Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS ~



Election 2007: how the
tch up

candidates ma

THE following unofficial
list of candidate match-ups
is accurate up to yesterday
afternoon.

e Farm Road

Prime Minister Perry
Christie will find himself fac-
ing a relative newcomer,
educator Ella Lewis. In 2002,
Mr Christie beat his oppo-
nent by more than 1,500
votes.

¢ South Beach
It has been suggested that

incumbent Agatha Marcelle
‘may not run in this election.



PN



@ PRIME Minister Perry The PLP candidate, whoever
Christie faces Ella Lewis he or she is, will face former
in Farm Road Coalition for Democratic



























2007 FORD SPORT T
$39,700.00 en

4.0L V6 Automatic

Limited
Edition,
loaded
with

leather
interior




RAC




SmartChoice

‘during the 2002 election.

2006

Make the SmartChoice!

. See the full line of your favourite Ford vehicles at

FRIENDLY MOTORS LTD__

THOMPSON BOULEVARD » TEL.: 356-7100 » FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL; friendlymotors@hotmail.com * WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas,com PART OF YOUR LIFE

Reform executive Phenton
Neymour, Mr Neymour, with
the majority of the CDR
leadership, went over to the
FNM in June following the
return of their leader Dr
Bernard Nottage to the PLP.

° Delaporte

Dr Hubert Minnis is said
to be running an extremely
organised campaign for the
FNM against the affable
incumbent, Youth, Sports
and Housing Minister
Neville Wisdom.

e Mount Moriah

If the embattled Keod
Smith does get the nomina-
tion from the PLP, he will
again face former FNM
leader Tommy Turnquest,
who lost his seat in 2002 to
Mr Smith by a little more
than 100 votes,

¢ North Eleuthera

FNM Incumbent Alvin
Smith will run against the
PLP’s candidate, who has yet
to be named,

° Adelaide

Michael Halkitis is expect-
ed to meet the FNM candi-
date, former deputy leader
of the CDR Charles May-
nard on the election battle-
field. Mr Maynard joined the
FNM with Mr Neymour in
June.

e Yamacraw

Minister of Social Services
Melanie Griffin is expected
to go up against Pauline
Cooper-Nairn, who ran for
the FNM in St Thomas More





FORD F150
$34,300.00

4.6L V6 Automatic









Reg Cab STX
The worlds
best selling



full size
truck
(other
models
available)















Zp





© St Thomas More

PLP Frank Smith:
expected to run against
accountant Reese Chipman.

¢ Marathon

Former FNM cabinet: min-
ister Earl Deveaux is expect-
ed to face Ron Pinder in this
constituency. Mr Pinder, a
first-timer when he ran in
2002, won his seat by 14
votes,

° Exuma

The FNM has recruited
former Bahamian ambas-
sador to the US Joshua Sears
to run against PLP incum-
bent Anthony Moss.

© Fort Charlotte

This is expected to be a
showdown between "two
great legal minds," The
incumbent, Minister of-Edu-
cation Alfred Sears, is
expected to face off against
lawyer. Michael Barnett.



@ MINISTER of Tourism Obie
Wilchcombe will face David
Wallace in West End and Bimini

© West End and Bimini

The FNM’s David Wal-
lace, who was unseated by
Minister of Tourism Obie
Wilchcombe, will face his
2002. opponent once again.
Mr Wilchcombe beat Mr
Wallace by more than 400
votes.

¢ Garden Hills

PLP incumbent Veronica
Owens is expected to face off
against former road traffic
controller Brensil Rolle.

@ CARL BETHEL could face
Sidney Stubbs in Holy Cross

° Holy Cross

The controversial Sidney
Stubbs, if he is ratified by his
party, will face his old neme-
sis Carl Bethel. The new-

comer Stubbs beat former

Attorney General Bethel by
more than 200 votes in 2002,

e Long Island

The newly-converted inde-
pendent Larry Cartwright
will run for the FNM in 2007.

e Fox Hill

In what will prove to be
one of the most interesting
match-ups in the 2007 race,
Foreign Affairs Minister



from people who are
making news in their: .
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award, ;

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.








Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

you are raising funds for a

Fred Mitchell will find him-
self up-against “native
Fox Hill gal” Dr Jacinta Hig-

gs.
¢ North Andros

Incumbent PLP candidate,
Financial Services Minister
Vincent Peet, is expected to
face Westernair owner Shan-

. drice Rolle.

° Montagu

PLP senator Yvette Turn-
quest will face incumbent
Brent Symonette once more.
Ms Turnquest lost by almost
600 votes in the last election.

¢ Carmichael

Former FNM senator and
current chairman of his par-
ty Desmond Bannister will
run against PLP incumbent
John Carey for the second
time in a general election.
Mr Carey won last time by
more than 300 votes.

e MICAL

Minister of Consumer
Affairs V Alfred Gray will
run against FNM Dion
Foulkes in the country’s
southernmost constituency.
In 2002, the race for this con-
stituency was won by only
four votes. The initial count
was so Close that it had to be
decided in Election Court.

Mr Foulkes lost his seat
last election in Baillou Hills
to Leslie Miller.

© Baillou Hills

Minister of Agriculture
Leslie Miller will face the
immediate past deputy
leader of the FNM Sidney
Collie.

° High Rock

Incumbent FNM candidate
and former minister in the
‘Ingraham administration,
Kenneth Russell, will face
newly appointed Senator
Doswell Coakley, who
recently announced that he
was resigning from the pres-
idency of Grand Bahama
Chamber of Commerce to
pursue the seat.

e Pineridge

Ann Percentie may repre-
sent the PLP against lawyer
Kwazi Thompson in the
upcoming election.

e Marco City

Incumbent PLP candidate
Pleasant Bridgewater may
face former FNM cabinet
minister Zhivargo Laing.

© Elizabeth

Elma Campbell will run
for the FNM against fellow
lawyer Malcolm Adderley.

° South Eleuthera

Speaker of the House
Oswald Ingraham will face
Johnley Ferguson.

_© Golden Gates

Incumbent PLP candidate
and Minister of Immigration
Shane Gibson will face
lawyer Don Saunders for the
FNM. Social activist Clever
Duncombe will run as an
independent.

e Lucaya
Incumbent FNM candidate

Neko Grant may face ‘attor-
ney Constance McDonald.







Co W/ . §
Vas Mf /

isnt
sat Remar eat tte










M@ ATTORNEY General
Allyson Maynard-Gibson could
face Byron Woodside in
Pinewood

e Pinewood

Attorney General Allyson
Maynard-Gibson may face
accountant and lawyer Byron
Woodside.

¢ Eight Mile Rock

Newcomer Verma Grant
will represent the FNM
against PLP senator Caleb
Outten.

¢ St Margarets

Loretta Butler-Turner will
represent the FNM. The PLP
candidate has yet to be
announced,

e St Cecilia

Deputy Prime Minister
Cynthia Pratt will defend her
seat for the PLP. The FNM
has yes to announce a candi-
date.



@ FNM leader and former
PM Hubert Ingraham will run
in North Abaco

e North Abaco

FNM leader and former
prime minister Hubert Ingra-
ham will defend his seat. The
PLP have not announced a
candidate.

eSouth Abaco

Former PLP senator Edi-
son Key will run for the FNM.
The PLP has yet to announce
a candidate.

e Cat Island, San Salvador
and Rum Cay

Phillip “Brave” Davis will
defend his seat for the PLP
against FNM senator Gladys
Sands.

e South Andros

Former broadcaster
Pricewell Forbes will run for
the PLP. He will face inde-
pendent incumbent Whitney
Bastian and real estate devel-
oper Marjorie Johnson, who
will be running for the FNM.

e Englerston

Minister of Transport
Glenys Hanna-Martin will
face attorney and FNM can-
didate Raymond Rolle.

¢ Bamboo Town ‘

Independent incumbent
Tennyson Wells will face
attorney Branville McCartney
for the FNM. The PLP has
yet to announce a candidate.

¢ Bain and Grants Town

It is expected that incum-
bent Bradley Roberts will
step aside to allow Health
Minister Dr Bernard Nottage
to run on the PLP ticket. He
will face the FNM’s youngest
candidate, former Torchbear-
er president David Jordine.

e Kennedy

If the PLP incumbent
Kenyatta Gibson is nominat-
ed, he will face Michael Turn-
quest, a first-time candidate
for the FNM. '

«= ¢

‘

«

Pe cae WS ea es:

“me AB

PP LSS

OF IF Ls

~+- oa"



-THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS |

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007, PAGE 3



ELECTION
COUNTDOWN



lm By RUPERT
MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

WITH the official
announcement of the full
slate of FNM candidates
coming yesterday, three
political pundits, an avowed
FNM, a committed PLP and

n “unbiased observer”, all
of whom wished to remain
anonymous, weighed in on
the soon to be election bat-
tle field and gave their pre-
dictions. |

According to the FNM
campaign general for Blue
Hills the campaign has
proved very interesting. In
fact, he said, FNM candidate
Sidney Collie has made
some good inroads into
incumbent Leslie Miller’s
turf.

“T think he (Mr Collie) is
going to win. I would not
have said that four months



ago, but Sidney Collie is
going to win,” he said.

However, both the inde-
pendent and PLP commen-
tator thinks that this might
be wishful thinking.

“Mr Miller is very popular’

now among PLPs and
FNMs, I think Blue Hills is a
safe seat for the PLP,” the
independent commentator
said.

While the PLP commen-
tator thinks that Ft Char-
lotte will be a win for his

party the FNM feel that it’

will be a close race but their
candidate Michael Barnett

gs. Political

pundits give

their vote predictions

A PLP, an FNM and an
independent look
ahead to election 2007

Alfred Sears out.

_ All three pundits however
agree that PLP MP for
Golden Gates cannot be
beaten.

“Although Gibson has lost
some credibility and he does
not have the big margin he
had many months ago
before the Anna Nicole
thing. He was a runaway.
While it is narrowed, I still
think he will win,” the FNM
commentator said.

The PLP pundit said that
many current PLP MPs wish
they were as secure as Mr
Gibson. ;

“Shane is almost invinci-



®@ PHENTON NEYMOUR:
Two of our three pundits
believe the FNM newcomer will
win the South Beach seat

ble down there. He has done
a great job in securing his
base and his campaigner is
an extremely hard worker,”

_he said.

While, perhaps not sur-
prisingly, the FNM com-
mentator said that the oppo-

will eventually “just edge”

@ THREE politically savvy commentators share their views on the outcome of the upcoming general elections.



A commentator who supports the PLP'said

his party will win the election with 21 seats.
He added that the FNM are sure to win 11,
that one seat will remain independent, and



Cushions |

; According to an experienced but inde-
: pendent political pundit, the odds are

: that the FNM will win by eight seats.

: He predicted the following outcome at

that eight constituencies are as yet unde- } the polls:
cided. He predicted: :
3 : FNM wins
FNM wins a:
Elizabeth . ! Adelaide
High Rock : Carmichael
Long Island / Ragged Island : Delaporte
Lucaya : Eight Mile Rock
Montagu : Elizabeth
North Abaco : Exuma
South Eleuthera ‘ Fox Hill
North Eleuthera : Garden Hills
South Abaco ? High Rock
St Margaret : Holy Cross
Mount Moriah Long Island / Ragged Island
: Lucaya
PLP Wins : Marathon
i; Marco City
: Montagu
. : Mount Moriah
Cat sland. Ruri €ay and San Salvador ? North Abaco
Englerston i North Andros/Berry Island
Farm Road : North Eleuthera
Fort Charlotte i Pineridge
Fox Hill : South Abaco
Garden Hills : South Beach
Golden Gates : St Margaret
St Cecelia : St Thomas Moore
South Andros
Marathon se
Marco City : PLP Wins
MICAL :
Pinewood : Bain and Grants Town
Pineridge : Bamboo Town
-St Thomas More : Blue Hills
‘South Beach : Cat Island, Rum Cay and San Salvador
West End and Bimini : Englerston
Yamacraw : Farm Road
; : Fort Charlotte
- Independent wins : Golden Gates
Bamboo Town : South Eleuthera
; : St Cecilia
Undecided : West End and Bimini
Kennedy _ i Yamacraw
Belpone : South Andros
Eight Mile Rock cy
Exuma ? MICAL
North Andros/Berry Island :
Holy Cross

‘Elegance .





: According to another commentator, who
: admitted a bias towards the FNM, the
: Spee will win by 18 votes. He pics
: dicted:

: FNM wins

? Adelaide
:? Bamboo Town
: Blue Hills
: Carmichael
: Delaporte
: Eight Mile Rock
: Elizabeth
:; Exuma
: Fox Hill
_? Garden Hills
: High Rock
: Holy Cross
: Long Island / Ragged Island
: Lucaya
: Marathon

Marco City

: MICAL

! Montagu

: Mount Moriah no seat
: North Abaco

: North Andros/Berry Island
: North Eleuthera

: Pineridge

: South Abaco

? South Beach

: St Margaret no seat

: South Eleuthera

: West End and Bimini
: Yamacraw

_ PLP Wins

! Bain and Grants Town

: Cat Island, Rum Cay and San Salvador
: Englerston

i Farm Road

? Fort Charlotte

: Golden Gates

i St Cecilia

; South Andros

: Pinewood

: Kennedy

: St Thomas More

may
(eae):
ay (65

UT ALS A
Ce



ENTIRE STOCK OF

sions en

Home Fabrics

ee St [242] 325-8233 ¢ Robinson Rd [242] 322-3080



HANNA-
MARTIN: All three pundits
believe the Minister of Trans-
port will win the Englerston seat

& GLENYS

sition would sweep Grand
Bahama he did say that the
party would have to work
hard in securing Marco City
and West End and Bimini.

“On the ground there was
talk that Marco City would
be the toughest constituency
in Grand Bahama while all
along we were hearing Obie
Wilchcombe. Regardless
though, there seems to bea
wave for the FNM in Grand
Bahama.

“Tam just about con-

_vinced that David Wallace



Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian family

Parliament Street (near Bay St.) Tel: 322-8393 or 328-7157
° Fax: 326-9953

Crystal Court at Atlantis, Paradise Island Tel: 363-4161/2

Lyford Cay (next to Lyford Cay Real Estate in
Harbour Green House) Tel: 362-5235

will win West End. If any-
one can win it David can,”
he said.

However, the PLP com-
mentator said that among
the seats that would be a
foregone conclusion for the
PLP would be Mr Wil-
chombe’s seat.

Among the seats the com-
mentators found interesting
was Bamboo Town. The
FNM pundit said that the
public could expect Ten-
nyson Wells to finish last in
a three-way race behind
FNM and the PLP if the
party nominates someone.

“The FNM ought to win
Bamboo Town. Branvill
McCartney will win. He has
done a good job of getting
those FNMs who supported
Tennyson Wells to come
back to the FNM,” he said.

However, the PLP pundit
said that Mr Wells is sure to
retain his seat in Bamboo
Town if he decides to run.









TROPICAL
arses
Fame
a ays ara EY,

OPEN
7 DAYS A WEEK FOR YOUR
SHOPPING CONVENIENCE




e-mail: www.colesofnassau.com ¢ P.O. Box N-121

ONE FoR Tel!

e LINEN = * COTTON
pe LAMOUR = « SILK

* BROADES » CHIFFON

* BRIDAL

* SPECIAL OCCASION

* TROPICAL FABRICS

* ALL SHEER & ANTIQUE SATIN
* ALL COTTON PRINTS
» ALL JACQUARDS, BROCADES

rie Hen eieiae melee



BUY 2 YARDS AT REGULAR PRICE & GET THE 3RD

averly
Fabric from
Spain

Vinyl, Plastic, Felf, Net & Tulle
NOT on SALE.



PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



‘EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR







The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master





LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914




SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.







Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991






EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-



Published Daily Monday to Saturday






Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama









TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

. Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348













Global warming debate is heating up



LAST week was interesting in the contro-
versial dialogue on climate change.

On Tuesday, President Bush uttered a
phrase during his State of the Union speech
that made headlines around the world.

In calling for cuts in U.S. gas consump-
tion and a greater emphasis on alternative
fuels, Bush conceded that something must be
done to “confront the serious challenge of
global climate change.”

That is a significant statement coming from
a president who has been reluctant to
acknowledge the climatic trend and even
less willing to admit that human activity
affects it. Bush stopped short, however, of
calling for mandatory emissions caps, which
would limit the amount of carbon dioxide
that companies can produce.

The day before his speech, the heads of 10
major energy companies asked Bush to do
just that in the form of a cap-and-trade sys-
tem. Their call takes some of the wind out of
the administration’s signature retort: that
mandatory emissions regulations would
excessively hurt American industry.

Instead, the CEOs of General Electric,
Duke Energy and other firms argue, meeting
climate challenges now will ensure econom-
ic competitiveness in a warming, world.

The corporate appeal fell flat on som
critics. ;

“Industry is interested in its public image
and, relatedly, profits. It represents absolute-
ly no expertise in climate,” Richard Lindzen,
Alfred P. Sloan Professor at the Massachu-
setts Institute of Technology, said in an e-
mail to The Express-News.

Lindzen is a nationally cited critic of
“alarmist” theories of global warming, which
he calls junk science.

In his view, the available evidence doesn’t
support the claim that human activity has
any discernible impact on the slight warming
seen since the late 19th century.

In other words, there’s really nothing
we’ve done or can do to change the situation.

“Under the circumstances, the best and .

so far the only viable policy is to prepare
society to be as adaptable as possible since
events like (Hurricane) Katrina will occur
regardless of climate change, as will climate
change itself regardless of man’s activities,”
Lindzen wrote.

Lindzen and a few other scientists are in
the minority.







KIEYANNA THOMPSON to





the date of publication of this notice.

ee














PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, LAKESHIA THOMPSON of
Buttonwood Avenue and Cedar Streets, Pinewood Garden intend
to change my name hild’s name from to LATAZ’YAH EDTWANYA
Ti AH EDTWANYA KIEYANNA
ROLLE. If there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box SS-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after





“Lose Yourself In Style”

Some. 500 scientists and officials are meet-
ing in Paris this week to work on a final ver-
sion of their report on how fast the world is
warming, how serious it is — and how much
is the fault of humans. The report by the
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change,
to be released Friday, could influence what
governments and businesses do to fight glob-
al warming.

According to sources familiar with its con-
tent, the report contains “smoking gun” evi-
dence of the human impact on climate
change.

Meanwhile, the World Economic Forum,
meeting in Davos, Switzerland, has
announced that climate change represents
the “shift most likely to affect the world in
the future.”

This is indeed a global problem that.
requires a global solution.

Bush and other critics of such treaties as
the Kyoto Protocol are right to cite the
inequality of policies that do not extend to
countries like India and China, two nations
whose mega-economies represent significant
and growing sources of emissions.

But that doesn’t exempt the United States
— the producer of 25 per cent of the world’s
carbon emissions — from doing something
now.

All this attention to global warming is
good. Isn’t it?

Well, yes and no. .

On one hand, more discourse on some-
thing of such global import is imperative.
This really should be dinner-table conver-
sation in homes all over the world.

On the other hand, hype is one of the first
by-products to arise when an issue du jour

‘becomes de rigueur — for example, the claim

that dramatic weather events like Katrina
are clear evidence of climate change.

The problem with an argument like that is
that if it can be scientifically refuted, or even
not scientifically proven, it gives critics
ammunition to debunk the broader theory of
climate change. It feeds directly into the very
alarmism Lindzen points to.

At that point, the debate becomes about
the debate. And that doesn’t get us any-
where.

(This article was written by
Rebeca Chapa - San Antonio
Express-News-c.2007).











Storewide Sale

January 25th - February rst
Excluding Pashmuinas

All Sales Final
No Store Credits

Less 5% for Credit Cards

Store Hours



Plugging you into the power of the sun...

We cannot
trust the PLP

EDITOR, The Tribune.

NO LAW-ABIDING
Bahamian would agree that drug
trafficking or any crime com-
mitted should not be investigat-
ed; the perpetrator arrested and
eventually brought to justice.

No sensible person would also
disagreed with the fact that if
the recent baggage handlers who
were “tricked” into going to the
US by their employer committed
a crime in the Bahamas, should

- be arrested by Bahamian police,

brought before a Bahamian
magistrate, and if found guilty
sentenced in the Bahamas

‘according to Bahamian law.

But all of that aside, and in

spite that there might have been ,

collusion, the most compelling
thing that obviously happened
was that the “ongoing investiga-
tion” in the Bahamas was hap-
pening without the assistance
and/or knowledge of the police,
Ministry of National Security,
the Attorney General, the Min-
ister of Foreign Affairs or the
Prime Minister. At least.that is
what everyone responsible is
expecting intelligent Bahamians
to believe.

This is unfortunate, downright
disrespectful and most certainly
counterproductive.

This one event will cause a
backlash, the likes of which have

never before been seen in this.

country, because Bahamians
believe that they were “sold out”
to the United States by the PLP.
It’s a matter of sovereignty.

Several words come to mind,
slackness, clueless, lack of
courage, deception, weakness
and too many cther words that
are closely associated with the
PLP government, reference to
the five baggage handlers.

First of all the Minister of
National Security must have
been briefed by the Commis-
sioner of Police at least once. In
this case it seems to me that
either the Commissioner and/or
the Minister of National Secu-
rity played too loose with the
truth.

Secondly, an investigation
where severe action was con-
templated internationally must
have got advice from the coun-
try’s lawyer who is the Attorney
General, Allison Maynard-Gib-
son..

Thirdly, since these events
stretched across the borders of
two country’s and both govern-
ments were involved, the most
sensible thing to expect is the
Minister of Foreign Affairs Fred-
erick Mitchell to help in the dis-
cussions to make sure the
process runs smoothly enough,
so that the sovereignty is not dis-
respected, which I suspect, should
be a priority with Mr Mitchell.

Last but by no means least,
the Prime Minister of the
Bahamas the Rt Hon Perry

FINALLY AFFORDABLE...





DaaMeas

letters@tribunemedia.net



Gladstone Christie. |

Mr Christie is in an unenvi-
able position, if he admits to
knowledge, he is in trouble for
allowing it to happen because it
would be perceived that he did
not protect the rights of the men.

This whole turn of events
exposes one glaring truth, that
the PLP cannot be trusted. One
only needs to recall, those who
are willing to recall, the Churchill
saga where two PLP MPs were
literally at each others throats,
and the Prime Minister had sev-
eral conflicting stories for that
one event. This singular event
must have done some damage

to his credibility.

The Bahamas needs a Prime
Minister they can trust and one
who is not afraid to make hard
decisions, even if they are
unpopular at the end of the day,

‘ because any man who thinks he

could please everyone all the
time is deluding himself.

The first time the Bahamas
was described as “A Nation for
Sale” it was under the PLP ref-
erence to drug trafficking. Today
the Bahamas is being “Sold
Out” by the PLP, again drugs
are involved. We have come full
circle.

IVOINE
INGRAHAM
Nassau,

January 27, 2007.

March to the tune of
patriot of the pass

EDITOR, The Tribune.

IT APPEARS some patriot from struggles of days gone by, polled

. my toe to awake me from my sleep: to tell their dreams they had for the

Bahamas and its people. So here I’m burning the midnight oil.

First and foremost; thank you for putting in print; the letter (Do we
have leaders or misleaders). I’m not associated with any political par-
ty, but have my political views!

The few in my humble environment look forward to see in print, the
other letters — the poetic spirited approach to concerns in this arena.

I heard in my mind — ringing thoughts:- “Bahamas how did you get
here; you’re not supposed to be here”. You made the wrong turn.
I’m reaching back — but you’re not standing there — where we
thought you should be — “in par excellence!”

Why so many suffering for the gains of so few? Why so few believe
they’re entitled to power inscriptively — as a pose to contractually.

In the struggles of days gone by — these were the very ideals we
struggled against. The very evil we struggled against is back with the
colour of a different skin!

Again the masses don’t have the intellect or political will — to com-
mand the direction they want to go!

Allowing themselves to be drag along — because of the paralysis of
fear! Being indoctrinated by the few, and believing that they’re where
they should be.

Many turning over in their graves to see what have become of us.
Turning over our inheritance to aliens, and our land to foreigners: “Not
only the principle of common sense appear to be impeded, but the com-
mon feelings of human nature have been retarded. —

If God created us for others, how much more he created us for
ourselves! So to reject the grassroots as insignificant — and the for-
eigners as everything goes against the root of our struggles.

Whose greatest good are immediately being served? How many
grassroots generations have to suffer before we benefit from the so-
called greater good? Unfortunately, there are so many that are blind
and can’t see. It will take another two generations of suffering before
we may be able to come out of these crisis.

So the gone, but not forgotten, have to wait a while before they can .
rest in peace! :

In closing this chapter in Bahamian history: A request goes out

’ from beyond the grave “that grassroots Bahamians come together, and

march.in memory and appreciation, of patriots of the struggles of
days gone by!”

Bahamians — you must come together again as a people, (without
the assistance of political parties or politicians) organise and march
forthwith!

RANDY

PATRIOTIC

BAHAMIAN

Nassau,

January 26, 2007.

‘98 HYUNDAI ELANTRA Best offer
‘99 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
‘00 HYUNDAI GALLOPER
‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE
‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE.

Very low mileage, very clean

‘05 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
Only 5,000 miles plus very clean

‘03 SUZUKI BALENO
‘03 SUZUKI XL-7

7-Passenger, dual A/C & low mileage

‘89 TOYOTA BUS Best offer

SOLAR POWER CONCEPTS LTD.

A Star in the Galaxy Group of Companies

Crawford St., Oakes Field
Tel: 323-5171 Fax: 322-6969

Mon- Fri (9:30 am -5:30 pm)
Sat (9:30 am -6 pm)



QUALITY3i3¢

LIMITED
#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS Ie
EAST SHIRLEY STREET ¢ 322-3775 ¢ 325-3079

Visit our showroom at Quallty Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals * Queen's Highway * 352.4122




c/a) Mackey Street (beside KFC)
Tel: 393-0551



i
A



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007, PAGE 5



Mii oe oo Sees eee ee ee
Excellence Estates residents claim



In brief

Activities
planned
for Coastal
Awareness
Month

THE National Coastal
Awareness Committee is
again planning a range of
educational activities for
Coastal Awareness ©
Monthin April. |

The committee is a
group of stakeholders
from the private and pub-
lic sectors with an inter-
est in promoting the sus-
tainable development of
the Bahamas

The Bahamian coastal
zone includes reefs,
beaches, bays, mangrove
forests and sea grass
beds.

These environments
are threatened by inva-
sive species, pollution
and marine debris, over-
fishing, climate change
and habitat destruction.

One of the activities
planned for April is a sci-
ence competition, which
is open to all schools,
clubs, and church groups.
Prizes will be awarded to
participants in primary,
junior high and senior
high school age cate-
gories.

“This ground-breaking
science-based contest
invites students to identi-
fy and scientifically
examine a problem facing
the Bahamian coastal
environment, develop
solutions to solve that
problem, and recommend
improvements,” said a
committee spokesman.

“The aim is to encour-
age students to become
involved with environ-
mental stewardship while
developing their critical
thinking skills.

“It gets students
involved, outside of the
classroom in.projects that
have real-life ‘applica-.:
tions while affecting
change in their communi-
ties. These skills are
essential for life in the
21st century.”

Prizes for last-year's
contest winners included
digital cameras. The
overall winners were able
to take part in the Wider
Caribbean Environmen-
tal Youth Programme in
the Virgin Islands.

The deadline for entry
this year is February 16.
Entry forms are available
online from the Bahamas
Reef Environment Edu-
cation Foundation.

RRR sles
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
aRAO OT

ae a CES
ce



REE at

WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY 31ST

6:30am Community Page 1540AM
8:00 Bahamas @ Sunrise

9:00 Bullwinkle & Friends

9:30 King Leonardo

10:00 International Fit Dance
10:30 Real Moms, Real Stories,










Real Savvy
11:00 Immediate Response
noon ZNS News Update
12:05 Immediate Response Cont'd




1:00 Island Lifestyles

1:30 Ethnic Health America

2:00 Thousand Dollar Bee

2:30 Aqua Kids

13:00 Paul Lewis

3:30 Don Stewart

4:00 —_Little Robots

4:30 Carmen San Diego

5:00 ZNS News Update

5:05 = The Fun Farm

6:00 One Cubed

6:30 News Night 13

7:00 Bahamas Tonight

8:00 — Anchor Projects

8:30 Be Your Own Boss

8:35 Caribbean Passport

9:00 Labour Speaks: National
Health Insurance

10:00 Caribbean Newsline

10:30 News Night 13

11:00 The Bahamas Tonight

11:30 Immediate Response

1:30am Community Page 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
ito] ahaa CoMaaFeL cea ESLULATIALO LC
programme changes!

























houses still in dire need of repair

@ By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

HOME owners in Excel-
lence Estates say their houses
remain in dire need of repair —
despite promises from the
Department of Housing to
look into their complaints.

The residents of the low-
cost housing community in
Carmichael first told The Tri-
bune their concerns about two

been sending complaint let-
ters to the housing department
since then.

However, they claim, their
letters have gone unanswered.

The Tribune visited the sub-
division on January 17 to find
out if the residents had made
any progress with their prob-
lems, and the reporter was
met with an additional com-
plaint.

The residents claimed they
had suffered “police harass-

ment” since their stories first
appeared in the newspaper. -

The Tribune contacted Gor-
don Major, director of the
Department of Housing, and
he promised that an investi-
gation and report would be
prepared on the matter.

On Monday, Mr Major said
that the investigation and
report were completed.

weeks ago.

They complained about
leaky roofs, cheap house paint
and a great deal of unfinished
work in their recently-bought
homes.

Excellence Estates was offi-
cially opened by the govern-
ment in September of last
year, and the frustrated home-
owners claimed they have

“Yes, the inspector did the |

report and their concerns did-
n’t even fill one page,” said
Mr Major. “But, I’ve asked
him to go to all the home own-
ers and get a list and we’ve
identified a contractor who is
going to go in there and look
at all the outstanding items
and deal with them.”

Contractor

Mr Major claimed however
that the contractor was hav-
ing problems finding the resi-
dents at home, because many
of them are at work during
the day.

Asked how much the home
repairs would cost, Major said
the contractor had not put
together a proposal yet.

However, Ms Leanna

Algernon Allen plans to launch
upscale resi



Hi MR AND Mrs Kevin Johnson, investors from the US; speak
to Prime Minister Perry Christie and former Housing Minister
Algernon Allen

FORMER Housing Minister Algernon Allen said he is tak-
ing advantage of the “unprecedented building boom” to launch
anew, upscale residential community — Coral Breeze Estates in

Coral Harbour.

Coldwell Banker Lightbourn Realty, the exclusive agents,
kicked off the project Thursday at a special reception at the
Hilton for realtors and VIPs, including Prime Minister Perry

. Christie.

. Banker Pauline Allen, Mr Allen’s partner and sister, and
the other developers .also were present.

Mr Allen, a director of Coral Breeze Estate, said there are less
than 2,000 acres of “immediately marketable land” left in
New Providence, or around 9,000-plus lots, excluding infra-
structure. ;

“The government availability of land for low and middle
income housing in New Providence is now at a premium,” he
said.

Mr Allen said low income housing land on the island has
been exhausted.

He said he was pleased that the new gated Coral Breezes com-
munity is located is an area which is expected to see almost one
billion dollars in investment.

Mike Lightbourn, president of Coldwell Banker Lightbourn

Realty, said land is a great investment opportunity in the.

Bahamas.

He noted that those who have invested in land over the years
have done incredibly well.

“This is just another part of that sphere where people have the
opportunity to invest, particularly now at the introductory
prices — the lots start at $90,000 for single family and $94,500 for
duplex lots.”

Mr Lightbourn said that first-time home buyers can benefit
from the introductory prices.

Sales ‘co-ordinator Carmen Massoni said Coral Breezes is
particularly attractive because it will have 24 hour security,
three parks, wide roads and it is only five minutes from beach-
es, hiking trails and horse back riding facilities.

Mr Allen said the new “billionaire” developers in the south
west, Albany, along with the planned development of a port and
revitalisation of the South Ocean Hotel, will boost property val-
ues, increase employment and provide more jobs, as well as act-
ing as a springboard for entrepreneurs.

“There is a buying mood for Bahamian investors in and
throughout the Bahamas,” he said.

“They are buying food chains, petrol chains, insurance and
investment companies. This is a period of unprecedented eco-

nomic expansion and the future now appears to be gloriously

bright.

“The real prospect of full employment is very near,” he said.

Mr Allen said the economy has grown by an almost “extra-
ordinary” seven per cent and $15 billion in investments has
launched unprecedented home construction by the govern-
ment and private investors.

“At all costs, we must not put a brake on investment in this
country,” he added.

Prime Minister Christie said great opportunities exist, but
cautioned that they will only succeed with planning.

He said government has a commitment to buy 350 acres of
land from the Joe Lewis organisation to “ensure that parallel to
the development of the major homes for foreigners . . . we will
have sister developments for Bahamians.”

This would include “guaranteed access to all of the beaches,
duck pond and wildlife habitat and parks of a major kind in Ade-
laide,” he said.

“The country does not have economic challenges and prob-
lems now,” Mr Christie said. “We are guaranteed a great
future.”







Ladies Sizes

y A Ri 10



\RLOSL LOO PRLLIBE

Carey, spokesperson for the
angry home-owners, said that
a contractor had been around
to a few homes, but did not
return.

Ms Carey explained: “I
talked to most of the people
and everybody said that there
is a contractor in the area, but
he is fixing one of the houses
that wasn’t finished.”

She said that her house has
not been inspected as yet.

Asked why she believed the
Department of Housing had
not resolved their concerns,
Ms Carey said: “They are try-
ing to keep our complaints
from being printed in The Tri-
bune, but as long as we keep
on talking about it, then they
will be forced to fix it.”

BAN



Rosetta St. :



Bahamian group
joins protest against
Dominican Republic

dolphin facility

A BAHAMIAN environmental organisation has joined the
protest against a dolphin facility in the Dominican Republic.

reEarth, headed by Sam Duncombe, has signed on to the petition
of the Save Japan Dolphins Coalition which is requesting that the
Dominican Republic block the import of dolphins to the Ocean
World Adventure Park.

International environmentalists say the facility - whose owners
are related to the Meister family, owners and operators of Dolphin
Encounters on Blue Lagoon Island — is scheduled to import 12 dol-
phins from Japanese “slaughter pens.” :

A spokesperson for Dolphin Encounters in the Bahamas empha-
sised that the facility in the Dominican Republic is in fact an
entirely separate company and has nothing to do with the Blue
Lagoon operation.

In a letter to President Leonel Fernandez Reyna of the Domini-

.can Republic, dozens of environmental groups requested that the

transfer of the animals be. stopped immediately.

“By allowing the dolphins into your country, the Dominican
Republic’s reputation as an environmentally friendly tourist des-
tination will be severely tarnished by direct association with the
Japanese dolphin slaughter,” the letter reads.

Environmentalists claim that Japan kills more than 2,000 dolphins
and porpoises annually. They allege that the majority of these ani-
mals are “butchered for sale in meat markets.”

The Save Japan Dolphins Coalition is also claiming that it has
obtained video footage of what it describes as the “cruel, bloody
capture” of the 12 dolphins in question.

The signatories to the petition said they feel that the blocking of
the import of the dolphins by the government of the Dominican
Republic would send an extremely important message to Japan that
environmentally responsible countries will not subsidise the slaugh-
ter of dolphins.





Z oo
SLALLLLAUCALELALMI LLL NAL



Ph: 325-3336



PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





,

Horticultural Society to
hold annual plant sale

PLANT enthusiasts have
been encouraged to root their
love with living Valentines at
the Horticultural Society of the
Bahamas’ annual plant sale.

The event will take place this
year on February 3 from 10am
to 2pm at the Bahamas Nation-
al Trust’s headquarters, The
Retreat.

“Say happy valentines day
with water plants, roses, orchids,
or other exotic or bedding
plants — all at amazingly good
prices,” promised former HSB
president Eric Butler, co-chair-
man of the popular plant sale
and co-chairperson Dorothy
Bowleg.

“Even if you don’t have a
valentine in mind yet, restock
your garden and prepare for
Spring Fever and Easter this
Saturday at the big sale opposite
Queen’s College. There is no
admission charge,” said Butler
and Bowleg in a statement.

“We've kept the extended

hours because of popular
demand, but it is still smart to
be one of the first in line for the
opening. The best stuff goes
fast,” added Mr Butler.

“There is always something
new to spark a gardener’s imag-
ination at this sale.

“Members show off new skills
and new plant life,” said Sara
Parker, a founding member of
the HSB.

Plants range in price from less
than a dollar to more than $100,
depending on size and rarity.

HSB members grow the
plants and label them for sale,
with 15 percent of the price
going to the HSB treasury.

“The plant sale is one of our
most popular events, and one
of our best fund raisers,” said
HSB president Sarah Labosky.

Of special interest each year
at any HSB sale are dozens of
dramatic bromeliads, from tiny
tillandsias or “air plants” to
gigantic hybrids with a five-foot



@ ERROL Duke Strachan (left) gives advice to Coach Tom
Grant during an early HSB annual piant sale

SP 'F

‘



@ MRS Linda Davis pays Gordon Wilde for a majestic Tillandsia at an early HSB annual plant sale
held each year at The Bahamas National Trust “Retreat Garden” on Village Rd.

leaf spread.

HSB members now often
donate inexpensive bare root
plants for the society’s sales.

“No plants will be sold before
10am on Saturday, February 3,”
said Mr Butler.

He urged HSB members to
bring plants on Friday between
2pm and 6pm and between 8am
to Yam on Saturday.

Since 1999, plant hunters
have started lining up shortly
after 8am outside the BNT
gates.

The lines are expected to be
shorter than ever at this year’s
plant sale, HSB officials say.

Founded by the late Mrs Sara
Bardelmeier in 1984, the HSB
conducts a field trip each year

CAREER OPPORTUNITY
CATV Headend Consultant

| yA

CABLE BAHAMAS

Cable Bahamas Limited, operating one of the most advanced
broadband networks, seeks the services of a top-notch professional. The
ideal candidate will have extensive experience in the reception and
distribution of off-air, satellite and tape originated programming to the

outside plant utilizing fiber optic transmissi
current operating environment includes analog

on technologies.

The
and digital channels,

four headends with high-speed cable modem services, in-house 20
channel digital video server, analog conditional access services, and an

advanced upstream management system.

Resposibilities Include:

* Engineer, design and upgrade existing and new headends and-hubs.

* Evaluation and procurement of headend equipment options based on
sound judgement of performance quality and cost of same.

* Support the development and deployment of high capacity and Metro
SONET services, subsystems and devices.

Operation and maintenance of:

* All headend signal-processing equipment for analog and digital video;

* High-Speed data network components and monitoring equipt. also

* Antennas, Dishes, Towers and microwave equipment

* Fiber optic path cabling and management systems (Fwd. and Return)
'*Assist with planning and implementation of new product intros

* Coordinate completion of projects on schedule and on budget

* Prepare, submit and manage a departmental budget

* Plan and insure Headend/Hub Preventative maintenance programs

Minimum Qualifications: :
A University degree in Electrical/Electronic Engineering or equivalent
with at least 10-15 years of experience in Headend Operations and
engineering, of which five (5) years, should be as an international

consultant.

Cahle Bahamas Ltd. owns and operates one of the world's most
advanced Broadband networks and provides world-class television
service and high-speed internet access services throughout the
Bahamas. The company also owns and operates a private submarine,
fiber-optic system connecting the Bahamas and Florida. Cable
Bahamas’ ordinary shares trade on .the Bahamas International Stock
Exchange (symbol: CAB). Additional information can be obtained from
the companies website at www.cablebahamas.com.

Sig

CABLE BAHAMAS

Resumes to be submitted by February 5th 2007 to the
Director of Human Resources or sent electronically to
rbadderley@cablebahamas.com.

a

and produces a massive “Show
of horticultural excellence”
every other year.

This year’s show, “Sara’s
Garden” will honour Mrs
Bardelmeier and will be held in
conjunction with the Orchid
Society of the Bahamas, which
Mrs Bardelmeier also helped
found.

Meetings of both groups are
held monthly, usvally in the gar-
dens of members.

Each year, HSB members
bring truck loads of plants to
the annual sale with part pro-
ceeds going to the society.

Orchids from Flamingo Nurs-
eries and unusual plants from
the Garden of Eden also are

» tsi

@ RESTOCK your garden and y
cultural Society of the Bahamas (HSB) Plant Sale, 1

featured, along with many water
plants —- ever more popular —
grown by member Marina
Greaves.

“Helping beautify the nation
is one of our goals as a society,
now nearly 25 years old,” said
Mr Butler.

Parking is available at
Queen’s College. Shoppers are
urged to bring boxes and bags
for their purchases. Some help
is available for transporting
large plants.

Former HSB president Cyn-
thia Gibbs said: “Some people
bring trucks,of plants to sell and
take home a truck load of other
member’s plants. It’s great fun.
People even fly in from the

Family Islands for this sale.

“Unusual plants, and lots of
good advice, are offered every
year at the HSB sale: orchids,
air plants on driftwood, rare
fruit trees and shrubs, rare
palms, roses and flowering
trees, herbs and bedding plants.

“HSB includes more than 100
members, including all the gar-
den clubs, top horticulturalists
and growers from many of the
Family Islands, so this will be
another plant sale to remem-
ber," says Errol ‘Duke’ Stra-
chan, award winning director of
the National Youth Orchestra.
He supplies substantial num-
bers of plants to the sale each
year.





our love life this Saturday, F' ebruary 3, during the annual Horti-

0am to 2pm, at the Bahamas National Trust

headquarters, The Retreat, on Village Road opposite Queen’s College. “We’ve kept the extend-
ed hours because of popular demand, but it is still smart to be one of the first in line for the open-
ing. The best stuff goes fast,” said former BNT president Eric Butler, co-chairman of the popular
plant sale, pictured along with co-chairperson Dorothy Bowleg (seated). :










Office.

2007.




T

No form will be accepted without:

E COLLEGE OF

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

a

NOTICE

ALL prospective graduates for SPRING 2007 MUST
submit COMPLETED Graduation Evaluation Forms to
the Records Department on or before FEBRUARY 2, 2007.

¥ ALL SIGNATURES (Student’s, Advisor’s and
Chairperson’s) and

Y PROOF OF PAYMENT from the Business

N.B. ANY form submitted after this date will be considered
LATE and will be processed for the Summer Semester





THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS



Cable
Bahamas
disruption |
on Grand
Bahama

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - Cable
Bahamas Limited
experienced a disrup-
tion in its services on
Tuesday in Grand
Bahama, affecting a
number of residents
and commercial cus-
tomers during peak
business hours.

Keith Wisdom, a
spokesperson for
Cable Bahamas, said
the disruption in cable
TV, Internet and fibre
services was caused
when a utility pole .
became dislodged from
the ground as a result
of a traffic accident on
the Queens Highway.

The services were
off-line from 9am, and
still had been not
restored by 3pm.

A press release
issued by Cable
Bahamas did not indi-
cate which areas or
how many customers
were affected by the
outage.

Mr Wisdom apolo-
gised for any inconve-
nience experienced as
a result of the disrup-
tion in services.

@ A GRAND
Bahama Power Com-
pany employee is in
hospital after being
injured while attending
to the damaged wires
that caused a disrup-
tion in cable services
yesterday.

_GBPC executive
Tony Lopez said that
at about 11.30am, a
senior transmission 4
and distribution lines-
man attending a power
interruption on
Queen’s Highway suf-
fered an injury after
making contact with a
live wire.

Mr Lopez said the
employee is alert and
has been seen by a car-
diologist.

“At this time our
prayers are and
thoughts are will him
and his family and all
our efforts are focused
on his health and well
being,” he said.

Mr Lopez said inves-
tigations are being
conducted in the acci-
dent.

A “NATIONAL emer-
gency” has erupted in the
form of an epidemic in the
dialysis unit of the Princess
Margaret Hospital, the
Bahamas Democratic Move-
ment is claiming.

Party leader Cassius Stu-
art said Health Minister Dr
Bernard Nottage should be
forced to resign for failing to
deal with the situation.

At a press conference held
outside Princess Margaret
Hospital on Monday, Mr
Stuart claimed that senior
health officials are aware
that “life-threatening bacte-
ria” exists in the dialysis unit
at the hospital at epidemic
levels.

The problem, he said,
should have led to the clo-
sure of the unit.

Mr Stuart further claimed
that some senior officials
have put pressure on hospital
staff to keep quiet about the
problem.

He alleged that patients
“face the death chamber”
upon entering the facility,
and that the infection has
already claimed 15 lives.

Mr Stuart said.an addi-
tional 70 persons have tested
positive for the antibiotic-
resistant “enterococcus fae-
calis sepsis” bacteria.

The bacteria, once it enters
the bloodstream, is known to
severely damage the heart by
forming lesions on the aortic
valve, impairing blood flow
to and from the heart.

Dr Patrick Whitfield, med-
ical chief of staff at the hos-
pital, previously claimed that
the bacterial transmissions
had “decreased significant-
ly”.

However, according to Mr
Stuart, staff in the dialysis
unit continue to diagnose
patients with symptoms of
the bacterial infection.

He said evidence had been
collected by a number of
doctors within the hospital —
including one who described
the situation as a “national
emergency”.

The BDM leader claimed
that government has “bla-
tantly betrayed its public
duty to protect and defend
its citizens,” by failing to
publicly disclose the extent
of the problem.

Mr Stuart added that the
unit needs to be shut down,
and the Centre for Disease
Control (CDC) in the US
contacted to determine how
to move forward.

Patients should be referred
to other private facilities
until the PMH unit is clear
of the bacteria, he suggest-
ed.

In November, Dr Whit-
field admitted that 16 to 18
people may have become ill

‘national emergency
has ane at PMH dialysis unit





@ PRINCESS MARGARET
HOSPITAL: The Bahamas
Democratic Movement is
claiming there is a ‘national
emergency’ at the dialysis unit
of the hospital.

due to the bacteria, but
claimed there was no
cause for alarm because the
infection proved to be treat-
able.

Referring to claims that
several deaths had been
linked to the bacterial out-
break, he explained that
patients were already'suffer-
ing from other diseases and
that it would not be fair to
say if the bacteria was nec-
essarily the cause of death.

However, several dialysis
patients have come forward
since that time claiming that
they believe the situation is
“out of control”.

The Tribune called the
Dialysis Unit to attempt to
verify the extent of the prob-
lem, however, staff there said
they were unable to give out
any information.

They suggested instead
that hospital administrator
Mrs Coralee Adderley
should be contacted about
the matter.

However, messages left for
Mrs Adderley, her deputy,
Dr Whitfield and Dr Nottage

_were not returned.

Orban
MYTH

Nassau’s
newest

boutique

<
®BIG SALE
EVENT

Wed. Jan 31st -
Sat. Feb 3

Hip Jeans, tops,
shoes and
accessories

Located in the
International
Bazaar

tel. 322-4535



COMMONWEALTH

q) BANK

CHAIRMAN’S REPORT ON UNAUDITED RESULTS DECEMBER, 2006



In 2006 Commonwealth Bank achieved a significant milestone in Bahamian history surpassing
the $1 Billion mark in Total Assets. In addition in 2006, the Bank, once again achieved record
results for the tenth consecutive year, always with a focus on our customers and consistent
performance, Net Income for 2006 was $40.4 Million, up from $31.8 Million in 2005. The
Board was pleased with the performance of the Bank in 2006 since sustainable success does
not come easily, requiring continuing focus on fundamental strengths while ensuring sufficient
investment is made to address strategic initiatives and anticipated market developments. The
Board has been fortunate to be able to work closely with a dedicated management team and
one that is committed to the future of the Bank and its customers. ,

Gross revenues reached $81.6 Million an increase of 16.4% with the net income contribution
of $40.4 Million an increase of more than 27% over the previous year, both historical highs
for the Bank. Earnings per share increased to $1.08 a further increase of 27 percent over the
previous year with our shareholders also participating in the earnings growth through dividends
of 68 cents per share an increase of greater than 50% over dividends paid in 2005.

Return on Equity (R.O.E.) and Return on Assets (R.O.A.), commonly used ratios to measure bank
performance increased appreciably in 2006. R.O.E. was 34.82 percent an increase of 4.2
percent while R.O.A. was 3.76 percent increasing 9.9 percent. Our overall efficiency ratio
which takes into consideration our non-interest expenses, compared to the Bank’s revenue
generation was 46.7 percent, a further improvement over 2005. The results of our efficiency
rating are reflective of the Bank’s objective to ensure that any expense growth is matched by
revenue generation and customer service. The Bank will continue to place ongoing attention to
operational effectiveness and will seek more costeffective ways to sustain and develop our
product and service throughput.

As the new year began, we opened our latest New Providence branch at Golden Gates. We
have a firm commitment to our customers to be the leader in personal banking by taking
banking to the people who have wholeheartedly supported this Bahamian institution.

On this notable occasion and on behalf of the Board | would like to acknowledge the ongoing
contribution of the individual directors and the personnel throughout the Bank who have and
continue to contribute to the growth and success of the Bank. The proof of their high level of
commitment, professionalism, creativity and interest in Bahamians is clear. | am confident that the
Bank will continue to seek opportunities to sustain the trust we have earned for many more years.

Chairman







COMMONWEALTH BANK LTD.
UNAUDITED RESULTS FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER, 2006

2006

ASSETS ($'000]



NET INCOME ($000)



NET INCOME AVAILABLE TO COMMON SHAREHOLDERS (‘000)}



EPS (IN CENTS) BASIC AND FULLY DILUTED



RETURN ON EQUITY

William BXSands, Jr. T.B. Donaldson
President & CEO Chairman

N.B. A full set of audited financial statements will be published within the time frame established
by BISX.



©2007 CreativeRelations net





PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007




SCHOOLS across the
Bahamas have been preparing
their students since the
beginning of the semester for
this year’s National Spelling
Bee.

Northwestern
district spellers
are buzzing

printed the photographs of stu-
dents from Albury Sayle Pri-
mary, CC Sweeting Junior
High, Gambier Primary, HO
Nash Junior High and Naomi
Blatch Primary.

Pictured today are the

THE TRIBUNE

#@ KURISSA NEWBOLD
Oakes Field Primary

g@ JOEYSA ABRAHAM
Oakes Field Primary

remaining competitors in the
event which will be held at
BCPOU Hall on January 31 at
10am to see who will represent
the Bahamas in the Scripps
National Spelling Bee in Wash-
ington DC.

B@ MALIK STUART
Oakes Field Primary

In yesterday’ s Tribune, we



#@ CRYSTAL ANDREWS
Stephen Dillet Primary

@ SHANTE

Oakes Field Primary Stephen Dillet Primary

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Libraries and Instructional Media Services Department
The Law les! Branch

Lunch & Litigation

Inaugural Luncheon
Topic: Consumer Protection Act, 2006
“ Nw



# IESHA FARRINGTON
TG Glover Primary a

â„¢ FRANKLYN WOODSIDE
Stephen Dillet Primary

# LINDRICJUOR
GIFFORD

Wednesday, 31st January, 2007
Choices Restaurant





Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute m MICHAELIANNA : B SHARMOR MICHEL â„¢SHANIQUE PYFROM
ADDERLEY : over Primar over Prim
_The College of The Bahamas 1G Glover Primary TI REO e ig 2 Mae eee tie

““TRORASSOP-BoUleéVvard ~
NESE ThéBahamas ~
12:00 noon - 2:00 p.m.

Silent Auction of Student Art
will take place during the luncheon



@ RACHE BURROWS
Woodcock Primary

B KARISMA KING
Woodcock Primary

@ BETHLEE GARDINER

Woodcock Primary

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Donation: $35.00 :: Student: $25.00.
Part proceeds in aid of the new library fund


















@ STANLEY SMITH
Woodcock Primary






Mark your calendar
Our Application Deadline
is February 2, 2007

Remember to include the following with your application :
$40.00 non-refundable processing fee .
Copy of passport pages showing your name, date of .
birth and expiration date of passport :
Official high school transcript .
Test scores and copy of BUC and BGCSE results to date ie
Don’t let the deadline pass you by! .
We look forward to welcoming you to The College, -
soon to be the University of The Bahamas. ea



Oe SAS RPE ES ALENT



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007, PAGE 9





The history of the



war on illegal drugs

AST week's article
on the baggage han-

dler controversy drew calls

from some readers for the
legalisation of drugs — which
may not be as crazy as it first
sounds.

Today's moralistic attitude
towards drug use developed
in the late 19th century, when
religious reformers pushed for
a law enforcement approach
to what previously had been a
matter of personal choice.

These crusaders were able
to criminalise the possession
of opium and its derivatives
morphine and heroin, as well
as cocaine, around the time
of the First World War, with
cannabis following soon after.

Before then opiates were
freely available in Western
societies, both on their own
and as an unregulated ingre-
dient in tonics and medicines.
Morphine was a popular
painkiller, heroin was pro-
duced by Bayer in 1895 as a
"safe" cough remedy, and
cocaine was an early ingredi-
ent in Coca Cola.



LARRY SMITH.

outright prohibition of drugs
has led directly to the awe-
some problems of corruption
and violence we face today.
Crime syndicates in the
world's major cities now orga-
nize a global traffic in illicit
drugs — a market response
that only ruthless totalitarian
regimes can effectively
counter.

President Richard Nixon
unleashed the first US anti-
drug war in the early 1970s
after heroin use among US
troops in Vietnam soared.
Nixon suppressed the so-
called French Connection,
which converted Turkish opi-
um to heroin for the US mar-
ket.

But that only increased
global demand. And the Rea-
gan and Bush administrations
were forced to pursue similar



“ The United Nations has
valued the international drug
trade at $400 billion a year —
more than the trade in textiles
or motor vehicles. The
Financial Action Task Force
came up with an estimate of
$280 billion. But whatever the
size of the market, traffickers
can easily earn returns of
thousands of percentage >
points on their investment —

tax-free.”



In fact, people have used
drugs for religion, recreation
and medicine since prehistoric
times, with opium having per-
haps the longest pedigree.
Made from the sap of the
poppy plant, it was an inter-
national trade item as early
as the second millennium BC.

In the modern era, this
commerce was so profitable
that it led to war. Experts say
that today's drug cartels can-
not compete with the British
East India Company's indus-
trial efforts to supply Chinese
users in the early 19th centu-
ry. The so-called opium wars

famously led to the takeover

of Hong Kong and the forced
legalisation of the drug trade
in China.

But, as with the slave trade,
public opinion eventually
changed. And from 1874
British missionaries and
moralists fought a relentless
campaign that culminated in a
1906 decision to end India's
drug exports. By then, opium

“was a global commodity as
important as coffee or tea.

As efforts grew to place
narcotics under international
control, the Opium Conven-
tion of 1912 was agreed to
help resolve the British-
caused drug problems in Chi-

na. And in 1914 the US;-
imposed heavy restrictions on ‘

the use of opiates and
cocaine.

By the 1920s both the US
and Britain had banned these
drugs, and the American tem-
perance movement had suc-
ceeded in making alcohol ille-
gal too (until 1933). Attempts
were also made at this time
to control cannabis — another
plant-derived drug that has
been in common use since
ancient times.

According to the first head
of the US Federal Bureau of
Narcotics: "There are 100,000
total marijuana smokers in
the US, and most are
Negroes, Hispanics, Filipinos,
and entertainers. Their Satan-
ic music — jazz, and swing —
result from marijuana use."

Needless to say, cannabis
was outlawed in 1937.

But many argue that.th

policies in Latin America and
Asia with limited results.
Cocaine became a major com-
modity during the 1980s, as
Bahamians know from direct
experience as a transit point
in this hugely profitable busi-
ness.

Rather than eradicating the
drug trade, prohibition drove
it underground. And experts
continue to predict rapid
growth in the global supply
of illicit drugs, together with
more drug abuse and a rise in
the undesirable side-effects of
the trade — corruption, vio-
lence, organised crime and
illegal arms trading.

_ According to Stanford Uni-
versity philosopher Sam Har-
ris, current drug policies make
no sense: "Concerns about
the health of our citizens, or
about their productivity, are
red herrings in this debate, as
the legality of alcohol and cig-

arettes attest."

He points out that alcohol
is by far the more dangerous
substance. It is addictive, its
lethal dose is easily achieved,
and it accounts for more vio-
lence, more crime, more sick-
ness, more death and more
arrests than all other drugs
combined.

"And yet," Harris says,
"people are still receiving life
sentences for growing selling,
possessing, or buying what is,
in effect, a naturally growing
plant. Cancer patients and
paraplegics have been sen-
tenced to decades in prison
for marijuana possession...The
only explanation is that our
discourse on this subject has
never been obliged to func-
tion within the bounds of
rationality."

So what are the conse-
quences of current drug poli-
cies? .

As newspaper columnist
Jack Cole wrote recently:
"America's futile effort to
arrest its way out of our drug
problems has cost taxpayers
more than $1 trillion since
1970.

“It funds terrorists and
clogs the court system, yet our
kids report that it can be eas-
ier for them to buy illegal
drugs than beer or cigarettes."

In fact, every major study
over the past 50 years in
Canada, the United States
and Europe agrees that
decriminalization of drug
use, under almost. any sce-
nario, is better than the cur-
rent drug war approach. To
see why, all we need to do is
ask how many millions of
people need to be arrested
and imprisoned to solve the
world's drug problem.

In the US alone there are
an estimated 16 million regu-
lar drug users (two thirds use
only marijuana), and the pris-
ons are already full at 1.5 mil-
lion inmates. In the Bahamas,
we all know that Fox Hill
Prison is so overcrowded and
badly run that it is a major
public health problem and
security threat in its own right.

Clearly, banning drugs cre-
ates more “criminals” and
costs more money than the
use of illicit drugs. Criminal-
ization forces users to obtain
drugs from an environment
that is violent and where
crime is inevitable. It inflates
revenues, increases the power
of criminal gangs and requires
ever greater enforcement
efforts.

The American experience
with alcohol prohibition is
instructive. According to one
expert: "As the illegal trade



boomed, so did the number
of violent crimes. Robberies,
burglaries and assaults
increased significantly during
Prohibition. About 880 “gang-
sters” died in turf wars in
Chicago alone. And the over-
all murder rate hit record
highs. Then, in 1933, alcohol
was legalized and violent
crime dropped immediately."

B ut perhaps the great-
est argument against
the current law enforcement
approach is the threat to
social stability and the dan-
ger that organised crime will
turn more countries into
failed states through wide-
spread corruption and vio-
lence. It almost happened
here in the 1980s.

The United Nations has’

valued the international drug
trade at $400 billion a year —
more than the trade in tex-
tiles or motor vehicles. The
Financial Action Task Force

came up with an estimate of -

$280 billion. But whatever the
size of the market, traffickers
can easily earn returns of
thousands of percentage
points on their investment —
tax-free. It is all but impossi-
ble to end the drug trade in






Quality System.




achieve (1) above.

efficiently.



Core Competencies:



P.O. Box N-1123
Nassau, Bahamas

Main Duties & Responsibilities:

Qualifications & Experience

the face of such profits.
As Sam Harris says: "Giv-
en the magnitude of the real

problems that confront us, our

war on sin is so outrageously
unwise as to almost defy ratio-
nal comment."

In short, current drug poli-
cy is both irrational and inef-
fective. Many experts argue
that the only sound policy is
to bring the drug trade within
the law, so that it can be
taxed, controlled and dis-
couraged. Drug prices would
decrease. significantly, drug
potency could be more close-
ly monitored and gainful
crimes would be greatly
reduced.

Police and government
officials could then re-direct
their resources into other
areas, such as investigating
and prosecuting violent crime.
These resources are consid-
erable — the Canadian gov-
ernment spends $500 million a
year to address illicit drug use,
and the American drug con-
trol budget is almost $13 bil-
lion.

Drug reformers say that
the war on drugs has not only
failed to meet the public
health objectives of prevent-
ing addiction, intoxication and
abuse, and prompting an

FINISH CABINET MAKERS NEEDED

Wanted for new state of the art factory.
Must have chop saw, circular saw, drill, hand tools & experience.

Secure job with good pay and benefits for the right person.

Call: 394-4151
Fax: 394-4159 ©

Position Available

Maintenance Technician

The Maintenance Technician shall report to the Maintenance Supervisor and must be
familiar with, understand and operate according to the relevant elements of the Coca-Cola

‘The Maintenance Technician shall be responsible for the following activities, within the
limits of his/her specific skill:

1. Ensure that all equipment works at its optimum level of efficiency by the:
- Installation and commissioning of all plants, equipment, services and utilities
- Maintenance of building and facilities (plumbing, painting, basic carpentry an
masonry and electric)
_ - Maintenance of forklifts and other vehicles
- Fabrication, machining and welding of parts or items as required
- Repairs to all electrical and mechanical equipment

2. Carry out all necessary maintenance activities covering Planned Maintenance (PM),

Condition Based Maintenance (CBM), and Improvement Projects in order to

3. Log and record all work undertaken to the satisfaction of the Maintenance Supervisors
Monitor and operate any production line equipment to ensure that its working

4. Report any non-conformances to the immediate supervision or QA personnel and carry
out the relevant corrective action as is recommended.

5. Perform other reasonable job related duties as may be assigned by management.

City and Guilds I & II or Ordinary Technicians Diploma in his/her area of expertise (i.e.
electrical, mechanical) or a minimum of five years experience in a similar capacity.

Good working knowledge of bottling plant machinery & machinery & services.
Possess good troubleshooting skills.
Ability to read and understand equipment manuals.

Please submit written resume to:
Caribbean Bottling Co. (Bah) Ltd.

ATTN: Human Resources Dept.
On Or Before Feb.16th, 2007

overall decrease in drug use |
— it has aggravated the situa- -
tion by supporting a huge |
black market and depriving .
thousands of medical treat-
ment.

But this is a highly emo-
tional debate. Reformers
think that those who are inter-
ested in tougher drug control
want to turn the world into a
police state. And drug war-
riors think the reformers are
addicts who want to make
more addicts.

And even if we legalize
drugs, there will still be a rev-
enue stream. Whoever gets

_ that revenue will try to maxi-

mize it: "What you might call
the political economy of drug
legalization is a bigger prob-
lem than the legalizers seem
to grasp," says Mark Klein- |
man, a professor of social
research at the University of »
California.

All things considered, it's a -
very tough call. :

What do you think? Send -
comments to larry@tribune- -
media.net bunemedia.net>

Or visit www.bahamapun-
dit.com pundit.com/>

































PAGE 10,WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007



WEDNESDAY EVENING JANUARY

NETWORK CHANNELS




WPBT



Fie va: Deco Drive [Bones ‘The Man inthe Cel’A [American Idol ‘Week 3B: Auditions |News (CC)
WSVN bumed body may be that of Bren- 6 San Antonio” Singing hopefuls au-
nan’s incarcerated adversary. (N) dition. (N) (CC)
C

|

rT Jeopardyl (N) George Lopez [According to |The Knights of in Case of Emer-[Primetime “Medical Mysteries” (N)
‘Wi =WPLG ch " Angie nanahs Jim “Delierance Prosperity Ase ency (N) — {(CC) :

| her story. (N) —_}(N) (CC) curity guard. (N) tec)

Sore oy. Ve] SO Sas)

Hardtalk BBC News World Business |BBC News Fast Track BBC News
BBCI (Latenight). |Report (Latenight). (Latenight).

BET Access Granted |The Parkers ( |The Parkers 1 |Girlfriends \ (Girlfriends © [Girlfriends 0
| (CC) (CC) (CC) (CC) (CC) (CC)

loney 100 to win $1 million. (CC)

| Scrubs “ ly Uni- |The Daily Show |The Colbert Re- |Chappelle’s {South Park The /South Park (Part
‘COM corn’ © (CC) With Jon Stew- {port Donna Sha- |Show (CC) [boys start a talent! of 2) (CC)
| art (CC) ala, (CC) agency.







election.
DIY This Old House |DIY to the Res- |DIY to the Res- |Wasted Spaces |Wasted Spaces |Finders Fixers
(CC) —_feue cue (N) Custom closet.
DW In-Focus (Ger- |Journal: Made inGer- — {Journal: In Euromaxx Journal: |
| man). Tagestema many ~ Depth Tagestema
| E! The Daily 10 jJenna Jameson: The E! True Hollywood Story Adult film star attains | Starveillance
| Hes mainstream success. (CC) Lindsay Lohan.

5] ESPN tiny College Basketball Miami at North Carolina. NBA Basketball San Antonio Spurs at Utah Jazz. From
Live) (CC) Arena in Salt Lake City. (Live) (4 (CC)

The Suite Life of] x * QUINTS (2000, Comedy) Kimberly J. Brown, Don Knotts, Dan Roe- |Life With Derek
DISN aa & ch buck. An only child must adjust to her parents’ new quintuplets. © (CC) [Upcoming school
ickness.

|
i
i



Lady

:00) Cardio |Ship Out, Shape Up ‘Mazatlan’ —_| Buff Brides: The Bridal Challenge |FitTV’s Housecall
(FITTV be’ (Co) |The ship eaches Mazatlan, (CC) [Siobhan & Jule” (CC) Weight-loss & Toni
FSNFL (:00) College Basketball Vanderbilt at Florida. (Live) {College Basketball Alabama at LSU. (Live)

:00) Golf Cen- |U.S. Open Golf Highlights Geoff |PGA Champions Clinic Ultimate Matches
GOLF fate)" losin ae
Lingo (CC; Who Wants to Be a Millionaire © Twenty One 1 (CC) Chain Reaction
Gs fm [eg PR arity

:00) Attack of |X-Play Morgan inX-Play The best {Star Trek: The Next Generation [Cops 0 (CC
G4Tech {fears Europe. (N)- loames of 2008, [20 hteractve ek (Acc) (Pe Cel

|: (00) Walker, — | Walker, Texas Ranger A 1 rye % %% MARCH OF THE PENGUINS (2005) Narrat-
‘HALL exas Ranger old boy is being groomed a is fa- Jed by nap Freeman. Emperor perauhs make an
i! 0 (CC ther for a life of crime. (CC) annual trek across the Antarctic, (CC)

| Buy Me Enlisted |Designed to Sell/National Open . |Property Virgins |Location, Loca- [House Hunters
HGTV the help ofan 11) (ec) House 1 (CC) “Avan & Kal tion, Location | (CC)
agent, ( (CC) A (CC) “Essex” (CC)
Morris Cerullo |Breakthrough:. |Zola Levitt Pre- Inspiration To- [Life Today (CC) |This Is Your Da
INSP ene on lems lage Tar CH (Eo
Reba Cheyenne |My Wifeand {Accordingto Accordingio {Friends Joey | Everybod
KTLA® © ‘kicks Van a of Kids "Gradua- “dim Nai pa rut Jim Jim's birth- [might ‘clas hs Loves Raynor
the house. (CC) |tion’ (CC) fles feathers. |day gifts. (CC) love. (CC) 0 (CC)









Countdown With Keith Olber-

| 00) Hardball

| MSNBC faa abel. Pan lantis

| NICK Jimmy Neutron: |SpongeBob {SpongeBob —_‘|Full House 1 |Full House Roseanne “Se-
| Boy Genius {SquarePants /SquarePants 1 |(CC) ~ |"Fogged Inn” —_|crets” ( (CC)
:00) Crossing {Bones “The Man in the Cell’ (N) [Deal or No Deal (iTV) (N) 0 (CC) [News 1 (CC)
NTV Cb) IPA) (CC) coe

lordan (N) (

Street Tuner | Street Tuner Unique Whips An
SPEED ee Challenge | Challenge ae a New Orleans gets






(re



jes (00) Billy Gra-_ |Behind the Grant Jeffrey |Ancient Secrets |Jack Van Impe [Praise the Lord (CC)
-TBN al cele Scenes (CC) ofthe Bible {Presents (CC)
rusades

fe Everybody Everybody Everybod Everybody Everybody The King of
“TBS Loves Raymond tones Raymond |Loves Raymond Loves Raymond cones Raymond Queens ‘Shear
I N(cc) . IA (CC) ‘The Plan’ (CC) |Debra’s mother. | M (CC) Torture” (CC)

Home for Imagl- jEd, Edd n Eddy |Ed, Eddn Eddy {Camp Lazio [Squirrel Bo My Gym Part
[TOON myetens [ont ABENESH [Panptazo aire TN eae
TV5 La Carte aux trésors David Nolande

Storm Stories [Abrams & Bettes Weather: Evening Edition (CC
TWO soe eee

0s Volume 2 {Billy Joel; Devo; “Dr. Who.” 0 Zappa; B-52s; 3 Mile Island. —_|room destruction.



Everybody | Beauty and the Geek The four re- |One Tree Hill Lucas discovers that |CW11 News at Te
| WPIX __ [Loves Raymond at teams each get a dog; an- |Derek’s interest in Peyton isimore Tong, Jim Watkin
N (CC) other elimination: (N) 0 icc} than brotherly. M (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) |Dr. Phil 1 (CC) Jeopardy! (CC) Frasier Frasier
WSBK (cc wants Eddie to
be neutered.

PREMIUM:CHANNELS ie
E
a




#% BIG MOMMA'S HOUSE 2 (2006, Comedy) Marin Lawrence,



HBO-E

I



iy Harrelson, Kiefer
anhattan to find a

:00) % & FIRST DAUGHTER vo * & THE COWBOY WAY (1994, Comedy) Woo
HBO-W |(2004, Romance-Comedy) Katie |Sutherland, Dylan McDermott, Two cowboys ride into
lolmes. 1 ‘PG’ (CC) missing compadre. © ‘PG-13' (CC)
:00) % %% ONE FINE DAY (1996, Romance-Comedy)] % % THE ICE HARVEST (2005, Comedy-Drama)
HBO-S ichelle Pfeiffer. Two overstressed single parents tip- |John Cusack, Connie Nielsen. A mob lawyer and a
toe around romance. © ‘PG’ (CC) pornographer steal a small fortune. © ‘R’ (CC)

:00) What Remains: The Life and | % % THE MAN (2005, Comedy) Samuel L. Jackson, | GRANDMA'S
MAX-E




renowned photographer. (N) with a salesman in his custody. 'PG-13



avenge his friend's death. © ‘R' (
6:00) a»






(2005) ‘PG-13' business escort. 0 ‘ McC)

ve * %& LEMONY SNICKET’S A SERIES OF UNFORTUNATE ie oe ARACHNOPHOBIA (19
VENTS (2004, Comedy) Jim Carrey, Liam Aiken, Emily Hane A
count plots to steal an inheritance from three orphans. a ‘PG’ (CC)



TMC
. a ee has termites and Venezuelan spider.



Wild Florida But-| America’s Ballroom Challenge The Supreme Court “One Nation Under Law; A New Kind of Justice” The

terflies. © (CC) |“American Smooth” American Court fon the brink of the Civil War; Chief Justice John Marshall, (N)
Smooth category. (N) (CC) 1 (CC) (DVS)

| The Insider (N)_|Armed & Famous “Unfortunately, [Criminal Minds The BAU look to’ |CSI: NY “All Access” Kid Rock's

(@ WFORIn ccc) Sometimes Police Work Reutes outsiders for clues when three col- limo driver is found dead. ( (CC)

| the Use of Force” (N) 1 (CC) lege athletes disappear. (CC)

| Access Holly- {Friday Night Lights “Upping the {Deal or No Deal A student contin- /Medium A young boy's doll, who
(3 WT VI |wood (n) (Cl) Ante" ean ea prepare for ues his game; a Washington woman|seems to have ur a him to kil,
| their first playoff game. (N) (CC) plays for $1 million. (N) ' |spooks Allison. (N) © (CC)

(:00) CSI: Miami |CSI: Miami “Double Cap’ The FBI /The Sopranos ‘Down Neck’ Antho- |The Sopranos ‘The ae of Ten-
A&E Dispo Day” 1 |refuses to ae the location of a ry Jr. gets into trouble at school. O |nessee Moltisanti” The FBI closes in
(cc) witness. 1 (CC) (CC)

on the Sopranos. (CC) °

CBC Marketplace Gift |Little Mosque on|Halifax Comedy |CBC News: the fifth estate (CC) [CBC News: The National (CC)
| cards. (N) the Prairie Fest (N) (CC)

| CNBC (0) Onthe — |Fast Money 1 vs. 100 One contestant battles |The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch

| 00) The Situa- |Paula Zahn Now (CC} Larry King Live (CC) Anderson Cooper 360 (CC)
CNN fiotien [eantene fark

P Cops “Palm |Most Shocking “Deadly Force’ {Forensic Files {Forensic Files [Dominick Dunne:
COURT [peste acc) ! ‘Gold Push & Justice (N) (CC)

Boxing NBA Basketball Sacramento Kings at Minnesota Timberwolves. From
ESPNI the Target Center in Minneapolis. ‘tive (CC)

EWTN Live Super Saints St. |The Haly Rosary|Micah
EWTN [nee Mani

| Fox Report |The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) |Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC On the Record With Greta Van
FOX-NC {shepard Smith ree i eo Giereee

; Still Standing —/Reba Van acci- [Reba “Surprise” /LIVING WITH THE ENEMY (2005, Suspense) Sarah Lancaster. A newly:
“LIFE “Stil Sisters” {dentally “outs” [Everyone gets s_|wed thinks her husband killed his first wife. (CC)
; Judy:meddles. Reba. (CC) |surprise.
ec Scarborough Country MSNBC Special: Quest for At-

os :00) Amazing {Man Whose Arms Exploded (CC) |Untold Stories of the E.R. ‘Hooked Tragedy in Amish Country (N)
TLC tec stores Alive” A steel hook impales a con-
: (CC) struction worker. (CC)

(00) Without a | Without a Trace ‘Crossroads’ The |Without a Trace Using psychologi- [Without a Trace Jack and the team
TNT race “White Bal-|former boyfriend of a murder victim |cal profiling, an FBI unit tries to lo- {search for a boy who disappeared
ance’ (CC) suddenly attacks Jack, 7 cate missing persons, (CC) on a subway train, (CC)

a (0) Duelo de /La Fea Mas Bella Lety es una nifia /Mundo de Fieras (N) Don Francisco Presenta Laura Za-
UNIV asiones dulce, roméntica e inteligente, pero pata; Karla Alvarez,
apenas atractiva. (N)
(:00) Law & Or- {Law & Order: Special Victims Unit]Law & Order: Special Victims Unit}Law & Order: Criminal Intent ‘In
USA der: Criminal In-|Two men claim they robbed a. |Arreluctant witness may set a child [the Dark” \ (CC)
tent © (CC) {woman but didn’t kill her. (CC) molester free. ( (CC)

VH1 (00) ILove the {I Love the ’70s Volume 21978" || Love the '70s Volume 2 Frank Surreal Life Fame Games Hotel
vs Shark Hunters: |Survivor: Guatemala -- The Maya |Survivor: Guatemala - The Maya |Survivor: Guatemala -- The Maya
' East vs. West Empire 4 (CC) Empire “Man Down” 1 (CC) Empire 0 (CC)
(0) America’s |Home Improve- |Home improve- |Becker “Snow [Becker ‘Hanging [WGN News at Nine () (CC)
WGN unniest Home |ment Tim gives |ment Tim pulls a {Means Snow” —_|With Jake” (1
Videos © (CC) ;Albad advice. groin muscle. {Cold snap. (CC) |(CC)

| #816 Extras Daniel inside the NFL (N) (CC)
ong, ee An FBI agent reprises his disguise, posing as a Radcliffe makes
heavy nanny. 1 'PG-13' (CC) Maggie an offer.

(is) The Making] * * THE THING ABOUT MY FOLKS (2005, Comedy-|(:45) % * REBOUND (2005, Comedy) Martin
HBO-P ; Jarhead 1 |Drama) Peter Falk, Paul Reiser. Aman and his father |Lawrence, Breckin Meyer. A college basketball coach
(CC) bond during a road trip. M ‘PG-13' (CC) leads a team of middle schoolers. 0 ‘PG’ (CC)





lork of Sally Mann A profile of a abe Levy, Luke Goss. An ATF agent wa" Cee Allen
overt. O'R’

fo a % & & BEVERLY HILLS COP (1984, Comedy- | & % &% KING KONG (2005, Adventure) Naomi Watts, Jack Black, Adrien
MOMAX |Drama) Eddie Murphy. A Detroit cop goes west to. (Brody. A beauty tames a savage beast. ( ‘PG-13' (CC)

7 7 & & PRETTY WOMAN (1990, Romance-Comedy) Richard Gere, Julia [The L Word “Layup” (iTV) Artist's
“SHOW _ [BEAUTY SHOP Roberts, Ralph Bellamy. iTV. A corporate raider hires a hooker to act as a re is politically incendiary. 1

eff Daniels, Harley Jane Kozak. Couple's new farm

31, 2007
10:30.

