Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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Full Text
PAGE 2, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007

‘Ingraham claims go

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIXjNE

administration’s accomplishments in Exuma

m@ By RUPERT
MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter



THE government has
spent much of its time in
office taking credit for the
former government’s accom-
plishments in Exuma, FNM
leader Hubert Ingraham said
during what he described as
the third in a series of mini-
rallies.

Mr Ingraham, taking the
opportunity to officially open



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FNM leader speaks at the
opening of new party —
headquarters in Hoopert’s Bay



the FNM headquarters in
Exuma, accused the govern-
ment of spending a good deal
of their term in office claim-
ing as their own the results of
the “labour and the success-
es of others.”



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‘THE MORGAN STATE

“They take credit, never
blame. Anything that is
good they claim. Anything
that goes wrong — they say
that’s our fault. You know
the radar has sat at the Lyn-
den Pindling International
Airport in Nassau for five
years under their govern-
ment. It’s not working now —
so they say that’s our fault,”
Mr Ingraham said.

The opposition leader said
the government has, from
the start, taken credit for
what they met when they
arrived in office.

Election

“Shortly after their elec-
tion to office they rushed to
Grand Bahama to open the
Royal Oasis. It was to their
credit then, mind you — now
they say it’s our fault. And
they opened the new North-
ern Police Headquarters in
Grand Bahama, too — built
on our watch.

“Then they ran down here
to open the Four Seasons
Hotel at Emerald Bay and
the golf course, and then
Grand Isles and then the
shopping centre — all initiat-
ed on our watch. In Nassau
they opened the art gallery,
the Doris Johnson High
School, and the new remand
centre at Her Majesty’s



@ FNM leader Hubert Ingraham speaks in Exuma

Prison at Fox Hill — all start-
ed on our watch,” Mr Ingra-
ham said.

A case in point, the oppo-
sition leader said, was when
a group of ministers came to
Exuma to celebrate the com-
pletion of.a water project.

“The record shows that
Exuma was an integral part
of the FNM’s planned
upgrade of infrastructure in
the Family Islands. That’s
why, as early as 1994, in con-
junction with the FNM gov-
ernment’s roadwork pro-
gramme in Exuma, some 20
miles of new water mains
were laid connecting Rolle
Town in the east to Farmer’s

OMMONWEALTH OF

OF CULTURE AND

__ DR. ERIC CONWAY,

Hill in the west,” Mr Ingra-
ham said.

The FNM leader said that
when construction of the golf
course at Emerald Bay com-
promised some of the area’s
well-fields, the FNM gov-
ernment required the devel-
opers to instal a reverse
osmosis system and a water-
holding tank in compensa-
tion to supply the water
needs of west Exuma.

“This was completed
before we left office in 2002.
All that was left to do was
for additional transmission
mains to be installed to bring
the improved water to
Steventon, Farmers’ Hill,

AN

’ Harts, Curtis, Stuart Manor,

Rolleville and Barreterre.
Well, it took this government
nearly its entire term in
office to get that work
done,” Mr Ingraham said.
Among other things, he
said that the government has

vt taking credit for former

left Exuma roads in “despi- 5

cable condition” and failed
to replace the galvanised
water mains.,

Project

“They ignore the fact that
the: project was already
underway when they came
to office in 2002, that here
in the Exuma Cays R/O
plants had already been
installed at Farmer’s Cay and
Black Point, for example,”
Mr Ingraham said.

The FNM, said Mr Ingra-
ham, has a history of concern

‘for the development of the

Family islands.

“You know when we came
to office in 1992 we found
few things to open — we did
find unpaved roads on every
island from Inagua in the
south to Abaco and Grand
Bahama in the north. We
reconstructed, repaired and
re-paved them.

“We met many communi-
ties throughout our Family
Islands without access to a
central supply of electricity.
We electrified all of them.
We met pit latrines in gov-
ernment-operated schools in

_ the central and southern

Bahamas — we removed
them and installed indoor
plumbing,” Mr Ingraham
said.

ING OF MUSIC _

apnea

‘THE DUNDAS CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS |

SATURDAY,

i

FEBRUARY 3RD, 2007
$:30 P.M.

(COCKTAIL RECECPTION IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING THE PER FORMANCE)

ii

For more information contact Ms Regina Hamilton The Cultural Uh
ffairs Division of the Office of The Prime Minister 326-0152/326-0149 | \

a d





ie

THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007, PAGE 3



FIM claims
the PLP has
mismanagetl
the economy

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE PLP has mismanaged the
economy, pursued a disastrous
model of development and missed
critical opportunities to increase
Bahamian ownership of the
tourism industry, the Opposition
claimed yesterday.

The FNM claims that in the
last five years the government has
pursued an unsustainable goal of
"hyper-growth", which has seen
huge tracts of land "give(n) away"
with little consultation to foreign-
ers for developments which could
have "many negative and irre-
versible cultural and demograph-
ic effects."

This Anchor Project scheme -
which threatens to place local
Bahamian culture "in danger of
being lost forever" - was never
mentioned in their manifesto,
unlike promises to increase the
level of consultation, said the com-
mentary.

"The government which
promised extensive consultation
never mentioned this core eco-
nomic principle in its contract with
the Bahamian people. They
seemed to have pulled it out of a
hat after they were elected," said
the party.

In approving these projects the
PLP has a failed to take into
account "the cultural, social and
micro-economic situations in our
unique islands."

"The PLP has closed its ears
to the extraordinary movement of
ordinary citizens, academics, envi-
ronmentalists, civic activists, econ-
omists, cultural leaders, business
people, union leaders, religious
leaders, columnists and journal-
ists who have issued urgent warn-
ings about the proposed mega-
anchor project rush into our Fam-
ily Islands," said the party.

There are fears that the 10,000-
acre residential development for
Mayaguana will "shatter the cul-
tural, demographic, environmental
and social landscape of that
island," it said, adding: "The PLP
anchor is threatening to drown
Mayaguana."

Meanwhile, while pushing for-

‘ward with the Anchor Project

model,.said the commentary, the
PLP have "generally ignored the
great contributions to our econo-
my which may be made by other
industries such as farming, fish-
ing, light manufacturing, logistics,
education and other service activ-
ities."

Thus, one of the most impor-
tant questions to be decided in this
2007 election, say the party, is:
“What kind of economic model
should we use to ensure planned,
sustainable development which
will attract needed and appropri-
ate foreign investment, dramati-
cally increase Bahamian owner-
ship of the economy while pro-
tecting our culture and preserving
our environment for generations
to come?”

If voted into power, the FNM
will "through sustained dialogue
with the Bahamian people...pro-
pose balanced and thoughtful
responses to this key question,"
claimed the commentary.

In the meantime, local envi-
ronmentalists are "outraged and
stunned by the massive and
unprecedented assault on land and
marine resources" that the anchor
projects have ushered in.

On this note, the government's
decision to give the go-ahead for
golf courses in a number of out
island gated communities and
resorts was criticised in particu-
lar.

"Does every gated community
require a golf course? Were golf
courses essential for development
at Buck Cay in the Exuma Cays or
at Baker’s Bay on Great Guana
Cay? We think not.

"The FNM government
refused to approve an 18-hole golf
course for the Bimini Bay devel-
opment which this PLP govern-
ment has now seen fit to approve.
We are not satisfied that this mul-
tiplicity of golf courses is environ-
mentally sustainable," it said.

The FNM claim that for each
proposed development they would
carry out not only environmental
impact studies but also social
impact studies in consultation with
local governments and residents.

The party will aim to "help
people in the various islands to
participate in the development of
their own communities by way of
training, technical assistance and
access to financing. And we will
most certainly not give away
Bahamian land to foreigners for
real estate development with
insignificant, benefit to Bahami-
ans," it said.

-FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

Be rr a Cele
ay





j PRINEVAL

-Turnquest: there are rumours that govt may

attempt to gerrymander election boundaries

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

THERE are “rumours” that
the government may attempt to
gerrymander the election bound-
aries in an attempt to win the
next election, former FNM
leader Tommy Turnquest said at

the opening of the party’s head-

quarters in Exuma.

He, along with party leader
Hubert Ingraham, gave their sup-
port for the FNM’s candidate for
Exuma, former Bahamian
ambassador to the US Joshua
Sears.

“People are talking about the
work that the boundaries com-
mission is doing and possible
changes that they will make to
the various constituency bound-
aries. The rumour mill is filled
with people talking this and that
and trying to make mischief. I
hear the stories, but whatever
they do they must remember
they can change lines but not
minds. Houses do not move, and
people will continue to reside in
their homes.

“We ought not be concerned
about the PLP trying to gerry-
mander. The people will take
care of that. The people’s minds
are made up and they are voting
FNM. They can talk all they like
and promise all they want, but
the record of this ‘new’ PLP is



i FORMER FNM leader
Tommy Turnquest

Deputy FNM leader Brent
Symonette also echoed fears that
government gerrymandering may
split Exuma into two parliamen-
try seats — one for the cays and
one for the mainland.

“The numbers don’t warrant
it, there are some 1,800 people
currently on the register for the

Dr Coakley to he sworn in as senator

DR DOSWELL COAKLEY, former president of the Grand
Bahama Chamber of Commerce, will be sworn in today as a sena-

tor

He will fill the gap left by former senator Damien Gomez, who
is due to be sworn in as a Supreme Court judge, after he resigned in

September of last year.

Dr Coakley resigned as president of the Grand Bahama Cham-
ber of Commerce on October 26 last year to pursue. his political
career, alter being twice elected to the seat - first in 2004 and again

in 2005.

At that time it was said that he wanted "to focus his total ener-
gies" on the High Rock constituency, and "on finding creative ways
to help empower its residents and drive the economy of East Grand

Bahama"

During his time as president of the chamber, he was credited with
doubling its membership to over 250 businesses and organisations.
Speaking as he was set to take over from Dr Coakley in October,
Daniel Lowe, the current president of Grand Bahama Chamber of
Commerce, praised Dr Coakley as a man "that makes good on his

promises and gets things done.

”

Questioned as to why the decision had been taken to swear in
another senator at this time, Mr Vincent Peet said that it was the
prime minister's. decision, and he was not ina position to comimient
any further on Mr Christie's motivation.

"The Mall-at-Marathon
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Exuma constituency and it does-
n’t look like that figure will grow
much more. So, it would be a
long stretch of the imagination
for people here tonight to expect
Exuma to go back to two con-
stituencies.”

Mr Symonette also asserted
that the government’s resched-
uling of a meeting of the bound-
aries commission from last Fri-
day to today suggests that the
government is concerned about
trends in Exuma.

“J would imagine that the gov-
ernment not being ready is
because the numbers are not to
where they want them to be, so
they can put their cut as to how
they want to.”

Mr Turnquest also focused on
government land policy. For the
last five years the government
had been giving away land to any
foreigner who asked, ignoring
important decisions on issues that
impact the lives of Bahamians,
he said.

Mr Turnquest also criticised
what he described as the gov-
ernment’s penchant for forming
commissions whose recommen-
dations they “usually ignore”,
hiding behind public servants
without taking responsibility,
neglecting vital services, getting
embroiled in one scandal alier
another, and letting things hap-
pen then telling the people they
will investigate when there is a
public outcry.

“When we return to office we
will continue to work hard for
you-and we will fix the PLP
neglect,” Mr Turnquest said.

The Bahamian people, he said,
had had five years under the PLP
and were worse off for it.

“Five years of promises and
fan-fare on the economy but
many Bahamians are still not
feeling the so-called economic

boom. All they do is promise
jobs here, jobs there and jobs
everywhere, but many young
Bahamians are looking for work
and are still unemployed,” said
the former FNM leader.

The time had come, he said,
for Bahamians to have a greater
stake in their economy. The
country, said Mr Turnquest,
needed a government that did
more than create more jobs, but
would create a Bahamas of
Bahamian ownership.

ee

SELECTED

EYEWEAR



ay Street. Tel (242) 322-8537 Fax (42) 326-8135,

“Five years under the PLP and
still there is no health centre for
the island of Exuma. An island
that caters to thousands of
tourists each year, and is home to
thousands of Bahamians, has
no proper health facilities in

lace. 5

“] ask Exuma to hand this PLP
government the pink slip and tell
them it’s nothing personal, but
you have to do what’s best for
you and your country,” Mr Turn-
quest said.



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PAGE 4, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama



New US immigration laws needed

FROM SLAVES to immigrants, figuring out
who belongs in America and with what status
has, throughout American history, taken hard
work and even war.

’ But today a new consensus is forming.

“Extending hope and opportunity in our
country requires an immigration system worthy
of America, with laws that are fair and borders
that are secure,” President Bush said in his
State of the Union address last Tuesday, offer-
ing a vision for meaningful reform.

Bush’s words follow a year of inspiring
progress. Congress has been grappling with the
issue, finding some bipartisan agreement in a bill
sponsored by Senators Edward M. Kennedy
and John McCain. Immigrants themselves have
led nationwide rallies and voter registration
drives, bringing new energy and ideas to the
public debate.

Earlier this month, Ali Noorani, head of the
Massachusetts Immigrant and Refugee Advo-
cacy Coalition, joined advocates across the
country by sending a letter to House Speaker
Nancy Pelosi and Senate majority leader Harry
Reid calling on the 110th Congress to pass com-
prehensive laws that can fix the nation’s broken
immigration system.

That letter calls for a path that lets undocu-
mented immigrants earn legal status, an
enhanced worker visa programme, more English

classes and job training, halting the “militariza-
tion on the border,” and better enforcement of
labour laws to protect immigrants from work-
place abuse.

It’s a wish list, more than Congress is likely to
deliver, but the principle is sound: Immigration
reform has to occur on many fronts.

Enforcement alone is not enough. Since 1990,
the US Border Patrol budget has increased
from $263 million to $1.6 billion, Kennedy says,
and in that time an estimated 9 million undoc-
umented immigrants still entered the country.
Just kicking them out can hurt companies. In
December, immigration officials arrested near-
ly 1,300 employees of the Swift & Co. meat
packing plants in six states, delaying produc-
tion and creating millions of dollars in losses.
And there aren’t enough resources to deport the
estimated 12 million people who are already
here illegally.

The country needs to fine them for breaking
the law and move them toward earning legal sta-
tus.

There’s strong interest in practical approach-

es.
Illegal immigration sparks understandable
anger. The evening news shows border-crossers
breaking American laws with every step. But
Congress has to move past emotion and craft
laws that usher in true reform.

Fear of civil war in Lebanon

FOLLOWING a general strike called Tues-
day by the Lebanese Shi’ite movement Hezbol-
lah, there were lethal clashes in Beirut and oth-
er Lebanese cities this week. Cars were set on
fire, and burning tyres were strewn across road-
ways. For Lebanese who recall the 1975-1990
civil war, these were the foreshadowing sights
and smells of another civil war.

Now as then, other countries are stoking the
fires of Lebanon’s internecine conflict, among
them Syria, Iran, Israel, France, and the United
States.

If another calamitous civil war is to be pre-
vented, the peacemaking will have to take place
in foreign capitals.

The most obvious outside effort to help sta-
bilize Lebanon’s tottering state was a striking-
ly successful donors’ conference this week in
Paris, where more than $7 billion in grants and
lenient loans was pledged by the Saudis, French,
and Americans — backers‘of the current
Lebanese government — and by international
financial institutions. -

This was an overt attempt to help preserve
the embattled anti-Syrian government of Prime
Minister Fuad Siniora against the pro-Syrian
forces of Hezbollah and its domestic allies.

But it was not a diplomatic intervention
aimed at forging the kind of political compro-
mise needed to avert the outbreak of civil war.

That would require an agreement between
the governing March 14 movement that ended

Syria’s occupation of Lebanon and Hezbollah
‘forces.

The Saudi government, acting on its own
interest in regional stability, has been wisely
seeking to promote the many-sided under-
standings that might enable Lebanon to escape
a new civil war.

Top Saudi and Iranian officials thrashed out
a bargain earlier this month on formation of a
unity government in Lebanon that would
include Hezbollah and its allies but would also
guarantee Lebanese approval for the UN Tri-
bunal on the Hariri assassination. Lebanese
political figures and Arab papers say that the
Syrian regime of Bashar Assad refused to coun-
tenance support for the UN Tribunal;
Lebanon’s street violence erupted almost imme-
diately after the Syrian refusal.

Fearful of Iraq’s Sunni-Shi’ite violence
spreading to Lebanon and of several simulta-
neous conflicts erupting around them, the Saud-
is are right to pursue diplomatic cooperation to
prevent another civil war in Lebanon. Iran,
Israel, and the United States have all had a
hand in weakening the foundation of the
Lebanese state; they should all be enlisted to
remove Syria’s heavy hand from Lebanon and
to settle Lebanese political differences peace-
fully, within the rules of the democratic game.

(° These articles are from

I
THE TRIBUNE



Work permits:
how to fix
the problem

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THE system is.in need of a
major overhaul. This made
clear by the attached:

Bahamians now on T G
Glover School.

However, William Nottage,
Assistant Director of Immi-
gration also said last Thurs-
day that the work permits for
the Chinese were granted by
his office on January 12, 2007.

“We issue permits based on
the knowledge of a need, now
whether there are qualified
Bahamians to work the jobs
or not, is a matter that must be
taken up with the Department
of Labour,” he stated.

This highlights some of the
root causes with the work per-
mit system:

e Companies put the
request to the Immigration
Department, not to the
Labour Department. This
allows them to circumvent the
labour requirements.

¢ Immigration approves
without checking with Labour,
lines of communications not
used.

¢ Companies allow the
Work Permit to expire. They
rush to put it back in place.
No checks done as to why no

- one has been trained.

¢ Companies also have per-
sons who work on travel visas
while they put in for the Work
Permits. No Immigration or

Labour checks done on com-

panies.

As a young country, we
have a need for some of their
service. If.done properly, it
would benefit all, not just the
few. That’s why we have a

~ Work Permit system. It is to

allow a company to bring in
the required help. This is to
be with the following condi-
tion: a Bahamian is to be
trained for the position.

To solve the current prob-
lem and prevent the “pass the
buck” approach, the blame
game. I give the follow:

1) The Labour Department
Notice of Vacancy Form is to
be revised. This would be giv-
en to the Labour Department
after they have advertised the
requirement in all of the daily
papers and check the Labour
Data Skills Bank. Having got
no reply, the Form would then
be Labour Department. The
Labour Department approves
the Form and forwards it to




Dae M eS

letters@tribunemedia.net



The Form gives who is being
hired on the Work Permit and
who is to be.-trained.

2) Bahamas Work Permit:
Foreigners wanting to work
or trade in the islands must
obtain a work permit from the
Immigration Department. In
the case of an employee, the
employer makes the applica-
tion and must show that there
is no suitable Bahamian can-
didate for the position. This
includes advertising in news-
papers and checking the
Labour Department Data
Skills Bank. Employers are
also expected to have training
programme(s) for Bahamians
in the skills they are likely to
need. Work permits are usu-
ally issued for one year, no
automatic renewals. There will
be a maximum length of three
renewals for Work Permits.
No renewals after that.

3) Companies to put the
renewal for in two months pri-
or to the expiration date. This
will allow for the person to be
repatriated in a timely fash-
ion. If the permit is not
renewed, the employee is enti-
tled to severance and one
month’s pay in lieu of notice.
Two months would allow a
month for a response from the
Immigration Department. If
the renewal is not in during

the prior two months, not
renewal.
4) Immigration and Labour
officials to do checks on the
work force. This would allow
for employees and the com-
pany to give updates on the
status. Company’s outlook
and how the training pro-
gramme is progressing. This
would also help to prevent
companies from having work-
ers, work on a Tourist Visa.
5) Government to increase
training programmes to help
to meet the needs of the com-
panics. , ;
We need to stop procrasti-
nating now on this matter and
deal with it. We want the
training and the benefits that
the companies give the for-
eign persons on the Work Per-
mit. \
Too many of us live with the
injustice from the current
Work Permit System. Want to
know how bad it gets, talk to
workers who are employed in
the Vessel Repair and Indus-
trial companies. We no longer
want to be told by the Labour
Department when a complaint
is put in, the following: You
have a job, be thankful.
Deal with this matter as this
is a boiling item and a very
bitter point to many.

SIGMUND WILLIS
Freeport,

Bahamas,

January 24, 2007.

An area of govt that
has been neglected

EDITOR, The Tribune.

PLEASE permit me space in your valued paper to comment
on an area of the government that I feel has been neglected in
the past by both the PLP and FNM and now once again by the
PLP. I speak of the naming and gazetting of Government

Boards.

These Boards by legislation are only in existence until Decem-

ber 31st of each year.

There were times in the past under the PLP when the Board
government the Town Planning area that controls the granting
of building permits was not appointed, in one instance, until late

June of that year.

All plans were held up for months waiting for the appoint-
ments, and when the Board was actually appointed the names
of members were not gazetted at all.



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Today the various board appointments are never gazetted, at
least not in the news media.

Why is this so? Are we as blacks so incompetent that a sim-
ple matter such as board appointments must be begged for by
the public or kept such a secret that no one knows who is on
what board or could it be that the various parties are ashamed
to show the public the level of cronyism that exists and therefore
show that persons they put on these various boards do not
have a clue of expertise that is expected once appointed to
these board. Why do we treat Bahamians as such fools and
why do we accept so little. ;

~RBRAYNEN
Nassau,
January 22, 2007.

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Sears: Exuma
malaria scare
came about
through
negligence

THE malaria scare that rocked
Exuma last year came about
through negligence, according to
the FNM’s candidate Joshua
Sears.

“Simply put, an incompetent
government could not ensure that

+ fogging was carried out regularly
and systematically, as was the
_.case on our watch,” he said.
Mr Sears said mosquitoes con-
‘tinue to be a nuisance throughout
the settlements on the island, to
-sresidents and visitors alike.
“| “An FNM government will
yensure that an adequate and
properly monitored mosquito
abatement programme is
+ resumed so as to protect the
‘health and welfare of our people
‘and our economy,” he said.

‘

ey em al eer
Cor in court’



















A NASSAU couple who
have been battling for justice
against the Baptist education-
| al authority for five years will
get their “day in court” in
March.

This is in spite of the with-
drawal of Mr Sidney Collie,
attorney for the Baptists.

Greg and Tanya Cash said
‘| they are confident the hear-

ing will now go ahead.
| They are alleging unfair dis-
missal and seeking damages
for hardship against the Bap-
tists following the firing of Mr
Cash as coach at Jordan
Prince William High School
in 2002.

Mr and Mrs Cash have
claimed repeatedly that their
bid for justice had been
blocked.



Benc
Umbrellas

Loungers
_Drinks Trolleys




for disaster, says Ingraham

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

THE FNM does not want eco-
nomic growth and development
that provides jobs for thousands
of foreigners while Bahamians
remain unemployed, under-
employed and unemployable,
FNM leader Hubert Ingraham
told those gathered at a mini-ral-
ly in Exuma.

This economic model, the for-
mer prime minister said, is a
recipe for disaster.

Mr Ingraham said that the
FNM has a history of being “the
party of development”.

“Before we came to office very
little new development was taking
place. In fact, the country was
almost at rock bottom. Thousands
of Bahamians in the hotel indus-
try were working a few days a
week and many others had no
work at all,” he said.

However, no government in
the world — especially the gov-
ernment of a small country such
as the Bahamas — could afford to
lose sight of the reason for devel-

opment in the first place, he

added.

“Economic development must
be first and foremost for the good
of the Bahamian people. It must
be about providing business
opportunities for Bahamians. We
need foreign investment and we
will no doubt need it for many
years to come. But we must plan,
and work towards, and take every
advantage of opportunities to
increase Bahamian ownership in
the Bahamian economy,” he said.

Likewise, the Bahamas may
always need a certain amount of
skills that we cannot fully supply.

Nevertheless, the country’s
objective, he said, must always be
maximum employment for
Bahamians in the Bahamas.

“We do not need, nor do we
want, economic growth and
development that provides jobs
for thousands of foreigners while
Bahamians remain unemployed,
under-employed and unemploy-

able. That economic model is a
recipe for disaster,” he said.

Mr Ingraham said it was bad
enough that the Bahamas contin-
ued to import artisans and skilled
labour from around our region,
but the government sought to jus-
tify bringing in Chinese labour to
work on uncomplicated con-
struction projects.

“While I’m on this topic, let
me say that we are watching them
carefully and we will not hesitate
to defend the rights of Bahamians
in our own country. And when it
comes to this, it does not matter
to us whether those Bahamians
are FNM, PLP or of whatever
political persuasion — as long as
they are Bahamian they come
first,” Mr Ingraham said.

The next FNM government, he
said, would resume programmes
for the education and develop-
ment of Bahamians so they could
grow along with the country, so
they could take full advantage of
business and job opportunities.

“We will reach out to those
who the PLP no longer count
because they have given up on
finding gainful employment. We
will provide opportunities for
them to be trained and retrained
so they can become productive
and happy citizens,” he said.

Mr Ingraham said the current
government never understood the
FNM’s education policy.

He said they never understood
that the expansion of the school
plant, the upgrade of tuition
materials, the increase in the
number of specialist teachers, was
all part of a design to improve
educational achievement by
Bahamian children, to equip them
for the challenges of a changing
world.

“They do not understand that
children who receive instruction
in clean, safe facilities, with mod-
ern and up-to-date tuition mate-
rials, in classes with low student to
teacher ratios, that those children
are more likely to learn and to
achieve and to succeed. That’s
why they could abandon our edu-

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@ FREE National Movement leader Hubert Ingraham

cation expansion plans — and then
they lament that academic
achievement is not what it ought
to be,” the opposition leader said.

The former prime minister said
that decades of neglect and mis-
management in the education sys-
tem could not be fixed overnight.

“It takes a process, a process
that we commenced and a process
which they stalled. They did not
understand why we initiated the
decentralisation of our education
system, why we placed more
authority in the Department of
Education; why we established
school boards; why we delegated
responsibility for aspects of school
maintenance to Family Island
local government.

“We did all that because we
knew that this would make our
education system more respon-
sive to the needs of our commu-
nities. And so, they set about to
reverse decentralisation in edu-
cation,” Mr Ingraham said.

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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007, PAGE 5
Weyer. VM sa



























Dee eet es
MONDAY,
JANUARY 29TH

6:30am Bahamas @ Sunrise - Live

11:00. Immediate Response

12:00 ZNS News Update (Live)

12:05 Immediate Response

1:00 Caribbean Passport

1:30. Ethnic Health America

2:00 Thousand Dollar Bee

2:30 Aqua Kids

3:00 — David Pitts

3:30 Bishop Neil Ellis

4:00 _ Little Robots

4:30 Carmen San Diego

5:00 ZNS News Update

5:05 The Fun Farm

6:00 Gospel Grooves

6:25 Life Line

6:30 News Night 13 - Freeport

7:00 Bahamas Tonight

8:00 You & Your Money

8:30 Be Your Own Boss

8:35 Urban Renewal Building Lives
Building Communities

9:00 Legends ’

9:30 Island Life Destinations

10:00 Caribbean Newsline

10:30 News Night 13

11:00 Bahamas Tonight

11:30 Immediate Response

1:30am Community Page 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the —
right to make last minute ~
programme changes!







qe Fr


















PAGE 6, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



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Challenges and opportunities

The Tribune :

SPECIAL



REPORT

@ By BRENT DEAN
and PACO NUNEZ

GEORGE TOWN, Exuma
— Over the last four years, bil-
lions of dollars of major
investment projects have
been announced for islands
all over the Bahamas. To
many, these projects appear
to be unquestionable evi-
dence of a Bahamas on the
verge of a ‘golden era’.

However, modern Exuma
reveals that creation of large-
scale investments on small,
unprepared islands can cre-
ate as many challenges as
opportunities.

Downtown George Town
does not look like the capi-

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@ THE FNM motorcade moyes through
the still largely undeveloped landscape of

Great Exuma before Friday’s rally.





tal of ‘boomtown’. The parks
in the island capital seem
unkept and the canal that
runs through the city centre —
once clear and bristling with
colourful fish — is now a
clogged, fetid gutter.

As you drive down the dark
Exuma roads towards the
Four Seasons Resort, you
quickly notice that the island
has nowhere near an ade-
quate number of street lights.
In some areas, a single lamp
is the only sign of civilisation
for miles.

The public library in
George Town is open for
only two hours a day and the
primary and high school are
not keeping pace with the
growth of the population.

As FNM candidate for
Exuma, Joshua Sears noted
in his remarks on Friday
night:

“George Town is more
than 210 years old. It is the
island’s capital — the capital
of the fourth employment

centre in the Bahamas. It.

should look like an island
capital.
“The dock and its environs

are a disgrace. The public
bathrooms are inadequate.
Regatta Park is in a state of
disrepair.”

While the political useful-
ness of such observations is
obvious, even a cursory
glance around George Town
makes it clear that these com-
ments are not far from the
truth — and as locals seem to
be aware, the need for
improvement must transcend
partisan rhetoric.

At the same time, however,
the seeds of optimism are
sprouting on the outskirts of
George Town.

Landscape

Small developments are
beginning to punctuate the
undeveloped landscape and
old properties, dormant for
years, are being renovated.
These include the famed Out
Island Inn and Pieces of Eight
properties, which remain
under Bahamian ownership.

In many places along the
Queen’s Highway, the
island’s main thoroughfare,
gaps are appearing in Exu-





ma’s trademark underbrush,
where new developments are
sprouting up — a sure sign of
confidence in the future of
the island’s economy.

In addition, the jobs pro-
vided by the opening of the
Four Seasons have also
brought many Exumians back
home. Residents stated that
they are glad to come back —
though some expressed con-
cern that the wealth of the
boom were concentrated “in
certain areas”.

A healthy rapport seems to
have continued between
locals and visitors, who mix
and mingle in the very same
nightspots. This aspect of the
Out Island experience, some
critics of the anchor policy
have maintained, will disap-
pear when bigger resorts
come on stream and enforce
exclusionist policies, as some
have suggested is the case in
New Providence.

However, for the moment
at least, Great Exuma seems
immune to this phenomenon.

When asked. aboutthe’

SEE page seven

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THE TRIBUNE

t

MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007, PAGE 7



of large-scale investments

FROM page six

challenges that Exuma will
face in the future, many locals
point to the issues of housing
and land ownership.

At the time of the last cen-
sus in 2000, before the open-
ing of the Four Seasons, the
population of Great Exuma
and the cays was 3,676.

The Department of Statis-
tics cannot give up-to-date
figures, but some Exumians
believe it may have more
than doubled since then.

Population booms -
whether through birth rates,
immigration, or both - are
often associated with pros-
perity and increased oppor-
tunity. However, the other
side of the coin, as many

* locals note, is that construc-

Qe

tion of housing can fall far

~- behind the growth.

With immigrants coming

. from New Providence and

* *

+2 €¢ 8 ¥ >



other islands to work at the

Four Seasons buying or rent- ©

ing a good deal of the avail-
able housing, many Exumi-
ans wonder if their children
will have the opportunity to
own their own home.

In many areas, land that
once went for a few thousand
dollars has already escalated
beyond the reach of locals.
Those who have legal own-

ership of property they lay
claim to, may reap the bene-
fits from the escalation in
property value. However, for
those who don’t, ownership
of land, in the only island that
they call home, may be an
unreachable aspiration.

If a land policy does not
emerge that considers the
special circumstance of small
island populations, then the
children of this island and
others may find themselves
permanently unable to be
homeowners in their own
country. ;

Danger

The danger of this situation
is that Bahamians may come
to resent the foreign invest-
ment and foreign presence
that is necessary to fuel the
Bahamian economy. Gov-
ernments of the Bahamas
must be careful and listen to
these concerns as major
growth begins to take off.

Predictably, attendants at
the FNM rally in Hooper’s
Bay over the weekend had
little good to say about the
performance of the PLP over
the last four years.

As one community patri-
arch, Samuel A Rolle, put it:
“I’m born and grow here, I
was born in 1919 and now I’m

88. All the development on
this island was done in
Hubert Ingraham’s time. All
the roads, everything else, he
give it to us.”

However, the current inad-
equacy of the very upgrades

’ that Mr Rolle was referring

to suggests that Exuma resi-
dents should not look to past
achievements, but project for-
ward when it comes to choic-
es in the next general elec-
tion.

In addition, there have
been rumblings of unrest
among the staff at the Four

Seasons. Whichever party —

wins the election will have to

address this issue, as the,

results of industrial action on
such an interdependent econ-
omy could be disastrous, as
one local political commen-
tator noted.

Of course, all of this
depends on the island’s
anchor project remaining the
lynch-pin of the Exuma econ-
omy into the future.

Were the resort to fail, the
collapse of. the real estate
market would be just the first
in a series of disasters for the
island.

Hundreds of Bahamians
would find themselves unem-
ployed, having gambled away
thousands of dollars in the
bid for prosperity; the gov-

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ernment would also lose the
increased tax dollars it
expects to help finance capital
projects on the island.

Such a scenario would also
have far-reaching ramifica-
tions — as confidence in the
overall anchor project model
would diminish.

Strategy

Although not officially
under Mr Christie’s anchor
project policy, Exuma is seen
by many as a test case for a
strategy that intrinsically ties
a population’s progress to the
fortunes of a commercial
enterprise over which it has
little control.

As Exuma continues to
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MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS —



$2.8m primary
school for Salina
Point, Acklins

@ By RUPERT
MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

IN LESS than a year the
community of Salina Point,
Acklins, will benefit from a
new $2.8 million primary
school, Ministry of Works
and Utilities Bradley
Roberts announced during
the signing of the contract in
Acklins.

The Ministry of Works and
Utilities, Mr Roberts said,
conducted a competitive ten-
der exercise, and five build-
ing contractors from the
Acklins region were invited
to submit bids for the work.

“After a careful review of
the tender documents, it was
noted that Mr Kevin Styles’
construction company had
submitted the most competi-
tive bid, coming in at
$2,806,864.57, an amount
which was agreed to by the
government,” Mr Roberts
said. It is anticipated that the
construction period will be
32 weeks.

According to Mr Roberts,
Ashward Ferguson, senior
architect of the ministry,
developed the architectural
drawings for this state-of-
the-art primary school and
Mr Ferguson, along with oth-
er technical officers of the
ministry, will administer the
contract.

Mr Roberts sard that this
again is another example of
the government responding
to the needs of the commu-
nity through its school
expansion programme in the
majority of schools in New
Providence, Grand Bahama
and the Family Islands,
including Acklins.

The minister said the new
school will have a comple-
ment of three standard class-
rooms, a science lab, a music
room, and an administration
area - including air-condi-
tioned offices for the princi-
pal, the vice-principal, teach-
ers’ lounge and kitchen, the
secretary’s office and gener-
al waiting area.

The school itself, he said,
will comprise an area of
22,042 square feet and the

fe (eroynie sollte



@ MINISTER of Works and Utilities Bradley Roberts

covered walkways connect-
ing all the buildings will com-
prise about 1,066 square feet.

The interior of the build-
ings will contain acoustic
ceiling tiles, storage cabinets,
ceramic floor tiles, and ceil-
ing fans will be placed in
each of the classrooms.

The school will also have a
400 metre quadrant track, a
softball field, a basketball
court with home and away
benches and bleachers for
fan capacity, plus an
enclosed area for garbage
disposal.

“The Hon V Alfred Gray
is a representative who con-
tinuously speaks with a great
deal of passion for his con-
stituents, whether they live
in Mayaguana, Inagua,
Crooked Island, Acklins or
Long Cay.

“Minister Gray constantly
reminds me of the PLP’s
pledge to provide for
Bahamians wherever they
reside within our land. I have
never seen a Member of Par-
liament who has championed
the cause of his people with

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such great zeal and enthusi-
asm as Mr Gray does.

“We are here again today
because of this young man’s
passion for the people of the
MICAL constituency, whom
he represents, to execute this
contract for the construction
of a primary school in Salina
Point, Acklins, one of our
fastest growing Family Island
communities,” Mr Roberts
said.

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' PAGE 10, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007



THE TRIB\E.









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MR. GREGORY
HUGH DEAL

of Joe’s Creek, Abaco will be held on
Tuesday, January 30th, 2007 at 4:00 p.m.
at St. Anne’s Anglican Church, Fox Hill.
Officiating will be Fr. Crosley Walkine.



SCAECUR ENTER BSR REHHARRERHESTURGSH HR EH ABeoe




BBRBCEBSSA



Rg



Ret




PRBRBARESS



Left to cherish his memories are his Wife;
Mary Hedden-Deal; Childern; Johnny
and Isabella; Three Grandchildren;
Isabel, Gregory and Gabrielle; Sisters
and Brothers and many other relatives
and friends.




BReae8







In lieu of flowers donations may be
made to the Cancer Society of the
Bahamas.








Arrangements are being conducted by
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Crematorium, Ernest and York Streets.

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Funeral for \
Lady Dupuch

@ LEFT: The funeral pro-
cession from Sacred Heart
Church to Eastern Cemetary
where the remains of Lady
Dupuch were interred in the
family grave. Lady Dupuch
died in her sleep at the
Camperdown home of her
eldest daughter and son-in-
law, Eileen and Roger Car-
ron, on January 18. She
would have been 101 next
month.

e SEE front page.

@ BELOW: ASHES
INTERRED — Lady
Dupuch’s ashes were
interred in the Dupuch fami-
ly sepulchre in the Eastern _
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to left Lady Dupuch’s
youngest daughter, Mrs
Bette Hull, her brother,
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son.

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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Three men fired from




jobs claim victimisation

FROM page one

drop in every hole in the road
so he could see how bad the
road is.”

These two statements,
along with the fact that he
was known to be an active
FNM member, led to his dis-
missal, he believes, despite
the fact he had never had any
problems with the company
before.

According to Brooks,
when he returned to work the
following Monday after the
PM's visit, January 22, Mr
Ramadan McKenzie, the res-
ident project manager, said
there was no work for him.

“He told me that I would
have to wait for Mr Faisal
Hepburn, the accountant, to
come to Mayaguana. I called
Faisal in Nassau and he said
the truck drivers were not
needed. But that is not true,
because there are five truck
drivers and they kept four on
the job. I was the only one
they let go.”

He said that in the past
when there was no work to
do in a particular area,
employees would be assigned
to work in other areas.

According to Tecoyo

Brooks, the company may be
trying "to get rid of all the
FNMs on the job."

"The three they fired are
all FNMs and there are about
four more FNMs on the job
and they are on the list to be
fired soon," he said.

Mr Dion Foulkes ~- the
FNM candidate for Mayagua-
na - alleges that the company
may be being influenced by
a member of the government.

Adding to the men's anger,
Brooks said that while these
Bahamians have been let go,
there are a large number of
foreign workers still on the
site, including Costa Ricans,

Guyanese, Chinese and

Nicaraguans.

"Tt is particularly infuriat-
ing that at a,time when it is
being said that there are not
enough Bahamians qualified
and willing to work that these
young men are forced to
stand idle while foreigners
are steadily employed on
their own island in their own
country," said Mr Foulkes.

He is calling on I-Group
and the government - which
is a 50 per cent partner in the
development - to ensure the
three men are immediately
reinstated and paid compen-

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sation for lost salary
and unfair and wrongful dis-
missal.

He claims that if this does
not happen promptly he,
along with Mayaguanans and
other Bahamians, will take to
the streets to demonstate for
the men's reinstatement.

He also intends to file an
industrial dispute with the
labour board.

"These Bahamians are
entitled to make a living in
their country as well as to
enjoy all the rights and privi-
leges of citizenship, includ-
ing the right to free associa-
tion,” said Mr Foulkes.

According to Mr Hubert
Ingraham, the FNM will be
"watching carefully" to
ensure that these men's
rights, and the rights of oth-
ers, are not "trampled."

The FNM "will not stand
for...Bahamians to be vic-
timised by anybody, not by
foolish ministers, not by PLP
operatives, and certainly not
by foreigners who are guests
in our land," said Mr Ingra-
ham at a rally in Exttma on
Friday.

No-one was available for

comment at I-Group yester-
day.

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Patients forced
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vet for X-ray in
Great Exuma

FROM page one

nificantly on the island, con-
cern about the lack of sufficient
health facilities is growing.

Speaking on Friday night at
an FNM mini-rally in Exuma,
the party’s candidate for the
area Joshua Sears drew atten-
tion to the situation, calling it
unacceptable.

A group of FNM supporters
enthusiastically concurred —
pointing out that, despite many
other changes on the island, the
veterinarian’s office is still the
only facility supplied with an
X-ray machine.

“Thad to go there when I
hurt my arm,” one local woman
said. “If anyone needs a scan,
that is where they have to go.”

During his speech, Mr Sears
said: “With respect to the mini-
hospital, consider how many
persons are still required to
travel to Nassau or elsewhere at
great personal expense to seek
medical care that should be
available here in Exuma.

“Exuma is growing and
expanding. Not only do we
need the mini-hospital, we
require extended medical ser-
vice hours so that our people
can have ready access to med-
ical care routinely,” he said.

Mr Sears said this access
must also become available in
the Exuma cays, as it is no
longer acceptable for residents
there to have to travel to Great
Exuma for medical attention.

“Your next FNM govern-
fnent will do the necessary
upgrade to community health
care in the Exuma cays,” he
said. “First of all we want to
ensure that adequate staff is

available so that health profes- ,

sionals can do what is required
of them — that is look after
patient care.”

Another promise the PLP

have failed to fulfil, according -
to Mr Sears, is the construction ,

of a new primary school in
George Town.

“They have recently
announced that they will now
move to build these facilities.

Why has it taken them so |

long?” he asked. “It is now
election time, so they are now

. trotting all over the Common-

wealth of the Bahamas trying »

to do things they should have
completed long ago.”

He noted that in the case of :
the newly-functional water sup- .

ply facility in Rolleville, the
FNM planned and implement-
ed the infrastructure, yet the

government took more than .

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water main. 5
“And they had the audacity -
to convene a big ceremony *
commissioning water supplies -
to the people of Rolleville. Just
think of all the pain and suf-
fering and hardship endured
by the people of Rolleville dur-
ing the last four years — the cost
of delay — corroded plumbing
fixtures, saline water to drink,
the cost of private wells, the
negative impact on the health
and people of Rolleville,” he ;
said.
Mr Sears further pointed out
that the terminal building at
the airport in Black Point, Exu-
ma, is still to be constructed —
“despite a ground-breaking cer-
emony held some time ago.”
“The Bahamian people ©
expect and deserve a govern-
ment to be responsive to their
needs and to provide for them
basic services as a matter of
duty, not a matter of political
expediency,” he said.

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The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



ot lee ae ee

-@ ene ee



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007, PAGE 13



LOCAL NEWS



Haywards save
Port Authority from
potential winding-up

FROM page one

through its attorney Gregory |
Moss, had filed a winding-up
petition with the Supreme
Court on January 19 against the
Grand Bahama Port Authori-
ty.

The association, which is
claiming $1.218 million in dam-
ages, alleged negligence relating
to building and maintenance of
the condo.

According to a press release
issued to The Tribune yester-
day, the Hayward family has
been.alarmed by recent legal
matters relevant to the Island
Bay Condominium Association
and the potential winding-up of
the Grand Bahama Port
Authority.

“In the best interests of the
stability of the Grand Bahama
Port Authority, Grand Bahama
Island, and by extension, the
economy of the entire
Bahamas, the Haywards
thought it best, despite the inac-
tion of others, to personally
resolve this matter and have
done so by committing over a
million dollars of their personal
resources to stop the winding-
up and liquidation process.

“We remain committed to —

employees of the Grand
Bahama Port Authority and to
the island of .Grand Bahama,
and will continue to do every-
thing within our ability to main-
tain the confidence of existing
and potential investors,” stat-
ed the release.

The Hayward and St George
families have been at odds over
the ownership of shares in the
Grand Bahama Port Authority
over the past year.

The legal action taken by
Island Bay Condominium
Phase III Association stems
from damage to its roof, which
was blown off.during the hurti-



@ RICK HAYWARD,
son of Sir Jack Hayward

cane in 2004.

Gregory Moss, who repre-
sented Island Bay at the time,
began negotiations in early
2005. Attorney Fred Smith rep-
resented the GBPA at the time.

Negotiations. continued into
2006, but got nowhere. Mean-
while, in June, 2006, Mr Moss
began acting for the GBPA
with the understanding that he
will continue acting for Island
Bay condo. He also signed on
with the Port with the commit-
ment that the GBPA wanted
to settle the matter.

Mr Moss continued -negotia-
tions with the GBPA in-house
counsel Carey Leonard, and its
outside counsel Fred Smith.

Sources claim that Mr Smith
refused to settle, but Leonard
recommended to the Port that
it should consider settling to
avoid exposure of some $1.8m
plus costs.

Under Hannes Babak’s
chairmanship, a settlement was
negotiated for $800,000 plus
costs.

However, sources claim that
Lady Henrietta St George was
the only person who refused in
October, 2006, to sign on to the

- settlement when all of the direc-

tors had signed on.

Following this, Greg Moss
immediately resigned from
GBPA and Sir Jack hired him
as his personal attorney with
the expressed provision and
understanding that he will con-
tinue his representation for
Island Bay.

Mr Moss filed a writ against
the GBPA and Uniprop Ltd,
the developers of Island Bay,
on behalf of Island Bay Associ-
ation in November, 2006.

Fred Smith represented
Uniprop Ltd. After the GBPA
and Uniprop failed to take
action, Moss filed judgment
against both parties in Decem-
ber, 2006, and served statutory
demands on the GBPA and
Uniprop, giving them both
mandatory 21-day notice.

However, due to a legal dis-
pute between the Hayward and
St George families over Sir Jack
Hayward’s claim to 75 per cent
ownership of the Port, it
appeared that both parties were
distracted.

Since no action by either par-
ty was taken, Mr Moss went
ahead and filed a winding-up
petition against the Port
Authority on January 19.

He gave an informal copy to
the GBPA inviting the compa-

’ ny to settle. The GBPA, how-

ever, filed a late application to
have the matter set aside, and
so Mr Moss finally served the
GBPA on January 23.

It is believed that the wind-
ing-up of the GBPA would
have further impacted the deli-
cate Freeport economy, sending
a negative message to residents,
business licensees, and to exist-
ing and potential international
investors.

The source praised the Hay-
ward family for “stepping in
and saving the day.”

¢ See Business section °°

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THE TRIBUNE | MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007, PAGE 15







u TORE
ae
ae

#10 RichLill House
Montgomery St, Palmdale



ceyrerenrcsetnashits



gazeoscrey

Church team p

courtesy call 0

4

Governor Genera

- gi ABOVE: BISHOP VG Clarke and his team from Calvary Deliverance Church, East Street
South, paid a courtesy call on the Governor General Arthur D Hanna on Friday, January 26, 2007
at Government House. The church, which was founded by Rev Clementina Stubbs, celebrates 25
years of ministry this year. Shown from left are Pastor James Newry, Bishop Clarke, Governor
General Arthur D Hanna, Elder Beverly Clarke, Pastor Dorothy Moss and Merlande Barrett.



scotia srt PRO OEERSH CROER



i BELOW: BISHOP V G Clarke, left, presents a gift from Calvary Deliverance church to Gov-

ernor General Arthur D Hanna during a courtesy call on Friday, January 26, 2007 at Government
House.



“(BIS photos: Tim Aylen)










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| PAGE 16, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007 THE TRIBUNE



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MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007

SECTION

business@tribunemedia.net

The Tribune



BUSINE

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street











Sir Jack opposes New cruise termin

GBPA minority
share dilution -

@ By NEIL HARTNELL .
Tribune Business Editor

SIR Jack Hayward is opposed
to any dilution of his stake in
the Grand Bahama Port
Authority (GBPA) to a “minor-
ity shareholding”, The Tribune
can reveal, creating an impasse
in attempts to resolve the dis-
pute between himself and the
estate of the late Edward St
George.

Sir Jack, via his attorney Gre-
gory Moss, is said by sources to

have communicated that posi-

tion to both Mr St George’s
family and the Government,
which ‘is being represented in

attempts to mediate a solution

to the GBPA shareholder dis-
pute by Paul Adderley, the for-
mer attorney general.

Sir Jack’s position is at odds
with the Government’s pre-
ferred outcome to resolve the
dispute, which has massive ram-
ifications for Freeport’s future,
and has impacted both the city’s
investment and business cli-
mate, plus its governance and
administration due to the
GBPA’s quasi-governmental
status.

The Government has had to
walk a fine-line in. the dispute
over Sir Jack’s claim to 75 per
cent ownership of both GBPA
and its affiliate, Port Group Ltd,

the company that holds the real

worth via stakes in the likes of
Grand Bahama Development

Position creates
impasse with
St Georges,
government

Company (Devco) and
Freeport Harbour Company.
Mr Adderley has been anx-
_ious to point out that the Gov-
ernmentiis not seeking to dic-
tate or impose a solution on the
two parties, mindful that any
government interference - real
or perceived - could have a
damaging impact on investor
and community confidence in
Freeport.

Nevertheless, he is under-
stood to have communicated to
both Sir Jack and the St George
estate, plus Clifford Culmer, the
court-appointed independent
management consultant for the
GBPA and Port Group Ltd, in
mid-January that the Govern-
ment’s preferred solution is one
“that would diversify the own-
ership base of the GBPA,
extending to a public of offering
of shares”.

He has told the parties: “This
would have the effect of remov-
ing the disputants’ controlling
family interests in the Port and

- SEE page 10B

to

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business

Reporter

he number of

cruise passenger

arrivals to Grand

Bahama _ could

increase trom
350,000 to 1.5 million within the
second year of operations at the
island’s planned new cruise ter-
minal, a deputy director-gener-
al ay the Ministry of Tourism
has projected.

David Johnson, who has
responsibility for investments
and planning, told The Tribune
that the creation of a new ter-
minal at Williamstown is expect-
ed to cost more than $100 mil-
lion, would be one of the most
significant and major direct
investments in the Bahamas.

“ You’re looking at the new
capacity and desirability of
Grand Bahama as a cruise des-
tination,” he said. “Cruise vol-
ume as a first port of entry will
likely move from 350,000-
400,000 to at least.1.5 million
passengers within the second
year of such a facility.

“The return on investment
and the injection of spending in
the community to all persons
affected will be great in a cruise
port that is really close to the

resort areas but not on.top of .

it, We’re giving all visitors many
more options on their vacations,



@ DAVID JOHNSON
(FILE photo)

so land visitors will go to that
site for dining, entertaining and
those type of options. All in all,
we see the initiative being one of
the most desirable short-term
influxes of business in Grand
Bahama we can.activate.”
Mr Johnson said the Govern-
ment was working with three
groups: the owners of the cruise
terminal and the land, the
Freeport Harbour Company,
and “one significant global

cruise partner” to create “new,

flashier cruise facility on Grand
Bahama”.



1

quadruple arrivals

Planned Grand Bahama facility

to cost $100m, as official tackles

private island, departure tax and

“We have come a long way in .

identifying a site, reviewing the
site, looking at design and look-
ing at how the logistics of how
the partners will work with each
other,” Mr Johnson said.
“Sometime around the middle
of February, we hope to resume
and conclude the structure of
an agreement, and at that time I
think we can say more.”

Mr Johnson added that the
Ministry of Tourism was not
overly concerned about the fact
that many ships companies visit
their companies’ private islands
as a first port of entry.

“Let me explain. The one
advantage we have in the
Bahamas is that we have multi-
ple ports beside Nassau and
Grand Bahama, offering differ-
ent experiences,” he said.

“ And there are Bahamians on
those islands, for example Berry
Islanders, who benefit but would
not have seen tourism dollars
had those facilities not been
there. Our challenge is to ensure

that every private island opera-

on-board opening concerns —

tor comes to Nassau and/or
Grand Bahama in combination
with that private island.

“So the opportunity is that we

_are growing business to Nassau

and Grand Bahama because of
those private islands, as they are
dedicating more capacity here.
We have seen, for instance, Car-
nival move from 600,000 pas-
sengers to about $1.5 million
passengers in about four years.”

Mr Johnson attributed this
increas@/to the attraction of Car-
nival’s private islands in the
Bahamas, and said these pas-
sengers would also have visited
Nassau.

“Whether they are private
ports or not, we need Bahami-
ans to deliver much more of the
experience” on private islands,
he added.

“We shouldn’t try to recon
struct their itineraries and move
passengers from going to those
private islands. We should get

SEE page 11B:

Early end to Winn-Dixie
transition saves $500,000

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMAS ‘Supermarkets

‘chief executive told The Tri-

~ bune that the retailer will end its

one-year Transition Services
Agreement (TSA) with former
majority owner Winn-Dixie six
months early on February 8,
2007, saving the company
$500,000.

Ken Burns, in an interview at
the weekend, said that apart
from saving Bahamas Super-
markets half the flat $1 million
fee it had been scheduled to pay
Winn-Dixie, the owner of 12
City Markets stores would save
a further $60,000 per month

over the six months to early
August 2007.

This was because apart from
the-$1 million flat fee payable to
Wian-Dixie, in four quarterly
instalments, Bahamas Super-
‘markets also had to pay the US
retailer 5 per cent of the cost of
goods it procured for it.

The $60,000 per month sav-
ings means that Bahamas
Supermarkets will probably
save about $360,000 from the
cancellation of the TSA halfway
through, giving it cost-savings
of $860,000.

Mr Burns said Bahamas

SEE page 2B



Cruise industry concerned
over Bahamas tours

lm By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter





THE limited amount of shore excursions for cruise passengers
could make them hesitant to come back to the Bahamas on repeat
cruise visits, a leading cruise industry executive told The Tribune.

Michele Paige, president of the Florida-Caribbean Cruise Asso-
ciation (FCCA), said the industry was concerned with the variety
of shore excursions available in the Bahamas, especially given the
frequency with which many tourists take cruises through this
nation.

“Tt ig even more important that you constantly re-evaluate your
product and offer people new things to do, and that has been a crit-
icism of some of the passengers, who feel they have seen the
Bahamas and there is no need to go back to shore,” Ms Paige
said.

She said this is something the
industry has been working on dili-
gently, aiming to have “new, excit-

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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



HDELITY MARKET WRAP



i By Fidelity Capital
Markets

IT was a slow trading week
in the Bahamian market, with
only 26,002 shares changing
hands. The market saw 12 out
of its 19 listed stocks trade, of
which six advanced, two
declined and four remained
unchanged.

Volume leader for the week
was Consolidated Water Co
BDR (CWCB), with 5,500
shares changing hands and
accounting for 21 per cent of
the total shares traded.

. The big advancer for the

week was FOCOL (FCL),
gaining'a whopping $3.13 or
24.94 per cent to end the week
at a new 52-week high of
$15.68.

On the down side, Fam-
Guard Company (FAM), lost
$0.15 or 2.52 per cent to close
at $5.80.

The FINDEX closed the
week at 756.85

COMPANY NE

Bahamas Supermarkets
(BSL) -

BSL held its Annual Gener-;

POSITION
AVAILABLE

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Responsihilities

Air medical transport of patients

¢ Administration of medication, oxygen and
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in the Clinical Protocol Manual.
Provide accurate and comprehensive verbal
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Requirements:

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Must have at least three years experience
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Air Ambulance Sonics Led



agree aE Fhe aniere
Peay

No contract

al Meeting on January 23,
2007, where its management
outlined some of the changes
that shareholders can expect
within the upcoming months.
They include:

* Point of Sales (POS) scan-
ning equipment to be installed
in all stores. The newly-opened
Cable Beach store is fully
equipped with scanners and
the Harbour Bay store is next
in line.

The implementation of POS
in all stores is scheduled to be
completed by the end of the
year.

| International Markets |

| FOREX Rates

| CAD$
GBP
| EUR

| Commodities _

| Crude Oil
| Gold

| International Stock Market Indexes:

DJIA

S & P 500
| NASDAQ
| Nikkei

INSIGHT

For the stories behind the
news, read Insight Mondays



ree ao

Mayr Tiereyareg (els yl) 00

2 year contract

3 year contract



meee
gas

o Ee) om
YAO
$1 ee



FINDEX 756.85 YTD 1. 99%

BISX
SYMBOL PRICE



Advantages associated with



the new POS system include AML $0.70 $0.06
reduced shrinkage levels, BAB $1.25 $-
improved inventory and pur- ae
chasing capabilities, and pric- OB $8.0
ing consistency on all products BPF $11.30
eee BSL's:network of BE nee ae
rere ‘ CAB. | $10.00.) 0: See i
< “The j interior pees ofall | CBL $13.00 $0.0
its existing stores in terms of CHL ($2. 00 ne Dat
décor;, lighting, Hetaaevation CwcB a a eae
Tree rie et IDS, 2 SOs
oe “patenave’ training’ 6? all | FAM $5.80 0
personnel in an effort to FCC $0.55
improve overall customer sat- FCL $15.68
isfaction. ’ EEN $12.30
ICD $7.10
JSJ $9.05

$10.00



DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:

% Change

Weekly
i | date December 31, 2006. ©
1.1801 0.69 |
1.9594 -0.74 |
1.2912 -0.44 }
ary 26, 2006.
Weekl %Ch |
eekly Change | 31, 2007
_ $54.23 7.43 |
$648.10 3.18 |
*; Weekly % Change
"12,487.02
1,422.18 --0.58 |
Tris ose | FROMpage1B

Supermarkets ‘ ‘couldn’ t sean
_ the TSA through to the end of

‘sits expiration in early August

‘2007, which would have gone

into the retailer’s next fiscal

_ year.

“However, he eanted: out that
even under Winn-Dixie’s major-
ity 78 per cent ownership,
Bahamas Supermarkets had

_ purchased “about 80 per cent”
of its products from Bahamas-

_ based suppliers.
Mr Burns said the company








RBC FINCO
is presently considering applications for
Mortgage Specialist
~ RBC FINCO, |
Freeport Branch

The successful candidate should possess the following
qualifications:






© ACIB OR ABIFS Diploma or degree in bonne
(or a related field)
-@ At least five or more. years banking experience.
Previous experience in portfolio and liability
administration would be an asset.
gotiating/Selling skills « :
tr adership, coaching, relationship bui in,
ing:and confidentiality sk
multiple’ priorities
ound credit analysis.
skills” (Word, age Power Pin












esponsibilities élude: me



e Contributing to meeting team sales plans by
acquiring and.growing profitable client relationships
¢ Providing customized solutions and financial advice
designed to satisfy the client’s long- -term goals on
obtaining a mortgage
¢ Seeking out new clients by developing relationships
within the community and local centres of influence
e Enhancing the experience of existing clients by
providing accessibility and one-on-one advice and
valuable information on the intricacies of having
a mortgage
¢ Successfully anchoring clients with the appropriate
delivery channel within RBC Financial Group












A competitive compensation package (base salary
& bonus) commensurate with relevant experience
and qualifications.




Please apply before February 2, 2007 to:
Regional Manager
Human Resources
Caribbean Banking
Royal Bank of Canada
Bahamas Regional Office

. P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, N.P, Bahamas








Via fax: (242)328-7145
Via email: bahcayjp@rbc.com



REC
Roval Bank

SG)

SS of Canada

The Bahamian Stock Market

CLOSING CHANGE





° CWCO has declared dividends of $0.012 per BDR,
payable on February 7, 2007 to all shareholders of record

e BSL has declared dividends of $0.285 per share, payable
on February 6, 2007, to all shareholders of record date J anu-

¢ FCL has declared dividends of $0. 12 per share, payable on
February 8, 2007, to all shareholders of record date ae





VOLUME YTD PRICE






CHANGE
1550 14.75%
0 - 0.00%
0 5.26%
100 0.00%
0 0.00%
0 0.00%
0 5.71%
1000 0.00%
1760 3,92%
3742 5.26%
2700 2.19%
5500 3.48%
200 0.00%
4400 0.17%
0 0.00%
1600 24.94%
1400 2.33%
2050 -0.70%
0 ee) 5.23%

0.00%














| Early end to Winn-Dixie
og | transition saves $500,000

would purchase the remaining

20 per cent through Super Val-
ue (US), a major wholesale sup-
plier with operations in Flori-
da, and also import produce
directly from suppliers.
Bahamas Supermarkets is
estimating that utilities costs for
the year ending on June 30,
2007, will be “close to $1 million
higher than the previous year”.
Mr Burns said electricity costs
alone were “astronomical” for
the food retail chain, which

must run its freezers and other =
electrical equipment ‘24/7 to al

keep produce fresh.

He added that the company
was hoping the installation of
new equipment would control
costs and “drive utilities back
down for us”.

Another “huge driving force
over the previous year” on the
cost side, Mr Burns explained,
was insurance premiums, par-
ticularly property and casualty
insurance, and other forms of
hurricane insurance.

Bahamas Supermarkets was
“shooting for the end of Feb-
ruary” for the installation of its
new point-of-sale (POS) system
at its Harbour Bay store, Mr
Burns said. The actual installa-
tion date, he added, depended
on how much work the retailer
needed to do, such as cutting
through the floor and running
wiring, something that was
being assessed now.

Bahamas Supermarkets was
also in the process of acquiring
new scanning equipment for all
its 12 stores, as the scanner scale
did not fit the current system.

“We’ve got a lot of work to
do,” said Mr Burns, acknowl-
edging that Bahamas Super-
markets was in a transition year
and would incur some extra
costs as it began life as a stand-
alone company, separate from
Winn-Dixie.

The transition has resulted
from Winn-Dixie’s majority
shareholding being purchased
last year by BSL Holdings, a
buy-out consortium featuring
Bahamian institutional and
high-net worth investors, plus
Barbados Shipping & Trading.

“We see a huge light at the
end of the tunnel when the tran-
sition is over and we’ve got the

POS system in place,” Mr Burns © -'

said.

He added that apart from
managing costs and the transi-
tion, Bahamas Supermarkets
was also looking to drive sales
and procure product more
cheaply.

As for Bahamas Supermar-
ket’ new flagship Cable Beach
store, Mr Burns said: “We’re
very pleased with the reaction
of the neighbourhood and the
island. Sales have been very
good. Consumers are impressed
with the:store, impressed with
the layout and the pricing
throughout the store. We’ve
had very good results.

“We’re building off con-
sumers’ comments, and any-
thing we might have missed.
We'll continue to improve the
store as we go along.

“It will kind of be our signa-
ture store, and serve as a model
for other stores moving into the
future.”























a

are aw oe

a

4





BUSINESS

Che Miami Herald |

WALL STREET

—_—



%



| MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007



End of double-digit growth may be near

@ With 40 percent of the S&P
500 reporting, it looks like
double-digit earnings has seen its
day. That is not all bad because -
most companies have beat
earnings expectations.

BY JOE BEL BRUNO
Associated Press

NEW YORK — All streaks must
come to an end. Investors accus-
tomed to double-digit earnings
growth should prepare for more
earthbound numbers as Wall Street
heads into the midpoint of the fourth-
quarter reporting season.

BRAZIL

Pipelines
in the
Amazon

@ Overcoming numerous
challenges, Brazil’s
state-controlled oil company
begins building pipelines in the
amazon jungle

BY LARRY ROHTER
New York Times Service

URUCU, Brazil — In theory, the
issue is simple: Brazil needs more
sources of energy. to keep its econ-
omy humming, and huge reserves of
gas and oil are in the Amazon jungle.
Problem solved.

Over the years, Petrobras, Bra-
zil’s state-controlled oil company,
has, in fact, invested more than $7
billion in Amazon exploration and

“development, and in 1986 it made'a
Inajor find. rt ae are

But only now — after a seemingly
endless sequence of geographic,
logistical, environmental and politi-
cal challenges were overcome — is
the first in what is intended as a
series of pipelines finally being con-
structed, this one to carry gas the
400 miles from Urucu to Manaus, a
port city of 1.5 million at the junction
of the region’s two biggest rivers
that is emerging as an important
industrial center.

“Everything in the Amazon
requires preparation that is big, long
and complicated, especially a pio-
neering effort like this one,”
explained Joelson Falcao Mendes,
the company’s regional director in

‘ Urucu. “You’ve got a harsh climate
that limits you to working only four
months a year in some places.
You're working in mud and crossing
rivers that are not navigable, and
there are 47 tropical diseases to
worry about.”

But oil pipeline leaks and the col-
lapse of an offshore drilling plat-
form in other parts of the country
have damaged Petrobras’ reputa-
tion, and there was initially strong
resistance to the pipeline from local
people, environmental and indige-
nous groups and archaeologists.

Some of them preferred that the
gas be transported to Manaus by
tankers from a terminal north of
Urucu, already connected by a pipe-
line, while others argued it would be
cheaper and safer to buy the excess
electricity generated by the Guri
Dam in Venezuela.

Rather than steam rolling the
opponents and skeptics, however, as

SUPER BOWL XLI

As of Friday, 197 stocks in the
widely watched Standard & Poor’s
500 index achieved a growth rate of
about 9 percent, according to Thom-
son Financial. Without any unexpect-
edly strong reports in the offing, it
means the 18 consecutive quarters
calculated by S&P to have double-
digit earnings growth will come to an
end.

Stock analysts believe this is all
part of a cycle that helps bring the
stock market down from lofty levels,
and hopefully sets it up again for
another run. ‘

“Investors need to get used to this





and realize that it is not necessarily a
bad thing,” said Howard Silverblatt,
Standard & Poor’s senior. analyst.
“This is a retrenchment and consoli-
dation after four years of growth. We
had a nice run.”

