Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
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This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Pei aii a
Claim that photographer Larry Birkhead is
‘definitely’ father of Anna Nicole’s baby daughter

PHOTOGRAPHER Larry
Birkhead is definitely the
father of Anna Nicole Smith’s
baby daughter, it was claimed
on American TV this week.

Ford Shelley, son-in-law of
Ms Smith’s ex-lover Ben
Thompson, said the cover girl
had herself spoken of Mr Birk-
head being the father several
times.

During the relevant time-
frame, only Mr Birkhead and
Mr Thompson had relations
with Ms Smith, he said.

And Mr Thomp on counted
himself out of in reckoning
because he had ha&= vasecto-
my long before. ig

Mr Shelley’s comments came
on Fox TV in an interview with
Greta van Susteren. He admit-
ted his family had helped Ms
Smith flee to the Bahamas,

where she hoped to escape Mr

Birkhead’s paternity claim.

He and Mr Thompson both
spoke of the “loan” advanced
to help Ms Smith buy the luxu-
ry home ‘Horizons’ on Eastern
Road.





ae sre eens a HOt ‘isehoded






SA






I

FASHION AVENUE
7 TO PRICEBUSTERS)

EL: 394-0491

1999 BROADWAY

EAST ST. NORTH
TEL: 325-2632

BUSINESS WEAR
FOR TODAY’S WOMEN



DEPARTMENT STORE POR WOMEN

And they both said that,
despite their legal efforts to get
possession of the house, they
still bore Ms Smith no ill-will
and regarded her as a friend.

Although Ms Smith’s lawyer
and friend Howard K Stern has
claimed publicly that he is the
father of Dannie Lynn Hope,
both said Mr Birkhead is the
only realistic contender.

They said it was likely she
had fled to the Bahamas under
Mr Stern’s influence. He “gov-
erned” her life and resented
the relationship with Mr Birk-
head, they said.

Laws

Even Ms Smith’s late son
Daniel had told them that Mr
Birkhead and Mi Thompson
were the only $wo likely
fathers. “When Héjvard came

down in June to se@ Anna, he
asked me to contact our attor-
ney. We asked about the laws
in the Bahamas and that’s
when we came to the ‘eonclu-
sion that she spoud go there,”





4
Beinn aes
lM hae

(NET ITEMS NOT INCLUDED)

Ss AT ALL OF eee

ACROSS FROM JOHN BULL)
EL: 394-7470

1999 BROADWAY
MALL AT MARATHON
TEL: 394-8282

said Mr Thompson.

At first, Ms Smith asked him
to be named as the father on
the birth certificate, but
after first agreeing he later
declined.

“T tentatively agreed but
then I changed my mind
because I was not the father.
Larry Birkhead was the father.
She never said that Howard
was the father.”

Mr Shelley said: “Anna is a
good person and we love
Anna, but she is governed by
Howard. I think Howard came
between Larry and Anna.
Sub-consciously Howard is
infatuated and in love with
Anna.” |

Both men said Ms Smith was
continuing to occupy Horizons,
though she had been negotiat-
ing to buy another house in
Nassau.

He said a Bahamas court had
decided that her case - in which
she claimed Horizons had been
a gift - “lacked merit”.

“Our attorney, Godfrey Pin-
der, said'they had kicked her
case out,” he added.

When Ms van Susteren

asked if Ms Smith was there- |

fore due to “get the boot”, Mr
Shelley said: “We don’t want
to kick her out, even though
we know the house is
ours.”

He said they didn’t want to
see her on the streets and “

don’t want any ill-will to come:

to her.”

Asked if Ms Smith took
Crugs, he said; “I don’t think
she has doné anything that is
not legal. I think she has issues,
however, with all the stress she
is under.”

Last week, Mr Birkhead
himself told CNN that he was
going to press his paternity
claims to the limit.

‘He denied he was pursuing

i et
EXTERMINATORS

FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 322-2157







@ LARRY BIRKHEAD

Ms Smith because of the for-
tune she could make from her
late husband Howard Mar-
shall’s estate, adding: “I am out
for a lifetime of fatherhood.”
“I kind of hope she doesn’ t
get the money if that is what
money makes you do,” he said,
referring to Ms Smith’s deci-
sion to flee the States.
Mr Birkhead said Ms Smith

shad. been told that. the

Bahamas was “the perfect
place to get away from me =
my paternity claim.”

Glimpse

His attorney, Debra Opri,
said it was “disgusting and nau-
seating” that Mr. Birkhead’s
first glimpse of his own child
was on television.

But she warned that the Cal-

ifornian judge who has ordered °
‘a DNA test on Dannie Lynn

“is losing patience” and was
ready to force the issue.

“The judge has made it clear
that we will win,” she added.

Ms Opri said of Mr Birk-

head: “He loves the child he,
has never seen. He will pursue
this until he is holding that
child.”

de wens







iL

50st ak eee
028, age Ora ata tate

ores oe





a
wi



@ ANNA NICOLE SMITH

ml HOWARD K STERN

(AP FILE Photos) i












































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*Price/Quotes are based on

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Marathon Rd. next door
to Family Guardian

Tel: 394-2669






THE TRIBUNE





© In brief

Seven in
custody
after drugs
discovered

SEVEN people were tak-
en into police custody on
Tuesday after 20 pounds of
marijuana was discovered
at a home on Soldier Road.

According to reports,
Drug Enforcement Unit
officers executed a search
warrant on the house short-
ly after noon.

Upon searching:the
house, officers reported dis-
covering the marijuana in
the wash room.

A family of four men and
three women — all between
the ages of 22 and 60 — were
arrested in connection
with the incident and are
helping police with their
inquiries.

e POLICE yesterday
released the identity of the
country’s first traffic fatali-
ty victim of the year.

Anthony McPhee, 30, of
Market Street died on Sun-
day morning after losing
control of his car and crash-
ing into a wall on East
Street, according to reports.

Police say that McPhee
suffered massive head
injuries and was pro-



LOCAL NEWS

Agatha Marcelle
won't run in next J]
general election

South Beach MP makes —
announcement in House

@ By PAULG
TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

AGATHA Marcelle, MP
for South Beach, officially
announced her intention not
to run in the next general
election yesterday in the
House of Assembly.

Mrs Marcelle, who spoke
to second an amendment to
the Pension Act, told her
constituents of how much she
appreciated their support in
the 2002 elections.

“This is very interesting for
me to rise to second the bill,
as this is the first and only
time that I have been asked
to second a bill in this House;
and I have been here for four
and a half years. So I want to
thank the minister because
this is another opportunity

for me to do something here.

. Also Mr Speaker, I want to

take a few moments to say
something to my constituents
in South Beach.

“T want them to know,
especially those who were not
able to be at the meeting I
called in my constituency
where I publicly announced
that 1 would not be seeking to
be re-elected; I would like to
say to them how much I
appreciated being given their
vote of confidence in 2002 to
come to this place where I
have experienced a lot, and
where I have learnt a lot.

“And, Mr Speaker, I want
to tell them that they will
always be in my heart. I have
spent my life in service of the
Bahamian people, and I will
continue to do that, in a dif-
ferent form in a different





@ AGATHA Marcelle,
MP for South Beach

place,” she said.

Mrs Marcelle said that she
has never been one to allow
what people say to persuade
her.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2









007, PAGE 3

FABULOUS
DESIGNER
FASHIONS

by Designer
EMILIO PUCCI
of Italy



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mes

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* Fax: 326-9953

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Lyford Cay (next to Lyford Cay Real Estate in ae
Harbour Green House) Tel: 362-5235

e-mail: www.colesofnassau.com ° P.O. Box N-121

nounced dead at the scene
shortly after 2am.

His car reportedly over-
turned as he smashed into

She said that she only
allows her life to be guided [J
by God, and with that, she ~

the wall, opposite the

‘ 1 ate .
Church of God of Prophe- Man shot by p olice hao a ae

Pas was driving a 1999 A MAN was shot by. police early Wednesday morning
burgundy Chrysler Cirrus. i after pointing a gun at officers — which was later discovered
to be an imitation.

According to reports, police officers on patrol in the St
Albans Drive area around 2am spotted occupants of a white
Toyota Avalon, who they thought were acting in a suspi-
cious manner.

The officers stopped the vehicle. When a male passenger
got out, they report, he pointed what they believed was a
handgun in their direction.

One of the officers shot the passenger in the right ankle.

. The man was transported to hospital where his condition is
: listed as not life threatening.
~~ ~The handgun, which was recovered, was discovered to be an
imitation.





PM and Governor
General expected
to attend ‘Valley
Family Reunion’

PRIME Minister Perry
Christié'and*Governor Gener=';
al Arthur Hanna are expected.:
to attend a special reunion of
people from The Valley this
weekend. ;

A good-sized turnout. is
expected for ‘The Valley Fam-
ily Reunion’ at the British
Colonial Hilton on Saturday,
according to organising com-
mittee member Marva
Sawyer.

She said proceeds from the
event, which was originally to
have been held last month,
would go to children’s chari-
ties.

“Anyone can.come along,”
she told The Tribune. “You
don’t have to be from The
Valley to attend.”

Cocktails will be served at
8pm with a three-course buffet
dinner starting at 8.30pm.

She said Mr Christie and Mr
Hanna had consented to
attend “because both lived in
The Valley in their early
days.”

Tickets for the event can be
obtained from McCartney’s
Pharmacy in Mount Royal
Avenue or from 328-5494.

Horse from:
Bond movie
to feature in
Nassau show

A HORSE that featured in
the latest James Bond movie
will be takingpart in a Nas-
sau equestrian show on Sun- ALOOD AND CHOCOLATE

day.
Monster Max, a Holsteiner THE RITGHER th 395 | un | 65 |
from Germany, will be one STOMP THE YARD 1 ig [3 [Wa 6:0

of many attractions when

BUY 2 YARDS AT REGULAR PRICE & GET THE 3RD

Police say that they also discovered a woman's bag inl§ide ONE FOR i

the car. — ~ — “LINEN =» COTTON
The driver was also arrested. SoS Bae * AMOUR =» SILK
STOCK OF m ° BROADES * CHIFFON

FABRICS: SPECIAL OCCASION Waverly &
7 Sie *. TROPICAL FABRICS Fabric from

UCC « a sneer @ ANTIQUE SATIN Spain
TFDTVEG(T MMM © ALL COTTON PRINTS ope
PUN Vat VAmeae ° ALLJACQUARDS, BROCADES | iy, post, Fob Mot & Tulle
: : NOT on SALE.

‘1¢ SALE AT BOTH Madeira & Robinson Rd. Store

sone cH eee Ges AMC eC ie rine ed ie





The Mall-at-Marathon
BOX OFFICE OPENS AT 10:00 AM D



Windsor Equestrian Centre [ARTHUR AND THE NVISILES
holds its annual show at CODE HAME: THE CLEANER
Coral Harbour.
: FREEDOM WRITERS
The grey was featured in :
Casino Royale, the new AEAMGIRLS ALL FOOTWEAR
Bond hit starring Daniel ;
Craig that was shot partly in me EBS & CLOTHING
The island’s top riders are :
expected to compete when ‘GALLERIA 6 - JFK DRIV SA VE ON THE
the action starts at 9.30am QURLE-CARD AT 380-3649 OR WV BEST BRANDS!

and is expected to go on
until mid-afternoon. Admis-
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ES T OR WWW.
moon AND CHOCOLATE [ttn | 340 | WA

NIKE « ADIDAS » PUMA + CROCS
SPERRY © ROCKET DOG + BILLABONG





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FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE \ LEVI'S « ENYCE + DICKIES
oe i STOMP THE YARD T 3:35 NS Lhe \ COLUMBIA « QUIKSILVER + OAKLEY
ANSEL WENGE 1 3a | Bay Street Store3 Bay Street. Tel (242) 322-8537 Fax (242) 326-8135, COSTA ie MAR « RAY-BAN
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AND MORE!



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LE ALSO AT; Bayt. Shoe Company & Little Feet Bay Street



Ps

1

===+4



PAGE 4, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007




- The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master



LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914



SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.









Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991





EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-







Published Daily Monday to Saturday





Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama







i - TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1 -(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Oe a SS

President Bush’s Sputnik moment

































IT IS President Bush’s Sputnik moment.
He is not like Ike.

Five days after the Soviets put Earth’s first
satellite into orbit on Oct. 4, 1957, President
Eisenhower pooh-poohed it as “one small
ball in the air” that *does not raise my appre-
hensions, not one iota.” He said, “the mere
fact that this thing orbits involves no new
discovery to science.” His top military offi-
cials downplayed this Cold War humiliation
by calling Sputnik a “useless hunk of iron”
and a “silly bauble in the sky.”

Six days after that press conference, a very
different Eisenhower was secretly at work.
He assembled some of the nation’s top fig-
ures in science, including the president of
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, James
Killian, and Polaroid founder Edwin Land.
According to a now-declassified confidential
memorandum of that meeting written by
Eisenhower’s staff secretary, Army General
Andrew Goodpaster, Land spoke “with great
eloquence about the great problem that is
before us. He said that the country needs a
great deal from science. But he felt that sci-
ence, to provide this, needs the President
acutely.”

Goodpaster wrote that Land asked “if
there is not some way in which the President
could inspire the country — setting out our
youth particularly on a whole variety of sci-
entific adventures. If he were able to do that,
there would be tremendous returns. At the
present time, scientists feel themselves iso-
lated and alone.” a :

Eisenhower, in Goodpaster’s narrative,
responded that he “would like to create a
spirit — an attitude toward science similar to
that held toward various kinds of athletics
in his youth — an attitude which now seemed
to him to have palled somewhat.” Eisen-
hower would make Killian the first presi-
dential science adviser.

Killian guided Eisenhower to the creation
of NASA (National Aeronautics and Space
Administration) and a massive expansion of
the National Science Foundation.

The attitude toward science in the current
White House has palled into the most
appalling state since Eisenhower. Scientists
feel so isolated that it barely registered that
Bush said he would “confront the serious
challenge of global climate change” in his
State of the Union address.

One reason is obvious. Bush responded to
climate change with chump change for cli-
mate science. Eisenhower responded to a
Soviet satellite with NASA. Under Bush,

NASA satellites are fading into useless hunks
of iron.

“Since 2000, this thing has gone off a cliff,”
said Berrien Moore, co-chairman of the
National Academy of Sciences panel on
studying Earth from space and director of
the Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans
and Space at the University of New Hamp-
shire. Moore said the Bush administration
has created a “perfect storm” with the “col-
lapse of the earth science budget, down 30
per cent at NASA,” and the inept develop-
ment of a polar-orbiting environmental satel-
lite system by NOAA and the Pentagon. The
system is three years behind schedule and $3
billion over budget, and many climate-detec-

_ tion instruments have been thrown out to

slash costs.

“They just drove the train off the tracks,”
Moore said. “The effects are about to become
very apparent. The assets we have for things
like measuring glaciers and ice are getting
long in the tooth, with very little in the future
to replace them. We’re buying data from
India and the French.”

Moore said the least the Bush administra-
tion could do is restore the earth science bud-
get to the levels of the Clinton administration.
Just as frustrating to him is that even as the
evidence piles up that humans cause global
warming — the tntergovenmental Panel on

_ Climate Change releases major new data this

week — there is no White House proposal to
cap fossil fuel emissions. Moore said it is

“almost irresponsible” that the CEOs of 10

major corporations have called for caps on
carbon dioxide emissions but Bush still has
not. :

“The CEOs gave him a vehicle to change
course on Kyoto and global warming,” Moore
said. “General Electric and Duke Energy are
not a group of fuzzy-headed scientists. But all
he is still talking about is drilling for more oil
in the Arctic ... his statement about global
warming was almost a throwaway.”

This is not surprising for a president who
has thrown away every report on climate
change as a silly bauble. Bush told us he was
waiting for “sound science.” Eisenhower
heard the sound of Soviet science — the beep
of Sputnik - and prepared America for
blastoff. It appears Bush will not understand
the need for science until dead satellites rain
down on the White House lawn.

(¢ This article is.by Derrick Z. Jackson of
5 The Boston Globe — © 2007)








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Sorry for any inconvenience caused

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR |

THE TRIBUNE

Responding to |
Fred Mitchell |

EDITOR: The Tribune.

I SHOULD be grateful if you
would allow me space to
respond to the “Honourable”
Fred Mitchell, who saw it fit-
ting to smear my family and me.

First of all, I, Dwight James
Higgs, never approached Mr
Mitchell for favours of any kind.
At my.Aunt Beryl Wright’s

birthday party Mr Mitchell:

approached me concerning the
work at Kerzner development
and about the involvement of
Bahamians at the project; and I
told him that it would be better
to ask the other contractors in
order to get a better take on the
overall concept. He then asked
me to set up a meeting. I told
him I would look into it,
because anything to help my
Bahamians advance was never a
problem to me. —

I did not believe in political
favours and I referred our con-
versation on to Mr Ashley Glin-
ton to pursue. I specifically told
him to bring no political fronts.
He saw it fitting to make the
meeting happen. At the meet-
ing the first person walked in,
accompanying him was the per-
son of Mr Kendell Demeritte. It
was at that moment I knew he
was not serious, because if there
was anyone who knew qualified
contractors it would have been
myself. After that meeting I
never met or had any conversa-
tion with Mr’Mitchell about his
so-called “concerns”, but I
guess, we, the other contractors,
had served him and his political
fronts’ purpose, just to say he
had met with us. ;

If there was one contract you
had asked for me to receive, let
me know now, because I did
not ask for you or anyone to
inter¢ede for me or my compa-
ny; and there was no work that
was passed on to myself because
of your intervention. My work
speaks for itself.

1 don’t get involved in half
truths or lies. When the PLP
Government took office in
200% every foreign contractor
who had Bahamian partners,
who seemed to have been an
FNM supporter, was encour-
aged into switching to a PLP
partner. Of course, there should
be no doubt in your mind that I
am one hundred per cent
Bahamian owned and run. This
kind of action will never benefit
the Bahamas. My support was
always to help my Bahamian
brothers.

I can definitely say with no
uncertainty, that am a member
of the Kerzner Team. They
brought the best, they ask for
the best, and will only encour-
age the best. And if you do not
fit in any of these categories,
you will not last. Yes, they will
give you a chance, but you will
have to earn your stripes. Ask
the many contractors who came





LETTERS

letters@triounemedia.net



and did not last. No amount of
political influence could have
saved them. This is why so
many Bahamians are only busi-
ness fronts. Anyone who is
fronting only looks at the bot-
tom line — “money” — what
is in it for themselves, not what
is the best for the Bahamian
people.

You, out of all people, should

“understand that there is no

room for mediocrity in a global
society. But, I guess not. You
and your Government should
not lower the standards of our
people. Is this a plan of yours to
take this country to a socialist
state?

As for Mr Larry Wilmott who
is self employed and is a quali-



you build his Community Cen-
tre without cost. He saw nothing
wrong with my helping him,
now he is encouraging this type
of behaviour. What hypocrisy!
How disingenuous can he be?
Could he be in such a quandary
that he must sink so low? How
low can he get? I want him to
tell the Bahamas the truth. How
many millions of dollars was
secured because of his political
influence? Tell the Fox Hillians
where they fitted in with the
millions of dollars worth of con-
tracts that he said he secured.

I call on you to apologise for
the lies. The TRUTH will be
told.

Only the TRUTH will set you
free.

By the way I would like Mr
Mitchell to know that I was a
sub contractor at Sun Interna-
tional/Kerzner International for
the past 14 years. Where was
he? Receiving a political




fied Glassier, who was awarded
many contracts for over 15
years by my company because
of his qualifications. You, Mr
Mitchell, never saw it fitting to
help secure one contract for

favour? FNM Senator Fred
Mitchell. Stay tuned much more
to come.

I would like Mr Mitchell to
address some of the issues and
concerns of the Fox Hill con-

your chairman. What a dis- stituents.
grace!

Now, Minister Fred Mitchell
encourages such actions and he DWIGHT J HIGGS
called me in to help secure work Nassau,

for his supporters; and I helped January 30, 2007.

Fox Hill now has a choice

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THERE is an old saying, “You can do as you like, but not as long as
you like”. Another saying goes like this, “You can fool some of the peo-
ple some of the times, but you can’t fool all of the people all of the
time.” Fred Mitchell is enjoying his last days as a member of parliament.
Fox Hill said so on Thursday.

We the people of the Fox Hill Constituency are ecstatic. We cannot
believe our good fortune. God is truly in the answering prayers busi-
ness. I have never, in my many years, witnessed the kind of energy and
the outpouring of support like what was displayed at the Fox Hill
Parade grounds this past Thursday. Fox Hill came alive with the high-
est powered energy, brought there by the FNM of the endorsement of |
educator, Dr Jacinta Higgs. God bless Dr Jacinta Higgs.

The people showed just how badly they want to have and need a'sen-
sible, humane; high moral, respected, respectful, God-fearing, family-
oriented person offering herself as the next member of parliament for
the Fox Hill Constituency. The overwhelming show of support is a snap-
shot of what is to come. Speaker after speaker honestly laid the cards
on the table, shining the brightest floodlight on the lack of represen-
tation by Fred Mitchell.

Everyone knows that Mr Mitchell was having a fine old time trav-
elling around the world. It is claimed that he probably spent more mon-
ey on travelling than any other member of parliament in the history of
the Bahamas. Nowadays he is seen, visiting homes walking in the rain
very late at night and too early in the morning before people are up and
about, in my opinion in desperation, brought on bby his own arro-
gance, superiority complex, and his standoffishness. He, by his own
doing, ostracized his most ardent supporters. He just: happens to know
the game of politics, and expects the people of Fox Hill to remain polit-
ically naive forever. :

But reality struck on Thursday, Dr J acinta Higgs, gave the people an
alternative. They can choose a woman who has literally given herself
and her family to people of Fox Hill a long time ago, and they know it.
She, at a tender age of 15 was a Sunday school teacher, led the Girl
Guides and continues to mentor youth and especially ladies through
education and other events, such as the summer youth programme and
the Fox Hill Congos. :

Dr Higgs showed the overflowing crowd just how knowledgeable,
willing and committed to.continue her mission to educate, empower and
help equip the people of Fox Hill constituency to compete in the
global environment which it is alleged that Minister Mitchell has
already signed, but just waiting if the PLP is returned to implement it.

Fox Hillians are “beating their breasts” showing how proud they are
to have Dr Higgs, a humble lady with strong family values which is the
foundation of a civilised society to eventually represent them. Her
speech was delivered under the watchful eyes of her husband who

__ remained on stage for the duration. This alone is an indication that the

family in still intact in the Bahamas.

The leader himself was elated to have “such a gem” as Dr Higgs. Fox
Hill is proud that their close family member will represent them next.
The Bahamas will certainly benefit from the many talents this fantas-
tic lady brings. It ain’t long now.

DIONNE EDGECOMBE
Nassau,
January 20, 2007.



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THE TRIBUNE





In brief

Man convicted
on drugs
charge gets two
year sentence

A HAITIAN man was sen-
tenced to serve two years in
prison after being convicted
on a marijuana possession
charge yesterday.

Bermane Necy, 38,
appeared before Magistrate
Carolita Bethel along with
Michael Thermidor, 44,
Makaty Benjamin, 28, and
Guirlaine Josue, 29.

All four were initially
arraigned on the charge of
possession of marijuana with
the intent to supply on
December 11, 2006.

At that time, they all plead-
ed not guilty.

They were charged with
being found in possession of
six pounds of marijuana with a
street value of $6,000.

Yesterday Nece pleaded
guilty to the charge.

Benjamin, Josue and Ther-
midor were.handed over to
immigration authorities to be
deported.

Nece will also be deported
after serving his sentence.



MH TWO sisters have been
sentenced to serve prison
terms after being convicted on
marijuana possession charges.

Jenna Neely, 20, and
Rachel Neely, 29, were
arraigned in Magistrate’s
Court on Monday on charges
of possession of marijuana
with the intent to supply and
conspiracy to possess with the
intent to supply.

It was alleged that the two,
while at the Lynden Pindling
International airport on
Thursday, July 8, 2004 were
found in possession of the
drugs.

The sisters were alleged to
be heading to Canada.

. On Monday, they both.
appeared before Magistrate
Carolita Bethel and pleaded
guilty to the charges after the
prosecution closed its cased.

Jenna was convicted of hav-
ing 10 and a half pounds of
marijuana and Rachel was
convicted of being in posses-
sion of 12,and a half pounds.

- Jenna was sentenced to

_ serve one year in prison and
Rachel was sentenced to serve
29 months.

BURR Haas

THURSDAY,

FEBRUARY 1ST
6:30am Community Page 1540AM
























11:00 Immediate Response

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NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
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programme changes!




m@ By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter



FOX HILL MP Fred
Mitchell is in a “panic” and
can only resort to mudsling-
ing tactics because he can’t
campaign on real issues, it was
claimed yesterday.

Dwight Higgs, husband of
the FNM’s Fox Hill candidate
Dr Jacinta Higgs, made the
comment following Mr
Mitchell’s public revelations
that he did various favours for

branch meeting in Fox Hill,
where he was accompanied by
many of his Cabinet col-
leagues.

The minister claimed he had
done “personal favours” for
the Higgs family and said he
helped a “close personal rela-
tive” of Dr Higgs in getting
her pension cheque, but that
person was now saying he had
not done anything for her.

“Remember the money, my
dear. It was Fred Mitchell who
got it for you,” claimed Mr

‘Mitchell.

The minister also claimed
he had done a favour for
Dwight Higgs.

He claimed Mr Higgs was

Dr Higgs and her family.

Mr Mitchell made the alle-
gations against the Higgs fam-
ily on Monday night at a

Dr Nottage: infection at dialysis
unit is under better control

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter



THERE has been no attempt
to downplay the seriousness of
the bacterial outbreak in the
dialysis unit of the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital, Health Minister
Dr Bernard Nottage said yes-
terday.

Speaking outside the Senate
about efforts to bring the infec-
tion — which has been present in
the unit since July of last year —
under control, he explained that
the bacteria is responding well to
antibiotics, and the number of
cases detected in December and
January have been minimal.

“Toward the middle of
November it appeared that the
infection was tailing off and that has been the trend,” said Dr
Nottage, whose ministry was informed about the outbreak in
October.

“Tt appears that the infection has been brought under control

@ HEALTH Minister
Dr Bernard Nottage

now — under better control — although it has not been completely

eliminated.”

These reassurances contradict statements made on Monday by
leader of the Bahamas Democratic Movement, Mr Cassius Stuart
- who claims to have been in contact with doctors inside the hos-
pital — that the rate of infection is getting worse, as the bacteria is
“highly resistant” to antibiotics.

* Mr Stuart, who alleged that 15 people had died of the infection
so far, and 70 people tested positive overall, claimed that staff in
the hospital had been pressured by some in the government into
downplay the seriousness of the infectious outbreak for political
reasons. ,

Yesterday however, Dr Nottage dismissed such claims as “fool-
ish”.

"The Public Hospitals Authority have made numerous state-
ments about it — I have read them in your paper and in other
papers. I don't think that they've ever indicated there was not an
infection. They've said there was infection, they've said what they
were doing about it, and they've given, I believe, reasonably accu-
rate information as far as I've read,” he said.

He did admit however that although government and the hos-
pital has been doing everything it can — following recommendations
made by the Pan American Health Organisation (PAHO) in
November — to eliminate the infection in the unit, it has so far failed
to discover the source of the bacteria.

"The water appears to be well, the cleaning liquids appear to be
good, the kidney machines haven't shown any infection," he said.

Tests of patient and staff's blood and faeces are also now in the
process of being carried out — with initial samples testing negative
for the bacteria.

He added that although some patients who contracted the infec-
tion have died — as alleged by Mr Stuart — it has not been deter-
mined whether they died of the enterococcus faecalis infection.

All patients in the unit are “immuno-compromised”, he
explained, and subject to contracting illnesses at a higher rate
than most. —

According to Dr Nottage, the hospital is trying to reduce the use
of catheters for dialysis, as evidence has shown that the incidence
of infection is greater in units where catheters — rather than other,
apparatus — have been used for long periods.

Addressing the infection is an “ongoing process" he said, adding
however that his ministry and the hospital are undertaking a
"step-by-step constructive approach to looking at solving the
problem." ;

The minister will be meeting with PAHO representatives on Fri-
day to arrange for PAHO to conduct a second review of the situ-
ation, and to determine what further steps could be taken, he
said.



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worried that he would lose his
contract on the Atlantis pro-
ject because the government
had just changed at the time.

Mr Mitchell said: “We sat
in Athena’s Cafe and he asked
for my help. I agreed because
I support any Bahamian con-
tractor and I did speak to
them to say this: The PLP
does not condone or support
any action that would jeopar-
dise any Bahamian contractor
and certainly not on the basis
of political affiliation.”

“So when you say I did
nothing, talk to your hus-
band,” Mr Mitchell said.

The Tribune contacted the
Higgs Family for a response,
and husband Dwight Higgs
responded to the allegations
in an official letter. (See Let-
ters column page 4).

Mr Higgs said the close per-
sonal relative that Mr Mitchell
claims he assisted with getting
their pension cheque is actu-
ally his mother-in-law.

He said he was surprised
that Mr Mitchell would call
this a personal favour because,
he said: “He is the Minister of
Foreign Affairs and Public
Service, and if my mother-in-
law can’t go to him if she does
not get results from the lower
level, then who can she go
to?”

Mr Higgs also claims he
never asked Mr Mitchell to
help secure his contract on the
Atlantis project.

Mr Higgs explained: “At my
Aunt Beryl Wright’s birthday
party, Mr Mitchell approached
me concerning the work at
Kerzner Development and
about the involvement of
Bahamians at the project, and
I told him that it would be bet-
ter to ask the other contrac-
tors in order to get a better
take on the overall concept.”

Mr Higgs accepted that a
meeting did take place
between himself, Mr Mitchell.
and some other Bahamian

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007, PAGE 5

nen ie ee |
usband of FNM Fox Hill candidate

contractors, but he claims
Mitchell brought a “political
front” to the meeting.

“After that meeting,” he
said, “I never met or had
any conversation with Mr
Mitchell about his so-called
concerns.”

Mr Higgs’ letter continues:

. “If there.was one contract you

had asked for me to receive,
let me know now, because I
did not ask for you or anyone
to intercede for me or my
company, and there was no
work that was passed on to
myself because of your inter-
vention. My work speaks for
itself.”

Mr Higgs claims it was Fred
Mitchell who had asked him
for favours when he won the
Fox Hill seat.

He claims he assisted Mr



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claims Fred Mitchell is in a ‘panic’

Mitchell with securing work
for his supporters and he
helped to build the Fox Hill
Community Centre “without
any cost.”

“He saw nothing wrong
with my helping him, now he
is encouraging this type of
behaviour. What hypocrisy!”
exclaimed Mr Higgs.

Mr Higgs said he was
demanding a full apology
from the Fox Hill MP, and he
challenged Mr Mitchell to
campaign on real issues rather
than personal attacks.

Mr Higgs told The Tribune
he only wanted an opportuni-
ty to respond to Mr Mitchell’s
“lies” about him and his moth-
er-in-law, because his wife (Dr
Jacinta Higgs) was well-
equipped to “answer back for
herself.”






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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007





THE TRIBUNE



Civil servant seeking financial
Sisvanies from the public

vf doni t treat

“We Welcome you

to be a part of our WOW service team.

Environmental Services Department

We are looking for young men and women with a positive
attitude, physically fit, high sckeal diploma, computer literate,
excellent customer service skills, previous experience and/or
certificate ip housekeeping floor cleaning

The successful candidates will be required to:

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@ By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY

Tribune Staff Reporter

A CIVIL servant has bee n forced to seek
financial assistance from the public — after
receiving no help from government — fora
debilitating injury that she suffered on the
job in 1998.

The 35-year-old mother of two young
children has had to resort to using a sponsor
sheet and begging family and friends to col-
lect the money she needs for a doctor-rec-
ommended operation in Florida.

The amount needed for the procedure,
she said, is $36,810.

Claudna Glinton-Knowles told her story
to The Tribune yesterday.

Ms Glinton-Knowles said she was
employed as a janitress at a local primary
school in 1998, where she received an injury
while working. .

According to her: “A little boy was
swinging on the bars at the school and I
told him to get off, but at the same time I
heard the PE teacher telling me to watch
out.” .

Ms Knowles said her left wrist got caught
in the bars and was fractured, resulting in
nerve damage.

Doctors have diagnosed her condition as
Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD).

Medical institutions in the US report
that two to five per cent of peripheral nerve
injury patients and 12 per cent to 21 per
cent of patients with paralysis on one side of
the body develop RSD as a complication.

The Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syn-
drome Association of America (RSDSA)

says the condition appears after one to two .

per cent of all bone fractures.
This group describes the condition as a



@ CLAUDNA Glinton-Knowles, 35,
told her story to Te Tribune

(Photo: Ana Rianca Marin)
“chronic, painful, and progressive neuro-

‘ logical condition that affects skin, muscles,
joints, and bones.”

In 2001, Ms Glinton-Knowles claims, she
received a letter from government indicat-
ing that said the accident was caused by
her own negligence.

She then sought legal representation, and
was told by an attorney that she had a
“good case” for a civil suit against the gov-
ernment.

However, her lawyer then advised that

‘her case would be unsuccessful, because

the statute of limitations (three years) had
expired.

“At the time, my RSD was not as bad as
it is now,” explained Ms Glinton-Knowles.

Her doctor recommended that she under-
go a procedure known as a Spinal Cord
Stimulator at a medical facility in Florida,
but she is having problems raising the mon-
ey.
“National Insurance has ominously
informed me that the cost of the Spinal
Cord Stimulator is too much for the gov-
ernment and NIB to bear, so I am forced to
solicit outside assistance from generous
sponsors,” she said.

Ms Knowles said she has had five opera-
tions since the accident, and has been pre-
scribed morphine and numerous pills to
deal with the pain.

She estimates that she has spent at least
$17,000 on medication since the accident
occurred.

She said: “I’ve written a letter to Prime
Minister Christie, the attorney general and
Hubert Ingraham asking for help, but no
one has replied to me.”

She is now appealing to the general pub-
lic for assistance in raising funds for the
operation that she “desperately” needs.

Donations can be deposited to account
No. 4636 at Scotia Bank on Thompson
Boulevard.

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@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT — Grand
Bahama Spelling Bee Compe-
titiom opened on Wednesday at




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Christ the King Church Hall,
where 26 students competed in
the annual event for a chance to
represent Grand Bahama in the
national competition.
However, former Spelling

Bee CAMABION » 13-year-old .
oon of Grand’

Anjanet
Bahama Catholic High emerged

again as this year’s winner after:

rounds.

Miss Loon, an eight grade
student, won both competitions
last year in Freeport and Nas-
sau, and represented the
Bahamas in Washington DC at
the Scripps Howard Spelling
Bee competition.

Grand Bahama has won the
national competition held in
New Providence for the past
seven consecutive years.

Miss Loon, along Raneisha
Higgs of McCleans Town Pri-

mary, represented Grand
Bahama last year and placed
first and second, respectively.

Mary Cooper, assistant direc-
tor of education at the Ministry
of Education, said that Grand
Bahama has produced some
fantastic spellérs over the years. *

Parents, teachers and stu-
dents from various schools
throughout the island gathered
at the church hall for the com-
petition, which got underway
shortly after 11am.

Ms Cooper said one student

from Grand Cay and two stu-

dents from Bimini were among
this year’s spellers. She
explained that the students in
the competition were winners
from their respective school
based spelling competitions.
Ms Cooper said spelling helps
to improve and raise the acade-

In Memoriam

mic standard of the child. “It

helps with pronunciation of:

words, word meaning, defini-
tion, and origin, and how to use
the word in a sentence and
teaches them correct English.”

The Grand Bahama District
“competition has been sponsored”

by Discovery Cruise Lines for
the past eight years. It provides
the study guide and Webster’s
Third New International Dic-
tionary to each participating
school.

Janet Albury, of VIP Ser-
vices, a public relations
spokesperson for Discovery,
said that the company is pleased
to be able to sponsor the event.

“Discovery has indeed been
the proud sponsor of the Bee
for the past eight years and is
excited to be a part of it once
more,” she said.

Ghislaine Deborah (Smith) Chappell

A memorial service for the life of —,
Debbie Smith-Chappell will be held at
Trinity Methodist Church on Thursday,
February 8, 2007 at 4:30 pm, following
the private interment of ashes at St.
Matthew’s Churchyard.

Debbie was born in Nassau in 1951 and died in Cambridge, England
on November 2, 2006, after a short but brave battle against cancer.

She is survived by her brother Philip, husband Michael, daughter
Laura, son Simon, daughter-in-law Shannon and grandson Finley.

Debbie attended Queen’s College from 1956 to 1967. She moved to
England and married Michael in 1974. They spent 31 wonderful years

together.

Debbie is missed by her many family members and friends both in the
Bahamas and England.

Donations in lieu of flowers may be sent to:

The Ranfurly Home for Children

P.O. Box N-1413, Nassau, Bahamas.





|IHURSDAY, FEBRUAHY

1, cuur, Pmnuee

THE TRIBUNE | |

ae es ea
‘He should get advice from his lawyer

rather than trying to interpret the law’

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A LONG Island boat business

Several weeks ago business
owner Mr Darville admitted to
not having complied with the
order, stating that it contained
references to violations of envi-
ronmental law with which he dis-
agreed.

“He should get advice from his
lawyer rather than trying to inter-
pret the law,” said Dr Bethel.

He added that whether or not
Mr Darville was now complying
with the order, issued in Decem-
ber, was "out of my jurisdiction to
verify."

Dr Bethel said previously that
the order was intended to be put
in place for a period of three
months so that a determination

owner accused of causing respi- responsible order, but was yet to receive any

ratory problems among residents for health response.

should have consulted his lawyer problems in “My advice would be that his

before refusing to comply witha the settle- lawyers should be the ones who

cease and desist order issued ment. should be formally communicat-

against him, Minister of Energy M r ing with the government agen- a
and the Environment Dr Marcus _ Darville, how- cies,” said Dr Bethel. #2
Bethel said yesterday. ever, has The Tribune first became ed

could be made
as to what
extent the
business was



claimed that
as the busi-
ness is his
family's sole
source of
income, he should have evidence
that he is responsible before he is
forced to close without compen-
sation.

"A cease and desist order has
been issued since before Christ-
mas," said Dr Bethel. "There are
police officers and others who
know what the law is, and so
when a formal complaint is
lodged and investigated, if he is
not proceeding to follow the
order then he's subject to possible
prosecution."

@ BETHEL

Mr Darville said last month
that he had written to the Depart-
ment of Environmental Health
Services to query the detail of the

aware of reports of respiratory
illness in the Mangrove Bush set-
tlement in September last year -
when a letter from a local pul-
monologist detailing the symp-
toms of the two residents
involved was leaked to the paper.

The residents were said to be
suffering from signs of “severe
bronchospasm” — a reactive air-
way disease, which the doctor
claimed was “secondary to chem-
ical exposure”.

A government investigation
was launched shortly after, cul-
minating in the December order
against Mr Darville's business, in
order to determine whether he is
responsible.

Sea Hauler tragedy victims call
off ‘serious action’ threat

VICTIMS of the Sea Hauler
tragedy have called off a threat of
“serious action” after the gover-
mment said it had found medical
files which had supposedly gone
missing.

“Now that the files are appar-
ently available, we shall draw up
our claims and try to put this
thing behind us,” said spokesman
Lincoln Bain yesterday.

Earlier this week, Mr Bain said
he and the victims would take
“serious action” unless the cru-
cial files were found.

He said the government was
trying to claim that only two vic-
tims had been treated at Princess
Margaret Hospital’s accident and

round a table.

These are the government itself
and the owners of the two boats
involved in the fatal collision -
the Sea Hauler and the United
Star.

She also reportedly told him
that it was in the interests of all
parties concerned to get the issue
behind them:

“We are now hoping for a res-
olution pretty soon,” said Mr
Bain. “Once we get these files we
are moving to settle this matter.

“We shall go ahead with our
claims and see how we resolve
this. She hopes this could happen
way before the election. She says
the next step is getting the other

had been stung into action since
he and the victims chained them-
selves to the gates of Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie’s Cable Beach
home some weeks ago.

“Mrs Hanna-Martin called and

said she would do whatever she

could,” he added, “I have no idea
where the files were. I can only
assume it was a stall tactic.”

Mr Bain said he could “guar-
antee” that only threats of more
action by the victims prompted
the government to act.

“We had the full machinery
ready to go this morning,” he told
The Tribune, “The minister says
she now has the files. If this is
another stall tactic, then we shall

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OCEAN CLUB
Employee of The Year Zammie Williams Meredith Culmer .
Highest Achiever Award of Excellence KarenTurnquest-Rahming Natasha Jervis
Best Appearance & Grooming Kayla Hall Lon Minns
Mentoring Award Leantha Gibson Gwendolyn Cleare
Service Skills Award Sharon Woodside Selena Russell ome

Shaffane Knowles Jermaine Mitchell
Bridgette Barry

Zammie William

Most Improved
Highest Retail Achiever
Regional Vice-President’s Inspirational Award

Gwendolyn Cleare
Navone Lightbourne

Each of the winners received a plaque, cash prizes and gifts.









PAGE 8, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007

< Ee

Construction Bahamas, Ltd.



THE TRIBUNE





New labour office
opened in Exuma

















i MINISTER of Immigration, Labour a
raining Shane Gibson spoke during official
opening ceremony. Pictured from left are
Exuma MP Anthony Moss; Thelma Beneb
Shane Gibson; Harcourt Brown; Rev Ced
Smith and Bradley Armbrister, assis
administrator.

(BIS Photo: Ri








8
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we re closed for business

on Friday, February 2

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@ THE Department of Labour officially opened its new
offices in Farmers Hill, Exuma last week Friday. Cutting the rib-

oie Bek ele er,

ee EE SY

#4
aE a

t FCe

bon was Mrs Sheila Moss, wife of Exuma and Ragged Island .””

MP, Anthony Moss. Pictured from left are Mr Moss; Shane Gib-
son, Minister of Immigration Labour and Training; Mrs Moss.
Also pictured are Harcourt Brown, Director of Labour; Thel-
ma Beneby, Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Immigra-
tion Labour and Training.

(BIS Photo: Raymond A Bethel)

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

A well established Hospitality Company is seeking to
hire the following individual:

MARKETING AND MEDIA
RELATIONS COORDINATOR

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Include but are not limited to the following:

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¢ Handling online and broadcast media.

* Assist with developing promotional materials.

¢ Develop and coordinate advertising initiatives
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* Assist with the planning and implementation *
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Ability to speak foreign languages a plus

Salary commensurate with experience

Excellent Benefits Package
Apply in writing to:

The Human Resources Manager
P.O. Box SS-6257
Nassau, The Bahamas
Or tax to 363-4437



AGE 10, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007

Government is a matter

I: WAS Henry Clay who
once said: “Government

is a trust, and the officers of
the government are trustees,
and both the trust and the
trustees are created for the
benefit of the people.”

Can we trust our govern-
ment? That is a serious ques-
tion. No entity in our country
is more powerful than the gov-
ernment or has as much
resources at its disposal.

The government makes the



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In the hands of decent folk,
they can be tricky. In the
hands of untrustworthy folks,
they’re downright dangerous!

The amount of money and
power that we give to govern-
ment should only be given if
those who run the government
have our trust. But what is
trust? Trust is the transfer of
something valuable to the care
of another with the expecta-
tion that they will manage it
primarily for your benefit and
not theirs. ;

In public trust, we transfer
our valuable common wealth
to those we elect to office and
we expect them to manage
our common wealth princi-
pally for our benefit and not
theirs.

Genuine trust must be
based on truth. Dishonest
trustees are dangerous to
those who trust them. Simi-
larly, dishonest governors are
dangerous to a trusting public.
Even if dishonest governors
do some good for you, you
still have to wonder whether
they did as much as they could
have done or whether the
good you think they have
done is good at all.

Dishonesty just makes the
whole affair a house of cards.

THE CHRISTIE
ADMINISTRATION
AND TRUST

[ Christie adminis-
tration has grave con-
cerns when it comes to hon-
esty and therefore when it
comes to trust. The last four
plus years are replete with
instances reflecting this. The
most recent case appears to
be what might be termed
“The Wilchcombe WHI
Deception”.

The local dailies reported
that Minister Wilchcombe

? _C.A. Christie Real Estate
has moved its offices to Seagrapes, West Bay Street
(Next to Saunders BeachWest)

Our telephone and fax numbers ROVE IMAI emt Tile

aR PL IE 0

YOUR CONNECTION”

or

Enea



O THE WORLD



PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT

SOFTWARE UPGRADE

i The Bahamas Telecommunications Co. Ltd. (BTC) wishes to advise its valued
| customers and the general public that in order to maintain optimal service
levels, a software upgrade of its network is required.

| As a result, subscribers throughout New Providence and the Family Islands

may experience a slight disruption in dome
cellular and internet, between the hours of 11

to 6:00 am on Friday, February 2, 2007.

| BTC sincerely apologizes for any incon
the public that every effort will be taken to comp

possible time.

ARONA TAR

stic services such as land line, |
:00 pm on Monday, January 29", |

venience this may cause and assures
lete this upgrade in the shortest




flew to Washington DC and
with charm and grace per-
suaded the entire US congress
to grant the Bahamas and the
Caribbean a 30-day extension
on its Western Hemisphere
Initiative (WHI), which
requires US citizens to have
passports in order to return
home from travel to these ter-
ritories. Minister Wilchcombe
was being hailed as a hero of
sorts.

I must confess that, on read-

Notwithstanding all of this, no
extension was given in those
early days. Now that the ini-
tiative has come on stream,
we read stories about Minister
Wilchcombe going to Wash-
ington and saving the day,
even if just for 30 days.
What would 30 days do?
How could the Department
of Homeland Security in the
US amend the implementa-
tion of a congressionally man-
dated initiative without refer-

ae

“Genuine trust must be based
on truth. Dishonest trustees are
dangerous to those who trust
them. Similarly, dishonest
governors are dangerous to a
trusting public. Even if dishonest
governors do some good for
you, you still have to wonder
whether they did as much as
they could have done or
whether the good you think they

have done is good at all.”
eS TS

ing the stories in the dailies, I
immediately thought to myself
that this was utter nonsense. It
simply didn’t add up. The
Western Hemisphere Initia-
tive was announced years ago
and for all that time Minister
Wilchcombe had opportunity
to approach the US about
seeking an extension.

Cries were made at home
and abroad about the impact
it would have on our tourism,
so much so that the Director
General of the Caribbean
Tourism Organisation, our

‘own Vincent Vanderpool

Wallace, said that it would be
“catastrophic” for Caribbean
tourism.

Ambassador John Rood
disagreed because, in his
thinking, most Americans
travelling to The Bahamas
already had _ passports.



ence to US congress after the
initiative has come into force
simply because a Bahamian
tourism minister flew into
town?

Why would the US ambas-
sador to The Bahamas not
have announced the exten-
sion, since it would have had
to be something in which he
was involved? Why would
such an extension be given so
late in the hour and why for
such a short period? Surely,
to be helpful, a generous US
would have given the same
extension that it gave to Cana-
da and others.

Through all the storytelling,
Minister Wilchcombe never
uttered a word to refute the
claims; as is his practice, he
simply soaked up the good
press, whether deserving or
not. ae



oils




We also. an Yy a lree s
teddies and adult 0
7tmentionables

Miall ar Marathon
Tel: 394-3205

THE TRIBUNE

There was no chance that
he would be like evangelist
Billy Graham, who once
called up a major news agency
in the US to refute claims that
he had so many thousands of
people to his crusade. He told
the news agency that the num-
ber was much lower than it
reported. No, Minister Wilch-
combe is no Billy Graham.

As it turned out, Ambas-
sador Rood had to set the
record straight. There was no
extension. There was none
granted, he said, and none
being considered.

If this is so, and we have no
reasons to believe otherwise,
from where did the press get
this bogus story? Did it get it
from Minister Wilchcombe?
If not, why did the minister
not correct the same?

Could this have been some
insidious plot to dupe the
Bahamian public? Who would
want to do such a thing? We
live in the Internet Age. Infor-
mation travels quickly.

Imagine tourists getting
whim of this bogus story, trav-
elling to The Bahamas and
then getting stuck here on try-
ing to return home. Yes, we
would get the tourists in the
short run but the frustration
and anxiety caused to them
on seeking to return home
would add to that bad visitor
experience that threatens our
tourism industry today. In the
long run we would suffer.

A trustworthy and compe-
tent Minister of Tourism
would have wanted to avoid

this. Alas, though, we have a .«

minister who has shown that
he values form over substance
and press over presence.

For four and a half years he
has managed to take credit for
a 40-year trend in increase in
visitor arrivals and expendi-
ture and has managed to avoid
the negative press many of his
colleagues suffer.

Yet, there are some close to
him and far away he knows
well that all that glitters is not
gold and at some point mon-
key was goin’ to put question
to he mar. Perhaps that time

_ has come.



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— CARACAS, Venezuela
ee

* A CONGRESS wholly loyal
to President Hugo Chavez
approved a law Wednesday
granting him authority to enact
sweeping measures by decree,
according to Associated Press.
Meeting at a downtown
‘plaza in a session that resem-
‘bled a political rally, lawmakers
‘unanimously approved all four
“irticles of the law by a show
‘of hands.
« “Long live the sovereign

Â¥








y

















‘PAGE 12, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007

people! Long live President
Hugo Chavez! Long live social-
ism!” said National Assembly
President Cilia Flores as she
proclaimed the law approved.
“Fatherland, socialism or
death! We will prevail!”
Chavez, who is beginning a
fresh six-year term, Says the
legislation will be the start of a
new era of “maximum revolu-
tion” during which he will con-
solidate Venezuela’s transfor-
mation into a socialist society.
His critics are calling it a radical

FINISH CABINET MAKERS NEEDED

Wanted for new state of the art factory. |
Must have chop saw, circular saw, drill, hand tools & experience.

Secure job with good pay and benefits for the right person.

Call: 394-4151
Fax: 394-4159

Please be advised that

Ken Joos



QPL AT EXURMA, LAR A MAS

~» Management

LOCAL AND CARIBBEA

Congress grants Chavez powers to —
remake Venezuelan society by decree

lurch toward authoritarianism
by a leader with unchecked
power.

Hundreds of Chavez sup-
porters wearing red — the col-
or of Venezuela’s ruling party
— gathered in the plaza, wav-

ing signs reading “Socialism is

democracy,” as lawmakers

read out passages of the law

giving the president special
powers for 18 months to trans-
form 11 broadly defined areas,
including the economy, ener-
gy and defense.

is no longer employed with
Grand Isle Resort & Spa,
Exuma, The Bahamas.
Mr. Joos is not authorized to conduct

business of any kind on our behalf.



Position Available

Maintenance Technician

The Maintenance Technician shall report to the Maintenance Supervisor and must be
familiar with, understand and operate according to the relevant elements of the Coca-Cola

Quality System.

Main Duties & Responsibilities:

The Maintenance Technician shall be responsible for the following activities, within the
limits of his/her specific skill:

1. Ensure that all equipment works at its optimum level of efficiency by the:
- Installation and commissioning of all plants, equipment, services and utilities
- Maintenance of building and facilities (plumbing, painting, basic carpentry an
masonry and electric)
- Maintenance of forklifts and other vehicles
- Fabrication, machining and welding of parts or items as required

- Repairs to all electrical and mechanical equipment

2. Carry out all necessary maintenance activities covering Planned Maintenance (PM),
Condition Based Maintenance (CBM), and Improvement Projects in order to

achieve the above.

3. Log and record all work undertaken to.the satisfaction of the Maintenance Supervisors
Monitor and operate any production line equipment to ensure that its working

efficiently.

4. Report any non-conformances to the immediate supervision or QA personnel and carry
out the relevant corrective action as is recommended.

5. Perform other reasonable job related duties as may be assigned by management.

Qualifications & Experience

Certificate from a qualified institution, Ordinary Technicians Diploma in his/her area of
expertise (i.e. electrical, mechanical) or a minimum of five years experience in a similar

capacity.

Core Competencies:

Good working knowledge of bottling plant machinery & machinery & services.
Possess good troubleshooting skills.
Ability to read and understand equipment manuals.

Please submit written resume to:
Caribbean Bottling Co. (Bah) Ltd.

P.O. Box N-1123
Nassau, Bahamas

ATTN: Human Resources Dept.
On Or Before Feb.16th, 2007


























N NEWS

@ PICTURED are (1-r) Lawrence Lewis,
at COB; student awardee Christina Smith; BICA coun
Cochinamogolus; BICA president Kendrick Christie;

THE TRIBUNE



council member; Mrs Cheryl Carey, student affairs
cil and student education chair Theofanis
second vice president Milford Lockhart.

BICA set to provide
annual scholarships

THE Bahamas Institute of
Chartered Accountants has
announced that it will provide
an annual scholarship over the
next five years to two deserv-
ing students in the accounting
programme at the College of
the Bahamas.

Beginning in 2007, a portion
will go to a student for assis-
tance with their textbooks and
other supplies, and a portion
will go to the top graduating
student in the programme.

The initial award towards
the purchase of text books was
presented to an appreciative

Store to celebrate

Christina Smith, a student cur-
rently enrolled in the account-

ing programme.

“It should be noted that
accounting remains the top
bachelors degree in terms of
enrollment in the USA and
places near the top in a num-
ber of other countries,” said
the association in a statement.
“The field of accounting pro-
vides many choices for young
persons.

“BICA is seeking to support
young persons in fulfilling
their career choice and edu-
cational endeavors.»

“The award also brings
these students into contact
with persons in the organisa-
tion who may be able to assist
in job placement and mentor-
ing.”

BICA was founded in 1971,
it has around 400 members
and is the umbrella and rep-
resentative organisation for
accountants in the country
providing training courses,
commenting on key financial
services legislation and issu-
ing licenses to qualified
accountants to practice attes-

. © station functions. Ree ey



Valentine’s Day —
with fundraiser for
Heart Foundation

mâ„¢ By TAMARA
FERGUSON

UNDER the theme Faith,
Hope and Love, John Bull is
celebrating Valentine’s Day
with a fundraiser for
the Bahamas Heart Founda-
tion.

During a press conference
at the Bay Street branch yes-
terday, Inga Bowleg, direc-
tor of business development,
said that there are many chil-
dren in the community who
have heart problems and
need assistance.

“Let us love the children
and support them,” Ms Bow-
leg said.

John Bull is inviting its
patrons and industry part-
ners to give a gift of love this
Valentine’s Day in support
of the Sir Victor Sasson
(Bahamas) Heart Founda-
tion.

The foundation, which was
started by the wife of Sir Vic-
tor Sasson, is a children’s

charity that aims to
assist children with heart
problems.

On the death of her hus-
band, Lady Sasson requested
that instead of sending flow-
érs, friends should make
donations to help children
with heart problems.

However, there was no
heart foundation established
at the time.

Lady Sasson then travelled
to Florida, where she attract-
ed a team of specialists to
conduct a clinic at the
Princess Margaret Hospital.

John Bull invites

patrons, industry
partners to give
‘sift of love’



She later formed the Heart
Foundation.

According to Linda
Lafleur, treasurer of the
foundation, the organisation
has helped many children.

“The foundation is a chil-
dren’s foundation. We repair
the hearts of children,” Mrs
LaFleur said.

According to Mrs LaFleur,
as of June of 2006, 15 hearts
had been repaired at a cost
over $300,000..

Donations

“It is donations like these
(John Bull) that helps the
foundation,” she said.

Mrs Bowleg explained that
each gift-giving season,
patrons of John Bull expect a
grand promotion which
would somehow enable them
to win fabulous products and
services.

But this year John Bull has
decided to take another
approach while celebrating
Valentine’s Day.

“As we prepare for the
occasion of Valentine’s Day, |
while we’re not offering
prizes, we are certainly con-
tinuing our efforts of corpo-
rate social responsibility: by

supporting children with |-|

heart disease,” she said: «

From January 31 to Feb-
ruary 18, John Bull shoppers
will be invited to make a
donation of $1 to the foun-
dation.

A keepsake bracelet is
being offered as a gift to all
donors.

All donations will be:pre-
sented to the foundation to
assist in defraying medical
and surgical costs for chil-
dren with heart diseases.

John Bull will also provide
the foundation with jewellery
from David Yurman valued
at around $2,500 to be fea-
tured in a silent auction
at their upcoming Heart
Ball.

The ball is scheduled for
February 17 in the Crown

Ballroom at Atlantis, Par- ..°:« "

adise Island.



THE TRIBUNE





THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007, PAGE 13



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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007, PAGE 15



FROM page one

would support a bill for the
bridging of service if the con-
ditions were clearly set out in
the law without a requirement
of the exercise of ministerial
discretion.

Discretion, he said, creates
opportunities for “patronage,
bias, unfairness, prejudice, dis-
crimination and victimisation.”

Mr Ingraham said the bill
seeks to empower a minister to
determine entitlement of civil
servants who do not have the
required number of years in
the service to qualify for a pen-
sion, to receive one nonethe-
less if: a civil servant is retired
from the public service for

however long, or resigned '

from the public service for
however long.
This bill will permit the min-

ister to bridge the services of -

persons already retired and
who did not qualify under the
pension law in effect at the
time of their retirement.

While the former prime
minister indicated that the bill
is intended to cure some of the
defects with respect to public
service pensions, he said the
question arises as to how a
person who has already retired
from the public service and
receives a gratuity and is in
receipt of pension payments
becomes entitled to have their
previous services bridged and
their entitlements re-calculat-
ed.

Presumably, Mr Ingraham
said, this bill will apply to peo-
ple currently in the service
although he didn’t see any-
thing in the bill that says it will



i FNM leader
Hubert Ingraham

apply to persons now in the
service.

He also questioned what the
cost of this legislation would
be to the public treasury.

The former prime minister
said ‘that it would be to the
parliament’s discredit if it
passed into law a bill whose
financial cost it was unable to
reasonably determine and rea-

sonably quantify.

“Clearly we must at a mini-
mum have information as to
the number of persons who
have applied to have their ser-
vices bridged whose applica-
tions were rejected. And clear-
ly we ought to have the num-
ber of potential eligible appli-

cants under this Bill so we can ~

figure out the likely cost of this

matter,” Mr Ingraham said.
The truth is, he said, there.is

no way of knowing how much

Ingraham accused of
attempting to ‘destroy’
fellow MP 23 years ago

FROM page one

cled at Christie, Ingraham and Co. Mr Ingraham and Mr Christie
at that time got fired by (the late Sir Lynden) Pindling — for what-

ever reason I don’t know.

“To show you how vindictive the member of North Abaco was,

he called me in his office and.he said: ‘I heard you support Mr Pin- ©

dling firing me.’ I did not have a clue what Sir Lynden did or why

he did it. He said that ‘from this day on you would never make __ |

another dime from this office’.

“I was making $100 per week doing all of the title searches, I

worked for that. I left his office, he said nothing else to me. I went

_ up to Mr Philip Davis’ (MP for Cat Island) office with tears in my

eyes, four children to feed, my wife making less than $800 a month.

“He (Ingraham) stopped the $100 a week I was getting as a law

student and Philip Davis had to pay me out of his salary for the next
one and a half years,” Mr Gray said.



from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
7 you are raising funds for a
, good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322- 1986
and share your story.



call us today! East Bay

393- 8000

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear _

















Cable Be
327-8000

Marathon Mall
. 393-8080

LOCAL NEWS

FNM leader hits out at proposed.
Pensions Act amendments.

money this bill will cost the
Bahamian people or the num-
ber of persons who will
become entitled to benefit
from its provisions and the
effective date of their require-
ment. _

“T refuse to believe and
accept that this Bill is the result

of thoughtful consideration by .

the majority. In my opinion,
this Bill is politically driven.
Once passed into law, rights
will accrue to persons — the

numbers we are unsure of —.

and no government may in the
future take those rights away,”
the opposition leader said.
Mr Ingraham said that,
under existing public service
policies, bridging a public offi-
cer’s service arises mostly
when an individual’s public
service career is interrupted

by: a period of private employ-

ment; unemployment for
domestic reasons, followed by
a return to the service; med-
ical/pregnancy or educational
studies in cases where leave to
do so was.denied or not
obtained by the public service.

He said that he had no
objection to objective, non-dis-
criminatory rules and criteria
governing the bridging of ser-

*Good while supplies last

©2007 CreativeRelations.net





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Golden Gates
__ 361-8000

vices being placed in law.

“T support such an initiative.
I and we support extending
the scope of the existing poli-
cies as the present limit of two
years absence in respect of
study leave is inadequate.

“It would be a good thing
to have objective criteria
established in law. It is not true
to say a civil servant is not enti-
tled to pension as the minis-
ter said today. Civil servants
are entitled to pensions,” Mr
Ingraham said.

However, he said that he
objected most strenuously to
the inclusion of a discretionary

authority for a minister in the
government to determine who —

qualifies for bridging.

“It has been my observation
over the past 30 years or more
that discretion does not gen-
erally produce good gover-
nance. It has been said before
— give a man power and dis-

cretion and whether he is a>
politician or a civil servant.
some will use their position to .
reward friends or punish their,

enemies or opponents,” he
said.

At the moment, he added, |
it is the Governor General and.

the Public Service Commis-

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sion who determine pensions
for public officers, and it is
they, if the circumstances war-
rant it, who would withhold a
pension if a civil servant is
found to have given disgrace-
ful service.

“I do not intend to delegate

my parliamentary authority in ©

respect of bridging civil ser-
vice to any minister, let alone
the minister that brought the
Bill.

“In short, the rules for the
award of pensions in respect
of unbroken continuous public
service have been transparent
and set out in the law,” Mr
Ingraham said.

This was, he said, the case
during colonial times extend-
ing all the way back to 1909.

“None of the 16 amend-

.ments to the Pension Act over

the past 98 years have sought
to change this or to insert or

inject a minister into the law. -

And TI do not support changing

the law now to inject a minis-

ter into the business of the
award or non-award of pen-

sions to civil servants,” Mr

Ingraham said.

The public service, he said,
must not be politicised and no
civil servant ought to depend















| Sten Boheme:



Bt lus a
sa

upon a minister for a
favourable decision as to
whether he/she gets a pension
or not; the same applies to the
amount of the pension.

. “According to the MP for
Fox Hill, the Minister for Pen-
sions, a retired civil servant
requesting ‘his assistance to
have a legally due pension —a
legal entitlement — received a
favour when he caused the
application to be processed.

“Can you imagine the fate
of those who make an appli-
cation for which he needs to
exercise discretion? I suppose
such a person in his eyes would
be indebted to him for life.

“Discretion creates oppor-
tunities for patronage, bias,
unfairness, prejudice and dis-

' ‘crimination, and yes, victimi-

sation.

“At times like now, when
we are approaching a general
election, discretionary powers

‘ can/may and do subject minis-

ters to untold pressures. Better
that a minister not hold such
discretionary powers lest
he/she be persuaded to use
them for reasons other than
good order and governance of
The Bahamas,” Mr Ingraham
said. ;

get the door...

hie Btn







| Quen s Hi bay
352-3802





PAGE 16, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007

aa eel



Claim that minimum |

wage rise may make
employers pay
more of NHI plan

FROM page one

Mr Nutt said he would have
thought they would have tried to
marry the two (NHI and mini-
mum wage) together.

“The feedback we get froma
lot of people on NHI is ‘where is
the money going to come from,
I need more money in order to
pay it.”

“Although it’s being touted
as something that is being paid
half by the employee and half
by the employer this is a round-
about way of making it so that
the employer in effect pays for
the whole amount by increas-
ing the minimum wage,” he said.

Minister Gibson on Monday
night at the PLP’s branch meet-
ing in Fox Hill announced that
government intends to increase
the $150 a week minimum wage
and to ensure that it removes
the “glass ceilings” which pre-
vent Bahamians in their employ-
ment progress.

Mr Gibson said that govern-

Airport

FROM page one
















said.

The airport source said
that The Tribune’s front
page story on Wednesday
about the delays in the
long anticipated transfor-
mation of LPIA was read
with much excitement at
the offices of the Airport
Authority.

“Someone needs to
come out and express how
frustrated we are,” he said.
























tern #: 32833

ment was currently in the final
stages of reviewing an increase
of the minimum wage, because
“¢150 a week just doesn’t cut
it.”

Mr Nutt said yesterday that
this move could lead to employ-
ers hiring fewer people because
of the greater expense.

“The situation is that the
more expensive it is to employ

someone, the less likely it will be.

for people to be employed,” he
said.

The BECon president said
that employers could switch to
technologies that would actual-
ly reduce the requirements of
manpower.

“One of the things I would
foresee happening is that as the
cost of employing someone

becomes greater and greater,
more thought is going to be giv-
en to labour-saving devices and
labour-saving equipment so that
persons can keep their payroll
under control,” Mr Nutt said.

In its proposal, the Blue Rib-
bon Commission foresees
employer and employee each
paying a contribution of half of
5.3 per cent of the employee’s
salary.

However, observers and the
National Coalition for Health-
care Reform have expressed
concern about the findings of
the International Labour Organ-
isation (ILO) which projected
that contributions rates to the
NHI scheme would have to
become “significantly higher”
than the initial 5.3 per cent.

Claim that PMH special
procedures appointments
cancelled due to training course

FROM page one

to be allocated for the appointment of additional staff to facilitate
that delivery of new and pre-existing technology.

As a result of the cancellations patients, who need to have pro-
cedures, will either have to go to a private facility and pay full cost,
or, they will have to wait until February 12th, which is when the
medical staff is expected back from training.

The source stated that this lack of strategic planning by the
medical staff will lead poor patients to wait for crucial procedures
— therefore, jeopardising the health of those who do not have the
resources to go to a private facility.

The administrative office at the hospital was unable to com-
ment on the situation when The Tribune made inquiries.

However, previous complaints have been made against the oper-
ation of the Radiology Department.

Previous claims suggested pati

ents had to wait as long as six

months for certain procedures at the Radiology Department.

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Bahamas external economic Bahamas ‘caught in
vulnerability drops to 14%

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Bahamas’ external
vulnerability indicator
(EVI), indicating the
economy’s vulnerabili-
ty to external shocks,
has fallen to 14 per cent, a Wall Street

credit rating agency said, with the -

Central Bank having “an ample cush-
ion of international reserves” to meet
refinancing or balance of payments
needs in the near term.

Moody’s, in its analysis of the
Bahamian economy, said the EVI for
this nation, one of the most vulnerable
in the world to external shocks due to
its openness and reliance on just a
few industries, had halved since 2001,
a year impacted by September 11,
Hurricane Michelle and the Straw
Market fire.

In a boost to the current govern-
ment and its handling of the economy,
Moody’s said the Bahamas’ credit-
worthiness was highlighted by the fact
_ that the ratio of its external debt to
gross domestic product (GDP) stood
at just 9 per cent in 2006, “among the
lowest in its broad peer group’ and
well below the 37 per cent average
for countries with Aa- and A- ratings.

The Bahamas’ ratio of external
debt to current account receipts was
19 per cent, below the 53 per cent
group average.

The Moody’s report will again
make it easier.for the Bahamas gov-
ernment to raise capital on the inter-
national markets if it so chose,
through a mechanism such as a bond
issue. The coupon, or interest rate
attached to the bond, will also be rel-

Tourism spending flat in 2006, says Wall Street credit
rating agency, with nation behind peers on fiscal ratings

atively low compared to most
Caribbean nations, as this nation will
be seen as a good risk, with a low
detault risk.

As a result, institutional investors
will not demand as much compensa-
tion for the .risk they would'take in
investing in a sovereign Bahamas
bond.

However, Moody’s said the
Bahamas’ fiscal ratios were “weak-
er” than most of its category peers.

The general government debt to
GDP ratio stood at about 38 per cent
of GDP in 2006, compared to the 19
per cent median for Aa- and A- rated
countries. Yet the Bahamas’ ratio was
better than the 76 per cent and 74 per
cent achieved by Barbados and Mal-
ta respectively, which have “similar
economies”

Moody’s ‘added: “The Bahamas’
government debt to revenue ratio of
169 per cent in 2006 is much higher
than the 67 per cent median for the
Aa- and A- rated countries, but it is
comparable, although lower than Mal-

.ta’s 173 per cent.and considerably

lower than Barbados’ 236 per cent.”

The Wall Street credit rating
agency described the Bahamas’ 2006-
2007 fiscal year performance as “on
track” for the first half, with revenues
slightly ahead of projections and
spending on target.

It added: “Public sector wage

growth has been restrained, and there
are no signs of ramped up spending in
the run-up to this year’s election.”

Some 12 per cent of the Govern-
ment’s debt was in foreign currency,
compared to the 26 per cent category
average. Moody’s added that tax rev-
enues had risen faster than expected,
up to 22 per cent of GDP from 17 per
cent when the PLP government took
power in May 2002.

