Citation
The Tribune.

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune.
Uniform Title:
Tribune. (Nassau, Bahamas).
Added title page title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )
9994850 ( OCLC )

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PAGE 2, FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007

i a aa ee
Govt employee claims public servants

‘taking too long to answer cell phones’

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A GOVERNMENT
employee says she is fed up
with how long it takes for
public servants to answer
their cell phones — if they
answer at all.

“Someone needs to take
action because they’re wast-
ing people’s time,” said the
irate woman.

Only two weeks after The
Tribune revealed that the
phones at the Department
of Immigration are so rarely
answered that even person-

nel at the Ministry of Immi--

gration admit to being
forced to communicate with
that department primarily by
messenger — the frustrated

































MASS E DISCONNECTION EX



“Something needs to happen.
This country, sometimes
I wonder if we’re going
forwards or backwards
because basic stuff, simple,
basic things, you can’t get

done.”



woman declared that there
s “definitely something
wrong.”

“Why are people not
answering the phones?” she



lack of telephonists, the

Government employee

asked.

The woman said that she
was spurred into contacting
the media after spending “all
morning on the phone” try-:
ing to contact the Registrar
General’s office.

However, like a large
number of people who have
contacted The Tribune, she
claimed she has come up
against the same problem
when attempting to contact
many different government
departments or services.

“Occasionally you'll get a
very polite person on the
phone but that’s very rare
occasion,” she said — adding
that on the other hand, an
exasperating number of calls
are answered by recordings..:

The woman said that she ©

was very pleased when
opposition leader Hubert
Ingraham announced at a
rally in Fox Hill last week
that, if voted into power, the
FNM will “banish answering
machines from all public sec-

‘tor entities, including public

corporation customer service
telephone and eomplatnts
lines.”

If the problem is one of a



‘ERCI SES

IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS:

‘© Bozine Town « Yellow Elder Gardens







Big Pond « Blue Hill

Road « Black Village * Bain Town * Boyd Sub « Farrington
Road « Chippingham * Oakes Field * Stapledon fepraens

° Mi



ennium Gardens + Englerston and



e Highland Park « Tall Pines * Rocky Pine Road ¢ ‘Jubliee
Gardens « Carmichael Road « Sunset Park « Bellot Road
¢ Gladstone Road « Faith Gardens « Tropical Meadows
* Flamingo Gardens « Miller’s Heights * Avocado Gardens
* Bacardi Road * Spigot Road « Adelaide * Coral Harbour
¢ South Ocean and Mt. Pleasant Village.

PRIORITIZE!

PAY ALL ARREARS ON YOUR BEC BILL IMMEDIATELY!

All overdue BEC payments must be made at the Head
Office on Blue Hill and Tucker Roads, the Mall at Marathon

or the Main Post Office.

Powering The Bahamas for Generations

woman said, there are
“many people looking for
jobs.”

However, she believes it is
primarily one of apathy.

. “They have so many peo-
ple sitting around — just pick

up the phone, answer the

phone!

“If somebody’s busy say
‘They’re busy, we'll take a
note and call you back’.”

“Something needs to hap-
pen,” she said.

“This country, sometimes I
wonder if we’re going for-
wards or backwards because
basic stuff, simple, basic
things, you can’t get done.”

A staff member at the
Registrar General’s office
admitted that she has heard
complaints about the down-
stairs department — which is
primarily responsible for
registering births and deaths
— adding, in an echo of the
situation at Immigration,
that she also has difficulty
contacting the personnel
there.

“There seems to be a
problem because upstairs

can’t even get (through to) »

downstairs,” she said.

- She noted that that section
was more in demand than
her own, however, she refut-
ed that the “endless ringing”
that members of the public
may often encounter was
due to a shortage of staff,
suggesting instead that it
may be due to a shortage of
phones.

@ SEVERAL owners
_ of cellphones have contacted
The Tribune

THE TRIBUNE



iiifunctioning

A LARGE proportion of
cellphone numbers are cur-
rently malfunctioning, and
attempts to get an explana-
tion from BTC have come up
against another wall of
silence.

Bahamas

International

Film Festival

For the past several days,
calls to all numbers beginning
with the prefix 422, 427 or
477 have been answered with
the message: "The number

you have dialled is not.a long ~

distance number. Do not dial



New This Week
Bahan nomatonal Fm Festal IF] FILM SOCIETY

BIFF is pleased! fo announce the launch ofits Monthly Film Series!
Please jon us forthe fist film series screening ofthe BIFF Audience Award

winner for Best Documentary:

Ce

ELEUTHERAN ADVENTURE

Director: Kareem Mortimer

pede erated enaner

Saturday, January 27th @ 7:30pm

Free of Charge

Downtown at Rawson Square - Quidoor Screening

| The ELEUTHERAN ADVENTURE is a documentary fl that involves

- Kareem Mortimer and cameraman Kevin Taylor hitchhiking from
Spanish Wells to the Southernmost point on the island of Eleuthera
with only $150 in hand. Along the waythey meet a slew of interesting
characters that give them an honest and entertaining look of ife on
the island, The fl explores Eleutheran Culture and what it means

tobe Bahamian,



the digit one before this num-
ber” — despite that fact that
no such digit was dialled.

Several members of the
public have contacted The
Tribune to complain that they
have been inconvenienced by
the situation.

Meanwhile, The Tribune's
best efforts to find out more
about what is at the root of
the problem, and how long it
might be expected to last,
have proved fruitless.

Repeated attempts were
made to contact the BTC
public relations department
over the past two days, how-
ever, all calls were greeted by
a recorded message saying
the staff were out of office,
and then forwarded to anoth-
er operative.

This BTC staff member
suggested that the problem
may be the result of an
"upgrade" currently taking
place. However, after further
questioning she said.she was

not sure if this was the case.

She said she did not know
how long the upgrade had
been going on for, or would
continue to be underway, but
would forward the call to
someone who did.

This staff member in the
wireless department, accord-
ing to her answerphone mes-
sage, was due to be out of her
office until Monday.

Another number was sug-
gested in the answerphone
message for someone else
within BTC who would be of
service, however, after
explaining the issue to the
staff member at that number,
she again said "hold", and
forwarded The Tribune on to
a line which rang unan-
swered.

Several more abortive
attempts were made, each
ending with the same
response: endless ringing.

TROPICAL |
EXTERMINATORS

eRe
PHONE: 322-2157



1
{
4
'
*
-
oe
af
“ql
-
2
;
”o
My
,
‘i
ie





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007, PAGE 3



@ YOUTH, Sports and
Housing Minister
Neville Wisdom.

Wisdom |
denies park
neglect —

allegations



ml By BRENT DEAN

YOUTH, Sports and
Housing Minister Neville
Wisdom denied assertions
that parks in his Delaporte
constituency have been
neglected.

At a press conference
yesterday, he lashed out at
the FNM for having done
nothing in terms of the
development of parks in
the constituency during
their tenure.

“T wish to advise that a
check with the Ministry of
Works and Utilities and the
Ministry of Youth, Sports
and Housing would indi-
cate that between May
1992, and 2002, no new
parks were constructed
anywhere within the Dela-
porte constituency, neither
was there in place any con-
tract arrangement for any
cleaning or maintenance of
any park in Delaporte,” he
said.

Mr Wisdom refuted
claims made by the FNM,
allegedly on behalf of resi-
dents of Delaporte, which
suggested that multiple

_ park upgrades made in the”

‘ constituency have been left
incomplete and in an
+ unsafe state.

‘Mr Wisdom explained

‘ that the unfinished
restroom on the Mother
Sweeting Park (across from
Nesbitt’s) was for two main
reasons.

Initially, Mr Marlon
Duncombe - the contractor
for the project — was forced
to stop work at the site, as
he was urgently needed to
assist with repairs on the
Mable Walker Primary
School.

Then, Mr Duncombe was
given a further extension in
order to deal with the
death of his wife.

Despite being in mourn-
ing, Mr Duncombe, who
was present at the press
conference, apologised for
the delay and said that the
restroom will be completed
by February 28.

As for the outrage
expressed over the state of
the park in Tropical Gar-
dens, Mr Wisdom acknowl-
edge that a contract was
signed on December 13,
2005 that was subsequently
terminated on the advice of
technical officers of the
Ministry of Youth, Sports
and Housing and the Dela-
porte Community Associa-
tion.

However, he said a new
contract has been awarded
to Mr Frederick Major’s
Construction Co and Mr
Major, who was also pre-
sent at the press confer-
ence, assured the communi-
ty that the park would be
completed on or before
March 31.

Mr Wisdom outlined
numerous accomplishments
since his election in 2002 —
either by the government,
the community association
or through private donors.

According to Mr Wis-
dom, some of these projects
include: The construction
of a restroom on the play-
ground of Gambier Village
by the community associa-
tion; the awarding of a con-
tract for the maintenance
of the Gambier Park and
playground area; the devel-
opment of a soccer pitch in
the community by a private

donor; the refurbishment of

the running track at the
Gambier Primary School;
the repair of the seawall at
Mother Sweeting Park; and
refurbishment of the bas-
ketball court at the Cable
Beach Police Station as
part of the Police Youth
Sports Programme in

the Delaporte constit-
uency.





finger badly damaged

after beating by principal

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A MOTHER is outraged
after her son's finger was badly
damaged during a beating by his
principal — leaving him unable to
write — after the child disrupted
a school assembly on Monday.

Now she is calling for corporal
punishment. in Bahamian
schools to be ended.

The mother said that her 12-
year-old son was subject to a
"severe" caning by his principal
after he was caught talking
through a morgin®assembly.

“I don't eyén beat my chil-
dren like that;” she said. Doctors
have told him that he must keep
his hand in a cast for a week.

"There was an assembly and
he was talking so the principal
take him out the crowd and he
beat him, and he was beating
him so hard he was rubbing his
hip with his hand," explained
the mother. —

When the boy moved his
hand over the area where his
principal was caning him in a

: response to the pain, he said the

principal warned him to move it
or else risk it getting broken.

"He wapped him a couple
more times and he (her son)
started rubbing his hip again —
so (the principal) wap him
across his hand and now his fin-
ger's broken,” she said.

The woman claims that her
son passed out from the pain.

Her husband received a call

Mother calls for end to corporal punishment in schools

from him shortly afterwards,
telling him he felt ill and wanted
to be taken home.

"My son called out and said
that he'd fainted," she said. "I'm
thinking now I’m going to meet
him to the hospital because he
fainted because he didn't eat
breakfast or something or
because of the heat."

She was later informed by her
son that he had passed out after
receiving the caning.

The woman said her son is an
avid amateur boxer, and as well
as hindering his capacity to
write, the injury is going to set
back his training.

According to the mother, she
would like to move her son to a
different school — but he insists
that he wants to stay.

She added that now she fears
her son may be victimised
because she has spoken out
about the incident.

Responding to the claims, the
principal in question said, “Yes,
I was the person responsible.”

He explained that the inci-
dent occurred after a special
"National Heroes" assembly,
which students had been
informed beforehand was an
important occasion.

He claims, however, that
despite the warning, several stu-
dents were "very, very disrup-
tive", resulting in his decision
to cane the 12-year-old.

Shooting incident
on Eastern Road

RESIDENTS in the area of Leeward East on the Eastern
Road became alarmed yesterday when they heard shots ring out

in theirneighbourhood.

One witness, a home owner in the area, said that she heard
five shots and when she looked out of the window, she saw one
man standing with a gun his hand, and another lying motionless

on the ground.

Police yesterday confirmed that there had been a shooting at
Leeward East, but said that no one had been sériously injured

during the incident.

Up until press time details about the shooting remained

sketchy.

STOMP 71

Ce ert

SMOKIN’ AGES
EPIC MOVIE
BLOOD AND CHOCOLATE

te | 0 [a [oe |

er [fe fos
T [tia [S40 [WA | Gta [oso | 1085

iss [336 [wa | 08 fas | 0 |

rope en ee TI 0 | aao_| to |

rerun ayo Tzwmues A | tts | 88
o | sip |3a0_|
I af | foo [as
ay | 328 |
im tua
i jt

PRIMEVAL
CODE NAME: THE CLEANER
FREEDOM WRITERS T

NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM

Cres
jwa_[ a0 [een [iow |

6a0_|a0_| in|
iat [un [0 |
wh [na |

[9 [uw

ha [fe
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f | LAST KING OF SCOTLAND

"When I caned him I told him
to put his hands away because if
you don't put your hand away it
might be broken, there's a pos-
sibility his hand might be dam-
aged," he said.

The principal said he had not

noticed that the 12-year-old .

moved his hand over the area
where he was being caned.

"I was not aware that his hand
was broken or that any damage
was done — not until late yester-
day evening," he said, adding
that the boy was “excessively
talking, very disruptive and rude
in assembly.”

The principal claimed the
damage was "not inten-
tional."

"It was a cane — if you put
your hand in the way of the cane
when the cane is being used

there's a possibility that could

happen," he said.

Though he regrets what hap-
pened, the principal reiterated
that he had warned the boy not
to put his hand in the way.

As for claims that the boy had
fainted as a result of the pain,

‘he did...

the principal said the auditorium
was very hot that morning
as 600 students were in atten-
dance.

"During assembly it was pret-
ty hot. I understand two or three
of the students fainted before
or before he almost
fainted, I gathered."

He said the boy may have
"almost fainted" but this was up

to 20 minutes after he was rep- _

rimanded.
According to the principal, he
spoke to the boy's mother yes-

terday, and felt that the issue
had been resolved.

"I spoke to the mother last
night, and we had a good con-
versation, y'know? I also spoke
to the boy and he said he was

feeling strong."

The principal claims a meet-
ing was set up between himself,
the mother and the district
superintendent yesterday morn-
ing but that the mother did not
attend.

Attempts to contact Minister
of Education Alfred Sears for
comment on his government
cellphone yesterday were unsuc-
cessful.

2 Unclaimed Buildings!

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348 er

Long on rhetoric, short on sorrow

PRESIDENT BUSH showed what he does
well at the beginning of the State of the Union
ceremony when he graciously acknowledged
and introduced Nancy Pelosi as speaker of
the House of Representatives. He seemed
both generous and sincere, and it was the
right touch for a genuinely historic moment.
At the end of his speech he introduced four
Americans of whom the nation can be proud,
including Wesley Autrey, a New Yorker who
made like a Hollywood stunt man to save the
life of a, stricken passenger who had fallen
onto the tracks in front of an oncoming sub-
way train.
The rest of the evening was a study i in gov-
ernmental dysfunction. The audience kept
mindlessly applauding — up and down, like
marionettes — when in fact there was nothing
to applaud. The state of the union is wretched,
which is why Bush’s public approval ratings
are the worst since those of Richard Nixon
and Jimmy Carter.
If Bush is bothered by his fall from political
grace, it wasn’t showing on Tuesday night.
He seemed as relaxed as ever, smiling, signing
autographs, glad-handing.
I wanted to hear him talk about the suf-
fering of the soldiers he has put in harm’s
way, and the plight of the residents of New
Orleans. I wanted to hear him express a little
in the way of sorrow for the many thousands
.. who. have.died. unnecessarily on his watch. I
wanted to see him slip the surly bonds of nar-
cissism and at least acknowledge the human

wreckage ‘that is the sum and substance of
his sustained folly. —

But this is a president who runs when empa-
thy calls. While others are monitoring the
casualty lists, he’s off to the gym. At least
Lyndon Johnson had the decency to agonize
over the losses he unleashed in Vietnam.

The State of the Union speech was boiler-:

plate at a time when much of the country,
with good reason, is boiling mad. The United
States, the most powerful nation in the histo-
ry of the world, seems paralyzed. It can’t extri-
cate itself from the war in Iraq, can’t rebuild
the lost city of New Orleans, can’t provide
health care for all of its citizens, can’t come up
with a sane energy policy in the era of global
warming, can’t even develop a thriving public
school system.

If it’s true, as President Bush told his audi-
ence, that “much is asked of us,” it’s equally
true that very little has been delivered.

The Democrats, delighted by the wounded |

Bush presidency, believe this is their time.
Like an ostentation of peacocks, an extraor-
dinary crowd of excited candidates is gath-
ering in hopes of succeeding Bush.

But such a timid crowd!

Ask a potential Democratic president what
he or she would do about the war, and you'll
get a doctoral dissertation about the impor-
tance of diplomacy, the possibility of a phased
withdrawal (but not too quick), the need for
Iraqis to help themselves and figure out a
way to-divvy up the oil, and so on and so
forth.

A straight answer? Surely you jest. The
Democrats remind me of the boxer in the
Bonnie Raitt lyric who was “afraid to throw a
punch that might land.”

There’s a hole in the American system
where the leadership used to be. The country
that led the miraculous rebuilding effort in
Western Europe after World War II can’t
even build an adequate system of levees on its
own Gulf Coast.

The most effective answer to this leadership
vacuum would be a new era of political
activism by ordinary citizens. The biggest,

most far-reaching changes of the past century

— the labour movement, the civil rights move-
ment, the women’s movement — were not
primarily the result of elective politics, but
rather the hard work of committed citizen-
activists fed up with the status quo.

It’s time for thoughtful citizens to turn off
their TVs and step into the public arena.
Protest. Attend meetings. Circulate petitions.
Run for office. I suspect the public right now
is way ahead of the politicians when it comes
to ideas about creating a more peaceful, more
equitable, more intelligent society.

The candidates for the most part are lis-
tening to their handlers and gurus and fat-
cat contributors, which is the antithesis of
democracy. It’s not easy.for ordinary men
and women to be heard above that self-serv-

_ing din, but it can be done.

Voters should listen to Dwight Eisenhower,
who said in 1954:

“Politics ought to be the part-time profes-
sion of every citizen who would protect the
rights and privileges of free people and who
would preserve what is good and fruitful in
our national heritage.”

(¢ This article is by Bob Herbert of The
New York Times — © 2007)



289 Market St. Sout ° P.O. Box N-7984 e Nassau, Bahamas
‘THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

You area iitarlacs.

Amazed at _
some vehicles

4

allowed on the
road in Nassau

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I FINALLY have found
it necessary to write
responding to an article in
January 24, 2007 by Alison
Lowe. “Anger over truck
missing wheel”.

As a relatively new resi-
dent of Nassau I find it tru-
ly amazing that some of the
vehicles travelling these
roads are even allowed on
the road.

I’m also not surprised by
the attitude of the police
and his remark that it is
not their responsibility.

I don’t believe the police
have any knowledge of
what. their duties include.
Signage on the side of
police cars in most soci-
eties in North America
says to “Serve & Protect”.

Seeing the way the oper-
ators of police cars and
motor bikes are driven
they don’t serve and cer-
tainly don’t protect, plus
have little or no respect for
others on the road. They
drive as if they feel it is
their right to drive errati-
cally and certainly don't
follow any rules of the
road.

The response by the
police that they cannot do
anything unless it has a
Bahamian plate shows
again that they have no
understanding of their
jurisdiction.

Although I for one have
been given a ticket because
the registration disc had
fallen off the window and
was on the floor.

The police still gave me a
$100 ticket.

But I digress. The condi-
tion of both truckers, buses
and cars in this country
borders on the criminal. I
have lived in England,
Canada and Bermuda and
unless the vehicles pass a
thorough examination,
which in Canada includes
checking that exhaust emis-
sions meet the standards,
the vehicle is pulled off the
road.

LETTERS

| letters@trilbunemedia.net



Most of the buses and
trucks need their exhaust
systems checked.

It is just lazy on the part

of the owner/operators to

not change the filters to
stop the pollution. In
Bermuda if a vehicle has
any rust on the car that car
does not get a renewal
licence.

Here I’ve seen vehicles
with pieces hanging off,
lights not operating, but
the renewal sticker was the
previous month.

I guess that it just hap-
pened. In Canada if lights
are not working correctly
the police will stop the car
and issue a summons to
have it corrected and visit
the police station within 48
hours to confirm that the

infraction is completed.

In response: to Mr
Bethel’s comments that
“everything that comes
here we make sure it is in
good working order” is
very erroneous. Watching
the “examination” at
renewal time certainly does
not confirm that even the
simplest of safety items
that the brakes work is
never checked.

It’s fine to see if tie
brake lights come on but
that doesn’t say the brakes
work.

Forget about upsetting
the bus or truck operators
what about.the health and
safety of the public? We
deserve that right and the
Road Traffic Department
and police are not “Serv-
ing or Protecting.”

r
‘

M GILL .
Nassau,
January, 2007.

Proper lighting, security -
should be in place at clinics

EDITOR, The Tribune.

7)

I WAS very happy to hear government clinics will now be
open until 11pm. I went to the Flamingo Gardens clinic last
evening at about 7pm with my daughter to see a doctor. I was
surprised when I pulled into the clinic’s yard and found it in

darkness.

The Carmichael Road street lights are not positioned to pro-
vide lighting for the parking area. © *
Parking at the rear and west of the building is in complet®
darkness. You can barely see the parked cars let alone a persoe

out there.

The staff were anxious about going to their vehicles in the
dark and rightfully so with only security officer. The clinies
being open later in the evenings is a needed service which was
evident by the number of persons (some 40) registered to see

doctors.

“

However I feel proper lighting or some sort of lighting along
with more security should have been in place before starting. I
am hoping that the Department of Public Health and the Min-
istry of Works and Utilities will work together to quickly recti-

fy this matter.

M GIBSON
Nassau, :
January, 2007.

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In brief

Sunday
School
Rally in

‘the Alley

THE Big Harvest Community

Sunday School will be holding its
th annual “Sunday School Rally

in the Alley” and awards presen-
tation on Sunday, January 28.

The event will begin at 3pm,
according to John Ferguson,
community Sunday School
superintendent.

« “This non-profit, non-denomi-
iyational community-based entity
came into existence on Sunday,
September 3, 1995 with 35 stu-
dents and a few adult volunteer
teachers,” said the institution in
a statement. “This vibrant and

’ proactive school now has an

enrollment of over 400 and is
growing. It caters mainly to the _
spiritual, moral and temporal
«upliftment of under-privileged
sehildren and at-risk youth in our
inner city community.”

.,- During the upcoming celebra-
‘tion, hundreds of persons from a
‘cross-section of the community,
including former residents of the
Atea, will converge on Woods
“Alley. :

%? The Bahama Brass Band and
the Farm Road Marching Band
svill be there to lead the march
‘ato Woods Alley.
»- Six outstanding Sunday/Sab-
bath school teachers who have
contributed to the development
‘and growth of their respective
‘schools will receive the coveted
‘>Conquering Lion Award” for
Succeeding against the odds with
the boldness of a conquering
jion.

., They are:

e Elder Alfred Brown — Sab-
bath school teacher, Good News
Seventh Day Adventist Church

e Janice Knowles — Sunday
school teacher, Church of God
of Prophecy East Street Taber-
nacle

e Reverend Brazil McDonald
— Sunday school teacher/bible
study scholar, Transfiguration
Baptist Church

e Marion Cooper — Salvation
Army, Grants Town Corp

e Linda Brown - Sunday
school teacher, St Agnes Angli-
can Church

e Kenneth Sands - Sunday
school superintendent, Abun-
dant Life Bible Church

ay



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Before buying
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‘all:

The Tribune

SPECIAL
REPORT

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter —



A SOURCE within the
prison system has spoken out
against the lack of a parole
scheme at Her Majesty’s Fox
Hill Prison — claiming that had
such a system been imple-
mented as proposed five years
ago, it would have most likely
prevented the 2006 prison
break which resulted in the
deaths of two men.

The source, who said he has
an extensive knowledge of Fox
Hill Prison and its inmates, has
questioned why parole was
never introduced despite it
being a key proposal in the cur-
rent government’s manifesto
handbook in 2002, “Our Plan".

“During the PLP’s campaign
leading up to the 2002 election
much was said (by Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie) about the
over crowding of the prison,”
noted the source.

“During that time they
pledged that if and when they
came to office, the prison
would be the first thing on their
agenda because they both saw
that the gross over crowding.
has made the prison a breeding
ground for criminals, and some-
thing must be done to solve this
situation,” he said.

“All these other things that
they pledged now just don’t
seem to exist anymore,” the
source stated.

He said inmates were happy
when the prime minister
appointed Dr Elliston Rahming
— now Superintendent at the

-prison — to head a commission

in 2002 to address the situation.

Dr Rahming “highly recom-
mended” a parole system in the
commission’s report, notes the
source, adding that Deputy



Prime Minister Cynthia Pratt
called it “ta step in the right
direction.”

“But that step was never
made,” he said.

The source believes that such
a system would give prisoners
an incentive to behave better
and improve their lives.

“Had the step been made (to
implement parole) guard Deon
Bowles and inmate Neil Brown
would be alive today, because
the inmates would have had
something to look forward to —
they need some incentive,” he
said.

“If you give people some-
thing to look forward to their
behaviour will be different. If
you let a person know that at
the end of a certain period I
am going to be ‘here’, they'll
look forward to that, and
there’s not a chance of them
trying to ruin the situation to

) but



FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007, PAGE 5







get into something else.”

The two men — an inmate
and a prison guard — died in a
January 17, 2006 éscape
attempt. Three other inmates
also sought to escape.

Responding to Dr Rah-
ming’s claims that a Depart-
ment of Corrections Bill is to
go before parliament shortly
which will allow inmates tos
leave on licence, the source said
it was simply a “stall tactic.”

“This bill’s supposed to be
going before parliament but
they’ve had this bill since five
years ago and nothing’s hap-
pened. I don’t know what the
problem is, why they have to
go with some new bill when
they had something in motion
when the FNM was in power.”

Asked last week about why
the system never came into

effect, Dr Rahming said that:

evidence from studies in other’~

}





Per ds vial:

Rosetta St.



‘penal communities “suggests
that people who go on parole
return to prison at the same

rate as people who spend their .

full time.”

He also claimed that “if a fel-
la is good at talking” he might
be able to talk his way to early
release. “So that has a number
of weaknesses,” he said.

Meanwhile, the source said
that there are some inmates
who would obviously never
qualify for the programme, but
“you cannot use that yardstick
to measure all the good peo-
ple in there who are trying to
do better in life.”

“There’s a hell of a lot of
them in there, willing and able
to do that if they (prison
authorities) would just do what
they’re supposed to do and find
these people and deal with

them*-one on--one,”'he ‘

%

‘explained ‘ ebiud Vass
Sayis aid fe J SIE

TOL Si

THE TRIBUNE | |

Claim that parole system could

have prevented 2006 prison break

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007



THE

CAPE Eleuthera Institute
has turned trash into a trea-
sure chest of investment
opportunities in Eleuthera by
turning discarded items into
valuable assets.

As more than $13 billion in
investments progress in the
Bahamas, Jack Kenworthy,
director of Systems at Cape
Eleuthera Institute, shared the
perspective his company has

developed in preparing to take

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“Lose Yourself In Style”

during National Tourism .

Bahamas.

Since the casuarinas have
been determined to be detri-
mental to the environment,
Florida officials have been
spending millions of dollars
annually in an attempt to
eradicate them. Bahamian
environmentalists have been
trying to remove the trees
from coastlines as well.

Cape Investments has found
ways to make these waste
items into valuable resources.

“We like to say that a waste
is resource out of place,” Mr
Kenworthy said. “A waste is a
resource that we have not fig-
ured out how to use yet.”

With a team of five employ-
ees, the organisation has har-

Investor turns trash to treasure

vested casuarinas trees from
central and south Eleuthera.

“We have harvested so far
45,000 board-feet of wood
from casuarinas,” Mr Ken-
worthy said.

Other areas of exploration
include the production of fish
as a food source.

Using 800-gallon water
tanks, the Institute projects
that it can grow 1,500 fish to
harvest size within a year.

At the same time, it plans
to turn waste from the fish
tanks into nutrition for veg-
etable produce.

@ JACK Kenworthy
gives a fresh perspective on
investment ideas.

THE TRIBUNE
















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Port Authority Union to —
meet with management

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter



FREEPORT — The Grand Bahama Port

_.Authority Workers’ Union will meet privately
with management at the Grand Bahama Ship-

yard this week in an effort avoid any unneces-
sary unrest at the facility.

Although Bahamian workers at the shipyard
voted in favour of a strike on Wednesday,

‘GBPAWU president Harold Grey said the

union has agreed to meet with management
before a decision is taken to strike.

During the strike vote, taken between 9am
and 4pm at the union’s office on Yellow Pine
Street, 101 of the 141 members cast ballots.
According to the results, 86 voted in favour
of a strike and 15 voted against it.

The shipyard employs a labour force of 600.

‘Of that number, 200.are Bahamians.

Following the vote, the union and manage-
ment met at the Labour Department on Thurs-
day morning to discuss various issues that have
led to the unrest.

This included the suspension of two Bahami-
an workers, and a warning letter issued to a
third for being sick. :

Mr Grey told The Tribune that nothing pos-
itive came out of this meeting as none of the
issues were resolved.

“We have been encouraged by labour offi-

cials to meet privately with management at

‘

the shipyard to try to reach some resolution. If ;
that fails, then we have no choice but to initiate,
astrike,” he said. ‘¢
Mr Grey claims that the suspensions were not:
in accordance with the industrial agreement:
signed between the union and management. '
He explained that a warning letter should’
have been issued prior to this.
The union president also expressed concern’?
about safety at the shipyard. i
He believes that the safety department is’
not adequately staffed to meet the demands at
the facility, which are sometimes left to one’
safety officer.
Mr Dave Dalgleish, managing director, dis-‘
agreed with Mr Grey. f
He said the safety department employs about °
six safety officers —a large staff compared to.
other shipyards. -
The safety department was established in,
2004 following a fatal explosion at the ship-»
yard, which claimed the life of 33-year-old
Bahamian Wendell “Sarge” Maxxam. ot
Since then, there have been two other fatal.
accidents involving expatriates, as well as oth-'
er injuries at the facility. : }
“Tn addition to the suspensions, we are very ’
concerned about the safety of workers at the’
facility and we hope that we can resolve all of
these issues when we meet with management °
because we do not want to cause unnecessary |

unrest,” Mr Grey said. ;

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THE TRIBUNE



A LEADING British QC
who represented suspected
Bahamian drug lord Samuel
‘Ninety’ Knowles has scored a
court victory which experts
claim will “change criminal
jurisprudence across the Eng-
lish-speaking Caribbean.”

Edward Fitzgerald QC, a
London-based barrister who
specialises in Caribbean cases,
has secured reprieves for two
killers who set a Catholic priest
and his congregation on fire.

He convinced the Privy
Council, the final court of
appeal for many former British
colonies, that the death sen-
tence should not be carried out
on Kim John and Francis
Phillip, who were condemned
to hang in St Lucia for what has
been described as one of the
island’s worst murders.

The pair entered a church in
the island’s capital, Castries, on
New Year’s Eve, 2000,
drenched the congregation with
petrol and set them ablaze.

The priest, Father Charles
Gaillard, was burned to death
and a nun, Sister Theresa Egan,
died after being attacked with a
torch.

At their trial, the men - who
claimed to be Rastafarian
prophets - said they were
ordered by God to take revenge
for corruption in the Catholic
church.

The judge, in sentencing them
to hang, said the crimes were
among the worst in St Lucia’s
history.

After Mr Fitzgerald secured
reprieves, legal experts said the
case would change criminal
jurisprudence across the
Caribbean. ;

His triumph was very much
in line with his tendency to
defend the most loathed crimi-
nals on the grounds that, in his
own words, “even the most hat-
ed people are entitled to a fair
trial.”

In Britain, he defended not

‘only the Moors murderess
Myra Hindley, but other child
killers like Mary Bell and Jon
Venables, who was one of the
two killers of toddler James
Bulger.

At the time of Hindley’s








- Leading attorney
scores court victory

Experts claim that the win will ‘change criminal
jurisprudence across English-speaking Caribbean’

4

death, Mr Fitzgerald was on the
verge of pulling off the biggest
coup of his career - release from
jail of a woman so reviled in
Britain that her safety could not
be guaranteed.

He became well-known in
Nassau courts when he was
hired by Samuel Knowles to
represent him during his pro-
tracted extradition proceedings.

Mr Fitzgerald flew from Lon-
don to Nassau for most hear-
ings, using his understated style
of advocacy on Knowles’ behalf.

As it happens, Knowles was
eventually extradited to Florida,
but Mr Fitzgerald is noted more
for his victories than his defeats.
And he has no qualms about
defending what some people
consider the indefensible.

“Tt would be terrible if we
stopped defending people
because they are unpopular,”
he told The Guardian of Lon-
don.

‘“The legal process is an
attempt to civilise our emotions
of revenge. Anything that’s
against lynch law seems to me
to be a good thing.”

Mr Fitzgerald works from the
Doughty Street chambers, Lon-
don’s most noted liberal legal
powerhouse.

Since his call to the bar in
1978, he has become one of the
UK’s most respected interna-
tional advocates, winning the
Human Rights Silk of the Year
Award in 2005.

Though he could have devot-
ed his talents to more lucrative
areas of the law, he chose
human rights with special
emphasis on rehabilitation.

A staunch Catholic, he
attended Downside - a leading
monastery school in England -
before taking a first-class hon-
ours degree in classics at Corpus
Christi College, Oxford.

In recent years, he has gained
a reputation for successful
defences in Caribbean death-
row cases.

The St Lucia victory will not
only reinforce an already for-

midable reputation, but make
him more in demand than ever
before.















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THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 8, FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007

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4

Mark my words,
this man needs —
to get a life

@ By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

ne Mark Symonette
has levelled a viru-
lent, nasty personal

attack against me, while misin-
forming the public about one
of my recent columns in which
L asserted that the Queens New
Year’s Honours list was a polit-
ical gimmick by the PLP to
brazenly ‘canonise’ certain par-
ty stalwarts.

In that column, which
appeared in the January 12,
2007, edition of The Tribune,
I said that Lady Marguerite
Pindling, Garet “Tiger” Fin-
layson and Baltron Bethel all
turned up on the honours list
for knighthoods, but in my
opinion, none of the three
seemed deserving of such hon-
ours as there were other more
deserving Bahamians who have
been persistently ignored.

I also said that the past five
years under the PLP adminis-
tration had been bland and
rather empty of achievements.
Because of this, I said that the
“new” PLP appeared to be
doing all they could to get peo-
ple on their side by capitalising
on the achievements of another
administration, whether that
meant renaming buildings or
bestowing honours on such

’ people as Sir Lynden’s widow.

In a nutshell, it was/is my
opinion that the PLP was sim-
ply playing to the gallery, hon-
ouring friends of the party.

Mr Symonette, in his letter
to another newspaper, took

' grave exception to my com-

ments. In his letter, Mr Symon-
ette made erroneous charges
and personally disparaging
remarks that were misleading
and has therefore invited a
response.

_ Mark Symonette’s attack on
me is not the first he has
launched at a Tribune colum-
nist. He seems to enjoy his role
as an apologist for the PLP. But
most of Mr Symonette’s letter
is factually incorrect and based
on his personal feelings.

In one paragraph, he claims: .

“Unfortunately, wisdom and
truth are often lacking in Mr
Gibson's columns in The Tri-
bune. Every week he is in a
mad dash to put on public dis-
play one piece of folly or anoth-
er. I only met this young civil
servant once, and was immedi-
ately struck by his brash and
obnoxious behaviour during a
recent function at the US
Ambassador's residence. Why
Dame (sic) Eileen Carron, a
dignified and _ esteemic 1
Bahamian; would continue to
allow this person to embarrass
her newspaper in his column is
beyond me. It is about time the
lady exercises a little restraint
over Mr Gibson before the
paper loses all credibility.”

_ This is pitiful! I would invite

YOUNG MAN’Ss VIEW ~

Kup Ral AN

Mr Symonette to support his
claims that “wisdom and truth”
are lacking in my columns.
Here, Mark Symonette
launched a fallacious assault
upon my character, pretending
to know me, when I don’t even
know the poor chap. This seem-
ingly delusional man’s letter
was a great disservice to the
public and suggests a perverted
misunderstanding of the truth.

We briefly met at the US
Ambassador’s residence last
year and again at the House of
Assembly on January 12. It per-
plexes me that Mr Symonette
could bald-facedly surmise that

he was “struck by (my) brash .

and obnoxious behaviour” dur-
ing our first meeting at the US
Ambassador’s residence.

It appears that Mr Symon-
ette, to whom I did not say
more than three or four intro-
ductory sentences, apparently
took a deeper interest in me
than I took in him.

His assertion that I thought
that the other persons on the
honours list (other than Garet
Finlayson, Lady Pindling and
Baltron Bethel) were not
deserving of honours is an out-
right lie! didn’t mention them
at all.

I: his letter, Mr Symon-
ette also claimed that The

Tribune’s publisher, Eileen
Carron, had received a dame-
hood under the FNM adminis-
tration. This was breaking news
to Mrs Carron, as even she was
unaware of this!

Mr Symonette, I believe,
calls himself a journalist but
had he made the slightest effort
to conduct some form of
research, he would have dis-

covered that Mrs Carron was

not a dame!

Mark Symonette, who works
for the government propaganda
machine, Bahamas Information
Services (BIS), also suggested
that Mrs Carron “exercises a
little restraint” over me before
her “paper loses all credibili-
ty”.
It appears that, as a journal-
ist, Mr Symonette has lost his
appreciation for journalistic
freedom. It seems he is sug-
gesting that Mrs Carron
restrains me as he is presum-
ably restrained as a ‘journalist’
at the official government
mouthpiece.

Further, Mark Symonette
should be the last to talk about
credibility, as he and credibility
appear to have long parted
ways. In his letter, Mr Symon-
ette further claimed that I had
expressed “utter contempt” for

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the recently honoured women
“precisely because they are
women”.

The only woman I addressed
was Lady Pindling, and any
other suggestion is far from the
truth. Further, Mr Symonette’s
suggestion is baseless, one he
has pulled straight out of thin
air. | have no problems with
women being elevated! I have
always had a great respect for
all the women in my life. Most
outstanding among them is my
wonderful grandmother who
brought me up (on Long
Island) and taught me respect. I
challenge Mr Symonette to tell
me what experience he has had
that qualifies him as a great
defender of women!

He asserts that I do not
know the personal persuasion
of the recent honorees and said
that I should therefore have not »
suggested that their honours
were based upon political
patronage.

Mr Symonette should know
that, as for the three persons I
did address, it is public knowl-
edge that Lady Pindling is a
PLP, and many persons have a
general idea of the political
leanings of Garet Finlayson and
Baltron Bethel.

And, no sir, I did not con-
tradict myself by conceding that
Lady Pindling stood by her hus-
band during the fight for major-
ity rule and nationhood but had
made no far reaching, individ-
ual contribution to the
Bahamas as a whole. It was not
a contradiction, but merely the
truth!

‘Based upon what I have
come to know of Mr Symon-
ette, I’ve concluded that he is
an immodest, unreasonable
man. To use the words of Sir
Arthur Foulkes in a previous
response to Mr Symonette, I
would advise Mark that “effec-
tive reasoning cannot hide
behind phrase mongering. It is
like dressing a clown in the gar-
ment of a king and that only
makes for a ridiculous specta-
cle.”

In the words of the great
16th century essayist/poet
Alexander Pope:

A little learning is a danger-
ous thing

Drink deep, or taste not the
Pierian spring

There shallow draughts
intoxicate the brain

And drinking largely sobers
us again.

If Mr Symonette is able to, I
suggest that he read between
the lines and get a life instead
of writing asinine letters.









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THE TRIBUNE



Mh Lee
Prestigious award

for nurse Rebecca

THE Bahamas is setting
the trend in nursing in the
Caribbean. Gone is the tra-
ditional mindset that they are
handmaidens to the medical
staff.

“They form a collaborative
team,” said Nurses Associa-
tion of the Bahamas presi-
dent Ampusam Symonette.
“Nurses now participate in
crucial decision-making.
Therefore it is vital that they
are fully equipped.”

And, among those setting
the pace is the - Bahamas’ first
paediatric nurse practition-
er, Rebecca Johnson, who
won a prestigious regional
award for her hard work and
dedication.

The 20-year veteran beat
out 26 other nominees to
capture the Mavis Harney
Award in October 2006 dur-
ing the Caribbean Nursing
Organisation (CNO) confer-
ence held in Nassau. The
award is named after the
CNO founder and is given
for excellence in clinical
practice.

The award committee
reviewed documents show-
casing Nurse Johnson’s work
with patients, her education-
al background, personal
development, community
work, staff interaction and
research.

“We are very proud of
Nurse Johnson,” said Mrs
Symonette. “The country
needs to continue showcas-
ing its nurses.

“The Bahamas is a trend-
setter. Our nurses are going
back to school to achieve
their bachelor’s degree. We
presently have nurses with
doctorate degrees.”

Nurse Johnson was nomi-
nated for the award by fami-
ly members of a patient.

“It felt very good that I
was recommended by a fam-
ily,” she said. “That was very
special.

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“Since it was a regional
award I did not think I stood
a chance. Usually the win-
ners are older persons or
persons who are oftentimes
much more experienced than
me.

“So it really was a surprise
and a big honour for me to
get the award.”

Nurse Johnson entered the
Bahamas School of Nursing
in October 1982 where she
obtained a ae in nurs-
ing.

She went on to ebinin
associate, bachelor and mas-
ter’s degrees in nursing,
majoring in acute/chronic
paediatric nursing with a
minor in health and nursing
administration. She also did
a post basic paediatric
course.

Notwithstanding her full
workload, Nurse Johnson
has become more of a super-

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visor and teacher to her
patients and their families,
and her co-workers.
““When I come on duty,”
she said, “I try to identify
some patients who might
need something special,
whether it is some teaching
for their families Or care
management to help them
plan their care at home.
Some days, I do staff teach-
ing.’

Nurse Johnson also works
tirelessly in the community.
She is a member of the Sus-
pected Child Abuse and
Neglect (SCAN) unit, which
is a multi-disciplinary team
working to prevent and
reduce the incidence of child
abuse.

“T really feel that with chil-
dren, we need to help them
from being hurt and being
abused,” said Nurse John-
son. “That would build a bet-
ter community. If children
grow up with a lot of hurt,
feeling unloved and unwant-
ed then they are going to be
dysfunctional adults and
have dysfunctional families.”

She volunteered as a nurse
at the diabetes camp for chil-
dren in Florida; is a founding
member of the Bahamas
Diabetic Youth Club; is a co-
ordinator for the Bahamas
diabetic summer camp and a
founding member of the
Adolescent Help Desk.

She has given lectures to
community, church and civic
groups on nutrition and the
prevention of chronic ill-
nesses, and is a member of
the chronic non-communica-
ble illness team, which works
with international organisa-
tions to prevent incidence of

. chronic diseases such as dia-

betes and hypertension.

She has completed several
research projects and hopes
to complete another one in
time to present at the next
CNO conference. hae

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PAGE 10, FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007



seats



STORY SO FAR: Unable to find
Mehmet, his father finally decides to go
to the police, even though they are Serbs.
Meli’s mother instructs Meli to go along,
figuring they will be easier on her hus-
band if a child is with him.

CHAPTER FOUR
Searching for Mehmet

“Go home, Meli,” Papa said when he
realized I was following him into the
street. “Stay with your mother. She’s
already anxious about your brother. I

don’t want her to have to worry about

you as well.”

I just shook my head. As scared as I
was, I was determined to do as Mama
had said and go with Papa to the police
station. The police had seen me walk
by every day with Mehmet. They might
remember that we were only school-
children, not terrorists to be jailed...
or tortured... or killed.

The station door was locked. Papa
knocked, and when nobody came, he
beat on the door with his fist.

“Shh, Papa,” I said. “You'll make

THE TRIBUNE





« breakfast serials sto



them angry.”

He ignored me and kept right on
beating until the door opened slightly.
A pistol stuck out of the crack. “What
do you want?”

“I need your help,” Papa said meekly,

“as though he really thought a Serbian

policeman would help an Albanian.
“My son never came home from school
today.”

“So? Can I help it if your boy has run
away?”

Papa pushed the door open wider,
ignoring the pistol in the policeman’s
hand. “I thought there might be some
mistake. He’s only a schoolboy. He
knows nothing of politics.” It was a lie.
Mehmet knew plenty about politics; but
of course, Papa meant that Mehmet was
not KLA.

“Who are you?” the policeman

demanded.

“My name is Hashim Lleshi. I own a
small grocery store on the north side
of town. This is my daughter, Meli. My
son, Mehmet, who is missing, is only
thirteen. He—is he here? Do you have
him in custody? By mistake? Perhaps
you have confused him with someone
else?”

“Come back in the morning if you
have a question.”

“But to make a child spend the night
in jail—he—do you have children?”
Papa’s voice was low and pleading. It
hurt to hear him humiliate himself, but

- | knew he was willing to do whatever it

took to get Mehmet safely home.
“Come back in the morning, I said.”

The policeman poked Papa with his pis-

tol. “And be glad I didn’t arrest you.”
“Come on, Papa,” I whispered.
Reluctantly, Papa backed out of the

station. Once again he became the old
man I had seen coming up our stairs.
“Pray for your brother, Meli,” he said.
They were the only words he spoke to
me during that long walk home.

We went back to the station the next
morning, but the result was the same.
The Serbs would not even say if
Mehmet was in the jail. or not.

For the next few weeks, we went
through the motions of getting up in
the morning, eating, working, and lying
down to sleepless nights. I couldn’t
make myself go to school.

Suppose something should happen
while I was gone?

It makes no sense now, nor did it
then, but I thought that since I had been
the cause of his disappearance, I had
to be there to make him come home
safely.

Whenever I wasn’t working in the
store or helping Mama with housework,
I stood at the front window and tried to
see Mehmet turning the corner, walking
down our street, climbing the stairs to
the apartment, or walking into the front
door of the store. I did this day after
day, time after time. One time Mama
came over and put her arm around my
shoulders.

“Tt will not bring him home sooner,”
she said gently.

But it might, I thought. If only I stare
long enough and hard enough, I can
will him home.

In a part of my mind I knew it was
foolishness, but I couldn’t help myself.
It was guilt, I suppose. If only I had
behaved that day in school, Mehmet
would be here now, teasing me, lording
it over me.



Summer came, and still no word. And
then one day when I wasn’t even look-
ing, Mehmet appeared.

At first I couldn’t believe it was he.

He was so thin. Besides, he knocked
on the kitchen door.

When had Mehmet ever knocked on
the door?

“Mehmet?” I said when I opened it.

The gaunt figure nodded. “Not a pel-
ican,” he said.

I pulled him across the threshold.
“Mama! Papa! It’s Mehmet. He’s come
home.”

Mama came running from the bed-
room, nearly knocking me down as she
threw her arms around him. “My
Mehmet,” she said. :

“Oh, Mehmet.” She led him to a chair
and sat him down. “I have soup,” she
said. “You must be hungry. Get your
papa, Meli.”

The little boys were at school, but the
rest of us just stood and watched while
Mehmet ate the soup that Mama had
brought him. Tears were rolling down
our faces. There were sO many ques-
tions, but none of us knew where to
begin.

It was, as always, Mehmet who spoke
first. “Uncle Fadil was right,” he said.
“We cannot stay here. We have to leave
as soon as possible.”

(Continued on Tuesday)

Text copyright © 2005

by Katherine Paterson
Illustrations copyright © 2005
by Emily Arnold McCully
Reprinted by permission of
Breakfast Serials, Inc.
www.breakfastserials.com



J







THE |tRIBUNE



BAHAMAVENTION, the
Ministry of lourism’s latest
media campaign, has reported-
ly drawn increased interest
from prospective travellers —
resulting in a 40 per cent
increase in visits to the
Bahamas.com website.

Bahamavention, a television,
print and Internet campaign,
encourages overworked and
stressed individuals to renew
their physical and emotional
condition by taking a Bahamas
vacation to intervene in their

ome aman

LOCAL NEWS

Bahamavention sparks 40%
increase in website visits

in ther regular lifestyle.

According to the Ministry of

Fourism, three of the four tele-
vision ads had made it to the
“Top 20” ads of Ad Critic — the
reputable online magazine for
advertising professionals.

“After only one month of

media exposure, the Ministry
of ‘Tourism’s advertising agency
- Fallon Worldwide — was able
to give an impressive overview
of the campaign during Nation-
al Tourism Week,” said the
ninistiy ina statement.



everyday lite.

B GREG BRINKER,
Group Account
director at Fallon.

individuals

The campaign’s most herald-
ed component consists of four
television ads that feature exag-
geraied situations that give
examples of highly-stressed
in need of a — Mr Brinket
Bahamas vacation to intervene

Among the results of the
campaign was the 40 per cent
increase iterest in
Bahamas com. said Greg
Briiker, Group Account direc-
tor at Fallon
. made his pie-
sentation during the NTW mas-

ter class on “Delivering the
brand promise.”

In an interactive seminar,
participants got an opportunity
to explore the importance of
providing a brand that is syn-
onymous with the product.

Mr Brinker emphasised that
the brand needs to have an
emotional connection to which
consumers can relate.

Tourism is considered to be
an experiential brand, where
consumers are concerned most
with experiencing (he things
that the destination can offer
to them.

Fallon has been in partner-
ship with the Bahamas since
2003. During this association,
their advertising work has won
several awards for the
Bahamas.

Georgie’s now on the
beach in Mather Town

Georgie’s at Port Lucaya has been relocated
to Mather Town and is now Georgie’s on the
Beach on the site for the former Club Caribe.

Minister of Tourism Obie Wilchcombe
called the move “another giant step towards
our ultimate objective, which is to ensure that
Bahamians fully realise the economic potential
of our nation and how they can in fact be a

part of that objective.”

“We must always remember, when we
attend functions such as these, the history of
our country — the fact that we are still a young
country, only 32 years old as an independent
nation.

“Men like George are part of the pioneers,
those who dared to dream; those who take
the risks, and those who are prepared to even
losé while they pursue and open up the
thoughts and the minds of many Bahamians.

Mr Wilchcombe said that with the move
the owner George Gibson is taking giant leap

“for ali of us” — as many Bahamians ‘who have
more money than he has but refuse to spend or
Invest It.

“We wish our country to be great but we
do not wish to take the risk for our country.
When things go bad we talk about who we
can bring in to help us; but we need to look at
ourselves, internalise, recognise that we have
come a long way in a short period of time,
and it would add to our achievements if more
of us are prepared to make their contribu-
tions, invest in each other, invest in our nation,
and realise that we have a country that has a
treasure trove of economic opportunity,” he
said.

Senator Marcus Bethel, a long time friend of
Mr Gibson, pointed out that the new site has a
long tradition of hospitality.

Mr Gibson ts a veteran Grand Bahamian
businessman who for the past 18 years has
operated the popular Georgie’s Restaurant at
the Port Lucaya Market Place.

He took the opportunity to restore Club
Caribe, left in shambles atter the hurricanes of
two years ago and has positioned the new
Operation in anticipation of a coming eco-
nomic resurgence in Grand Bahama.

bw Ree S Fy
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Rosetta Street @ Mt. Royal Avenue

PHONE: (242) 356-5760



FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007, PAGE 11



ae:

The Ministry

of Tourism’s

Satellite Offices in Nassau

WILL BE CLOSED

to the public on
Friday, January 26, 2007.

Our main office at Bolam House,
George Street as well as our desks at
the Lynden Pindling International Airport
and Festival Place will remain open.

Please direct all inquiries to our main
line at 242-302-2000

We sincerely apologize for any
inconvenience caused.

HE ISLANDS OF THE





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. PAGE 12, FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007






MONDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: New Providence
Community Centre: Mondays - 6pm to Tpm. The
Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support group

meets the first Monday of each month at 6:30pm at
New Providence Community Centre, Blake Road.
Dinner is provided and free blood sugar, blood pres-

sure and cholesterol testing is available. For more info _

call 702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third
Monday of every month at 6pm @ Doctors Hospital
conference room.

CIVIC CLUBS
Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial
Hilton Monday's at 7pm ¢ Club 612315 meets Mon-

day 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach _

e Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial Hilton
Mondays at 7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC)
meets every third Monday of the month in the Board
Room of the British Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.



TUESDAY

@ HEALTH

‘Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Tuesday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at 5:30pm

_ on the second Tuesday of each month at their Head-

quarters at East Terrace, Centreville. Call 323.4482
for more info. ~~~" ~~ ee

Pre & Post’ Natal Fitness Classes ake; being held

8,

- 6:30pm'Tuesdays at Nasa GymiNastics Seagrapes

location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval is
required. Call 364.8423 to register for more info.

H CIVIC CLUBS

The Kiwanis Club of New Providence meets every
Tuesday at 7:30pm at the Holy Cross Community
Centre; Highbury Park.

The Luncheon Pilot Club of Nassau meets every
third Tuesday at SuperClubs Breezes, Cable Beach
at 12:30pm. We invite all community minded persons
to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7:30pm @ C
C Sweeting Senior School's Dining Room, College
Avenue off Moss Road. ° Club Cousteau 7343 meets
Tuesdays at 7:30pm in the Chickcharney Hotel,

Fresh Creek, Central Andros ° Club 7178 meets.

each Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer Society of the
Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Eta Psi Omega chap-
ter meets every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ the
Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort,
Cable Beach ¢ Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets
every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ Atlantic House,
IBM Office, 4th floor meeting room ¢ Alpha Phi
Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday, 6:30pm
at the British Colonial Hilton. Please call
502.4842/377.4589 for more info.

The Downtown Pilot Club of Nassau meets every.

third Tuesday of the month at 6pm at the J P Whit-
ney Building, First Terrace, Collins Avenue.

The Rotary Club of Nassau meets every Tuesday at
Luciano's of Chicago on East Bay Street. Fellowship
starts at 12:30pm with the meeting held from 1pm-
2pm.

WEDNESDAY



@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar
every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free appetizers and
numerous drink specials.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: New Providence
Community Centre: Wednesday - 7pm to 8pm. The
Nassau Group: Rosetta Street, Wednesday 6pm to
7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.









ACs sd vol

@ THE Bahamas International Film Festi-
val is pleased to announce the launch of its
Monthly Film Series. Please join us for the
first screening of the Series:

ELEUTHERAN ADVENTURE

Saturday, January 27 at 7:30pm

Downtown at Rawson Square

Free of charge

The Eleutheran Adventure is a documen-
tary film that involves

Kareem Mortimer and cameraman Kevin
Taylor hitchhiking from

Spanish Wells to the Southernmost point
on the island of Eleuthera with only $150 in
hand. Along the way théy meet a slew of
interesting characters that give them an hon-
est and entertaining look of life on the island.
The film explores Eleutheran Culture and
what it means to be Bahamian.



Coming next month:
N Half Nelson on February 24.

4

B



FREE Health and Wellness Lectures are held the
first Wednesday of every month at 6:30pm at New
Providence Community Center Blake Road. For
more information call 327.1660 or 327.2878. FREE
Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar and Cholesterol Screen-

ing.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas Support Group
meets every Wednesday from 5:30pm to 7pm at
Cancer Headquarters, two doors south of ZNS. Can-
cer patients, survivors, their family members and
friends are invited to attend. Phone 323.4482

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of SouthEast Nassau meets every
Wednesday from 1pm — 2pm at East Villa Restau-
rant, East Bay Street. Always an interesting, speaker
and great fellowship. If you would like to attend our
meetings please send an e-mail to bruno.pletsch-
er@gottardo.com or kathyvsmith@hotmail.com.

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta
Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated meets 6:30pm
every third Wednesday at the Bahamas National
Pride Building.

International Training in Communication, Essence
Club #3173 holds it’s bi-monthly meetings on the
1st and 3rd Wednesday of each month at Doctor's
Hospital Conference Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets ;

the second and fourth Wednesday of the month,
8pm @ St Augustine's Monastery.

The Kiwanis Club of Cable Beach invites the public
to its regular weekly meeting held every Wednesday
at 7:30pm at the British Colonial Hilton. Kiwanis is
4 worldwide service organisation dedicated to chang-
ing the world One Child, One Community at a time."

School and Community Nature Walk and Petting
Zoo - Free Every Wednesday from 1Oam to 2:30pm
at Earth Village Ranch, St Albans Drive and Colum-
bus Avenue (Chippingham). Call (242) 356.2274
now to make reservations. Open to all ages and
groups Monday-Sunday from 9am to 6pm. Inquire
about additional activities and programmes.

TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday. on the 4th
floor of the Ministry of Health, Meeting Street, at
6pm.

THURSDAY

@ ENTERTAINMENT

Shadowhand Entertainment presents an all Bahami-
an Talent Explosion this and every Thursday night at
the Patio Bar & Grill on Carmichael Road. This
event features upcoming Bahamian artist who are
ready to showcase their original material to the
world. There will also be a freestyle competition
every week which is open to the public at large.
Doors open at 8:30pm. Ladies free until 11pm - Gen-
tlemen - small door charge. See u there.

@ HEALTH
Free public health lectures featuring distinguished
physicians are held at Doctors Hospital every third
Thursday of the month at 6pm in the Doctors Hos-
pital Conference Room. Free screenings between
5pm & 6pm. For more information call 302.4603.

"The brewery of The Bahamas" —

sei ea ret SEOR DRED REAR IDOP MET DEES AOREREEETIELOS IIE DEAD ANT eae OOD RIAA DS OME REESLAESEEERERERRIEEE












RET T OLE L






Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to infor the public
its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Thursday opm to 7pm / 8:30pm te
9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes
location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval is
required. Call 364.8423 to register for more info

REACH - Resources & Education for Autism and
Related Challenges meets from 7pm -Ypm the sec-

BEC building, Blue Hill Road.

ond Thursday of each month in the cafeteria af the ,

@ CIVIC CLUBS \

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise has a breakfast
meeting every Thursday morning al Jam at the
British Colonial Hilton Hotel (Fellowship begins at
6:45am).

The Kiwanis Club of Over-the-Hill meets every
Thursday at 8pm at the Holy Cross Activity, Centre,
Soldier Road. Guests are welcome.

Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first, second
and third Thursday at the Ministry of Health &

’ Environment building on Meeting Street com

mencing at 7:30pm. Everyone is welcome to attend
¢ TM Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8:30pm @ Super
Clubs Breezes.

International Association of Administrative Profes-
sionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the third ‘Thurs-
day of every month @ SuperClubs Breezes, Cable
Beach, 6pm.

The recently established National tnsurance Board

‘Retiree Association (NIBRA). meets every fourth

Thursday in the month, in the National Insurance
Board's (NIB) training room, Wulf Road office com-
plex, at 6pm. All retirees are welcome,

The Rotary Club of West Nassau holds its weekly
meeting, every Thursday at Choices Restaurant on
the campus of the College of the Bahamas. Fellow-
ship starts at 12:30pm, with the meeting held from
1pm to 2pm.

FRIDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Friday 6pm to 7pm & S.s0pmr to
9:30pm. Sacred Heart Church: Friday opm to 7pm.
New Providence Community Centre: Friday 7pm
to 8pm.

@ CIVIC CLUBS
TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm © Bahamas Bap-
tist Community College Rm A19, fean St

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Pri-
day of each month, 7:30pm at the Fmmaus Centre at
St Augustine’s Monastery. For more info call
325.1947 after 4pm.

AMISTAD is a club which promotes the Spanish
language and culture in the community. Residents ol
the Bahamas who speak Spanish or are learning







Ballrc










PHyotos WELCOME

Spanish are invited to attend meetings on the third
Friday of the month during the academic year at
7pm in room 13 of COB's Tourism Training Centre.

@ CONCERTS

The Nassau Music Society will be holding its first
concert series for 2007 featuring Dmitri Berlinski, vio-
lin, and Elena Baksht, piano, on Friday, January 26
at Spm at St Paul’s Church Hall, Lyford Cay.



SATURDAY

@ HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Saturday mornings - 1Oam to 11am.

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third.
Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and December) @
the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes are
offered every third Saturday of the month from 9am-
1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Community Train-
ing Representative at 302.4732 for more information
and learn to save a life today.

CIVIC CLUBS -
JAR CYCLING: The Owners of JAR Cycling arc
pleased to offer a cycling clinic for juniors between 10°

and 17. The {ree clinic will be held every Saturday in

an effort to encourage kids to cycle. Parents inter-
ested in registering their children should contact
organisers at jareycling@gmail.com.

@ FAMILY REUNION

New - The Valley Family Reunion for former res-
idents and those reuniting with loved ones and friends ;

will be holding a

Dinner, Dance Celebration on Saturday, February.

3 - Cocktails at 8pm and dinner at 8:30pm - at the
British-Colonial Hilton Hotel in the Governor’s



Renew old acquaintances and meet friends from
school days. For more information telephone
328.5494, Tickets are available at McCartney’s Phar-
macy, Mount Royal Avenue. Part proceeds to ben-
efit children’s charities. \

lm CONCERTS :

The Nassau Music Society will be holding its first,
concert series for 2007 featuring Dmitri Berlinski, vio- ;
lin. and Elena Baksht, piano, on Saturday, January
27 at Spm at St Andrew’s Kirk, Shirley Street.

@ ATHLETICS

Star Trackers Track and Field Club will be

hosting the Baker Construction Bahamas, Ltd
Star Performers Track Classic on Saturday,

February 3 from 9am to 7pm at the Thomas A .

Robinson Track and Field Stadium, Queen
Elizabeth Sports Centre. The BAAA-sanc-
tioned event is for divisions U9-Open.

SUNDAY



f@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

lraveller's Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street, fea-
tures special entertainment - Gernie, Tabitha and the
Caribbean Express - very Sunday from 6:30pm to
9:30pm.

HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm:

m& SUNDAY

_ RELIGIOUS SERVICES

NEW - The Bahamas Metaphysical Society Inc - A
spiritual teaching society leading you to greater peace
of mind, health, prosperity and happiness - holds
Higher Consciousness Services every Sunday at
10am and weekly Meditation services every Wednes-
day at 7pm at Bowe’s Cove off Bernard Road. Inter-
ested persons are welcome to attend. For more infor-
mation contact by e-mail @ bahmetsol @hotmail.com
or call 393.0279.

Send all your civic and social events (attach pictures if
possible) to The Tribune via fax: 328.2398 or e-mail:
ybdeleveaux@tribunemedia.net - Out there in the sub-
ject line. ;



THE TRIBUNE

_ Ballroom. The evening will include cocktails, dinner.
“and dancing and a three course buffet dinner. A live
band will also be featured. Dress: Lounge Suit.





ose



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007, PAGE 13.



BAHAMAS INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL MONTHLY FILM SERIES

Eleutheran Adventure

is a crowc-

@ By JASON DONALD



THE Bahamas Internation-
al Film Festival kicks off its
Monthly Film Series this
weekend with the outdoor
screening of The Eleutheran
Adventure at Rawson Square
on Saturday.

This documentary was the
winner of the Audience
Award at the recent 3rd
Bahamas International Film
Festival and — right from the
off — it’s not hard to see why.

The film follows director
Kareem Mortimer when
decides to get out of Nassau,
quit his job, take 150 dollars
and travel across Eleuthera.

Along with cameraman
Kevin Taylor, Mortimer trav-
els from Spanish Wells to the
Southernmost point of the
island and the two meet an
incredibly wide range of peo-
ple who give their insight into
life on the island.

The movie is perfectly
paced: Mortimer doesn’t over
indulge with anyone we’re
introduced to - we just spend
enough time to give us a
flavour of each settlement and
then we’re on the road again.
And it’s almost impossible not
get the travel bug.

19 Cuban
migrants land
on military
erounds

in Key West

@ KEY WEST, Fla.

NINETEEN Cuban illegal
migrants came ashore in the
backyard of the home of
Naval Air Station Key West’s
commander, officials said,
according to Associated Press.

The group of 12 men, five
women and two children was
discovered Wednesday morn-
ing by an off-duty Defense
Department officer who was
jogging on U.S. military prop-
erty at Truman Annex, Key

: West police said.

The officer knocked on
Capt. J.R. Brown’s front door,
alerting him to the situation
and asking to use his phone
to call authorities.

The group arrived in what
appeared to be a homemade
boat, police said.

Brown asked a Spanish-

_ Speaking neighbor to meet

with the Cubans, who
“appeared to be in very good

‘ condition,” he said.

The captain said he knew
the arrival of Cuban immi-
grants near his backyard was a
possibility when he took the

'. post within the past year. Key

West is only 90 miles from
Cuba, and thousands of
Cubans try to reach the U.S.
each year by boat.

The 19 were to be processed

_ by U.S. Customs and Border

Protection.

Under USS. policy, Cubans
found on shore are generally
allowed to stay, while those

found at sea are usually

returned.





The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.










But for a documentary like
this to really work, it is essen-
tial that a narrative exists in
some form — even if isn’t the
original route the filmmakers
had in mind.

The Eleutheran Adventure
effortlessly achieves this by

keeping us entertained with
the islanders that we meet
before tying up the movie with
a crowd pleasing finale
focussing on the director.

And, by,the end, you really
do get a sense that you’ve
shared in the journey.

LF ONEE



@ THE ELEUTHERAN
ADVENTURE
Saturday,

January 27 at 7.30pm
Rawson Square

QDb ako carry a large sel

oils, feddlios and aduh nopellies



Diploma in Education
asa

Accredited * Registered « Recoc

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AO UETIOU UE TCT Tre Te

| Teacher Viatning Program for Untrained Teachers

Convenient Weekend Class Schedule
Hands-on Practicum (Teacher Training):
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US: Certifieation: (Prixis) Component ;
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Payment Plan Available

Classes begin on 9th February, 2006
Call now for registration information



oe yey ice ld ree ey. ected
isit us at ttp:sojournerdouglassblogspot.com
poses ces alle Laer Wal (2-1-8







pleaser

@ VIEW FROM THE TOP: a scene from The Eleutheran

Adventure, directed by Kareem Mortimer.



Secretary/Receptionist

} Offshore Company is seeking a dynamic, mature,
| and motivated individual for administrative support.

° Fluent in both English and Spanish

° Must be well-groomed

° Must be computer literate and proficient
with Microsoft Office

° Preferably have at least 2 years experience
in related field

Send resume to: Human Resources

P.O.Box CB13323

Nassau, Bahamas

or Fax to: 323-4871

or mail to: jsoler@tgoltd.com



Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR THE LATE

HAZEL EVANGELINE
GIBSON-SAWYER, 89

of Stapledon Gardens and
formerly of Savannah Sound,
Eleuthera, will be held on
Saturday, 10:00 a.m. at
Wesley Methodist Church,
Malcolm Road East. Bishop
Rev. Dr. Raymond R. Neilly,
Rev. Dr. Kenneth A.
Huggins, Rev. Henley B.
Perry, Rev. Edward J. Sykes,
Rev. Stacia M. Williams-
Christmas and Rey. Dr.
Godfrey B. Huyler will
officiate. Interment will be
made in the Western
Cemetery, Nassau, Street.