The last time Wall Street saw this

kind of surge in the S&P 500 index —

was between 1992 and 1995. The mar-
kets, particularly the Nasdaq com-
posite index, then bounced back with
the dot-com boom of the late 1990s.
Still, the fourth quarter isn’t turn-
ing out all that bad. Of the S&P 500
components that have already
reported, 68 percent beat expecta-



FERNANDO AUGUSTO/AP FILE

AVOIDING PAST MISTAKES: In July 2000, Petrobras workers, above,
struggled to contain an oil spill caused by a pipeline burst at
Iguacu river in southern Brazil. The company now is beginning to
build a 400-mile Amazon pipeline from Urucu to the port city of

Manaus.

often happens in Brazil, the com-
pany chose to woo them. The 2 mil-
lion residents of Amazonas state
have been promised economic ben-
efits that have contributed to the
project’s.$L15 billion price, and sci-
entists and environmentalists were
consulted about how to minimize
damage to the jungle that blankets
the state, which is larger than Brit-
ain, France, Germany and Italy com-
bined. : (

“They have really tried to mini-
mize the impact, and the outcome is
not as bad as we had feared,” said
Paulo Adario, director of Green-
peace’s Amazon campaign. “Since
they are taking oil and gas out of the
heart of the Amazon, creating a
model for what will be done in the
future, that concern is quite under-
standable and necessary.”

A second pipeline, which would
head south to Porto Velho, a city

more than 300 miles away, is a far
more complicated matter. That pro-
ject still faces challenges from advo-
cates for the environment and rights
of indigenous people because it will
cross rivers and Indian lands. It also
is competing with two large dams
for government money.

Farther west, near the Jurua
River, Petrobras also has plans to
develop oil and gas deposits first
discovered in 1978. Company offi-
cials said they hoped to begin pro-
duction in 2010, after construction
of a pipeline that would run through
dense and remote jungle to a refin-
ery in Urucu.

In the past, the construction of
large energy projects in the Ama-
zon, such as the mammoth Tucurui
dam, typically led to the migration
of thousands of peasants seeking

* TURN TO PIPELINES

Fans can buy ticket insurance

i Did you pay a small fortune for
a Super Bowl ticket? Ticket
insurance can buy you alittle
peace of mind if calamity
prevents you from getting to the
big game.

BY MONICA HATCHER
mhatcher@MiamiHerald.com

It’s not a pleasant thought, getting
the flu, crashing your car or meeting
another calamity — on game day, no
less. :
_ Especially after you mortgaged
your home to buy a Super Bowl
ticket.

Die-hard football fans now have a
way to protect their financial, if not
their emotional, investment in the big



game through event ticket insurance.

New to the market, ticket insur-
ance is being sold by a handful of bro-
kers for the Super Bowl XLI game
Feb. 4, as well as for concerts, festi-

‘ vals and other sporting events.

The product is proving popular
among consumers, said Emily Porter,
spokeswoman for World Access, a
Virginia company that sells policies
through In Ticketing, Tickets Now
and their subsidiaries.

“We've insured more than $4 mil-
lion worth of tickets since launching
the product six months ago,” Porter
said, adding it was still too soon to
say how many policies were bought
to cover Super Bowl tickets.

While travel insurance has been

available for some time, event ticket
insurance is fairly new.

American Express in October
launched a free event ticket protec-
tion plan for consumers and busi-
nesses who charge ticket purchases
on their Gold, Platinum and Centu-
rion cards.

Typical ticket insurance from
other companies costs about 5 per-
cent of the total ticket value, includ-
ing shipping and other fees.

A policy covering a $1,000 ticket,
for instance, would cost $50.

Insurance only covers tickets cost-
ing less than $3,000.

According to Seat Smart, this

°TURN TO TICKETS _ is









tions and 15 percent matched them.
Earnings are also coming in about 5
percent above estimates, which tops
the average surprise factor of 4.2 per-
cent seen over the last eight quarters,
according to Thomson Financial.

There is also a remote possibility
the U.S. can still realize double-digit
growth for the quarter, though most
analysts admit this would likely be by
a harrow margin and not without a
few unexpected results. The best
hopes are for energy companies,
especially Exxon Mobil on Thursday
and Chevron on Friday.

“At this point, it doesn’t look in the

TAX TIPS

cards with about 40 percent of the
S&P 500 reporting,” Silverblatt said.
“There will have to be some signifi-
cant results, a couple of knockouts
from companies. If not, investors
need to get comfortable with single
digits.”

Debate continues about if it’s now
the right time to shift focus to large-
cap stocks like those in the S&P 500.
The group is considered to be more
defensive in nature, and can with-
stand a slowing economy because

they are typically more diversified

° TURN TO EARNINGS

Carefully declare’
business expenses

@ Small businesses can reduce
taxes by deducting
business-related meals and
entertainment, but the IRS keeps
aclose watch on such activity.

BY JOYCE M. ROSENBERG
Associated Press

The little piles of credit card
receipts on the desks of many small
business owners can mean only one
thing: They’re trying to figure out
how much of their 2006 lunches, din-
ners and entertainment expenses can
be deducted on their tax returns.

Meals and entertainment are a
popular tax deduction with busi-
nesses. Under the tax law, a company
can deduct 50 percent of the cost of
meals and entertainment expenses
that were incurred in the course of
doing business.

But these are deductions that
should be taken only with discretion.
Accountants say the IRS is wary of
meal and entertainment expenses
because of the possibility of abuse,
and they believe the government is

IRS

ff Accountant Ed Godoy offers
tax tips for small businesses.

BY JIM WYSS
jwyss@MiamiHerald.com

Over the last three decades Ed

Godoy, a. partner at the Miami

accounting firm of BDO Seidman, has
seen the IRS tax code almost triple in
size. It has been good for his busi-
ness, but a nightmare for just about
everyone else’s, he admits.

“Our tax system is so complicated,
it’s unreal,” says Godoy.

But tax deadlines — and penalties
for missing them — are real. So here
is some of the advice Godoy is giving
his small-business clients this tax sea-
son:

‘e Look for above-the-line
healthy deductions. Many sole pro-
prietors forget that they can deduct
their health insurance premiums
from their. gross income — or
“above-the-line” in tax speak. That
allows business owners to deduct
their premiums in full, rather than
face the limits that come with item-
ized “below-the-line” deductions, he
said.

e Take property deductions
now, not later. Typically, business
that purchase tangible property —
think computers, machinery and fur-

likely to question any numbers ona
tax return that seem out of line.

Mark Toolan, a certified public
accountant in Exton, Pa., said busi-
ness owners need to ask themselves
about each expense, “is it reasonable,
is it ordinary?” And, he warned, “it
cannot be lavish.”

Toolan said a critical part of taking
deductions for meals and entertain-
ment is being sure you have the sub-
stantiation for each expense. That
way, if the IRS does inquire about
your expenses, you’ll be able to back
up your claim.

The problem for many business
owners is that record-keeping, while
an important part of doing business,
is something that can become slap-
dash while they’re trying to juggle
everything else. “People try to over-
look it, or do it after the fact,” Toolan
said. He recommends to business
owners, “do it as you go along”
through the year.

There are five essential parts to

° TURN TO DEDUCTIONS

Tax tips froma pro

niture — have to write off those
items over the course of several
years, factoring in depreciation.
Thanks to Section 179, sole propri-

. etors, partnerships and corporations

can write off some purchases in full
the year they were bought.

The deduction is neither auto-
matic nor sweeping (there is a
$108,000 limit, and items such as air
conditioners and furnishings for
lodgings are exempted). But taking
advantage of the rule can potentially
save small firms thousands of dollars.

“It’s a timing issue,” said Godoy.
“And sometimes it’s better to get the
deduction up front rather than over
time.”

e Seek domestic production
breaks. Since 2004 manufacturers
and producers engaged in “qualified
domestic production activities” have
been eligible for breaks. Among the
South Florida industries that might
qualify are construction and engi-
neering firms and software, music
and film production companies.

Under Section 199, those compa-
nies may be able to reduce their total
taxable income by up to 3 percent. As
a result, a company with $1 million in
qualified domestic production in

* TURN TO TAX CODE





DAVE MARTIN ZAP
COVERAGE: Event ticket insurance is fairly new. The cost fora $1,000
ticket is about $50.



4B , MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007

OIL AND GAS:
The
Petrobras
oil refinery
Guillermo
Elder Bell in
Santa Cruz
de la Sierra,
Eastern
Bolivia is
controlled
by the
state.

DIEGO GIUDICE
BLOOMBERG NEWS

WALL STREET

End of doub

*EARNINGS

around the world.

Indeed, the Russell 2000
index of smaller companies
posted a gain of 18.4 percent
last year. It has outperformed
the large-cap Russell 1000

index for seven of the past

eight years. A resurgent Rus-
sell 1000 beat the Russell
2000 in the second half of
2006 — though small caps
won out for the year overall.
Other widely followed large-
cap indexes showed strong

\

IRS





INTERNATIONAL EDITION

BRAZIL

Construction

___ MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

begins |

on Amazon pipelines

°PIPELINES, FROM 1B

work and the creation of slum
settlements in the jungle.
When a project is finished,
the workers will often remain,
with no jobs, swelling social
and environmental problems
that are already intractable.
Inhabitants of small jungle
settlements along the path of
transmission lines have also
complained that no provision
is made for them to be sup-
plied electricity. That alien-
ates local residents and has

even provoked some inci-—

dents of sabotage.

Urucu, however, is being
built with a requirement that
two-thirds of the labor force
be hired from the population

e-digit ¢g

There is also a remote possibility the U.S. can
still realize double-digit growth for the

quarter, though most analysts admit this would
likely be by a narrow margin and not without a

few unexpected results.

performances.

Portfolio. managers have
been telling clients to diver-
sify more of their assets into
large-cap companies. As cor-

porate earnings begin to show.

signs of weakening — espe-
cially stacked up to the third
quarter’s 23.2 percent growth
rate — this could be the tip-
ping point.

“We've been saying large-

Tax tips from a pro

°TAX CODE,

2006 would only be taxed on
$970,000. That, in turn, could
result in saving $10,500 in

their taxes. By 2008 the

deduction will increase to 9
percent, meaning that same $1
million company could save
more $31,000.

e Out of state is not out
of mind. Businesses that have
_a stake in companies in other
states or other countries need
to make sure they file the
appropriate. forms, said
Godoy. The penalties for not
reporting international com-
panies or bank accounts can
be up to $10,000, he said.

“And just because you are

TAX TIPS

_ RESOURCE GUIDE AT MIAMIHERALD.COM

Go to MiamiHerald.com/Business and click on Small Busi-

> ness. There you will find:
@ News and special reports




a small company doesn’t
mean you are exempt,” he
said. ee

And for those entrepre-
neurs who insist on preparing
their own taxes, Godoy said
that they — at the very least

‘@ Small-business resource lists _
formation on financing a small business

— should invest in software
that might highlight the tax
breaks and help them avoid
unforeseen pitfalls.

“The system is compli-
cated,” he said. “But hey, it
keeps me in business.”

Carefully declare expenses

* DEDUCTIONS

substantiating a meal or
entertainment expense:

e The date that the meal
or event took place.

e The amount spent,
including tax and tip.

e Where it took place.

e What the business
purpose was for the occa-

sion — for example, if you,

were trying to land a cus-
tomer.

e An explanation of the
business’ relationship
between you and the person
or people you entertained.
Such information would
include their names and com-
panies or occupations — any-
thing that would explain why
you'd be meeting with them
to discuss business.

Credit-card receipts and
restaurant checks are an easy

way to substantiate expenses,
since they contain the date,
amount and place. You'd still
need to provide the rest of the
information.

Many business owners also
input their expense informa-
tion into the software they.
use to keep their books —
some expense-tracking soft-
ware. will also export the data
into tax preparation applica-
tions. That’ll make the pro-
cess easier during tax season
— but you'll still need to hold
on to your receipts in case the
IRS has questions.

What constitutes a deduct-
ible meal or entertainment
expense is more complex. For
a business to be able to deduct
the cost of dinner or an event,
it has to fall within the realm
of, as Toolan noted, an ordi-
nary and reasonable expense.

The most clear-cut exam-

ple is taking a client out to
lunch and discussing the ser-
vices you'll provide. The tab
is certainly deductible. But if,
for example, you own a dry
cleaning business and take an
average customer — who’s
also a friend — out to a very
expensive dinner, there’s a
good chance it wouldn’t stand
up to IRS scrutiny.

“It comes down to com-
mon sense. ... There has to be
a business purpose,” Toolan
said.

FUN AND GAMES

Business owners also rou-
tinely take customers and cli-
ents out to the theater, to
sporting events or to play a
round of golf..It can be argued
that there’s no business pur-
pose to a baseball game, but if
you can show you were talk-
ing about that deal you were



SUPER BOWL XLI |

already in the region. That
has created about 10,000 jobs,
a significant advance in a
region with fewer than

500,000 people, as well as job-

training programs.

To prevent an influx of set-
tlers, who typically carve out
illegal homesteads along high-
ways, almost no permanent
roads have been built.

Instead, armed forces bring
in supplies and equipment by
helicopter or boat, and many
construction workers live in
floating dormitories that
move from one site to the
next as the work advances.

“There was a time when
the only way to get in here
was to come by helicopter
and then rappel down,” said

Mauro Loureiro, the project’s
technical director.

“Tt took hundreds of trips
like that just to open a clear-
ing to be able to do the initial
soundings and then dig a test
well.”

In addition, the pipeline
will include spurs to seven
smaller towns on its way to
Manaus, adding.$30 million
and 78 miles to the project. As
a result, diesel fuel will no
longer have to be sent in by
boat for local consumption,
blackouts will diminish and
businesses can be promised
regular supplies of cheap,
clean energy.

“Each municipality is using
this to increase its economic
potential,” said Eduardo

rowth may be

cap multinationals that pay
dividends for about six
months now,” said Hugh
Moore, partner at Guerite
Advisors. ,

“The more diversification
you have in the international
arena the better so that you
aren’t left being driven by
exactly what’s going on here
in the U.S.”

He said large-cap stocks —
whose market value exceeds
$5 billion — usually le
behind small caps and tec:
nology issues. But, “now their

trying to close between
innings, it could be deducted.
In compiling your records,
you might want to go into
some detail about what you
and your client discussed.

If you have any questions
about the deductibility of
these expenses, you should
consult a tax professional.

There are some instances
where the line between enter-
tainment expenses and busi-
ness gifts can look a little
blurred. For instance, if you

has now come.”

However, economists are
still trying to determine
exactly how fast the economy
is slowing, especially after
recent data suggested it might
be expanding at a better-than-
expected rate.

Speculation about a possi-
ble interest rate cut by the
Federal Reserve has now led
to talk central bankers might
need to hike.

“Based on guidance from
corporate America and the
forthcoming economic data,

give a customer tickets to an
event but don’t go yourself, is
that entertainment? Most
likely the answer is no — it’s
not entertainment unless you
or one of your employees
attends the event.

“Tf it’s entertainment, it
typically involves the com-
pany and a representative
going out with someone,”
Toolan said. “With a gift, typi-
cally, the company is not
involved, and it’s pretty much
an expenditure made on

Braga, the governor of Ama-
zonas.

The projects, he said,
include one to build a plant in
Codajas to process agai (pro-
nounced ah-sigh-EE), an
Amazon fruit whose purple
pulp and juice Brazilians con-
sume as a health and energy
tonic, and another in Manaca-
paru, to expand the produc-
tion of organic fibers there.

“The idea is not only to
avoid repeating the errors
committed in the past, but
also to change the energy
sources here in the north of
the country,” Braga said.

“More than 90 percent of
this state is forest, and I want -
to keep it that way.”

near _

investors will begin to seek
direction as far as the market.
is concerned,” said Peter Car-
dillo, chief market economist
for Avalon Partners.

“Traditionally, going into
large caps would be the case if
we were headed toward
higher interest rates along
with a stronger economy. But,
I think it’s a little too early to
make that decision.” —

He’s waiting for a little
more economic data before
making “any real switches
within the marketplace.”



Senet
ILLUSTRATION BY MICHAEL HOGUE/MCT

behalf of a customer with no
pleasure on behalf of an
employee” or the owner.

What if you bring a bottle
of wine or food to a party
given by a customer? Toolan
suggests that’s probably a gift.

Gift deductions have very
strict rules — a business can
deduct only $25 worth of gifts
per recipient per year.

You can, however, give
multiple gifts to employees in
one firm and deduct up to $25
for each.

Die-hard fans can buy insurance for tickets to the game

* TICKETS

week, the average cost of a
ticket to the colossal sporting
event was $5,540. Partial cov-
erage is not available, Porter
said.

Policies cover last-minute
injuries and illnesses, acci-
dents, the death or illness of
family members and other
unforeseen incidents, like
inclement weather, that may
prevent someone from getting

to an event.

Also, policy holders have
to show that the ticket was
not used by anyone else.

Robert Tuchman, presi-
dent of TSE Sports & Enter-
tainment, a company that
acquires Super Bowl tickets
for corporate clients, said the
idea was appealing.

“When you have them,
they are so valuable. You’re
putting them under your pil-
low at night and then making

Policies cover last-minute injuries and
illnesses, accidents, the death or illness of
family members and other unforeseen
incidents, like inclement weather, that may
prevent someone from getting to an event.

sure they are there every
morning.

If they disappeared, got
lost or were stolen, it would

be nice to be refunded,”
Tuchman said.

TSE, Tuchman empha-
sized, keeps their clients’ tick-

ets ina safety deposit box.

Porter, of World Access,
denied the insurance pan-
dered to the morbidly pessi-
mistic, but it offered a good
value for expensive tickets,
especially those purchased
months in advance.

“I would say it’s for people
who are being realistic,” Por-
ter said.

“Having insurance can
ease the emotional pain of
missing a greatly anticipated

event.”

Tuchman wasn’t so sure,
saying barring the worst, it
was hard to conceive not
being able to unload some of
the most valuable tickets in
the world.

“T’ye been to the last 10
Super Bowls, and I don't
recall seeing any empty
seats,” he said.

“T think it’s another way for
insurance companies to make

”

money.



NE



Investor ‘injury’ concerns
on Port Authority petition ‘S

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



THE Grand Bahama Cham-
ber of Commerce’s president
told The. Tribune that the writ
issued to wind-up the Grand
Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) will likely cause
more “injury” to investor con-
fidence and potential in
Freeport.

Christopher Lowe said the
Chamber’s members, and all
GBPA licencees, “remain ded-
icated” to Freeport and its
vision, despite the ongoing
shareholder dispute between
the Port’s two major share-

holders,.Sir Jack Hayward and.

the estate of the late Edward
St George. He was responding
to the latest development in
the saga over Sir Jack’s claim
that he owns 75 per cent of the
GBPA and Port Group Ltd,
which has seen Gregory Moss,
the attorney representing Sir



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Jack and Hannes Babak in the
matter, file a petition with the
Supreme Court to wind-up the
GBPA.

Mr Moss was representing a
client, Island Bay Condomini-
um Phase III Association, in a
separate case against the
GBPA, and had obtained a
default judgement for $1.2 mil-
lion on his client’s behalf. The
winding-up petition was filed
after the GBPA failed to
respond to a statutory demand
for payment of the $1.2 mil-
lion judgement, which was
served on it on December 28,
2006.

Mr Lowe told The Tribune: |

“This latest writ for the wind-
ing-up of the Port Authority,
we believe, will only further
serve to damage the credibility
of the players involved in this
action.

“We remain dedicated to the
clarity of vision needed for
Freeport, the original anchor









/HALSBURY
/CHAMBERS

Counsel and Attorneys-at-Law Notaries Public
is seeking to hire an ambitious

COMMERCIAL ATTORNEY

for its Nassau Office

Applicants with a minimum of five (5) years
experience must possess the skills and the ability to
work independently on conveyancing and mortgage

matters.

Attractive salary and benefits are available to the
candidate with the right aptitude and skills.

Applicants should send resumes to:

THE HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGER
P.O. Box N-979, Nassau, Bahamas or
By facsimile (242) 393-4558 or
E-mail: info@halsburylawchambers.com

Security & General
INSURANCE

Security & General Insurance Co., a local property and casualty
insurer and member of the Colonial Group of Bermuda, seeks
to appoint a Claims Manager to their Nassau office.

As the manager of our claims department, you will be
responsible for the management and operation of the claims
department reporting directly to the General Manager and
management team on all matters relating to strategic and local
initiatives both ongoing and forming part of the company’s

development strategy.

You must demonstrate a proven track record as the all round
performer in the field of property and casualty claim
management with a minimum of at least 10 years experience
within the industry. In particular, you will have experience in
the legal aspects of personal injury claims handling, catastrophe
management and substantive motor claims experience.
The company offers a competitive remuneration package with
benefits commensurate to qualifications and experience.

Resumés should be sent to The Human Resources Manager,
P. O. Box N 3540 no later than 5th February 2007.



project for the Bahamas.”

Mr Lowe added that under- .

standing the present situation
playing out between the

GBPA’s shareholders, and the -

root causes that had developed
over many years, “will help
chart the way forward for the
uniform benefit of people,
island, community licencees
and country”.

The Grand Bahama Cham-
ber of Commerce president
said: “The unfortunate fallout

from this myopic situation is .

the injury it does to local and

tial, but we feel confident that
once past this unfortunate
development, Freeport will
totally surpass the Govern-
ment in sustained success” and
economic development, “to
operate with full stakeholder
involvement in all aspects of
Freeport’s future.”

Mr Lowe added: “We
believe that the Port Authori-
ty, as the quasi-governmental
authority that it is, will survive
due to the efforts of a number
of dedicated individuals there-
in, and once through this mess,
it will thrive.”

MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007, PAGE 5B





international investor poten-

UU eS Ta UCT

ee) We on Montlays



February 2007

ya Waa Property ‘Pik

:
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BAHAMAS
RE ALYY

EST. 1949

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community in the well established area of
Coral Harbour. Villas feature a hexagon
shape, airy interiors, woad or tile floors, large
windows and a wrap-around balcony.

Each unit is designed to maximize individual
privacy and offer tranquil ocean views.

The community features beautiful gardens
enhanced with ponds and waterfalls and an
infinity pool. in addition, dock slips will be
available for the avid boater. The villas can
be one, two, three bedrooms or more.
Pre-construction price: $650,000





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“| Put People and Places Together” —

DID YOU KNOW...
There are 120 single men (i.e. never married, widowed or divorced) who are in their 20’s for every 100 single
wornen of the same age.









The museum is named for the African slave Pompey who led a revolt on the island of
Exuma in 1830 and defied the dehumanizing institution of slavery. The museum is
housed in the former marketplace, Vendue House built around 1769 to allow for the sale

of commodities mnchiditg enslaved Africans.






















This riveting exhibition was created by the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture
and UNESCO and is featured at the Pompey Museum during this bicentennial year to mark
the abolition of the transatlantic slave trade.

This traveling exhibition is unique in that it focuses less on enslaved Africans as victims
and more on the ways in which-they reshaped their destinies and place in history through

the creation of distinct cultures .. .
Schomburg Press Release

Authentic objects associated with the trauma of enslavement including shackles, a slave
branding iron, a slave whip, furniture from a slave house and more are here for you to see and
experience.

Days/Hours: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday
9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Closed: Sunday and Thursday

Adults: $3.00
Seniors (60 plus) $2.00
Children (under 14) $1.00
Adults: $2.00
Children (under 14) $1.00

Admission: Non-Residents:

Residents:





PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



UME eer

No complimentary room
tax plan, hoteliers told

STORE MANAGER

Small Retail Store specializing in
girls accessories is seeking a dynamic,
energetic, and highly motivated Store
Manager prior

retail managerial
experience to handle all aspects
of store operations. Only persons
30 years and older need apply.

Please send resumes by e-mail to

ecooke@coralwave.com
Phone: 324-2970



@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

THE Ministry of Tourism will
not intend pursue the introduc-
tion of a complimentary room
tax, the minister of tourism told
Bahamian hoteliers during his
address at the closing of National
Tourism Week.

Obie Wilchcombe, did, though
note the Ministry’s intent to
expand the scope of responsibili-









ty for the Hotel Licensing
Department.

“Its expanded role will include
closer monitoring of our proper-
ties, aimed at reducing the level of
complaints of our guests,” he said,
adding that the Ministry of
Tourism. would evolve into a
Tourism Corporation.

Mr Wilchombe said the Min-
istry of Tourism was now entering
a reconstruction phase to ensure
that the Bahamas remains com-
petitive in an ever-changing and
expanding tourism market.

He said there was a negative
spirit, overcrowded with those
who cast doubt on the ability of
Bahamians to meet the challenge
of this new phase of economic
development.

NOTICE

“We have been overloaded
with the arguments that we will
be unable to find Bahamians to
work on the construction of many
of the anchor properties, and
once completed, we will not be
able to find qualified Bahami-
ans,” Mr Wilchcombe added.

He said this could only remain
if the status quo stayed the same.

The problem would not be that.

we will be unable to find Bahami-
ans, but rather if the country
refused to prepare young people,
they will have no value on the job
market.

Mr Wilchcombe said that now '

the Government has successfully
attracted investors, it must pre-
pare young Bahamians.

“The Ministry will lead an ini-

Y

NOTICE is hereby given that ATAIN TAKITOTA OF
BAHAMA AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 22th day of January, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,

Nassau, Bahamas.








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CHEVENING

tiative that will see the creation of
a training institution, which will
absorb hundreds of young peo-
ple annually. The young Bahami-
ans will be exposed to theoretical
and practical training in all facets
of the tourism industry,” he said.

Mr Wilchcombe added that
Bahamians will be qualified and
certified upon completion, and
thus obtain secure employment.

He said the standard will be
sun, sand, sea and service.

Further, realising the impor-
tance of technology, the Ministry
of Tourism will introduce a 24-
hour online video and audio tech-
nology network to market the
Bahamas. ;

Mr Wilchombe added that the
new initiatives must be coupled
with placing product high on its
list of priorities, such as ensuring
the Bahamas remains clean.

A tourism excellence centre is
to be established to showcase
those who have contributed to
tourism. ~

The minister also announced
that veteran tourism experts
Angela Cleare, Bobby Issacs and
Cordell Thompson will be asked
to lead this significant step.

“What we did yesterday will
not suffice,” Mr Wilchcombe said.
“We must therefore evolve into a
Tourism Corporation that will
provide the leverage that is
demanded to meet the expecta-
tions of all of the islands.”

He added that it was incon-
ceivable to believe that the mar-
keting and promotional dollars
for the central government will
be enough to continue to develop,
promote and market the product.

New ways must be found, Mr
Wilchcombe said.

“The corporation will create a
new vista for tourism growth and
development, expanding and
stretching the arms of the Min-
istry, ensuring that our collective
product is globally competitive
and our economy secured.”

BRITISH CHEVENING SCHOLARSHIPS FOR 2007-2008

Applications are now being accepted for the 2007-2008 Chevening Scholarships,
available to Bahamian applicants wishing to pursue post-graduated studies in the
UK in the following subjects:

Justice & Human rights

Media/journalism studies

International relations/diplomacy Public Administration
Sustainable development

Law

Environmental Studies

Management

Further information and application forms can be found on the British Council

(Jamaica) website at: www.britishcouncil.org/jamaica

est
SM ER ASS

Mark your calendar

Our Application Deadline

is February 2, 2007 |
Remember to include the following with your application
¢ $40.00 non-refundable processing fee
¢ Copy of passport pages showing your name, date of
birth and expiration date of passport
¢ Official high school transcript
¢ Test scores and copy of BUC and BGCSE results to date
Don’t let the deadline pass you by!



soon to be the University of The Bahamas.

Closing date 5th February 2007

e look forward to welcoming you to The College,





THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007, PAGE 7B








Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs FE

G & IR



INTERNATIONAL
LANGUAGES
AND CULTURES
INSTITUTE



INTERNATIONAL
LANGUAGES
AND CULTURES
TNS air Ee



ALOBAL URGERSTARDING



COMMUNICATION: A KEY TO GLOBAL UNDERSTANOING COURSE OFFERINGS:
SPRING 2007

Sed aa TRO UU u MORAY

EVENTS










Beginning 12" February





DATE [*] VENUE



CONVERSATIONAL HAITIAN CREOLE I: Mon/Wed: 6 - 7:30 PM





Institute



| Spanish Lecture — on literary / cultural topic to be Thursday 7 p.m. $5.00 CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I: Tues/Thurs: 6 — 7:30 PM
; y 25, 2007 ;
announced January 25, 200 GERMAN FOR TOURISM: Mon/Wed: 6 — 7:30 PM
| Discussion Panel — Where ls Haiti going? With Dr. | Thursday 7am institute This course is designed for those working in the tourism industry, teaching the

basic language skills needed for effective interaction with German tourists.

Eugene Newry, Ambassador Harold Joseph and COB
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I: Mon/Wed: 7:30 —- 9 PM

Lecturer Frenand Leger
Spanish Cinema evening ~ La Ultima Cena by Luis
Bunuel mo

February 1, 2007






Friday Institute

February 9, 2007
Wednesday

7 p.m.
February 28, 2007

7 p.m.
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH II: Tues/Thurs: 6 — 7:30 PM

CLASSICAL LATIN I: Mon/Wed: 4 — 5:30 PM
| ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE: Mon/Wed: 5 — 6:30 PM
ADVANCED FRENCH CONVERSATION GROUP: Wed: 1 to 2 PM





Victor Hugo beyond “Les Miz” ~ Lecture by |. Moss Institute

on one of the greatest romantic poets










































































International Café Evening Thursday 7pm. Institute $5.00 These are directed conversation and practice “brown bag” sessions - bring your
March 82007 own lunch! 10 consecutive sessions: $100 ($50 for COB Students)

Se SS ee pe fet Sa ea anna | LOCATION:

An evening of Irish music — dancing and sing along | Saturday 7-10 Choices $20.00 SN Se .

to celebrate St. Patrick's Day — with Canadian group | March 10, 2007 Munnings Building (next to KFC at COB Roundabout): Room 15

The Immigrants DURATION: ,

3 hours per week for 10 weeks,.total course hours: 30 hours

French Folksong Evening -- the lessons learned from | March 23, 2007 7pm. Institute $5.00 :

folk songs and their historical significance — lecture PRICE: $ 250.00 per course

by I. Moss followed by sing-along (copies of texts TELEPHONE: 302-4584 or 302-4587

handed out)

Communication: The Key to Global Understanding

b= Sao : z

The Junkanoo Costume - demonstration of pasting March 30, 2007 7 p.m. Institute COST

techniques by members of various “rushing” groups

- followed by a Junkanoo rush

What is Nouvelle Cuisine? - with the participation | April 4, 2007 Choices $10.00 | : ;

of Chef Laudermilk from Hospitality — why is French NAG prospective ae ates for SPRING 2007 MUST
ciisine: so emponaah fate = z baes = A asd

Spanish Literary Evening — to be announced April 19, 2007 7pm Institute $5.00 the Records Department on or before FEBRUARY De 2007.
Invite the Corona Society (A group of women April 27, 2007 7 p.m. Institute $5.00 At form will lye accepted without:

writers) to speak on writing techniques or do a

writing workshop . ‘ 5

v ALL SIGNATURES (Student’s, Advisor’s and

German Maifest --a celebration of Spring with a May 4, 2007 7 p.m. Institute $5.00 Oit-tigolerastoye 2 Sy) and

sing-along of German folk songs — led and snacks : , :
accompanied by L. Moss: ;

Eee ¥ PROOF OF PAYMENT from the Business Office.
| Bahamian folksong traditions ~ an evening with the | May 17, 2007 7 p.m. Institute $10.00 , : : : ‘

Dicey-Do Singers snacks & N.B. ANY form submitted after this date will be considered

soft drinks









LATE and will be processed for the Summer Semester 2007.

The Colle







COB - RESPONDING TO GB’S NEED FOR
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS:
Patricia Anderson; Cheryl Bartlett; Sharel
Carter; Crecola Glass; Sarah Grant;
Lawanda Greene; Sharon Wilchombe Hall;
Joselee Hepburn; Kara Johnson;

Nicole Lightbourne; Eyvette Roberts; Evette
Rolle; Brenda Sands




e of Bahamas

Grand Bahama’s professionals continue to tool and
retool themselves as they rise to meet the challenge
of being proficient, productive and au courant in an
increasingly competitive and changeable work arena.

















MICROSOFT OUTLOOK: Crecola
Glass; Gloverbell Anderson; Eyvette
Thompson; Charisse Brown; Hadassah
Swain; Paula Von Hamm; Laverne Russell;
Christine van der Linde; lona Kemp; Patricia
Hutchenson; Craig Nicholls; Nicola Elliott;
Althea Burrows; Anastacia lsaac; Corey
Cartwright; Kara Cartwright; Levette Smith;
Mary Russell; Michelle Riley; Olliemae
Tynes; Oseta Henfield; Paulette Richie;
Renaldo Karageorgiou; Sirissa McCartney

To this end, having completed rigorous courses of
study, twenty-five persons proudly earned professional
cettification through The Centre for Continuing
Education and Extension Services, CEES,
at COB’s Northern Campus in Freeport,
Grand Bahama. Sixteen have been awarded CM
designation by The Institute of Certified Professional
Managers at James Madison University, Virginia, as a
result of their completion of the Certified Professional
Managers Programme offered by CEES in conjunction
with (CPM. The other nine, upon completion of the
Certified Human Resource Management Programme,
have been awarded CHAM certification. This
programme has been offered in conjunction with
Columbia Southern University, Alabama.







MICROSOFT TRACKING: Gioverbell
Anderson; Charisse Brown; Hadassah
Swain; Nicola Elliott; Paulette Ritchie;
Tenisha Cox; Brenda Sands; Sirissa
McCartney; Levette Smith.












CM awardees are: Anthia Bartlett, RN; Anthony
Beckford, Crane Operator - G.B. Shipyard; Antoine
Brooks, Manager - Radio Shack; Jonathan Campbell,
Utility/Env. Operator, PharmChem; Janet Carey, Office
Manager, Tropical Shipping Co Ltd; Sheryt Carey,

RN; Don Forbes, Prod /Control Asst. Manager - G.B
Shipyard; Allison Levarity, Branch Manager - Fidelity
Bank; Pamela Minnis, RN; Sharon R. Morley, RN; Sonia
Nesbitt, RN; Glenys Roach, Nursing Officer I, Barbara
Rolle; Admin. Asst.- Min of Tourism; Annie Stubbs-
Grant, RN; Joyann Williams, Sec. - Batelco; Meshelle
Wright, RN.

Antoine Brooks donathan J. Campbell Sheryl L. Carey





SHORTHAND I: Jar’ Darnell Bowe; Shan
Elliott; Eyvette Roberts; Deondra Stubbs.













Certificates courses in Massage Therapy
and Supervisory Management open to
the general community, were also well
subscribed. Certificate recipients are as
follows:



Don Forbes Sharon R. Marley

MASSAGE THERAPY I: Nakeisha

Bain; Winifred Forbes; Lisa Gibson; Stacy
Hanna; Auttea Lightbourne; Lorine Miller;
Nicole Moss; Mandy Plant; Drexel Rahming;
Fretelia Rolle; Deloris Russell; Qutel Smith-
McPhee; Ceceal Williams; Shyrone Willis.

’ CHRM awardees are: Judy Bridgewater, Nursing
Officer Il; Dorlan Cartwright, District Manager, DSS
Ltd.; Janice Forbes, HR Assistant - W & S Our
Lucaya; Quinta Forbes, Educator - Tabernacle Baptist;
Alyvonnetta Levarity, HR Asst - Freeport Container Port;
Lennise Lopez, Secretary - COB; Frances Maynard,
Financial Controller - Freeport Gases; Charmaine Rolle,
Accounts Payable Rep. - insurance Management;
Marcia Sands, Training and Employee Manager, Isle of
Capri.



joyann Wiliams



Glenys Roach Barbara N. Rolle Meshelie 0. Wright




SUPERVISORY MANAGEMENT:
Clementina Burrows-Nixon; Sherise
Dawkins; Elise Hepburn; Helena McPhee;
Janice Minnis; Sylvia Mortimer; Lori Russell.

Certified Human Resource Management Programme Awardees











Congratulations are extended to all
individuais and companies who have
demonstrated their commitment to
continued education by their support and
‘/or participation in these programmes.

Responding to the training needs of industry is a
significant aspect of the mandate of CEES. Hence,
upon the request of the Grand Bahama Port Authority,
CEES developed and offered specific courses to
GBPA's employees. in 2006, over 30 GBPA employees
earned CEES certificates for successful completion of
courses/workshops, as follows:



Doran Cartwright Q. Forbes

danice Forbes

Alyvonnetta Levarity



CEES anticipates 2007 to be
nother busy year. Personal and
professional development
ourses and programmes are
scheduled to commence in |
. March, 2007. -
interested persons are asked to call -
L CEES orcomeby ~~
_ The College of The Bahamas |

Frances Maynard

on West Settlers Way

oe ee

Soe. He

aay

Se ay yO re AL AAP IE BENT MILO ENE REN AS ARB OTT PAR. ses

ab

wee

RPI WY UR Re MPO es ee >

AE

SS & hel ae eas Se eee eet ee ee ee

for additional information. _



ceunsaue

Resarn



PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007



et OF The

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Libraries and Instructional Media Services Department
The Law Library Branch:

Lunch & Litigation

Inaugural Luncheon

Topic: Consumer Protection Act, 2006
x fs AN

Wednesday, 31st January, 2007
Choices Restaurant
Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute
The College of The Bahamas
Thompson Boulevard
Nassau, The Bahamas
12:00 noon - 2:00 p.m.

Silent Auction of Student Art
will take place during the luncheon

Donation: $35.00 :: Student: $25.00
Part proceeds in aid of the new library func




Have you done anything
special for yourself today?

Try a Personal Development Course/Workshop at COB’s
Centre for Continuing Education and Extension Services...

With one of our courses, you can gain

new job skills, increase your chances for
promotion or just learn something new for
personal satisfaction. With your success

in courses such as Massage Therapy,
Drapery Making, Floral Design, Make-up
|- Application or Nail Art Technician, you
could even start a small business. Sign up
for a course today,
































































ENQUIRIES
Email .: perdev@cob.edu.bs








All fees are included with the exception of
ine application fee of $40.00 (one time),









vee the right to change Tuition,
Bes se Content. Course Schedule
and Course Materials.



































Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs



BUSI9O4

FLORBO2

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

EDU












THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES
Computer Offerings - Spring Semester 2007





- EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT
PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide
participants with an overview ol the
fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. it
focuses on developing effective and dynamic

. QUICKBOOKS .
This course trains new and existing small
business entrepreneurs (fewer than 20
employees) in organizing and managing their

GOMPUTER APPLICATIONS |

This course is for the beginner who knows
very little about computers and does not
understand bow it works. This course
covers the major computer concepts with
extensive hands-on practice using various

accounting using QuickBooks Pro software.
Students will learn how to set up their

software, including: PowerPoint presentations. company files, chart of accounts, budget and
(}) Microsoft Office - Word Processing customers, vendor and employee files.

(ii) Microsolt Excel - Spreadsheet Pre-requisite: None

(iii) Microsoft Access - Database Date: Thursday, 8th March 2007 Pre-requisife: None




Management. Time: . 9:30am - 4:30pm Begins: Tuesday, 27th February 2007
Duration: 1 day Time: 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Pre-requisite: None Venue: CEES Computer Lab Duration: 6 weeks
Begins: Monday, 5th February, 2007 Fees: $160.00 Venue: SEES Computer Lab
6:00pm - 9:00pm Fees: $330.00
Section 01 (CEES) INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY #




This course covers basic concepts of WEBPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP
Informatio Technology. The course provides Targeting persons who would like to create
training in these areas: Basic Hardware their personal web pages, this course
Proficiency, Application Features Proficiency, —_ will cover Web pags creation, Web site

Saturday, 3rd February, 2007
10:00am - 1:00pm
Section 02 (CEES)

















Duration: 12 weeks Operating System Proficiency, Internet and management and HTML. Specific topics will
Venue: CEES Computer Lab Email Proficiency. include Formatting, Graphies, Multimedia,
Tuition: $450.00 Forms and Tables and hosting of web pages.

Pre-requisite: None i
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS # Begins: Wednesday, 7th February
This course covers the advanced concepts 2007

Pre-requisife: Participants must be
computer literate and have




with extensive hands-on practice using Time: 6:00pm - 9:06pm a basic knowledge of
various software, including: Duration: 12 weeks word processing
{i} Microsoft Office - Word Processing Venue: CEES Computer Lab Dates: ist & 2nd March, 2007
(i) Microsoft Excel - Spreadsheet Fees: $450.00
(iii) Microsoft Access - Database Time: &:30am - 4:30pm
Management. PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR Duration: 2 days
This course is a hands-on introduction to Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Pre-requisite: Computer Applications | technology systems for use in information Fees: $550.00
Begins: Thursday, 8th February, 2007 — environments. The course will cover the
Time: 6:00pm - 9:00pm following topics: Basic Hardware, Operating
Duration: 12 weeks Systems, Troubleshooting and Repairs.
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: $550.00 Pre-requisite: None



Begins: Monday 12th Sabpuaty 2007
Time: 6:00pm - 7:30pm







Monday & Wednesday
Duration: 12 weeks
Venue: BHTC Computer Lab
“Fees: $500.00

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting application,
kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport, CEES reserves ihe right to change Tuition, Fees,
Course Content, Paurse Sehedule and Course.



Contact the Coordinator - gris 2 cob sie bs

Personal Development - SPRING SEMESTER JANUARY 2007

COURSE SECT COURSE TEME DAY START DUR FEE
NO. NO. DESCRIPTION

AGCOUNTING

ACCASOO Oi ACCA FOR BEGINNERS | 6:00-8:00prm MonfWed 12-Feb 10 wks $250
ACCASO4 O1 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS 6:00-8:00pm Tue/Thurs .13-Feb 10 wks $275
ACCAS02 O01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS Hl 6:00-8:00pm Tue/Thurs 13-Feb 10wks $300




BUSINESS

BUSI9O0 Ot
CUST800 a
01

27-Feb Bwks $225
tday $170
1Owks $225

CREDIT & COLLECTIONS | 6:00-9:00pm Tue
SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE W/S 9:30am-4:30pm = Thurs 22-Feb
INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS | §:00-9:00pm Thurs 1-Mar






COMPUTERS

COMPS01 QO} COMPUTER APPLICATIONS | 6:00-9-0Opm Mon 5Feb i2wks $450
COMP901 02 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS | 10:00am-1:00pm_ Sat a-Feb i2wks $450
COMP802 Oo COMPUTER APPLICATIONS It 6:00-9:00pm Thurs 8-Feb f2 wks $550

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY I
QUICKBOOKS

PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR
EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT W/S
WEB PAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP

§:00-9-00pm Wed ?-Feb 12wks $450
6§:00-9:00pm Tue 27-Feb Gwks $330
6:00-7:30pm MonWed 12-Feb 12 wks $800
9:30am-4:30pm Thurs 8-Mar iday $160
9:30am-4:30pm Thurs/Ai 1-Mar = 2 days $550

COMP903~ 01
COMP 941 01
COMP9D3 01
COMP960 01
GOMP930 Ot






COSMETOLOGY
COSMB802 Qi MAKE-UP APPLICATION
COSMB04 01 MANICURE & PEDICURE
COSM8O0? O1 NAB ART TECHNICIAN

26-Feb Swks $225
27-Feb Bwks $225
26-Feb Gwks $500

6:00-9:00pim Mon
6:00-9:00pm Tue

6:00-9:00pm Mon/Thurs





DECORATING

DECOBDO (1 INTERIOR DECORATING | 6:00-9:00pm Wed 28-Feb Bwks $225

DECO8M Q1 INTERIOR DECORATING 1 6:00-9:00pm Tue 97-Feb Swks $250

FLOREO0 01 FLORAL DESIGN | 6:00-9:00prn Tue 27-Feh 1Owks $225

FLORBO1 Ot FLORAL DESIGN H 6:00-9:00pm Mon 26-Feb TO wks $250
|

01 FLORAL DESIGN Hl 8:00-9:00pm Thurs {-Mar 10 wks $300









ENGLISH

ENG S00 a EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS 6:00-9:00pm Tue 27-Feb Bwks $225



HEALTH & FITNESS

MASGIOO Ot MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS | 6:00-9:00pmn Thurs 22-Feb 10 wks $465
MASG9O1 04 MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS IE 6:00-9:00pm Mon 26-Feb 10 wks $620
HLTHS00 a GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR 6:00-9:00pm Wed 28-Feb 10 wks $400





MANAGEMENT
GMT900 01
GMTS01 01

8-Feb 12 wks $250

1V2wks $300

Thurs

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT | 6:00-9:30pm
HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Il 6:00-9:30pm Mon 5-Feb

me ee






MEDICAL

MEDT900 01 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 22-Feb 10 wks $225

00-9:00pm Thurs

SEWING
EW 800 01
SEW 802 Ot

26-Feb 1Q0wks $225
22-Feb 10 wks $250

oo

BASICS OF FREEHAND CUTTING |
BASICS OF FREEHAND CUTTING II

6:00-9:00pm Mon
6:00-9:00pm Thurs

to



SEW 808 Ot DRAPERY MAKING | 6:00-9:00pm Tues 27-Feb 10 wks $225
SEW 806 01 DRAPERY MAKING I 6:00-9:00pm Wed 28-Feb 10 wks $250
SEWBT ot UPHOLSTERY MAKING | 6:00-9:00pm Wed 28-Feb 10 wks $225
SEW 804 01 BEDROOM DECORATING | 4:00-10:00pm Sal 24-Feb 10 wks $225





























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5 o

_ fRIBUNE BUSINESS MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007, PAGE 9B

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs FEDUCATING

TIMETABLE OF CLASSES TIMETABLE OF CLASSES

Master’s Degree Programme | Master’s Degree Programme
in Library & Information Sciences fj = —— in School Counselling



_SPRING SEMESTER _ n ! _ SPRING SEMESTER















| Date ‘| Course | Time i
macau Friday, Jan. 12, 2007 CHDS 682 - Career Development 5:00 pm — 9:00 pm
oo - . and Guidance 8 He
Saturday, Jan. 13, 2007 Saturday, Jan. 13,2007 | CHDS 682 9:00 am — 5:00 pn
pm F : J



Lo - . SS — 2 - CHDS 620 — Group Work: Theory 5:00 pm =)
Saturday, Feb. 17, 2007 and Techniques
CHDS 620



9:00 am — 5:00. pm

5:00 pm — 9:00 pm
9:00 am ~ 5:00 pm










9:30 am to 3:00

DM




sat
ce ENN


























-
10:00 am to 4:00 Friday, Feb. 16, 2007 EDU 620 5:00 pm — 9:00 pm
hildren m Sabirday, Hee 17, 2007 EDU 620 9:00 am ~ 5:00 pm










RR a CUNY EEE CK
a ee |

Friday, Mar. 16, 2007 EDU 620
1S 626- 10:00 am to 3:00
noe ee Saturday, Mar. 17, 2007 EDU 620



| 5:00 pm — 9:00 pm
9:00 5:00 m













pm









Friday, Mar. 23, 2007 _ CHDS 682 - 35:00 pm — 9:00 pm
Saturday, Mar. 24, 2007 CHDS 682 9:00 am — 5:00 pm








.










CHDS 682 5:00 pm — 9:00 pm_
CHDS 682 9:00 am 5:00 pm









Course Code : Course Name Instructors
LIS 593 Multicultural Materials for | Dr. Linda Alexander
Children (3 credits)

5:00 pm — 9:00 pm |
9:00 am — 5:00 pm
























LIS 626 Information Science in Dr. Vicki Gregory : a
Librarianships (3 credits) Course Code | Course Name | Instructors
. / CHDS 620 Group Work: Theory and Dr. F. Ziegler

LIS 656 - | Materials for Children Dr. Henrietta Smith Techniques (3 credits) Mrs. Zoe Powell

. (3 credits) Mrs. Ann Smith

EDU 682 Career Development and Dr. Marty Jencius
. Guidance (3 credits) Mr. Vicente Roberts

* Please Note: The dates and times ‘are subject to change. i





* ALL CLASSES WILL BE HELD IN ROOM E12, E BLOCK.
Gt cymes Sak ; ae ° Please Note: The dates and times are subject to change.



a * ALL CLASSES WILL BE HELD IN ROOM 3A, Michael Eldon Complex.



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS _ THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES | CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES

Health and Fitness Course Offerings - Spring Semester 2007 | Personal Development Workshops - Spring Semester 2007





“



MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS i

This is an introductory course for learning basic techniques of massage therapy and its many
benefits. Major topic areas will include Massage Theory, Manipulations and Techniques, Wellness
Education (Psychological and Physiological Benefits), Indications and Contraindications, Serving
Special Populations and Complementary Bodywork Systems, to include Aromatherapy Essentials.



This workshop is designed to pravide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of superior

Starting: Thursday, 22nd February 2007 customer service. |t focuses on customer value, retention and relationship building and employee
Time: 6:00-8:00prn motivation,

Duration: 10 Weeks Date: Thursday, 22nd February, 2007

Tuition Fee: $465.00 Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm

Venue: Yo be announced

Vente: Munnings Building, The College of The Bahamas
Tuition: $170.00

MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS 1
This is an advanced course for learning techniques of rnassage therapy and its many benefits. Major EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS

topics include Introduction to Hydrotherapy; Spa and Body treatments; Basic Facial; Aromatherapy- This workshop is designed to provice participants with an overview af the fundamentals of Microsoft
Fundamentals or Essential Oils; Relaxation and Meditative Methods: anid Hot Stone Therapy. PowerPaint. It focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations,

Starting: — Monday, 26th February 2007 Date: Thursday, 8th March, 2007

Time: '6:00-9:00pm Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm

Duration; 10 Weeks Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road

Tuition Fee: $620.00 Tuition: $160.00

Venue: Munnings Building, The Callege of The Bahamas

WES PAGE DESIGN

GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR This course wil cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy
This is an introductory course for learning how to teach group fitness and exercise classes. Major working with computers and would like fo create their own web pages are encouraged to attend.
topics of discussion will include: Basic Anatomy and Physiolagy; Choreography and Cueing; the five Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics. Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web
componenis of fitness, nutrition, basic exercise testing and how to teach group exercise. pages. \ F

Starting: Wecinesday, 28th February, 2007 : : Date: Thursday & Friday, Ist & 2nd March, 2007

Time: 6:00-8:00pm i , Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm

Duration; 10 Weeks Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road

Tuition Fee: $400.00 Tuition: $550.00

Verue: Munnings Building, The College of the Bahamas

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time}. When submitting
application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting charige Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials
a i s S, LOUIS 7 SE MONE AUIE 4 “OUTSE Ma as,

application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to
change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials

Contact the Coordinator - perdev(Ocob.edu.bs Contact the Coordinator - perdev@cob.edu.bs





Ba



r {



PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007 THE TRIBUN

NOTICE |

NOTICE is hereby given that GARTH STEWART OF
CROSSING ROCK, ABACO, BAHAMAS is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 22th day of January, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas. ’

Become self-sufficient and acquire the skills to
start and successfully run your own business.
Alpha Entrepreneurial Management Training &
Consultancy Services (AEMTC) can make it
happen for you!

HOW TO START & OPERATE A BUSINESS

PHASE I

February, 19, 20, 22, 26, 27 &
March 1, 2007 6pm-9pm

PHASE II- A One-Day Seminar
February 24, 2007 9am-3pm

The College of The Bahamas, Grosvenor
Close Campus
(GCC) Room 113, Shirley Street

Telephone: 393-5961 or 323-5195
E-mail: alphaenttraining@yahoo.com

CALL & REGISTER RIGHT NOW!
SPACE IS LIMITED!



NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a)

is in
dissolution under the provisions of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the
25th day of January, 2007 when its Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is K. L. Floyd of 16945
Northchase Drive, Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

FROM page 1B

consolidating them in a public
company acceptable to its
shareholders.

“A diluted ownership base
could include such minor inter-
ests as the current sharehold-
ers would wish to retain, togeth-
er with interests of equity part-
ners such as commercial and
individual stakeholders in
Freeport and the Bahamas.”

The Government feels such
an approach would enhance
corporate governance of
Freeport and the GBPA, plac-
ing it in the hands of a broader-
based Board of Directors.

This approach has met with
the St George estate’s support,
the family having told the Gov-
ernment that it has no problem
in selling part of its stake in
Intercontinental Diversified
Corporation (ICD), the Cay-
man entity that acts as a holding
company for their and Sir Jack-
’s ownership interests in the
GBPA and Port Group Ltd.

The St Georges are said by
sources to have accepted the
Government’s position, which

is in line with their own, and
are willing to divest “either by
way of a private sale to inter-
ested third parties or by way of
a public offering”.

As previously revealed exclu-
sively by The Tribune, the fam-
ily has agreed that ownership
of the GBPA and Port Group
Ltd “should be diversified and
that the St Georges and Hay-
wards should either divest
themselves of ownership in the
companies entirely or reduce
their interests to minority share-
holdings”.

It is unclear at this point,
though, whether the estate
would still want to retain a
minority stake, but sources said
it wanted to reach a quick set-
tlement and act “in the best
interests” of Grand Bahama as
a whole. ,

Sir Jack’s position, though, is
that while he is “ready and
able” to acquire the St George
estate’s stake in ICD, he is “not
able” to consider reducing his
shareholding to a minority posi-
tion.

Among the options the two
sides have been discussing, via
mediation and negotiation, in
an effort to settle the dispute

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND
PRODUCTION BAHAMAS OFFSHORE
LIMITED

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named _
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the
undersigned cio P. O. Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or
before 19th February, A.D. 2007. In default thereof they will be

excluded from _ the
by the Liquidator.

benefit of any

distribution made

Dated the 25th day of January, A.D., 2007.

have been that one party buys
out the other; one side sells
either their whole or part share-
holding to a third party; the
entire ICD shareholding is sold;
or that the status quo as the St
Georges claim be maintained,
with both sides holding a 50 per
cent stake in the GBPA.

The latter option seems the
least likely, and given Sir Jack-
*s refusal to contemplate reduc-
ing his shareholding to a minor-
ity stake, it appears likely that
February 7, 2007, will see the
reinstatement of Mr Culmer as
receiver for the GBPA and Port
Group Ltd.

Then, observers have told
The Tribune, the best way for-
ward would appear to be for Sir
Jack’s claim to 75 per cent own-
ership of the GBPA and Port

‘Group Ltd to be resolved as’

rapidly as possible via Supreme
Court trial.

The fact this issue is out-
standing would make it hard for
either party to make an offer
for the other’s ICD shares, as
it could be perceived as either
an offer for 25 per cent, 50 per
cent or 75 per cent.

* Once this is concluded, the
two sides could then move to



resolve the question of the the

GBPA’s long-term ownership
structure. However, it would be
difficult to compel Sir Jack to
sell.

It is understood that no cur-

ae]
«4

a4
©

ee
wn

rent true valuation of the.

GBPA and Port Group has
been performed by a team of
investment bankers or accoun-

tants, making it difficult for Sir 4

Jack or the estate to offer a ,,
price to the other. Sources said, |

though, that prices ranging from

$70 million through to $300 mil- ,,

lion have been knocked back
and forth.

The Tribune previously.”

revealed that Sir Jack was pre-
pared to sell his stake to Hannes

Babak, the GBPA’s chairman,

who has been restrained by a

St-George estate-obtained court, .

order from involvement in the
company’s management and
executive decisions, for $55 mil-
lion in April 2006.

Any involvement by Mr .

Babak represents a sore point
for the St George estate, which
will “vigorously continue to
oppose” any attempt to rein-
state him to his former position

at the GBPA and Port Group:,

Ltd.

NOTICE

ONMO O O

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a)

is in

dissolution under the provisions of the International Business

Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the
25th day of January, 2007 when its Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is K. L. Floyd of 16945
Northchase Drive, Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

Dated the 25th day of January A.D., 2007.

K.L. Floyd
Liquidator
16945 Northcase Drive
Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

Piateo eo tnGay- pt January 520 Te. HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT CO. LTD.

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT CO. LTD. NE NOUNS Reve aie Coneny

8 Attorneys for the above-named Company

NOTICE

-EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION
ITALY LIMITED.

NOTICE

LIMITED — ;
Creditors having debts or claims against the NOTICE 1S HEREBY GIVEN: follows:

above-named’ Company are required to send

particulars thereof to the undersigned c/o P. O. Box ‘eda amtalueerandee
BAHAMAS OFFSHORE LIMITED |

N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or before 19th the provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

February, A.D. 2007. In default thereof they will be

excluded from the benefit of any distribution made | (b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the
nei? 25th day of January, 2007 when its Articles of Dissolution
by. the Liquidator.

were submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the
undersigned c/o P. O. Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or
before 19th February, A.D. 2007. In default thereof they will be
}excluded from the benefit of any distribution made
by the Liquidator.

(a)

Dated the 25th day of January, A.D., 2007.
(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is K. L. Floyd of 16945

Dated the 25th day of January, A.D., 2007.
: Northchase Drive, Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

K.L. Floyd
‘Liquidator
16945 Northcase Drive
Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

K.L. Floyd
Liquidator
16945 Northcase Drive
Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

Dated the 25th day of January A.D., 2007.

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT CoO. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named Company

POSITION
AVAILABLE

Registered Nurse

Bis

Pricing Information As Of:
Friday, 26 January 2007

= FIDELITY

0.54
10.25
6.90
0.70
1.26
1.10
9.00
1.64
9.05
4.22
2.40
5.54
10.70
10.90
10.00
0.50
7.10
8.52
10.00

Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

10.00 aagbromier RealEstate
naa ae a
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symb
14.30 12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.54 Oo RN

eireaeassyempremneniety ,

Responsibilities

e Provide primary and minor emergency
medical care
Administration of medication, oxygen,
intravenous fluids as indicated and outlined
in the Clinical Protocol Manual
Provide accurate and comprehensive medical
reports as required

Requirements:
Holder of current Bahamian Licence
Must have at least three years experience post
graduation
Have current BLS & ALS Certification
ee Bahamas Supermarkets Must be responsible, have good

oe ie co : og communication skills and independent.
52wk-Low Fund Name Last 12 Months Div $

1.2700 Colina Money Market Fund
2.6262 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
2.3220 Colina MSI Preferred Fund
1.1495 Colina Bond Fund
10.0000

rpenanencen snonancndsonpsam tis,

5 ae

Yield
9.35%
7.85%

ol Last Price
14.00
10.00

OE
28.00 ABDAB

S2wk-Hi
1.3253
3.0017
2.5002
1.2175

1.325275"
2.9728"**
2.500211**
1.217450""**
3075

CV should be sent
via e-mail to
mary.epcotmedical
@coralwave.com by
January 31st, 2007.

THE
} BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 _
S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks MEDICLINIC
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's welghted price for daliy volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV § - Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS § - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

*~ 19 January 2007
** - 31 December 2006
*** - 31 December 2006

*** - 31 December 2006

AS INFORMATIE









lew cruise terminal
POMC eirali Corre eA




FROM page 1B

y
i

Bahamian entrepreneurs involved with
those private ports, delivering the experi-
ence and reaping the returns that, in some
cases, the cruise ships have been getting
themselves. We want to encourage more
Bahamian ownership of those experiences
and benefiting from those ports in other
ways.” :
Mt Johngon said the Government has
moved away from a tax rebate for cruise
passengers, not because it did not work,
but because there were better ways to cre-
ate incentives that allows tax dollars to be
treated separate and apart from an incen-

tive.~
t
Moved

“We have moved away from that. The
principle, though, is-even with the rebate

programme, the way it was structured, the
Bahamas received about $11.40 per pas-
senger in head tax, not half, because 600,000
passengers paid the full load. That $11.40 is
almost twice as much higher than the head
tax of many other islands in the Caribbean,”
Mr Johnson said.

Income

“So, relatively, our income from head
tax is a significant amount compared to the
competition. But we are going to an incen-
tive that is based on volume delivered in a
way that we want it. We will provide cash
incentives to the cruise ships. We will not be
rebating, not because it did not stimulate,
but because of other reasons.”

He added that the previous Cruise
Overnight Incentives Act, which expired
at the end of 2003 and has been allowed to
continue in practice as the Bahamas readies
to replace it. traded off allowing the cruise

lines to keep their casinos, restaurants,
shops and bars open while in port in Nassau
or Grand Bahama with keeping them here.

“Our experience has been that with busi-
ness and spend outside the cruise ship, we
saw no dip to speak of. What we found was
that we had far too little to offer after 5pm
in downtown Nassau for the passengers to
take advantage of,” Mr Johnson said.

“As a result, many of them went to the
casino on Paradise Island, so the benefits
went mostly there, not downtown

Provision

“We intend to continue the provision for
economic reasons. They lobbied very effec-
tively with us for that. They could not afford
to shut down for that period of time. They
would then sail earlier and we would rather
them be here till midnight than their leaving
at Spm, and then we would lose 100 per
cent of the revenue.”

Cruise industry concerned

ee

over Bahamas tours

FROM page 1B

ing things for the passengers
and tourists to do”.

These criticisms are likely to
be opposed by Bahamian tour
operators and shore excursion
providers, industry sources
telling The Tribune that this
nation has the second highest
number of tours on offer behind
Mexico.

They are also arguing that the
cruisé lines have begun to copy

theit ideas!through what is”
offered on their private:islands,

where companies such as Car-
nivalRoyal Caribbean and Dis-
ney control all the activities and
excursions provided.

‘ Operator

Rather, Bahamian tour oper-
ator believe their major prob-
lems are getting cruise passen-
gers fo leave their boats at all
when, they arrive in Nassau or
Grand Bahama. especially as
onboard shops, casinos and bars
currently remain open.

Thén there is the issue of fair
markups for: tour operators,
enabling thegy to make a decent
margin and profit. The Tribune

r

















* Computer Literate

o0o0a00

has been repeatedly told over
the past several years that the
cruise lines, in selling excursion
tickets for $40, keep the major-
ity of that revenue and only pass
on between $11-$15 to the oper-
ator.

Ms Paige, and a group of
FCCA platinum industry mem-
bers, were the guests of the
Ministry of. Tourism and the
Nassau/Paradise Island Devel-
opment Board at a luncheon
held in their honour at the
Humidor restaurant on Friday.

“You have to look at the
totality, which is that the cruise
industry once.a year takes: its

chief executives and platinum

members on a cruise,” Ms Paige
said.
“With the popularity of the









N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Freeport Container Port

Grand Bahama, Bahamas

Invites Qualified Candidates to apply for the position of
Crane Technician
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:
* Three (3) years’ experience working on GE, ABB or Siemens Drive Control Systems
* Diploma or Associate Degree in Electronics or Electrical Technology.

* Experience in supporting OMG, HHI or Mobile Cranes preferred.

\

¢ Must be willing to work as part of a Team.

¢ Must be able to repair and maintain:

o AC/DC Motors
o AC/DC Motor Control Drive Equipment
o Medium/High Voltage Distribution Sysiems

Freeport Container Port will offer the following benefits to the successful candidates:
Full-time Employment

Major Medical/Life Group Insurance
Retirement Savings Plan

School Fee Subsidy for Dependents
Performance Bonus

Representatives from the Freeport Container Port will be visiting Nassau on
January 30 & 31, 2007 and will conduct interviews from 09:00 a.m. through 4:00
p.m. daily at the Atlantic House on Co

Candidates are asked to mail Resumes to the attention of:

Human Resources Director
Freeport Container Port
P.O. Box F-42465

Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas

email: ADS@fcp.com.bs

NOTICE is hereby given that ST. FILMA CEZALIEN OF
WILLIAMS ST. OFF SHIRLEY ST., NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of ihe
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the tacts within
twenty-eight days from the 29th day of January, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box

llins Avenue, Centerville

Bahamas, it is significant that
the Bahamas Ministry of
Courism would put on a venue
that would not only have a fan-
tastic entertainment experience
for the group, but is also an edu-
cational purpose, because when
you're sending the amount of
ships and passengers to the
Bahamas. it is important to look

at things with renewed appreci-

ation and enthusiasm.”
Cases

Ms Paige said that in most
cases, all cruise ships visited
both their private islands and
either Nassau or
Bahama during a voyage.

She added that on most of
these islands there was only the



beach experience to enjoy,

which did not satisfy passen- |

gers, leaving plenty of options
for the other islands.

David Johnson, deputy direc-
tor-general at the Ministry of
Tourism for planning and
investment, told the group:
“We're committed to improv-
ing each of our islands and
putting the islands of the
Bahamas on the cutting edge of
tourism destinations around the
world.

“We are committed to our
partnership being one where
we're all able to deliver a qual-
ity and safe experience to our

Grande “Suests. at a reasonable profit
8 for all our suppliers.”
























Qualifications:

performed

hubs.









Remuneration:

1 - II job levels)

~ FIRSTCARIBBEAN

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

Senior Programme Manager, Northern
Caribbean Operations
Location: Bahamas

° Bachelor's degree in business related field

° 5- 10 years experience in Financial Institutions

¢ Comprehensive knowledge of Financial Institutions operational processes and
procedures that support Retail Distribution (Retail, Corporate, Capital Markets
& International Wealth Management customer segments) sufficient to develop

- and improve complex practices and processes.