It attributed this to enhanced col-
lection efficiency and compliance,
coupled with increased customs and
import duties, plus immigration fees,
resulting from the high level of fpreign
direct investment projects.

However, Moody’s said “the
urgency is not as great as before”
when it came to reforming the
Bahamian tax system, despite pres-
sures from international trade bod-
ies and agreements such as the World
Trade Organisation (WTO) and the
Economic Partnership Agreement
(EPA) being. negotiated with the
European Union.

Meanwhile, Moody’s said tourism
spending for 2006 was likely to be
flat, standing at around 2005’s $2 bil-
lion, although this represented a 25
per cent increase over the trough
experienced in 2001. The industry
accounted for over 50 per cent of
direct and indirect employment, and
60 per cent of foreign exchange earn-

ings.
Yet stopover: arrivals ‘have not

recovered from their high mark in the
late 1990s”, the rating agency warned.
“The policy challenges are now how
to manage growth while maintaining
economic and financial stability.
Growth was led by construction and
investment in housing and tourism in
2006. This was strong enough to offset

‘flat tourism expenditure. Moody’s

expects ongoing investment to keep
economic growth on its current trend
in 2006.”

The Bahamas had a per capita
GDP of almost $19,000 in 2006, the
highest rating. among Caribbean

‘nations excluding British overseas ter-

ritories, and above the $14,900 medi-
an level for its Moody’s rating peer
group.

The rating agency added: “Not
much is expected with regards to pri-
vatisation of public sector companies.
Bahamasair will likely remain state-
owned, as the public-good aspect of
ensuring transportation access to the
Bahamas many remote and thinly
populated islands outweighs the finan-
cial inefficiency of the company. In
addition, the airline’s well-compen-
sated unions seem to have political
clout. “There is a possibility that the
Government may partially divest from
the public telecom company, although
this would not be imminent.”

Devco ‘doing everything we can to close’
~~ Morgan Stanley and Raven projects _

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Grand Bahama Development Com-
pany’s (Devco) president yesterday said
the firm was “doing everything we possibly
can to get” the potential investments by
Morgan Stanley and the Raven Group .
closed, althouen nothing had been signed

yet.

Graham Torode confirmed Tribune Busi-
ness’s exclusive stories that Devco was in
separate negotiations with both parties on
potential tourism-related developments for

Grand Bahama, with both itself and the
‘Grand Bahama Port.Authority “seeking to
- attract high-end, residential tourism invest-
ments to the island”.

On the Raven Group project, which
would involve the luxury boutique, high-
end resort chain.Aman Resorts as its oper-
ating partner if concluded, Mr Torode said:
“We've been in discussions with them for
over a year now. It’s more than explorato-
ry, [but] there’s nothing signed, there’s noth-

ing finalised.”

The Tribune revealed yesterday that the
Raven Group’s attorneys and representa-

tives had visited Grand: Bahama over the
past week in an attempt to progress their
investment project, which involves luxury

hotels and signature, luxury multi-million

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The Raven Group project is understood
to be earmarked for 250 acres of land imme-
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the Morgan Stanley project, which strad-
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SEE page 9B



an economic vortex’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas is “caught in a clas-
sic economic vortex”, the minister of
state for finance said yesterday, its
proximity to the efficient US economy
making it easier for this nation’s busi-
nesses to import products and ham-
pering the development of indigenous
industries such as agriculture.

Commenting on the analysis of the
Bahamian economy by Moody’s, the
Wall Street credit rating agency, Mr
Smith said the Bahamas’ high depen-
dence on imports, and propensity to
spend $0.8 of every $1 tourist dollar
outside the country, contributed to
its low ranking in some categories.

This, and the Bahamian economy’s

. openness, Mr Smith said, represented

a “structural imbalance” in the
Bahamian economy that this nation
could do little to correct in the short-
term until it created domestic indus-
tries that would reduce the tourist
dollar leakages.

Moody’s described the Bahamas

‘as having “structural trade and cur-

rent account deficits”, the size of
which depended on tourism-related
imports and construction material
imports financed by foreign direct
investment spending. ©

It said the current account deficit
for 2006 was likely to reach $1.5 bil-
lion, an amount equivalent to 24 per
cent or almost one quarter of gross
domestic product (GDP), driven there
by higher global oil prices and the
rise in imported goods and services
related to tourism investment pro-
jects.

Moody’s said in its analysis: “For-
eign direct investment financed most
of the current account deficit in 2005,
but perhaps only half of the larger
current account deficit in 2006.........

“Bahamian banks also helped to
finance some of the construction relat-
ed imports in 2006. Foreign direct
investment will likely rise substan-
tially in the next several years, financ-
ing correspondingly large ‘current
account deficits driven by imports of
materials and-service for new con-
struction in the tourism sector.”

- Moody’s said the Central Bank of
the Bahamas seemed happy to keep
its foreign exchange reserve holdings
around $500 million, even though



Current account
deficit to hit $1.5 bn,
some 24% of GDP

@ JAMES SMITH

these had come under pressure from
credit demand and oil imports in 2006.

Mr Smith said the Bahamas was
“caught in a classical economic vortex,
so to speak”, because it was “next
door to one of the most efficient
economies the world has ever seen,
the US”.

He added that due to this efficien-
cy, it made more sense for Bahamian
businesses to import products from
the US, as they were more competi-
tive on price and quality. Yet “on the
other hand this hampers the devel-
opment of our own sectors, particu-
larly agriculture”.

“We’ve been unable to reduce the
ratio of imports to GDP,” Mr Smith
said. “With our proximity to the US,
it’s so much easier for local business:

_ people to import rather than look at —¢
alternative means of local production-- ~

“When you make a decision like
that, it’s on economics. It makes sense
to get the best price, but on another
level, you run the risk of over-depen-
dence.”

.

Cabinet signs off on
insurance regulations

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Cabinet has signed off on the
accompanying regulations for the
Domestic Insurance Act, which are
required before that legislation can
be implemented, and they are now
before the Attorney General’s Office
for “vetting”.

Tribune Business’s contacts in the
insurance industry confirmed to this
newspaper that Dr Roger Brown, the
Registrar of Insurance, had circulated
a memorandum on Monday, January
29, saying that the Attorney General’s
Office was “now vetting them and

getting them ready to table in the.

House of Assembly”.

While most said a review of the
regulations indicated no changes had
been made since an insurance indus-
try working group went through them
in late 2005, some sector sources
expressed concern about whether they
would see any amendments made by
the Attorney General’s Office before
they went before the House of

Bahamas ‘not fully
compliant’ on money
transmission business
regulation

Assembly.

James.Smith, minister of state for
finance, whose ministry has regula-
tory responsibility for the insurance
industry, said the regulations.to give
the Act ‘teeth’ had been delayed
because of government concerns over
“whether we have the administrative
capacity” to enforce them.

He added that before the Govern-
ment.implemented the Act and the
regulations, it had to “feel comfort-
able we can administer it”.

Mr Smith admitted that the Gov-

SEE page 12B

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PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN of the loss of
Bahamas Government Registered Stock Certificate
as follows:

Certificate No. Maturity Date Amount
65-112 06 Sept 2021 218,400
65-113 06 Sept 2022 81,600

Bahamas Gov. Reg. Stock 0.375APR
Bahamas Gov. Reg. Stock 0.40625 APR

I intend to request The Registrar to issue a
replacement certificate. If this certificate
is found, please write to P.O. Box N7788,
Nassau, Bahamas.

APR=Approve Prime rate






POSITION AVAILABLE |-




ACCOUNTANT



Responsibilities:
° Preparation of monthly financial statements.
° Reconciliation of general ledger accounts.

e Preparation of work papers for auditors.

© Report directly to Financial Controller.








Qualifications:
e Three years work experience in a similar position.
e Proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel.
© Ability to work with minimal supervision.









Benefits:
Salary is based on skills and experience. Other
benefits include health insurance and pension.




All interested accountants should mail their resumes to:







H.R. Manager
PO. Box N-4036 °*
Nassau, Bahamas




Fax to: (242) 364-6084







RBC ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
is presently considering applications for




































Senior Manager & Deputy,
Group Risk Management
Risk Management,
Caribbean Banking

The successful candidate should possess the following

qualifications:

e Degree in Banking, Finance or Accounting

‘e Three or more years experience in a Risk Management

environment with responsibility for large credit approval

Proven experience in Corporate Risk Management and

seasoned in Problem Loan Management

¢ Proficiency with Bank technology

° Teamwork & Co-operation

Initiative

e Impact and Influence

¢ Thinking skills (analytical, breakthrough, conceptual and
strategic)

e Leadership

e Experience in developing and delivering training programs
for commercial account managers

Responsibilities include:

© Acting as Deputy for Head of Risk Management, Caribbean
Banking.

¢ Adjudicating credit for Corporate accounts throughout the
Caribbean Banking Region within a delegated lending limit
of $5MM, providing work ups as required for applications
over that limit.

¢ Fulfilling Special Loans functions for all Watch Listed
accounts over $500M, developing strategies in concert with
account management and overseeing their execution.

© Developing Credit Policy for Caribbean Banking Region
through reviewing RBC Canadian policy, determining
applicability/relevance under Caribbean environment,
obtaining approval/exceptions as required.

e Identifying credit learning gaps within Commercial account
management teams and develops and conducts training
initiatives/programs to address these deficiencies.

A competitive compensation package (base salary & bonus)
commensurate with relevant experience and qualifications.

Please apply before February 9, 2007 to:
Regional Manager

Human Resources

Caribbean Banking

Royal Bank of Canada

Bahamas Regional Office

P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, N.P, Bahamas





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Be



Abaco Markets sees
7.9% sales rise despite
continuing losses

ABACO Markets attempted
to accentuate the positive with
its third quarter results
announcement for the year to
January 31, 2007, pointing to
increased sales and reduced

losses despite suffering a

$753,000 net loss.

That represented an almost
40 per cent decline on the
$1.248 million net loss sus-
tained in the three months to
October 31, 2005, with the
BISX-listed retailer pointing
to a net margin increase, from
27.7 per cent to 28.8 per cent,
as further signs that it was
making “sustained progress”
in its seemingly never-ending
turnaround programme that is
running into its fourth year.

Abaco Markets’ net operat-
ing loss on continuing opera-
tions for the 2007 third quarter
was $234,000, a more than 50
per cent decline compared toa
loss of $473,000 the previous
year.

The operating loss on con-
tinuing operations for the first
nine months was even better,
standing at $69,000 compared
to a loss of $805,000 for the
same period in 2005.

Gavin Watchorn, Abaco
Markets’ president, said in a
statement: “We have record-
ed a net loss on continuing
operations of $234,000 com-
pared to a reported loss of
$473,000 for the same period of
the previous year, while our
year-to-date operating Joss on



PUBLIC NOTICE

-Ben-Bo Collection &



& GAVIN WATCHORN
(FILE photo)

continuing operations ‘is
$69,000, compared to a loss of
$805,000 for the same period
of the previous year.

He added that Abaco Mar-
Kets’ year-to-date net loss was
$1.137 million on continuing
operations, compared to a net
loss of $2.117 million in the
previous year prior to receiving
one-off insurance proceeds of
$3 million. These were relat-
ed to 2004 hurricane-related
insurance recoveries, helping
to boost 2005’s figures into a
net profit.

The retail group’s sales fig-
ures are trending positively,

Management Company Ltd

wish to inform the public that

BRIDGETTE ROLLE

is no longer employed with us.
She is no longer authorized to do
business for and on behalf of

eu BEN-BO COLLECTION &
t+ MANAGEMENT COMPANY LTD.

CAREER OPPORTUNITY
Senior Trust Officer

Requirements:

Professional qualification-STEP accreditation or ACIB

Trustee Diploma

Minimum five years experience in trust administration at

senior level

Ability to work independently

Strong knowledge of offshore jurisdictions
Strong knowledge of fiduciary offshore trust and corporate

procedures
Excellent PC skills

Excellent command of the English Language, both written

and oral

e Ability to work effectively as a member of team:

Personal Attributes:

e Excellent work attitude, punctuality and attendance record
¢ Ability to interact with others in a professional manner

e Ability to prioritize tasks

e Ability to work with minimal supervision
e Ability to learn new tasks quickly

We offer an excellent remuneration an benefits package that
includes medical insurance, performance based incentive

and a pension plan.

Interested persons should submit complete resumes in
writing along with supporting documents to:

Human Resources
The Private Trust Corporation Limited
P.O.Box N-65
Fax 326-8388

Deadline 28th February 2007





and were ahead of 2005 com-

. paratives by $3.964 million or

7.9 per cent for the nine
months to October 31, 2006.
For the.third quarter, they
were ahead by 6 per cent or
$1.027 million.

And Abaco Markets’ debt
was further reduced by
$716,000 during the third quar-
ter.

‘The margin increase was
achieved despite what were

‘described as ‘inflationary pres-

sures’, as Mr Watchorn said
“every step” of their opera-
tions was affected by the oil
price increase in 2006. He said
the recent decrease in oil prices
has yet to trickle down.

“We are very focused on
tackling this though buying and
logistics, along with stream-
lining all other operational
costs so that the impact is min-
imisied and we remain com-
petitive and deliver real value
to our customers every day,”
he added.

While Abaco Markets’

expenses increased in dollar
terms, they remained the same
as a percentage of sales.

The increase in year-to-date

costs of $589,000 was attrib-
uted to increases in utility
costs, which rose by over
$600,000 compared to 2005.
Abaco Markets said signifi- -
cant elements contributing to
the net loss for the group
included interest costs of
$368,000, as well as discontin-
uing operations of $151,000.
“We are progressing well in
our divestment as we continue
to focus on our core markets to
improve our operations, con-
trol costs and, most impor-
tantly, improve our customer’s
experience by delivering qual-
ity products at real value every
day,” said Craig Symonette,

Abaco Markets’ chairman and

chief executive said.

“We are steadily regaining
the market share lost in the
past and rebuilding the confi-
dence our customers have in
our stores. Obviously there is
still much work to be done.
However, the sustained
improvement we are seeing in
our operations indicates that
we are heading in the right
direction and provides a good
foundation to build upoun in
the coming year.”

ok/ Baker with 10 years or more ex
35 to 45 must be responsible and fl

dd persons may contact Mr. Avar

os Tel: 394-0052 -

Please leave name %

Help Wanted



Dental Office seeking applicants for the following positions:

The applicant must possess the following:

Dental Assistant

Minimum of two years experience
Good communicator

Team player

Good people skills

Fax resume to 393-5802

Office Administrative Assistant
INCOR UPON NON ASH
Minimum of 2 years experience in office administration

Must be a good communicator, team player, and able to multi task

Possess excellent organizational skills, good people skills and experience with
Microsoft Word.

Fax resume to 393-5802



Temfole Christian High School

_ “Teach Me, O Lond, Thy Way" ...Prabn 9:33

TEMPLE CHRISTIAN
HIGH SCHOOL

ENTRANCE
EXAMINATION

Temple Christian High School will hold
its Entrance Examination on Saturday

February 10th, 2007 at the school on Shirley
Street from 8:00 a.m. - 12 noon for students
wishing to enter grades 7,8,9 and 10.

Application forms are available at .the
High School Office. The application fee
is. twenty dollars ($20.00). Application
forms should be returned to the school
on or before Friday, February 9th, 2007.

For Further Information

please call
394-4481 or call 394-4484

Our school is a member of the
Association of Christian Schools International



THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007

a a
Bank’s 27% income
rise generates 10th —
consecutive record

Hi, my name is Scherell Ferguson

Agent of the Month - November 2006

British American Insurance
Home Service Division



Give me a call today at our Rosetta Street Branch
— 242-322-1801/2

Let me explain the benefits of our popular “Money Back” Series
and “Flexi-Care” plans and how they can work for you.

Planning for Education, Mortgage, Retirement?

Give me a call... and let me design a plan
to suit your financial needs,

Gea

Sstabiishedt 1920



RSs ees

oap-de 4008 bafinancial@babinsurance.com

| Frespart 242-952-7209 Exuma 242-338-3095








FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK




CAREER OPPORTUNITY

in
Wealth Management — |
‘Financial Advisor/Investment Manager
Bahamas

COMMONWEALTH
Bank’s net income increased
by 27 per cent to $40.4 million
for its 2006 fiscal year, gener-
ating its 10th consecutive year
of record growth and profits.

The increase upon 2005’s
$31.8 million net income was
driven by a 16.4 per cent rise in
gross revenues to $81.6 million
for the 12 months to Decem-
ber 31, 2006.

In a statement, Common-
wealth Bank said it had gen-
erated strong efficiency ratios
to reap a nearly 50 per cent
profit on those revenues, with
its BISX share price on Tues-
day standing at a 52-week high
of $13.10.

Return on assets, among the
most common measurements
of commercial bank efficien-
cy, was 3.76 per cent, a 9.9 per
cent increase over 2005.
Return on equity was 34.82 per
cent? a rise of 4.2 per cent.

’ Meanwhile, Commonwealth
Bank said its overall efficiency
ratio, which accounts for non-
interest expenses compared to
revenues, stood at 46.7 per
cent.

Meanwhile, earnings per
share (EPS) rose to $1.08 in
fiscal 2006, compared to $0.85
the year before, a 27 per cent
rise and more than double the
$0.48 EPS achieved in 2004.

Commonwealth Bank’s
assets at year-end stood at
$1.018 billion,a rise of more
than $140 million upon: the
previous year’s $863 million,
due to growth in its long-term
loan and mortgage portfolios,
coupled with enhanced con-
sumer lending and savings.

“Sustainable growth does
not come easily, requiring con-
stant vigilance and focus on



mT B DONALDSON

fundamental strengths, while

’ ensuring sufficient investment
to address strategic initiatives

and anticipated market devel-
opments,” said the bank’s
chairman, TB Donaldson,
CBE.

“As the new year began, we

opened our latest New Provi- -

dence branch at Golden Gates,

International
Certification
in



(FILE photo)

a firm commitment to our cus-
tomers to be the leader in per-
sonal banking by taking bank-
ing to the people who have
wholeheartedly supported this
Bahamian institution.”

The $3 million branch takes
the bank’s total network to 10,
spread across New Providence,
Grand Bahama and Abaco. : °

:
wa





We are expanding our capabilities in wealth management and are now seeking to recruit
seasoned financial advisers who have the gravitas and expertise to contribute significantly
to the growth of AUM by developing investment relationships with HNWIs, professional
trustees and COIs.







How You will :
You will understand what “projects” are, and how they are becoming a
part of organizational thinking.
You will identify your role as project manager and the skills required of .
you..
You will recognize the steps you must take to keep budgets on track
and on budget.






Qualifications:

’

























s Recognised Financial Planning or Investment qualification (e.g. FPC or CFA). identify the key factors in project success
a Qualification in Banking, Law or Accounting. , : stan rae é
® ‘A self-motivator with excellent sales management and business development skills. vee ote itil Be oe oA ae ‘
" Detailed and technical knowledge of investment management and the investment cee ce ecome more skilled at presenting ideas and asking for
product range as it relates to non-residents/ non-nationals, HNWIs, trustees and You'wil identify techniqués for bench marking your
COIs. sige
" Full awareness of the local and international competitive environments. oe
: Good understanding of the qualitative and quantitative aspects of investment a
management including, Alfa, Beta and Total Return considerations and analytical What's Included?
depth in respect of their impact on sector allocations and individual stock picks. ¢ Instruction by an expert
a Sound experience in global capital markets. certified lecturer -

Small interactive classes
Classroom Project
Exercises and Tests

General Requirements/Responsibilities:

a Must have a minimum of 5 years international investment portfolio management Specialized Student
or financial advisory experience. ;
: . . as . : ’ e ’
a Must be able to deliver a high level of expert investment advice and service with nee Soa Nc ane

the aim of developing significant sales and new business, covering investment and
fiduciary services and the cross-selling of other banking services.

a Proven track record in providing investment recommendations to both corporate
and personal clients as well as client performance reporting. This includes a full
understanding of the mathematical and statistical basis of portfolio diversification.

Project Management
Guides.

Personalized certificate of
completion

a. Must be totally at ease with the concept of personal affluence and high-net worth °
clients. FEES: $895.00 per person, plus
" Experience of, or at least be at ease with clients from differing social, religious, applicable Guides. *Prices and dates

ethnic and cultural backgrounds. are subject.to change.

Experience of selling other banking and / or regulated products is desirable



Remuneration:

° Salary commensurate with the position’s seniority level 8 (The Bank has 11 pay

Lignum Institute of Technology (L.I-T.)

levels). i
° Benefits- includes a car allowance, variable incentive pay (bonus) and preferred Course Starting Feb. 1 3th, 2007
loan rates i (Every Tues. & Thurs. from 6:00p.m. to 8:00p.m.)

for 8 weeks




Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter via email by February
9", 2007 to: deangelia.deleveaux@FirstCaribbeanBank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for their interest,
however only those under consideration will be contacted.

OT ETRE





BUSINESS —

_sgogannar AA NNR RAR MA REESE TERE TN

The Miami Herald

THE MARKETS
STOCKS, MUTUAL FUNDS, 5-6B

DOW 30 12,621.69 +98.38 AX
SaP 500 1,438.24 +9.42 Ad
NASDAQ 2,463.93 +15.29 AX
10-YR NOTE 481 -06 W
CRUDE OIL 58.14 +117

Stocks
rise on
healthy
outlook

BY TIM PARADIS
Associated Press

NEW YORK — Stocks shot
higher Wednesday after the
Federal Reserve answered two
of Wall Street’s major concerns,

indicating that the economy
remains healthy and that infla-
tion pressures are easing. The.

' Dow Jones industrials climbed
nearly 100 points to set another
trading high, while the Russell
2000 index had its first close
above 800.

The Fed, which issued its
economic assessment as it
decided to leave short-term
interest rates unchanged, said
recent indicators “suggested.
somewhat firmer economic
growth” and tentative signs of
stabilization in the housing mar-
ket.

Wall Street had expected the
Fed’s Open Market Committee
would leave short-term interest
rates unchanged for the fifth
straight meeting. But investors
had been uneasy about the cen-
tral bank’s economic assess-
ment statement and whether it:
would indicate that policy mak-
ers were considering raising ~
interest rates in the near future
because the-economy and/or
inflation has been growing too
fast.

The Dow rose 98.38, or 0.79
percent, to 12,621.69. The Dow
came with a few decimal points
of a week-old closing high and.
set a new trading high of
12,657.02. The previous trading
high set Jan. 24 was 12,623.45;
the Dow’s record close remains
12,621.77.

Broader stock indicators also
spurted higher. The Standard &
Poor’s 500 index rose 9.42, or’
0.66 percent, to 1,438.24 and the
Nasdaq composite index gained
15.29, or 0.62 percent, to finish at
2,463.93.

The Fed’s comments pushed
the Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies above the |
800 mark to a record close; it
finished up 2.37, or 0.30 percent,
at 800.34. Its previous high was
Tuesday.

For the first month of the
year, the Dow rose 1.27 percent,
while the S&P gained 1.41 per-
cent and the tech-dominated
Nasdaq added 2.01 percent.

Bond prices rose sharply fol-
lowing the Fed’s’ statement, —
with the yield on the benchmark
10-year Treasury note falling to
4.82 percent from 4.88 percent
late Tuesday. The dollar was
mixed against other major cur-
rencies, while gold prices rose.

Light, sweet crude settled up
$1.17 at $58.14 per barrel on the
New York Mercantile
Exchange.

' Stocks, which had been
mixed on lighter-than-normal
trading ahead of the rate deci-
sion, had found some support
earlier Wednesday as the econ-
omy gave off fresh signs it could
sidestep a sharp slowdown. The
Commerce Department found
the economy, as measured by
gross domestic product, grew at
3.5 percent annual rate in the
fourth quarter as consumers
increased spending despite a
pullback in the housing market.

Advancing issues outnum-
bered decliners by about 2 to 1
on the New York Stock
Exchange, where volume came
to 1.72 billion shares compared
with 1.53 billion Tuesday.

Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei
stock average closed down 0.61
percent. Britain’s FTSE 100
closed down 0.62 percent, Ger-
many’s DAX index finished up
0.01 percent, and France’s
CAC-40 was down 0.66 percent.









FEDERAL RESERVE





oe



Fed holds interest rates steady

i The Federal Reserve kept the
benchmark U.S. interest rate at
5.25 percent, declaring that
inflation is slowing ‘modestly’
even as the economy picks up
speed.

BY JEANNINE AVERSA
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Pointing to a
revved-up economy and encouraging
news on inflation, the Federal
Reserve held interest rates steady on
Wednesday and extended a half-year
breather for U.S. borrowers. Wall





I want ‘to join the conversation
taking place in Pamela Fero’s liv-
ing room. But to make room for
myself on the couch I must push
aside Christmas lights, bags of
beads, kids’ school papers and toy
trains. I clear a spot just big
enough for my rear to hang over
the edge of the
cushion.

Around us,
evidence of
Pamela’s busy life
covers most sur-
faces — granite
kitchen counters
- peek out from
piles of papers
and unopened
bills. The mother of six tells me
the clutter makes her uncomfort-
able inviting guests over. Only 39
years old, this air traffic controller
wants more organization in her
life and South Florida home.

With me is Diane Hatcher, a
no-nonsense eee at pene



CINDY KRISCHER
“GOODMAN

cgoodman@
MiamiHerald. GoM

PHOTOGRAPHY

Street surged in response.

Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke and
his central bank colleagues left an
important interest rate unchanged at
5.25 percent, the fifth straight meeting
without budging the rate. The deci-
sion was unanimous.

That means commercial banks’
prime interest rate — for certain
credit cards, home equity lines of
credit and other loans — stays at 8.25
percent, once again giving a break to
borrowers who until last summer had
endured the pain of two-plus ree s of
rate increases.



Fed policymakers delivered a
more positive assessment. of the
economy than in December, recog-
nizing improvements in economic
growth, inflation and even the trou-
bled housing sector.

“Overall, the economy seems
likely to expand at a moderate pace
over coming quarters,” they said.

The Fed also observed that core
inflation, which excludes energy and
food prices, has “irnproved modestly
in recent months.” That was an
upgrade from December when poli-

readings on underlying inflation.

They continued to note that infla-
tion risks remain, keeping open the
possibility of a rate increase. Still,
with the Fed’s fairly upbeat assess-
ment, many economists bélieve rates
are likely to remain where they are
for much of this year.

“I think they are taking a slightly |
softer stance on inflation. They are
not as concerned about inflation as
they were last year,” said Victor Li,
associate professor of economics at |

* TURN TO RATES

cymakers fretted about “elevated”

PHOTOS BY J. ALBERT DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF

TAKING CHARGE: Professional organizer Diane Hatcher, top left, offers pointers on sorting the
clutter to Pamela Fero as Fero’s 3-year-old son, Quentin, vies for his mother’s attention. Ina
more relaxed moment, the two women file Fero’s paperwork, below.

COACHED BY PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZER DIANE HATCHER,
THE FERO FAMILY SORTS THROUGH THE MESS AND RESTORES



ORDER





ns

space and time. Hatcher, a former
school teacher and owner of
TimeSavers Professional Organiz-
ing Services, quizzes Pamela on
her goals and gauges her desire



for change.

The two decide first to focus

on clearing the active area of

° TURN TO BALANCING ACT



fi
ae,

US Airways
pulls Delta



bid; creditors

reject merger

i US Airways Wednesday withdrew
its $10 billion hostile takeover bid of
Delta Air Lines after being informed
that the bankrupt carrier’s creditors
were not interested in pursuing a
deal.

BY HARRY R. WEBER
Associated Press

ATLANTA — Delta rallied employ-
ees, lawmakers and customers to its side
for more than two months to hammer
home the belief that US Airways’ pro-
posal to buy the bankrupt carrier would
be bad for everyone involved.

But in defeating the hostile bid
Wednesday, the regulatory angle may
have been Delta’s most successful drum-
beat.

A key group of Delta’s creditors said
in endorsing Delta’s stand-alone plan
Wednesday that it considered, among
other things, the risks associated with

‘and the likelihood of a successful con-

summation of US Airways’ proposal.

Analysts had said regulatory concerns
over US Airways’ proposal might be a
bigger issue than the $9.8 billion US Air-
ways was offering for Delta. Delta had
said the US Airways proposal would
cause a significant delay in Delta’s emer-
gence from Chapter 1] because of how
regulators would view the overlapping
routes of the.two carriers. US Airways
had argued regulatory i issues would not
cause a.delay..

But in the end, US Airways dropped
its hostile bid after Delta’s official cgm-
mittee of unsecured creditors said the
carrier would be better off emerging
from Chapter 11 on its own.

With the dual decisions, Atlanta-based
Delta cleared a big hurdle in its effort to
exit bankruptcy by the middle of this
year as a stand-alone company.

But it isn’t out of the woods yet.
Smaller creditors could ultimately vote
not to approve Delta’s reorganization
plan, and some have already filed objec-
tions to the disclosure statement to the
Delta plan.

A Feb. 7 hearing in bankruptcy court
in New York is scheduled to discuss the
disclosure statement. If the statement
related to Delta’s operations is approved,
Delta could begin soliciting votes for
approval of its reorganization plan. Delta
hopes to hold a confirmation hearing on
its plan in April.

* TURN TO AIRLINES

Kodak posts first profit in nine quarters

i Eastman Kodak, the world’s
largest pnotography company,
posted its first profit in nine
quarters on higher revenue from
photo kiosks and savings from

- firing workers.

BY BEN DOBBIN
Associated Press

ROCHESTER, N.Y. — After wad-
ing through a river of red ink for two
years, Eastman Kodak finally hauled
in a modest profit in the fourth quar-
ter. For the first time, it also gener-
ated more earnings from digital pho-
tography and commercial printing
than from its storied film business.

The world’s top maker of photo-
graphic film earned $16 million, or 6
cents a share, in the October-Decem-
ber period. That compared to a year-
ago loss of $46 million, or 16 cents a
share, when Kodak took hefty

is



charges linked to its mammoth, four-
year digital overhaul, which it aims to
wrap up this year.

Sales fell 9 percent to $3.821 billion
from $4.197 billion largely because of
its emphasis on improving digital
profit margins, such as focusing more
on the higher-end camera market.

Excluding one-time items, Kodak
beat Wall Street expectations by
earning $169 million, or 59 cents a
share, in the quarter. Analysts sur-
veyed by Thomson Financial had
forecast earnings of 55 cents a share,
but they also anticipated higher sales
of $3.94 billion.

The company’s shares rose 46
cents, or 1.8 percent, to $25.98 in
afternoon trading on the New York
Stock Exchange. They have traded in
a 52-week range of $18.93 to $30.91.

* TURN TO KODAK





DAMIAN DOVARGANES/AP

BACK IN BLACK: The new Kodak EASYSHARE V1003 Zoom 10.0
megapixel digital cameras are showcased at the 2007 International
Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas last month.







4B_| THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007

SUPER BOWL

INTERNATIONAL EDITION



d.com_| THE MIAMI HERALD



Fans snap up big TVs for the big game

BY DAVE CARPENTER
Associated Press

CHICAGO — Mark Smithe
admits to a moment of doubt
before shelling out $10,000 for
a 65-inch high-definition, flat-
panel, plasma TV and related
gear last week.

The hesitation was brief.
He’s a Bears fan, after all, and
what better way to experience
the Super Bowl than to see and
hear every Brian Urlacher
glare and crunching hit
through a system with 2 mil-
lion pixels and theater-quality
speakers?

“It’s a little bit of keeping
up with the Joneses,” said
Smithe, one of an estimated 2.5
million Americans purchasing
a new television for Super
Bowl Sunday, based on results
of a recent survey. “Our
friends’ jaws are going to drop
when they see this.”

Just buying chip and dip
and a 12-pack of beer doesn’t
cut it for Super Bowl parties
any more. If you expect your

friends and neighbors to,

choose your place for the big
game, you may have to pony
up for a flat-screen TV, digital
tuner and surround-sound
speakers so they can spectate

BALANCING ACT

‘ with quality.

Sunday’s showdown
between the Bears and India-
napolis Colts is amplifying a
high-definition TV buying
frenzy that already was under
way thanks to a 20 percent to
30 percent drop in prices from
a year ago and heavy promo-
tions by retailers and manu-
facturers.

“A lot of people want them
and they’ve been waiting for
prices to come down,” said
Mike Gatti, executive director
of the Retail Advertising and
Marketing Association, which
conducted the nationwide sur-
vey on consumers’ TV buying
intentions in early January.
“They’re still not cheap, but
they’re starting to get within
range of people who are say-
ing ’Gee I’m going to get one

29

now.

SURGING DEMAND

In Chicago, where the Bears
are making their first Super
Bowl appearance in 21 years,
flashy flat-panel sets are in
demand like never before. A
surge in business that fol-
lowed the team’s Jan. 21 vic-
tory in the NFC championship
game generated holiday-sized

Family works to
conquer clutter

* BALANCING ACT

Fero’s home — the kitchen,
family room and living room.
Hatcher will teach Pamela a
filing system to ensure
appointments get kept, field
trip forms get completed and
bills get paid on time. Hatcher
also will show Pamela how to
improve her daily to-do list.

“The biggest challenge is
there is not enough of me to
go around,” Pamela says. “I
feel overwhelmed.”

To get started on the bal-
ance makeover, Hatcher and
Pamela attack a plastic bin on
the couch by putting items in
the rooms they need to go —
Christmas ornaments in the
garage, toys in the kids rooms.
“Put like with like,” Hatcher
says. “Everything needs a
home, even if that means it
gets tossed in a junk drawer.”

More advice from Hatcher:
“If something is broken, it
goes right to the garbage. If it
hasn’t been used in a while,
ask yourself, ‘What’s the
worst thing that could happen
if I didn’t have the item. Can I

borrow it from someone? Is it |

worth taking up space?’ ”

‘PACK RAT’.

This isn’t going to be easy,
Pamela says. “My husband is a
pack rat.”

AIRLINES

Delta
creditors
reject
merger

° AIRLINES

US Airways disclosed its
initial hostile bid for Delta on
Nov. 15. US Airways later
raised its bid by nearly 20 per-
cent in hopes of swaying Del-
ta’s official committee of
unsecured creditors.

“Using the bankruptcy pro-
cess the right way, Delta peo-
ple have transformed their
company’s business model,”
Delta Chief Executive Gerald

Grinstein said in a statement. -

“Our focus now is on the
work still before us to emerge
from Chapter 11 this spring. as
a strong, healthy, and vibrant
global competitor.”

In his own statement, Doug
Parker, chief executive of
Tempe, Ariz.-based US Air-
ways, said he was disap-

pointed by the decision by the |

creditors committee. His air-
line quickly withdrew its bid,
which was set to expire
Thursday if the committee
did not show support for
moving the bid forward.
Parker said the committee

Husband Terry works the
night shift seven days a week
as a mechanic for Coca-Cola.
On this morning, Terry enter-
tains the couple’s youngest,
3-year-old Quentin, with an
interactive TV learning game.
Hatcher insists that Pamela
urge Terry to share responsi-
bility for putting things back
where they go and getting rid
of things they don’t need.

“You will feel calmer when
the space you live in is
cleared,” Hatcher says.

Moving on, Hatcher wants
Pamela to tackle the piles of
paper. Two of Pamela’s six
children now are adults and
have moved out. But three are
school age — Keenen, 14;
Warren, 8; and Monika, 6 —
and bring home forms to sign,
homework to peruse and invi-
tations to put on the calendar.

We sit around the dining-
room table, the only clutter-
free surface I saw. Pamela
lugs over a stack of paper-
work from various rooms.
Like Mary Poppins pulling
from her bottomless carpet-
bag, Hatcher yanks out plastic
trays, a label maker and
manila file folders to devise a
paperwork system.

Hatcher stacks the trays
four high and labels them: To
Do, To Read, To File, Miscel-
laneous. When sorting,







NAM Y. HUH/AP

BIG PURCHASES: Shoppers examine large-screen TVs at
Abt Electronics in Glenview, Ill. This year, an estimated
2.5 million people will buy a new TV for the Super Bowl.

crowds of customers in the
home theater departments of
Best Buy stores for days,
according to the nation’s larg-
est consumer electronics
retailer.

Some buyers weren't wait-
ing for installation appoint-
ments. Rushing to properly
equip their homes for parties,
many shoppers said they

would stand their flat-panel
sets on the floor for the game
and get them properly
mounted later, according to
Mike Obucina, a supervisor at
a store on the city’s northwest
side.

“Because the Bears won, it
literally made people say I’m
done waiting, I’m going to go
get my flat-panel TV,” he said.



Abt Electronics, a gigantic
family-run store in north sub-
urban Glenview, IIl., that
claims to sell more televisions
than any other single store in
the country, sold about 170
large-screen TVs a day in Jan-
uary during a traditionally
slow month gone crazy. That
made it its busiest month ever
for TV sales.

Money isn’t necessarily an
object. On one recent day at
the showroom filled with
high-def goodies, shoppers
were examining 50-inch tele-
visions by Bang & Olufsen for
$20,000 and even an 80-inch
set dubbed “The Ultimate
Plasma TV” for $150,000.

“People don’t care about
price,” Mike Abt, president of
the business his grandmother
founded in 1936, said happily.
“They’re asking the salesmen
what’s the highest-quality set.”

Even the non-wealthy can
afford a quality system,
although it will get a little pric-
ier once Super Bowl sales end.

Among the biggest sellers
for the month, retailers say,
have been 42-inch high-defini-
tion sets for as little as $1,000.
Or on an unlimited budget you
can always fork over $200,000





J. ALBERT DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF

GROUP EFFORT: Standing in the messy family room of their home, Terry and Pamela
Fero and their son, Quentin, are determined to get their lives organized.

Hatcher gives these tips:

e With invitations or
papers about upcoming
school events, the’ date goes
on the calendar, RSVPs are
made, and then they go in an
upcoming events folder in the
miscellaneous tray

e Recipes are tossed or
placed near cookbooks

e Manuals are saved ina
folder in a file cabinet

e Receipts are stapled to
warranties and also filed.

With a garbage can next to
her, Pamela sorts and tosses.

To track appointments,
Pamela uses a PDA. Hatcher
wants Pamela to keep a writ-
ten daily to-do list and num-



“is ignoring its fiduciary obli-
gation” to the creditors it rep-
resents.

“Our proposal would have
provided substantially more
value to Delta’s unsecured
creditors than the Delta stan-
dalone plan,” Parker said.

Delta’s official unsecured
creditors committee said ina
statement it reached its deci-
sion after a lengthy review of
both Delta’s proposal and US
Airways’ proposal.

Analysts had said regula-
tory concerns over US Air-
ways’ proposal might be a big-
ger issue than the money at
stake. Delta had said the US
Airways proposal would
cause a significant delay in
Delta’s emergence from
Chapter 11 because of how
regulators would view the
overlapping routes of the two
carriers.

Delta has said it projects it
will be worth $9.4 billion to

~<.



KAREN BLEIER/AFP-GETTY IMAGES FILE

FLYING SOLO: Delta creditors said that the carrier would
be better off emerging from bankruptcy on its own.

$12 billion when it emerges
from bankruptcy. Its manage-
ment had said repeatedly it
wanted the carrier to remain
on its own and not combine
with US Airways.

The official creditors com-
mittee said in its statement
that it “has determined that it
will support the stand-alone
plan of reorganization as
finally agreed upon between
Delta and the creditors com-
mittee that will be filed later
this week.” It did not say if
Delta’s amended plan will
make any major changes.

“The creditors committee
reached this determination
after engaging in extensive
discussions with representa-
tives of Delta and US Airways
over the last two months and
upon consideration of the
advice of the creditors com-
mittee’s legal, financial and
industry advisers,” the com-
mittee’s statement said.

ber the tasks by priority.

In some ways, Pamela
shows just how organized she
can be. During our morning
visit, a crock pot with pork
roast was cooking the eve-
ning’s dinner. This works for
her most nights. But because
Pamela’s work schedule
changes each week, some
nights she just wings it, rely-
ing on the nanny to make hot
dogs or'pick up take-out.

PROGRESS REPORT

When I check in with
Pamela five days later, she has
made progress in scheduling,
delegating and decluttering.

This week, she made a

PHOTOGRAPHY .

menu for the week, noting
what needs to be thawed or
purchased. Instead of sched-
uling activities one after
another, she schedules what
needs to get done first, creat-
ing order on her to-do list.
“Tt’s challenging, trying to
coordinate the kids schedule
with mine,” Fero says. But

using Hatcher’s advice, she ©

now has her children putting
more of their events or

appointments on the wall cal-

ender. She transfers all that
information into her PDA.
_We will check back with the
Feros in a few weeks.
E-mail comments to cgood
man@MiamiHerald.com

Kodak posts first
profit since 2004

* KODAK

Kodak had run up eight
quarterly losses in a row since
last posting a profit of $458
million in the third quarter of
2004. It has accumulated $2.7
billion in restructuring
charges and $2 billion in net
losses. And it plans to elimi-
nate up to 27,000 jobs, with
23,300 already axed through
2006.

Its overall digital sales in
the fourth quarter fell 5 per-
cent to $2.45 billion, while
revenue from film, paper and
other chemical-based busi-
nesses dropped 15 percent to
$1.36 billion.

While it made more money
from traditional businesses
last year — $423 million vs.
digital’s $343 million — profit
from the digital arena shot up
92 percent in the fourth quar-
ter to $271 million. Profit from
the older businesses totaled
$98 million.

“TJ think it’s a very clear
sign they’ve turned the cor-
ner,” said Ulysses Yannas, a
broker with Buckman, Buck-
man & Reid in New York.

While film sales have been
shrinking by 20 percent to 30
percent in recent years, Yan-
nas added, the 15 percent con-

traction suggests Kodak is

benefiting from the demise of .

film operations at Japan’s
Konica Minolta and Belgium’s
Agfa-Gevaert.

Three weeks ago, Kodak
said it was selling its health-
imaging business, created
after the discovery of X-rays
in 1895, to Canada’s Onex for
up to $2.55 billion.

Aside from paying down
about $1.15 billion in debt, the
sale could help fund Kodak’s
long-awaited entry next week
into the home inkjet-printer
market dominated by
Hewlett-Packard.

“[’m very excited with the
new product introductions
that we’ll talk about” at a
meeting with investors in
New York, Chief Executive
Antonio Perez said in a con-
ference call with analysts.

for a home theater system.
Consumer anthropologist
Robbie Blinkoff says the grow-
ing obsession with TVs on
Super Bowl Sunday makes it
easier for people to enjoy a
shared group experience,
albeit in a very American way.

DEFINED BY PURCHASES
“It’s insane, it seems, to

spend so much money on a

TV,” said Blinkoff, who does
consumer research for Balti-
more-based consulting firm
Context-Based Research
Group. “But from an anthropo-
logical viewpoint, it has its
root cause..In our culture, how
we define ourselves is through
what we buy.”

For Smithe, 42, it’s about
fun as he looks forward to
hosting his first Super Bowl
party.

“Every guy wants one,” the
attorney said of his 65-inch
plasma TV. “I must say people
are going to be pretty
impressed.”

That attitude makes con-
sumer electronics retailers
among the biggest Super Bowl
fans around.

“Nothing compares to foot-
ball for TV buying,” said Abt.

FEDERAL RESERVE

Fed

leaves
rate at

0.20%

*RATES

Villanova School of Business.
“I think right now they are
taking a wait-and-see
approach.”

The Fed’s announcement
came hours after the govern-
ment reported that the econ-
omy snapped out of a sluggish
spell and grew at a 3.5 percent
pace in the final quarter of
last year as consumers ratch-
eted up spending.

The report also showed
that underlying inflation
ebbed: during the quarter.

The fresh snapshot of busi-
ness activity, released by the
Commerce Department,
underscored the resilience of
the economy. It has managed
to keep moving despite the ill
effects of the residential real-
estate bust and an ailing auto-
motive sector.

President Bush pointed to
the economic figures as evi-
dence that his policies are
working. The president, in a
New York speech, also sought
to calm fears about an econ-
omy that is constantly chang-
ing.

“By and large, our dynamic
and innovative economy has
helped Americans live better
and more comfortable lives,”
Bush said. “Yet the same
dynamism that is driving eco-
nomic growth... also can be
unsettling for people. For
many Americans, change
means having to find a new
job, or to deal with a new boss
after a merger or to go back to
school to learn new skills for a
new career.”

An AP-Ipsos poll in early
January found that 55 percent
of people disapproved of the
president’s handling of the
economy, while 43 percent
approved.

Democrats, in control of
Congress for the first time in
a dozen years, argue that the
White House hasn’t paid
attention to widening eco-
nomic inequality that they say
is making it harder for the
middle class to succeed.
“Middle class families are not
struggling to get by, but they
are struggling to get ahead,”
said Sen. Charles Schumer,
D-N.Y.

“LATE TRADING



4pm. 6:35 p.m. Late 4pm. 6:35 pum. Late
Stock Tkr. dose close Chg. volume Stock Tk. dose close vee
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Synagro = SYGR) 5.75. 5,75 9006

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HarrahE = HET = 84.48 84.48 12403 | Intel INTC 20.96 20.91.05) TSA



For up-to-date stock quotes, go to www.MiamiHerald.com and click on Business





THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007, PAGE 5B

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY ;

MUST SELL eae:

MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES ee
| ELEUTHERA - LOT NO. 14B & 7B, PALMETTO POINT

All that piece parcel or lot of land and improvement comprising of 20,355 sq. ft. being Lot #14B and 7B and situated in the Palmetto
Point District of the Island of Eleuthera, Northward of the public road which runs from the Palmetto Point settlement to Savannah
Sound in the coastal area northward of Ingraham’s Pond, and which said piece, parcel or Lot of land and improvements forms a
portion of several parcels of land containing 2.947 acres or thereabouts and which also includes Lot No. 7B. This site encompasses a
2-storey structure comprising 3-bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathorooms, front room, dining room, dining room, family room, utility room, pantry,
| kitchen, stairwell, basement, 2-car garage and attic office. The entire house is equipped with central air-conditioning. The upper floor

to the porch area has been converted into a storage and an area for the irrigation system and equipment. There is a pool area at the
rear of this building approximately 537.14 sq. ft. with the garage area approximately 777 sq. ft. This area is complete with all utilities

and services available.
Appraisal: $513,959.00
LOT NO. 1490 GOLDEN GATES SECTION 2

J All that lot of land having an area of 6,000 sq. ft. being lot no. 1490 of the subdivision known and designated as Golden Gates, the
said subdivision situated in the southwestern district of New Providence, bahamas. This property is comprised of a 25 yer old single
family residence consisting of approximately 2,480 sq. ft. of enclosed living space with three bedrooms, three bathrooms, living,
| dining rooms and kitchen. The land is on a grade and level, however the site appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the posibility

of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods of the year. The grounds are fairly kept, ith improvements including driveway, walkway
and low shrubs. Yard is enclosed on one side wth a 5 foot chain linked fencing and a low cement block wall to the front.

‘ Appraisal: $162,400.00

Traveling west on Carmichael Road turn left then right onto the service road opposite Bahamas Faith Ministries Complex, then first left
again after passing clico and pre-school. The subject house is the 6th house left painted green trimmed white. :

LOT NO. 1,BLOCKNO.45, |
SECTION E, ELEUTHERA ISLAND SHORES

All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of 9,644 sq. ft. being lot #1 in block 45, Section “E” in the subdivision called and known as Eleuthera
island Shores Subdivision, situated in the vicinity of Hatchet Bay Harbour, on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahams. This site encompasses a two storey building which is approximately 14 yrs old and is abandoned. There is a wooden landing approximately 7’-

| 4” wide by 20’-0” on the upper level, approximately 1,610 sq. ft. of enclosed living space, with 3-bedrooms, 2-bathrooms, front room, dining room, den,
kitchen, and utility room. The wooden porch on the upper level is approximately 148sq. ft. There is also a water cistern under the dining room floor area.

All utilities and services available.
Appraisal: $151,007.00














This property is situated in Eleuthera Island Shores.

LOT NO. 4 GAMBLE HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION

Alll that lot of land having an area:of 5,000 sq. ft. being Lot No. 4 of the subdivision known and designated as Gamble Heights, the said subdivision
situated in the southern district of New Providence Bahamas. Located on the subject property is a single storey duplex‘apartment building containing
one 2, and one 1-bedroom apartment each'unit consisting of 1-bath, closets, dining rooms and kitchen. This building is approximately 2 years old
with an enclosed living space of approximately 1,213 sq. ft. the land is one a grade and level; however the site appears to be sufficiently elevated to
disallow the possibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods of the year.

Appraisal: $143,217.60
Traveling south on Blue Hill Road take the first corner left after passing corner of Faith United Baptist Church and Primary School. This corner is slant and just opposite
St Vincent Road, then take second left (paved road) go all the way to the end around the curve then make a left then first right up the gravel road, all the way over the
hill. The subject duplex is the 3rd building on the right hand side painted light yellow trimmed white with high steps in front.

DUNDAS TOWN (ABACO)

3 two bed, 1 bath triplex 9,000 sq. ft., lot no. 18b.with an area for a small shop. Age 12 years the land is a portion of one of the Dundas Town Crown Allotment
parcels stretching from Forest Drive to Front Street, being just under a quarter acre in size and on the lowside. A concrete block structure, with asphalt shingle roof
and L-shape in design with a total length of 70x26 ft, plus 50 x 92 ft., 2,920 sq. ft., the interior walls are concrete blocks, ceiling is sheet rock and the floors of vinyl

| tiles.
Appraisal: $265,225.00












MURPHY TOWN (ABACO)..

| Lot #60 with a structure, lot size 60 x 115 ft., 6,900 sq. ft., 10 ft., above sea level but below road level and would flood in a severe hurricane the duplex has dimensions

of 60 ft by 30 ft partly of wood and partly of cement blocks with one section virtually finished and occupied with blocks up to window level and floor ready to be poured.
The roof is asphalt shingles, the interior walls and ceiling are of 1x6 pine and the floor of ceramic tiles. The finished work is average/below, 2 bedrooms, one bath,
living/dining. The occupied portion of the structure is not complete. Age: 10 years old.

Appraisal: $75,660.00

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY MUST SELL
LOT NO. 46 GOLDEN GATES SECTION 2

All that lot of land having an area of 6,000 sq. ft. being lot 46 of the subdivision known and designated as Golden Gates 2, the said subdivision situated
in the Southwestern District of New Providence Bahamas. This property is comprised of a 20yr old single family residence consisting of approximately
1,854 sq. ft. of enclosed living space with 4-bedrooms, 2-bathraoms, living/dining rooms, and kitchen. The land is on a grade and level; however the
site appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods of the year. The grounds are fairly kept,
with improvements including driveway, walkway and low shrubs. The yard is enclosed with chain linked fencing and cement block wall to the front with
wrought iron gate. ‘

Appraisal: $1 80,678.00

Traveling west on Carmichael Road turn left on Dominica Drive, corner just after St Gregory’s Church the subject house is the 8th house on the right
hand side painted light peach trimmed dark peach with large mango tree in front.

LOT NO. 6 BLOCK 13 WOODLAND WAY, WINTON HEIGHTS (NASSAU)

All that piece parcel-or lot of land having an area of 14,897 sq. ft. being lot 6, block 13, in the Subdivision known as Winton Heights, this property is comprised of a 26
year old 11/2 storey single family resident consisting of approximately 2,567 sq. ft. of enclosed living space with 3 bed rooms, 2 baths, upstairs and downstairs
consisting of a foyer, guest bedroom and bath, laundry room, kitchen, powder room, sunken living area, tv room and dining area. Climate control is provided by wall air
conditioning units throughout the house quality of construction and maintenance is fair as a good amount of remedial work is needed on the roof and plumbing system.
The effective age of the building is seven years the property is rectangular in shape on flat terrain, and on a level grade slightly elevated above the road to disallow
flooding during annual heavy rainy periods. The grounds improvements include a concrete wall with two double gates at the front with chain-link fencing otherwise,
open patios at the front and back, and a 20,000 gal rainwater cistern under the front patio overall, the grounds are attractive and well kept.

Appraisal: $385,369.75

| Traveling east on Prince Charles Drive go pass Winton Super Value, then second left to T Junction, turn right at T junction and the subject property is the third
house right painted yellow trimmed white.

VACANT PROPERTIES



LOT NO. 10B, PALMETTO POINT
All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land containing 9,000 sq. ft., and being Lot No. 10B situated North of Ingraham’s Pond and Eastwardly of North Palmetto Point, on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas, and is bounded and abutting as follows:- on the north by Lot No. 3B and running thereon for a distance of (90) ft; on the East by Lot No. 11B and running thereon for a distance of (100) ft; on the south by a 20’ wide
road reservation and running thereon (90) ft on the west by Lot No. 9B running thereon for a distance of (100) Ft, the said Lot is overgrown with shrubs and is in close proximity of a white sandy beach. This neighborhood is zoned
residential development and is quiet and peaceful with a topagraphy of approximately 50ft and because of this there is no danger of flooding. The area is approximately 80% developed with all utilities and services available.

APPRAISAL: $72,000.00



MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA
All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land containing 44,714 sq. ft., and designated “E” which forms a portion of land known as “Mutton Fish Point” situated about two miles northwestward of the settlement of Gregory Town on the
island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and is bounded and abutting as follows:- Northwardly by the land now or formerly the property of Coridon Limited, and running thereon for a distance
of 393.13 hundredth ft.; outwardly by a 30’ wide road reservation and running thereon for a distance of 402.57 hundredth ft; eastwardly by the main Queen's Highway and running thereon for a distance of 109.73 hundredth ft;
westwardly by land now or formerly the property of Caridon Limited and running thereon for a distance of 110.75 hundredth ft. this property having an area of approximately 44,714 sq. ft. this neighbourhood is zoned commercial/residential
development and is quiet, peaceful and has a topography of approximately 2 ft. with all utilities and services available. ‘

APPRAISAL: $51,421.00
MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA
All that piece, parcel or tract of land containing 1 acre situated about two miles northwestward of the settlement of Gregory Town on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and is bounded
and abutting as follows:- Northwestwardly by the main Queens Highway and is running thereon for a distance of 125.462 feet northwestwardly by the land now of formerly the property of Coridon Limited, and running thereon for a
distance of 390.274 hundredth ft.; southwestwardly by a 30’ wide road reservation and running thereon for a distance of 128.128 hundredth ft; southeastwardly by the land now or formerly the property of the Venor and running
thereon for a distance of 322.955 hundredth ft. This property having an area of approximately 44,847.76 sq. ft. This neighbourhood is zoned commercial development and is quiet and peaceful with a topography of approximately 2

ft. with all utilities and services available.
APPRAISAL: $51,421.00

This lot is vacant land and is located in the area known as “Mutton Fish Point”

MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA

All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land and improvements containing approximately 44,587 sq. ft. and designated “E” which forms a portion of land known as “Mutton Fish Point” situated about two miles northwestward of the
settlement of Gregory Town on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and bounded and abutting as follows:- Northwardly by the land now or formerly the property of Coridon Limited,
and running thereon for a distance of 383.56 hundredth ft; southwardly by land now or formerly the property of Caridon Limited and running thereon for a distance of 393-19 hundredth ft. eastwardly by the main Queen’s Highway
and running thereon for a distance of 113.40 hundredth fi. westwardly by land now or formerly the property of Coridon Limited and running thereon for a distance of 113.40 hundredth ft. this neighbourhood is zoned commercial/residential

development and is quiet, peaceful and has a topography of approximately 2 ft. with all utilities and services available.

APPRAISAL: $51,276.00 \

For Creat yar) Mlle) Pitta information contact

Philip White @ S12 OAT philip.white@scotiabank.com or Harry Collie @ 502-3034 ¢ email harry.collie@scotiabank.com * Fax 356-3851





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007, PAGE 7B





‘Split OUI F
saver’s credit can

CRU Tua
Savings at tax time



"<. By EILEEN ALT

POWELL

AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — The
government wants to help con-
sumers save — for retirement,
for an emergency fund or for
other goals — during the tax
season. It is, after all, a good
time to think about jump-start-
ing a savings program because
so many taxpayers get refunds.

According to Internal Rev-
enue Service figures, about
three-quarters of federal
income tax filers claim refunds,
and those refunds last year
averaged more than $2,260.

This year, there are several
ways consumers can take

‘advantage of the tax system to
boost savings, experts point
out. Among them is a new
option for having refunds split
up and deposited directly into
more than one account. Others
are the saver’s credit for mid-
dle- and low-income families
and the traditional tax deferral
for contributions to retirement
accounts.

A number of advocacy
groups, including the nonprof-
it Retirement Security Project
and the AARP, have been
working to alert consumers
about the new split refund,
which was authorized by the
Pension Protection Act of
2006.

Attorney Mark Iwry, a for-
mer U.S. Treasury official who
_ig.a senior adviser to the
Retirement Security Project in
Washington, D.C., said most
families have typically had a
tax refund check mailed to
them or deposited directly into
a checking account, from
which it was spent.

“That refund is the biggest
hunk of money that many peo-
ple will see in the course of the
year,” Iwry said. “The idea
was, why not encourage people
to save a little bit of it.” _

By allowing taxpayers to
split their refunds, the govern-
ment hopes some of the refund
money will make its way into
savings accounts, including
those earmarked for retire-

MANAGER - PRIVATE BANKING & WEALTH MANAGEMENT SERVICES



PROFILE:
* Bachelors Degree in Finance
° STEP Qualification

° 10 years experience in advising clients on fiduciary services and developing
appropriate legal structures

ment or college, Iwry said.

Iwry said consumers can split
their refunds for deposit in up
to three accounts by attaching
IRS Form 8888 “Direct
Deposit of Refund to More
Than One Account” to their
tax return. They could include
an emergency savings account
and an Individual Retirement
Account, he pointed out.

“It’s a precommitment to
savings, because the moneys
isn’t in your hot little hands
yet,” he said.

Another savings device is the
saver’s credit, which rewards
families with adjusted gross
income of $50,000 or less if
they set money aside in IRAs
and company-sponsored retire-
ment accounts like 401(k)s.

The saver’s credit had been
scheduled to expire at the end
of this year but was made per-
manent by last year’s Pension
Protection Act.

It’s a “nonrefundable” cred-
it, which means taxpayers who
qualify for it don’t get it in
cash. But they can use the
credit to reduce the taxes they
owe on a dollar-for-dollar
basis, said Mark Luscombe,
principal tax analyst at CCH
Inc. of Riverwoods, Ill. The
company, a division of Walters
Kluwer, provides tax informa-
tion and services to tax profes-
sionals. °

A worker who contributes
$2,000 to an IRA or qualified
retirement account can claim a
savers credit of up to $1,000,
he said. The amount of the
credit varies between 10 per
cent and 50 per cent depending
on total income, he added,
with the highest credits going
to the lowest income families.

Families can apply for the
credit on IRS Form 8880, he
said.

Taxpayers also can boost
their savings with contributions
to traditional IRAs and
401(k)s. Money contributed to
these accounts grows tax
deferred until it is withdrawn
in retirement.

This year, tax filing day is
April 17. That’s because the
traditional filing day of April

Ja

MANAGER -

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

° Client Relationship Management

* Investment of client funds -

¢ Monthly management reports

* Quarterly reports to clients

* Business development and marketing activities
¢ Account opening formalities

* Invoicing & booking fees

° Estate Planning

° Administration of Trusts

° Training, management and coaching of staff

15 falls on a Sunday and April
16 is a legal holiday in Wash-
ington, D.C., where the IRS is
located.

That means that taxpayers
have until April 17 to put pre-

tax money of up to $4,000 into -

their IRAs for 2006; those over
50 can make an additional
$1,000 “catch-up” contribution.
The limits remain the same in
2007.

Luscombe warned that tax-
payers who plan to fund their
2006 IRAs out of split refund
money should make sure they
file their tax forms well in
advance of the April 17 dead-
line to ensure that the refunds
get deposited early enough to
qualify. Or they can take the
easier route and apply the
money to their 2007 IRAs, he
said. The limit on employee
contributions to 401(k) and
other company-sponsored
accounts rises to $15,500 in
2007 from $15,000 in 2006;
people 50 and over can make
additional $5,000 contributions
both years. Contributions to
these programs must be made
before Dec. 31 of each year.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



FIDELITY BANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

A MEMBER OF THE FIDELITY GROUP OF COMPANIES

invites qualified applicants for the following position:

Private Banking & Wealth Management Services

The applicant must have the following minimum qualifications:

* Superior organization, communication, niedesonal and computer skills

° Production of trust deeds, letter of wishes & testamentary trusts

Send resume no later than February 7th, 2007 to:

The Human Resource Director
Fidelity » 51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853 » Nassau, Bahamas

f: 326.3000

e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com



RBC

(401) Lots #17 & #18 Crown
Allotments, Love Hill Set-
tlement, Andros. - Contain-
‘ing a two-storey residence.
Appraised Value $100,000.



(806) Lots #1 & #2, Block 3
with a parcel situated between
Lot #1, Block 3, containing a 4
bedroom condominium - Sun-
set View Villas, West Bay Street.
Appraised Value $750,000.

(806) Lot #13, Block 4 of Coral
Waterways, Section One, Coral
Harbour, N.P. with two houses
and a swimming pool, #312
N.P. bounded Northwardly
by a canal or waterway of the
said Subdivision known as
Flamingo waterway and run-
ning 102.004 ft. Eastwardly by
lot #14 and 146.145ft South-
wardly by a reservation for a
private road. Appraised Value
$530,000



(433) Lot #27 of Village Allot-
ment #14 in the Eastern Dis-
trict, containing residence sit-
uated on Denver Street off
Parkgate Road in the Ann’s
Town Constituency, N.P. Prop-
erty size 2,500 sq ft Building
size 990 sq ft Appraised value
$50,000.



(304) Lot #213 containing resi-
dence in Elizabeth Estates East
Subdivision, N.P. Appraised
value: TBO

(304) Lot #2 in block #8, Stew-
ard Road, Coral Heights East
Subdivision situated in West-
ern District of N.P., approx.
size 8,800 sq ft with a split
level containing two bed, two
bath, living, dining & fam-
ily rooms, kitchen. and _ utility
room-approx. size of building
2,658 sq ft. Appraised value:
$322,752

(702) Lot #20 with residen-
tial property located Sky-
line Heights. Appraised value
$280,000.

(902) Lot situated North Pal-
metto Point, 100 x 100 x 100
x 100 containing a one story
house with 3 bed, 2 bath, living
room, kitchen and linen closet.
Appraised value $123,192. °

(902) Lot #14, Block #23 (125
x 80) situated Rainbow Bay,
Eleuthera containing a one sto-

(304) Lot D-2,415 west of Fox
Hill Road and 659 ft. south of
Joe Farrington Road, N.P. Ap-
praised value: TBO ~

(565) ‘Vacant lot #5 located
Eleuthera Island Shores, Sea-
side -Drive Section B, Block
#15, Eleuthera. 9,691 sq. ft.
Appraised value $21,805.

(902) Lot #46, Block #32, Ba-
hamia. Section 1X Freeport,
Grand Bahama 90 ft wide
along Stratford Way and 150
ft along Stratford Court: Ap-
praised value $26,000.

(902) Lot #5 of Bowles Tract,
8.35 acres (2,017.17 ft x 200
ft.) located approximately 2



COMMERCIAL

BANKING CENTRE

Tel: 242-356-8567

(800) ag Monique Crawford
(802) Mr. Marvin Clarke
(803) Mr Brian Knowles
(806) Mr. Jerome Pinder
(807) Mr. Wayne Kendall
(808) Mrs. Hope Sealey
PALMDALE SHOPPING
CENTRE BRANCH

Tel: 242-322-4426/9

or 242-302-3800

(201) Mr. David Barr

(202) Mr. Frank Dean

(203) Mrs. Cedricka Clarke
NASSAU INT’L AIRPORT
Tel: 242-377-7179

(433) Mrs. Lindsey Peterson
GOVERNOR’S HARBOUR,
ELEUTHERA

Tel: 242-332-2856/8

(902) Mr. Brian Hanna
HARBOUR ISLAND BRANCH
Tel: 242-333-2230

(901) Ms. Velderine Laroda
(903) Mrs. Rose Bethel





Royal Bank
Rasy) Of Canada’

PROPERTIES LISTED
FOR SALE

Contact Account Officer listed below by using number code for each property.
HOUSES/APARTMENTS/COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

rey house with 2 bed/1 bath,
kitchen, living room and 2
linen closets. Appraised value
$89,998.

(902) Lot of land 94 x 94 x 150
x 150 on Queens Highway just
south of Palmetto Point with a
two storey stone building con-
taining two apartments. Each
unit has 3 bed/2 1/2 bath,
kitchen, living room and 3
linen closets. Appraised value
$287,209.

(105) Lot with three bed, two
and a half bath residence, sit-
uated Bailey Town, North
Bimini. Appraised value TBO

(903) Lot #15 located Johnson
Harbour View Estate, Harbour
Island, size 6,750 sq ft with a
3 bed, 2 bath residence. Esti-
mated value $95,000.

(701) Single storey commercial
building situated on the south
side of Harrold Road contain-
ing two offices.

(902) Lot (8,000 sq ft) situ-
ated Sand’s Alley, North Pal-
metto Point with incomplete
triplex (concrete structure
- belt course 2,529.6 sq ft).
Appraised value $49,414.

(601) Lot (3,150 sq ft) located
Mason’s Addition with
partly completed restaurant.
Appraised value $35,000.

(100) Developed _ property
Pinder’s, Long Island contain-
ing a split level Mediterranean
style home with kitchen, living
room, dining room, master bed
& bath, two guest rooms, full
and half guest bathroom on
lower level. Also garage and
breezeway - a gross area 4,212
sq ft. Kitchenette, master bed-
room and bath and front entry
porch features the upper level,
gross area of 780 sq ft. Porches
all around the concrete struc-
ture which is 90% complete.
Appraised value $650,000.

(400) Property situated in Cal-
abash Bay on the Island of
Andros. 75’x150’ and contain-
ing thereon a small grocery
store 480 sq ft and an incom-
plete 3 bed 2 bath house 900 sq
ft. Appraised value $65,000.

(565) Lot #12 in Block #2 con-
taining 4 houses (3 wooden,

| _ VACANT PROPERTIES

miles southeast of Governor’s
Harbour. Appraised value
$292,000 ;
(565) Vacant Lot #9 (11,406.65
sq. ft.) situated in Mango Lane
Section “B” Block #15, Eleu-
thera Island Shores on the is-
land of Eleuthera. Appraised
value $25,665.

(902) .281 acre of vacant land
off Queen’s Highway in the
settlement of Governor’s Har-
bour, Eleuthera. Appraised
value $31,320.

(S05) Lots # 12 - 15, Block #11
- Greater Chippingham Subdi-
vision situated on the south
side of Flamingo Avenue, 2nd
lot west of, Hibiscus Avenue

,

ANDROS TOWN
Tel:242-368-2071 ‘
(400) Mrs. Vanessa Scott

_ NASSAU MAIN BRANCH

Tel: 242-322-8700

(701) Mrs. Stephanie Saunders
(702) Mrs. Anastacia Knowles
(703) Mrs. Renae Walkine
JFK DRIVE BRANCH

Tel: 242-325-4711

(401) Mr. James Strachan
PRINCE CHARLES
SHOPPING CENTRE

Tel: 242-393-7505/8

(501) Mr, Keith Lloyd

(505) Ms. Patricia Russell
CABLE BEACH

Tel: 242-327-6077

(466) Mrs. Winnifred Roberts
MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO
Tel: 242-367-2420

(908) Mr. Antonio Eyma
(909) Mrs. Sylvia Poitier
(910) Mr. Travis Spicer
BIMINI BRANCH

Telephone: 242-347-3031
(105) Mr. Kermit Curry

-www.rbcroyalbank.com/catibbean

® Registered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada



Ma at Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are Hk a of Royal Sa of Canada

Raat Sooo

For eae

‘the Island of Andros










one partly concrete block,
partly stucco building), 4,763
sq ft situated on Farrington
Road in the Western District
of New Providence. Appraised
value $68,000.

(505) A concrete single-fam-
ily residence located on Lot
#212 Roland St, Ridgeland Park
West Subdivision. Appraised
value $72,035.

(902) Lot containing 3 bed , 2
bath residence situated in the
settlement of Governor’s Har-
bour bounded northwardly
by a 19ft road and running
thereon 50ft eastwardly and
running thereon 100ft south-
wardly’ and SOft westwardly.
Appraised value $90,000.



(902) Lot: #17, Block# 7 of
Section “A” of the Eleuthera
Island Shores Subdivision sit-
uated 3 miles Northeastward
of Hatchet Bay, Eleuthera con-
taining residence. (Presently
being appraised)

(400) Lot #14 situated in the
settlement of Love Hill on
total-
ing 20,000 sq. ft. Property
contains a two storey 5 bed-
room, 3 bathroom residence.
Appraised value $185,000.

