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

tyles of |

THE TRIBUNE:





+

»

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 @ a
SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972 | "

Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box
Insurance Management Building.,

N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352 :
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

a

Blair won’t exit over honours scandal

LONDON (AP) — Britain will have to
“put up with me for a bit longer,” Prime Min-
ister Tony Blair said Friday, a day after police
revealed that they questioned him a second
time in an investigation into whether political
honours such as knighthoods were traded
forcash. |

The Labour leader last year became the
first serving prime minister in British history
to be questioned in a criminal investigation —
and there is growing concern in his party
about the damaging effect it is having on his

government. But Blair said he would not let’

the inquiry drive him from office.

“I think it would be particularly wrong ...
before the inquiry has even run its course
and come to any conclusions,” Blair told
British Broadcasting Corp. radio. “So you
will have to put up with me for a bit longer.”

Blair has suffered a series of setbacks over
the years but his third term has been partic-
ularly explosive — voters angry over his han-
dling of the Iraq war cost his party a signifi-
cant share of its parliamentary seats in 2005
and pummelled the party a second time in
local elections last year. It was that, defeat
that sparked a party rebellion that ultimate-
ly forced Blair to announce he'll resign by
September.

In an address planned for today at the
Labour Party’s National Policy Forum in
London, Blair says that the cash-for-honours
scandal won’t determine how Britons vote
in the next elections.

“The fourth election will not be decided by
current events,” Blair plans to say, according
to a text of his speech released in advance. “It
will be about whether we have the dynamism,
energy, vision and, above all, clear, well
thought out policies for Britain’s future.

“The biggest danger for us electorally is
not in the end what embarrasses us but what
makes the country think that on the big chal-
lenges the country faces, we only have small

-answeIs.”

The honours scandal, however, may be
Blair’s final battle as prime minister.

“JT am not going to beg for my character in
front of anyone,” Blair told the BBC Friday.
“People can make up their mind about me,
according to what they think about me, but I
know what type of person I am. And I am not
going to get into a situation where I am plead-
ing for my integrity.”

Labour Party chairman Hazel Blears says

NOTICE



not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 3rd day of
February 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

tinue to refer to himself as Prime 4

: ; [> RO if ECTI © Ni Minister. It is as if at times he has 4

NOTICE is hereby given that JANICE JOSEPH OF #83 to remind himself that yes, believe A CONCERNED ~ HY
WINDSOR LANE OFF EAST STREET, P.O. BOX N-10461, diols Gukipens it or not, he has indeed realised CITIZEN ten
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible soy HES ° | his childhood dream of being Nassau, 7 j
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization y) 6 Broun prime minister! January 30, 2007. ot
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who ; 8 |
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should We BURGLARS 4

1








the probe is having a “corrosive effect” on
Blair’s government — and Constitutional
Affairs Secretary Harriet Harman says trust
has been eroded.

Police are investigating allegations that
honours — including seats in the House of
Lords and knighthoods — were given to indi-
viduals who loaned money to the Labour
Party or the Conservatives, the main opposi-
tion party.

Blair was first questioned last year, and
his office revealed Thursday that police inter-
viewed the prime minister for a second time,
on January 26, as a witness and not under
caution — meaning it is unlikely he is sus-
pected of committing offences.

Police said they asked that the interview be
kept secret for nearly a week. They did not
offer an explanation.

Blair has acknowledged that some sup-
porters who offered loans later were nomi-
nated for honours, but has insisted he did
nothing wrong. Those candidates had been
legitimate selections, allowed under rules to
reward supporters for their service to a polit-
ical party, Blair’s office has said.

Blair’s chief fundraiser, Lord Levy, and
Ruth Turner — Blair’s director of govern-
ment relations — were arrested and released
after being accused of perverting the course
of justice. Sir Christopher Evans, a biotech-
nology entrepreneur, and Des Smith, a gov-
ernment adviser, were also questioned.

In his BBC interview, Blair declined to
answer questions about the police inquiry
until it concludes.

“All I would say to members of the public
is don’t believe everything that is ricocheting
around the media in terms of what is sup-
posed to have happened,” he said.

Blair added that he remains completely
focused on leading the country.

Still, some wonder whether the investiga-
tion — and the possibility that insiders could
be charged — may force him to leave sooner
than planned.

The honours scandal “is not so much a
fatal issue for Blair, but it is an issue hanging
over him. It’s overshadowing his final months
in office,” said Robert Kaye, an academic
researcher at the London School of Eco-
nomics.

(This-article was written by Paisley Dodds

of the Associated Press) .


























oN o
4





















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EDITOR, The Tribune.

I WOULD be pleased if you
would allow me some of your valu-
able space to provide a commen-
tary on a very critical issue facing
our country. -

I will admit at the offset that it is
not very often that I listen or even
read the comments of Prime Min-
ister Christie since his election to
office almost five years ago. This is
because I find that he talks much
but says very little. However,
despite this there was a comment
that he made in one of the local
dailies recently about being confi-
dent that he will win the next gen-
eral election and that this election
will be a test of the leadership
styles of him and the leader of the
opposition Mr Hubert Ingraham.

I remember when our country
was at this same crossroad some
fifteen or so years ago when com-
parisons were being made again
the personality of the late Sir Lyn-
den Pindling and the newly
appointed leader of the FNM Mr
Ingraham. Comparisons were
being made between the smooth
style of Sir Lynden and the seem-
ingly harsh or unpolished style of
Mr Ingraham. We laughed at Mr
Ingraham’s pronunciation of some
words and were mesmerised at the
eloquence of Sir Lynden. “But at
the end of the day the voters made
achoice to elect Mr Ingraham and
unseat Sir Lynden because it was
determined then that being the
leader of this country required
much, much more than having a
fine polished exterior.

Today we are at the same cross-
road. As Prime Minister Christie
has stated, basically a key issue in
this election is a referendum on
the styles of leadership of the
leader of the PLP and the leader of
the FNM. Of course the election
should be about more than that as
one individual cannot run a coun-
try and therefore voters should
consider what party is putting the
BEST team forward, from which
will come members of the Cabi-
net and other key positions in this
country.
eeBut let us look at the leadership
style’of Christie v Ingraham.

‘Mr Christie has declared him-
self the best orator in the country.
I will admit that he does have the
gift of the gab. He can talk ad
infinitum, and do so with the
appropriate gesticulations and if
you did not know any better, he
could truly convince you that he
is a great speaker. But at the end of
the day after his usually long
episodes one must ask ... “what
did he say?”

And yes, Mr Christie is an excel-
lent entertainer. If it is drama and

entertainment that we want from ¢

our leader then he wins hands
down! His years as a junkanooer
have ranked him amongst the best
in terms of performatice...there is
stiff competition between him and
Vola Francis of the Saxons and
Gus Cooper of the Valley Boys.
These three individuals can give a
performance out of this world. But
should Vola and Gus be consid-

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f (Protection) Limited








LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



ered for the position of Prime Min-
ister because they could dance a
good junkanoo jig?

In anticipation of what we can
expect for the upcoming election a
Stalwart Counsellor was proud to
say that Mr Christie has a “new
move” for the election campaign.
She did not say that he had new
programmes and plans for the
country, but that he had a new
move for the campaign trail — that
even included a “jook”. I guess we
got a foretaste during the Fox Hill
Branch Meeting (rally) on the Fox
Hill Park the other night. I com-
mend PM Christie for his perfor-
mance and unreservedly give him
all 10’s. Perfect on execution and
perfect on performance. Always
dramatic...always entertaining,

But is this what we in this coun-
try want from our leader? Is this
who we would wish to send to the
United Nations and to meet with
world leaders to discuss how we
can progress and develop as a
nation? Last time I checked great
leaders of the more developed or
developing nations do not win sup-
port with the junkanoo shuffle,
square dancing, the waltz, calyp-
so, soca or reggae dancing or any
other form of gyration. Last time I
checked serious world leaders sat
down to discuss issues. Perhaps
this is why the PM has allowed
Minister Fred Mitchell to repre-
sent our country at most major
meetings.

PM Christie is no doubt an
effective leader... in the confines of
a very narrow context. I believe
he is an effective leader of his polit-
ical party. They seem to be more
about entertainment and good
times and not concerned much
about substance. He no doubt will
make an excellent leader of a
junkanoo group as he could not
only talk the talk but he could also
walk the walk. He would make an
excellent front line or even a free
dancer!

Our nation is facing some seri-
ous challenges and it is important
that strong leadership is required.
We need more than a dream-
er...Wwe need an executor. We need
someone who has a vision and a
focus to ensure that that vision is
executed. We need someone who
can focus a team of individuals to
achieve a common goal for the
benefit of our country, not for the
benefit of any group of individuals.
We need a leader who can stand
up on his own two feet and repre-
sent this country and clearly artic-
ulate a vision for us. We need a
leader who can stand on his own
and get out of the shadows of Sir
Lynden or the old guard PLP. If
this is the “new” PLP, how is it
that Mr Christie has had to sur-
round hiriself with so many of the
personalities from the “old” PLP?

We need aPrime Minister who
is not still so awestruck with the
position of being prime minister
almost five years since assuming
that position that he has to con-

ASBA
iam (BAHAMIAN)
Born 2 Rule!!

Blessed Love 2 Zion my son





7
We need a prime minister who
can give focused direction to this,
country. One who can lead a cabi-
net of ministers and exercise some
influence and control over themr
We cannot have an indecisive,
prime minister who allows his min-
isters to continually dig ditches for
themselves in pursuit of their owt
personal goals and aspirations. Wes
need a prime minister who will
direct a team for the good of the
country and not for their own pert:
sonal enrichment. "»
One of the critical traits of being
a leader is being decisive. A leader
must be able to make decisions
that are consistent. A leader can-
not be indecisive and unsure of his ~
or her vision. I have heard many,-
stories of where PM Christie has
had to recant on decisions he may ,
have made because the decisions
he made were not consistent with ~
what his mentors or puppeteers
would have given. a
PM Christie has consistently:
shown that he is indecisive. Yes
there is a need for considered and !
consultative decision-making, but ,
not every decision warrants a com-,,
mission or select group to consider, ,
it. And even if you do send things
out for consideration there comes ~
a time when some decision must be "
made. 40
In 1992 when the FNM govern-
ment was elected the government -
it was clear what Hubert Ingra-»
ham and his government intended,”
to do. Everything was clearly spelt ,
out in their Manifesto 1992 and he ;,
consistently referred to the mani; .
festo as the benchmark from which .
to be judged. ‘
This was repeated in 1997 and
again in 2002. It was possible to

see the direction that this country".

was being taken and all and sundry +, °

were able to comment and to crit-
icise if they wished. a)
The PLP published “Our Plan”, °
for the 2002 election. It was obvi-
ously just a public relations exer- i
cise as it was clear that it was nev-"s
er intended to be the guidebook *
for a PLP government. Only in
recent times have I heard the PM
and some of his colleagues refer, ¢
to'this document...it’s election**
time again folks! “ey
Mr Ingraham proved during his, °.
almost ten years in office as Primév¢:
Minister that he can be trustedty:
decisive, that he is focused and that,*,
he and his team govern for the.’
benefit of ALL Bahamians. he
His focus was not on a select*e
group of his bagmen, or for his*«
party supporters, but he governede-,
in a manner that all Bahamianss#,)
whether PLP or FNM coula bene)
fit. \ =
In fact he was severely critiased $
by his own party for not doing
enough for the FNMs. His was @
vision and style for all persons irre-,
spective of political persuasion. He
restored the good name of this’
country and it was because of his!
style of leadership that serious
investors, not those who were pre+
pared to pay the 10 percent under
the table for a deal, were attracted"
to this country. C
This choice is clear! If this elec~
tion is truly to be a referendum oni
leadership...then enjoy your retire-*
ment Mr Christie. f

ae

ie te a

_ eee
© In brief

Date for
international |
dog show

THE 26th international
dog show and obedience
trials, organised by the :
Bahamas Kennel Club, will ;
be held at the Botanical
Gardens, Nassau, on
March 17 and 18.

Man sentenced
to two anda
half years after
guilty plea to
drugs charge

A MAN has been
sentenced to two and
a‘half years in jail
after pleading guilty
to a marijuana posses-
sion charge.

‘Craig Higgs, 41,
appeared before Mag-

istrate Carolita Bethel x

at Court Eight, Bank
Lane, on Thursday —
along with several
others who were sub-
sequently acquitted
“on the drug charge
after Higgs’ plea of
guilty.

Court dockets stated
that on Tuesday, Jan-
uary 30, Higgs was
found in possession of
a‘quantity of marijua-
na, which authorities
believed he intended
td supply to another.

According to prose-
cutors, he was found
- in possession of 20

‘-. pounds of marijuana.

The drug was
reportedly found at
Higgs’ Soldier Road
residence. Higgs was
jailed and fined
$5,000.

1

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TV 13 SCHEDULE

' SATURDAY
FEBRUARY 3RD
12:30 Bullwinke & Friends

1:00 King Leonardo
1:30 © The Fun Farm


































2:30 411

3:00 Matinee: Legend of The
- Ruby Silver

4:30 Sports Desk

5:00 Cricket World

5:30 — Gillette World Sports
6:00 In This Corner

6:30 Sports Lifestyle

7:00 The Bahamas Tonight

7:30 Native Show

8:00
9:00

Tropical Beat
11th Annual Cacique Awards
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
[11:30 Hustle

42:30 Comm. Pg. 1540AM

ST

SUNDAY
FEBRUARY 4TH

[
6:30am Community Pg. 1540AM

8:30 The Covenant Hour
9:00 E.M.P.A.C.T.
9:30 The Voice That Makes
’ The Difference
10:00 Effective Living
10:30 This Is The Life
44:00 Zion Baptist Church
4:00 Gillette World Sports
4:30 - Sports Desk
2:00 — Sports Lifestyles
2:30 Agape Full Gospel Baptist
©" Church
3:00 — St. John’s Jubilee
' Cathedral
3:30 - Ernest Angley Ministries
4:30 Temple Fellowship Ministries
International
5:00 — Walking In Victory
6:00 The Christian Tabernacle
© Church
6:30 One Cubed
7:00 The Bahamas Tonight
7:30 Kemp Road Ministries
8:00 Calvary Deliverance Church
8:30 Turning Point
‘| 9:00 - Movie: Once Upon A Time... }
When We Were Colored
11:00 Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Bobby Jones Presents

12:30 Community Pg. 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
right to make last minute

programme changes!

i mm By ALEXANDRIO

MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE medical files of the vic-
tims from the Sea Hauler
tragedy were in fact missing, a
source has told The Tribune.

This new revelation comes
on the heels of Dr. Bernard
Nottage’s on-air announce-
ment that the files were never
missing.

Yesterday, a source told The
Tribune that a team of Public
Hospital Authority (PHA)
employees, who had been
assigned to locate the missing
files, had telephoned one of
the daily newspapers to inquire
about the actual date of the

‘ accident. ,

The source claimed PHA
had problems with “tracking
down” the files and it needed
the exact date of the accident
to find them.

On Wednesday, victims of
the sea tragedy accused Health
Minister Dr Nottage of being
“out of the loop” on the issue.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007, PAGE 5

Claim that Sea Hauler victims’

medical files were missing

Allegation follows Health Minister’s
announcement that they were never lost

Mother-of-four, Sophia
Antonio, said all the victims
were deeply upset by Dr. Not-
tage’s statements.

She said: “Now Dr. Nottage
has said these files were never
lost. He has basically accused
us of lying, but we are tired of
being lied to and pushed
around.”

Lincoln Bain, spokesperson
for the Sea Hauler protest
group, also refuted Minister
Nottage’s claims. —

He claimed it was Transport

_ and Aviation Minister Glenys

Hanna Martin who first
informed him that only two
files of the victims had been
found.

Mr. Bain suggested that
there was a break-down of
communication between the
two ministers.

New AUTEC commantler
visits govt officials

THE new commander of the Atlantic Undersea Testing
and Evaluation Centre (AUTEC) located.on Andros Island,
United States Navy Lieutenant Commander Jeffrey Pafford, vis-
ited Nassau, January 31, to pay courtesy calls on Deputy Prime
Minister Cynthia Pratt, Foreign Minister Fred Mitchell and
Energy and Environment Minister Dr. Marcus Bethel.

The discussions continued AUTEC's continuing dialogue
with government regarding AUTEC’s activities, community
engagement in Andros, efforts to expand employment oppor-
tunities for Bahamians, and environmental protection initiatives.

Lt Commander Pafford updated the ministers on AUTEC's
Coral Reef Protection Programme and the marine mammal
research programmes, part of nearly $10,000,000 the Navy
spends each year on such programmes. Lt. Commander Pafford
conveyed his appreciation for the dedicated service of the
nearly 200 Bahamian employees at AUTEC and outlined the
base's efforts to expand its Bahamian workforce and offer new

- opportunities for career growth.

In response to a request from the Deputy Prime Minister, Lt.
Commander Pafford agreed to open AUTEC to tours for
Andros schools and to explore opportunities for summer intern-
ships among local youth as part of the base's community activ-

ities.

This week's meetings followed a series of four outreach
activities organized by AUTEC and the United States Embassy
last year to raise public awareness about AUTEC'’s operations
and to open the facilities to the media and local residents.
Since those meetings, AUTEC has opened its base to a local
farmers market, organizes softball games, and continues to
work to be a good friend and neighbour to the people of

Andros.