° Working (practical) Knowledge of several areas of external activities (financial
and/or other industries, market and/or regulatory environment, or client business
practices and needs) sufficient to apply relevant issues or developments to work

General Responsibilities:

¢ As apart of Senior Management, lead the development of Change Management
Documents — Business User Requirements / Project Charter, Project Plan,
Implementation Plan, Project Budget, Business Cases, Request For Information
(RED-and Request For Proposal (RFP)

° Responsible in conjunction with the Head of Operations and other Northern
Caribbean Operations Managers in developing the Bahamas Regional Operations
Centres into a fully centralised processing unit for the Northern Caribbean
Region by incorporating additional functions from the Local Processing Unit

© To support the overall strategic mandate of the northern Operations group by
identifying and executing process improvements that increase profitability and
enhance our customers’ and employees’ experience.

¢ To provide advice and /ov consultation typically of an operational or tactical

nature to Operations Centres management as it relates to existing business

processes and proposed business changes.

¢ Salary commensurate with senior management position at the FC Level 8 (Note:

© Benefits. includes a car allowance, preferred loan rates, variable incentive pay
(bonus). medical scheme. pension benelits...

Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter via
email by February 9", 2007 to: Chaunte.toote@firstcaribbeanbank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all
applicants for their interest, however only those under
consideration will be contacted.
Vacancies are open to Bahamians only.

MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007, PAGE 11B

Taree

Ben-Bo Collection &
Management Company Ltd

wish to inform the public that

BRIDGETTE ROLLE

is no longer employed with us.
She is no longer authorized to do
business for and on behalf of

















BEN-BO COLLECTION &
MANAGEMENT COMPANY LTD.

An Exclusive Boutique Resort & Spa
is recruiting for the positions of:






























Qualified Applicants should possess the following:

¢ Solid training in all areas of Hotel Accounting from A/P, AIR.
Genera! Ledger, Credit, Collections, Audit, Inventory control,
payroll, Budgeting, Costing, P&L preparation and analysis, etc.

° Clear, concise written and verbal communication skills

* Ability to clearly and concisely present technical subjects

¢ Demonstrate team building experience

¢ Track record promoting an atmosphere of teamwork

° Solid career progression up through the ranks

¢ Abilities to inspire, train, and develop people for promotion




Qualified Applicants should possess the following:
¢ Creativity in selling, managing and menu design

* Knowledge of banquets, catering, and room service

° Understanding forecasting, budgeting, food and labor costs
e Ability to read and manage a P&L

e Positive attitude who appreciates being part of a team

¢ Organized with good computer skills

e Desire to mentor and train others

¢ Ability to focus, stay on task and produce

¢ Must be a strong manager and proven leader




Personal. Energetic Executive. Chef who is a leader. innovator,
dynamic, creative, flexible, people oriented with strong
management skills and eager to display a genuine desire to lead
the team in producing a high quality product and to maximize the
performance of kitchen personnel.

Business and profit oriented, able to estimate food consumption
and purchase food, create menus, strong people management
and development skills with strong ability to manage in a diverse
environment with focus on client and customer services is
essential to success in this role. :

All applications are appreciated but only qualified individuals will
be considered. Our email address is kwright@marleyresort.com,
Fax: (242) 327-4393 or you can mail it to AP-59223 Slot 440,

Nassau, Bahamas. .- - async nny

A AY




INTERNATIONAL BANK

fora










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2007, PAGE 13B

ing

1ce

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LEAH DAVIS

reach as many
ives our sales



’

AY, JANUARY 29

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ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
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PAGE 14B, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007 THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS



“COMICS PAGE












Fay YOU KNOW, THE WORLD SHOULDVE
BEEN DESIGNED Sp ENERIONE
} DIDNT HAVE TO EAT EACH OTHER
TO SURVIVE. TERE
) JUST BE FEWER PEXALE AND
ANIMALS TO BEGIN WITH.



y..YOU MIGHT WANT
“TO RETHINK YOUR
* POGITIONL

AFTER BUYING THOSE TWO
EXTREMELY REVEALING

COME ON, NED...
I WANT TO GO
TO THE PARTY
TONIGHT!








AND THE WORLD CERTAINLY
QOULD'VE USED A NORE EVEN

APARTMENT 3-G

| ORRRR ow THAT.
g, DAA OLS





HE’S JUST
3L RODE,

T WONDER. NAY
NOBODY CONSULTED
YOU.
‘ INCREDIBLE,
ISNT IT?
4









MILLS ALL DAY ABOUT mayer
THAT STUPID PARTY OF] HEIs





1 READ THAT A HIGH SCHOOL WAS
BEING SUED BECAUSE SOMEONE
bag OOJECTED ooo SCHOOL



South dealer. less collection, hoping to strike his ;
Both sides vulnerable. partner’s long suit. As it happened, MONDAY. \
NORTH West was successful in his aim, but : 4 i
@AKQ4 this was not the real cause of South’s JAN UARY 29 i
Â¥Q107 undoing. ie
765 Declarer took the diamond lead : ti
843 with the ace and tested the spades by rit? % March 21/April 20 |
: could be a tough start to the
WEST EAST cashing the A-K. Had East woodenly | ocx Aries. Take your time, find .
873 $3105 followed suit, there would have been | ya 8 to work aa the problem '
MARVIN ¥8643 v3 i: no a to tell. But when the two top ihe patient. - \s
: 109 QJ832 spades were cashed, East followed echt : foe
, SO £3975 #Q 10 with the ten and jack! ~ | TAURUS - April 21/May 21
IT’S A NICIOUS CYCLE, i CAN'T THEN THE NEXT DAY I'M SOUTH South naturally assumed tha: You are sure to be daydreaming |
ROY.\IF IT TAKE AN FALL ASLEEP TIRED HAVE To TAKE ANAP 6962 West had both missing spades, so he: about something you would like to ,
AFTERNOON NAP _AT NIGHT Wl ¥K52 next led the four of spades to his aa meee oer ee i
@AK4 nine. He then played the king of | G4YS-,RceP your tte Oe ais
- PAK 62 hearts, hoping the opponent with the Se ae ODED YORE Beans
The bidding: ace would win the trick and thereby 12 1° COUSS-
South West North East provide him with an entry to the GEMINI - May 22/June 21
1NT Pass 3NT AlMlPass queen of spades. The time has come to accept that

OST. BY UMVCRSM. PRodS SPM ATE

m Pie VILE We, ee.



HIS, NO RESPONSE?



COcOMiCS. COM /PONSeQu Tue



Opening lead — ten of diamonds.

If you look at all four hands, it
isn’t easy to see how declarer can
possibly go down in three notrump.
He seems certain to score two clubs,
two diamonds, a heart and, because
of the lucky 3-3 spade division, four
spades for a total of nine tricks.

Yet, as reported ‘by the great Aus-
tralian star Tim Seres, South failed to
make the contract. Not only that, but

in winding up with only eight tricks, °
it’s hard to prove that declarer did

anything really wrong!
West started by leading the dia-
mond ten from his virtually worth-




“MR& WILSON SAYS TM GROWIN UP TOO FAST,
BUT MR. WILSON SAYS NOT FAST ENOLIGH."

A Tactical Defensive Maneuver

But East had not come this far to

make things easy for declarer. He did .

not take his ace, leaving South with
no choice but to lead a second round
of hearts toward the Q-10. When
West followed low, South finessed
the ten, losing to East’s jack. Not
long after that, declarer finished
down one.

In summarizing the deal, Seres
cited the basic principle of defense
that East had followed: When you
see that declarer is bound to succeed

by normal play, you should look for .

a way to present him with a losing
alternative. 2 “





certain friendships must be brought ,

tionally and mentally moved on.

CANCER - June 22/July 22

The most important thing today is
ever happens, be it good, bad or

work to your advantage in the end.

LEO ~ July 23/August 23

VIRGO -— Aug 24/Sept 22

You’re the only one who truly’
knows what’s-right for you. Follow |
your heart and your dreams.
LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23

There is nothing wrong with ambi-
tion, and this time of year brings out

to an end. Don’t feel guilty about .
letting go: the fact is, you have emo- °

that you respond positively to what- °

indifferent. Don’t worry, it will |

On the outside, you appear calm and

confident, but your emotions are |
raging. You have to get over this. .
Life is full of disappointments — it .
is how you handle them that matters.

Don’t let anyone try to change the: .
way you look at the world today.’ :








TIGER Bee o the aspiring side of your nature. Your-
tesco Dist ee ac first task is to remind yourself why
ee 3 success is so important to you :
VONT BOTHER MANGE. BUT SHE Century 8S 2s portant to you. ae
| Ke) CAT. SHES ae Dictionary aoa SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22
i& : LEFT HER MOTOR (1999. Seeks : naga
SOUND? A ew RUNNIN edition) Zeeeof Just because something is accepted |
SO SLE ING 5 8 gy pa wisdom does not mean you have to ,
" Qn HOW many words of four oO ary follow it slavishly like everyone
ve letters or more can you make 8 Be se ® else. You have something much bet-
from the letters shown here? Y oka h ter than knowledge: common sense.
In making a word, each letter z £ § Sei oy.
may be used once only. Each 4 Seeds SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21 |
must contain the centre letter ha g vase There are things that need to be said, . ,
and there must be at least one e ees eos things that need to be discussed and:
nine-letter, word. No plurals. OdSUaaAS things that need to be changed. It’s
















| CRYPTIC PUZZLE |

















TODAY’S TARGET
Good 20; very good 30;
excellent 40 (or more).
Solution tomorrow.



new







time to tackle these challenges once
and for all.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20 |
What starts out as a minor disagree-
ment could develop into an all-out.
battle. Focus on the important things
today — meaning the things that are
important to you.







































ACROSS
DOWN AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
4 — He washed his hands with one in 4 Source of a sensation (5) word a seem to believe you can pull
a dish (6) 2 Pick up something exclusive (6) the wool over everyone’s eyes,
regardless of facts that tell
7 Cover one, by arrangement, for a 3 Asadjusted by a canny Scot? (4) shop steward different story. Be big eiuahite
quick check (4-4) A Doeshe religiously take admit you made a mistake. 4
a Reject a rogion at random (6) precedence? (5) an elected union pisces nee March 20
r Oo
osc 5 — Annual occasion for soma | representative responsible for the highs 7 ee
an actor (5) Valentines? (4) other ‘people’s existence. Happiness
13 Youmeyheveosentheemeninone | 6 — Justhappento arrive? (4,2) begins at home — with yourself.
on the river (4) 9 t's tke a bridge over the railway (6)
14 Flights around the housetops? (4) 11 Theprotester's rubbish? (3)
15 Give eound ede though it only Bedceuauere ) CHESS | by. Leonard er leel dy
second-hand (4) 13. Variety of lobster on the bed (7)
16 Porridge veseet? (3) 15 For cooking, its good to a point (3) Mikhail KoballavTigran
17. Self-possessed when out Headpiace with hi Nalbandian, Geller Memorial,
of contol (4) ae Moscow1999. White (to move)
c's 18 State of a piece of has an obviously stony sitar
aryzarous vehicle? (4) work 6 but how to break through?
#i: shnea wieeihe peer Kobalia did so with a
up etoppert (2) 20 Plant fresh trees at the second spectacular sacrifidal sequence,
23 Can'tbear unsuitable heat (4) attempt? (5) giving up queen and rook to
ae ee oe nein |
26 Catch in en untenable situation (3) "22. Reserved for the commanding officer, : 4 che . It's the kind of tactic my
27° Enrty tea colour? (4) a Yankee (3) uw : 0 eae tee a Vietnam ain (5) any chessplayer ape el i:
29 Didhis archery Stiff paper thrilled to play, and the point to
etiery ae lwna 23 Simply to call ita stopper would be — Me eacls Regularly (6) note is that if you can push your
| soroback? (4) a ropy clue (6) S 15 Dry (4) 2 ee opponent's army back an
“1 32 The woodin the hole in the wall (4) j 3 11 r oblige your rival to cam his
133 Smelt ike rotten tanks ( . oe a. 7 ee 12 Note value (5) defenders into the back ranks,
1 , 5) 28 Has he ajolly bony head? (5) = 19 Catch sight of (4) 13 Ironed (7) then opportunities are likely to
ot 34 Partly t's of queetionable length (6) 30 Norma's Spanish boy (5) 2 21 Ea (9) 45 Manner (3) — o am ved s
4 35 23 Entreaty 16 Mimic (3 winning move givena
{ mee Sion roan i er nee so 31 Is hls among the riskier sports? (5) ; ul 24 Painful (4) 18 (age e strong hint, so It's easy) and the
suit it to etemity? (8) 32 Aposelbly wounding fellow? (4) a Shoot h 20 Alloy (5) follow-up which led to
936 Avolatively dealer? (6 Phase 21° Elderly (3 checkmate on White’
Impecunious declor?(6) 33. Tho kind ype? (4) sa Diacn nase al Deanne s fifth turn (harder)? LEONARD BARDEN
; : f 32 Type of gchool (2-2) 23 Small basket (6)
Yesterday's cryptic soluvons Yesterday's easy solutions = 3 ibn an ©) 25 Wicked (3)
ACROSS:1, Points 7, W-+-eea-cre 8, Pita 10, A-bad-an 11, | ACROSS: 1, Sparta 7, Corridor 8, Lash 10, Chaste 11, 35 Raticant (8) 28 Molars (5)
Greece 14, Sex 16, Sedan 17, D-at-a 19, Pedal 21, Facade 14, Toy 16, Tales 17, Seen 19, Valet 21, Timid 22, 36 Stink (6) 7 ent 6 < cl
in
H-one-y 22, Baton 23, To-NS 26, Limit 28, Lea 29, At | Comet 23, Bits 26, Senor 28, Cad 29, Cranny 30, Canopy aS Naren eel Chess solution 8290: 1 Qxh7#1 Kxh7 2(6+ Kh6 Gi Kh8
DOWH: 1, Poland 2, Noldea 3, S-wan4, Heare-a-y5, | DOWN: 1, Sauces 2, Reason 3, Ache 4, Created 5, deal 6, 33 Stemn(t) MonacdiCaneadapln |
Acted 6, S-aven 8, Pa’s-T 9, TA-X 12, Eel 13, Canon 15, | Urges 8, Late 9, Sty 12, Cat 13, Debit 15, Camel 18, One possible word ladder solution és: LEFT, lent,
Teno-F 18, Admit 19, Pot 20, Den 21, Hatchet 22, B-in 23, | Ember 19, Vim 20, Lit 21, Tomado 22, Con 23, Banana lend, wend, wind, wins, WINGS :

24, Idol 25, Styles 26, Score 27, Nadir 28, Car
30, Cord

Tenner 24, (the) Oaks 25, Serves 26, Large 27, Mound 28,
Law 30, Boys







THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS



MONDAY EVENING JANUARY 29, 2007

[7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30
The Power of Choice: The Life

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The Gospel!

ee

MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007, PAGE 15B ~



Let Charlie the
Bahamian Puppet and
his sidekick Derek put,

some smiles on your )
kids’s faces.

Bring your children to the

McHappy Hour at McDonald's in
Marlborough Street every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
month of January 2007,

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.

im lovin’ it







See eae Bann se

a al ete ow er atl.

eS Sw ae wae

_ oe we we pate









Tuesday WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS
High = Low W High Low W WASSAU Today: SW at 15-30 Knots 4-6 Feet 2-4 Miles 77° F

wi et —_ FC FIC agi _ Fic Tuesday: _ NW at 12-25 Knots 3-5 Feet 6-7 Miles 77°F

Acap : ee = R631 = (4/23. P SW at 15-30 Knots 4-6 Feet 2-4 Miles Tr

Amsterdam NW at 10-20 Knots 4-6 Feet 6-7 Miles 77°F

WSW at 15-30 Knots 4-7 Feet 2-4 Miles qk

NW at 10-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 6-7 Miles










~ MODERATE


















The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the





Mostly cloudy with Pleasant with clouds Humid with times of |



Breezy with plenty of ‘Clear. Sunshine and patchy







sunshine. clouds. showers possible. and sun. clouds and sun. | greater the need for eye and skin protection.
High: 72° ie 70° High: 79° High: 84°
High: 72° Low: 59° Low: 57° et i
















AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWe \Feel



er Rea AccuWeather RealFeel

58°

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

>

AccuWea








4:36 a.m. 27 11:00 a.m. 01
4:55p.m. 2.0 10:49p.m. -0.2

Tuesday 99:39am. 27 11:54am. 0.0
. 5:51pm. 2.1 11:45pm. -0.2

Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday thee 6:26am. 27 1242p.m. -0.1

Today






























- Wednesday°-
ABACO Temperature rad Vet pm. 2.2 —
: High Supdganetia seams dels Dace ecctsisechesisieenss FOr FILO AO 7-12 98 12:36 0.3
_High: 70° F/21°C Low 70° F/21° Cc Thursday . a.m. x a am. PF
4 ssaseransonsa 7:26pm. 23 1:25pm. -0.1
Low: 58°F/14°C Normal high "77° F/25° C om a
Normal low . . 65° F/18° C aN g rrr
Last year’s high . 76° F/24° C
High: 63° F/A7°C Last year's IOW .......secsscssssecseesseesseee, 65° F/18° C SanCaneS Si SEAT TE Sone.
Low: 46° F/8°C Precipitation Sunrise......6:54a.m. Moonrise ... . 2:30 p.m.
As of 1 p.m. yesterday 0.28” Sunset.......5:52 p.m. Moonset ..... 4:01 a.m.
Year to date . 0.96”
Normal year to date. "1.60" pis -—
' [SA] Showers
AccuWeather.com % [23] Tstorms
. All forecasts and maps provided by — 7 [a%2"] Rain
ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007 Feb. 2 Feb. 10 Feb. 17 —2 ” 3 [=] Fiurries
: High: ° : : ? ROR ERT pon Ea : Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
ae ee aes : , _— 5 ee —— precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
High: 72° F/22° os " eae : ee Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.



«Low SO°F/S°C

High: 67° F/19°C

Low: 58° F/14°C 51/0



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's lows.







~ MAYAGUANA |
tx 84° F/29°C



33/0 17/-8 pe






























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‘GREAT INAGUA
High: 84° F/29° C
“O68 15-9 sf Low: 73° F/23°6
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32/0 9/-12 pe -28/-2 13/-10 sf New Orleans
22/5 14/-10- Sh 22/-5 13/10 st New York: 8-13 2/-16 sf
77/25 71/21 sh = 79/26 71/21 sh Oklahoma City"
rs 4! 4 Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, ¢-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
co B42 44/6 So STN8, 44/6 he Orlando» Washington, DC 36/2 21/6 pe 35/1 22/-5 pe . storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prep-precipitation, Tr-trace

ee







MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

Regatta has sailors on
the crest of a Wave

@ SAILING
By KELSIE JOHNSON

Sports Reporter

THE first regatta is in the “bag” leaving skippers
and fans looking forward to the next showdown

on the sea.

The annual New Years Day regatta got underway
on Friday with races in the C-class and continued on
over the weekend at the Montagu Beach shores.
Races in the A and B-classes were held on Saturday

and Sunday.

The highly anticipated boat race attracted the
top skippers from around the Bahamas, all hoping
to clinch the top spot and to gather points towards

the boat of the year award.

Before the sound of the horn crew members
gathered together one final time putting in last

minute plans.

The strategic moves by each crew brought on
some exciting races that went down to the wire,
leaving sailors optimistic about the final results.

For those who had experienced problems on day
two, the final day of competition was designed to
correct their wrongs. But they would have to wait a
little longer as the rain set the regatta two hours

back.

Because of the delay, the results were not avail-
able up until press time and will posted in Tuesday’s

edition of The Tribune.

® SETTING sail for the
New Year’s Day Regatta.
(Photo: Tim Clarke)





@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE






Sands and Thomas

— eon. Fr ys

@ TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Sports Reporter



ACHIEVING the provisional

on track

Tae ete ane ahem ed artenininin CSR ae oe

: ae

—

standards.

for Ind

Bahamian duo qualify for championships

standards wasn’t enough for
Shamar Sands so he teamed up
with Donald Thomas to make the
first Bahamian duo to surpass the
NCAA Indoor Championships
automatic timing.

The Auburn Tigers’ pair, Sands
and Thomas led the college at the

Diet Pepsi Invitational, becoming ©
the universities’ first automatic

qualifiers. °
Not only did Thomas secure his
spot in the men’s high jump event

for the championships, his perfor-
mance inked his name in the
Tigers’ record book. The clearance
of 2.31m (7-6.50) set a new indoor
record, it is also the leading jump in
the country. Second place in this
event went to Keith Moffat 2.28m,
a provisional marking, third went
to Jerome Miller another provi-
sional marker, 2.16m.

Turning up the heat was Sands
with a season’s best in the 55m

having an exceptional year, bounc-
ing back from.a rough season last
year where he only competed in a
couple of meets due to injuries.

At the meet Sands ran a time
of 7.27 seconds in the preliminar-
ies, advancing to the finals with
the fastest time. In the finals he
clocked a personal best to achieve
the automatic berth at the cham-
pionships.

The top five times in this event
had surpassed the qualification

The automatic timing:isn’t out of

_ Teach for Oral Roberts’ Andretti

Bain but his weekly performances
are getting better.

So far Bain has turhed in the
fastest time, in the indoors, by any
Bahamian male and as the season
continues the quartermiler is still
shaving seconds of his records.

Bain posted the top time in the

_men’s 400m at the Adidas classic

47.11 seconds, another provisional

performance. Coming in second

47.20 seconds and Drew Morano
of Colorado State was third in
47.71 seconds.

At the Penn State Invitational,
Kenrick Brathwaite of Norfolk
State had to settle for 16th overall
in the men’s long jump having a
best of 6.60m. The winning jump
was recorded at 7.72m a perfor-
mance turned in by Scott Mayle
of Ohio University, Roy Richards

hurdles. The senior at the college is



Caribs win third

@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter

THE College of the Bahamas Lady
Caribs completed a fantastic week in the
New Providence Women's Basketball
Association by winning their third straight
game over’one of the top ranked teams.

Saturday's victim at the DW Davis Gym
was the Defence Force Lady Bluewaves.

The Lady Caribs held off the Lady
Bluewaves 68-61 to improve their impres-
sive league-leading record to 10-1. With
the loss, the Lady Bluewaves remained
in fifth place at 3-8.

_ Coach Linda Davis, no doubt, was
thrilled by the team's performance as they
posted victories over the former champi-
ons Cleaning Center Lady Angels on
Tuesday and the defending champions
Johnson's Lady Truckers on Thursday.

The Angels, on the other hand, reeled
off two straight victories since their defeat
to the Lady Caribs. In Saturday's opener,
the roughed up the Junior All-Stars 65-29
to add to their decision over the Lady
Bluewaves on Thursday.

Defence Force coach Freddie Brown
said after Saturday's loss to COB said he
was pleased with the way they bounced
back to play against the Lady Caribs.

"They played a three-guard rotation,
so all we did was tip the ball inside,"
Brown stated. "Our only problem was we

|

”

game ont

were unable to play defence on the tran-
sition. We basically have front court play-
ers and so it was a little hard for us’to
play defence on the transition."

Unlike the previous two games when
the Lady Caribs' Kiavonne Newbold and
Alexis Russell went to work on the inside,
coach Davis had to resort to the outside
with the backcourt duo of Diasti Delancy
and Christine Sinclair leading the way.

Presence

That was because Newbold and Rus-
sell had to deal with the more experienced
Lady Bluewaves' centre Natasha Miller,
whose presence in the paint posed so
much problems that they were both in
foul trouble in the first half.

What the Lady Caribs lacked inside,
they made up for the outside as Delancy
and Sinclair combined for 40 points, scor-
ing 20 apiece. Delancy also had three
assists, while Sinclair had six, along with
five rebounds.

COB, who rebounded from a 15-13 first
quarter deficit, went up 32-28 at the half
and they never relinquished the lead in the
second half as Newbold and Russell took
advantage of a weary Miller to get into the
scoring attack.

Newbold finished with 15 points and
10 rebounds and Russell added seven
points and seven rebounds.

While Miller was a tower of strength

i

inside, scoring 18 with 11 rebounds,
Lannes Bennos took the offensive spot-
light as she pumped in a game high 30
points with five rebounds, five assists and
four steals.

Point guard Varel Davis was the only
other Lady Bluewaves' player to do any-
thing significant. She helped out with sev-
en points.

Lady Angels 65, All-Stars 29: It's anoth-
er challenging year for the Junior All-
Stars as they suffered their ninth defeat to
remain at the bottom of the pile in the
NPWBA. But coach Sharel Cash said
she's not concerned because they are
improving.

The youth All-Stars didn't have an
answer for the Lady Angels, who Cash
plays for, as they got a 1-2-3 punch from
Keisha Richardson, Suzette McKenzie
and Kecia Smith.

Richardson led the Cleaning Center
with a game high 20 points, while McKen-
zie had 15 with five rebounds and Smith
ended up with 13 points, nine rebounds,
six assists and three steals.

Cash, who opted not to play for the
Lady Angels against the team she
coached, said this year's team is much
more committed to practising and playing,
which makes her job that much easier.
She thanked the parents for their support
of the team. But she said that the dedica-
tion will eventually pay off.

"That's our worse game we played,"

he trot

said Cash, who substituted the entire five
at various intervals as she tried to get a
cohesive unit on the court. "I really don't
care about the score.

"From watching them ever day, only
one team really blew us out since we came
back (from the Christmas break) and that
was COB and now the Angels in this
game. The rest of them beat us by less
than 10 points. So there is a game for us to
win." :

Notch

After playing a tight and close first half,
leading 14-10 after the first period and
28-23 at the break, the Lady Angels took
their game into another notch the second
half.

They held the-Junior All-Stars to just
four points in the third and two in the
fourth to seal the deal.

To show how dominant the game was
for the Lady Angels, no Jr. All-Star scored
in double figures.

Antonia Simons led the way with six
points and five rebounds; Asley Black
had six points, four rebounds and two
steals; Inderia Saunders had five points
and three rebounds and Keva Barry had
four points and eight rebounds.

Note: The NPWBA won't play on Tues-
day or Saturday, but they will have a
double header on Thursday, starting at 7

f

p.m.

nen rane Ts Sa 5 omen meinry S

OOFrS

was second in 7.46m and Davion
Lambert third in 7.44m.

At the same meet Reginald
Sands would close the day in the
24th spot in the men’s shot putt
event with a best throw of 13.63m.

"was Aaron Buzard of Minnesota in’ Opening ‘up her indoor season

for Essex College were Deandrea
Laing at the George Mason Invi-
tational. Laing would close the day
in the a 21st spot, in the women’s
800m, in 2:28.84 seconds. .

The Carle health Alliance invite
saw Missouri States’ Alexandria
Oembler and Leniece Rolle in
action.

Both competed in the 60m dash
with Oembler getting the better of
Rolle. She would finish 20th over-
all in a time of 7.93 seconds while
teammate Rolle would finish in
the 33rd spot in 8.93 seconds.

Oembler would move onto the
200m where she would finish 29th
overall in 26.42 seconds and Rolle
in the 44th spot in 29.22 seconds.

It was a rough meet for Oem-
bler, having recorded her slowest
time in her specialty — the hurdles.

After colliding with one hurdle,
Oembler crossed the line in a time
of 12.57 seconds. She didn’t
advance to the finals.

Findlay Indoor Classic would
bring Lanece Clarke to the track
for the McKendree College.

Clarke, who led the 60m dash
last year in the NAIA conference,
had to settle for third in the 200m
over the weekend. Her time of
25.68 seconds trailed Jessica
White’s, the event’s winner, 25.22
seconds and Pamela Bullock of
Findlay College in 25.63 seconds.

@ TRACK AND FIELD

THE Bahamian collegiate ath-
letes weren't the only track and
field stars busy over the weekend,
our elite athletes also got a piece of
the action.

Ferguson-McKenzie was hop- °
ing to open her season on a high,
but the American trio of Me’Lisa
Barber, Lauryn Williams and
Angela Daigle-Bowen was just too
much for the field of six, leaving
the others to settle for the remain-
ing spots.

Winning the women’s 60m dash
at the Reebok Boston Games was
Barber in a time of 7.09 seconds,
Williams was second in 7.13 sec-
onds and Daigle-Bowen third in
7.30 seconds. Kerron Stewart of
Jamaica would take the fourth spot
in 7.31 seconds leaving Ferguson-.
McKenzie to settle for fifth place in
7.37 seconds.





PAGE 2E, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Likhoviseva,
Nestor win mixed
louhles title

B@ TENNIS
MELBOURNE,
Australia
Associated Press

ELENA LIKHOVTSE-
VA of Russia won her sec-
ond Grand Slam mixed
doubles title Sunday,
teaming with Daniel.
Nestor in a 6-4, 6-4 victory
over Max Mirnyi and Vic-
toria Azarenka of Belarus
at the Australian Open.

Likhovtseva and Nestor
were down a break in the
second set after winning
the first before breaking .
back in the fifth game.

“We played a tough
team,” said Nestor, a
Canadian. “They seem to
be winning all your match-
es pretty easily. We were
a little bit worried about
that, but we stuck to our
game and we executed
well.”

It was the first win in
three Grand Slam finals
appearances for the
unseeded pair, who were
runners-up in the Aus-
tralian and French Opens :
last year.

Nestor won the 2002
Australian Open and 2004
U.S. Qpen men’s doubles
titles, both with Mark
Knowles of the Bahamas.
Likhovtseva won the 2002
Wimbledon mixed ‘doubles
title with India’s Mahesh
Bhupathi.

Mirnyi was playing his
second doubles final in as
many days. He and Swe-
den’s Jonas Bjorkman lost
to American twins Mike
and Bob Bryan on Satur-
day.

Veteran

Azarenka is 17 and
beginning her career while
Mirnyi is a 29-year-old
tour veteran. The wild-car
pair beat top-seeded
Americans Bob Bryan and.
Lisa Raymond and fourth-
seeded Bjorkman and Ital-
ian Francesca Schiavone
to reach the final.

The 31-year-old
Likhovtseva turned pro-
fessional in 1992 and con-
sidered retirement at the
end of last year.

“I’ve been on the tour
for a long time, and I just
decided that I should start
doing something differ-
ent,” she said. “But then I
thought, if I still enjoy it
... should maybe go
another year.”

@ TWO FOR ONE: Rod
Laver says Roger Federer
is playing well enough to
win all four majors this
season. And the Aus-
tralian great reckons it is
doubly difficult for Feder-
er to complete a Grand
Slam season than it was
for him in 1962 and 1969.

Laver, the only player to
have twice won all four
majors in a season, was at
the Australian Open this
week on a visit from the
United States, his long-
time residence. —_.

Laver has noted that
Federer is only in the mid-
dle of his career but is on
track to become the
sport’s best player ever.

“The best way to beat
him would be to hit him
over the head with a rack-
et,” Laver joked in The
Sunday Age newspaper.

Laver spoke on the eve
of Federer’s 10th Grand
Slam title, a straight-sets
victory over Fernando
Gonzalez in the final.

“Roger could win the
Grand Slam if he keeps
playing the way he is,” he
said. “And if he does that,
it will equate to the two
Grand Slams that I won
because standards are
much higher these days.”













CRUSE?

japanesevehicies.com

m CROSS COUNTRY
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

THIS year's Albury Sayle
Primary Schools Cross Coun-
try Championships didn't
draw such a large contingent
of competitors on Saturday at
Fort Charlotte.

But the 11th version of the
championships will go down
as a keenly contested duel
between hosts Albury Sayle
and Temple Christian.

’ The two schools emerged
with three divisional titles
each. Schools were awarded
points in the respective divi-
sions by the amount of ath-
letes that finished the event.

The top six finishers from
each school scored the points.
Meet director Shirley
Mireault said she would have
definitely preferred to have
more entries, but she's grate-
ful to the schools who did
show up to participate.

She said the event will still a |

success, thanks to the assis-
tance from the Bahamas
Association of Certified Offi-
cials, the Bahamas Red Cross,
Thompson Trading and
Gatorade and Bethel Brothers
for their sponsorship.

"It's still a well run meet.

and we are happy with that,"
Mireault insisted. "But we
would like to see a lot more
kids out. This is just for the
primary schools, no high

_ schools are involved."

Mireault said the champi-
Onship should serve as a
morale booster for the vari-
ous schools as they gear up
for the number of meets that
are planned this year.

Keno Demeritte, who along
with Sherry Francis, coached
Temple Christian, said he was
very proud of the way their
Suns performed.

"The team performed
excellent. They,really:worked
for it," Demeritte stressed.
"Last year we won a lot of
individual trophies, but we
didn't win the meet overall.
"So we decided to come back
and do a better job so that we
could win it."

Although there was a tie
between Albury Sayle and
Temple Christian, Mireault
awarded the Suns the title.

Temple Christian had a
number of outstanding per-
formances, led off by Chyna
Curry, who won the girls
eight-and-under divisional
title as she ran the 800 metre
route in four minutes and
28.66 seconds.

Curry, a seven-year-old
grade two student at Temple
Christian, improved on her
seventh place finish last year.

When asked if she was sur-
prised that she won it, Curry
stated "yes,"

She won over Tia Miller of
Temple Christian (4:43.33);
Amaya Moss of Albury Sayle
(4:56.90); Althea Rolle of
Albury Sayle (5:38.21); Max-
cean Cooper of Albury Sayle
(6:48.21) and Gem Wilon of
Temple Christian.

"I'm happy that I won it,"
she said. "I knew when I came
down to the finish that I had
it."

Timothy Wilson, a nine-
year-old fourth grader, repeat-
ed as champion in the boys 9-
10 division in a 1200 metre
race,

Wilson beat out his team-
mates Julius Nottage, second
in 7:29.51 and Dominick
Lightbourne, who was third
in 7:39.30. Rounding out the
top six were Kinard Rolle of
Carlton E Francis in 7:43.62;
Clement Butler of Temple
Christian was seventh in
8:49.40 and James Darville of
Mt. Carmel was sixth in
9:00.98.

Cameron Knowles of Tem-
ple Christian secured the boys
eight-and-under crown in
4:00.20. Mariano Kelly of
Temple Christian was second
in 4:04.51 and Fredrick
Bethel of Albury Sayle was

eg heh

head with Te







thi

Yy

@ ELEVEN and 12 boys

third in 4:23.57.

Donovan Lynch of Albury
Sayle got fourth in 4:25.19;
Godfrey Arthur Jr was sixth

‘

Over 100 Cars Reatly for

Immediate Shipment

Ask for Ana, Dan, or Humberto on +1-954-880-0781

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- Albury Sayle goes head to
mple Christian









in 4:27.06 and Rumalo Ellis
of Temple Christian complete
the top six in 4:29.43.

The boys 11-12 competed
in a 1600 metre race with
Aaron Kelly of Albury Sayle
coming first in 11:37.25, Mar-
lin Bowe of Albury Sayle was
second in 11:43.84 with
Thomas Wilson of Temple
Christian third in 12:04.72.

Laquan Nairn of Albury
Sayle was fourth in 12:24.15;
Trae Carey fifth in 12:44.73
and Gaege Smith of Mt.
Carmel sixth in 12:53.84,

In the girls 11-12 division,

_ Thereannea Calma of Albury

Sayle won the title in 11:32.54.
Talia Thompson of Temple

t

Christian was second in
11:38.81 and Vanallion Walk-
er of Gerald Cash topped the
list of three.

The remaining positions in
scoring were Zahra Powell of
Temple Christian (12:48.49);
Danielle Gibson of Temple
Christian fifth (14:11.82) and
Anthonique Smith of Temple
Christian sixth (14:52,99),

And in the girls 9-10 divi-
sion, Taryn Butler of Temple
Christian won the 1200 metre
race in 8:16.25 with team-
mates Jeoijette Williams sec-
ond (8:31.50); Keithra Pick-
stock third (9:03.40) and Tar-
rah Miller fourth (9:20.43).
Linda Bien-Aime of Albury



Sayle was fifth in 10:19.42 and
Lauren Williams of Charles
W Saunders was sixth in
10:27.87.

Striders' coach’ Stephen
Murray, who assisted Mireault
in designing a fine course for
them to compete on at Fort
Charlotte, said based on what
he saw during the races, all of
the athletes enjoyed them-
selves,

‘It was very good. The
tumout could have been bet-
ter," he said. "The Primary
School Association need to
pull themselves together and
support each other. Hopeful-
ly they will get more support
nextyear."

\







GOLF
BUICK INVITATIONAL



HECTOR MATA/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

BUICK CHAMP: Tiger Woods poses
with his trophy after winning the
Buick Invitational in La Jolla,
California on Sunday. He finished
with a total of 15 under par in
three days of competition.

Wood’s PGA
run reaches
7 straight

BY DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press ;

SAN DIEGO — Tiger Woods
resumed his improbable pursuit of
Byron Nelson with a result that was
all too predictable.

Woods caught up to the pack with
an eagle, buried the hopes of his final
challenger with a birdie and closed
with a 6-under 66 on Sunday to win
the Buick Invitational for his seventh
consecutive PGA Tour victory, the
second-longest streak in history.

Nelson set the record in 1945 with
ll in a row, a record long thought to be
out of reach.

The way Woods is playing — no
worse than second in stroke play any-
where in the world since July — that
might no longer be the case.

Woods won six in a row in 2000, a
streak that Phil Mickelson stopped at
Torrey Pines. But against a cast of
challengers short on experience and
victories, the world’s No. 1 player met
little resistance in winning the Buick
Invitational for the third straight year.

Woods doesn’t consider this a true
winning streak because he lost once
in Europe and twice in Asia since Sep-
tember. But it still counts in the PGA
Tour record books, and the only ques-
tion is when it will resume.

Woods was headed for the Dubai
Desert Classic on Sunday night, and

he was not sure if would play his next .

PGA Tour event at the Nissan Open:
on Feb. 15 in Los Angeles or the
Accenture Match Play Championship
in Arizona a week later.

“To somehow sneak out with the
win is a cool feeling,” Woods said.

He got some help from Andrew
Buckle and Jeff Quinney, both of
whom had at least a share of the lead
on the back nine until stumbling in a
span of about 15 minutes on a cool,
breezy afternoon at Torrey Pines.

Charles Howell III provide the
final challenge with three birdies ina
four-hole stretch, but Woods
answered with an approach to 21 feet
on the 17th hole for birdie that
allowed him to play it safe on the
par-5 closing hole.

Woods finished at 15-under 273 for
his 55th career victory, the fifth time
he has started a new season with a
trophy.

Howell had a 50-foot eagle putt on
the 18th that could have forced a play-
off, but he played it too high over the
ridge and wound up three-putting for
par to close with 68.

“I gave him a run,” Howell said.
“Anytime you try to win a tourna-
ment against that guy, it’s tough. I
played well down the stretch. He just
never flinched.”

The same couldn’t be said for
Buckle and Quinney, who each took
double bogey along the back nine on
the South Course to quickly take
themselves out of contention. Brandt
Snedeker, tied for the 54-hole lead
with Buckle, closed with a 71 and fin-
ished third.

Woods’ streak resumed after a
nearly four-month break from the
PGA Tour, when he won by eight
shots in the American Express Cham-
pionship outside London on Oct. 1. He
skipped the season-ending Tour
Championship and the season-open-
ing Mercedes-Benz Championship,
and learned that his wife was preg-

nant for the first time.
One thing that hasn’t changed is his
golf.

The PGA Tour winning streak

°TURN TO PGA



BY JOHN PYE
Associated Press
MELBOURNE, Australia —
Roger Federer held back the tears
this time. He didn’t hold back
much else at the Australian Open.
Federer underlined his 10th
Grand Slam singles title by win-

‘ning 21 straight sets, saving a set

point in Sunday’s final before fin-
ishing off Fernando Gonzalez 7-6
(2), 6-4, 6-4.

The last man to go through a

major without dropping a set was

Bjorn Borg at the 1980 French
Open. The only other man to win
the Australian Open without drop-
ping a set was Ken Rosewall in
1971, although he had to play only
five matches.

“Equaling records, doing some-
thing that hasn’t been done for a
long time, it’s really nice, no
doubt,” Federer said. “All I care
about in the end is to hopefully
hold that trophy. Of course, now
that it’s over, it’s great to think,
"Wow, you know, not having
dropped a set.’ It’s quite amazing.”



BY STEVE HERMAN
Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS — A convoy of moving
vans brought more than the Colts to Indianapo-

lis.

‘The westward migration that cold, snowy
night almost a quarter-century ago also awak-
ened Naptown to a new era of professional
football and transformed the city into a major

league sports town.
India-no-place was no more.

The Indianapolis Colts’ Super Bowl matchup
Sunday with the Chicago Bears will be the high-
light in the city’s transformation from a sleepy
Midwest city to a world-class sports venue.

“It’s like that MasterCard commercial: It’s
priceless,” Colts owner Jim Irsay said after the



3E|

INTERNATIONAL EDITION



TENNIS | AUSTRALIAN OPEN

Federer gets 10th Grand Slam victory

Rosewall was in the crowd Sun-
day night, and Federer gave him a
nod in a composed victory speech.
It was the mere presence of
another Australian great, Rod
Laver, that reduced Federer to
tears the previous year at the tro-
phy presentation. ,

“I can’t force them out every
year!” Federer said of his sobbing
celebration in 2006, when he
accepted the trophy from Laver. “I
had a wonderful tournament. A
great end. Just because there were

“no tears doesn’t mean it doesn’t

mean anything to me.”

Laver, the last man to win the
Grand Slam — all four majors in
one season — made the trip from
California to see Federer dismantle
Andy Roddick 6-4, 6-0, 6-2 in the
semifinals.

He met with Federer in the
locker room after the semifinal and
said he had little doubt the 25-year-
old Swiss star could beat Pete Sam-
pras’ record 14 Grand Slam singles
titles, and just about every other
tennis record as well.

“The best way to beat him
would be to hit him over the head
with a racket,” Laver joked in a
newspaper column.

Federer improved his streak to a
career-best 36 wins, became the
first man in the Open era to twice
win three straight majors and has
collected six of the last seven
Grand Slam titles.

He tied Jack Crawford’s 73-year-
old record by reaching his seventh
consecutive final in majors.

“If somebody would have told

me I’d win 10 Grand Slams from
mid ’03 till today, I never would
have thought there was any
chance,” he said.

Even before the tournament he
had enough points to ensure he
will break Jimmy Connors’ record
of 160 consecutive weeks atop the
men’s rankings by the end of next
month.

Although he knows he’s only
one-quarter of the way there in
2007, a season Grand Slam is his

. ° TURN TO TENNIS

PRO BASKETBALL | PHOENIX 115, CLEVELAND 100

- Suns still rising



BY TOM WITHERS
Associated Press

teams.

of nine overall.

MARK DUNCAN/AP
INSIDE POSITION: Phoenix Suns’ Steve Nash, right, gets inside Cleveland Cavaliers’
Drew Gooden for a shot in the fourth quarter on Sunday in Cleveland. Nash
scored 23 points and handed out 15 assists to lead Phoenix to a 115-110 victory.

PRO FOOTBALL | AFC CHAMPIONS

The Colts’ move transformed Indianapolis

you get caught up in that avalanche of emo-

joy you’re sharing with the community because |
ay re)

tions.”

Colts arrived in 1984.

38-34 AFC championship game win against the

New England Patriots. “You can’t explain the

* TURN TO COLTS

Indianapolis officials had decided sports was
the city’s ticket to prominence long before the

The Indianapolis 500 — the “greatest specta-
cle in racing” — already was drawing thousands
of visitors to the city each May, and Hoosier
Hysteria — the nickname for the state’s high
school basketball frenzy — was legendary.

“Sports was an element in our game plan to ©
change the image of the city back in the late
1970s, early 1980s,” said David Frick, a former
deputy mayor. “It was a community effort
involving the major businesses in town, com-
bined with the not-for-profit sector and the

Wa) 0 2) Pa





CORINNE DUBREUIL/ABACA PRESS/MCT
SLAMMIN’: Roger Federer holds
up the championship trophy
after defeating Chile’s
Fernando Gonzales in the
Men’s Final of the Australian
Open on Sunday.

Nash has double-double;
Phoenix extends streak

CLEVELAND — Steve Nash scored 23 points and
kept Phoenix’s high-energy offense purring with 15
‘assists as the Suns-extended their winning streak to 17
games — the NBA’s longest in seven years — by beat-
ing the Cleveland Cavaliers 115-100 on Sunday.
Shawn Marion added 23 points, Amare Stoudemire
22 and Leandro Barbosa had.19 for the Suns, who
improved to 34-4 since opening the season 1-5. Phoe-
nix, which had a 15-game win streak earlier this sea-
son, also matched a franchise record with their ninth
straight road win and are 20-1 vs. Eastern Conference

The Suns haven’t lost since Dec. 28, and with the

way their running and sharing the ball right now, it’s
_ going to take a spectacular effort to beat them.

LeBron James scored 30 points and Drew Gooden
19 to lead the Cavaliers, who were within four points
going into the fourth. However, they couldn’t match
the Suns’ blazing up-and-down pace and managed just
13 points in the final 12 minutes.

The Suns’ winning streak is the league’s longest
since Kobe Bryant, Shaquille O’Neal and the Los
Angeles Lakers reeled off 19 in a row during the
1999-200 season. It’s also tied for the fifth-longest
streak in NBA history.

Leading 91-87 after three, and with Nash on the
bench getting some rest, the Suns got consecutive
3-pointers from James Jones and Barbosa in an 8-0 run
to take a 99-87 lead with 8:09 remaining.

The Suns’ quick'burst all but finished the Cavs,
who have dropped three straight at home and seven ~

Cleveland found out what so many other teams are
learning this season: Run with the Suns, and you’re
bound to get burned. :

James, who missed the previous game with a sore
right big toe, got a steal and dunk to get the Cavs
within 99-89 with 7:20 left. But Nash returned and
immediately made a twisting reverse layup, and
moments later, fed Marion for a 3-pointer — Phoe-
nix’s 13th — to make it 107-94 with 3:44 remaining.

Cavs center Zyrdunas Ilgauskas had four points.

e MORE NBA, 7-8B.





AJ MAST/AP

PLAYED BIG ROLE: David Frick, who was
instrumental in bringing the Colts to

Indianapolis in 1984, poses in front of the
RCA Dome in Indianapolis.



4E\ smonpay, JANUARY 29, 2007

INTERNATIONAL EDITION



WHAT 10
THIS WEEK





WHAT DID YOU
THINK OF EARL
BARRON’S RECENT
TRAVEL CLOTHES?

Before Saturday’s
game against the
Bulls, an unidentified
member of the Heat
hung Earl Barron’s
light blue linen shirt
and pants from the ceiling of the visiting
locker room of the United, Center to point out
a few things. First, Barron wore the same out-
fit the night before in New York. Second, it
was wrinkled, dirty and looked flat-out
sloppy. And third, it was his second night in
freezing temperatures - and he wore linen
both nights. .

Responses? ;

Jason Williams: “Just look at it. And he had
the nerve to put cuff links on that thing.”

Barron: “I don’t care. | wore it yesterday.
I’m wearing it today. I’m going to wear it
tomorrow, too.”



ANDREI KIRILENKO, JAZZ

e Fantasy: It used to be that Kirilenko was

a fantasy stud who put.up strong numbers in
every category, except maybe three-pointers.
_Kirilenko’s numbers have suffered this season,
as has his fantasy status. What made Kirilenko
so valuable was his ability to complement.a
decent scoring game with a good number of
blocks, steals and rebounds. This season, all
three of those areas are down.

e Reality: As low as his fantasy value is, his
standing with the Utah Jazz might be even

worse. The team’s owner, Larry Miller, already

has declared the sixth-year forward is on “thin
ice,” and needs to play up to his contract,
which pays him $12.3 million this season. With
Deron Williams running the show in Utah and
Carlos Boozer having a breakthrough season,
it leaves few opportunities for Kirilenko to
make an impact. ;

e@ Winner: Fantasy.



ELEVATED | GROUNDED



AL ADAM
HARRINGTON MORRISON
The new Morrison
uniform has
seems to proven
be work- to be
ing for Harrington. one of the
After being traded streakiest players
from the Pacers to in the game, which
the Warriors last tends to happen

with rookies. In his
more efficient per-
formances, the
Bobcats manage to
win. In his poor
shooting games,
like his combined
3-of-15 effort in
consecutive games:

week, Harrington
made just 4 of 21
shots in a loss to
the Cavaliers. But
he followed with
30- and 29-point
games, and shot a
combined 23 of 33
(69.7 percent) to

win the love of against the Raptors —
Golden State and Pistons, the
fans. Bobcats lose.



CAVALIERS AT HEAT, 8 P.M. THURSDAY, TNT

There’s a possibility of something special happening when

these teams get together. Last season in Miami, Dwyane

Wade and Shaquille O’Neal were part of arguably the play

of the year when Wade dribbled around Sasha Pavlovic to
avoid going out of bounds, and then threw a long alley-oop

pass to O’Neal, who finished and was fouled. And in the last
meeting in Cleveland, Wade and LeBron James each had

better than 40 points ina Cleveland victory.
CAVS FORWARD

LeBRON JAMES

ou can sit and complain
Y about the All-Star starter

selections until you earn a
guest spot on ESPN, but it won’t
take away the privilege of the
fans to choose who they want to
see.

So rather than waste time
complaining, let’s hope the
coaches at least choose the right
group of
reserves:

EASTERN
CONFERENCE

e Guards:
Kudos to the
fans for getting
Gilbert Arenas
into the starting
lineup by a nose
ahead of Vince
Carter. Arenas deserves to be
playing alongside Dwyane
Wade at the start of that game.
Playing behind them should be
the more-deserving Jason Kidd
of the New Jersey Nets, along
with Milwaukee’s Michael
Redd, Detroit’s Richard Hamil-
ton and Atlanta’s Joe Johnson.

Kidd is the primary reason the
Nets have overcome inconsistent
play from Carter and an injury-
plagued season to Richard Jef-
ferson and remain in the playoff
race. Redd, meanwhile, has been
one of the many league stars to
sustain significant injuries, but he
did average 27.7 points during 33
games, which is good enough to
earn the nod. Hamilton has been
the most consistent Piston, and
Johnson is much more than just a
good player on a bad team. He
plays like an All-Star and
shouldn’t be punished for his
team’s woes.

e Forwards: Not much to
choose from, but ‘the two choices
are simple. Indiana’s Jermaine
O’Neal and Washington’s Caron
Butler should join starters
LeBron James and Chris Bosh.
O’Neal has carried an inconsis-
tent Pacers team with his
defense, and Butler has flour-
ished as one of the better all-
around forwards in the league.

e.Center: Orlando’s Dwight
Howard should be the starter
ahead of Shaquille O’Neal
because he actually has played.
But the fans want to see Shaq, so
they’ll have to settle for mini-
Shaq coming off the bench.

e Snubs: Carter should find
himself.going from starter to



‘goner; Ben Gordon, Eddy

Curry and Emeka Okafor can
make a strong case.

WESTERN CONFERENCE

e Guards: Not only does
Steve Nash deserve to be the
starter ahead of either Tracy
McGrady or Kobe Bryant, but
with so much talent on the floor,

he’s probably the best fit to make

those guys look good. There’s no
doubt he’ll join them, and Den-
ver’s Allen Iverson will make his
debut with the West squad. Ray
Allen has played all season like
an elite guard — including a 54-
point game and a 44-point effort
in a span of ll days — despite
playing for a struggling Sonics
team.







H|

NBAEXTRA | BY ISRAEL GUTIERREZ

Say







MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD



LAKERS AT WIZARDS, 7 P.M. SATURDAY

The last time these teams met, Gilbert Arenas made his best
argument for MVP with a career-high 60 points in the Wizards’
overtime victory in Los Angeles. After the game, Kobe Bryant
questioned Arenas’ shot selection, which was laughable given
Bryant’s tendency to take difficult shots every game. The last
thing Bryant needs is to give Arenas additional motivation.



: Arenas is intent on paying back any coach who contributed to

_ him being cut from the U.S. national team this summer.

JULIE JACOBSON/AP

MAKING HIS POINT: Point guard Jason Kidd has steadied the
Nets and deserves a spot on the East’s All-Star team.

e Forwards: The toughest
position to fill for the past few
years again features some tough
decisions. Denver’s Carmelo
Anthony shouildn’t be penalized,
despite missing 15 games after -
being suspended for fighting.
Had the league’s leading scorer
missed those games due to
injury, he still would be selected.
And in Utah, Carlos Boozer is
having a breakthrough season
and is the primary reason the
Jazz has thrust itself back among
the playoff contenders in the
West. The Suns, meanwhile, are
the best team in the league and
deserve to have a representative
other than Nash. That would be
Shawn Marion, the underappre-
ciated forward who only aver-
ages 19 points, 10 rebounds, two
steals and shoots 52 percent from
the field.

e Center: The best way to

WHO HAS THE EDGE?

IS EDDIE JONES OR STEVE FRANCIS MORE LIKELY TO LAND WITH A CONTENDER?

Jones struggled with an Achilles’ injury and wasn’t very productive for most of the first part of

make the forward situation work
is to name Dallas’ Dirk Nowitzki
as a reserve at the center spot,.
which really isn’t a stretch for the
7-footer. Arguably the league
MVP through the first half, Now-
itzki might as well be amatchup
nightmare in this game as well.

e Snubs: Iverson’s move out
west hurt Golden State’s Baron
Davis the most, because he
clearly is an All-Star after elevat-
ing what should be a horrible
Warriors team to respectable sta-
tus. Kevin Martin’s remarkably
efficient season also will fail to be
rewarded in the stacked West,
and Spurs guards Tony Parker
and Manu Ginobili will find it
difficult to make the cut. Phoe-
nix’s Amare Stoudemire also
could find that his 19 points and
nine rebounds aren’t enough to ~
earn him a nod, despite the lack
of centers out West.



|
;
{
i
i
i
i
i
j
i
i
|
i
i







EASTERN
CONFERENCE







Reports of the Pistons fall-
ing apart because of a bad
relationship between Rash-
eed Wallace and Flip Saun-
ders have been largely over-
stated. Wallace said an ESPN
report claiming he “hated”
Saunders was untrue. “At
points in the season, coaches
and players are going to have
their differences, but it’s not
to the point where | hate that
man, or | think he’s.a bad per-
son,” Wallace said... . The
Knicks signed big man
Jerome James to the mid-
level exception last season,
and that turned out to bea
bad move. So the Knicks fol-
lowed that with another
apparently poor decision by
giving Jared Jeffries similar
money. Against the Heat on
Menday, Jeffries started and
played just four minutes
before Isiah Thomas took this

_supposed defensive stopper
out of the game for good dur-
ing a 27-0 Heat run.... Losing
Allen Iverson as a teammate
has forced Andre Iguodala to
be the Sixers’ best player on
both ends of the court. It’s a
challenge he’s adjusting to. “It -
takes a lot of energy, but |
think it’s only going to make
me a better player,” he said.
“Look at the best players who
ever played the game, they
do it on both ends of the
court. That’s why Kobe [Bry-
ant] is the best player,
because he’s the best offen-
sive player and a top-five
defensive player as well.”

WESTERN
CONFERENCE

The recent run of Pau
Gasol trade rumors has
stemmed from his “private”
meeting with owner Michael
Heisley, during which he
requested the Grizzlies look
into trading him to a con-
tender. It was far from a trade
demand, and Heisley report-
edly told Gasol he would look
into it, but made no promises.
Gasol, meanwhile, is upset
that his character has been
questioned for supposedly
giving up ona losing team.
“I'm still here and I’m still com-
peting,” he said. “For people
to second-guess my profes-
sionalism and my willingness
to work is a real shame. I’ve
been here the longest. I’m
loyal to my team. I’m a loyal
person.”... The Clippers have
begun to win again, but if it’s
going to continue, Shaun Liv-
ingston will have to shoot
more - and better - from the
outside. With Sam Cassell on
the court, teams can’t afford
to sag on Elton Brand. But
Cassell is 37, so Livingston will
have to help provide more
balance. ... Sacramento no
longer is in love with point
guard Mike Bibby, who is
shooting 38 percent from the
field and was booed this week
after missing a free throw
against the Nets.



#6

6-6/200

guard

6-3/220

guard

the season. But lately, Jones has shown he has something left, hitting a pair of clutch shots in a
Memphis win against the Jazz, and putting up 19 and 17 points in back-to-back games. That, along
with his always-solid defense, makes Jones a valuable asset to a winning team that needs perime-
ter help. The Grizzlies have displayed a willingness to buy Jones out of the final year of his con-
tract, which pays him $15.6 million this season. He could draw interest from the Lakers, Heat, Cav-
aliers and Spurs.

Francis has had his own health issues, except his are ongoing. He is away from the Knicks with
a sore knee. Before he left, Francis shot 40 percent for New York and averaged 10 points a game,
though he was better than 2-to-1 with his assist-to-turnover ratio. The Knicks also have reportedly
considered buying out Francis’ contract, but he has two years remaining after this season at bet-
ter than $16 million each season. If New York does find a way to rid itself of Francis, it’s doubtful
one of the league’s better teams will be willing to sign a disruptive offensive force.

The edge: Jones is more likely to be cut loose and attract a contender’s interest.





FRANCIS.

GS «MPG «6FG% =—3p% = FI% «= s«(OFF=S «(EF = RPGS APG «= SPG_)S ss BPG PF PPG

NEW YORK 21 Vo 263 4063799 BH 10 02 19 31 100





Team G GS MPG) = FG% = 3P% = FI% »~=—s«OFF' COEF

Team G
MEMPHIS 28 ib 19.0 561 286 J) 05 ld 19 iA] 08 0] 08 16 53 ,







Go online to view our Extras, including Heat beat writer Israel Gutierrez’s weblog and our interactive free-throw game. Also watch video ofthe
festivities before the defending NBA champions’ opening game, view photo galleries from last season’s run to the title and download wallpaper.

- MIAMIHERALD.COM





THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com

EASTERN CONFERENCE

SOUTHEAST WL Pet. GB 10 Str. Home Away Conf

Washington 26 17 .605 - 7-3 W-2 17-4 9-13 18-9
Orlando 23 21) «523 3% «403-7 ~L-2 14-9 9-12 13-12
Miami 19 25 .432 7% 46 L-3 10-10 9-15 8-14
Atlanta 15 27 357 10% «5-5 L-l 7-12 8-15 10-18
Charlotte 15 28 .349 11 5-5 L-l 8-14 7-14 11-17

ATLANTIC WL Pet, GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf

Toronto 22 23 489 - 7-3) Ll 14-7 8-16 15-9
New Jersey 21 23) ATT) =e 6-4 W-1 13-10 8-13 16-9
New York 19 27 .413 3% 4-6 L-l 11-13 8-14 12-17
Philadelphia 14 31 311 8 5-5 W-1 7-11 7-20 10-17
Boston 12 31.279 «9 «(0-10 L-11 4-17 8-14 8-20

Home Away — _Conf

CEUTA ee We Pe EE

Detroit 25°17 «595-5 WelS12-9—«13-B «17-9
Chicago 26 19 578 =} 6-4 W-3 20-6 6-13 20-8
Cleveland 25 19 .568 1 3-7 L-1 15-6 10-13 16-12
Indiana 23 21 623 3 5-5 L-l 13-7 10-14 18-13
Milwaukee 18 26 .409 8 2-8 W-1 10-8 8-18 8-16

WESTERN CONFERENCE

SOUTHWEST = Ww L Pet. GB } Lio Str. Home_ _Away — _Conf

Dallas 36 9 800 - 91 W-1l 20-3 16-6 24-6
San Antonio 32-14 .696 4% 7-3 W-2 16-8 16-6 21-9
Houston 27 16 «628 «68 6-4 W-2 14-5 13-11 15-14
New Orleans 18 25 .419 17 6-4 W-2 12-10 6-15 9-17
Memphis 11 34 «4.244 25 «3-7 L-2 8-14 3-20 5-21
NORTHWEST






Utah
Denver 22 19 .537 5 10-8 9-12
Minnesota 21 22 +488) «7 9-14 12-14
Portland 19 26 .422 10 8-14 12-14
Seattle 17 26 = «©.395 «11 4-16 7-16
- PACIFIC W tL. Pct. GB L10 Str. Home _Away Conf
Phoenix 36 8 .818 - 10-0 W-17 “19- 3. 17-5 16-7
L.A. Lakers 27 17 «614 «9 4-6 =—L-2) 19-6 = 8-11-17-10
L.A. Clippers 21 22 .48814% 6-4 L-1 16-8 5-14 13-17
Golden State 21 23) 477 «15 4-6 W-2) 17-8 4-15 13-15
Sacramento 17 25 = .405° 18 3-7 L-2 12-11 5-14 8-17

RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Sunday’s results Tonight’s games Saturday’s results

Pho. 115, Cle. 100 Orl. at Atl, 7 Chi. 100, Miami 97
Mil. 107, NY 105 Sac. at Mem., 8 Ind. 102, Tor. 84
S.A. 96, LAL'94, OT Pho. at Minn., 8 Phi. 104, Atl. 89
Was. 105, Bos. 91 Port-N.O. @0.C., 8 N.O. 94, Utah 83

Por. 135, Mem. 132 (20T)

Det. 95, Ind. 87
Dal. 106, Sac. 104

LA.C. at Sea., late

Phil. at Hou., 8:30
Char. at Den., 9°

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

BASKETBALL

NBA GAMES

MONDAY, JANUARY. 29, 2007 | 2

Finley’s 3 lifts the Spurs

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — Michael Finley’s
3-pointer with 1.3 seconds left in overtime
gave the cold-shooting San Antonio Spurs an
improbable 96-94 victory over the Los Ange-
les Lakers.

Finley took a pass from Tim Duncan well
behind the arc and hit nothing but net on his
long jumper over Lamar Odom, helping the
Spurs avoid their first regular-season sweep
at hands of the Lakers in nine years.

Vladimir Radmanovic’s 3-pointer as time
expired didn’t come close. Kobe Bryant, who
had’31 points, six rebounds and seven assists,
was unable to get open, leaving it up to Rad-
manovic to try the final shot.

Tony Parker scored seven of his 19 points
for the Spurs in overtime. Duncan led San
Antonio with 21 points, 14 rebounds and a
season-high nine assists, while Manu Ginob-
ili had 21 points and seven rebounds.

Odom had 18 points, 10 rebounds and six
assists for the Lakers, who have lost four of
five.

e Bucks 107, Knicks 105: In Milwaukee,
Mo Williams had 30 points, including a run-
ning, 20-foot jumper with 3.1 seconds left,
and 10 assists to lift Milwaukee past New
York and snap a six-game losing streak.

Williams, who missed the last nine games
after spraining his left shoulder in a collision
on Jan. 8 at Denver, brought some desper-
ately needed energy and bailed out the strug-
gling Bucks after they nearly blew a 13-point
lead with just under 9 minutes to play.

Milwaukee, which had lost 11 of its last 12
and nearly completed its first winless month



Ge oe)

WINSLOW TOWNSON/AP
DRIVING WIZARD: The Wizards’ Caron
Butler, right, drives to the basket past
the Celtics’ Ryan Gomes in the first
quarter on Sunday in Boston.
Washington won 105-91.

at home in more than 15 years, outhustled the
Knicks for most of the game before New
York made a furious rally.

Jamal Crawford, who scored 17 points in
the fourth and finished with 26, started by
scoring the Knicks’ first 10 points of the final

quarter. He picked up his fifth foul with 5:05
left and the Knicks down 91-85.

e Wizards 105, Celtics 91: In Boston,
Antawn Jamison scored 34 points and Caron
Butler added 21 points and 11 rebounds to
lead Washington past slumping Boston.

Gilbert Arenas finished with 23 points for
the Wizards, who have won six of seven to
move into first place in the Eastern Confer-
ence. Brendan Haywood added 11 points and
nine rebounds.

Delonte West had 22 points and 1] assists
and Ryan Gomes scored 20 for the Celtics.

e Pistons 95, Pacers 87: In Auburn
Hills, Mich., Chris Webber had 17 points and
13 rebounds, and Detroit Pistons coach Flip
Saunders picked up his 500th victory.

Rasheed Wallace added 20 points for
Detroit, including 18 in the second half, while
Richard Hamilton scored 21 and Antonio
McDyess had 13 points and 11 rebounds.

Jermaine O’Neal led.all scorers with 26
points, adding 12 rebounds and five blocks.

LATE SATURDAY

e Timberwolves 101, Clippers 87: In
Los Angeles, Kevin Garnett had 32 points and
nine rebounds, and Minnesota snapped a six-
game losing streak.

e Warriors 131, Bobcats 105: In Oak-
land, Calif, Al Harrington scored 21 of his 28
points in the first half, leading Golden State
over Charlotte.

e Nets 112, Nuggets 102: In Denver,
Vince Carter scored 40 points and Bostjan
Nachbar added a career-best 22 in New Jer-
sey’s victory over tired Denver.