(203). Lot B_ situated. on
the north side of Shell Fish
Road, being the third lot west
of Fire Trail Road and east of
Hamster Road with a one half
duplex residential premises.
Appraised value TBO



(433) | Lot#71located Yamac-
raw Shores, New Providence
containing 2 storey build-
ing with 2 apartments above
and shops below. Appraised
value $317,000 Lot Number
A, located Rocky Pine Road,
Pineview Heights Subdivision,
Western District, New Provi-
dence containing triplex 7,000
sq ft gross. Appraised value
$317,000.

(723) Residence in Ridgeland
Park, valued at $72,000.

(433) Lot Number A, located
Rocky Pine Road, Pineview
Heights Subdivision, Western
District, New Providence
containing triplex 7,000 sq

ft gross. Appraised value
$200,000.

extending to the 4th lot east

of Myrton Avenue. Appraised
value $169,000.

(902) Vacant lot #13 & #14 of
Block #50 located in Green-
wood Estates Subdivision in
Cat Island. Appraised value
$40,000. ’

(717) Vacant residential lot #25
(6,513 sq. ft) in James Cistern
North Subdivision, Eleuthera.
Appraised value $12,375

Lot No. 17456 Bahama Sound
off Exuma No. 18, located
approximately 2.5 miles north-
westwardly of George Town,
Exuma. Appraised value TBO.

GRAY’S, LONG ISLAND

Telephone: 242-337-0101

(100) Mrs Lucy Wells

LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE

Tel: 242-394-3560

(716) Mrs. Ingrid Simon

(717) Mrs. Nancy Swaby

(723) Mrs. Deidre King

(724) Mrs. Faye Higgs

(725) Ms. Marguerite Johnson

(565) Mrs. Catherine Davis

MACKEY STREET

Tel: 242-393-3097

(601) Ms. Nicola Walker

BAY & VICTORIA BRANCH

Tel: 242-322-2451 /3

(301) Ms. Thyra Johnson

(303) Mr. Desmond McIntosh

(304) Mrs. Alicia Thompson

FREEPORT, MAIN BRANCH

Tel: 242-352-6631/2

(101) Ms. Garnell Frith

(103) Mrs. Damita Newbold-
Cartwright

(104) Ms. Jackie Knowles

(108) Ms. Sylvie Carey



RBC
Eee eke) a1 3
‘} of Canada



nis Courts
Retention Pond
Jogging Trails & Playground
Basketball Court

Q Gazehos & Grills
Single Family, Duplex, Triplex & Fourplex

LOTS FOR SALE and going FAST!

PRICE STARTING @ $90,000
es Tel: 325-6447/9 or 325-6456

Legal Notice



NOTICE |

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

EQUIFIN HOLDINGS
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
EQUIFIN HOLDINGS has been dissolved and struck off
the Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued
| by the Registar General on the 27th day of December, 2006.

JOHN GRIMSHAW
Nautilus House, La Cour des Casernes
St. Helier, Jersey, JE1 3NH
Liquidator



Legal Notice

NOTICE

PHOENIX VELLA CORP.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of PHOENIX VELLA CORP. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Be Se ee ae
Fed leaves US rates unchanged

@ By MARTIN
CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
The Federal Reserve, faced
with a strongly rebounding
economy, left interest rates
unchanged yesterday while
repeating concerns about infla-
tion.

The central bank voted to *

leave the federal funds rate,
the interest that banks charge
each other, at 5.25 percent,
where it has been since last
June. | 7

That decision had been
widely expected given an econ-
omy that is exhibiting better-
than-expected growth. While
the Fed had been expected to
start cutting rates later this
year, economists are now wor-

ried that the central bank may

feel the need to resume rais-
ing rates for fear that inflation
pressures will not keep easing.

The rate action was sup-
ported by a unanimous 11-0
vote of the Federal Open Mar-
ket Committee, the panel of
Fed board members in Wash-
ington and regional bank pres-
idents who meet eight times a
year to set interest rates.

At the previous four meet-
ings, Jeffrey Lacker, the presi-
dent of the Richmond Fed
regional bank, had dissented
in favor of a further boost in
rates. However, he is not a vot-
ing member of the FOME this
year.

The action means that
banks’ prime lending rate, the
benchmark for millions of con-

sumer and business loans, will,

EMPLOYMENT
0 ee ae a

RISTORANTS

Villaggio

STAN OG SAR & CAFE

Seeks to employ experience

Pizza Chef and
Dish Wash ers

Must be well-groomed

Fluent in the English Language
Must have own transportation
Must be able to work flexible

hours

Send Resume to:

Hf

Human Resources
P.O. Box CB 13647
Nassau, Bahamas
or Apply in person
Caves Village, West Bay Street.





Sandringham House
Shirley Street

Nassau, Bahamas

Tel. 242-393-8618
www.bahamasrealty.bs
www.cbrichardellis.com

* 2311 sq.ft. (Ground Floor).

* 4564 sq.ft. (storage).

* 24 on-site parking.

* Immediate occupancy.

* Rental rate $25.00 per sq.ft. plus service chg.

Bis

Pricing Information As Of:
Wednesday

52wk-Hi 52wk-Low

eel gel oe REALTY trp

ERGIAL

CB RICHARD ELLIS
NAVIGATING A NEW WORLD

remain unchanged at 8.25 per-
cent.

While the Fed had been
widely expected to leave rates
unchanged for a fifth straight
meeting, there are growing
concerns its next move could
be to raise rates, given a string
of indicators showing stronger-
than-expected growth.

On Wednesday before the
Fed announcement, the gov-
ernment reported that the
economy grew at a solid annu-
al rate of 3.5 percent in the
final three months of 2006 as
strong consumer spending and
an improving trade picture off-
set severe slowdowns in hous-
ing and auto production.

In a brief statement explain-
ing its actions, the Fed said,
“Recent indicators have sug-
gested somewhat firmer eco-
nomic growth and some ten-
tative signs of stabilization
have appeared in the housing
market.”

The statement also said that
“reading on core inflation have
improved modestly in recent
months and inflation pressures
seem rue to moderate over

ee
owever, Fed Chairman
Ben ernanke and his col-

leagues followed up that com- .

ment by repeating its belief
that the panel “judges that
some inflation risks remain.”
It said that the extent of any

future rate hikes will depend

on how the prospects for infla-
tion and economic growth

evolve in coming months,
repeating the language it has
been using at previous meet-
ings.

Since the Fed’s last meeting
Dec. 12, the economic news
has been uniformly good, with
job growth stronger than
expected, energy prices drop-
ping and the overall economy
navigating the rough waters of
a severe housing slump.

Many analysts have gone
from forecasting that the Fed
would cut rates possibly three
times this year to thinking that
the most likely outcome is that
the Fed will leave rates steady
for a considerable period. And
some are worried that there
could be rate hikes in the sec-
ond half of the year if inflation
does not slow further.

The Fed last changed rates
back in June when it pushed
the federal funds rate, the

interest that banks charge each

other, up to 5.25 percent.

It marked the 17th consecu-
tive meeting that the central
bank had nudged rates up by a
quarter-point. Before the Fed
started raising rates in June
2004, the funds rate was at 1
percent and the prime rate
stood at 4 percent, both the
lowest levels in more than four
decades.

The Fed is hoping to engi-

. heer a “soft landing” in which

the economy slows and infla-
tion pressures are lowered but
the slackening of business
activity doesn’t spell recession.

NOTICE

KIROVA OVERSEAS S.A.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (4) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, KIROVA OVERSEAS S.A. is in dissolution as of

January 29, 2007.

oa

uidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City is the

Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

Legal Notice

NOTICE

THE CHANDELIER CO. LTD.

/

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of THE CHANDELIER CO. LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

2,000 -0.282
1.689
0.796
0.265
0.199 .
0.170
0.715
0.078
0.998
0.134
0.295
0.552
0.779
0.921
1.476

-0.434
0.532
0.588

1.85 0.54
112.05 10.25
8.03 6.90
0.85 0.70
1.85 1.26
‘y1.49 1.12
10.00 9.00
2.20 1.64
13.10 9.05
6.26 4.22
2.88 2.40
6.21 5.54
12.30 10.70
14.50 10.90
16.21 10.00
1.15 0.50
10.20 7.10

Abaco Markets
Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

Hart leo CORY
CHAMBERS

Counsel and Attorneys-at-Law Notaries Public
is seeking to hire an ambitious

COMMERCTAL ATTORNEY

for its Nassau Office

Applicants with a minimum of five (5) years
experience must possess the skills and the ability to
work independently on conveyancing and mortgage
matters.

EPS $
1.766
0.000

y Last Price
Bahamas Supermarkets 14.00
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00
RND Holdings

Weekly Vol.

9.04%
0.00%

Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings
YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
1.326132"
2.9728"*"
2.500211**
1.217450****

11.3075****

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund

Fidelity Prime Income Fund

Attractive salary and benefits are available to the
candidate with the right aptitude and skills.

YIELD - last 12 month ‘dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

NAV ISEY. Applicants should send resumes to:

THE HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGER
P.O. Box N-979, Nassau, Bahamas or
By facsimile (242) 393-4558 or
E-mail: info@halsburylawchambers.com

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
' | S52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
| Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

" - 26 January 2007
** - 31 December 2006
*- 31 December 2006

*** - 31 December 2006

PTR CALL: COLINA 243:862-767) IBELITY BAS 4862976:





THE TRIBUNE



Sa ne RUBUSINESS emus vy ener
Devco ‘doing everything —
we can to close’ Morgan

Stanley and Raven projects

FROM page 1B

Beach, at the easternmost
fringes of the Port Authority
area.

Mr Torode said Devco, aided
by the support of its owners,
_-Port Group Ltd and Hutchison
Whampoa, was actively target-
ing investors and brands it
thought would be a good fit for
_ Grand Bahama’s tourism mod-

el.

‘He added that the Morgan
Stanley projéct was in the
“same situation” as the Raven
Group deal. “We’re at an
advanced stage of discussions,
but there is absolutely nothing

signed,” Mr Torode said. “It’s

not done yet; we are still nego-
tiating, and still have high aspi-
rations.

“It’s premature to say any of

them are signed. There are seri- .

ous discussions/negotiations,
and they are ongoing.”

Both Port Group Ltd and
Hutchison Whampoa were
attempting to attract “high qual-
ity investors to support what
we're doing” in Grand Bahama.

“We have high expectations
and hope all of them, certainly
one of them, comes off. But cer-
tainly, at this stage, there is
nothing firm at all,” Mr Torode
said of both projects.

“We’re continuing to do
everything we possibly can to
get these deals closed.”

The Tribune reported previ-
ously that a $50 million land







2007. r.

















(m) Crop Science

of their choice.

of course.

Technical or Community College or

purchase represented the first
stage of a multi-million dollar
investment in Freeport by
Morgan Stanley.

The deal involves Devco
selling its 50 per cent stake in

-1,000 acres at Barbary Beach

to Morgan Stanley, which
would then be 50/50 partners
in the development via a joint
venture agreement with Port
Group Ltd. The deal has to be
approved by three Boards -
those of Port Group Ltd, Dev-
co and Hutchison Whampoa.

Due: to the continuing dis-
pute between Sir Jack Hay-
ward and the late Edward St
George’s family over the for-
mer’s claim to own 75 per cent
of the GBPA and Port Group
Ltd, approval of the Morgan
Stanley purchase will be
required from Sir. Jack, Lady
Henrietta St George and Clif-
ford Culmer, the two compa-
nies’ independent management
consultant.

The Tribune has seen corre-
spondence indicating that Sir
Jack has signed off on the Mor-
gan Stanley project, while Lady
Henrietta has also been “asked
to sign certain documents for
Port Group Ltd regarding the
Morgan Stanley transaction”.

Few details on the Morgan
Stanley project have been
made public, although it is
understood to involve a major
hotel and casino, timeshares,
condos, second homes and
retail and commercial facili-
ties.

It has been billed by execu-
tives who have spoken to The

ae

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

IMPORTANT NOTICE

FINANCIAL COMMUNITY ADVANCED TECHNICAL
EDUCATION TRUST FOR BAHAMIANS (1973)

EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANCE FOR TECHNICAL STUDIES

Applications are invited from suitable candidates for consideration for financial
Awards offered by the above Trust at The College of The Bahamas or any accredited
University overseas, commencing September,

The Awards are intended to provide financial assistance for training at advanced
~ evel in areas of technology where there is vital need for such skills in The Bahamas.
Areas of study include the following:

(a) Automobile, Mechanical and Architectural Engineering
(b) Aviation/ Maintenance
(c) Automobile or Marine Maintenance (gas or diesel engines)
(d) Air-conditioning and refrigeration
(e) Elevator Engineering
(f) Computer Engineering
(g) Marine Engineering (Coastal Management)
(h) Food Processing and Production techniques
(i) Manufacture of Clothing, Furniture, etc.

(j) Craft Production and Boat Building
(k) Radio and Television Technology/Mass Communication
dd) Medical Technology

(n) Livestock Science
(0) Any other area of technology acceptable to the Selection Committee

Successful candidates will be required to pursue a course of study from (1) to not
more than three (3) years leading to a Certificate or Diploma (Not a Degree).

It is expected that candidates will seek admission to a recognized technical institution

Candidates should have successfully completed high school education in The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas and should preferably have attained G.E.C. ‘O”
level/B.G.C.S.E. certificates in appropriate subjects or completed courses of study
in a technical field. The value of each award will depend upon the cost and length

The successful candidates will be expected to return to The Bahamas on the
satisfactory completion of the course to give the country the benefit of their training.

Tribune on condition of
anonymity as being Freeport’s
answer to Kerzner Interna-
tional’s Atlantis resort on Par-
adise Island, having a similar
impact on that island.

The developments sur-

rounding the Morgan Stanley »

and Raven Group projects
indicate that it is far from
‘doom and gloom’ when it
comes to Grand Bahama’s
economy, especially when the
$4.9 billion Ginn project is

‘included in the mix. ;
Things are happening

behind the scenes, and despite
the ongoing closure of the
Royal Oasis, the economic
future for Grand Bahama will
probably look brighter two
years out, especially if both
projects get off the ground.

And Grand Bahama also
happens to be a mixed econo-
my, due to its industrial sec-
tor, and facilities such as
Freeport Container Port,
Freeport. Harbour Company
and the Grand Bahama Ship-
yard. Their creation has
spawned new industries for the
Bahamas.

Mr Torode described the
island’s future as “extremely
positive”, particularly if it
turned potential into actual
investment dollars.

Grand Bahama’s infrastruc-
ture, proximity to the US and
America’s ‘baby boomers’ gen-

erations all gave the island a.

potentially huge tourist mar-
ket on which to draw, espe-
cially for the second home
industry.







242-461-1000.

fre @ Bank & Tract (Bahamas) Ltd



’ Qualifications:




THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007, PAGE 9B

Public Notice



Amos Cox Natasha Dean

Are No Longer employed at British American

Insurance and is not authorized to conduct
any business on behalf of the Company

For further information please
call our Independence office

at 461-1000

OE

Established 1920

bafinancial@babinsurance.com
Freeport 242-352-7209 Exuma 242-336-3095



POSITION AVAILABLE

Chief Investment Officer for International Private Bank

Job Responsibilities:

Provide discretionary and advisory investment management services
to diverse international high net worth client base;

Support Client Relationship Officers (CROs) in growing and maintaining
the Bahamas office investment book;

Coordinate with other EFG International Investment teams to develop

- and communicate investment ideas, products. and solutions to CROs

and clients;
Manage, develop and mentor the Investment Management Team of
traders and analysts;

~ Serve as Chair of the Investment Committee;

Work closely with Compliance Department to ensure on-going
compliance of Investment Management & Trading policies and
procedures with relevant regulatory bodies and corporate directives;
representing industry- wide best practice.

Advanced Investment Management Degree or Qualification such as
CFA

Minimum of 15 years’ Investment Management experience in Private
Banking setting
Proven quantitative skills and analytical background with investment
portfolio analysis

Strong managerial, written and verbal communication skills

Ability to evaluate overall portfolio risks and exposures in a risk
management framework

Working knowledge of additional languages would be an asset
Willingness to travel as necessary













The individual must be an excellent team player and work closely with all
areas in EFG. Compensation will be commensurate with experience. Interested
applicants must submit applications by February 9, 2007 to:











Application forms may be obtained from the Scholarship and Education Loan
Division, Ministry of Education, Science & Technology, Thompson Boulevard.
Completed application forms should be returned in an envelope marked “Financial
Community Advanced Education Scholarship”, Scholarship & Education Loan
Division, Ministry of Education, Science & Technology, P.O. Box N-3913,
Nassau, Bahamas to arrive no later than the deadline date.

EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited
Human Resources Manager
(Re: Chief Investment Officer)
, P. O. Box SS-6289
Nassau, Bahamas
or fax to (242) 393-1161

APPLICATION DEADLINE : Thursday May ai , 2007

INCOMPLETE OR LATE APPLICATION FORMS
WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED



AGE 10B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007 THE TRIBUNE
oy ae ; BUSINESS

Americans fail _

F



5s esc a a ie Sapa Se mS aE SP REE RE EE TT

eg



= 1 :
Fantasie fares: to claim phone
! eNassau - Atlanta—$381.20 tax refunds

| sNassau - Orlando—$209.70

- Nassau - Boston—$266.20

e Nassau - Fort Lauderdale—$181.20
eNassau - Miami—$179.20

Fares based on Round-Trip travel & include all taxes, fees and service charges.



Tee a ee a ee



328-0264 / 328-0

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PI EMIEK TRAVEL

#57 Callins Avenue
P.O. Box N-9670

257

ae eo 2 ee he ee eS

WASHINGTON (AP) —
More than a third of early tax
return filers are not request-
ing the one-time telephone tax
refund entitling them to at
least $30, the Internal Rev-
enue Service said Wednesday.

The IRS notice about mis-
takes in requesting the refund
came a week after the tax
agency sent out a warning that
it would take action against
taxpayers and tax preparers
who improperly claim large
refunds from the discontinued
tax.

The government last August
stopped collecting the long-
distance excise tax, and has
authorized a refund of tax col-
lected on service billed during
the period from March 2003
to July 2006.

Those claiming a standard
refund amount, which needs
no documentation, will receive

$30 to $60, based on the num-
ber of exemptions they claim.
People making claims on the
actual amount paid over the
41-month period need not
send records to the IRS, but
should have documents to
back up their claims in case
the IRS has questions.

Agency

The agency said that in addi-
tion to more than one-third of
early filers using Forms 1040,
1040A and others not request-
ing the refund, lower income
people using Form 1040EZ-T
are failing to show a refund
amount on Line 1a.

Others it said, are requesting
refunds based on the entire
amount of their phone biils,
rather than the three per cent
tax on long-distance and bun-
dled service, or requesting

amounts in the hundreds or
thousands of dollars.

It advised taxpayers to file
electronically because elec-
tronic-filing software flags
often-overlooked tax breaks.

The agency also reminded
taxpayers that the break does
not apply to the total phone
bill or taxes paid on local-only
service.

Taxpayers are urged to stay
away from tax preparers claim-
ing they can get hundreds of
dollars or more back.

’ Most taxpayers can claim
the one-time refund on feder-
al excise taxes for long-dis-
tance telephone service —
whether for landline, cell
phone or

Voice over Internet Proto-
col. The government stopped
collecting the tax after July
2006 after businesses repeat-
edly fought the tax and won.

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Install new PCs including loading softare and configuring network settings

Upgrade PCs - hardware and operating systems |
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Customer service will be a key focus of the successful candidate.

Interested applicants pleae e-mail resumes to ithahamas@yahoo.com at latest by
February % , 2007.



KERZNER

Shirley & Mackey S treet

Intersection Improvemen

Project

Important PSA

: LUO. The Ministry of Works & Utilities and Kerzner

| — International wish to inform the public that works for the
. -— Shirley & Mackey Street project will be completed by
a Telephone ° 6 /" 71-8720 || February 3, 2007

email:checks@coralwave.com |

The intersecion will return to normal operation at the
end of construction. We thank you for your patience
| throughtout the project which improved traffic operations
at the intersection.



i
ala RRL RH





THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007, PAGE 11B



US economy grew

@ By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) — The
economy snapped out of a slug-
gish spell and grew at a faster-
than-expected 3.5 percent pace
in the final quarter of last year as
consumers ratcheted up spend-
ing despite a painful housing
slump.

The fresh snapshot of business
activity, released by the Com-
merce Department Wednesday,
underscored the resilience of the
economy; it has managed to keep
on moving despite the ill effects of
the residential real-estate bust
and an ailing automotive sector.

The economy’s performance in
the October-to-December quar-
ter, which followed two quarters

_-of rather listless activity, exceed-
. ed analysts’ forecasts for a 3 per-
cent growth rate.

The economy opened 2006 on
a strong note, growing at a 5.6
percent pace, the fastest spurt in 2
1/2 years. But it lost steam during

‘-< the spring and late summer. It

-" grew at a 2.6 percent pace in the
second quarter and then a weak-
er 2 percent pace in the third
quarter. The fourth-quarter’s
rebound ended the year on a pos-
itive note.

For all of 2006, the gross
domestic product (GDP)
increased by 3.4 percent. That

~, *

. Brand new upscale.mini mall, offices and

HIRLEY

was an improvement from a 3.2
percent showing in 2005 and was
the best performance in two
years.

That’s even more impressive
considering the economy was hit
by the housing slump. Investment
in home building for all of last
year was slashed by 4.2 percent,
the most in 15 years.

GDP measures the value of all
goods and services produced
within the United States and is

_the best barometer of the coun-

try’s economic standing.

“Housing and autos hit the
économy with their best punch,
and the economy is still standing.
It is dancing,” said Stuart Hoff-
man, chief economist at PNC
Financial Services Group.

The White House pointed to
the GDP figures as evidence that
the president’s policies are work-
ing and benefiting most Ameri-
cans. President Bush, in a trip to
New York, to highlight his eco-
nomic stewardship declared: “The
state of our economy is strong.”

But Democrats, now in control
of Congress for the first time in a
dozen years, counter that eco-
nomic inequality is widening and
that it’s harder for the middle
class to get ahead.

An AP-Ipsos poll in early Jan-
uary found that 55 percent of
Americans disapproved of the
president’s handling of the econ-

&

omy, while 43 percent approved.

In other economic news,
employers’ costs to hire and
retain workers moderated, which
could ease concerns about the
development of inflation pres-
sures. Wages and benefits rose
0.8 percent in the fourth quarter,
down from a 1 percent rise in the
third quarter, the Labor Depart-
ment reported.

Spending on construction pro-
jects around the country dropped
0.4 percent in December, after
edging up in November, mostly
reflecting fallout from the housing

slump, the Commerce Depart-

ment said in another report.

In the GDP report, consumers
spent more freely in the fourth
quarter, a-major factor behind the
rebound in overall economic
activity. Consumer spending grew
at a 4.4 percent, annual rate, up
from a 2.8 percent pace in the
third quarter and the strongest
since the opening quarter of 2006.

An improvement in the
nation’s trade picture helped by
stronger U.S. export growth also
was a factor in the overall GDP
boost.

More brisk government spend-
ing also helped the fourth-quarter

GDP. Government spending ©

increased at a 3.7 percent pace in
the final quarter, up from a 1.7
percent growth rate in the third
quarter. Federal spending on

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MANAGER - PRIVATE BANKING & WEALTH MANAGEMENT Baas

Private Banking

PROFILE: ;

* Bachelors Degree in Finance

* STEP Qualification

* 10 years experience in advising clients on fiduciary services and developing
appropriate legal structures

GONTACT
FRIDAY

*

Jn

FIDELITY BANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

A MEMBER OF THE FIDELITY GROUP OF COMPANIES

invites qualified applicants for the following position:

MANAGER -

~The applicant must have the following minimum qualifications:

* Superior organization, communication, interpersonal and computer skills

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

° Client Relationship Management

* Investment of client funds

* Monthly management reports

* Quarterly reports to clients
-* Business development and marketing activities
* Account opening formalities

* Invoicing & booking fees

e Estate Planning

¢ Administration of Trusts

¢ Production of trust deeds, letter of wishes & testamentary trusts

¢ Training, management and coaching of staff

Send resume no later than February 7th, 2007 to:

The Human Resource Director
Fidelity > 51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853 « Nassau, Bahamas

f: 326.3000

& Wealth Management Services

e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com

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national defense rose at a rate of
11.9 percent in the fourth quarter,
the most since the spring of 2003,
when the country went to war
with Iraq. , .

All those positive contributions

to GDP helped to blunt some ©

negative forces.

Investment in home building
during the fourth quarter plunged
at'a rate of 19:2 percent, even
worse than the 18.7 percent drop
in the prior quarter. Both were
the worst drops in 15 years.

The drop in residential building
in the fourth quarter shaved 1.16
percentage points off GDP. In

the third quarter, it sliced a bigger :

1.20 percentage point off of over-
all economic growth. That led to




maintenance.

Please send resume to:

|

Telephone calls will not be accepted.

hope that the damage to the
economy from the housing slump
might be easing a bit.

In the troubled automotive sec-
tor, a pullback in car and truck
production shaved 1.17 percent-
age points off fourth-quarter
GDP. Businesses, meanwhile,
trimmed investment in equipment
and software. They also didn’t
invest as much in building their
inventories as they had in the pre-
vious quarter.

An inflation gauge tied to the
GDP report showed that core

prices — excluding food and

energy — rose at a rate of 2.1 per-
cent in the final quarter of last
year, down from a 2.2 percent
pace in the third quarter.

PEPSI-COLA BAHAMAS BOTTLING COMPANY
Applicants are invited from suitably qualified individuals to fill the position of:
PRODUCTION MANAGER

The incumbent will have overall responsibility of managing all aspects
of the manufacturing operation which include the control of raw material
utilization, finished goods production, quality assurance and plant

Ideal candidate would at minimum have an Associate’s Degree in a
technical field, experience in Supervisory Management and five years
experience in manufacturing plant operations é

Human Resources Manager

P. O. Box N-3004
Nassau, Bahamas.
FAX: 364-2123

3.5 per cent in 2006 Q4

Even with the slight improve-
ment, underlying inflation is run-
ning higher than the Federal
Reserve would like. For all of
2006, core inflation rose by 2.2
percent, up from 2.1 percent in

2005. The Federal Reserve, wrap-

ping up a two-day meeting
Wednesday, is widely expected
to hold a key interest rate steady
at 5.25 percent. The Fed has left
rates alone since August, follow-
ing a two-year stretch of rate
increases, the longest in Fed his-
tory. Economists believe the Fed
is on course to achieve its goal of
slowing the economy sufficiently
to thwart inflation but not so
much as seriously hurt economic
activity.








7 GERACE RESEARCH CENTRE SCHOLARSHIPS
(FORMALLY) BAHAMAS FIELD STATION AWARDS

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY



Paella: FALL 2007

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for nine (9) full scholarships
and two (2) partial scholarships tenable at accredited institutions in the United States

of America under the Bahamas Field Station/Ministry of
commencing September 2007.

Education Agreement (1971),

Under the Agreement, participating Colleges and Universities will offer full tuition
scholarships and the Ministry of Education, Science & Technology will pay board and

lodging charges.

Applicants should have gained admission into one of the following institutions where
_ the number and type of awards available is indicated:

ALBRIGHT COLLEGE, Reading, Pennsylvania
WITTENBERG UNIVERSITY, Springfield, Ohio
DICKINSON COLLEGE, Carlisle, Pennsylvania
HARTWICK COLLEGE, Oneonta, New York

MIAMI UNIVERSITY OF OHIO, Oxford, Ohio
UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN, New Haven, Connecticut
ELMIRA COLLEGE, Elmira, New York

EMPORIA STATE UNIVERSITY, Emporia, Kansas
YOUNGSTOWN STATE UNIVERSITY, Ohio

1
1
1

Application Forms will be accepted only for the Colleges/Universities specified

above.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens, sh
education in The Bahamas, and be in possession 0
including English language and Mat

ould have successfully completed high school
f at least 5 G.C.E/B.G.C.S.E. subjects,
hematics at grade A, B, or C.

Bahamian citizens currently pursuing studies at one of the named institutions may apply
for this award and should submit an up-to-date transcript along with the completed

application form.

Applicants should note that the area of study must be one deemed acceptable for the
further development of the country.

Further details and application forms may be obtained from the Scholarship and Education
Loan Division of The Ministry of Education or from the Ministry of Education website

at

Completed application forms should

be returned to The Scholarship and Education

Loan Division, Ministry of Education, Science & Technology,
P. O. Box N-3913, No later than Monday, April 30th, $

Application forms received after this date will not be considered.
SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATION LOAN DIVISION

MINISTRY OF EDUCATION





THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



CUT



4 @ MIAMI HERALD
> __ SPORTS INSIDE



~ Rattlers crush Stingrays

@ BASKETBALL
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Sports Reporter

THE pathway to the Gov-
ernment Secondary Schools
Sporting Association (GSS-
SA) championships has got-
ten a little clearer for the CI
Gibson Rattlers senior girls,
yesterday.

The team hammered the
CV Bethel Stingrays girls 57-
11 to keep a clean win-loss
record and post their second
highest win on the season.

But the Rattlers, who are
currently leading the girls
division, will have to cross
their fingers now that teams
are gunning for the top posi-
tion.

The team might have
blown away the Stingrays in
their two match-ups, but
they had to fight tooth and
nail to get past the CC
Sweeting Cobras.

According to head coach : wf

Kevin ‘KJ’ Johnson, the
team is still the best on paper.
and on the-court but will
need to strengthen on both
the offensive and defensive
ends if they want to hold of
the threats from the other
teams.

In yesterday’s game, even
though the Rattlers had con-

‘trol of the game from the
opening tip, Johnson
believes that they made to
many mental mistakes, that
led to easy baskets for the
Stingrays.

The Rattlers sent the
Stingrays to the line 12 times
in the first half and another
13 in the second half.

This was the only hope for
the Stingrays, who tried their
best to post a score on the
board by driving to the bas-
ket.

Even though they were
given the open lane at the
free throw line the team
went 11-for-25 on the night.

Coach Johnson said: “The
girls played ‘hard, even

though they got out to a slow
and sluggish start. They were
able to pick things up in the
second half gaining posses-
sion on easy balls, they were
also able to convert on some
turnovers to make easy bas-
kets.

“What we try to do was

apply the press in the second
half and work on proper
rotation so they can execute’
on defence and score easy
baskets.

“I don’t want the team to
sleep on any of the teams,
because CC has a good team
and their girls are tough. My
girls they are the better team
but they are not as strong as
they can be. They are young
and soft, but good players.
Playing CC was a test for the
team and we are looking for-
ward to the next match.”

Johnson did reveal that the
team will work on their
weaknesses in preparation
for the other matches.

The Rattlers were led by

Inderia Saunders and Kenva
Johnson, both ending the
night with 10 points, con-
tributing to the win was Erna
Serphine with eight points.
__ For the Stingrays, Tenaz
Higgs would lead all scorers
with five points, Jessica
Francis had three and
Daneisha Greene had

two.

The Stingrays will take to
the court on Friday, trying to
avenge the loss suffered yes-
terday.



@ CI GIBSON Rattlers senior girls apply their full court press on a CV Bethel player, yesterday.

PIP el

clue tems sco

lm TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Sports Reporter

THE NCAA isn’t the only confer-
ence getting action from Bahamian
collegiate athletes, the NAIA is also
cashing in on some top perfor-
mances.

The NAIA conference released
their weekly indoor performance list-
ings yesterday, and Bahamians com-
peting in this conference made sure
that their names appeared in the top
rankings.

These listings are used as a per-
formance guide for the athletes who
are hoping to qualify for the 26th
annual NAIA indoor championships
set for March 8th-10th at the Memo-
rial Center, in Johnson, Tennessee.

However, it is not certain if any of
the Bahamians competing in this
conference have qualified for the
indoor championships since the qual-
ification times are not listed on the
conference’s website.



SN



Conference releases
indoor performance list



But this hasn’t stopped Missouri
Baptist Kenton Taylor from burn-
ing up the track.

Taylor leads the men’s 60m hur-
dles with a season’s best of 7.19 sec-
onds, his closest rival is Lamar
Baskin who has a time of 8.11 sec-
onds and Gentell Skyes with 8.18
seconds.

In the men’s 60m, Lavardo Sands
is ranked 15th overall with a time of
7.01 seconds. The leading time is 6.69
seconds posted by Mike Rodgers of
Oklahoma Baptist, Paulvince Oboun
is second with a time of 6.72 seconds
and Brian Melvin, third with 6.81
seconds.

Ramon Miller might have posted

the fastest outdoor time in the NAIA
conference last year, but he will have
to settle for a sixth place ranking in
the 400m Miller has a time of 50.19
seconds, he his joined by fellow'‘coun-
tryman, who is also a member of the
Dickinson State University track and
field team, Jameson Strachan. Stra-
chan is ranked eighth with 50.46 sec-
onds. The leading time in the event
belongs to Travis Brown, 48.31 sec-
onds.

This might be Dominic Goodman’s
first year with Dickinson State, but
he is no stranger to the NAIA rank-
ings.

Last year Goodman competed for
Lindenwood University where he

io heep ther clean record



(Photo: Tim Clarke)



was considered one of the leading
jumpers at the school and confer-
ence.

This is still the case for Goodman,
who has secured the fifth spot in the
triple jump, with 48-03.25 and sec-
ond in the long jump with 23-07.50.
Joining him in the long jump rank-
ings is teammate Roosevelt Curry
with a best of 23-06.75.

The times turned in by Laniece
Clarke over the weekend came just
in time, for the second year member
of Missouri Baptist track and field
team.

Clarke jumped two spots up the
ladder in the women’s 60m dash with
a season’s best of 7.60 seconds, for
the fourth slating. The leading time is
7.08 seconds posted by Judy John-
son.

Another Bahamian in the mix of
things is Astra Curry with a time of
7.47 seconds for the 19th spot overall.

Clarke has also dented the charts
in'the 200m with a best of 25.68 sec-
onds, she is ranked fifth.





HORSE RACING




COMMENTARY



ANDY LYONS/GETTY IMAGES

Barbaro’s plight
and valiant fight,
stirred our hearts

BY DICK JERARD!
Philadelphia Daily News

-hy were so many people
\ \ / attracted to Barbaro? Why
were they so devoted? Why

was Monday a day they feared so
much? It wasn’t just that the horse
won the Kentucky Derby looking for
all the world like the next great race-
horse. It wasn’t just that he was
injured when the elusive Triple
Crown seemed so close. And it wasn’t
just that the colt seemed to have an
uncommon will to live.

It was all of that, and it was our
devotion to animals. Barbaro’s story
was something we understood
instinctively. This was a magnificent
animal that needed humanhelp. —

"The human story played out
through the eyes and voice of a veteri-

narian who is equal parts compassion- .

ate and pragmatic, two owners who
so loved their horse that all that mat-
tered was the horse’s well-being, and
an Olympic-hero trainer who, within |
two weeks, found himself on his
sport’s highest mountain and in its
deepest valley with the same horse.

In the end, Barbaro was-euthanized
Monday at New Bolton Center in
Kennett Square, Pa. It was the
humane thing. The colt was suffering.

It is the attempt to save'a beloved
horse that everybody will remember.

Who couldn't get this story?

-AHEARTBREAKING STORY |

Pat Chapman got it. She lived her
fairy-tale horse story in 2004, when
Smarty Jones, the colt she owned with
her husband, Roy, took everybody on
aracing ride that we all thought
‘couldn’t possibly be duplicated.

“ “Te shook me up When'l heard,” she “

said Monday from Florida. “It was a
complete shock to me. I am just very
saddened, heartbroken for Gretchen
and Roy [Jackson] and all the fans.”

Chapman lived through the adula- —

tion of the Triple Crown. And then
‘she had to deal with backlash when |
Smarty was retired because of injury.

“Smarty had that compromised leg.
with the cartilage loss,” she said.

She was so concerned about
Smarty he was retired a few months
after the 2004 Belmont Stakes.

“(Racehorses | are almost like fam-
ily,” Chapman said. “They give every-
thing they’ve got, and then alittle
more. To be in that position is heart-
breaking.”

Chapman could not have imagined
that another horse would come along
that people would get so attached to.

But it happened with Barbaro.

“I’ve never seen anything like it,”
she said. “As well loved as Smarty
was, this horse went beyond that.”

‘SO MANY ADORED HIM’

People inside and outside racing
got it. They sent e-mails by the hun-
dreds — wanting to know every detail
about Barbaro, sharing their feelings
— because it was important to them.

“The Barbaro story hits me in a dif-
ferent place,” wrote Suzy Stepnowski,
who grew up ina small town in North
Jersey. “I love horses.”

Stepnowski watched the last year’s
Preakness race like millions of others.

“When Barbaro went down, my

heart stopped, as so many others.did,” |

she wrote. “T watched the news and
the Internet for word every moment
of the day.”

Sandie Dennis of Greensboro, N.C., |

summed up so many feelings so well
when she wrote: “This horse and his
caregivers have captured something
in many, many people — horse lovers
and regular people alike. They give us
hope, and they show us courage.”

Barbaro’s owners, Roy and
Gretchen Jackson, got it. The trainer, .
Michael Matz, got it. The vet, Dr.
Dean Richardson, got it.

“I have very positive thoughts,”
Gretchen Jackson said. “It was a bril-
liant time... . It was great that we had
so many people that adored him.”

It was, as horse racing so often is,
as high as you can be, and as low. It is
simply the nature of the sport

“T knew if this day came, that it
would be very difficult to keep my
composure,” Richardson said Mon-
day. “But it is what itis. It’s not the
first horse I've cried over.”



sos nannies SO SSEP SNR SSEORPUSNE SSO OMAN RLSM SEC8A8 508 2RCBSSURGCESEREAESHLSEESICODEIRDEISLRSEESRLSE OER IOEE CU GLEEEOOETOALLONSLESS ORES AEE EEN LEEE SDL EUNEED SELB STOLEN RAG

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007



3E

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

COLLEGE BASKETBALL | INDIANA 71, NO. 2 WISCONSIN 66

Hoosiers knock off the Badgers

BY STEVE HERMAN
Associated Press
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — The
scariest moment for AJ. Ratliff
came after the game was over.
Ratliff scored 18 of his season-
high 20 points in the second half
Wednesday night, Indiana held off

No. 2 Wisconsin 71-66, ending the

Badgers’ 17-game win-

ning streak. But before

Ratliff and the rest of

his teammates could get

off the court, several x

thousand delirious fans

stormed out of the stands and onto

the floor in a wild celebration.
“Ym claustrophobic anyway,”

said Ratliff, who was quickly

mobbed by the Indiana fans. “Il was

just trying to get to the locker

room. It was funny, but it was kind

of scary at the same time.” |

Ratliff was even scarier for the
Badgers in the game. He had a pair
of 3-pointers during a 13-1 run and
another 3-pointer that gave the
Hoosiers (16-5, 6-2 Big Ten) a 53-43
lead with less than 10 minutes
remaining in the game.

A rebound basket by Alando
Tucker, who led Wisconsin (21-2,
7-1) with 23 points, and
two 3-pointers. by
Kammron. Taylor
helped the Badgers tie
the game at 59. But
Ratliff scored six of

Indiana’s next eight points, includ-
ing two free’throws with a minute
to go to for a 70-66 lead, and the
Badgers never recovered.
Ratliff, a junior guard who has
_been the Hoosiers’ top scorer off
the bench in the past, three games
and in five of the past six, hit six of





~ PRO FOOTBALL |



DARRON CUMMINGS/AP

UPSET SPECIAL: |U’s Roderick
Wilmont celebrates victory.

his seven shots, including four
3-pointers, in the second half.

“I felt somebody had to step up
and make a play,” Ratliff said. “I
felt like I was hitting all my shots,

and I was open, so I had all the .

SUPER BOWL XLI

confidence in the world.”

DJ. White added 16 points for
the Hoosiers, who beat their high-
est-ranked opponent since an
NCAA Tourment upset of top-
ranked Duke in 2002.

“This was a tremendous college
basketball game,” Indiana coach

Kelvin Sampson said.

“When you get down to a pos-
session game, you’ve got to make
baskets.”

After Ratliffs final basket,
Tucker missed the first of a one-
and-one free throw opportunity,

and the Hoosiers rebounded as the |

Assembly Hall crowd began chant-
ing “AJ. RATLIFF!”

Tucker also missed a 3-point
attempt with 10 seconds left, and

Earl Calloway iced the game by.

hitting one of two free throws.
e BASKETBALL REPORT

Fans stuff themselves full of the NFL

BY MANNY NAVARRO ~
mnavarro@MiamiHerald.com
Longtime ESPN anchor Chris
Berman was among the more
than 3,000 registered journalists
to participate in Tuesday’s Super

' Bowl Media Day.

Berman was among the first
to feed the beast — the glutton-
ous NFL — with his charismatic
nature, wit and analysis.

_Inhis 26 yeais with ESPN, he

has seen the NFL grow to a dif-
ferent magnitude. The glutton-
ous growth of media coverage.
The fan participation in fantasy
football. Increased spending on
NEL merchandise, including |
video games. Gambling. It all has
some wondering: Is there too
much football to go around?

“T’m a football fan myself. I

like it a lot,” said Jeffrey McCall,
a professor of communications

SUPER BOWL XLI | INSIDE THE GAME

Golden years: Edwin Pope has seen them all

® For the past 50 years, the eloquent writing of Edwin Pope has
graced the pages of The Miami Herald. Pope has covered every
major sports event, including all 40 Super Bowls, in his career.

BY ARMANDO SALGUERO
asalguero @MiamiHerald.com

Fifty years ago, before the
Internet and ESPN, before the
Super Bow! was a thought in Pete
Rozelle’s imagination,
Edwin Pope tried to get
a $1.95 requisition
approved by an Atlan-
ta-Journal Constitution
editor so the newspa-
per’s sports reporters wouldn't
have to walk a hundred yards to
the nearest pencil sharpener.

The requisition for the new °
pencil sharpener was summarily



denied, leaving the paper’s sports
department with dull pencils —
and no Pope.

“J walked out of that meeting

_ and asked myself, ‘Is this where

you want to spend the
rest of your life work-
ing?’ ” Pope recalls
today. “And the answer
was no.”

Pope called the
Miami Herald’s sports editor and
said, “Do you need a man?”

The answer was yes.

“T flew down to Miami the
next day and started working



SUPER EXPERIENCE: Edwin Pope.

right away,” Pope says.

Pope has spanned the time since
that Sept. 8, 1956, day by delivering
to South Florida his folksy but
pointed commentary — copy that
has taken readers from Albert-

at DePauw University, a school
just outside of Indianapolis.
“But I do wonder sometimes
if it becomes too much and it
changes people’s lifestyles. Peo-
ple can be planted in a chair to
watch football for a long time.
Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays,
Mondays. There are plenty of
other things sensible people ‘can

* TURN TO NFL FANS





ville’s Olympics to Wimbledon’s
tennis and every point on the
sports landscape in between.

“T’ve been an NFL head coach
and was involved in six Super
Bowls, and the thing I remember
the most is the dramatic change in
the attention this game gets,” says
former Miami Dolphins coach Don
Shula, a member of the Pro Foot-
ball Hall of Fame.

“In that first Super Bowl
I coached, we got off the bus, and
there were a couple of writers
there, and we went to the hotel
lounge, and that’s where we had
our press conference.

“Pope was there.”

* TURN TO POPE



5M TUR Um met

a

Ew Zs



4E | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007

SOCCER

Bayern Munich fires coach ,

From Miami Herald Wire Services

Werder Bremen and
Schalke moved eight points
clear of Bayern Munich with
victories in the Bundesliga on
Wednesday, the same day the
defending champ fired coach
Felix Magath.

Bremen won 2-0 at Bayer
Leverkusen, which finished
with 10 men, and Schalke beat
Alemannia Aachen 2-1 at
home.

Both teams, which clash
Sunday in the next round,
improved to 42 points, with
Bremen ahead on goal differ
ence, ;

Stuttgart beat Ariminia Bie-
lefeld on Tuesday te improve
te 35 points and move past

_ Bayern (34) into third place.

Bayern managed only a 0-6
draw at home Tuesday against
15th-placed Bochum and fired
Magath less than 24 hours
later.

Despite sweeping the
domestic double in his first
two years with the club, Bay-
ern fired Magath over con-
cerns that the German power-

house would fail to claim a

place in next season’s Euro-
pean Champions League.

Magath’s predecessor Ott-
mar Hitzfeld was brought in
as a replacement.

Bremen and Schalke both
took advantage of Bayern’s
slump with routine victories.

Bremen led in the 15th min-
ute when Miroslav Klose
headed in his 10th goal of the
season at the far post, and
Hugo Almeida fired in a
sharp, low left-footed shot in
the 78th, after Leverkusen’s

SPORTS ROUNDUP



OLIVER LANG/AFP-GETTY IMAGES

HE’S ALL DONE NOW: Bayern
Munich fired Felix Magath
with Germany’s defending
champions in fourth place.

Gonzalo Castro had been
ejected for a foul tackle on
Tim Borowski.

Schalke rallied to edge
Aachen, which led in the 17th
ona goal by Vedad Ibisevic.

But Rafinha’s penalty six
minutes later and Aachen cap-
tain Moses Sichone’s own-
goal in the 74th gave Schalke
the victory.

In another game, Ham-
burger SV played to its 12th
draw of the season, 1-1 at home
against Energie Cottbus, and

fell to the bottom of the stand-
‘ings. Hamburg won only once

in 19 games and the draw
could spell the end of coach
Thomas Doll’s tenure.

Juan Pablo Sorin started
Hamburg by converting a
fourth-minute penalty. But
Sergiu Radu equalized after a
lucky bounce and Hamburg
never recovered, although
Colin Benjamin hit the post
one minute later.

sonds

will not sign
revised deal

From Miami Herald Wire Services

Barry Bonds’ contract
with the San Francisco Giants
isn’t final just yet.

After the commissioner’s
office rejected Bonds’ one-
year, $15.8 -millicn deal
because it contained a person-
al-appearance provision, the
team sent revised documents
to his agent, Jeff Borris. :

“At this time, Barry is noi
signing the new documents,”
Borris said.

Baseball’s Uniform Playex
Contract states a player
“agrees to cooperate with the
club in any and all reasonable
promotional activities.”
Bonds’ contract had additional
language that the commission-
er’s office rejected.

Borris did not detail the.

provisions in dispute, but a
baseball executive, speaking
on condition of anonymity
because these details had not
been made public, said they
dealt with personal appear-
ances.

Giants executives did not
immediately return telephone
calls seeking comment.

Bonds and the Giants, who
agreed to financial terms on
Dec. 7, said Monday the
drawn-out agreement had
been finalized.

Still, they disagree on the
meaning of an unusual provi-
sion in the deaj relating to
Bonds’ potential! legal prob-
lems.-In the contract, a list of
crimes acts is spelled out in a
section.

“Player acknowledges and

agrees chat an 1adictment for
any criminai act under [that
section]... is proper grounds
for terminatiog of this con-
tract, Bonds’ coiiivact states

The language in the con-
tract was read to The Associ-
ated Press by a person with a
copy of the agreement.

e Elsewhere: Boston Red
Sox ace Curt Schilling says he
isn’t looking for a raise now
that he’s decided to pitch in
2008 — he just wants a con-
tract. If he doesn’t have an

extension by the end of spring
training. Schilling says he
won't negotiate during the
season and will become a free
agent tor the first time in his
Cai after the 2007 World
Series... Right-hander Mark
Prior and the Chicago Cubs
agreed on a one-year deal and
avoided salary arbitration.
Prior will get $3,575,000 and



would earn an additional!’

$150,000 each for making 27
and 30 starts. Once considered
a Cubs’ ace of the future, Prior
has won just 18 games the past
three seasons while battling
injuries.,... New York Mets
pitcher Dave Williams had
surgery to repair a herniated
disk in his neck and it’s
unclear how long he could be
sidelined. The team also
announced that it agreed toa
minor-league contract with
outfielder Ruben Sierra and
invited him to spring training,
and right-hander Jason Stan-
dridge chose to become a free
agent after he was designated
for assignment last week. ...
Yankee Stadium is going out
with an All-Star salute. whe
beloved oid bailpark will host
the All-Star Game in 2008, the
final season before the New
York Yankees move into a
new stadium being built
across the street in the Bronx.
Baseball Commissioner Bud
Selig and New York Mayor
Michael Bloomberg were on
hand Wednesday at City Hall
for the announcement, which
had been expected. ... The
Milwaukee Brewers signed
right-hande: Jose Capelian
to a one-year conivact. Capel-
lan was 4-2 with a 4.40 ERA in
6] appearalices with the Brew-
aus last season. Milwaukee
also signed outfielder Drew
Anderson, second baseman
Hernan Iribarren, cight-
hander Mike Jones and left-
hander Manny Parra

ETC.

e NFL: The Dallas Cow
boys won’t name Bill Parcells’
replacement until after the

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

SOCCER | BASEBALL | ETC. |

Hannover got two goals
from Brazilian Vinicius in the
first 37 minutes and another
from fellow defender Frank
Fahrenhorst before Jan
Rosenthal and Altin Lala
completed a 5-0 rout of Hertha
Berlin.

Leon Andreasen. who
transferred to Mainz from Bre-
men during the winter break,
gave his new team its second
consecutive victory by con-
verting a penalty in the 6ist
against Borussia Dortmuid
The victory moved Mainz out
of the bottom of the table.

Magath wasn’t the only
coach to go Wednesday —
Jupp Heynckes resigned
from Borussia Moenchenglad-
bach after a winless run oi 13
games left his team next-to-
last in the table. »

ELSEWHERE.

e Spain: Getafe took a
firm stride toward its first
appearance in the Copa del
Rey semifinais when it
downed visiting Osasuna 3-0.

Striker Daniel Guiza,
defender Alexis Ruano and
substitute Maris Verpakov-
skis all scored in the quarterti-
nal first leg at Getafe’s Alfonso
Perez stadium.

Deportivo La Coruna is also
a clear favorite to reach the
semifinals after rallying to
beat second-division Vallado-
lid 4-1.

Striker Viadimir Manchev,
making his debut for Vallado-
lid after transferring from
Levante, put the visitors ahead
in the 22nd minute.

The two-time champion,

however, took the lead on
goals by Pablo Alvarez and
Ruben Rivera in the 53rd and
67th minutes, and added insur-
ance with a pair of goals by
Joan Verdu and Juanma
Delgado in the final two min-
utes. .

e Italy: AS Roma
advanced to its third consecu-
tive Italian Cup final, beating
AC Milan 3-1 in the second leg
of the semifinals.

Alessandro Mancini and
Simone Perrotta both scored
in the first 23 minutes and fel-
low midfielder David Pizarro
added a tally just after ‘haif-
time to send Roma through
with a 5-3 aggregate victory.

Alberto Gilardino scored
for. Milan.

Roma will meet either two-
time defending ‘champion
Inter Milan or Sampdoria in
the title match. Inter leads 3-0
entering the second leg of
their semifinal today. :

The finals are scheduled for
April 18 and May 9.

e England: A_ Dubai-
based consortium pulled out
of a proposed $882 million
takeover of Liverpool, clearing
the way for an American busi-
nessman to buy the storied
soccer club.

Dubai International Capital,
owned by the ruler of Dubai,
Sheik Mohammed bin
Rashid al-Maktoum, called
off negotiations with the five-
time European champions
after hearing that the board of
directors was considering a
rival bid from George Gillett
Jr., owner of the Montreal
Canadiens.



DARREN HAUCK/AP

NO SIGNATURE: ‘At this time, Barry is not signing the new
documents,’ Jeff Borris, the agent for slugger Barry
Bonds, said on Wednesday regarding Bonds’ contract

Super Bowl. In his first public
comments since Parcells
retired on Jan. 22, owner and
general manager Jerry Jones
said he wouldn’t have a deci-
sion on a new coach until next
week. Jones has already inter-
viewed eight candidates, and
might add to that list.... San
Diego Chargers linebacker
Steve Foley sued the city of
Coronado, Calif., and the off-
duty police officer who shot
him three times outside his
homie, his attorney said. The
civil suit accuses Officer
Aaron Mansker of negligence
nd excessive force, and seeks
unspecified damages trom the
officer and the city. he
Detroit Lions hired former
NFL fullback Sam Gash as an
assistant special teams coach.

. Garrett Giemont was
hired as the Pittsburgh Steel-
ers’ strength and conditioning
coach, replacing Chet Fuhr-
man.

e College football: As an
audiotape spread on the Inter-
net, Alabama coach Nick
Saban acknowledged
Wediiesday using a phrase
considered derogatory to
Cajuis but said he doesn’t
condone such langage and
merely was repeating some-
thing a friend told hii.

Sabai, a former LSU aid
Mian Delphins coach, used
ab, ethnic slur jai. 3 while «il
ing Florida reporters i Tusca-
loosa, Ala., an anecdote about
an LSU fan’s angry reaction to
his hiring.

e Tennis: Martina Hingis

overpowered Australian
Nicole Pratt 6-1, 7-5 to
advance to the quarterfinals of
the Pan Pacific Open in Tokyo.
.. . Defending champion Ivan

. Ljubicic defeated Roko Kar-

anusic 6-4, 6-3 in the first
round of the Zagreb Open in
Croatia. He will face Stefan
Koubek in the second round
— a repeat of last year’s final.
Koubek rallied to beat Felici-
ano Lopez 2-6, 7-6 (7-2), 6-4.
... Albert Montanez beat
Gustavo Kuerten 6-1, 6-4,
ousting the three-time French
Open champion from the Vina
del Mar Open in Chile. ...
Fifth-seeded Florian Mayer of
Germany and seventh-seeded
Guillermo Garcia-Lopez of
Spain reached the quarterfi-

_hals at the Delray Beach (Fla.)

International Tennis Champi-
onships for the second consec
utive year.... Kim Clijsters
pulled out of next week's
Open Gaz de France in Paris
because of a bad hip. Clijsters
said she wants to make sure
she is fit to play the following
week at the Diamoiud Games
in Antwerp — her last tourna-
Meni wm Belgium betore vetiz
ing at the ena of the year.

e Boxing: Former world
champion Ricardo “‘El Mata
dor’ Mayorga has been
arrested on fraud charges in
his uative Nicaragua.

Mayorga was arrested
Tuesday at the Managua air-
port as he boarded a plane
headed for the U.S., National
Police spokeswoman Miriam
Torres said Wednesday.

MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD



PEOPLE IN SPORTS



JACQUELYN MARTIN/AP

TOWERING FIGURE: Larry La, who is 5-6, translates for
Sun Ming Ming, 23, who was introduced Wednesday.
as the new center for the Maryland Nighthawks of the
American Basketball Association. At 7-9, Sun is now
the tallest player in professional basketball history.

A giant among giants

The “have size, will travel” basketball odyssey that’s
taken 7-9, 370-pound Sun Ming Ming from China to Califor-

- nia to Kansas to North Carolina made its latest stop

Wednesday in the back room of a Chinese restaurant in the
tony Washington, D.C., suburb of Chevy Chase, Md.

That’s where the Maryland Nighthawks of the American
Basketball Association introduced their newest player, a

sional basketball.

' man they’re touting as the tallest in the history of profes-

Sun donned a uniform with the number 79 — Get it? —

_and his new team’s owner and coach and a teammate all ©

gushed about his “basketball IQ” and “soft hands.”

The 23-year-old — who complained the XXXXXXL sweat

shirt the team gave him was too small — was asked what his

goals are.

“T hope,” Sun said, “I make the NBA some day.”

To which Nighthawks owner and ABA chief operating
officer Tom Doyle said: “I’m quite sure he will.”

Really? After all, Sun hasn’t played organized basketball
in more than six months, since a brief stint with the Dodge
City Legend of the United States Basketball League.

Turns out, the NBA doesn’t overlook 7-footers.

“We will monitor his progress. His name has cropped up,
but since he’s never really played, I don’t know how he can
be on our radar,” Marty Biake, the-NBA’s director of scout-
ing, said in a telephone interview. But “as [former Utah Jazz
coach] Frank Layden always said, “You can’t teach

height.’ ”

_ Princess for a day

Serena Williams often
refers to herself as a prin-
cess. Now, she’s getting a
promotion.

The Australian Open
champion has lent her voice
to an episode of the ani-
mated children’s show
Loonatics Unleashed, airing.
Feb. i7 on The CW network.

Williams voices Queen
Athena, who presides over
an island colony of beautiful,
powerful women with devi-
ous plans for the planet and
itsmen.

“The character was
described as being tall,
strong, beautiful, so I guess
that’s how I got the role,”
Williams said, laughing. “I
liked bringing my own char-~
acter to the role. I’ve always
thought of myself as a prin-
cess, but Athena is a queen.
So I had to work it a little.”

Williams has guest-
starred on such series as ER
and My Wife and Kids.

‘In the first two periods, we
played as good as we could. In
the third period, we played as bad

as we could.’

- TED NOLAN. New York Islanders coach
following Tuesday night's 4-3 overtime joss
to the Detroit Red Wings. The Islanders led
3-0 at the start of the third period

Sold on soccer?

Soccer is not Tiger
Woods’ game. The world’s
No. 1 golfer is more of an
Americar football, basket-
ball or baseball fan.

But Woods believes
David Beckham's move to
the Los Angeles Galaxy will
have an impact on the game
in the United States.

. Two NEL teams have
abandoned L.A. in recent
years, and the pop culture
buzz associated with the
flamboyant Beckham could
be the catalyst that finally
sparks soccer interest.

“The Rams and the Raid-
ers moved out. Now we’re
looking for something else,
and J think with David’s star
power there, I think it will
bring another notch and
another thing for all of us in
southern California to come
out and watch,” Woods said
Wednesday, a day before
the start of the Dubai (UAE)
Desert Classic.

FLASHBACK

On this day in history:
1964

In hockey, Bobby Rousseau v1 the Muntveal

Canadiens scores five goals in a 9-3 victory over the Detroit

Red Wings.

1998 — David Graham captures the longest playoff in
Senior PGA Tour history, beating Dave Stockton with a
birdie on the 10th extra hole in the Royal Caribbean Classic.



a FP PE



THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com



« . .
_ >.” From Miami Herald Wire Services

BOSTON — Kobe Bryant returned from
his one-game suspension and had 43 points,
eight rebounds and eight assists to help the
-.. Los Angeles Lakers beat Boston 111-98 on

.'. Wednesday night and send the Celtics to a
’.‘ franchise-record 13th consecutive loss.
Bryant hit a pair of 3-pointers after the
Celtics cut the deficit to 63-62 with 8:31 left in
the third quarter. He also made a 30-footer at
the end of the quarter to give the Lakers a
10-point lead and threw down a reverse dunk
in the final two minutes to electrify the fans
who weren't already heading for the exits.
He made a 3-pointer on the Lakers’ next
possession, and when Los Angeles got the
ball back the Boston fans, who had once con-
sidered the Lakers their biggest rival, were

chanting, “Kobe!”

Bryant was suspended by the NBA after
whacking — accidentally, he said — San
Antonio’s Manu Ginobili in the face on Sun-

. day.
MAVERICKS 95, GRIZZLIES 94

MEMPHIS, Tenn. -— Dirk Nowitzki over-

BASKETBALL | HOCKEY

PRO BASKETBALL

ONE-MAN SHOW: Lakers superstar Kobe
Bryant weaves through a pair of Celtics
defenders during his 43-point night.

came a tough shooting night with 26 points,

including 16 in the fourth quarter, to lead the

Mavericks. y
RAPTORS 119, WIZARDS 109

the Rockets to the victory.’

TORONTO — Chris Bosh scored 34

points and Jose Calderon had a career-high
24 points and 11 assists to lead the Raptors.
Toronto shot a season-high 59 percent and
scored a franchise-record 43 points in the

third quarter.
PISTONS 113, NETS 89

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Richard
-’ Hamilton scored 24 points and the Pistons
set a team record by making 27 consecutive

free throws in the victory.



_ Florida fights off

From Miami Herald Wire Services

Lee Humphrey made three con-

secutive 3-pointers to spark Florida’s
rally from a double-digit deficit
Wednesday night, and the top-ranked
Gators, playing at home, beat Van-
derbilt 74-64.

Humphrey, one of the best outside
shooters in the college game, added
another 3-pointer that gave Florida a
70-59 lead with 2:56 left and essen-
tially sealed the team’s 13th consecu-
tive victory.

The Gators (20-2, 7-0 Southeast-

_ern Conference) trailed by as many
as 12 points in the first half and were
down 41-30 at the break. But they
looked much more like the defending
national champs in the second half.

Humphrey finished with 15 points.

Florida extended its winning

streak against Vanderbilt (15-7, 5-3) to .

seven. The Gators have won of 12 of
the past 13 games in the series.
e No. 3 North Carolina 105,

MAGIC 98, BUCKS 73

76ERS 89, HORNETS 78

OKLAHOMA CITY — Andre Iguodala
scored 22 points, Samuel Dalembert grabbed
15 rebounds and the 76ers spoiled point
guard Chris Paul’s return from a sprained

right ankle.



22 points and grabbed 13 rebounds,
and the Tar Heels hammered the vis-
iting Hurricanes.

Wayne Ellington scored 14 points
for the Tar Heels (20-2, 6-1 Atlantic
Coast Conference), who had no trou-
ble winning their fifth consecutive
game. North Carolina shot 56 percent
— including 61 percent after halftime
— and hit 12 of 24 3-pointers for
another league victory by a double-
digit margin — this time a huge one.

Anthony Harris scored 18 points
for the Hurricanes (9-13, 2-6), who
have lost five games in a row — all in
the ACC. Four of those five have
come by at least 19 points.

@ No. 4 Ohio State 78, Purdue
60: Mike Conley scored 18 points,
and Jamar Butler added 16, to help the
visiting Buckeyes (19-3, 7-1 Big Ten)
rout the Boilermakers (14-8, 3-5).

While Purdue was concentrating
on stopping 7-foot freshman Greg
Oden, who finished the game with
nine points, the Buckeyes made eight



ROCKETS 112, SUPERSONICS 102
HOUSTON — Tracy McGrady scored 36
points to match Seattle’s Ray Allen and lead

ORLANDO, Fla. — Hedo Turkoglu scored
17 points and Tony Battie added a season-
high 15 as the Magic ended a three-game skid.

triumphant return

KINGS 100, T’WOLVES 98

MINNEAPOLIS — Kevin Martin had 28
points and the go-ahead jump shot with 16.6
seconds left, helping the struggling Kings
stave off another road defeat.

___INTERNATIONAL EDITION





Washington 27

Orlando 24
Miami 20
Atlanta 17
Charlotte 17

:
New Jersey 22
New York 20
Philadelphia 15



BOBCATS 104, KNICKS 87 Boston 2

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Gerald Wallace
scored 17 of his career-high 42 points in the
fourth quarter and the Bobcats pulled away
from cold-shooting New York. —

HAWKS 115, WARRIORS 94

ATLANTA — The Hawks capped their
first winning month in almost three years
with their highest point total of the season.

Chicago 26
Cleveland 26
Indiana 24

Milwaukee 18

CENTRAL OW
Detroit 26

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007 | SE



NBASTANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE

SOUTHEAST W__

L_ Pet. GB 10 Str. Home Away Cont

18 600 - 7-3 Ll 18-4 914 19-10
22 «522 3% 28 W-1 15-9 9-13 1413
25 444 «7 «(4-6 Wl 11-10 9-15 9-14
27 «6386 9% «26-4 W-2 «(9-12 8-15 11-18
28 «4.378 «10 «5-5 W-2 9-14 814 12-17



23. 500 «- ‘7-3 W-l 15-7 8-16 16-9
24 «478 «61 «64 «Ll 13-11 9-13 16-10
28 «417, 4 46) LL 12-13) 8-15 12-18
32. 319 8% 5-5 W-1l 7-11 8-21 10-17
33.267 10% 0-10 L-13 4-18 815 &21

L Pct. GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf
18 591. - 64 W-1 12-9
19 .578 % 6-4 W-3 20-6 6-13 20-8
19 578 % 46 W-1 16-6 10-13 16-12
21 533 2% 55 W-1 14-7 10-14 19-13
28. 391 9 28 L2 10-8 8-20 8-18

WESTERN CONFERENCE

SOUTHWEST WL

Pct. GB





Dallas 38 (9
ELSEWHERE San Antonio 32.14
e Jazz: Power forward Carlos Boozer Houston 28 16 636 8% 13-11 15-14
iB hail fracture in his left leg, an dis New Orleans 19 26 .422 18 6-15 10-17
as a hairline tractur’ S 8) ] Memphis 12 35 .255 26 3-20 6-22
expected to be out of action for several
wap Weeks. , NORTHWEST OWL Pet. GB I Away Cont
CHITOSE SUZUMEY AP e Bulls: Center Ben Wallace sat out Chi- Utah 29 17 «+630 - 13-11 18-10
0’ i Clippers Denver 22 20 524 5 56 4-3 12-12 10-8 912
Le Modus a pe pnedl slips 3 | Minnesota = «2223-489 GM 3-7
  • ate Wednesday night because of a bruise Portland 19 27 413 10 5:5 L-l 11-12 8-15 12-15
    tendon in his left knee. Seattle 17 29. 370 12 4-6 L3 13-11 4-18 7-19
    e Kings: Forward Shareef Abdur-Rahim
    was inactive for Wednesday night’s game at Paci. | Wet OB: Lie Str. Meme, “Avay _Cont
    Minnesota because of a sore right knee. Phoenix 36 9 800 - 91 Ll 193 176 168
    L.A. Lakers 28 18 .609 8% 5-5 W-1 19-6 9-12 17-10

    against Sacramento.

    COLLEGE BASKETBALL



    PHIL SANDLIN/AP

    FLOOR WORK: Florida center
    Joakim Noah: center, fights for
    the ball during a 74-64 victory.

    three-pointers. Butler was 4-of-7
    from three-point range.

    The Buckeyes shot 53 percent
    from the field and outrebounded the
    Boilermakers 38-29. Ohio State has
    won six games in a row in the series

    -e Timberwolves:.
    McCants returned from microfracture sur-
    gery on his right knee on Wednesday night

    e Clippers: The team signed guard Doug
    Christie to a 10-day contract.

    e Hornets: The Hornets planned to let a
    deadline pass Wednesday on the team’s
    option to play a third season at its temporary
    home in Oklahoma City.

    e Obituary: Stu Inman, who helped
    build the Portland Trail Blazers’ 1977 NBA
    championship team, died of an apparent
    heart attack. He was 80.

    Guard Rashad

    Orl. 98, Mil. 73
    Atl. 115, G.S.W.94
    Tor. 119, Was. 109
    Cha. 104, N.Y. 87
    LA.L. 111, Bos. 98
    Detroit 113, NJ. 89
    Dal. 95, Mem. 94
    Sac. 100, Min, 98
    Phi. 89, N.O. 78
    Hou. 112, Sea. 102
    “ Sac. at Min., late
    Den. at Por., late
    Chi. at L.A.C., late



    and 12 of the teams’ past 13 meetings.

    e No. 10 Texas A&M 73, lowa
    State 49: Joseph Jones scored 21
    points, and the Aggies (18-3, 6-1:;Big~
    12) stifled the Cyclones (11-10; 2-5):
    with tight defense to extend their
    home winning streak to 20.

    e No. 11 Memphis 87, Central
    Florida 65: Chris Douglas-Roberts
    scored 23 points, and Joey Dorsey
    had 22 points and nine rebounds, to
    help the visiting Tigers (18-3, 8-0
    Conference USA) trounce. the
    Golden Knights (15-6, 4-3).

    e No. 13 Butler 71, Youngs-
    town State 58: Mike Green scored a
    season-high 23 points as the Bulldogs
    (21-2, 9-1 Horizon League) beat the
    host Penguins (9-14, 4-7) for their
    seventh triumph in a row. Butler sur-
    passed the 20-victory mark for the
    third time in school history.

    e No. 15 Nevada 79, Louisiana
    Tech 71: Nick Fazekas and Marcellus
    Kemp each scored 20 points, and the
    Wolf Pack (20-2, 8-1 Western Ath-

    LA. Clippers 22 22
    Golden State 21 25
    Sacramento 18 26

    RESULTS AND SCHEDULES
    Wedneday’s results

    500 134% 7-3 W-1 16-8 6-14 14-17
    457154 3-7 ~=L-2 17-8 417_:13-15
    40917% 4-6 W-1 12-11 6-15 918

    Tonight’s games

    Cleveland at Miami, 8
    S.A. at Phoenix, 10:30

    Tuesday’s results

    Miami 110, Mil. 80
    Indiana 103, Boston 96
    Wash. 104, Detroit 99
    Cleveland 124,G.S.97 -
    N.Y. 99, Lakers 94

    Dallas 122, Seattle 102

    letic Conference) held off the host
    Bulldogs (6-15, 4-5) by closing the
    game with a 11-6 run.