AUTEC remains open to requests for facility tours and
community service opportunities on Andros.

@ THE photo shows, from left, Deputy Chief of
Mission Dr Brent Hardt, DPM Pratt,
AUTEC Lieutenant Commander Pafford

BEWU may

The source, who spoke on
the condition of anonymity,
said someone may have “inno-
cently” misplaced the medical
files or they were “deliberate-
ly” taken.

After the accident; the gov-
ernment appointed a wreck
commissioner to carry out a
“diligent and formal investiga-
tion” into the accident.

Investigation

The commissioner was man-
dated to carry out an investi-
gation into the “circumstances
surrounding” the collision of
the shipping vessels, the col-
lapse of an hydraulic crane
used for lifting freight on and
off the Sea Hauler, and the
deaths of Brunell Smith-Ellis,
40, Brenda Smith Leslie, 29,

travelling
‘Hauler.

Livingston Seymour, 38, and
Lynden Riley, 14.

‘The commissioner was also
to investigate the circum-
stances surrounding the
injuries sustained by about 25
persons and the possible
disappearance of passengers
on the Sea

The 2005 Wreck Commis-

sioner’s Report reads: “On the’

2nd of August 2003..... The
motor vessel Sea Hauler, a
mail boat, and the motor vessel
United Star collided with fatal
consequences; four deaths,
twenty-five injuries, grief
stricken families and
friends and strong public con-
cerns.”

Some commentators believe
The Sea-Hauler issue is threat-
ening to become a major pre-

«

election embarrassment for the
government.

In particular, the issue is
likely to be a “thorn” in the
side of Health Minister Not-
tage, because he is the govern-
ment’s number one proponent
of the proposed National
Health Insurance plan, and
Transport Minister Martin,
because she has recently come
under heavy fire for numerous
labour issues and a failing
radar system at Sir Lynden
Pindling International Airport.

According to the source, the
missing medical files repre-.
sents the “degree of disorga-
nization” of the health-care
sector in the country.

The Tribune attempted to
contact the. Public Hospital
Authority, but calls were not
returned up to press time.



ake industrial action

if grievances not addressed by BEC

THE Bahamas Electrical
Workers Union may take indus-
trial action if certain grievances
are not addressed by BEC’s
management, union president
Dennis Williams said at a press
conference at Worker’s House
yesterday.

“The members of the BEWU
will not be intimidated, vic-
timised and treated in a dis-
criminatory manner without
retaliation. We have sat at the
table in good faith for a very
long time and now we believe
that it is time for action,” a press
statement by BEWU President
Dennis Williams stated yester-
day.

In the press statement, Mr
Williams claimed; “The union
has attempted to resolve these
issues with the government and
management but it is apparent
that BEC is hell bent on violat-
ing the Code of Industrial Rela-
tions Practice by not negotiating
in good faith.” The issues
referred to include, the 40-hour
work week, shift worker’s meal
breaks and Clifton finishing
time.

In the release, Mr Williams
claimed that the past few years
in BEC have been “tumul-
tuous.” Mr Williams accused
BEC’s top level management
of “tyranny” and “unethical

behaviour.”

“Lack of respect, indecisive-
ness and confusion are the
order of the day,” the release
stated. The BEWU President
called on the government to
step in and compel BEC’s man-
agement to negotiate in good
faith.

Demand

.“We demand that the gov-
ernment and Minister of
Labour compel the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation to nego-
tiate with logic and reason. The
union will not sit idly by if the
government of the Bahamas
does not cause BEC’s manage-
ment to operate in good faith.

“Every person in this country
has a lunch break and the top
level management of BEC take
a minimum of an hour not
including, of course, the time
they take to pick up their chil-
dren. Do you think they should
afford the same right to shift
workers? There are employees
in BEC who top level manage-
ment refuses to allow a lunch
break. This is unconstitutional
and not in conformity to the
Employment Act and Industri-
al Agreement,” the release stat-
ed.

Mr Williams also claimed
that the union has spent “count-
less hours” working to have
adjustments made to the Pen-
sion Plan with the Bahamas
Electrical Utility Managerial
Union (BEUMU) which was
approved by BEC’s board in
mid-2006.

“To this date BEC’s manage-
ment has not executed the nec-
essary actions to benefit the
members of our union. We call
on the government and the
Board of BEC to force man-
agement to execute the

approved adjustment to the -

pension plan.”

“There may have to be some
form of industrial action
because we have spent months

- trying to resolve issues and

BEC is not negotiating in good
faith,” Mr Williams told The
Tribune. Mr Williams did not
specify what kind of industrial
action might occur or when any
such action would take place.

Message

The Tribune left a message
for BEC’s General Manager
Kevin Basden seeking some
comment on the situation and
tried to reach him up to press
time yesterday but without suc-
cess.

In the past several months
the management of BEC and
the Bahamas Electrical Work-
ers Union have been engaged
in a dispute over numerous
industrial issues.

The union has called repeat-
edly for the government to
step in and help solve these dis-
putes.

Last August the industrial
unrest at BEC reached a high
point when 200 workers refused
to return to work because of
unresolved issues between the
union and BEC’s management.
That dispute had initially arisen
after government reduced the
working hours from 44 per
week to 40. T

he union felt its members
were owed money because their
hours of work were not reduced
at the same time that other gov-
ernment corporations were
reduced.

The matter was forwarded to
the Industrial Tribunal.

CABINET MAKERS/ INSTALLERS

_ NEEDED

Wanted for new state of the art factory.

Must have chop saw, circular saw, drill, hand tools & experience.
Secure job with good pay and benefits for the right person.

Call: 394-4151
Fax: 394-4159


NX

THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007, PAGE 7



OL 8 a ee

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
_ Tribune Freeport
Reporter

we ae

FNM Leader Hubert

ENM leader t

Grand Bahama Women’s
Association 8am prayer
breakfast at Church the
King Parish Hall.
Association President

near the women of the par-
ty want to give praise to
God as we seek His guid-
ance over our party and
Bahamians everywhere

LOCAL NEWS

0 attend women’s
association prayer breakfast

Hubert

Ms Ferguson said that
women in the party on
Grand Bahama are very
excited about the event.

“We are privileged to

Ingraham is in Freeport
today attending the FNM

Stephanie Ferguson said
that “as the election draws _ son.

”

during this election sea-

have the Leader of the Free
National Movement,

Upgraded skills accompany Bimini’s
increasing room numbers

BIMINI artisans are upgrading their
manufacturing skills in order to position
themselves to take advantage of increas-
ing visitor numbers to the island.

The Ministry of Tourism’s “Authenti-
cally Bahamian” unit held a three-day
training workshop for artisans of Bimini
and other islands this week. The group
was instructed on advanced tools and
methods of jewellery making.

The goal of the workshop, said organ-
isers, was to ensure that the jewellery-
making skills of the artisans were at the
highest possible level in order to ensure
the satisfaction of buyers. This would
result in more sales for the artisans, they
said.
“We want to be suppliers to the
islands,” said Rowena Rolle, general
manager of the Authentically Bahamian
unit. “We want to be supplying most of
the souvenir shops around here with all
they need.”

Ms Rolle said artisans can experience
record numbers in sales and income now
that the room inventory in Bimini is
increasing.

Apart from souvenir stores, Bimini will
soon have a new craft centre to show-
case the work of local producers.

Antoinette Stuart, acting manager of

the Bimini Tourist Office, said the new

craft centre is intended to showcase more
than craft work.

Through the centre, visitors will get a
better idea of a broad range of Bahamian
culture. The space, which is designed for
15, artisans, will feature traditional straw

at 3

@ WORKSHOP instructor Marthe Harwell is pictured working with Bahamian arti-







Ingraham, to
address our members,” she
said.

FNM Deputy Leader
Brent Symonette, Party
Chairman Desmond Ban-
nister, as well as National
Association president Ms
Caron Shepherd, and mem-
bers of the FNM Women’s
Association are expected to
travel from Nassau for the
Freeport event.

FNM candidates for
Grand Bahama are also
expected to attend.

Association vice presi-
dent Dionne Britton said
they are pleased to have a
woman candidate - Mrs
Verna Grant for Eight Mile
Rock - to put forward to
the Grand Bahama com-
munity. .

“Our Leader has
always shown confidence
in the women of our party
and has always done
his best to protect our
rights and most important-
ly, the rights of our chil-
dren in the Bahamas,” she
said.



@ FNM leader
Hubert Ingraham

OPEN HOUSE
LUXURY OCEAN
FRONT CONDOS

Private Marina

sans during the Authentically Bahamian Hands-On Jewellery Workshop.

1 to 6 bedroom from $349,000 +
The Porches @ Coral Harbor
RET MEC Mmmm TIC Ag CUED orem 1)

work as well as jewellery and other fine
examples of Bahamian work, she said.
“We have now launched into the areas
where we have more diversified prod-
ucts,” Ms Stuart said. .
The new cultural centre is. scheduled

to be completed in March.

In addition to Bimini residents, arti-
sans at the workshop also came from
Abaco, Andros, the Berry Islands, New
Providence, Harbour Island and Grand
Bahama.

VG

CANNOT
BEAT OUR
PRICES NOT
EVEN IN
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Jeo QM Pell cs

For More Information Call: 424-8366

By Appointment Only



EVERYBODY

KNOWS WE
HAVE THE


PAGE 8, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



eee EP els oc
DPM calls for continued collaboration

in the fight against criminality

_ THE “criminal element”
across the Caribbean is tak-
ing advantage of technology
to improve its operations on a
daily basis, Deputy Prime
Minister Cynthia Pratt
warned. ;

She said that criminals,
including drug traffickers, are
working “collectively and
cohesively” to advance their
enterprises.

Mrs Pratt, who is also the
minister of national security,
said the strength of the
region’s drug control initia-
tives therefore depends on co-
operation.

. We must fight collective-
ly. We cannot fight individu-
ally (because) we are no
match as individuals,” Mrs
Pratt said. “But collectively,
wé certainly step by step, will
be‘ able to destroy those who
aim to destroy our families,
’ the fabric of our societies,
which is our families and our
universe.

“We owe it to our children;
we owe it to the generations to
come to do what we can in
order to make the world a
safer place,” she said.

Commission (CICAD) Work-

shop, on Wednesday, Mrs.

Pratt told participants from 11

countries cannot, will not and
must not “sit by” and allow
their societies to be overtaken

“Addressing an Inter-Amer-

i¢an Drug Abuse Control by the scourge of illegal drugs

member states that regional

J Ena

FIDELITY BANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

A MEMBER OF THE FIDELITY GROUP OF COMPANIES








































invites qualified applicants for the following position:

| MANAGER -
Private Banking & Wealth Management Services

The applicant must have the following minimum qualifications:

PROFILE:

* Bachelors Degree in Finance

* STEP Qualification... .. Sie oes

* 10 years experience in advising clients on fiduciary services and developing
appropriate legal structures

+ Superior organization, communication, interpersonal and computer skills

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:
* Client Relationship Management
* Investment of client funds
. * Monthly management reports
* Quarterly reports to clients
* Business development and marketing activities
* Account opening formalities
-¢ Invoicing & booking fees
Estate Planning .
¢ Administration of Trusts
* Production of trust deeds, letter of wishes & testamentary trusts
+ Training, management and coaching of staff

Send resume no later than February 7th, 2007 to:

The Human Resource Director
Fidelity » 51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853 » Nassau, Bahamas
f: 326.3000
e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com ‘

MANAGER — PRIVATE BANKING & WEALTH MANAGEMENT SERVICES



Pricing Information As Of:
Friday, 2 February 2007



Securit y

Abaco Markets 0.76
10.25 Bahamas Property Fund 11.30
6.90 Bank of Bahamas 8.03
0.70 Benchmark 0.80
1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.85
1.12 Fidelity Bank 1.28
9.00 Cable Bahamas 10.00
1.64 Colina Holdings 2.00
9.05 Commonwealth Bank 13.20
4.22 Consolidated Water BDRs 5.21
2.40 Doctor's Hospital 2.44
5.54 Famguard 5.80
10.70 Finco 12.30
10.90 FirstCaribbean 14.50
10.00 Focol 16.21
0.50 Freeport Concrete 0.50
7.10 ICD Utilities : 7.10

J. S. Johnson
Premier Real Estate





12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

: 28.00 ABDAB 41.00
14.60 14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 14.60
0.60 0.35 RND Holdings



Colina Money Market Fund 1.326132"
2.6662 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.9728***
2.3220 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.500211**

1.217450****

wie

Colina Bond Fund
idelity Prime |







5 pa UREA RCT A sarap RUE

MS ECFA
YIELD - ‘ast 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

MARKET TERMS.
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks s

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume *

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change -.Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV § - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings



AO TRADE CALC




































and criminality. -

She noted that limited
resources is another reason
why nations in the region
should continue to collaborate
in the war on drugs and crim-
inality.

Mrs Pratt pointed out that
the Bahamas, for example, is
laid out over 100,000 square
miles of water, and made up
of 700 islands with a Defence
Force “of about 1,000'men.”

“Certainly, 100,000 square
miles of water is a lot to patrol
on a daily basis and so you can
see that we need help. And
many of our sister countries
face some of the same chal-
lenges.”

She said collaborative ini-
tiatives such as the CICAD
workshops allow countries to
strengthen each other’s efforts
in the war on drug trafficking
and criminal activity.

“We all have the same prob-
lems, we all have challenges
in trying to reduce the pro-
duction, trafficking and use
and abuse of drugs within our
region and so we definitely
must continue to fight.”

Mrs Pratt praised CICAD
for “the excellent work they
have done” within the region.

The organisation has pro-
vided both financial and tech-
nical assistance to all of its
member states while creating
expert groups on various
aspects of the drug trade
(money laundering, diversion
of chemicals and pharmaceu-
ticals, firearms and demand

reduction, etc); developed.

model regulations in the area
of drug control; provided
funding to conduct surveys on
the prevalence of drugs and
established the Multilateral
Evaluation Mechanism
(MEM) to review the anti-
drug efforts of each member
state, identifying any weak-
nesses.

CICAD was established in

—

crAK












1.320'
0.000



‘07
Yield %

fo

ea A

* = 26 January 2007

** .31 December 2006

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

*** - 31 December 2006

**** . 31 December 2006



1986 by the General Assembly
of the Organisation of Amer-
ican States (OAS) as the
Western Hemisphere’s policy
forum on all aspects of the
drug problem. .

‘Its core mission is to
strengthen the human and

institutional capabilities and

harness the collective energy
of its member states to reduce
the production, trafficking and
use and abuse of drugs in the
Americas.

The mission is carried out
through the fostering of mul-

tilateral co-operation on drug
issues; strengthening capacity
in national drug commissions
and promoting drug-related
research, information sharing .
and specialised training and
technical assistance.

“Clearly, we in the
Caribbean and in this hemi-
sphere have benefited from
the work of CICAD and we
expect that their commitment
will continue to be manifested
in tangible and meaningful
contributions,” Mrs Pratt
said.

~_Asylum-seeking Cuban
doctors mired in legal limbo

m BOGOTA, Colombia

AT LEAST 38 Cuban doctors who defected from a mission in
Venezuela have been stranded for months in Colombia, where they have
been refused refugee status as they await word on possible asylum in the
United States, according to a relief organization.

The doctors are stranded despite a shift in U.S. policy, announced in
August; that Cuban medical personnel working abroad would be
allowed into the United States once routine background checks were
made, according to Associated Press.

But most of the defecting doctors who reached Colombia have been

waiting as long as six months for a response, according to an advocacy
group in Miami and several doctors who spoke to The Associated
Press. At least two have been rejected by U.S. officials.

Physician Jorge Toledo, 39, and his ophthalmologist wife Leticia
Viamonte were notified on Dec. 27 that their request to enter the
United States under the Cuban Medical Professional Parole program
was denied.

The AP obtained a copy of the letter on the decision — which can no
be appealed — that was signed by Barbara Strack, chief of the refugee
affairs division at the Department of Homeland Security.

A spokesman for the U.S. Embassy in Bogota said he could not
comment on specific asylum cases. And Colombia's Foreign Ministry did

‘ not return repeated phone calls and e-mails seeking comment about the

Cubans' legal status.

Joanna Gonzalez, a Homeland Security spokeswoman in Washington,
would also not comment on the Cuban doctors marooned in Colombia,
but she said that any applicants under the program "must pass a back-
ground check" like any others wanting to enter the United States.

Julio Cesar Alfonso, president of the Miami-based relief organization
Solidarity Without Borders, said his three-year-old organization has pro-
vided economic and legal assistance to 38 Cuban doctors trying to
leave Colombia. He estimates the overall number of defected doctors
here could exceed 100. *

"There's no explanation for the delay — these applications should've
taken a maximum two or three months," Said Alfonso, a Cuban-trained
physician who himself immigrated to the United States seven years ago.

Cuban officials last year said they had 31,000 doctors serving in
humanitarian missions in 68 countries around the world — a major
point of pride for the communist nation.

More than 20,000 are on loan to Venezuela and another 1,700 are
based in Bolivia, whose leftist President Evo Morales is a frequent
visitor to Havana. .

Prior to the policy shift, which occurred two weeks after ailing Cuban
leader Fidel Castro handed power to his brother Raul, U.S. officials con-
sidered the doctors to be residents of the country where they defected
— which meant they were often expected to stay there. :

More than 500 doctors are believed to have fled the two missions in
recent years, most from Venezuela, Alfonso said.