She is survived by seven daughters, Dorothea Charlow, Vivenne
Huggins, Juanita Cecile Edgecombe, Cynthia Sturrup, Judith
Huyler, Carmen Elaine Sawyer and Andrea Gaynelle Wood;
twp sons, Garth and Clyde Warren Sawyer; three daughters-
in-law, Dorcas, Evelyn Daphne and Vernita Sawyer; five sons-
in-law, Rev. Dr. Kenneth Huggins, Burke Edgecombe, Alfred
Sturrup, Rev. Godfrey Huyler and Ralph Wood II; one adopted
sister, Rev. Enid Cooper of Savannah Sound, Eleuthera: two
sisters-in-law, Nera Sawyer and Louise Gibson; one brother-
in-law, Neville Bethel Sr.; grandchildren, Donna Bannister,
Claire Patton, Dawn, Vincent, Dale and Denis Charlow, Neil
Huggins, Douglas Sawyer, Jefferson Edgecombe, Caron Dean,
Carla Barr, Gavan, Mauricio and D'Marco Huyler Julian,
Darren, Giles, Gaylyn, Gabrielle and Daniel Sawyer, Sara and
Ralph Wood III, also Whitney Patton, Patrice Huggins, Cindy
Sawyer, Godfrey Dean, Desmond Barr Wendy, Yolanda and
Raquel Huyler, Ebony Johnson, Sandra St. Elvardo Rolle and
Desmond Bannister; Katarina, Larissa & Noelle Sawyer; great
grandchildren, Daynah and Vincent Donald Charlow II,
Dominique and Danielle Banniser, Taneilsha Huggins, Olivia,
Ch'nae, Douglas Jr. and Dante Sawyer, Maria Edgecombe,
Philecia Nairn, Donisha and Crystal Dean, Daniel and Darius
Barr, Katherine, Cien, Gabrielle and Brian Huyler; nieces,
Dazelle Bethel, Nurse Gina Rolle, Gayle Carey, Dr. Gill Gibson-
Marche, Patricia Bastian, Patricia Gibson, Rosalie Hall, Marjorie
Archer and Maria Neely; nephews, Bursel Gibson, D'Costa
and Neville Bethel Jr. and Lawrence Sawyer; survivors of
William, David, Timothy, Marion, Sarah Emma Gibson,
Malvina Clarke, Rhoda Bullard, Eunice Thompson and Ida
Crawford.

Other relatives and friends including Llonella and Emma
Cooper and families, Gloria Strachan, Jane Bethel, Peggy
Lockhart, Rev. and Mrs. Joseph Richardson of Chicago,
Gertrude Gibson, Olga Wilchombe, Leah Cunningham, Thelma
Thompson, Ella Whitfield, Tommy Gibson, Meagan Taylor,
Cheryl Charlow, Mr. and Mrs. Basil Lewis, Mr. and Mrs.
Granville O'Brien, Mrs. and Mrs. William Rolle, Mrs. Malvina
Wong and family, Mr. Percentie, Rosemarie, Kolamae Judy
Newman, Larona Peterkin (care giver); the communities of
Savannah Sound and Palmetto Point, Eleuthera including Marie
Johnson, Manette Clarke, Muriel Cooper, Angela Simmons,
Geraldine and Valerie Ingraham, Verna Cooper-Hutchinson,
The Gibson Family Reunion, The Gibson, Wood and Robinson
families' The Goffs of Belize and Hyacinth Byron of Nevis,
The Methodist Church MCCA families especially Providence
and Wesley and The Andros Circuit.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians,
#44 Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and
on Saturday at the church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.





THE TRIBUNE



i” “as Ue

30 days extension
for passport rule

FROM page one

“Initial discussions will start
on Monday. We will see how
we are going to phase it (the
new passport requirements) in.
This will be a period to edu-
cate the American people
more,” he said.

Mr Wilchcombe said that he
was also able to negotiate fora
further review of the travel ini-
tiative and its implementation
timeline.

That review, he said, will be
held in March in Washington,
DC.

“By that time I hope to have
assembled an entire Caribbean
team to come with me to

@ MINISTER of Tourism
_Obie Wilchcombe



Washington,” the minister
said. ;

Mr Wilchcombe said he will
work very hard until then to
convince the US government
that the Caribbean countries
and American travellers need
another year to sufficiently

prepare themselves for the

new passport rules.

The minister said he was
very pleased with this devel-
opment and with the response
by the US government.

He said that even if the trav-
el initiative results in only a

minor decrease in the number .

of US visitors to the Bahamas

and the region, it would nev-
ertheless have a negative
impact on the tourism indus-
try. ;

“Tf we are affected by one
per cent or two per cent or ten
per cent, it’s the same affect. I
was particularly concerned, not
only for us, but for the smaller
Caribbean countries,” he said,

Minister Wilchcombe said
that in the case of having the
implementation date of the
travel initiative moved it was
necessary “to get in the door”
in Washington, DC.

“We need to build relation-
ships that is what it comes
down to. It is difficult to get
into the office, but it is funda-
mental that we do.

“You can’t run a country, we
can’t just have a Bahamas sit-
ting out there and we're affect-
ed by decisions being made
every day, it’s important to
develop friendships and rela-
tionships,” the minister said.

Mr Wilchcombe said he was
able to have the Caribbean’s

concerns regarding the WHT]
heard in Washington, DC,
because he wrote directly to

_ the Secretary of the Depart-

ment of Homeland Security
and to Congressman Bennie
Thompson, chairman of the
House Committee on Home-
land Security

“It all came together. | am
pleased that the American
government and especially
Congressman Bennie Thomp-
son took the time to listen to
our concerns and supported
the position the Bahamas put
forth,” he said.
« Customs and Border Pro-
tection officers at US airports
were informed on Wednesday
not to turn away any American
visitors travelling to the
Caribbean without a passport

The Associated Press report
ed that the travellers instead
received a warning and a pass-
port application and had their
names entered into the Cus-
toms and Border Protection's
computer system.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007, PAGE 15

eRe bart aeynreent



i



Feel good
about eating.







a

makes it easy to have a



Court of Appeal president
expresses concern over
the death penalty

FROM page one

Her partially-clothed body, which reportedly also had burns on
‘it, was found in a quarry pit off Cowpen Road. fe Nhe

Tido was sentenced to:death in April, 2006, by Justice Anita
Allen, who ruled that the death penalty was appropriate.

It was the first time since the Privy Council had ruled against the
Bahamas’ mandatory death penalty, leaving sentencing to the dis-
cretion of the trial judge, that a Bahamian judge had excercised dis-
cretion to hand down the death sentence on a convicted murderer.

In March, 2006, the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council
(SCPC) decided to abolish the mandatory death sentence for those
convicted of murder in the Bahamas. :

The ruling was the result of an appeal brought by prisoners For-

rest Bowe Jr. and Tron Davis who had been on death row for six and’

eight years respectively following convictions for murder.
In October, 2006, Tido’s attorney Wayne Munroe, president of
the Bahamas Bar Association, made submissions to the Court of

Appeal that the procedure followed by the trial judge in deter-

mining the appropriate sentence was “flawed” and amounted to nul-
lity on the basis that it was cruel and unusual punishment.

- Yesterday, director of public prosecutions Bernard Turner made
submissions on behalf of the Crown before president of the
Bahamas Court of Appeal Justice Dame Joan Sawyer, Emmanuel
Osadebay and Lorris Ganpatsingh.

The arguments yesterday centered on section two of the Capital
Punishment and Procedure Act.

Dame Joan Sawyer said: “Mr Turner, I think I told youand Mr
Munroe this the last time, and Mr Munroe knows this about me,
because I have said it on more than one occasion. I am not a sup-
porter of capital punishment. However, I did swear an oath when
I took judicial office that I would do justice without fear or favour,
affection or illness, according to the laws and usages of the
Bahamas. ane

“Now the law in the Bahamas as sei out in the Capital Punish-
ment and Procedure Act says that where a person is convicted of
murder then the judge shall sentence him in this manner; you shall
suffer death in the manner provided by law.” :

She said the word “shall’ in the act’ is usually interpreted as
mandatory, and that it would suggest that the judge has no discre-
tion besides from a common law ground in these cases.

The president said the Privy Council ruling did not deal with sit-
uations that involved all of the other lesser homicides that carried
a maximum penalty of life imprisonment, like armed robbery with
a gun, and manslaughter. , :

“While I consciously and conscientiously agree that as far as
possible courts should make the punishment fit the crime, I ask
myself what is left where it is the cold blooded killing of another
human being - if you are making the punishment fit the crime - see-
ing that life imprisonment is applied to those others,” she stated.

The prosecution presented arguments to the court late into the
evening, but was not allowed to complete submissions due to time.

Maxo Tido’s appeal is expected before the court again in March.

"We don't like counting it so..
shop till ya drop!



Two more are charged in
connection with toddler's

death in speedboat incident
FROM page one

tested.

When the samples were tested by the British team, it was

reported that the driver’s blood contained 5.1 nanograms of car-
_ boxy-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), an active ingredient in mar-
" jjuana plants.

The Bahamian police claim that while this indicated the dri-
ver had been using cannabis, it did not mean that his ability to
drive or control the boat was impaired.

However, the new report warns that the samples may have
deteriorated since 2002 because of the way they were stored and
the readings may have been higher at the time they were taken

Earlier this week, James Alexander Bain, the driver of the
speed-boat, was atraigned in court and was charged with
manslaughter by neghgence.

‘[wenty-five-year-old Bain was granted $10,000 bail.

Yesterday two more:persons were arraigned in respect to the’

case. sc
Evengeless Williamson. 65. of East Wood Boulevard was
charged with manslaughter by negligence and perjury and (lu
ford Nottage. 52, of Eastwood Estates was charged with
manslaughter by negligcuice.
Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez granted Williamson bail on
$12,000 and Nottage was granted bail on $10,000.
The deceased toddler’s father Paul, 42, and mothei Anidica.
40, from Orpington, Kent have receatly hit out at the Bahamas
- government for failing to prosecute whoever might have been
responsible for their son’s death.







great-tasting, nutritious meal —-
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According to a recent report from a British newspaper, the
Gallagher family want the driver tried for at least the manslaugh-

ter of their yourig son.

It was claimed the powerful speedboat was out of control at

the time.

“We are devastated. We want the investigation to be re-
opened and will not siop until there is justice.” exclaimed the

boy’s father

All of the accused are expected back in court at the end of the

month.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, cainpaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award. :

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

AP YA el ee

Wa




Tel; (242) 393-4002
Fax: (242) 393-4096



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BUSINESS&SPORTS [F

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FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007





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THE MARKETS ECONOMY 7
STOCKS, MUTUAL FUNDS, 5-6B , : :
pow30 —12,502.56 -119.21 W l ) : t = h ] l e 2 QO O
S&P 500 1,423.90 -16.23 W XIS ing ome Sa e S p un e In )
NASDAQ 2,434.24 -32.04 W . .
: A ff Sales of previously owned analysts said, given a continuing huge _ the homes for big profits. However, other analysts cautioned

10-YR NOTE 4.88 +.07 homes in the U.S. declined in backlog of unsold homes that will David Lereah, chief economist for that the rebound will likely be

54.23 “1.14 Vv December for the first time in keep downward pressure on prices, the Realtors, said that 40 percent of extremely slow because it will take

CRUDE OIL

Stocks

A kM ea Bea HEE

oY oe

dive on
~ homes
drop

BY TIM PARADIS
Associated Press
- NEW YORK — Stocks suf-
fered their biggest pullback in
‘two months Thursday, with the
Dow Jones industrials logging a
triple-digit decline as a lacklus-
ter home sales report and a dis-
appointing bond auction halted
the market’s two-day rally. A
less-than-enthusiastic reception
- for the Treasury’s latest sale of
five-year notes sent bond prices
falling and yields rising sharply,
rattling stock investors already
worried about higher interest
rates,

Stocks fell further while the
yield on the 10-year Treasury
note rose to highs not seen
since the summer.

“We had a great run,” said

- Ryan Larson, senior equity
trader at Voyager Asset Man-
agement, a division of RBC Dain
Rauscher. “I think people are
kind of tired right now and

* Jooking-for-other avenues.”

The Dow fell 119.21, or 0.94
percent, to 12,502.56.

Broader stock indicators also
fell. The Standard & Poor’s 500

index fell 16.23, or 1.13 percent, .

to 1,423.90 and the Nasdaq com-
posite index was down 32.04, or
130 percent, at 2,434.24. The
pullback comes a day after the
Nasdaq rose well over 1 percent
and the Dow set record trading
and closing highs. The Dow’s

decline erased nearly all the .

previous two-day rally of about
145 points.

Bond prices fell in response
to the auction and the Realtors’
news, which also showed the
inventory of existing homes
available for sale fell 7.9 percent
to 3.51 million. The yield on the
benchmark 10-year note jumped

to 4.87 percent from 4.81 per-

cent late Wednesday. The dol-
jar was mixed against other
major currencies, while gold
prices fell.
David Thompson, invest-
- ment officer at Dwight Asset
Management, said the data hint-
ing at stability in the housing
market unnerved the bond mar-
ket because it could signal the
economy is holding up better
than expected and raise the
specter of higher interest rates.

\

He said some bond investors’

were surprised by the tepid
response to the note auction.

“I think the market is just

_coming to grips with the fact
that the economy is stronger
than folks thought two months
ago,” Thompson said.

Investors have wondered for
months whether the housing
sector and the broader econ-
omy could share a similar fate;
that is, if a pullback in the hous-
ing market would drag down
the rest of the economy.

Light, sweet crude fell $1.14
to $54.23 per barrel on the New
York Mercantile Exchange.
Investors halted recent sharp
drops after growing more confi-
dent OPEC production cuts
would occur.

Declining issues outnum-
bered advancers by more than 3
to 1 on the New York Stock
Exchange, where consolidated
volume came to 3.11 billion
shares compared with 2.86 bil-
lion traded Wednesday.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies was down
9.84, or 1.24 percent, at 784.19.

Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei
stock average closed down 0.28
percent. Britain’s FTSE 100
closed down 0.72 percent, Ger-
many’s DAX index fell 0.43 per-
cent, and France’s CAC-40 was
down 0.51 percent.

three months, capping the
biggest annual drop since 1989.

BY MARTIN CRUTSINGER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — After a five-
year boom, the nation’s housing mar-
ket cooled considerably in 2006 with
existing home sales falling by the
largest amount in 17 years.

While the worst may be over, the

‘rebound could be slow in coming,

particularly in former boom areas.
The National Association of Real-
tors reported Thursday that sales of
existing homes totaled 6.48 million
units for all of 2006, down 8.4 percent
from 2005 when 7.08 million existing
homes were sold, the fifth straight
year that sales hit an all-time high.
That boom drove prices up at dou-
ble-digit rates and caused a stampede
of investors into the market who pur-
chased none hoping to en sell

home sales in 2005, the peak of the
housing boom, represented pur-
chases by investors and people buy-
ing vacation homes.

“A lot of those people have now
left the market,” Lereah said, predict-
ing that sales have bottomed out and
should start a slow rebound in 2007.

“With fingers and toes crossed, it
appears that we have hit bottom in
the existing home market,” Lereah
said.

time for unsold inventories to be
worked down and for speculators to
unload homes they purchased hoping
for a quick profit.

“Last year was a tough year for
housing and 2007 will be difficult as
well,” said Mark Zandi, chief econo-
mist at Moody’s Economy.com.
“Sales are near a bottom, but prices
and new home construction will con-

*TURN TO ECONOMY, 4B



AGRICULTURE











| é

]

i In an effort to keep pace
| with the pressures of
globalization, U.S. Sugar is
building the third-largest
sugar mill in the world.

BY SUSAN SALISBURY
Palm Beach Post

Deep in Florida’s Big Sugar
land, a new mill is rising that
wants to be the biggest of them
all.

U.S. Sugar is pouring more
than $100 million into an
expansion and modernization
of its 1927 Clewiston Sugar Mill
that will turn it into the largest
in the nation and third-largest
in the world, the company says.

The mill is U.S. Sugar’s
answer to the globalization that
is washing over the sugar
industry, like most other indus-
| tries. To stay in business in the
| face of more sugar imports, the
i





RAISING CANE: U.S. Sugar is pouring more than $100 million into an expansion and
modernization of its 1927 sugar mill in Clewiston, Fla.

Sweet Success |



INTERNATIONAL IDEAS: ‘Arie Jansen, the mill expansion
project’s manager, notes that the project employs y
technologies developed all over the world.

company wants to compete
with low-cost producers such
as India, Brazil and Thailand,
the last two home to the
world’s largest sugar mills.

PHOTOS BY TAYLOR JONES/PALM BEACH POST



However, labor costs in those
countries are much lower and
environmental standards less

° TURN TO SUGAR, 4B



AIRLINES ;

British Airways

grounds flights

next week as
strike looms

lf British Airways is canceling all its flights
to and from London’s Heathrow airport and
several more from its Gatwick terminal for
two days next week because of a strike by
cabin crew.

BY JANE WARDELL
Associated Press *

LONDON — British Airways said Thursday
that a total of 1,300 flights to and from the London
airports will be grounded on Tuesday and
Wednesday during a 48-hour walkout by cabin
crew over pay and sick leave policy.

BA Chief Executive Willie Walsh said the
carrier still hoped to reach an agreement
with the Transport and General Workers union,

but the contingency plans were necessary after .

talks between the two broke down earlier Thurs-
day.

“If we postponed the cancellation of flights
until the eve of a strike, customers would have
virtually no time to make alternative arrange-
ments,” said Walsh, adding that more than 15,000
customers a day had contacted the airline since
news of the strike broke.

“We remain absolutely determined to search
for a negotiated settlement and our door remains
open to the T&G, day or night,” he added.

BA said that passengers affected by the strike
will be able to claim a full refund, rebook their
flight for a later date, or be rebooked by the air-
line onto another carrier.

Negotiations between the union, which repre-
sents about 11,000 of the airline’s 14,000 cabin
crew, on pay and sick leave policy fell apart with
each blaming the other for the failure to reach
agreement.

The union has proposed further walkouts for
Feb. 5-7 and Feb. 12-14 if the dispute is not
resolved.

“The company has failed to hear the voice of
common sense. This is a sad day for passengers
and cabin crew alike,” said Jack Dromey, deputy
secretary-general of the union.

British Airways said it would fly some empty
planes out of Heathrow on Monday and Tuesday
to pick up passengers in other destinations, but
warned of further cancellations on either side of
the official strike dates because crew and aircraft
will be out of position.

_ The airline has opened an extra call center,
staffed by 100 workers, to deal with customer
inquiries.

Analysts said the strike action could cost the
airline between $20 million to $29.6 million a day.
British Airways shares fell 1.3 percent to $10.44 on

SOFTWARE

& Delays in the launch of Vista
hurt Microsoft’s profits, but
second-quarter earnings fell less
than analysts predicted after the
world’s largest software maker
sold more Xbox video games and
database programs.

BY BRIAN BERGSTEIN
Associated Press

The long-delayed launch of the
Windows Vista operating system cut
into fiscal second-quarter profits at
Microsoft, which reported a 28 per-
cent drop in earnings Thursday
despite revenue growth that
exceeded forecasts.

In the last three months of the
year, earnings fell to $2.63 billion, or
26 cents per share, from $3.65 billion,
or 34 cents per share, during the same
period last year.

Analysts. polled by Thomson
Financial expected the Redmond,
Wash.-based software maker to post
a profit of 23 cents per share.

Revenue rose to $12.5 billion, a 6



percent gain from $11.8 billion in the
year-ago quarter. Analysts were
expecting just shy of $12.1 billion in
sales.

“Overall, it was a strong quarter,”
said Robert Breza, an analyst at RBC
Capital Markets.

Microsoft shares fell 64 cents, 2.1
percent, to close Thursday at $30.45
on the Nasdaq Stock Market, ending
an uneven day in which the stock also
hit a 52-week high of $31.48. In
extended trading after the earnings
release, the stock initially shot up 3
percent but later was trading at
$30.50.

Although Windows Vista and
Office 2007, the latest editions of
Microsoft’s flagship products, do not
hit the consumer market until Tues-
day, they have been available for
businesses since Nov. 30, two-thirds
of the way through the company’s
second quarter.

Even so, Microsoft’s “client” divi-
sion, responsible for Windows,
posted a 25 percent drop in sales to

$2.59 billion. And the business divi-
sion, which includes Office, saw a 5
percent drop to $3.5] billion.

The falls were expected because
Microsoft had warned it would be
heavily deferring Windows and
Office revenue from the second quar-
ter to the current period. That was
done to account for coupons that
recent computer buyers got to let
them upgrade their existing software
to Vista and Office.

The deferrals trimmed $1.64 bil-
lion from Microsoft’s second-quarter
revenue, and $1.13 billion, or 11 cents
per share, from profits. If not for the
deferrals, Microsoft said revenue
would have leaped 20 percent in the
quarter.

“That’s impressive growth for any
company, let alone one of our size,”
Chief Financial Officer Chris Liddell
said in a conference call.

Previously, Microsoft had said the
deferred revenue would be around

° TURN TO MICROSOFT, 4B



the London Stock Exchange.

Delays with Vista cut into Microsoft’s profits

TED S. WARREN/AP
PROFIT DROPS: As a Vista banner
is displayed on its campus,
Microsoft said Thursday its fiscal
second-quarter profit fell 28
percent.





4B | FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007 _

GUN MAKER

Smith

BY ADAM GORLICK
Associated Press

SPRINGFIELD, Mass. —
Smith & Wesson may be best
recognized as the brand of
choice for Dirty Harry, the
movie cop who warned punks
his .44 Magnum was “the most
powerful handgun in the
world.”

But that was in 1971, and
much has changed in the past
36 years.

Police officers want lighter-
weight pistols than the bulky
steel revolver “Dirty” Harry
Callahan barely concealed
under a sport coat. Soldiers
need foolproof weapons that
won’t get jammed by the des-
ert sands.

There are guns now more
powerful than the .44, and
Smith & Wesson has realized
it can’t get by on its name
alone.

That’s why Mike Golden,
Smith & Wesson’s CEO for the
past two years, has targeted

AGRICULTURE

new technologies and sales to
the military and police depart-
ments to ensure the compa-
ny’s future.

A past corporate boss at
Black & Decker, Kohler and
The Stanley Works, Golden .
knew more about power tools
and toilets than the .40-caliber
pistols he jokes about hardly
being able to hit a target with.

“When I joined the com-
pany, I had never shot a fire-
arm before in my life,” the 52-
year-old said. “I tell people the
board wasn’t
marksman.”

EARNINGS WERE FLAT

When he took over the 155-
year-old Springfield-based
company, its earnings were
flat. The country was at war,
and the military’s handgun
contracts were all going to
Italian-based Beretta. Hand-
gun sales to police depart-
ments — a market that Smith
& Wesson once had 98 per-





TAYLOR JONES/PALM BEACH POST

HIGH TECH: The new Clewiston, Fla., sugar mill automates
many processes with high-tech computers, making the
mill more efficient and reducing the need for labor.

U.S. Sugar gives

* SUGAR

stringent.

So U.S. Sugar is on a mis-
sion to become the nation’s
most cost-efficient sugar pro-
ducer, with the help of the
new mill.

“This will make us the low-
est-cost producer in Florida
and the U.S.,” spokeswoman
Judy Sanchez said.

Florida grows close to
400,000 acres of sugar cane,
the bulk of it in Palm Beach
. County. However, a recent
study by Oxford, England-
based LMC International
found Florida was the 18th-
lowest-cost producer of sugar
when compared with 107 cane
and sugar beet-producing
countries, Sanchez says.

So U.S. Sugar embarked on
project Breakthrough.

The company brought
experts — many of them
mechanical and chemical
engineers who have worked
in the sugar industry in more
than 30 countries — to its
headquarters in Clewiston,
Fla.

In early 2004, it assembled
a team of 20 people it called
the Technology Forum. They
spent two weeks mapping out
the process of building a new
plant and determining which
technology to use.

“The technology is from
Brazil, South Africa, Louisi-
ana, Finland and France,” said
Arno Jansen, 45, the project
manager, who is originally
from South Africa, during a
tour of the mill and refinery
on 200-plus acres. “A lot of

INTERNET

the guys here are from South

Africa, Europe, the U.K.”
The three-year project is

two-thirds done. The third

phase — completing the
refurbished sugar-boiling
house — is scheduled for
October.

The mill will grind 38,000
to 40,000 tons of cane a day.

The expansion is being
done around the existing mill,

. which is still operating during
the project.

Among the ways the mill
will save money: more auto-
mation and fewer jobs.

The company’s Bryant
mill, in operation since 1963 at
Canal Point outside Pahokee,
Fla., will close when it wraps
up its final season this year.
All the company’s milling
operations will be consoli-
dated at the Clewiston mill.

As in numerous other
industries facing globaliza-
tion, employees will take a hit.
The milling workforce will be
cut 60 percent from 570
employees at the two mills to
226, says Neil Smith, U.S. Sug-
ar’s vice president for sugar
manufacturing and a chemical
engineer.

“Because of sugar alloca-
tions, you can’t sell more
sugar,” Smith says. “We had
two factories. We decided
combining the two would be
the most cost efficient.”

Automation is evident at
the mill’s control room, which
five employees run with 20-
plus computers and several
overhead video screens
enabling them to monitor and
control the operation.

Debate stirs about

BY BRIAN BERGSTEIN
Associated Press

BOSTON — When a blog-
ger revealed this week that
Microsoft wanted to pay him
to fix purported inaccuracies
in technical articles on Wiki-
pedia, the software company
endured online slams and a
rebuke from the Web encyclo-
pedia’s founder.

The imbroglio raises a big-
ger question: Why is it so bad
to pay someone to write some-
thing on Wikipedia? After all,
most contributors to the “free

edit” probably have some per-
sonal motivation to dive into a
subject.

That’s what ran through
Gregory Kohs’ mind last year
when he launched My WikiBiz,
a service that offered to write
Wikipedia entries for busi-
nesses for $49 to $99. A mar-
ket researcher in West Ches-
ter, Pa., Kohs believed that the
corporate world was under-
represented in the sprawling
Web encyclopedia.

“It is strange that a minor
Pokémon character will get a

,200-word article, but a For-







CHARLES KRUPA/AP

looking to finda yew taRGETS: Smith & Wesson CEO Mike Golden has

targeted technologies and markets beyond some of its
well-known products, like the 1911 pistol, above, that
helped produce a 46 percent jump in 2Q profit this year.

cent control over — were
mostly going to Glock, an Aus-
trian company.

“The company had been
under-managed and under-
marketed for the last 10 to 15
years, at least,” Golden said.
“Our research shows that it

SOFTWARE

Vista delays cut

* MICROSOFT

$1.5 billion. Analysts inter-
preted the higher result as a
sign that more consumers
snapped up new PCs than
expected, meaning the
upgrade coupons helped stim-
ulate demand.

Previous evidence of PC
demand had been unclear.
Two leading analyst firms,
Gartner and IDC, reported
last week that PC sales rose 7
percent to 8 percent world-
wide in the end-of-year quar-
ter but declined in the United
States.

“The deferred revenue
number for Vista is pretty
good. It gives us some sense
of the early level of interest in
Vista,” said Sid Parakh, an

analyst at McAdams Wright.

Ragen. ;

A huge reason for Micro-
soft’s overall revenue gain
was the performance of the
entertainment and devices
division, which includes the
Xbox 360 video game console
and Gears of War, Decem-
ber’s top-selling game,
according to market research-
ers at NPD Group.

The entertainment division
saw revenue hit $2.96 billion,
a 76 percent jump. The unit
lost $289 million, however,
roughly even with last year.

Also in that division is.
Microsoft’s new Zune music |

ECONOMY

doesn’t matter whether you're
male or female, old or young,
Democrat or Republican, like
guns or don’t like guns, the
perception of the brand is
extremely positive. That’s
what intrigued me, that this
brand that everybody knows

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3 Character Map

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(gb Content

(gb) CryptnetUrCache

4 “ERLs | : ;

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__MiamiHerald.c

and everybody loves wasn’t
being utilized.”

Golden hired a Washing-
ton, D.C. lobbying firm to go
after government contracts. In

. the past two years, the com-

pany has made four deals
worth a total of $20 million to
make the 9 mm pistols the
Army is giving to security
forces in Afghanistan.

STRONG GROWTH

Smith & Wesson’s earnings
have seen double-digit growth
since Golden took over. The
company’s work force stands
at about 900 non-union

employees, 200 of which were

hired in the past two years.

The company reported
$98.4 million in sales for its
second quarter that ended in
October, an increase of 46 per-
cent from the same period in
the year before. Its net sale
expectations for the 2008 fis-
cal year are about $320 mil-
lion.

Peer estare sr ieit)
Documents
| Pictures

eesti

| Search

Hmitrecinia guises
Computer

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Neosat colt
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Help and Support





MICROSOFT VIA AP

SLOW START: Microsoft’s delays in launching its new Vista
operating system - the’start menu from Vista is seen
above - helped cause a 28 percent drop in earnings.

player, which hit the market
in mid-November to soft
reviews. Liddell said the com-
pany remains confident it can
sell 1 million Zunes by the end

of June.

Microsoft’s server division,
which sells software for cor-
porate data centers, was the
other standout performer. Its

‘Financial. /
For the full fiscal year,



& Wesson takes aim at new markets

About 75 percent of the
company’s sales are in the
sporting goods market, which
has remained steady despite
gun control efforts.

But government sales are
still a major aim for Golden.

This year, the military
handgun contract that Beretta
has had a lock on for nearly 20
years is expected to come up
for bid.

Analysts say that deal could
fetch about $310 million, and
predict that Smith & Wesson’s
chances to land it are good,
but far from guaranteed.

“The government is going
to buy the guns that fit their
needs and not just a brand
name,” said Eric Wold, manag-
ing director at San Francisco-
based Merriman Curhan Ford.

Golden realizes that, and

has quickly fused the compa-
ny’s popularity with a need to
advance its technology by try-
ing to reclaim ground that
Smith & Wesson lost to Glock.

Microsoft profits

revenue leaped 17 percent to
$2.85 billion, while its profits
rose 35 percent.

“Tt’s a continuation of a
very good trend in our busi-
ness,” Liddell said in an inter-
view.

Microsoft also updated its
outlook — Liddell predicted
“an excellent year overall” —
but appeared to give analysts
little reason to alter their
expectations.

In the current quarter,
Microsoft predicts earnings of
45 cents to 46 cents per share
on $13.7 billion to $14 billion
in revenue, helped by the
deferrals from the second
quarter. Analysts ‘already
were expecting 46 cents per
share and $14 billion in reve-

.*

Bee ase

nue, according to Thomson , .._

which ends June 30, Microsoft
foresees earnings of $1.45 to
$1.47 per share, with revenue
of $50.2 billion to $50.7 billion.

. That was slightly ahead of the

estimates already held on
Wall Street: $1.45 per share
and revenue of $50.5 billion.
For the first half of its fiscal
year, Microsoft earned $6.10
billion, 61 cents per share, on
revenue of $23.4 billion. In the
comparable period a year ear-
lier, Microsoft’s profit was
$6.79 billion, 63 cents per
share, with revenue of $21.6

' billion.

Existing home sales drop sharply

* ECONOMY

tinue to fall throughout most
of this year. I don’t expect the
market to show broad
improvement until 2008.”

Even with the sales decline
in 2006, the median price of a
new home managed to rise
slightly last year to $222,000,
compared to a median, or
midpoint price, of $219,600 in
2005.

However, the 1.1 percent
price increase last year was
far below the 12.4 percent
price surge in 2005.

Analysts said prices are
likely to continue falling in
such formerly red-hot mar-
kets as California, Florida,
Arizona, Nevada and the
Northeast corridor.

“There was an unprece-
dented boom in housing that

privately

tune 500 company will get...
maybe 100 words,” he said.
Kohs, 38, said he was com-
mitted to having MyWikiBiz
create only legitimate Wikipe-
dia entries — neutral, foot-
noted and just on organiza-
tions with a sizable presence.
Kohs researched Wikipedia
. to see whether his idea vio-
lated the site’s communal
spirit. He found Wikipedia’s
Reward Board, an internal
forum for people who would
like to see certain topics intro-
duced or improved so they
have a chance of achieving the

created a lot of imbalances
that have to be righted before
the market revives,” Zandi
said. “We have gone from
boom to bust and the bottom

’ is here to stay at least until

this time next year.”

For December, sales of
existing homes fell by 0.8 per-
cent to a seasonally adjusted
annual rate of 6.22 million
units. ,

Analysts had been hoping
for a small increase after sales
gains in October and Novem-
ber, the first back-to-back
increases since the spring of
2005. He

The median sales price in
December was unchanged at
$222,000, the same as Decem-
ber a year ago, which repre-
sented an improvement after
four straight months in which
the median sales price had

fallen compared to the same
month a year ago, the longest
stretch of such declines on
record.

The slowdown in housing
has been a major factor drag-
ging down overall economic
growth, trimming more than a
percentage point from growth
in the July-September quarter,
when the economy expanded
at a lackluster 2 percent
growth rate.

Still, economists are grow-
ing more confident that the
housing bust will not be
severe enough to push the
economy into an outright
recession, as job growth out-
side of housing-related indus-
tries has remained strong,
helping to bolster consumer
spending.

By section of the country,
sales in December were down

the most in the West, a drop
of 9.1 percent, and the North-
east, where sales fell by 2.8
percent.

Sales rose by 4.3 percent in
the Midwest and 0.8 percent
in the South.

For the entire year, sales
were down in all regions of
the country, dropping 19.6
percent in the West, 7.2 per-
cent in the Northeast, 6.6 per-
cent in the Midwest and 5.1
percent in the South.

In other economic news,
the Labor Department
reported that the number of
newly laid off workers filing
claims for unemployment
benefits rose to 325,000 last
week, an increase of 36,000,
which was the biggest one-
week jump since the hurri-
cane-related layoffs in the fall
of 2005.

paid writers on Wikipedia

status of “featured article.”
Here’s what got Kohs’
attention: Offers for barter or
even cash are common on the
forum, and the person making
the offer can remain anony-
mous. Indeed, on Wednesday,
someone was ponying up $55
for whoever could get an arti-
cle about Lithuania to reach
featured status.
So Kohs and his sister
decided to launch My WikiBiz.
But a few days after they put
out a press release in August,
MyWikiBiz’s account on Wiki-
pedia was blocked. Wikipedia

founder Jimmy Wales called
Kohs to tell him MyWikiBiz
was “antithetical” to Wikipe-
dia’s mission, as Kohs recalls

the conversation.

After several disagree-
ments, Kohs was permanently
shut out of Wikipedia.

LATE TRADING



4p.m. 6:35 p.m. Late 4 6:35 p.m. Late

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“THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007, PAGE 5B



i el a
Tax incentives sought for Jewish group visit

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter



THE Ministry of Tourism is to
request special tax incentived to
accommodate a group of Jewish lead-
ers who will be celebrating the
Passover on Grand Bahama this April.

The group, which is several hundred
strong, has committed to staying on
the island this year and next, with pos-
sible stays up to 2010.

James Malcolm, executive director of
group travel at the Ministry of
Tourism, said this group will require
special needs to make their stay enjoy-
able, including bringing kosher food
items into the Bahamas and at least
12 kosher chefs to cater to the large
crowd.

Given the level of commitment to
the Bahamas the group has indicated,
Mr Malcom said the Ministry was now
drafting a formal request to the

Departments of Immigration and Cus-
toms to see if special consideration can
be given for tax breaks for the items
that need to be brought in, and for the
temporary work permits the chefs will
need.

Mr Malcom said it would be benefi-
cial if there could be some kind of
umbrella policy for religious groups
who require special foods, materials
or religious paraphernalia.

Linville Johnson, who heads the
Ministry of Tourism’s religious tourism
market, added that given the impor-
tance of this market, it was vital they
be catered to.

“Group traveller’s word of mouth is
very important, and if they can tell oth-
ers how well they are treated in the
Bahamas, the spin off can be tremen-

. dous,” he said.

The two men have the task of
expanding the Bahamas’ share in the
$7.5 billion religious travel industry.

Currently, religious travel is one of the
top three group sellers for the Min-
istry.

According to Mr Johnson, more than
16,000 religious meetings are held in
the US annually, with delegates staying
on average four to five nights in a loca-
tion, representing over 12 million room
nights. Of that number, the market
outside the US accounts for just under
10 per cent - 8.5 per cent.

Vital

Mr Johnson said it was vital that the
Bahamas establish itself as a centre for
religious travel, whether it be for con-
ventions, retreats or leisure activities.

He noted that religious travel was
primarily group-oriented, and said they
are more community-oriented than
secular groups. Mr Johnson explained
this means that they are more likely
to spend their money away from tra-

ditional tourist centres, with more of
their dollars remaining in the Bahamas.

The Ministry has launched an exten-
sive religious tourism ad campaign,
catering to trade and industry media
outlets.

The ads focus around the tag lines
that say “no matter where you are you
can worship” and “On the 700 islands
of the Bahamas, God rested.”

There are vast possibilities for entre-
preneurs, such as religious entertain-
ment, tours and souvenirs, the men
said.

Also participating in this National
Tourism Week masterclass was Kevin
Wright, North America’s most recog-
nisied religious travel, tourism and hos-
pitality authority, who has written a
number of books on the subject and
is the president of the Religious Mar-

keting Consulting Group, a team of

independent professionals who assist
travel companies in working with the

religious tourism market.

He said this market was now looking
for a higher-end stay rather than the
sort of “poverty minded” visit that was
previously perceived. Mr Wright said
the market was consumer savvy, and
does not expect every aspect of their
vacation to be religious-based. Once
they are given service, they remain loy-
al to a destination.

Mr Wright pointed out that one in
seven churches travel, and these groups
are traditionally twice the size of the
business group.

Mr Malcolm said this group sizing
may be a hindrance to the Bahamas,
because presently there is nowhere to
host a large convention group. Once
Atlantis’s convention centre is com-
pleted, he said there will be accommo-
dations for more than 5000 people, but
one challenge will be that many reli-
gious groups would be hesitant or
unable to pay Atlantis’s room rates.



Bahamas destination wedding, honeymoon spot

FROM page 1B

Caribbean market leader, a 20-
year tourism veteran said yester-
day, something that would enable
this nation to generate higher
returns from its visitors.
Jacqueline Johnson, president
of her own company, Jacqueline
Johnson & Associates, and a rep-

'- resentative for Conde Nast Bridal.

Media, told a class at National
Tourism Week that. the
Caribbean had the greatest share
of the overseas honeymoon mar-
ket for US couples, standing at
33 per cent.

Jamaica had the greatest share
of the Caribbean market,. again
at 33 per cent, with the Bahamas
in joint second place in the
regional honeymoon stakes with
an 18 per cent share.

It shares this spot with the US
Virgin Islands and St Lucia, with

’. the Cayman Islands also enjoy-

ing 17 per cent market share. Mrs
Johnson pointed out that both St
Lucia and the Cayman Islands
had a much smaller room inven-
tory than the Bahamas, but
almost as large a market share.
She said: “I’m always surprised

~. “that the Bahamas and Jamaica |

are not neck and neck i in the run-
ning for déstination weddings.
But Jamaica does one thing the
Bahamas doesn’t, which is pro-
motion and marketing.”

Mrs Johnson added that

.' Jamaica was constantly “out

there” in the weddings and hon-
eymoon market, pushing “to
make it happen”, and if the
Bahamas “wants it, it will have
to step and get out there”.

She said the US honeymoon
market was worth $10.3 billion
annually, and generated some
18.4 million room nights. This was

a “growing business, a year-round
business that generates much rev-
enue for a destination to spend
on roads, schools and trickle
down to the local population”.

Mrs Johnson said the cruise
ship industry accounted for 17 per
cent of overseas US honeymoons,
and generated $991 million in rev-
enue for the cruise ship industry.

To maximise profits from their
passengers in their on-board retail
stores, Mrs Johnson said “the
night before” cruise ships called
on ports in the Bahamas and else-
where in the Caribbean, these
stores often held sales’ and sold
products for lower prices.

The message the cruise lines
gave for passengers, she added,
was “shop with me, because our
prices are better than what you
will get anywhere in Nassau, the
Turks & Caicos” and elsewhere, a
move that lowers per capita cruise
passenger spend and expectations
when they arrive in the Bahamas.

This cruise ship tactic is likely
to cause further controversy with
Bay Street merchants, tour oper-
ators and other Bahamian busi-
nesses dependent on the cruise
ship industry, as it reduces their
revenues, profits and ‘trickle
down’ impact on the economy.

, Previous controversy had sur-

‘rounded the cruise ships’ on-
' board marketing programmes,

which had been accused of direct-
ing passengers to shop at certain
stores that had paid for the adver-
tising.

Mrs Johnson said that of the
$991 million the cruise industry
earned: “God knows they des-
perately want to increase that.”
She added that privately, the
cruise industry seés itself as com-
peting directly with resorts and
land-based tourism, and wants
passengers to solely “use our
facilities, shops on board and

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that HENRI CHER AIME OF
LANCASTER ROAD, P.O. BOX N-7060, NASSAU, |
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26th day of -
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

entertainment on board”.

On Hawaii, cruise passengers
who wanted to get married on
shore at facilities such as hotels
and gardens, but then get back
on the ship, had seen the cost for
doing so tripled, Mrs Johnson
said.

She added that destination
weddings were “the fastest grow-

ing segment” of the tourism mar- —

ket, having increased by 400 per
cent.

US couples and their guests
tended to stay longer, be more
affluent and spend more, accord-
ing to a Travel Industry Associa-
tion (TIA) survey, and Mrs John-
son said regions such as Europe
were “aggressively going after the
weddings and honeymoons mar-
ket because they realise the
return on their investment is
greater than going after the
leisure market”.

The total value of destination
weddings outside the US, accord-
ing to TIA, she said, was $1.5 bil-
lion, with some $3.8 billion spent
on room nights. This gave the US
destination wedding market a
total value of $5.3 billion, with
the Caribbean getting a 40 per
cent share of that.

Some 7.8 million guests visit-
ed US overseas destination wed-

dings.

ye
ye

SY2Z & CO] Bank & Trust

Private Banking
OYSTER Funds

f Alternative Investments

www.syzbank.com

SPORTS TOURISM

from 1B



and invite five teams from gut-
side the countr,y and they
brought in 30 athletes, five coach-
es and medical staff, and about
50. relatives and friends, that
would be more than 5,000 visi-
tors.

“We can see the amount and
magnitude of the amount of
tourists which can actually come
in to these events.”

He added that this can also be
duplicated on Grand Bahama and
the other islands just in athletics.

Mr Albury said islands with-
out tracks or facilities need not
be left behind, as there was no
reason why they could not devel-
op signature annual events.

“Why can’t we do road races?
We can have a road race on San
Salvador. We have flights com-
ing in direct from Europe,. Why
can’t we have a road race? We
can have road races on Long
Island, Exuma or all over,” Mr
Albury said.

He added that similar things
could be done with baseball and
softball.

“If we have eight tournaments ~

in baseball, with 10 teams of 15
players, and each team brings in
three coaches and 50 relatives,
we see that is 680 visitors. Eight
tournaments, and that is 5,440 vis-

itors, and that is just in baseball;

just in Nassau,” Mr Albury said.

He added that basketball was
the biggest participation sport,
and said there was no reason why

it could not attract at least 30,000

visitors.

Factoring all the other sports,
such as cricket darts and tennis
into the equation, Mr Albury said
extra visitor numbers could easi-
ly reach 100,000. He said college
groups, minor leagues, church
groups and schools could all be
targeted, as could clinics, retreat,
meetings and workshops. Exhi-
bition games could also be played
in the Bahamas.

Mr Albury said: “Take the
100,000 sports tourists and trans-
late it into dollars and cents, to
room nights. We need a clear
understanding of our role and
what we are talking about, and
we need commitment.”

He said sporting bodies in the
Bahamas needed to take advan-
tage of the potential, and think
outside the box to invite teams
from outside the country.

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“It won’t just happen; we have
to plan,” Mr Albury said. “We
need to develop linkages when
we go to events aboard.”

He added that annual events
are sustainable because you
would not have to market them
continuously.

Mr Albury said partnerships
can also be forged with Bahamian
hotels and Bahamasair to bring
persons in during slow periods of
the tourism year.

Greg Rolle, of the Ministry of
Tourism, said the Ministry sees
the economic impact of sports
tourism, and that while they may
not have a specific budget for
sports tourism, they would work
hard to accommodate sporting
federations who wished to host
profitable events.

' The event was a part of Nation-
al Tourism Week.

Full-time Housekeeper Wanted
Live-in or
Live-out Position

Must be able to -
Drive and Cook

Spanish speaking would be desirable

Leave message at
327-1519



Com plhlance Officer

The successful applicant must:

m Have several years of experience as compliance officer in private banking.

m Have knowledge of Bahamian and international compliance requirements.

m Be computer literate with communication skills.

We require knowledge and experience with:

m Planning, organizing the compliance function for a bank.

m Developing and maintaining adequate policies and procedures.

m Reviewing and managing the documentation of client files.

m Liaising with regulators and compliance officer of the Group.

Motivated team player with pleasant personality.
Must be able to work independently with minimal supervision.
Ability to conduct the monitoring of clients credit risk and/or law degree is an asset.

We offer:

m A salary which is commensurate with the job, a pension plan and medical insurance.

Absolutely no telephone calls will be accepted.

Please send your resume and two (2) letters of reference to:

SYZ & CO Bank & Trust LTD. ms Human Resources Manager

Bayside Executive. Park m RO. Box N —-1089 m Nassau, Bahamas

SS
. Cea atic

: eo

Ca ni

Mark your calendar

Our Application Deadline

is February 2, 2007

Remember to include the following with your application
$40.00 non-refundable processing fee
Copy of passport pages showing your name, date of
birth and expiration date of passport
Official high school transcript

¢ Test scores and copy of BUC and BGCSE results to date

Don’t let the deadline pass you by!

We look forward to welcoming you to The College,

soon to be the University of The Bahamas.







Legal Notice

NOTICE

LERIDA S.A.

(in Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 24th day of January 2007. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

FROM page 1B

breached their fiduciary duties
to plan members as a result of
the investments in the Bahamas
and the Caribbean.

The lawsuit, filed in the
Ontario courts on December
29, 2006, alleges that the $1.4
billion-asset plan breached
Canadian regulations by hav-
ing more than 10 per cent of the
book value of its assets invested
in one person, two or more affil-
iated persons, and two or more
affiliated corporations.

It alleged that at December
31, 2003, CCWIPP’s investment
committee “had approved loans
totalling $166.989 million” to
companies known as Propcos,
which in turn lent the funds to

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
ig-y-Ce MRI 7¢ [p14

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

CONTEN-MONT SPRINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 24th day of January 2007. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

on Mondays



CHEVENING

BRITISH CHEVENING SCHOLARSHIPS FOR 2007-2008

Applications are now being accepted for the 2007-2008 Chevening Scholarships,
available to Bahamian applicants wishing to pursue post-graduated studies in the
UK in the following subjects:

Media/journalism studies
Public Administration
Sustainable development
Management

Justice & Human rights
International relations/diplomacy
Law

Environmental Studies

Further information and application forms can be found on the British Council
(Jamaica) website at: www.britishcouncil.org/jamaica

Closing date 5th February 2007

IMPORTANT
NOTICE

SERVICE INTERRUPTION

From 12 a.m. to 7 a.m. on
Sunday 28th January 2007.

Our Electronic Banking System will be temporarily unavailable
during the times listed above while we conduct routine
maintenance in order to improve our service to you.

During this period, the following services will be unavailable:
e Point-Of-Sale (POS) transactions
e VISA transactions via ABM

ABM machines will be available from 7 a.m.
for cash withdrawals. Internet and Telephone banking
will be available from 10 a.m.

Please plan your weekend finances to cater for this necessary
maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

www. firstcaribbeanbank.com

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.





PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007

Lae ee ae ee
Bahamas investments

prompt class lawsuit

RHK Capital, the company
owned by Canadian Ron Kelly.

“RHK in turn purchased
hotels and land in Jamaica and
the Bahamas,” the lawsuit
added, referring to the British
Colonial Hilton, which Mr Kel-
ly redeveloped, and the South
Ocean property that he bought
later.

The lawsuit alleged that while

CCWIPP’s total assets at book
value stood at $.065 billion at
December 31, 2003, the funds
loaned to the Bahamas and
Jamaican resort projects of Mr
Kelly totalled 15.68 per cent of
book value assets, a breach of
Canadian law that “dates from
at least 1998 and perhaps earli-
er”:
The class action suit alleged
that CCWIPP’s investment
committee and _ trustees
“approved further funding” for
the Bahamas hotels in 2004, and
that they failed to follow invest-
ment guidelines and procedures,
and did not perform adequate
due diligence before making the
loans.

“For the real estate invest-
ments in general, and the
Caribbean developments in par- .
ticular, the trustees failed to reg-
ularly obtain reliable up-to-date
appraisals, audited financial
statements for each corporation
involved, failed to follow up in
obtaining such statements,
failed to be aware of the impli-
cations for the plan in the fail-
ure to obtain such statements,
failed to establish an exit strat-
egy for such investment, failed

to evaluate each such invest-
ment where there had been a
financial failure,” the lawsuit
alleged. :

It claimed that CCWIPP
failed to perform proper due
diligence by obtaining full audit-
ed financial statements on
RHK, the Bahamian holding
company that funnelled the
plan’s money into the British
Colonial Hilton and South
Ocean, and “each of the sub-
sidiary companies”.

The lawsuit will not impact
the proposed $1 billion rede-
velopment of South Ocean,
though, which involves
CCWIPP selling a majority
stake to outside partners, nor
operations at the Hilton.

‘The class action lawsuit’s alle-

' gations are likely to be based

on the findings of a report into
CCWIPP by the Financial Ser-
vices Commission of Ontario in
March 2005.

The regulator demanded that
the fund's Board of Trustees
conduct “a complete indepen-
dent due diligence review" of
their investments in the British
Colonial Hilton and South
Ocean resorts to determine,
among other issues, whether all
funds advanced to the resorts
since December 2000 are
"recoverable".

The Commission's report
detailed that over an 18-month
period between June 14, 2001,
and December 22, 2003,
CCWIPP advanced a total of
almost $20 million to the British
Colonial Hilton and South

Legal Notice

NOTICE

RAPPID EXPRESS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that. the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 24th day of January 2007. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)






















IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law Side

BETWEEN



TO: Roselande Poiter
Nassau, The Bahamas

Court of the

TAKE NOTICE

Dated this 24th day of January A.D., 2007

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

JAMES LEROY POITIER
AND

ROSELANDE POITIER

TAKE NOTICE that an application has been made in The Supreme
Commonwealth of The
Family Division Action No. 168 of 2001 by James Leroy Poitier, the Plaintiff
that leave of the Court has been granted on the 16th
day of June A.D., 2006, to advertise the said Defendant with a twenty-eight
(28) days period from the date of the publication of this
enter an appearance at the Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher
Building, East Street, Nassau, The Bahamas. Should you not do so, the
Court may make such Order as it deems fit without further reference to you.

HANNA & CO.
CHAMBERS
3rd Floor, Columbus House
East & Shirley Streets
Nassau, The Bahamas
Attorneys for the'Plaintiff



No. 168

Plantiff

Defendant

Bahamas in Common Law Side

avertisement

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law Side

BETWEEN

KENNETH KNOWLES

Plantiff

AND

ALFRED JOHNSON —
Defendant

TO: Alfred Johnson
Nassau, The Bahamas

JAKE NOTICE that an application has been made in The Supreme

Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas in Common Law Side

Action No. 259 of 2003 by Kenneth Knowles, the Plaintiff
that leave of the Court has been granted on the

NOTICE

TAKE
23rd day of

June A.D., 2006, to advertise the said Defendant with a twenty-eight

(28) days period from the date of the publication of this

advertisement

enter an appearance at the Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher
Building, East Street, Nassau, The Bahamas. Should you not do so, the
Court may make such Order as it deems fit without further reference to you.

Dated this 24th day. of January A.D., 2007

HANNA & CO.
CHAMBERS
3rd Floor, Columbus House
East & Shirley Streets
Nassau, The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Plaintiff



THE TRIBUNE



Ocean resorts.

Over that period some
$11.638 million was sent to
South Ocean's holding compa-
ny, the South Ocean Develop-
ment Corporation, through
Propco 34, the investment vehi-
cle which acts as the 'in' com-
pany for CCWIPP to funnel
funds to that property.

Similarly, some $8.304 mil-
lion was channelled to the
British Colonial Hilton through
Propco 39, which acts as the 'in'
company for that resort. Lend-
ing to the resorts has continued
through 2004, the report added.

There are few details in the 2

Commission's report as to what
all the CCWIPP advances were
used for, although some were

‘used for "working capital" at

South Ocean, and others to ser-
vice both interest and principal °
payments to Scotiabank.

The Commission's examina-
tion of CCWIPP blasted the
pension fund for poor record
keeping and the absence of
financial statements in relation
to companies through which
investments in the British Colo-
nial Hilton and South Ocean
were made.

The regulator was especially
concerned at the absence of
financial statements for two.
companies, PRK Holdings, a
Bahamian entity, and RHK
Capital, firms through which the
Propco entities send money to -
the Bahamian resorts. This, it
added, made the pension fund
non-compliant with Canadian
regulations.

Port
Authority —
faces
winding- ~
up petition
FROM page 1B

it clear that under no circum-'
stances will the Government.

. contemplate Mr Babak’s return’

to the GBPA and Port Group’
Ltd as chairman.

The Tribune previously
revealed that the Government
is keen on a dilution of the Hay-
ward and St George stakes in
the two companies, something,
the latter side has expressed’
interest in. Sir Jack’s position;
on this is unknown, although he. °
is thought to be reluctant to do
this, and feels the Government
is imposing undue pressure on,
him.

The Government is eager to:
see a broadening of the GBPA
and Port Group Ltd ownership.
base, possibly via a public offer-
ing that would see equity par-'
ticipation in the companies and
their assets by the likes of
GBPA licencees and landhold-.
ers within the 230 square mile*
Freeport area. :

The St George family had
been reaching out to institu-
tional investors and high net’

worth Bahamians residing in. ' >>

Nassau to see if they were inter--
ested in participating. .
Any public offering would,
result in a move away from “a. .
cult of personality" at the,
GBPA helm, ensuring the Gov-:
ernment was no longer behold-*
en to one shareholder - or
group of shareholders - for the
running of a quasi-governmen-
tal authority, and Freeport's
governance and development.

Obtaining the participation.
of outside investors would give -
Bahamians a stake in Freeport's*
future success, and allow the
management of Port Group
Ltd's various subsidiary com-
panies to get on with running
their respective operations.

A public offering would also
vest GBPA's and Port Group
Ltd's operations with enhanced’
transparency and accountabili-.
ty, but a public offering is some
way off.

The Government is under-

stood to be contemplating’. :.-
whether it should participate in)" ”

any public offering, a move that |
would not go down well with .
Freeport licencees, who would
prefer it was kept on the out-
side.



: THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007, PAGE 7B



BUSINESS



hina reports fastest growth in a decade |

@ By JOE McDONALD
AP Business Writer

BEIJING (AP) — China
reported Thursday that its siz-
zling economy grew at its
‘fastest rate in a decade last
year as the government strug-
gled to contain the strains of
an export-driven boom.

.The economy grew by 10.7
per cent, moving China closer
to overtaking Germany as the
world’s third-largest economy,

. according to figures issued by
the government. It was the
fastest growth since 1995, when
the economy expanded by 10.9
per cent.

Spending on real estate and
other assets soared despite

“- government efforts to cool an
investment boom that it wor-
ries could ignite inflation or a
debt crisis. Consumer spend-
ing grew more slowly, suggest-
ing Beijing still faces challenges
in its effort to reduce reliance
on exports and narrow its trade
gap by boosting domestic con-
sumption.

“Fast growth in itself is fine.

It’s more about the compos!-

a |



Leading Japanese Car Exporter

Visit our most comprehensive,

tion of growth,” said econo-
mist Mingchun Sun of Lehman
Brothers. “Investment needs
to slow even faster. Second,
there is an urgent need to
reduce the trade surplus.”

Analysts said they expect
Beijing to raise interest rates
again this year, following two
hikes last year.

The government — has
imposed investment curbs on
real estate, auto manufactur-
ing and other industries and
tried to restrain exports by
levying new taxes on steel and
other products.

Beijing has allowed the grad-
ual rise of its currency to quick-
en in recent weeks in a move
that could slow the growth of
the trade surplus by making
Chinese goods more expensive
abroad. The yuan has strength-
ened by 0.5 per cent against
the U.S. dollar since January |
after rising by about six pere
cent over the previous 18
months.

But the government says its
efforts only began to take
effect in late 2006.

“Outstanding problems still



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| Japanese & European cars.
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exist with the irrational rela-
tionship between investment
and consumption, the imbal-
ance of payments and excess
liquidity in the banking sys-
tem,” the commissioner of the
National Bureau of Statistics,
Xie Fuzhan, said at a news
conference.

In efforts to boost consumer
spending, he said, “we are still
not seeing significant results.”

China’s total economic out-
put last year was 20.9 trillion
yuan, the government said, or
$2.7 trillion at current
exchange rates. Germany’s
output was $3 trillion, but its
growth rate at 2.5 per cent was
far below China’s.

Chinese investment in real
estate grew by 21.8 per cent
while overall investment in
assets was up 24 per cent, Xie
said. Retail sales expanded by
13.7 per cent.

Consumer prices jumped by .

2.8 per cent in December over
the same month of 2005, com-
pared with 1.9 per cent in
November and an annual rate
of 1.5 per cent for the full year.

Economist Stephen Green

NOTICE

at Standard Chartered Bank
said he expected inflation to
stay at 2.5 to 3.5 per cent this
year.

In a report to clients, Green
said that might cause concern
abroad about rising prices for
Chinese goods, prompting cen-
tral bankers to consider rais-

' ing interest rates. But he said

China is unlikely to “export
inflation” because prices of
exports are falling.

The government said this
month its swollen global trade
surplus jumped nearly 75 per
cent in 2006 to a record $177.5:
billion — equal to nearly 10
per cent of China’s total eco-
nomic output.

The flood of export revenues
is straining Beijing’s ability to
keep inflation in check.

The central bank is draining
billions of dollars a month
from the economy, and. has
piled up the world’s biggest
foreign reserves, which stood
at just over $1 trillion at the
end of December.

Fourth quarter growth
slowed slightly, but not much.
Output expanded 10.4 per cent



in the three months through
December, down from a
decade-high 11.5 per cent in
the second quarter to the third
quarter’s 10.6 per cent.

Incomes of urban Chinese
households grew 10.4 per cent
in real terms last year, while
those in the countryside rose
7.4 per cent, the statistics
agency said.

Rural incomes are “still at a
comparatively low level,” Xie

said, though he stressed that
compared with China’s historic
poverty, “this is a great leap
forward.”

President Hu Jintao’s gov-
ernment has promised to
spend more on aid to farmers
and health, education and oth-
er services to spread prosperi-
ty to the countryside, home to
800 million people, most of
whom have missed out on Chi-
na’s economic boom.







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NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GERARD JACQUES OF
MORLEY CLOSE, P.O. BOX N-805, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a_ citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE.

NOTICE is hereby given that SYLIFICIA JACQUES OF
MORLEY CLOSE, P.O. BOX N-805, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
is applying to thé Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality



NOTICE is hereby given that SHERLINE JUSTE OF FOX
HILL ROAD, P.O. BOX N-10326; NASSAU, BAHAMAS
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a_ citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why: registration/ naturalization should not be

granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MAYLELIN POMPA GONZALEZ
OF #4 DIAMOND DRIVE, CORAL GARDENS, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26TH. day of

JANAUARY, 2007 to the Minisier responsible for. Nationality... ,

and - Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas,

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BERNARD SIGMOND HENFIELD
OF #15 LAWRENCE CLOSE, P.O. BOX F-43009, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAWIA. BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26TH day of
JANAUARY, 2067 ‘o the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship. FPO.Box . N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that RENAND PETIT-HOMME
OF ELIZABETH ESTATES, P.O. BOX N-4493, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of "he Bahamas, and that any person who
knows afiy reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from. the 26th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GEORGES JEAN OF
TAYLOR STREET, P.O.BOX N-1390, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 19th day of January, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARGARET BOUQUETTE-
CHER AIME OF LANCASTER ROAD, P.O. BOX N-7060,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality

. and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



Security & General
INSURANCE

development strategy.









Security & General Insurance Co., a local property and casualty

| insurer and member of the Colonial Group of Bermuda, seeks |
to appoint a Claims Manager to their Nassau office

As the manager of our claims department, you will be |
responsible toi the management and operation of the clainis
department reporting directly to the Geiieral Manager aud
management team on all matters relating to strategic and local
initiatives borh ongoing and forming part of the company’s

You must demonstrate a proven track record as the all round

performer in the field of property and casualty claim
management with a minimum of at least 10 years experience
within the industry. {n particular, you will have experience in



management and substantive motor ¢!
The company offers a competitive remuneration package with

benefits commensurate to qualifications and experience.

the legal aspects of personal injury claims handling, catastrophe

laims experience

Resumes should be sent to The Human Resources Manager,
P.O. Box N 3540 no later than 5th February 2007.

and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Pricing Information As Of:
Thursday, 25 January 200 7



and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.









~ SOUS CHEFS

Yield



f ye







0.000 N/M














0.54 Abaco Markets ; 0.70 6.06 1,000 -0.293
1025) Bahamas Property Fund 11.30 11.30 0.00 1.689 0.400 6.7
6.90 Bank of Bahamas 8.03 8.03 0.00 0.796 0.260 10.1 3.2
0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0.265 0.020 30 2.50%
: : : , . 1.26 Bahamas Waste : ‘BE ; 0.199 0.060 93
| Private club is seeking two (2) experienced io? | Waaslneenk 1 oR woe oop 0.170 0.050 74
: : os : 9.00 Cable Bahama 10.00 10.00 0.00 1,000 0.715 0.240 14.0 2.
‘full-time sous chefs with a minimum of eight 1.64 Sollee Hatiingd 2.00 2.00 0.00 3,742 0.078 0.040 25.6
: : . 9.05 Com salth Bant 13.00 413.00 0.00 0.998 0.680 3.0
(8) years experience in the culinary field. All 480. Gendollanedwae Baae 5.04 4.97 -0.07 0.134 0.045 376
: ita 2.40. Doctor's Hospital 2.50 2.50 0.00 0.295 0.000 8&5
standard diplomas from the Nassau Hotel Training Bea Parnquars 5.80 5.80 0.00 0552 0.240 105
: 10.70. Fine 12.30 12.30 0,00 0.779 O570 15.7 4.65
College are demanded. The applicants must have 10.90 FirstCaribbean 14.46 14.46 0.00 0.921 0.500 15.7 346°
. . 4 10.00 Focol 15.68 15.68 0.00 400 1.476 0.500 106 Ac
i extensive knowledge in management skills and 0.50 Freeport Concrete 0.55 0.55 0.00 -0.423 0.000 N/M
, : i aie 7.15 ICD Utilities 7.20 7.20 0.00 0.632 0135 135
excellent levels of cooking skills. The positions 8.52 J. S. Johnson 9.05 9.05 0.00 0.588 0.560 154




Premier Real Estate

| to be filled are banquet sous chef and production
sous chef.




DivS P/E __. Yield
7.080 8.8 “4
0.640 NM 7.85%
0.000 26.2
Sea











0.000 19.4
1.320 8.3 9.04%

Interested persons should fax resumes to
362-6245 to the attention of:

28.00 ABDAB ~ .
14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
35 RND Holdir













ied Mutual Bunda (0
YTD% Last 12 Months



~* Fund Name

52wk-Low

52wk-Hi



NA _ V Div $ wkd Yield %_
1.3253 1.2700 Colina Money Market Fund 1.325275"
3.0017 2.6262 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.9728***
TH E DIRECTOR OF CU ISINE 2.5002 2.3220 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.500211**
1.1495 Colina Bond Fund 1.217450****

1.2175








000 Fidelity Prime Incom seigaccasnatanssgeg ssensengmccancn siesta " sy
arianraentkc acinar anes BE PVE OT B8% 7 Bd06 SAare
IE) - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity






LYFORD CAY CLUB
_ LYFORD CAY DRIVE
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 NAV KEY.
52wk-Hl - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

*- 19 January 2007
Previous Close - Pravious day's weighted price for dally volume 2

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week **- 31 December 2006
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Dally Vol. - Nurnber of total shares traded today

DIV § - Dividends per share pald in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Ficleélity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

“**- 31 December 2006
“**~ 31 December 2006
31 December 2006

eterna oy mn AL



42380-7764) FOR MORI DATA’



PTRADE CALL: GOLINA 242-n028-71





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SATHURRAY
SES FS aE S.