    Vandy; UNC routs Miami

    -+@ North Carolina State 70,-
    Nov 16*Vitginia.Tech 59:.Gavin - -

    Grant scored all 16 of his points in the
    second half, and Ben McCauley
    scored 20, as the Wolfpack (12-8, 2-5
    ACC) knocked the host Hokies (16-6,
    6-2) out of first place in the ACC.

    e No. 19 Alabama 73, Louisi-
    ana State 70: Jermareo Davidson
    scored a career-high 31 points, and
    the Crimson Tide (16-5, 3-4 SEC) held

    _ off the host Tigers (13-8, 2-5), who

    pulled to 71-70 with 10 seconds left
    before Davidson’s last-second dunk.

    e No. 22 Texas 76, Texas Tech
    64: Kevin Durant scored 37 points
    and grabbed a season-high 23
    rebounds, and the Longhorns (16-5,
    6-1 Big 12) beat the host Red Raiders
    (15-7, 4-3), handing Bob Knight his
    llth loss to Texas since he arrived in
    2001. Knight’s Red Raiders have
    beaten Texas only twice:

    oo



    Miami 64: Tyler Hansbrough scored



    EASTERN CONFERENCE :

    SOUTHEAST WL OL SLPTS GF GA

    mnsontrsunnusenngarannuntnnsnonasounasonissposansnnsntnanansnasnasorussossacsssssssassanasnasiansninasscaisecstscssssnsseentsnsiinnen

    Atlanta 29 16 6 2 66165 160
    Carolina - 26.21 2 .4 58 163 168
    Tampa Bay 27 23 «1 «1 «(56165 163
    Washington 21 23 2 #5 49 160 180
    Florida 19 23 4 6 48 147 166

    HOME AWAY DIV
    14-7-3-115-9-3-112-4-4-1
    14-9-0-3 12-12-2-1 13-5-0-2
    12-13-00 15-10-1-1—11-7-0-0
    12-11-1-2. 9-12-1-3 8-10-11
    13-9-2-1 6-14-2-5 . 4-11-2-0 |

    |

    New Jersey 30 15 0 6 66 134 120
    Pittsburgh 2417 3 5 56165 153
    N.Y.Rangers 25 22 3 1 54149 151
    N.Y. Islanders 23 21 4 2 52 149 148
    Philadelphia 12 32 2 4 30120 189

    NORTHEAST OWL OL SLPTS GF GA

    Buffalo 34 14 2 2 72197 152
    Ottawa 30 21 2 O 62178 144
    Montreal 28 18 #1 4 61150 145
    Toronto 2521 2 4. 56 169 171
    Boston 22 23 1 3 48 139 186

    17-4-0-4 13-11-0-2. — 12-4-0-1
    13-8-2-2. 11-9-1-3.—13-5-1-1
    10-11-3-0 15-11-0-1 9-9-0-0
    12-9-3-1 11-12-1-1 9-7-2-0
    3-15-2-3. 9-17-0-1 — 3-13-0-3

    HOME Oe Se









    HOCKEY



    Sundin lifts Leafs past Rangers

    From Miami Herald Wire Services*

    NEW YORK — Mats Sundin’s break-
    away goal snapped a third-period tie and
    lifted the surging Toronto Maple Leafs to
    a 2-1 victory over the New York Rangers
    on Wednesday night.

    Sundin, who also assisted on Alexei
    Ponikarovsky’s tying power-play goal in
    the second period, hit the 20-goal mark
    for the 16th consecutive season — every

    That was enough to give the Leafs their
    fifth victory in six games, including four

    Brendan Shanahan scored for New
    York, which had a two-game winning

    The Rangers and Maple Leafs entered
    tied for ninth in the Eastern Conference,
    but Toronto — which had a vocal band of
    supporters in the stands — jumped into a
    three-way deadlock for seventh. :

    Andrew Raycroft, in his 13th consecu-
    tive start, made 37 saves as Toronto
    improved to 2-0 on its five-game trip one
    night after winning at Carolina. Shanahan
    nearly tied it with under 5 minutes left,
    but Raycroft stopped him at the left post.

    e Flyers: Center Peter Forsberg had a

    W111 7-1-1
    15-11-1-0 15-10-1-0 —13-8-0- :
    16-7-0-3 12-I1-1-1 10-6-0-4 one spent in the NHL.
    11-12-1-2 14-9-1-2-9-8-2-2
    14-10-0-2 8-13-1-1 10-11-0-1
    on the road.
    CENTRAL = W__L OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV
    Nashville 36 13.2 1 75185 133 18-3-2-1 18-10-00 17-4-1-0 streak broken.
    Detroit 32 14 3 3 70157 124 18-3-1-2 14-11-2-1 11-3-1-1
    St. Louis 20 23 4 4 48130 159 10-13-2-1 10-10-2-3 7-11-2-2
    Columbus 21°25 2 3 47129 155 12-10-1-2 9-15-1-1 —7-11-0-2
    Chicago 18 25 2 5 43124 156 11-13-1-2 7-12-1-3 9-12-1-0
    NORTHWEST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME "AM Dm
    Vancouver 28 19 1 3 60131 129 16-8-1-1 . 1 |
    Calgary 27°17 «3)— 360. 155 128 © -20-5-0-07-12-3-3.—10-5-1-2
    Minnesota 27 21. 0 4 58145 134 18-5-0-3 9-16-0-1 — 8-6-0-2
    Colorado 25 21 2 2 54157 147 14-10-1-2 11-11-10 —_9-5-1-0
    Edmonton 24 22 2 2 52136 146 15-10-1-1 9-12-1-1 8-10-1-0
    PACIFIC WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME = AWAY | DIV
    Anaheim 31 12.2 6 70171 131 17-4-1-4 14-8-1-2 — 11-3-0-1
    San Jose 33 17 0 1 67 157 117 17-9-0-1 16-8-0-0 ~—‘11-8-0-1
    Dallas 30 19 0 2 62136 126 15-8-0-1 15-11-0-1 14-6-0-0 ELSEWHERE
    Phoenix 23 25 1 1 48.140 175 12-11-1-0 11-14-0-1 | 7-12-1-1
    Los Angeles 17 30 3 3 40145 192 11-12-3-3 6-18-0-0 6-14-0-2

    Note: Two points for a win, one point for a tie and overtime loss
    RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

    Wednesday’s results

    Toronto 2, Rangers 1
    Phoenix at Anaheim, late
    Columbus at Edmonton, late

    Tonight’s games

    Wash. at Florida, 7:30
    Buffalo at Boston, 7

    Islanders at Atlanta, 7
    NJ. at Philadelphia, 7
    Montreal at Pitt., 7:30
    Minn. at Colorado, 9
    Nashville at Phoenix, 9
    Edmonton at Vanc., 10
    Dallas at S.J., 10:30
    Chicago at L.A., 10:30

    Tampa Bay at Carolina, 7

    Tuesday’s results

    Pittsburgh 3, Florida 0
    Buffalo 7, Boston 1
    Toronto 4, Carolina 1
    Atlanta 5, N.J. 4 (SO)
    Tampa Bay 4, Phil. 3 (SO)
    Ottawa 3, Washington 2
    Detroit 4, Islanders 3 (OT)
    Minnesota 5, St. Louis 2
    Colorado 4, Nashville 3
    Calgary 4, L.A. 1
    Columbus 3, Vanc. 2 (SO)
    Dallas 3, San Jose 2 (SO)



    second consecutive day of near-trouble-
    free skating Wednesday with his trouble-
    some right ankle.

    “It looks good, I’m positive,” he said.
    “Tt felt better yesterday. I don’t think it’s
    100 percent, but it’s 10 times better than it
    used to be. I was very happy yesterday,
    and it felt pretty good at practice today.
    We'll keep on working on it.”

    Forsberg has had difficulty finding a
    skate to accommodate his surgically
    repaired foot, but a new orthotic seems to
    be providing some relief.



    JIM MCISAAC/GETTY IMAGES

    OUT OF MY WAY: Jason Krog of the
    Rangers, left, is crunched by lan
    White of the Leafs on Wednesday.

    He acknowledged tonight’s game
    against the New Jersey Devils will be a
    big test.

    “The game after has been brutal,” he
    said.

    e Wild: Goalie Manny Fernandez
    aggravated his sprained left knee in Tues-
    day’s game at St. Louis, leaving his status
    in doubt for the rest of the Wild’s road
    trip.

    Fernandez was questionable for
    tonight’s game at Colorado, team spokes-
    man Aaron Sickman said.

    Niklas Backstrom would replace Fer-
    nandez if he can’t play, and Josh Harding
    could be recalled from the minors.

    Fernandez was initially hurt in Minne-
    sota’s game on Jan. 20 against Dallas, and
    he returned to action one week later with

    the benefit of the All-Star break.

    Fernandez is 22-16 with a .9ll save per-
    centage and a 2.57 goals-against average
    this season.

    e Blue Jackets: Defenseman Bryan
    Berard was activated by the team after
    being sidelined since last season follow-
    ing back surgery.

    Berard, 29, has missed the Blue Jackets’
    past 82 games, including the final 31 of last
    season. He had surgery last March on a
    herniated disk, and another operation in
    October to repair a different disk.

    He scored 12 goals and had 20 assists in
    44 games last season, setting the club
    record for goals by a defenseman.

    The Woonsocket, R.I., native has
    played in 554 career games and totaled 71
    goals and 227 assists.

    LATE TUESDAY

    e Stars 3, Sharks 2 (SO): Philippe
    Boucher scored the tying goal with 2.2
    seconds left, and Mike Ribeiro added the
    winning shootout goal to his regulation
    score to lift visiting Dallas.

    e Avalanche 4, Predators 3:
    Andrew Brunette and Wojtek Wolski
    each had a goal and an assist, and Peter
    Budaj stopped 34 shots to lead host Colo-
    rado.

    e Wild 5, Blues 2: Pierre-Marc Bou-
    chard’s second goal snapped a third-pe-
    riod tie to help visiting Minnesota to the
    victory.

    e Blue Jackets 3, Canucks 2 (SO):
    Nikolai Zherdev scored the winning
    shootout goal with a wrist shot off
    Roberto Luongo’s glove to lift visiting
    Columbus.

    e Flames 4, Kings 1: Craig Conroy
    scored twice against his former team in
    his first game with his new club, leading
    host Calgary.

    — _.__















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    PRO FOOTBALL

    MICHAEL HEIMAN/GETTY IMAGES

    | SUPER BOWL XLI









    EA SPORTS



    NEVER TOO MUCH: Left, the media’s coverage of the NFL, especially during Super Bowl week, has grown significantly. Madden ’07,

    center, was the No. 1-selling video game last year. Right, the NFL has the top-selling merchandise among the professional sports.

    A heaping helping of NFL

    °NFL FANS

    do with their time — family,
    exercise-related.

    “The amazing thing to me is
    there’s a sufficient audience to
    watch it all,” McCall said. “I think
    real football fans can’t get enough.
    Most of those real football fans
    could probably enjoy it the same if
    they didn’t watch it as much. They
    just feel like they need to be glued
    to it all the time. It’s naive to think
    it will change, but it does make you
    wonder if the way the television
    world treats it, they ought to be a
    little more responsible.”

    The NFL Network, now in its
    third year, doesn’t agree. Its slogan,
    “Everything But the Game,” speaks
    volumes of the aim of its 105 hours
    of Super Bowl week coverage. A
    lineup that includes 21 anchors and
    analysts at five different South
    Florida locations, covering every-
    thing from daily news conferences
    to replays of old Super Bowls.

    “If what’s going on is of interest,
    we're going to cover it,” said NFL
    Network spokesman Dan Massa-
    son, who said the difference in
    media coverage between this year’s
    Super Bowl and the previous South
    Florida Super Bowl in 1999 is “hard
    to quantify.”

    ‘TREMENDOUS INTEREST’
    “There is tremendous interest in

    _ the game for the fans of these

    teams and around the country,”
    Massason said. “There were many
    fans that watched Media Day from
    start to finish. And we want to be
    able to provide it for them.”

    But Media Day was held

    between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., the
    middle of the work day for most
    Americans. And that’s where peo-
    ple such as McCall think the excess
    in coverage is occuring. McCall
    says TV networks need to stay free
    of playing games during the middle
    of the week and go back to the days
    when high schools played on Fri-
    days, colleges on Saturdays and the
    pros on Sunday and Monday.

    The NFL is even
    looking for new mar-
    kets.

    “Many more for-
    eign languages,” said
    Berman, who has cov-
    ered 25 Super Bowls,
    when asked what the
    biggest difference in
    the media coverage
    between the first and
    the latest Super Bowls
    he has attended.

    “Many more peo-
    ple, you know, football
    fans of foreign lan-

    guages who can speak

    football. That’s ESPN has watched
    changed a lot in the the NFL expand
    25 years. People are tremendously.
    watching football

    games in Antarctica and places we
    never knew existed 25 years ago,
    unless you were good with a-geo-
    graphic map.”

    That’s not news to anyone. The
    NFL’s popularity worldwide has
    grown — especially in Europe and
    Asia, where preseason games have
    been played since the 1980s. Two
    seasons ago, the first regular-
    season game outside the United
    States was played in Mexico. Next
    season, the Dolphins are expected





    BRIAN BAHR/GETTY IMAGES

    IT’S NOT THE SAME:
    Chris Berman of

    to play in the first regular-season
    game outside of North America.

    But it is not that growth which
    has some experts worried.

    MARKETS CORNERED

    Of course, Americans always
    have the right to click the off but-
    ton on their remotes. But it’s tough
    to cut back right now — especially
    for the NFL, which is enjoying the
    peak of its popularity
    and its riches.

    e Tickets: This
    season alone, there
    was a record blackout
    lifts for 249 of the
    256 NFL regular-sea-
    son games, and the
    17,340,879 tickets sold
    set arecord for the
    regular season.

    e Viewers:
    According to the NFL,
    more people watched
    Super Bowl XL (141.4
    million viewers) than



    idential election or .
    went out to celebrate
    New Year’s Eve.
    According to NFL
    and Nielsen Media Research, the
    NFL owned 12 of the top 20 most-
    watched programs of the 2006-07
    TV season, outdrawing American

    - Idol, Dancing with the Stars, CSI

    and Grey’s Anatomy. The 13 most-
    watched programs ever are all
    Super Bowls.

    e Video games: Madden NFL
    ’07 was the highest-sold video
    game of 2006, with more than
    3.9 million units sold for Play-
    Station2 and Xbox 360.

    voted in the 2004 pres-

    e Merchandise: The NFL has
    the most popular merchandise sold
    among pro sports. According to an
    ESPN poll, 32 percent of sports fans
    own league-licensed apparel —
    double that of second-place Major
    League Baseball.

    Then there is fantasy football,
    which, according to some busi-

    " nesses, is beginning to cost compa-

    nies billions in worker hours.

    According to a report by global
    outplacement consultancy Chal-
    lenger, Gray and Christmas Inc. in
    August, the cost to employers for
    paying unproductive workers
    logged into fantasy websites was
    estimated as high as $1.1 billion for
    each week of the NFL season.

    Marco Rosales, 29, said his new
    job has banned fantasy-football
    websites from Internet access.

    “It kind of stinks because I can’t
    make transactions during the day,”
    Rosales said. “But the goqd thing is
    I have Sprint, which has a deal with
    the NFL, and I can stay plugged in
    if there’s any news with my cell-

    . phone.”

    Rosales was on South Beach on
    Tuesday night, not far from where
    ESPN was shooting SportsCenter.
    He was wearing a Peyton Manning
    jersey, hoping to run into one of the
    players onhis fantasyteam. .

    “T used to be just a Dolphins
    fan,” Rosales said. “But when they
    started to stink, I signed up for fan-
    tasy football. Now I know all about
    all the players and teams.

    “My wife hates to be around me
    on Sundays because all I do is
    watch footbail. I feel guilty for
    about 5 seconds. Then the game
    comes back on, and it’s all good.”

    MiamiHerald.com |_ THE MIAMI HERALD



    AL DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF

    FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

    For Edwin Pope, the journey is still going strong

    *POPE

    “Now every press conference is televised,
    there are thousands of media people. It’s
    grown to be the biggest sports event in the
    country,” Shula says.

    And Pope is still there.

    Super Bowl XLI is Pope’s 41st Super Bowl,
    making him one of four men who have covered
    every one of pro football’s signature games.

    But this is a special Super Bowl for Pope
    because it coincides with his 50-year anniver-
    sary at The Miami Herald, a journey with mile-
    stone markers but no end in sight.

    “T think ’'ll keep on until I get too tired to do’

    it anymore,” said Pope, whose career was cele-
    brated at a Herald dinner on Monday night.
    “It’s odd. I have no feeling of wanting to stop
    or thinking about when I'll stop.”

    Athletes who grew up reading Pope’s
    columns, and those he covered along the way,
    applaud that attitude.

    “He’s still going, right?” former Kansas City
    Chiefs quarterback Len Dawson said before a
    Dolphins game earlier this season. “I remem-
    ber he covered me when I was playing early in
    my career and also toward the end of my
    career. That was a long time ago.

    “Tm glad he’s still going strong. I hope he
    just keeps on.”

    Pope has churned out about 12,564 stories in
    his career, containing about 10,051,200 words.

    “That’s a lot of bad writing in there,” Pope
    says, deadpan. “It feels like 8 million of those
    words were on deadline.”

    PLENTY OF AWARDS

    Pope’s words won a Red Smith Award, and
    a record four Eclipse Awards for the nation’s
    best columns. Pope also is in the Florida
    Sports Hall of Fame and the National Sports-
    casters and Sportswriters Hall of Fame.

    Pope’s wife, Eileen, has kept a book of
    Pope’s columns since 1972. There is a new
    book for every season that chronicles the
    exploits of the University of Miami football
    team and the Dolphins.

    In the early 1990s, with reams of newspaper
    articles already clipped, the couple struck a
    deal to keep Eileen working on the books.

    “The deal was I’d work for him doing that,”
    Eileen Pope says. “And he would pay my



    Bloomingdale’s bill.”

    Edwin Pope learned to type when he was
    6 years old, and he got his own typewriter for
    Christmas when he was 10 in 1938. He wrote
    his first story at age ll after he listened toa
    radio broadcast of the 1940 Orange Bowl game,
    between Georgia Tech and Missouri.

    “I copied down everything they said, word
    for word,” Pope says.

    When he finished, he had 10 pages of copy.
    He took them to the offices of the Athens Ban-
    ner-Herald and demanded to see the editor.

    “Can you use a running story on the Orange
    Bowl?” the boy asked.

    The paper didn’t run the
    story, but it wrote a story about
    the budding journalist. The
    story, a copy of which sits in

    MiamiHerald.com

    Edwin Pope shares
    his memories from

    noon when Tennessee beat his beloved Geor-
    gia Bulldogs team, and a disconsolate Pope
    began sobbing.

    “I got on my bike and rode around town for
    2 hours just wailing at the top of my voice,” he
    says. “I was just sobbing. My daddy had to
    come to calm to me down.”

    But Pope’s passion is balanced by wisdom.
    He does not use the pen as a sword very often,
    and he cannot recollect ever calling for any-
    one’s firing.

    “I never took lightly the idea of calling for
    someone’s livelihood to be taken away from
    them,” Pope says.

    “Tt’s very hard to pull that trigger.”

    * COVERING THE WORLD

    Pope has covered Wimbledon 18 times. He’s
    covered six Summer Olympics and two Win-
    ter Olympics. The Winter Games were always
    an adventure because Pope, an avid walker,
    has this thing about falling down on ice.

    “{’ve fallen in a lot of ditches,” he reports.

    Pope has covered the World Series, 40 Ken-
    tucky Derby races, plenty of golf and just
    about everything else.

    His favorite events?

    “Football games,” he says. “Anything foot-
    ball. I want to say the Super Bow], but that
    would not be true. Some Super Bowls are not
    that great. But there were very
    few days I was writing football
    that I felt I was working.”

    BUT football gave Pope his
    favorite subject: Shula.

    Pope’s office, predicted, all 40 Super Bowls. Also the subject he loathes:
    “Watch out for this boy’s former Chicago Bears quarter-
    byline in the future.” back Jim McMahon.

    Four years later, at age 15, Pope was writing “Shula might not always tell you what you
    for the paper. needed to know, but he never, never, to my

    “About every morning at 5:30, I would go in
    and lay out what there was of the sports sec-
    tion,” Pope says. “In the wintertime, I had to
    go in there and put the logs on the fire to make
    the fire, too. I would light the fire and sit there
    typing in my cloth gloves.”

    Just about the time the newsroom — about
    the size of a living room — warmed up, Pope
    would be off to high school.

    Pope was armed with special gifts that
    made him a natural for his art.

    Passion? He proved he had that one after-

    knowledge, lied,” Pope says. “McMahon, I
    thought, was the biggest jackass I ever met in
    my life. And I don’t mind stating it. He was an
    absolute jerk. And believe me, I’ve met quite a
    few of them, especially more in baseball.”
    Shula’s teams were the darlings of the NFL
    in the early 1970s. They were undefeated in
    1972-73 and won the Super Bowl a second con-
    secutive time in 1973-74. Pope calls that the
    golden age of sportswriting in South Florida.
    “The thing I respected most about Edwin
    was that after you talked to him he always



    ‘ printed the truth,” Shula says. “I know it’s hard

    for some people to believe, but I counted sev-
    eral reporters as my friends, including John
    Steadman and Edwin Pope. You could have a
    conversation with them.

    “And there were some times when Edwin
    would write something I didn’t like. But at
    least you could pick up the phone and call him,
    and you could tell him what you were think-
    ing, and he’d at least listen.”

    SERVICE, PLEASE!

    Edwin Pope is no saint. Just ask that bar-
    tender at the New Jersey hotel across from the
    Meadowlands Sports Complex who didn’t
    serve him promptly after a Dolphins-Jets game
    in the early 1990s.

    “What does a guy have to do to get a
    Heineken around here?” Pope yelled in his
    pronounced Georgia accent.

    He also was no fan of editors who might
    miss — or introduce — a typo in his copy.

    “Even in the days before spell-check, that
    was a big deal,” says former Herald copy edi-
    tor Hal Habib. “For a young editor, for any-
    body, editing Edwin Pope was something of a
    compliment, but it could be nerve-wracking.”

    Habib left the Herald years ago, and, when
    he did, he called Pope and other employees at
    the paper to announce his departure.

    “I told Edwin it was a privilege to work with
    him, and he said, ‘Hal, I feel the same way
    about you,’ ” Habib says.

    “For somebody in our business, it doesn’t
    get any better than that.”

    “_@@es

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    Rattlers beat
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    ACTION continued yesterday
    in the GSSSA regular season
    with the CI Gibson Rattlers top-
    ping the CV Bethel Stingrays 57-

    11.
    e SEE STORY

    FRONT PAGE
    (Photos: Tim Clarke)





    meé yesterday at Donald Davis field. The game ended

    THE RM Bailey Pacers and the Doris Johnson Mystic Marlins fought out tight

    “pa

    in a 0-0 draw.
    (Photos: Tim Clarke)





    PHE TRIBUNE












    TRIBUNE SPORTS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007, PAGE 11



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    3 High: 83° High: 83° High: 81° High: 77°
    High: 81° Low: 71° Low: 73° Low: 71° Low: 69° Low: 56°
    Va elu eLa atlas Omran | AccuWeather RealFeel | Ya Ee tee UAT EE Tg —
















    . WEST PALM BEACH
    High: 82° F/28°C
    Low: 62° F/17°C





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    Low: 59° F/15°C








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    Temperature



    High... .. 19° F/26° C
    Low ... .. 65° F/18° C
    Normal . 17° F/25° C

    .. 64° F/18° C
    Last year’s high .. 85° F/29° C
    Last year’s low ve 10° F/21° C

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    m Lhe Tribune

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    * ‘

    Volume: 103 No.59

    {



    BAHAMAS EDITION

    THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007 -



    PRICE - 75¢

    ates ae

    ‘Obituaries and
    LCT ese a
    STARTING TODAY



    Allegation that govt want

    to make announcement
    closer to election date

    m By KARIN HERIG
    Tribune Staff Reporter

    GOVERNMENT is inten-
    tionally drawing out the hand-
    over of the airport’s manage-
    ment to, Vancouver Airport
    Services (YVRAS) because it
    wants to be able to make a
    positive announcement clos-
    er to the general election date,
    a source close to the Airport
    Authority claimed yesterday.

    The airport source — who
    wished to remain anonymous
    — said that morale is at an all-.
    time low at the airport, with
    both Bahamian and Canadi-
    an employees frustrated with
    government’s repeated delays
    in the handing over of man-
    agement to YVRAS.

    ‘An employee, who is part
    of the handover process of the
    Lynden Pindling Internation-
    al Airport (LPIA) to the
    Canadian firm YVRAS, told
    The ‘Tribune that the process
    could have been wrapped up
    months ago. He said he
    believes government is delay-
    ing the matter because of
    political manoeuvring.

    “Because of this no-one
    _ wants to invest in the airport.
    The Airport Authority is wait-
    ing for NAD (the new Nas-
    sau Airport Development
    Company and subsidiary of
    YVRAS) to do it, and NAD
    doesn’t want to do it because
    they are sceptical that it (the’
    handover) will even go
    through. As a result the trav-
    elling public is being held

    hostage,” the employee said.
    On Tuesday, The Tribune
    revealed that the handover of
    the airport had been delayed
    yet again because Joseph
    Reckley, Airport Authority
    acting general manager, suf-
    fered a stroke late last year.
    Business sources claimed

    that YVRAS executives were

    frustrated with the slow pace
    at which government was
    moving.

    Government’s chief nego-
    tiator Sir Baltron Bethel told
    The Tribune that he was
    unaware of any such feelings
    on the part of YVRAS.

    However, yesterday an air-
    port source confirmed these
    claims.

    “We are all frustrated. We
    have divided our time
    between the Airport Author-
    ity and NAD (the new Nas-
    sau Airport Development
    Company and subsidiary of
    YVRAS), we are working at
    both places but are not being
    compensated for it financial-

    ‘ly,” he said.
    The source said that his.
    - Canadian colleagues ‘from

    YVRAS share the frustration
    of their Bahamian counter-
    parts.

    “Ryeryone is annoyed. They
    (government) keep saying
    they are going to sign-off on
    one thing or another and then
    nothing happens. I don’t want
    to get political, but I do think
    this. is a political move,” he

    ‘SEE page 16



    we Dr eT erway sworn in



    as senator

    a SWEARING IN — Dr Doswell Coakley (right) i is sworn in as the new PLP senator yesterday. Dr : Coakley, who

    replaces former senator Damien Gomez, i

    Claim that PMH

    special procedures |

    appointments
    cancelled due to

    ‘training course
    @ By BRENT DEAN

    pital radiology facilities for two

    appointments for special pro- :
    cedures have been cancelled

    make employers pay more of NHI plan

    due to the entire medical staff : . ”
    i : lic purse.

    of the Radiology Department ;
    for the new computed tomog- im By KARIN HERIG
    raphy equipment in the depart- ;

    being sent on a training course

    ment.
    of upgrades announced last July

    ology Department at PMH.

    These improvements were to, :
    in part, include a new 16- slice i
    CAT scanner at ‘a cost of }
    $987,000, $50,000 for training ;

    and a further $300,000 that was :
    i is talking about an increase in minimum wage at this time.

    SEE page 16

    This Hew equipments part : a “round-about way” of making employers pay for more of the ;

    ’ } National Health Insurance plan, president of the Bahamas Employ- }
    sO0 He eXBARSION CAC LAGE : ers Confederation Brian Nutt said yesterday.

    ' Ingraham accused of attempting to.

    is running for the PLP in Grand Bahama in the next general election.

    (Photo: Tim Clarke i bune staff)

    ‘destroy’ fellow MP 23 years ago

    _ | = By RUPERT MISSICK Jr

    Chief Reporter _
    FORMER Prime Minister

    ? Hubert Ingraham was accused
    : yesterday of attempting to
    ! ni i: “destroy” a fellow member of

    PATIENTS will not be able : parliament some 23 years ago.
    to have special procedures done. :

    at the Princess Margaret Hos- :

    The accusation came from
    MP for MICAL, V Alfred

    Gray, who said that while work-
    weeks as all of the doctors have : ing for Mr Ingraham in the

    gone on a training course, an }
    ‘inside source has alleged. :

    -. The source claims that all

    1980s, the former prime minis-

    » ter Wieepied to “destroy” his :
    chance to make a living for his :
    - family. i
    Mr Gray said that in 1984, he }
    had passed all of his Bar exams, ?
    and with “four children at home : By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
    to feed”, was making $100 a :
    week in 1984 articling at ;

    Christie, Ingraham and Co.

    “T had left being a family :
    ‘ island commissioner and arti- :
    : proposed amendments to the
    : Pensions Act and Bridging
    : Service, which he described as
    : a “politically driven bill” that

    SEE page 15

    Claim that minimum wage rise may



    Tribune Staff Reporter

    BY RAISING the minimum wage government may have found

    unemployment rate.

    SEE page 16

    SU BWAY CL U Bo

    Nu TRITIONAL INEoâ„¢
    Calories .......320
    Total PAT 6.0Q
    SOdUMasisesiel 310M

    a

    Carbs.i47Q
    Dietary Fiben..4g
    Protein ii24g



    FNM leader
    hits out at
    proposed

    Pensions Act
    amendments

    ' Chief Reporter ‘

    FORMER Prime Minister
    Hubert Ingraham yesterday
    heavily criticised government’s

    : represents a “reckless, unwar-

    ranted expenditure of the pub-

    The opposition leader made

    : the comments during debate
    : on the amendments that seek
    : to calculate a pension based
    : on the total number of years a.

    person works in the public ser-

    : vice rather than the years he or
    : she gives after returning to the
    Speaking with The Tribune, Mr Nutt said that the increase of min- : © ee ee Fs
    : imum wage ~ as announced by Minister of Labour Shane Gibson — }

    paired with the introduction of NHI may also result in a greater objected bo -thecfack’ tak the

    The BECon president said that he was surprised that government : bill gives discretionary power
    : toa minister, but said that he

    service following a hiatus.
    Mr Ingraham strongly

    SEE page 15









    PAGE 14, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007



    ~ Bitter Sweet
    i Book Signing at Bookworld
    ~ on Mackey St.

    Gloria P. Burrows will bef
    signing her autobiographical
    novel called BitterSweet. It
    captures the essence of life in
    the Family Islands in he
    1950's.





























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    LOCAL NEWS.

    THE TRIBUNE



    DPM promotes education

    at school ‘pep rally’

    @ By BAHAMAS
    INFORMATION
    SERVICES

    LOVE Hill, Andros —- Deputy
    Prime Minister Cynthia Pratt
    told students of the Central
    Andros High School that there
    is no reason why children living in
    the Bahamas cannot receive a
    quality education if they want it.

    “There is no reason why any
    child in this country should not be
    able to read and write. There is
    no reason why,” Mr Pratt said.

    But, she added, “it’s up to you
    as students to receive it. We can
    put all the schools in place; we
    can put all of the teachers in
    place, but it’s up to you to
    take advantage of all of the
    opportunities to get a decent edu-
    cation.”.

    Addressing a school assembly
    and pep rally opening a week-
    long series of activities celebrat-
    ing the school’s 30th anniversary,
    the deputy prime minister sin-
    gled out the Central Andros High
    School as having a long and dis-
    tinguished history of providing
    the Bahamas with some of its
    “best and brightest” sons and
    daughters.

    “Our schools are the founda-
    tion to the nation,” she said. “If
    we lay the proper foundation,
    which we have, the proper edu-
    cation, then we will have decent,
    law abiding citizens. That’s what
    it is all about, but it’s up to you.
    It’s still up to you.”

    “You are just as good as any-
    body. You are just as smart as
    anybody, but you must believe
    that. There is no such thing as a
    dumb child,” she added.

    “Some children may be quick-
    er than others, but that does not
    mean that those that are not
    quick are dumb. Continue to per-
    severe until you can get it right.

    “The quality students that have



    @ LOVE HILL, Andros - Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of National Security Cynthia



    Pratt leads the Central Andros High School Cougars in the school’s cheer during a pep rally and assem-
    bly Monday, that kicked off Pride Week at the school.

    Central Andros High was officially opened in 1977 by former prime minister the late Sir Lynden Pin-
    dling and was established through the joint efforts of the government, the Central Andros High School
    Committee and other interested persons.

    been produced here at Central
    Andros High School, this country
    has been and continue to benefit
    from them and that’s what it is all
    about.”

    Mrs Pratt said some Bahami-
    ans take for granted the fact that
    they will always be able to receive
    quality education.

    She said there are children in
    other countries that do not have
    the same opportunities, and so
    Bahamian children must be
    grateful to God for the many

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    benefits they enjoy in this coun-
    try.

    Recalling an experience from
    one of her travels in the region,
    Mrs Pratt told of watching chil-
    dren in tattered clothing and no
    shoes attend school sessions in a
    tent. ‘

    “Not dressed up like you; not
    sitting in air-conditioned class-
    rooms like some-that we have,
    but they still went to school. They
    still wanted to get an education
    despite their circumstances,” she
    said.

    “And that’s the message that I
    want to get across to you here
    today — that no matter what your
    circumstances are, you must
    everyday take advantage of the
    opportunities to get a quality edu-
    cation because: education is the

    key that will open whatever doors .

    you set, before.you.”
    She said the construction of

    (BIS photo: Patrick Hanna)

    the Central Andros High School
    30 years ago, and other such

    schools, is a testament to how.

    government and communities
    can collaborate to ensure that the
    children of those communities
    have access to quality education.

    “And so if the community
    wants the school in it, then all of
    us should be interested in keep-
    ing that school as a part of the
    community. Each one of us
    should carry our own responsi-
    bility.

    “Rach one of us should take
    the initiative and ask ourselves
    what is it we can do as individuals
    to help to build our schools and
    make them successful centres for
    learning for our children, grand-
    children and great grandchildren,
    so that even after we are dead
    and gone, the schools will still
    existin order to educate Bahami-
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    PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007
    iin i ee
    Union presents five-year deal to FirstCaribbean

    @ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
    Tribune Business Reporter

    ssues of disiclipne and discharge

    of First Caribbean International °

    Bank (Bahamas) employers fea-

    tured prominently in the new

    industrial proposal presented by
    the Bahamas Financial Services Union
    (BFSU) to the bank yesterday.

    The union’s.general secretary, Lashon
    Sawyer, said the 84-page document
    proposing a five-year industrial agree-
    ment encompasses “a lot of things that
    the employees were not getting”.

    “First Caribbean has benefited well in
    the Bahamas over the last three years
    since their merger [with Barclays], so we



    know that this should be shared with our
    employees here. It needs to be shared,”
    she said.

    Ms Sawyer said the major area tha
    BFSU had an issue with was the disci-
    plining and discharge of employees.

    “We’ve had too many grey areas that
    have been left to the bank’s discretion
    still, and it has not given the employees a
    fair chance to.explain themselves in situ-
    ations they may not have put themselves
    into, but surrounding things might have
    caused that problem,” she added.

    The previous industrial agreement
    expired last May, and Ms Sawyer said:
    “Today, we are here historically again
    to present to First Caribbean Interna-
    tional Bank our second proposed indus-

    trial agreement.

    “The agreement expired last May 2006.
    The union took a stand that we would go
    through that agreement thoroughly
    before we presented it to First Caribbean
    to ensure that we gave our members, the
    employees of the bank, the best or better
    benefits than they experienced over the
    three years of our first agreement.” She
    added: “We are happy to present a new
    benefits package. There are a lot of areas
    which have tightened up in the agree-
    ment, we are happy to say, and our mem-
    bers have seen the documents and have
    given us heads up. They are glad to see
    that the document has encompassed a lot
    of things that the employees were not
    getting, and at this point we know that

    Cabinet signs off on insurance regulations

    the bank has to look at in a different
    stand going forward.

    “Once we present this document
    today, we hope that the bank is prepared
    to move as quickly as possible to sign off
    on the agreement. We hope as soon as
    we get that in, we are ready to go. We
    hope that it is an amicable set of negoti-
    ations in this round, and we hope to
    ensure that we have really represented
    our employees well in this sector.”

    Ms Sawyer said: “We know that once
    this agreement is on the table and signed

    -we will get another commercial bank or

    all the commercial banks to join when
    they recognisie that we have gotten excel-
    lent benefits for employees working in
    financial services industry. “We hope

    THE TRIBUNE

    that the bank does look favourably, as we

    go through the negotiations, at the econ-. °
    omy and where we are at today, and what

    they have benefited from in the
    Bahamas.”

    She was accompanied by chief shop
    steward Jermaine Sands and various
    other members of the BFSU at the pre-
    sentation. :

    FirstCaribbean told The Tribune: “The.
    management of FirstCaribbean Interna-.

    tional Bank (Bahamas) receipt of the. -

    Bahamas Financial Services Union's pro-.
    posal for a- five -year industrial agree-
    ment with the bank, and we look for-*
    ward to beginning meaningful dialogue as.

    _we work to complete the agreement in,

    the true spirit of partnership.” ce

    r

    Mes sss

    Central Bank amends’
    40-day KYC rule

    FROM page 1B .

    ernment had to “build capacity” at
    the Registrar of Insurance’s Office,
    which under the Act will be an Insur-
    ance Commission, if the regulator is to
    effectively administer and supervise
    the industry.

    Sector

    The private sector has long held
    concerns over whether the Registrar
    of Insurance’s Office is up to the task,
    and Mr Smith said: “We’re looking
    at some proposals from experts in the
    area to provide i is with help for capes,
    ity building.”

    Personnel issues were among the
    key concerns, and the minister added:



    “We need to have someone to look at
    the right structure, the right people
    in the right spots, as the role of the
    Registrar of Insurance has changed
    to a Commissioner, like at the Central
    Bank.”

    Industry

    The insurance industry regulator,
    Mr Smith said, would be taking a
    much more involved role in areas such
    as capital and solvency requirements,
    reserve ratios, liquidity and provi-
    sioning. *

    However, he denied reports circu-
    lating in the insurance industry that

    ‘the Compliance Commission would

    be taking over some of the Registrar
    of Insurance’s regulatory functions.
    Meanwhile, Mr Smith admitted the
    Bahamas was “not fully compliant”
    with international best practices and
    standards on the regulation of money

    _ transmission businesses, and would

    soon effect legislative amendments

    to deal with that.

    “We keep getting things coming
    out of the Central Bank, which has
    its own mandate, and we’re looking at
    some proposed amendments to bring
    money transmission businesses in line

    with internationally accepted rules .

    and KYC procedures,” Mr Smith told
    The Tribune.

    He added that the amendments
    would focus on ensuring Bahamas-
    based money transmission businesses
    were compliant with Know Your Cus-
    tomer regulations on wire transfers,
    and were able to trace the originator

    .and source of funds involved in any

    wire transfer.
    Compliant

    “We're not fully compliant with
    that,” Mr Smith said. “The Bahamas
    is looking to amend its legislation to
    become more compliant.”

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    Funds for emergency or
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    Help to meet short- and
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    Currently, money transmission
    businesses in the Bahamas include
    the likes of Western Union and Mon-
    eygram, which are operated by Fideli-

    ty Bank (Bahamas) and Bank of the’

    Bahamas International respectively.
    A financial and corporate services
    provider, Omni Financial Services, is
    also licensed to provide money trans-
    mission services. °

    Posts

    Mr Smith said “the goal posts keep
    changing” on money transmission reg-
    ulation, adding: “You have to keep
    benchmarking international best prac-
    tices in terms of your anti-money
    laundering and terror financing

    regime”.

    The Senate yesterday debated the
    amendments to financial services-leg-
    islation that will allow Bahamian reg-
    ulators to share information more
    effectively with one another.

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    8 By CARA BRENNEN-
    BETHEL
    Tribune Business Reporter

    THE Central Bank of the
    Bahamas has waived the 30-day
    rule for licensees to obtain clear
    and legible copies of all KYC doc-
    umentation in specific cases
    involving company incorporation
    or registered agent/office services
    provided to so-called eligible
    introducers, who introduce clients
    to them.

    Michael Foot, the Inspector of

    Banks and Trust Companies, said
    the waiver applies to limited areas
    of operations, with clearly defined
    roles where the company will not
    engage in depositing or borrowing

    funds from Bhaamas-based insti-

    tutions.

    Mr Foot explained that the
    Bahamas does have a big juris-
    diction for this market, which was
    why the Central Bank felt there
    was justifiable risk in granting the
    waiver.

    He explained that under the
    current regulations, the eligible
    introducer would have had to-sub-
    mit proper KYC documentation
    on the undrelying client to the
    Bahamas-based bank or trust
    company within 30 days of the
    introducer completing its due dili-
    gence processes.

    However, Mr Foot said that in-

    the case of company incorpora-
    tion’ or registrated agent/office
    services, the companies would not
    be adding any new risks to the
    Bahamas, which is why the Cen-
    tral Bank granted the waiver.

    In a guidance notice released
    this week, the Central Bank said it
    had been asked to consider the
    waiver of the 30-day rule for the
    benefit of the industry.

    Under the waiver, copies of the
    KYC documentation would be
    provided to licensees upon
    request, for example, for onward
    transmission to the Central Bank
    or more generally where regula-
    tors or law enforcement are con-
    ducting investigations, the notice
    said.

    grams.



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    . According to the Central Bank, '

    the industry representatives:

    sought the waiver on the basis
    that company incorporation and
    the provision of registrated |
    agent/office services are not “facil-,
    ities’ as defined by the Financial’
    Transaction Reporting Act’
    (FTRA). aif

    The waiver is subject to the fol-'
    lowing conditions:
    Eligible introducers are limit-,
    ed to the following financial insti-'
    tutions as listed in paragraph 122.1’
    and 122.2 of the Bank’s guidance:

    for licencees on the Prevention.’

    of Money Laundering and Coun-".

    tering the Financing of Terror-)
    ism:

    * Banks and trust companies,
    life assurance companies, broker
    dealers, investment fund admin-'
    istrators, operators of investment,
    funds

    * Foreign financial institutions’

    located in countries listed in the
    First Schedule of the FTRA,

    which exercise function equiva-' _

    lent to those to the local institu-. °

    tions listed above

    * The eligible introducer for’.
    whom such services are provided:
    must be part of the financial,
    group, and be located in a-country '
    listed in the First Schedule of the’
    FTRA (for convenience a copy.
    of the current list is annexed to:

    this note.)

    * In such cases, eligible intro-.

    ducers must provide written con-
    firmation that they have conduct-
    ed due diligence on the underly-
    ing client.

    * Eligible introducers must

    agree to provide KYC documen-

    tation to the licensee within three.
    days of a request for the same.
    The Central Bank also said the
    licensees who incorporate inter-
    national business companies and
    provide registrated agent/office

    services must comply with the due _

    diligence requirements of the’.
    International Business Compa- ~

    nies Act 2000 to maintain aâ„¢

    “shareholder’s register for com-
    panies that they incorporate”.



    .

    St.REGis - ‘WESTIN

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    THE TRIBUNE

    THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007, PAGE 9





    Hugh Campbell
    teachers protest
    over security

    HB By DENISE MAYCOCK
    Tribune Freeport Reporter

    FREEPORT - Teachers demonstrated at the
    Hugh Campbell Primary School on Wednesday
    morning to protest what they say is the
    inadequate number of security staff at the
    school.

    The demonstration — which was said to have
    been peaceful — was reportedly held in an effort
    to draw attention to what the teachers believe is
    a very serious problem.

    The teachers lined up outside the school and
    marched back and forth holding colourful plac-
    ards in an effort to draw attention to their cause.

    Hugh Campbell Primary has an enrollment of

    800 students and is considered one of the largest
    primary schools on the island.

    According to reports, Bahamas Union of
    Teachers (BUT) officials and teachers do not
    believe that having one security officer on duty is

    sufficient to ensure the protection of all these
    students.

    Mr Rudy Sands, area vice president of the
    BUT, could not be reached for comment up to
    press time on Wednesday.

    One Ministry of Education official is reported
    to have pointed out that as far as he knows, every
    private school on Grand Bahama has only one
    security guard. He said that the present level at
    Hugh Campbell is sufficient.

    The official said that although his view might be
    considered insensitive, it is merely a “common
    sense” approach, aimed at fulfilling the security
    needs of the school in light of one available
    resources.

    The Tribune spoke with Sandra Fidscaonibe:
    district superintendent of schools in Freeport,
    about the situation.

    She said she was totally unaware of the demon-
    stration at the Hugh Campbell and could not
    comment on the matter.







    @ FROM left, Grand Bahama businessman Basil Neymour presents $10,000 cheque to Sir
    Clement Maynard, patron of the Bahamas Primary Student of the Year Foundation; Ricardo
    Deveaux, president and CEO of the foundation, and Sandra Edgecombe MOE official.

    (Photo: Denise Maycock)

    $10,000 donation to student
    of the year foundation

    @ By DENISE MAYCOCK
    Tribune Freeport Reporter

    FREEPORT -_ Grand
    Bahama businessman Basil Ney-
    mour presented the first $10,000
    cheque to the Bahamas Primary
    School Student of the Year
    Foundation.

    Sir Clement Maynard, one of
    the patrons of the Awards Pro-
    gramme, accepted the donation
    on behalf the organisation during
    a presentation ceremony held at
    the Ministry of Education offices
    in the International Building yes-
    terday.

    Ricardo Deveaux, president
    and CEO of the Foundation, and
    Phenton Neymour, vice presi-
    dent, were in attendance.

    Both men thanked Mr Ney-
    mour for his contribution to the
    educational development of the
    nation’s youth.

    Also present were Ministry of

    Education officials including,
    Mary Cooper, assistant director
    for education for professional
    development and student affairs;
    district superintendent of schools
    Sandra Edgecombe; and Hezeki-

    ah Dean.

    Phenton Neymour noted that
    Bahamas Primary School Stu-
    dent of the Year programme is in
    the 10th year.

    He said he hopes that his
    father’s contribution. will spur
    donations by other business per-
    sons, religious and civic groups.
    ' “Over the past 10 years ... we
    have had three winners and the
    foundation found it fitting to
    come to Grand Bahama, because
    we recognise the contribution
    that Grand Bahama has made in
    regard to the students involve-
    ment in the programme,” he
    said.

    Ricardo Deveaux, president
    and CEO of the programme,

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    invited all public and private
    schools in New Providence and
    the Family Islands to participate
    in the 2007 programme.

    He said the foundation is look-
    ing for the best and brightest pri-
    mary school students in the
    Bahamas — who are well rounded
    individuals that excel not only in
    academics, but are also active in
    school, church and sports activi-
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    “T think the $10,000 donation
    to Sir Clernent for the winner
    will definitely be an added incen-
    tive for the students out there
    and we have two more weeks
    before the deadline,” he said.

    “Mr Neymour’s contribution

    . is a demonstration of his
    commitment and concern for the
    welfare of our Young people. We
    are pleased that his son, Phen-
    ton Neymour has also continued
    his contribution for a third con-
    secutive year,” said Mr Deveaux.

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    THE TRIBUNE

    THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007, PAGE 11





    trust

    JUST ONE OF MANY
    SUSPICIOUS ISSUES

    | his Wilchcombe WHI
    Deception is just one

    of many instances that call
    into question the trustworthi-
    ness of the Christie adminis-
    tration. The Bahamian public
    was lied to in the Keod
    Smith/Kenyatta Gibson Cabi-
    net body slam debacle.

    The Bahamian public is still
    left to wonder if it is being lied
    to in the Nassau Flight Ser-
    vices Five affair. What about
    the prison break affair or the
    visa scandal matter? What is
    the truth in the Korean Boat
    Scandal or the Vincent Peet
    ‘US dollars in the closet’
    affair?

    How much did Harajchi
    give the PLP in the last elec-
    tion? Harajchi said $5 million
    and the PM said no. What is
    the truth? Leslie Miller mis-
    leads regularly about oil mar-
    gin increases in the country.
    Why does he refuse the truth?

    There are many nasty
    rumours running around
    about the deeds of govern-
    ment ministers. What is the
    truth?

    ITISTRULY A
    MATTER OF TRUST

    A government must
    be trustworthy. A

    government should not lie to,
    deceive or mislead its people.
    When a government does this
    it places the entire society at
    risk.

    If you can’t trust the most
    powerful and heavily-funded
    entity in your natic:., then
    your nation is in jec -«rdy of
    falling apart. What sh Id we
    do?

    COMMUNITY
    MEETING FAKERY

    "|: PLP. must really
    think that Bahamians
    are fools. Imagine calling a
    branch meeting and inviting
    the entire Cabinet less the
    ’ Prime Minister to attend.
    Imagine inviting all PLPs in
    the country to this branch
    meeting and not inviting the
    prime minister. What could

    be the meaning of this? Per-

    haps it was really a public rela-
    tions ploy - what Michael Pin-
    tard refers to as “politriks”.
    The truth is that the PLP
    was afraid to call a political
    rally following the successful

    Of course, the PM pretend-
    ed not to have been invited
    when really he and his crew
    determined that it was better
    for him not to be named as a
    speaker in case only a small
    crowd showed up. In that way,
    they could say that the crowd
    did not show up because he
    was not there.

    However, if a crowd did
    show up, he could appear like
    it was some surprise and spin
    it as an event. Notwithstand-
    ing their carefully crafted dra-
    ma, the PM still made the
    affair ridiculous in that he said
    that he figured that since he
    was a the leader of the party
    he should show up, even if he
    was not invited. Like my
    friends say. “Well muddasick
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    PAGE 2E, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007



    TRIBUNE SPORTS



    Basketball transition has
    made a huge difference

    STUBBS"

    W HAT a transition
    the New Provi-

    dence Basketball Association
    has made in one year.

    No longer do you have to
    go out and watch players who
    are in some cases not proper-
    ly fit much to the annoyance
    of the paying customers who
    come to watch them perform.

    The. fans, who are now
    patronising the league, are
    being entertained by a youth-
    ful bunch of players, who pro-
    vide a lot of excitement and
    thrills with their athleticism as
    they quickly move up and
    down the court.

    It's the way the game should
    be played and that has NPBA
    executives enthused about the
    remainder of the season.

    Recently, I caught up with
    league president Keith
    'Belzee' Smith, who was smil-
    ing from ear to ear as he
    watched the top two teams go
    at each other in the marquee
    game of the season at the DW
    Davis Gymnasium.

    Smith, a year ago, struggled
    in his first term in office. But,
    this year, the league has come
    out with a new look with just
    one division. It was a move





    OPINION

    that drew some initial skepti-
    cism.

    However, the only problem
    the league has had to face is
    trying to play their games in
    sufficient time, considering the

    NOTICE

    NOTICE is hereby given that KINSON BEAUCHAMP OF

    DUNMORE STREET, HARBOUR ISLAND, BAHAMAS,
    is applying to. the Minister responsible for Nationality and
    Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
    Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
    registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
    send a written and signed statement of the facts within
    twenty-eight days from the 25th day of January, 2007 to the
    Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
    N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

    NOTICE.

    NOTICE ~ is “hereby given “that
    P.O. BOX SS-6272, is applying to the Minister responsible
    for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
    as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
    knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
    not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
    of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 25th day of
    January, 2007 to the Minister responsible - for Nationality
    and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



    NOTICE

    NOTICE is hereby given that DARKSON BEAUCHAMP OF
    DUNMORE STREET, HARBOUR ISLAND, BAHAMAS,
    is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
    Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
    Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
    registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
    send a written and signed statement of the facts within
    twenty-eight days from the 25th day of January, 2007 to the
    Minister responsible for Nationality and Cine ne: P.O.Box
    N- 7147,-Nassau, Bahamas.

    NOTICE

    NOTICE is hereby given that RONIS BEAUCHAMP OF
    DUNMORE STREET, HARBOUR ISLAND, BAHAMAS,
    is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
    Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
    Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
    registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
    send a written and signed statement of the facts within
    .twenty-eight days from the 25th day of January, 2007 to the
    Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
    N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





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    fact that they have to wait
    until the Government Sec-
    ondary Schools Sports Asso-
    ciation complete their high
    school games.

    Cognizant of the fact that
    it's late in the night and they
    don't want to go into the wee
    hours playing, the league has
    also reduced the minutes
    played per quarter to eight
    and that has resulted in the
    games moving at a much
    faster, pace.

    It also enables the players
    to provide an even more excit-
    ing brand of basketball
    because there's very little time
    to make any adjustments as
    they would have done previ-
    ously with the 12 minute quar-
    ters.

    I think it's a good move on,

    the part of the league and they
    should be commended for the
    decision.

    Of course, it's only tempo-
    rary, because Smith has indi-
    cated that once the high
    school league is completed,
    they will revert back to the
    regular playing time.

    What I've also noticed is the
    fact that the league now oper-
    ates with a new core of refer-
    ees.

    Over the years, the league
    has had some contentious

    moments with the referees.

    association over the non-pay-
    ment or the late payment of
    their fees for officiating.

    In some cases, the referees
    did not show up to officiate,
    leaving the league in a fix.

    Smith said that problem has
    been ratified with this new
    core of officials.

    Even as they officiate, Smith
    said there are opportunities
    for them to certify themselves
    through courses that are being

    arranged by the Bahamas .Bas- ’
    ketball Federation. That

    should speak volumes for the

    ’ continued growth and success

    of the league.

    Another first class act

    Of course, with new and
    novice officials, there will be
    some calls that they would
    miss or don't blow: the whistle
    on.

    But players and coaches
    should realise that it's a learn-
    ing process and they will only
    get better with time.

    As the léague continues to
    blossom. with this new vision,
    so the officiating will continue

    @ FIRST Class Promotions is gear-
    ing up to put on another first class act
    tonight at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium
    when they host Jermaine ‘Choo Choo’ }
    Mackey's (left) World Boxing Council |
    CABOFE's super middleweight title
    fight.

    Mackey's opponent, Anibal Aceve-
    do of Puerto Rico, is eager for his par-
    ticipation in what is being dubbed: "Pre |
    Valentine War on the Shore."

    The two combatants go to war in the
    12-round main event. It should be'an
    interesting fight as Mackey has posted a |
    12-1 win-loss record, while Acevedo
    comes in at 14-4-1.

    He's a little more experienced than y
    Mackey, but Mackey said he's on a mis- |
    sion and he's not going to let anyone |
    spoil his show, especially at home. Both

    1 fighters are the super middleweight
    champion of their respective countries,
    which makes the showdown-even more [7
    interesting.

    Can the fight go the distance? That
    has to be seen. But one thing is for sure,
    the fans can look forward to another
    class act tonight.

    The undercard should be just as excit-
    ing, so I would advise you to go early
    and get your seat and don't miss any of
    the action.

    ° Yesterday The Tribune accidentally |
    printed the date for tonight’s boxing event )
    as Friday. We apologise for any incon-

    venience caused.

    to improve. It's not going to
    be an overnight success
    because there are still some
    of the older players who are
    not participating and are dis-
    appointed that they are not a
    part of the league.

    But I like what Smith said
    when he noted that they can
    still make their contribution
    by assisting the coaches of the
    teams during practice and at



    games as they share their
    expertise.

    At the same token, the
    younger players should realise
    that they have not fully
    arrived and, even though they
    might possess a lot of talent,
    there are some players who
    could help them enhance it
    even more.

    The league can only get bet-
    ter with time.

    PPPESPUPEerTe rere eeeeererrerereere eee eer errr eee eeereeees eerie ee ereere eer errr etree eree reer rere ere eeee ier erect erere errr terete errr reer rer errr ei rere tert irere reer eretie rier irre cei irtiti tr nr erie terre rir enrrtiecco ne coset Stott reereee nnn

    Nassau Nastics star
    at the Orange Bowl

    QU a









    @ GYMNASTICS
    By KELSIE JOHNSON
    Sports Reporter

    TWO weeks after compet-
    ing in the Orange Bowl Invi-
    tational, members of the Nas-
    sau Nastics are ready to make
    the leap about another tour-
    nament on the horizon.

    The 18 member team is
    scheduled to compete in the
    South Florida Presidential
    Classic, on February 16th, a
    tournament attended by some

    . of the best gymnasts in the

    Florida region.

    Nassau Nastics will send a
    18-member team to the invi-
    tational, which will serve as
    their second international
    meet for the year.

    At their showing at the
    Orange Bowl, Toni Johnson
    was able to walk away with an
    overall divisional crown, win-
    ning the all around title for
    level five competitors. John-
    son produced the best com-
    bined score on all four events,
    a total of 32.55.

    On the floor exercise, Nas-
    sau Nastics’ Philisha Wallace
    claimed top prize edging out
    Johnson.

    The first international meet
    proved fruitful for Tyja Bray-

    NOTICE



    NOTICE is hereby given that JOSEPH EVENS OF
    CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS _ is
    applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
    Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen

    of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
    reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
    granted, should send a written and signed statement of
    the facts within twenty-eight days from the 25th day of
    January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
    and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

    nen, who won the level three
    category vault. Her score,
    which was taken out; of 10
    points, was recorded at 9.50.

    The vault saw Nassau Nas-
    tics members Rokelle Joseph
    and Athalia accumulate 9.45
    points for second place.

    Braynen might have gotten
    the better of Joseph on the
    vault, but the latter would pre-
    vail clinching the third place
    overall. She finished with 34
    points for all four events.

    Level seven belonged to
    Toneka Johnson, who had an
    impressive performance on
    the vault.

    Toneka Johnson scored 9.55
    on the vaults, but had to settle
    for second place. She would
    post another 9.05 on the even
    bars that placed her in the
    fourth spot.

    The Tribune wants to hear
    from people who are
    making news in their
    neighbourhoods. Perhaps
    you are raising funds for a
    good cause, campaigning
    for improvements in the
    area or have won an
    award.

    If so, call us on 322-1986
    and share your story.





    THE MIAMI HERALD



    Miami Orange Bowl

    Attendance
    80,187

    i
    PTS Cie
    ‘Wide Receiver —

    Pittsburgh
    coach
    Chuck Noll

    Dallas coach
    Tom Landry

    National
    anthem.
    Tom Sullivan

    Halftime show
    Up with People
    Bicentennial Tribute

    Cost of
    30-second
    commercial

    $110,000

    Nielsen
    ratings
    42.3

    e : Super Bowl
    ticket price
    $20

    Did You Know
    Lynn Swann
    set a Super Bowl
    record by gaining
    16} yards on his
    _ four receptions.

    “A bit of a nippy
    _ day for Miami
    at 51 degrees.
    And Steelers
    lineman
    Ernie Holmes
    had some
    unpleasant
    things to say
    about Miami.
    T don’t like this
    place. It’s for
    people with
    arthritis. All
    that’s out here
    are those mos~-
    quitoes and
    space.’ Boy,
    he should see

    South Florida



    | MiamiHerald.com



    Broadcaster Emilio Milian (6)
    OL ES Bey WiC Cora

    os

    LOOKING BACK

    Neb!

    ly big
    catches
    that day are
    what people
    remember,
    But in coming
    back from my
    concussion,
    my biggest
    catch
    vecurved on
    the fii st pass
    that Terry
    [Bradshaw]
    threw to me.
    / went up
    for a high,
    graceful
    reception
    thal yave
    me the
    confidence
    | needed to
    make the
    other cuk hes
    later on.”

    LYNN SWANN

    Johnny Roselli, 71, leaves er pere . peer Af Ht last IE Eat -n ri er rr rrena
    eM Lele NA ate MEF Ci MCC MeE MUM Clea ELT Ce POA eS involved

    aS
    md Ty 1 Chicago, L.A. and Las Vegas mobs, ie Hi [se My ae ae he CIA.

    INTERNATIONAL EDITION

    HEADLINES
    * Southern Democrat Jiminy Carter beats
    Geralo ! ord for election to the U.S. presidency
    * Supreme Court rules that death penalty (2)
    is a constitutionally acceptable form of punishment
    * China's chairman Mao Zedong (1)
    dies of Parkinson's disease
    » Nation celebrates bicentennial

    MOVIES

    * Best picture: ‘Rocky’

    * Top box office hits: ‘Star Is Born’
    ef and ‘Ail The President's Men’

    TELEVISION
    * Debut: ‘Laverne & Shirley’ (3)
    * Top-rated shows: ‘All in the Family’ and Rich Man, Poor Man’

    MUSIC
    « Hit song: ‘Silly Love Songs’ - Wings
    * Top albums: ‘Frampton Comes Alive’ -
    Peter Frampton and ‘Fleetwood Mac’ -
    Fleetwood Mac

    HOT CAR : Cadillac Eldorado

    POP CULTURE
    * College dropouts Stephen
    Wozniak and Steven Jobs
    found Apple Computer
    "ina garage
    + Farrah Fawcett (4)
    lands the role of Jill
    on ‘Charlie's Angels.’
    A poster of her in a.
    red bathing suit
    becomes the bes
    selling poster.
    ofitsera
    * Romanian —
    ~ gymnast Nadia
    Comaneci
    earns seven —
    perfect 10s -
    in 1976 Summer
    Olympics hel
    in Montreal



    SOURCES: Nielsen
    Media Researc
    Exhibitor Relations,
    Billboard, Academy.
    Motion Pictures
    and Sciences, 6M,
    Daimler Chrysler, —
    Miami Herald Resea

    Ana Larrauri/
    Miami Herald Staff

    SMP CUE IL lms ce) C2109 La
    “sentenced to three consecutive
    . life terms for rape, kidnap and
    “murder of three Miami-Dade
    * youngsters and four other rapes.

    [HURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007 | 2E



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    PAGE 2, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007

    THE TRIBUNE



    Pei aii a
    Claim that photographer Larry Birkhead is
    ‘definitely’ father of Anna Nicole’s baby daughter

    PHOTOGRAPHER Larry
    Birkhead is definitely the
    father of Anna Nicole Smith’s
    baby daughter, it was claimed
    on American TV this week.

    Ford Shelley, son-in-law of
    Ms Smith’s ex-lover Ben
    Thompson, said the cover girl
    had herself spoken of Mr Birk-
    head being the father several
    times.

    During the relevant time-
    frame, only Mr Birkhead and
    Mr Thompson had relations
    with Ms Smith, he said.

    And Mr Thomp on counted
    himself out of in reckoning
    because he had ha&= vasecto-
    my long before. ig

    Mr Shelley’s comments came
    on Fox TV in an interview with
    Greta van Susteren. He admit-
    ted his family had helped Ms
    Smith flee to the Bahamas,

    where she hoped to escape Mr

    Birkhead’s paternity claim.

    He and Mr Thompson both
    spoke of the “loan” advanced
    to help Ms Smith buy the luxu-
    ry home ‘Horizons’ on Eastern
    Road.





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    And they both said that,
    despite their legal efforts to get
    possession of the house, they
    still bore Ms Smith no ill-will
    and regarded her as a friend.

    Although Ms Smith’s lawyer
    and friend Howard K Stern has
    claimed publicly that he is the
    father of Dannie Lynn Hope,
    both said Mr Birkhead is the
    only realistic contender.

    They said it was likely she
    had fled to the Bahamas under
    Mr Stern’s influence. He “gov-
    erned” her life and resented
    the relationship with Mr Birk-
    head, they said.

    Laws

    Even Ms Smith’s late son
    Daniel had told them that Mr
    Birkhead and Mi Thompson
    were the only $wo likely
    fathers. “When Héjvard came

    down in June to se@ Anna, he
    asked me to contact our attor-
    ney. We asked about the laws
    in the Bahamas and that’s
    when we came to the ‘eonclu-
    sion that she spoud go there,”





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    said Mr Thompson.

    At first, Ms Smith asked him
    to be named as the father on
    the birth certificate, but
    after first agreeing he later
    declined.

    “T tentatively agreed but
    then I changed my mind
    because I was not the father.
    Larry Birkhead was the father.
    She never said that Howard
    was the father.”

    Mr Shelley said: “Anna is a
    good person and we love
    Anna, but she is governed by
    Howard. I think Howard came
    between Larry and Anna.
    Sub-consciously Howard is
    infatuated and in love with
    Anna.” |

    Both men said Ms Smith was
    continuing to occupy Horizons,
    though she had been negotiat-
    ing to buy another house in
    Nassau.

    He said a Bahamas court had
    decided that her case - in which
    she claimed Horizons had been
    a gift - “lacked merit”.

    “Our attorney, Godfrey Pin-
    der, said'they had kicked her
    case out,” he added.

    When Ms van Susteren

    asked if Ms Smith was there- |

    fore due to “get the boot”, Mr
    Shelley said: “We don’t want
    to kick her out, even though
    we know the house is
    ours.”

    He said they didn’t want to
    see her on the streets and “

    don’t want any ill-will to come:

    to her.”

    Asked if Ms Smith took
    Crugs, he said; “I don’t think
    she has doné anything that is
    not legal. I think she has issues,
    however, with all the stress she
    is under.”

    Last week, Mr Birkhead
    himself told CNN that he was
    going to press his paternity
    claims to the limit.

    ‘He denied he was pursuing

    i et
    EXTERMINATORS

    FOR PEST PROBLEMS
    PHONE: 322-2157







    @ LARRY BIRKHEAD

    Ms Smith because of the for-
    tune she could make from her
    late husband Howard Mar-
    shall’s estate, adding: “I am out
    for a lifetime of fatherhood.”
    “I kind of hope she doesn’ t
    get the money if that is what
    money makes you do,” he said,
    referring to Ms Smith’s deci-
    sion to flee the States.
    Mr Birkhead said Ms Smith

    shad. been told that. the

    Bahamas was “the perfect
    place to get away from me =
    my paternity claim.”

    Glimpse

    His attorney, Debra Opri,
    said it was “disgusting and nau-
    seating” that Mr. Birkhead’s
    first glimpse of his own child
    was on television.

    But she warned that the Cal-

    ifornian judge who has ordered °
    ‘a DNA test on Dannie Lynn

    “is losing patience” and was
    ready to force the issue.

    “The judge has made it clear
    that we will win,” she added.

    Ms Opri said of Mr Birk-

    head: “He loves the child he,
    has never seen. He will pursue
    this until he is holding that
    child.”

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    @ ANNA NICOLE SMITH

    ml HOWARD K STERN

    (AP FILE Photos) i












































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    THE TRIBUNE





    © In brief

    Seven in
    custody
    after drugs
    discovered

    SEVEN people were tak-
    en into police custody on
    Tuesday after 20 pounds of
    marijuana was discovered
    at a home on Soldier Road.

    According to reports,
    Drug Enforcement Unit
    officers executed a search
    warrant on the house short-
    ly after noon.

    Upon searching:the
    house, officers reported dis-
    covering the marijuana in
    the wash room.

    A family of four men and
    three women — all between
    the ages of 22 and 60 — were
    arrested in connection
    with the incident and are
    helping police with their
    inquiries.

    e POLICE yesterday
    released the identity of the
    country’s first traffic fatali-
    ty victim of the year.

    Anthony McPhee, 30, of
    Market Street died on Sun-
    day morning after losing
    control of his car and crash-
    ing into a wall on East
    Street, according to reports.

    Police say that McPhee
    suffered massive head
    injuries and was pro-



    LOCAL NEWS

    Agatha Marcelle
    won't run in next J]
    general election

    South Beach MP makes —
    announcement in House

    @ By PAULG
    TURNQUEST
    Tribune Staff Reporter

    AGATHA Marcelle, MP
    for South Beach, officially
    announced her intention not
    to run in the next general
    election yesterday in the
    House of Assembly.

    Mrs Marcelle, who spoke
    to second an amendment to
    the Pension Act, told her
    constituents of how much she
    appreciated their support in
    the 2002 elections.

    “This is very interesting for
    me to rise to second the bill,
    as this is the first and only
    time that I have been asked
    to second a bill in this House;
    and I have been here for four
    and a half years. So I want to
    thank the minister because
    this is another opportunity

    for me to do something here.

    . Also Mr Speaker, I want to

    take a few moments to say
    something to my constituents
    in South Beach.

    “T want them to know,
    especially those who were not
    able to be at the meeting I
    called in my constituency
    where I publicly announced
    that 1 would not be seeking to
    be re-elected; I would like to
    say to them how much I
    appreciated being given their
    vote of confidence in 2002 to
    come to this place where I
    have experienced a lot, and
    where I have learnt a lot.

    “And, Mr Speaker, I want
    to tell them that they will
    always be in my heart. I have
    spent my life in service of the
    Bahamian people, and I will
    continue to do that, in a dif-
    ferent form in a different





    @ AGATHA Marcelle,
    MP for South Beach

    place,” she said.

    Mrs Marcelle said that she
    has never been one to allow
    what people say to persuade
    her.

    THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2









    007, PAGE 3

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    nounced dead at the scene
    shortly after 2am.

    His car reportedly over-
    turned as he smashed into

    She said that she only
    allows her life to be guided [J
    by God, and with that, she ~

    the wall, opposite the

    ‘ 1 ate .
    Church of God of Prophe- Man shot by p olice hao a ae

    Pas was driving a 1999 A MAN was shot by. police early Wednesday morning
    burgundy Chrysler Cirrus. i after pointing a gun at officers — which was later discovered
    to be an imitation.

    According to reports, police officers on patrol in the St
    Albans Drive area around 2am spotted occupants of a white
    Toyota Avalon, who they thought were acting in a suspi-
    cious manner.