Like Toledo and Viamonte, who live in a tiny apartment where
even the plates and dish towels are on loan, the majority of asylum-seek-
ing Cuban doctors are living in precarious tenements because they are
unable to work in Colombia without refugee status.

The couple said they applied for refugee status at the U.S. Embassy
on Aug. 11, the same day the new program was announced in Wash-
ington. Only one of eight other doctors who applied the same day has
so far been granted entry to the U.S., they said.

Toledo and Viamonte said they sneaked into Colombia in December
2005, switching taxis five times while driving from town to town and slip-
ping across the border from Venezuela at night.

A friend later smuggled out of Cuba their university diplomas and oth-
er government records accrediting them as doctors.

Toledo and Viamonte were assigned to Venezuela in mid-2003 as part
of the Miracle Mission in which Cuba and Venezuela have provided free
eye surgery to more than 375,000 poor Latin Americans.

The couple said they were forced to work seven days a week for lit-
tle pay in the countryside near Caracas, and their relations with
Venezuelans were tightly controlled. :

"We couldn't call our families or go out after 5 p.m. The Venezuelan
national guard and Cuban authorities watched our every move," Via-
monte said. "We never planned on abandoning our duty, but we got
tired of being treated like slaves."

The couple planned their escape over a year, even keeping their
plans secret from their 12-year old son, who lives with Viamonte's
parents, when they returned to Cuba for a vacation in July 2005.

Alfonso said Colombia's government — Washington's closest ally in
Latin America — has so far only given the Cuban doctors a pass of
safe-conduct that is renewable every three months.

BKG/410.03

ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE BAHAMAS
GOVERNMENT TREASURY BILLS

Sealed tenders for B$47,369,000.00 of 91-Day Treasury
will be received by the banking manager, The Central
Bank of The Bahamas, Frederick Street, Nassau up to
3:00 p.m on Tuesday, February 6, 2007. Successful
tenderers, who will be advised should take up their
bills against payment on Thursday, February 8, 2007.
These bills will be in minimum multiples of B$100.00,

Tenders are to be on special forms obtainable from the
Central Bank of The Bahamas or commercial banks.

Tenders must state the net price percent (in multiples of one
cent) and should be marked “Tender”. The Central Bank of
the Bahamas reserves the right to reject any or all tenders,

Vent
warden nes Fovnoennene


THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007, PAGE 9

Se ct a
Sunland Baptist
Academy students
make courtesy call
on Governor General

STUDENTS of Sunland Baptist Academy, a teacher, parents
and guardians made a courtesy call on Governor General
Arthur Hanna at Government House on Wednesday.

(BIS photo: Raymond A Bethel)



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CLAUDIA LORISTON OF
MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS is applying to

_the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 27th day of January, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE.

NOTICE is hereby given that JEAN SIMON OF

MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS is applying to-
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for

registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and

that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written

and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight

days from the 27th day of January, 2007 to the Minister

responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,

.Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LINDA LOUIS-PIERRE.
OF PEACH STREET, #P.0. BOX CR-54802, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization,
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 3rd day of
February 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



\
{ if

FIDELITY

invites applications for the position of
MANAGER, CARD OPERATIONS

PROFILE:

+ 7+ years in the financial services industry with 5+ years in the bank card

and/or electronic banking services and card operations management
RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

Establish operating policies. procedures & controls
responsibile for daily management of card product operations and electronic
banking delivery systems

Work with internal departments, external vendors and card
associations to assure cardholder services and compliance

Output and delivery of statements. plastics, letters and supporting
I'l infrastructure

Support the development of new card and electronic banking
products and services

Team with Marketing to execute product and sales plans,
marketing strategies, customer loyalty programme

Oversee payments and application processing, maintenance of
databases, cards support training, account posting and reconciliation
Resolve cardholder disputes and process chargebacks

Administer fraud and loss prevention programmes

Participate in budgeting process

Monitor service levels and report on performance

CRITICAL COMPETENCIES:

Operations /financial focus with technical background

Demonstrated project management experience

Strong communication (verbal and written), organizational. and
supervisory skills

Strong demonstrated knowledge in banking regulation and operational risk
management

Excellent interpersonal skills. Ability to effectively interact with all levels

of management and employees

The person will report directly to the Executive Vice President and CFO
Competitive compensation package will include salary, benefits and bonuses.
Send resume no later than February 16th, 2007 to:

The Director Human Resources
= ) FIDELITY |
51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853

Nassau
Fax 326.3000

e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com












MONDAY



S HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: New Providence
Community Centre: Mondays - 6pm to 7pm. The
Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support
‘group meets the first Monday of each month at
6:30pm at New Providence Community Centre,
Blake Road. Dinner is provided and free blood
sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol testing is
available. For more info call 702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third
Monday of every month at 6pm @ Doctors Hospi-
tal conference room.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colo-
nial Hilton Monday's at 7pm ® Club 612315 meets
Monday 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable
Beach ® Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial
Hilton Mondays at 7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas’ Pan-Hellenic Council
(NPHC) meets every third Monday of the month in
the Board Room of the British Colonial Hilton
Hotel, Bay St.



LEE TUESDAY

B ART EXHIBITION
ART IS FOR LOVERS
Roses are Red

Violets are Blue

Grand Bahama Artists
Have a Valentine for you!

The Grand Bahama Artists Association (GBAA) is
giving all lovers on Grand Bahama Island an oppor-
tunity to show their sweetheart the real depth of
their love.

We all know that art in all its forms speaks to the
soul and exciting art is what you will find Tuesday,
February 8 from 7pm-10pm at the GBAA’s Valen-
tine Art Exhibition, Freeport Art Centre. Well
known and emerging artists of Grand Bahama’s
artistic community are exhibiting great creations
that will express your feelings to that special some-
one in your life.

Many artists exhibiting will be in attendance. They
will assist you in choosing just the right piece that
will delight your loved one! It is important to note
that one does not need to spend a lot of money for
an original art piece. The GBAA’s Valentine Art
Exhibition has a wide selection of beautiful art
pieces in all price ranges. Private viewing with the
artists can be arranged by calling 351.4603 or at
gbaa@batelnet.bs.

As February is the month for lovers the Valentine
Art Exhibition continues all month at the Freeport
Art Centre, Monday to Friday 9am to 5pm and
Saturday 9am to 12pm.

B HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: The Nassau
Group, Rosetta Street: Tuesday 6pm to 7pm /
8:30pm to 9:30pm. 3

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at
5:30pm on the second Tuesday of each month at
their Headquarters at East Terrace, Centreville.
Call 323.4482 for more info.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Tuesdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes
location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval
is required. Call 364.8423 to register for more info.

@ CIVIC CLUBS .

The Kiwanis Club of New Providence meets every
Tuesday at 7:30pm at the Holy Cross Community
Centre; Highbury Park. ;

The Luncheon Pilot Club of Nassau meets every
third Tuesday at SuperClubs Breezes, Cable Beach
at 12:30pm.

We invite all community minded persons to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7:30pm @
C C Sweeting Senior School's Dining Room, Col-
lege Avenue off Moss Road. ¢ Club Cousteau 7343
meets Tuesdays at 7:30pm in the Chickcharney
Hotel, Fresh Creek, Central Andros * Club 7178
meets each Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer Society
of the Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Eta Psi Omega chap-
ter meets every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ the

| Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort,







"The brewery of The Bahamas"

ALAA RE ELOMAAACOAARAMLLOSRONAEAROALAE SAAD MARLAASAMRLEMAEE RYERSS LELE EERE LIANE EE HE
HENNE en

PAGE 10, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007





Cable Beach * Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets
every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ Atlantic House,
IBM Office, 4th floor meeting room ¢ Alpha Phi
Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday, 6:30pm
at the British Colonial Hilton. Please call
502.4842/377.4589 for more info.

The Downtown Pilot Club of Nassau meets every
third Tuesday of the month at 6pm at the J P Whit-
ney Building, First Terrace, Collins Avenue.

The Rotary Club of Nassau meets every Tuesday at
Luciano's of Chicago on East Bay Street. Fellow-
ship starts at 12:30pm with the meeting held from
lpm-2pm.

@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar
every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free appetizers and
numerous drink specials

WEDNESDAY ‘QQQRaaal

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: New Providence
Community Centre: Wednesday - 7pm to 8pm. The
Nassau Group: Rosetta Street, Wednesday 6pm to
Tpm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.

FREE Health and Wellness Lectures are held the
first Wednesday of every month at 6:30pm at New
Providence Community Center Blake Road. For
more information call 327.1660 or 327.2878. FREE
Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar and Cholesterol
Screening.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas Support Group
meets every Wednesday from 5:30pm to 7pm at
Cancer Headquarters, two doors south of ZNS.
Cancer patients, survivors, their family members
and friends are invited to attend. Phone 323.4482

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of SouthEast Nassau meets every
Wednesday from 1pm - 2pm at East Villa Restau-
rant, East Bay Street. Always an interesting speak-
er and great fellowship. If you would like to attend
our meetings please send an e-mail to
bruno.pletscher@gottardo.com or
kathyvsmith@hotmail.com.

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta
Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated meets 6:30pm
every third Wednesday at the Bahamas National
Pride Building.

International Training in Communication, Essence
Club #3173 holds it’s bimonthly meetings on the
1st and 3rd Wednesday of each month at Doctor's
Hospital Conference Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets
the second and fourth Wednesday of the month,
8pm @ St Augustine's Monastery.

The Kiwanis Club of Cable Beach invites the pub-
lic to its regular weekly meeting held every
Wednesday at 7:30pm at the British Colonial
Hilton. Kiwanis is a worldwide service organisation
dedicated to changing the world One Child, One
Community at a time."

School and Community Nature Walk and Petting
Zoo - Free Every Wednesday from 1Oam to 2:30pm
at Earth Village Ranch, St Albans Drive and
Columbus Avenue (Chippingham). Call (242)
356.2274 now to make reservations. Open to all
ages and groups Monday-Sunday from 9am to 6pm.
Inquire about additional activities and programmes.







NEW EXHIBITION OPENING

Bahamian Art:
Pre-Columbian to the Present

OPENS TO THE PUBLIC: THURSDAY, FEB 22, 2007
This is a survey show on Bahamian Art History. itis
designed to support the publication of the National
Art Gallery's Educational Pack for teachers scheduled
for release in 2007.






TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday on the 4th
floor of the Ministry of Health, Meeting Street, at
6pm.

@ ART EXHIBITION

Arts And Entertainment: Portraits from Jerome
Miller’s Coloring Book, a charity exhibit, will be
held Thursday, February 8 at the Dundas Centre
for Performing Arts, Mackey Street from 7pm to
9pm. Entertainment and wines sponsored by
Cacique International and Bristol Wines And Spir-
its. Admission is free, but donations will be accept-
ed. All monies will go to the endowment fund for a
scholarship in memory of the late Winston Saun-
ders. Dress is smart casual. The paintings will hang
at Azure Spa, British Colonial Hilton from Febru-
ary 10 through 28.

THURSDAY Ql

@ ENTERTAINMENT

Shadowhana Entertainment presents an all
Bahamian Talent Explosion this and every Thurs-
day night at the Patio Bar & Grill on Carmichael
Road. This event features upcoming Bahamian
artist who are ready to showcase their original
material to the world. There will also be a freestyle
competition every week which is open to the pub-
lic at large. Doors open at 8:30pm. Ladies free
until 11pm - Gentlemen - small door charge. See u
there.

@ HEALTH

Free public health lectures featuring distinguished
physicians are held at Doctors Hospital every third
Thursday of the month at 6pm in the Doctors Hos-
pital Conference Room. Free screenings between
Spm & 6pm. For more information call 302.4603.

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to.inform the pub-
lic its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Thursday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes
location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval’

is required. Call 364.8423 to register for more info.

REACH - Resources & Education for Autism and
Related Challenges meets from 7pm - 9pm the sec-
ond Thursday of each month in the cafeteria of
the BEC building, Blue Hill Road.

B CIVIC CLUBS ;

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise has a breakfast
meeting every Thursday morning at Jam at the
British Colonial Hilton Hotel (Fellowship begins at
6:45am).

The Kiwanis Club of Over-the-Hill meets every
Thursday at 8pm at the Holy Cross Activity Centre,
Soldier Road. Guests are welcome. :

Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first, second

and third Thursday at the Ministry of Health & ©

Environment building on Meeting Street com-
mencing at 7:30pm. Everyone is welcome to attend
¢ TM Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8:30pm @ Super-
Clubs Breezes.

International. Association of Administrative Pro-
fessionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the third Thurs-
day of every month @ SuperClubs Breezes, Cable
Beach, 6pm. :

The recently established National Insurance Board
Retiree Association (NIBRA), meets every fourth

Thursday in the month, in the National Insurance -

Board's (NIB) training room, Wulf Road office
complex, at 6pm. All retirees are welcome.



THE TRIBUNE

PHoTOS WELCOME



The Rotary Club of West Nassau holds its weekly
meeting, every Thursday at Choices Restaurant
on the campus of the College of the Bahamas. Fel-
lowship starts at 12:30pm, with the meeting held
from 1pm to 2pm.

FRIDAY



g@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: The Nassau
Group, Rosetta Street: Friday 6pm to 7pm. &
8:30pm to 9:30pm. Sacred Heart Church: Friday
6pm to 7pm. New Providence Community Centre:
Friday 7pm to 8pm.

@ CIVIC CLUBS
TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm @ Bahamas Bap-
tist Community College Rm A19, Jean St.

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Fri-
day of each month, 7:30pm at the Emmaus Centre
at St Augustine’s Monastery. For more info call
325.1947 after 4pm.

AMISTAD is a club which promotes the Spanish
language and culture in the community. Residents
of the Bahamas who speak Spanish or are learning
Spanish are invited to attend meetings on the third
Friday of the month during the academic year at
7pm in room 13 of COB's Tourism Training Centre.

EEE «SATURDAY “a
@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: The Nassau
Group, Rosetta Street: Saturday mornings - l|Oam
to llam. :

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third
Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and December) @
the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley

. Street.

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes are
offered every third Saturday of the month from
9am-1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Community
Training Representative at 302.4732 for more infor-
mation and learn to save a life today.

@ CIVIC CLUBS

JAR CYCLING: The Owners of JAR Cycling arc
pleased to offer a cycling clinic for juniors between
10 and 17. The free clinic will be held every Satur-
day in an effort to encourage kids to cycle. Parents
interested in registering their children should con-
tact organisers at jarcycling@gmail.com.

@ ATHLETICS

Star Trackers Track and Field Club will be host-
ing the Baker Construction Bahamas, Ltd Star
Performers Track Classic on Saturday, February 3
from 9am to 7pm at the Thomas A Robinson
Track and Field Stadium, Queen Elizabeth Sports
Centre. The BAAA-sanctioned event is for divi-
sions U9-Open.

HESS ss SUNDAY WW
@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS
Traveller's Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street, fea-
tures special entertainment - Gernie, Tabitha and

. the Caribbean Express - very Sunday from 6:30pm

to 9:30pm.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the pub-
lic of its meeting times and places: The Nassau
Group, Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm to 7pm /
8:30pm to 9:30pm.

m@ SUNDAY
RELIGIOUS SERVICES

The Bahamas Metaphysical Society Inc - A spiritual
teaching society leading you to greater peace of
mind, health, prosperity and happiness - holds
Higher Consciousness Services every Sunday at
10am and weekly Meditation services every
Wednesday at 7pm at Bowe’s Cove off Bernard
Road. Interested persons are welcome to attend.
For more information contact by e-mail @ bah-
metsol@hotmail.com or call 393.0279.

cecuuaauceseseeccueeuucacnecseeeaseaauanseeeusasaaaussesceeegaueneceusauaunaneeaenu ans egsenses

Send all your civic and social events (attach pic-
tures if possible) to The Tribune via fax: 328.2398 or
e-mail: ybdeleveaux@tribunemedia.net - Out there in
the subject line.



~

owe ete

oes nee

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THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007, PAGE 11



a LOCAL NEWS .

‘Paid at the
Pumps’ raffle
kicks-off

FOR two years Grand
Bahamians have been
earning valuable Paid at
the Pumps booklets at
Freeport Jet Wash and
redeeming them for great
merchandise at Kelly’s.
Now it’s time to turn
those same booklets in
for a chance to win a new
car!

To celebrate the suc-
cess and completion of
the popular Paid at the
Pumps promotion, Kelly’s
True Value and Freeport
Jet Wash & Auto Mart
Ltd have planned a two-
month long raffle to win a
2007 Jeep Compass.

From Thursday, Febru-
ary lst, everyone with
completed Paid at the
Pumps booklets can drop
the books off at Kelly’s or
Freeport Jet Wash to be
used as raffle tickets. The
drawing will be held at
noon on Saturday, March
31st, in Kelly’s parking
lot.

“We, at Freeport Jet
Wash would like to sin-
cerely thank the general
public for their support of
this promotion, without
which, it would not have
been a success. We also
wanted to help the declin-
ing economy during a
time of need, especially
after the hurricanes, and
found that this was an
effective way of doing so.
Again, we want to extend
our wholehearted appre-
ciation to our customers,
without whom, we would
not be here today,” said —
Larry Albury, General
Manager of Freeport Jet
Wash.