World Business
Report

Girlfriends 0
(CC)

The Naked
Trucker and T-
Bones Show (N)

Power, Privilege

Phil of the Fu-
ture O (CC)

Finders Fixers
Im Focus

High Mainte-
nance 90210

EnergySolutions

s “Allison;
ing’ (CC)

I've Got a Secret
(CC)

Cops “Las Ve-
gas’ M (CC)
wok MAT-
LOCK: THE
OUTCAST (CC)

Buy Me “Rob &
Matt’ © (CC)

The Gospel
Truth

Everybody
Loves Raymond
0 (CC)

Roseanne
“Aliens’ O (CC)
News

applicant from
a Shot at UA.

The King of
Queens “Inn Es-
capable” 1

Futurama
(CC)

crans du
monde

a

n With Kaity
s (CC)

Frasier Frasier
adopts a new atti-
tude. (CC)

i) 1 BIG
OMMA’S
HOUSE 2 (2006)

xx THAT
THING YOU DO!
(1996) ‘PG’ (CC)

BOY (2006,

90, Suspense)
‘PG-13'



THE TRIBUNE













aMovie Gift Certi

[make great gifts!

Let Charlie the
Bahamian Puppet and
his. sidekick Derek put ay

some smiles on your
kids’s faces.

Bring your children to the
McHappy Hour at McDonald's in
Marlborough Street every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:300m during the
month of January 2007,

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun

& RS

?m lovin’ it



THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Woman who claims she was

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007, PAGE 11



Be



hits out at the judicial system —

FROM page one

and I questioned him about it,
then we started arguing. This is
when he pulled out a knife, he
went into the kitchen and got a
knife and told me not to say
anything to him. And that’s
when he cut me with the knife,”
she said.

Ms Andrews showed The Tri-
bune the large scar that pro-
trudes from her arm from this
initial experience.

Her abusive husband also
made additional threats against
her with the same knife. He
repeatedly threatened to slit her
throat and seems to have taken
particular pleasure pressing the
knife into her neck. On several
occasions this sadistic ritual
even included the slight inser-
tion of the knife into Ms
Andrew’s neck, causing blood
to flow. She has a scar on her
neck today from the repeated
experience.

Unfortunately for her,
though, these initial experiences
were merely the beginning of a
lifetime of mistreatment.

The abuse became more reg-
ular and more violent over the
years. Her husband would
repeatedly belittle her, telling
her she had no worth and that
she was not wanted or desired
by anyone.

In another of the many vio-
lent episodes described to The
Tribune, her husband almost
killed her after the birth of one
of her children.

In this episode, she was
forced by her husband to get
on her knees to scrub and clean
her bathroom. When she was
done, she merely said to him

The Tribune



SPECIAL REPORT

ig





that it is a shame to make a
woman scrub and clean after
she delivered a child. At this
moment, her husband flew at
her in a violent rage. The beat-
ing that followed broke the
stitches from her cesarean sec-
« tion.

This beating led her to the
hospital and forced her to call
the police, as she had done on
many occasions.

Ms Andrews admitted that
she had dropped charges
against him on several occa-
sions,

Many may wonder why Ms
Andrews and other battered
individuals stay in abusive rela-
tionships, or do not pursue legal
action against the person on the
first offence. However, medical
sources suggest that there are
many complicated reasons why
abused individuals remain in
these situations,

Some persons have nowhere
to go if they leave and are finan-
cially dependent on their
abusers, Others are psycholog-
ically dependent, or are physi-
cally afraid of what the abuser
would do if they left.

Additionally, some religious
traditions do not support
divorce, which can lead abused
individuals to think that they
may be committing a moral
offence if they left an abusive
partner,

Ms Andrews said that these
violent experiences have signif-
icantly affected her psychologi-





cal state over the years. She has
suffered from low self-esteem, a
low sense of self-worth and has
contemplated suicide on sever-
al occasions,

However, seeing how the vio-
lent situated has affected her
children has given her the
courage to leave.

She described watching two
of her children go through
moments where they collapsed
and could not move after wit-
nessing their father savagely
attack their mother,

She wonders what psycho-
logical effects have already tak-
en root in the children and she
feels guilty that they witnessed
and experienced all that
occurred over the years.

In recent times she has come
to the conclusion that separa-
tion is the only answer.

“Divorce is not something
that I believe in. But you know,
it is something I would advise
any young person, may it be
male or female, if you are in
any abusive relationship, don’t
stay in situations like that
because in the end it could be
fatal,” she said.

Her main frustration now

- exists with the delay in the court

system to get a date for her
divorce hearing.

“Something needs to be done
with the court system because a
lot of women are living in fear,”
she said.

From early last year, she has
still been unable to schedule a

PM on The Tribune | Airport delay

FROM page one

FROM page one

The PM’s comments came at a rally to sup-
port incumbent Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell,
who is going up against his former campaign
general Dr Jacinta Higgs — the now FNM can-

didate.

The prime minister’s comments were: “And _
we will not hesitate as we go to our various;
places of abode, to ensure that our country
knows, beginning tonight, that no matter what
The Tribune says; no matter how hard they try
to help Ingraham, the more they do it, the
more many of you must cut it out. Cut it out
and put it on your headquarters’ wall. Motivate
our people. Show them who’s trying to take us
out. Put their faces on the wall. Put the stories
on the wall. And everytime we walk into those
headquarters we are motivated to spare no
effort to go to every crook an cranny of the i
Bahamas, and to ensure that everytime they ;
rise up, we put them back down. PLP! PLP!”

still had to be worked out.

At the signing of the 10-year management con-
tract with YVARS, Prime Minister Perry Christie.
announced that the hand-over of airport opera-

tions to YVARS was expected to have been com-

pleted by late December.

This latest delay is one of many in the pro-
longed three-year selection and negotiation
process in the effort to turn the airport into a
modern facility of the 21st century.

At a cost of about $200 million and under the
partnership of the Nassau Airport Development
Company (NAD) —a new subsidiary of the Air-
port Authority and YVARS - the airport is
expected to be transformed into a “premier world
class facility” and the “jewel of the Caribbean.”

The prime minister explained that during the
first phase of the transformation — scheduled to be
completed within 24 months — the physical and
sanitary conditions of the facility will be improved.

Carl Bethel
denies ever being

— involved in
human smuggling

FROM page one

a Holy Cross constituent in
2002,” Mr Bethel said in a state-
ment.

“It is interesting that the min-
ister in his communication at
no time stated exactly when it
was that the, apparently, con-
venient suspicion was aroused
in the official whose letter he
quoted from,” he added. “Was
it before or after 2002? And, in
particular, was it before or after
I first raised concerns about the
visa scandal in September
2005?”

He said that the minister is
attempting to deflect attention
from the allegations made by
the FNM of an alleged visa sell-
ing racket within the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs.

Mr Bethel said the public
should not forget “the detailed
allegations” which have been
made on this matter, including
that:

“The number of non-immi-
grant visas issued to Haitian and
Chinese nationals had sky-rock-
eted from 200 in 2002 to more
than 2,000 per year over the first
three years of the new PLP gov-

ernment;

“There was direct political
interference in the issuance of
visas;

“PLP MPs were personally
sponsoring visas for Haitians
and other foreign nationals (not
writing letters on behalf of con-
stituents);

“PLP generals, and family
members, were busy sponsor-
ing visas for foreign nationals
to enter the Bahamas over and
repeatedly;

“Visas were being issued
which bore no photographs,
were unsigned, or signed only
with an ‘X’, and also without
any intended address for the
applicant in the Bahamas;

“That certain persons were
permitted to sponsor hundreds
of different visas over a short
space of time, over and repeat-
edly.”

Mr Bethel said the record will
show that none of these allega-
tions has ever been specifically
addressed by Mr Mitchell.

“He has, instead, been intent
on denying that he ever ‘issued
any visas’. It’s all about him!

“However, the allegations are
not only about the minister,

they are very serious matters
involving sovereignty, border
control, national security
(including concerns about inter-
national terrorism) and the gen-
eral concerns of Bahamians that
the efforts of the Department
of Immigration were under-cut
and frustrated by the apparent
‘open door’ policies being pur-
sued by the Consular Division
of the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs,” he said.

Mr Bethel further said that
Mitchell’s “open-ended allega-
tion” regarding human smug-
gling is “utterly false, scan-
dalous, defamatory, and is at a
level far below gutter politics,
mudslinging and name-calling.”

“Notwithstanding this, his
vain attempts to deflect atten-
tion — do nothing, just deflect,
will not be tolerated. Minister
Mitchell must account to the
Bahamian people. He must
acknowledge faults, accept his
ministerial responsibility, fully
explain exactly what went
wrong and what he is doing
about the matter; not do noth-
ing, obfuscate, confuse, deflect,
deny and blame any and every-
one other than himself,” he said.

hearing.

Ms.Andrews, who attributes
her survival from this ordeal to
God, also wanted to challenge
the churches to do more for bat-
tered women. -

“TI feel the churches are in a
lukewarm state and what they
are doing now, their focus now
is more on telling persons how
to become rich, or how to get
rich.

“This is not what they should
be doing. They should be out
there trying to restore lives for

persons who are abused or in
distress or in serious situations
like mine. They should be trying
to seek help for these persons
and they should have pro-
grammes in place to assist
women, especially battered
women — and they don’t,” she
said.

“Instead of turning God’s
house into a den of thieves,”
she said, “they should be trying
to restore lives and reach out
to these hurting women.”

As the new Domestic Vio-

lence Act is considered, there
should probably be some con-
sideration for individuals who
seek divorce from violent
predators. :

The same slow and inefficient
judicial process, which frustrates
most Bahamians, only prolongs
these unhealthy relationships.

Battered persons should not
have to wait a year to get a
hearing to extract themselves
from predators, she said. The
process must be more compas-
sionate.

Minister of Transport

in respect to the collision of the two mailboats at
sea, is one for the Office of the Attorney Gener-

FROM page one

“The minister of transport and aviation is seek-
ing to assist each of said claimants in procuring

their medical reports from the Princess Margaret

Hospital, so that their claims can
be formulated. These reports are
expected to be in hand shortly,”
the statement said.

According to Mrs Hanna-Mar-
tin, her ministry and the Office of
the Attorney General have
engaged in a number of meet-
ings with some of the victims
along with legal counsel and oth-
er representatives,

“During these meetings, the
minister of transport and avia-
tion discussed the findings of the
Wreck Commission which was
appointed by the minister to
investigate the circumstances sur-
rounding the collision at sea of
the two vessels.

“And while the minister noted
the findings of the commissioners
relative to the Port Department,
she indicated that the question of
legal liability of the department

FOUNDATION
EMAIL: .



Math, Social Studies, Science



@ MINISTER of Transport
Glenys Hanna-Martin



FOR EDUCATIO
DATIONFOREDUCATI
| BIG REVIEW
EVERY SATURDAY

9:30 - 12:30 and 1-4 pm



N TRANSFORMATION
IN @ YAHOO.COM

» English language & Religious Studies
Spaces are limited. Cost: $20 per Saturday

al and could not be substantively commented on
by the minister of transport and aviation,” the
statement said.

The Wreck Commission found
that the government, through the
Port Department, was jointly
responsible for the accident.

“The recent intervention of
the minister of transport and avi-
ation, in the wake of the public’
protests by some of the
claimants, is intended to assist:
in assessing the status of claims
by persons injured, and in help-
ing to bring closure to the
process,” the statement said.

“In this regard, many of the
claimants have not had their:
action prosecuted beyond the fil-
ing of writs of summons.

“The minister of transport and
aviation is committed to using
her best efforts with all of the
relevant parties and wherever
possible, in bringing closure to
this matter at the earliest possible
time.”







Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd
Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 ¢ Fax: 326-7452





WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007



SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

BU

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street











= ) FIDELITY

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE

Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010



Luxury resort chain part of

proposed Freeport project

M@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he high-end, ultra luxury

the brand/operating part-
ner for a potential multi-
“+ ‘project slated for Grand Bahama,
* sources have told The Tribune, with
the development’s representatives on
the island earlier this week.



_*.>) Those close to developments said
-" Aman Resorts was the preferred oper-

ating partner for the Raven Group,
which is negotiating a 250-acre devel-
opment with the Grand Bahama
Development Company (Devco) and
Grand Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) for a'site on the eastern edge
of Freeport.

The Raven Group’s attorneys and
representatives are understood to have
been on Grand Bahama earlier this
week in an attempt to progress the
deal, which involves luxury hotels and
signature, luxury multi-million man-

Aman Resorts chain is

sion-type residences that are sold to
ultra high-net worth individuals.

The Raven Group project is under-
stood to be earmarked for land imme-
diately next to the 1,000 acres slated for
the Morgan Stanley project, which stra-
dles both sides of the waterway at Bar-
bary Beach.

The project was referred to in the
employment contract for Hannes
Bababk, the GBPA’s now-restrained
chairman, which described “the con-
clusion of the business undertaking
current;ly envisaged and known to the
parties as the Raven Group deal,
regarding a portion of the acreage in
the amount of 250 acres”

It is unclear how far advanced talks
are on the Raven Group project, but
the presence of the group’s represen-
tatives on the island indicates that there
could be ‘light at the end of the tunnel’
for the Grand Bahama economy,
which has struggled since the 2004 hur-
ricanes and Royal Oasis closure.

Together with the Morgan Stanley
project, the two deals could help to lift

Aman Resorts brand/operating partner for
Raven Group project, Tribune Business told

Grand Bahama’s economy back to
growth in two to three years’ time,
together with the Ginn development in
West End, and show that the GBPA

shareholders dispute may not be hav- -

ing as great an impact as feared.

Graham Torode, Devco’s president,
did not return The Tribune’s call seek-
ing comment, despite a detailed mes-
sage being left on his voice mail.

A Google search located the Raven
Group as a London-based property
development and investment group,
focusing on both residential and com-
mercial developments in the UK and
abroad.

The company is listed on the London
Stock Exchange (LSE), and its major

investors include top fund manage-
ment companies and financial houses
such as Deutsche Bank, UBS Global
Asset Management, and hedge fund
manager, Man Financial. The largest
institutional investor is Schroder
Investment Management, with a 13.22
per cent stake, while its two main exec-
utives hold 5 per cent of the Raven
Group between them.

Aman, which can charge as much as *

$438 per night for its rooms, has long
been trying to come to the Bahamas. It
has been attempting to get a $500 mil-
lion resort, residential community and
marina off the ground for Norman’s
Cay in the Exumas since 1998, and
signed a Heads of Agreement in 2002

with the former FNM government
under Hubert Ingraham.

However, the project has been
delayed after Prime Minister Perry
Christie’s government wanted to

amend the Heads of Agreement draft- .;

ed under the Ingraham administration,
in the belief that the developers and a
Bahamian group associated with them
were getting “too sweet a deal”.

Adrian Zecha, chairman of Aman
Resorts, in an exclusive interview with
The Tribune, revealed that the chain
was looking at other sites in the
Bahamas.

SEE page 7B -

Film Studios takeover will see $11m debt repayment

Minister promises
minimum wage rise

@ By CARA BRENNEN- ~~
BETHEL
Tribune Business
‘Reporter




ANE Gibson, minister of
, immigration and training,
ut employers on notice of

* thé Government’s intention to

increase the current $150 per
week minimum wage, and ensure
they remove “glass ceilings”
which hinder Bahamians’
employment progress.

His comments came at a PLP
Fox Hill mini-rally on Monday
night. Giving a brief progress
report on the areas in his portfo-
lio, Mr Gibson said the Govern-
ment was in the final stages of
preparing amendments to the
labour laws.

“We are also in the final stages

of reviewing the minimum wage,’

because we know that $150 a
-- week just won’t cut it. So we are
now in the process of reviewing
that with a view to having that
increased as soon as possible,”
Mr Gibson said.

“We fully intend to bring the

“+ _+ focus of your caring PLP govern-
*-‘ ment on removing any real or
- imagined glass ceilings, to where

more deserving Bahamians can
benefit from these major devel-

Unions hopeful,
employers wary

opments coming into the coun-

try. : :
“Now this is important, and I
want y’all to remember this cause
y’all will hear some employers
start crying, but for too long
employers have been creating a
glass ceiling, making Bahamians
believe that they could get some-
where and every time they hit the
top it’s a glass ceiling.

“And so those persons who
hire these foreigners and don’t
put together their succession
plans to make sure we transfer
skills, knowledge, and also posi-

. tions, watch out, cause we com-

ing. And I guarantee you within
the next few days, you will hear
some employers crying because

some of them have been hiring .

foreigners and not making a real

. effort to replace those with

Bahamians.”

Mr Gibson said that while this
may not happen in every case,
the Government is putting

SEE page 5B

Lady Henrietta’s ICD
stake attracts interest

_- Ig By NEIL HARTNELL
~, Tribune Business Editor

POTENTIAL buyers are cir-
cling the 50.37 per cent stake that
Lady Henrietta St George holds

“in Grand Bahama Power Com-

"+ pany, sources have told The Tri-

bune, as the firm’s major share-
holder, US electricity giant,
Mirant, continues the auction
process to sell its 55 per cent
shareholding.

The attraction of Lady Henri-
etta’s stake in BISX-listed ICD
Utilities, which is listed on the
Bahamas International Securities
Exchange (BISX), is that the
company has a “first right of
refusal to purchase the shares
held by Mirant in Grand Bahama
Power Company”, according to
an affidavit sworn in the Grand
Bahama Port Authority (GBPA)

_ Shareholders’ dispute by Charles
Gillis, the late Edward St
George’s chief foreign investment
adviser.

Indépendent sources have con-
firmed to The Tribune that this
is correct, meaning that whoever
controls Lady Henrietta’s stake
in ICD Utilities, by extension,
could dictate the outcome of the

Mirant auction by taking up that
option to the exclusion of the US
power company’s other suitors.

It is unclear, though, whether
Lady Henrietta would choase to
sell her ICD Utilities stake, and
no deal with another buyer has
been concluded.

Mr Gillis’s affidavit said the
shareholders agreement between
ICD Utilities and Mirant “pro-

hibits the hypothecation of ICD -

Utilities equity”.

However, he added in his affi-
davit filed last. year that he
‘understood’ that at the time,
Lady Henrietta “was indeed seek-
ing to sell some shares in Grand
Bahama Power”.

This move to sell is likely to
have been prompted by the dis-
putes over the late Mr St
George’s estate that were raging
at the time, particularly with a
daughter by his first wife, Caro-
line, and his second wide, Mary.

However, the situation has
since calmed, with Caroline now
back in the estate fold as a result
of Sir Jack Hayward’s claim to 75
per cent ownership of the Grand

SEE page 5B

a By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Film, Studios’
sale to Bahamas FilmInvest
International, a group headed
by Bahamian banker Owen
Bethel, has been officially con-
firmed by the studios’ ultimate
parent, the deal involving the
settling of $10 million in bank
loans and $1 million in debts
owed by the company.

The announcement from
Ashby Corporation, which is
listed on the Bermuda Stock
Exchange (BSE), confirmed
Tribune Business’s exclusive
revelation on January 9 that the
group led by Mr Bethel, head of

’ the Nassau-based Montaque

an ZERO rol LOT ee
eco ro SAVINGS ACCOUNTS

Benet onan

Purchase by Owen Bethel’s group confirmed, beating out rivals that
included Cedric Scott; Monteine lawsuit dismissed as ‘frivolous’

Group, had
won the race
to acquire the }
rights to
develop the
studios.

Mr Bethel pe
said in a
statement
released by
Ashby Cor-
poration that
his group
“looks forward to creating a sus-
tainable project, beneficial to

@ BETHEL



both our investors and the fur-
ther development of the film
and television industry in the
Bahamas. ,

“We are in ongoing discus-
sions with the Government of
the Bahamas and believe that
this project will soon become a
hub of activity for a national
film industry that truly com-
petes globally.”

Mr Bethel was off the island
when The Tribune attempted
to contact him for comment yes-
terday about the acquisition of

the development rights for the
project where Pirates of the
Caribbean; Dead Man’s Chest
and At World’s End were

filmed.

Ross Fuller, Ashby’s chair-
man, said the company had
received multiple offers for the
Bahamas Film Studios, which
were held by its subsidiary,
Gold Rock Creek Enterprises.

The Tribune can reveal that

SEE page 7B

aca ec than a Bank

ace is Gary’s one ae cold cll his ener needs.

CDs

MORTGAGE & PERSONAL LOANS

FINANCIAL PLANNING

FREE INTERNET BANKING

TRUSTS & ESTATE PLANNING |

Melton NC
Melee nate

Map te) 133101, eas
BS ROAD

HOME EQUITY LOANS

PENSION PLANS.

Soma a MANAGEMENT

=) FIDELITY,

More than.a Bank

Nassau: T356.7764 _F 326.3000

Da ie aed T hoe 6676/7

DE RNs WEE St
aS el :
ISLAND: |. \ |

MACKEY
SUM

PARADISE

a oe 2695





cath



~BUSINESS

sta MACAO SOSES C8 AEP AS RET RASS

Che Miami Herald |







\ |
' | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

ae e-

40+

THE MARKETS

STOCKS, MUTUAL FUNDS, 5-6B

DOW 30 12,523.31 +32.53 Ad
S&P 500 1,428.82 +8.20
NASDAQ 2,448.64 +7.55 ,
10-YR NOTE 487-03 W
CRUDE OIL 56.97 +2.96 ,

Stocks
rise; Fed
watch

is on

BY JOE BEL BRUNO
Associated Press

NEW YORK — Stocks fin-
ished moderately higher in an
uneven session Tuesday as opti-
mism about the economy
helped investors overcome
some of their uneasiness about
the Federal Reserve’s decision
on interest rates.

The energy sector rose on a5.

- percent spike in oil prices, while
news that billionaire investor
Carl Icahn was seeking to join
~ Motorola’s board lifted technol-
"ogy stocks.

- But fluctuations in the major
indexes reflected the market’s
uncertainty as it waits for the
Fed to complete a two-day
meeting this afternoon. Market
watchers are expecting the cen-
tral bank to keep rates
unchanged as they have for the
past four meetings after 17
straight hikes, because recent
economic data has been show-
ing slow, stable growth.

Now that investors have
abandoned their hopes for a
rate cut anytime soon, many are
regarding this year’s positive

economic reports and the Fed’s
holding pattern as auspicious
for stocks.

“If the Fed feels the economy
is strong enough on its: own, it
means corporate earnings this
year will probably be better
than people were expecting,”
‘said Alfred E. Goldman, chief

-Imarket strategist at A.G.
Edwards in St. Louis.

The Dow Jones industrial
average rose 32.53, or 0.26 per-
cent, to 12,523.31.

Broader stock indicators
were also higher. The Standard
& Poor’s 500 index was up 8.20,
or 0.58 percent, at 1,428.82, and
‘the Nasdaq composite index
rose 7.55, or 0.31 percent, to
2,448.64.

-The bond market edged
lower as fixed income investors
also awaited the Fed’s decision.
The yield on the benchmark 10-
year Treasury note was up
slightly at 4.88 percent from
4.87 percent late Monday.

The dollar was little changed
against other major currencies,
while gold prices inched up.

Oil prices shot higher Mon-
day on signs of production cuts
from OPEC members, A barrel
of light sweet crude rose $2.96
to settle at $56.97 the New York
Mercantile Exchange. Natural
gas soared more than Il percent
on forecasts of frigid tempera-
tures in the Midwest.

Stock investors brushed off
worries about fuel-costs crimp-
ing consumers’ discretionary
spending, and instead focused
on a possible swell in oil compa-
nies’ profits.

In response to the spike in
energy prices, Exxon Mobil rose
$1.19 to $74.39, Chevron rose
$1.54 to $73.07, and ConocoPhil-
lips rose $1.03 to $65.65.

Meanwhile, Motorola rose
$1.27, or 6.9 percent, to $19.58,
after Icahn revealed his stake in
the cell phone maker and
expressed interest in joining the
board.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies rose 4.87, or
0.61 percent, at 797.97.

Advancing issues led decli-
ners by more than 2 to 1 on the
New York Stock Exchange,
where consolidated: volume
came to 2.69 billion shares,
which was unchanged from -
Monday’s close.

Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei
stock average rose 0.11 percent.
Britain’s FTSE 100 rose 0.03
percent, Germany’s DAX index
rose 0.93 percent, and France’s
CAC-40 gained 0.46 percent.







ECONOMY

Consumer confidence rises in Jan.

Confidence among U.S.
consumers reached the highest
level in almost five years in
January as an expanding labor
market and rising wages gave
Americans more money to spend.

BY EILEEN ALT POWELL
Associated Press

NEW YORK — Consumers were
feeling confident in January: The job
market was chugging along and oil

. prices were down. Their optimism

may dwindle, however, on concerns

that job and wage Epes may slow.





The Conference Board, a private
research group, said Tuesday that its
Consumer Confidence Index edged
up to 110.3 in January from a revised
110.0 in December.

Analysts had expected a reading
between 110.0 and 110.5. The January
index was the highest in five years,
suggesting that consumers will con-
tinue to be the engine behind the
nation’s economic growth in coming
months.

At the same time, a measure of
consumer expectations for the next
six months dropped to 94.5 in January



TOKYO’S SONY BUILDING: Sony’s quarterly profit dipped 5 percent as huge costs for launching its
PlayStation 3 video game console offset a recovery in its electronics business.

VIDEO GAME LOSS |

SONY REPORTS 5 PERCENT PROFIT DROP

ON PLAYSTATION 3 COSTS

The PS3 launched in the United
States and Japan in November,
plagued with production problems
that resulted in shortages and will
| keep the machines out of Europe

entirely until March. The next-gen-

eration game player also faces
immense competition with Ninten-

do’s Wii and Microsoft’s Xbox 360.

Sony raised its earnings forecast

for the fiscal year through March
by 38 percent, however, citing a
recovery in its core electronics
division amid booming Christmas



DEMO TECH SHOW

BY YURI KAGEYAMA
Associated Press

TOKYO — Just when Sony appears to have turned around its
electronics business, another part of its sprawling empire — video games
— is dragging down profits. The Japanese electronics and entertainment
company on Tuesday blamed the launching costs of its PlayStation 3
game console for much of the 5 percent drop in group net profit for the
last three months of 2006 to $1.3 billion.

sales in digital cameras and flat-
panel TVs.

It now expects: an annual net
profit of 110: billion yen ($903 mil-
lion), up from an earlier 80 billion
yen ($657 million). That’s still
below the 123 billion yen Sony
earned last fiscal year — and under
the 130 billion yen annual profit it
had forecast earlier last year.

The gaming unit, meanwhile,
posted. a $443 million operating loss
during the quarter, though Sony
promised business will improve by



from 96.3 the month before.

Lynn Franco, director of the
board’s consumer research center,
said that “looking ahead... consum-
ers are not as optimistic as they were
in December.” ,

As a result, the index suggests just
“moderate improvement” in eco-
nomic growth in early 2007.

This should ease fears at the Fed-
eral Reserve, which is meeting Tues-

day and Wednesday to review its

economic policy, said Anthony Chan,
managing director and chief econo-
mist with JPMorgan Private Client

wevoevereevercermeeereecevereerreteteeti



SHIZUO KAMBAYASHI/AP

YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP-GETTY IMAGES
JUST A DIP: CFO Nobuyuki
Oneda explains Sony’s
third-quarter performance.

the latter half of next fiscal year.
“Startup costs are high, and the
losses (in the gaming division) will

° TURN TO SONY





Services in New York.

“At the central bank, they’re
mainly concerned about the econ-
omy overheating,” Chan said. “I think
this report says they can sit and
watch.”

Still, he said, the economy will
benefit in the short run from contin-
ued consumer spending because the
latest figures “tell us that at the
moment, the consumer is in a sweet
spot thanks to improved labor market
conditions and lower oil prices.”

* TURN TO ECONOMY

Profits
climb for
consumer

product.

makers

@ Procter & Gamble said its profit
jumped 12 percent in the second
quarter of its fiscal year, while
Colgate-Palmolive said its
fourth-quarter profit rose 11
percent.

BY DAN SEWELL
Associated Press

CINCINNATI — Boosted by new
products from familiar brands and
growth in emerging markets, con-
sumer products makers Procter &
Gamble and Colgate-Palmolive
posted double-digit quarterly earn-
ings increases Tuesday and offered
bright outlooks.

“We are now in the best position
we have ever been of stuff coming
along to help our gross profit,” Col-
gate-Palmolive Chief Executive Reu-
ben Mark said in a conference call
with investors. The New York-based
maker of toothpaste, soaps and Sci-
ence Diet pet food said it has a full
pipeline of new products around the
world and expects double-digit earn-
ings per share growth for the year
ahead.

Cincinnati-based P&G also raised
its outlook for the year. The company
cited the strong quarter and progress
in its integration of the Gillette Co.,
with the Blades & Razors division
contributing an 11 percent sales
increase led by the year-old Gillette
Fusion. The company also reported
good sales of new products such as
Tide Simple Pleasures detergent,
Febreze Noticeables air fresheners,
Olay Definity skin cream, Crest Pro
Health toothpaste and additions to
the Swiffer duster line.

“We have been working for six or

- seven years now to build a robust

innovation and initiative portfolio,”
A.G. Lafley, P&G’s chairman, presi-

* TURN TO CONSUMER PRODUCTS,

Juicing up portable lifestyle emerges as theme

@ New ways to enhance the

power of mobile technologies is a
key topic at this year’s influential -
DEMO Technology Show in Palm
Springs, Calif.

BY BRIAN BERGSTEIN
Associated Press:

The founders of Zink Imaging
believe they have two great ideas in
one absolute show-stopper. They’ve
created a portable device that makes
it ultra-convenient to print photos
from digital cameras and phones.
And they designed it to use no ink.

That’s not to say “hardly any ink,”
mind you, but zero ink — shorten
that and you get “Zink.” Instead, the
device uses heat to activate minus-
cule dye crystals embedded in the
photo paper.

Not bad for a device roughly the
size of an iPod. No wonder founder
and CEO Wendy Caswell proclaims
that Zink “delivers a magical user
experience.”

Though months away from store
shelves, the product is expected to be
among the hottest items unveiled

today and Thursday at the influential
DEMO technology show in Palm
Desert, Calif.

DEMO is notable because it
focuses on emerging technologies
and gives their creators just six min-
utes on stage to explain themselves
to a ballroom of investors, analysts
and journalists. Past shows have
pointed to such trends as sharing
photos and blogging.

The show’s producer, Chris Shi-
pley, said she doesn’t seek particular
technology themes in advance. But
invariably she notices threads com-
ing together after the exhibitors have
passed their auditions and the partici-
pant list is assembled. And one of
those key topics this year will be
ways to enhance the power of mobile
technologies.

The ideas will come mainly from
companies you’ve never heard of —
such as Buz Interactive, which lets
cell phone users incorporate licensed
music clips into voice mail greetings
— and a few larger tech players.

One of them, Seagate Technology,
will use DEMO to introduce a small



wireless drive that can store files
downloaded over cell phone net-
works. The product — named DAVE
— has to be within 30 feet of a cell
phone to serve as its storage annex,
using Bluetooth wireless technology.
It also works over Wi-Fi or a USB
cord to do the same trick with com-
puters. Expected to come out this
summer, a 10-gigabyte version should
retail for about $150.

Rob Pait, Seagate’s director of
consumer electronics marketing,
contends that DAVE will help turn
cell-phone networks into souped-up
sources of music and other fancy
content. Short video clips, ring tones
and little games are mainly what peo-
ple download now because most cell
phones can’t store very much.

“You’ve got a lot of bandwidth
available to you,” Pait said. “Now
people need a place to download the
content to.”

Zink similarly could help people
get more out of the wireless world,
although its inkless printing system

*TURN TO TECH SHOW
aN



ZINK IMAGING/AP
MAKING LIFE EASIER: A prototype
of a printer is shown using
technologies from Zink Imaging.





ECONOMY

4B _| WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31,2007 INTERNATIONAL EDITION

Consumer confidence edges up

* ECONOMY

The consumer confidence
index, which is based on a
survey of 5,000 U.S. house-
holds by the New York-based
research group, is closely
watched because consumer
confidence often signals
changes in spending trends.
Consumer spending makes up
about two-thirds of the U.S.
economy. January’s index
reading on consumer confi-
dence was the highest since
110.7 in March 2002 and
matched a reading of 110.3 in
May 2002, the Conference
Board said.

David H. Resler, chief
economist with Nomura

EARNINGS

Securities in New York,
pointed out that January’s
reading was boosted by opti-
mism about the job market,
with nearly 30 percent of
those surveyed saying jobs
were plentiful.

“You’re looking at a reflec-
tion of what is making con-
sumers feel good,” he said. “It
tells you that the conditions
that underpin things like con-
sumer spending are pretty
good, so people are going to
spend.”

The figures also showed
“people are not quite as pessi-
mistic about the car market as
they were, but housing is still
languishing.” Weakness in the
housing market could be seen

in another report issued
Tuesday. An index prepared
by Standard & Poor’s showed
that the prices of single-fam-
ily homes across the nation
rose in November at the slow-
est rate in more than a decade,
a further sign that housing
will be a drag on the econ-
omy. The S&P/Case-Shiller
composite index showed a 1.3
percent year-over-year rise in
the price of a single-family
home based on existing
homes tracked over time in 10
metropolitan markets.

The slower housing market
may be weighing on consum-
ers’ expectations about the
future, the economists said.

The Conference Board’s

Expectations Index, which
measures consumers’ outlook
over the next six months,
dropped to 94.5 in January
from 96.3 the month before.

The report said those
anticipating business condi-
tions to worsen rose to 8 per-
cent from 7.8 percent while
those who expected business
conditions to get better
decreased to 16.2 percent
from 16.7 percent.

Those anticipating fewer
jobs edged up to 15.7 percent
in January from 15.5 percent.
Asked if they expected their
incomes to increase, 19.8 per-
cent said “yes” in January,
down from 21.4 percent in
December.

Consumer product firms show profit rise

* CONSUMER PRODUCTS

dent and chief executive, told

analysts. “Every year we have
built the size, we have built
the strength and we have built
the success rate of this inno-
vation portfolio.”

The company is delighted
with the Gillette Fusion razor,
which it showed off during
last year’s Super Bowl tele-
cast. The five-blade razor sys-
tem has already racked up
$400 million in North Ameri-
can retail sales, is off to a
strong start after later
launches in England, Ger-
many and Japan, and is being
rolled out in markets includ-
ing Australia and eastern
Europe, P&G said.

A Fusion Phantom razor
and a Venus Breeze female
shaver with built-in gel are
being launched in North
America.

Meanwhile, Colgate-Pal-
molive plans to launch Col-
gate Total Advanced Clean,
which will begin shipping at

the end of February. The.

company’s leading share of
the U.S. toothpaste market
grew to 37.3 percent last year
led by sales of Colgate Total,
according to data from
ACNielsen.

New products introduced

in the United States include**”

Colgate Luminous Mint Twist
toothpaste, Colgate 360
degree toothbrush, Irish
Spring MoistureBlast bar soap
and Fabuloso multi-purpose
spray cleaner.
Colgate-Palmolive said
international sales grew,

SONY



including a 14 percent reve-
nue growth in Latin America.
Chief Operating Officer Ian
Cook said market share for
toothpaste improved in coun-
tries including Mexico, Brazil,
India, Britain and Russia.

Cook will take over as CEO

sometime this year and Mark
will remain as chairman for
an undisclosed period of time,
Mark said Tuesday.
“Lafley said P&G had dou-
ble-digit sales growth in
developing markets and sees
strong potential.

“We remain pretty bullish
on developing markets,”
Latley said.

For the quarter ended Dec.
31, P&G posted net income of

$2.86 billion, or 84 cents per
share, versus $2.55 billion, or
72 cents per share, in the pri-
or-year period. Revenue grew
8 percent to $19.73 billion
from $18.3 billion a year ago.
Analysts surveyed by
Thomson Financial expected
earnings of 83 cents per share
on $19.57 billion in revenue.
For the year, the company
projects earnings of $2.99 to
$3.03 per share, up slightly
from its October forecast of
$2.97 to $3.02 per share. The
forecast includes the impact
of P&G’s $57 billion Gillette
acquisition in 2005, which the
company estimates will come
in at the lower end of its guid-
ance for 12 cents to 18 cents

AMY SANCETTA/AP

SALES GREW: Colgate-Palmolive, maker of toothpaste, soaps and dishwashing liquid,
posts a fourth-quarter profit gain of 11 percent.

per share.

P&G shares, which
recently have traded at all-
time highs, slipped 24 cents to
$64.62 in late trading on the
New York Stock Exchange.
They reached an all-time high
of $66.30 on Jan. 19, up from a
52-week low of $52.75 in June.

Colgate-Palmolive’s earn-
ings rose to $401.2 million, or
73 ¢ents:per share, in the

fourth quarter compared ‘with '

$3612 million, or 65 cents per
share, a year ago.

Excluding charges related
to a restructuring plan, as well
as stock-based compensation
expenses, Colgate-Palmolive
reported earnings of $436.9
million, or 80 cents per share.

PlayStation 3 costs lead to a drop in profit

° SONY

continue for some time,”
Chief Financial Officer Nobu-
yuki Oneda told reporters.

For the past several years,
Sony’s biggest problem was
its core electronics business,
where it fell behind Apple and
its iPod portable music player
and Samsung Electronics’ flat-
panel TV business.

Sony was also dealt a blow
last year when it announced a
massive global recall of about

10 million lithium-ion batter- _

ies used in not only its own
lapteps but also those from
Apple, Dell, Lenovo and oth-
ers.

The company has been
engaged in a massive turn-
around effort since 2005,
when Welsh-born American

DEMO TECH SHOW

Howard Stringer took the
chief executive job. Sony has
dropped unprofitable busi-

nesses, sold off assets, cut:

jobs and closed plants.

Those actions appear to be
paying off, somewhat. Sony’s
core electronics division
reported record sales for the
quarter, thanks to strong
demand for its flat TVs and
digital cameras, helping to lift
Sony’s overall sales for the
quarter 9.8 percent to $21.4
billion.

The company’s weak spot
now appears to be its gaming
division.

Sony blamed its own price-
slashing strategy for the PS3
for cutting into profits. Game
machines usually come down
in price over time, but faced
with competition, Sony made

an unusual move in lowering
the PS3 price in Japan by
about 20 percent even before
sales started.

Sony shipped 1.84 million
PS3 machines worldwide dur-

ing the quarter, the company .

said. The machine has already
gone on sale in the United
States, Japan and some other
countries, but its sale has
been delayed to March 23 in
Europe, the Middle East,
Africa and Australia.

Sony stuck to its earlier
target of shipping 6 million
PS3 consoles by March 31.
Earlier, it said it shipped 2
million PS3 machines world-
wide by mid-January, falling
about two weeks behind its
initial shipment targets in
Japan. Declining sales during
the October-December period

of Sony’s predecessor con-|

sole, PlayStation 2, and of the
handheld PlayStation Porta-
ble, including PSP game soft-
ware, also pushed down prof-
its at its gaming unit, Sony
said.

Sony also got a $328 mil-
lion boost toward quarterly
profits from a weak yen, and
$276 million from its invest-
ment in London-based Sony
Ericsson, a mobile phone joint
venture with Sweden’s LM
Ericsson, it said.

Separately on Tuesday, the
U.S. Federal Trade Commis-
sion said Sony’s joint venture
with Bertelsmann, Sony BMG
Music Entertainment, agreed
to reimburse consumers up to
$150 for damage to their com-
puters from CDs with hidden
anti-piracy software.

Enhancing portable lifestyle a show theme

°TECH SHOW

isn’t necessarily for mobile
devices only. It’s just debut-
ing that way. _

Based in Waltham, Mass.,
Zink was founded in 2005,
when private investors
acquired mary of Polaroid’s
key technologies and
researchers shortly after that
company emerged from bank:
ruptcy.

Zink’s special sauce is ithe
photo paper, which has multi-
ple layers of dye crystals
inside and a transparent, pro-
tective coat on the outside.
The dye crystals are normally
colorless but produce a color
when they melt.

Cyan (a kind of blue),

magenta and yellow crystals
— each activated by applying
different levels of heat for dif-
ferent lengths of time — are
enough to reproduce the full
color spectrum.

About 100,000 pulses of
heat come every second,
which means a 2-by-3-inch
print rolls out in less than a
minute. ;

Although fax machines and
other devices have employed
aspects of thermal printing
technology before, Zink has
mastered ways to incorporate
it into an inexpensive yet
long-lasting format.

“It allows us to put printers
where they’ve never been
able to go before,” Caswell
said.

Zink plans to partner with
electronics makers that would
build the technology into
handheld printers, which
could be linked with or with-
out wires to cell phones and
digital cameras. Or some part-
ners might make new hybrid
digital cameras that have the
printers already integrated,
the way Polaroid did with
film.

There are no such partners
yet, but Zink expects whoever
they are will be able to make
the little camera phone com-
panion for about $100 and the
integrated camera and printer
for $200.

Zink plans to make its
money on the paper: 20 cents
a page, or a 10-pack for $2.

Zink will initially target the
quick-shoot pictures that peo-
ple tend to take with camera
phones, but that market alone
could be big.

The NPD Group research
firm says 69 percent of mobile
phones sold in December had
a built-in camera, up from 51
percent at the start of 2006.
And earlier research by NPD
found that about 80 percent of
the pictures taken with
phones just sit there — nei-
ther sent to anyone else nor
printed.

“Fundamentally, everyone
will have a camera their
pocket,” Caswell said. “What
we want to do is be the tech-
nology that frees the pictures
from their captive state.”

NavniHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

e MICROSOFT

BUSINESS BRIEFS









PAUL SAKUMA/AP
HAPPY SHOPPER: Richard Woodard smiles as he
purchases several boxes of Microsoft’s Windows
Vista at a Best Buy store in San Jose, Calif.

Vista operating system
hits retail shelves

From Herald Wire Services
Consumers can finally get their hands on Microsoft’s
(MSFT) long-delayed Windows Vista, but unlike the mad
midnight rushes retailers saw with the recently released
video game consoles, stores saw only a trickle of early adopt-

ers Tuesday.

_ Retailers around the world held special midnight events
Monday or opened early Tuesday morning, as the Vista oper-
ating system and Office 2007 business software went on sale
in 70 countries. Some stores, including a Best Buy in midtown
Manhattan, brought in extra employees to handle pent-up

demand for Vista.

At a CompUSA in San Jose, Calif., David Keller, a 40-year-
old information-technology consultant from Jacksonville,
Fla., was among the first in line to pick up a new Hewlett-
Packard Co. laptop at midnight (3 a.m. EST).

At a CompUSA in San Jose, Calif., David Keller, a Ao-geats
old information-technology consultant from Jacksonville,
Fla., was among the first in line to pick up a new Hewlett-
Packard laptop at midnight (3 a.m. EST).

But at another CompUSA store in Raleigh, N.C., only
about a dozen people braved frigid late-night temperatures to
stake their claim on a copy of Vista.

As in the past, most consumers will switch to Vista only
when they buy new computers, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer
said Monday during a launch-related event.

Microsoft shares slipped 5 cents to close at $30.48 on the

Nasdaq Stock Market.

e AIRLINES

DELTA SAYS IT SECURES
$2.5B IN EXIT FINANCING

Delta Air Lines":

| © (DALR@.-PK);the nation’s 2

» third-largest carrier, said it
has obtained a commitment
for $2.5 billion in exit financ-
ing as part of its plan to
emerge from bankruptcy by
the middle of this year as a
stand-alone company.

The Atlanta-based com-
pany said the financing will
be led by six financial
groups — JPMorgan, Gold-
man Sachs & Co., Merrill
Lynch, Lehman Brothers,
UBS and Barclays Capital.

© US AIRWAYS REPORTS
FULL-YEAR PROFIT

|

i

:

|

i

}

i

|

|

'

j

i

US Airways (LCC),

| which is pushing to buy rival

| Delta Air Lines in a hostile

| takeover bid, said it swung

| toa profit in the fourth quar-

| ter, as strength in both main-

line and express operations

| helped offset high fuel costs.

| The company said it
posted a profit of $12 mil-

| lion, or 13 cents per share, in

| the fourth quarter, com-

pared to a loss of $261 mil-
lion, or $3.27 per share dur-

| ing the same period in 2005.

|. Shares of US Airways fell

| $1.33, or 2.4 percent, to close

| at $53.10 in late morning

| trading on the New York

| Stock Exchange.

|

|

|

|

© PILOTS’ RETIREMENT
AGE MAY RISE TO 65

Airline pilots would be
_ allowed to fly until they turn
65 instead of the current

mandatory retirement age of

60 under new rules pro-
posed by the Federal Avia-
tion Administration.

At least one member of a
flight crew would still have
‘to be under 60 under the
proposal announced Tues-
day.







4pm. 6:35 p.m. Late
Stock Tk. lose close ~— Chg. ~— volume
SanDisk SNDK = 42.83 38.46 4.37 117954
NutriSys NTRI 52.05 46.10 “5.95 32944
SPDR SPY 142.79 142.80 +01 — 25562
Nasd100Tr QQQQ 43.63 43.67 +.04 20280
ProvidSve PRSC 23.50 22.59 -91 18014

JnprNtw tf = JNPR 19,82 18.55 +127
SiRF Tch SIRF ql 44.13
TD Bknorth =BNK 32.24 32.24 *
ForcePron — FRPT 18.28 18.40 +.12
YM Bio g YMI 3.17 177 -2.00 8894
HCC Ins HCC 30.97 30.97 - 8402
MedcoHIth MHS 58.48
Citigrp c 54.27 54.00 +27 71972

LATE TRADING _

e SHIPPING CARRIER

UPS REPORTS 4Q PROFIT
RISES 7.5 PERCENT

"UPS (UPS), the world’s."
largest shipping carrier, said”

its fourth-quarter profit
increased 7.5 percent ona
5.6 percent gain in sales.

The results, announced
before the market opened,
were in line with Wall Street
expectations. But shares of
UPS fell 95 cents, or 1.3 per-
cent, to close at $72.70 on
the New York Stock
Exchange.

The Atlanta-based com-
pany said that for the three
months ending Dec. 31 it
earned $1.13 billion, or $1.04
a share, compared to a profit
of $1.05 billion, or 95 cents a

share, for the same perioda |

year ago.

e FAST FOOD

BURGER KING 2Q PROFIT
JUMPS 41 PERCENT

Burger King Holdings
(BKC), the world’s second-
largest burger chain, kept its
revitalization going with a
second-quarter profit gain
of 41 percent on strong
same-store sales and income
from new restaurants.

The Miami-based chain
reiterated its double-digit
profit growth forecast for
fiscal 2007 as it works to
improve its brand through
expansion and marketing of
new food menus.

Net income rose to $38
million, or 28 cents per
share, for the three months
ended Dec. 31 compared
with $27 million, or 24 cents
per share, a year ago. Reve-
nue climbed 9 percent to
$559 million from $512 mil-
lion.

Burger King’s stock has
risen more than 21 percent
since the company went
public at $17 a share. Shares
rose 10 cents to $20.85 in
trading on the NYSE.





a ae

Stock Thr. volume
Mills pfE MLSpE 25.40 25.30 = -.10 7236
KeySpan KSE 40.76 40.76 * 7147
WA Mut! WM 44.14 4415 +.01 7096

Microsoft MSFT 30.48 30.45 -.03 6892
AbtLab ABT 53.19 53.19 * 6770
CMSEng CMS 16.71 16.71 . 6312
NorflkSo NSC 47.54 47,54 * 6252
JPMorgCh JPM 50.18 50.18 7 6242
Websenses WBSN = 24.35 21.48 -2.87 6026
Motorola = MOT 19.58 19.60 +.02 5852
iShR2K aya IWM 79.18 79,17 -01 5571
Qwesttm Q 821 823 +,02 5497



For up-to-date stock quotes, go to www.MiamiHerald.com and click on Business



LEAT GE TPS SSRI PTAA PPS ae SSS ESOS EE SO ET TY PE SS FS STIS] Ga SIT ES BIE TSO

ye
te

peor



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007, PAGE 5B



Lady Henrietta’s ICD stake

FROM page 1B

Bahama Port Authority (GBPA)
and Port Group Ltd, which has
served to unite the family.

The Tribune understands that
one interested party in Lady Hen-
rietta’s stake is Floyd Farquhar-
son, who together with Senator
Philip Galanis submitted a multi-
million dollar bid to acquire the
GBPA and Port Group last year.
This was rejected by Sir Jack.

Meanwhile, The Tribune has
confirmed that Franklyn Wilson,
head of Eleuthera Properties, the
Cotton Bay developer, and chair-
man of RoyalStar Assurance,
Sunshine Insurance and Arawak
Homes, is part of a consortium
featuring a major North Ameri-
can power generator that is bid-
ding on Mirant’s stake.

Mr Wilson told this newspaper
that he was unable to comment
“at this time” when asked several
weeks ago about his involvement
in a group seeking to purchase
Mirant’s stake.

Since then, sources have sug-
gested that another party in Mr
Wilson’s group is Emanuel Alex-
iou, the attorney and chairman
of A. F. Holdings, renamed par-
ent company of the Colina Finan-
cial Group (CFG).

This would suggest that Colina
is involved, possibly either pro-
viding corporate advice or some
Bahamas-based financing, but this
nor Mr Alexiou’s participation

- could not be confirmed last night.

* Tony Ferguson, Mr Alexiou’s fel-
. low A. F. Holdings shareholder
and CFAL principal, did not
return The Tribune’s call seeking
comment.

Based on the $7.10 per share
BISX price for ICD Utilities,
Lady Henrietta’s just over five
million shares would fetch over
$35 million based on market
prices. Any buyer would likely
have to pay a slight premium,
meaning that a purchase would
cost between $35-$40 million.

Mirant is seeking to sell its 55
per cent stake in Grand Bahama
Power Company as part of a
wider disposal of its Caribbean
interests, believing a single trans-
action will generate most value
and enable it to avoid writing
down the value of assets held for
sale.

In its last quarterly 10Q report,
filed with the Securities and

‘ Exchange Commission (SEC),

the Atlanta-headquartered pow-
er company said: “Mirant is cur-
rently seeking to sell the
Caribbean business in a single
transaction. Mirant’s analysis indi-
cated that no impairment was
necessary, as the estimated fair
value less costs to sell exceeded
the book carrying value.

“However, if the operating
companies and investments that
comprise the Caribbean business
are ultimately not sold in a single
transaction, an impairment loss
could result.

“Our estimate at September
30, 2006, is that these potential
losses would not be material. As
of September 30, 2006, the book
value for two of the investments
in the Caribbean business exceed-
ed the estimated fair value by a
combined amount of less than $10
million.”

Apart from its 55 per cent stake
in Grand Bahama Power Com-

pany, Mirant’s other Caribbean
operations include an 80 per cent
stake in. Jamaica Public Service
Company, a 39 per cent interest
in Power Generation Company
of Trinidad & Tobago, and a 25.5
per cent stake in Curacao Utilities
Company.

The Tribune understands that
the first round in the auction
process has been completed, and
that some contenders have been
eliminated from the process.
Interested parties are now waiting
to see who has made it into the
second bidding round, and when
this will start.

A collective sale of Mirant’s
will make it more difficult for
Bahamians to participate in the
process other than as minority
partners attached to a larger
international bidder, such as a
major electrical utility.

Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany’s total book value, or total
assets minus total liabilities, stood
at just under $115 million at
December 31, 2005. This means
that Mirant’s stake was worth
$63.25 million, using this valua-
tion method, and financial ana-
lysts spoken to by The Tribune
felt it might be sold for 2x book
value, making it worth $126.5 mil-
lion. .
_Mirant holds 50 per cent of
Grand Bahama Power Compa-
ny through its own subsidiary,
Mirant Grand Bahama Ltd, with
the remaining 5 per cent interest
owned through ICD Utilities, the
BISX-listed holding vehicle for
the other 50 per cent stake.
Therefore, the Mirant sale will
ultimately involve a transaction
via BISX.

Minister promises minimum wage rise

FROM page 1B

employers on notice.

“Listen. Y’all remember this .

now, cause we started throwing
some blows today, and so J tell
you that we putting them on
notice; create real opportunities
for Bahamians and remove all
those glass ceilings now.”

Mr Gibson vowed that his Min-
istry would be enforcing stricter
penalties for persons hiring
employees without valid work
permits:

Responding to the minister,
. Trades Union Congress (TUC)
president and labour lawyer, Obie
Ferguson, said the unions had
long been agitating that the min-
. imum wage be increased to some-
. where between $225-350 per
week.

He said this was a necessity,
given the relatively high and
increasing costs of living in the

’ Bahamas, inflation and the con-
. sumer price index, and related ©

- expenses that the average house-
hold faces.
' Mr Ferguson said an actual
increase may be difficult to
achieve, given the persuasive and
influential role of employers.
“Still, we are hopeful,” he

added.

Brian Nutt, president of the
Bahamas Employers Confedera-
tion (BECon), said that before
the minimum wage can be
increased, there must be proper
feasibility studies and consulta-
tion with employers and trade

’ unions under section 4-2 of the

labour laws.

He hoped the law would be fol-
lowed to determine a prudent
increase if one did take place, Mr
Nutt said.

As far as the minister’s glass
ceiling comments, Mr Nutt said
the employers. would welcome a
workable scenario that would
allow training for Bahamians in
job capacities normally held by
non- Bahamians.

However, Mr Nutt added that
in the changing landscape of the
Bahamian labour market, work
permits have to be granted almost
across the board.

“It seems to me we have work-
ers in every category, not just in
one or two,” he explained. In the
past, Mr Nutt said work permits
generally fell into two categories
- labourers at the lower end, and
managers and upper echelon
positions at the top end of the

‘Legal Notice
| NOTICE
CALEDONIAN MANAGEMENT LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) CALEDONIAN MANAGEMENT LIMITED is in
voluntary dissolution under the provisions of
Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced

on the 30th January, 2007 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the

Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Credit

Suisse Trust Limited, Rue de Lausanne 17 bis,

Geneva.

Dated this 31st day of January, A.D. 2007

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator



Legal Notice

NOTICE

YASAWA MANAGEMENT LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) YASAWA MANAGEMENT LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commence on the
30th January, 2007 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated

Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, B.V.I.

Dated this 31st day of January, A.D. 2007

Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator



labour market.

Mr Nutt said that in examin-
ing labour shortages, issues such
as brain drain of talented young
Bahamian college graduates,
worker attitudes and ethics had to
be addressed.

Noting the minister’s
announcement that the Govern-
ment was in the final stages of
preparing amendments to the
labour laws, Mr Nutt said he was
not aware of any new amend-
ments, indicating this might speak
to a lack of consultation between
BECon and the Ministry of
Labour. He said consultation was
built into the legislation to éasure
that. the voices of both employers
and the labour movement were
heard.

RESPONSIBILITIES:

FirstCaribbean is a major Caribbean Bank offering a full range of market-leading financial services in
_ Corporate Banking, Retail Banking, Credit Cards, Wealth Management, Capital Markets and Treasury.
We are the largest regionally-listéd bank in the English-speaking Caribbean with over 3,500 staff,

' 100 branches and banking centres, and offices in 17 regional markets, serving 800,000 active accounts.

Dey UW wa nies










































Atlantic Medical
Clinical Administrator

Atlantic Medical Insurance (AMI),a subsidiary of Colonial Group International
Limited (CGI) headquartered in Bermuda, is seeking a Clinical Administrator.

CGI, with offices in Bermuda, the Bahamas, the Cayman Islands, and the
British Virgin Islands, offers a complete range of premier financial and
insurance services to both local and international clients. This is an
opportunity to be part of a rapidly growing innovative company, focusing on
providing clients with first class service and access to competitive products.

Reporting to the Operations Manager Designate, the position of
Clinical Administrator will be responsible for a variety of medically
related issues such as reviewing local and foreign medical claims,
pre-certifying patients for off-island air evacuations and hospitalization
and maximizing medical claims cee in a demanding and _ rapidly
expanding environment. Other duties will include but not be limited to:

© Periodic review of medical enrolment forms for eleioatey

© Reporting to re-insurers regarding large and potentially large claim losses
and coordinating reserves

® Liaising with doctors, social workers, medical facilities (local and foreign)
regarding client and claim queries

© Dealing with walk-in and telephone queries, assisting enrollees and their
families with medical and claims related queries

© Reviewing in-patient/out-patient authorization and following up as

appropriate

It is essential that applicants possess the following qualifications, experience
and attributes:

© Registered Nurse currently registered with the Bahamas Nursing
Licensing/Registration Authority and on their “Active” Nurses List _

© Minimum of 5 years’ practical nursing experience

° Knowledge of CPT, ICD-9CM, HCPCS coding

© Strong customer service skills including confidence in dealing with clients
in a professional manner to assist them with their enquiries

© Proven communication (verbal and written) and organizational skills

© Superior proficiency in MS Word; knowledge of email and electronic
calendar software; accurate typing at 45 wpm

© Experience in creating reports and as well as composing correspondence

© Ability to work under pressure, multi-task and meet deadlines

Compensation for the successful candidate will be attractive and linked
to performance. AMI offers an attractive benefits package that includes
comprehensive medical insurance, contributory pension plan, life and long
term disability coverage.

If you have a keen commitment to quality results and want to contribute your
talents to a dynamic company, contact us about this opportunity. Applications
will be treated in the strictest confidence and should be made in writing to:

Atlantic Medical Insurance

Attn: Operations Manager

. 2" Terrace, Collins Avenue
P.O.Box SS 5915 |
Nassau, Bahamas..

Closing Date for applications is February 15, 2007.



PREREQUISITES:

° To provide technical expertise and consulting services in the
development, implementation and maintenance of business
applications, the Bank's information architecture and
supporting information delivery systems

¢ To propose and participate in projects to research, develop,
test and implement new products to meet the requirements
of the technology architecture, encompassing the current
and future business applications, and to ensure alignment of
the Bank's information and processing platforms

7 © To lead the development and maintenance of the Bank's

technology architecture
© To monitor industry-wide standards, new systems

development and vendors' business application products for

applicability to the organisation

TECHNICAL ARCHITECT - SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT |

PREREQUISITES:
© Good skill and knowledge in the following areas:

RESPONSIBILITIES:

¢ To provide technical expertise and consulting services in the
development, implementation and maintenance of business
applications, the bank's information architecture and
supporting information delivery systems

¢ To propose and participate in projects to research, develop,
test and implement new products to meet the requirements
of the technology architecture, encompassing the current
and future business applications, and to ensure alignment of
the Bank's information and processing platforms

e To lead the development and maintenance of the Bank's
technology architecture

¢ To develop, maintain and implement policies, standards and
guidelines on all aspects of technology architecture within
the organisation :

¢ To monitor industry-wide standards, new systems
development and vendors' business application products for
applicability to the organisation

© Good skill and knowledge in the following areas:

business information/technology architecture; systems
integration; methodologies, standards and metrics sufficient to
interpret/analyse relevant issues/developments and apply these
in innovative ways

° Expert knowledge in the ffeld of information architecture with

extensive experience working with tools, standards,,
methodologies and best practices in at least two of the
following related areas: data modelling, data warehousing,
data mining, information delivery systems

e Extensive experience in using XML, UML, ERD, SQL, ETL tools
¢ Minimum of 3 year's experience in a Bank’s Technology

Department would be an asset



business information/technology architecture; systems
integration; methodologies, standards and metrics sufficient
to interpret/analyse relevant issues/developments and apply
these in innovative ways

° Expert knowledge in the field of systems development and

design

e Strong customer service attitude when providing expertise

in service area

e Ability to examine and analyse data in a systematic and

organised manner

e Ability to interpret and analyse medium to complex concepts

and apply these in innovative ways

¢ Minimum of 3 year's experience in a Bank’s Technology

Department would be an asset

We offer a challenging and diverse experience in addition to opportunities for professional growth and an attractive

compensation and reward package including performance bonuses.

Applications with detailed résumés with the names of three business references should be submitted no later than

Monday 5th February, 2007 to:

Nicole M Griffith
FirstCaribbean International Bank

' Head Office

Warrens, St. Michael

Barbados _

Tel: (246) 367 2142

Email: Nicole.Griffith@firstcaribbeanbank.com

Only applicants who are short-listed will be contacted.

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.









PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.












LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION

International Business Companies Act
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act, (No. 45 of 2000), STASEC LIMITES has been
completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been issed and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register. The date of
completion of the dissolution was the 21st of December,
2006.

PANAMERICAN MANAGEMENT
SERVICES (BAHAMAS) LTD.






CAREER OPPORTUNITY
, : |

Requirements:
























¢ Professional qualification-STEP accreditation or ACIB
Trustee Diploma = .

e Minimum five years experience in trust administration at
senior level

e Ability to work independently

° Strong knowledge of offshore jurisdictions

° Strong knowledge of fiduciary offshore trust and corporate
procedures

¢ Excellent PC skills _

e Excellent command of the English Language, both written
and oral

° Ability to work effectively as’a'member of team

Sita NEEL PLATA ET

Personal Attributes:



¢ Excellent work attitude, punctuality and attendance record
¢ Ability to interact with others in a professional manner

e Ability to prioritize tasks

e Ability to work with minimal supervision

e Ability to learn new tasks quickly




We offer an excellent remuneration an benefits package that
includes medical insurance, performance based incentive
and a pension plan.

Interested persons should submit complete resumes in
writing along with supporting documents to:






Human Resources

The Private Trust Corporation Limited
P.O.Box N-65.
Fax 326-8388 .

Deadline 28th February 2007

Pricing Information As Of:




Previous C'



Abaco Markets

‘ 3 0.70
12.05 10.25 Bahamas Property Fund. 11.30
18.03 6.90 Bank of Bahamas 8.03
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80
1.85 1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.85
1.49 4.12 Fidelity Bank 1.26
10.00 9.00 Cable Bahamas 10.00
12.20 1.64 . Colina Holdings ‘ 2.00
13.10 9.05 Commonwealth Bank 13.00
16.26 4.22 Consolidated Water BDRs 5.12
12.88 2.40 Doctor's Hospital 2.50
6.21 | 5.54 Famguard 5.80
12.30 10.70 Finco 12.30
14.50 10.90 FirstCaribbean 14.30
15.68 10.90 Focol : 15.68
1.15 0.50 Freeport Concrete 0.55
10.20 7.10 ICD Utilities 7.10

J. S. Johnson 9.05

Premier Real Estate







Bahamas Supermarkets
40.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)





1.325275*
2.9728***
2.500211**

colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & ! Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund

Fidel







10.0000




BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec f 5
62wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings















BAIC, COB launch »
business seminars

m By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

THE Bahamas Agricultural
and Industrial Corporation
(BAIC), in conjunction with
the College of the Bahamas

(COB), is to launch a 10-week |

Business Empowerment Lec-
ture Series to provide poten-
tial businesses persons with
vital business tools.
Announcing the event yes-



NOTICE is hereby given

NOTICE

MOUNTABOR DRIVE, PINEWOOD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,

terday, BAIC chairman
Michael Halkitis said the pur-
pose of the free seminars was
to provide potential and exist-
ing entrepreneurs and business
persons with broad exposure
to proven strategies, best prac-
tices and real life business
experience.

Mr Halkitis said these semi-
nars were particularly timely
given what is happening in the
Bahamas.

“The initial seminars will be
conducted once per week (

that SHELDA EXANTIS OF





each Thursday) over a 10-week
period, and will cover such top-
ics as business planning, fund-
ing, accounting, expense con-
trol, forecasting, marketing,
information technology and
human resources,” Mr Halkitis
said.

“Additionally, there will be a
segment during each sessions
for testimonials from successful
business persons. These semi-
nars will enhance the capacity
of entrepreneurs and business
persons to benefit from anchor
properties throughout the
Bahamas.”

Mr Halkitis added that
BAIC was aware of the role
that small businesses play in
the economy, especially as it
relates to job creation.

“Properly operated small
business enterprise can pro-
vide at a high level, needed
goods and services to the —
Bahamian economy, keeping °
pace with future projects and
developments,” Mr Halkitis
said. rie

“It must be noted that

financing a business is impor- *. ': ’
tant, but having the expertise .°.~
to operate that business is crit: -

ical.
Remelda Moxey, chair of
the School Business at COB,

said they were delighted to be vie
a part of the venture as it.

would assist in the develop-
ment of Bahamas business per-
sons. ;

The series begins at COB on
February 1, 2007.

lose. Today's Close

11.30 .

10.00

13.10









YIELD - last 12
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration’ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 31st day of January, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

- Ben-Bo Collection &
‘Management Company Ltd

wish to inform the public that

BRIDGETTE ROLLE

is no longer employed with us.
She is no longer authorized to do
business for and on behalf of





































BEN-BO COLLECTION &
MANAGEMENT COMPANY LTD.

CHAMBERS

Counsel and Attorneys-at-Law Notaries Public
is seeking to hire an ambitious

COMMERCIAL ATTORNEY

for its Nassau Office

Applicants with a minimum of five (5) years
experience must possess the skills and the ability to
work independently on conveyancing and mortgage
matters.



Attractive salary and benefits are available to the
candidate with the right aptitude and skills.

Applicants should send resumes to:

THE HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGER
P.O. Box N-979, Nassau, Bahamas or
By facsimile (242) 393-4558 or
E-mail: info@halsburylawchambers.com

0.00



Last Price Weekly Vol.



*-19 January 2007

** . 31 December 2006
*** 31 December 2006
*s«* 31 December 2008

* - 31 December 2006



NOTICE

registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 31st day of January, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHARLES OSAZUWA OF

TWYNAM HEIGHTS, P.O. BOX EE-16843, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement

of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 31st day of ©
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and

Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE is hereby given that RODNEY CALIS OF FORT |
ST. GROOVE, P.O. BOX CR-54802, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, -
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and -
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The (Fo -.
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why sf-<-<-

















se eH






NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN of the loss of
Bahamas Government Registered Stock Certificate

as follows:

218,406
81,600

0.375 APR
0.40625 APR

65-112
65-113

06 Sept. 2021
06 Sept. 2022

Stock
Bahamas Gov. Reg. Stock
Bahamas Gov. Reg. Stock

I intend to request The Registrar to issue a
replacement certificate. If this certificate

| is found, please write to P.O. Box N7788,

Nassau, Bahamas.

APR=Approve Prime rate

POSITION AVAILABLE

ACCOUNTANT

Responsibilities:
e Preparation of monthly financial statements.
e Reconciliation of general ledger accounts.
e Preparation of work papers for auditors.
e Report directly to Financial Controller.

Qualifications:
e Three years work experience in a similar position.
e Proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel.
e Ability to work with minimal supervision.

Benefits:
Salary is based on skills and experience. Other
benefits include health insurance and pension.

All interested accountants should mail their resumes to:

H.R. Manager
PO. Box N-4036
Nassau, Bahamas

Fax to: (242) 364-6084





‘THE TRIBUNE

3

FROM page 1B

among the other interested parties that
attempted to acquire the Bahamas Film
Studios was a group headed by Bahamian
filmmaker Cedric Scott, who has long har-
boured ambitions to set-up his own televi-
‘sion and film production studio on Grand
Bahama. At least one other party was inter-
»ested in the project and in negotiations with
«Mr Fuller.
‘»’ He said in a statement: “This new invest-
>ment will provide the necessary upgrades
and additions necessary for the studio to
*become a more full-service facility. This

'. |. , decision is in the best interest of the future
’.' «pf the project, as well as our shareholders
.~ and the citizens of Grand Bahama.”

The statement from Ashby Corporation

‘indicated that the Government had ©

_approved the takeover in principle,

_ although it did not explicitly say so.

., A previous release by the company said

_the sale “involves the pay off of $10 million

_in bank loans and approximately $1 mil-
lion in other debts of the company’s sub-
sidiary, Gold Rock Creek Enterprises”.

The $10 million figure refers to the loan
made to the Bahamas Film Studios by First-
Caribbean International Bank (Bahamas)

eee

‘
we

for construction of the project’s water tank.
The Tribune understands that the sale was
somewhat forced on Mr Fuller by the bank,
which was pushing for repayment of the
loan, and the purchase price is likely to
have involved an eight-figure sum.

In return, Mr Fuller will have settled all
debts, enabling Mr Bethel and his Bahamas
FilmInvest group, which is affiliated with his
Montaque Capital Partners and Montaque
Corporate Partners, to start with a rela-
tively clean balance sheet.

Both parties said they were working with
the Government to ensure a smooth tran-
sition to new ownership, with a manage-

‘ment team for the Bahamas Film Studios”

due to be announced in the coming months.

Meanwhile, Mr Fuller appeared to have
received more good news, with Ashby Cor-
poration releasing a statement yesterday
announcing that a Miami court had dis-
missed a lawsuit filed against it by Bjorn
Monteine, in relation to the Bahamas Film
Studios, as “frivolous”.

Ashby added that the judge had yet to
rule on Ashby’s motion to be awarded costs
and attorney fees from Mr Monteine.

Mr Monteine had alleged that he signed
an agreement to take over the Bahamas
Film Studios and rescue it from insolvency,
but then its principals reneged on the deal

Be

Film Studios takeover

and instead used his money to rescue the
project. These allegations had been strenu-
ously denied by Mr Fuller.

However, legal actions against the now
former owners may not be over, as it is
understood that Paul Quigley, one of the
Bahamas Film Studios’ three founding part-
ners, is planning to take legal action over
how he was ousted from the Board and
overall project last year.

Yet the acquisition by Mr Bethel and his
group represents an opportunity to unlock
the Bahamas Film Studios’ true potential
and small bit of. economic diversification
that it represents, provided the buyers have

the capital to build on the Pirates of the

Caribbean filming.

The Bahamas Film Studios is a $76 mil-
lion project in eastern Grand Bahama that
was the first investment deal for which a
Heads of Agreement was signed by the cur-
rent administration back in 2002.

The plan was for the Bahamas Film Stu-
dios to possess the world’s largest water
tank, some 60 million gallons in size; movie
theme park; resort hotel; and film, television
and movie recording studios.

The site of the project is the 3,500 acre
former US missile base, leased from the

. Government for 50 years, a deal that is

renewable for a further 49 years.

‘Luxury resort chain part of proposed Freeport project





WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007, PAGE 7B

NOTICE



NOTICE is hereby given -that LARRY JACQUES OF
5139 Marion Place, West Palm Beach, FI. 33407, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The

Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 24th day of January, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, BETTY

of the Soutjern District of the Island of New Providence one
of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas intend
to change my name to BETTE MELANIE DORCELY. If
there are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, .
you may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box SS-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (80) days
after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSER GEDEUS OF
THE MUD, MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a_ citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 31st day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.









Legal Notice

' FROM page 1B

ror
+f 2.88. e

- He added: “We intend at
‘looking and developing other
ssites in the Bahamas. We have
-‘specifically looked at two other
sites to date. One is the world’s
.deepest blue hole, an amazing
‘site just off the beach, sur-
rounded by cliffs in Long Island,
vand the other is one in Grand
‘Bahama.”

4
4

The Raven Group’s Aman-
branded development is likely
to be similar to the resort
chain’s Turks & Caicos project.

Mr Zecha said: “In terms of
real estate we have thirty-three
5,000 square foot villas for sale
in our Turks and Caicos pro-
ject. We have already sold 12
of these villas to our Aman
‘Junkies’ at an average rate of
$6-$7 million per villa. Ten of
these villas are under construc-



Help Wanted

Dental Office seeking applicants for the following positions

The applicant must possess the following:

. Dental Assistant
“Gate eave)
MG fese eto nner te cela
Steen e vig
“Good people skills
ee esattn Ck OR SRS

perience

Office Administrative Assistant
Weeeiiicontan caren ; ey,
PrpSTons reese be siCca-CesnnnnayeineeviCOyn
icator, team player, and able to multi task
SSCS ent organizational skills, good people’skills and experience with
Microsoft Word.’ . :
Fax resume to 393-5802

Minimum of 2



Ces

MOWU
&
KERZNER

tion already, and so we are
extremely pleased that without
even putting the product on the
market we have achieved this
level of sales.”

The Raven Group project is
likely to complement Morgan
Stanley’s, acting as the ‘Ocean
Club’ to the latter’s Atlantis-
style development.

The Morgan Stanley deal
involves the Grand Bahama
Development Company (Dev-
co) selling its 50 per cent stake
in 1,000 acres at Barbary
Beach to Morgan Stanley,
which would then be 50/50
partners in the development
via a joint venture agreement
with Port Group Ltd.

Port Group Ltd is the hold-
ing company for all the pro-
ductive assets spun-off from
the Grand Bahama Port
Authority (GBPA) by Sir Jack

‘Hayward and the late Edward
St George. | | 3 ;

Due to the continuing dis-
pute between Sir Jack and Mr
St George’s family over the
former’s claim to own 75 per
cent of the GBPA and Port
Group Ltd, approval of the
Morgan Stanley purchase will
be required from Sir Jack,
Lady Henrietta St George and
Clifford Culmer, the two com-

Shirley & Mackey Street

Intersection Improvement

Bliiyo weitere

The

Ministry of Works

Project

& Utilities

and Kerzner

International wish to inform the public that works for the
Shirley & Mackey Street project will be completed by

February 3, 2007

The intersecion will return to normal operation at the
end of construction. We thank you for your patience
throughtout the project which improved traffic operations

at the intersection.



panies’ independent manage-
ment consultant.

The Tribune has seen corre-
spondence indicating that Sir
Jack has signed off on the Mor-
gan Stanley project, while Lady
Henrietta has also been “‘asked
to sign certain documents for
Port Group Ltd regarding the
Morgan Stanley transaction”.

Few details on the Morgan
Stanley project have been
made public, although it is
understood to involve a major
hotel and casino, timeshares,
condos, second homes and
retail and commercial facili-
ties.

It has been billed by execu-
tives who have spoken to The
Tribune on condition of
anonymity as being Freeport’s
answer to Kerzner Interna-
tional’s Atlantis resort on Par-
adise Island, having a similar
impact on that island. ....

Paes

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

LURIG S.A.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),

LURIG S.A. has been dissolved and struck off the Register

according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registar

General on the 17th day of January, 2007.

MARK JAMES SHORTLAND
Vannin, Fairy Cottage
Laxey, Isle of Man
IM4 7JB

->¢ Laquidator. -



ail Atlantic Medical
DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS

Atlantic Medical Insurance (AMI), a subsidiary of Colonial Group International
Limited (CGIL) headquartered in Bermuda, is seeking a Director of Operations _
for the medical claims and eligibility departments of AMI in the Bahamas.

CGIL, with offices in Bermuda, the Bahamas, the Cayman Islands, and
the British Virgin Islands, offers a complete range of premier financial
and insurance services to both local and international clients. This is an
opportunity to be part of a rapidly growing innovative company, focusing on
providing clients with first class service and access to competitive products,

The Director of Operations will be responsible for the overall
day-to-day management of the medical claims, customer service,
administration and eligibility departments with a primary focus on the
claims area. These responsibilities will include monitoring and evaluating all
activities and procedures and introducing and monitoring structured audits
as well as productivity standards. This position will also be responsible for
developing and training staff in areas that are essential to efficient company
operations. It is essential that applicants possess the following qualifications:

¢ 10 years experience managing claims and eligibility departments within the
health insurance industry, including the development and implementation
of procedures and audits.
Experience of working within the US healthcare system and experience
of US claims processing, provider and network discounts and negotiating
contracts with independent service providers.
Minimum 10 years’ supervisory experience with the ability to train and

mentor staff.

Thorough understanding of group employee health benefits including
medical, dental, life, and disability.

Superior communication and organisational skills as well as a
service-oriented approach.

Proven ability to negotiate with external and internal clients and work

under pressure.

Compensation for the successful candidate will be attractive and linked
to performance. CGIL offers an attractive benefits package that includes
comprehensive medical insurance, contributory pension plan, and life insurance.

If you have a keen commitment to quality results and want to contribute your
talents to a dynamic company, contact us about this opportunity. Applications
will be treated in the strictest confidence and should be made in writing to:

Atlantic Medical Insurance

P. Box SS-5915

Nassau, Bahamas

or

email address for electronic submission of applications
hr_manager_bm@colonial.bm

Closing date for applications is February 15, 2007.





PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

Dear Shareholders,
We present our un-audited 1st quarter fiscal year 2007 financial statements.

Most of you will have read our audited financial statements for the year ended August 31,
2006, and for those of you that have not, then please go to our website “fccbahamas.com”
where you will find them under the ‘Investor Relations’ section.

As | said in my letter to you dated January 12th, 2007 the company will return to prof-
itability in the 3rd quarter of this fiscal year once all of the costs associated with our tran-
sitioning the business have finished; hence the reason that we are reporting a 1st quarter
loss for the company of $159k. The Home Centre’s 1st quarter loss was $214k and the
Concrete Plant division reporting a $ 54k net profit.