    The officers stopped the vehicle. When a male passenger
    got out, they report, he pointed what they believed was a
    handgun in their direction.

    One of the officers shot the passenger in the right ankle.

    . The man was transported to hospital where his condition is
    : listed as not life threatening.
    ~~ ~The handgun, which was recovered, was discovered to be an
    imitation.





    PM and Governor
    General expected
    to attend ‘Valley
    Family Reunion’

    PRIME Minister Perry
    Christié'and*Governor Gener=';
    al Arthur Hanna are expected.:
    to attend a special reunion of
    people from The Valley this
    weekend. ;

    A good-sized turnout. is
    expected for ‘The Valley Fam-
    ily Reunion’ at the British
    Colonial Hilton on Saturday,
    according to organising com-
    mittee member Marva
    Sawyer.

    She said proceeds from the
    event, which was originally to
    have been held last month,
    would go to children’s chari-
    ties.

    “Anyone can.come along,”
    she told The Tribune. “You
    don’t have to be from The
    Valley to attend.”

    Cocktails will be served at
    8pm with a three-course buffet
    dinner starting at 8.30pm.

    She said Mr Christie and Mr
    Hanna had consented to
    attend “because both lived in
    The Valley in their early
    days.”

    Tickets for the event can be
    obtained from McCartney’s
    Pharmacy in Mount Royal
    Avenue or from 328-5494.

    Horse from:
    Bond movie
    to feature in
    Nassau show

    A HORSE that featured in
    the latest James Bond movie
    will be takingpart in a Nas-
    sau equestrian show on Sun- ALOOD AND CHOCOLATE

    day.
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    PAGE 4, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007




    - The Tribune Limited

    NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
    Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master



    LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914



    SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
    (Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.









    Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
    Contributing Editor 1972-1991





    EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
    Publisher/Editor 1972-







    Published Daily Monday to Saturday





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    Oe a SS

    President Bush’s Sputnik moment

































    IT IS President Bush’s Sputnik moment.
    He is not like Ike.

    Five days after the Soviets put Earth’s first
    satellite into orbit on Oct. 4, 1957, President
    Eisenhower pooh-poohed it as “one small
    ball in the air” that *does not raise my appre-
    hensions, not one iota.” He said, “the mere
    fact that this thing orbits involves no new
    discovery to science.” His top military offi-
    cials downplayed this Cold War humiliation
    by calling Sputnik a “useless hunk of iron”
    and a “silly bauble in the sky.”

    Six days after that press conference, a very
    different Eisenhower was secretly at work.
    He assembled some of the nation’s top fig-
    ures in science, including the president of
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, James
    Killian, and Polaroid founder Edwin Land.
    According to a now-declassified confidential
    memorandum of that meeting written by
    Eisenhower’s staff secretary, Army General
    Andrew Goodpaster, Land spoke “with great
    eloquence about the great problem that is
    before us. He said that the country needs a
    great deal from science. But he felt that sci-
    ence, to provide this, needs the President
    acutely.”

    Goodpaster wrote that Land asked “if
    there is not some way in which the President
    could inspire the country — setting out our
    youth particularly on a whole variety of sci-
    entific adventures. If he were able to do that,
    there would be tremendous returns. At the
    present time, scientists feel themselves iso-
    lated and alone.” a :

    Eisenhower, in Goodpaster’s narrative,
    responded that he “would like to create a
    spirit — an attitude toward science similar to
    that held toward various kinds of athletics
    in his youth — an attitude which now seemed
    to him to have palled somewhat.” Eisen-
    hower would make Killian the first presi-
    dential science adviser.

    Killian guided Eisenhower to the creation
    of NASA (National Aeronautics and Space
    Administration) and a massive expansion of
    the National Science Foundation.

    The attitude toward science in the current
    White House has palled into the most
    appalling state since Eisenhower. Scientists
    feel so isolated that it barely registered that
    Bush said he would “confront the serious
    challenge of global climate change” in his
    State of the Union address.

    One reason is obvious. Bush responded to
    climate change with chump change for cli-
    mate science. Eisenhower responded to a
    Soviet satellite with NASA. Under Bush,

    NASA satellites are fading into useless hunks
    of iron.

    “Since 2000, this thing has gone off a cliff,”
    said Berrien Moore, co-chairman of the
    National Academy of Sciences panel on
    studying Earth from space and director of
    the Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans
    and Space at the University of New Hamp-
    shire. Moore said the Bush administration
    has created a “perfect storm” with the “col-
    lapse of the earth science budget, down 30
    per cent at NASA,” and the inept develop-
    ment of a polar-orbiting environmental satel-
    lite system by NOAA and the Pentagon. The
    system is three years behind schedule and $3
    billion over budget, and many climate-detec-

    _ tion instruments have been thrown out to

    slash costs.

    “They just drove the train off the tracks,”
    Moore said. “The effects are about to become
    very apparent. The assets we have for things
    like measuring glaciers and ice are getting
    long in the tooth, with very little in the future
    to replace them. We’re buying data from
    India and the French.”

    Moore said the least the Bush administra-
    tion could do is restore the earth science bud-
    get to the levels of the Clinton administration.
    Just as frustrating to him is that even as the
    evidence piles up that humans cause global
    warming — the tntergovenmental Panel on

    _ Climate Change releases major new data this

    week — there is no White House proposal to
    cap fossil fuel emissions. Moore said it is

    “almost irresponsible” that the CEOs of 10

    major corporations have called for caps on
    carbon dioxide emissions but Bush still has
    not. :

    “The CEOs gave him a vehicle to change
    course on Kyoto and global warming,” Moore
    said. “General Electric and Duke Energy are
    not a group of fuzzy-headed scientists. But all
    he is still talking about is drilling for more oil
    in the Arctic ... his statement about global
    warming was almost a throwaway.”

    This is not surprising for a president who
    has thrown away every report on climate
    change as a silly bauble. Bush told us he was
    waiting for “sound science.” Eisenhower
    heard the sound of Soviet science — the beep
    of Sputnik - and prepared America for
    blastoff. It appears Bush will not understand
    the need for science until dead satellites rain
    down on the White House lawn.

    (¢ This article is.by Derrick Z. Jackson of
    5 The Boston Globe — © 2007)








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    EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR |

    THE TRIBUNE

    Responding to |
    Fred Mitchell |

    EDITOR: The Tribune.

    I SHOULD be grateful if you
    would allow me space to
    respond to the “Honourable”
    Fred Mitchell, who saw it fit-
    ting to smear my family and me.

    First of all, I, Dwight James
    Higgs, never approached Mr
    Mitchell for favours of any kind.
    At my.Aunt Beryl Wright’s

    birthday party Mr Mitchell:

    approached me concerning the
    work at Kerzner development
    and about the involvement of
    Bahamians at the project; and I
    told him that it would be better
    to ask the other contractors in
    order to get a better take on the
    overall concept. He then asked
    me to set up a meeting. I told
    him I would look into it,
    because anything to help my
    Bahamians advance was never a
    problem to me. —

    I did not believe in political
    favours and I referred our con-
    versation on to Mr Ashley Glin-
    ton to pursue. I specifically told
    him to bring no political fronts.
    He saw it fitting to make the
    meeting happen. At the meet-
    ing the first person walked in,
    accompanying him was the per-
    son of Mr Kendell Demeritte. It
    was at that moment I knew he
    was not serious, because if there
    was anyone who knew qualified
    contractors it would have been
    myself. After that meeting I
    never met or had any conversa-
    tion with Mr’Mitchell about his
    so-called “concerns”, but I
    guess, we, the other contractors,
    had served him and his political
    fronts’ purpose, just to say he
    had met with us. ;

    If there was one contract you
    had asked for me to receive, let
    me know now, because I did
    not ask for you or anyone to
    inter¢ede for me or my compa-
    ny; and there was no work that
    was passed on to myself because
    of your intervention. My work
    speaks for itself.

    1 don’t get involved in half
    truths or lies. When the PLP
    Government took office in
    200% every foreign contractor
    who had Bahamian partners,
    who seemed to have been an
    FNM supporter, was encour-
    aged into switching to a PLP
    partner. Of course, there should
    be no doubt in your mind that I
    am one hundred per cent
    Bahamian owned and run. This
    kind of action will never benefit
    the Bahamas. My support was
    always to help my Bahamian
    brothers.

    I can definitely say with no
    uncertainty, that am a member
    of the Kerzner Team. They
    brought the best, they ask for
    the best, and will only encour-
    age the best. And if you do not
    fit in any of these categories,
    you will not last. Yes, they will
    give you a chance, but you will
    have to earn your stripes. Ask
    the many contractors who came





    LETTERS

    letters@triounemedia.net



    and did not last. No amount of
    political influence could have
    saved them. This is why so
    many Bahamians are only busi-
    ness fronts. Anyone who is
    fronting only looks at the bot-
    tom line — “money” — what
    is in it for themselves, not what
    is the best for the Bahamian
    people.

    You, out of all people, should

    “understand that there is no

    room for mediocrity in a global
    society. But, I guess not. You
    and your Government should
    not lower the standards of our
    people. Is this a plan of yours to
    take this country to a socialist
    state?

    As for Mr Larry Wilmott who
    is self employed and is a quali-



    you build his Community Cen-
    tre without cost. He saw nothing
    wrong with my helping him,
    now he is encouraging this type
    of behaviour. What hypocrisy!
    How disingenuous can he be?
    Could he be in such a quandary
    that he must sink so low? How
    low can he get? I want him to
    tell the Bahamas the truth. How
    many millions of dollars was
    secured because of his political
    influence? Tell the Fox Hillians
    where they fitted in with the
    millions of dollars worth of con-
    tracts that he said he secured.

    I call on you to apologise for
    the lies. The TRUTH will be
    told.

    Only the TRUTH will set you
    free.

    By the way I would like Mr
    Mitchell to know that I was a
    sub contractor at Sun Interna-
    tional/Kerzner International for
    the past 14 years. Where was
    he? Receiving a political




    fied Glassier, who was awarded
    many contracts for over 15
    years by my company because
    of his qualifications. You, Mr
    Mitchell, never saw it fitting to
    help secure one contract for

    favour? FNM Senator Fred
    Mitchell. Stay tuned much more
    to come.

    I would like Mr Mitchell to
    address some of the issues and
    concerns of the Fox Hill con-

    your chairman. What a dis- stituents.
    grace!

    Now, Minister Fred Mitchell
    encourages such actions and he DWIGHT J HIGGS
    called me in to help secure work Nassau,

    for his supporters; and I helped January 30, 2007.

    Fox Hill now has a choice

    EDITOR, The Tribune.

    THERE is an old saying, “You can do as you like, but not as long as
    you like”. Another saying goes like this, “You can fool some of the peo-
    ple some of the times, but you can’t fool all of the people all of the
    time.” Fred Mitchell is enjoying his last days as a member of parliament.
    Fox Hill said so on Thursday.

    We the people of the Fox Hill Constituency are ecstatic. We cannot
    believe our good fortune. God is truly in the answering prayers busi-
    ness. I have never, in my many years, witnessed the kind of energy and
    the outpouring of support like what was displayed at the Fox Hill
    Parade grounds this past Thursday. Fox Hill came alive with the high-
    est powered energy, brought there by the FNM of the endorsement of |
    educator, Dr Jacinta Higgs. God bless Dr Jacinta Higgs.

    The people showed just how badly they want to have and need a'sen-
    sible, humane; high moral, respected, respectful, God-fearing, family-
    oriented person offering herself as the next member of parliament for
    the Fox Hill Constituency. The overwhelming show of support is a snap-
    shot of what is to come. Speaker after speaker honestly laid the cards
    on the table, shining the brightest floodlight on the lack of represen-
    tation by Fred Mitchell.

    Everyone knows that Mr Mitchell was having a fine old time trav-
    elling around the world. It is claimed that he probably spent more mon-
    ey on travelling than any other member of parliament in the history of
    the Bahamas. Nowadays he is seen, visiting homes walking in the rain
    very late at night and too early in the morning before people are up and
    about, in my opinion in desperation, brought on bby his own arro-
    gance, superiority complex, and his standoffishness. He, by his own
    doing, ostracized his most ardent supporters. He just: happens to know
    the game of politics, and expects the people of Fox Hill to remain polit-
    ically naive forever. :

    But reality struck on Thursday, Dr J acinta Higgs, gave the people an
    alternative. They can choose a woman who has literally given herself
    and her family to people of Fox Hill a long time ago, and they know it.
    She, at a tender age of 15 was a Sunday school teacher, led the Girl
    Guides and continues to mentor youth and especially ladies through
    education and other events, such as the summer youth programme and
    the Fox Hill Congos. :

    Dr Higgs showed the overflowing crowd just how knowledgeable,
    willing and committed to.continue her mission to educate, empower and
    help equip the people of Fox Hill constituency to compete in the
    global environment which it is alleged that Minister Mitchell has
    already signed, but just waiting if the PLP is returned to implement it.

    Fox Hillians are “beating their breasts” showing how proud they are
    to have Dr Higgs, a humble lady with strong family values which is the
    foundation of a civilised society to eventually represent them. Her
    speech was delivered under the watchful eyes of her husband who

    __ remained on stage for the duration. This alone is an indication that the

    family in still intact in the Bahamas.

    The leader himself was elated to have “such a gem” as Dr Higgs. Fox
    Hill is proud that their close family member will represent them next.
    The Bahamas will certainly benefit from the many talents this fantas-
    tic lady brings. It ain’t long now.

    DIONNE EDGECOMBE
    Nassau,
    January 20, 2007.



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    THE TRIBUNE





    In brief

    Man convicted
    on drugs
    charge gets two
    year sentence

    A HAITIAN man was sen-
    tenced to serve two years in
    prison after being convicted
    on a marijuana possession
    charge yesterday.

    Bermane Necy, 38,
    appeared before Magistrate
    Carolita Bethel along with
    Michael Thermidor, 44,
    Makaty Benjamin, 28, and
    Guirlaine Josue, 29.

    All four were initially
    arraigned on the charge of
    possession of marijuana with
    the intent to supply on
    December 11, 2006.

    At that time, they all plead-
    ed not guilty.

    They were charged with
    being found in possession of
    six pounds of marijuana with a
    street value of $6,000.

    Yesterday Nece pleaded
    guilty to the charge.

    Benjamin, Josue and Ther-
    midor were.handed over to
    immigration authorities to be
    deported.

    Nece will also be deported
    after serving his sentence.



    MH TWO sisters have been
    sentenced to serve prison
    terms after being convicted on
    marijuana possession charges.

    Jenna Neely, 20, and
    Rachel Neely, 29, were
    arraigned in Magistrate’s
    Court on Monday on charges
    of possession of marijuana
    with the intent to supply and
    conspiracy to possess with the
    intent to supply.

    It was alleged that the two,
    while at the Lynden Pindling
    International airport on
    Thursday, July 8, 2004 were
    found in possession of the
    drugs.

    The sisters were alleged to
    be heading to Canada.

    . On Monday, they both.
    appeared before Magistrate
    Carolita Bethel and pleaded
    guilty to the charges after the
    prosecution closed its cased.

    Jenna was convicted of hav-
    ing 10 and a half pounds of
    marijuana and Rachel was
    convicted of being in posses-
    sion of 12,and a half pounds.

    - Jenna was sentenced to

    _ serve one year in prison and
    Rachel was sentenced to serve
    29 months.

    BURR Haas

    THURSDAY,

    FEBRUARY 1ST
    6:30am Community Page 1540AM
























    11:00 Immediate Response

    12:00 ZNS News Update

    12:05 Immediate Response Cont'd
    11:00 |CanSee

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    8:35
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    m@ By ALEXANDRIO
    MORLEY
    Tribune Staff Reporter



    FOX HILL MP Fred
    Mitchell is in a “panic” and
    can only resort to mudsling-
    ing tactics because he can’t
    campaign on real issues, it was
    claimed yesterday.

    Dwight Higgs, husband of
    the FNM’s Fox Hill candidate
    Dr Jacinta Higgs, made the
    comment following Mr
    Mitchell’s public revelations
    that he did various favours for

    branch meeting in Fox Hill,
    where he was accompanied by
    many of his Cabinet col-
    leagues.

    The minister claimed he had
    done “personal favours” for
    the Higgs family and said he
    helped a “close personal rela-
    tive” of Dr Higgs in getting
    her pension cheque, but that
    person was now saying he had
    not done anything for her.

    “Remember the money, my
    dear. It was Fred Mitchell who
    got it for you,” claimed Mr

    ‘Mitchell.

    The minister also claimed
    he had done a favour for
    Dwight Higgs.

    He claimed Mr Higgs was

    Dr Higgs and her family.

    Mr Mitchell made the alle-
    gations against the Higgs fam-
    ily on Monday night at a

    Dr Nottage: infection at dialysis
    unit is under better control

    @ By ALISON LOWE
    Tribune Staff Reporter



    THERE has been no attempt
    to downplay the seriousness of
    the bacterial outbreak in the
    dialysis unit of the Princess Mar-
    garet Hospital, Health Minister
    Dr Bernard Nottage said yes-
    terday.

    Speaking outside the Senate
    about efforts to bring the infec-
    tion — which has been present in
    the unit since July of last year —
    under control, he explained that
    the bacteria is responding well to
    antibiotics, and the number of
    cases detected in December and
    January have been minimal.

    “Toward the middle of
    November it appeared that the
    infection was tailing off and that has been the trend,” said Dr
    Nottage, whose ministry was informed about the outbreak in
    October.

    “Tt appears that the infection has been brought under control

    @ HEALTH Minister
    Dr Bernard Nottage

    now — under better control — although it has not been completely

    eliminated.”

    These reassurances contradict statements made on Monday by
    leader of the Bahamas Democratic Movement, Mr Cassius Stuart
    - who claims to have been in contact with doctors inside the hos-
    pital — that the rate of infection is getting worse, as the bacteria is
    “highly resistant” to antibiotics.

    * Mr Stuart, who alleged that 15 people had died of the infection
    so far, and 70 people tested positive overall, claimed that staff in
    the hospital had been pressured by some in the government into
    downplay the seriousness of the infectious outbreak for political
    reasons. ,

    Yesterday however, Dr Nottage dismissed such claims as “fool-
    ish”.

    "The Public Hospitals Authority have made numerous state-
    ments about it — I have read them in your paper and in other
    papers. I don't think that they've ever indicated there was not an
    infection. They've said there was infection, they've said what they
    were doing about it, and they've given, I believe, reasonably accu-
    rate information as far as I've read,” he said.

    He did admit however that although government and the hos-
    pital has been doing everything it can — following recommendations
    made by the Pan American Health Organisation (PAHO) in
    November — to eliminate the infection in the unit, it has so far failed
    to discover the source of the bacteria.

    "The water appears to be well, the cleaning liquids appear to be
    good, the kidney machines haven't shown any infection," he said.

    Tests of patient and staff's blood and faeces are also now in the
    process of being carried out — with initial samples testing negative
    for the bacteria.

    He added that although some patients who contracted the infec-
    tion have died — as alleged by Mr Stuart — it has not been deter-
    mined whether they died of the enterococcus faecalis infection.

    All patients in the unit are “immuno-compromised”, he
    explained, and subject to contracting illnesses at a higher rate
    than most. —

    According to Dr Nottage, the hospital is trying to reduce the use
    of catheters for dialysis, as evidence has shown that the incidence
    of infection is greater in units where catheters — rather than other,
    apparatus — have been used for long periods.

    Addressing the infection is an “ongoing process" he said, adding
    however that his ministry and the hospital are undertaking a
    "step-by-step constructive approach to looking at solving the
    problem." ;

    The minister will be meeting with PAHO representatives on Fri-
    day to arrange for PAHO to conduct a second review of the situ-
    ation, and to determine what further steps could be taken, he
    said.



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    worried that he would lose his
    contract on the Atlantis pro-
    ject because the government
    had just changed at the time.

    Mr Mitchell said: “We sat
    in Athena’s Cafe and he asked
    for my help. I agreed because
    I support any Bahamian con-
    tractor and I did speak to
    them to say this: The PLP
    does not condone or support
    any action that would jeopar-
    dise any Bahamian contractor
    and certainly not on the basis
    of political affiliation.”

    “So when you say I did
    nothing, talk to your hus-
    band,” Mr Mitchell said.

    The Tribune contacted the
    Higgs Family for a response,
    and husband Dwight Higgs
    responded to the allegations
    in an official letter. (See Let-
    ters column page 4).

    Mr Higgs said the close per-
    sonal relative that Mr Mitchell
    claims he assisted with getting
    their pension cheque is actu-
    ally his mother-in-law.

    He said he was surprised
    that Mr Mitchell would call
    this a personal favour because,
    he said: “He is the Minister of
    Foreign Affairs and Public
    Service, and if my mother-in-
    law can’t go to him if she does
    not get results from the lower
    level, then who can she go
    to?”

    Mr Higgs also claims he
    never asked Mr Mitchell to
    help secure his contract on the
    Atlantis project.

    Mr Higgs explained: “At my
    Aunt Beryl Wright’s birthday
    party, Mr Mitchell approached
    me concerning the work at
    Kerzner Development and
    about the involvement of
    Bahamians at the project, and
    I told him that it would be bet-
    ter to ask the other contrac-
    tors in order to get a better
    take on the overall concept.”

    Mr Higgs accepted that a
    meeting did take place
    between himself, Mr Mitchell.
    and some other Bahamian

    THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007, PAGE 5

    nen ie ee |
    usband of FNM Fox Hill candidate

    contractors, but he claims
    Mitchell brought a “political
    front” to the meeting.

    “After that meeting,” he
    said, “I never met or had
    any conversation with Mr
    Mitchell about his so-called
    concerns.”

    Mr Higgs’ letter continues:

    . “If there.was one contract you

    had asked for me to receive,
    let me know now, because I
    did not ask for you or anyone
    to intercede for me or my
    company, and there was no
    work that was passed on to
    myself because of your inter-
    vention. My work speaks for
    itself.”

    Mr Higgs claims it was Fred
    Mitchell who had asked him
    for favours when he won the
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    Mitchell with securing work
    for his supporters and he
    helped to build the Fox Hill
    Community Centre “without
    any cost.”

    “He saw nothing wrong
    with my helping him, now he
    is encouraging this type of
    behaviour. What hypocrisy!”
    exclaimed Mr Higgs.

    Mr Higgs said he was
    demanding a full apology
    from the Fox Hill MP, and he
    challenged Mr Mitchell to
    campaign on real issues rather
    than personal attacks.

    Mr Higgs told The Tribune
    he only wanted an opportuni-
    ty to respond to Mr Mitchell’s
    “lies” about him and his moth-
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    PAGE 6, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007





    THE TRIBUNE



    Civil servant seeking financial
    Sisvanies from the public

    vf doni t treat

    “We Welcome you

    to be a part of our WOW service team.

    Environmental Services Department

    We are looking for young men and women with a positive
    attitude, physically fit, high sckeal diploma, computer literate,
    excellent customer service skills, previous experience and/or
    certificate ip housekeeping floor cleaning

    The successful candidates will be required to:

    * Maintain the hospital and adjacent offices ina clean,
    sanitary and safe environment
    Collect soiled linen and furnish clean linen
    Remove solid waste
    Ensure delivery of water and other supplies necessary ta
    _ meet the needs of Associates, Patients and Customers
    * Work shift hours .
    Excellent benefits Salary commensurate with experience
    '

    mee DOCTORS HOSPITAL

    Heslsls For L8

    - Please submit resume te: Human Resources Department | Doctors Hospital
    ~ PO, Box N-3018 | Nassau, Bahamas | of call 302-4618 | Website: www.dactorshosp.com












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    MORLEY

    Tribune Staff Reporter

    A CIVIL servant has bee n forced to seek
    financial assistance from the public — after
    receiving no help from government — fora
    debilitating injury that she suffered on the
    job in 1998.

    The 35-year-old mother of two young
    children has had to resort to using a sponsor
    sheet and begging family and friends to col-
    lect the money she needs for a doctor-rec-
    ommended operation in Florida.

    The amount needed for the procedure,
    she said, is $36,810.

    Claudna Glinton-Knowles told her story
    to The Tribune yesterday.

    Ms Glinton-Knowles said she was
    employed as a janitress at a local primary
    school in 1998, where she received an injury
    while working. .

    According to her: “A little boy was
    swinging on the bars at the school and I
    told him to get off, but at the same time I
    heard the PE teacher telling me to watch
    out.” .

    Ms Knowles said her left wrist got caught
    in the bars and was fractured, resulting in
    nerve damage.

    Doctors have diagnosed her condition as
    Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD).

    Medical institutions in the US report
    that two to five per cent of peripheral nerve
    injury patients and 12 per cent to 21 per
    cent of patients with paralysis on one side of
    the body develop RSD as a complication.

    The Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syn-
    drome Association of America (RSDSA)

    says the condition appears after one to two .

    per cent of all bone fractures.
    This group describes the condition as a



    @ CLAUDNA Glinton-Knowles, 35,
    told her story to Te Tribune

    (Photo: Ana Rianca Marin)
    “chronic, painful, and progressive neuro-

    ‘ logical condition that affects skin, muscles,
    joints, and bones.”

    In 2001, Ms Glinton-Knowles claims, she
    received a letter from government indicat-
    ing that said the accident was caused by
    her own negligence.

    She then sought legal representation, and
    was told by an attorney that she had a
    “good case” for a civil suit against the gov-
    ernment.

    However, her lawyer then advised that

    ‘her case would be unsuccessful, because

    the statute of limitations (three years) had
    expired.

    “At the time, my RSD was not as bad as
    it is now,” explained Ms Glinton-Knowles.

    Her doctor recommended that she under-
    go a procedure known as a Spinal Cord
    Stimulator at a medical facility in Florida,
    but she is having problems raising the mon-
    ey.
    “National Insurance has ominously
    informed me that the cost of the Spinal
    Cord Stimulator is too much for the gov-
    ernment and NIB to bear, so I am forced to
    solicit outside assistance from generous
    sponsors,” she said.

    Ms Knowles said she has had five opera-
    tions since the accident, and has been pre-
    scribed morphine and numerous pills to
    deal with the pain.

    She estimates that she has spent at least
    $17,000 on medication since the accident
    occurred.

    She said: “I’ve written a letter to Prime
    Minister Christie, the attorney general and
    Hubert Ingraham asking for help, but no
    one has replied to me.”

    She is now appealing to the general pub-
    lic for assistance in raising funds for the
    operation that she “desperately” needs.

    Donations can be deposited to account
    No. 4636 at Scotia Bank on Thompson
    Boulevard.

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    where 26 students competed in
    the annual event for a chance to
    represent Grand Bahama in the
    national competition.
    However, former Spelling

    Bee CAMABION » 13-year-old .
    oon of Grand’

    Anjanet
    Bahama Catholic High emerged

    again as this year’s winner after:

    rounds.

    Miss Loon, an eight grade
    student, won both competitions
    last year in Freeport and Nas-
    sau, and represented the
    Bahamas in Washington DC at
    the Scripps Howard Spelling
    Bee competition.

    Grand Bahama has won the
    national competition held in
    New Providence for the past
    seven consecutive years.

    Miss Loon, along Raneisha
    Higgs of McCleans Town Pri-

    mary, represented Grand
    Bahama last year and placed
    first and second, respectively.

    Mary Cooper, assistant direc-
    tor of education at the Ministry
    of Education, said that Grand
    Bahama has produced some
    fantastic spellérs over the years. *

    Parents, teachers and stu-
    dents from various schools
    throughout the island gathered
    at the church hall for the com-
    petition, which got underway
    shortly after 11am.

    Ms Cooper said one student

    from Grand Cay and two stu-

    dents from Bimini were among
    this year’s spellers. She
    explained that the students in
    the competition were winners
    from their respective school
    based spelling competitions.
    Ms Cooper said spelling helps
    to improve and raise the acade-

    In Memoriam

    mic standard of the child. “It

    helps with pronunciation of:

    words, word meaning, defini-
    tion, and origin, and how to use
    the word in a sentence and
    teaches them correct English.”

    The Grand Bahama District
    “competition has been sponsored”

    by Discovery Cruise Lines for
    the past eight years. It provides
    the study guide and Webster’s
    Third New International Dic-
    tionary to each participating
    school.

    Janet Albury, of VIP Ser-
    vices, a public relations
    spokesperson for Discovery,
    said that the company is pleased
    to be able to sponsor the event.

    “Discovery has indeed been
    the proud sponsor of the Bee
    for the past eight years and is
    excited to be a part of it once
    more,” she said.

    Ghislaine Deborah (Smith) Chappell

    A memorial service for the life of —,
    Debbie Smith-Chappell will be held at
    Trinity Methodist Church on Thursday,
    February 8, 2007 at 4:30 pm, following
    the private interment of ashes at St.
    Matthew’s Churchyard.

    Debbie was born in Nassau in 1951 and died in Cambridge, England
    on November 2, 2006, after a short but brave battle against cancer.

    She is survived by her brother Philip, husband Michael, daughter
    Laura, son Simon, daughter-in-law Shannon and grandson Finley.

    Debbie attended Queen’s College from 1956 to 1967. She moved to
    England and married Michael in 1974. They spent 31 wonderful years

    together.

    Debbie is missed by her many family members and friends both in the
    Bahamas and England.

    Donations in lieu of flowers may be sent to:

    The Ranfurly Home for Children

    P.O. Box N-1413, Nassau, Bahamas.


    |IHURSDAY, FEBRUAHY

    1, cuur, Pmnuee

    THE TRIBUNE | |

    ae es ea
    ‘He should get advice from his lawyer

    rather than trying to interpret the law’

    m@ By ALISON LOWE
    Tribune Staff Reporter

    A LONG Island boat business

    Several weeks ago business
    owner Mr Darville admitted to
    not having complied with the
    order, stating that it contained
    references to violations of envi-
    ronmental law with which he dis-
    agreed.

    “He should get advice from his
    lawyer rather than trying to inter-
    pret the law,” said Dr Bethel.

    He added that whether or not
    Mr Darville was now complying
    with the order, issued in Decem-
    ber, was "out of my jurisdiction to
    verify."

    Dr Bethel said previously that
    the order was intended to be put
    in place for a period of three
    months so that a determination

    owner accused of causing respi- responsible order, but was yet to receive any

    ratory problems among residents for health response.

    should have consulted his lawyer problems in “My advice would be that his

    before refusing to comply witha the settle- lawyers should be the ones who

    cease and desist order issued ment. should be formally communicat-

    against him, Minister of Energy M r ing with the government agen- a
    and the Environment Dr Marcus _ Darville, how- cies,” said Dr Bethel. #2
    Bethel said yesterday. ever, has The Tribune first became ed

    could be made
    as to what
    extent the
    business was



    claimed that
    as the busi-
    ness is his
    family's sole
    source of
    income, he should have evidence
    that he is responsible before he is
    forced to close without compen-
    sation.

    "A cease and desist order has
    been issued since before Christ-
    mas," said Dr Bethel. "There are
    police officers and others who
    know what the law is, and so
    when a formal complaint is
    lodged and investigated, if he is
    not proceeding to follow the
    order then he's subject to possible
    prosecution."

    @ BETHEL

    Mr Darville said last month
    that he had written to the Depart-
    ment of Environmental Health
    Services to query the detail of the

    aware of reports of respiratory
    illness in the Mangrove Bush set-
    tlement in September last year -
    when a letter from a local pul-
    monologist detailing the symp-
    toms of the two residents
    involved was leaked to the paper.

    The residents were said to be
    suffering from signs of “severe
    bronchospasm” — a reactive air-
    way disease, which the doctor
    claimed was “secondary to chem-
    ical exposure”.

    A government investigation
    was launched shortly after, cul-
    minating in the December order
    against Mr Darville's business, in
    order to determine whether he is
    responsible.

    Sea Hauler tragedy victims call
    off ‘serious action’ threat

    VICTIMS of the Sea Hauler
    tragedy have called off a threat of
    “serious action” after the gover-
    mment said it had found medical
    files which had supposedly gone
    missing.

    “Now that the files are appar-
    ently available, we shall draw up
    our claims and try to put this
    thing behind us,” said spokesman
    Lincoln Bain yesterday.

    Earlier this week, Mr Bain said
    he and the victims would take
    “serious action” unless the cru-
    cial files were found.

    He said the government was
    trying to claim that only two vic-
    tims had been treated at Princess
    Margaret Hospital’s accident and

    round a table.

    These are the government itself
    and the owners of the two boats
    involved in the fatal collision -
    the Sea Hauler and the United
    Star.

    She also reportedly told him
    that it was in the interests of all
    parties concerned to get the issue
    behind them:

    “We are now hoping for a res-
    olution pretty soon,” said Mr
    Bain. “Once we get these files we
    are moving to settle this matter.

    “We shall go ahead with our
    claims and see how we resolve
    this. She hopes this could happen
    way before the election. She says
    the next step is getting the other

    had been stung into action since
    he and the victims chained them-
    selves to the gates of Prime Min-
    ister Perry Christie’s Cable Beach
    home some weeks ago.

    “Mrs Hanna-Martin called and

    said she would do whatever she

    could,” he added, “I have no idea
    where the files were. I can only
    assume it was a stall tactic.”

    Mr Bain said he could “guar-
    antee” that only threats of more
    action by the victims prompted
    the government to act.

    “We had the full machinery
    ready to go this morning,” he told
    The Tribune, “The minister says
    she now has the files. If this is
    another stall tactic, then we shall

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    Service Skills Award Sharon Woodside Selena Russell ome

    Shaffane Knowles Jermaine Mitchell
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    Most Improved
    Highest Retail Achiever
    Regional Vice-President’s Inspirational Award

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    Each of the winners received a plaque, cash prizes and gifts.






    PAGE 8, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007

    < Ee

    Construction Bahamas, Ltd.



    THE TRIBUNE





    New labour office
    opened in Exuma

















    i MINISTER of Immigration, Labour a
    raining Shane Gibson spoke during official
    opening ceremony. Pictured from left are
    Exuma MP Anthony Moss; Thelma Beneb
    Shane Gibson; Harcourt Brown; Rev Ced
    Smith and Bradley Armbrister, assis
    administrator.

    (BIS Photo: Ri








    8
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    we re closed for business

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    Our offices will be closed
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    @ THE Department of Labour officially opened its new
    offices in Farmers Hill, Exuma last week Friday. Cutting the rib-

    oie Bek ele er,

    ee EE SY

    #4
    aE a

    t FCe

    bon was Mrs Sheila Moss, wife of Exuma and Ragged Island .””

    MP, Anthony Moss. Pictured from left are Mr Moss; Shane Gib-
    son, Minister of Immigration Labour and Training; Mrs Moss.
    Also pictured are Harcourt Brown, Director of Labour; Thel-
    ma Beneby, Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Immigra-
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    (BIS Photo: Raymond A Bethel)

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    Government is a matter

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    In the hands of decent folk,
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    The amount of money and
    power that we give to govern-
    ment should only be given if
    those who run the government
    have our trust. But what is
    trust? Trust is the transfer of
    something valuable to the care
    of another with the expecta-
    tion that they will manage it
    primarily for your benefit and
    not theirs. ;

    In public trust, we transfer
    our valuable common wealth
    to those we elect to office and
    we expect them to manage
    our common wealth princi-
    pally for our benefit and not
    theirs.

    Genuine trust must be
    based on truth. Dishonest
    trustees are dangerous to
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    Even if dishonest governors
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    Dishonesty just makes the
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    THE CHRISTIE
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    [ Christie adminis-
    tration has grave con-
    cerns when it comes to hon-
    esty and therefore when it
    comes to trust. The last four
    plus years are replete with
    instances reflecting this. The
    most recent case appears to
    be what might be termed
    “The Wilchcombe WHI
    Deception”.

    The local dailies reported
    that Minister Wilchcombe

    ? _C.A. Christie Real Estate
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    (Next to Saunders BeachWest)

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    O THE WORLD



    PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT

    SOFTWARE UPGRADE

    i The Bahamas Telecommunications Co. Ltd. (BTC) wishes to advise its valued
    | customers and the general public that in order to maintain optimal service
    levels, a software upgrade of its network is required.

    | As a result, subscribers throughout New Providence and the Family Islands

    may experience a slight disruption in dome
    cellular and internet, between the hours of 11

    to 6:00 am on Friday, February 2, 2007.

    | BTC sincerely apologizes for any incon
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    flew to Washington DC and
    with charm and grace per-
    suaded the entire US congress
    to grant the Bahamas and the
    Caribbean a 30-day extension
    on its Western Hemisphere
    Initiative (WHI), which
    requires US citizens to have
    passports in order to return
    home from travel to these ter-
    ritories. Minister Wilchcombe
    was being hailed as a hero of
    sorts.

    I must confess that, on read-

    Notwithstanding all of this, no
    extension was given in those
    early days. Now that the ini-
    tiative has come on stream,
    we read stories about Minister
    Wilchcombe going to Wash-
    ington and saving the day,
    even if just for 30 days.
    What would 30 days do?
    How could the Department
    of Homeland Security in the
    US amend the implementa-
    tion of a congressionally man-
    dated initiative without refer-

    ae

    “Genuine trust must be based
    on truth. Dishonest trustees are
    dangerous to those who trust
    them. Similarly, dishonest
    governors are dangerous to a
    trusting public. Even if dishonest
    governors do some good for
    you, you still have to wonder
    whether they did as much as
    they could have done or
    whether the good you think they

    have done is good at all.”
    eS TS

    ing the stories in the dailies, I
    immediately thought to myself
    that this was utter nonsense. It
    simply didn’t add up. The
    Western Hemisphere Initia-
    tive was announced years ago
    and for all that time Minister
    Wilchcombe had opportunity
    to approach the US about
    seeking an extension.

    Cries were made at home
    and abroad about the impact
    it would have on our tourism,
    so much so that the Director
    General of the Caribbean
    Tourism Organisation, our

    ‘own Vincent Vanderpool

    Wallace, said that it would be
    “catastrophic” for Caribbean
    tourism.

    Ambassador John Rood
    disagreed because, in his
    thinking, most Americans
    travelling to The Bahamas
    already had _ passports.



    ence to US congress after the
    initiative has come into force
    simply because a Bahamian
    tourism minister flew into
    town?

    Why would the US ambas-
    sador to The Bahamas not
    have announced the exten-
    sion, since it would have had
    to be something in which he
    was involved? Why would
    such an extension be given so
    late in the hour and why for
    such a short period? Surely,
    to be helpful, a generous US
    would have given the same
    extension that it gave to Cana-
    da and others.

    Through all the storytelling,
    Minister Wilchcombe never
    uttered a word to refute the
    claims; as is his practice, he
    simply soaked up the good
    press, whether deserving or
    not. ae



    oils




    We also. an Yy a lree s
    teddies and adult 0
    7tmentionables

    Miall ar Marathon
    Tel: 394-3205

    THE TRIBUNE

    There was no chance that
    he would be like evangelist
    Billy Graham, who once
    called up a major news agency
    in the US to refute claims that
    he had so many thousands of
    people to his crusade. He told
    the news agency that the num-
    ber was much lower than it
    reported. No, Minister Wilch-
    combe is no Billy Graham.

    As it turned out, Ambas-
    sador Rood had to set the
    record straight. There was no
    extension. There was none
    granted, he said, and none
    being considered.

    If this is so, and we have no
    reasons to believe otherwise,
    from where did the press get
    this bogus story? Did it get it
    from Minister Wilchcombe?
    If not, why did the minister
    not correct the same?

    Could this have been some
    insidious plot to dupe the
    Bahamian public? Who would
    want to do such a thing? We
    live in the Internet Age. Infor-
    mation travels quickly.

    Imagine tourists getting
    whim of this bogus story, trav-
    elling to The Bahamas and
    then getting stuck here on try-
    ing to return home. Yes, we
    would get the tourists in the
    short run but the frustration
    and anxiety caused to them
    on seeking to return home
    would add to that bad visitor
    experience that threatens our
    tourism industry today. In the
    long run we would suffer.

    A trustworthy and compe-
    tent Minister of Tourism
    would have wanted to avoid

    this. Alas, though, we have a .«

    minister who has shown that
    he values form over substance
    and press over presence.

    For four and a half years he
    has managed to take credit for
    a 40-year trend in increase in
    visitor arrivals and expendi-
    ture and has managed to avoid
    the negative press many of his
    colleagues suffer.

    Yet, there are some close to
    him and far away he knows
    well that all that glitters is not
    gold and at some point mon-
    key was goin’ to put question
    to he mar. Perhaps that time

    _ has come.



    n of body :

    veltios



    Phone: 323-3460

    Montrose Avenue & Oxford Street ¢ 2 Doors North of Multi Discount Furniture
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    — CARACAS, Venezuela
    ee

    * A CONGRESS wholly loyal
    to President Hugo Chavez
    approved a law Wednesday
    granting him authority to enact
    sweeping measures by decree,
    according to Associated Press.
    Meeting at a downtown
    ‘plaza in a session that resem-
    ‘bled a political rally, lawmakers
    ‘unanimously approved all four
    “irticles of the law by a show
    ‘of hands.
    « “Long live the sovereign

    ¥








    y

















    ‘PAGE 12, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007

    people! Long live President
    Hugo Chavez! Long live social-
    ism!” said National Assembly
    President Cilia Flores as she
    proclaimed the law approved.
    “Fatherland, socialism or
    death! We will prevail!”
    Chavez, who is beginning a
    fresh six-year term, Says the
    legislation will be the start of a
    new era of “maximum revolu-
    tion” during which he will con-
    solidate Venezuela’s transfor-
    mation into a socialist society.
    His critics are calling it a radical

    FINISH CABINET MAKERS NEEDED

    Wanted for new state of the art factory. |
    Must have chop saw, circular saw, drill, hand tools & experience.

    Secure job with good pay and benefits for the right person.

    Call: 394-4151
    Fax: 394-4159

    Please be advised that

    Ken Joos



    QPL AT EXURMA, LAR A MAS

    ~» Management

    LOCAL AND CARIBBEA

    Congress grants Chavez powers to —
    remake Venezuelan society by decree

    lurch toward authoritarianism
    by a leader with unchecked
    power.

    Hundreds of Chavez sup-
    porters wearing red — the col-
    or of Venezuela’s ruling party
    — gathered in the plaza, wav-

    ing signs reading “Socialism is

    democracy,” as lawmakers

    read out passages of the law

    giving the president special
    powers for 18 months to trans-
    form 11 broadly defined areas,
    including the economy, ener-
    gy and defense.

    is no longer employed with
    Grand Isle Resort & Spa,
    Exuma, The Bahamas.
    Mr. Joos is not authorized to conduct

    business of any kind on our behalf.



    Position Available

    Maintenance Technician

    The Maintenance Technician shall report to the Maintenance Supervisor and must be
    familiar with, understand and operate according to the relevant elements of the Coca-Cola

    Quality System.

    Main Duties & Responsibilities:

    The Maintenance Technician shall be responsible for the following activities, within the
    limits of his/her specific skill:

    1. Ensure that all equipment works at its optimum level of efficiency by the:
    - Installation and commissioning of all plants, equipment, services and utilities
    - Maintenance of building and facilities (plumbing, painting, basic carpentry an
    masonry and electric)
    - Maintenance of forklifts and other vehicles
    - Fabrication, machining and welding of parts or items as required

    - Repairs to all electrical and mechanical equipment

    2. Carry out all necessary maintenance activities covering Planned Maintenance (PM),
    Condition Based Maintenance (CBM), and Improvement Projects in order to

    achieve the above.

    3. Log and record all work undertaken to.the satisfaction of the Maintenance Supervisors
    Monitor and operate any production line equipment to ensure that its working

    efficiently.

    4. Report any non-conformances to the immediate supervision or QA personnel and carry
    out the relevant corrective action as is recommended.

    5. Perform other reasonable job related duties as may be assigned by management.

    Qualifications & Experience

    Certificate from a qualified institution, Ordinary Technicians Diploma in his/her area of
    expertise (i.e. electrical, mechanical) or a minimum of five years experience in a similar

    capacity.

    Core Competencies:

    Good working knowledge of bottling plant machinery & machinery & services.
    Possess good troubleshooting skills.
    Ability to read and understand equipment manuals.

    Please submit written resume to:
    Caribbean Bottling Co. (Bah) Ltd.

    P.O. Box N-1123
    Nassau, Bahamas

    ATTN: Human Resources Dept.
    On Or Before Feb.16th, 2007


























    N NEWS

    @ PICTURED are (1-r) Lawrence Lewis,
    at COB; student awardee Christina Smith; BICA coun
    Cochinamogolus; BICA president Kendrick Christie;

    THE TRIBUNE



    council member; Mrs Cheryl Carey, student affairs
    cil and student education chair Theofanis
    second vice president Milford Lockhart.

    BICA set to provide
    annual scholarships

    THE Bahamas Institute of
    Chartered Accountants has
    announced that it will provide
    an annual scholarship over the
    next five years to two deserv-
    ing students in the accounting
    programme at the College of
    the Bahamas.

    Beginning in 2007, a portion
    will go to a student for assis-
    tance with their textbooks and
    other supplies, and a portion
    will go to the top graduating
    student in the programme.

    The initial award towards
    the purchase of text books was
    presented to an appreciative

    Store to celebrate

    Christina Smith, a student cur-
    rently enrolled in the account-

    ing programme.

    “It should be noted that
    accounting remains the top
    bachelors degree in terms of
    enrollment in the USA and
    places near the top in a num-
    ber of other countries,” said
    the association in a statement.
    “The field of accounting pro-
    vides many choices for young
    persons.

    “BICA is seeking to support
    young persons in fulfilling
    their career choice and edu-
    cational endeavors.»

    “The award also brings
    these students into contact
    with persons in the organisa-
    tion who may be able to assist
    in job placement and mentor-
    ing.”

    BICA was founded in 1971,
    it has around 400 members
    and is the umbrella and rep-
    resentative organisation for
    accountants in the country
    providing training courses,
    commenting on key financial
    services legislation and issu-
    ing licenses to qualified
    accountants to practice attes-

    . © station functions. Ree ey



    Valentine’s Day —
    with fundraiser for
    Heart Foundation

    mâ„¢ By TAMARA
    FERGUSON

    UNDER the theme Faith,
    Hope and Love, John Bull is
    celebrating Valentine’s Day
    with a fundraiser for
    the Bahamas Heart Founda-
    tion.

    During a press conference
    at the Bay Street branch yes-
    terday, Inga Bowleg, direc-
    tor of business development,
    said that there are many chil-
    dren in the community who
    have heart problems and
    need assistance.

    “Let us love the children
    and support them,” Ms Bow-
    leg said.

    John Bull is inviting its
    patrons and industry part-
    ners to give a gift of love this
    Valentine’s Day in support
    of the Sir Victor Sasson
    (Bahamas) Heart Founda-
    tion.

    The foundation, which was
    started by the wife of Sir Vic-
    tor Sasson, is a children’s

    charity that aims to
    assist children with heart
    problems.

    On the death of her hus-
    band, Lady Sasson requested
    that instead of sending flow-
    érs, friends should make
    donations to help children
    with heart problems.

    However, there was no
    heart foundation established
    at the time.

    Lady Sasson then travelled
    to Florida, where she attract-
    ed a team of specialists to
    conduct a clinic at the
    Princess Margaret Hospital.

    John Bull invites

    patrons, industry
    partners to give
    ‘sift of love’



    She later formed the Heart
    Foundation.

    According to Linda
    Lafleur, treasurer of the
    foundation, the organisation
    has helped many children.

    “The foundation is a chil-
    dren’s foundation. We repair
    the hearts of children,” Mrs
    LaFleur said.

    According to Mrs LaFleur,
    as of June of 2006, 15 hearts
    had been repaired at a cost
    over $300,000..

    Donations

    “It is donations like these
    (John Bull) that helps the
    foundation,” she said.

    Mrs Bowleg explained that
    each gift-giving season,
    patrons of John Bull expect a
    grand promotion which
    would somehow enable them
    to win fabulous products and
    services.

    But this year John Bull has
    decided to take another
    approach while celebrating
    Valentine’s Day.

    “As we prepare for the
    occasion of Valentine’s Day, |
    while we’re not offering
    prizes, we are certainly con-
    tinuing our efforts of corpo-
    rate social responsibility: by

    supporting children with |-|

    heart disease,” she said: «

    From January 31 to Feb-
    ruary 18, John Bull shoppers
    will be invited to make a
    donation of $1 to the foun-
    dation.

    A keepsake bracelet is
    being offered as a gift to all
    donors.

    All donations will be:pre-
    sented to the foundation to
    assist in defraying medical
    and surgical costs for chil-
    dren with heart diseases.

    John Bull will also provide
    the foundation with jewellery
    from David Yurman valued
    at around $2,500 to be fea-
    tured in a silent auction
    at their upcoming Heart
    Ball.

    The ball is scheduled for
    February 17 in the Crown

    Ballroom at Atlantis, Par- ..°:« "

    adise Island.
    THE TRIBUNE





    THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007, PAGE 13



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    THE TRIBUNE

    THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007, PAGE 15



    FROM page one

    would support a bill for the
    bridging of service if the con-
    ditions were clearly set out in
    the law without a requirement
    of the exercise of ministerial
    discretion.

    Discretion, he said, creates
    opportunities for “patronage,
    bias, unfairness, prejudice, dis-
    crimination and victimisation.”

    Mr Ingraham said the bill
    seeks to empower a minister to
    determine entitlement of civil
    servants who do not have the
    required number of years in
    the service to qualify for a pen-
    sion, to receive one nonethe-
    less if: a civil servant is retired
    from the public service for

    however long, or resigned '

    from the public service for
    however long.
    This bill will permit the min-

    ister to bridge the services of -

    persons already retired and
    who did not qualify under the
    pension law in effect at the
    time of their retirement.

    While the former prime
    minister indicated that the bill
    is intended to cure some of the
    defects with respect to public
    service pensions, he said the
    question arises as to how a
    person who has already retired
    from the public service and
    receives a gratuity and is in
    receipt of pension payments
    becomes entitled to have their
    previous services bridged and
    their entitlements re-calculat-
    ed.

    Presumably, Mr Ingraham
    said, this bill will apply to peo-
    ple currently in the service
    although he didn’t see any-
    thing in the bill that says it will



    i FNM leader
    Hubert Ingraham

    apply to persons now in the
    service.

    He also questioned what the
    cost of this legislation would
    be to the public treasury.

    The former prime minister
    said ‘that it would be to the
    parliament’s discredit if it
    passed into law a bill whose
    financial cost it was unable to
    reasonably determine and rea-

    sonably quantify.

    “Clearly we must at a mini-
    mum have information as to
    the number of persons who
    have applied to have their ser-
    vices bridged whose applica-
    tions were rejected. And clear-
    ly we ought to have the num-
    ber of potential eligible appli-

    cants under this Bill so we can ~

    figure out the likely cost of this

    matter,” Mr Ingraham said.
    The truth is, he said, there.is

    no way of knowing how much

    Ingraham accused of
    attempting to ‘destroy’
    fellow MP 23 years ago

    FROM page one

    cled at Christie, Ingraham and Co. Mr Ingraham and Mr Christie
    at that time got fired by (the late Sir Lynden) Pindling — for what-

    ever reason I don’t know.

    “To show you how vindictive the member of North Abaco was,

    he called me in his office and.he said: ‘I heard you support Mr Pin- ©

    dling firing me.’ I did not have a clue what Sir Lynden did or why

    he did it. He said that ‘from this day on you would never make __ |

    another dime from this office’.

    “I was making $100 per week doing all of the title searches, I

    worked for that. I left his office, he said nothing else to me. I went

    _ up to Mr Philip Davis’ (MP for Cat Island) office with tears in my

    eyes, four children to feed, my wife making less than $800 a month.

    “He (Ingraham) stopped the $100 a week I was getting as a law

    student and Philip Davis had to pay me out of his salary for the next
    one and a half years,” Mr Gray said.



    from people who are
    making news in their
    neighbourhoods. Perhaps
    7 you are raising funds for a
    , good cause, campaigning
    for improvements in the
    area or have won an
    award.

    If so, call us on 322- 1986
    and share your story.



    call us today! East Bay

    393- 8000

    Share your news

    The Tribune wants to hear _

















    Cable Be
    327-8000

    Marathon Mall
    . 393-8080

    LOCAL NEWS

    FNM leader hits out at proposed.
    Pensions Act amendments.

    money this bill will cost the
    Bahamian people or the num-
    ber of persons who will
    become entitled to benefit
    from its provisions and the
    effective date of their require-
    ment. _

    “T refuse to believe and
    accept that this Bill is the result

    of thoughtful consideration by .

    the majority. In my opinion,
    this Bill is politically driven.
    Once passed into law, rights
    will accrue to persons — the

    numbers we are unsure of —.

    and no government may in the
    future take those rights away,”
    the opposition leader said.
    Mr Ingraham said that,
    under existing public service
    policies, bridging a public offi-
    cer’s service arises mostly
    when an individual’s public
    service career is interrupted

    by: a period of private employ-

    ment; unemployment for
    domestic reasons, followed by
    a return to the service; med-
    ical/pregnancy or educational
    studies in cases where leave to
    do so was.denied or not
    obtained by the public service.

    He said that he had no
    objection to objective, non-dis-
    criminatory rules and criteria
    governing the bridging of ser-

    *Good while supplies last

    ©2007 CreativeRelations.net





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    Golden Gates
    __ 361-8000

    vices being placed in law.

    “T support such an initiative.
    I and we support extending
    the scope of the existing poli-
    cies as the present limit of two
    years absence in respect of
    study leave is inadequate.

    “It would be a good thing
    to have objective criteria
    established in law. It is not true
    to say a civil servant is not enti-
    tled to pension as the minis-
    ter said today. Civil servants
    are entitled to pensions,” Mr
    Ingraham said.

    However, he said that he
    objected most strenuously to
    the inclusion of a discretionary

    authority for a minister in the
    government to determine who —

    qualifies for bridging.

    “It has been my observation
    over the past 30 years or more
    that discretion does not gen-
    erally produce good gover-
    nance. It has been said before
    — give a man power and dis-

    cretion and whether he is a>
    politician or a civil servant.
    some will use their position to .
    reward friends or punish their,

    enemies or opponents,” he
    said.

    At the moment, he added, |
    it is the Governor General and.

    the Public Service Commis-

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    sion who determine pensions
    for public officers, and it is
    they, if the circumstances war-
    rant it, who would withhold a
    pension if a civil servant is
    found to have given disgrace-
    ful service.

    “I do not intend to delegate

    my parliamentary authority in ©

    respect of bridging civil ser-
    vice to any minister, let alone
    the minister that brought the
    Bill.

    “In short, the rules for the
    award of pensions in respect
    of unbroken continuous public
    service have been transparent
    and set out in the law,” Mr
    Ingraham said.

    This was, he said, the case
    during colonial times extend-
    ing all the way back to 1909.

    “None of the 16 amend-

    .ments to the Pension Act over

    the past 98 years have sought
    to change this or to insert or

    inject a minister into the law. -

    And TI do not support changing

    the law now to inject a minis-

    ter into the business of the
    award or non-award of pen-

    sions to civil servants,” Mr

    Ingraham said.

    The public service, he said,
    must not be politicised and no
    civil servant ought to depend















    | Sten Boheme:



    Bt lus a
    sa

    upon a minister for a
    favourable decision as to
    whether he/she gets a pension
    or not; the same applies to the
    amount of the pension.

    . “According to the MP for
    Fox Hill, the Minister for Pen-
    sions, a retired civil servant
    requesting ‘his assistance to
    have a legally due pension —a
    legal entitlement — received a
    favour when he caused the
    application to be processed.

    “Can you imagine the fate
    of those who make an appli-
    cation for which he needs to
    exercise discretion? I suppose
    such a person in his eyes would
    be indebted to him for life.

    “Discretion creates oppor-
    tunities for patronage, bias,
    unfairness, prejudice and dis-

    ' ‘crimination, and yes, victimi-

    sation.

    “At times like now, when
    we are approaching a general
    election, discretionary powers

    ‘ can/may and do subject minis-

    ters to untold pressures. Better
    that a minister not hold such
    discretionary powers lest
    he/she be persuaded to use
    them for reasons other than
    good order and governance of
    The Bahamas,” Mr Ingraham
    said. ;

    get the door...

    hie Btn







    | Quen s Hi bay
    352-3802


    PAGE 16, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007

    aa eel



    Claim that minimum |

    wage rise may make
    employers pay
    more of NHI plan

    FROM page one

    Mr Nutt said he would have
    thought they would have tried to
    marry the two (NHI and mini-
    mum wage) together.

    “The feedback we get froma
    lot of people on NHI is ‘where is
    the money going to come from,
    I need more money in order to
    pay it.”

    “Although it’s being touted
    as something that is being paid
    half by the employee and half
    by the employer this is a round-
    about way of making it so that
    the employer in effect pays for
    the whole amount by increas-
    ing the minimum wage,” he said.

    Minister Gibson on Monday
    night at the PLP’s branch meet-
    ing in Fox Hill announced that
    government intends to increase
    the $150 a week minimum wage
    and to ensure that it removes
    the “glass ceilings” which pre-
    vent Bahamians in their employ-
    ment progress.

    Mr Gibson said that govern-

    Airport

    FROM page one
















    said.

    The airport source said
    that The Tribune’s front
    page story on Wednesday
    about the delays in the
    long anticipated transfor-
    mation of LPIA was read
    with much excitement at
    the offices of the Airport
    Authority.

    “Someone needs to
    come out and express how
    frustrated we are,” he said.
























    tern #: 32833

    ment was currently in the final
    stages of reviewing an increase
    of the minimum wage, because
    “¢150 a week just doesn’t cut
    it.”

    Mr Nutt said yesterday that
    this move could lead to employ-
    ers hiring fewer people because
    of the greater expense.

    “The situation is that the
    more expensive it is to employ

    someone, the less likely it will be.

    for people to be employed,” he
    said.

    The BECon president said
    that employers could switch to
    technologies that would actual-
    ly reduce the requirements of
    manpower.

    “One of the things I would
    foresee happening is that as the
    cost of employing someone

    becomes greater and greater,
    more thought is going to be giv-
    en to labour-saving devices and
    labour-saving equipment so that
    persons can keep their payroll
    under control,” Mr Nutt said.

    In its proposal, the Blue Rib-
    bon Commission foresees
    employer and employee each
    paying a contribution of half of
    5.3 per cent of the employee’s
    salary.

    However, observers and the
    National Coalition for Health-
    care Reform have expressed
    concern about the findings of
    the International Labour Organ-
    isation (ILO) which projected
    that contributions rates to the
    NHI scheme would have to
    become “significantly higher”
    than the initial 5.3 per cent.

    Claim that PMH special
    procedures appointments
    cancelled due to training course

    FROM page one

    to be allocated for the appointment of additional staff to facilitate
    that delivery of new and pre-existing technology.

    As a result of the cancellations patients, who need to have pro-
    cedures, will either have to go to a private facility and pay full cost,
    or, they will have to wait until February 12th, which is when the
    medical staff is expected back from training.

    The source stated that this lack of strategic planning by the
    medical staff will lead poor patients to wait for crucial procedures
    — therefore, jeopardising the health of those who do not have the
    resources to go to a private facility.

    The administrative office at the hospital was unable to com-
    ment on the situation when The Tribune made inquiries.

    However, previous complaints have been made against the oper-
    ation of the Radiology Department.

    Previous claims suggested pati

    ents had to wait as long as six

    months for certain procedures at the Radiology Department.

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    Bahamas external economic Bahamas ‘caught in
    vulnerability drops to 14%

    @ By NEIL HARTNELL
    Tribune Business Editor

    he Bahamas’ external
    vulnerability indicator
    (EVI), indicating the
    economy’s vulnerabili-
    ty to external shocks,
    has fallen to 14 per cent, a Wall Street

    credit rating agency said, with the -

    Central Bank having “an ample cush-
    ion of international reserves” to meet
    refinancing or balance of payments
    needs in the near term.

    Moody’s, in its analysis of the
    Bahamian economy, said the EVI for
    this nation, one of the most vulnerable
    in the world to external shocks due to
    its openness and reliance on just a
    few industries, had halved since 2001,
    a year impacted by September 11,
    Hurricane Michelle and the Straw
    Market fire.

    In a boost to the current govern-
    ment and its handling of the economy,
    Moody’s said the Bahamas’ credit-
    worthiness was highlighted by the fact
    _ that the ratio of its external debt to
    gross domestic product (GDP) stood
    at just 9 per cent in 2006, “among the
    lowest in its broad peer group’ and
    well below the 37 per cent average
    for countries with Aa- and A- ratings.

    The Bahamas’ ratio of external
    debt to current account receipts was
    19 per cent, below the 53 per cent
    group average.

    The Moody’s report will again
    make it easier.for the Bahamas gov-
    ernment to raise capital on the inter-
    national markets if it so chose,
    through a mechanism such as a bond
    issue. The coupon, or interest rate
    attached to the bond, will also be rel-

    Tourism spending flat in 2006, says Wall Street credit
    rating agency, with nation behind peers on fiscal ratings

    atively low compared to most
    Caribbean nations, as this nation will
    be seen as a good risk, with a low
    detault risk.

    As a result, institutional investors
    will not demand as much compensa-
    tion for the .risk they would'take in
    investing in a sovereign Bahamas
    bond.

    However, Moody’s said the
    Bahamas’ fiscal ratios were “weak-
    er” than most of its category peers.

    The general government debt to
    GDP ratio stood at about 38 per cent
    of GDP in 2006, compared to the 19
    per cent median for Aa- and A- rated
    countries. Yet the Bahamas’ ratio was
    better than the 76 per cent and 74 per
    cent achieved by Barbados and Mal-
    ta respectively, which have “similar
    economies”

    Moody’s ‘added: “The Bahamas’
    government debt to revenue ratio of
    169 per cent in 2006 is much higher
    than the 67 per cent median for the
    Aa- and A- rated countries, but it is
    comparable, although lower than Mal-

    .ta’s 173 per cent.and considerably

    lower than Barbados’ 236 per cent.”

    The Wall Street credit rating
    agency described the Bahamas’ 2006-
    2007 fiscal year performance as “on
    track” for the first half, with revenues
    slightly ahead of projections and
    spending on target.

    It added: “Public sector wage

    growth has been restrained, and there
    are no signs of ramped up spending in
    the run-up to this year’s election.”

    Some 12 per cent of the Govern-
    ment’s debt was in foreign currency,
    compared to the 26 per cent category
    average. Moody’s added that tax rev-
    enues had risen faster than expected,
    up to 22 per cent of GDP from 17 per
    cent when the PLP government took
    power in May 2002.

    It attributed this to enhanced col-
    lection efficiency and compliance,
    coupled with increased customs and
    import duties, plus immigration fees,
    resulting from the high level of fpreign
    direct investment projects.

    However, Moody’s said “the
    urgency is not as great as before”
    when it came to reforming the
    Bahamian tax system, despite pres-
    sures from international trade bod-
    ies and agreements such as the World
    Trade Organisation (WTO) and the
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    (EPA) being. negotiated with the
    European Union.

    Meanwhile, Moody’s said tourism
    spending for 2006 was likely to be
    flat, standing at around 2005’s $2 bil-
    lion, although this represented a 25
    per cent increase over the trough
    experienced in 2001. The industry
    accounted for over 50 per cent of
    direct and indirect employment, and
    60 per cent of foreign exchange earn-

    ings.
    Yet stopover: arrivals ‘have not

    recovered from their high mark in the
    late 1990s”, the rating agency warned.
    “The policy challenges are now how
    to manage growth while maintaining
    economic and financial stability.
    Growth was led by construction and
    investment in housing and tourism in
    2006. This was strong enough to offset

    ‘flat tourism expenditure. Moody’s

    expects ongoing investment to keep
    economic growth on its current trend
    in 2006.”

    The Bahamas had a per capita
    GDP of almost $19,000 in 2006, the
    highest rating. among Caribbean

    ‘nations excluding British overseas ter-

    ritories, and above the $14,900 medi-
    an level for its Moody’s rating peer
    group.

    The rating agency added: “Not
    much is expected with regards to pri-
    vatisation of public sector companies.
    Bahamasair will likely remain state-
    owned, as the public-good aspect of
    ensuring transportation access to the
    Bahamas many remote and thinly
    populated islands outweighs the finan-
    cial inefficiency of the company. In
    addition, the airline’s well-compen-
    sated unions seem to have political
    clout. “There is a possibility that the
    Government may partially divest from
    the public telecom company, although
    this would not be imminent.”

    Devco ‘doing everything we can to close’
    ~~ Morgan Stanley and Raven projects _

    @ By NEIL HARTNELL
    Tribune Business Editor

    THE Grand Bahama Development Com-
    pany’s (Devco) president yesterday said
    the firm was “doing everything we possibly
    can to get” the potential investments by
    Morgan Stanley and the Raven Group .
    closed, althouen nothing had been signed

    yet.

    Graham Torode confirmed Tribune Busi-
    ness’s exclusive stories that Devco was in
    separate negotiations with both parties on
    potential tourism-related developments for

    Grand Bahama, with both itself and the
    ‘Grand Bahama Port.Authority “seeking to
    - attract high-end, residential tourism invest-
    ments to the island”.

    On the Raven Group project, which
    would involve the luxury boutique, high-
    end resort chain.Aman Resorts as its oper-
    ating partner if concluded, Mr Torode said:
    “We've been in discussions with them for
    over a year now. It’s more than explorato-
    ry, [but] there’s nothing signed, there’s noth-

    ing finalised.”

    The Tribune revealed yesterday that the
    Raven Group’s attorneys and representa-

    tives had visited Grand: Bahama over the
    past week in an attempt to progress their
    investment project, which involves luxury

    hotels and signature, luxury multi-million

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    The Raven Group project is understood
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    SEE page 9B



    an economic vortex’

    @ By NEIL HARTNELL
    Tribune Business Editor

    THE Bahamas is “caught in a clas-
    sic economic vortex”, the minister of
    state for finance said yesterday, its
    proximity to the efficient US economy
    making it easier for this nation’s busi-
    nesses to import products and ham-
    pering the development of indigenous
    industries such as agriculture.

    Commenting on the analysis of the
    Bahamian economy by Moody’s, the
    Wall Street credit rating agency, Mr
    Smith said the Bahamas’ high depen-
    dence on imports, and propensity to
    spend $0.8 of every $1 tourist dollar
    outside the country, contributed to
    its low ranking in some categories.

    This, and the Bahamian economy’s

    . openness, Mr Smith said, represented

    a “structural imbalance” in the
    Bahamian economy that this nation
    could do little to correct in the short-
    term until it created domestic indus-
    tries that would reduce the tourist
    dollar leakages.

    Moody’s described the Bahamas

    ‘as having “structural trade and cur-

    rent account deficits”, the size of
    which depended on tourism-related
    imports and construction material
    imports financed by foreign direct
    investment spending. ©

    It said the current account deficit
    for 2006 was likely to reach $1.5 bil-
    lion, an amount equivalent to 24 per
    cent or almost one quarter of gross
    domestic product (GDP), driven there
    by higher global oil prices and the
    rise in imported goods and services
    related to tourism investment pro-
    jects.

    Moody’s said in its analysis: “For-
    eign direct investment financed most
    of the current account deficit in 2005,
    but perhaps only half of the larger
    current account deficit in 2006.........

    “Bahamian banks also helped to
    finance some of the construction relat-
    ed imports in 2006. Foreign direct
    investment will likely rise substan-
    tially in the next several years, financ-
    ing correspondingly large ‘current
    account deficits driven by imports of
    materials and-service for new con-
    struction in the tourism sector.”

    - Moody’s said the Central Bank of
    the Bahamas seemed happy to keep
    its foreign exchange reserve holdings
    around $500 million, even though



    Current account
    deficit to hit $1.5 bn,
    some 24% of GDP

    @ JAMES SMITH

    these had come under pressure from
    credit demand and oil imports in 2006.

    Mr Smith said the Bahamas was
    “caught in a classical economic vortex,
    so to speak”, because it was “next
    door to one of the most efficient
    economies the world has ever seen,
    the US”.

    He added that due to this efficien-
    cy, it made more sense for Bahamian
    businesses to import products from
    the US, as they were more competi-
    tive on price and quality. Yet “on the
    other hand this hampers the devel-
    opment of our own sectors, particu-
    larly agriculture”.

    “We’ve been unable to reduce the
    ratio of imports to GDP,” Mr Smith
    said. “With our proximity to the US,
    it’s so much easier for local business:

    _ people to import rather than look at —¢
    alternative means of local production-- ~

    “When you make a decision like
    that, it’s on economics. It makes sense
    to get the best price, but on another
    level, you run the risk of over-depen-
    dence.”

    .

    Cabinet signs off on
    insurance regulations

    @ By NEIL HARTNELL
    Tribune Business Editor

    THE Cabinet has signed off on the
    accompanying regulations for the
    Domestic Insurance Act, which are
    required before that legislation can
    be implemented, and they are now
    before the Attorney General’s Office
    for “vetting”.