Be sure to fill in your
name, address and tele-
phone contacts on the
space provided on the
booklet. For those who
still need: additional
stamps to complete cur-
rent books or for those
who haven't participated
in the programme before,
but would like ‘the chance
to win a new car just for
buying gas, Jet Wash will
continue distributing
stamps until the raffle
day. Consumers receive
one stamp for every $20
of gas purchased.

On the day of the raffle
Kelly’s will be having oth-
er fun activities for the
community, including a
special visit by the Easter
Bunny for the children.

“Paid at the Pumps has
been a great partnership
between two companies
on the island and more of
this type of business net-
working would be great,”
said Christopher Lowe,
Operations Manager at
Kelly’s. “We’ve enjoyed
giving back to the com-
munity and we thought
this raffle, for the chance
to. win a new vehicle and
other great prizes, would
be a great way to wrap up
this programme.”

. As from February 1st,
Paid at the Pumps books
are only eligible for the
raffle. Customers who
have enjoyed the Paid at
the Pumps programme
can look forward to new
exciting promotions from
Kelly’s and Jet Wash.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are

} making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the

j area or have won an
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986

| and share your story.







ae

Regatta awards
are held at
Govt House

MINISTRY of Local Gov-
ernment and Consumer
Affairs, Regatta Division,
held its first Awards and

’ Recognition Ceremony at
Government House. From
left, front row, are Ferarin
‘Hanna, Miss Culture; Minis-
ter of Local Government
and Consumer Affairs, V

‘Alfred Gray; Governor Gen-
eral Arthur Hanna, and
James Wallace, treasurer,
Regatta Committee; (back
tow) Harrison Thompson,
permanent secretary;
Clement Fox, M D Kirkland,
Rueben Knowles, Kirk John-
son (accepting on behalf of
his father Ted Johnson,
deceased) and Eric Gibson.

=
—

SN

(BIS photo:
Raymond A Bethel)

‘Unprecedented opportunities’

n the year ahead for Grenada

NATION CELEBRATES 33RD ANNIVERSARY OF INDEPENDENCE

AS GRENADA celebrates its thirty-third
anniversary of independence, Prime Minister
Dr Keith Mitchell said that this year “promis-
es to be one filled with unprecedented oppor-
tunities” for Grenadians.

In a message to his people, Dr Mitchell said
that although they have gone through trying
times “formidable challenges” still lie ahead.
However, he said, there has been “significant
advancement in rebuilding the nation.”

He pointed out that the government of
Grenada has spent “well over $86 million build-
ing and repairing thousands of homes for the
most vulnerable families.”

It has also spent close to $83 million rebuild-
ing schools so that Grenadian children can
have a “comfortable learning environment.”

_» Also more than $60 million has been spent on

/ community, centres, health centres and public
buildings with $59 million going to resuscitate
and revitalize their farms.

“Therefore,” he said, “we endeavour to
expand our social safety nets and develop pro-
grammes to bring the best standard of living to
all our people.

“We have also made considerable progress in
revising outdated policies and developing new
strategies. We can be proud that we now have
national policies for agriculture, health, edu-
cation, youth and an investment policy which is
charting the way for Grenada as a preferred
location for foreign and local investment.”

Dr Mitchell said he was “pleased to
announce that the first working Draft of
Grenada's National Strategic Development
Plan has been completed. This policy embraces
the rich heritage that nurtures community and
family values, and guides the way for the con-
tinuance of peace, opportunity and an
enhanced quality of life.”

On Sunday Grenadians resident in Nassau
will worship as a group at the 10am mass at St-
Anselm’s Catholic Church, Fox Hill, to cele-
brate the independence of Grenada, Carria-
‘cou and Petite Martinique. February 7th is the
country’s independence day.

@ GRENADA Prime Minister
Dr Keith Mitchell —



Grenadians attending the St Anselm’s ser-
vice are asked to arrive early so that they can sit
together. Seats will not be reserved.

Ambassador of Argentina



@ MARIO JOSE PINO, non-resident ambassador of the
Republic of Argentina (right), presented his letters of credence
to Arthur Hanna, Governor General, on Thursday at Govern-
ment House. Pictured in background is Mrs Bernice Bowe,
senior assistant secretary to the Governor General.

(BIS photo: Raymond A Bethel)





presents letters of credence HRP?5 WP-74



Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd

| AO KPA SILC |
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

_ PEPSI-COLA BAHAMAS BOTTLING COMPANY

Applicants are invited from suitably qualified individuals to fill the position of:

PRODUCTION MANAGER

The incumbent will have overall responsibility of managing all aspects
of the manufacturing operation which include the control of raw material
utilization, finished goods production, quality assurance and_ plant

maintenance.

Ideal candidate would at minimum have an Associate’s Degree ina
technical field, experience in Supervisory Management and five years
experience in manufacturing plant operations

Please send resume to:

Human Resources Manager
P. O. Box N-3004

Nassau, Bahamas

FAX: 364-2123

Telephone calls will not be accepted.


PAGE 12, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007

Young author
releases Forest
of the Sprites

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport *
Reporter

FREEPORT - An ambi-
tious young Bahamian
author has released a new
children’s book, Forest of
the Sprites, the first part of
a trilogy that takes its read-
ers on a magical story
adventure of good versus
evil.

Lester Ferguson, author
and artist, said his self-pub-
lished book is not consid-
ered as a traditional
Bahamian story, and was
inspired by classic children’s
literature, such as The
Chronicles of Narnia, Peter
Pan, and Lord of the Rings.

Like these popular novel
series that have become best
sellers and adapted for
major movie films, Mr Fer-
guson has high hopes for the
Forest of Sprites trilogy and
is expected to meet with
Minister of Education
Alfred Sears this month.

It took Mr Ferguson six
years to write and illustrate
a storybook that would cap-

ture the imagination of chil- .

dren age eight to 12.

“IT was always exposed
and fascinated to so much
wonderful children’s litera-
ture at an early age, such as
CS Lewis’s Chronicles of
Narnia, Sir James Barrie’s
Peter Pan, and John
Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings,
and also good story telling,
and these had a profound
affect on me,” he said.

Mr Ferguson, who has
sold 500 copies so far in the
US, has printed 100 copies
to test the Bahamian mar-
ket.

The book is available at
Bellevue Business Depot in
Freeport. It is also available
at Barnes & Noble and
Amazon.

As a self-published
Bahamian author, Mr Fer-
guson believes that govern-
ment should make grants
available to help budding
Bahamian authors.

Additionally, he said, that
there should be literary
awards to expose Bahamian
literature as is done in the
UK and Canada.

He commended the Edu-
cation Minister on establish-
ing a Minister’s Book Club,
and hopes that his book can
be added to the Minister’s
book selection list.

“T am a big supporter of
ljterature and I think that a *
lot of our children need to
go back to the fascinating
world of reading.

“Some people may look at
the book and say it is not
Bahamian, but it depends
on what you define Bahami-
an as. People think that you
have to speak a dialect, but
that’s not the point, we live
in such a big world, and the
Bahamas is not in a world
by itself,” he said.

Mr Ferguson, who is a
‘native of Grand Bahama
and attended the former
Sunland Lutheran School,
was graduated from the
Government High. He has
completed studies at the Art
Institute of Fort Laud-







@ THIS photo released by the Canadi
arctic off Northern Alaska. The words of warning about global warming from the top panel of interna

ing of the climate system is unequivocal," the cause is "very likely" man-made, and "would continue for centuries.

how, what and why the planet is warming —

slobal warming report
akes for grim reading —

tal Panel on Climate Change.

z

a

an Ice Service Friday Feb. 2, 2007 and taken by photographer Dan Crosbie in
tional scientists

THE TRIBUNE |

2004 shows two polar bears on a chunk of ice in the
Friday Feb. 2, 2007 were purposely biunt: "warm-,
" Officially releasing a 21-page report in Paris on the
though not telling the world what to do about it — the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change gave a bleak observation
of what is happening now and an even more dire prediction for the future. ¥

(AP Photo/Dan Crosbie/Canadian Ice Service via PA, HO)

FROM page one

ist Sam Duncombe of
ReEarth told The Tribune

- that she hopes this report

serves as a wake-up call to the
country’s government, adding
that our new Ministry of
Energy and Environment will
become one of the most
important agencies within the
government in the next few
years,

“The Bahamas should be
very, very concerned, not only
about sea levels encroaching
on our very, very limited land
mass, but also the effect that
global warming will have on
our fresh water resources,”
Mrs Duncombe said.

She explained that when sea
levels rise, because fresh
water is lighter than sea water,
the sea water will push the
fresh water up and bring it to
the surface where it will evap-
orate due to the warmer cli-
mate. °

Warmer seas, in addition to
increasing the possibility of
more frequent and stronger
hurricanes, will also have a
huge negative impact on coral
reefs, which so far have pro-

tected us from storm surges

and offered habitats to fishes,
Mrs Duncombe said.

“In general when we do any
type of development we need
to be very mindful that sea
levels will be playing a huge
role in our lives in the future
and we.need to plan accord-
ingly,” she said.

The environmentalist said
that this also is why it is
so important that
government does not allow a
Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG)
terminal to built in the
Bahamas.

Since gas emissions are at
the root of the global warming
trend, she said, Bahamians
would be “aiding and abetting
their demise” if they say yes
to LNG.

The UN’s Intergovernmen-

(IPCC), which issued the 21-
page report, said that they are
90 per cent certain that man-
made emissions of greenhouse
gases can already be blamed
for “fewer cold days, hotter
nights, killer heat waves,
floods and heavy rains, dev-
astating droughts, and an
increase in hurricane and
tropical storm strength — par-
ticularly in the Atlantic
Ocean.”

“Warming of the climate

system is unequivocal, as is |

now evident from observa-
tions of increases in global
average air and ocean tem-
peratures, widespread
melting of snow and ice, and
rising global mean sea
level,” the UN panel’s report

‘said.

Another report by the
IPCC, expected to be released
later this year, will address the
most effective measures for
government to slow down
global warming. ,

@ FRENCH President Jacques Chirac delivers a speech during the opening of a high-level conference
on world environmental governance Friday, Feb. 2, 2007 in Paris. Jacques Chirac sought Friday to par- ‘
lay world worry about global warming into support for his bid for a new international body to protect
the environment, and perhaps punish nations who abuse it. "In the face of this urgency, it is no longer

erdale.

The Forest of the Sprites
is colourfully illustrated and
presents an adventure story

of a once flawless world that
has become contaminated
by evil. There are creatures
in the forest of the sprites
that are trying to restore
goodness back in the world,
and have to overcome an
evil queen, who is trying to
kill the trees, which have
special abilities.

Mr Ferguson said that the
moral of the story is that
even though we go through
bad and hard times, good
will triumph over evil.

He said good writers, such
as CS Lewis and James Bar-
rie, were exposed to war
which traumatised them and
was inspiration for their
writings.

“T have never been to
war, but I have seen what
war can do. We are living in
a war right now, and
although we are thousands
of miles away, we are still
being affected by it. We live
in a time of terrorists,” he
said.

Mr Ferguson said the
book is an imaginative story
that has a little bit of reality
and will make the reader cry
and smile.

He says he has received
positive feedback from an
actor in the UK who pur-
chased the book for his child
while on location in Grand
Bahama for the filming of
Pirates of the Caribbean
film.

Mr Ferguson is expected
to have a book signing in
New Providence to launch
“Forest of the Sprites”.





FROM page one

saw the Minister. By the time
the police arrived a few seconds
later, the worker was nowhere
to be found.

Mr Miller said that responsi-
bility for land extraction lies
with the Town Planning divi-
sion of the Ministry of Works.
He told the press that Mr
Michael Major — from that
department — had informed him
that the individuals on the site
near the Milo Butler highway
had no permission to extract fill.

“I have had numerous com-
plaints about this site from the
residents of my constituency
because obviously they have to
pass this way everyday to go to
work. And, in some cases, boul-
ders have fallen on to the road-
way. I have witnessed that,” he
said.



Minister leads ‘raid’



Minister Miller had the
police stop work on this site
also. oo

Police questioned workers on:
both sites. Inspector Chester
Thomas said there would be an
investigation.

However, no worker on
either site was arrested.

Mr Miller said that new and
tougher laws were needed to
deal with these matters.

He said a new land policy is
being developed to deal with
these cases.

This new policy will fine indi-
viduals as much as $20,000 in
addition to the confiscation of
their equipment. According to
Mr Miller, the current fines only
go up to a few thousand dol-
lars.

Mr Miller hopes this piece of
legislation will be made law
before this current parliament
ends.



the time for half-measures. It is time for a revolution," he said. Writing on the podium reads "Citizens.

of the Earth".

Baggage handler
accused of conspiracy
to import cocaine



FROM page one

aboard a Spirit Airlines flight.

The men had been sent to Ft. Lauderdale
by NFS for Transportation Safety Adminis-
tration training.

Tony's case is unique compared to three
of the other men — Lester Bain, Delvino
Rigby, and Marcus Rolle who were
arraigned together early last month.

The case of Lester Bain vs The USA,
under which the three men fall, alleges that
they knowingly imported a substance con-
taining a detectable amount of cocaine
between November 9, 2006 and November
10, 2006.

However, Tony is set to be tried on four
counts of Known importation of a substance
containing a detectable amount of cocaine
between January 22 and January 27 of last
year, along with co-defendant Trujillo
Darville, who was convicted of cocaine
importation in June of last year.

According to an affidavit signed by Spe-

(

’



(AP Photo/Patrick Kovarik, Pool) |

“

> %

o@

cial Agent Jorge Gomez of Immigration and

Customs Enforcement, Darville, while dis- .

embarking a Spirit Airlines Flight from Nas-
sau was discovered to have traces of nar-
cotics on his person by canine "Dottie." Sub-
sequently, he was found to be carrying 4.82
pounds of cocaine in his luggage, and admit-
ted to law enforcement officers that he was
to receive $1,500 for transporting the nar-
cotics to an unknown man in Ft Lauderdale.

Darville was arraigned in Federal Court
last March where he initially pleaded not

guilty to two counts of importation of an...
illicit substance, but later changed his plea to.

guilty and received a 46-month sentence on
both charges.

Now, Darville, who was arraigned yes-
terday on four counts of knowingly attempt-
ing to import a controlled substance, is set to
be tried along with Tony in March.

‘Information released by the US Embassy
shortly after the group's arrest suggested
that they had been under surveillance for
more than a year.

°


‘.’° Three-time Desert Classic

'+|+"-and ninth and finished with




Pe crete we

Woods chasing
_ jittle known
Englishman

in Dubai

mg GOLF
DUBAI,
United Arab Emirates
Associated Press

EIGHT years ago, Ross
Fisher was fetching balls for
_- Tiger Woods on the practice
‘range. Now, the Englishman
holds a five-shot lead over
the defending champion
going into the third round of
the Dubai Desert Classic.

Fisher shot a second con-
secutive 7-under 65 Friday
for a halfway score of 14
under, while Woods strug-
gled with his putting for the
second straight day and fin-
ished with a 67 to stand at 9
under.

"It was kind of weird,"
Woods said. "I just didn't
feel like I made many putts
today. I was all around the
hole and most of them were:
actually misreads." i

winner Ernie Els climbed i
within two strokes of the i
lead with an eagle on the
13th hole before play was
cut short by darkness at the
Emirates Golf Club. A rare
Dubai thunderstorm
delayed play for more than
two hours, leaving Fisher
with a clubhouse lead of i
four strokes over Peter 3
Hanson and Graeme :
McDowell. :

"I'm hitting the ball prob-
ably as good as I've ever hit
it," said Fisher, who had
eight birdies and a bogey.
"It would be tough to have a
third 65, but you know it's
out there if you play well."

The Desert Classic is just

_- the second tournament in
.'.* which Fisher has been the
leader — the first was the
2005 China Open.

The 26-year-old English-
man described how he'd
spent his early years in awe
of Woods, and said the clos-
est contact he had with him
was when he worked as a
teenager on a driving range
at the World Match Play
Championship at Went-
worth in England.

"I've never met him or
spoke to him," he said.

_», Now Fisher faces the pos-
sibility of playing alongside
Woods on Sunday if they
are the top two heading into

the final round.

. "It would be an absolute
_.° thrill to play with the best

player in the world," Fisher
said. “Obviously all the
pressure is going to be on
him because he's expected
to win. No one's going to be
thinking, 'I think Ross can
take this guy on.' I'll try not
to watch him too closely
because at the end of the
day, I'm going to try and
beat the guy."

Woods had five birdies
and no bogeys. On the 13th,
Woods fell to his knees and
bashed the ground with his
club in frustration after a
chip for an eagle dribbled a
few inches from the hole.
He settled for a birdie.

“I've got to go practice
first of all and get organized
and be ready for tomor-
row," Woods said. "It's just
a matter of going out there
and making a bunch of
birdies. The golf course is
pretty benign."

Playing the back nine
first, Woods dueled all day
with partner Miguel Angel
Jimenez. The Spaniard was
at 11 under for a few holes

_ before he bogeyed the 15th

-’-'a 68. He was tied with
Woods at 9 under.

Woods enjoyed bantering
with the ponytailed
Jimenez.

"He's so funny," Woods
said. "Some of the one-lin-
ers he comes up with out
there are pretty good."

By day's end, Els was at
12 under after 14 holes, with
McDowell and Hanson in
the clubhouse at 10 under.
Swede Henrik Stenson was
also at 10 under with four
holes left to play. Stenson,
Els and 34 others are to
complete the second round
Saturday morning.