We opened the new Home Centre Superstore on September 6th 2006 and we have seen
our monthly sales, since opening, increase every month from the $875k in September to

| $1,045k in November. Sales at the Concrete Plant have increased 3% over the same
quarter last fiscal year.

Our gross profit margin has increased significantly, primarily at the Home Centre, as-our

| 1st quarter revenues this fiscal year show more revenue being generated from the non
building material sector compared to the same period last year. This is good as we gen-
erate higher gross profit from this sector.

During the 1st quarter last fiscal year, almost 70% of our sales at the Home Centre, Peel
Street facility were generated from the building materials sector as a result of a lot of hur-
ricane repair work during this period. However, in this 1st quarter, the non building supply
revenues were only 50% of our total sales and yet our total sales for the quarter have
remained the same at just under $3 million, showing growth in the non building supplies
sector. ‘

Our operating expenses have increased almost 30% primarily due to payroll costs, rent
and utilities. Our payroll costs are higher because we had an additional 20 staff compared
to the same quarter last fiscal year, together with all the overtime and casual labour costs

associated with the transitioning of the business. As we go into the 3rd quarter, our pay- }

roll costs will decease as we consolidate the staff from the Seahorse Plaza store, which is
now closed, and the transitioning costs are completed

The rent expense is higher because we were paying a much lower rent in the 1st quarter
| last fiscal year due to a rent reduction because of the poor state of the Peel Street facility
which we were operating out of at that time.

Our utility costs are higher this quarter compared to the same period last fiscal year
because we had no air conditioning working at the Peel Street facility.

We are working on further reducing our operating expenses by a minimum of 10% by the }

start of our 3rd quarter.

| The Concrete Plant’s revenue forecast for the remainder of this fiscal year looks bright and
this division will remain profitable throughout the year.

| Thank you for your support.

Ray Simpson
Chief Executive Officer
January 29, 2007

a

Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Consolidated Statement of Operations
Three months ended November 30, 2006 with comparative information for 2005

Outstanding shares = 4,708,334
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)
3 months ended 3 months ended
November 30, 2006 November 30, 2005
Sales 4,104,360 4,045,860
Cost of sales. 2,956,079 3,131,644
Gross profit 1,148,281 914,216
Payroll costs 625,501 468,808
Other operating costs 287,988 255,885
Rent expense 142,138 114,429
Advertising expense 21,953 7,840
Utilities expense 107,115 66,677
Other income ‘4,810 5,284
1,179,885 908,355
Income/(loss) before interest, taxes
depreciation and amortisation (31,604) 5,861
Depn. and amort. expense (84,696) (87,097)
Net financing income/(expense 43,242 28,765
Net income/{loss 159,542 : 110,001
Earnings per share
Basic and diluted earnings/ (loss) per share $ 0.034 0.023'

Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Consolidated Balance Sheet
As at November 30, 2006

nn
November 30,2006 August 31,2006

Unaudited (audited)

Assets

Current assets

Cash 198,879 198,471
Time deposits 63,698 63,274
Accounts receivable, net 41,136,104 1,323,717
Due from former subsidiary shareholder - -
Due from former subsidiary - 17,250
Inventories 1,967,387 2,488,843
inventories of spare parts and supplies 115,930 121,187
Deposits and prepaid expenses $0,536 132,642
3,572,534 4,345,384
Property, plant and equipment 3,475,028 3,387,232
Total assets 7,047,562 7,732,616
Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity
Current liabilities
Bank overdraft $ - 1,605,412 1,491,916
Accounts payable and accrued
expenses 3,137,250 3,734,627
Warranty Provision 5,000 5,000
Due to Shareholder - -
Current portion of long term debt 118,884 183,710
4,866,546 §,415,253
Long term debt 463,648 440,453
Shareholders’ equity:
Share Capital 47,083 47,083
Contributed surplus 5,774,868 5,774,868
Appraisal excess 1,433,867 1,433,867
Retained earings : (5,378,908) (5,378,908)
Current eamings ' (159,542)
1,717,368 1,876,910

THE TRIBUNE

aaa
Corporation plans
50m bond for water

The Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration is planning to issue a
$50 million bond in June to
fund water and wastewater
infrastructure works through-
out the Bahamas, and is
already looking to put this

financing method to use on.

Long Island.

The Corporation has pro-
posed that Long Islanders
finance the development of
water production and trans-
mission facilities on their own
island by buying into a $5.2
million bond issue, taking own-
ership of their own utilities.

Donald Demeritte, the Cor-
poration’s chairman, told a
town meeting in Deadman’s
Cay, held to discuss a potential
private/public partnership in
developing the island’s water
infrastructure, that the bond
would pay 7 per cent interest.

He also urged Long
Islanders to consider taking
ownership of a new reverse
osmosis plant planned for
northern Long Island.

This would serve not only
the local population, but
planned resort developments
and existing properties such as
Cap Santa Maria, creating
demand for one million gal-
lons per day.

Mr Demeritte said it would
costs $20 million to finance
water production and mains
extensions from one end of the
island to the other, covering
200 miles.

“The intention is to take
care of the entire Long Island
transmission and water distri-
bution system, but it would be
done in a protracted way if
government had to do it by
itself, so the aim is to create a
Public-Private-Partnership that
would enable Long Islanders
to facilitate and accelerate the
delivery of water throughout

the length and breadth of Long
Island,” Mr Demeritte said.

The Government’s National
Water and Wastewater Policy
was intended to ensure that
the Water and Sewerage Cor-
poration had the right of first
refusal to provide water to new
developments, including such
clauses in Heads of Agree-
ments.

Mr Demeritte said Bahami-
ans had previously missed out
on opportunities to supply the
likes of Kerzner International
and Emerald Bay with water.

He pointed out that Kerzner
International had indicated
that Atlantis would need 4.4
million gallons of water per
day once the Phase III expan-
sion was completed, and cur-
rent prices for reverse osmosis
was ranged from $10 to $15
per thousand gallons.

On Long Island, Mr
Demeritte suggested a phased
approach that would extend
mains in north and central
Long Island from Grays to
Thompson Bay, and south

from Turtle Cove to Lochabar.

In addition, the ‘blended
approach’ called for the con-
struction of a Reverse Osmosis
Plant in the north and installa-
tion of mains from Simms to
Cape Santa Maria.

Mr Demeritte told Long
Islanders that their $5.2 mil-
lion bond would be a legal
instrument that was honoured
regardless of changes in the
Corporation’s leadership or
government.

Without this bond, he said
Long Island could expect to
have about $1.8 to $2 million

allocated to them in 2007 - as '

in 2006. However, the time
period to complete the neces-
sary works for Long Island
would likely be much longer if
a public-private partnership

infrastructure works

agreement was not cemented, | -
and the proposed ‘Long Island -
Bond’ not issued.
Jan Knowles, chief councillor
for Long Island, said Bahami-
ans have seen the value of |

bond issues such as the Par- ce
adise Island Bridge bond, *.-.-

adding that the 7 per cent
interest being offered on the
bond was superior to rates
being offered by the banks. In
addition, Long Islanders could
take pride in ownership of
their own system.

“Once you own something
syou take better care of it and
understand the operation of it.
The Government can’t do
everything. With this partner-
ship between private individu-
als and the Government, we

can go much further in devel- °-".
oping our country in a better .".~

way,” Mr Knowles said.
Vernice Brice, a resident of -

Long Island, also expressed .°. '
interest in the investment -,-:-—
opportunity. “The proposed -*-*

bond is an excellent idea if, as
they say, you are guaranteed
at least 7 per cent interest
because at today’s rate in the
bank, they only give you 2.5
per cent ...if we finally get
water in the south, kudos! It
would be in our best interest to
energise Long Islanders and
sell them the plan,” Mrs Brice
said.

Long Island, which has
almost no ground water
resources, currently has a
reverse osmosis plant - the
DevMat plant at Deadman’s
Cay - to supply settlements
between Grays in the north
and Turtle Cove in south Long
Island.

However, settlements
beyond these points rely on
the Corporation’s tanker truck
service for delivery of reverse ~
osmosis water.

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

in

Wealth Management
Financial Advisor/Investment Manager

Bahamas

We are expanding our capabilities in wealth management and are now seeking to recruit
seasoned financial advisers who have the gravitas and expertise to contribute significantly
to the growth of AUM by developing investment relationships with HNWIs, professional

trustees and COIs.

Qualifications:

Recognised Financial Planning or Investment qualification (e.g. FPC or CFA).
Qualification in Banking, Law or Accounting.
A self-motivator with excellent sales management and business development skills.
Detailed and technical knowledge of investment management and the investment
product range as it relates to non-residents/ non-nationals, HNWIs, trustees and

COIs.

Full awareness of the local and international competitive environments.

Good understanding of the qualitative and quantitative aspects of investment
management including, Alfa, Beta and Total Return considerations and analytical
depth in respect of their impact on sector allocations and individual stock picks.
Sound experience in global capital markets.

General Requirements/Responsibilities:

Must have a minimum of 5 years international investment portfolio management
or financial advisory experience.
Must be able to deliver a high level of expert investment advice and service with
the aim of developing significant sales and new business, covering investment and
fiduciary services and the cross-selling of other banking services.

Proven track record in providing investment recommendations to both corporate
and personal clients as well as client performance reporting. This includes a full
understanding of the mathematical and statistical basis of portfolio diversification.
Must be totally at ease with the concept of personal affluence and high-net worth

clients.

Experience of, or at least be at ease with clients from differing social, religious,
ethnic and cultural backgrounds.
Experience of selling other banking and / or regulated products is desirable

Remuneration:

° Salary commensurate with the position’s seniority level 8 (The Bank has 11 pay

levels).

Benefits- includes a car allowance, variable incentive pay (bonus) and preferred

loan rates

Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter via email by February

9", 2007 to: deangelia.deleveaux@FirstCaribbeanBank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for their interest,
however only those under consideration will be contacted.





WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

~ SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



@ BASKETBALL
BSC BASKETBALL
CLASSIC

THE Baptist Sports
Council will kick off its
2007 Rev. Tyrone
Knowles Basketball
Classic on Saturday at.
the Bahamas Baptist
College, Jean Street on
Saturday.

The Classic will get
underway at 10 a.m.
with Macedonia playing
New Covenant (15-and-
under); 11 a.m. Temple
Fellowship will play
Kemp Road Ministries
(Men); Noon Macedo-
nia vs Faith United (19-
and-under); 1 p.m.
Faith United vs St.
Paul's (Ladies) and
2 p.m. Faith United vs
St. Paul's (15-and-
under).

All teams that have
not yet registered are
advised that they have
until Saturday to do so
at Jean Street.

@ BAISS ACTION

The Bahamas Associ-
ation of Independent
Secondary Schools will
continue its basketball
regular season today
with a series of games,
starting at 4 p.m.
Senior boys - Queen’s
College at St.
Augustine’s College
and St. Andrew’s at
Kingsway Academy.
Junior girls - St.
Augustine’s College at
Nassau Christian Acad-
emy and St. Anne’s
School at St. John’s
College.

@ GSSSA ACTION

The Government Sec-
ondary Schools Sports
Association will contin-
ue its basketball regu-
lar season action today
at 4 p.m. CI Gibson
Gym - SC McPherson
vs CH Reeves (JG);'CC
Sweeting vs HO Nash
(JG) and CC Sweeting
vs HO Nash (JB). DW
Davis Gym - CV Bethel

_vs CI Gibson (SG); CV

Bethel vs CI Gibson

_(SB) and CC Sweeting

vs Government High
(SB).

@ NPBA ACTION

The New Providence
Basketball Association
will be back in action
tonight at the DW
Davis Gymnasium with
a double header on tap.
At 7 p.m., the Millenni-
um Jammers will take
on the Coke Explorers
and at 8:15 p.m., the
Commonwealth Bank
Giants will face the Y-
Care Destroyers.

@ NPWBA ACTION

The New Providence
Women’s Basketball
Association will be
back in action on
Thursday night with a
double header at the
DW Davis Gym. In the
7 p.m. opener, the
Johnson Lady Truckers
will take on the Clean-
ing Center Angels and
in the 8:15 p.m. feature
contest, the Sunshine
Auto Cheetahs will bat-
tle the Defence Force
Bluewaves.











@ ANIBAL ‘El Olimpico’ Ac



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

Bahamian boxers

prepare for packed |

Friday night card.

@ BOXING
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Sports Reporter

JERMAIN ‘Choo Choo’
Mackey is preparing to put the
WBC (CABOFE) supermid-
dleweight title on the line for
the first time since securing
the crown in July of last year.

Mackey will square off
against Anibal ‘El Olimpico’
Acevedo of Puerto Rico on
Friday night at the Sir Kendal
Isaacs gym. The fight is sched-
uled for 12 rounds.

The card, which is dubbed
the “Pre-Valentine War on
the Shore”, will host four oth-
er matches, with Acevedo’s
teammate and training part-
ner Joseph Delos Santos being
featured as the co-main event.

Santos, who has a fight
record of 2-1-0, is set to fight
Wilson ‘Kid Wonder’
Theophile in the supermid-
dleweight division, this fight
is scheduled to last for six
rounds,

Two of the top Bahamian
middleweight boxers will aim
to please the crowd in their
four round match. Set to fight
this match will be Alpachino
‘Banger’ Allen taking on
Ricardo ‘One Short’ Bethel.

In the junior welterweight
bout, Anthony ‘Psyco’ Woads
will go up against Hensely
‘Bruiser’ Strachan; while Ryon
‘Big Youth’ McKenzie laces
his gloves to match-up with
Anthony ‘The Kid’ Drum-

mett. Both matches are set for
four rounds.

Although the boxing card
has a packed schedule, Edgard
Gonzalez, Acevedo’s and San-
tos’ trainer, believes that the
heated match will be between
Acevedo and Mackey.

According to Gonzalez the
duo has had an intense train-
ing schedule — starting the
practice session with a 45
minute run.

The workout sessions also
include more than 90 rounds
of sparring, and 12 rounds on
the superbag.

He said: “Acevedo is an
excellent fighter and he is
ready to win. He trains very
hard, so we are hoping that
his training will pay off in the
ring and in this fight.

“I love to see him fight, he is
smooth and has a very unique
technique. This fight will be
an exciting one.”

Acevedo is no stranger to
the ring. The Olympic silver
medalist from the 1992
Barcelona'Games is currently
weighing in at 162 pounds.

The well built fighter has a’

win-loss record of 14-4-1,
while Mackey holds a 12-1-0
record.

This will be Acevedo’s first
fight since March of last year.

i ALPACHINO ‘Banger’
Allen (right) will take on
Ricardo ‘One Short’ Bethel.
(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)



The Tribune

evedo of Puerto Rico (left) will challenge Jermain ‘Choo Choo’ Mackey

5 ‘

i E ent
Ch Ch A
: t



@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE



.

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff) 3 re :





aspen



op eQennnonna

+

FS RO-S H
,

o

_ SFR SSREB BAe Me ADA RAPeBeaneq FOF ORO DOOD OLE OAD DODD DD DO OOD

<

7 88

eee te

eden ee sad earn onganacenaa
. ee 8 8 ’ we we

za

° t .
‘ o>

pyr ee ee eae
ye
,

‘

=~ PEST HK Re RAO RTH HEE S Aka TBonBeser KFT eBwManensae re ansacAsnewsomgsaman

PAGE 2E, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Giants hand Ruff Ryders
first defeat in seven games

Ronaldo heads
to AG Milan

m@ SOCCER
MILAN, Italy
Associated Press

RONALDO’S farewell to Real
Madrid didn’t include any fond
words for coach Fabio Capello.

The World Cup’s all-time lead-
ing scorer left Madrid for AC
Milan on Tuesday, returning to
Italy’s Serie A for a reported
$9.73 million transfer fee. The 30-
year-old Brazil striker will join
Milan until ‘2008 — the same
length as the remainder of his
contract at Madrid,

“My heart’s breaking but life
goes on,” Ronaldo told reporters
in Madrid. “I’m a great Madrid

_ fan. I’m not so sure about the

coach.”

“I know that Ronaldo is
Milan’s,” Capello said. “I wish
him good luck, that he does what

_he used to be able to do, that is be

a great player.”
Ronaldo hasn’t been picked to
play by Capello since a Jan. 7

_defeat at Deportivo La Coruna,

“T want to thank all the fans
who supported me, all my team-
mates who were with me, all the
coaches I’ve had — except one,”

* Ronaldo said. “I wasn’t wanted,

and as I’m a professional and I
love soccer, I had to find another
solution.”

Ronaldo’s departure marks the

_- end of Madrid’s project of signing
- the world’s best players — who

earned the nickname “Galacti-
cos.”

Luis Figo left for Inter Milan in
2005, Zinedine Zidane has retired

_ and David Beckham will be leav-

ing for the Los Angeles Galaxy
after the season.
While the policy helped

Madrid financially, it proved a°

flop on the field as the power-
house team failed to win a major
_trophy since 2003 — its
worst drought since the early
1950s.



:



@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter



THE Commonwealth
Bank Giants ran past the
Sunshine Auto Ruff Ryders
in the fourth quarter to pull
off a 77-63 victory Monday
night at the DW Davis Gym.
- The Giants’ victory hand-
ed the Ruff Ryders their first
defeat in seven games, leaving

no teams undefeated in the

New Providence Basketball
Association.

With the victory, the Giants
improved to 5-1 to sit in sec-
ond place behind the Ruff
Ryders. It was a victory that
Commonwealth Bank’s head
coach Perry Thompson said
was a gratifying one.

“It’s gratifying that we
could come out against the
number one team in the
league, with respect to the
standings and pull off a win
like this,” he stated,

“We realised that our only
loss was because we had just
gotten back from the Christ-
mas break and we hadn’t
practised as a team. But we
were more committed to
coming out and playing this
game.”

The game was the marquee
one.so far for the season as it
pitted the top two games
against each other. It lived up

‘Gratifying’ victory
ends final unbeaten run

to its advanced billing as both
teams traded the lead for the
majority of the game.

But when it counted the
most, the Ruff Ryders didn’t
have an answer to slow down
or stop the 1-2 punch of
Michael Bain and Garvin
Lightbourne, who sparked
the Giants down the stretch,

Bain and Lightbourne com-
bined for 18 points as they
took the ball inside, scoring
on fast break lay-ups or
dunks, as the Giants extended
a 54-46 advantage at the end
of the third period into a
comfortable lead during the
fourth quarter.

Bain finished with a game
high 22 points and Light-
bourne had 11. Mark Hanna,
however, kept Common-
wealth Bank in the game with
his 20,

Hanna connected on 10 of

-, his points in the third quarter

as he opened the frame with

.. two consecutive three-point-

ers as they rallied from a 36-
30 deficit at the half.

‘Adrian Miller also played
his role in helping the Giants
to keep rolling. He had eight
points. Creto Knowles added
seven and Raif Ferguson

Over 100 Cars Reatly for

Immediate Shipment

Japanesevehicles.com

ASK for Ana, Dan, or nee st Eee er ee

i

istributed in the Bahamas if y hi eee Trading,
seal



CMa tac)

PF

chipped in six.

Coach Thompson said once
the Giants come prepared to
play basketball, they will give
any team they play a run for
their money.

“It’s just a matter of us
staying together and like we
did tonight, don’t play
unselfish, it shows that good
things could happen for us as
a team,” he pointed out.

The Ruff Ryders got a
game high 16 from Jeremy
Hutchinson, who wasn’t as
expressive as he normally is.
Wilton Russell had 10,
Christopher ‘Chicken’ Turn-
quest eight, Mario Pickstock
six and Mario Martin helped
out with five.

Sunshine Auto’s coach
Charles ‘Chuck’ Mackey said
Commonwealth Bank just
wanted the game more than
they did and it showed.

“Not wanting to sound like
you’re crying, but your game
plan starts from the gym,” he
stressed. “I must say we’ve
been fortunate to have won
the games that we’ve won,
but I’ve yet to have my full
team in the gym.

“I’ve been coaching long
enough to know that prepa-
ration is very important
because if you don’t, when
you encounter an opportuni-

ty, you won’t win. You have.

to be prepared and we were
not prepared for this game.”
Mackey said he hopes this
is a wake up call for his Ruff
Ryders and he urged them
that if they want to win, they
need to take advantage of
their opportunities to prac-
tise.as.a complete team.
“I'm not making excuses,
but théy kicked our butt,”
Mackey proclaimed. “We just

@ COMMONWEALTH Bank Giants



Michael Bain scores

on a lay-up over Sunshine Auto Ruff Ryders’ Wilton Russell
during their NPBA men’s game on Monday night at the DW

Davis Gym.

have to find a way to come
back and we have io.do that
in practice.”

- In the opener, the Police
Crimestoppers cuffed the
Cable Bahamas Entertainers

(Photo: Tim Clarke)

71-66 —- Anthony Whylly
scored a game high 19 and
Jamal Bain and Hillary Jack-
son had 15 apiece,

Gary Bethel scored 15 in
the loss.





SPORTS —

seoncaenaenasngnaicanet setae punMaSne Re RRR HE SARE Uae AEN

3E 1
COERCION ELLE LEANER aracassorentenarasersssnsasssensssoatinararassessionnsensersscosscoeseteatttieietiti¢Ie,



soasgasenamaniearine raha nseannaAS tase hn ea RRA A RAR ANN Nes oe



Nageceeats JANUARY 31, 2007 INTERNATIONAL EDITION



PRO BASKETBALL | WASHINGTON 104, DETROIT 99

IN MY OPINION

EDWIN POPE

~ epope@MiamiHerald.com

One loss didn’t
define Marino
— so no regrets

T hink it’s devastating to make



just one Super Bowl and strike
out in that one? Think it’s
something either Peyton Manning or
Rex.Grossman would never get over,
to lose this game and never get back?
Think the loser would agonize right
on through to his personal. equivalent
of forever? -
I don’t think so, One game isn’t
a life. Ask Dan Marino.
He never even watched the dks.

_ tape of his only Super Bowl.

. . “TsaidI would watchit,butI
didn’t,” Marino said. He’s reeling back
22 years, all the way to the 1985 game,
and ifhe doesn’t run around celebrat-

ing that day, well, no

particular misery
comes across either.
What happened
there, the San Fran-°
cisco 49ers clubbing
the Dolphins 38-16,



Marino to bear.
Everybody who

DAN MARINO |
. wanted to makea.

louder case for some other quarter-

back as the greatest ever — say, Terry
- Bradshaw or Joe Montanaor Tom
: Brady — would simply j jump up and

point to the rout in old Stanford Sta

dium i in Palo Alto, Calif. —
DOWN BUT NOT OUT

That was the thing about Marino.
He never thought he was beaten. Even —

when the 49ers kept whaling on the
Dolphins on that foggy day in north-
ern California, Marino never ‘shouent
that he was whipped.

“T remember the whole second half ~
seemed like fog,” Marino said now, on ©

his way as a TV commentator to this |
week’s endless pre-Super Bowl meet-
ings. “It was hard to see from one end
of the field to another. But I’ve always
hhad the same feeling when I flash
back, and that is: It might have been
different if we’d played again.
“They had the best defense in the

league, and we'd have adjusted some -

things both offensively and defen-
- Sively. I'd love to have played the
49ers a best two-out-of-three.”
Marino was down, four times on
sacks that day, but he wouldn’t stay
down. The 49ers intercepted him
twice, and he kept pegging. He came

out with 318 yards and the unshakable

- belief that the Dolphins could have ,

- won, should have won, if only some-
body had disabled the game clock.

Marino sees maybe 10 times as

‘much chaos swirling around the Bears
and the Colts now.
_ “There’s no doubt it affects how
you think during the week,” he said.
“But when the game starts, it’s just ~
a game. It’s past the hype, and it’s a
game like always. It’s the biggest
game of your life, but I don’t think
Iwas especially nervous or eye: 2

FEARLESS IN THE POCKET

Pairing off against Montana didn’t
faze Marino. He respected Montana.
He just wasn’t scared, or shaky, any-
thing like that. It was like Don Strock
always said: “The best thing about
Marino is, he’s not afraid to lose.”

Besides, there was nothing Marino
could do about the 49ers’ offense.
They were coming at young Miami
players,.such as linebackers Jay Bro-

_ phy and Mark Brown, using just about
everybody on the defense as clay
pigeons from time to time.

That’s what it was like for Montana
— shooting skeet. For Marino, every

_ pass was an effort.

People forget a little back story
about Montana and Marino. Easy Hall
of Famers? No question. But neither
came in as a superstar — Montana in
the third round of the ’79 draft, Mar-
ino barely at the tail end of the ’83 first
round — 27th, actually.

Marino arrived in Miami in the last

season of poor, doomed David Wood- |

ley. Woodley would die at age 44; -
died from life, is the only way I could
describe it, and the Super Bowl was
just another hard bit and piece of that
life. Woodley took the Dolphins all
the way to the 17th Super Bowl, only
to get tagged by the Redskins.

Marino and Montana had one thing
in common. Neither would internalize
much, Neither was a big talker. So
don’t expect Marino to pour out his
aching heart about the one Super
Bowl chance that got away, while
Montana made all four of his stick.

Instead, Marino simply says:
“Would I trade my 17 seasons for one
Super Bowl championship? No way.”

was hard history for

Arenas, Wizards punish Pistons

BY JOSEPH WHITE
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Gilbert Are-
nas had 36 points, ll assists and
seven rebounds Tuesday night as
the Washington Wizards beat the
Detroit Pistons 104-99 in a midsea-
son, first-place showdown — a tri-
umph that was tempered by a knee
injury to Antawn Jamison.

The victory kept the Wizards
ahead of the Pistons
atop the NBA’s Eastern
Conference and gave
the teams a 2-2 split in
the season series, level-
ing the first tiebreaker
should they finish the regular sea-
son with the same record. The
Wizards beat the Pistons twice in
five days, having won 99-96 on the
road last week.

Jamison sprained his left knee
after colliding with teammate
DeShawn Stevenson under the bas-
ket during a fast break with 6:29 to

RAE CARRUTH

De MAA)



BY PAUL J. WEBER
Associated Press

ARLINGTON, Texas — Sammy
Sosa has a contract with the Texas
Rangers and a chance to get back
to the major leagues. Now the for-
mer slugger has to go to spring
training and earn a roster spot.

Sosa and the Rangers completed
a minor-league contract on
Tuesday. If he is added to
the major-league roster,
Sosa would get a $500,000,
one-year deal, with the
chance to earn $2.1 million
more from performance bonuses.

“I am not going to let you guys
down,” Sosa, who is 38, said during
a conference call that included
team executives. “So trust me. I’ve
got to go to spring training ready.
“I know I have to make the team.

' [I’ve heard] that about 20 times.





play in the first quarter. Jamison,
who entered the game averaging
19.7 points and 8.1 rebounds per
game, did not return to the game.
He hyperextended the same knee
against the Boston Celtics on Jan.
20, although it was not the same
knee that required surgery two
years ago.

-Jamison would be difficult to
replace if he is out for any
extended period — he,
Arenas and Caron But-
ler form the NBA’s
Ran highest-scoring trio,
averaging a combined

70 points per game —
but the Wizards persevered with-
out him Tuesday night and won for
the seventh time in eight games.

“We’ve won some games even
without Gilbert over the last year
or two,” Wizards coach Eddi Jor-
dan said. “Look at Cleveland
tonight — they killed Golden State
without LeBron [James], so things




Couns





LAWRENCE JACKSON/AP

WIZ KID: Gilbert Arenas, right,
had 36 points, 11 assists and
seven rebounds Tuesday night.

like that happen in the league.
“You can withstand it for a cou-

ple of games, but in the long run

you eventually wear down.” ~

The Wizards shot 61 percent in
the first quarter, led by 19 points
midway through the second, then
held off the Pistons after Detroit
pulled within single digits in the
fourth quarter. Arenas, who scored
14 points in the final period, con-
verted a three-point play with 1:44
to play to restore a 10-point lead.

The Pistons made one final
push, largely because of the Wiz-
ards’ three missed free throws in
the final 30 seconds, but Tayshaun
Prince then missed a 3-pointer that
would have cut the lead to two.

Stevenson, picking up the slack
for Jamison, scored 15 points on
7-for-8 shooting. Butler finished
with 13 points.

Chauncey Billups scored
24 points, Prince had 19 points, and
Richard Hamilton and Rasheed
Wallace finished with 15 apiece for
the Pistons, who outshot the Wiz-
ards 52 percent to 49 percent.

e MORE BASKETBALL

TANK JOHNSON

Players try to leave their aggression on the fi oy ,

“BY BRIAN COSTA |
bcosta@MiamiHerald.com &
- The Chicago Bears arrived
_ attheir suburban practice __
complex one day this month
and found a large sign planted
in front of the driveway.

“Play angry,” the sign read,
urging the Bears to summon
their wrath for a playoff game

against the Seattle Seahawks.
. For the sake of defensive
tackle Tank Johnson, the Bears

might have done well to add a
second sign for players to see
on their drive back to the real —
world: “Now play nice.”
Johnson was arrested twice
last year, first for reportedly -
threatening a police officer and _
then on gun charges. He joined.
asmall but steady group of ~
NFL players whose aggression
becomes as destructive off the
field as it can be helpful on it.
Such off-field problems are

BASEBALL | TEXAS RANGERS

Sosa, back with Rangers, is looking for a break

“I wanted to come back in 2006,
but I was beaten mentally,” Sosa
said. “I’m fresh. I’m relaxed. I’ve
got my game face again, and I feel
great. My body’s in shape. I’m
ready to go.”

Sosa said his chance of failing to
be added to the big-league roster
was “one in a million.”

“Believe me, I’m going to
make that team,” he said.
Sosa, who began his
career with the Rangers,
hasn’t played in the major
leagues since 2005, with the
Baltimore Orioles.

“For me. this is about giving an
opportunity to a guy who has done
a lot for the game over the last 10,
15 years,” Rangers general manager
Jon Daniels said. “What really
came across to us was that Sammy
wanted an opportunity, in-the true



“JIM McISAAC/GETTY IMAGES

IT’S BEEN A WHILE: Sammy Sosa
last played in the major leagues
in ’O5, with the Orioles (above).

sense of the word, to prove him-
self. He still thinks he has some-
thing left to give and wants to
prove it to the industry, to

not necessarily related to. the”
violence that comes with the _
job.Butthe basiccourseof |
events, particularly with defen-

sive players, isoftenthesame. —}

A player gets mad. A player —
hits somebody. In one case,it >
ends with a congratulatory slap_

_ in the rear. In the other, it ends

with handcuffs being slapped
on. his wrists.

“TURN TO SUPER BOWL



the Rangers, to himself.”

Sosa is fifth on the career home-
run list, with 588, and has 1,575
RBIs. Like Mark McGwire, Sosa is
suspected by some of having using
steroids before the drugs were
banned by baseball after the 2002
season.

When Sosa, a seven-time All-
Star, last played in 2005, he batted
only .221, with 14 homers and
45 RBIs in 102 games for Baltimore.

During spring training that year,
Sosa was one of several players
who testified before a congres-
sional committee looking into ste-
roid use in professional baseball.

“There’s a lot of speculation,
but no evidence,” Sosa said. “I am
not going to go to every fan’s home
and knock on the door and say to
them: ‘Believe in me.’

“This is not my style.”





4E | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007



Lakers fall

From Miami Herald Wire Services

NEW YORK — Playing without the sus-
pended Kobe Bryant, the Los Angeles Lakers’

late rally fell short in their season-high third —

consecutive loss, 99-94 to the New York
Knicks on Tuesday night

Eddy Curry had 27 points and nine
rebounds and Stephon Marbury scored 22
points for the Knicks, who led most of the
game but never pulled away. David Lee
grabbed 13 rebounds and Jamal Crawford
added 17 points.

Bryant was penalized one game without
pay earlier Tuesday for hitting San Antonio’s
Manu Ginobili in the face late in the Lakers’
overtime loss to the Spurs on Sunday.

Without his 28.4 points per game, the Lak-
ers shot only 43.5 percent and lost for the
fourth time in five games.

HEAT 110, BUCKS 80

MIAMI — Dwyane Wade scored 28
points and the Heat beat the Bucks to snap a
three-game losing streak.

_ Wade played only three quarters and shot
12-of-17 from the field, and Michael Doleac
had his first double-double of the season
with 11 points and ll rebounds for Miami.

Charlie Villanueva scored 17 points to
lead the Bucks, who have lost six of seven.

The Heat, playing without injured starters
Shaquille O’Neal (calf) and Jason Williams
(foot), never trailed after Wade’s 10 points
keyed a 17-4 run to build a 25-12 lead with
4:23 remaining in the first quarter.

PACERS 103, CELTICS 96

INDIANAPOLIS — Jamaal Tinsley scored
a season-high 28 points as the Pacers handed
the Celtics their 12th consecutive loss.

Jermaine O’Neal added 25 points and
eight rebounds for the Pacers, who won for
the fourth time in five games.

Notre Dame airs it out, thumps Syracuse

From Miami Herald Wire Services

INTERNATIONAL EDITION



BASKETBALL | HOCKEY

PRO BASKETBALL

JULIE JACOBSON/AP

AN INSIDE STRUGGLE: Knicks forward
Channing Frye takes it to, the basket °
against Lakers center Andrew Bynum.

CAVALIERS 124, WARRIORS 97

CLEVELAND — Sasha Pavlovic scored a
career-high 24 points filling in for the injured
LeBron James (sprained toe) and the Cava-
liers rolled without their superstar.

Donyell Marshall added 15 points, Zydru-
nas Ilgauskas had 14 with 10 rebounds and
Cleveland snapped a three-game losing
streak at home while getting eight Players in
double figures for the first time since April
22, 1994.

MAVERICKS 122, SUPERSONICS 102

DALLAS — Austin Croshere had a career-
high 34 points and seven rebounds as the
Mavericks beat the SuperSonics, stretching



MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD *



short without Kobe

their home winning streak to 14 games.

row.

ELSEWHERE
e Grizzlies:

with a new team on Thursday.

contract.

‘travel with the team Tuesday.

month to test his sprained right ankle.
e Mavericks:

was expected to rejoin the team today. ~

.LATE MONDAY

that lifted New Jersey, ending a trip that
started miserably with consecutive victories.
e Bobcats 105, Nuggets 101: Gerald

NBA STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE





N.Y, 99, Lakers 94
Dallas 122, Seattle 102

* Hou. 105, Phi. 84
Char. 105, Den. 101
NJ. 116, Utah 115

L.A.L. at Bos., 7:30

Det. at NJ., 7:30

Dall. at Mem., 8

Phi. vs. N.O. at Ok. City, 8
Sea. at Hou., 8:30

|
| SOUTHEAST WL Pct, GB 110 Str, Home Away Conf
Ww g 27 17~— 614-73 W-3 18-4. 9-13 19-9
; Orlando 23 22) «S11 4% «22-8 «=L-3) 14-9 = 9-13-:13-13
i Miami 20 25 444 7% 4-6 W-1 11-10 9-15 9-14
' Atlanta 16 27 .372 10% 6-4 W-l 8-12 815 11-18
: i Charlotte 16 28 .364 11 5-5 W-1 8-14 8-14 11-17.
; : : aes
Jason Terty.s. 1) P pe Greg Buckner > | ATLANTIC WL Pct. GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf -<
season-best 7 and Devin Harris 16 helped es Raastcnt ae ee es oat a oe a Pera Ts
the Mavericks set a season high for points Toronto. = «2223: 489-73 B16 159
and beat the Sonics for the ninth time in a New York 20 27 426 3 «4-6 Wel 12-13. 8-14 12-17.
Philadelphia 14 32 .304 8% 4-6 L-1 7-11 7-21 10-17 <'
Boston 12 32 .273 9% 0-10 L-12 4-17 8-15
Th lub ived d CENTRAL WL. Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
e-club waived guar ee fp ee ee
Eddie Jones after agreeing to a buyout of his Chicago 26 19 578 - 6-4 W-3 20-6 6-13 20-8
contract. Jones was believed to be consider- Cleveland 26 19 578 =- «46 Wel 16-6 10-13 16-12
ing signing with several teams, including the ee em i re s 38 ye ee ty a
Miami Heat, for whom he played before
being traded to Memphis prior to the |
2005-06 season. He will be eligible to sign | WESTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHWEST WL. Pet. GB L10 Str. Home Away, Conf
‘The Grizzlies replaced him on the roster | Dallas 37.9 804 - 91 W-2 21-3 16-6 25-6
by signing guard Will Conroy to a 10-day San Antonio 32 14 696 5 7-3 W-2 168 16-6 21-9
Houston 28 16 636 «8 7-3 W-3 15-5 13-11 15-14
: F New Orleans 19 25 .432 17 7-3 W-3 13-10 6-15 10-17
_@ Nuggets: Guard Allen Iverson will Memphis 12 34 .261 25° 3-7 Wel 914 3-20 6-21
miss tonight’s game against the Trail Blazers :
in Portland after spraining his right ankle. NORTHWEST WL Pet. GB 110 Str, Home Away Conf
Iverson was hurt in the Nuggets’ 105-101 loss Utah 29 17 «630 ~- 5-5 L-2 (16-6 13-11 18-10
tothe Charlotte Bobcats on Monday night in | Pit, SM 5 55 C3 kn ine ou
Denver. The Nuggets said Iverson did not Portland 19 27 413 10 5-5 Ll 11-12 815 12-15
Seattle 17 28 «378 11% 4-6 L-2 13-11 4-17 7-18
e Hornets: Point guard Chris Paul
returned to practice for the first time in a PACIFIC. __W' iL. Pet. GB 10" Str. Home (Away Conf
Phoenix 36 9 800 - 9-1 L-l 19-3 17-6 168
F d h H d L.A. Lakers 27 18 600 9 46 L-3 19-6 8-12 17-10
: orward Jos owar LA. Clippers 22 22 .50013% 7-3 W-1 16-8 6-14 14-17
missed Tuesday’s game against the Super- Golden State 21 24 467 15 3-7 L-l 17-8 4-16 13-15
Sonics for the birth of his first child. Howard Sacramento 17 26 «4.395 18 3-7 L-3 12-11 5-15 8-18
i RESULTS AND SCHEDULES
Tuesday’s results Tonight’s games Monday’s results
“VU; Miami 110, Mil. 80 Mil. at Orl., 7 Atl. 93, Orl. 83
e Nets 116, Jazz 115: Vince Carter beat Indiana 103, Boston 96 GS. at Atl., 7 Mem. 124, Sac. 117
the buzzer and host Utah with a 3-pointer Wash. 104, Detroit 99 Was. at Tor., 7 Minn. 121, Pho. 112
Cleveland 124, G.S. 97 N.Y. at Cha., 7 N.O. 103, Por. 91
i
}

Wallace scored 25 points and had a key block
of Carmelo Anthony in the final minute to
lead visiting Charlotte.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Luke Harangody had 21 points and
13 rebounds, and No. 21 Notre Dame
beat host Syracuse 103-91 on Tuesday
night behind an impressive display of
3-point shooting.

Notre Dame (18-4, 6-3 Big East)
won for the first time in four confer-
ence road games and halted a three-
game losing streak against the reeling
Orange (15-7, 4-4).

Syracuse lost its third consecutive
game.

The Irish missed their first ihre

3-pointers, but it didn’t take them
long to find the range.

Notre Dame went 10-for-14 on 3s
for the rest of the opening half, with
Russell Carter and Colin Falls each
hitting four, and most were wide-
open looks against the defenseless
Orange.

Notre Dame scored 18 points off 10
Orange turnovers in the half and left
the floor with a 61-42 lead, just five
points off the team record set against

Ball State in 1964 and matched in 1986
against Miami.

It also was just four points off the
all-time record for points given up in
a half by the Orange.

Syracuse gave up 65 points in the
second half in a 97-85 loss to Navy in
March 1986 and hadn’t given up 60
points in the first half of a game since
1988.

Carter finished with 18 points and
Falls had 16 before touling out in the
closing minutes, while Zach Hilles-
land had 14 points, nine rebounds and
six assists, and Tory Jackson added 19
points and seven assists.

Demetris Nichols had 29 points to
lead Syracuse, Terrence Roberts had
20 points and six rebounds, and Dar-
ryl Watkins had 10 points and six
rebounds before fouling out in the
final two minutes.

_Eric Devendorf, who had led Syra-
cuse in scoring in five of seven con-

ference games, did not score, missing .

all 11 shots he took.

NHL STANDINGS |

EASTERN CONFERENCE





KEVIN RIVOLI/AP

BOARD WORK: Notre Dame’s Luke
Harangody outlasts Syracuse’s
Darryl Watkins for a rebound.

OTHER GAMES

e Florida State 96, Maryland
79: Al Thornton scored 27 points and
Jason Rich added a career-high 24
points to lead the host Seminoles.

Florida State (16-6, 4-4 Atlantic
Coast Conference) made 30 of its
first 43 shots to maintain a double-
digit lead for most of the second half

as it evened its ACC record halfway
through the conference schedule
after an 0-3 start.

Maryland (16-6, 2-5) was led by

'. James Gist’s 23 points. Greivis Vas-

quez added 13 and Ekene Ibekwe had
10. Gist made 10 of his 14 field- “goal
attempts.

e Wake Forest 85, Georgia
Tech 75: Kyle Visser scored 26
points and host Wake Forest got key
points from free throws down the

‘stretch in the victory.

Harvey Hale added 19 points and
freshman Ishmael Smith had 10
points for the Demon Deacons (14-7,

3-5 Atlantic Coast Conference), who ,

snapped a six-game losing streak.

Jeremis Smith and Ra’Sean Dickey
scored 14 points each for the Yellow
Jackets (9-12, 1-8), who suffered their
17th consecutive road loss and fourth
in a row overall. ;

e UNLV 76, Colorado State
59: Wink Adams scored 17 points
and Kevin Kruger returned from a



HOCKEY

S.A. at Utah, 9
Sac. at Min., 9

Den. at Por., 10
Chi. at L.A.C., 10:30

three-week absence to help visiting
UNLV race past Colorado State.
Wendell White added 16 points for

the Rebels (19-4, 6-2), who moved

into a first-place tie with 17th-ranked

Air Force in the Mountain West |

standings.
Stephan Gilling’s 13 points led Cols
orado State (14-6, 4-4).

LATE MONDAY

e No. 6 Kansas 76, Nebraska‘. -

56: Brandon Rush scored 20 points, , - . -

Julian Wright added 17, and visiting:

_Kansas used a 27-0 run in the first

half to trigger a blowout.

The Jayhawks (19-3, 6-1 Big 12)
won fér the 13th time in their past 14
games.

Their 16th victory in 17 meetings
with Nebraska gave them a half-game
lead over Texas A&M and Texas in
the conference. The Cornhuskers

(12-8, 1-5) lost their third game in a:

row. Ryan Anderson led Nebraska
with 19 points.

B21. tah









e ©
SOUTHEAST: Wb OL SERTS, GE". GAT) HOME |. AWAY... DIV \) \ l I | QS rall y p Ast | S | dad i | ders l fl | () | ee:
Atlanta 29-16 6 2 66165 160 14-7-3-1 15-9-3-1 12-4-4-1 | : eek
Carolina 26 21 2 4 58163 168 14-9-0-3 12-12-2-1 13-5-0-2_ th
TampaBay 27 23 1 1 56165 163 12-13-0-0 15:10-1-1 11-7-0-0 |
Washington 21 23 2 5 49 160 180 12-11-1-2 9-12-1-3 8-10-1-1 | From Miami Herald Wire Services Kaberle had an empty-net goal and an
poids Le aes Sy Oly ae Aah tee 2 ga ea, eee mee adeno UNIONDALE, N.Y. — Henrik Zetter- assist and Andrew Raycroft stopped 28
ATLANTIC WoL GA _ HOME AWAY piv | berg capped Detroit’s big rally by scoring shots for the Maple Leafs, who kept Caro-
New Jersey 30 15 0 6 66 134 0 Ww 110-2 12.4.0] | at 2:57 of overtime and giving the Red lina scoreless in the final two periods.
Pittsburgh 24 17 153 -13-8-2-211-9-1-3.-13-5-1-1 Wings a 4-3 victory over the New York
N.Y. Rangers 25 21 149 10-10-3-0 15-11-0-1 9-9-0-0 | Ys]anders on Tuesday night. PENGUINS 3, PANTHERS O
Pivladclohic 3 g is eee ee on Detroit, which hasn’t been shut out this PITTSBURGH — Marc-Andre Fleury
| season, trailed 3-0 at the start of the third stopped 32 shots, and the Penguins ended
NORTHEAST WL OLSSLPTS GF "GA HOME -_AWAY DIV | period:but quickly erased that deficit: and a nearly five-year home losing streak
Buffalo 34140202 «72:197 152 17-7-1-1‘17-7-1-1_—10-8-1-1_— “set the stage for Zetterberg’s winner. against the Panthers.
ee 3 a ; ? a He io tevin nee ieeka Nicklas Lidstrom gloved down a Michel Ouellet, Dominic Moore and
Toronto 24212 «4 54167 170 .11-12-1-2 13-9-1-2 9-8-2-2. . deflected puck on a rush and passed it to Ryan Whitney scored for Pittsburgh,
Boston 22 23 1 «3 48 139 186 14-10-0-2 8-13-1-1 10-11-0-1 Zetterberg, who had the entire left side of which won its fourth in a row and sixth in
_ the net to fire his wrist shot into. seven games. Sidney Crosby extended his
WESTERN CONFERENCE Tomas Holmstrom, Niklas Kronwall point streak to seven games (4 goals, 10
CENTRAL WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME _AWAY DV and Dan Cleary also scored for Detroit, assists) by helping set up Whitney’s ninth
Nasiwile” 36 1b 2 Lae 18s a 1d bdo) 17a, |. Which got 16 saves from Dominik Hasek. goal of the season.
Detroit 32 14 3 3 70157 124 1831-2 14-11-2-1—11-3-1-1 Mike Sillinger, Shawn Bates and Jason
St Lous 20 23 4 4 48130 159 101321 101023 71122 | Blake had goals for the Islanders, who SENATORS 3, CAPITALS 2
olumbus 45 126 153 : -15-1-1 7-11-0-2, . ‘ : as ‘
Chicago 18 25 2 5 43 24 186 MIBL2 213 9.1210 ae iijfour consecutive eames JIM MCISAAC/GETTY IMAGES wits i neainaeer ede one
NORTHWEST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME _ AWAY DIV | NO HOLDING BACK: Sean Hill (6) of the _ to lead the Senators over the Capitals.
Vancouver 28 19 1 2 69129 126 1681-0 1211-02 910-01 _ ?HRASHERS 5, DEVILS 4 (SO) Islanders lays into Josh Langfeld of Heatley gave Ottawa its second two-
oa a is : = a ae ne A aS i ATLANTA — Marian Hossa delivered the Red Wings on Tuesday night. goal lead 10:31 into the second, scoring on
Colorado 2% 212 «2 54157 147. 14-10-1-2 1l-l1-1-0 9-5-1-0 the decisive goal in a shootout as the _ a power play less than a minute and a half .
Edmonton 24 22 2 #2 52136 146 i5-10-1-1 9-12-1-1 8-10-1-0 Thrashers edged the Devils in a matchup SABRES 7, BRUINS 1 after Washington cut the lead to 2-1 on
| of division leaders. BUFFALO, N.Y. — Daniel Briere net- Alexander Ovechkin’s 4-on-4 goal.
Wb OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV The Thrashers ended a slump with ted his second career hat trick, and Jason Ovechkin took over the league lead with
31 i2 2 é He an 131 ir x a aes Hk three power-play goals, including two by Pominville and Thomas Vanek added a __ his 32nd goal.
29 19 0 2 60133 124 15-8-0-1 \14-11-0-1 136-00 | - Ilya Kovalchuk. goal and an assist each to give the Sabres
23 25 1 1 48140 175 12-11-1-0 11-14-0-1 = 7-12-1-1 Atlanta earned its fourth consecutive _ the victory. ELSEWHERE
Los Angeles 17 29 3-3 40 144 188 11-12-33 6-17-00 6-14-0-2 home victory over New Jersey, which has Chris Drury and Paul Gaustad also e Stars: The club activated center

Mike Modano from injured reserve, and
he was expected to play in the team’s
game late Tuesday night at San Jose after
being sidelined for nearly two months.

e Bruins: The team recalled center
David Krejci from Providence of the AHL,
and placed forward Jeff Hoggan on waiv-
ers. If Hoggan clears waivers, he’ll be
assigned to Providence.

e Canucks: Center Ryan Kesler

scored for the Sabres, who snapped a sea-
son-high, three-game regulation losing
streak by beating the Bruins for the sixth
consecutive time at home. Maxim Afino-
genov posted three assists for Buffalo,
which went 6-7-1 in January.

MAPLE LEAFS 4, HURRICANES 1

RALEIGH, N.C. — Nik Antropov
scored two goals in the third period to

lost two in a row overall.

LIGHTNING 4, FLYERS 3 (SO)

PHILADELPHIA — Vincent Lecava-
lier scored in regulation and then added a
goal in the shootout as the Lightning
extended Philadelphia’s franchise-worst
home losing streak to 1.
| Martin St. Louis and Ruslan Fedotenko
| also scored for the Lightning, who have
| won six road games in a row. Brad Rich- lead the Maple Leafs to the victory. underwent successful hip surgery in Col-

ards also scored in the 2-0 shootout. Bates Battaglia also scored, Tomas _orado and might return for the playoffs.

j

Note: Two points for a win, one point for a tie and overtime loss
RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Tonight’s games

Toronto at N.Y. Rangers, late
Phoenix at Anaheim, late
Columbus at Edmonton, late

Monday’s results

N.Y. Rangers 6, Boston 1 |
Montreal 3, Ottawa 1 |

Tuesday’s results

Pittsburgh 3, Florida 0
Buffalo 7, Boston 1
Toronto 4, Carolina 1
Atlanta 5, NJ. 4 (SO)
Tampa Bay 4, Phil. 3 (SO)
Ottawa 3, Washington 2
Detroit 4, Islanders 3 (OT)
Minnesota 5, St. Louis 2
Colorado 4, Nashville 3
LA. at Calgary, late
Columbus at Vanc., late
Dallas at San Jose, late



THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com 0



oday is the first day fans can flock to the
Miami Beach Convention Center media
headquarters and watch broadcasts

of the NFL Network and Radio Row from

a “special viewing area.”

It’s free, although no autographs will be
available. The event is designed for people
whose dream is to be herded cattle-like into
a special pen and see Rich Eisen
much less clearly than they
would on TV, or to find out for



Herald columnist Dan Le Ba-
tard do his radio show is, in
some ways, even more annoy- .
ing than merely hearing him.
Radio Row traditionally is

considered the saddest of all
Super Bow] phenomena, in
which talking heads from about 90 stations
from across the Unite States and their boring
guests chatter about the Super Bowl nonstop.
Not a lot of people know that a recent mental-
health study cited Radio Row as a major cause
for the previously unexplained spike in winter
suicides.

e Quick synopsis of Tuesday’s Media
Day at the stadium: A Mexican TV
woman dressed like a hooker; a
guy with a hand puppet that asked
questions; and a local radio pro-
ducer posing intentionally-inane
questions (“Who do think will be the
first player arrested!?”) in an effort to elicit
wacky sound bytes. That would be it in a nut-
shell. And I mean that literally.

e The official media party sponsored by
Broward County is tonight at horse racing’s
Gulfstream Park, where reporters will walk.a
red carpet and be treated like stars, dine on

RICH EISEN



themselves if watching Miami



GREG COTE’S

sumptuous food and clean horse stalls.

e Today begins the “Motorola Mile at
Ocean Drive” on Miami Beach, described as an
“interactive walk.” So you walk around and
look at stuff. Mostly Motorola logos.

_ @ Scheduled this morning: Something
billed-as the “Super Bowl Counterfeit Press
Conference.” Still trying to find out when the

real one will be held. The NFL will
warn fans how to identify and avoid
unlicensed league products. One
tip, for example: Be wary of hats and
T-shirts being sold beneath a big sign
that reads: FAKE MERCHANDISE!

e Ata Pro Bowl news conference today,
several AFC and NFC stars will be on hand to
discuss the Pro Bowl phenomenon, which is
that players love to be selected for reasons
related to ego and contractual bonuses but
then dream up all sorts of lame excuses (bun-
ion, fish tank needs cleaning, dog ate my play-
book) to not actually play in the game.

e@ The FedEx Air & Ground Players of the
Year will be revealed todays Air finalists are





SUPER BOWL XXXVII

BUCCANEERS 48, RAIDERS 21

e January 26, 2003
e Qualcomm Stadium, San Diego
e MVP: FS Dexter Jackson, Tampa Bay

Not showing up to play, in a figurative sense,
is one thing. Not showing up at all on the day
_ before the Super Bowl is quite another.

That is what Raiders center Barret Robbins
did to get benched for the game, kicked out of
the team hotel and become the story. of Super
Bowl XXXVII.

Even more shocking than his absence from Saturday team

meetings, though, is where he turned out to be.

-Robbins reportedly spent part of the day drinking in Tijuana,
_ Mexico, and he was seen later at a San Diego bar.



e wild, weird,
wacky and
wondrous of past |
Super Bowls

more sympathy than snickering.

disorder and alcohol abuse.

When asked the next day why Robbins was absent, Raiders
teammate Mo Collins quipped, “Too much bad tequila.”



. Aventura
Aventura Towne Center
(305) 466-4555

Coral Springs .
2812 N. University Drive
(954) 752-1551

Hollywood
2914 Oakwood Blvd.
(954) 921-5330

Lauderdale Lakes

2878 North State Road 7
(954) 731-1220

We accept most vision plans.

Call 1-800-YES-EYES for a location near you or visit pearlevision.com.

AARP

Members

Buy One,
Get One

Miami Lakes
18610 N.W. 67th Ave.
(305) 474-0433

Miami
Kendall Shopping Center
(305) 271-3199

Miami
8231 South Dixie Highway
(305) 665-8660

CAVA (sr-1 4
ew Look

Miami
7901 Biscayne Blvd.
(305) 754-5144

~ Miramar
The Fountains of Miramar
(954) 437-9733

Pompano Beach
2240 N. Federal Hwy.
(954) 943-0053

Weston

Waterway Shoppes
(954) 217-3991

PEARLE ISON

Save

Super Bowl witha

But it was far more serious than that.
Robbins had a history of depression and had
a major breakdown before the Super Bowl.
Witnesses who saw Robbins at one bar said he
was crying and muttering to himself.

By the time he returned to the team hotel on
Saturday night, the Pro Bowl center was sald to
be incoherent. Benched by Raiders coach Bill
Callahan, Robbins spent the day of the game.in
a local hospital, where he reportedly was
treated for alcohol poisoning.

After the game, Robbins became a target of
criticism from his teammates and.a subject of
public ridicule. But, over time, his story drew

Robbins spent a month in a treatment center for bipolar

His story took another bizarre twist in 2005 when he was shot
and wounded during a cenfrontation with Miami Beach police.







INTERNATIONAL EDITION WEDNESDAY, JA

PRO FOOTBALL | SUPER BOWL XL!

Drew Brees, Peyton Manning and Carson
Palmer; ground nominees are Frank Gore,
Larry Johnson and LaDainian Tomlinson.
(Aside to Frank and Larry: Sleep in).

e@ The Motorola Coach of the Year also will
be named today, from among Eric Mangini
(Jets), Sean Payton (Saints) and Andy Reid
(Eagles). The winner is expected to call the
honor the biggest thrill of his career... other
than taking an interactive walk on the Motor-
ola Mile at Ocean Drive.

e Some lucky fans will play PlayStation 3
against Playboy Playmates today at the South
Seas Hotel on Collins Ave. Oddsmakers call '
the Playmates heavy favorites — because they

won't be staring at your cleavage while playing.

Smirk is invited to attend a private Sony cock-
tail reception this evening featuring Playmates
Deanna Brooks (May 1998), Alison Waite
(May 2006) and Sara Jean Underwood (July
2006), but Smirk must regrettably decline
because the event fails to meet Smirk’s long-
standing Four Bunny Minimum policy. -

e “A Super Bowl Tribute to Black History




WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007 | 5B

Month” is tonight at Miami-Dade County ,
Auditorium. What’s weird about that is, to our
knowledge, there are no blacks in the NFL.

e The NFL Global Junior Championships
run all day today, with youth football teams
from the United States, Canada, Japan, France,
Mexico and Panama. The Americans are
heavily favored. Cannot confirm speculation
that, in the name of fair play and to give the
other nations a sporting chance, the U.S. team
will be quarterbacked by Rex Grossman.

e Prince, the Super Bow] halftime per-
former, plays the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino

_tonight. To avoid fans and paparazzi, the elf-

like, bantam singer is to be transported from
his limousine to the stage in a shoe box.

e “Bud Bowl 2007” is today, featuring Latin
singel guest disc jockeys and the Budweiser
Clydesdales. Of those three groups, the Clydes-
dales are most likely to be the ones dropping
enormous, fetid loads. Security personnel at
this event have been warned to look out for,:
and repel at the door, that donkey who
dreamed of being a Clydesdale. The donkey
did not realize that was only a television com-
mercial (he’s a donkey!) and has since become
a persisting nuisance — what an Anheuser-
Busch spokesman called “a real ass.”



6 P.M. EST SUNDAY, FEB. 4, 2007
DOLPHIN STADIUM ® ON TV: CBS







- BRIAN COSTA



Motorized Awnings
.also available!

oo mn "OconstagS
\ ee

Good Housekeeping

Pi a
Recurrent SS





AWNINGS

Enjoy Instant Shade & Comfort
All Summer and SAVE $200!

Keeping your deck or patio cool and
comfortable this summer just got a LOT
more affordable! Because if you act
now you can get a $200 Discount
Certificate, good toward any SunSetter
Retractable Lateral Arm Awning —
America’s #1 best-selling awning. For
as little as $398, you can add a gor-
geous SunSetter Awning to your home
and enjoy the outdoors so much more!

A SunSetter keeps your deck about
20 degrees cooler. It opens and closes
in under 60 seconds, providing instant
protection against hot sun, light show-
ers, and 99% of harmful UV rays. With
a SunSetter, you'll never have to worry

about the weather ruining your outdoor
plans again. And now, with your $200
Discount Certificate, you can own a
SunSetter for as little as $398! Enjoy _
your deck or patio EVERY day this sum-
mer — and save $200, too! Call today
and take advantage of this special
awning sale now.

Call Toll Free for a FREE brochure,
DVD and $200 Discount Certificate:

1-800-876-8060

Ext. 12554
You can also email your name and
mailing address to:
freedvd@sunsetter.com







Free

On Eyeglasses
(up to $200)

Buy a complete pair (frame and lenses) at
regular price and receive a free complete

pair ~ same prescription, valued up to $200.
First pair must be of equal or greater value to
free pair. Cannot be combined with any other
offer, previous purchases, most insurance
programs, readers or non-prescription sunglasses.
Valid prescription required. Accessories are
additional on both pairs. Certain brands
excluded. Valid at participating locations.
Some restrictions may apply. Savings applied
to lenses. Offer ends 2/24/07.

Save 30”

On ALL Eyeglasses

| or RxSunglasses

Must be a current AARP member to receive
discount off regular price. Valid on multiple
pairs. Both frame and lenses purchase required
Cannot be combined with other coupons,
discounts, offers, previous purchases, most
insurance programs or readers. Void where
prohibited. Offer subject to change without
notice. Certain frames excluded. Valid
prescription required. See store for details
Provided by EyeMed Vision Care"

AARP iso"
Aaa oe

Vision Discounts

On Eyeglasses
or RxSunglasses

Valid on multiple pairs. Complete pair
(frame and lenses) purchase required, Cannot
be combined with any other offer, previous
purchases, most insurance programs, readers
or non-prescription sunglasses. Discount off
regular prices. Valid prescription required. Valid
at participating locations. Some restrictions may
apply. Accessories are additional. Savings
applied to lenses. Offer ends 2/24/07.

©2007. Pearle, Inc. All Rights Reserved.





1-800-876-8060, Ext. 12554
freedvd@sunsetter.com

I
Street, Malden, MA 02148 i
i









(iy YES, please rush me a FREE Brochure & DVD on
SunSetter Retractable Awnings, plus my $200 Discount Certificate.
Mail to: SunSetter Products, Dept. 12554, 184 Charles
NAME as _
ADDRESS _
City ST. ZIP
EMAIL a



(Be sure to include your email to receive our best deals!





6E | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

SOCCER | PRO FOOTBALL | ETC.

MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD



SOCCER

Ronaldo transfer goes through ——

_ ELSEWHERE

From Miami Herald Wire Services

MILAN, Italy — Ronaldo’s
farewell to Real Madrid didn’t
include any fond words for
coach Fabio Capello.

Ronaldo, the World Cup’s
all-time leading scorer, left
Madrid for AC Milan on Tues-
day, returning to Italy’s Serie
A for a reported $9.73 million
transfer fee. The 30-year-old
Brazil striker will join Milan
until 2008 — the same length
as the remainder of his con-
tract at Madrid.

“My heart’s breaking, but
life goes on,” Ronaldo told
reporters in Madrid. “I’m a

great Madrid fan. I’m not so

sure about the coach.”

“I know that Ronaldo is
Milan’s,” Capello said. “I wish
him good luck, that he does
what he used to be able to do
— that is, be a great player.”

Ronaldo hasn’t been picked



PRDRO ARMESTRE/AFT-GETTY IMAGES

TO ITALY: Ronaldo will join
AC Milan, at least fora year.

to play by Capello since a Jan.
7 loss at Deportivo La Coruna.

Ronaldo’s departure marks
the end of Madrid’s project of
signing the world’s best play-
ers — who earned the nick-

‘name “Galacticos.”

e Premier League: Liver-
pool increased West Ham’s
relegation worries with a 2-0
victory in the English Premier
League on Tuesday. Dirk Kuyt
and Peter Crouch scored at
Upton Park to move the team
to 49 points — eight points
behind league leader Man-
chester United and two points
back from Chelsea, who both
have games today....

American defender Oguchi
Onyewu joined Newcastle on
loan in a move that will keep
him in the Premier League for
at least the rest of the season.
Onyewu, 24, leaves the Bel-
gian team Standard Liege after
scoring eight goals in 93 games
since joining in 2004. He pre-
viously played for French
team Metz and Belgian side La
Louviere.

e German

League:

' Defending champion Bayern

Munich suffered its second

‘consecutive setback in a 0-0

draw at home against lowly
Bochum and dropped to
fourth place in the Bundesliga
standings on Tuesday. Beaten
3-2 at Dortmund on Friday,

‘Bayern could lose more

ground when the 19th round is
completed today..

e Gulf Cup: The United
Arab Emirates won the Gulf
Cup on Tuesday after beating
Oman 1-0 in the final.

Ismail Matar scored in the
73rd minute off a pass from
Abdulraheem Jumaato at
the Zayed Sports City stadium
to clinch the UAE’s first
regional championship title.

Matar’s goal was his fifth in
the UAE's five games during
the tournament, winning him
awards as the highest’ scorer
and the best player.



FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

SE

co Ee











_ JOE RIMKUS JR./MIAMI HERALD STAFF

A TARGET: Bears nose tackle Tank Johnson is among a small but steady group of players with off-the-field problems.

Players wrestle with their wrath

*SUPER BOWL

“A lot of anger, depending
on the position, can be
extremely instrumental,” said
John Murray, a Palm Beach,
Fla., sports psychologist who
has worked with NFL players.
“The key is, how do you turn
that off? How do you train
somebody to be almost like a

killer on the field and then

come off the field and act
responsibly in society?”

Being a killer might be an
exaggeration, but the role of
anger and aggression in foot-
ball is not. After seeing the
“play angry” sign, which
turned out to be the work of
two fans, Bears quarterbdck
Rex Grossman said it summed
up his team’s mind-set going
into the playoffs.

Several years ago, former
Bears defensive coordinator
Greg Blache took that,
mind-set to an extreme.
Blache, who is now an assis-
tant coach with the Redskins,
rewarded a player with a bul-
let for a big defensive play.

Bennie Blades, a former
University of Miami defen-
sive back who had a 10-year
NFL career, didn’t need any
motivational ploys. Blades

said he would pretend that

- the receiver he was guarding

was someone who had made
him angry.

“Whatever troubles I had
during the week that really

[ticked] me off, instead of :

going to jail for assault, I
would take all that aggression
and literally go out there and
physically abuse the oppo-
nent,” Blades said. |

But Blades left that anger
on the field, as most players
are able to do. Some say it’s
like flipping a switch. Others
say it’s just common sense.

Dolphins linebacker Don-
nie Spragan said it’s about
self-discipline.

“You have to understand
the consequences of not com-
ing back down to normal and
how much trouble you can get
yourself into when you start
thinking you’re playing foot-
ball going against a cop,”
Spragan said. “That’s not a
good move.”

Yet, off-field aggression
has led to some high-profile
violent incidents over the past
decade. The height of public
scrutiny came after Super
Bowl XXXIV in Atlanta in
2000, when Ravens line-
backer Ray Lewis, a former

Hurricane, was charged with
double murder after a post-
Super Bowl party (he would
later plead guilty to lesser
charges). Panthers receiver
Rae Carruth was facing a
murder charge at the time.

In 2006, at least 15 players
were arrested on violence-re-
lated charges. The common
threads were domestic vio-
lence and late-night incidents
involving guns at or around
nightclubs. :

The latter is a cause and
effect of increased gun own-
ership among players. Guns
can lead to problems of their
own, such as when Bengals
receiver Chris Henry was
arrested in January 2006 after
allegedly threatening a group
of people with:a gun.

_ But many players say they
carry guns because they have
become targets, an idea that is
hardly discouraged by the
recent slaying of Broncos cor-
nerback Darrent Williams.

“There used to be a day
when you could go out with
your boys and have a good
time and not get yourself into
any trouble,” said Mark
Schlereth, an ESPN analyst
and former offensive lineman.
“You go out [now], and there



er eeeenererererenermeeerenth





SUPER BOWL XXXVI

NEW ENGLAND 20, ST. LOUIS 17

e@ Feb. 3, 2002

e Louisiana Superdome, New Orleans
e MVP: GB Tom Brady, New England

For anyone watching Super Bowl XXXVI, it
was almost impossible not to be reminded that
the game marked the first Super Bowl since the
Sept. ll attacks. There were televised greetings

from U.S. troops in Afghanistan, a “Tribute to

America” pregame show and a segment with

former NFL players reading the Declaration of Independence.
But the most poignant and memorable reminder of all came

during a halftime show by U2.

After a heart-shaped stage was wheeled onto the field, the
lrish rock band performed Beautiful Day and MLK. Then, as the
band performed its final song, Where the Streets Have No Name,

The wild, weird,
_ wacky and
wondrous of past
Super Bowls

SUPER
Eee
| MEMORIES



the game.

wea

COUNTDOWN TO SUPER BOWL XLI (fae

is ultimately going to be
somebody there who is going
to say, ‘Hey, that’s my golden
ticket. Let’s see if I can’t get a
lawsuit or some hush-hush
money.’ ”

Domestic violence among
players is a less recent devel-
opment. Former Dolphins
safety Liffort Hobley saw the
problem during his playing
days in the early 1990s and
decided to do something
about it. He started a program
called Athletes Against
Domestic Violence to raise
awareness and prevention
around the league.

Most teams have added
player-development staffs
that help players avoid trou-
ble and make good decisions
away from football. The Bears
will look to help Johnson do
that. After his arrest on gun
charges, Johnson pledged last
month to seek counseling and
make changes in his life.

He will try to play nice. But
when he arrives at Dolphin
Stadium on Sunday, it will be
time to “play angry.”

“You know what you have
to do to be successful and
keep up your lifestyle,” Spra-
gan said. “You have to go out
there and get violent.”

‘

to Finland.







AZIZ SHAH/AP

CHILDLIKE ENTHUSIASM ‘

A young female fan from the United Arab Emirates
cheers for the UAE team at the 18th Arab Gulf Cup
final against Oman in Abu Dhabi, UAE, on Tuesday.





Extra-special invitation

Annika Sorenstam invited a talented teen-age golfer with
a rare heart condition to help launch her tournament.

Sorenstam awarded a sponsor’s exemption to 14-year-old
MacKinzie Kline for the $2.6 million Ginn Tribute in Mt.
Pleasant, S.C., hosted by Sorenstam from May 3]-June 3.

Kline, of Encinitas, Calif., is one of the top-rated juniors in
the country. She will play on the Arnold Palmer-designed
RiverTowne Country Club Course at the Belvidere Resort.

Because of her condition, Kline can’t walk long distances
without becoming fatigued. The LPGA issued a landmark rul-
ing allowing her to become the first player in the organiza-
tion’s history to ride a cart during her rounds. Kline, who also
will have oxygen at her disposal, was born without a spleen,
and her heart has only one ventricle.

LPGA Commissioner Carolyn Bivens said her group
studied Kline’s request for a cart and determined that it
wouldn’t give her an unfair competitive advantage. The
LPGA believes “it is imperative to support the participation
of all qualified players to the extent that the integrity of the

‘ competition is not affected,” she said.

Kline had heart surgery twice before she was 2. In 2005,
doctors repaired a hole in her heart and found a blood clot
above the valve of her single ventricle.

“MacKinzie is a very unique and determined young lady,
and we are thrilled to have her play in the Ginn Tribute,”
Sorenstam said. “What she has accomplished — not only in
golf but [also] for the community — is extraordinary.”

Kline qualified for the U.S. Women’s amateur but had to
decline because she couldn’t walk 18 holes.

“This is a dream come true for me,” Kline said. “I’ve
always had the dream to play on the LPGA Tour, and Annika
has made this a reality for me.

“Words cannot express my appreciation for this honor.”

Branching out Memory lives

_ Steve Yzerman will _ Gulfstream Park will start
serve as Team Canada’s a college scholarship for vet-
general manager at the ITHF erinary students in honor of
world hockey champion- Barbaro, park officials
ships in Moscow in April _ _ announced Monday, shortly
and May. — after the death of the 2006

“T really enjoyed my. Kentucky Derby Winner.
‘experiences in international The horse had strong ties
hockey,” said Yzerman, who to the Sunshine State and a

helped Canada win gold at large fan base, Gulfstream
the 2002 Olympics. “I Park spokesman Mike Mul-
enjoyed watching them as a laney said. Barbaro, who
young boy and participating was euthanized Monday

after complications from his
gruesome breakdown at last

throughout my career. Being
able to stay involved tom

is very exciting.” : year’s Preakness, secured
He’s currently a vice his Derby spot after winning
president with the Detroit the $1 million Florida Derby
Red Wings. | at Gulfstream. .
The 41-year-old Yzerman “The sacrifices of owners
‘played in three world cham- Roy and Gretchen Jack-

son, and the enormity of
their colt’s contribution to
the sport, and the courage of
all involved, have been ines-
timable,” Gulfstream Park
president Bill Murphy said.

pionships, two Olympics, a
World Cup, Canada Cup
and world junior champion-
ship.

- Canada finished fourth at
last year’s world champion-



ship in Riga, Latvia, after “The Barbaro story went
losing a bronze-medal game beyond racing. It held us all
in its grip for eight months.”



4 DAYS

TO GO.

6 P.M. EST SUNDAY, FEB. 4, 2007
DOLPHIN STADIUM. @ ON TV: CBS



the names of all the Sept. 11 attack victims
scrolled up a large screen behind the stage.

The NFL chose U2, the Super Bowl’s
first-ever halftime solo act, after seeing the
band perform in New York in October 2001. But
details of its performance were kept secret until

At anews conference éarlier in the week, U2
lead singer Bono instead talked about the New
England quarterback controversy between
Tom Brady and Drew Bledsoe.

“We are here to bring peace to Brady and
Bledsoe, to bring peace to the AFL and the

NEL,” he said. “That’s our mission.”
But, clearly, the show had a larger purpose. Toward the end,
Bono pulled open his black leather jacket to reveal its American
flag lining. It was an exclamation point on a performance that left

many fans visibly in tears.

- BRIAN COSTA



GETTY IMAGES ARCHIVES









RNATIONAL EDITION WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007 | 7



_LOOKING BACK ! THE ROAD TOMIAMI

ae

Uy

Attendance |
79,204

th ane
Marion ge
LTT) 5- Col (ge

Baltimore
~ coach:
Don McCafferty

Dallas _
coach —
Tom Landry

» National
anthem
Tommy Loy

(trumpeter) —

Halftime show.
Florida A&M Band

Cost of
30-second
commercial

moe, $55,000

Nielsen
ratings:

39,9 _ | Renee | a ae ee a Ait
pee a ‘i ae om oe . t | pages LEWE Wick AM ~
uper : ' a ane ' , ge sea ; ‘ca ‘WGa3
ticket price > (es i 16) ge Of nn Ca

HEADLINES
+ The 26th Amendment | wers the United States’
voting age from 21 tod



ye Court upholds 4 measure to bus
f ee a 4 ao re 4 ‘ety oe children-“S)=in order*to-enforce integration in schools
. : ca mF a ; : se ..» Jim Morrison, (2) lead'singer of The Doors, is found
; 4 dead in his hotel room in Paris, France
* Pentagon papers published by The New York Times impli-
cating President Richard Nixon (7)
Tere) st oO : MOVIES
wets oe a | uma a Tai * Best picture: ‘The French Connection
2 ae — - 1 : Pas es a * Top box office hits: ‘Billy Jack’ ana ‘Diamonds Are Forever’
TELEVISION
oe! Mnetens f ’ * Debut: ‘All in the Family’ (3)
zs Did You Know & i et 7 4 ‘ * Top-rated shows: ‘Marcus Welby M.D.’ and ‘Flip Wilson’
‘The game between ‘
the. champions. of the 4 aitiia Rae on MUSIC ,
AFC and NFC was - , ‘i i we : .» Hit song: Joy To The World’ - Three Dog Night
: played on artificial. i. : a + Top albums; ‘Jesus Christ Superstar ’ ~ Various Artists
- turf for the first time, sa - ; and ‘Tapestry’ - Carole King
oe HOT CAR - Dodge Challenger
POP CULTURE
_» Nike swoosh trademark is created
ae ee ; 5 ; m ° Hand-held blow-dryer is introduced
' oe Be = : ‘ “oo rok a! ie + Joe Frazier defeats Muhammad Alll in
- a5 aa : New York in their first of three bouts (4)
i . Designer Coco Chanel dies
: | SOURCES: Nielsen Media o
wlan Bi ! Research, Exhibitor
os \ Relations, Billboard,
ee / A ; . Academy: of Motion Pictures
(ack ‘ —— — Arts and Sci , GM,
& L played ee ie = ‘Daimler Chrysler, Miamj
one ofmy : ( : “4 ‘ ea , : : Herald Research J
wee better games, a Bi —t © & phir orooner
Pas) | . ie , ’ . 4 Paul Ch kK
a Iwas | Cee coo wk Ds spaarraun/
‘| satisfied ae Egy hh US sak
ee) §=performance.
| But Iwas
surprised to
mr win the
#) «award - and
mi) 6 would have
oe AE y eee) § been much
gaan yos Mey more satisfied
to win the
game.”
Uper | CHUCK
fe ey a HOWLEY



ae Enna “
a a

a

Lay

Bi







PAGE 2F, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



HEALTH & FITNESS SUPPLEMENT



Caribbean:

Fight against HIV/AIDS

undermined by ‘widespread ignorance’

@ By MAT PROBASCO
Associated Press Writer

CHRISTIANSTED, United
States Virgin Islands (AP) —
Widespread ignorance about
HIV/AIDS is undermining
efforts to fight the spread of
the virus in the Caribbean,

. which has the second highest |

rate of infection after sub-
Saharan Africa, health officials
have said.

Discrimination by employ-
ers and others. is so pervasive
that infected people often
delay seeking treatment for the
Motee still largely perceived as

“gay disease” by many in the
con. said officials at the one-

day Caribbean Summit on

HIV-AIDS in St Croix...

“It’s going to be a political
challenge because, unfortu-
nately, we live ina society that
is very homophobic,” said
Douglas Slater, health minis-
ter for St Vincent and the
Grenadines. “It’s something
we are going to have to over-
come.”

The 15-member Caribbean
Community, known as Cari-
com, has not secured enough
international funding for. pre-
vention and treatment, said US
Rep Donald M Payne, a
Democrat from New Jersey,

and co-chair of the Congres- '

sional Caribbean Caucus. :
“Caricom needs to step up

to the plate and demand these

federal funds,” Payne said.
An estimated 500,000 peo-

ple — or 2.4 per cent of the

‘Caribbean — have the virus.
The figure excludes Cuba,

_* which has a relatively low rate

due to testing and prevention
programmes.

aged 15 to 44, said Barry S
Featherman, president of the
Inter-American Economic
Council, which organized the
conference.