Marine Forecast































































































Saturday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
Low W High = Low W NASSAU ‘Today: NNE at 10-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-7 Miles LTE
_ FIC FIC F/C Saturday: _E at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-7 Miles TE
‘TS t 90/32 75/23 ¢ ~—s FREEPORT Today: NNE at 10-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 6-7 Miles 77° F
Sol c 40/4 40/4 sn Saturday: ESE at 8-16 Knots 3-5 Feet 6-7 Miles 77°F
; ; ~ 28-1 pe SOO 34/1 pe ABACO Today: NNE at 10-20 Knots 4-7 Feet 6-7 Miles irr
Breezy with clouds = Partly cloudy. | Breezy with times of | Overcast and windy — Windy; chance of a Sun and some The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the a2 c 83/17 «48/8 pc Saturday: __ ESE at 8-16 Knots 3-6 Feet 6-7 Miles 77° F
and sunshine. Be, clouds and sun. with showers. | morning shower. =| clouds. greater the need for eye and skin protection. BAT r 78/22 63/17 pc
High: 75° = sHiigh: 78° - High: 78° =| High: 72° Bee _ AMA s 20/82 65/18 s ;
were aon ; ae rape Se T5238 s BARB Téa AT VMs cise Cy
ac ie Fi seat alia: mercer! Bae Barc 320s «SIMO 362 s : a
marr]! (raerr ) 0 reser High _Ht(f. Beirut eai7s oa) Gar s
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 1:14am. 2.7 7:44am. 0.1 AR EDG greener cs 31/0 24/4 sn
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 1:38p.m. 21 7:39p.m. -0.2 24/-6 me 27-2 17/-8 ¢ I
Saturday 2:21am. 26 8:50am. 0.1 0/15 50/10 sh = 58/14 54/12 pe ‘ Bee be (BLUSTERY )
ALmanac 4 2:45 p.m. 2.0 8:43p.m. -0.1 47/8 68/20 45/7 c SS : Pagke 3 aS
: Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Sunda “3:30am. 26 958am. O04 36/2. 29/1 sn = 39/8 80/-1 sn
= Temperature 3:52pm. 2.0 9:48p.m. -0.1 32/0 19/-7 ¢ 35/1 22/-5 sf
_ High .... vessuees B4° F/29° C 6/30 70/21 sh = 86/30 68/20 pe
Low .. pares Money a ee a 76/24 55/12 5 77/25 60/15
Normal high . 77° F/25° C eee apes 83/28 63/17 s = 87/80 4
Normal low ou... 65° F/18° C plac 36/2 13/-10 pc
Last year’s high ..... eee. . 82° F/28° C BT pyre Nioon 79126 69/20 t 68/20 +
High: 70° F/21°C Last year’s LOW w..sssssssssscseessesenseeeesess 66° F/19° C 68/20 pc
~ Low: 48° F/9°C Precipitation Sunrise......6:55.a.m. Moonrise ... 11:56 a.m. ee




40/4 pe



As of 1 p.m. yesterday .. 0.00” Sunset .
Year to date ............. 0.51” Full

...9:50 p.m. Moonset... . 12:48 a.m.
New First





Normal year to date ............. 1.43”































221-5 21-6 pe
AccuWeather.com, 16/-8 10/-12 sf [XS] Showers
All forecasts and maps provided by ee : 72/22 62/16 1/25 64/17 f= =] T-storms
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007 Feh. 2 Feb. 10 Feb. 17 Feb. 24 29/-1 22/-5 sn 23/-5 2/-16 sf [2°6"] Rain Feonis
: 6 S3/1t s 63/1 ABIT [« ~*] Flurries Cold ===
77/25 5010s 77/25 52/11 s Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
9/15 49/9" 49 AAG precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm Mn,
A 67/1 9 Ad 16 : a 2 - a 7/ Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Aap
79/26 57/13. 9/26 $1 40s 5 is Atte
85/29 76/24 s 86/30
CAT ISLAND 2



71125



4145



: 75° F/24° 6














Manila 85/29 88/31
Mexico Ci (2/22 68/20.
SAN Monterrey 71/21
cree Moscow 19-10 19/40. an
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's Low: 66° F/19°C

highs and tonights's lows.

ur
us!















































































9

Today Saturday Saturday Saturday MAYAGUANA

High Low W High Low Ww High Low W High Low: W W High” Low W High: 80° F/27°C

F/C F/C F/C F/C 90/;

Albuquerque 45/7 27/-2 s 50/10 28/2" pe _— indianapolis 4/28 28°

Anchorage 24/-4 19/-7 sn 30/-1 21/-6 c Jacksonville 83/28 68/20 pc

Atlanta BOAO 27/-2 s 563 35/4 pe Ka ity

Atlantic City 24/-4 17/-8 pc 43/6. 28/-2 pe —_Las Vegas 48/8 34/1 oe

Baltimore — ence 27-2 19/-7 pe. as 42/5 30/-1 pe Little Roc! Di oof t q 4 a4} Low:67° FA9°C

Boston 12/-11 11/-11 32/0 22/-5 pe Los Angeles 69/20 47/8 s St. Louis 38/3 18/-7 7 i

Buffalo = 15/9 45/-9° sf ~~ 35/4 20-6 sf Louisville 41/5 © 35/ 46/7 25-3 > Salt Lake Ci 16 aa = AVI

Charleston,SC 50/10 24/-4 ‘5 6317 41/5 s | 94/12 30/-1 San Antonio 68/20 41/5 pc : ~ GREAT INAGU A sed8 15S

Chicago 30-4 25/3 pe 28-2 151-9" sf 25 680% pe San Dieg 2/16 500° pe ee 68/200 t —=«86/30. 73/22 t

Clevelan 24/-4 24/-4 sf 36/2 20/-6 sf f San Francisco 58/14 43/6 c Low: 73° F/23°C : ; ‘pe
gs BTS 41/5 pe 55/12 33/0 or Seattle 46) i 16/-8 c "31/0 17/8 sn

Denver 45/7 18/-7 pc 35/1 13/-10 sf New Orleans Tallahassee 63/17 40/4 Wai

Detroit 22/-5 22/-5 sn 34/1 17/-8 sf = NewYork. 31/0 pe = Tampa 21 59/15 Winnipeg 3/-16 sf 11/-11 -8/-22 sf

Honolulu 79/26 67/19 s 80/26 67/19 pc Oklahoma City c 44/6 25/-3 c Tucson 67/19 37/2

Houston = G1N1G" 48/8 pe G79 45/7 -r~——sCOrlando:





Washington, DC 27/-2 23/-5 pe 47/8 31/0 Weather (W): s-sunny, oy cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-

storms, t-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rcp-precipitation, Tr-trace

mene ae | Ee





FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007

SECTION —

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



Bahamians
make their mark
in collegiate
track and field
rankings

@ TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON

Sports Reporter

THIS week’s indoor

_ track and field rankings
are out and the Bahamian
collegiate athletes are
topping the charts.

Four Bahamian athletes
have already made the
NCAA indoor champi-
onships provisional mark-
ings, with several coming
close to the standards.

Bianca Stuart, one of
the four Bahamians secur-
ing a spot at the NCAA
indoor championships is
leading the Missouri Val-
ley Conference in the
women’s long jump.

Stuart has a season’s
best of 6.17m (20-feet-2).
In the 60m she is ranked
sixth with a time of 7.77
seconds.

' Also ranked in the 60m
dash is Alexandria Oem-
bler of Missouri State, she
is currently holding the
13th spot with a time of
7.91 seconds. The leading
time in the event is posted
by Devon Williams, 7.54
seconds.

The Bahamian duo’s
names also appear in the
top 50 of the 200m. Stuart
is 16th in 26.00 and Oem-
bler is 17th with 26.15 sec-
ORES scot sagtensenerebiin

In the 60m hurdles,
Oembler is in the top
three on the charts with a
time of 8.95 seconds. The
leading time is 8.58 sec-
onds by Jennifer Snyder -
of Wichita State followed
by Kasey McDaniel of
Drake with 8.83 seconds.

No stranger to the top
of the charts in the South
Eastern Conference
(SEC), Aymara Albury of
Alabama University is
ending her senior year
with a bang. os,

Albury is ranked sec-
ond in the shot putt with a
season’s best of 16.26m.
The throw was recorded
at the weekend meet and
earned her provisional
markings for the NCAA
Indoor championships.

In the weight throw she
is third with 18.86m.
Leading the weight throw
is Shawneise Williams
from Florida University
with a best of 21.16m,
which is also an automatic
marking. Shanna Dicken-
son of Tennessee Univer-
sity is holding onto the
second spot with 19.02m,
a provisional marker.

Kenrick-Brathwaite
hasn’t made the marker
for the championships as
yet, but he is well on his
way. |

The long jumper leads
the Mid Eastern Athletic
Conference (MEAC)
men’s long jump event
with a best of 24-ft-1.

But Brathwaite will
have another shot this
weekend, at the Adidas
meet.

The Mid Continent
Conference hasn’t
revealéd its rankings as
yet, but Andretti Bain is
receiving accolades for
weekend performance.

The junior, attending
the Oral Roberts Univer-
sity, was named the male
athlete of the week for
the second consecutive
time.

At the weekend meet,
Bain dipped under the
provisional marker for the
indoor championships to
win the Razorback’s
400m. He won the event
in a time of 47.10 seconds,
holding off the number
one ranked quartermiler
in the United States, Wal-
lace Spearmon.

,





@ PICTURED FROM TOP: The Southern Cross, The Lucayan Lady and The Healthcliffe - all will be hoping to make their presence f

"TRASH TALKING’ STARTS AH



wisi:

MIAMI HERALD SPORTS |

LAA

LAAT









(ee

ein al eee
meas
ame

Thai x: Ping

AEE

SA

@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE



EVENT THIS WEEKEND





elt at the New Year’s Day Regatta.
(Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

Sailors target first win, bragging rights

@ SAILING
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Sports Reporter

THE regatta trash talking
has officially begun.

The long awaited Regatta
season will get underway this
weekend at Montagu Beach
and sailors are hoping to clinch
a first win.

Not only will a victory give
sailors bragging rights, but it
will also help them accumulate
points towards the boat of the
year award.

Boats from all around the
Family Islands were due to
arrive yesterday to compete in
the annual New Years Day
Regatta.

The Regatta will host three
classes, A-C and will be offi-
cially opened by the Prime
Minister Perry Christie.

Races in the C-class will
begin on Friday while the A
and B classes will get under-



“I have a new boat and I am
more than confident it will take

‘the crown. Buzzy Rolle is the

best C-class builder and skipper
in sailing today and I think he
will win this prestigious regatta
in the Red Hot Thunderbird.”



way on Saturday and Sunday. .

Phillip McPhee, owner of
boat of the year in the C-class —
the Red Hot Thunderbird, is
already confident, claiming the
Thunderbird was built by the
best boatbuilder in the
Bahamas: Buzzy Rolle.

He said: “I have a new boat
and I am more than confident
it will take the crown. Buzzy
Rolle is the best C-class builder

Phillip McPhee

and skipper in sailing today
and I think he will win this
prestigious regatta in the Red
Hot Thunderbird.

“We are putting the finishing
touches on the boat as I speak
to you, it will be in Nassau
tonight to sail in her first regat-
ta. I claim this win now and
put it in honour of my father,
Dr WG McPhee. I know there
will be some stiff competition

in the C-class at this regatta,
but I do believe that this regat-
ta will make history this com-
ing Friday.

“Everyone knows-that Bulla
Reg was considered the fastest
C-class boat in the country,
that boat was also built by
Buzzy Rolle. We added some
new features to the Red Hot
Thunderbird. She is a lot clean-
er and a whole lot faster and I
think she will perform to our
expectations this coming Fri-
day.”

The Heathcliffe’s owner Lar-
ry Bastian claims he has the B-
class wrapped up tightly.
Despite having to sail this
weekend in a boat that has only
hit the waters once since being
remodelled, Bastian said other
boats should be more than
scared as they reflect on the
damage the boat did last year.

The Androsian skipper said:
“Be prepared, the best boat
will win the B-class on Satur-

day. I am coming to win, that is
the bottom line.

“Yes we've only sailed the
boat once since it has been
remodelled, we are working
out some details, but I am sure
that we will have a very good
race this weekend.

“What is going to separate
us from the other boats will be
teamwork. Once we have the
crew working together we will
win. I don’t think anyone can
beat our captain.

“There is no doubt that we
have what it takes to win the
B-class. My captain and crew
we will be ready to go once the
cannon fires on Saturday
morning.”

The Heathcliffe has put in a
practice session last week try-
ing to fine tune the boat.

The New Years Day regatta
will start at 12 noon today at
the Montagu Beach. Races
held on Saturday will get
underway at 9am.



PAGE 2C, FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007





Twellman is
ated to US
training camp

m@ SOCCER
CARSON, Calif.
Associated Press

FORWARD Taylor
Twellman has recovered
from a hernia injury and
was added Wednesday to
the U.S. soccer team’s train-
ing camp for its Feb. 7 exhi-
bition game against Mexico
at Glendale, Ariz.

Four players were
dropped from the training
camp, with defenders Dan
Califf and Heath Pearce
returning to their clubs in
Denmark, and Pat Noonan
(knee) and Brian Mullan
(ankle) sidelined by
injuries.

Interim U.S. coach Bob
Bradley has 26 players com-
ing into his training camp
that opens Thursday and
has asked for European
clubs to release eight play-
ers for the game. The Unit-
ed States beat Denmark 3-1
Saturday in Bradley’s first
game since replacing Bruce
Arena.

The roster:

Goalkeepers: Joe Cannon
(Los Angeles), Matt Pick-
ens (Chicago), Troy Perkins
(D.C.), Matt Reis (New
England)

Defenders: Chris
Albright (Los Angeles),
Bobby Boswell (D.C.),
Jonathan Bornstein (Chivas
USA), Jimmy Conrad
(Kansas City), Todd Duni-
vant (New York), Bryan
Namoff (D.C.), Michael
Parkhurst (New England),
Dasan Robinson (Chicago),
Eddie Robinson (Houston)

Midfielders: Kyle Becker-
man (Colorado), Brian Car-
roll (D.C.), Ricardo Clark
(Houston), Joshua Gros
(D.C.), Sacha Kljestan
(Chivas USA), Justin Mapp
(Chicago), Pablo Mastroeni
(Colorado)

Forwards: Kenny Cooper
(Dallas), Landon Donovan
(Los Angeles), Eddie John-
son (Kansas City), Nate
Jaqua (Los Angeles), Chris
Rolfe (Chicago), Taylor
Twellman (New England).



@ TENNIS
MELBOURNE, Australia
Associated Press

IF HE could pick any player
from any era to test himself
against, Roger Federer would
like a shot at Rod Laver or
Bjorn Borg.

Laver, the last man to win
all four majors in one season,
was in the stadium that carries
his name on Thursday to wit-
ness Federer dismantle Andy
Roddick in the Australian
Open semifinals. After what
he saw, Laver would just as
soon stick to meeting Federer
in the locker room — after the
matches.

Federer likes to put on a
show when Laver is at Rod
Laver Arena, and called his 6-
4, 6-0, 6-2 victory over Rod-
dick his best match in Mel-
bourne.

“I had one of these days
when everything worked,” the
Swiss star said. “I was unbeat-
able. I was playing out of my
mind. I am shocked myself.”

The win put him in his sev-
enth consecutive Grand Slam
final, tying a record set by Jack
Crawford in 1934, and left him
only one victory from a 10th
Grand Slam title. He will meet
the winner of the Fernando
Gonzalez-Tommy Haas semi-
final in Sunday’s championship
match.

With seemingly few. chal-
lengers among his contempo-
raries, Federer is often asked
about facing one of the greats
from another time — Laver
and Borg come to his mind.

Both won 11 majors — Borg





th






just

HERMAN ‘the Caribbean Tank’
Williams has started the year on

a roll.
He’s added another title - and is now

the WBF’s European and Pan Pacific

heavyweight champion.

Although he’s making some great
strides in the heavyweight division, he
still has to crack the top 50 list in order
to be considered as a contender for one
of the major titles.

At the rate he’s going, there’s no rea-
son why Williams shouldn’t be climb-
ing the ladder. : Mah

He deserves every bit of support he
can get from the Bahamian public, but,

more importantly, the Bahamas gov- .

ernment. i gis in
Yet, Williams, who has fought some

big time fighters in some of the biggest

stages in professional boxjng in the Unit~:
ed States, feels as if he’s not getting his”
just reward from the country. —

With all of the athletes, whose pic-

tures are mounted on the “Walk of
Fame” at the Lynden Pindling Interna-

tional Airport’s international arrival sec-

tion, there’s no reason why Williams
should not be included.

He has fought and won more titles
than any heavyweight fighter in the
country. He added his latest title to the
WBC’s Caribbean Boxing Federation
(CABOFE) and the National Boxing

' Association’s heavyweight titles.

The only other boxer who has fought
and held as many titles was Ray Minus
Jr., who did it in both the bantamweight
and lightweight divisions. Minus Jr., now
a coach and co-promoter of First Class
Promotions, has also been overlooked
on the wall of fame.

Williams, who is still waiting for a shot
at Minus Jr’s brother, Renaldo ‘the Ter-
minator’ Minus’ Bahamas’ heavyweight
title, was scheduled to fight here this
month at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

But according to Williams, his pro-
motional team, Silver Hawks Promo-
tions from Las Vegas, are still waiting
for the negotiations to be sealed up with
the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Hous-
ing.
The fight, in the meantime, had to be

i. . postponed until April when Williams is .
+.expected to take-on Gonzalo Omar
Basile, the Argentinean heavyweight

SPORTS



champion.

Williams, who has compiled a 33-10-2
win-loss-draw record with 19 knockouts,
said he’s eager to come home and dis-
play his skills in front of the Bahamian
crowd.

The fight is expected to carried live
back to the United States.

At 5-foot-11 and 248-pounds,
Williams is looking at facing a much big-
ger Basile, who is listed at 6-foot-6 and
over 300 pounds. He has a record of 28-
2.

Williams, a native of Grand Bahama,
said all he wants is a chance to get in the
ring.

Williams deserves to be in the spot-

_light at home and whatever it takes, the

TRIBUNE SPORTS



‘The Caribbean Tank’

keeps on rolling
STUBBS





m SHERMAN ‘The Caribbean Tank’ Williams in action

Bahamas Government should ensure
that our best prospect in the heavy-
weight division is given the opportunity
to continue to rise to the top.

Another on the way up is lightweight
Meacher ‘Pain’ Major who has returned
to Hollywood, Florida where he’s now
training again with Anthony ‘Chills’ Wil-
son.

Major left town last week after spend-
ing the past two years here training and
fighting under First Class Promotions

- and his mentor Minus Jr.

The move is definitely a good one for
Major, who has demonstrated that he
has the ability to be a championship
contender. He just needs to get more
exposure and Wilson said he intends to
give ittohim. — SAS

Major is back with Wilson after they
had a split. In order for him to get in a
better position to contend for a title, he
needs to be in an environment that will
make it easier for him to achieve it.

Many still feel that had Minus Jr. left
the Bahamas when he was in his prime
and worked under Angelo Dundee in
Miami, he would have been a world’
champion.

Although he eventually fought and
lost his bid for a world title, the fact that
he missed the opportunity to be in an
environment in the US may have veen
his downfall.

Major say he only wants a chance to
prove himself. He now has the oppor-
tunity. Let’s see if he can make the best
out of it. ee

PAToa ena aocs,
could be the best ever

from 16 finals spanning 1974
to ’81, and Laver in a five-sea-
son run wedged around his
absence from the Grand Slam
tournaments from 1963-67.
By Sunday, Federer is likely
to be only one major title
behind, although Laver
expects him to go a lot further
and break Pete Sampras’
record of 14 Grand Slam titles.

“T think the art of Roger is »

probably the best player Pve
ever seen ... The way he’s com-

piling the Grand Slam titles, I .

think he’s got a great chance of
being the best ever,” Laver
said.

The 68-year-old Laver made
a rare return to Melbourne
from California to marvel Fed-
erer again.

Talent

“Roger’s got too many
shots, too much talent in one
body,” Laver said. “It’s hardly
fair that one person can do all
this — his backhands, his fore-
hands, volleys, serving, his
court position ... the way he
moves around the court, you

feel ‘like he’s barely touching .
the ground. That’s the sign of a

great champion.”

And that’s a daunting
prospect for Gonzalez or Haas.
Haas, a two-time semifinalist

in Australia, has never reached

a Grand Slam final. Gonzalez
is into the semis at a major for
the first time.

Roddick, who beat Federer
in an exhibition tournament
less than two weeks ago and
had match points against him

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at the Masters Cup last
November, rated the prospect
of an upset as “slim.”

The women’s final Saturday
features top-seeded Maria
Sharapova against No. 81-
ranked Serena Williams.
Despite the ranking disparity,
nobody is counting Williams

: out.
.: After playing just four tour-

naments in 2006 because of a
lingering knee problem,
Williams said the only other
person that gave her a chance
of winning an eighth Grand
Slam title was her mother and
coach, Oracene.

She led 5-1 in the second set
of her semifinal before letting
Nicole Vaidisova back in, wast-
ing triple match point at 3-5
and needing three more before
finally converting in a 7-6 (5),
6-4 victory.

“I almost did a gagarooney
there,” Williams said.

Now, close to a third Aus-

tralian title, she’s guaranteed

of returning to the top 20.
‘“T can’t believe it,” she said.
“That’s awesome. If I play

“well, which I don’t think I’ve

evén'reached yet at all in this

- tournament ... it’s really hard

for anyone on the women’s

~ tour to beat me.”

Sharapova turned her semi-
final against No. 4 Kim Cli-
jsters into an Australian
farewell match for the 23-year-
old Belgian, who is retiring at
the end of the year, with a 6-4,
6-2 victory.

Sharapova is 2-2 against
Williams and had match points
in their last meeting — the
2005 Australian semifinal.

Ask for Ana, Dan, or Humberto on +1-954-880-0781







Fax +1-954-880-0785 Email usa@japanesevehicles.com





Rugby's Woodside
is selected for
West Indies team

m RUGBY
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Sports Reporter

WHEN Dan Woodside awoke on the morning
of the West Indies Seven-a-side trials - he did-
n’t foresee himself being the first Bahamian
selected to a multi-national rugby team.

But Woodside, a member of the Bahamas
national team, continues to make history in rug-
by: His latest feat came on Monday, when he
was named to the West Indies side.

He joined 16 of the Caribbean’s top Rugby
players in a training camp held in Trinidad and
Tobago with the hopes of representing the
region at the Steinlager Sevens tournament.

The Steinlager Sevens, also known as the
World Seven Series International Rugby tour-
nament, is sanctioned by the International Rug-
by Board (IRB) and features 16 nations, playing
in 44 matches. It will be held on February 10th-
11th at the Petco Park in San Diego, California.

Woodside said: “When I woke up Saturday
morning I knew it would be a tough day, but I
was willing to work through whatever it was so
I could be selected to the team.

“J would like to publicly thank Andrew
Davies and the rest of the guys for introducing
me to the sport of rugby and helping me as I
continue on.

“It is pretty amazing, it is pretty good, unbe-
lievable actually. There are a lot of things I had
to do to make sure that I was in the best shape.
The training was hard, compared to the training
I went through in the Bahamas, but I am grate-
ful.”

Representing the West Indies will be
Guyana’s Kevin McKenzie, Albert Larose,
Clauduis Butts and Theo Henry. From Barbados
Antonio Gibbons and Kurt Johnson. Trinidad
and Tobago will be represented by Graeme
Alkins, Jason Clarke, Kelson Figuero, while
Tom Healy and Derek Hurdle will represent
Bermuda.

The West Indian squad will play in pool A
with Fiji, Argentina and Scotland. Playing out of
poo! B will be South Africa, Samoa, Portugal
and Tonga. Pool C will have England, Australia,
Kenya and the USA while pool D will host New
Zealand, France, Canada and Chile.

The seven-a-sides game has recently been for-
matted but is still being played on the same size
field as traditional game.

The game was introduced to the IRB in 1997



|
|



m DAN WOODSIDE |

in hopes of developing an elite-level of compe-
tition between nations. ‘

Woodside added: “There is a lot of pressure
on me being the first person to be named to a
team like this. I am not scared, I feel as though
I’ve gotten past the hardest part, that is making
sure that I’ve added up to the other players.

“Now that I’ve seen that I am able to play
with them my confidence level has grown and I
am ready to represent the Bahamas and the
other players in the rugby clubs.

“I am hoping to grasp so much from this tour-
nament adding it to the things I’ve learned in
England so when I come home I can assist some
of the younger players or most importantly the
national team.”

Woodside will join us team members on Feb-
ruary Sth for practice sessions.



SPORTS WEEKEND _

The Miami Herald

IN MY OPINION

DAVID J. NEAL

dneal@MiamiHerald.com



Opportunities
mark progress
for minorities

erhaps more than the Super
P Bowl XLI being the first Black

Coach Sunday in the game’s
overstated history, progress for
minority coaches can be tracked by
Chicago Bears defensive coordinator
Ron Rivera and new Pittsburgh Steel-
ers head coach Mike Tomlin.

Not that Chicago’s Lovie Smith atid
Indianapolis’ Tony Dungy getting to
the game that Dennis Green and Art
Shell have missed by one victory isn’t
significant, especially to people of
color in and around the league.

It is. If you have trouble under-
standing why it means so much, con-

. sider yourself lucky. You have never
been in a business in which most of
labor looked like you and there was a
long-lingering perception that those
who looked like you didn’t Possess.
management skills.

And, if you still wonder why it’s a
big deal, I guarantee that you never
got the equivalent suggestion to the
one that Dungy famously got when

interviewing for a head coaching job: —

Shave your beard, so that you have a

less-militant look. That didn’t happen -

in 1966 but in our modern, ESPN era.

WELL WORTH THE CHANCE |

That’s why, sometimes, getting the
chance to achieve means more than
achievement. So it is with NFL head
coaches. After all, the only reason the
last Super Bowl in Miami didn’t have

Green wasn’t anybody’s closed mind. .

_ It was a wide kick. Minhesota’s Gary
Anderson, who had not missed a field
goal all season, blew what would have
been an NFC Championship Game-
clinching field goal. Atlanta tied the
score and won in overtime.

An example of a change in NFL
teams’ upper-management change in
mind-set is what is happening with
Rivera and Tomlin.

Rivera is such a hot prospect fora
head coaching job that each Bears
playoff victory affected coaching
searches across the league. Teams
wanted to talk to Rivera, the Bears
defensive coordinator, who almost .
certainly will be the NFL’s next His-
panic head coach. But, since the
Bears’ playoff bye week, Rivera has
been in a holding pattern because he
could not interview while the Bears
were still alive in the playoffs.

After each Bears playoff victory, —
Rivera, 44, shrugged off any sugges-
tion of frustration with his situation,
reasoning that the further the Bears
go, the more a desired coaching com-
modity he will be.

TOMLIN, READY OR NOT
One of the jobs that got filled while

— Rivera was figuring out playoff strate-

gies went to Tomlin, a guy who is 34,
with 12 years of coaching experience,
but only six at the NFL level and one
as defensive coordinator.

Granted, in that one year as coordi-
nator, Minnesota had one of the great
run defenses of all-time, giving up
only 61.6 rushing yards per game and
2.8 yards per run. Tomlin benefited

_ from the unrelated Williamses at
defensive tackle, Pat and Kevin,
devouring runners as if they were cin-
namon-flavored. The Vikings weren’t
very good against the pass, though:
18th in yards per pass play, 30th in
sacks per pass play and tied for worst
pass defense overall.

But NFL teams tapped Tomlin as a
golden guy. Interviews showered on
him at an age when Dungy, who hada
much more accomplished résumé at
the same age, was getting polite
smiles and grooming tips.

The Steelers took Tomlin over
Russ Grimm, who had 15 seasons of
NFL coaching experience. The past:
six of them were in Pittsburgh, where
head coach Bill Cowher recognized
how well Grimm handled the offen-
sive line by making Grimm his first
“assistant head coach” in 2004. Tom-
lin might have interviewed better. As
a head coach, he might be the next
Don Shula, for all we know. But it’s
hard to argue on credentials that the
Steelers made the right call.

. Someone once said the sign of true
equality isn’t when the superior black
candidate gets the chance to succeed
but when a mediocre black candidate
gets the same breaks and opportuni-
ties that a mediocre white one could.

Maybe the NFL has reached that
point. Which begs the question if
there is a further need for arule —
requiring teams to interview at least
one minority candidate when each
head coaching job comes open.



SSA MAS a A SN

FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007

SHARAPOVA WINS,
WILL PLAY SERENA
FOR WOMEN’S TITLE

BY JOHN PYE
Associated Press

MELBOURNE, Australia — If
he could pick any player from any
era to test himself against, Roger
Federer would like a shot at Rod
Laver or Bjorn Borg.

Laver, the last man to win all
four major tennis tournaments in
one season, was in the stadium that
carries his name on Thursday to
witness top-ranked Federer dis-
mantle Andy Roddick in the Aus-
tralian Open semifinals.

After what he saw, Laver, who is

. 68, would just as soon stick to

meeting Federer in the locker

room — after the matches.
Federer likes to put on a show

when Laver is at Rod Laver Arena,






BY DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press ;

SAN DIEGO — Brandt Sne-
deker had trouble remembering a
round he will never forget.

Snedeker, a 26-year-old rookie
on the PGA Tour, flirted with
golfs magic number Thursday in
the Buick Invitational until the
birdies dried up on the easy North
Course at Torrey Pines. Snedeker
finished with a 61, tying the course
record and taking a two-shot lead.

“The whole front nine was a

blur,” said Snedeker, who couldn’t

recall how he birdied some of the
holes, much less what those holes
even looked like. But he generated
the biggest buzz at the Buick Invi-
tational, where two-time defending
champion Tiger Woods opened
with a round of 66 and was
reduced to a supporting role.

“To see the crowd kind of work
their way back to me from Tiger
was kind of nice,” said Snedeker,
who played two groups behind
Woods. “Seeing them rooting me
on the last nine holes — although

SS A I EST SEG SEES



INTERNATIONAL EDITION



TENNIS | AUSTRALIAN OPEN

Federer slams door on Roddick



CLIVE BRUNSKILL/AP

EXTRA SPECIAL: With Rod Laver i in the crowd at Rod Laver Arena,
Roger Federer, above, dismantled Andy Roddick: 6-4, 6-O, 6-2.

and he called his 6-4, 6-0, 6-2 vic-
tory over sixth-seeded Roddick his
best match in Melbourne.

“I had one of these days when
everything worked,” the Swiss star

said. “I was unbeatable. I was play-
ing out of my mind. I am shocked
myself.”

The victory put Federer in his
seventh consecutive Grand Slam

final, tying a record set by Jack
Crawford in 1934, and left him only
one victory from a 10th Grand
Slam title. Federer will meet the
winner of today’s Fernando Gonza-
lez-Tommy Haas semifinal in Sun-
day’s championship match.
’ .With seemingly few challengers
among his contemporaries, Fed-
erer often is asked about facing one
of the greats from another era —
and Laver and Borg come to his
mind.

Each of those stars won 11
majors — Borg from 16 finals span-

ning 1974 to 1881, and Laver in a

five-season run wedged around his
absence from the Grand Slam tour-
naments from 1963-67.

After Sunday’s match, Federer
is likely to be only one major title
behind, although Laver expects
him to go.a lot further and break
Pete Sampras’ record of 14 Grand
Slam championships.

* TURN TO AUSTRALIAN OPEN



PRO FOOTBALL | SUPER BOWL XLI

BLU

Indianapolis has been
swamped by a sea of
the Colts’ colors as the
city relishes its team’s
first Super Bowl.

IN



BY MIKE PHILLIPS
mphillips@MiamiHerald.com

THE
FACE

INDIANAPOLIS. — Banners hang from sky-
scrapers downtown, where City Circle has a tint of
blue and the ancient statues outside the state capi-
tol actually don Colt jerseys. The Simons Building,
which is wedged between the RCA Dome and the
old capitol building, i is ‘lit up — its windows form-

ing a horseshoe.

Suburban lawns are dotted with snowmen
wearing Colts gear, and one snowman in
Carmel — just outside Indianapolis —
seems to say it all. He stands bigger,
buffer and taller, draped in a Colts
uniform. He has been dyed a deep

rich Indianapolis Colts blue.

The Colts are headed for the
Super Bowl, and a city that has
never won an NFL champion-

*TURN TO COLTS



GOLF | BUICK INVITATIONAL

Dream round for rookie: Snedeker fires a ol



DONALD MIRALLE/AP

BUICK SPECIAL: Brandt Snedeker
climbed into the driver’s seat.

I couldn’t bring it in the way they
wanted — was still fun.

“TJ had a blast.”

Woods had just knocked down
the flag with a 5-iron for a short

eagle putt on the 18th hole when,
on his way to the first tee, he saw
a. scoreboard listing Snedeker at
8 under through seven holes.

“We thought it was a misprint,”
Woods said. “It came up again, so
obviously it was not a misprint.
That’s some great playing.”

Starting his first round at No. 10,
Snedeker went eight holes before
settling for par and was 9 under
through nine holes, tying the Tour
record for nine holes on a par 36.

Charlie Wi shot a 63 that hardly
anyone noticed, and John Senden
and Jeff Quinney each shot 64.

Almost as noteworthy as Sne-
deker’s 61 is that the top
23 scores came on the North
Course, one of the easiest on the
PGA Tour. The real work comes
on the South, which is nearly
700 yards longer and will be the
site of the U.S. Open next year.

The South played 4.7 strokes
per round harder in the opening
round, with Camilo Villegas post-
ing the best score at 67.

Phil Mickelson took a double

GO BLUE: Jake Berry of
Indianapolis shows his support
of the Colts during a rally.
















DARRON CUMMINGS/AP

JUSTIN LANE/EFE

TIGER WATCH: Woods shot a 66
- and he was five strokes back.

bogey by hitting over the 14th
green and into a hazard on his way
to a 74 on the South Course, and
Vijay Singh made only one birdie
during his round of 75.



__MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

4E, | FRIDAY, JANUARY 26,2007 __ INTERNATIONAL EDITION

SOCCER | BASEBALL | ETC.



a PEOPLE IN SPORTS _







a

From Miami Herald Wire Services

AC Milan has made Real
Madrid an offer for Ronaldo.

“We are sending an offer
for Ronaldo. We are shopping
so we'll see,” Milan vice presi-
dent Adriano Galliani said on
Thursday. “Everything of
course will be down to a medi-
cal [exam], so we have plenty
to do yet.

“Ronaldo, who. is at the
moment still a Real Madrid
player, will undergo a medical
at Milanello tomorrow,” Galli-
ani added while waiting at
Milan’s Linate airport for the
striker.

Ronaldo, who left the Span-
ish capital by private jet,
attended Milan’s Italian Cup
first-leg semifinal against AS
Roma at San Siro on Thursday
evening.

“I want to publicly thank
[Real] president Ramon Cal-
deron for having offered us
this possibility. I have a meet-
ing [in Madrid] on Monday
and if all goes well as I hope,
Ronaldo will become a Milan
player,” Galliani said.

Galliani and Madrid official
Franco Baldini reached a ver-
bal agreement for the Brazil
forward late Wednesday for
about $9 million, Italian news
agency ANSA reported.

“We are still waiting for a
written offer from Milan,” Bal-
dini was quoted as saying on
Thursday morning by ANSA.

Spanish news agency Efe
said Ronaldo was at Madrid’s
training in the morning, and
showed no sign his transfer
was imminent.

It added that the 30-year-
old did not bid his teammates
farewell or collect his belong-

SPORTS ROUNDUP

LUCA BRUNO/AP

NEW KID IN TOWN: Ronaldo
hears the cheers as he
attends Thursday’s AC
Milan-AS Roma match.

ings. But Efe did report that
Ronaldo sent a text message to
Galliani on Wednesday.

“Tl arrive, pass the medical
and go to the stadium with my
new president,” Efe quoted
him as saying.

Baldini did not divulge
financial details of the agree-
ment but said that “it’s a long
way from the $10 million that

Real is asking to release Ron- -

aldo,” ANSA reported.

' Spanish daily El] Mundo
cited a figure closer to $8 mil-
lion and reported that Ronaldo
will be offered a 12-year con-
tract with the Rossoneri — the
same length as the remainder
of his contract at Madrid.

Regardless, both transfer
fees represent a significant
discount on Milan’s unsuc-
cessful offer of $28.6 million
five months ago.

Red Sox put
final touches
on Drew deal

From Miami Herald Wire Services

The Boston Red Sox and
J.D. Drew finally resolved
their wrangling over a five-
year, $70 million contract,
more than seven weeks after
agreeing to everything except
what to do about the outfield-
er’s surgically repaired right
shoulder.

‘A baseball official involved
in the negotiations said Thurs-
day that the language had been
agreed to.

The official spoke on condi-
tion of anonymity because an
announcement had not yet
been made.

Drew’s contract contains
language similar to that in
Magglio Ordonez’s deal with
Detroit in which the team can
opt out of guaranteed money
in the event a specified pre-ex-
isting injury recurs.

Drew’s agent, Scott Boras,
and the players’ association
agreed that if the Red Sox
exercise their rights under that
language, neither Drew nor
the union would contend that
the language is unenforceable.

e Elsewhere: With spring
training less than three weeks
away, Bernie Williams still
doesn’t know whether he’ll be
back with the New York Yan-
kees. Williams’ agent, Scott
Boras, said Wednesday he
was waiting to hear from gen-
eral manager Brian Cashman.
With the Yankees planning to
carry 12 pitchers, use a platoon
at first base and move Jason
Giambi to designated hitter,
there doesn’t appear to be
room on the roster for Wil-
liams, 38, who has been with
the team since 1991. It’s possi-
ble the Yankees could agree to
a minor-league deal with Wil-
liams, a favorite of manager
Joe Torre. ... Outfielder
Darin Erstad and the Chicago
White Sox agreed on a one-
year, $1 million contract that
includes a club option for
2008.... While Sammy Sosa
and the Texas Rangers were

close to finalizing a minor-
league deal, a final resolution
isn’t expected until at least
early next week. Texas did
agree to a minor-league con-
tract with right-hander Jamey
Wright. ... The Chicago Cubs
released left-handed pitcher
Glendon Rusch, after his
2006 season was cut short by a
blood clot in his lung. ...
Third baseman Morgan Ens-
berg, shortstop Adam Ever-
ett and outfielder Jason Lane
agreed to one-year contracts
with the Houston Astros, set-
tling the team’s remaining
arbitration cases. ... Right-
hander Aaron Sele agreed to
a minor-league contract with
the Mets, giving New York
another starting pitching
option heading to spring train-
ing... . Pittsburgh Pirates out-
fielder Jody Gerut, out for
most of two seasons with knee
problems, accepted a $25,000
pay cut and agreed to a one-
year, $850,000 deal. ... The
Seattle Mariners are giving
Arthur Rhodes another
chance to help their bullpen,
agreeing to a minor-league
contract with the 36-year-old
reliever. ... The Toronto Blue
Jays finalized a $1.5 million
contract with pitcher Tomo
Ohka after he passed a physi-
cal.... The Oakland Athletics
all but completed their roster
heading into spring training,
agreeing with outfielder

‘Bobby Kielty on a one-year,

$2.1 million ‘contract that
avoided arbitration. ... The
Detroit Tigers agreed to terms
with left-hander Joey Eis-
chen on a minor-league con-
tract.... Jack Lang, a Hall of
Fame baseball writer who for
two decades had the pleasant
assignment of telling players
they had been elected to Coo-
perstown, died on Thursday.
He was 85 years old. Lang had
been ill for an extended period
with a variety of ailments,
according to his lawyer, Kevin
Brosnahan.

"



Ronaldo has six days
remaining in the January
transfer window to switch
clubs. Otherwise, he will have
to stay at Madrid at least until
the end of the season.

e Elsewhere: AC Milan
drew AS Roma 2-2 in an Ital-
ian Cup first-leg semifinal.

Ricardo Oliveira and
Filippo Inzaghi scored for
Milan, before Simone Per-
rotta and David Pizarro lev-
eled the game for Roma. All
four goals were in the first
half.

The return leg is scheduled
for Wednesday.

In the other first-leg semifi-
nal, two-time defending cham-
pion Inter Milan beat Samp-
doria 3-0 on Wednesday. ...
Serie A club Parma was sold to
a consortium led by Italian
businessman Tommaso Ghir-
ardi. Financial details of the
deal were not disclosed by for-
mer owner Parmalat SpA.

ELSEWHERE

e France: Araujo Ilan
and Batefimbi Gomis each
scored to lead Saint-Etienne
over Nancy 2-0 and into fifth
place in French first-division
soccer.

Ilan put the visitors ahead
in the 55th minute after col-
lecting a pass from Pascal
Feindouno and finishing
inside the near post. In the
71st, Brazilian Ilan turned pro-
vider when he set up Gomis.

The victory moved Saint-
Etienne to 34 points from 21
rounds, while Nancy stayed in
ninth place with 30 points. ...
Paris Saint-Germain signed
Jeremy Clement from Rang-
ers. Clement will be reunited

with coach Paul Le Guen,
who left the Scottish club this
month. He was also coach at
Lyon, where Clement started
his career. A PSG spokesman
confirmed the deal has been
completed for the 22-year-old
midfielder, but did not imme-
diately give more details.

e England: Newcastle
midfielder Emre denied a
Football Association charge of
being racially abusive. Emre
was charged with “using
racially aggravated ‘abusive
and/or insulting words” in the
Magpies’ 3-0 Premier League
loss to Everton at Goodison
Park on Dec. 30. The Turkey
midfielder will have his case
heard after requesting a per-
sonal hearing.

e Spain: Sevilla has signed
Argentine teenage defender
Federico Fazio to a five-year
contract. Fazio’s contract will
carry a $19.5 million buyout
clause, Sevilla said.

e Germany: Stuttgart has
signed striker Benjamin
Lauth from Hamburger SV on
loan until the end of the sea-
son. The move came Thurs-
day, one day after Stuttgart
sent striker Jon Dahl Tomas-
son to Villarreal.

e UEFA election: FIFA
president Sepp Blatter backs
Michel Platini in his bid to
unseat Lennart Johansson as
head of European soccer’s
governing body.

Speaking on the eve of
today’s UEFA election, Blatter
insisted he was neutral but
then openly professed his
admiration for Platini, a for-
mer France star and three-
time European Player of the
Year.



PETER COSGROVE/AP

READY TO GO: The Red Sox settled outfielder J.D. Drew’s
contract, with the final obstacle involving his shoulder.

ETC.

e NFL: The Dallas Cow-
boys added Jason Garrett to
their coaching staff, and said
he would remain a candidate
to replace retired head coach
Bill Parcells. The Cowboys
said Garrett’s responsibilities
and title won’t be determined
until the head coaching search
is complete. The most likely
scenario, however, is that Gar-
rett will become the offensive

_coordinator if he’s not the

head coach. ... Long snapper
David Binn was added to the
Pro Bowl roster as the AFC’s
“need” player, making him the
llth San Diego Chargers player
selected for the game in Hono-
lulu. ..: The Arizona Cardi-
nals hired former Dallas assis-
tant coach Todd Haley as
their offensive coordinator,
and retained defensive coordi-
nator Clancy Pendergast. ...
The Houston Texans hired
Frank Bush as their senior
defensive assistant... . Hall of
Fame quarterback Roger
Staubach was selected to
chair an effort to bring the
Super Bowl to North Texas.
... Former Alabama coach
Mike Shula was hired as the
quarterbacks coach for the
Jacksonville Jaguars. ... Chi-
cago Bears left guard Ruben
Brown was added to the
NFC’s Pro Bowl roster as a
replacement for injured Phila-
delphia Eagles guard Shawn
Andrews... . Cincinnati Ben-
gals wide receiver Chris
Henry was sent to jail for two
days after pleading guilty to

allowing minors to drink alco-
hol in his hotel room last
spring. ... Darren Perry, the
Pittsburgh Steelers” defensive
secondary coach since 2003,
resigned following a meeting
with new coach Mike Tomlin.
... The Buffalo Bills signed
offensive lineman Kirk Cham-
bers.

e Golf: South Africa’s
Retief Goosen shot a 7-under
65 to take a one-stroke lead
after the first round of the
Qatar Masters in Doha. Spain’s
Miguel Angel Jimenez and
Australia’s Nick O’Hern
opened with 66s.

e Auto racing: Alex Gur-
ney took the pole position for
the Rolex 24 At Daytona, 45
years after father Dan Gurney
captured the first sports car
race at Daytona International
Speedway.

e College’ football:
North Carolina State com-
pleted its coaching staff by hir-
ing assistants Andy McCol-
lum and Mike Reed.
McCollum, the former head
coach at Middle Tennessee,
will coach linebackers and
Reed is leaving the Philadel-
phia Eagles’ staff to coach the
Wolfpack’s defensive backs.
... Marshall hired Steve Dun-
lap as its defensive coordina-
tor. :
e Cycling: France’s anti-
doping agency dropped its
investigation of Tour de
France runner-up Oscar Per-
eiro, saying the Spanish rider
gave enough justification for
use of an asthma medication.











MANU FERNANDEZ/AP

GETTING GEARED UP

BAR Honda Formula One driver Rubens Barrichello
of Brazil drives his new Honda RA 107 during a test
session at Montmelo racetrack near Barcelona.

Auto racing trash talk

With Toyota poised to enter NASCAR’s Nextel Cup series
this season, Ford team owner Jack Roush is revving up the

combative rhetoric.

Roush, the loudest critic of NASCAR’s decision to allow
the Japanese automaker to enter the Nextel Cup series, said
he’s “preparing myself for siege” on the track and in the

boardroom this year.

’ “J expect to hand Toyota their head over the short term,”
Roush said this week during NASCAR’s preseason media

tour

Roush, who has said that Americans shouldn’t buy foreign-

made cars because it hurts the economy, believes that Toyo-
ta’s entry will hurt NASCAR because the automaker will out-
spend teams affiliated with domestic automakers.

But he’s ready for a fight.

“Nobody is frightened,” Roush said. “We're going to go to
war with them, and they should give us their best shot.”

Given current events, this might not be the most sensitive
time for Roush — a war history buff who owns a World War
II-era P-51 Mustang fighter plane — to compare sports to war.
But at times Wednesday, Roush seemed to be channeling

Winston Churchill.

“Toyota will not find that the established teams and manu-
facturers will wither in their path, as has been the case where
they have tried to engage elsewhere,” he said. -

But Roush’s preparations to take on Toyota go beyond
tough talk. He is negotiating to sell a significant stake of his
team to a group headed by Boston Red Sox and former Flor-
ida Marlins owner John Henry to raise more money to race.

Historic fight

Boxer Laila Ali met with
Nelson Mandela’s ex-wife
ahead of a historic fight in
Johannesburg, South Africa.
The daughter of Muham-
mad Ali visited human-
rights activist Winnie
Madikizela-Mandela in
Soweto on Wednesday and
spoke at a local school.

Ali, 29, will become the
first female to headline a
bout in South Africa,
defending her World Boxing
Council and International
Boxing Federation super-
middleweight titles against
Gwendolyn O'Neil of Guy-
ana on Feb. 3 at Emperor’s
Palace casino.

Ali (23-0, 20 knockouts)
beat O’Neil, 36, with a third-
round knockout in 2004 to
win the IBF light-heavy-
weight title in Atlanta.

“I know Gwendolyn will
be better prepared this time
and a more formidable
opponent, so I’m not taking
anything for granted,” Ali
said.

‘There were 21 goals; you think
| would have had one. | guess it
wasn’t meant to be. | had a few
chances, it just didn’t work out.’

- SIDNEY CROSBY, Pittsburgh Penguins
center, joking after going without a goal in
the NHL All-Star Game on Wednesday night.
Crosby’s Eastern Conference team lost to
the Western Conference 12-9.



Hard act to follow

Tennessee women’s bas-
ketball coach Pat Summitt
is trying to figure out how to
top Bruce Pearl’s show of
support.

Pearl made good ona
promise to paint himself
orange and cheer in the stu-
dent section for the wom-
en’s game against No. 1
Duke on Monday.

Pearl, the Vols’ men’s
coach, painted his torso
orange with a light blue “V”
on his chest and an “L” on
his back.

“J don’t know that I can
match it,” Summitt said. “I
thought it was great. I think
it shows his passion not only
for his program, but he’s
been a great friend to our
program.”

. Pearl stood in front of the
student section with his son,
Steven, a walk-on fresh-
man, three other players and
a manager to spell out the
messages “GO VOLS” on
their chests and “LADY” on
their backs. :



FLASHBACK

On this day in history:

1985 — In hockey, Edmonton’s Wayne Gretzky scores
his 50th goal in the 49th game of the season.

1986 — The Chicago Bears capture their first NFL cham-
pionship since 1963 by setting a Super Bowl record for points
scored in defeating the New England Patriots 46-10.

ot eae

~ Ye ee «

ss 4



6E_| FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007__ INTERNATIONAL EDITION _

po



ulls snap Mavericks’ streak

From Miami Herald Wire Services

CHICAGO — Ben Gordon
scored 30 points, Luol Deng
added 21 and the Chicago Bulls
snapped the Dallas Mavericks’
eight-game winning streak with a
96-85 victory on Thursday night.

Dirk Nowitzki had 28 points
and ll rebounds for the Maver-
icks; who lost for just the second
time in 23 games.

After nearly blowing an early
17-point lead, the Bulls pulled
away late in the fourth quarter.

Nowitzki’s 3 closed Chicago’s
lead to 79-76 with 4:31 left.

PJ. Brown followed with a
basket for Chicago and Kirk Hin-
rich followed with a 3, making it
84-76. Erick Dampier’s dunk for
Dallas cut the lead to 86-81, but
Brown answered for Chicago by
going around Nowitzki for a bas-
ket and hitting a jumper to put
Chicago up 90-81 with 1:16 left.

Brown scored six of his 12
points in the fourth quarter. Hin-
rich added 15 points and eight
rebounds and Ben Wallace had
17 rebounds for Chicago, which
improved to 19-6 at home.

Jerry Stackhouse scored 16
points and Jason Terry added 12
’ points and six assists for Dallas.

Nowitzki and Josh Howard,
Dallas’ top two scorers, had poor
shooting games. Nowitzki was
4-for-16 and Howard was 1-for-15
entering the fourth quarter. They
finally got it going in the fourth.

Nowitzki went to the basket
and scored and Howard fol-
lowed with a jumper to make it
72-67. After Gordon hit a jumper,
Howard converted a three-point
play to close the gap to 74-70
with 6:24 left.

Nowitzki’s jumper cut Chica-
go’s lead to 53-48 early in the
- third quarter, but the Bulls
responded with a 12-3 run.
Brown had back-to-back baskets
for the Bulls and Gordon fol-
lowed with a jumper. Deng’s
steal and dunk gave the Bulls a
65-51 lead with 2:28 left in the
quarter. '

Howard finished 4-for-20 and
Nowitzki was 7-for-22. Dallas
shot 31.2 percent, its worst mark
of the season. ,

The Bulls jumped out to a 23-6
lead with Deng scoring eight
points. Dallas was held to 13

P

PRO BASKETBALL

poirits in the first quarter, its sea-
son-low for a period.

Nowitzki and Stackhouse kept
Dallas in striking distance in the
second quarter.

Stackhouse came off the
bench and scored 13 points on
5-of-8 shooting and Nowitzki
scored 15 points. Nowitzki was
just 3-of-10 from the floor, but
made all nine free-throw

“attempts.

Chicago led 47-41 at the half

behind Gordon’s 16 points.

ALL-STAR STARTERS

NEW YORK — Gilbert Are-
nas pulled out another late vic-
tory. The Washington star
surged past Vince Carter in the
final days of All-Star voting to
claim the second Eastern Con-
ference guard spot by 3,010
votes, the fourth-closest margin
for a starting spot.

Cavaliers standout LeBron
James, the MVP last year, led all
players with more than 2.5 mil-
lion votes for the Feb. 18 game in
Las Vegas.

The first All-Star Game held
outside an NBA city will main-
tain one traditional look: Heat
center Shaquille O’Neal was cho-
sen to his 14th consecutive All-
Star Game, tying Jerry West and
Karl Malone for the most con-
secutive selections.

Aremas was 214,460 votes
behind Carter two weeks ago,
but finished with 1,454,166 to
Carter’s 1,451,156.

Arenas, O’Neal and James will
be joined in the East lineup by
Heat guard Dwyane Wade and

ELSEWHERE
e Cavaliers:

X-rays

O BASKETBALL | HOCKEY



HARD TO CORRAL: Bulls guard Ben Gordon drives to the basket
during his 30-point performance in Thursday night’s victory
over the Mavericks, snapping Dallas’ eight-gam

LATE WEDNESDAY
on

e win streak.

e Rockets 90, Spurs 85:

_ MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD





_ NBA STANDINGS





EASTERN CONFERENCE















Chicago 96, Dallas 85



Miami at N.Y., 7:30

Minn. at Sea., 10:30
Char. at Lakers, 10:30

NEw nas I

another first-time starter,
Toronto forward Chris Bosh.

Injured Houston center Yao
Ming led all West players with
more than 2.4 million votes. Min-
nesota’s Kevin Garnett and San
Antonio’s Tim Duncan were
voted in at forward, while Los
Angeles’ Kobe Bryant and Hous-
ton’s Tracy McGrady won the
guard spots.

McGrady held off Denver
newcomer Allen Iverson, who

LeBron James’ sore right big toe
were negative, and the Cavaliers
are hoping their superstar for-
ward doesn’t have to miss any
games.

James injured his toe during
the recent West Coast trip and
aggravated it during Wednesday
night’s double-overtime loss to
the 76ers. womens

e SuperSonics: The club
signed journeyman forward
Andre Brown to a contract for

Tracy McGrady scored 37 points
to lead visiting Houston.

e Grizzlies 132, Jazz 130

(OT): Eddie Jones beat the
buzzer with a 22-foot jump shot
to lift visiting Memphis.

e Kings 114, Bucks 106:
Ron Artest scored 36 points to
lead host Sacramento.

e Trail Blazers 101, Tim-

berwolves 98 (OT): Zach Ran- - =:

dolph had 22. points, 15 rebounds,
and two key free throws at the

would have finished ahead of the rest of the season.
Arenas to earn a starting spot if
he were still in Philadelphia.
Iverson started the past seven
All-Star games and was the MVP

in 2001 and 2005.



e Knicks: The Knicks are the
NBA’s most valuable franchise
despite nearly $40 million in
operating losses last season,
according to a list by Forbes.

HOCKEY

end to lead host Portland to the .

victory.

State.

e Warriors 110, Nets 109:
Monta Ellis hit a 17-foot jumper
at the buzzer to lift host Golden

SOUTHEAST vol Ww et Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Washington 24 17 «585 - 64 Ll 17-4 7-13 16-9
Orlando 23 20 «535 2 46 L-1 14-8 9-12 13-11
Miami 19 23 .452 5% 6-4 L-1. 10-10 9-13 8-12
Atlanta 14 26 .350 9% 55 Wl 7-11 7-15 9-17
Charlotte 1427 341 10 55 L2 8-14 6-13 11-17
ATLANTIC WL Pct. GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf
Toronto 21 22 488 «+- %7-3 W-2 13-7 8-15 14-8
New Jersey 20 22 .476 % 64 L-2 13-10 7-12 16-9
New York 18 26 .409 3% 5-5 L-2 10-13 8-13 11-16
Philadelphia 13 30 302 8 4-6 W-2 7-10 6-20 9-16
Boston 12.29 .293 8 19 L-9 4-16 8-13 8-18
CENTRAL WoL. Pet. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Detroit 24 16 «600 - 55 W-3 11-8 138 168
Cleveland 24 18 «4.571 1 46 L2 15-5 9-13 15-12
Chicago 25 19 568 1 55 W-2 19-6 6-13 19-8
Indiana 22°20 524 3 55 W-2 12-7 10-13 17-12
Milwaukee 17 25 405 «#8 #19 LS 9-7 8-18 7-16
WESTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHWEST wie : Pct. GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf
Dallas 359 #795 - 8&2 L-L 19-3 16-6 23-6
San Antonio 30 14 682 5 7-3 Ld 15-8 15-6 19-9
Houston 26 16 «4.619 8 64 W-1 13-5 13-11 14-14
New Orleans 16 25 .39017% 46 L-2 10-10 6-15 7-17
Memphis 11 32 .25623% 3-7 W-1 8-13 3-19 5-19
NORTHWEST WL. Pct. GB L10 Str, Home Away Conf
Utah 28 15 651 - 55 Ll 15-5 13-10 17-9
Denver 22 17 «564-4 «64 W-5 12-10 10-7 9-11
Minnesota 20 21 .488 #+(7? 46 4L5 12-8 8-13 11-13
Portland 18 25 .419 10 5-5 W-2 11-12 7-13 11-13
Seattle 16 26 .38111% 3-7 L-1 12-10 4-16 6-16
PACIFIC WL Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Phoenix 34 8 .810 - 10-0 W-15 19-3 15-5 16-7
L.A. Lakers 27: 15 «+.643 «7. 6-4 W-l 19-4 8-11 17-9
L.A. Clippers 20 21 .48813% 64 W-3 15-7 5-14 13-16
Golden State 20 23 .465144% 46 W-1 168 4-15 13-15
Sacramento 17.23 .425 16 3-7 W-2 12-11 5-12 8-15
RESULTS AND SCHEDULES
Thursday’s results Tonight’s games Wednesday’s results

Ind. 96, Miami 94 (OT)

N.J. at Clippers, late Atl. at Orl., 7 Det. 103, Cha. 92
Bos. at Tor., 7 Tor. 90, N.O. 88
: ee at Phil., 7 wy A ue (20T) '
lem. at S.A., 8 .. Atl. 82, Bos.

NAM Y. HUH/AP Sac. at N.O., 8 Pho. 112, N.Y. 107
Wash. at Det.,8 . Hou. 90, S.A. 85
Pho. at Mil., 8:30 Mem. 132, Utah 130 (OT)
Port. at Hous., 8:30 Sac. 114, Mil. 106
Den. at Utah, 9 Por. 101, Min. 98 (OT)

G.S. 110, NJ. 109

Through Wednesday
SCORING REBOUNDING

G FG FT PTS AVG G OFF DEF TOT AVG

Anthony, Den. 24 287 171 758 31.6 Garnett, Minn. 40 102 403 505 12.6
Arenas, Wash. 41 389 314 1218 29.7 Camby, Den. 34 90 338 428 12.6
Iverson, Den. 31 303 265 900 29.0 Howard, Orl. 43 150 388 538 12.5
Wade, Mia. 35 330 312 990 283 Boozer, Utah 43 137 374 511 11.9
Bryant, LAL 39 363 3141102 283 . Okafor, Char. 41 159 301 460.11.2
Redd, Mil. 33 302 244 914 27.7 Chandler, NOk. 39 146 282 428 11.0
James, Clev. 42 409 265 1139 27.1 —_Lee, N.Y. 44 162 309 471 10.7
Allen, Sea. 32 286 172 836 26.1. O'Neal, Ind. 37 90 298 388 10.5
Nowitzki, Dall. 42 359 296 1053 25.1 Duncan, S.A. 44 128 333 461 10.5
Johnson, Atl. ... , 36.340. 135,890 24.7 Randolph, Port. 42 127 307 434 10.3

FIELD GOALS“-" _ ASSISTS”

Leet S URE FGA PCT . “@ AST AVG

Biedrins, G.S. 192 309 .621 Nash, Phoe. 40 465 11.6
Lee, N.Y. 193 318 .607 Williams, Utah 43 392 9.1
Stoudemire, Phoe. 283 470 .602 ‘Kidd, N.J. 42 382 9.1
Curry, N.Y. 320 546 .586 Paul, NOk. 27 242 9.0
Boozer, Utah 399 702 .568 Miller, Phil. 41 355 87
Dalembert, Phil. 185326 .567 Davis, G.S. 38 326 8.6
Bogut, Mil. 218 385 .566 Wade, Mia. 35 278 «(7.9
Howard, Orl. 259 459 .564 _ Billups, Det. 32 253 (7.9
Brand, LAC 331 594 .557 Ford, Tor. 38 294. 7.7
Diaw, Phoe. 187 . 347 .539 290 7.6

Felton, Char. 38

Teams lining up to acquire Forsberg

From Miami Herald Wire Services

VOORHEES, N.J. — Peter
Forsberg has generated lots of
interest among NHL teams
looking to add a veteran
scorer.

Philadelphia Flyers general
manager Paul Holmgren said
he’s been contacted by a num-
ber of teams about Forsberg
leading up to the Feb. 27 NHL
trading deadline.

But Holmgren denied a
Denver television report that
the Swedish star has been
given permission to speak to
the Colorado Avalanche about
returning to his former team.

Forsberg, 33, is in the final
year of his contract and can
become an unrestricted free
agent on July 1.

Holmgren was asked if any
arrangement is in place in
which Forsberg or his agent
could talk to Colorado about
possible interest by the Ava-
lanche.

“Absolutely not,” Holm-
gren said. “First, I seriously
doubt that [reports of such
talks] are true. Colorado is a
team that has asked about him.
Our stance all along has been
when we get to that point with
Peter, we'll get to that point.”

Forsberg was returning
from a four-day trip to Sweden
and was unavailable for com-
ment. —

“Pve talked with Peter a
few times, but not about
whether he wants to be traded
or where he wants to go,”
Holmgren said.

The Flyers and Forsberg
have maintained that no trade
is likely if Forsberg can’t
resolve his foot issues.

He has missed 16 games this
season due to post-surgery
problems with his right ankle.

“Our focus has been on get-
ting his skate-foot issues
fixed,” Holmgren said.

“Then doing something [a

ger term.”

consider giving permission to
Forsberg to talk to teams at
this time.

down with Peter and talk
about options, but not right
now.”

Forsberg on Wednesday. Fors-

berg has been consulting with

Swedish doctors on this trip

with the hope of coming up

with a solution to his foot
roblem.



ae CHRIS O’MEARA/AP
A HOT COMMODITY: Philadelphia Flyers general manager
Paul Holmgren said Thursday he has been contacted by
many teams about star center Peter Forsberg, above.

“He has been skating with
his junior team and made
some adjustments,” Holmgren
said. “He felt fairly good about
the progress that he made.”

Holmgren also has not yet
begun contract extension talks
with Forsberg’s agent, Don
Baizley.

Forsberg, who has eight
goals and 20 assists in 31
games, was drafted by the

. Flyers in 1991 but sent to Colo-
rado in 1992 as part of the Eric
Lindros trade.

He signed with the Flyers

as a free agent in 2005.

Holmgren said he won't

“Not right now,” he said.
“J think we need to sit

The GM said he spoke to

ELSEWHERE

e Stars: The club acti-
vated defenseman Sergei
Zubov from injured reserve
and he is expected to play
tonight against Pittsburgh, the
first game after the All-Star
break.

Zubov missed three games
after elbow surgery on Jan. 12.

He is the highest-scoring
Russian defenseman in NHL
history with 708 points in 978
career games. This season, he
has seven goals and 23 assists
for 30 points in 44 games.

The 36-year-old captured
Stanley Cups with the Stars in
1999 and the New York Rang-
ers in 1994,

The Stars also recalled win-
ger Krys Barch from Iowa of
the AHL. He made his NHL
debut earlier this month.

-@ Wild: Goalie Manny
Fernandez’s sprained left knee
will keep him out of the team’s
first game after the All-Star
break. ;

Fernandez stayed in Minne-
sota during the four-day All-
Star break and skated to test
the knee, which he injured in a
game against Dallas right
before the break. He practiced
briefly on Thursday, but left
when his knee stiffened up,
coach Jacques Lemaire said.

The Wild will face Calgary
at home tonight, with backup
goalie Niklas Backstrom
expected to play for Fer-
nandez.

“He won't be playing, that’s
for sure, tomorrow,” Lemaire
said of Fernandez. “It will be a
day-to-day thing. But I don’t
think he will be playing tomor-
row.”

Fernandez, who is 21-15-1
with a 2.58 goals-against aver-
age and .911 save percentage
this season, said after practice
that he was a little more opti-
mistic.

e Sabres: The banged-up
Sabres can count on at least



EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic W LOT Pts GF GA
New Jersey 29 14 «5 63 126 111°
N.Y. Rangers. 23 21 4 50 140 147
Pittsburgh 21 17 8 50 151 148
N.Y. Islanders 22:21. 4 «48 137 136
Philadelphia 1131 5 27 114 182
Northeast W LOT Pts GF GA
Buffalo 33 12 4 70 185 143
Montreal 2777 5 59 146 140
Ottawa 28 20 2 58 171 138
Toronto 22 21 «6 50 159 168
Boston 22 20 4 48 136 170
Southeast W LOT Pts GF GA
Atlanta 27 15 8 62 154 150
Carolina 25 19 6 56 153 155
Tampa Bay 26 22 2 54 161 158
Washington 20 21 7 47 149 168
Florida 18 22 10 46 143 161
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central ; W LOT Pts GF GA
Nashville 34.12 3 71 173 (125
Detroit 30 14°55 65 149 118
St. Louis 19 21 8 46 123 147
Columbus 18 25 5 41 120 149
Chicago 17 24: «7 41 119 150
Northwest W LOT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 27:19 2 56 124 122
Calgary 2617 4 ~ #56 147 121
Minnesota 25 20 4 54 136 128
Colorado 24 20 3 51 148 136
Edmonton » 23 21 4 50 131 138
Pacific W LOT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 30 12 8 68 167 130
San Jose 32 16 0 64 149 110
Dallas 29 18 #1 59 129 116
Phoenix 22 24 2 46 133 164
Los Angeles 16 28 6 38 138 182

left wing Jochen Hecht’s
return now that the NHL All-
Star break is over.

Hecht said Thursday he
expects to play at Columbus
tonight after he practiced fully
in the team’s first session back
after a four-day break. Hecht,
who missed three games with
what the Sabres referred to as
a lower-body injury, ranks
ninth on the team with 25
points (12 goals, 13 assists) and
plays alongside co-captain and
scoring leader Daniel Briere.

The Eastern Conference-
leading Sabres (33-12-4) are
still uncertain of the status of
defenseman Henrik Tallinder
(high right ankle sprain) and
forward Jiri Novotny (left
ankle).

Tallinder practiced but isn’t
sure he’s ready to return dur-
ing Buffalo’s two-game road
trip, which concludes at the

New York Islanders on Satur-
day. Novotny did not practice
and has missed one game
since being hurt in the first
period of a 4-3 shootout vic-
tory over Vancouver on Jan.
19. Assistant Brian McCutch-
eon said the team will wait
until today to decide whether
Tallinder or Novotny can play.

e Players’ Association:
Executive director Ted Saskin
is facing another challenge to
his leadership of the NHL

- Players’ Association, with a
majority of the 30 union-
player representatives approv-
ing an independent investiga-
tion into his hiring.

The action was announced
Thursday in a statement from
a New York public relations
company, with players and
officials scattered across the

country after Wednesday
night’s All-Star Game.

“This is an informative
investigation that we feel will
preserve the integrity of our
NHLPA constitution and lead-
ership process,” Mathieu
Schneider, a Detroit Red
Wings defenseman and
interim NHLPA executive
committee member, said in
the statement. “The purpose
of the investigation is to clear
the air, produce clarity on
these questions and fortify a
strong unified union.”

A conference call was
scheduled Thursday night
between Saskin and the execu-
tive board, which is made up
of the NHLPA’s executive
committee and the player-rep-
resentatives from the 30
teams. News of this latest chal-
lenge comes three days after a
lawsuit against Saskin and oth- |
ers was dismissed by a U.S.
federal court in Illinois. The
judge agreed with the NHLPA
position that Ontario rather
than Illinois should host such a
lawsuit, if indeed it was even
warranted.

contract] with the Flyers lon- p



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THE MIAMIHERALD | MiamiHerald.com

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

_ but Duke wins;

Affialo, UCLA

From Miami Herald Wire Services

DURHAM, N.C. — David
McClure has earned his minutes by
grabbing rebounds, getting steals and
bringing energy off the bench while
his Duke teammates grab most of the
headlines.

On Thursday night, though,
McClure made the most of his
chance to take the big shot.

The sophomore hit a layup as time
expired to lead the No. 10 Blue Devils
past No. 19 Clemson 68-66, extending
Duke’s mastery of the Tigers while
keeping it moving forward in the
Atlantic Coast Conference standings.

In a game with the wildest of fin-
ishes — including a blown five-point
lead in the final 13 seconds and a dose
of clock controversy before the final
play — McClure’s stunning basket
helped the Blue Devils (17-3, 4-2
ACC) win their fourth consecutive
game. Duke has also won 20 meetings
in a row in the series — a span of 10
years — and 24 of 26 games played at
Cameron Indoor Stadium.

This one came thanks to an
unflashy, 6-foot-6 forward who fin-
ished with a modest statistics line off
the bench. As Duke head coach Mike
Krzyzewski put it, “He makes simple,
terrific plays.”

“You never know what’s going to
happen,” McClure said. “If you’re in
every play, you’re going to be ready:
to make a play.”

_ With the score tied at 66 with

“"4.4 seconds left, Josh* McRoberts

inbounded the ball to freshman Jon:
Scheyer,.who pushed the ball near
midcourt and sent a pass ahead to
McClure.

McClure, who had a step on Ver-
non Hamilton, caught the pass and
laid it up over the outstretched arms
of K.C. Rivers as the horn sounded.

“It was a great finish and a great
way to win,” said Scheyer, who had
12 points in the game. “That’s about
as crazy.as it gets.”

The Duke bench players immedi-
ately spilled onto the floor in celebra-
tion and mobbed McClure.

“T’ve been on teams where we’ve
hit shots like that, but 2've never been
the one to hit it,” McClure said. “You
can’t even explain how it feels. I just
started jumping around, and, about a
second later, I got hit by the rest of

- the team, and we all went down.

“It’s one of the best feelings you
can experience in a lifetime.”

Not so for the Tigers (18-3, 4-3),
who walked back toward their bench
in stunned silence after making a

FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

_ rout California

remarkable comeback themselves.

Duke looked on its way to the vic-
tory when Blue Devils freshman Ger-
ald Henderson hit two free throws to
make it 66-61 with 12.7 seconds left.
But Hamilton scored a layup to cut
the deficit to three with 5 seconds
left.

Then Duke made its biggest mis-
take of the night, when McRoberts’
inbounds pass for Greg Paulus went
right to Hamilton just outside the
3-point arc. Hamilton buried the shot
to tie the game with 1.8 seconds left,
which seemed to have the game
headed for overtime.