NJ. at Utah, 9 N.J. 112, Den. 102
G.S. 131, Cha. 105
Min. 101, L.A.C. 87
WOMEN’S TOP 25

No. 2 UNC beats No. 3 Maryland

Associated Press
Associated Press

COLLEGE PARK, Md. —
Playing on the road against
the defending national cham-
pions before an energized
sellout crowd, No. 2 North
_’ Carolina didn’t flinch.
“Ivory Latta scored a sea-
son-high 32 points, and the
unbeaten Tar Heels extracted
a measure of revenge against
No. 3 Maryland with an 84-71
victory Sunday night.

The crowd of 17,950 was
the largest to watch a wom-
en’s basketball game in Atlan-
tic Coast Conference history,
surpassing the 17,243 that
viewed the Terrapins’ loss to
Duke in February 2005. Mary-
land has hosted the top five
crowds in ACC history.

On this night, however, the
Terps (21-2, 5-2) waited too
long to match the intensity of
their enthusiastic fans. Mary-
land fell behind with five min-
utes elapsed and never caught
up, crumbling under a series
of turnovers and missed shots.

Latta made four 3-pointers
and the Tar Heels (23-0, 7-0)
made eight of their first nine
shots in the second half to
open up a 55-35 lead with 15
minutes remaining. Although
the Terrapins eventually got
within one point, they
couldn’t complete the come-
back.

e@ No. 4 Tennessee 80, Ala-
bama 51: In Tuscaloosa, Ala.,
Shannon Bobbitt scored 20
points, including six 3-point-
ers, to lead the fourth-ranked
Tennessee Lady Vols to an
80-51 victory over Alabama on
Sunday.

Three of the 5-foot-2 junior
point guard’s 3-pointers came
in a four-minute span in the
second half that saw Tennes-
see (19-2, 6-0 Southeastern
Conference) go on a run to
turn a four-point advantage
into a 53-36 lead with 13 min-
utes to go.

Alabama (10-12, 0-7) never
got closer than 15 points the
rest of the way.

e No. 8 LSU 65, Auburn
45: In Baton Rouge, La., Syl-
via Fowles scored 19 points
and grabbed 20 rebounds to
help LSU beat Auburn.

Quianna Chaney added 17
points for LSU (20-2, 6-1
Southeastern Conference),
which extended the nation’s
longest homecourt winning
streak to 42 games.

Whitney Boddie was the
only player in double figures
for Auburn (15-7, 2-4) with 14
points.

e No. 11 George Wash-
ington 71, La Salle 47: In
Philadelphia, Sarah-Jo Law-
‘ rence scored 20 points and
Jessica Adair added 18 points
and 12 rebounds to lead
George Washington to its lth
straight win.

Kimberly Beck had 12
points for the Colonials (18-2,
7-0 Atlantic 10), who also won
ll straight games during the
2003-04 season.

The Explorers (15-7, 3-4)
missed 22 of their first 23
shots and hit just 3-of-25 field
goals in the first half, helping
George Washington jump out
to a 31-9 lead and hold a 34-20
advantage at the break.

e No. 14 Georgia 77,
Florida 54: In Gainesville,
Fla., Tasha Humphrey scored
19 points and Ashley Houts
added 16 to help Georgia hand
Florida its ninth straight loss.

The Lady Bulldogs (18-4,
5-2 Southeastern Conference)
ended the first half with a 9-1
run to lead 36-27 at the break.
The Lady Gators (6-16, 0-7)
trimmed the lead to 53-49 on
Marsha Dotson’s layup with
9:28 remaining, but Georgia
closed the game with a 24-5
spurt.

e No. 15 Vanderbilt 61,
Arkansas 34: In Fayetteville,
Ark., Carla Thomas scored 18
points to lead Vanderbilt over
Arkansas.

The Lady Commodores
(18-4, 4-3 Southeastern Con-
ference) allowed just 10 field
goals in the game, a record
low for the Lady Razorbacks
in Southeastern Conference
play. The previous low was 12,
in a 2003 game against
Auburn. .

e No. 16 Bowling Green
72, Eastern Michigan 55: In
Ypsilanti, Mich., Kate Achter
scored 22 points to lead Bowl-
ing Green over Eastern Michi-
gan for the Falcons’ llth
straight win.

The Falcons (18-2, 8-0 Mid-
American Conference) built a
20-point lead in the second
half behind Achter and Ali
Mann, who scored 19 points.

e No. 19-Middle Tennes-
see 84, Louisiana-Lafay-
ette 57: In Murfreesboro,



Tenn., Chrissy Given scored
23 points as Middle Tennes-
see pulled away in the second
half for a victory over Louisi-
ana-Lafayette.

The Blue Raiders (19-3,
11-0) won their 16th straight
game, setting a new school
record. The streak is also the
third-longest in the nation,
pending Maryland’s game
against North Carolina later
Sunday.

e Mississippi State 73,
No. 22 Mississippi 71: In
Oxford, Miss., Marneshia
Richard’s shot at the buzzer
lifted Mississippi State over
Mississippi.

Richard’s shot, which was
upheld after a video review,
came after Ashley Awkward
had tied the game at 7l ona
3-pointer with 6.3 seconds
remaining.

It was the first home loss
for Mississippi (16-6 overall,
5-2 Southeastern Conference)
in 12 games this season.

Mississippi State’s Alexis
Rack had three of the Bull-

dogs’ nine 3-pointers to finish .

with 18 points and seven
rebounds. Richard scored 15
points for Mississippi State
(13-8, 4-3). >

e Rutgers 63, No. 23
Michigan State 57: In Pisca-
taway, N.J., Essence Carson
scored seven of her 21 points
in the final 2:38 to lift Rutgers
over Michigan State.

The Scarlet Knights (12-6)
won for the seventh time in
eight games while handing the
Spartans (15-6) their second
straight loss to an unranked
opponent.

Victoria Lucas-Perry led
Michigan State with 13 points.

LATE SATURDAY

e No. 25 Nebraska 78,
Kansas 58: In Lincoln, Neb.,
Kelsey Griffin scored 24
points to help Nebraska beat
Kansas.

GREG CARROCCIO/AP

‘IT’S MINE’: George Washington’s Robin Murphy grabs a
rebound in the first half against La Salle in Philadelphia
on Sunday. George Washington beat La Salle 71-47.



NHAT MEYER/SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS/MCT

UNDERDOG IS HERE: Stanfora’s ae Goods, center, drives against UCLA defenders
Luc Richard Mbah a Moute, left, and Josh Shipp in the first half. Host Stanford
defeated No. 3 UCLA 75-68 on sun ey:

Stanford upsets of No. 3 UCLA

Associated Press

STANFORD, Calif. — Law-
rence Hill scored seven
straight points including the
tying and go-ahead baskets to
finish with 22, and Stanford
rallied in the second half to
stun No. 3 UCLA 75-68 Sun-
day night and hand the Bruins
only their second loss of the
season.

Arron Afflalo had 22
points, six rebounds and five
assists for the Bruins (18-2, 7-2
Pac-10), who were thoroughly

outplayed in the second half

and had their four-game win-
ning streak snapped. Their
only other loss came Jan. 6 at
Oregon, 68-66.

Anthony Goods scored 17
of his 20 points in the second
half as Stanford won.its third
straight and sixth in seven to
complete a sweep of the
ranked Los Angeles schools
after a 65-50 victory over No.
25 USC on Thursday night.

Maybe now it’s the Cardi-
nal’s turn to earn a ranking.
Stanford (14-5, 6-3) was
picked to finish seventh in the
surprisingly even Pac-l0. °

e No. 2 Wisconsin 57,
lowa 46: In Iowa City, Iowa
— Alando Tucker scored 27
points, Brian Butch added 13
points and 14 rebounds and
No. 2 Wisconsin beat Iowa
57-46 on Sunday, eclipsing the
best start in school history.

Tucker went ll-of-14 from
the floor for the Badgers (21-1,
7-0 Big Ten), who topped the
old mark of 20-1 set in 1915-16.

Wisconsin also extended
the nation’s longest winning
streak to 17 games.

Adam Haluska scored 16
points to lead Iowa (11-10, 3-4
Big Ten).

e No. 10 Duke 75, Bos-
ton College 61: In Durham,
N.C., DeMarcus Nelson
scored 17 points to lead No. 10

Duke past Boston College
75-61 on Sunday.

Josh McRoberts had 16
points, 12 rebounds and five
blocks for the Blue Devils
(18-3, 5-2 Atlantic Coast Con-
ference), who have won five
straight games since an 0-2
league start. Duke has won
the past six meetings, includ-
ing all three since the Eagles
joined the ACC.

Jared Dudley scored 17
points to lead the Eagles (14-6,
6-2), who fell out of first place
in the league.

No. 15 Marquette 70,
South Florida 68: In Tampa,
Fla., Dominic James scored 16
points and Jerel McNeal stole
a pass and drove nearly the
length of the floor to make a
layup at the buzzer to give
Marquette a victory over
McNeal finished with 13
points and Marquette (19-4,
6-2), won its sixth straight.

Mattis led South Florida
(11-11, 2-6) with 20 points and
nine rebounds.

e Virginia 64, No. 19
Clemson 63: In Clemson,
S.C., Jason Cain’s tip-in with
15.5 seconds left capped a 16-
point comeback over the final
nine minutes to lift Virginia
over Clemson.

The Cavaliers (13-6, 5-2
Atlantic Coast Conference)
trailed 61-45 after Cliff Ham-
monds’ 3-pointer with 8:47 to
go. But Clemson was held to
two foul shots the rest of the
way.

It was the second straight
improbable defeat for Clem-
son (18-4, 4-4), which lost at
Duke 68-66 on David
McClure’s layup with no time
remaining this past Thursday
night when officials incor-
rectly added time after the
Tigers had tied things.

e Georgia 57, No. 21
LSU 54: In Athens, Ga., Levi

Stukes’s 3-pointer with 0.6
seconds left gave Georgia a
win over Louisiana State.

It was Stukes’ fourth
3-pointer of the game and was
one of eight second-half 3s by
the Bulldogs (13-6, 5-2 South-
eastern Conference). He fin-
ished with 16 points.

Glenn Davis had 18 points,

14 rebounds and a career-high

six assists for LSU (13-7, 2-4).
Terry Martin added 16 points.

Takais Brown had 15 points
and 10 rebounds for Georgia,
which has won five of its last
six games.

e No. 24 Virginia Tech
73, Georgia Tech 65: In
Atlanta, Zabian Dowdell
scored 23 points and A.D.
Vassallo had 19 to help Vir-
ginia Tech beat Georgia Tech.

The Hokies (16-5, 6-1 Atlan-
tic Coast Conference) have
won three straight, six of eight
and 12 of 14.

Georgia Tech (13-7, 2-5) has
lost three straight to drop into
10th place in the ACC.

LATE SATURDAY

e No. 5 Ohio State 66,
Michigan State 64: In
Columbus, Ohio, Greg Oden
scored 19 points and Ohio
State nearly blew a 20-point
halftime lead before holding
off Michigan State.

e No. 7 Oregon 77, No.
20 Washington State 74
(OT): In Pullman, Wash.,
Aaron Brooks returned from a
suspension to score 31 points
and help Oregon beat Wash-
ington State in overtime to
claim sole possession of sec-
ond place in the Pacific-10
Conference.

e No. 18 Nevada 79,
Utah State 62: In Reno, Nev.,
Nick Fazekas had 24 points
and 18 rebounds and Nevada
went on a 10-0 run late in the
game to beat Utah State.



A



6E | MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007 _ INTERNATIONAL EDITION _



GOLF

Funk claims
lopsided victory §

Associated Press

KAHUKU, Hawaii — Fred
Funk had the most-lopsided
victory ever in a 54-hole
Champions Tour event, shoot-
ing his second straight 8-under
64 on Sunday for'an ll-stroke
win in the Turtle Bay Champi-
onship.

The 50-year-old Funk, still a
regular on the PGA Tour,
ended the suspense early with
six birdies in a front-nine 30
and finished with a tourna-

_ment record 23-under 193 total
in the tour’s first full-field
event of the year.

Funk earned $240,000 for
his second Champions Tour
victory in five career starts. He
also went wire-to-wire to win
the AT&T Championship, the
last full-field event in the 2006
season.

Funk, who missed the cut in
the PGA Tour’s Sony Open
and tied for 28th last week in
the Champions Tour’s 41-man
MasterCard Championship,
put on another show with his
sweet putting using a new
wider stance he picked up dur-
ing the pro-am.

“Probably my best three
days of putting I’ve ever had,”
said Funk, the only player in
the 78-player field without a
bogey in three days.

Tom Kite, who tied for sec-
ond last week in the Master-
Card Championship, went
double bogey-bogey on the
last two holes to close with a
71, dropping him into a five-
way tie at 12 under with 2006
winner Loren Roberts (66),
Tom Purtzer (66), Denis Wat-
son (68) and Kiyoshi Murota
(72).

Tim Simpson (68), D.A.
Weibring (68) and David Eger
(69) were another stroke back
at 11 under. :

The legendary surf was up
on Oahu’s North Shore, but
the wind wasn’t. It was calm
for a second day, setting up
the layout for birdies.

Funk made it a race for sec-
ond by swirling in a 9-foot
birdie putt on the 574-yard
ninth to reach 21.under for an
eight-stroke lead over Murota
and Kite. Funk made the turn
at 30 and was relaxed as he
strolled along the oceanside
Palmer Course, smiling and
waving a hang-loose sign to

“cameras. — :

The seven-time PGA Tour
winner broke the previous 54-
hole record of 195 set by Jim
Colbert in 1991 when the event
was played on Maui on a
par-70 course.

Hale Irwin, a six-time win-

ner in the event, closed witha

69 to finish at 6 under. He said
he knew of only one way any-
one could stop Funk from win-
ning.
“Go hire a hitman,” said
Irwin, who had a 23-under 193
- total at the MasterCard last
week to beat Kite and Jim
Thorpe by five strokes for his
tour-record 45th victory and
first in 15 months.

Irwin’s run for an unprece-
dented seventh title in the
event ended on the first day

with a quadruple-bogey 8 on

TENNIS

the seventh hole.
“I kind of dug my grave
right then,” he said.

NATIONWIDE TOUR

PANAMA CITY, Panama
— Argentina’s Miguel Car-
ballo won the Nationwide
Tour’s season-opening Pan-
ama Championship, closing
with a 5-under 65 on Sunday
for a two-stroke victory over
three players.

The 27-year-old Carballo,
five strokes back at the start of
the round, finished with a
6-under 274 total on the Pan-

-ama Golf Club course. He

earned $99,000 and secured
full status on the Nationwide

‘Tour through the end of next

season.

“I still can’t believe I won,”
Carballo said. “I didn’t think I
would ever win, but I’m happy
that I did. To win any Nation-
wide Tour tournament would
be a thrill, but to do it in Latin
America makes it even more
special.

“Earning a Nationwide
Tour card and having the
opportunity to fulfill a goal of
mine to play on the PGA Tour
is beyond words.”

PGA Tour winner Jim

McGovern (66), Hunter Haas
(70) and Patrick Sheehan (71)
tied for second at 4 under, and
Camilo Benedetti (65) and
third-round leader Marc Tur-
nesa (73) followed at 3 under.

Carballo won 55 years after
Argentine star Roberto De



RONEN ZILBERMAN/AP

TURTLE BAY WINNER: Fred Funk smiles as he holds his
trophy after winning the Turtle Bay Championship in

Kahuku, Hawaii, on Sunday.

Vicenzo claimed the first of
his five victories at the Pan-
ama Golf Club.

“Just winning is great,” Car-
ballo said. “But winning in the
same place where one of the
best golfers from Argentina
and the world won is a great
thrill.”

Carballo’s only other pro-
fessional win came in the 2006
Guatemalan Open, an event
sanctioned by the PGA Euro-



TITO HERRERA/AP

BIRDIE HAPPY: Miguel Carballo celebrates after scoring a
birdie on the 16th hole during the Movistar Nationwide
championship in Panama City, Panama, on Sunday.

pean Challenge Tour and the
Tour de Las Americas.

“My goal at the beginning
of the day was to shoot 4 or 5
under, and I was able to do
that,” Carballo said. “I played
so well today under tough
conditions and a lot of pres-
sure. ... This course was
really hard all week long. You
just had to do your best to hit
fairways and greens. I guess I
did that better than anyone
else this week.”

QATAR MASTERS

DOHA, Qatar — Retief
Goosen eagled the final hole
Sunday to win the Qatar Mas-
ters, beating Nick O’Hern by a
stroke for his first title in more
than a year.

The South African birdied
the 17th and closed with a
3-under-par 69 and finished at
15-under 273.

“It feels good to be the

‘champion after such a long

while,” said Goosen, who has
won 32 tournaments. “This
win sets me up nicely for the
rest of the season.”

Goosen had been tied with
O’Hern (70) and Richard
Green (72) entering the final
day.

“The birdie on 17 set me up
nicely for the 18th,” Goosen
said. “I told my caddie that an
eagle can do it for me. And I
did it.”

Ernie Els, the 2005 Qatar
Masters winner, shot a 67 and
finished two strokes behind
Goosen. He was hurt by
bogeys on the second and
sixth holes.

Stuart Appleby (66),
Graeme McDowell (67) and
Green were at 276. Sergio Gar-
cia, playing in Doha for the
first time, shot a 67 for 281.

O’Hern was leading by two
shots before Goosen’s birdie-
eagle finish.

“T didn’t hit the ball well
today,” O’Hern said. “But I
kept hitting because that’s
what you’ve got to do when
you are not playing well.”



S. Williams, Gonzalez big movers in rankings

BY DENNIS PASSA
Associated Press

MELBOURNE, Australia —
Serena Williams and Fernando
Gonzalez made the biggest
jumps in the rankings after the
first Grand Slam of the year.

Williams, who came to the
Australia Open ranked No. 81,
vaulted to No. 14 after she beat
Maria Sharapova 6-1, 6-2 Sat-
urday to win the title.

Gonzalez lost to Roger Fed-
erer in Sunday’s final, beaten
7-6 (2), 6-4, 6-4. The Chilean
advanced five places to No. 5
after his celebrated run to his
first Grand Slam final, accord-
ing to ATP projections.

The men’s and women’s
rankings: were to be officially
announced Monday.

Sharapova’s consolation
prize is moving to No. 1, a
ranking she first attained in

ugust 2005. When Sharapova

made the fourth round, she
displaced Justine Henin. The
Belgian did not play the Aus-
tralian Open after withdraw-
ing for personal reasons — she
and her husband have sepa-
rated. ;
Amelie Mauresmo, the
defending Australian Open
champion who was beaten by
Lucie Safarova in the fourth
round, remains at No. 3, fol-
lowed by Australian Open
semifinalist Kim Clijsters, who
is to retire after this season.
In projections by the WTA
Tour, Clijsters moved up one
spot and swaps with 2004 U.S.
Open Svetlana Kuznetsova,
who was beaten in the fourth
round and now is No. 5. Mar-
tina Hingis, beaten by Clijsters
in the quarterfinals, advanced
to No. 6 from seventh, bump-
ing Nadia Petrova, who was
beaten in the third round by

Williams.

Gonzalez had wins over
former No. 1 Lleyton Hewitt,
Masters Cup finalist James
Blake and French Open cham-
pion Rafael Nadal. The Chil-
ean’s previous best ranking
was No. 7.

“I know that I can go for-
ward,” Gonzalez said. “This
tournament was really impor-
tant for me, not only in the
numbers, but in my game.”

Federer stayed at No. 1 for
his 156th straight week. He has
held the top ranking since Feb.
2, 2004. He is already guaran-
teed of breaking Jimmy Con-
nors’ tour record of 160 con-
secutive weeks at No. 1 on Feb.
26.

Nadal remains No. 2 and
Russia’s Nikolay Davydenko is
No. 3. Australian Open semifi-
nalist Andy Roddick moves up
two places to No. 4.



ANDREW BROWNBILL/AP

MOVING UP: Fernando
Gonzalez of Chile returns
the ball to Roger Federer
during the Australian
Open final on Sunday.





nmorcosaosessvanssnevietestaeniteevanmemstcsesssssiesureitesasemtesissimsensemarainessstnesiteeissintonteetteniett sett

__ MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

Woods wins again

°PGA, FROM 5B

dates to his victory in the
British Open last July, and
Woods is now 124-under par
during that stretch.

This win looked like so
many others, especially at
Torrey Pines. Part of it was
due to him, most of it was
due to the guys falling apart
down the stretch.

Buckle held it together
for the longest time.

Woods erased a two-shot
deficit in four holes, but the
24-year-old Australian
bounced back with an
approach into 6 feet for
birdie on No. 5, and nearly
reaching the par-5 sixth
green from the right rough
to set up a simple up-and-
down birdie and a two-shot

- lead.

And even after a roar that
resonated across the course,
Buckle didn’t blink.

Woods hammered a
3-wood from the ninth fair-
way to 25 feet and holed the
putt for eagle and a share of
the lead. Buckle was walking
up the ninth fairway to his
tee shot, calmly taking a
drag from a cigarette. He
looked up when he heard the
cheer, flicked the cigarette
to the ground and stomped it
out, then birdied the next
two holes.

He still had a two-shot
lead over Woods and Quin-
ney when he reached the
12th tee, but his tee shot
caught a corner of grass on
the edge of a fairway bunker,
and that’s when everything
collapsed.

Buckle’s feet slipped in
the sand as he struck the

right and left him little green
between a bunker and the
flag. Attempting a flop shot
to give himself a short putt
at par, it came out too strong

and tumbled over the green

on the other side. He pitched
to 4 feet and missed the putt,
taking double bogey.

Woods took the lead for
the first time with a 65-foot
eagle putt that curled
around the back of the cup
and came an inch within fail-
ing, while Buckle against
chopped around the rough
and had to save par. Two
holes later, Buckle was up to
his ankles in ice plant and
his chances were sliding
over the cliffs lining the
Pacific.

Quinney also disap-
peared, trying to play a per-
fect bunker shot that came
up short and led to double
bogey on the 14th.

As quickly as those two
contenders vanished, How-
ell emerged.

He made the only birdie
of the final round on the 477-
yard 12th hole, followed that
with a two-putt birdie on the
13th, then neariy holed out
an 8-iron on the 15th, the ball
grazing the edge of the cup.
That pulled him to within
one shot of the lead. He had
the momentum. He was due
to have something good
come his way.

But he was playing with a
guy for whom little goes
wrong. ‘

Woods, who saved par
from the bunker on the 14th
and 15th hole, hit his
approach from 143 yards into
30 inches on the 17th hole,
effectively ending the tour-
nament. .

FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

Federer victorious
without losing a set

° TENNIS

objective. He was two sets
from that last year, when he
won the first set of the
French Open final before
losing in four to Rafael
Nadal.

That was his only defeat
in the last seven majors.
Nadal was 26-0 on clay last
season and is on a record 62-
match streak on the surface.

“French Open is obvi-
ously the next big one for
me,” he said. “I’ve made one
step further every year now.
Went from semis to finals.
Got closer to Rafa, as well.”

That and three other

losses to Nadal were about -

the only downsides of his
2006 season — he was 91-1
against everyone else and
picked up 12 titles.

“TI think it’s going to be a
very interesting French
Open for me ... hopefully
win the title,” he said. “That
will be a dream come true.
That’s the only way I can
make this season a better
one than last year. Other-
wise it won’t be possible.”

Federer saw Gonzalez
coming. The Chilean beat
former No. 1 Lleyton Hewitt
and Masters Cup finalist
James Blake before pound-
ing Nadal in straight in the
quarterfinals.

“T knew he was a danger-
ous player, and the way he’s
been going through the draw
made me wonder what did
he do different this time
around,” Federer said.
“Especially the win against
Nadal — it kind of shocked
me. ... I didn’t believe he was
going to beat Rafa so easy.”
“ Then Gonzalez routed
Haas 6-1, 6-3, 6-1.

Federer considered
changing strategy against
Gonzalez.

“In the end I said, You
know what, I’ve beaten him
nine times, so just take it
easy and play your game,
and hopefully it is going to
work out,” Federer said. “It
did.”

Gonzalez had the most
vocal cheering section Sun-
day, many with painted
faces chanting and blowing
whistles and twirling flags as
if they were at a soccer
game.



ANDREW BROWNBILL/AP

RETURN NOTICE: Roger
Federer returns the ball
to Fernando Gonzalez at
the Australian Open.

Federer, as usual, had
thousands of backers, too.
One fan, dressed in Swiss
red and white, carried a sign
that summed up the general
feeling: “Federer is bet-
terer.” In the end, he was.

It was close in the begin-
ning.

Gonzalez broke Federer
in the ninth game and had
set points at 5-4, but was
unable to convert the oppor-
tunities. Both players agreed
that was the turning point.

“J have to congratulate
again Roger,” Gonzalez said.
“He’s on the way to be
maybe the best player ever.
He is a great champion who
played a really good match
today, all week — almost all
his life. So I can take a lot
out of this tournament.”

Gonzalez was the biggest
mover in the men’s top 10,
moving five places to No. 5
with his run to-his first
Grand Slam final.

Serena Williams won her
eighth and most improbable
Grand Slam title, beating
top-seeded Maria Sharapova
6-1, 6-2 on Saturday in one of
the most lopsided finals at
the Australian Open. Shara-
pova left for Tokyo on Sun-
day, knowing she would
assume the No. 1 ranking the
following day.

Williams, who played
about half as many matches
in two weeks at Melbourne
Park as she did in an injury-
plagued 2006, stuck around
to watch the men’s final. She
will move from No. 81 to No.
14 and has designs on getting
back to No. 1.

ie



THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com _



NFL NOTES









Bears arrive in Miami for Super Bowl

Associated Press

MIAMI — Coach Lovie
Smith bounded down the
steps of the airplane sporting
an orange tie and several play-
ers recorded the biggest event
of their football careers on
camcorders.

The Chicago’ Bears
returned to the Super Bowl on
Sunday for the first time in 21
years.

Their chartered plane had a
big Bears logo on the side
when it arrived at Miami
International Airport. As they
taxied up, the pilot opened the
window of the mammoth jet-
liner and flew a giant Bears
flag.

From temperatures in the
teens, it took the Bears just
three hours to reach a breezy
60-degree warmup on a trip
that whisked them from snow-
covered fields to palm trees.

It also took Smith just three
seasons to land the Bears back
in the Super Bow] for the first
time since 1986.

The team hotel, just five
minutes away from the airport
and miles from the glitter of
South Beach, featured a big
orange and blue ’C’ on the ele-
vator doors and a large sign
above many of the doorways
with “Finish” sandwiched by
two Bears heads.

Smith said Friday his plan
was to take keep the Bears on
a normal schedule as much as
possible. That will certainly be
interrupted by media mob ses-
sions the first four days this
week, including one Tuesday
at the stadium where they will
face the Colts in a week.

“We're taking Halas Hall ©
down to Miami. I’m a routine
guy, and that’s what we’re
going to do. You have distrac-
tions in Chicago. Distractions
are everywhere. The guys will
be fine,” Smith said Friday.

Now the Bears have
reached the | destination
they’ ve been talking about
since last spring in their off-
season workouts. All season
eee they’ve oe the





ALAN DIAZ/AP

ARRIVAL IN MIAMI: Chicago Bears head coach Lovie Smith arrives at Miami International Mises on Sunday with the
rest of the team as they get ready for their Super Bow! date with the mGlanapolis Colts on Sunday, Feb. 4.

doubters, who questioned just
how good are these Bears
because they play in what is
perceived as the weaker NFC.

Their 15-3 record was met
with some skepticism, and
quarterback Rex Grossman
has been a question mark —
good one week, shaky the
next, with a little of both
thrown in throughout 2006.

The defense that led the
NEL with 44 takeaways wasn’t
as tough down the stretch
until a strong showing in the
NFC championship game rout
of New Orleans and its top-
ranked offense.

COWBOYS

Norv Turner got the best

1

FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

The arrival of the Colts in Indianapolis transformed the city

*COLTS

government leadership of
Indianapolis, and the state
itself.”

Frick got the nod from
then-Mayor William Hudnut
III to shepherd the Colts’
move from Baltimore to Indi-
anapolis. He began secret
negotiations with Colts coun-
sel Michael Chernoff in Feb-
ruary 1984.

On March 29, 1984, the
Colts, threatened with emi-
nent domain proceedings by
the Maryland legislature,
made their move. Two days
later, the Capital Improve-
ment Board in Indianapolis
ratified a 200-page agreement
that included a 20-year lease
to play in the then-Hoosier
Dome.

Heads turned, and not just
in the sports world, Frick said.

“Before, if you had a deal, it

would oftentimes be between ~

a couple local individuals or
businesses. Suddenly, outside
capital discovered Indianapo-
lis and started making invest-
ments in Indianapolis,” said
Frick, chairman of the Sta-
dium ‘and Convention Build-



SUPER BOWL XXXV

BALTIMORE 34, N.Y. GIANTS 7

e Jan. 28, 2001

e Raymond James Stadium, Tampa

@ MVP: LB Ray Lewis, Baltimore

The image of former UM linebacker Ray
Lewis holding the game MVP trophy was the
defining moment of Super Bowl XXXV, and not
just because Lewis was the leader of one of the

best defenses in NFL history.

ing Authority, which is build-

ing the Colts’ future home, the ° |

$675 million Lucas Oil Sta-
dium scheduled to open in
2008. :

Before the Colts, the Indi-
ana capital only was recog-
nized forthe Indianapolis 500.
The Indiana Pacers, perennial
kingpins in the old ABA, had

‘yet to make a mark in the

NBA, and college sports were
focused on a basketball coach

with a temper as fiery as his:

red sweater some 50 miles to
the south in Bloomington.

But in 1979, community
leaders created the Indiana
Sports Corp. to attract major
sports events to central Indi-
ana. The next year, Hudnut
appointed a committee to
study the feasibility of build-
ing a new'stadium that could
serve as home to a pro foot-
ball team. |

In 1982, the group brought
in the National Sports Festi-
val, which drew some 250,000
people to venues that
included new world-class
swimming and track and field
facilities on the IUPUI cam-
pus. By then, the city also was

building the Hoosier Dome —

COUNTDOWN TO SUPER BOWL XLI



The award and Super Bowl victory came:
almost one year to the day after Lewis was charged with murder
in connection with the stabbing deaths of two men. The
symmetry was remarkable, given that the incident occurred in
- Atlanta, the site of Super Bow! XXXIV, on the night of the game.
Though the murder charge later was dropped, Lewis pleaded
guilty to obstruction of justice, and was heckled about the ordeal

d The wild, weird,’
f pr veleayreiste Ae te
i wondrous.of past’ @
Super Bowls

aS 0)) 2° eae
ee) ]
Mol



out of Troy Aikman, Emmitt
Smith and Michael Irvin
when he was the Dallas Cow-
boys’ offensive coordinator.
He thinks he can do the same
with Tony Romo, Terrell
Owens and the rest of the
club as their next head coach.

Turner interviewed for the
job Sunday, becoming the sev-
enth — and likely final — can-
didate being considered by
owner Jerry Jones.

“I was excited to get a
chance to visit and talk about
things that are important to
me,” said ‘Turner, San Francis?
co’s offensive coordinator, “Ini
this league, it’s all about timing
and circumstance. ... I’ve got
a lot of confidence in the

things I can do. I think there
are a lot of people in this
league that look at it in that
manner.”

Turner was the offensive
coordinator in Dallas from
1991-93. He called the plays
that catapulted the Cowboys
to Super Bowl titles his final
two seasons. Along the way,
he became so close with Aik-
man that Turner introduced
the quarterback when he was
inducted into the Pro Football
Hall of Fame last summer.

Although Turner went
59-83-1 over nine years as a
coach with Washington and
Oakland, he’s considered the
front-runner to replace Bill
Parcells because of his long



DOUG PENSINGER/GETTY IMAGES

MOTIVATED: ‘A lot of my success came through him,’ said
Reggie Wayne, who had 86 receptions for 1,310 yards
and nine touchdowns in the regular season.

now the RCA Dome — which
was.one of the main reasons
the late owner Roberi lrsay
was attracted to Indianapolis.

“It was not a monetary sit-
uation,” Robert Irsay, the
father of the current owner,
said iat the time.

“People told me indianapo-
lis was excited about getting
an NFL team, but never in my
wildest dreams did | think we

all season

him th
award

2 eAQUE
“But!

believe it,’



would be welcomed as we
have.”

Even through some rocky
seasons — the Colts finished
1-15 in 1991, never won more
than nine games before Pey-
ton Manning arrived in 1998
and went through eight
coaches before Tony Dungy
took over in 2002 — the city’s
momentum toward major
sports status hasn’t slowed.



He already had overcome it to a certain
degree. responding with a season that earned
s Defensive Player of the Year
ve did not truly defy his detractors
until the Super Bowl.

“If you put this ina storybook, nobody would
_ewis said after the game. “To be
where | was last year and to hear everyone say
that it’s going to affect me, | had a higher power
that saia everything’s

The murder charge came into play again
during the postgame celebration, when Disney

going to be all right.”

snubbed Lewis in its “What's Next?”
commercial, choosing quarterback Trent Dilfer instead. But by
then, Lewis's turnaround was complete.
“IE the world wants io see me stumble now,” Lewis said, “I'll

stumble with a ring on my finger.”

- BRIAN COSTA

6 DAYS S tO GO

relationship with Jones and
the success they had together.

Turner had not been inside
team headquarters since he
was hired by the Redskins in
February 1994. Being back trig-
gered many memories.

“It’s just a very, very unique
place,” he said. “When you’re
away from it some time you
don’t realize it. But it certainly
hit me at Troy’s Hall of Fame
induction ceremony — the
Cowboys fans, all the people
wearing Troy’s jersey, just the
excitement and energy that’s
always there with. this organiz
zation.”

Parcells ahead monday

after going 34-32 the last four:

years. He went 0-2 in the play-

Indianapolis hosted the
NBA All-Star game in 1985. In
1987, the Pan-American
Games came to town, along
with the world indoor track
and field championships. The
NCAA moved its headquar-
ters from Kansas City to Indi-
anapolis in 1999, and the city
has become a regular stop for
the Big Ten and NCAA men’s
and women’s basketball tour-
naments, more than 400
national and international

sports events and 15 U.S.

Olympic team trials.

The Pacers, the city’s only
major team until the Colts
arrived, reached the NBA
Finals for the first time in
2000. That same year, the
expansion WNBA Indiana
Fever made its debut. The city
also hosts NASCAR and For-
mula One racing, keeping the
Indianapolis Motor Speedway

bustling beyond the month of

May.
There’s even talk of a bid
to host the 2011 Super Bowl.
“T think the Colts have ele-
vated Indianapolis to a status

‘among some cities in the

United States,” said former
Republican state Sen. Larry



offs, extending a postseason

drought that dates to 1996.

Others being considered to
replace him include defensive
coordinators Wade Phillips
of San Diego and Gary Gibbs
of New Orleans, and Jason
Garrett, Aikman’s longtime
backup who already has heen
hired for an undetermined job
— maybe head coach, proba-
bly offensive coordinator.

Turner said he’d have no
problem having Garrett on his
staff. In fact, Turner tried get-
ting Garrett on his staff in
Oakland.

“That tells you a little
something about how I feel
about Jason,” Turner said.

Jones also interviewed

1. three of Parcells’ assistant,

including secondary coach
Todd Bowles, who is black,
thus fulfilling the league rule
requiring a minority candi-
date.




SAINTS 0 ©

Reggié was fined
$5,000 by ng taunting
during hi touchdown
receptio zNew Orleans’
NEC cha ‘nshiip game loss

RY

at Chicago: ast week.
Although the rookie run-
ning was not penalized for
pointing back at Bears line-
backer Brian Urlacher or for
somersaulting into the end

zone, he _ subsequently
received the league’s standard
punishment for taunting.

NFL spokesman Greg
Aiello confirmed the fine Sun-
day.

Bush, the 2005 Heisman
Trophy winner and second
pick in last year’s draft, caught
a short pass from Drew Brees
on the left sideline. He sped
downfield, cut back near mid-
field and was several steps
ahead of Urlacher when Bush
turned and pointed at the
Bears star.

He then did his front flip
into the end zone, making” the
score 16-14.

The Bears won 39-14 to
reach the aunt Bowl.

Borst, who witnessed the
city’s transformation in three
decades as a lawmaker. “I
don’t know. we'll ever reach

Sx



phia and eres Worth.”
Bill Benner, spokesman for
the Indiana Convention and

Visitors Association, said
each Colts home game injects
about $15 million into the
city’s economy. Just as impor-
tant, he said, being one of 32
NFL cities fosters a “big-
league” atmosphere.

“When the Colts came here
in ’84, that sent the message
to the nation that we were
indeed on a course to succeed
in revitalizing, re-energizing
and upgrading our image,”
Benner said.

Could: Indianapolis have
shed its sleepy Naptown
image without the Colts?
Maybe. But why question suc-
cess?

“The sports strategy
clearly has worked,” Frick
said, adding, “And the Colts
have been an important piece
of it.”

6 P.M. EST SUNDAY, FEB. 4, 2007
DOLPHIN STADIUM ® ON TV: CBS







PAGE 8E, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS

eae ee nn



101.

@ CRICKET
PERTH, Ausiralia
Associated Press

MATTHEW HAYDEN and
Ricky Ponting made centuries
and shared a 200-run second-
wicket partnership as Australia
scraped in an eight-run win
over New Zealand in a tri-
series limited-overs cricket
match Sunday.

Hayden made 117 from 111
balls and Ponting 111 from 122
as Australia reached 343 for
five after winning the toss and
batting first; the highest score
by any team in a limited-overs
match at the WACA Ground.

Jacob Oram smashed 101 not
out from only 72 balls, putting
on 137 in an unbroken part-
nership with Brendon McCul-
lum (46 not out), as New
Zealand reached 335 for five
in reply, failing only narrowly
to overhaul Australia's massive
total.

Oram's century from 71 balls
contained four fours and six
sixes and was the fastest by a
New Zealander in limited-
overs internationals. It was also
his first-one-day international
century and eclipsed his 86 at
Adelaide last week as his high-
est limited-overs score.

"We were chasing two runs

an over at the end so I just kept .

on swinging as hard as I could,"
Oram said.

"It was thoroughly enjoyable
and very satisfying, but disap-
pointing to lose, of course."

Recalled opener Lou Vin-
cent gave New Zealand's
innings a solid foundation with
a score of 66 from 82 balls,
including eight fours and a six.
He had New Zealand on tar-
get for an unlikely win when
he was adjudged Ibw to
Michael Clarke off a ball which
clearly came from bat onto
pad.

Stephen Fleming with 28,
Peter Fulton with 24 and Ross
Taylor with 39 assisted the run
chase before Oram and McCul-
lum carried New Zealand to
the brink of victory. Australia

put down several catch
chances, but its excellent
ground fielding helped it to its
sixth straight win of the tri-
series tournament which also
includes England.

Hayden and Ponting's 200-.

run stand for Australia's sec-
ond wicket had already made
New Zealand's task almost
impossible.

Hayden recovered form and
cemented his place in Aus-

tralia's World Cup squad with -

a century from 104 balls; his
sixth hundred in 127 limited-
overs internationals.

Ponting batted in Hayden's
shadow early in his innings but
reached his half century from
62 balls and his century from
113 deliveries. The century was
his 21st in 266 one-day inter-
nationals, his third against New
Zealand and his first at the
WACA. ;

Hayden and Ponting came
together when Australia was
28 for one, after the dismissal
of Adam Gilchrist for 13. They
reached their 100 partnership
from 113 balls and their 200
partnership from 203 as they
kept up a run rate of almost a
run per ball.

Later Michael Hussey
smashed 29 from 16 balls with
three sixes and Cameron White
24 from 12 balls with a four and
a six in a late, unbroken stand
of 50 for the sixth wicket. That
partnership was eventually the
difference between the teams.

New Zealand fielded poor-
ly, dropping several catches
including chances off Hayden
when he was 0, 4 and 72. Oram
suffered most at the hands of
the Australian batsman, con-
ceding 50 runs from five overs
but had his revenge later with
the bat.

@ AUSTRALIA'S captain
Ricky Ponting raises his bat
after making 100 runs against
New Zealand in their one day
international cricket match in
Perth, Australia, Sunday, Jan.
28, 2007.

(AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)

@ NEW ZEALAND'S Jacob Oram raises his bat and helmet after making 100 runs against Aus-
tralia in their one day international cricket match in'Perth, Australia, Sunday, Jan. 28, 2007. Australia
won by 8 runs after making 343 in their innings while Oram top scored for New Zealand with a not out

(AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)



am
es ui



.& AUSTRALIA'S Matthew Hayden plays a cut shot against New Zealand in their one day inter-
national cricket match in Perth, Australia, Sunday, Jan. 28, 2007. Australia made 343 in their innings.,



(AP Photo/Rick Rycroft).

- Hayden, Ponting, Oram make 100s as
Australia edges New Zealand in

ri-series















The Tribune





Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

t: (242) 325-8737
info@ae.com.bs



“alternative
energy

Energy For Everyone

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Volume: 103 No.56





New cruise terminal
to quadruple arrivals

SEE FRONT PAGE OF BUSINESS SECTION

to. N ew Providence |

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

ONE man has been arrested
after a lucrative stolen vehi-
cle racket was busted in a joint
operation between New Prov-
idence Central Detective Unit
and North Andros police.

Yesterday saw the return of

24 stolen vehicles. from
Andros —- where they had
been shipped to be sold off at
cut-price rates — to New Prov-
idence’ ~

According to police press
liason officer, Mr Walter
Evans, North Andros police
were'said to have become sus-
picious after a significant num-
ber of cars, primarily Nissans
and Hondas, were being sold
on the island at a “below mar-
ket price”.

After bringing in officers
from the Central Detective
Unit to aid them with their

investigations, the vehicles
were recovered, and yester-
day the first batch were

- returned to New Providence.

Sixteen more cars are wait-
ing to be brought back from
the island, said Mr Evans.

Some. of the cars had to be
retrieved from Andros resi-
dents who had already bought
them by the time police con-
firmed that they had been
stolen from New Providence.

Mr Evans could not confirm

~wheiher or how these people

were compensated. ~

The cars are being stored at
the police compound, while
"some determination is made"
about what will happen to
them next, he said.

Although police have inves- |

tigated similar operations
before, this was the first of its
size as far as police are aware.

"This was a major break-
through," he said.

Man dies in car crash

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

AN UNIDENTIFIED man in his late 20s or early 30s died on
Sunday morning after losing control of his car and crashing
into a wall on East Street, police have confirmed.

According to police press liaison officer Walter Evans, the
man suffered massive head injuries and was pronounced dead

at the scene shortly after 2am.

His car overturned as he smashed into the wall, opposite the

Church of God of Prophecy.

The man — driving a 1999 burgundy coloured Chrysler Cirrus
— was said to be about 6ft to 6ft 4ins tall and of slim build. He
was dressed in blue jeans and a white and grey shirt at pe time

of his death.

According to Mr Evans, it is not thought anyone diss was

involved in the accident.





) We don’t like counting it so..
shop till ya drop!

re-inventory

















MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007

SPUR
Ua ae

SEE TODAY’S RSL

â„¢@ BERNARD DUPUCH,

| Tribune publisher Eileen Car-

ron, Roger Carron, Etienne

Dupuch Jr and Minister of
Agriculture and Fisheries

Leslie Miller at the funeral ser-

vice Saturday for Lady Dupuch

at Sacred Heart Church.
(Photo: Ana Bianca Marin)

THE funeral of Lady-
Marie Dupuch, widow of Sir
Etienne Dupuch, was held
Saturday at Sacred Heart
Catholic Church in Nassau.

The service was conducted
by Monsignor Preston Moss,
OSB.

Lady Dupuch died in her
sleep at the Camperdown
home of her eldest daughter
and son-in-law, Eileen and
Roger Carron, on January
18. She would have been 101
next month.

Her ashes were interred at
the Dupuch family’s plot in
the Eastern Cemetery.

Deputy Prime Minister
Cynthia Pratt, Works Minis-
ter Bradley Roberts, Agri-
culture Minister Leslie
Miller, Deputy Leader of the
Opposition Brent Symon-
ette, and Independent MP
Tennyson Wells were among
the mourners, which includ-
ed Lady Dupuch’s brother
Henry Plouse, and family
and friends from near and








Patients forced to visit local |

vet for X-ray in Great Exuma —

@ By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune News Editor

GEORGE . TOWN,
Exuma — The state of med-
ical services in Great Exu-
ma is so dire that anyone
needing an emergency X-

_ ray is forced to pay a visit

to the local vet, The Tri-
bune was told over the
weekend.

As the population of this

small island continues to
grow — some say it has
more than doubled in the
last few years — locals are
angry that the government
has yet to fulfil its promise
to construct a mini-hospital
here.

And with the Four Sea-
sons Emerald Bay Resort
raising visitor numbers sig-

SEE page 12

Haywards save Port Authority
from potential winding-up

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK

‘Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT -

The Hayward family has saved the

Grand Bahama Port Authority from a potential winding-
up of the company by stepping in and personally paying
a $1.2 million settlement to resolve a legal dispute with
Island Bay Condominium Phase III Association.

According to reliable sources, Rick Hayward, son of Sir
Jack Hayward, one of the principal shareowners of the
GBPA, on Friday initiated the move to avoid winding-up
and liquidation of the company.

The Island Bay Condominium Phase HI Association,

SEE page 13

a ‘ \ x
. ; os i)
i rN

E: rr we a A
with medium fries
and drink

PRICE — 75¢












Three men fired

from jobs claim

victimisation
li By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THREE Mayaguana men are
claiming victimisation after
allegedly being fired from their

jobs with a development com- .

pany for being FNM support-
ers.

The three - Edison Brooks,
25, Tecoyo "CJ" Brooks, 21,
and Trevor Collie, 34 - all
worked for I-Group (Mayagua-
na Development Company)
until they were all told this
month that there was no more
work for them.

They were then dismissed
with no notice or pay, it is
alleged.

According to Edison Brooks,
his dismissal came after he
refused a demand by his pro-

_ ject manager to greet prime
minister Mr Perry Christie at

the airport wearing a PLP T-
shirt on January 20.

Shortly before the visit, Mr
Brooks said he had joked that if
he drove the PM "he would

SEE page 12



PAGE 14, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



oT)






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$375.00 zi
#AGV08 MNESTY Interna-
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. 3 The organisation believes
#AGV12 é that he was targeted because
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14,000 BTU 3 reporting on gang violence
; g in Martissant, a suburb south
$535.00 3 of Port-au-Prince.
#tAGV14 8 Jean-Rémy Badio was a

freelance journalist and pho-
tographer. On January 19, he
was reportedly shot at his
home in Martissant, where
gang warfare has been spi-
ralling for more than two
years.

Jean-Rémy Badio was a
member of SOS Journalistes,
a Haitian organisation dedi-
cated to the protection and
defence of journalists’ rights
and freedom of the press.

According to this organi-



Sales & Full Service Department
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sation, he was killed because
he had photographed mem-
bers of an armed gang in
Martissant. His family
reported that, prior to his
death, he had received death
threats from gang members.

Haitian authorities must
ensure that the murder of
Jean-Rémy Badio does not

remain unpunished, said AI ©

in a statement.

An investigation into his
murder must be carried out
promptly and thoroughly,
and the results made public,
it added.

Members of armed gangs
who are terrorising men,
women and children must be
shown that there can be no



Amnesty International -
condemns the murder
of Haitian journalist

t

impunity for such crimes and
must be brought to trial.

Amnesty International
exhorted Haitian authorities
to end impunity for the mur-
der of journalists and to
bring the alleged perpetra-
tors of these crimes to jus-
tice.

In cases where investiga-
tions have been initiated,
impunity still prevails.
Among these are:

° Jean Léopold
Dominique along with Jean
Claude Louissaint, murdered
in Port-au-Prince on April 3,
2000.

e Brignol Lindor, found
dead in Acul (near Petite
Godave) on December 3,
2003.

e Abdias Jean, allegedly
extrajudicially executed by
police officers on January 7,
2005.

e Jacques Roche, found
dead on July 15, 2005.

Amnesty International has
urged the Haitian govern-

ment, with the assistance of .

MINUSTAH, to take urgent
steps to ensure that all jour-
nalists and human rights
defenders in Haiti are able
to carry out their activities
in safety and without fear of
harassment or intimidation.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
‘area or have won an
“award. Sai ay

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Housewares an

e



uding pillows, rugs,

as Ave. Opp.

Third Street

el: 323-4153 |

Careys Shopping Center,
Prince Charles
Tel: $24-64135

Sir Charles Hotel,
East Street South.
: Tel: 522-5528 |



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PAGE 12B, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007

Hoteliers hope 30-dy =
passport delay opens the
door to more extensions

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business

Reporter

BAHAMIAN hoteliers were
elated by the US decision to
grant a 30-day extension to
implementing the Western
Hemisphere Travel Initiative’s
(WHTI) passport initiative,
hoping it opens the door to fur-
ther extensions - possibly even
for a year or more.

Minister of Tourism Obie
Wilchcombe was able to secure
the 30-day extension on imple-
menting the WHTI, which was
supposed to come into effect
on January 23, 2007, following
emergency talks in Washing-
ton DC.

Robert Sands, senior vice-
president of administration and
external affairs for Baha Mar
Resorts, told The Tribune that
the US move, which allows
Americans another month to
secure passports is a tremen-
dous opportunity for the
region.

“It gives an opportunity for ..

the authorities in the United
States to revisit this entire situ-
ation. Thirty days, especially at
this time of the year, is very.
significant because we are in
our winter season, and it would
have a tremendous impact on
decision making for tourists
coming to the Bahamas,” Mr
Sands said.

“It is a very positive initia-
tive, because it also opens the
door for further extensions to
come, and we are extremely
encouraged by this last-minute
initiative on behalf, certainly:

of the Bahamas and the entire

Caribbean. We would wish to
congratulate the minister, and
also the authorities of the US
embassy, and all of our col-
leagues abroad who persisted
in making this happen.
“This.is a tremendous oppor-
tunity now for us to perhaps
get an extension to the point
where the cruise ships are, and
it would in fact level the playing
field. It would result in exactly
what we would have wished
under the circumstances, so we
are extremely encouraged by
this and it is a very positive

move, certainly for the °

Bahamas and the rest of the
Caribbean.” :
During his closing charge at
the conclusion of National
Tourism Week, Mr Wilch-.

PROFILE:

combe thanked everyone who

assisted in getting the exten-

sion.

“On behalf of a grateful
nation, I wish to thank Con-
gressman Bennie Thompson
from the state of Mississippi,
the chairman of the Homeland
Security committee in the US
Congress and members of his

staff, who worked through the -

11th hour to understand the
potential and devastating
impact that WHTI could have
to our tourism dependent
countries,” he added.

Mr Wilchcombe thanked -
Robert Johnson, the owner of .

the Charlotte Bobcats basket-
ball team, Doris Crenshaw and
Debbie Bartlett.

“With their help our cry was
heard,” he said.

. Mr Wilchcombe ‘said the
extension allows for further
education of American trav-
ellers, and provides a window
to.continue the pursuit of sim-
ilar consideration for land-
based tourism that was given
to the cruise lines.

“Our efforts have not been
for the Bahamas alone, but the
wider Caribbean, some nations
that could perish economically
if they were to lose any of the
tourism trade that has replaced
the banana industry,” Mr
Wilchcombe added.

He said the Caribbean was
to prepare for the congression-
al review of the matter, which
will be held in March in New
Yorke 25...

Mr Wilchcombe said the
WHTI brought the Caribbean

“eye-to-eye with the extreme

vulnerability of the tourism

industry.

He added that to protect
itself, the region must develop
stronger relationships with the
US congress generally, and the
Congressional Black Caucus.

“We must understand that



@ ROBERT SANDS

many see us a small country.
They do not understand the
complexity of our nation, the
challenges that we face or the
potentially devastating impact
that decisions made in Wash-
ington could have on small and
vulnerable economies such as
the Bahamas,” Mr Wilchcombe

‘Said.

“We cannot be casual or lais-
sez-faire to the vulnerability of
our country and the fact that
tourism, though, resilient is
fraught with valleys and pot-
holes.”

Mr Wilchcombe said that
while the industry has been
able to rebound in the face of
adversity, in some cases it has

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LEONARD MOONSAMMY OF
MOUNT R

OSE AVE., P.O.BOX N-8341,

NASSAU,

BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and

itizenship, for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 22ND day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



Jini

FIDELITY BANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

A MEMBER OF THE FIDELITY GROUP OF COMPANIES

MANAGER -

° Bachelors Degree in Finance
_ ° STEP Qualification a
¢ 10 years experience in advising clients
appropriate legal structures o
~ © Superior organization, communication, interpersonal and computer skills

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:
* Client Relationship Management

¢ Investment of client funds

¢ Monthly management reports

* Quarterly reports to clients

° Business development and marketing activities

¢ Account opening formalities:
¢ Invoicing & booking fees _

¢ Estate Planning

¢ Administration of Trusts

¢ Production of trust deeds, letter of wishes & testamentary trusts
° Training, management and coaching of staff

invites qualified applicants for the following position:

Private Banking & Wealth Management Services

The applicant must have the following minimum qualifications:

on fiduciary services and developing

(FILE photo)

taken years to rebuild the con-
fidence of the travelling pub-
lic, service providers and poten-
tial investors.

Meetings on the WHT] ini-
tiative continue today in Wash-
ington. These will look at how
to phase-in the requirement
that all US travellers possess a
passport to return home.

In the meantine, airlines
have been told to adopt a flex-
ible approach to US tourists
without passports.

THE TRIBUNE

RBC ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
is presently considering applications for

Senior Manager & Deputy,
Group Risk Management
Risk Management,
Caribbean Banking

The successful candidate should possess the following

qualifications:

¢ Degree in-Banking, Finance or Accounting

¢ Three or more years experience in a Risk Management
environment with responsibility for large credit approval

e Proven experience in Corporate Risk Management and
seasoned in Problem Loan Management

¢ Proficiency with Bank technology

¢ Teamwork & Co-operation

© Initiative

© Impact and Influence i

¢ Thinking skills (analytical, breakthrough, conceptual and

" strategic

© Leadership ee

e Experience in developing and delivering training programs
for commercial account managers

Responsibilities include:

e Acting as Deputy for Head of Risk Management, Caribbean
Banking.

e Adjudicating credit for Corporate accounts throughout the
Caribbean Banking Region within a delegated lending limit
of $5MM, providing work ups as required for applications
over that limit.

Fulfilling Special Loans functions for all Watch Listed
accounts over $500M, developing strategies in concert with
account management and overseeing their execution.
Developing Credit Policy for Caribbean Banking Region
through reviewing RBC Canadian policy, determining
applicability/relevance under Caribbean environment,
obtaining approval/exceptions as required.

Identifying credit learning gaps within Commercial account
management teams and develops and conducts training
initiatives/programs to address these deficiencies.

A competitive compensation package (base salary & bonus)
commensurate with relevant experience and qualifications.

’ Please apply before February 9, 2007 to:

Regional Manager

Human Resources

Caribbean Banking

Royal Bank of Canada

Bahamas Regional Office

P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, N.P, Bahamas

Via fax: (242)328-7145
Via email: bahcayjp@rbc.com .

www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean

(Ge, RBG

NG Royal ol

RBC. of Canada



Freeport Container Port

rand Bahama, Bahamas

Invites Qualified Candidates to apply for the position of

Straddle Technician

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:

° Three (3) years’ experience in repairing and maintaining heavy mobile

equipment.

Certification in Heavy Equipment Repair and Maintenance (Diploma or
Associate Degree preferred)

Three to Five years working experience and knowledge of Kalmar or
Noell Straddle Carries.

Computer Literate

Must be willing to work as part of a Team.

_ © Must be able to repair and maintain:
o Hydraulic Systems
o Diesel & Gasoline Engines
o Automotive Electronic Circuits

Freeport Container Port will offer the following benefits to the successful

' candidates:

Full-time Employment .
Major Medical/Life Group Insurance
Retirement Savings Plan

School Fee Subsidy for Dependents
Performance Bonus

Representatives from the Freeport Container Port will be visiting Nassau
on January 30 & 31, 2007 and will conduct interviews from 09:00 a.m.
through 4:00 p.m. daily at the Atlantic House on Collins Avenue, Centerville

Candidates are asked to mail Resumes to the attention of:

Human Resources Director
Freeport Container Port
P.O. Box F-42465
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas

Send resume no later than February 7th, 2007 to:

The Human Resource Director
Fidelity - 51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853 » Nassau, Bahamas

f: 326.3000
e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com

MANAGER - PRIVATE BANKING & WEALTH MANAGEMENT SERVICES.

email: ADS@fcp.com.bs





PAGE 8, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



EE — a

Delivering the message 0

{ the

§ Government: A tough task

m By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a business
consultant and former
Caribbean diplomat)

T MUST be a tough
job being an Ambas-
sador for the United States
in these times when virtu-
ally every Government in
the world, with the excep-
tion of Israel, feels that it is
a phenomenal error for the
US government to try to
commit 21,500 more troops
to Iraq.
It must be even tougher














The Ministr



4. Obey the.
speed lin

stop for.

sclely,

1.To be a good driver, is to
be an alert driver :

2. Be a courteous driver

3. Obey the traffic signs

6. Buckle up for




WORLD VIEV

to be a US Ambassador to
small countries who are
convinced that the US
should not have ventured
into Iraq at all unless it had
done so as part of a United
Nations force with the full
authority of the UN Secu-
rity Council, and who
believe that the continued
US military presence to

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of Works and Utilities would like to
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pedestrians

When entering areas under road
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The Ministry of
Works and Utilities

Roadsafety

prop up a dubiously
installed (and clearly spite-
ful) government will fur-
ther turn the country into a
cauldron of violence and
blood.

It must be especially

tough to be a US Ambas- °

sador in a week when the
Democratic members of
the US Senate Foreign









B SIR Ronald Sanders

Relations Committee
opposed President Bush's
"new way forward" in Iraq,
and the majority of the
Senate, including many
Republicans, was showing
signs of deep disagreement
with the administration
over Iraq.

And, it must be espe-
cially tough to be a US
Ambassador when every
international human rights
organisation, the govern-
ments of the European
Union, and a host of others
have decried the denial of
rights to approximately 400
persons held prisoner at

the United States has treat-
ed terror suspects detained
at Guantanamo Bay.
Being in tough situations
on behalf of your govern-
ment comes with the terri-
tory for every Ambassador.
So, one has to admire
the present US Ambas-
sador to Barbados and the
Eastern Caribbean, Mary
Orismam, for her sense of

-duty to her government

when, in the same week
that all of this was happen-
ing, she delivered the mes-
sage to Caribbean leaders
to speak out for freedom
in Cuba, and then went on
to tell them that, in rela-
tion of Venezuela’s Presi-
dent, Hugo Chavez, “my
mother told me as a child
that you are known by the
company you keep”

mbassador Oris-

mam made this
statement in Dominica
where she was presenting
her credentials to the Pres-
ident of Dominica,
Nicholas Liverpool.

No official response was
made to the statement at
the time this commentary
was being written, but, if
one were to be made to



“ It must be especially tough
to be a US Ambassador in a
week when the Democratic
members of the US Senate
Foreign Relations Committee
opposed President Bush's

‘new way forward’ in Iraq, and
the majority of the Senate,
including many Republicans,
was showing signs of deep
disagreement with the |
administration over Iraq.”



Guantanamo Bay with
charges brought against
only 10 of them.

But, it must be excep-
tionally tough to be a US
Ambassador advocating
respect for human rights in
the same week that the
British Broadcasting Ser-
vice (BBC) released the
findings of a poll which it
commissioned trom the
Programme on Interna-
tional Policy Attitudes at
the University of Mary-
land. The poll, conducted
in 25 countries, showed
that 73 per cent of the per-
sons polled disapprove of
the Iraq war while 67 per
cent disapprove of the way

Bank f
Financing
Available

Prices includes: Licensing,

this particular statement, it
may have gone as follows:

Caribbean leaders are
well aware that for 45
years, the United States
has enforced an embargo
against Cuba and has
repeatedly sponsored
forms of intervention and
destabilisation in the coun-
try.

They also recognise that
the present US administra-
tion is spending:$80 million
a year on promoting dis-
sent within Cuba and on
propaganda directed at
Cuba.

No other country in the
world has had to suffer

such callous behaviour
from another; Cuba is an
abnormal place, made so
by the abnormal treatment
it has been forced to
endure from successive US
governments even against
the wishes of the majority
of people of the United
States.

' In this connection,
Caribbean countries and
their leaders recognise
that, as long as the US con-
tinues both its embargo
and the deliberate funding
of dissent in Cuba, the peo-
ple of Cuba are restrained
from living in freedom with
all the responsibilities,
obligations and enjoyments
that such freedom would
bring. When a US govern-
ment decides to listen to its
own Congressmen and the
Governors of several states

in the mid-West who want

to do business in Cuba, and
turn away from pandering
to the pressure of.the
groups of Cuban-American
exiles as part of its Presi-
dential election process,
and to normalise its rela-
tions with Cuba, Caribbean
leaders will be in a better
position to call publicly for
normalcy in Cuba includ-
ing the institutionalisation
of freedom.

It would also help if the
US were to close down the
atrocity to freedom that
Guantanamo Bay has
become.

nd, as for

Venezuela,
Caribbean leaders keep
company with democrati-
cally-elected governments
the world over, even when
the winner of an election
has to be established by a
Court. Thus, the Caribbean
maintains its relations with
Venezuela as it does with

_ the United States and oth-

er countries, récognising
always that leaders and
governments come and go,
but countries endure.

It has also not by-passed
the attention of Caribbean
leaders that the United
States and Venezuela have
the closest economic rela-

tionship.
The United States is the
biggest purchaser of

Venezuelan petroleum and
Venezuela is among the
four biggest suppliers of
petroleum to the US. The
two countries keep close
company and, as the
Ambassador’s mother told
her as a child, they are
judged by that company.

Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com
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Full Text
PAGE 2, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007

‘Ingraham claims go

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIXjNE

administration’s accomplishments in Exuma

m@ By RUPERT
MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter



THE government has
spent much of its time in
office taking credit for the
former government’s accom-
plishments in Exuma, FNM
leader Hubert Ingraham said
during what he described as
the third in a series of mini-
rallies.

Mr Ingraham, taking the
opportunity to officially open



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FNM leader speaks at the
opening of new party —
headquarters in Hoopert’s Bay



the FNM headquarters in
Exuma, accused the govern-
ment of spending a good deal
of their term in office claim-
ing as their own the results of
the “labour and the success-
es of others.”



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“They take credit, never
blame. Anything that is
good they claim. Anything
that goes wrong — they say
that’s our fault. You know
the radar has sat at the Lyn-
den Pindling International
Airport in Nassau for five
years under their govern-
ment. It’s not working now —
so they say that’s our fault,”
Mr Ingraham said.

The opposition leader said
the government has, from
the start, taken credit for
what they met when they
arrived in office.

Election

“Shortly after their elec-
tion to office they rushed to
Grand Bahama to open the
Royal Oasis. It was to their
credit then, mind you — now
they say it’s our fault. And
they opened the new North-
ern Police Headquarters in
Grand Bahama, too — built
on our watch.

“Then they ran down here
to open the Four Seasons
Hotel at Emerald Bay and
the golf course, and then
Grand Isles and then the
shopping centre — all initiat-
ed on our watch. In Nassau
they opened the art gallery,
the Doris Johnson High
School, and the new remand
centre at Her Majesty’s



@ FNM leader Hubert Ingraham speaks in Exuma

Prison at Fox Hill — all start-
ed on our watch,” Mr Ingra-
ham said.

A case in point, the oppo-
sition leader said, was when
a group of ministers came to
Exuma to celebrate the com-
pletion of.a water project.

“The record shows that
Exuma was an integral part
of the FNM’s planned
upgrade of infrastructure in
the Family Islands. That’s
why, as early as 1994, in con-
junction with the FNM gov-
ernment’s roadwork pro-
gramme in Exuma, some 20
miles of new water mains
were laid connecting Rolle
Town in the east to Farmer’s

OMMONWEALTH OF

OF CULTURE AND

__ DR. ERIC CONWAY,

Hill in the west,” Mr Ingra-
ham said.

The FNM leader said that
when construction of the golf
course at Emerald Bay com-
promised some of the area’s
well-fields, the FNM gov-
ernment required the devel-
opers to instal a reverse
osmosis system and a water-
holding tank in compensa-
tion to supply the water
needs of west Exuma.

“This was completed
before we left office in 2002.
All that was left to do was
for additional transmission
mains to be installed to bring
the improved water to
Steventon, Farmers’ Hill,

AN

’ Harts, Curtis, Stuart Manor,

Rolleville and Barreterre.
Well, it took this government
nearly its entire term in
office to get that work
done,” Mr Ingraham said.
Among other things, he
said that the government has

vt taking credit for former

left Exuma roads in “despi- 5

cable condition” and failed
to replace the galvanised
water mains.,

Project

“They ignore the fact that
the: project was already
underway when they came
to office in 2002, that here
in the Exuma Cays R/O
plants had already been
installed at Farmer’s Cay and
Black Point, for example,”
Mr Ingraham said.