Regional studies have shown
that businesses that invest in
HIV prevention programmes
save money by reducing health
care costs.and having more
productive workers, officials

said. But there have not been ~

increased efforts to educate the
population on prevention and
treatment, Payne said.

“T haven’t seen this overall
realization, like ‘Houston, we
have a problem,’” he said. “If
you heighten the rhetoric it
may effect tourism. But if you
don’t, there might not be any-
body left here.”

Studies by economists at the
University of the West Indies
have shown that failing to slow
the spread of the disease will
deeply affect economies
because those infected tend to
be younger people who make
up a large part of the region: s
work force.
~ Albert Ramdin, assistant
secretary-general for the

’ Washington-based Organiza-

tion of American States,
echoed this conclusion.

“This (pandemic) has major
implications for governance,

Promoting free condoms



ri

~ ew
tt FF Pur

vetoes

@ A BASKET of condoms is displayed at the Gay Men’s Health Crisis center in New York. New York Mayor Michael
Bloomberg’s administration is focused on reducing rates of sexually transmitted diseases and HIV/AIDS, and part of the
strategy is the aggressive promotion of free condoms. One idea for the design of the official city condom is a subway theme,
with maps and colours of the different lines emblazoned on the wrappers. ,

In 2005, an estimated 24,000 .
people died in the Caribbean
from AIDS-related complica-

national security, human secu-
rity and the economic viability
of many of these countries

. tions, making it the leading
cause of death_among people

whose resources are already
stretched,” he said.



i
i
i
i
i
i
i

MEDICAL CLINIC

TaPesttaye tits tia tee
UUW LR e hatin

, Unsightly leg veins can be a problem for millions of men and women, the world over. This

problem affects a wide range of age groups, skin types and lifestyles. It is estimated that in many
| areas over 60% of the adult population suffers from varicose veins and spider veins. Varicose
; veins are enlarged vessels that have widened as a result of weakness in the vein wall, which
| stretches and bulges. Spider veins are the small superficial purple or red veins stretching like
/ a web under the skin.

Until now, treating varicose and spider veins was a lengthy and painful process with needles
or other invasive treatments. Now, using the new combined technologies of the VascuLightâ„¢
_ system, unsightly leg veins of all types can be treated - simply, non-invasively, and successfully.

Piet ie ry i rua ote
eT ELT cea ig

Varicose veins, usually deeper blue veins, need different treatment from discolored clusters
(known as “spider veins”) that are near the skin surface. For this reason, the VascuLight
system is equipped with two different light technologies. Your doctor may use either the
VascuLight laser or Sclerotherapy treatment depending on you. veins.

How many treatments
are needed?

Many leg veins need multiple treatments, often over a few months before the effect is
completed. Even small vessels often require time to resolve. Sometimes a bit of “matting”
or “staining” surrounds the treated vessel. By using both technologies in the VascuLight
system, your doctor can treat the vein and this minor temporary discoloration and offer a
complete, excellent outcome.

For more information call
THE LASER UNIT at the Walk-in Clinic aE
Tel 327-5483 or 322-1007



_(AP Photo: Frank Franklin ID)



Diagnosing strokes: MRI
scans should be adopted
as new standard of care

@ By MARIA CHENG
AP Medical Writer

LONDON (AP) — The
most common method of diag-

‘nosing a stroke in the emer-

gency rooms catches only
about one out of every four
cases — far fewer than an
MRI scan, which also was bet-
ter at spotting the type of
stroke, a US government fund-
ed study showed.

The study led some experts,

writing in the medical journal -

The Lancet, to declare that
MRI scans should replace CT
X-rays as the standard of care.
The journal published the
stroke study in Friday’s issue.

“This mantle should now be
passed to magnetic. resonance
imaging,” wrote Dr Geoffrey
A Donnan. and colleagues at
the University of Melbourne
in Australia in an accompany-
ing commentary.

MRI scans shouldbe adopt- )

ed as the new standard of care,
wrote the doctors, while they
also criticized governments
and health care systems for
their poor track record of
assessing new technologies.

However, others argue it’s
not such a clear-cut choice.
MRI results take more time,
a delay that can prove deadly
to a stroke patient, these doc-
tors contend.

“The time delay between

. MRI and CT may be around

15 to 20 minutes,” said Dr
Joseph Broderick, chairman
of neurology at the University
of Cincinnati College-of Med-
icine. “And in an emergency,
15 to 20 minutes can make a
big difference.”

Role

Broderick had no role in the
study, which was led by Dr
Julio Chalela, of the Medical
University of South Carolina.
Chalela was with the US
National Institutes of Health

when the study was conducted.
Chalela and colleagues
examined 356 patients, of
whom 217 were ultimately
diagnosed with an acute
stroke. Patients were scanned
both by CT and MRI
machines. CT scans are a type
of X-ray, whereas magnetic
resonance imaging uses pow-
erful magnets instead of radi-
ation to produce an image.

Experts

The scans were indepen-
dently interpreted by four
experts, who had no other
patient information. Based
only on the MRI scans, experts
accurately diagnosed acute
strokes 83 per cent of the time.
Using the CT scans, however,
they were right just 26 per cent
of the time.

MRI scans were also more

‘precise in spotting the cause

of the stroke — a blood clot or
bleeding in the brain. The vast
majority of strokes are caused
by clots. In patients scanned
within three hours of symp-
toms, MRIs detected strokes
caused by clots in 41 of 90
patients, while CT scans only
picked up six of the 90
patients.

The first few hours following
a stroke are critical, since clot-
busting drugs must be given
within three hours to have a
real impact. If they are given
to the wrong patients, howev-
er, death or severe disability
can result.

Strokes are the second lead-
ing cause of death worldwide,
and account for approximate-
ly 5.5 million deaths each year.

Though CT scans may lose
out to MRI scans on accuracy,
on issues such as time and
money, CT scans are far
ahead. Widely available in
emergency rooms in all devel-
oped countries, CT machines
are compact pieces of equip-
ment that produce images in as

little as two minutes. In com-
parison, MRI machines are

- large, coffin-like structures

that require patients to lie still
for up to 30 minutes. They are
also unsuitable for patients
with pacemakers, metal
objects, or who may be preg-
nant.

MRI scans also cost signifi-
cantly more than CT scans and
require specialized technicians
to operate them and to read
the scans.

“The superiority of MRI in
detecting stroke in ideal con-
ditions is unquestioned,” said
Dr Lee Schwamm, an associ-
ate professor of neurology at
Harvard Medical School.
Schwamm was not connected
to the study. But combined
with a consideration of patient
symptoms, ‘he says that CT
scans are just as effective in
diagnosing patients in emer-
gencies.

MRI scans may offer more
detailed information, but such
information hasn’t yet been
proven to make a difference
in patient outcomes. Experts
say studies are needed to
determine if MRI stans might
save more lives than cr scans

in emergencies.

Comparison

Schwamm likens the com-
parison between the two tech-
niques to the difference
between FM and AM radio.
“FM radio is better because
it’s high-definition, and is great
if you’re listening to classical
music,” he said. “But some-
times all you need is the
weather and the news, so AM
is just fine.”

In the same Lancet issue, an
all-stroke special, two other
studies found that stroke
patients treated in a stroke
care unit have a better chance
of recovery than if they were
treated in a conventional hos-
pital ward.

»

eae

_ 2 «



THE TRIBUNE

HEALTH & FITNESS SUPPLEMENT

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007, PAGE 3F



@ By JANET FRANKSTON
LORIN
Associated Press Writer

LODI, N.J. (AP) — The
cafeteria lunch line at.Colum-
bus Elementary School
moves quickly as students .
grab portions of carrots cel-
ery, apples and oranges.
French fries and hamburgers,
once cafeteria staples, aren’t
even offered.

“JT eat carrots or apples
every day,” said 10-year-old
Alan Espino. He said he did-
n’t notice that the bun hold-
ing his all-beef hot dog was
whole wheat. Even the pizza
available in the cafeteria has
whole wheat crust.

The school cafeteria looks
radically different from those
of his parents’ generation,
and it appears many kids
aren’t turning their noses up
at the new offerings. In fact,
according to a survey of food
service directors, french fries

are decreasing in popularity
and interest in carrots is sky-
rocketing. 3 one

As choices on the lunch
line change, many children
are accepting them, said
Martha Conklin, an associate
professor at Penn State Uni-
versity who conducts
research about school nutri-

tion programmes and school’ .

food service. 3
“If you present these...)

healthy offerings to children,“
e . major ingredient.

they may turn, then}:down the
first time, but-you-¢an’t give
up,” she said, “Children will
adapt. Choice is important,
but they can make those.
selections from healthy offer-
ings.”

The School Nutrition Asso-
ciation’s annual survey given
to food service directors
around the country shows
just that. Among students in









Service Highlights

24 Hour Emergency Services

Emergency Transport
Services/Ambulance



‘

kindergarten through 12th
grade, french fries dropped in
popularity from 1998 to 2006,
while carrots and fresh veg-
etables-rose in popularity.

“We are dealing with much
more sophisticated audiences
now, and we working hard to
meet their needs in a healthi-
er way,” said Janey Thorn-
ton, the association’s presi-
dent.

More states are enacting
nutrition standards to ensure
healthy food and beverage
options are available to stu-
dents, said Amy Winterfeld,
a health policy analyst for the
National Conference of State
Legislatures.

A 2004 wellness pro-
gramme requires school dis-
tricts receiving federal reim-
bursements for school meal
programmes to develop poli-
cies that promote the health
of students and address the
growing problem of child-
hood obesity.

In 2005, at least 17 states

- enacted some form of school

nutrition legislation and at
least 11 more approved them
last year. ra

A New Jersey law requires
that, by next fall, snacks and
ala carte items sold or served
contain no more than eight

.. grains of total fat per.serving

and two grams of saturated

fat per serving. Candy is

banned and so are foods and
beverages with sugar as the

The law is an attempt to
establish a culture in which
eating nutritiously is the
accepted social norm, said
Emma Davis-Kovacs, acting
state director for the New
Jersey Department of Agri-
culture’s division of food and
nutrition. ,

“The leading health
authorities are all recom-

ECG/EEG

Surgical Services
Recovery Room
Gynecological Care



@ ALAN Ian Espino, a fifth-grader at Columbus Elementary School in Lodi, N.J., holds his lunch tray containing a beef hot dog on
a whole wheat bun, beans, carrot sticks, a bag of apple slices and low-fat milk in the school’s cafeteria. In an effort to combat the nation-

al crisis of childhood obesity, schools across the country are changing their menus, adding more fresh vegetables and fruits and opt-:

ing for baking instead of frying.

mending that schools take an
active role in this area of
nutrition to prevent disabling
chronic health conditions,”
she said. .
Mark Vidovich, president
of Pomptonian Food Service,
which runs programmes in 11
north and central New Jersey.

Comprehensive Diagnostic Imaging

Bone Densitometry
CAT Scan
Mammography

counties, recalled that stu-
dents were turned off by
whole wheat bread just five
years ago.

“The children wouldn’t eat
it. It didn’t look right to
them,” he said. “Now their
dining preferences have
changed and they’re now

MRI

Nuclear Medicine
Ultrasound

X-ray

?

accepting of making healthier
dining options.”

Pat Johnson, food service
director in the Maplewood
and South Orange district,
said she started reforming
her cafeterias before the new
state law.. The district is reno-
vating its kitchens to remove

(AP Photo: Mike Derer)

fryers and add grills and
ovens. She said younger chil-
dren seem more open to tast-
ing healthier foods and are
likely to continue the pat-
terns to middle and high
school. “If you put it there
and make it look appealing to
them, they like it,” she said.



*| DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life



Catherization Lab (Cath Lab) Matemity Care tl a aN mS

Dialysis Nursery Sea ate

MRI Adult,Pediatric & Geriatric Care See eee Therapy To make an appointment for

CAT Scan Primary Care ysical 'herapy rgonomics ;

ICU/IMCU Pharmacy Speech Language Pathology Incontinence Treatment Program your annual physical call:

WEDISURE Nutiition Counseling Si cies scesain ae annie ap CTnminioniacnmmitnaee Tg .

Open Heart Surgery Limited Home Health Services Laboratory Microbiology 302-4684.

Kidney Transplants Outpatient Physician Clinics Blood Bank Pathology www.doctorshos p.com

Organ Harvesting Sessional Clinics Chemistry Phlebotomy

Cardiac Care Weight Mansgement . Hematology a ,

ee a Se SE a ee ee ee ee ee



*. , looks like just another tennis

>... tember 2005 by the Tennis

go out and play with one.

PAGE 4F, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007



THE TRIBUNE

HEALTH & FITNESS SUPPLEMENT

@ By DANIEL YEE
Associated Press Writer

ATLANTA (AP) — It

workout as balls sail by and
sometimes directly at pro
instructor Tony Palafox.

But the plastic cones and the
rope ladder along either side of
the court suggest otherwise.
This is “Cardio Tennis,” a
group class that combines tra-
ditional tennis practice with
other endurance-building exer-
cise.

On a recent brisk morning
at a YMCA tennis court in
Atlanta’s trendy Buckhead
neighbourhood, three tennis
players had a workout with
Palafox, a former pro tennis
player from Mexico City.
Palafox has trained other pro-
fessionals, including US tennis
champion John McEnroe.

“Did John McEnroe do
this?” asks 42-year-old Caro-
line McCrary during pre-work-
out arm stretches and moving
sideways in a circle with the
group.

“Pros should do it — it is
good fitness,” says the 70-year-
old Palafox. Today’s pros, he
says, have access to personal
trainers to build their stamina.

For everyone else, Cardio
Tennis provides similar bene-
fits, Palafox says, because it
uses aspects of a regular tennis
workout — hitting balls — with
footwork exercises designed to
build endurance.

Unlike a regular game of
tennis, Cardio Tennis is
focused on fitness and less-on
hitting great forehands and
backhands. The programme
has 1,500 workout sites in 48
states, Puerto Rico and 25
countries. It started in Sep-

Industry Association as a way
to get more people involved in
the sport.

“When lower-skilled players

SEE page 5F

*






StH ANNUAL

FuN Run/ Wak



REGISTRATION FEE: S12



Race starts at 7a.m. at the Western Esplanade to Goodman's Bay & back
Late registration starts at 6:00 a.m. Registration Fee: $12 (Includes race T-shirt and other gifts and surprises)



Applications can be picked up at all Subway® Restaurants in New Providence



Early registration & applications can be dropped off at Subway® restaurant in the Harbour Bay Shopping Centre from February 14 - 23.
All Proceeds will be donated to The Bahamas Heart Association and The Strider Track Club. Trophies and prizes will be awards for different categories.

For More Information, Call 327-0806 or 394-6715





Name:

Date of Biff ek ow Age(onraceday): Sex: Mo Fe
Address:

E-mail: Telephone:



| X-Large | 2XLarge

T-shirt Size (circle one) Small | Medium || Large

Check Appropriate Category
Runners

Walkers





; Under 15 :
Under 20

Under 30 Female
Under 40 Female

Under 50

Masters
Over 50 Female
Masters
Over 60 Female

Largest Group/Name:
























Prior to any physical activity, we strongly suggest you consult your physician
J assume all risks associated with The Subway” Fun Run/Walk including, but not limited to, falls, contact with other participants, the effect of
the weather, including extreme heat, extreme cold, and/or humidity, traffic and the conditions of the road, all such risks being known and
appreciated by me. Having read this waiver and knowing these facts and in consideration of accepting my application, |, for myself and anyone
entitled to act on my behalf, waive and release Subway® and all sponsors, their representatives and successors from all claims
and liabilities of any kind arising out of my participation in the Subway® Fun Run/Walk even though that liability may arise
out of negligence or carelessness on the part of the persons named in this waiver. | am.aware that the registration fee is
on-refundable.| am also aware that the course will open to traffic and that headphone, jogging strollers, bikes; in line skaters
and similar items and animals accompanying entrants are not permitted on the course.

Signature: Date:

PARENTS SIGNATURE (if under 18): 2 Date:

event sponsors:



















@ INSTRUCTOR Tony Palafox (right) shows an exercise to Cam Fenton, 49, of Atlanta during a cardio tennis workout at an Atlanta YMCA.

(AP Photo: Gene Blythe)

SAC



A CONSISTENT SAVINGS PLAN PROVIDES:
Security for the future

Funds for emergency or
unplanned expenses

Help to meet short- and
long-term needs





Make your decision to save now and open an
account at any Royal Bank or RBC FINCO branch.
We offer attractive interest rates to our customers!





+ www. rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean

No iS Yoy ert a seta)

RBC, of Canada

Mo seiner gu LMU Md Bet BoD ier % i ay UN



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007, PAGE 5F



offers more challenging aerobic workout



@ CAM Fenton, 49, of Atlanta works
through rope ladder exercises

i FORTY two-year-old Caroline McCrary (left) of Atlanta returns balls to Tony Palafox

FROM page 5F

another they are not hitting many balls — they
are chasing many balls. That doesn’t get your
heart rate up,” said Michele Krause, national
Cardio Tennis director for the Tennis Industry
Association. “In Cardio Tennis, a pro is con-
trolling the activity, you’re hitting tons of
balls...and you have a great ability to stay in
your heart-rate range for the recommended
period of time.”

Organisers claim the workout offers cardio-

vascular benefits because all the activity in each
workout allows participants to hit their aerobic
training zone, which is between 65 per cent and
85 per cent of their maximum heart rate. The
workout also improves a player’s tennis game
because players get lots of tennis practice and
tips on how to improve with instructors.
Cardio Tennis means more of a “total body”
workout than just tennis alone or other activities
suth as running or cycling, said Randy Braith,
director of the an exercise physiology lab at the
University of Florida, who is not involved in
the Cardio Tennis programme. Both upper and

(AP Photo: Gene Blythe)

lower body get a workout, he said.

“IT can run a gazillion miles, but it’s hard,”
McCrary says during the 45-minute workout’s
only down time — when Palafox exhausts his
ball hopper and players break to pick them all
up again.

“We look forward to picking up the balls,”
jokes Cam Fenton, 49, of Atlanta.

First, Palafox does stretching exercises with his
group. Then he hits three or four volleys to a
class member, who returns the serves, then runs
to the side of the court to do jumping exercises
over the rungs of the rope ladder, or footwork







available at

(AP Photo: Gene Blythe)

exercises around the plastic cones. Then it's
back to the volley line and hitting balls again.

They work on their forehand and backhand,
lobs, baseline shots and even close to the net. A
workout session usually includes three sets of
hitting exercises, with two breaks of picking up
tennis balls in between.

Fenton started taking Cardio Tennis last sum-
mer and says she can burn about 600 calories per
workout. .

“] like to play tennis and try to get cardio in
everyday,” Fenton said. “Your heart rate jumps
up huge because you’re running.”



JOHNN’S CARE WEAR

Rosetta Street > P.O. Box N-4277 « Tel: 325-7288 - Fax: 325-7278





PAGE 6F, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

TVs, iPods help some exercisers, but break

mind-body connection for serious-minded

m@ By MICHAEL HILL
Associated Press Writer

JENNIFER Unruh can run
a mile in two songs.

“Tve got it figured out,” said
Unruh, who moves to the beat
of Van Halen and The Fray on
her iPod. “Usually, every song
lasts about four minutes. I run
a mile in a little over eight. So
if I can get through two songs,
I know I’m a mile though my
run.”

Gyms are jammed with peo-
ple like Unruh — the guy on
the treadmill watching ESPN,
the aerobic class bouncing to
“Hollaback Girl,” the spinner
reading Self magazine. Words,
images and especially songs
can provide inspiration for
exercisers, as well as a distrac-
tion from tedium and discom-
fort. t

Unruh, director of wellness
support at the YMCA of Met-
ropolitan Atlanta, uses her
songs-per-mile mind games as
a way to keep engaged.

But are those distractions
good or bad for exercisers?
Researchers say it cuts both
ways. Yes, a dose of video or
audio can inspire better work-
outs. But distractions can also
hurt performance. In a way,
music can add some static to
the mind-body connection.

Since the dawn of the Walk-
man, headphones have been
as important as sneakers to
many exercisers. Jacqueline
Wojtusik, an Albany-area fash-
ion designer who wears head-
phones for her regular work-
outs, listens to disco, ‘80s
dance, electronic — anything
as long as it has a fast beat.

“If it has a higher beat per
minute,” she said, “then I tend
to stay with that beat.”

Science is on her side.

In a 2005 study, British
researchers put 18 undergrad-
uates on stationary bicycles to

pedal either to silence or to
“popular electronic dance
music” on headphones. Partic-
ipants worked about 13 per
cent harder to the up-tempo
music compared to silence.
One of the researchers, Sam
Carr, suggested in an e-mail
interview that music competes
with an exercisers’ awareness

of how hard they’re breathing,,

or how much their legs ache.
Psychologists sometimes use
the phrase “dissociation effect”

to describe distractions like.

music and TV, and they have
found it can have other bene-
fits.

Dr. James Annesi, a health
psychologist who works at the
same Atlanta YMCA as
Unruh, found that novice exer-
cisers given a choice of TV or
music were more apt to stick
with an exercise programme
than those told to focus only
on. their-exertions or people
limited to one type of media. If
the gyms look like media cen-
ters, that’s fine by Annesi, as
long as it encourages people
to exercise.

“The more dissociation the
better, the more we can dis-
tance the people from their dis-
comfort,” he said.

Still, athletes digging deep
for peak performance would
do well to ditch the head-
phones and focus on their bod-
ies. Studies have shown that
the more distracted the ath-
lete, the slower the times, said
Ohio University psychology
professor Benjamin Ogles.

“If you want to maintain a
high level of intensity, you
pretty much have to focus on
your body,” he said.

This is related to the belief
that noisy gadgets interfere
with the intensely focused
mental state many athletes
refer to as “flow.” For instance,
visitors to the Kripalu Center

for Yoga & Health, in Stock-







THE TRIBUNE



a 1 SINCE the dawn of the Walkman, headphones-have been as important as sneakers to many exercisers. A dose of video or audio
can inspire better workouts. But distractions can also hurt performance. In a way, music can add some static to mind-body connection.

bridge, Mass., are encouraged

to leave the headphones

behind. Jennifer Young, direc-
tor of healthy living pro-
grammes, said she wants to
keep visitors’ mind-body con-
nections strong.

Hikers at Kripalu are
coached to “scan” their bod-

‘We Corcedoaibe hed tet Chorktte onfeb 24. Pediormen inchade: The box office
‘pilogen 9.00: Teckel: cee $95.00 it ocvnnew ord! cn sale ot Juke Box, Signctune Styles,

end Sey Thang end Dive ine: Tickets obo. careiicle of waar corbicte
‘ham the conced wil be donolest io The Rehiorcs Heat Amociion,

pom. Process:

ies by concentrating sequen-
tially on their ankles, hips,
shoulders and so on. Even dur-
ing weightlifting — an activity
linked more to Metallica then
meditation — people are asked
to visualize what their muscles
are doing, or to focus on their
breathing.

&

s BQ
ARNE \w &

e

“Don’t turn out and turn
off,” Young said, “because
then there’s that underlying
signal, ‘Oh, working out is
something I don’t want to do.
I’m escaping it by doing this.’”

Even Anna Fyodorova, a
triathlete from New York City
who calls the iPod one of the

(AP Photo: Jim McKnight)

“sreatest creations made” for
training, sees its limits. When
other runners wore their ear
buds during a recent 60 kilo-
meter race, she decided against
it. “When you’re racing, you
have to concentrate,” she said,

_ “you have to be totally in the

moment.”

KELSO MEDICAL
LABORATORY

Eat a balanced diet

Choose your foods wisely

Exercise

Get plenty of rest -

Keep your body hydrated
Keep your mind active — challenge your brain

Have your annual visit with your physician

and let .

KELSO MEDICAL LABORATORY
be a part of your overall health
evaluation and testing workups.

Laboratory Testing

Electrocardiograph (ECG) Testing
Vitamins & Nutritional Supplements

10 Collins Avenue -
322-7994 or 322-8440

“The oldest private medical
lab in the Bahamas”



HMA
\aaaannin Hy





THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007, PAGE 7F
HEALTH & FITNESS SUPPLEMENT

Schwarzenegger
announces school
fitness challenge

'







A RE ELS Lr oe

Ce COS S HEEL HE ESR RE FT EMSS GHAR SESW EN

2, @@ & WY

























experts.

Together we can make a difference.






This is an opportunity to interact with health care professionals over issues important to your
personal health, nutrition and physical well being. The event includes health checks and
demonstrations. It will also introduce you to the latest methods of reducing stress, gaining

more energy, increasing mental focus and improving overall health and.wellness, directly from the

A guest speaker, Dr. Marie Savard, LLC, an internationally recognised internal medicine physician,and
expert on health and wellness. It's time to be all together better informed about your health.

2007 Health Fair Partners include: Doctors Hospital; Bahamas National Drug Council; GNC General Nutrition
Centers; Weight Watchers Of The Bahamas; Kelso Medical Laboratory; Mystical Fitness Centers; The Walk-In Clinic; AIDS
Eoundation Of The Bahamas; Bahamas Family Planning Association; Better Bodies Gym; Chela-Tech Medical Laboratory; Pearl Vision;

Center for Specialized Dentistry; Commonwealth Drugs & Medical Supplies Co. Ltd.; Dental Health Centre; Med Evac; Rollins Dental;
Super Saver Discount; The Skin Centre; Impressions Center For General & Cosmetic Dentistry;Bahamas Heart Association; Bally Total Fitness;





e
‘ SACRAMENTO, Califor-
i nia (AP) — Governor Arnold
: Schwarzenegger wants Cali-
“ fornia’s students to run, jump
; and squat their way to anew
gymnasium for their schools.
b As part of his effort to boost
: students’ physical fitness, the
* governor has announced a fit- »
it ness challenge.
i The Austrian-born governor
" and former Mr Universe wants
: to get 20,000 kindergarten
. through 12th-grade students
« active for 30 to 60 minutes a
. day at least three times a week.
hd As an incentive, the school
“ with the highest percentage of
. participating students at the
's end of the four-week challenge
¢ will win a new fitness center.
: The next 11 will win $1,000
; (?770) to buy fitness equip-
&! ment. .
. A statewide review of phys-
- ical fitness released in Novem- MM AS part of his effort to get California school children into
« ber found that nearly half of | shape, Goy. Arnold Schwarzenegger announces his physical fit-
a California’s ninth-grade stu- ness challenge during his visit to Will C. Wood Middle School. |
. dents do not have the stamina ;
@ to briskly run one mile (1 1/2 (AP Photo: Rich Pedroncelli)
E kilometers). Fewer than a third.
: of the nearly 1.4 million stu- on Physical Fitness. effect this July. One will
Se dents who took the test in fifth, The governor said working require foods sold in school
® seventh and ninth grades met _ out three times a week for a vending machines to meet high
© all the minimum benchmarks month is just a start. They nutritional standards and reg-
in areas such as percentage of should aim to be active every ulate the number of calories
body fat, abdominal strength day, he told students at WillC from fat and sugar. The other
and flexibility. Wood Middle School in Sacra- _ limits drinks sold at schools to
State law requires that ele- mento. water, milk and some fruit and
_ mentary students receive 200 “It’s not just to have a mus- sport drinks that have limited
minutes of physical education cular body and to look studly sweeteners. ;
every 10 school days and dou- when you go out there,” he Schwarzenegger launched --
‘ ble that many for grades 7-12, said. the student fitness challenge
* @ EIGHTH grader Tou Her, 13, squeezes between schoolmates to shake hands with California. but the state conducts few “Tt has also to do with your Wednesday at a Sacramento '
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger (right) who visited Will C Wood Middle School in Sacramento, Cal- compliance checks. health, because so many peo- middle school.
“ ifornia. As part of his effort to boost students’ physical fitness, the governor has announced a fit- Schwarzenegger has pro- ple get sick as they get older — Teachers and schools can
ness challenge. The Austrian-born governor and former Mr Universe wants to get 20,000 kinder- — moted increased physical activ- _ sick because they have aterri- _ register for the program online,
garten through 12th-grade students active for 30 to 60 minutes a day at least three times a week. _ ity for students since he was a ble lifestyle.” where they also can keep track _
, member of former President Two bills aimed at improv- of their progress against other -.
(AP Photo: Rich Pedroncelli)... George HW Bush’s Council ing school nutrition will take schools.
< €
Premier Healthy
/ [he Wellness Hea th Fair 2007
Â¥
Atlantic Medical invites you to attend the 2007 Corporate Wellness Health Fair, Saturday February 3rd at the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel.The event takes place between | 1.00am and 4.00pm. It is part of the Weliness
initiative operated with The Bahamas’ most advanced health insurance plan, Premier Health.
Members of the public are free to attend too.





























COLONTAL GROUP
INTERNATIONAL

Cancer Society of the Bahamas; Princess Margaret Hospital; The Medi Centre;
The Bahamas Diabetic Association; Bahamas Red Cross; Centreville Medical Centre;
Advance Family Medicine Centre & Medispa; Nutrition for Life; Foot Solutions.

ll Atlantic Medical

ATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE CO.LTD.
Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue, Nassau, Bahamas Tel.326-8191
www.cgigroup.bm e: atlanticmedical@atlantichouse.com.bs

5 Jasmine Corporate Center, East Sunrise Highway, Freeport, Bahamas Tel. 351-3960

A member of Colonial Group International Ltd.
Personal & Business Insurance:Group Pensions:Group Medical:Life Assurance & Investments



ally

éa

&
-
7

4\WVellness

yr! together better!

Ci vest >
5 mat ®

Colonial Group International is
rated A-(Excellent) by AM Best.



PAGE 8F, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

HEALTH & FITNESS SUPPLEMENT



US mammogram
rate falls slightly

since 2000

Bi By MIKE STOBBE
AP Medical Writer

ATLANTA (AP) — The
percentage of American
women getting mammo-
grams has dropped slightly
over the past few years, in
what health officials have
said is a troubling sign that
the battle against breast can-
cer may be flagging.

The share of women 40
and older who said they had
a mammogram in the previ-
ous two years slipped from
76.4 per cent to 74.6 per cent
between 2000 and 2005,
according to study released
by the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention.

The rate had risen dramati-
cally over the past two
decades, from 29 per cent in
1987, according to, American
Cancer Society statistics.

The CDC and other |
researchers said possible
explanations for the drop
include a shortage of mam-
mography screening centers
and specialists, and a lack of
health insurance among
patients.

Dr Len Lichtenfeld, the
cancer society’s deputy chief
medical officer, said the
decline may also reflect com-
placency among women.

“This is a group of women
who have ‘grown up’ with
mammography as they’ve
aged, they’ve perhaps had it
done many times over the
years and they’ve decided, |
‘Well, it’s been OK, maybe I
can put it off for a while,’” he
said.

He warned that the recent-

Health officials say this
is a troubling sign that

the battle against breast
cancer may be flagging

ly reported declines in breast
cancer incidence rates and
cancer deaths are at risk if
the decline continues. “If we
don’t pay attention now, we
run the risk of seeing some of
the gains we’ve made
reversed,” he said.

Decline

The decline of less than
two percentage points may
seem small, but it could be
terribly significant, Lichten-
feld said.

But if you consider that
about 80 million US women
should be getting a mammo-
gram every year, it means
more than one million fewer
women are getting the
screening test, he said.

And that.may mean thou-
sands of cases of breast can-
cer may not be diagnosed.
Women whose breast cancer
is caught early have more
treatment options and a bet-
ter chance of beating the dis-
ease.

The decline may also at
least partly explain a recent



drop in US breast cancer
rates: It may be that if fewer
women are getting mammo-
grams, fewer cases of breast
cancer are being discovered.

Some researchers instead
tied the drop in breast cancer
to reduced use of hormones
for menopause.
. The study is being pub-
lished this week in a CDC
publication, Morbidity and
Mortality Weekly Report. It
was based on a national tele-
phone survey of more than
14,000 women in each of the
survey years.

The study is not the first to

. spot the decline. The cancer

society keeps statistics,
derived from a different
national survey, that showed
a slight decline in mammo-
gram from 2000 to 2003.
Another study of HMO
patients showed a decline in
screening rates from 1999 to
2002. .

Mammography rates
increased substantially dur-
ing the 1990s, so there seems
to have been some turning
point around 2000.



nee TT veonine HTM PS AMOI
from Just Nuts for that special person.

Store Hours: Mon - Sat. 9am to 5:30pm
upstairs Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street, Palmdale

-3235 » Fax: 323-3236.









THE TRIBUNE



A breast with fatty
tissue free of tumors





B THIS is an undated handout image provided by the University of Texas M D Anderson
Cancer Center in Houston showing a mammogram of a breast with fatty tissue free of tumors.
Dense breast tissue shows up lighter, obscuring cancer tumors, which also look light on mam-
mograms. This mammogram of a breast with lots of fatty tissue (the opposite of dense)
appears noticeably darker, so light tumors would show up better against the background.



(AP Photo: University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center)



‘Turning a corner’

| in the fight against

prostate cancer

Hm By CAROLYN SUSMAN
Cox News Service =

WEST PALM BEACH,
Florida Is the PSA test
worth it? The test used for
detecting prostate cancer has
been both clobbered and treat-
ed as necessary, even though
results can be unreliable.

The chairman of the Nation-
al Prostate Cancer Coalition,
Dr Richard N Atkins, has
released a statement in sup-
port of the test, coupled with a
plea for more money for
research:

“Deaths from prostate can-
cer have dropped 11 per cent
over the last two years, a clear
illustration annual early detec-
tion along with advancements
in treatment are helping us
turn a corner in the fight
against prostate cancer. While
the debate continues over the
usefulness of screening and
new tests loom on the horizon,
evidence shows the PSA test
is saving lives.

\dvancements



in treatment

Chairman of National
Prostate Cancer Coalition
issues plea for more money to
conduct research on disease

are particularly encouraging,
according to a 2006 survey
from the Pharmaceutical

Research and Manufacturers’

of America, medicines in
development for prostate can-
cer have equaled breast can-
cer for the first time ever, 50
each.

“However, more work still
needs to be done as more than
27,000 men will die from
prostate cancer this year — the
second leading cause of male
cancer death and a plague
among African Americans
with a mortality rate 2.5 times
higher than white men.

“We must achieve parity

ith breast cancer, Both -dis

eases are hormonally driven
with similar caseloads. More
than $850 million is dedicated
from the federal government
toward breast cancer research
every year compared to about
$400 million for prostate can-
cer.

“Federal research has
spawned to breast cancer
breakthrough drugs like Her-
ceptin which has lead to an
increase in survivorship by as
much as one-third. We need a
‘His’-ceptin now.”

© Carolyn Susman writes for
the Palm Beach Post. E-mail:
carolyn (underscore) susman

pbpost.com
i it - +



THE TRIBUNE



HEALTH & FITNESS SUPPLEMENT

@ NANCY G Brinker, founder of the Susan G. Komen Foundation, poses at her home in
Palm Beach, Florida. Brinker founded the breast cancer
name to Susan G Komen for the Cure, to fulfill a promise to her younger sister who died of

the disease in 1980.

foundation, which is changing its

(AP Photo: Alan Diaz)

Breast cancer
— foundatio

marks 25 year

@ By JAMIE STENGLE
Associated Press Writer



DALLAS (AP) — As breast
cancer ravaged her body,
Susan G Komen asked her
younger sister for a promise.

Komen wanted help to “cure
this disease.” After a three-
year struggle, the vivacious
young mother with the bright
smile died in 1980 at age 36.

And her sister, Nancy
Brinker, kept her promise to
do something, founding the
Susan G Komen Breast Can-
cer Foundation two years later.

“I knew it had to be big. We
had to change a culture,”
Brinker said.

In the 25 years since, the
foundation has grown from a
small gathering in Brinker’s
living room to an operation
that will have invested roughly
$1 billion in community out-
reach and research by year’s
end and has opened branches
across the country as well as
in Puerto Rico, Italy and Ger-
many.

The Dallas-based organiza-
tion has 200 employees, more
than 100,000 volunteers and
125 affiliates. Its annual Race
for the Cure has grown from
800 women who ran for chari-
ty in Dallas to about 1.5 million
participants in 120 races world-
wide. The foundation has fund-
ed work in more than 47 coun-
tries.

The non-profit is celebrat-
ing its 25th year with a new
‘name Susan G Komen for the
Cure and an edgy new adver-
tisement campaign that
includes T-shirts reading: “If
you're going to stare at my
breasts, you could at least
donate a dollar to save them.”
It has pledged to raise another
$1 billion (?770 million) in the
next 10 years.

With the help of organiza-
tions like Komen and promi-
nent figures like ex-First Lady
Betty Ford, who spoke openly
of about her breast cancer in
the mid-1970s, the culture
slowly began to change from
breast cancer being a taboo
subject, said Dr Gabriel Hor-
tobagyi, president of the
American Society of Clinical
Oncology.

“I grew up at a time when
most families didn’t talk about
either sex or cancer,” said Hor-
tobagyi, chairman of the



Susan G Komen for the
Cure has branches in
Europe, Caribbean

department of breast medical
oncology at the University of
Texas M D Anderson Cancer
Center in Houston. “Those
were sort of taboos. It was sort
of shameful if anyone in the
family had cancer.”

Today, the Komen Founda-
tion.reports, nearly 75 per cent
of American women over 40
get regular mammograms com-
pared to fewer than a third in
1982; the five-year survival rate
for breast cancer when caught
before it spreads is 98 per cent
compared to 74 per cent back
then; the federal government
devotes more than $900 mil-
lion (2695 million) each year
to breast cancer research, treat-
ment and prevention com-
pared to $30 million (?23.2 mil-
lion) in 1982.

“T truly believe if Nancy had-
n’t started this thing, that that
would not be the case,” said
Hala Moddelmog, president
and chief executive officer of
Komen. She said the goal is to
support research that is “trans-
formational and that definitely
ties back to the cure.”

“Every advance in breast
cancer has been touched by a
Komen grant,” said Komen
spokeswoman Emily Callahan.

There will be an interna-
tional emphasis this year
including a September summit
in Budapest, where Brinker
served as US ambassador from
2001 to 2003.

The event will pair 25 US
activists with 25 people from
around the world to look at
the social, cultural and finan-
cial circumstances that prevent
women from getting quality
breast health care and treat-
ment.

Growing up in Illinois,
Komen and Brinker were
close, but had different per-
sonalities, said Brinker, who
now lives in the capital Wash-
ington. She said Komen was
“pretty and popular” while she

4

herself was the more driven
sister.

By the late 1970s, Brinker
was in an executive training
programme at luxury retailer
Neiman Marcus in Dallas.
Komen, three years older, was
raising a family in Peoria, Illi-
nois, working as a part-time
model. They remained close,
keeping up by phone.

One afternoon, Komen
called to tell Brinker that her
doctor had found a lump in her
breast that needed to be biop-
sied. Komen had a mastecto-
my, but about five months lat-
er she found a lump under her
arm. When her sister died, a
devastated Brinker knew she
had work to do.

“It wasn’t going to be

enough to raise money from
some very wealthy people, we
needed to change the culture,”
said Brinker, who herself was
diagnosed with breast cancer
in 1984,

By getting the subject of
breast cancer out into the pub-
lic, Komen led women to
become advocates, said Jean
Sachs, executive director of
Living Beyond Breast Cancer,
a non-profit group sponsored
by Komen, among others, that
provides breast cancer educa-
tion.

“If you look at where we are
today, it’s so different. Women
have so many choices,” said
Sachs.

While the advances made
since Komen was formed are
reason to celebrate, the orga-
nization’s ultimate goal
remains unachieved: the crad-
ication of breast cancer. About
41,000 US women died of
breast cancer last year. World-
wide, it kills about 370,000
women each year.

“When you look at where
we are, we’re still not where
our mission is, and that’s a
world without breast cancer.”
Moddelmog said.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007, PAGE 9F








BIN this photo released by Susan G Komen for the Cure, singer Toni Braxton shows her support
for breast cancer awareness by wearing a Komen for the Cure Promise Ring at The Trumpet Awards
in Las Vegas. ‘

(AP Photo: Eric Jamison) ~~

»

‘

Christina G. Messarra B.SC. PT, M.B.A.,

Provide, a Facility Director, Physiotherapist

c






. Physiotherapy

° Hand Therapy

_ Massage Therapy
Occupational Therapy

- Pediatric Rehabilitation

H| LOCATION: : HOURS OF OPERATION:
4 | Suite 57, Grosvenor Close West Mon to Fri. 8:30am to 7:30pm
| Off Shirley Street between Sat: 8:00am to 1:00pm
“| Doctor's Hospital & PMH













We specialize in the assessment and
treatment of ADULTS & CHILDREN including:

Rete fers |Hat-lnte)e)1U€\ cols emits :
Road Traffic Accident Injuries. . ¢ Postural Dysfunction
Operative Rehabilitation «Pediatric Rehabilitation:
Orthopedic Rehabilitation’. «°° Work Related Injuries (NIB)*.. :

ack and: Neck Ca
Foto) g CoM (N.Y La (kfm

»©) Foot Pains).

Or Li Tet f aCe llc ite)

Providence Rehabilitation Centre welcomes and accepts
ALL extended Medicai benefit plans.

A doctor’s referral may be required for certain services
and access to Extended Medical benefits.



Cea cer 37 cee



PAGE 10F, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Study finds most with diabetes or at risk

for it ignore doctors’ advice to exercise

m By CHASE SQUIRES

Associated Press Writer

DENVER (AP) — Bad
ws wher: it comes to diabet-
iad exercise: Most people
with Type 2 diabetes or at risk
for it apparently ignore their
doctors’ advice to be active.

Fewer than 40 per cent get
exercise, a new study found,
and the more in danger the
patients are, the less likely they
are to be active.

That’s despite an earlier
study that found nearly three-
quarters of diabetics said their
doctors had advised them to
exercise.

‘The patients who got the
strongest warnings to get mov-
ing were the least likely to lis-
ten, according to research
being released Friday.

“People should exercise
more, that story is out,” said
Dr Elaine Morrato, who led
both studies.

“What we’re saying is,
‘Here’s a high-risk population
that can benefit from exercise,
and they’re even less likely to
exercise.””

Without exercise, Type 2
diabetics face complications
ranging from nerve damage to
high blood pressure.

Morrato, an assistant pro-
fessor at the University of Col-
orado Denver with a doctorate
in public health and epidemi-

olog: , said rescaichers sur-.
veyea more than 22,000
patients for th survev

in the rebruay SaiiON OF tare
American Diabetes Associa-
tion’s journal Diabetes Care.

The federal Centers for Dis-
ease Control and Prevention
estimates more than 20 mil-

lion Americans have diabetes,

about 90 per cent of them
Type 2, which is linked with
obesity.

Dr Larry Deeb, president of
medicine and science at the
American Diabetes Associa-
tion, said by the time patients
have Type 2 diabetes or are at
risk of getting it, the deck is
stacked against them. They
may already have problems
with mobility as a result of
obesity or foot and circulatory
disorders that make exercise
difficult.

“We have to be caxetal not
to blame the victims,” he said.
“There’s a difference between
being unable and being unwill-
ing.”

Fven for ihe mosi
there’s hope, said author and
fitness expert Charlotte Hayes,
but health professionals must
do more.

Hayes, who wrote “The I
Hate to Exercise Book For
People With Diabetes,” said
telling patients to exercise is
different from telling them
how.

Every step of exercise is
important, she said. For those
who can walk, a few steps a
day helps. For those who can’t,
there are alternatives.

““We take a small-steps
approach,” she said.

The American Diabetes
Association recominends peo-
ple get at least 30 minutes of
aerobic exercise, such as brisk

disabled,

walking, five times a week. But.

the association says for those
who can’t, {here are benefits
from even five minutes a day,
i spe with evervday activities
garde: valking

ww work, ,

Morrato said she doesn’t
know the answer, only that the
results of her study are disap-
pointing.

“It is difficult to be opti-
mistic about addressing the
twin epidemics of obesity and
diabetes without success in
increasing physical activity in



a Dr Elaine Morrato, a diabetes researcher at the University of Colorado Health Science
Center in Aurora, Colorado, stands near a window in the facility.

the population,” her study
concludes. “The results of this
study provide very pessimistic
data.”

Deeb, who specializes in
pediatrics, said the next gen-
eration is off to a better start.

eo
ron Doser

The right shoe makes all the
difference in how we look and feel.
Your feet are the foundation and
support of the rest of your body.
Shoes should do more than cover

your feet. Great shoes should feel



great. Ai cot Solutions, we take

~ of your feel.

| oot Solutions can

¢Prolonged Standing

fi
§
i
ql

e Arch Pain/Strain

e Metatarsal Pain



* Narrow Feet



exon ang

ie ey

Tava





help you...



°Flat Feet ° High-Arched Feet

° Artritis eDidcisin. Foot Probie:
°Corns ¢Ingrown Toenails
*Calluses ¢Achilles Tendonitis
¢Bunions ¢Fallen Arches

‘SPECIALIZING IN: MEN SIZES UPTO 17 AND WOMEN SIZES UPTO 13 = WIDER WIDTHS,

BCH Oievyaasancesis)

~ SANDYPORT PLAZA STORE 1E West Bay Street
email:nassau@footsolutions,com



Children, he said, are taught
nutrition and the benefits of
physical activity. Now, fami-
lies, local governments and
school boards need to take
action;.while doctors need. to
follo




up and find out if_at-

(AP Photo: David Zalubowski)

risk patients know where to
get help.

“When you ask a family
what they’re doing, the answer
is all about time. They know
what’s good. for, their families,
but both parents are: esoriang,

and sometimes the only time
they have is to pick up fast
food,” he said. “They have to
understand, your health
depends on it.

“We will not give up,” he
said. “We can’t give up.”

Diabetics should check medicines for sugar

@ By CAROLYN SUSMAN
Cox News Service

WEST PALM BEACH, Florida
— Because it’s cold and flu season,
we’ve been seeing lots of adver-
tisements for over-the-counter cold
and cough medicines. They all tend
to blur together in my mind, except
for one: Coricidin HBP.

This product was developed by
Schering-Plough, a pharmaceutical
company, that now is a sponsor of

the American Heart Association’s
hypertension Web site —
http://www.americanheart.org
The HBP in the medicine’s name
stands for high blood pressure. The
point is that many cold medicines
contain decongestants that can raise
your blood pressure. Coricidin HBP
does not. The box touts this infor-
mation so people with this condi-
tion can avoid taking a medicine

_ that may help with one health prob-

lem — a cold — while wreaking hav-

- Mobile (242) 557-1294

ammcanrenaad
paramedlab247@yahoo.



oc with another — high blood pres-
sure.

But people with diabetes can
have reactions to over-the-counter
products, too. How many sugar-
free medications do we see adver-
tised? None that I’m aware of.

The American Diabetes Associ-
ation - http://www.diabetes.org -
points out this problem on its Web
site. “Always check the label of
over-the-counter medicines before
you buy them to see if they have
sugar. Decongestants and some
products for treating colds raise
blood sugar levels.

“Decongestants to clear your
stuffy nose, and cough syrups, can
make your blood glucose (sugar)
go up. Some medicines have things
in them like dextrose, glucose, fruc-
tose and dextrin which are all
names for sugar.”

So are sucrose and sucralose, also
found in these products.

Of course, people with chronic
medical conditions must be on top
of their illnesses and know how

their bodies react to everything.

‘from food to drugs, even those
medicines they can buy without a
prescription.

But many diabetics may be
unaware of the sugar that is added
to these cold medications. What is it

’ Mary Poppins said? A spoonful of

sugar helps the medicine go down.

But it doesn't help blood sugar
levels if you're sensitive to sugar.

You can find the same caution-
ary advice about over-the-counter
products in many publications,
among them, a revised edition of
“Diabetes Survival Guide” (Bal-
lantine Books.)

The new soft-cover edition
warns, “Check all medications for
sugar. Many cold medicines are
loaded with it and can throw your
control off in a hurry.”

The author, Dr Stanley Mirsky,
writes, “Sudafed and Triaminic
syrups, for example, contain three
and-a-half grams of carbohydrate
per teaspoon. If you take three tea-
spoons a day for a cold, you are
adding 10 and-a-half grams of
unwanted simple sugar to your
bloodstream.” He suggests looking
for sugar-free formulas such as
Robitussin SF, Safetussin DM, Sor-
butuss and Diabetic Tussin.

It does seem odd that while
Schering-Plough is touting its
blood-pressure-safe medicine and
sponsoring a Web site for the
American Heart Association, sugar-
free medications receive little to
any exposure. Whether you believe
in taking drugs or not — gargling
warm water with salt is helpful for a
cough - taking a drug without
knowing all of its side effects is dan-
gerous.

¢ Carolyn Susman writes for the
Palm Beach Post. E-mail: carolyn
(underscore) susman AT
pbpost.com

i
1
7)
a





T





















HE TRIBUNE

@ TARA Guber poses in her yoga
teaching room at home in Los Ange-
les. When Guber created a yoga pro-
gramme five years ago for a public
elementary school in Colorado, she
envisioned students meditating to

never fathomed her proposal would
provoke a crusade by Christian fun-
damentalists and parents who
argued to the school board that
yoga’s Hindu roots conflicted with
Jesus’ teachings.

Tae

relax before standardized tests. She :

(AP Photos: Reed Saxon)

eR CU

athens

Paitin!








WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007, PAGE 11F



Besos
Bist
ay

HB TARA Guber and staff members Mattilyn Rochester (left) and Laurie Parlapiano (right)
demonstrate a typical session, where she teaches the teachers at home in Los Angeles.

paw usa





Buying a home is not only a dream come true,



EVERY MONTH GETS YOU CLOSER TO HON
it can also be a great investment that appreciates over time. Start saving automatically with
the Scotiabank Home Savings Plan and we'll top up your savings with as much as $2,000.+ So
while others are still saving, you can be out house-hunting. Let a Scotiabank representative
show you how the Scotiabank Home Savings Plan can work for you. Drop by your nearest

Scotiabank branch today. :



You save. We top it up.
Become a homeowner sooner. Visit us today.





* Trademarks of The Bank of Nova Scotia. Trademarks used under authorization and control of The Bank of Nova Scotia. + Conditions apply. Subject to credit approval.






































eS PAGE 12F, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007 . | THE TRIBUNE | |
| as individual as ye
Reality Check. | |
With BahamaHealth you can. ao iy ge ee as
; by ‘ te ee ee ES
We've got health plans with flexible == ® 5 045)
options that suit your individual needs. | ae
for information on individual and group coverage, :
familyguardian.com today!
ae

Health |.

YOUR HEALTHB EAN







ail
Ah

INSURANCE
COMPANY

SALES OFFICES: NASSAU, FREEPORT, ABACO & ELEUTHERA CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET, NASSAU P.O. BOX SS 6232





The Tribune

Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

Pm lovin’ it.
TIF |
67F |

| ai? PARTLY |

di SUNNY |



















Volume: 103 No.58 °

CASH ASI TE
TMNT is Mew (a

NTS a OF BUSINESS SECTION

Transformation
hits another snag

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE eagerly anticipated
transformation of Nassau’s air-
port has hit yet another snag
with a delay in handing over
operations to the Canadian
management firm, Vancouver
_ Airport Services (YVRAS), it

has emerged.

: The delay — which was con-
firmed by Transport and Avia-

“tron Minister-Glenys*Hanna~

Martin at the PLP’s branch
meeting Monday night — was
caused when Joseph Reckley,
acting general manager of the
Airport Authority, suffered a
stroke at Christmas time, gov-
ernment’s chief negotiator Sir
Baltron Bethel told The Tri-
bune yesterday.

Sir Baltron said that as a
result of Mr Reckley’s stroke
“some things that should have
been completed, the pieces had
to be picked up.” °

Nevertheless, he said, negoti-

ations are moving steadily
ahead and all agreements per-
taining to the hand-over of air-
port operations are expected to
be completed within the next
30 days,

However, business sources
claim that there is some dis-
gruntlement on the part of
YVRAS -— the subsidiary com-
pany of YVR— which has the
contract for the Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport —

~and ‘that the executives of the

world-renowned Canadian firm
are disappointed at the slow
pace at which the Bahamian
government is moving.

Sir Baltron said he was’

unaware of any such sentiments,
emphasising that steady
progress is being made and that
he is “optimistic by how things
are going.”

Minister Hanna-Martin on
Monday night told radio station
Love97 that some final details

SEE page 11

PM: Tribune is threat to
govt in upcoming election

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

PRIME Minister Perry Christie has claimed that The Tribune is
one of the main threats to his government in the upcoming gener-

al election.

He urged Supperen at the Fox Hill branch meeting on. Monday
night to pin up Tribune articles on their walls as inspiration for the

upcoming campaign.

Mr Christie accused’ The Tribune of being determined to restore
FNM leader Hubert Ingraham to power, and encouraged their
supporters to be aware of “who’ s trying to take us out”.

SEE page I 11

TNiire ieee!

denies ever
being involved |

on ae |

1 Q

i
@-

ICE BROKERS & AGENTS

| Eeathera | Exum
Wels.) |





WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

Carl Bethel

in human
smuggling

involved in human smuggling.
His statement follows the

facilitated a favour for some-

ficking and alien smuggling.
Speaking in the House of

in March 2002.

“I specifically'and affirma- }
tively deny that I ever, in any ; 0
: divorce hearing in her attempt

capacity, had any suspicion,

information or knowledge of }

any person allegedly involved ;

in the smuggling of human car- ; referred to as Ms Andrews to

go at the time I sought to assist : protect her identity, has decided

; to come forward, as she thinks
; that the laws and judicial

SEE page 11



PRICE — 75¢

of the Phi Beta Sigma Fraterni
FNM candidate for South Bea

involved in the BTYI pilot pr:
yesterday. The trade-based pri
_ Was started at the school in,
‘and aims to give students th

pursuing more practical courses.

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

| Transport Minister denies |
admitting govt responsible

for Sea Hauler tragedy

: TRANSPORT and Aviation Minister Glenys Hanna-Martin | i
i said she never admitted that government was responsible for the ;

. + Sea Hauler tragedy.
FNM Senator Carl Bethel has | yOhG aid ther de

denied that he was ever : the question of legal liability is one for the attorney general.

She said that despite the findings of the Wreck Commission,

said in a statement issued yesterday.

SEE page 11

hits out at the judicial system

i dent.

A WOMAN who says she

system has left her unable, after
nearly a year, to even attain a

to leave her abusive husband.
The woman, who shall be

stances of battered women.

cal and psychological well-being
of her children.

The abuse started shortly
after her marriage began.

had this young girl pregnant,

SEE page 11



INS executive .
allegedly attacked
_ by Bahamian boxer

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - A ZNS exec-

i utive was allegedly threatened
: “Any assertion that the minister of transport and aviation admit- | and attacked Sunday by a well-
1 tows the + ted liability on behalf of the Bahamas government is incorrect,” she ; Known Bahamian boxer, who |
claim by Foreign Affairs Minis- :
ter Fred Mitchell that while Mr ;

Bethel was attorney general, he ! Hospital could only produce medical files for two victims - even }

TANG : though 25 persons were treated in the wake of the accident.
one that police files show was :

involved in fraud, human traf- ;

; was arraigned in Freeport
The minister also responded to claims that the Princess Margaret ; Magistrate’s Court on Tuesday
? in connection with the inci-

Cyril Minnis, a former boxer,

was charged with assault in a
:' matter, involving ZNS general
: manager Elvis Hepburn. He

Woman who claims she was battered

Assembly last week, Mr ;
Mitchell asked Mr Bethel to :
explain a letter that he wrote i
to his then colleague, Minister ;
of Foreign Affairs Janet Bost- ;
wick, who, at his request, per- has been battered and tortured
sonally intervened and granted } for more than 20 years has
visas for six Haitian nationals ; decided to speak publicly — as
the inefficiency of the judicial

pleaded not guilty to the

; charge and was granted bail.

According to reports, Mr

Hepburn, who sustained an

i : injury to the eye, was at
process in the Bahamas are not } Wendy’

cae igi a4 y’s Restaurant on Janu-
sensitive to the specific circum ! ary 28 when he was attacked.

: The incident is believed to

Ms Andrews decided to leave : have stemmed from alleged

her marriage based on fears for | repeated political threats

her life and fears for the physi- i regarding Mr Hepburn’s recent

: appointment at ZNS.

“Tt is a sad day when any

i person has to resort to violence
: and intimidating of any citizen.
“When I found out that he }
i politics that we have people in
: society that has not grown-up

: politically,” said Mr Hepburn.

It is a sad day in the Bahamian

Inspired by the sun...

Located behind the Outback Steak House near the PI Bridge
. Open Monday - Friday 10:00am to 4:00pm - Saturday 10:00am - 2:00pm
Telephone 242-394-4711 » www.bahamahandprints.com





PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight





MANAGER — PRIVATE BANKING & WEALTH MANAGEMENT SERVICES

on Mondays



invites qualified applicants for the following position:

MANAGER -
Private Banking & Wealth Management Services

The applicant must have the following minimum qualifications:

PROFILE:

* Bachelors Degree in Finance
¢ STEP Qualification

* 10 years experience in advising clients on fiduciary services and developing

appropriate legal structures
° Superior organization, commu

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

- © Client Relationship Management

° Investment of client funds
* Monthly management reports
* Quarterly reports to clients

* Business development and marketing activities

* Account opening formalities
* Invoicing & booking fees

* Estate Planning

¢ Administration of Trusts

* Production of trust deeds, letter of wishes & testamentary trusts
* Training, management and coaching of staff

Send resume no later than February 7th, 2007 to:

The Human Resource Director

Fidelity «
P.O. Box N-4

= ) FIDELITY
FIDELITY BANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

A MEMBER OF THE FIDELITY GROUP OF COMPANIES

_ €-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com

CAN an event happen, or will















nication, interpersonal and computer skills








51 Frederick Street
853 » Nassau, Bahamas
f: 326.3000

EXCITING AND CHALLENGING OPPORTUNITY FOR
YOUNG BAHAMIANS

A Maritime career could take yc

there.

on to the world’s most fascinating ports and far flung destinations,

Do you have, or are likely to-have, 5 BGCSE passes, including Math, Physics/Combined Science and



English Language at grade ‘C’ or above?
Have you obtained, or do you expect to achieve, a combined SAT score of at least 1500?

Are you physically fit?

Are you between the ages of 16 and 20 years?

if you have answered YES to the questions above then read on.

The Bahamas Maritime Authority and the Bahamas Shipowners Association are once again offering
attractive scholarships to young academically sound Bahamians who are keen to train for an exciting
and challenging career in the Maritime Industry which is gaining increasing national importance.

These generous scholarships are inclusive of tuition, fees, course material, accommodation and
transportation costs, Commencing in September 2007, successful candidates will follow a 4 year
degree programme at the California Maritime Academy, a unique campus of the California State
University. Upon completion of the degree, the qualified officers will be expected to serve on board 3
Bahamian flagged vessel for at least 2 years providing the solid foundation on which to build their
Maritime careers,



Further information and application forms can
be obtained from Mrs Erma Rahming Mackey,
Assistant. Director, Bahamas Maritime
Authority, Gold Cirele Complex, East Bay
Street, P O Box N-4679, mas,
394 3024, fax: 39 Completed
applications must be submitted in person or by
post, with copies of academic
certificates/transcripts and proof of Bahamian
citizenship, no later than 9" February 2007,

















it not occur? This is considered
the chance, the probability or the
possibility. The study of risk finds
its origins in the human attempt
to control these outcomes,
according to Bernstein (2000). It
can be further said that the more
control we have, the safer we feel,
for we have in our minds reduced
the opportunities for loss.

Nevertheless, the numerous
definitions for risk do not make
this task easy at all. However,
prevalent in these definitions is
the desire to determine when,
how and the loss involved in the
undertaking or event.

Risk, as stated by Sir Frederick
Warner FRS (1992), in the Royal
Society Study Group: Risk Analy-
sis, Perception and Management,
is: “The probability that a partic-

. ular adverse event occurs during

a stated period of time, or results
from a particular challenge.”

Carl A. Roper (1999) puts for-
ward the following definition:
“The potential for damage or loss
of an asset.”

From the above definitions, it is
apparent that risk can be associ-
ated with the lack of, or absence
of, security or safety measures,
inclusive of policies. How safe is
the environment? This is sup-
ported by O’Creevy and Soane
(2000), when they state how risk
is considered in all of our activi-
ties from the simple ones, such
as buying a lottery ticket, or
pulling a car into busy traffic.

Hood and Jones go on to
explain risk as being “comprised
perceptions about the loss poten-
tial associated with the interrela-
tionship among humans and
between humans, and their natu-
rals (physical), biological, tech-
nological, behavioural and finan-,
cial environmerts”.

This expansion does two things.
First, it brings in to play the per-
ception of risk. By nature, human
discernment of an event or inci-
dent is based on the culture they
are living in. This was mentioned
earlier, as seen by the way in
which September 11, 2001, was
received around the world. Some
peapl@were happy, some sad.

: ROUSE
BSGV ELE SOR ERIN
WRIA INA

a full‘size SUV.

ly rigid cabin structure
ENC enue Cae Le) ‘
WET UNO LCE
protection.

THE TRIBUNE



Racca to sey

Second, risk, because of the
environment or profession it is
associated with, takes on a spe-
cific meaning to a particular pro-
fessional group. It then becomes
rather difficult to talk about risk
without discussing its perception
and the culture it exists in. This is
supported by Bellaby (1989) in
the article, To risk or not to risk.
An example of this is the
tightrope walker, and his/her per-
ception of risk. The audience at a
circus sees this individual as very
daring and brave; some naysayer,
of course, will see the act as rather
foolish. The walker may even
share some of these conclusions,
but to a lesser degree than those
who are not aware of the hours of
training that goes into performing
the walk. Likewise, it would not
be prudent for. the untrained to
take on the task of the lion tamer
that places his head into the
mouth of a lion. The trainer, of
course, does not perceive the
same risk as the spectators.

Training, conditioning and.edu-
cation create a cultural view of
what risk is. These methods.can
be formal or informal in their
approach, and can be national as
it pertains to a country, ethnic
group or organisation. In fact,
many companies go to great
lengths to create and ingrain a
specific culture to ensure a par-
ticular performance level. The
methods companies use include
Management by Objectives
(MBO), Strategic Business Units
(SBU) and Total Quality Man-
agement (TQM). What does this

- have to do.with risk? Based on

ae



Price includes rustproofing, licensing and inspection to birthday, full tank of fuel,
24,000 miles/24 months warranty and emergency roadside assistance.

QUALIT

#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET 322-3775 ¢ 325-3079

Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals, Queens Highway, 325-6122
or Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2916

Suzuki's all-new SX4 is a cross between a sporty
compact and a light SUV. The go-anywhere design is
perfect for today's lifestyle— efficient daily
transportation an dynamic all-round performance.

This crisp handling, Sport X-Over comes loaded with: alloy
wheels, automatic transmission, air bags, CD player, ABS
brakes with EBD, air conditioning, keyless entry

roof rails, fog lamps and much more

ON-THE-SPOT FINANCING with Commonwealth Bank

auto
Y sales



these concepts, the actions, inter-
actions or reactions of individuals
are determined, and provide an
understanding of what the world
should be like. Thus what is seen
as risk, or risky, can and is deter-
mined by some form of training,
conditioning or education. It then
becomes only sensible to for-
malise this process to achieve

maximum benefit for the con-

cerned parties.

Attempts to formalise these
actions, interactions or reactions
give us a basic concept of what is
called management. Robbins and
DeCenzo (1998) define manage-
ment as being: “The process of
getting things done efficiently and
effectively through and with peo-
ple.” Additionally, management
has been described by Drucker
(1999) as: “The constitutive, the
determining, the differential
organ of society”, and: “The spe-
cific practice that converts amob
into an effective, purposeful and
productive group”. Just as a dis-
cussion of. risk is not possible
without recognition of the per-
ception, it is critical to highlight

that management is an attempt _

to control those perceptions.
NB: Gamal Newry is the pres-
ident of Preventative Measures, a
loss prevention and asset protec-
tion training and consulting com-
pany, specialising in policy and
procedure development, business
security reviews and audits, and
emergency and crisis manage-
ment. Comments can be sent.to
PO Box N-3154 Nassau,
Bahamas or,....” e-mail
gnewry@coralwave.com

















PAGE 8E, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007



TRIBUNE SPORTS:



Nadal to represent —
Spain in first round
of Davis Cup,
Federer sits out

@ TENNIS
LONDON
Associated Press





RAFAEL NADAL
was picked Tuesday to
represent Spain at the
Davis Cup against a
Swiss team without top-
ranked Roger Federer.

The second-ranked
Nadal, who lost to Fer-
nando Gonzalez in the
quarterfinals of the Aus-
tralian Open, will team
with David Ferrer, Fer-
nando Verdasco and
Feliciano Lopez against
Switzerland on carpet in
Geneva.

Nadal already knew
he’d miss a chance at
playing Federer, who
won the Australian Open
on Sunday for his 10th
Grand Slam title, ruled
himself out of the match
in November so he could
concentrate on keeping
his No. 1 ranking.

The International Ten-
nis Federation released
the official team rosters
Tuesday.

In the absence of Fed-
erer, Switzerland will be
led by Stanislas Wawrin-
ka, Marco Chiudinelli,
Yves Allegro and.
Stephane Bohli.

Other top players,
including Andy Roddick,
James Blake, Ivan Ljubi-
cic and Tommy Haas,
will also be playing in the
first round on Feb. 9-11.

The other first round
matches are: Chile vs.
Russia; France vs. Roma-
nia; Germany vs. Croat-
ia; Belgium vs. Australia;
Czech Republic vs. Unit-
ed States; Belarus vs.
Sweden; and Austria vs,
Argentina.

The United States,
which has won the Davis
_ Cup a record 31 times,

will face, the Czech.
Republic on clay in
Ostrava.

Roddick and Blake
will be joined by Aus-
tralian Open doubles
champions Bob and
Mike Bryan against
Tomas Berdych, Lukas
Dlouhy, Ivo Minar and
Pavel Vizner.

Defending champion
Russia will be without
third-ranked Nikolay
Davydenko. Instead,
Marat Safin, Dmitry Tur-

_ sunov, Igor Andreev and
Teimuraz Gabashvili will
take on Australian Open
runner-up Gonzalez,
Nicolas Massu, Paul
Capdeville and Adrian
Garcia on clay in La Ser-
ena, Chile.

France will host Roma-
nia on hardcourts in
‘Clermont-Ferrand with
Richard Gasquet,
Sebastien Grosjean,
Arnaud Clement and
Michael Llodra playing
Andrei Pavel, Victor
Hanescu, Victor Crivoi
and Horia Tecau.

Haas will lead Ger-
many, also on hard-.
courts, against Croatia in
Krefeld. Benjamin Beck-
er, Alexander Waske and
Michael Kohlmann will
join Haas in playing Lju-
bicic and teammates
Mario Ancic; Ivo
Karlovic and Marin Cilic.

Lleyton Hewitt will
play for Australia at Bel-
gium on clay in Liege
along with Chris Guc-
‘cione, Paul Hanley and
Peter Luczak.

Olivier Rochus, Kristof
Vliegen, Christophe
Rochus and Dick Nor-
man will represent the -
hosts.

Belarus is hosting Swe-
den on hardcourts in
Minsk with Max Mirnyi,
Vladimir Voltchkov,
Pavel Katliarou and Ser-
guei Tarasevitch facing
Robin Soderling, Jonas
Bjorkman, Thomas
Johansson and Simon
Aspelin.

Argentina, playing
without David Nalbandi-
an, will compete on car-
pet at Linz, Austria, with
Jose Acasuso, Juan del
Potro, Guillermo Canas
and Sebastian Prieto
against Jurgen Melzer,
Stefan Koubek, Oliver
Marach and Julian
Knowle.











ae
o.
5
‘<
C)
=
O
S
—

SIDNEY Collie emerged as
the champion of the Baptist
Sports Council’s seventh
annual Family Fun Run/Walk
Road Race that was held on
Saturday morning.

Collie ran away from the
pack to win the four-mile run
segment of the race that was
named this year in honour of
Minister Clinton Minnis, the
immediate past director of the
Bahamas National Baptist
Missionary and Educational
Convention’s National Youth
Convention,

The first female finisher was
Sherry Francis.

In the two-mile walk race,
Eric Seymour was the first
male finisher to cross the line.

Also at the completion of
the race, the BSC hosted a
Health Fair where members
of the Ministry of Health and
Doctor’s Hospital provided
free screening tests for all par-
ticipants.

Minister Minnis said he’s
seen the growth and develop-
ment of the road race from its
inception in 2001 when he
placed third to the point
where it is right now.

“This is all about having a
good time and I’m pleased
that this race is being held in

my honour,” said Minnis, who.

commended the BSC for the
gesture, even though his term
in office expired in Septem-
ber.

“It’s been a wonderful time
and I will continue to be a part
of this experience.”

For Collie, who competed
in the under-30 division, it was
only a matter of time until he
won his first title

“J just want to thank God.

‘The race was good, but I was

looking for some more com-
petition,” he noted. “I hope
that next year Jason
(Williams) and Mackey
(Williams) will be back so I
can give them a run for their
money.”

Injuries

Collie further noted that
he’s hoping that this will be a
breakthrough year for him as
he tries to get over the injuries
that have plagued him in the
past.

He thanked his coach, Ash-
land Murray, for sticking it out
with him during his ordeal.

Sherry Francis, competing
in her first race in two years,
said she was surprised that she
still had enough energy to win
the female segment of the
race.

She was also even surprised
that she emerged as the oldest
female finisher in the run.

There was also a Pas-
tor’s/Minister’s segment in the
race, which was won by Rev.
Livingstone Bevans, who was
quite pleased with his perfor-
mance,

“It was short, but it was well
put together,” he insisted.
“Bless God.” “

Rev. Bevans stated that he
will be back next time to
defend his title.

“It was good, but I just had
one challenge and that is to
deal with Rev. Bevans next
year,” Rev. Nottage charged.
“It was good. But I will get
him back next year.”

Among some of the other
divisional winners were:

Male runners - Seharon
Saunders, Leonardo Bain,
Ashland Murray Jr; Valentino
Rolle, Ashland Murray Sr,
Ricardo Rolle, Stephen Mur-
ray and Raymond Rudon.

Female runners - Lashan
Burrows, Mishea Burrows,
Isher Johnson, Jonique Webb
and Racquel Fowler.

Male Walkers - Steven Rus-
sell, John Webb, Hosea Wal-
lace, Basil Miller, Nikeno

Demeritte, Wilton Brown,'

Clinton Minnis, Kedor
Knowles, Rev. Harrison
Thompson and Colin ‘Trophy’
Knowles.

Female Walkers - Joannie
Webb, Brittany Stubbs, Ariel
Webb, Latyra Ferguson, Shan-
dria Saunders, Tia Hinsey,
Laurette Hinsey, Jacqueline
Sands, Joy Moss, Cyprianna
Saunders, Janet Cooper, Lav-
erne Nixon, Joann Webb, Ari-
anna Hinsey and Berdie
Stubbs.







@ SIDNEY COLLIE (centre) collects his awards for winning the Baptist Sports Council’s 2007 Family Fun Run/Walk Race on

Saturday from Minister Clinton Minnis (left) and Stephen Murray (right).



@ REV. Livingstone Bevans (centre) is presented with his trophy by Minister Clinton Minnis (left) and Stephen Murray (right) at the

Baptist Sports Council’s 2007 Family Fun Run/Walk Race on Saturday.

Elaine Sargent, one of the
three nurses from the Ministry
of Public Health’s Healthy
Lifestyles, said they were
pleased with the response they
got from the participants as
they did a complete body
check-up.

“We just wanted to see what
their weight and height was
supposed to be for your body
height,” said Sargent, who was
assisted by Nurse Ruth Coak-
ley and Nurse Pamela Carey.

The BSC thanked the Min-
istry of Public Health as well
as Doctor’s Hospital and the
Bahamas Association of Cer-
tified Officials (BACO and
Thompson Trading through
Gatorade for their assistance
once again in officiating and
providing the drinks for the
participants.

@ TIA HINSEY receives her
award from Minister Clinton
Minnis during the Baptist
Sports Council’s Family
FDun Run/Walk Race that
was held on Saturday.







PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007





Bahamas
National Trust
executives call
on Governor
General

EXECUTIVES of Bahamas
National Trust (BNT) called on
Governor General Arthur D
Hanna on January 23 at Gov-
ernment House. Pictured from
left are Hank Ferguson, BNT
financial specialist; Eric Carey,
BNT executive director; the
governor general; Lynn Gape,
BNT deputy director.

(BIS Photo
Raymond A Bethel)

Embassy sponsors |_

Narcotics Detection

and Tracking training |

for RBDF Officer

_ THE United States Embassy
continues to assist Bahamian
law enforcement agencies with
training and funding in the
fight against illegal drug traf-
ficking.

The Embassy’s Narcotics
Affairs Section (NAS) recent-
ly provided a member of the

Royal Bahamas Police Force .

with a new drug-sniffing dog
and the opportunity to partici-

‘pate in a narcotics detection

and tracking training course in
the United States.

RBPF Constable Garth
McIntosh travelled to Mechan-
icsburg, PA and received four
weeks of training with the
RBPFs new drug-sniffing dog
Vori.

Vori is an eight-month-old,
65 pound male Belgian Mali-
nois that was donated to the
RBPF by the embassy at a cost
of $7,500.

The embassy provided
another $3,000 for Constable



@ PICTURED from left to right are Taisha LI

McIntosh’s training pro-
gramme. Both dog and con-
stable are presently stationed
at the Grand Bahama Interna-
tional Airport.

During a recent visit to
Grand Bahama, US Ambas-
sador John Rood met with
Constable McIntosh, com-
mended him for his dedication,
and encouraged him to contin-
ue to utilise the recent train-
ing to keep drugs off the
streets,

“The training provided to
Constable McIntosh and his
drug-sniffing companion
reflects the continuing close-
ness of the ongoing partner-
ship between the Bahamas and
the United States to combat
illegal narcotics trafficking,”
said the embassy in a state-
ment. :

@ Photo shows from left:
Ambassador Rood, Consta-
ble Garth McIntosh and Vori.





Wa)
oyd, Tamr

4]





‘a

Jones, and Christie Cash. Seated is Mrs Russell, the school

principal.

Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc donates
to Claridge Primary School

SCHOLARSHIP, service, sisterly love and finer woman-
hood — these are the principles on which service organisation
Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc was founded 87 years ago by five
strong, independent and distinguished black women.

On Wednesday, January 24, Christie Cash (president), and
Taisha Lloyd (public relations officer) of the sorority’s Theta :
Epsilon Zeta Chapter donated a Spanish poster board to the
Claridge Primary School Spanish class.

The donation was accepted by the school’s principal Mrs
Russell along with Spanish teacher Mrs Tamra Jones.

Both Mrs Russell and Mrs Jones expressed their gratitude for
‘the donation and stated how the poster board would help in
-teaching the students how to read and speak Spanish.

After the presentation, Mrs Russell gave Cash and Lloyd a
tour of the school grounds, highlighting developing areas such
as the school’s flower garden and agricultural farm — which
the students plant and maintain themselves.

The agricultural farm is used to encourage the students’ inter-

est in agriculture.

Both Cash and Lloyd said they were impressed with the
school’s proactive approach in broadening the horizons of its stu-

dents.






For Your Heart's
__ Sake, Choose |

OSson Canola Oil.

Trans fatty acids are a form of saturated fat that raises

cholesterol and increases the risk of heart disease,
Wesson vegetable oils are naturally low in saturated fat
_and contain zero grams of trans fatty acids per serving.

Do your valentine a favour

by cooking with heart-healthy |
Wesson canola oil.

Â¥ Doctor recommended

V Zerocholestero!

Â¥ Contains healthy omega-3 fats

Â¥ Helps to maintain low cholesterol levels



Wesson is a registered! brand of ComAgra Foods.

THE TRIBUNE.















Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID ED68R8F3Y_7JMP5I INGEST_TIME 2011-10-03T14:34:30Z PACKAGE UF00084249_02807
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES




PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS ~



Election 2007: how the
tch up

candidates ma

THE following unofficial
list of candidate match-ups
is accurate up to yesterday
afternoon.

e Farm Road

Prime Minister Perry
Christie will find himself fac-
ing a relative newcomer,
educator Ella Lewis. In 2002,
Mr Christie beat his oppo-
nent by more than 1,500
votes.

¢ South Beach
It has been suggested that

incumbent Agatha Marcelle
‘may not run in this election.