But game officials stopped play to
review the time left and restored the
clock to 4.4 seconds. Video replays
showed that the clock, which stopped
on Hamilton’s layup, did not restart
on Hamilton’s steal until the ball was
almost in the basket — a pause of
more than a second that led to confu-
sion.

“Tt all happened so fast,” said
Hamilton, who led Clemson with 21
points. “I really thought when I hit
the 3 it was time to go to overtime.”

Clemson coach Oliver Purnell said
he had no arguments with the call,
even though only 0.6 seconds expired
on Hamilton’s steal-and-3-pointer, in
which the senior hesitated before the
shot.

“I don’t have any proof or feeling
that it was handled poorly,” Purnell
said. “As soon as they told me, we
were trying to set our defense
because they had some time left.”

Clemson certainly had plenty of
chances in the final minutes to keep it
from coming down to the final play.
The Tigers tied the score at 60 when
James Mays stole the ball in the
Tigers’ full-court pressure and made
a layup with 3:30 left.

Scheyer hit a pair of free throws
on the next possession to put Duke
back ahead at 62-60. Then, after
Mays made a freé throw to cut the
deficit to one, Clemson’s Cliff Ham-
monds missed shots for the lead on
consecutive possessions, and Rivers
missed an open 3-pointer with about
a minute left.

Scheyer rebounded Rivers’ miss
and hit two free throws to make it

64-61 with 47.1 seconds left, and Hen- |

derson’s free throws pushed the mar-
gin to five.

McRoberts led Duke with
17 points, and McClure finished with
eight points and six rebounds in
34 minutes. The Blue Devils shot just
41 percent, but they kept control of

the game with a 40-24 rebounding
advantage — including a 17-6 edge on
the offensive boards that led to a
19-4 edge in second-chance points.

e No. 3 UCLA 62, California
46: Arron Afflalo scored 20 of his 25
points in the second half and made all
nine of his free throws for the Bruins,
who won in Berkeley, Calif.

Josh Shipp added 12 points and
threw a behind-the-back bounce pass
to Afflalo for a late basket, and Luc
Richard Mbah a Moute grabbed 1l
rebounds in the Bruins’ fourth con-
secutive victory since a 68-66 loss at
Oregon on Jan. 6 — the team’s lone
defeat so far.

Afflalo shot 7-for-13 and didn’t
score for the first time until making
two free throws with 4:39 to go in the
opening half.

Theo Robertson had 16 points,
four rebounds and three assists, and
Ryan Anderson added 13 points and
six boards, but the Golden Bears dis-
appointed the sellout crowd of 11,877
at Haas Pavilion, where many stu-
dents packéd their section about an
hour before tipoff.

The Bruins (18-1, 7-i Pac-10), com-
ing off a sweep of the Arizona
schools, finished 50 percent from the
floor after a slow start and held Cal
leader Ayinde Ubaka to no points
and two assists on 0-for-8 shooting.

UCLA beat the Bears tu two of
three meetings last season, ana the
Bruins clinched a share of the Pac-10
title with a 67-58 overtime victory in
Berkeley last March 2, UCLA then
defeated Cal again in the conference
tournament championship game.

This time, the Bruins took their
first lead of the game on a 3-pointer
by Afflalo with 3:55 before halftime —
giving him five consecutive points
after the free throws —- to start a 7-0
spurt that helped UCLA to a 28-24
edge at the break

Cal (12-8, 4-4), which returned
home after playing six of its previous

‘eight games on the road, gave up too

many easy baskets in the second half.

INTERNATIONAL EDITION _

COLLEGE BASKETBALL | TENNIS

The Bears lost their second game in a
row to a highly-ranked conference
opponent, after a 92-84 defeat at No.
7 Oregon on Saturday.

During Cal’s quick start Thursday
night, Anderson hit a long 3-pointer
with a hand in his face to beat the 35-
second buzzer, then dunked the next
time down the floor with the clock
about to expire. Robertson’s dunk on
Cal’s ensuing possession made it 13-8,
causing UCLA coach Ben Howland
to call a timeout.

The Bruins’ Darren Collison was
whistled for an offensive foul while
driving the lane moments later.

After Jerome Randle’s 3-pointer
with 10:24 remaining before halftime
made it 16-8, UCLA answered with
seven unanswered points, including
five in a row from Michael Roll.

UCLA missed its first four shots
and had two early traveling calls,
finding it tough to establish any
offensive rhythm against Cal’s
scrappy man defense. The Bruins,
who were 8-of-20 to begin the game,
didn’t reach the free-throw line until

9:54 remaining in the first half, and ’

Russell Westbrook missed both

Shots.

Already short-handed because of
injury, Cal played another man down
after losing forward Eric Vierneisel
to a sprained left ankle in the final 2
minutes of Wednesday’s practice.
Lihat left the Bears with only eight
healthy scholarship players, includ-
ing a former walk-on and two fresh-
men. :

e No. 14 Butler 70, Loyola-
Chicago 66 (OT): A. J. Graves hit
three 3-pointers in overtime, includ-
ing the go-ahead basket with 55.2 sec-
onds to play, and the Bulldogs, play-
ing in Chicago, posted their eighth
victory in nine games.

Graves scored 26 points to lead
the Buildogs (18-2, 6-1 Horizon
League), and Pete Campbell added 12
— including 1i in the first half.

Blake Schlib, who put Loyola up
66-65 when. he hit a 3-pointer with

FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007 | 7E



STREETER LECKA/GETTY IMAGES

FANTASTIC FINISH: David McClure, center left, and his Duke teammates celebrate after McClure’s layup
at the buzzer beat Clemson 68-66. Duke blew a five-point lead in the final 13 seconds but still survived.

2:53 to play in overtime, scored a
game-high 27 points. Majak Kou
added 14 points for the Ramblers
(13-8, 4-4), and Leon Young scored
12 points in a reserve role.

LATE WEDNESDAY

@ No. 11 Memphis 72, Tulsa 59:
Joey Dorsey scored 13 points,
grabbed 11 rebounds and blocked
three shots to lead the Tigers (16-3,
6-0 Conference USA) over the
Golden Hurricanes (12-6, 2-3).

Dorsey dominated the inside in
the first half, and the Tigers built an
early lead on the way to their eighth
consetutive victory, keeping them
undefeated at home.

Tulsa lost its third game in a row,
and the team has lost all four of its
road games this season.

Robert Dozier had 12 points and
eight rebounds for Memphis, and Jer-
emy Hunt scored 11 on 4-of-15 shoot-
ing from the field.

Ray Reese led Tulsa with 17
points, and Ben Uzoh added 10. Rod
Earls — Tulsa’s leading scorer, at
12.5 points per. game — was held to
three points, missing five of his six
shots from the field.

e No. 17 Arizona 71, Arizona
State 47: Freshman Chase Budinger
had 21 points and 10 rebounds, and
the host Wildcats (14-5, 5-4 Pac-10)
snapped a three-game skid.

In a tune‘up for Saturday’s game
against No. 4 North Carolina, Ari-
zona beat its in-state rival for the Uth
tite in a row. Jawann McClellan
added i4 points for the Wildcats.

Arizona was without leading-
scorer Marcus Williams, who was
suspended for an undisclosed viola-
tion of team rules. Freshman Jordan
Hill started in his place and scored 12
points, shooting 5-for-7 from the
floor, and he grabbed nine rebounds.

Christian Polk scored 11 points for
Arizona State (6-14, 0-9), which has
dropped 10 games in a row. It is the
Sun Devils’ longest skid since they -
lost their final 11 games in 1996-97.

° AUSTRALIAN OPEN

“I think the art of Roger is
probably the best player I’ve
ever seen,” Laver said. “The
way he’s compiling the Grand
Slam titles, I think he’s got a
great chance of being the best
ever.”

Laver made a rare return to
Melbourne from California to
watch Federer again.

“Roger’s got too many

. shots, too much talent in one

body,” Laver said. “It’s hardly
fair that one person can do all
this — his backhands, his
forehands, volleys, serving,
his court position. ... The
way he moves around the
court, you feel like he’s barely
touching the ground. That’s
the sign of a great champion.”

And that’s a daunting pros-
pect for Haas or Gonzalez.
Haas, a two-time semifinalist
in Australia, has never
reached a Grand Slam final.
Gonzalez is into the semis at a
major for the first time.

Roddick, who beat Federer
in an exhibition tournament
less than two weeks ago and
had match points against him
at the Masters Cup in Novem-
ber, rated the prospect of an
upset as “slim.”



PHIL WALTER/GETTY IMAGES

TOUGH LOSS: Andy Roddick.

Meanwhile, the women’s

‘final, on Saturday, features

top-seeded Maria Sharapova
against No. 81 Serena Wil-
liams. Despite the ranking dis-
parity, nobody is counting
Williams out.

After playing just four
tournaments in 2006 because
of a lingering knee problem,
Williams has said the only
other person that gave her a
chance of winning an eighth
Grand Slam title was her
mother and coach, Oracene.

Williams led 5-1 in the sec-
ond set of her semifinal
before letting Nicole Vaidi-
sova back in, wasting triple

match point at 3-5 and need-
ing three more before finally
converting in a 7-6 (7-5), 6-4
victory.

“T almost did a gag-a-roo-
ney there,” Williams said.

Now, close to a third Aus-
tralian title, she is guaranteed
of returning to the top 20

“T can’t believe it,” Wil-
liams said. “That’s awesome.
If I play well, which I don’t
think I’ve even reached yet at
all in this tournament .. it's
really hard for anyone oni the
women’s tour to beat me.”

Sharapova turned her
semifinal against No, 4 Kim
Clijsters into an Australian
farewell match for the 23
year-old Belgian, who is retir
ing at the end of the year, with
a 6-4, 6-2 victory.

Sharapova is 2-2 against
Williams, and she bad match
points in their previous meet-
ing — the 2005 Australian
semifinal.

“J think she has nothing to
lose,” said Sharapova, who
will assume the top :anking
next week regardless of Satui

day’s result. those are
always dangerous oppo
nents.”

Federer reached the finals
of all four majors last year but



WILLIAM WEST/AFP-GETTY IMAGES
FINAL CUT: Maria Sharapova.

was deprived of a Grand Slam
in a four-set loss to Rafael
Nadal at the French Open.
Federer has led the rankings
since February 2004.

Laver, who had Grand
Slam seasons in 1962 and 1969,
thinks Federer is setting him-
selt up for a run at a Grand
Slam season and has all the
shots he needs to. shatter the
tennis records. After that was
said. Federer put his full rep
ertoive on display, leaving
Roddick bewildered in their
83-minute match.

1 ve played good matches
here, but never really almost
destroyed somebody,” Fed-

Sharapova, Serena advance to women’s title match

erer said. “I’ve done it at the
U.S. Open, Wimbledon,
French Open. Maybe not so
much here because I didn’t
get so many chances yet.
“For me, that’s a highlight
of my career. I’m very, very

‘happy about it.”

Federer broke Roddick’s
first service game, and then
was broken back immediately.
It was the only chance Rod-
dick had in the match, with
Federer winning ll games in a
row from 3-4 in the first set to

‘go up a break in the third.

After falling behind 5-0 in
the second set. Roddick tried
to smack a ball into the stands
to let off steam. Instead, he
lost his grip of the racket, and
it skidded into a photogra-
pher’s knee, drawing a warn-
ing from the chair umpire.

Federer closed that set
with an ace, handing Roddick
his first 6-0 losing set in 25
Grand Slam tournaments.

“It was frustrating. You
know, it was miserable. ..
Terrible,” Roddick said. “I
was playing well coming in. I
didn’t toresee it.”

Roddick, at coach Jimmy
Connors’ urging, rushed the
net in his exhibition victory
over Federer. He thought







GREG WOOD/AFP-GETTY IMAGES
BIG FINISH: Serena Williams.

those tactics would work
again. This time, he got
scorched. Now with a 1-13
record against Federer, Rod-
dick is back to square one.

“You do your best not to
get discouraged. I caught an
absolute beating tonight, no
two ways about it,” he said.
“You deal with it, and you go
back to the drawing board.”

Laver went into the locker
room te congratulate Federer
and renew a friendship that
began last year.

Asked of Laver’s assess-
meni, Federer said: “Oh, he
said it was excellent, which
is nice to hear.”



PAGE 8C, FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS





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Opening lead — queen of hearts.

The problem of insufficient
entries can occasionally be solved by
extremely careful manipulation of
the cards.

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West leads a heart, and South
sees that there are four finesses —
two in spades, one in diamonds and
one in clubs — that can be taken:

The problem is that there are only ©

two apparent entries to dummy for
the purpose of taking the four
finesses. Nevertheless, all the
finesses can be accomplished by
making judicious use of the spot
cards.

South wins the heart and leads
the seven of clubs to the ace. He then
returns a low club to the jack and
cashes the king, leaving his four of
clubs as an entry to dummy’s five.

Declarer performs a similar feat
in diamonds. He leads the eight to
the king, finesses the jack on. the
return and cashes the ace. The six is
now an entry to dummy’s seven.

South next crosses to the five of
clubs to take his first finesse in
spades, and then to the seven of dia-
monds for the second one. His work
done, he then claims 13 tricks.

It can be seen that declarer can
easily spare the seven of clubs and
eight of diamonds when he leads
them to dummy. They are not signif-
icant as high cards, but they must be
gotten out of the way if declarer is to
score the maximum number of tricks.

ARR! WE'RE BLOODTHIRSTY



COCOMILS.COPS [HOSSEOMTUZ

HOW many words of four letters or more can you
make from the letters shown here? In making a
word, each letter may be used once only. Each
must contain the centre letter and there must be
at least one nine-letter word. No plurals or verb
forms ending in ‘s’, no words with initial capitals
and no words with a hyphen or apostrophe ‘
permitted. The first word of a phrase is permitted
(e.g. inkjet in inkjet printer).

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ANAST, YE SCURNY DOGS!
HOIST THE JOLIN ROGER
AND READY THE PLANK /





FRIDAY,
JANUARY 26

ARIES — March 21/April 20
Preparation is key this week, Aries.
Be ready to hit the ground running
when new opportunities arrive that
allow you to showcase your talents.

TAURUS - April 21/May 21

Although it seems like you’re facing
a tough decision, if you think about
it logically, the answer is clear..Do
only what feels right to you, Tautus.
You are the master of your own fate.

GEMINI - May 22/June 21

If you feel like your life. has lacked a
certain sparkle recently, Gemini,
now’s the time to prepare for a

change. A new romance is on,the -’
4 horizon, but you must act quickly'to’ . ’

take advantage of the opportunity.
CANCER - June 22/July 22

This is a week to assess where you are
in life, Cancer. Are you doing all.you
can to succeed? Make time to nurture
a new romance. Of course you're
busy, but the results are worth it. *

LEO — July 23/August 23
Events are important this week,
Leo, but not nearly as important, as
your attitude. The tide is beginning
to tur in your favor, so stop whin-
ing and have a little fun. “!

VIRGO -— Aug 24/Sept 22 °:
Don’t be too hard on yourself when
something doesn’t go quite as You
planned it, Virgo. Focus your effdrts
on moving on to new success. :

LIBRA — Sept 23/Oct 23
You'll be especially alert to patterns
and similarities in those around you,
Libra. Try to use this information to
your advantage. On Friday, an,old
flame stops by to chit-chat. +

SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22-

Success is all about timing this
week, Scorpio. You may be full of
big ideas, but it’s best to not do any-
thing about them just yet. Do what
you can to help a family member
with a personal problem on Tuesday

SAGITTARIUS — Novy 23/Dec 21
The fears and doubts of the past few
weeks are starting to fade. Although
you may feel that you can take on
the world, don’t get too cocky —
that’s asking for trouble.

CAPRICORN -— Dec 22/Jan 2)
Money: matters come to the fore this
week. Now’s the time to give some
thought to why your finances are


























































































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ACROSS 3, Gle-AM 8, Surly 10, Be-N-ds. 11, Sol 12, Dinar | ACROSS: 3, Edict B, Facet 10; Rayon 11, Gum 12, Scrap on ip 25 Area of authority (5) * “4
i reveling stare eee ats ae ute ie Venus 18, Tea 19, Cerise 21, Beer can 22, 29° Funny (7) 26 Cereal crop (4) Chess solution 8288: 1 Bd4! cxd4 2 Ng7+! Kd8 (if :
1 NY 29, 1 A , £78 31, , 24, Monitor 26, Random 29, Nod 31, Ei
So-lid 32, Inkwell 34, Adutt 35, Pa-D 36, A-do-re 37, 32, Demigod 34, Covet 35, Cur 36, Kudos 37, Lunch a "ff 30° Salute (6) 28 Rodent (3) Bxg7 3 Qxf7+ Kd 4 Qud7 mate) 3 Red7 #1 Kid 4 Qd5+



and Black resigned. If Bd6 5 Rod7+ Kd8 6 Qxd6 mate.

Bor-ed 38, Anise(-ed) Reply 31 Principle (6)

DOWN: 1, Mus-e8 2, ALlure-d 4, Laid 5, Abacus 6, Me-rit | DOWN: 1, Magic 2, Demoted 4, Dice 5, Craven 6, Taper 7, IF KT 5 Rd7+ Kb8 6 Qb7 mate.

7, Adieu 9, Roc 12, Debt-or-s 14, Rut 16, To-Kay 17, State | Bogus 9, Cup 12, Stardom 14, See 16, Niger 17, Sense Mensa quiz: 19.30. ‘
19, PR-event 20, Ha-N-gs 21, Sepal 23, Stewpot 24, 19, Cabinet 20; Scare 21, Blunt 23, Modicum 24, Morose One possible word ladder solution is: BUSY, bury, ,
Bid-den 25, Irk 27, Ron-do 28, T-lar-a 30, E-L-der 32, Ilis | 25, Tom 27, Annul 28, Decor 30, Torch 32, Deal bum, bom, bore, bode, BODY. ’

38, Ear 33, Gun



TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007, PAGE 9C

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7 y I look forward to :cuding The Tribune.
It always provides valuable information and something |
to talk about like local news, sports, entertainment | :
and world news. The Tribune provides everything
i need to know about lite in The Bahamas and 3

‘ newspaper.”



internationally. The Tribune is m

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|

JASON RAHMING
CONSTRUCTION FOREMAN



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Purchase The Tribune trom
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PAGE 10C, FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007 ;

TRIBUNE SPORTS ,



Knowles and Nestor suffer
‘brutal’ defeat in Australia

@ TENNIS
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

MARK Knowles described
the three-set loss that he and
Daniel Nestor suffered at the
hands of American twin broth-
ers Bob and Mike Bryan as a“
brutal” one that will cost him
some “sleepless nights” over
the next two weeks.

“Tt was a brutal loss, tough
one. They don’t get any easi-
er,” said Knowles as they
failed to hold on in the semifi-
nal of the Australian Open,
losing 2-6, 6-3, 7-5 to the
world’s best men’s doubles
team.

“Obviously, we came out, we
played fantastic.and we broke
them a.few times in the first
set as they dominated the
game. In the first game in the
second set, we had three break
points right away on Bob’s
serve, who'was their best serv-
er.” +
But Knowles said he and
Nestor, seeded number three
in the tournament, have to give
the Bryans a lot of credit
because “they played a hell-
of-a-game. They played pretty
strong at the end of the sec-
ond game as they broke us to
win. ;

“Then in the third set, it was
tough. We got a very bad call
in the first game that caused
Dan his serve. Unfortunately
we didn’t play on centre court
to have the use of the hawkeye
(replay camera), so we fell
down a break.” a ak

Knowles said they managed
to pull even at 5-5 at the end of
the third, but they didn’t con-
vert and the Bryans did what
they had to do to seal the deal.

“It was a tough loss,” he
summed up: ~

Despite the loss, Knowles
said he still feels that they were
the team that was playing the
best tennis throughout the two
games of competition.

“We played better than they
did. The good sign was that we
played better than they did,
but we just didn’t win the right
points at the end,” he reflect-
ed. “I guess we needed a little
bit of luck, maybe a lot of luck.

“But it’s a tough loss. It
doesn’t get any easier unfor-
tunately. I don’t know. We
played well. To be honest with
you, I thought we were the
best team here this year. We
played great the whole time. I

Ba

fy





@ ROAD RACE

women.
fitness fair will be staged.

@ BASKETBALL

@ VOLLEYBALL
Technicians Offer Help

leyball?

Volleyball?

tionally?
ball.com/

Goodman’s Bay.

UE ae

Trophies will be presented to the first three finishers in
each division. Immediately following the race, a health and

BSC Basketball Registration

THE Baptist Sports Council will hold a meeting on Sat-
urday at 10 a.m. for all Churches interested in participat-
ing in the Rev. Tyrone Knowles Basketball Classic.

The meeting and registration of teams will be

held at the Bahamas Baptist College, Jean Street. The
Classic is scheduled to get underway on Saturday, Febru-
ary 3. The entry fee is $100.00 per team in each division.

Are you interested in Learning about the game of vol-

Are you a skilled player and want to try-out for a team?
Do you have a child or know someone interested in

Are you interested in joining a volleyball / social club
that host social events, render community service, have
fundraisers and compete both nationally and interna-

Then you are welcomed to join the TVC — Technicians
Volleyball Fan Club. Email us at
techvolleyball_fanclub@yahoo.com

Or visit their website @ http://www.techniciansvolley-

The Technicians will hold open try-out for ladies team
Feb 3rd, Yam at Tom Grant Park behind A.F. Adderley
High School, Harold Road.

The Technicians will begin training Feb 5th, 6pm at

really thought we would have
won this tournament.”

Now with their bags packed
as they prepare to leave from
“Down Under,” Knowles said
it really hurt because “we real-
ly thought that we would have
won another Grand Slam. But
at the end of the day, we gave
it our best shot.

“That’s all you can do. Go
back to the drawing board and
get ready for the next one.”

With a two-week brea
before they. get back on track
of trying to win their first tour-
nament for the year, Knowles
said they will try to win “the
three other Grand Slams and
finish the year off as the num-
ber one doubles team.”

He said they haven’t decided
on which tournament they will
play next. He said they just
want to take some time off to
heal their wounds after such a
heartbreaking loss.

“It will take me a while to
recover,” he admitted. “I know
there will be some sleepless
nights to get over this loss,
which is standard, but that’s
my lifestyle.

“You just kind of deal with
your disappointment. But the ‘
exciting part is I get to go back
home and see my family and
spend some time with my son.
So there’s a positive side to
everything.” *

With the National Football
League’s Super Bowl XLI tak-
ing the spotlight in the United
States this weekend, Knowles
said he has his money on the ~
Indianapolis Colts winning
because he’s convinced that
the Chicago Bears won’t beat
them.

“I know they can play
defence, but I don’t think they
have the offence to hang with
the Colts,” he noted. “So I
think it will be a fairly lop-
sided Super Bowl.”

And even though the Super
Bowl will be played on Sun-
day at the Dolphin Stadium in
Miami Gardens, Florida,

- Knowles said he won’t be

going to the “Sunshine State”
to watch it.

“Maybe if the San Francisco
49ers were playing, I would be
there,” he insisted. “But only
Grand Slam champions can
afford to go to Miami any-
way.”

@ MARK KNOWLES and

Daniel Nestor in action
(AP FILE Photo)

Baptist Sports Council’s Family Fun Run/Walk

THE Baptist Sports Council will hold its Minister

Clinton Minnis Family Fun Run/Walk Race on Saturday.

The event will kick off at 7 a.m. from the Charles W.
Saunders High School, Jean Street. Pre-registration of
$5.00 per athlete will be conducted from 6 a.m.

There will be a four-mile road race and a two-mile walk
race. Categories are under-15, under-20, under-30,

under-40, under-50 and 50-and-under for men and



‘two me

@ SWIMMING

GUNITE Pools and Swift
Swimming have had a healthy
working relationship for over
16 years and now in 2007 they
are working together to put

together another unique swim

meet.

This event is actually two
meets in one with the use of the
50 metre, long course and 25
metre short course pools at the
Betty Kelly Kenning Aquatic
Centre.

The swim meet takes place
this Saturday, January 27th,
2007 with warm-up at 7 am and
an 8:30 am start.

The organisers like being able
to run fast efficient meets that

don’t require swimmers or par- -

ents having to be at the pool
for excessively long times.

Running the two meets simul-
taneously cuts the time of the
meet almost in half.

The meet director is Nancy
Knowles who organised the first
Carifta Games in the Bahamas
in 1992.

The meet is being run as a
pentathlon event as there will
be five events, a 50 of each
stroke and a 100 IM for the 10
& under age groups, and a 100
of each stroke and a 200 IM for
the 11 & over age groups.

The times of each of the five
events are added together and
the swimmer with the lowest
cumulative time wins the high
point trophy for their age group.

This format offers some good
match-ups as swimmers have to







@ TROPHIES up for grabs at the Swift Swimming meet

race in their weakest strokes as
well as their favourite strokes
so as to keep the total time
down.

There will be trophies for the
top three lowest cumulative
times in each age group.

Gunite Pools, as sponsors of

the swim meet, are pleased to
be able to contribute to the
healthy development of the
youth of the Bahamas and sup-
port the sport of swimming.

Swift has three of its swim-
mers traveling home from
school to compete in this years
swim meet. Shane Armbrister,
McKayla Lightbourne, and
Sofia Whitehead will all be at
the meet.

All the local clubs will be
competing with the goal of qual-
ifying more swimmers for the
Carifta Games and the Nation-
al championships later in the
year.

Swift will be lead by former
Carifta swimmers Denaj Sey
mour, Jonathan Bain, Jena
Chaplin, Jade Thompson and
Shaunte Moss. o

Other standouts this season
have been Larissa and Shonae
Musgrove, Laura Morley, Abi-
gail Lowe, Crystal Rhaming,
Zack Moses, Simone Sturrups
Paige Waugh and many others
ready to make their mark on
the swimming scene.



Pm lovin’ it. |

= Lhe Tribune

Hi 75F | !

HIGH __
LOW

61F |
CLOUDS AND |

A SUNSHINE |



Volume: 103 No.54





Tan
DL

SEE FRONT PAGE OF BUSINESS SECTION

assport rule extension

Wilchcombe convinces
‘members of US Congress
to extend implementation
period for Caribbean

i By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas and the rest
of the Caribbean have been giv-'
en a 30-day-respite from the
US’ new passport rule with the
possibility of obtaining a fur-
ther year-long delay until the

..Newtequirements.are imple-

mented for the region, Tourism
Minister Obie Wilchcombe told
The Tribune yesterday.

Despite the fact that Wednes-
day marked the implementa-
tion date of the Western Hemi-
sphere Travel Initiative
(WHT)), Minister Wilchcombe
on Wednesday night was able
to convince members of the US
Congress in Washington, DC,
of the need to extend the imple-
mentation period for the entire
Caribbean.

Tourism industry veterans

and observers throughout the

Caribbean have warned that the
implementation of the travel
initiative — which requires US
citizens to obtain a passport for
all international air travel —
could discourage Americans
from travelling abroad.

The World Travel Tourism
Council (WTTC) estimated that

the Caribbean region couid Tose |

$2.6 billion in revenue intake
and 188,300 industry jobs as a
result of the implementation of
the new passport requirements.

Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, Minister Wilchcombe
said that he will return to the
US capital on Monday morn-
ing to meet with the Depart-
ment of Homeland Security for

additional discussions on the

WHTI.
SEE page 15 |

Wisdom waiting for police report
on alleged housing scandal

li By BRENT DEAN



HOUSING Minister Neville Wisdom stated that he is awaiting
a report from the police on the alleged housing scandal uncovered

by The Tribune.

“We are awaiting a report now for the police. My understanding
is that they have concluded their interviews with the ministry and
the staff here, and they are now speaking with specific contractors
to conclude their report. So, I’m told that in very short order now
you should be getting a report. As soon as I receive it, | intend to
make public the findings from the report.”

SEE page 16








awk

COMPANIES SWITCHING TO















ali oe:








Sree _

Frequen

‘Lower Cost






Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

|

FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007



®@ MINISTER of Tourism Obie Wilchcombe along with Janyne Hodder, President of COB,
- dances with CR Walker’s Junior Junkanoo group during the National Tourism Week opening cer-
emony this week. Mr Wilchcombe on Wednesday night was able to convince members of the US

Congress in Washington, DC, of the need to extend

the entire Caribbean.

Court of Appeal .
president expresses |

concern over
death penalty

& By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY:

sentenced to death:

‘She expressed her concern
during the prosecution’s sub- ;
missions to uphold the convic- :
tion of Maxo Tido, who was }

sentenced to death last year.

mandatory death penalty.

dent of L W Young.

erations to the brain.

SEE page 15



MST
eli ernere
athe peas
ENDO asst

the passport rule implementation period for

(Photo: F elipé Major/ T ribune staff)

Teenager
‘chopped

in head’

A TEENAGER is in seri-

. } ous condition in hospital
: after he was “chopped in the
Tribune Staff Reporter : i
ace re a : Fox Hill on Wednesday after- :
COURT of Appeal president :
Dame Joan Sawyer yesterday }
questioned the application of |
the law in respect of persons }
:; injured teenager got into a

dispute with a young man just : treated at Sandilands.

head” by another youth in

noon, it was revealed yester-
day. ;

tor Walter Evans said the

after school at 3pm on

Wednesday in Bernard Road. } yy, iat - Se
Witnesses claimed that, fol- : made by -pales may i Pepe
: lowing the violent row,

Tido was the first to be sen- ;
tenced after a landmark ruling }
by the Privy Council against the

friends of the injured teenag-
er sought revenge by setting

fire to the home of one of the }
; suspects.

In March, 2006, a jury of 11}
women and one man unani- }
mously found Tido guilty of the ;
murder of 16-year-old Donnell ;
Conover, who had been a stu- ;
i the result of retaliatory

Conover reportedly died asa }
result of a crushed skull and lac-
; investigating the two matters, :
: but could not say if they were ;
: connected. i

SHELVING

WOOD STAINS CLOSET ORGANIZE
& SPRAY PAINT TOO!

COMMONWEALTH TG SUPPLIES Sy She anne aian

Assistant Commissioner

there was fire at a home in
Bernard Road and that he
had heard reports that it was

action.
Mr Evans said police were

Sandilands ‘has no
record’ of US man
who was found
dead in Abaco cell

| ll By BRENT DEAN

CATHERINE Weech,

: Sandilands Rehabilitation Cen-
: tre administrator, revealed that
‘ a, : : the hospital currently has “no
Press liaison officer Inspec- } secord” of Mark Sapp — the
: American citizen found dead in
: acell in Abaco — having been

This statement refutes a claim

i was taken to Sandilands for
: evaluation when he was brought
: to Nassau.

The discrepancy between the

: claim of the police and that of
: the hospital, raises questions
: about the chain of events lead-

Reginald Ferguson confirmed } ing up to Mr Sapp’s death.

Assistant Police Commis-

: sioner Elliston Greenslade did
: not wish to comment on the dis-
: crepancy in “isolation”, but
: chose rather to speak about the
: matter in general terms.

SEE page 16







Two more charged
in connection with
toddler’s death in

speedboat incident

i By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

TWO more persons were
arraigned in Magistrate’s court
yesterday for their alleged

involvement in the incident that

caused the death of British tod-
dler Paul Gallagher.

In August 2002, the two-year-
old boy was struck by a speed-
boat as he slept near his mother
on Paradise Island Beach.

Paul died five days later in

hospital after the accident from

head injuries, described by sur-
geons as the worst they had ever
seen.

Two Metropolitan Police offi-
cers flew to the Bahamas last
summer to review the case with
local police. —

Their report reveals that after
the crash, the driver provided
blood and urine samples.

At the time, The Gallaghers
were told these were never

SEE page 15

. Bastian claims
PLP paid to have
him accused of.
drug trafficking
in 1987

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

IN 1987, the PLP paid
$200,000 to have a man
accuse Whitney Bastian of
drug trafficking, the South
Andros MP claimed yester-
day on Love 97’s Issues of the
Day.

Mr Bastian also announced
that he would not be running

SEE page 16
i

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problem in

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PAGE 14, FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007

| FRIDAY EVENING JANUARY 26, 2007

1730 | 8:00_[ 8:30 [9:00 [9:30 J 70:00 | 10:30

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=

THE TRIBUNE

Let Charlie the 4
Bahamian Puppet and » , ‘
his sidekick Derek put 2 | :

some smiles on your
kids’s faces.

Bring your children to the |
McHappy Hour at McDonald's in
Marlborough Street every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the

‘ month of January 2007.

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.

i'm lovin’ it

s ‘



PAGE 16, FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007





High Commissioner of Republic of South Africa receives Letters of Commission
GOVERNOR General Arthur Hanna presents the Letters of Commission to Her Excellency Advocate Faith Doreen
Radebe, the High Commissioner of the Republic of South Africa,

at Government House yesterday.
(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)



i





Wisdom waiting for police report
on alleged housing scandal

FROM page one

These comments come in
the wake of controversy that
emerged at the Ministry of
Housing regarding contracting
practices with low-cost homes.

Allegations were made that
an unfair number of contracts
were awarded to a few con-
tractors and that some of these
contractors received these con-
tracts due to connections with
government officials — an
arrangement that may or may

not have included bribes.

Additionally, some contrac-
tors alleged that certain indi-
viduals were extorting money
from them throughout the
building process on low-cost
homes since at least 2001.

In response to some of these
allegations, Mr Wisdom had
previously asserted that some
contractors received more con-
tracts, as their work was of a
higher quality.

_ At today’s press conference
Mr Wisdom said he would like
to see the government hous-

ing process evolve to a state
where no individual is incon-
venienced or given an unfair
advantage.

Additionally, Mr Wisdom
said he would like to see con-
tractors complete the work
they were assigned to do rather
than sub-contracting the work
out to other individuals who
may not have been approved
by the ministry — along with,
inspectors carrying out their
duties honestly and fairly.

A call was placed to the
office of the Commissioner of

Bastian claims PLP paid to have him
accused of drug trafficking in 1987

FROM page one

for a third term if he wins in the upcoming
election.

While the MP was charged with drug traf-
ficking, he was never convicted and was later
vindicated by the courts.

Mr Bastian, who represents a constituency
of around 9,000 people, said the PLP allowed
the charges to stay “hanging over his head”
for almost seven years because they would
prevent him from participating in the electoral
process. .

The MP, who claims his 2002 campaign cost
him $1 million, ended up as the only inde-
pendent MP who ran against both PLP and
FNM candidates to win his seat.

Mr Bastian said that, during the PLP con-
vention of 1987, he had offered to run for
the post of National General Council member
for the South Andros constituency.

“Stanley Bain was the acting NGC member
at the time. When we went for elections we
. had elections two or three times. Every time
the count would show that Mr Bastian beat
Mr Bain by one vote.

“Every time the vote was completed
Charles Thompson would tie the vote and
say that we need to hold elections again. He
wanted Stanley Bain to be his NGC member
but the branches in the area were saying
something different. They wanted me to be
their NGC member,” the MP said.

Because of the deadlock Mr Bastian said
that he took the issue to the PLP’s then
leader, the late Sir Lynden Pindling, and for-
mer party chairman Sean McWeeney, and
asked them to explain whether the election

was being conducted in accordance with the

PLP’s constitution.

“He said: ‘Well, Whitney, y’all have done it
the right way’.

“T was then told by Sir Lynden that I should
leave it alone and try to complete my law
degree, go off to school and then come back
where I could participate in the process. I
then said to Sir Lynden that there are provi-

sions in the party’s constitution for me to run -

against you if I want to. He then threw his
hands.up and said ‘Oh, OK’.

“And that was it,” Mr Bastian said.

Two hours after the meeting with Sir Lyn-
den, the South Andros MP said that two offi-
cers came to him and said that a senior police
officer wanted to speak with him in his
office.

“When I got to the office, they asked me if
I knew a Charles Broomquest. I said ‘Yes, I
know a Charles Broomquest’. Does know-
ing a Charles Broomquest constitute a crime?

“They said ‘No, but Charles Broomquest
made certain allegations which we want you
to respond to’.

“I said I know Mr Broomquest to be a gen-
tleman who comes to Mangrove Cay who
sells electronics at wholesale prices. They
said ‘Well, he made allegations that you were
involved in drugs’. .

“And I said ‘No, I don’t know anything
about that’,” the MP said.

While Mr Bastian was at the police station,
Stanley Bain was elected NGC member
because Mr Bastian was absent from the con-
vention. A ae:

“While I was at the DEU’s office a phone
call came through on the other end and I
recognised a voice who said, ‘Do you have
anything on him?’

“(The police) said ‘no’.

“The voice on the other end said, ‘But book
him anyway’,” Mr Bastian said.

Police to inquire about the sta-
tus of the investigation and to
determine what would occur
with those findings
when the investigation is com-
pleted.

Specifically, The Tribune
was seeking to determine if the
findings of the investigation
would be initially forwarded
to the Office of the Attorney
General, made public, or sub-
mitted to the Minister.

However, up to press time,

‘there was no response from

the Commissioner’s office.







THE TRIBUNE

Sandilands ‘has no record’
of US man who was found
dead in Abaco cell

FROM page one -

He said it is being treated as
a police investigation.

He further stated that in
matters such as this, an autop-
sy is undertaken to determine
the cause of death and the
file is sent to the coroner’s
court.

Godfrey “Pro” Pinder,
attorney for the deceased, told
The Tribune that he and the
Sapp family are in the process
of negotiating with indepen-
dent pathologists in the Unjit-



Saturday ° January 27th, 2007 | ]
12 noon - 6pm | |
Garden Hills Headquarters | {4
Soldier Road West

Between Blue Hill Road and East Street

Donation $10.00

FF he ENM cs det for oul NO

FISH e CHICKEN e STEAK

ed States to assist in the
autopsy. -

Mr Pinder says that he and
the Sapp family have been in
contact with the American
Embassy for assistance. How-
ever, he was unable to divulge
the details of that meeting.

Mark Sapp was found dead
in his cell in Abaco while
awaiting transfer back to Her
Majesty’s Prison. He was on’
remand charged with arson in
a fire that caused an estimated
$3 million in damages to the
Royal Palm Condominiums at
Treasure Cay, Abaco.

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FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007

SECTION



OB ieee Be loyetetee









BAN outside view of the British Colonial Hilton

(FILE phore)

Bahamas investments
prompt class lawsuit

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Canadian pension fund
that owns the British Colonial
Hilton and is in the process of
selling a majority stake in the
South Ocean Golf & Beach
Resort has been hit with a class
action lawsuit in Canada relat-
ing to its investments in both

properties.

Three beneficiaries of the
Canadian Commercial Workers
Industry Pension Plan
(CCWIPP) are suing the plan’s
trustees and employer members
for $1 billion in damages on the
grounds that they allegedly

SEE page 6B

100,000 visitor boost
from sports tourism

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

PROPERLY developed, sports tourism could bring an addi-
tional 50,000 -100,000 more visitors to the Bahamas aoateny

industry experts said yesterday.

Charles Albury, an executive at Kerzner International, said
there were many ways to grow this untapped industry through
planned events, meets and recreational events and tournaments.

“We have a lot of sporting groups in the Bahamas, Take athlet-
ics, for example. In 2007 there are about 15 major meets on the

schedule for 2007 that are on

schedule,” he said.

“Tf we take each of these meets







© 2004 ADWORKS

SALES OFFICES: NASSAU, FREEPORT,

SEE page 5B

Port cial Gace

winding-up petition

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he attorney repre-
senting Sir Jack
~Hayward = and
Hannes Babak has
filed a petition to
wind-up the Grand Bahama

Port Authority (GBPA) on.

behalf of another company he
is representing in an action
against the GBPA, a move that
last night had baffled many
observers.

Gregory Moss, of Moss &
Associates, filed a winding-up
petition with the Supreme Court
on January 19, 2007, on behalf
of another client, Island Bay

' Condominium ‘Phase II Asso-

ciation, which is claiming $1.218
million in damages against the
GBPA.

A default judgement had
been entered against the GBPA
after Island Bay Condominium
Phase III Association alleged
that it had breached “its statu-
tory duty” and been negligent
in causing the condo complex
to be properly built and main-
tained.

In its winding-up petition,
Island Bay Condominium Phase
III Association alleged that its
attorneys had served a statutory
demand for payment on the
GBPA at its offices on Decem-
ber 28, 2006. _

It added that three weeks had
elapsed since the demand had
been served, but the GBPA had
not paid the judgement sum. As
a result, Island Bay Condomini-
um Phase II Association was
requesting “that the Grand
Bahama Port Authority may be
wound up by the court under
the provisions of the Companies
Act, Chapter 308”.

The winding-up petition is the
latest twist in the saga that has
embroiled the GBPA and its
shareholders over the past year,
and few observers last night
knew what to make of the devel-










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college is in his future

Reality Check.

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His future and yours can be protected
with the right life insurance or investment plan.



és et Sr AAP SPR SSN RS dn A

net

Fawn

GUARDIAN

INSURANCE
COMPANY
UTHERA CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET, NASSAU P.O. BOX SS 6232

Sir Jack’s and Babak’s attorney seeks payment

of $1.2m on behalf of client suing GBPA

opment.

The Tribune understands that
the GBPA failed to oppose the
original writ of summons filed
by Island Bay Condominium
Phase III Association on
November 30, 2006, largely as
a result of an oversight.

At the time, it was distracted
by the dispute between its two
shareholders, Sir Jack Hayward
and the late Edward St George’s
family, over the former’s claim
to 75 per cent ownership of the
GBPA and its affiliate, Port
Group Ltd, which owns the
chief money-making assets in
Freeport.

In addition, Supreme Court
Justice Jeanie Thompson had
just several days before appoint-
ed a receiver for the GBPA and
Port Group Ltd in the shape of
BDO Mann Judd accountant,
Clifford Culmer, and imposed
an injunction preventing Mr
Babak playing any role in man-
agement or Board deliberations.

As a result, the GBPA failed
to set aside the judgement and,
after it failed to respond to the
statutory demand for payment,

Mr Moss went ahead and filed

the winding-up petition.

Several observers last night
expressed surprise that an attor-
ney acting for Sir Jack in his
claim to 75 per cent ownership
of the GBPA would attempt to
petition for the winding-up of
that very same entity.

The Tribune understands,
though, that the GBPA has
instructed Thomas Evans to
attempt to.set aside the judge-
ment. The GBPA’s fellow
defendant in the action,
Uniprop Ltd, the developer and
contractor for the Island Bay







wi

Condominium complex, is being
represented by Robert Adams
of Graham, Thompson & Co,

Several sources yesterday
expressed concern about the
impact the winding-up petition’s
filing would have on Freeport’s
economy and residents, particu-
larly in terms of the message it
send to licencees, existing and
potential international investors.

The Freeport economy has
been struggling to cope with the
fallout from the 2004 and 2005
hurricane seasons, and the Roy--
al Oasis closure, and this has
been exacerbated by the dispute
between the GBPA’s two share-
holding families.

One source said: “How’s that
going to effect the Morgan Stan-

ley transaction and any other

transactions?

“To file a petition to liquidate
the Port Authority would be cat-
astrophic for the investment cli-
mate. On the heels of the share-
holder dispute, it sends a mes-
sage to investors that Freeport is
in utter meltdown, that the reg-
ulatory authority in incapable
of managing its own affairs.

“This adverse negative pub-
licity is going to count against
the Port Authority. It’s going to
reach its lowest ebb when coun-
sel for the man claiming a
majority 75 per cent stake is
attempting to liquidate the com-
pany.’

The dispute with Island Bay
Condominium Phase III Asso-
ciation has been a running sore
in the dispute between the Hay-
ward and St George families.
Mr Moss was appointed to act as
one of the GBPA’s outside
attorneys last summer, at a time
when he was representing three

separate parties in lawsuits

’ against it.

A settlement was agreed on
the Island Bay issue, but this
was blocked by the St George
estate as they felt the Associa-
tion did not have a case. Mr
Moss then resigned as an attor-
ney for the GBPA, and resumed
the action on behalf of Island
Bay.

The winding-up petition has
the potential to disturb the mul-
ti-million dollar.investment pro-
ject planned for Freeport involv-
ing Morgan Stanley, the blue
chip Wall Street investment
bank.

The Grand Bahama Devel-
opment Company (Devco) is in
the process of selling its 50 per
cent stake in 1,000 acres at Bar-
bary Beach to Morgan Stanley
for $50 million, the first stage in
a deal that would lead to a 50/50
venture with Port Group Ltd.

In essence, the winding-up
petition could serve to further
drive down the value of GBPA
and Port Group Ltd.

The petition’s filing comes as — AK

both Sir Jack and the St George
family are engaged in mediation
and conciliation to resolve the
dispute over the former’s 75 per
cent ownership claim before the
February 7 deadline on the con-
sent order issued by Justice Ani-
ta Allen expires.

On that day, if the dispute is
not settled, Mr Culmer’s
receivership of GBPA and Port
Group Ltd is likely to resume.

The Government is repre-
sented in the talks by Paul
Adderley, the former attorney

SEE page 6B

Bahamas ‘needs to do more’
to promote itself as destination
wedding and honeymoon spot

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas needs to do
more to market and promote
itself as a destination wedding and
honeymoon location if it hopes
to go “neck and neck” with
Jamaica and become the

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Ow He) @: 1

Cruise ships use discount
‘sales’ to keep passenger
money on board

SEE page 5B

Gg, re Avan Fae

You Are Invited!

(er Ca a

ood OL ee on 1

sales@hachristia.com

www. HOChristie. com







THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007

Build the brand to tie-in the customer

nowing your position-
ing and, by extension,
your brand are key

components to successful mar-
keting. As mentioned in my pre-
vious column, having a great
brand can ultimately lead you
to the holy grail of marketing,
called brand loyalty, where the
customer is tied into you lock,
stock and barrel.

Brand loyalty explains why
most Macintosh users would
rather die that be seen using a
PC, and why some consumers
would never buy any other car
than a Lexus.

Good branding flows from a
good positioning strategy. Get
your positioning strategy right
and your branding will follow.
While branding is often seen as
a collection of image, ideas,
name, logo and design, in prac-
tical terms your brand is in effect

| Business

Sense



“the promise you make to your
customers”.

It starts with the features of
your product and the perceived
benefits those features bring to
your customers. For example, a
Volvo is a well-built car with
cutting edge safety features epit-
omising safety. Over time, these
features led to the promise that
Volvo makes to all its cus-
tomers, one of “safety”. Simi-
larly BMW’s promise to you is
to provide you with “a driving
machine”.

You only have to look at the
beautiful designs, the innova-





Office.

2007.

N



No form will be accepted without:

Y ALL SIGNATURES (Student’s, Advisor’s and
Chairperson’s) and

Â¥ PROOF OF PAYMENT from the Business

N.B. ANY ‘form submitted after this date will be considered
LATE and will be processed for the Summer Semester

’

OTICE

ALL prospective graduates for SPRING 2007 MUST
| submit COMPLETED Graduation Evaluation Forms to
the Records Department on or before FEBRUARY 2, 2007.

tion, the great packaging and
easy-to-use technology to sce
what the promise is behind
Apple’s valuable brand.

So, what is your promise is to
your customers? Do your cus-
tomers have a clear idea of what
your product or company stands
for? Do you? Do your cus-
tomers know where you fit in
the market place? Do you? Try
surveying your customers and
you will see if there is a gap
between your perception and
their reality. Create your own
online surveys and e-mail your
customers, using survey software
such as Vanguard software,
found at http://www.van-
guardsw.com,

Good branding is important
to success, as poor branding can
often create problems for your
company. For example, a posi-
tive brand image could help you










THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS.

- Libraries and Instructional Media Services Department

The Law Library Branch



eee ete






Inaugural Luncheon
Topic: Consumer Protection Act, 2006

Wednesday, 31st January, 200/
Choices Restaurant
Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute




convince your customers that
you are larger than you are, that
you are capable of doing larger
jobs and that you are capable
of delivering quality work.

It is well-known in the mar-
keting industry that a well man-
aged brand is worth more in
share value than a poorly man-
aged brand, which is why brand
management is now a key part
of the job description for chief
executives.

Equity

Brand equity is often
described as the value that is
built up in a brand. Brand equi-
ty is as a result of prudent and
careful brand management.

So, what are some practical
steps you can take to create or
improve your brand? In what
ways can you position your

- product or service in the eyes

of the customer that, over time,
creates a brand? Here are some
steps you can take to help you
manage your brand:

Step 1: State Your Benefits -
Be clear and state the benefits of
your product. Be clear about

completion of — the
December, 2006.













~ Liquidator

Qualifications:






performed

LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION

International Business Companies Act
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act,
(No. 45 of 2000), ALBION SERVICES INC. has been
completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been issed and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register. The date of
dissolution

Se eo
PANAMERICAN MANAGEMENT
SERVICES (BAHAMAS) LTD.

& International Wealth M
and improve complex practices and processes.
¢ Working (practical) knowledge of sever
and/or other industries, market and/or regu
practices and needs) sufficient to apply relevant issues or developments to work

what the ‘sizzle’ is about your
product. A mission statement
can help to this effect.

Step 2: Contemplate Your
Appeal - Be clear why cus-
tomers buy your product. Are
you appealing to the rational
side of your customers in how
the product will solve their prob-
lems, and meet their needs? Are
you appealing to their emotion-
al side, their moral side, or to
their lifestyle aspirations?

Step 3: Create a Future Vision
- Create a future vision of what
you expect your company to be
in your customers’ eyes. What
will you mean to them. What
will your promise be? Is it to be
the cheapest, the largest, the
safest, the best value, the best
service, the widest choice, the
hardest trying, the most creative,
the most environmentally aware,
or the most ethical? Create the
vision that is right for you and
stick to it.

Step 4: Create a Name and
Logo - Create a name, logo and
strap line to support your mis-
sion and vision. Outsource this
function to a professional to










was the 21st of

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

fora

Senior Programme Manager, Northern
Caribbean Operations
Location: Bahamas

¢ Bachelor’s degree in business related field

¢ 5 - 10 years experience in Financial Institutions

¢ Comprehensive knowledge of Financial Institutions operational processes and
procedures that support Retail Distribution (Retail, Corporate, Capital Markets

anagement customer segments) sufficient to develop

al areas of external activities (financial
latory environment, or client business



help you create the right image
for your business, which your
customers will come to accept
as part of your branding.

Step 5: Develop a Communi-
cation Style - Develop a com-
munication style through your
writing that complements your
design. Are you conservative,
clever, funky, cutting edge? Let
this be reflected in both your
writing and design to create a
consistent brand.

Step 6: Build Marketing Strat-
egy - Build specific marketing
strategy around your proposi-
tion and communication style.
Decide whether to use conserv-
ative marketing, guerilla, or viral
marketing strategies.

Effective brand management
will try to increase your pro-
duct’s perceived value to your
customers, which in turn will
increase your brand equity.
Make sure you get this impor-
tant area right.

Don’t be an antipreneur and
make the following mistakes: —

* Be brand illiterate

* Forget to create or manage
your brand

Marketing your business is an
important area and will require
constant effort to get it right. .
So, in order to avoid the trap of
antipreneurship, make sure that
you spend time on this area as it
could pay large dividends for
your future business success.

NB: Adapted from his
upcoming book, Antipreneur-
ship And How to Avoid It,
Mark draws on 20 years of top
level business, marketing and
communications experience in

London and the Bahamas. He is «|
chief operating officer of |

www.ezpzemail.com, currently
lives in Nassau, and can be con-
tacted at
markalexpalmer@mac.com .

© Mark Palmer. All rights: ec
2 reserved - an

The College of The Bahamas
Thompson Boulevard
Nassau, The Bahamas
12:00 noon - 2:00 p.m.

General Responsibilities:

















° Asa part of Senior Management, lead the development of Change Management
Documents — Business User Requirements / Project Charter, Project Plan,
Implementation Plan, Project Budget, Business Cases, Request For Information
(RFI) and Request For Proposal (RFP)

¢ Responsible in conjunction with the Head of Operations and other Northern
Caribbean Operations Managers in developing the Bahamas Regional Operations
Centres into a fully centralised processing unit for the Northern Caribbean
Region by incorporating additional functions from the Local Processing Unit
hubs.

¢ To support the overall strategic mandate of the northern Operations group by
identifying and executing process improvements that increase profitability and
enhance our customers’ and employees’ experience.

¢ To provide advice and /or consultation typically of an operational or tactical
nature to Operations Centres management as it relates to existing business

processes and proposed business changes.

















Silent Auction of Student Art
will take place during the luncheon

Donation: $35.00 »: Student: $25.00
Part proceeds in aid of the new library fund

Remuneration:



¢ Salary commensurate with senior management position at the FC Level 8 (Note:
1 - 11 job levels)

° Benefits- includes a car allowance, preferred loan rates, variable incentive pay
(bonus), medical scheme, pension benefits...

Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter via
email by February 9", 2007 to: Chaunte.toote@firstcaribbeanbank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all
applicants for their interest, however only those under
consideration will be contacted.
Vacancies are open to Bahamians only.





THE COLLEGE OF 4HE DAHAMAS |

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs Eprcatinc Be TRAINING Baetaeans



THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com

INTERNATIONAL EDITION”

PRO FOOTBALL | SUPER BOWL XLI

FROM THE SPORTS FRONT



DOUG PENSINGER/GETTY IMAGES

TOTAL SUPPORT: Indianapolis fans hold up a banner during the Colts’ 38-34 victory over the Patriots for the AFC title.

Indy captivated by Colts

*COLTS

ship is covered in passion,
giddy with excitement and
dazed by a football team that

rolled in here 23 years ago in -

the dead of the night.

The Colts are redefining
this city of Hoosiers and
hoops and the Indy: 500.

“Everybody thinks Indiana |

is a basketball state,” Rich
Johnson said. “But not now.
We're going to the Super
Bowl, and Indiana is a football
state now. Things will never
be the same.”

Johnson, 59, is a die-hard
fan who won a drawing and
bought season tickets to the
Colts in 1984.

“T’ve been here since Day 1,
through it all. Through the
1-13 and the 2-14 seasons,” he
said. “I never thought this day
would come. When they beat
New England Sunday [in the
AFC Championship Gamel,
grown men cried.”

You see it and feel it the
minute you hit the airport
covered in blue, where airline
and car rental employees are
wearing Colts jerseys, and
where a huge billboard of
Colts quarterback Peyton
Manning directing traffic
greets you as you exit toward
downtown.

‘BUBBLING’

' “It’s bubbling. The whole
city is bubbling,” said Kathy
Brown, who runs an office
where employees show up
wearing Colts jerseys these
days, and where Brown has
made it mandatory to wear
Colts blue every Friday.

It is a new Indy.

“You see blue everywhere
you look,” said Jerry Roberts,
64; a retired banker who wore
a Colts windbreaker and Colts
baseball cap downtown
Wednesday.

“We've been to a lot of big
sporting events,” he said. “But
I’ve never seen anything like
Sunday. It was absolutely

COUNTDOWN TO SUPER BOWL XLI +:

SUPER BOWL XXXII

DENVER 31, GREEN BAY 24

e Jan. 25,1998

@ Qualcomm Stadium, San Diego
e MVP: RB Terrell Davis, Denver

Not that there is ever a good time fora
migraine headache, but could there be a worse
time for a football player to have one than in the

middle of the Super Bowl?

ANDY LYONS/GETTY IMAGES

GOOD TIMES: Colts fans have waited a long time for their team, which relocated from
Baltimore, to reach the Super Bowl. ‘I never thought this day would. come,’ one fan said..

phenomenal. No one wanted
to leave. No one wanted to let
go of that feeling.”

Roberts’ wife,
cried.

“It was an awesome feel-
ing,” she said. “It had never
happened before, and now it
was happening with us, and
our team. It was like the feel-
ing of first love. Even if we go
to 10 Super Bowls, it will
never feel like this again,
because it’s a first for all of
us.”

Nancy,

There might not be a better
bar to watch the Colts than
the Blue Crew in Northeast
Indianapolis, where owner
Randy Collins, 49, has erected
a shrine. Collins even drives a
blue Colts fire truck — com-
plete with a statue of a blue
and white Dalmatian — to
every Colts home game. He’s



Broncos running back Terrell Davis had
frequent migraines, for which he usually took
medication before games. But, somehow, Davis forgot to take his
medication until shortly before kickoff - too late for it to take

effect fully.

Davis seemed fine early in Super Bowl XXXII, when he rushed
for a touchdown in the first quarter. But one rough hit late.in the

FSET EEE ESET TE LSE LTS ET eT a ET EE ME AL ST NE TE ST TNT TET ETNA NEST 2 ve

e wild, weird,

wacky and i
wondrous of past
Super Bowls

ys
to)
ees



trying to find a way to get the
truck to Miami.

‘DISBELIEF AND JOY’

“It was crazy in here Sun-
day. There was a lot of crying,
a lot of screaming and a lot of
laughing,” bartender Jason
Donahue said. “People who
have been with the Colts from
the beginning had that look on
their faces. It was a mixture of
disbelief and joy.”

“There was not a stranger
in here,” said Shelby Collins,
who worked that night.
“Everyone was crying and
hugging each other. There
must have been about 20 peo-
ple who ran outside to call
their parents on their cell-
phones. You could hear one
after another: ‘Hey mom, can
you believe this happened?’
Or, ‘Hey dad, we’re going to

good time.’’







the Supe: Bowl.’ ”

Outside the RCA Dome, it
was sheer madness.

“Downtown was like Mardi
Gras,” Randy Collins said.
“T’ve never seen anything like
it. People were honking
horns, hanging out of win-
dows screaming.”

In nearby Kokomo, the
Grimes hugged each other.

“When the Colts won the
game my husband reached
over and pinched me, and I
said, ‘Yes honey, it’s true. We
are really gong to the Super
Bowl,’ ”’ Hattie Grimes said.
“The next day, he woke up in
disbelief, saying, ‘I can’t
believe this is happening. I
think it left him numb. I think
that’s the way a lot of people
felt — just numb, because it’s
the first time it’s ever hap-
pened in Indianapolis.”

9 D A

quarter triggered the headache he had feared
“My vision started to black out, and! gota

little dizzy,” Davis recalled years later.

to my knees and started thinking, ‘This is not a

“I gotup

Davis had to leave the game and go back to
the locker room in the second quarter, and he
was not expected to return. But with the
halftime made longer by all the Super Bowl
hoopla, Davis had extra time to recover and was
able to re-enter the game in the third quarter.

And it’s a good thing for the Broncos that:he

did. Davis ran for two more touchdowns in the
second half, including the decisive score late in

the fourth quarter.

Davis said he had a slight headache the rest of the evening, but
the championship trophy and game MVP award had a way of
soathing it, That, and the medication.

- BRIAN COSTA



j

YS TO ae

CHICAGO BEARS

_ FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007 | SE)

Grossman, Bears
get back to work
on ultimate goal |

BY ANDREW SELIGMAN
Associated Press

LAKE FOREST, Ill. — The
magnitude of the situation
hit Chicago Bears quarter-
back Rex Grossman with the
force of an unchecked line-
backer as he headed toward
offensive coordinator Ron
Turner’s office Wednesday.

Grossman looked at the
binder and noticed the label:
“Super Bowl game plan.”

“It’s one of those
moments that it ‘really hit me:
I’m about to go get the plays
that we’re going to call in
Super Bow] XLI,” Grossman
said. “It puts things in per-
‘spective that this is real, this

_is coming up, and I couldn’t
be more excited.”

Yes, the quarterback that
some fans wanted removed
and the team that has decried
a lack of respect the past two
seasons will play the India-
napolis Colts for the NFL
title a week from Sunday.

The Bears had three days
to savor beating the New
Orleans Saints in the NFC
Championship Game, the
franchise’s biggest victory
since the 1985 team won it all.
And there were still plenty of
smiles as the Bears returned
to practice Thursday.

“?’m just smiling and say-
ing ‘Yeah’ to every question,”
veteran left guard Ruben
Brown said as he sat at his
locker with a wide grin.
“Really, what’s in the back of
my mind is not only the fact
that I’m in it, but I want to
win it. You want to win it;
you don’t want to be in it. .

“Tm not resting “c ‘on: the



Brown thought pour his
time in Buffalo, where he
made eight Pro Bowls i in nine
seasons before signing with
the Bears in April 2004. The
Bills were a few years
removed from their run of
four Super Bowl losses by
the time they drafted him in
1995, but they made the play-
offs his first two seasons.

“We had a confidence on
that team that we were going
to beat you,” Brown said.
“We felt like'we were always
going to be in the hunt for
the playoffs; we were always
going to be in the hunt for
possibly a Super Bowl. That
was our attitude.”

And the Bears’ attitude is
similar.

They showed up at train-
ing camp in 2005 predicting a
playoff appearance, even

__ though they had gone 5-11 the

previous season. They were
forced to go with Kyle Orton
at quarterback for most of
the season after Grossman
broke an ankle in the presea-
son. They finished 11-5 any-
way and won'the NFC North
behind their defense, offen-
sive line and running game.

With higher expectations
this season, the Bears went
13-3 and earned the top seed
in the playoffs. _

Grossman played at a Pro
Bowl level in the first five
weeks, but he was inconsis-
tent afterward. He had a 1.3
passer rating against the
Minnesota Vikings on Dec. 3,
when he was 6-of-19 for 34
yards and threw three inter-
ceptions for the second con-
secutive week.





JONATHAN DANIEL/GETTY IMAGES
BIG THRILL: Rex Grossman
has been hot and cold
this season, but right now
he’s feeling pretty cool.

Some fans called for
backup Brian Griese. Gross-
man responded with three
solid games before a dismal
performance in the regular-
season finale against the
Green Bay Packers, when he
was 2-of-12 with 33 yards and
three interceptions. Gross-
man’s passer rating in the
first half was 0.0, and he sat
out the rest of the game.

The defense fell from first
to fifth overall during a
tumultuous stretch late in the
regular season. Defensive
tackle Tommie Harris sus-
tained a season-ending ham-
string injury in December,
joining safety Mike Brown
(foot) on the sideline. Start-
ing cornerbacks Charles Till-
man and Nathan Vasher
missed time in the final
month because of injuries.
Anctaekle Tank Johnson
tive for one game
and isuspended for another
after being arrested on mis-
demeanor gun chargés.

The defense was vulnera-
ble, the quarterback shaky.

Yet here are the Bears,
getting ready for the biggest
game of them all. ~

“I think when you're in.
the Super Bowl, you're get-
ting respect,” Bears coach
Lovie Smith said. “We’re one
of the last two teams playing,
so how can we not get our
respect? It’s hard to get to the
Super Bowl without being a
pretty good football team. I
think there are two pretty
good football teams that will
play.

“The ultimate respect you
get is-when you hold up the
championship trophy, and
that’s our goal.”

Brown got another round
of good news recently when
he was named to his ninth







Pro Bowl — his first with the
Bears.
“Right now, the Super

Bowl’s got everything,” he
said. “It’s good to hear, but,
really, the Super Bowl is
[everything].”

Brown’s brother Cornell
played in one for Baltimore,
but he won’t be at the game
because the two are supersti-
tious. Cornell witnessed last
year’s playoff game against
the Carolina Panthers, which
the Bears lost.

“So we can win, he’s not
going to show up,” Ruben
Brown said. “I went to a cou-
ple of his games in the past,
and he ended up losing big
games. We’ll celebrate after.”

The Colts might have
something to say about that.

6 P.M. EST SUNDAY, FEB. 4, 2007
DOLPHIN STADIUM @ ON TV: CBS

TERRELL DAVIS

GETTY IMAGES



Full Text


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FILES




PAGE 2, FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007

i a aa ee
Govt employee claims public servants

‘taking too long to answer cell phones’

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A GOVERNMENT
employee says she is fed up
with how long it takes for
public servants to answer
their cell phones — if they
answer at all.

“Someone needs to take
action because they’re wast-
ing people’s time,” said the
irate woman.

Only two weeks after The
Tribune revealed that the
phones at the Department
of Immigration are so rarely
answered that even person-

nel at the Ministry of Immi--

gration admit to being
forced to communicate with
that department primarily by
messenger — the frustrated

































MASS E DISCONNECTION EX



“Something needs to happen.
This country, sometimes
I wonder if we’re going
forwards or backwards
because basic stuff, simple,
basic things, you can’t get

done.”



woman declared that there
s “definitely something
wrong.”

“Why are people not
answering the phones?” she



lack of telephonists, the

Government employee

asked.

The woman said that she
was spurred into contacting
the media after spending “all
morning on the phone” try-:
ing to contact the Registrar
General’s office.

However, like a large
number of people who have
contacted The Tribune, she
claimed she has come up
against the same problem
when attempting to contact
many different government
departments or services.

“Occasionally you'll get a
very polite person on the
phone but that’s very rare
occasion,” she said — adding
that on the other hand, an
exasperating number of calls
are answered by recordings..:

The woman said that she ©

was very pleased when
opposition leader Hubert
Ingraham announced at a
rally in Fox Hill last week
that, if voted into power, the
FNM will “banish answering
machines from all public sec-

‘tor entities, including public

corporation customer service
telephone and eomplatnts
lines.”

If the problem is one of a



‘ERCI SES

IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS:

‘© Bozine Town « Yellow Elder Gardens







Big Pond « Blue Hill

Road « Black Village * Bain Town * Boyd Sub « Farrington
Road « Chippingham * Oakes Field * Stapledon fepraens

° Mi



ennium Gardens + Englerston and



e Highland Park « Tall Pines * Rocky Pine Road ¢ ‘Jubliee
Gardens « Carmichael Road « Sunset Park « Bellot Road
¢ Gladstone Road « Faith Gardens « Tropical Meadows
* Flamingo Gardens « Miller’s Heights * Avocado Gardens
* Bacardi Road * Spigot Road « Adelaide * Coral Harbour
¢ South Ocean and Mt. Pleasant Village.

PRIORITIZE!

PAY ALL ARREARS ON YOUR BEC BILL IMMEDIATELY!

All overdue BEC payments must be made at the Head
Office on Blue Hill and Tucker Roads, the Mall at Marathon

or the Main Post Office.

Powering The Bahamas for Generations

woman said, there are
“many people looking for
jobs.”

However, she believes it is
primarily one of apathy.

. “They have so many peo-
ple sitting around — just pick

up the phone, answer the

phone!

“If somebody’s busy say
‘They’re busy, we'll take a
note and call you back’.”

“Something needs to hap-
pen,” she said.

“This country, sometimes I
wonder if we’re going for-
wards or backwards because
basic stuff, simple, basic
things, you can’t get done.”

A staff member at the
Registrar General’s office
admitted that she has heard
complaints about the down-
stairs department — which is
primarily responsible for
registering births and deaths
— adding, in an echo of the
situation at Immigration,
that she also has difficulty
contacting the personnel
there.

“There seems to be a
problem because upstairs

can’t even get (through to) »

downstairs,” she said.

- She noted that that section
was more in demand than
her own, however, she refut-
ed that the “endless ringing”
that members of the public
may often encounter was
due to a shortage of staff,
suggesting instead that it
may be due to a shortage of
phones.

@ SEVERAL owners
_ of cellphones have contacted
The Tribune

THE TRIBUNE



iiifunctioning

A LARGE proportion of
cellphone numbers are cur-
rently malfunctioning, and
attempts to get an explana-
tion from BTC have come up
against another wall of
silence.