    Tribune Business’s contacts in the
    insurance industry confirmed to this
    newspaper that Dr Roger Brown, the
    Registrar of Insurance, had circulated
    a memorandum on Monday, January
    29, saying that the Attorney General’s
    Office was “now vetting them and

    getting them ready to table in the.

    House of Assembly”.

    While most said a review of the
    regulations indicated no changes had
    been made since an insurance indus-
    try working group went through them
    in late 2005, some sector sources
    expressed concern about whether they
    would see any amendments made by
    the Attorney General’s Office before
    they went before the House of

    Bahamas ‘not fully
    compliant’ on money
    transmission business
    regulation

    Assembly.

    James.Smith, minister of state for
    finance, whose ministry has regula-
    tory responsibility for the insurance
    industry, said the regulations.to give
    the Act ‘teeth’ had been delayed
    because of government concerns over
    “whether we have the administrative
    capacity” to enforce them.

    He added that before the Govern-
    ment.implemented the Act and the
    regulations, it had to “feel comfort-
    able we can administer it”.

    Mr Smith admitted that the Gov-

    SEE page 12B

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    PAGE 6B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007

    THE TRIBUNE



    NOTICE

    NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN of the loss of
    Bahamas Government Registered Stock Certificate
    as follows:

    Certificate No. Maturity Date Amount
    65-112 06 Sept 2021 218,400
    65-113 06 Sept 2022 81,600

    Bahamas Gov. Reg. Stock 0.375APR
    Bahamas Gov. Reg. Stock 0.40625 APR

    I intend to request The Registrar to issue a
    replacement certificate. If this certificate
    is found, please write to P.O. Box N7788,
    Nassau, Bahamas.

    APR=Approve Prime rate






    POSITION AVAILABLE |-




    ACCOUNTANT



    Responsibilities:
    ° Preparation of monthly financial statements.
    ° Reconciliation of general ledger accounts.

    e Preparation of work papers for auditors.

    © Report directly to Financial Controller.








    Qualifications:
    e Three years work experience in a similar position.
    e Proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel.
    © Ability to work with minimal supervision.









    Benefits:
    Salary is based on skills and experience. Other
    benefits include health insurance and pension.




    All interested accountants should mail their resumes to:







    H.R. Manager
    PO. Box N-4036 °*
    Nassau, Bahamas




    Fax to: (242) 364-6084







    RBC ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
    is presently considering applications for




































    Senior Manager & Deputy,
    Group Risk Management
    Risk Management,
    Caribbean Banking

    The successful candidate should possess the following

    qualifications:

    e Degree in Banking, Finance or Accounting

    ‘e Three or more years experience in a Risk Management

    environment with responsibility for large credit approval

    Proven experience in Corporate Risk Management and

    seasoned in Problem Loan Management

    ¢ Proficiency with Bank technology

    ° Teamwork & Co-operation

    Initiative

    e Impact and Influence

    ¢ Thinking skills (analytical, breakthrough, conceptual and
    strategic)

    e Leadership

    e Experience in developing and delivering training programs
    for commercial account managers

    Responsibilities include:

    © Acting as Deputy for Head of Risk Management, Caribbean
    Banking.

    ¢ Adjudicating credit for Corporate accounts throughout the
    Caribbean Banking Region within a delegated lending limit
    of $5MM, providing work ups as required for applications
    over that limit.

    ¢ Fulfilling Special Loans functions for all Watch Listed
    accounts over $500M, developing strategies in concert with
    account management and overseeing their execution.

    © Developing Credit Policy for Caribbean Banking Region
    through reviewing RBC Canadian policy, determining
    applicability/relevance under Caribbean environment,
    obtaining approval/exceptions as required.

    e Identifying credit learning gaps within Commercial account
    management teams and develops and conducts training
    initiatives/programs to address these deficiencies.

    A competitive compensation package (base salary & bonus)
    commensurate with relevant experience and qualifications.

    Please apply before February 9, 2007 to:
    Regional Manager

    Human Resources

    Caribbean Banking

    Royal Bank of Canada

    Bahamas Regional Office

    P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, N.P, Bahamas





    Via fax: (242)328-7145
    Via email: bahcayjp@rbc.com



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    Abaco Markets sees
    7.9% sales rise despite
    continuing losses

    ABACO Markets attempted
    to accentuate the positive with
    its third quarter results
    announcement for the year to
    January 31, 2007, pointing to
    increased sales and reduced

    losses despite suffering a

    $753,000 net loss.

    That represented an almost
    40 per cent decline on the
    $1.248 million net loss sus-
    tained in the three months to
    October 31, 2005, with the
    BISX-listed retailer pointing
    to a net margin increase, from
    27.7 per cent to 28.8 per cent,
    as further signs that it was
    making “sustained progress”
    in its seemingly never-ending
    turnaround programme that is
    running into its fourth year.

    Abaco Markets’ net operat-
    ing loss on continuing opera-
    tions for the 2007 third quarter
    was $234,000, a more than 50
    per cent decline compared toa
    loss of $473,000 the previous
    year.

    The operating loss on con-
    tinuing operations for the first
    nine months was even better,
    standing at $69,000 compared
    to a loss of $805,000 for the
    same period in 2005.

    Gavin Watchorn, Abaco
    Markets’ president, said in a
    statement: “We have record-
    ed a net loss on continuing
    operations of $234,000 com-
    pared to a reported loss of
    $473,000 for the same period of
    the previous year, while our
    year-to-date operating Joss on



    PUBLIC NOTICE

    -Ben-Bo Collection &



    & GAVIN WATCHORN
    (FILE photo)

    continuing operations ‘is
    $69,000, compared to a loss of
    $805,000 for the same period
    of the previous year.

    He added that Abaco Mar-
    Kets’ year-to-date net loss was
    $1.137 million on continuing
    operations, compared to a net
    loss of $2.117 million in the
    previous year prior to receiving
    one-off insurance proceeds of
    $3 million. These were relat-
    ed to 2004 hurricane-related
    insurance recoveries, helping
    to boost 2005’s figures into a
    net profit.

    The retail group’s sales fig-
    ures are trending positively,

    Management Company Ltd

    wish to inform the public that

    BRIDGETTE ROLLE

    is no longer employed with us.
    She is no longer authorized to do
    business for and on behalf of

    eu BEN-BO COLLECTION &
    t+ MANAGEMENT COMPANY LTD.

    CAREER OPPORTUNITY
    Senior Trust Officer

    Requirements:

    Professional qualification-STEP accreditation or ACIB

    Trustee Diploma

    Minimum five years experience in trust administration at

    senior level

    Ability to work independently

    Strong knowledge of offshore jurisdictions
    Strong knowledge of fiduciary offshore trust and corporate

    procedures
    Excellent PC skills

    Excellent command of the English Language, both written

    and oral

    e Ability to work effectively as a member of team:

    Personal Attributes:

    e Excellent work attitude, punctuality and attendance record
    ¢ Ability to interact with others in a professional manner

    e Ability to prioritize tasks

    e Ability to work with minimal supervision
    e Ability to learn new tasks quickly

    We offer an excellent remuneration an benefits package that
    includes medical insurance, performance based incentive

    and a pension plan.

    Interested persons should submit complete resumes in
    writing along with supporting documents to:

    Human Resources
    The Private Trust Corporation Limited
    P.O.Box N-65
    Fax 326-8388

    Deadline 28th February 2007





    and were ahead of 2005 com-

    . paratives by $3.964 million or

    7.9 per cent for the nine
    months to October 31, 2006.
    For the.third quarter, they
    were ahead by 6 per cent or
    $1.027 million.

    And Abaco Markets’ debt
    was further reduced by
    $716,000 during the third quar-
    ter.

    ‘The margin increase was
    achieved despite what were

    ‘described as ‘inflationary pres-

    sures’, as Mr Watchorn said
    “every step” of their opera-
    tions was affected by the oil
    price increase in 2006. He said
    the recent decrease in oil prices
    has yet to trickle down.

    “We are very focused on
    tackling this though buying and
    logistics, along with stream-
    lining all other operational
    costs so that the impact is min-
    imisied and we remain com-
    petitive and deliver real value
    to our customers every day,”
    he added.

    While Abaco Markets’

    expenses increased in dollar
    terms, they remained the same
    as a percentage of sales.

    The increase in year-to-date

    costs of $589,000 was attrib-
    uted to increases in utility
    costs, which rose by over
    $600,000 compared to 2005.
    Abaco Markets said signifi- -
    cant elements contributing to
    the net loss for the group
    included interest costs of
    $368,000, as well as discontin-
    uing operations of $151,000.
    “We are progressing well in
    our divestment as we continue
    to focus on our core markets to
    improve our operations, con-
    trol costs and, most impor-
    tantly, improve our customer’s
    experience by delivering qual-
    ity products at real value every
    day,” said Craig Symonette,

    Abaco Markets’ chairman and

    chief executive said.

    “We are steadily regaining
    the market share lost in the
    past and rebuilding the confi-
    dence our customers have in
    our stores. Obviously there is
    still much work to be done.
    However, the sustained
    improvement we are seeing in
    our operations indicates that
    we are heading in the right
    direction and provides a good
    foundation to build upoun in
    the coming year.”

    ok/ Baker with 10 years or more ex
    35 to 45 must be responsible and fl

    dd persons may contact Mr. Avar

    os Tel: 394-0052 -

    Please leave name %

    Help Wanted



    Dental Office seeking applicants for the following positions:

    The applicant must possess the following:

    Dental Assistant

    Minimum of two years experience
    Good communicator

    Team player

    Good people skills

    Fax resume to 393-5802

    Office Administrative Assistant
    INCOR UPON NON ASH
    Minimum of 2 years experience in office administration

    Must be a good communicator, team player, and able to multi task

    Possess excellent organizational skills, good people skills and experience with
    Microsoft Word.

    Fax resume to 393-5802



    Temfole Christian High School

    _ “Teach Me, O Lond, Thy Way" ...Prabn 9:33

    TEMPLE CHRISTIAN
    HIGH SCHOOL

    ENTRANCE
    EXAMINATION

    Temple Christian High School will hold
    its Entrance Examination on Saturday

    February 10th, 2007 at the school on Shirley
    Street from 8:00 a.m. - 12 noon for students
    wishing to enter grades 7,8,9 and 10.

    Application forms are available at .the
    High School Office. The application fee
    is. twenty dollars ($20.00). Application
    forms should be returned to the school
    on or before Friday, February 9th, 2007.

    For Further Information

    please call
    394-4481 or call 394-4484

    Our school is a member of the
    Association of Christian Schools International
    THE TRIBUNE

    PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007

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    COMMONWEALTH
    Bank’s net income increased
    by 27 per cent to $40.4 million
    for its 2006 fiscal year, gener-
    ating its 10th consecutive year
    of record growth and profits.

    The increase upon 2005’s
    $31.8 million net income was
    driven by a 16.4 per cent rise in
    gross revenues to $81.6 million
    for the 12 months to Decem-
    ber 31, 2006.

    In a statement, Common-
    wealth Bank said it had gen-
    erated strong efficiency ratios
    to reap a nearly 50 per cent
    profit on those revenues, with
    its BISX share price on Tues-
    day standing at a 52-week high
    of $13.10.

    Return on assets, among the
    most common measurements
    of commercial bank efficien-
    cy, was 3.76 per cent, a 9.9 per
    cent increase over 2005.
    Return on equity was 34.82 per
    cent? a rise of 4.2 per cent.

    ’ Meanwhile, Commonwealth
    Bank said its overall efficiency
    ratio, which accounts for non-
    interest expenses compared to
    revenues, stood at 46.7 per
    cent.

    Meanwhile, earnings per
    share (EPS) rose to $1.08 in
    fiscal 2006, compared to $0.85
    the year before, a 27 per cent
    rise and more than double the
    $0.48 EPS achieved in 2004.

    Commonwealth Bank’s
    assets at year-end stood at
    $1.018 billion,a rise of more
    than $140 million upon: the
    previous year’s $863 million,
    due to growth in its long-term
    loan and mortgage portfolios,
    coupled with enhanced con-
    sumer lending and savings.

    “Sustainable growth does
    not come easily, requiring con-
    stant vigilance and focus on



    mT B DONALDSON

    fundamental strengths, while

    ’ ensuring sufficient investment
    to address strategic initiatives

    and anticipated market devel-
    opments,” said the bank’s
    chairman, TB Donaldson,
    CBE.

    “As the new year began, we

    opened our latest New Provi- -

    dence branch at Golden Gates,

    International
    Certification
    in



    (FILE photo)

    a firm commitment to our cus-
    tomers to be the leader in per-
    sonal banking by taking bank-
    ing to the people who have
    wholeheartedly supported this
    Bahamian institution.”

    The $3 million branch takes
    the bank’s total network to 10,
    spread across New Providence,
    Grand Bahama and Abaco. : °

    :
    wa





    We are expanding our capabilities in wealth management and are now seeking to recruit
    seasoned financial advisers who have the gravitas and expertise to contribute significantly
    to the growth of AUM by developing investment relationships with HNWIs, professional
    trustees and COIs.







    How You will :
    You will understand what “projects” are, and how they are becoming a
    part of organizational thinking.
    You will identify your role as project manager and the skills required of .
    you..
    You will recognize the steps you must take to keep budgets on track
    and on budget.






    Qualifications:

    ’

























    s Recognised Financial Planning or Investment qualification (e.g. FPC or CFA). identify the key factors in project success
    a Qualification in Banking, Law or Accounting. , : stan rae é
    ® ‘A self-motivator with excellent sales management and business development skills. vee ote itil Be oe oA ae ‘
    " Detailed and technical knowledge of investment management and the investment cee ce ecome more skilled at presenting ideas and asking for
    product range as it relates to non-residents/ non-nationals, HNWIs, trustees and You'wil identify techniqués for bench marking your
    COIs. sige
    " Full awareness of the local and international competitive environments. oe
    : Good understanding of the qualitative and quantitative aspects of investment a
    management including, Alfa, Beta and Total Return considerations and analytical What's Included?
    depth in respect of their impact on sector allocations and individual stock picks. ¢ Instruction by an expert
    a Sound experience in global capital markets. certified lecturer -

    Small interactive classes
    Classroom Project
    Exercises and Tests

    General Requirements/Responsibilities:

    a Must have a minimum of 5 years international investment portfolio management Specialized Student
    or financial advisory experience. ;
    : . . as . : ’ e ’
    a Must be able to deliver a high level of expert investment advice and service with nee Soa Nc ane

    the aim of developing significant sales and new business, covering investment and
    fiduciary services and the cross-selling of other banking services.

    a Proven track record in providing investment recommendations to both corporate
    and personal clients as well as client performance reporting. This includes a full
    understanding of the mathematical and statistical basis of portfolio diversification.

    Project Management
    Guides.

    Personalized certificate of
    completion

    a. Must be totally at ease with the concept of personal affluence and high-net worth °
    clients. FEES: $895.00 per person, plus
    " Experience of, or at least be at ease with clients from differing social, religious, applicable Guides. *Prices and dates

    ethnic and cultural backgrounds. are subject.to change.

    Experience of selling other banking and / or regulated products is desirable



    Remuneration:

    ° Salary commensurate with the position’s seniority level 8 (The Bank has 11 pay

    Lignum Institute of Technology (L.I-T.)

    levels). i
    ° Benefits- includes a car allowance, variable incentive pay (bonus) and preferred Course Starting Feb. 1 3th, 2007
    loan rates i (Every Tues. & Thurs. from 6:00p.m. to 8:00p.m.)

    for 8 weeks




    Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter via email by February
    9", 2007 to: deangelia.deleveaux@FirstCaribbeanBank.com

    FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for their interest,
    however only those under consideration will be contacted.

    OT ETRE


    BUSINESS —

    _sgogannar AA NNR RAR MA REESE TERE TN

    The Miami Herald

    THE MARKETS
    STOCKS, MUTUAL FUNDS, 5-6B

    DOW 30 12,621.69 +98.38 AX
    SaP 500 1,438.24 +9.42 Ad
    NASDAQ 2,463.93 +15.29 AX
    10-YR NOTE 481 -06 W
    CRUDE OIL 58.14 +117

    Stocks
    rise on
    healthy
    outlook

    BY TIM PARADIS
    Associated Press

    NEW YORK — Stocks shot
    higher Wednesday after the
    Federal Reserve answered two
    of Wall Street’s major concerns,

    indicating that the economy
    remains healthy and that infla-
    tion pressures are easing. The.

    ' Dow Jones industrials climbed
    nearly 100 points to set another
    trading high, while the Russell
    2000 index had its first close
    above 800.

    The Fed, which issued its
    economic assessment as it
    decided to leave short-term
    interest rates unchanged, said
    recent indicators “suggested.
    somewhat firmer economic
    growth” and tentative signs of
    stabilization in the housing mar-
    ket.

    Wall Street had expected the
    Fed’s Open Market Committee
    would leave short-term interest
    rates unchanged for the fifth
    straight meeting. But investors
    had been uneasy about the cen-
    tral bank’s economic assess-
    ment statement and whether it:
    would indicate that policy mak-
    ers were considering raising ~
    interest rates in the near future
    because the-economy and/or
    inflation has been growing too
    fast.

    The Dow rose 98.38, or 0.79
    percent, to 12,621.69. The Dow
    came with a few decimal points
    of a week-old closing high and.
    set a new trading high of
    12,657.02. The previous trading
    high set Jan. 24 was 12,623.45;
    the Dow’s record close remains
    12,621.77.

    Broader stock indicators also
    spurted higher. The Standard &
    Poor’s 500 index rose 9.42, or’
    0.66 percent, to 1,438.24 and the
    Nasdaq composite index gained
    15.29, or 0.62 percent, to finish at
    2,463.93.

    The Fed’s comments pushed
    the Russell 2000 index of
    smaller companies above the |
    800 mark to a record close; it
    finished up 2.37, or 0.30 percent,
    at 800.34. Its previous high was
    Tuesday.

    For the first month of the
    year, the Dow rose 1.27 percent,
    while the S&P gained 1.41 per-
    cent and the tech-dominated
    Nasdaq added 2.01 percent.

    Bond prices rose sharply fol-
    lowing the Fed’s’ statement, —
    with the yield on the benchmark
    10-year Treasury note falling to
    4.82 percent from 4.88 percent
    late Tuesday. The dollar was
    mixed against other major cur-
    rencies, while gold prices rose.

    Light, sweet crude settled up
    $1.17 at $58.14 per barrel on the
    New York Mercantile
    Exchange.

    ' Stocks, which had been
    mixed on lighter-than-normal
    trading ahead of the rate deci-
    sion, had found some support
    earlier Wednesday as the econ-
    omy gave off fresh signs it could
    sidestep a sharp slowdown. The
    Commerce Department found
    the economy, as measured by
    gross domestic product, grew at
    3.5 percent annual rate in the
    fourth quarter as consumers
    increased spending despite a
    pullback in the housing market.

    Advancing issues outnum-
    bered decliners by about 2 to 1
    on the New York Stock
    Exchange, where volume came
    to 1.72 billion shares compared
    with 1.53 billion Tuesday.

    Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei
    stock average closed down 0.61
    percent. Britain’s FTSE 100
    closed down 0.62 percent, Ger-
    many’s DAX index finished up
    0.01 percent, and France’s
    CAC-40 was down 0.66 percent.









    FEDERAL RESERVE





    oe



    Fed holds interest rates steady

    i The Federal Reserve kept the
    benchmark U.S. interest rate at
    5.25 percent, declaring that
    inflation is slowing ‘modestly’
    even as the economy picks up
    speed.

    BY JEANNINE AVERSA
    Associated Press

    WASHINGTON — Pointing to a
    revved-up economy and encouraging
    news on inflation, the Federal
    Reserve held interest rates steady on
    Wednesday and extended a half-year
    breather for U.S. borrowers. Wall





    I want ‘to join the conversation
    taking place in Pamela Fero’s liv-
    ing room. But to make room for
    myself on the couch I must push
    aside Christmas lights, bags of
    beads, kids’ school papers and toy
    trains. I clear a spot just big
    enough for my rear to hang over
    the edge of the
    cushion.

    Around us,
    evidence of
    Pamela’s busy life
    covers most sur-
    faces — granite
    kitchen counters
    - peek out from
    piles of papers
    and unopened
    bills. The mother of six tells me
    the clutter makes her uncomfort-
    able inviting guests over. Only 39
    years old, this air traffic controller
    wants more organization in her
    life and South Florida home.

    With me is Diane Hatcher, a
    no-nonsense eee at pene



    CINDY KRISCHER
    “GOODMAN

    cgoodman@
    MiamiHerald. GoM

    PHOTOGRAPHY

    Street surged in response.

    Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke and
    his central bank colleagues left an
    important interest rate unchanged at
    5.25 percent, the fifth straight meeting
    without budging the rate. The deci-
    sion was unanimous.

    That means commercial banks’
    prime interest rate — for certain
    credit cards, home equity lines of
    credit and other loans — stays at 8.25
    percent, once again giving a break to
    borrowers who until last summer had
    endured the pain of two-plus ree s of
    rate increases.



    Fed policymakers delivered a
    more positive assessment. of the
    economy than in December, recog-
    nizing improvements in economic
    growth, inflation and even the trou-
    bled housing sector.

    “Overall, the economy seems
    likely to expand at a moderate pace
    over coming quarters,” they said.

    The Fed also observed that core
    inflation, which excludes energy and
    food prices, has “irnproved modestly
    in recent months.” That was an
    upgrade from December when poli-

    readings on underlying inflation.

    They continued to note that infla-
    tion risks remain, keeping open the
    possibility of a rate increase. Still,
    with the Fed’s fairly upbeat assess-
    ment, many economists bélieve rates
    are likely to remain where they are
    for much of this year.

    “I think they are taking a slightly |
    softer stance on inflation. They are
    not as concerned about inflation as
    they were last year,” said Victor Li,
    associate professor of economics at |

    * TURN TO RATES

    cymakers fretted about “elevated”

    PHOTOS BY J. ALBERT DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF

    TAKING CHARGE: Professional organizer Diane Hatcher, top left, offers pointers on sorting the
    clutter to Pamela Fero as Fero’s 3-year-old son, Quentin, vies for his mother’s attention. Ina
    more relaxed moment, the two women file Fero’s paperwork, below.

    COACHED BY PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZER DIANE HATCHER,
    THE FERO FAMILY SORTS THROUGH THE MESS AND RESTORES



    ORDER





    ns

    space and time. Hatcher, a former
    school teacher and owner of
    TimeSavers Professional Organiz-
    ing Services, quizzes Pamela on
    her goals and gauges her desire



    for change.

    The two decide first to focus

    on clearing the active area of

    ° TURN TO BALANCING ACT



    fi
    ae,

    US Airways
    pulls Delta



    bid; creditors

    reject merger

    i US Airways Wednesday withdrew
    its $10 billion hostile takeover bid of
    Delta Air Lines after being informed
    that the bankrupt carrier’s creditors
    were not interested in pursuing a
    deal.

    BY HARRY R. WEBER
    Associated Press

    ATLANTA — Delta rallied employ-
    ees, lawmakers and customers to its side
    for more than two months to hammer
    home the belief that US Airways’ pro-
    posal to buy the bankrupt carrier would
    be bad for everyone involved.

    But in defeating the hostile bid
    Wednesday, the regulatory angle may
    have been Delta’s most successful drum-
    beat.

    A key group of Delta’s creditors said
    in endorsing Delta’s stand-alone plan
    Wednesday that it considered, among
    other things, the risks associated with

    ‘and the likelihood of a successful con-

    summation of US Airways’ proposal.

    Analysts had said regulatory concerns
    over US Airways’ proposal might be a
    bigger issue than the $9.8 billion US Air-
    ways was offering for Delta. Delta had
    said the US Airways proposal would
    cause a significant delay in Delta’s emer-
    gence from Chapter 1] because of how
    regulators would view the overlapping
    routes of the.two carriers. US Airways
    had argued regulatory i issues would not
    cause a.delay..

    But in the end, US Airways dropped
    its hostile bid after Delta’s official cgm-
    mittee of unsecured creditors said the
    carrier would be better off emerging
    from Chapter 11 on its own.

    With the dual decisions, Atlanta-based
    Delta cleared a big hurdle in its effort to
    exit bankruptcy by the middle of this
    year as a stand-alone company.

    But it isn’t out of the woods yet.
    Smaller creditors could ultimately vote
    not to approve Delta’s reorganization
    plan, and some have already filed objec-
    tions to the disclosure statement to the
    Delta plan.

    A Feb. 7 hearing in bankruptcy court
    in New York is scheduled to discuss the
    disclosure statement. If the statement
    related to Delta’s operations is approved,
    Delta could begin soliciting votes for
    approval of its reorganization plan. Delta
    hopes to hold a confirmation hearing on
    its plan in April.

    * TURN TO AIRLINES

    Kodak posts first profit in nine quarters

    i Eastman Kodak, the world’s
    largest pnotography company,
    posted its first profit in nine
    quarters on higher revenue from
    photo kiosks and savings from

    - firing workers.

    BY BEN DOBBIN
    Associated Press

    ROCHESTER, N.Y. — After wad-
    ing through a river of red ink for two
    years, Eastman Kodak finally hauled
    in a modest profit in the fourth quar-
    ter. For the first time, it also gener-
    ated more earnings from digital pho-
    tography and commercial printing
    than from its storied film business.

    The world’s top maker of photo-
    graphic film earned $16 million, or 6
    cents a share, in the October-Decem-
    ber period. That compared to a year-
    ago loss of $46 million, or 16 cents a
    share, when Kodak took hefty

    is



    charges linked to its mammoth, four-
    year digital overhaul, which it aims to
    wrap up this year.

    Sales fell 9 percent to $3.821 billion
    from $4.197 billion largely because of
    its emphasis on improving digital
    profit margins, such as focusing more
    on the higher-end camera market.

    Excluding one-time items, Kodak
    beat Wall Street expectations by
    earning $169 million, or 59 cents a
    share, in the quarter. Analysts sur-
    veyed by Thomson Financial had
    forecast earnings of 55 cents a share,
    but they also anticipated higher sales
    of $3.94 billion.

    The company’s shares rose 46
    cents, or 1.8 percent, to $25.98 in
    afternoon trading on the New York
    Stock Exchange. They have traded in
    a 52-week range of $18.93 to $30.91.

    * TURN TO KODAK





    DAMIAN DOVARGANES/AP

    BACK IN BLACK: The new Kodak EASYSHARE V1003 Zoom 10.0
    megapixel digital cameras are showcased at the 2007 International
    Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas last month.




    4B_| THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007

    SUPER BOWL

    INTERNATIONAL EDITION



    d.com_| THE MIAMI HERALD



    Fans snap up big TVs for the big game

    BY DAVE CARPENTER
    Associated Press

    CHICAGO — Mark Smithe
    admits to a moment of doubt
    before shelling out $10,000 for
    a 65-inch high-definition, flat-
    panel, plasma TV and related
    gear last week.

    The hesitation was brief.
    He’s a Bears fan, after all, and
    what better way to experience
    the Super Bowl than to see and
    hear every Brian Urlacher
    glare and crunching hit
    through a system with 2 mil-
    lion pixels and theater-quality
    speakers?

    “It’s a little bit of keeping
    up with the Joneses,” said
    Smithe, one of an estimated 2.5
    million Americans purchasing
    a new television for Super
    Bowl Sunday, based on results
    of a recent survey. “Our
    friends’ jaws are going to drop
    when they see this.”

    Just buying chip and dip
    and a 12-pack of beer doesn’t
    cut it for Super Bowl parties
    any more. If you expect your

    friends and neighbors to,

    choose your place for the big
    game, you may have to pony
    up for a flat-screen TV, digital
    tuner and surround-sound
    speakers so they can spectate

    BALANCING ACT

    ‘ with quality.

    Sunday’s showdown
    between the Bears and India-
    napolis Colts is amplifying a
    high-definition TV buying
    frenzy that already was under
    way thanks to a 20 percent to
    30 percent drop in prices from
    a year ago and heavy promo-
    tions by retailers and manu-
    facturers.

    “A lot of people want them
    and they’ve been waiting for
    prices to come down,” said
    Mike Gatti, executive director
    of the Retail Advertising and
    Marketing Association, which
    conducted the nationwide sur-
    vey on consumers’ TV buying
    intentions in early January.
    “They’re still not cheap, but
    they’re starting to get within
    range of people who are say-
    ing ’Gee I’m going to get one

    29

    now.

    SURGING DEMAND

    In Chicago, where the Bears
    are making their first Super
    Bowl appearance in 21 years,
    flashy flat-panel sets are in
    demand like never before. A
    surge in business that fol-
    lowed the team’s Jan. 21 vic-
    tory in the NFC championship
    game generated holiday-sized

    Family works to
    conquer clutter

    * BALANCING ACT

    Fero’s home — the kitchen,
    family room and living room.
    Hatcher will teach Pamela a
    filing system to ensure
    appointments get kept, field
    trip forms get completed and
    bills get paid on time. Hatcher
    also will show Pamela how to
    improve her daily to-do list.

    “The biggest challenge is
    there is not enough of me to
    go around,” Pamela says. “I
    feel overwhelmed.”

    To get started on the bal-
    ance makeover, Hatcher and
    Pamela attack a plastic bin on
    the couch by putting items in
    the rooms they need to go —
    Christmas ornaments in the
    garage, toys in the kids rooms.
    “Put like with like,” Hatcher
    says. “Everything needs a
    home, even if that means it
    gets tossed in a junk drawer.”

    More advice from Hatcher:
    “If something is broken, it
    goes right to the garbage. If it
    hasn’t been used in a while,
    ask yourself, ‘What’s the
    worst thing that could happen
    if I didn’t have the item. Can I

    borrow it from someone? Is it |

    worth taking up space?’ ”

    ‘PACK RAT’.

    This isn’t going to be easy,
    Pamela says. “My husband is a
    pack rat.”

    AIRLINES

    Delta
    creditors
    reject
    merger

    ° AIRLINES

    US Airways disclosed its
    initial hostile bid for Delta on
    Nov. 15. US Airways later
    raised its bid by nearly 20 per-
    cent in hopes of swaying Del-
    ta’s official committee of
    unsecured creditors.

    “Using the bankruptcy pro-
    cess the right way, Delta peo-
    ple have transformed their
    company’s business model,”
    Delta Chief Executive Gerald

    Grinstein said in a statement. -

    “Our focus now is on the
    work still before us to emerge
    from Chapter 11 this spring. as
    a strong, healthy, and vibrant
    global competitor.”

    In his own statement, Doug
    Parker, chief executive of
    Tempe, Ariz.-based US Air-
    ways, said he was disap-

    pointed by the decision by the |

    creditors committee. His air-
    line quickly withdrew its bid,
    which was set to expire
    Thursday if the committee
    did not show support for
    moving the bid forward.
    Parker said the committee

    Husband Terry works the
    night shift seven days a week
    as a mechanic for Coca-Cola.
    On this morning, Terry enter-
    tains the couple’s youngest,
    3-year-old Quentin, with an
    interactive TV learning game.
    Hatcher insists that Pamela
    urge Terry to share responsi-
    bility for putting things back
    where they go and getting rid
    of things they don’t need.

    “You will feel calmer when
    the space you live in is
    cleared,” Hatcher says.

    Moving on, Hatcher wants
    Pamela to tackle the piles of
    paper. Two of Pamela’s six
    children now are adults and
    have moved out. But three are
    school age — Keenen, 14;
    Warren, 8; and Monika, 6 —
    and bring home forms to sign,
    homework to peruse and invi-
    tations to put on the calendar.

    We sit around the dining-
    room table, the only clutter-
    free surface I saw. Pamela
    lugs over a stack of paper-
    work from various rooms.
    Like Mary Poppins pulling
    from her bottomless carpet-
    bag, Hatcher yanks out plastic
    trays, a label maker and
    manila file folders to devise a
    paperwork system.

    Hatcher stacks the trays
    four high and labels them: To
    Do, To Read, To File, Miscel-
    laneous. When sorting,







    NAM Y. HUH/AP

    BIG PURCHASES: Shoppers examine large-screen TVs at
    Abt Electronics in Glenview, Ill. This year, an estimated
    2.5 million people will buy a new TV for the Super Bowl.

    crowds of customers in the
    home theater departments of
    Best Buy stores for days,
    according to the nation’s larg-
    est consumer electronics
    retailer.

    Some buyers weren't wait-
    ing for installation appoint-
    ments. Rushing to properly
    equip their homes for parties,
    many shoppers said they

    would stand their flat-panel
    sets on the floor for the game
    and get them properly
    mounted later, according to
    Mike Obucina, a supervisor at
    a store on the city’s northwest
    side.

    “Because the Bears won, it
    literally made people say I’m
    done waiting, I’m going to go
    get my flat-panel TV,” he said.



    Abt Electronics, a gigantic
    family-run store in north sub-
    urban Glenview, IIl., that
    claims to sell more televisions
    than any other single store in
    the country, sold about 170
    large-screen TVs a day in Jan-
    uary during a traditionally
    slow month gone crazy. That
    made it its busiest month ever
    for TV sales.

    Money isn’t necessarily an
    object. On one recent day at
    the showroom filled with
    high-def goodies, shoppers
    were examining 50-inch tele-
    visions by Bang & Olufsen for
    $20,000 and even an 80-inch
    set dubbed “The Ultimate
    Plasma TV” for $150,000.

    “People don’t care about
    price,” Mike Abt, president of
    the business his grandmother
    founded in 1936, said happily.
    “They’re asking the salesmen
    what’s the highest-quality set.”

    Even the non-wealthy can
    afford a quality system,
    although it will get a little pric-
    ier once Super Bowl sales end.

    Among the biggest sellers
    for the month, retailers say,
    have been 42-inch high-defini-
    tion sets for as little as $1,000.
    Or on an unlimited budget you
    can always fork over $200,000





    J. ALBERT DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF

    GROUP EFFORT: Standing in the messy family room of their home, Terry and Pamela
    Fero and their son, Quentin, are determined to get their lives organized.

    Hatcher gives these tips:

    e With invitations or
    papers about upcoming
    school events, the’ date goes
    on the calendar, RSVPs are
    made, and then they go in an
    upcoming events folder in the
    miscellaneous tray

    e Recipes are tossed or
    placed near cookbooks

    e Manuals are saved ina
    folder in a file cabinet

    e Receipts are stapled to
    warranties and also filed.

    With a garbage can next to
    her, Pamela sorts and tosses.

    To track appointments,
    Pamela uses a PDA. Hatcher
    wants Pamela to keep a writ-
    ten daily to-do list and num-



    “is ignoring its fiduciary obli-
    gation” to the creditors it rep-
    resents.

    “Our proposal would have
    provided substantially more
    value to Delta’s unsecured
    creditors than the Delta stan-
    dalone plan,” Parker said.

    Delta’s official unsecured
    creditors committee said ina
    statement it reached its deci-
    sion after a lengthy review of
    both Delta’s proposal and US
    Airways’ proposal.

    Analysts had said regula-
    tory concerns over US Air-
    ways’ proposal might be a big-
    ger issue than the money at
    stake. Delta had said the US
    Airways proposal would
    cause a significant delay in
    Delta’s emergence from
    Chapter 11 because of how
    regulators would view the
    overlapping routes of the two
    carriers.

    Delta has said it projects it
    will be worth $9.4 billion to

    ~<.



    KAREN BLEIER/AFP-GETTY IMAGES FILE

    FLYING SOLO: Delta creditors said that the carrier would
    be better off emerging from bankruptcy on its own.

    $12 billion when it emerges
    from bankruptcy. Its manage-
    ment had said repeatedly it
    wanted the carrier to remain
    on its own and not combine
    with US Airways.

    The official creditors com-
    mittee said in its statement
    that it “has determined that it
    will support the stand-alone
    plan of reorganization as
    finally agreed upon between
    Delta and the creditors com-
    mittee that will be filed later
    this week.” It did not say if
    Delta’s amended plan will
    make any major changes.

    “The creditors committee
    reached this determination
    after engaging in extensive
    discussions with representa-
    tives of Delta and US Airways
    over the last two months and
    upon consideration of the
    advice of the creditors com-
    mittee’s legal, financial and
    industry advisers,” the com-
    mittee’s statement said.

    ber the tasks by priority.

    In some ways, Pamela
    shows just how organized she
    can be. During our morning
    visit, a crock pot with pork
    roast was cooking the eve-
    ning’s dinner. This works for
    her most nights. But because
    Pamela’s work schedule
    changes each week, some
    nights she just wings it, rely-
    ing on the nanny to make hot
    dogs or'pick up take-out.

    PROGRESS REPORT

    When I check in with
    Pamela five days later, she has
    made progress in scheduling,
    delegating and decluttering.

    This week, she made a

    PHOTOGRAPHY .

    menu for the week, noting
    what needs to be thawed or
    purchased. Instead of sched-
    uling activities one after
    another, she schedules what
    needs to get done first, creat-
    ing order on her to-do list.
    “Tt’s challenging, trying to
    coordinate the kids schedule
    with mine,” Fero says. But

    using Hatcher’s advice, she ©

    now has her children putting
    more of their events or

    appointments on the wall cal-

    ender. She transfers all that
    information into her PDA.
    _We will check back with the
    Feros in a few weeks.
    E-mail comments to cgood
    man@MiamiHerald.com

    Kodak posts first
    profit since 2004

    * KODAK

    Kodak had run up eight
    quarterly losses in a row since
    last posting a profit of $458
    million in the third quarter of
    2004. It has accumulated $2.7
    billion in restructuring
    charges and $2 billion in net
    losses. And it plans to elimi-
    nate up to 27,000 jobs, with
    23,300 already axed through
    2006.

    Its overall digital sales in
    the fourth quarter fell 5 per-
    cent to $2.45 billion, while
    revenue from film, paper and
    other chemical-based busi-
    nesses dropped 15 percent to
    $1.36 billion.

    While it made more money
    from traditional businesses
    last year — $423 million vs.
    digital’s $343 million — profit
    from the digital arena shot up
    92 percent in the fourth quar-
    ter to $271 million. Profit from
    the older businesses totaled
    $98 million.

    “TJ think it’s a very clear
    sign they’ve turned the cor-
    ner,” said Ulysses Yannas, a
    broker with Buckman, Buck-
    man & Reid in New York.

    While film sales have been
    shrinking by 20 percent to 30
    percent in recent years, Yan-
    nas added, the 15 percent con-

    traction suggests Kodak is

    benefiting from the demise of .

    film operations at Japan’s
    Konica Minolta and Belgium’s
    Agfa-Gevaert.

    Three weeks ago, Kodak
    said it was selling its health-
    imaging business, created
    after the discovery of X-rays
    in 1895, to Canada’s Onex for
    up to $2.55 billion.

    Aside from paying down
    about $1.15 billion in debt, the
    sale could help fund Kodak’s
    long-awaited entry next week
    into the home inkjet-printer
    market dominated by
    Hewlett-Packard.

    “[’m very excited with the
    new product introductions
    that we’ll talk about” at a
    meeting with investors in
    New York, Chief Executive
    Antonio Perez said in a con-
    ference call with analysts.

    for a home theater system.
    Consumer anthropologist
    Robbie Blinkoff says the grow-
    ing obsession with TVs on
    Super Bowl Sunday makes it
    easier for people to enjoy a
    shared group experience,
    albeit in a very American way.

    DEFINED BY PURCHASES
    “It’s insane, it seems, to

    spend so much money on a

    TV,” said Blinkoff, who does
    consumer research for Balti-
    more-based consulting firm
    Context-Based Research
    Group. “But from an anthropo-
    logical viewpoint, it has its
    root cause..In our culture, how
    we define ourselves is through
    what we buy.”

    For Smithe, 42, it’s about
    fun as he looks forward to
    hosting his first Super Bowl
    party.

    “Every guy wants one,” the
    attorney said of his 65-inch
    plasma TV. “I must say people
    are going to be pretty
    impressed.”

    That attitude makes con-
    sumer electronics retailers
    among the biggest Super Bowl
    fans around.

    “Nothing compares to foot-
    ball for TV buying,” said Abt.

    FEDERAL RESERVE

    Fed

    leaves
    rate at

    0.20%

    *RATES

    Villanova School of Business.
    “I think right now they are
    taking a wait-and-see
    approach.”

    The Fed’s announcement
    came hours after the govern-
    ment reported that the econ-
    omy snapped out of a sluggish
    spell and grew at a 3.5 percent
    pace in the final quarter of
    last year as consumers ratch-
    eted up spending.

    The report also showed
    that underlying inflation
    ebbed: during the quarter.

    The fresh snapshot of busi-
    ness activity, released by the
    Commerce Department,
    underscored the resilience of
    the economy. It has managed
    to keep moving despite the ill
    effects of the residential real-
    estate bust and an ailing auto-
    motive sector.

    President Bush pointed to
    the economic figures as evi-
    dence that his policies are
    working. The president, in a
    New York speech, also sought
    to calm fears about an econ-
    omy that is constantly chang-
    ing.

    “By and large, our dynamic
    and innovative economy has
    helped Americans live better
    and more comfortable lives,”
    Bush said. “Yet the same
    dynamism that is driving eco-
    nomic growth... also can be
    unsettling for people. For
    many Americans, change
    means having to find a new
    job, or to deal with a new boss
    after a merger or to go back to
    school to learn new skills for a
    new career.”

    An AP-Ipsos poll in early
    January found that 55 percent
    of people disapproved of the
    president’s handling of the
    economy, while 43 percent
    approved.

    Democrats, in control of
    Congress for the first time in
    a dozen years, argue that the
    White House hasn’t paid
    attention to widening eco-
    nomic inequality that they say
    is making it harder for the
    middle class to succeed.
    “Middle class families are not
    struggling to get by, but they
    are struggling to get ahead,”
    said Sen. Charles Schumer,
    D-N.Y.

    “LATE TRADING



    4pm. 6:35 p.m. Late 4pm. 6:35 pum. Late
    Stock Tkr. dose close Chg. volume Stock Tk. dose close vee
    NasdiooT QQ0Q 44.07 44.07 * «121074 | GileadSci ILD = 64.32 67.35 +303 12137
    Dellinclf DELL 2422 25.24 +1.02 92485 | NorflkSo NSC 49.65 49.65 * 9525
    Pfizer PFE 26.24 ~=«-26.25.~«« +01 «456826 | Motorola MOT 1985 1985 ° 9419
    Comversif CMVT 1949 19.50 +.01 53550 | Citigp C 5513 5513 ¢ 9412
    Google GOOG 501.50 49469 -6.81 35766 SchergP! SGP 25.00 25.00 * 9112

    SunMicro. SUNW 6.64 6.70 +.06 27788 ; .
    Synagro = SYGR) 5.75. 5,75 9006

    SPY 143.75 143.74 -.01- 26852

    FrdmAcwt FRH/WS 113 1.10 03-9000

    Tyson TSN 1775 «TST 1821286 | oir ULCM 855 «B55
    iShR2K nya IWM 79.350 79.35 * 19295 0398
    FordM F 813815. +.02«14769 | ‘TimeWarm TWX = 21.87 21.7512 824
    GnMotr GM 32.84 32.84 14443 | ConocPhil COP 66.41 6641 * 8014
    APwCnv APCC =—-30.74 30.74 * 12931 | JPMorgch JPM 50.93 50.90 03 7932
    HarrahE = HET = 84.48 84.48 12403 | Intel INTC 20.96 20.91.05) TSA



    For up-to-date stock quotes, go to www.MiamiHerald.com and click on Business


    THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007, PAGE 5B

    INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY ;

    MUST SELL eae:

    MISCELLANEOUS PROPERTIES ee
    | ELEUTHERA - LOT NO. 14B & 7B, PALMETTO POINT

    All that piece parcel or lot of land and improvement comprising of 20,355 sq. ft. being Lot #14B and 7B and situated in the Palmetto
    Point District of the Island of Eleuthera, Northward of the public road which runs from the Palmetto Point settlement to Savannah
    Sound in the coastal area northward of Ingraham’s Pond, and which said piece, parcel or Lot of land and improvements forms a
    portion of several parcels of land containing 2.947 acres or thereabouts and which also includes Lot No. 7B. This site encompasses a
    2-storey structure comprising 3-bedrooms, 2 1/2 bathorooms, front room, dining room, dining room, family room, utility room, pantry,
    | kitchen, stairwell, basement, 2-car garage and attic office. The entire house is equipped with central air-conditioning. The upper floor

    to the porch area has been converted into a storage and an area for the irrigation system and equipment. There is a pool area at the
    rear of this building approximately 537.14 sq. ft. with the garage area approximately 777 sq. ft. This area is complete with all utilities

    and services available.
    Appraisal: $513,959.00
    LOT NO. 1490 GOLDEN GATES SECTION 2

    J All that lot of land having an area of 6,000 sq. ft. being lot no. 1490 of the subdivision known and designated as Golden Gates, the
    said subdivision situated in the southwestern district of New Providence, bahamas. This property is comprised of a 25 yer old single
    family residence consisting of approximately 2,480 sq. ft. of enclosed living space with three bedrooms, three bathrooms, living,
    | dining rooms and kitchen. The land is on a grade and level, however the site appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the posibility

    of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods of the year. The grounds are fairly kept, ith improvements including driveway, walkway
    and low shrubs. Yard is enclosed on one side wth a 5 foot chain linked fencing and a low cement block wall to the front.

    ‘ Appraisal: $162,400.00

    Traveling west on Carmichael Road turn left then right onto the service road opposite Bahamas Faith Ministries Complex, then first left
    again after passing clico and pre-school. The subject house is the 6th house left painted green trimmed white. :

    LOT NO. 1,BLOCKNO.45, |
    SECTION E, ELEUTHERA ISLAND SHORES

    All that piece parcel or lot of land having an area of 9,644 sq. ft. being lot #1 in block 45, Section “E” in the subdivision called and known as Eleuthera
    island Shores Subdivision, situated in the vicinity of Hatchet Bay Harbour, on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The
    Bahams. This site encompasses a two storey building which is approximately 14 yrs old and is abandoned. There is a wooden landing approximately 7’-

    | 4” wide by 20’-0” on the upper level, approximately 1,610 sq. ft. of enclosed living space, with 3-bedrooms, 2-bathrooms, front room, dining room, den,
    kitchen, and utility room. The wooden porch on the upper level is approximately 148sq. ft. There is also a water cistern under the dining room floor area.

    All utilities and services available.
    Appraisal: $151,007.00














    This property is situated in Eleuthera Island Shores.

    LOT NO. 4 GAMBLE HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION

    Alll that lot of land having an area:of 5,000 sq. ft. being Lot No. 4 of the subdivision known and designated as Gamble Heights, the said subdivision
    situated in the southern district of New Providence Bahamas. Located on the subject property is a single storey duplex‘apartment building containing
    one 2, and one 1-bedroom apartment each'unit consisting of 1-bath, closets, dining rooms and kitchen. This building is approximately 2 years old
    with an enclosed living space of approximately 1,213 sq. ft. the land is one a grade and level; however the site appears to be sufficiently elevated to
    disallow the possibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods of the year.

    Appraisal: $143,217.60
    Traveling south on Blue Hill Road take the first corner left after passing corner of Faith United Baptist Church and Primary School. This corner is slant and just opposite
    St Vincent Road, then take second left (paved road) go all the way to the end around the curve then make a left then first right up the gravel road, all the way over the
    hill. The subject duplex is the 3rd building on the right hand side painted light yellow trimmed white with high steps in front.

    DUNDAS TOWN (ABACO)

    3 two bed, 1 bath triplex 9,000 sq. ft., lot no. 18b.with an area for a small shop. Age 12 years the land is a portion of one of the Dundas Town Crown Allotment
    parcels stretching from Forest Drive to Front Street, being just under a quarter acre in size and on the lowside. A concrete block structure, with asphalt shingle roof
    and L-shape in design with a total length of 70x26 ft, plus 50 x 92 ft., 2,920 sq. ft., the interior walls are concrete blocks, ceiling is sheet rock and the floors of vinyl

    | tiles.
    Appraisal: $265,225.00












    MURPHY TOWN (ABACO)..

    | Lot #60 with a structure, lot size 60 x 115 ft., 6,900 sq. ft., 10 ft., above sea level but below road level and would flood in a severe hurricane the duplex has dimensions

    of 60 ft by 30 ft partly of wood and partly of cement blocks with one section virtually finished and occupied with blocks up to window level and floor ready to be poured.
    The roof is asphalt shingles, the interior walls and ceiling are of 1x6 pine and the floor of ceramic tiles. The finished work is average/below, 2 bedrooms, one bath,
    living/dining. The occupied portion of the structure is not complete. Age: 10 years old.

    Appraisal: $75,660.00

    INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY MUST SELL
    LOT NO. 46 GOLDEN GATES SECTION 2

    All that lot of land having an area of 6,000 sq. ft. being lot 46 of the subdivision known and designated as Golden Gates 2, the said subdivision situated
    in the Southwestern District of New Providence Bahamas. This property is comprised of a 20yr old single family residence consisting of approximately
    1,854 sq. ft. of enclosed living space with 4-bedrooms, 2-bathraoms, living/dining rooms, and kitchen. The land is on a grade and level; however the
    site appears to be sufficiently elevated to disallow the possibility of flooding during annual heavy rainy periods of the year. The grounds are fairly kept,
    with improvements including driveway, walkway and low shrubs. The yard is enclosed with chain linked fencing and cement block wall to the front with
    wrought iron gate. ‘

    Appraisal: $1 80,678.00

    Traveling west on Carmichael Road turn left on Dominica Drive, corner just after St Gregory’s Church the subject house is the 8th house on the right
    hand side painted light peach trimmed dark peach with large mango tree in front.

    LOT NO. 6 BLOCK 13 WOODLAND WAY, WINTON HEIGHTS (NASSAU)

    All that piece parcel-or lot of land having an area of 14,897 sq. ft. being lot 6, block 13, in the Subdivision known as Winton Heights, this property is comprised of a 26
    year old 11/2 storey single family resident consisting of approximately 2,567 sq. ft. of enclosed living space with 3 bed rooms, 2 baths, upstairs and downstairs
    consisting of a foyer, guest bedroom and bath, laundry room, kitchen, powder room, sunken living area, tv room and dining area. Climate control is provided by wall air
    conditioning units throughout the house quality of construction and maintenance is fair as a good amount of remedial work is needed on the roof and plumbing system.
    The effective age of the building is seven years the property is rectangular in shape on flat terrain, and on a level grade slightly elevated above the road to disallow
    flooding during annual heavy rainy periods. The grounds improvements include a concrete wall with two double gates at the front with chain-link fencing otherwise,
    open patios at the front and back, and a 20,000 gal rainwater cistern under the front patio overall, the grounds are attractive and well kept.

    Appraisal: $385,369.75

    | Traveling east on Prince Charles Drive go pass Winton Super Value, then second left to T Junction, turn right at T junction and the subject property is the third
    house right painted yellow trimmed white.

    VACANT PROPERTIES



    LOT NO. 10B, PALMETTO POINT
    All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land containing 9,000 sq. ft., and being Lot No. 10B situated North of Ingraham’s Pond and Eastwardly of North Palmetto Point, on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth
    of the Bahamas, and is bounded and abutting as follows:- on the north by Lot No. 3B and running thereon for a distance of (90) ft; on the East by Lot No. 11B and running thereon for a distance of (100) ft; on the south by a 20’ wide
    road reservation and running thereon (90) ft on the west by Lot No. 9B running thereon for a distance of (100) Ft, the said Lot is overgrown with shrubs and is in close proximity of a white sandy beach. This neighborhood is zoned
    residential development and is quiet and peaceful with a topagraphy of approximately 50ft and because of this there is no danger of flooding. The area is approximately 80% developed with all utilities and services available.

    APPRAISAL: $72,000.00



    MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA
    All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land containing 44,714 sq. ft., and designated “E” which forms a portion of land known as “Mutton Fish Point” situated about two miles northwestward of the settlement of Gregory Town on the
    island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and is bounded and abutting as follows:- Northwardly by the land now or formerly the property of Coridon Limited, and running thereon for a distance
    of 393.13 hundredth ft.; outwardly by a 30’ wide road reservation and running thereon for a distance of 402.57 hundredth ft; eastwardly by the main Queen's Highway and running thereon for a distance of 109.73 hundredth ft;
    westwardly by land now or formerly the property of Caridon Limited and running thereon for a distance of 110.75 hundredth ft. this property having an area of approximately 44,714 sq. ft. this neighbourhood is zoned commercial/residential
    development and is quiet, peaceful and has a topography of approximately 2 ft. with all utilities and services available. ‘

    APPRAISAL: $51,421.00
    MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA
    All that piece, parcel or tract of land containing 1 acre situated about two miles northwestward of the settlement of Gregory Town on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and is bounded
    and abutting as follows:- Northwestwardly by the main Queens Highway and is running thereon for a distance of 125.462 feet northwestwardly by the land now of formerly the property of Coridon Limited, and running thereon for a
    distance of 390.274 hundredth ft.; southwestwardly by a 30’ wide road reservation and running thereon for a distance of 128.128 hundredth ft; southeastwardly by the land now or formerly the property of the Venor and running
    thereon for a distance of 322.955 hundredth ft. This property having an area of approximately 44,847.76 sq. ft. This neighbourhood is zoned commercial development and is quiet and peaceful with a topography of approximately 2

    ft. with all utilities and services available.
    APPRAISAL: $51,421.00

    This lot is vacant land and is located in the area known as “Mutton Fish Point”

    MUTTON FISH POINT NORTH ELEUTHERA

    All that piece, parcel or lot of vacant land and improvements containing approximately 44,587 sq. ft. and designated “E” which forms a portion of land known as “Mutton Fish Point” situated about two miles northwestward of the
    settlement of Gregory Town on the island of Eleuthera, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and bounded and abutting as follows:- Northwardly by the land now or formerly the property of Coridon Limited,
    and running thereon for a distance of 383.56 hundredth ft; southwardly by land now or formerly the property of Caridon Limited and running thereon for a distance of 393-19 hundredth ft. eastwardly by the main Queen’s Highway
    and running thereon for a distance of 113.40 hundredth fi. westwardly by land now or formerly the property of Coridon Limited and running thereon for a distance of 113.40 hundredth ft. this neighbourhood is zoned commercial/residential

    development and is quiet, peaceful and has a topography of approximately 2 ft. with all utilities and services available.

    APPRAISAL: $51,276.00 \

    For Creat yar) Mlle) Pitta information contact

    Philip White @ S12 OAT philip.white@scotiabank.com or Harry Collie @ 502-3034 ¢ email harry.collie@scotiabank.com * Fax 356-3851


    THE TRIBUNE

    THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007, PAGE 7B





    ‘Split OUI F
    saver’s credit can

    CRU Tua
    Savings at tax time



    "<. By EILEEN ALT

    POWELL

    AP Business Writer

    NEW YORK (AP) — The
    government wants to help con-
    sumers save — for retirement,
    for an emergency fund or for
    other goals — during the tax
    season. It is, after all, a good
    time to think about jump-start-
    ing a savings program because
    so many taxpayers get refunds.

    According to Internal Rev-
    enue Service figures, about
    three-quarters of federal
    income tax filers claim refunds,
    and those refunds last year
    averaged more than $2,260.

    This year, there are several
    ways consumers can take

    ‘advantage of the tax system to
    boost savings, experts point
    out. Among them is a new
    option for having refunds split
    up and deposited directly into
    more than one account. Others
    are the saver’s credit for mid-
    dle- and low-income families
    and the traditional tax deferral
    for contributions to retirement
    accounts.

    A number of advocacy
    groups, including the nonprof-
    it Retirement Security Project
    and the AARP, have been
    working to alert consumers
    about the new split refund,
    which was authorized by the
    Pension Protection Act of
    2006.

    Attorney Mark Iwry, a for-
    mer U.S. Treasury official who
    _ig.a senior adviser to the
    Retirement Security Project in
    Washington, D.C., said most
    families have typically had a
    tax refund check mailed to
    them or deposited directly into
    a checking account, from
    which it was spent.

    “That refund is the biggest
    hunk of money that many peo-
    ple will see in the course of the
    year,” Iwry said. “The idea
    was, why not encourage people
    to save a little bit of it.” _

    By allowing taxpayers to
    split their refunds, the govern-
    ment hopes some of the refund
    money will make its way into
    savings accounts, including
    those earmarked for retire-

    MANAGER - PRIVATE BANKING & WEALTH MANAGEMENT SERVICES



    PROFILE:
    * Bachelors Degree in Finance
    ° STEP Qualification

    ° 10 years experience in advising clients on fiduciary services and developing
    appropriate legal structures

    ment or college, Iwry said.

    Iwry said consumers can split
    their refunds for deposit in up
    to three accounts by attaching
    IRS Form 8888 “Direct
    Deposit of Refund to More
    Than One Account” to their
    tax return. They could include
    an emergency savings account
    and an Individual Retirement
    Account, he pointed out.

    “It’s a precommitment to
    savings, because the moneys
    isn’t in your hot little hands
    yet,” he said.

    Another savings device is the
    saver’s credit, which rewards
    families with adjusted gross
    income of $50,000 or less if
    they set money aside in IRAs
    and company-sponsored retire-
    ment accounts like 401(k)s.

    The saver’s credit had been
    scheduled to expire at the end
    of this year but was made per-
    manent by last year’s Pension
    Protection Act.

    It’s a “nonrefundable” cred-
    it, which means taxpayers who
    qualify for it don’t get it in
    cash. But they can use the
    credit to reduce the taxes they
    owe on a dollar-for-dollar
    basis, said Mark Luscombe,
    principal tax analyst at CCH
    Inc. of Riverwoods, Ill. The
    company, a division of Walters
    Kluwer, provides tax informa-
    tion and services to tax profes-
    sionals. °

    A worker who contributes
    $2,000 to an IRA or qualified
    retirement account can claim a
    savers credit of up to $1,000,
    he said. The amount of the
    credit varies between 10 per
    cent and 50 per cent depending
    on total income, he added,
    with the highest credits going
    to the lowest income families.

    Families can apply for the
    credit on IRS Form 8880, he
    said.

    Taxpayers also can boost
    their savings with contributions
    to traditional IRAs and
    401(k)s. Money contributed to
    these accounts grows tax
    deferred until it is withdrawn
    in retirement.

    This year, tax filing day is
    April 17. That’s because the
    traditional filing day of April

    Ja

    MANAGER -

    RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

    ° Client Relationship Management

    * Investment of client funds -

    ¢ Monthly management reports

    * Quarterly reports to clients

    * Business development and marketing activities
    ¢ Account opening formalities

    * Invoicing & booking fees

    ° Estate Planning

    ° Administration of Trusts

    ° Training, management and coaching of staff

    15 falls on a Sunday and April
    16 is a legal holiday in Wash-
    ington, D.C., where the IRS is
    located.

    That means that taxpayers
    have until April 17 to put pre-

    tax money of up to $4,000 into -

    their IRAs for 2006; those over
    50 can make an additional
    $1,000 “catch-up” contribution.
    The limits remain the same in
    2007.

    Luscombe warned that tax-
    payers who plan to fund their
    2006 IRAs out of split refund
    money should make sure they
    file their tax forms well in
    advance of the April 17 dead-
    line to ensure that the refunds
    get deposited early enough to
    qualify. Or they can take the
    easier route and apply the
    money to their 2007 IRAs, he
    said. The limit on employee
    contributions to 401(k) and
    other company-sponsored
    accounts rises to $15,500 in
    2007 from $15,000 in 2006;
    people 50 and over can make
    additional $5,000 contributions
    both years. Contributions to
    these programs must be made
    before Dec. 31 of each year.

    The Tribune wants to hear
    from people who are
    making news in their
    neighbourhoods. Perhaps
    you are raising funds for a
    good cause, campaigning
    for improvements in the
    area or have won an
    award.

    If so, call us on 322-1986
    and share your story.



    FIDELITY BANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

    A MEMBER OF THE FIDELITY GROUP OF COMPANIES

    invites qualified applicants for the following position:

    Private Banking & Wealth Management Services

    The applicant must have the following minimum qualifications:

    * Superior organization, communication, niedesonal and computer skills

    ° Production of trust deeds, letter of wishes & testamentary trusts

    Send resume no later than February 7th, 2007 to:

    The Human Resource Director
    Fidelity » 51 Frederick Street
    P.O. Box N-4853 » Nassau, Bahamas

    f: 326.3000

    e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com



    RBC

    (401) Lots #17 & #18 Crown
    Allotments, Love Hill Set-
    tlement, Andros. - Contain-
    ‘ing a two-storey residence.
    Appraised Value $100,000.



    (806) Lots #1 & #2, Block 3
    with a parcel situated between
    Lot #1, Block 3, containing a 4
    bedroom condominium - Sun-
    set View Villas, West Bay Street.
    Appraised Value $750,000.

    (806) Lot #13, Block 4 of Coral
    Waterways, Section One, Coral
    Harbour, N.P. with two houses
    and a swimming pool, #312
    N.P. bounded Northwardly
    by a canal or waterway of the
    said Subdivision known as
    Flamingo waterway and run-
    ning 102.004 ft. Eastwardly by
    lot #14 and 146.145ft South-
    wardly by a reservation for a
    private road. Appraised Value
    $530,000



    (433) Lot #27 of Village Allot-
    ment #14 in the Eastern Dis-
    trict, containing residence sit-
    uated on Denver Street off
    Parkgate Road in the Ann’s
    Town Constituency, N.P. Prop-
    erty size 2,500 sq ft Building
    size 990 sq ft Appraised value
    $50,000.



    (304) Lot #213 containing resi-
    dence in Elizabeth Estates East
    Subdivision, N.P. Appraised
    value: TBO

    (304) Lot #2 in block #8, Stew-
    ard Road, Coral Heights East
    Subdivision situated in West-
    ern District of N.P., approx.
    size 8,800 sq ft with a split
    level containing two bed, two
    bath, living, dining & fam-
    ily rooms, kitchen. and _ utility
    room-approx. size of building
    2,658 sq ft. Appraised value:
    $322,752

    (702) Lot #20 with residen-
    tial property located Sky-
    line Heights. Appraised value
    $280,000.

    (902) Lot situated North Pal-
    metto Point, 100 x 100 x 100
    x 100 containing a one story
    house with 3 bed, 2 bath, living
    room, kitchen and linen closet.
    Appraised value $123,192. °

    (902) Lot #14, Block #23 (125
    x 80) situated Rainbow Bay,
    Eleuthera containing a one sto-

    (304) Lot D-2,415 west of Fox
    Hill Road and 659 ft. south of
    Joe Farrington Road, N.P. Ap-
    praised value: TBO ~

    (565) ‘Vacant lot #5 located
    Eleuthera Island Shores, Sea-
    side -Drive Section B, Block
    #15, Eleuthera. 9,691 sq. ft.
    Appraised value $21,805.

    (902) Lot #46, Block #32, Ba-
    hamia. Section 1X Freeport,
    Grand Bahama 90 ft wide
    along Stratford Way and 150
    ft along Stratford Court: Ap-
    praised value $26,000.

    (902) Lot #5 of Bowles Tract,
    8.35 acres (2,017.17 ft x 200
    ft.) located approximately 2



    COMMERCIAL

    BANKING CENTRE

    Tel: 242-356-8567

    (800) ag Monique Crawford
    (802) Mr. Marvin Clarke
    (803) Mr Brian Knowles
    (806) Mr. Jerome Pinder
    (807) Mr. Wayne Kendall
    (808) Mrs. Hope Sealey
    PALMDALE SHOPPING
    CENTRE BRANCH

    Tel: 242-322-4426/9

    or 242-302-3800

    (201) Mr. David Barr

    (202) Mr. Frank Dean

    (203) Mrs. Cedricka Clarke
    NASSAU INT’L AIRPORT
    Tel: 242-377-7179

    (433) Mrs. Lindsey Peterson
    GOVERNOR’S HARBOUR,
    ELEUTHERA

    Tel: 242-332-2856/8

    (902) Mr. Brian Hanna
    HARBOUR ISLAND BRANCH
    Tel: 242-333-2230

    (901) Ms. Velderine Laroda
    (903) Mrs. Rose Bethel





    Royal Bank
    Rasy) Of Canada’

    PROPERTIES LISTED
    FOR SALE

    Contact Account Officer listed below by using number code for each property.
    HOUSES/APARTMENTS/COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

    rey house with 2 bed/1 bath,
    kitchen, living room and 2
    linen closets. Appraised value
    $89,998.

    (902) Lot of land 94 x 94 x 150
    x 150 on Queens Highway just
    south of Palmetto Point with a
    two storey stone building con-
    taining two apartments. Each
    unit has 3 bed/2 1/2 bath,
    kitchen, living room and 3
    linen closets. Appraised value
    $287,209.

    (105) Lot with three bed, two
    and a half bath residence, sit-
    uated Bailey Town, North
    Bimini. Appraised value TBO

    (903) Lot #15 located Johnson
    Harbour View Estate, Harbour
    Island, size 6,750 sq ft with a
    3 bed, 2 bath residence. Esti-
    mated value $95,000.

    (701) Single storey commercial
    building situated on the south
    side of Harrold Road contain-
    ing two offices.

    (902) Lot (8,000 sq ft) situ-
    ated Sand’s Alley, North Pal-
    metto Point with incomplete
    triplex (concrete structure
    - belt course 2,529.6 sq ft).
    Appraised value $49,414.

    (601) Lot (3,150 sq ft) located
    Mason’s Addition with
    partly completed restaurant.
    Appraised value $35,000.

    (100) Developed _ property
    Pinder’s, Long Island contain-
    ing a split level Mediterranean
    style home with kitchen, living
    room, dining room, master bed
    & bath, two guest rooms, full
    and half guest bathroom on
    lower level. Also garage and
    breezeway - a gross area 4,212
    sq ft. Kitchenette, master bed-
    room and bath and front entry
    porch features the upper level,
    gross area of 780 sq ft. Porches
    all around the concrete struc-
    ture which is 90% complete.
    Appraised value $650,000.

    (400) Property situated in Cal-
    abash Bay on the Island of
    Andros. 75’x150’ and contain-
    ing thereon a small grocery
    store 480 sq ft and an incom-
    plete 3 bed 2 bath house 900 sq
    ft. Appraised value $65,000.

    (565) Lot #12 in Block #2 con-
    taining 4 houses (3 wooden,

    | _ VACANT PROPERTIES

    miles southeast of Governor’s
    Harbour. Appraised value
    $292,000 ;
    (565) Vacant Lot #9 (11,406.65
    sq. ft.) situated in Mango Lane
    Section “B” Block #15, Eleu-
    thera Island Shores on the is-
    land of Eleuthera. Appraised
    value $25,665.

    (902) .281 acre of vacant land
    off Queen’s Highway in the
    settlement of Governor’s Har-
    bour, Eleuthera. Appraised
    value $31,320.

    (S05) Lots # 12 - 15, Block #11
    - Greater Chippingham Subdi-
    vision situated on the south
    side of Flamingo Avenue, 2nd
    lot west of, Hibiscus Avenue

    ,

    ANDROS TOWN
    Tel:242-368-2071 ‘
    (400) Mrs. Vanessa Scott

    _ NASSAU MAIN BRANCH

    Tel: 242-322-8700

    (701) Mrs. Stephanie Saunders
    (702) Mrs. Anastacia Knowles
    (703) Mrs. Renae Walkine
    JFK DRIVE BRANCH

    Tel: 242-325-4711

    (401) Mr. James Strachan
    PRINCE CHARLES
    SHOPPING CENTRE

    Tel: 242-393-7505/8

    (501) Mr, Keith Lloyd

    (505) Ms. Patricia Russell
    CABLE BEACH

    Tel: 242-327-6077

    (466) Mrs. Winnifred Roberts
    MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO
    Tel: 242-367-2420

    (908) Mr. Antonio Eyma
    (909) Mrs. Sylvia Poitier
    (910) Mr. Travis Spicer
    BIMINI BRANCH

    Telephone: 242-347-3031
    (105) Mr. Kermit Curry

    -www.rbcroyalbank.com/catibbean

    ® Registered trade-mark of Royal Bank of Canada



    Ma at Lion & Globe symbol and RBC are Hk a of Royal Sa of Canada

    Raat Sooo

    For eae

    ‘the Island of Andros










    one partly concrete block,
    partly stucco building), 4,763
    sq ft situated on Farrington
    Road in the Western District
    of New Providence. Appraised
    value $68,000.

    (505) A concrete single-fam-
    ily residence located on Lot
    #212 Roland St, Ridgeland Park
    West Subdivision. Appraised
    value $72,035.

    (902) Lot containing 3 bed , 2
    bath residence situated in the
    settlement of Governor’s Har-
    bour bounded northwardly
    by a 19ft road and running
    thereon 50ft eastwardly and
    running thereon 100ft south-
    wardly’ and SOft westwardly.
    Appraised value $90,000.