Els said the rain had
slowed the greens and left

_ him slipping in the mud. But
. .the South African made the
‘green on the par-5, 13th
hole in two shots, then
holed a 12-foot putt for an
eagle.

"I've got to keep my foot
on the pedal," Els said.
"There's so many guys
involved. I've just got to
keep up the pace."





rd fought victory
or ‘Choo Choo’

@ ACTION from Jer-
maine ‘Choo Choo’
Mackey’s World Boxing
Council’s CABOFE
Caribbean Boxing Fed-
eration’s super mid-
dleweight title bout on
Thursday night against
Puerto Rican Anibal ‘El
Olimpico’ Acevedo.

Mackey won with a
knockout in the seventh
round.

e SEE STORY ON
SPORTS FRONT

(Photo above by
Felipé Major,
all others by
Tim Clarke)






PAGE 4B, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS.



Ljuhicic

aivances to
semifinals of
Zagreb Open

MTENNIS .
ZAGREB, Croatia
Associated Press

DEFENDING champion
Ivan Ljubicic defeated
Thomas Johansson of Swe-
den after three tiebreakers
Friday to advance to the
semifinals of the Zagreb
Open.

Ljubicic won 7-6 (8), 6-7
(8), 7-6 (4) with only one
break of serve by each
player in the final set.

The Croat served 28 aces
but struggled with careless
shots from the baseline and
at the net. Ljubicic rallied
from 4-1 down in the first
tiebreaker but could not
clinch the match in straight
sets _ despite staving off
four set-points in the sec-
ond tiebreaker.

The top seed broke in
the opening game of the
third set. Johansson struck
right back and forced a
final tiebreaker, which Lju-
bicic won after taking a 3-0
lead.

Ljubicic faces fourth-
seeded Mikhail Youzhny in
the semifinal after the
Russian defeated Marc
Gicquel of France 7-5, 6-2.

Youzhny struggled to
take control until the 12th
game of the first set and
then never relinquished
control with fine serving
and a series of winners.

Alexander Peya beat
Michael Llodra of France
6-3, 6-3. The Austrian had
to qualify for the main
draw and had previously
never made it to an ATP |
quarterfinal.

Peya broke in the sev-
enth game of the first set
and went on to win the sec-
ond set despite dropping
his serve twice.

Peya faces the winner
between second-seeded
Marcos Baghdatis of
Cyprus and Arnaud
Clemente of France in the
other quarterfinal.

In last year's tourna-
ment, Stefan Koubek of
Austria qualified for the
main draw and made it to
the final where he lost to
Ljubicic.

Hicks hits
to purchase
50 per cent
interest in
Liverpool

m@ SOCCER
DALLAS
Associated Press

TOM HICKS, owner of
the Dallas Stars and the
Texas Rangers, is close to
adding England’s Liver-
pool soccer club to his list
of sports holdings.

Hicks has agreed to join
Montreal Canadiens owner
George Gillett Jr. in a bid
to purchase the five-time
European champions, a
person familiar with the
negotiations said Thursday,
speaking on condition of
anonymity because no
announcement had been
made.

The decision by Hicks to
join Gillette’s bid was first
reported by The Dallas
Morning News on its Web
site Thursday. Hicks did
not immediately return
messages seeking com-
ment.

Hicks would have a 50
percent stake in the group.
Gillette’s offer seemed
imminent after a Dubai-
based consortium pulled
out of a proposed $882 mil-
lion offer Wednesday.
Dubai International Capi-
tal, owned by the ruler of
Dubai, Sheik Mohammed
bin Rashid al-Maktoum,
called off negotiations after
hearing that the board of
directors was considering a
bid from Gillett.

Liverpool has won a
record 18 English league
titles and is planning to
build a 60,000-seat stadi-
um. The club has been
looking for a buyer to help
fund construction of a new
stadium and provide the
financial power to compete
with Chelsea and Manches-
ter United in the transfer
market

Ireland needs early victory over.







m@ RUGBY
LONDON
Associated Press

THE top three Six Nations
favorites — Ireland, England

and France — all have extra.

incentive to win their opening
matches in the rugby union
championship this weekend.

Ireland has a difficult match
at Wales on Sunday and while
defeat in Cardiff wouldn't nec-
essarily end its hopes of break-
ing a 22-year wait for the title,
it would make it harder for
the bookmakers' No. lL
favorite.

England is relying on Jonny
Wilkinson's return after more

than three years out to turn,

things round. Having lost eight
games in its last nine, England
won't want to lose to Scotland
at Twickenham on Saturday
for the first time since 1983
with a World Cup defense to
follow later this year.

As host of the World Cup in
September and October,
France will be confident of
beating Italy for the 27th time
in 28 games on Saturday as it
bids to win the Six Nations for
the second straight year.

Criticism

Defeat to an Italian team
improving under former
French captain Pierre
Berbizier in Rome would
heap more criticism upon
France coach Bernard
Laporte.

Ireland won its opening
three games in 2005 to lift
hopes of winning the title, but
losses to France and Wales
gave the title ~ and the Grand
Slam — to Wales.

‘Ireland coach Eddie O'Sul-
livan is happy for his team to

be tavored — if it doesn t lead

to complacency.

"IT suppose you picter to be
favorites, but it's a notional
thing and a reflection of where
the team is given ils recent
performances." he said “Its a
nice accolade, but it can bite
you more often than not if you
pay too much attention to it.

"We know there's accertain
amount of expectation, which
is fair and it's a lot better than
the expectations we had 12
months ago. But what goes
with that is a responsibility to
continue with the level of per-
formances that earned that
reputation. We have to put
five performances together."

O'Sullivan will have a set-
tled lineup which has played

NS

Wales to justify favorites tag _



@ RHYS THOMAS of Wales is brought down by Ireland's Shane Hogan, on the ground no. 14, during their Six Nations Rugby match °.' .

at Lansdowne Road, Dublin, Sunday Feb. 26, 2006. Ireland beat Wales 31-5. Ireland play Wale

together for several champi-
onships and is led by star cen-
ter Brian O'Driscoll at the
Millennium Stadium.

Wales has lost backs Shane
Williams, Tom Shanklin and
Mark Jones to injury and
Gareth Thomas to suspension,
while Gavin Henson has been
diopped and doesn't even
make the bench. Despite the
rise of center James Hook,
Wales looks considerably
weaker than when it won'the
Grand Slam im 2005.

icugiand lost fullback Lain
Balshaw lo a groim injury on
Friday and coach Brian Ash-
ton promoted Olly Morgan
for his test debut. Ashton has
already gambled by naming
Wilkinson and two rugby
league converts. — Jason
Robinson and Andy Farrell —
in his backline.

In his first game in charge
since he replaced Andy
Robinson, Ashton selected



Robinson on the wing after
he ended his international
retirement from 2005 and
picked Farrell at inside cen-
ter after starting just seven
club.rugby games.

~ With Twickenham expect-
ed to be at full 82,000-capaci-
ty, Morgan will also be test-
ed.

Selection

"1 did not consider moving
Lewsey or Robinson because
they are best on the wing,"
Ashton said of his selection.
"Olly was very close to playing
during the autumn before he
was injured. He has all the
qualities of an old-fashioned
fullback, which he will find
handy against Scotland.

"He is good under the high
ball, he is strong, and I am
sure when the time is right he
will come into the attack."

France coach Laporte, who
has been accused of tinkering
too often with his lineup with
the World Cup in mind, has
even tried 28 different pair-
ings at halfback.

With Frederic Michalak
expected to return from a
long-term Knee injury for the
World Cup, flyhalt David
Skrela will make his second
appearance for France six
years after his first.

"We want to be able to go
to the players, look into the
eyes of all those who want a
place in the World Cup squad,
and tell them they had a
chance to prove themselves.
Then the time will come to
choose," Laporte said.

"Of course we want to win
these (Six Nations) games.
When.a team like France
enters a tournament, they aim
to win it. But the important
thing is to try out as many
players as possible. We are

s again on Sunday.

(AP Photo/John Cogill)

using the Six Nations to put
the finishing touches to our
plans."

Italy coach Berbizier has
also made a surprise choice at
flyhalf with 33-year-old
Andrea Scanavacca replacing
Ramiro Pez.

Berbizier wants to make full
use of Italy's standout for-
wards and see if Scanavacca. - |
has an attacking vision rather. *
than just kick for position and —
territorial gains.

HB ENGLAND'S Iain Bal-
shaw, left, attempts to get
away from Harry Ellis, right,
and Josh Lewsey during a
training session at Twicken-
ham Stadium in London,
Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2007, ahead
of this weekend's opening 6
Nations clash with Scotland.

(AP Photo/Sang Tan)




TRIBUNE SPORTS

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007, PAGE 5B

TRIBUNE SPORTS

‘Sharapova

“and Hingis
atvance at
Pan Pacific

@ TENNIS
TOKYO
Associated Press

TOP-RANKED Maria
Sharapova rallied from a
set down to cruise past
Japan’s Ai Sugiyama 4-
~ 6, 6-0, 6-1 on Friday and
* advance to the Pan J
- Pacific Open semifinals.
~ Sugiyama broke
» Sharapova to win the
first set but was no
match for the No. | seed
- from then on.

, “It’s never easy

» against Sugiyama,”

* Sharapova said. “She
had the crowd behind

_ her and was able to take
« the first set, but I’m glad
* I was able to come back
and win.”

Sharapova will face
fifth-seeded Ana
Ivanovic of Serbia in
* Saturday’s semifinals.

Ivanovic outlasted
fourth-seeded compatri-
ot Jelena Jankovic 3-6,
6-4, 6-2.

Second-seeded Marti-
_na Hingis coasted to a 6-
0, 6-1 win over Australi-
»a’s Samantha Stosur to

advance to the semifi-
nals.

Surface

“It’s no coincidence
that I play well here,”
said Hingis, who has
- won here four times.

“The surface suits me

and everyone treats me
' so well here in Japan so

7 eee

eer
oe . %

*

rr 7m

“!.\» that I’m able to relax.”

Hingis will next face
defending champion
Elena Dementieva of
Russia, who downed
. Italy’s Roberta Vinci 6-

- 1, 6-2.

As in Thursday’s
, match against Francesca
- Schiavone, Sharapova

struggled with her serve,
~ conceding 14 double-

‘faults and hitting just

, one ace.

Once again, her coach
Michael Joyce had some
-’. advice between sets.
* “She was playing
aggressively in the first
set and I wasn’t making
my shots,” Sharapova
's' said. “Michael told me
to move it around and
play more aggressively,
and I started making my
shots and gave her less
. time to do what she
- wanted to do.”
In their only previous
meeting, Sharapova beat
- Sugiyama in the 2004
Wimbledon quarterfi-
nals.

Sharapova said she
didn’t let her serving
problems get the better
- | of her.

“I worried about the
«serve a little too much in
‘the first set,” Sharapova
.said. “There are going to
‘be days when your serve

isn’t working and when

that happens you just

-have to concentrate on
the things that are going
well.”

,

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.















@ ENGLAND'S captain Andrew Flintoff, front left, claps as he and his team le



ave the pitch after defeating Australia in their one day international cricket match in Syd-

ney, Friday, Feb. 2, 2007. England won by 92 runs after making 292 in their innings.

England finally takes

(AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)

win over Australia

m@ CRICKET
SYDNEY, Australia
Associated Press



THREE months after Eng-
land began its cricket tour of
Australia, the visitors finally
have their first win over the
home side. :

Opener Ed Joyce smashed
107 for his maiden one-day
international century and Eng-
land kept its hopes of a tri-
series finals alive with a 92-run
victory over Australia at the
Sydney Cricket Ground on Fri-
day.
Set 293 to win, Australia was
all out for 200 in 38.5 overs,
despite a fighting 51 from
Matthew Hayden, while

-Andrew Symonds retired hurt

on 39.

The result leaves England
equal with New Zealand on
nine points while Australia is
on 27 and guaranteed a spot in
the best-of-three final series.

Australia will hope to regain
captain Ricky Ponting from a
hip injury for Sunday's match
against New Zealand in Mel-
bourne. Symonds suffered a
biceps injury and is also in
doubt for the match.

England and New Zealand
meet in the last round-robin
match Tuesday in Brisbane,
with the best-of-three finals
series starting in Melbourne on
Feb. 9.

England scored its highest
total of the series, 292-7, led
by man-of-the-match Joyce
after Andrew Flintoff won the
toss and elected to bat first.

Glenn McGrath (2-51) and
Shaun Tait (2-68) were Aus-
tralia's only multiple wicket-
takers, with Tait conceding
nine of Australia's 19 wides.

Liam Plunkett (3-24) and
Sajid Mahmood (2-38) led
England's pace attack as the
visitors made early inroads in
defending its total.

Australia lost stand-in skip-
per Adam Gilchrist first ball
to paceman Liam Plunkett and
Brad Hodge (1) was dismissed
the next over off Mahmood.

Michael Clarke (18) became
Plunkett's second victim before
Symonds and Hayden added
71 off 50 balls for the fourth
wicket.

But within the space of five
overs, Australia lost Hayden,
closing specialist Mike Hussey
(6) and Symonds, who hit four
fours and one six.

Having lost five of its open-
ing six matches, England start-
ed strongly as Dublin-born
Joyce, who came into the Eng-
land squad for the injured
Kevin Pietersen, hit 10 fours
and faced 142 balls before he
was finally out with the score at
256-5 in the 47th over. The 28-
year-old left-hander shared an
opening stand of 58 with Mal
Loye (29) before sharing a 111-
run, second wicket partnership
with Ian Bell (51).

Loye's ambitious sweep-shot
attempt off the bowling of
McGrath in the 11th over end-
ed badly with the right-hander
struck flush on the chin. After
an on-field break for some
icing on the wound, Loye was
out next ball and taken to hos-

pital where he was give three |

stitches.

"I thought we played great
tonight," said England captain
Andrew Flintoff. "We hada
great start, Adam Gilchrist first
ball.

"We have a point to prove,
we've been working hard," he
added. "I'm glad it's come."

Gilchrist said Australia was
"outplayed in almost every
area."

"We never any illusions
about the quality of their
team," he said. "This could give
them some momentum."

Joyce was thrilled with his
century and England's first big
reason for celebration after los-
ing the Ashes 5-0.

"I don't have words to
describe it," said Joyce. "I
know this is our first victory
across Australia, but it's been a
great series."

B@ ENGLAND'S Liam
Plunkett celebrates taking the
wicket of Australia's Glenn
McGrath, back, in their one
day international cricket
match in Sydney, Friday, Feb.
2, 2007. England won by 92
runs after making 292 in their
innings.

(AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)






PAGE 6B, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007









JUDGE PARKER













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1 Hide sorne sticks of wood? (5) 2 — Writing about helsts that have

6 — Untidy as certain eating places? gone wrong? (6)
(5) district in South

9 Such remarks can have a goading 3 a a cay

* effect (7)

20 Run over in a mad caper (5) 4 To jump is hot work! (3)

11 Revolutionary linen maker (5) 5. Anose for tobacco (5)

12 . Republic, American backed and 6 This mixture gives me a new angle
reorganised (5) (7)

13° Far from detached? (7) 7 Place of unprecedented pleasure

* 15 It's bad when one has to take a (4) :

Corner twice! (3) 8 — Protection thrown around a novice

47° Alot of land (4) (6)

13 fee ae girl out as a matter 12 Sound asleep! (5)

‘YS Amachine to stretch your neck? 13 Move rhythmically with a chap at
(5) half pace (5)

20 Stick to business in this place (6) 14 A good deal of sense (5)

22 Keep moving, pet (4) 15_Not the big picture (5)

24 Little creature's contribution to beef 16 Water leaks, possibly (5)
tea (3) 18 Some boys, after a girl, cause

25 = They usually need one or two displeasure (5)
players (7) i 19 Vessel right behind Tom (7)

26 enn person who'd like 21 Whence the workers get away for
a joint? (6) : tefreshment (6)

27 Aremoval sign (5) 22. Promise dad a part (6

28 Lists of bad actors not including romise dad a part (6)
Charlie (5) 23 = In Hawaii, he starts as he finishes

29 |s his military career all over? (7) (6) ;

30 Fathead always in a heated state 25 Salesmen use It in untidy piles (5)

(5) 26
32 A bit of a bloomer (5)

A big squeeze, sweetheart! (4)
Strike quickly, not idly (3)

CRYPTIC SOLUTIONS

ACROSS: 4, Supine 7, War paint 8, Ad-on-is 10, F-rail 13, Flip 14, Turn 15,
No-el 16, P-EN 17, Fair 19, A-las 21, Collector 23, Surf 24, Sued 26, Y-E.T.
27, Rate 29, Goes 32, Hers 33, He-Art 34, No-mad-s. 35, Operated 36, Strain

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Rug 12, In for 13, Forests 15, Nil 16, P-A-R 18, Alfred 20, Lodge 21, Cut 22,
Cue 23, S-e-t out 25, Per 28, Arson 30, Oasts 31, Study 32, H-a-H-a 33, Harm

EASY SOLUTIONS

ACROSS: 4, Eleven 7, Appendix 8, Thames 10, Erase 13, Moon 14, Dart 15, Ball
16, Beg 17, Abet 19, Loud 21, Credulous 23, Sued 24, Rows 26, Nib 27, Suet
29, Trip 32, Dips 33, Aside 34, Spouts 35, Elephant 36, Resent

DOWN: 1, Faced 2, Spear 3, Once 4, Extol 5, Elan 6, Evened 9, Hollow 11, Ram
12, Stare 13, Matures 15, Bed 16, Bus 18, Bedsit 20, Ousts 21, Cub 22, Lot 23,
Simple 25, Bid 28, Upset 30, Rival 31, Pesto 32, Dune 33, Asps





EVERYWHERE
FOR LAST
Em SUMMER


















BRESoos

COMICS PAGE

North dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.
NORTH
@KI8
Â¥Q63
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WEST
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£1098

EAST
a4
VAKJ2
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£643

SOUTH
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The bidding:

North East

1 NT Pass

4¢

Opening lead — ten of clubs.