The FNM, said Mr Ingra-
ham, has a history of concern

‘for the development of the

Family islands.

“You know when we came
to office in 1992 we found
few things to open — we did
find unpaved roads on every
island from Inagua in the
south to Abaco and Grand
Bahama in the north. We
reconstructed, repaired and
re-paved them.

“We met many communi-
ties throughout our Family
Islands without access to a
central supply of electricity.
We electrified all of them.
We met pit latrines in gov-
ernment-operated schools in

_ the central and southern

Bahamas — we removed
them and installed indoor
plumbing,” Mr Ingraham
said.

ING OF MUSIC _

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a d


ie

THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007, PAGE 3



FIM claims
the PLP has
mismanagetl
the economy

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE PLP has mismanaged the
economy, pursued a disastrous
model of development and missed
critical opportunities to increase
Bahamian ownership of the
tourism industry, the Opposition
claimed yesterday.

The FNM claims that in the
last five years the government has
pursued an unsustainable goal of
"hyper-growth", which has seen
huge tracts of land "give(n) away"
with little consultation to foreign-
ers for developments which could
have "many negative and irre-
versible cultural and demograph-
ic effects."

This Anchor Project scheme -
which threatens to place local
Bahamian culture "in danger of
being lost forever" - was never
mentioned in their manifesto,
unlike promises to increase the
level of consultation, said the com-
mentary.

"The government which
promised extensive consultation
never mentioned this core eco-
nomic principle in its contract with
the Bahamian people. They
seemed to have pulled it out of a
hat after they were elected," said
the party.

In approving these projects the
PLP has a failed to take into
account "the cultural, social and
micro-economic situations in our
unique islands."

"The PLP has closed its ears
to the extraordinary movement of
ordinary citizens, academics, envi-
ronmentalists, civic activists, econ-
omists, cultural leaders, business
people, union leaders, religious
leaders, columnists and journal-
ists who have issued urgent warn-
ings about the proposed mega-
anchor project rush into our Fam-
ily Islands," said the party.

There are fears that the 10,000-
acre residential development for
Mayaguana will "shatter the cul-
tural, demographic, environmental
and social landscape of that
island," it said, adding: "The PLP
anchor is threatening to drown
Mayaguana."

Meanwhile, while pushing for-

‘ward with the Anchor Project

model,.said the commentary, the
PLP have "generally ignored the
great contributions to our econo-
my which may be made by other
industries such as farming, fish-
ing, light manufacturing, logistics,
education and other service activ-
ities."

Thus, one of the most impor-
tant questions to be decided in this
2007 election, say the party, is:
“What kind of economic model
should we use to ensure planned,
sustainable development which
will attract needed and appropri-
ate foreign investment, dramati-
cally increase Bahamian owner-
ship of the economy while pro-
tecting our culture and preserving
our environment for generations
to come?”

If voted into power, the FNM
will "through sustained dialogue
with the Bahamian people...pro-
pose balanced and thoughtful
responses to this key question,"
claimed the commentary.

In the meantime, local envi-
ronmentalists are "outraged and
stunned by the massive and
unprecedented assault on land and
marine resources" that the anchor
projects have ushered in.

On this note, the government's
decision to give the go-ahead for
golf courses in a number of out
island gated communities and
resorts was criticised in particu-
lar.

"Does every gated community
require a golf course? Were golf
courses essential for development
at Buck Cay in the Exuma Cays or
at Baker’s Bay on Great Guana
Cay? We think not.

"The FNM government
refused to approve an 18-hole golf
course for the Bimini Bay devel-
opment which this PLP govern-
ment has now seen fit to approve.
We are not satisfied that this mul-
tiplicity of golf courses is environ-
mentally sustainable," it said.

The FNM claim that for each
proposed development they would
carry out not only environmental
impact studies but also social
impact studies in consultation with
local governments and residents.

The party will aim to "help
people in the various islands to
participate in the development of
their own communities by way of
training, technical assistance and
access to financing. And we will
most certainly not give away
Bahamian land to foreigners for
real estate development with
insignificant, benefit to Bahami-
ans," it said.

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j PRINEVAL

-Turnquest: there are rumours that govt may

attempt to gerrymander election boundaries

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

THERE are “rumours” that
the government may attempt to
gerrymander the election bound-
aries in an attempt to win the
next election, former FNM
leader Tommy Turnquest said at

the opening of the party’s head-

quarters in Exuma.

He, along with party leader
Hubert Ingraham, gave their sup-
port for the FNM’s candidate for
Exuma, former Bahamian
ambassador to the US Joshua
Sears.

“People are talking about the
work that the boundaries com-
mission is doing and possible
changes that they will make to
the various constituency bound-
aries. The rumour mill is filled
with people talking this and that
and trying to make mischief. I
hear the stories, but whatever
they do they must remember
they can change lines but not
minds. Houses do not move, and
people will continue to reside in
their homes.

“We ought not be concerned
about the PLP trying to gerry-
mander. The people will take
care of that. The people’s minds
are made up and they are voting
FNM. They can talk all they like
and promise all they want, but
the record of this ‘new’ PLP is



i FORMER FNM leader
Tommy Turnquest

Deputy FNM leader Brent
Symonette also echoed fears that
government gerrymandering may
split Exuma into two parliamen-
try seats — one for the cays and
one for the mainland.

“The numbers don’t warrant
it, there are some 1,800 people
currently on the register for the

Dr Coakley to he sworn in as senator

DR DOSWELL COAKLEY, former president of the Grand
Bahama Chamber of Commerce, will be sworn in today as a sena-

tor

He will fill the gap left by former senator Damien Gomez, who
is due to be sworn in as a Supreme Court judge, after he resigned in

September of last year.

Dr Coakley resigned as president of the Grand Bahama Cham-
ber of Commerce on October 26 last year to pursue. his political
career, alter being twice elected to the seat - first in 2004 and again

in 2005.

At that time it was said that he wanted "to focus his total ener-
gies" on the High Rock constituency, and "on finding creative ways
to help empower its residents and drive the economy of East Grand

Bahama"

During his time as president of the chamber, he was credited with
doubling its membership to over 250 businesses and organisations.
Speaking as he was set to take over from Dr Coakley in October,
Daniel Lowe, the current president of Grand Bahama Chamber of
Commerce, praised Dr Coakley as a man "that makes good on his

promises and gets things done.

”

Questioned as to why the decision had been taken to swear in
another senator at this time, Mr Vincent Peet said that it was the
prime minister's. decision, and he was not ina position to comimient
any further on Mr Christie's motivation.

"The Mall-at-Marathon
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Exuma constituency and it does-
n’t look like that figure will grow
much more. So, it would be a
long stretch of the imagination
for people here tonight to expect
Exuma to go back to two con-
stituencies.”

Mr Symonette also asserted
that the government’s resched-
uling of a meeting of the bound-
aries commission from last Fri-
day to today suggests that the
government is concerned about
trends in Exuma.

“J would imagine that the gov-
ernment not being ready is
because the numbers are not to
where they want them to be, so
they can put their cut as to how
they want to.”

Mr Turnquest also focused on
government land policy. For the
last five years the government
had been giving away land to any
foreigner who asked, ignoring
important decisions on issues that
impact the lives of Bahamians,
he said.

Mr Turnquest also criticised
what he described as the gov-
ernment’s penchant for forming
commissions whose recommen-
dations they “usually ignore”,
hiding behind public servants
without taking responsibility,
neglecting vital services, getting
embroiled in one scandal alier
another, and letting things hap-
pen then telling the people they
will investigate when there is a
public outcry.

“When we return to office we
will continue to work hard for
you-and we will fix the PLP
neglect,” Mr Turnquest said.

The Bahamian people, he said,
had had five years under the PLP
and were worse off for it.

“Five years of promises and
fan-fare on the economy but
many Bahamians are still not
feeling the so-called economic

boom. All they do is promise
jobs here, jobs there and jobs
everywhere, but many young
Bahamians are looking for work
and are still unemployed,” said
the former FNM leader.

The time had come, he said,
for Bahamians to have a greater
stake in their economy. The
country, said Mr Turnquest,
needed a government that did
more than create more jobs, but
would create a Bahamas of
Bahamian ownership.

ee

SELECTED

EYEWEAR



ay Street. Tel (242) 322-8537 Fax (42) 326-8135,

“Five years under the PLP and
still there is no health centre for
the island of Exuma. An island
that caters to thousands of
tourists each year, and is home to
thousands of Bahamians, has
no proper health facilities in

lace. 5

“] ask Exuma to hand this PLP
government the pink slip and tell
them it’s nothing personal, but
you have to do what’s best for
you and your country,” Mr Turn-
quest said.



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PAGE 4, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama



New US immigration laws needed

FROM SLAVES to immigrants, figuring out
who belongs in America and with what status
has, throughout American history, taken hard
work and even war.

’ But today a new consensus is forming.

“Extending hope and opportunity in our
country requires an immigration system worthy
of America, with laws that are fair and borders
that are secure,” President Bush said in his
State of the Union address last Tuesday, offer-
ing a vision for meaningful reform.

Bush’s words follow a year of inspiring
progress. Congress has been grappling with the
issue, finding some bipartisan agreement in a bill
sponsored by Senators Edward M. Kennedy
and John McCain. Immigrants themselves have
led nationwide rallies and voter registration
drives, bringing new energy and ideas to the
public debate.

Earlier this month, Ali Noorani, head of the
Massachusetts Immigrant and Refugee Advo-
cacy Coalition, joined advocates across the
country by sending a letter to House Speaker
Nancy Pelosi and Senate majority leader Harry
Reid calling on the 110th Congress to pass com-
prehensive laws that can fix the nation’s broken
immigration system.

That letter calls for a path that lets undocu-
mented immigrants earn legal status, an
enhanced worker visa programme, more English

classes and job training, halting the “militariza-
tion on the border,” and better enforcement of
labour laws to protect immigrants from work-
place abuse.

It’s a wish list, more than Congress is likely to
deliver, but the principle is sound: Immigration
reform has to occur on many fronts.

Enforcement alone is not enough. Since 1990,
the US Border Patrol budget has increased
from $263 million to $1.6 billion, Kennedy says,
and in that time an estimated 9 million undoc-
umented immigrants still entered the country.
Just kicking them out can hurt companies. In
December, immigration officials arrested near-
ly 1,300 employees of the Swift & Co. meat
packing plants in six states, delaying produc-
tion and creating millions of dollars in losses.
And there aren’t enough resources to deport the
estimated 12 million people who are already
here illegally.

The country needs to fine them for breaking
the law and move them toward earning legal sta-
tus.

There’s strong interest in practical approach-

es.
Illegal immigration sparks understandable
anger. The evening news shows border-crossers
breaking American laws with every step. But
Congress has to move past emotion and craft
laws that usher in true reform.

Fear of civil war in Lebanon

FOLLOWING a general strike called Tues-
day by the Lebanese Shi’ite movement Hezbol-
lah, there were lethal clashes in Beirut and oth-
er Lebanese cities this week. Cars were set on
fire, and burning tyres were strewn across road-
ways. For Lebanese who recall the 1975-1990
civil war, these were the foreshadowing sights
and smells of another civil war.

Now as then, other countries are stoking the
fires of Lebanon’s internecine conflict, among
them Syria, Iran, Israel, France, and the United
States.

If another calamitous civil war is to be pre-
vented, the peacemaking will have to take place
in foreign capitals.

The most obvious outside effort to help sta-
bilize Lebanon’s tottering state was a striking-
ly successful donors’ conference this week in
Paris, where more than $7 billion in grants and
lenient loans was pledged by the Saudis, French,
and Americans — backers‘of the current
Lebanese government — and by international
financial institutions. -

This was an overt attempt to help preserve
the embattled anti-Syrian government of Prime
Minister Fuad Siniora against the pro-Syrian
forces of Hezbollah and its domestic allies.

But it was not a diplomatic intervention
aimed at forging the kind of political compro-
mise needed to avert the outbreak of civil war.

That would require an agreement between
the governing March 14 movement that ended

Syria’s occupation of Lebanon and Hezbollah
‘forces.

The Saudi government, acting on its own
interest in regional stability, has been wisely
seeking to promote the many-sided under-
standings that might enable Lebanon to escape
a new civil war.

Top Saudi and Iranian officials thrashed out
a bargain earlier this month on formation of a
unity government in Lebanon that would
include Hezbollah and its allies but would also
guarantee Lebanese approval for the UN Tri-
bunal on the Hariri assassination. Lebanese
political figures and Arab papers say that the
Syrian regime of Bashar Assad refused to coun-
tenance support for the UN Tribunal;
Lebanon’s street violence erupted almost imme-
diately after the Syrian refusal.

Fearful of Iraq’s Sunni-Shi’ite violence
spreading to Lebanon and of several simulta-
neous conflicts erupting around them, the Saud-
is are right to pursue diplomatic cooperation to
prevent another civil war in Lebanon. Iran,
Israel, and the United States have all had a
hand in weakening the foundation of the
Lebanese state; they should all be enlisted to
remove Syria’s heavy hand from Lebanon and
to settle Lebanese political differences peace-
fully, within the rules of the democratic game.

(° These articles are from

I
THE TRIBUNE



Work permits:
how to fix
the problem

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THE system is.in need of a
major overhaul. This made
clear by the attached:

Bahamians now on T G
Glover School.

However, William Nottage,
Assistant Director of Immi-
gration also said last Thurs-
day that the work permits for
the Chinese were granted by
his office on January 12, 2007.

“We issue permits based on
the knowledge of a need, now
whether there are qualified
Bahamians to work the jobs
or not, is a matter that must be
taken up with the Department
of Labour,” he stated.

This highlights some of the
root causes with the work per-
mit system:

e Companies put the
request to the Immigration
Department, not to the
Labour Department. This
allows them to circumvent the
labour requirements.

¢ Immigration approves
without checking with Labour,
lines of communications not
used.

¢ Companies allow the
Work Permit to expire. They
rush to put it back in place.
No checks done as to why no

- one has been trained.

¢ Companies also have per-
sons who work on travel visas
while they put in for the Work
Permits. No Immigration or

Labour checks done on com-

panies.

As a young country, we
have a need for some of their
service. If.done properly, it
would benefit all, not just the
few. That’s why we have a

~ Work Permit system. It is to

allow a company to bring in
the required help. This is to
be with the following condi-
tion: a Bahamian is to be
trained for the position.

To solve the current prob-
lem and prevent the “pass the
buck” approach, the blame
game. I give the follow:

1) The Labour Department
Notice of Vacancy Form is to
be revised. This would be giv-
en to the Labour Department
after they have advertised the
requirement in all of the daily
papers and check the Labour
Data Skills Bank. Having got
no reply, the Form would then
be Labour Department. The
Labour Department approves
the Form and forwards it to




Dae M eS

letters@tribunemedia.net



The Form gives who is being
hired on the Work Permit and
who is to be.-trained.

2) Bahamas Work Permit:
Foreigners wanting to work
or trade in the islands must
obtain a work permit from the
Immigration Department. In
the case of an employee, the
employer makes the applica-
tion and must show that there
is no suitable Bahamian can-
didate for the position. This
includes advertising in news-
papers and checking the
Labour Department Data
Skills Bank. Employers are
also expected to have training
programme(s) for Bahamians
in the skills they are likely to
need. Work permits are usu-
ally issued for one year, no
automatic renewals. There will
be a maximum length of three
renewals for Work Permits.
No renewals after that.

3) Companies to put the
renewal for in two months pri-
or to the expiration date. This
will allow for the person to be
repatriated in a timely fash-
ion. If the permit is not
renewed, the employee is enti-
tled to severance and one
month’s pay in lieu of notice.
Two months would allow a
month for a response from the
Immigration Department. If
the renewal is not in during

the prior two months, not
renewal.
4) Immigration and Labour
officials to do checks on the
work force. This would allow
for employees and the com-
pany to give updates on the
status. Company’s outlook
and how the training pro-
gramme is progressing. This
would also help to prevent
companies from having work-
ers, work on a Tourist Visa.
5) Government to increase
training programmes to help
to meet the needs of the com-
panics. , ;
We need to stop procrasti-
nating now on this matter and
deal with it. We want the
training and the benefits that
the companies give the for-
eign persons on the Work Per-
mit. \
Too many of us live with the
injustice from the current
Work Permit System. Want to
know how bad it gets, talk to
workers who are employed in
the Vessel Repair and Indus-
trial companies. We no longer
want to be told by the Labour
Department when a complaint
is put in, the following: You
have a job, be thankful.
Deal with this matter as this
is a boiling item and a very
bitter point to many.

SIGMUND WILLIS
Freeport,

Bahamas,

January 24, 2007.

An area of govt that
has been neglected

EDITOR, The Tribune.

PLEASE permit me space in your valued paper to comment
on an area of the government that I feel has been neglected in
the past by both the PLP and FNM and now once again by the
PLP. I speak of the naming and gazetting of Government

Boards.

These Boards by legislation are only in existence until Decem-

ber 31st of each year.

There were times in the past under the PLP when the Board
government the Town Planning area that controls the granting
of building permits was not appointed, in one instance, until late

June of that year.

All plans were held up for months waiting for the appoint-
ments, and when the Board was actually appointed the names
of members were not gazetted at all.



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Today the various board appointments are never gazetted, at
least not in the news media.

Why is this so? Are we as blacks so incompetent that a sim-
ple matter such as board appointments must be begged for by
the public or kept such a secret that no one knows who is on
what board or could it be that the various parties are ashamed
to show the public the level of cronyism that exists and therefore
show that persons they put on these various boards do not
have a clue of expertise that is expected once appointed to
these board. Why do we treat Bahamians as such fools and
why do we accept so little. ;

~RBRAYNEN
Nassau,
January 22, 2007.

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Sears: Exuma
malaria scare
came about
through
negligence

THE malaria scare that rocked
Exuma last year came about
through negligence, according to
the FNM’s candidate Joshua
Sears.

“Simply put, an incompetent
government could not ensure that

+ fogging was carried out regularly
and systematically, as was the
_.case on our watch,” he said.
Mr Sears said mosquitoes con-
‘tinue to be a nuisance throughout
the settlements on the island, to
-sresidents and visitors alike.
“| “An FNM government will
yensure that an adequate and
properly monitored mosquito
abatement programme is
+ resumed so as to protect the
‘health and welfare of our people
‘and our economy,” he said.

‘

ey em al eer
Cor in court’



















A NASSAU couple who
have been battling for justice
against the Baptist education-
| al authority for five years will
get their “day in court” in
March.

This is in spite of the with-
drawal of Mr Sidney Collie,
attorney for the Baptists.

Greg and Tanya Cash said
‘| they are confident the hear-

ing will now go ahead.
| They are alleging unfair dis-
missal and seeking damages
for hardship against the Bap-
tists following the firing of Mr
Cash as coach at Jordan
Prince William High School
in 2002.

Mr and Mrs Cash have
claimed repeatedly that their
bid for justice had been
blocked.



Benc
Umbrellas

Loungers
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for disaster, says Ingraham

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

THE FNM does not want eco-
nomic growth and development
that provides jobs for thousands
of foreigners while Bahamians
remain unemployed, under-
employed and unemployable,
FNM leader Hubert Ingraham
told those gathered at a mini-ral-
ly in Exuma.

This economic model, the for-
mer prime minister said, is a
recipe for disaster.

Mr Ingraham said that the
FNM has a history of being “the
party of development”.

“Before we came to office very
little new development was taking
place. In fact, the country was
almost at rock bottom. Thousands
of Bahamians in the hotel indus-
try were working a few days a
week and many others had no
work at all,” he said.

However, no government in
the world — especially the gov-
ernment of a small country such
as the Bahamas — could afford to
lose sight of the reason for devel-

opment in the first place, he

added.

“Economic development must
be first and foremost for the good
of the Bahamian people. It must
be about providing business
opportunities for Bahamians. We
need foreign investment and we
will no doubt need it for many
years to come. But we must plan,
and work towards, and take every
advantage of opportunities to
increase Bahamian ownership in
the Bahamian economy,” he said.

Likewise, the Bahamas may
always need a certain amount of
skills that we cannot fully supply.

Nevertheless, the country’s
objective, he said, must always be
maximum employment for
Bahamians in the Bahamas.

“We do not need, nor do we
want, economic growth and
development that provides jobs
for thousands of foreigners while
Bahamians remain unemployed,
under-employed and unemploy-

able. That economic model is a
recipe for disaster,” he said.

Mr Ingraham said it was bad
enough that the Bahamas contin-
ued to import artisans and skilled
labour from around our region,
but the government sought to jus-
tify bringing in Chinese labour to
work on uncomplicated con-
struction projects.

“While I’m on this topic, let
me say that we are watching them
carefully and we will not hesitate
to defend the rights of Bahamians
in our own country. And when it
comes to this, it does not matter
to us whether those Bahamians
are FNM, PLP or of whatever
political persuasion — as long as
they are Bahamian they come
first,” Mr Ingraham said.

The next FNM government, he
said, would resume programmes
for the education and develop-
ment of Bahamians so they could
grow along with the country, so
they could take full advantage of
business and job opportunities.

“We will reach out to those
who the PLP no longer count
because they have given up on
finding gainful employment. We
will provide opportunities for
them to be trained and retrained
so they can become productive
and happy citizens,” he said.

Mr Ingraham said the current
government never understood the
FNM’s education policy.

He said they never understood
that the expansion of the school
plant, the upgrade of tuition
materials, the increase in the
number of specialist teachers, was
all part of a design to improve
educational achievement by
Bahamian children, to equip them
for the challenges of a changing
world.

“They do not understand that
children who receive instruction
in clean, safe facilities, with mod-
ern and up-to-date tuition mate-
rials, in classes with low student to
teacher ratios, that those children
are more likely to learn and to
achieve and to succeed. That’s
why they could abandon our edu-

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@ FREE National Movement leader Hubert Ingraham

cation expansion plans — and then
they lament that academic
achievement is not what it ought
to be,” the opposition leader said.

The former prime minister said
that decades of neglect and mis-
management in the education sys-
tem could not be fixed overnight.

“It takes a process, a process
that we commenced and a process
which they stalled. They did not
understand why we initiated the
decentralisation of our education
system, why we placed more
authority in the Department of
Education; why we established
school boards; why we delegated
responsibility for aspects of school
maintenance to Family Island
local government.

“We did all that because we
knew that this would make our
education system more respon-
sive to the needs of our commu-
nities. And so, they set about to
reverse decentralisation in edu-
cation,” Mr Ingraham said.

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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007, PAGE 5
Weyer. VM sa



























Dee eet es
MONDAY,
JANUARY 29TH

6:30am Bahamas @ Sunrise - Live

11:00. Immediate Response

12:00 ZNS News Update (Live)

12:05 Immediate Response

1:00 Caribbean Passport

1:30. Ethnic Health America

2:00 Thousand Dollar Bee

2:30 Aqua Kids

3:00 — David Pitts

3:30 Bishop Neil Ellis

4:00 _ Little Robots

4:30 Carmen San Diego

5:00 ZNS News Update

5:05 The Fun Farm

6:00 Gospel Grooves

6:25 Life Line

6:30 News Night 13 - Freeport

7:00 Bahamas Tonight

8:00 You & Your Money

8:30 Be Your Own Boss

8:35 Urban Renewal Building Lives
Building Communities

9:00 Legends ’

9:30 Island Life Destinations

10:00 Caribbean Newsline

10:30 News Night 13

11:00 Bahamas Tonight

11:30 Immediate Response

1:30am Community Page 1540AM

NOTE: ZNS-TV 13 reserves the —
right to make last minute ~
programme changes!







qe Fr















PAGE 6, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



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Challenges and opportunities

The Tribune :

SPECIAL



REPORT

@ By BRENT DEAN
and PACO NUNEZ

GEORGE TOWN, Exuma
— Over the last four years, bil-
lions of dollars of major
investment projects have
been announced for islands
all over the Bahamas. To
many, these projects appear
to be unquestionable evi-
dence of a Bahamas on the
verge of a ‘golden era’.

However, modern Exuma
reveals that creation of large-
scale investments on small,
unprepared islands can cre-
ate as many challenges as
opportunities.

Downtown George Town
does not look like the capi-

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@ THE FNM motorcade moyes through
the still largely undeveloped landscape of

Great Exuma before Friday’s rally.





tal of ‘boomtown’. The parks
in the island capital seem
unkept and the canal that
runs through the city centre —
once clear and bristling with
colourful fish — is now a
clogged, fetid gutter.

As you drive down the dark
Exuma roads towards the
Four Seasons Resort, you
quickly notice that the island
has nowhere near an ade-
quate number of street lights.
In some areas, a single lamp
is the only sign of civilisation
for miles.

The public library in
George Town is open for
only two hours a day and the
primary and high school are
not keeping pace with the
growth of the population.

As FNM candidate for
Exuma, Joshua Sears noted
in his remarks on Friday
night:

“George Town is more
than 210 years old. It is the
island’s capital — the capital
of the fourth employment

centre in the Bahamas. It.

should look like an island
capital.
“The dock and its environs

are a disgrace. The public
bathrooms are inadequate.
Regatta Park is in a state of
disrepair.”

While the political useful-
ness of such observations is
obvious, even a cursory
glance around George Town
makes it clear that these com-
ments are not far from the
truth — and as locals seem to
be aware, the need for
improvement must transcend
partisan rhetoric.

At the same time, however,
the seeds of optimism are
sprouting on the outskirts of
George Town.

Landscape

Small developments are
beginning to punctuate the
undeveloped landscape and
old properties, dormant for
years, are being renovated.
These include the famed Out
Island Inn and Pieces of Eight
properties, which remain
under Bahamian ownership.

In many places along the
Queen’s Highway, the
island’s main thoroughfare,
gaps are appearing in Exu-





ma’s trademark underbrush,
where new developments are
sprouting up — a sure sign of
confidence in the future of
the island’s economy.

In addition, the jobs pro-
vided by the opening of the
Four Seasons have also
brought many Exumians back
home. Residents stated that
they are glad to come back —
though some expressed con-
cern that the wealth of the
boom were concentrated “in
certain areas”.

A healthy rapport seems to
have continued between
locals and visitors, who mix
and mingle in the very same
nightspots. This aspect of the
Out Island experience, some
critics of the anchor policy
have maintained, will disap-
pear when bigger resorts
come on stream and enforce
exclusionist policies, as some
have suggested is the case in
New Providence.

However, for the moment
at least, Great Exuma seems
immune to this phenomenon.

When asked. aboutthe’

SEE page seven

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THE TRIBUNE

t

MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007, PAGE 7



of large-scale investments

FROM page six

challenges that Exuma will
face in the future, many locals
point to the issues of housing
and land ownership.

At the time of the last cen-
sus in 2000, before the open-
ing of the Four Seasons, the
population of Great Exuma
and the cays was 3,676.

The Department of Statis-
tics cannot give up-to-date
figures, but some Exumians
believe it may have more
than doubled since then.

Population booms -
whether through birth rates,
immigration, or both - are
often associated with pros-
perity and increased oppor-
tunity. However, the other
side of the coin, as many

* locals note, is that construc-

Qe

tion of housing can fall far

~- behind the growth.

With immigrants coming

. from New Providence and

* *

+2 €¢ 8 ¥ >



other islands to work at the

Four Seasons buying or rent- ©

ing a good deal of the avail-
able housing, many Exumi-
ans wonder if their children
will have the opportunity to
own their own home.

In many areas, land that
once went for a few thousand
dollars has already escalated
beyond the reach of locals.
Those who have legal own-

ership of property they lay
claim to, may reap the bene-
fits from the escalation in
property value. However, for
those who don’t, ownership
of land, in the only island that
they call home, may be an
unreachable aspiration.

If a land policy does not
emerge that considers the
special circumstance of small
island populations, then the
children of this island and
others may find themselves
permanently unable to be
homeowners in their own
country. ;

Danger

The danger of this situation
is that Bahamians may come
to resent the foreign invest-
ment and foreign presence
that is necessary to fuel the
Bahamian economy. Gov-
ernments of the Bahamas
must be careful and listen to
these concerns as major
growth begins to take off.

Predictably, attendants at
the FNM rally in Hooper’s
Bay over the weekend had
little good to say about the
performance of the PLP over
the last four years.

As one community patri-
arch, Samuel A Rolle, put it:
“I’m born and grow here, I
was born in 1919 and now I’m

88. All the development on
this island was done in
Hubert Ingraham’s time. All
the roads, everything else, he
give it to us.”

However, the current inad-
equacy of the very upgrades

’ that Mr Rolle was referring

to suggests that Exuma resi-
dents should not look to past
achievements, but project for-
ward when it comes to choic-
es in the next general elec-
tion.

In addition, there have
been rumblings of unrest
among the staff at the Four

Seasons. Whichever party —

wins the election will have to

address this issue, as the,

results of industrial action on
such an interdependent econ-
omy could be disastrous, as
one local political commen-
tator noted.

Of course, all of this
depends on the island’s
anchor project remaining the
lynch-pin of the Exuma econ-
omy into the future.

Were the resort to fail, the
collapse of. the real estate
market would be just the first
in a series of disasters for the
island.

Hundreds of Bahamians
would find themselves unem-
ployed, having gambled away
thousands of dollars in the
bid for prosperity; the gov-

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ernment would also lose the
increased tax dollars it
expects to help finance capital
projects on the island.

Such a scenario would also
have far-reaching ramifica-
tions — as confidence in the
overall anchor project model
would diminish.

Strategy

Although not officially
under Mr Christie’s anchor
project policy, Exuma is seen
by many as a test case for a
strategy that intrinsically ties
a population’s progress to the
fortunes of a commercial
enterprise over which it has
little control.

As Exuma continues to
spearhead the move towards
a new economic model for
the Bahamas, the rest of the
nation is watching.

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MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007, PAGE 9



LOCAL NEWS —



$2.8m primary
school for Salina
Point, Acklins

@ By RUPERT
MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

IN LESS than a year the
community of Salina Point,
Acklins, will benefit from a
new $2.8 million primary
school, Ministry of Works
and Utilities Bradley
Roberts announced during
the signing of the contract in
Acklins.

The Ministry of Works and
Utilities, Mr Roberts said,
conducted a competitive ten-
der exercise, and five build-
ing contractors from the
Acklins region were invited
to submit bids for the work.

“After a careful review of
the tender documents, it was
noted that Mr Kevin Styles’
construction company had
submitted the most competi-
tive bid, coming in at
$2,806,864.57, an amount
which was agreed to by the
government,” Mr Roberts
said. It is anticipated that the
construction period will be
32 weeks.

According to Mr Roberts,
Ashward Ferguson, senior
architect of the ministry,
developed the architectural
drawings for this state-of-
the-art primary school and
Mr Ferguson, along with oth-
er technical officers of the
ministry, will administer the
contract.

Mr Roberts sard that this
again is another example of
the government responding
to the needs of the commu-
nity through its school
expansion programme in the
majority of schools in New
Providence, Grand Bahama
and the Family Islands,
including Acklins.

The minister said the new
school will have a comple-
ment of three standard class-
rooms, a science lab, a music
room, and an administration
area - including air-condi-
tioned offices for the princi-
pal, the vice-principal, teach-
ers’ lounge and kitchen, the
secretary’s office and gener-
al waiting area.

The school itself, he said,
will comprise an area of
22,042 square feet and the

fe (eroynie sollte



@ MINISTER of Works and Utilities Bradley Roberts

covered walkways connect-
ing all the buildings will com-
prise about 1,066 square feet.

The interior of the build-
ings will contain acoustic
ceiling tiles, storage cabinets,
ceramic floor tiles, and ceil-
ing fans will be placed in
each of the classrooms.

The school will also have a
400 metre quadrant track, a
softball field, a basketball
court with home and away
benches and bleachers for
fan capacity, plus an
enclosed area for garbage
disposal.

“The Hon V Alfred Gray
is a representative who con-
tinuously speaks with a great
deal of passion for his con-
stituents, whether they live
in Mayaguana, Inagua,
Crooked Island, Acklins or
Long Cay.

“Minister Gray constantly
reminds me of the PLP’s
pledge to provide for
Bahamians wherever they
reside within our land. I have
never seen a Member of Par-
liament who has championed
the cause of his people with

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such great zeal and enthusi-
asm as Mr Gray does.

“We are here again today
because of this young man’s
passion for the people of the
MICAL constituency, whom
he represents, to execute this
contract for the construction
of a primary school in Salina
Point, Acklins, one of our
fastest growing Family Island
communities,” Mr Roberts
said.

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' PAGE 10, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007



THE TRIB\E.









Butler's Funeral Homes

& Crematorium

Tel: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas





MR. GREGORY
HUGH DEAL

of Joe’s Creek, Abaco will be held on
Tuesday, January 30th, 2007 at 4:00 p.m.
at St. Anne’s Anglican Church, Fox Hill.
Officiating will be Fr. Crosley Walkine.



SCAECUR ENTER BSR REHHARRERHESTURGSH HR EH ABeoe




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Left to cherish his memories are his Wife;
Mary Hedden-Deal; Childern; Johnny
and Isabella; Three Grandchildren;
Isabel, Gregory and Gabrielle; Sisters
and Brothers and many other relatives
and friends.




BReae8







In lieu of flowers donations may be
made to the Cancer Society of the
Bahamas.








Arrangements are being conducted by
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Funeral for \
Lady Dupuch

@ LEFT: The funeral pro-
cession from Sacred Heart
Church to Eastern Cemetary
where the remains of Lady
Dupuch were interred in the
family grave. Lady Dupuch
died in her sleep at the
Camperdown home of her
eldest daughter and son-in-
law, Eileen and Roger Car-
ron, on January 18. She
would have been 101 next
month.

e SEE front page.

@ BELOW: ASHES
INTERRED — Lady
Dupuch’s ashes were
interred in the Dupuch fami-
ly sepulchre in the Eastern _
Cemetery. Seated from right
to left Lady Dupuch’s
youngest daughter, Mrs
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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Three men fired from




jobs claim victimisation

FROM page one

drop in every hole in the road
so he could see how bad the
road is.”

These two statements,
along with the fact that he
was known to be an active
FNM member, led to his dis-
missal, he believes, despite
the fact he had never had any
problems with the company
before.

According to Brooks,
when he returned to work the
following Monday after the
PM's visit, January 22, Mr
Ramadan McKenzie, the res-
ident project manager, said
there was no work for him.

“He told me that I would
have to wait for Mr Faisal
Hepburn, the accountant, to
come to Mayaguana. I called
Faisal in Nassau and he said
the truck drivers were not
needed. But that is not true,
because there are five truck
drivers and they kept four on
the job. I was the only one
they let go.”

He said that in the past
when there was no work to
do in a particular area,
employees would be assigned
to work in other areas.

According to Tecoyo

Brooks, the company may be
trying "to get rid of all the
FNMs on the job."

"The three they fired are
all FNMs and there are about
four more FNMs on the job
and they are on the list to be
fired soon," he said.

Mr Dion Foulkes ~- the
FNM candidate for Mayagua-
na - alleges that the company
may be being influenced by
a member of the government.

Adding to the men's anger,
Brooks said that while these
Bahamians have been let go,
there are a large number of
foreign workers still on the
site, including Costa Ricans,

Guyanese, Chinese and

Nicaraguans.

"Tt is particularly infuriat-
ing that at a,time when it is
being said that there are not
enough Bahamians qualified
and willing to work that these
young men are forced to
stand idle while foreigners
are steadily employed on
their own island in their own
country," said Mr Foulkes.

He is calling on I-Group
and the government - which
is a 50 per cent partner in the
development - to ensure the
three men are immediately
reinstated and paid compen-

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sation for lost salary
and unfair and wrongful dis-
missal.

He claims that if this does
not happen promptly he,
along with Mayaguanans and
other Bahamians, will take to
the streets to demonstate for
the men's reinstatement.

He also intends to file an
industrial dispute with the
labour board.

"These Bahamians are
entitled to make a living in
their country as well as to
enjoy all the rights and privi-
leges of citizenship, includ-
ing the right to free associa-
tion,” said Mr Foulkes.

According to Mr Hubert
Ingraham, the FNM will be
"watching carefully" to
ensure that these men's
rights, and the rights of oth-
ers, are not "trampled."

The FNM "will not stand
for...Bahamians to be vic-
timised by anybody, not by
foolish ministers, not by PLP
operatives, and certainly not
by foreigners who are guests
in our land," said Mr Ingra-
ham at a rally in Exttma on
Friday.

No-one was available for

comment at I-Group yester-
day.

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Patients forced
to visit local
vet for X-ray in
Great Exuma

FROM page one

nificantly on the island, con-
cern about the lack of sufficient
health facilities is growing.

Speaking on Friday night at
an FNM mini-rally in Exuma,
the party’s candidate for the
area Joshua Sears drew atten-
tion to the situation, calling it
unacceptable.

A group of FNM supporters
enthusiastically concurred —
pointing out that, despite many
other changes on the island, the
veterinarian’s office is still the
only facility supplied with an
X-ray machine.

“Thad to go there when I
hurt my arm,” one local woman
said. “If anyone needs a scan,
that is where they have to go.”

During his speech, Mr Sears
said: “With respect to the mini-
hospital, consider how many
persons are still required to
travel to Nassau or elsewhere at
great personal expense to seek
medical care that should be
available here in Exuma.

“Exuma is growing and
expanding. Not only do we
need the mini-hospital, we
require extended medical ser-
vice hours so that our people
can have ready access to med-
ical care routinely,” he said.

Mr Sears said this access
must also become available in
the Exuma cays, as it is no
longer acceptable for residents
there to have to travel to Great
Exuma for medical attention.

“Your next FNM govern-
fnent will do the necessary
upgrade to community health
care in the Exuma cays,” he
said. “First of all we want to
ensure that adequate staff is

available so that health profes- ,

sionals can do what is required
of them — that is look after
patient care.”

Another promise the PLP

have failed to fulfil, according -
to Mr Sears, is the construction ,

of a new primary school in
George Town.

“They have recently
announced that they will now
move to build these facilities.

Why has it taken them so |

long?” he asked. “It is now
election time, so they are now

. trotting all over the Common-

wealth of the Bahamas trying »

to do things they should have
completed long ago.”

He noted that in the case of :
the newly-functional water sup- .

ply facility in Rolleville, the
FNM planned and implement-
ed the infrastructure, yet the

government took more than .

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four years to simply instal a ~
water main. 5
“And they had the audacity -
to convene a big ceremony *
commissioning water supplies -
to the people of Rolleville. Just
think of all the pain and suf-
fering and hardship endured
by the people of Rolleville dur-
ing the last four years — the cost
of delay — corroded plumbing
fixtures, saline water to drink,
the cost of private wells, the
negative impact on the health
and people of Rolleville,” he ;
said.
Mr Sears further pointed out
that the terminal building at
the airport in Black Point, Exu-
ma, is still to be constructed —
“despite a ground-breaking cer-
emony held some time ago.”
“The Bahamian people ©
expect and deserve a govern-
ment to be responsive to their
needs and to provide for them
basic services as a matter of
duty, not a matter of political
expediency,” he said.

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The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



ot lee ae ee

-@ ene ee
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007, PAGE 13



LOCAL NEWS



Haywards save
Port Authority from
potential winding-up

FROM page one

through its attorney Gregory |
Moss, had filed a winding-up
petition with the Supreme
Court on January 19 against the
Grand Bahama Port Authori-
ty.

The association, which is
claiming $1.218 million in dam-
ages, alleged negligence relating
to building and maintenance of
the condo.

According to a press release
issued to The Tribune yester-
day, the Hayward family has
been.alarmed by recent legal
matters relevant to the Island
Bay Condominium Association
and the potential winding-up of
the Grand Bahama Port
Authority.

“In the best interests of the
stability of the Grand Bahama
Port Authority, Grand Bahama
Island, and by extension, the
economy of the entire
Bahamas, the Haywards
thought it best, despite the inac-
tion of others, to personally
resolve this matter and have
done so by committing over a
million dollars of their personal
resources to stop the winding-
up and liquidation process.

“We remain committed to —

employees of the Grand
Bahama Port Authority and to
the island of .Grand Bahama,
and will continue to do every-
thing within our ability to main-
tain the confidence of existing
and potential investors,” stat-
ed the release.

The Hayward and St George
families have been at odds over
the ownership of shares in the
Grand Bahama Port Authority
over the past year.

The legal action taken by
Island Bay Condominium
Phase III Association stems
from damage to its roof, which
was blown off.during the hurti-



@ RICK HAYWARD,
son of Sir Jack Hayward

cane in 2004.

Gregory Moss, who repre-
sented Island Bay at the time,
began negotiations in early
2005. Attorney Fred Smith rep-
resented the GBPA at the time.

Negotiations. continued into
2006, but got nowhere. Mean-
while, in June, 2006, Mr Moss
began acting for the GBPA
with the understanding that he
will continue acting for Island
Bay condo. He also signed on
with the Port with the commit-
ment that the GBPA wanted
to settle the matter.

Mr Moss continued -negotia-
tions with the GBPA in-house
counsel Carey Leonard, and its
outside counsel Fred Smith.

Sources claim that Mr Smith
refused to settle, but Leonard
recommended to the Port that
it should consider settling to
avoid exposure of some $1.8m
plus costs.

Under Hannes Babak’s
chairmanship, a settlement was
negotiated for $800,000 plus
costs.

However, sources claim that
Lady Henrietta St George was
the only person who refused in
October, 2006, to sign on to the

- settlement when all of the direc-

tors had signed on.

Following this, Greg Moss
immediately resigned from
GBPA and Sir Jack hired him
as his personal attorney with
the expressed provision and
understanding that he will con-
tinue his representation for
Island Bay.

Mr Moss filed a writ against
the GBPA and Uniprop Ltd,
the developers of Island Bay,
on behalf of Island Bay Associ-
ation in November, 2006.

Fred Smith represented
Uniprop Ltd. After the GBPA
and Uniprop failed to take
action, Moss filed judgment
against both parties in Decem-
ber, 2006, and served statutory
demands on the GBPA and
Uniprop, giving them both
mandatory 21-day notice.

However, due to a legal dis-
pute between the Hayward and
St George families over Sir Jack
Hayward’s claim to 75 per cent
ownership of the Port, it
appeared that both parties were
distracted.

Since no action by either par-
ty was taken, Mr Moss went
ahead and filed a winding-up
petition against the Port
Authority on January 19.

He gave an informal copy to
the GBPA inviting the compa-

’ ny to settle. The GBPA, how-

ever, filed a late application to
have the matter set aside, and
so Mr Moss finally served the
GBPA on January 23.

It is believed that the wind-
ing-up of the GBPA would
have further impacted the deli-
cate Freeport economy, sending
a negative message to residents,
business licensees, and to exist-
ing and potential international
investors.

The source praised the Hay-
ward family for “stepping in
and saving the day.”

¢ See Business section °°

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THE TRIBUNE | MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007, PAGE 15







u TORE
ae
ae

#10 RichLill House
Montgomery St, Palmdale



ceyrerenrcsetnashits



gazeoscrey

Church team p

courtesy call 0

4

Governor Genera

- gi ABOVE: BISHOP VG Clarke and his team from Calvary Deliverance Church, East Street
South, paid a courtesy call on the Governor General Arthur D Hanna on Friday, January 26, 2007
at Government House. The church, which was founded by Rev Clementina Stubbs, celebrates 25
years of ministry this year. Shown from left are Pastor James Newry, Bishop Clarke, Governor
General Arthur D Hanna, Elder Beverly Clarke, Pastor Dorothy Moss and Merlande Barrett.



scotia srt PRO OEERSH CROER



i BELOW: BISHOP V G Clarke, left, presents a gift from Calvary Deliverance church to Gov-

ernor General Arthur D Hanna during a courtesy call on Friday, January 26, 2007 at Government
House.



“(BIS photos: Tim Aylen)










Hh aioey aur caliente tr ARERR Cee S
igang ry tye ee aN oe



EVERY SALAD
AT WENDY'S IS
MADE ONTHE
| PAGE 16, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007 THE TRIBUNE



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MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007

SECTION

business@tribunemedia.net

The Tribune



BUSINE

Miami Herald Business, Stocks, Analysis, Wall Street











Sir Jack opposes New cruise termin

GBPA minority
share dilution -

@ By NEIL HARTNELL .
Tribune Business Editor

SIR Jack Hayward is opposed
to any dilution of his stake in
the Grand Bahama Port
Authority (GBPA) to a “minor-
ity shareholding”, The Tribune
can reveal, creating an impasse
in attempts to resolve the dis-
pute between himself and the
estate of the late Edward St
George.

Sir Jack, via his attorney Gre-
gory Moss, is said by sources to

have communicated that posi-

tion to both Mr St George’s
family and the Government,
which ‘is being represented in

attempts to mediate a solution

to the GBPA shareholder dis-
pute by Paul Adderley, the for-
mer attorney general.

Sir Jack’s position is at odds
with the Government’s pre-
ferred outcome to resolve the
dispute, which has massive ram-
ifications for Freeport’s future,
and has impacted both the city’s
investment and business cli-
mate, plus its governance and
administration due to the
GBPA’s quasi-governmental
status.

The Government has had to
walk a fine-line in. the dispute
over Sir Jack’s claim to 75 per
cent ownership of both GBPA
and its affiliate, Port Group Ltd,

the company that holds the real

worth via stakes in the likes of
Grand Bahama Development

Position creates
impasse with
St Georges,
government

Company (Devco) and
Freeport Harbour Company.
Mr Adderley has been anx-
_ious to point out that the Gov-
ernmentiis not seeking to dic-
tate or impose a solution on the
two parties, mindful that any
government interference - real
or perceived - could have a
damaging impact on investor
and community confidence in
Freeport.

Nevertheless, he is under-
stood to have communicated to
both Sir Jack and the St George
estate, plus Clifford Culmer, the
court-appointed independent
management consultant for the
GBPA and Port Group Ltd, in
mid-January that the Govern-
ment’s preferred solution is one
“that would diversify the own-
ership base of the GBPA,
extending to a public of offering
of shares”.

He has told the parties: “This
would have the effect of remov-
ing the disputants’ controlling
family interests in the Port and

- SEE page 10B

to

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business

Reporter

he number of

cruise passenger

arrivals to Grand

Bahama _ could

increase trom
350,000 to 1.5 million within the
second year of operations at the
island’s planned new cruise ter-
minal, a deputy director-gener-
al ay the Ministry of Tourism
has projected.

David Johnson, who has
responsibility for investments
and planning, told The Tribune
that the creation of a new ter-
minal at Williamstown is expect-
ed to cost more than $100 mil-
lion, would be one of the most
significant and major direct
investments in the Bahamas.

“ You’re looking at the new
capacity and desirability of
Grand Bahama as a cruise des-
tination,” he said. “Cruise vol-
ume as a first port of entry will
likely move from 350,000-
400,000 to at least.1.5 million
passengers within the second
year of such a facility.

“The return on investment
and the injection of spending in
the community to all persons
affected will be great in a cruise
port that is really close to the

resort areas but not on.top of .

it, We’re giving all visitors many
more options on their vacations,



@ DAVID JOHNSON
(FILE photo)

so land visitors will go to that
site for dining, entertaining and
those type of options. All in all,
we see the initiative being one of
the most desirable short-term
influxes of business in Grand
Bahama we can.activate.”
Mr Johnson said the Govern-
ment was working with three
groups: the owners of the cruise
terminal and the land, the
Freeport Harbour Company,
and “one significant global

cruise partner” to create “new,

flashier cruise facility on Grand
Bahama”.



1

quadruple arrivals

Planned Grand Bahama facility

to cost $100m, as official tackles

private island, departure tax and

“We have come a long way in .

identifying a site, reviewing the
site, looking at design and look-
ing at how the logistics of how
the partners will work with each
other,” Mr Johnson said.
“Sometime around the middle
of February, we hope to resume
and conclude the structure of
an agreement, and at that time I
think we can say more.”

Mr Johnson added that the
Ministry of Tourism was not
overly concerned about the fact
that many ships companies visit
their companies’ private islands
as a first port of entry.

“Let me explain. The one
advantage we have in the
Bahamas is that we have multi-
ple ports beside Nassau and
Grand Bahama, offering differ-
ent experiences,” he said.

“ And there are Bahamians on
those islands, for example Berry
Islanders, who benefit but would
not have seen tourism dollars
had those facilities not been
there. Our challenge is to ensure

that every private island opera-

on-board opening concerns —

tor comes to Nassau and/or
Grand Bahama in combination
with that private island.

“So the opportunity is that we

_are growing business to Nassau

and Grand Bahama because of
those private islands, as they are
dedicating more capacity here.
We have seen, for instance, Car-
nival move from 600,000 pas-
sengers to about $1.5 million
passengers in about four years.”

Mr Johnson attributed this
increas@/to the attraction of Car-
nival’s private islands in the
Bahamas, and said these pas-
sengers would also have visited
Nassau.

“Whether they are private
ports or not, we need Bahami-
ans to deliver much more of the
experience” on private islands,
he added.

“We shouldn’t try to recon
struct their itineraries and move
passengers from going to those
private islands. We should get

SEE page 11B:

Early end to Winn-Dixie
transition saves $500,000

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMAS ‘Supermarkets

‘chief executive told The Tri-

~ bune that the retailer will end its

one-year Transition Services
Agreement (TSA) with former
majority owner Winn-Dixie six
months early on February 8,
2007, saving the company
$500,000.

Ken Burns, in an interview at
the weekend, said that apart
from saving Bahamas Super-
markets half the flat $1 million
fee it had been scheduled to pay
Winn-Dixie, the owner of 12
City Markets stores would save
a further $60,000 per month

over the six months to early
August 2007.

This was because apart from
the-$1 million flat fee payable to
Wian-Dixie, in four quarterly
instalments, Bahamas Super-
‘markets also had to pay the US
retailer 5 per cent of the cost of
goods it procured for it.

The $60,000 per month sav-
ings means that Bahamas
Supermarkets will probably
save about $360,000 from the
cancellation of the TSA halfway
through, giving it cost-savings
of $860,000.

Mr Burns said Bahamas

SEE page 2B



Cruise industry concerned
over Bahamas tours

lm By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter





THE limited amount of shore excursions for cruise passengers
could make them hesitant to come back to the Bahamas on repeat
cruise visits, a leading cruise industry executive told The Tribune.

Michele Paige, president of the Florida-Caribbean Cruise Asso-
ciation (FCCA), said the industry was concerned with the variety
of shore excursions available in the Bahamas, especially given the
frequency with which many tourists take cruises through this
nation.

“Tt ig even more important that you constantly re-evaluate your
product and offer people new things to do, and that has been a crit-
icism of some of the passengers, who feel they have seen the
Bahamas and there is no need to go back to shore,” Ms Paige
said.

She said this is something the
industry has been working on dili-
gently, aiming to have “new, excit-

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SEE page 11B

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PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



HDELITY MARKET WRAP



i By Fidelity Capital
Markets

IT was a slow trading week
in the Bahamian market, with
only 26,002 shares changing
hands. The market saw 12 out
of its 19 listed stocks trade, of
which six advanced, two
declined and four remained
unchanged.

Volume leader for the week
was Consolidated Water Co
BDR (CWCB), with 5,500
shares changing hands and
accounting for 21 per cent of
the total shares traded.

. The big advancer for the

week was FOCOL (FCL),
gaining'a whopping $3.13 or
24.94 per cent to end the week
at a new 52-week high of
$15.68.

On the down side, Fam-
Guard Company (FAM), lost
$0.15 or 2.52 per cent to close
at $5.80.

The FINDEX closed the
week at 756.85

COMPANY NE

Bahamas Supermarkets
(BSL) -

BSL held its Annual Gener-;

POSITION
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Responsihilities

Air medical transport of patients

¢ Administration of medication, oxygen and
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in the Clinical Protocol Manual.
Provide accurate and comprehensive verbal
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Requirements:

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Must have at least three years experience
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Have current BLS & ALS Certification
Must be independent, responsible with good

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Air Ambulance Sonics Led



agree aE Fhe aniere
Peay

No contract

al Meeting on January 23,
2007, where its management
outlined some of the changes
that shareholders can expect
within the upcoming months.
They include:

* Point of Sales (POS) scan-
ning equipment to be installed
in all stores. The newly-opened
Cable Beach store is fully
equipped with scanners and
the Harbour Bay store is next
in line.

The implementation of POS
in all stores is scheduled to be
completed by the end of the
year.

| International Markets |

| FOREX Rates

| CAD$
GBP
| EUR

| Commodities _

| Crude Oil
| Gold

| International Stock Market Indexes:

DJIA

S & P 500
| NASDAQ
| Nikkei

INSIGHT

For the stories behind the
news, read Insight Mondays



ree ao

Mayr Tiereyareg (els yl) 00

2 year contract

3 year contract



meee
gas

o Ee) om
YAO
$1 ee



FINDEX 756.85 YTD 1. 99%

BISX
SYMBOL PRICE



Advantages associated with



the new POS system include AML $0.70 $0.06
reduced shrinkage levels, BAB $1.25 $-
improved inventory and pur- ae
chasing capabilities, and pric- OB $8.0
ing consistency on all products BPF $11.30
eee BSL's:network of BE nee ae
rere ‘ CAB. | $10.00.) 0: See i
< “The j interior pees ofall | CBL $13.00 $0.0
its existing stores in terms of CHL ($2. 00 ne Dat
décor;, lighting, Hetaaevation CwcB a a eae
Tree rie et IDS, 2 SOs
oe “patenave’ training’ 6? all | FAM $5.80 0
personnel in an effort to FCC $0.55
improve overall customer sat- FCL $15.68
isfaction. ’ EEN $12.30
ICD $7.10
JSJ $9.05

$10.00



DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:

% Change

Weekly
i | date December 31, 2006. ©
1.1801 0.69 |
1.9594 -0.74 |
1.2912 -0.44 }
ary 26, 2006.
Weekl %Ch |
eekly Change | 31, 2007
_ $54.23 7.43 |
$648.10 3.18 |
*; Weekly % Change
"12,487.02
1,422.18 --0.58 |
Tris ose | FROMpage1B

Supermarkets ‘ ‘couldn’ t sean
_ the TSA through to the end of

‘sits expiration in early August

‘2007, which would have gone

into the retailer’s next fiscal

_ year.

“However, he eanted: out that
even under Winn-Dixie’s major-
ity 78 per cent ownership,
Bahamas Supermarkets had

_ purchased “about 80 per cent”
of its products from Bahamas-

_ based suppliers.
Mr Burns said the company








RBC FINCO
is presently considering applications for
Mortgage Specialist
~ RBC FINCO, |
Freeport Branch

The successful candidate should possess the following
qualifications:






© ACIB OR ABIFS Diploma or degree in bonne
(or a related field)
-@ At least five or more. years banking experience.
Previous experience in portfolio and liability
administration would be an asset.
gotiating/Selling skills « :
tr adership, coaching, relationship bui in,
ing:and confidentiality sk
multiple’ priorities
ound credit analysis.
skills” (Word, age Power Pin












esponsibilities élude: me



e Contributing to meeting team sales plans by
acquiring and.growing profitable client relationships
¢ Providing customized solutions and financial advice
designed to satisfy the client’s long- -term goals on
obtaining a mortgage
¢ Seeking out new clients by developing relationships
within the community and local centres of influence
e Enhancing the experience of existing clients by
providing accessibility and one-on-one advice and
valuable information on the intricacies of having
a mortgage
¢ Successfully anchoring clients with the appropriate
delivery channel within RBC Financial Group












A competitive compensation package (base salary
& bonus) commensurate with relevant experience
and qualifications.




Please apply before February 2, 2007 to:
Regional Manager
Human Resources
Caribbean Banking
Royal Bank of Canada
Bahamas Regional Office

. P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, N.P, Bahamas








Via fax: (242)328-7145
Via email: bahcayjp@rbc.com



REC
Roval Bank

SG)

SS of Canada

The Bahamian Stock Market

CLOSING CHANGE





° CWCO has declared dividends of $0.012 per BDR,
payable on February 7, 2007 to all shareholders of record

e BSL has declared dividends of $0.285 per share, payable
on February 6, 2007, to all shareholders of record date J anu-

¢ FCL has declared dividends of $0. 12 per share, payable on
February 8, 2007, to all shareholders of record date ae





VOLUME YTD PRICE






CHANGE
1550 14.75%
0 - 0.00%
0 5.26%
100 0.00%
0 0.00%
0 0.00%
0 5.71%
1000 0.00%
1760 3,92%
3742 5.26%
2700 2.19%
5500 3.48%
200 0.00%
4400 0.17%
0 0.00%
1600 24.94%
1400 2.33%
2050 -0.70%
0 ee) 5.23%

0.00%














| Early end to Winn-Dixie
og | transition saves $500,000

would purchase the remaining

20 per cent through Super Val-
ue (US), a major wholesale sup-
plier with operations in Flori-
da, and also import produce
directly from suppliers.
Bahamas Supermarkets is
estimating that utilities costs for
the year ending on June 30,
2007, will be “close to $1 million
higher than the previous year”.
Mr Burns said electricity costs
alone were “astronomical” for
the food retail chain, which

must run its freezers and other =
electrical equipment ‘24/7 to al

keep produce fresh.

He added that the company
was hoping the installation of
new equipment would control
costs and “drive utilities back
down for us”.

Another “huge driving force
over the previous year” on the
cost side, Mr Burns explained,
was insurance premiums, par-
ticularly property and casualty
insurance, and other forms of
hurricane insurance.

Bahamas Supermarkets was
“shooting for the end of Feb-
ruary” for the installation of its
new point-of-sale (POS) system
at its Harbour Bay store, Mr
Burns said. The actual installa-
tion date, he added, depended
on how much work the retailer
needed to do, such as cutting
through the floor and running
wiring, something that was
being assessed now.

Bahamas Supermarkets was
also in the process of acquiring
new scanning equipment for all
its 12 stores, as the scanner scale
did not fit the current system.

“We’ve got a lot of work to
do,” said Mr Burns, acknowl-
edging that Bahamas Super-
markets was in a transition year
and would incur some extra
costs as it began life as a stand-
alone company, separate from
Winn-Dixie.

The transition has resulted
from Winn-Dixie’s majority
shareholding being purchased
last year by BSL Holdings, a
buy-out consortium featuring
Bahamian institutional and
high-net worth investors, plus
Barbados Shipping & Trading.

“We see a huge light at the
end of the tunnel when the tran-
sition is over and we’ve got the

POS system in place,” Mr Burns © -'

said.

He added that apart from
managing costs and the transi-
tion, Bahamas Supermarkets
was also looking to drive sales
and procure product more
cheaply.

As for Bahamas Supermar-
ket’ new flagship Cable Beach
store, Mr Burns said: “We’re
very pleased with the reaction
of the neighbourhood and the
island. Sales have been very
good. Consumers are impressed
with the:store, impressed with
the layout and the pricing
throughout the store. We’ve
had very good results.

“We’re building off con-
sumers’ comments, and any-
thing we might have missed.
We'll continue to improve the
store as we go along.

“It will kind of be our signa-
ture store, and serve as a model
for other stores moving into the
future.”























a

are aw oe

a

4


BUSINESS

Che Miami Herald |

WALL STREET

—_—



%



| MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007



End of double-digit growth may be near

@ With 40 percent of the S&P
500 reporting, it looks like
double-digit earnings has seen its
day. That is not all bad because -
most companies have beat
earnings expectations.

BY JOE BEL BRUNO
Associated Press

NEW YORK — All streaks must
come to an end. Investors accus-
tomed to double-digit earnings
growth should prepare for more
earthbound numbers as Wall Street
heads into the midpoint of the fourth-
quarter reporting season.

BRAZIL

Pipelines
in the
Amazon

@ Overcoming numerous
challenges, Brazil’s
state-controlled oil company
begins building pipelines in the
amazon jungle

BY LARRY ROHTER
New York Times Service

URUCU, Brazil — In theory, the
issue is simple: Brazil needs more
sources of energy. to keep its econ-
omy humming, and huge reserves of
gas and oil are in the Amazon jungle.
Problem solved.

Over the years, Petrobras, Bra-
zil’s state-controlled oil company,
has, in fact, invested more than $7
billion in Amazon exploration and

“development, and in 1986 it made'a
Inajor find. rt ae are

But only now — after a seemingly
endless sequence of geographic,
logistical, environmental and politi-
cal challenges were overcome — is
the first in what is intended as a
series of pipelines finally being con-
structed, this one to carry gas the
400 miles from Urucu to Manaus, a
port city of 1.5 million at the junction
of the region’s two biggest rivers
that is emerging as an important
industrial center.

“Everything in the Amazon
requires preparation that is big, long
and complicated, especially a pio-
neering effort like this one,”
explained Joelson Falcao Mendes,
the company’s regional director in

‘ Urucu. “You’ve got a harsh climate
that limits you to working only four
months a year in some places.
You're working in mud and crossing
rivers that are not navigable, and
there are 47 tropical diseases to
worry about.”

But oil pipeline leaks and the col-
lapse of an offshore drilling plat-
form in other parts of the country
have damaged Petrobras’ reputa-
tion, and there was initially strong
resistance to the pipeline from local
people, environmental and indige-
nous groups and archaeologists.

Some of them preferred that the
gas be transported to Manaus by
tankers from a terminal north of
Urucu, already connected by a pipe-
line, while others argued it would be
cheaper and safer to buy the excess
electricity generated by the Guri
Dam in Venezuela.

Rather than steam rolling the
opponents and skeptics, however, as

SUPER BOWL XLI

As of Friday, 197 stocks in the
widely watched Standard & Poor’s
500 index achieved a growth rate of
about 9 percent, according to Thom-
son Financial. Without any unexpect-
edly strong reports in the offing, it
means the 18 consecutive quarters
calculated by S&P to have double-
digit earnings growth will come to an
end.

Stock analysts believe this is all
part of a cycle that helps bring the
stock market down from lofty levels,
and hopefully sets it up again for
another run. ‘

“Investors need to get used to this





and realize that it is not necessarily a
bad thing,” said Howard Silverblatt,
Standard & Poor’s senior. analyst.
“This is a retrenchment and consoli-
dation after four years of growth. We
had a nice run.”

The last time Wall Street saw this

kind of surge in the S&P 500 index —

was between 1992 and 1995. The mar-
kets, particularly the Nasdaq com-
posite index, then bounced back with
the dot-com boom of the late 1990s.
Still, the fourth quarter isn’t turn-
ing out all that bad. Of the S&P 500
components that have already
reported, 68 percent beat expecta-



FERNANDO AUGUSTO/AP FILE

AVOIDING PAST MISTAKES: In July 2000, Petrobras workers, above,
struggled to contain an oil spill caused by a pipeline burst at
Iguacu river in southern Brazil. The company now is beginning to
build a 400-mile Amazon pipeline from Urucu to the port city of

Manaus.

often happens in Brazil, the com-
pany chose to woo them. The 2 mil-
lion residents of Amazonas state
have been promised economic ben-
efits that have contributed to the
project’s.$L15 billion price, and sci-
entists and environmentalists were
consulted about how to minimize
damage to the jungle that blankets
the state, which is larger than Brit-
ain, France, Germany and Italy com-
bined. : (

“They have really tried to mini-
mize the impact, and the outcome is
not as bad as we had feared,” said
Paulo Adario, director of Green-
peace’s Amazon campaign. “Since
they are taking oil and gas out of the
heart of the Amazon, creating a
model for what will be done in the
future, that concern is quite under-
standable and necessary.”

A second pipeline, which would
head south to Porto Velho, a city

more than 300 miles away, is a far
more complicated matter. That pro-
ject still faces challenges from advo-
cates for the environment and rights
of indigenous people because it will
cross rivers and Indian lands. It also
is competing with two large dams
for government money.

Farther west, near the Jurua
River, Petrobras also has plans to
develop oil and gas deposits first
discovered in 1978. Company offi-
cials said they hoped to begin pro-
duction in 2010, after construction
of a pipeline that would run through
dense and remote jungle to a refin-
ery in Urucu.

In the past, the construction of
large energy projects in the Ama-
zon, such as the mammoth Tucurui
dam, typically led to the migration
of thousands of peasants seeking

* TURN TO PIPELINES

Fans can buy ticket insurance

i Did you pay a small fortune for
a Super Bowl ticket? Ticket
insurance can buy you alittle
peace of mind if calamity
prevents you from getting to the
big game.

BY MONICA HATCHER
mhatcher@MiamiHerald.com

It’s not a pleasant thought, getting
the flu, crashing your car or meeting
another calamity — on game day, no
less. :
_ Especially after you mortgaged
your home to buy a Super Bowl
ticket.

Die-hard football fans now have a
way to protect their financial, if not
their emotional, investment in the big



game through event ticket insurance.

New to the market, ticket insur-
ance is being sold by a handful of bro-
kers for the Super Bowl XLI game
Feb. 4, as well as for concerts, festi-

‘ vals and other sporting events.

The product is proving popular
among consumers, said Emily Porter,
spokeswoman for World Access, a
Virginia company that sells policies
through In Ticketing, Tickets Now
and their subsidiaries.

“We've insured more than $4 mil-
lion worth of tickets since launching
the product six months ago,” Porter
said, adding it was still too soon to
say how many policies were bought
to cover Super Bowl tickets.

While travel insurance has been

available for some time, event ticket
insurance is fairly new.