Bahamas

International

Film Festival

For the past several days,
calls to all numbers beginning
with the prefix 422, 427 or
477 have been answered with
the message: "The number

you have dialled is not.a long ~

distance number. Do not dial



New This Week
Bahan nomatonal Fm Festal IF] FILM SOCIETY

BIFF is pleased! fo announce the launch ofits Monthly Film Series!
Please jon us forthe fist film series screening ofthe BIFF Audience Award

winner for Best Documentary:

Ce

ELEUTHERAN ADVENTURE

Director: Kareem Mortimer

pede erated enaner

Saturday, January 27th @ 7:30pm

Free of Charge

Downtown at Rawson Square - Quidoor Screening

| The ELEUTHERAN ADVENTURE is a documentary fl that involves

- Kareem Mortimer and cameraman Kevin Taylor hitchhiking from
Spanish Wells to the Southernmost point on the island of Eleuthera
with only $150 in hand. Along the waythey meet a slew of interesting
characters that give them an honest and entertaining look of ife on
the island, The fl explores Eleutheran Culture and what it means

tobe Bahamian,



the digit one before this num-
ber” — despite that fact that
no such digit was dialled.

Several members of the
public have contacted The
Tribune to complain that they
have been inconvenienced by
the situation.

Meanwhile, The Tribune's
best efforts to find out more
about what is at the root of
the problem, and how long it
might be expected to last,
have proved fruitless.

Repeated attempts were
made to contact the BTC
public relations department
over the past two days, how-
ever, all calls were greeted by
a recorded message saying
the staff were out of office,
and then forwarded to anoth-
er operative.

This BTC staff member
suggested that the problem
may be the result of an
"upgrade" currently taking
place. However, after further
questioning she said.she was

not sure if this was the case.

She said she did not know
how long the upgrade had
been going on for, or would
continue to be underway, but
would forward the call to
someone who did.

This staff member in the
wireless department, accord-
ing to her answerphone mes-
sage, was due to be out of her
office until Monday.

Another number was sug-
gested in the answerphone
message for someone else
within BTC who would be of
service, however, after
explaining the issue to the
staff member at that number,
she again said "hold", and
forwarded The Tribune on to
a line which rang unan-
swered.

Several more abortive
attempts were made, each
ending with the same
response: endless ringing.

TROPICAL |
EXTERMINATORS

eRe
PHONE: 322-2157



1
{
4
'
*
-
oe
af
“ql
-
2
;
”o
My
,
‘i
ie


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007, PAGE 3



@ YOUTH, Sports and
Housing Minister
Neville Wisdom.

Wisdom |
denies park
neglect —

allegations



ml By BRENT DEAN

YOUTH, Sports and
Housing Minister Neville
Wisdom denied assertions
that parks in his Delaporte
constituency have been
neglected.

At a press conference
yesterday, he lashed out at
the FNM for having done
nothing in terms of the
development of parks in
the constituency during
their tenure.

“T wish to advise that a
check with the Ministry of
Works and Utilities and the
Ministry of Youth, Sports
and Housing would indi-
cate that between May
1992, and 2002, no new
parks were constructed
anywhere within the Dela-
porte constituency, neither
was there in place any con-
tract arrangement for any
cleaning or maintenance of
any park in Delaporte,” he
said.

Mr Wisdom refuted
claims made by the FNM,
allegedly on behalf of resi-
dents of Delaporte, which
suggested that multiple

_ park upgrades made in the”

‘ constituency have been left
incomplete and in an
+ unsafe state.

‘Mr Wisdom explained

‘ that the unfinished
restroom on the Mother
Sweeting Park (across from
Nesbitt’s) was for two main
reasons.

Initially, Mr Marlon
Duncombe - the contractor
for the project — was forced
to stop work at the site, as
he was urgently needed to
assist with repairs on the
Mable Walker Primary
School.

Then, Mr Duncombe was
given a further extension in
order to deal with the
death of his wife.

Despite being in mourn-
ing, Mr Duncombe, who
was present at the press
conference, apologised for
the delay and said that the
restroom will be completed
by February 28.

As for the outrage
expressed over the state of
the park in Tropical Gar-
dens, Mr Wisdom acknowl-
edge that a contract was
signed on December 13,
2005 that was subsequently
terminated on the advice of
technical officers of the
Ministry of Youth, Sports
and Housing and the Dela-
porte Community Associa-
tion.

However, he said a new
contract has been awarded
to Mr Frederick Major’s
Construction Co and Mr
Major, who was also pre-
sent at the press confer-
ence, assured the communi-
ty that the park would be
completed on or before
March 31.

Mr Wisdom outlined
numerous accomplishments
since his election in 2002 —
either by the government,
the community association
or through private donors.

According to Mr Wis-
dom, some of these projects
include: The construction
of a restroom on the play-
ground of Gambier Village
by the community associa-
tion; the awarding of a con-
tract for the maintenance
of the Gambier Park and
playground area; the devel-
opment of a soccer pitch in
the community by a private

donor; the refurbishment of

the running track at the
Gambier Primary School;
the repair of the seawall at
Mother Sweeting Park; and
refurbishment of the bas-
ketball court at the Cable
Beach Police Station as
part of the Police Youth
Sports Programme in

the Delaporte constit-
uency.





finger badly damaged

after beating by principal

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A MOTHER is outraged
after her son's finger was badly
damaged during a beating by his
principal — leaving him unable to
write — after the child disrupted
a school assembly on Monday.

Now she is calling for corporal
punishment. in Bahamian
schools to be ended.

The mother said that her 12-
year-old son was subject to a
"severe" caning by his principal
after he was caught talking
through a morgin®assembly.

“I don't eyén beat my chil-
dren like that;” she said. Doctors
have told him that he must keep
his hand in a cast for a week.

"There was an assembly and
he was talking so the principal
take him out the crowd and he
beat him, and he was beating
him so hard he was rubbing his
hip with his hand," explained
the mother. —

When the boy moved his
hand over the area where his
principal was caning him in a

: response to the pain, he said the

principal warned him to move it
or else risk it getting broken.

"He wapped him a couple
more times and he (her son)
started rubbing his hip again —
so (the principal) wap him
across his hand and now his fin-
ger's broken,” she said.

The woman claims that her
son passed out from the pain.

Her husband received a call

Mother calls for end to corporal punishment in schools

from him shortly afterwards,
telling him he felt ill and wanted
to be taken home.

"My son called out and said
that he'd fainted," she said. "I'm
thinking now I’m going to meet
him to the hospital because he
fainted because he didn't eat
breakfast or something or
because of the heat."

She was later informed by her
son that he had passed out after
receiving the caning.

The woman said her son is an
avid amateur boxer, and as well
as hindering his capacity to
write, the injury is going to set
back his training.

According to the mother, she
would like to move her son to a
different school — but he insists
that he wants to stay.

She added that now she fears
her son may be victimised
because she has spoken out
about the incident.

Responding to the claims, the
principal in question said, “Yes,
I was the person responsible.”

He explained that the inci-
dent occurred after a special
"National Heroes" assembly,
which students had been
informed beforehand was an
important occasion.

He claims, however, that
despite the warning, several stu-
dents were "very, very disrup-
tive", resulting in his decision
to cane the 12-year-old.

Shooting incident
on Eastern Road

RESIDENTS in the area of Leeward East on the Eastern
Road became alarmed yesterday when they heard shots ring out

in theirneighbourhood.

One witness, a home owner in the area, said that she heard
five shots and when she looked out of the window, she saw one
man standing with a gun his hand, and another lying motionless

on the ground.

Police yesterday confirmed that there had been a shooting at
Leeward East, but said that no one had been sériously injured

during the incident.

Up until press time details about the shooting remained

sketchy.

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"When I caned him I told him
to put his hands away because if
you don't put your hand away it
might be broken, there's a pos-
sibility his hand might be dam-
aged," he said.

The principal said he had not

noticed that the 12-year-old .

moved his hand over the area
where he was being caned.

"I was not aware that his hand
was broken or that any damage
was done — not until late yester-
day evening," he said, adding
that the boy was “excessively
talking, very disruptive and rude
in assembly.”

The principal claimed the
damage was "not inten-
tional."

"It was a cane — if you put
your hand in the way of the cane
when the cane is being used

there's a possibility that could

happen," he said.

Though he regrets what hap-
pened, the principal reiterated
that he had warned the boy not
to put his hand in the way.

As for claims that the boy had
fainted as a result of the pain,

‘he did...

the principal said the auditorium
was very hot that morning
as 600 students were in atten-
dance.

"During assembly it was pret-
ty hot. I understand two or three
of the students fainted before
or before he almost
fainted, I gathered."

He said the boy may have
"almost fainted" but this was up

to 20 minutes after he was rep- _

rimanded.
According to the principal, he
spoke to the boy's mother yes-

terday, and felt that the issue
had been resolved.

"I spoke to the mother last
night, and we had a good con-
versation, y'know? I also spoke
to the boy and he said he was

feeling strong."

The principal claims a meet-
ing was set up between himself,
the mother and the district
superintendent yesterday morn-
ing but that the mother did not
attend.

Attempts to contact Minister
of Education Alfred Sears for
comment on his government
cellphone yesterday were unsuc-
cessful.

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PAGE 4, FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348 er

Long on rhetoric, short on sorrow

PRESIDENT BUSH showed what he does
well at the beginning of the State of the Union
ceremony when he graciously acknowledged
and introduced Nancy Pelosi as speaker of
the House of Representatives. He seemed
both generous and sincere, and it was the
right touch for a genuinely historic moment.
At the end of his speech he introduced four
Americans of whom the nation can be proud,
including Wesley Autrey, a New Yorker who
made like a Hollywood stunt man to save the
life of a, stricken passenger who had fallen
onto the tracks in front of an oncoming sub-
way train.
The rest of the evening was a study i in gov-
ernmental dysfunction. The audience kept
mindlessly applauding — up and down, like
marionettes — when in fact there was nothing
to applaud. The state of the union is wretched,
which is why Bush’s public approval ratings
are the worst since those of Richard Nixon
and Jimmy Carter.
If Bush is bothered by his fall from political
grace, it wasn’t showing on Tuesday night.
He seemed as relaxed as ever, smiling, signing
autographs, glad-handing.
I wanted to hear him talk about the suf-
fering of the soldiers he has put in harm’s
way, and the plight of the residents of New
Orleans. I wanted to hear him express a little
in the way of sorrow for the many thousands
.. who. have.died. unnecessarily on his watch. I
wanted to see him slip the surly bonds of nar-
cissism and at least acknowledge the human

wreckage ‘that is the sum and substance of
his sustained folly. —

But this is a president who runs when empa-
thy calls. While others are monitoring the
casualty lists, he’s off to the gym. At least
Lyndon Johnson had the decency to agonize
over the losses he unleashed in Vietnam.

The State of the Union speech was boiler-:

plate at a time when much of the country,
with good reason, is boiling mad. The United
States, the most powerful nation in the histo-
ry of the world, seems paralyzed. It can’t extri-
cate itself from the war in Iraq, can’t rebuild
the lost city of New Orleans, can’t provide
health care for all of its citizens, can’t come up
with a sane energy policy in the era of global
warming, can’t even develop a thriving public
school system.

If it’s true, as President Bush told his audi-
ence, that “much is asked of us,” it’s equally
true that very little has been delivered.

The Democrats, delighted by the wounded |

Bush presidency, believe this is their time.
Like an ostentation of peacocks, an extraor-
dinary crowd of excited candidates is gath-
ering in hopes of succeeding Bush.

But such a timid crowd!

Ask a potential Democratic president what
he or she would do about the war, and you'll
get a doctoral dissertation about the impor-
tance of diplomacy, the possibility of a phased
withdrawal (but not too quick), the need for
Iraqis to help themselves and figure out a
way to-divvy up the oil, and so on and so
forth.

A straight answer? Surely you jest. The
Democrats remind me of the boxer in the
Bonnie Raitt lyric who was “afraid to throw a
punch that might land.”

There’s a hole in the American system
where the leadership used to be. The country
that led the miraculous rebuilding effort in
Western Europe after World War II can’t
even build an adequate system of levees on its
own Gulf Coast.

The most effective answer to this leadership
vacuum would be a new era of political
activism by ordinary citizens. The biggest,

most far-reaching changes of the past century

— the labour movement, the civil rights move-
ment, the women’s movement — were not
primarily the result of elective politics, but
rather the hard work of committed citizen-
activists fed up with the status quo.

It’s time for thoughtful citizens to turn off
their TVs and step into the public arena.
Protest. Attend meetings. Circulate petitions.
Run for office. I suspect the public right now
is way ahead of the politicians when it comes
to ideas about creating a more peaceful, more
equitable, more intelligent society.

The candidates for the most part are lis-
tening to their handlers and gurus and fat-
cat contributors, which is the antithesis of
democracy. It’s not easy.for ordinary men
and women to be heard above that self-serv-

_ing din, but it can be done.

Voters should listen to Dwight Eisenhower,
who said in 1954:

“Politics ought to be the part-time profes-
sion of every citizen who would protect the
rights and privileges of free people and who
would preserve what is good and fruitful in
our national heritage.”

(¢ This article is by Bob Herbert of The
New York Times — © 2007)



289 Market St. Sout ° P.O. Box N-7984 e Nassau, Bahamas
‘THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

You area iitarlacs.

Amazed at _
some vehicles

4

allowed on the
road in Nassau

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I FINALLY have found
it necessary to write
responding to an article in
January 24, 2007 by Alison
Lowe. “Anger over truck
missing wheel”.

As a relatively new resi-
dent of Nassau I find it tru-
ly amazing that some of the
vehicles travelling these
roads are even allowed on
the road.

I’m also not surprised by
the attitude of the police
and his remark that it is
not their responsibility.

I don’t believe the police
have any knowledge of
what. their duties include.
Signage on the side of
police cars in most soci-
eties in North America
says to “Serve & Protect”.

Seeing the way the oper-
ators of police cars and
motor bikes are driven
they don’t serve and cer-
tainly don’t protect, plus
have little or no respect for
others on the road. They
drive as if they feel it is
their right to drive errati-
cally and certainly don't
follow any rules of the
road.

The response by the
police that they cannot do
anything unless it has a
Bahamian plate shows
again that they have no
understanding of their
jurisdiction.

Although I for one have
been given a ticket because
the registration disc had
fallen off the window and
was on the floor.

The police still gave me a
$100 ticket.

But I digress. The condi-
tion of both truckers, buses
and cars in this country
borders on the criminal. I
have lived in England,
Canada and Bermuda and
unless the vehicles pass a
thorough examination,
which in Canada includes
checking that exhaust emis-
sions meet the standards,
the vehicle is pulled off the
road.

LETTERS

| letters@trilbunemedia.net



Most of the buses and
trucks need their exhaust
systems checked.

It is just lazy on the part

of the owner/operators to

not change the filters to
stop the pollution. In
Bermuda if a vehicle has
any rust on the car that car
does not get a renewal
licence.

Here I’ve seen vehicles
with pieces hanging off,
lights not operating, but
the renewal sticker was the
previous month.

I guess that it just hap-
pened. In Canada if lights
are not working correctly
the police will stop the car
and issue a summons to
have it corrected and visit
the police station within 48
hours to confirm that the

infraction is completed.

In response: to Mr
Bethel’s comments that
“everything that comes
here we make sure it is in
good working order” is
very erroneous. Watching
the “examination” at
renewal time certainly does
not confirm that even the
simplest of safety items
that the brakes work is
never checked.

It’s fine to see if tie
brake lights come on but
that doesn’t say the brakes
work.

Forget about upsetting
the bus or truck operators
what about.the health and
safety of the public? We
deserve that right and the
Road Traffic Department
and police are not “Serv-
ing or Protecting.”

r
‘

M GILL .
Nassau,
January, 2007.

Proper lighting, security -
should be in place at clinics

EDITOR, The Tribune.

7)

I WAS very happy to hear government clinics will now be
open until 11pm. I went to the Flamingo Gardens clinic last
evening at about 7pm with my daughter to see a doctor. I was
surprised when I pulled into the clinic’s yard and found it in

darkness.

The Carmichael Road street lights are not positioned to pro-
vide lighting for the parking area. © *
Parking at the rear and west of the building is in complet®
darkness. You can barely see the parked cars let alone a persoe

out there.

The staff were anxious about going to their vehicles in the
dark and rightfully so with only security officer. The clinies
being open later in the evenings is a needed service which was
evident by the number of persons (some 40) registered to see

doctors.

“

However I feel proper lighting or some sort of lighting along
with more security should have been in place before starting. I
am hoping that the Department of Public Health and the Min-
istry of Works and Utilities will work together to quickly recti-

fy this matter.

M GIBSON
Nassau, :
January, 2007.

8
9

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In brief

Sunday
School
Rally in

‘the Alley

THE Big Harvest Community

Sunday School will be holding its
th annual “Sunday School Rally

in the Alley” and awards presen-
tation on Sunday, January 28.

The event will begin at 3pm,
according to John Ferguson,
community Sunday School
superintendent.

« “This non-profit, non-denomi-
iyational community-based entity
came into existence on Sunday,
September 3, 1995 with 35 stu-
dents and a few adult volunteer
teachers,” said the institution in
a statement. “This vibrant and

’ proactive school now has an

enrollment of over 400 and is
growing. It caters mainly to the _
spiritual, moral and temporal
«upliftment of under-privileged
sehildren and at-risk youth in our
inner city community.”

.,- During the upcoming celebra-
‘tion, hundreds of persons from a
‘cross-section of the community,
including former residents of the
Atea, will converge on Woods
“Alley. :

%? The Bahama Brass Band and
the Farm Road Marching Band
svill be there to lead the march
‘ato Woods Alley.
»- Six outstanding Sunday/Sab-
bath school teachers who have
contributed to the development
‘and growth of their respective
‘schools will receive the coveted
‘>Conquering Lion Award” for
Succeeding against the odds with
the boldness of a conquering
jion.

., They are:

e Elder Alfred Brown — Sab-
bath school teacher, Good News
Seventh Day Adventist Church

e Janice Knowles — Sunday
school teacher, Church of God
of Prophecy East Street Taber-
nacle

e Reverend Brazil McDonald
— Sunday school teacher/bible
study scholar, Transfiguration
Baptist Church

e Marion Cooper — Salvation
Army, Grants Town Corp

e Linda Brown - Sunday
school teacher, St Agnes Angli-
can Church

e Kenneth Sands - Sunday
school superintendent, Abun-
dant Life Bible Church

ay



Se ES er: Truck Co., Ltd

Montrose Avenue ~
Phone:322-1722 ¢ Fax: 326-7452

Before buying
Bahamas Bus & Truck ©

‘all:

The Tribune

SPECIAL
REPORT

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter —



A SOURCE within the
prison system has spoken out
against the lack of a parole
scheme at Her Majesty’s Fox
Hill Prison — claiming that had
such a system been imple-
mented as proposed five years
ago, it would have most likely
prevented the 2006 prison
break which resulted in the
deaths of two men.

The source, who said he has
an extensive knowledge of Fox
Hill Prison and its inmates, has
questioned why parole was
never introduced despite it
being a key proposal in the cur-
rent government’s manifesto
handbook in 2002, “Our Plan".

“During the PLP’s campaign
leading up to the 2002 election
much was said (by Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie) about the
over crowding of the prison,”
noted the source.

“During that time they
pledged that if and when they
came to office, the prison
would be the first thing on their
agenda because they both saw
that the gross over crowding.
has made the prison a breeding
ground for criminals, and some-
thing must be done to solve this
situation,” he said.

“All these other things that
they pledged now just don’t
seem to exist anymore,” the
source stated.

He said inmates were happy
when the prime minister
appointed Dr Elliston Rahming
— now Superintendent at the

-prison — to head a commission

in 2002 to address the situation.

Dr Rahming “highly recom-
mended” a parole system in the
commission’s report, notes the
source, adding that Deputy



Prime Minister Cynthia Pratt
called it “ta step in the right
direction.”

“But that step was never
made,” he said.

The source believes that such
a system would give prisoners
an incentive to behave better
and improve their lives.

“Had the step been made (to
implement parole) guard Deon
Bowles and inmate Neil Brown
would be alive today, because
the inmates would have had
something to look forward to —
they need some incentive,” he
said.

“If you give people some-
thing to look forward to their
behaviour will be different. If
you let a person know that at
the end of a certain period I
am going to be ‘here’, they'll
look forward to that, and
there’s not a chance of them
trying to ruin the situation to

) but



FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007, PAGE 5







get into something else.”

The two men — an inmate
and a prison guard — died in a
January 17, 2006 éscape
attempt. Three other inmates
also sought to escape.

Responding to Dr Rah-
ming’s claims that a Depart-
ment of Corrections Bill is to
go before parliament shortly
which will allow inmates tos
leave on licence, the source said
it was simply a “stall tactic.”

“This bill’s supposed to be
going before parliament but
they’ve had this bill since five
years ago and nothing’s hap-
pened. I don’t know what the
problem is, why they have to
go with some new bill when
they had something in motion
when the FNM was in power.”

Asked last week about why
the system never came into

effect, Dr Rahming said that:

evidence from studies in other’~

}





Per ds vial:

Rosetta St.



‘penal communities “suggests
that people who go on parole
return to prison at the same

rate as people who spend their .

full time.”

He also claimed that “if a fel-
la is good at talking” he might
be able to talk his way to early
release. “So that has a number
of weaknesses,” he said.

Meanwhile, the source said
that there are some inmates
who would obviously never
qualify for the programme, but
“you cannot use that yardstick
to measure all the good peo-
ple in there who are trying to
do better in life.”

“There’s a hell of a lot of
them in there, willing and able
to do that if they (prison
authorities) would just do what
they’re supposed to do and find
these people and deal with

them*-one on--one,”'he ‘

%

‘explained ‘ ebiud Vass
Sayis aid fe J SIE

TOL Si

THE TRIBUNE | |

Claim that parole system could

have prevented 2006 prison break

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7:30 Urban Renewal: Building
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8:00 Ardastra Gardens

8:15 — Bah. Culinary Classic Wine
& Food Festival 2006

8:30 National Tourism Week
Proclamation

9:00 — Minister’s Closing Charge
Nat. Tourism Conference

11:00 Immediate Response

Noon ZNS News Upaate

12:05 Immediate Response
Cont'd :

‘1:00 — National Art Gallery of The

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1:30 Ethnic Health America

2:00 Thousand Dollar Bee

2:30 Aqua Kids

3:00 _ International Fellowship.
Of Christians & Jews

3:30 Ed Nout

4:00 Little Robots

4:30 Carmen San Diego

5:00 ZNS News Update

5:05 The Fun Farm

6:00 — Caribbean Passport

6:30 . News Night 13

7:00 The Bahamas Tonight

8:00 55 Degree North

9:00 The Envy Life

9:30 3D’ Funk Studio

10:00 Caribbean Newsline

10:30 News Night 13
11:00 The Bahamas Tonight
11:30 Immediate Response
1:30, Community Page 1540 am











SATURDAY,
JANUARY 27TH
6:30am Community Page 1540AM
9:00 Bahamas @ Sunrise

10:00. Int'l Fit Dance

10:30 Dennis The Menace
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11:30 .. Little Robots

noon Underdog

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right to make last minute
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Ph: 325-3336
PAGE 6, FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007



THE

CAPE Eleuthera Institute
has turned trash into a trea-
sure chest of investment
opportunities in Eleuthera by
turning discarded items into
valuable assets.

As more than $13 billion in
investments progress in the
Bahamas, Jack Kenworthy,
director of Systems at Cape
Eleuthera Institute, shared the
perspective his company has

developed in preparing to take

Storewide Sale
advantage of these opportu-

A Ere tae Lilie ta ae Le nities.
Excluding Pashminas aE Sen ie Veen
OD pa C C n S nt
All Sales Final Opportunities” master class
No Store Credits

o Week.
Ee es edit Cards Cape Investments has made

















“Lose Yourself In Style”

during National Tourism .

Bahamas.

Since the casuarinas have
been determined to be detri-
mental to the environment,
Florida officials have been
spending millions of dollars
annually in an attempt to
eradicate them. Bahamian
environmentalists have been
trying to remove the trees
from coastlines as well.

Cape Investments has found
ways to make these waste
items into valuable resources.

“We like to say that a waste
is resource out of place,” Mr
Kenworthy said. “A waste is a
resource that we have not fig-
ured out how to use yet.”

With a team of five employ-
ees, the organisation has har-

Investor turns trash to treasure

vested casuarinas trees from
central and south Eleuthera.

“We have harvested so far
45,000 board-feet of wood
from casuarinas,” Mr Ken-
worthy said.

Other areas of exploration
include the production of fish
as a food source.

Using 800-gallon water
tanks, the Institute projects
that it can grow 1,500 fish to
harvest size within a year.

At the same time, it plans
to turn waste from the fish
tanks into nutrition for veg-
etable produce.

@ JACK Kenworthy
gives a fresh perspective on
investment ideas.

THE TRIBUNE
















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Sat (9:30 am -6 pm)

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Tel: 393-0551

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Port Authority Union to —
meet with management

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter



FREEPORT — The Grand Bahama Port

_.Authority Workers’ Union will meet privately
with management at the Grand Bahama Ship-

yard this week in an effort avoid any unneces-
sary unrest at the facility.

Although Bahamian workers at the shipyard
voted in favour of a strike on Wednesday,

‘GBPAWU president Harold Grey said the

union has agreed to meet with management
before a decision is taken to strike.

During the strike vote, taken between 9am
and 4pm at the union’s office on Yellow Pine
Street, 101 of the 141 members cast ballots.
According to the results, 86 voted in favour
of a strike and 15 voted against it.

The shipyard employs a labour force of 600.

‘Of that number, 200.are Bahamians.

Following the vote, the union and manage-
ment met at the Labour Department on Thurs-
day morning to discuss various issues that have
led to the unrest.

This included the suspension of two Bahami-
an workers, and a warning letter issued to a
third for being sick. :

Mr Grey told The Tribune that nothing pos-
itive came out of this meeting as none of the
issues were resolved.

“We have been encouraged by labour offi-

cials to meet privately with management at

‘

the shipyard to try to reach some resolution. If ;
that fails, then we have no choice but to initiate,
astrike,” he said. ‘¢
Mr Grey claims that the suspensions were not:
in accordance with the industrial agreement:
signed between the union and management. '
He explained that a warning letter should’
have been issued prior to this.
The union president also expressed concern’?
about safety at the shipyard. i
He believes that the safety department is’
not adequately staffed to meet the demands at
the facility, which are sometimes left to one’
safety officer.
Mr Dave Dalgleish, managing director, dis-‘
agreed with Mr Grey. f
He said the safety department employs about °
six safety officers —a large staff compared to.
other shipyards. -
The safety department was established in,
2004 following a fatal explosion at the ship-»
yard, which claimed the life of 33-year-old
Bahamian Wendell “Sarge” Maxxam. ot
Since then, there have been two other fatal.
accidents involving expatriates, as well as oth-'
er injuries at the facility. : }
“Tn addition to the suspensions, we are very ’
concerned about the safety of workers at the’
facility and we hope that we can resolve all of
these issues when we meet with management °
because we do not want to cause unnecessary |

unrest,” Mr Grey said. ;

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THE TRIBUNE



A LEADING British QC
who represented suspected
Bahamian drug lord Samuel
‘Ninety’ Knowles has scored a
court victory which experts
claim will “change criminal
jurisprudence across the Eng-
lish-speaking Caribbean.”

Edward Fitzgerald QC, a
London-based barrister who
specialises in Caribbean cases,
has secured reprieves for two
killers who set a Catholic priest
and his congregation on fire.

He convinced the Privy
Council, the final court of
appeal for many former British
colonies, that the death sen-
tence should not be carried out
on Kim John and Francis
Phillip, who were condemned
to hang in St Lucia for what has
been described as one of the
island’s worst murders.

The pair entered a church in
the island’s capital, Castries, on
New Year’s Eve, 2000,
drenched the congregation with
petrol and set them ablaze.

The priest, Father Charles
Gaillard, was burned to death
and a nun, Sister Theresa Egan,
died after being attacked with a
torch.

At their trial, the men - who
claimed to be Rastafarian
prophets - said they were
ordered by God to take revenge
for corruption in the Catholic
church.

The judge, in sentencing them
to hang, said the crimes were
among the worst in St Lucia’s
history.

After Mr Fitzgerald secured
reprieves, legal experts said the
case would change criminal
jurisprudence across the
Caribbean. ;

His triumph was very much
in line with his tendency to
defend the most loathed crimi-
nals on the grounds that, in his
own words, “even the most hat-
ed people are entitled to a fair
trial.”

In Britain, he defended not

‘only the Moors murderess
Myra Hindley, but other child
killers like Mary Bell and Jon
Venables, who was one of the
two killers of toddler James
Bulger.

At the time of Hindley’s








- Leading attorney
scores court victory

Experts claim that the win will ‘change criminal
jurisprudence across English-speaking Caribbean’

4

death, Mr Fitzgerald was on the
verge of pulling off the biggest
coup of his career - release from
jail of a woman so reviled in
Britain that her safety could not
be guaranteed.

He became well-known in
Nassau courts when he was
hired by Samuel Knowles to
represent him during his pro-
tracted extradition proceedings.

Mr Fitzgerald flew from Lon-
don to Nassau for most hear-
ings, using his understated style
of advocacy on Knowles’ behalf.

As it happens, Knowles was
eventually extradited to Florida,
but Mr Fitzgerald is noted more
for his victories than his defeats.
And he has no qualms about
defending what some people
consider the indefensible.

“Tt would be terrible if we
stopped defending people
because they are unpopular,”
he told The Guardian of Lon-
don.

‘“The legal process is an
attempt to civilise our emotions
of revenge. Anything that’s
against lynch law seems to me
to be a good thing.”

Mr Fitzgerald works from the
Doughty Street chambers, Lon-
don’s most noted liberal legal
powerhouse.

Since his call to the bar in
1978, he has become one of the
UK’s most respected interna-
tional advocates, winning the
Human Rights Silk of the Year
Award in 2005.

Though he could have devot-
ed his talents to more lucrative
areas of the law, he chose
human rights with special
emphasis on rehabilitation.

A staunch Catholic, he
attended Downside - a leading
monastery school in England -
before taking a first-class hon-
ours degree in classics at Corpus
Christi College, Oxford.

In recent years, he has gained
a reputation for successful
defences in Caribbean death-
row cases.

The St Lucia victory will not
only reinforce an already for-

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him more in demand than ever
before.















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THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 8, FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007

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4

Mark my words,
this man needs —
to get a life

@ By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

ne Mark Symonette
has levelled a viru-
lent, nasty personal

attack against me, while misin-
forming the public about one
of my recent columns in which
L asserted that the Queens New
Year’s Honours list was a polit-
ical gimmick by the PLP to
brazenly ‘canonise’ certain par-
ty stalwarts.

In that column, which
appeared in the January 12,
2007, edition of The Tribune,
I said that Lady Marguerite
Pindling, Garet “Tiger” Fin-
layson and Baltron Bethel all
turned up on the honours list
for knighthoods, but in my
opinion, none of the three
seemed deserving of such hon-
ours as there were other more
deserving Bahamians who have
been persistently ignored.

I also said that the past five
years under the PLP adminis-
tration had been bland and
rather empty of achievements.
Because of this, I said that the
“new” PLP appeared to be
doing all they could to get peo-
ple on their side by capitalising
on the achievements of another
administration, whether that
meant renaming buildings or
bestowing honours on such

’ people as Sir Lynden’s widow.

In a nutshell, it was/is my
opinion that the PLP was sim-
ply playing to the gallery, hon-
ouring friends of the party.

Mr Symonette, in his letter
to another newspaper, took

' grave exception to my com-

ments. In his letter, Mr Symon-
ette made erroneous charges
and personally disparaging
remarks that were misleading
and has therefore invited a
response.

_ Mark Symonette’s attack on
me is not the first he has
launched at a Tribune colum-
nist. He seems to enjoy his role
as an apologist for the PLP. But
most of Mr Symonette’s letter
is factually incorrect and based
on his personal feelings.

In one paragraph, he claims: .

“Unfortunately, wisdom and
truth are often lacking in Mr
Gibson's columns in The Tri-
bune. Every week he is in a
mad dash to put on public dis-
play one piece of folly or anoth-
er. I only met this young civil
servant once, and was immedi-
ately struck by his brash and
obnoxious behaviour during a
recent function at the US
Ambassador's residence. Why
Dame (sic) Eileen Carron, a
dignified and _ esteemic 1
Bahamian; would continue to
allow this person to embarrass
her newspaper in his column is
beyond me. It is about time the
lady exercises a little restraint
over Mr Gibson before the
paper loses all credibility.”

_ This is pitiful! I would invite

YOUNG MAN’Ss VIEW ~

Kup Ral AN

Mr Symonette to support his
claims that “wisdom and truth”
are lacking in my columns.
Here, Mark Symonette
launched a fallacious assault
upon my character, pretending
to know me, when I don’t even
know the poor chap. This seem-
ingly delusional man’s letter
was a great disservice to the
public and suggests a perverted
misunderstanding of the truth.

We briefly met at the US
Ambassador’s residence last
year and again at the House of
Assembly on January 12. It per-
plexes me that Mr Symonette
could bald-facedly surmise that

he was “struck by (my) brash .

and obnoxious behaviour” dur-
ing our first meeting at the US
Ambassador’s residence.

It appears that Mr Symon-
ette, to whom I did not say
more than three or four intro-
ductory sentences, apparently
took a deeper interest in me
than I took in him.

His assertion that I thought
that the other persons on the
honours list (other than Garet
Finlayson, Lady Pindling and
Baltron Bethel) were not
deserving of honours is an out-
right lie! didn’t mention them
at all.

I: his letter, Mr Symon-
ette also claimed that The

Tribune’s publisher, Eileen
Carron, had received a dame-
hood under the FNM adminis-
tration. This was breaking news
to Mrs Carron, as even she was
unaware of this!

Mr Symonette, I believe,
calls himself a journalist but
had he made the slightest effort
to conduct some form of
research, he would have dis-

covered that Mrs Carron was

not a dame!

Mark Symonette, who works
for the government propaganda
machine, Bahamas Information
Services (BIS), also suggested
that Mrs Carron “exercises a
little restraint” over me before
her “paper loses all credibili-
ty”.
It appears that, as a journal-
ist, Mr Symonette has lost his
appreciation for journalistic
freedom. It seems he is sug-
gesting that Mrs Carron
restrains me as he is presum-
ably restrained as a ‘journalist’
at the official government
mouthpiece.

Further, Mark Symonette
should be the last to talk about
credibility, as he and credibility
appear to have long parted
ways. In his letter, Mr Symon-
ette further claimed that I had
expressed “utter contempt” for

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the recently honoured women
“precisely because they are
women”.

The only woman I addressed
was Lady Pindling, and any
other suggestion is far from the
truth. Further, Mr Symonette’s
suggestion is baseless, one he
has pulled straight out of thin
air. | have no problems with
women being elevated! I have
always had a great respect for
all the women in my life. Most
outstanding among them is my
wonderful grandmother who
brought me up (on Long
Island) and taught me respect. I
challenge Mr Symonette to tell
me what experience he has had
that qualifies him as a great
defender of women!

He asserts that I do not
know the personal persuasion
of the recent honorees and said
that I should therefore have not »
suggested that their honours
were based upon political
patronage.

Mr Symonette should know
that, as for the three persons I
did address, it is public knowl-
edge that Lady Pindling is a
PLP, and many persons have a
general idea of the political
leanings of Garet Finlayson and
Baltron Bethel.

And, no sir, I did not con-
tradict myself by conceding that
Lady Pindling stood by her hus-
band during the fight for major-
ity rule and nationhood but had
made no far reaching, individ-
ual contribution to the
Bahamas as a whole. It was not
a contradiction, but merely the
truth!

‘Based upon what I have
come to know of Mr Symon-
ette, I’ve concluded that he is
an immodest, unreasonable
man. To use the words of Sir
Arthur Foulkes in a previous
response to Mr Symonette, I
would advise Mark that “effec-
tive reasoning cannot hide
behind phrase mongering. It is
like dressing a clown in the gar-
ment of a king and that only
makes for a ridiculous specta-
cle.”

In the words of the great
16th century essayist/poet
Alexander Pope:

A little learning is a danger-
ous thing

Drink deep, or taste not the
Pierian spring

There shallow draughts
intoxicate the brain

And drinking largely sobers
us again.

If Mr Symonette is able to, I
suggest that he read between
the lines and get a life instead
of writing asinine letters.









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THE TRIBUNE



Mh Lee
Prestigious award

for nurse Rebecca

THE Bahamas is setting
the trend in nursing in the
Caribbean. Gone is the tra-
ditional mindset that they are
handmaidens to the medical
staff.

“They form a collaborative
team,” said Nurses Associa-
tion of the Bahamas presi-
dent Ampusam Symonette.
“Nurses now participate in
crucial decision-making.
Therefore it is vital that they
are fully equipped.”

And, among those setting
the pace is the - Bahamas’ first
paediatric nurse practition-
er, Rebecca Johnson, who
won a prestigious regional
award for her hard work and
dedication.

The 20-year veteran beat
out 26 other nominees to
capture the Mavis Harney
Award in October 2006 dur-
ing the Caribbean Nursing
Organisation (CNO) confer-
ence held in Nassau. The
award is named after the
CNO founder and is given
for excellence in clinical
practice.

The award committee
reviewed documents show-
casing Nurse Johnson’s work
with patients, her education-
al background, personal
development, community
work, staff interaction and
research.

“We are very proud of
Nurse Johnson,” said Mrs
Symonette. “The country
needs to continue showcas-
ing its nurses.

“The Bahamas is a trend-
setter. Our nurses are going
back to school to achieve
their bachelor’s degree. We
presently have nurses with
doctorate degrees.”

Nurse Johnson was nomi-
nated for the award by fami-
ly members of a patient.

“It felt very good that I
was recommended by a fam-
ily,” she said. “That was very
special.

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“Since it was a regional
award I did not think I stood
a chance. Usually the win-
ners are older persons or
persons who are oftentimes
much more experienced than
me.

“So it really was a surprise
and a big honour for me to
get the award.”

Nurse Johnson entered the
Bahamas School of Nursing
in October 1982 where she
obtained a ae in nurs-
ing.

She went on to ebinin
associate, bachelor and mas-
ter’s degrees in nursing,
majoring in acute/chronic
paediatric nursing with a
minor in health and nursing
administration. She also did
a post basic paediatric
course.

Notwithstanding her full
workload, Nurse Johnson
has become more of a super-

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visor and teacher to her
patients and their families,
and her co-workers.
““When I come on duty,”
she said, “I try to identify
some patients who might
need something special,
whether it is some teaching
for their families Or care
management to help them
plan their care at home.
Some days, I do staff teach-
ing.’

Nurse Johnson also works
tirelessly in the community.
She is a member of the Sus-
pected Child Abuse and
Neglect (SCAN) unit, which
is a multi-disciplinary team
working to prevent and
reduce the incidence of child
abuse.

“T really feel that with chil-
dren, we need to help them
from being hurt and being
abused,” said Nurse John-
son. “That would build a bet-
ter community. If children
grow up with a lot of hurt,
feeling unloved and unwant-
ed then they are going to be
dysfunctional adults and
have dysfunctional families.”

She volunteered as a nurse
at the diabetes camp for chil-
dren in Florida; is a founding
member of the Bahamas
Diabetic Youth Club; is a co-
ordinator for the Bahamas
diabetic summer camp and a
founding member of the
Adolescent Help Desk.

She has given lectures to
community, church and civic
groups on nutrition and the
prevention of chronic ill-
nesses, and is a member of
the chronic non-communica-
ble illness team, which works
with international organisa-
tions to prevent incidence of

. chronic diseases such as dia-

betes and hypertension.

She has completed several
research projects and hopes
to complete another one in
time to present at the next
CNO conference. hae

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seats



STORY SO FAR: Unable to find
Mehmet, his father finally decides to go
to the police, even though they are Serbs.
Meli’s mother instructs Meli to go along,
figuring they will be easier on her hus-
band if a child is with him.

CHAPTER FOUR
Searching for Mehmet

“Go home, Meli,” Papa said when he
realized I was following him into the
street. “Stay with your mother. She’s
already anxious about your brother. I

don’t want her to have to worry about

you as well.”

I just shook my head. As scared as I
was, I was determined to do as Mama
had said and go with Papa to the police
station. The police had seen me walk
by every day with Mehmet. They might
remember that we were only school-
children, not terrorists to be jailed...
or tortured... or killed.

The station door was locked. Papa
knocked, and when nobody came, he
beat on the door with his fist.

“Shh, Papa,” I said. “You'll make

THE TRIBUNE





« breakfast serials sto



them angry.”

He ignored me and kept right on
beating until the door opened slightly.
A pistol stuck out of the crack. “What
do you want?”

“I need your help,” Papa said meekly,

“as though he really thought a Serbian

policeman would help an Albanian.
“My son never came home from school
today.”

“So? Can I help it if your boy has run
away?”

Papa pushed the door open wider,
ignoring the pistol in the policeman’s
hand. “I thought there might be some
mistake. He’s only a schoolboy. He
knows nothing of politics.” It was a lie.
Mehmet knew plenty about politics; but
of course, Papa meant that Mehmet was
not KLA.

“Who are you?” the policeman

demanded.

“My name is Hashim Lleshi. I own a
small grocery store on the north side
of town. This is my daughter, Meli. My
son, Mehmet, who is missing, is only
thirteen. He—is he here? Do you have
him in custody? By mistake? Perhaps
you have confused him with someone
else?”

“Come back in the morning if you
have a question.”

“But to make a child spend the night
in jail—he—do you have children?”
Papa’s voice was low and pleading. It
hurt to hear him humiliate himself, but

- | knew he was willing to do whatever it

took to get Mehmet safely home.
“Come back in the morning, I said.”

The policeman poked Papa with his pis-

tol. “And be glad I didn’t arrest you.”
“Come on, Papa,” I whispered.
Reluctantly, Papa backed out of the

station. Once again he became the old
man I had seen coming up our stairs.
“Pray for your brother, Meli,” he said.
They were the only words he spoke to
me during that long walk home.

We went back to the station the next
morning, but the result was the same.
The Serbs would not even say if
Mehmet was in the jail. or not.

For the next few weeks, we went
through the motions of getting up in
the morning, eating, working, and lying
down to sleepless nights. I couldn’t
make myself go to school.

Suppose something should happen
while I was gone?

It makes no sense now, nor did it
then, but I thought that since I had been
the cause of his disappearance, I had
to be there to make him come home
safely.

Whenever I wasn’t working in the
store or helping Mama with housework,
I stood at the front window and tried to
see Mehmet turning the corner, walking
down our street, climbing the stairs to
the apartment, or walking into the front
door of the store. I did this day after
day, time after time. One time Mama
came over and put her arm around my
shoulders.

“Tt will not bring him home sooner,”
she said gently.

But it might, I thought. If only I stare
long enough and hard enough, I can
will him home.

In a part of my mind I knew it was
foolishness, but I couldn’t help myself.
It was guilt, I suppose. If only I had
behaved that day in school, Mehmet
would be here now, teasing me, lording
it over me.



Summer came, and still no word. And
then one day when I wasn’t even look-
ing, Mehmet appeared.

At first I couldn’t believe it was he.

He was so thin. Besides, he knocked
on the kitchen door.

When had Mehmet ever knocked on
the door?

“Mehmet?” I said when I opened it.

The gaunt figure nodded. “Not a pel-
ican,” he said.

I pulled him across the threshold.
“Mama! Papa! It’s Mehmet. He’s come
home.”

Mama came running from the bed-
room, nearly knocking me down as she
threw her arms around him. “My
Mehmet,” she said. :

“Oh, Mehmet.” She led him to a chair
and sat him down. “I have soup,” she
said. “You must be hungry. Get your
papa, Meli.”

The little boys were at school, but the
rest of us just stood and watched while
Mehmet ate the soup that Mama had
brought him. Tears were rolling down
our faces. There were sO many ques-
tions, but none of us knew where to
begin.

It was, as always, Mehmet who spoke
first. “Uncle Fadil was right,” he said.
“We cannot stay here. We have to leave
as soon as possible.”

(Continued on Tuesday)

Text copyright © 2005

by Katherine Paterson
Illustrations copyright © 2005
by Emily Arnold McCully
Reprinted by permission of
Breakfast Serials, Inc.
www.breakfastserials.com



J




THE |tRIBUNE



BAHAMAVENTION, the
Ministry of lourism’s latest
media campaign, has reported-
ly drawn increased interest
from prospective travellers —
resulting in a 40 per cent
increase in visits to the
Bahamas.com website.

Bahamavention, a television,
print and Internet campaign,
encourages overworked and
stressed individuals to renew
their physical and emotional
condition by taking a Bahamas
vacation to intervene in their

ome aman

LOCAL NEWS

Bahamavention sparks 40%
increase in website visits

in ther regular lifestyle.

According to the Ministry of

Fourism, three of the four tele-
vision ads had made it to the
“Top 20” ads of Ad Critic — the
reputable online magazine for
advertising professionals.

“After only one month of

media exposure, the Ministry
of ‘Tourism’s advertising agency
- Fallon Worldwide — was able
to give an impressive overview
of the campaign during Nation-
al Tourism Week,” said the
ninistiy ina statement.



everyday lite.

B GREG BRINKER,
Group Account
director at Fallon.

individuals

The campaign’s most herald-
ed component consists of four
television ads that feature exag-
geraied situations that give
examples of highly-stressed
in need of a — Mr Brinket
Bahamas vacation to intervene

Among the results of the
campaign was the 40 per cent
increase iterest in
Bahamas com. said Greg
Briiker, Group Account direc-
tor at Fallon
. made his pie-
sentation during the NTW mas-

ter class on “Delivering the
brand promise.”

In an interactive seminar,
participants got an opportunity
to explore the importance of
providing a brand that is syn-
onymous with the product.

Mr Brinker emphasised that
the brand needs to have an
emotional connection to which
consumers can relate.

Tourism is considered to be
an experiential brand, where
consumers are concerned most
with experiencing (he things
that the destination can offer
to them.

Fallon has been in partner-
ship with the Bahamas since
2003. During this association,
their advertising work has won
several awards for the
Bahamas.

Georgie’s now on the
beach in Mather Town

Georgie’s at Port Lucaya has been relocated
to Mather Town and is now Georgie’s on the
Beach on the site for the former Club Caribe.

Minister of Tourism Obie Wilchcombe
called the move “another giant step towards
our ultimate objective, which is to ensure that
Bahamians fully realise the economic potential
of our nation and how they can in fact be a

part of that objective.”

“We must always remember, when we
attend functions such as these, the history of
our country — the fact that we are still a young
country, only 32 years old as an independent
nation.

“Men like George are part of the pioneers,
those who dared to dream; those who take
the risks, and those who are prepared to even
losé while they pursue and open up the
thoughts and the minds of many Bahamians.

Mr Wilchcombe said that with the move
the owner George Gibson is taking giant leap

“for ali of us” — as many Bahamians ‘who have
more money than he has but refuse to spend or
Invest It.

“We wish our country to be great but we
do not wish to take the risk for our country.
When things go bad we talk about who we
can bring in to help us; but we need to look at
ourselves, internalise, recognise that we have
come a long way in a short period of time,
and it would add to our achievements if more
of us are prepared to make their contribu-
tions, invest in each other, invest in our nation,
and realise that we have a country that has a
treasure trove of economic opportunity,” he
said.

Senator Marcus Bethel, a long time friend of
Mr Gibson, pointed out that the new site has a
long tradition of hospitality.

Mr Gibson ts a veteran Grand Bahamian
businessman who for the past 18 years has
operated the popular Georgie’s Restaurant at
the Port Lucaya Market Place.

He took the opportunity to restore Club
Caribe, left in shambles atter the hurricanes of
two years ago and has positioned the new
Operation in anticipation of a coming eco-
nomic resurgence in Grand Bahama.

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PHONE: (242) 356-5760



FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007, PAGE 11



ae:

The Ministry

of Tourism’s

Satellite Offices in Nassau

WILL BE CLOSED

to the public on
Friday, January 26, 2007.

Our main office at Bolam House,
George Street as well as our desks at
the Lynden Pindling International Airport
and Festival Place will remain open.

Please direct all inquiries to our main
line at 242-302-2000

We sincerely apologize for any
inconvenience caused.

HE ISLANDS OF THE





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. PAGE 12, FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007






MONDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: New Providence
Community Centre: Mondays - 6pm to Tpm. The
Kirk: Mondays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm

Diabetes Directions a FREE diabetic support group

meets the first Monday of each month at 6:30pm at
New Providence Community Centre, Blake Road.
Dinner is provided and free blood sugar, blood pres-

sure and cholesterol testing is available. For more info _

call 702.4646 or 327.2878

MS (Multiple Sclerosis) Bahamas meets the third
Monday of every month at 6pm @ Doctors Hospital
conference room.

CIVIC CLUBS
Toastmasters Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial
Hilton Monday's at 7pm ¢ Club 612315 meets Mon-

day 6pm @ Wyndham Nassau Resort, Cable Beach _

e Club 3596 meets at the British Colonial Hilton
Mondays at 7pm.

The Nassau Bahamas Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC)
meets every third Monday of the month in the Board
Room of the British Colonial Hilton Hotel, Bay St.



TUESDAY

@ HEALTH

‘Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Tuesday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas meets at 5:30pm

_ on the second Tuesday of each month at their Head-

quarters at East Terrace, Centreville. Call 323.4482
for more info. ~~~" ~~ ee

Pre & Post’ Natal Fitness Classes ake; being held

8,

- 6:30pm'Tuesdays at Nasa GymiNastics Seagrapes

location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval is
required. Call 364.8423 to register for more info.

H CIVIC CLUBS

The Kiwanis Club of New Providence meets every
Tuesday at 7:30pm at the Holy Cross Community
Centre; Highbury Park.

The Luncheon Pilot Club of Nassau meets every
third Tuesday at SuperClubs Breezes, Cable Beach
at 12:30pm. We invite all community minded persons
to attend.

Toastmasters Club 1095 meets Tuesday, 7:30pm @ C
C Sweeting Senior School's Dining Room, College
Avenue off Moss Road. ° Club Cousteau 7343 meets
Tuesdays at 7:30pm in the Chickcharney Hotel,

Fresh Creek, Central Andros ° Club 7178 meets.

each Tuesday at 6pm at the Cancer Society of the
Bahamas, 3rd Terrace, Centreville.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Eta Psi Omega chap-
ter meets every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ the
Eleuthera Room in the Wyndham Nassau Resort,
Cable Beach ¢ Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity meets
every second Tuesday, 6:30pm @ Atlantic House,
IBM Office, 4th floor meeting room ¢ Alpha Phi
Alpha Fraternity meets every first Tuesday, 6:30pm
at the British Colonial Hilton. Please call
502.4842/377.4589 for more info.

The Downtown Pilot Club of Nassau meets every.

third Tuesday of the month at 6pm at the J P Whit-
ney Building, First Terrace, Collins Avenue.

The Rotary Club of Nassau meets every Tuesday at
Luciano's of Chicago on East Bay Street. Fellowship
starts at 12:30pm with the meeting held from 1pm-
2pm.

WEDNESDAY



@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

Hump Day Happy Hour @ Topshotters Sports Bar
every Wednesday 5pm-8pm. Free appetizers and
numerous drink specials.

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: New Providence
Community Centre: Wednesday - 7pm to 8pm. The
Nassau Group: Rosetta Street, Wednesday 6pm to
7pm / 8:30pm to 9:30pm.









ACs sd vol

@ THE Bahamas International Film Festi-
val is pleased to announce the launch of its
Monthly Film Series. Please join us for the
first screening of the Series:

ELEUTHERAN ADVENTURE

Saturday, January 27 at 7:30pm

Downtown at Rawson Square

Free of charge

The Eleutheran Adventure is a documen-
tary film that involves

Kareem Mortimer and cameraman Kevin
Taylor hitchhiking from

Spanish Wells to the Southernmost point
on the island of Eleuthera with only $150 in
hand. Along the way théy meet a slew of
interesting characters that give them an hon-
est and entertaining look of life on the island.
The film explores Eleutheran Culture and
what it means to be Bahamian.



Coming next month:
N Half Nelson on February 24.

4

B



FREE Health and Wellness Lectures are held the
first Wednesday of every month at 6:30pm at New
Providence Community Center Blake Road. For
more information call 327.1660 or 327.2878. FREE
Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar and Cholesterol Screen-

ing.

The Cancer Society of the Bahamas Support Group
meets every Wednesday from 5:30pm to 7pm at
Cancer Headquarters, two doors south of ZNS. Can-
cer patients, survivors, their family members and
friends are invited to attend. Phone 323.4482

@ CIVIC CLUBS

The Rotary Club of SouthEast Nassau meets every
Wednesday from 1pm — 2pm at East Villa Restau-
rant, East Bay Street. Always an interesting, speaker
and great fellowship. If you would like to attend our
meetings please send an e-mail to bruno.pletsch-
er@gottardo.com or kathyvsmith@hotmail.com.

The Nassau Bahamas Alumnae chapter of Delta
Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated meets 6:30pm
every third Wednesday at the Bahamas National
Pride Building.

International Training in Communication, Essence
Club #3173 holds it’s bi-monthly meetings on the
1st and 3rd Wednesday of each month at Doctor's
Hospital Conference Room.

Nassau Council 10415 Knights of Columbus meets ;

the second and fourth Wednesday of the month,
8pm @ St Augustine's Monastery.

The Kiwanis Club of Cable Beach invites the public
to its regular weekly meeting held every Wednesday
at 7:30pm at the British Colonial Hilton. Kiwanis is
4 worldwide service organisation dedicated to chang-
ing the world One Child, One Community at a time."

School and Community Nature Walk and Petting
Zoo - Free Every Wednesday from 1Oam to 2:30pm
at Earth Village Ranch, St Albans Drive and Colum-
bus Avenue (Chippingham). Call (242) 356.2274
now to make reservations. Open to all ages and
groups Monday-Sunday from 9am to 6pm. Inquire
about additional activities and programmes.

TM Club 2437 meets each Wednesday. on the 4th
floor of the Ministry of Health, Meeting Street, at
6pm.

THURSDAY

@ ENTERTAINMENT

Shadowhand Entertainment presents an all Bahami-
an Talent Explosion this and every Thursday night at
the Patio Bar & Grill on Carmichael Road. This
event features upcoming Bahamian artist who are
ready to showcase their original material to the
world. There will also be a freestyle competition
every week which is open to the public at large.
Doors open at 8:30pm. Ladies free until 11pm - Gen-
tlemen - small door charge. See u there.

@ HEALTH
Free public health lectures featuring distinguished
physicians are held at Doctors Hospital every third
Thursday of the month at 6pm in the Doctors Hos-
pital Conference Room. Free screenings between
5pm & 6pm. For more information call 302.4603.

"The brewery of The Bahamas" —

sei ea ret SEOR DRED REAR IDOP MET DEES AOREREEETIELOS IIE DEAD ANT eae OOD RIAA DS OME REESLAESEEERERERRIEEE












RET T OLE L






Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to infor the public
its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Thursday opm to 7pm / 8:30pm te
9:30pm. The Kirk: Thursdays - 7:30pm to 8:30pm.

Pre & Post Natal Fitness Classes are being held
6:30pm Thursdays at Nassau GymNastics Seagrapes
location (off Prince Charles Dr). Doctor approval is
required. Call 364.8423 to register for more info

REACH - Resources & Education for Autism and
Related Challenges meets from 7pm -Ypm the sec-

BEC building, Blue Hill Road.

ond Thursday of each month in the cafeteria af the ,

@ CIVIC CLUBS \

The Rotary Club of Nassau Sunrise has a breakfast
meeting every Thursday morning al Jam at the
British Colonial Hilton Hotel (Fellowship begins at
6:45am).

The Kiwanis Club of Over-the-Hill meets every
Thursday at 8pm at the Holy Cross Activity, Centre,
Soldier Road. Guests are welcome.

Toastmasters Club 3956 meets every first, second
and third Thursday at the Ministry of Health &

’ Environment building on Meeting Street com

mencing at 7:30pm. Everyone is welcome to attend
¢ TM Club 1600 meets Thursday, 8:30pm @ Super
Clubs Breezes.

International Association of Administrative Profes-
sionals, Bahamas Chapter meets the third ‘Thurs-
day of every month @ SuperClubs Breezes, Cable
Beach, 6pm.

The recently established National tnsurance Board

‘Retiree Association (NIBRA). meets every fourth

Thursday in the month, in the National Insurance
Board's (NIB) training room, Wulf Road office com-
plex, at 6pm. All retirees are welcome,

The Rotary Club of West Nassau holds its weekly
meeting, every Thursday at Choices Restaurant on
the campus of the College of the Bahamas. Fellow-
ship starts at 12:30pm, with the meeting held from
1pm to 2pm.

FRIDAY

@ HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Friday 6pm to 7pm & S.s0pmr to
9:30pm. Sacred Heart Church: Friday opm to 7pm.
New Providence Community Centre: Friday 7pm
to 8pm.

@ CIVIC CLUBS
TM Club 9477 meets Friday, 7pm © Bahamas Bap-
tist Community College Rm A19, fean St

Nassau Bahamas Koinonia meets every second Pri-
day of each month, 7:30pm at the Fmmaus Centre at
St Augustine’s Monastery. For more info call
325.1947 after 4pm.

AMISTAD is a club which promotes the Spanish
language and culture in the community. Residents ol
the Bahamas who speak Spanish or are learning







Ballrc










PHyotos WELCOME

Spanish are invited to attend meetings on the third
Friday of the month during the academic year at
7pm in room 13 of COB's Tourism Training Centre.

@ CONCERTS

The Nassau Music Society will be holding its first
concert series for 2007 featuring Dmitri Berlinski, vio-
lin, and Elena Baksht, piano, on Friday, January 26
at Spm at St Paul’s Church Hall, Lyford Cay.



SATURDAY

@ HEALTH
Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Saturday mornings - 1Oam to 11am.

Bahamas Diabetic Association meets every third.
Saturday, 2:30pm (except August and December) @
the Nursing School, Grosvenor Close, Shirley Street.

Doctors Hospital - CPR and First Aid classes are
offered every third Saturday of the month from 9am-
1pm. Contact a Doctors Hospital Community Train-
ing Representative at 302.4732 for more information
and learn to save a life today.

CIVIC CLUBS -
JAR CYCLING: The Owners of JAR Cycling arc
pleased to offer a cycling clinic for juniors between 10°

and 17. The {ree clinic will be held every Saturday in

an effort to encourage kids to cycle. Parents inter-
ested in registering their children should contact
organisers at jareycling@gmail.com.

@ FAMILY REUNION

New - The Valley Family Reunion for former res-
idents and those reuniting with loved ones and friends ;

will be holding a

Dinner, Dance Celebration on Saturday, February.

3 - Cocktails at 8pm and dinner at 8:30pm - at the
British-Colonial Hilton Hotel in the Governor’s



Renew old acquaintances and meet friends from
school days. For more information telephone
328.5494, Tickets are available at McCartney’s Phar-
macy, Mount Royal Avenue. Part proceeds to ben-
efit children’s charities. \

lm CONCERTS :

The Nassau Music Society will be holding its first,
concert series for 2007 featuring Dmitri Berlinski, vio- ;
lin. and Elena Baksht, piano, on Saturday, January
27 at Spm at St Andrew’s Kirk, Shirley Street.

@ ATHLETICS

Star Trackers Track and Field Club will be

hosting the Baker Construction Bahamas, Ltd
Star Performers Track Classic on Saturday,

February 3 from 9am to 7pm at the Thomas A .

Robinson Track and Field Stadium, Queen
Elizabeth Sports Centre. The BAAA-sanc-
tioned event is for divisions U9-Open.

SUNDAY



f@ PARTIES, NIGHTCLUBS

& RESTAURANTS

lraveller's Rest Restaurant, West Bay Street, fea-
tures special entertainment - Gernie, Tabitha and the
Caribbean Express - very Sunday from 6:30pm to
9:30pm.

HEALTH

Alcoholics Anonymous wishes to inform the public
of its meeting times and places: The Nassau Group,
Rosetta Street: Sunday 6pm to 7pm / 8:30pm to
9:30pm:

m& SUNDAY

_ RELIGIOUS SERVICES

NEW - The Bahamas Metaphysical Society Inc - A
spiritual teaching society leading you to greater peace
of mind, health, prosperity and happiness - holds
Higher Consciousness Services every Sunday at
10am and weekly Meditation services every Wednes-
day at 7pm at Bowe’s Cove off Bernard Road. Inter-
ested persons are welcome to attend. For more infor-
mation contact by e-mail @ bahmetsol @hotmail.com
or call 393.0279.

Send all your civic and social events (attach pictures if
possible) to The Tribune via fax: 328.2398 or e-mail:
ybdeleveaux@tribunemedia.net - Out there in the sub-
ject line. ;



THE TRIBUNE

_ Ballroom. The evening will include cocktails, dinner.
“and dancing and a three course buffet dinner. A live
band will also be featured. Dress: Lounge Suit.


ose



THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007, PAGE 13.



BAHAMAS INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL MONTHLY FILM SERIES

Eleutheran Adventure

is a crowc-

@ By JASON DONALD



THE Bahamas Internation-
al Film Festival kicks off its
Monthly Film Series this
weekend with the outdoor
screening of The Eleutheran
Adventure at Rawson Square
on Saturday.

This documentary was the
winner of the Audience
Award at the recent 3rd
Bahamas International Film
Festival and — right from the
off — it’s not hard to see why.

The film follows director
Kareem Mortimer when
decides to get out of Nassau,
quit his job, take 150 dollars
and travel across Eleuthera.

Along with cameraman
Kevin Taylor, Mortimer trav-
els from Spanish Wells to the
Southernmost point of the
island and the two meet an
incredibly wide range of peo-
ple who give their insight into
life on the island.

The movie is perfectly
paced: Mortimer doesn’t over
indulge with anyone we’re
introduced to - we just spend
enough time to give us a
flavour of each settlement and
then we’re on the road again.
And it’s almost impossible not
get the travel bug.

19 Cuban
migrants land
on military
erounds

in Key West

@ KEY WEST, Fla.

NINETEEN Cuban illegal
migrants came ashore in the
backyard of the home of
Naval Air Station Key West’s
commander, officials said,
according to Associated Press.

The group of 12 men, five
women and two children was
discovered Wednesday morn-
ing by an off-duty Defense
Department officer who was
jogging on U.S. military prop-
erty at Truman Annex, Key

: West police said.

The officer knocked on
Capt. J.R. Brown’s front door,
alerting him to the situation
and asking to use his phone
to call authorities.

The group arrived in what
appeared to be a homemade
boat, police said.

Brown asked a Spanish-

_ Speaking neighbor to meet

with the Cubans, who
“appeared to be in very good

‘ condition,” he said.

The captain said he knew
the arrival of Cuban immi-
grants near his backyard was a
possibility when he took the

'. post within the past year. Key

West is only 90 miles from
Cuba, and thousands of
Cubans try to reach the U.S.
each year by boat.

The 19 were to be processed

_ by U.S. Customs and Border

Protection.

Under USS. policy, Cubans
found on shore are generally
allowed to stay, while those

found at sea are usually

returned.





The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.










But for a documentary like
this to really work, it is essen-
tial that a narrative exists in
some form — even if isn’t the
original route the filmmakers
had in mind.

The Eleutheran Adventure
effortlessly achieves this by

keeping us entertained with
the islanders that we meet
before tying up the movie with
a crowd pleasing finale
focussing on the director.

And, by,the end, you really
do get a sense that you’ve
shared in the journey.

LF ONEE



@ THE ELEUTHERAN
ADVENTURE
Saturday,

January 27 at 7.30pm
Rawson Square

QDb ako carry a large sel

oils, feddlios and aduh nopellies



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oe yey ice ld ree ey. ected
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poses ces alle Laer Wal (2-1-8







pleaser

@ VIEW FROM THE TOP: a scene from The Eleutheran

Adventure, directed by Kareem Mortimer.



Secretary/Receptionist

} Offshore Company is seeking a dynamic, mature,
| and motivated individual for administrative support.

° Fluent in both English and Spanish

° Must be well-groomed

° Must be computer literate and proficient
with Microsoft Office

° Preferably have at least 2 years experience
in related field

Send resume to: Human Resources

P.O.Box CB13323

Nassau, Bahamas

or Fax to: 323-4871

or mail to: jsoler@tgoltd.com



Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR THE LATE

HAZEL EVANGELINE
GIBSON-SAWYER, 89

of Stapledon Gardens and
formerly of Savannah Sound,
Eleuthera, will be held on
Saturday, 10:00 a.m. at
Wesley Methodist Church,
Malcolm Road East. Bishop
Rev. Dr. Raymond R. Neilly,
Rev. Dr. Kenneth A.
Huggins, Rev. Henley B.
Perry, Rev. Edward J. Sykes,
Rev. Stacia M. Williams-
Christmas and Rey. Dr.
Godfrey B. Huyler will
officiate. Interment will be
made in the Western
Cemetery, Nassau, Street.





She is survived by seven daughters, Dorothea Charlow, Vivenne
Huggins, Juanita Cecile Edgecombe, Cynthia Sturrup, Judith
Huyler, Carmen Elaine Sawyer and Andrea Gaynelle Wood;
twp sons, Garth and Clyde Warren Sawyer; three daughters-
in-law, Dorcas, Evelyn Daphne and Vernita Sawyer; five sons-
in-law, Rev. Dr. Kenneth Huggins, Burke Edgecombe, Alfred
Sturrup, Rev. Godfrey Huyler and Ralph Wood II; one adopted
sister, Rev. Enid Cooper of Savannah Sound, Eleuthera: two
sisters-in-law, Nera Sawyer and Louise Gibson; one brother-
in-law, Neville Bethel Sr.; grandchildren, Donna Bannister,
Claire Patton, Dawn, Vincent, Dale and Denis Charlow, Neil
Huggins, Douglas Sawyer, Jefferson Edgecombe, Caron Dean,
Carla Barr, Gavan, Mauricio and D'Marco Huyler Julian,
Darren, Giles, Gaylyn, Gabrielle and Daniel Sawyer, Sara and
Ralph Wood III, also Whitney Patton, Patrice Huggins, Cindy
Sawyer, Godfrey Dean, Desmond Barr Wendy, Yolanda and
Raquel Huyler, Ebony Johnson, Sandra St. Elvardo Rolle and
Desmond Bannister; Katarina, Larissa & Noelle Sawyer; great
grandchildren, Daynah and Vincent Donald Charlow II,
Dominique and Danielle Banniser, Taneilsha Huggins, Olivia,
Ch'nae, Douglas Jr. and Dante Sawyer, Maria Edgecombe,
Philecia Nairn, Donisha and Crystal Dean, Daniel and Darius
Barr, Katherine, Cien, Gabrielle and Brian Huyler; nieces,
Dazelle Bethel, Nurse Gina Rolle, Gayle Carey, Dr. Gill Gibson-
Marche, Patricia Bastian, Patricia Gibson, Rosalie Hall, Marjorie
Archer and Maria Neely; nephews, Bursel Gibson, D'Costa
and Neville Bethel Jr. and Lawrence Sawyer; survivors of
William, David, Timothy, Marion, Sarah Emma Gibson,
Malvina Clarke, Rhoda Bullard, Eunice Thompson and Ida
Crawford.