There are times when a defender
wants to send an urgent come-on sig-
nal to his partner, but lacks the nec-
essary cards to do so in the usual
fashion. In that case, he tries to get
the message across by telling his
partner what not to do.

Consider this deal where South
gets to four spades and West leads
the ten of clubs. If you look at all
four hands, it’s easy to see that the
defenders can take four tricks before
declarer can take 10. But this is more
easily said than done. When West

South West
34 Pass

COOCOMECS. Cow | Hon Seuss

HOW many words of four letters
or more can you make from the
letters shown here? In making a
word, each letter may be used
once only. Each must contain
the centre letter and there must
be at least one nine-letter word.
No plurals.

TODAY'S TARGET

Good 13 very good 20; excellent
26 (or more). Solution tomorrow.






=
o hee

— Be
ome
ie



































Down
ACROSS 2 = - Hung (6)
Decree (5) "3 Swiss villa (6)
Couples (5) 4 — Unit of weight
Vacation (7) (3)
Heathen (5) 5 — Sacked (5)
Harvests (5) 6 Companion (7)
Defeats (5) 7 Affirmative
Crossed out votes (4)
(7) 8 Mend (6)
Noise (3) 12 Stomach (5)
Revise (4) 13 Hollows (5)
Sedate (6) 14 Swimming-
Painful pools (5)
Pan - sae (5)
tickly (6
Skin ome aint 18 a material
(4)
Distress signal : - eel
(3)
respect (6)
fae 22 Deer's horn (6)
est (5) 23° Snuggle (6)
Paddla-boat (5) 25° Liquid
Chosen (5) measures (5)
Ecstasy (7) 26 Centre (4)
Prise (5) 28 Before (3)
Strayed (5)









“THE ONLY PROBLEM WITH MARGARET 16 THAT
SHE DOESN'T HAVE AN OFF BUTTON."

Actions Speak Louder Than Words









BAND
CUETIRGAT P



sooner or later gains the lead with his
ace of trumps, he will have to shift to
a heart or else South will make the
contract.

Unfortunately, East does not have
a high heart that he can afford to dis-
card as trumps are being drawn to
show that he wants the suit led by
partner. Nevertheless, if East-West
cooperate perfectly, they can find the
winning defense.

When the deal occurred, declarer
tried to muddy the waters for the
defenders by putting up dummy’s
ace of clubs at trick one (on which
East played the three, a discouraging
signal). South then led dummy’s king
of spades, hoping to lose the trick at
once to the ace.

But West wanted to see his part-
ner’s discard on the next trump lead,
so he held up the ace. On the next
spade lead, East discarded the dia-
mond deuce, another negative signal.

East’s two discouraging signals .

in the minor suits got the message
across to West loud and clear. East
did not appear to have the king of
clubs, nor was he interested in a dia-
mond lead. Only one hope remained
— hearts.

Accordingly, West took the spade

“ace at trick three and shifted to the

eight of hearts, and East quickly col-
lected three heart tricks to put the
contract down one.



’S SOLUTION
file filet filth
flight flit
gilt hilt left
ght lithe tile
y while wifely wile

ly flew fli

FLYWEIGHT

YESTERDAY
ethyl felt
filthy fitl
lefty life lift 1i
welt wet]

wilt wily

oa alas
grant that
legally protects
an invention



Vassily Ivanchuk v Ivan Sokolov,
European Club Cup 2006. It’s a
dassical formation known to :

every attacking player. The 7

white queen combines with a

knight at g5 or with abishopon °
the b1-h7 dlagonaltolauncha = 5
checkmate attack on the black =,

king holed up at g8 or h8. The
paradoxical problem in today's 3

ARE A Pee ae
\RATES



TRIBUNE SPORTS



SATURDAY,
FEBRUARY 3

ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20
Romantic interests take center stage,
Aries, as you attract the attention of a
would-be special someone. Tum on
the charm that makes you irrisistible
and you’re bound to make a match.

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21
Travel plans will have to be post-'
poned, Taurus. An unexpected turn of
events requires you to stay close to
home base for the time being. It
should blow over in a few days.
GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21
Maintaining a long-term friendship
is on your mind, Gemini. Don’t

worry, that minor argument you had” - | - ”

is not enough to sever the relation: , - ’

ship. Hurt feelings will mend. '

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22

You have taken on a project that is a
step above your skill level. Instead .
of doing it all wrong, accept that you

might need a little help, and call in

the reinforcements.

LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23

Don’t let past experience put a.
damper on your upcoming trip with '
friends. This time around you’ll be '
pleasantly surprised at the results..'
Romantic sparks will fly. ‘

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sep 22
If you haven’t had much luck .with |

relationships, Virgo, it might be time . -.
to look in the mirror. Instead of plac- .° .

ing blame on‘‘them,’ the problem
could lie with you.

LIBRA — Sep 23/Oct 23

You feel especially confined this,'.
week, Libra. It could be that your,', ’

A
we
Nels
‘

same old routine has gotten you
down. Change things up a bit and
you are sure to boost your spirits.

SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22

You have an admirer, Scorpio, and

as luck would have it, it’s that neigh- | '
bor who has been glancing in your *

direction. Pursue the relationship
and enjoy your chemistry.

SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21

Your nervous energy could be put ;
to better use, Sagittarius. Why not |

try a home-improvement
project or take up a hobby that
puts idle fingers to work?

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20 .~
Waking up on the wrong side of the .'

bed doesn’t give you free reign to min

the days of others. To make it through: '
the week, plaster a smile on your face, .

even if-it doesn’t reflect your mood.

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18

Lately you’ve been demonstrating a | -
quick temper, Aquarius. YOu must .

keep it in check or those around you
are bound to take offense, especially
loved ones.

PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20

If you’ve been feeling a bit under the ;
weather, you may want to, have ail- |
ments checked out. It’s better to be _

prepared than sorry later.





puzzle Is that White has too
many plausible options. ee E:
Ukraine's world top 10 HAT Td ft Lek
grandmaster lvanchuk would 2 bc de f gh
like to eliminate Sokolov's
defensive f6 knight to enable Ineffective here. lvanchuk saw
Qh7 mate, but the knight is through the confusing variety of
guarded by Its partner atd5so choice. After his next tum, Black
that, for example, 1 Rxf6 falls _ resigned. What White's winning
foul of Nxf6. And spectacular move?
altematives like 1 Bg8 and 1
Nxf7+ which sometimes solve
such positions are also LEONARD BARDEN

(SEE,

”
Chess solution 8294: 1 Be4! Resigns. White

threatens 2 BxdS Nxd5 3 Qh7 mate. If Bb7 2 BxdS BxdS
3 Rxf6! with the same mate threat. If g6 2 BrodS NoadS 3
Qed! NIG 4 Rodi6 Qxf6 5 Qh4+ Kg7 6 Qh7 mate.
Mensa quiz: L 88. Add the two digits together and
increase the number by this amount. 2. 76. The
alphabetical positions of the two letters are added
together and then multiplied by two.

One possible word ladder solution ts: TAKE, tale,

tall, tell, teal, teat, THAT.


TRIBUNE SPORTS SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007, PAGE 7B

FEBRUARY 4, 2007





SATURDAY EVENING - ‘FEBRUARY 3, 2007 | | | SUNDAY EVENING
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| problems for their engaged children, (CC) ing couple have an affair. (CC) Pralrle Last Farewell” |kidnapped by a deranged woman,





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‘PACKED FULL OF BARGAINS - SEE INSIDE

Members of the
Bahamas Hotel
Managerial Association
vote ‘yes’ on document
headed ‘strike vote’

@ By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

INDUSTRIAL action is on
the horizon for Cable Beach
hotels as members of the
Bahamas Hotel Managerial
Association voted “yes” for
strike action. The vote was tak-
en yesterday at the House of
Labour on Wulff Road.

According to BHMA presi-
dent Obie Ferguson, 131 mem-
bers voted yes and four
abstained from indicating
whether they supported the
action.

Mr Ferguson told The Tri-
bune: “This shows that there is
considerable support from the
workers to withdraw labour,
despite Baha Mar’s attempt to
mislead them.”

Mr Ferguson said his mem-
bers were “fed up” with Baha
Mar executives’ refusal to com-
plete negotiations on their
industrial agreement and man-
agement’s decision last year to
pay employees a one week
Christmas bonus, instead of the
two weeks that the workers
normally receive.

Yesterday, BHMA members
were asked to tick “yes” or
“no” on a document headed:
“Strike Vote.”

The document read: “In fur-
therance of our dispute with
management at Radisson
Cable Beach and Golf Resort,
Nassau Beach Hotel and Wyn-
dham Nassau Resort now trad-
ing as ‘Baha Mar Company
Limited’ the Bahamas Hotel
Managerial Association is seek-
ing in accordance with article
20(c) of the Industrial Rela-
tions Act Ch.321, a sttike vote
against our said employers.

“Do you support taking a
strike against Radisson Cable
Beach & Golf Resort, Wynd-
ham Nassau Beach, and Crystal
Palace Casino and the Nassau
Beach Hotel to aid the resolu-
tion of our association’s dispute
over the unilateral reduction in
the payment in Christmas
bonus and failure to negotiate
our industrial agreement on a
timely basis?”

The “yes” vote comes a day

after Baha Mar executive

Mpbert Sands expressed seri-
us concerns following

\mours of “some form of

ilustrial action” at the Wynd-

Fp Nassau Resort on Super

wl Sunday.

Mr Sands said that any form

if industrial action not only had
ihe potential of permanently

"es.

jeopardising the feputation of
the casino, but the employees’
livelihoods and the well-being
of their individual families.

The senior vice president also
said that the hotel had recently
introduced a number of posi-
tive initiatives in response to
the employee’s concerns,
among them the introduction
of a non-contributory plan and
the revision of the medical plan.

He added that the entire
compensation and bonus incen-
tive plan is also now under
review for all employees.

However, Mr Ferguson
claims that Mr Sand’s state-
ments are only “empty promis-
3”

The Tribune asked Mr Fer-
guson when the strike action
would occur. The date was still
“under review,” he replied.

Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007

@ HRH Prince Edward, the Earl of Wessex
and Arthur D. Hanna, Governor General of the
Bahamas, present Ms. Elaine Gomez with the
Governor-General’s Youth Award for 10 years of
service.

¢ SEE STORY ON PAGE TWO

(Photo: Ana Bianca Marin)

Minister leads ‘raid’ on
land fill removal sites

@ By BRENT DEAN

LESLIE Miller, Minister of
Agriculture and Marine
Resources, led the press on a
“raid” of two sites where land
fill was being removed without
proper authorisation.

Mr Miller, accompanied by the.

police, pulled up to the first site
in the Carmichael Road area yes-
terday afternoon. He confronted
workers on the site asking who
gave them permission to extract
fill. He ordered them to stop.

“What you all are doing here
is totally destroying the land
from any sort of cultivation or
anything else by going down
about six feet below the road
grade. I mean this is a total dis-
grace. Why would you do this?
Why would you gouge out the
land like this?”



Mi MINISTER of Agriculture
and Marine Resources
Leslie Miller

Minister Miller then instructed the workers to give nn the tele-

phone number of their boss.

The Minister called and spoke with their boss in front of the press.
Mr Miller informed the man that he was removing fill from agri-
cultural land. The Minister got the name of the person who had
hired the work crew and gave this information to the police officers

standing nearby.

The police ordered the workers to stop the extraction immedi-

ately.

Meanwhile, Mr Miller said he would have the Ministries of
Environmental Health and Works posta bora notice to stop all

extraction on the site.

Minister Miller then took the press to a site next to the Sir Milo
Butler highway where major extractions have taken place, leaving
a dangerously thin layer of rock next to the road — which may in

time collapse with erosion.

As the Minister arrived on the site, a worker on a tractor — who
may have been foreign — jumped'and ran from the vehicle when he

SEE page 12

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PRICE — 75¢

UN global warming report makes

orim reading for the Bahamas

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas could see a
dangerous decrease in fresh
water supplies, stronger hur-
ricanes and loss of land mass
in the'next few decades due
to the global warming trend,
according to the results of a
new United Nations report
released yesterday in Paris.

In their most dire progno-
sis on global warming to
date, 133 of the world’s top
climate scientists yesterday
‘released their findings on the

levels are rising faster than
anticipated and that as a con-
sequence places like the

Bahamas and Florida will be

partially submerged within
the next few decades.

The report, which is pre-
dicting a bleak future, is con-
sidered to be “a little cau-
tious and conservative”
because it represents the
views of more than 1,000 sci-
entists from more than LOO
different nations.

Scientists and Environ-
mentalists are warning that
it is time for low-lying coun-
tries such as the Bahamas to

stop “sticking their heads in
the sand” and address the
consequences and future
implications of a drastic cli-
mate change.

Speaking to the public
after the release of the
report, French President
Jacques Chirac called for an
economic and political “rev-
olution” to save the planet.

“We are on the historic
threshold of the irre-
versible,” warned President
Chirac.

Bahamian environmental-

SEE page 12

phenomenon, stating that sea

Baggage handler accused of
conspiracy to import cocaine

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS

MIAMI, Florida — Nassau Flight Services
baggage handler Roney Tony is to go on tri-
al March 19 charged with four counts of con-
spiracy to import 500 grams or more of a sub-
stance containing a detectable amount of
cocaine. The USA may also introduce evi-
dence accusing Tony of conspiring to illegal-
ly import blasting caps.

According to official court dockets, the
US Government may introduce into evidence
that Tony conspired on or about May 9, 2006,

to illegally import 500 grams or more of

cocaine into the United States.
"On May 9, 2006, defendant Tony met

with another individual at the Nassau Beach
Hotel and agreed to import one kilogram of
cocaine into the United States using a couri-
er he identified as Ladaria Higgs," the court
document alleged.

"The Government may also introduce...evi-
dence that defendant Tony conspired on or
about May 17, 2006, to illegally transport
blasting caps into the United States."

Tony was arraigned on these charges ina
Miami Federal Court on December 19, one
day after he and four other NFS baggage
handlers were arrested at the Fort Laud-
erdale airport when they arrived from Nassau

SEE page 12



SS ee




PAGE 6, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007

THE TRIBUNE |



Positive response’ for Professional
Security Association of the Bahamas

THE newly-formed Profes-
sional Security Association of
the Bahamas has received an
“overwhelming” positive
response from all sectors of
Bahamian society, according
to its president Byron Rogers.

Since the organisation was
formed in November 30, 2006
representatives from the busi-
ness community, government
agencies, hotels and civil
organisations, have expressed
their support, he said.

Mr Rogers noted that this
followed an initial endorse-
ment from Commissioner of
Police Paul Farquharson, his
deputy John Rolle and sever-
al assistant police commis-
sioners.

Private Security Companies
in The Bahamas, along with
other ancillary security service
providers, have long sought,
since 1974 to come together
to form one body and address
the many concerns that hold
back growth within the indus-
try. The PSAB and its mem-
bers are making strides to
change the overall attitude for
the betterment of all members
by speaking with one voice.

‘After many sacrifices and
efforts made by key individu-
als since the year 2000, and
continuing with a resurgence
of those efforts throughout the
year 2006, The Professional
Security Association Of the
Bahamas (PSAB) was again
reintroduced officially on
November 30, 2006.

The association’s previous
constitution was extensively
amended after being reviewed
and discussed from the attend-
ing body of security compa-
nies and later ratified, along
with confirming elected offi-






Sunday School: 10am

Radio Bible Hour:
Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2

FUNDAMENTAL
Preachering 11am & 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC

Pastor:H. Mills

Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm . °

“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are”
Pastor: H. Mills * Phone: 393-0563 * Box N-3622



THEB



11:00AM

Prince Charles Drive
11:00AM



Bernard Road
11:00AM

Zion Boulevard
10:00AM
7:00AM

East Shirley Street
11:00AM
7:00PM

9:30AM

Avenue
8:00AM
9:30AM

11:00AM




RADIO PROGRAMMES

Your Host:

Your Host:



Church at 7:30pm.



Ad 8 Chi

AHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
owen P.O. Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas
seme Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-81 35

Mame CHURCH SERVICES
Cr SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2007
THIRD SUNDAY BEFORE LENT

AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road
Rev. Mark Carey/HC

ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,

Rev. Dr. Laverne Lockhart/HC
COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Pastor Sharon Loyley/HC
CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,

Rev. Charles Sweeting/HC
Rev. Charles Sweeting.

EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,

Pastor Martin Loyley/HC
Pastor Martin Loyley

GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH,
Queen’s College Campus
Rev. James Neilly/HC

ST. MICHAEL’S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill

Connections - Rev. Phillip Stubbs
Rev. Philip Stubbs/HC

.. TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
Mr. Reginald W. Eldon/HC
7:00PM Mr. David Higgs

FAI ICI IOI IOI ITI IIIT OO TOC IO IOI OOOO IO TOTO III TOT AITO IIT

RENEWAL’ on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1

Rev. Dr. Laverne R. Lockhart
‘METHODIST MOMENTS! on each weekday at 6:55a.m,
Rev. Dr. Laverne R. Lockhart

BAHAMAS METHODIST WOMEN’S FELLOWSHIP (NASSAU REGION) will be holding
their monthly meeting on Monday, February 5, 2007 at St Michael’s Methodist

COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH will be holding a Dedication Service for
their New Extension on Sunday, February 18, 2007 at 3:00pm.

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www. gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 4TH, 2007
7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Bro. Ernest Miller
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Usher Board Anniversary
7:00 p.m. Sis. Tezel Anderson/Board of Finance & Investments _

mele lg Col ALLL. Le us” (1 Peter 5:7)

cers, directors and the
appointment of.a number of
committees after a series of
meetings. As the security pro-
fession remains a “special-
ized” service, the two main
objectives that the PSAB will
be seeking to secure are as fol-
lows:



@ MR ROGERS said there
* was an initial endorsement
from Commissioner of Police

Paul Farquharson (pictured)

Comprehensive statutory
recognition and protection for
the industry, and have the
right to self-regulate the affairs
of the security industry.

- The PSAB is well on its
way, despite the efforts by
independent factions who
want to “divide” the member-
ship. by desiring to create
another security associa-
tion....to assume leadership
without having invested any










































OBKCRaMe









effort from the beginning.

Said the PSAB statement:

“The PSAB has brought
and will continue to bring the
best and the brightest minds to
work together for the better-
ment of the membership in
the security industry. We
sought to combine our efforts
in that regard by inviting rele-
vant professional expertise in
the areas of business, law,
finance, professional leader-
ship and law enforcement
partnerships and with tremen-
dous emphasis on training.
Undoubtedly, the PSAB
membership through training,
will realize a much higher
standard of service than is cur-
rently being provided to its
clients.

“In short, the PSAB visual-
izes greater benefits for its
members,)such as:

“Training syllabus designed
to upgrade and certify securi-
ty officers;

increased wages and bene-
fits;

major medical/life insur-
ance;

employers liability for secu-
rity officers;

improved working condi-
tions;

- emergency relief fund (loss
of employment due to special
circumstances). There will also
bea

credit union for members;

discount members credit
card;

develop a pension scheme
(retirement plan);
attorney/legal representation
for members and security
companies; participate within
a Special Security Task Force
(candidates who qualify),
executive, administrative and
training facilities/offices.

“With regard to the busi-
ness community and general
public, the PSAB is develop-
ing and has installed the fol-
lowing to date:

¢ Clear Code of Conduct;




Sunday School: 9:45am

Prayer Time: 6:30pm

Center

each Sunday morning on
Joy 101.9 at 8:30a.m

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ° Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 4TH, 2007
11:30 a.m. & 7:00 p.m. Services

Speaker:Pastor Marcel Lightbourne

| LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH
| Grounded In The Past & Geared To the Future

Worship Time: lam & 7pm

Place; The Madeira Shopping

Pastor Knowles can be heard

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles
P.O. Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
Email-lynnk@batelnet.bs

e Mission statement
(designed for the PSAB by
Mr. Paul Thompson, Advis-
er);

© More accountability from
the security companies

¢ Membership data bank

¢ Complaint division (re:
customers/clients and general
public);

¢ Security Disciplinary Tri-
bunal;

¢ Public liability to protect
the clients’ properties, staff
and customers.”

The PSAB said that Com-
missioner of Police Paul Far-
quharson and his office,
Deputy Prime Minister and
Minister of National Security,
Mrs. Cynthia Pratt, and other
business entities are impressed
with its mandate to move
ahead.

Internationally, the PSAB
said, it has also received

! Torn Bibles, broken pews, flattened
homes are left in tornado’s path



m@ LADY LAKE, Fla.

PARISHIONERS walked over
the splintered remains of the
Lady Lake Church of God on Fri-
day, rescuing torn Bibles from the
jumble of broken pews, altar and
glass left behind by a tornado,
according to Associated Press.
’ Someone had pulled a framed
religious poem nearly unscathed
from the rubble. Its title: “The

. Touch of the Master’s Hand.”

The reinforced building had
been considered an emergency
shelter before the storm early Fri-
day turned it into a twisted mess
of wood and metal. Pieces of alu-
minum roof hung from oak
branches and clanked in the wind.

Across a 30-mile swath, the
twister:and thunderstorms killed
at least 19 people and laid waste
to, hundreds of homes.

People pulled the bodies of
their neighbors from under the
rubble in the rural central Florida











Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles






Girace and Peace Wesleyan Church

A Society of The Free

Worship time: Lla.m. & 7pm,
Adult Sunday School: I0a.m.
Church School during Worship Service

Place: Twynam Heights

off Prince Charles Drive

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O.Box SS-563]1
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

‘OME T



RSHIP_LEAVE TO SE



endorsements from several of
the United States’ “most
respected high profile and
credible law enforcement
associations, one of whom is
associated directly with the
US Homeland Security and
other associations from the
Caribbean.”

As an example the PSAB
named:

¢ International Association
of Chiefs of Police (IACP);

¢ National Organization of
Black Law Enforcement
Executives (NOBLE);

e American Society for
Industrial Security (ASIS);

* Council of International



@ ANGELINA JOLIE
(AP Photo)

Angelina Jolie
to ‘scatter her
mother's ashes
in Bahamas’

HOLLYWOOD actress
Angelina Jolie will scatter
her mother’s ashes in the
Bahamas, the US enter-
tainment media has report-

Investigators (CII) and the ed.
¢ Association of Caribbean The celebrity is said to
Chiefs of Police (AACP) - have chosen a secret spot
The PSAB said it is the only in the chain of islands

because her mother, actress
Marcheline Bertrand, loved
spending time here.

Ms Bertrand was with
her son James Haven, her
daughter Angelina and
Brad Pitt when she lost her
lengthy battle with cancer
last Saturday at the age of
56.

recognized security associa-
tion, as accepted by the secu-
rity industry in The Bahamas.



area northwest of Orlando.

“Hell opened up and half the
demons came out,” said Russell
Timmons, of Lady Lake.

In the Lake Mack section of
Paisley, Bernadette Fields, 67,
said her house sustained little
damage, but friends told her the
force of the tornado blew two of
her neighbors out the bedroom
wall of their mobile homes and
into the lake where they died.

The couple’s dog found them,
she said.

“The wind picked me up four
times and put me back down,”
said Nellie Byrd, who huddled
with her husband as the storm
shook their home.

A lone baby doll lay in the
street, clothes hung from downed
trees and telephone poles jutted
at 45-degree angles. Mobile
homes had crumpled in on them-
selves, creating massive garbage
heaps. A pickup truck lay upside
down in a field.




She died on January 27

at Cedars-Sinai Medical

_ Centre in Los Angeles after

a more than seven year bat-
tle with the disease.

It was revealed earlier
this week that Marcheline
died happy in the knowl- -
edge her daughter had
finally found love and sta-
bility with Pitt.












ly magazine that Ms
Bertrand approved “com-
pletely” of the celebrity
couple’s relationship and
that she loved Pitt.

Ms Bertrand, whose first
husband was Oscar-win-
ning actor Jon Voight —
father of her two children —
had small roles in 80s
movies Lookin' to Get Out
and The Man Who Loved
Women.
















THE BAHAMAS, TURKS AND CAICOS ISLANDS
CONFERENCE
OF THE METHODIST CHURCH IN THE
CARIBBEAN AND THE AMERICAS _
L’EGLISE METHODISTE DANS LA CARAIBE

ET LES AMERIQUES
NASSAU CIRCUIT Or cHURCErS tem
108 Montrose Avenue
P.O. Box EE=16379, Nassau, Bahamas; Telephone: 325-6432; Fax:
328-2784; rhodesmethod@batelnet.bs
METHODISM: RAISED UP IN THE. PROVIDENCE OF GOD,
TO REFORM THE NATION, BUT ESPECIALLY THE CHURCH
AND TO SPREAD SCRIPTURAL HOLINESS THROUGHOUT
THE LAND (Father John Wesley)
“Celebrating 223 years of continuous Methodist witness
for Christ in The Bahamas”
THE SIXTH LORD’S DAY AFTER THE NATIVITY,
FEBRUARY 4, 2007
COLLECT:
Almighty God, by whose grace alone we are accepted and called to
your service: strengthen us by your Holy Spirit and make us worthy
of our calling; through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord, who is alive
and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now
and forever. = :

$





















WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH (Malcolm Rd East)
9:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes (Holy Communion)
3:00 p.m. Circuit Youth March and Rally




RHODES MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (108 Montrose
Ave. near Wulff Rd)







7:00 a.m. Bishop Rev. Dr. Raymond R. Neilly
(Holy Communion)
10:00 a.m. Sis. Patrice Strachan
11:00 a.m. Rev. Emily A. Demeritte / Rev. Mark. S. Christmas



COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH (Rose Street, Fox
Hill)
11:00 a.m. Rev. Leonard G. Roberts, Jr. (Holy Communion)
Live Broadcast on 1540
PROVIDENCE METHODIST CHURCH (Shirley Plaza)
11:00 a.m. Rev. Stacia Williams- Christmas (Holy Communion)
HERITAGE OF REDEEMING LOVE METHODIST CHURCH
(28 Crawford St, Oakes Field) ‘

7:00 a.m. Rev. Edward J. Sykes (Holy Communion)
10:00 a.m. Bishop Rev. Dr, Raymond R. Neilly
GOOD SHEPHERD METHODIST CHURCH

8:00 a.m. Rev. Emily A. Demeritte (Holy Communion)
CROIX-DES-MISSIONS ALDERSGATE (Quackoo Street)

5:30 p.m. Fridays Children’s Club

9:30a.m. Sunday —_ Circuit Mission and Evangelism
METHODIST MISSION CENTRE (Quackoo St) -Thrift Shop and
other Ministries
JOHN WESLEY METHODIST COLLEGE (28 Crawford St., Oakes
Field) Reception to Primary
















FASTING FOR JUSTICE - All Methodists of the Conference are
urged to fast for Justice to in the Methodist Cases. The fast begins
weekly after the evening meal on Thursday and ends at noon on
Friday. This we proclaim unswervingly: “My God and My Right.”







RADIO PROGRAMS

“Vision” - On the Lord’s Day, ZNS | at 9 p.m.; “Great Hymns of

Inspiration” - On the Lord’s Day, Radio 810 at 5:30 p.m; “Family
Vibes” ZNS 1, Tuesday, 7:30 p.m.; “To God be the Glory” ZNS 1,
Tuesday, 7:45 p.m.









PRAYERS
For Justice to prevail in the Methodist Cases. Our brothers and sisters
in the Middle East, those affected by hurricanes and other natural disasters,
and the Privy Council Appeal.




A source told Us Week-. .°.-.


—

}

Fax: (242) 328-2398

.. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007

SECTION

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

‘

MIAMI HERALD SPORTS






The

Hees MA ganay
ted ag gah
{hytong

Se,
aaa
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@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE






“*.° BOXING
By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter

IN A rare battle of two

"7. southpaws, it was Jermaine

‘Choo Choo’ Mackey’s right
hand that finished Puerto
Rican Anibal ‘El Olimpico’
Acevedo on Thursday night at
the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasi-
um.

Mackey took advantage of
his height and his effective
right jab and uppercut to stop
Acevedo in the seventh round
to retain his World Boxing
Council’s CABOFE
Caribbean Boxing Federa-
tion’s super middleweight title.
Two minutes and nine sec-
-*.*, onds into the seventh of the

-- 12 scheduled rounds main
event bout on the First Class
Promotion’s first professional
show for the year, Acevedo
turned his back and knelt
down for a mandatory eight
count,

However, he didn’t continue
fighting and Mackey was
awarded a TKO decision.
Instead, Acevedo had to be
treated for quite some time in
his corner by the ring doctors
for what appeared to be a bro-
Ken nose.

“I was really excited, going
against an opponent with 19
fights,” reflected Mackey of

. the one-time Olympic silver

medalist who came from Puer-

“I: to Rico with 14-4-1 record. “I

know I had to work hard here.
I did my homework. I said I
would put it all in the ring.

“For the first three rounds, it

- was really hard. I knew he
would come on strong. I start-
ed to slunk, but my coach (Ray
Minus Jr.) told me that’s not
the way to go. So I just fought
my fight and it came in.”

In the third, Acevedo took
control of the fight when
caught Mackey with a series
of combinations. Mackey tried
to counter punch, but the
Puerto Rican avoided getting
him, leaving the Bahamian
swinging at the air.

“He could throw some com-
bination. He caught me with
some combinations,” Mackey
stated. “I was dizzy, but I
shook it off. But I said I was
training hard and there’s no
way he’s going to beat.”

After regaining control of
the fight in the fourth, Mackey
went into another gear in the
fifth as he threw what seemed
like a million shots, rocking

_..._ the head and body of Aceve-

572 GO,

oe “T came out very aggressive,
but I wasn’t willing to take a
chance. I wanted to knock out
bad, but I said I will wait on it.

I got a couple (shots) in that
round, so I said I will wait on
it.”

In the sixth, nothing much
happened as both fighters
slowed down the pace.

But Mackey went back to
the head and body of Acevedo
and with the fans on their feet

cheering, he threw another
series of punches that set up
the knockdown.

_ “It was off the hook. He
knew the jab was coming, so I
threw a jab uppercut that
caught him right on the nose,”
said Mackey of the big blow.
“T had already softened up his
nose with the jab. The upper-
cut just caught him and it
broke his nose.”

Despite the way he ended
it, Mackey knew that he was in
for a real battle.

“TI had to change up my
punches and throw more

honke ” -- :

a a ee eee



he counter-attacked Acevedo.
“T had the jab off the hook,
straight rights. He caught me
with a couple shots, so I said I
would stay off him because
he’s a real slugger.”

Mackey said with Acevedo
having the edge in experience,
having fought at the Olympic
Games, he wanted to be a little
cautious and wait until the
opportune time to strike.

When he did, he said he
knew that there was no way
that the Puerto Rican could
stop him,

Now Mackey said he wants
to go after the British Com-
monwealth title. The last
Bahamian to hold a British
Commonwealth title was
Minus Jr., who was the ban-
tamweight and lightweight
champion,

“Pll be back in the gym
come Monday,” stressed
Mackey as he looks ahead to
his future.

Promoter Michelle Minus,
wife of Minus Jr., said they
were quite pleased with Mack-
ey’s performance and they are
definitely going to pursue the
British Commonwealth title
shot this year.

She revealed that they will
lobby to host it here at the
Kendal Isaacs Gym, but if it’s
too costly to bring to the
Bahamas, then they will have
to go on the road and fight in
the champion’s hometown.

Mackey’s only defeat came
last year when he traveled to
Canada and lost a split deci-
sion,

@ JERMAINE ‘CHOO
CHOO’ Mackey in action
against Anibal ‘El Olimpico’
Acevedo.

(Photo: Tim Clarke)



CE y

STAR TRACKERS TRACK



}

fifteen Thousand



@ FRONT: L-R Coach David Charlton,
Back: L-R Coach Trevor Strachan,

@ STAR Trackers Track & Field
Club will be hosting the Baker Con-
struction Bahamas, Ltd. “Star Per-
formers Track Classic 2007” on Sat-
urday, February 3rd. The mect will
take place at the Thomas A. Robinson
Track & Field Stadium at the Queen
Elizabeth Sports Centre. The meet will
run from 10am until 7pm. Tickets will
cost $5 for adults, $3 for children and
$10 for V.LP.

This track meet is for divisions under
sine tx anen Tt is sanctioned by the

Bahamas Association of Athletic
Associations (B.A.A.A.) and Interna-
tional Amateur Athletic Federation
(L.A.A.F.) rules apply.

This meet is being held under the
distinguished patronage of Debbie Fer-
guson-McKenzie. Competing in this
meet will be two of Jamaica’s Star
Junior Athletes, Yohan Blake and
Carrie Russell, Both of them were
2006 World Junior Bronze Medalists.
There will be over 500 athletes com-

peting from Nassau, Freeport and the .

Laura Pratt-Charlton, J.R. McDonald (Baker Cons
Henry Bethel (Baker Construction), Coach Rudolph Ferguson

Turks and Caicos Islands.

The Star Trackers are proud to have
Baker Construction Bahamas, Ltd. as
the title sponsor for the second year.

Star Trackers Track & Field Club
is a non-profit club, officially started in
2001, and has over 35 high school ath-
letes, David Charlton, well known
Carifta athlete, is the head coach. He
is assisted by coaches Rudolph Fergu-
son and Trevor Strachan,

The Star Trackers are proud to state
that in their short history they have

truction),



i OA) AN
LS CGH i( }

®
q

obtained nine athletic scholarships to
colleges or universities in the United
States. Eighty percent of the club’s
current athletes hold-a 3.0 or higher
grade point average,

For more information on the club,
Visit their website at http:/Avww.star-
trackersbahamas.com,

¢ FOR HIGHLIGHTS FROM
THE STAR TRACKERS’
RECENT TRIP TO JAMAICA -
SEE PAGE TWO

‘Choo Choo’ retains title
with seventh ro






















































\
\
PAGE 2B, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORIS



Ronaldo out
to prove
he's not
finished

m SOCCER
MILAN, Italy

Associated Press

RONALDO is deter-
mined to prove he can
still score goals.