American Express in October
launched a free event ticket protec-
tion plan for consumers and busi-
nesses who charge ticket purchases
on their Gold, Platinum and Centu-
rion cards.

Typical ticket insurance from
other companies costs about 5 per-
cent of the total ticket value, includ-
ing shipping and other fees.

A policy covering a $1,000 ticket,
for instance, would cost $50.

Insurance only covers tickets cost-
ing less than $3,000.

According to Seat Smart, this

°TURN TO TICKETS _ is









tions and 15 percent matched them.
Earnings are also coming in about 5
percent above estimates, which tops
the average surprise factor of 4.2 per-
cent seen over the last eight quarters,
according to Thomson Financial.

There is also a remote possibility
the U.S. can still realize double-digit
growth for the quarter, though most
analysts admit this would likely be by
a harrow margin and not without a
few unexpected results. The best
hopes are for energy companies,
especially Exxon Mobil on Thursday
and Chevron on Friday.

“At this point, it doesn’t look in the

TAX TIPS

cards with about 40 percent of the
S&P 500 reporting,” Silverblatt said.
“There will have to be some signifi-
cant results, a couple of knockouts
from companies. If not, investors
need to get comfortable with single
digits.”

Debate continues about if it’s now
the right time to shift focus to large-
cap stocks like those in the S&P 500.
The group is considered to be more
defensive in nature, and can with-
stand a slowing economy because

they are typically more diversified

° TURN TO EARNINGS

Carefully declare’
business expenses

@ Small businesses can reduce
taxes by deducting
business-related meals and
entertainment, but the IRS keeps
aclose watch on such activity.

BY JOYCE M. ROSENBERG
Associated Press

The little piles of credit card
receipts on the desks of many small
business owners can mean only one
thing: They’re trying to figure out
how much of their 2006 lunches, din-
ners and entertainment expenses can
be deducted on their tax returns.

Meals and entertainment are a
popular tax deduction with busi-
nesses. Under the tax law, a company
can deduct 50 percent of the cost of
meals and entertainment expenses
that were incurred in the course of
doing business.

But these are deductions that
should be taken only with discretion.
Accountants say the IRS is wary of
meal and entertainment expenses
because of the possibility of abuse,
and they believe the government is

IRS

ff Accountant Ed Godoy offers
tax tips for small businesses.

BY JIM WYSS
jwyss@MiamiHerald.com

Over the last three decades Ed

Godoy, a. partner at the Miami

accounting firm of BDO Seidman, has
seen the IRS tax code almost triple in
size. It has been good for his busi-
ness, but a nightmare for just about
everyone else’s, he admits.

“Our tax system is so complicated,
it’s unreal,” says Godoy.

But tax deadlines — and penalties
for missing them — are real. So here
is some of the advice Godoy is giving
his small-business clients this tax sea-
son:

‘e Look for above-the-line
healthy deductions. Many sole pro-
prietors forget that they can deduct
their health insurance premiums
from their. gross income — or
“above-the-line” in tax speak. That
allows business owners to deduct
their premiums in full, rather than
face the limits that come with item-
ized “below-the-line” deductions, he
said.

e Take property deductions
now, not later. Typically, business
that purchase tangible property —
think computers, machinery and fur-

likely to question any numbers ona
tax return that seem out of line.

Mark Toolan, a certified public
accountant in Exton, Pa., said busi-
ness owners need to ask themselves
about each expense, “is it reasonable,
is it ordinary?” And, he warned, “it
cannot be lavish.”

Toolan said a critical part of taking
deductions for meals and entertain-
ment is being sure you have the sub-
stantiation for each expense. That
way, if the IRS does inquire about
your expenses, you’ll be able to back
up your claim.

The problem for many business
owners is that record-keeping, while
an important part of doing business,
is something that can become slap-
dash while they’re trying to juggle
everything else. “People try to over-
look it, or do it after the fact,” Toolan
said. He recommends to business
owners, “do it as you go along”
through the year.

There are five essential parts to

° TURN TO DEDUCTIONS

Tax tips froma pro

niture — have to write off those
items over the course of several
years, factoring in depreciation.
Thanks to Section 179, sole propri-

. etors, partnerships and corporations

can write off some purchases in full
the year they were bought.

The deduction is neither auto-
matic nor sweeping (there is a
$108,000 limit, and items such as air
conditioners and furnishings for
lodgings are exempted). But taking
advantage of the rule can potentially
save small firms thousands of dollars.

“It’s a timing issue,” said Godoy.
“And sometimes it’s better to get the
deduction up front rather than over
time.”

e Seek domestic production
breaks. Since 2004 manufacturers
and producers engaged in “qualified
domestic production activities” have
been eligible for breaks. Among the
South Florida industries that might
qualify are construction and engi-
neering firms and software, music
and film production companies.

Under Section 199, those compa-
nies may be able to reduce their total
taxable income by up to 3 percent. As
a result, a company with $1 million in
qualified domestic production in

* TURN TO TAX CODE





DAVE MARTIN ZAP
COVERAGE: Event ticket insurance is fairly new. The cost fora $1,000
ticket is about $50.
4B , MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007

OIL AND GAS:
The
Petrobras
oil refinery
Guillermo
Elder Bell in
Santa Cruz
de la Sierra,
Eastern
Bolivia is
controlled
by the
state.

DIEGO GIUDICE
BLOOMBERG NEWS

WALL STREET

End of doub

*EARNINGS

around the world.

Indeed, the Russell 2000
index of smaller companies
posted a gain of 18.4 percent
last year. It has outperformed
the large-cap Russell 1000

index for seven of the past

eight years. A resurgent Rus-
sell 1000 beat the Russell
2000 in the second half of
2006 — though small caps
won out for the year overall.
Other widely followed large-
cap indexes showed strong

\

IRS





INTERNATIONAL EDITION

BRAZIL

Construction

___ MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

begins |

on Amazon pipelines

°PIPELINES, FROM 1B

work and the creation of slum
settlements in the jungle.
When a project is finished,
the workers will often remain,
with no jobs, swelling social
and environmental problems
that are already intractable.
Inhabitants of small jungle
settlements along the path of
transmission lines have also
complained that no provision
is made for them to be sup-
plied electricity. That alien-
ates local residents and has

even provoked some inci-—

dents of sabotage.

Urucu, however, is being
built with a requirement that
two-thirds of the labor force
be hired from the population

e-digit ¢g

There is also a remote possibility the U.S. can
still realize double-digit growth for the

quarter, though most analysts admit this would
likely be by a narrow margin and not without a

few unexpected results.

performances.

Portfolio. managers have
been telling clients to diver-
sify more of their assets into
large-cap companies. As cor-

porate earnings begin to show.

signs of weakening — espe-
cially stacked up to the third
quarter’s 23.2 percent growth
rate — this could be the tip-
ping point.

“We've been saying large-

Tax tips from a pro

°TAX CODE,

2006 would only be taxed on
$970,000. That, in turn, could
result in saving $10,500 in

their taxes. By 2008 the

deduction will increase to 9
percent, meaning that same $1
million company could save
more $31,000.

e Out of state is not out
of mind. Businesses that have
_a stake in companies in other
states or other countries need
to make sure they file the
appropriate. forms, said
Godoy. The penalties for not
reporting international com-
panies or bank accounts can
be up to $10,000, he said.

“And just because you are

TAX TIPS

_ RESOURCE GUIDE AT MIAMIHERALD.COM

Go to MiamiHerald.com/Business and click on Small Busi-

> ness. There you will find:
@ News and special reports




a small company doesn’t
mean you are exempt,” he
said. ee

And for those entrepre-
neurs who insist on preparing
their own taxes, Godoy said
that they — at the very least

‘@ Small-business resource lists _
formation on financing a small business

— should invest in software
that might highlight the tax
breaks and help them avoid
unforeseen pitfalls.

“The system is compli-
cated,” he said. “But hey, it
keeps me in business.”

Carefully declare expenses

* DEDUCTIONS

substantiating a meal or
entertainment expense:

e The date that the meal
or event took place.

e The amount spent,
including tax and tip.

e Where it took place.

e What the business
purpose was for the occa-

sion — for example, if you,

were trying to land a cus-
tomer.

e An explanation of the
business’ relationship
between you and the person
or people you entertained.
Such information would
include their names and com-
panies or occupations — any-
thing that would explain why
you'd be meeting with them
to discuss business.

Credit-card receipts and
restaurant checks are an easy

way to substantiate expenses,
since they contain the date,
amount and place. You'd still
need to provide the rest of the
information.

Many business owners also
input their expense informa-
tion into the software they.
use to keep their books —
some expense-tracking soft-
ware. will also export the data
into tax preparation applica-
tions. That’ll make the pro-
cess easier during tax season
— but you'll still need to hold
on to your receipts in case the
IRS has questions.

What constitutes a deduct-
ible meal or entertainment
expense is more complex. For
a business to be able to deduct
the cost of dinner or an event,
it has to fall within the realm
of, as Toolan noted, an ordi-
nary and reasonable expense.

The most clear-cut exam-

ple is taking a client out to
lunch and discussing the ser-
vices you'll provide. The tab
is certainly deductible. But if,
for example, you own a dry
cleaning business and take an
average customer — who’s
also a friend — out to a very
expensive dinner, there’s a
good chance it wouldn’t stand
up to IRS scrutiny.

“It comes down to com-
mon sense. ... There has to be
a business purpose,” Toolan
said.

FUN AND GAMES

Business owners also rou-
tinely take customers and cli-
ents out to the theater, to
sporting events or to play a
round of golf..It can be argued
that there’s no business pur-
pose to a baseball game, but if
you can show you were talk-
ing about that deal you were



SUPER BOWL XLI |

already in the region. That
has created about 10,000 jobs,
a significant advance in a
region with fewer than

500,000 people, as well as job-

training programs.

To prevent an influx of set-
tlers, who typically carve out
illegal homesteads along high-
ways, almost no permanent
roads have been built.

Instead, armed forces bring
in supplies and equipment by
helicopter or boat, and many
construction workers live in
floating dormitories that
move from one site to the
next as the work advances.

“There was a time when
the only way to get in here
was to come by helicopter
and then rappel down,” said

Mauro Loureiro, the project’s
technical director.

“Tt took hundreds of trips
like that just to open a clear-
ing to be able to do the initial
soundings and then dig a test
well.”

In addition, the pipeline
will include spurs to seven
smaller towns on its way to
Manaus, adding.$30 million
and 78 miles to the project. As
a result, diesel fuel will no
longer have to be sent in by
boat for local consumption,
blackouts will diminish and
businesses can be promised
regular supplies of cheap,
clean energy.

“Each municipality is using
this to increase its economic
potential,” said Eduardo

rowth may be

cap multinationals that pay
dividends for about six
months now,” said Hugh
Moore, partner at Guerite
Advisors. ,

“The more diversification
you have in the international
arena the better so that you
aren’t left being driven by
exactly what’s going on here
in the U.S.”

He said large-cap stocks —
whose market value exceeds
$5 billion — usually le
behind small caps and tec:
nology issues. But, “now their

trying to close between
innings, it could be deducted.
In compiling your records,
you might want to go into
some detail about what you
and your client discussed.

If you have any questions
about the deductibility of
these expenses, you should
consult a tax professional.

There are some instances
where the line between enter-
tainment expenses and busi-
ness gifts can look a little
blurred. For instance, if you

has now come.”

However, economists are
still trying to determine
exactly how fast the economy
is slowing, especially after
recent data suggested it might
be expanding at a better-than-
expected rate.

Speculation about a possi-
ble interest rate cut by the
Federal Reserve has now led
to talk central bankers might
need to hike.

“Based on guidance from
corporate America and the
forthcoming economic data,

give a customer tickets to an
event but don’t go yourself, is
that entertainment? Most
likely the answer is no — it’s
not entertainment unless you
or one of your employees
attends the event.

“Tf it’s entertainment, it
typically involves the com-
pany and a representative
going out with someone,”
Toolan said. “With a gift, typi-
cally, the company is not
involved, and it’s pretty much
an expenditure made on

Braga, the governor of Ama-
zonas.

The projects, he said,
include one to build a plant in
Codajas to process agai (pro-
nounced ah-sigh-EE), an
Amazon fruit whose purple
pulp and juice Brazilians con-
sume as a health and energy
tonic, and another in Manaca-
paru, to expand the produc-
tion of organic fibers there.

“The idea is not only to
avoid repeating the errors
committed in the past, but
also to change the energy
sources here in the north of
the country,” Braga said.

“More than 90 percent of
this state is forest, and I want -
to keep it that way.”

near _

investors will begin to seek
direction as far as the market.
is concerned,” said Peter Car-
dillo, chief market economist
for Avalon Partners.

“Traditionally, going into
large caps would be the case if
we were headed toward
higher interest rates along
with a stronger economy. But,
I think it’s a little too early to
make that decision.” —

He’s waiting for a little
more economic data before
making “any real switches
within the marketplace.”



Senet
ILLUSTRATION BY MICHAEL HOGUE/MCT

behalf of a customer with no
pleasure on behalf of an
employee” or the owner.

What if you bring a bottle
of wine or food to a party
given by a customer? Toolan
suggests that’s probably a gift.

Gift deductions have very
strict rules — a business can
deduct only $25 worth of gifts
per recipient per year.

You can, however, give
multiple gifts to employees in
one firm and deduct up to $25
for each.

Die-hard fans can buy insurance for tickets to the game

* TICKETS

week, the average cost of a
ticket to the colossal sporting
event was $5,540. Partial cov-
erage is not available, Porter
said.

Policies cover last-minute
injuries and illnesses, acci-
dents, the death or illness of
family members and other
unforeseen incidents, like
inclement weather, that may
prevent someone from getting

to an event.

Also, policy holders have
to show that the ticket was
not used by anyone else.

Robert Tuchman, presi-
dent of TSE Sports & Enter-
tainment, a company that
acquires Super Bowl tickets
for corporate clients, said the
idea was appealing.

“When you have them,
they are so valuable. You’re
putting them under your pil-
low at night and then making

Policies cover last-minute injuries and
illnesses, accidents, the death or illness of
family members and other unforeseen
incidents, like inclement weather, that may
prevent someone from getting to an event.

sure they are there every
morning.

If they disappeared, got
lost or were stolen, it would

be nice to be refunded,”
Tuchman said.

TSE, Tuchman empha-
sized, keeps their clients’ tick-

ets ina safety deposit box.

Porter, of World Access,
denied the insurance pan-
dered to the morbidly pessi-
mistic, but it offered a good
value for expensive tickets,
especially those purchased
months in advance.

“I would say it’s for people
who are being realistic,” Por-
ter said.

“Having insurance can
ease the emotional pain of
missing a greatly anticipated

event.”

Tuchman wasn’t so sure,
saying barring the worst, it
was hard to conceive not
being able to unload some of
the most valuable tickets in
the world.

“T’ye been to the last 10
Super Bowls, and I don't
recall seeing any empty
seats,” he said.

“T think it’s another way for
insurance companies to make

”

money.
NE



Investor ‘injury’ concerns
on Port Authority petition ‘S

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



THE Grand Bahama Cham-
ber of Commerce’s president
told The. Tribune that the writ
issued to wind-up the Grand
Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) will likely cause
more “injury” to investor con-
fidence and potential in
Freeport.

Christopher Lowe said the
Chamber’s members, and all
GBPA licencees, “remain ded-
icated” to Freeport and its
vision, despite the ongoing
shareholder dispute between
the Port’s two major share-

holders,.Sir Jack Hayward and.

the estate of the late Edward
St George. He was responding
to the latest development in
the saga over Sir Jack’s claim
that he owns 75 per cent of the
GBPA and Port Group Ltd,
which has seen Gregory Moss,
the attorney representing Sir



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Jack and Hannes Babak in the
matter, file a petition with the
Supreme Court to wind-up the
GBPA.

Mr Moss was representing a
client, Island Bay Condomini-
um Phase III Association, in a
separate case against the
GBPA, and had obtained a
default judgement for $1.2 mil-
lion on his client’s behalf. The
winding-up petition was filed
after the GBPA failed to
respond to a statutory demand
for payment of the $1.2 mil-
lion judgement, which was
served on it on December 28,
2006.

Mr Lowe told The Tribune: |

“This latest writ for the wind-
ing-up of the Port Authority,
we believe, will only further
serve to damage the credibility
of the players involved in this
action.

“We remain dedicated to the
clarity of vision needed for
Freeport, the original anchor









/HALSBURY
/CHAMBERS

Counsel and Attorneys-at-Law Notaries Public
is seeking to hire an ambitious

COMMERCIAL ATTORNEY

for its Nassau Office

Applicants with a minimum of five (5) years
experience must possess the skills and the ability to
work independently on conveyancing and mortgage

matters.

Attractive salary and benefits are available to the
candidate with the right aptitude and skills.

Applicants should send resumes to:

THE HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGER
P.O. Box N-979, Nassau, Bahamas or
By facsimile (242) 393-4558 or
E-mail: info@halsburylawchambers.com

Security & General
INSURANCE

Security & General Insurance Co., a local property and casualty
insurer and member of the Colonial Group of Bermuda, seeks
to appoint a Claims Manager to their Nassau office.

As the manager of our claims department, you will be
responsible for the management and operation of the claims
department reporting directly to the General Manager and
management team on all matters relating to strategic and local
initiatives both ongoing and forming part of the company’s

development strategy.

You must demonstrate a proven track record as the all round
performer in the field of property and casualty claim
management with a minimum of at least 10 years experience
within the industry. In particular, you will have experience in
the legal aspects of personal injury claims handling, catastrophe
management and substantive motor claims experience.
The company offers a competitive remuneration package with
benefits commensurate to qualifications and experience.

Resumés should be sent to The Human Resources Manager,
P. O. Box N 3540 no later than 5th February 2007.



project for the Bahamas.”

Mr Lowe added that under- .

standing the present situation
playing out between the

GBPA’s shareholders, and the -

root causes that had developed
over many years, “will help
chart the way forward for the
uniform benefit of people,
island, community licencees
and country”.

The Grand Bahama Cham-
ber of Commerce president
said: “The unfortunate fallout

from this myopic situation is .

the injury it does to local and

tial, but we feel confident that
once past this unfortunate
development, Freeport will
totally surpass the Govern-
ment in sustained success” and
economic development, “to
operate with full stakeholder
involvement in all aspects of
Freeport’s future.”

Mr Lowe added: “We
believe that the Port Authori-
ty, as the quasi-governmental
authority that it is, will survive
due to the efforts of a number
of dedicated individuals there-
in, and once through this mess,
it will thrive.”

MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007, PAGE 5B





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The museum is named for the African slave Pompey who led a revolt on the island of
Exuma in 1830 and defied the dehumanizing institution of slavery. The museum is
housed in the former marketplace, Vendue House built around 1769 to allow for the sale

of commodities mnchiditg enslaved Africans.






















This riveting exhibition was created by the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture
and UNESCO and is featured at the Pompey Museum during this bicentennial year to mark
the abolition of the transatlantic slave trade.

This traveling exhibition is unique in that it focuses less on enslaved Africans as victims
and more on the ways in which-they reshaped their destinies and place in history through

the creation of distinct cultures .. .
Schomburg Press Release

Authentic objects associated with the trauma of enslavement including shackles, a slave
branding iron, a slave whip, furniture from a slave house and more are here for you to see and
experience.

Days/Hours: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday
9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Closed: Sunday and Thursday

Adults: $3.00
Seniors (60 plus) $2.00
Children (under 14) $1.00
Adults: $2.00
Children (under 14) $1.00

Admission: Non-Residents:

Residents:


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



UME eer

No complimentary room
tax plan, hoteliers told

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Phone: 324-2970



@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

THE Ministry of Tourism will
not intend pursue the introduc-
tion of a complimentary room
tax, the minister of tourism told
Bahamian hoteliers during his
address at the closing of National
Tourism Week.

Obie Wilchcombe, did, though
note the Ministry’s intent to
expand the scope of responsibili-









ty for the Hotel Licensing
Department.

“Its expanded role will include
closer monitoring of our proper-
ties, aimed at reducing the level of
complaints of our guests,” he said,
adding that the Ministry of
Tourism. would evolve into a
Tourism Corporation.

Mr Wilchombe said the Min-
istry of Tourism was now entering
a reconstruction phase to ensure
that the Bahamas remains com-
petitive in an ever-changing and
expanding tourism market.

He said there was a negative
spirit, overcrowded with those
who cast doubt on the ability of
Bahamians to meet the challenge
of this new phase of economic
development.

NOTICE

“We have been overloaded
with the arguments that we will
be unable to find Bahamians to
work on the construction of many
of the anchor properties, and
once completed, we will not be
able to find qualified Bahami-
ans,” Mr Wilchcombe added.

He said this could only remain
if the status quo stayed the same.

The problem would not be that.

we will be unable to find Bahami-
ans, but rather if the country
refused to prepare young people,
they will have no value on the job
market.

Mr Wilchcombe said that now '

the Government has successfully
attracted investors, it must pre-
pare young Bahamians.

“The Ministry will lead an ini-

Y

NOTICE is hereby given that ATAIN TAKITOTA OF
BAHAMA AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 22th day of January, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,

Nassau, Bahamas.








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tiative that will see the creation of
a training institution, which will
absorb hundreds of young peo-
ple annually. The young Bahami-
ans will be exposed to theoretical
and practical training in all facets
of the tourism industry,” he said.

Mr Wilchcombe added that
Bahamians will be qualified and
certified upon completion, and
thus obtain secure employment.

He said the standard will be
sun, sand, sea and service.

Further, realising the impor-
tance of technology, the Ministry
of Tourism will introduce a 24-
hour online video and audio tech-
nology network to market the
Bahamas. ;

Mr Wilchombe added that the
new initiatives must be coupled
with placing product high on its
list of priorities, such as ensuring
the Bahamas remains clean.

A tourism excellence centre is
to be established to showcase
those who have contributed to
tourism. ~

The minister also announced
that veteran tourism experts
Angela Cleare, Bobby Issacs and
Cordell Thompson will be asked
to lead this significant step.

“What we did yesterday will
not suffice,” Mr Wilchcombe said.
“We must therefore evolve into a
Tourism Corporation that will
provide the leverage that is
demanded to meet the expecta-
tions of all of the islands.”

He added that it was incon-
ceivable to believe that the mar-
keting and promotional dollars
for the central government will
be enough to continue to develop,
promote and market the product.

New ways must be found, Mr
Wilchcombe said.

“The corporation will create a
new vista for tourism growth and
development, expanding and
stretching the arms of the Min-
istry, ensuring that our collective
product is globally competitive
and our economy secured.”

BRITISH CHEVENING SCHOLARSHIPS FOR 2007-2008

Applications are now being accepted for the 2007-2008 Chevening Scholarships,
available to Bahamian applicants wishing to pursue post-graduated studies in the
UK in the following subjects:

Justice & Human rights

Media/journalism studies

International relations/diplomacy Public Administration
Sustainable development

Law

Environmental Studies

Management

Further information and application forms can be found on the British Council

(Jamaica) website at: www.britishcouncil.org/jamaica

est
SM ER ASS

Mark your calendar

Our Application Deadline

is February 2, 2007 |
Remember to include the following with your application
¢ $40.00 non-refundable processing fee
¢ Copy of passport pages showing your name, date of
birth and expiration date of passport
¢ Official high school transcript
¢ Test scores and copy of BUC and BGCSE results to date
Don’t let the deadline pass you by!



soon to be the University of The Bahamas.

Closing date 5th February 2007

e look forward to welcoming you to The College,


THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007, PAGE 7B








Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs FE

G & IR



INTERNATIONAL
LANGUAGES
AND CULTURES
INSTITUTE



INTERNATIONAL
LANGUAGES
AND CULTURES
TNS air Ee



ALOBAL URGERSTARDING



COMMUNICATION: A KEY TO GLOBAL UNDERSTANOING COURSE OFFERINGS:
SPRING 2007

Sed aa TRO UU u MORAY

EVENTS










Beginning 12" February





DATE [*] VENUE



CONVERSATIONAL HAITIAN CREOLE I: Mon/Wed: 6 - 7:30 PM





Institute



| Spanish Lecture — on literary / cultural topic to be Thursday 7 p.m. $5.00 CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I: Tues/Thurs: 6 — 7:30 PM
; y 25, 2007 ;
announced January 25, 200 GERMAN FOR TOURISM: Mon/Wed: 6 — 7:30 PM
| Discussion Panel — Where ls Haiti going? With Dr. | Thursday 7am institute This course is designed for those working in the tourism industry, teaching the

basic language skills needed for effective interaction with German tourists.

Eugene Newry, Ambassador Harold Joseph and COB
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH I: Mon/Wed: 7:30 —- 9 PM

Lecturer Frenand Leger
Spanish Cinema evening ~ La Ultima Cena by Luis
Bunuel mo

February 1, 2007






Friday Institute

February 9, 2007
Wednesday

7 p.m.
February 28, 2007

7 p.m.
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH II: Tues/Thurs: 6 — 7:30 PM

CLASSICAL LATIN I: Mon/Wed: 4 — 5:30 PM
| ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE: Mon/Wed: 5 — 6:30 PM
ADVANCED FRENCH CONVERSATION GROUP: Wed: 1 to 2 PM





Victor Hugo beyond “Les Miz” ~ Lecture by |. Moss Institute

on one of the greatest romantic poets










































































International Café Evening Thursday 7pm. Institute $5.00 These are directed conversation and practice “brown bag” sessions - bring your
March 82007 own lunch! 10 consecutive sessions: $100 ($50 for COB Students)

Se SS ee pe fet Sa ea anna | LOCATION:

An evening of Irish music — dancing and sing along | Saturday 7-10 Choices $20.00 SN Se .

to celebrate St. Patrick's Day — with Canadian group | March 10, 2007 Munnings Building (next to KFC at COB Roundabout): Room 15

The Immigrants DURATION: ,

3 hours per week for 10 weeks,.total course hours: 30 hours

French Folksong Evening -- the lessons learned from | March 23, 2007 7pm. Institute $5.00 :

folk songs and their historical significance — lecture PRICE: $ 250.00 per course

by I. Moss followed by sing-along (copies of texts TELEPHONE: 302-4584 or 302-4587

handed out)

Communication: The Key to Global Understanding

b= Sao : z

The Junkanoo Costume - demonstration of pasting March 30, 2007 7 p.m. Institute COST

techniques by members of various “rushing” groups

- followed by a Junkanoo rush

What is Nouvelle Cuisine? - with the participation | April 4, 2007 Choices $10.00 | : ;

of Chef Laudermilk from Hospitality — why is French NAG prospective ae ates for SPRING 2007 MUST
ciisine: so emponaah fate = z baes = A asd

Spanish Literary Evening — to be announced April 19, 2007 7pm Institute $5.00 the Records Department on or before FEBRUARY De 2007.
Invite the Corona Society (A group of women April 27, 2007 7 p.m. Institute $5.00 At form will lye accepted without:

writers) to speak on writing techniques or do a

writing workshop . ‘ 5

v ALL SIGNATURES (Student’s, Advisor’s and

German Maifest --a celebration of Spring with a May 4, 2007 7 p.m. Institute $5.00 Oit-tigolerastoye 2 Sy) and

sing-along of German folk songs — led and snacks : , :
accompanied by L. Moss: ;

Eee ¥ PROOF OF PAYMENT from the Business Office.
| Bahamian folksong traditions ~ an evening with the | May 17, 2007 7 p.m. Institute $10.00 , : : : ‘

Dicey-Do Singers snacks & N.B. ANY form submitted after this date will be considered

soft drinks









LATE and will be processed for the Summer Semester 2007.

The Colle







COB - RESPONDING TO GB’S NEED FOR
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS:
Patricia Anderson; Cheryl Bartlett; Sharel
Carter; Crecola Glass; Sarah Grant;
Lawanda Greene; Sharon Wilchombe Hall;
Joselee Hepburn; Kara Johnson;

Nicole Lightbourne; Eyvette Roberts; Evette
Rolle; Brenda Sands




e of Bahamas

Grand Bahama’s professionals continue to tool and
retool themselves as they rise to meet the challenge
of being proficient, productive and au courant in an
increasingly competitive and changeable work arena.

















MICROSOFT OUTLOOK: Crecola
Glass; Gloverbell Anderson; Eyvette
Thompson; Charisse Brown; Hadassah
Swain; Paula Von Hamm; Laverne Russell;
Christine van der Linde; lona Kemp; Patricia
Hutchenson; Craig Nicholls; Nicola Elliott;
Althea Burrows; Anastacia lsaac; Corey
Cartwright; Kara Cartwright; Levette Smith;
Mary Russell; Michelle Riley; Olliemae
Tynes; Oseta Henfield; Paulette Richie;
Renaldo Karageorgiou; Sirissa McCartney

To this end, having completed rigorous courses of
study, twenty-five persons proudly earned professional
cettification through The Centre for Continuing
Education and Extension Services, CEES,
at COB’s Northern Campus in Freeport,
Grand Bahama. Sixteen have been awarded CM
designation by The Institute of Certified Professional
Managers at James Madison University, Virginia, as a
result of their completion of the Certified Professional
Managers Programme offered by CEES in conjunction
with (CPM. The other nine, upon completion of the
Certified Human Resource Management Programme,
have been awarded CHAM certification. This
programme has been offered in conjunction with
Columbia Southern University, Alabama.







MICROSOFT TRACKING: Gioverbell
Anderson; Charisse Brown; Hadassah
Swain; Nicola Elliott; Paulette Ritchie;
Tenisha Cox; Brenda Sands; Sirissa
McCartney; Levette Smith.












CM awardees are: Anthia Bartlett, RN; Anthony
Beckford, Crane Operator - G.B. Shipyard; Antoine
Brooks, Manager - Radio Shack; Jonathan Campbell,
Utility/Env. Operator, PharmChem; Janet Carey, Office
Manager, Tropical Shipping Co Ltd; Sheryt Carey,

RN; Don Forbes, Prod /Control Asst. Manager - G.B
Shipyard; Allison Levarity, Branch Manager - Fidelity
Bank; Pamela Minnis, RN; Sharon R. Morley, RN; Sonia
Nesbitt, RN; Glenys Roach, Nursing Officer I, Barbara
Rolle; Admin. Asst.- Min of Tourism; Annie Stubbs-
Grant, RN; Joyann Williams, Sec. - Batelco; Meshelle
Wright, RN.

Antoine Brooks donathan J. Campbell Sheryl L. Carey





SHORTHAND I: Jar’ Darnell Bowe; Shan
Elliott; Eyvette Roberts; Deondra Stubbs.













Certificates courses in Massage Therapy
and Supervisory Management open to
the general community, were also well
subscribed. Certificate recipients are as
follows:



Don Forbes Sharon R. Marley

MASSAGE THERAPY I: Nakeisha

Bain; Winifred Forbes; Lisa Gibson; Stacy
Hanna; Auttea Lightbourne; Lorine Miller;
Nicole Moss; Mandy Plant; Drexel Rahming;
Fretelia Rolle; Deloris Russell; Qutel Smith-
McPhee; Ceceal Williams; Shyrone Willis.

’ CHRM awardees are: Judy Bridgewater, Nursing
Officer Il; Dorlan Cartwright, District Manager, DSS
Ltd.; Janice Forbes, HR Assistant - W & S Our
Lucaya; Quinta Forbes, Educator - Tabernacle Baptist;
Alyvonnetta Levarity, HR Asst - Freeport Container Port;
Lennise Lopez, Secretary - COB; Frances Maynard,
Financial Controller - Freeport Gases; Charmaine Rolle,
Accounts Payable Rep. - insurance Management;
Marcia Sands, Training and Employee Manager, Isle of
Capri.



joyann Wiliams



Glenys Roach Barbara N. Rolle Meshelie 0. Wright




SUPERVISORY MANAGEMENT:
Clementina Burrows-Nixon; Sherise
Dawkins; Elise Hepburn; Helena McPhee;
Janice Minnis; Sylvia Mortimer; Lori Russell.

Certified Human Resource Management Programme Awardees











Congratulations are extended to all
individuais and companies who have
demonstrated their commitment to
continued education by their support and
‘/or participation in these programmes.

Responding to the training needs of industry is a
significant aspect of the mandate of CEES. Hence,
upon the request of the Grand Bahama Port Authority,
CEES developed and offered specific courses to
GBPA's employees. in 2006, over 30 GBPA employees
earned CEES certificates for successful completion of
courses/workshops, as follows:



Doran Cartwright Q. Forbes

danice Forbes

Alyvonnetta Levarity



CEES anticipates 2007 to be
nother busy year. Personal and
professional development
ourses and programmes are
scheduled to commence in |
. March, 2007. -
interested persons are asked to call -
L CEES orcomeby ~~
_ The College of The Bahamas |

Frances Maynard

on West Settlers Way

oe ee

Soe. He

aay

Se ay yO re AL AAP IE BENT MILO ENE REN AS ARB OTT PAR. ses

ab

wee

RPI WY UR Re MPO es ee >

AE

SS & hel ae eas Se eee eet ee ee ee

for additional information. _



ceunsaue

Resarn
PAGE 8B, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007



et OF The

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Libraries and Instructional Media Services Department
The Law Library Branch:

Lunch & Litigation

Inaugural Luncheon

Topic: Consumer Protection Act, 2006
x fs AN

Wednesday, 31st January, 2007
Choices Restaurant
Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute
The College of The Bahamas
Thompson Boulevard
Nassau, The Bahamas
12:00 noon - 2:00 p.m.

Silent Auction of Student Art
will take place during the luncheon

Donation: $35.00 :: Student: $25.00
Part proceeds in aid of the new library func




Have you done anything
special for yourself today?

Try a Personal Development Course/Workshop at COB’s
Centre for Continuing Education and Extension Services...

With one of our courses, you can gain

new job skills, increase your chances for
promotion or just learn something new for
personal satisfaction. With your success

in courses such as Massage Therapy,
Drapery Making, Floral Design, Make-up
|- Application or Nail Art Technician, you
could even start a small business. Sign up
for a course today,
































































ENQUIRIES
Email .: perdev@cob.edu.bs








All fees are included with the exception of
ine application fee of $40.00 (one time),









vee the right to change Tuition,
Bes se Content. Course Schedule
and Course Materials.



































Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs



BUSI9O4

FLORBO2

THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS

EDU












THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES
Computer Offerings - Spring Semester 2007





- EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT
PRESENTATIONS
This workshop is designed to provide
participants with an overview ol the
fundamentals of Microsoft PowerPoint. it
focuses on developing effective and dynamic

. QUICKBOOKS .
This course trains new and existing small
business entrepreneurs (fewer than 20
employees) in organizing and managing their

GOMPUTER APPLICATIONS |

This course is for the beginner who knows
very little about computers and does not
understand bow it works. This course
covers the major computer concepts with
extensive hands-on practice using various

accounting using QuickBooks Pro software.
Students will learn how to set up their

software, including: PowerPoint presentations. company files, chart of accounts, budget and
(}) Microsoft Office - Word Processing customers, vendor and employee files.

(ii) Microsolt Excel - Spreadsheet Pre-requisite: None

(iii) Microsoft Access - Database Date: Thursday, 8th March 2007 Pre-requisife: None




Management. Time: . 9:30am - 4:30pm Begins: Tuesday, 27th February 2007
Duration: 1 day Time: 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Pre-requisite: None Venue: CEES Computer Lab Duration: 6 weeks
Begins: Monday, 5th February, 2007 Fees: $160.00 Venue: SEES Computer Lab
6:00pm - 9:00pm Fees: $330.00
Section 01 (CEES) INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY #




This course covers basic concepts of WEBPAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP
Informatio Technology. The course provides Targeting persons who would like to create
training in these areas: Basic Hardware their personal web pages, this course
Proficiency, Application Features Proficiency, —_ will cover Web pags creation, Web site

Saturday, 3rd February, 2007
10:00am - 1:00pm
Section 02 (CEES)

















Duration: 12 weeks Operating System Proficiency, Internet and management and HTML. Specific topics will
Venue: CEES Computer Lab Email Proficiency. include Formatting, Graphies, Multimedia,
Tuition: $450.00 Forms and Tables and hosting of web pages.

Pre-requisite: None i
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS # Begins: Wednesday, 7th February
This course covers the advanced concepts 2007

Pre-requisife: Participants must be
computer literate and have




with extensive hands-on practice using Time: 6:00pm - 9:06pm a basic knowledge of
various software, including: Duration: 12 weeks word processing
{i} Microsoft Office - Word Processing Venue: CEES Computer Lab Dates: ist & 2nd March, 2007
(i) Microsoft Excel - Spreadsheet Fees: $450.00
(iii) Microsoft Access - Database Time: &:30am - 4:30pm
Management. PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR Duration: 2 days
This course is a hands-on introduction to Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Pre-requisite: Computer Applications | technology systems for use in information Fees: $550.00
Begins: Thursday, 8th February, 2007 — environments. The course will cover the
Time: 6:00pm - 9:00pm following topics: Basic Hardware, Operating
Duration: 12 weeks Systems, Troubleshooting and Repairs.
Venue: CEES Computer Lab
Fees: $550.00 Pre-requisite: None



Begins: Monday 12th Sabpuaty 2007
Time: 6:00pm - 7:30pm







Monday & Wednesday
Duration: 12 weeks
Venue: BHTC Computer Lab
“Fees: $500.00

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting application,
kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport, CEES reserves ihe right to change Tuition, Fees,
Course Content, Paurse Sehedule and Course.



Contact the Coordinator - gris 2 cob sie bs

Personal Development - SPRING SEMESTER JANUARY 2007

COURSE SECT COURSE TEME DAY START DUR FEE
NO. NO. DESCRIPTION

AGCOUNTING

ACCASOO Oi ACCA FOR BEGINNERS | 6:00-8:00prm MonfWed 12-Feb 10 wks $250
ACCASO4 O1 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS 6:00-8:00pm Tue/Thurs .13-Feb 10 wks $275
ACCAS02 O01 ACCA FOR BEGINNERS Hl 6:00-8:00pm Tue/Thurs 13-Feb 10wks $300




BUSINESS

BUSI9O0 Ot
CUST800 a
01

27-Feb Bwks $225
tday $170
1Owks $225

CREDIT & COLLECTIONS | 6:00-9:00pm Tue
SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE W/S 9:30am-4:30pm = Thurs 22-Feb
INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS | §:00-9:00pm Thurs 1-Mar






COMPUTERS

COMPS01 QO} COMPUTER APPLICATIONS | 6:00-9-0Opm Mon 5Feb i2wks $450
COMP901 02 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS | 10:00am-1:00pm_ Sat a-Feb i2wks $450
COMP802 Oo COMPUTER APPLICATIONS It 6:00-9:00pm Thurs 8-Feb f2 wks $550

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY I
QUICKBOOKS

PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR
EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT W/S
WEB PAGE DESIGN WORKSHOP

§:00-9-00pm Wed ?-Feb 12wks $450
6§:00-9:00pm Tue 27-Feb Gwks $330
6:00-7:30pm MonWed 12-Feb 12 wks $800
9:30am-4:30pm Thurs 8-Mar iday $160
9:30am-4:30pm Thurs/Ai 1-Mar = 2 days $550

COMP903~ 01
COMP 941 01
COMP9D3 01
COMP960 01
GOMP930 Ot






COSMETOLOGY
COSMB802 Qi MAKE-UP APPLICATION
COSMB04 01 MANICURE & PEDICURE
COSM8O0? O1 NAB ART TECHNICIAN

26-Feb Swks $225
27-Feb Bwks $225
26-Feb Gwks $500

6:00-9:00pim Mon
6:00-9:00pm Tue

6:00-9:00pm Mon/Thurs





DECORATING

DECOBDO (1 INTERIOR DECORATING | 6:00-9:00pm Wed 28-Feb Bwks $225

DECO8M Q1 INTERIOR DECORATING 1 6:00-9:00pm Tue 97-Feb Swks $250

FLOREO0 01 FLORAL DESIGN | 6:00-9:00prn Tue 27-Feh 1Owks $225

FLORBO1 Ot FLORAL DESIGN H 6:00-9:00pm Mon 26-Feb TO wks $250
|

01 FLORAL DESIGN Hl 8:00-9:00pm Thurs {-Mar 10 wks $300









ENGLISH

ENG S00 a EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS 6:00-9:00pm Tue 27-Feb Bwks $225



HEALTH & FITNESS

MASGIOO Ot MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS | 6:00-9:00pmn Thurs 22-Feb 10 wks $465
MASG9O1 04 MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS IE 6:00-9:00pm Mon 26-Feb 10 wks $620
HLTHS00 a GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR 6:00-9:00pm Wed 28-Feb 10 wks $400





MANAGEMENT
GMT900 01
GMTS01 01

8-Feb 12 wks $250

1V2wks $300

Thurs

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT | 6:00-9:30pm
HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Il 6:00-9:30pm Mon 5-Feb

me ee






MEDICAL

MEDT900 01 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 22-Feb 10 wks $225

00-9:00pm Thurs

SEWING
EW 800 01
SEW 802 Ot

26-Feb 1Q0wks $225
22-Feb 10 wks $250

oo

BASICS OF FREEHAND CUTTING |
BASICS OF FREEHAND CUTTING II

6:00-9:00pm Mon
6:00-9:00pm Thurs

to



SEW 808 Ot DRAPERY MAKING | 6:00-9:00pm Tues 27-Feb 10 wks $225
SEW 806 01 DRAPERY MAKING I 6:00-9:00pm Wed 28-Feb 10 wks $250
SEWBT ot UPHOLSTERY MAKING | 6:00-9:00pm Wed 28-Feb 10 wks $225
SEW 804 01 BEDROOM DECORATING | 4:00-10:00pm Sal 24-Feb 10 wks $225





























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_ fRIBUNE BUSINESS MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007, PAGE 9B

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs FEDUCATING

TIMETABLE OF CLASSES TIMETABLE OF CLASSES

Master’s Degree Programme | Master’s Degree Programme
in Library & Information Sciences fj = —— in School Counselling



_SPRING SEMESTER _ n ! _ SPRING SEMESTER















| Date ‘| Course | Time i
macau Friday, Jan. 12, 2007 CHDS 682 - Career Development 5:00 pm — 9:00 pm
oo - . and Guidance 8 He
Saturday, Jan. 13, 2007 Saturday, Jan. 13,2007 | CHDS 682 9:00 am — 5:00 pn
pm F : J



Lo - . SS — 2 - CHDS 620 — Group Work: Theory 5:00 pm =)
Saturday, Feb. 17, 2007 and Techniques
CHDS 620



9:00 am — 5:00. pm

5:00 pm — 9:00 pm
9:00 am ~ 5:00 pm










9:30 am to 3:00

DM




sat
ce ENN


























-
10:00 am to 4:00 Friday, Feb. 16, 2007 EDU 620 5:00 pm — 9:00 pm
hildren m Sabirday, Hee 17, 2007 EDU 620 9:00 am ~ 5:00 pm










RR a CUNY EEE CK
a ee |

Friday, Mar. 16, 2007 EDU 620
1S 626- 10:00 am to 3:00
noe ee Saturday, Mar. 17, 2007 EDU 620



| 5:00 pm — 9:00 pm
9:00 5:00 m













pm









Friday, Mar. 23, 2007 _ CHDS 682 - 35:00 pm — 9:00 pm
Saturday, Mar. 24, 2007 CHDS 682 9:00 am — 5:00 pm








.










CHDS 682 5:00 pm — 9:00 pm_
CHDS 682 9:00 am 5:00 pm









Course Code : Course Name Instructors
LIS 593 Multicultural Materials for | Dr. Linda Alexander
Children (3 credits)

5:00 pm — 9:00 pm |
9:00 am — 5:00 pm
























LIS 626 Information Science in Dr. Vicki Gregory : a
Librarianships (3 credits) Course Code | Course Name | Instructors
. / CHDS 620 Group Work: Theory and Dr. F. Ziegler

LIS 656 - | Materials for Children Dr. Henrietta Smith Techniques (3 credits) Mrs. Zoe Powell

. (3 credits) Mrs. Ann Smith

EDU 682 Career Development and Dr. Marty Jencius
. Guidance (3 credits) Mr. Vicente Roberts

* Please Note: The dates and times ‘are subject to change. i





* ALL CLASSES WILL BE HELD IN ROOM E12, E BLOCK.
Gt cymes Sak ; ae ° Please Note: The dates and times are subject to change.



a * ALL CLASSES WILL BE HELD IN ROOM 3A, Michael Eldon Complex.



THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS _ THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES | CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES

Health and Fitness Course Offerings - Spring Semester 2007 | Personal Development Workshops - Spring Semester 2007





“



MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS i

This is an introductory course for learning basic techniques of massage therapy and its many
benefits. Major topic areas will include Massage Theory, Manipulations and Techniques, Wellness
Education (Psychological and Physiological Benefits), Indications and Contraindications, Serving
Special Populations and Complementary Bodywork Systems, to include Aromatherapy Essentials.



This workshop is designed to pravide participants with an overview of the fundamentals of superior

Starting: Thursday, 22nd February 2007 customer service. |t focuses on customer value, retention and relationship building and employee
Time: 6:00-8:00prn motivation,

Duration: 10 Weeks Date: Thursday, 22nd February, 2007

Tuition Fee: $465.00 Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm

Venue: Yo be announced

Vente: Munnings Building, The College of The Bahamas
Tuition: $170.00

MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS 1
This is an advanced course for learning techniques of rnassage therapy and its many benefits. Major EFFECTIVE POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS

topics include Introduction to Hydrotherapy; Spa and Body treatments; Basic Facial; Aromatherapy- This workshop is designed to provice participants with an overview af the fundamentals of Microsoft
Fundamentals or Essential Oils; Relaxation and Meditative Methods: anid Hot Stone Therapy. PowerPaint. It focuses on developing effective and dynamic PowerPoint presentations,

Starting: — Monday, 26th February 2007 Date: Thursday, 8th March, 2007

Time: '6:00-9:00pm Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm

Duration; 10 Weeks Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road

Tuition Fee: $620.00 Tuition: $160.00

Venue: Munnings Building, The Callege of The Bahamas

WES PAGE DESIGN

GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR This course wil cover Web Page Creation, Web Site Management and HTML. Persons who enjoy
This is an introductory course for learning how to teach group fitness and exercise classes. Major working with computers and would like fo create their own web pages are encouraged to attend.
topics of discussion will include: Basic Anatomy and Physiolagy; Choreography and Cueing; the five Specific topics will include Formatting, Graphics. Multimedia, Forms and Tables and hosting of web
componenis of fitness, nutrition, basic exercise testing and how to teach group exercise. pages. \ F

Starting: Wecinesday, 28th February, 2007 : : Date: Thursday & Friday, Ist & 2nd March, 2007

Time: 6:00-8:00pm i , Time: 9:30am - 4:30pm

Duration; 10 Weeks Venue: CEES Computer Lab, Moss Road

Tuition Fee: $400.00 Tuition: $550.00

Verue: Munnings Building, The College of the Bahamas

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time}. When submitting
application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time). When submitting charige Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials
a i s S, LOUIS 7 SE MONE AUIE 4 “OUTSE Ma as,

application, kindly provide copies of the first four pages of your passport. CEES reserves the right to
change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials

Contact the Coordinator - perdev(Ocob.edu.bs Contact the Coordinator - perdev@cob.edu.bs





Ba



r {
PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007 THE TRIBUN

NOTICE |

NOTICE is hereby given that GARTH STEWART OF
CROSSING ROCK, ABACO, BAHAMAS is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 22th day of January, 2007 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147,
Nassau, Bahamas. ’

Become self-sufficient and acquire the skills to
start and successfully run your own business.
Alpha Entrepreneurial Management Training &
Consultancy Services (AEMTC) can make it
happen for you!

HOW TO START & OPERATE A BUSINESS

PHASE I

February, 19, 20, 22, 26, 27 &
March 1, 2007 6pm-9pm

PHASE II- A One-Day Seminar
February 24, 2007 9am-3pm

The College of The Bahamas, Grosvenor
Close Campus
(GCC) Room 113, Shirley Street

Telephone: 393-5961 or 323-5195
E-mail: alphaenttraining@yahoo.com

CALL & REGISTER RIGHT NOW!
SPACE IS LIMITED!



NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION
EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN LIMITED

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a)

is in
dissolution under the provisions of the International
Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the
25th day of January, 2007 when its Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is K. L. Floyd of 16945
Northchase Drive, Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

FROM page 1B

consolidating them in a public
company acceptable to its
shareholders.

“A diluted ownership base
could include such minor inter-
ests as the current sharehold-
ers would wish to retain, togeth-
er with interests of equity part-
ners such as commercial and
individual stakeholders in
Freeport and the Bahamas.”

The Government feels such
an approach would enhance
corporate governance of
Freeport and the GBPA, plac-
ing it in the hands of a broader-
based Board of Directors.

This approach has met with
the St George estate’s support,
the family having told the Gov-
ernment that it has no problem
in selling part of its stake in
Intercontinental Diversified
Corporation (ICD), the Cay-
man entity that acts as a holding
company for their and Sir Jack-
’s ownership interests in the
GBPA and Port Group Ltd.

The St Georges are said by
sources to have accepted the
Government’s position, which

is in line with their own, and
are willing to divest “either by
way of a private sale to inter-
ested third parties or by way of
a public offering”.

As previously revealed exclu-
sively by The Tribune, the fam-
ily has agreed that ownership
of the GBPA and Port Group
Ltd “should be diversified and
that the St Georges and Hay-
wards should either divest
themselves of ownership in the
companies entirely or reduce
their interests to minority share-
holdings”.

It is unclear at this point,
though, whether the estate
would still want to retain a
minority stake, but sources said
it wanted to reach a quick set-
tlement and act “in the best
interests” of Grand Bahama as
a whole. ,

Sir Jack’s position, though, is
that while he is “ready and
able” to acquire the St George
estate’s stake in ICD, he is “not
able” to consider reducing his
shareholding to a minority posi-
tion.

Among the options the two
sides have been discussing, via
mediation and negotiation, in
an effort to settle the dispute

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND
PRODUCTION BAHAMAS OFFSHORE
LIMITED

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named _
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the
undersigned cio P. O. Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or
before 19th February, A.D. 2007. In default thereof they will be

excluded from _ the
by the Liquidator.

benefit of any

distribution made

Dated the 25th day of January, A.D., 2007.

have been that one party buys
out the other; one side sells
either their whole or part share-
holding to a third party; the
entire ICD shareholding is sold;
or that the status quo as the St
Georges claim be maintained,
with both sides holding a 50 per
cent stake in the GBPA.

The latter option seems the
least likely, and given Sir Jack-
*s refusal to contemplate reduc-
ing his shareholding to a minor-
ity stake, it appears likely that
February 7, 2007, will see the
reinstatement of Mr Culmer as
receiver for the GBPA and Port
Group Ltd.

Then, observers have told
The Tribune, the best way for-
ward would appear to be for Sir
Jack’s claim to 75 per cent own-
ership of the GBPA and Port

‘Group Ltd to be resolved as’

rapidly as possible via Supreme
Court trial.

The fact this issue is out-
standing would make it hard for
either party to make an offer
for the other’s ICD shares, as
it could be perceived as either
an offer for 25 per cent, 50 per
cent or 75 per cent.

* Once this is concluded, the
two sides could then move to



resolve the question of the the

GBPA’s long-term ownership
structure. However, it would be
difficult to compel Sir Jack to
sell.

It is understood that no cur-

ae]
«4

a4
©

ee
wn

rent true valuation of the.

GBPA and Port Group has
been performed by a team of
investment bankers or accoun-

tants, making it difficult for Sir 4

Jack or the estate to offer a ,,
price to the other. Sources said, |

though, that prices ranging from

$70 million through to $300 mil- ,,

lion have been knocked back
and forth.

The Tribune previously.”

revealed that Sir Jack was pre-
pared to sell his stake to Hannes

Babak, the GBPA’s chairman,

who has been restrained by a

St-George estate-obtained court, .

order from involvement in the
company’s management and
executive decisions, for $55 mil-
lion in April 2006.

Any involvement by Mr .

Babak represents a sore point
for the St George estate, which
will “vigorously continue to
oppose” any attempt to rein-
state him to his former position

at the GBPA and Port Group:,

Ltd.

NOTICE

ONMO O O

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a)

is in

dissolution under the provisions of the International Business

Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the
25th day of January, 2007 when its Articles of Dissolution
were submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is K. L. Floyd of 16945
Northchase Drive, Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

Dated the 25th day of January A.D., 2007.

K.L. Floyd
Liquidator
16945 Northcase Drive
Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

Piateo eo tnGay- pt January 520 Te. HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT CO. LTD.

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT CO. LTD. NE NOUNS Reve aie Coneny

8 Attorneys for the above-named Company

NOTICE

-EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION

NOTICE

EXXONMOBIL EXPLORATION
ITALY LIMITED.

NOTICE

LIMITED — ;
Creditors having debts or claims against the NOTICE 1S HEREBY GIVEN: follows:

above-named’ Company are required to send

particulars thereof to the undersigned c/o P. O. Box ‘eda amtalueerandee
BAHAMAS OFFSHORE LIMITED |

N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or before 19th the provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

February, A.D. 2007. In default thereof they will be

excluded from the benefit of any distribution made | (b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the
nei? 25th day of January, 2007 when its Articles of Dissolution
by. the Liquidator.

were submitted to and registered by the Registrar General.

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-named
Company are required to send particulars thereof to the
undersigned c/o P. O. Box N-624, Nassau, Bahamas on or
before 19th February, A.D. 2007. In default thereof they will be
}excluded from the benefit of any distribution made
by the Liquidator.

(a)

Dated the 25th day of January, A.D., 2007.
(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is K. L. Floyd of 16945

Dated the 25th day of January, A.D., 2007.
: Northchase Drive, Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

K.L. Floyd
‘Liquidator
16945 Northcase Drive
Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

K.L. Floyd
Liquidator
16945 Northcase Drive
Houston, Texas 77060, U.S.A.

Dated the 25th day of January A.D., 2007.

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT CoO. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named Company

POSITION
AVAILABLE

Registered Nurse

Bis

Pricing Information As Of:
Friday, 26 January 2007

= FIDELITY

0.54
10.25
6.90
0.70
1.26
1.10
9.00
1.64
9.05
4.22
2.40
5.54
10.70
10.90
10.00
0.50
7.10
8.52
10.00

Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean

Focol

Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

10.00 aagbromier RealEstate
naa ae a
52wk-Hi 52wk-Low Symb
14.30 12.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
10.14 10.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
0.54 Oo RN

eireaeassyempremneniety ,

Responsibilities

e Provide primary and minor emergency
medical care
Administration of medication, oxygen,
intravenous fluids as indicated and outlined
in the Clinical Protocol Manual
Provide accurate and comprehensive medical
reports as required

Requirements:
Holder of current Bahamian Licence
Must have at least three years experience post
graduation
Have current BLS & ALS Certification
ee Bahamas Supermarkets Must be responsible, have good

oe ie co : og communication skills and independent.
52wk-Low Fund Name Last 12 Months Div $

1.2700 Colina Money Market Fund
2.6262 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
2.3220 Colina MSI Preferred Fund
1.1495 Colina Bond Fund
10.0000

rpenanencen snonancndsonpsam tis,

5 ae

Yield
9.35%
7.85%

ol Last Price
14.00
10.00

OE
28.00 ABDAB

S2wk-Hi
1.3253
3.0017
2.5002
1.2175

1.325275"
2.9728"**
2.500211**
1.217450""**
3075

CV should be sent
via e-mail to
mary.epcotmedical
@coralwave.com by
January 31st, 2007.

THE
} BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 _
S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks MEDICLINIC
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's welghted price for daliy volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV § - Dividends per share paid In the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS § - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

*~ 19 January 2007
** - 31 December 2006
*** - 31 December 2006

*** - 31 December 2006

AS INFORMATIE






lew cruise terminal
POMC eirali Corre eA




FROM page 1B

y
i

Bahamian entrepreneurs involved with
those private ports, delivering the experi-
ence and reaping the returns that, in some
cases, the cruise ships have been getting
themselves. We want to encourage more
Bahamian ownership of those experiences
and benefiting from those ports in other
ways.” :
Mt Johngon said the Government has
moved away from a tax rebate for cruise
passengers, not because it did not work,
but because there were better ways to cre-
ate incentives that allows tax dollars to be
treated separate and apart from an incen-

tive.~
t
Moved

“We have moved away from that. The
principle, though, is-even with the rebate

programme, the way it was structured, the
Bahamas received about $11.40 per pas-
senger in head tax, not half, because 600,000
passengers paid the full load. That $11.40 is
almost twice as much higher than the head
tax of many other islands in the Caribbean,”
Mr Johnson said.

Income

“So, relatively, our income from head
tax is a significant amount compared to the
competition. But we are going to an incen-
tive that is based on volume delivered in a
way that we want it. We will provide cash
incentives to the cruise ships. We will not be
rebating, not because it did not stimulate,
but because of other reasons.”

He added that the previous Cruise
Overnight Incentives Act, which expired
at the end of 2003 and has been allowed to
continue in practice as the Bahamas readies
to replace it. traded off allowing the cruise

lines to keep their casinos, restaurants,
shops and bars open while in port in Nassau
or Grand Bahama with keeping them here.

“Our experience has been that with busi-
ness and spend outside the cruise ship, we
saw no dip to speak of. What we found was
that we had far too little to offer after 5pm
in downtown Nassau for the passengers to
take advantage of,” Mr Johnson said.

“As a result, many of them went to the
casino on Paradise Island, so the benefits
went mostly there, not downtown

Provision

“We intend to continue the provision for
economic reasons. They lobbied very effec-
tively with us for that. They could not afford
to shut down for that period of time. They
would then sail earlier and we would rather
them be here till midnight than their leaving
at Spm, and then we would lose 100 per
cent of the revenue.”

Cruise industry concerned

ee

over Bahamas tours

FROM page 1B

ing things for the passengers
and tourists to do”.

These criticisms are likely to
be opposed by Bahamian tour
operators and shore excursion
providers, industry sources
telling The Tribune that this
nation has the second highest
number of tours on offer behind
Mexico.

They are also arguing that the
cruisé lines have begun to copy

theit ideas!through what is”
offered on their private:islands,

where companies such as Car-
nivalRoyal Caribbean and Dis-
ney control all the activities and
excursions provided.

‘ Operator

Rather, Bahamian tour oper-
ator believe their major prob-
lems are getting cruise passen-
gers fo leave their boats at all
when, they arrive in Nassau or
Grand Bahama. especially as
onboard shops, casinos and bars
currently remain open.

Thén there is the issue of fair
markups for: tour operators,
enabling thegy to make a decent
margin and profit. The Tribune

r

















* Computer Literate

o0o0a00

has been repeatedly told over
the past several years that the
cruise lines, in selling excursion
tickets for $40, keep the major-
ity of that revenue and only pass
on between $11-$15 to the oper-
ator.

Ms Paige, and a group of
FCCA platinum industry mem-
bers, were the guests of the
Ministry of. Tourism and the
Nassau/Paradise Island Devel-
opment Board at a luncheon
held in their honour at the
Humidor restaurant on Friday.

“You have to look at the
totality, which is that the cruise
industry once.a year takes: its

chief executives and platinum

members on a cruise,” Ms Paige
said.
“With the popularity of the









N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Freeport Container Port

Grand Bahama, Bahamas

Invites Qualified Candidates to apply for the position of
Crane Technician
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:
* Three (3) years’ experience working on GE, ABB or Siemens Drive Control Systems
* Diploma or Associate Degree in Electronics or Electrical Technology.

* Experience in supporting OMG, HHI or Mobile Cranes preferred.

\

¢ Must be willing to work as part of a Team.

¢ Must be able to repair and maintain:

o AC/DC Motors
o AC/DC Motor Control Drive Equipment
o Medium/High Voltage Distribution Sysiems

Freeport Container Port will offer the following benefits to the successful candidates:
Full-time Employment

Major Medical/Life Group Insurance
Retirement Savings Plan

School Fee Subsidy for Dependents
Performance Bonus

Representatives from the Freeport Container Port will be visiting Nassau on
January 30 & 31, 2007 and will conduct interviews from 09:00 a.m. through 4:00
p.m. daily at the Atlantic House on Co

Candidates are asked to mail Resumes to the attention of:

Human Resources Director
Freeport Container Port
P.O. Box F-42465

Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas

email: ADS@fcp.com.bs

NOTICE is hereby given that ST. FILMA CEZALIEN OF
WILLIAMS ST. OFF SHIRLEY ST., NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of ihe
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the tacts within
twenty-eight days from the 29th day of January, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box

llins Avenue, Centerville

Bahamas, it is significant that
the Bahamas Ministry of
Courism would put on a venue
that would not only have a fan-
tastic entertainment experience
for the group, but is also an edu-
cational purpose, because when
you're sending the amount of
ships and passengers to the
Bahamas. it is important to look

at things with renewed appreci-

ation and enthusiasm.”
Cases

Ms Paige said that in most
cases, all cruise ships visited
both their private islands and
either Nassau or
Bahama during a voyage.

She added that on most of
these islands there was only the



beach experience to enjoy,

which did not satisfy passen- |

gers, leaving plenty of options
for the other islands.

David Johnson, deputy direc-
tor-general at the Ministry of
Tourism for planning and
investment, told the group:
“We're committed to improv-
ing each of our islands and
putting the islands of the
Bahamas on the cutting edge of
tourism destinations around the
world.

“We are committed to our
partnership being one where
we're all able to deliver a qual-
ity and safe experience to our

Grande “Suests. at a reasonable profit
8 for all our suppliers.”
























Qualifications:

performed

hubs.









Remuneration:

1 - II job levels)

~ FIRSTCARIBBEAN

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

Senior Programme Manager, Northern
Caribbean Operations
Location: Bahamas

° Bachelor's degree in business related field

° 5- 10 years experience in Financial Institutions

¢ Comprehensive knowledge of Financial Institutions operational processes and
procedures that support Retail Distribution (Retail, Corporate, Capital Markets
& International Wealth Management customer segments) sufficient to develop

- and improve complex practices and processes.

° Working (practical) Knowledge of several areas of external activities (financial
and/or other industries, market and/or regulatory environment, or client business
practices and needs) sufficient to apply relevant issues or developments to work

General Responsibilities:

¢ As apart of Senior Management, lead the development of Change Management
Documents — Business User Requirements / Project Charter, Project Plan,
Implementation Plan, Project Budget, Business Cases, Request For Information
(RED-and Request For Proposal (RFP)

° Responsible in conjunction with the Head of Operations and other Northern
Caribbean Operations Managers in developing the Bahamas Regional Operations
Centres into a fully centralised processing unit for the Northern Caribbean
Region by incorporating additional functions from the Local Processing Unit

© To support the overall strategic mandate of the northern Operations group by
identifying and executing process improvements that increase profitability and
enhance our customers’ and employees’ experience.

¢ To provide advice and /ov consultation typically of an operational or tactical

nature to Operations Centres management as it relates to existing business

processes and proposed business changes.

¢ Salary commensurate with senior management position at the FC Level 8 (Note:

© Benefits. includes a car allowance, preferred loan rates, variable incentive pay
(bonus). medical scheme. pension benelits...

Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter via
email by February 9", 2007 to: Chaunte.toote@firstcaribbeanbank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all
applicants for their interest, however only those under
consideration will be contacted.
Vacancies are open to Bahamians only.

MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007, PAGE 11B

Taree

Ben-Bo Collection &
Management Company Ltd

wish to inform the public that

BRIDGETTE ROLLE

is no longer employed with us.
She is no longer authorized to do
business for and on behalf of

















BEN-BO COLLECTION &
MANAGEMENT COMPANY LTD.

An Exclusive Boutique Resort & Spa
is recruiting for the positions of:






























Qualified Applicants should possess the following:

¢ Solid training in all areas of Hotel Accounting from A/P, AIR.
Genera! Ledger, Credit, Collections, Audit, Inventory control,
payroll, Budgeting, Costing, P&L preparation and analysis, etc.

° Clear, concise written and verbal communication skills

* Ability to clearly and concisely present technical subjects

¢ Demonstrate team building experience

¢ Track record promoting an atmosphere of teamwork

° Solid career progression up through the ranks

¢ Abilities to inspire, train, and develop people for promotion




Qualified Applicants should possess the following:
¢ Creativity in selling, managing and menu design

* Knowledge of banquets, catering, and room service

° Understanding forecasting, budgeting, food and labor costs
e Ability to read and manage a P&L

e Positive attitude who appreciates being part of a team

¢ Organized with good computer skills

e Desire to mentor and train others

¢ Ability to focus, stay on task and produce

¢ Must be a strong manager and proven leader




Personal. Energetic Executive. Chef who is a leader. innovator,
dynamic, creative, flexible, people oriented with strong
management skills and eager to display a genuine desire to lead
the team in producing a high quality product and to maximize the
performance of kitchen personnel.