Other relatives and friends including Llonella and Emma
Cooper and families, Gloria Strachan, Jane Bethel, Peggy
Lockhart, Rev. and Mrs. Joseph Richardson of Chicago,
Gertrude Gibson, Olga Wilchombe, Leah Cunningham, Thelma
Thompson, Ella Whitfield, Tommy Gibson, Meagan Taylor,
Cheryl Charlow, Mr. and Mrs. Basil Lewis, Mr. and Mrs.
Granville O'Brien, Mrs. and Mrs. William Rolle, Mrs. Malvina
Wong and family, Mr. Percentie, Rosemarie, Kolamae Judy
Newman, Larona Peterkin (care giver); the communities of
Savannah Sound and Palmetto Point, Eleuthera including Marie
Johnson, Manette Clarke, Muriel Cooper, Angela Simmons,
Geraldine and Valerie Ingraham, Verna Cooper-Hutchinson,
The Gibson Family Reunion, The Gibson, Wood and Robinson
families' The Goffs of Belize and Hyacinth Byron of Nevis,
The Methodist Church MCCA families especially Providence
and Wesley and The Andros Circuit.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians,
#44 Nassau Street on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and
on Saturday at the church from 9:00 a.m. until service time.


THE TRIBUNE



i” “as Ue

30 days extension
for passport rule

FROM page one

“Initial discussions will start
on Monday. We will see how
we are going to phase it (the
new passport requirements) in.
This will be a period to edu-
cate the American people
more,” he said.

Mr Wilchcombe said that he
was also able to negotiate fora
further review of the travel ini-
tiative and its implementation
timeline.

That review, he said, will be
held in March in Washington,
DC.

“By that time I hope to have
assembled an entire Caribbean
team to come with me to

@ MINISTER of Tourism
_Obie Wilchcombe



Washington,” the minister
said. ;

Mr Wilchcombe said he will
work very hard until then to
convince the US government
that the Caribbean countries
and American travellers need
another year to sufficiently

prepare themselves for the

new passport rules.

The minister said he was
very pleased with this devel-
opment and with the response
by the US government.

He said that even if the trav-
el initiative results in only a

minor decrease in the number .

of US visitors to the Bahamas

and the region, it would nev-
ertheless have a negative
impact on the tourism indus-
try. ;

“Tf we are affected by one
per cent or two per cent or ten
per cent, it’s the same affect. I
was particularly concerned, not
only for us, but for the smaller
Caribbean countries,” he said,

Minister Wilchcombe said
that in the case of having the
implementation date of the
travel initiative moved it was
necessary “to get in the door”
in Washington, DC.

“We need to build relation-
ships that is what it comes
down to. It is difficult to get
into the office, but it is funda-
mental that we do.

“You can’t run a country, we
can’t just have a Bahamas sit-
ting out there and we're affect-
ed by decisions being made
every day, it’s important to
develop friendships and rela-
tionships,” the minister said.

Mr Wilchcombe said he was
able to have the Caribbean’s

concerns regarding the WHT]
heard in Washington, DC,
because he wrote directly to

_ the Secretary of the Depart-

ment of Homeland Security
and to Congressman Bennie
Thompson, chairman of the
House Committee on Home-
land Security

“It all came together. | am
pleased that the American
government and especially
Congressman Bennie Thomp-
son took the time to listen to
our concerns and supported
the position the Bahamas put
forth,” he said.
« Customs and Border Pro-
tection officers at US airports
were informed on Wednesday
not to turn away any American
visitors travelling to the
Caribbean without a passport

The Associated Press report
ed that the travellers instead
received a warning and a pass-
port application and had their
names entered into the Cus-
toms and Border Protection's
computer system.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007, PAGE 15

eRe bart aeynreent



i



Feel good
about eating.







a

makes it easy to have a



Court of Appeal president
expresses concern over
the death penalty

FROM page one

Her partially-clothed body, which reportedly also had burns on
‘it, was found in a quarry pit off Cowpen Road. fe Nhe

Tido was sentenced to:death in April, 2006, by Justice Anita
Allen, who ruled that the death penalty was appropriate.

It was the first time since the Privy Council had ruled against the
Bahamas’ mandatory death penalty, leaving sentencing to the dis-
cretion of the trial judge, that a Bahamian judge had excercised dis-
cretion to hand down the death sentence on a convicted murderer.

In March, 2006, the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council
(SCPC) decided to abolish the mandatory death sentence for those
convicted of murder in the Bahamas. :

The ruling was the result of an appeal brought by prisoners For-

rest Bowe Jr. and Tron Davis who had been on death row for six and’

eight years respectively following convictions for murder.
In October, 2006, Tido’s attorney Wayne Munroe, president of
the Bahamas Bar Association, made submissions to the Court of

Appeal that the procedure followed by the trial judge in deter-

mining the appropriate sentence was “flawed” and amounted to nul-
lity on the basis that it was cruel and unusual punishment.

- Yesterday, director of public prosecutions Bernard Turner made
submissions on behalf of the Crown before president of the
Bahamas Court of Appeal Justice Dame Joan Sawyer, Emmanuel
Osadebay and Lorris Ganpatsingh.

The arguments yesterday centered on section two of the Capital
Punishment and Procedure Act.

Dame Joan Sawyer said: “Mr Turner, I think I told youand Mr
Munroe this the last time, and Mr Munroe knows this about me,
because I have said it on more than one occasion. I am not a sup-
porter of capital punishment. However, I did swear an oath when
I took judicial office that I would do justice without fear or favour,
affection or illness, according to the laws and usages of the
Bahamas. ane

“Now the law in the Bahamas as sei out in the Capital Punish-
ment and Procedure Act says that where a person is convicted of
murder then the judge shall sentence him in this manner; you shall
suffer death in the manner provided by law.” :

She said the word “shall’ in the act’ is usually interpreted as
mandatory, and that it would suggest that the judge has no discre-
tion besides from a common law ground in these cases.

The president said the Privy Council ruling did not deal with sit-
uations that involved all of the other lesser homicides that carried
a maximum penalty of life imprisonment, like armed robbery with
a gun, and manslaughter. , :

“While I consciously and conscientiously agree that as far as
possible courts should make the punishment fit the crime, I ask
myself what is left where it is the cold blooded killing of another
human being - if you are making the punishment fit the crime - see-
ing that life imprisonment is applied to those others,” she stated.

The prosecution presented arguments to the court late into the
evening, but was not allowed to complete submissions due to time.

Maxo Tido’s appeal is expected before the court again in March.

"We don't like counting it so..
shop till ya drop!



Two more are charged in
connection with toddler's

death in speedboat incident
FROM page one

tested.

When the samples were tested by the British team, it was

reported that the driver’s blood contained 5.1 nanograms of car-
_ boxy-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), an active ingredient in mar-
" jjuana plants.

The Bahamian police claim that while this indicated the dri-
ver had been using cannabis, it did not mean that his ability to
drive or control the boat was impaired.

However, the new report warns that the samples may have
deteriorated since 2002 because of the way they were stored and
the readings may have been higher at the time they were taken

Earlier this week, James Alexander Bain, the driver of the
speed-boat, was atraigned in court and was charged with
manslaughter by neghgence.

‘[wenty-five-year-old Bain was granted $10,000 bail.

Yesterday two more:persons were arraigned in respect to the’

case. sc
Evengeless Williamson. 65. of East Wood Boulevard was
charged with manslaughter by negligence and perjury and (lu
ford Nottage. 52, of Eastwood Estates was charged with
manslaughter by negligcuice.
Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez granted Williamson bail on
$12,000 and Nottage was granted bail on $10,000.
The deceased toddler’s father Paul, 42, and mothei Anidica.
40, from Orpington, Kent have receatly hit out at the Bahamas
- government for failing to prosecute whoever might have been
responsible for their son’s death.







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According to a recent report from a British newspaper, the
Gallagher family want the driver tried for at least the manslaugh-

ter of their yourig son.

It was claimed the powerful speedboat was out of control at

the time.

“We are devastated. We want the investigation to be re-
opened and will not siop until there is justice.” exclaimed the

boy’s father

All of the accused are expected back in court at the end of the

month.

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BUSINESS&SPORTS [F

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FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007





ieseteeeeaeeneeameeeemeeenetenneeeeeeeneemeemeennnennennennemmmeennnnenmnemmeenemene em cnnnaammnumnencnannNNaND

THE MARKETS ECONOMY 7
STOCKS, MUTUAL FUNDS, 5-6B , : :
pow30 —12,502.56 -119.21 W l ) : t = h ] l e 2 QO O
S&P 500 1,423.90 -16.23 W XIS ing ome Sa e S p un e In )
NASDAQ 2,434.24 -32.04 W . .
: A ff Sales of previously owned analysts said, given a continuing huge _ the homes for big profits. However, other analysts cautioned

10-YR NOTE 4.88 +.07 homes in the U.S. declined in backlog of unsold homes that will David Lereah, chief economist for that the rebound will likely be

54.23 “1.14 Vv December for the first time in keep downward pressure on prices, the Realtors, said that 40 percent of extremely slow because it will take

CRUDE OIL

Stocks

A kM ea Bea HEE

oY oe

dive on
~ homes
drop

BY TIM PARADIS
Associated Press
- NEW YORK — Stocks suf-
fered their biggest pullback in
‘two months Thursday, with the
Dow Jones industrials logging a
triple-digit decline as a lacklus-
ter home sales report and a dis-
appointing bond auction halted
the market’s two-day rally. A
less-than-enthusiastic reception
- for the Treasury’s latest sale of
five-year notes sent bond prices
falling and yields rising sharply,
rattling stock investors already
worried about higher interest
rates,

Stocks fell further while the
yield on the 10-year Treasury
note rose to highs not seen
since the summer.

“We had a great run,” said

- Ryan Larson, senior equity
trader at Voyager Asset Man-
agement, a division of RBC Dain
Rauscher. “I think people are
kind of tired right now and

* Jooking-for-other avenues.”

The Dow fell 119.21, or 0.94
percent, to 12,502.56.

Broader stock indicators also
fell. The Standard & Poor’s 500

index fell 16.23, or 1.13 percent, .

to 1,423.90 and the Nasdaq com-
posite index was down 32.04, or
130 percent, at 2,434.24. The
pullback comes a day after the
Nasdaq rose well over 1 percent
and the Dow set record trading
and closing highs. The Dow’s

decline erased nearly all the .

previous two-day rally of about
145 points.

Bond prices fell in response
to the auction and the Realtors’
news, which also showed the
inventory of existing homes
available for sale fell 7.9 percent
to 3.51 million. The yield on the
benchmark 10-year note jumped

to 4.87 percent from 4.81 per-

cent late Wednesday. The dol-
jar was mixed against other
major currencies, while gold
prices fell.
David Thompson, invest-
- ment officer at Dwight Asset
Management, said the data hint-
ing at stability in the housing
market unnerved the bond mar-
ket because it could signal the
economy is holding up better
than expected and raise the
specter of higher interest rates.

\

He said some bond investors’

were surprised by the tepid
response to the note auction.

“I think the market is just

_coming to grips with the fact
that the economy is stronger
than folks thought two months
ago,” Thompson said.

Investors have wondered for
months whether the housing
sector and the broader econ-
omy could share a similar fate;
that is, if a pullback in the hous-
ing market would drag down
the rest of the economy.

Light, sweet crude fell $1.14
to $54.23 per barrel on the New
York Mercantile Exchange.
Investors halted recent sharp
drops after growing more confi-
dent OPEC production cuts
would occur.

Declining issues outnum-
bered advancers by more than 3
to 1 on the New York Stock
Exchange, where consolidated
volume came to 3.11 billion
shares compared with 2.86 bil-
lion traded Wednesday.

The Russell 2000 index of
smaller companies was down
9.84, or 1.24 percent, at 784.19.

Overseas, Japan’s Nikkei
stock average closed down 0.28
percent. Britain’s FTSE 100
closed down 0.72 percent, Ger-
many’s DAX index fell 0.43 per-
cent, and France’s CAC-40 was
down 0.51 percent.

three months, capping the
biggest annual drop since 1989.

BY MARTIN CRUTSINGER
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — After a five-
year boom, the nation’s housing mar-
ket cooled considerably in 2006 with
existing home sales falling by the
largest amount in 17 years.

While the worst may be over, the

‘rebound could be slow in coming,

particularly in former boom areas.
The National Association of Real-
tors reported Thursday that sales of
existing homes totaled 6.48 million
units for all of 2006, down 8.4 percent
from 2005 when 7.08 million existing
homes were sold, the fifth straight
year that sales hit an all-time high.
That boom drove prices up at dou-
ble-digit rates and caused a stampede
of investors into the market who pur-
chased none hoping to en sell

home sales in 2005, the peak of the
housing boom, represented pur-
chases by investors and people buy-
ing vacation homes.

“A lot of those people have now
left the market,” Lereah said, predict-
ing that sales have bottomed out and
should start a slow rebound in 2007.

“With fingers and toes crossed, it
appears that we have hit bottom in
the existing home market,” Lereah
said.

time for unsold inventories to be
worked down and for speculators to
unload homes they purchased hoping
for a quick profit.

“Last year was a tough year for
housing and 2007 will be difficult as
well,” said Mark Zandi, chief econo-
mist at Moody’s Economy.com.
“Sales are near a bottom, but prices
and new home construction will con-

*TURN TO ECONOMY, 4B



AGRICULTURE











| é

]

i In an effort to keep pace
| with the pressures of
globalization, U.S. Sugar is
building the third-largest
sugar mill in the world.

BY SUSAN SALISBURY
Palm Beach Post

Deep in Florida’s Big Sugar
land, a new mill is rising that
wants to be the biggest of them
all.

U.S. Sugar is pouring more
than $100 million into an
expansion and modernization
of its 1927 Clewiston Sugar Mill
that will turn it into the largest
in the nation and third-largest
in the world, the company says.

The mill is U.S. Sugar’s
answer to the globalization that
is washing over the sugar
industry, like most other indus-
| tries. To stay in business in the
| face of more sugar imports, the
i





RAISING CANE: U.S. Sugar is pouring more than $100 million into an expansion and
modernization of its 1927 sugar mill in Clewiston, Fla.

Sweet Success |



INTERNATIONAL IDEAS: ‘Arie Jansen, the mill expansion
project’s manager, notes that the project employs y
technologies developed all over the world.

company wants to compete
with low-cost producers such
as India, Brazil and Thailand,
the last two home to the
world’s largest sugar mills.

PHOTOS BY TAYLOR JONES/PALM BEACH POST



However, labor costs in those
countries are much lower and
environmental standards less

° TURN TO SUGAR, 4B



AIRLINES ;

British Airways

grounds flights

next week as
strike looms

lf British Airways is canceling all its flights
to and from London’s Heathrow airport and
several more from its Gatwick terminal for
two days next week because of a strike by
cabin crew.

BY JANE WARDELL
Associated Press *

LONDON — British Airways said Thursday
that a total of 1,300 flights to and from the London
airports will be grounded on Tuesday and
Wednesday during a 48-hour walkout by cabin
crew over pay and sick leave policy.

BA Chief Executive Willie Walsh said the
carrier still hoped to reach an agreement
with the Transport and General Workers union,

but the contingency plans were necessary after .

talks between the two broke down earlier Thurs-
day.

“If we postponed the cancellation of flights
until the eve of a strike, customers would have
virtually no time to make alternative arrange-
ments,” said Walsh, adding that more than 15,000
customers a day had contacted the airline since
news of the strike broke.

“We remain absolutely determined to search
for a negotiated settlement and our door remains
open to the T&G, day or night,” he added.

BA said that passengers affected by the strike
will be able to claim a full refund, rebook their
flight for a later date, or be rebooked by the air-
line onto another carrier.

Negotiations between the union, which repre-
sents about 11,000 of the airline’s 14,000 cabin
crew, on pay and sick leave policy fell apart with
each blaming the other for the failure to reach
agreement.

The union has proposed further walkouts for
Feb. 5-7 and Feb. 12-14 if the dispute is not
resolved.

“The company has failed to hear the voice of
common sense. This is a sad day for passengers
and cabin crew alike,” said Jack Dromey, deputy
secretary-general of the union.

British Airways said it would fly some empty
planes out of Heathrow on Monday and Tuesday
to pick up passengers in other destinations, but
warned of further cancellations on either side of
the official strike dates because crew and aircraft
will be out of position.

_ The airline has opened an extra call center,
staffed by 100 workers, to deal with customer
inquiries.

Analysts said the strike action could cost the
airline between $20 million to $29.6 million a day.
British Airways shares fell 1.3 percent to $10.44 on

SOFTWARE

& Delays in the launch of Vista
hurt Microsoft’s profits, but
second-quarter earnings fell less
than analysts predicted after the
world’s largest software maker
sold more Xbox video games and
database programs.

BY BRIAN BERGSTEIN
Associated Press

The long-delayed launch of the
Windows Vista operating system cut
into fiscal second-quarter profits at
Microsoft, which reported a 28 per-
cent drop in earnings Thursday
despite revenue growth that
exceeded forecasts.

In the last three months of the
year, earnings fell to $2.63 billion, or
26 cents per share, from $3.65 billion,
or 34 cents per share, during the same
period last year.

Analysts. polled by Thomson
Financial expected the Redmond,
Wash.-based software maker to post
a profit of 23 cents per share.

Revenue rose to $12.5 billion, a 6



percent gain from $11.8 billion in the
year-ago quarter. Analysts were
expecting just shy of $12.1 billion in
sales.

“Overall, it was a strong quarter,”
said Robert Breza, an analyst at RBC
Capital Markets.

Microsoft shares fell 64 cents, 2.1
percent, to close Thursday at $30.45
on the Nasdaq Stock Market, ending
an uneven day in which the stock also
hit a 52-week high of $31.48. In
extended trading after the earnings
release, the stock initially shot up 3
percent but later was trading at
$30.50.

Although Windows Vista and
Office 2007, the latest editions of
Microsoft’s flagship products, do not
hit the consumer market until Tues-
day, they have been available for
businesses since Nov. 30, two-thirds
of the way through the company’s
second quarter.

Even so, Microsoft’s “client” divi-
sion, responsible for Windows,
posted a 25 percent drop in sales to

$2.59 billion. And the business divi-
sion, which includes Office, saw a 5
percent drop to $3.5] billion.

The falls were expected because
Microsoft had warned it would be
heavily deferring Windows and
Office revenue from the second quar-
ter to the current period. That was
done to account for coupons that
recent computer buyers got to let
them upgrade their existing software
to Vista and Office.

The deferrals trimmed $1.64 bil-
lion from Microsoft’s second-quarter
revenue, and $1.13 billion, or 11 cents
per share, from profits. If not for the
deferrals, Microsoft said revenue
would have leaped 20 percent in the
quarter.

“That’s impressive growth for any
company, let alone one of our size,”
Chief Financial Officer Chris Liddell
said in a conference call.

Previously, Microsoft had said the
deferred revenue would be around

° TURN TO MICROSOFT, 4B



the London Stock Exchange.

Delays with Vista cut into Microsoft’s profits

TED S. WARREN/AP
PROFIT DROPS: As a Vista banner
is displayed on its campus,
Microsoft said Thursday its fiscal
second-quarter profit fell 28
percent.


4B | FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007 _

GUN MAKER

Smith

BY ADAM GORLICK
Associated Press

SPRINGFIELD, Mass. —
Smith & Wesson may be best
recognized as the brand of
choice for Dirty Harry, the
movie cop who warned punks
his .44 Magnum was “the most
powerful handgun in the
world.”

But that was in 1971, and
much has changed in the past
36 years.

Police officers want lighter-
weight pistols than the bulky
steel revolver “Dirty” Harry
Callahan barely concealed
under a sport coat. Soldiers
need foolproof weapons that
won’t get jammed by the des-
ert sands.

There are guns now more
powerful than the .44, and
Smith & Wesson has realized
it can’t get by on its name
alone.

That’s why Mike Golden,
Smith & Wesson’s CEO for the
past two years, has targeted

AGRICULTURE

new technologies and sales to
the military and police depart-
ments to ensure the compa-
ny’s future.

A past corporate boss at
Black & Decker, Kohler and
The Stanley Works, Golden .
knew more about power tools
and toilets than the .40-caliber
pistols he jokes about hardly
being able to hit a target with.

“When I joined the com-
pany, I had never shot a fire-
arm before in my life,” the 52-
year-old said. “I tell people the
board wasn’t
marksman.”

EARNINGS WERE FLAT

When he took over the 155-
year-old Springfield-based
company, its earnings were
flat. The country was at war,
and the military’s handgun
contracts were all going to
Italian-based Beretta. Hand-
gun sales to police depart-
ments — a market that Smith
& Wesson once had 98 per-





TAYLOR JONES/PALM BEACH POST

HIGH TECH: The new Clewiston, Fla., sugar mill automates
many processes with high-tech computers, making the
mill more efficient and reducing the need for labor.

U.S. Sugar gives

* SUGAR

stringent.

So U.S. Sugar is on a mis-
sion to become the nation’s
most cost-efficient sugar pro-
ducer, with the help of the
new mill.

“This will make us the low-
est-cost producer in Florida
and the U.S.,” spokeswoman
Judy Sanchez said.

Florida grows close to
400,000 acres of sugar cane,
the bulk of it in Palm Beach
. County. However, a recent
study by Oxford, England-
based LMC International
found Florida was the 18th-
lowest-cost producer of sugar
when compared with 107 cane
and sugar beet-producing
countries, Sanchez says.

So U.S. Sugar embarked on
project Breakthrough.

The company brought
experts — many of them
mechanical and chemical
engineers who have worked
in the sugar industry in more
than 30 countries — to its
headquarters in Clewiston,
Fla.

In early 2004, it assembled
a team of 20 people it called
the Technology Forum. They
spent two weeks mapping out
the process of building a new
plant and determining which
technology to use.

“The technology is from
Brazil, South Africa, Louisi-
ana, Finland and France,” said
Arno Jansen, 45, the project
manager, who is originally
from South Africa, during a
tour of the mill and refinery
on 200-plus acres. “A lot of

INTERNET

the guys here are from South

Africa, Europe, the U.K.”
The three-year project is

two-thirds done. The third

phase — completing the
refurbished sugar-boiling
house — is scheduled for
October.

The mill will grind 38,000
to 40,000 tons of cane a day.

The expansion is being
done around the existing mill,

. which is still operating during
the project.

Among the ways the mill
will save money: more auto-
mation and fewer jobs.

The company’s Bryant
mill, in operation since 1963 at
Canal Point outside Pahokee,
Fla., will close when it wraps
up its final season this year.
All the company’s milling
operations will be consoli-
dated at the Clewiston mill.

As in numerous other
industries facing globaliza-
tion, employees will take a hit.
The milling workforce will be
cut 60 percent from 570
employees at the two mills to
226, says Neil Smith, U.S. Sug-
ar’s vice president for sugar
manufacturing and a chemical
engineer.

“Because of sugar alloca-
tions, you can’t sell more
sugar,” Smith says. “We had
two factories. We decided
combining the two would be
the most cost efficient.”

Automation is evident at
the mill’s control room, which
five employees run with 20-
plus computers and several
overhead video screens
enabling them to monitor and
control the operation.

Debate stirs about

BY BRIAN BERGSTEIN
Associated Press

BOSTON — When a blog-
ger revealed this week that
Microsoft wanted to pay him
to fix purported inaccuracies
in technical articles on Wiki-
pedia, the software company
endured online slams and a
rebuke from the Web encyclo-
pedia’s founder.

The imbroglio raises a big-
ger question: Why is it so bad
to pay someone to write some-
thing on Wikipedia? After all,
most contributors to the “free

edit” probably have some per-
sonal motivation to dive into a
subject.

That’s what ran through
Gregory Kohs’ mind last year
when he launched My WikiBiz,
a service that offered to write
Wikipedia entries for busi-
nesses for $49 to $99. A mar-
ket researcher in West Ches-
ter, Pa., Kohs believed that the
corporate world was under-
represented in the sprawling
Web encyclopedia.

“It is strange that a minor
Pokémon character will get a

,200-word article, but a For-







CHARLES KRUPA/AP

looking to finda yew taRGETS: Smith & Wesson CEO Mike Golden has

targeted technologies and markets beyond some of its
well-known products, like the 1911 pistol, above, that
helped produce a 46 percent jump in 2Q profit this year.

cent control over — were
mostly going to Glock, an Aus-
trian company.

“The company had been
under-managed and under-
marketed for the last 10 to 15
years, at least,” Golden said.
“Our research shows that it

SOFTWARE

Vista delays cut

* MICROSOFT

$1.5 billion. Analysts inter-
preted the higher result as a
sign that more consumers
snapped up new PCs than
expected, meaning the
upgrade coupons helped stim-
ulate demand.

Previous evidence of PC
demand had been unclear.
Two leading analyst firms,
Gartner and IDC, reported
last week that PC sales rose 7
percent to 8 percent world-
wide in the end-of-year quar-
ter but declined in the United
States.

“The deferred revenue
number for Vista is pretty
good. It gives us some sense
of the early level of interest in
Vista,” said Sid Parakh, an

analyst at McAdams Wright.

Ragen. ;

A huge reason for Micro-
soft’s overall revenue gain
was the performance of the
entertainment and devices
division, which includes the
Xbox 360 video game console
and Gears of War, Decem-
ber’s top-selling game,
according to market research-
ers at NPD Group.

The entertainment division
saw revenue hit $2.96 billion,
a 76 percent jump. The unit
lost $289 million, however,
roughly even with last year.

Also in that division is.
Microsoft’s new Zune music |

ECONOMY

doesn’t matter whether you're
male or female, old or young,
Democrat or Republican, like
guns or don’t like guns, the
perception of the brand is
extremely positive. That’s
what intrigued me, that this
brand that everybody knows

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__MiamiHerald.c

and everybody loves wasn’t
being utilized.”

Golden hired a Washing-
ton, D.C. lobbying firm to go
after government contracts. In

. the past two years, the com-

pany has made four deals
worth a total of $20 million to
make the 9 mm pistols the
Army is giving to security
forces in Afghanistan.

STRONG GROWTH

Smith & Wesson’s earnings
have seen double-digit growth
since Golden took over. The
company’s work force stands
at about 900 non-union

employees, 200 of which were

hired in the past two years.

The company reported
$98.4 million in sales for its
second quarter that ended in
October, an increase of 46 per-
cent from the same period in
the year before. Its net sale
expectations for the 2008 fis-
cal year are about $320 mil-
lion.

Peer estare sr ieit)
Documents
| Pictures

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Hmitrecinia guises
Computer

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Wiatettetucers et

Help and Support





MICROSOFT VIA AP

SLOW START: Microsoft’s delays in launching its new Vista
operating system - the’start menu from Vista is seen
above - helped cause a 28 percent drop in earnings.

player, which hit the market
in mid-November to soft
reviews. Liddell said the com-
pany remains confident it can
sell 1 million Zunes by the end

of June.

Microsoft’s server division,
which sells software for cor-
porate data centers, was the
other standout performer. Its

‘Financial. /
For the full fiscal year,



& Wesson takes aim at new markets

About 75 percent of the
company’s sales are in the
sporting goods market, which
has remained steady despite
gun control efforts.

But government sales are
still a major aim for Golden.

This year, the military
handgun contract that Beretta
has had a lock on for nearly 20
years is expected to come up
for bid.

Analysts say that deal could
fetch about $310 million, and
predict that Smith & Wesson’s
chances to land it are good,
but far from guaranteed.

“The government is going
to buy the guns that fit their
needs and not just a brand
name,” said Eric Wold, manag-
ing director at San Francisco-
based Merriman Curhan Ford.

Golden realizes that, and

has quickly fused the compa-
ny’s popularity with a need to
advance its technology by try-
ing to reclaim ground that
Smith & Wesson lost to Glock.

Microsoft profits

revenue leaped 17 percent to
$2.85 billion, while its profits
rose 35 percent.

“Tt’s a continuation of a
very good trend in our busi-
ness,” Liddell said in an inter-
view.

Microsoft also updated its
outlook — Liddell predicted
“an excellent year overall” —
but appeared to give analysts
little reason to alter their
expectations.

In the current quarter,
Microsoft predicts earnings of
45 cents to 46 cents per share
on $13.7 billion to $14 billion
in revenue, helped by the
deferrals from the second
quarter. Analysts ‘already
were expecting 46 cents per
share and $14 billion in reve-

.*

Bee ase

nue, according to Thomson , .._

which ends June 30, Microsoft
foresees earnings of $1.45 to
$1.47 per share, with revenue
of $50.2 billion to $50.7 billion.

. That was slightly ahead of the

estimates already held on
Wall Street: $1.45 per share
and revenue of $50.5 billion.
For the first half of its fiscal
year, Microsoft earned $6.10
billion, 61 cents per share, on
revenue of $23.4 billion. In the
comparable period a year ear-
lier, Microsoft’s profit was
$6.79 billion, 63 cents per
share, with revenue of $21.6

' billion.

Existing home sales drop sharply

* ECONOMY

tinue to fall throughout most
of this year. I don’t expect the
market to show broad
improvement until 2008.”

Even with the sales decline
in 2006, the median price of a
new home managed to rise
slightly last year to $222,000,
compared to a median, or
midpoint price, of $219,600 in
2005.

However, the 1.1 percent
price increase last year was
far below the 12.4 percent
price surge in 2005.

Analysts said prices are
likely to continue falling in
such formerly red-hot mar-
kets as California, Florida,
Arizona, Nevada and the
Northeast corridor.

“There was an unprece-
dented boom in housing that

privately

tune 500 company will get...
maybe 100 words,” he said.
Kohs, 38, said he was com-
mitted to having MyWikiBiz
create only legitimate Wikipe-
dia entries — neutral, foot-
noted and just on organiza-
tions with a sizable presence.
Kohs researched Wikipedia
. to see whether his idea vio-
lated the site’s communal
spirit. He found Wikipedia’s
Reward Board, an internal
forum for people who would
like to see certain topics intro-
duced or improved so they
have a chance of achieving the

created a lot of imbalances
that have to be righted before
the market revives,” Zandi
said. “We have gone from
boom to bust and the bottom

’ is here to stay at least until

this time next year.”

For December, sales of
existing homes fell by 0.8 per-
cent to a seasonally adjusted
annual rate of 6.22 million
units. ,

Analysts had been hoping
for a small increase after sales
gains in October and Novem-
ber, the first back-to-back
increases since the spring of
2005. He

The median sales price in
December was unchanged at
$222,000, the same as Decem-
ber a year ago, which repre-
sented an improvement after
four straight months in which
the median sales price had

fallen compared to the same
month a year ago, the longest
stretch of such declines on
record.

The slowdown in housing
has been a major factor drag-
ging down overall economic
growth, trimming more than a
percentage point from growth
in the July-September quarter,
when the economy expanded
at a lackluster 2 percent
growth rate.

Still, economists are grow-
ing more confident that the
housing bust will not be
severe enough to push the
economy into an outright
recession, as job growth out-
side of housing-related indus-
tries has remained strong,
helping to bolster consumer
spending.

By section of the country,
sales in December were down

the most in the West, a drop
of 9.1 percent, and the North-
east, where sales fell by 2.8
percent.

Sales rose by 4.3 percent in
the Midwest and 0.8 percent
in the South.

For the entire year, sales
were down in all regions of
the country, dropping 19.6
percent in the West, 7.2 per-
cent in the Northeast, 6.6 per-
cent in the Midwest and 5.1
percent in the South.

In other economic news,
the Labor Department
reported that the number of
newly laid off workers filing
claims for unemployment
benefits rose to 325,000 last
week, an increase of 36,000,
which was the biggest one-
week jump since the hurri-
cane-related layoffs in the fall
of 2005.

paid writers on Wikipedia

status of “featured article.”
Here’s what got Kohs’
attention: Offers for barter or
even cash are common on the
forum, and the person making
the offer can remain anony-
mous. Indeed, on Wednesday,
someone was ponying up $55
for whoever could get an arti-
cle about Lithuania to reach
featured status.
So Kohs and his sister
decided to launch My WikiBiz.
But a few days after they put
out a press release in August,
MyWikiBiz’s account on Wiki-
pedia was blocked. Wikipedia

founder Jimmy Wales called
Kohs to tell him MyWikiBiz
was “antithetical” to Wikipe-
dia’s mission, as Kohs recalls

the conversation.

After several disagree-
ments, Kohs was permanently
shut out of Wikipedia.

LATE TRADING



4p.m. 6:35 p.m. Late 4 6:35 p.m. Late

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encyclopedia that anyone can 1

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“THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007, PAGE 5B



i el a
Tax incentives sought for Jewish group visit

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter



THE Ministry of Tourism is to
request special tax incentived to
accommodate a group of Jewish lead-
ers who will be celebrating the
Passover on Grand Bahama this April.

The group, which is several hundred
strong, has committed to staying on
the island this year and next, with pos-
sible stays up to 2010.

James Malcolm, executive director of
group travel at the Ministry of
Tourism, said this group will require
special needs to make their stay enjoy-
able, including bringing kosher food
items into the Bahamas and at least
12 kosher chefs to cater to the large
crowd.

Given the level of commitment to
the Bahamas the group has indicated,
Mr Malcom said the Ministry was now
drafting a formal request to the

Departments of Immigration and Cus-
toms to see if special consideration can
be given for tax breaks for the items
that need to be brought in, and for the
temporary work permits the chefs will
need.

Mr Malcom said it would be benefi-
cial if there could be some kind of
umbrella policy for religious groups
who require special foods, materials
or religious paraphernalia.

Linville Johnson, who heads the
Ministry of Tourism’s religious tourism
market, added that given the impor-
tance of this market, it was vital they
be catered to.

“Group traveller’s word of mouth is
very important, and if they can tell oth-
ers how well they are treated in the
Bahamas, the spin off can be tremen-

. dous,” he said.

The two men have the task of
expanding the Bahamas’ share in the
$7.5 billion religious travel industry.

Currently, religious travel is one of the
top three group sellers for the Min-
istry.

According to Mr Johnson, more than
16,000 religious meetings are held in
the US annually, with delegates staying
on average four to five nights in a loca-
tion, representing over 12 million room
nights. Of that number, the market
outside the US accounts for just under
10 per cent - 8.5 per cent.

Vital

Mr Johnson said it was vital that the
Bahamas establish itself as a centre for
religious travel, whether it be for con-
ventions, retreats or leisure activities.

He noted that religious travel was
primarily group-oriented, and said they
are more community-oriented than
secular groups. Mr Johnson explained
this means that they are more likely
to spend their money away from tra-

ditional tourist centres, with more of
their dollars remaining in the Bahamas.

The Ministry has launched an exten-
sive religious tourism ad campaign,
catering to trade and industry media
outlets.

The ads focus around the tag lines
that say “no matter where you are you
can worship” and “On the 700 islands
of the Bahamas, God rested.”

There are vast possibilities for entre-
preneurs, such as religious entertain-
ment, tours and souvenirs, the men
said.

Also participating in this National
Tourism Week masterclass was Kevin
Wright, North America’s most recog-
nisied religious travel, tourism and hos-
pitality authority, who has written a
number of books on the subject and
is the president of the Religious Mar-

keting Consulting Group, a team of

independent professionals who assist
travel companies in working with the

religious tourism market.

He said this market was now looking
for a higher-end stay rather than the
sort of “poverty minded” visit that was
previously perceived. Mr Wright said
the market was consumer savvy, and
does not expect every aspect of their
vacation to be religious-based. Once
they are given service, they remain loy-
al to a destination.

Mr Wright pointed out that one in
seven churches travel, and these groups
are traditionally twice the size of the
business group.

Mr Malcolm said this group sizing
may be a hindrance to the Bahamas,
because presently there is nowhere to
host a large convention group. Once
Atlantis’s convention centre is com-
pleted, he said there will be accommo-
dations for more than 5000 people, but
one challenge will be that many reli-
gious groups would be hesitant or
unable to pay Atlantis’s room rates.



Bahamas destination wedding, honeymoon spot

FROM page 1B

Caribbean market leader, a 20-
year tourism veteran said yester-
day, something that would enable
this nation to generate higher
returns from its visitors.
Jacqueline Johnson, president
of her own company, Jacqueline
Johnson & Associates, and a rep-

'- resentative for Conde Nast Bridal.

Media, told a class at National
Tourism Week that. the
Caribbean had the greatest share
of the overseas honeymoon mar-
ket for US couples, standing at
33 per cent.

Jamaica had the greatest share
of the Caribbean market,. again
at 33 per cent, with the Bahamas
in joint second place in the
regional honeymoon stakes with
an 18 per cent share.

It shares this spot with the US
Virgin Islands and St Lucia, with

’. the Cayman Islands also enjoy-

ing 17 per cent market share. Mrs
Johnson pointed out that both St
Lucia and the Cayman Islands
had a much smaller room inven-
tory than the Bahamas, but
almost as large a market share.
She said: “I’m always surprised

~. “that the Bahamas and Jamaica |

are not neck and neck i in the run-
ning for déstination weddings.
But Jamaica does one thing the
Bahamas doesn’t, which is pro-
motion and marketing.”

Mrs Johnson added that

.' Jamaica was constantly “out

there” in the weddings and hon-
eymoon market, pushing “to
make it happen”, and if the
Bahamas “wants it, it will have
to step and get out there”.

She said the US honeymoon
market was worth $10.3 billion
annually, and generated some
18.4 million room nights. This was

a “growing business, a year-round
business that generates much rev-
enue for a destination to spend
on roads, schools and trickle
down to the local population”.

Mrs Johnson said the cruise
ship industry accounted for 17 per
cent of overseas US honeymoons,
and generated $991 million in rev-
enue for the cruise ship industry.

To maximise profits from their
passengers in their on-board retail
stores, Mrs Johnson said “the
night before” cruise ships called
on ports in the Bahamas and else-
where in the Caribbean, these
stores often held sales’ and sold
products for lower prices.

The message the cruise lines
gave for passengers, she added,
was “shop with me, because our
prices are better than what you
will get anywhere in Nassau, the
Turks & Caicos” and elsewhere, a
move that lowers per capita cruise
passenger spend and expectations
when they arrive in the Bahamas.

This cruise ship tactic is likely
to cause further controversy with
Bay Street merchants, tour oper-
ators and other Bahamian busi-
nesses dependent on the cruise
ship industry, as it reduces their
revenues, profits and ‘trickle
down’ impact on the economy.

, Previous controversy had sur-

‘rounded the cruise ships’ on-
' board marketing programmes,

which had been accused of direct-
ing passengers to shop at certain
stores that had paid for the adver-
tising.

Mrs Johnson said that of the
$991 million the cruise industry
earned: “God knows they des-
perately want to increase that.”
She added that privately, the
cruise industry seés itself as com-
peting directly with resorts and
land-based tourism, and wants
passengers to solely “use our
facilities, shops on board and

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that HENRI CHER AIME OF
LANCASTER ROAD, P.O. BOX N-7060, NASSAU, |
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26th day of -
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

entertainment on board”.

On Hawaii, cruise passengers
who wanted to get married on
shore at facilities such as hotels
and gardens, but then get back
on the ship, had seen the cost for
doing so tripled, Mrs Johnson
said.

She added that destination
weddings were “the fastest grow-

ing segment” of the tourism mar- —

ket, having increased by 400 per
cent.

US couples and their guests
tended to stay longer, be more
affluent and spend more, accord-
ing to a Travel Industry Associa-
tion (TIA) survey, and Mrs John-
son said regions such as Europe
were “aggressively going after the
weddings and honeymoons mar-
ket because they realise the
return on their investment is
greater than going after the
leisure market”.

The total value of destination
weddings outside the US, accord-
ing to TIA, she said, was $1.5 bil-
lion, with some $3.8 billion spent
on room nights. This gave the US
destination wedding market a
total value of $5.3 billion, with
the Caribbean getting a 40 per
cent share of that.

Some 7.8 million guests visit-
ed US overseas destination wed-

dings.

ye
ye

SY2Z & CO] Bank & Trust

Private Banking
OYSTER Funds

f Alternative Investments

www.syzbank.com

SPORTS TOURISM

from 1B



and invite five teams from gut-
side the countr,y and they
brought in 30 athletes, five coach-
es and medical staff, and about
50. relatives and friends, that
would be more than 5,000 visi-
tors.

“We can see the amount and
magnitude of the amount of
tourists which can actually come
in to these events.”

He added that this can also be
duplicated on Grand Bahama and
the other islands just in athletics.

Mr Albury said islands with-
out tracks or facilities need not
be left behind, as there was no
reason why they could not devel-
op signature annual events.

“Why can’t we do road races?
We can have a road race on San
Salvador. We have flights com-
ing in direct from Europe,. Why
can’t we have a road race? We
can have road races on Long
Island, Exuma or all over,” Mr
Albury said.

He added that similar things
could be done with baseball and
softball.

“If we have eight tournaments ~

in baseball, with 10 teams of 15
players, and each team brings in
three coaches and 50 relatives,
we see that is 680 visitors. Eight
tournaments, and that is 5,440 vis-

itors, and that is just in baseball;

just in Nassau,” Mr Albury said.

He added that basketball was
the biggest participation sport,
and said there was no reason why

it could not attract at least 30,000

visitors.

Factoring all the other sports,
such as cricket darts and tennis
into the equation, Mr Albury said
extra visitor numbers could easi-
ly reach 100,000. He said college
groups, minor leagues, church
groups and schools could all be
targeted, as could clinics, retreat,
meetings and workshops. Exhi-
bition games could also be played
in the Bahamas.

Mr Albury said: “Take the
100,000 sports tourists and trans-
late it into dollars and cents, to
room nights. We need a clear
understanding of our role and
what we are talking about, and
we need commitment.”

He said sporting bodies in the
Bahamas needed to take advan-
tage of the potential, and think
outside the box to invite teams
from outside the country.

Works By

ANTONIOUS ROBERTS

Max TAYLOR

Post Houst NERS &

Innovative Private Banking Group is presently looking for a:



“It won’t just happen; we have
to plan,” Mr Albury said. “We
need to develop linkages when
we go to events aboard.”

He added that annual events
are sustainable because you
would not have to market them
continuously.

Mr Albury said partnerships
can also be forged with Bahamian
hotels and Bahamasair to bring
persons in during slow periods of
the tourism year.

Greg Rolle, of the Ministry of
Tourism, said the Ministry sees
the economic impact of sports
tourism, and that while they may
not have a specific budget for
sports tourism, they would work
hard to accommodate sporting
federations who wished to host
profitable events.

' The event was a part of Nation-
al Tourism Week.

Full-time Housekeeper Wanted
Live-in or
Live-out Position

Must be able to -
Drive and Cook

Spanish speaking would be desirable

Leave message at
327-1519



Com plhlance Officer

The successful applicant must:

m Have several years of experience as compliance officer in private banking.

m Have knowledge of Bahamian and international compliance requirements.

m Be computer literate with communication skills.

We require knowledge and experience with:

m Planning, organizing the compliance function for a bank.

m Developing and maintaining adequate policies and procedures.

m Reviewing and managing the documentation of client files.

m Liaising with regulators and compliance officer of the Group.

Motivated team player with pleasant personality.
Must be able to work independently with minimal supervision.
Ability to conduct the monitoring of clients credit risk and/or law degree is an asset.

We offer:

m A salary which is commensurate with the job, a pension plan and medical insurance.

Absolutely no telephone calls will be accepted.

Please send your resume and two (2) letters of reference to:

SYZ & CO Bank & Trust LTD. ms Human Resources Manager

Bayside Executive. Park m RO. Box N —-1089 m Nassau, Bahamas

SS
. Cea atic

: eo

Ca ni

Mark your calendar

Our Application Deadline

is February 2, 2007

Remember to include the following with your application
$40.00 non-refundable processing fee
Copy of passport pages showing your name, date of
birth and expiration date of passport
Official high school transcript

¢ Test scores and copy of BUC and BGCSE results to date

Don’t let the deadline pass you by!

We look forward to welcoming you to The College,

soon to be the University of The Bahamas.




Legal Notice

NOTICE

LERIDA S.A.

(in Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 24th day of January 2007. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

FROM page 1B

breached their fiduciary duties
to plan members as a result of
the investments in the Bahamas
and the Caribbean.

The lawsuit, filed in the
Ontario courts on December
29, 2006, alleges that the $1.4
billion-asset plan breached
Canadian regulations by hav-
ing more than 10 per cent of the
book value of its assets invested
in one person, two or more affil-
iated persons, and two or more
affiliated corporations.

It alleged that at December
31, 2003, CCWIPP’s investment
committee “had approved loans
totalling $166.989 million” to
companies known as Propcos,
which in turn lent the funds to

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
ig-y-Ce MRI 7¢ [p14

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

CONTEN-MONT SPRINGS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 24th day of January 2007. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.




ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

on Mondays



CHEVENING

BRITISH CHEVENING SCHOLARSHIPS FOR 2007-2008

Applications are now being accepted for the 2007-2008 Chevening Scholarships,
available to Bahamian applicants wishing to pursue post-graduated studies in the
UK in the following subjects:

Media/journalism studies
Public Administration
Sustainable development
Management

Justice & Human rights
International relations/diplomacy
Law

Environmental Studies

Further information and application forms can be found on the British Council
(Jamaica) website at: www.britishcouncil.org/jamaica

Closing date 5th February 2007

IMPORTANT
NOTICE

SERVICE INTERRUPTION

From 12 a.m. to 7 a.m. on
Sunday 28th January 2007.

Our Electronic Banking System will be temporarily unavailable
during the times listed above while we conduct routine
maintenance in order to improve our service to you.

During this period, the following services will be unavailable:
e Point-Of-Sale (POS) transactions
e VISA transactions via ABM

ABM machines will be available from 7 a.m.
for cash withdrawals. Internet and Telephone banking
will be available from 10 a.m.

Please plan your weekend finances to cater for this necessary
maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

www. firstcaribbeanbank.com

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.





PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007

Lae ee ae ee
Bahamas investments

prompt class lawsuit

RHK Capital, the company
owned by Canadian Ron Kelly.

“RHK in turn purchased
hotels and land in Jamaica and
the Bahamas,” the lawsuit
added, referring to the British
Colonial Hilton, which Mr Kel-
ly redeveloped, and the South
Ocean property that he bought
later.

The lawsuit alleged that while

CCWIPP’s total assets at book
value stood at $.065 billion at
December 31, 2003, the funds
loaned to the Bahamas and
Jamaican resort projects of Mr
Kelly totalled 15.68 per cent of
book value assets, a breach of
Canadian law that “dates from
at least 1998 and perhaps earli-
er”:
The class action suit alleged
that CCWIPP’s investment
committee and _ trustees
“approved further funding” for
the Bahamas hotels in 2004, and
that they failed to follow invest-
ment guidelines and procedures,
and did not perform adequate
due diligence before making the
loans.

“For the real estate invest-
ments in general, and the
Caribbean developments in par- .
ticular, the trustees failed to reg-
ularly obtain reliable up-to-date
appraisals, audited financial
statements for each corporation
involved, failed to follow up in
obtaining such statements,
failed to be aware of the impli-
cations for the plan in the fail-
ure to obtain such statements,
failed to establish an exit strat-
egy for such investment, failed

to evaluate each such invest-
ment where there had been a
financial failure,” the lawsuit
alleged. :

It claimed that CCWIPP
failed to perform proper due
diligence by obtaining full audit-
ed financial statements on
RHK, the Bahamian holding
company that funnelled the
plan’s money into the British
Colonial Hilton and South
Ocean, and “each of the sub-
sidiary companies”.

The lawsuit will not impact
the proposed $1 billion rede-
velopment of South Ocean,
though, which involves
CCWIPP selling a majority
stake to outside partners, nor
operations at the Hilton.

‘The class action lawsuit’s alle-

' gations are likely to be based

on the findings of a report into
CCWIPP by the Financial Ser-
vices Commission of Ontario in
March 2005.

The regulator demanded that
the fund's Board of Trustees
conduct “a complete indepen-
dent due diligence review" of
their investments in the British
Colonial Hilton and South
Ocean resorts to determine,
among other issues, whether all
funds advanced to the resorts
since December 2000 are
"recoverable".

The Commission's report
detailed that over an 18-month
period between June 14, 2001,
and December 22, 2003,
CCWIPP advanced a total of
almost $20 million to the British
Colonial Hilton and South

Legal Notice

NOTICE

RAPPID EXPRESS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that. the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 24th day of January 2007. The Liquidator is
Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau, Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)






















IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law Side

BETWEEN



TO: Roselande Poiter
Nassau, The Bahamas

Court of the

TAKE NOTICE

Dated this 24th day of January A.D., 2007

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

JAMES LEROY POITIER
AND

ROSELANDE POITIER

TAKE NOTICE that an application has been made in The Supreme
Commonwealth of The
Family Division Action No. 168 of 2001 by James Leroy Poitier, the Plaintiff
that leave of the Court has been granted on the 16th
day of June A.D., 2006, to advertise the said Defendant with a twenty-eight
(28) days period from the date of the publication of this
enter an appearance at the Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher
Building, East Street, Nassau, The Bahamas. Should you not do so, the
Court may make such Order as it deems fit without further reference to you.

HANNA & CO.
CHAMBERS
3rd Floor, Columbus House
East & Shirley Streets
Nassau, The Bahamas
Attorneys for the'Plaintiff



No. 168

Plantiff

Defendant

Bahamas in Common Law Side

avertisement

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT
Common Law Side

BETWEEN

KENNETH KNOWLES

Plantiff

AND

ALFRED JOHNSON —
Defendant

TO: Alfred Johnson
Nassau, The Bahamas

JAKE NOTICE that an application has been made in The Supreme

Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas in Common Law Side

Action No. 259 of 2003 by Kenneth Knowles, the Plaintiff
that leave of the Court has been granted on the

NOTICE

TAKE
23rd day of

June A.D., 2006, to advertise the said Defendant with a twenty-eight

(28) days period from the date of the publication of this

advertisement

enter an appearance at the Registry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher
Building, East Street, Nassau, The Bahamas. Should you not do so, the
Court may make such Order as it deems fit without further reference to you.

Dated this 24th day. of January A.D., 2007

HANNA & CO.
CHAMBERS
3rd Floor, Columbus House
East & Shirley Streets
Nassau, The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Plaintiff



THE TRIBUNE



Ocean resorts.

Over that period some
$11.638 million was sent to
South Ocean's holding compa-
ny, the South Ocean Develop-
ment Corporation, through
Propco 34, the investment vehi-
cle which acts as the 'in' com-
pany for CCWIPP to funnel
funds to that property.

Similarly, some $8.304 mil-
lion was channelled to the
British Colonial Hilton through
Propco 39, which acts as the 'in'
company for that resort. Lend-
ing to the resorts has continued
through 2004, the report added.

There are few details in the 2

Commission's report as to what
all the CCWIPP advances were
used for, although some were

‘used for "working capital" at

South Ocean, and others to ser-
vice both interest and principal °
payments to Scotiabank.

The Commission's examina-
tion of CCWIPP blasted the
pension fund for poor record
keeping and the absence of
financial statements in relation
to companies through which
investments in the British Colo-
nial Hilton and South Ocean
were made.

The regulator was especially
concerned at the absence of
financial statements for two.
companies, PRK Holdings, a
Bahamian entity, and RHK
Capital, firms through which the
Propco entities send money to -
the Bahamian resorts. This, it
added, made the pension fund
non-compliant with Canadian
regulations.

Port
Authority —
faces
winding- ~
up petition
FROM page 1B

it clear that under no circum-'
stances will the Government.

. contemplate Mr Babak’s return’

to the GBPA and Port Group’
Ltd as chairman.

The Tribune previously
revealed that the Government
is keen on a dilution of the Hay-
ward and St George stakes in
the two companies, something,
the latter side has expressed’
interest in. Sir Jack’s position;
on this is unknown, although he. °
is thought to be reluctant to do
this, and feels the Government
is imposing undue pressure on,
him.

The Government is eager to:
see a broadening of the GBPA
and Port Group Ltd ownership.
base, possibly via a public offer-
ing that would see equity par-'
ticipation in the companies and
their assets by the likes of
GBPA licencees and landhold-.
ers within the 230 square mile*
Freeport area. :

The St George family had
been reaching out to institu-
tional investors and high net’

worth Bahamians residing in. ' >>

Nassau to see if they were inter--
ested in participating. .
Any public offering would,
result in a move away from “a. .
cult of personality" at the,
GBPA helm, ensuring the Gov-:
ernment was no longer behold-*
en to one shareholder - or
group of shareholders - for the
running of a quasi-governmen-
tal authority, and Freeport's
governance and development.

Obtaining the participation.
of outside investors would give -
Bahamians a stake in Freeport's*
future success, and allow the
management of Port Group
Ltd's various subsidiary com-
panies to get on with running
their respective operations.

A public offering would also
vest GBPA's and Port Group
Ltd's operations with enhanced’
transparency and accountabili-.
ty, but a public offering is some
way off.

The Government is under-

stood to be contemplating’. :.-
whether it should participate in)" ”

any public offering, a move that |
would not go down well with .
Freeport licencees, who would
prefer it was kept on the out-
side.
: THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007, PAGE 7B



BUSINESS



hina reports fastest growth in a decade |

@ By JOE McDONALD
AP Business Writer

BEIJING (AP) — China
reported Thursday that its siz-
zling economy grew at its
‘fastest rate in a decade last
year as the government strug-
gled to contain the strains of
an export-driven boom.

.The economy grew by 10.7
per cent, moving China closer
to overtaking Germany as the
world’s third-largest economy,

. according to figures issued by
the government. It was the
fastest growth since 1995, when
the economy expanded by 10.9
per cent.

Spending on real estate and
other assets soared despite

“- government efforts to cool an
investment boom that it wor-
ries could ignite inflation or a
debt crisis. Consumer spend-
ing grew more slowly, suggest-
ing Beijing still faces challenges
in its effort to reduce reliance
on exports and narrow its trade
gap by boosting domestic con-
sumption.

“Fast growth in itself is fine.

It’s more about the compos!-

a |



Leading Japanese Car Exporter

Visit our most comprehensive,

tion of growth,” said econo-
mist Mingchun Sun of Lehman
Brothers. “Investment needs
to slow even faster. Second,
there is an urgent need to
reduce the trade surplus.”

Analysts said they expect
Beijing to raise interest rates
again this year, following two
hikes last year.

The government — has
imposed investment curbs on
real estate, auto manufactur-
ing and other industries and
tried to restrain exports by
levying new taxes on steel and
other products.

Beijing has allowed the grad-
ual rise of its currency to quick-
en in recent weeks in a move
that could slow the growth of
the trade surplus by making
Chinese goods more expensive
abroad. The yuan has strength-
ened by 0.5 per cent against
the U.S. dollar since January |
after rising by about six pere
cent over the previous 18
months.

But the government says its
efforts only began to take
effect in late 2006.

“Outstanding problems still



| Internet Showroom for
| Japanese & European cars.
www Kan-de,co. jp



exist with the irrational rela-
tionship between investment
and consumption, the imbal-
ance of payments and excess
liquidity in the banking sys-
tem,” the commissioner of the
National Bureau of Statistics,
Xie Fuzhan, said at a news
conference.

In efforts to boost consumer
spending, he said, “we are still
not seeing significant results.”

China’s total economic out-
put last year was 20.9 trillion
yuan, the government said, or
$2.7 trillion at current
exchange rates. Germany’s
output was $3 trillion, but its
growth rate at 2.5 per cent was
far below China’s.

Chinese investment in real
estate grew by 21.8 per cent
while overall investment in
assets was up 24 per cent, Xie
said. Retail sales expanded by
13.7 per cent.

Consumer prices jumped by .

2.8 per cent in December over
the same month of 2005, com-
pared with 1.9 per cent in
November and an annual rate
of 1.5 per cent for the full year.

Economist Stephen Green

NOTICE

at Standard Chartered Bank
said he expected inflation to
stay at 2.5 to 3.5 per cent this
year.

In a report to clients, Green
said that might cause concern
abroad about rising prices for
Chinese goods, prompting cen-
tral bankers to consider rais-

' ing interest rates. But he said

China is unlikely to “export
inflation” because prices of
exports are falling.

The government said this
month its swollen global trade
surplus jumped nearly 75 per
cent in 2006 to a record $177.5:
billion — equal to nearly 10
per cent of China’s total eco-
nomic output.

The flood of export revenues
is straining Beijing’s ability to
keep inflation in check.

The central bank is draining
billions of dollars a month
from the economy, and. has
piled up the world’s biggest
foreign reserves, which stood
at just over $1 trillion at the
end of December.

Fourth quarter growth
slowed slightly, but not much.
Output expanded 10.4 per cent



in the three months through
December, down from a
decade-high 11.5 per cent in
the second quarter to the third
quarter’s 10.6 per cent.

Incomes of urban Chinese
households grew 10.4 per cent
in real terms last year, while
those in the countryside rose
7.4 per cent, the statistics
agency said.

Rural incomes are “still at a
comparatively low level,” Xie

said, though he stressed that
compared with China’s historic
poverty, “this is a great leap
forward.”

President Hu Jintao’s gov-
ernment has promised to
spend more on aid to farmers
and health, education and oth-
er services to spread prosperi-
ty to the countryside, home to
800 million people, most of
whom have missed out on Chi-
na’s economic boom.







Kan-de (Nagoya) Trading Co, Ltd

Tel | +81-52-361-9943 www.kan-de.cojp
Fax /+81-52-351-9944 email: salesi@kan-de.co.ip

BUSINESS FOR SALE

Medium Sized, Established Local Retail Business for Sale

Profitable, Stable and Fantastic Potential
Significant Cash required (-/+1M)
Immediate/Constant cash returns
Serious enquiries only please.

aur susretailbusiness@ hotmail.com

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GERARD JACQUES OF
MORLEY CLOSE, P.O. BOX N-805, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a_ citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE.

NOTICE is hereby given that SYLIFICIA JACQUES OF
MORLEY CLOSE, P.O. BOX N-805, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
is applying to thé Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality



NOTICE is hereby given that SHERLINE JUSTE OF FOX
HILL ROAD, P.O. BOX N-10326; NASSAU, BAHAMAS
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a_ citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why: registration/ naturalization should not be

granted, should send a written and signed statement of
the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MAYLELIN POMPA GONZALEZ
OF #4 DIAMOND DRIVE, CORAL GARDENS, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26TH. day of

JANAUARY, 2007 to the Minisier responsible for. Nationality... ,

and - Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas,

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BERNARD SIGMOND HENFIELD
OF #15 LAWRENCE CLOSE, P.O. BOX F-43009, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAWIA. BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26TH day of
JANAUARY, 2067 ‘o the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship. FPO.Box . N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that RENAND PETIT-HOMME
OF ELIZABETH ESTATES, P.O. BOX N-4493, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of "he Bahamas, and that any person who
knows afiy reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from. the 26th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GEORGES JEAN OF
TAYLOR STREET, P.O.BOX N-1390, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 19th day of January, 2007 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARGARET BOUQUETTE-
CHER AIME OF LANCASTER ROAD, P.O. BOX N-7060,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 26th day of
January, 2007 to the Minister responsible for Nationality

. and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



Security & General
INSURANCE

development strategy.









Security & General Insurance Co., a local property and casualty

| insurer and member of the Colonial Group of Bermuda, seeks |
to appoint a Claims Manager to their Nassau office

As the manager of our claims department, you will be |
responsible toi the management and operation of the clainis
department reporting directly to the Geiieral Manager aud
management team on all matters relating to strategic and local
initiatives borh ongoing and forming part of the company’s

You must demonstrate a proven track record as the all round

performer in the field of property and casualty claim
management with a minimum of at least 10 years experience
within the industry. {n particular, you will have experience in



management and substantive motor ¢!
The company offers a competitive remuneration package with

benefits commensurate to qualifications and experience.

the legal aspects of personal injury claims handling, catastrophe

laims experience

Resumes should be sent to The Human Resources Manager,
P.O. Box N 3540 no later than 5th February 2007.

and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Pricing Information As Of:
Thursday, 25 January 200 7



and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.









~ SOUS CHEFS

Yield



f ye







0.000 N/M














0.54 Abaco Markets ; 0.70 6.06 1,000 -0.293
1025) Bahamas Property Fund 11.30 11.30 0.00 1.689 0.400 6.7
6.90 Bank of Bahamas 8.03 8.03 0.00 0.796 0.260 10.1 3.2
0.70 Benchmark 0.80 0.80 0.00 0.265 0.020 30 2.50%
: : : , . 1.26 Bahamas Waste : ‘BE ; 0.199 0.060 93
| Private club is seeking two (2) experienced io? | Waaslneenk 1 oR woe oop 0.170 0.050 74
: : os : 9.00 Cable Bahama 10.00 10.00 0.00 1,000 0.715 0.240 14.0 2.
‘full-time sous chefs with a minimum of eight 1.64 Sollee Hatiingd 2.00 2.00 0.00 3,742 0.078 0.040 25.6
: : . 9.05 Com salth Bant 13.00 413.00 0.00 0.998 0.680 3.0
(8) years experience in the culinary field. All 480. Gendollanedwae Baae 5.04 4.97 -0.07 0.134 0.045 376
: ita 2.40. Doctor's Hospital 2.50 2.50 0.00 0.295 0.000 8&5
standard diplomas from the Nassau Hotel Training Bea Parnquars 5.80 5.80 0.00 0552 0.240 105
: 10.70. Fine 12.30 12.30 0,00 0.779 O570 15.7 4.65
College are demanded. The applicants must have 10.90 FirstCaribbean 14.46 14.46 0.00 0.921 0.500 15.7 346°
. . 4 10.00 Focol 15.68 15.68 0.00 400 1.476 0.500 106 Ac
i extensive knowledge in management skills and 0.50 Freeport Concrete 0.55 0.55 0.00 -0.423 0.000 N/M
, : i aie 7.15 ICD Utilities 7.20 7.20 0.00 0.632 0135 135
excellent levels of cooking skills. The positions 8.52 J. S. Johnson 9.05 9.05 0.00 0.588 0.560 154




Premier Real Estate

| to be filled are banquet sous chef and production
sous chef.




DivS P/E __. Yield
7.080 8.8 “4
0.640 NM 7.85%
0.000 26.2
Sea











0.000 19.4
1.320 8.3 9.04%

Interested persons should fax resumes to
362-6245 to the attention of:

28.00 ABDAB ~ .
14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
35 RND Holdir













ied Mutual Bunda (0
YTD% Last 12 Months



~* Fund Name

52wk-Low

52wk-Hi



NA _ V Div $ wkd Yield %_
1.3253 1.2700 Colina Money Market Fund 1.325275"
3.0017 2.6262 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 2.9728***
TH E DIRECTOR OF CU ISINE 2.5002 2.3220 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 2.500211**
1.1495 Colina Bond Fund 1.217450****

1.2175








000 Fidelity Prime Incom seigaccasnatanssgeg ssensengmccancn siesta " sy
arianraentkc acinar anes BE PVE OT B8% 7 Bd06 SAare
IE) - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity

Ask § - Selling price of Colina and fidelity






LYFORD CAY CLUB
_ LYFORD CAY DRIVE
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00 NAV KEY.
52wk-Hl - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

*- 19 January 2007
Previous Close - Pravious day's weighted price for dally volume 2

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week **- 31 December 2006
Change - Change in closing price from day to day
Dally Vol. - Nurnber of total shares traded today

DIV § - Dividends per share pald in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Ficleélity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

“**- 31 December 2006
“**~ 31 December 2006
31 December 2006

eterna oy mn AL



42380-7764) FOR MORI DATA’



PTRADE CALL: GOLINA 242-n028-71


“pe

ze 8 =









SATHURRAY
SES FS aE S.





Marine Forecast































































































Saturday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
Low W High = Low W NASSAU ‘Today: NNE at 10-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-7 Miles LTE
_ FIC FIC F/C Saturday: _E at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-7 Miles TE
‘TS t 90/32 75/23 ¢ ~—s FREEPORT Today: NNE at 10-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 6-7 Miles 77° F
Sol c 40/4 40/4 sn Saturday: ESE at 8-16 Knots 3-5 Feet 6-7 Miles 77°F
; ; ~ 28-1 pe SOO 34/1 pe ABACO Today: NNE at 10-20 Knots 4-7 Feet 6-7 Miles irr
Breezy with clouds = Partly cloudy. | Breezy with times of | Overcast and windy — Windy; chance of a Sun and some The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the a2 c 83/17 «48/8 pc Saturday: __ ESE at 8-16 Knots 3-6 Feet 6-7 Miles 77° F
and sunshine. Be, clouds and sun. with showers. | morning shower. =| clouds. greater the need for eye and skin protection. BAT r 78/22 63/17 pc
High: 75° = sHiigh: 78° - High: 78° =| High: 72° Bee _ AMA s 20/82 65/18 s ;
were aon ; ae rape Se T5238 s BARB Téa AT VMs cise Cy
ac ie Fi seat alia: mercer! Bae Barc 320s «SIMO 362 s : a
marr]! (raerr ) 0 reser High _Ht(f. Beirut eai7s oa) Gar s
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 1:14am. 2.7 7:44am. 0.1 AR EDG greener cs 31/0 24/4 sn
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 1:38p.m. 21 7:39p.m. -0.2 24/-6 me 27-2 17/-8 ¢ I
Saturday 2:21am. 26 8:50am. 0.1 0/15 50/10 sh = 58/14 54/12 pe ‘ Bee be (BLUSTERY )
ALmanac 4 2:45 p.m. 2.0 8:43p.m. -0.1 47/8 68/20 45/7 c SS : Pagke 3 aS
: Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Sunda “3:30am. 26 958am. O04 36/2. 29/1 sn = 39/8 80/-1 sn
= Temperature 3:52pm. 2.0 9:48p.m. -0.1 32/0 19/-7 ¢ 35/1 22/-5 sf
_ High .... vessuees B4° F/29° C 6/30 70/21 sh = 86/30 68/20 pe
Low .. pares Money a ee a 76/24 55/12 5 77/25 60/15
Normal high . 77° F/25° C eee apes 83/28 63/17 s = 87/80 4
Normal low ou... 65° F/18° C plac 36/2 13/-10 pc
Last year’s high ..... eee. . 82° F/28° C BT pyre Nioon 79126 69/20 t 68/20 +
High: 70° F/21°C Last year’s LOW w..sssssssssscseessesenseeeesess 66° F/19° C 68/20 pc
~ Low: 48° F/9°C Precipitation Sunrise......6:55.a.m. Moonrise ... 11:56 a.m. ee




40/4 pe



As of 1 p.m. yesterday .. 0.00” Sunset .
Year to date ............. 0.51” Full

...9:50 p.m. Moonset... . 12:48 a.m.
New First





Normal year to date ............. 1.43”































221-5 21-6 pe
AccuWeather.com, 16/-8 10/-12 sf [XS] Showers
All forecasts and maps provided by ee : 72/22 62/16 1/25 64/17 f= =] T-storms
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2007 Feh. 2 Feb. 10 Feb. 17 Feb. 24 29/-1 22/-5 sn 23/-5 2/-16 sf [2°6"] Rain Feonis
: 6 S3/1t s 63/1 ABIT [« ~*] Flurries Cold ===
77/25 5010s 77/25 52/11 s Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
9/15 49/9" 49 AAG precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm Mn,
A 67/1 9 Ad 16 : a 2 - a 7/ Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Aap
79/26 57/13. 9/26 $1 40s 5 is Atte
85/29 76/24 s 86/30
CAT ISLAND 2



71125



4145



: 75° F/24° 6














Manila 85/29 88/31
Mexico Ci (2/22 68/20.
SAN Monterrey 71/21
cree Moscow 19-10 19/40. an
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's Low: 66° F/19°C

highs and tonights's lows.

ur
us!















































































9

Today Saturday Saturday Saturday MAYAGUANA

High Low W High Low Ww High Low W High Low: W W High” Low W High: 80° F/27°C

F/C F/C F/C F/C 90/;

Albuquerque 45/7 27/-2 s 50/10 28/2" pe _— indianapolis 4/28 28°

Anchorage 24/-4 19/-7 sn 30/-1 21/-6 c Jacksonville 83/28 68/20 pc

Atlanta BOAO 27/-2 s 563 35/4 pe Ka ity

Atlantic City 24/-4 17/-8 pc 43/6. 28/-2 pe —_Las Vegas 48/8 34/1 oe

Baltimore — ence 27-2 19/-7 pe. as 42/5 30/-1 pe Little Roc! Di oof t q 4 a4} Low:67° FA9°C

Boston 12/-11 11/-11 32/0 22/-5 pe Los Angeles 69/20 47/8 s St. Louis 38/3 18/-7 7 i

Buffalo = 15/9 45/-9° sf ~~ 35/4 20-6 sf Louisville 41/5 © 35/ 46/7 25-3 > Salt Lake Ci 16 aa = AVI

Charleston,SC 50/10 24/-4 ‘5 6317 41/5 s | 94/12 30/-1 San Antonio 68/20 41/5 pc : ~ GREAT INAGU A sed8 15S

Chicago 30-4 25/3 pe 28-2 151-9" sf 25 680% pe San Dieg 2/16 500° pe ee 68/200 t —=«86/30. 73/22 t

Clevelan 24/-4 24/-4 sf 36/2 20/-6 sf f San Francisco 58/14 43/6 c Low: 73° F/23°C : ; ‘pe
gs BTS 41/5 pe 55/12 33/0 or Seattle 46) i 16/-8 c "31/0 17/8 sn

Denver 45/7 18/-7 pc 35/1 13/-10 sf New Orleans Tallahassee 63/17 40/4 Wai

Detroit 22/-5 22/-5 sn 34/1 17/-8 sf = NewYork. 31/0 pe = Tampa 21 59/15 Winnipeg 3/-16 sf 11/-11 -8/-22 sf

Honolulu 79/26 67/19 s 80/26 67/19 pc Oklahoma City c 44/6 25/-3 c Tucson 67/19 37/2

Houston = G1N1G" 48/8 pe G79 45/7 -r~——sCOrlando:





Washington, DC 27/-2 23/-5 pe 47/8 31/0 Weather (W): s-sunny, oy cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-

storms, t-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rcp-precipitation, Tr-trace

mene ae | Ee


FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007

SECTION —

Fax: (242) 328-2398

E-Mail: sports@100jamz.com



Bahamians
make their mark
in collegiate
track and field
rankings

@ TRACK AND FIELD
By KELSIE JOHNSON

Sports Reporter

THIS week’s indoor

_ track and field rankings
are out and the Bahamian
collegiate athletes are
topping the charts.