PN



@ PRIME Minister Perry The PLP candidate, whoever
Christie faces Ella Lewis he or she is, will face former
in Farm Road Coalition for Democratic



























2007 FORD SPORT T
$39,700.00 en

4.0L V6 Automatic

Limited
Edition,
loaded
with

leather
interior




RAC




SmartChoice

‘during the 2002 election.

2006

Make the SmartChoice!

. See the full line of your favourite Ford vehicles at

FRIENDLY MOTORS LTD__

THOMPSON BOULEVARD » TEL.: 356-7100 » FAX: 328-6094

EMAIL; friendlymotors@hotmail.com * WEBSITE: friendlymotorsbahamas,com PART OF YOUR LIFE

Reform executive Phenton
Neymour, Mr Neymour, with
the majority of the CDR
leadership, went over to the
FNM in June following the
return of their leader Dr
Bernard Nottage to the PLP.

° Delaporte

Dr Hubert Minnis is said
to be running an extremely
organised campaign for the
FNM against the affable
incumbent, Youth, Sports
and Housing Minister
Neville Wisdom.

e Mount Moriah

If the embattled Keod
Smith does get the nomina-
tion from the PLP, he will
again face former FNM
leader Tommy Turnquest,
who lost his seat in 2002 to
Mr Smith by a little more
than 100 votes,

¢ North Eleuthera

FNM Incumbent Alvin
Smith will run against the
PLP’s candidate, who has yet
to be named,

° Adelaide

Michael Halkitis is expect-
ed to meet the FNM candi-
date, former deputy leader
of the CDR Charles May-
nard on the election battle-
field. Mr Maynard joined the
FNM with Mr Neymour in
June.

e Yamacraw

Minister of Social Services
Melanie Griffin is expected
to go up against Pauline
Cooper-Nairn, who ran for
the FNM in St Thomas More





FORD F150
$34,300.00

4.6L V6 Automatic









Reg Cab STX
The worlds
best selling



full size
truck
(other
models
available)















Zp





© St Thomas More

PLP Frank Smith:
expected to run against
accountant Reese Chipman.

¢ Marathon

Former FNM cabinet: min-
ister Earl Deveaux is expect-
ed to face Ron Pinder in this
constituency. Mr Pinder, a
first-timer when he ran in
2002, won his seat by 14
votes,

° Exuma

The FNM has recruited
former Bahamian ambas-
sador to the US Joshua Sears
to run against PLP incum-
bent Anthony Moss.

© Fort Charlotte

This is expected to be a
showdown between "two
great legal minds," The
incumbent, Minister of-Edu-
cation Alfred Sears, is
expected to face off against
lawyer. Michael Barnett.



@ MINISTER of Tourism Obie
Wilchcombe will face David
Wallace in West End and Bimini

© West End and Bimini

The FNM’s David Wal-
lace, who was unseated by
Minister of Tourism Obie
Wilchcombe, will face his
2002. opponent once again.
Mr Wilchcombe beat Mr
Wallace by more than 400
votes.

¢ Garden Hills

PLP incumbent Veronica
Owens is expected to face off
against former road traffic
controller Brensil Rolle.

@ CARL BETHEL could face
Sidney Stubbs in Holy Cross

° Holy Cross

The controversial Sidney
Stubbs, if he is ratified by his
party, will face his old neme-
sis Carl Bethel. The new-

comer Stubbs beat former

Attorney General Bethel by
more than 200 votes in 2002,

e Long Island

The newly-converted inde-
pendent Larry Cartwright
will run for the FNM in 2007.

e Fox Hill

In what will prove to be
one of the most interesting
match-ups in the 2007 race,
Foreign Affairs Minister



from people who are
making news in their: .
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award, ;

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.








Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

you are raising funds for a

Fred Mitchell will find him-
self up-against “native
Fox Hill gal” Dr Jacinta Hig-

gs.
¢ North Andros

Incumbent PLP candidate,
Financial Services Minister
Vincent Peet, is expected to
face Westernair owner Shan-

. drice Rolle.

° Montagu

PLP senator Yvette Turn-
quest will face incumbent
Brent Symonette once more.
Ms Turnquest lost by almost
600 votes in the last election.

¢ Carmichael

Former FNM senator and
current chairman of his par-
ty Desmond Bannister will
run against PLP incumbent
John Carey for the second
time in a general election.
Mr Carey won last time by
more than 300 votes.

e MICAL

Minister of Consumer
Affairs V Alfred Gray will
run against FNM Dion
Foulkes in the country’s
southernmost constituency.
In 2002, the race for this con-
stituency was won by only
four votes. The initial count
was so Close that it had to be
decided in Election Court.

Mr Foulkes lost his seat
last election in Baillou Hills
to Leslie Miller.

© Baillou Hills

Minister of Agriculture
Leslie Miller will face the
immediate past deputy
leader of the FNM Sidney
Collie.

° High Rock

Incumbent FNM candidate
and former minister in the
‘Ingraham administration,
Kenneth Russell, will face
newly appointed Senator
Doswell Coakley, who
recently announced that he
was resigning from the pres-
idency of Grand Bahama
Chamber of Commerce to
pursue the seat.

e Pineridge

Ann Percentie may repre-
sent the PLP against lawyer
Kwazi Thompson in the
upcoming election.

e Marco City

Incumbent PLP candidate
Pleasant Bridgewater may
face former FNM cabinet
minister Zhivargo Laing.

© Elizabeth

Elma Campbell will run
for the FNM against fellow
lawyer Malcolm Adderley.

° South Eleuthera

Speaker of the House
Oswald Ingraham will face
Johnley Ferguson.

_© Golden Gates

Incumbent PLP candidate
and Minister of Immigration
Shane Gibson will face
lawyer Don Saunders for the
FNM. Social activist Clever
Duncombe will run as an
independent.

e Lucaya
Incumbent FNM candidate

Neko Grant may face ‘attor-
ney Constance McDonald.







Co W/ . §
Vas Mf /

isnt
sat Remar eat tte










M@ ATTORNEY General
Allyson Maynard-Gibson could
face Byron Woodside in
Pinewood

e Pinewood

Attorney General Allyson
Maynard-Gibson may face
accountant and lawyer Byron
Woodside.

¢ Eight Mile Rock

Newcomer Verma Grant
will represent the FNM
against PLP senator Caleb
Outten.

¢ St Margarets

Loretta Butler-Turner will
represent the FNM. The PLP
candidate has yet to be
announced,

e St Cecilia

Deputy Prime Minister
Cynthia Pratt will defend her
seat for the PLP. The FNM
has yes to announce a candi-
date.



@ FNM leader and former
PM Hubert Ingraham will run
in North Abaco

e North Abaco

FNM leader and former
prime minister Hubert Ingra-
ham will defend his seat. The
PLP have not announced a
candidate.

eSouth Abaco

Former PLP senator Edi-
son Key will run for the FNM.
The PLP has yet to announce
a candidate.

e Cat Island, San Salvador
and Rum Cay

Phillip “Brave” Davis will
defend his seat for the PLP
against FNM senator Gladys
Sands.

e South Andros

Former broadcaster
Pricewell Forbes will run for
the PLP. He will face inde-
pendent incumbent Whitney
Bastian and real estate devel-
oper Marjorie Johnson, who
will be running for the FNM.

e Englerston

Minister of Transport
Glenys Hanna-Martin will
face attorney and FNM can-
didate Raymond Rolle.

¢ Bamboo Town ‘

Independent incumbent
Tennyson Wells will face
attorney Branville McCartney
for the FNM. The PLP has
yet to announce a candidate.

¢ Bain and Grants Town

It is expected that incum-
bent Bradley Roberts will
step aside to allow Health
Minister Dr Bernard Nottage
to run on the PLP ticket. He
will face the FNM’s youngest
candidate, former Torchbear-
er president David Jordine.

e Kennedy

If the PLP incumbent
Kenyatta Gibson is nominat-
ed, he will face Michael Turn-
quest, a first-time candidate
for the FNM. '

«= ¢

‘

«

Pe cae WS ea es:

“me AB

PP LSS

OF IF Ls

~+- oa"
-THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS |

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007, PAGE 3



ELECTION
COUNTDOWN



lm By RUPERT
MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

WITH the official
announcement of the full
slate of FNM candidates
coming yesterday, three
political pundits, an avowed
FNM, a committed PLP and

n “unbiased observer”, all
of whom wished to remain
anonymous, weighed in on
the soon to be election bat-
tle field and gave their pre-
dictions. |

According to the FNM
campaign general for Blue
Hills the campaign has
proved very interesting. In
fact, he said, FNM candidate
Sidney Collie has made
some good inroads into
incumbent Leslie Miller’s
turf.

“T think he (Mr Collie) is
going to win. I would not
have said that four months



ago, but Sidney Collie is
going to win,” he said.

However, both the inde-
pendent and PLP commen-
tator thinks that this might
be wishful thinking.

“Mr Miller is very popular’

now among PLPs and
FNMs, I think Blue Hills is a
safe seat for the PLP,” the
independent commentator
said.

While the PLP commen-
tator thinks that Ft Char-
lotte will be a win for his

party the FNM feel that it’

will be a close race but their
candidate Michael Barnett

gs. Political

pundits give

their vote predictions

A PLP, an FNM and an
independent look
ahead to election 2007

Alfred Sears out.

_ All three pundits however
agree that PLP MP for
Golden Gates cannot be
beaten.

“Although Gibson has lost
some credibility and he does
not have the big margin he
had many months ago
before the Anna Nicole
thing. He was a runaway.
While it is narrowed, I still
think he will win,” the FNM
commentator said.

The PLP pundit said that
many current PLP MPs wish
they were as secure as Mr
Gibson. ;

“Shane is almost invinci-



®@ PHENTON NEYMOUR:
Two of our three pundits
believe the FNM newcomer will
win the South Beach seat

ble down there. He has done
a great job in securing his
base and his campaigner is
an extremely hard worker,”

_he said.

While, perhaps not sur-
prisingly, the FNM com-
mentator said that the oppo-

will eventually “just edge”

@ THREE politically savvy commentators share their views on the outcome of the upcoming general elections.



A commentator who supports the PLP'said

his party will win the election with 21 seats.
He added that the FNM are sure to win 11,
that one seat will remain independent, and



Cushions |

; According to an experienced but inde-
: pendent political pundit, the odds are

: that the FNM will win by eight seats.

: He predicted the following outcome at

that eight constituencies are as yet unde- } the polls:
cided. He predicted: :
3 : FNM wins
FNM wins a:
Elizabeth . ! Adelaide
High Rock : Carmichael
Long Island / Ragged Island : Delaporte
Lucaya : Eight Mile Rock
Montagu : Elizabeth
North Abaco : Exuma
South Eleuthera ‘ Fox Hill
North Eleuthera : Garden Hills
South Abaco ? High Rock
St Margaret : Holy Cross
Mount Moriah Long Island / Ragged Island
: Lucaya
PLP Wins : Marathon
i; Marco City
: Montagu
. : Mount Moriah
Cat sland. Ruri €ay and San Salvador ? North Abaco
Englerston i North Andros/Berry Island
Farm Road : North Eleuthera
Fort Charlotte i Pineridge
Fox Hill : South Abaco
Garden Hills : South Beach
Golden Gates : St Margaret
St Cecelia : St Thomas Moore
South Andros
Marathon se
Marco City : PLP Wins
MICAL :
Pinewood : Bain and Grants Town
Pineridge : Bamboo Town
-St Thomas More : Blue Hills
‘South Beach : Cat Island, Rum Cay and San Salvador
West End and Bimini : Englerston
Yamacraw : Farm Road
; : Fort Charlotte
- Independent wins : Golden Gates
Bamboo Town : South Eleuthera
; : St Cecilia
Undecided : West End and Bimini
Kennedy _ i Yamacraw
Belpone : South Andros
Eight Mile Rock cy
Exuma ? MICAL
North Andros/Berry Island :
Holy Cross

‘Elegance .





: According to another commentator, who
: admitted a bias towards the FNM, the
: Spee will win by 18 votes. He pics
: dicted:

: FNM wins

? Adelaide
:? Bamboo Town
: Blue Hills
: Carmichael
: Delaporte
: Eight Mile Rock
: Elizabeth
:; Exuma
: Fox Hill
_? Garden Hills
: High Rock
: Holy Cross
: Long Island / Ragged Island
: Lucaya
: Marathon

Marco City

: MICAL

! Montagu

: Mount Moriah no seat
: North Abaco

: North Andros/Berry Island
: North Eleuthera

: Pineridge

: South Abaco

? South Beach

: St Margaret no seat

: South Eleuthera

: West End and Bimini
: Yamacraw

_ PLP Wins

! Bain and Grants Town

: Cat Island, Rum Cay and San Salvador
: Englerston

i Farm Road

? Fort Charlotte

: Golden Gates

i St Cecilia

; South Andros

: Pinewood

: Kennedy

: St Thomas More

may
(eae):
ay (65

UT ALS A
Ce



ENTIRE STOCK OF

sions en

Home Fabrics

ee St [242] 325-8233 ¢ Robinson Rd [242] 322-3080



HANNA-
MARTIN: All three pundits
believe the Minister of Trans-
port will win the Englerston seat

& GLENYS

sition would sweep Grand
Bahama he did say that the
party would have to work
hard in securing Marco City
and West End and Bimini.

“On the ground there was
talk that Marco City would
be the toughest constituency
in Grand Bahama while all
along we were hearing Obie
Wilchcombe. Regardless
though, there seems to bea
wave for the FNM in Grand
Bahama.

“Tam just about con-

_vinced that David Wallace



Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian family

Parliament Street (near Bay St.) Tel: 322-8393 or 328-7157
° Fax: 326-9953

Crystal Court at Atlantis, Paradise Island Tel: 363-4161/2

Lyford Cay (next to Lyford Cay Real Estate in
Harbour Green House) Tel: 362-5235

will win West End. If any-
one can win it David can,”
he said.

However, the PLP com-
mentator said that among
the seats that would be a
foregone conclusion for the
PLP would be Mr Wil-
chombe’s seat.

Among the seats the com-
mentators found interesting
was Bamboo Town. The
FNM pundit said that the
public could expect Ten-
nyson Wells to finish last in
a three-way race behind
FNM and the PLP if the
party nominates someone.

“The FNM ought to win
Bamboo Town. Branvill
McCartney will win. He has
done a good job of getting
those FNMs who supported
Tennyson Wells to come
back to the FNM,” he said.

However, the PLP pundit
said that Mr Wells is sure to
retain his seat in Bamboo
Town if he decides to run.









TROPICAL
arses
Fame
a ays ara EY,

OPEN
7 DAYS A WEEK FOR YOUR
SHOPPING CONVENIENCE




e-mail: www.colesofnassau.com ¢ P.O. Box N-121

ONE FoR Tel!

e LINEN = * COTTON
pe LAMOUR = « SILK

* BROADES » CHIFFON

* BRIDAL

* SPECIAL OCCASION

* TROPICAL FABRICS

* ALL SHEER & ANTIQUE SATIN
* ALL COTTON PRINTS
» ALL JACQUARDS, BROCADES

rie Hen eieiae melee



BUY 2 YARDS AT REGULAR PRICE & GET THE 3RD

averly
Fabric from
Spain

Vinyl, Plastic, Felf, Net & Tulle
NOT on SALE.
PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



‘EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR







The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master





LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914




SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.







Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991






EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-



Published Daily Monday to Saturday






Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama









TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

. Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348













Global warming debate is heating up



LAST week was interesting in the contro-
versial dialogue on climate change.

On Tuesday, President Bush uttered a
phrase during his State of the Union speech
that made headlines around the world.

In calling for cuts in U.S. gas consump-
tion and a greater emphasis on alternative
fuels, Bush conceded that something must be
done to “confront the serious challenge of
global climate change.”

That is a significant statement coming from
a president who has been reluctant to
acknowledge the climatic trend and even
less willing to admit that human activity
affects it. Bush stopped short, however, of
calling for mandatory emissions caps, which
would limit the amount of carbon dioxide
that companies can produce.

The day before his speech, the heads of 10
major energy companies asked Bush to do
just that in the form of a cap-and-trade sys-
tem. Their call takes some of the wind out of
the administration’s signature retort: that
mandatory emissions regulations would
excessively hurt American industry.

Instead, the CEOs of General Electric,
Duke Energy and other firms argue, meeting
climate challenges now will ensure econom-
ic competitiveness in a warming, world.

The corporate appeal fell flat on som
critics. ;

“Industry is interested in its public image
and, relatedly, profits. It represents absolute-
ly no expertise in climate,” Richard Lindzen,
Alfred P. Sloan Professor at the Massachu-
setts Institute of Technology, said in an e-
mail to The Express-News.

Lindzen is a nationally cited critic of
“alarmist” theories of global warming, which
he calls junk science.

In his view, the available evidence doesn’t
support the claim that human activity has
any discernible impact on the slight warming
seen since the late 19th century.

In other words, there’s really nothing
we’ve done or can do to change the situation.

“Under the circumstances, the best and .

so far the only viable policy is to prepare
society to be as adaptable as possible since
events like (Hurricane) Katrina will occur
regardless of climate change, as will climate
change itself regardless of man’s activities,”
Lindzen wrote.

Lindzen and a few other scientists are in
the minority.







KIEYANNA THOMPSON to





the date of publication of this notice.

ee














PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, LAKESHIA THOMPSON of
Buttonwood Avenue and Cedar Streets, Pinewood Garden intend
to change my name hild’s name from to LATAZ’YAH EDTWANYA
Ti AH EDTWANYA KIEYANNA
ROLLE. If there are any objections to this change of name by Deed
Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box SS-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after





“Lose Yourself In Style”

Some. 500 scientists and officials are meet-
ing in Paris this week to work on a final ver-
sion of their report on how fast the world is
warming, how serious it is — and how much
is the fault of humans. The report by the
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change,
to be released Friday, could influence what
governments and businesses do to fight glob-
al warming.

According to sources familiar with its con-
tent, the report contains “smoking gun” evi-
dence of the human impact on climate
change.

Meanwhile, the World Economic Forum,
meeting in Davos, Switzerland, has
announced that climate change represents
the “shift most likely to affect the world in
the future.”

This is indeed a global problem that.
requires a global solution.

Bush and other critics of such treaties as
the Kyoto Protocol are right to cite the
inequality of policies that do not extend to
countries like India and China, two nations
whose mega-economies represent significant
and growing sources of emissions.

But that doesn’t exempt the United States
— the producer of 25 per cent of the world’s
carbon emissions — from doing something
now.

All this attention to global warming is
good. Isn’t it?

Well, yes and no. .

On one hand, more discourse on some-
thing of such global import is imperative.
This really should be dinner-table conver-
sation in homes all over the world.

On the other hand, hype is one of the first
by-products to arise when an issue du jour

‘becomes de rigueur — for example, the claim

that dramatic weather events like Katrina
are clear evidence of climate change.

The problem with an argument like that is
that if it can be scientifically refuted, or even
not scientifically proven, it gives critics
ammunition to debunk the broader theory of
climate change. It feeds directly into the very
alarmism Lindzen points to.

At that point, the debate becomes about
the debate. And that doesn’t get us any-
where.

(This article was written by
Rebeca Chapa - San Antonio
Express-News-c.2007).











Storewide Sale

January 25th - February rst
Excluding Pashmuinas

All Sales Final
No Store Credits

Less 5% for Credit Cards

Store Hours



Plugging you into the power of the sun...

We cannot
trust the PLP

EDITOR, The Tribune.

NO LAW-ABIDING
Bahamian would agree that drug
trafficking or any crime com-
mitted should not be investigat-
ed; the perpetrator arrested and
eventually brought to justice.

No sensible person would also
disagreed with the fact that if
the recent baggage handlers who
were “tricked” into going to the
US by their employer committed
a crime in the Bahamas, should

- be arrested by Bahamian police,

brought before a Bahamian
magistrate, and if found guilty
sentenced in the Bahamas

‘according to Bahamian law.

But all of that aside, and in

spite that there might have been ,

collusion, the most compelling
thing that obviously happened
was that the “ongoing investiga-
tion” in the Bahamas was hap-
pening without the assistance
and/or knowledge of the police,
Ministry of National Security,
the Attorney General, the Min-
ister of Foreign Affairs or the
Prime Minister. At least.that is
what everyone responsible is
expecting intelligent Bahamians
to believe.

This is unfortunate, downright
disrespectful and most certainly
counterproductive.

This one event will cause a
backlash, the likes of which have

never before been seen in this.

country, because Bahamians
believe that they were “sold out”
to the United States by the PLP.
It’s a matter of sovereignty.

Several words come to mind,
slackness, clueless, lack of
courage, deception, weakness
and too many cther words that
are closely associated with the
PLP government, reference to
the five baggage handlers.

First of all the Minister of
National Security must have
been briefed by the Commis-
sioner of Police at least once. In
this case it seems to me that
either the Commissioner and/or
the Minister of National Secu-
rity played too loose with the
truth.

Secondly, an investigation
where severe action was con-
templated internationally must
have got advice from the coun-
try’s lawyer who is the Attorney
General, Allison Maynard-Gib-
son..

Thirdly, since these events
stretched across the borders of
two country’s and both govern-
ments were involved, the most
sensible thing to expect is the
Minister of Foreign Affairs Fred-
erick Mitchell to help in the dis-
cussions to make sure the
process runs smoothly enough,
so that the sovereignty is not dis-
respected, which I suspect, should
be a priority with Mr Mitchell.

Last but by no means least,
the Prime Minister of the
Bahamas the Rt Hon Perry

FINALLY AFFORDABLE...





DaaMeas

letters@tribunemedia.net



Gladstone Christie. |

Mr Christie is in an unenvi-
able position, if he admits to
knowledge, he is in trouble for
allowing it to happen because it
would be perceived that he did
not protect the rights of the men.

This whole turn of events
exposes one glaring truth, that
the PLP cannot be trusted. One
only needs to recall, those who
are willing to recall, the Churchill
saga where two PLP MPs were
literally at each others throats,
and the Prime Minister had sev-
eral conflicting stories for that
one event. This singular event
must have done some damage

to his credibility.

The Bahamas needs a Prime
Minister they can trust and one
who is not afraid to make hard
decisions, even if they are
unpopular at the end of the day,

‘ because any man who thinks he

could please everyone all the
time is deluding himself.

The first time the Bahamas
was described as “A Nation for
Sale” it was under the PLP ref-
erence to drug trafficking. Today
the Bahamas is being “Sold
Out” by the PLP, again drugs
are involved. We have come full
circle.

IVOINE
INGRAHAM
Nassau,

January 27, 2007.

March to the tune of
patriot of the pass

EDITOR, The Tribune.

IT APPEARS some patriot from struggles of days gone by, polled

. my toe to awake me from my sleep: to tell their dreams they had for the

Bahamas and its people. So here I’m burning the midnight oil.

First and foremost; thank you for putting in print; the letter (Do we
have leaders or misleaders). I’m not associated with any political par-
ty, but have my political views!

The few in my humble environment look forward to see in print, the
other letters — the poetic spirited approach to concerns in this arena.

I heard in my mind — ringing thoughts:- “Bahamas how did you get
here; you’re not supposed to be here”. You made the wrong turn.
I’m reaching back — but you’re not standing there — where we
thought you should be — “in par excellence!”

Why so many suffering for the gains of so few? Why so few believe
they’re entitled to power inscriptively — as a pose to contractually.

In the struggles of days gone by — these were the very ideals we
struggled against. The very evil we struggled against is back with the
colour of a different skin!

Again the masses don’t have the intellect or political will — to com-
mand the direction they want to go!

Allowing themselves to be drag along — because of the paralysis of
fear! Being indoctrinated by the few, and believing that they’re where
they should be.

Many turning over in their graves to see what have become of us.
Turning over our inheritance to aliens, and our land to foreigners: “Not
only the principle of common sense appear to be impeded, but the com-
mon feelings of human nature have been retarded. —

If God created us for others, how much more he created us for
ourselves! So to reject the grassroots as insignificant — and the for-
eigners as everything goes against the root of our struggles.

Whose greatest good are immediately being served? How many
grassroots generations have to suffer before we benefit from the so-
called greater good? Unfortunately, there are so many that are blind
and can’t see. It will take another two generations of suffering before
we may be able to come out of these crisis.

So the gone, but not forgotten, have to wait a while before they can .
rest in peace! :

In closing this chapter in Bahamian history: A request goes out

’ from beyond the grave “that grassroots Bahamians come together, and

march.in memory and appreciation, of patriots of the struggles of
days gone by!”

Bahamians — you must come together again as a people, (without
the assistance of political parties or politicians) organise and march
forthwith!

RANDY

PATRIOTIC

BAHAMIAN

Nassau,

January 26, 2007.

‘98 HYUNDAI ELANTRA Best offer
‘99 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
‘00 HYUNDAI GALLOPER
‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE
‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE.

Very low mileage, very clean

‘05 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
Only 5,000 miles plus very clean

‘03 SUZUKI BALENO
‘03 SUZUKI XL-7

7-Passenger, dual A/C & low mileage

‘89 TOYOTA BUS Best offer

SOLAR POWER CONCEPTS LTD.

A Star in the Galaxy Group of Companies

Crawford St., Oakes Field
Tel: 323-5171 Fax: 322-6969

Mon- Fri (9:30 am -5:30 pm)
Sat (9:30 am -6 pm)



QUALITY3i3¢

LIMITED
#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS Ie
EAST SHIRLEY STREET ¢ 322-3775 ¢ 325-3079

Visit our showroom at Quallty Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals * Queen's Highway * 352.4122




c/a) Mackey Street (beside KFC)
Tel: 393-0551



i
A
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007, PAGE 5



Mii oe oo Sees eee ee ee
Excellence Estates residents claim



In brief

Activities
planned
for Coastal
Awareness
Month

THE National Coastal
Awareness Committee is
again planning a range of
educational activities for
Coastal Awareness ©
Monthin April. |

The committee is a
group of stakeholders
from the private and pub-
lic sectors with an inter-
est in promoting the sus-
tainable development of
the Bahamas

The Bahamian coastal
zone includes reefs,
beaches, bays, mangrove
forests and sea grass
beds.

These environments
are threatened by inva-
sive species, pollution
and marine debris, over-
fishing, climate change
and habitat destruction.

One of the activities
planned for April is a sci-
ence competition, which
is open to all schools,
clubs, and church groups.
Prizes will be awarded to
participants in primary,
junior high and senior
high school age cate-
gories.

“This ground-breaking
science-based contest
invites students to identi-
fy and scientifically
examine a problem facing
the Bahamian coastal
environment, develop
solutions to solve that
problem, and recommend
improvements,” said a
committee spokesman.

“The aim is to encour-
age students to become
involved with environ-
mental stewardship while
developing their critical
thinking skills.

“It gets students
involved, outside of the
classroom in.projects that
have real-life ‘applica-.:
tions while affecting
change in their communi-
ties. These skills are
essential for life in the
21st century.”

Prizes for last-year's
contest winners included
digital cameras. The
overall winners were able
to take part in the Wider
Caribbean Environmen-
tal Youth Programme in
the Virgin Islands.

The deadline for entry
this year is February 16.
Entry forms are available
online from the Bahamas
Reef Environment Edu-
cation Foundation.

RRR sles
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
aRAO OT

ae a CES
ce



REE at

WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY 31ST

6:30am Community Page 1540AM
8:00 Bahamas @ Sunrise

9:00 Bullwinkle & Friends

9:30 King Leonardo

10:00 International Fit Dance
10:30 Real Moms, Real Stories,










Real Savvy
11:00 Immediate Response
noon ZNS News Update
12:05 Immediate Response Cont'd




1:00 Island Lifestyles

1:30 Ethnic Health America

2:00 Thousand Dollar Bee

2:30 Aqua Kids

13:00 Paul Lewis

3:30 Don Stewart

4:00 —_Little Robots

4:30 Carmen San Diego

5:00 ZNS News Update

5:05 = The Fun Farm

6:00 One Cubed

6:30 News Night 13

7:00 Bahamas Tonight

8:00 — Anchor Projects

8:30 Be Your Own Boss

8:35 Caribbean Passport

9:00 Labour Speaks: National
Health Insurance

10:00 Caribbean Newsline

10:30 News Night 13

11:00 The Bahamas Tonight

11:30 Immediate Response

1:30am Community Page 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the
ito] ahaa CoMaaFeL cea ESLULATIALO LC
programme changes!

























houses still in dire need of repair

@ By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

HOME owners in Excel-
lence Estates say their houses
remain in dire need of repair —
despite promises from the
Department of Housing to
look into their complaints.

The residents of the low-
cost housing community in
Carmichael first told The Tri-
bune their concerns about two

been sending complaint let-
ters to the housing department
since then.

However, they claim, their
letters have gone unanswered.

The Tribune visited the sub-
division on January 17 to find
out if the residents had made
any progress with their prob-
lems, and the reporter was
met with an additional com-
plaint.

The residents claimed they
had suffered “police harass-

ment” since their stories first
appeared in the newspaper. -

The Tribune contacted Gor-
don Major, director of the
Department of Housing, and
he promised that an investi-
gation and report would be
prepared on the matter.

On Monday, Mr Major said
that the investigation and
report were completed.

weeks ago.

They complained about
leaky roofs, cheap house paint
and a great deal of unfinished
work in their recently-bought
homes.

Excellence Estates was offi-
cially opened by the govern-
ment in September of last
year, and the frustrated home-
owners claimed they have

“Yes, the inspector did the |

report and their concerns did-
n’t even fill one page,” said
Mr Major. “But, I’ve asked
him to go to all the home own-
ers and get a list and we’ve
identified a contractor who is
going to go in there and look
at all the outstanding items
and deal with them.”

Contractor

Mr Major claimed however
that the contractor was hav-
ing problems finding the resi-
dents at home, because many
of them are at work during
the day.

Asked how much the home
repairs would cost, Major said
the contractor had not put
together a proposal yet.

However, Ms Leanna

Algernon Allen plans to launch
upscale resi



Hi MR AND Mrs Kevin Johnson, investors from the US; speak
to Prime Minister Perry Christie and former Housing Minister
Algernon Allen

FORMER Housing Minister Algernon Allen said he is tak-
ing advantage of the “unprecedented building boom” to launch
anew, upscale residential community — Coral Breeze Estates in

Coral Harbour.

Coldwell Banker Lightbourn Realty, the exclusive agents,
kicked off the project Thursday at a special reception at the
Hilton for realtors and VIPs, including Prime Minister Perry

. Christie.

. Banker Pauline Allen, Mr Allen’s partner and sister, and
the other developers .also were present.

Mr Allen, a director of Coral Breeze Estate, said there are less
than 2,000 acres of “immediately marketable land” left in
New Providence, or around 9,000-plus lots, excluding infra-
structure. ;

“The government availability of land for low and middle
income housing in New Providence is now at a premium,” he
said.

Mr Allen said low income housing land on the island has
been exhausted.

He said he was pleased that the new gated Coral Breezes com-
munity is located is an area which is expected to see almost one
billion dollars in investment.

Mike Lightbourn, president of Coldwell Banker Lightbourn

Realty, said land is a great investment opportunity in the.

Bahamas.

He noted that those who have invested in land over the years
have done incredibly well.

“This is just another part of that sphere where people have the
opportunity to invest, particularly now at the introductory
prices — the lots start at $90,000 for single family and $94,500 for
duplex lots.”

Mr Lightbourn said that first-time home buyers can benefit
from the introductory prices.

Sales ‘co-ordinator Carmen Massoni said Coral Breezes is
particularly attractive because it will have 24 hour security,
three parks, wide roads and it is only five minutes from beach-
es, hiking trails and horse back riding facilities.

Mr Allen said the new “billionaire” developers in the south
west, Albany, along with the planned development of a port and
revitalisation of the South Ocean Hotel, will boost property val-
ues, increase employment and provide more jobs, as well as act-
ing as a springboard for entrepreneurs.

“There is a buying mood for Bahamian investors in and
throughout the Bahamas,” he said.

“They are buying food chains, petrol chains, insurance and
investment companies. This is a period of unprecedented eco-

nomic expansion and the future now appears to be gloriously

bright.

“The real prospect of full employment is very near,” he said.

Mr Allen said the economy has grown by an almost “extra-
ordinary” seven per cent and $15 billion in investments has
launched unprecedented home construction by the govern-
ment and private investors.

“At all costs, we must not put a brake on investment in this
country,” he added.

Prime Minister Christie said great opportunities exist, but
cautioned that they will only succeed with planning.

He said government has a commitment to buy 350 acres of
land from the Joe Lewis organisation to “ensure that parallel to
the development of the major homes for foreigners . . . we will
have sister developments for Bahamians.”

This would include “guaranteed access to all of the beaches,
duck pond and wildlife habitat and parks of a major kind in Ade-
laide,” he said.

“The country does not have economic challenges and prob-
lems now,” Mr Christie said. “We are guaranteed a great
future.”







Ladies Sizes

y A Ri 10



\RLOSL LOO PRLLIBE

Carey, spokesperson for the
angry home-owners, said that
a contractor had been around
to a few homes, but did not
return.

Ms Carey explained: “I
talked to most of the people
and everybody said that there
is a contractor in the area, but
he is fixing one of the houses
that wasn’t finished.”

She said that her house has
not been inspected as yet.

Asked why she believed the
Department of Housing had
not resolved their concerns,
Ms Carey said: “They are try-
ing to keep our complaints
from being printed in The Tri-
bune, but as long as we keep
on talking about it, then they
will be forced to fix it.”

BAN



Rosetta St. :



Bahamian group
joins protest against
Dominican Republic

dolphin facility

A BAHAMIAN environmental organisation has joined the
protest against a dolphin facility in the Dominican Republic.

reEarth, headed by Sam Duncombe, has signed on to the petition
of the Save Japan Dolphins Coalition which is requesting that the
Dominican Republic block the import of dolphins to the Ocean
World Adventure Park.

International environmentalists say the facility - whose owners
are related to the Meister family, owners and operators of Dolphin
Encounters on Blue Lagoon Island — is scheduled to import 12 dol-
phins from Japanese “slaughter pens.” :

A spokesperson for Dolphin Encounters in the Bahamas empha-
sised that the facility in the Dominican Republic is in fact an
entirely separate company and has nothing to do with the Blue
Lagoon operation.

In a letter to President Leonel Fernandez Reyna of the Domini-

.can Republic, dozens of environmental groups requested that the

transfer of the animals be. stopped immediately.

“By allowing the dolphins into your country, the Dominican
Republic’s reputation as an environmentally friendly tourist des-
tination will be severely tarnished by direct association with the
Japanese dolphin slaughter,” the letter reads.

Environmentalists claim that Japan kills more than 2,000 dolphins
and porpoises annually. They allege that the majority of these ani-
mals are “butchered for sale in meat markets.”

The Save Japan Dolphins Coalition is also claiming that it has
obtained video footage of what it describes as the “cruel, bloody
capture” of the 12 dolphins in question.

The signatories to the petition said they feel that the blocking of
the import of the dolphins by the government of the Dominican
Republic would send an extremely important message to Japan that
environmentally responsible countries will not subsidise the slaugh-
ter of dolphins.





Z oo
SLALLLLAUCALELALMI LLL NAL



Ph: 325-3336
PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





,

Horticultural Society to
hold annual plant sale

PLANT enthusiasts have
been encouraged to root their
love with living Valentines at
the Horticultural Society of the
Bahamas’ annual plant sale.

The event will take place this
year on February 3 from 10am
to 2pm at the Bahamas Nation-
al Trust’s headquarters, The
Retreat.

“Say happy valentines day
with water plants, roses, orchids,
or other exotic or bedding
plants — all at amazingly good
prices,” promised former HSB
president Eric Butler, co-chair-
man of the popular plant sale
and co-chairperson Dorothy
Bowleg.

“Even if you don’t have a
valentine in mind yet, restock
your garden and prepare for
Spring Fever and Easter this
Saturday at the big sale opposite
Queen’s College. There is no
admission charge,” said Butler
and Bowleg in a statement.

“We've kept the extended

hours because of popular
demand, but it is still smart to
be one of the first in line for the
opening. The best stuff goes
fast,” added Mr Butler.

“There is always something
new to spark a gardener’s imag-
ination at this sale.

“Members show off new skills
and new plant life,” said Sara
Parker, a founding member of
the HSB.

Plants range in price from less
than a dollar to more than $100,
depending on size and rarity.

HSB members grow the
plants and label them for sale,
with 15 percent of the price
going to the HSB treasury.

“The plant sale is one of our
most popular events, and one
of our best fund raisers,” said
HSB president Sarah Labosky.

Of special interest each year
at any HSB sale are dozens of
dramatic bromeliads, from tiny
tillandsias or “air plants” to
gigantic hybrids with a five-foot



@ ERROL Duke Strachan (left) gives advice to Coach Tom
Grant during an early HSB annual piant sale

SP 'F

‘



@ MRS Linda Davis pays Gordon Wilde for a majestic Tillandsia at an early HSB annual plant sale
held each year at The Bahamas National Trust “Retreat Garden” on Village Rd.

leaf spread.

HSB members now often
donate inexpensive bare root
plants for the society’s sales.

“No plants will be sold before
10am on Saturday, February 3,”
said Mr Butler.

He urged HSB members to
bring plants on Friday between
2pm and 6pm and between 8am
to Yam on Saturday.

Since 1999, plant hunters
have started lining up shortly
after 8am outside the BNT
gates.

The lines are expected to be
shorter than ever at this year’s
plant sale, HSB officials say.

Founded by the late Mrs Sara
Bardelmeier in 1984, the HSB
conducts a field trip each year

CAREER OPPORTUNITY
CATV Headend Consultant

| yA

CABLE BAHAMAS

Cable Bahamas Limited, operating one of the most advanced
broadband networks, seeks the services of a top-notch professional. The
ideal candidate will have extensive experience in the reception and
distribution of off-air, satellite and tape originated programming to the

outside plant utilizing fiber optic transmissi
current operating environment includes analog

on technologies.

The
and digital channels,

four headends with high-speed cable modem services, in-house 20
channel digital video server, analog conditional access services, and an

advanced upstream management system.

Resposibilities Include:

* Engineer, design and upgrade existing and new headends and-hubs.

* Evaluation and procurement of headend equipment options based on
sound judgement of performance quality and cost of same.

* Support the development and deployment of high capacity and Metro
SONET services, subsystems and devices.

Operation and maintenance of:

* All headend signal-processing equipment for analog and digital video;

* High-Speed data network components and monitoring equipt. also

* Antennas, Dishes, Towers and microwave equipment

* Fiber optic path cabling and management systems (Fwd. and Return)
'*Assist with planning and implementation of new product intros

* Coordinate completion of projects on schedule and on budget

* Prepare, submit and manage a departmental budget

* Plan and insure Headend/Hub Preventative maintenance programs

Minimum Qualifications: :
A University degree in Electrical/Electronic Engineering or equivalent
with at least 10-15 years of experience in Headend Operations and
engineering, of which five (5) years, should be as an international

consultant.

Cahle Bahamas Ltd. owns and operates one of the world's most
advanced Broadband networks and provides world-class television
service and high-speed internet access services throughout the
Bahamas. The company also owns and operates a private submarine,
fiber-optic system connecting the Bahamas and Florida. Cable
Bahamas’ ordinary shares trade on .the Bahamas International Stock
Exchange (symbol: CAB). Additional information can be obtained from
the companies website at www.cablebahamas.com.

Sig

CABLE BAHAMAS

Resumes to be submitted by February 5th 2007 to the
Director of Human Resources or sent electronically to
rbadderley@cablebahamas.com.

a

and produces a massive “Show
of horticultural excellence”
every other year.

This year’s show, “Sara’s
Garden” will honour Mrs
Bardelmeier and will be held in
conjunction with the Orchid
Society of the Bahamas, which
Mrs Bardelmeier also helped
found.

Meetings of both groups are
held monthly, usvally in the gar-
dens of members.

Each year, HSB members
bring truck loads of plants to
the annual sale with part pro-
ceeds going to the society.

Orchids from Flamingo Nurs-
eries and unusual plants from
the Garden of Eden also are

» tsi

@ RESTOCK your garden and y
cultural Society of the Bahamas (HSB) Plant Sale, 1

featured, along with many water
plants —- ever more popular —
grown by member Marina
Greaves.

“Helping beautify the nation
is one of our goals as a society,
now nearly 25 years old,” said
Mr Butler.

Parking is available at
Queen’s College. Shoppers are
urged to bring boxes and bags
for their purchases. Some help
is available for transporting
large plants.

Former HSB president Cyn-
thia Gibbs said: “Some people
bring trucks,of plants to sell and
take home a truck load of other
member’s plants. It’s great fun.
People even fly in from the

Family Islands for this sale.

“Unusual plants, and lots of
good advice, are offered every
year at the HSB sale: orchids,
air plants on driftwood, rare
fruit trees and shrubs, rare
palms, roses and flowering
trees, herbs and bedding plants.

“HSB includes more than 100
members, including all the gar-
den clubs, top horticulturalists
and growers from many of the
Family Islands, so this will be
another plant sale to remem-
ber," says Errol ‘Duke’ Stra-
chan, award winning director of
the National Youth Orchestra.
He supplies substantial num-
bers of plants to the sale each
year.





our love life this Saturday, F' ebruary 3, during the annual Horti-

0am to 2pm, at the Bahamas National Trust

headquarters, The Retreat, on Village Road opposite Queen’s College. “We’ve kept the extend-
ed hours because of popular demand, but it is still smart to be one of the first in line for the open-
ing. The best stuff goes fast,” said former BNT president Eric Butler, co-chairman of the popular
plant sale, pictured along with co-chairperson Dorothy Bowleg (seated). :










Office.

2007.




T

No form will be accepted without:

E COLLEGE OF

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

a

NOTICE

ALL prospective graduates for SPRING 2007 MUST
submit COMPLETED Graduation Evaluation Forms to
the Records Department on or before FEBRUARY 2, 2007.

¥ ALL SIGNATURES (Student’s, Advisor’s and
Chairperson’s) and

Y PROOF OF PAYMENT from the Business

N.B. ANY form submitted after this date will be considered
LATE and will be processed for the Summer Semester


THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS



Cable
Bahamas
disruption |
on Grand
Bahama

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

FREEPORT - Cable
Bahamas Limited
experienced a disrup-
tion in its services on
Tuesday in Grand
Bahama, affecting a
number of residents
and commercial cus-
tomers during peak
business hours.

Keith Wisdom, a
spokesperson for
Cable Bahamas, said
the disruption in cable
TV, Internet and fibre
services was caused
when a utility pole .
became dislodged from
the ground as a result
of a traffic accident on
the Queens Highway.

The services were
off-line from 9am, and
still had been not
restored by 3pm.

A press release
issued by Cable
Bahamas did not indi-
cate which areas or
how many customers
were affected by the
outage.

Mr Wisdom apolo-
gised for any inconve-
nience experienced as
a result of the disrup-
tion in services.

@ A GRAND
Bahama Power Com-
pany employee is in
hospital after being
injured while attending
to the damaged wires
that caused a disrup-
tion in cable services
yesterday.

_GBPC executive
Tony Lopez said that
at about 11.30am, a
senior transmission 4
and distribution lines-
man attending a power
interruption on
Queen’s Highway suf-
fered an injury after
making contact with a
live wire.

Mr Lopez said the
employee is alert and
has been seen by a car-
diologist.

“At this time our
prayers are and
thoughts are will him
and his family and all
our efforts are focused
on his health and well
being,” he said.

Mr Lopez said inves-
tigations are being
conducted in the acci-
dent.

A “NATIONAL emer-
gency” has erupted in the
form of an epidemic in the
dialysis unit of the Princess
Margaret Hospital, the
Bahamas Democratic Move-
ment is claiming.

Party leader Cassius Stu-
art said Health Minister Dr
Bernard Nottage should be
forced to resign for failing to
deal with the situation.

At a press conference held
outside Princess Margaret
Hospital on Monday, Mr
Stuart claimed that senior
health officials are aware
that “life-threatening bacte-
ria” exists in the dialysis unit
at the hospital at epidemic
levels.

The problem, he said,
should have led to the clo-
sure of the unit.

Mr Stuart further claimed
that some senior officials
have put pressure on hospital
staff to keep quiet about the
problem.

He alleged that patients
“face the death chamber”
upon entering the facility,
and that the infection has
already claimed 15 lives.

Mr Stuart said.an addi-
tional 70 persons have tested
positive for the antibiotic-
resistant “enterococcus fae-
calis sepsis” bacteria.

The bacteria, once it enters
the bloodstream, is known to
severely damage the heart by
forming lesions on the aortic
valve, impairing blood flow
to and from the heart.

Dr Patrick Whitfield, med-
ical chief of staff at the hos-
pital, previously claimed that
the bacterial transmissions
had “decreased significant-
ly”.

However, according to Mr
Stuart, staff in the dialysis
unit continue to diagnose
patients with symptoms of
the bacterial infection.

He said evidence had been
collected by a number of
doctors within the hospital —
including one who described
the situation as a “national
emergency”.

The BDM leader claimed
that government has “bla-
tantly betrayed its public
duty to protect and defend
its citizens,” by failing to
publicly disclose the extent
of the problem.

Mr Stuart added that the
unit needs to be shut down,
and the Centre for Disease
Control (CDC) in the US
contacted to determine how
to move forward.

Patients should be referred
to other private facilities
until the PMH unit is clear
of the bacteria, he suggest-
ed.

In November, Dr Whit-
field admitted that 16 to 18
people may have become ill

‘national emergency
has ane at PMH dialysis unit





@ PRINCESS MARGARET
HOSPITAL: The Bahamas
Democratic Movement is
claiming there is a ‘national
emergency’ at the dialysis unit
of the hospital.

due to the bacteria, but
claimed there was no
cause for alarm because the
infection proved to be treat-
able.

Referring to claims that
several deaths had been
linked to the bacterial out-
break, he explained that
patients were already'suffer-
ing from other diseases and
that it would not be fair to
say if the bacteria was nec-
essarily the cause of death.

However, several dialysis
patients have come forward
since that time claiming that
they believe the situation is
“out of control”.

The Tribune called the
Dialysis Unit to attempt to
verify the extent of the prob-
lem, however, staff there said
they were unable to give out
any information.

They suggested instead
that hospital administrator
Mrs Coralee Adderley
should be contacted about
the matter.

However, messages left for
Mrs Adderley, her deputy,
Dr Whitfield and Dr Nottage

_were not returned.

Orban
MYTH

Nassau’s
newest

boutique

<
®BIG SALE
EVENT

Wed. Jan 31st -
Sat. Feb 3

Hip Jeans, tops,
shoes and
accessories

Located in the
International
Bazaar

tel. 322-4535



COMMONWEALTH

q) BANK

CHAIRMAN’S REPORT ON UNAUDITED RESULTS DECEMBER, 2006



In 2006 Commonwealth Bank achieved a significant milestone in Bahamian history surpassing
the $1 Billion mark in Total Assets. In addition in 2006, the Bank, once again achieved record
results for the tenth consecutive year, always with a focus on our customers and consistent
performance, Net Income for 2006 was $40.4 Million, up from $31.8 Million in 2005. The
Board was pleased with the performance of the Bank in 2006 since sustainable success does
not come easily, requiring continuing focus on fundamental strengths while ensuring sufficient
investment is made to address strategic initiatives and anticipated market developments. The
Board has been fortunate to be able to work closely with a dedicated management team and
one that is committed to the future of the Bank and its customers. ,

Gross revenues reached $81.6 Million an increase of 16.4% with the net income contribution
of $40.4 Million an increase of more than 27% over the previous year, both historical highs
for the Bank. Earnings per share increased to $1.08 a further increase of 27 percent over the
previous year with our shareholders also participating in the earnings growth through dividends
of 68 cents per share an increase of greater than 50% over dividends paid in 2005.

Return on Equity (R.O.E.) and Return on Assets (R.O.A.), commonly used ratios to measure bank
performance increased appreciably in 2006. R.O.E. was 34.82 percent an increase of 4.2
percent while R.O.A. was 3.76 percent increasing 9.9 percent. Our overall efficiency ratio
which takes into consideration our non-interest expenses, compared to the Bank’s revenue
generation was 46.7 percent, a further improvement over 2005. The results of our efficiency
rating are reflective of the Bank’s objective to ensure that any expense growth is matched by
revenue generation and customer service. The Bank will continue to place ongoing attention to
operational effectiveness and will seek more costeffective ways to sustain and develop our
product and service throughput.

As the new year began, we opened our latest New Providence branch at Golden Gates. We
have a firm commitment to our customers to be the leader in personal banking by taking
banking to the people who have wholeheartedly supported this Bahamian institution.

On this notable occasion and on behalf of the Board | would like to acknowledge the ongoing
contribution of the individual directors and the personnel throughout the Bank who have and
continue to contribute to the growth and success of the Bank. The proof of their high level of
commitment, professionalism, creativity and interest in Bahamians is clear. | am confident that the
Bank will continue to seek opportunities to sustain the trust we have earned for many more years.

Chairman







COMMONWEALTH BANK LTD.
UNAUDITED RESULTS FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER, 2006

2006

ASSETS ($'000]



NET INCOME ($000)



NET INCOME AVAILABLE TO COMMON SHAREHOLDERS (‘000)}



EPS (IN CENTS) BASIC AND FULLY DILUTED



RETURN ON EQUITY

William BXSands, Jr. T.B. Donaldson
President & CEO Chairman

N.B. A full set of audited financial statements will be published within the time frame established
by BISX.



©2007 CreativeRelations net


PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007




SCHOOLS across the
Bahamas have been preparing
their students since the
beginning of the semester for
this year’s National Spelling
Bee.

Northwestern
district spellers
are buzzing

printed the photographs of stu-
dents from Albury Sayle Pri-
mary, CC Sweeting Junior
High, Gambier Primary, HO
Nash Junior High and Naomi
Blatch Primary.

Pictured today are the

THE TRIBUNE

#@ KURISSA NEWBOLD
Oakes Field Primary

g@ JOEYSA ABRAHAM
Oakes Field Primary

remaining competitors in the
event which will be held at
BCPOU Hall on January 31 at
10am to see who will represent
the Bahamas in the Scripps
National Spelling Bee in Wash-
ington DC.

B@ MALIK STUART
Oakes Field Primary

In yesterday’ s Tribune, we



#@ CRYSTAL ANDREWS
Stephen Dillet Primary

@ SHANTE

Oakes Field Primary Stephen Dillet Primary

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Libraries and Instructional Media Services Department
The Law les! Branch

Lunch & Litigation

Inaugural Luncheon
Topic: Consumer Protection Act, 2006
“ Nw



# IESHA FARRINGTON
TG Glover Primary a

â„¢ FRANKLYN WOODSIDE
Stephen Dillet Primary

# LINDRICJUOR
GIFFORD

Wednesday, 31st January, 2007
Choices Restaurant





Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute m MICHAELIANNA : B SHARMOR MICHEL â„¢SHANIQUE PYFROM
ADDERLEY : over Primar over Prim
_The College of The Bahamas 1G Glover Primary TI REO e ig 2 Mae eee tie

““TRORASSOP-BoUleéVvard ~
NESE ThéBahamas ~
12:00 noon - 2:00 p.m.

Silent Auction of Student Art
will take place during the luncheon



@ RACHE BURROWS
Woodcock Primary

B KARISMA KING
Woodcock Primary

@ BETHLEE GARDINER

Woodcock Primary

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Donation: $35.00 :: Student: $25.00.
Part proceeds in aid of the new library fund


















@ STANLEY SMITH
Woodcock Primary






Mark your calendar
Our Application Deadline
is February 2, 2007

Remember to include the following with your application :
$40.00 non-refundable processing fee .
Copy of passport pages showing your name, date of .
birth and expiration date of passport :
Official high school transcript .
Test scores and copy of BUC and BGCSE results to date ie
Don’t let the deadline pass you by! .
We look forward to welcoming you to The College, -
soon to be the University of The Bahamas. ea



Oe SAS RPE ES ALENT
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007, PAGE 9





The history of the



war on illegal drugs

AST week's article
on the baggage han-

dler controversy drew calls

from some readers for the
legalisation of drugs — which
may not be as crazy as it first
sounds.

Today's moralistic attitude
towards drug use developed
in the late 19th century, when
religious reformers pushed for
a law enforcement approach
to what previously had been a
matter of personal choice.

These crusaders were able
to criminalise the possession
of opium and its derivatives
morphine and heroin, as well
as cocaine, around the time
of the First World War, with
cannabis following soon after.

Before then opiates were
freely available in Western
societies, both on their own
and as an unregulated ingre-
dient in tonics and medicines.
Morphine was a popular
painkiller, heroin was pro-
duced by Bayer in 1895 as a
"safe" cough remedy, and
cocaine was an early ingredi-
ent in Coca Cola.



LARRY SMITH.

outright prohibition of drugs
has led directly to the awe-
some problems of corruption
and violence we face today.
Crime syndicates in the
world's major cities now orga-
nize a global traffic in illicit
drugs — a market response
that only ruthless totalitarian
regimes can effectively
counter.

President Richard Nixon
unleashed the first US anti-
drug war in the early 1970s
after heroin use among US
troops in Vietnam soared.
Nixon suppressed the so-
called French Connection,
which converted Turkish opi-
um to heroin for the US mar-
ket.

But that only increased
global demand. And the Rea-
gan and Bush administrations
were forced to pursue similar



“ The United Nations has
valued the international drug
trade at $400 billion a year —
more than the trade in textiles
or motor vehicles. The
Financial Action Task Force
came up with an estimate of
$280 billion. But whatever the
size of the market, traffickers
can easily earn returns of
thousands of percentage >
points on their investment —

tax-free.”



In fact, people have used
drugs for religion, recreation
and medicine since prehistoric
times, with opium having per-
haps the longest pedigree.
Made from the sap of the
poppy plant, it was an inter-
national trade item as early
as the second millennium BC.

In the modern era, this
commerce was so profitable
that it led to war. Experts say
that today's drug cartels can-
not compete with the British
East India Company's indus-
trial efforts to supply Chinese
users in the early 19th centu-
ry. The so-called opium wars

famously led to the takeover

of Hong Kong and the forced
legalisation of the drug trade
in China.

But, as with the slave trade,
public opinion eventually
changed. And from 1874
British missionaries and
moralists fought a relentless
campaign that culminated in a
1906 decision to end India's
drug exports. By then, opium

“was a global commodity as
important as coffee or tea.

As efforts grew to place
narcotics under international
control, the Opium Conven-
tion of 1912 was agreed to
help resolve the British-
caused drug problems in Chi-

na. And in 1914 the US;-
imposed heavy restrictions on ‘

the use of opiates and
cocaine.

By the 1920s both the US
and Britain had banned these
drugs, and the American tem-
perance movement had suc-
ceeded in making alcohol ille-
gal too (until 1933). Attempts
were also made at this time
to control cannabis — another
plant-derived drug that has
been in common use since
ancient times.

According to the first head
of the US Federal Bureau of
Narcotics: "There are 100,000
total marijuana smokers in
the US, and most are
Negroes, Hispanics, Filipinos,
and entertainers. Their Satan-
ic music — jazz, and swing —
result from marijuana use."

Needless to say, cannabis
was outlawed in 1937.

But many argue that.th

policies in Latin America and
Asia with limited results.
Cocaine became a major com-
modity during the 1980s, as
Bahamians know from direct
experience as a transit point
in this hugely profitable busi-
ness.

Rather than eradicating the
drug trade, prohibition drove
it underground. And experts
continue to predict rapid
growth in the global supply
of illicit drugs, together with
more drug abuse and a rise in
the undesirable side-effects of
the trade — corruption, vio-
lence, organised crime and
illegal arms trading.

_ According to Stanford Uni-
versity philosopher Sam Har-
ris, current drug policies make
no sense: "Concerns about
the health of our citizens, or
about their productivity, are
red herrings in this debate, as
the legality of alcohol and cig-

arettes attest."

He points out that alcohol
is by far the more dangerous
substance. It is addictive, its
lethal dose is easily achieved,
and it accounts for more vio-
lence, more crime, more sick-
ness, more death and more
arrests than all other drugs
combined.

"And yet," Harris says,
"people are still receiving life
sentences for growing selling,
possessing, or buying what is,
in effect, a naturally growing
plant. Cancer patients and
paraplegics have been sen-
tenced to decades in prison
for marijuana possession...The
only explanation is that our
discourse on this subject has
never been obliged to func-
tion within the bounds of
rationality."

So what are the conse-
quences of current drug poli-
cies? .

As newspaper columnist
Jack Cole wrote recently:
"America's futile effort to
arrest its way out of our drug
problems has cost taxpayers
more than $1 trillion since
1970.

“It funds terrorists and
clogs the court system, yet our
kids report that it can be eas-
ier for them to buy illegal
drugs than beer or cigarettes."

In fact, every major study
over the past 50 years in
Canada, the United States
and Europe agrees that
decriminalization of drug
use, under almost. any sce-
nario, is better than the cur-
rent drug war approach. To
see why, all we need to do is
ask how many millions of
people need to be arrested
and imprisoned to solve the
world's drug problem.

In the US alone there are
an estimated 16 million regu-
lar drug users (two thirds use
only marijuana), and the pris-
ons are already full at 1.5 mil-
lion inmates. In the Bahamas,
we all know that Fox Hill
Prison is so overcrowded and
badly run that it is a major
public health problem and
security threat in its own right.

Clearly, banning drugs cre-
ates more “criminals” and
costs more money than the
use of illicit drugs. Criminal-
ization forces users to obtain
drugs from an environment
that is violent and where
crime is inevitable. It inflates
revenues, increases the power
of criminal gangs and requires
ever greater enforcement
efforts.

The American experience
with alcohol prohibition is
instructive. According to one
expert: "As the illegal trade



boomed, so did the number
of violent crimes. Robberies,
burglaries and assaults
increased significantly during
Prohibition. About 880 “gang-
sters” died in turf wars in
Chicago alone. And the over-
all murder rate hit record
highs. Then, in 1933, alcohol
was legalized and violent
crime dropped immediately."

B ut perhaps the great-
est argument against
the current law enforcement
approach is the threat to
social stability and the dan-
ger that organised crime will
turn more countries into
failed states through wide-
spread corruption and vio-
lence. It almost happened
here in the 1980s.

The United Nations has’

valued the international drug
trade at $400 billion a year —
more than the trade in tex-
tiles or motor vehicles. The
Financial Action Task Force

came up with an estimate of -

$280 billion. But whatever the
size of the market, traffickers
can easily earn returns of
thousands of percentage
points on their investment —
tax-free. It is all but impossi-
ble to end the drug trade in






Quality System.




achieve (1) above.

efficiently.



Core Competencies:



P.O. Box N-1123
Nassau, Bahamas

Main Duties & Responsibilities:

Qualifications & Experience

the face of such profits.
As Sam Harris says: "Giv-
en the magnitude of the real

problems that confront us, our

war on sin is so outrageously
unwise as to almost defy ratio-
nal comment."

In short, current drug poli-
cy is both irrational and inef-
fective. Many experts argue
that the only sound policy is
to bring the drug trade within
the law, so that it can be
taxed, controlled and dis-
couraged. Drug prices would
decrease. significantly, drug
potency could be more close-
ly monitored and gainful
crimes would be greatly
reduced.

Police and government
officials could then re-direct
their resources into other
areas, such as investigating
and prosecuting violent crime.
These resources are consid-
erable — the Canadian gov-
ernment spends $500 million a
year to address illicit drug use,
and the American drug con-
trol budget is almost $13 bil-
lion.

Drug reformers say that
the war on drugs has not only
failed to meet the public
health objectives of prevent-
ing addiction, intoxication and
abuse, and prompting an

FINISH CABINET MAKERS NEEDED

Wanted for new state of the art factory.
Must have chop saw, circular saw, drill, hand tools & experience.

Secure job with good pay and benefits for the right person.

Call: 394-4151
Fax: 394-4159 ©

Position Available

Maintenance Technician

The Maintenance Technician shall report to the Maintenance Supervisor and must be
familiar with, understand and operate according to the relevant elements of the Coca-Cola

‘The Maintenance Technician shall be responsible for the following activities, within the
limits of his/her specific skill:

1. Ensure that all equipment works at its optimum level of efficiency by the:
- Installation and commissioning of all plants, equipment, services and utilities
- Maintenance of building and facilities (plumbing, painting, basic carpentry an
masonry and electric)
_ - Maintenance of forklifts and other vehicles
- Fabrication, machining and welding of parts or items as required
- Repairs to all electrical and mechanical equipment

2. Carry out all necessary maintenance activities covering Planned Maintenance (PM),

Condition Based Maintenance (CBM), and Improvement Projects in order to

3. Log and record all work undertaken to the satisfaction of the Maintenance Supervisors
Monitor and operate any production line equipment to ensure that its working

4. Report any non-conformances to the immediate supervision or QA personnel and carry
out the relevant corrective action as is recommended.

5. Perform other reasonable job related duties as may be assigned by management.

City and Guilds I & II or Ordinary Technicians Diploma in his/her area of expertise (i.e.
electrical, mechanical) or a minimum of five years experience in a similar capacity.

Good working knowledge of bottling plant machinery & machinery & services.
Possess good troubleshooting skills.
Ability to read and understand equipment manuals.

Please submit written resume to:
Caribbean Bottling Co. (Bah) Ltd.

ATTN: Human Resources Dept.
On Or Before Feb.16th, 2007

overall decrease in drug use |
— it has aggravated the situa- -
tion by supporting a huge |
black market and depriving .
thousands of medical treat-
ment.

But this is a highly emo-
tional debate. Reformers
think that those who are inter-
ested in tougher drug control
want to turn the world into a
police state. And drug war-
riors think the reformers are
addicts who want to make
more addicts.

And even if we legalize
drugs, there will still be a rev-
enue stream. Whoever gets

_ that revenue will try to maxi-

mize it: "What you might call
the political economy of drug
legalization is a bigger prob-
lem than the legalizers seem
to grasp," says Mark Klein- |
man, a professor of social
research at the University of »
California.

All things considered, it's a -
very tough call. :

What do you think? Send -
comments to larry@tribune- -
media.net bunemedia.net>

Or visit www.bahamapun-
dit.com pundit.com/>






























PAGE 10,WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007



WEDNESDAY EVENING JANUARY

NETWORK CHANNELS




WPBT



Fie va: Deco Drive [Bones ‘The Man inthe Cel’A [American Idol ‘Week 3B: Auditions |News (CC)
WSVN bumed body may be that of Bren- 6 San Antonio” Singing hopefuls au-
nan’s incarcerated adversary. (N) dition. (N) (CC)
C

|

rT Jeopardyl (N) George Lopez [According to |The Knights of in Case of Emer-[Primetime “Medical Mysteries” (N)
‘Wi =WPLG ch " Angie nanahs Jim “Delierance Prosperity Ase ency (N) — {(CC) :

| her story. (N) —_}(N) (CC) curity guard. (N) tec)

Sore oy. Ve] SO Sas)

Hardtalk BBC News World Business |BBC News Fast Track BBC News
BBCI (Latenight). |Report (Latenight). (Latenight).

BET Access Granted |The Parkers ( |The Parkers 1 |Girlfriends \ (Girlfriends © [Girlfriends 0
| (CC) (CC) (CC) (CC) (CC) (CC)

loney 100 to win $1 million. (CC)

| Scrubs “ ly Uni- |The Daily Show |The Colbert Re- |Chappelle’s {South Park The /South Park (Part
‘COM corn’ © (CC) With Jon Stew- {port Donna Sha- |Show (CC) [boys start a talent! of 2) (CC)
| art (CC) ala, (CC) agency.







election.
DIY This Old House |DIY to the Res- |DIY to the Res- |Wasted Spaces |Wasted Spaces |Finders Fixers
(CC) —_feue cue (N) Custom closet.
DW In-Focus (Ger- |Journal: Made inGer- — {Journal: In Euromaxx Journal: |
| man). Tagestema many ~ Depth Tagestema
| E! The Daily 10 jJenna Jameson: The E! True Hollywood Story Adult film star attains | Starveillance
| Hes mainstream success. (CC) Lindsay Lohan.

5] ESPN tiny College Basketball Miami at North Carolina. NBA Basketball San Antonio Spurs at Utah Jazz. From
Live) (CC) Arena in Salt Lake City. (Live) (4 (CC)

The Suite Life of] x * QUINTS (2000, Comedy) Kimberly J. Brown, Don Knotts, Dan Roe- |Life With Derek
DISN aa & ch buck. An only child must adjust to her parents’ new quintuplets. © (CC) [Upcoming school
ickness.

|
i
i



Lady

:00) Cardio |Ship Out, Shape Up ‘Mazatlan’ —_| Buff Brides: The Bridal Challenge |FitTV’s Housecall
(FITTV be’ (Co) |The ship eaches Mazatlan, (CC) [Siobhan & Jule” (CC) Weight-loss & Toni
FSNFL (:00) College Basketball Vanderbilt at Florida. (Live) {College Basketball Alabama at LSU. (Live)

:00) Golf Cen- |U.S. Open Golf Highlights Geoff |PGA Champions Clinic Ultimate Matches
GOLF fate)" losin ae
Lingo (CC; Who Wants to Be a Millionaire © Twenty One 1 (CC) Chain Reaction
Gs fm [eg PR arity

:00) Attack of |X-Play Morgan inX-Play The best {Star Trek: The Next Generation [Cops 0 (CC
G4Tech {fears Europe. (N)- loames of 2008, [20 hteractve ek (Acc) (Pe Cel

|: (00) Walker, — | Walker, Texas Ranger A 1 rye % %% MARCH OF THE PENGUINS (2005) Narrat-
‘HALL exas Ranger old boy is being groomed a is fa- Jed by nap Freeman. Emperor perauhs make an
i! 0 (CC ther for a life of crime. (CC) annual trek across the Antarctic, (CC)

| Buy Me Enlisted |Designed to Sell/National Open . |Property Virgins |Location, Loca- [House Hunters
HGTV the help ofan 11) (ec) House 1 (CC) “Avan & Kal tion, Location | (CC)
agent, ( (CC) A (CC) “Essex” (CC)
Morris Cerullo |Breakthrough:. |Zola Levitt Pre- Inspiration To- [Life Today (CC) |This Is Your Da
INSP ene on lems lage Tar CH (Eo
Reba Cheyenne |My Wifeand {Accordingto Accordingio {Friends Joey | Everybod
KTLA® © ‘kicks Van a of Kids "Gradua- “dim Nai pa rut Jim Jim's birth- [might ‘clas hs Loves Raynor
the house. (CC) |tion’ (CC) fles feathers. |day gifts. (CC) love. (CC) 0 (CC)









Countdown With Keith Olber-

| 00) Hardball

| MSNBC faa abel. Pan lantis

| NICK Jimmy Neutron: |SpongeBob {SpongeBob —_‘|Full House 1 |Full House Roseanne “Se-
| Boy Genius {SquarePants /SquarePants 1 |(CC) ~ |"Fogged Inn” —_|crets” ( (CC)
:00) Crossing {Bones “The Man in the Cell’ (N) [Deal or No Deal (iTV) (N) 0 (CC) [News 1 (CC)
NTV Cb) IPA) (CC) coe

lordan (N) (

Street Tuner | Street Tuner Unique Whips An
SPEED ee Challenge | Challenge ae a New Orleans gets






(re



jes (00) Billy Gra-_ |Behind the Grant Jeffrey |Ancient Secrets |Jack Van Impe [Praise the Lord (CC)
-TBN al cele Scenes (CC) ofthe Bible {Presents (CC)
rusades

fe Everybody Everybody Everybod Everybody Everybody The King of
“TBS Loves Raymond tones Raymond |Loves Raymond Loves Raymond cones Raymond Queens ‘Shear
I N(cc) . IA (CC) ‘The Plan’ (CC) |Debra’s mother. | M (CC) Torture” (CC)

Home for Imagl- jEd, Edd n Eddy |Ed, Eddn Eddy {Camp Lazio [Squirrel Bo My Gym Part
[TOON myetens [ont ABENESH [Panptazo aire TN eae
TV5 La Carte aux trésors David Nolande

Storm Stories [Abrams & Bettes Weather: Evening Edition (CC
TWO soe eee

0s Volume 2 {Billy Joel; Devo; “Dr. Who.” 0 Zappa; B-52s; 3 Mile Island. —_|room destruction.



Everybody | Beauty and the Geek The four re- |One Tree Hill Lucas discovers that |CW11 News at Te
| WPIX __ [Loves Raymond at teams each get a dog; an- |Derek’s interest in Peyton isimore Tong, Jim Watkin
N (CC) other elimination: (N) 0 icc} than brotherly. M (CC)
Jeopardy! (N) |Dr. Phil 1 (CC) Jeopardy! (CC) Frasier Frasier
WSBK (cc wants Eddie to
be neutered.

PREMIUM:CHANNELS ie
E
a




#% BIG MOMMA'S HOUSE 2 (2006, Comedy) Marin Lawrence,



HBO-E

I



iy Harrelson, Kiefer
anhattan to find a

:00) % & FIRST DAUGHTER vo * & THE COWBOY WAY (1994, Comedy) Woo
HBO-W |(2004, Romance-Comedy) Katie |Sutherland, Dylan McDermott, Two cowboys ride into
lolmes. 1 ‘PG’ (CC) missing compadre. © ‘PG-13' (CC)
:00) % %% ONE FINE DAY (1996, Romance-Comedy)] % % THE ICE HARVEST (2005, Comedy-Drama)
HBO-S ichelle Pfeiffer. Two overstressed single parents tip- |John Cusack, Connie Nielsen. A mob lawyer and a
toe around romance. © ‘PG’ (CC) pornographer steal a small fortune. © ‘R’ (CC)

:00) What Remains: The Life and | % % THE MAN (2005, Comedy) Samuel L. Jackson, | GRANDMA'S
MAX-E




renowned photographer. (N) with a salesman in his custody. 'PG-13



avenge his friend's death. © ‘R' (
6:00) a»






(2005) ‘PG-13' business escort. 0 ‘ McC)

ve * %& LEMONY SNICKET’S A SERIES OF UNFORTUNATE ie oe ARACHNOPHOBIA (19
VENTS (2004, Comedy) Jim Carrey, Liam Aiken, Emily Hane A
count plots to steal an inheritance from three orphans. a ‘PG’ (CC)



TMC
. a ee has termites and Venezuelan spider.



Wild Florida But-| America’s Ballroom Challenge The Supreme Court “One Nation Under Law; A New Kind of Justice” The

terflies. © (CC) |“American Smooth” American Court fon the brink of the Civil War; Chief Justice John Marshall, (N)
Smooth category. (N) (CC) 1 (CC) (DVS)

| The Insider (N)_|Armed & Famous “Unfortunately, [Criminal Minds The BAU look to’ |CSI: NY “All Access” Kid Rock's

(@ WFORIn ccc) Sometimes Police Work Reutes outsiders for clues when three col- limo driver is found dead. ( (CC)

| the Use of Force” (N) 1 (CC) lege athletes disappear. (CC)

| Access Holly- {Friday Night Lights “Upping the {Deal or No Deal A student contin- /Medium A young boy's doll, who
(3 WT VI |wood (n) (Cl) Ante" ean ea prepare for ues his game; a Washington woman|seems to have ur a him to kil,
| their first playoff game. (N) (CC) plays for $1 million. (N) ' |spooks Allison. (N) © (CC)

(:00) CSI: Miami |CSI: Miami “Double Cap’ The FBI /The Sopranos ‘Down Neck’ Antho- |The Sopranos ‘The ae of Ten-
A&E Dispo Day” 1 |refuses to ae the location of a ry Jr. gets into trouble at school. O |nessee Moltisanti” The FBI closes in
(cc) witness. 1 (CC) (CC)

on the Sopranos. (CC) °

CBC Marketplace Gift |Little Mosque on|Halifax Comedy |CBC News: the fifth estate (CC) [CBC News: The National (CC)
| cards. (N) the Prairie Fest (N) (CC)

| CNBC (0) Onthe — |Fast Money 1 vs. 100 One contestant battles |The Big Idea With Donny Deutsch

| 00) The Situa- |Paula Zahn Now (CC} Larry King Live (CC) Anderson Cooper 360 (CC)
CNN fiotien [eantene fark

P Cops “Palm |Most Shocking “Deadly Force’ {Forensic Files {Forensic Files [Dominick Dunne:
COURT [peste acc) ! ‘Gold Push & Justice (N) (CC)

Boxing NBA Basketball Sacramento Kings at Minnesota Timberwolves. From
ESPNI the Target Center in Minneapolis. ‘tive (CC)

EWTN Live Super Saints St. |The Haly Rosary|Micah
EWTN [nee Mani

| Fox Report |The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) |Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC On the Record With Greta Van
FOX-NC {shepard Smith ree i eo Giereee

; Still Standing —/Reba Van acci- [Reba “Surprise” /LIVING WITH THE ENEMY (2005, Suspense) Sarah Lancaster. A newly:
“LIFE “Stil Sisters” {dentally “outs” [Everyone gets s_|wed thinks her husband killed his first wife. (CC)
; Judy:meddles. Reba. (CC) |surprise.
ec Scarborough Country MSNBC Special: Quest for At-

os :00) Amazing {Man Whose Arms Exploded (CC) |Untold Stories of the E.R. ‘Hooked Tragedy in Amish Country (N)
TLC tec stores Alive” A steel hook impales a con-
: (CC) struction worker. (CC)

(00) Without a | Without a Trace ‘Crossroads’ The |Without a Trace Using psychologi- [Without a Trace Jack and the team
TNT race “White Bal-|former boyfriend of a murder victim |cal profiling, an FBI unit tries to lo- {search for a boy who disappeared
ance’ (CC) suddenly attacks Jack, 7 cate missing persons, (CC) on a subway train, (CC)

a (0) Duelo de /La Fea Mas Bella Lety es una nifia /Mundo de Fieras (N) Don Francisco Presenta Laura Za-
UNIV asiones dulce, roméntica e inteligente, pero pata; Karla Alvarez,
apenas atractiva. (N)
(:00) Law & Or- {Law & Order: Special Victims Unit]Law & Order: Special Victims Unit}Law & Order: Criminal Intent ‘In
USA der: Criminal In-|Two men claim they robbed a. |Arreluctant witness may set a child [the Dark” \ (CC)
tent © (CC) {woman but didn’t kill her. (CC) molester free. ( (CC)

VH1 (00) ILove the {I Love the ’70s Volume 21978" || Love the '70s Volume 2 Frank Surreal Life Fame Games Hotel
vs Shark Hunters: |Survivor: Guatemala -- The Maya |Survivor: Guatemala - The Maya |Survivor: Guatemala -- The Maya
' East vs. West Empire 4 (CC) Empire “Man Down” 1 (CC) Empire 0 (CC)
(0) America’s |Home Improve- |Home improve- |Becker “Snow [Becker ‘Hanging [WGN News at Nine () (CC)
WGN unniest Home |ment Tim gives |ment Tim pulls a {Means Snow” —_|With Jake” (1
Videos © (CC) ;Albad advice. groin muscle. {Cold snap. (CC) |(CC)

| #816 Extras Daniel inside the NFL (N) (CC)
ong, ee An FBI agent reprises his disguise, posing as a Radcliffe makes
heavy nanny. 1 'PG-13' (CC) Maggie an offer.

(is) The Making] * * THE THING ABOUT MY FOLKS (2005, Comedy-|(:45) % * REBOUND (2005, Comedy) Martin
HBO-P ; Jarhead 1 |Drama) Peter Falk, Paul Reiser. Aman and his father |Lawrence, Breckin Meyer. A college basketball coach
(CC) bond during a road trip. M ‘PG-13' (CC) leads a team of middle schoolers. 0 ‘PG’ (CC)





lork of Sally Mann A profile of a abe Levy, Luke Goss. An ATF agent wa" Cee Allen
overt. O'R’

fo a % & & BEVERLY HILLS COP (1984, Comedy- | & % &% KING KONG (2005, Adventure) Naomi Watts, Jack Black, Adrien
MOMAX |Drama) Eddie Murphy. A Detroit cop goes west to. (Brody. A beauty tames a savage beast. ( ‘PG-13' (CC)

7 7 & & PRETTY WOMAN (1990, Romance-Comedy) Richard Gere, Julia [The L Word “Layup” (iTV) Artist's
“SHOW _ [BEAUTY SHOP Roberts, Ralph Bellamy. iTV. A corporate raider hires a hooker to act as a re is politically incendiary. 1

eff Daniels, Harley Jane Kozak. Couple's new farm

31, 2007
10:30.

World Business
Report

Girlfriends 0
(CC)

The Naked
Trucker and T-
Bones Show (N)

Power, Privilege

Phil of the Fu-
ture O (CC)

Finders Fixers
Im Focus

High Mainte-
nance 90210

EnergySolutions

s “Allison;
ing’ (CC)

I've Got a Secret
(CC)

Cops “Las Ve-
gas’ M (CC)
wok MAT-
LOCK: THE
OUTCAST (CC)

Buy Me “Rob &
Matt’ © (CC)

The Gospel
Truth

Everybody
Loves Raymond
0 (CC)

Roseanne
“Aliens’ O (CC)
News

applicant from
a Shot at UA.