Business and profit oriented, able to estimate food consumption
and purchase food, create menus, strong people management
and development skills with strong ability to manage in a diverse
environment with focus on client and customer services is
essential to success in this role. :

All applications are appreciated but only qualified individuals will
be considered. Our email address is kwright@marleyresort.com,
Fax: (242) 327-4393 or you can mail it to AP-59223 Slot 440,

Nassau, Bahamas. .- - async nny

A AY




INTERNATIONAL BANK

fora










caine a NR RR




t wes 5 ; Sse vnapsion SSP ON EE REARS SDE CEASE RE EO RE OES EC SRS T+? ASX HO SRER PSS ZS LH SS REP ERS ESI EBA RAS EEOF

3
99
e

2007, PAGE 13B

ing

1ce

ider
LEAH DAVIS

reach as many
ives our sales



’

AY, JANUARY 29

Few:

IS my newspaper

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
S SUPERCENTRE

MOND



ible. When cons
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punvenprpteed
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snanennnvsrveslssterreTel Ome”
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THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS



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AE ONE ELE EP I PE i Ot Be a
PAGE 14B, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007 THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS



“COMICS PAGE












Fay YOU KNOW, THE WORLD SHOULDVE
BEEN DESIGNED Sp ENERIONE
} DIDNT HAVE TO EAT EACH OTHER
TO SURVIVE. TERE
) JUST BE FEWER PEXALE AND
ANIMALS TO BEGIN WITH.



y..YOU MIGHT WANT
“TO RETHINK YOUR
* POGITIONL

AFTER BUYING THOSE TWO
EXTREMELY REVEALING

COME ON, NED...
I WANT TO GO
TO THE PARTY
TONIGHT!








AND THE WORLD CERTAINLY
QOULD'VE USED A NORE EVEN

APARTMENT 3-G

| ORRRR ow THAT.
g, DAA OLS





HE’S JUST
3L RODE,

T WONDER. NAY
NOBODY CONSULTED
YOU.
‘ INCREDIBLE,
ISNT IT?
4









MILLS ALL DAY ABOUT mayer
THAT STUPID PARTY OF] HEIs





1 READ THAT A HIGH SCHOOL WAS
BEING SUED BECAUSE SOMEONE
bag OOJECTED ooo SCHOOL



South dealer. less collection, hoping to strike his ;
Both sides vulnerable. partner’s long suit. As it happened, MONDAY. \
NORTH West was successful in his aim, but : 4 i
@AKQ4 this was not the real cause of South’s JAN UARY 29 i
Â¥Q107 undoing. ie
765 Declarer took the diamond lead : ti
843 with the ace and tested the spades by rit? % March 21/April 20 |
: could be a tough start to the
WEST EAST cashing the A-K. Had East woodenly | ocx Aries. Take your time, find .
873 $3105 followed suit, there would have been | ya 8 to work aa the problem '
MARVIN ¥8643 v3 i: no a to tell. But when the two top ihe patient. - \s
: 109 QJ832 spades were cashed, East followed echt : foe
, SO £3975 #Q 10 with the ten and jack! ~ | TAURUS - April 21/May 21
IT’S A NICIOUS CYCLE, i CAN'T THEN THE NEXT DAY I'M SOUTH South naturally assumed tha: You are sure to be daydreaming |
ROY.\IF IT TAKE AN FALL ASLEEP TIRED HAVE To TAKE ANAP 6962 West had both missing spades, so he: about something you would like to ,
AFTERNOON NAP _AT NIGHT Wl ¥K52 next led the four of spades to his aa meee oer ee i
@AK4 nine. He then played the king of | G4YS-,RceP your tte Oe ais
- PAK 62 hearts, hoping the opponent with the Se ae ODED YORE Beans
The bidding: ace would win the trick and thereby 12 1° COUSS-
South West North East provide him with an entry to the GEMINI - May 22/June 21
1NT Pass 3NT AlMlPass queen of spades. The time has come to accept that

OST. BY UMVCRSM. PRodS SPM ATE

m Pie VILE We, ee.



HIS, NO RESPONSE?



COcOMiCS. COM /PONSeQu Tue



Opening lead — ten of diamonds.

If you look at all four hands, it
isn’t easy to see how declarer can
possibly go down in three notrump.
He seems certain to score two clubs,
two diamonds, a heart and, because
of the lucky 3-3 spade division, four
spades for a total of nine tricks.

Yet, as reported ‘by the great Aus-
tralian star Tim Seres, South failed to
make the contract. Not only that, but

in winding up with only eight tricks, °
it’s hard to prove that declarer did

anything really wrong!
West started by leading the dia-
mond ten from his virtually worth-




“MR& WILSON SAYS TM GROWIN UP TOO FAST,
BUT MR. WILSON SAYS NOT FAST ENOLIGH."

A Tactical Defensive Maneuver

But East had not come this far to

make things easy for declarer. He did .

not take his ace, leaving South with
no choice but to lead a second round
of hearts toward the Q-10. When
West followed low, South finessed
the ten, losing to East’s jack. Not
long after that, declarer finished
down one.

In summarizing the deal, Seres
cited the basic principle of defense
that East had followed: When you
see that declarer is bound to succeed

by normal play, you should look for .

a way to present him with a losing
alternative. 2 “





certain friendships must be brought ,

tionally and mentally moved on.

CANCER - June 22/July 22

The most important thing today is
ever happens, be it good, bad or

work to your advantage in the end.

LEO ~ July 23/August 23

VIRGO -— Aug 24/Sept 22

You’re the only one who truly’
knows what’s-right for you. Follow |
your heart and your dreams.
LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23

There is nothing wrong with ambi-
tion, and this time of year brings out

to an end. Don’t feel guilty about .
letting go: the fact is, you have emo- °

that you respond positively to what- °

indifferent. Don’t worry, it will |

On the outside, you appear calm and

confident, but your emotions are |
raging. You have to get over this. .
Life is full of disappointments — it .
is how you handle them that matters.

Don’t let anyone try to change the: .
way you look at the world today.’ :








TIGER Bee o the aspiring side of your nature. Your-
tesco Dist ee ac first task is to remind yourself why
ee 3 success is so important to you :
VONT BOTHER MANGE. BUT SHE Century 8S 2s portant to you. ae
| Ke) CAT. SHES ae Dictionary aoa SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22
i& : LEFT HER MOTOR (1999. Seeks : naga
SOUND? A ew RUNNIN edition) Zeeeof Just because something is accepted |
SO SLE ING 5 8 gy pa wisdom does not mean you have to ,
" Qn HOW many words of four oO ary follow it slavishly like everyone
ve letters or more can you make 8 Be se ® else. You have something much bet-
from the letters shown here? Y oka h ter than knowledge: common sense.
In making a word, each letter z £ § Sei oy.
may be used once only. Each 4 Seeds SAGITTARIUS — Nov 23/Dec 21 |
must contain the centre letter ha g vase There are things that need to be said, . ,
and there must be at least one e ees eos things that need to be discussed and:
nine-letter, word. No plurals. OdSUaaAS things that need to be changed. It’s
















| CRYPTIC PUZZLE |

















TODAY’S TARGET
Good 20; very good 30;
excellent 40 (or more).
Solution tomorrow.



new







time to tackle these challenges once
and for all.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20 |
What starts out as a minor disagree-
ment could develop into an all-out.
battle. Focus on the important things
today — meaning the things that are
important to you.







































ACROSS
DOWN AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
4 — He washed his hands with one in 4 Source of a sensation (5) word a seem to believe you can pull
a dish (6) 2 Pick up something exclusive (6) the wool over everyone’s eyes,
regardless of facts that tell
7 Cover one, by arrangement, for a 3 Asadjusted by a canny Scot? (4) shop steward different story. Be big eiuahite
quick check (4-4) A Doeshe religiously take admit you made a mistake. 4
a Reject a rogion at random (6) precedence? (5) an elected union pisces nee March 20
r Oo
osc 5 — Annual occasion for soma | representative responsible for the highs 7 ee
an actor (5) Valentines? (4) other ‘people’s existence. Happiness
13 Youmeyheveosentheemeninone | 6 — Justhappento arrive? (4,2) begins at home — with yourself.
on the river (4) 9 t's tke a bridge over the railway (6)
14 Flights around the housetops? (4) 11 Theprotester's rubbish? (3)
15 Give eound ede though it only Bedceuauere ) CHESS | by. Leonard er leel dy
second-hand (4) 13. Variety of lobster on the bed (7)
16 Porridge veseet? (3) 15 For cooking, its good to a point (3) Mikhail KoballavTigran
17. Self-possessed when out Headpiace with hi Nalbandian, Geller Memorial,
of contol (4) ae Moscow1999. White (to move)
c's 18 State of a piece of has an obviously stony sitar
aryzarous vehicle? (4) work 6 but how to break through?
#i: shnea wieeihe peer Kobalia did so with a
up etoppert (2) 20 Plant fresh trees at the second spectacular sacrifidal sequence,
23 Can'tbear unsuitable heat (4) attempt? (5) giving up queen and rook to
ae ee oe nein |
26 Catch in en untenable situation (3) "22. Reserved for the commanding officer, : 4 che . It's the kind of tactic my
27° Enrty tea colour? (4) a Yankee (3) uw : 0 eae tee a Vietnam ain (5) any chessplayer ape el i:
29 Didhis archery Stiff paper thrilled to play, and the point to
etiery ae lwna 23 Simply to call ita stopper would be — Me eacls Regularly (6) note is that if you can push your
| soroback? (4) a ropy clue (6) S 15 Dry (4) 2 ee opponent's army back an
“1 32 The woodin the hole in the wall (4) j 3 11 r oblige your rival to cam his
133 Smelt ike rotten tanks ( . oe a. 7 ee 12 Note value (5) defenders into the back ranks,
1 , 5) 28 Has he ajolly bony head? (5) = 19 Catch sight of (4) 13 Ironed (7) then opportunities are likely to
ot 34 Partly t's of queetionable length (6) 30 Norma's Spanish boy (5) 2 21 Ea (9) 45 Manner (3) — o am ved s
4 35 23 Entreaty 16 Mimic (3 winning move givena
{ mee Sion roan i er nee so 31 Is hls among the riskier sports? (5) ; ul 24 Painful (4) 18 (age e strong hint, so It's easy) and the
suit it to etemity? (8) 32 Aposelbly wounding fellow? (4) a Shoot h 20 Alloy (5) follow-up which led to
936 Avolatively dealer? (6 Phase 21° Elderly (3 checkmate on White’
Impecunious declor?(6) 33. Tho kind ype? (4) sa Diacn nase al Deanne s fifth turn (harder)? LEONARD BARDEN
; : f 32 Type of gchool (2-2) 23 Small basket (6)
Yesterday's cryptic soluvons Yesterday's easy solutions = 3 ibn an ©) 25 Wicked (3)
ACROSS:1, Points 7, W-+-eea-cre 8, Pita 10, A-bad-an 11, | ACROSS: 1, Sparta 7, Corridor 8, Lash 10, Chaste 11, 35 Raticant (8) 28 Molars (5)
Greece 14, Sex 16, Sedan 17, D-at-a 19, Pedal 21, Facade 14, Toy 16, Tales 17, Seen 19, Valet 21, Timid 22, 36 Stink (6) 7 ent 6 < cl
in
H-one-y 22, Baton 23, To-NS 26, Limit 28, Lea 29, At | Comet 23, Bits 26, Senor 28, Cad 29, Cranny 30, Canopy aS Naren eel Chess solution 8290: 1 Qxh7#1 Kxh7 2(6+ Kh6 Gi Kh8
DOWH: 1, Poland 2, Noldea 3, S-wan4, Heare-a-y5, | DOWN: 1, Sauces 2, Reason 3, Ache 4, Created 5, deal 6, 33 Stemn(t) MonacdiCaneadapln |
Acted 6, S-aven 8, Pa’s-T 9, TA-X 12, Eel 13, Canon 15, | Urges 8, Late 9, Sty 12, Cat 13, Debit 15, Camel 18, One possible word ladder solution és: LEFT, lent,
Teno-F 18, Admit 19, Pot 20, Den 21, Hatchet 22, B-in 23, | Ember 19, Vim 20, Lit 21, Tomado 22, Con 23, Banana lend, wend, wind, wins, WINGS :

24, Idol 25, Styles 26, Score 27, Nadir 28, Car
30, Cord

Tenner 24, (the) Oaks 25, Serves 26, Large 27, Mound 28,
Law 30, Boys




THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS



MONDAY EVENING JANUARY 29, 2007

[7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30
The Power of Choice: The Life

NETWORK CHANNELS
meee of Milton Friedman (N)

Art 360 Casa Antiques Roadshow Alexander {American Experience The United
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3 crafted chair. (N) (Cc) to Berlin in 1948. (N) A (CC
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" Jeopardy! (N) | Wife Swap “Bimonte/Hubbard’ |Supernanny “Haines Family” A po- |What About Brian Brian invites the
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authority in their house. weekend getaway.

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Stop” (CC) deadly radiation. O (CC) mob. 1 (CC) mob boss, (CC) -

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BBCI (Latenight). Report (Latenight). sential guide to |(Latenight). Report
; computers.
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Hotwyred (CC) |x %% DON'T TRIP ... HE AIN'T THROUGH WITH ME YET! (2006, Com-|Soul Food 1 (CC)
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3 sey Gags (CC) Crime “Hunted”

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0 (CC) art (CC) Head” Elliot's life. (CC)
. {Cops “Coast to |Beach Patrol (N)|Beach Patrol (N)/Forensic Files Suburban Se- /Suburban Se-
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The Suite Life of] * % * THE EMPEROR'S NEW GROOVE (2000) [The Emperor's Life With Derek [Phil of the Fu-
DISN Zack & Cody —_| Voices of David Spade. Animated. A conspirator turn |New School A |"Mice and Men” |ture Phil has bul-
Bowling match. jan arrogant ruler into a llama. 0 ‘G’ (0c) wish is granted. ly problems.
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man). Tagestema Depth Tagestema —_{haufnahme”
E! The Daily 10 | 101 Favorite Stars Way Back 101 Favorite Stars Way Back High Mainte- | Boulevard of
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ESPN fire” ?
Gol ESPN: FIBA Slam (N) Figure Skating State Farm U.S. Championships -- {SportsCenter -- International Edi-
ESPNI Fuera de Juego Men's Free Program. From Spokane, Wash. : tion (Live)
‘ Daily Mass: Our |The Journey Home -{Lord Have Mer- |Holy Rosary |To Be Announced
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-FIT TV Stretch Max: |The Craze Bakers team up to lose _|FitTV’s Diet Doctor “Dean Ornish” |FitNation “Gadgets Get-Ups and
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Fox Report- |The O'Reilly Factor (Live) (CC) |Hannity & Colmes (Live) (CC) On the Record With Greta Van
FOX-NC Shepard Smith : I Susteren (Live) (CC)
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(00) Walker, | Walker, Texas Range Walker goes /MURDER 101: COLLEGE CAN BE MURDER (2007, Mystery) Dick Van
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(CO) witnesses a murder. (CC) - . |
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f Everybody Friends ‘The Friends 1 (CC) |Friends Baby's |Friends Rachel |Family aly Family Guy Wit |
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TNT “Vaya Con Leos” |unknowingly contacts a demon pos- |tims suddenly die after being inocu- investigate the strangling of a prom-
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PREMIUM CHANNELS Be
% & THE WEDDING DATE (2005) Debra Messing, —|Rome “These Being the Words of | * x JARHEAD (2005) Jake Gyl- |
HBO-E Dermot Mulroney. A woman brings a male escort to her|Marcus Tullius Cicero” Cicero sends |lenhaal. Marines band together dur: |
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6:30) ey % & STRIPTEASE (1996, Drama) Demi Moore, Armand Assante, Ving Extras Daniel | & x THE 40-
HBO-P CraIGTLY BUSI-/Rhames, A Miami mother becomes a stripper to raise some quick cash Radcliffe makes )YEAR-OLD VIR-
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HBO-W In es Matthew Broderick, Uma Thurman, Two men scheme to swindle investors Prodi: The [DING DATE
in a Broadway flop. M ‘PG-13' (CC) Movie Musical |(2005) ‘PG-13'

(:15) & & FIRST DAUGHTER (2004, Romance-Com- | & & SPANGLISH (2004, Comedy-Drama) Adam Sandler, Téa Leoni
HBO-S edy) Katie Holmes. The president's daughter falls for a {Paz Vega. A housekeeper works for a chef and his neurotic wife, ‘PG-
man at college. 1 ‘PG’ (CC) : 13 cc} |
























6:30) eee te GRANDMA'S BOY (2006, Comedy) Doris :35)MAXon |x%%FORCESOF NATURE
MAX-E GADAGASCAR Roberts, Allen Covert. A man must live tf his grand- ba Mad car (1998, Romance-Comedy) Sandra |

(2005) ‘PG’ (CC) |mother and her two friends. ‘R’ (CC) 0 (CC) ullock, M 'PG-13' (CC)

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in touch by passing along a pair of jeans. women known by an outcast ex-cop. 1 ‘R’ (CC) R

(00) % % « TOMORROW NEVER DIES (1997) The L Word “Layup” (iTV) Artist's Sleeper Cell: American Terror
SHOW ierce Brosnan. iTV. James Bond tries to short-circuit |work is politically incendiary. . | "Salesman” (iTV) Darwyn strives to |
a communications tycoon. 4 ‘PG-13' (CC) (CC) maintain his cover. ( (CC)

by) % * * TOMBSTONE (1993, Western) Kurt Russell, Val Kilmer, | %% TO LIVE AND DIE IN L.A, (1985) William L. Pe-|
TMC ichael Biehn. Doc Holliday joins Wyatt Earp for OK Corral showdown. —|tersen, Willem Dafoe, Premiere, A tederal agent looks
R’ (CC) for the crook who killed his partner, ‘R’ |









eee Deco Drive , {Prison Break Michael, Lincoln and |24 The country reels from the |News (CC) Lf
WSVN Kellerman try to get a message to threatening situation and additional .
missing Sara. Ny (CC) terror attacks. (N) (CC)

wee POY

The Gospel!

ee

MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007, PAGE 15B ~



Let Charlie the
Bahamian Puppet and
his sidekick Derek put,

some smiles on your )
kids’s faces.

Bring your children to the

McHappy Hour at McDonald's in
Marlborough Street every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
month of January 2007,

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.

im lovin’ it







See eae Bann se

a al ete ow er atl.

eS Sw ae wae

_ oe we we pate






Tuesday WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS
High = Low W High Low W WASSAU Today: SW at 15-30 Knots 4-6 Feet 2-4 Miles 77° F

wi et —_ FC FIC agi _ Fic Tuesday: _ NW at 12-25 Knots 3-5 Feet 6-7 Miles 77°F

Acap : ee = R631 = (4/23. P SW at 15-30 Knots 4-6 Feet 2-4 Miles Tr

Amsterdam NW at 10-20 Knots 4-6 Feet 6-7 Miles 77°F

WSW at 15-30 Knots 4-7 Feet 2-4 Miles qk

NW at 10-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 6-7 Miles










~ MODERATE


















The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the





Mostly cloudy with Pleasant with clouds Humid with times of |



Breezy with plenty of ‘Clear. Sunshine and patchy







sunshine. clouds. showers possible. and sun. clouds and sun. | greater the need for eye and skin protection.
High: 72° ie 70° High: 79° High: 84°
High: 72° Low: 59° Low: 57° et i
















AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWe \Feel



er Rea AccuWeather RealFeel

58°

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.

>

AccuWea








4:36 a.m. 27 11:00 a.m. 01
4:55p.m. 2.0 10:49p.m. -0.2

Tuesday 99:39am. 27 11:54am. 0.0
. 5:51pm. 2.1 11:45pm. -0.2

Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday thee 6:26am. 27 1242p.m. -0.1

Today






























- Wednesday°-
ABACO Temperature rad Vet pm. 2.2 —
: High Supdganetia seams dels Dace ecctsisechesisieenss FOr FILO AO 7-12 98 12:36 0.3
_High: 70° F/21°C Low 70° F/21° Cc Thursday . a.m. x a am. PF
4 ssaseransonsa 7:26pm. 23 1:25pm. -0.1
Low: 58°F/14°C Normal high "77° F/25° C om a
Normal low . . 65° F/18° C aN g rrr
Last year’s high . 76° F/24° C
High: 63° F/A7°C Last year's IOW .......secsscssssecseesseesseee, 65° F/18° C SanCaneS Si SEAT TE Sone.
Low: 46° F/8°C Precipitation Sunrise......6:54a.m. Moonrise ... . 2:30 p.m.
As of 1 p.m. yesterday 0.28” Sunset.......5:52 p.m. Moonset ..... 4:01 a.m.
Year to date . 0.96”
Normal year to date. "1.60" pis -—
' [SA] Showers
AccuWeather.com % [23] Tstorms
. All forecasts and maps provided by — 7 [a%2"] Rain
ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007 Feb. 2 Feb. 10 Feb. 17 —2 ” 3 [=] Fiurries
: High: ° : : ? ROR ERT pon Ea : Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
ae ee aes : , _— 5 ee —— precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
High: 72° F/22° os " eae : ee Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.



«Low SO°F/S°C

High: 67° F/19°C

Low: 58° F/14°C 51/0



Shown is today
highs and tonights



* 34/28 56/13 ‘po



s weather. Temperatures are today's
's lows.







~ MAYAGUANA |
tx 84° F/29°C



33/0 17/-8 pe






























om yo ‘Law65 FEC
63/17 “50/10. sh f ‘
‘GREAT INAGUA
High: 84° F/29° C
“O68 15-9 sf Low: 73° F/23°6
AB 31/0-ts2
32/0 9/-12 pe -28/-2 13/-10 sf New Orleans
22/5 14/-10- Sh 22/-5 13/10 st New York: 8-13 2/-16 sf
77/25 71/21 sh = 79/26 71/21 sh Oklahoma City"
rs 4! 4 Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, ¢-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
co B42 44/6 So STN8, 44/6 he Orlando» Washington, DC 36/2 21/6 pe 35/1 22/-5 pe . storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prep-precipitation, Tr-trace

ee




MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007

SECTION

Fax: (242) 328-2398
E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com

Regatta has sailors on
the crest of a Wave

@ SAILING
By KELSIE JOHNSON

Sports Reporter

THE first regatta is in the “bag” leaving skippers
and fans looking forward to the next showdown

on the sea.

The annual New Years Day regatta got underway
on Friday with races in the C-class and continued on
over the weekend at the Montagu Beach shores.
Races in the A and B-classes were held on Saturday

and Sunday.

The highly anticipated boat race attracted the
top skippers from around the Bahamas, all hoping
to clinch the top spot and to gather points towards

the boat of the year award.

Before the sound of the horn crew members
gathered together one final time putting in last

minute plans.

The strategic moves by each crew brought on
some exciting races that went down to the wire,
leaving sailors optimistic about the final results.

For those who had experienced problems on day
two, the final day of competition was designed to
correct their wrongs. But they would have to wait a
little longer as the rain set the regatta two hours

back.

Because of the delay, the results were not avail-
able up until press time and will posted in Tuesday’s

edition of The Tribune.

® SETTING sail for the
New Year’s Day Regatta.
(Photo: Tim Clarke)





@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE






Sands and Thomas

— eon. Fr ys

@ TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Sports Reporter



ACHIEVING the provisional

on track

Tae ete ane ahem ed artenininin CSR ae oe

: ae

—

standards.

for Ind

Bahamian duo qualify for championships

standards wasn’t enough for
Shamar Sands so he teamed up
with Donald Thomas to make the
first Bahamian duo to surpass the
NCAA Indoor Championships
automatic timing.

The Auburn Tigers’ pair, Sands
and Thomas led the college at the

Diet Pepsi Invitational, becoming ©
the universities’ first automatic

qualifiers. °
Not only did Thomas secure his
spot in the men’s high jump event

for the championships, his perfor-
mance inked his name in the
Tigers’ record book. The clearance
of 2.31m (7-6.50) set a new indoor
record, it is also the leading jump in
the country. Second place in this
event went to Keith Moffat 2.28m,
a provisional marking, third went
to Jerome Miller another provi-
sional marker, 2.16m.

Turning up the heat was Sands
with a season’s best in the 55m

having an exceptional year, bounc-
ing back from.a rough season last
year where he only competed in a
couple of meets due to injuries.

At the meet Sands ran a time
of 7.27 seconds in the preliminar-
ies, advancing to the finals with
the fastest time. In the finals he
clocked a personal best to achieve
the automatic berth at the cham-
pionships.

The top five times in this event
had surpassed the qualification

The automatic timing:isn’t out of

_ Teach for Oral Roberts’ Andretti

Bain but his weekly performances
are getting better.

So far Bain has turhed in the
fastest time, in the indoors, by any
Bahamian male and as the season
continues the quartermiler is still
shaving seconds of his records.

Bain posted the top time in the

_men’s 400m at the Adidas classic

47.11 seconds, another provisional

performance. Coming in second

47.20 seconds and Drew Morano
of Colorado State was third in
47.71 seconds.

At the Penn State Invitational,
Kenrick Brathwaite of Norfolk
State had to settle for 16th overall
in the men’s long jump having a
best of 6.60m. The winning jump
was recorded at 7.72m a perfor-
mance turned in by Scott Mayle
of Ohio University, Roy Richards

hurdles. The senior at the college is



Caribs win third

@ BASKETBALL
By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter

THE College of the Bahamas Lady
Caribs completed a fantastic week in the
New Providence Women's Basketball
Association by winning their third straight
game over’one of the top ranked teams.

Saturday's victim at the DW Davis Gym
was the Defence Force Lady Bluewaves.

The Lady Caribs held off the Lady
Bluewaves 68-61 to improve their impres-
sive league-leading record to 10-1. With
the loss, the Lady Bluewaves remained
in fifth place at 3-8.

_ Coach Linda Davis, no doubt, was
thrilled by the team's performance as they
posted victories over the former champi-
ons Cleaning Center Lady Angels on
Tuesday and the defending champions
Johnson's Lady Truckers on Thursday.

The Angels, on the other hand, reeled
off two straight victories since their defeat
to the Lady Caribs. In Saturday's opener,
the roughed up the Junior All-Stars 65-29
to add to their decision over the Lady
Bluewaves on Thursday.

Defence Force coach Freddie Brown
said after Saturday's loss to COB said he
was pleased with the way they bounced
back to play against the Lady Caribs.

"They played a three-guard rotation,
so all we did was tip the ball inside,"
Brown stated. "Our only problem was we

|

”

game ont

were unable to play defence on the tran-
sition. We basically have front court play-
ers and so it was a little hard for us’to
play defence on the transition."

Unlike the previous two games when
the Lady Caribs' Kiavonne Newbold and
Alexis Russell went to work on the inside,
coach Davis had to resort to the outside
with the backcourt duo of Diasti Delancy
and Christine Sinclair leading the way.

Presence

That was because Newbold and Rus-
sell had to deal with the more experienced
Lady Bluewaves' centre Natasha Miller,
whose presence in the paint posed so
much problems that they were both in
foul trouble in the first half.

What the Lady Caribs lacked inside,
they made up for the outside as Delancy
and Sinclair combined for 40 points, scor-
ing 20 apiece. Delancy also had three
assists, while Sinclair had six, along with
five rebounds.

COB, who rebounded from a 15-13 first
quarter deficit, went up 32-28 at the half
and they never relinquished the lead in the
second half as Newbold and Russell took
advantage of a weary Miller to get into the
scoring attack.

Newbold finished with 15 points and
10 rebounds and Russell added seven
points and seven rebounds.

While Miller was a tower of strength

i

inside, scoring 18 with 11 rebounds,
Lannes Bennos took the offensive spot-
light as she pumped in a game high 30
points with five rebounds, five assists and
four steals.

Point guard Varel Davis was the only
other Lady Bluewaves' player to do any-
thing significant. She helped out with sev-
en points.

Lady Angels 65, All-Stars 29: It's anoth-
er challenging year for the Junior All-
Stars as they suffered their ninth defeat to
remain at the bottom of the pile in the
NPWBA. But coach Sharel Cash said
she's not concerned because they are
improving.

The youth All-Stars didn't have an
answer for the Lady Angels, who Cash
plays for, as they got a 1-2-3 punch from
Keisha Richardson, Suzette McKenzie
and Kecia Smith.

Richardson led the Cleaning Center
with a game high 20 points, while McKen-
zie had 15 with five rebounds and Smith
ended up with 13 points, nine rebounds,
six assists and three steals.

Cash, who opted not to play for the
Lady Angels against the team she
coached, said this year's team is much
more committed to practising and playing,
which makes her job that much easier.
She thanked the parents for their support
of the team. But she said that the dedica-
tion will eventually pay off.

"That's our worse game we played,"

he trot

said Cash, who substituted the entire five
at various intervals as she tried to get a
cohesive unit on the court. "I really don't
care about the score.

"From watching them ever day, only
one team really blew us out since we came
back (from the Christmas break) and that
was COB and now the Angels in this
game. The rest of them beat us by less
than 10 points. So there is a game for us to
win." :

Notch

After playing a tight and close first half,
leading 14-10 after the first period and
28-23 at the break, the Lady Angels took
their game into another notch the second
half.

They held the-Junior All-Stars to just
four points in the third and two in the
fourth to seal the deal.

To show how dominant the game was
for the Lady Angels, no Jr. All-Star scored
in double figures.

Antonia Simons led the way with six
points and five rebounds; Asley Black
had six points, four rebounds and two
steals; Inderia Saunders had five points
and three rebounds and Keva Barry had
four points and eight rebounds.

Note: The NPWBA won't play on Tues-
day or Saturday, but they will have a
double header on Thursday, starting at 7

f

p.m.

nen rane Ts Sa 5 omen meinry S

OOFrS

was second in 7.46m and Davion
Lambert third in 7.44m.

At the same meet Reginald
Sands would close the day in the
24th spot in the men’s shot putt
event with a best throw of 13.63m.

"was Aaron Buzard of Minnesota in’ Opening ‘up her indoor season

for Essex College were Deandrea
Laing at the George Mason Invi-
tational. Laing would close the day
in the a 21st spot, in the women’s
800m, in 2:28.84 seconds. .

The Carle health Alliance invite
saw Missouri States’ Alexandria
Oembler and Leniece Rolle in
action.

Both competed in the 60m dash
with Oembler getting the better of
Rolle. She would finish 20th over-
all in a time of 7.93 seconds while
teammate Rolle would finish in
the 33rd spot in 8.93 seconds.

Oembler would move onto the
200m where she would finish 29th
overall in 26.42 seconds and Rolle
in the 44th spot in 29.22 seconds.

It was a rough meet for Oem-
bler, having recorded her slowest
time in her specialty — the hurdles.

After colliding with one hurdle,
Oembler crossed the line in a time
of 12.57 seconds. She didn’t
advance to the finals.

Findlay Indoor Classic would
bring Lanece Clarke to the track
for the McKendree College.

Clarke, who led the 60m dash
last year in the NAIA conference,
had to settle for third in the 200m
over the weekend. Her time of
25.68 seconds trailed Jessica
White’s, the event’s winner, 25.22
seconds and Pamela Bullock of
Findlay College in 25.63 seconds.

@ TRACK AND FIELD

THE Bahamian collegiate ath-
letes weren't the only track and
field stars busy over the weekend,
our elite athletes also got a piece of
the action.

Ferguson-McKenzie was hop- °
ing to open her season on a high,
but the American trio of Me’Lisa
Barber, Lauryn Williams and
Angela Daigle-Bowen was just too
much for the field of six, leaving
the others to settle for the remain-
ing spots.

Winning the women’s 60m dash
at the Reebok Boston Games was
Barber in a time of 7.09 seconds,
Williams was second in 7.13 sec-
onds and Daigle-Bowen third in
7.30 seconds. Kerron Stewart of
Jamaica would take the fourth spot
in 7.31 seconds leaving Ferguson-.
McKenzie to settle for fifth place in
7.37 seconds.


PAGE 2E, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Likhoviseva,
Nestor win mixed
louhles title

B@ TENNIS
MELBOURNE,
Australia
Associated Press

ELENA LIKHOVTSE-
VA of Russia won her sec-
ond Grand Slam mixed
doubles title Sunday,
teaming with Daniel.
Nestor in a 6-4, 6-4 victory
over Max Mirnyi and Vic-
toria Azarenka of Belarus
at the Australian Open.

Likhovtseva and Nestor
were down a break in the
second set after winning
the first before breaking .
back in the fifth game.

“We played a tough
team,” said Nestor, a
Canadian. “They seem to
be winning all your match-
es pretty easily. We were
a little bit worried about
that, but we stuck to our
game and we executed
well.”

It was the first win in
three Grand Slam finals
appearances for the
unseeded pair, who were
runners-up in the Aus-
tralian and French Opens :
last year.

Nestor won the 2002
Australian Open and 2004
U.S. Qpen men’s doubles
titles, both with Mark
Knowles of the Bahamas.
Likhovtseva won the 2002
Wimbledon mixed ‘doubles
title with India’s Mahesh
Bhupathi.

Mirnyi was playing his
second doubles final in as
many days. He and Swe-
den’s Jonas Bjorkman lost
to American twins Mike
and Bob Bryan on Satur-
day.

Veteran

Azarenka is 17 and
beginning her career while
Mirnyi is a 29-year-old
tour veteran. The wild-car
pair beat top-seeded
Americans Bob Bryan and.
Lisa Raymond and fourth-
seeded Bjorkman and Ital-
ian Francesca Schiavone
to reach the final.

The 31-year-old
Likhovtseva turned pro-
fessional in 1992 and con-
sidered retirement at the
end of last year.

“I’ve been on the tour
for a long time, and I just
decided that I should start
doing something differ-
ent,” she said. “But then I
thought, if I still enjoy it
... should maybe go
another year.”

@ TWO FOR ONE: Rod
Laver says Roger Federer
is playing well enough to
win all four majors this
season. And the Aus-
tralian great reckons it is
doubly difficult for Feder-
er to complete a Grand
Slam season than it was
for him in 1962 and 1969.

Laver, the only player to
have twice won all four
majors in a season, was at
the Australian Open this
week on a visit from the
United States, his long-
time residence. —_.

Laver has noted that
Federer is only in the mid-
dle of his career but is on
track to become the
sport’s best player ever.

“The best way to beat
him would be to hit him
over the head with a rack-
et,” Laver joked in The
Sunday Age newspaper.

Laver spoke on the eve
of Federer’s 10th Grand
Slam title, a straight-sets
victory over Fernando
Gonzalez in the final.

“Roger could win the
Grand Slam if he keeps
playing the way he is,” he
said. “And if he does that,
it will equate to the two
Grand Slams that I won
because standards are
much higher these days.”













CRUSE?

japanesevehicies.com

m CROSS COUNTRY
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

THIS year's Albury Sayle
Primary Schools Cross Coun-
try Championships didn't
draw such a large contingent
of competitors on Saturday at
Fort Charlotte.

But the 11th version of the
championships will go down
as a keenly contested duel
between hosts Albury Sayle
and Temple Christian.

’ The two schools emerged
with three divisional titles
each. Schools were awarded
points in the respective divi-
sions by the amount of ath-
letes that finished the event.

The top six finishers from
each school scored the points.
Meet director Shirley
Mireault said she would have
definitely preferred to have
more entries, but she's grate-
ful to the schools who did
show up to participate.

She said the event will still a |

success, thanks to the assis-
tance from the Bahamas
Association of Certified Offi-
cials, the Bahamas Red Cross,
Thompson Trading and
Gatorade and Bethel Brothers
for their sponsorship.

"It's still a well run meet.

and we are happy with that,"
Mireault insisted. "But we
would like to see a lot more
kids out. This is just for the
primary schools, no high

_ schools are involved."

Mireault said the champi-
Onship should serve as a
morale booster for the vari-
ous schools as they gear up
for the number of meets that
are planned this year.

Keno Demeritte, who along
with Sherry Francis, coached
Temple Christian, said he was
very proud of the way their
Suns performed.

"The team performed
excellent. They,really:worked
for it," Demeritte stressed.
"Last year we won a lot of
individual trophies, but we
didn't win the meet overall.
"So we decided to come back
and do a better job so that we
could win it."

Although there was a tie
between Albury Sayle and
Temple Christian, Mireault
awarded the Suns the title.

Temple Christian had a
number of outstanding per-
formances, led off by Chyna
Curry, who won the girls
eight-and-under divisional
title as she ran the 800 metre
route in four minutes and
28.66 seconds.

Curry, a seven-year-old
grade two student at Temple
Christian, improved on her
seventh place finish last year.

When asked if she was sur-
prised that she won it, Curry
stated "yes,"

She won over Tia Miller of
Temple Christian (4:43.33);
Amaya Moss of Albury Sayle
(4:56.90); Althea Rolle of
Albury Sayle (5:38.21); Max-
cean Cooper of Albury Sayle
(6:48.21) and Gem Wilon of
Temple Christian.

"I'm happy that I won it,"
she said. "I knew when I came
down to the finish that I had
it."

Timothy Wilson, a nine-
year-old fourth grader, repeat-
ed as champion in the boys 9-
10 division in a 1200 metre
race,

Wilson beat out his team-
mates Julius Nottage, second
in 7:29.51 and Dominick
Lightbourne, who was third
in 7:39.30. Rounding out the
top six were Kinard Rolle of
Carlton E Francis in 7:43.62;
Clement Butler of Temple
Christian was seventh in
8:49.40 and James Darville of
Mt. Carmel was sixth in
9:00.98.

Cameron Knowles of Tem-
ple Christian secured the boys
eight-and-under crown in
4:00.20. Mariano Kelly of
Temple Christian was second
in 4:04.51 and Fredrick
Bethel of Albury Sayle was

eg heh

head with Te







thi

Yy

@ ELEVEN and 12 boys

third in 4:23.57.

Donovan Lynch of Albury
Sayle got fourth in 4:25.19;
Godfrey Arthur Jr was sixth

‘

Over 100 Cars Reatly for

Immediate Shipment

Ask for Ana, Dan, or Humberto on +1-954-880-0781

Fax +1-954-880-0785 Email usa@japanesevehicles.com



- Albury Sayle goes head to
mple Christian









in 4:27.06 and Rumalo Ellis
of Temple Christian complete
the top six in 4:29.43.

The boys 11-12 competed
in a 1600 metre race with
Aaron Kelly of Albury Sayle
coming first in 11:37.25, Mar-
lin Bowe of Albury Sayle was
second in 11:43.84 with
Thomas Wilson of Temple
Christian third in 12:04.72.

Laquan Nairn of Albury
Sayle was fourth in 12:24.15;
Trae Carey fifth in 12:44.73
and Gaege Smith of Mt.
Carmel sixth in 12:53.84,

In the girls 11-12 division,

_ Thereannea Calma of Albury

Sayle won the title in 11:32.54.
Talia Thompson of Temple

t

Christian was second in
11:38.81 and Vanallion Walk-
er of Gerald Cash topped the
list of three.

The remaining positions in
scoring were Zahra Powell of
Temple Christian (12:48.49);
Danielle Gibson of Temple
Christian fifth (14:11.82) and
Anthonique Smith of Temple
Christian sixth (14:52,99),

And in the girls 9-10 divi-
sion, Taryn Butler of Temple
Christian won the 1200 metre
race in 8:16.25 with team-
mates Jeoijette Williams sec-
ond (8:31.50); Keithra Pick-
stock third (9:03.40) and Tar-
rah Miller fourth (9:20.43).
Linda Bien-Aime of Albury



Sayle was fifth in 10:19.42 and
Lauren Williams of Charles
W Saunders was sixth in
10:27.87.

Striders' coach’ Stephen
Murray, who assisted Mireault
in designing a fine course for
them to compete on at Fort
Charlotte, said based on what
he saw during the races, all of
the athletes enjoyed them-
selves,

‘It was very good. The
tumout could have been bet-
ter," he said. "The Primary
School Association need to
pull themselves together and
support each other. Hopeful-
ly they will get more support
nextyear."

\




GOLF
BUICK INVITATIONAL



HECTOR MATA/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

BUICK CHAMP: Tiger Woods poses
with his trophy after winning the
Buick Invitational in La Jolla,
California on Sunday. He finished
with a total of 15 under par in
three days of competition.

Wood’s PGA
run reaches
7 straight

BY DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press ;

SAN DIEGO — Tiger Woods
resumed his improbable pursuit of
Byron Nelson with a result that was
all too predictable.

Woods caught up to the pack with
an eagle, buried the hopes of his final
challenger with a birdie and closed
with a 6-under 66 on Sunday to win
the Buick Invitational for his seventh
consecutive PGA Tour victory, the
second-longest streak in history.

Nelson set the record in 1945 with
ll in a row, a record long thought to be
out of reach.

The way Woods is playing — no
worse than second in stroke play any-
where in the world since July — that
might no longer be the case.

Woods won six in a row in 2000, a
streak that Phil Mickelson stopped at
Torrey Pines. But against a cast of
challengers short on experience and
victories, the world’s No. 1 player met
little resistance in winning the Buick
Invitational for the third straight year.

Woods doesn’t consider this a true
winning streak because he lost once
in Europe and twice in Asia since Sep-
tember. But it still counts in the PGA
Tour record books, and the only ques-
tion is when it will resume.

Woods was headed for the Dubai
Desert Classic on Sunday night, and

he was not sure if would play his next .

PGA Tour event at the Nissan Open:
on Feb. 15 in Los Angeles or the
Accenture Match Play Championship
in Arizona a week later.

“To somehow sneak out with the
win is a cool feeling,” Woods said.

He got some help from Andrew
Buckle and Jeff Quinney, both of
whom had at least a share of the lead
on the back nine until stumbling in a
span of about 15 minutes on a cool,
breezy afternoon at Torrey Pines.

Charles Howell III provide the
final challenge with three birdies ina
four-hole stretch, but Woods
answered with an approach to 21 feet
on the 17th hole for birdie that
allowed him to play it safe on the
par-5 closing hole.

Woods finished at 15-under 273 for
his 55th career victory, the fifth time
he has started a new season with a
trophy.

Howell had a 50-foot eagle putt on
the 18th that could have forced a play-
off, but he played it too high over the
ridge and wound up three-putting for
par to close with 68.

“I gave him a run,” Howell said.
“Anytime you try to win a tourna-
ment against that guy, it’s tough. I
played well down the stretch. He just
never flinched.”

The same couldn’t be said for
Buckle and Quinney, who each took
double bogey along the back nine on
the South Course to quickly take
themselves out of contention. Brandt
Snedeker, tied for the 54-hole lead
with Buckle, closed with a 71 and fin-
ished third.

Woods’ streak resumed after a
nearly four-month break from the
PGA Tour, when he won by eight
shots in the American Express Cham-
pionship outside London on Oct. 1. He
skipped the season-ending Tour
Championship and the season-open-
ing Mercedes-Benz Championship,
and learned that his wife was preg-

nant for the first time.
One thing that hasn’t changed is his
golf.

The PGA Tour winning streak

°TURN TO PGA



BY JOHN PYE
Associated Press
MELBOURNE, Australia —
Roger Federer held back the tears
this time. He didn’t hold back
much else at the Australian Open.
Federer underlined his 10th
Grand Slam singles title by win-

‘ning 21 straight sets, saving a set

point in Sunday’s final before fin-
ishing off Fernando Gonzalez 7-6
(2), 6-4, 6-4.

The last man to go through a

major without dropping a set was

Bjorn Borg at the 1980 French
Open. The only other man to win
the Australian Open without drop-
ping a set was Ken Rosewall in
1971, although he had to play only
five matches.

“Equaling records, doing some-
thing that hasn’t been done for a
long time, it’s really nice, no
doubt,” Federer said. “All I care
about in the end is to hopefully
hold that trophy. Of course, now
that it’s over, it’s great to think,
"Wow, you know, not having
dropped a set.’ It’s quite amazing.”



BY STEVE HERMAN
Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS — A convoy of moving
vans brought more than the Colts to Indianapo-

lis.

‘The westward migration that cold, snowy
night almost a quarter-century ago also awak-
ened Naptown to a new era of professional
football and transformed the city into a major

league sports town.
India-no-place was no more.

The Indianapolis Colts’ Super Bowl matchup
Sunday with the Chicago Bears will be the high-
light in the city’s transformation from a sleepy
Midwest city to a world-class sports venue.

“It’s like that MasterCard commercial: It’s
priceless,” Colts owner Jim Irsay said after the



3E|

INTERNATIONAL EDITION



TENNIS | AUSTRALIAN OPEN

Federer gets 10th Grand Slam victory

Rosewall was in the crowd Sun-
day night, and Federer gave him a
nod in a composed victory speech.
It was the mere presence of
another Australian great, Rod
Laver, that reduced Federer to
tears the previous year at the tro-
phy presentation. ,

“I can’t force them out every
year!” Federer said of his sobbing
celebration in 2006, when he
accepted the trophy from Laver. “I
had a wonderful tournament. A
great end. Just because there were

“no tears doesn’t mean it doesn’t

mean anything to me.”

Laver, the last man to win the
Grand Slam — all four majors in
one season — made the trip from
California to see Federer dismantle
Andy Roddick 6-4, 6-0, 6-2 in the
semifinals.

He met with Federer in the
locker room after the semifinal and
said he had little doubt the 25-year-
old Swiss star could beat Pete Sam-
pras’ record 14 Grand Slam singles
titles, and just about every other
tennis record as well.

“The best way to beat him
would be to hit him over the head
with a racket,” Laver joked in a
newspaper column.

Federer improved his streak to a
career-best 36 wins, became the
first man in the Open era to twice
win three straight majors and has
collected six of the last seven
Grand Slam titles.

He tied Jack Crawford’s 73-year-
old record by reaching his seventh
consecutive final in majors.

“If somebody would have told

me I’d win 10 Grand Slams from
mid ’03 till today, I never would
have thought there was any
chance,” he said.

Even before the tournament he
had enough points to ensure he
will break Jimmy Connors’ record
of 160 consecutive weeks atop the
men’s rankings by the end of next
month.

Although he knows he’s only
one-quarter of the way there in
2007, a season Grand Slam is his

. ° TURN TO TENNIS

PRO BASKETBALL | PHOENIX 115, CLEVELAND 100

- Suns still rising



BY TOM WITHERS
Associated Press

teams.

of nine overall.

MARK DUNCAN/AP
INSIDE POSITION: Phoenix Suns’ Steve Nash, right, gets inside Cleveland Cavaliers’
Drew Gooden for a shot in the fourth quarter on Sunday in Cleveland. Nash
scored 23 points and handed out 15 assists to lead Phoenix to a 115-110 victory.

PRO FOOTBALL | AFC CHAMPIONS

The Colts’ move transformed Indianapolis

you get caught up in that avalanche of emo-

joy you’re sharing with the community because |
ay re)

tions.”

Colts arrived in 1984.

38-34 AFC championship game win against the

New England Patriots. “You can’t explain the

* TURN TO COLTS

Indianapolis officials had decided sports was
the city’s ticket to prominence long before the

The Indianapolis 500 — the “greatest specta-
cle in racing” — already was drawing thousands
of visitors to the city each May, and Hoosier
Hysteria — the nickname for the state’s high
school basketball frenzy — was legendary.

“Sports was an element in our game plan to ©
change the image of the city back in the late
1970s, early 1980s,” said David Frick, a former
deputy mayor. “It was a community effort
involving the major businesses in town, com-
bined with the not-for-profit sector and the

Wa) 0 2) Pa





CORINNE DUBREUIL/ABACA PRESS/MCT
SLAMMIN’: Roger Federer holds
up the championship trophy
after defeating Chile’s
Fernando Gonzales in the
Men’s Final of the Australian
Open on Sunday.

Nash has double-double;
Phoenix extends streak

CLEVELAND — Steve Nash scored 23 points and
kept Phoenix’s high-energy offense purring with 15
‘assists as the Suns-extended their winning streak to 17
games — the NBA’s longest in seven years — by beat-
ing the Cleveland Cavaliers 115-100 on Sunday.
Shawn Marion added 23 points, Amare Stoudemire
22 and Leandro Barbosa had.19 for the Suns, who
improved to 34-4 since opening the season 1-5. Phoe-
nix, which had a 15-game win streak earlier this sea-
son, also matched a franchise record with their ninth
straight road win and are 20-1 vs. Eastern Conference

The Suns haven’t lost since Dec. 28, and with the

way their running and sharing the ball right now, it’s
_ going to take a spectacular effort to beat them.

LeBron James scored 30 points and Drew Gooden
19 to lead the Cavaliers, who were within four points
going into the fourth. However, they couldn’t match
the Suns’ blazing up-and-down pace and managed just
13 points in the final 12 minutes.

The Suns’ winning streak is the league’s longest
since Kobe Bryant, Shaquille O’Neal and the Los
Angeles Lakers reeled off 19 in a row during the
1999-200 season. It’s also tied for the fifth-longest
streak in NBA history.

Leading 91-87 after three, and with Nash on the
bench getting some rest, the Suns got consecutive
3-pointers from James Jones and Barbosa in an 8-0 run
to take a 99-87 lead with 8:09 remaining.

The Suns’ quick'burst all but finished the Cavs,
who have dropped three straight at home and seven ~

Cleveland found out what so many other teams are
learning this season: Run with the Suns, and you’re
bound to get burned. :

James, who missed the previous game with a sore
right big toe, got a steal and dunk to get the Cavs
within 99-89 with 7:20 left. But Nash returned and
immediately made a twisting reverse layup, and
moments later, fed Marion for a 3-pointer — Phoe-
nix’s 13th — to make it 107-94 with 3:44 remaining.

Cavs center Zyrdunas Ilgauskas had four points.

e MORE NBA, 7-8B.





AJ MAST/AP

PLAYED BIG ROLE: David Frick, who was
instrumental in bringing the Colts to

Indianapolis in 1984, poses in front of the
RCA Dome in Indianapolis.
4E\ smonpay, JANUARY 29, 2007

INTERNATIONAL EDITION



WHAT 10
THIS WEEK





WHAT DID YOU
THINK OF EARL
BARRON’S RECENT
TRAVEL CLOTHES?

Before Saturday’s
game against the
Bulls, an unidentified
member of the Heat
hung Earl Barron’s
light blue linen shirt
and pants from the ceiling of the visiting
locker room of the United, Center to point out
a few things. First, Barron wore the same out-
fit the night before in New York. Second, it
was wrinkled, dirty and looked flat-out
sloppy. And third, it was his second night in
freezing temperatures - and he wore linen
both nights. .

Responses? ;

Jason Williams: “Just look at it. And he had
the nerve to put cuff links on that thing.”

Barron: “I don’t care. | wore it yesterday.
I’m wearing it today. I’m going to wear it
tomorrow, too.”



ANDREI KIRILENKO, JAZZ

e Fantasy: It used to be that Kirilenko was

a fantasy stud who put.up strong numbers in
every category, except maybe three-pointers.
_Kirilenko’s numbers have suffered this season,
as has his fantasy status. What made Kirilenko
so valuable was his ability to complement.a
decent scoring game with a good number of
blocks, steals and rebounds. This season, all
three of those areas are down.

e Reality: As low as his fantasy value is, his
standing with the Utah Jazz might be even

worse. The team’s owner, Larry Miller, already

has declared the sixth-year forward is on “thin
ice,” and needs to play up to his contract,
which pays him $12.3 million this season. With
Deron Williams running the show in Utah and
Carlos Boozer having a breakthrough season,
it leaves few opportunities for Kirilenko to
make an impact. ;

e@ Winner: Fantasy.



ELEVATED | GROUNDED



AL ADAM
HARRINGTON MORRISON
The new Morrison
uniform has
seems to proven
be work- to be
ing for Harrington. one of the
After being traded streakiest players
from the Pacers to in the game, which
the Warriors last tends to happen

with rookies. In his
more efficient per-
formances, the
Bobcats manage to
win. In his poor
shooting games,
like his combined
3-of-15 effort in
consecutive games:

week, Harrington
made just 4 of 21
shots in a loss to
the Cavaliers. But
he followed with
30- and 29-point
games, and shot a
combined 23 of 33
(69.7 percent) to

win the love of against the Raptors —
Golden State and Pistons, the
fans. Bobcats lose.



CAVALIERS AT HEAT, 8 P.M. THURSDAY, TNT

There’s a possibility of something special happening when

these teams get together. Last season in Miami, Dwyane

Wade and Shaquille O’Neal were part of arguably the play

of the year when Wade dribbled around Sasha Pavlovic to
avoid going out of bounds, and then threw a long alley-oop

pass to O’Neal, who finished and was fouled. And in the last
meeting in Cleveland, Wade and LeBron James each had

better than 40 points ina Cleveland victory.
CAVS FORWARD

LeBRON JAMES

ou can sit and complain
Y about the All-Star starter

selections until you earn a
guest spot on ESPN, but it won’t
take away the privilege of the
fans to choose who they want to
see.

So rather than waste time
complaining, let’s hope the
coaches at least choose the right
group of
reserves:

EASTERN
CONFERENCE

e Guards:
Kudos to the
fans for getting
Gilbert Arenas
into the starting
lineup by a nose
ahead of Vince
Carter. Arenas deserves to be
playing alongside Dwyane
Wade at the start of that game.
Playing behind them should be
the more-deserving Jason Kidd
of the New Jersey Nets, along
with Milwaukee’s Michael
Redd, Detroit’s Richard Hamil-
ton and Atlanta’s Joe Johnson.

Kidd is the primary reason the
Nets have overcome inconsistent
play from Carter and an injury-
plagued season to Richard Jef-
ferson and remain in the playoff
race. Redd, meanwhile, has been
one of the many league stars to
sustain significant injuries, but he
did average 27.7 points during 33
games, which is good enough to
earn the nod. Hamilton has been
the most consistent Piston, and
Johnson is much more than just a
good player on a bad team. He
plays like an All-Star and
shouldn’t be punished for his
team’s woes.

e Forwards: Not much to
choose from, but ‘the two choices
are simple. Indiana’s Jermaine
O’Neal and Washington’s Caron
Butler should join starters
LeBron James and Chris Bosh.
O’Neal has carried an inconsis-
tent Pacers team with his
defense, and Butler has flour-
ished as one of the better all-
around forwards in the league.

e.Center: Orlando’s Dwight
Howard should be the starter
ahead of Shaquille O’Neal
because he actually has played.
But the fans want to see Shaq, so
they’ll have to settle for mini-
Shaq coming off the bench.

e Snubs: Carter should find
himself.going from starter to



‘goner; Ben Gordon, Eddy

Curry and Emeka Okafor can
make a strong case.

WESTERN CONFERENCE

e Guards: Not only does
Steve Nash deserve to be the
starter ahead of either Tracy
McGrady or Kobe Bryant, but
with so much talent on the floor,

he’s probably the best fit to make

those guys look good. There’s no
doubt he’ll join them, and Den-
ver’s Allen Iverson will make his
debut with the West squad. Ray
Allen has played all season like
an elite guard — including a 54-
point game and a 44-point effort
in a span of ll days — despite
playing for a struggling Sonics
team.







H|

NBAEXTRA | BY ISRAEL GUTIERREZ

Say







MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD



LAKERS AT WIZARDS, 7 P.M. SATURDAY

The last time these teams met, Gilbert Arenas made his best
argument for MVP with a career-high 60 points in the Wizards’
overtime victory in Los Angeles. After the game, Kobe Bryant
questioned Arenas’ shot selection, which was laughable given
Bryant’s tendency to take difficult shots every game. The last
thing Bryant needs is to give Arenas additional motivation.



: Arenas is intent on paying back any coach who contributed to

_ him being cut from the U.S. national team this summer.

JULIE JACOBSON/AP

MAKING HIS POINT: Point guard Jason Kidd has steadied the
Nets and deserves a spot on the East’s All-Star team.

e Forwards: The toughest
position to fill for the past few
years again features some tough
decisions. Denver’s Carmelo
Anthony shouildn’t be penalized,
despite missing 15 games after -
being suspended for fighting.
Had the league’s leading scorer
missed those games due to
injury, he still would be selected.
And in Utah, Carlos Boozer is
having a breakthrough season
and is the primary reason the
Jazz has thrust itself back among
the playoff contenders in the
West. The Suns, meanwhile, are
the best team in the league and
deserve to have a representative
other than Nash. That would be
Shawn Marion, the underappre-
ciated forward who only aver-
ages 19 points, 10 rebounds, two
steals and shoots 52 percent from
the field.

e Center: The best way to

WHO HAS THE EDGE?

IS EDDIE JONES OR STEVE FRANCIS MORE LIKELY TO LAND WITH A CONTENDER?

Jones struggled with an Achilles’ injury and wasn’t very productive for most of the first part of

make the forward situation work
is to name Dallas’ Dirk Nowitzki
as a reserve at the center spot,.
which really isn’t a stretch for the
7-footer. Arguably the league
MVP through the first half, Now-
itzki might as well be amatchup
nightmare in this game as well.

e Snubs: Iverson’s move out
west hurt Golden State’s Baron
Davis the most, because he
clearly is an All-Star after elevat-
ing what should be a horrible
Warriors team to respectable sta-
tus. Kevin Martin’s remarkably
efficient season also will fail to be
rewarded in the stacked West,
and Spurs guards Tony Parker
and Manu Ginobili will find it
difficult to make the cut. Phoe-
nix’s Amare Stoudemire also
could find that his 19 points and
nine rebounds aren’t enough to ~
earn him a nod, despite the lack
of centers out West.



|
;
{
i
i
i
i
i
j
i
i
|
i
i







EASTERN
CONFERENCE







Reports of the Pistons fall-
ing apart because of a bad
relationship between Rash-
eed Wallace and Flip Saun-
ders have been largely over-
stated. Wallace said an ESPN
report claiming he “hated”
Saunders was untrue. “At
points in the season, coaches
and players are going to have
their differences, but it’s not
to the point where | hate that
man, or | think he’s.a bad per-
son,” Wallace said... . The
Knicks signed big man
Jerome James to the mid-
level exception last season,
and that turned out to bea
bad move. So the Knicks fol-
lowed that with another
apparently poor decision by
giving Jared Jeffries similar
money. Against the Heat on
Menday, Jeffries started and
played just four minutes
before Isiah Thomas took this

_supposed defensive stopper
out of the game for good dur-
ing a 27-0 Heat run.... Losing
Allen Iverson as a teammate
has forced Andre Iguodala to
be the Sixers’ best player on
both ends of the court. It’s a
challenge he’s adjusting to. “It -
takes a lot of energy, but |
think it’s only going to make
me a better player,” he said.
“Look at the best players who
ever played the game, they
do it on both ends of the
court. That’s why Kobe [Bry-
ant] is the best player,
because he’s the best offen-
sive player and a top-five
defensive player as well.”

WESTERN
CONFERENCE

The recent run of Pau
Gasol trade rumors has
stemmed from his “private”
meeting with owner Michael
Heisley, during which he
requested the Grizzlies look
into trading him to a con-
tender. It was far from a trade
demand, and Heisley report-
edly told Gasol he would look
into it, but made no promises.
Gasol, meanwhile, is upset
that his character has been
questioned for supposedly
giving up ona losing team.
“I'm still here and I’m still com-
peting,” he said. “For people
to second-guess my profes-
sionalism and my willingness
to work is a real shame. I’ve
been here the longest. I’m
loyal to my team. I’m a loyal
person.”... The Clippers have
begun to win again, but if it’s
going to continue, Shaun Liv-
ingston will have to shoot
more - and better - from the
outside. With Sam Cassell on
the court, teams can’t afford
to sag on Elton Brand. But
Cassell is 37, so Livingston will
have to help provide more
balance. ... Sacramento no
longer is in love with point
guard Mike Bibby, who is
shooting 38 percent from the
field and was booed this week
after missing a free throw
against the Nets.



#6

6-6/200

guard

6-3/220

guard

the season. But lately, Jones has shown he has something left, hitting a pair of clutch shots in a
Memphis win against the Jazz, and putting up 19 and 17 points in back-to-back games. That, along
with his always-solid defense, makes Jones a valuable asset to a winning team that needs perime-
ter help. The Grizzlies have displayed a willingness to buy Jones out of the final year of his con-
tract, which pays him $15.6 million this season. He could draw interest from the Lakers, Heat, Cav-
aliers and Spurs.

Francis has had his own health issues, except his are ongoing. He is away from the Knicks with
a sore knee. Before he left, Francis shot 40 percent for New York and averaged 10 points a game,
though he was better than 2-to-1 with his assist-to-turnover ratio. The Knicks also have reportedly
considered buying out Francis’ contract, but he has two years remaining after this season at bet-
ter than $16 million each season. If New York does find a way to rid itself of Francis, it’s doubtful
one of the league’s better teams will be willing to sign a disruptive offensive force.

The edge: Jones is more likely to be cut loose and attract a contender’s interest.





FRANCIS.

GS «MPG «6FG% =—3p% = FI% «= s«(OFF=S «(EF = RPGS APG «= SPG_)S ss BPG PF PPG

NEW YORK 21 Vo 263 4063799 BH 10 02 19 31 100





Team G GS MPG) = FG% = 3P% = FI% »~=—s«OFF' COEF

Team G
MEMPHIS 28 ib 19.0 561 286 J) 05 ld 19 iA] 08 0] 08 16 53 ,







Go online to view our Extras, including Heat beat writer Israel Gutierrez’s weblog and our interactive free-throw game. Also watch video ofthe
festivities before the defending NBA champions’ opening game, view photo galleries from last season’s run to the title and download wallpaper.

- MIAMIHERALD.COM


THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com

EASTERN CONFERENCE

SOUTHEAST WL Pet. GB 10 Str. Home Away Conf

Washington 26 17 .605 - 7-3 W-2 17-4 9-13 18-9
Orlando 23 21) «523 3% «403-7 ~L-2 14-9 9-12 13-12
Miami 19 25 .432 7% 46 L-3 10-10 9-15 8-14
Atlanta 15 27 357 10% «5-5 L-l 7-12 8-15 10-18
Charlotte 15 28 .349 11 5-5 L-l 8-14 7-14 11-17

ATLANTIC WL Pet, GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf

Toronto 22 23 489 - 7-3) Ll 14-7 8-16 15-9
New Jersey 21 23) ATT) =e 6-4 W-1 13-10 8-13 16-9
New York 19 27 .413 3% 4-6 L-l 11-13 8-14 12-17
Philadelphia 14 31 311 8 5-5 W-1 7-11 7-20 10-17
Boston 12 31.279 «9 «(0-10 L-11 4-17 8-14 8-20

Home Away — _Conf

CEUTA ee We Pe EE

Detroit 25°17 «595-5 WelS12-9—«13-B «17-9
Chicago 26 19 578 =} 6-4 W-3 20-6 6-13 20-8
Cleveland 25 19 .568 1 3-7 L-1 15-6 10-13 16-12
Indiana 23 21 623 3 5-5 L-l 13-7 10-14 18-13
Milwaukee 18 26 .409 8 2-8 W-1 10-8 8-18 8-16

WESTERN CONFERENCE

SOUTHWEST = Ww L Pet. GB } Lio Str. Home_ _Away — _Conf

Dallas 36 9 800 - 91 W-1l 20-3 16-6 24-6
San Antonio 32-14 .696 4% 7-3 W-2 16-8 16-6 21-9
Houston 27 16 «628 «68 6-4 W-2 14-5 13-11 15-14
New Orleans 18 25 .419 17 6-4 W-2 12-10 6-15 9-17
Memphis 11 34 «4.244 25 «3-7 L-2 8-14 3-20 5-21
NORTHWEST






Utah
Denver 22 19 .537 5 10-8 9-12
Minnesota 21 22 +488) «7 9-14 12-14
Portland 19 26 .422 10 8-14 12-14
Seattle 17 26 = «©.395 «11 4-16 7-16
- PACIFIC W tL. Pct. GB L10 Str. Home _Away Conf
Phoenix 36 8 .818 - 10-0 W-17 “19- 3. 17-5 16-7
L.A. Lakers 27 17 «614 «9 4-6 =—L-2) 19-6 = 8-11-17-10
L.A. Clippers 21 22 .48814% 6-4 L-1 16-8 5-14 13-17
Golden State 21 23) 477 «15 4-6 W-2) 17-8 4-15 13-15
Sacramento 17 25 = .405° 18 3-7 L-2 12-11 5-14 8-17

RESULTS AND SCHEDULES

Sunday’s results Tonight’s games Saturday’s results

Pho. 115, Cle. 100 Orl. at Atl, 7 Chi. 100, Miami 97
Mil. 107, NY 105 Sac. at Mem., 8 Ind. 102, Tor. 84
S.A. 96, LAL'94, OT Pho. at Minn., 8 Phi. 104, Atl. 89
Was. 105, Bos. 91 Port-N.O. @0.C., 8 N.O. 94, Utah 83

Por. 135, Mem. 132 (20T)

Det. 95, Ind. 87
Dal. 106, Sac. 104

LA.C. at Sea., late

Phil. at Hou., 8:30
Char. at Den., 9°

INTERNATIONAL EDITION

BASKETBALL

NBA GAMES

MONDAY, JANUARY. 29, 2007 | 2

Finley’s 3 lifts the Spurs

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — Michael Finley’s
3-pointer with 1.3 seconds left in overtime
gave the cold-shooting San Antonio Spurs an
improbable 96-94 victory over the Los Ange-
les Lakers.

Finley took a pass from Tim Duncan well
behind the arc and hit nothing but net on his
long jumper over Lamar Odom, helping the
Spurs avoid their first regular-season sweep
at hands of the Lakers in nine years.