Four Bahamian athletes
have already made the
NCAA indoor champi-
onships provisional mark-
ings, with several coming
close to the standards.

Bianca Stuart, one of
the four Bahamians secur-
ing a spot at the NCAA
indoor championships is
leading the Missouri Val-
ley Conference in the
women’s long jump.

Stuart has a season’s
best of 6.17m (20-feet-2).
In the 60m she is ranked
sixth with a time of 7.77
seconds.

' Also ranked in the 60m
dash is Alexandria Oem-
bler of Missouri State, she
is currently holding the
13th spot with a time of
7.91 seconds. The leading
time in the event is posted
by Devon Williams, 7.54
seconds.

The Bahamian duo’s
names also appear in the
top 50 of the 200m. Stuart
is 16th in 26.00 and Oem-
bler is 17th with 26.15 sec-
ORES scot sagtensenerebiin

In the 60m hurdles,
Oembler is in the top
three on the charts with a
time of 8.95 seconds. The
leading time is 8.58 sec-
onds by Jennifer Snyder -
of Wichita State followed
by Kasey McDaniel of
Drake with 8.83 seconds.

No stranger to the top
of the charts in the South
Eastern Conference
(SEC), Aymara Albury of
Alabama University is
ending her senior year
with a bang. os,

Albury is ranked sec-
ond in the shot putt with a
season’s best of 16.26m.
The throw was recorded
at the weekend meet and
earned her provisional
markings for the NCAA
Indoor championships.

In the weight throw she
is third with 18.86m.
Leading the weight throw
is Shawneise Williams
from Florida University
with a best of 21.16m,
which is also an automatic
marking. Shanna Dicken-
son of Tennessee Univer-
sity is holding onto the
second spot with 19.02m,
a provisional marker.

Kenrick-Brathwaite
hasn’t made the marker
for the championships as
yet, but he is well on his
way. |

The long jumper leads
the Mid Eastern Athletic
Conference (MEAC)
men’s long jump event
with a best of 24-ft-1.

But Brathwaite will
have another shot this
weekend, at the Adidas
meet.

The Mid Continent
Conference hasn’t
revealéd its rankings as
yet, but Andretti Bain is
receiving accolades for
weekend performance.

The junior, attending
the Oral Roberts Univer-
sity, was named the male
athlete of the week for
the second consecutive
time.

At the weekend meet,
Bain dipped under the
provisional marker for the
indoor championships to
win the Razorback’s
400m. He won the event
in a time of 47.10 seconds,
holding off the number
one ranked quartermiler
in the United States, Wal-
lace Spearmon.

,





@ PICTURED FROM TOP: The Southern Cross, The Lucayan Lady and The Healthcliffe - all will be hoping to make their presence f

"TRASH TALKING’ STARTS AH



wisi:

MIAMI HERALD SPORTS |

LAA

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meas
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Thai x: Ping

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@ MIAMI HERALD
SPORTS INSIDE



EVENT THIS WEEKEND





elt at the New Year’s Day Regatta.
(Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)

Sailors target first win, bragging rights

@ SAILING
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Sports Reporter

THE regatta trash talking
has officially begun.

The long awaited Regatta
season will get underway this
weekend at Montagu Beach
and sailors are hoping to clinch
a first win.

Not only will a victory give
sailors bragging rights, but it
will also help them accumulate
points towards the boat of the
year award.

Boats from all around the
Family Islands were due to
arrive yesterday to compete in
the annual New Years Day
Regatta.

The Regatta will host three
classes, A-C and will be offi-
cially opened by the Prime
Minister Perry Christie.

Races in the C-class will
begin on Friday while the A
and B classes will get under-



“I have a new boat and I am
more than confident it will take

‘the crown. Buzzy Rolle is the

best C-class builder and skipper
in sailing today and I think he
will win this prestigious regatta
in the Red Hot Thunderbird.”



way on Saturday and Sunday. .

Phillip McPhee, owner of
boat of the year in the C-class —
the Red Hot Thunderbird, is
already confident, claiming the
Thunderbird was built by the
best boatbuilder in the
Bahamas: Buzzy Rolle.

He said: “I have a new boat
and I am more than confident
it will take the crown. Buzzy
Rolle is the best C-class builder

Phillip McPhee

and skipper in sailing today
and I think he will win this
prestigious regatta in the Red
Hot Thunderbird.

“We are putting the finishing
touches on the boat as I speak
to you, it will be in Nassau
tonight to sail in her first regat-
ta. I claim this win now and
put it in honour of my father,
Dr WG McPhee. I know there
will be some stiff competition

in the C-class at this regatta,
but I do believe that this regat-
ta will make history this com-
ing Friday.

“Everyone knows-that Bulla
Reg was considered the fastest
C-class boat in the country,
that boat was also built by
Buzzy Rolle. We added some
new features to the Red Hot
Thunderbird. She is a lot clean-
er and a whole lot faster and I
think she will perform to our
expectations this coming Fri-
day.”

The Heathcliffe’s owner Lar-
ry Bastian claims he has the B-
class wrapped up tightly.
Despite having to sail this
weekend in a boat that has only
hit the waters once since being
remodelled, Bastian said other
boats should be more than
scared as they reflect on the
damage the boat did last year.

The Androsian skipper said:
“Be prepared, the best boat
will win the B-class on Satur-

day. I am coming to win, that is
the bottom line.

“Yes we've only sailed the
boat once since it has been
remodelled, we are working
out some details, but I am sure
that we will have a very good
race this weekend.

“What is going to separate
us from the other boats will be
teamwork. Once we have the
crew working together we will
win. I don’t think anyone can
beat our captain.

“There is no doubt that we
have what it takes to win the
B-class. My captain and crew
we will be ready to go once the
cannon fires on Saturday
morning.”

The Heathcliffe has put in a
practice session last week try-
ing to fine tune the boat.

The New Years Day regatta
will start at 12 noon today at
the Montagu Beach. Races
held on Saturday will get
underway at 9am.
PAGE 2C, FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007





Twellman is
ated to US
training camp

m@ SOCCER
CARSON, Calif.
Associated Press

FORWARD Taylor
Twellman has recovered
from a hernia injury and
was added Wednesday to
the U.S. soccer team’s train-
ing camp for its Feb. 7 exhi-
bition game against Mexico
at Glendale, Ariz.

Four players were
dropped from the training
camp, with defenders Dan
Califf and Heath Pearce
returning to their clubs in
Denmark, and Pat Noonan
(knee) and Brian Mullan
(ankle) sidelined by
injuries.

Interim U.S. coach Bob
Bradley has 26 players com-
ing into his training camp
that opens Thursday and
has asked for European
clubs to release eight play-
ers for the game. The Unit-
ed States beat Denmark 3-1
Saturday in Bradley’s first
game since replacing Bruce
Arena.

The roster:

Goalkeepers: Joe Cannon
(Los Angeles), Matt Pick-
ens (Chicago), Troy Perkins
(D.C.), Matt Reis (New
England)

Defenders: Chris
Albright (Los Angeles),
Bobby Boswell (D.C.),
Jonathan Bornstein (Chivas
USA), Jimmy Conrad
(Kansas City), Todd Duni-
vant (New York), Bryan
Namoff (D.C.), Michael
Parkhurst (New England),
Dasan Robinson (Chicago),
Eddie Robinson (Houston)

Midfielders: Kyle Becker-
man (Colorado), Brian Car-
roll (D.C.), Ricardo Clark
(Houston), Joshua Gros
(D.C.), Sacha Kljestan
(Chivas USA), Justin Mapp
(Chicago), Pablo Mastroeni
(Colorado)

Forwards: Kenny Cooper
(Dallas), Landon Donovan
(Los Angeles), Eddie John-
son (Kansas City), Nate
Jaqua (Los Angeles), Chris
Rolfe (Chicago), Taylor
Twellman (New England).



@ TENNIS
MELBOURNE, Australia
Associated Press

IF HE could pick any player
from any era to test himself
against, Roger Federer would
like a shot at Rod Laver or
Bjorn Borg.

Laver, the last man to win
all four majors in one season,
was in the stadium that carries
his name on Thursday to wit-
ness Federer dismantle Andy
Roddick in the Australian
Open semifinals. After what
he saw, Laver would just as
soon stick to meeting Federer
in the locker room — after the
matches.

Federer likes to put on a
show when Laver is at Rod
Laver Arena, and called his 6-
4, 6-0, 6-2 victory over Rod-
dick his best match in Mel-
bourne.

“I had one of these days
when everything worked,” the
Swiss star said. “I was unbeat-
able. I was playing out of my
mind. I am shocked myself.”

The win put him in his sev-
enth consecutive Grand Slam
final, tying a record set by Jack
Crawford in 1934, and left him
only one victory from a 10th
Grand Slam title. He will meet
the winner of the Fernando
Gonzalez-Tommy Haas semi-
final in Sunday’s championship
match.

With seemingly few. chal-
lengers among his contempo-
raries, Federer is often asked
about facing one of the greats
from another time — Laver
and Borg come to his mind.

Both won 11 majors — Borg





th






just

HERMAN ‘the Caribbean Tank’
Williams has started the year on

a roll.
He’s added another title - and is now

the WBF’s European and Pan Pacific

heavyweight champion.

Although he’s making some great
strides in the heavyweight division, he
still has to crack the top 50 list in order
to be considered as a contender for one
of the major titles.

At the rate he’s going, there’s no rea-
son why Williams shouldn’t be climb-
ing the ladder. : Mah

He deserves every bit of support he
can get from the Bahamian public, but,

more importantly, the Bahamas gov- .

ernment. i gis in
Yet, Williams, who has fought some

big time fighters in some of the biggest

stages in professional boxjng in the Unit~:
ed States, feels as if he’s not getting his”
just reward from the country. —

With all of the athletes, whose pic-

tures are mounted on the “Walk of
Fame” at the Lynden Pindling Interna-

tional Airport’s international arrival sec-

tion, there’s no reason why Williams
should not be included.

He has fought and won more titles
than any heavyweight fighter in the
country. He added his latest title to the
WBC’s Caribbean Boxing Federation
(CABOFE) and the National Boxing

' Association’s heavyweight titles.

The only other boxer who has fought
and held as many titles was Ray Minus
Jr., who did it in both the bantamweight
and lightweight divisions. Minus Jr., now
a coach and co-promoter of First Class
Promotions, has also been overlooked
on the wall of fame.

Williams, who is still waiting for a shot
at Minus Jr’s brother, Renaldo ‘the Ter-
minator’ Minus’ Bahamas’ heavyweight
title, was scheduled to fight here this
month at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

But according to Williams, his pro-
motional team, Silver Hawks Promo-
tions from Las Vegas, are still waiting
for the negotiations to be sealed up with
the Ministry of Youth, Sports and Hous-
ing.
The fight, in the meantime, had to be

i. . postponed until April when Williams is .
+.expected to take-on Gonzalo Omar
Basile, the Argentinean heavyweight

SPORTS



champion.

Williams, who has compiled a 33-10-2
win-loss-draw record with 19 knockouts,
said he’s eager to come home and dis-
play his skills in front of the Bahamian
crowd.

The fight is expected to carried live
back to the United States.

At 5-foot-11 and 248-pounds,
Williams is looking at facing a much big-
ger Basile, who is listed at 6-foot-6 and
over 300 pounds. He has a record of 28-
2.

Williams, a native of Grand Bahama,
said all he wants is a chance to get in the
ring.

Williams deserves to be in the spot-

_light at home and whatever it takes, the

TRIBUNE SPORTS



‘The Caribbean Tank’

keeps on rolling
STUBBS





m SHERMAN ‘The Caribbean Tank’ Williams in action

Bahamas Government should ensure
that our best prospect in the heavy-
weight division is given the opportunity
to continue to rise to the top.

Another on the way up is lightweight
Meacher ‘Pain’ Major who has returned
to Hollywood, Florida where he’s now
training again with Anthony ‘Chills’ Wil-
son.

Major left town last week after spend-
ing the past two years here training and
fighting under First Class Promotions

- and his mentor Minus Jr.

The move is definitely a good one for
Major, who has demonstrated that he
has the ability to be a championship
contender. He just needs to get more
exposure and Wilson said he intends to
give ittohim. — SAS

Major is back with Wilson after they
had a split. In order for him to get in a
better position to contend for a title, he
needs to be in an environment that will
make it easier for him to achieve it.

Many still feel that had Minus Jr. left
the Bahamas when he was in his prime
and worked under Angelo Dundee in
Miami, he would have been a world’
champion.

Although he eventually fought and
lost his bid for a world title, the fact that
he missed the opportunity to be in an
environment in the US may have veen
his downfall.

Major say he only wants a chance to
prove himself. He now has the oppor-
tunity. Let’s see if he can make the best
out of it. ee

PAToa ena aocs,
could be the best ever

from 16 finals spanning 1974
to ’81, and Laver in a five-sea-
son run wedged around his
absence from the Grand Slam
tournaments from 1963-67.
By Sunday, Federer is likely
to be only one major title
behind, although Laver
expects him to go a lot further
and break Pete Sampras’
record of 14 Grand Slam titles.

“T think the art of Roger is »

probably the best player Pve
ever seen ... The way he’s com-

piling the Grand Slam titles, I .

think he’s got a great chance of
being the best ever,” Laver
said.

The 68-year-old Laver made
a rare return to Melbourne
from California to marvel Fed-
erer again.

Talent

“Roger’s got too many
shots, too much talent in one
body,” Laver said. “It’s hardly
fair that one person can do all
this — his backhands, his fore-
hands, volleys, serving, his
court position ... the way he
moves around the court, you

feel ‘like he’s barely touching .
the ground. That’s the sign of a

great champion.”

And that’s a daunting
prospect for Gonzalez or Haas.
Haas, a two-time semifinalist

in Australia, has never reached

a Grand Slam final. Gonzalez
is into the semis at a major for
the first time.

Roddick, who beat Federer
in an exhibition tournament
less than two weeks ago and
had match points against him

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at the Masters Cup last
November, rated the prospect
of an upset as “slim.”

The women’s final Saturday
features top-seeded Maria
Sharapova against No. 81-
ranked Serena Williams.
Despite the ranking disparity,
nobody is counting Williams

: out.
.: After playing just four tour-

naments in 2006 because of a
lingering knee problem,
Williams said the only other
person that gave her a chance
of winning an eighth Grand
Slam title was her mother and
coach, Oracene.

She led 5-1 in the second set
of her semifinal before letting
Nicole Vaidisova back in, wast-
ing triple match point at 3-5
and needing three more before
finally converting in a 7-6 (5),
6-4 victory.

“I almost did a gagarooney
there,” Williams said.

Now, close to a third Aus-

tralian title, she’s guaranteed

of returning to the top 20.
‘“T can’t believe it,” she said.
“That’s awesome. If I play

“well, which I don’t think I’ve

evén'reached yet at all in this

- tournament ... it’s really hard

for anyone on the women’s

~ tour to beat me.”

Sharapova turned her semi-
final against No. 4 Kim Cli-
jsters into an Australian
farewell match for the 23-year-
old Belgian, who is retiring at
the end of the year, with a 6-4,
6-2 victory.

Sharapova is 2-2 against
Williams and had match points
in their last meeting — the
2005 Australian semifinal.

Ask for Ana, Dan, or Humberto on +1-954-880-0781







Fax +1-954-880-0785 Email usa@japanesevehicles.com





Rugby's Woodside
is selected for
West Indies team

m RUGBY
By KELSIE JOHNSON
Sports Reporter

WHEN Dan Woodside awoke on the morning
of the West Indies Seven-a-side trials - he did-
n’t foresee himself being the first Bahamian
selected to a multi-national rugby team.

But Woodside, a member of the Bahamas
national team, continues to make history in rug-
by: His latest feat came on Monday, when he
was named to the West Indies side.

He joined 16 of the Caribbean’s top Rugby
players in a training camp held in Trinidad and
Tobago with the hopes of representing the
region at the Steinlager Sevens tournament.

The Steinlager Sevens, also known as the
World Seven Series International Rugby tour-
nament, is sanctioned by the International Rug-
by Board (IRB) and features 16 nations, playing
in 44 matches. It will be held on February 10th-
11th at the Petco Park in San Diego, California.

Woodside said: “When I woke up Saturday
morning I knew it would be a tough day, but I
was willing to work through whatever it was so
I could be selected to the team.

“J would like to publicly thank Andrew
Davies and the rest of the guys for introducing
me to the sport of rugby and helping me as I
continue on.

“It is pretty amazing, it is pretty good, unbe-
lievable actually. There are a lot of things I had
to do to make sure that I was in the best shape.
The training was hard, compared to the training
I went through in the Bahamas, but I am grate-
ful.”

Representing the West Indies will be
Guyana’s Kevin McKenzie, Albert Larose,
Clauduis Butts and Theo Henry. From Barbados
Antonio Gibbons and Kurt Johnson. Trinidad
and Tobago will be represented by Graeme
Alkins, Jason Clarke, Kelson Figuero, while
Tom Healy and Derek Hurdle will represent
Bermuda.

The West Indian squad will play in pool A
with Fiji, Argentina and Scotland. Playing out of
poo! B will be South Africa, Samoa, Portugal
and Tonga. Pool C will have England, Australia,
Kenya and the USA while pool D will host New
Zealand, France, Canada and Chile.

The seven-a-sides game has recently been for-
matted but is still being played on the same size
field as traditional game.

The game was introduced to the IRB in 1997



|
|



m DAN WOODSIDE |

in hopes of developing an elite-level of compe-
tition between nations. ‘

Woodside added: “There is a lot of pressure
on me being the first person to be named to a
team like this. I am not scared, I feel as though
I’ve gotten past the hardest part, that is making
sure that I’ve added up to the other players.

“Now that I’ve seen that I am able to play
with them my confidence level has grown and I
am ready to represent the Bahamas and the
other players in the rugby clubs.

“I am hoping to grasp so much from this tour-
nament adding it to the things I’ve learned in
England so when I come home I can assist some
of the younger players or most importantly the
national team.”

Woodside will join us team members on Feb-
ruary Sth for practice sessions.
SPORTS WEEKEND _

The Miami Herald

IN MY OPINION

DAVID J. NEAL

dneal@MiamiHerald.com



Opportunities
mark progress
for minorities

erhaps more than the Super
P Bowl XLI being the first Black

Coach Sunday in the game’s
overstated history, progress for
minority coaches can be tracked by
Chicago Bears defensive coordinator
Ron Rivera and new Pittsburgh Steel-
ers head coach Mike Tomlin.

Not that Chicago’s Lovie Smith atid
Indianapolis’ Tony Dungy getting to
the game that Dennis Green and Art
Shell have missed by one victory isn’t
significant, especially to people of
color in and around the league.

It is. If you have trouble under-
standing why it means so much, con-

. sider yourself lucky. You have never
been in a business in which most of
labor looked like you and there was a
long-lingering perception that those
who looked like you didn’t Possess.
management skills.

And, if you still wonder why it’s a
big deal, I guarantee that you never
got the equivalent suggestion to the
one that Dungy famously got when

interviewing for a head coaching job: —

Shave your beard, so that you have a

less-militant look. That didn’t happen -

in 1966 but in our modern, ESPN era.

WELL WORTH THE CHANCE |

That’s why, sometimes, getting the
chance to achieve means more than
achievement. So it is with NFL head
coaches. After all, the only reason the
last Super Bowl in Miami didn’t have

Green wasn’t anybody’s closed mind. .

_ It was a wide kick. Minhesota’s Gary
Anderson, who had not missed a field
goal all season, blew what would have
been an NFC Championship Game-
clinching field goal. Atlanta tied the
score and won in overtime.

An example of a change in NFL
teams’ upper-management change in
mind-set is what is happening with
Rivera and Tomlin.

Rivera is such a hot prospect fora
head coaching job that each Bears
playoff victory affected coaching
searches across the league. Teams
wanted to talk to Rivera, the Bears
defensive coordinator, who almost .
certainly will be the NFL’s next His-
panic head coach. But, since the
Bears’ playoff bye week, Rivera has
been in a holding pattern because he
could not interview while the Bears
were still alive in the playoffs.

After each Bears playoff victory, —
Rivera, 44, shrugged off any sugges-
tion of frustration with his situation,
reasoning that the further the Bears
go, the more a desired coaching com-
modity he will be.

TOMLIN, READY OR NOT
One of the jobs that got filled while

— Rivera was figuring out playoff strate-

gies went to Tomlin, a guy who is 34,
with 12 years of coaching experience,
but only six at the NFL level and one
as defensive coordinator.

Granted, in that one year as coordi-
nator, Minnesota had one of the great
run defenses of all-time, giving up
only 61.6 rushing yards per game and
2.8 yards per run. Tomlin benefited

_ from the unrelated Williamses at
defensive tackle, Pat and Kevin,
devouring runners as if they were cin-
namon-flavored. The Vikings weren’t
very good against the pass, though:
18th in yards per pass play, 30th in
sacks per pass play and tied for worst
pass defense overall.

But NFL teams tapped Tomlin as a
golden guy. Interviews showered on
him at an age when Dungy, who hada
much more accomplished résumé at
the same age, was getting polite
smiles and grooming tips.

The Steelers took Tomlin over
Russ Grimm, who had 15 seasons of
NFL coaching experience. The past:
six of them were in Pittsburgh, where
head coach Bill Cowher recognized
how well Grimm handled the offen-
sive line by making Grimm his first
“assistant head coach” in 2004. Tom-
lin might have interviewed better. As
a head coach, he might be the next
Don Shula, for all we know. But it’s
hard to argue on credentials that the
Steelers made the right call.

. Someone once said the sign of true
equality isn’t when the superior black
candidate gets the chance to succeed
but when a mediocre black candidate
gets the same breaks and opportuni-
ties that a mediocre white one could.

Maybe the NFL has reached that
point. Which begs the question if
there is a further need for arule —
requiring teams to interview at least
one minority candidate when each
head coaching job comes open.



SSA MAS a A SN

FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007

SHARAPOVA WINS,
WILL PLAY SERENA
FOR WOMEN’S TITLE

BY JOHN PYE
Associated Press

MELBOURNE, Australia — If
he could pick any player from any
era to test himself against, Roger
Federer would like a shot at Rod
Laver or Bjorn Borg.

Laver, the last man to win all
four major tennis tournaments in
one season, was in the stadium that
carries his name on Thursday to
witness top-ranked Federer dis-
mantle Andy Roddick in the Aus-
tralian Open semifinals.

After what he saw, Laver, who is

. 68, would just as soon stick to

meeting Federer in the locker

room — after the matches.
Federer likes to put on a show

when Laver is at Rod Laver Arena,






BY DOUG FERGUSON
Associated Press ;

SAN DIEGO — Brandt Sne-
deker had trouble remembering a
round he will never forget.

Snedeker, a 26-year-old rookie
on the PGA Tour, flirted with
golfs magic number Thursday in
the Buick Invitational until the
birdies dried up on the easy North
Course at Torrey Pines. Snedeker
finished with a 61, tying the course
record and taking a two-shot lead.

“The whole front nine was a

blur,” said Snedeker, who couldn’t

recall how he birdied some of the
holes, much less what those holes
even looked like. But he generated
the biggest buzz at the Buick Invi-
tational, where two-time defending
champion Tiger Woods opened
with a round of 66 and was
reduced to a supporting role.

“To see the crowd kind of work
their way back to me from Tiger
was kind of nice,” said Snedeker,
who played two groups behind
Woods. “Seeing them rooting me
on the last nine holes — although

SS A I EST SEG SEES



INTERNATIONAL EDITION



TENNIS | AUSTRALIAN OPEN

Federer slams door on Roddick



CLIVE BRUNSKILL/AP

EXTRA SPECIAL: With Rod Laver i in the crowd at Rod Laver Arena,
Roger Federer, above, dismantled Andy Roddick: 6-4, 6-O, 6-2.

and he called his 6-4, 6-0, 6-2 vic-
tory over sixth-seeded Roddick his
best match in Melbourne.

“I had one of these days when
everything worked,” the Swiss star

said. “I was unbeatable. I was play-
ing out of my mind. I am shocked
myself.”

The victory put Federer in his
seventh consecutive Grand Slam

final, tying a record set by Jack
Crawford in 1934, and left him only
one victory from a 10th Grand
Slam title. Federer will meet the
winner of today’s Fernando Gonza-
lez-Tommy Haas semifinal in Sun-
day’s championship match.
’ .With seemingly few challengers
among his contemporaries, Fed-
erer often is asked about facing one
of the greats from another era —
and Laver and Borg come to his
mind.

Each of those stars won 11
majors — Borg from 16 finals span-

ning 1974 to 1881, and Laver in a

five-season run wedged around his
absence from the Grand Slam tour-
naments from 1963-67.

After Sunday’s match, Federer
is likely to be only one major title
behind, although Laver expects
him to go.a lot further and break
Pete Sampras’ record of 14 Grand
Slam championships.

* TURN TO AUSTRALIAN OPEN



PRO FOOTBALL | SUPER BOWL XLI

BLU

Indianapolis has been
swamped by a sea of
the Colts’ colors as the
city relishes its team’s
first Super Bowl.

IN



BY MIKE PHILLIPS
mphillips@MiamiHerald.com

THE
FACE

INDIANAPOLIS. — Banners hang from sky-
scrapers downtown, where City Circle has a tint of
blue and the ancient statues outside the state capi-
tol actually don Colt jerseys. The Simons Building,
which is wedged between the RCA Dome and the
old capitol building, i is ‘lit up — its windows form-

ing a horseshoe.

Suburban lawns are dotted with snowmen
wearing Colts gear, and one snowman in
Carmel — just outside Indianapolis —
seems to say it all. He stands bigger,
buffer and taller, draped in a Colts
uniform. He has been dyed a deep

rich Indianapolis Colts blue.

The Colts are headed for the
Super Bowl, and a city that has
never won an NFL champion-

*TURN TO COLTS



GOLF | BUICK INVITATIONAL

Dream round for rookie: Snedeker fires a ol



DONALD MIRALLE/AP

BUICK SPECIAL: Brandt Snedeker
climbed into the driver’s seat.

I couldn’t bring it in the way they
wanted — was still fun.

“TJ had a blast.”

Woods had just knocked down
the flag with a 5-iron for a short

eagle putt on the 18th hole when,
on his way to the first tee, he saw
a. scoreboard listing Snedeker at
8 under through seven holes.

“We thought it was a misprint,”
Woods said. “It came up again, so
obviously it was not a misprint.
That’s some great playing.”

Starting his first round at No. 10,
Snedeker went eight holes before
settling for par and was 9 under
through nine holes, tying the Tour
record for nine holes on a par 36.

Charlie Wi shot a 63 that hardly
anyone noticed, and John Senden
and Jeff Quinney each shot 64.

Almost as noteworthy as Sne-
deker’s 61 is that the top
23 scores came on the North
Course, one of the easiest on the
PGA Tour. The real work comes
on the South, which is nearly
700 yards longer and will be the
site of the U.S. Open next year.

The South played 4.7 strokes
per round harder in the opening
round, with Camilo Villegas post-
ing the best score at 67.

Phil Mickelson took a double

GO BLUE: Jake Berry of
Indianapolis shows his support
of the Colts during a rally.
















DARRON CUMMINGS/AP

JUSTIN LANE/EFE

TIGER WATCH: Woods shot a 66
- and he was five strokes back.

bogey by hitting over the 14th
green and into a hazard on his way
to a 74 on the South Course, and
Vijay Singh made only one birdie
during his round of 75.
__MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD

4E, | FRIDAY, JANUARY 26,2007 __ INTERNATIONAL EDITION

SOCCER | BASEBALL | ETC.



a PEOPLE IN SPORTS _







a

From Miami Herald Wire Services

AC Milan has made Real
Madrid an offer for Ronaldo.

“We are sending an offer
for Ronaldo. We are shopping
so we'll see,” Milan vice presi-
dent Adriano Galliani said on
Thursday. “Everything of
course will be down to a medi-
cal [exam], so we have plenty
to do yet.

“Ronaldo, who. is at the
moment still a Real Madrid
player, will undergo a medical
at Milanello tomorrow,” Galli-
ani added while waiting at
Milan’s Linate airport for the
striker.

Ronaldo, who left the Span-
ish capital by private jet,
attended Milan’s Italian Cup
first-leg semifinal against AS
Roma at San Siro on Thursday
evening.

“I want to publicly thank
[Real] president Ramon Cal-
deron for having offered us
this possibility. I have a meet-
ing [in Madrid] on Monday
and if all goes well as I hope,
Ronaldo will become a Milan
player,” Galliani said.

Galliani and Madrid official
Franco Baldini reached a ver-
bal agreement for the Brazil
forward late Wednesday for
about $9 million, Italian news
agency ANSA reported.

“We are still waiting for a
written offer from Milan,” Bal-
dini was quoted as saying on
Thursday morning by ANSA.

Spanish news agency Efe
said Ronaldo was at Madrid’s
training in the morning, and
showed no sign his transfer
was imminent.

It added that the 30-year-
old did not bid his teammates
farewell or collect his belong-

SPORTS ROUNDUP

LUCA BRUNO/AP

NEW KID IN TOWN: Ronaldo
hears the cheers as he
attends Thursday’s AC
Milan-AS Roma match.

ings. But Efe did report that
Ronaldo sent a text message to
Galliani on Wednesday.

“Tl arrive, pass the medical
and go to the stadium with my
new president,” Efe quoted
him as saying.

Baldini did not divulge
financial details of the agree-
ment but said that “it’s a long
way from the $10 million that

Real is asking to release Ron- -

aldo,” ANSA reported.

' Spanish daily El] Mundo
cited a figure closer to $8 mil-
lion and reported that Ronaldo
will be offered a 12-year con-
tract with the Rossoneri — the
same length as the remainder
of his contract at Madrid.

Regardless, both transfer
fees represent a significant
discount on Milan’s unsuc-
cessful offer of $28.6 million
five months ago.

Red Sox put
final touches
on Drew deal

From Miami Herald Wire Services

The Boston Red Sox and
J.D. Drew finally resolved
their wrangling over a five-
year, $70 million contract,
more than seven weeks after
agreeing to everything except
what to do about the outfield-
er’s surgically repaired right
shoulder.

‘A baseball official involved
in the negotiations said Thurs-
day that the language had been
agreed to.

The official spoke on condi-
tion of anonymity because an
announcement had not yet
been made.

Drew’s contract contains
language similar to that in
Magglio Ordonez’s deal with
Detroit in which the team can
opt out of guaranteed money
in the event a specified pre-ex-
isting injury recurs.

Drew’s agent, Scott Boras,
and the players’ association
agreed that if the Red Sox
exercise their rights under that
language, neither Drew nor
the union would contend that
the language is unenforceable.

e Elsewhere: With spring
training less than three weeks
away, Bernie Williams still
doesn’t know whether he’ll be
back with the New York Yan-
kees. Williams’ agent, Scott
Boras, said Wednesday he
was waiting to hear from gen-
eral manager Brian Cashman.
With the Yankees planning to
carry 12 pitchers, use a platoon
at first base and move Jason
Giambi to designated hitter,
there doesn’t appear to be
room on the roster for Wil-
liams, 38, who has been with
the team since 1991. It’s possi-
ble the Yankees could agree to
a minor-league deal with Wil-
liams, a favorite of manager
Joe Torre. ... Outfielder
Darin Erstad and the Chicago
White Sox agreed on a one-
year, $1 million contract that
includes a club option for
2008.... While Sammy Sosa
and the Texas Rangers were

close to finalizing a minor-
league deal, a final resolution
isn’t expected until at least
early next week. Texas did
agree to a minor-league con-
tract with right-hander Jamey
Wright. ... The Chicago Cubs
released left-handed pitcher
Glendon Rusch, after his
2006 season was cut short by a
blood clot in his lung. ...
Third baseman Morgan Ens-
berg, shortstop Adam Ever-
ett and outfielder Jason Lane
agreed to one-year contracts
with the Houston Astros, set-
tling the team’s remaining
arbitration cases. ... Right-
hander Aaron Sele agreed to
a minor-league contract with
the Mets, giving New York
another starting pitching
option heading to spring train-
ing... . Pittsburgh Pirates out-
fielder Jody Gerut, out for
most of two seasons with knee
problems, accepted a $25,000
pay cut and agreed to a one-
year, $850,000 deal. ... The
Seattle Mariners are giving
Arthur Rhodes another
chance to help their bullpen,
agreeing to a minor-league
contract with the 36-year-old
reliever. ... The Toronto Blue
Jays finalized a $1.5 million
contract with pitcher Tomo
Ohka after he passed a physi-
cal.... The Oakland Athletics
all but completed their roster
heading into spring training,
agreeing with outfielder

‘Bobby Kielty on a one-year,

$2.1 million ‘contract that
avoided arbitration. ... The
Detroit Tigers agreed to terms
with left-hander Joey Eis-
chen on a minor-league con-
tract.... Jack Lang, a Hall of
Fame baseball writer who for
two decades had the pleasant
assignment of telling players
they had been elected to Coo-
perstown, died on Thursday.
He was 85 years old. Lang had
been ill for an extended period
with a variety of ailments,
according to his lawyer, Kevin
Brosnahan.

"



Ronaldo has six days
remaining in the January
transfer window to switch
clubs. Otherwise, he will have
to stay at Madrid at least until
the end of the season.

e Elsewhere: AC Milan
drew AS Roma 2-2 in an Ital-
ian Cup first-leg semifinal.

Ricardo Oliveira and
Filippo Inzaghi scored for
Milan, before Simone Per-
rotta and David Pizarro lev-
eled the game for Roma. All
four goals were in the first
half.

The return leg is scheduled
for Wednesday.

In the other first-leg semifi-
nal, two-time defending cham-
pion Inter Milan beat Samp-
doria 3-0 on Wednesday. ...
Serie A club Parma was sold to
a consortium led by Italian
businessman Tommaso Ghir-
ardi. Financial details of the
deal were not disclosed by for-
mer owner Parmalat SpA.

ELSEWHERE

e France: Araujo Ilan
and Batefimbi Gomis each
scored to lead Saint-Etienne
over Nancy 2-0 and into fifth
place in French first-division
soccer.

Ilan put the visitors ahead
in the 55th minute after col-
lecting a pass from Pascal
Feindouno and finishing
inside the near post. In the
71st, Brazilian Ilan turned pro-
vider when he set up Gomis.

The victory moved Saint-
Etienne to 34 points from 21
rounds, while Nancy stayed in
ninth place with 30 points. ...
Paris Saint-Germain signed
Jeremy Clement from Rang-
ers. Clement will be reunited

with coach Paul Le Guen,
who left the Scottish club this
month. He was also coach at
Lyon, where Clement started
his career. A PSG spokesman
confirmed the deal has been
completed for the 22-year-old
midfielder, but did not imme-
diately give more details.

e England: Newcastle
midfielder Emre denied a
Football Association charge of
being racially abusive. Emre
was charged with “using
racially aggravated ‘abusive
and/or insulting words” in the
Magpies’ 3-0 Premier League
loss to Everton at Goodison
Park on Dec. 30. The Turkey
midfielder will have his case
heard after requesting a per-
sonal hearing.

e Spain: Sevilla has signed
Argentine teenage defender
Federico Fazio to a five-year
contract. Fazio’s contract will
carry a $19.5 million buyout
clause, Sevilla said.

e Germany: Stuttgart has
signed striker Benjamin
Lauth from Hamburger SV on
loan until the end of the sea-
son. The move came Thurs-
day, one day after Stuttgart
sent striker Jon Dahl Tomas-
son to Villarreal.

e UEFA election: FIFA
president Sepp Blatter backs
Michel Platini in his bid to
unseat Lennart Johansson as
head of European soccer’s
governing body.

Speaking on the eve of
today’s UEFA election, Blatter
insisted he was neutral but
then openly professed his
admiration for Platini, a for-
mer France star and three-
time European Player of the
Year.



PETER COSGROVE/AP

READY TO GO: The Red Sox settled outfielder J.D. Drew’s
contract, with the final obstacle involving his shoulder.

ETC.

e NFL: The Dallas Cow-
boys added Jason Garrett to
their coaching staff, and said
he would remain a candidate
to replace retired head coach
Bill Parcells. The Cowboys
said Garrett’s responsibilities
and title won’t be determined
until the head coaching search
is complete. The most likely
scenario, however, is that Gar-
rett will become the offensive

_coordinator if he’s not the

head coach. ... Long snapper
David Binn was added to the
Pro Bowl roster as the AFC’s
“need” player, making him the
llth San Diego Chargers player
selected for the game in Hono-
lulu. ..: The Arizona Cardi-
nals hired former Dallas assis-
tant coach Todd Haley as
their offensive coordinator,
and retained defensive coordi-
nator Clancy Pendergast. ...
The Houston Texans hired
Frank Bush as their senior
defensive assistant... . Hall of
Fame quarterback Roger
Staubach was selected to
chair an effort to bring the
Super Bowl to North Texas.
... Former Alabama coach
Mike Shula was hired as the
quarterbacks coach for the
Jacksonville Jaguars. ... Chi-
cago Bears left guard Ruben
Brown was added to the
NFC’s Pro Bowl roster as a
replacement for injured Phila-
delphia Eagles guard Shawn
Andrews... . Cincinnati Ben-
gals wide receiver Chris
Henry was sent to jail for two
days after pleading guilty to

allowing minors to drink alco-
hol in his hotel room last
spring. ... Darren Perry, the
Pittsburgh Steelers” defensive
secondary coach since 2003,
resigned following a meeting
with new coach Mike Tomlin.
... The Buffalo Bills signed
offensive lineman Kirk Cham-
bers.

e Golf: South Africa’s
Retief Goosen shot a 7-under
65 to take a one-stroke lead
after the first round of the
Qatar Masters in Doha. Spain’s
Miguel Angel Jimenez and
Australia’s Nick O’Hern
opened with 66s.

e Auto racing: Alex Gur-
ney took the pole position for
the Rolex 24 At Daytona, 45
years after father Dan Gurney
captured the first sports car
race at Daytona International
Speedway.

e College’ football:
North Carolina State com-
pleted its coaching staff by hir-
ing assistants Andy McCol-
lum and Mike Reed.
McCollum, the former head
coach at Middle Tennessee,
will coach linebackers and
Reed is leaving the Philadel-
phia Eagles’ staff to coach the
Wolfpack’s defensive backs.
... Marshall hired Steve Dun-
lap as its defensive coordina-
tor. :
e Cycling: France’s anti-
doping agency dropped its
investigation of Tour de
France runner-up Oscar Per-
eiro, saying the Spanish rider
gave enough justification for
use of an asthma medication.











MANU FERNANDEZ/AP

GETTING GEARED UP

BAR Honda Formula One driver Rubens Barrichello
of Brazil drives his new Honda RA 107 during a test
session at Montmelo racetrack near Barcelona.

Auto racing trash talk

With Toyota poised to enter NASCAR’s Nextel Cup series
this season, Ford team owner Jack Roush is revving up the

combative rhetoric.

Roush, the loudest critic of NASCAR’s decision to allow
the Japanese automaker to enter the Nextel Cup series, said
he’s “preparing myself for siege” on the track and in the

boardroom this year.

’ “J expect to hand Toyota their head over the short term,”
Roush said this week during NASCAR’s preseason media

tour

Roush, who has said that Americans shouldn’t buy foreign-

made cars because it hurts the economy, believes that Toyo-
ta’s entry will hurt NASCAR because the automaker will out-
spend teams affiliated with domestic automakers.

But he’s ready for a fight.

“Nobody is frightened,” Roush said. “We're going to go to
war with them, and they should give us their best shot.”

Given current events, this might not be the most sensitive
time for Roush — a war history buff who owns a World War
II-era P-51 Mustang fighter plane — to compare sports to war.
But at times Wednesday, Roush seemed to be channeling

Winston Churchill.

“Toyota will not find that the established teams and manu-
facturers will wither in their path, as has been the case where
they have tried to engage elsewhere,” he said. -

But Roush’s preparations to take on Toyota go beyond
tough talk. He is negotiating to sell a significant stake of his
team to a group headed by Boston Red Sox and former Flor-
ida Marlins owner John Henry to raise more money to race.

Historic fight

Boxer Laila Ali met with
Nelson Mandela’s ex-wife
ahead of a historic fight in
Johannesburg, South Africa.
The daughter of Muham-
mad Ali visited human-
rights activist Winnie
Madikizela-Mandela in
Soweto on Wednesday and
spoke at a local school.

Ali, 29, will become the
first female to headline a
bout in South Africa,
defending her World Boxing
Council and International
Boxing Federation super-
middleweight titles against
Gwendolyn O'Neil of Guy-
ana on Feb. 3 at Emperor’s
Palace casino.

Ali (23-0, 20 knockouts)
beat O’Neil, 36, with a third-
round knockout in 2004 to
win the IBF light-heavy-
weight title in Atlanta.

“I know Gwendolyn will
be better prepared this time
and a more formidable
opponent, so I’m not taking
anything for granted,” Ali
said.

‘There were 21 goals; you think
| would have had one. | guess it
wasn’t meant to be. | had a few
chances, it just didn’t work out.’

- SIDNEY CROSBY, Pittsburgh Penguins
center, joking after going without a goal in
the NHL All-Star Game on Wednesday night.
Crosby’s Eastern Conference team lost to
the Western Conference 12-9.



Hard act to follow

Tennessee women’s bas-
ketball coach Pat Summitt
is trying to figure out how to
top Bruce Pearl’s show of
support.

Pearl made good ona
promise to paint himself
orange and cheer in the stu-
dent section for the wom-
en’s game against No. 1
Duke on Monday.

Pearl, the Vols’ men’s
coach, painted his torso
orange with a light blue “V”
on his chest and an “L” on
his back.

“J don’t know that I can
match it,” Summitt said. “I
thought it was great. I think
it shows his passion not only
for his program, but he’s
been a great friend to our
program.”

. Pearl stood in front of the
student section with his son,
Steven, a walk-on fresh-
man, three other players and
a manager to spell out the
messages “GO VOLS” on
their chests and “LADY” on
their backs. :



FLASHBACK

On this day in history:

1985 — In hockey, Edmonton’s Wayne Gretzky scores
his 50th goal in the 49th game of the season.

1986 — The Chicago Bears capture their first NFL cham-
pionship since 1963 by setting a Super Bowl record for points
scored in defeating the New England Patriots 46-10.

ot eae

~ Ye ee «

ss 4
6E_| FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007__ INTERNATIONAL EDITION _

po



ulls snap Mavericks’ streak

From Miami Herald Wire Services

CHICAGO — Ben Gordon
scored 30 points, Luol Deng
added 21 and the Chicago Bulls
snapped the Dallas Mavericks’
eight-game winning streak with a
96-85 victory on Thursday night.

Dirk Nowitzki had 28 points
and ll rebounds for the Maver-
icks; who lost for just the second
time in 23 games.

After nearly blowing an early
17-point lead, the Bulls pulled
away late in the fourth quarter.

Nowitzki’s 3 closed Chicago’s
lead to 79-76 with 4:31 left.

PJ. Brown followed with a
basket for Chicago and Kirk Hin-
rich followed with a 3, making it
84-76. Erick Dampier’s dunk for
Dallas cut the lead to 86-81, but
Brown answered for Chicago by
going around Nowitzki for a bas-
ket and hitting a jumper to put
Chicago up 90-81 with 1:16 left.

Brown scored six of his 12
points in the fourth quarter. Hin-
rich added 15 points and eight
rebounds and Ben Wallace had
17 rebounds for Chicago, which
improved to 19-6 at home.

Jerry Stackhouse scored 16
points and Jason Terry added 12
’ points and six assists for Dallas.

Nowitzki and Josh Howard,
Dallas’ top two scorers, had poor
shooting games. Nowitzki was
4-for-16 and Howard was 1-for-15
entering the fourth quarter. They
finally got it going in the fourth.

Nowitzki went to the basket
and scored and Howard fol-
lowed with a jumper to make it
72-67. After Gordon hit a jumper,
Howard converted a three-point
play to close the gap to 74-70
with 6:24 left.

Nowitzki’s jumper cut Chica-
go’s lead to 53-48 early in the
- third quarter, but the Bulls
responded with a 12-3 run.
Brown had back-to-back baskets
for the Bulls and Gordon fol-
lowed with a jumper. Deng’s
steal and dunk gave the Bulls a
65-51 lead with 2:28 left in the
quarter. '

Howard finished 4-for-20 and
Nowitzki was 7-for-22. Dallas
shot 31.2 percent, its worst mark
of the season. ,

The Bulls jumped out to a 23-6
lead with Deng scoring eight
points. Dallas was held to 13

P

PRO BASKETBALL

poirits in the first quarter, its sea-
son-low for a period.

Nowitzki and Stackhouse kept
Dallas in striking distance in the
second quarter.

Stackhouse came off the
bench and scored 13 points on
5-of-8 shooting and Nowitzki
scored 15 points. Nowitzki was
just 3-of-10 from the floor, but
made all nine free-throw

“attempts.

Chicago led 47-41 at the half

behind Gordon’s 16 points.

ALL-STAR STARTERS

NEW YORK — Gilbert Are-
nas pulled out another late vic-
tory. The Washington star
surged past Vince Carter in the
final days of All-Star voting to
claim the second Eastern Con-
ference guard spot by 3,010
votes, the fourth-closest margin
for a starting spot.

Cavaliers standout LeBron
James, the MVP last year, led all
players with more than 2.5 mil-
lion votes for the Feb. 18 game in
Las Vegas.

The first All-Star Game held
outside an NBA city will main-
tain one traditional look: Heat
center Shaquille O’Neal was cho-
sen to his 14th consecutive All-
Star Game, tying Jerry West and
Karl Malone for the most con-
secutive selections.

Aremas was 214,460 votes
behind Carter two weeks ago,
but finished with 1,454,166 to
Carter’s 1,451,156.

Arenas, O’Neal and James will
be joined in the East lineup by
Heat guard Dwyane Wade and

ELSEWHERE
e Cavaliers:

X-rays

O BASKETBALL | HOCKEY



HARD TO CORRAL: Bulls guard Ben Gordon drives to the basket
during his 30-point performance in Thursday night’s victory
over the Mavericks, snapping Dallas’ eight-gam

LATE WEDNESDAY
on

e win streak.

e Rockets 90, Spurs 85:

_ MiamiHerald.com | THE MIAMI HERALD





_ NBA STANDINGS





EASTERN CONFERENCE















Chicago 96, Dallas 85



Miami at N.Y., 7:30

Minn. at Sea., 10:30
Char. at Lakers, 10:30

NEw nas I

another first-time starter,
Toronto forward Chris Bosh.

Injured Houston center Yao
Ming led all West players with
more than 2.4 million votes. Min-
nesota’s Kevin Garnett and San
Antonio’s Tim Duncan were
voted in at forward, while Los
Angeles’ Kobe Bryant and Hous-
ton’s Tracy McGrady won the
guard spots.

McGrady held off Denver
newcomer Allen Iverson, who

LeBron James’ sore right big toe
were negative, and the Cavaliers
are hoping their superstar for-
ward doesn’t have to miss any
games.

James injured his toe during
the recent West Coast trip and
aggravated it during Wednesday
night’s double-overtime loss to
the 76ers. womens

e SuperSonics: The club
signed journeyman forward
Andre Brown to a contract for

Tracy McGrady scored 37 points
to lead visiting Houston.

e Grizzlies 132, Jazz 130

(OT): Eddie Jones beat the
buzzer with a 22-foot jump shot
to lift visiting Memphis.

e Kings 114, Bucks 106:
Ron Artest scored 36 points to
lead host Sacramento.

e Trail Blazers 101, Tim-

berwolves 98 (OT): Zach Ran- - =:

dolph had 22. points, 15 rebounds,
and two key free throws at the

would have finished ahead of the rest of the season.
Arenas to earn a starting spot if
he were still in Philadelphia.
Iverson started the past seven
All-Star games and was the MVP

in 2001 and 2005.



e Knicks: The Knicks are the
NBA’s most valuable franchise
despite nearly $40 million in
operating losses last season,
according to a list by Forbes.

HOCKEY

end to lead host Portland to the .

victory.

State.

e Warriors 110, Nets 109:
Monta Ellis hit a 17-foot jumper
at the buzzer to lift host Golden

SOUTHEAST vol Ww et Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Washington 24 17 «585 - 64 Ll 17-4 7-13 16-9
Orlando 23 20 «535 2 46 L-1 14-8 9-12 13-11
Miami 19 23 .452 5% 6-4 L-1. 10-10 9-13 8-12
Atlanta 14 26 .350 9% 55 Wl 7-11 7-15 9-17
Charlotte 1427 341 10 55 L2 8-14 6-13 11-17
ATLANTIC WL Pct. GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf
Toronto 21 22 488 «+- %7-3 W-2 13-7 8-15 14-8
New Jersey 20 22 .476 % 64 L-2 13-10 7-12 16-9
New York 18 26 .409 3% 5-5 L-2 10-13 8-13 11-16
Philadelphia 13 30 302 8 4-6 W-2 7-10 6-20 9-16
Boston 12.29 .293 8 19 L-9 4-16 8-13 8-18
CENTRAL WoL. Pet. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Detroit 24 16 «600 - 55 W-3 11-8 138 168
Cleveland 24 18 «4.571 1 46 L2 15-5 9-13 15-12
Chicago 25 19 568 1 55 W-2 19-6 6-13 19-8
Indiana 22°20 524 3 55 W-2 12-7 10-13 17-12
Milwaukee 17 25 405 «#8 #19 LS 9-7 8-18 7-16
WESTERN CONFERENCE
SOUTHWEST wie : Pct. GB 110 Str. Home Away Conf
Dallas 359 #795 - 8&2 L-L 19-3 16-6 23-6
San Antonio 30 14 682 5 7-3 Ld 15-8 15-6 19-9
Houston 26 16 «4.619 8 64 W-1 13-5 13-11 14-14
New Orleans 16 25 .39017% 46 L-2 10-10 6-15 7-17
Memphis 11 32 .25623% 3-7 W-1 8-13 3-19 5-19
NORTHWEST WL. Pct. GB L10 Str, Home Away Conf
Utah 28 15 651 - 55 Ll 15-5 13-10 17-9
Denver 22 17 «564-4 «64 W-5 12-10 10-7 9-11
Minnesota 20 21 .488 #+(7? 46 4L5 12-8 8-13 11-13
Portland 18 25 .419 10 5-5 W-2 11-12 7-13 11-13
Seattle 16 26 .38111% 3-7 L-1 12-10 4-16 6-16
PACIFIC WL Pct. GB L10 Str. Home Away Conf
Phoenix 34 8 .810 - 10-0 W-15 19-3 15-5 16-7
L.A. Lakers 27: 15 «+.643 «7. 6-4 W-l 19-4 8-11 17-9
L.A. Clippers 20 21 .48813% 64 W-3 15-7 5-14 13-16
Golden State 20 23 .465144% 46 W-1 168 4-15 13-15
Sacramento 17.23 .425 16 3-7 W-2 12-11 5-12 8-15
RESULTS AND SCHEDULES
Thursday’s results Tonight’s games Wednesday’s results

Ind. 96, Miami 94 (OT)

N.J. at Clippers, late Atl. at Orl., 7 Det. 103, Cha. 92
Bos. at Tor., 7 Tor. 90, N.O. 88
: ee at Phil., 7 wy A ue (20T) '
lem. at S.A., 8 .. Atl. 82, Bos.

NAM Y. HUH/AP Sac. at N.O., 8 Pho. 112, N.Y. 107
Wash. at Det.,8 . Hou. 90, S.A. 85
Pho. at Mil., 8:30 Mem. 132, Utah 130 (OT)
Port. at Hous., 8:30 Sac. 114, Mil. 106
Den. at Utah, 9 Por. 101, Min. 98 (OT)

G.S. 110, NJ. 109

Through Wednesday
SCORING REBOUNDING

G FG FT PTS AVG G OFF DEF TOT AVG

Anthony, Den. 24 287 171 758 31.6 Garnett, Minn. 40 102 403 505 12.6
Arenas, Wash. 41 389 314 1218 29.7 Camby, Den. 34 90 338 428 12.6
Iverson, Den. 31 303 265 900 29.0 Howard, Orl. 43 150 388 538 12.5
Wade, Mia. 35 330 312 990 283 Boozer, Utah 43 137 374 511 11.9
Bryant, LAL 39 363 3141102 283 . Okafor, Char. 41 159 301 460.11.2
Redd, Mil. 33 302 244 914 27.7 Chandler, NOk. 39 146 282 428 11.0
James, Clev. 42 409 265 1139 27.1 —_Lee, N.Y. 44 162 309 471 10.7
Allen, Sea. 32 286 172 836 26.1. O'Neal, Ind. 37 90 298 388 10.5
Nowitzki, Dall. 42 359 296 1053 25.1 Duncan, S.A. 44 128 333 461 10.5
Johnson, Atl. ... , 36.340. 135,890 24.7 Randolph, Port. 42 127 307 434 10.3

FIELD GOALS“-" _ ASSISTS”

Leet S URE FGA PCT . “@ AST AVG

Biedrins, G.S. 192 309 .621 Nash, Phoe. 40 465 11.6
Lee, N.Y. 193 318 .607 Williams, Utah 43 392 9.1
Stoudemire, Phoe. 283 470 .602 ‘Kidd, N.J. 42 382 9.1
Curry, N.Y. 320 546 .586 Paul, NOk. 27 242 9.0
Boozer, Utah 399 702 .568 Miller, Phil. 41 355 87
Dalembert, Phil. 185326 .567 Davis, G.S. 38 326 8.6
Bogut, Mil. 218 385 .566 Wade, Mia. 35 278 «(7.9
Howard, Orl. 259 459 .564 _ Billups, Det. 32 253 (7.9
Brand, LAC 331 594 .557 Ford, Tor. 38 294. 7.7
Diaw, Phoe. 187 . 347 .539 290 7.6

Felton, Char. 38

Teams lining up to acquire Forsberg

From Miami Herald Wire Services

VOORHEES, N.J. — Peter
Forsberg has generated lots of
interest among NHL teams
looking to add a veteran
scorer.

Philadelphia Flyers general
manager Paul Holmgren said
he’s been contacted by a num-
ber of teams about Forsberg
leading up to the Feb. 27 NHL
trading deadline.

But Holmgren denied a
Denver television report that
the Swedish star has been
given permission to speak to
the Colorado Avalanche about
returning to his former team.

Forsberg, 33, is in the final
year of his contract and can
become an unrestricted free
agent on July 1.

Holmgren was asked if any
arrangement is in place in
which Forsberg or his agent
could talk to Colorado about
possible interest by the Ava-
lanche.

“Absolutely not,” Holm-
gren said. “First, I seriously
doubt that [reports of such
talks] are true. Colorado is a
team that has asked about him.
Our stance all along has been
when we get to that point with
Peter, we'll get to that point.”

Forsberg was returning
from a four-day trip to Sweden
and was unavailable for com-
ment. —

“Pve talked with Peter a
few times, but not about
whether he wants to be traded
or where he wants to go,”
Holmgren said.

The Flyers and Forsberg
have maintained that no trade
is likely if Forsberg can’t
resolve his foot issues.

He has missed 16 games this
season due to post-surgery
problems with his right ankle.

“Our focus has been on get-
ting his skate-foot issues
fixed,” Holmgren said.

“Then doing something [a

ger term.”

consider giving permission to
Forsberg to talk to teams at
this time.

down with Peter and talk
about options, but not right
now.”

Forsberg on Wednesday. Fors-

berg has been consulting with

Swedish doctors on this trip

with the hope of coming up

with a solution to his foot
roblem.



ae CHRIS O’MEARA/AP
A HOT COMMODITY: Philadelphia Flyers general manager
Paul Holmgren said Thursday he has been contacted by
many teams about star center Peter Forsberg, above.

“He has been skating with
his junior team and made
some adjustments,” Holmgren
said. “He felt fairly good about
the progress that he made.”

Holmgren also has not yet
begun contract extension talks
with Forsberg’s agent, Don
Baizley.

Forsberg, who has eight
goals and 20 assists in 31
games, was drafted by the

. Flyers in 1991 but sent to Colo-
rado in 1992 as part of the Eric
Lindros trade.

He signed with the Flyers

as a free agent in 2005.

Holmgren said he won't

“Not right now,” he said.
“J think we need to sit

The GM said he spoke to

ELSEWHERE

e Stars: The club acti-
vated defenseman Sergei
Zubov from injured reserve
and he is expected to play
tonight against Pittsburgh, the
first game after the All-Star
break.

Zubov missed three games
after elbow surgery on Jan. 12.

He is the highest-scoring
Russian defenseman in NHL
history with 708 points in 978
career games. This season, he
has seven goals and 23 assists
for 30 points in 44 games.

The 36-year-old captured
Stanley Cups with the Stars in
1999 and the New York Rang-
ers in 1994,

The Stars also recalled win-
ger Krys Barch from Iowa of
the AHL. He made his NHL
debut earlier this month.

-@ Wild: Goalie Manny
Fernandez’s sprained left knee
will keep him out of the team’s
first game after the All-Star
break. ;

Fernandez stayed in Minne-
sota during the four-day All-
Star break and skated to test
the knee, which he injured in a
game against Dallas right
before the break. He practiced
briefly on Thursday, but left
when his knee stiffened up,
coach Jacques Lemaire said.

The Wild will face Calgary
at home tonight, with backup
goalie Niklas Backstrom
expected to play for Fer-
nandez.

“He won't be playing, that’s
for sure, tomorrow,” Lemaire
said of Fernandez. “It will be a
day-to-day thing. But I don’t
think he will be playing tomor-
row.”

Fernandez, who is 21-15-1
with a 2.58 goals-against aver-
age and .911 save percentage
this season, said after practice
that he was a little more opti-
mistic.

e Sabres: The banged-up
Sabres can count on at least



EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic W LOT Pts GF GA
New Jersey 29 14 «5 63 126 111°
N.Y. Rangers. 23 21 4 50 140 147
Pittsburgh 21 17 8 50 151 148
N.Y. Islanders 22:21. 4 «48 137 136
Philadelphia 1131 5 27 114 182
Northeast W LOT Pts GF GA
Buffalo 33 12 4 70 185 143
Montreal 2777 5 59 146 140
Ottawa 28 20 2 58 171 138
Toronto 22 21 «6 50 159 168
Boston 22 20 4 48 136 170
Southeast W LOT Pts GF GA
Atlanta 27 15 8 62 154 150
Carolina 25 19 6 56 153 155
Tampa Bay 26 22 2 54 161 158
Washington 20 21 7 47 149 168
Florida 18 22 10 46 143 161
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central ; W LOT Pts GF GA
Nashville 34.12 3 71 173 (125
Detroit 30 14°55 65 149 118
St. Louis 19 21 8 46 123 147
Columbus 18 25 5 41 120 149
Chicago 17 24: «7 41 119 150
Northwest W LOT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 27:19 2 56 124 122
Calgary 2617 4 ~ #56 147 121
Minnesota 25 20 4 54 136 128
Colorado 24 20 3 51 148 136
Edmonton » 23 21 4 50 131 138
Pacific W LOT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 30 12 8 68 167 130
San Jose 32 16 0 64 149 110
Dallas 29 18 #1 59 129 116
Phoenix 22 24 2 46 133 164
Los Angeles 16 28 6 38 138 182

left wing Jochen Hecht’s
return now that the NHL All-
Star break is over.

Hecht said Thursday he
expects to play at Columbus
tonight after he practiced fully
in the team’s first session back
after a four-day break. Hecht,
who missed three games with
what the Sabres referred to as
a lower-body injury, ranks
ninth on the team with 25
points (12 goals, 13 assists) and
plays alongside co-captain and
scoring leader Daniel Briere.

The Eastern Conference-
leading Sabres (33-12-4) are
still uncertain of the status of
defenseman Henrik Tallinder
(high right ankle sprain) and
forward Jiri Novotny (left
ankle).

Tallinder practiced but isn’t
sure he’s ready to return dur-
ing Buffalo’s two-game road
trip, which concludes at the

New York Islanders on Satur-
day. Novotny did not practice
and has missed one game
since being hurt in the first
period of a 4-3 shootout vic-
tory over Vancouver on Jan.
19. Assistant Brian McCutch-
eon said the team will wait
until today to decide whether
Tallinder or Novotny can play.

e Players’ Association:
Executive director Ted Saskin
is facing another challenge to
his leadership of the NHL

- Players’ Association, with a
majority of the 30 union-
player representatives approv-
ing an independent investiga-
tion into his hiring.

The action was announced
Thursday in a statement from
a New York public relations
company, with players and
officials scattered across the

country after Wednesday
night’s All-Star Game.

“This is an informative
investigation that we feel will
preserve the integrity of our
NHLPA constitution and lead-
ership process,” Mathieu
Schneider, a Detroit Red
Wings defenseman and
interim NHLPA executive
committee member, said in
the statement. “The purpose
of the investigation is to clear
the air, produce clarity on
these questions and fortify a
strong unified union.”

A conference call was
scheduled Thursday night
between Saskin and the execu-
tive board, which is made up
of the NHLPA’s executive
committee and the player-rep-
resentatives from the 30
teams. News of this latest chal-
lenge comes three days after a
lawsuit against Saskin and oth- |
ers was dismissed by a U.S.
federal court in Illinois. The
judge agreed with the NHLPA
position that Ontario rather
than Illinois should host such a
lawsuit, if indeed it was even
warranted.

contract] with the Flyers lon- p
~ Clemson rallies, |

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THE MIAMIHERALD | MiamiHerald.com

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

_ but Duke wins;

Affialo, UCLA

From Miami Herald Wire Services

DURHAM, N.C. — David
McClure has earned his minutes by
grabbing rebounds, getting steals and
bringing energy off the bench while
his Duke teammates grab most of the
headlines.

On Thursday night, though,
McClure made the most of his
chance to take the big shot.

The sophomore hit a layup as time
expired to lead the No. 10 Blue Devils
past No. 19 Clemson 68-66, extending
Duke’s mastery of the Tigers while
keeping it moving forward in the
Atlantic Coast Conference standings.

In a game with the wildest of fin-
ishes — including a blown five-point
lead in the final 13 seconds and a dose
of clock controversy before the final
play — McClure’s stunning basket
helped the Blue Devils (17-3, 4-2
ACC) win their fourth consecutive
game. Duke has also won 20 meetings
in a row in the series — a span of 10
years — and 24 of 26 games played at
Cameron Indoor Stadium.

This one came thanks to an
unflashy, 6-foot-6 forward who fin-
ished with a modest statistics line off
the bench. As Duke head coach Mike
Krzyzewski put it, “He makes simple,
terrific plays.”

“You never know what’s going to
happen,” McClure said. “If you’re in
every play, you’re going to be ready:
to make a play.”

_ With the score tied at 66 with

“"4.4 seconds left, Josh* McRoberts

inbounded the ball to freshman Jon:
Scheyer,.who pushed the ball near
midcourt and sent a pass ahead to
McClure.

McClure, who had a step on Ver-
non Hamilton, caught the pass and
laid it up over the outstretched arms
of K.C. Rivers as the horn sounded.

“It was a great finish and a great
way to win,” said Scheyer, who had
12 points in the game. “That’s about
as crazy.as it gets.”

The Duke bench players immedi-
ately spilled onto the floor in celebra-
tion and mobbed McClure.

“T’ve been on teams where we’ve
hit shots like that, but 2've never been
the one to hit it,” McClure said. “You
can’t even explain how it feels. I just
started jumping around, and, about a
second later, I got hit by the rest of

- the team, and we all went down.

“It’s one of the best feelings you
can experience in a lifetime.”

Not so for the Tigers (18-3, 4-3),
who walked back toward their bench
in stunned silence after making a

FROM THE SPORTS FRONT

_ rout California

remarkable comeback themselves.

Duke looked on its way to the vic-
tory when Blue Devils freshman Ger-
ald Henderson hit two free throws to
make it 66-61 with 12.7 seconds left.
But Hamilton scored a layup to cut
the deficit to three with 5 seconds
left.

Then Duke made its biggest mis-
take of the night, when McRoberts’
inbounds pass for Greg Paulus went
right to Hamilton just outside the
3-point arc. Hamilton buried the shot
to tie the game with 1.8 seconds left,
which seemed to have the game
headed for overtime.

But game officials stopped play to
review the time left and restored the
clock to 4.4 seconds. Video replays
showed that the clock, which stopped
on Hamilton’s layup, did not restart
on Hamilton’s steal until the ball was
almost in the basket — a pause of
more than a second that led to confu-
sion.