    (902) Lot: #17, Block# 7 of
    Section “A” of the Eleuthera
    Island Shores Subdivision sit-
    uated 3 miles Northeastward
    of Hatchet Bay, Eleuthera con-
    taining residence. (Presently
    being appraised)

    (400) Lot #14 situated in the
    settlement of Love Hill on
    total-
    ing 20,000 sq. ft. Property
    contains a two storey 5 bed-
    room, 3 bathroom residence.
    Appraised value $185,000.

    (203). Lot B_ situated. on
    the north side of Shell Fish
    Road, being the third lot west
    of Fire Trail Road and east of
    Hamster Road with a one half
    duplex residential premises.
    Appraised value TBO



    (433) | Lot#71located Yamac-
    raw Shores, New Providence
    containing 2 storey build-
    ing with 2 apartments above
    and shops below. Appraised
    value $317,000 Lot Number
    A, located Rocky Pine Road,
    Pineview Heights Subdivision,
    Western District, New Provi-
    dence containing triplex 7,000
    sq ft gross. Appraised value
    $317,000.

    (723) Residence in Ridgeland
    Park, valued at $72,000.

    (433) Lot Number A, located
    Rocky Pine Road, Pineview
    Heights Subdivision, Western
    District, New Providence
    containing triplex 7,000 sq

    ft gross. Appraised value
    $200,000.

    extending to the 4th lot east

    of Myrton Avenue. Appraised
    value $169,000.

    (902) Vacant lot #13 & #14 of
    Block #50 located in Green-
    wood Estates Subdivision in
    Cat Island. Appraised value
    $40,000. ’

    (717) Vacant residential lot #25
    (6,513 sq. ft) in James Cistern
    North Subdivision, Eleuthera.
    Appraised value $12,375

    Lot No. 17456 Bahama Sound
    off Exuma No. 18, located
    approximately 2.5 miles north-
    westwardly of George Town,
    Exuma. Appraised value TBO.

    GRAY’S, LONG ISLAND

    Telephone: 242-337-0101

    (100) Mrs Lucy Wells

    LOAN COLLECTION CENTRE

    Tel: 242-394-3560

    (716) Mrs. Ingrid Simon

    (717) Mrs. Nancy Swaby

    (723) Mrs. Deidre King

    (724) Mrs. Faye Higgs

    (725) Ms. Marguerite Johnson

    (565) Mrs. Catherine Davis

    MACKEY STREET

    Tel: 242-393-3097

    (601) Ms. Nicola Walker

    BAY & VICTORIA BRANCH

    Tel: 242-322-2451 /3

    (301) Ms. Thyra Johnson

    (303) Mr. Desmond McIntosh

    (304) Mrs. Alicia Thompson

    FREEPORT, MAIN BRANCH

    Tel: 242-352-6631/2

    (101) Ms. Garnell Frith

    (103) Mrs. Damita Newbold-
    Cartwright

    (104) Ms. Jackie Knowles

    (108) Ms. Sylvie Carey



    RBC
    Eee eke) a1 3
    ‘} of Canada
    nis Courts
    Retention Pond
    Jogging Trails & Playground
    Basketball Court

    Q Gazehos & Grills
    Single Family, Duplex, Triplex & Fourplex

    LOTS FOR SALE and going FAST!

    PRICE STARTING @ $90,000
    es Tel: 325-6447/9 or 325-6456

    Legal Notice



    NOTICE |

    INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
    (No.45 of 2000)

    EQUIFIN HOLDINGS
    In Voluntary Liquidation

    Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
    of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),
    EQUIFIN HOLDINGS has been dissolved and struck off
    the Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued
    | by the Registar General on the 27th day of December, 2006.

    JOHN GRIMSHAW
    Nautilus House, La Cour des Casernes
    St. Helier, Jersey, JE1 3NH
    Liquidator



    Legal Notice

    NOTICE

    PHOENIX VELLA CORP.

    Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
    138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
    the dissolution of PHOENIX VELLA CORP. has been
    completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
    the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

    ARGOSA CORP. INC.
    (Liquidator)

    PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007

    THE TRIBUNE



    Be Se ee ae
    Fed leaves US rates unchanged

    @ By MARTIN
    CRUTSINGER
    AP Economics Writer

    WASHINGTON (AP) —
    The Federal Reserve, faced
    with a strongly rebounding
    economy, left interest rates
    unchanged yesterday while
    repeating concerns about infla-
    tion.

    The central bank voted to *

    leave the federal funds rate,
    the interest that banks charge
    each other, at 5.25 percent,
    where it has been since last
    June. | 7

    That decision had been
    widely expected given an econ-
    omy that is exhibiting better-
    than-expected growth. While
    the Fed had been expected to
    start cutting rates later this
    year, economists are now wor-

    ried that the central bank may

    feel the need to resume rais-
    ing rates for fear that inflation
    pressures will not keep easing.

    The rate action was sup-
    ported by a unanimous 11-0
    vote of the Federal Open Mar-
    ket Committee, the panel of
    Fed board members in Wash-
    ington and regional bank pres-
    idents who meet eight times a
    year to set interest rates.

    At the previous four meet-
    ings, Jeffrey Lacker, the presi-
    dent of the Richmond Fed
    regional bank, had dissented
    in favor of a further boost in
    rates. However, he is not a vot-
    ing member of the FOME this
    year.

    The action means that
    banks’ prime lending rate, the
    benchmark for millions of con-

    sumer and business loans, will,

    EMPLOYMENT
    0 ee ae a

    RISTORANTS

    Villaggio

    STAN OG SAR & CAFE

    Seeks to employ experience

    Pizza Chef and
    Dish Wash ers

    Must be well-groomed

    Fluent in the English Language
    Must have own transportation
    Must be able to work flexible

    hours

    Send Resume to:

    Hf

    Human Resources
    P.O. Box CB 13647
    Nassau, Bahamas
    or Apply in person
    Caves Village, West Bay Street.





    Sandringham House
    Shirley Street

    Nassau, Bahamas

    Tel. 242-393-8618
    www.bahamasrealty.bs
    www.cbrichardellis.com

    * 2311 sq.ft. (Ground Floor).

    * 4564 sq.ft. (storage).

    * 24 on-site parking.

    * Immediate occupancy.

    * Rental rate $25.00 per sq.ft. plus service chg.

    Bis

    Pricing Information As Of:
    Wednesday

    52wk-Hi 52wk-Low

    eel gel oe REALTY trp

    ERGIAL

    CB RICHARD ELLIS
    NAVIGATING A NEW WORLD

    remain unchanged at 8.25 per-
    cent.

    While the Fed had been
    widely expected to leave rates
    unchanged for a fifth straight
    meeting, there are growing
    concerns its next move could
    be to raise rates, given a string
    of indicators showing stronger-
    than-expected growth.

    On Wednesday before the
    Fed announcement, the gov-
    ernment reported that the
    economy grew at a solid annu-
    al rate of 3.5 percent in the
    final three months of 2006 as
    strong consumer spending and
    an improving trade picture off-
    set severe slowdowns in hous-
    ing and auto production.

    In a brief statement explain-
    ing its actions, the Fed said,
    “Recent indicators have sug-
    gested somewhat firmer eco-
    nomic growth and some ten-
    tative signs of stabilization
    have appeared in the housing
    market.”

    The statement also said that
    “reading on core inflation have
    improved modestly in recent
    months and inflation pressures
    seem rue to moderate over

    ee
    owever, Fed Chairman
    Ben ernanke and his col-

    leagues followed up that com- .

    ment by repeating its belief
    that the panel “judges that
    some inflation risks remain.”
    It said that the extent of any

    future rate hikes will depend

    on how the prospects for infla-
    tion and economic growth

    evolve in coming months,
    repeating the language it has
    been using at previous meet-
    ings.

    Since the Fed’s last meeting
    Dec. 12, the economic news
    has been uniformly good, with
    job growth stronger than
    expected, energy prices drop-
    ping and the overall economy
    navigating the rough waters of
    a severe housing slump.

    Many analysts have gone
    from forecasting that the Fed
    would cut rates possibly three
    times this year to thinking that
    the most likely outcome is that
    the Fed will leave rates steady
    for a considerable period. And
    some are worried that there
    could be rate hikes in the sec-
    ond half of the year if inflation
    does not slow further.

    The Fed last changed rates
    back in June when it pushed
    the federal funds rate, the

    interest that banks charge each

    other, up to 5.25 percent.

    It marked the 17th consecu-
    tive meeting that the central
    bank had nudged rates up by a
    quarter-point. Before the Fed
    started raising rates in June
    2004, the funds rate was at 1
    percent and the prime rate
    stood at 4 percent, both the
    lowest levels in more than four
    decades.

    The Fed is hoping to engi-

    . heer a “soft landing” in which

    the economy slows and infla-
    tion pressures are lowered but
    the slackening of business
    activity doesn’t spell recession.

    NOTICE

    KIROVA OVERSEAS S.A.

    In Voluntary Liquidation

    Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
    138 (4) of the International Business Companies Act,
    2000, KIROVA OVERSEAS S.A. is in dissolution as of

    January 29, 2007.

    oa

    uidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
    Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City is the

    Liquidator.

    LIQUIDATOR

    Legal Notice

    NOTICE

    THE CHANDELIER CO. LTD.

    /

    Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
    (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
    dissolution of THE CHANDELIER CO. LTD. has been
    completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
    the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

    ARGOSA CORP. INC.
    (Liquidator)

    2,000 -0.282
    1.689
    0.796
    0.265
    0.199 .
    0.170
    0.715
    0.078
    0.998
    0.134
    0.295
    0.552
    0.779
    0.921
    1.476

    -0.434
    0.532
    0.588

    1.85 0.54
    112.05 10.25
    8.03 6.90
    0.85 0.70
    1.85 1.26
    ‘y1.49 1.12
    10.00 9.00
    2.20 1.64
    13.10 9.05
    6.26 4.22
    2.88 2.40
    6.21 5.54
    12.30 10.70
    14.50 10.90
    16.21 10.00
    1.15 0.50
    10.20 7.10

    Abaco Markets
    Bahamas Property Fund
    Bank of Bahamas
    Benchmark

    Bahamas Waste

    Fidelity Bank

    Cable Bahamas

    Colina Holdings
    Commonwealth Bank
    Consolidated Water BDRs
    Doctor's Hospital
    Famguard

    Finco

    FirstCaribbean

    Focol

    Freeport Concrete

    ICD Utilities

    J. S. Johnson

    Premier Real Estate

    Hart leo CORY
    CHAMBERS

    Counsel and Attorneys-at-Law Notaries Public
    is seeking to hire an ambitious

    COMMERCTAL ATTORNEY

    for its Nassau Office

    Applicants with a minimum of five (5) years
    experience must possess the skills and the ability to
    work independently on conveyancing and mortgage
    matters.

    EPS $
    1.766
    0.000

    y Last Price
    Bahamas Supermarkets 14.00
    Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 10.00
    RND Holdings

    Weekly Vol.

    9.04%
    0.00%

    Bahamas Supermarkets
    RND Holdings
    YTD% Last 12 Months Div $ Yield %
    1.326132"
    2.9728"*"
    2.500211**
    1.217450****

    11.3075****

    Colina Money Market Fund
    Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
    Colina MSI Preferred Fund
    Colina Bond Fund

    Fidelity Prime Income Fund

    Attractive salary and benefits are available to the
    candidate with the right aptitude and skills.

    YIELD - last 12 month ‘dividends divided by closing price

    Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

    Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

    Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

    Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

    EPS $ - Acompany's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
    NAV - Net Asset Value

    N/M - Not Meaningful

    FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

    NAV ISEY. Applicants should send resumes to:

    THE HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGER
    P.O. Box N-979, Nassau, Bahamas or
    By facsimile (242) 393-4558 or
    E-mail: info@halsburylawchambers.com

    52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
    ' | S52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks
    | Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
    Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
    Change - Change in closing price from day to day
    Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
    DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months
    P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

    " - 26 January 2007
    ** - 31 December 2006
    *- 31 December 2006

    *** - 31 December 2006

    PTR CALL: COLINA 243:862-767) IBELITY BAS 4862976:


    THE TRIBUNE



    Sa ne RUBUSINESS emus vy ener
    Devco ‘doing everything —
    we can to close’ Morgan

    Stanley and Raven projects

    FROM page 1B

    Beach, at the easternmost
    fringes of the Port Authority
    area.

    Mr Torode said Devco, aided
    by the support of its owners,
    _-Port Group Ltd and Hutchison
    Whampoa, was actively target-
    ing investors and brands it
    thought would be a good fit for
    _ Grand Bahama’s tourism mod-

    el.

    ‘He added that the Morgan
    Stanley projéct was in the
    “same situation” as the Raven
    Group deal. “We’re at an
    advanced stage of discussions,
    but there is absolutely nothing

    signed,” Mr Torode said. “It’s

    not done yet; we are still nego-
    tiating, and still have high aspi-
    rations.

    “It’s premature to say any of

    them are signed. There are seri- .

    ous discussions/negotiations,
    and they are ongoing.”

    Both Port Group Ltd and
    Hutchison Whampoa were
    attempting to attract “high qual-
    ity investors to support what
    we're doing” in Grand Bahama.

    “We have high expectations
    and hope all of them, certainly
    one of them, comes off. But cer-
    tainly, at this stage, there is
    nothing firm at all,” Mr Torode
    said of both projects.

    “We’re continuing to do
    everything we possibly can to
    get these deals closed.”

    The Tribune reported previ-
    ously that a $50 million land







    2007. r.

















    (m) Crop Science

    of their choice.

    of course.

    Technical or Community College or

    purchase represented the first
    stage of a multi-million dollar
    investment in Freeport by
    Morgan Stanley.

    The deal involves Devco
    selling its 50 per cent stake in

    -1,000 acres at Barbary Beach

    to Morgan Stanley, which
    would then be 50/50 partners
    in the development via a joint
    venture agreement with Port
    Group Ltd. The deal has to be
    approved by three Boards -
    those of Port Group Ltd, Dev-
    co and Hutchison Whampoa.

    Due: to the continuing dis-
    pute between Sir Jack Hay-
    ward and the late Edward St
    George’s family over the for-
    mer’s claim to own 75 per cent
    of the GBPA and Port Group
    Ltd, approval of the Morgan
    Stanley purchase will be
    required from Sir. Jack, Lady
    Henrietta St George and Clif-
    ford Culmer, the two compa-
    nies’ independent management
    consultant.

    The Tribune has seen corre-
    spondence indicating that Sir
    Jack has signed off on the Mor-
    gan Stanley project, while Lady
    Henrietta has also been “asked
    to sign certain documents for
    Port Group Ltd regarding the
    Morgan Stanley transaction”.

    Few details on the Morgan
    Stanley project have been
    made public, although it is
    understood to involve a major
    hotel and casino, timeshares,
    condos, second homes and
    retail and commercial facili-
    ties.

    It has been billed by execu-
    tives who have spoken to The

    ae

    MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

    IMPORTANT NOTICE

    FINANCIAL COMMUNITY ADVANCED TECHNICAL
    EDUCATION TRUST FOR BAHAMIANS (1973)

    EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANCE FOR TECHNICAL STUDIES

    Applications are invited from suitable candidates for consideration for financial
    Awards offered by the above Trust at The College of The Bahamas or any accredited
    University overseas, commencing September,

    The Awards are intended to provide financial assistance for training at advanced
    ~ evel in areas of technology where there is vital need for such skills in The Bahamas.
    Areas of study include the following:

    (a) Automobile, Mechanical and Architectural Engineering
    (b) Aviation/ Maintenance
    (c) Automobile or Marine Maintenance (gas or diesel engines)
    (d) Air-conditioning and refrigeration
    (e) Elevator Engineering
    (f) Computer Engineering
    (g) Marine Engineering (Coastal Management)
    (h) Food Processing and Production techniques
    (i) Manufacture of Clothing, Furniture, etc.

    (j) Craft Production and Boat Building
    (k) Radio and Television Technology/Mass Communication
    dd) Medical Technology

    (n) Livestock Science
    (0) Any other area of technology acceptable to the Selection Committee

    Successful candidates will be required to pursue a course of study from (1) to not
    more than three (3) years leading to a Certificate or Diploma (Not a Degree).

    It is expected that candidates will seek admission to a recognized technical institution

    Candidates should have successfully completed high school education in The
    Commonwealth of The Bahamas and should preferably have attained G.E.C. ‘O”
    level/B.G.C.S.E. certificates in appropriate subjects or completed courses of study
    in a technical field. The value of each award will depend upon the cost and length

    The successful candidates will be expected to return to The Bahamas on the
    satisfactory completion of the course to give the country the benefit of their training.

    Tribune on condition of
    anonymity as being Freeport’s
    answer to Kerzner Interna-
    tional’s Atlantis resort on Par-
    adise Island, having a similar
    impact on that island.

    The developments sur-

    rounding the Morgan Stanley »

    and Raven Group projects
    indicate that it is far from
    ‘doom and gloom’ when it
    comes to Grand Bahama’s
    economy, especially when the
    $4.9 billion Ginn project is

    ‘included in the mix. ;
    Things are happening

    behind the scenes, and despite
    the ongoing closure of the
    Royal Oasis, the economic
    future for Grand Bahama will
    probably look brighter two
    years out, especially if both
    projects get off the ground.

    And Grand Bahama also
    happens to be a mixed econo-
    my, due to its industrial sec-
    tor, and facilities such as
    Freeport Container Port,
    Freeport. Harbour Company
    and the Grand Bahama Ship-
    yard. Their creation has
    spawned new industries for the
    Bahamas.

    Mr Torode described the
    island’s future as “extremely
    positive”, particularly if it
    turned potential into actual
    investment dollars.

    Grand Bahama’s infrastruc-
    ture, proximity to the US and
    America’s ‘baby boomers’ gen-

    erations all gave the island a.

    potentially huge tourist mar-
    ket on which to draw, espe-
    cially for the second home
    industry.







    242-461-1000.

    fre @ Bank & Tract (Bahamas) Ltd



    ’ Qualifications:




    THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007, PAGE 9B

    Public Notice



    Amos Cox Natasha Dean

    Are No Longer employed at British American

    Insurance and is not authorized to conduct
    any business on behalf of the Company

    For further information please
    call our Independence office

    at 461-1000

    OE

    Established 1920

    bafinancial@babinsurance.com
    Freeport 242-352-7209 Exuma 242-336-3095



    POSITION AVAILABLE

    Chief Investment Officer for International Private Bank

    Job Responsibilities:

    Provide discretionary and advisory investment management services
    to diverse international high net worth client base;

    Support Client Relationship Officers (CROs) in growing and maintaining
    the Bahamas office investment book;

    Coordinate with other EFG International Investment teams to develop

    - and communicate investment ideas, products. and solutions to CROs

    and clients;
    Manage, develop and mentor the Investment Management Team of
    traders and analysts;

    ~ Serve as Chair of the Investment Committee;

    Work closely with Compliance Department to ensure on-going
    compliance of Investment Management & Trading policies and
    procedures with relevant regulatory bodies and corporate directives;
    representing industry- wide best practice.

    Advanced Investment Management Degree or Qualification such as
    CFA

    Minimum of 15 years’ Investment Management experience in Private
    Banking setting
    Proven quantitative skills and analytical background with investment
    portfolio analysis

    Strong managerial, written and verbal communication skills

    Ability to evaluate overall portfolio risks and exposures in a risk
    management framework

    Working knowledge of additional languages would be an asset
    Willingness to travel as necessary













    The individual must be an excellent team player and work closely with all
    areas in EFG. Compensation will be commensurate with experience. Interested
    applicants must submit applications by February 9, 2007 to:











    Application forms may be obtained from the Scholarship and Education Loan
    Division, Ministry of Education, Science & Technology, Thompson Boulevard.
    Completed application forms should be returned in an envelope marked “Financial
    Community Advanced Education Scholarship”, Scholarship & Education Loan
    Division, Ministry of Education, Science & Technology, P.O. Box N-3913,
    Nassau, Bahamas to arrive no later than the deadline date.

    EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Limited
    Human Resources Manager
    (Re: Chief Investment Officer)
    , P. O. Box SS-6289
    Nassau, Bahamas
    or fax to (242) 393-1161

    APPLICATION DEADLINE : Thursday May ai , 2007

    INCOMPLETE OR LATE APPLICATION FORMS
    WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED
    AGE 10B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007 THE TRIBUNE
    oy ae ; BUSINESS

    Americans fail _

    F



    5s esc a a ie Sapa Se mS aE SP REE RE EE TT

    eg



    = 1 :
    Fantasie fares: to claim phone
    ! eNassau - Atlanta—$381.20 tax refunds

    | sNassau - Orlando—$209.70

    - Nassau - Boston—$266.20

    e Nassau - Fort Lauderdale—$181.20
    eNassau - Miami—$179.20

    Fares based on Round-Trip travel & include all taxes, fees and service charges.



    Tee a ee a ee



    328-0264 / 328-0

    eee ne eneaeae nena aaa A eee. ee ee ee

    gee ww are

    PI EMIEK TRAVEL

    #57 Callins Avenue
    P.O. Box N-9670

    257

    ae eo 2 ee he ee eS

    WASHINGTON (AP) —
    More than a third of early tax
    return filers are not request-
    ing the one-time telephone tax
    refund entitling them to at
    least $30, the Internal Rev-
    enue Service said Wednesday.

    The IRS notice about mis-
    takes in requesting the refund
    came a week after the tax
    agency sent out a warning that
    it would take action against
    taxpayers and tax preparers
    who improperly claim large
    refunds from the discontinued
    tax.

    The government last August
    stopped collecting the long-
    distance excise tax, and has
    authorized a refund of tax col-
    lected on service billed during
    the period from March 2003
    to July 2006.

    Those claiming a standard
    refund amount, which needs
    no documentation, will receive

    $30 to $60, based on the num-
    ber of exemptions they claim.
    People making claims on the
    actual amount paid over the
    41-month period need not
    send records to the IRS, but
    should have documents to
    back up their claims in case
    the IRS has questions.

    Agency

    The agency said that in addi-
    tion to more than one-third of
    early filers using Forms 1040,
    1040A and others not request-
    ing the refund, lower income
    people using Form 1040EZ-T
    are failing to show a refund
    amount on Line 1a.

    Others it said, are requesting
    refunds based on the entire
    amount of their phone biils,
    rather than the three per cent
    tax on long-distance and bun-
    dled service, or requesting

    amounts in the hundreds or
    thousands of dollars.

    It advised taxpayers to file
    electronically because elec-
    tronic-filing software flags
    often-overlooked tax breaks.

    The agency also reminded
    taxpayers that the break does
    not apply to the total phone
    bill or taxes paid on local-only
    service.

    Taxpayers are urged to stay
    away from tax preparers claim-
    ing they can get hundreds of
    dollars or more back.

    ’ Most taxpayers can claim
    the one-time refund on feder-
    al excise taxes for long-dis-
    tance telephone service —
    whether for landline, cell
    phone or

    Voice over Internet Proto-
    col. The government stopped
    collecting the tax after July
    2006 after businesses repeat-
    edly fought the tax and won.

    Junior Network Engineer







    A local networking consulting firm seeks highy energetic, motivated and qualified Junio
    Network Engineer, with the right aitude towards customer service.

    ye Lot #53 Twynam Heights
    Off Prince Charles Drive
    With two-story Residence.

    ee we ee

    The ideal candidate should have a minimunof two years experience in the IT field.

    Responsibilities/Skills:

    Working knowledge of Windows 2000 Professional & Server Environments

    Install new PCs including loading softare and configuring network settings

    Upgrade PCs - hardware and operating systems |
    Provide basic level support of persoml computer hardware, software and '
    operating systems :
    Must have good PC troubleshooting skills

    Basic telephony system knowledge _

    Previous PC support experience is required

    Excellent interpersonal skills... Lee

    Ability to work in a team environment

    Self-motivated

    Requires A+, MCP or better.

    _ For conditions of sale and any other information, contact

    D. L. Marche
    at

    356-1400.



    Customer service will be a key focus of the successful candidate.

    Interested applicants pleae e-mail resumes to ithahamas@yahoo.com at latest by
    February % , 2007.



    KERZNER

    Shirley & Mackey S treet

    Intersection Improvemen

    Project

    Important PSA

    : LUO. The Ministry of Works & Utilities and Kerzner

    | — International wish to inform the public that works for the
    . -— Shirley & Mackey Street project will be completed by
    a Telephone ° 6 /" 71-8720 || February 3, 2007

    email:checks@coralwave.com |

    The intersecion will return to normal operation at the
    end of construction. We thank you for your patience
    | throughtout the project which improved traffic operations
    at the intersection.



    i
    ala RRL RH


    THE TRIBUNE

    THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007, PAGE 11B



    US economy grew

    @ By JEANNINE AVERSA
    AP Economics Writer

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The
    economy snapped out of a slug-
    gish spell and grew at a faster-
    than-expected 3.5 percent pace
    in the final quarter of last year as
    consumers ratcheted up spend-
    ing despite a painful housing
    slump.

    The fresh snapshot of business
    activity, released by the Com-
    merce Department Wednesday,
    underscored the resilience of the
    economy; it has managed to keep
    on moving despite the ill effects of
    the residential real-estate bust
    and an ailing automotive sector.

    The economy’s performance in
    the October-to-December quar-
    ter, which followed two quarters

    _-of rather listless activity, exceed-
    . ed analysts’ forecasts for a 3 per-
    cent growth rate.

    The economy opened 2006 on
    a strong note, growing at a 5.6
    percent pace, the fastest spurt in 2
    1/2 years. But it lost steam during

    ‘-< the spring and late summer. It

    -" grew at a 2.6 percent pace in the
    second quarter and then a weak-
    er 2 percent pace in the third
    quarter. The fourth-quarter’s
    rebound ended the year on a pos-
    itive note.

    For all of 2006, the gross
    domestic product (GDP)
    increased by 3.4 percent. That

    ~, *

    . Brand new upscale.mini mall, offices and

    HIRLEY

    was an improvement from a 3.2
    percent showing in 2005 and was
    the best performance in two
    years.

    That’s even more impressive
    considering the economy was hit
    by the housing slump. Investment
    in home building for all of last
    year was slashed by 4.2 percent,
    the most in 15 years.

    GDP measures the value of all
    goods and services produced
    within the United States and is

    _the best barometer of the coun-

    try’s economic standing.

    “Housing and autos hit the
    économy with their best punch,
    and the economy is still standing.
    It is dancing,” said Stuart Hoff-
    man, chief economist at PNC
    Financial Services Group.

    The White House pointed to
    the GDP figures as evidence that
    the president’s policies are work-
    ing and benefiting most Ameri-
    cans. President Bush, in a trip to
    New York, to highlight his eco-
    nomic stewardship declared: “The
    state of our economy is strong.”

    But Democrats, now in control
    of Congress for the first time in a
    dozen years, counter that eco-
    nomic inequality is widening and
    that it’s harder for the middle
    class to get ahead.

    An AP-Ipsos poll in early Jan-
    uary found that 55 percent of
    Americans disapproved of the
    president’s handling of the econ-

    &

    omy, while 43 percent approved.

    In other economic news,
    employers’ costs to hire and
    retain workers moderated, which
    could ease concerns about the
    development of inflation pres-
    sures. Wages and benefits rose
    0.8 percent in the fourth quarter,
    down from a 1 percent rise in the
    third quarter, the Labor Depart-
    ment reported.

    Spending on construction pro-
    jects around the country dropped
    0.4 percent in December, after
    edging up in November, mostly
    reflecting fallout from the housing

    slump, the Commerce Depart-

    ment said in another report.

    In the GDP report, consumers
    spent more freely in the fourth
    quarter, a-major factor behind the
    rebound in overall economic
    activity. Consumer spending grew
    at a 4.4 percent, annual rate, up
    from a 2.8 percent pace in the
    third quarter and the strongest
    since the opening quarter of 2006.

    An improvement in the
    nation’s trade picture helped by
    stronger U.S. export growth also
    was a factor in the overall GDP
    boost.

    More brisk government spend-
    ing also helped the fourth-quarter

    GDP. Government spending ©

    increased at a 3.7 percent pace in
    the final quarter, up from a 1.7
    percent growth rate in the third
    quarter. Federal spending on

    apartment

    | located Shirley & Church Streets near, Paradise Island
    Becca uer sa eget Ce lots of parking.

    Pat Rice Mei ee Ries O8 eNO sR mils
    (4) 1500 sq ft - Office Spaces jucai ior

    _ (3) Kiosk Booths « (3) 3 bedroom 2 *





    MANAGER - PRIVATE BANKING & WEALTH MANAGEMENT Baas

    Private Banking

    PROFILE: ;

    * Bachelors Degree in Finance

    * STEP Qualification

    * 10 years experience in advising clients on fiduciary services and developing
    appropriate legal structures

    GONTACT
    FRIDAY

    *

    Jn

    FIDELITY BANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

    A MEMBER OF THE FIDELITY GROUP OF COMPANIES

    invites qualified applicants for the following position:

    MANAGER -

    ~The applicant must have the following minimum qualifications:

    * Superior organization, communication, interpersonal and computer skills

    RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

    ° Client Relationship Management

    * Investment of client funds

    * Monthly management reports

    * Quarterly reports to clients
    -* Business development and marketing activities
    * Account opening formalities

    * Invoicing & booking fees

    e Estate Planning

    ¢ Administration of Trusts

    ¢ Production of trust deeds, letter of wishes & testamentary trusts

    ¢ Training, management and coaching of staff

    Send resume no later than February 7th, 2007 to:

    The Human Resource Director
    Fidelity > 51 Frederick Street
    P.O. Box N-4853 « Nassau, Bahamas

    f: 326.3000

    & Wealth Management Services

    e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com

    SR EIA UST ESL

    bath apartments






























    national defense rose at a rate of
    11.9 percent in the fourth quarter,
    the most since the spring of 2003,
    when the country went to war
    with Iraq. , .

    All those positive contributions

    to GDP helped to blunt some ©

    negative forces.

    Investment in home building
    during the fourth quarter plunged
    at'a rate of 19:2 percent, even
    worse than the 18.7 percent drop
    in the prior quarter. Both were
    the worst drops in 15 years.

    The drop in residential building
    in the fourth quarter shaved 1.16
    percentage points off GDP. In

    the third quarter, it sliced a bigger :

    1.20 percentage point off of over-
    all economic growth. That led to




    maintenance.

    Please send resume to:

    |

    Telephone calls will not be accepted.

    hope that the damage to the
    economy from the housing slump
    might be easing a bit.

    In the troubled automotive sec-
    tor, a pullback in car and truck
    production shaved 1.17 percent-
    age points off fourth-quarter
    GDP. Businesses, meanwhile,
    trimmed investment in equipment
    and software. They also didn’t
    invest as much in building their
    inventories as they had in the pre-
    vious quarter.

    An inflation gauge tied to the
    GDP report showed that core

    prices — excluding food and

    energy — rose at a rate of 2.1 per-
    cent in the final quarter of last
    year, down from a 2.2 percent
    pace in the third quarter.

    PEPSI-COLA BAHAMAS BOTTLING COMPANY
    Applicants are invited from suitably qualified individuals to fill the position of:
    PRODUCTION MANAGER

    The incumbent will have overall responsibility of managing all aspects
    of the manufacturing operation which include the control of raw material
    utilization, finished goods production, quality assurance and plant

    Ideal candidate would at minimum have an Associate’s Degree in a
    technical field, experience in Supervisory Management and five years
    experience in manufacturing plant operations é

    Human Resources Manager

    P. O. Box N-3004
    Nassau, Bahamas.
    FAX: 364-2123

    3.5 per cent in 2006 Q4

    Even with the slight improve-
    ment, underlying inflation is run-
    ning higher than the Federal
    Reserve would like. For all of
    2006, core inflation rose by 2.2
    percent, up from 2.1 percent in

    2005. The Federal Reserve, wrap-

    ping up a two-day meeting
    Wednesday, is widely expected
    to hold a key interest rate steady
    at 5.25 percent. The Fed has left
    rates alone since August, follow-
    ing a two-year stretch of rate
    increases, the longest in Fed his-
    tory. Economists believe the Fed
    is on course to achieve its goal of
    slowing the economy sufficiently
    to thwart inflation but not so
    much as seriously hurt economic
    activity.








    7 GERACE RESEARCH CENTRE SCHOLARSHIPS
    (FORMALLY) BAHAMAS FIELD STATION AWARDS

    MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY



    Paella: FALL 2007

    Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for nine (9) full scholarships
    and two (2) partial scholarships tenable at accredited institutions in the United States

    of America under the Bahamas Field Station/Ministry of
    commencing September 2007.

    Education Agreement (1971),

    Under the Agreement, participating Colleges and Universities will offer full tuition
    scholarships and the Ministry of Education, Science & Technology will pay board and

    lodging charges.

    Applicants should have gained admission into one of the following institutions where
    _ the number and type of awards available is indicated:

    ALBRIGHT COLLEGE, Reading, Pennsylvania
    WITTENBERG UNIVERSITY, Springfield, Ohio
    DICKINSON COLLEGE, Carlisle, Pennsylvania
    HARTWICK COLLEGE, Oneonta, New York

    MIAMI UNIVERSITY OF OHIO, Oxford, Ohio
    UNIVERSITY OF NEW HAVEN, New Haven, Connecticut
    ELMIRA COLLEGE, Elmira, New York

    EMPORIA STATE UNIVERSITY, Emporia, Kansas
    YOUNGSTOWN STATE UNIVERSITY, Ohio

    1
    1
    1

    Application Forms will be accepted only for the Colleges/Universities specified

    above.

    Applicants must be Bahamian citizens, sh
    education in The Bahamas, and be in possession 0
    including English language and Mat

    ould have successfully completed high school
    f at least 5 G.C.E/B.G.C.S.E. subjects,
    hematics at grade A, B, or C.

    Bahamian citizens currently pursuing studies at one of the named institutions may apply
    for this award and should submit an up-to-date transcript along with the completed

    application form.

    Applicants should note that the area of study must be one deemed acceptable for the
    further development of the country.

    Further details and application forms may be obtained from the Scholarship and Education
    Loan Division of The Ministry of Education or from the Ministry of Education website

    at

    Completed application forms should

    be returned to The Scholarship and Education

    Loan Division, Ministry of Education, Science & Technology,
    P. O. Box N-3913, No later than Monday, April 30th, $

    Application forms received after this date will not be considered.
    SCHOLARSHIP & EDUCATION LOAN DIVISION

    MINISTRY OF EDUCATION


    THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007

    SECTION

    Fax: (242) 328-2398

    E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



    CUT



    4 @ MIAMI HERALD
    > __ SPORTS INSIDE



    ~ Rattlers crush Stingrays

    @ BASKETBALL
    By KELSIE JOHNSON
    Sports Reporter

    THE pathway to the Gov-
    ernment Secondary Schools
    Sporting Association (GSS-
    SA) championships has got-
    ten a little clearer for the CI
    Gibson Rattlers senior girls,
    yesterday.

    The team hammered the
    CV Bethel Stingrays girls 57-
    11 to keep a clean win-loss
    record and post their second
    highest win on the season.

    But the Rattlers, who are
    currently leading the girls
    division, will have to cross
    their fingers now that teams
    are gunning for the top posi-
    tion.

    The team might have
    blown away the Stingrays in
    their two match-ups, but
    they had to fight tooth and
    nail to get past the CC
    Sweeting Cobras.

    According to head coach : wf

    Kevin ‘KJ’ Johnson, the
    team is still the best on paper.
    and on the-court but will
    need to strengthen on both
    the offensive and defensive
    ends if they want to hold of
    the threats from the other
    teams.

    In yesterday’s game, even
    though the Rattlers had con-

    ‘trol of the game from the
    opening tip, Johnson
    believes that they made to
    many mental mistakes, that
    led to easy baskets for the
    Stingrays.

    The Rattlers sent the
    Stingrays to the line 12 times
    in the first half and another
    13 in the second half.

    This was the only hope for
    the Stingrays, who tried their
    best to post a score on the
    board by driving to the bas-
    ket.

    Even though they were
    given the open lane at the
    free throw line the team
    went 11-for-25 on the night.

    Coach Johnson said: “The
    girls played ‘hard, even

    though they got out to a slow
    and sluggish start. They were
    able to pick things up in the
    second half gaining posses-
    sion on easy balls, they were
    also able to convert on some
    turnovers to make easy bas-
    kets.

    “What we try to do was

    apply the press in the second
    half and work on proper
    rotation so they can execute’
    on defence and score easy
    baskets.

    “I don’t want the team to
    sleep on any of the teams,
    because CC has a good team
    and their girls are tough. My
    girls they are the better team
    but they are not as strong as
    they can be. They are young
    and soft, but good players.
    Playing CC was a test for the
    team and we are looking for-
    ward to the next match.”

    Johnson did reveal that the
    team will work on their
    weaknesses in preparation
    for the other matches.

    The Rattlers were led by

    Inderia Saunders and Kenva
    Johnson, both ending the
    night with 10 points, con-
    tributing to the win was Erna
    Serphine with eight points.
    __ For the Stingrays, Tenaz
    Higgs would lead all scorers
    with five points, Jessica
    Francis had three and
    Daneisha Greene had

    two.

    The Stingrays will take to
    the court on Friday, trying to
    avenge the loss suffered yes-
    terday.



    @ CI GIBSON Rattlers senior girls apply their full court press on a CV Bethel player, yesterday.

    PIP el

    clue tems sco

    lm TRACK AND FIELD
    By KELSIE JOHNSON
    Sports Reporter

    THE NCAA isn’t the only confer-
    ence getting action from Bahamian
    collegiate athletes, the NAIA is also
    cashing in on some top perfor-
    mances.

    The NAIA conference released
    their weekly indoor performance list-
    ings yesterday, and Bahamians com-
    peting in this conference made sure
    that their names appeared in the top
    rankings.

    These listings are used as a per-
    formance guide for the athletes who
    are hoping to qualify for the 26th
    annual NAIA indoor championships
    set for March 8th-10th at the Memo-
    rial Center, in Johnson, Tennessee.

    However, it is not certain if any of
    the Bahamians competing in this
    conference have qualified for the
    indoor championships since the qual-
    ification times are not listed on the
    conference’s website.



    SN



    Conference releases
    indoor performance list



    But this hasn’t stopped Missouri
    Baptist Kenton Taylor from burn-
    ing up the track.

    Taylor leads the men’s 60m hur-
    dles with a season’s best of 7.19 sec-
    onds, his closest rival is Lamar
    Baskin who has a time of 8.11 sec-
    onds and Gentell Skyes with 8.18
    seconds.

    In the men’s 60m, Lavardo Sands
    is ranked 15th overall with a time of
    7.01 seconds. The leading time is 6.69
    seconds posted by Mike Rodgers of
    Oklahoma Baptist, Paulvince Oboun
    is second with a time of 6.72 seconds
    and Brian Melvin, third with 6.81
    seconds.

    Ramon Miller might have posted

    the fastest outdoor time in the NAIA
    conference last year, but he will have
    to settle for a sixth place ranking in
    the 400m Miller has a time of 50.19
    seconds, he his joined by fellow'‘coun-
    tryman, who is also a member of the
    Dickinson State University track and
    field team, Jameson Strachan. Stra-
    chan is ranked eighth with 50.46 sec-
    onds. The leading time in the event
    belongs to Travis Brown, 48.31 sec-
    onds.

    This might be Dominic Goodman’s
    first year with Dickinson State, but
    he is no stranger to the NAIA rank-
    ings.

    Last year Goodman competed for
    Lindenwood University where he

    io heep ther clean record



    (Photo: Tim Clarke)



    was considered one of the leading
    jumpers at the school and confer-
    ence.

    This is still the case for Goodman,
    who has secured the fifth spot in the
    triple jump, with 48-03.25 and sec-
    ond in the long jump with 23-07.50.
    Joining him in the long jump rank-
    ings is teammate Roosevelt Curry
    with a best of 23-06.75.

    The times turned in by Laniece
    Clarke over the weekend came just
    in time, for the second year member
    of Missouri Baptist track and field
    team.

    Clarke jumped two spots up the
    ladder in the women’s 60m dash with
    a season’s best of 7.60 seconds, for
    the fourth slating. The leading time is
    7.08 seconds posted by Judy John-
    son.

    Another Bahamian in the mix of
    things is Astra Curry with a time of
    7.47 seconds for the 19th spot overall.

    Clarke has also dented the charts
    in'the 200m with a best of 25.68 sec-
    onds, she is ranked fifth.


    HORSE RACING




    COMMENTARY



    ANDY LYONS/GETTY IMAGES

    Barbaro’s plight
    and valiant fight,
    stirred our hearts

    BY DICK JERARD!
    Philadelphia Daily News

    -hy were so many people
    \ \ / attracted to Barbaro? Why
    were they so devoted? Why

    was Monday a day they feared so
    much? It wasn’t just that the horse
    won the Kentucky Derby looking for
    all the world like the next great race-
    horse. It wasn’t just that he was
    injured when the elusive Triple
    Crown seemed so close. And it wasn’t
    just that the colt seemed to have an
    uncommon will to live.

    It was all of that, and it was our
    devotion to animals. Barbaro’s story
    was something we understood
    instinctively. This was a magnificent
    animal that needed humanhelp. —

    "The human story played out
    through the eyes and voice of a veteri-

    narian who is equal parts compassion- .

    ate and pragmatic, two owners who
    so loved their horse that all that mat-
    tered was the horse’s well-being, and
    an Olympic-hero trainer who, within |
    two weeks, found himself on his
    sport’s highest mountain and in its
    deepest valley with the same horse.

    In the end, Barbaro was-euthanized
    Monday at New Bolton Center in
    Kennett Square, Pa. It was the
    humane thing. The colt was suffering.

    It is the attempt to save'a beloved
    horse that everybody will remember.

    Who couldn't get this story?

    -AHEARTBREAKING STORY |

    Pat Chapman got it. She lived her
    fairy-tale horse story in 2004, when
    Smarty Jones, the colt she owned with
    her husband, Roy, took everybody on
    aracing ride that we all thought
    ‘couldn’t possibly be duplicated.

    “ “Te shook me up When'l heard,” she “

    said Monday from Florida. “It was a
    complete shock to me. I am just very
    saddened, heartbroken for Gretchen
    and Roy [Jackson] and all the fans.”

    Chapman lived through the adula- —

    tion of the Triple Crown. And then
    ‘she had to deal with backlash when |
    Smarty was retired because of injury.

    “Smarty had that compromised leg.
    with the cartilage loss,” she said.

    She was so concerned about
    Smarty he was retired a few months
    after the 2004 Belmont Stakes.

    “(Racehorses | are almost like fam-
    ily,” Chapman said. “They give every-
    thing they’ve got, and then alittle
    more. To be in that position is heart-
    breaking.”

    Chapman could not have imagined
    that another horse would come along
    that people would get so attached to.

    But it happened with Barbaro.

    “I’ve never seen anything like it,”
    she said. “As well loved as Smarty
    was, this horse went beyond that.”

    ‘SO MANY ADORED HIM’

    People inside and outside racing
    got it. They sent e-mails by the hun-
    dreds — wanting to know every detail
    about Barbaro, sharing their feelings
    — because it was important to them.

    “The Barbaro story hits me in a dif-
    ferent place,” wrote Suzy Stepnowski,
    who grew up ina small town in North
    Jersey. “I love horses.”

    Stepnowski watched the last year’s
    Preakness race like millions of others.

    “When Barbaro went down, my

    heart stopped, as so many others.did,” |

    she wrote. “T watched the news and
    the Internet for word every moment
    of the day.”

    Sandie Dennis of Greensboro, N.C., |

    summed up so many feelings so well
    when she wrote: “This horse and his
    caregivers have captured something
    in many, many people — horse lovers
    and regular people alike. They give us
    hope, and they show us courage.”

    Barbaro’s owners, Roy and
    Gretchen Jackson, got it. The trainer, .
    Michael Matz, got it. The vet, Dr.
    Dean Richardson, got it.

    “I have very positive thoughts,”
    Gretchen Jackson said. “It was a bril-
    liant time... . It was great that we had
    so many people that adored him.”

    It was, as horse racing so often is,
    as high as you can be, and as low. It is
    simply the nature of the sport

    “T knew if this day came, that it
    would be very difficult to keep my
    composure,” Richardson said Mon-
    day. “But it is what itis. It’s not the
    first horse I've cried over.”



    sos nannies SO SSEP SNR SSEORPUSNE SSO OMAN RLSM SEC8A8 508 2RCBSSURGCESEREAESHLSEESICODEIRDEISLRSEESRLSE OER IOEE CU GLEEEOOETOALLONSLESS ORES AEE EEN LEEE SDL EUNEED SELB STOLEN RAG

    THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007



    3E

    INTERNATIONAL EDITION

    COLLEGE BASKETBALL | INDIANA 71, NO. 2 WISCONSIN 66

    Hoosiers knock off the Badgers

    BY STEVE HERMAN
    Associated Press
    BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — The
    scariest moment for AJ. Ratliff
    came after the game was over.
    Ratliff scored 18 of his season-
    high 20 points in the second half
    Wednesday night, Indiana held off

    No. 2 Wisconsin 71-66, ending the

    Badgers’ 17-game win-

    ning streak. But before

    Ratliff and the rest of

    his teammates could get

    off the court, several x

    thousand delirious fans

    stormed out of the stands and onto

    the floor in a wild celebration.
    “Ym claustrophobic anyway,”

    said Ratliff, who was quickly

    mobbed by the Indiana fans. “Il was

    just trying to get to the locker

    room. It was funny, but it was kind

    of scary at the same time.” |

    Ratliff was even scarier for the
    Badgers in the game. He had a pair
    of 3-pointers during a 13-1 run and
    another 3-pointer that gave the
    Hoosiers (16-5, 6-2 Big Ten) a 53-43
    lead with less than 10 minutes
    remaining in the game.

    A rebound basket by Alando
    Tucker, who led Wisconsin (21-2,
    7-1) with 23 points, and
    two 3-pointers. by
    Kammron. Taylor
    helped the Badgers tie
    the game at 59. But
    Ratliff scored six of

    Indiana’s next eight points, includ-
    ing two free’throws with a minute
    to go to for a 70-66 lead, and the
    Badgers never recovered.
    Ratliff, a junior guard who has
    _been the Hoosiers’ top scorer off
    the bench in the past, three games
    and in five of the past six, hit six of





    ~ PRO FOOTBALL |



    DARRON CUMMINGS/AP

    UPSET SPECIAL: |U’s Roderick
    Wilmont celebrates victory.

    his seven shots, including four
    3-pointers, in the second half.

    “I felt somebody had to step up
    and make a play,” Ratliff said. “I
    felt like I was hitting all my shots,

    and I was open, so I had all the .

    SUPER BOWL XLI

    confidence in the world.”

    DJ. White added 16 points for
    the Hoosiers, who beat their high-
    est-ranked opponent since an
    NCAA Tourment upset of top-
    ranked Duke in 2002.

    “This was a tremendous college
    basketball game,” Indiana coach

    Kelvin Sampson said.

    “When you get down to a pos-
    session game, you’ve got to make
    baskets.”

    After Ratliffs final basket,
    Tucker missed the first of a one-
    and-one free throw opportunity,

    and the Hoosiers rebounded as the |

    Assembly Hall crowd began chant-
    ing “AJ. RATLIFF!”

    Tucker also missed a 3-point
    attempt with 10 seconds left, and

    Earl Calloway iced the game by.

    hitting one of two free throws.
    e BASKETBALL REPORT

    Fans stuff themselves full of the NFL

    BY MANNY NAVARRO ~
    mnavarro@MiamiHerald.com
    Longtime ESPN anchor Chris
    Berman was among the more
    than 3,000 registered journalists
    to participate in Tuesday’s Super

    ' Bowl Media Day.

    Berman was among the first
    to feed the beast — the glutton-
    ous NFL — with his charismatic
    nature, wit and analysis.

    _Inhis 26 yeais with ESPN, he

    has seen the NFL grow to a dif-
    ferent magnitude. The glutton-
    ous growth of media coverage.
    The fan participation in fantasy
    football. Increased spending on
    NEL merchandise, including |
    video games. Gambling. It all has
    some wondering: Is there too
    much football to go around?

    “T’m a football fan myself. I

    like it a lot,” said Jeffrey McCall,
    a professor of communications

    SUPER BOWL XLI | INSIDE THE GAME

    Golden years: Edwin Pope has seen them all

    ® For the past 50 years, the eloquent writing of Edwin Pope has
    graced the pages of The Miami Herald. Pope has covered every
    major sports event, including all 40 Super Bowls, in his career.

    BY ARMANDO SALGUERO
    asalguero @MiamiHerald.com

    Fifty years ago, before the
    Internet and ESPN, before the
    Super Bow! was a thought in Pete
    Rozelle’s imagination,
    Edwin Pope tried to get
    a $1.95 requisition
    approved by an Atlan-
    ta-Journal Constitution
    editor so the newspa-
    per’s sports reporters wouldn't
    have to walk a hundred yards to
    the nearest pencil sharpener.

    The requisition for the new °
    pencil sharpener was summarily



    denied, leaving the paper’s sports
    department with dull pencils —
    and no Pope.

    “J walked out of that meeting

    _ and asked myself, ‘Is this where

    you want to spend the
    rest of your life work-
    ing?’ ” Pope recalls
    today. “And the answer
    was no.”

    Pope called the
    Miami Herald’s sports editor and
    said, “Do you need a man?”

    The answer was yes.

    “T flew down to Miami the
    next day and started working



    SUPER EXPERIENCE: Edwin Pope.

    right away,” Pope says.

    Pope has spanned the time since
    that Sept. 8, 1956, day by delivering
    to South Florida his folksy but
    pointed commentary — copy that
    has taken readers from Albert-

    at DePauw University, a school
    just outside of Indianapolis.
    “But I do wonder sometimes
    if it becomes too much and it
    changes people’s lifestyles. Peo-
    ple can be planted in a chair to
    watch football for a long time.
    Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays,
    Mondays. There are plenty of
    other things sensible people ‘can

    * TURN TO NFL FANS





    ville’s Olympics to Wimbledon’s
    tennis and every point on the
    sports landscape in between.

    “T’ve been an NFL head coach
    and was involved in six Super
    Bowls, and the thing I remember
    the most is the dramatic change in
    the attention this game gets,” says
    former Miami Dolphins coach Don
    Shula, a member of the Pro Foot-
    ball Hall of Fame.

    “In that first Super Bowl
    I coached, we got off the bus, and
    there were a couple of writers
    there, and we went to the hotel
    lounge, and that’s where we had
    our press conference.

    “Pope was there.”

    * TURN TO POPE



    5M TUR Um met

    a

    Ew Zs
    4E | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007

    SOCCER

    Bayern Munich fires coach ,

    From Miami Herald Wire Services

    Werder Bremen and
    Schalke moved eight points
    clear of Bayern Munich with
    victories in the Bundesliga on
    Wednesday, the same day the
    defending champ fired coach
    Felix Magath.

    Bremen won 2-0 at Bayer
    Leverkusen, which finished
    with 10 men, and Schalke beat
    Alemannia Aachen 2-1 at
    home.

    Both teams, which clash
    Sunday in the next round,
    improved to 42 points, with
    Bremen ahead on goal differ
    ence, ;

    Stuttgart beat Ariminia Bie-
    lefeld on Tuesday te improve
    te 35 points and move past

    _ Bayern (34) into third place.

    Bayern managed only a 0-6
    draw at home Tuesday against
    15th-placed Bochum and fired
    Magath less than 24 hours
    later.

    Despite sweeping the
    domestic double in his first
    two years with the club, Bay-
    ern fired Magath over con-
    cerns that the German power-

    house would fail to claim a

    place in next season’s Euro-
    pean Champions League.

    Magath’s predecessor Ott-
    mar Hitzfeld was brought in
    as a replacement.

    Bremen and Schalke both
    took advantage of Bayern’s
    slump with routine victories.

    Bremen led in the 15th min-
    ute when Miroslav Klose
    headed in his 10th goal of the
    season at the far post, and
    Hugo Almeida fired in a
    sharp, low left-footed shot in
    the 78th, after Leverkusen’s

    SPORTS ROUNDUP



    OLIVER LANG/AFP-GETTY IMAGES

    HE’S ALL DONE NOW: Bayern
    Munich fired Felix Magath
    with Germany’s defending
    champions in fourth place.

    Gonzalo Castro had been
    ejected for a foul tackle on
    Tim Borowski.

    Schalke rallied to edge
    Aachen, which led in the 17th
    ona goal by Vedad Ibisevic.

    But Rafinha’s penalty six
    minutes later and Aachen cap-
    tain Moses Sichone’s own-
    goal in the 74th gave Schalke
    the victory.

    In another game, Ham-
    burger SV played to its 12th
    draw of the season, 1-1 at home
    against Energie Cottbus, and

    fell to the bottom of the stand-
    ‘ings. Hamburg won only once

    in 19 games and the draw
    could spell the end of coach
    Thomas Doll’s tenure.

    Juan Pablo Sorin started
    Hamburg by converting a
    fourth-minute penalty. But
    Sergiu Radu equalized after a
    lucky bounce and Hamburg
    never recovered, although
    Colin Benjamin hit the post
    one minute later.

    sonds

    will not sign
    revised deal

    From Miami Herald Wire Services

    Barry Bonds’ contract
    with the San Francisco Giants
    isn’t final just yet.

    After the commissioner’s
    office rejected Bonds’ one-
    year, $15.8 -millicn deal
    because it contained a person-
    al-appearance provision, the
    team sent revised documents
    to his agent, Jeff Borris. :

    “At this time, Barry is noi
    signing the new documents,”
    Borris said.

    Baseball’s Uniform Playex
    Contract states a player
    “agrees to cooperate with the
    club in any and all reasonable
    promotional activities.”
    Bonds’ contract had additional
    language that the commission-
    er’s office rejected.

    Borris did not detail the.

    provisions in dispute, but a
    baseball executive, speaking
    on condition of anonymity
    because these details had not
    been made public, said they
    dealt with personal appear-
    ances.

    Giants executives did not
    immediately return telephone
    calls seeking comment.

    Bonds and the Giants, who
    agreed to financial terms on
    Dec. 7, said Monday the
    drawn-out agreement had
    been finalized.

    Still, they disagree on the
    meaning of an unusual provi-
    sion in the deaj relating to
    Bonds’ potential! legal prob-
    lems.-In the contract, a list of
    crimes acts is spelled out in a
    section.

    “Player acknowledges and

    agrees chat an 1adictment for
    any criminai act under [that
    section]... is proper grounds
    for terminatiog of this con-
    tract, Bonds’ coiiivact states

    The language in the con-
    tract was read to The Associ-
    ated Press by a person with a
    copy of the agreement.

    e Elsewhere: Boston Red
    Sox ace Curt Schilling says he
    isn’t looking for a raise now
    that he’s decided to pitch in
    2008 — he just wants a con-
    tract. If he doesn’t have an

    extension by the end of spring
    training. Schilling says he
    won't negotiate during the
    season and will become a free
    agent tor the first time in his
    Cai after the 2007 World
    Series... Right-hander Mark
    Prior and the Chicago Cubs
    agreed on a one-year deal and
    avoided salary arbitration.
    Prior will get $3,575,000 and



    would earn an additional!’

    $150,000 each for making 27
    and 30 starts. Once considered
    a Cubs’ ace of the future, Prior
    has won just 18 games the past
    three seasons while battling
    injuries.,... New York Mets
    pitcher Dave Williams had
    surgery to repair a herniated
    disk in his neck and it’s
    unclear how long he could be
    sidelined. The team also
    announced that it agreed toa
    minor-league contract with
    outfielder Ruben Sierra and
    invited him to spring training,
    and right-hander Jason Stan-
    dridge chose to become a free
    agent after he was designated
    for assignment last week. ...
    Yankee Stadium is going out
    with an All-Star salute. whe
    beloved oid bailpark will host
    the All-Star Game in 2008, the
    final season before the New
    York Yankees move into a
    new stadium being built
    across the street in the Bronx.
    Baseball Commissioner Bud
    Selig and New York Mayor
    Michael Bloomberg were on
    hand Wednesday at City Hall
    for the announcement, which
    had been expected. ... The
    Milwaukee Brewers signed
    right-hande: Jose Capelian
    to a one-year conivact. Capel-
    lan was 4-2 with a 4.40 ERA in
    6] appearalices with the Brew-
    aus last season. Milwaukee
    also signed outfielder Drew
    Anderson, second baseman
    Hernan Iribarren, cight-
    hander Mike Jones and left-
    hander Manny Parra

    ETC.

    e NFL: The Dallas Cow
    boys won’t name Bill Parcells’
    replacement until after the

    INTERNATIONAL EDITION

    SOCCER | BASEBALL | ETC. |

    Hannover got two goals
    from Brazilian Vinicius in the
    first 37 minutes and another
    from fellow defender Frank
    Fahrenhorst before Jan
    Rosenthal and Altin Lala
    completed a 5-0 rout of Hertha
    Berlin.

    Leon Andreasen. who
    transferred to Mainz from Bre-
    men during the winter break,
    gave his new team its second
    consecutive victory by con-
    verting a penalty in the 6ist
    against Borussia Dortmuid
    The victory moved Mainz out
    of the bottom of the table.

    Magath wasn’t the only
    coach to go Wednesday —
    Jupp Heynckes resigned
    from Borussia Moenchenglad-
    bach after a winless run oi 13
    games left his team next-to-
    last in the table. »

    ELSEWHERE.

    e Spain: Getafe took a
    firm stride toward its first
    appearance in the Copa del
    Rey semifinais when it
    downed visiting Osasuna 3-0.

    Striker Daniel Guiza,
    defender Alexis Ruano and
    substitute Maris Verpakov-
    skis all scored in the quarterti-
    nal first leg at Getafe’s Alfonso
    Perez stadium.

    Deportivo La Coruna is also
    a clear favorite to reach the
    semifinals after rallying to
    beat second-division Vallado-
    lid 4-1.

    Striker Viadimir Manchev,
    making his debut for Vallado-
    lid after transferring from
    Levante, put the visitors ahead
    in the 22nd minute.

    The two-time champion,

    however, took the lead on
    goals by Pablo Alvarez and
    Ruben Rivera in the 53rd and
    67th minutes, and added insur-
    ance with a pair of goals by
    Joan Verdu and Juanma
    Delgado in the final two min-
    utes. .

    e Italy: AS Roma
    advanced to its third consecu-
    tive Italian Cup final, beating
    AC Milan 3-1 in the second leg
    of the semifinals.

    Alessandro Mancini and
    Simone Perrotta both scored
    in the first 23 minutes and fel-
    low midfielder David Pizarro
    added a tally just after ‘haif-
    time to send Roma through
    with a 5-3 aggregate victory.

    Alberto Gilardino scored
    for. Milan.

    Roma will meet either two-
    time defending ‘champion
    Inter Milan or Sampdoria in
    the title match. Inter leads 3-0
    entering the second leg of
    their semifinal today. :

    The finals are scheduled for
    April 18 and May 9.

    e England: A_ Dubai-
    based consortium pulled out
    of a proposed $882 million
    takeover of Liverpool, clearing
    the way for an American busi-
    nessman to buy the storied
    soccer club.

    Dubai International Capital,
    owned by the ruler of Dubai,
    Sheik Mohammed bin
    Rashid al-Maktoum, called
    off negotiations with the five-
    time European champions
    after hearing that the board of
    directors was considering a
    rival bid from George Gillett
    Jr., owner of the Montreal
    Canadiens.



    DARREN HAUCK/AP

    NO SIGNATURE: ‘At this time, Barry is not signing the new
    documents,’ Jeff Borris, the agent for slugger Barry
    Bonds, said on Wednesday regarding Bonds’ contract

    Super Bowl. In his first public
    comments since Parcells
    retired on Jan. 22, owner and
    general manager Jerry Jones
    said he wouldn’t have a deci-
    sion on a new coach until next
    week. Jones has already inter-
    viewed eight candidates, and
    might add to that list.... San
    Diego Chargers linebacker
    Steve Foley sued the city of
    Coronado, Calif., and the off-
    duty police officer who shot
    him three times outside his
    homie, his attorney said. The
    civil suit accuses Officer
    Aaron Mansker of negligence
    nd excessive force, and seeks
    unspecified damages trom the
    officer and the city. he
    Detroit Lions hired former
    NFL fullback Sam Gash as an
    assistant special teams coach.

    . Garrett Giemont was
    hired as the Pittsburgh Steel-
    ers’ strength and conditioning
    coach, replacing Chet Fuhr-
    man.

    e College football: As an
    audiotape spread on the Inter-
    net, Alabama coach Nick
    Saban acknowledged
    Wediiesday using a phrase
    considered derogatory to
    Cajuis but said he doesn’t
    condone such langage and
    merely was repeating some-
    thing a friend told hii.

    Sabai, a former LSU aid
    Mian Delphins coach, used
    ab, ethnic slur jai. 3 while «il
    ing Florida reporters i Tusca-
    loosa, Ala., an anecdote about
    an LSU fan’s angry reaction to
    his hiring.

    e Tennis: Martina Hingis

    overpowered Australian
    Nicole Pratt 6-1, 7-5 to
    advance to the quarterfinals of
    the Pan Pacific Open in Tokyo.
    .. . Defending champion Ivan

    . Ljubicic defeated Roko Kar-

    anusic 6-4, 6-3 in the first
    round of the Zagreb Open in
    Croatia. He will face Stefan
    Koubek in the second round
    — a repeat of last year’s final.
    Koubek rallied to beat Felici-
    ano Lopez 2-6, 7-6 (7-2), 6-4.
    ... Albert Montanez beat
    Gustavo Kuerten 6-1, 6-4,
    ousting the three-time French
    Open champion from the Vina
    del Mar Open in Chile. ...
    Fifth-seeded Florian Mayer of
    Germany and seventh-seeded
    Guillermo Garcia-Lopez of
    Spain reached the quarterfi-

    _hals at the Delray Beach (Fla.)

    International Tennis Champi-
    onships for the second consec
    utive year.... Kim Clijsters
    pulled out of next week's
    Open Gaz de France in Paris
    because of a bad hip. Clijsters
    said she wants to make sure
    she is fit to play the following
    week at the Diamoiud Games
    in Antwerp — her last tourna-
    Meni wm Belgium betore vetiz
    ing at the ena of the year.

    e Boxing: Former world
    champion Ricardo “‘El Mata
    dor’ Mayorga has been
    arrested on fraud charges in
    his uative Nicaragua.

    Mayorga was arrested
    Tuesday at the Managua air-
    port as he boarded a plane
    headed for the U.S., National
    Police spokeswoman Miriam
    Torres said Wednesday.

    MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD



    PEOPLE IN SPORTS



    JACQUELYN MARTIN/AP

    TOWERING FIGURE: Larry La, who is 5-6, translates for
    Sun Ming Ming, 23, who was introduced Wednesday.
    as the new center for the Maryland Nighthawks of the
    American Basketball Association. At 7-9, Sun is now
    the tallest player in professional basketball history.

    A giant among giants

    The “have size, will travel” basketball odyssey that’s
    taken 7-9, 370-pound Sun Ming Ming from China to Califor-

    - nia to Kansas to North Carolina made its latest stop

    Wednesday in the back room of a Chinese restaurant in the
    tony Washington, D.C., suburb of Chevy Chase, Md.

    That’s where the Maryland Nighthawks of the American
    Basketball Association introduced their newest player, a

    sional basketball.

    ' man they’re touting as the tallest in the history of profes-

    Sun donned a uniform with the number 79 — Get it? —

    _and his new team’s owner and coach and a teammate all ©

    gushed about his “basketball IQ” and “soft hands.”

    The 23-year-old — who complained the XXXXXXL sweat

    shirt the team gave him was too small — was asked what his

    goals are.

    “T hope,” Sun said, “I make the NBA some day.”

    To which Nighthawks owner and ABA chief operating
    officer Tom Doyle said: “I’m quite sure he will.”

    Really? After all, Sun hasn’t played organized basketball
    in more than six months, since a brief stint with the Dodge
    City Legend of the United States Basketball League.

    Turns out, the NBA doesn’t overlook 7-footers.

    “We will monitor his progress. His name has cropped up,
    but since he’s never really played, I don’t know how he can
    be on our radar,” Marty Biake, the-NBA’s director of scout-
    ing, said in a telephone interview. But “as [former Utah Jazz
    coach] Frank Layden always said, “You can’t teach

    height.’ ”

    _ Princess for a day

    Serena Williams often
    refers to herself as a prin-
    cess. Now, she’s getting a
    promotion.

    The Australian Open
    champion has lent her voice
    to an episode of the ani-
    mated children’s show
    Loonatics Unleashed, airing.
    Feb. i7 on The CW network.

    Williams voices Queen
    Athena, who presides over
    an island colony of beautiful,
    powerful women with devi-
    ous plans for the planet and
    itsmen.

    “The character was
    described as being tall,
    strong, beautiful, so I guess
    that’s how I got the role,”
    Williams said, laughing. “I
    liked bringing my own char-~
    acter to the role. I’ve always
    thought of myself as a prin-
    cess, but Athena is a queen.
    So I had to work it a little.”

    Williams has guest-
    starred on such series as ER
    and My Wife and Kids.

    ‘In the first two periods, we
    played as good as we could. In
    the third period, we played as bad

    as we could.’

    - TED NOLAN. New York Islanders coach
    following Tuesday night's 4-3 overtime joss
    to the Detroit Red Wings. The Islanders led
    3-0 at the start of the third period

    Sold on soccer?

    Soccer is not Tiger
    Woods’ game. The world’s
    No. 1 golfer is more of an
    Americar football, basket-
    ball or baseball fan.

    But Woods believes
    David Beckham's move to
    the Los Angeles Galaxy will
    have an impact on the game
    in the United States.

    . Two NEL teams have
    abandoned L.A. in recent
    years, and the pop culture
    buzz associated with the
    flamboyant Beckham could
    be the catalyst that finally
    sparks soccer interest.

    “The Rams and the Raid-
    ers moved out. Now we’re
    looking for something else,
    and J think with David’s star
    power there, I think it will
    bring another notch and
    another thing for all of us in
    southern California to come
    out and watch,” Woods said
    Wednesday, a day before
    the start of the Dubai (UAE)
    Desert Classic.

    FLASHBACK

    On this day in history:
    1964

    In hockey, Bobby Rousseau v1 the Muntveal

    Canadiens scores five goals in a 9-3 victory over the Detroit

    Red Wings.

    1998 — David Graham captures the longest playoff in
    Senior PGA Tour history, beating Dave Stockton with a
    birdie on the 10th extra hole in the Royal Caribbean Classic.



    a FP PE
    THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com



    « . .
    _ >.” From Miami Herald Wire Services

    BOSTON — Kobe Bryant returned from
    his one-game suspension and had 43 points,
    eight rebounds and eight assists to help the
    -.. Los Angeles Lakers beat Boston 111-98 on

    .'. Wednesday night and send the Celtics to a
    ’.‘ franchise-record 13th consecutive loss.
    Bryant hit a pair of 3-pointers after the
    Celtics cut the deficit to 63-62 with 8:31 left in
    the third quarter. He also made a 30-footer at
    the end of the quarter to give the Lakers a
    10-point lead and threw down a reverse dunk
    in the final two minutes to electrify the fans
    who weren't already heading for the exits.
    He made a 3-pointer on the Lakers’ next
    possession, and when Los Angeles got the
    ball back the Boston fans, who had once con-
    sidered the Lakers their biggest rival, were

    chanting, “Kobe!”

    Bryant was suspended by the NBA after
    whacking — accidentally, he said — San
    Antonio’s Manu Ginobili in the face on Sun-

    . day.
    MAVERICKS 95, GRIZZLIES 94

    MEMPHIS, Tenn. -— Dirk Nowitzki over-

    BASKETBALL | HOCKEY

    PRO BASKETBALL

    ONE-MAN SHOW: Lakers superstar Kobe
    Bryant weaves through a pair of Celtics
    defenders during his 43-point night.

    came a tough shooting night with 26 points,

    including 16 in the fourth quarter, to lead the

    Mavericks. y
    RAPTORS 119, WIZARDS 109

    the Rockets to the victory.’

    TORONTO — Chris Bosh scored 34

    points and Jose Calderon had a career-high
    24 points and 11 assists to lead the Raptors.
    Toronto shot a season-high 59 percent and
    scored a franchise-record 43 points in the

    third quarter.
    PISTONS 113, NETS 89

    EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Richard
    -’ Hamilton scored 24 points and the Pistons
    set a team record by making 27 consecutive

    free throws in the victory.



    _ Florida fights off

    From Miami Herald Wire Services

    Lee Humphrey made three con-

    secutive 3-pointers to spark Florida’s
    rally from a double-digit deficit
    Wednesday night, and the top-ranked
    Gators, playing at home, beat Van-
    derbilt 74-64.

    Humphrey, one of the best outside
    shooters in the college game, added
    another 3-pointer that gave Florida a
    70-59 lead with 2:56 left and essen-
    tially sealed the team’s 13th consecu-
    tive victory.