The King of
Queens “Inn Es-
capable” 1

Futurama
(CC)

crans du
monde

a

n With Kaity
s (CC)

Frasier Frasier
adopts a new atti-
tude. (CC)

i) 1 BIG
OMMA’S
HOUSE 2 (2006)

xx THAT
THING YOU DO!
(1996) ‘PG’ (CC)

BOY (2006,

90, Suspense)
‘PG-13'



THE TRIBUNE













aMovie Gift Certi

[make great gifts!

Let Charlie the
Bahamian Puppet and
his. sidekick Derek put ay

some smiles on your
kids’s faces.

Bring your children to the
McHappy Hour at McDonald's in
Marlborough Street every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:300m during the
month of January 2007,

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun

& RS

?m lovin’ it
THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Woman who claims she was

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007, PAGE 11



Be



hits out at the judicial system —

FROM page one

and I questioned him about it,
then we started arguing. This is
when he pulled out a knife, he
went into the kitchen and got a
knife and told me not to say
anything to him. And that’s
when he cut me with the knife,”
she said.

Ms Andrews showed The Tri-
bune the large scar that pro-
trudes from her arm from this
initial experience.

Her abusive husband also
made additional threats against
her with the same knife. He
repeatedly threatened to slit her
throat and seems to have taken
particular pleasure pressing the
knife into her neck. On several
occasions this sadistic ritual
even included the slight inser-
tion of the knife into Ms
Andrew’s neck, causing blood
to flow. She has a scar on her
neck today from the repeated
experience.

Unfortunately for her,
though, these initial experiences
were merely the beginning of a
lifetime of mistreatment.

The abuse became more reg-
ular and more violent over the
years. Her husband would
repeatedly belittle her, telling
her she had no worth and that
she was not wanted or desired
by anyone.

In another of the many vio-
lent episodes described to The
Tribune, her husband almost
killed her after the birth of one
of her children.

In this episode, she was
forced by her husband to get
on her knees to scrub and clean
her bathroom. When she was
done, she merely said to him

The Tribune



SPECIAL REPORT

ig





that it is a shame to make a
woman scrub and clean after
she delivered a child. At this
moment, her husband flew at
her in a violent rage. The beat-
ing that followed broke the
stitches from her cesarean sec-
« tion.

This beating led her to the
hospital and forced her to call
the police, as she had done on
many occasions.

Ms Andrews admitted that
she had dropped charges
against him on several occa-
sions,

Many may wonder why Ms
Andrews and other battered
individuals stay in abusive rela-
tionships, or do not pursue legal
action against the person on the
first offence. However, medical
sources suggest that there are
many complicated reasons why
abused individuals remain in
these situations,

Some persons have nowhere
to go if they leave and are finan-
cially dependent on their
abusers, Others are psycholog-
ically dependent, or are physi-
cally afraid of what the abuser
would do if they left.

Additionally, some religious
traditions do not support
divorce, which can lead abused
individuals to think that they
may be committing a moral
offence if they left an abusive
partner,

Ms Andrews said that these
violent experiences have signif-
icantly affected her psychologi-





cal state over the years. She has
suffered from low self-esteem, a
low sense of self-worth and has
contemplated suicide on sever-
al occasions,

However, seeing how the vio-
lent situated has affected her
children has given her the
courage to leave.

She described watching two
of her children go through
moments where they collapsed
and could not move after wit-
nessing their father savagely
attack their mother,

She wonders what psycho-
logical effects have already tak-
en root in the children and she
feels guilty that they witnessed
and experienced all that
occurred over the years.

In recent times she has come
to the conclusion that separa-
tion is the only answer.

“Divorce is not something
that I believe in. But you know,
it is something I would advise
any young person, may it be
male or female, if you are in
any abusive relationship, don’t
stay in situations like that
because in the end it could be
fatal,” she said.

Her main frustration now

- exists with the delay in the court

system to get a date for her
divorce hearing.

“Something needs to be done
with the court system because a
lot of women are living in fear,”
she said.

From early last year, she has
still been unable to schedule a

PM on The Tribune | Airport delay

FROM page one

FROM page one

The PM’s comments came at a rally to sup-
port incumbent Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell,
who is going up against his former campaign
general Dr Jacinta Higgs — the now FNM can-

didate.

The prime minister’s comments were: “And _
we will not hesitate as we go to our various;
places of abode, to ensure that our country
knows, beginning tonight, that no matter what
The Tribune says; no matter how hard they try
to help Ingraham, the more they do it, the
more many of you must cut it out. Cut it out
and put it on your headquarters’ wall. Motivate
our people. Show them who’s trying to take us
out. Put their faces on the wall. Put the stories
on the wall. And everytime we walk into those
headquarters we are motivated to spare no
effort to go to every crook an cranny of the i
Bahamas, and to ensure that everytime they ;
rise up, we put them back down. PLP! PLP!”

still had to be worked out.

At the signing of the 10-year management con-
tract with YVARS, Prime Minister Perry Christie.
announced that the hand-over of airport opera-

tions to YVARS was expected to have been com-

pleted by late December.

This latest delay is one of many in the pro-
longed three-year selection and negotiation
process in the effort to turn the airport into a
modern facility of the 21st century.

At a cost of about $200 million and under the
partnership of the Nassau Airport Development
Company (NAD) —a new subsidiary of the Air-
port Authority and YVARS - the airport is
expected to be transformed into a “premier world
class facility” and the “jewel of the Caribbean.”

The prime minister explained that during the
first phase of the transformation — scheduled to be
completed within 24 months — the physical and
sanitary conditions of the facility will be improved.

Carl Bethel
denies ever being

— involved in
human smuggling

FROM page one

a Holy Cross constituent in
2002,” Mr Bethel said in a state-
ment.

“It is interesting that the min-
ister in his communication at
no time stated exactly when it
was that the, apparently, con-
venient suspicion was aroused
in the official whose letter he
quoted from,” he added. “Was
it before or after 2002? And, in
particular, was it before or after
I first raised concerns about the
visa scandal in September
2005?”

He said that the minister is
attempting to deflect attention
from the allegations made by
the FNM of an alleged visa sell-
ing racket within the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs.

Mr Bethel said the public
should not forget “the detailed
allegations” which have been
made on this matter, including
that:

“The number of non-immi-
grant visas issued to Haitian and
Chinese nationals had sky-rock-
eted from 200 in 2002 to more
than 2,000 per year over the first
three years of the new PLP gov-

ernment;

“There was direct political
interference in the issuance of
visas;

“PLP MPs were personally
sponsoring visas for Haitians
and other foreign nationals (not
writing letters on behalf of con-
stituents);

“PLP generals, and family
members, were busy sponsor-
ing visas for foreign nationals
to enter the Bahamas over and
repeatedly;

“Visas were being issued
which bore no photographs,
were unsigned, or signed only
with an ‘X’, and also without
any intended address for the
applicant in the Bahamas;

“That certain persons were
permitted to sponsor hundreds
of different visas over a short
space of time, over and repeat-
edly.”

Mr Bethel said the record will
show that none of these allega-
tions has ever been specifically
addressed by Mr Mitchell.

“He has, instead, been intent
on denying that he ever ‘issued
any visas’. It’s all about him!

“However, the allegations are
not only about the minister,

they are very serious matters
involving sovereignty, border
control, national security
(including concerns about inter-
national terrorism) and the gen-
eral concerns of Bahamians that
the efforts of the Department
of Immigration were under-cut
and frustrated by the apparent
‘open door’ policies being pur-
sued by the Consular Division
of the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs,” he said.

Mr Bethel further said that
Mitchell’s “open-ended allega-
tion” regarding human smug-
gling is “utterly false, scan-
dalous, defamatory, and is at a
level far below gutter politics,
mudslinging and name-calling.”

“Notwithstanding this, his
vain attempts to deflect atten-
tion — do nothing, just deflect,
will not be tolerated. Minister
Mitchell must account to the
Bahamian people. He must
acknowledge faults, accept his
ministerial responsibility, fully
explain exactly what went
wrong and what he is doing
about the matter; not do noth-
ing, obfuscate, confuse, deflect,
deny and blame any and every-
one other than himself,” he said.

hearing.

Ms.Andrews, who attributes
her survival from this ordeal to
God, also wanted to challenge
the churches to do more for bat-
tered women. -

“TI feel the churches are in a
lukewarm state and what they
are doing now, their focus now
is more on telling persons how
to become rich, or how to get
rich.

“This is not what they should
be doing. They should be out
there trying to restore lives for

persons who are abused or in
distress or in serious situations
like mine. They should be trying
to seek help for these persons
and they should have pro-
grammes in place to assist
women, especially battered
women — and they don’t,” she
said.

“Instead of turning God’s
house into a den of thieves,”
she said, “they should be trying
to restore lives and reach out
to these hurting women.”

As the new Domestic Vio-

lence Act is considered, there
should probably be some con-
sideration for individuals who
seek divorce from violent
predators. :

The same slow and inefficient
judicial process, which frustrates
most Bahamians, only prolongs
these unhealthy relationships.

Battered persons should not
have to wait a year to get a
hearing to extract themselves
from predators, she said. The
process must be more compas-
sionate.

Minister of Transport

in respect to the collision of the two mailboats at
sea, is one for the Office of the Attorney Gener-

FROM page one

“The minister of transport and aviation is seek-
ing to assist each of said claimants in procuring

their medical reports from the Princess Margaret

Hospital, so that their claims can
be formulated. These reports are
expected to be in hand shortly,”
the statement said.

According to Mrs Hanna-Mar-
tin, her ministry and the Office of
the Attorney General have
engaged in a number of meet-
ings with some of the victims
along with legal counsel and oth-
er representatives,

“During these meetings, the
minister of transport and avia-
tion discussed the findings of the
Wreck Commission which was
appointed by the minister to
investigate the circumstances sur-
rounding the collision at sea of
the two vessels.

“And while the minister noted
the findings of the commissioners
relative to the Port Department,
she indicated that the question of
legal liability of the department

FOUNDATION
EMAIL: .



Math, Social Studies, Science



@ MINISTER of Transport
Glenys Hanna-Martin



FOR EDUCATIO
DATIONFOREDUCATI
| BIG REVIEW
EVERY SATURDAY

9:30 - 12:30 and 1-4 pm



N TRANSFORMATION
IN @ YAHOO.COM

» English language & Religious Studies
Spaces are limited. Cost: $20 per Saturday

al and could not be substantively commented on
by the minister of transport and aviation,” the
statement said.

The Wreck Commission found
that the government, through the
Port Department, was jointly
responsible for the accident.

“The recent intervention of
the minister of transport and avi-
ation, in the wake of the public’
protests by some of the
claimants, is intended to assist:
in assessing the status of claims
by persons injured, and in help-
ing to bring closure to the
process,” the statement said.

“In this regard, many of the
claimants have not had their:
action prosecuted beyond the fil-
ing of writs of summons.

“The minister of transport and
aviation is committed to using
her best efforts with all of the
relevant parties and wherever
possible, in bringing closure to
this matter at the earliest possible
time.”







Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd
Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 ¢ Fax: 326-7452


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007



SECTION



business@tribunemedia.net

BU

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street











= ) FIDELITY

HELPING YOU CREATE AND MANAGE WEALTH

NASSAU OFFICE

Tel: (242) 356-7764

FREEPORT OFFICE
Tel: (242) 351-3010



Luxury resort chain part of

proposed Freeport project

M@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he high-end, ultra luxury

the brand/operating part-
ner for a potential multi-
“+ ‘project slated for Grand Bahama,
* sources have told The Tribune, with
the development’s representatives on
the island earlier this week.



_*.>) Those close to developments said
-" Aman Resorts was the preferred oper-

ating partner for the Raven Group,
which is negotiating a 250-acre devel-
opment with the Grand Bahama
Development Company (Devco) and
Grand Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) for a'site on the eastern edge
of Freeport.

The Raven Group’s attorneys and
representatives are understood to have
been on Grand Bahama earlier this
week in an attempt to progress the
deal, which involves luxury hotels and
signature, luxury multi-million man-

Aman Resorts chain is

sion-type residences that are sold to
ultra high-net worth individuals.

The Raven Group project is under-
stood to be earmarked for land imme-
diately next to the 1,000 acres slated for
the Morgan Stanley project, which stra-
dles both sides of the waterway at Bar-
bary Beach.

The project was referred to in the
employment contract for Hannes
Bababk, the GBPA’s now-restrained
chairman, which described “the con-
clusion of the business undertaking
current;ly envisaged and known to the
parties as the Raven Group deal,
regarding a portion of the acreage in
the amount of 250 acres”

It is unclear how far advanced talks
are on the Raven Group project, but
the presence of the group’s represen-
tatives on the island indicates that there
could be ‘light at the end of the tunnel’
for the Grand Bahama economy,
which has struggled since the 2004 hur-
ricanes and Royal Oasis closure.

Together with the Morgan Stanley
project, the two deals could help to lift

Aman Resorts brand/operating partner for
Raven Group project, Tribune Business told

Grand Bahama’s economy back to
growth in two to three years’ time,
together with the Ginn development in
West End, and show that the GBPA

shareholders dispute may not be hav- -

ing as great an impact as feared.

Graham Torode, Devco’s president,
did not return The Tribune’s call seek-
ing comment, despite a detailed mes-
sage being left on his voice mail.

A Google search located the Raven
Group as a London-based property
development and investment group,
focusing on both residential and com-
mercial developments in the UK and
abroad.

The company is listed on the London
Stock Exchange (LSE), and its major

investors include top fund manage-
ment companies and financial houses
such as Deutsche Bank, UBS Global
Asset Management, and hedge fund
manager, Man Financial. The largest
institutional investor is Schroder
Investment Management, with a 13.22
per cent stake, while its two main exec-
utives hold 5 per cent of the Raven
Group between them.

Aman, which can charge as much as *

$438 per night for its rooms, has long
been trying to come to the Bahamas. It
has been attempting to get a $500 mil-
lion resort, residential community and
marina off the ground for Norman’s
Cay in the Exumas since 1998, and
signed a Heads of Agreement in 2002

with the former FNM government
under Hubert Ingraham.

However, the project has been
delayed after Prime Minister Perry
Christie’s government wanted to

amend the Heads of Agreement draft- .;

ed under the Ingraham administration,
in the belief that the developers and a
Bahamian group associated with them
were getting “too sweet a deal”.

Adrian Zecha, chairman of Aman
Resorts, in an exclusive interview with
The Tribune, revealed that the chain
was looking at other sites in the
Bahamas.

SEE page 7B -

Film Studios takeover will see $11m debt repayment

Minister promises
minimum wage rise

@ By CARA BRENNEN- ~~
BETHEL
Tribune Business
‘Reporter




ANE Gibson, minister of
, immigration and training,
ut employers on notice of

* thé Government’s intention to

increase the current $150 per
week minimum wage, and ensure
they remove “glass ceilings”
which hinder Bahamians’
employment progress.

His comments came at a PLP
Fox Hill mini-rally on Monday
night. Giving a brief progress
report on the areas in his portfo-
lio, Mr Gibson said the Govern-
ment was in the final stages of
preparing amendments to the
labour laws.

“We are also in the final stages

of reviewing the minimum wage,’

because we know that $150 a
-- week just won’t cut it. So we are
now in the process of reviewing
that with a view to having that
increased as soon as possible,”
Mr Gibson said.

“We fully intend to bring the

“+ _+ focus of your caring PLP govern-
*-‘ ment on removing any real or
- imagined glass ceilings, to where

more deserving Bahamians can
benefit from these major devel-

Unions hopeful,
employers wary

opments coming into the coun-

try. : :
“Now this is important, and I
want y’all to remember this cause
y’all will hear some employers
start crying, but for too long
employers have been creating a
glass ceiling, making Bahamians
believe that they could get some-
where and every time they hit the
top it’s a glass ceiling.

“And so those persons who
hire these foreigners and don’t
put together their succession
plans to make sure we transfer
skills, knowledge, and also posi-

. tions, watch out, cause we com-

ing. And I guarantee you within
the next few days, you will hear
some employers crying because

some of them have been hiring .

foreigners and not making a real

. effort to replace those with

Bahamians.”

Mr Gibson said that while this
may not happen in every case,
the Government is putting

SEE page 5B

Lady Henrietta’s ICD
stake attracts interest

_- Ig By NEIL HARTNELL
~, Tribune Business Editor

POTENTIAL buyers are cir-
cling the 50.37 per cent stake that
Lady Henrietta St George holds

“in Grand Bahama Power Com-

"+ pany, sources have told The Tri-

bune, as the firm’s major share-
holder, US electricity giant,
Mirant, continues the auction
process to sell its 55 per cent
shareholding.

The attraction of Lady Henri-
etta’s stake in BISX-listed ICD
Utilities, which is listed on the
Bahamas International Securities
Exchange (BISX), is that the
company has a “first right of
refusal to purchase the shares
held by Mirant in Grand Bahama
Power Company”, according to
an affidavit sworn in the Grand
Bahama Port Authority (GBPA)

_ Shareholders’ dispute by Charles
Gillis, the late Edward St
George’s chief foreign investment
adviser.

Indépendent sources have con-
firmed to The Tribune that this
is correct, meaning that whoever
controls Lady Henrietta’s stake
in ICD Utilities, by extension,
could dictate the outcome of the

Mirant auction by taking up that
option to the exclusion of the US
power company’s other suitors.

It is unclear, though, whether
Lady Henrietta would choase to
sell her ICD Utilities stake, and
no deal with another buyer has
been concluded.

Mr Gillis’s affidavit said the
shareholders agreement between
ICD Utilities and Mirant “pro-

hibits the hypothecation of ICD -

Utilities equity”.

However, he added in his affi-
davit filed last. year that he
‘understood’ that at the time,
Lady Henrietta “was indeed seek-
ing to sell some shares in Grand
Bahama Power”.

This move to sell is likely to
have been prompted by the dis-
putes over the late Mr St
George’s estate that were raging
at the time, particularly with a
daughter by his first wife, Caro-
line, and his second wide, Mary.

However, the situation has
since calmed, with Caroline now
back in the estate fold as a result
of Sir Jack Hayward’s claim to 75
per cent ownership of the Grand

SEE page 5B

a By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Film, Studios’
sale to Bahamas FilmInvest
International, a group headed
by Bahamian banker Owen
Bethel, has been officially con-
firmed by the studios’ ultimate
parent, the deal involving the
settling of $10 million in bank
loans and $1 million in debts
owed by the company.

The announcement from
Ashby Corporation, which is
listed on the Bermuda Stock
Exchange (BSE), confirmed
Tribune Business’s exclusive
revelation on January 9 that the
group led by Mr Bethel, head of

’ the Nassau-based Montaque

an ZERO rol LOT ee
eco ro SAVINGS ACCOUNTS

Benet onan

Purchase by Owen Bethel’s group confirmed, beating out rivals that
included Cedric Scott; Monteine lawsuit dismissed as ‘frivolous’

Group, had
won the race
to acquire the }
rights to
develop the
studios.

Mr Bethel pe
said in a
statement
released by
Ashby Cor-
poration that
his group
“looks forward to creating a sus-
tainable project, beneficial to

@ BETHEL



both our investors and the fur-
ther development of the film
and television industry in the
Bahamas. ,

“We are in ongoing discus-
sions with the Government of
the Bahamas and believe that
this project will soon become a
hub of activity for a national
film industry that truly com-
petes globally.”

Mr Bethel was off the island
when The Tribune attempted
to contact him for comment yes-
terday about the acquisition of

the development rights for the
project where Pirates of the
Caribbean; Dead Man’s Chest
and At World’s End were

filmed.

Ross Fuller, Ashby’s chair-
man, said the company had
received multiple offers for the
Bahamas Film Studios, which
were held by its subsidiary,
Gold Rock Creek Enterprises.

The Tribune can reveal that

SEE page 7B

aca ec than a Bank

ace is Gary’s one ae cold cll his ener needs.

CDs

MORTGAGE & PERSONAL LOANS

FINANCIAL PLANNING

FREE INTERNET BANKING

TRUSTS & ESTATE PLANNING |

Melton NC
Melee nate

Map te) 133101, eas
BS ROAD

HOME EQUITY LOANS

PENSION PLANS.

Soma a MANAGEMENT

=) FIDELITY,

More than.a Bank

Nassau: T356.7764 _F 326.3000

Da ie aed T hoe 6676/7

DE RNs WEE St
aS el :
ISLAND: |. \ |

MACKEY
SUM

PARADISE

a oe 2695





cath
~BUSINESS

sta MACAO SOSES C8 AEP AS RET RASS

Che Miami Herald |







\ |
' | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

ae e-

40+

THE MARKETS

STOCKS, MUTUAL FUNDS, 5-6B

DOW 30 12,523.31 +32.53 Ad
S&P 500 1,428.82 +8.20
NASDAQ 2,448.64 +7.55 ,
10-YR NOTE 487-03 W
CRUDE OIL 56.97 +2.96 ,

Stocks
rise; Fed
watch

is on

BY JOE BEL BRUNO
Associated Press

NEW YORK — Stocks fin-
ished moderately higher in an
uneven session Tuesday as opti-
mism about the economy
helped investors overcome
some of their uneasiness about
the Federal Reserve’s decision
on interest rates.

The energy sector rose on a5.

- percent spike in oil prices, while
news that billionaire investor
Carl Icahn was seeking to join
~ Motorola’s board lifted technol-
"ogy stocks.

- But fluctuations in the major
indexes reflected the market’s
uncertainty as it waits for the
Fed to complete a two-day
meeting this afternoon. Market
watchers are expecting the cen-
tral bank to keep rates
unchanged as they have for the
past four meetings after 17
straight hikes, because recent
economic data has been show-
ing slow, stable growth.

Now that investors have
abandoned their hopes for a
rate cut anytime soon, many are
regarding this year’s positive

economic reports and the Fed’s
holding pattern as auspicious
for stocks.

“If the Fed feels the economy
is strong enough on its: own, it
means corporate earnings this
year will probably be better
than people were expecting,”
‘said Alfred E. Goldman, chief

-Imarket strategist at A.G.
Edwards in St. Louis.

The Dow Jones industrial
average rose 32.53, or 0.26 per-
cent, to 12,523.31.

Broader stock indicators
were also higher. The Standard
& Poor’s 500 index was up 8.20,
or 0.58 percent, at 1,428.82, and
‘the Nasdaq composite index
rose 7.55, or 0.31 percent, to
2,448.64.

-The bond market edged
lower as fixed income investors
also awaited the Fed’s decision.
The yield on the benchmark 10-
year Treasury note was up
slightly at 4.88 percent from
4.87 percent late Monday.

The dollar was little changed
against other major currencies,
while gold prices inched up.

Oil prices shot higher Mon-
day on signs of production cuts
from OPEC members, A barrel
of light sweet crude rose $2.96
to settle at $56.97 the New York
Mercantile Exchange. Natural
gas soared more than Il percent
on forecasts of frigid tempera-
tures in the Midwest.

Stock investors brushed off
worries about fuel-costs crimp-
ing consumers’ discretionary
spending, and instead focused
on a possible swell in oil compa-
nies’ profits.

In response to the spike in
energy prices, Exxon Mobil rose
$1.19 to $74.39, Chevron rose
$1.54 to $73.07, and ConocoPhil-
lips rose $1.03 to $65.65.

Meanwhile, Motorola rose
$1.27, or 6.9 percent, to $19.58,
after Icahn revealed his stake in
the cell phone maker and
expressed interest in joining the
board.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies rose 4.87, or
0.61 percent, at 797.97.

Advancing issues led decli-
ners by more than 2 to 1 on the
New York Stock Exchange,
where consolidated: volume
came to 2.69 billion shares,
which was unchanged from -
Monday’s close.

Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei
stock average rose 0.11 percent.
Britain’s FTSE 100 rose 0.03
percent, Germany’s DAX index
rose 0.93 percent, and France’s
CAC-40 gained 0.46 percent.







ECONOMY

Consumer confidence rises in Jan.

Confidence among U.S.
consumers reached the highest
level in almost five years in
January as an expanding labor
market and rising wages gave
Americans more money to spend.

BY EILEEN ALT POWELL
Associated Press

NEW YORK — Consumers were
feeling confident in January: The job
market was chugging along and oil

. prices were down. Their optimism

may dwindle, however, on concerns

that job and wage Epes may slow.





The Conference Board, a private
research group, said Tuesday that its
Consumer Confidence Index edged
up to 110.3 in January from a revised
110.0 in December.

Analysts had expected a reading
between 110.0 and 110.5. The January
index was the highest in five years,
suggesting that consumers will con-
tinue to be the engine behind the
nation’s economic growth in coming
months.

At the same time, a measure of
consumer expectations for the next
six months dropped to 94.5 in January



TOKYO’S SONY BUILDING: Sony’s quarterly profit dipped 5 percent as huge costs for launching its
PlayStation 3 video game console offset a recovery in its electronics business.

VIDEO GAME LOSS |

SONY REPORTS 5 PERCENT PROFIT DROP

ON PLAYSTATION 3 COSTS

The PS3 launched in the United
States and Japan in November,
plagued with production problems
that resulted in shortages and will
| keep the machines out of Europe

entirely until March. The next-gen-

eration game player also faces
immense competition with Ninten-

do’s Wii and Microsoft’s Xbox 360.

Sony raised its earnings forecast

for the fiscal year through March
by 38 percent, however, citing a
recovery in its core electronics
division amid booming Christmas



DEMO TECH SHOW

BY YURI KAGEYAMA
Associated Press

TOKYO — Just when Sony appears to have turned around its
electronics business, another part of its sprawling empire — video games
— is dragging down profits. The Japanese electronics and entertainment
company on Tuesday blamed the launching costs of its PlayStation 3
game console for much of the 5 percent drop in group net profit for the
last three months of 2006 to $1.3 billion.

sales in digital cameras and flat-
panel TVs.

It now expects: an annual net
profit of 110: billion yen ($903 mil-
lion), up from an earlier 80 billion
yen ($657 million). That’s still
below the 123 billion yen Sony
earned last fiscal year — and under
the 130 billion yen annual profit it
had forecast earlier last year.

The gaming unit, meanwhile,
posted. a $443 million operating loss
during the quarter, though Sony
promised business will improve by



from 96.3 the month before.

Lynn Franco, director of the
board’s consumer research center,
said that “looking ahead... consum-
ers are not as optimistic as they were
in December.” ,

As a result, the index suggests just
“moderate improvement” in eco-
nomic growth in early 2007.

This should ease fears at the Fed-
eral Reserve, which is meeting Tues-

day and Wednesday to review its

economic policy, said Anthony Chan,
managing director and chief econo-
mist with JPMorgan Private Client

wevoevereevercermeeereecevereerreteteeti



SHIZUO KAMBAYASHI/AP

YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP-GETTY IMAGES
JUST A DIP: CFO Nobuyuki
Oneda explains Sony’s
third-quarter performance.

the latter half of next fiscal year.
“Startup costs are high, and the
losses (in the gaming division) will

° TURN TO SONY





Services in New York.

“At the central bank, they’re
mainly concerned about the econ-
omy overheating,” Chan said. “I think
this report says they can sit and
watch.”

Still, he said, the economy will
benefit in the short run from contin-
ued consumer spending because the
latest figures “tell us that at the
moment, the consumer is in a sweet
spot thanks to improved labor market
conditions and lower oil prices.”

* TURN TO ECONOMY

Profits
climb for
consumer

product.

makers

@ Procter & Gamble said its profit
jumped 12 percent in the second
quarter of its fiscal year, while
Colgate-Palmolive said its
fourth-quarter profit rose 11
percent.

BY DAN SEWELL
Associated Press

CINCINNATI — Boosted by new
products from familiar brands and
growth in emerging markets, con-
sumer products makers Procter &
Gamble and Colgate-Palmolive
posted double-digit quarterly earn-
ings increases Tuesday and offered
bright outlooks.

“We are now in the best position
we have ever been of stuff coming
along to help our gross profit,” Col-
gate-Palmolive Chief Executive Reu-
ben Mark said in a conference call
with investors. The New York-based
maker of toothpaste, soaps and Sci-
ence Diet pet food said it has a full
pipeline of new products around the
world and expects double-digit earn-
ings per share growth for the year
ahead.

Cincinnati-based P&G also raised
its outlook for the year. The company
cited the strong quarter and progress
in its integration of the Gillette Co.,
with the Blades & Razors division
contributing an 11 percent sales
increase led by the year-old Gillette
Fusion. The company also reported
good sales of new products such as
Tide Simple Pleasures detergent,
Febreze Noticeables air fresheners,
Olay Definity skin cream, Crest Pro
Health toothpaste and additions to
the Swiffer duster line.

“We have been working for six or

- seven years now to build a robust

innovation and initiative portfolio,”
A.G. Lafley, P&G’s chairman, presi-

* TURN TO CONSUMER PRODUCTS,

Juicing up portable lifestyle emerges as theme

@ New ways to enhance the

power of mobile technologies is a
key topic at this year’s influential -
DEMO Technology Show in Palm
Springs, Calif.

BY BRIAN BERGSTEIN
Associated Press:

The founders of Zink Imaging
believe they have two great ideas in
one absolute show-stopper. They’ve
created a portable device that makes
it ultra-convenient to print photos
from digital cameras and phones.
And they designed it to use no ink.

That’s not to say “hardly any ink,”
mind you, but zero ink — shorten
that and you get “Zink.” Instead, the
device uses heat to activate minus-
cule dye crystals embedded in the
photo paper.

Not bad for a device roughly the
size of an iPod. No wonder founder
and CEO Wendy Caswell proclaims
that Zink “delivers a magical user
experience.”

Though months away from store
shelves, the product is expected to be
among the hottest items unveiled

today and Thursday at the influential
DEMO technology show in Palm
Desert, Calif.

DEMO is notable because it
focuses on emerging technologies
and gives their creators just six min-
utes on stage to explain themselves
to a ballroom of investors, analysts
and journalists. Past shows have
pointed to such trends as sharing
photos and blogging.

The show’s producer, Chris Shi-
pley, said she doesn’t seek particular
technology themes in advance. But
invariably she notices threads com-
ing together after the exhibitors have
passed their auditions and the partici-
pant list is assembled. And one of
those key topics this year will be
ways to enhance the power of mobile
technologies.

The ideas will come mainly from
companies you’ve never heard of —
such as Buz Interactive, which lets
cell phone users incorporate licensed
music clips into voice mail greetings
— and a few larger tech players.

One of them, Seagate Technology,
will use DEMO to introduce a small



wireless drive that can store files
downloaded over cell phone net-
works. The product — named DAVE
— has to be within 30 feet of a cell
phone to serve as its storage annex,
using Bluetooth wireless technology.
It also works over Wi-Fi or a USB
cord to do the same trick with com-
puters. Expected to come out this
summer, a 10-gigabyte version should
retail for about $150.

Rob Pait, Seagate’s director of
consumer electronics marketing,
contends that DAVE will help turn
cell-phone networks into souped-up
sources of music and other fancy
content. Short video clips, ring tones
and little games are mainly what peo-
ple download now because most cell
phones can’t store very much.

“You’ve got a lot of bandwidth
available to you,” Pait said. “Now
people need a place to download the
content to.”

Zink similarly could help people
get more out of the wireless world,
although its inkless printing system

*TURN TO TECH SHOW
aN



ZINK IMAGING/AP
MAKING LIFE EASIER: A prototype
of a printer is shown using
technologies from Zink Imaging.


ECONOMY

4B _| WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31,2007 INTERNATIONAL EDITION

Consumer confidence edges up

* ECONOMY

The consumer confidence
index, which is based on a
survey of 5,000 U.S. house-
holds by the New York-based
research group, is closely
watched because consumer
confidence often signals
changes in spending trends.
Consumer spending makes up
about two-thirds of the U.S.
economy. January’s index
reading on consumer confi-
dence was the highest since
110.7 in March 2002 and
matched a reading of 110.3 in
May 2002, the Conference
Board said.

David H. Resler, chief
economist with Nomura

EARNINGS

Securities in New York,
pointed out that January’s
reading was boosted by opti-
mism about the job market,
with nearly 30 percent of
those surveyed saying jobs
were plentiful.

“You’re looking at a reflec-
tion of what is making con-
sumers feel good,” he said. “It
tells you that the conditions
that underpin things like con-
sumer spending are pretty
good, so people are going to
spend.”

The figures also showed
“people are not quite as pessi-
mistic about the car market as
they were, but housing is still
languishing.” Weakness in the
housing market could be seen

in another report issued
Tuesday. An index prepared
by Standard & Poor’s showed
that the prices of single-fam-
ily homes across the nation
rose in November at the slow-
est rate in more than a decade,
a further sign that housing
will be a drag on the econ-
omy. The S&P/Case-Shiller
composite index showed a 1.3
percent year-over-year rise in
the price of a single-family
home based on existing
homes tracked over time in 10
metropolitan markets.

The slower housing market
may be weighing on consum-
ers’ expectations about the
future, the economists said.

The Conference Board’s

Expectations Index, which
measures consumers’ outlook
over the next six months,
dropped to 94.5 in January
from 96.3 the month before.

The report said those
anticipating business condi-
tions to worsen rose to 8 per-
cent from 7.8 percent while
those who expected business
conditions to get better
decreased to 16.2 percent
from 16.7 percent.

Those anticipating fewer
jobs edged up to 15.7 percent
in January from 15.5 percent.
Asked if they expected their
incomes to increase, 19.8 per-
cent said “yes” in January,
down from 21.4 percent in
December.

Consumer product firms show profit rise

* CONSUMER PRODUCTS

dent and chief executive, told

analysts. “Every year we have
built the size, we have built
the strength and we have built
the success rate of this inno-
vation portfolio.”

The company is delighted
with the Gillette Fusion razor,
which it showed off during
last year’s Super Bowl tele-
cast. The five-blade razor sys-
tem has already racked up
$400 million in North Ameri-
can retail sales, is off to a
strong start after later
launches in England, Ger-
many and Japan, and is being
rolled out in markets includ-
ing Australia and eastern
Europe, P&G said.

A Fusion Phantom razor
and a Venus Breeze female
shaver with built-in gel are
being launched in North
America.

Meanwhile, Colgate-Pal-
molive plans to launch Col-
gate Total Advanced Clean,
which will begin shipping at

the end of February. The.

company’s leading share of
the U.S. toothpaste market
grew to 37.3 percent last year
led by sales of Colgate Total,
according to data from
ACNielsen.

New products introduced

in the United States include**”

Colgate Luminous Mint Twist
toothpaste, Colgate 360
degree toothbrush, Irish
Spring MoistureBlast bar soap
and Fabuloso multi-purpose
spray cleaner.
Colgate-Palmolive said
international sales grew,

SONY



including a 14 percent reve-
nue growth in Latin America.
Chief Operating Officer Ian
Cook said market share for
toothpaste improved in coun-
tries including Mexico, Brazil,
India, Britain and Russia.

Cook will take over as CEO

sometime this year and Mark
will remain as chairman for
an undisclosed period of time,
Mark said Tuesday.
“Lafley said P&G had dou-
ble-digit sales growth in
developing markets and sees
strong potential.

“We remain pretty bullish
on developing markets,”
Latley said.

For the quarter ended Dec.
31, P&G posted net income of

$2.86 billion, or 84 cents per
share, versus $2.55 billion, or
72 cents per share, in the pri-
or-year period. Revenue grew
8 percent to $19.73 billion
from $18.3 billion a year ago.
Analysts surveyed by
Thomson Financial expected
earnings of 83 cents per share
on $19.57 billion in revenue.
For the year, the company
projects earnings of $2.99 to
$3.03 per share, up slightly
from its October forecast of
$2.97 to $3.02 per share. The
forecast includes the impact
of P&G’s $57 billion Gillette
acquisition in 2005, which the
company estimates will come
in at the lower end of its guid-
ance for 12 cents to 18 cents

AMY SANCETTA/AP

SALES GREW: Colgate-Palmolive, maker of toothpaste, soaps and dishwashing liquid,
posts a fourth-quarter profit gain of 11 percent.

per share.

P&G shares, which
recently have traded at all-
time highs, slipped 24 cents to
$64.62 in late trading on the
New York Stock Exchange.
They reached an all-time high
of $66.30 on Jan. 19, up from a
52-week low of $52.75 in June.

Colgate-Palmolive’s earn-
ings rose to $401.2 million, or
73 ¢ents:per share, in the

fourth quarter compared ‘with '

$3612 million, or 65 cents per
share, a year ago.

Excluding charges related
to a restructuring plan, as well
as stock-based compensation
expenses, Colgate-Palmolive
reported earnings of $436.9
million, or 80 cents per share.

PlayStation 3 costs lead to a drop in profit

° SONY

continue for some time,”
Chief Financial Officer Nobu-
yuki Oneda told reporters.

For the past several years,
Sony’s biggest problem was
its core electronics business,
where it fell behind Apple and
its iPod portable music player
and Samsung Electronics’ flat-
panel TV business.

Sony was also dealt a blow
last year when it announced a
massive global recall of about

10 million lithium-ion batter- _

ies used in not only its own
lapteps but also those from
Apple, Dell, Lenovo and oth-
ers.

The company has been
engaged in a massive turn-
around effort since 2005,
when Welsh-born American

DEMO TECH SHOW

Howard Stringer took the
chief executive job. Sony has
dropped unprofitable busi-

nesses, sold off assets, cut:

jobs and closed plants.

Those actions appear to be
paying off, somewhat. Sony’s
core electronics division
reported record sales for the
quarter, thanks to strong
demand for its flat TVs and
digital cameras, helping to lift
Sony’s overall sales for the
quarter 9.8 percent to $21.4
billion.

The company’s weak spot
now appears to be its gaming
division.

Sony blamed its own price-
slashing strategy for the PS3
for cutting into profits. Game
machines usually come down
in price over time, but faced
with competition, Sony made

an unusual move in lowering
the PS3 price in Japan by
about 20 percent even before
sales started.

Sony shipped 1.84 million
PS3 machines worldwide dur-

ing the quarter, the company .

said. The machine has already
gone on sale in the United
States, Japan and some other
countries, but its sale has
been delayed to March 23 in
Europe, the Middle East,
Africa and Australia.

Sony stuck to its earlier
target of shipping 6 million
PS3 consoles by March 31.
Earlier, it said it shipped 2
million PS3 machines world-
wide by mid-January, falling
about two weeks behind its
initial shipment targets in
Japan. Declining sales during
the October-December period

of Sony’s predecessor con-|

sole, PlayStation 2, and of the
handheld PlayStation Porta-
ble, including PSP game soft-
ware, also pushed down prof-
its at its gaming unit, Sony
said.

Sony also got a $328 mil-
lion boost toward quarterly
profits from a weak yen, and
$276 million from its invest-
ment in London-based Sony
Ericsson, a mobile phone joint
venture with Sweden’s LM
Ericsson, it said.

Separately on Tuesday, the
U.S. Federal Trade Commis-
sion said Sony’s joint venture
with Bertelsmann, Sony BMG
Music Entertainment, agreed
to reimburse consumers up to
$150 for damage to their com-
puters from CDs with hidden
anti-piracy software.

Enhancing portable lifestyle a show theme

°TECH SHOW

isn’t necessarily for mobile
devices only. It’s just debut-
ing that way. _

Based in Waltham, Mass.,
Zink was founded in 2005,
when private investors
acquired mary of Polaroid’s
key technologies and
researchers shortly after that
company emerged from bank:
ruptcy.

Zink’s special sauce is ithe
photo paper, which has multi-
ple layers of dye crystals
inside and a transparent, pro-
tective coat on the outside.
The dye crystals are normally
colorless but produce a color
when they melt.

Cyan (a kind of blue),

magenta and yellow crystals
— each activated by applying
different levels of heat for dif-
ferent lengths of time — are
enough to reproduce the full
color spectrum.

About 100,000 pulses of
heat come every second,
which means a 2-by-3-inch
print rolls out in less than a
minute. ;

Although fax machines and
other devices have employed
aspects of thermal printing
technology before, Zink has
mastered ways to incorporate
it into an inexpensive yet
long-lasting format.

“It allows us to put printers
where they’ve never been
able to go before,” Caswell
said.

Zink plans to partner with
electronics makers that would
build the technology into
handheld printers, which
could be linked with or with-
out wires to cell phones and
digital cameras. Or some part-
ners might make new hybrid
digital cameras that have the
printers already integrated,
the way Polaroid did with
film.

There are no such partners
yet, but Zink expects whoever
they are will be able to make
the little camera phone com-
panion for about $100 and the
integrated camera and printer
for $200.

Zink plans to make its
money on the paper: 20 cents
a page, or a 10-pack for $2.

Zink will initially target the
quick-shoot pictures that peo-
ple tend to take with camera
phones, but that market alone
could be big.

The NPD Group research
firm says 69 percent of mobile
phones sold in December had
a built-in camera, up from 51
percent at the start of 2006.
And earlier research by NPD
found that about 80 percent of
the pictures taken with
phones just sit there — nei-
ther sent to anyone else nor
printed.

“Fundamentally, everyone
will have a camera their
pocket,” Caswell said. “What
we want to do is be the tech-
nology that frees the pictures
from their captive state.”

NavniHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

e MICROSOFT

BUSINESS BRIEFS









PAUL SAKUMA/AP
HAPPY SHOPPER: Richard Woodard smiles as he
purchases several boxes of Microsoft’s Windows
Vista at a Best Buy store in San Jose, Calif.

Vista operating system
hits retail shelves

From Herald Wire Services
Consumers can finally get their hands on Microsoft’s
(MSFT) long-delayed Windows Vista, but unlike the mad
midnight rushes retailers saw with the recently released
video game consoles, stores saw only a trickle of early adopt-

ers Tuesday.

_ Retailers around the world held special midnight events
Monday or opened early Tuesday morning, as the Vista oper-
ating system and Office 2007 business software went on sale
in 70 countries. Some stores, including a Best Buy in midtown
Manhattan, brought in extra employees to handle pent-up

demand for Vista.

At a CompUSA in San Jose, Calif., David Keller, a 40-year-
old information-technology consultant from Jacksonville,
Fla., was among the first in line to pick up a new Hewlett-
Packard Co. laptop at midnight (3 a.m. EST).

At a CompUSA in San Jose, Calif., David Keller, a Ao-geats
old information-technology consultant from Jacksonville,
Fla., was among the first in line to pick up a new Hewlett-
Packard laptop at midnight (3 a.m. EST).

But at another CompUSA store in Raleigh, N.C., only
about a dozen people braved frigid late-night temperatures to
stake their claim on a copy of Vista.

As in the past, most consumers will switch to Vista only
when they buy new computers, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer
said Monday during a launch-related event.

Microsoft shares slipped 5 cents to close at $30.48 on the

Nasdaq Stock Market.

e AIRLINES

DELTA SAYS IT SECURES
$2.5B IN EXIT FINANCING

Delta Air Lines":

| © (DALR@.-PK);the nation’s 2

» third-largest carrier, said it
has obtained a commitment
for $2.5 billion in exit financ-
ing as part of its plan to
emerge from bankruptcy by
the middle of this year as a
stand-alone company.

The Atlanta-based com-
pany said the financing will
be led by six financial
groups — JPMorgan, Gold-
man Sachs & Co., Merrill
Lynch, Lehman Brothers,
UBS and Barclays Capital.

© US AIRWAYS REPORTS
FULL-YEAR PROFIT

|

i

:

|

i

}

i

|

|

'

j

i

US Airways (LCC),

| which is pushing to buy rival

| Delta Air Lines in a hostile

| takeover bid, said it swung

| toa profit in the fourth quar-

| ter, as strength in both main-

line and express operations

| helped offset high fuel costs.

| The company said it
posted a profit of $12 mil-

| lion, or 13 cents per share, in

| the fourth quarter, com-

pared to a loss of $261 mil-
lion, or $3.27 per share dur-

| ing the same period in 2005.

|. Shares of US Airways fell

| $1.33, or 2.4 percent, to close

| at $53.10 in late morning

| trading on the New York

| Stock Exchange.

|

|

|

|

© PILOTS’ RETIREMENT
AGE MAY RISE TO 65

Airline pilots would be
_ allowed to fly until they turn
65 instead of the current

mandatory retirement age of

60 under new rules pro-
posed by the Federal Avia-
tion Administration.

At least one member of a
flight crew would still have
‘to be under 60 under the
proposal announced Tues-
day.







4pm. 6:35 p.m. Late
Stock Tk. lose close ~— Chg. ~— volume
SanDisk SNDK = 42.83 38.46 4.37 117954
NutriSys NTRI 52.05 46.10 “5.95 32944
SPDR SPY 142.79 142.80 +01 — 25562
Nasd100Tr QQQQ 43.63 43.67 +.04 20280
ProvidSve PRSC 23.50 22.59 -91 18014

JnprNtw tf = JNPR 19,82 18.55 +127
SiRF Tch SIRF ql 44.13
TD Bknorth =BNK 32.24 32.24 *
ForcePron — FRPT 18.28 18.40 +.12
YM Bio g YMI 3.17 177 -2.00 8894
HCC Ins HCC 30.97 30.97 - 8402
MedcoHIth MHS 58.48
Citigrp c 54.27 54.00 +27 71972

LATE TRADING _

e SHIPPING CARRIER

UPS REPORTS 4Q PROFIT
RISES 7.5 PERCENT

"UPS (UPS), the world’s."
largest shipping carrier, said”

its fourth-quarter profit
increased 7.5 percent ona
5.6 percent gain in sales.

The results, announced
before the market opened,
were in line with Wall Street
expectations. But shares of
UPS fell 95 cents, or 1.3 per-
cent, to close at $72.70 on
the New York Stock
Exchange.

The Atlanta-based com-
pany said that for the three
months ending Dec. 31 it
earned $1.13 billion, or $1.04
a share, compared to a profit
of $1.05 billion, or 95 cents a

share, for the same perioda |

year ago.

e FAST FOOD

BURGER KING 2Q PROFIT
JUMPS 41 PERCENT

Burger King Holdings
(BKC), the world’s second-
largest burger chain, kept its
revitalization going with a
second-quarter profit gain
of 41 percent on strong
same-store sales and income
from new restaurants.

The Miami-based chain
reiterated its double-digit
profit growth forecast for
fiscal 2007 as it works to
improve its brand through
expansion and marketing of
new food menus.

Net income rose to $38
million, or 28 cents per
share, for the three months
ended Dec. 31 compared
with $27 million, or 24 cents
per share, a year ago. Reve-
nue climbed 9 percent to
$559 million from $512 mil-
lion.

Burger King’s stock has
risen more than 21 percent
since the company went
public at $17 a share. Shares
rose 10 cents to $20.85 in
trading on the NYSE.





a ae

Stock Thr. volume
Mills pfE MLSpE 25.40 25.30 = -.10 7236
KeySpan KSE 40.76 40.76 * 7147
WA Mut! WM 44.14 4415 +.01 7096

Microsoft MSFT 30.48 30.45 -.03 6892
AbtLab ABT 53.19 53.19 * 6770
CMSEng CMS 16.71 16.71 . 6312
NorflkSo NSC 47.54 47,54 * 6252
JPMorgCh JPM 50.18 50.18 7 6242
Websenses WBSN = 24.35 21.48 -2.87 6026
Motorola = MOT 19.58 19.60 +.02 5852
iShR2K aya IWM 79.18 79,17 -01 5571
Qwesttm Q 821 823 +,02 5497



For up-to-date stock quotes, go to www.MiamiHerald.com and click on Business



LEAT GE TPS SSRI PTAA PPS ae SSS ESOS EE SO ET TY PE SS FS STIS] Ga SIT ES BIE TSO

ye
te

peor
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007, PAGE 5B



Lady Henrietta’s ICD stake

FROM page 1B

Bahama Port Authority (GBPA)
and Port Group Ltd, which has
served to unite the family.

The Tribune understands that
one interested party in Lady Hen-
rietta’s stake is Floyd Farquhar-
son, who together with Senator
Philip Galanis submitted a multi-
million dollar bid to acquire the
GBPA and Port Group last year.
This was rejected by Sir Jack.

Meanwhile, The Tribune has
confirmed that Franklyn Wilson,
head of Eleuthera Properties, the
Cotton Bay developer, and chair-
man of RoyalStar Assurance,
Sunshine Insurance and Arawak
Homes, is part of a consortium
featuring a major North Ameri-
can power generator that is bid-
ding on Mirant’s stake.

Mr Wilson told this newspaper
that he was unable to comment
“at this time” when asked several
weeks ago about his involvement
in a group seeking to purchase
Mirant’s stake.

Since then, sources have sug-
gested that another party in Mr
Wilson’s group is Emanuel Alex-
iou, the attorney and chairman
of A. F. Holdings, renamed par-
ent company of the Colina Finan-
cial Group (CFG).

This would suggest that Colina
is involved, possibly either pro-
viding corporate advice or some
Bahamas-based financing, but this
nor Mr Alexiou’s participation

- could not be confirmed last night.

* Tony Ferguson, Mr Alexiou’s fel-
. low A. F. Holdings shareholder
and CFAL principal, did not
return The Tribune’s call seeking
comment.

Based on the $7.10 per share
BISX price for ICD Utilities,
Lady Henrietta’s just over five
million shares would fetch over
$35 million based on market
prices. Any buyer would likely
have to pay a slight premium,
meaning that a purchase would
cost between $35-$40 million.

Mirant is seeking to sell its 55
per cent stake in Grand Bahama
Power Company as part of a
wider disposal of its Caribbean
interests, believing a single trans-
action will generate most value
and enable it to avoid writing
down the value of assets held for
sale.

In its last quarterly 10Q report,
filed with the Securities and

‘ Exchange Commission (SEC),

the Atlanta-headquartered pow-
er company said: “Mirant is cur-
rently seeking to sell the
Caribbean business in a single
transaction. Mirant’s analysis indi-
cated that no impairment was
necessary, as the estimated fair
value less costs to sell exceeded
the book carrying value.

“However, if the operating
companies and investments that
comprise the Caribbean business
are ultimately not sold in a single
transaction, an impairment loss
could result.

“Our estimate at September
30, 2006, is that these potential
losses would not be material. As
of September 30, 2006, the book
value for two of the investments
in the Caribbean business exceed-
ed the estimated fair value by a
combined amount of less than $10
million.”

Apart from its 55 per cent stake
in Grand Bahama Power Com-

pany, Mirant’s other Caribbean
operations include an 80 per cent
stake in. Jamaica Public Service
Company, a 39 per cent interest
in Power Generation Company
of Trinidad & Tobago, and a 25.5
per cent stake in Curacao Utilities
Company.

The Tribune understands that
the first round in the auction
process has been completed, and
that some contenders have been
eliminated from the process.
Interested parties are now waiting
to see who has made it into the
second bidding round, and when
this will start.

A collective sale of Mirant’s
will make it more difficult for
Bahamians to participate in the
process other than as minority
partners attached to a larger
international bidder, such as a
major electrical utility.

Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany’s total book value, or total
assets minus total liabilities, stood
at just under $115 million at
December 31, 2005. This means
that Mirant’s stake was worth
$63.25 million, using this valua-
tion method, and financial ana-
lysts spoken to by The Tribune
felt it might be sold for 2x book
value, making it worth $126.5 mil-
lion. .
_Mirant holds 50 per cent of
Grand Bahama Power Compa-
ny through its own subsidiary,
Mirant Grand Bahama Ltd, with
the remaining 5 per cent interest
owned through ICD Utilities, the
BISX-listed holding vehicle for
the other 50 per cent stake.
Therefore, the Mirant sale will
ultimately involve a transaction
via BISX.

Minister promises minimum wage rise

FROM page 1B

employers on notice.

“Listen. Y’all remember this .

now, cause we started throwing
some blows today, and so J tell
you that we putting them on
notice; create real opportunities
for Bahamians and remove all
those glass ceilings now.”

Mr Gibson vowed that his Min-
istry would be enforcing stricter
penalties for persons hiring
employees without valid work
permits:

Responding to the minister,
. Trades Union Congress (TUC)
president and labour lawyer, Obie
Ferguson, said the unions had
long been agitating that the min-
. imum wage be increased to some-
. where between $225-350 per
week.

He said this was a necessity,
given the relatively high and
increasing costs of living in the

’ Bahamas, inflation and the con-
. sumer price index, and related ©

- expenses that the average house-
hold faces.
' Mr Ferguson said an actual
increase may be difficult to
achieve, given the persuasive and
influential role of employers.
“Still, we are hopeful,” he

added.

Brian Nutt, president of the
Bahamas Employers Confedera-
tion (BECon), said that before
the minimum wage can be
increased, there must be proper
feasibility studies and consulta-
tion with employers and trade

’ unions under section 4-2 of the

labour laws.

He hoped the law would be fol-
lowed to determine a prudent
increase if one did take place, Mr
Nutt said.

As far as the minister’s glass
ceiling comments, Mr Nutt said
the employers. would welcome a
workable scenario that would
allow training for Bahamians in
job capacities normally held by
non- Bahamians.

However, Mr Nutt added that
in the changing landscape of the
Bahamian labour market, work
permits have to be granted almost
across the board.

“It seems to me we have work-
ers in every category, not just in
one or two,” he explained. In the
past, Mr Nutt said work permits
generally fell into two categories
- labourers at the lower end, and
managers and upper echelon
positions at the top end of the

‘Legal Notice
| NOTICE
CALEDONIAN MANAGEMENT LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) CALEDONIAN MANAGEMENT LIMITED is in
voluntary dissolution under the provisions of
Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced

on the 30th January, 2007 when the Articles of
Dissolution were submitted to and registered by the

Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Credit

Suisse Trust Limited, Rue de Lausanne 17 bis,

Geneva.

Dated this 31st day of January, A.D. 2007

Credit Suisse Trust Limited
Liquidator



Legal Notice

NOTICE

YASAWA MANAGEMENT LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) YASAWA MANAGEMENT LIMITED is in voluntary
dissolution under the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said company commence on the
30th January, 2007 when the Articles of Dissolution were
submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Verduro Associated

Ltd., Pasea Estate, Road Town, Tortola, B.V.I.

Dated this 31st day of January, A.D. 2007

Verduro Associated Ltd.
Liquidator



labour market.

Mr Nutt said that in examin-
ing labour shortages, issues such
as brain drain of talented young
Bahamian college graduates,
worker attitudes and ethics had to
be addressed.

Noting the minister’s
announcement that the Govern-
ment was in the final stages of
preparing amendments to the
labour laws, Mr Nutt said he was
not aware of any new amend-
ments, indicating this might speak
to a lack of consultation between
BECon and the Ministry of
Labour. He said consultation was
built into the legislation to éasure
that. the voices of both employers
and the labour movement were
heard.

RESPONSIBILITIES:

FirstCaribbean is a major Caribbean Bank offering a full range of market-leading financial services in
_ Corporate Banking, Retail Banking, Credit Cards, Wealth Management, Capital Markets and Treasury.
We are the largest regionally-listéd bank in the English-speaking Caribbean with over 3,500 staff,

' 100 branches and banking centres, and offices in 17 regional markets, serving 800,000 active accounts.

Dey UW wa nies










































Atlantic Medical
Clinical Administrator

Atlantic Medical Insurance (AMI),a subsidiary of Colonial Group International
Limited (CGI) headquartered in Bermuda, is seeking a Clinical Administrator.

CGI, with offices in Bermuda, the Bahamas, the Cayman Islands, and the
British Virgin Islands, offers a complete range of premier financial and
insurance services to both local and international clients. This is an
opportunity to be part of a rapidly growing innovative company, focusing on
providing clients with first class service and access to competitive products.

Reporting to the Operations Manager Designate, the position of
Clinical Administrator will be responsible for a variety of medically
related issues such as reviewing local and foreign medical claims,
pre-certifying patients for off-island air evacuations and hospitalization
and maximizing medical claims cee in a demanding and _ rapidly
expanding environment. Other duties will include but not be limited to:

© Periodic review of medical enrolment forms for eleioatey

© Reporting to re-insurers regarding large and potentially large claim losses
and coordinating reserves

® Liaising with doctors, social workers, medical facilities (local and foreign)
regarding client and claim queries

© Dealing with walk-in and telephone queries, assisting enrollees and their
families with medical and claims related queries

© Reviewing in-patient/out-patient authorization and following up as

appropriate

It is essential that applicants possess the following qualifications, experience
and attributes:

© Registered Nurse currently registered with the Bahamas Nursing
Licensing/Registration Authority and on their “Active” Nurses List _

© Minimum of 5 years’ practical nursing experience

° Knowledge of CPT, ICD-9CM, HCPCS coding

© Strong customer service skills including confidence in dealing with clients
in a professional manner to assist them with their enquiries

© Proven communication (verbal and written) and organizational skills

© Superior proficiency in MS Word; knowledge of email and electronic
calendar software; accurate typing at 45 wpm

© Experience in creating reports and as well as composing correspondence

© Ability to work under pressure, multi-task and meet deadlines

Compensation for the successful candidate will be attractive and linked
to performance. AMI offers an attractive benefits package that includes
comprehensive medical insurance, contributory pension plan, life and long
term disability coverage.

If you have a keen commitment to quality results and want to contribute your
talents to a dynamic company, contact us about this opportunity. Applications
will be treated in the strictest confidence and should be made in writing to:

Atlantic Medical Insurance

Attn: Operations Manager

. 2" Terrace, Collins Avenue
P.O.Box SS 5915 |
Nassau, Bahamas..

Closing Date for applications is February 15, 2007.



PREREQUISITES:

° To provide technical expertise and consulting services in the
development, implementation and maintenance of business
applications, the Bank's information architecture and
supporting information delivery systems

¢ To propose and participate in projects to research, develop,
test and implement new products to meet the requirements
of the technology architecture, encompassing the current
and future business applications, and to ensure alignment of
the Bank's information and processing platforms

7 © To lead the development and maintenance of the Bank's

technology architecture
© To monitor industry-wide standards, new systems

development and vendors' business application products for

applicability to the organisation

TECHNICAL ARCHITECT - SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT |

PREREQUISITES:
© Good skill and knowledge in the following areas:

RESPONSIBILITIES:

¢ To provide technical expertise and consulting services in the
development, implementation and maintenance of business
applications, the bank's information architecture and
supporting information delivery systems

¢ To propose and participate in projects to research, develop,
test and implement new products to meet the requirements
of the technology architecture, encompassing the current
and future business applications, and to ensure alignment of
the Bank's information and processing platforms

e To lead the development and maintenance of the Bank's
technology architecture

¢ To develop, maintain and implement policies, standards and
guidelines on all aspects of technology architecture within
the organisation :

¢ To monitor industry-wide standards, new systems
development and vendors' business application products for
applicability to the organisation

© Good skill and knowledge in the following areas:

business information/technology architecture; systems
integration; methodologies, standards and metrics sufficient to
interpret/analyse relevant issues/developments and apply these
in innovative ways

° Expert knowledge in the ffeld of information architecture with

extensive experience working with tools, standards,,
methodologies and best practices in at least two of the
following related areas: data modelling, data warehousing,
data mining, information delivery systems

e Extensive experience in using XML, UML, ERD, SQL, ETL tools
¢ Minimum of 3 year's experience in a Bank’s Technology

Department would be an asset



business information/technology architecture; systems
integration; methodologies, standards and metrics sufficient
to interpret/analyse relevant issues/developments and apply
these in innovative ways

° Expert knowledge in the field of systems development and

design

e Strong customer service attitude when providing expertise

in service area

e Ability to examine and analyse data in a systematic and

organised manner

e Ability to interpret and analyse medium to complex concepts

and apply these in innovative ways

¢ Minimum of 3 year's experience in a Bank’s Technology

Department would be an asset

We offer a challenging and diverse experience in addition to opportunities for professional growth and an attractive

compensation and reward package including performance bonuses.

Applications with detailed résumés with the names of three business references should be submitted no later than

Monday 5th February, 2007 to:

Nicole M Griffith
FirstCaribbean International Bank

' Head Office

Warrens, St. Michael

Barbados _

Tel: (246) 367 2142

Email: Nicole.Griffith@firstcaribbeanbank.com

Only applicants who are short-listed will be contacted.

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.






PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

THE TRIBUNE





Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.












LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION

International Business Companies Act
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act, (No. 45 of 2000), STASEC LIMITES has been
completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been issed and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register. The date of
completion of the dissolution was the 21st of December,
2006.

PANAMERICAN MANAGEMENT
SERVICES (BAHAMAS) LTD.






CAREER OPPORTUNITY
, : |

Requirements:
























¢ Professional qualification-STEP accreditation or ACIB
Trustee Diploma = .

e Minimum five years experience in trust administration at
senior level

e Ability to work independently

° Strong knowledge of offshore jurisdictions

° Strong knowledge of fiduciary offshore trust and corporate
procedures

¢ Excellent PC skills _

e Excellent command of the English Language, both written
and oral

° Ability to work effectively as’a'member of team

Sita NEEL PLATA ET

Personal Attributes:



¢ Excellent work attitude, punctuality and attendance record
¢ Ability to interact with others in a professional manner

e Ability to prioritize tasks

e Ability to work with minimal supervision

e Ability to learn new tasks quickly




We offer an excellent remuneration an benefits package that
includes medical insurance, performance based incentive
and a pension plan.

Interested persons should submit complete resumes in
writing along with supporting documents to:






Human Resources

The Private Trust Corporation Limited
P.O.Box N-65.
Fax 326-8388 .

Deadline 28th February 2007

Pricing Information As Of:




Previous C'



Abaco Markets

‘ 3 0.70
12.05 10.25 Bahamas Property Fund. 11.30
18.03 6.90 Bank of Bahamas 8.03
0.85 0.70 Benchmark 0.80
1.85 1.26 Bahamas Waste 1.85
1.49 4.12 Fidelity Bank 1.26
10.00 9.00 Cable Bahamas 10.00
12.20 1.64 . Colina Holdings ‘ 2.00
13.10 9.05 Commonwealth Bank 13.00
16.26 4.22 Consolidated Water BDRs 5.12
12.88 2.40 Doctor's Hospital 2.50
6.21 | 5.54 Famguard 5.80
12.30 10.70 Finco 12.30
14.50 10.90 FirstCaribbean 14.30
15.68 10.90 Focol : 15.68
1.15 0.50 Freeport Concrete 0.55
10.20 7.10 ICD Utilities 7.10

J. S. Johnson 9.05

Premier Real Estate







Bahamas Supermarkets
40.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)





1.325275*
2.9728***
2.500211**

colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & ! Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Bond Fund

Fidel







10.0000




BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec f 5
62wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings















BAIC, COB launch »
business seminars

m By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

THE Bahamas Agricultural
and Industrial Corporation
(BAIC), in conjunction with
the College of the Bahamas

(COB), is to launch a 10-week |

Business Empowerment Lec-
ture Series to provide poten-
tial businesses persons with
vital business tools.
Announcing the event yes-



NOTICE is hereby given

NOTICE

MOUNTABOR DRIVE, PINEWOOD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,

terday, BAIC chairman
Michael Halkitis said the pur-
pose of the free seminars was
to provide potential and exist-
ing entrepreneurs and business
persons with broad exposure
to proven strategies, best prac-
tices and real life business
experience.

Mr Halkitis said these semi-
nars were particularly timely
given what is happening in the
Bahamas.

“The initial seminars will be
conducted once per week (

that SHELDA EXANTIS OF





each Thursday) over a 10-week
period, and will cover such top-
ics as business planning, fund-
ing, accounting, expense con-
trol, forecasting, marketing,
information technology and
human resources,” Mr Halkitis
said.

“Additionally, there will be a
segment during each sessions
for testimonials from successful
business persons. These semi-
nars will enhance the capacity
of entrepreneurs and business
persons to benefit from anchor
properties throughout the
Bahamas.”

Mr Halkitis added that
BAIC was aware of the role
that small businesses play in
the economy, especially as it
relates to job creation.

“Properly operated small
business enterprise can pro-
vide at a high level, needed
goods and services to the —
Bahamian economy, keeping °
pace with future projects and
developments,” Mr Halkitis
said. rie

“It must be noted that

financing a business is impor- *. ': ’
tant, but having the expertise .°.~
to operate that business is crit: -

ical.
Remelda Moxey, chair of
the School Business at COB,

said they were delighted to be vie
a part of the venture as it.

would assist in the develop-
ment of Bahamas business per-
sons. ;

The series begins at COB on
February 1, 2007.

lose. Today's Close

11.30 .

10.00

13.10









YIELD - last 12
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS $ - Acompany's reported eamings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration’ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 31st day of January, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

- Ben-Bo Collection &
‘Management Company Ltd

wish to inform the public that

BRIDGETTE ROLLE

is no longer employed with us.
She is no longer authorized to do
business for and on behalf of





































BEN-BO COLLECTION &
MANAGEMENT COMPANY LTD.

CHAMBERS

Counsel and Attorneys-at-Law Notaries Public
is seeking to hire an ambitious

COMMERCIAL ATTORNEY

for its Nassau Office

Applicants with a minimum of five (5) years
experience must possess the skills and the ability to
work independently on conveyancing and mortgage
matters.



Attractive salary and benefits are available to the
candidate with the right aptitude and skills.

Applicants should send resumes to:

THE HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGER
P.O. Box N-979, Nassau, Bahamas or
By facsimile (242) 393-4558 or
E-mail: info@halsburylawchambers.com

0.00



Last Price Weekly Vol.



*-19 January 2007

** . 31 December 2006
*** 31 December 2006
*s«* 31 December 2008

* - 31 December 2006



NOTICE

registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 31st day of January, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHARLES OSAZUWA OF

TWYNAM HEIGHTS, P.O. BOX EE-16843, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement

of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 31st day of ©
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and

Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE is hereby given that RODNEY CALIS OF FORT |
ST. GROOVE, P.O. BOX CR-54802, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, -
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and -
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The (Fo -.
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why sf-<-<-

















se eH






NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN of the loss of
Bahamas Government Registered Stock Certificate

as follows:

218,406
81,600

0.375 APR
0.40625 APR

65-112
65-113

06 Sept. 2021
06 Sept. 2022

Stock
Bahamas Gov. Reg. Stock
Bahamas Gov. Reg. Stock

I intend to request The Registrar to issue a
replacement certificate. If this certificate

| is found, please write to P.O. Box N7788,

Nassau, Bahamas.

APR=Approve Prime rate

POSITION AVAILABLE

ACCOUNTANT

Responsibilities:
e Preparation of monthly financial statements.
e Reconciliation of general ledger accounts.
e Preparation of work papers for auditors.
e Report directly to Financial Controller.

Qualifications:
e Three years work experience in a similar position.
e Proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel.
e Ability to work with minimal supervision.

Benefits:
Salary is based on skills and experience. Other
benefits include health insurance and pension.

All interested accountants should mail their resumes to:

H.R. Manager
PO. Box N-4036
Nassau, Bahamas

Fax to: (242) 364-6084


‘THE TRIBUNE

3

FROM page 1B

among the other interested parties that
attempted to acquire the Bahamas Film
Studios was a group headed by Bahamian
filmmaker Cedric Scott, who has long har-
boured ambitions to set-up his own televi-
‘sion and film production studio on Grand
Bahama. At least one other party was inter-
»ested in the project and in negotiations with
«Mr Fuller.
‘»’ He said in a statement: “This new invest-
>ment will provide the necessary upgrades
and additions necessary for the studio to
*become a more full-service facility. This

'. |. , decision is in the best interest of the future
’.' «pf the project, as well as our shareholders
.~ and the citizens of Grand Bahama.”

The statement from Ashby Corporation

‘indicated that the Government had ©

_approved the takeover in principle,

_ although it did not explicitly say so.

., A previous release by the company said

_the sale “involves the pay off of $10 million

_in bank loans and approximately $1 mil-
lion in other debts of the company’s sub-
sidiary, Gold Rock Creek Enterprises”.

The $10 million figure refers to the loan
made to the Bahamas Film Studios by First-
Caribbean International Bank (Bahamas)

eee

‘
we

for construction of the project’s water tank.
The Tribune understands that the sale was
somewhat forced on Mr Fuller by the bank,
which was pushing for repayment of the
loan, and the purchase price is likely to
have involved an eight-figure sum.

In return, Mr Fuller will have settled all
debts, enabling Mr Bethel and his Bahamas
FilmInvest group, which is affiliated with his
Montaque Capital Partners and Montaque
Corporate Partners, to start with a rela-
tively clean balance sheet.

Both parties said they were working with
the Government to ensure a smooth tran-
sition to new ownership, with a manage-

‘ment team for the Bahamas Film Studios”

due to be announced in the coming months.

Meanwhile, Mr Fuller appeared to have
received more good news, with Ashby Cor-
poration releasing a statement yesterday
announcing that a Miami court had dis-
missed a lawsuit filed against it by Bjorn
Monteine, in relation to the Bahamas Film
Studios, as “frivolous”.

Ashby added that the judge had yet to
rule on Ashby’s motion to be awarded costs
and attorney fees from Mr Monteine.

Mr Monteine had alleged that he signed
an agreement to take over the Bahamas
Film Studios and rescue it from insolvency,
but then its principals reneged on the deal

Be

Film Studios takeover

and instead used his money to rescue the
project. These allegations had been strenu-
ously denied by Mr Fuller.

However, legal actions against the now
former owners may not be over, as it is
understood that Paul Quigley, one of the
Bahamas Film Studios’ three founding part-
ners, is planning to take legal action over
how he was ousted from the Board and
overall project last year.

Yet the acquisition by Mr Bethel and his
group represents an opportunity to unlock
the Bahamas Film Studios’ true potential
and small bit of. economic diversification
that it represents, provided the buyers have

the capital to build on the Pirates of the

Caribbean filming.

The Bahamas Film Studios is a $76 mil-
lion project in eastern Grand Bahama that
was the first investment deal for which a
Heads of Agreement was signed by the cur-
rent administration back in 2002.

The plan was for the Bahamas Film Stu-
dios to possess the world’s largest water
tank, some 60 million gallons in size; movie
theme park; resort hotel; and film, television
and movie recording studios.

The site of the project is the 3,500 acre
former US missile base, leased from the

. Government for 50 years, a deal that is

renewable for a further 49 years.

‘Luxury resort chain part of proposed Freeport project





WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007, PAGE 7B

NOTICE



NOTICE is hereby given -that LARRY JACQUES OF
5139 Marion Place, West Palm Beach, FI. 33407, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The

Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 24th day of January, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, BETTY

of the Soutjern District of the Island of New Providence one
of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas intend
to change my name to BETTE MELANIE DORCELY. If
there are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, .
you may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box SS-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (80) days
after the date of publication of this notice.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JOSER GEDEUS OF
THE MUD, MARSH HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a_ citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 31st day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.









Legal Notice

' FROM page 1B

ror
+f 2.88. e

- He added: “We intend at
‘looking and developing other
ssites in the Bahamas. We have
-‘specifically looked at two other
sites to date. One is the world’s
.deepest blue hole, an amazing
‘site just off the beach, sur-
rounded by cliffs in Long Island,
vand the other is one in Grand
‘Bahama.”

4
4

The Raven Group’s Aman-
branded development is likely
to be similar to the resort
chain’s Turks & Caicos project.

Mr Zecha said: “In terms of
real estate we have thirty-three
5,000 square foot villas for sale
in our Turks and Caicos pro-
ject. We have already sold 12
of these villas to our Aman
‘Junkies’ at an average rate of
$6-$7 million per villa. Ten of
these villas are under construc-



Help Wanted

Dental Office seeking applicants for the following positions

The applicant must possess the following:

. Dental Assistant
“Gate eave)
MG fese eto nner te cela
Steen e vig
“Good people skills
ee esattn Ck OR SRS

perience

Office Administrative Assistant
Weeeiiicontan caren ; ey,
PrpSTons reese be siCca-CesnnnnayeineeviCOyn
icator, team player, and able to multi task
SSCS ent organizational skills, good people’skills and experience with
Microsoft Word.’ . :
Fax resume to 393-5802

Minimum of 2



Ces

MOWU
&
KERZNER

tion already, and so we are
extremely pleased that without
even putting the product on the
market we have achieved this
level of sales.”

The Raven Group project is
likely to complement Morgan
Stanley’s, acting as the ‘Ocean
Club’ to the latter’s Atlantis-
style development.

The Morgan Stanley deal
involves the Grand Bahama
Development Company (Dev-
co) selling its 50 per cent stake
in 1,000 acres at Barbary
Beach to Morgan Stanley,
which would then be 50/50
partners in the development
via a joint venture agreement
with Port Group Ltd.

Port Group Ltd is the hold-
ing company for all the pro-
ductive assets spun-off from
the Grand Bahama Port
Authority (GBPA) by Sir Jack

‘Hayward and the late Edward
St George. | | 3 ;

Due to the continuing dis-
pute between Sir Jack and Mr
St George’s family over the
former’s claim to own 75 per
cent of the GBPA and Port
Group Ltd, approval of the
Morgan Stanley purchase will
be required from Sir Jack,
Lady Henrietta St George and
Clifford Culmer, the two com-

Shirley & Mackey Street

Intersection Improvement

Bliiyo weitere

The

Ministry of Works

Project

& Utilities

and Kerzner

International wish to inform the public that works for the
Shirley & Mackey Street project will be completed by

February 3, 2007

The intersecion will return to normal operation at the
end of construction. We thank you for your patience
throughtout the project which improved traffic operations

at the intersection.



panies’ independent manage-
ment consultant.

The Tribune has seen corre-
spondence indicating that Sir
Jack has signed off on the Mor-
gan Stanley project, while Lady
Henrietta has also been “‘asked
to sign certain documents for
Port Group Ltd regarding the
Morgan Stanley transaction”.

Few details on the Morgan
Stanley project have been
made public, although it is
understood to involve a major
hotel and casino, timeshares,
condos, second homes and
retail and commercial facili-
ties.

It has been billed by execu-
tives who have spoken to The
Tribune on condition of
anonymity as being Freeport’s
answer to Kerzner Interna-
tional’s Atlantis resort on Par-
adise Island, having a similar
impact on that island. ....

Paes

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

LURIG S.A.
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000),

LURIG S.A. has been dissolved and struck off the Register

according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registar

General on the 17th day of January, 2007.

MARK JAMES SHORTLAND
Vannin, Fairy Cottage
Laxey, Isle of Man
IM4 7JB

->¢ Laquidator. -



ail Atlantic Medical
DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS

Atlantic Medical Insurance (AMI), a subsidiary of Colonial Group International
Limited (CGIL) headquartered in Bermuda, is seeking a Director of Operations _
for the medical claims and eligibility departments of AMI in the Bahamas.

CGIL, with offices in Bermuda, the Bahamas, the Cayman Islands, and
the British Virgin Islands, offers a complete range of premier financial
and insurance services to both local and international clients. This is an
opportunity to be part of a rapidly growing innovative company, focusing on
providing clients with first class service and access to competitive products,

The Director of Operations will be responsible for the overall
day-to-day management of the medical claims, customer service,
administration and eligibility departments with a primary focus on the
claims area. These responsibilities will include monitoring and evaluating all
activities and procedures and introducing and monitoring structured audits
as well as productivity standards. This position will also be responsible for
developing and training staff in areas that are essential to efficient company
operations. It is essential that applicants possess the following qualifications:

¢ 10 years experience managing claims and eligibility departments within the
health insurance industry, including the development and implementation
of procedures and audits.
Experience of working within the US healthcare system and experience
of US claims processing, provider and network discounts and negotiating
contracts with independent service providers.
Minimum 10 years’ supervisory experience with the ability to train and

mentor staff.

Thorough understanding of group employee health benefits including
medical, dental, life, and disability.

Superior communication and organisational skills as well as a
service-oriented approach.

Proven ability to negotiate with external and internal clients and work

under pressure.

Compensation for the successful candidate will be attractive and linked
to performance. CGIL offers an attractive benefits package that includes
comprehensive medical insurance, contributory pension plan, and life insurance.

If you have a keen commitment to quality results and want to contribute your
talents to a dynamic company, contact us about this opportunity. Applications
will be treated in the strictest confidence and should be made in writing to:

Atlantic Medical Insurance

P. Box SS-5915

Nassau, Bahamas

or

email address for electronic submission of applications
hr_manager_bm@colonial.bm

Closing date for applications is February 15, 2007.


PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

Dear Shareholders,
We present our un-audited 1st quarter fiscal year 2007 financial statements.

Most of you will have read our audited financial statements for the year ended August 31,
2006, and for those of you that have not, then please go to our website “fccbahamas.com”
where you will find them under the ‘Investor Relations’ section.