Vladimir Radmanovic’s 3-pointer as time
expired didn’t come close. Kobe Bryant, who
had’31 points, six rebounds and seven assists,
was unable to get open, leaving it up to Rad-
manovic to try the final shot.

Tony Parker scored seven of his 19 points
for the Spurs in overtime. Duncan led San
Antonio with 21 points, 14 rebounds and a
season-high nine assists, while Manu Ginob-
ili had 21 points and seven rebounds.

Odom had 18 points, 10 rebounds and six
assists for the Lakers, who have lost four of
five.

e Bucks 107, Knicks 105: In Milwaukee,
Mo Williams had 30 points, including a run-
ning, 20-foot jumper with 3.1 seconds left,
and 10 assists to lift Milwaukee past New
York and snap a six-game losing streak.

Williams, who missed the last nine games
after spraining his left shoulder in a collision
on Jan. 8 at Denver, brought some desper-
ately needed energy and bailed out the strug-
gling Bucks after they nearly blew a 13-point
lead with just under 9 minutes to play.

Milwaukee, which had lost 11 of its last 12
and nearly completed its first winless month



Ge oe)

WINSLOW TOWNSON/AP
DRIVING WIZARD: The Wizards’ Caron
Butler, right, drives to the basket past
the Celtics’ Ryan Gomes in the first
quarter on Sunday in Boston.
Washington won 105-91.

at home in more than 15 years, outhustled the
Knicks for most of the game before New
York made a furious rally.

Jamal Crawford, who scored 17 points in
the fourth and finished with 26, started by
scoring the Knicks’ first 10 points of the final

quarter. He picked up his fifth foul with 5:05
left and the Knicks down 91-85.

e Wizards 105, Celtics 91: In Boston,
Antawn Jamison scored 34 points and Caron
Butler added 21 points and 11 rebounds to
lead Washington past slumping Boston.

Gilbert Arenas finished with 23 points for
the Wizards, who have won six of seven to
move into first place in the Eastern Confer-
ence. Brendan Haywood added 11 points and
nine rebounds.

Delonte West had 22 points and 1] assists
and Ryan Gomes scored 20 for the Celtics.

e Pistons 95, Pacers 87: In Auburn
Hills, Mich., Chris Webber had 17 points and
13 rebounds, and Detroit Pistons coach Flip
Saunders picked up his 500th victory.

Rasheed Wallace added 20 points for
Detroit, including 18 in the second half, while
Richard Hamilton scored 21 and Antonio
McDyess had 13 points and 11 rebounds.

Jermaine O’Neal led.all scorers with 26
points, adding 12 rebounds and five blocks.

LATE SATURDAY

e Timberwolves 101, Clippers 87: In
Los Angeles, Kevin Garnett had 32 points and
nine rebounds, and Minnesota snapped a six-
game losing streak.

e Warriors 131, Bobcats 105: In Oak-
land, Calif, Al Harrington scored 21 of his 28
points in the first half, leading Golden State
over Charlotte.

e Nets 112, Nuggets 102: In Denver,
Vince Carter scored 40 points and Bostjan
Nachbar added a career-best 22 in New Jer-
sey’s victory over tired Denver.

NJ. at Utah, 9 N.J. 112, Den. 102
G.S. 131, Cha. 105
Min. 101, L.A.C. 87
WOMEN’S TOP 25

No. 2 UNC beats No. 3 Maryland

Associated Press
Associated Press

COLLEGE PARK, Md. —
Playing on the road against
the defending national cham-
pions before an energized
sellout crowd, No. 2 North
_’ Carolina didn’t flinch.
“Ivory Latta scored a sea-
son-high 32 points, and the
unbeaten Tar Heels extracted
a measure of revenge against
No. 3 Maryland with an 84-71
victory Sunday night.

The crowd of 17,950 was
the largest to watch a wom-
en’s basketball game in Atlan-
tic Coast Conference history,
surpassing the 17,243 that
viewed the Terrapins’ loss to
Duke in February 2005. Mary-
land has hosted the top five
crowds in ACC history.

On this night, however, the
Terps (21-2, 5-2) waited too
long to match the intensity of
their enthusiastic fans. Mary-
land fell behind with five min-
utes elapsed and never caught
up, crumbling under a series
of turnovers and missed shots.

Latta made four 3-pointers
and the Tar Heels (23-0, 7-0)
made eight of their first nine
shots in the second half to
open up a 55-35 lead with 15
minutes remaining. Although
the Terrapins eventually got
within one point, they
couldn’t complete the come-
back.

e@ No. 4 Tennessee 80, Ala-
bama 51: In Tuscaloosa, Ala.,
Shannon Bobbitt scored 20
points, including six 3-point-
ers, to lead the fourth-ranked
Tennessee Lady Vols to an
80-51 victory over Alabama on
Sunday.

Three of the 5-foot-2 junior
point guard’s 3-pointers came
in a four-minute span in the
second half that saw Tennes-
see (19-2, 6-0 Southeastern
Conference) go on a run to
turn a four-point advantage
into a 53-36 lead with 13 min-
utes to go.

Alabama (10-12, 0-7) never
got closer than 15 points the
rest of the way.

e No. 8 LSU 65, Auburn
45: In Baton Rouge, La., Syl-
via Fowles scored 19 points
and grabbed 20 rebounds to
help LSU beat Auburn.

Quianna Chaney added 17
points for LSU (20-2, 6-1
Southeastern Conference),
which extended the nation’s
longest homecourt winning
streak to 42 games.

Whitney Boddie was the
only player in double figures
for Auburn (15-7, 2-4) with 14
points.

e No. 11 George Wash-
ington 71, La Salle 47: In
Philadelphia, Sarah-Jo Law-
‘ rence scored 20 points and
Jessica Adair added 18 points
and 12 rebounds to lead
George Washington to its lth
straight win.

Kimberly Beck had 12
points for the Colonials (18-2,
7-0 Atlantic 10), who also won
ll straight games during the
2003-04 season.

The Explorers (15-7, 3-4)
missed 22 of their first 23
shots and hit just 3-of-25 field
goals in the first half, helping
George Washington jump out
to a 31-9 lead and hold a 34-20
advantage at the break.

e No. 14 Georgia 77,
Florida 54: In Gainesville,
Fla., Tasha Humphrey scored
19 points and Ashley Houts
added 16 to help Georgia hand
Florida its ninth straight loss.

The Lady Bulldogs (18-4,
5-2 Southeastern Conference)
ended the first half with a 9-1
run to lead 36-27 at the break.
The Lady Gators (6-16, 0-7)
trimmed the lead to 53-49 on
Marsha Dotson’s layup with
9:28 remaining, but Georgia
closed the game with a 24-5
spurt.

e No. 15 Vanderbilt 61,
Arkansas 34: In Fayetteville,
Ark., Carla Thomas scored 18
points to lead Vanderbilt over
Arkansas.

The Lady Commodores
(18-4, 4-3 Southeastern Con-
ference) allowed just 10 field
goals in the game, a record
low for the Lady Razorbacks
in Southeastern Conference
play. The previous low was 12,
in a 2003 game against
Auburn. .

e No. 16 Bowling Green
72, Eastern Michigan 55: In
Ypsilanti, Mich., Kate Achter
scored 22 points to lead Bowl-
ing Green over Eastern Michi-
gan for the Falcons’ llth
straight win.

The Falcons (18-2, 8-0 Mid-
American Conference) built a
20-point lead in the second
half behind Achter and Ali
Mann, who scored 19 points.

e No. 19-Middle Tennes-
see 84, Louisiana-Lafay-
ette 57: In Murfreesboro,



Tenn., Chrissy Given scored
23 points as Middle Tennes-
see pulled away in the second
half for a victory over Louisi-
ana-Lafayette.

The Blue Raiders (19-3,
11-0) won their 16th straight
game, setting a new school
record. The streak is also the
third-longest in the nation,
pending Maryland’s game
against North Carolina later
Sunday.

e Mississippi State 73,
No. 22 Mississippi 71: In
Oxford, Miss., Marneshia
Richard’s shot at the buzzer
lifted Mississippi State over
Mississippi.

Richard’s shot, which was
upheld after a video review,
came after Ashley Awkward
had tied the game at 7l ona
3-pointer with 6.3 seconds
remaining.

It was the first home loss
for Mississippi (16-6 overall,
5-2 Southeastern Conference)
in 12 games this season.

Mississippi State’s Alexis
Rack had three of the Bull-

dogs’ nine 3-pointers to finish .

with 18 points and seven
rebounds. Richard scored 15
points for Mississippi State
(13-8, 4-3). >

e Rutgers 63, No. 23
Michigan State 57: In Pisca-
taway, N.J., Essence Carson
scored seven of her 21 points
in the final 2:38 to lift Rutgers
over Michigan State.

The Scarlet Knights (12-6)
won for the seventh time in
eight games while handing the
Spartans (15-6) their second
straight loss to an unranked
opponent.

Victoria Lucas-Perry led
Michigan State with 13 points.

LATE SATURDAY

e No. 25 Nebraska 78,
Kansas 58: In Lincoln, Neb.,
Kelsey Griffin scored 24
points to help Nebraska beat
Kansas.

GREG CARROCCIO/AP

‘IT’S MINE’: George Washington’s Robin Murphy grabs a
rebound in the first half against La Salle in Philadelphia
on Sunday. George Washington beat La Salle 71-47.



NHAT MEYER/SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS/MCT

UNDERDOG IS HERE: Stanfora’s ae Goods, center, drives against UCLA defenders
Luc Richard Mbah a Moute, left, and Josh Shipp in the first half. Host Stanford
defeated No. 3 UCLA 75-68 on sun ey:

Stanford upsets of No. 3 UCLA

Associated Press

STANFORD, Calif. — Law-
rence Hill scored seven
straight points including the
tying and go-ahead baskets to
finish with 22, and Stanford
rallied in the second half to
stun No. 3 UCLA 75-68 Sun-
day night and hand the Bruins
only their second loss of the
season.

Arron Afflalo had 22
points, six rebounds and five
assists for the Bruins (18-2, 7-2
Pac-10), who were thoroughly

outplayed in the second half

and had their four-game win-
ning streak snapped. Their
only other loss came Jan. 6 at
Oregon, 68-66.

Anthony Goods scored 17
of his 20 points in the second
half as Stanford won.its third
straight and sixth in seven to
complete a sweep of the
ranked Los Angeles schools
after a 65-50 victory over No.
25 USC on Thursday night.

Maybe now it’s the Cardi-
nal’s turn to earn a ranking.
Stanford (14-5, 6-3) was
picked to finish seventh in the
surprisingly even Pac-l0. °

e No. 2 Wisconsin 57,
lowa 46: In Iowa City, Iowa
— Alando Tucker scored 27
points, Brian Butch added 13
points and 14 rebounds and
No. 2 Wisconsin beat Iowa
57-46 on Sunday, eclipsing the
best start in school history.

Tucker went ll-of-14 from
the floor for the Badgers (21-1,
7-0 Big Ten), who topped the
old mark of 20-1 set in 1915-16.

Wisconsin also extended
the nation’s longest winning
streak to 17 games.

Adam Haluska scored 16
points to lead Iowa (11-10, 3-4
Big Ten).

e No. 10 Duke 75, Bos-
ton College 61: In Durham,
N.C., DeMarcus Nelson
scored 17 points to lead No. 10

Duke past Boston College
75-61 on Sunday.

Josh McRoberts had 16
points, 12 rebounds and five
blocks for the Blue Devils
(18-3, 5-2 Atlantic Coast Con-
ference), who have won five
straight games since an 0-2
league start. Duke has won
the past six meetings, includ-
ing all three since the Eagles
joined the ACC.

Jared Dudley scored 17
points to lead the Eagles (14-6,
6-2), who fell out of first place
in the league.

No. 15 Marquette 70,
South Florida 68: In Tampa,
Fla., Dominic James scored 16
points and Jerel McNeal stole
a pass and drove nearly the
length of the floor to make a
layup at the buzzer to give
Marquette a victory over
McNeal finished with 13
points and Marquette (19-4,
6-2), won its sixth straight.

Mattis led South Florida
(11-11, 2-6) with 20 points and
nine rebounds.

e Virginia 64, No. 19
Clemson 63: In Clemson,
S.C., Jason Cain’s tip-in with
15.5 seconds left capped a 16-
point comeback over the final
nine minutes to lift Virginia
over Clemson.

The Cavaliers (13-6, 5-2
Atlantic Coast Conference)
trailed 61-45 after Cliff Ham-
monds’ 3-pointer with 8:47 to
go. But Clemson was held to
two foul shots the rest of the
way.

It was the second straight
improbable defeat for Clem-
son (18-4, 4-4), which lost at
Duke 68-66 on David
McClure’s layup with no time
remaining this past Thursday
night when officials incor-
rectly added time after the
Tigers had tied things.

e Georgia 57, No. 21
LSU 54: In Athens, Ga., Levi

Stukes’s 3-pointer with 0.6
seconds left gave Georgia a
win over Louisiana State.

It was Stukes’ fourth
3-pointer of the game and was
one of eight second-half 3s by
the Bulldogs (13-6, 5-2 South-
eastern Conference). He fin-
ished with 16 points.

Glenn Davis had 18 points,

14 rebounds and a career-high

six assists for LSU (13-7, 2-4).
Terry Martin added 16 points.

Takais Brown had 15 points
and 10 rebounds for Georgia,
which has won five of its last
six games.

e No. 24 Virginia Tech
73, Georgia Tech 65: In
Atlanta, Zabian Dowdell
scored 23 points and A.D.
Vassallo had 19 to help Vir-
ginia Tech beat Georgia Tech.

The Hokies (16-5, 6-1 Atlan-
tic Coast Conference) have
won three straight, six of eight
and 12 of 14.

Georgia Tech (13-7, 2-5) has
lost three straight to drop into
10th place in the ACC.

LATE SATURDAY

e No. 5 Ohio State 66,
Michigan State 64: In
Columbus, Ohio, Greg Oden
scored 19 points and Ohio
State nearly blew a 20-point
halftime lead before holding
off Michigan State.

e No. 7 Oregon 77, No.
20 Washington State 74
(OT): In Pullman, Wash.,
Aaron Brooks returned from a
suspension to score 31 points
and help Oregon beat Wash-
ington State in overtime to
claim sole possession of sec-
ond place in the Pacific-10
Conference.

e No. 18 Nevada 79,
Utah State 62: In Reno, Nev.,
Nick Fazekas had 24 points
and 18 rebounds and Nevada
went on a 10-0 run late in the
game to beat Utah State.



A
6E | MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007 _ INTERNATIONAL EDITION _



GOLF

Funk claims
lopsided victory §

Associated Press

KAHUKU, Hawaii — Fred
Funk had the most-lopsided
victory ever in a 54-hole
Champions Tour event, shoot-
ing his second straight 8-under
64 on Sunday for'an ll-stroke
win in the Turtle Bay Champi-
onship.

The 50-year-old Funk, still a
regular on the PGA Tour,
ended the suspense early with
six birdies in a front-nine 30
and finished with a tourna-

_ment record 23-under 193 total
in the tour’s first full-field
event of the year.

Funk earned $240,000 for
his second Champions Tour
victory in five career starts. He
also went wire-to-wire to win
the AT&T Championship, the
last full-field event in the 2006
season.

Funk, who missed the cut in
the PGA Tour’s Sony Open
and tied for 28th last week in
the Champions Tour’s 41-man
MasterCard Championship,
put on another show with his
sweet putting using a new
wider stance he picked up dur-
ing the pro-am.

“Probably my best three
days of putting I’ve ever had,”
said Funk, the only player in
the 78-player field without a
bogey in three days.

Tom Kite, who tied for sec-
ond last week in the Master-
Card Championship, went
double bogey-bogey on the
last two holes to close with a
71, dropping him into a five-
way tie at 12 under with 2006
winner Loren Roberts (66),
Tom Purtzer (66), Denis Wat-
son (68) and Kiyoshi Murota
(72).

Tim Simpson (68), D.A.
Weibring (68) and David Eger
(69) were another stroke back
at 11 under. :

The legendary surf was up
on Oahu’s North Shore, but
the wind wasn’t. It was calm
for a second day, setting up
the layout for birdies.

Funk made it a race for sec-
ond by swirling in a 9-foot
birdie putt on the 574-yard
ninth to reach 21.under for an
eight-stroke lead over Murota
and Kite. Funk made the turn
at 30 and was relaxed as he
strolled along the oceanside
Palmer Course, smiling and
waving a hang-loose sign to

“cameras. — :

The seven-time PGA Tour
winner broke the previous 54-
hole record of 195 set by Jim
Colbert in 1991 when the event
was played on Maui on a
par-70 course.

Hale Irwin, a six-time win-

ner in the event, closed witha

69 to finish at 6 under. He said
he knew of only one way any-
one could stop Funk from win-
ning.
“Go hire a hitman,” said
Irwin, who had a 23-under 193
- total at the MasterCard last
week to beat Kite and Jim
Thorpe by five strokes for his
tour-record 45th victory and
first in 15 months.

Irwin’s run for an unprece-
dented seventh title in the
event ended on the first day

with a quadruple-bogey 8 on

TENNIS

the seventh hole.
“I kind of dug my grave
right then,” he said.

NATIONWIDE TOUR

PANAMA CITY, Panama
— Argentina’s Miguel Car-
ballo won the Nationwide
Tour’s season-opening Pan-
ama Championship, closing
with a 5-under 65 on Sunday
for a two-stroke victory over
three players.

The 27-year-old Carballo,
five strokes back at the start of
the round, finished with a
6-under 274 total on the Pan-

-ama Golf Club course. He

earned $99,000 and secured
full status on the Nationwide

‘Tour through the end of next

season.

“I still can’t believe I won,”
Carballo said. “I didn’t think I
would ever win, but I’m happy
that I did. To win any Nation-
wide Tour tournament would
be a thrill, but to do it in Latin
America makes it even more
special.

“Earning a Nationwide
Tour card and having the
opportunity to fulfill a goal of
mine to play on the PGA Tour
is beyond words.”

PGA Tour winner Jim

McGovern (66), Hunter Haas
(70) and Patrick Sheehan (71)
tied for second at 4 under, and
Camilo Benedetti (65) and
third-round leader Marc Tur-
nesa (73) followed at 3 under.

Carballo won 55 years after
Argentine star Roberto De



RONEN ZILBERMAN/AP

TURTLE BAY WINNER: Fred Funk smiles as he holds his
trophy after winning the Turtle Bay Championship in

Kahuku, Hawaii, on Sunday.

Vicenzo claimed the first of
his five victories at the Pan-
ama Golf Club.

“Just winning is great,” Car-
ballo said. “But winning in the
same place where one of the
best golfers from Argentina
and the world won is a great
thrill.”

Carballo’s only other pro-
fessional win came in the 2006
Guatemalan Open, an event
sanctioned by the PGA Euro-



TITO HERRERA/AP

BIRDIE HAPPY: Miguel Carballo celebrates after scoring a
birdie on the 16th hole during the Movistar Nationwide
championship in Panama City, Panama, on Sunday.

pean Challenge Tour and the
Tour de Las Americas.

“My goal at the beginning
of the day was to shoot 4 or 5
under, and I was able to do
that,” Carballo said. “I played
so well today under tough
conditions and a lot of pres-
sure. ... This course was
really hard all week long. You
just had to do your best to hit
fairways and greens. I guess I
did that better than anyone
else this week.”

QATAR MASTERS

DOHA, Qatar — Retief
Goosen eagled the final hole
Sunday to win the Qatar Mas-
ters, beating Nick O’Hern by a
stroke for his first title in more
than a year.

The South African birdied
the 17th and closed with a
3-under-par 69 and finished at
15-under 273.

“It feels good to be the

‘champion after such a long

while,” said Goosen, who has
won 32 tournaments. “This
win sets me up nicely for the
rest of the season.”

Goosen had been tied with
O’Hern (70) and Richard
Green (72) entering the final
day.

“The birdie on 17 set me up
nicely for the 18th,” Goosen
said. “I told my caddie that an
eagle can do it for me. And I
did it.”

Ernie Els, the 2005 Qatar
Masters winner, shot a 67 and
finished two strokes behind
Goosen. He was hurt by
bogeys on the second and
sixth holes.

Stuart Appleby (66),
Graeme McDowell (67) and
Green were at 276. Sergio Gar-
cia, playing in Doha for the
first time, shot a 67 for 281.

O’Hern was leading by two
shots before Goosen’s birdie-
eagle finish.

“T didn’t hit the ball well
today,” O’Hern said. “But I
kept hitting because that’s
what you’ve got to do when
you are not playing well.”



S. Williams, Gonzalez big movers in rankings

BY DENNIS PASSA
Associated Press

MELBOURNE, Australia —
Serena Williams and Fernando
Gonzalez made the biggest
jumps in the rankings after the
first Grand Slam of the year.

Williams, who came to the
Australia Open ranked No. 81,
vaulted to No. 14 after she beat
Maria Sharapova 6-1, 6-2 Sat-
urday to win the title.

Gonzalez lost to Roger Fed-
erer in Sunday’s final, beaten
7-6 (2), 6-4, 6-4. The Chilean
advanced five places to No. 5
after his celebrated run to his
first Grand Slam final, accord-
ing to ATP projections.

The men’s and women’s
rankings: were to be officially
announced Monday.

Sharapova’s consolation
prize is moving to No. 1, a
ranking she first attained in

ugust 2005. When Sharapova

made the fourth round, she
displaced Justine Henin. The
Belgian did not play the Aus-
tralian Open after withdraw-
ing for personal reasons — she
and her husband have sepa-
rated. ;
Amelie Mauresmo, the
defending Australian Open
champion who was beaten by
Lucie Safarova in the fourth
round, remains at No. 3, fol-
lowed by Australian Open
semifinalist Kim Clijsters, who
is to retire after this season.
In projections by the WTA
Tour, Clijsters moved up one
spot and swaps with 2004 U.S.
Open Svetlana Kuznetsova,
who was beaten in the fourth
round and now is No. 5. Mar-
tina Hingis, beaten by Clijsters
in the quarterfinals, advanced
to No. 6 from seventh, bump-
ing Nadia Petrova, who was
beaten in the third round by

Williams.

Gonzalez had wins over
former No. 1 Lleyton Hewitt,
Masters Cup finalist James
Blake and French Open cham-
pion Rafael Nadal. The Chil-
ean’s previous best ranking
was No. 7.

“I know that I can go for-
ward,” Gonzalez said. “This
tournament was really impor-
tant for me, not only in the
numbers, but in my game.”

Federer stayed at No. 1 for
his 156th straight week. He has
held the top ranking since Feb.
2, 2004. He is already guaran-
teed of breaking Jimmy Con-
nors’ tour record of 160 con-
secutive weeks at No. 1 on Feb.
26.

Nadal remains No. 2 and
Russia’s Nikolay Davydenko is
No. 3. Australian Open semifi-
nalist Andy Roddick moves up
two places to No. 4.



ANDREW BROWNBILL/AP

MOVING UP: Fernando
Gonzalez of Chile returns
the ball to Roger Federer
during the Australian
Open final on Sunday.





nmorcosaosessvanssnevietestaeniteevanmemstcsesssssiesureitesasemtesissimsensemarainessstnesiteeissintonteetteniett sett

__ MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

Woods wins again

°PGA, FROM 5B

dates to his victory in the
British Open last July, and
Woods is now 124-under par
during that stretch.

This win looked like so
many others, especially at
Torrey Pines. Part of it was
due to him, most of it was
due to the guys falling apart
down the stretch.

Buckle held it together
for the longest time.

Woods erased a two-shot
deficit in four holes, but the
24-year-old Australian
bounced back with an
approach into 6 feet for
birdie on No. 5, and nearly
reaching the par-5 sixth
green from the right rough
to set up a simple up-and-
down birdie and a two-shot

- lead.

And even after a roar that
resonated across the course,
Buckle didn’t blink.

Woods hammered a
3-wood from the ninth fair-
way to 25 feet and holed the
putt for eagle and a share of
the lead. Buckle was walking
up the ninth fairway to his
tee shot, calmly taking a
drag from a cigarette. He
looked up when he heard the
cheer, flicked the cigarette
to the ground and stomped it
out, then birdied the next
two holes.

He still had a two-shot
lead over Woods and Quin-
ney when he reached the
12th tee, but his tee shot
caught a corner of grass on
the edge of a fairway bunker,
and that’s when everything
collapsed.

Buckle’s feet slipped in
the sand as he struck the

right and left him little green
between a bunker and the
flag. Attempting a flop shot
to give himself a short putt
at par, it came out too strong

and tumbled over the green

on the other side. He pitched
to 4 feet and missed the putt,
taking double bogey.

Woods took the lead for
the first time with a 65-foot
eagle putt that curled
around the back of the cup
and came an inch within fail-
ing, while Buckle against
chopped around the rough
and had to save par. Two
holes later, Buckle was up to
his ankles in ice plant and
his chances were sliding
over the cliffs lining the
Pacific.

Quinney also disap-
peared, trying to play a per-
fect bunker shot that came
up short and led to double
bogey on the 14th.

As quickly as those two
contenders vanished, How-
ell emerged.

He made the only birdie
of the final round on the 477-
yard 12th hole, followed that
with a two-putt birdie on the
13th, then neariy holed out
an 8-iron on the 15th, the ball
grazing the edge of the cup.
That pulled him to within
one shot of the lead. He had
the momentum. He was due
to have something good
come his way.

But he was playing with a
guy for whom little goes
wrong. ‘

Woods, who saved par
from the bunker on the 14th
and 15th hole, hit his
approach from 143 yards into
30 inches on the 17th hole,
effectively ending the tour-
nament. .

FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

Federer victorious
without losing a set

° TENNIS

objective. He was two sets
from that last year, when he
won the first set of the
French Open final before
losing in four to Rafael
Nadal.

That was his only defeat
in the last seven majors.
Nadal was 26-0 on clay last
season and is on a record 62-
match streak on the surface.

“French Open is obvi-
ously the next big one for
me,” he said. “I’ve made one
step further every year now.
Went from semis to finals.
Got closer to Rafa, as well.”

That and three other

losses to Nadal were about -

the only downsides of his
2006 season — he was 91-1
against everyone else and
picked up 12 titles.

“TI think it’s going to be a
very interesting French
Open for me ... hopefully
win the title,” he said. “That
will be a dream come true.
That’s the only way I can
make this season a better
one than last year. Other-
wise it won’t be possible.”

Federer saw Gonzalez
coming. The Chilean beat
former No. 1 Lleyton Hewitt
and Masters Cup finalist
James Blake before pound-
ing Nadal in straight in the
quarterfinals.

“T knew he was a danger-
ous player, and the way he’s
been going through the draw
made me wonder what did
he do different this time
around,” Federer said.
“Especially the win against
Nadal — it kind of shocked
me. ... I didn’t believe he was
going to beat Rafa so easy.”
“ Then Gonzalez routed
Haas 6-1, 6-3, 6-1.

Federer considered
changing strategy against
Gonzalez.

“In the end I said, You
know what, I’ve beaten him
nine times, so just take it
easy and play your game,
and hopefully it is going to
work out,” Federer said. “It
did.”

Gonzalez had the most
vocal cheering section Sun-
day, many with painted
faces chanting and blowing
whistles and twirling flags as
if they were at a soccer
game.



ANDREW BROWNBILL/AP

RETURN NOTICE: Roger
Federer returns the ball
to Fernando Gonzalez at
the Australian Open.

Federer, as usual, had
thousands of backers, too.
One fan, dressed in Swiss
red and white, carried a sign
that summed up the general
feeling: “Federer is bet-
terer.” In the end, he was.

It was close in the begin-
ning.

Gonzalez broke Federer
in the ninth game and had
set points at 5-4, but was
unable to convert the oppor-
tunities. Both players agreed
that was the turning point.

“J have to congratulate
again Roger,” Gonzalez said.
“He’s on the way to be
maybe the best player ever.
He is a great champion who
played a really good match
today, all week — almost all
his life. So I can take a lot
out of this tournament.”

Gonzalez was the biggest
mover in the men’s top 10,
moving five places to No. 5
with his run to-his first
Grand Slam final.

Serena Williams won her
eighth and most improbable
Grand Slam title, beating
top-seeded Maria Sharapova
6-1, 6-2 on Saturday in one of
the most lopsided finals at
the Australian Open. Shara-
pova left for Tokyo on Sun-
day, knowing she would
assume the No. 1 ranking the
following day.

Williams, who played
about half as many matches
in two weeks at Melbourne
Park as she did in an injury-
plagued 2006, stuck around
to watch the men’s final. She
will move from No. 81 to No.
14 and has designs on getting
back to No. 1.

ie
THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com _



NFL NOTES









Bears arrive in Miami for Super Bowl

Associated Press

MIAMI — Coach Lovie
Smith bounded down the
steps of the airplane sporting
an orange tie and several play-
ers recorded the biggest event
of their football careers on
camcorders.

The Chicago’ Bears
returned to the Super Bowl on
Sunday for the first time in 21
years.

Their chartered plane had a
big Bears logo on the side
when it arrived at Miami
International Airport. As they
taxied up, the pilot opened the
window of the mammoth jet-
liner and flew a giant Bears
flag.

From temperatures in the
teens, it took the Bears just
three hours to reach a breezy
60-degree warmup on a trip
that whisked them from snow-
covered fields to palm trees.

It also took Smith just three
seasons to land the Bears back
in the Super Bow] for the first
time since 1986.

The team hotel, just five
minutes away from the airport
and miles from the glitter of
South Beach, featured a big
orange and blue ’C’ on the ele-
vator doors and a large sign
above many of the doorways
with “Finish” sandwiched by
two Bears heads.

Smith said Friday his plan
was to take keep the Bears on
a normal schedule as much as
possible. That will certainly be
interrupted by media mob ses-
sions the first four days this
week, including one Tuesday
at the stadium where they will
face the Colts in a week.

“We're taking Halas Hall ©
down to Miami. I’m a routine
guy, and that’s what we’re
going to do. You have distrac-
tions in Chicago. Distractions
are everywhere. The guys will
be fine,” Smith said Friday.

Now the Bears have
reached the | destination
they’ ve been talking about
since last spring in their off-
season workouts. All season
eee they’ve oe the





ALAN DIAZ/AP

ARRIVAL IN MIAMI: Chicago Bears head coach Lovie Smith arrives at Miami International Mises on Sunday with the
rest of the team as they get ready for their Super Bow! date with the mGlanapolis Colts on Sunday, Feb. 4.

doubters, who questioned just
how good are these Bears
because they play in what is
perceived as the weaker NFC.

Their 15-3 record was met
with some skepticism, and
quarterback Rex Grossman
has been a question mark —
good one week, shaky the
next, with a little of both
thrown in throughout 2006.

The defense that led the
NEL with 44 takeaways wasn’t
as tough down the stretch
until a strong showing in the
NFC championship game rout
of New Orleans and its top-
ranked offense.

COWBOYS

Norv Turner got the best

1

FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

The arrival of the Colts in Indianapolis transformed the city

*COLTS

government leadership of
Indianapolis, and the state
itself.”

Frick got the nod from
then-Mayor William Hudnut
III to shepherd the Colts’
move from Baltimore to Indi-
anapolis. He began secret
negotiations with Colts coun-
sel Michael Chernoff in Feb-
ruary 1984.

On March 29, 1984, the
Colts, threatened with emi-
nent domain proceedings by
the Maryland legislature,
made their move. Two days
later, the Capital Improve-
ment Board in Indianapolis
ratified a 200-page agreement
that included a 20-year lease
to play in the then-Hoosier
Dome.

Heads turned, and not just
in the sports world, Frick said.

“Before, if you had a deal, it

would oftentimes be between ~

a couple local individuals or
businesses. Suddenly, outside
capital discovered Indianapo-
lis and started making invest-
ments in Indianapolis,” said
Frick, chairman of the Sta-
dium ‘and Convention Build-



SUPER BOWL XXXV

BALTIMORE 34, N.Y. GIANTS 7

e Jan. 28, 2001

e Raymond James Stadium, Tampa

@ MVP: LB Ray Lewis, Baltimore

The image of former UM linebacker Ray
Lewis holding the game MVP trophy was the
defining moment of Super Bowl XXXV, and not
just because Lewis was the leader of one of the

best defenses in NFL history.

ing Authority, which is build-

ing the Colts’ future home, the ° |

$675 million Lucas Oil Sta-
dium scheduled to open in
2008. :

Before the Colts, the Indi-
ana capital only was recog-
nized forthe Indianapolis 500.
The Indiana Pacers, perennial
kingpins in the old ABA, had

‘yet to make a mark in the

NBA, and college sports were
focused on a basketball coach

with a temper as fiery as his:

red sweater some 50 miles to
the south in Bloomington.

But in 1979, community
leaders created the Indiana
Sports Corp. to attract major
sports events to central Indi-
ana. The next year, Hudnut
appointed a committee to
study the feasibility of build-
ing a new'stadium that could
serve as home to a pro foot-
ball team. |

In 1982, the group brought
in the National Sports Festi-
val, which drew some 250,000
people to venues that
included new world-class
swimming and track and field
facilities on the IUPUI cam-
pus. By then, the city also was

building the Hoosier Dome —

COUNTDOWN TO SUPER BOWL XLI



The award and Super Bowl victory came:
almost one year to the day after Lewis was charged with murder
in connection with the stabbing deaths of two men. The
symmetry was remarkable, given that the incident occurred in
- Atlanta, the site of Super Bow! XXXIV, on the night of the game.
Though the murder charge later was dropped, Lewis pleaded
guilty to obstruction of justice, and was heckled about the ordeal

d The wild, weird,’
f pr veleayreiste Ae te
i wondrous.of past’ @
Super Bowls

aS 0)) 2° eae
ee) ]
Mol



out of Troy Aikman, Emmitt
Smith and Michael Irvin
when he was the Dallas Cow-
boys’ offensive coordinator.
He thinks he can do the same
with Tony Romo, Terrell
Owens and the rest of the
club as their next head coach.

Turner interviewed for the
job Sunday, becoming the sev-
enth — and likely final — can-
didate being considered by
owner Jerry Jones.

“I was excited to get a
chance to visit and talk about
things that are important to
me,” said ‘Turner, San Francis?
co’s offensive coordinator, “Ini
this league, it’s all about timing
and circumstance. ... I’ve got
a lot of confidence in the

things I can do. I think there
are a lot of people in this
league that look at it in that
manner.”

Turner was the offensive
coordinator in Dallas from
1991-93. He called the plays
that catapulted the Cowboys
to Super Bowl titles his final
two seasons. Along the way,
he became so close with Aik-
man that Turner introduced
the quarterback when he was
inducted into the Pro Football
Hall of Fame last summer.

Although Turner went
59-83-1 over nine years as a
coach with Washington and
Oakland, he’s considered the
front-runner to replace Bill
Parcells because of his long



DOUG PENSINGER/GETTY IMAGES

MOTIVATED: ‘A lot of my success came through him,’ said
Reggie Wayne, who had 86 receptions for 1,310 yards
and nine touchdowns in the regular season.

now the RCA Dome — which
was.one of the main reasons
the late owner Roberi lrsay
was attracted to Indianapolis.

“It was not a monetary sit-
uation,” Robert Irsay, the
father of the current owner,
said iat the time.

“People told me indianapo-
lis was excited about getting
an NFL team, but never in my
wildest dreams did | think we

all season

him th
award

2 eAQUE
“But!

believe it,’



would be welcomed as we
have.”

Even through some rocky
seasons — the Colts finished
1-15 in 1991, never won more
than nine games before Pey-
ton Manning arrived in 1998
and went through eight
coaches before Tony Dungy
took over in 2002 — the city’s
momentum toward major
sports status hasn’t slowed.



He already had overcome it to a certain
degree. responding with a season that earned
s Defensive Player of the Year
ve did not truly defy his detractors
until the Super Bowl.

“If you put this ina storybook, nobody would
_ewis said after the game. “To be
where | was last year and to hear everyone say
that it’s going to affect me, | had a higher power
that saia everything’s

The murder charge came into play again
during the postgame celebration, when Disney

going to be all right.”

snubbed Lewis in its “What's Next?”
commercial, choosing quarterback Trent Dilfer instead. But by
then, Lewis's turnaround was complete.
“IE the world wants io see me stumble now,” Lewis said, “I'll

stumble with a ring on my finger.”

- BRIAN COSTA

6 DAYS S tO GO

relationship with Jones and
the success they had together.

Turner had not been inside
team headquarters since he
was hired by the Redskins in
February 1994. Being back trig-
gered many memories.

“It’s just a very, very unique
place,” he said. “When you’re
away from it some time you
don’t realize it. But it certainly
hit me at Troy’s Hall of Fame
induction ceremony — the
Cowboys fans, all the people
wearing Troy’s jersey, just the
excitement and energy that’s
always there with. this organiz
zation.”

Parcells ahead monday

after going 34-32 the last four:

years. He went 0-2 in the play-

Indianapolis hosted the
NBA All-Star game in 1985. In
1987, the Pan-American
Games came to town, along
with the world indoor track
and field championships. The
NCAA moved its headquar-
ters from Kansas City to Indi-
anapolis in 1999, and the city
has become a regular stop for
the Big Ten and NCAA men’s
and women’s basketball tour-
naments, more than 400
national and international

sports events and 15 U.S.

Olympic team trials.

The Pacers, the city’s only
major team until the Colts
arrived, reached the NBA
Finals for the first time in
2000. That same year, the
expansion WNBA Indiana
Fever made its debut. The city
also hosts NASCAR and For-
mula One racing, keeping the
Indianapolis Motor Speedway

bustling beyond the month of

May.
There’s even talk of a bid
to host the 2011 Super Bowl.
“T think the Colts have ele-
vated Indianapolis to a status

‘among some cities in the

United States,” said former
Republican state Sen. Larry



offs, extending a postseason

drought that dates to 1996.

Others being considered to
replace him include defensive
coordinators Wade Phillips
of San Diego and Gary Gibbs
of New Orleans, and Jason
Garrett, Aikman’s longtime
backup who already has heen
hired for an undetermined job
— maybe head coach, proba-
bly offensive coordinator.

Turner said he’d have no
problem having Garrett on his
staff. In fact, Turner tried get-
ting Garrett on his staff in
Oakland.

“That tells you a little
something about how I feel
about Jason,” Turner said.

Jones also interviewed

1. three of Parcells’ assistant,

including secondary coach
Todd Bowles, who is black,
thus fulfilling the league rule
requiring a minority candi-
date.




SAINTS 0 ©

Reggié was fined
$5,000 by ng taunting
during hi touchdown
receptio zNew Orleans’
NEC cha ‘nshiip game loss

RY

at Chicago: ast week.
Although the rookie run-
ning was not penalized for
pointing back at Bears line-
backer Brian Urlacher or for
somersaulting into the end

zone, he _ subsequently
received the league’s standard
punishment for taunting.

NFL spokesman Greg
Aiello confirmed the fine Sun-
day.

Bush, the 2005 Heisman
Trophy winner and second
pick in last year’s draft, caught
a short pass from Drew Brees
on the left sideline. He sped
downfield, cut back near mid-
field and was several steps
ahead of Urlacher when Bush
turned and pointed at the
Bears star.

He then did his front flip
into the end zone, making” the
score 16-14.

The Bears won 39-14 to
reach the aunt Bowl.

Borst, who witnessed the
city’s transformation in three
decades as a lawmaker. “I
don’t know. we'll ever reach

Sx



phia and eres Worth.”
Bill Benner, spokesman for
the Indiana Convention and

Visitors Association, said
each Colts home game injects
about $15 million into the
city’s economy. Just as impor-
tant, he said, being one of 32
NFL cities fosters a “big-
league” atmosphere.

“When the Colts came here
in ’84, that sent the message
to the nation that we were
indeed on a course to succeed
in revitalizing, re-energizing
and upgrading our image,”
Benner said.

Could: Indianapolis have
shed its sleepy Naptown
image without the Colts?
Maybe. But why question suc-
cess?

“The sports strategy
clearly has worked,” Frick
said, adding, “And the Colts
have been an important piece
of it.”

6 P.M. EST SUNDAY, FEB. 4, 2007
DOLPHIN STADIUM ® ON TV: CBS




PAGE 8E, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS

eae ee nn



101.

@ CRICKET
PERTH, Ausiralia
Associated Press

MATTHEW HAYDEN and
Ricky Ponting made centuries
and shared a 200-run second-
wicket partnership as Australia
scraped in an eight-run win
over New Zealand in a tri-
series limited-overs cricket
match Sunday.

Hayden made 117 from 111
balls and Ponting 111 from 122
as Australia reached 343 for
five after winning the toss and
batting first; the highest score
by any team in a limited-overs
match at the WACA Ground.

Jacob Oram smashed 101 not
out from only 72 balls, putting
on 137 in an unbroken part-
nership with Brendon McCul-
lum (46 not out), as New
Zealand reached 335 for five
in reply, failing only narrowly
to overhaul Australia's massive
total.

Oram's century from 71 balls
contained four fours and six
sixes and was the fastest by a
New Zealander in limited-
overs internationals. It was also
his first-one-day international
century and eclipsed his 86 at
Adelaide last week as his high-
est limited-overs score.

"We were chasing two runs

an over at the end so I just kept .

on swinging as hard as I could,"
Oram said.

"It was thoroughly enjoyable
and very satisfying, but disap-
pointing to lose, of course."

Recalled opener Lou Vin-
cent gave New Zealand's
innings a solid foundation with
a score of 66 from 82 balls,
including eight fours and a six.
He had New Zealand on tar-
get for an unlikely win when
he was adjudged Ibw to
Michael Clarke off a ball which
clearly came from bat onto
pad.

Stephen Fleming with 28,
Peter Fulton with 24 and Ross
Taylor with 39 assisted the run
chase before Oram and McCul-
lum carried New Zealand to
the brink of victory. Australia

put down several catch
chances, but its excellent
ground fielding helped it to its
sixth straight win of the tri-
series tournament which also
includes England.

Hayden and Ponting's 200-.

run stand for Australia's sec-
ond wicket had already made
New Zealand's task almost
impossible.

Hayden recovered form and
cemented his place in Aus-

tralia's World Cup squad with -

a century from 104 balls; his
sixth hundred in 127 limited-
overs internationals.

Ponting batted in Hayden's
shadow early in his innings but
reached his half century from
62 balls and his century from
113 deliveries. The century was
his 21st in 266 one-day inter-
nationals, his third against New
Zealand and his first at the
WACA. ;

Hayden and Ponting came
together when Australia was
28 for one, after the dismissal
of Adam Gilchrist for 13. They
reached their 100 partnership
from 113 balls and their 200
partnership from 203 as they
kept up a run rate of almost a
run per ball.

Later Michael Hussey
smashed 29 from 16 balls with
three sixes and Cameron White
24 from 12 balls with a four and
a six in a late, unbroken stand
of 50 for the sixth wicket. That
partnership was eventually the
difference between the teams.

New Zealand fielded poor-
ly, dropping several catches
including chances off Hayden
when he was 0, 4 and 72. Oram
suffered most at the hands of
the Australian batsman, con-
ceding 50 runs from five overs
but had his revenge later with
the bat.

@ AUSTRALIA'S captain
Ricky Ponting raises his bat
after making 100 runs against
New Zealand in their one day
international cricket match in
Perth, Australia, Sunday, Jan.
28, 2007.

(AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)

@ NEW ZEALAND'S Jacob Oram raises his bat and helmet after making 100 runs against Aus-
tralia in their one day international cricket match in'Perth, Australia, Sunday, Jan. 28, 2007. Australia
won by 8 runs after making 343 in their innings while Oram top scored for New Zealand with a not out

(AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)



am
es ui



.& AUSTRALIA'S Matthew Hayden plays a cut shot against New Zealand in their one day inter-
national cricket match in Perth, Australia, Sunday, Jan. 28, 2007. Australia made 343 in their innings.,



(AP Photo/Rick Rycroft).

- Hayden, Ponting, Oram make 100s as
Australia edges New Zealand in

ri-series












The Tribune





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BAHAMAS EDITION

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Volume: 103 No.56





New cruise terminal
to quadruple arrivals

SEE FRONT PAGE OF BUSINESS SECTION

to. N ew Providence |

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

ONE man has been arrested
after a lucrative stolen vehi-
cle racket was busted in a joint
operation between New Prov-
idence Central Detective Unit
and North Andros police.

Yesterday saw the return of

24 stolen vehicles. from
Andros —- where they had
been shipped to be sold off at
cut-price rates — to New Prov-
idence’ ~

According to police press
liason officer, Mr Walter
Evans, North Andros police
were'said to have become sus-
picious after a significant num-
ber of cars, primarily Nissans
and Hondas, were being sold
on the island at a “below mar-
ket price”.

After bringing in officers
from the Central Detective
Unit to aid them with their

investigations, the vehicles
were recovered, and yester-
day the first batch were

- returned to New Providence.

Sixteen more cars are wait-
ing to be brought back from
the island, said Mr Evans.

Some. of the cars had to be
retrieved from Andros resi-
dents who had already bought
them by the time police con-
firmed that they had been
stolen from New Providence.

Mr Evans could not confirm

~wheiher or how these people

were compensated. ~

The cars are being stored at
the police compound, while
"some determination is made"
about what will happen to
them next, he said.

Although police have inves- |

tigated similar operations
before, this was the first of its
size as far as police are aware.

"This was a major break-
through," he said.

Man dies in car crash

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

AN UNIDENTIFIED man in his late 20s or early 30s died on
Sunday morning after losing control of his car and crashing
into a wall on East Street, police have confirmed.

According to police press liaison officer Walter Evans, the
man suffered massive head injuries and was pronounced dead

at the scene shortly after 2am.

His car overturned as he smashed into the wall, opposite the

Church of God of Prophecy.

The man — driving a 1999 burgundy coloured Chrysler Cirrus
— was said to be about 6ft to 6ft 4ins tall and of slim build. He
was dressed in blue jeans and a white and grey shirt at pe time

of his death.

According to Mr Evans, it is not thought anyone diss was

involved in the accident.





) We don’t like counting it so..
shop till ya drop!

re-inventory

















MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007

SPUR
Ua ae

SEE TODAY’S RSL

â„¢@ BERNARD DUPUCH,

| Tribune publisher Eileen Car-

ron, Roger Carron, Etienne

Dupuch Jr and Minister of
Agriculture and Fisheries

Leslie Miller at the funeral ser-

vice Saturday for Lady Dupuch

at Sacred Heart Church.
(Photo: Ana Bianca Marin)

THE funeral of Lady-
Marie Dupuch, widow of Sir
Etienne Dupuch, was held
Saturday at Sacred Heart
Catholic Church in Nassau.

The service was conducted
by Monsignor Preston Moss,
OSB.

Lady Dupuch died in her
sleep at the Camperdown
home of her eldest daughter
and son-in-law, Eileen and
Roger Carron, on January
18. She would have been 101
next month.

Her ashes were interred at
the Dupuch family’s plot in
the Eastern Cemetery.

Deputy Prime Minister
Cynthia Pratt, Works Minis-
ter Bradley Roberts, Agri-
culture Minister Leslie
Miller, Deputy Leader of the
Opposition Brent Symon-
ette, and Independent MP
Tennyson Wells were among
the mourners, which includ-
ed Lady Dupuch’s brother
Henry Plouse, and family
and friends from near and








Patients forced to visit local |

vet for X-ray in Great Exuma —

@ By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune News Editor

GEORGE . TOWN,
Exuma — The state of med-
ical services in Great Exu-
ma is so dire that anyone
needing an emergency X-

_ ray is forced to pay a visit

to the local vet, The Tri-
bune was told over the
weekend.

As the population of this

small island continues to
grow — some say it has
more than doubled in the
last few years — locals are
angry that the government
has yet to fulfil its promise
to construct a mini-hospital
here.

And with the Four Sea-
sons Emerald Bay Resort
raising visitor numbers sig-

SEE page 12

Haywards save Port Authority
from potential winding-up

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK

‘Tribune Freeport Reporter

FREEPORT -

The Hayward family has saved the

Grand Bahama Port Authority from a potential winding-
up of the company by stepping in and personally paying
a $1.2 million settlement to resolve a legal dispute with
Island Bay Condominium Phase III Association.

According to reliable sources, Rick Hayward, son of Sir
Jack Hayward, one of the principal shareowners of the
GBPA, on Friday initiated the move to avoid winding-up
and liquidation of the company.

The Island Bay Condominium Phase HI Association,

SEE page 13

a ‘ \ x
. ; os i)
i rN

E: rr we a A
with medium fries
and drink

PRICE — 75¢












Three men fired

from jobs claim

victimisation
li By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THREE Mayaguana men are
claiming victimisation after
allegedly being fired from their

jobs with a development com- .

pany for being FNM support-
ers.

The three - Edison Brooks,
25, Tecoyo "CJ" Brooks, 21,
and Trevor Collie, 34 - all
worked for I-Group (Mayagua-
na Development Company)
until they were all told this
month that there was no more
work for them.

They were then dismissed
with no notice or pay, it is
alleged.

According to Edison Brooks,
his dismissal came after he
refused a demand by his pro-

_ ject manager to greet prime
minister Mr Perry Christie at

the airport wearing a PLP T-
shirt on January 20.

Shortly before the visit, Mr
Brooks said he had joked that if
he drove the PM "he would

SEE page 12
PAGE 14, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



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. 3 The organisation believes
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; g in Martissant, a suburb south
$535.00 3 of Port-au-Prince.
#tAGV14 8 Jean-Rémy Badio was a

freelance journalist and pho-
tographer. On January 19, he
was reportedly shot at his
home in Martissant, where
gang warfare has been spi-
ralling for more than two
years.

Jean-Rémy Badio was a
member of SOS Journalistes,
a Haitian organisation dedi-
cated to the protection and
defence of journalists’ rights
and freedom of the press.

According to this organi-



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sation, he was killed because
he had photographed mem-
bers of an armed gang in
Martissant. His family
reported that, prior to his
death, he had received death
threats from gang members.

Haitian authorities must
ensure that the murder of
Jean-Rémy Badio does not

remain unpunished, said AI ©

in a statement.

An investigation into his
murder must be carried out
promptly and thoroughly,
and the results made public,
it added.

Members of armed gangs
who are terrorising men,
women and children must be
shown that there can be no



Amnesty International -
condemns the murder
of Haitian journalist

t

impunity for such crimes and
must be brought to trial.

Amnesty International
exhorted Haitian authorities
to end impunity for the mur-
der of journalists and to
bring the alleged perpetra-
tors of these crimes to jus-
tice.

In cases where investiga-
tions have been initiated,
impunity still prevails.
Among these are:

° Jean Léopold
Dominique along with Jean
Claude Louissaint, murdered
in Port-au-Prince on April 3,
2000.

e Brignol Lindor, found
dead in Acul (near Petite
Godave) on December 3,
2003.

e Abdias Jean, allegedly
extrajudicially executed by
police officers on January 7,
2005.

e Jacques Roche, found
dead on July 15, 2005.

Amnesty International has
urged the Haitian govern-

ment, with the assistance of .

MINUSTAH, to take urgent
steps to ensure that all jour-
nalists and human rights
defenders in Haiti are able
to carry out their activities
in safety and without fear of
harassment or intimidation.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear

from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
‘area or have won an
“award. Sai ay

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Housewares an

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el: 323-4153 |

Careys Shopping Center,
Prince Charles
Tel: $24-64135

Sir Charles Hotel,
East Street South.
: Tel: 522-5528 |



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‘*
PAGE 12B, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007

Hoteliers hope 30-dy =
passport delay opens the
door to more extensions

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Tribune Business

Reporter

BAHAMIAN hoteliers were
elated by the US decision to
grant a 30-day extension to
implementing the Western
Hemisphere Travel Initiative’s
(WHTI) passport initiative,
hoping it opens the door to fur-
ther extensions - possibly even
for a year or more.

Minister of Tourism Obie
Wilchcombe was able to secure
the 30-day extension on imple-
menting the WHTI, which was
supposed to come into effect
on January 23, 2007, following
emergency talks in Washing-
ton DC.

Robert Sands, senior vice-
president of administration and
external affairs for Baha Mar
Resorts, told The Tribune that
the US move, which allows
Americans another month to
secure passports is a tremen-
dous opportunity for the
region.

“It gives an opportunity for ..

the authorities in the United
States to revisit this entire situ-
ation. Thirty days, especially at
this time of the year, is very.
significant because we are in
our winter season, and it would
have a tremendous impact on
decision making for tourists
coming to the Bahamas,” Mr
Sands said.

“It is a very positive initia-
tive, because it also opens the
door for further extensions to
come, and we are extremely
encouraged by this last-minute
initiative on behalf, certainly:

of the Bahamas and the entire

Caribbean. We would wish to
congratulate the minister, and
also the authorities of the US
embassy, and all of our col-
leagues abroad who persisted
in making this happen.
“This.is a tremendous oppor-
tunity now for us to perhaps
get an extension to the point
where the cruise ships are, and
it would in fact level the playing
field. It would result in exactly
what we would have wished
under the circumstances, so we
are extremely encouraged by
this and it is a very positive

move, certainly for the °

Bahamas and the rest of the
Caribbean.” :
During his closing charge at
the conclusion of National
Tourism Week, Mr Wilch-.

PROFILE:

combe thanked everyone who

assisted in getting the exten-

sion.

“On behalf of a grateful
nation, I wish to thank Con-
gressman Bennie Thompson
from the state of Mississippi,
the chairman of the Homeland
Security committee in the US
Congress and members of his

staff, who worked through the -

11th hour to understand the
potential and devastating
impact that WHTI could have
to our tourism dependent
countries,” he added.

Mr Wilchcombe thanked -
Robert Johnson, the owner of .

the Charlotte Bobcats basket-
ball team, Doris Crenshaw and
Debbie Bartlett.

“With their help our cry was
heard,” he said.

. Mr Wilchcombe ‘said the
extension allows for further
education of American trav-
ellers, and provides a window
to.continue the pursuit of sim-
ilar consideration for land-
based tourism that was given
to the cruise lines.

“Our efforts have not been
for the Bahamas alone, but the
wider Caribbean, some nations
that could perish economically
if they were to lose any of the
tourism trade that has replaced
the banana industry,” Mr
Wilchcombe added.

He said the Caribbean was
to prepare for the congression-
al review of the matter, which
will be held in March in New
Yorke 25...

Mr Wilchcombe said the
WHTI brought the Caribbean

“eye-to-eye with the extreme

vulnerability of the tourism

industry.

He added that to protect
itself, the region must develop
stronger relationships with the
US congress generally, and the
Congressional Black Caucus.

“We must understand that



@ ROBERT SANDS

many see us a small country.
They do not understand the
complexity of our nation, the
challenges that we face or the
potentially devastating impact
that decisions made in Wash-
ington could have on small and
vulnerable economies such as
the Bahamas,” Mr Wilchcombe

‘Said.

“We cannot be casual or lais-
sez-faire to the vulnerability of
our country and the fact that
tourism, though, resilient is
fraught with valleys and pot-
holes.”

Mr Wilchcombe said that
while the industry has been
able to rebound in the face of
adversity, in some cases it has

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LEONARD MOONSAMMY OF
MOUNT R

OSE AVE., P.O.BOX N-8341,

NASSAU,

BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and

itizenship, for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 22ND day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



Jini

FIDELITY BANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

A MEMBER OF THE FIDELITY GROUP OF COMPANIES

MANAGER -

° Bachelors Degree in Finance
_ ° STEP Qualification a
¢ 10 years experience in advising clients
appropriate legal structures o
~ © Superior organization, communication, interpersonal and computer skills

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:
* Client Relationship Management

¢ Investment of client funds

¢ Monthly management reports

* Quarterly reports to clients

° Business development and marketing activities

¢ Account opening formalities:
¢ Invoicing & booking fees _

¢ Estate Planning

¢ Administration of Trusts

¢ Production of trust deeds, letter of wishes & testamentary trusts
° Training, management and coaching of staff

invites qualified applicants for the following position:

Private Banking & Wealth Management Services

The applicant must have the following minimum qualifications:

on fiduciary services and developing

(FILE photo)

taken years to rebuild the con-
fidence of the travelling pub-
lic, service providers and poten-
tial investors.

Meetings on the WHT] ini-
tiative continue today in Wash-
ington. These will look at how
to phase-in the requirement
that all US travellers possess a
passport to return home.

In the meantine, airlines
have been told to adopt a flex-
ible approach to US tourists
without passports.

THE TRIBUNE

RBC ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
is presently considering applications for

Senior Manager & Deputy,
Group Risk Management
Risk Management,
Caribbean Banking

The successful candidate should possess the following

qualifications:

¢ Degree in-Banking, Finance or Accounting

¢ Three or more years experience in a Risk Management
environment with responsibility for large credit approval

e Proven experience in Corporate Risk Management and
seasoned in Problem Loan Management

¢ Proficiency with Bank technology

¢ Teamwork & Co-operation

© Initiative

© Impact and Influence i

¢ Thinking skills (analytical, breakthrough, conceptual and

" strategic

© Leadership ee

e Experience in developing and delivering training programs
for commercial account managers

Responsibilities include:

e Acting as Deputy for Head of Risk Management, Caribbean
Banking.

e Adjudicating credit for Corporate accounts throughout the
Caribbean Banking Region within a delegated lending limit
of $5MM, providing work ups as required for applications
over that limit.

Fulfilling Special Loans functions for all Watch Listed
accounts over $500M, developing strategies in concert with
account management and overseeing their execution.
Developing Credit Policy for Caribbean Banking Region
through reviewing RBC Canadian policy, determining
applicability/relevance under Caribbean environment,
obtaining approval/exceptions as required.

Identifying credit learning gaps within Commercial account
management teams and develops and conducts training
initiatives/programs to address these deficiencies.

A competitive compensation package (base salary & bonus)
commensurate with relevant experience and qualifications.

’ Please apply before February 9, 2007 to:

Regional Manager

Human Resources

Caribbean Banking

Royal Bank of Canada

Bahamas Regional Office

P.O. Box N-7549, Nassau, N.P, Bahamas

Via fax: (242)328-7145
Via email: bahcayjp@rbc.com .

www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean

(Ge, RBG

NG Royal ol

RBC. of Canada



Freeport Container Port

rand Bahama, Bahamas

Invites Qualified Candidates to apply for the position of

Straddle Technician

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS:

° Three (3) years’ experience in repairing and maintaining heavy mobile

equipment.

Certification in Heavy Equipment Repair and Maintenance (Diploma or
Associate Degree preferred)

Three to Five years working experience and knowledge of Kalmar or
Noell Straddle Carries.

Computer Literate

Must be willing to work as part of a Team.

_ © Must be able to repair and maintain:
o Hydraulic Systems
o Diesel & Gasoline Engines
o Automotive Electronic Circuits

Freeport Container Port will offer the following benefits to the successful

' candidates:

Full-time Employment .
Major Medical/Life Group Insurance
Retirement Savings Plan

School Fee Subsidy for Dependents
Performance Bonus

Representatives from the Freeport Container Port will be visiting Nassau
on January 30 & 31, 2007 and will conduct interviews from 09:00 a.m.
through 4:00 p.m. daily at the Atlantic House on Collins Avenue, Centerville

Candidates are asked to mail Resumes to the attention of:

Human Resources Director
Freeport Container Port
P.O. Box F-42465
Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas

Send resume no later than February 7th, 2007 to:

The Human Resource Director
Fidelity - 51 Frederick Street
P.O. Box N-4853 » Nassau, Bahamas

f: 326.3000
e-mail: careers@fidelitybahamas.com

MANAGER - PRIVATE BANKING & WEALTH MANAGEMENT SERVICES.

email: ADS@fcp.com.bs


PAGE 8, MONDAY, JANUARY 29, 2007

THE TRIBUNE



EE — a

Delivering the message 0

{ the

§ Government: A tough task

m By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a business
consultant and former
Caribbean diplomat)

T MUST be a tough
job being an Ambas-
sador for the United States
in these times when virtu-
ally every Government in
the world, with the excep-
tion of Israel, feels that it is
a phenomenal error for the
US government to try to
commit 21,500 more troops
to Iraq.
It must be even tougher














The Ministr



4. Obey the.
speed lin

stop for.

sclely,

1.To be a good driver, is to
be an alert driver :

2. Be a courteous driver

3. Obey the traffic signs

6. Buckle up for




WORLD VIEV

to be a US Ambassador to
small countries who are
convinced that the US
should not have ventured
into Iraq at all unless it had
done so as part of a United
Nations force with the full
authority of the UN Secu-
rity Council, and who
believe that the continued
US military presence to

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Montrose Avenue & Oxford Street * 2 Doors North Of Multi Discount Furniture
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of Works and Utilities would like to
‘remind all road users that we all should be
- defensive drivers.

pedestrians

When entering areas under road
HUTS Hef please proceed with

DOr NTO] e

The Ministry of
Works and Utilities

Roadsafety

prop up a dubiously
installed (and clearly spite-
ful) government will fur-
ther turn the country into a
cauldron of violence and
blood.

It must be especially

tough to be a US Ambas- °

sador in a week when the
Democratic members of
the US Senate Foreign









B SIR Ronald Sanders

Relations Committee
opposed President Bush's
"new way forward" in Iraq,
and the majority of the
Senate, including many
Republicans, was showing
signs of deep disagreement
with the administration
over Iraq.

And, it must be espe-
cially tough to be a US
Ambassador when every
international human rights
organisation, the govern-
ments of the European
Union, and a host of others
have decried the denial of
rights to approximately 400
persons held prisoner at

the United States has treat-
ed terror suspects detained
at Guantanamo Bay.
Being in tough situations
on behalf of your govern-
ment comes with the terri-
tory for every Ambassador.
So, one has to admire
the present US Ambas-
sador to Barbados and the
Eastern Caribbean, Mary
Orismam, for her sense of

-duty to her government

when, in the same week
that all of this was happen-
ing, she delivered the mes-
sage to Caribbean leaders
to speak out for freedom
in Cuba, and then went on
to tell them that, in rela-
tion of Venezuela’s Presi-
dent, Hugo Chavez, “my
mother told me as a child
that you are known by the
company you keep”

mbassador Oris-

mam made this
statement in Dominica
where she was presenting
her credentials to the Pres-
ident of Dominica,
Nicholas Liverpool.

No official response was
made to the statement at
the time this commentary
was being written, but, if
one were to be made to



“ It must be especially tough
to be a US Ambassador in a
week when the Democratic
members of the US Senate
Foreign Relations Committee
opposed President Bush's

‘new way forward’ in Iraq, and
the majority of the Senate,
including many Republicans,
was showing signs of deep
disagreement with the |
administration over Iraq.”



Guantanamo Bay with
charges brought against
only 10 of them.

But, it must be excep-
tionally tough to be a US
Ambassador advocating
respect for human rights in
the same week that the
British Broadcasting Ser-
vice (BBC) released the
findings of a poll which it
commissioned trom the
Programme on Interna-
tional Policy Attitudes at
the University of Mary-
land. The poll, conducted
in 25 countries, showed
that 73 per cent of the per-
sons polled disapprove of
the Iraq war while 67 per
cent disapprove of the way

Bank f
Financing
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Prices includes: Licensing,

this particular statement, it
may have gone as follows:

Caribbean leaders are
well aware that for 45
years, the United States
has enforced an embargo
against Cuba and has
repeatedly sponsored
forms of intervention and
destabilisation in the coun-
try.

They also recognise that
the present US administra-
tion is spending:$80 million
a year on promoting dis-
sent within Cuba and on
propaganda directed at
Cuba.

No other country in the
world has had to suffer

such callous behaviour
from another; Cuba is an
abnormal place, made so
by the abnormal treatment
it has been forced to
endure from successive US
governments even against
the wishes of the majority
of people of the United
States.

' In this connection,
Caribbean countries and
their leaders recognise
that, as long as the US con-
tinues both its embargo
and the deliberate funding
of dissent in Cuba, the peo-
ple of Cuba are restrained
from living in freedom with
all the responsibilities,
obligations and enjoyments
that such freedom would
bring. When a US govern-
ment decides to listen to its
own Congressmen and the
Governors of several states

in the mid-West who want

to do business in Cuba, and
turn away from pandering
to the pressure of.the
groups of Cuban-American
exiles as part of its Presi-
dential election process,
and to normalise its rela-
tions with Cuba, Caribbean
leaders will be in a better
position to call publicly for
normalcy in Cuba includ-
ing the institutionalisation
of freedom.

It would also help if the
US were to close down the
atrocity to freedom that
Guantanamo Bay has
become.

nd, as for

Venezuela,
Caribbean leaders keep
company with democrati-
cally-elected governments
the world over, even when
the winner of an election
has to be established by a
Court. Thus, the Caribbean
maintains its relations with
Venezuela as it does with

_ the United States and oth-

er countries, récognising
always that leaders and
governments come and go,
but countries endure.

It has also not by-passed
the attention of Caribbean
leaders that the United
States and Venezuela have
the closest economic rela-

tionship.
The United States is the
biggest purchaser of

Venezuelan petroleum and
Venezuela is among the
four biggest suppliers of
petroleum to the US. The
two countries keep close
company and, as the
Ambassador’s mother told
her as a child, they are
judged by that company.

Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com
n.com>



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