    The Gators (20-2, 7-0 Southeast-

    _ern Conference) trailed by as many
    as 12 points in the first half and were
    down 41-30 at the break. But they
    looked much more like the defending
    national champs in the second half.

    Humphrey finished with 15 points.

    Florida extended its winning

    streak against Vanderbilt (15-7, 5-3) to .

    seven. The Gators have won of 12 of
    the past 13 games in the series.
    e No. 3 North Carolina 105,

    MAGIC 98, BUCKS 73

    76ERS 89, HORNETS 78

    OKLAHOMA CITY — Andre Iguodala
    scored 22 points, Samuel Dalembert grabbed
    15 rebounds and the 76ers spoiled point
    guard Chris Paul’s return from a sprained

    right ankle.



    22 points and grabbed 13 rebounds,
    and the Tar Heels hammered the vis-
    iting Hurricanes.

    Wayne Ellington scored 14 points
    for the Tar Heels (20-2, 6-1 Atlantic
    Coast Conference), who had no trou-
    ble winning their fifth consecutive
    game. North Carolina shot 56 percent
    — including 61 percent after halftime
    — and hit 12 of 24 3-pointers for
    another league victory by a double-
    digit margin — this time a huge one.

    Anthony Harris scored 18 points
    for the Hurricanes (9-13, 2-6), who
    have lost five games in a row — all in
    the ACC. Four of those five have
    come by at least 19 points.

    @ No. 4 Ohio State 78, Purdue
    60: Mike Conley scored 18 points,
    and Jamar Butler added 16, to help the
    visiting Buckeyes (19-3, 7-1 Big Ten)
    rout the Boilermakers (14-8, 3-5).

    While Purdue was concentrating
    on stopping 7-foot freshman Greg
    Oden, who finished the game with
    nine points, the Buckeyes made eight



    ROCKETS 112, SUPERSONICS 102
    HOUSTON — Tracy McGrady scored 36
    points to match Seattle’s Ray Allen and lead

    ORLANDO, Fla. — Hedo Turkoglu scored
    17 points and Tony Battie added a season-
    high 15 as the Magic ended a three-game skid.

    triumphant return

    KINGS 100, T’WOLVES 98

    MINNEAPOLIS — Kevin Martin had 28
    points and the go-ahead jump shot with 16.6
    seconds left, helping the struggling Kings
    stave off another road defeat.

    ___INTERNATIONAL EDITION





    Washington 27

    Orlando 24
    Miami 20
    Atlanta 17
    Charlotte 17

    :
    New Jersey 22
    New York 20
    Philadelphia 15



    BOBCATS 104, KNICKS 87 Boston 2

    CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Gerald Wallace
    scored 17 of his career-high 42 points in the
    fourth quarter and the Bobcats pulled away
    from cold-shooting New York. —

    HAWKS 115, WARRIORS 94

    ATLANTA — The Hawks capped their
    first winning month in almost three years
    with their highest point total of the season.

    Chicago 26
    Cleveland 26
    Indiana 24

    Milwaukee 18

    CENTRAL OW
    Detroit 26

    THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007 | SE



    NBASTANDINGS

    EASTERN CONFERENCE

    SOUTHEAST W__

    L_ Pet. GB 10 Str. Home Away Cont

    18 600 - 7-3 Ll 18-4 914 19-10
    22 «522 3% 28 W-1 15-9 9-13 1413
    25 444 «7 «(4-6 Wl 11-10 9-15 9-14
    27 «6386 9% «26-4 W-2 «(9-12 8-15 11-18
    28 «4.378 «10 «5-5 W-2 9-14 814 12-17



    23. 500 «- ‘7-3 W-l 15-7 8-16 16-9
    24 «478 «61 «64 «Ll 13-11 9-13 16-10
    28 «417, 4 46) LL 12-13) 8-15 12-18
    32. 319 8% 5-5 W-1l 7-11 8-21 10-17
    33.267 10% 0-10 L-13 4-18 815 &21

    L Pct. GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf
    18 591. - 64 W-1 12-9
    19 .578 % 6-4 W-3 20-6 6-13 20-8
    19 578 % 46 W-1 16-6 10-13 16-12
    21 533 2% 55 W-1 14-7 10-14 19-13
    28. 391 9 28 L2 10-8 8-20 8-18

    WESTERN CONFERENCE

    SOUTHWEST WL

    Pct. GB





    Dallas 38 (9
    ELSEWHERE San Antonio 32.14
    e Jazz: Power forward Carlos Boozer Houston 28 16 636 8% 13-11 15-14
    iB hail fracture in his left leg, an dis New Orleans 19 26 .422 18 6-15 10-17
    as a hairline tractur’ S 8) ] Memphis 12 35 .255 26 3-20 6-22
    expected to be out of action for several
    wap Weeks. , NORTHWEST OWL Pet. GB I Away Cont
    CHITOSE SUZUMEY AP e Bulls: Center Ben Wallace sat out Chi- Utah 29 17 «+630 - 13-11 18-10
    0’ i Clippers Denver 22 20 524 5 56 4-3 12-12 10-8 912
    Le Modus a pe pnedl slips 3 | Minnesota = «2223-489 GM 3-7
  • ate Wednesday night because of a bruise Portland 19 27 413 10 5:5 L-l 11-12 8-15 12-15
    tendon in his left knee. Seattle 17 29. 370 12 4-6 L3 13-11 4-18 7-19
    e Kings: Forward Shareef Abdur-Rahim
    was inactive for Wednesday night’s game at Paci. | Wet OB: Lie Str. Meme, “Avay _Cont
    Minnesota because of a sore right knee. Phoenix 36 9 800 - 91 Ll 193 176 168
    L.A. Lakers 28 18 .609 8% 5-5 W-1 19-6 9-12 17-10

    against Sacramento.

    COLLEGE BASKETBALL



    PHIL SANDLIN/AP

    FLOOR WORK: Florida center
    Joakim Noah: center, fights for
    the ball during a 74-64 victory.

    three-pointers. Butler was 4-of-7
    from three-point range.

    The Buckeyes shot 53 percent
    from the field and outrebounded the
    Boilermakers 38-29. Ohio State has
    won six games in a row in the series

    -e Timberwolves:.
    McCants returned from microfracture sur-
    gery on his right knee on Wednesday night

    e Clippers: The team signed guard Doug
    Christie to a 10-day contract.

    e Hornets: The Hornets planned to let a
    deadline pass Wednesday on the team’s
    option to play a third season at its temporary
    home in Oklahoma City.

    e Obituary: Stu Inman, who helped
    build the Portland Trail Blazers’ 1977 NBA
    championship team, died of an apparent
    heart attack. He was 80.

    Guard Rashad

    Orl. 98, Mil. 73
    Atl. 115, G.S.W.94
    Tor. 119, Was. 109
    Cha. 104, N.Y. 87
    LA.L. 111, Bos. 98
    Detroit 113, NJ. 89
    Dal. 95, Mem. 94
    Sac. 100, Min, 98
    Phi. 89, N.O. 78
    Hou. 112, Sea. 102
    “ Sac. at Min., late
    Den. at Por., late
    Chi. at L.A.C., late



    and 12 of the teams’ past 13 meetings.

    e No. 10 Texas A&M 73, lowa
    State 49: Joseph Jones scored 21
    points, and the Aggies (18-3, 6-1:;Big~
    12) stifled the Cyclones (11-10; 2-5):
    with tight defense to extend their
    home winning streak to 20.

    e No. 11 Memphis 87, Central
    Florida 65: Chris Douglas-Roberts
    scored 23 points, and Joey Dorsey
    had 22 points and nine rebounds, to
    help the visiting Tigers (18-3, 8-0
    Conference USA) trounce. the
    Golden Knights (15-6, 4-3).

    e No. 13 Butler 71, Youngs-
    town State 58: Mike Green scored a
    season-high 23 points as the Bulldogs
    (21-2, 9-1 Horizon League) beat the
    host Penguins (9-14, 4-7) for their
    seventh triumph in a row. Butler sur-
    passed the 20-victory mark for the
    third time in school history.

    e No. 15 Nevada 79, Louisiana
    Tech 71: Nick Fazekas and Marcellus
    Kemp each scored 20 points, and the
    Wolf Pack (20-2, 8-1 Western Ath-

    LA. Clippers 22 22
    Golden State 21 25
    Sacramento 18 26

    RESULTS AND SCHEDULES
    Wedneday’s results

    500 134% 7-3 W-1 16-8 6-14 14-17
    457154 3-7 ~=L-2 17-8 417_:13-15
    40917% 4-6 W-1 12-11 6-15 918

    Tonight’s games

    Cleveland at Miami, 8
    S.A. at Phoenix, 10:30

    Tuesday’s results

    Miami 110, Mil. 80
    Indiana 103, Boston 96
    Wash. 104, Detroit 99
    Cleveland 124,G.S.97 -
    N.Y. 99, Lakers 94

    Dallas 122, Seattle 102

    letic Conference) held off the host
    Bulldogs (6-15, 4-5) by closing the
    game with a 11-6 run.

    Vandy; UNC routs Miami

    -+@ North Carolina State 70,-
    Nov 16*Vitginia.Tech 59:.Gavin - -

    Grant scored all 16 of his points in the
    second half, and Ben McCauley
    scored 20, as the Wolfpack (12-8, 2-5
    ACC) knocked the host Hokies (16-6,
    6-2) out of first place in the ACC.

    e No. 19 Alabama 73, Louisi-
    ana State 70: Jermareo Davidson
    scored a career-high 31 points, and
    the Crimson Tide (16-5, 3-4 SEC) held

    _ off the host Tigers (13-8, 2-5), who

    pulled to 71-70 with 10 seconds left
    before Davidson’s last-second dunk.

    e No. 22 Texas 76, Texas Tech
    64: Kevin Durant scored 37 points
    and grabbed a season-high 23
    rebounds, and the Longhorns (16-5,
    6-1 Big 12) beat the host Red Raiders
    (15-7, 4-3), handing Bob Knight his
    llth loss to Texas since he arrived in
    2001. Knight’s Red Raiders have
    beaten Texas only twice:

    oo



    Miami 64: Tyler Hansbrough scored



    EASTERN CONFERENCE :

    SOUTHEAST WL OL SLPTS GF GA

    mnsontrsunnusenngarannuntnnsnonasounasonissposansnnsntnanansnasnasorussossacsssssssassanasnasiansninasscaisecstscssssnsseentsnsiinnen

    Atlanta 29 16 6 2 66165 160
    Carolina - 26.21 2 .4 58 163 168
    Tampa Bay 27 23 «1 «1 «(56165 163
    Washington 21 23 2 #5 49 160 180
    Florida 19 23 4 6 48 147 166

    HOME AWAY DIV
    14-7-3-115-9-3-112-4-4-1
    14-9-0-3 12-12-2-1 13-5-0-2
    12-13-00 15-10-1-1—11-7-0-0
    12-11-1-2. 9-12-1-3 8-10-11
    13-9-2-1 6-14-2-5 . 4-11-2-0 |

    |

    New Jersey 30 15 0 6 66 134 120
    Pittsburgh 2417 3 5 56165 153
    N.Y.Rangers 25 22 3 1 54149 151
    N.Y. Islanders 23 21 4 2 52 149 148
    Philadelphia 12 32 2 4 30120 189

    NORTHEAST OWL OL SLPTS GF GA

    Buffalo 34 14 2 2 72197 152
    Ottawa 30 21 2 O 62178 144
    Montreal 28 18 #1 4 61150 145
    Toronto 2521 2 4. 56 169 171
    Boston 22 23 1 3 48 139 186

    17-4-0-4 13-11-0-2. — 12-4-0-1
    13-8-2-2. 11-9-1-3.—13-5-1-1
    10-11-3-0 15-11-0-1 9-9-0-0
    12-9-3-1 11-12-1-1 9-7-2-0
    3-15-2-3. 9-17-0-1 — 3-13-0-3

    HOME Oe Se









    HOCKEY



    Sundin lifts Leafs past Rangers

    From Miami Herald Wire Services*

    NEW YORK — Mats Sundin’s break-
    away goal snapped a third-period tie and
    lifted the surging Toronto Maple Leafs to
    a 2-1 victory over the New York Rangers
    on Wednesday night.

    Sundin, who also assisted on Alexei
    Ponikarovsky’s tying power-play goal in
    the second period, hit the 20-goal mark
    for the 16th consecutive season — every

    That was enough to give the Leafs their
    fifth victory in six games, including four

    Brendan Shanahan scored for New
    York, which had a two-game winning

    The Rangers and Maple Leafs entered
    tied for ninth in the Eastern Conference,
    but Toronto — which had a vocal band of
    supporters in the stands — jumped into a
    three-way deadlock for seventh. :

    Andrew Raycroft, in his 13th consecu-
    tive start, made 37 saves as Toronto
    improved to 2-0 on its five-game trip one
    night after winning at Carolina. Shanahan
    nearly tied it with under 5 minutes left,
    but Raycroft stopped him at the left post.

    e Flyers: Center Peter Forsberg had a

    W111 7-1-1
    15-11-1-0 15-10-1-0 —13-8-0- :
    16-7-0-3 12-I1-1-1 10-6-0-4 one spent in the NHL.
    11-12-1-2 14-9-1-2-9-8-2-2
    14-10-0-2 8-13-1-1 10-11-0-1
    on the road.
    CENTRAL = W__L OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV
    Nashville 36 13.2 1 75185 133 18-3-2-1 18-10-00 17-4-1-0 streak broken.
    Detroit 32 14 3 3 70157 124 18-3-1-2 14-11-2-1 11-3-1-1
    St. Louis 20 23 4 4 48130 159 10-13-2-1 10-10-2-3 7-11-2-2
    Columbus 21°25 2 3 47129 155 12-10-1-2 9-15-1-1 —7-11-0-2
    Chicago 18 25 2 5 43124 156 11-13-1-2 7-12-1-3 9-12-1-0
    NORTHWEST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME "AM Dm
    Vancouver 28 19 1 3 60131 129 16-8-1-1 . 1 |
    Calgary 27°17 «3)— 360. 155 128 © -20-5-0-07-12-3-3.—10-5-1-2
    Minnesota 27 21. 0 4 58145 134 18-5-0-3 9-16-0-1 — 8-6-0-2
    Colorado 25 21 2 2 54157 147 14-10-1-2 11-11-10 —_9-5-1-0
    Edmonton 24 22 2 2 52136 146 15-10-1-1 9-12-1-1 8-10-1-0
    PACIFIC WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME = AWAY | DIV
    Anaheim 31 12.2 6 70171 131 17-4-1-4 14-8-1-2 — 11-3-0-1
    San Jose 33 17 0 1 67 157 117 17-9-0-1 16-8-0-0 ~—‘11-8-0-1
    Dallas 30 19 0 2 62136 126 15-8-0-1 15-11-0-1 14-6-0-0 ELSEWHERE
    Phoenix 23 25 1 1 48.140 175 12-11-1-0 11-14-0-1 | 7-12-1-1
    Los Angeles 17 30 3 3 40145 192 11-12-3-3 6-18-0-0 6-14-0-2

    Note: Two points for a win, one point for a tie and overtime loss
    RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

    Wednesday’s results

    Toronto 2, Rangers 1
    Phoenix at Anaheim, late
    Columbus at Edmonton, late

    Tonight’s games

    Wash. at Florida, 7:30
    Buffalo at Boston, 7

    Islanders at Atlanta, 7
    NJ. at Philadelphia, 7
    Montreal at Pitt., 7:30
    Minn. at Colorado, 9
    Nashville at Phoenix, 9
    Edmonton at Vanc., 10
    Dallas at S.J., 10:30
    Chicago at L.A., 10:30

    Tampa Bay at Carolina, 7

    Tuesday’s results

    Pittsburgh 3, Florida 0
    Buffalo 7, Boston 1
    Toronto 4, Carolina 1
    Atlanta 5, N.J. 4 (SO)
    Tampa Bay 4, Phil. 3 (SO)
    Ottawa 3, Washington 2
    Detroit 4, Islanders 3 (OT)
    Minnesota 5, St. Louis 2
    Colorado 4, Nashville 3
    Calgary 4, L.A. 1
    Columbus 3, Vanc. 2 (SO)
    Dallas 3, San Jose 2 (SO)



    second consecutive day of near-trouble-
    free skating Wednesday with his trouble-
    some right ankle.

    “It looks good, I’m positive,” he said.
    “Tt felt better yesterday. I don’t think it’s
    100 percent, but it’s 10 times better than it
    used to be. I was very happy yesterday,
    and it felt pretty good at practice today.
    We'll keep on working on it.”

    Forsberg has had difficulty finding a
    skate to accommodate his surgically
    repaired foot, but a new orthotic seems to
    be providing some relief.



    JIM MCISAAC/GETTY IMAGES

    OUT OF MY WAY: Jason Krog of the
    Rangers, left, is crunched by lan
    White of the Leafs on Wednesday.

    He acknowledged tonight’s game
    against the New Jersey Devils will be a
    big test.

    “The game after has been brutal,” he
    said.

    e Wild: Goalie Manny Fernandez
    aggravated his sprained left knee in Tues-
    day’s game at St. Louis, leaving his status
    in doubt for the rest of the Wild’s road
    trip.

    Fernandez was questionable for
    tonight’s game at Colorado, team spokes-
    man Aaron Sickman said.

    Niklas Backstrom would replace Fer-
    nandez if he can’t play, and Josh Harding
    could be recalled from the minors.

    Fernandez was initially hurt in Minne-
    sota’s game on Jan. 20 against Dallas, and
    he returned to action one week later with

    the benefit of the All-Star break.

    Fernandez is 22-16 with a .9ll save per-
    centage and a 2.57 goals-against average
    this season.

    e Blue Jackets: Defenseman Bryan
    Berard was activated by the team after
    being sidelined since last season follow-
    ing back surgery.

    Berard, 29, has missed the Blue Jackets’
    past 82 games, including the final 31 of last
    season. He had surgery last March on a
    herniated disk, and another operation in
    October to repair a different disk.

    He scored 12 goals and had 20 assists in
    44 games last season, setting the club
    record for goals by a defenseman.

    The Woonsocket, R.I., native has
    played in 554 career games and totaled 71
    goals and 227 assists.

    LATE TUESDAY

    e Stars 3, Sharks 2 (SO): Philippe
    Boucher scored the tying goal with 2.2
    seconds left, and Mike Ribeiro added the
    winning shootout goal to his regulation
    score to lift visiting Dallas.

    e Avalanche 4, Predators 3:
    Andrew Brunette and Wojtek Wolski
    each had a goal and an assist, and Peter
    Budaj stopped 34 shots to lead host Colo-
    rado.

    e Wild 5, Blues 2: Pierre-Marc Bou-
    chard’s second goal snapped a third-pe-
    riod tie to help visiting Minnesota to the
    victory.

    e Blue Jackets 3, Canucks 2 (SO):
    Nikolai Zherdev scored the winning
    shootout goal with a wrist shot off
    Roberto Luongo’s glove to lift visiting
    Columbus.

    e Flames 4, Kings 1: Craig Conroy
    scored twice against his former team in
    his first game with his new club, leading
    host Calgary.

    — _.__












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    PRO FOOTBALL

    MICHAEL HEIMAN/GETTY IMAGES

    | SUPER BOWL XLI









    EA SPORTS



    NEVER TOO MUCH: Left, the media’s coverage of the NFL, especially during Super Bowl week, has grown significantly. Madden ’07,

    center, was the No. 1-selling video game last year. Right, the NFL has the top-selling merchandise among the professional sports.

    A heaping helping of NFL

    °NFL FANS

    do with their time — family,
    exercise-related.

    “The amazing thing to me is
    there’s a sufficient audience to
    watch it all,” McCall said. “I think
    real football fans can’t get enough.
    Most of those real football fans
    could probably enjoy it the same if
    they didn’t watch it as much. They
    just feel like they need to be glued
    to it all the time. It’s naive to think
    it will change, but it does make you
    wonder if the way the television
    world treats it, they ought to be a
    little more responsible.”

    The NFL Network, now in its
    third year, doesn’t agree. Its slogan,
    “Everything But the Game,” speaks
    volumes of the aim of its 105 hours
    of Super Bowl week coverage. A
    lineup that includes 21 anchors and
    analysts at five different South
    Florida locations, covering every-
    thing from daily news conferences
    to replays of old Super Bowls.

    “If what’s going on is of interest,
    we're going to cover it,” said NFL
    Network spokesman Dan Massa-
    son, who said the difference in
    media coverage between this year’s
    Super Bowl and the previous South
    Florida Super Bowl in 1999 is “hard
    to quantify.”

    ‘TREMENDOUS INTEREST’
    “There is tremendous interest in

    _ the game for the fans of these

    teams and around the country,”
    Massason said. “There were many
    fans that watched Media Day from
    start to finish. And we want to be
    able to provide it for them.”

    But Media Day was held

    between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., the
    middle of the work day for most
    Americans. And that’s where peo-
    ple such as McCall think the excess
    in coverage is occuring. McCall
    says TV networks need to stay free
    of playing games during the middle
    of the week and go back to the days
    when high schools played on Fri-
    days, colleges on Saturdays and the
    pros on Sunday and Monday.

    The NFL is even
    looking for new mar-
    kets.

    “Many more for-
    eign languages,” said
    Berman, who has cov-
    ered 25 Super Bowls,
    when asked what the
    biggest difference in
    the media coverage
    between the first and
    the latest Super Bowls
    he has attended.

    “Many more peo-
    ple, you know, football
    fans of foreign lan-

    guages who can speak

    football. That’s ESPN has watched
    changed a lot in the the NFL expand
    25 years. People are tremendously.
    watching football

    games in Antarctica and places we
    never knew existed 25 years ago,
    unless you were good with a-geo-
    graphic map.”

    That’s not news to anyone. The
    NFL’s popularity worldwide has
    grown — especially in Europe and
    Asia, where preseason games have
    been played since the 1980s. Two
    seasons ago, the first regular-
    season game outside the United
    States was played in Mexico. Next
    season, the Dolphins are expected





    BRIAN BAHR/GETTY IMAGES

    IT’S NOT THE SAME:
    Chris Berman of

    to play in the first regular-season
    game outside of North America.

    But it is not that growth which
    has some experts worried.

    MARKETS CORNERED

    Of course, Americans always
    have the right to click the off but-
    ton on their remotes. But it’s tough
    to cut back right now — especially
    for the NFL, which is enjoying the
    peak of its popularity
    and its riches.

    e Tickets: This
    season alone, there
    was a record blackout
    lifts for 249 of the
    256 NFL regular-sea-
    son games, and the
    17,340,879 tickets sold
    set arecord for the
    regular season.

    e Viewers:
    According to the NFL,
    more people watched
    Super Bowl XL (141.4
    million viewers) than



    idential election or .
    went out to celebrate
    New Year’s Eve.
    According to NFL
    and Nielsen Media Research, the
    NFL owned 12 of the top 20 most-
    watched programs of the 2006-07
    TV season, outdrawing American

    - Idol, Dancing with the Stars, CSI

    and Grey’s Anatomy. The 13 most-
    watched programs ever are all
    Super Bowls.

    e Video games: Madden NFL
    ’07 was the highest-sold video
    game of 2006, with more than
    3.9 million units sold for Play-
    Station2 and Xbox 360.

    voted in the 2004 pres-

    e Merchandise: The NFL has
    the most popular merchandise sold
    among pro sports. According to an
    ESPN poll, 32 percent of sports fans
    own league-licensed apparel —
    double that of second-place Major
    League Baseball.

    Then there is fantasy football,
    which, according to some busi-

    " nesses, is beginning to cost compa-

    nies billions in worker hours.

    According to a report by global
    outplacement consultancy Chal-
    lenger, Gray and Christmas Inc. in
    August, the cost to employers for
    paying unproductive workers
    logged into fantasy websites was
    estimated as high as $1.1 billion for
    each week of the NFL season.

    Marco Rosales, 29, said his new
    job has banned fantasy-football
    websites from Internet access.

    “It kind of stinks because I can’t
    make transactions during the day,”
    Rosales said. “But the goqd thing is
    I have Sprint, which has a deal with
    the NFL, and I can stay plugged in
    if there’s any news with my cell-

    . phone.”

    Rosales was on South Beach on
    Tuesday night, not far from where
    ESPN was shooting SportsCenter.
    He was wearing a Peyton Manning
    jersey, hoping to run into one of the
    players onhis fantasyteam. .

    “T used to be just a Dolphins
    fan,” Rosales said. “But when they
    started to stink, I signed up for fan-
    tasy football. Now I know all about
    all the players and teams.

    “My wife hates to be around me
    on Sundays because all I do is
    watch footbail. I feel guilty for
    about 5 seconds. Then the game
    comes back on, and it’s all good.”

    MiamiHerald.com |_ THE MIAMI HERALD



    AL DIAZ/MIAMI HERALD STAFF

    FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

    For Edwin Pope, the journey is still going strong

    *POPE

    “Now every press conference is televised,
    there are thousands of media people. It’s
    grown to be the biggest sports event in the
    country,” Shula says.

    And Pope is still there.

    Super Bowl XLI is Pope’s 41st Super Bowl,
    making him one of four men who have covered
    every one of pro football’s signature games.

    But this is a special Super Bowl for Pope
    because it coincides with his 50-year anniver-
    sary at The Miami Herald, a journey with mile-
    stone markers but no end in sight.

    “T think ’'ll keep on until I get too tired to do’

    it anymore,” said Pope, whose career was cele-
    brated at a Herald dinner on Monday night.
    “It’s odd. I have no feeling of wanting to stop
    or thinking about when I'll stop.”

    Athletes who grew up reading Pope’s
    columns, and those he covered along the way,
    applaud that attitude.

    “He’s still going, right?” former Kansas City
    Chiefs quarterback Len Dawson said before a
    Dolphins game earlier this season. “I remem-
    ber he covered me when I was playing early in
    my career and also toward the end of my
    career. That was a long time ago.

    “Tm glad he’s still going strong. I hope he
    just keeps on.”

    Pope has churned out about 12,564 stories in
    his career, containing about 10,051,200 words.

    “That’s a lot of bad writing in there,” Pope
    says, deadpan. “It feels like 8 million of those
    words were on deadline.”

    PLENTY OF AWARDS

    Pope’s words won a Red Smith Award, and
    a record four Eclipse Awards for the nation’s
    best columns. Pope also is in the Florida
    Sports Hall of Fame and the National Sports-
    casters and Sportswriters Hall of Fame.

    Pope’s wife, Eileen, has kept a book of
    Pope’s columns since 1972. There is a new
    book for every season that chronicles the
    exploits of the University of Miami football
    team and the Dolphins.

    In the early 1990s, with reams of newspaper
    articles already clipped, the couple struck a
    deal to keep Eileen working on the books.

    “The deal was I’d work for him doing that,”
    Eileen Pope says. “And he would pay my



    Bloomingdale’s bill.”

    Edwin Pope learned to type when he was
    6 years old, and he got his own typewriter for
    Christmas when he was 10 in 1938. He wrote
    his first story at age ll after he listened toa
    radio broadcast of the 1940 Orange Bowl game,
    between Georgia Tech and Missouri.

    “I copied down everything they said, word
    for word,” Pope says.

    When he finished, he had 10 pages of copy.
    He took them to the offices of the Athens Ban-
    ner-Herald and demanded to see the editor.

    “Can you use a running story on the Orange
    Bowl?” the boy asked.

    The paper didn’t run the
    story, but it wrote a story about
    the budding journalist. The
    story, a copy of which sits in

    MiamiHerald.com

    Edwin Pope shares
    his memories from

    noon when Tennessee beat his beloved Geor-
    gia Bulldogs team, and a disconsolate Pope
    began sobbing.

    “I got on my bike and rode around town for
    2 hours just wailing at the top of my voice,” he
    says. “I was just sobbing. My daddy had to
    come to calm to me down.”

    But Pope’s passion is balanced by wisdom.
    He does not use the pen as a sword very often,
    and he cannot recollect ever calling for any-
    one’s firing.

    “I never took lightly the idea of calling for
    someone’s livelihood to be taken away from
    them,” Pope says.

    “Tt’s very hard to pull that trigger.”

    * COVERING THE WORLD

    Pope has covered Wimbledon 18 times. He’s
    covered six Summer Olympics and two Win-
    ter Olympics. The Winter Games were always
    an adventure because Pope, an avid walker,
    has this thing about falling down on ice.

    “{’ve fallen in a lot of ditches,” he reports.

    Pope has covered the World Series, 40 Ken-
    tucky Derby races, plenty of golf and just
    about everything else.

    His favorite events?

    “Football games,” he says. “Anything foot-
    ball. I want to say the Super Bow], but that
    would not be true. Some Super Bowls are not
    that great. But there were very
    few days I was writing football
    that I felt I was working.”

    BUT football gave Pope his
    favorite subject: Shula.

    Pope’s office, predicted, all 40 Super Bowls. Also the subject he loathes:
    “Watch out for this boy’s former Chicago Bears quarter-
    byline in the future.” back Jim McMahon.

    Four years later, at age 15, Pope was writing “Shula might not always tell you what you
    for the paper. needed to know, but he never, never, to my

    “About every morning at 5:30, I would go in
    and lay out what there was of the sports sec-
    tion,” Pope says. “In the wintertime, I had to
    go in there and put the logs on the fire to make
    the fire, too. I would light the fire and sit there
    typing in my cloth gloves.”

    Just about the time the newsroom — about
    the size of a living room — warmed up, Pope
    would be off to high school.

    Pope was armed with special gifts that
    made him a natural for his art.

    Passion? He proved he had that one after-

    knowledge, lied,” Pope says. “McMahon, I
    thought, was the biggest jackass I ever met in
    my life. And I don’t mind stating it. He was an
    absolute jerk. And believe me, I’ve met quite a
    few of them, especially more in baseball.”
    Shula’s teams were the darlings of the NFL
    in the early 1970s. They were undefeated in
    1972-73 and won the Super Bowl a second con-
    secutive time in 1973-74. Pope calls that the
    golden age of sportswriting in South Florida.
    “The thing I respected most about Edwin
    was that after you talked to him he always



    ‘ printed the truth,” Shula says. “I know it’s hard

    for some people to believe, but I counted sev-
    eral reporters as my friends, including John
    Steadman and Edwin Pope. You could have a
    conversation with them.

    “And there were some times when Edwin
    would write something I didn’t like. But at
    least you could pick up the phone and call him,
    and you could tell him what you were think-
    ing, and he’d at least listen.”

    SERVICE, PLEASE!

    Edwin Pope is no saint. Just ask that bar-
    tender at the New Jersey hotel across from the
    Meadowlands Sports Complex who didn’t
    serve him promptly after a Dolphins-Jets game
    in the early 1990s.

    “What does a guy have to do to get a
    Heineken around here?” Pope yelled in his
    pronounced Georgia accent.

    He also was no fan of editors who might
    miss — or introduce — a typo in his copy.

    “Even in the days before spell-check, that
    was a big deal,” says former Herald copy edi-
    tor Hal Habib. “For a young editor, for any-
    body, editing Edwin Pope was something of a
    compliment, but it could be nerve-wracking.”

    Habib left the Herald years ago, and, when
    he did, he called Pope and other employees at
    the paper to announce his departure.

    “I told Edwin it was a privilege to work with
    him, and he said, ‘Hal, I feel the same way
    about you,’ ” Habib says.

    “For somebody in our business, it doesn’t
    get any better than that.”

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    Rattlers beat
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    ACTION continued yesterday
    in the GSSSA regular season
    with the CI Gibson Rattlers top-
    ping the CV Bethel Stingrays 57-

    11.
    e SEE STORY

    FRONT PAGE
    (Photos: Tim Clarke)





    meé yesterday at Donald Davis field. The game ended

    THE RM Bailey Pacers and the Doris Johnson Mystic Marlins fought out tight

    “pa

    in a 0-0 draw.
    (Photos: Tim Clarke)





    PHE TRIBUNE









    TRIBUNE SPORTS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007, PAGE 11



    ee







    of The Tribune 1

    convenient and gives me a head start



    “Home delivery

    in the mornings. I get a wealth of
    information about Bahamian,
    international, business and sporting
    news before leaving for work.

    The Tribune is my newspaper.”



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    <> om) = @he Miami Herald

    | wag. CLOUDS
    ~* AND SUN

















    * ‘

    Volume: 103 No.59

    {



    BAHAMAS EDITION

    THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007 -



    PRICE - 75¢

    ates ae

    ‘Obituaries and
    LCT ese a
    STARTING TODAY



    Allegation that govt want

    to make announcement
    closer to election date

    m By KARIN HERIG
    Tribune Staff Reporter

    GOVERNMENT is inten-
    tionally drawing out the hand-
    over of the airport’s manage-
    ment to, Vancouver Airport
    Services (YVRAS) because it
    wants to be able to make a
    positive announcement clos-
    er to the general election date,
    a source close to the Airport
    Authority claimed yesterday.

    The airport source — who
    wished to remain anonymous
    — said that morale is at an all-.
    time low at the airport, with
    both Bahamian and Canadi-
    an employees frustrated with
    government’s repeated delays
    in the handing over of man-
    agement to YVRAS.

    ‘An employee, who is part
    of the handover process of the
    Lynden Pindling Internation-
    al Airport (LPIA) to the
    Canadian firm YVRAS, told
    The ‘Tribune that the process
    could have been wrapped up
    months ago. He said he
    believes government is delay-
    ing the matter because of
    political manoeuvring.

    “Because of this no-one
    _ wants to invest in the airport.
    The Airport Authority is wait-
    ing for NAD (the new Nas-
    sau Airport Development
    Company and subsidiary of
    YVRAS) to do it, and NAD
    doesn’t want to do it because
    they are sceptical that it (the’
    handover) will even go
    through. As a result the trav-
    elling public is being held

    hostage,” the employee said.
    On Tuesday, The Tribune
    revealed that the handover of
    the airport had been delayed
    yet again because Joseph
    Reckley, Airport Authority
    acting general manager, suf-
    fered a stroke late last year.
    Business sources claimed

    that YVRAS executives were

    frustrated with the slow pace
    at which government was
    moving.

    Government’s chief nego-
    tiator Sir Baltron Bethel told
    The Tribune that he was
    unaware of any such feelings
    on the part of YVRAS.

    However, yesterday an air-
    port source confirmed these
    claims.

    “We are all frustrated. We
    have divided our time
    between the Airport Author-
    ity and NAD (the new Nas-
    sau Airport Development
    Company and subsidiary of
    YVRAS), we are working at
    both places but are not being
    compensated for it financial-

    ‘ly,” he said.
    The source said that his.
    - Canadian colleagues ‘from

    YVRAS share the frustration
    of their Bahamian counter-
    parts.

    “Ryeryone is annoyed. They
    (government) keep saying
    they are going to sign-off on
    one thing or another and then
    nothing happens. I don’t want
    to get political, but I do think
    this. is a political move,” he

    ‘SEE page 16



    we Dr eT erway sworn in



    as senator

    a SWEARING IN — Dr Doswell Coakley (right) i is sworn in as the new PLP senator yesterday. Dr : Coakley, who

    replaces former senator Damien Gomez, i

    Claim that PMH

    special procedures |

    appointments
    cancelled due to

    ‘training course
    @ By BRENT DEAN

    pital radiology facilities for two

    appointments for special pro- :
    cedures have been cancelled

    make employers pay more of NHI plan

    due to the entire medical staff : . ”
    i : lic purse.

    of the Radiology Department ;
    for the new computed tomog- im By KARIN HERIG
    raphy equipment in the depart- ;

    being sent on a training course

    ment.
    of upgrades announced last July

    ology Department at PMH.

    These improvements were to, :
    in part, include a new 16- slice i
    CAT scanner at ‘a cost of }
    $987,000, $50,000 for training ;

    and a further $300,000 that was :
    i is talking about an increase in minimum wage at this time.

    SEE page 16

    This Hew equipments part : a “round-about way” of making employers pay for more of the ;

    ’ } National Health Insurance plan, president of the Bahamas Employ- }
    sO0 He eXBARSION CAC LAGE : ers Confederation Brian Nutt said yesterday.

    ' Ingraham accused of attempting to.

    is running for the PLP in Grand Bahama in the next general election.

    (Photo: Tim Clarke i bune staff)

    ‘destroy’ fellow MP 23 years ago

    _ | = By RUPERT MISSICK Jr

    Chief Reporter _
    FORMER Prime Minister

    ? Hubert Ingraham was accused
    : yesterday of attempting to
    ! ni i: “destroy” a fellow member of

    PATIENTS will not be able : parliament some 23 years ago.
    to have special procedures done. :

    at the Princess Margaret Hos- :

    The accusation came from
    MP for MICAL, V Alfred

    Gray, who said that while work-
    weeks as all of the doctors have : ing for Mr Ingraham in the

    gone on a training course, an }
    ‘inside source has alleged. :

    -. The source claims that all

    1980s, the former prime minis-

    » ter Wieepied to “destroy” his :
    chance to make a living for his :
    - family. i
    Mr Gray said that in 1984, he }
    had passed all of his Bar exams, ?
    and with “four children at home : By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
    to feed”, was making $100 a :
    week in 1984 articling at ;

    Christie, Ingraham and Co.

    “T had left being a family :
    ‘ island commissioner and arti- :
    : proposed amendments to the
    : Pensions Act and Bridging
    : Service, which he described as
    : a “politically driven bill” that

    SEE page 15

    Claim that minimum wage rise may



    Tribune Staff Reporter

    BY RAISING the minimum wage government may have found

    unemployment rate.

    SEE page 16

    SU BWAY CL U Bo

    Nu TRITIONAL INEoâ„¢
    Calories .......320
    Total PAT 6.0Q
    SOdUMasisesiel 310M

    a

    Carbs.i47Q
    Dietary Fiben..4g
    Protein ii24g



    FNM leader
    hits out at
    proposed

    Pensions Act
    amendments

    ' Chief Reporter ‘

    FORMER Prime Minister
    Hubert Ingraham yesterday
    heavily criticised government’s

    : represents a “reckless, unwar-

    ranted expenditure of the pub-

    The opposition leader made

    : the comments during debate
    : on the amendments that seek
    : to calculate a pension based
    : on the total number of years a.

    person works in the public ser-

    : vice rather than the years he or
    : she gives after returning to the
    Speaking with The Tribune, Mr Nutt said that the increase of min- : © ee ee Fs
    : imum wage ~ as announced by Minister of Labour Shane Gibson — }

    paired with the introduction of NHI may also result in a greater objected bo -thecfack’ tak the

    The BECon president said that he was surprised that government : bill gives discretionary power
    : toa minister, but said that he

    service following a hiatus.
    Mr Ingraham strongly

    SEE page 15






    PAGE 14, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007



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    LOCAL NEWS.

    THE TRIBUNE



    DPM promotes education

    at school ‘pep rally’

    @ By BAHAMAS
    INFORMATION
    SERVICES

    LOVE Hill, Andros —- Deputy
    Prime Minister Cynthia Pratt
    told students of the Central
    Andros High School that there
    is no reason why children living in
    the Bahamas cannot receive a
    quality education if they want it.

    “There is no reason why any
    child in this country should not be
    able to read and write. There is
    no reason why,” Mr Pratt said.

    But, she added, “it’s up to you
    as students to receive it. We can
    put all the schools in place; we
    can put all of the teachers in
    place, but it’s up to you to
    take advantage of all of the
    opportunities to get a decent edu-
    cation.”.

    Addressing a school assembly
    and pep rally opening a week-
    long series of activities celebrat-
    ing the school’s 30th anniversary,
    the deputy prime minister sin-
    gled out the Central Andros High
    School as having a long and dis-
    tinguished history of providing
    the Bahamas with some of its
    “best and brightest” sons and
    daughters.

    “Our schools are the founda-
    tion to the nation,” she said. “If
    we lay the proper foundation,
    which we have, the proper edu-
    cation, then we will have decent,
    law abiding citizens. That’s what
    it is all about, but it’s up to you.
    It’s still up to you.”

    “You are just as good as any-
    body. You are just as smart as
    anybody, but you must believe
    that. There is no such thing as a
    dumb child,” she added.

    “Some children may be quick-
    er than others, but that does not
    mean that those that are not
    quick are dumb. Continue to per-
    severe until you can get it right.

    “The quality students that have



    @ LOVE HILL, Andros - Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of National Security Cynthia



    Pratt leads the Central Andros High School Cougars in the school’s cheer during a pep rally and assem-
    bly Monday, that kicked off Pride Week at the school.

    Central Andros High was officially opened in 1977 by former prime minister the late Sir Lynden Pin-
    dling and was established through the joint efforts of the government, the Central Andros High School
    Committee and other interested persons.

    been produced here at Central
    Andros High School, this country
    has been and continue to benefit
    from them and that’s what it is all
    about.”

    Mrs Pratt said some Bahami-
    ans take for granted the fact that
    they will always be able to receive
    quality education.

    She said there are children in
    other countries that do not have
    the same opportunities, and so
    Bahamian children must be
    grateful to God for the many

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    benefits they enjoy in this coun-
    try.

    Recalling an experience from
    one of her travels in the region,
    Mrs Pratt told of watching chil-
    dren in tattered clothing and no
    shoes attend school sessions in a
    tent. ‘

    “Not dressed up like you; not
    sitting in air-conditioned class-
    rooms like some-that we have,
    but they still went to school. They
    still wanted to get an education
    despite their circumstances,” she
    said.

    “And that’s the message that I
    want to get across to you here
    today — that no matter what your
    circumstances are, you must
    everyday take advantage of the
    opportunities to get a quality edu-
    cation because: education is the

    key that will open whatever doors .

    you set, before.you.”
    She said the construction of

    (BIS photo: Patrick Hanna)

    the Central Andros High School
    30 years ago, and other such

    schools, is a testament to how.

    government and communities
    can collaborate to ensure that the
    children of those communities
    have access to quality education.

    “And so if the community
    wants the school in it, then all of
    us should be interested in keep-
    ing that school as a part of the
    community. Each one of us
    should carry our own responsi-
    bility.

    “Rach one of us should take
    the initiative and ask ourselves
    what is it we can do as individuals
    to help to build our schools and
    make them successful centres for
    learning for our children, grand-
    children and great grandchildren,
    so that even after we are dead
    and gone, the schools will still
    existin order to educate Bahami-
    ans,” she added.

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    PAGE 12B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007
    iin i ee
    Union presents five-year deal to FirstCaribbean

    @ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
    Tribune Business Reporter

    ssues of disiclipne and discharge

    of First Caribbean International °

    Bank (Bahamas) employers fea-

    tured prominently in the new

    industrial proposal presented by
    the Bahamas Financial Services Union
    (BFSU) to the bank yesterday.

    The union’s.general secretary, Lashon
    Sawyer, said the 84-page document
    proposing a five-year industrial agree-
    ment encompasses “a lot of things that
    the employees were not getting”.

    “First Caribbean has benefited well in
    the Bahamas over the last three years
    since their merger [with Barclays], so we



    know that this should be shared with our
    employees here. It needs to be shared,”
    she said.

    Ms Sawyer said the major area tha
    BFSU had an issue with was the disci-
    plining and discharge of employees.

    “We’ve had too many grey areas that
    have been left to the bank’s discretion
    still, and it has not given the employees a
    fair chance to.explain themselves in situ-
    ations they may not have put themselves
    into, but surrounding things might have
    caused that problem,” she added.

    The previous industrial agreement
    expired last May, and Ms Sawyer said:
    “Today, we are here historically again
    to present to First Caribbean Interna-
    tional Bank our second proposed indus-

    trial agreement.

    “The agreement expired last May 2006.
    The union took a stand that we would go
    through that agreement thoroughly
    before we presented it to First Caribbean
    to ensure that we gave our members, the
    employees of the bank, the best or better
    benefits than they experienced over the
    three years of our first agreement.” She
    added: “We are happy to present a new
    benefits package. There are a lot of areas
    which have tightened up in the agree-
    ment, we are happy to say, and our mem-
    bers have seen the documents and have
    given us heads up. They are glad to see
    that the document has encompassed a lot
    of things that the employees were not
    getting, and at this point we know that

    Cabinet signs off on insurance regulations

    the bank has to look at in a different
    stand going forward.

    “Once we present this document
    today, we hope that the bank is prepared
    to move as quickly as possible to sign off
    on the agreement. We hope as soon as
    we get that in, we are ready to go. We
    hope that it is an amicable set of negoti-
    ations in this round, and we hope to
    ensure that we have really represented
    our employees well in this sector.”

    Ms Sawyer said: “We know that once
    this agreement is on the table and signed

    -we will get another commercial bank or

    all the commercial banks to join when
    they recognisie that we have gotten excel-
    lent benefits for employees working in
    financial services industry. “We hope

    THE TRIBUNE

    that the bank does look favourably, as we

    go through the negotiations, at the econ-. °
    omy and where we are at today, and what

    they have benefited from in the
    Bahamas.”

    She was accompanied by chief shop
    steward Jermaine Sands and various
    other members of the BFSU at the pre-
    sentation. :

    FirstCaribbean told The Tribune: “The.
    management of FirstCaribbean Interna-.

    tional Bank (Bahamas) receipt of the. -

    Bahamas Financial Services Union's pro-.
    posal for a- five -year industrial agree-
    ment with the bank, and we look for-*
    ward to beginning meaningful dialogue as.

    _we work to complete the agreement in,

    the true spirit of partnership.” ce

    r

    Mes sss

    Central Bank amends’
    40-day KYC rule

    FROM page 1B .

    ernment had to “build capacity” at
    the Registrar of Insurance’s Office,
    which under the Act will be an Insur-
    ance Commission, if the regulator is to
    effectively administer and supervise
    the industry.

    Sector

    The private sector has long held
    concerns over whether the Registrar
    of Insurance’s Office is up to the task,
    and Mr Smith said: “We’re looking
    at some proposals from experts in the
    area to provide i is with help for capes,
    ity building.”

    Personnel issues were among the
    key concerns, and the minister added:



    “We need to have someone to look at
    the right structure, the right people
    in the right spots, as the role of the
    Registrar of Insurance has changed
    to a Commissioner, like at the Central
    Bank.”

    Industry

    The insurance industry regulator,
    Mr Smith said, would be taking a
    much more involved role in areas such
    as capital and solvency requirements,
    reserve ratios, liquidity and provi-
    sioning. *

    However, he denied reports circu-
    lating in the insurance industry that

    ‘the Compliance Commission would

    be taking over some of the Registrar
    of Insurance’s regulatory functions.
    Meanwhile, Mr Smith admitted the
    Bahamas was “not fully compliant”
    with international best practices and
    standards on the regulation of money

    _ transmission businesses, and would

    soon effect legislative amendments

    to deal with that.

    “We keep getting things coming
    out of the Central Bank, which has
    its own mandate, and we’re looking at
    some proposed amendments to bring
    money transmission businesses in line

    with internationally accepted rules .

    and KYC procedures,” Mr Smith told
    The Tribune.

    He added that the amendments
    would focus on ensuring Bahamas-
    based money transmission businesses
    were compliant with Know Your Cus-
    tomer regulations on wire transfers,
    and were able to trace the originator

    .and source of funds involved in any

    wire transfer.
    Compliant

    “We're not fully compliant with
    that,” Mr Smith said. “The Bahamas
    is looking to amend its legislation to
    become more compliant.”

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    A financial and corporate services
    provider, Omni Financial Services, is
    also licensed to provide money trans-
    mission services. °

    Posts

    Mr Smith said “the goal posts keep
    changing” on money transmission reg-
    ulation, adding: “You have to keep
    benchmarking international best prac-
    tices in terms of your anti-money
    laundering and terror financing

    regime”.

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    8 By CARA BRENNEN-
    BETHEL
    Tribune Business Reporter

    THE Central Bank of the
    Bahamas has waived the 30-day
    rule for licensees to obtain clear
    and legible copies of all KYC doc-
    umentation in specific cases
    involving company incorporation
    or registered agent/office services
    provided to so-called eligible
    introducers, who introduce clients
    to them.

    Michael Foot, the Inspector of

    Banks and Trust Companies, said
    the waiver applies to limited areas
    of operations, with clearly defined
    roles where the company will not
    engage in depositing or borrowing

    funds from Bhaamas-based insti-

    tutions.

    Mr Foot explained that the
    Bahamas does have a big juris-
    diction for this market, which was
    why the Central Bank felt there
    was justifiable risk in granting the
    waiver.

    He explained that under the
    current regulations, the eligible
    introducer would have had to-sub-
    mit proper KYC documentation
    on the undrelying client to the
    Bahamas-based bank or trust
    company within 30 days of the
    introducer completing its due dili-
    gence processes.

    However, Mr Foot said that in-

    the case of company incorpora-
    tion’ or registrated agent/office
    services, the companies would not
    be adding any new risks to the
    Bahamas, which is why the Cen-
    tral Bank granted the waiver.

    In a guidance notice released
    this week, the Central Bank said it
    had been asked to consider the
    waiver of the 30-day rule for the
    benefit of the industry.

    Under the waiver, copies of the
    KYC documentation would be
    provided to licensees upon
    request, for example, for onward
    transmission to the Central Bank
    or more generally where regula-
    tors or law enforcement are con-
    ducting investigations, the notice
    said.

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    . According to the Central Bank, '

    the industry representatives:

    sought the waiver on the basis
    that company incorporation and
    the provision of registrated |
    agent/office services are not “facil-,
    ities’ as defined by the Financial’
    Transaction Reporting Act’
    (FTRA). aif

    The waiver is subject to the fol-'
    lowing conditions:
    Eligible introducers are limit-,
    ed to the following financial insti-'
    tutions as listed in paragraph 122.1’
    and 122.2 of the Bank’s guidance:

    for licencees on the Prevention.’

    of Money Laundering and Coun-".

    tering the Financing of Terror-)
    ism:

    * Banks and trust companies,
    life assurance companies, broker
    dealers, investment fund admin-'
    istrators, operators of investment,
    funds

    * Foreign financial institutions’

    located in countries listed in the
    First Schedule of the FTRA,

    which exercise function equiva-' _

    lent to those to the local institu-. °

    tions listed above

    * The eligible introducer for’.
    whom such services are provided:
    must be part of the financial,
    group, and be located in a-country '
    listed in the First Schedule of the’
    FTRA (for convenience a copy.
    of the current list is annexed to:

    this note.)

    * In such cases, eligible intro-.

    ducers must provide written con-
    firmation that they have conduct-
    ed due diligence on the underly-
    ing client.

    * Eligible introducers must

    agree to provide KYC documen-

    tation to the licensee within three.
    days of a request for the same.
    The Central Bank also said the
    licensees who incorporate inter-
    national business companies and
    provide registrated agent/office

    services must comply with the due _

    diligence requirements of the’.
    International Business Compa- ~

    nies Act 2000 to maintain aâ„¢

    “shareholder’s register for com-
    panies that they incorporate”.



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    THE TRIBUNE

    THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007, PAGE 9





    Hugh Campbell
    teachers protest
    over security

    HB By DENISE MAYCOCK
    Tribune Freeport Reporter

    FREEPORT - Teachers demonstrated at the
    Hugh Campbell Primary School on Wednesday
    morning to protest what they say is the
    inadequate number of security staff at the
    school.

    The demonstration — which was said to have
    been peaceful — was reportedly held in an effort
    to draw attention to what the teachers believe is
    a very serious problem.

    The teachers lined up outside the school and
    marched back and forth holding colourful plac-
    ards in an effort to draw attention to their cause.

    Hugh Campbell Primary has an enrollment of

    800 students and is considered one of the largest
    primary schools on the island.

    According to reports, Bahamas Union of
    Teachers (BUT) officials and teachers do not
    believe that having one security officer on duty is

    sufficient to ensure the protection of all these
    students.

    Mr Rudy Sands, area vice president of the
    BUT, could not be reached for comment up to
    press time on Wednesday.

    One Ministry of Education official is reported
    to have pointed out that as far as he knows, every
    private school on Grand Bahama has only one
    security guard. He said that the present level at
    Hugh Campbell is sufficient.

    The official said that although his view might be
    considered insensitive, it is merely a “common
    sense” approach, aimed at fulfilling the security
    needs of the school in light of one available
    resources.

    The Tribune spoke with Sandra Fidscaonibe:
    district superintendent of schools in Freeport,
    about the situation.

    She said she was totally unaware of the demon-
    stration at the Hugh Campbell and could not
    comment on the matter.







    @ FROM left, Grand Bahama businessman Basil Neymour presents $10,000 cheque to Sir
    Clement Maynard, patron of the Bahamas Primary Student of the Year Foundation; Ricardo
    Deveaux, president and CEO of the foundation, and Sandra Edgecombe MOE official.

    (Photo: Denise Maycock)

    $10,000 donation to student
    of the year foundation

    @ By DENISE MAYCOCK
    Tribune Freeport Reporter

    FREEPORT -_ Grand
    Bahama businessman Basil Ney-
    mour presented the first $10,000
    cheque to the Bahamas Primary
    School Student of the Year
    Foundation.

    Sir Clement Maynard, one of
    the patrons of the Awards Pro-
    gramme, accepted the donation
    on behalf the organisation during
    a presentation ceremony held at
    the Ministry of Education offices
    in the International Building yes-
    terday.

    Ricardo Deveaux, president
    and CEO of the Foundation, and
    Phenton Neymour, vice presi-
    dent, were in attendance.

    Both men thanked Mr Ney-
    mour for his contribution to the
    educational development of the
    nation’s youth.

    Also present were Ministry of

    Education officials including,
    Mary Cooper, assistant director
    for education for professional
    development and student affairs;
    district superintendent of schools
    Sandra Edgecombe; and Hezeki-

    ah Dean.

    Phenton Neymour noted that
    Bahamas Primary School Stu-
    dent of the Year programme is in
    the 10th year.

    He said he hopes that his
    father’s contribution. will spur
    donations by other business per-
    sons, religious and civic groups.
    ' “Over the past 10 years ... we
    have had three winners and the
    foundation found it fitting to
    come to Grand Bahama, because
    we recognise the contribution
    that Grand Bahama has made in
    regard to the students involve-
    ment in the programme,” he
    said.

    Ricardo Deveaux, president
    and CEO of the programme,

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    invited all public and private
    schools in New Providence and
    the Family Islands to participate
    in the 2007 programme.

    He said the foundation is look-
    ing for the best and brightest pri-
    mary school students in the
    Bahamas — who are well rounded
    individuals that excel not only in
    academics, but are also active in
    school, church and sports activi-
    ties.

    “T think the $10,000 donation
    to Sir Clernent for the winner
    will definitely be an added incen-
    tive for the students out there
    and we have two more weeks
    before the deadline,” he said.

    “Mr Neymour’s contribution

    . is a demonstration of his
    commitment and concern for the
    welfare of our Young people. We
    are pleased that his son, Phen-
    ton Neymour has also continued
    his contribution for a third con-
    secutive year,” said Mr Deveaux.

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    THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007, PAGE 11





    trust

    JUST ONE OF MANY
    SUSPICIOUS ISSUES

    | his Wilchcombe WHI
    Deception is just one

    of many instances that call
    into question the trustworthi-
    ness of the Christie adminis-
    tration. The Bahamian public
    was lied to in the Keod
    Smith/Kenyatta Gibson Cabi-
    net body slam debacle.

    The Bahamian public is still
    left to wonder if it is being lied
    to in the Nassau Flight Ser-
    vices Five affair. What about
    the prison break affair or the
    visa scandal matter? What is
    the truth in the Korean Boat
    Scandal or the Vincent Peet
    ‘US dollars in the closet’
    affair?

    How much did Harajchi
    give the PLP in the last elec-
    tion? Harajchi said $5 million
    and the PM said no. What is
    the truth? Leslie Miller mis-
    leads regularly about oil mar-
    gin increases in the country.
    Why does he refuse the truth?

    There are many nasty
    rumours running around
    about the deeds of govern-
    ment ministers. What is the
    truth?

    ITISTRULY A
    MATTER OF TRUST

    A government must
    be trustworthy. A

    government should not lie to,
    deceive or mislead its people.
    When a government does this
    it places the entire society at
    risk.

    If you can’t trust the most
    powerful and heavily-funded
    entity in your natic:., then
    your nation is in jec -«rdy of
    falling apart. What sh Id we
    do?

    COMMUNITY
    MEETING FAKERY

    "|: PLP. must really
    think that Bahamians
    are fools. Imagine calling a
    branch meeting and inviting
    the entire Cabinet less the
    ’ Prime Minister to attend.
    Imagine inviting all PLPs in
    the country to this branch
    meeting and not inviting the
    prime minister. What could

    be the meaning of this? Per-

    haps it was really a public rela-
    tions ploy - what Michael Pin-
    tard refers to as “politriks”.
    The truth is that the PLP
    was afraid to call a political
    rally following the successful

    Of course, the PM pretend-
    ed not to have been invited
    when really he and his crew
    determined that it was better
    for him not to be named as a
    speaker in case only a small
    crowd showed up. In that way,
    they could say that the crowd
    did not show up because he
    was not there.

    However, if a crowd did
    show up, he could appear like
    it was some surprise and spin
    it as an event. Notwithstand-
    ing their carefully crafted dra-
    ma, the PM still made the
    affair ridiculous in that he said
    that he figured that since he
    was a the leader of the party
    he should show up, even if he
    was not invited. Like my
    friends say. “Well muddasick
    dred! Dey really gat us fa
    joke!”

    THOUGHT
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    who has not a conscience in

    everything.” Laurence Stern

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    PAGE 2E, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007



    TRIBUNE SPORTS



    Basketball transition has
    made a huge difference

    STUBBS"

    W HAT a transition
    the New Provi-

    dence Basketball Association
    has made in one year.

    No longer do you have to
    go out and watch players who
    are in some cases not proper-
    ly fit much to the annoyance
    of the paying customers who
    come to watch them perform.

    The. fans, who are now
    patronising the league, are
    being entertained by a youth-
    ful bunch of players, who pro-
    vide a lot of excitement and
    thrills with their athleticism as
    they quickly move up and
    down the court.

    It's the way the game should
    be played and that has NPBA
    executives enthused about the
    remainder of the season.

    Recently, I caught up with
    league president Keith
    'Belzee' Smith, who was smil-
    ing from ear to ear as he
    watched the top two teams go
    at each other in the marquee
    game of the season at the DW
    Davis Gymnasium.

    Smith, a year ago, struggled
    in his first term in office. But,
    this year, the league has come
    out with a new look with just
    one division. It was a move





    OPINION

    that drew some initial skepti-
    cism.

    However, the only problem
    the league has had to face is
    trying to play their games in
    sufficient time, considering the

    NOTICE

    NOTICE is hereby given that KINSON BEAUCHAMP OF

    DUNMORE STREET, HARBOUR ISLAND, BAHAMAS,
    is applying to. the Minister responsible for Nationality and
    Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
    Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
    registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
    send a written and signed statement of the facts within
    twenty-eight days from the 25th day of January, 2007 to the
    Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
    N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

    NOTICE.

    NOTICE ~ is “hereby given “that
    P.O. BOX SS-6272, is applying to the Minister responsible
    for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
    as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
    knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
    not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
    of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 25th day of
    January, 2007 to the Minister responsible - for Nationality
    and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



    NOTICE

    NOTICE is hereby given that DARKSON BEAUCHAMP OF
    DUNMORE STREET, HARBOUR ISLAND, BAHAMAS,
    is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
    Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
    Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
    registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
    send a written and signed statement of the facts within
    twenty-eight days from the 25th day of January, 2007 to the
    Minister responsible for Nationality and Cine ne: P.O.Box
    N- 7147,-Nassau, Bahamas.

    NOTICE

    NOTICE is hereby given that RONIS BEAUCHAMP OF
    DUNMORE STREET, HARBOUR ISLAND, BAHAMAS,
    is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
    Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
    Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
    registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
    send a written and signed statement of the facts within
    .twenty-eight days from the 25th day of January, 2007 to the
    Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
    N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





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    fact that they have to wait
    until the Government Sec-
    ondary Schools Sports Asso-
    ciation complete their high
    school games.

    Cognizant of the fact that
    it's late in the night and they
    don't want to go into the wee
    hours playing, the league has
    also reduced the minutes
    played per quarter to eight
    and that has resulted in the
    games moving at a much
    faster, pace.

    It also enables the players
    to provide an even more excit-
    ing brand of basketball
    because there's very little time
    to make any adjustments as
    they would have done previ-
    ously with the 12 minute quar-
    ters.

    I think it's a good move on,

    the part of the league and they
    should be commended for the
    decision.

    Of course, it's only tempo-
    rary, because Smith has indi-
    cated that once the high
    school league is completed,
    they will revert back to the
    regular playing time.

    What I've also noticed is the
    fact that the league now oper-
    ates with a new core of refer-
    ees.

    Over the years, the league
    has had some contentious

    moments with the referees.

    association over the non-pay-
    ment or the late payment of
    their fees for officiating.

    In some cases, the referees
    did not show up to officiate,
    leaving the league in a fix.

    Smith said that problem has
    been ratified with this new
    core of officials.

    Even as they officiate, Smith
    said there are opportunities
    for them to certify themselves
    through courses that are being

    arranged by the Bahamas .Bas- ’
    ketball Federation. That

    should speak volumes for the

    ’ continued growth and success

    of the league.

    Another first class act

    Of course, with new and
    novice officials, there will be
    some calls that they would
    miss or don't blow: the whistle
    on.

    But players and coaches
    should realise that it's a learn-
    ing process and they will only
    get better with time.

    As the léague continues to
    blossom. with this new vision,
    so the officiating will continue

    @ FIRST Class Promotions is gear-
    ing up to put on another first class act
    tonight at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium
    when they host Jermaine ‘Choo Choo’ }
    Mackey's (left) World Boxing Council |
    CABOFE's super middleweight title
    fight.

    Mackey's opponent, Anibal Aceve-
    do of Puerto Rico, is eager for his par-
    ticipation in what is being dubbed: "Pre |
    Valentine War on the Shore."

    The two combatants go to war in the
    12-round main event. It should be'an
    interesting fight as Mackey has posted a |
    12-1 win-loss record, while Acevedo
    comes in at 14-4-1.

    He's a little more experienced than y
    Mackey, but Mackey said he's on a mis- |
    sion and he's not going to let anyone |
    spoil his show, especially at home. Both

    1 fighters are the super middleweight
    champion of their respective countries,
    which makes the showdown-even more [7
    interesting.

    Can the fight go the distance? That
    has to be seen. But one thing is for sure,
    the fans can look forward to another
    class act tonight.

    The undercard should be just as excit-
    ing, so I would advise you to go early
    and get your seat and don't miss any of
    the action.

    ° Yesterday The Tribune accidentally |
    printed the date for tonight’s boxing event )
    as Friday. We apologise for any incon-

    venience caused.

    to improve. It's not going to
    be an overnight success
    because there are still some
    of the older players who are
    not participating and are dis-
    appointed that they are not a
    part of the league.

    But I like what Smith said
    when he noted that they can
    still make their contribution
    by assisting the coaches of the
    teams during practice and at



    games as they share their
    expertise.

    At the same token, the
    younger players should realise
    that they have not fully
    arrived and, even though they
    might possess a lot of talent,
    there are some players who
    could help them enhance it
    even more.

    The league can only get bet-
    ter with time.

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    Nassau Nastics star
    at the Orange Bowl

    QU a









    @ GYMNASTICS
    By KELSIE JOHNSON
    Sports Reporter

    TWO weeks after compet-
    ing in the Orange Bowl Invi-
    tational, members of the Nas-
    sau Nastics are ready to make
    the leap about another tour-
    nament on the horizon.

    The 18 member team is
    scheduled to compete in the
    South Florida Presidential
    Classic, on February 16th, a
    tournament attended by some

    . of the best gymnasts in the

    Florida region.

    Nassau Nastics will send a
    18-member team to the invi-
    tational, which will serve as
    their second international
    meet for the year.

    At their showing at the
    Orange Bowl, Toni Johnson
    was able to walk away with an
    overall divisional crown, win-
    ning the all around title for
    level five competitors. John-
    son produced the best com-
    bined score on all four events,
    a total of 32.55.

    On the floor exercise, Nas-
    sau Nastics’ Philisha Wallace
    claimed top prize edging out
    Johnson.

    The first international meet
    proved fruitful for Tyja Bray-

    NOTICE



    NOTICE is hereby given that JOSEPH EVENS OF
    CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS _ is
    applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
    Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen

    of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
    reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
    granted, should send a written and signed statement of
    the facts within twenty-eight days from the 25th day of
    January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
    and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

    nen, who won the level three
    category vault. Her score,
    which was taken out; of 10
    points, was recorded at 9.50.

    The vault saw Nassau Nas-
    tics members Rokelle Joseph
    and Athalia accumulate 9.45
    points for second place.

    Braynen might have gotten
    the better of Joseph on the
    vault, but the latter would pre-
    vail clinching the third place
    overall. She finished with 34
    points for all four events.

    Level seven belonged to
    Toneka Johnson, who had an
    impressive performance on
    the vault.

    Toneka Johnson scored 9.55
    on the vaults, but had to settle
    for second place. She would
    post another 9.05 on the even
    bars that placed her in the
    fourth spot.

    The Tribune wants to hear
    from people who are
    making news in their
    neighbourhoods. Perhaps
    you are raising funds for a
    good cause, campaigning
    for improvements in the
    area or have won an
    award.

    If so, call us on 322-1986
    and share your story.


    THE MIAMI HERALD



    Miami Orange Bowl

    Attendance
    80,187

    i
    PTS Cie
    ‘Wide Receiver —

    Pittsburgh
    coach
    Chuck Noll

    Dallas coach
    Tom Landry

    National
    anthem.
    Tom Sullivan

    Halftime show
    Up with People
    Bicentennial Tribute

    Cost of
    30-second
    commercial

    $110,000

    Nielsen
    ratings
    42.3

    e : Super Bowl
    ticket price
    $20

    Did You Know
    Lynn Swann
    set a Super Bowl
    record by gaining
    16} yards on his
    _ four receptions.

    “A bit of a nippy
    _ day for Miami
    at 51 degrees.
    And Steelers
    lineman
    Ernie Holmes
    had some
    unpleasant
    things to say
    about Miami.
    T don’t like this
    place. It’s for
    people with
    arthritis. All
    that’s out here
    are those mos~-
    quitoes and
    space.’ Boy,
    he should see

    South Florida



    | MiamiHerald.com



    Broadcaster Emilio Milian (6)
    OL ES Bey WiC Cora

    os

    LOOKING BACK

    Neb!

    ly big
    catches
    that day are
    what people
    remember,
    But in coming
    back from my
    concussion,
    my biggest
    catch
    vecurved on
    the fii st pass
    that Terry
    [Bradshaw]
    threw to me.
    / went up
    for a high,
    graceful
    reception
    thal yave
    me the
    confidence
    | needed to
    make the
    other cuk hes
    later on.”

    LYNN SWANN

    Johnny Roselli, 71, leaves er pere . peer Af Ht last IE Eat -n ri er rr rrena
    eM Lele NA ate MEF Ci MCC MeE MUM Clea ELT Ce POA eS involved

    aS
    md Ty 1 Chicago, L.A. and Las Vegas mobs, ie Hi [se My ae ae he CIA.

    INTERNATIONAL EDITION

    HEADLINES
    * Southern Democrat Jiminy Carter beats
    Geralo ! ord for election to the U.S. presidency
    * Supreme Court rules that death penalty (2)
    is a constitutionally acceptable form of punishment
    * China's chairman Mao Zedong (1)
    dies of Parkinson's disease
    » Nation celebrates bicentennial

    MOVIES

    * Best picture: ‘Rocky’

    * Top box office hits: ‘Star Is Born’
    ef and ‘Ail The President's Men’

    TELEVISION
    * Debut: ‘Laverne & Shirley’ (3)
    * Top-rated shows: ‘All in the Family’ and Rich Man, Poor Man’

    MUSIC
    « Hit song: ‘Silly Love Songs’ - Wings
    * Top albums: ‘Frampton Comes Alive’ -
    Peter Frampton and ‘Fleetwood Mac’ -
    Fleetwood Mac

    HOT CAR : Cadillac Eldorado

    POP CULTURE
    * College dropouts Stephen
    Wozniak and Steven Jobs
    found Apple Computer
    "ina garage
    + Farrah Fawcett (4)
    lands the role of Jill
    on ‘Charlie's Angels.’
    A poster of her in a.
    red bathing suit
    becomes the bes
    selling poster.
    ofitsera
    * Romanian —
    ~ gymnast Nadia
    Comaneci
    earns seven —
    perfect 10s -
    in 1976 Summer
    Olympics hel
    in Montreal



    SOURCES: Nielsen
    Media Researc
    Exhibitor Relations,
    Billboard, Academy.
    Motion Pictures
    and Sciences, 6M,
    Daimler Chrysler, —
    Miami Herald Resea

    Ana Larrauri/
    Miami Herald Staff

    SMP CUE IL lms ce) C2109 La
    “sentenced to three consecutive
    . life terms for rape, kidnap and
    “murder of three Miami-Dade
    * youngsters and four other rapes.

    [HURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2007 | 2E