As | said in my letter to you dated January 12th, 2007 the company will return to prof-
itability in the 3rd quarter of this fiscal year once all of the costs associated with our tran-
sitioning the business have finished; hence the reason that we are reporting a 1st quarter
loss for the company of $159k. The Home Centre’s 1st quarter loss was $214k and the
Concrete Plant division reporting a $ 54k net profit.

We opened the new Home Centre Superstore on September 6th 2006 and we have seen
our monthly sales, since opening, increase every month from the $875k in September to

| $1,045k in November. Sales at the Concrete Plant have increased 3% over the same
quarter last fiscal year.

Our gross profit margin has increased significantly, primarily at the Home Centre, as-our

| 1st quarter revenues this fiscal year show more revenue being generated from the non
building material sector compared to the same period last year. This is good as we gen-
erate higher gross profit from this sector.

During the 1st quarter last fiscal year, almost 70% of our sales at the Home Centre, Peel
Street facility were generated from the building materials sector as a result of a lot of hur-
ricane repair work during this period. However, in this 1st quarter, the non building supply
revenues were only 50% of our total sales and yet our total sales for the quarter have
remained the same at just under $3 million, showing growth in the non building supplies
sector. ‘

Our operating expenses have increased almost 30% primarily due to payroll costs, rent
and utilities. Our payroll costs are higher because we had an additional 20 staff compared
to the same quarter last fiscal year, together with all the overtime and casual labour costs

associated with the transitioning of the business. As we go into the 3rd quarter, our pay- }

roll costs will decease as we consolidate the staff from the Seahorse Plaza store, which is
now closed, and the transitioning costs are completed

The rent expense is higher because we were paying a much lower rent in the 1st quarter
| last fiscal year due to a rent reduction because of the poor state of the Peel Street facility
which we were operating out of at that time.

Our utility costs are higher this quarter compared to the same period last fiscal year
because we had no air conditioning working at the Peel Street facility.

We are working on further reducing our operating expenses by a minimum of 10% by the }

start of our 3rd quarter.

| The Concrete Plant’s revenue forecast for the remainder of this fiscal year looks bright and
this division will remain profitable throughout the year.

| Thank you for your support.

Ray Simpson
Chief Executive Officer
January 29, 2007

a

Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Consolidated Statement of Operations
Three months ended November 30, 2006 with comparative information for 2005

Outstanding shares = 4,708,334
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)
3 months ended 3 months ended
November 30, 2006 November 30, 2005
Sales 4,104,360 4,045,860
Cost of sales. 2,956,079 3,131,644
Gross profit 1,148,281 914,216
Payroll costs 625,501 468,808
Other operating costs 287,988 255,885
Rent expense 142,138 114,429
Advertising expense 21,953 7,840
Utilities expense 107,115 66,677
Other income ‘4,810 5,284
1,179,885 908,355
Income/(loss) before interest, taxes
depreciation and amortisation (31,604) 5,861
Depn. and amort. expense (84,696) (87,097)
Net financing income/(expense 43,242 28,765
Net income/{loss 159,542 : 110,001
Earnings per share
Basic and diluted earnings/ (loss) per share $ 0.034 0.023'

Freeport Concrete Company Limited
Consolidated Balance Sheet
As at November 30, 2006

nn
November 30,2006 August 31,2006

Unaudited (audited)

Assets

Current assets

Cash 198,879 198,471
Time deposits 63,698 63,274
Accounts receivable, net 41,136,104 1,323,717
Due from former subsidiary shareholder - -
Due from former subsidiary - 17,250
Inventories 1,967,387 2,488,843
inventories of spare parts and supplies 115,930 121,187
Deposits and prepaid expenses $0,536 132,642
3,572,534 4,345,384
Property, plant and equipment 3,475,028 3,387,232
Total assets 7,047,562 7,732,616
Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity
Current liabilities
Bank overdraft $ - 1,605,412 1,491,916
Accounts payable and accrued
expenses 3,137,250 3,734,627
Warranty Provision 5,000 5,000
Due to Shareholder - -
Current portion of long term debt 118,884 183,710
4,866,546 §,415,253
Long term debt 463,648 440,453
Shareholders’ equity:
Share Capital 47,083 47,083
Contributed surplus 5,774,868 5,774,868
Appraisal excess 1,433,867 1,433,867
Retained earings : (5,378,908) (5,378,908)
Current eamings ' (159,542)
1,717,368 1,876,910

THE TRIBUNE

aaa
Corporation plans
50m bond for water

The Water & Sewerage Cor-
poration is planning to issue a
$50 million bond in June to
fund water and wastewater
infrastructure works through-
out the Bahamas, and is
already looking to put this

financing method to use on.

Long Island.

The Corporation has pro-
posed that Long Islanders
finance the development of
water production and trans-
mission facilities on their own
island by buying into a $5.2
million bond issue, taking own-
ership of their own utilities.

Donald Demeritte, the Cor-
poration’s chairman, told a
town meeting in Deadman’s
Cay, held to discuss a potential
private/public partnership in
developing the island’s water
infrastructure, that the bond
would pay 7 per cent interest.

He also urged Long
Islanders to consider taking
ownership of a new reverse
osmosis plant planned for
northern Long Island.

This would serve not only
the local population, but
planned resort developments
and existing properties such as
Cap Santa Maria, creating
demand for one million gal-
lons per day.

Mr Demeritte said it would
costs $20 million to finance
water production and mains
extensions from one end of the
island to the other, covering
200 miles.

“The intention is to take
care of the entire Long Island
transmission and water distri-
bution system, but it would be
done in a protracted way if
government had to do it by
itself, so the aim is to create a
Public-Private-Partnership that
would enable Long Islanders
to facilitate and accelerate the
delivery of water throughout

the length and breadth of Long
Island,” Mr Demeritte said.

The Government’s National
Water and Wastewater Policy
was intended to ensure that
the Water and Sewerage Cor-
poration had the right of first
refusal to provide water to new
developments, including such
clauses in Heads of Agree-
ments.

Mr Demeritte said Bahami-
ans had previously missed out
on opportunities to supply the
likes of Kerzner International
and Emerald Bay with water.

He pointed out that Kerzner
International had indicated
that Atlantis would need 4.4
million gallons of water per
day once the Phase III expan-
sion was completed, and cur-
rent prices for reverse osmosis
was ranged from $10 to $15
per thousand gallons.

On Long Island, Mr
Demeritte suggested a phased
approach that would extend
mains in north and central
Long Island from Grays to
Thompson Bay, and south

from Turtle Cove to Lochabar.

In addition, the ‘blended
approach’ called for the con-
struction of a Reverse Osmosis
Plant in the north and installa-
tion of mains from Simms to
Cape Santa Maria.

Mr Demeritte told Long
Islanders that their $5.2 mil-
lion bond would be a legal
instrument that was honoured
regardless of changes in the
Corporation’s leadership or
government.

Without this bond, he said
Long Island could expect to
have about $1.8 to $2 million

allocated to them in 2007 - as '

in 2006. However, the time
period to complete the neces-
sary works for Long Island
would likely be much longer if
a public-private partnership

infrastructure works

agreement was not cemented, | -
and the proposed ‘Long Island -
Bond’ not issued.
Jan Knowles, chief councillor
for Long Island, said Bahami-
ans have seen the value of |

bond issues such as the Par- ce
adise Island Bridge bond, *.-.-

adding that the 7 per cent
interest being offered on the
bond was superior to rates
being offered by the banks. In
addition, Long Islanders could
take pride in ownership of
their own system.

“Once you own something
syou take better care of it and
understand the operation of it.
The Government can’t do
everything. With this partner-
ship between private individu-
als and the Government, we

can go much further in devel- °-".
oping our country in a better .".~

way,” Mr Knowles said.
Vernice Brice, a resident of -

Long Island, also expressed .°. '
interest in the investment -,-:-—
opportunity. “The proposed -*-*

bond is an excellent idea if, as
they say, you are guaranteed
at least 7 per cent interest
because at today’s rate in the
bank, they only give you 2.5
per cent ...if we finally get
water in the south, kudos! It
would be in our best interest to
energise Long Islanders and
sell them the plan,” Mrs Brice
said.

Long Island, which has
almost no ground water
resources, currently has a
reverse osmosis plant - the
DevMat plant at Deadman’s
Cay - to supply settlements
between Grays in the north
and Turtle Cove in south Long
Island.

However, settlements
beyond these points rely on
the Corporation’s tanker truck
service for delivery of reverse ~
osmosis water.

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

in

Wealth Management
Financial Advisor/Investment Manager

Bahamas

We are expanding our capabilities in wealth management and are now seeking to recruit
seasoned financial advisers who have the gravitas and expertise to contribute significantly
to the growth of AUM by developing investment relationships with HNWIs, professional

trustees and COIs.

Qualifications:

Recognised Financial Planning or Investment qualification (e.g. FPC or CFA).
Qualification in Banking, Law or Accounting.
A self-motivator with excellent sales management and business development skills.
Detailed and technical knowledge of investment management and the investment
product range as it relates to non-residents/ non-nationals, HNWIs, trustees and

COIs.

Full awareness of the local and international competitive environments.

Good understanding of the qualitative and quantitative aspects of investment
management including, Alfa, Beta and Total Return considerations and analytical
depth in respect of their impact on sector allocations and individual stock picks.
Sound experience in global capital markets.

General Requirements/Responsibilities:

Must have a minimum of 5 years international investment portfolio management
or financial advisory experience.
Must be able to deliver a high level of expert investment advice and service with
the aim of developing significant sales and new business, covering investment and
fiduciary services and the cross-selling of other banking services.

Proven track record in providing investment recommendations to both corporate
and personal clients as well as client performance reporting. This includes a full
understanding of the mathematical and statistical basis of portfolio diversification.
Must be totally at ease with the concept of personal affluence and high-net worth

clients.

Experience of, or at least be at ease with clients from differing social, religious,
ethnic and cultural backgrounds.
Experience of selling other banking and / or regulated products is desirable

Remuneration:

° Salary commensurate with the position’s seniority level 8 (The Bank has 11 pay

levels).

Benefits- includes a car allowance, variable incentive pay (bonus) and preferred

loan rates

Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter via email by February

9", 2007 to: deangelia.deleveaux@FirstCaribbeanBank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all applicants for their interest,
however only those under consideration will be contacted.


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

~ SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



@ BASKETBALL
BSC BASKETBALL
CLASSIC

THE Baptist Sports
Council will kick off its
2007 Rev. Tyrone
Knowles Basketball
Classic on Saturday at.
the Bahamas Baptist
College, Jean Street on
Saturday.

The Classic will get
underway at 10 a.m.
with Macedonia playing
New Covenant (15-and-
under); 11 a.m. Temple
Fellowship will play
Kemp Road Ministries
(Men); Noon Macedo-
nia vs Faith United (19-
and-under); 1 p.m.
Faith United vs St.
Paul's (Ladies) and
2 p.m. Faith United vs
St. Paul's (15-and-
under).

All teams that have
not yet registered are
advised that they have
until Saturday to do so
at Jean Street.

@ BAISS ACTION

The Bahamas Associ-
ation of Independent
Secondary Schools will
continue its basketball
regular season today
with a series of games,
starting at 4 p.m.
Senior boys - Queen’s
College at St.
Augustine’s College
and St. Andrew’s at
Kingsway Academy.
Junior girls - St.
Augustine’s College at
Nassau Christian Acad-
emy and St. Anne’s
School at St. John’s
College.

@ GSSSA ACTION

The Government Sec-
ondary Schools Sports
Association will contin-
ue its basketball regu-
lar season action today
at 4 p.m. CI Gibson
Gym - SC McPherson
vs CH Reeves (JG);'CC
Sweeting vs HO Nash
(JG) and CC Sweeting
vs HO Nash (JB). DW
Davis Gym - CV Bethel

_vs CI Gibson (SG); CV

Bethel vs CI Gibson

_(SB) and CC Sweeting

vs Government High
(SB).

@ NPBA ACTION

The New Providence
Basketball Association
will be back in action
tonight at the DW
Davis Gymnasium with
a double header on tap.
At 7 p.m., the Millenni-
um Jammers will take
on the Coke Explorers
and at 8:15 p.m., the
Commonwealth Bank
Giants will face the Y-
Care Destroyers.

@ NPWBA ACTION

The New Providence
Women’s Basketball
Association will be
back in action on
Thursday night with a
double header at the
DW Davis Gym. In the
7 p.m. opener, the
Johnson Lady Truckers
will take on the Clean-
ing Center Angels and
in the 8:15 p.m. feature
contest, the Sunshine
Auto Cheetahs will bat-
tle the Defence Force
Bluewaves.











@ ANIBAL ‘El Olimpico’ Ac



MIAMI HERALD SPORTS

Bahamian boxers

prepare for packed |

Friday night card.

@ BOXING
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Sports Reporter

JERMAIN ‘Choo Choo’
Mackey is preparing to put the
WBC (CABOFE) supermid-
dleweight title on the line for
the first time since securing
the crown in July of last year.

Mackey will square off
against Anibal ‘El Olimpico’
Acevedo of Puerto Rico on
Friday night at the Sir Kendal
Isaacs gym. The fight is sched-
uled for 12 rounds.

The card, which is dubbed
the “Pre-Valentine War on
the Shore”, will host four oth-
er matches, with Acevedo’s
teammate and training part-
ner Joseph Delos Santos being
featured as the co-main event.

Santos, who has a fight
record of 2-1-0, is set to fight
Wilson ‘Kid Wonder’
Theophile in the supermid-
dleweight division, this fight
is scheduled to last for six
rounds,

Two of the top Bahamian
middleweight boxers will aim
to please the crowd in their
four round match. Set to fight
this match will be Alpachino
‘Banger’ Allen taking on
Ricardo ‘One Short’ Bethel.

In the junior welterweight
bout, Anthony ‘Psyco’ Woads
will go up against Hensely
‘Bruiser’ Strachan; while Ryon
‘Big Youth’ McKenzie laces
his gloves to match-up with
Anthony ‘The Kid’ Drum-

mett. Both matches are set for
four rounds.

Although the boxing card
has a packed schedule, Edgard
Gonzalez, Acevedo’s and San-
tos’ trainer, believes that the
heated match will be between
Acevedo and Mackey.

According to Gonzalez the
duo has had an intense train-
ing schedule — starting the
practice session with a 45
minute run.

The workout sessions also
include more than 90 rounds
of sparring, and 12 rounds on
the superbag.

He said: “Acevedo is an
excellent fighter and he is
ready to win. He trains very
hard, so we are hoping that
his training will pay off in the
ring and in this fight.

“I love to see him fight, he is
smooth and has a very unique
technique. This fight will be
an exciting one.”

Acevedo is no stranger to
the ring. The Olympic silver
medalist from the 1992
Barcelona'Games is currently
weighing in at 162 pounds.

The well built fighter has a’

win-loss record of 14-4-1,
while Mackey holds a 12-1-0
record.

This will be Acevedo’s first
fight since March of last year.

i ALPACHINO ‘Banger’
Allen (right) will take on
Ricardo ‘One Short’ Bethel.
(Photo: Felipé Major/
Tribune staff)



The Tribune

evedo of Puerto Rico (left) will challenge Jermain ‘Choo Choo’ Mackey

5 ‘

i E ent
Ch Ch A
: t



@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE



.

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff) 3 re :





aspen
op eQennnonna

+

FS RO-S H
,

o

_ SFR SSREB BAe Me ADA RAPeBeaneq FOF ORO DOOD OLE OAD DODD DD DO OOD

<

7 88

eee te

eden ee sad earn onganacenaa
. ee 8 8 ’ we we

za

° t .
‘ o>

pyr ee ee eae
ye
,

‘

=~ PEST HK Re RAO RTH HEE S Aka TBonBeser KFT eBwManensae re ansacAsnewsomgsaman

PAGE 2E, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Giants hand Ruff Ryders
first defeat in seven games

Ronaldo heads
to AG Milan

m@ SOCCER
MILAN, Italy
Associated Press

RONALDO’S farewell to Real
Madrid didn’t include any fond
words for coach Fabio Capello.

The World Cup’s all-time lead-
ing scorer left Madrid for AC
Milan on Tuesday, returning to
Italy’s Serie A for a reported
$9.73 million transfer fee. The 30-
year-old Brazil striker will join
Milan until ‘2008 — the same
length as the remainder of his
contract at Madrid,

“My heart’s breaking but life
goes on,” Ronaldo told reporters
in Madrid. “I’m a great Madrid

_ fan. I’m not so sure about the

coach.”

“I know that Ronaldo is
Milan’s,” Capello said. “I wish
him good luck, that he does what

_he used to be able to do, that is be

a great player.”
Ronaldo hasn’t been picked to
play by Capello since a Jan. 7

_defeat at Deportivo La Coruna,

“T want to thank all the fans
who supported me, all my team-
mates who were with me, all the
coaches I’ve had — except one,”

* Ronaldo said. “I wasn’t wanted,

and as I’m a professional and I
love soccer, I had to find another
solution.”

Ronaldo’s departure marks the

_- end of Madrid’s project of signing
- the world’s best players — who

earned the nickname “Galacti-
cos.”

Luis Figo left for Inter Milan in
2005, Zinedine Zidane has retired

_ and David Beckham will be leav-

ing for the Los Angeles Galaxy
after the season.
While the policy helped

Madrid financially, it proved a°

flop on the field as the power-
house team failed to win a major
_trophy since 2003 — its
worst drought since the early
1950s.



:



@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter



THE Commonwealth
Bank Giants ran past the
Sunshine Auto Ruff Ryders
in the fourth quarter to pull
off a 77-63 victory Monday
night at the DW Davis Gym.
- The Giants’ victory hand-
ed the Ruff Ryders their first
defeat in seven games, leaving

no teams undefeated in the

New Providence Basketball
Association.

With the victory, the Giants
improved to 5-1 to sit in sec-
ond place behind the Ruff
Ryders. It was a victory that
Commonwealth Bank’s head
coach Perry Thompson said
was a gratifying one.

“It’s gratifying that we
could come out against the
number one team in the
league, with respect to the
standings and pull off a win
like this,” he stated,

“We realised that our only
loss was because we had just
gotten back from the Christ-
mas break and we hadn’t
practised as a team. But we
were more committed to
coming out and playing this
game.”

The game was the marquee
one.so far for the season as it
pitted the top two games
against each other. It lived up

‘Gratifying’ victory
ends final unbeaten run

to its advanced billing as both
teams traded the lead for the
majority of the game.

But when it counted the
most, the Ruff Ryders didn’t
have an answer to slow down
or stop the 1-2 punch of
Michael Bain and Garvin
Lightbourne, who sparked
the Giants down the stretch,

Bain and Lightbourne com-
bined for 18 points as they
took the ball inside, scoring
on fast break lay-ups or
dunks, as the Giants extended
a 54-46 advantage at the end
of the third period into a
comfortable lead during the
fourth quarter.

Bain finished with a game
high 22 points and Light-
bourne had 11. Mark Hanna,
however, kept Common-
wealth Bank in the game with
his 20,

Hanna connected on 10 of

-, his points in the third quarter

as he opened the frame with

.. two consecutive three-point-

ers as they rallied from a 36-
30 deficit at the half.

‘Adrian Miller also played
his role in helping the Giants
to keep rolling. He had eight
points. Creto Knowles added
seven and Raif Ferguson

Over 100 Cars Reatly for

Immediate Shipment

Japanesevehicles.com

ASK for Ana, Dan, or nee st Eee er ee

i

istributed in the Bahamas if y hi eee Trading,
seal



CMa tac)

PF

chipped in six.

Coach Thompson said once
the Giants come prepared to
play basketball, they will give
any team they play a run for
their money.

“It’s just a matter of us
staying together and like we
did tonight, don’t play
unselfish, it shows that good
things could happen for us as
a team,” he pointed out.

The Ruff Ryders got a
game high 16 from Jeremy
Hutchinson, who wasn’t as
expressive as he normally is.
Wilton Russell had 10,
Christopher ‘Chicken’ Turn-
quest eight, Mario Pickstock
six and Mario Martin helped
out with five.

Sunshine Auto’s coach
Charles ‘Chuck’ Mackey said
Commonwealth Bank just
wanted the game more than
they did and it showed.

“Not wanting to sound like
you’re crying, but your game
plan starts from the gym,” he
stressed. “I must say we’ve
been fortunate to have won
the games that we’ve won,
but I’ve yet to have my full
team in the gym.

“I’ve been coaching long
enough to know that prepa-
ration is very important
because if you don’t, when
you encounter an opportuni-

ty, you won’t win. You have.

to be prepared and we were
not prepared for this game.”
Mackey said he hopes this
is a wake up call for his Ruff
Ryders and he urged them
that if they want to win, they
need to take advantage of
their opportunities to prac-
tise.as.a complete team.
“I'm not making excuses,
but théy kicked our butt,”
Mackey proclaimed. “We just

@ COMMONWEALTH Bank Giants



Michael Bain scores

on a lay-up over Sunshine Auto Ruff Ryders’ Wilton Russell
during their NPBA men’s game on Monday night at the DW

Davis Gym.

have to find a way to come
back and we have io.do that
in practice.”

- In the opener, the Police
Crimestoppers cuffed the
Cable Bahamas Entertainers

(Photo: Tim Clarke)

71-66 —- Anthony Whylly
scored a game high 19 and
Jamal Bain and Hillary Jack-
son had 15 apiece,

Gary Bethel scored 15 in
the loss.


SPORTS —

seoncaenaenasngnaicanet setae punMaSne Re RRR HE SARE Uae AEN

3E 1
COERCION ELLE LEANER aracassorentenarasersssnsasssensssoatinararassessionnsensersscosscoeseteatttieietiti¢Ie,



soasgasenamaniearine raha nseannaAS tase hn ea RRA A RAR ANN Nes oe



Nageceeats JANUARY 31, 2007 INTERNATIONAL EDITION



PRO BASKETBALL | WASHINGTON 104, DETROIT 99

IN MY OPINION

EDWIN POPE

~ epope@MiamiHerald.com

One loss didn’t
define Marino
— so no regrets

T hink it’s devastating to make



just one Super Bowl and strike
out in that one? Think it’s
something either Peyton Manning or
Rex.Grossman would never get over,
to lose this game and never get back?
Think the loser would agonize right
on through to his personal. equivalent
of forever? -
I don’t think so, One game isn’t
a life. Ask Dan Marino.
He never even watched the dks.

_ tape of his only Super Bowl.

. . “TsaidI would watchit,butI
didn’t,” Marino said. He’s reeling back
22 years, all the way to the 1985 game,
and ifhe doesn’t run around celebrat-

ing that day, well, no

particular misery
comes across either.
What happened
there, the San Fran-°
cisco 49ers clubbing
the Dolphins 38-16,



Marino to bear.
Everybody who

DAN MARINO |
. wanted to makea.

louder case for some other quarter-

back as the greatest ever — say, Terry
- Bradshaw or Joe Montanaor Tom
: Brady — would simply j jump up and

point to the rout in old Stanford Sta

dium i in Palo Alto, Calif. —
DOWN BUT NOT OUT

That was the thing about Marino.
He never thought he was beaten. Even —

when the 49ers kept whaling on the
Dolphins on that foggy day in north-
ern California, Marino never ‘shouent
that he was whipped.

“T remember the whole second half ~
seemed like fog,” Marino said now, on ©

his way as a TV commentator to this |
week’s endless pre-Super Bowl meet-
ings. “It was hard to see from one end
of the field to another. But I’ve always
hhad the same feeling when I flash
back, and that is: It might have been
different if we’d played again.
“They had the best defense in the

league, and we'd have adjusted some -

things both offensively and defen-
- Sively. I'd love to have played the
49ers a best two-out-of-three.”
Marino was down, four times on
sacks that day, but he wouldn’t stay
down. The 49ers intercepted him
twice, and he kept pegging. He came

out with 318 yards and the unshakable

- belief that the Dolphins could have ,

- won, should have won, if only some-
body had disabled the game clock.

Marino sees maybe 10 times as

‘much chaos swirling around the Bears
and the Colts now.
_ “There’s no doubt it affects how
you think during the week,” he said.
“But when the game starts, it’s just ~
a game. It’s past the hype, and it’s a
game like always. It’s the biggest
game of your life, but I don’t think
Iwas especially nervous or eye: 2

FEARLESS IN THE POCKET

Pairing off against Montana didn’t
faze Marino. He respected Montana.
He just wasn’t scared, or shaky, any-
thing like that. It was like Don Strock
always said: “The best thing about
Marino is, he’s not afraid to lose.”

Besides, there was nothing Marino
could do about the 49ers’ offense.
They were coming at young Miami
players,.such as linebackers Jay Bro-

_ phy and Mark Brown, using just about
everybody on the defense as clay
pigeons from time to time.

That’s what it was like for Montana
— shooting skeet. For Marino, every

_ pass was an effort.

People forget a little back story
about Montana and Marino. Easy Hall
of Famers? No question. But neither
came in as a superstar — Montana in
the third round of the ’79 draft, Mar-
ino barely at the tail end of the ’83 first
round — 27th, actually.

Marino arrived in Miami in the last

season of poor, doomed David Wood- |

ley. Woodley would die at age 44; -
died from life, is the only way I could
describe it, and the Super Bowl was
just another hard bit and piece of that
life. Woodley took the Dolphins all
the way to the 17th Super Bowl, only
to get tagged by the Redskins.

Marino and Montana had one thing
in common. Neither would internalize
much, Neither was a big talker. So
don’t expect Marino to pour out his
aching heart about the one Super
Bowl chance that got away, while
Montana made all four of his stick.

Instead, Marino simply says:
“Would I trade my 17 seasons for one
Super Bowl championship? No way.”

was hard history for

Arenas, Wizards punish Pistons

BY JOSEPH WHITE
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Gilbert Are-
nas had 36 points, ll assists and
seven rebounds Tuesday night as
the Washington Wizards beat the
Detroit Pistons 104-99 in a midsea-
son, first-place showdown — a tri-
umph that was tempered by a knee
injury to Antawn Jamison.

The victory kept the Wizards
ahead of the Pistons
atop the NBA’s Eastern
Conference and gave
the teams a 2-2 split in
the season series, level-
ing the first tiebreaker
should they finish the regular sea-
son with the same record. The
Wizards beat the Pistons twice in
five days, having won 99-96 on the
road last week.

Jamison sprained his left knee
after colliding with teammate
DeShawn Stevenson under the bas-
ket during a fast break with 6:29 to

RAE CARRUTH

De MAA)



BY PAUL J. WEBER
Associated Press

ARLINGTON, Texas — Sammy
Sosa has a contract with the Texas
Rangers and a chance to get back
to the major leagues. Now the for-
mer slugger has to go to spring
training and earn a roster spot.

Sosa and the Rangers completed
a minor-league contract on
Tuesday. If he is added to
the major-league roster,
Sosa would get a $500,000,
one-year deal, with the
chance to earn $2.1 million
more from performance bonuses.

“I am not going to let you guys
down,” Sosa, who is 38, said during
a conference call that included
team executives. “So trust me. I’ve
got to go to spring training ready.
“I know I have to make the team.

' [I’ve heard] that about 20 times.





play in the first quarter. Jamison,
who entered the game averaging
19.7 points and 8.1 rebounds per
game, did not return to the game.
He hyperextended the same knee
against the Boston Celtics on Jan.
20, although it was not the same
knee that required surgery two
years ago.

-Jamison would be difficult to
replace if he is out for any
extended period — he,
Arenas and Caron But-
ler form the NBA’s
Ran highest-scoring trio,
averaging a combined

70 points per game —
but the Wizards persevered with-
out him Tuesday night and won for
the seventh time in eight games.

“We’ve won some games even
without Gilbert over the last year
or two,” Wizards coach Eddi Jor-
dan said. “Look at Cleveland
tonight — they killed Golden State
without LeBron [James], so things




Couns





LAWRENCE JACKSON/AP

WIZ KID: Gilbert Arenas, right,
had 36 points, 11 assists and
seven rebounds Tuesday night.

like that happen in the league.
“You can withstand it for a cou-

ple of games, but in the long run

you eventually wear down.” ~

The Wizards shot 61 percent in
the first quarter, led by 19 points
midway through the second, then
held off the Pistons after Detroit
pulled within single digits in the
fourth quarter. Arenas, who scored
14 points in the final period, con-
verted a three-point play with 1:44
to play to restore a 10-point lead.

The Pistons made one final
push, largely because of the Wiz-
ards’ three missed free throws in
the final 30 seconds, but Tayshaun
Prince then missed a 3-pointer that
would have cut the lead to two.

Stevenson, picking up the slack
for Jamison, scored 15 points on
7-for-8 shooting. Butler finished
with 13 points.

Chauncey Billups scored
24 points, Prince had 19 points, and
Richard Hamilton and Rasheed
Wallace finished with 15 apiece for
the Pistons, who outshot the Wiz-
ards 52 percent to 49 percent.

e MORE BASKETBALL

TANK JOHNSON

Players try to leave their aggression on the fi oy ,

“BY BRIAN COSTA |
bcosta@MiamiHerald.com &
- The Chicago Bears arrived
_ attheir suburban practice __
complex one day this month
and found a large sign planted
in front of the driveway.

“Play angry,” the sign read,
urging the Bears to summon
their wrath for a playoff game

against the Seattle Seahawks.
. For the sake of defensive
tackle Tank Johnson, the Bears

might have done well to add a
second sign for players to see
on their drive back to the real —
world: “Now play nice.”
Johnson was arrested twice
last year, first for reportedly -
threatening a police officer and _
then on gun charges. He joined.
asmall but steady group of ~
NFL players whose aggression
becomes as destructive off the
field as it can be helpful on it.
Such off-field problems are

BASEBALL | TEXAS RANGERS

Sosa, back with Rangers, is looking for a break

“I wanted to come back in 2006,
but I was beaten mentally,” Sosa
said. “I’m fresh. I’m relaxed. I’ve
got my game face again, and I feel
great. My body’s in shape. I’m
ready to go.”

Sosa said his chance of failing to
be added to the big-league roster
was “one in a million.”

“Believe me, I’m going to
make that team,” he said.
Sosa, who began his
career with the Rangers,
hasn’t played in the major
leagues since 2005, with the
Baltimore Orioles.

“For me. this is about giving an
opportunity to a guy who has done
a lot for the game over the last 10,
15 years,” Rangers general manager
Jon Daniels said. “What really
came across to us was that Sammy
wanted an opportunity, in-the true



“JIM McISAAC/GETTY IMAGES

IT’S BEEN A WHILE: Sammy Sosa
last played in the major leagues
in ’O5, with the Orioles (above).

sense of the word, to prove him-
self. He still thinks he has some-
thing left to give and wants to
prove it to the industry, to

not necessarily related to. the”
violence that comes with the _
job.Butthe basiccourseof |
events, particularly with defen-

sive players, isoftenthesame. —}

A player gets mad. A player —
hits somebody. In one case,it >
ends with a congratulatory slap_

_ in the rear. In the other, it ends

with handcuffs being slapped
on. his wrists.

“TURN TO SUPER BOWL



the Rangers, to himself.”

Sosa is fifth on the career home-
run list, with 588, and has 1,575
RBIs. Like Mark McGwire, Sosa is
suspected by some of having using
steroids before the drugs were
banned by baseball after the 2002
season.

When Sosa, a seven-time All-
Star, last played in 2005, he batted
only .221, with 14 homers and
45 RBIs in 102 games for Baltimore.

During spring training that year,
Sosa was one of several players
who testified before a congres-
sional committee looking into ste-
roid use in professional baseball.

“There’s a lot of speculation,
but no evidence,” Sosa said. “I am
not going to go to every fan’s home
and knock on the door and say to
them: ‘Believe in me.’

“This is not my style.”


4E | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007



Lakers fall

From Miami Herald Wire Services

NEW YORK — Playing without the sus-
pended Kobe Bryant, the Los Angeles Lakers’

late rally fell short in their season-high third —

consecutive loss, 99-94 to the New York
Knicks on Tuesday night

Eddy Curry had 27 points and nine
rebounds and Stephon Marbury scored 22
points for the Knicks, who led most of the
game but never pulled away. David Lee
grabbed 13 rebounds and Jamal Crawford
added 17 points.

Bryant was penalized one game without
pay earlier Tuesday for hitting San Antonio’s
Manu Ginobili in the face late in the Lakers’
overtime loss to the Spurs on Sunday.

Without his 28.4 points per game, the Lak-
ers shot only 43.5 percent and lost for the
fourth time in five games.

HEAT 110, BUCKS 80

MIAMI — Dwyane Wade scored 28
points and the Heat beat the Bucks to snap a
three-game losing streak.

_ Wade played only three quarters and shot
12-of-17 from the field, and Michael Doleac
had his first double-double of the season
with 11 points and ll rebounds for Miami.

Charlie Villanueva scored 17 points to
lead the Bucks, who have lost six of seven.

The Heat, playing without injured starters
Shaquille O’Neal (calf) and Jason Williams
(foot), never trailed after Wade’s 10 points
keyed a 17-4 run to build a 25-12 lead with
4:23 remaining in the first quarter.

PACERS 103, CELTICS 96

INDIANAPOLIS — Jamaal Tinsley scored
a season-high 28 points as the Pacers handed
the Celtics their 12th consecutive loss.

Jermaine O’Neal added 25 points and
eight rebounds for the Pacers, who won for
the fourth time in five games.

Notre Dame airs it out, thumps Syracuse

From Miami Herald Wire Services

INTERNATIONAL EDITION



BASKETBALL | HOCKEY

PRO BASKETBALL

JULIE JACOBSON/AP

AN INSIDE STRUGGLE: Knicks forward
Channing Frye takes it to, the basket °
against Lakers center Andrew Bynum.

CAVALIERS 124, WARRIORS 97

CLEVELAND — Sasha Pavlovic scored a
career-high 24 points filling in for the injured
LeBron James (sprained toe) and the Cava-
liers rolled without their superstar.

Donyell Marshall added 15 points, Zydru-
nas Ilgauskas had 14 with 10 rebounds and
Cleveland snapped a three-game losing
streak at home while getting eight Players in
double figures for the first time since April
22, 1994.

MAVERICKS 122, SUPERSONICS 102

DALLAS — Austin Croshere had a career-
high 34 points and seven rebounds as the
Mavericks beat the SuperSonics, stretching



MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD *



short without Kobe

their home winning streak to 14 games.

row.

ELSEWHERE
e Grizzlies:

with a new team on Thursday.

contract.

‘travel with the team Tuesday.

month to test his sprained right ankle.
e Mavericks:

was expected to rejoin the team today. ~

.LATE MONDAY

that lifted New Jersey, ending a trip that
started miserably with consecutive victories.
e Bobcats 105, Nuggets 101: Gerald

NBA STANDINGS

EASTERN CONFERENCE





N.Y, 99, Lakers 94
Dallas 122, Seattle 102

* Hou. 105, Phi. 84
Char. 105, Den. 101
NJ. 116, Utah 115

L.A.L. at Bos., 7:30

Det. at NJ., 7:30

Dall. at Mem., 8

Phi. vs. N.O. at Ok. City, 8
Sea. at Hou., 8:30

|
| SOUTHEAST WL Pct, GB 110 Str, Home Away Conf
Ww g 27 17~— 614-73 W-3 18-4. 9-13 19-9
; Orlando 23 22) «S11 4% «22-8 «=L-3) 14-9 = 9-13-:13-13
i Miami 20 25 444 7% 4-6 W-1 11-10 9-15 9-14
' Atlanta 16 27 .372 10% 6-4 W-l 8-12 815 11-18
: i Charlotte 16 28 .364 11 5-5 W-1 8-14 8-14 11-17.
; : : aes
Jason Terty.s. 1) P pe Greg Buckner > | ATLANTIC WL Pct. GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf -<
season-best 7 and Devin Harris 16 helped es Raastcnt ae ee es oat a oe a Pera Ts
the Mavericks set a season high for points Toronto. = «2223: 489-73 B16 159
and beat the Sonics for the ninth time in a New York 20 27 426 3 «4-6 Wel 12-13. 8-14 12-17.
Philadelphia 14 32 .304 8% 4-6 L-1 7-11 7-21 10-17 <'
Boston 12 32 .273 9% 0-10 L-12 4-17 8-15
Th lub ived d CENTRAL WL. Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
e-club waived guar ee fp ee ee
Eddie Jones after agreeing to a buyout of his Chicago 26 19 578 - 6-4 W-3 20-6 6-13 20-8
contract. Jones was believed to be consider- Cleveland 26 19 578 =- «46 Wel 16-6 10-13 16-12
ing signing with several teams, including the ee em i re s 38 ye ee ty a
Miami Heat, for whom he played before
being traded to Memphis prior to the |
2005-06 season. He will be eligible to sign | WESTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHWEST WL. Pet. GB L10 Str. Home Away, Conf
‘The Grizzlies replaced him on the roster | Dallas 37.9 804 - 91 W-2 21-3 16-6 25-6
by signing guard Will Conroy to a 10-day San Antonio 32 14 696 5 7-3 W-2 168 16-6 21-9
Houston 28 16 636 «8 7-3 W-3 15-5 13-11 15-14
: F New Orleans 19 25 .432 17 7-3 W-3 13-10 6-15 10-17
_@ Nuggets: Guard Allen Iverson will Memphis 12 34 .261 25° 3-7 Wel 914 3-20 6-21
miss tonight’s game against the Trail Blazers :
in Portland after spraining his right ankle. NORTHWEST WL Pet. GB 110 Str, Home Away Conf
Iverson was hurt in the Nuggets’ 105-101 loss Utah 29 17 «630 ~- 5-5 L-2 (16-6 13-11 18-10
tothe Charlotte Bobcats on Monday night in | Pit, SM 5 55 C3 kn ine ou
Denver. The Nuggets said Iverson did not Portland 19 27 413 10 5-5 Ll 11-12 815 12-15
Seattle 17 28 «378 11% 4-6 L-2 13-11 4-17 7-18
e Hornets: Point guard Chris Paul
returned to practice for the first time in a PACIFIC. __W' iL. Pet. GB 10" Str. Home (Away Conf
Phoenix 36 9 800 - 9-1 L-l 19-3 17-6 168
F d h H d L.A. Lakers 27 18 600 9 46 L-3 19-6 8-12 17-10
: orward Jos owar LA. Clippers 22 22 .50013% 7-3 W-1 16-8 6-14 14-17
missed Tuesday’s game against the Super- Golden State 21 24 467 15 3-7 L-l 17-8 4-16 13-15
Sonics for the birth of his first child. Howard Sacramento 17 26 «4.395 18 3-7 L-3 12-11 5-15 8-18
i RESULTS AND SCHEDULES
Tuesday’s results Tonight’s games Monday’s results
“VU; Miami 110, Mil. 80 Mil. at Orl., 7 Atl. 93, Orl. 83
e Nets 116, Jazz 115: Vince Carter beat Indiana 103, Boston 96 GS. at Atl., 7 Mem. 124, Sac. 117
the buzzer and host Utah with a 3-pointer Wash. 104, Detroit 99 Was. at Tor., 7 Minn. 121, Pho. 112
Cleveland 124, G.S. 97 N.Y. at Cha., 7 N.O. 103, Por. 91
i
}

Wallace scored 25 points and had a key block
of Carmelo Anthony in the final minute to
lead visiting Charlotte.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Luke Harangody had 21 points and
13 rebounds, and No. 21 Notre Dame
beat host Syracuse 103-91 on Tuesday
night behind an impressive display of
3-point shooting.

Notre Dame (18-4, 6-3 Big East)
won for the first time in four confer-
ence road games and halted a three-
game losing streak against the reeling
Orange (15-7, 4-4).

Syracuse lost its third consecutive
game.

The Irish missed their first ihre

3-pointers, but it didn’t take them
long to find the range.

Notre Dame went 10-for-14 on 3s
for the rest of the opening half, with
Russell Carter and Colin Falls each
hitting four, and most were wide-
open looks against the defenseless
Orange.

Notre Dame scored 18 points off 10
Orange turnovers in the half and left
the floor with a 61-42 lead, just five
points off the team record set against

Ball State in 1964 and matched in 1986
against Miami.

It also was just four points off the
all-time record for points given up in
a half by the Orange.

Syracuse gave up 65 points in the
second half in a 97-85 loss to Navy in
March 1986 and hadn’t given up 60
points in the first half of a game since
1988.

Carter finished with 18 points and
Falls had 16 before touling out in the
closing minutes, while Zach Hilles-
land had 14 points, nine rebounds and
six assists, and Tory Jackson added 19
points and seven assists.

Demetris Nichols had 29 points to
lead Syracuse, Terrence Roberts had
20 points and six rebounds, and Dar-
ryl Watkins had 10 points and six
rebounds before fouling out in the
final two minutes.

_Eric Devendorf, who had led Syra-
cuse in scoring in five of seven con-

ference games, did not score, missing .

all 11 shots he took.

NHL STANDINGS |

EASTERN CONFERENCE





KEVIN RIVOLI/AP

BOARD WORK: Notre Dame’s Luke
Harangody outlasts Syracuse’s
Darryl Watkins for a rebound.

OTHER GAMES

e Florida State 96, Maryland
79: Al Thornton scored 27 points and
Jason Rich added a career-high 24
points to lead the host Seminoles.

Florida State (16-6, 4-4 Atlantic
Coast Conference) made 30 of its
first 43 shots to maintain a double-
digit lead for most of the second half

as it evened its ACC record halfway
through the conference schedule
after an 0-3 start.

Maryland (16-6, 2-5) was led by

'. James Gist’s 23 points. Greivis Vas-

quez added 13 and Ekene Ibekwe had
10. Gist made 10 of his 14 field- “goal
attempts.

e Wake Forest 85, Georgia
Tech 75: Kyle Visser scored 26
points and host Wake Forest got key
points from free throws down the

‘stretch in the victory.

Harvey Hale added 19 points and
freshman Ishmael Smith had 10
points for the Demon Deacons (14-7,

3-5 Atlantic Coast Conference), who ,

snapped a six-game losing streak.

Jeremis Smith and Ra’Sean Dickey
scored 14 points each for the Yellow
Jackets (9-12, 1-8), who suffered their
17th consecutive road loss and fourth
in a row overall. ;

e UNLV 76, Colorado State
59: Wink Adams scored 17 points
and Kevin Kruger returned from a



HOCKEY

S.A. at Utah, 9
Sac. at Min., 9

Den. at Por., 10
Chi. at L.A.C., 10:30

three-week absence to help visiting
UNLV race past Colorado State.
Wendell White added 16 points for

the Rebels (19-4, 6-2), who moved

into a first-place tie with 17th-ranked

Air Force in the Mountain West |

standings.
Stephan Gilling’s 13 points led Cols
orado State (14-6, 4-4).

LATE MONDAY

e No. 6 Kansas 76, Nebraska‘. -

56: Brandon Rush scored 20 points, , - . -

Julian Wright added 17, and visiting:

_Kansas used a 27-0 run in the first

half to trigger a blowout.

The Jayhawks (19-3, 6-1 Big 12)
won fér the 13th time in their past 14
games.

Their 16th victory in 17 meetings
with Nebraska gave them a half-game
lead over Texas A&M and Texas in
the conference. The Cornhuskers

(12-8, 1-5) lost their third game in a:

row. Ryan Anderson led Nebraska
with 19 points.

B21. tah









e ©
SOUTHEAST: Wb OL SERTS, GE". GAT) HOME |. AWAY... DIV \) \ l I | QS rall y p Ast | S | dad i | ders l fl | () | ee:
Atlanta 29-16 6 2 66165 160 14-7-3-1 15-9-3-1 12-4-4-1 | : eek
Carolina 26 21 2 4 58163 168 14-9-0-3 12-12-2-1 13-5-0-2_ th
TampaBay 27 23 1 1 56165 163 12-13-0-0 15:10-1-1 11-7-0-0 |
Washington 21 23 2 5 49 160 180 12-11-1-2 9-12-1-3 8-10-1-1 | From Miami Herald Wire Services Kaberle had an empty-net goal and an
poids Le aes Sy Oly ae Aah tee 2 ga ea, eee mee adeno UNIONDALE, N.Y. — Henrik Zetter- assist and Andrew Raycroft stopped 28
ATLANTIC WoL GA _ HOME AWAY piv | berg capped Detroit’s big rally by scoring shots for the Maple Leafs, who kept Caro-
New Jersey 30 15 0 6 66 134 0 Ww 110-2 12.4.0] | at 2:57 of overtime and giving the Red lina scoreless in the final two periods.
Pittsburgh 24 17 153 -13-8-2-211-9-1-3.-13-5-1-1 Wings a 4-3 victory over the New York
N.Y. Rangers 25 21 149 10-10-3-0 15-11-0-1 9-9-0-0 | Ys]anders on Tuesday night. PENGUINS 3, PANTHERS O
Pivladclohic 3 g is eee ee on Detroit, which hasn’t been shut out this PITTSBURGH — Marc-Andre Fleury
| season, trailed 3-0 at the start of the third stopped 32 shots, and the Penguins ended
NORTHEAST WL OLSSLPTS GF "GA HOME -_AWAY DIV | period:but quickly erased that deficit: and a nearly five-year home losing streak
Buffalo 34140202 «72:197 152 17-7-1-1‘17-7-1-1_—10-8-1-1_— “set the stage for Zetterberg’s winner. against the Panthers.
ee 3 a ; ? a He io tevin nee ieeka Nicklas Lidstrom gloved down a Michel Ouellet, Dominic Moore and
Toronto 24212 «4 54167 170 .11-12-1-2 13-9-1-2 9-8-2-2. . deflected puck on a rush and passed it to Ryan Whitney scored for Pittsburgh,
Boston 22 23 1 «3 48 139 186 14-10-0-2 8-13-1-1 10-11-0-1 Zetterberg, who had the entire left side of which won its fourth in a row and sixth in
_ the net to fire his wrist shot into. seven games. Sidney Crosby extended his
WESTERN CONFERENCE Tomas Holmstrom, Niklas Kronwall point streak to seven games (4 goals, 10
CENTRAL WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME _AWAY DV and Dan Cleary also scored for Detroit, assists) by helping set up Whitney’s ninth
Nasiwile” 36 1b 2 Lae 18s a 1d bdo) 17a, |. Which got 16 saves from Dominik Hasek. goal of the season.
Detroit 32 14 3 3 70157 124 1831-2 14-11-2-1—11-3-1-1 Mike Sillinger, Shawn Bates and Jason
St Lous 20 23 4 4 48130 159 101321 101023 71122 | Blake had goals for the Islanders, who SENATORS 3, CAPITALS 2
olumbus 45 126 153 : -15-1-1 7-11-0-2, . ‘ : as ‘
Chicago 18 25 2 5 43 24 186 MIBL2 213 9.1210 ae iijfour consecutive eames JIM MCISAAC/GETTY IMAGES wits i neainaeer ede one
NORTHWEST WL OL SLPTS GF GA HOME _ AWAY DIV | NO HOLDING BACK: Sean Hill (6) of the _ to lead the Senators over the Capitals.
Vancouver 28 19 1 2 69129 126 1681-0 1211-02 910-01 _ ?HRASHERS 5, DEVILS 4 (SO) Islanders lays into Josh Langfeld of Heatley gave Ottawa its second two-
oa a is : = a ae ne A aS i ATLANTA — Marian Hossa delivered the Red Wings on Tuesday night. goal lead 10:31 into the second, scoring on
Colorado 2% 212 «2 54157 147. 14-10-1-2 1l-l1-1-0 9-5-1-0 the decisive goal in a shootout as the _ a power play less than a minute and a half .
Edmonton 24 22 2 #2 52136 146 i5-10-1-1 9-12-1-1 8-10-1-0 Thrashers edged the Devils in a matchup SABRES 7, BRUINS 1 after Washington cut the lead to 2-1 on
| of division leaders. BUFFALO, N.Y. — Daniel Briere net- Alexander Ovechkin’s 4-on-4 goal.
Wb OL SLPTS GF GA HOME AWAY DIV The Thrashers ended a slump with ted his second career hat trick, and Jason Ovechkin took over the league lead with
31 i2 2 é He an 131 ir x a aes Hk three power-play goals, including two by Pominville and Thomas Vanek added a __ his 32nd goal.
29 19 0 2 60133 124 15-8-0-1 \14-11-0-1 136-00 | - Ilya Kovalchuk. goal and an assist each to give the Sabres
23 25 1 1 48140 175 12-11-1-0 11-14-0-1 = 7-12-1-1 Atlanta earned its fourth consecutive _ the victory. ELSEWHERE
Los Angeles 17 29 3-3 40 144 188 11-12-33 6-17-00 6-14-0-2 home victory over New Jersey, which has Chris Drury and Paul Gaustad also e Stars: The club activated center

Mike Modano from injured reserve, and
he was expected to play in the team’s
game late Tuesday night at San Jose after
being sidelined for nearly two months.

e Bruins: The team recalled center
David Krejci from Providence of the AHL,
and placed forward Jeff Hoggan on waiv-
ers. If Hoggan clears waivers, he’ll be
assigned to Providence.

e Canucks: Center Ryan Kesler

scored for the Sabres, who snapped a sea-
son-high, three-game regulation losing
streak by beating the Bruins for the sixth
consecutive time at home. Maxim Afino-
genov posted three assists for Buffalo,
which went 6-7-1 in January.

MAPLE LEAFS 4, HURRICANES 1

RALEIGH, N.C. — Nik Antropov
scored two goals in the third period to

lost two in a row overall.

LIGHTNING 4, FLYERS 3 (SO)

PHILADELPHIA — Vincent Lecava-
lier scored in regulation and then added a
goal in the shootout as the Lightning
extended Philadelphia’s franchise-worst
home losing streak to 1.
| Martin St. Louis and Ruslan Fedotenko
| also scored for the Lightning, who have
| won six road games in a row. Brad Rich- lead the Maple Leafs to the victory. underwent successful hip surgery in Col-

ards also scored in the 2-0 shootout. Bates Battaglia also scored, Tomas _orado and might return for the playoffs.

j

Note: Two points for a win, one point for a tie and overtime loss
RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Tonight’s games

Toronto at N.Y. Rangers, late
Phoenix at Anaheim, late
Columbus at Edmonton, late

Monday’s results

N.Y. Rangers 6, Boston 1 |
Montreal 3, Ottawa 1 |

Tuesday’s results

Pittsburgh 3, Florida 0
Buffalo 7, Boston 1
Toronto 4, Carolina 1
Atlanta 5, NJ. 4 (SO)
Tampa Bay 4, Phil. 3 (SO)
Ottawa 3, Washington 2
Detroit 4, Islanders 3 (OT)
Minnesota 5, St. Louis 2
Colorado 4, Nashville 3
LA. at Calgary, late
Columbus at Vanc., late
Dallas at San Jose, late
THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com 0



oday is the first day fans can flock to the
Miami Beach Convention Center media
headquarters and watch broadcasts

of the NFL Network and Radio Row from

a “special viewing area.”

It’s free, although no autographs will be
available. The event is designed for people
whose dream is to be herded cattle-like into
a special pen and see Rich Eisen
much less clearly than they
would on TV, or to find out for



Herald columnist Dan Le Ba-
tard do his radio show is, in
some ways, even more annoy- .
ing than merely hearing him.
Radio Row traditionally is

considered the saddest of all
Super Bow] phenomena, in
which talking heads from about 90 stations
from across the Unite States and their boring
guests chatter about the Super Bowl nonstop.
Not a lot of people know that a recent mental-
health study cited Radio Row as a major cause
for the previously unexplained spike in winter
suicides.

e Quick synopsis of Tuesday’s Media
Day at the stadium: A Mexican TV
woman dressed like a hooker; a
guy with a hand puppet that asked
questions; and a local radio pro-
ducer posing intentionally-inane
questions (“Who do think will be the
first player arrested!?”) in an effort to elicit
wacky sound bytes. That would be it in a nut-
shell. And I mean that literally.

e The official media party sponsored by
Broward County is tonight at horse racing’s
Gulfstream Park, where reporters will walk.a
red carpet and be treated like stars, dine on

RICH EISEN



themselves if watching Miami



GREG COTE’S

sumptuous food and clean horse stalls.

e Today begins the “Motorola Mile at
Ocean Drive” on Miami Beach, described as an
“interactive walk.” So you walk around and
look at stuff. Mostly Motorola logos.

_ @ Scheduled this morning: Something
billed-as the “Super Bowl Counterfeit Press
Conference.” Still trying to find out when the

real one will be held. The NFL will
warn fans how to identify and avoid
unlicensed league products. One
tip, for example: Be wary of hats and
T-shirts being sold beneath a big sign
that reads: FAKE MERCHANDISE!

e Ata Pro Bowl news conference today,
several AFC and NFC stars will be on hand to
discuss the Pro Bowl phenomenon, which is
that players love to be selected for reasons
related to ego and contractual bonuses but
then dream up all sorts of lame excuses (bun-
ion, fish tank needs cleaning, dog ate my play-
book) to not actually play in the game.

e@ The FedEx Air & Ground Players of the
Year will be revealed todays Air finalists are





SUPER BOWL XXXVII

BUCCANEERS 48, RAIDERS 21

e January 26, 2003
e Qualcomm Stadium, San Diego
e MVP: FS Dexter Jackson, Tampa Bay

Not showing up to play, in a figurative sense,
is one thing. Not showing up at all on the day
_ before the Super Bowl is quite another.

That is what Raiders center Barret Robbins
did to get benched for the game, kicked out of
the team hotel and become the story. of Super
Bowl XXXVII.

Even more shocking than his absence from Saturday team

meetings, though, is where he turned out to be.

-Robbins reportedly spent part of the day drinking in Tijuana,
_ Mexico, and he was seen later at a San Diego bar.



e wild, weird,
wacky and
wondrous of past |
Super Bowls

more sympathy than snickering.

disorder and alcohol abuse.

When asked the next day why Robbins was absent, Raiders
teammate Mo Collins quipped, “Too much bad tequila.”



. Aventura
Aventura Towne Center
(305) 466-4555

Coral Springs .
2812 N. University Drive
(954) 752-1551

Hollywood
2914 Oakwood Blvd.
(954) 921-5330

Lauderdale Lakes

2878 North State Road 7
(954) 731-1220

We accept most vision plans.

Call 1-800-YES-EYES for a location near you or visit pearlevision.com.

AARP

Members

Buy One,
Get One

Miami Lakes
18610 N.W. 67th Ave.
(305) 474-0433

Miami
Kendall Shopping Center
(305) 271-3199

Miami
8231 South Dixie Highway
(305) 665-8660

CAVA (sr-1 4
ew Look

Miami
7901 Biscayne Blvd.
(305) 754-5144

~ Miramar
The Fountains of Miramar
(954) 437-9733

Pompano Beach
2240 N. Federal Hwy.
(954) 943-0053

Weston

Waterway Shoppes
(954) 217-3991

PEARLE ISON

Save

Super Bowl witha

But it was far more serious than that.
Robbins had a history of depression and had
a major breakdown before the Super Bowl.
Witnesses who saw Robbins at one bar said he
was crying and muttering to himself.

By the time he returned to the team hotel on
Saturday night, the Pro Bowl center was sald to
be incoherent. Benched by Raiders coach Bill
Callahan, Robbins spent the day of the game.in
a local hospital, where he reportedly was
treated for alcohol poisoning.

After the game, Robbins became a target of
criticism from his teammates and.a subject of
public ridicule. But, over time, his story drew

Robbins spent a month in a treatment center for bipolar

His story took another bizarre twist in 2005 when he was shot
and wounded during a cenfrontation with Miami Beach police.







INTERNATIONAL EDITION WEDNESDAY, JA

PRO FOOTBALL | SUPER BOWL XL!

Drew Brees, Peyton Manning and Carson
Palmer; ground nominees are Frank Gore,
Larry Johnson and LaDainian Tomlinson.
(Aside to Frank and Larry: Sleep in).

e@ The Motorola Coach of the Year also will
be named today, from among Eric Mangini
(Jets), Sean Payton (Saints) and Andy Reid
(Eagles). The winner is expected to call the
honor the biggest thrill of his career... other
than taking an interactive walk on the Motor-
ola Mile at Ocean Drive.

e Some lucky fans will play PlayStation 3
against Playboy Playmates today at the South
Seas Hotel on Collins Ave. Oddsmakers call '
the Playmates heavy favorites — because they

won't be staring at your cleavage while playing.

Smirk is invited to attend a private Sony cock-
tail reception this evening featuring Playmates
Deanna Brooks (May 1998), Alison Waite
(May 2006) and Sara Jean Underwood (July
2006), but Smirk must regrettably decline
because the event fails to meet Smirk’s long-
standing Four Bunny Minimum policy. -

e “A Super Bowl Tribute to Black History




WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007 | 5B

Month” is tonight at Miami-Dade County ,
Auditorium. What’s weird about that is, to our
knowledge, there are no blacks in the NFL.

e The NFL Global Junior Championships
run all day today, with youth football teams
from the United States, Canada, Japan, France,
Mexico and Panama. The Americans are
heavily favored. Cannot confirm speculation
that, in the name of fair play and to give the
other nations a sporting chance, the U.S. team
will be quarterbacked by Rex Grossman.

e Prince, the Super Bow] halftime per-
former, plays the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino

_tonight. To avoid fans and paparazzi, the elf-

like, bantam singer is to be transported from
his limousine to the stage in a shoe box.

e “Bud Bowl 2007” is today, featuring Latin
singel guest disc jockeys and the Budweiser
Clydesdales. Of those three groups, the Clydes-
dales are most likely to be the ones dropping
enormous, fetid loads. Security personnel at
this event have been warned to look out for,:
and repel at the door, that donkey who
dreamed of being a Clydesdale. The donkey
did not realize that was only a television com-
mercial (he’s a donkey!) and has since become
a persisting nuisance — what an Anheuser-
Busch spokesman called “a real ass.”



6 P.M. EST SUNDAY, FEB. 4, 2007
DOLPHIN STADIUM ® ON TV: CBS







- BRIAN COSTA



Motorized Awnings
.also available!

oo mn "OconstagS
\ ee

Good Housekeeping

Pi a
Recurrent SS





AWNINGS

Enjoy Instant Shade & Comfort
All Summer and SAVE $200!

Keeping your deck or patio cool and
comfortable this summer just got a LOT
more affordable! Because if you act
now you can get a $200 Discount
Certificate, good toward any SunSetter
Retractable Lateral Arm Awning —
America’s #1 best-selling awning. For
as little as $398, you can add a gor-
geous SunSetter Awning to your home
and enjoy the outdoors so much more!

A SunSetter keeps your deck about
20 degrees cooler. It opens and closes
in under 60 seconds, providing instant
protection against hot sun, light show-
ers, and 99% of harmful UV rays. With
a SunSetter, you'll never have to worry

about the weather ruining your outdoor
plans again. And now, with your $200
Discount Certificate, you can own a
SunSetter for as little as $398! Enjoy _
your deck or patio EVERY day this sum-
mer — and save $200, too! Call today
and take advantage of this special
awning sale now.

Call Toll Free for a FREE brochure,
DVD and $200 Discount Certificate:

1-800-876-8060

Ext. 12554
You can also email your name and
mailing address to:
freedvd@sunsetter.com







Free

On Eyeglasses
(up to $200)

Buy a complete pair (frame and lenses) at
regular price and receive a free complete

pair ~ same prescription, valued up to $200.
First pair must be of equal or greater value to
free pair. Cannot be combined with any other
offer, previous purchases, most insurance
programs, readers or non-prescription sunglasses.
Valid prescription required. Accessories are
additional on both pairs. Certain brands
excluded. Valid at participating locations.
Some restrictions may apply. Savings applied
to lenses. Offer ends 2/24/07.

Save 30”

On ALL Eyeglasses

| or RxSunglasses

Must be a current AARP member to receive
discount off regular price. Valid on multiple
pairs. Both frame and lenses purchase required
Cannot be combined with other coupons,
discounts, offers, previous purchases, most
insurance programs or readers. Void where
prohibited. Offer subject to change without
notice. Certain frames excluded. Valid
prescription required. See store for details
Provided by EyeMed Vision Care"

AARP iso"
Aaa oe

Vision Discounts

On Eyeglasses
or RxSunglasses

Valid on multiple pairs. Complete pair
(frame and lenses) purchase required, Cannot
be combined with any other offer, previous
purchases, most insurance programs, readers
or non-prescription sunglasses. Discount off
regular prices. Valid prescription required. Valid
at participating locations. Some restrictions may
apply. Accessories are additional. Savings
applied to lenses. Offer ends 2/24/07.

©2007. Pearle, Inc. All Rights Reserved.





1-800-876-8060, Ext. 12554
freedvd@sunsetter.com

I
Street, Malden, MA 02148 i
i









(iy YES, please rush me a FREE Brochure & DVD on
SunSetter Retractable Awnings, plus my $200 Discount Certificate.
Mail to: SunSetter Products, Dept. 12554, 184 Charles
NAME as _
ADDRESS _
City ST. ZIP
EMAIL a



(Be sure to include your email to receive our best deals!


6E | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

SOCCER | PRO FOOTBALL | ETC.

MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD



SOCCER

Ronaldo transfer goes through ——

_ ELSEWHERE

From Miami Herald Wire Services

MILAN, Italy — Ronaldo’s
farewell to Real Madrid didn’t
include any fond words for
coach Fabio Capello.

Ronaldo, the World Cup’s
all-time leading scorer, left
Madrid for AC Milan on Tues-
day, returning to Italy’s Serie
A for a reported $9.73 million
transfer fee. The 30-year-old
Brazil striker will join Milan
until 2008 — the same length
as the remainder of his con-
tract at Madrid.

“My heart’s breaking, but
life goes on,” Ronaldo told
reporters in Madrid. “I’m a

great Madrid fan. I’m not so

sure about the coach.”

“I know that Ronaldo is
Milan’s,” Capello said. “I wish
him good luck, that he does
what he used to be able to do
— that is, be a great player.”

Ronaldo hasn’t been picked



PRDRO ARMESTRE/AFT-GETTY IMAGES

TO ITALY: Ronaldo will join
AC Milan, at least fora year.

to play by Capello since a Jan.
7 loss at Deportivo La Coruna.

Ronaldo’s departure marks
the end of Madrid’s project of
signing the world’s best play-
ers — who earned the nick-

‘name “Galacticos.”

e Premier League: Liver-
pool increased West Ham’s
relegation worries with a 2-0
victory in the English Premier
League on Tuesday. Dirk Kuyt
and Peter Crouch scored at
Upton Park to move the team
to 49 points — eight points
behind league leader Man-
chester United and two points
back from Chelsea, who both
have games today....

American defender Oguchi
Onyewu joined Newcastle on
loan in a move that will keep
him in the Premier League for
at least the rest of the season.
Onyewu, 24, leaves the Bel-
gian team Standard Liege after
scoring eight goals in 93 games
since joining in 2004. He pre-
viously played for French
team Metz and Belgian side La
Louviere.

e German

League:

' Defending champion Bayern

Munich suffered its second

‘consecutive setback in a 0-0

draw at home against lowly
Bochum and dropped to
fourth place in the Bundesliga
standings on Tuesday. Beaten
3-2 at Dortmund on Friday,

‘Bayern could lose more

ground when the 19th round is
completed today..

e Gulf Cup: The United
Arab Emirates won the Gulf
Cup on Tuesday after beating
Oman 1-0 in the final.

Ismail Matar scored in the
73rd minute off a pass from
Abdulraheem Jumaato at
the Zayed Sports City stadium
to clinch the UAE’s first
regional championship title.

Matar’s goal was his fifth in
the UAE's five games during
the tournament, winning him
awards as the highest’ scorer
and the best player.



FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

SE

co Ee











_ JOE RIMKUS JR./MIAMI HERALD STAFF

A TARGET: Bears nose tackle Tank Johnson is among a small but steady group of players with off-the-field problems.

Players wrestle with their wrath

*SUPER BOWL

“A lot of anger, depending
on the position, can be
extremely instrumental,” said
John Murray, a Palm Beach,
Fla., sports psychologist who
has worked with NFL players.
“The key is, how do you turn
that off? How do you train
somebody to be almost like a

killer on the field and then

come off the field and act
responsibly in society?”

Being a killer might be an
exaggeration, but the role of
anger and aggression in foot-
ball is not. After seeing the
“play angry” sign, which
turned out to be the work of
two fans, Bears quarterbdck
Rex Grossman said it summed
up his team’s mind-set going
into the playoffs.

Several years ago, former
Bears defensive coordinator
Greg Blache took that,
mind-set to an extreme.
Blache, who is now an assis-
tant coach with the Redskins,
rewarded a player with a bul-
let for a big defensive play.

Bennie Blades, a former
University of Miami defen-
sive back who had a 10-year
NFL career, didn’t need any
motivational ploys. Blades

said he would pretend that

- the receiver he was guarding

was someone who had made
him angry.

“Whatever troubles I had
during the week that really

[ticked] me off, instead of :

going to jail for assault, I
would take all that aggression
and literally go out there and
physically abuse the oppo-
nent,” Blades said. |

But Blades left that anger
on the field, as most players
are able to do. Some say it’s
like flipping a switch. Others
say it’s just common sense.

Dolphins linebacker Don-
nie Spragan said it’s about
self-discipline.

“You have to understand
the consequences of not com-
ing back down to normal and
how much trouble you can get
yourself into when you start
thinking you’re playing foot-
ball going against a cop,”
Spragan said. “That’s not a
good move.”

Yet, off-field aggression
has led to some high-profile
violent incidents over the past
decade. The height of public
scrutiny came after Super
Bowl XXXIV in Atlanta in
2000, when Ravens line-
backer Ray Lewis, a former

Hurricane, was charged with
double murder after a post-
Super Bowl party (he would
later plead guilty to lesser
charges). Panthers receiver
Rae Carruth was facing a
murder charge at the time.

In 2006, at least 15 players
were arrested on violence-re-
lated charges. The common
threads were domestic vio-
lence and late-night incidents
involving guns at or around
nightclubs. :

The latter is a cause and
effect of increased gun own-
ership among players. Guns
can lead to problems of their
own, such as when Bengals
receiver Chris Henry was
arrested in January 2006 after
allegedly threatening a group
of people with:a gun.

_ But many players say they
carry guns because they have
become targets, an idea that is
hardly discouraged by the
recent slaying of Broncos cor-
nerback Darrent Williams.

“There used to be a day
when you could go out with
your boys and have a good
time and not get yourself into
any trouble,” said Mark
Schlereth, an ESPN analyst
and former offensive lineman.
“You go out [now], and there



er eeeenererererenermeeerenth





SUPER BOWL XXXVI

NEW ENGLAND 20, ST. LOUIS 17

e@ Feb. 3, 2002

e Louisiana Superdome, New Orleans
e MVP: GB Tom Brady, New England

For anyone watching Super Bowl XXXVI, it
was almost impossible not to be reminded that
the game marked the first Super Bowl since the
Sept. ll attacks. There were televised greetings

from U.S. troops in Afghanistan, a “Tribute to

America” pregame show and a segment with

former NFL players reading the Declaration of Independence.
But the most poignant and memorable reminder of all came

during a halftime show by U2.

After a heart-shaped stage was wheeled onto the field, the
lrish rock band performed Beautiful Day and MLK. Then, as the
band performed its final song, Where the Streets Have No Name,

The wild, weird,
_ wacky and
wondrous of past
Super Bowls

SUPER
Eee
| MEMORIES



the game.

wea

COUNTDOWN TO SUPER BOWL XLI (fae

is ultimately going to be
somebody there who is going
to say, ‘Hey, that’s my golden
ticket. Let’s see if I can’t get a
lawsuit or some hush-hush
money.’ ”

Domestic violence among
players is a less recent devel-
opment. Former Dolphins
safety Liffort Hobley saw the
problem during his playing
days in the early 1990s and
decided to do something
about it. He started a program
called Athletes Against
Domestic Violence to raise
awareness and prevention
around the league.

Most teams have added
player-development staffs
that help players avoid trou-
ble and make good decisions
away from football. The Bears
will look to help Johnson do
that. After his arrest on gun
charges, Johnson pledged last
month to seek counseling and
make changes in his life.

He will try to play nice. But
when he arrives at Dolphin
Stadium on Sunday, it will be
time to “play angry.”

“You know what you have
to do to be successful and
keep up your lifestyle,” Spra-
gan said. “You have to go out
there and get violent.”

‘

to Finland.







AZIZ SHAH/AP

CHILDLIKE ENTHUSIASM ‘

A young female fan from the United Arab Emirates
cheers for the UAE team at the 18th Arab Gulf Cup
final against Oman in Abu Dhabi, UAE, on Tuesday.





Extra-special invitation

Annika Sorenstam invited a talented teen-age golfer with
a rare heart condition to help launch her tournament.

Sorenstam awarded a sponsor’s exemption to 14-year-old
MacKinzie Kline for the $2.6 million Ginn Tribute in Mt.
Pleasant, S.C., hosted by Sorenstam from May 3]-June 3.

Kline, of Encinitas, Calif., is one of the top-rated juniors in
the country. She will play on the Arnold Palmer-designed
RiverTowne Country Club Course at the Belvidere Resort.

Because of her condition, Kline can’t walk long distances
without becoming fatigued. The LPGA issued a landmark rul-
ing allowing her to become the first player in the organiza-
tion’s history to ride a cart during her rounds. Kline, who also
will have oxygen at her disposal, was born without a spleen,
and her heart has only one ventricle.

LPGA Commissioner Carolyn Bivens said her group
studied Kline’s request for a cart and determined that it
wouldn’t give her an unfair competitive advantage. The
LPGA believes “it is imperative to support the participation
of all qualified players to the extent that the integrity of the

‘ competition is not affected,” she said.

Kline had heart surgery twice before she was 2. In 2005,
doctors repaired a hole in her heart and found a blood clot
above the valve of her single ventricle.

“MacKinzie is a very unique and determined young lady,
and we are thrilled to have her play in the Ginn Tribute,”
Sorenstam said. “What she has accomplished — not only in
golf but [also] for the community — is extraordinary.”

Kline qualified for the U.S. Women’s amateur but had to
decline because she couldn’t walk 18 holes.

“This is a dream come true for me,” Kline said. “I’ve
always had the dream to play on the LPGA Tour, and Annika
has made this a reality for me.

“Words cannot express my appreciation for this honor.”

Branching out Memory lives

_ Steve Yzerman will _ Gulfstream Park will start
serve as Team Canada’s a college scholarship for vet-
general manager at the ITHF erinary students in honor of
world hockey champion- Barbaro, park officials
ships in Moscow in April _ _ announced Monday, shortly
and May. — after the death of the 2006

“T really enjoyed my. Kentucky Derby Winner.
‘experiences in international The horse had strong ties
hockey,” said Yzerman, who to the Sunshine State and a

helped Canada win gold at large fan base, Gulfstream
the 2002 Olympics. “I Park spokesman Mike Mul-
enjoyed watching them as a laney said. Barbaro, who
young boy and participating was euthanized Monday

after complications from his
gruesome breakdown at last

throughout my career. Being
able to stay involved tom

is very exciting.” : year’s Preakness, secured
He’s currently a vice his Derby spot after winning
president with the Detroit the $1 million Florida Derby
Red Wings. | at Gulfstream. .
The 41-year-old Yzerman “The sacrifices of owners
‘played in three world cham- Roy and Gretchen Jack-

son, and the enormity of
their colt’s contribution to
the sport, and the courage of
all involved, have been ines-
timable,” Gulfstream Park
president Bill Murphy said.

pionships, two Olympics, a
World Cup, Canada Cup
and world junior champion-
ship.

- Canada finished fourth at
last year’s world champion-



ship in Riga, Latvia, after “The Barbaro story went
losing a bronze-medal game beyond racing. It held us all
in its grip for eight months.”



4 DAYS

TO GO.

6 P.M. EST SUNDAY, FEB. 4, 2007
DOLPHIN STADIUM. @ ON TV: CBS



the names of all the Sept. 11 attack victims
scrolled up a large screen behind the stage.

The NFL chose U2, the Super Bowl’s
first-ever halftime solo act, after seeing the
band perform in New York in October 2001. But
details of its performance were kept secret until

At anews conference éarlier in the week, U2
lead singer Bono instead talked about the New
England quarterback controversy between
Tom Brady and Drew Bledsoe.

“We are here to bring peace to Brady and
Bledsoe, to bring peace to the AFL and the

NEL,” he said. “That’s our mission.”
But, clearly, the show had a larger purpose. Toward the end,
Bono pulled open his black leather jacket to reveal its American
flag lining. It was an exclamation point on a performance that left

many fans visibly in tears.

- BRIAN COSTA



GETTY IMAGES ARCHIVES






RNATIONAL EDITION WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007 | 7



_LOOKING BACK ! THE ROAD TOMIAMI

ae

Uy

Attendance |
79,204

th ane
Marion ge
LTT) 5- Col (ge

Baltimore
~ coach:
Don McCafferty

Dallas _
coach —
Tom Landry

» National
anthem
Tommy Loy

(trumpeter) —

Halftime show.
Florida A&M Band

Cost of
30-second
commercial

moe, $55,000

Nielsen
ratings:

39,9 _ | Renee | a ae ee a Ait
pee a ‘i ae om oe . t | pages LEWE Wick AM ~
uper : ' a ane ' , ge sea ; ‘ca ‘WGa3
ticket price > (es i 16) ge Of nn Ca

HEADLINES
+ The 26th Amendment | wers the United States’
voting age from 21 tod



ye Court upholds 4 measure to bus
f ee a 4 ao re 4 ‘ety oe children-“S)=in order*to-enforce integration in schools
. : ca mF a ; : se ..» Jim Morrison, (2) lead'singer of The Doors, is found
; 4 dead in his hotel room in Paris, France
* Pentagon papers published by The New York Times impli-
cating President Richard Nixon (7)
Tere) st oO : MOVIES
wets oe a | uma a Tai * Best picture: ‘The French Connection
2 ae — - 1 : Pas es a * Top box office hits: ‘Billy Jack’ ana ‘Diamonds Are Forever’
TELEVISION
oe! Mnetens f ’ * Debut: ‘All in the Family’ (3)
zs Did You Know & i et 7 4 ‘ * Top-rated shows: ‘Marcus Welby M.D.’ and ‘Flip Wilson’
‘The game between ‘
the. champions. of the 4 aitiia Rae on MUSIC ,
AFC and NFC was - , ‘i i we : .» Hit song: Joy To The World’ - Three Dog Night
: played on artificial. i. : a + Top albums; ‘Jesus Christ Superstar ’ ~ Various Artists
- turf for the first time, sa - ; and ‘Tapestry’ - Carole King
oe HOT CAR - Dodge Challenger
POP CULTURE
_» Nike swoosh trademark is created
ae ee ; 5 ; m ° Hand-held blow-dryer is introduced
' oe Be = : ‘ “oo rok a! ie + Joe Frazier defeats Muhammad Alll in
- a5 aa : New York in their first of three bouts (4)
i . Designer Coco Chanel dies
: | SOURCES: Nielsen Media o
wlan Bi ! Research, Exhibitor
os \ Relations, Billboard,
ee / A ; . Academy: of Motion Pictures
(ack ‘ —— — Arts and Sci , GM,
& L played ee ie = ‘Daimler Chrysler, Miamj
one ofmy : ( : “4 ‘ ea , : : Herald Research J
wee better games, a Bi —t © & phir orooner
Pas) | . ie , ’ . 4 Paul Ch kK
a Iwas | Cee coo wk Ds spaarraun/
‘| satisfied ae Egy hh US sak
ee) §=performance.
| But Iwas
surprised to
mr win the
#) «award - and
mi) 6 would have
oe AE y eee) § been much
gaan yos Mey more satisfied
to win the
game.”
Uper | CHUCK
fe ey a HOWLEY
ae Enna “
a a

a

Lay

Bi




PAGE 2F, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



HEALTH & FITNESS SUPPLEMENT



Caribbean:

Fight against HIV/AIDS

undermined by ‘widespread ignorance’

@ By MAT PROBASCO
Associated Press Writer

CHRISTIANSTED, United
States Virgin Islands (AP) —
Widespread ignorance about
HIV/AIDS is undermining
efforts to fight the spread of
the virus in the Caribbean,

. which has the second highest |

rate of infection after sub-
Saharan Africa, health officials
have said.

Discrimination by employ-
ers and others. is so pervasive
that infected people often
delay seeking treatment for the
Motee still largely perceived as

“gay disease” by many in the
con. said officials at the one-

day Caribbean Summit on

HIV-AIDS in St Croix...

“It’s going to be a political
challenge because, unfortu-
nately, we live ina society that
is very homophobic,” said
Douglas Slater, health minis-
ter for St Vincent and the
Grenadines. “It’s something
we are going to have to over-
come.”