“I'm not finished,” the
30-year-old Brazilian
striker said Friday at his
first news conference
since joining AC Milan
from Real Madrid. “I’ve
had little opportunity to
play in the last six
months, but here at»
Milan I'll have the
chance to show the
whole world that the
Ronaldo story goes on.”

The three-time FIFA
world player of the year
signed an 18-month deal

-with Milan on Tuesday,

hoping to re-ignite his
season — and career —
after limited play under
Madrid coach Fabio
Capello.

“My time with Capello
was short, ugly and sad,”
Ronaldo said, “He did-
n’t have faith in me and
he never told me why.”

He was relegated toa
part-time role after
Capello arrived in
Madrid in the summer.
Ronaldo didn’t play
until October because of
a knee injury, which lat-
er recurred to keep him
out another month. He
scored only one league
goal in seven appear-
ances, mostly as a sub-
stitute, compared with
82 goals in 120 league
games in his first four

seasons at Madrid.

“I’ve come to Milan
because it represents a
sporting challenge, the
most important of my
life,” Ronaldo said.

Ronaldo was flanked
by Milan vice president
Adriano Galliani, who
brokered the $9.7 mil-
lion transfer.

“Ronaldo’s resume is
stratospheric,” Galliani
said. “He is a phenome-
non.”

Ronaldo has won
almost ever major tro-
phy in world soccer at
least once. He’s lifted
the World Cup twice —
in 1994 and 2002 — and
is the tournament’s all-
time leading scorer with
15 goals.

“Capello told me over
lunch last Wednesday
that Ronaldo is the most
talented player he has
ever coached,” Galliani
said,

The transfer brought
Ronaldo back to the city
where he spent five
years with crosstown
rival Inter Milan
between 1997 and 2002.

“My time at Inter was
very beautiful but it
ended badly,” said
Ronaldo, who left for
Madrid after falling out

’ with then coach Hector

Cuper.

At the time, Ronal-
do’s decision upset Inter
fans because the club
had helped the forward
recover from a knee
injury that restricted
him to a handful of
appearances from 1998,

“Everyone has their
own path to take,”
Ronaldo said, “I’m in
love with soccer and
with playing soccer, All
I expect is respect.”

Milan is ninth in
Italy’s Serie A after
starting the season with
an eight-point penalty
from a match-fixing
scandal,

“My objective is to get
Milan in the top four (in
Serie A),” Ronaldo said,

‘Inter leads the league
with 57 points, 30 more
than Milan.

“ll do everything
that (Milan coach Carlo
Ancelotti) tells me to do
to reach my objective,”
Ronaldo said. “The
challenge is the most
important thing, it
always has been. ... I'll
do my talking on the
pitch.”

Theophile loses
in comeback bout

BOXING
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter



WILSON ‘Kid Wonder’ Theophile was .

hoping to make his comeback a grand
one Thursday night. Puerto Rican Joseph
de los Santos, however, had other plans.

Sluggish after sitting out the past two
years with a fractured jaw, Theophile
gave it all he had, but Santos prevailed in
the end with an unanimous decision in
the co main event of the First Class Pro-
motions’ first professional show for the
year.

“TI feel it was a fair decision. I just came
on late in the fight, but he won that one,”
Theophile reflected. “I felt as thought I
was behind in the fight and so my coach
told me to throw a little more punches.”

Santos out-jabbed and counter-
punched well against Theophile for the
first two rounds before he went to work in
the third, That was when Santos caught
Theophile with a left hook that sent him
flat on his back for an eight count.

Theophile got back up on his feet and
continued fighting, but Santos went on
to win another round,

It wasn’t until the fifth that Theophile
was more the aggressor as he picked the
pace. And in the sixth, he had the fans on
their feet cheering for him as he out-.
slugged Santos.

Santos, however, regained control of
the fight at the end of the round as
Theophile turned his back at least twice
before the bell sounded,

For Theophile, it wasn't what he
expected in his return after the two-year
lay-off, And, if his performance was any
indication, he admits that he has a lot of
work to do.

“I did my best. He did his best, That's
all we could ask for,” he charged, “But
the best man won. I tip my hat off to him.
He beat me tonight,” ‘

In what was perhaps the most exciting
bout on the undercard, Damian ‘the
Blade’ Tinker was just a little too much
for Hensley ‘the Bruiser’ Strachan to han-
dle,

In their four round junior welterweight
bout, Tinker established his speed as he
used his height to get on the inside to
out-box Strachan in the first two rounds.

To his credit, Strachan made a gallant
effort in the final two rounds as he
counter-punched well, But he kept his
guard down and Tinker came back on

DUODO DEERE RSE DOPED ED EO DEP OP ORD ROPER DOP SPEREDEREF EP EDI DOOD OR

Star Trackers sp
at Jamaican m

@ TRACK AND FIELD

































THE Star Trackers Track &

Field Club returned home AARON WILMORE
eee with ats to be proud 200m — 23.05 (4th)
of. Sixteen of their athletes
competed at the 3rd Edition of THEREZE MISSICK ’
the Douglas Forrest Invitation- 400m — 1:00.81 PR (4th)
al Meet in Kingston, Jamaica DEVON CREARY
on Saturday, January 13th 200m - 23.11 (Sth )
which saw performances from ee
over 2,000 athletes from TAI DORSETT
Jamaica, Cayman Islands and 400mH — 1:09.94 (6th)
the Bahamas. ;

P’LAR DORSETT

The team was lead by Coach-
es David Charlton and Rudolph
Ferguson, along with Team
Manager Laura Pratt-Charlton,

: LAUREN CHARLTON
parents and supporters. The
team left a lasting first impres- HJ — 1.35m (9th)
sion in Jamaica as they record- NEJMI BURNSIDE
ed some spectacular perfor- 400mH — 59.90 PR
mances,
The athletes started off the (19th/35)
meet by Natalya Beneby win- REMAAL THOMPSON

ning the very first event on the
track, the Open Women’s 400m
Hurdles in a time of 1:03.20 and

they ended the meet with bang | LEEZA GLINTON
as Trevor Strachan Jr. ran away 200m — 27.65 (26th/63) —
with the 1500m in a personal :
best time of 4:19.02. res ont ee he Suhel
" h ighli r » ( 7 ° ATTN me 5 08
Pag highlight of the mcet Was 3:26.94 Place 5th (Remaal Printassia pce

the Open Men 1,600 Sprint
Medley. The team of Nathan

OTHER PERFORMANCES:

100mH -16.28 (8th)
200m - 27.22 (18th/63)

200m ~ 23.04 (24th/135)
400m - 52.25 PR (30th/120)

Thompson, Kenneth Wal-

both occasions and made him pay dearly
for it.

“My coach told me that if I had one
more week of workout, I would have
been able to take him out,” Tinker stated.
“T was trying to get in shape, but I only
had two weeks.”

Tinker, 20, said he wasn't concerned
about the blows that Strachan threw
because he knew that it would have tak-
en alot more to put him down,

One of the bouts on the undercard was
to be staged between Alpachino ‘Banger’
Allen and Sean ‘Patches’ McPhee.

But McPhee fought Ryan ‘Big Youth’
McKenzie instead and McKenzie used
his height as he stopped McPhee in the

. we

WWE WAPSo sy





Johnson (left) in

first round of their scheduled four round
light heavyweight bout.

“I'm staying in the gym, trying to devel-
op my skills,” said McKenzie, 21, who
improved to 4-0, “Anyone who steps in
my way, they have to get it. They have to
get what everybody else get.

“But I expected this to be a good fight
because I’ve been training every day,

- working with Kenny (Minus). So very

soon, I will be up there in ‘Choo Choo’
league. I want to go for the title.”
Allen, disappointed that he didn’t get
ta fight, said he had a lot of fans who
came to watch him perform and even
though he claimed he was on time for the
third bout, they Ict his opponent fight in

Arnett, Aaron Wilmore, Nejmi lace-Whitfield, Nejmi the 200m
Burnside and Dwayne Fergu- Burnside and Nathan
son, running the 400m, 200m, Arnett)
200m and 800m respectively,
won the event in 3:31.70, This OPEN WOMEN
win came much to the surpri 1,600 SPRINT MEDLEY
Prise | 4:31.43 4th (Thereze Mi

of the Jamaicans whose aunties: eek Gath Ee EO AUR
announcer had already boast- sick, Printassia Johnson,
ed, “The Bahamians not taking | Leeza Glinton and Tai
home the GOLD"! Dorsett)

The baby of the group, Print-
assia Johnson, won the 200m in — overall he was sed wi ‘

’ s pleased with the

25.14 and Kenneth Wallace- performances of all the athletes
Whitfield won the 800m in and they all gave 110 per cent.
1:55.88, surpassing the Carifta He was even more impressed
qualifying standards and also with the fact that this was the
recording his personal best. first meet for the season and
Nathan Arnett placed 2nd in can hardly wait for the rest of
the Open Men 400m Hurdles in (he season’s meets. The team
a time of 54,76, Devon Creary competes again at the 4th Star
placed 3rd in the 400m in atime performers Track Classic today.
of 51.14 (PR). Dwayne Fergu- — H¢ is also looking forward to @ RIGHT:
son was 3rd in the 800m in a taking the team back to Jamaica Remaal
time of 1:58.70, for the Gibson Relays in Feb- Thompson

Coach Charlton said that in the 400m

ruary,



the first fight.

“T don’t think it was fair to me and to
my fans,” said Allen, who was looking
forward to taking on McPhee, “A lot of
people spent a lot of money to come and
watch me fight, but they didn’t allow me '
to fight.”

However, promoter Micktelle Minus:
said Allen wasn’t on time when the World
Boxing Council’s representatives, present
to assist First Class Promotions, checked
the line-up to get the card going,

Despite not getting the opportunity to
fight, Allen said he wil get right back in
the gym to train and he will take his frus-
tration out on whoever he faces in the
next show.

DUD eeeeeenP Aree ePePePREROREEDEOER ODD DSDDOEERRSDEDEDEREGEPEODENGDEDEDSDSDED OSE EF OSES PIES ESRESESEDSHEDO SPE O USED OPER ED ELEODIVEDEDEDEDEDIDEDEDODELESEDONTI SSRI VELEREIEVEGY Nee peenenerernnerennennen eee nreene PONDS Pee OR DORSET EPR RU TONDO R REET ERS ASSRE RR eRe naeaeene na ee eee nee ean ee eH Tey eee



"s weather. Temperatures are today
highs and tonights's lows.

Shown is today

Albuquerque 44/6 23/-5 49/9 28/-2
45/7 30/-1
32/0 10/-12
27-2 10/-12

22/-5 13/-10

46/7 28/-2
36/2 17/-8
35/1 15/-9
32/0 18/-7
19/-7 5/-15
Charleston,SC 56/13 31/0
10/-12 -4/-20
20/-6 5/-15
42/5 32/0
26/-3 18/-7
12/-11 3/-16
78/25 60/15 s

Atlantic City

Ss





jaaeic ae

Jacksonville
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Liftle Rock
Los Angeles
Louisville
Memphis
Miami
Minneapolis
Nashville -

New Orleans

New York

Oklahoma City

Orlando

Chance of a late-night

Mostly cloudy.



AccuWeather

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFee
elevation on the

| ATF8 8-6. -—§ 5415 sf
56/13 34/1
SAT 8d.
60/15 37/2
40/4 25/-3
73/22 48/8
29/1 12/-11
40/4 27/-2
82/27 65/18
-2)-18-12/-24
36/2 24/-6
51/10 39/3
- 32/0 14/-10
34/1 24/-4
66/18 46/7 c.

B13 pe



°° 73/22 6317 sh





Low: 69°







High

: «FC
Philadelphia == 34

Phoenix 66/18



Pittsburgh
Portland, OR 4718

Raleigh-Durham 46/7 ©

St. Louis * 23/-5

Salt Lake City —-28/-2.

San Antonio 49/9

SanDiego = 64/17

San Francisco 59/15
Seattle 46/7
Tallahassee 52/11

Tampa titsé~ BD

Tucson 64/17
Washington, DC 36/2

Amsterdam

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.

A couple of showers Mostly cloudy.

possible; windy.

High: 77°

Mostly cloudy, a
shower possible.

High: 75°

Rather cloudy with
spotty showers.

High: 79° © Bangkok

High: 70°



Barcelona
PR mace - pdb

75°-64° F
nsity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
gh and the low for the day.

PPR rma

70°-59° F

Yan CYuamattia as

of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine inte
Id a person feels. Temperatures reflect the hi

Yom rma

78°-63° F

| Temperature? is an index that combines the effects
human body—everything that effects how warm or co





46am. -0.2



Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday

_ Temperature

. 86° F/30° C
... 67° F/19° C
77° F/25° C
. 64° F/18° C
. 79° F/26° C
.... 65° F/18° C

3:47 p.m. -0.1









Normal high
Normal low
Last year’s high .
Last years low

Te ft



Caracas

As of 1 p.m. yesterday
Year to date
Normal year to date

AccuWeather.com

All forecasts and maps provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007

‘Dublin




SAN SALVADOR

High: 83° F/28° C
Low: 73° F/23°C





MAYAGUANA

Today
High: 85° F/29°C
72/22 - 47/8
10-12 OF 17

ATES RAGGED ISLAND

High: 84° F/29° C
Low: 70° F/21°C

Low: 74° F/23°C




25/-3 13/-10 |
ae GREAT INAGUA
85° F/29°C

Low: 74° F/23°C







INSURANCE MANAGEMEN

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS








NIARINE FORECAST - PAE eS
Today Sunday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
High Low W High Low W HASSAU Today: VAR at 6-12 Knots 0-1 Feet 5-7 Miles 76° F
FIC FIC F/C F/C Sunday: NE at 7-14 Knots 1-2 Feet 3-5 Miles 76° F








» 99/31 73/22 pe ~~ ~—« 88/31. 73/22 © ~— FREEPORT Today: NNW at 10-20 Knots 2-3 Feet 4-7 Miles 75° F
35/1 pc. 44/6 38/3 s Sunday: Nat 12-25 Knots 3-5 Feet 3-5 Miles 75°F








‘Ankara, Turkey 154-9 sn (28/2 21-6 sn ABACO Today: NNW at 8-16 Knots 1-3 Feet 4-7 Miles 75°F
Athens 43/6 po 45/7 42/5 sh Sunday: __NNE at 12-25 Knots 3-5 Feet 3-5 Miles 75° F
‘Auckland “60/15 pe ——s« 72/22. BOIS pe



91/32 72/22 s P
wana 75a pe PV
5713 44/6 pc
5915 56/13 6

S4/1 251-3 c
45/7 36/2 pc
68/20 58/14 sh



Fe gH Cay











5IA0 30/4 s~
40/4 _ 31/0 pc



\y

41/5

y
\\
\

i







88/31








NU





O15 48/8 pc Ze.
84/28 69/20 pe Ze
25/-3 10/-12 ¢
" 83/28 69/20. pe



Casablanca
Copenhagen

Frankfurt































































Halifax 30/-1 14/-10 pe 22/5 7/-13 pe Pos hed

Havana 86/30 66/18 pe BIAS c 2 aS

Helsinki 34/1 23/-5 ¢ /-4 sn

Hong Kong 6518 56/13 s A Flurries -

isamabad 79726 SIMO po BEE sow LATO eo tce Wena

Istanbul 87/2 32/0 pe [y_Â¥! Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Menges

Jerusalem 48/8 40/46 sak : ot ee

Johannesburg = 74723 59/15 pe

Kingston 89/31 76/24 pc

lima 76/24 68/20 pe

London 50/10 37/2 pe

Manila 83/28 71/21 s

Mexico City (TIT BK

Monterrey 5110 «= 44/6 +

‘Montreal GA SE

Moscow 47/-8 12/-11 sn

Munich ~~ 2S = SAT = 31/0 pe |

Nairobi a 8227 «55/12 c 7 :

NewDelhi 7925 5040s «76/24. S3t s

Oslo 34/1 = 34/1 pe 35/1 25/-3

pie SS CAS 46/f 38/3 s—

Prague 39/3 29/-1 c

Rio de Janeiro 1/27 72/22 : : iS
Riyadh 72/22 57/3 pe _ ES - SS SS . =
Rome ota sae Or you can rest easy knowing

a ees at hat you have excellent insurance ff
Sap Salis eae Se el coverage no matter which :
antiago = 2s : = pe — = =
Santo Domingo 85/29 way the wind blows.

‘Sao Paulo 1322 = =

Seoul 44/6 46/7 30/-1 s 7

‘Stockholm S72 39/3 29/-1 c obody does 1t better. a
Sydney 81/27 69 81/27 69/20 pc = =
Taipei 6890 573s 74/23 GANT S- =
Tokyo eas 49/9 39/3 s «47/8 38/3 S

en ae MANAGEMENT
Trinidad —87/80. 73/22 r 88/31 75/23 sh | (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS .

Vancoar a7 88 poo Ab | SORE : 2 :
Viera =—i(wsti(‘<«*é‘*é GIS:=BI-Z pc AOA 84M pc Fleuthera Fron

‘Warsaw: S962 O72 sn 88/0 38/0 ec BOHR

Winnipeg -12/-24 -23/-30 c -6/-21 -19/-28 ¢

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder- Sees = = SS

storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prep-precipitation, Tr-trace





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