“Tt all happened so fast,” said
Hamilton, who led Clemson with 21
points. “I really thought when I hit
the 3 it was time to go to overtime.”

Clemson coach Oliver Purnell said
he had no arguments with the call,
even though only 0.6 seconds expired
on Hamilton’s steal-and-3-pointer, in
which the senior hesitated before the
shot.

“I don’t have any proof or feeling
that it was handled poorly,” Purnell
said. “As soon as they told me, we
were trying to set our defense
because they had some time left.”

Clemson certainly had plenty of
chances in the final minutes to keep it
from coming down to the final play.
The Tigers tied the score at 60 when
James Mays stole the ball in the
Tigers’ full-court pressure and made
a layup with 3:30 left.

Scheyer hit a pair of free throws
on the next possession to put Duke
back ahead at 62-60. Then, after
Mays made a freé throw to cut the
deficit to one, Clemson’s Cliff Ham-
monds missed shots for the lead on
consecutive possessions, and Rivers
missed an open 3-pointer with about
a minute left.

Scheyer rebounded Rivers’ miss
and hit two free throws to make it

64-61 with 47.1 seconds left, and Hen- |

derson’s free throws pushed the mar-
gin to five.

McRoberts led Duke with
17 points, and McClure finished with
eight points and six rebounds in
34 minutes. The Blue Devils shot just
41 percent, but they kept control of

the game with a 40-24 rebounding
advantage — including a 17-6 edge on
the offensive boards that led to a
19-4 edge in second-chance points.

e No. 3 UCLA 62, California
46: Arron Afflalo scored 20 of his 25
points in the second half and made all
nine of his free throws for the Bruins,
who won in Berkeley, Calif.

Josh Shipp added 12 points and
threw a behind-the-back bounce pass
to Afflalo for a late basket, and Luc
Richard Mbah a Moute grabbed 1l
rebounds in the Bruins’ fourth con-
secutive victory since a 68-66 loss at
Oregon on Jan. 6 — the team’s lone
defeat so far.

Afflalo shot 7-for-13 and didn’t
score for the first time until making
two free throws with 4:39 to go in the
opening half.

Theo Robertson had 16 points,
four rebounds and three assists, and
Ryan Anderson added 13 points and
six boards, but the Golden Bears dis-
appointed the sellout crowd of 11,877
at Haas Pavilion, where many stu-
dents packéd their section about an
hour before tipoff.

The Bruins (18-1, 7-i Pac-10), com-
ing off a sweep of the Arizona
schools, finished 50 percent from the
floor after a slow start and held Cal
leader Ayinde Ubaka to no points
and two assists on 0-for-8 shooting.

UCLA beat the Bears tu two of
three meetings last season, ana the
Bruins clinched a share of the Pac-10
title with a 67-58 overtime victory in
Berkeley last March 2, UCLA then
defeated Cal again in the conference
tournament championship game.

This time, the Bruins took their
first lead of the game on a 3-pointer
by Afflalo with 3:55 before halftime —
giving him five consecutive points
after the free throws —- to start a 7-0
spurt that helped UCLA to a 28-24
edge at the break

Cal (12-8, 4-4), which returned
home after playing six of its previous

‘eight games on the road, gave up too

many easy baskets in the second half.

INTERNATIONAL EDITION _

COLLEGE BASKETBALL | TENNIS

The Bears lost their second game in a
row to a highly-ranked conference
opponent, after a 92-84 defeat at No.
7 Oregon on Saturday.

During Cal’s quick start Thursday
night, Anderson hit a long 3-pointer
with a hand in his face to beat the 35-
second buzzer, then dunked the next
time down the floor with the clock
about to expire. Robertson’s dunk on
Cal’s ensuing possession made it 13-8,
causing UCLA coach Ben Howland
to call a timeout.

The Bruins’ Darren Collison was
whistled for an offensive foul while
driving the lane moments later.

After Jerome Randle’s 3-pointer
with 10:24 remaining before halftime
made it 16-8, UCLA answered with
seven unanswered points, including
five in a row from Michael Roll.

UCLA missed its first four shots
and had two early traveling calls,
finding it tough to establish any
offensive rhythm against Cal’s
scrappy man defense. The Bruins,
who were 8-of-20 to begin the game,
didn’t reach the free-throw line until

9:54 remaining in the first half, and ’

Russell Westbrook missed both

Shots.

Already short-handed because of
injury, Cal played another man down
after losing forward Eric Vierneisel
to a sprained left ankle in the final 2
minutes of Wednesday’s practice.
Lihat left the Bears with only eight
healthy scholarship players, includ-
ing a former walk-on and two fresh-
men. :

e No. 14 Butler 70, Loyola-
Chicago 66 (OT): A. J. Graves hit
three 3-pointers in overtime, includ-
ing the go-ahead basket with 55.2 sec-
onds to play, and the Bulldogs, play-
ing in Chicago, posted their eighth
victory in nine games.

Graves scored 26 points to lead
the Buildogs (18-2, 6-1 Horizon
League), and Pete Campbell added 12
— including 1i in the first half.

Blake Schlib, who put Loyola up
66-65 when. he hit a 3-pointer with

FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007 | 7E



STREETER LECKA/GETTY IMAGES

FANTASTIC FINISH: David McClure, center left, and his Duke teammates celebrate after McClure’s layup
at the buzzer beat Clemson 68-66. Duke blew a five-point lead in the final 13 seconds but still survived.

2:53 to play in overtime, scored a
game-high 27 points. Majak Kou
added 14 points for the Ramblers
(13-8, 4-4), and Leon Young scored
12 points in a reserve role.

LATE WEDNESDAY

@ No. 11 Memphis 72, Tulsa 59:
Joey Dorsey scored 13 points,
grabbed 11 rebounds and blocked
three shots to lead the Tigers (16-3,
6-0 Conference USA) over the
Golden Hurricanes (12-6, 2-3).

Dorsey dominated the inside in
the first half, and the Tigers built an
early lead on the way to their eighth
consetutive victory, keeping them
undefeated at home.

Tulsa lost its third game in a row,
and the team has lost all four of its
road games this season.

Robert Dozier had 12 points and
eight rebounds for Memphis, and Jer-
emy Hunt scored 11 on 4-of-15 shoot-
ing from the field.

Ray Reese led Tulsa with 17
points, and Ben Uzoh added 10. Rod
Earls — Tulsa’s leading scorer, at
12.5 points per. game — was held to
three points, missing five of his six
shots from the field.

e No. 17 Arizona 71, Arizona
State 47: Freshman Chase Budinger
had 21 points and 10 rebounds, and
the host Wildcats (14-5, 5-4 Pac-10)
snapped a three-game skid.

In a tune‘up for Saturday’s game
against No. 4 North Carolina, Ari-
zona beat its in-state rival for the Uth
tite in a row. Jawann McClellan
added i4 points for the Wildcats.

Arizona was without leading-
scorer Marcus Williams, who was
suspended for an undisclosed viola-
tion of team rules. Freshman Jordan
Hill started in his place and scored 12
points, shooting 5-for-7 from the
floor, and he grabbed nine rebounds.

Christian Polk scored 11 points for
Arizona State (6-14, 0-9), which has
dropped 10 games in a row. It is the
Sun Devils’ longest skid since they -
lost their final 11 games in 1996-97.

° AUSTRALIAN OPEN

“I think the art of Roger is
probably the best player I’ve
ever seen,” Laver said. “The
way he’s compiling the Grand
Slam titles, I think he’s got a
great chance of being the best
ever.”

Laver made a rare return to
Melbourne from California to
watch Federer again.

“Roger’s got too many

. shots, too much talent in one

body,” Laver said. “It’s hardly
fair that one person can do all
this — his backhands, his
forehands, volleys, serving,
his court position. ... The
way he moves around the
court, you feel like he’s barely
touching the ground. That’s
the sign of a great champion.”

And that’s a daunting pros-
pect for Haas or Gonzalez.
Haas, a two-time semifinalist
in Australia, has never
reached a Grand Slam final.
Gonzalez is into the semis at a
major for the first time.

Roddick, who beat Federer
in an exhibition tournament
less than two weeks ago and
had match points against him
at the Masters Cup in Novem-
ber, rated the prospect of an
upset as “slim.”



PHIL WALTER/GETTY IMAGES

TOUGH LOSS: Andy Roddick.

Meanwhile, the women’s

‘final, on Saturday, features

top-seeded Maria Sharapova
against No. 81 Serena Wil-
liams. Despite the ranking dis-
parity, nobody is counting
Williams out.

After playing just four
tournaments in 2006 because
of a lingering knee problem,
Williams has said the only
other person that gave her a
chance of winning an eighth
Grand Slam title was her
mother and coach, Oracene.

Williams led 5-1 in the sec-
ond set of her semifinal
before letting Nicole Vaidi-
sova back in, wasting triple

match point at 3-5 and need-
ing three more before finally
converting in a 7-6 (7-5), 6-4
victory.

“T almost did a gag-a-roo-
ney there,” Williams said.

Now, close to a third Aus-
tralian title, she is guaranteed
of returning to the top 20

“T can’t believe it,” Wil-
liams said. “That’s awesome.
If I play well, which I don’t
think I’ve even reached yet at
all in this tournament .. it's
really hard for anyone oni the
women’s tour to beat me.”

Sharapova turned her
semifinal against No, 4 Kim
Clijsters into an Australian
farewell match for the 23
year-old Belgian, who is retir
ing at the end of the year, with
a 6-4, 6-2 victory.

Sharapova is 2-2 against
Williams, and she bad match
points in their previous meet-
ing — the 2005 Australian
semifinal.

“J think she has nothing to
lose,” said Sharapova, who
will assume the top :anking
next week regardless of Satui

day’s result. those are
always dangerous oppo
nents.”

Federer reached the finals
of all four majors last year but



WILLIAM WEST/AFP-GETTY IMAGES
FINAL CUT: Maria Sharapova.

was deprived of a Grand Slam
in a four-set loss to Rafael
Nadal at the French Open.
Federer has led the rankings
since February 2004.

Laver, who had Grand
Slam seasons in 1962 and 1969,
thinks Federer is setting him-
selt up for a run at a Grand
Slam season and has all the
shots he needs to. shatter the
tennis records. After that was
said. Federer put his full rep
ertoive on display, leaving
Roddick bewildered in their
83-minute match.

1 ve played good matches
here, but never really almost
destroyed somebody,” Fed-

Sharapova, Serena advance to women’s title match

erer said. “I’ve done it at the
U.S. Open, Wimbledon,
French Open. Maybe not so
much here because I didn’t
get so many chances yet.
“For me, that’s a highlight
of my career. I’m very, very

‘happy about it.”

Federer broke Roddick’s
first service game, and then
was broken back immediately.
It was the only chance Rod-
dick had in the match, with
Federer winning ll games in a
row from 3-4 in the first set to

‘go up a break in the third.

After falling behind 5-0 in
the second set. Roddick tried
to smack a ball into the stands
to let off steam. Instead, he
lost his grip of the racket, and
it skidded into a photogra-
pher’s knee, drawing a warn-
ing from the chair umpire.

Federer closed that set
with an ace, handing Roddick
his first 6-0 losing set in 25
Grand Slam tournaments.

“It was frustrating. You
know, it was miserable. ..
Terrible,” Roddick said. “I
was playing well coming in. I
didn’t toresee it.”

Roddick, at coach Jimmy
Connors’ urging, rushed the
net in his exhibition victory
over Federer. He thought







GREG WOOD/AFP-GETTY IMAGES
BIG FINISH: Serena Williams.

those tactics would work
again. This time, he got
scorched. Now with a 1-13
record against Federer, Rod-
dick is back to square one.

“You do your best not to
get discouraged. I caught an
absolute beating tonight, no
two ways about it,” he said.
“You deal with it, and you go
back to the drawing board.”

Laver went into the locker
room te congratulate Federer
and renew a friendship that
began last year.

Asked of Laver’s assess-
meni, Federer said: “Oh, he
said it was excellent, which
is nice to hear.”
PAGE 8C, FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007

TRIBUNE SPORTS





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Opening lead — queen of hearts.

The problem of insufficient
entries can occasionally be solved by
extremely careful manipulation of
the cards.

In this deal, for example, South
can make all 13 tricks if he plays
properly. This might not be a vital
matter, since the contract is only
three notrump, but anyone capable of
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Eliminating the Impediments

West leads a heart, and South
sees that there are four finesses —
two in spades, one in diamonds and
one in clubs — that can be taken:

The problem is that there are only ©

two apparent entries to dummy for
the purpose of taking the four
finesses. Nevertheless, all the
finesses can be accomplished by
making judicious use of the spot
cards.

South wins the heart and leads
the seven of clubs to the ace. He then
returns a low club to the jack and
cashes the king, leaving his four of
clubs as an entry to dummy’s five.

Declarer performs a similar feat
in diamonds. He leads the eight to
the king, finesses the jack on. the
return and cashes the ace. The six is
now an entry to dummy’s seven.

South next crosses to the five of
clubs to take his first finesse in
spades, and then to the seven of dia-
monds for the second one. His work
done, he then claims 13 tricks.

It can be seen that declarer can
easily spare the seven of clubs and
eight of diamonds when he leads
them to dummy. They are not signif-
icant as high cards, but they must be
gotten out of the way if declarer is to
score the maximum number of tricks.

ARR! WE'RE BLOODTHIRSTY



COCOMILS.COPS [HOSSEOMTUZ

HOW many words of four letters or more can you
make from the letters shown here? In making a
word, each letter may be used once only. Each
must contain the centre letter and there must be
at least one nine-letter word. No plurals or verb
forms ending in ‘s’, no words with initial capitals
and no words with a hyphen or apostrophe ‘
permitted. The first word of a phrase is permitted
(e.g. inkjet in inkjet printer).

TODAY'S TARGET

Good 18; very good 27; excellent 36 (or more).
Solution Monday.











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YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION

emit emote item lemon lime LIMESTONE meet
melon melt meson mete mien mile milestone
milt mine mint mist mite moist moisten mole
molest molten most mote motel omen omit
seem semi slim slime smelt smile smite smote
solemn some stem teem time tome

fe CRYPTIC PUZZLE | |

























ANAST, YE SCURNY DOGS!
HOIST THE JOLIN ROGER
AND READY THE PLANK /





FRIDAY,
JANUARY 26

ARIES — March 21/April 20
Preparation is key this week, Aries.
Be ready to hit the ground running
when new opportunities arrive that
allow you to showcase your talents.

TAURUS - April 21/May 21

Although it seems like you’re facing
a tough decision, if you think about
it logically, the answer is clear..Do
only what feels right to you, Tautus.
You are the master of your own fate.

GEMINI - May 22/June 21

If you feel like your life. has lacked a
certain sparkle recently, Gemini,
now’s the time to prepare for a

change. A new romance is on,the -’
4 horizon, but you must act quickly'to’ . ’

take advantage of the opportunity.
CANCER - June 22/July 22

This is a week to assess where you are
in life, Cancer. Are you doing all.you
can to succeed? Make time to nurture
a new romance. Of course you're
busy, but the results are worth it. *

LEO — July 23/August 23
Events are important this week,
Leo, but not nearly as important, as
your attitude. The tide is beginning
to tur in your favor, so stop whin-
ing and have a little fun. “!

VIRGO -— Aug 24/Sept 22 °:
Don’t be too hard on yourself when
something doesn’t go quite as You
planned it, Virgo. Focus your effdrts
on moving on to new success. :

LIBRA — Sept 23/Oct 23
You'll be especially alert to patterns
and similarities in those around you,
Libra. Try to use this information to
your advantage. On Friday, an,old
flame stops by to chit-chat. +

SCORPIO — Oct 24/Nov 22-

Success is all about timing this
week, Scorpio. You may be full of
big ideas, but it’s best to not do any-
thing about them just yet. Do what
you can to help a family member
with a personal problem on Tuesday

SAGITTARIUS — Novy 23/Dec 21
The fears and doubts of the past few
weeks are starting to fade. Although
you may feel that you can take on
the world, don’t get too cocky —
that’s asking for trouble.

CAPRICORN -— Dec 22/Jan 2)
Money: matters come to the fore this
week. Now’s the time to give some
thought to why your finances are


























































































not as good as you'd like thein to be
ACROSS DOWN and what you can do about it
1 Character who got rich touring the 2 Seaman hardened to AQUARIUS - Jan 2Z1/reb 18,
' States (5) ; being reviled (6) This week, you’ll use what you
6 - Annoyed by arty pretentiousness 3 Hardly a mark on the side || hey We dacstee | 74 et know to persuade others to go along
about central heating (6) ° of the facel (6) with your plans. Failure is just not
: 3 4 16 bulary this week.
9 Henevrtcs done (25) =| &_Lastfth wag rar?) rey“ | | | i me Fe ois
10 Frovecialy 20439 61 (2) 5 _ Birds with their own fruit (5) Bee ies Pee esse idla td Things have been going great for
11 Aperfect sitter (5) 6 What Cameron found in you, Pisces. Be careful not to take
12 Chap sald to take ‘em on (5) Cremona? (7) : | 4 Bees Flt eri : this for granted. Remember the peo-
13 Every one in the reserves gets 7 Alitte matter of elémentary ee ie Pela ple a helped you get to where you
somewheral (7) ~ importance (4) are today.
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breath? (3) 12 Hot fish sometimes replaced (5) | B
17. |had halt a mile of elack (4) 13 The dangers, to Romeo, of an ve] Pde
18 Even slight damage can mean a injudicious kiss (5) Ez ae BS] ety ol
difficulty (6) : 14 - The town's saint (5) Fi ene Gothen ne ates '
19 She puts a touch of spice 15 Where a capital standard exists (5) lelectra : Every ae ciisjet witha sense .
in the drink (5) 16 What the hacker did when he got | ret of creative or artistic pleasure
20 Rogues at carts? (6) married (5) dreams of being able to sacrifice
22 If backing some winners, 18 Unhappy about Charlie's goal (5) several pieces for checkmate.
that's great! (4) 19 Each, in tum, is judged to be nicely ae - aL kc :
24 immorality in kissing? (3) fizzy (7) ACROSS DOME ua can maximise your ances
1 Stow (5) 2 Hypnotic state (6) y y
25 Gooked in the manner bread Is? (7) 21 Old, but starts the year with much 6 Range (6) 3 Bagrudge (6) by aiming for fast piece
26 A good thing to get your. unwise tennis (6) wu 9 an (7) 4 — Devour (3) development on an open board.
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cB . ' : "1 rt achie ream in s
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a 28 mi - thanks le 23 It's heavenly, cloudy, but no source of r= 13 ree 7 ‘Black en Cap d’Agde tournament in style,
Oe, man rain (6) 8 Favour collecting €16,000 at the finish. ‘
4 29° Figures ina meal calculated to do = 15 Meadow (3) 12 Deserve (5) Can you 9€' out the main remaining army, spearheaded by :
Cc Fig 25 Has Tony been : y line
you good (7 heard o'blare? (6) wn 17, Saucy (4) 13 Recreation (6) of White's winning idea? White _the £3 queen and the f1 rook, |
R a noted aes i 19 Ren os 5 ee sactifices three of his pieces. forces checkmate. Christmas é:
ae) 30 Tapped tame ey 76 It's of passing ‘ yah G. ie oa Two sacrifices are accepted, the greetings to all chessplaying
0 kind (6) importance (4) 22 Expensive (4) 18 Allude (5) third declined. Then White's readers.
| | 31. Atsea, something to do with apin (6) = 28 Pick it up and yout pay (3) 24 Rubbish (3) 19 Type of bean (7) LEONARD BARDEN
Ss - "te RE SE I 25 oon ") 21 real
: S Yesterday's cryptic solutions = Yesterday's easy solutions 7 Pale a ler 2
ACROSS 3, Gle-AM 8, Surly 10, Be-N-ds. 11, Sol 12, Dinar | ACROSS: 3, Edict B, Facet 10; Rayon 11, Gum 12, Scrap on ip 25 Area of authority (5) * “4
i reveling stare eee ats ae ute ie Venus 18, Tea 19, Cerise 21, Beer can 22, 29° Funny (7) 26 Cereal crop (4) Chess solution 8288: 1 Bd4! cxd4 2 Ng7+! Kd8 (if :
1 NY 29, 1 A , £78 31, , 24, Monitor 26, Random 29, Nod 31, Ei
So-lid 32, Inkwell 34, Adutt 35, Pa-D 36, A-do-re 37, 32, Demigod 34, Covet 35, Cur 36, Kudos 37, Lunch a "ff 30° Salute (6) 28 Rodent (3) Bxg7 3 Qxf7+ Kd 4 Qud7 mate) 3 Red7 #1 Kid 4 Qd5+



and Black resigned. If Bd6 5 Rod7+ Kd8 6 Qxd6 mate.

Bor-ed 38, Anise(-ed) Reply 31 Principle (6)

DOWN: 1, Mus-e8 2, ALlure-d 4, Laid 5, Abacus 6, Me-rit | DOWN: 1, Magic 2, Demoted 4, Dice 5, Craven 6, Taper 7, IF KT 5 Rd7+ Kb8 6 Qb7 mate.

7, Adieu 9, Roc 12, Debt-or-s 14, Rut 16, To-Kay 17, State | Bogus 9, Cup 12, Stardom 14, See 16, Niger 17, Sense Mensa quiz: 19.30. ‘
19, PR-event 20, Ha-N-gs 21, Sepal 23, Stewpot 24, 19, Cabinet 20; Scare 21, Blunt 23, Modicum 24, Morose One possible word ladder solution is: BUSY, bury, ,
Bid-den 25, Irk 27, Ron-do 28, T-lar-a 30, E-L-der 32, Ilis | 25, Tom 27, Annul 28, Decor 30, Torch 32, Deal bum, bom, bore, bode, BODY. ’

38, Ear 33, Gun
TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007, PAGE 9C

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and world news. The Tribune provides everything
i need to know about lite in The Bahamas and 3

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JASON RAHMING
CONSTRUCTION FOREMAN



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PAGE 10C, FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007 ;

TRIBUNE SPORTS ,



Knowles and Nestor suffer
‘brutal’ defeat in Australia

@ TENNIS
By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

MARK Knowles described
the three-set loss that he and
Daniel Nestor suffered at the
hands of American twin broth-
ers Bob and Mike Bryan as a“
brutal” one that will cost him
some “sleepless nights” over
the next two weeks.

“Tt was a brutal loss, tough
one. They don’t get any easi-
er,” said Knowles as they
failed to hold on in the semifi-
nal of the Australian Open,
losing 2-6, 6-3, 7-5 to the
world’s best men’s doubles
team.

“Obviously, we came out, we
played fantastic.and we broke
them a.few times in the first
set as they dominated the
game. In the first game in the
second set, we had three break
points right away on Bob’s
serve, who'was their best serv-
er.” +
But Knowles said he and
Nestor, seeded number three
in the tournament, have to give
the Bryans a lot of credit
because “they played a hell-
of-a-game. They played pretty
strong at the end of the sec-
ond game as they broke us to
win. ;

“Then in the third set, it was
tough. We got a very bad call
in the first game that caused
Dan his serve. Unfortunately
we didn’t play on centre court
to have the use of the hawkeye
(replay camera), so we fell
down a break.” a ak

Knowles said they managed
to pull even at 5-5 at the end of
the third, but they didn’t con-
vert and the Bryans did what
they had to do to seal the deal.

“It was a tough loss,” he
summed up: ~

Despite the loss, Knowles
said he still feels that they were
the team that was playing the
best tennis throughout the two
games of competition.

“We played better than they
did. The good sign was that we
played better than they did,
but we just didn’t win the right
points at the end,” he reflect-
ed. “I guess we needed a little
bit of luck, maybe a lot of luck.

“But it’s a tough loss. It
doesn’t get any easier unfor-
tunately. I don’t know. We
played well. To be honest with
you, I thought we were the
best team here this year. We
played great the whole time. I

Ba

fy





@ ROAD RACE

women.
fitness fair will be staged.

@ BASKETBALL

@ VOLLEYBALL
Technicians Offer Help

leyball?

Volleyball?

tionally?
ball.com/

Goodman’s Bay.

UE ae

Trophies will be presented to the first three finishers in
each division. Immediately following the race, a health and

BSC Basketball Registration

THE Baptist Sports Council will hold a meeting on Sat-
urday at 10 a.m. for all Churches interested in participat-
ing in the Rev. Tyrone Knowles Basketball Classic.

The meeting and registration of teams will be

held at the Bahamas Baptist College, Jean Street. The
Classic is scheduled to get underway on Saturday, Febru-
ary 3. The entry fee is $100.00 per team in each division.

Are you interested in Learning about the game of vol-

Are you a skilled player and want to try-out for a team?
Do you have a child or know someone interested in

Are you interested in joining a volleyball / social club
that host social events, render community service, have
fundraisers and compete both nationally and interna-

Then you are welcomed to join the TVC — Technicians
Volleyball Fan Club. Email us at
techvolleyball_fanclub@yahoo.com

Or visit their website @ http://www.techniciansvolley-

The Technicians will hold open try-out for ladies team
Feb 3rd, Yam at Tom Grant Park behind A.F. Adderley
High School, Harold Road.

The Technicians will begin training Feb 5th, 6pm at

really thought we would have
won this tournament.”

Now with their bags packed
as they prepare to leave from
“Down Under,” Knowles said
it really hurt because “we real-
ly thought that we would have
won another Grand Slam. But
at the end of the day, we gave
it our best shot.

“That’s all you can do. Go
back to the drawing board and
get ready for the next one.”

With a two-week brea
before they. get back on track
of trying to win their first tour-
nament for the year, Knowles
said they will try to win “the
three other Grand Slams and
finish the year off as the num-
ber one doubles team.”

He said they haven’t decided
on which tournament they will
play next. He said they just
want to take some time off to
heal their wounds after such a
heartbreaking loss.

“It will take me a while to
recover,” he admitted. “I know
there will be some sleepless
nights to get over this loss,
which is standard, but that’s
my lifestyle.

“You just kind of deal with
your disappointment. But the ‘
exciting part is I get to go back
home and see my family and
spend some time with my son.
So there’s a positive side to
everything.” *

With the National Football
League’s Super Bowl XLI tak-
ing the spotlight in the United
States this weekend, Knowles
said he has his money on the ~
Indianapolis Colts winning
because he’s convinced that
the Chicago Bears won’t beat
them.

“I know they can play
defence, but I don’t think they
have the offence to hang with
the Colts,” he noted. “So I
think it will be a fairly lop-
sided Super Bowl.”

And even though the Super
Bowl will be played on Sun-
day at the Dolphin Stadium in
Miami Gardens, Florida,

- Knowles said he won’t be

going to the “Sunshine State”
to watch it.

“Maybe if the San Francisco
49ers were playing, I would be
there,” he insisted. “But only
Grand Slam champions can
afford to go to Miami any-
way.”

@ MARK KNOWLES and

Daniel Nestor in action
(AP FILE Photo)

Baptist Sports Council’s Family Fun Run/Walk

THE Baptist Sports Council will hold its Minister

Clinton Minnis Family Fun Run/Walk Race on Saturday.

The event will kick off at 7 a.m. from the Charles W.
Saunders High School, Jean Street. Pre-registration of
$5.00 per athlete will be conducted from 6 a.m.

There will be a four-mile road race and a two-mile walk
race. Categories are under-15, under-20, under-30,

under-40, under-50 and 50-and-under for men and



‘two me

@ SWIMMING

GUNITE Pools and Swift
Swimming have had a healthy
working relationship for over
16 years and now in 2007 they
are working together to put

together another unique swim

meet.

This event is actually two
meets in one with the use of the
50 metre, long course and 25
metre short course pools at the
Betty Kelly Kenning Aquatic
Centre.

The swim meet takes place
this Saturday, January 27th,
2007 with warm-up at 7 am and
an 8:30 am start.

The organisers like being able
to run fast efficient meets that

don’t require swimmers or par- -

ents having to be at the pool
for excessively long times.

Running the two meets simul-
taneously cuts the time of the
meet almost in half.

The meet director is Nancy
Knowles who organised the first
Carifta Games in the Bahamas
in 1992.

The meet is being run as a
pentathlon event as there will
be five events, a 50 of each
stroke and a 100 IM for the 10
& under age groups, and a 100
of each stroke and a 200 IM for
the 11 & over age groups.

The times of each of the five
events are added together and
the swimmer with the lowest
cumulative time wins the high
point trophy for their age group.

This format offers some good
match-ups as swimmers have to







@ TROPHIES up for grabs at the Swift Swimming meet

race in their weakest strokes as
well as their favourite strokes
so as to keep the total time
down.

There will be trophies for the
top three lowest cumulative
times in each age group.

Gunite Pools, as sponsors of

the swim meet, are pleased to
be able to contribute to the
healthy development of the
youth of the Bahamas and sup-
port the sport of swimming.

Swift has three of its swim-
mers traveling home from
school to compete in this years
swim meet. Shane Armbrister,
McKayla Lightbourne, and
Sofia Whitehead will all be at
the meet.

All the local clubs will be
competing with the goal of qual-
ifying more swimmers for the
Carifta Games and the Nation-
al championships later in the
year.

Swift will be lead by former
Carifta swimmers Denaj Sey
mour, Jonathan Bain, Jena
Chaplin, Jade Thompson and
Shaunte Moss. o

Other standouts this season
have been Larissa and Shonae
Musgrove, Laura Morley, Abi-
gail Lowe, Crystal Rhaming,
Zack Moses, Simone Sturrups
Paige Waugh and many others
ready to make their mark on
the swimming scene.
Pm lovin’ it. |

= Lhe Tribune

Hi 75F | !

HIGH __
LOW

61F |
CLOUDS AND |

A SUNSHINE |



Volume: 103 No.54





Tan
DL

SEE FRONT PAGE OF BUSINESS SECTION

assport rule extension

Wilchcombe convinces
‘members of US Congress
to extend implementation
period for Caribbean

i By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas and the rest
of the Caribbean have been giv-'
en a 30-day-respite from the
US’ new passport rule with the
possibility of obtaining a fur-
ther year-long delay until the

..Newtequirements.are imple-

mented for the region, Tourism
Minister Obie Wilchcombe told
The Tribune yesterday.

Despite the fact that Wednes-
day marked the implementa-
tion date of the Western Hemi-
sphere Travel Initiative
(WHT)), Minister Wilchcombe
on Wednesday night was able
to convince members of the US
Congress in Washington, DC,
of the need to extend the imple-
mentation period for the entire
Caribbean.

Tourism industry veterans

and observers throughout the

Caribbean have warned that the
implementation of the travel
initiative — which requires US
citizens to obtain a passport for
all international air travel —
could discourage Americans
from travelling abroad.

The World Travel Tourism
Council (WTTC) estimated that

the Caribbean region couid Tose |

$2.6 billion in revenue intake
and 188,300 industry jobs as a
result of the implementation of
the new passport requirements.

Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday, Minister Wilchcombe
said that he will return to the
US capital on Monday morn-
ing to meet with the Depart-
ment of Homeland Security for

additional discussions on the

WHTI.
SEE page 15 |

Wisdom waiting for police report
on alleged housing scandal

li By BRENT DEAN



HOUSING Minister Neville Wisdom stated that he is awaiting
a report from the police on the alleged housing scandal uncovered

by The Tribune.

“We are awaiting a report now for the police. My understanding
is that they have concluded their interviews with the ministry and
the staff here, and they are now speaking with specific contractors
to conclude their report. So, I’m told that in very short order now
you should be getting a report. As soon as I receive it, | intend to
make public the findings from the report.”

SEE page 16








awk

COMPANIES SWITCHING TO















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Sree _

Frequen

‘Lower Cost






Che Miami Herald

BAHAMAS EDITION

|

FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007



®@ MINISTER of Tourism Obie Wilchcombe along with Janyne Hodder, President of COB,
- dances with CR Walker’s Junior Junkanoo group during the National Tourism Week opening cer-
emony this week. Mr Wilchcombe on Wednesday night was able to convince members of the US

Congress in Washington, DC, of the need to extend

the entire Caribbean.

Court of Appeal .
president expresses |

concern over
death penalty

& By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY:

sentenced to death:

‘She expressed her concern
during the prosecution’s sub- ;
missions to uphold the convic- :
tion of Maxo Tido, who was }

sentenced to death last year.

mandatory death penalty.

dent of L W Young.

erations to the brain.

SEE page 15



MST
eli ernere
athe peas
ENDO asst

the passport rule implementation period for

(Photo: F elipé Major/ T ribune staff)

Teenager
‘chopped

in head’

A TEENAGER is in seri-

. } ous condition in hospital
: after he was “chopped in the
Tribune Staff Reporter : i
ace re a : Fox Hill on Wednesday after- :
COURT of Appeal president :
Dame Joan Sawyer yesterday }
questioned the application of |
the law in respect of persons }
:; injured teenager got into a

dispute with a young man just : treated at Sandilands.

head” by another youth in

noon, it was revealed yester-
day. ;

tor Walter Evans said the

after school at 3pm on

Wednesday in Bernard Road. } yy, iat - Se
Witnesses claimed that, fol- : made by -pales may i Pepe
: lowing the violent row,

Tido was the first to be sen- ;
tenced after a landmark ruling }
by the Privy Council against the

friends of the injured teenag-
er sought revenge by setting

fire to the home of one of the }
; suspects.

In March, 2006, a jury of 11}
women and one man unani- }
mously found Tido guilty of the ;
murder of 16-year-old Donnell ;
Conover, who had been a stu- ;
i the result of retaliatory

Conover reportedly died asa }
result of a crushed skull and lac-
; investigating the two matters, :
: but could not say if they were ;
: connected. i

SHELVING

WOOD STAINS CLOSET ORGANIZE
& SPRAY PAINT TOO!

COMMONWEALTH TG SUPPLIES Sy She anne aian

Assistant Commissioner

there was fire at a home in
Bernard Road and that he
had heard reports that it was

action.
Mr Evans said police were

Sandilands ‘has no
record’ of US man
who was found
dead in Abaco cell

| ll By BRENT DEAN

CATHERINE Weech,

: Sandilands Rehabilitation Cen-
: tre administrator, revealed that
‘ a, : : the hospital currently has “no
Press liaison officer Inspec- } secord” of Mark Sapp — the
: American citizen found dead in
: acell in Abaco — having been

This statement refutes a claim

i was taken to Sandilands for
: evaluation when he was brought
: to Nassau.

The discrepancy between the

: claim of the police and that of
: the hospital, raises questions
: about the chain of events lead-

Reginald Ferguson confirmed } ing up to Mr Sapp’s death.

Assistant Police Commis-

: sioner Elliston Greenslade did
: not wish to comment on the dis-
: crepancy in “isolation”, but
: chose rather to speak about the
: matter in general terms.

SEE page 16







Two more charged
in connection with
toddler’s death in

speedboat incident

i By ALEXANDRIO
MORLEY
Tribune Staff Reporter

TWO more persons were
arraigned in Magistrate’s court
yesterday for their alleged

involvement in the incident that

caused the death of British tod-
dler Paul Gallagher.

In August 2002, the two-year-
old boy was struck by a speed-
boat as he slept near his mother
on Paradise Island Beach.

Paul died five days later in

hospital after the accident from

head injuries, described by sur-
geons as the worst they had ever
seen.

Two Metropolitan Police offi-
cers flew to the Bahamas last
summer to review the case with
local police. —

Their report reveals that after
the crash, the driver provided
blood and urine samples.

At the time, The Gallaghers
were told these were never

SEE page 15

. Bastian claims
PLP paid to have
him accused of.
drug trafficking
in 1987

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

IN 1987, the PLP paid
$200,000 to have a man
accuse Whitney Bastian of
drug trafficking, the South
Andros MP claimed yester-
day on Love 97’s Issues of the
Day.

Mr Bastian also announced
that he would not be running

SEE page 16
i

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problem in

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PAGE 14, FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007

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=

THE TRIBUNE

Let Charlie the 4
Bahamian Puppet and » , ‘
his sidekick Derek put 2 | :

some smiles on your
kids’s faces.

Bring your children to the |
McHappy Hour at McDonald's in
Marlborough Street every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the

‘ month of January 2007.

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.

i'm lovin’ it

s ‘
PAGE 16, FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007





High Commissioner of Republic of South Africa receives Letters of Commission
GOVERNOR General Arthur Hanna presents the Letters of Commission to Her Excellency Advocate Faith Doreen
Radebe, the High Commissioner of the Republic of South Africa,

at Government House yesterday.
(Photo: Felipé Major/Tribune staff)



i





Wisdom waiting for police report
on alleged housing scandal

FROM page one

These comments come in
the wake of controversy that
emerged at the Ministry of
Housing regarding contracting
practices with low-cost homes.

Allegations were made that
an unfair number of contracts
were awarded to a few con-
tractors and that some of these
contractors received these con-
tracts due to connections with
government officials — an
arrangement that may or may

not have included bribes.

Additionally, some contrac-
tors alleged that certain indi-
viduals were extorting money
from them throughout the
building process on low-cost
homes since at least 2001.

In response to some of these
allegations, Mr Wisdom had
previously asserted that some
contractors received more con-
tracts, as their work was of a
higher quality.

_ At today’s press conference
Mr Wisdom said he would like
to see the government hous-

ing process evolve to a state
where no individual is incon-
venienced or given an unfair
advantage.

Additionally, Mr Wisdom
said he would like to see con-
tractors complete the work
they were assigned to do rather
than sub-contracting the work
out to other individuals who
may not have been approved
by the ministry — along with,
inspectors carrying out their
duties honestly and fairly.

A call was placed to the
office of the Commissioner of

Bastian claims PLP paid to have him
accused of drug trafficking in 1987

FROM page one

for a third term if he wins in the upcoming
election.

While the MP was charged with drug traf-
ficking, he was never convicted and was later
vindicated by the courts.

Mr Bastian, who represents a constituency
of around 9,000 people, said the PLP allowed
the charges to stay “hanging over his head”
for almost seven years because they would
prevent him from participating in the electoral
process. .

The MP, who claims his 2002 campaign cost
him $1 million, ended up as the only inde-
pendent MP who ran against both PLP and
FNM candidates to win his seat.

Mr Bastian said that, during the PLP con-
vention of 1987, he had offered to run for
the post of National General Council member
for the South Andros constituency.

“Stanley Bain was the acting NGC member
at the time. When we went for elections we
. had elections two or three times. Every time
the count would show that Mr Bastian beat
Mr Bain by one vote.

“Every time the vote was completed
Charles Thompson would tie the vote and
say that we need to hold elections again. He
wanted Stanley Bain to be his NGC member
but the branches in the area were saying
something different. They wanted me to be
their NGC member,” the MP said.

Because of the deadlock Mr Bastian said
that he took the issue to the PLP’s then
leader, the late Sir Lynden Pindling, and for-
mer party chairman Sean McWeeney, and
asked them to explain whether the election

was being conducted in accordance with the

PLP’s constitution.

“He said: ‘Well, Whitney, y’all have done it
the right way’.

“T was then told by Sir Lynden that I should
leave it alone and try to complete my law
degree, go off to school and then come back
where I could participate in the process. I
then said to Sir Lynden that there are provi-

sions in the party’s constitution for me to run -

against you if I want to. He then threw his
hands.up and said ‘Oh, OK’.

“And that was it,” Mr Bastian said.

Two hours after the meeting with Sir Lyn-
den, the South Andros MP said that two offi-
cers came to him and said that a senior police
officer wanted to speak with him in his
office.

“When I got to the office, they asked me if
I knew a Charles Broomquest. I said ‘Yes, I
know a Charles Broomquest’. Does know-
ing a Charles Broomquest constitute a crime?

“They said ‘No, but Charles Broomquest
made certain allegations which we want you
to respond to’.

“I said I know Mr Broomquest to be a gen-
tleman who comes to Mangrove Cay who
sells electronics at wholesale prices. They
said ‘Well, he made allegations that you were
involved in drugs’. .

“And I said ‘No, I don’t know anything
about that’,” the MP said.

While Mr Bastian was at the police station,
Stanley Bain was elected NGC member
because Mr Bastian was absent from the con-
vention. A ae:

“While I was at the DEU’s office a phone
call came through on the other end and I
recognised a voice who said, ‘Do you have
anything on him?’

“(The police) said ‘no’.

“The voice on the other end said, ‘But book
him anyway’,” Mr Bastian said.

Police to inquire about the sta-
tus of the investigation and to
determine what would occur
with those findings
when the investigation is com-
pleted.

Specifically, The Tribune
was seeking to determine if the
findings of the investigation
would be initially forwarded
to the Office of the Attorney
General, made public, or sub-
mitted to the Minister.

However, up to press time,

‘there was no response from

the Commissioner’s office.







THE TRIBUNE

Sandilands ‘has no record’
of US man who was found
dead in Abaco cell

FROM page one -

He said it is being treated as
a police investigation.

He further stated that in
matters such as this, an autop-
sy is undertaken to determine
the cause of death and the
file is sent to the coroner’s
court.

Godfrey “Pro” Pinder,
attorney for the deceased, told
The Tribune that he and the
Sapp family are in the process
of negotiating with indepen-
dent pathologists in the Unjit-



Saturday ° January 27th, 2007 | ]
12 noon - 6pm | |
Garden Hills Headquarters | {4
Soldier Road West

Between Blue Hill Road and East Street

Donation $10.00

FF he ENM cs det for oul NO

FISH e CHICKEN e STEAK

ed States to assist in the
autopsy. -

Mr Pinder says that he and
the Sapp family have been in
contact with the American
Embassy for assistance. How-
ever, he was unable to divulge
the details of that meeting.

Mark Sapp was found dead
in his cell in Abaco while
awaiting transfer back to Her
Majesty’s Prison. He was on’
remand charged with arson in
a fire that caused an estimated
$3 million in damages to the
Royal Palm Condominiums at
Treasure Cay, Abaco.

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Excludes Suit PackYages & Linen Sets













FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007

SECTION



OB ieee Be loyetetee









BAN outside view of the British Colonial Hilton

(FILE phore)

Bahamas investments
prompt class lawsuit

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Canadian pension fund
that owns the British Colonial
Hilton and is in the process of
selling a majority stake in the
South Ocean Golf & Beach
Resort has been hit with a class
action lawsuit in Canada relat-
ing to its investments in both

properties.

Three beneficiaries of the
Canadian Commercial Workers
Industry Pension Plan
(CCWIPP) are suing the plan’s
trustees and employer members
for $1 billion in damages on the
grounds that they allegedly

SEE page 6B

100,000 visitor boost
from sports tourism

@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter

PROPERLY developed, sports tourism could bring an addi-
tional 50,000 -100,000 more visitors to the Bahamas aoateny

industry experts said yesterday.

Charles Albury, an executive at Kerzner International, said
there were many ways to grow this untapped industry through
planned events, meets and recreational events and tournaments.

“We have a lot of sporting groups in the Bahamas, Take athlet-
ics, for example. In 2007 there are about 15 major meets on the

schedule for 2007 that are on

schedule,” he said.

“Tf we take each of these meets







© 2004 ADWORKS

SALES OFFICES: NASSAU, FREEPORT,

SEE page 5B

Port cial Gace

winding-up petition

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he attorney repre-
senting Sir Jack
~Hayward = and
Hannes Babak has
filed a petition to
wind-up the Grand Bahama

Port Authority (GBPA) on.

behalf of another company he
is representing in an action
against the GBPA, a move that
last night had baffled many
observers.

Gregory Moss, of Moss &
Associates, filed a winding-up
petition with the Supreme Court
on January 19, 2007, on behalf
of another client, Island Bay

' Condominium ‘Phase II Asso-

ciation, which is claiming $1.218
million in damages against the
GBPA.

A default judgement had
been entered against the GBPA
after Island Bay Condominium
Phase III Association alleged
that it had breached “its statu-
tory duty” and been negligent
in causing the condo complex
to be properly built and main-
tained.

In its winding-up petition,
Island Bay Condominium Phase
III Association alleged that its
attorneys had served a statutory
demand for payment on the
GBPA at its offices on Decem-
ber 28, 2006. _

It added that three weeks had
elapsed since the demand had
been served, but the GBPA had
not paid the judgement sum. As
a result, Island Bay Condomini-
um Phase II Association was
requesting “that the Grand
Bahama Port Authority may be
wound up by the court under
the provisions of the Companies
Act, Chapter 308”.

The winding-up petition is the
latest twist in the saga that has
embroiled the GBPA and its
shareholders over the past year,
and few observers last night
knew what to make of the devel-










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college is in his future

Reality Check.

You never know what's in yours.
His future and yours can be protected
with the right life insurance or investment plan.



és et Sr AAP SPR SSN RS dn A

net

Fawn

GUARDIAN

INSURANCE
COMPANY
UTHERA CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET, NASSAU P.O. BOX SS 6232

Sir Jack’s and Babak’s attorney seeks payment

of $1.2m on behalf of client suing GBPA

opment.

The Tribune understands that
the GBPA failed to oppose the
original writ of summons filed
by Island Bay Condominium
Phase III Association on
November 30, 2006, largely as
a result of an oversight.

At the time, it was distracted
by the dispute between its two
shareholders, Sir Jack Hayward
and the late Edward St George’s
family, over the former’s claim
to 75 per cent ownership of the
GBPA and its affiliate, Port
Group Ltd, which owns the
chief money-making assets in
Freeport.

In addition, Supreme Court
Justice Jeanie Thompson had
just several days before appoint-
ed a receiver for the GBPA and
Port Group Ltd in the shape of
BDO Mann Judd accountant,
Clifford Culmer, and imposed
an injunction preventing Mr
Babak playing any role in man-
agement or Board deliberations.

As a result, the GBPA failed
to set aside the judgement and,
after it failed to respond to the
statutory demand for payment,

Mr Moss went ahead and filed

the winding-up petition.

Several observers last night
expressed surprise that an attor-
ney acting for Sir Jack in his
claim to 75 per cent ownership
of the GBPA would attempt to
petition for the winding-up of
that very same entity.

The Tribune understands,
though, that the GBPA has
instructed Thomas Evans to
attempt to.set aside the judge-
ment. The GBPA’s fellow
defendant in the action,
Uniprop Ltd, the developer and
contractor for the Island Bay







wi

Condominium complex, is being
represented by Robert Adams
of Graham, Thompson & Co,

Several sources yesterday
expressed concern about the
impact the winding-up petition’s
filing would have on Freeport’s
economy and residents, particu-
larly in terms of the message it
send to licencees, existing and
potential international investors.

The Freeport economy has
been struggling to cope with the
fallout from the 2004 and 2005
hurricane seasons, and the Roy--
al Oasis closure, and this has
been exacerbated by the dispute
between the GBPA’s two share-
holding families.

One source said: “How’s that
going to effect the Morgan Stan-

ley transaction and any other

transactions?

“To file a petition to liquidate
the Port Authority would be cat-
astrophic for the investment cli-
mate. On the heels of the share-
holder dispute, it sends a mes-
sage to investors that Freeport is
in utter meltdown, that the reg-
ulatory authority in incapable
of managing its own affairs.

“This adverse negative pub-
licity is going to count against
the Port Authority. It’s going to
reach its lowest ebb when coun-
sel for the man claiming a
majority 75 per cent stake is
attempting to liquidate the com-
pany.’

The dispute with Island Bay
Condominium Phase III Asso-
ciation has been a running sore
in the dispute between the Hay-
ward and St George families.
Mr Moss was appointed to act as
one of the GBPA’s outside
attorneys last summer, at a time
when he was representing three

separate parties in lawsuits

’ against it.

A settlement was agreed on
the Island Bay issue, but this
was blocked by the St George
estate as they felt the Associa-
tion did not have a case. Mr
Moss then resigned as an attor-
ney for the GBPA, and resumed
the action on behalf of Island
Bay.

The winding-up petition has
the potential to disturb the mul-
ti-million dollar.investment pro-
ject planned for Freeport involv-
ing Morgan Stanley, the blue
chip Wall Street investment
bank.

The Grand Bahama Devel-
opment Company (Devco) is in
the process of selling its 50 per
cent stake in 1,000 acres at Bar-
bary Beach to Morgan Stanley
for $50 million, the first stage in
a deal that would lead to a 50/50
venture with Port Group Ltd.

In essence, the winding-up
petition could serve to further
drive down the value of GBPA
and Port Group Ltd.

The petition’s filing comes as — AK

both Sir Jack and the St George
family are engaged in mediation
and conciliation to resolve the
dispute over the former’s 75 per
cent ownership claim before the
February 7 deadline on the con-
sent order issued by Justice Ani-
ta Allen expires.

On that day, if the dispute is
not settled, Mr Culmer’s
receivership of GBPA and Port
Group Ltd is likely to resume.

The Government is repre-
sented in the talks by Paul
Adderley, the former attorney

SEE page 6B

Bahamas ‘needs to do more’
to promote itself as destination
wedding and honeymoon spot

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas needs to do
more to market and promote
itself as a destination wedding and
honeymoon location if it hopes
to go “neck and neck” with
Jamaica and become the

aa aa)

Ow He) @: 1

Cruise ships use discount
‘sales’ to keep passenger
money on board

SEE page 5B

Gg, re Avan Fae

You Are Invited!

(er Ca a

ood OL ee on 1

sales@hachristia.com

www. HOChristie. com




THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007

Build the brand to tie-in the customer

nowing your position-
ing and, by extension,
your brand are key

components to successful mar-
keting. As mentioned in my pre-
vious column, having a great
brand can ultimately lead you
to the holy grail of marketing,
called brand loyalty, where the
customer is tied into you lock,
stock and barrel.

Brand loyalty explains why
most Macintosh users would
rather die that be seen using a
PC, and why some consumers
would never buy any other car
than a Lexus.

Good branding flows from a
good positioning strategy. Get
your positioning strategy right
and your branding will follow.
While branding is often seen as
a collection of image, ideas,
name, logo and design, in prac-
tical terms your brand is in effect

| Business

Sense



“the promise you make to your
customers”.

It starts with the features of
your product and the perceived
benefits those features bring to
your customers. For example, a
Volvo is a well-built car with
cutting edge safety features epit-
omising safety. Over time, these
features led to the promise that
Volvo makes to all its cus-
tomers, one of “safety”. Simi-
larly BMW’s promise to you is
to provide you with “a driving
machine”.

You only have to look at the
beautiful designs, the innova-





Office.

2007.

N



No form will be accepted without:

Y ALL SIGNATURES (Student’s, Advisor’s and
Chairperson’s) and

Â¥ PROOF OF PAYMENT from the Business

N.B. ANY ‘form submitted after this date will be considered
LATE and will be processed for the Summer Semester

’

OTICE

ALL prospective graduates for SPRING 2007 MUST
| submit COMPLETED Graduation Evaluation Forms to
the Records Department on or before FEBRUARY 2, 2007.

tion, the great packaging and
easy-to-use technology to sce
what the promise is behind
Apple’s valuable brand.

So, what is your promise is to
your customers? Do your cus-
tomers have a clear idea of what
your product or company stands
for? Do you? Do your cus-
tomers know where you fit in
the market place? Do you? Try
surveying your customers and
you will see if there is a gap
between your perception and
their reality. Create your own
online surveys and e-mail your
customers, using survey software
such as Vanguard software,
found at http://www.van-
guardsw.com,

Good branding is important
to success, as poor branding can
often create problems for your
company. For example, a posi-
tive brand image could help you










THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS.

- Libraries and Instructional Media Services Department

The Law Library Branch



eee ete






Inaugural Luncheon
Topic: Consumer Protection Act, 2006

Wednesday, 31st January, 200/
Choices Restaurant
Culinary and Hospitality Management Institute




convince your customers that
you are larger than you are, that
you are capable of doing larger
jobs and that you are capable
of delivering quality work.

It is well-known in the mar-
keting industry that a well man-
aged brand is worth more in
share value than a poorly man-
aged brand, which is why brand
management is now a key part
of the job description for chief
executives.

Equity

Brand equity is often
described as the value that is
built up in a brand. Brand equi-
ty is as a result of prudent and
careful brand management.

So, what are some practical
steps you can take to create or
improve your brand? In what
ways can you position your

- product or service in the eyes

of the customer that, over time,
creates a brand? Here are some
steps you can take to help you
manage your brand:

Step 1: State Your Benefits -
Be clear and state the benefits of
your product. Be clear about

completion of — the
December, 2006.













~ Liquidator

Qualifications:






performed

LEGAL NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION

International Business Companies Act
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act,
(No. 45 of 2000), ALBION SERVICES INC. has been
completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been issed and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register. The date of
dissolution

Se eo
PANAMERICAN MANAGEMENT
SERVICES (BAHAMAS) LTD.

& International Wealth M
and improve complex practices and processes.
¢ Working (practical) knowledge of sever
and/or other industries, market and/or regu
practices and needs) sufficient to apply relevant issues or developments to work

what the ‘sizzle’ is about your
product. A mission statement
can help to this effect.

Step 2: Contemplate Your
Appeal - Be clear why cus-
tomers buy your product. Are
you appealing to the rational
side of your customers in how
the product will solve their prob-
lems, and meet their needs? Are
you appealing to their emotion-
al side, their moral side, or to
their lifestyle aspirations?

Step 3: Create a Future Vision
- Create a future vision of what
you expect your company to be
in your customers’ eyes. What
will you mean to them. What
will your promise be? Is it to be
the cheapest, the largest, the
safest, the best value, the best
service, the widest choice, the
hardest trying, the most creative,
the most environmentally aware,
or the most ethical? Create the
vision that is right for you and
stick to it.

Step 4: Create a Name and
Logo - Create a name, logo and
strap line to support your mis-
sion and vision. Outsource this
function to a professional to










was the 21st of

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

fora

Senior Programme Manager, Northern
Caribbean Operations
Location: Bahamas

¢ Bachelor’s degree in business related field

¢ 5 - 10 years experience in Financial Institutions

¢ Comprehensive knowledge of Financial Institutions operational processes and
procedures that support Retail Distribution (Retail, Corporate, Capital Markets

anagement customer segments) sufficient to develop

al areas of external activities (financial
latory environment, or client business



help you create the right image
for your business, which your
customers will come to accept
as part of your branding.

Step 5: Develop a Communi-
cation Style - Develop a com-
munication style through your
writing that complements your
design. Are you conservative,
clever, funky, cutting edge? Let
this be reflected in both your
writing and design to create a
consistent brand.

Step 6: Build Marketing Strat-
egy - Build specific marketing
strategy around your proposi-
tion and communication style.
Decide whether to use conserv-
ative marketing, guerilla, or viral
marketing strategies.

Effective brand management
will try to increase your pro-
duct’s perceived value to your
customers, which in turn will
increase your brand equity.
Make sure you get this impor-
tant area right.

Don’t be an antipreneur and
make the following mistakes: —

* Be brand illiterate

* Forget to create or manage
your brand

Marketing your business is an
important area and will require
constant effort to get it right. .
So, in order to avoid the trap of
antipreneurship, make sure that
you spend time on this area as it
could pay large dividends for
your future business success.

NB: Adapted from his
upcoming book, Antipreneur-
ship And How to Avoid It,
Mark draws on 20 years of top
level business, marketing and
communications experience in

London and the Bahamas. He is «|
chief operating officer of |

www.ezpzemail.com, currently
lives in Nassau, and can be con-
tacted at
markalexpalmer@mac.com .

© Mark Palmer. All rights: ec
2 reserved - an

The College of The Bahamas
Thompson Boulevard
Nassau, The Bahamas
12:00 noon - 2:00 p.m.

General Responsibilities:

















° Asa part of Senior Management, lead the development of Change Management
Documents — Business User Requirements / Project Charter, Project Plan,
Implementation Plan, Project Budget, Business Cases, Request For Information
(RFI) and Request For Proposal (RFP)

¢ Responsible in conjunction with the Head of Operations and other Northern
Caribbean Operations Managers in developing the Bahamas Regional Operations
Centres into a fully centralised processing unit for the Northern Caribbean
Region by incorporating additional functions from the Local Processing Unit
hubs.

¢ To support the overall strategic mandate of the northern Operations group by
identifying and executing process improvements that increase profitability and
enhance our customers’ and employees’ experience.

¢ To provide advice and /or consultation typically of an operational or tactical
nature to Operations Centres management as it relates to existing business

processes and proposed business changes.

















Silent Auction of Student Art
will take place during the luncheon

Donation: $35.00 »: Student: $25.00
Part proceeds in aid of the new library fund

Remuneration:



¢ Salary commensurate with senior management position at the FC Level 8 (Note:
1 - 11 job levels)

° Benefits- includes a car allowance, preferred loan rates, variable incentive pay
(bonus), medical scheme, pension benefits...

Applicants are requested to submit their resume with a cover letter via
email by February 9", 2007 to: Chaunte.toote@firstcaribbeanbank.com

FirstCaribbean International Bank (Bahamas) Limited thanks all
applicants for their interest, however only those under
consideration will be contacted.
Vacancies are open to Bahamians only.





THE COLLEGE OF 4HE DAHAMAS |

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs Eprcatinc Be TRAINING Baetaeans
THE MIAMI HERALD | MiamiHerald.com

INTERNATIONAL EDITION”

PRO FOOTBALL | SUPER BOWL XLI

FROM THE SPORTS FRONT



DOUG PENSINGER/GETTY IMAGES

TOTAL SUPPORT: Indianapolis fans hold up a banner during the Colts’ 38-34 victory over the Patriots for the AFC title.

Indy captivated by Colts

*COLTS

ship is covered in passion,
giddy with excitement and
dazed by a football team that

rolled in here 23 years ago in -

the dead of the night.

The Colts are redefining
this city of Hoosiers and
hoops and the Indy: 500.

“Everybody thinks Indiana |

is a basketball state,” Rich
Johnson said. “But not now.
We're going to the Super
Bowl, and Indiana is a football
state now. Things will never
be the same.”

Johnson, 59, is a die-hard
fan who won a drawing and
bought season tickets to the
Colts in 1984.

“T’ve been here since Day 1,
through it all. Through the
1-13 and the 2-14 seasons,” he
said. “I never thought this day
would come. When they beat
New England Sunday [in the
AFC Championship Gamel,
grown men cried.”

You see it and feel it the
minute you hit the airport
covered in blue, where airline
and car rental employees are
wearing Colts jerseys, and
where a huge billboard of
Colts quarterback Peyton
Manning directing traffic
greets you as you exit toward
downtown.

‘BUBBLING’

' “It’s bubbling. The whole
city is bubbling,” said Kathy
Brown, who runs an office
where employees show up
wearing Colts jerseys these
days, and where Brown has
made it mandatory to wear
Colts blue every Friday.

It is a new Indy.

“You see blue everywhere
you look,” said Jerry Roberts,
64; a retired banker who wore
a Colts windbreaker and Colts
baseball cap downtown
Wednesday.

“We've been to a lot of big
sporting events,” he said. “But
I’ve never seen anything like
Sunday. It was absolutely

COUNTDOWN TO SUPER BOWL XLI +:

SUPER BOWL XXXII

DENVER 31, GREEN BAY 24

e Jan. 25,1998

@ Qualcomm Stadium, San Diego
e MVP: RB Terrell Davis, Denver

Not that there is ever a good time fora
migraine headache, but could there be a worse
time for a football player to have one than in the

middle of the Super Bowl?

ANDY LYONS/GETTY IMAGES

GOOD TIMES: Colts fans have waited a long time for their team, which relocated from
Baltimore, to reach the Super Bowl. ‘I never thought this day would. come,’ one fan said..

phenomenal. No one wanted
to leave. No one wanted to let
go of that feeling.”

Roberts’ wife,
cried.

“It was an awesome feel-
ing,” she said. “It had never
happened before, and now it
was happening with us, and
our team. It was like the feel-
ing of first love. Even if we go
to 10 Super Bowls, it will
never feel like this again,
because it’s a first for all of
us.”

Nancy,

There might not be a better
bar to watch the Colts than
the Blue Crew in Northeast
Indianapolis, where owner
Randy Collins, 49, has erected
a shrine. Collins even drives a
blue Colts fire truck — com-
plete with a statue of a blue
and white Dalmatian — to
every Colts home game. He’s



Broncos running back Terrell Davis had
frequent migraines, for which he usually took
medication before games. But, somehow, Davis forgot to take his
medication until shortly before kickoff - too late for it to take

effect fully.

Davis seemed fine early in Super Bowl XXXII, when he rushed
for a touchdown in the first quarter. But one rough hit late.in the

FSET EEE ESET TE LSE LTS ET eT a ET EE ME AL ST NE TE ST TNT TET ETNA NEST 2 ve

e wild, weird,

wacky and i
wondrous of past
Super Bowls

ys
to)
ees



trying to find a way to get the
truck to Miami.

‘DISBELIEF AND JOY’

“It was crazy in here Sun-
day. There was a lot of crying,
a lot of screaming and a lot of
laughing,” bartender Jason
Donahue said. “People who
have been with the Colts from
the beginning had that look on
their faces. It was a mixture of
disbelief and joy.”

“There was not a stranger
in here,” said Shelby Collins,
who worked that night.
“Everyone was crying and
hugging each other. There
must have been about 20 peo-
ple who ran outside to call
their parents on their cell-
phones. You could hear one
after another: ‘Hey mom, can
you believe this happened?’
Or, ‘Hey dad, we’re going to

good time.’’







the Supe: Bowl.’ ”

Outside the RCA Dome, it
was sheer madness.

“Downtown was like Mardi
Gras,” Randy Collins said.
“T’ve never seen anything like
it. People were honking
horns, hanging out of win-
dows screaming.”

In nearby Kokomo, the
Grimes hugged each other.

“When the Colts won the
game my husband reached
over and pinched me, and I
said, ‘Yes honey, it’s true. We
are really gong to the Super
Bowl,’ ”’ Hattie Grimes said.
“The next day, he woke up in
disbelief, saying, ‘I can’t
believe this is happening. I
think it left him numb. I think
that’s the way a lot of people
felt — just numb, because it’s
the first time it’s ever hap-
pened in Indianapolis.”

9 D A

quarter triggered the headache he had feared
“My vision started to black out, and! gota

little dizzy,” Davis recalled years later.

to my knees and started thinking, ‘This is not a

“I gotup

Davis had to leave the game and go back to
the locker room in the second quarter, and he
was not expected to return. But with the
halftime made longer by all the Super Bowl
hoopla, Davis had extra time to recover and was
able to re-enter the game in the third quarter.

And it’s a good thing for the Broncos that:he

did. Davis ran for two more touchdowns in the
second half, including the decisive score late in

the fourth quarter.

Davis said he had a slight headache the rest of the evening, but
the championship trophy and game MVP award had a way of
soathing it, That, and the medication.

- BRIAN COSTA



j

YS TO ae

CHICAGO BEARS

_ FRIDAY, JANUARY 26, 2007 | SE)

Grossman, Bears
get back to work
on ultimate goal |

BY ANDREW SELIGMAN
Associated Press

LAKE FOREST, Ill. — The
magnitude of the situation
hit Chicago Bears quarter-
back Rex Grossman with the
force of an unchecked line-
backer as he headed toward
offensive coordinator Ron
Turner’s office Wednesday.

Grossman looked at the
binder and noticed the label:
“Super Bowl game plan.”

“It’s one of those
moments that it ‘really hit me:
I’m about to go get the plays
that we’re going to call in
Super Bow] XLI,” Grossman
said. “It puts things in per-
‘spective that this is real, this

_is coming up, and I couldn’t
be more excited.”

Yes, the quarterback that
some fans wanted removed
and the team that has decried
a lack of respect the past two
seasons will play the India-
napolis Colts for the NFL
title a week from Sunday.

The Bears had three days
to savor beating the New
Orleans Saints in the NFC
Championship Game, the
franchise’s biggest victory
since the 1985 team won it all.
And there were still plenty of
smiles as the Bears returned
to practice Thursday.

“?’m just smiling and say-
ing ‘Yeah’ to every question,”
veteran left guard Ruben
Brown said as he sat at his
locker with a wide grin.
“Really, what’s in the back of
my mind is not only the fact
that I’m in it, but I want to
win it. You want to win it;
you don’t want to be in it. .

“Tm not resting “c ‘on: the



Brown thought pour his
time in Buffalo, where he
made eight Pro Bowls i in nine
seasons before signing with
the Bears in April 2004. The
Bills were a few years
removed from their run of
four Super Bowl losses by
the time they drafted him in
1995, but they made the play-
offs his first two seasons.

“We had a confidence on
that team that we were going
to beat you,” Brown said.
“We felt like'we were always
going to be in the hunt for
the playoffs; we were always
going to be in the hunt for
possibly a Super Bowl. That
was our attitude.”

And the Bears’ attitude is
similar.

They showed up at train-
ing camp in 2005 predicting a
playoff appearance, even

__ though they had gone 5-11 the

previous season. They were
forced to go with Kyle Orton
at quarterback for most of
the season after Grossman
broke an ankle in the presea-
son. They finished 11-5 any-
way and won'the NFC North
behind their defense, offen-
sive line and running game.

With higher expectations
this season, the Bears went
13-3 and earned the top seed
in the playoffs. _

Grossman played at a Pro
Bowl level in the first five
weeks, but he was inconsis-
tent afterward. He had a 1.3
passer rating against the
Minnesota Vikings on Dec. 3,
when he was 6-of-19 for 34
yards and threw three inter-
ceptions for the second con-
secutive week.





JONATHAN DANIEL/GETTY IMAGES
BIG THRILL: Rex Grossman
has been hot and cold
this season, but right now
he’s feeling pretty cool.

Some fans called for
backup Brian Griese. Gross-
man responded with three
solid games before a dismal
performance in the regular-
season finale against the
Green Bay Packers, when he
was 2-of-12 with 33 yards and
three interceptions. Gross-
man’s passer rating in the
first half was 0.0, and he sat
out the rest of the game.

The defense fell from first
to fifth overall during a
tumultuous stretch late in the
regular season. Defensive
tackle Tommie Harris sus-
tained a season-ending ham-
string injury in December,
joining safety Mike Brown
(foot) on the sideline. Start-
ing cornerbacks Charles Till-
man and Nathan Vasher
missed time in the final
month because of injuries.
Anctaekle Tank Johnson
tive for one game
and isuspended for another
after being arrested on mis-
demeanor gun chargés.

The defense was vulnera-
ble, the quarterback shaky.

Yet here are the Bears,
getting ready for the biggest
game of them all. ~

“I think when you're in.
the Super Bowl, you're get-
ting respect,” Bears coach
Lovie Smith said. “We’re one
of the last two teams playing,
so how can we not get our
respect? It’s hard to get to the
Super Bowl without being a
pretty good football team. I
think there are two pretty
good football teams that will
play.

“The ultimate respect you
get is-when you hold up the
championship trophy, and
that’s our goal.”

Brown got another round
of good news recently when
he was named to his ninth







Pro Bowl — his first with the
Bears.
“Right now, the Super

Bowl’s got everything,” he
said. “It’s good to hear, but,
really, the Super Bowl is
[everything].”

Brown’s brother Cornell
played in one for Baltimore,
but he won’t be at the game
because the two are supersti-
tious. Cornell witnessed last
year’s playoff game against
the Carolina Panthers, which
the Bears lost.

“So we can win, he’s not
going to show up,” Ruben
Brown said. “I went to a cou-
ple of his games in the past,
and he ended up losing big
games. We’ll celebrate after.”

The Colts might have
something to say about that.

6 P.M. EST SUNDAY, FEB. 4, 2007
DOLPHIN STADIUM @ ON TV: CBS

TERRELL DAVIS

GETTY IMAGES