The 15-member Caribbean
Community, known as Cari-
com, has not secured enough
international funding for. pre-
vention and treatment, said US
Rep Donald M Payne, a
Democrat from New Jersey,

and co-chair of the Congres- '

sional Caribbean Caucus. :
“Caricom needs to step up

to the plate and demand these

federal funds,” Payne said.
An estimated 500,000 peo-

ple — or 2.4 per cent of the

‘Caribbean — have the virus.
The figure excludes Cuba,

_* which has a relatively low rate

due to testing and prevention
programmes.

aged 15 to 44, said Barry S
Featherman, president of the
Inter-American Economic
Council, which organized the
conference.

Regional studies have shown
that businesses that invest in
HIV prevention programmes
save money by reducing health
care costs.and having more
productive workers, officials

said. But there have not been ~

increased efforts to educate the
population on prevention and
treatment, Payne said.

“T haven’t seen this overall
realization, like ‘Houston, we
have a problem,’” he said. “If
you heighten the rhetoric it
may effect tourism. But if you
don’t, there might not be any-
body left here.”

Studies by economists at the
University of the West Indies
have shown that failing to slow
the spread of the disease will
deeply affect economies
because those infected tend to
be younger people who make
up a large part of the region: s
work force.
~ Albert Ramdin, assistant
secretary-general for the

’ Washington-based Organiza-

tion of American States,
echoed this conclusion.

“This (pandemic) has major
implications for governance,

Promoting free condoms



ri

~ ew
tt FF Pur

vetoes

@ A BASKET of condoms is displayed at the Gay Men’s Health Crisis center in New York. New York Mayor Michael
Bloomberg’s administration is focused on reducing rates of sexually transmitted diseases and HIV/AIDS, and part of the
strategy is the aggressive promotion of free condoms. One idea for the design of the official city condom is a subway theme,
with maps and colours of the different lines emblazoned on the wrappers. ,

In 2005, an estimated 24,000 .
people died in the Caribbean
from AIDS-related complica-

national security, human secu-
rity and the economic viability
of many of these countries

. tions, making it the leading
cause of death_among people

whose resources are already
stretched,” he said.



i
i
i
i
i
i
i

MEDICAL CLINIC

TaPesttaye tits tia tee
UUW LR e hatin

, Unsightly leg veins can be a problem for millions of men and women, the world over. This

problem affects a wide range of age groups, skin types and lifestyles. It is estimated that in many
| areas over 60% of the adult population suffers from varicose veins and spider veins. Varicose
; veins are enlarged vessels that have widened as a result of weakness in the vein wall, which
| stretches and bulges. Spider veins are the small superficial purple or red veins stretching like
/ a web under the skin.

Until now, treating varicose and spider veins was a lengthy and painful process with needles
or other invasive treatments. Now, using the new combined technologies of the VascuLightâ„¢
_ system, unsightly leg veins of all types can be treated - simply, non-invasively, and successfully.

Piet ie ry i rua ote
eT ELT cea ig

Varicose veins, usually deeper blue veins, need different treatment from discolored clusters
(known as “spider veins”) that are near the skin surface. For this reason, the VascuLight
system is equipped with two different light technologies. Your doctor may use either the
VascuLight laser or Sclerotherapy treatment depending on you. veins.

How many treatments
are needed?

Many leg veins need multiple treatments, often over a few months before the effect is
completed. Even small vessels often require time to resolve. Sometimes a bit of “matting”
or “staining” surrounds the treated vessel. By using both technologies in the VascuLight
system, your doctor can treat the vein and this minor temporary discoloration and offer a
complete, excellent outcome.

For more information call
THE LASER UNIT at the Walk-in Clinic aE
Tel 327-5483 or 322-1007



_(AP Photo: Frank Franklin ID)



Diagnosing strokes: MRI
scans should be adopted
as new standard of care

@ By MARIA CHENG
AP Medical Writer

LONDON (AP) — The
most common method of diag-

‘nosing a stroke in the emer-

gency rooms catches only
about one out of every four
cases — far fewer than an
MRI scan, which also was bet-
ter at spotting the type of
stroke, a US government fund-
ed study showed.

The study led some experts,

writing in the medical journal -

The Lancet, to declare that
MRI scans should replace CT
X-rays as the standard of care.
The journal published the
stroke study in Friday’s issue.

“This mantle should now be
passed to magnetic. resonance
imaging,” wrote Dr Geoffrey
A Donnan. and colleagues at
the University of Melbourne
in Australia in an accompany-
ing commentary.

MRI scans shouldbe adopt- )

ed as the new standard of care,
wrote the doctors, while they
also criticized governments
and health care systems for
their poor track record of
assessing new technologies.

However, others argue it’s
not such a clear-cut choice.
MRI results take more time,
a delay that can prove deadly
to a stroke patient, these doc-
tors contend.

“The time delay between

. MRI and CT may be around

15 to 20 minutes,” said Dr
Joseph Broderick, chairman
of neurology at the University
of Cincinnati College-of Med-
icine. “And in an emergency,
15 to 20 minutes can make a
big difference.”

Role

Broderick had no role in the
study, which was led by Dr
Julio Chalela, of the Medical
University of South Carolina.
Chalela was with the US
National Institutes of Health

when the study was conducted.
Chalela and colleagues
examined 356 patients, of
whom 217 were ultimately
diagnosed with an acute
stroke. Patients were scanned
both by CT and MRI
machines. CT scans are a type
of X-ray, whereas magnetic
resonance imaging uses pow-
erful magnets instead of radi-
ation to produce an image.

Experts

The scans were indepen-
dently interpreted by four
experts, who had no other
patient information. Based
only on the MRI scans, experts
accurately diagnosed acute
strokes 83 per cent of the time.
Using the CT scans, however,
they were right just 26 per cent
of the time.

MRI scans were also more

‘precise in spotting the cause

of the stroke — a blood clot or
bleeding in the brain. The vast
majority of strokes are caused
by clots. In patients scanned
within three hours of symp-
toms, MRIs detected strokes
caused by clots in 41 of 90
patients, while CT scans only
picked up six of the 90
patients.

The first few hours following
a stroke are critical, since clot-
busting drugs must be given
within three hours to have a
real impact. If they are given
to the wrong patients, howev-
er, death or severe disability
can result.

Strokes are the second lead-
ing cause of death worldwide,
and account for approximate-
ly 5.5 million deaths each year.

Though CT scans may lose
out to MRI scans on accuracy,
on issues such as time and
money, CT scans are far
ahead. Widely available in
emergency rooms in all devel-
oped countries, CT machines
are compact pieces of equip-
ment that produce images in as

little as two minutes. In com-
parison, MRI machines are

- large, coffin-like structures

that require patients to lie still
for up to 30 minutes. They are
also unsuitable for patients
with pacemakers, metal
objects, or who may be preg-
nant.

MRI scans also cost signifi-
cantly more than CT scans and
require specialized technicians
to operate them and to read
the scans.

“The superiority of MRI in
detecting stroke in ideal con-
ditions is unquestioned,” said
Dr Lee Schwamm, an associ-
ate professor of neurology at
Harvard Medical School.
Schwamm was not connected
to the study. But combined
with a consideration of patient
symptoms, ‘he says that CT
scans are just as effective in
diagnosing patients in emer-
gencies.

MRI scans may offer more
detailed information, but such
information hasn’t yet been
proven to make a difference
in patient outcomes. Experts
say studies are needed to
determine if MRI stans might
save more lives than cr scans

in emergencies.

Comparison

Schwamm likens the com-
parison between the two tech-
niques to the difference
between FM and AM radio.
“FM radio is better because
it’s high-definition, and is great
if you’re listening to classical
music,” he said. “But some-
times all you need is the
weather and the news, so AM
is just fine.”

In the same Lancet issue, an
all-stroke special, two other
studies found that stroke
patients treated in a stroke
care unit have a better chance
of recovery than if they were
treated in a conventional hos-
pital ward.

»

eae

_ 2 «
THE TRIBUNE

HEALTH & FITNESS SUPPLEMENT

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007, PAGE 3F



@ By JANET FRANKSTON
LORIN
Associated Press Writer

LODI, N.J. (AP) — The
cafeteria lunch line at.Colum-
bus Elementary School
moves quickly as students .
grab portions of carrots cel-
ery, apples and oranges.
French fries and hamburgers,
once cafeteria staples, aren’t
even offered.

“JT eat carrots or apples
every day,” said 10-year-old
Alan Espino. He said he did-
n’t notice that the bun hold-
ing his all-beef hot dog was
whole wheat. Even the pizza
available in the cafeteria has
whole wheat crust.

The school cafeteria looks
radically different from those
of his parents’ generation,
and it appears many kids
aren’t turning their noses up
at the new offerings. In fact,
according to a survey of food
service directors, french fries

are decreasing in popularity
and interest in carrots is sky-
rocketing. 3 one

As choices on the lunch
line change, many children
are accepting them, said
Martha Conklin, an associate
professor at Penn State Uni-
versity who conducts
research about school nutri-

tion programmes and school’ .

food service. 3
“If you present these...)

healthy offerings to children,“
e . major ingredient.

they may turn, then}:down the
first time, but-you-¢an’t give
up,” she said, “Children will
adapt. Choice is important,
but they can make those.
selections from healthy offer-
ings.”

The School Nutrition Asso-
ciation’s annual survey given
to food service directors
around the country shows
just that. Among students in









Service Highlights

24 Hour Emergency Services

Emergency Transport
Services/Ambulance



‘

kindergarten through 12th
grade, french fries dropped in
popularity from 1998 to 2006,
while carrots and fresh veg-
etables-rose in popularity.

“We are dealing with much
more sophisticated audiences
now, and we working hard to
meet their needs in a healthi-
er way,” said Janey Thorn-
ton, the association’s presi-
dent.

More states are enacting
nutrition standards to ensure
healthy food and beverage
options are available to stu-
dents, said Amy Winterfeld,
a health policy analyst for the
National Conference of State
Legislatures.

A 2004 wellness pro-
gramme requires school dis-
tricts receiving federal reim-
bursements for school meal
programmes to develop poli-
cies that promote the health
of students and address the
growing problem of child-
hood obesity.

In 2005, at least 17 states

- enacted some form of school

nutrition legislation and at
least 11 more approved them
last year. ra

A New Jersey law requires
that, by next fall, snacks and
ala carte items sold or served
contain no more than eight

.. grains of total fat per.serving

and two grams of saturated

fat per serving. Candy is

banned and so are foods and
beverages with sugar as the

The law is an attempt to
establish a culture in which
eating nutritiously is the
accepted social norm, said
Emma Davis-Kovacs, acting
state director for the New
Jersey Department of Agri-
culture’s division of food and
nutrition. ,

“The leading health
authorities are all recom-

ECG/EEG

Surgical Services
Recovery Room
Gynecological Care



@ ALAN Ian Espino, a fifth-grader at Columbus Elementary School in Lodi, N.J., holds his lunch tray containing a beef hot dog on
a whole wheat bun, beans, carrot sticks, a bag of apple slices and low-fat milk in the school’s cafeteria. In an effort to combat the nation-

al crisis of childhood obesity, schools across the country are changing their menus, adding more fresh vegetables and fruits and opt-:

ing for baking instead of frying.

mending that schools take an
active role in this area of
nutrition to prevent disabling
chronic health conditions,”
she said. .
Mark Vidovich, president
of Pomptonian Food Service,
which runs programmes in 11
north and central New Jersey.

Comprehensive Diagnostic Imaging

Bone Densitometry
CAT Scan
Mammography

counties, recalled that stu-
dents were turned off by
whole wheat bread just five
years ago.

“The children wouldn’t eat
it. It didn’t look right to
them,” he said. “Now their
dining preferences have
changed and they’re now

MRI

Nuclear Medicine
Ultrasound

X-ray

?

accepting of making healthier
dining options.”

Pat Johnson, food service
director in the Maplewood
and South Orange district,
said she started reforming
her cafeterias before the new
state law.. The district is reno-
vating its kitchens to remove

(AP Photo: Mike Derer)

fryers and add grills and
ovens. She said younger chil-
dren seem more open to tast-
ing healthier foods and are
likely to continue the pat-
terns to middle and high
school. “If you put it there
and make it look appealing to
them, they like it,” she said.



*| DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life



Catherization Lab (Cath Lab) Matemity Care tl a aN mS

Dialysis Nursery Sea ate

MRI Adult,Pediatric & Geriatric Care See eee Therapy To make an appointment for

CAT Scan Primary Care ysical 'herapy rgonomics ;

ICU/IMCU Pharmacy Speech Language Pathology Incontinence Treatment Program your annual physical call:

WEDISURE Nutiition Counseling Si cies scesain ae annie ap CTnminioniacnmmitnaee Tg .

Open Heart Surgery Limited Home Health Services Laboratory Microbiology 302-4684.

Kidney Transplants Outpatient Physician Clinics Blood Bank Pathology www.doctorshos p.com

Organ Harvesting Sessional Clinics Chemistry Phlebotomy

Cardiac Care Weight Mansgement . Hematology a ,

ee a Se SE a ee ee ee ee ee
*. , looks like just another tennis

>... tember 2005 by the Tennis

go out and play with one.

PAGE 4F, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007



THE TRIBUNE

HEALTH & FITNESS SUPPLEMENT

@ By DANIEL YEE
Associated Press Writer

ATLANTA (AP) — It

workout as balls sail by and
sometimes directly at pro
instructor Tony Palafox.

But the plastic cones and the
rope ladder along either side of
the court suggest otherwise.
This is “Cardio Tennis,” a
group class that combines tra-
ditional tennis practice with
other endurance-building exer-
cise.

On a recent brisk morning
at a YMCA tennis court in
Atlanta’s trendy Buckhead
neighbourhood, three tennis
players had a workout with
Palafox, a former pro tennis
player from Mexico City.
Palafox has trained other pro-
fessionals, including US tennis
champion John McEnroe.

“Did John McEnroe do
this?” asks 42-year-old Caro-
line McCrary during pre-work-
out arm stretches and moving
sideways in a circle with the
group.

“Pros should do it — it is
good fitness,” says the 70-year-
old Palafox. Today’s pros, he
says, have access to personal
trainers to build their stamina.

For everyone else, Cardio
Tennis provides similar bene-
fits, Palafox says, because it
uses aspects of a regular tennis
workout — hitting balls — with
footwork exercises designed to
build endurance.

Unlike a regular game of
tennis, Cardio Tennis is
focused on fitness and less-on
hitting great forehands and
backhands. The programme
has 1,500 workout sites in 48
states, Puerto Rico and 25
countries. It started in Sep-

Industry Association as a way
to get more people involved in
the sport.

“When lower-skilled players

SEE page 5F

*






StH ANNUAL

FuN Run/ Wak



REGISTRATION FEE: S12



Race starts at 7a.m. at the Western Esplanade to Goodman's Bay & back
Late registration starts at 6:00 a.m. Registration Fee: $12 (Includes race T-shirt and other gifts and surprises)



Applications can be picked up at all Subway® Restaurants in New Providence



Early registration & applications can be dropped off at Subway® restaurant in the Harbour Bay Shopping Centre from February 14 - 23.
All Proceeds will be donated to The Bahamas Heart Association and The Strider Track Club. Trophies and prizes will be awards for different categories.

For More Information, Call 327-0806 or 394-6715





Name:

Date of Biff ek ow Age(onraceday): Sex: Mo Fe
Address:

E-mail: Telephone:



| X-Large | 2XLarge

T-shirt Size (circle one) Small | Medium || Large

Check Appropriate Category
Runners

Walkers





; Under 15 :
Under 20

Under 30 Female
Under 40 Female

Under 50

Masters
Over 50 Female
Masters
Over 60 Female

Largest Group/Name:
























Prior to any physical activity, we strongly suggest you consult your physician
J assume all risks associated with The Subway” Fun Run/Walk including, but not limited to, falls, contact with other participants, the effect of
the weather, including extreme heat, extreme cold, and/or humidity, traffic and the conditions of the road, all such risks being known and
appreciated by me. Having read this waiver and knowing these facts and in consideration of accepting my application, |, for myself and anyone
entitled to act on my behalf, waive and release Subway® and all sponsors, their representatives and successors from all claims
and liabilities of any kind arising out of my participation in the Subway® Fun Run/Walk even though that liability may arise
out of negligence or carelessness on the part of the persons named in this waiver. | am.aware that the registration fee is
on-refundable.| am also aware that the course will open to traffic and that headphone, jogging strollers, bikes; in line skaters
and similar items and animals accompanying entrants are not permitted on the course.

Signature: Date:

PARENTS SIGNATURE (if under 18): 2 Date:

event sponsors:



















@ INSTRUCTOR Tony Palafox (right) shows an exercise to Cam Fenton, 49, of Atlanta during a cardio tennis workout at an Atlanta YMCA.

(AP Photo: Gene Blythe)

SAC



A CONSISTENT SAVINGS PLAN PROVIDES:
Security for the future

Funds for emergency or
unplanned expenses

Help to meet short- and
long-term needs





Make your decision to save now and open an
account at any Royal Bank or RBC FINCO branch.
We offer attractive interest rates to our customers!





+ www. rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean

No iS Yoy ert a seta)

RBC, of Canada

Mo seiner gu LMU Md Bet BoD ier % i ay UN
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007, PAGE 5F



offers more challenging aerobic workout



@ CAM Fenton, 49, of Atlanta works
through rope ladder exercises

i FORTY two-year-old Caroline McCrary (left) of Atlanta returns balls to Tony Palafox

FROM page 5F

another they are not hitting many balls — they
are chasing many balls. That doesn’t get your
heart rate up,” said Michele Krause, national
Cardio Tennis director for the Tennis Industry
Association. “In Cardio Tennis, a pro is con-
trolling the activity, you’re hitting tons of
balls...and you have a great ability to stay in
your heart-rate range for the recommended
period of time.”

Organisers claim the workout offers cardio-

vascular benefits because all the activity in each
workout allows participants to hit their aerobic
training zone, which is between 65 per cent and
85 per cent of their maximum heart rate. The
workout also improves a player’s tennis game
because players get lots of tennis practice and
tips on how to improve with instructors.
Cardio Tennis means more of a “total body”
workout than just tennis alone or other activities
suth as running or cycling, said Randy Braith,
director of the an exercise physiology lab at the
University of Florida, who is not involved in
the Cardio Tennis programme. Both upper and

(AP Photo: Gene Blythe)

lower body get a workout, he said.

“IT can run a gazillion miles, but it’s hard,”
McCrary says during the 45-minute workout’s
only down time — when Palafox exhausts his
ball hopper and players break to pick them all
up again.

“We look forward to picking up the balls,”
jokes Cam Fenton, 49, of Atlanta.

First, Palafox does stretching exercises with his
group. Then he hits three or four volleys to a
class member, who returns the serves, then runs
to the side of the court to do jumping exercises
over the rungs of the rope ladder, or footwork







available at

(AP Photo: Gene Blythe)

exercises around the plastic cones. Then it's
back to the volley line and hitting balls again.

They work on their forehand and backhand,
lobs, baseline shots and even close to the net. A
workout session usually includes three sets of
hitting exercises, with two breaks of picking up
tennis balls in between.

Fenton started taking Cardio Tennis last sum-
mer and says she can burn about 600 calories per
workout. .

“] like to play tennis and try to get cardio in
everyday,” Fenton said. “Your heart rate jumps
up huge because you’re running.”



JOHNN’S CARE WEAR

Rosetta Street > P.O. Box N-4277 « Tel: 325-7288 - Fax: 325-7278


PAGE 6F, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

TVs, iPods help some exercisers, but break

mind-body connection for serious-minded

m@ By MICHAEL HILL
Associated Press Writer

JENNIFER Unruh can run
a mile in two songs.

“Tve got it figured out,” said
Unruh, who moves to the beat
of Van Halen and The Fray on
her iPod. “Usually, every song
lasts about four minutes. I run
a mile in a little over eight. So
if I can get through two songs,
I know I’m a mile though my
run.”

Gyms are jammed with peo-
ple like Unruh — the guy on
the treadmill watching ESPN,
the aerobic class bouncing to
“Hollaback Girl,” the spinner
reading Self magazine. Words,
images and especially songs
can provide inspiration for
exercisers, as well as a distrac-
tion from tedium and discom-
fort. t

Unruh, director of wellness
support at the YMCA of Met-
ropolitan Atlanta, uses her
songs-per-mile mind games as
a way to keep engaged.

But are those distractions
good or bad for exercisers?
Researchers say it cuts both
ways. Yes, a dose of video or
audio can inspire better work-
outs. But distractions can also
hurt performance. In a way,
music can add some static to
the mind-body connection.

Since the dawn of the Walk-
man, headphones have been
as important as sneakers to
many exercisers. Jacqueline
Wojtusik, an Albany-area fash-
ion designer who wears head-
phones for her regular work-
outs, listens to disco, ‘80s
dance, electronic — anything
as long as it has a fast beat.

“If it has a higher beat per
minute,” she said, “then I tend
to stay with that beat.”

Science is on her side.

In a 2005 study, British
researchers put 18 undergrad-
uates on stationary bicycles to

pedal either to silence or to
“popular electronic dance
music” on headphones. Partic-
ipants worked about 13 per
cent harder to the up-tempo
music compared to silence.
One of the researchers, Sam
Carr, suggested in an e-mail
interview that music competes
with an exercisers’ awareness

of how hard they’re breathing,,

or how much their legs ache.
Psychologists sometimes use
the phrase “dissociation effect”

to describe distractions like.

music and TV, and they have
found it can have other bene-
fits.

Dr. James Annesi, a health
psychologist who works at the
same Atlanta YMCA as
Unruh, found that novice exer-
cisers given a choice of TV or
music were more apt to stick
with an exercise programme
than those told to focus only
on. their-exertions or people
limited to one type of media. If
the gyms look like media cen-
ters, that’s fine by Annesi, as
long as it encourages people
to exercise.

“The more dissociation the
better, the more we can dis-
tance the people from their dis-
comfort,” he said.

Still, athletes digging deep
for peak performance would
do well to ditch the head-
phones and focus on their bod-
ies. Studies have shown that
the more distracted the ath-
lete, the slower the times, said
Ohio University psychology
professor Benjamin Ogles.

“If you want to maintain a
high level of intensity, you
pretty much have to focus on
your body,” he said.

This is related to the belief
that noisy gadgets interfere
with the intensely focused
mental state many athletes
refer to as “flow.” For instance,
visitors to the Kripalu Center

for Yoga & Health, in Stock-







THE TRIBUNE



a 1 SINCE the dawn of the Walkman, headphones-have been as important as sneakers to many exercisers. A dose of video or audio
can inspire better workouts. But distractions can also hurt performance. In a way, music can add some static to mind-body connection.

bridge, Mass., are encouraged

to leave the headphones

behind. Jennifer Young, direc-
tor of healthy living pro-
grammes, said she wants to
keep visitors’ mind-body con-
nections strong.

Hikers at Kripalu are
coached to “scan” their bod-

‘We Corcedoaibe hed tet Chorktte onfeb 24. Pediormen inchade: The box office
‘pilogen 9.00: Teckel: cee $95.00 it ocvnnew ord! cn sale ot Juke Box, Signctune Styles,

end Sey Thang end Dive ine: Tickets obo. careiicle of waar corbicte
‘ham the conced wil be donolest io The Rehiorcs Heat Amociion,

pom. Process:

ies by concentrating sequen-
tially on their ankles, hips,
shoulders and so on. Even dur-
ing weightlifting — an activity
linked more to Metallica then
meditation — people are asked
to visualize what their muscles
are doing, or to focus on their
breathing.

&

s BQ
ARNE \w &

e

“Don’t turn out and turn
off,” Young said, “because
then there’s that underlying
signal, ‘Oh, working out is
something I don’t want to do.
I’m escaping it by doing this.’”

Even Anna Fyodorova, a
triathlete from New York City
who calls the iPod one of the

(AP Photo: Jim McKnight)

“sreatest creations made” for
training, sees its limits. When
other runners wore their ear
buds during a recent 60 kilo-
meter race, she decided against
it. “When you’re racing, you
have to concentrate,” she said,

_ “you have to be totally in the

moment.”

KELSO MEDICAL
LABORATORY

Eat a balanced diet

Choose your foods wisely

Exercise

Get plenty of rest -

Keep your body hydrated
Keep your mind active — challenge your brain

Have your annual visit with your physician

and let .

KELSO MEDICAL LABORATORY
be a part of your overall health
evaluation and testing workups.

Laboratory Testing

Electrocardiograph (ECG) Testing
Vitamins & Nutritional Supplements

10 Collins Avenue -
322-7994 or 322-8440

“The oldest private medical
lab in the Bahamas”



HMA
\aaaannin Hy


THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007, PAGE 7F
HEALTH & FITNESS SUPPLEMENT

Schwarzenegger
announces school
fitness challenge

'







A RE ELS Lr oe

Ce COS S HEEL HE ESR RE FT EMSS GHAR SESW EN

2, @@ & WY

























experts.

Together we can make a difference.






This is an opportunity to interact with health care professionals over issues important to your
personal health, nutrition and physical well being. The event includes health checks and
demonstrations. It will also introduce you to the latest methods of reducing stress, gaining

more energy, increasing mental focus and improving overall health and.wellness, directly from the

A guest speaker, Dr. Marie Savard, LLC, an internationally recognised internal medicine physician,and
expert on health and wellness. It's time to be all together better informed about your health.

2007 Health Fair Partners include: Doctors Hospital; Bahamas National Drug Council; GNC General Nutrition
Centers; Weight Watchers Of The Bahamas; Kelso Medical Laboratory; Mystical Fitness Centers; The Walk-In Clinic; AIDS
Eoundation Of The Bahamas; Bahamas Family Planning Association; Better Bodies Gym; Chela-Tech Medical Laboratory; Pearl Vision;

Center for Specialized Dentistry; Commonwealth Drugs & Medical Supplies Co. Ltd.; Dental Health Centre; Med Evac; Rollins Dental;
Super Saver Discount; The Skin Centre; Impressions Center For General & Cosmetic Dentistry;Bahamas Heart Association; Bally Total Fitness;





e
‘ SACRAMENTO, Califor-
i nia (AP) — Governor Arnold
: Schwarzenegger wants Cali-
“ fornia’s students to run, jump
; and squat their way to anew
gymnasium for their schools.
b As part of his effort to boost
: students’ physical fitness, the
* governor has announced a fit- »
it ness challenge.
i The Austrian-born governor
" and former Mr Universe wants
: to get 20,000 kindergarten
. through 12th-grade students
« active for 30 to 60 minutes a
. day at least three times a week.
hd As an incentive, the school
“ with the highest percentage of
. participating students at the
's end of the four-week challenge
¢ will win a new fitness center.
: The next 11 will win $1,000
; (?770) to buy fitness equip-
&! ment. .
. A statewide review of phys-
- ical fitness released in Novem- MM AS part of his effort to get California school children into
« ber found that nearly half of | shape, Goy. Arnold Schwarzenegger announces his physical fit-
a California’s ninth-grade stu- ness challenge during his visit to Will C. Wood Middle School. |
. dents do not have the stamina ;
@ to briskly run one mile (1 1/2 (AP Photo: Rich Pedroncelli)
E kilometers). Fewer than a third.
: of the nearly 1.4 million stu- on Physical Fitness. effect this July. One will
Se dents who took the test in fifth, The governor said working require foods sold in school
® seventh and ninth grades met _ out three times a week for a vending machines to meet high
© all the minimum benchmarks month is just a start. They nutritional standards and reg-
in areas such as percentage of should aim to be active every ulate the number of calories
body fat, abdominal strength day, he told students at WillC from fat and sugar. The other
and flexibility. Wood Middle School in Sacra- _ limits drinks sold at schools to
State law requires that ele- mento. water, milk and some fruit and
_ mentary students receive 200 “It’s not just to have a mus- sport drinks that have limited
minutes of physical education cular body and to look studly sweeteners. ;
every 10 school days and dou- when you go out there,” he Schwarzenegger launched --
‘ ble that many for grades 7-12, said. the student fitness challenge
* @ EIGHTH grader Tou Her, 13, squeezes between schoolmates to shake hands with California. but the state conducts few “Tt has also to do with your Wednesday at a Sacramento '
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger (right) who visited Will C Wood Middle School in Sacramento, Cal- compliance checks. health, because so many peo- middle school.
“ ifornia. As part of his effort to boost students’ physical fitness, the governor has announced a fit- Schwarzenegger has pro- ple get sick as they get older — Teachers and schools can
ness challenge. The Austrian-born governor and former Mr Universe wants to get 20,000 kinder- — moted increased physical activ- _ sick because they have aterri- _ register for the program online,
garten through 12th-grade students active for 30 to 60 minutes a day at least three times a week. _ ity for students since he was a ble lifestyle.” where they also can keep track _
, member of former President Two bills aimed at improv- of their progress against other -.
(AP Photo: Rich Pedroncelli)... George HW Bush’s Council ing school nutrition will take schools.
< €
Premier Healthy
/ [he Wellness Hea th Fair 2007
Â¥
Atlantic Medical invites you to attend the 2007 Corporate Wellness Health Fair, Saturday February 3rd at the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel.The event takes place between | 1.00am and 4.00pm. It is part of the Weliness
initiative operated with The Bahamas’ most advanced health insurance plan, Premier Health.
Members of the public are free to attend too.





























COLONTAL GROUP
INTERNATIONAL

Cancer Society of the Bahamas; Princess Margaret Hospital; The Medi Centre;
The Bahamas Diabetic Association; Bahamas Red Cross; Centreville Medical Centre;
Advance Family Medicine Centre & Medispa; Nutrition for Life; Foot Solutions.

ll Atlantic Medical

ATLANTIC MEDICAL INSURANCE CO.LTD.
Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue, Nassau, Bahamas Tel.326-8191
www.cgigroup.bm e: atlanticmedical@atlantichouse.com.bs

5 Jasmine Corporate Center, East Sunrise Highway, Freeport, Bahamas Tel. 351-3960

A member of Colonial Group International Ltd.
Personal & Business Insurance:Group Pensions:Group Medical:Life Assurance & Investments



ally

éa

&
-
7

4\WVellness

yr! together better!

Ci vest >
5 mat ®

Colonial Group International is
rated A-(Excellent) by AM Best.
PAGE 8F, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

HEALTH & FITNESS SUPPLEMENT



US mammogram
rate falls slightly

since 2000

Bi By MIKE STOBBE
AP Medical Writer

ATLANTA (AP) — The
percentage of American
women getting mammo-
grams has dropped slightly
over the past few years, in
what health officials have
said is a troubling sign that
the battle against breast can-
cer may be flagging.

The share of women 40
and older who said they had
a mammogram in the previ-
ous two years slipped from
76.4 per cent to 74.6 per cent
between 2000 and 2005,
according to study released
by the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention.

The rate had risen dramati-
cally over the past two
decades, from 29 per cent in
1987, according to, American
Cancer Society statistics.

The CDC and other |
researchers said possible
explanations for the drop
include a shortage of mam-
mography screening centers
and specialists, and a lack of
health insurance among
patients.

Dr Len Lichtenfeld, the
cancer society’s deputy chief
medical officer, said the
decline may also reflect com-
placency among women.

“This is a group of women
who have ‘grown up’ with
mammography as they’ve
aged, they’ve perhaps had it
done many times over the
years and they’ve decided, |
‘Well, it’s been OK, maybe I
can put it off for a while,’” he
said.

He warned that the recent-

Health officials say this
is a troubling sign that

the battle against breast
cancer may be flagging

ly reported declines in breast
cancer incidence rates and
cancer deaths are at risk if
the decline continues. “If we
don’t pay attention now, we
run the risk of seeing some of
the gains we’ve made
reversed,” he said.

Decline

The decline of less than
two percentage points may
seem small, but it could be
terribly significant, Lichten-
feld said.

But if you consider that
about 80 million US women
should be getting a mammo-
gram every year, it means
more than one million fewer
women are getting the
screening test, he said.

And that.may mean thou-
sands of cases of breast can-
cer may not be diagnosed.
Women whose breast cancer
is caught early have more
treatment options and a bet-
ter chance of beating the dis-
ease.

The decline may also at
least partly explain a recent



drop in US breast cancer
rates: It may be that if fewer
women are getting mammo-
grams, fewer cases of breast
cancer are being discovered.

Some researchers instead
tied the drop in breast cancer
to reduced use of hormones
for menopause.
. The study is being pub-
lished this week in a CDC
publication, Morbidity and
Mortality Weekly Report. It
was based on a national tele-
phone survey of more than
14,000 women in each of the
survey years.

The study is not the first to

. spot the decline. The cancer

society keeps statistics,
derived from a different
national survey, that showed
a slight decline in mammo-
gram from 2000 to 2003.
Another study of HMO
patients showed a decline in
screening rates from 1999 to
2002. .

Mammography rates
increased substantially dur-
ing the 1990s, so there seems
to have been some turning
point around 2000.



nee TT veonine HTM PS AMOI
from Just Nuts for that special person.

Store Hours: Mon - Sat. 9am to 5:30pm
upstairs Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street, Palmdale

-3235 » Fax: 323-3236.









THE TRIBUNE



A breast with fatty
tissue free of tumors





B THIS is an undated handout image provided by the University of Texas M D Anderson
Cancer Center in Houston showing a mammogram of a breast with fatty tissue free of tumors.
Dense breast tissue shows up lighter, obscuring cancer tumors, which also look light on mam-
mograms. This mammogram of a breast with lots of fatty tissue (the opposite of dense)
appears noticeably darker, so light tumors would show up better against the background.



(AP Photo: University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center)



‘Turning a corner’

| in the fight against

prostate cancer

Hm By CAROLYN SUSMAN
Cox News Service =

WEST PALM BEACH,
Florida Is the PSA test
worth it? The test used for
detecting prostate cancer has
been both clobbered and treat-
ed as necessary, even though
results can be unreliable.

The chairman of the Nation-
al Prostate Cancer Coalition,
Dr Richard N Atkins, has
released a statement in sup-
port of the test, coupled with a
plea for more money for
research:

“Deaths from prostate can-
cer have dropped 11 per cent
over the last two years, a clear
illustration annual early detec-
tion along with advancements
in treatment are helping us
turn a corner in the fight
against prostate cancer. While
the debate continues over the
usefulness of screening and
new tests loom on the horizon,
evidence shows the PSA test
is saving lives.

\dvancements



in treatment

Chairman of National
Prostate Cancer Coalition
issues plea for more money to
conduct research on disease

are particularly encouraging,
according to a 2006 survey
from the Pharmaceutical

Research and Manufacturers’

of America, medicines in
development for prostate can-
cer have equaled breast can-
cer for the first time ever, 50
each.

“However, more work still
needs to be done as more than
27,000 men will die from
prostate cancer this year — the
second leading cause of male
cancer death and a plague
among African Americans
with a mortality rate 2.5 times
higher than white men.

“We must achieve parity

ith breast cancer, Both -dis

eases are hormonally driven
with similar caseloads. More
than $850 million is dedicated
from the federal government
toward breast cancer research
every year compared to about
$400 million for prostate can-
cer.

“Federal research has
spawned to breast cancer
breakthrough drugs like Her-
ceptin which has lead to an
increase in survivorship by as
much as one-third. We need a
‘His’-ceptin now.”

© Carolyn Susman writes for
the Palm Beach Post. E-mail:
carolyn (underscore) susman

pbpost.com
i it - +
THE TRIBUNE



HEALTH & FITNESS SUPPLEMENT

@ NANCY G Brinker, founder of the Susan G. Komen Foundation, poses at her home in
Palm Beach, Florida. Brinker founded the breast cancer
name to Susan G Komen for the Cure, to fulfill a promise to her younger sister who died of

the disease in 1980.

foundation, which is changing its

(AP Photo: Alan Diaz)

Breast cancer
— foundatio

marks 25 year

@ By JAMIE STENGLE
Associated Press Writer



DALLAS (AP) — As breast
cancer ravaged her body,
Susan G Komen asked her
younger sister for a promise.

Komen wanted help to “cure
this disease.” After a three-
year struggle, the vivacious
young mother with the bright
smile died in 1980 at age 36.

And her sister, Nancy
Brinker, kept her promise to
do something, founding the
Susan G Komen Breast Can-
cer Foundation two years later.

“I knew it had to be big. We
had to change a culture,”
Brinker said.

In the 25 years since, the
foundation has grown from a
small gathering in Brinker’s
living room to an operation
that will have invested roughly
$1 billion in community out-
reach and research by year’s
end and has opened branches
across the country as well as
in Puerto Rico, Italy and Ger-
many.

The Dallas-based organiza-
tion has 200 employees, more
than 100,000 volunteers and
125 affiliates. Its annual Race
for the Cure has grown from
800 women who ran for chari-
ty in Dallas to about 1.5 million
participants in 120 races world-
wide. The foundation has fund-
ed work in more than 47 coun-
tries.

The non-profit is celebrat-
ing its 25th year with a new
‘name Susan G Komen for the
Cure and an edgy new adver-
tisement campaign that
includes T-shirts reading: “If
you're going to stare at my
breasts, you could at least
donate a dollar to save them.”
It has pledged to raise another
$1 billion (?770 million) in the
next 10 years.

With the help of organiza-
tions like Komen and promi-
nent figures like ex-First Lady
Betty Ford, who spoke openly
of about her breast cancer in
the mid-1970s, the culture
slowly began to change from
breast cancer being a taboo
subject, said Dr Gabriel Hor-
tobagyi, president of the
American Society of Clinical
Oncology.

“I grew up at a time when
most families didn’t talk about
either sex or cancer,” said Hor-
tobagyi, chairman of the



Susan G Komen for the
Cure has branches in
Europe, Caribbean

department of breast medical
oncology at the University of
Texas M D Anderson Cancer
Center in Houston. “Those
were sort of taboos. It was sort
of shameful if anyone in the
family had cancer.”

Today, the Komen Founda-
tion.reports, nearly 75 per cent
of American women over 40
get regular mammograms com-
pared to fewer than a third in
1982; the five-year survival rate
for breast cancer when caught
before it spreads is 98 per cent
compared to 74 per cent back
then; the federal government
devotes more than $900 mil-
lion (2695 million) each year
to breast cancer research, treat-
ment and prevention com-
pared to $30 million (?23.2 mil-
lion) in 1982.

“T truly believe if Nancy had-
n’t started this thing, that that
would not be the case,” said
Hala Moddelmog, president
and chief executive officer of
Komen. She said the goal is to
support research that is “trans-
formational and that definitely
ties back to the cure.”

“Every advance in breast
cancer has been touched by a
Komen grant,” said Komen
spokeswoman Emily Callahan.

There will be an interna-
tional emphasis this year
including a September summit
in Budapest, where Brinker
served as US ambassador from
2001 to 2003.

The event will pair 25 US
activists with 25 people from
around the world to look at
the social, cultural and finan-
cial circumstances that prevent
women from getting quality
breast health care and treat-
ment.

Growing up in Illinois,
Komen and Brinker were
close, but had different per-
sonalities, said Brinker, who
now lives in the capital Wash-
ington. She said Komen was
“pretty and popular” while she

4

herself was the more driven
sister.

By the late 1970s, Brinker
was in an executive training
programme at luxury retailer
Neiman Marcus in Dallas.
Komen, three years older, was
raising a family in Peoria, Illi-
nois, working as a part-time
model. They remained close,
keeping up by phone.

One afternoon, Komen
called to tell Brinker that her
doctor had found a lump in her
breast that needed to be biop-
sied. Komen had a mastecto-
my, but about five months lat-
er she found a lump under her
arm. When her sister died, a
devastated Brinker knew she
had work to do.

“It wasn’t going to be

enough to raise money from
some very wealthy people, we
needed to change the culture,”
said Brinker, who herself was
diagnosed with breast cancer
in 1984,

By getting the subject of
breast cancer out into the pub-
lic, Komen led women to
become advocates, said Jean
Sachs, executive director of
Living Beyond Breast Cancer,
a non-profit group sponsored
by Komen, among others, that
provides breast cancer educa-
tion.

“If you look at where we are
today, it’s so different. Women
have so many choices,” said
Sachs.

While the advances made
since Komen was formed are
reason to celebrate, the orga-
nization’s ultimate goal
remains unachieved: the crad-
ication of breast cancer. About
41,000 US women died of
breast cancer last year. World-
wide, it kills about 370,000
women each year.

“When you look at where
we are, we’re still not where
our mission is, and that’s a
world without breast cancer.”
Moddelmog said.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007, PAGE 9F








BIN this photo released by Susan G Komen for the Cure, singer Toni Braxton shows her support
for breast cancer awareness by wearing a Komen for the Cure Promise Ring at The Trumpet Awards
in Las Vegas. ‘

(AP Photo: Eric Jamison) ~~

»

‘

Christina G. Messarra B.SC. PT, M.B.A.,

Provide, a Facility Director, Physiotherapist

c






. Physiotherapy

° Hand Therapy

_ Massage Therapy
Occupational Therapy

- Pediatric Rehabilitation

H| LOCATION: : HOURS OF OPERATION:
4 | Suite 57, Grosvenor Close West Mon to Fri. 8:30am to 7:30pm
| Off Shirley Street between Sat: 8:00am to 1:00pm
“| Doctor's Hospital & PMH













We specialize in the assessment and
treatment of ADULTS & CHILDREN including:

Rete fers |Hat-lnte)e)1U€\ cols emits :
Road Traffic Accident Injuries. . ¢ Postural Dysfunction
Operative Rehabilitation «Pediatric Rehabilitation:
Orthopedic Rehabilitation’. «°° Work Related Injuries (NIB)*.. :

ack and: Neck Ca
Foto) g CoM (N.Y La (kfm

»©) Foot Pains).

Or Li Tet f aCe llc ite)

Providence Rehabilitation Centre welcomes and accepts
ALL extended Medicai benefit plans.

A doctor’s referral may be required for certain services
and access to Extended Medical benefits.



Cea cer 37 cee
PAGE 10F, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



Study finds most with diabetes or at risk

for it ignore doctors’ advice to exercise

m By CHASE SQUIRES

Associated Press Writer

DENVER (AP) — Bad
ws wher: it comes to diabet-
iad exercise: Most people
with Type 2 diabetes or at risk
for it apparently ignore their
doctors’ advice to be active.

Fewer than 40 per cent get
exercise, a new study found,
and the more in danger the
patients are, the less likely they
are to be active.

That’s despite an earlier
study that found nearly three-
quarters of diabetics said their
doctors had advised them to
exercise.

‘The patients who got the
strongest warnings to get mov-
ing were the least likely to lis-
ten, according to research
being released Friday.

“People should exercise
more, that story is out,” said
Dr Elaine Morrato, who led
both studies.

“What we’re saying is,
‘Here’s a high-risk population
that can benefit from exercise,
and they’re even less likely to
exercise.””

Without exercise, Type 2
diabetics face complications
ranging from nerve damage to
high blood pressure.

Morrato, an assistant pro-
fessor at the University of Col-
orado Denver with a doctorate
in public health and epidemi-

olog: , said rescaichers sur-.
veyea more than 22,000
patients for th survev

in the rebruay SaiiON OF tare
American Diabetes Associa-
tion’s journal Diabetes Care.

The federal Centers for Dis-
ease Control and Prevention
estimates more than 20 mil-

lion Americans have diabetes,

about 90 per cent of them
Type 2, which is linked with
obesity.

Dr Larry Deeb, president of
medicine and science at the
American Diabetes Associa-
tion, said by the time patients
have Type 2 diabetes or are at
risk of getting it, the deck is
stacked against them. They
may already have problems
with mobility as a result of
obesity or foot and circulatory
disorders that make exercise
difficult.

“We have to be caxetal not
to blame the victims,” he said.
“There’s a difference between
being unable and being unwill-
ing.”

Fven for ihe mosi
there’s hope, said author and
fitness expert Charlotte Hayes,
but health professionals must
do more.

Hayes, who wrote “The I
Hate to Exercise Book For
People With Diabetes,” said
telling patients to exercise is
different from telling them
how.

Every step of exercise is
important, she said. For those
who can walk, a few steps a
day helps. For those who can’t,
there are alternatives.

““We take a small-steps
approach,” she said.

The American Diabetes
Association recominends peo-
ple get at least 30 minutes of
aerobic exercise, such as brisk

disabled,

walking, five times a week. But.

the association says for those
who can’t, {here are benefits
from even five minutes a day,
i spe with evervday activities
garde: valking

ww work, ,

Morrato said she doesn’t
know the answer, only that the
results of her study are disap-
pointing.

“It is difficult to be opti-
mistic about addressing the
twin epidemics of obesity and
diabetes without success in
increasing physical activity in



a Dr Elaine Morrato, a diabetes researcher at the University of Colorado Health Science
Center in Aurora, Colorado, stands near a window in the facility.

the population,” her study
concludes. “The results of this
study provide very pessimistic
data.”

Deeb, who specializes in
pediatrics, said the next gen-
eration is off to a better start.

eo
ron Doser

The right shoe makes all the
difference in how we look and feel.
Your feet are the foundation and
support of the rest of your body.
Shoes should do more than cover

your feet. Great shoes should feel



great. Ai cot Solutions, we take

~ of your feel.

| oot Solutions can

¢Prolonged Standing

fi
§
i
ql

e Arch Pain/Strain

e Metatarsal Pain



* Narrow Feet



exon ang

ie ey

Tava





help you...



°Flat Feet ° High-Arched Feet

° Artritis eDidcisin. Foot Probie:
°Corns ¢Ingrown Toenails
*Calluses ¢Achilles Tendonitis
¢Bunions ¢Fallen Arches

‘SPECIALIZING IN: MEN SIZES UPTO 17 AND WOMEN SIZES UPTO 13 = WIDER WIDTHS,

BCH Oievyaasancesis)

~ SANDYPORT PLAZA STORE 1E West Bay Street
email:nassau@footsolutions,com



Children, he said, are taught
nutrition and the benefits of
physical activity. Now, fami-
lies, local governments and
school boards need to take
action;.while doctors need. to
follo




up and find out if_at-

(AP Photo: David Zalubowski)

risk patients know where to
get help.

“When you ask a family
what they’re doing, the answer
is all about time. They know
what’s good. for, their families,
but both parents are: esoriang,

and sometimes the only time
they have is to pick up fast
food,” he said. “They have to
understand, your health
depends on it.

“We will not give up,” he
said. “We can’t give up.”

Diabetics should check medicines for sugar

@ By CAROLYN SUSMAN
Cox News Service

WEST PALM BEACH, Florida
— Because it’s cold and flu season,
we’ve been seeing lots of adver-
tisements for over-the-counter cold
and cough medicines. They all tend
to blur together in my mind, except
for one: Coricidin HBP.

This product was developed by
Schering-Plough, a pharmaceutical
company, that now is a sponsor of

the American Heart Association’s
hypertension Web site —
http://www.americanheart.org
The HBP in the medicine’s name
stands for high blood pressure. The
point is that many cold medicines
contain decongestants that can raise
your blood pressure. Coricidin HBP
does not. The box touts this infor-
mation so people with this condi-
tion can avoid taking a medicine

_ that may help with one health prob-

lem — a cold — while wreaking hav-

- Mobile (242) 557-1294

ammcanrenaad
paramedlab247@yahoo.



oc with another — high blood pres-
sure.

But people with diabetes can
have reactions to over-the-counter
products, too. How many sugar-
free medications do we see adver-
tised? None that I’m aware of.

The American Diabetes Associ-
ation - http://www.diabetes.org -
points out this problem on its Web
site. “Always check the label of
over-the-counter medicines before
you buy them to see if they have
sugar. Decongestants and some
products for treating colds raise
blood sugar levels.

“Decongestants to clear your
stuffy nose, and cough syrups, can
make your blood glucose (sugar)
go up. Some medicines have things
in them like dextrose, glucose, fruc-
tose and dextrin which are all
names for sugar.”

So are sucrose and sucralose, also
found in these products.

Of course, people with chronic
medical conditions must be on top
of their illnesses and know how

their bodies react to everything.

‘from food to drugs, even those
medicines they can buy without a
prescription.

But many diabetics may be
unaware of the sugar that is added
to these cold medications. What is it

’ Mary Poppins said? A spoonful of

sugar helps the medicine go down.

But it doesn't help blood sugar
levels if you're sensitive to sugar.

You can find the same caution-
ary advice about over-the-counter
products in many publications,
among them, a revised edition of
“Diabetes Survival Guide” (Bal-
lantine Books.)

The new soft-cover edition
warns, “Check all medications for
sugar. Many cold medicines are
loaded with it and can throw your
control off in a hurry.”

The author, Dr Stanley Mirsky,
writes, “Sudafed and Triaminic
syrups, for example, contain three
and-a-half grams of carbohydrate
per teaspoon. If you take three tea-
spoons a day for a cold, you are
adding 10 and-a-half grams of
unwanted simple sugar to your
bloodstream.” He suggests looking
for sugar-free formulas such as
Robitussin SF, Safetussin DM, Sor-
butuss and Diabetic Tussin.

It does seem odd that while
Schering-Plough is touting its
blood-pressure-safe medicine and
sponsoring a Web site for the
American Heart Association, sugar-
free medications receive little to
any exposure. Whether you believe
in taking drugs or not — gargling
warm water with salt is helpful for a
cough - taking a drug without
knowing all of its side effects is dan-
gerous.

¢ Carolyn Susman writes for the
Palm Beach Post. E-mail: carolyn
(underscore) susman AT
pbpost.com

i
1
7)
a


T





















HE TRIBUNE

@ TARA Guber poses in her yoga
teaching room at home in Los Ange-
les. When Guber created a yoga pro-
gramme five years ago for a public
elementary school in Colorado, she
envisioned students meditating to

never fathomed her proposal would
provoke a crusade by Christian fun-
damentalists and parents who
argued to the school board that
yoga’s Hindu roots conflicted with
Jesus’ teachings.

Tae

relax before standardized tests. She :

(AP Photos: Reed Saxon)

eR CU

athens

Paitin!








WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007, PAGE 11F



Besos
Bist
ay

HB TARA Guber and staff members Mattilyn Rochester (left) and Laurie Parlapiano (right)
demonstrate a typical session, where she teaches the teachers at home in Los Angeles.

paw usa





Buying a home is not only a dream come true,



EVERY MONTH GETS YOU CLOSER TO HON
it can also be a great investment that appreciates over time. Start saving automatically with
the Scotiabank Home Savings Plan and we'll top up your savings with as much as $2,000.+ So
while others are still saving, you can be out house-hunting. Let a Scotiabank representative
show you how the Scotiabank Home Savings Plan can work for you. Drop by your nearest

Scotiabank branch today. :



You save. We top it up.
Become a homeowner sooner. Visit us today.





* Trademarks of The Bank of Nova Scotia. Trademarks used under authorization and control of The Bank of Nova Scotia. + Conditions apply. Subject to credit approval.



































eS PAGE 12F, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007 . | THE TRIBUNE | |
| as individual as ye
Reality Check. | |
With BahamaHealth you can. ao iy ge ee as
; by ‘ te ee ee ES
We've got health plans with flexible == ® 5 045)
options that suit your individual needs. | ae
for information on individual and group coverage, :
familyguardian.com today!
ae

Health |.

YOUR HEALTHB EAN







ail
Ah

INSURANCE
COMPANY

SALES OFFICES: NASSAU, FREEPORT, ABACO & ELEUTHERA CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET, NASSAU P.O. BOX SS 6232


The Tribune

Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

Pm lovin’ it.
TIF |
67F |

| ai? PARTLY |

di SUNNY |



















Volume: 103 No.58 °

CASH ASI TE
TMNT is Mew (a

NTS a OF BUSINESS SECTION

Transformation
hits another snag

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE eagerly anticipated
transformation of Nassau’s air-
port has hit yet another snag
with a delay in handing over
operations to the Canadian
management firm, Vancouver
_ Airport Services (YVRAS), it

has emerged.

: The delay — which was con-
firmed by Transport and Avia-

“tron Minister-Glenys*Hanna~

Martin at the PLP’s branch
meeting Monday night — was
caused when Joseph Reckley,
acting general manager of the
Airport Authority, suffered a
stroke at Christmas time, gov-
ernment’s chief negotiator Sir
Baltron Bethel told The Tri-
bune yesterday.

Sir Baltron said that as a
result of Mr Reckley’s stroke
“some things that should have
been completed, the pieces had
to be picked up.” °

Nevertheless, he said, negoti-

ations are moving steadily
ahead and all agreements per-
taining to the hand-over of air-
port operations are expected to
be completed within the next
30 days,

However, business sources
claim that there is some dis-
gruntlement on the part of
YVRAS -— the subsidiary com-
pany of YVR— which has the
contract for the Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport —

~and ‘that the executives of the

world-renowned Canadian firm
are disappointed at the slow
pace at which the Bahamian
government is moving.

Sir Baltron said he was’

unaware of any such sentiments,
emphasising that steady
progress is being made and that
he is “optimistic by how things
are going.”

Minister Hanna-Martin on
Monday night told radio station
Love97 that some final details

SEE page 11

PM: Tribune is threat to
govt in upcoming election

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter

PRIME Minister Perry Christie has claimed that The Tribune is
one of the main threats to his government in the upcoming gener-

al election.

He urged Supperen at the Fox Hill branch meeting on. Monday
night to pin up Tribune articles on their walls as inspiration for the

upcoming campaign.

Mr Christie accused’ The Tribune of being determined to restore
FNM leader Hubert Ingraham to power, and encouraged their
supporters to be aware of “who’ s trying to take us out”.

SEE page I 11

TNiire ieee!

denies ever
being involved |

on ae |

1 Q

i
@-

ICE BROKERS & AGENTS

| Eeathera | Exum
Wels.) |





WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

Carl Bethel

in human
smuggling

involved in human smuggling.
His statement follows the

facilitated a favour for some-

ficking and alien smuggling.
Speaking in the House of

in March 2002.

“I specifically'and affirma- }
tively deny that I ever, in any ; 0
: divorce hearing in her attempt

capacity, had any suspicion,

information or knowledge of }

any person allegedly involved ;

in the smuggling of human car- ; referred to as Ms Andrews to

go at the time I sought to assist : protect her identity, has decided

; to come forward, as she thinks
; that the laws and judicial

SEE page 11



PRICE — 75¢

of the Phi Beta Sigma Fraterni
FNM candidate for South Bea

involved in the BTYI pilot pr:
yesterday. The trade-based pri
_ Was started at the school in,
‘and aims to give students th

pursuing more practical courses.

(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

| Transport Minister denies |
admitting govt responsible

for Sea Hauler tragedy

: TRANSPORT and Aviation Minister Glenys Hanna-Martin | i
i said she never admitted that government was responsible for the ;

. + Sea Hauler tragedy.
FNM Senator Carl Bethel has | yOhG aid ther de

denied that he was ever : the question of legal liability is one for the attorney general.

She said that despite the findings of the Wreck Commission,

said in a statement issued yesterday.

SEE page 11

hits out at the judicial system

i dent.

A WOMAN who says she

system has left her unable, after
nearly a year, to even attain a

to leave her abusive husband.
The woman, who shall be

stances of battered women.

cal and psychological well-being
of her children.

The abuse started shortly
after her marriage began.

had this young girl pregnant,

SEE page 11



INS executive .
allegedly attacked
_ by Bahamian boxer

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT - A ZNS exec-

i utive was allegedly threatened
: “Any assertion that the minister of transport and aviation admit- | and attacked Sunday by a well-
1 tows the + ted liability on behalf of the Bahamas government is incorrect,” she ; Known Bahamian boxer, who |
claim by Foreign Affairs Minis- :
ter Fred Mitchell that while Mr ;

Bethel was attorney general, he ! Hospital could only produce medical files for two victims - even }

TANG : though 25 persons were treated in the wake of the accident.
one that police files show was :

involved in fraud, human traf- ;

; was arraigned in Freeport
The minister also responded to claims that the Princess Margaret ; Magistrate’s Court on Tuesday
? in connection with the inci-

Cyril Minnis, a former boxer,

was charged with assault in a
:' matter, involving ZNS general
: manager Elvis Hepburn. He

Woman who claims she was battered

Assembly last week, Mr ;
Mitchell asked Mr Bethel to :
explain a letter that he wrote i
to his then colleague, Minister ;
of Foreign Affairs Janet Bost- ;
wick, who, at his request, per- has been battered and tortured
sonally intervened and granted } for more than 20 years has
visas for six Haitian nationals ; decided to speak publicly — as
the inefficiency of the judicial

pleaded not guilty to the

; charge and was granted bail.

According to reports, Mr

Hepburn, who sustained an

i : injury to the eye, was at
process in the Bahamas are not } Wendy’

cae igi a4 y’s Restaurant on Janu-
sensitive to the specific circum ! ary 28 when he was attacked.

: The incident is believed to

Ms Andrews decided to leave : have stemmed from alleged

her marriage based on fears for | repeated political threats

her life and fears for the physi- i regarding Mr Hepburn’s recent

: appointment at ZNS.

“Tt is a sad day when any

i person has to resort to violence
: and intimidating of any citizen.
“When I found out that he }
i politics that we have people in
: society that has not grown-up

: politically,” said Mr Hepburn.

It is a sad day in the Bahamian

Inspired by the sun...

Located behind the Outback Steak House near the PI Bridge
. Open Monday - Friday 10:00am to 4:00pm - Saturday 10:00am - 2:00pm
Telephone 242-394-4711 » www.bahamahandprints.com


PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight





MANAGER — PRIVATE BANKING & WEALTH MANAGEMENT SERVICES

on Mondays



invites qualified applicants for the following position:

MANAGER -
Private Banking & Wealth Management Services

The applicant must have the following minimum qualifications:

PROFILE:

* Bachelors Degree in Finance
¢ STEP Qualification

* 10 years experience in advising clients on fiduciary services and developing

appropriate legal structures
° Superior organization, commu

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

- © Client Relationship Management

° Investment of client funds
* Monthly management reports
* Quarterly reports to clients

* Business development and marketing activities

* Account opening formalities
* Invoicing & booking fees

* Estate Planning

¢ Administration of Trusts

* Production of trust deeds, letter of wishes & testamentary trusts
* Training, management and coaching of staff

Send resume no later than February 7th, 2007 to:

The Human Resource Director

Fidelity «
P.O. Box N-4

= ) FIDELITY
FIDELITY BANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

A MEMBER OF THE FIDELITY GROUP OF COMPANIES

_ €-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com

CAN an event happen, or will















nication, interpersonal and computer skills








51 Frederick Street
853 » Nassau, Bahamas
f: 326.3000

EXCITING AND CHALLENGING OPPORTUNITY FOR
YOUNG BAHAMIANS

A Maritime career could take yc

there.

on to the world’s most fascinating ports and far flung destinations,

Do you have, or are likely to-have, 5 BGCSE passes, including Math, Physics/Combined Science and



English Language at grade ‘C’ or above?
Have you obtained, or do you expect to achieve, a combined SAT score of at least 1500?

Are you physically fit?

Are you between the ages of 16 and 20 years?

if you have answered YES to the questions above then read on.

The Bahamas Maritime Authority and the Bahamas Shipowners Association are once again offering
attractive scholarships to young academically sound Bahamians who are keen to train for an exciting
and challenging career in the Maritime Industry which is gaining increasing national importance.

These generous scholarships are inclusive of tuition, fees, course material, accommodation and
transportation costs, Commencing in September 2007, successful candidates will follow a 4 year
degree programme at the California Maritime Academy, a unique campus of the California State
University. Upon completion of the degree, the qualified officers will be expected to serve on board 3
Bahamian flagged vessel for at least 2 years providing the solid foundation on which to build their
Maritime careers,



Further information and application forms can
be obtained from Mrs Erma Rahming Mackey,
Assistant. Director, Bahamas Maritime
Authority, Gold Cirele Complex, East Bay
Street, P O Box N-4679, mas,
394 3024, fax: 39 Completed
applications must be submitted in person or by
post, with copies of academic
certificates/transcripts and proof of Bahamian
citizenship, no later than 9" February 2007,

















it not occur? This is considered
the chance, the probability or the
possibility. The study of risk finds
its origins in the human attempt
to control these outcomes,
according to Bernstein (2000). It
can be further said that the more
control we have, the safer we feel,
for we have in our minds reduced
the opportunities for loss.

Nevertheless, the numerous
definitions for risk do not make
this task easy at all. However,
prevalent in these definitions is
the desire to determine when,
how and the loss involved in the
undertaking or event.

Risk, as stated by Sir Frederick
Warner FRS (1992), in the Royal
Society Study Group: Risk Analy-
sis, Perception and Management,
is: “The probability that a partic-

. ular adverse event occurs during

a stated period of time, or results
from a particular challenge.”

Carl A. Roper (1999) puts for-
ward the following definition:
“The potential for damage or loss
of an asset.”

From the above definitions, it is
apparent that risk can be associ-
ated with the lack of, or absence
of, security or safety measures,
inclusive of policies. How safe is
the environment? This is sup-
ported by O’Creevy and Soane
(2000), when they state how risk
is considered in all of our activi-
ties from the simple ones, such
as buying a lottery ticket, or
pulling a car into busy traffic.

Hood and Jones go on to
explain risk as being “comprised
perceptions about the loss poten-
tial associated with the interrela-
tionship among humans and
between humans, and their natu-
rals (physical), biological, tech-
nological, behavioural and finan-,
cial environmerts”.

This expansion does two things.
First, it brings in to play the per-
ception of risk. By nature, human
discernment of an event or inci-
dent is based on the culture they
are living in. This was mentioned
earlier, as seen by the way in
which September 11, 2001, was
received around the world. Some
peapl@were happy, some sad.

: ROUSE
BSGV ELE SOR ERIN
WRIA INA

a full‘size SUV.

ly rigid cabin structure
ENC enue Cae Le) ‘
WET UNO LCE
protection.

THE TRIBUNE



Racca to sey

Second, risk, because of the
environment or profession it is
associated with, takes on a spe-
cific meaning to a particular pro-
fessional group. It then becomes
rather difficult to talk about risk
without discussing its perception
and the culture it exists in. This is
supported by Bellaby (1989) in
the article, To risk or not to risk.
An example of this is the
tightrope walker, and his/her per-
ception of risk. The audience at a
circus sees this individual as very
daring and brave; some naysayer,
of course, will see the act as rather
foolish. The walker may even
share some of these conclusions,
but to a lesser degree than those
who are not aware of the hours of
training that goes into performing
the walk. Likewise, it would not
be prudent for. the untrained to
take on the task of the lion tamer
that places his head into the
mouth of a lion. The trainer, of
course, does not perceive the
same risk as the spectators.

Training, conditioning and.edu-
cation create a cultural view of
what risk is. These methods.can
be formal or informal in their
approach, and can be national as
it pertains to a country, ethnic
group or organisation. In fact,
many companies go to great
lengths to create and ingrain a
specific culture to ensure a par-
ticular performance level. The
methods companies use include
Management by Objectives
(MBO), Strategic Business Units
(SBU) and Total Quality Man-
agement (TQM). What does this

- have to do.with risk? Based on

ae



Price includes rustproofing, licensing and inspection to birthday, full tank of fuel,
24,000 miles/24 months warranty and emergency roadside assistance.

QUALIT

#1 AUTO DEALER IN THE BAHAMAS
EAST SHIRLEY STREET 322-3775 ¢ 325-3079

Visit our showroom at Quality Auto Sales (Freeport) Ltd for similar deals, Queens Highway, 325-6122
or Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blvd, 367-2916

Suzuki's all-new SX4 is a cross between a sporty
compact and a light SUV. The go-anywhere design is
perfect for today's lifestyle— efficient daily
transportation an dynamic all-round performance.

This crisp handling, Sport X-Over comes loaded with: alloy
wheels, automatic transmission, air bags, CD player, ABS
brakes with EBD, air conditioning, keyless entry

roof rails, fog lamps and much more

ON-THE-SPOT FINANCING with Commonwealth Bank

auto
Y sales



these concepts, the actions, inter-
actions or reactions of individuals
are determined, and provide an
understanding of what the world
should be like. Thus what is seen
as risk, or risky, can and is deter-
mined by some form of training,
conditioning or education. It then
becomes only sensible to for-
malise this process to achieve

maximum benefit for the con-

cerned parties.

Attempts to formalise these
actions, interactions or reactions
give us a basic concept of what is
called management. Robbins and
DeCenzo (1998) define manage-
ment as being: “The process of
getting things done efficiently and
effectively through and with peo-
ple.” Additionally, management
has been described by Drucker
(1999) as: “The constitutive, the
determining, the differential
organ of society”, and: “The spe-
cific practice that converts amob
into an effective, purposeful and
productive group”. Just as a dis-
cussion of. risk is not possible
without recognition of the per-
ception, it is critical to highlight

that management is an attempt _

to control those perceptions.
NB: Gamal Newry is the pres-
ident of Preventative Measures, a
loss prevention and asset protec-
tion training and consulting com-
pany, specialising in policy and
procedure development, business
security reviews and audits, and
emergency and crisis manage-
ment. Comments can be sent.to
PO Box N-3154 Nassau,
Bahamas or,....” e-mail
gnewry@coralwave.com














PAGE 8E, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007



TRIBUNE SPORTS:



Nadal to represent —
Spain in first round
of Davis Cup,
Federer sits out

@ TENNIS
LONDON
Associated Press





RAFAEL NADAL
was picked Tuesday to
represent Spain at the
Davis Cup against a
Swiss team without top-
ranked Roger Federer.

The second-ranked
Nadal, who lost to Fer-
nando Gonzalez in the
quarterfinals of the Aus-
tralian Open, will team
with David Ferrer, Fer-
nando Verdasco and
Feliciano Lopez against
Switzerland on carpet in
Geneva.

Nadal already knew
he’d miss a chance at
playing Federer, who
won the Australian Open
on Sunday for his 10th
Grand Slam title, ruled
himself out of the match
in November so he could
concentrate on keeping
his No. 1 ranking.

The International Ten-
nis Federation released
the official team rosters
Tuesday.

In the absence of Fed-
erer, Switzerland will be
led by Stanislas Wawrin-
ka, Marco Chiudinelli,
Yves Allegro and.
Stephane Bohli.

Other top players,
including Andy Roddick,
James Blake, Ivan Ljubi-
cic and Tommy Haas,
will also be playing in the
first round on Feb. 9-11.

The other first round
matches are: Chile vs.
Russia; France vs. Roma-
nia; Germany vs. Croat-
ia; Belgium vs. Australia;
Czech Republic vs. Unit-
ed States; Belarus vs.
Sweden; and Austria vs,
Argentina.

The United States,
which has won the Davis
_ Cup a record 31 times,

will face, the Czech.
Republic on clay in
Ostrava.

Roddick and Blake
will be joined by Aus-
tralian Open doubles
champions Bob and
Mike Bryan against
Tomas Berdych, Lukas
Dlouhy, Ivo Minar and
Pavel Vizner.

Defending champion
Russia will be without
third-ranked Nikolay
Davydenko. Instead,
Marat Safin, Dmitry Tur-

_ sunov, Igor Andreev and
Teimuraz Gabashvili will
take on Australian Open
runner-up Gonzalez,
Nicolas Massu, Paul
Capdeville and Adrian
Garcia on clay in La Ser-
ena, Chile.

France will host Roma-
nia on hardcourts in
‘Clermont-Ferrand with
Richard Gasquet,
Sebastien Grosjean,
Arnaud Clement and
Michael Llodra playing
Andrei Pavel, Victor
Hanescu, Victor Crivoi
and Horia Tecau.

Haas will lead Ger-
many, also on hard-.
courts, against Croatia in
Krefeld. Benjamin Beck-
er, Alexander Waske and
Michael Kohlmann will
join Haas in playing Lju-
bicic and teammates
Mario Ancic; Ivo
Karlovic and Marin Cilic.

Lleyton Hewitt will
play for Australia at Bel-
gium on clay in Liege
along with Chris Guc-
‘cione, Paul Hanley and
Peter Luczak.

Olivier Rochus, Kristof
Vliegen, Christophe
Rochus and Dick Nor-
man will represent the -
hosts.

Belarus is hosting Swe-
den on hardcourts in
Minsk with Max Mirnyi,
Vladimir Voltchkov,
Pavel Katliarou and Ser-
guei Tarasevitch facing
Robin Soderling, Jonas
Bjorkman, Thomas
Johansson and Simon
Aspelin.

Argentina, playing
without David Nalbandi-
an, will compete on car-
pet at Linz, Austria, with
Jose Acasuso, Juan del
Potro, Guillermo Canas
and Sebastian Prieto
against Jurgen Melzer,
Stefan Koubek, Oliver
Marach and Julian
Knowle.











ae
o.
5
‘<
C)
=
O
S
—

SIDNEY Collie emerged as
the champion of the Baptist
Sports Council’s seventh
annual Family Fun Run/Walk
Road Race that was held on
Saturday morning.

Collie ran away from the
pack to win the four-mile run
segment of the race that was
named this year in honour of
Minister Clinton Minnis, the
immediate past director of the
Bahamas National Baptist
Missionary and Educational
Convention’s National Youth
Convention,

The first female finisher was
Sherry Francis.

In the two-mile walk race,
Eric Seymour was the first
male finisher to cross the line.

Also at the completion of
the race, the BSC hosted a
Health Fair where members
of the Ministry of Health and
Doctor’s Hospital provided
free screening tests for all par-
ticipants.

Minister Minnis said he’s
seen the growth and develop-
ment of the road race from its
inception in 2001 when he
placed third to the point
where it is right now.

“This is all about having a
good time and I’m pleased
that this race is being held in

my honour,” said Minnis, who.

commended the BSC for the
gesture, even though his term
in office expired in Septem-
ber.

“It’s been a wonderful time
and I will continue to be a part
of this experience.”

For Collie, who competed
in the under-30 division, it was
only a matter of time until he
won his first title

“J just want to thank God.

‘The race was good, but I was

looking for some more com-
petition,” he noted. “I hope
that next year Jason
(Williams) and Mackey
(Williams) will be back so I
can give them a run for their
money.”

Injuries

Collie further noted that
he’s hoping that this will be a
breakthrough year for him as
he tries to get over the injuries
that have plagued him in the
past.

He thanked his coach, Ash-
land Murray, for sticking it out
with him during his ordeal.

Sherry Francis, competing
in her first race in two years,
said she was surprised that she
still had enough energy to win
the female segment of the
race.

She was also even surprised
that she emerged as the oldest
female finisher in the run.

There was also a Pas-
tor’s/Minister’s segment in the
race, which was won by Rev.
Livingstone Bevans, who was
quite pleased with his perfor-
mance,

“It was short, but it was well
put together,” he insisted.
“Bless God.” “

Rev. Bevans stated that he
will be back next time to
defend his title.

“It was good, but I just had
one challenge and that is to
deal with Rev. Bevans next
year,” Rev. Nottage charged.
“It was good. But I will get
him back next year.”

Among some of the other
divisional winners were:

Male runners - Seharon
Saunders, Leonardo Bain,
Ashland Murray Jr; Valentino
Rolle, Ashland Murray Sr,
Ricardo Rolle, Stephen Mur-
ray and Raymond Rudon.

Female runners - Lashan
Burrows, Mishea Burrows,
Isher Johnson, Jonique Webb
and Racquel Fowler.

Male Walkers - Steven Rus-
sell, John Webb, Hosea Wal-
lace, Basil Miller, Nikeno

Demeritte, Wilton Brown,'

Clinton Minnis, Kedor
Knowles, Rev. Harrison
Thompson and Colin ‘Trophy’
Knowles.

Female Walkers - Joannie
Webb, Brittany Stubbs, Ariel
Webb, Latyra Ferguson, Shan-
dria Saunders, Tia Hinsey,
Laurette Hinsey, Jacqueline
Sands, Joy Moss, Cyprianna
Saunders, Janet Cooper, Lav-
erne Nixon, Joann Webb, Ari-
anna Hinsey and Berdie
Stubbs.







@ SIDNEY COLLIE (centre) collects his awards for winning the Baptist Sports Council’s 2007 Family Fun Run/Walk Race on

Saturday from Minister Clinton Minnis (left) and Stephen Murray (right).



@ REV. Livingstone Bevans (centre) is presented with his trophy by Minister Clinton Minnis (left) and Stephen Murray (right) at the

Baptist Sports Council’s 2007 Family Fun Run/Walk Race on Saturday.

Elaine Sargent, one of the
three nurses from the Ministry
of Public Health’s Healthy
Lifestyles, said they were
pleased with the response they
got from the participants as
they did a complete body
check-up.

“We just wanted to see what
their weight and height was
supposed to be for your body
height,” said Sargent, who was
assisted by Nurse Ruth Coak-
ley and Nurse Pamela Carey.

The BSC thanked the Min-
istry of Public Health as well
as Doctor’s Hospital and the
Bahamas Association of Cer-
tified Officials (BACO and
Thompson Trading through
Gatorade for their assistance
once again in officiating and
providing the drinks for the
participants.

@ TIA HINSEY receives her
award from Minister Clinton
Minnis during the Baptist
Sports Council’s Family
FDun Run/Walk Race that
was held on Saturday.




PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2007





Bahamas
National Trust
executives call
on Governor
General

EXECUTIVES of Bahamas
National Trust (BNT) called on
Governor General Arthur D
Hanna on January 23 at Gov-
ernment House. Pictured from
left are Hank Ferguson, BNT
financial specialist; Eric Carey,
BNT executive director; the
governor general; Lynn Gape,
BNT deputy director.

(BIS Photo
Raymond A Bethel)

Embassy sponsors |_

Narcotics Detection

and Tracking training |

for RBDF Officer

_ THE United States Embassy
continues to assist Bahamian
law enforcement agencies with
training and funding in the
fight against illegal drug traf-
ficking.

The Embassy’s Narcotics
Affairs Section (NAS) recent-
ly provided a member of the

Royal Bahamas Police Force .

with a new drug-sniffing dog
and the opportunity to partici-

‘pate in a narcotics detection

and tracking training course in
the United States.

RBPF Constable Garth
McIntosh travelled to Mechan-
icsburg, PA and received four
weeks of training with the
RBPFs new drug-sniffing dog
Vori.

Vori is an eight-month-old,
65 pound male Belgian Mali-
nois that was donated to the
RBPF by the embassy at a cost
of $7,500.

The embassy provided
another $3,000 for Constable



@ PICTURED from left to right are Taisha LI

McIntosh’s training pro-
gramme. Both dog and con-
stable are presently stationed
at the Grand Bahama Interna-
tional Airport.

During a recent visit to
Grand Bahama, US Ambas-
sador John Rood met with
Constable McIntosh, com-
mended him for his dedication,
and encouraged him to contin-
ue to utilise the recent train-
ing to keep drugs off the
streets,

“The training provided to
Constable McIntosh and his
drug-sniffing companion
reflects the continuing close-
ness of the ongoing partner-
ship between the Bahamas and
the United States to combat
illegal narcotics trafficking,”
said the embassy in a state-
ment. :

@ Photo shows from left:
Ambassador Rood, Consta-
ble Garth McIntosh and Vori.





Wa)
oyd, Tamr

4]





‘a

Jones, and Christie Cash. Seated is Mrs Russell, the school

principal.

Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc donates
to Claridge Primary School

SCHOLARSHIP, service, sisterly love and finer woman-
hood — these are the principles on which service organisation
Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc was founded 87 years ago by five
strong, independent and distinguished black women.

On Wednesday, January 24, Christie Cash (president), and
Taisha Lloyd (public relations officer) of the sorority’s Theta :
Epsilon Zeta Chapter donated a Spanish poster board to the
Claridge Primary School Spanish class.

The donation was accepted by the school’s principal Mrs
Russell along with Spanish teacher Mrs Tamra Jones.

Both Mrs Russell and Mrs Jones expressed their gratitude for
‘the donation and stated how the poster board would help in
-teaching the students how to read and speak Spanish.

After the presentation, Mrs Russell gave Cash and Lloyd a
tour of the school grounds, highlighting developing areas such
as the school’s flower garden and agricultural farm — which
the students plant and maintain themselves.

The agricultural farm is used to encourage the students’ inter-

est in agriculture.

Both Cash and Lloyd said they were impressed with the
school’s proactive approach in broadening the horizons of its stu-

dents.






For Your Heart's
__ Sake, Choose |

OSson Canola Oil.

Trans fatty acids are a form of saturated fat that raises

cholesterol and increases the risk of heart disease,
Wesson vegetable oils are naturally low in saturated fat
_and contain zero grams of trans fatty acids per serving.

Do your valentine a favour

by cooking with heart-healthy |
Wesson canola oil.

Â¥ Doctor recommended

V Zerocholestero!

Â¥ Contains healthy omega-3 fats

Â¥ Helps to maintain low cholesterol levels



Wesson is a registered! brand of ComAgra Foods.

THE TRIBUNE.